Citation
Boys wanted

Material Information

Title:
Boys wanted
Creator:
Nye, J. L
George Stoneman ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
George Stoneman
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
139, [1] p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Religious life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Honesty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Love -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1897 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1897
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Children's stories
short stories ( aat )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Pictorial front cover and spine signed by J.L. Nye.
Statement of Responsibility:
by J.L. Nye.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026893509 ( ALEPH )
ALH5484 ( NOTIS )
237792549 ( OCLC )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library

University
Rat Da
Florida















































E GUIDE OF YOUTH

Tu



Boys
Wanted.

BY
7b NYE,

Author of ‘Stories illustrative of the Book of Proverbs,” &c.

FORKOQe

LONDON:
GEORGE STONEMAN, 39, Warwick Lanz, E.C.

——

1897.



The Sculptor Boy.

—

CHISEL in hand stood a sculptor boy,
With his marble block before him ;

And his face lit up with a smile of joy,
As an angel dream passed o’er him ;

He carved it then on the yielding stone,
With many a sharp incision ;

With heaven’s own light the sculpture shone;
He had caught that angel-vision.

Sculptors of life are we, as we stand,
With our souls, uncarved, before us,
Waiting the hour when, at God’s command,
Our life-dream shall pass o’er us.
If we carve it then, on the yielding stone,
With many a sharp incision,
Its heavenly beauty shall be our own,
Our lives, that angel-vision.
Bishop Doanr.



& CONTENTS oe
gee esas Dees at EL)

CuapTer I.

Truthful Boys.

The Poet Tennyson’s motto—Truth has power
—Abd-el Kadir’s love of truth in his childhood—
The robbers repentance —Didn’t I Dan—The
truthatall hazards—Demurrage—Untruths cause
sorrow—Died for the want of medicine—Truth
is always triumphant—Beans barrelled and
marked—The missing sixpence—Keep your hon-
our without stain-——Charles Thomson—True Dun-
can—Truthfulness brings honour—Prize nobly
won—Don’t be cowards—Charlie Mann—The
immortal Sydney—Falsehood sure to be found out
—John Kinney’s falsehood—The same thing every
time—Uphold the truth—Little Scotch Granite
—Lying is mean—Tom Quayle’s Grandfather—
Robert Burdette’s message to boys.





Cuarter II

—_—_—

Faithful Boys.

Forty generations look down upon you—
Gerhardt the German shepherd boy—Execution
of Thomas Dowry the blind boy —Thomas Croker
kurnt—S8t. Cuthbert—Boy’s courage for Jesus—
Robert Moffat’s mother’s parting request—Three
Good lessons—Joe’s first temptation—The lesson
Fido taught—Hold on to the end—Battle of
Gettysburg—Mr. and Mrs. C. Hall’s visit to Ire-
land—A_ boy’s influence—George C. Lake faith-
ful to his word—When to say No—Diocletian and
young St. Pancras—Zinzendorf, poet and preacher
——Martin Luther.

Cuapter III.



Diligent Boys.



Franklin’s advice—Cressinus accused of witch-
craft—Gounod determined to succeed—Sir Mar-
tin Shee’s advice to Millais mother —Fred-
erick D. Maurice’s pledge—The Rev. T. Champ:



ness’ story—The luckiest fellow in town—One
leisure hour—Giotto’s design sent to Pope Boni-
face VIII.—Best boys story—Boy wanted, notice
in Mr Peter’s window—A poor Bulgarian boy—
How one boy faced the world—Proudest mom-
ent of Agassiz’s life—No yeast—Jared sparks—
Never miss an opportunity to do good—Harold
Robertson— Whistling to some purpose —A little
encouragement——One by one.

CHAPTER IV,



Honest Boys.

Epaminondas refusing bribes—Honesty brings
happiness—Carolo and the count—The best ten-
ant to have—Dear Stanley’s story of a match boy
—Reuby and Sandy—Stating the facts—A good
name—Reputation, Love and death—A Counter-
feit—Paul Wallace—Mr. Talmage lend me £1—
Thomas Tege’s business enterprise—Old Peter
Schroeder’s advice—Fearless and sincere—Horne
Tooke at School—The boy I can trust—An hon-
est coloured lad.



A Boy’s Resolve.

I witt Not Swear,

I WILL NoT DARE,

Gop’s NAME IN VAIN TO TAKE;
I WILL NOT LIE,

But I wir try,

THE TRUTH MY GUIDE TO MAKE.



Truthful Boys.

TRUTH HAS POWER. IT IS

RIGHT TO TELL IT.

UnrrutTHs CAUSE SORROW. TRUTH IS
TRIUMPHANT. HELPS TO KEEP
Honour WITHOUT STAIN.

FarsreHooD IS FOUND OUT.

UrnHoLpD THE TRUTH.

LyInc IS MEAN. _



HE Poet Tennyson had the motto “Y
Gwyr yn Erbyn y byd”—the truth
against the world—in incrusted tiles on

see the pavement of his entrance-hall. The

motto is an excellent one for boys. A
lie has no legs and therefore cannot stand.

“ After a tongue” says a great writer ‘has once

got the knack of lying, ‘tis not to be imagined

how impossible almost it is to reclaim it.” The
boys that are wanted are the boys that are

Truthful. The

Truth has Power.

How simply and beautifully has Abd-el-Kadir,
of Ghilon, impressed us with the love of truth in
A





10 BOYS WANTED.

his childhood. After stating the vision which
made him entreat of his mother to go to Bagdad
and devote himself to God, he thus proceeds: “I
informed her what I had seen, and she wept;
and taking out eighty dinars she told me that, as I
had a brother, half of that was all my inheritance;
she made me swear when she gave it to me,
never to tell a lie, and afterwards bade me fare-
well, exclaiming: ‘Go, my son, [ consign thee
to God; ‘we shall not meet until the day of
judgement.’ I went on well till I came near
Hamandnai, when our Kafillah was plundered
by sixty horsemen. One fellow asked me what
Thad got. ‘Forty dinars,’ said I, ‘are sewed up
under my garments.’ The fellow laughed,
thinking I. was joking. ‘And what have you
got?’ said another. I gave him the same
answer. When they were dividing the spoil, I
was called to an eminence where the chief stood.
‘What have you got my little fellow?’ said he,
‘I have told two of your people already,’ I
replied. ‘I have forty dinars sewed in my gar-
ments!’ He ordered them to be ripped open,
and found my money. ‘And how came you,’ he
said, in surprise, ‘to declare so openly what had
been so carefully concealed ?’ ‘ Because I will not
be false to my mother, to whom I have promised
I would never tell:a lie.” ‘Child;’ said the
robber, ‘hast thou such sense of duty to thy
mother at thy years, and am I insensible, at my
age, of the duty l owe to God? Give me thy



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 11

hand, innocent boy,’ he continued, ‘that I may
swear repentance upon it. He did so. His
followers were all alike struck with the scene.

‘You have been our leader in guilt,’ said they,
to their chief; ‘be the same in the path of virtue,’
and they instantly, at his order, made restitution
of their spoil, and vowed repentance on his hand.”

The boy who always speaks the truth has no
need to seek confirmation from another.

‘Jimmy, have you watered my horse this
morning?”

“Yes uncle, I watered him ; didn’t I, Dan?”
he added, turning to his younger brother.

“Of course you did,” responded Dan.

The gentleman looked at the boys a moment,
wondering a little at Jimmy’s words; then he
rode away. .

This was Mr. Harley’s first visit with his
nephews, and thus far he had been pleased with
their bright intelligent faces and kind behaviour.
Still there was something in Jimmy’s appeal to
his brother that impressed him unfavourably, he
could hardly tell why ; but the cloud of disfavour
had vanished from his mind when, two hours later
he turned his horse’s head homeward. Just in
the bend of the road he met his nephews, Jimmy
bearing a gun over his shoulder.

“Did your father give you permission to carry
that gun?” he inquired.

“Yes, sir,” replied Jimmy; ‘didn’t he, Dan?”

‘Of course he did,” said Dan.



12 BOYS WANTED.

‘‘And of course I believe you, Jimmy, without
your brother’s word for it,” said Mr. Harley.

Jimmy’s face flushed, and his bright eye fell
below his uncle’s gaze. Mr. Harley noticed his
nephew’s confusion, and rode on without further
comment.

“This map of North America is finely ex-
ecuted ; did you draw it, Jimmy?” asked Mr.
Harley that afternoon, while looking over a book
of drawings.

“Yes, Sir,” replied Jimmy, with a look of con-
scious pride; then turning to his brother he
added,

“Didn’t I, Dan?”

Mr. Harley closed the book and laid it on the
table.

“ Jimmy,” he began, “‘ what does this mean?
To every question I have asked you to-day you
have appealed to Dan to confirm your reply. Can-
not your own word be trusted ?”

Jimmy’s face turned scarlet, and he looked as
if he would like to vanish from his uncle’s sight.

‘Not always,” he murmured, looking straight _
down at his boots. j

‘““My dear boy, I was afraid of this,” said Mr.
Harley kindly.

Do you mean to go through life always having
to say: ‘Didn’t I, Dan?”

_ “No, uncle; I am going to try to speak the
truth so that people will believe me as well as
Dan,” said Jimmy, impulsively.

6c



TRUTHEUL BOYS. 13

Mr. Harley spent the season with his nephews,
and before he left he had the pleasure of hearing
people say, “‘ What’s come over Jimmy Page? He
never says lately, ‘ Didn’t I, Dan?”

Mr. Harley thought it was because Jimmy
was gaining confidence in himself.

The Truth must always be told, and at all
hazards, because it is

Right.

A story I read the other day in one of the
papers well illustrates this:

SOME time after the beginning of the present
century there were living ina busy country town
in the North a pious couple who had an only
son. For this son they daily prayed to God.
So the foundations of an upright life were laid in
the boy’s heart, and among these very especially
a regard for uprightness and truth.

In the course of years the boy’s school-days
were ended, and also his apprenticeship to a
business life in the country town, and as there
was no prospect for him there, he went to one
of the great sea-ports, and, by-and-bye, he got a
good position in a merchant’s office.

But he was not long in this excellent place
before he was put to the test in a very painful
way with respect to the lessons he had received
about truth. It was part of the business of that
office to have ships coming and going. And it
was the rule when a ship came into port that its



14 BOYS WANTED.

captain sent word to the office that he had
arrived and was now waiting instructions where
to discharge the cargo; and it was the duty of
the manager of the office to send back instruc-
tions to the captain where and when this was to
be done. A few months after the little lad came
to the office a ship laden with coal came in, and
the usual message from the captain came, but
somehow or other no answer was sent back to
him. The captain waited a week, but still no
word came back. . Now, that was very hard on
the captain. Until his ship was free of its cargo
it had to lie idle in the dock, and all who be-
longed to the ship were kept idle too. So at
the end of a week the captain sent word to the
office that his ship had been kept so long waiting
for instructions where to discharge its cargo that
it had missed a good offer of a new cargo, and
the office would have to pay him for the loss.
This payment is called “demurrage.”

When the manager of the office got this mes-
sage from the captain he was very angry. He
sent for the little lad, and said to him: -

“Didn’t I send you down to Captain Smith
with instructions to discharge his cargo?”

The little lad said:

“No, sir; I do not remember being sent
down.”

“OQ, but I did,” answered the manager. ‘You
have forgotten.”

And there for atime, so far as the office was



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 15

concerned, the matter was allowed to rest.

But the captain did not intend to let it rest
there. He applied for his demurrage. And
when that was refused, he took the manager of
the office to law, and by-and-bye his complaint
came before the judges in the court of law.

The day before the trial the manager came to
the little lad and said to him:

“Mind, I sent you to the dock with those
instructions to discharge the coal.”

“But I assure you I cannot remember your
doing so,” said the boy.

“OQ, yes, but I did. You have forgotten.”

It was a great trouble to the youngster. He
had never been sent to the dock. He could not
say that he had been sent; and he foresaw that
he would have to say before the judges what
would certainly offend the manager, and lead to
the loss of his excellent place.

On the morning of the trial he went to the
court. The manager came up, and the poor
young fellow tried once more to assure him that
he was mistaken, but he would not listen.

“Tt is all right,” he said hastily; “I sent you
on such a day, and you have got to bear witness
that I did—and see you say it clearly.”

Tn a little while he was called into the witness-
box, and almost the first question put to him
was whether he remembered the day when
Captain Smith’s ship came in. And then this:

“You remember during the day being sent by



16 BOYS WANTED.

the manager of the office to the dock with a
letter for the captain?”

“No, sir.”

‘Were you not sent by the manager of your
office to the coal ship on that day ?”

“‘T was not, sir.”

“Nor the next day?”

INO?

“Nor any other day ?”

Ce No.” ne

The gentleman who put the question was a
barrister. He had been engaged by the manager
to win the case for them. But when he heard
the little lad’s reply he turned to the judge
and said :

‘““My lord, I give up this case. My instruc-
tions were that this witness would prove that a
message to discharge had been sent to Captain
Smith, and it is plain no such proof is to be got
from him.”

So the case ended in the captain’s favour and
against the office in which the youthful witness
had found so excellent a place.

He went to his lodgings with a sorrowful heart,
and wrote to his father and mother that he was
sure to be dismissed. Then he packed his trunk
to be ready to go home next day; and in the
morning, expecting nothing but dismissal, he
went early to the office. The first to come in
after him was his master. He stopped for a
moment at the lad’s desk and said:



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 17

“We lost our case yesterday.”
“Yes, sir,” answered the boy, “and Iam very

sorry I had to say what I did.”

By-and-bye the manager came in; and after a
little time he was sent for to the master’s room.
It was a long while before he came out. Then
the young witness was sent for. “I am going
to be dismissed,” he thought to himself. But
the master said to him, “I was angry yesterday,
but not with you. You did right to speak the
truth; and to mark my approval of what you
did, I am going to put you in charge of all the
workings and sales of our Glentardel mine.”
Then he sent for the: manager, and told him
what he had said, and added, ‘And this youth
will make his reports direct to me.”

Six months afterwards the manager left the
office, and, young though he was, the hero of
this story was appointed to his place. And
before as many years had passed he was admitted
as junior partner in the firm; and he is now at
the head of the entire business—the managing
partner.

In his case truth was the best. But I want
to say that if things had turned out other than
they did, and he had been dismissed, it would
still have been the best for him to speak the
truth.

Another reason why truthful boys are wanted
is because



18 BOYS WANTED.

Untruths cause Sorrow,
~ and the sorrow often lasts a lifetime.

A GENTLEMAN tells us that he had one of the
kindest and best of fathers, and when he was a
little boy, about six years old, his father used to
carry him to school before him on his horse, to
help him in his little plans, and always seemed
trying to make him happy, and he never seemed
so happy himself as when trying to make his lad
happy. When 1 was six years old says the
gentleman, my father came home one day very
sick. My mother, too, was sick, and thus no-
body but my two sisters could take care of my
father.

In a few days he was worse, very sick, and all
the physicians in the neighbourhood were called
in to see him.

Next Sabbath morning early he was evidently
much worse. As I went into his room he
stretched out his hand to me and said :

“My little boy, Iam very sick. I wish you
to take that paper on the stand, and run to Mr.
C.’s, and get me the medicine written on that
" paper.”

I took the paper, and went to the apothecary’s
shop, as I had often done before. It was about
half a mile; but when I got there I found it
shut, and, as Mr. C. lived a quarter of a mile
further off, I concluded not to go to him. So I
set out for home.



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 19

On my way back I contrived what to say. I
knew how wicked it was to tell a lie; but one sin
always leads to another.

On going into my father, I saw that he was
in great pain, and, though pale and weak, |
could see great drops of sweat standing on his
forehead, forced out by the pain. Oh! then I
was sorry I had not gone and found the apothe-
cary. . At length he said to me:

‘““My son has got the medicine, I hope, for I
am in great pain.”

I hung my head and muttered, for my con-
science smote me, “No, sir; Mr. C. says he has
got none.” ‘ Has got none! Is this possible?”
He then cast a keen eye upon me, and seeing
my head hang, and probably suspecting my
falsehood, said in the mildest, kindest tone: “My
little boy will see his father suffer great pain for
the want of that medicine?” I went out of the
room and cried. I was soon called back. My
brothers had come, and all the children were
standing round his bed, and he was committing
my poor mother to their care, and giving them
his last advice. I was the youngest, and when
he laid his hand on my head, and told me that
in a few hours I should have no father—that in
a day or two he would be buried—that I must
now seek God to be my father, love Him, obey
Him, and always do right, and speak the truth,
because the eye of God is always upon me—it
seemed as if | should sink; and when he laid his



20 BOYS WANTED.

hand upon my head again, and prayed for the
blessing of God the Redeemer to rest upon me,
‘soon to be a fatherless orphan,” I dared not
look at him I felt so guilty. Sobbing, I rushed
from his bedside and wished I could die.

They soon told me he could not speak. Oh,
how much would I have given to go in and tell
him that I had told a lie, and ask him once more
to lay his hand on my head and forgive me!

I crept in once more, and heard the minister
pray for the dying man. Oh, how my heart
ached!

I snatched my hat, and ran to the apothecary’s
house and got the medicine. I ran home with
all my might, and ran up to my father’s bedside
to confess my sin, crying out, ‘Oh, here father!”
but I was hushed; and I then saw he was pale,
and that all in the room were weeping. My
dear father was dead, and the last thing I ever
spoke to him was to tell a lie!

I sobbed as if my heart would break, for
his kindness, his tender looks, and my own sin,
all rushed upon my mind; and, as I gazed upon
his cold, pale face, and saw his eyes shut, and
his lips closed, could I help thinking of his last
words :

‘““My little boy will see his father suffer great
pain for the want of that medicine ?”’ I could not
but know that he died for the want of it.

It was twelve years after this, while in college
that I went alone to the grave of my father, and



TRUTHFUL BOYS. Q1

as I stood over it I seemed to be at his bedside,
to see his pale face, and hear his voice. Oh, the
thought of that sin and wickedness cut me to the
heart! It seemed as though worlds would not
be too much to give could I then only have
called loud enough to have him hear me and ask
his forgiveness. But it was too late. I must
live and die weeping over the ungrateful false-
hood. May God forgive me!”

Boys, beware of disobedience and lying. One
wrong step leads to others, which are increasing
evil, and thus may go on from bad to worse.
May you be blessed with the fear of the Lord!

I want you to remember that truth is mighty,
and shall prevail.

An old Swiss proverb declares that it takes a
good many shovelfuls of earth to bury the truth.

Those who desert truth in trifles are seldom
trusted in matters of importance, but those who
stick to the truth in the end are

Triumphant.

The following incident from one of the weekly
papers is a case in point:

A youth, who was an earnest Christian, had
a situation in a large commission house. On
one occasion a large quantity of beans that had
been damaged was sent to this firm for them to
sell. When these damaged beans were received,
a lot of beans of first quality was purchased.



22 BOYS WANTED.

Then they went to work to put up the beans in
barrels. At the bottom and top of each barrel a
lot of the good beans were put, so that whichever
end of any barrel might be opened, the good
beans would be seen, though the rest of each
barrel was filled up with the bad beans. When
the barrels were all closed up, the head of the
firm went to work and marked them thus:
‘Beans A—No. 1.” On seeing this, the clerk
said: to his employer, ‘Do you think it right,
sir, to mark those beans ‘A—No. 1’ ?”

_ “Hold your tongue, sir! it’s none of your
business!” was the sharp reply. The clerk said
no more. The beans were all barrelled and
marked ‘““A—No. 1,” and stowed away in the
upper part of the warehouse. A sample of beans
of the first quality was kept in the office for
examination,

One day a gentleman came into the office, who
wished to buy a large quantity of beans. He
examined the samples there and liked them very
much. ‘‘Can I see the beans in the barrels?”
he asked. ‘Certainly, sir,”’ said the head of the
firm, and he told the clerk already spoken of to
take the gentleman upstairs. A barrel was
opened; he looked at them carefully. They were
just like the sample he had seen below. Then
he said to the clerk, ‘“‘ Young man, the sample of
beans showed me in the office, and these at the
top of the barrel, are of the first quality. I
cannot get such beans anywhere for so low a



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 23

price. But answer me honestly one question, are
the beans in these barrels of the same quality all
the way through?” The clerk hesitated for a
moment. He knew his employer would expect
him to say “‘ Yes,” but his conscience told him
he ought to say “‘ No.” He resolved to be true
to his conscience, So he answered “‘ No, sir, they
are not.” ‘' Then I don’t. want them,” said the
gentleman, and he left. The young man return-
ed to the office. “‘ Did you sell that man those
beans ?”’ asked his employer. ‘No, sir,” said he.
“Why not?” “Well, sir, the man asked me
to tell him honestly if the beans were the same
quality all through the barrel as they were on
the top. I told him they were not. Then he
said he did not want them, and left.”

‘“ Well, sir, you can go to the cashier and get
your wages,” said the employer. Well, this
was rather a poor reward for his piety and
bravery. But this was not the end of it. A
few days after, he received a note from his late
employers asking him to call on them. He
went to see them.

‘We have a place of great importance to be
filled,” said the head of the firm. ‘ We need for
it a person in whose truthfulness and honesty
we can have the utmost confidence. The salary
is a hundred pounds a year more than you
received in your former position. Will you
accept it ?”

“Jo will, sir, with thankfulness.”

“Very well,



24 BOYS WANTED.

then, it is yours.” :

Here is another story illustrating the point
that truth triumphs :—

Hotpine out his hand for the change, John’s
employer said: ‘‘ Well, my boy, did you get
what I sent you for ?”

“Yes, sir,” said John; ‘‘and here is the change,
but I don’t understand it. The lemons cost
three shillings, and there ought to be seven
shillings change, and there’s only six shillings
and sixpence, according to my count.” ;

‘‘ Perhaps I made a mistake in giving you the
money.”

“ No, sir. I counted it over in the hall to be
sure it was all right.”

‘Then perhaps the clerk made a mistake in
giving you the change.”

But John shook his head. ‘‘No, sir; I counted
that, too. Father said we must always count
our change before leaving a shop.”

‘Then how in the world do you account for
the missing sixpence? How do you expect me
to believe such a queer story as that?”

John’s cheeks grew red, but his voice was
firm. ‘I don’t account for it, sir; I can’t. All
I know is that it is so.”

“Well, it is worth a good deal in this world to
be so sure of that. How do you account for
that sixpence that is hiding inside your coat
sleeve?”

John looked down quickly, and caught the



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 25

gleaming bit with a cry of pleasure. “Here you
are! — Now it is all right, I couldn’t imagine
what hal become of that sixpence. [ was
certain J had it when I started from the shop to
returies | —

‘There are two things that I know now,” Mr.
Brown said, with a satisfied air. “I know you
have been taught to count your money in coming
and going, and to tell the exact truth, whether
it sounds well or not—two important things in
an errand boy. I think ll try you without
looking farther.”

At this John’s cheeks grew redder than ever.
He looked down and up, and finally he said in a
low voice: “I think I ought to tell you that I
wanted the place so badly Talmost made up my
mind to say. nothing about the change if you
didn’t ask me.’

“Exactly,” said Mr. Brown; “and if you had
not done it, you would have lost the situation,
that’s all. I need a boy about me who can be
honest over so small a sum as sixpence, whether
he is asked questions or not.”

Telling the truth will help you to keep your

Honour Without Stain.

Many incidents are told of Quakers in the old
days. One of these has a significance that is
worthy of consideration.

There was a famous school to which the boys
of well-to-do parents were sent. The examin-

B



26 BOYS WANTED. -

ations were severe, and the lads who failed felt
themselves somewhat disgraced in the eyes of
the whole school. Many of the pupils secretly
used translations, or were helped by scholarly
friends in their studies.

One boy, Charles Thompson, refused to avail
himself of any help or dishonest trick. He was
slow to learn, and timid. His classmates in-
sisted that he appeared at an unjust disadvantage
for these reasons at examinations, and urged him
to use cribs.

“No,” he said. “It is a pity if I do not learn
_ Greek; but it.will be worse if I learn to lie.”

He failed, and was sent down to a lower class
for the next term.

Charles Thompson was never, perhaps, first in
his class at school; but among the good and
noble men of a past generation he stood in
the foremost rank as aman whose honour was
stainless.

He became and long held the post of Secretary
to the United States Congress, and on disputed
points his simple statement outweighed the oaths
of noisy disputants. Even the Indians recog-
nised the quality of the man, and received him
into their nation, giving him a name which sig-
nified ‘*‘ He who cannot lie.”

If he had learned to lie in order to pass a
simple. school examination, for what a poor
mess of pottage would he have sold his kingly
birthright.



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 2p

THERE was once a boy named Duncan. The
boys used to call him “True Duncan” because
he would never tell a lie. One day he was
playing with an axe in the schoolyard. The
axe was used for cutting wood for the schoolroom
fire in winter. While Duncan was chopping a
stick, the teacher’s cat, ‘‘ Old Tabby,” came and
leaped on to the log of wood where Duncan was
at work. He had raised the axe to cut the wood,
but it fell on the cat and killed her. What to
do he knew not. She was the master’s pet cat,
and used to sit on a cushion at his side while he
was hearing the boys their lessons. Duncan
stood looking at poor Tabby. His face grew red
and the tears stood in his eyes. All the boys
came running up and everyone had something
to say.

One of them was heard whispering to the
others, ‘‘ Now, boys, let us see whether Duncan
can’t make up a fib as well as the rest of us.”

“ Not he,’ said Tom Brown, who was Dun-
can’s friend, ‘not he I'l] warrant. Duncan will
be as true as gold.”

John Jones stepped up and said, “ Come,
boys, let us fling the cat into the lane, and we
can tell Mr. Cole that the butcher’s dog killed
her. You know that he worried her last
week.”

Some of them thought that would do very
well. But Duncan looked quite angry, his cheek
swelled and his face grew redder than before.



28 BOYS WANTED.

“No, no,” said he. ‘ Do you think I would say
che It would be alie—a lie!” Each time he
used the word his voice grew louder. Then he
took up the poor thing and’ carried her into the
master’s room. The boys followed to see what
would happen.

The master looked up and said, ‘“‘ What ! is
this my poor Tabby killed ? Who could have
- done me such an injury ? iy

All were silent for a little while. As soon as
Dunean could get his voice he said, ‘‘ Mr. Cole
I am very sorry [ killed poor Tabby. Indeed,
sir, [am very sorry, I ought to have been more

careful, for I saw hee rubbing herself ag ainst the
log. I am ‘more sor ry than T can tell, sir.

“Everyone expected to see Mr. Cole get very
angry, take down his cane, and give Duncan a
sonnd: thrashing. But instead of that he put on
a pleasant smile and said, ‘ Duncan, you are a
‘brave boy. I saw and heard all that. passed in
the yard “from my window above. I am glad to
see such an example of truth and honour in my
school.”

Duncan took out his handkerchief and wiped
his eyes. The boys could not keep silence any
longer, and when Tom Brown cried, “ Three
cheers for True Duncan!” they all joined and
made-the schoolhouse ring with a mighty hurrah.
The teacher then said, ‘‘ My boys, 1 am glad you
know what is right and that you approve it,
though Iam afraid some of you could not have



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 29
done it. Learn from this time that nothing can
make a lie necessary. Suppose Duncan had
taken evil advice and come to me with a lie, it
would have been instantly detected, and instead
of the honour of truth he would have had only
the shame of falsehood.”

Truthfulness brings honour, while lying brings
disgrace.

Two country lads came at an early hour to a
market town, and, arranging their little stands,
sat down to wait for customers. One was fur-
ished with fruits and vegetables of the boys
own raising, and the other supplied with clams and
fish. The market hours passed along, and each
little merchant saw with pleasure his store
steadily decreasing, and an equivalent in silver
bits shining in his little money cup, The last
melon lay on Harry’s stand when a gentleman
came by, and placing his hand upon it, said:—

“What a fine, large melon! What do you ask
for it, my boy?”

‘The melon is the last I have, sir; and though
it looks very fair, there is an unsound spot in it,”
said the boy, turning it over.

‘“So there is,’ said the man, “I think I will
not take it. Buty’ he added, looking into the
boy’s fine, open countenance, ‘is it very business-
like to point out the defects of your fruit to
customers ?”

“Tt is better than being dishonest, sir,” said
the boy modestly.



30 BOYS WANTED.

“You are right; always remember that prin-
ciple, and you will find favour with God and
with man also. I shall remember your little
standin future. Are those clams fresh ?” he con-
tinued, turning to Ben Wilson’s stand.

“Yes, sir, fresh this morning. I caught them
myself.” was the reply ; and, a purchase being
made, the gentleman went away.

‘Harry, what a fool you were to show the
gentleman that spot in the melon! Now you
can take it home for your pains or throw it away.
How much wiser is he about those clams I
caught yesterday? Sold them for the same
price as I did the fresh ones. He would never
have looked at the melon until he had gone
away.”

“Ben, I would not tell a lie, or act one either, -
for twice what I have gained this morning. Be-
sides, I shall be better off in the end, for I have
gained a customer, and you have lost one.”

And so it proved, for the next day the gentle-
man bought nearly all his fruits and vegetables
of Harry, but never spent another penny at the
stand of his neighbour. Thus the season passed;
the gentleman, finding he could always get a
good article of Harry, constantly patronised him
and sometimes talked to him about his future
prospects. To become a merchant was Harry’s
great ambition! and when the winter came on,
the gentleman wanting a trusty boy for his
warehouse, decided on giving the place to Harry.



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“BEHIND THE OTHER BOYS.”









TRUTHFUL BOYS. 33

‘Prizes were to be given in Willie’s school,
and he was very anxious to merit one of them.
Willie had never had much opportunity to learn,
and he was behind the other boys in all his
studies except writing. As he had no hope to
excel in anything except writing, he made up his
mind to try for the special prize for that. And
he did try; his copy-book would have done
credit to a boy twice his age. When the prizes
were awarded the chairman of the committee
held up two copy-books and said, ‘It would be
dificult to say which of these two books is better
than the other, but for one ‘copy in Willie’s
which is not only superior to Charlie’s, but to
every other copy in the same book. This, there-:
fore gains the prize.’ Willie’s heart beat high
with hope, which was not unmixed with fear.
Blushing to his temples, he said, ‘ Please, sir, may
I see that copy?’ Willie glanced at. the page,
and then, handing the book back, said, ‘ Please,
sir, that is not my writing. It was written by
an upper-class boy, who took my book by
mistake one day instead of his own.’ The two
books went back to the committee, and they
awarded the prize to Charlie. The boys laughed
at Willie, but he felt that he was right. ‘I
would rather hold fast the truth,’ he said ‘ than
have a prize, for truth is better than gold.’
‘Hurrah for Willie!’ ‘Well done Willie!’
shouted the boys ; and the truthful fellow went
home happier than he could have done if by



34 BOYS WANTED.

means of a silent untruth he had won the prize.”

It is cowardly not to tell the truth. Don’t be
cowards.

Charles Mann smashed a large pane of glass in
a chemist’s shop, and ran away at first; but he
quickly thought : “‘ Why am I running ? It was
an accident. Why not tell the truth ?”

No sooner thought than done. Charlie was a
brave boy. He told the whole truth; how the
ball with which he was playing slipped out of his
hand, how frightened he was, how sorry, too, at
the mischief done, and how willing to pay if he
had the money.

Charlie did not have money, but he could
.work; and to work he went at once in the very
shop where he had broken the glass. It took
him a long time to pay for the large and expen-
sive pane he had shattered; but when he was done
he had endeared himself so much to the shop-
keeper by his fidelity and truthfulness that he
could not hear of his going away.

‘Ah, what a lucky day that was when I broke
that window!” he used to say.

“Charlie,” his mother would respond, “ what
a lucky day it was when you were not afraid to
tell the truth!”

Boys, do not forget that, “lying lips are an
abomination to the Lord, but they that deal trul y
are his delight.”

Truthful boys are wanted everywhere. The
only thing to be gained by telling a falsehood is



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 35

“Never to be credited when you speak the
truth.” “‘ Falsehood is fire in stubble (declares
Coleridge); it likewise turns all the light stuff
around it into its own substance for a moment—
one crackling, blazing moment—and then dies;
and all its contents are scattered in the wind,
without place, or evidence of their existence—as
viewless as the wind which scatters them.”

When the immortal Sidney was told that he
might save his life by telling a falsehood by
denying his hand-writing, he answered, ‘“‘ When
God hath brought me into a dilemma in which I
must assert a lie, or lose my life, He gives me a
clear indication of my duty; which is to prefer
death to falsehood.”

All boys should ponder the text ‘“ Be sure
your sins will find you out.” A good reason
why boys should be truthful is, because

Falsehood is sure to be found out.

Some time ago The Chicago News contained a
remarkable narrative of John Kinney, of the firm
of Kinney & Ransome. Mr. John Kinney told
the story about himself.

‘“Wuen I was a young chap,” says he, “I got
the Pike’s Peak fever along with a lot more of
the men and boys of our town, and as I was
pretty hard to manage around home, and as some
staid old friends of my father’s were going to the
new gold country, it was concluded that 1 should
go with them. When we were all ready to shut



36 BOYS WANTED.

my trunk and lock it, my mother, who, bless her,
was more than half afraid to have me go out into
that rough country, brought a handsome clasp
Bible out of her bedroom and laid it in my trunk
on top of the other things.

‘Now, Johnnie,’ said she, ‘I want you to
promise that you will read this Bible every
day.’

‘Of course I will, mother,’ I said; ‘I will read
it every chance [ have.’

‘And Johnnie,’ said she, ‘I want you to study
well the Sermon on the Mount. — It will do you
good. You will find it in St. Matthew and St.
Mark and St. Luke and St. John, but the best is
in St. Matthew. You will read it often, won’t
you, Johnnie ?’

‘I promised everything, and I meant to keep
my promise, too. But somehow I never did.
I never opened the Bible; never even undid the
clasp. After I had been at Pike’s Peak some
time, and spent nearly all the money that my
father had given to one of his old friends for me,
I started with what was left to come home. I
joined a party that was coming home, but they
left me at the Missouri crossing and I had a
terrible time from that hour. I ran out of money
and then spent all I could borrow on such
valuables as I could pawn. I would have sold
that Bible a dozen times if I could have found
anybody to buy it. Well, after a heap of walking
and all sorts of hardship, I finally reached home.



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 37

After the kissing and the talking was over, my
mother began unpacking the little handbag I had
brought back in the place of the trunk I took
away. In the bottom of it she found the little
clasp Bible.’

‘Your Bible looks as if you hadn’t used it
much,’ she said.

‘Yes,’ said I, ‘I took very good care of it.’

‘Did you read it, Johnnie ?’ she asked.

‘Of course I did; read it every day.’

‘You read the Sermon on the Mount, then,
did you?’ she asked with a kind of peculiar ex-
pression in her eyes.

‘Yes, very often.’

-Then she opened the Bible to St. Matthew
and there lay the twenty-dollar bill she had put
between the leaves. There was a ten dollar bill
in each St. Mark, St. Luke and St. John—fifty
dollars in all, and [ would have given every cent
of it to have been out of that room.

‘I told you St. Matthew had the best account
of the Sermon on the Mount,’ was all my mother
said about the matter.”

Trura is beautiful, as well as safe and mighty.
A boy twelve years old, with only truth as a weapon
conquered a smart and shrewd lawyer, who was
fighting for a bad cause. “Truth is the highest
thing that man may keep,” and the noblest child
or'man is he who keeps the truth ever between
his lips.

Walter was the important witness in a lawsuit.



38 BOYS WANTED.

One of the lawyers, after cross-questioning him
severely, said : “ Your father has been talking to
you and telling you how to testify, hasn’t he?”
“Yes,” said the boy. “ Now,” said the lawyer,
“ just tell us how your father told you to testify.”
‘“Well,” said the boy, modestly, ‘“ father told me
that the lawyers would try and tangle me in my
testimony ; but, if I would just be careful and
tell the truth, I could tell the same thing every
time.” The lawyer didn’t try to tangle up that
boy any more.

Boys who hate the false and love the true will

Uphold the Truth.

Brrr and Johnnie Lee were delighted when
their Scotch cousin came to live with them. He
was little, but very bright and full of fun. He
could tell curious things about his home in Scot-
land and his voyage across the ocean.

He was as far advanced in his studies as they
were, and the first day he went to school they
thought him remarkably good. He wasted no
time in play when he should have been studying,
and he advanced finely.

Before the close of the school, the teacher
called the roll, and the boys began to answer,
ken.

When Willie understood that he was to say
“ten” if he had not whispered during the day,
he replied,

“IT have whispered.”



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 39

‘More than once ?”

pees esi

‘Then I shall mark you zero,” said the teacher
sternly, ‘“‘and that isa great disgrace.”

‘Why I did-not see you whisper once,” said
Johnnie after school.

“Well,-I did,” said Willie. ‘I saw others doing
it, and so I asked to borrow a book; then I lent a
slate pencil, and asked a boy fora knife, and did
several things, I supposed it was allowed.”

‘Oh, we all do it,’ said Bert, reddening.

“There isn’t any sense in the old rule, and nobody
could keep it, and nobody does.”

“T will, or else I will say I haven’ t,” said
Willie. “ ‘Do you suppose I will tell ten lies in
one heap ?”

‘“‘Qh,we don’t call them lies,” muttered Johnnie

“There wouldn't be a credit amongst us at night
if we were so strict.”

‘What of that, if you told the truth ?”” laughed
Willie brayely.

In a short time they all saw how it was with
him. He studied hard, played with all his
might in playtime, but, according to his account,
he lost more credit than any of the rest. After
some weeks the boys answered ‘“ Nine” and
“ Hight” oftener than they used to. Yet the
school-room seemed to have grown quieter.
Sometimes, when Willie Grant’s mark was even
lower than usual, the teacher would smile pecu-
liarly, but said no more of disgrace.’ Willie



40 BOYS WANTED.

never preached at them or told tales; but some
how it made the boys ashamed of "themsely es,
just the seeing that this sturdy, blue-eyed boy
must tell the truth. It was putting the clean
cloth by the half-soiled one, you see, and they
felt like cheats and story-tellers. They talked
him all over, and loved him, if they did nick-
name hin ‘Scotch Granite,’ he, was so firm
about a promise.

Well, at*the end of the term, Willie’s name
was very low down on the credit list. When it
was read he had hard work not to cry, for he
was very sensitive, and he had tried hard to be
perfect. But the very last thing that day was a
speech by. the teacher, who told of seeing a man
mufled up in a cloak. He was passing him
without a look, when he was told that the man
was General , the great hero.

“The signs of his rank were hidden, but the
hero was there just the same,” said the teacher.
“And now, boys, you will see what I mean
when I give a little gold medal to the most faith-
ful boy, the one really most conscientiously ‘ per-
fect in his deportment’ among you. — Who shall
have it?”

“Tittle Scotch Granite!” shouted forty boys s at
once; for the child whose name was-so * low” on
the credit list had made truth noble in their
eyes.

Some boys speak the truth because they are
afraid of being punished if they tell a lie. You





TRUTHFUL BOYS. Al

must speak the truth because it is right.
Lying is Mean

and the liar seldom goes unpunished.

Tom Quayrm had come to spend his holidays
with his grandfather. Grandfather Quayle lived
in a pretty cottage, to which he and his good old
wife often welcomed their children and grand-
children. Grandfather Quayle had a good many
strong feelings, and perhaps one of his strongest
feelings was his hatred of anything like a lie.

One day Tom was telling him a story of a
scrape that some of his school-fellows had got
into before the holidays, and how they had es-
. caped punishment by making an excuse which
the master understood (as they intended he
should) in one sense in which it was not true,
though the actual words could bear another
meaning which was true.

Tom chuckled over this cleverness, as he
thought it, of his companions, but his grand-
father looked grave and said: ‘Tom, my boy,
never laugh at a lie, and remember that the
essence of a lie is to wish to deceive. If you
purposely use words which you know others will
take in a meaning that misleads them, that is as
much a lie as if you spoke a plain falsehood.
There are no such things as “white lies’; all
lies are black, and stain your soul. Believe the
words of an old soldier, Tom; no really brave
man will stoop to tell a lie. It is a mean, cow-

Cc



42 BOYS WANTED.

ardly vice, which is very displeasing to God, and
which all good men hate. Speak the truth, what-
ever happens to you, and you will please God
and gain the favour of your neighbours. I re-
member long ago when I was a little boy—less
than you are, Tom—my mother taught me some
verses, about this that I have always tried to
act upon myself, and have often repeated to little
children. They are not very fine poetry, but
they. teach a very good lesson:

Once there was a little boy,
With curly hair and pleasant eye—
A boy who always told the truth,
And never, never told a lie.
And when he trotted off to school
The children all about would cry,
“There goes the curly-headed boy—
The boy who never told a lie,”
And everybody loved him so,
Because he always told the truth;
But every day as he grew up,
"Twas said, ‘‘ There goes the honest youth.”
And when the people that stood near
Would turn to ask the reason why,
The answer would be always this,
‘¢ Because he never told a lie.”

“JT hope, Tom, you will try to be such an
honest youth, and always speak the truth, boy.”

Mr. Robert Burdette’s message to boys is
worth repeating.



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 43

He says ‘my boy, the first thing you want to
learn—if you haven’t learned how to do it
already—is to tell the truth. The pure, sweet,
refreshing, wholesome truth. The plain, unvar-
nished, simple, vereay; manly truth, with a
little « Ge

For one thing, it will save you so much
trouble. Oh, heaps of trouble. And no end of
hard work, And a terrible strain upon your
memory. Sometimes—and when I say some-
times, [ mean a great many times—it is hard to
tell the truth the first time. But when you have
told-it, there is an end of it. You have won
the victory; the fight is over. Next time you
tell the truth you can tell it without thinking.

Your memory may be faulty, but you tell your
story without a single lash from the stinging
whip of that stern old task-master—Conscience.
You don’t have to stop and remember how you
told it yesterday. You don’t get half through
with it and then stop with the awful sense upon
you that you are not telling it as you did the
other time, and cannot remember just how you
did tell it then. You won’t have to look around -
to see who is there before you begin telling it.
And you won’t have to invent a lot of new lies
to reinforce the old one. After Ananias told a
lie, his wife had to tell another just like it. You
see, if you tell lies you are apt to get your whole
family into trouble. Lies always travel along
in gangs with their co-equals.



44 BOYS WANTED.

And then, it is so foolish for you to lie. You
cannot pass a lie-off for the truth, any more
than you can get counterfeit money into circu-
lation. The leaden coin is always detected
before it goes very far. When you tell a lie it is
known. Yes, you say, “God knows it.” That’s
right; but He is not the only one. So far as
God’s knowledge is concerned, the liar doesn’t
care very much. He doesn’t worry about what
God knows—if he did he wouldn’t be a liar; but
it does worry a man or boy who tells les to
think that everybody else knows it. The other
boys know it; your teacher knows it; people
who hear you tell ‘“ whoppers,” know it; your
mother knows it, but she won’t say so. And all
the people who know it, and don’t say anything
about it to you, talk about it to each other, and—
dear! dear! the things they say about a boy who
is given to telling big stories! If he could only
hear them it would make him stick to the truth
like flour to a miller.

And, finally, if you tell the truth always, I
don’t see how you are going to get very far out
of the right way. And how people trust a truth-
_ ful boy. We never worry about him when he is
out of our sight. We never say, I wonder where
he is? I wish I knew what he is doing? I
wonder who he is with? I wonder why he
doesn’t come home ?” Nothing of the sort. We
know he is all right, and that when he comes
home we will know all about it and get it



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 45

straight. We don’t have to ask him where he is
going and how long he will be gone every time

7

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Vy coal








7

aS.









“ CAUSE OF SUCCESS.”

he leaves the house. We don’t have to call him
back and make him ‘solemnly promise” the



46 BOYS WANTED.

same thing over and over two or three times.
When he says “Yes, I will,” or “No, I won’t”
just once, that settles it. We don’t have to cross-
examine him when he comes home to find out
where he has been. He tells us once and that is
enough. We don’t have to say “Sure?” “Are
you sure now”’ when he tells anything.

But, my boy you can’t build up that repu-
tation by merely telling the truth about half the
time,.nor two-thirds, nor three-fourths, nor nine-
tenths of the time; but all the time. If it brings
punishment upon you while the liars escape; if it
brings you into present disgrace, while the
smooth-tongued liars are exalted; if it loses you a
good position; if it degrades you in the class; if
it stops a week’s pay—no matter what punish-
ment it may bring upon you, tell the truth.



Faithful Boys.



FIRMNESS NEEDED.
ACKNOWLEDGE THEIR BELIEF.
IN LITTLE THINGS.

TEMPTED.

Hop ON TO THE END.
FAITHFUL TO THEIR WORD.
Unto DEATH.

Love THE LORD.

@i,* HERE are few better reasons for faithful-

ness than that given by Bonaparte. On

~ catching the first sight of the Mamelukes

Y drawn up in order of battle on the banks

of the Nile, in view of the Pyramids,

he said, riding before the ranks, ‘ Soldiers! from

the summits of yonder Pyramids, forty gener-

ations look down upon you.”

Generations of men look down upon the boys

of to-day, and the command is “ Be Faithful.”

Firmness is needed.

In these days, when so many people are false
to the trusts committed to them, the following,



48 BOYS WANTED.

though often told, is worth repeating :—

Gerhardt was a German shepherd boy, and a
noble fellow he was, although he was very poor.
One day he was watching his flock, which was
feeding in a valley on the borders of a forest,
when a hunter came out of the woods and asked:
‘“‘How far is it to the nearest village?” “ Six
miles, sir’ answered the boy; ‘but the road is
only a sheep track, and very easily missed.”
The hunter looked at the crooked track, and said:
‘“ My lad, I'am very hungry and thirsty; I have
lost my companions and missed my way. Leave
your sheep and show me the road; I will pay
you well.” “I cannot leave my sheep, sir,”
rejoined Gerhardt. “They will stray into the
woods, and may be eaten by wolves vr stolen by
robbers.”

“Well, what of that?” queried the hunter.
“they are not your sheep. The loss of one or
two wouldn’t be much to your master, and I'll
give you more than you have earned in a whole
year.”

‘““T cannot go, sir,’ rejoined Gerhardt, very
firmly. ‘‘ My master pays me for my time, and
he trusts me with his sheep. If I were to sell
my time, which does not belong to me, and the
sheep should get lost, it would be the same as if
I had stolen them.”

‘Well,’ said the hunter, “ you will trust your
sheep with me while you go to the village and
get me some food, drink, anda guide? [ will



FAITHFUL BOYS. 49

take care of them for you.” The boy shook his
head.

“The sheep,” said he, “do not know your
voice, and. He stopped speaking. ‘“ And
what? Can’t you trust me? Do I look like a
dishonest man?” asked the hunter, angrily.

“Sir,” said the boy, “ you tried to make me
false to my trust, and tried to make me break
my word to my master; how do I know that
you would keep your word.”

The hunter laughed, for he felt that the lad
had fairly cornered him. He said: “I see, my
lad, that you are a good, faithful boy. I will
not forget you. Show me the road, and I will
try to make it out myself.”

Gerhardt then offered the contents of his scrip
to the hungry man, who, coarse as it was, ate it
gladly. Presently his attendants came up ; and
then Gerhardt, to his surprise, found that the
hunter was the Grand Duke, who owned all the
country around. The duke was so pleased with
the boy’s honesty that he sent for him shortly
after that, and had him educated. In after
years Gerhardt became a very great and power-
ful man; but he remained honest and true to his
dying day.

It is also necessary that boys should

Acknowledge their belief.



In the reign of Mary of England, when the
good Bishop Hooper was abvut to be burned to



50 BOYS WANTED.

death, a blind boy, by much importunity, pre-
vailed on the guard to bring him to the bishop.
This boy had lately suffered imprisonment in
Gloucester for confessing the truth. After the
bishop had examined him concerning his
faith and the cause of his imprisonment, he
looked on him steadfastly, tears standing in his
eyes, and said, “Ah, poor boy, God hath taken
from thee thy outward sight, for what reason He
best knoweth; but he hath endued thy soul with
the eye of knowledge and faith. God give thee
grace continually to pray unto Him, that thou
lose not that sight, for thou shouldst then be
blind both in body and soul.”

The boy’s name was Thomas Dowry. How .
often or how long he had endured imprisonment
for the truth’s sake is not known; but on his
final examination he was brought before Dr.
Williams, Chancellor of Gloucester, sitting ju-
dicial with the register of the diocese in the
consistory, near the south door of the cathedral
church, who administered the usual articles,
chiefly urging that on transubstantiation, and
saying,—

“Dost thou not believe that after the words
of consecration, spoken by the priest, there re-
maineth the very real body of Christ in the
sacrament of the altar ?”

‘““No,” answered the blind boy, “that I do
not.”

“Then,” said the chancellor, “thou art a



FAITHFUL BOYS. 51

heretic, and shalt be burned. But who taught
you this heresy ?”

“You, master Chancellor.”

‘‘ Where, I pray thee ?”

‘““Hiven in yonder place,” replied the boy,
turning and pointing with his hand towards
where the pulpit stood.

The chancellor again inquired, “‘ When did I
teach thee so?”

Dowry answered, ‘“‘ When you preached there
(naming a day) a sermon to all men as well as
to me, upon the sacrament. You said the sac-
rament was to be received spiritually, by faith,
and not carnally and really, as the Papists have
heretofore taught.”

The shameless apostate answered,—

‘“‘ Then do as I have done, and thou shalt live,
as I do, and escape burning.”

The blind boy said,—

“Though you can so easily dispense with
yourself, and mock God, the world, and your
conscience, yet will I not do so.”

‘Then God have mercy upon thee,” rejoined
the chancellor, “for Twill read the condemnation
sentence against thee.”

« God’s will be fulfilled !” answered the young
martyr.

Hereupon the register, being moved with the
scene, stood up and ‘said to the “chancellor, —

wR ie, for shame, man! will you read ° the
sentence against him and condemn yourself?



52 BOYS WANTED. .

Away, away, and substitute some other to give ©
sentence and judgement.”

‘No, register,” said the fearfully hardened
man; “I will obey the law, and give sentence
according to mine office.”

He did so; delivered him to the secular power,
who on the very same day led the blind boy to
the place of execution at Gloucester, together
with one Thomas Crocker, a poor bricklayer,
condemned also for the like testimony of the
truth ; when both, in one fire, most constantly
and joyfully yielded their souls into the hands
of the Lord Jesus.

SOME time ago several hundred Roman Cath-
olics made a pilgrimage to Lindisfarne, or Holy
Island, in honour of St. Cuthbert. It was a
very foolish thing for them to do, especially as
Cuthbert was not a Roman Catholic, but taught
the Gospel of Christ in its purity and simplicity.
He lived when the country was wild, and the
people were rude and savage. He was named
Cuthbert, or Guthbert, which meant “worthy of
God,” and Cuthbert tried to deserve his name
and to walk worthy of the Lord, being fruitful
in every good work.

He was a shepherd lad, and tended his flock
on the high, bleak uplands. There in the night
he watched the meteors shine in the darkness.
To this boy-shepherd, as to those men who, some
hundred years before, “kept their flocks by
night” in Judean fields, came the knowledge of



FAITHFUL BOYS. 53

‘fa Saviour which is Christ the Lord.” . Like
the shepherd-king of Israel, Cuthbert might have
said that the Lord “took him from the sheep
folds.”

A few Irish missionaries had come from
Lindisfarne, and were living in some log houses
in the wilderness. To these men Cuthbert went.
They became his teachers; but at last he almost
outstripped them in his missionary zeal for the
people of the surrounding country. He went
out among the men of Northumbria and preached
to them.

He knew their language, and could more easily
make himself understood than could the Irish
missionaries. Into the lonely little villages of
the mountains where other missionaries could
not go, into boggy tracks where danger lurked
and where travellers always carried spears to
defend themselves with, into wide, desolate
tracts of country that had only here and there
some clusters of wooden huts, Cuthbert went.
The poor had the Gospel preached to them by a
man whose hardy frame was equal to the task of
enduring all the hardships of travel in such a
country.

Some of the incidents of his journeys have been
recorded for us.

It is said that once, on a snowy day, he and
his companions had their boat driven ashore on
a lonely coast of Fife. Cuthbert’s companions
murmured at their miserable plight.



54 BOYS WANTED.

‘“The snow closes the road along the shore,”
said they ‘“‘and the storm bars our way over
the sea.”

But Cuthbert was not in despair. He was
ready with a comforting answer.

‘There is still the way of heaven, that lies
open,” said he.

But the thing best to remember about this “A p-
ostle of the Lowlands,” as he has been called, is
his faith in the One who said: “Take no thought,
saying, What shall we eat ? or, What shall we
drink ? or, Wherewithal shall we be clothed ?
for your Heavenly Father knoweth that ye have
need of all these things.”

Sometimes night would come upon the mission-
aries when they were off in the wilderness with-
out food.

But Cuthbert said: “Never did man die of
hunger who served God faithfully.”

Once when he was without food in such a
place, it is said that an eagle flew overhead, and,
frightened at something, let a fish that it was
carrying fall to the ground, and so a meal was
furnished to the needy man of God. Cuthbert
must have felt that He “who giveth food to all
flesh,” had seen and remembered him and sent
him food from the sky, even as He sent it to
Elyjah the Tishbite, in that eastern country by
the brook Cherith.

But the time came at last when the painful
journeys of the old missionary must cease. He



FAITHFUL BOYS. 35

could no longer endure the “perils of the wil-
derness.” He retired to a little island, one of the
group of the seventeen small Farne, or Fern
Islands, off the east coast of Northumberland.
It is said to have been a barren place without
food or water, but Cuthbert toiled till he made
it fit fora home. On that lonely island he died,
when probably nearly eighty years old. _After-
ward a tower was erected on that island to his
memory, and, as the years went by, many
traditions arose about the work of this good
man.

Mr. Hammonp, the evangelist, in “ Children
and Jesus,” tells of a stern father who “ one day,
when he came home from his business, heard a
noise, as if someone were talking in his little
boy’s room. He asked his wife what it was.
She told him it was Johnnie praying. This
made him angry. He told his little son in a
decided tone, that if he dared to do it again, he
must leave the house and find another home.
Like Daniel, dear Johnnie knew all he must
suffer; but he determined to keep on praying.
The next day his father came home and found
him praying again. He went at once to his little
room, and in a gruff voice said, ‘Pack up your
things and be off. I'll not have any of your
praying in my house. You shall not live with
me.’ and so the poor fellow packed up the
little that was his, and took his bundle and
walked downstairs to say ‘ good-bye.’ He went



56 BOYS WANTED.

first to his mother and sister, and gave them the
‘good-bye’ kiss: and then, with a full heart he
leaned over the cradle and pressed his quivering
lips to those of the little one he loved so much.
His mother stood by weeping. How could he
part with her? At last, throwing his arms
around ler neck, and with tears in his eyes, he
sobbed, ‘Good-bye, mother!’ And then the
little hero turned kindly to his stern father, and,
holding out his land, said, ‘Good-bye, father.’
But the father could not bear it any longer. He
could not keep the hot tears from his eyes. No,
he could not, after all, drive away his noble boy.
‘Johnnie, you need not go now. Pray for me.
I have been a wicked man to try and keep you
from praying. O, pray for me!’ was all he
could say. And Johnnie did pray. Yes, and
the father prayed too. He became a converted
man, and loved, with his family, to bow before
the mercy-seat.”
Boys are wanted to be faithful

In little things.

The Rev. Robert Moffat once begun an address
with these words: I knew a little boy exceed-
ingly well, and he had a very pious mother, and
that mother was wont to talk to him of heavenly
things, and pray for him, too; and when that
boy grew up I believe he loved his mother. But
he was about to leave her and go to another part
of the country at a great distance; and when the



FAITHFUL BOYS. 57

time for parting came the little boy felt the
separation very keenly, and his mother embraced
that opportunity of asking him a favour, She
walked with him a long way on the road in
order that she might be the last to see him before
he got into the boat to cross the river. And
just before the time for parting came, and while
his heart was softened at leaving her, his mother
took that occasion for making her request ; and
what do you think it was? If I remember, it
was this:—‘ My boy, my son,” she said, “ you
are going away from a mother’s eye, and you
will no more, perhaps never more, hear a mother’s
voice. My son, before we part, let me ask of
you one favour; it is but a small one. Oh, help
me,” she said, “my son, to return home, after I
have parted with you, with a heart filled with
hope and joy.” The son said, ‘“ What do you
want, mother?” The mother said, “It is a
very small thing; but you must promise me that
you will grant it before I tell you what I want.”
‘“No,” said the naughty boy, “I am not going
to promise anything before I know what it is.”
‘Qh, my son,” said the mother, “do you think
a mother would ask anything which was not
right of her own child?” No, he would not
promise his mother till she had first told him
what she wanted. Well, the mother pleaded and
pleaded, and at last the tears began to flow over
her cheeks, and the son could not stand that,
and he said in a great hurry, “‘ Oh, tell me what
D



58 BOYS WANTED.

you want—ask of me what you like, my mother.”
Then the mother said to him, “ Only promise
me that you will read in the Bible every day,
that you will read in the Old and NewTestament.
Oh,” she said, ‘read much in the Gospels you
cannot go astray there, young as you are.”

Well, young friends, the boy made the promise,
and he went to another part of the country,
where there was no mother’s eye to watch over
him, no ‘mother’s voice to warn him; and there
he did what he liked, naughty boy that he was.
He was very fond of music and could play the
fiddle, and he liked to go to balls to dance, for
he was fond of those nonsensical fooleries of the
world; but mark well, for [ know his history—
that boy when he came home, sometimes from a
dance, and from playing the fiddle to large
dancing parties, would then think about fulfilling
the promise which he had made to his mother,
and he would sit down and read the Testament,
and, perhaps, after coming from a dance, he
would read the 16th, 17th, 18th or 19th chap-
ters of St. John. Now what an awful thing it
was to unite dancing with the reading of these
chapters giving an account of the Saviour’s death
on the cross, and the crucifixion of the Lord ot
Glory! It made him very unhappy, and he
thought he would not keep his promise to his
mother, and he went to bed once and again and
tried to forget his promise; but no, his mother’s
face and his mother’s tears were before him, and



FAITHFUL BOYS. 59

he was obliged to get up in the dark and light a
candle and read a chapter. Well, that. was the
means in time of saving that little boy from
destroying himself; for he had almost done this
—he had almost gone into the gulf of suicide,
_and then he rejoiced in God and prayed for his
mother; and glorified God that he had a praying
mother.

This young man (for he had now grown up)
became very zealous and went about talking to
everyone that would hear him and thought to
convert them all. It was hard work, but he did
what he could. One day, while visiting ina
town about seven miles distant, he happened to
see a placard on the walls announcing a mission-
ary meeting, and he began to think within
himself what kind of a meeting it was; and as
he returned home he still kept thinking about
it; and he called it to mind so, that there was a
resurrection of all he had once heard from his
dear mother by the fireside; for his mother used
to keep him at home and taught him to knit
stockings rather than let him run about in the
streets and get into mischief ; and he remembered
what his mother told him about Greenland and
the South Sea Islands, and other parts of the
world; and by the time he got home he was
another boy altogether. He began to think and
pray for the heathen, and in his exhortations to
others he desired them to pray for the perishing
heathen. In the course of time a wonderful



60 BOYS WANTED.

providence brought that youth into a position in
which he was himself sent.out to be a missionary.
He was at first afraid that his parents would not
allow him to go, and he thought of leaving them
without letting them know anything about it;
but when at length his mother heard of it she
rejoiced very much, and she said, “ I wish all my
other sons were missionaries too.” Well that
boy went out as a missionary, and laboured
among the heathen for a quarter of a century,
and learned languages, and saw hundreds con-
verted to a knowledge of God, and saw schools
established, and people taught to read in their
own language the wonderful works of God.

And that missionary came back and saw his
mother ; and he was one time preaching a mis-
sionary sermon in a chapel where his mother
was, and when he came down from the pulpit he
found his mother in tears, and he said to her,
“Mother, you seem to feel what I have been
saying,” and she replied, ‘ Oh yes, my son, my
heart rejoices at the spread of the Redeemer’s
Kingdom.”

Now that boy is going to see his mother
again, and here he is—I am that boy; and he is
come to tell you this day something of what he
he has seen in Africa.

‘One of my first lessons,” said Mr. Sturgis,
an American merchant, ‘“ was in 1813, when I
was eleven years old. My grandfather had a fine
flock of sheep, which was carefully tended during



FAITHFUL BOYS. . 61

the war of those times. Iwas the shepherd boy,
and my business was to watch the sheep in the
fields. A boy more fond of his book than the
sheep was sent with me, but left the work to me
while he lay under the trees and read. I. went
to my grandfather and complained of it. I shall
never forget the kind smile of the old gentleman
' as he said ‘never mind, Jonathan, my boy; if
you watch the sheep you will have the sheep.”

‘““What does grandfather mean by that ?’
I said to myself; ‘I don’t expect to have a
sheep.’ I could not exactly make out in my
mind what it was, but I had great confidence in
him, for he was a judge, and had been in Con-
gress in Washington’s time; so I concluded it
was all right, and went back contentedly to the
sheep. After I got into the field I could not
keep his words out of my head. Then I thought
of Sunday’s lesson, ‘Thou hast been faithful
over a few things, I will make thee ruler over
many things.’ I began to see through it;
‘ Never you mind who neglects his duty; be you
faithful, and you will have your reward.’

‘“T received a second lesson soon after I came
to the city asa clerk to the late Lyman Reed.
A merchant from Ohio who knew me came to
buy goods and said: ‘Make yourself so useful
that they cannot do without you.’ I took his
meaning quicker than I did that of my grand-
father.

“Well, I worked upon these two. ideas until



62 BOYS WANTED.

Mr. Reed offered me a partnership in the business.
The first morning after the partnership was made
known, Mr. James Geery, the old tea-merchant,
called in to congratulate me, and he said: ‘ You
are right now. I have only one word of advice
to give you, Be careful who you walk the streets
with.’ That was lesson number three.”

And what valuable lessons they are: Fidelity
in all things ; do your best for employers ; be
careful about your associates.

Take these lessons and study them well.
They are the foundation-stones of character and
honourable success.

Boys are wanted who will be faithful when

Tempted.

Temptation comes to us in various ways.

Deacon Jones kept a little fish market. |

“Do you want a boy to help you?” asked
Joe White one day. ‘I fancy I can sell fish.”

“Can you give good weight to my customers
and take good care of my pennies.”

“Yes, sir,” answered Joe: and forthwith he
took his place in the market, weighed the fish,
and kept the room in order.

‘“‘ A whole day for fun, fireworks, and crackers
to-morrow !”’ exclaimed Joe, as he buttoned his
white apron about him. A great trout was flung
down on the counter.

‘“Here’s a royal trout, Joe. I caught it my-
self. You may have it for fivepence. Just



FAITHFUL BOYS. 63

hand over the money, for [’m in a hurry to
buy my fire-crackers,”’ said Ned Long, one of
Joe’s mates.

The deacon was out, but Joe had made pur-
chases for him before, so the money was thrown
across to Ned, who was off like a shot. Just
then Mrs. Martin appeared. “I want a nice
trout for my dinner to-morrow. This one will
do. How much is it?”

“One shilling, ma’am,’ and the fish was
transferred to the lady’s basket and the silver
piece to the money-drawer.

But here Joe paused... “‘ Fivepence was very
cheap for that fish. IfI tell the deacon it cost
eightpence he'll be satisfied, and I shall have
threepence to invest in fir eworks.”

The deacon was pleased with Joe’s bargain,
and when the market closed each went his way
for the night. But the silver in Joe’s pocket
burned like a coal! he could eat no supper, and
was cross and unhappy. At last he could stand
it no longer, but, walking rapidly, tapped at the
door of Deacon Jones's cottage.

A stand was drawn out, and before the open
Bible sat the old man. Joe’s heart almost failed
him; but he told his story, and with tears of
sorrow laid the coin in the deacon’s -hand.
Turning over the leaves of the Bible, the old
man read:—

““« Fe that eoveretl his sins shall not prosper,
but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall



64. BOYS WANTED.

have mercy.’ You have my forgiveness, Joe.
Now go home and confess to the Lord; but,
remember, you must forsake as well as confess.
And keep this little coin as long as you live to
- remind you of this first temptation.”

Sometimes dogs are more faithful than boys.

‘Now, Dick, see if you cannot carry father’s
dinner to him to-day. It is time he had it, and
Mary has not come home from school yet.”
_ Dick looked very proud at being entrusted
with his father’s dinner, and he promised
willingly that he would not stop to play on the
way, but would walk steadily along until he had
given the pail to his father, who was working
about half a mile from his home.

Bareheaded and barefooted he trudged along,
his brown, tangled hair making a thatch over
his head to shield him from the sun, and no
thought of stopping for a moment entered his
mind till he passed the cottage where his friend
Tim was at play in the yard, prancing up and
down upon a stick which did duty for a horse.

‘“T’ll tell you a secret if you come here a
minute,” Tim shouted; and so Dick turned aside
to hear his friend’s secret, although he knew he
ought to have waited till he was on his home-
ward way.

‘Down in the orchard, back of our house,
there is a bird’s-nest in the bushes, and there
are eggs in it,’ said Tim. ‘Now, mind, you



FAITHFUL BOYS. 65

must not tell anybody of it. Come down and
Pll show them to you.”

Forgetting all about his hungry father waiting
for his dinner, Dick followed down to the bushes.
_ It was quite a long walk across the orchard, and
the dinner-pail grew heavy.

‘“‘ Leave it here under the shed until we come
back,” suggested Tim.

‘Tm afraid something will happen to it,” said
Dick. ;

‘Fido’ll guard it—here, Fido, watch!” and
the faithful dog crouched. down beside the pail,
prepared to guard it faithfully.

Tim showed Dick the nest with its dainty
treasures, and the two boys spent some minutes
in looking at it, to the great alarm of the mother-
bird, who fluttered about and chirped and scolded
at the intruders.

‘Hello! Here comes Uncle Jack!” ex-
claimed Tim, looking up as a waggon came
rattlng down the lane that ran behind the
orchard. “I’m going to ask him to give me a
ride.”

Dick started for his pail as Tim scrambled into
the waggon, but he was dismayed to find that
Fido had no idea of giving up the trust which
his master had committed to him. Whenever
Dick extended his hand toward it, the dog
snarled so angrily that he was afraid to touch
it. Whatshouldhedo? Father would be so hun-
gry, and it must be so long after his dinner-time.



66 BOYS WANTED.

He was standing looking at the dog, with
tears in his eyes, when Tim’s mother looked out
of the window, and guessed that something was
wrong. Putting on her bonnet, she went to the
boy’s assistance. Fido felt that he could hon-
ourably relinquish his charge when his mistress
bade him do so; so, to Dick’s delight, he regained
his pail again.

“And what were you doing here with your
father’s dinner?” asked Tim’s mother. “ Didn’t
your mother tell you to take it as straight as you
could carry it ?”

“Yes,” faltered Dick.

“T thought so. Now, see if Fido can teach
you how to do what you’re told. Tim told him
to watch that pail, and he did it so well that you
couldn’t coax or frighten him away from it, and
yet you_couldn’t be trusted as well as a little
dog. Now, see if you can’t go straight along
the rest of the way, and show that you can be
trusted too.”

It was a good lesson of faithfulness that Fido
taught Dick that morning, and the boy remem-
bered it well.

Faithful: boys will

Hold on to the end.

In the battle of Gettysburg, a young colour-
bearer of the Sixteenth Regiment of Vermont
Volunteers fell mortally wounded. Holding on
firmly to his colour-staff, he felt some one. taking



FAITHFUL BOYS. 67

hold, and heard a voice saying, “ Give us the
flag.” Death was already blinding his eyes,and
he was unable to see who it was.

‘‘Are you friends or enemies ?”’ he asked.

‘““We are friends,” they replied.

“Then, if you are friends,” the dying boy
continued, ‘‘let me hold the flag till I die.”
And uttering these words he fell back and
expired.

That was the impulse and act of a brave and
true heart. The flag had been entrusted to his
keeping. He could not and would not yield it
to an enemy. He could not yield it to a friend,
because he would cling to his trust to the end.
His example, though but that of a boy, is one of
the noblest and truest in history. Have you a
trust committed to you? Yes. God has en-
trusted you with gifts, and opportunities, and
duties. And Jesus says, ‘‘ Be thou faithful unto
death, and I will give thee a crown of life.”
Paul, just before his martyrdom, wrote to
Timothy, “I have fought a good fight, I have
finished my course, I have kept the faith; hence-
forth there is laid up for me a crown of right-
eousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge,
will give me at that day.”

Every boy has influence of some kind, and by
remaining faithful may influence others to do
noble deeds.

Many, many years since, Mr. and Mrs. S. C.
Hall visited Ireland, previous to writing their



68 BOYS WANTED.

well-known work descriptive of its scenery and
customs. On the occasion of their visit to Glen-
dalough, the far-famed district of the Seven
Churches, they observed a young lad seated on
one of the tombstones, who, immediately on their
approach, doffed his cap, and offered his services
as guide over the district.

A bargain was soon struck, and the party drove
off. The lad, full of the quaint old legends of
the place, did the work well, and to the entire
satisfaction of his employers. Returning home
after a day’s thorough enjoyment, Mr. Hall took
a flask from his pocket, and after partaking of
the contents, offered some to the lad. To his
utter astonishment, the offer was firmly but
politely declined.

To Mr. Hall such a thing was inexplicable.
An Irish boy who would not even taste whisky
was, indeed, a stranger sight than any he had
seen during the day. He could not understand
it. Resolved to test the lad’s principles, he
offered him a shilling, then half-a-crown, then
five shillings, if he would drink the poisonous
drug ; but the lad was firm. Under the ragged
jacket there throbbed a true heart. Mr. Hall
determined, however, to conquer, if possible, and
finally offered him half a sovereign, a coin not
often seen by lads of his class in these parts.
It was a wicked act, and proved too much for
the politeness even of an Irish boy.

Drawing himself up in something well-nigh



FAITHFUL BOYS. - 69

akin to indignation, and pulling a temperance
-medal from the folds of his ragged jacket, he
firmly told Mr. Hall “ that for all the money his
honour might be worth he would not break his
pledge.”

The history was soon told. It had belonged to
the lad’s father, who had spent the prime of his
days in the service of the cruellest of task-
masters,—Drink. Until the advent of the gen-
uine Apostle of Temperance, happiness had been
unknown in yon home on the hill-side. But
with his advent, peace and joy prevailed. The
medal was now round the lad’s neck—a father’s
dying legacy to his son. Hence his noble and
firm resolve. Nor was his heroism in vain. It
was too much for Mr. Hall, who there and then
screwed the top on to the flask, and threw it into
the lake by the side of which they stood. That
day, and entirely through the influence of that
lad, Mr. and Mrs. Hall became staunch teetotalers,
aiding the movement by tongue and pen.

Under all circumstances in life boys are wanted

to be
Faithful to their Word.

An interesting circumstance is related of
George G. Lake, the benevolent merchant of
New York. Like so many others, he came to
the great city from Connecticut a poor lad, and
obtained employment as an errand-boy in a store



70 BOYS WANTED.

in Catherine Street, a narrow thoroughfare
leading to the Kast River.

He was an errand-boy of the old-fashioned
kind, one who received two dollars a week wages,
_ slept on or under the counter of the store, and
lived chiefly on crackers and cheese. But he
was a good boy, attended to his business and
made friends. Ina year or two he obtained a
better place, in a better store, in a better street,
where he--advanced rapidly from one post to
another, until at nineteen he was placed in
charge of the silk department, the highest
position in the store.

Salaries at this period were so small that this
smart young man thought himself well off in
getting 400 dollars a year, and he engaged to
remain four years in the service of the firm at
that rate of wages.

At the head of the silk counters, he had fre-
quently to visit a great importing house, to re-
plenish the stock of his own firm, and there he
attracted notice by his excellent taste in selecting
silks and his sound judgement as to what. pat-
terns would be likely to please people.

One day he was asked to step into the counting-
room of the importing house, where one of the
partners invited him to enter their service at
1,000 dollars the year, 2,000 dollars the second,
and 3,000 dollars afterward. The young man
replied that he had just made a contract with his



FAITHFUL BOYS. 71

employers for four years at eight dollars per
week.

‘That contract was only verbal, I suppose,”
said the merchant.

‘““T don’t break contracts,” replied the clerk,
“whether verbal or not.”

So he went back to his silks in the old store,
and to his eight dollars a week. He served out
his four years faithfully. At the end of the period
he made himself the “ indispensable man’? to his
employers, who offered him 10,000 dollars a year
or a partnership, He accepted the salary, and
after some years entered the firm, of which in due
time, by the retirement of his partners, he became
the head.

He made large property in the business, from
which he retired at an early age, and spent the
remainder of his days in happy and honourable
retirement, a good patriot, a good Christian, and
a wisely benevolentman. The solace and charm
of his old age was music, of which he was a
warm lover and munificent patron.

All boys that are faithful to their employers
do not become partners, neither do they all
succeed in life, in fact, some faithful servants are
very badly treated by their masters, but all may
be heroes.

Can a boy be a hero? Of course he can, if
he has courage, and opportunity to show it.
The boy who will stand up for the right, stick



&

72 BOYS WANTED.

to the truth, resist temptation, and suffer rather
than do wrong, is a true hero. Here is an ex-
ample of a true hero. A drummer-boy, who had
become a great favourite with his officers, was
asked by the captain to drink a glass of rum.
The boy declined, saying, “I am a Temperance
boy, and do not touch strong drink:” “ But
you must take some now,” said the captain, “you
have been on duty all day, beating the drum and
marching, and now you must not refuse: I insist
upon it.” But the boy stood firm. The captain
then turned to the major and said, “our little
drummer is afraid to drink: he will never make
a soldier.” ‘“ How is this?” said the major, in
a playful manner, ‘‘do you refuse to obey orders ?”
“Sir,” said the boy, ‘I have never refused to
obey orders, and have tried to do my duty as a
soldier faithtully; but I must refuse to drink
rum, for | know it would dome harm.” “Then,”
said the major, in a stern tone of voice, in order
to test his sincerity, “(I command you to take
a drink; and you know it is death to disobey
orders!” The little hero, fixing his clear blue
eyes on the face of the officer, said, “‘ Sir, my
father died a drunkard ; and when I entered the
army I promised my mother I would not taste
a drop of rum, and I mean to keep my promise.
I am sorry to disobey your orders, sir; but I
would rather suffer anything than disgrace my
mother, and break my pledge.” Was not that
boy a hero? He had learned when to say NO.



FAITHFUL BOYS. 73

“Few have learned to speak this word
When it should be spoken;
Resolution is delayed, .
Vows to virtue broken.
‘More of courage is required
This one word to say,
Than to stand where shots are fired
In the battle fray.”

The officers could not help admiring the con-
duct of the boy, and ever afterwards treated him
with great kindness.

Boys are wanted that will be faithful
Unto death.

‘Diocletian was at Rome, wielding the sword
of persecution with all the fury of fanaticism.
In the blindness of his zeal he saw in the mur-
dered Christians an acceptable offering to the
gods, and the imperial city was red with slaughter.
The property of the wealthier victims, too, was
a prize worth having, and it is therefore not sur-
prising that a rumour soon reached the ears of
Diocletian that young Pancratius was rich,
friendless, and a follower of Jesus. The lad was
instantly summoned to the palace. And there
they met, the purple-faced emperor and the
Christain youth ; the former in all the pride and
pomp of supreme dominion, the latter in the
calm dignity of truth and innocence. Struck

E



74 BOYS WANTED.

with the noble bearing of the boy, Diocletian
spoke to him of his father Cleonius, who never
failed in his allegiance to the gods. And was it
true, he asked, that Pancratius had dared to
become a Christian in defiance of the imperial
edict ? Instant death should be his portion
unless he at once consented to sacrifice to
Jupiter.

In that awful moment the courage of Pan-
cratius failed not. Strengthened by Him who
had thus far directed his path, he at once avowed
himself a Christian, and, fired with holy indig-
nation, demanded of his accuser how he dared to
commit such deeds of wickedness and cruelty as
were then daily perpetrated in Rome. “A
Christian he was, and a Christian he would die ;
for Christ, our Master in Heaven,” said he,
“Inspires the soul of his servants, even young
as I with a courage which is able to defy the
cruelty of all the emperors in the world.”

Enraged at this bold reply, Diocletian ordered
him to be immediately beheaded, as a warning to
the Roman youths, how they presumed to trifle
with the imperial mandate.

Forth the soldiers lead that heroic boy; they
pass along the streets of Rome, and enter the
Aurelian way; there, with the courage of a Paul,
and the meekness of a Stephen, the youthful
martyr bends his neck to the fatal stroke and
yields up his soul to God.

Boys are wanted who



FAITHFUL BOYS. 75
Love the Lord,

and mean to be faithful to Him.

Zinzendorf was the son of rich and noble
parents, and would have had many temptations,
but when he was four years old he began to love
to talk with God. He was only a little fellow
when he made this covenant with Jesus: “ Be
thou mine, dear Saviour, and I will be Thine.”
The window is still shown in an old castle where
Zinzendorf dropped out letters addressed to
Jesus. In those little notes he told his Saviour
how dearly he loved Him, and he never doubted
that Jesus saw them.

When we remember that Christ has said,
‘They that seek Me early shall find Me,” we
cannot doubt either that God saw and answered
those letters. Do you‘ask how God could answer
them? By sending His Holy Spirit to the little
boy, and pouring more love and grace into his
young heart. One day when Zinzendorf was
only six years old, he was praying aloud in his
room. invading army, forced their way into the castle,
and entered the little Counts room. When they
saw how earnestly he was praying, they stood
quietly aside, and watched him, and then: went
away without touching him.

What text does that remind you of? “He
shall give His angeis charge over thee, to keep
thee in all thy ways.” As Zinzendorf grew older,



76 BOYS WANTED.

he worked more for God, and was noted at school
for his earnest piety. He was not content to
know that his own soul was saved, but he worked
hard among his (choolielloee to make them, too,
feel the need of a Saviour; and when he left, he
had founded seven different societies for prayer.
You must not imagine. that, because Zinzendorf
loved and prayed to God, he was backward in
his lessons.. He was a hard-working boy, and
at sixteen-was far ahead of those of his own age
in Latin and Greek. When he became aman he
was a poet, a preacher, and a missionary.

‘There is nothing sweeter on earth than the
heart of a woman in which piety dwells.” This
beautiful utterance is Luther’s. It was born of
a touching experience of his childhood. John
Luther, his father, a miner and smelter of ores,
conceived a strong desire to educate his son.
Too poor to pay for young Martin’s education,
he yet ventured to send him toa celebrated school
at Hisenach, trusting for his support to the
‘occasional help of friends and the charity which,
according to the custom of those times, was be-
stowed more or less freely upon poor students.

Our generation has improved upon the old
method, indeed, but it is quite as true to-day as
three centuries ago that education, especially all
higher education, is beneficiary.

Young Martin Luther, driven forth by hunger,
would join his school-fellows in singing from
door to door, hoping thus to gain food. Instead








I ih
ao TAS





=| Martin LuTHEer
SINGING IN
THE STREETS AT

HISENACH.









FAITHFUL BOYS. 79

of “bread” he not rarely received “a stone’’—
harsh and insulting words. Often he left the
streets hungry and weeping. One evening, when
a high wind was abroad, and snow filled the air,
he found himself, after three successive repulses,
before the door of Conrad Cotta, on St. George-
‘square. He was on his way to his lodgings, to
spend the night fasting. Who shall doubt what
Hand it was that held him there a little space,
and touched his heart to sing one song more?

These are the words he sang:—
Foxes to their holes have gone,
Every bird unto its nest ;
But I wander here alone,
And for me there is no rest.

Inside the house Conrad Cotta played his flute,
while Ursula, his wife, prepared the evening
meal. Perhaps the strains ofthe flute—Martin’s
favourite instrument—had arrested his footsteps
and awakened his song. The flute was silent
within while the sweet child voice filled the air
with melody.

‘A fine, sweet voice!” said Conrad; ‘ pit
it should be spoiled by use in such ill weather.”

‘A child’s voice, too,” said Ursula, whose
heart was tender by the recent loss of her
own beloved child. The door was thrown open.
The light streamed forth upon the snow and re-
vealed the young singer.



80 BOYS WANTED.

“Charity, for Christ’s sake, charity?” said
the youth. :

He was bidden to enter. The sudden change
to the warm room threw him into a faint. The
care of Ursula— the pious Shunamite,’ as the
Hisenach people used to call her—revived him.
Kind words fed his heart, while good food
nourished his body. He was put away in bed,
and as the good people looked upon his sleeping
face they were won by it, and in the morning
offered the boy a home. In that home the
scholar’s mind awoke, grew, blossomed forth like
winter verdure under the touch of spring.

Thus again, as so often, “man’s extremity ”
was “God’s opportunity.” The eagle-wings
were spread beneath the fledgling. God _pro-
vided for His child. God opened the door to that
way over which, in after years, Luther was to
walk, leading with him a host of God’s elect.

Gop ?—let the weary, the discouraged, the
doubting, the sore afflicted, be comforted in the
thought that God ts, and that He is the Ever-
lasting Father !

The following is the whole of the song which
Luther sung on that memorable night:—

Lord of heaven! lone and sad,
I would lift my heart to thee ;
Pilgrim in a foreign land,
Gracious Father, look on me;
I shall neither faint nor die
While I walk beneath Thine eye.





FAITHFUL BOYS. 81

I will stay my faith on Thee,
And will never fear to tread
Where the Saviour Master leads;
He will give me daily bread.
Christ was hungry, Christ was poor—
He will feed me from His store.

Foxes to their holes have gone, |
Every bird unto its nest:
But I wander here alone,
And for me there is no rest.
Yet I neither faint nor fear,

For the Saviour, Christ, is here.
If I live, He’ll be with me;
If I die, to Him I go;
He’ll not leave me, I will trust Him,
And my heart no fear shall know.
Sin. and sorrow I defy,
For on Jesus I rely.



Diligent Boys.

DETERMINED TO SUCCEED.
INDEPENDENT OF BAD COMPANY.

Luck Is NOT THE CAUSE OF SUCCESS.
INTERESTED IN THEIR BUSINESS.

GAIN KNOWLEDGE. ALWAYS
ENERGETIC.

NEVER MISS OPPORTUNITY TO DO GOOD.
TAKE TIME.

ILIGENCE is said to be the mother of
good luck, and God gives all things to
=~- industry. Franklin’s advice is “‘ Plough
ae deep while sluggards sleep, and you shall
have corn to sell and to keep. Work
while it is called to-day; for you know not how
much you may be hindered to-morrow. One to-
day is worth two to-morrow, as poor Richard
says; and, further, never leave that till to-morrow
which you can do to-day.”
Pliny relates that Cressinus gathered so much







DILIGENT BOYS. 83

more wealth from a small piece of ground than
his neighbours could from a much larger piece,
that they accused him of witchcraft. To defend
himself, he brought into court his servants, with
their instruments of labour, and said, ‘“ My
witchcrafts, O ye Romans! are these. These
servants and these tools are all the witchcraft
that I know of. I say not to my servants, ‘Go
do this or do that,’ but, ‘ Come, let us go do it.’
and so the work goes on.” Industry and dili-
gence make any man excellent and glorious, and
chief in any condition, calling or profession.

The world wants diligent boys, boys who are

Determined to succeed.

In the autobiography of Gounod, appears the
following incident of that great musician’s early
career. As a boy at school he neglected his
essays to write music. The teacher tore up the
music, but that was not the end of the matter.
Gounod writes:—

This first persecution, far from curing me,
only inflamed my musical ardour, and I promised
myself hereafter that I would assure myself of
my pleasure by putting it behind the regular
accomplishment of my school duties. In this
conjuncture I decided to put forth a sort of pro-
fession of faith, in which I should formally
declare to my mother that I was absolutely
determined to be an artist; [ had a momentary
hesitation between painting and music; but



84 BOYS WANTED.

finally I felt more inclination to express my ideas
in music, and I decided on this latter choice.

My poor mother was distressed. This may
easily be understood. She had seen an artist’s
life from the inside, and probably she foresaw
for me a second edition of the scarcely successful
life that she had shared with my father. So she
ran in great distress to tell her woes to my
teacher, M. Poirson. He reassured her.

‘Fear nothing,” he said to her, ‘your son
will never be a musician. He is a good little
scholar; he works well; his teachers are satisfied
with him; I will undertake to see him entered
at the normal school. _1 will make this my
business; calm yourself, Mme Gounod, your son
will never be a musician.” |

My mother left, entirely reassured. The
principal summoned me to his room.

“Well,” said he, “what is this, my child?
You want to be a musician ?”

““ Yes, sir.”

“Ah, but you mustn’t ‘think of it! A
musician has no position |” ’

‘“What ! Had Mozart, Rossini, no position ?”

And I felt, as I answered him, my little
thirteen-year-old head throw itself back a trifle.

On the instant the face of my interlocutor
altered.

“ Ah,” said he, “it is that kind of a musician
you mean? Well, well, that is good ; we will
see if you can make one. I have had my box at



DILIGENT BOYS. 85.

the opera ten years, and I am a good judge.”

He opened a desk and took out a sheet of
paper on which he began to write verses. Then
he said :

‘Take that and set it to music for me.”

I was jubilant. I left him and returned to
my study, where I ran with feverish anxiety
over the verses that he had given me. It
was the romance from ‘“Joseph,” beginning,
‘“Scarcely had I left my childhood.”

I knew neither “Joseph” nor Méhul (its
composer). I was thus restrained or intimidated
by no recollection. The ardour that I felt for
my Latin lesson at this moment of musical in-
toxication may be imagined. At the following
recreation-hour my romance was done. I ran in
haste to the principal.

‘What is it, my boy?” “My romance is
finished, sir.” ‘‘ What! already” “ Yes, sir.”
“Let us see; sing it to me.” ‘“ But, sir, I must
have a piano to accompany myself.”

[M. Poirson had a daughter who took piano
lessons, and I knew that he had a piano in the
adjoining room. |

‘No, no, that is useless; I don’t want a
piano.” ‘But I do, sir, for my harmonies.”
“What! your harmonies! And where are they,
pray?” ‘Here, sir,” said I, putting a finger
on my forehead. ‘‘ Ah, well; sing all the same;
I shall understand without the harmonies.”

I saw that it was necessary to do as he bade,



86 BOYS WANTED.

and I sang. I had hardly reached the middle of
the first verse when I saw that my judge was
regarding me intently. This look encouraged
me; I began to feel victory on my side. I went
on confidently, and when I had finished, the
principal said to me:

‘“‘ Now go to the piano.”

Thus I triumphed. I had now all my weapons
in hand. I began my little exercise again, and
at the end, poor M. Poirson, vanquished, tears in
his eyes, took my head in his two hands and
kissed me, saying:

“Go, child; be a musician! ”

Joun Mixuats was one of those prodigies who,
having real genius, fulfil the promise of their
youth. When he was a boy, so little that his
friends used to pile books on a chair to make a
seat high enough for him to sit on while he
worked, he was always sketching, hoping some
day to be a painter.

His mother was an acquaintance of Sir Martin
Shee, then president of the Royal Academy, and
she told him that her little boy had a great gift
in the line of drawing.

‘Don’t encourage it!”’ said Sir Martin.
‘Many children show this sort of proclivity, and
the end of it all is failure. It is not once in a
thousand times that success is achieved. Bring
him up to any profession but mine.’

She then asked him at least to gratify a
mother’s pride by looking at some of her darling’s



DILIGENT BOYS. 87

sketches. He glanced at them and exclaimed,
delightedly: “It is your duty, Mrs. Millais to
encourage this boy! He is a marvel.”

~The result of this advice was that the child
was sent to the finest schools of art, and when
the prize for the best historical drawing in pencil
was awarded, at one of the Royal Academy
assemblies, the name of Mr. Millais was called.
A child in short dresses was presented, and the
Duke of Sussex, who was in the chair, called out
in amazement: “Is this Mr. Millais? Put him
on the table!” And standing there he received
his prize.

At the age of seventeen his first picture was
hung in the Royal Academy. In 1854, at the
age of twenty-five, he became A.R.A., being the
youngest Associate ever admitted except Sir
Thomas Lawrence, and in 1873, he became a
Royal Academician. He was one ofthe founders,
im 1848, of the Pre-Raphaelite School, with
Holman Hunt, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and
others, but abandoned the style of this school
about 1860. He rapidly achieved fame, and was
made a baronet. Some of Sir John’s best-known
works are ‘ Bubbles,’ ‘ Cherry Ripe,’ and ‘ The
Huguenot.’ Of late years he had devoted him-
self to portrait painting.

The grave of Sir John Millais adjoins that
of Lord Leighton in the crypt of St. Paul’s
Cathedral.

Freperick D. Maurice, was not, says the



88 BOYS WANTED.

writer of his life, what, perhaps, would be re-
garded as the model schoolboy of the present
day—for though naturally strong and robust in
body as he was active in mind, he took little
part in games or athletic exercises, and he had a
great dislike to what is called sport, more
especially looking upon anything which involved
the torture or death of dumb creatures as cruel
and inhuman. He was full of aspirations as
regarded his own future career.

Returning home full of enthusiam after one of «
these conversations he drew up the following re-
solutions, which we both signed, and which many
years after I rejoiced to show him, and to prove
how nobly he had fulfilled his share of the
agreement. It ran thus:—

‘““We pledge each other to endeavour to dis-
tinguish ourselves in after life, and to promote
as far as lies in our power the good of mankind.”
Neither of us was fifteen years old at the time.

The writer continues :—“We were rambling
with another friend one summer evening ata
distance from home, when we found ourselves in
the presence of an angry bull, who drove us to
take refuge upon an embankment in the middle
of a large field.

There we were safe enough, but completely be-
sieged, the savage beast continuing to pace round
us, apparently ready to rush upon anyone who
came within his reach.

Time wore on, and the night Sioeae: we



DILIGENT BOYS. 89

began to feel that his mother would grow un-
easy at our absence—a matter about which he
was always exceedingly sensative. It was re-
solved, therefore, that one of us should make an
attempt to procure assistance, whilst the others
endeavoured to divert the bull’s attention.

Drawing lots was talked of, but Frederick
insisted on his right as the eldest to lead the for-
lorn hope.

The scheme was successful ; but the quiet un-
daunted way in which he retired, facing the bull
(who followed him all the while), and slowly
bowing to it with his hat at intervals—according
to the theory he had on the subject—till he
could make a final rush for the gate, was worthy
of all admiration. ,

The boyhood’s character was seen in man-
hood’s action breaking through everywhere on
to the surface. Whatever, then, you would like
manhood to be, make the boyhood now. Dreams
of future greatness or goodness are worthless
unless they can now lead to action, and to
laying the foundations strong and deep.

A Swedish boy fell out of a window and was
badly hurt, but with quenched lips he kept back
the cry of pain. The king, Gustavus Adolphus,
who saw him fall, prophesied that the boy
would make a man for an emergency. And so
he did, for he became the famous General
Bauer.

A boy used to crush the flowers to get their

F



90 BOYS WANTED.

colour, and painted the white side of his father’s
cottage in Tyrol with all sorts of pictures,
which the mountaineers gazed at as wonderful.
‘He was the great artist Titian.

An old painter watched a little fellow who
amused himself making drawings of his pot and
brushes, easel and stool, and said: ‘“ That boy
will beat me one day.” So he did, for he was
Michael Angelo.

A German boy was reading a blood and thun-
der-novel. Right in the midst of it he said to
himself: “ Now, this will never do. I get too
much excited over it. I can’t study so well
after it. So here it goes!” and he flung the
book out into the river. He was Fichte, the
great German philosopher.

The world wants boys who will be diligent
and

Independent of bad company.

The Rev. THomas Cuampyess writing in the
Christain, Oct. 8th, 1891, says: My story is
of a man I knew very well. I knew him when
he was a boy. He was a little boy when I was
a big boy, and now he is a great man and I am
a little man. He isa member of the Gicumenical
Conference, has gone to America and will tell
stories that will make the Yankees wonder. He
went to the same Sunday school as I did, and
was serving his apprenticeship in one of the



DILIGENT BOYS. 91

Manchester warehouses. One day, boy as he was,
he went into a public-house, and he had a glass
of something. When he came out he felt him-
self going round, and as soon as he felt himself
the worse for drink he said, “‘ Never any more ! ”
In God’s name he put the drink from his lips
from that day. Then he listened to what his
teachers said, and he gave his young heart to
God.

In the place where he worked were many
drinking and swearing men, and when they
found out that this lad had become good they
persecuted him. He was the youngest appren-
tice, and it was the custom there for the youngest
apprentice to brush out the shop. When the
other men put on their jackets and went home
the young apprentice had to stay behind and
make the place fit for the next day. It was the
rule that when a new apprentice came the pre-
ceding apprentice should go home when the men
did, and that the new apprentice should brush
out the shop. My friend determined to be good;
so the men boycotted him, and they did it in
this way. When the new apprentice came they
made Tom still stick to the long brush; he was
not allowed to put his jacket on. They said to
the new apprentice, “‘ Thou can come home with
us, but Tom must stop.” He did not retort but
he stuck to the brush. And with the next
‘apprentice it was still the same; Tom stuck to
the brush. But he had got his head on, and



92 BOYS WANTED.

he picked up the business ; he was not muddling
his brain with drink.

One day the master said to him, ‘‘ Thomas,
when you come to-morrow, come in your Sunday
clothes, you are going to be foreman here.” So
the next night, when time had come to go home,
Tom went to get his jacket; but the men said,
“Get to thy brush.” ‘ Nay,” he replied, ‘‘never
any more.” His name is over the warehouse
door; he-is master where he used to brush the
shop out. He has now gone to America. He
is “established to be a prophet of the Lord,”
for he has done a work within seven miles of
where I live that has made the angels sing.

The world wants boys to be diligent, and
refuse to believe that

Luck is the cause of success.

““FreD Drxon is the luckiest fellow in town ;
everything he wants he gets; everything he
undertakes prospers. Did you hear he has the
place at Kell’s, that so many have been trying
to get?”

“You don’t say so! Why, he is a very
young man to fill so responsible a position.”

‘“ Yes,” added the first speaker, ‘“ He always
would stand on the top of the ladder in school.
Though not the brightest scholar, he managed
to carry off the honours upon quitting school,
which he did at an earlier age than his class-
mates, because he had to help to support a



DILIGENT BOYS. 93

widowed mother and younger brothers and
sisters. He only had to ask for a situation, and
lo! all other applicants were ruled out, and
Fred had the preference.”

Boys, do you know any Fred Dixon? If
you do, don’t think it is duck that helps him
along, gives him the laurels at school, aids him
to obtain first-class situations, puts him i in places
of trust and honour, where a ‘good name or un-
tarnished character is required. Look back in
the pages of his life. See if he was not studious
at school, fair and square in all boyish games,
gentlemanly and obliging, honest in all his deal-
ings. Ask his friends if truthfulness, faithful-
ness to his duty, steadfastness of purpose are not
his characteristics. Find out whether he has
ever been known to frequent tippling shops,
gambling dens and kindred places of vice;
whether he spends his spare time in filling his
mind with trashy literature, such as is thrown
broadcast over our land, in the shape of cheap
novels. Depend upon it, boys, you will never
be ‘the luckiest fellow in town,’ unless you earn
it by honesty, and integrity of character, and
fidelity to all your undertakings.

Giotto was of humble origin, and had no early
education in the modern sense of the term, and
at ten years of age was employed in tending
sheep upon the hill-side. “The tradition is that
one day when the little boy was thus occupied,
or supposed to be occupied, he was busily



94 BOYS WANTED.

amusing himself by drawing one of his flock,
using a sharp piece of slate as a pencil, and the
bare face of the rock as his canvas. Cimabue, the
famous Florentine painter, then at the height of
his reputation, happened to be riding over the
plain, and his attention being attracted by the
shepherd lad, he came near to see what he was
doing. ‘ We may suppose,” says Mr. Quilter,
“that there was something in the work which
the painter knew to be genius, for, according to
all the legends, he does not appear to have
hesitated in the least, but after asking the boy if
he would like to go with him, and receiving a
glad answer in the affirmative, he obtained his
father’s permission, took him to Florence, and
installed him in his own studio.” As to the
way in which those years were spent by the
young pupil we are left to imference and con-
jecture. But when next we see him, by the
light of historical record, the boy has become a
painter whose power has received recognition,
and who possesses the confidence of conscious
strength. This was exemplified by the famous
incident, given by Mr. Quilter, which has been
often described, and is known as “the incident
of the 0.” The Pope, Boniface VIII, we are
told, wanted to add to the decorations of St. |
Peter’s, and he sent one of his courtiers to see
what kind of painter Giotto might be. On the
way the messenger called at Sienna, and received
from artists there several designs of an elaborate



DILIGENT BOYS. 95

character. Giotto, however, when he was applied
to, simply ‘drew, with one sweep of his arm, a
circle in red ink, of perfect accuracy, and gave it
to the messenger, refusing to send any other
design.” The story goes that this evidence of
the painter’s skill was accepted, for “the Pope,
and such of his courtiers as were well versed in
the subject, perceived how far Giotto surpassed
all the other painters of his time.” Whether
the details of the incident be literally true or
not, the anecdote illustrates an independence and
force which were manifested by Giotto in many
ways, both in his character and in his work as
an artist.
The world wants boys to be diligent and

Interested in their Business.

This narrative from Wide-Awake will en-
courage and stimulate. :

“The best boy story I ever heard.”

‘That was what.a lawyer said of this story I
am going to relate-to you: “It is the best boy’s
story that I ever heard.”

‘““We have had a good many boys with us
from time to time,”” said Mr. Alden, the senior
member of a large hardware establishment in
Philadelphia, ‘‘as apprentices, to learn the
business. What may surprise you is that we
never take country boys, unless they live in the
city with some relative who takes care of them
and keeps them home at night, for when a coun-



96 BOYS WANTED.

try boy comes to the city to live everything is
new to him, and he is attracted by every shop
window and unusual sight. The city boy who
is accustomed to these things cares little for
them, and if he has a good mother he is at home
and in bed in due season. And we are very par-
ticular about our boys—and before accepting one
as an apprentice we must know that he comes of
honest and industrious parents.

‘“But the vest boy we ever had is now with
us, and amember of the firm. He is the one
man in the establishment that we couldn’t do
without. He was thirteen years old when he
was apprenticed to us, and he was with us for
eleven years, acting for several years as salesman.
When he first came we told him that for a long
time his wages would be very small, but that if
he proved to be a good boy his salary would be
increased at a certain rate each year, and as it
turned out, when, according to agreement, we
should have been paying him five hundred dollars
a year, we paid nine hundred and he never said
a word himself about an increase of salary. From
the very outset he showed an interest in the
business. He \was prompt in the morning, and
if kept a little overtime at night it never seemed
to make any difference with him. He gradually
came to know where everything was to be found,
and. if information was wanted it was to this boy,
Frank Jones that everyone applied. ‘The entire
establishment seemed to be mapped out in his



DILIGENT BOYS. : 97

head and everything in it catalogued and num-
bered. His memory of faces was equally as re-
markable. He knew the name of every man
who came to the store to buy goods, what he
bought, and where he came from. I used often
to say to him, ‘Jones,’ your memory is worth
more than a gold mine! How do you manage
to remember ? ’

“*T make it my business to remember,’ he
would say, ‘I know that if I can remember a
man and can call him by name when he comes
into the store, and can ask him how things are
going on where he lives, I will be very likely to
keep him as a customer.’

‘“And that was the exact case. He made
friends of buyers. He took the same interest in
their purchases as he did in the store, and would
go to no end of trouble to suit them, and to fulfil
to the letter everything he promised.

“Well, affairs went on in this way until he
had been with us eleven years, when we con-
cluded to take him into the firm as a partner.
We knew that he had no extravagant habits, that
he neither used tobacco, nor beer, nor went to
the theatre. He continued as at the beginning
to board at home, and everi when his salary was
the very lowest he paid his mother two dollars a
week for his board. He was always neatly
dressed, and we thought it was very probable
that he had laid up one or two thousand dollars,
as his salary for the last two years had been



98 BOYS WANTED.

twelve hundred dollars. So when we made him
the offer to become a partner in the business, and
suggested that it would be more satisfactory if
he could put some money into the firm, he
replied :

“ can put in that much. I have saved out of my
salary nine thousand four hundred dollars, and
my sister will let me have six hundred.’

“T can tell you that I was never more as-
tonished in my life than when that fellow said
he could put in ten thousand dollars, and the
most of it his own money. He had never spent
a dollar, or twenty-five cents or five cents for an
unnecessary thing, and he had kept his money in
the bank where it gathered a small interest. Jam
a great believer in the Bible, you know, and
IT always kept two placards in big letters up in
the store. On one was this text: ‘He that is
faithful in that which is least, is faithful also m
that which is much’; and on the other, ‘ He
that is diligent in business, shall stand before
kings, and not before mean men.’ And Frank
Jones’ success was the fulfilment of those two
texts. He had been faithful in the smallest
things as in the greater ones, and diligent in
business. That kind of a boy always succeeds,”
concluded Mr. Alden.

A small boy of ten, who had listened to the
story with eager eyes, as Well as ears, said:

‘But we don’t have any kings in this country,



DILIGENT BOYS. 99

Mr. Alden, for diligent boys to stand before !”

“Yes, we do,” laughed Mr. Alden. ‘ We
have more kings here than in any other country
in the world. We have money kings, and bus-
iness kings, and railroad kings, and land kings,
and merchant kings, and publishing kings, and
some of them wield an enormous power. This
is a great country for kings.”

In this book I have inserted stories of boys in
many parts of the world.

Here is a story of a Bulgarian boy. It goes
to show that the diligent are anxious to

Gain knowledge.

While up in the Balkan Mountains, caring for
his sheep, a poor Bulgarian boy in some way
heard of Robert College and the education that
was given there, and he resolved to go and ask
for admittance.

He travelled alone on foot all the distance,
and at last appeared before the gates of that
institution. He stated what he had come for,
but was refused admittance, as the college was
already full.

He could not have presented a very encourag-
ing appearance, as he stood there, that ignorant
boy of fifteen. His dress consisted of trousers
and vest of sheep-skin, with a large garment of
the. same material, which was worn over the
head, forming a peaked cap, which also came
down over his shoulders and served as a cloak.



Full Text



The Baldwin Library

University
Rat Da
Florida












































E GUIDE OF YOUTH

Tu
Boys
Wanted.

BY
7b NYE,

Author of ‘Stories illustrative of the Book of Proverbs,” &c.

FORKOQe

LONDON:
GEORGE STONEMAN, 39, Warwick Lanz, E.C.

——

1897.
The Sculptor Boy.

—

CHISEL in hand stood a sculptor boy,
With his marble block before him ;

And his face lit up with a smile of joy,
As an angel dream passed o’er him ;

He carved it then on the yielding stone,
With many a sharp incision ;

With heaven’s own light the sculpture shone;
He had caught that angel-vision.

Sculptors of life are we, as we stand,
With our souls, uncarved, before us,
Waiting the hour when, at God’s command,
Our life-dream shall pass o’er us.
If we carve it then, on the yielding stone,
With many a sharp incision,
Its heavenly beauty shall be our own,
Our lives, that angel-vision.
Bishop Doanr.
& CONTENTS oe
gee esas Dees at EL)

CuapTer I.

Truthful Boys.

The Poet Tennyson’s motto—Truth has power
—Abd-el Kadir’s love of truth in his childhood—
The robbers repentance —Didn’t I Dan—The
truthatall hazards—Demurrage—Untruths cause
sorrow—Died for the want of medicine—Truth
is always triumphant—Beans barrelled and
marked—The missing sixpence—Keep your hon-
our without stain-——Charles Thomson—True Dun-
can—Truthfulness brings honour—Prize nobly
won—Don’t be cowards—Charlie Mann—The
immortal Sydney—Falsehood sure to be found out
—John Kinney’s falsehood—The same thing every
time—Uphold the truth—Little Scotch Granite
—Lying is mean—Tom Quayle’s Grandfather—
Robert Burdette’s message to boys.


Cuarter II

—_—_—

Faithful Boys.

Forty generations look down upon you—
Gerhardt the German shepherd boy—Execution
of Thomas Dowry the blind boy —Thomas Croker
kurnt—S8t. Cuthbert—Boy’s courage for Jesus—
Robert Moffat’s mother’s parting request—Three
Good lessons—Joe’s first temptation—The lesson
Fido taught—Hold on to the end—Battle of
Gettysburg—Mr. and Mrs. C. Hall’s visit to Ire-
land—A_ boy’s influence—George C. Lake faith-
ful to his word—When to say No—Diocletian and
young St. Pancras—Zinzendorf, poet and preacher
——Martin Luther.

Cuapter III.



Diligent Boys.



Franklin’s advice—Cressinus accused of witch-
craft—Gounod determined to succeed—Sir Mar-
tin Shee’s advice to Millais mother —Fred-
erick D. Maurice’s pledge—The Rev. T. Champ:
ness’ story—The luckiest fellow in town—One
leisure hour—Giotto’s design sent to Pope Boni-
face VIII.—Best boys story—Boy wanted, notice
in Mr Peter’s window—A poor Bulgarian boy—
How one boy faced the world—Proudest mom-
ent of Agassiz’s life—No yeast—Jared sparks—
Never miss an opportunity to do good—Harold
Robertson— Whistling to some purpose —A little
encouragement——One by one.

CHAPTER IV,



Honest Boys.

Epaminondas refusing bribes—Honesty brings
happiness—Carolo and the count—The best ten-
ant to have—Dear Stanley’s story of a match boy
—Reuby and Sandy—Stating the facts—A good
name—Reputation, Love and death—A Counter-
feit—Paul Wallace—Mr. Talmage lend me £1—
Thomas Tege’s business enterprise—Old Peter
Schroeder’s advice—Fearless and sincere—Horne
Tooke at School—The boy I can trust—An hon-
est coloured lad.
A Boy’s Resolve.

I witt Not Swear,

I WILL NoT DARE,

Gop’s NAME IN VAIN TO TAKE;
I WILL NOT LIE,

But I wir try,

THE TRUTH MY GUIDE TO MAKE.
Truthful Boys.

TRUTH HAS POWER. IT IS

RIGHT TO TELL IT.

UnrrutTHs CAUSE SORROW. TRUTH IS
TRIUMPHANT. HELPS TO KEEP
Honour WITHOUT STAIN.

FarsreHooD IS FOUND OUT.

UrnHoLpD THE TRUTH.

LyInc IS MEAN. _



HE Poet Tennyson had the motto “Y
Gwyr yn Erbyn y byd”—the truth
against the world—in incrusted tiles on

see the pavement of his entrance-hall. The

motto is an excellent one for boys. A
lie has no legs and therefore cannot stand.

“ After a tongue” says a great writer ‘has once

got the knack of lying, ‘tis not to be imagined

how impossible almost it is to reclaim it.” The
boys that are wanted are the boys that are

Truthful. The

Truth has Power.

How simply and beautifully has Abd-el-Kadir,
of Ghilon, impressed us with the love of truth in
A


10 BOYS WANTED.

his childhood. After stating the vision which
made him entreat of his mother to go to Bagdad
and devote himself to God, he thus proceeds: “I
informed her what I had seen, and she wept;
and taking out eighty dinars she told me that, as I
had a brother, half of that was all my inheritance;
she made me swear when she gave it to me,
never to tell a lie, and afterwards bade me fare-
well, exclaiming: ‘Go, my son, [ consign thee
to God; ‘we shall not meet until the day of
judgement.’ I went on well till I came near
Hamandnai, when our Kafillah was plundered
by sixty horsemen. One fellow asked me what
Thad got. ‘Forty dinars,’ said I, ‘are sewed up
under my garments.’ The fellow laughed,
thinking I. was joking. ‘And what have you
got?’ said another. I gave him the same
answer. When they were dividing the spoil, I
was called to an eminence where the chief stood.
‘What have you got my little fellow?’ said he,
‘I have told two of your people already,’ I
replied. ‘I have forty dinars sewed in my gar-
ments!’ He ordered them to be ripped open,
and found my money. ‘And how came you,’ he
said, in surprise, ‘to declare so openly what had
been so carefully concealed ?’ ‘ Because I will not
be false to my mother, to whom I have promised
I would never tell:a lie.” ‘Child;’ said the
robber, ‘hast thou such sense of duty to thy
mother at thy years, and am I insensible, at my
age, of the duty l owe to God? Give me thy
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 11

hand, innocent boy,’ he continued, ‘that I may
swear repentance upon it. He did so. His
followers were all alike struck with the scene.

‘You have been our leader in guilt,’ said they,
to their chief; ‘be the same in the path of virtue,’
and they instantly, at his order, made restitution
of their spoil, and vowed repentance on his hand.”

The boy who always speaks the truth has no
need to seek confirmation from another.

‘Jimmy, have you watered my horse this
morning?”

“Yes uncle, I watered him ; didn’t I, Dan?”
he added, turning to his younger brother.

“Of course you did,” responded Dan.

The gentleman looked at the boys a moment,
wondering a little at Jimmy’s words; then he
rode away. .

This was Mr. Harley’s first visit with his
nephews, and thus far he had been pleased with
their bright intelligent faces and kind behaviour.
Still there was something in Jimmy’s appeal to
his brother that impressed him unfavourably, he
could hardly tell why ; but the cloud of disfavour
had vanished from his mind when, two hours later
he turned his horse’s head homeward. Just in
the bend of the road he met his nephews, Jimmy
bearing a gun over his shoulder.

“Did your father give you permission to carry
that gun?” he inquired.

“Yes, sir,” replied Jimmy; ‘didn’t he, Dan?”

‘Of course he did,” said Dan.
12 BOYS WANTED.

‘‘And of course I believe you, Jimmy, without
your brother’s word for it,” said Mr. Harley.

Jimmy’s face flushed, and his bright eye fell
below his uncle’s gaze. Mr. Harley noticed his
nephew’s confusion, and rode on without further
comment.

“This map of North America is finely ex-
ecuted ; did you draw it, Jimmy?” asked Mr.
Harley that afternoon, while looking over a book
of drawings.

“Yes, Sir,” replied Jimmy, with a look of con-
scious pride; then turning to his brother he
added,

“Didn’t I, Dan?”

Mr. Harley closed the book and laid it on the
table.

“ Jimmy,” he began, “‘ what does this mean?
To every question I have asked you to-day you
have appealed to Dan to confirm your reply. Can-
not your own word be trusted ?”

Jimmy’s face turned scarlet, and he looked as
if he would like to vanish from his uncle’s sight.

‘Not always,” he murmured, looking straight _
down at his boots. j

‘““My dear boy, I was afraid of this,” said Mr.
Harley kindly.

Do you mean to go through life always having
to say: ‘Didn’t I, Dan?”

_ “No, uncle; I am going to try to speak the
truth so that people will believe me as well as
Dan,” said Jimmy, impulsively.

6c
TRUTHEUL BOYS. 13

Mr. Harley spent the season with his nephews,
and before he left he had the pleasure of hearing
people say, “‘ What’s come over Jimmy Page? He
never says lately, ‘ Didn’t I, Dan?”

Mr. Harley thought it was because Jimmy
was gaining confidence in himself.

The Truth must always be told, and at all
hazards, because it is

Right.

A story I read the other day in one of the
papers well illustrates this:

SOME time after the beginning of the present
century there were living ina busy country town
in the North a pious couple who had an only
son. For this son they daily prayed to God.
So the foundations of an upright life were laid in
the boy’s heart, and among these very especially
a regard for uprightness and truth.

In the course of years the boy’s school-days
were ended, and also his apprenticeship to a
business life in the country town, and as there
was no prospect for him there, he went to one
of the great sea-ports, and, by-and-bye, he got a
good position in a merchant’s office.

But he was not long in this excellent place
before he was put to the test in a very painful
way with respect to the lessons he had received
about truth. It was part of the business of that
office to have ships coming and going. And it
was the rule when a ship came into port that its
14 BOYS WANTED.

captain sent word to the office that he had
arrived and was now waiting instructions where
to discharge the cargo; and it was the duty of
the manager of the office to send back instruc-
tions to the captain where and when this was to
be done. A few months after the little lad came
to the office a ship laden with coal came in, and
the usual message from the captain came, but
somehow or other no answer was sent back to
him. The captain waited a week, but still no
word came back. . Now, that was very hard on
the captain. Until his ship was free of its cargo
it had to lie idle in the dock, and all who be-
longed to the ship were kept idle too. So at
the end of a week the captain sent word to the
office that his ship had been kept so long waiting
for instructions where to discharge its cargo that
it had missed a good offer of a new cargo, and
the office would have to pay him for the loss.
This payment is called “demurrage.”

When the manager of the office got this mes-
sage from the captain he was very angry. He
sent for the little lad, and said to him: -

“Didn’t I send you down to Captain Smith
with instructions to discharge his cargo?”

The little lad said:

“No, sir; I do not remember being sent
down.”

“OQ, but I did,” answered the manager. ‘You
have forgotten.”

And there for atime, so far as the office was
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 15

concerned, the matter was allowed to rest.

But the captain did not intend to let it rest
there. He applied for his demurrage. And
when that was refused, he took the manager of
the office to law, and by-and-bye his complaint
came before the judges in the court of law.

The day before the trial the manager came to
the little lad and said to him:

“Mind, I sent you to the dock with those
instructions to discharge the coal.”

“But I assure you I cannot remember your
doing so,” said the boy.

“OQ, yes, but I did. You have forgotten.”

It was a great trouble to the youngster. He
had never been sent to the dock. He could not
say that he had been sent; and he foresaw that
he would have to say before the judges what
would certainly offend the manager, and lead to
the loss of his excellent place.

On the morning of the trial he went to the
court. The manager came up, and the poor
young fellow tried once more to assure him that
he was mistaken, but he would not listen.

“Tt is all right,” he said hastily; “I sent you
on such a day, and you have got to bear witness
that I did—and see you say it clearly.”

Tn a little while he was called into the witness-
box, and almost the first question put to him
was whether he remembered the day when
Captain Smith’s ship came in. And then this:

“You remember during the day being sent by
16 BOYS WANTED.

the manager of the office to the dock with a
letter for the captain?”

“No, sir.”

‘Were you not sent by the manager of your
office to the coal ship on that day ?”

“‘T was not, sir.”

“Nor the next day?”

INO?

“Nor any other day ?”

Ce No.” ne

The gentleman who put the question was a
barrister. He had been engaged by the manager
to win the case for them. But when he heard
the little lad’s reply he turned to the judge
and said :

‘““My lord, I give up this case. My instruc-
tions were that this witness would prove that a
message to discharge had been sent to Captain
Smith, and it is plain no such proof is to be got
from him.”

So the case ended in the captain’s favour and
against the office in which the youthful witness
had found so excellent a place.

He went to his lodgings with a sorrowful heart,
and wrote to his father and mother that he was
sure to be dismissed. Then he packed his trunk
to be ready to go home next day; and in the
morning, expecting nothing but dismissal, he
went early to the office. The first to come in
after him was his master. He stopped for a
moment at the lad’s desk and said:
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 17

“We lost our case yesterday.”
“Yes, sir,” answered the boy, “and Iam very

sorry I had to say what I did.”

By-and-bye the manager came in; and after a
little time he was sent for to the master’s room.
It was a long while before he came out. Then
the young witness was sent for. “I am going
to be dismissed,” he thought to himself. But
the master said to him, “I was angry yesterday,
but not with you. You did right to speak the
truth; and to mark my approval of what you
did, I am going to put you in charge of all the
workings and sales of our Glentardel mine.”
Then he sent for the: manager, and told him
what he had said, and added, ‘And this youth
will make his reports direct to me.”

Six months afterwards the manager left the
office, and, young though he was, the hero of
this story was appointed to his place. And
before as many years had passed he was admitted
as junior partner in the firm; and he is now at
the head of the entire business—the managing
partner.

In his case truth was the best. But I want
to say that if things had turned out other than
they did, and he had been dismissed, it would
still have been the best for him to speak the
truth.

Another reason why truthful boys are wanted
is because
18 BOYS WANTED.

Untruths cause Sorrow,
~ and the sorrow often lasts a lifetime.

A GENTLEMAN tells us that he had one of the
kindest and best of fathers, and when he was a
little boy, about six years old, his father used to
carry him to school before him on his horse, to
help him in his little plans, and always seemed
trying to make him happy, and he never seemed
so happy himself as when trying to make his lad
happy. When 1 was six years old says the
gentleman, my father came home one day very
sick. My mother, too, was sick, and thus no-
body but my two sisters could take care of my
father.

In a few days he was worse, very sick, and all
the physicians in the neighbourhood were called
in to see him.

Next Sabbath morning early he was evidently
much worse. As I went into his room he
stretched out his hand to me and said :

“My little boy, Iam very sick. I wish you
to take that paper on the stand, and run to Mr.
C.’s, and get me the medicine written on that
" paper.”

I took the paper, and went to the apothecary’s
shop, as I had often done before. It was about
half a mile; but when I got there I found it
shut, and, as Mr. C. lived a quarter of a mile
further off, I concluded not to go to him. So I
set out for home.
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 19

On my way back I contrived what to say. I
knew how wicked it was to tell a lie; but one sin
always leads to another.

On going into my father, I saw that he was
in great pain, and, though pale and weak, |
could see great drops of sweat standing on his
forehead, forced out by the pain. Oh! then I
was sorry I had not gone and found the apothe-
cary. . At length he said to me:

‘““My son has got the medicine, I hope, for I
am in great pain.”

I hung my head and muttered, for my con-
science smote me, “No, sir; Mr. C. says he has
got none.” ‘ Has got none! Is this possible?”
He then cast a keen eye upon me, and seeing
my head hang, and probably suspecting my
falsehood, said in the mildest, kindest tone: “My
little boy will see his father suffer great pain for
the want of that medicine?” I went out of the
room and cried. I was soon called back. My
brothers had come, and all the children were
standing round his bed, and he was committing
my poor mother to their care, and giving them
his last advice. I was the youngest, and when
he laid his hand on my head, and told me that
in a few hours I should have no father—that in
a day or two he would be buried—that I must
now seek God to be my father, love Him, obey
Him, and always do right, and speak the truth,
because the eye of God is always upon me—it
seemed as if | should sink; and when he laid his
20 BOYS WANTED.

hand upon my head again, and prayed for the
blessing of God the Redeemer to rest upon me,
‘soon to be a fatherless orphan,” I dared not
look at him I felt so guilty. Sobbing, I rushed
from his bedside and wished I could die.

They soon told me he could not speak. Oh,
how much would I have given to go in and tell
him that I had told a lie, and ask him once more
to lay his hand on my head and forgive me!

I crept in once more, and heard the minister
pray for the dying man. Oh, how my heart
ached!

I snatched my hat, and ran to the apothecary’s
house and got the medicine. I ran home with
all my might, and ran up to my father’s bedside
to confess my sin, crying out, ‘Oh, here father!”
but I was hushed; and I then saw he was pale,
and that all in the room were weeping. My
dear father was dead, and the last thing I ever
spoke to him was to tell a lie!

I sobbed as if my heart would break, for
his kindness, his tender looks, and my own sin,
all rushed upon my mind; and, as I gazed upon
his cold, pale face, and saw his eyes shut, and
his lips closed, could I help thinking of his last
words :

‘““My little boy will see his father suffer great
pain for the want of that medicine ?”’ I could not
but know that he died for the want of it.

It was twelve years after this, while in college
that I went alone to the grave of my father, and
TRUTHFUL BOYS. Q1

as I stood over it I seemed to be at his bedside,
to see his pale face, and hear his voice. Oh, the
thought of that sin and wickedness cut me to the
heart! It seemed as though worlds would not
be too much to give could I then only have
called loud enough to have him hear me and ask
his forgiveness. But it was too late. I must
live and die weeping over the ungrateful false-
hood. May God forgive me!”

Boys, beware of disobedience and lying. One
wrong step leads to others, which are increasing
evil, and thus may go on from bad to worse.
May you be blessed with the fear of the Lord!

I want you to remember that truth is mighty,
and shall prevail.

An old Swiss proverb declares that it takes a
good many shovelfuls of earth to bury the truth.

Those who desert truth in trifles are seldom
trusted in matters of importance, but those who
stick to the truth in the end are

Triumphant.

The following incident from one of the weekly
papers is a case in point:

A youth, who was an earnest Christian, had
a situation in a large commission house. On
one occasion a large quantity of beans that had
been damaged was sent to this firm for them to
sell. When these damaged beans were received,
a lot of beans of first quality was purchased.
22 BOYS WANTED.

Then they went to work to put up the beans in
barrels. At the bottom and top of each barrel a
lot of the good beans were put, so that whichever
end of any barrel might be opened, the good
beans would be seen, though the rest of each
barrel was filled up with the bad beans. When
the barrels were all closed up, the head of the
firm went to work and marked them thus:
‘Beans A—No. 1.” On seeing this, the clerk
said: to his employer, ‘Do you think it right,
sir, to mark those beans ‘A—No. 1’ ?”

_ “Hold your tongue, sir! it’s none of your
business!” was the sharp reply. The clerk said
no more. The beans were all barrelled and
marked ‘““A—No. 1,” and stowed away in the
upper part of the warehouse. A sample of beans
of the first quality was kept in the office for
examination,

One day a gentleman came into the office, who
wished to buy a large quantity of beans. He
examined the samples there and liked them very
much. ‘‘Can I see the beans in the barrels?”
he asked. ‘Certainly, sir,”’ said the head of the
firm, and he told the clerk already spoken of to
take the gentleman upstairs. A barrel was
opened; he looked at them carefully. They were
just like the sample he had seen below. Then
he said to the clerk, ‘“‘ Young man, the sample of
beans showed me in the office, and these at the
top of the barrel, are of the first quality. I
cannot get such beans anywhere for so low a
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 23

price. But answer me honestly one question, are
the beans in these barrels of the same quality all
the way through?” The clerk hesitated for a
moment. He knew his employer would expect
him to say “‘ Yes,” but his conscience told him
he ought to say “‘ No.” He resolved to be true
to his conscience, So he answered “‘ No, sir, they
are not.” ‘' Then I don’t. want them,” said the
gentleman, and he left. The young man return-
ed to the office. “‘ Did you sell that man those
beans ?”’ asked his employer. ‘No, sir,” said he.
“Why not?” “Well, sir, the man asked me
to tell him honestly if the beans were the same
quality all through the barrel as they were on
the top. I told him they were not. Then he
said he did not want them, and left.”

‘“ Well, sir, you can go to the cashier and get
your wages,” said the employer. Well, this
was rather a poor reward for his piety and
bravery. But this was not the end of it. A
few days after, he received a note from his late
employers asking him to call on them. He
went to see them.

‘We have a place of great importance to be
filled,” said the head of the firm. ‘ We need for
it a person in whose truthfulness and honesty
we can have the utmost confidence. The salary
is a hundred pounds a year more than you
received in your former position. Will you
accept it ?”

“Jo will, sir, with thankfulness.”

“Very well,
24 BOYS WANTED.

then, it is yours.” :

Here is another story illustrating the point
that truth triumphs :—

Hotpine out his hand for the change, John’s
employer said: ‘‘ Well, my boy, did you get
what I sent you for ?”

“Yes, sir,” said John; ‘‘and here is the change,
but I don’t understand it. The lemons cost
three shillings, and there ought to be seven
shillings change, and there’s only six shillings
and sixpence, according to my count.” ;

‘‘ Perhaps I made a mistake in giving you the
money.”

“ No, sir. I counted it over in the hall to be
sure it was all right.”

‘Then perhaps the clerk made a mistake in
giving you the change.”

But John shook his head. ‘‘No, sir; I counted
that, too. Father said we must always count
our change before leaving a shop.”

‘Then how in the world do you account for
the missing sixpence? How do you expect me
to believe such a queer story as that?”

John’s cheeks grew red, but his voice was
firm. ‘I don’t account for it, sir; I can’t. All
I know is that it is so.”

“Well, it is worth a good deal in this world to
be so sure of that. How do you account for
that sixpence that is hiding inside your coat
sleeve?”

John looked down quickly, and caught the
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 25

gleaming bit with a cry of pleasure. “Here you
are! — Now it is all right, I couldn’t imagine
what hal become of that sixpence. [ was
certain J had it when I started from the shop to
returies | —

‘There are two things that I know now,” Mr.
Brown said, with a satisfied air. “I know you
have been taught to count your money in coming
and going, and to tell the exact truth, whether
it sounds well or not—two important things in
an errand boy. I think ll try you without
looking farther.”

At this John’s cheeks grew redder than ever.
He looked down and up, and finally he said in a
low voice: “I think I ought to tell you that I
wanted the place so badly Talmost made up my
mind to say. nothing about the change if you
didn’t ask me.’

“Exactly,” said Mr. Brown; “and if you had
not done it, you would have lost the situation,
that’s all. I need a boy about me who can be
honest over so small a sum as sixpence, whether
he is asked questions or not.”

Telling the truth will help you to keep your

Honour Without Stain.

Many incidents are told of Quakers in the old
days. One of these has a significance that is
worthy of consideration.

There was a famous school to which the boys
of well-to-do parents were sent. The examin-

B
26 BOYS WANTED. -

ations were severe, and the lads who failed felt
themselves somewhat disgraced in the eyes of
the whole school. Many of the pupils secretly
used translations, or were helped by scholarly
friends in their studies.

One boy, Charles Thompson, refused to avail
himself of any help or dishonest trick. He was
slow to learn, and timid. His classmates in-
sisted that he appeared at an unjust disadvantage
for these reasons at examinations, and urged him
to use cribs.

“No,” he said. “It is a pity if I do not learn
_ Greek; but it.will be worse if I learn to lie.”

He failed, and was sent down to a lower class
for the next term.

Charles Thompson was never, perhaps, first in
his class at school; but among the good and
noble men of a past generation he stood in
the foremost rank as aman whose honour was
stainless.

He became and long held the post of Secretary
to the United States Congress, and on disputed
points his simple statement outweighed the oaths
of noisy disputants. Even the Indians recog-
nised the quality of the man, and received him
into their nation, giving him a name which sig-
nified ‘*‘ He who cannot lie.”

If he had learned to lie in order to pass a
simple. school examination, for what a poor
mess of pottage would he have sold his kingly
birthright.
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 2p

THERE was once a boy named Duncan. The
boys used to call him “True Duncan” because
he would never tell a lie. One day he was
playing with an axe in the schoolyard. The
axe was used for cutting wood for the schoolroom
fire in winter. While Duncan was chopping a
stick, the teacher’s cat, ‘‘ Old Tabby,” came and
leaped on to the log of wood where Duncan was
at work. He had raised the axe to cut the wood,
but it fell on the cat and killed her. What to
do he knew not. She was the master’s pet cat,
and used to sit on a cushion at his side while he
was hearing the boys their lessons. Duncan
stood looking at poor Tabby. His face grew red
and the tears stood in his eyes. All the boys
came running up and everyone had something
to say.

One of them was heard whispering to the
others, ‘‘ Now, boys, let us see whether Duncan
can’t make up a fib as well as the rest of us.”

“ Not he,’ said Tom Brown, who was Dun-
can’s friend, ‘not he I'l] warrant. Duncan will
be as true as gold.”

John Jones stepped up and said, “ Come,
boys, let us fling the cat into the lane, and we
can tell Mr. Cole that the butcher’s dog killed
her. You know that he worried her last
week.”

Some of them thought that would do very
well. But Duncan looked quite angry, his cheek
swelled and his face grew redder than before.
28 BOYS WANTED.

“No, no,” said he. ‘ Do you think I would say
che It would be alie—a lie!” Each time he
used the word his voice grew louder. Then he
took up the poor thing and’ carried her into the
master’s room. The boys followed to see what
would happen.

The master looked up and said, ‘“‘ What ! is
this my poor Tabby killed ? Who could have
- done me such an injury ? iy

All were silent for a little while. As soon as
Dunean could get his voice he said, ‘‘ Mr. Cole
I am very sorry [ killed poor Tabby. Indeed,
sir, [am very sorry, I ought to have been more

careful, for I saw hee rubbing herself ag ainst the
log. I am ‘more sor ry than T can tell, sir.

“Everyone expected to see Mr. Cole get very
angry, take down his cane, and give Duncan a
sonnd: thrashing. But instead of that he put on
a pleasant smile and said, ‘ Duncan, you are a
‘brave boy. I saw and heard all that. passed in
the yard “from my window above. I am glad to
see such an example of truth and honour in my
school.”

Duncan took out his handkerchief and wiped
his eyes. The boys could not keep silence any
longer, and when Tom Brown cried, “ Three
cheers for True Duncan!” they all joined and
made-the schoolhouse ring with a mighty hurrah.
The teacher then said, ‘‘ My boys, 1 am glad you
know what is right and that you approve it,
though Iam afraid some of you could not have
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 29
done it. Learn from this time that nothing can
make a lie necessary. Suppose Duncan had
taken evil advice and come to me with a lie, it
would have been instantly detected, and instead
of the honour of truth he would have had only
the shame of falsehood.”

Truthfulness brings honour, while lying brings
disgrace.

Two country lads came at an early hour to a
market town, and, arranging their little stands,
sat down to wait for customers. One was fur-
ished with fruits and vegetables of the boys
own raising, and the other supplied with clams and
fish. The market hours passed along, and each
little merchant saw with pleasure his store
steadily decreasing, and an equivalent in silver
bits shining in his little money cup, The last
melon lay on Harry’s stand when a gentleman
came by, and placing his hand upon it, said:—

“What a fine, large melon! What do you ask
for it, my boy?”

‘The melon is the last I have, sir; and though
it looks very fair, there is an unsound spot in it,”
said the boy, turning it over.

‘“So there is,’ said the man, “I think I will
not take it. Buty’ he added, looking into the
boy’s fine, open countenance, ‘is it very business-
like to point out the defects of your fruit to
customers ?”

“Tt is better than being dishonest, sir,” said
the boy modestly.
30 BOYS WANTED.

“You are right; always remember that prin-
ciple, and you will find favour with God and
with man also. I shall remember your little
standin future. Are those clams fresh ?” he con-
tinued, turning to Ben Wilson’s stand.

“Yes, sir, fresh this morning. I caught them
myself.” was the reply ; and, a purchase being
made, the gentleman went away.

‘Harry, what a fool you were to show the
gentleman that spot in the melon! Now you
can take it home for your pains or throw it away.
How much wiser is he about those clams I
caught yesterday? Sold them for the same
price as I did the fresh ones. He would never
have looked at the melon until he had gone
away.”

“Ben, I would not tell a lie, or act one either, -
for twice what I have gained this morning. Be-
sides, I shall be better off in the end, for I have
gained a customer, and you have lost one.”

And so it proved, for the next day the gentle-
man bought nearly all his fruits and vegetables
of Harry, but never spent another penny at the
stand of his neighbour. Thus the season passed;
the gentleman, finding he could always get a
good article of Harry, constantly patronised him
and sometimes talked to him about his future
prospects. To become a merchant was Harry’s
great ambition! and when the winter came on,
the gentleman wanting a trusty boy for his
warehouse, decided on giving the place to Harry.
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“BEHIND THE OTHER BOYS.”



TRUTHFUL BOYS. 33

‘Prizes were to be given in Willie’s school,
and he was very anxious to merit one of them.
Willie had never had much opportunity to learn,
and he was behind the other boys in all his
studies except writing. As he had no hope to
excel in anything except writing, he made up his
mind to try for the special prize for that. And
he did try; his copy-book would have done
credit to a boy twice his age. When the prizes
were awarded the chairman of the committee
held up two copy-books and said, ‘It would be
dificult to say which of these two books is better
than the other, but for one ‘copy in Willie’s
which is not only superior to Charlie’s, but to
every other copy in the same book. This, there-:
fore gains the prize.’ Willie’s heart beat high
with hope, which was not unmixed with fear.
Blushing to his temples, he said, ‘ Please, sir, may
I see that copy?’ Willie glanced at. the page,
and then, handing the book back, said, ‘ Please,
sir, that is not my writing. It was written by
an upper-class boy, who took my book by
mistake one day instead of his own.’ The two
books went back to the committee, and they
awarded the prize to Charlie. The boys laughed
at Willie, but he felt that he was right. ‘I
would rather hold fast the truth,’ he said ‘ than
have a prize, for truth is better than gold.’
‘Hurrah for Willie!’ ‘Well done Willie!’
shouted the boys ; and the truthful fellow went
home happier than he could have done if by
34 BOYS WANTED.

means of a silent untruth he had won the prize.”

It is cowardly not to tell the truth. Don’t be
cowards.

Charles Mann smashed a large pane of glass in
a chemist’s shop, and ran away at first; but he
quickly thought : “‘ Why am I running ? It was
an accident. Why not tell the truth ?”

No sooner thought than done. Charlie was a
brave boy. He told the whole truth; how the
ball with which he was playing slipped out of his
hand, how frightened he was, how sorry, too, at
the mischief done, and how willing to pay if he
had the money.

Charlie did not have money, but he could
.work; and to work he went at once in the very
shop where he had broken the glass. It took
him a long time to pay for the large and expen-
sive pane he had shattered; but when he was done
he had endeared himself so much to the shop-
keeper by his fidelity and truthfulness that he
could not hear of his going away.

‘Ah, what a lucky day that was when I broke
that window!” he used to say.

“Charlie,” his mother would respond, “ what
a lucky day it was when you were not afraid to
tell the truth!”

Boys, do not forget that, “lying lips are an
abomination to the Lord, but they that deal trul y
are his delight.”

Truthful boys are wanted everywhere. The
only thing to be gained by telling a falsehood is
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 35

“Never to be credited when you speak the
truth.” “‘ Falsehood is fire in stubble (declares
Coleridge); it likewise turns all the light stuff
around it into its own substance for a moment—
one crackling, blazing moment—and then dies;
and all its contents are scattered in the wind,
without place, or evidence of their existence—as
viewless as the wind which scatters them.”

When the immortal Sidney was told that he
might save his life by telling a falsehood by
denying his hand-writing, he answered, ‘“‘ When
God hath brought me into a dilemma in which I
must assert a lie, or lose my life, He gives me a
clear indication of my duty; which is to prefer
death to falsehood.”

All boys should ponder the text ‘“ Be sure
your sins will find you out.” A good reason
why boys should be truthful is, because

Falsehood is sure to be found out.

Some time ago The Chicago News contained a
remarkable narrative of John Kinney, of the firm
of Kinney & Ransome. Mr. John Kinney told
the story about himself.

‘“Wuen I was a young chap,” says he, “I got
the Pike’s Peak fever along with a lot more of
the men and boys of our town, and as I was
pretty hard to manage around home, and as some
staid old friends of my father’s were going to the
new gold country, it was concluded that 1 should
go with them. When we were all ready to shut
36 BOYS WANTED.

my trunk and lock it, my mother, who, bless her,
was more than half afraid to have me go out into
that rough country, brought a handsome clasp
Bible out of her bedroom and laid it in my trunk
on top of the other things.

‘Now, Johnnie,’ said she, ‘I want you to
promise that you will read this Bible every
day.’

‘Of course I will, mother,’ I said; ‘I will read
it every chance [ have.’

‘And Johnnie,’ said she, ‘I want you to study
well the Sermon on the Mount. — It will do you
good. You will find it in St. Matthew and St.
Mark and St. Luke and St. John, but the best is
in St. Matthew. You will read it often, won’t
you, Johnnie ?’

‘I promised everything, and I meant to keep
my promise, too. But somehow I never did.
I never opened the Bible; never even undid the
clasp. After I had been at Pike’s Peak some
time, and spent nearly all the money that my
father had given to one of his old friends for me,
I started with what was left to come home. I
joined a party that was coming home, but they
left me at the Missouri crossing and I had a
terrible time from that hour. I ran out of money
and then spent all I could borrow on such
valuables as I could pawn. I would have sold
that Bible a dozen times if I could have found
anybody to buy it. Well, after a heap of walking
and all sorts of hardship, I finally reached home.
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 37

After the kissing and the talking was over, my
mother began unpacking the little handbag I had
brought back in the place of the trunk I took
away. In the bottom of it she found the little
clasp Bible.’

‘Your Bible looks as if you hadn’t used it
much,’ she said.

‘Yes,’ said I, ‘I took very good care of it.’

‘Did you read it, Johnnie ?’ she asked.

‘Of course I did; read it every day.’

‘You read the Sermon on the Mount, then,
did you?’ she asked with a kind of peculiar ex-
pression in her eyes.

‘Yes, very often.’

-Then she opened the Bible to St. Matthew
and there lay the twenty-dollar bill she had put
between the leaves. There was a ten dollar bill
in each St. Mark, St. Luke and St. John—fifty
dollars in all, and [ would have given every cent
of it to have been out of that room.

‘I told you St. Matthew had the best account
of the Sermon on the Mount,’ was all my mother
said about the matter.”

Trura is beautiful, as well as safe and mighty.
A boy twelve years old, with only truth as a weapon
conquered a smart and shrewd lawyer, who was
fighting for a bad cause. “Truth is the highest
thing that man may keep,” and the noblest child
or'man is he who keeps the truth ever between
his lips.

Walter was the important witness in a lawsuit.
38 BOYS WANTED.

One of the lawyers, after cross-questioning him
severely, said : “ Your father has been talking to
you and telling you how to testify, hasn’t he?”
“Yes,” said the boy. “ Now,” said the lawyer,
“ just tell us how your father told you to testify.”
‘“Well,” said the boy, modestly, ‘“ father told me
that the lawyers would try and tangle me in my
testimony ; but, if I would just be careful and
tell the truth, I could tell the same thing every
time.” The lawyer didn’t try to tangle up that
boy any more.

Boys who hate the false and love the true will

Uphold the Truth.

Brrr and Johnnie Lee were delighted when
their Scotch cousin came to live with them. He
was little, but very bright and full of fun. He
could tell curious things about his home in Scot-
land and his voyage across the ocean.

He was as far advanced in his studies as they
were, and the first day he went to school they
thought him remarkably good. He wasted no
time in play when he should have been studying,
and he advanced finely.

Before the close of the school, the teacher
called the roll, and the boys began to answer,
ken.

When Willie understood that he was to say
“ten” if he had not whispered during the day,
he replied,

“IT have whispered.”
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 39

‘More than once ?”

pees esi

‘Then I shall mark you zero,” said the teacher
sternly, ‘“‘and that isa great disgrace.”

‘Why I did-not see you whisper once,” said
Johnnie after school.

“Well,-I did,” said Willie. ‘I saw others doing
it, and so I asked to borrow a book; then I lent a
slate pencil, and asked a boy fora knife, and did
several things, I supposed it was allowed.”

‘Oh, we all do it,’ said Bert, reddening.

“There isn’t any sense in the old rule, and nobody
could keep it, and nobody does.”

“T will, or else I will say I haven’ t,” said
Willie. “ ‘Do you suppose I will tell ten lies in
one heap ?”

‘“‘Qh,we don’t call them lies,” muttered Johnnie

“There wouldn't be a credit amongst us at night
if we were so strict.”

‘What of that, if you told the truth ?”” laughed
Willie brayely.

In a short time they all saw how it was with
him. He studied hard, played with all his
might in playtime, but, according to his account,
he lost more credit than any of the rest. After
some weeks the boys answered ‘“ Nine” and
“ Hight” oftener than they used to. Yet the
school-room seemed to have grown quieter.
Sometimes, when Willie Grant’s mark was even
lower than usual, the teacher would smile pecu-
liarly, but said no more of disgrace.’ Willie
40 BOYS WANTED.

never preached at them or told tales; but some
how it made the boys ashamed of "themsely es,
just the seeing that this sturdy, blue-eyed boy
must tell the truth. It was putting the clean
cloth by the half-soiled one, you see, and they
felt like cheats and story-tellers. They talked
him all over, and loved him, if they did nick-
name hin ‘Scotch Granite,’ he, was so firm
about a promise.

Well, at*the end of the term, Willie’s name
was very low down on the credit list. When it
was read he had hard work not to cry, for he
was very sensitive, and he had tried hard to be
perfect. But the very last thing that day was a
speech by. the teacher, who told of seeing a man
mufled up in a cloak. He was passing him
without a look, when he was told that the man
was General , the great hero.

“The signs of his rank were hidden, but the
hero was there just the same,” said the teacher.
“And now, boys, you will see what I mean
when I give a little gold medal to the most faith-
ful boy, the one really most conscientiously ‘ per-
fect in his deportment’ among you. — Who shall
have it?”

“Tittle Scotch Granite!” shouted forty boys s at
once; for the child whose name was-so * low” on
the credit list had made truth noble in their
eyes.

Some boys speak the truth because they are
afraid of being punished if they tell a lie. You


TRUTHFUL BOYS. Al

must speak the truth because it is right.
Lying is Mean

and the liar seldom goes unpunished.

Tom Quayrm had come to spend his holidays
with his grandfather. Grandfather Quayle lived
in a pretty cottage, to which he and his good old
wife often welcomed their children and grand-
children. Grandfather Quayle had a good many
strong feelings, and perhaps one of his strongest
feelings was his hatred of anything like a lie.

One day Tom was telling him a story of a
scrape that some of his school-fellows had got
into before the holidays, and how they had es-
. caped punishment by making an excuse which
the master understood (as they intended he
should) in one sense in which it was not true,
though the actual words could bear another
meaning which was true.

Tom chuckled over this cleverness, as he
thought it, of his companions, but his grand-
father looked grave and said: ‘Tom, my boy,
never laugh at a lie, and remember that the
essence of a lie is to wish to deceive. If you
purposely use words which you know others will
take in a meaning that misleads them, that is as
much a lie as if you spoke a plain falsehood.
There are no such things as “white lies’; all
lies are black, and stain your soul. Believe the
words of an old soldier, Tom; no really brave
man will stoop to tell a lie. It is a mean, cow-

Cc
42 BOYS WANTED.

ardly vice, which is very displeasing to God, and
which all good men hate. Speak the truth, what-
ever happens to you, and you will please God
and gain the favour of your neighbours. I re-
member long ago when I was a little boy—less
than you are, Tom—my mother taught me some
verses, about this that I have always tried to
act upon myself, and have often repeated to little
children. They are not very fine poetry, but
they. teach a very good lesson:

Once there was a little boy,
With curly hair and pleasant eye—
A boy who always told the truth,
And never, never told a lie.
And when he trotted off to school
The children all about would cry,
“There goes the curly-headed boy—
The boy who never told a lie,”
And everybody loved him so,
Because he always told the truth;
But every day as he grew up,
"Twas said, ‘‘ There goes the honest youth.”
And when the people that stood near
Would turn to ask the reason why,
The answer would be always this,
‘¢ Because he never told a lie.”

“JT hope, Tom, you will try to be such an
honest youth, and always speak the truth, boy.”

Mr. Robert Burdette’s message to boys is
worth repeating.
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 43

He says ‘my boy, the first thing you want to
learn—if you haven’t learned how to do it
already—is to tell the truth. The pure, sweet,
refreshing, wholesome truth. The plain, unvar-
nished, simple, vereay; manly truth, with a
little « Ge

For one thing, it will save you so much
trouble. Oh, heaps of trouble. And no end of
hard work, And a terrible strain upon your
memory. Sometimes—and when I say some-
times, [ mean a great many times—it is hard to
tell the truth the first time. But when you have
told-it, there is an end of it. You have won
the victory; the fight is over. Next time you
tell the truth you can tell it without thinking.

Your memory may be faulty, but you tell your
story without a single lash from the stinging
whip of that stern old task-master—Conscience.
You don’t have to stop and remember how you
told it yesterday. You don’t get half through
with it and then stop with the awful sense upon
you that you are not telling it as you did the
other time, and cannot remember just how you
did tell it then. You won’t have to look around -
to see who is there before you begin telling it.
And you won’t have to invent a lot of new lies
to reinforce the old one. After Ananias told a
lie, his wife had to tell another just like it. You
see, if you tell lies you are apt to get your whole
family into trouble. Lies always travel along
in gangs with their co-equals.
44 BOYS WANTED.

And then, it is so foolish for you to lie. You
cannot pass a lie-off for the truth, any more
than you can get counterfeit money into circu-
lation. The leaden coin is always detected
before it goes very far. When you tell a lie it is
known. Yes, you say, “God knows it.” That’s
right; but He is not the only one. So far as
God’s knowledge is concerned, the liar doesn’t
care very much. He doesn’t worry about what
God knows—if he did he wouldn’t be a liar; but
it does worry a man or boy who tells les to
think that everybody else knows it. The other
boys know it; your teacher knows it; people
who hear you tell ‘“ whoppers,” know it; your
mother knows it, but she won’t say so. And all
the people who know it, and don’t say anything
about it to you, talk about it to each other, and—
dear! dear! the things they say about a boy who
is given to telling big stories! If he could only
hear them it would make him stick to the truth
like flour to a miller.

And, finally, if you tell the truth always, I
don’t see how you are going to get very far out
of the right way. And how people trust a truth-
_ ful boy. We never worry about him when he is
out of our sight. We never say, I wonder where
he is? I wish I knew what he is doing? I
wonder who he is with? I wonder why he
doesn’t come home ?” Nothing of the sort. We
know he is all right, and that when he comes
home we will know all about it and get it
TRUTHFUL BOYS. 45

straight. We don’t have to ask him where he is
going and how long he will be gone every time

7

Wy)
Vy coal








7

aS.









“ CAUSE OF SUCCESS.”

he leaves the house. We don’t have to call him
back and make him ‘solemnly promise” the
46 BOYS WANTED.

same thing over and over two or three times.
When he says “Yes, I will,” or “No, I won’t”
just once, that settles it. We don’t have to cross-
examine him when he comes home to find out
where he has been. He tells us once and that is
enough. We don’t have to say “Sure?” “Are
you sure now”’ when he tells anything.

But, my boy you can’t build up that repu-
tation by merely telling the truth about half the
time,.nor two-thirds, nor three-fourths, nor nine-
tenths of the time; but all the time. If it brings
punishment upon you while the liars escape; if it
brings you into present disgrace, while the
smooth-tongued liars are exalted; if it loses you a
good position; if it degrades you in the class; if
it stops a week’s pay—no matter what punish-
ment it may bring upon you, tell the truth.
Faithful Boys.



FIRMNESS NEEDED.
ACKNOWLEDGE THEIR BELIEF.
IN LITTLE THINGS.

TEMPTED.

Hop ON TO THE END.
FAITHFUL TO THEIR WORD.
Unto DEATH.

Love THE LORD.

@i,* HERE are few better reasons for faithful-

ness than that given by Bonaparte. On

~ catching the first sight of the Mamelukes

Y drawn up in order of battle on the banks

of the Nile, in view of the Pyramids,

he said, riding before the ranks, ‘ Soldiers! from

the summits of yonder Pyramids, forty gener-

ations look down upon you.”

Generations of men look down upon the boys

of to-day, and the command is “ Be Faithful.”

Firmness is needed.

In these days, when so many people are false
to the trusts committed to them, the following,
48 BOYS WANTED.

though often told, is worth repeating :—

Gerhardt was a German shepherd boy, and a
noble fellow he was, although he was very poor.
One day he was watching his flock, which was
feeding in a valley on the borders of a forest,
when a hunter came out of the woods and asked:
‘“‘How far is it to the nearest village?” “ Six
miles, sir’ answered the boy; ‘but the road is
only a sheep track, and very easily missed.”
The hunter looked at the crooked track, and said:
‘“ My lad, I'am very hungry and thirsty; I have
lost my companions and missed my way. Leave
your sheep and show me the road; I will pay
you well.” “I cannot leave my sheep, sir,”
rejoined Gerhardt. “They will stray into the
woods, and may be eaten by wolves vr stolen by
robbers.”

“Well, what of that?” queried the hunter.
“they are not your sheep. The loss of one or
two wouldn’t be much to your master, and I'll
give you more than you have earned in a whole
year.”

‘““T cannot go, sir,’ rejoined Gerhardt, very
firmly. ‘‘ My master pays me for my time, and
he trusts me with his sheep. If I were to sell
my time, which does not belong to me, and the
sheep should get lost, it would be the same as if
I had stolen them.”

‘Well,’ said the hunter, “ you will trust your
sheep with me while you go to the village and
get me some food, drink, anda guide? [ will
FAITHFUL BOYS. 49

take care of them for you.” The boy shook his
head.

“The sheep,” said he, “do not know your
voice, and. He stopped speaking. ‘“ And
what? Can’t you trust me? Do I look like a
dishonest man?” asked the hunter, angrily.

“Sir,” said the boy, “ you tried to make me
false to my trust, and tried to make me break
my word to my master; how do I know that
you would keep your word.”

The hunter laughed, for he felt that the lad
had fairly cornered him. He said: “I see, my
lad, that you are a good, faithful boy. I will
not forget you. Show me the road, and I will
try to make it out myself.”

Gerhardt then offered the contents of his scrip
to the hungry man, who, coarse as it was, ate it
gladly. Presently his attendants came up ; and
then Gerhardt, to his surprise, found that the
hunter was the Grand Duke, who owned all the
country around. The duke was so pleased with
the boy’s honesty that he sent for him shortly
after that, and had him educated. In after
years Gerhardt became a very great and power-
ful man; but he remained honest and true to his
dying day.

It is also necessary that boys should

Acknowledge their belief.



In the reign of Mary of England, when the
good Bishop Hooper was abvut to be burned to
50 BOYS WANTED.

death, a blind boy, by much importunity, pre-
vailed on the guard to bring him to the bishop.
This boy had lately suffered imprisonment in
Gloucester for confessing the truth. After the
bishop had examined him concerning his
faith and the cause of his imprisonment, he
looked on him steadfastly, tears standing in his
eyes, and said, “Ah, poor boy, God hath taken
from thee thy outward sight, for what reason He
best knoweth; but he hath endued thy soul with
the eye of knowledge and faith. God give thee
grace continually to pray unto Him, that thou
lose not that sight, for thou shouldst then be
blind both in body and soul.”

The boy’s name was Thomas Dowry. How .
often or how long he had endured imprisonment
for the truth’s sake is not known; but on his
final examination he was brought before Dr.
Williams, Chancellor of Gloucester, sitting ju-
dicial with the register of the diocese in the
consistory, near the south door of the cathedral
church, who administered the usual articles,
chiefly urging that on transubstantiation, and
saying,—

“Dost thou not believe that after the words
of consecration, spoken by the priest, there re-
maineth the very real body of Christ in the
sacrament of the altar ?”

‘““No,” answered the blind boy, “that I do
not.”

“Then,” said the chancellor, “thou art a
FAITHFUL BOYS. 51

heretic, and shalt be burned. But who taught
you this heresy ?”

“You, master Chancellor.”

‘‘ Where, I pray thee ?”

‘““Hiven in yonder place,” replied the boy,
turning and pointing with his hand towards
where the pulpit stood.

The chancellor again inquired, “‘ When did I
teach thee so?”

Dowry answered, ‘“‘ When you preached there
(naming a day) a sermon to all men as well as
to me, upon the sacrament. You said the sac-
rament was to be received spiritually, by faith,
and not carnally and really, as the Papists have
heretofore taught.”

The shameless apostate answered,—

‘“‘ Then do as I have done, and thou shalt live,
as I do, and escape burning.”

The blind boy said,—

“Though you can so easily dispense with
yourself, and mock God, the world, and your
conscience, yet will I not do so.”

‘Then God have mercy upon thee,” rejoined
the chancellor, “for Twill read the condemnation
sentence against thee.”

« God’s will be fulfilled !” answered the young
martyr.

Hereupon the register, being moved with the
scene, stood up and ‘said to the “chancellor, —

wR ie, for shame, man! will you read ° the
sentence against him and condemn yourself?
52 BOYS WANTED. .

Away, away, and substitute some other to give ©
sentence and judgement.”

‘No, register,” said the fearfully hardened
man; “I will obey the law, and give sentence
according to mine office.”

He did so; delivered him to the secular power,
who on the very same day led the blind boy to
the place of execution at Gloucester, together
with one Thomas Crocker, a poor bricklayer,
condemned also for the like testimony of the
truth ; when both, in one fire, most constantly
and joyfully yielded their souls into the hands
of the Lord Jesus.

SOME time ago several hundred Roman Cath-
olics made a pilgrimage to Lindisfarne, or Holy
Island, in honour of St. Cuthbert. It was a
very foolish thing for them to do, especially as
Cuthbert was not a Roman Catholic, but taught
the Gospel of Christ in its purity and simplicity.
He lived when the country was wild, and the
people were rude and savage. He was named
Cuthbert, or Guthbert, which meant “worthy of
God,” and Cuthbert tried to deserve his name
and to walk worthy of the Lord, being fruitful
in every good work.

He was a shepherd lad, and tended his flock
on the high, bleak uplands. There in the night
he watched the meteors shine in the darkness.
To this boy-shepherd, as to those men who, some
hundred years before, “kept their flocks by
night” in Judean fields, came the knowledge of
FAITHFUL BOYS. 53

‘fa Saviour which is Christ the Lord.” . Like
the shepherd-king of Israel, Cuthbert might have
said that the Lord “took him from the sheep
folds.”

A few Irish missionaries had come from
Lindisfarne, and were living in some log houses
in the wilderness. To these men Cuthbert went.
They became his teachers; but at last he almost
outstripped them in his missionary zeal for the
people of the surrounding country. He went
out among the men of Northumbria and preached
to them.

He knew their language, and could more easily
make himself understood than could the Irish
missionaries. Into the lonely little villages of
the mountains where other missionaries could
not go, into boggy tracks where danger lurked
and where travellers always carried spears to
defend themselves with, into wide, desolate
tracts of country that had only here and there
some clusters of wooden huts, Cuthbert went.
The poor had the Gospel preached to them by a
man whose hardy frame was equal to the task of
enduring all the hardships of travel in such a
country.

Some of the incidents of his journeys have been
recorded for us.

It is said that once, on a snowy day, he and
his companions had their boat driven ashore on
a lonely coast of Fife. Cuthbert’s companions
murmured at their miserable plight.
54 BOYS WANTED.

‘“The snow closes the road along the shore,”
said they ‘“‘and the storm bars our way over
the sea.”

But Cuthbert was not in despair. He was
ready with a comforting answer.

‘There is still the way of heaven, that lies
open,” said he.

But the thing best to remember about this “A p-
ostle of the Lowlands,” as he has been called, is
his faith in the One who said: “Take no thought,
saying, What shall we eat ? or, What shall we
drink ? or, Wherewithal shall we be clothed ?
for your Heavenly Father knoweth that ye have
need of all these things.”

Sometimes night would come upon the mission-
aries when they were off in the wilderness with-
out food.

But Cuthbert said: “Never did man die of
hunger who served God faithfully.”

Once when he was without food in such a
place, it is said that an eagle flew overhead, and,
frightened at something, let a fish that it was
carrying fall to the ground, and so a meal was
furnished to the needy man of God. Cuthbert
must have felt that He “who giveth food to all
flesh,” had seen and remembered him and sent
him food from the sky, even as He sent it to
Elyjah the Tishbite, in that eastern country by
the brook Cherith.

But the time came at last when the painful
journeys of the old missionary must cease. He
FAITHFUL BOYS. 35

could no longer endure the “perils of the wil-
derness.” He retired to a little island, one of the
group of the seventeen small Farne, or Fern
Islands, off the east coast of Northumberland.
It is said to have been a barren place without
food or water, but Cuthbert toiled till he made
it fit fora home. On that lonely island he died,
when probably nearly eighty years old. _After-
ward a tower was erected on that island to his
memory, and, as the years went by, many
traditions arose about the work of this good
man.

Mr. Hammonp, the evangelist, in “ Children
and Jesus,” tells of a stern father who “ one day,
when he came home from his business, heard a
noise, as if someone were talking in his little
boy’s room. He asked his wife what it was.
She told him it was Johnnie praying. This
made him angry. He told his little son in a
decided tone, that if he dared to do it again, he
must leave the house and find another home.
Like Daniel, dear Johnnie knew all he must
suffer; but he determined to keep on praying.
The next day his father came home and found
him praying again. He went at once to his little
room, and in a gruff voice said, ‘Pack up your
things and be off. I'll not have any of your
praying in my house. You shall not live with
me.’ and so the poor fellow packed up the
little that was his, and took his bundle and
walked downstairs to say ‘ good-bye.’ He went
56 BOYS WANTED.

first to his mother and sister, and gave them the
‘good-bye’ kiss: and then, with a full heart he
leaned over the cradle and pressed his quivering
lips to those of the little one he loved so much.
His mother stood by weeping. How could he
part with her? At last, throwing his arms
around ler neck, and with tears in his eyes, he
sobbed, ‘Good-bye, mother!’ And then the
little hero turned kindly to his stern father, and,
holding out his land, said, ‘Good-bye, father.’
But the father could not bear it any longer. He
could not keep the hot tears from his eyes. No,
he could not, after all, drive away his noble boy.
‘Johnnie, you need not go now. Pray for me.
I have been a wicked man to try and keep you
from praying. O, pray for me!’ was all he
could say. And Johnnie did pray. Yes, and
the father prayed too. He became a converted
man, and loved, with his family, to bow before
the mercy-seat.”
Boys are wanted to be faithful

In little things.

The Rev. Robert Moffat once begun an address
with these words: I knew a little boy exceed-
ingly well, and he had a very pious mother, and
that mother was wont to talk to him of heavenly
things, and pray for him, too; and when that
boy grew up I believe he loved his mother. But
he was about to leave her and go to another part
of the country at a great distance; and when the
FAITHFUL BOYS. 57

time for parting came the little boy felt the
separation very keenly, and his mother embraced
that opportunity of asking him a favour, She
walked with him a long way on the road in
order that she might be the last to see him before
he got into the boat to cross the river. And
just before the time for parting came, and while
his heart was softened at leaving her, his mother
took that occasion for making her request ; and
what do you think it was? If I remember, it
was this:—‘ My boy, my son,” she said, “ you
are going away from a mother’s eye, and you
will no more, perhaps never more, hear a mother’s
voice. My son, before we part, let me ask of
you one favour; it is but a small one. Oh, help
me,” she said, “my son, to return home, after I
have parted with you, with a heart filled with
hope and joy.” The son said, ‘“ What do you
want, mother?” The mother said, “It is a
very small thing; but you must promise me that
you will grant it before I tell you what I want.”
‘“No,” said the naughty boy, “I am not going
to promise anything before I know what it is.”
‘Qh, my son,” said the mother, “do you think
a mother would ask anything which was not
right of her own child?” No, he would not
promise his mother till she had first told him
what she wanted. Well, the mother pleaded and
pleaded, and at last the tears began to flow over
her cheeks, and the son could not stand that,
and he said in a great hurry, “‘ Oh, tell me what
D
58 BOYS WANTED.

you want—ask of me what you like, my mother.”
Then the mother said to him, “ Only promise
me that you will read in the Bible every day,
that you will read in the Old and NewTestament.
Oh,” she said, ‘read much in the Gospels you
cannot go astray there, young as you are.”

Well, young friends, the boy made the promise,
and he went to another part of the country,
where there was no mother’s eye to watch over
him, no ‘mother’s voice to warn him; and there
he did what he liked, naughty boy that he was.
He was very fond of music and could play the
fiddle, and he liked to go to balls to dance, for
he was fond of those nonsensical fooleries of the
world; but mark well, for [ know his history—
that boy when he came home, sometimes from a
dance, and from playing the fiddle to large
dancing parties, would then think about fulfilling
the promise which he had made to his mother,
and he would sit down and read the Testament,
and, perhaps, after coming from a dance, he
would read the 16th, 17th, 18th or 19th chap-
ters of St. John. Now what an awful thing it
was to unite dancing with the reading of these
chapters giving an account of the Saviour’s death
on the cross, and the crucifixion of the Lord ot
Glory! It made him very unhappy, and he
thought he would not keep his promise to his
mother, and he went to bed once and again and
tried to forget his promise; but no, his mother’s
face and his mother’s tears were before him, and
FAITHFUL BOYS. 59

he was obliged to get up in the dark and light a
candle and read a chapter. Well, that. was the
means in time of saving that little boy from
destroying himself; for he had almost done this
—he had almost gone into the gulf of suicide,
_and then he rejoiced in God and prayed for his
mother; and glorified God that he had a praying
mother.

This young man (for he had now grown up)
became very zealous and went about talking to
everyone that would hear him and thought to
convert them all. It was hard work, but he did
what he could. One day, while visiting ina
town about seven miles distant, he happened to
see a placard on the walls announcing a mission-
ary meeting, and he began to think within
himself what kind of a meeting it was; and as
he returned home he still kept thinking about
it; and he called it to mind so, that there was a
resurrection of all he had once heard from his
dear mother by the fireside; for his mother used
to keep him at home and taught him to knit
stockings rather than let him run about in the
streets and get into mischief ; and he remembered
what his mother told him about Greenland and
the South Sea Islands, and other parts of the
world; and by the time he got home he was
another boy altogether. He began to think and
pray for the heathen, and in his exhortations to
others he desired them to pray for the perishing
heathen. In the course of time a wonderful
60 BOYS WANTED.

providence brought that youth into a position in
which he was himself sent.out to be a missionary.
He was at first afraid that his parents would not
allow him to go, and he thought of leaving them
without letting them know anything about it;
but when at length his mother heard of it she
rejoiced very much, and she said, “ I wish all my
other sons were missionaries too.” Well that
boy went out as a missionary, and laboured
among the heathen for a quarter of a century,
and learned languages, and saw hundreds con-
verted to a knowledge of God, and saw schools
established, and people taught to read in their
own language the wonderful works of God.

And that missionary came back and saw his
mother ; and he was one time preaching a mis-
sionary sermon in a chapel where his mother
was, and when he came down from the pulpit he
found his mother in tears, and he said to her,
“Mother, you seem to feel what I have been
saying,” and she replied, ‘ Oh yes, my son, my
heart rejoices at the spread of the Redeemer’s
Kingdom.”

Now that boy is going to see his mother
again, and here he is—I am that boy; and he is
come to tell you this day something of what he
he has seen in Africa.

‘One of my first lessons,” said Mr. Sturgis,
an American merchant, ‘“ was in 1813, when I
was eleven years old. My grandfather had a fine
flock of sheep, which was carefully tended during
FAITHFUL BOYS. . 61

the war of those times. Iwas the shepherd boy,
and my business was to watch the sheep in the
fields. A boy more fond of his book than the
sheep was sent with me, but left the work to me
while he lay under the trees and read. I. went
to my grandfather and complained of it. I shall
never forget the kind smile of the old gentleman
' as he said ‘never mind, Jonathan, my boy; if
you watch the sheep you will have the sheep.”

‘““What does grandfather mean by that ?’
I said to myself; ‘I don’t expect to have a
sheep.’ I could not exactly make out in my
mind what it was, but I had great confidence in
him, for he was a judge, and had been in Con-
gress in Washington’s time; so I concluded it
was all right, and went back contentedly to the
sheep. After I got into the field I could not
keep his words out of my head. Then I thought
of Sunday’s lesson, ‘Thou hast been faithful
over a few things, I will make thee ruler over
many things.’ I began to see through it;
‘ Never you mind who neglects his duty; be you
faithful, and you will have your reward.’

‘“T received a second lesson soon after I came
to the city asa clerk to the late Lyman Reed.
A merchant from Ohio who knew me came to
buy goods and said: ‘Make yourself so useful
that they cannot do without you.’ I took his
meaning quicker than I did that of my grand-
father.

“Well, I worked upon these two. ideas until
62 BOYS WANTED.

Mr. Reed offered me a partnership in the business.
The first morning after the partnership was made
known, Mr. James Geery, the old tea-merchant,
called in to congratulate me, and he said: ‘ You
are right now. I have only one word of advice
to give you, Be careful who you walk the streets
with.’ That was lesson number three.”

And what valuable lessons they are: Fidelity
in all things ; do your best for employers ; be
careful about your associates.

Take these lessons and study them well.
They are the foundation-stones of character and
honourable success.

Boys are wanted who will be faithful when

Tempted.

Temptation comes to us in various ways.

Deacon Jones kept a little fish market. |

“Do you want a boy to help you?” asked
Joe White one day. ‘I fancy I can sell fish.”

“Can you give good weight to my customers
and take good care of my pennies.”

“Yes, sir,” answered Joe: and forthwith he
took his place in the market, weighed the fish,
and kept the room in order.

‘“‘ A whole day for fun, fireworks, and crackers
to-morrow !”’ exclaimed Joe, as he buttoned his
white apron about him. A great trout was flung
down on the counter.

‘“Here’s a royal trout, Joe. I caught it my-
self. You may have it for fivepence. Just
FAITHFUL BOYS. 63

hand over the money, for [’m in a hurry to
buy my fire-crackers,”’ said Ned Long, one of
Joe’s mates.

The deacon was out, but Joe had made pur-
chases for him before, so the money was thrown
across to Ned, who was off like a shot. Just
then Mrs. Martin appeared. “I want a nice
trout for my dinner to-morrow. This one will
do. How much is it?”

“One shilling, ma’am,’ and the fish was
transferred to the lady’s basket and the silver
piece to the money-drawer.

But here Joe paused... “‘ Fivepence was very
cheap for that fish. IfI tell the deacon it cost
eightpence he'll be satisfied, and I shall have
threepence to invest in fir eworks.”

The deacon was pleased with Joe’s bargain,
and when the market closed each went his way
for the night. But the silver in Joe’s pocket
burned like a coal! he could eat no supper, and
was cross and unhappy. At last he could stand
it no longer, but, walking rapidly, tapped at the
door of Deacon Jones's cottage.

A stand was drawn out, and before the open
Bible sat the old man. Joe’s heart almost failed
him; but he told his story, and with tears of
sorrow laid the coin in the deacon’s -hand.
Turning over the leaves of the Bible, the old
man read:—

““« Fe that eoveretl his sins shall not prosper,
but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall
64. BOYS WANTED.

have mercy.’ You have my forgiveness, Joe.
Now go home and confess to the Lord; but,
remember, you must forsake as well as confess.
And keep this little coin as long as you live to
- remind you of this first temptation.”

Sometimes dogs are more faithful than boys.

‘Now, Dick, see if you cannot carry father’s
dinner to him to-day. It is time he had it, and
Mary has not come home from school yet.”
_ Dick looked very proud at being entrusted
with his father’s dinner, and he promised
willingly that he would not stop to play on the
way, but would walk steadily along until he had
given the pail to his father, who was working
about half a mile from his home.

Bareheaded and barefooted he trudged along,
his brown, tangled hair making a thatch over
his head to shield him from the sun, and no
thought of stopping for a moment entered his
mind till he passed the cottage where his friend
Tim was at play in the yard, prancing up and
down upon a stick which did duty for a horse.

‘“T’ll tell you a secret if you come here a
minute,” Tim shouted; and so Dick turned aside
to hear his friend’s secret, although he knew he
ought to have waited till he was on his home-
ward way.

‘Down in the orchard, back of our house,
there is a bird’s-nest in the bushes, and there
are eggs in it,’ said Tim. ‘Now, mind, you
FAITHFUL BOYS. 65

must not tell anybody of it. Come down and
Pll show them to you.”

Forgetting all about his hungry father waiting
for his dinner, Dick followed down to the bushes.
_ It was quite a long walk across the orchard, and
the dinner-pail grew heavy.

‘“‘ Leave it here under the shed until we come
back,” suggested Tim.

‘Tm afraid something will happen to it,” said
Dick. ;

‘Fido’ll guard it—here, Fido, watch!” and
the faithful dog crouched. down beside the pail,
prepared to guard it faithfully.

Tim showed Dick the nest with its dainty
treasures, and the two boys spent some minutes
in looking at it, to the great alarm of the mother-
bird, who fluttered about and chirped and scolded
at the intruders.

‘Hello! Here comes Uncle Jack!” ex-
claimed Tim, looking up as a waggon came
rattlng down the lane that ran behind the
orchard. “I’m going to ask him to give me a
ride.”

Dick started for his pail as Tim scrambled into
the waggon, but he was dismayed to find that
Fido had no idea of giving up the trust which
his master had committed to him. Whenever
Dick extended his hand toward it, the dog
snarled so angrily that he was afraid to touch
it. Whatshouldhedo? Father would be so hun-
gry, and it must be so long after his dinner-time.
66 BOYS WANTED.

He was standing looking at the dog, with
tears in his eyes, when Tim’s mother looked out
of the window, and guessed that something was
wrong. Putting on her bonnet, she went to the
boy’s assistance. Fido felt that he could hon-
ourably relinquish his charge when his mistress
bade him do so; so, to Dick’s delight, he regained
his pail again.

“And what were you doing here with your
father’s dinner?” asked Tim’s mother. “ Didn’t
your mother tell you to take it as straight as you
could carry it ?”

“Yes,” faltered Dick.

“T thought so. Now, see if Fido can teach
you how to do what you’re told. Tim told him
to watch that pail, and he did it so well that you
couldn’t coax or frighten him away from it, and
yet you_couldn’t be trusted as well as a little
dog. Now, see if you can’t go straight along
the rest of the way, and show that you can be
trusted too.”

It was a good lesson of faithfulness that Fido
taught Dick that morning, and the boy remem-
bered it well.

Faithful: boys will

Hold on to the end.

In the battle of Gettysburg, a young colour-
bearer of the Sixteenth Regiment of Vermont
Volunteers fell mortally wounded. Holding on
firmly to his colour-staff, he felt some one. taking
FAITHFUL BOYS. 67

hold, and heard a voice saying, “ Give us the
flag.” Death was already blinding his eyes,and
he was unable to see who it was.

‘‘Are you friends or enemies ?”’ he asked.

‘““We are friends,” they replied.

“Then, if you are friends,” the dying boy
continued, ‘‘let me hold the flag till I die.”
And uttering these words he fell back and
expired.

That was the impulse and act of a brave and
true heart. The flag had been entrusted to his
keeping. He could not and would not yield it
to an enemy. He could not yield it to a friend,
because he would cling to his trust to the end.
His example, though but that of a boy, is one of
the noblest and truest in history. Have you a
trust committed to you? Yes. God has en-
trusted you with gifts, and opportunities, and
duties. And Jesus says, ‘‘ Be thou faithful unto
death, and I will give thee a crown of life.”
Paul, just before his martyrdom, wrote to
Timothy, “I have fought a good fight, I have
finished my course, I have kept the faith; hence-
forth there is laid up for me a crown of right-
eousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge,
will give me at that day.”

Every boy has influence of some kind, and by
remaining faithful may influence others to do
noble deeds.

Many, many years since, Mr. and Mrs. S. C.
Hall visited Ireland, previous to writing their
68 BOYS WANTED.

well-known work descriptive of its scenery and
customs. On the occasion of their visit to Glen-
dalough, the far-famed district of the Seven
Churches, they observed a young lad seated on
one of the tombstones, who, immediately on their
approach, doffed his cap, and offered his services
as guide over the district.

A bargain was soon struck, and the party drove
off. The lad, full of the quaint old legends of
the place, did the work well, and to the entire
satisfaction of his employers. Returning home
after a day’s thorough enjoyment, Mr. Hall took
a flask from his pocket, and after partaking of
the contents, offered some to the lad. To his
utter astonishment, the offer was firmly but
politely declined.

To Mr. Hall such a thing was inexplicable.
An Irish boy who would not even taste whisky
was, indeed, a stranger sight than any he had
seen during the day. He could not understand
it. Resolved to test the lad’s principles, he
offered him a shilling, then half-a-crown, then
five shillings, if he would drink the poisonous
drug ; but the lad was firm. Under the ragged
jacket there throbbed a true heart. Mr. Hall
determined, however, to conquer, if possible, and
finally offered him half a sovereign, a coin not
often seen by lads of his class in these parts.
It was a wicked act, and proved too much for
the politeness even of an Irish boy.

Drawing himself up in something well-nigh
FAITHFUL BOYS. - 69

akin to indignation, and pulling a temperance
-medal from the folds of his ragged jacket, he
firmly told Mr. Hall “ that for all the money his
honour might be worth he would not break his
pledge.”

The history was soon told. It had belonged to
the lad’s father, who had spent the prime of his
days in the service of the cruellest of task-
masters,—Drink. Until the advent of the gen-
uine Apostle of Temperance, happiness had been
unknown in yon home on the hill-side. But
with his advent, peace and joy prevailed. The
medal was now round the lad’s neck—a father’s
dying legacy to his son. Hence his noble and
firm resolve. Nor was his heroism in vain. It
was too much for Mr. Hall, who there and then
screwed the top on to the flask, and threw it into
the lake by the side of which they stood. That
day, and entirely through the influence of that
lad, Mr. and Mrs. Hall became staunch teetotalers,
aiding the movement by tongue and pen.

Under all circumstances in life boys are wanted

to be
Faithful to their Word.

An interesting circumstance is related of
George G. Lake, the benevolent merchant of
New York. Like so many others, he came to
the great city from Connecticut a poor lad, and
obtained employment as an errand-boy in a store
70 BOYS WANTED.

in Catherine Street, a narrow thoroughfare
leading to the Kast River.

He was an errand-boy of the old-fashioned
kind, one who received two dollars a week wages,
_ slept on or under the counter of the store, and
lived chiefly on crackers and cheese. But he
was a good boy, attended to his business and
made friends. Ina year or two he obtained a
better place, in a better store, in a better street,
where he--advanced rapidly from one post to
another, until at nineteen he was placed in
charge of the silk department, the highest
position in the store.

Salaries at this period were so small that this
smart young man thought himself well off in
getting 400 dollars a year, and he engaged to
remain four years in the service of the firm at
that rate of wages.

At the head of the silk counters, he had fre-
quently to visit a great importing house, to re-
plenish the stock of his own firm, and there he
attracted notice by his excellent taste in selecting
silks and his sound judgement as to what. pat-
terns would be likely to please people.

One day he was asked to step into the counting-
room of the importing house, where one of the
partners invited him to enter their service at
1,000 dollars the year, 2,000 dollars the second,
and 3,000 dollars afterward. The young man
replied that he had just made a contract with his
FAITHFUL BOYS. 71

employers for four years at eight dollars per
week.

‘That contract was only verbal, I suppose,”
said the merchant.

‘““T don’t break contracts,” replied the clerk,
“whether verbal or not.”

So he went back to his silks in the old store,
and to his eight dollars a week. He served out
his four years faithfully. At the end of the period
he made himself the “ indispensable man’? to his
employers, who offered him 10,000 dollars a year
or a partnership, He accepted the salary, and
after some years entered the firm, of which in due
time, by the retirement of his partners, he became
the head.

He made large property in the business, from
which he retired at an early age, and spent the
remainder of his days in happy and honourable
retirement, a good patriot, a good Christian, and
a wisely benevolentman. The solace and charm
of his old age was music, of which he was a
warm lover and munificent patron.

All boys that are faithful to their employers
do not become partners, neither do they all
succeed in life, in fact, some faithful servants are
very badly treated by their masters, but all may
be heroes.

Can a boy be a hero? Of course he can, if
he has courage, and opportunity to show it.
The boy who will stand up for the right, stick
&

72 BOYS WANTED.

to the truth, resist temptation, and suffer rather
than do wrong, is a true hero. Here is an ex-
ample of a true hero. A drummer-boy, who had
become a great favourite with his officers, was
asked by the captain to drink a glass of rum.
The boy declined, saying, “I am a Temperance
boy, and do not touch strong drink:” “ But
you must take some now,” said the captain, “you
have been on duty all day, beating the drum and
marching, and now you must not refuse: I insist
upon it.” But the boy stood firm. The captain
then turned to the major and said, “our little
drummer is afraid to drink: he will never make
a soldier.” ‘“ How is this?” said the major, in
a playful manner, ‘‘do you refuse to obey orders ?”
“Sir,” said the boy, ‘I have never refused to
obey orders, and have tried to do my duty as a
soldier faithtully; but I must refuse to drink
rum, for | know it would dome harm.” “Then,”
said the major, in a stern tone of voice, in order
to test his sincerity, “(I command you to take
a drink; and you know it is death to disobey
orders!” The little hero, fixing his clear blue
eyes on the face of the officer, said, “‘ Sir, my
father died a drunkard ; and when I entered the
army I promised my mother I would not taste
a drop of rum, and I mean to keep my promise.
I am sorry to disobey your orders, sir; but I
would rather suffer anything than disgrace my
mother, and break my pledge.” Was not that
boy a hero? He had learned when to say NO.
FAITHFUL BOYS. 73

“Few have learned to speak this word
When it should be spoken;
Resolution is delayed, .
Vows to virtue broken.
‘More of courage is required
This one word to say,
Than to stand where shots are fired
In the battle fray.”

The officers could not help admiring the con-
duct of the boy, and ever afterwards treated him
with great kindness.

Boys are wanted that will be faithful
Unto death.

‘Diocletian was at Rome, wielding the sword
of persecution with all the fury of fanaticism.
In the blindness of his zeal he saw in the mur-
dered Christians an acceptable offering to the
gods, and the imperial city was red with slaughter.
The property of the wealthier victims, too, was
a prize worth having, and it is therefore not sur-
prising that a rumour soon reached the ears of
Diocletian that young Pancratius was rich,
friendless, and a follower of Jesus. The lad was
instantly summoned to the palace. And there
they met, the purple-faced emperor and the
Christain youth ; the former in all the pride and
pomp of supreme dominion, the latter in the
calm dignity of truth and innocence. Struck

E
74 BOYS WANTED.

with the noble bearing of the boy, Diocletian
spoke to him of his father Cleonius, who never
failed in his allegiance to the gods. And was it
true, he asked, that Pancratius had dared to
become a Christian in defiance of the imperial
edict ? Instant death should be his portion
unless he at once consented to sacrifice to
Jupiter.

In that awful moment the courage of Pan-
cratius failed not. Strengthened by Him who
had thus far directed his path, he at once avowed
himself a Christian, and, fired with holy indig-
nation, demanded of his accuser how he dared to
commit such deeds of wickedness and cruelty as
were then daily perpetrated in Rome. “A
Christian he was, and a Christian he would die ;
for Christ, our Master in Heaven,” said he,
“Inspires the soul of his servants, even young
as I with a courage which is able to defy the
cruelty of all the emperors in the world.”

Enraged at this bold reply, Diocletian ordered
him to be immediately beheaded, as a warning to
the Roman youths, how they presumed to trifle
with the imperial mandate.

Forth the soldiers lead that heroic boy; they
pass along the streets of Rome, and enter the
Aurelian way; there, with the courage of a Paul,
and the meekness of a Stephen, the youthful
martyr bends his neck to the fatal stroke and
yields up his soul to God.

Boys are wanted who
FAITHFUL BOYS. 75
Love the Lord,

and mean to be faithful to Him.

Zinzendorf was the son of rich and noble
parents, and would have had many temptations,
but when he was four years old he began to love
to talk with God. He was only a little fellow
when he made this covenant with Jesus: “ Be
thou mine, dear Saviour, and I will be Thine.”
The window is still shown in an old castle where
Zinzendorf dropped out letters addressed to
Jesus. In those little notes he told his Saviour
how dearly he loved Him, and he never doubted
that Jesus saw them.

When we remember that Christ has said,
‘They that seek Me early shall find Me,” we
cannot doubt either that God saw and answered
those letters. Do you‘ask how God could answer
them? By sending His Holy Spirit to the little
boy, and pouring more love and grace into his
young heart. One day when Zinzendorf was
only six years old, he was praying aloud in his
room. invading army, forced their way into the castle,
and entered the little Counts room. When they
saw how earnestly he was praying, they stood
quietly aside, and watched him, and then: went
away without touching him.

What text does that remind you of? “He
shall give His angeis charge over thee, to keep
thee in all thy ways.” As Zinzendorf grew older,
76 BOYS WANTED.

he worked more for God, and was noted at school
for his earnest piety. He was not content to
know that his own soul was saved, but he worked
hard among his (choolielloee to make them, too,
feel the need of a Saviour; and when he left, he
had founded seven different societies for prayer.
You must not imagine. that, because Zinzendorf
loved and prayed to God, he was backward in
his lessons.. He was a hard-working boy, and
at sixteen-was far ahead of those of his own age
in Latin and Greek. When he became aman he
was a poet, a preacher, and a missionary.

‘There is nothing sweeter on earth than the
heart of a woman in which piety dwells.” This
beautiful utterance is Luther’s. It was born of
a touching experience of his childhood. John
Luther, his father, a miner and smelter of ores,
conceived a strong desire to educate his son.
Too poor to pay for young Martin’s education,
he yet ventured to send him toa celebrated school
at Hisenach, trusting for his support to the
‘occasional help of friends and the charity which,
according to the custom of those times, was be-
stowed more or less freely upon poor students.

Our generation has improved upon the old
method, indeed, but it is quite as true to-day as
three centuries ago that education, especially all
higher education, is beneficiary.

Young Martin Luther, driven forth by hunger,
would join his school-fellows in singing from
door to door, hoping thus to gain food. Instead





I ih
ao TAS





=| Martin LuTHEer
SINGING IN
THE STREETS AT

HISENACH.



FAITHFUL BOYS. 79

of “bread” he not rarely received “a stone’’—
harsh and insulting words. Often he left the
streets hungry and weeping. One evening, when
a high wind was abroad, and snow filled the air,
he found himself, after three successive repulses,
before the door of Conrad Cotta, on St. George-
‘square. He was on his way to his lodgings, to
spend the night fasting. Who shall doubt what
Hand it was that held him there a little space,
and touched his heart to sing one song more?

These are the words he sang:—
Foxes to their holes have gone,
Every bird unto its nest ;
But I wander here alone,
And for me there is no rest.

Inside the house Conrad Cotta played his flute,
while Ursula, his wife, prepared the evening
meal. Perhaps the strains ofthe flute—Martin’s
favourite instrument—had arrested his footsteps
and awakened his song. The flute was silent
within while the sweet child voice filled the air
with melody.

‘A fine, sweet voice!” said Conrad; ‘ pit
it should be spoiled by use in such ill weather.”

‘A child’s voice, too,” said Ursula, whose
heart was tender by the recent loss of her
own beloved child. The door was thrown open.
The light streamed forth upon the snow and re-
vealed the young singer.
80 BOYS WANTED.

“Charity, for Christ’s sake, charity?” said
the youth. :

He was bidden to enter. The sudden change
to the warm room threw him into a faint. The
care of Ursula— the pious Shunamite,’ as the
Hisenach people used to call her—revived him.
Kind words fed his heart, while good food
nourished his body. He was put away in bed,
and as the good people looked upon his sleeping
face they were won by it, and in the morning
offered the boy a home. In that home the
scholar’s mind awoke, grew, blossomed forth like
winter verdure under the touch of spring.

Thus again, as so often, “man’s extremity ”
was “God’s opportunity.” The eagle-wings
were spread beneath the fledgling. God _pro-
vided for His child. God opened the door to that
way over which, in after years, Luther was to
walk, leading with him a host of God’s elect.

Gop ?—let the weary, the discouraged, the
doubting, the sore afflicted, be comforted in the
thought that God ts, and that He is the Ever-
lasting Father !

The following is the whole of the song which
Luther sung on that memorable night:—

Lord of heaven! lone and sad,
I would lift my heart to thee ;
Pilgrim in a foreign land,
Gracious Father, look on me;
I shall neither faint nor die
While I walk beneath Thine eye.


FAITHFUL BOYS. 81

I will stay my faith on Thee,
And will never fear to tread
Where the Saviour Master leads;
He will give me daily bread.
Christ was hungry, Christ was poor—
He will feed me from His store.

Foxes to their holes have gone, |
Every bird unto its nest:
But I wander here alone,
And for me there is no rest.
Yet I neither faint nor fear,

For the Saviour, Christ, is here.
If I live, He’ll be with me;
If I die, to Him I go;
He’ll not leave me, I will trust Him,
And my heart no fear shall know.
Sin. and sorrow I defy,
For on Jesus I rely.
Diligent Boys.

DETERMINED TO SUCCEED.
INDEPENDENT OF BAD COMPANY.

Luck Is NOT THE CAUSE OF SUCCESS.
INTERESTED IN THEIR BUSINESS.

GAIN KNOWLEDGE. ALWAYS
ENERGETIC.

NEVER MISS OPPORTUNITY TO DO GOOD.
TAKE TIME.

ILIGENCE is said to be the mother of
good luck, and God gives all things to
=~- industry. Franklin’s advice is “‘ Plough
ae deep while sluggards sleep, and you shall
have corn to sell and to keep. Work
while it is called to-day; for you know not how
much you may be hindered to-morrow. One to-
day is worth two to-morrow, as poor Richard
says; and, further, never leave that till to-morrow
which you can do to-day.”
Pliny relates that Cressinus gathered so much




DILIGENT BOYS. 83

more wealth from a small piece of ground than
his neighbours could from a much larger piece,
that they accused him of witchcraft. To defend
himself, he brought into court his servants, with
their instruments of labour, and said, ‘“ My
witchcrafts, O ye Romans! are these. These
servants and these tools are all the witchcraft
that I know of. I say not to my servants, ‘Go
do this or do that,’ but, ‘ Come, let us go do it.’
and so the work goes on.” Industry and dili-
gence make any man excellent and glorious, and
chief in any condition, calling or profession.

The world wants diligent boys, boys who are

Determined to succeed.

In the autobiography of Gounod, appears the
following incident of that great musician’s early
career. As a boy at school he neglected his
essays to write music. The teacher tore up the
music, but that was not the end of the matter.
Gounod writes:—

This first persecution, far from curing me,
only inflamed my musical ardour, and I promised
myself hereafter that I would assure myself of
my pleasure by putting it behind the regular
accomplishment of my school duties. In this
conjuncture I decided to put forth a sort of pro-
fession of faith, in which I should formally
declare to my mother that I was absolutely
determined to be an artist; [ had a momentary
hesitation between painting and music; but
84 BOYS WANTED.

finally I felt more inclination to express my ideas
in music, and I decided on this latter choice.

My poor mother was distressed. This may
easily be understood. She had seen an artist’s
life from the inside, and probably she foresaw
for me a second edition of the scarcely successful
life that she had shared with my father. So she
ran in great distress to tell her woes to my
teacher, M. Poirson. He reassured her.

‘Fear nothing,” he said to her, ‘your son
will never be a musician. He is a good little
scholar; he works well; his teachers are satisfied
with him; I will undertake to see him entered
at the normal school. _1 will make this my
business; calm yourself, Mme Gounod, your son
will never be a musician.” |

My mother left, entirely reassured. The
principal summoned me to his room.

“Well,” said he, “what is this, my child?
You want to be a musician ?”

““ Yes, sir.”

“Ah, but you mustn’t ‘think of it! A
musician has no position |” ’

‘“What ! Had Mozart, Rossini, no position ?”

And I felt, as I answered him, my little
thirteen-year-old head throw itself back a trifle.

On the instant the face of my interlocutor
altered.

“ Ah,” said he, “it is that kind of a musician
you mean? Well, well, that is good ; we will
see if you can make one. I have had my box at
DILIGENT BOYS. 85.

the opera ten years, and I am a good judge.”

He opened a desk and took out a sheet of
paper on which he began to write verses. Then
he said :

‘Take that and set it to music for me.”

I was jubilant. I left him and returned to
my study, where I ran with feverish anxiety
over the verses that he had given me. It
was the romance from ‘“Joseph,” beginning,
‘“Scarcely had I left my childhood.”

I knew neither “Joseph” nor Méhul (its
composer). I was thus restrained or intimidated
by no recollection. The ardour that I felt for
my Latin lesson at this moment of musical in-
toxication may be imagined. At the following
recreation-hour my romance was done. I ran in
haste to the principal.

‘What is it, my boy?” “My romance is
finished, sir.” ‘‘ What! already” “ Yes, sir.”
“Let us see; sing it to me.” ‘“ But, sir, I must
have a piano to accompany myself.”

[M. Poirson had a daughter who took piano
lessons, and I knew that he had a piano in the
adjoining room. |

‘No, no, that is useless; I don’t want a
piano.” ‘But I do, sir, for my harmonies.”
“What! your harmonies! And where are they,
pray?” ‘Here, sir,” said I, putting a finger
on my forehead. ‘‘ Ah, well; sing all the same;
I shall understand without the harmonies.”

I saw that it was necessary to do as he bade,
86 BOYS WANTED.

and I sang. I had hardly reached the middle of
the first verse when I saw that my judge was
regarding me intently. This look encouraged
me; I began to feel victory on my side. I went
on confidently, and when I had finished, the
principal said to me:

‘“‘ Now go to the piano.”

Thus I triumphed. I had now all my weapons
in hand. I began my little exercise again, and
at the end, poor M. Poirson, vanquished, tears in
his eyes, took my head in his two hands and
kissed me, saying:

“Go, child; be a musician! ”

Joun Mixuats was one of those prodigies who,
having real genius, fulfil the promise of their
youth. When he was a boy, so little that his
friends used to pile books on a chair to make a
seat high enough for him to sit on while he
worked, he was always sketching, hoping some
day to be a painter.

His mother was an acquaintance of Sir Martin
Shee, then president of the Royal Academy, and
she told him that her little boy had a great gift
in the line of drawing.

‘Don’t encourage it!”’ said Sir Martin.
‘Many children show this sort of proclivity, and
the end of it all is failure. It is not once in a
thousand times that success is achieved. Bring
him up to any profession but mine.’

She then asked him at least to gratify a
mother’s pride by looking at some of her darling’s
DILIGENT BOYS. 87

sketches. He glanced at them and exclaimed,
delightedly: “It is your duty, Mrs. Millais to
encourage this boy! He is a marvel.”

~The result of this advice was that the child
was sent to the finest schools of art, and when
the prize for the best historical drawing in pencil
was awarded, at one of the Royal Academy
assemblies, the name of Mr. Millais was called.
A child in short dresses was presented, and the
Duke of Sussex, who was in the chair, called out
in amazement: “Is this Mr. Millais? Put him
on the table!” And standing there he received
his prize.

At the age of seventeen his first picture was
hung in the Royal Academy. In 1854, at the
age of twenty-five, he became A.R.A., being the
youngest Associate ever admitted except Sir
Thomas Lawrence, and in 1873, he became a
Royal Academician. He was one ofthe founders,
im 1848, of the Pre-Raphaelite School, with
Holman Hunt, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and
others, but abandoned the style of this school
about 1860. He rapidly achieved fame, and was
made a baronet. Some of Sir John’s best-known
works are ‘ Bubbles,’ ‘ Cherry Ripe,’ and ‘ The
Huguenot.’ Of late years he had devoted him-
self to portrait painting.

The grave of Sir John Millais adjoins that
of Lord Leighton in the crypt of St. Paul’s
Cathedral.

Freperick D. Maurice, was not, says the
88 BOYS WANTED.

writer of his life, what, perhaps, would be re-
garded as the model schoolboy of the present
day—for though naturally strong and robust in
body as he was active in mind, he took little
part in games or athletic exercises, and he had a
great dislike to what is called sport, more
especially looking upon anything which involved
the torture or death of dumb creatures as cruel
and inhuman. He was full of aspirations as
regarded his own future career.

Returning home full of enthusiam after one of «
these conversations he drew up the following re-
solutions, which we both signed, and which many
years after I rejoiced to show him, and to prove
how nobly he had fulfilled his share of the
agreement. It ran thus:—

‘““We pledge each other to endeavour to dis-
tinguish ourselves in after life, and to promote
as far as lies in our power the good of mankind.”
Neither of us was fifteen years old at the time.

The writer continues :—“We were rambling
with another friend one summer evening ata
distance from home, when we found ourselves in
the presence of an angry bull, who drove us to
take refuge upon an embankment in the middle
of a large field.

There we were safe enough, but completely be-
sieged, the savage beast continuing to pace round
us, apparently ready to rush upon anyone who
came within his reach.

Time wore on, and the night Sioeae: we
DILIGENT BOYS. 89

began to feel that his mother would grow un-
easy at our absence—a matter about which he
was always exceedingly sensative. It was re-
solved, therefore, that one of us should make an
attempt to procure assistance, whilst the others
endeavoured to divert the bull’s attention.

Drawing lots was talked of, but Frederick
insisted on his right as the eldest to lead the for-
lorn hope.

The scheme was successful ; but the quiet un-
daunted way in which he retired, facing the bull
(who followed him all the while), and slowly
bowing to it with his hat at intervals—according
to the theory he had on the subject—till he
could make a final rush for the gate, was worthy
of all admiration. ,

The boyhood’s character was seen in man-
hood’s action breaking through everywhere on
to the surface. Whatever, then, you would like
manhood to be, make the boyhood now. Dreams
of future greatness or goodness are worthless
unless they can now lead to action, and to
laying the foundations strong and deep.

A Swedish boy fell out of a window and was
badly hurt, but with quenched lips he kept back
the cry of pain. The king, Gustavus Adolphus,
who saw him fall, prophesied that the boy
would make a man for an emergency. And so
he did, for he became the famous General
Bauer.

A boy used to crush the flowers to get their

F
90 BOYS WANTED.

colour, and painted the white side of his father’s
cottage in Tyrol with all sorts of pictures,
which the mountaineers gazed at as wonderful.
‘He was the great artist Titian.

An old painter watched a little fellow who
amused himself making drawings of his pot and
brushes, easel and stool, and said: ‘“ That boy
will beat me one day.” So he did, for he was
Michael Angelo.

A German boy was reading a blood and thun-
der-novel. Right in the midst of it he said to
himself: “ Now, this will never do. I get too
much excited over it. I can’t study so well
after it. So here it goes!” and he flung the
book out into the river. He was Fichte, the
great German philosopher.

The world wants boys who will be diligent
and

Independent of bad company.

The Rev. THomas Cuampyess writing in the
Christain, Oct. 8th, 1891, says: My story is
of a man I knew very well. I knew him when
he was a boy. He was a little boy when I was
a big boy, and now he is a great man and I am
a little man. He isa member of the Gicumenical
Conference, has gone to America and will tell
stories that will make the Yankees wonder. He
went to the same Sunday school as I did, and
was serving his apprenticeship in one of the
DILIGENT BOYS. 91

Manchester warehouses. One day, boy as he was,
he went into a public-house, and he had a glass
of something. When he came out he felt him-
self going round, and as soon as he felt himself
the worse for drink he said, “‘ Never any more ! ”
In God’s name he put the drink from his lips
from that day. Then he listened to what his
teachers said, and he gave his young heart to
God.

In the place where he worked were many
drinking and swearing men, and when they
found out that this lad had become good they
persecuted him. He was the youngest appren-
tice, and it was the custom there for the youngest
apprentice to brush out the shop. When the
other men put on their jackets and went home
the young apprentice had to stay behind and
make the place fit for the next day. It was the
rule that when a new apprentice came the pre-
ceding apprentice should go home when the men
did, and that the new apprentice should brush
out the shop. My friend determined to be good;
so the men boycotted him, and they did it in
this way. When the new apprentice came they
made Tom still stick to the long brush; he was
not allowed to put his jacket on. They said to
the new apprentice, “‘ Thou can come home with
us, but Tom must stop.” He did not retort but
he stuck to the brush. And with the next
‘apprentice it was still the same; Tom stuck to
the brush. But he had got his head on, and
92 BOYS WANTED.

he picked up the business ; he was not muddling
his brain with drink.

One day the master said to him, ‘‘ Thomas,
when you come to-morrow, come in your Sunday
clothes, you are going to be foreman here.” So
the next night, when time had come to go home,
Tom went to get his jacket; but the men said,
“Get to thy brush.” ‘ Nay,” he replied, ‘‘never
any more.” His name is over the warehouse
door; he-is master where he used to brush the
shop out. He has now gone to America. He
is “established to be a prophet of the Lord,”
for he has done a work within seven miles of
where I live that has made the angels sing.

The world wants boys to be diligent, and
refuse to believe that

Luck is the cause of success.

““FreD Drxon is the luckiest fellow in town ;
everything he wants he gets; everything he
undertakes prospers. Did you hear he has the
place at Kell’s, that so many have been trying
to get?”

“You don’t say so! Why, he is a very
young man to fill so responsible a position.”

‘“ Yes,” added the first speaker, ‘“ He always
would stand on the top of the ladder in school.
Though not the brightest scholar, he managed
to carry off the honours upon quitting school,
which he did at an earlier age than his class-
mates, because he had to help to support a
DILIGENT BOYS. 93

widowed mother and younger brothers and
sisters. He only had to ask for a situation, and
lo! all other applicants were ruled out, and
Fred had the preference.”

Boys, do you know any Fred Dixon? If
you do, don’t think it is duck that helps him
along, gives him the laurels at school, aids him
to obtain first-class situations, puts him i in places
of trust and honour, where a ‘good name or un-
tarnished character is required. Look back in
the pages of his life. See if he was not studious
at school, fair and square in all boyish games,
gentlemanly and obliging, honest in all his deal-
ings. Ask his friends if truthfulness, faithful-
ness to his duty, steadfastness of purpose are not
his characteristics. Find out whether he has
ever been known to frequent tippling shops,
gambling dens and kindred places of vice;
whether he spends his spare time in filling his
mind with trashy literature, such as is thrown
broadcast over our land, in the shape of cheap
novels. Depend upon it, boys, you will never
be ‘the luckiest fellow in town,’ unless you earn
it by honesty, and integrity of character, and
fidelity to all your undertakings.

Giotto was of humble origin, and had no early
education in the modern sense of the term, and
at ten years of age was employed in tending
sheep upon the hill-side. “The tradition is that
one day when the little boy was thus occupied,
or supposed to be occupied, he was busily
94 BOYS WANTED.

amusing himself by drawing one of his flock,
using a sharp piece of slate as a pencil, and the
bare face of the rock as his canvas. Cimabue, the
famous Florentine painter, then at the height of
his reputation, happened to be riding over the
plain, and his attention being attracted by the
shepherd lad, he came near to see what he was
doing. ‘ We may suppose,” says Mr. Quilter,
“that there was something in the work which
the painter knew to be genius, for, according to
all the legends, he does not appear to have
hesitated in the least, but after asking the boy if
he would like to go with him, and receiving a
glad answer in the affirmative, he obtained his
father’s permission, took him to Florence, and
installed him in his own studio.” As to the
way in which those years were spent by the
young pupil we are left to imference and con-
jecture. But when next we see him, by the
light of historical record, the boy has become a
painter whose power has received recognition,
and who possesses the confidence of conscious
strength. This was exemplified by the famous
incident, given by Mr. Quilter, which has been
often described, and is known as “the incident
of the 0.” The Pope, Boniface VIII, we are
told, wanted to add to the decorations of St. |
Peter’s, and he sent one of his courtiers to see
what kind of painter Giotto might be. On the
way the messenger called at Sienna, and received
from artists there several designs of an elaborate
DILIGENT BOYS. 95

character. Giotto, however, when he was applied
to, simply ‘drew, with one sweep of his arm, a
circle in red ink, of perfect accuracy, and gave it
to the messenger, refusing to send any other
design.” The story goes that this evidence of
the painter’s skill was accepted, for “the Pope,
and such of his courtiers as were well versed in
the subject, perceived how far Giotto surpassed
all the other painters of his time.” Whether
the details of the incident be literally true or
not, the anecdote illustrates an independence and
force which were manifested by Giotto in many
ways, both in his character and in his work as
an artist.
The world wants boys to be diligent and

Interested in their Business.

This narrative from Wide-Awake will en-
courage and stimulate. :

“The best boy story I ever heard.”

‘That was what.a lawyer said of this story I
am going to relate-to you: “It is the best boy’s
story that I ever heard.”

‘““We have had a good many boys with us
from time to time,”” said Mr. Alden, the senior
member of a large hardware establishment in
Philadelphia, ‘‘as apprentices, to learn the
business. What may surprise you is that we
never take country boys, unless they live in the
city with some relative who takes care of them
and keeps them home at night, for when a coun-
96 BOYS WANTED.

try boy comes to the city to live everything is
new to him, and he is attracted by every shop
window and unusual sight. The city boy who
is accustomed to these things cares little for
them, and if he has a good mother he is at home
and in bed in due season. And we are very par-
ticular about our boys—and before accepting one
as an apprentice we must know that he comes of
honest and industrious parents.

‘“But the vest boy we ever had is now with
us, and amember of the firm. He is the one
man in the establishment that we couldn’t do
without. He was thirteen years old when he
was apprenticed to us, and he was with us for
eleven years, acting for several years as salesman.
When he first came we told him that for a long
time his wages would be very small, but that if
he proved to be a good boy his salary would be
increased at a certain rate each year, and as it
turned out, when, according to agreement, we
should have been paying him five hundred dollars
a year, we paid nine hundred and he never said
a word himself about an increase of salary. From
the very outset he showed an interest in the
business. He \was prompt in the morning, and
if kept a little overtime at night it never seemed
to make any difference with him. He gradually
came to know where everything was to be found,
and. if information was wanted it was to this boy,
Frank Jones that everyone applied. ‘The entire
establishment seemed to be mapped out in his
DILIGENT BOYS. : 97

head and everything in it catalogued and num-
bered. His memory of faces was equally as re-
markable. He knew the name of every man
who came to the store to buy goods, what he
bought, and where he came from. I used often
to say to him, ‘Jones,’ your memory is worth
more than a gold mine! How do you manage
to remember ? ’

“*T make it my business to remember,’ he
would say, ‘I know that if I can remember a
man and can call him by name when he comes
into the store, and can ask him how things are
going on where he lives, I will be very likely to
keep him as a customer.’

‘“And that was the exact case. He made
friends of buyers. He took the same interest in
their purchases as he did in the store, and would
go to no end of trouble to suit them, and to fulfil
to the letter everything he promised.

“Well, affairs went on in this way until he
had been with us eleven years, when we con-
cluded to take him into the firm as a partner.
We knew that he had no extravagant habits, that
he neither used tobacco, nor beer, nor went to
the theatre. He continued as at the beginning
to board at home, and everi when his salary was
the very lowest he paid his mother two dollars a
week for his board. He was always neatly
dressed, and we thought it was very probable
that he had laid up one or two thousand dollars,
as his salary for the last two years had been
98 BOYS WANTED.

twelve hundred dollars. So when we made him
the offer to become a partner in the business, and
suggested that it would be more satisfactory if
he could put some money into the firm, he
replied :

“ can put in that much. I have saved out of my
salary nine thousand four hundred dollars, and
my sister will let me have six hundred.’

“T can tell you that I was never more as-
tonished in my life than when that fellow said
he could put in ten thousand dollars, and the
most of it his own money. He had never spent
a dollar, or twenty-five cents or five cents for an
unnecessary thing, and he had kept his money in
the bank where it gathered a small interest. Jam
a great believer in the Bible, you know, and
IT always kept two placards in big letters up in
the store. On one was this text: ‘He that is
faithful in that which is least, is faithful also m
that which is much’; and on the other, ‘ He
that is diligent in business, shall stand before
kings, and not before mean men.’ And Frank
Jones’ success was the fulfilment of those two
texts. He had been faithful in the smallest
things as in the greater ones, and diligent in
business. That kind of a boy always succeeds,”
concluded Mr. Alden.

A small boy of ten, who had listened to the
story with eager eyes, as Well as ears, said:

‘But we don’t have any kings in this country,
DILIGENT BOYS. 99

Mr. Alden, for diligent boys to stand before !”

“Yes, we do,” laughed Mr. Alden. ‘ We
have more kings here than in any other country
in the world. We have money kings, and bus-
iness kings, and railroad kings, and land kings,
and merchant kings, and publishing kings, and
some of them wield an enormous power. This
is a great country for kings.”

In this book I have inserted stories of boys in
many parts of the world.

Here is a story of a Bulgarian boy. It goes
to show that the diligent are anxious to

Gain knowledge.

While up in the Balkan Mountains, caring for
his sheep, a poor Bulgarian boy in some way
heard of Robert College and the education that
was given there, and he resolved to go and ask
for admittance.

He travelled alone on foot all the distance,
and at last appeared before the gates of that
institution. He stated what he had come for,
but was refused admittance, as the college was
already full.

He could not have presented a very encourag-
ing appearance, as he stood there, that ignorant
boy of fifteen. His dress consisted of trousers
and vest of sheep-skin, with a large garment of
the. same material, which was worn over the
head, forming a peaked cap, which also came
down over his shoulders and served as a cloak.
100 BOYS WANTED.

He looked very much like Esquimaux. Do you
think their refusal to admit him satisfied him ?
By no means. He said he must come to the col-
lege, and he would work for them.

They told him they had no place for him to
sleep; but, as that did not discourage him, the
faculty came together to consider the case. |

Finally, it was decided to give him the care of
the thirty-two stoves in the building, saying this
would soon test him, believing that some morn-
ing they would wake to find the boy gone to his
mountains and his sheep. They led him into
the basement, where was a perfectly cold room,
with no furniture in it: this, they told him, was
the best they could do for him.

He appeared delighted, and said that it was
better than he had been accustomed to at home.
Even the prospect of thirty-two stoves did not
discourage him, and he set to work at once to fit
up his quarters. He dragged into his room a
large, empty box. This he filled with sawdust,
of which he found an abundance near the wood
pile over which he was to preside. This fur-
nished him his bed.

As he went about his work, he attracted the
attention and sympathy of the young men of
the college, and one gave him a pair of shoes,
another a coat, and so on, until he began to look
more like a human being, and, best of all, the
students, between them, found time to teach him
his letters; and it was a curious sight to see this
DILIGENT BOYS. 101

poor boy, every evening after his work was
finished, sitting in his box of sawdust to avoid
the dampness of the stone floor, his little piece
of candle fastened to a nail on another box,
poring over his book.

At last, it was decided that his fidelity to his
work deserved wages; and he was regularly
hired, and told that, if he could fit himself for
the ‘“‘ preparatory course,” he might enter college
the following year. This was much doubted.
However, with the assistance of the young men,
he so fitted himself that the question was not,
Can he keep up with his class? but, Can his
class keep up with him ?

A benevolent lady furnished a scholarship for
him: and he finished the course with credit, and
became a Christian worker among his own people.

All can learn a lesson from this poor Bul-
garian boy, who carried a brave heart and deter-
mined will, and who came out triumphant.

Miss Frances E. Willard told how one boy
faced the world.

_ About twelve years ago a soldier’s widow,
with one boy and one girl, lived in Chicago.
The boy was less than ten years old—a hand-
some, dark-eyed, curly-haired young -fellow,
richly endowed in heart and mind, and having a
true, royal love for his mother. They were very
poor, and the boy felt that he ought to work
instead of going to public schools; but his
mother was a very intelligent woman and could
102 BOYS WANTED.

not bear to have him do this. He thought a
great deal upon the subject, and finally begged
a penny from his sister, who was a few years
older than himself. With this money he bought
one copy of the daily paper at wholesale and sold
it for two cents. He was then careful to pay
back the money he had borrowed (make a note
of that, boys), and he now had one cent of his
own. With that he bought another paper and
sold it for two cents, and soon. He took up
his position in front of the Sherman House,
opposite the City Hall, a favourite place with
newsboys, and they fought the little fellow
fiercely; but he stood his ground, won standing-
room for himself, and went on selling papers.

He became one of the most successful news-
boys in the city, and at the age of fourteen had
laid up money enough, besides helping his
mother, so that he could afford to take a course
of study in stenography and typewriting. He
began in a class of two hundred others. When
he graduated from the course, only six remained
with him. There is something in this for you
to think about. A great many start in the race,
but few hold on to the end. ‘hey are like boys
chasing a butterfly. Pretty flowers along the
way attract them, and they hear a bird sing
somewhere in the woods or they stop to skip
pebbles in the river. It is only the few that go
on—right straight on—who catch the butterfly
we call “ success.”
DILIGENT BOYS. 103

Well, this boy became the best stenographer
in Chicago. When he was only eighteen he was
president of their society. He then went toa
leading college and took the entire four years’
course of preparation in two years, at the same
time supporting himself and his mother by his
stenography for the professors. He kept up his
health by outdoor exercise and riding the bicycle.
He never tasted tea, coffee, or tobacco, or al-
coholic drinks. His food was simple—mostly
fish, vegetables, and fruit. He had a good con-
science ; there was no meanness about him.

When he was twenty years of age he became
the private secretary of one of the greatest
capitalists in America. Of course, he had a
large salary. He was clear-cut in everything he
did: there was no slackness in his work. The
gentleman who employed him used tobacco and
drank wine; but his young private secretary,
with quiet dignity, declined both cigars and
clarat, though offered him by his employer in
his most gracious manner. It is to the credit of
the great capitalist that, when his secretary told
him he never used tobacco or liquor, he answered,
“T honour you for it, young man.”

The name of this remarkable Chicagoan is
Jerome Raymond. He is now the private sec-
retary of Bishop Thoburn, and is making a trip
around the world. At the same time he is
studying for his degree in the university, being
permitted to substitute French and Sanskrit for
104 BOYS WANTED.

some other studies, that he would have taken if
he were here.

He was my stenographer, on and off. two
years; and I think most highly of him. It
seemed to me I could not do a greater’ service
than to tell you this simple story.”

The world wants boys to be diligent and

Energetic.

A good story is told of Agassiz, the great
naturalist. His father destined him for a com-
mercial life, and was impatient at his devotion to
frogs, snakes, and fishes. The last especially
were objects of the boy’s attention. His vaca-
tions he spent in making journeys on foot through
Europe, examining the different species of fresh-
water fishes. He came to London with letters

of introduction to Sir R. Murchison. ‘“ You
have been studying nature,” said the great man

bluntly. ‘What have you learned ?”’ The lad
was timid, not sure at that moment that he had
learned anything. ‘1 think,” he said at last,
‘“T know a little about fishes.” “ Very well,
there will be a meeting of the Royal Society to-
night. I will take you with me there.” All of
the great scientific savants of England belonged
to this society. That evening, towards its close,
Sir Roderick rose and said “I have a young
friend here from Switzerland, who thinks he
knows something about fishes ; how much I have
a fancy to try. There is under this cloth a per-
DILIGENT BOYS. 105

fect skeleton of a fish which existed long before
man.” He then gave the precise locality in
which it had been found, with one or two other
facts concerning it. The species to which the
specimen belonged was, of course, extinct. ‘Can

ou sketch for me on the blackboard your idea
of this fish ?”’ said Sir Roderick. Agassiz took
up the chalk, hesitated a moment, and then
sketched rapidly a skeleton fish. Sir Roderick
held up the specimen. The portrait was correct
in every bone and line. The grave old doctors
burst into loud applause. “ Sir,” Agassiz said
on telling the story, “that was the proudest
moment of my life—no, the happiest—for I
knew, now, my father would consent that I
should give my life to science.”

The world wants diligent boys to

Never miss an opportunity to do good.

There are great men who never forget that
they were helped on their way, and express their
gratitude by lending a hand to all who need a
lift. Dr. Peabody mentions, in his “ Harvard
Graduates whom I have known,” one of the last
times he saw Jared Sparks, the eminent his-
torian and former president of the distinguished
American university :—

‘Mr, Sparks was carrying a large bundle ot
clothes from the washing, anda shabbily dressed
little girl was chatting merrily at his side. He

G
106 BOYS WANTED.

had come up with the child, tottering under a
burden too heavy for her, and instinctively, for
he never missed an opportunity for a kind word
or deed, had taken the bundle from her.

“He begun life as a poor country boy, deter-
mined to get an education, but compelled to
labour for his daily bread. Until his twentieth
year his schooling had amounted in all to forty
months. He had, however, done a great deal
for his own education, and had learned the trade
of a carpenter.

“The scholarly clergyman of his native town,
the Rev. Hubbell Looiis, owned a barn which
needed shingling. Jared offered to shingle it it
the clergyman would teach him Latin and
mathematics. The offer was accepted, and young
Sparks went to work.

“ One day, a brother-clergyman named Abbot
called on Mr. Loomis, and was told of the re-
markable young carpenter then shingling the
barn. Mr. Abbot asked that Sparks might be
summoned to the study to construe a passage in
Virgil. The carpenter’s translation was such as
prompted Mr. Abbot to bespeak for him a place
on the beneficiary list of Phillips Academy at
Exeter. The application was successful, and
Sparks walked to Exeter, one hundred and
twenty miles, in four days, that he might begin
at the autumn term.

“Two years after he entered Harvard College,
where his robust strength of body and strenuous-
DILIGENT BOYS. 107

ness of purpose enabled him to support himself
by teaching, to hold a high rank in his class,
and to graduate the first scholar in mathematics.
Friends gave him aid, sympathy, and, what he
valued most, opportunities to help himself.

‘When he became a great man, and the pre-
sident of the university, he loved to recall the
trials of his early days, not in self-congratulation,
but that the remembrance might keep him up to
his rule of life—never to miss an opportunity for
a kind word or deed.”

The Rev. W. W. Newton says :—

I remember in college a companion who none
of us could quite understand.

He was not diffident, and yet he never made
a confidant of any of us. He was all alone, but
he always seemed cheerful. He never joined
any cricket or football clubs, never spent any
money on himself or on others, yet we all felt
he could not be mean. He never had anything
to do with the others on excursions or visits.
We were sure that it wasn’t his studies alone
that kept him so busy.

Whenever any of us went to his room it was
locked, and we had to wait awhile till some pre-
parations were made to receive us.

What did it all mean? No one could tell.

Term after term went by, and Harold Robert-
gon was as much of a sphinx as ever.

Some of the fellows tried to climb up to his
window, but the inside shutters were always
108 BOYS WANTED.

closed, and it was a hard thing to climb upa
- trellis and a lightning rod. A Sophomore once
hid himself under his bed, but an irrepressible
sneeze betrayed him.

In this way it went on until the last term of
the Senior year. Then the mystery was solved.

Robertson, all those days had been writing
for magazines and copying legal documents, and
had regular correspondence with a weekly news-
‘paper. He had done all this extra work to earn
money enough to send a younger brother to col-
lege. The brother desired to be educated, but
the father could only manage, by hard efforts, to
support his eldest son in college.

Harold found out on his first visit home what
a terrible disappointment it was to his younger
brother, that, instead of entering college, he would
have to enter a country shop. The noble student
never rested until, by his own exertions and
self-denial, he had laid by money enough in the
bank to pay for his younger brother's tuition.

The way we found it out was that, by some
mistake, one of his articles appeared in a review
with his name attached to it. This told the
story. He was not blanketed and crowned and
presented with a wooden spoon, as being the
most popular man in class, but he stood with his
classmates, head and shoulders above them all,
as a noble specimen of moral heroism.

His lite and influence never were forgotten.
Though he sank into an early grave, just as he
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DILIGENT BOYS. 111

was beginning a brilliant professional career, yet

he still lives in the memories of those who knew

him best, and in the finished education of his
brother, whom he lifted into power.

One of two lives is open to our choice. We
can live for self, and have our own wishes grati-
fied, or we can live for others and, forgetful of
self, be happy in their happiness.

How true are Bonar’s lines—

‘“‘T need not be missed, if my life has been

bearing

As its summer and autumn move silently on,
The bloom and the fruit and the seed ‘of its

season,

I shall still be remembered by what I have

done.
I need not be missed, if another succeed me

To reap down those fields which in spring I

have sown;

He who ploughed and who sowed is not missed

by the reaper;

He is only remembered by what he has done.

Not myself, but the words that in life I have
spoken;

Not myself, but the seeds that in life I have

sown,

Shall pass on to ages; all about me forgotten,
Save the truth I have spoken the things I
have done.”

The world wants diligent boys; boys who will
have patience and
112 BOYS WANTED.
Take time.

What you cannot find out to-day you may
discover to-morrow. A gentleman speaking of
a lad, said: ‘“ Heis not a boy ina book; he
lives in our house. He seldom says anything

‘remarkable. He eats oatmeal in large quantities,
and tears his trousers and goes through the toes
of his boots and loses his cap and slams the doors
and chases the cat, just like any other boy. But
he is remarkable, for he asks few questions, and
does much individual thinking. If he does not
understand, he whistles—an excellent habit on
most occasions, but at the table or in a church
it is liable to be misinterpreted.”

There was whistling in our yard one summer.
It seemed to be an all-summer’s performance.
Near the end of the season, however, our boy an-
nounced the height of our tall maple to be thirty-
three feet.

‘Why, how do you know,” was the general
question.

‘“‘ Measured,” sententiously.

“ How 2?” *

“ Foot rule and yardstick.”

“You didn’t climb that tall tree?” his
mother asked, anxiously.

“Nom; I just found the length of the
shadow, and measured that.”

“ But the length of the shadow changes.”

“Yes’m; but twice a day the shadows are
DILIGENT BOYS. 113

just as long as the things themselves. [ve been
trying it all summer. I drove a stick into the
ground, and when the shadow was just as long
as the stick I knew that the shadow of the tree
would be just as long as the tree, and that’s
thirty-three feet.”

“So that is what you have been whistling
about all summer.”

‘Did I whistle ?” asked Tom.

‘‘ There’s nothing like giving a boy a little en-
couragement once in a while,’ said a wealthy
City merchant. “I know I owe a great deal to
a remark a crabbed old farmer made to me when
I was quite small.

“T was trying to split a cross-grained oaken
log, and as our garden was close by the roadside
my efforts attracted the notice of the farmer, who
stopped his trap to watch me.

“T was greatly flattered by his attention,
because he was the crossest and surliest man in
the country side, and never took any notice of
us boys, except to sit in his orchard with an old
gun in his hand when the apples were ripe. So
I put in my best whacks, and covered my hands
with blisters, but the log refused to split. The
hard thing seemed to have no grain to it. I
hated to be beaten, but apparently there was no
help for it. The old man noticed my chagrin.

“Humph! I thought you'd have to give it
up!” he said, with a chuckle of malicious
delight.
114 BOYS WANTED.

Those words were all I needed.

‘“‘T made no reply, but the way that axe went
into that log was a revelation to me. As I
drove it into the knots, they yielded. There
was a cheerful crackle; the gap widened, and
soon the two halves lay before me, and the far-
mer drove off in discomfiture.

“But I never forgot that scene. When I
first went into business I made mistakes, as
every young man will. But whenever I had to
undertake a tough enterprise I recollected that
my friends were standing round waiting for the
chance to say: ‘I thought you’d have to give
it up.’

“ But they never got the chance. I knew
what they were watching for and prophesying,
and that knowledge gave me a bull-dog deter-
mination to carry the thing through.

‘In spite of himself, that old farmer gave me
the key-note of my success.

‘So you see that if a boy has any grit in him,
he is sure to profit by the right sort of encourage-
ment; and in that connection I may remark that
a well-placed sneer is sometimes worth more
than a whole barrel of praise.”

A lesson or two might be learnt from Sidney
Dayre’s short story, ‘‘ One by one.”

‘Pile them straight and evenly, my boy.”

Will’s father came and stood near him as he
was pilling up some wood.
DILIGENT BOYS. 115

‘‘But then I shall have to lay every one sep-
arately,” said Will, in a complaining voice.

“ That is a good way,—one by one.”

“One by one! Oh, dear! It takes so long.
I like to take a half-dozen atatime. Just think
of going all through this great pile, laying the
sticks one by one.”

“But one by one, little by little, is the way
most of the great things are done in this world,”
said his father.

“Tt’s the way I’m laying this walk, one brick
at a time,” said Robert, Will’s older brother,
who was working near by,—‘‘one brick, and
then another.”

“Tt’s the way I’m doing this knitting,’ said
grandmother, with a smile, from her seat on a
bench in the shade,—“ one stitch, and then
another.”

“Tf Thad my way about things, I'd have it
different,” said Will. “I'd have things done in
one big lump.”

“J don’t think I’d like that,” said Robert.
“T’d like to see things grow under my own
hand.”

“When we think how many things are made
up of one small thing added to another,” said
father, “it gives a great deal of dignity to little
things. Look at the leaves on the trees, —how
they wave in the soft wind, every new move-
‘ment giving them a new gleam in the sun-
shine.”
116 BOYS WANTED,

“I don’t think I'd fancy a tree with just one
big leaf on it,” said Robert, “ora lawn with one
big blade of grass to it.”

“ Water is made up of drops, land of grains of
sand or earth, and the sunshine of separate
bright rays,” said father.

“Sure enough, there are plenty of littles,”
said Will, who was becoming interested in the
discussion. ‘“ But,” the whine coming back to
his voice, ‘there's so much tug, tug to it. At
school it’s day after day, and day after day.
And it’s one figure after another on your slate,
one line after another in your lesson.”

“Well,” said Robert, ‘what would there be
for us to do, if it wasn’t one thing and then
another? Would you like to get through, and
then have nothing more to do?”

“No!” said Will: “I really didn’t think of
that. No, I don’t think it would suit me to be
all through with everything.”

““T think,” said father, “it is well for us some-
times to remember how few of the great things
in the world are done by just one person, or
through a single effort. They come of the
united force of a dozen or a hundred or thou-
sands of men, and from all these through the
adding of one day’s effort to another. So now,
having preached my little sermon, we will go to
dinner.”

“ And after Pve finished this wood pile we'll
have our game of ball,” said Will.
DILIGENT BOYS. 117

“That will be one pitch after another,” said
his father.

““Qne bite and then another,” said Robert,
with a smile at his brother, as they were at the
table.

“Yes,” said Will, laughing. ‘I shouldn’t
like to take it all in a lump.”

A number of youthful courtiers were gather-
ed one day in the Palace of King Edward VL,
and one of them, desiring to obtain an article
which was a little beyond his reach, thoughtless-
ly took a large Bible from the table and stepped on
it. The young King, whose piety was most sin-
cere and devout, was deeply grieved at this want
of reverence for God’s Word. But he loved the
offender, and was unwilling to subject him to
the mortification of a rebuke, while he felt that
the offence ought to receive attention. He there-
fore lifted the Bible from the floor with great
care, laid it gently on the table, and then stooped
over reverently and kissed it. The silent act
made a profound impression on the courtiers ;
and the offender felt most keenly the tender
reproof conveyed by the monarch. It were well
if in all homes a similar reverence were cherished
for the Word of God. A picture of the young
king is given as a frontispiece to this book.
Honest Boys.

Happiness.
OccuPATION.
Name.
ENTERPRISE.
SINCERE.
Trust.

who acts upon this principle, says
Whately, is not an honest man. One
Vy of the ancient fathers, Epaminondas,
being offered large bribes, replied, “‘ If
the thing you desire be good, I will do it without
any bribe, because it is good; if it be not honest,
I will not do it for all the goods in the world.”
“Provide things honest in the sight of all
men,” says Paul, in his Epistle to the Romans.
One of the first questions asked by masters
of boys seeking employment, is: ‘“ Are you
Honest?”
Honest boys are in great demand; they are
wanted everywhere. Honesty brings

TR to is the best policy,” but he
Q
HONEST. BOYS. 119

Happiness.

In one of the most beautiful market places in
Brunswick, Germany, is a fine residence, very
curiously ornamented. On the most conspicuous
corner, facing the market place, is a life-sized
statue of a ragged beggar-boy, placed just above
the first-story window. The holes in the knees
and elbows are so perfectly cut in the stone, that
you would almost think you were locking at
Carolo himself. Over each window of the first
and second stories, a beggar’s hat is carved in
the stone, instead of the ornaments usually
placed there.

The gentleman who built the house did this
because he wished never to forget that he had
been a poor boy, and to remind all who saw it
that ‘Honesty is the best policy.” A great
many years before, a German count, living in
the same town, took a journey into Italy. One
day, while driving through the streets of Rome,
he found himself pursued by a crowd of half-
famished children begging for money. He took
no notice of them, and by degrees they all went
away but one, little Carolo, who, perhaps more
hungry than the rest, persevered, until the
count, to get rid of his cries, threw out a hand-
full of small coins into the boy’s ragged hat.

The boy, turning away satisfied, sat down in the
shade to rest and count his money. As he took
the coins one by one out of his cap, to his sur-
120 BOYS WANTED.

prise he found a large and valuable gold piece
among them. The Italian children are too often
thieves as well as beggars, but Carolo was not.
His mother had taught him to be honest; so his
first thought was to find the gentleman again,
and return the gold piece. All day long he ran
through the streets, and at last, towards night,
he found again the gay carriage of the count
standing before a shop, and he soon told the
nobleman of. his mistake. The gentleman was so
pleased with the honesty of the child that he ob-
tained the mother’s consent, and took him with
him to Germany. There he educated him,
adopted him as his own son, and finally left him
all his large fortune. Carolo has been dead
many years, but the old house still remains,
keeping ever fresh the story of his need, and the
pure teaching of his humble mother; proving,
too, the truth of the proverb, ‘‘ Honesty is the
best policy.”

A property owner in Chicago, in answer to a
question concerning his tenants, replied :

“Oh, yes, L have all kinds of tenants, but the
one I like best is a child not more than ten years
of age. A few years ago I bought a piece of
land, with an old house on it, and after a while
a man came to me and wanted to know if I would
rent it to him.

“¢ Well,’ I said, ‘ You can have it. Pay me
what you think it worth to you.’

“The first month he brought two dollars ;
HONEST BOYS. 121

and the second month a little boy, who said he
was the man’s son, came with three dollars.
After that I saw the man once in a while, but in
the course of time the boy paid the rent regularly.
One day I asked the boy what had become of
his father.

‘“¢ He’s dead, sir,’ was the reply.

‘““*Ts that so?’ said I. ‘How long since ?’

“* More’n a year,’ he answered.

‘““T made up my mind that I would go over
and investigate, and the next day I drove over
there.

‘The old shed looked quite decent. I knocked
at the door, and a little girl let mein. I asked
for her mother. She said she had none.

‘“¢* Where is she ?’ I asked.

‘““* We don’t know, sir. She went away after
my father died, and we’ve never seen her since.’

“Just then a little girl of three years old
came in, and I learned that these children had
been keeping house together for a year and a
half, the boy supporting his two sisters by
blacking boots and selling newspapers, the elder
girl managing the house and taking care of the
baby.

“Well, I just had my daughter call on them,
and we kept an eye on them. I thought I
wouldn't disturb them while they were getting
along. The next time the boy came with the
rent I talked with him a little, and then said,
‘My boy, you are a hero. Keep on as you have

H
122 BOYS WANTED.

begun, and you will never be sorry. Keep your
little sisters together and never leave them.
Now look at this.’

““T showed him a ledger in which I had
entered up all the money that he paid for rent,
and I told him it was all his, with interest.
‘You keep right on,’ said I, ‘and Pll be your
banker ; and when this amounts to a little more,
T’ll see that you get a house somewhere of your —
own.’ - :

“ That is the kind of tenant to have.”

Boys are wanted to be honest in their

Occupation.

The late Dean Stanley, in a sermon to children
at Westminster Abbey, told the following: “Not
long ago in Edinburgh, two gentlemen were
standing at the door of an hotel one very cold
day, when a little boy with a poor thin blue face,
his feet bare and red with the cold, and with
nothing to cover him but a bundle of rags, came
and said—

‘Please sir, buy some matches ?”’

‘No, don’t want any,” the gentleman said.

“But they are only a penny a box,” the poor
little fellow pleaded. ‘Yes, but you see we
don’t want a box,” the gentleman said again.
“Then I will gie ye twa boxes for a penny,” the
boy said at last, and so to get rid of him, the
gentleman who tells the story says, ‘I bought a
box ; but then I found I had no change, so I said,
HONEST BOYS. 123

‘T will buy a box to-morrow.’ ‘Oh do buy them
to-night, if you please,’ the boy pleaded again ;
‘I will run and get you change, for I am very
hungry, So I gave the shilling, and he started.
away. I waited for him, but no boy came.
Then I thought I had lost my shilling; still
there was that in the boy’s face I trusted, and I
did not like to think bad of him.

Late in the evening I was told a little boy.
wanted to see me; when he was brought in I
found it was a smaller brother of the boy that
got my shilling, but if possible still more ragged
and poor and thin. He stood for a moment, div-
ing into his rags as if he was seeking something,
and then said, ‘Are you the gentleman that
bought the matches frae Sandie? ‘Yes.’ ‘Weel
then, here’s fourpence out o’ yer shilling ; Sandie
cannot come; he’s very ill; a cart ran over him
and knocked him down, and he lost his bonnet
and his matches and your sevenpence, and both
his legs are broken, and the doctor says he'll die ;
and that’s a’.” And then, putting the fourpence
on the table, the poor child broke down in great
sobs. Sol fed the little man and 1 went with
him to see Sandie. I found that the two little
things lived alone, their father and mother being
dead. Poor Sandie was lying on a bundle of
shavings. He knew meas soon as | came in, and
said, ‘I got the change, sir, and was coming back ;
and then the horse knocked me down, and both
my legs were broken. And oh, Reuby! little

/
124 BOYS WANTED.

Reuby ! I am sure I am dying, and who will take
-care of you when Iam gone? What will you do,
Reuby ?’

Then I took his hand, and said I would always
take care of Reuby. He understood me, and had
just strength to look up at me as if to thank me;
and the light went out of his eyes. In a mo-
ment.

He lay within the light of God.
‘Like’a babe upon the breast,

Where the wicked cease from troubling
And the weary are at rest.

A young shopman was endeavouring to sell
some goods. He had a quantity on hand which
he much desired to dispose of, as they were not
of the freshest style, and the customer seemed in-
clined to take them. When the goods had been
examined, and the bargain was about to be con-
cluded, the customer enquired: ‘“ Are these
goods the latest style?” The young man
hesitated. | He wanted to sell the goods, and it
appeared evident that, if he said they were the
latest style, the man would take them. But he
could not tell a lie, and he replied: ‘They are
not the latest style of goods, but they are a very
good style.” The man looked at him, examined
some other goods of later style, and said : ‘I will
take those of the older style, and some of the new
also. Your honesty in stating the facts will
fasten me to this place.

By honesty strive to gain and keep a good
HONEST BOYS. 12

Or

Name.

It is said that Reputation, Love, and Death
once started forth to travel the world over in
different ways. At parting, each told where he
might be found. Death said they would hear
of him in battles, hospitals, and where famine
and disease raged. Love said they might look
for him among the children of the poor, at
marriages and feasts, and among the virtuous.
Reputation said reluctantly, that, if he once left
aman, he need not be looked for there again.
A good name lost is seldom regained. A good
name is rather to be chosen than great riches.
A name for honesty is worth more than silver
and gold. :

The Rev. Dr. de Witt Talmage narrated a
story of a ragged boy who came into his brother’s
office, in New York, and said: “ Mr. Talmage
lend me £1.” My brother said ; “‘ Who are you 2”
The boy replied, ‘I am nobody, lend me a £1.”
‘What do you want to do with it?” “ Well,”
the boy replied, my mother is ill and poor, and I
shall get a home for her, and I will pay you
back.” My brother gave him the money, of
course never expecting to see it again; but he
said, ‘‘ When will you pay it?” The boy said,
““T will pay it in six months, sir.”

Time went by, and one day a lad came into
my brother’s office, and said, ‘‘ There’s your £1.”
“What do you mean? What £1?” inquired
126 BOYS WANTED.

my brother. ‘‘ Don’t you remember that a boy
came in here six months ago, and wanted a £1
to go into the newspaper business?” ‘“ O yes, I
remember ; are you the lad?” “ Yes,” he re-
plied; “I have got along nicely. I have got a
nice home for my mother (she is ill yet), and I
am as well clothed as you are, and there’s your
£1.” O, was he not worth saving? Why, that
lad is worth fifty such boys as I have sometimes
seen moving in fashionable circles, never put to
any use for God or man.

Many think it impossible to be honest in
business

Enterprise.

The late Thomas Tegg left a name in the
bookselling trade for enterprise and successful
prosecution of his calling. When a lad, coming
to London in search of employment, he met on
the coach some other young men who were bent
on the same errand. They on reaching their
place of destination thought they would like, be-
fore searching for a situation, to spend a few days
in seeing the sights of the metropolis. Tegg, on
the contrary, went straight to the point, and en-
tered the first bookshop he saw in quest of
work.

‘What can you do?’ he was asked,

‘My best,’ was his laconic and pregnant reply.

‘Do you wear an apron ?’

Tegg produced one, and tied it on.
HONEST BOYS. 127

‘Go to work,’ said his new master, and thus,
as he himself afterwards said :

‘Tn less than half an hour after my arrival, I
was at work in one of the best houses in
_ London.’

The young man’s application to business was
marked, but on one occasion, when in another sit-
uation, he asked for a holiday.

‘We have no objection; but where art thou
going ?’ said his employer, a member of Society
of Friends.

‘To Greenwich fair, sir.’

‘Then we think thou hadst better not go.
Thou wilt lose half a day’s wages. Thou wilt
spend, at least, the amount of two days’ wages
more, and thou wilt get into bad company.’

At two o'clock, however, he was told that he
might go; but as soon as he reached London
Bridge, his heart smote him and he returned.

‘Why, Thomas, is this thee ?’ his employer ex-
claimed, ‘Thou art a prudent lad,’ and when
Saturday came a guinea was added to his wages.

This incident, we may add, led Tegg when he
came to be a master to be a kind though strict
one, and during fifty years of a business life, his
biographer tells us, he never used a harsh word
to a servant, and dismissed but three. Hqually
judicious was a resolution he made, that he would
visit a place of worship very Sunday; read no
loose or infidel books ; would frequent no public-
houses ; would devote his leisure to profitable
128 BOYS WANTED.

studies ; and would form no friendships till he
knew the parties well.

With such principles, success in business was
but a question of time. He inspired confidence,
which subsequent experience justified, and start-
ed in trade on his own account. Some difficul-
ties, however, followed, in the course of which
occurred the following incident ;

‘He had purchased,’ says Mr. Curwen, in his
interesting history of booksellers, ‘a hundred
pounds’ worth of books from Mr. Hunt, who,
hearing of his struggles, bade him pay for them
when he pleased. Tegg, in the fulness of his
gratitude, told him that should he in his turn
ever need aid, he should have it ; but the wealthy
bookseller smiled at the young struggler’s evi-
dent simplicity.’ We will tell the rest of the
story in Mr. Tege’s own words:

‘Thirty years afterwards I was in my count-
ing-house, when Mr. Hunt, with a queer-looking
companion, came and reminded me of my pro-
mise. He was under arrest, and must go to
prison unless I would be his bail. I acknow-
ledged the obligation, but I would first take my
wife’s opinion.

‘ Yes, my dear,’ was her answer, ‘by all means
help Mr. Hunt. He aided us in trouble; you
can do no less for him.’

‘Next morning I found I had become his sure-
ty for thirty thousand pounds.’

The hundred pounds which Mr. Hunt had lent
HONEST BOYS. 129

Tegg so many years before was thus found by
him after many days.

Old Peter Schroeder’s advice to his apprentice
is worth noting.

Schroeder’s shop was the wonder and envy of
the ignorant country people; and as they came
to the market at Nuremberg, week by week, the
journey would have lost half its interest, had
they not taken a good look at the wonderful
things set out for sale in Peter’s shop window.
Peter was a jeweller, and amongst other things
made mathematical instruments for students, and
watches, when they were but little known or
worn. His only apprentice wasa lithe, cunning,
sharp clever young fellow named Gottfried Olnitz.
Gottfried cared more to be rich, than as to how
he got rich ; and, had old Peter consented, would
have put inferior workmanship into the mathe-
matical instruments and watches entrusted to his
hands. But Peter, knowing this failing of his
apprentice, would say,

“No, lad. Honesty and integrity before all
things. Be an honest man first; a rich one
afterwards.”

An honest boy will be fearless and

Sincere.

In the columns of The Christian (robe,
I read of a Scotch lad who arrived at Euston
the brightest, yet the loneliest, passenger by the
London and North Western Company’s express.
130 BOYS WANTED.

He was barely 14, had not a friend in London,
and had only a sovereign in his pocket.

‘Well, Sandy,” said a fellow-passenger who
had befriended him during the journey from
Glasgow, “don’t you wish that you were safe
now with your mother in Scotland ? ”

“No,” said the boy, “I promised her when I
left that I would be fearless and honest. I have
her fortune to make as well as my own, and I
must-have good courage.”

‘“Well, laddie, what can you do?” asked a
kind voice behind him.

‘“T can be loyal and true to anyone who will
give me something to do,” was the quick re-
sponse,

A well-known lawyer, whose experience with
applicants for clerkships in his office had been
unfavourable, was passing at the moment.

Sandy’s fearless face caught his eye. The
honest manly ring in Sandy’s voice touched his
faithful Scotch heart.

‘‘ Tell me your story,” he said kindly.

It was soon told. Sandy’s mother had been
left a widow with little money and a child to
bring up. She had worked for him as long as
she could, but when her health failed she had
bought his ticket for London and had given him
what little money she could spare.

‘““Go and make your fortune,’ she had said.
‘‘ Be fearless and honest, and don’t forget your
mother who cannot work for you any longer.”
HONEST BOYS. 131

Having heard this story, the lawyer engaged
Sandy as an office-boy. ;

‘““T’ll give you a chance,” he said, “to show
what there is in you. Write to your mother to-
day that you have found a friend, who will stand
by you so long as you are fearless and honest.”

Sandy became a favourite at once in the office.
Many of the clients who entered the office paused
to have a word with him.

He attended evening classes and became an
expert penman and accountant. He was rapidly
promoted until he became his patron’s confi-
dential clerk.

After sharing his earnings with his mother,
he went to Scotland and brought her back with
him.

‘“ You have made my fortune,” he said; ‘ and
I cannot have luck without you.”

He was right. By-and-by he studied law,
and when he began to practise at the bar, his
fearlessness commanded respect and his honesty
inspired confidence. Juries liked to hear him
speak. They instinctively trusted him.

His mother had impressed her high courage
and sincerity upon him. His success was mainly
due to her.

At school, Horne Tooke was once asked why
he put a word in some case or mood, and an-
swered, “I do not know,” for which he was
instantly flogged. Another boy was then asked, |
who repeated the grammatical rule, and took his
132 BOYS WANTED.

place in the class. On this Tooke cried. His
master asked him what he meant, and Tooke
said, ‘“‘I knew the rule as well as he did, but
you did not ask for the rule, but the reason. You
asked why it is so, and I do not know that now.”
The master is said to have taken him aside and
given him a Virgil, in memory of the injustice
done him, of which Virgil Tooke was very
proud.
An honest boy is one that everybody can

Trust.

A teacher said the other day: “ Henry Stover
is the only boy in school I can trust when my
back is turned.” | Wasn’t that a good word for
Henry ?

A mother once said “I can leave any letter I
write open on my desk, and if I am called away,
no matter how long, I am certain Ned will never
try to read a word of it.” These things couldn’t
be said of every boy.

Honest boys do right, not only when others
are looking at them, but always, remembering
that God’s eye is upon them. They do right
because it is right. This is what we should all
and always do—live as in God’s presence, and
do what will please him.

Here is a little story of an honest colored
lad.

‘‘ The fields of Arkansas were white with the
bursting balls of cotton, and wherever one trav-
HONEST BOYS. 133

elled, the cotton plantations followed the road.
An Eastern lady in passing through that region
was very desirous of getting a sprig of the plant
with a bunch of cotton on it; but the train
always stood provokingly near, yet just too far
to get a twig. In vain she looked for a small
boy to gather a spray. When the small boy was
-there the cotton was gone ; and when the cotton
was almost within reach there was never a boy
to be seen.

As last her fellow-travellers became interested
in her success, and always looked up inquiringly,
or in words asked how she fared in her quest.
Just before dusk, the train halted opposite a vast
field tufted with snow-white dots all over its
wide expanse; and here—yes, here—was a boy,
three of them. Stepping to the front of the car,
she said, ‘ A nickle to the boy who brings me a
sprig from the cotton plant,’ and threw a five-
cent piece.

The three black faces grinned at so unusual a
request. The one who caught the money gave
a bound, cleared the ditch, and was almost over
the fence into the cotton patch when the warning
bell of the engine began to ring. The boy was
‘doubtful for a moment, then jumped back, and
began to follow the train, which was already
moving pretty fast. The lady had not gone in.
She was still looking longingly at the coveted
plants, and had quite forgotten the trifle she had
given in vain, when a black hand caught hold of
134 BOYS WANTED.

the stair-railing on which she was holding, and
a hurried pair of feet kept pace with the train,
as a panting voice exclaimed, ‘ Lady—here’s—
yer nickel ;’ and the shining bit was laid on the
car-step as the boy fell back. The lady kicked
it off with her toe so quickly that it must have
fallen within his sight ; for a loud ‘ Thank yer,
lady,’ followed after the now swiftly moving
car. She returned to her seat, only sorry that
she hadn’t ventured more for such a pleasant
return. The other passengers, seeing her satis-
fied look, asked eagerly, ‘Oh, did you find
some ?’ ‘No, but I found something better; I
found an honest boy.’”

Another good story worth reading and think-
ing about went the rounds of the press some time
ago. It was entitled: ‘‘ Boy wanted.”

People laughed when they saw the sign again.

It seemed to be always in Mr. Peters’ window.
For a day or two, sometimes only for an hour or
two, it would be missing, and passers by would
wonder whether Mr. Peters had at last found a
boy to suit; but, sooner or later, it was sure to
appear again.

‘“ What sort of a boy does he want, any way ?”
one and another would ask ; and then they would
say to each other that they supposed he was
looking for a perfect boy, and in their opinion
he would look a good while before he found one.
Not that there were not plenty of boys—as
many as a dozen used sometimes to appear in
HONEST BOYS. 135

the course of a morning, trying for the situation.

Mr, Peters was said to be rich and queer; and
for one or both of these reasons, boys were very
anxious to try and suit him. “ All he wants is
a fellow to run of errands; it must be easy work
and sure pay.” This was the way they talked
to each other. But Mr. Peters wanted more
than a boy to run errands. John Simmonds
found that out, and this is the way he did it.
He had been engaged that very morning, and
had been kept busy all the afternoou at pleasant
enough work; and, although he was a lazy
fellow, he rather enjoyed the place. It was to-
wards the middle of the afternoon that he was
sent up to the attic, dark, dingy place inhabited
by mice and cobwebs.

“ You will find a long, deep box there,” said
Mr. Peters, “that I want to have put in order.
It stands right in the middle of the room; you
can’t miss it.”

John looked doleful. “A long deep box, I
should think it was !”’ he said to himself, as the
attic door closed after him. “It would weigh
almost a ton, I guess; and what is there in it ?
Nothing in the world but old nails, and screws,
and pieces of iron, and broken keys and things
—rubbish the whole of it. Nothing worth
touching, and it is as dark as a pocket up here,
and cold besides. How the wind blows in
through those knot-holes! There’s a mouse !
If there is anything I hate, it’s mice! I'll tell
136 BOYS WANTED.

you what it is, if old Peters thinks I’m going to
stay up here and tumble over his rusty nails,
he’s much mistaken. JI wasn’t hired for that
kind of work.”

Whereupon John bounded down the attic
stairs, three at a time, and was found lounging
in the show window half an hour afterward, when
Mr. Peters appeared.

“Have you put the box in order already ?”
was the gentleman’s question.

‘“T didn’t find anything to putin order; there
was nothing in it but nails and things.”

‘Exactly. It was the ‘nails and things’ that
J wanted put in order. Did you do it 2?”

“No, sir. It was dark up there, and cold ;
and I didn’t see anything worth doing. Besides,
I thought I was hired to run of errands.”

“Oh,” said Mr. Peters, “I thought you were
hired to do as you were told.” But he smiled
pleasantly enough, and at once gave John an
errand to do down town; and the boy went off
chuckling, declaring to himself that he knew
how to manage the old fellow; all it needed was
a little standing up for your rights.

Precisely at six o'clock, John was called, and
paid the sum promised him for a day’s work ;
and then, to his dismay, he was told that his
services would not be needed any more. He
asked no questions. Indeed, he had time for
none, as Mr. Peters immediately closed the
door.
HONEST BOYS. 137

The next morning, the old sign, “‘ Boy wan-
ted,” appeared in its usual place.

Before noon it was taken down; and Charlie
Jones was the fortunate boy. Errands—plenty
of them. He was kept busy until within an
hour of closing. Then, behold! he was sent up
to the attic to put the long box in order. He
was not afraid of a mouse nor of the cold, but he
grumbled much over that box. Nothing worth
his attention. However, he tumbled over the
things, growling all the time, picked out a few
straight nails, a key or two, and finally appeared
with this message: ‘‘ Here’s all there is worth
keeping in that box. The rest of the nails are
rusty ; and the hooks are bent, or something.”

‘Very well,” said Mr. Peters, and sent him
to the post-office. What.do you think? By
the closing of the next day, Charlie had been
paid and discharged, and the old sign hung in
the window.

‘“Tve no kind of a notion why I was dis-
charged,” grumbled Charlie to his mother. ‘‘ He
said he had no fault to find, only he saw that I
wouldn’t suit. It’s my opinion that he doesn’t
want a boy at all, and takes that way to cheat.
Mean old fellow ! ”

It was Crawford Mills who was hired next.
He knew neither of the other boys, and so did
his errands in blissful ignorance of the “ long
box,” until the second morning of his stay, when
in a leisure hour he was sent to put it in.order.
138 | BOYS WANTED.

The morning passed, dinner-time came, and
still Crawford had not appeared from the attic.
At last, Mr. Peters called him. ‘Got through?”

‘No sir, there is ever so much more to do.”

‘All right. It is dinner-time now; you may
go back to it after dinner. After dinner, back
he went. All the short afternoon he was not
heard from ; but, just as Mr. Peters was deciding
to call him again, he appeared.

‘“T’ve done my. best, sir,” he said, “ and down
at the bottom of the box I found this.” ‘ This”
was.a gold piece.

“That's a queer place for gold,” said Mr.
Peters. ‘It’s good you found it. Well, sir, I
suppose you will be on hand to-morrow morn-
ing?” This he said as he was putting the
gold piece into his pocket-book.

After Crawford had said good night and gone,
Mr. Peters took the lantern and went slowly up
the attic stairs. | There was the long, deep box,
in which the rubbish of twenty-five years had
gathered. Crawford had evidently been to the
bottom of it. He had fitted pieces of shingle to
make compartments, and in these different rooms
he had placed the articles, with bits of shingle
laid on top, and labelled thus: ‘ Good screws.”
‘Picture nails.” “* Small keys, somewhat bent.”
“* Picture hooks.’”’ ‘‘ Pieces of iron whose use I -
don’t know.” So on through the long box. In
perfect order it was at last, and very little that
could really be called useful could be found within.
HONEST BOYS. 139

it. But Mr. Peters, as he bent over and read
the labels, laughed gleefully, and murmured to
the mice: ‘If we are not both mistaken, I have
found a boy; and he has found a fortune.”

Sure enough. ‘The sign disappeared from the
window, and was seen no more. Crawford be-
came the well known errand boy of the firm of
Peters & Co. He had a little room neatly fitted
next to the attic, where he spent his evenings,
and at the foot of the bed hung a motto which
Mr. Peters gave him. “It tells your fortune for
you, don’t forget it,” he said, when he handed it
to Crawford; and the boy laughed, and read it
curiously— ‘* He that is faithful in that which is
least is faithful also in much.” ‘ [ll try to be,
sir,” he said; and he never once thought of the
long-box over which he had been faithful.

All this happened years ago. Crawford Mills
is errand boy no more, but of the firm of Peters,
Mills & Co. A young man anda rich man.
“He found his fortune in a long box of rubbish,”
Mr. Peters said once, laughing. ‘Never was a
gold piece so successful in business as that one
of his has been; it is good he found it.” Then,
after a moment of silence, he said gravely: ‘No,
he didn’t; he found it in his mother’s Bible—
‘He that is faithful in that which is least is
faithful also in much.’ It is true: Mills the boy
was faithful, and now Mills is the man of trust.”

The object of this book will be achieved if all
its readers learn from its contents to be Farrurut,
Trutarut, Dinicenr and Honest.



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'19688' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVIT' 'sip-files00010.pro'
a3f8646d235303addb396a1002014d2e
a990def6f944f0b70a3e5ed472ed773ab3a40f58
'2011-10-27T22:56:41-04:00'
describe
'26028' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVIU' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
d4041d0e325b08950ce33c67eebffff6
0066abbb955abc2ed57c530b74dadeddae0bb49e
'2011-10-27T22:57:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVIV' 'sip-files00010.tif'
5ee119cdabf71565dcfb5e92b3fa5678
132b35a073310e2b643003693fd623411e046393
'2011-10-27T22:55:18-04:00'
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVIW' 'sip-files00010.txt'
f1d76443acd622d9f1d356476dcfbcef
a47d9cf77f65c7d4ed0fa33c1648494363e10b42
'2011-10-27T22:55:25-04:00'
describe
'6764' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVIX' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
77cf376e22b8afb7fbf94695fd63a521
a39a7204bb08d5ce728ad87e139bf195d3780550
'2011-10-27T22:55:47-04:00'
describe
'356340' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVIY' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
7ef6ce4f9e029a8059d1a5678bf85e23
1cd6ed7e99bf8738575c1941e919ce4910997e71
'2011-10-27T22:54:40-04:00'
describe
'112295' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVIZ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
2b5023601d295b5004b2a823c804fb97
ff2958fe1ea23c6f61aa960d64eb8b96a8d9f4ff
'2011-10-27T22:54:52-04:00'
describe
'21781' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
d7410462409a1a6ec78336bb82b7b706
b9b9b93146466990ba2010e1ca91db3b69fe3c3f
describe
'31153' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJB' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
4ba4ccad922c4731e0876cf510e07c29
70be26b106d1c23bfc77662a044c97b435957598
'2011-10-27T22:55:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJC' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b025dd821c68f1af4a24fd2b3cd31f00
7aaa32a8f2503dc44a17987e1e965dce0aa491b4
'2011-10-27T22:55:26-04:00'
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJD' 'sip-files00011.txt'
ea9dae260430bbc4462ed7c520976da3
c0dbc9ccdb6cdbcbc55991308f72230fabe3b908
'2011-10-27T22:55:07-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7425' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJE' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f42fe4027032bf090e68a24815908b85
74a7a85ffefd13e5df3f865fb4a51c6a64e1343e
describe
'356258' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
3813bda4a8bbf01464fbf02766f2fd96
e2696d188dbeee32f73c8b0cff6ffee6fc7dfd37
'2011-10-27T22:56:48-04:00'
describe
'47363' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
de347ab1b1362ca38f958c1dcc9baf1e
fdf7589a36ccd4c86a63943f2510aff8e079bbc0
'2011-10-27T22:56:34-04:00'
describe
'3855' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJH' 'sip-files00012.pro'
4ad45f65e3f4f5a7f441214b8cd7d78b
6303d95df7f70f1b0eeaee0dba3f234489a5164b
describe
'11110' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJI' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
e5951a5ab792806fb0159174fb8e97e1
12d0378a478288bf62f2123c69571f06ac529079
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
bd16db3fa45c68a36e4a8cae96ab45d3
aa31a702fb10da69f3062c1b5f0fab0a5763b909
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
e4b8c81770289c17ecd5aaadb68eb69a
4c77d4c5702b81ba99288d6e43fd8e34578b7875
'2011-10-27T22:57:13-04:00'
describe
'2809' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJL' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
e51d6619c17632d2f79a6f8227de4673
dd83f109ef55954fc04354f6379735cdaf320d7d
describe
'356308' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
79623878201bdc8be2b8f9784ba78a0d
fde6d1259bca090647b0848c14b3b365a2ef0fd4
'2011-10-27T22:55:00-04:00'
describe
'97286' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJN' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
76ba27d0d831a86855a49579ecdbb2f6
a8f46228d6b16ea184decbc383f5aa28b53a61e0
'2011-10-27T22:55:08-04:00'
describe
'19573' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJO' 'sip-files00013.pro'
1f07dfccc5457069d35c69ba5ff24a77
58e13b6cab4c8dc171998d12c79f9ed63a5c42e4
'2011-10-27T22:57:12-04:00'
describe
'28238' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJP' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
071ce3ac566dedfabd3b12341679d5d4
9f75ef956164364fc189ff4ec5cf4fdb102771e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJQ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
54ba4d0970437e42337b4341e7eb8c38
68334639261ed0bdcf81eaf533e187fdca602ad4
'2011-10-27T22:57:44-04:00'
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJR' 'sip-files00013.txt'
201c52982fd392f63d2c01140e53d414
be7554ad564ebefeaf2fcf94502b092bfe483288
'2011-10-27T22:54:47-04:00'
describe
'7176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJS' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
22087ccf5bf197811db4109a38c1138e
3fcb0adcde9f71de328db297c97ada722307a0d4
'2011-10-27T22:55:32-04:00'
describe
'356273' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJT' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
fec664e34e9a89f267d894e1be299e46
53f202077fdfe772d739e5fc64ce873a9d9ee105
'2011-10-27T22:55:05-04:00'
describe
'147874' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJU' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
4e988af7747b3f93f3e35da6d8a3a39a
e76713049ec0b0d147ce6fec274455aa1b03f050
'2011-10-27T22:56:11-04:00'
describe
'38044' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJV' 'sip-files00014.pro'
fadbb54ef24d7c1c30539f95463dafba
79542b3c103f5d67ad1694fe38e3cee8cdf8072a
'2011-10-27T22:56:57-04:00'
describe
'43232' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJW' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
5d36bcabc896ce5e34b322ff06bde424
92861520daa085d0b23e81640e1b06be8e826558
'2011-10-27T22:55:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJX' 'sip-files00014.tif'
65f60ffeb36ee4db3da32f11b429604a
7ea586b2fcfffd2fc13e01b4caf09a39d7d055e4
'2011-10-27T22:55:43-04:00'
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJY' 'sip-files00014.txt'
c783d000495b6a25b2be542426c0ef59
dd861300ad19004121f5607aec79f72c4b0dc021
'2011-10-27T22:54:42-04:00'
describe
'10119' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVJZ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
e901b1f09f30bac00f4a0a1d4812b3dd
c3206ed883f73e6892bbe245170fc699555dbdf4
'2011-10-27T22:55:12-04:00'
describe
'356286' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKA' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
92d1006e4f6b2af4cec8c1e7b237ba74
237eb9d348b2c83af3cccc50772e4fee33443ac9
'2011-10-27T22:56:18-04:00'
describe
'141496' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKB' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
97d3d601546b0cfef88c3dc19861b0fd
7e7277e5e29c546a8eae8fc5583157e357e00621
'2011-10-27T22:56:36-04:00'
describe
'34798' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKC' 'sip-files00015.pro'
0fa4714ac4b5174b1c4f2f9015f5df59
3c40244c5e3ae71b4132643b0051958907105c1d
'2011-10-27T22:54:30-04:00'
describe
'41026' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKD' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
41e9622b3ab8f89094a867b7aa6717ea
78d8699791c88732504da09d4729401587cba44d
'2011-10-27T22:56:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKE' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d8404be8b83c8f289a318ba362b2e652
3325256e5f5ad0d04ad55734b50cb373f04bbbfb
'2011-10-27T22:55:44-04:00'
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKF' 'sip-files00015.txt'
5d3d435b4f51f3469c1b718db315d809
1208e01496d77533e08d336029b5e6249deaa975
describe
'9424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKG' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
b73f89b5ad0ecb62e2b388339d09285a
039e7352083d91493ab11d9c868d7f202afd5981
'2011-10-27T22:55:01-04:00'
describe
'356346' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
9e9dc5bd282a2e66d85c5ac9a9f3593b
a0faa1f6f3c72f1bb83e9937c1eaf6836573222d
'2011-10-27T22:55:40-04:00'
describe
'126720' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKI' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
46cef5d70e77cb55987478c9c1005ead
a041c168d85bc15267650ea4badb2ab98b2815e9
describe
'30505' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKJ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
697e5d497b412bc5aa4d38ac766a462c
79bf791cf4e895b8b8a789c5e5256795c51d714b
describe
'36738' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKK' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
2f2ad674f5003347456ffc958f112e42
b6f0bd36687f9ab350ed573821bc9a78940d5a4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKL' 'sip-files00016.tif'
449f80fbbe2101df49a3b3f0625cfabe
160fa6cf41e92018da26d7bf6b96613cae63da8e
'2011-10-27T22:57:03-04:00'
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKM' 'sip-files00016.txt'
c6b4d7fb3791cb59f9a415316b72df00
361a2fee3d5434acf6483cd5b47a80ed933578f5
describe
'9389' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKN' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4fc7485e2aa2b84b6d0060cccb8efcca
44b6af91dc2cfd0a048e2402eaa51679e6e08655
'2011-10-27T22:55:24-04:00'
describe
'356312' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKO' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
0aabd53fc952aeb873fca0e7472b4e73
34bc15a3c82fa1a0b02cb637bcc7dd2bcc527a59
describe
'137189' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKP' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
d73676f8277b5ca43b4a5d0e4fc27018
5b9985bb19c532c8709d5c2033a14a1047f5fd5f
'2011-10-27T22:54:28-04:00'
describe
'33973' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKQ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
87d2c3be3cc6ed2079245deef8227b4d
04934dc6d9668d4cd179ee5a6d50d898bf5dac85
'2011-10-27T22:56:40-04:00'
describe
'39228' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKR' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
6199f3953e9e014f3ecf0640d458a18a
52f20a8ffa37b2c28961f57e72c2fdfa00e0b313
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKS' 'sip-files00017.tif'
aa5cc940a7b93dac1eba2f68398ca5cd
27ee74c767ee00ab0f6dd27e4b59386191d5802f
'2011-10-27T22:57:05-04:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKT' 'sip-files00017.txt'
c8b64e16d129dc73f6054c75d086e8a2
5019eb022ffcbd594cc43961f88558d0ecd99afb
'2011-10-27T22:57:16-04:00'
describe
'9227' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKU' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
e13282af47b839589b5609227c1fa294
50249b46579df3bdddd5a4db894587e41bb8b1d9
'2011-10-27T22:56:25-04:00'
describe
'356344' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKV' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
66db1f4ffb94d99eb67c02038e469574
ed72a86e9de55dddd86b4d365fd37af9df7d6773
'2011-10-27T22:55:50-04:00'
describe
'141129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKW' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
f3eb694a42cece1b3a3cd8e3b193ddb7
0a656dac9bc7123185e3f76f3ff96c27c270d6f4
'2011-10-27T22:57:08-04:00'
describe
'35279' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
902e6594b63a88a852e01ed10abf86af
467a66c440dc1df7a212e1ddcd303814296cc89e
'2011-10-27T22:57:15-04:00'
describe
'39761' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKY' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
ec3fe82657bbbc0b130d9f8935922f98
840b69415d510e361bcb4342244ce43585f4b53e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVKZ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
d983a880360183f10d1c9fffe044088f
a038c950104444a3624aab1cbe55dbefe73e4643
'2011-10-27T22:55:11-04:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLA' 'sip-files00018.txt'
54c2cacc2849f952f9249dd1365e877f
bb37a49b65861356e8ccb0cb4bce66c559338165
'2011-10-27T22:55:10-04:00'
describe
'9515' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
6fa540f8ecb863f512a0b4bade4b2e76
d7293244f85251572ba952f7c6e83a37672cda66
describe
'356290' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLC' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
05351340efca0fe6871f5d66a08167fb
4fb2ac91f04591d422cfc96ad599afdb416cc47c
'2011-10-27T22:56:54-04:00'
describe
'140449' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLD' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
053dee9faa06d513cabc60926ec042c9
8e53c6c4ad1c04ca01877cf815216acedebaee8a
describe
'35374' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLE' 'sip-files00019.pro'
56ee21bb2b3d85fb2ece0f2c30792e15
88c7ea6b1ec344d349561ec379fae4e35626ed49
describe
'41603' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLF' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
86b01cdece806a13b683509db4a533a8
eaa638b0a7ea61f849a91aa97137fe5fb146f154
'2011-10-27T22:54:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
fce24e0bb39501c8a266084da40dc630
190c6b04b1eec6579a3a328b2eaeda5c728b71f8
'2011-10-27T22:55:31-04:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLH' 'sip-files00019.txt'
6de0b057315dc8a81ab9c33c9ee61fb2
462cacafb9bc4d2f52ef80cbd6335b22fd5b2865
'2011-10-27T22:54:50-04:00'
describe
'9789' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLI' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
a1ce1b338a4e577d8d95acee470550ac
40ab10f6491bbf76537b332d5575dea756aa3d0d
describe
'356142' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLJ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
a731e16067c291cd8298a9f3513fe8e5
b4c481806fd0ef412b78c25911bf6122e45186c3
describe
'125412' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLK' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
f33731f7420fb2d64af61b1e40d8a3b0
45cdc15694efdd9c7b6ccc67869c21f2237af5ed
'2011-10-27T22:55:54-04:00'
describe
'29691' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLL' 'sip-files00020.pro'
91948ad79fba461d52a83a301eaeb609
59d570abaf27d45ffe52ee9eefcfe04bdafe8697
describe
'36373' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLM' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
e990db11c2129c4c3568e8dcb194cf9e
a2036df047890eecde0112db1995bfbf99b0f543
describe
'2866312' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLN' 'sip-files00020.tif'
0714666c7c5d4983738ba0986c1affe4
8d759bb868df21a9c38b8b7ce5284261837719d4
'2011-10-27T22:55:16-04:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLO' 'sip-files00020.txt'
30557ebc3a98915b3403aece8d0189b2
78c544e3b682c0e4f3363306155db19e9d736233
'2011-10-27T22:54:35-04:00'
describe
'8652' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLP' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
6559ba3377c55b4f2b63de2afce59754
3c897c7d4362059c26ef3c2e63f70f00b30086fd
'2011-10-27T22:56:02-04:00'
describe
'356296' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLQ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
cf872efa5c7195b85563dcecdc3c5b13
92baf88fab1a32ff8359137a12ebf688ec5eaa7f
describe
'131926' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLR' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
39bab03a205702e40be19af3aed3343d
3d7fd6b145a45c005e72db6a7ba811eec6e0350a
'2011-10-27T22:55:27-04:00'
describe
'32470' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
f7fed03d8e2f76e45e1ae7cf9d40a8b6
79ccd5de0fc37af9a8f4994cd606904ce2d97b2d
describe
'38220' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLT' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
c36f18c3444d0b35d89b141e5699b33e
2997409df42a10dae59386405e681082585d5555
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLU' 'sip-files00021.tif'
104f3afcd926adceb8e6dbbdfa00f64d
a45f7cef111c884092d32728214ed3b19ee6fde8
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLV' 'sip-files00021.txt'
422968ffdf800f8b7821f3431cf0de1b
5374977b5a7641b010773d544122217b63bea4ee
'2011-10-27T22:57:27-04:00'
describe
'9116' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLW' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
7c4ede15b1367aade02e141f3b7e756e
3ef414b05aea5b7fe705dd219643eb9af9d5a2a3
'2011-10-27T22:57:17-04:00'
describe
'356173' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLX' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
64106fcc4543cf2ec00be5bc8106f78b
ba20bf7d091d3e69ea4db7fbc5a44f08a659863d
'2011-10-27T22:54:26-04:00'
describe
'124968' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e35a6143d6b40d3cf8e8f3b4ebfdbf70
43ec01176b9b146c9bcd88a32149b272616ef4a3
describe
'32389' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVLZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
995e61637816ea2f27fbf4756cbae4c0
a00222304a14a29a20b470b89905e5380ded15f1
'2011-10-27T22:56:17-04:00'
describe
'37398' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
695e4a22ea31448e76efc7d8b6e4430e
f746d4694a8392675a4d7386a39b01bbe0045112
'2011-10-27T22:55:45-04:00'
describe
'2866308' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
b6db01b9dde38c66016047611217f745
34da770349a66e5d7e56ac54bee61e2e44ea4344
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
53b1b2dde7606f7bc1377b61c089d622
f8aebcaeabadb5a2680607c1619f822a45cc527d
'2011-10-27T22:56:13-04:00'
describe
'8948' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMD' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
370bfa9704923a639d557bb05d6e963b
09eb224a53e97908ccdf802130003e4898052cb0
describe
'356136' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVME' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
ab3b32e142e94e516c0a40eac23dd167
c3683d2dadde0dd09b0c7145e8cffc93fada2af0
describe
'137305' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMF' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
54d07c5276fdc22a2f08ef62590e2fe0
0ae0740f0182c74f3df0b4aaf7d2813fc80381bc
describe
'36214' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMG' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5903cc1f48835417ec716dcf5df52963
56293ca65cd65726a22f88d5d2bc81821dcf65a6
'2011-10-27T22:56:51-04:00'
describe
'40987' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMH' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
2c7cbeca822d20ae268a26c6dd2780c8
53b032ada80120a5cf7b70e759995ef2e0b26984
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMI' 'sip-files00023.tif'
22d50685c8681b575b70d0fcbb6a1043
fad644bca9d6ed02a92380255d29a30de7de76b8
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMJ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
105b5c479a2a7688da11ddb281d35bdd
cd40f339b259b85648beb62779e7af544fd08833
'2011-10-27T22:56:50-04:00'
describe
'9559' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMK' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
aaa6c2dbd47c963d1d19161d033c6807
ba5cc3082bbf3e6dfd0d66c6db617292298f2802
describe
'356180' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVML' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a5c1d953f7eec4f5171f5945d23e56f6
623f36efa311ef5d8a63fd3d389415534b3e42bd
describe
'139504' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMM' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
5ffc0b01a9f50162cfaa68eabe6f196e
71f9b06436cabdad503e4683b1530e4b0337c5ff
'2011-10-27T22:54:55-04:00'
describe
'35688' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMN' 'sip-files00024.pro'
e4fb27c02215417a1d6a051df0231ea4
6adbd867aa44d08c88e3a225ed135623aa0491b0
'2011-10-27T22:54:58-04:00'
describe
'41299' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
9d492fb44ecff205028b9de00ee8c69b
df07d6bd53e4a19ae0ea08e97884a22992f6e374
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMP' 'sip-files00024.tif'
56a9b4862cfe46f1ad50928c2d32ab7a
6d4ebb5d48c3cce4b07bda38893f362c0bbec0bf
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMQ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
8cde93e9a0923e1889b0bf061e73528b
f6751ccccc4983ce438a2543ce40ae6d65f3c887
describe
'9632' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMR' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
d09cea45202dd6c0cba15fa05e16c4b3
9d36537ba01e682c266c6489dd134807c4818ba4
'2011-10-27T22:55:03-04:00'
describe
'356168' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
680a23b845365a45c3429e1d1d69d9b6
d5d0b2b88f2897d4036a03814ee6c34a23cf6ddb
'2011-10-27T22:55:19-04:00'
describe
'134987' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMT' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
e555726b88f6612ac0d7a27d19392166
e167659047f4106dd72a04066fd9cb5f1e16223a
describe
'32886' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMU' 'sip-files00025.pro'
86019fad32789542a9bd18822d389706
6ad2afd2d3695b6886a57d11115896879e2341c5
describe
'39735' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f1078c6ec2f785daaa91c033f6070ace
8067cc80f774c7934d51d86836d42b353232f520
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMW' 'sip-files00025.tif'
b4f49c8a690292ca990b37874964c557
2dc8f5f8d72f52815c922e42e2c4a832448f1de7
'2011-10-27T22:56:56-04:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMX' 'sip-files00025.txt'
77c404765296b817b40c9837a312865d
d7c1f0c1aa52e66b75a1c938369e8d3cb890e69f
'2011-10-27T22:55:58-04:00'
describe
'9456' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMY' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
3cd3205c6117e8b108139d1842270348
39193bc4575d811f77264284ba120b5ec72516ee
describe
'356138' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVMZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
2452d31bde4fe3cf9b4d6de624aca2d0
87f24662ade3495ce422b24125e30fbe079f4361
describe
'145251' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
d0940755c8d2232ae163127638961d22
c9abc4fc4f6670973983841cacecaaca51c8e844
'2011-10-27T22:55:20-04:00'
describe
'36983' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
88c4c393fcfbb92446504eff0a8554e3
2d4b8d556b741761951036be12134d686b89e9cd
describe
'42979' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNC' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
e0bc9fc472b9bde64cb262a362d0d77d
b1cc0f5d96d2b9e07da7d2ca389ae32ee3938514
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVND' 'sip-files00026.tif'
9a81dbe0298900be927a69523c8ecfad
f5b5227f4d4e11a3471099dc2fb23e94db9c3dad
'2011-10-27T22:55:57-04:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNE' 'sip-files00026.txt'
96bfa5f6b5e49fbb8410666a473e3343
758ae413d3e2b7e599f557345bfe554a999694ae
describe
'9940' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNF' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
0843ce50c23f8931c56c4d4b2c36dafd
113b76119785c3941e027a2fa6c4601f6b13c641
describe
'356328' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNG' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
01ed1fb67189f06f4d7e1dae1138b084
fbb0e0aaef1a1fbda19168795aa1bc193d301986
describe
'137866' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNH' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d2691827671c777efb0495085a3402aa
f7f62cbce7cd87fc5a8fa01c9285994e57c63c28
describe
'36050' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNI' 'sip-files00027.pro'
5a1e6b5edefc68056a2baf87b711ddb1
a631716b47078ebc387512a6508c2da1ccc885a3
'2011-10-27T22:56:21-04:00'
describe
'40913' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNJ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
d69768ead2e813e0aaf1b4e10b60257d
c6406813ef1d47cd09cf2d4d0337b5a2ba751e8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
13763dab17533931210c3e56c8a8ccfa
cdc9495a5d468d787fa354946e5f0c4953572658
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNL' 'sip-files00027.txt'
24c3aedc4c17282664d776507897d170
69d6b68273fed225f9a8b06e54d40066c4f2ea04
describe
'9834' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNM' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
e57d0e70894ef2f2923f165ebdbe6763
4eb0d9a9b0874cbe9c434e0b4e089aee68479c57
describe
'356175' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNN' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
16d8d960fd7b8e123e749d6db8dd0255
c1630d9a96ed075c8387f2ef1e446ec9d26f43e0
describe
'128133' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
5b12d08b423d4b4ed593476a8eb84769
3bdd62cf6d30d7bc71f45efaa8950259b14e7eb2
describe
'31215' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b3b1297aa60016a28330db9b142bf04f
c17466fc472c6a4964b9494eb73cff1ae528153c
'2011-10-27T22:54:54-04:00'
describe
'38049' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNQ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
09b31576b47c69311f3b25a8fc03c443
6f2f3c2594607dd72edbc87569908fb68af121cf
'2011-10-27T22:54:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
519a503b01a8f4eefd31a0869e442fb6
485f4e5e64a76d910e5d35d7381ffb871994daf8
'2011-10-27T22:56:19-04:00'
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
23472b1766cc7f8dd7f9285d2bb9da98
70a9865ee311f7b3fd56f8fa34e27ebd918a345c
describe
'9498' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNT' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
e901a1ca90b2ee23ef2377ced6c73f52
d09f9f7cf8aeff8bfb5f8158f0cf9588df355340
describe
'356134' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
e1e388e0d019a49e567a30a45273e418
b13f5e73caffb1dd070f3b32ff2ab277c6e78981
describe
'127456' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
429bc223457264be545603eee0213efb
39f4b55012a90f0cb655191b1d577715f8b14b82
describe
'32688' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
b38d03d09e079ce112c472c92fae6ac4
ddbcf44951441f0dbbc700d60477ef95b3458f5b
describe
'36269' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
7291af93d5180b4ccb886828598d6072
6babded6bbf86d10ef0140f19d2da9b63bc39569
'2011-10-27T22:57:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
4740571742430a5ed5cc7a1442e1a166
39465fa5bcecec2434bd35349b520e91bdcf139f
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVNZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
aaa209a2dd409033c6b2cbd739321abc
8c068ac2c703a0a3e1dca9bba958cdb92f5e1c2c
describe
'9070' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
689a51acc8d8dc55ff01bbdb38df3d13
8c6c6a7b91e6ce979a538272c9f9fbdce6cbadca
describe
'356327' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
4ba2caae5b48be424f6b6b6dfd645f25
4c99b7b014737819d0e0a832d75c51641bf44604
describe
'134648' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
45ffc46c1742eba72f57e48ffadda975
e2f482a0a2a345f909f23766d722dd35f4c468f9
'2011-10-27T22:57:00-04:00'
describe
'33911' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
9ed03efe3683300251328db1e7bc6031
98abc2a2564884f5537d883cc84ce7086951f189
'2011-10-27T22:54:56-04:00'
describe
'39112' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOE' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
98ce92fcc14fe2c61a632e539c469375
501a6304e2a778f67bc21929fd06f9d874a669cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
68e7a32535e3fd94d5e51de4f5ea0c6e
d06a4b7a8cb1e56bd92a95a756717ef398808e12
'2011-10-27T22:56:29-04:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOG' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8bb7c5dbc6e4bc3a16cf87d42c992aa7
02a8dac5c7888639ca02c81a2a9aa37d344a5bf4
'2011-10-27T22:56:27-04:00'
describe
'9377' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
69ac6aa584d9ded1cfbe435b978cdac0
7a1e0a92428b21a799d17a8d38a25576d5793e26
'2011-10-27T22:56:44-04:00'
describe
'356174' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
55bd3127ad5de6cebc5ccded8de8a445
8ef6b410f270c088550519b93d2eb1b561ea7cde
describe
'138790' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
38bb202140722785df461a7bf4d9b485
4bb114bb57bcfae961d98a827ed6e98fb6a9fbd4
'2011-10-27T22:56:33-04:00'
describe
'34764' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOK' 'sip-files00031.pro'
612de6130c23aa7eaba36bbc4db40e59
d2f9db870de38e5b788dd3142b75ef3277498e27
describe
'41166' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOL' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
c0155f9d6255104611375a79124180ca
18ee1b0d0673bd47cfe5a388faa2fc4db5321326
'2011-10-27T22:56:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e975f77d404fa50e01e219b24b0853aa
e9692a6c866d210fe0d64bac2ac66d26ae6c5613
'2011-10-27T22:55:35-04:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVON' 'sip-files00031.txt'
1448a04cc969f33924c254448ca1b4ad
427f7a419e5582b60f5e8d2b832542f441d5afaf
describe
'9936' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOO' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
0bf820f3182ac76916a95b4c33350f62
39888ca8224147b84846e208438db290dd45f454
describe
'356164' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
34a48b283240fb2664a2f1f1f3e64c1b
25f61bf22d4e3a0441a998169c44d2aeb62af54d
describe
'130910' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
30e02a3c8174271e4a03cd893492b037
64e729f6f7cdea33672c7dc02b0c4e824a36fcec
describe
'35583' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOR' 'sip-files00032.pro'
73b8b33c29d06d4a87d55b4ff74bb0b4
736d2021d0b039b07c064d9dc415204e0dc5cca9
describe
'37395' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOS' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
abb36abf54cc24920c424cf0cbf46066
5b697d0fc19ec5ff7e98400afb5792b651810a58
'2011-10-27T22:54:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOT' 'sip-files00032.tif'
b0744d38db5b629e4346e8369ecd7855
3a50f69769d39d1342b6fcb069711d106a22645e
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
807da3a55e2ddc549380782bb4ee7f9e
603399e46c53f1b78318c729589f9f2800b7e6c4
describe
'9159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOV' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
4b33741d8855be12efd23aea4b4f1432
63ddd44d57459f743b3f5a07f98dca9b1440c1ef
describe
'356150' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
67dced8fe1bab715429d44cec9174569
abec98b692f9931879e1fa4113c8f96da51134a6
'2011-10-27T22:57:22-04:00'
describe
'130382' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOX' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
ca63e8c9af9997f41e7b5afb2de0316b
0abe2ec621c15315aa30342f17dce30516627097
'2011-10-27T22:56:12-04:00'
describe
'34377' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOY' 'sip-files00033.pro'
5840fb3cb2dd745783c44b7cc38c2b1d
aa0a2e94f2851e1f2db4f72241dbbfb870128c5b
'2011-10-27T22:56:16-04:00'
describe
'38191' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVOZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
4e5fa10f77dd638edb261a7b7ab66e20
74eb0bba68912cbbf569da661bf6eedbb2d2b5a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
f2956b4e6cb1b916bf4fa40454a0f1d9
d0d3c8a65de49d55c706f7920483b23c6f69d65f
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPB' 'sip-files00033.txt'
d3b82d5caac182c854a83fc2c2507059
41704dae7750163557f833589a57f520111aa4a3
'2011-10-27T22:56:26-04:00'
describe
'9229' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPC' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
2abd765b10ad900d733ecf6b733381b3
ab962129eb12b3a51ecfec58bb6ae141ceca3d66
'2011-10-27T22:56:42-04:00'
describe
'356166' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b491fdbb42f5f032c7efc7f2bcce75d9
817b5bdb2b8f6c1e10a23a4e83fe7f23329cf096
describe
'141534' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPE' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
ed765e43ac959294b2c7a3f853dc7f41
bf21ed4f9a761be8f1be984a256e95d466e651f5
'2011-10-27T22:56:07-04:00'
describe
'36275' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
0ce690dc24b10d6f474e1bf5bb845569
f65e74b4dca7c32fbddeabb0f1377e5f761257b4
'2011-10-27T22:55:36-04:00'
describe
'42247' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
4d7b7dee976f616e344e0ccd05da6584
1a498c92f58da09619a10d2dabb6438a2776c537
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
b2d55da9814cb11841fcf5f7cf20fde8
dde5bd508002e757be413714c6e1cffc03b4d178
'2011-10-27T22:56:28-04:00'
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPI' 'sip-files00034.txt'
6db9fff78658b0ffa93fa5dbb95a9e82
7c83eb0a477408cab41dbebb3ff4657c2c3f5a25
describe
'9882' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
ed0ebc65f045e097001f35be47cf0496
d205d1b7136f03751749df3d6df399544499674c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
1a895fd32217c5fd6f824cef5b4b9c18
c412dce7afcabd09ebd57b12116d8b8055f44d18
describe
'187759' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
0d2fae5a02567e2709b5939137baf580
02c0e89bb57f81e9c881e3a305072a2f5aa819cc
'2011-10-27T22:54:46-04:00'
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
f54d0571046081c2b447d374dca2741e
e70c917c462966b8ec198f1a72776b2c8a08ce5a
describe
'44826' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
a8bad0d6e1642885b43025b4f7150318
604b9031fa6b88afd095a89cfad200b737305a0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
ab9462e7d9d2b087d8aaf835905bfff1
1793b2a3073700a881fa3cfa03494eb8a8ce1e94
'2011-10-27T22:56:59-04:00'
describe
'81' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
d080d5a29f6468d90bb2761d7e02a571
cb2c697bfa5189610ceb3577c13bf0309f3c3780
describe
'10632' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a65a74a02a9207e1b22ed000b8bb9777
50140551c5e3be29389484044c2fe2a252d0cc4c
'2011-10-27T22:55:46-04:00'
describe
'356125' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
59e1dd48355072d4ed1633f15a3652f6
14696999d0bba61eaf33e9a7c20413a4e71ad4dc
describe
'31857' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
b5a53d853b11ebd4fb388d72d6cad7e5
887dd2af5fad8065c6eb38f938023ed5d957bc49
describe
'5715' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPT' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
ad3733f9480e02e14340230386f2e45d
0296dd78b0bb2d4a711648446e5199d546154cb6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPU' 'sip-files00036.tif'
306a1e0dd5d14e93e6512951216bbf72
2aef0b3180a6de3892cc37c686ef47cdc0689387
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPV' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
7a64d1770c31806cbb9d1b589248fffb
86b65d7cfce313829778593a6a1e5de21e04b30e
describe
'356157' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPW' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
36e9214cd470468d01187c7b342b298d
c39d41f758d2dba94dfdf00a74a0bb40cb185476
describe
'144908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPX' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
894dc65f20e996e28c9a054116cdba39
74ba9e8c1218474bc4935dc7b97f2e1ce877e63c
'2011-10-27T22:56:05-04:00'
describe
'38197' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
4140cbe81902cbb79a1eef1382601650
1cf3035ed851c65b19ed206c31ab2df80c5de772
'2011-10-27T22:55:09-04:00'
describe
'42304' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVPZ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
745d7e2f2794792189b2d53de72b69ef
bd1b9501691c06272b1117245fb2bb2e20cf8046
'2011-10-27T22:56:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQA' 'sip-files00037.tif'
28902bcf3e3a07ddf0237de6f5f5a9ae
2e2f884787412123818f750f511896746badb861
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQB' 'sip-files00037.txt'
55c7fe684d5fb418c9417a1be6b070c2
a96f1c0e5237ff8d1d2ae57df0eadf5a6f0e02b6
'2011-10-27T22:55:13-04:00'
describe
'9594' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQC' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
3f1383b5a4d16214b4da4cb58cf32048
211cb026ea620cac31e96cf0b1d593b655a1f2eb
'2011-10-27T22:54:45-04:00'
describe
'356145' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQD' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
70c2153918f9e5ec58704555366867a3
85d99d1766f67964d4b6d8cc47aa8a0cb501bdf3
describe
'136847' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQE' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f96d78bf6ce7041a9f258a5cdd86dc75
667dfa84c33f0bd1cb4e4dc09441a68e876719ba
describe
'34025' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQF' 'sip-files00038.pro'
3ab5cabfe8315b7f6e4b5b86d7287ed9
1a59068d38f7f7183e0b9cb7e76bd7363233ce75
describe
'39869' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQG' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2207d892e1b1d2a911ab6a04108faa94
e1a62a2309e35597cb88f79c5e660494c47187d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQH' 'sip-files00038.tif'
52a92d1afa292e3fde6aaed3dff64a16
ac5c114e58c46c5ac4e48881d1f61735d49a9894
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQI' 'sip-files00038.txt'
c0705aa30967d007c79a6c5dd8d69406
35d943cced4a4e0b0b3fadd85fd56e0a6e7be8b0
describe
'9643' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQJ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
189abd1a3044545e93a8889926b13c23
ccb380a63402f93fc44897ed9008c285ed880a73
describe
'356169' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQK' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
25b69b4e22c09532d9046efb5e9fe9e0
30bca5397b9287e1067e6426fe2c0098558d03b5
'2011-10-27T22:55:52-04:00'
describe
'146131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQL' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
0460e7702c68722bdb6e303c9115d97c
2051658c542f26e9e9fe327bb4429e737aa6ab0a
describe
'35183' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQM' 'sip-files00039.pro'
9c83f05eeeb1b557a43a104b74eda04d
974027bce632045ad88d6dcd2bfaf1e23f4bf160
'2011-10-27T22:57:35-04:00'
describe
'41604' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQN' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9bce2fe355d78a95ba676c3b0a24eb1c
80c23499214e2516a516ed67f68460b1e019a1cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQO' 'sip-files00039.tif'
9deb9d123d82cd640b11ea023823e9bc
ace7d12348d7e5d4541cbc11847ed691a9b656ac
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQP' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c86878b724d29edef73ced6ef9639534
024a15f21e31f2bc593a3e28eb3953483575b886
'2011-10-27T22:54:32-04:00'
describe
'9695' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQQ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
6f895c5dd3fc945d293c7962bfe40841
a49ea687454f054540a6ae3f5a8000cc7814248d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQR' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f30c36f0795bc804a64c1073db970314
7816f7d1f8b30d7b92f53fd4a83afc07a1632c95
describe
'137611' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQS' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
aa257530dfa7269b68dbd909db73e8bf
dd7dd7c92838118b336bfba419e08de6da9e45b1
describe
'35292' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQT' 'sip-files00040.pro'
f5da18e5a90e369e544039686d34b6d3
762a62415aaa04ec1b10eb06ee9b2cf3a5751943
describe
'39898' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQU' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c49288ec6f8d1b01ee972cec093ec25e
5af2acf2a62ddaa371896da169660cc4936e50d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQV' 'sip-files00040.tif'
53ecb1d5e90a959173cdcdbe67b80145
599d7cff441f4dee909cc6af48d84029d9db544d
'2011-10-27T22:55:59-04:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQW' 'sip-files00040.txt'
686a633cbfe6824b0532888647c237df
0e2ce000779278d8ecac224525ade9c4ff8e7a70
'2011-10-27T22:54:49-04:00'
describe
'9481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQX' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
1e5a8b8f202359457f86f08934425128
970596b89cfe40f28cec1b0239b99b947fba53d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQY' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
5e09df2d8009ba906ab4a9baf96b1a5d
ea56dac0598dd25e00bcfc84e0fb4f6824a23be2
describe
'127490' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVQZ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
1c7ab8b66e35ae6dc1796d10a828baa8
62dca64c5f0d5c01e17fea89da82295b53c5c204
'2011-10-27T22:57:37-04:00'
describe
'33234' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRA' 'sip-files00041.pro'
e14859d16f8f9133b44dea7ccc27353a
34e2b76c8d0a7628dece8df2a5542c85172c8af6
describe
'36194' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRB' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1aae7e626e0360365c973a73eb24e31d
a9d241b7fa966a3319dd38d3858fe50f14aa88cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRC' 'sip-files00041.tif'
9ba78cee200497c6753a4b42fe5db086
19bbc151b69b97e18b3b71276edb4cb93c3dfee9
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRD' 'sip-files00041.txt'
c0a275daf50fca52d644cbcbc72dbc36
073830b9065e45691e87cb81565cb9815f7d9c01
describe
'8774' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRE' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
8c127acb8f078d2387b4cbb911d59730
eb58b4b9e9968ea8f939bebf89feb0f9f7d36951
describe
'356178' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRF' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
043837d87ad3edcd0ba9a043d039ef42
d3a853184aa9abf0f2b66f8a7ed377076d0ab70b
'2011-10-27T22:55:22-04:00'
describe
'136918' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRG' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
764ab56b05af19c837840f42f0793f00
ad0863a234c96fb15ee965f6c851584bfcba2997
describe
'32569' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRH' 'sip-files00042.pro'
416f6d56c84b312247a4f97749160a4f
9b0c60f85e215232552ee7c38ed65ead8ccf6760
describe
'39339' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRI' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
a7fc390484f385a6f309033270aa8b16
7cbdf52c13d5f816622886d0f5952bbdc5b58050
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRJ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
7be6227132f0eb8cfb2bedc0081f1dbd
e89bfc69ce40aa2daa3f5e66a778302bf1a67487
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRK' 'sip-files00042.txt'
86ac44c5214444436b3e81a8c0f92c1b
6b24c6121bef42d7d06bbeb8135e3bbc46bc1278
'2011-10-27T22:54:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRL' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
268f2027dd83599921785ab91aec945a
2d3b7dffd7f815577a90b0382bbf7f42ed1fea1d
describe
'356266' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRM' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
4225e0881736971d1c21436f2bb12372
ed81fa87c08910a1820aa3747523a29ad4e659d7
describe
'136358' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRN' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
12f21e4597fa00dcdc18ffe573b42640
cc5c1d307dff8ac69478065e129a1d79f2d6d074
'2011-10-27T22:55:21-04:00'
describe
'33394' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRO' 'sip-files00043.pro'
fddde95b3cc263c769342e9e1f683cb6
563b970655f9120cc31e6e277e8821b2576079e2
describe
'39502' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRP' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
ab07094083c5ce9429aa8c9428cc185e
9fb0f20c6d9c1da02ee5b805de2736fa3e56406d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRQ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
367241928a52f63667fff503c31f0bb3
c5eea38d682f6da5d832f9b45809e151a4535897
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRR' 'sip-files00043.txt'
01598db9503000a531a57bfccb6beab1
be1cec82c9afe7ddf2b6762cae779fc9197a768f
describe
'9421' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRS' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
2d2e700fed582047934209e265058670
7ef8eea0c95c5cf2cbf15029cd64157a519616e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRT' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
b6515cfc233e279ca2bde28efc44f26f
17107e81afece29ef5b427efef952fc862c4d8d1
describe
'132222' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRU' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
74e2748113107f58236adf0467cacb18
277db6c16010d2bb38b9c98905f50b9de6850331
describe
'35368' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRV' 'sip-files00044.pro'
5b5d3a7644ae038242368850823288bb
891f427cba7bfd2d62cad95a41f49d66cdd18550
describe
'38969' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRW' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
e82b67c2714f6c78a7fbc1fba218b1b5
640a9f937da829aa0ec6c9dc086e609d4b920240
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRX' 'sip-files00044.tif'
21c8acebae43b88bdf89e3a17d2a8999
bab12d2f2562fd09be3e07514bcaaa3cfa104511
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRY' 'sip-files00044.txt'
908bde9ad95afa85a7feaa31616b218b
05de9f3a65ccf9c2e3d138faf944746dc6d6e95e
'2011-10-27T22:56:24-04:00'
describe
'9112' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVRZ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
6d66bc76fec6a2dc894a51f1d92d22a0
46803e949872569667efce23eb1e02c462b7668c
'2011-10-27T22:56:47-04:00'
describe
'356280' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSA' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
fcc1863fc5d2b0db7ec7c1b9e80676dc
66f46ad396de4fa3a2faaaeb0df4178d2af4ccfe
describe
'141686' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSB' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
7dc08bfbdb894b9f456077bc40489ed8
1c08432b9eca12412cb3eff8ae5823a9802a5de9
describe
'34994' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSC' 'sip-files00045.pro'
f7f14d328ed5f0c0ef889189408ba908
e6575d0c42fbb1acf062cd9675f514b4e8fa43c5
describe
'41207' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSD' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
244f9f5bb25d2e6fa0920cec8b25b7c5
595eeb581cb0bf0b53cff7395d5eb4628485f840
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSE' 'sip-files00045.tif'
ba5aabf3b160ab43a730e2db785216c8
adff1325f5b65e35c3d8bc44b186065934cd467a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSF' 'sip-files00045.txt'
2f239137a57a4918f6f8979a250d9da9
16c4b9da5faca223de499de2de291de2da156c62
describe
'9571' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSG' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
9932e85b7174aeb7603a56f23b017846
d6693d0ae1808a0d64c720f7a5c44e40f950eab9
describe
'356306' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSH' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
e15ef5bf3129e2a6e2341afebb27b48b
5367af043519e59592bb65b5f5008cd39990d57b
'2011-10-27T22:57:06-04:00'
describe
'117975' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSI' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
3df8e8442bbf7c387ea7168e99332033
53fcf025ce4822b177baac613c3b025cb8e8ed85
'2011-10-27T22:56:39-04:00'
describe
'30243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSJ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
06b1e05a4150a67db184749e5d3db448
821cb7cfd68f87d32ec72788ac6a4d4c61e4c1c0
describe
'34929' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSK' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
8f9f03b48a54b510e7a12cc95c5140f9
dbf1d62ba956c644ad0ecadab435fbc593a9fdc9
'2011-10-27T22:56:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSL' 'sip-files00046.tif'
8e4157cdc6f4186509589e4fec9f06c1
337587780230800a0f6a48b563a372fd8b445c3b
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSM' 'sip-files00046.txt'
04bd8b56e6d868618ea3dd16d2ae12fd
641b83f5d418acf15ec7d0d54941e364acd8bc2c
describe
'8219' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSN' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
e6dae3ed110e722a698db21d2476b116
c4d37962fac6d7b0fe4becabd241fcb4dc74c405
describe
'356093' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSO' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
2e95eb75d203c72ae92c8d9bdf4d4864
860e592ef45063807d6bb9e3cbc00c7c56b9b57a
describe
'138589' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSP' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
8dbfe3cf3a3f3568a14cc684880e2835
a0ee9f3b8741e997cffade0f23d4f11979427493
'2011-10-27T22:54:53-04:00'
describe
'36796' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSQ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
a189fc5833da33890721dab4d169c6d0
7d47bc817998127662fa3aa5a9e31dcf0e21a743
describe
'41912' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSR' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
6594f0816b775098a3fad8eb7d943c41
42192235cb8ace3b21d053db8ab553040ab1cd28
'2011-10-27T22:57:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSS' 'sip-files00047.tif'
b4b46589752611d9fb48988a7187cb87
8f5906f544ccc59962735c00c7275017069d7312
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVST' 'sip-files00047.txt'
b5a464b32b037068e218872d0ea73ef6
3cb26d41c38b3a4b64d3380f6c023247f606ba5e
'2011-10-27T22:55:41-04:00'
describe
'9593' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSU' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
3049aecad9a31a7be3b753cc31bf13f8
cf27cec30ea58bce57901c1756a359bb176ccdd7
'2011-10-27T22:54:57-04:00'
describe
'356114' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSV' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
183871b6ce93e5169552b007fa4332ae
d6d83b707c3e5c9ba93f06f3b386d3cbbc298ebf
describe
'141220' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSW' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
d659c59863575d264fb173e8b28f1bd9
a4b123d04e590f74730fce27632150ff96ccbc13
describe
'37505' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSX' 'sip-files00048.pro'
38361122deba0e6c81419b0c316cd76e
de9b80f4ebf5feb1dba081ed3d04c69306d314a3
describe
'42077' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSY' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
d123e1fcd95cbc7e7a48678c03d5573b
d1964619a5b11275b7258fee2a33fd5cd9278bd6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVSZ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
c80ea6054192cc17a908bded8fe30b3f
70036fb7620a0c845112362c6f354db1c96df533
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTA' 'sip-files00048.txt'
7da17597eeaaba6b0c64a3611cf9290d
f6fa32c48d8eab6e56940bc9171be2f3ca9d6c93
'2011-10-27T22:55:55-04:00'
describe
'9590' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTB' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
24eb30821fba0092dc7bf2dd7d4a75a1
43a77c29bb9ab81161f8a96c79c2d6191cba83d8
describe
'356056' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTC' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
d3c66ed3d44b5dc1376d0fa4f20e52e1
ed36f998b191750daf7ab7e55783ed92414cf5cf
describe
'162636' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTD' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
0538f7c947137a7ecfdd5b77c7265ac2
6c0a93871bada1a445e1c262af4e7d130121ab97
describe
'7183' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTE' 'sip-files00049.pro'
3713fca3da1d545ba50035d24a850f3f
ecb6751a78eed10af1749caa11913f1bec57aa14
describe
'40269' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTF' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
bd72a208d7cb268cdad54fdfe6296561
709190be43457bb6918706048ca78483232b5a93
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTG' 'sip-files00049.tif'
9dabd3092a87300c893d0243625441ce
734a179b3f8cc5edd2f311ae9ecab96510f346a1
describe
'302' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTH' 'sip-files00049.txt'
236b793fc92ef315f8a364f1063757c7
ee29956c07bc6a73528ad114b86333c7655cae5a
describe
'9379' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTI' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
857ef6bec17fda53ac63a3393a1e5e61
d63bc61c622d2c9a2754f68218b49226d8cfa2d6
'2011-10-27T22:55:33-04:00'
describe
'356131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTJ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
1f3bc9bc421b33a263e4c89e50e10e02
4b52110102f2ea204d9cf7c3acc5841cbce64c33
describe
'93862' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTK' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
1a1c8e219ddf524d6a6ff1d04003ac81
0226f26bdc86ff7a3472a5e9efc4afb65a261027
'2011-10-27T22:55:14-04:00'
describe
'21661' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTL' 'sip-files00050.pro'
dcc8a3d26626e732b08303b57d56a3ac
e7aaa1be63697e250e486e64b93723a2da31e354
describe
'26514' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTM' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
22921913ff8dfd849807038f32b232c8
f282ce4191921a0363cf62e654fc87a3dfd8ae97
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTN' 'sip-files00050.tif'
104e27e8ba6f42fc62d813763d3b2b43
9d9ae625db70c0ef234b9affa79a0a1728a7229e
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTO' 'sip-files00050.txt'
785894beb3adc1475e1eaff8209114c7
f1dcd96c796db2ad206d42b3732c3d57307cb187
describe
'5861' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTP' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
c42aad2a773d39ede572849fe5041655
e6261e11cbe2673167ba886187759f1e67acf558
'2011-10-27T22:54:29-04:00'
describe
'356289' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTQ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9c5ab97009b8191890c32670a3e79793
1c48ebc7c2563bd404c0938102767e4177e95097
'2011-10-27T22:54:33-04:00'
describe
'89932' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTR' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
8479bd7919cb130a6d7c8ee6d48a5158
1a4a930cb1813904d4d97494102c2db1569d35d7
describe
'18108' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTS' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d83d3ca5605bb3f81ebc0e5bb6a6920c
d92846c1c14036ba4d9d53cfa997c2edd3bec9ee
describe
'25381' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTT' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
68f4c2f8503707d76d24e943f06deb77
6a3f3f99d080ce45fd7f3985640675ef7d05f2a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTU' 'sip-files00051.tif'
bd176bf07b419cd211103d1c318b806b
c6bfab24cc5479bfd5d35aab3f99ce02d972cfcc
'2011-10-27T22:57:14-04:00'
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTV' 'sip-files00051.txt'
bc75bed48f796a71a76dae7d177a7877
84213c33c20dfb686f70ea6d64ca4b3eb5034013
describe
'6372' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTW' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
7e36daa6e245de006ea2032b12c1a9c0
7cef7adffa95fa6616e94d42a7b6c6b3c01825af
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTX' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
68fbe5334951f7ea3e23ded63e78b897
e725096681b5b9e72e0556248ba8720b5885bab5
describe
'138210' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTY' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
a74f78c21889b693d7f7a7096f1c2001
ef7227bbb01a2fa5c83ddc323cf4a2d3ecda15cb
describe
'35220' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVTZ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
ff8fe7bf56a2376cac30bcdf3ed6f68e
0c376a20ceaf69cea60e89adc01dc4b363421a4f
describe
'40419' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUA' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
cebc499f4c199a7b3471b0c989c8f1ec
7bd9028c6f387db2dd27fcbfa553dea30c8dd6ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUB' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0daa71d9b7833ff9c9000b64c8fb9314
33743a2f46fb8b7b40d16516dc7cbb195de25405
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUC' 'sip-files00052.txt'
d16e938c066439e77fe06fd2acadc244
69b7701ba1651746aae7a02d02832d6811b8deb0
describe
'9353' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUD' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
4925ba1381891a21e91f8e7d428d20aa
07fe086b7fdea1bc57aebd9c6da52b2134f79510
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUE' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e6a70f13963bb320795ae517c1a443d3
444bdb0f0c11fc6db8b9f53baecdccea6a10e659
describe
'132059' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUF' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
d3f2013ff22cf9ab944f3876faed6334
138448cb391130a88184da8bede38ae4cbb12181
describe
'32676' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUG' 'sip-files00053.pro'
daee79d7beb53997228cc514e2b1de3e
388c6a8cc6891d87ae3edc30a60cc3ee8a1c130b
describe
'38008' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUH' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f1662d8b5eb7778994126b2e87b4b31e
bda410bdfa2b3518e802fe7c2811664e859806bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUI' 'sip-files00053.tif'
4417b0cd646820945c9a08c5517eb724
d2ff065a90fe5c4c5f8c2266b7706a2afca1a7f8
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUJ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
1f333c1042d9934147be7c9fb348faa1
96c3fea22ec1f5528ffae9ae14bcd77aa4b9172f
describe
'9236' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUK' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
8c4a067d72e3574d2a693bcf0712793b
681a67e37357e7410045bc4107e42886195bb89c
describe
'356353' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUL' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
a80d82b3ad4e9443df7236860adbfd02
47f146cc406b09251969e2952ab5a38f2c669438
describe
'138207' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUM' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
3908109f3a198226ded4aae62cd54ca3
e47be0a48da14face5db809b2810dca67bbd6c9b
describe
'34802' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUN' 'sip-files00054.pro'
6e4f303708f02a661e372ebaae3a77c9
1a322796fd1933ed6a3cca2221c75c1a73b9c99a
describe
'40888' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUO' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
072ac253b26d3a12cfff94ae47fc187c
fd82b866115a6e533c11e989d5a9143fc6a4e6ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUP' 'sip-files00054.tif'
5bbdb7f111e092cf3d8ee42896e8bb83
88c7758a7fec717b7397a10e89eee805e9ea4314
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUQ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
1610dd9b7040e16425777c5fff770611
ec68a9a9bb7a74078e0b2b9bff554adbac67a3dc
describe
'9760' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUR' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
73b2971dfd8e9cb2e3db515be22a6c75
621163eb5e6226c463fc5b9fd7e6dcc5e9a4c384
describe
'356298' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUS' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
ebc7c389fc8bad6e086ea0def5f615b9
f65af7c3626cdab08856be878cfc9ebaac3dde29
describe
'127948' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUT' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1eb12fced59b04c814ecce332dba3499
80b66fc8c9beadf74788ca3164ea06fbf0baeb0d
describe
'30439' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUU' 'sip-files00055.pro'
02b2a5a88b9628e34b3169c095eeb6e1
c277658fc382318b84f53f361580326b10593e1d
describe
'37231' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUV' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
2c537f65a3a4c2eeb2be8a94207552a0
c29896d80974b96cbb27541412887e72ca60bd05
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUW' 'sip-files00055.tif'
095f185d96d2d491e2b11f140fe1b3a1
7b9b8d973fc02742cc5243a4de37a781bd042c21
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUX' 'sip-files00055.txt'
8069e034adc1a41d8bee21dcf6a709bf
3caa64d701cd60bd6eb6fee36ca10db25681bbab
describe
'8933' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUY' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
18fd3b98493283781115dbab81fea284
aacbe30ed5643b03b79182e2d50e726d1422a3bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVUZ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
372287ec333fe983b8588873218e96a6
09909a2259f9a8a2e8b2cd44862799585b445a4c
describe
'141572' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVA' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
e3af66bff63eaf65a4f1ff802295481d
80e4c7dea6907f49eb440793c5c7787d5ea7296b
describe
'35357' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVB' 'sip-files00056.pro'
1e83ec79bbf8bc1382801090badafce9
dcc9a296ea9062a7202934f2857ec88f3c710760
describe
'41079' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVC' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
ff2c7e606ad43e9d15ee56fc3e978b88
dc427c595bbea9dded3cf83fb49af483095e8cc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVD' 'sip-files00056.tif'
88c93b0f706b0c92512796b100028e20
c63226c5fe71bf06b2f63b0208762e1ed8ad3a4c
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVE' 'sip-files00056.txt'
60eabafea1b7950cb50bbcb269081c7c
f3998256759df1486ed64bb885d3c13917d386b6
describe
'9329' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVF' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
c1121c2157233768b0bd678bdd1627f7
0f08febf68f5398c9becaf9345f1af056a12184b
'2011-10-27T22:55:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVG' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c45b64d186fb207b4516b708d5d92d65
6634b2d50da1d402078274661a63e4fea4a79b2d
describe
'133994' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVH' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
9553b6c97e29804ba0f8bf43519abef1
ef086cb30490cb1f1c4154ceb7f0f4d9f9916d38
describe
'34126' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVI' 'sip-files00057.pro'
a0d2e424c3324aa46f8d123c6cd74db5
ea52c8de92060f2a8e6f7f7296317046d5dbc81f
describe
'38653' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVJ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
fe5b6d0eb7a7a2815eeb3f63694bce70
389c375a4420a911f38f947c426ee808548474b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVK' 'sip-files00057.tif'
261254f6a3a4a4708cdb443dc8e21dd0
11201caf178128593671a1ffa5d9dd6150e092e8
'2011-10-27T22:55:53-04:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVL' 'sip-files00057.txt'
28fb7d8567a684fe6802a95a3cd6c235
5b10ea8ea752adc72f0781891db8709e8478ea89
describe
'9362' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVM' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f2e0f5093d2e3f1a5464ea3d4968c40c
f7528be7d8503e549ffe883154d7f3ea97a81c11
describe
'356155' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVN' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1a7f80a6d6f60c2d0f8ab78f2d4e6b84
6c2dfcecadcef57fba17c3a52acfea2920a76c37
describe
'131097' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVO' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
53d2fbb3c8897a7e093c672614d75767
1c456df02f962a06dcce77d1cb9484d5b665176d
describe
'33265' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVP' 'sip-files00058.pro'
62df703b625ecadd25697784db13c3cf
b0a1281b9820e29eb671e9f443878b7e802b2595
'2011-10-27T22:56:08-04:00'
describe
'38149' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVQ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
092144c3a7b2afc18a5f0b271e5d676a
3f7dfb743f101df5b44f204f89a708a921d3d79c
'2011-10-27T22:57:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVR' 'sip-files00058.tif'
1b0e295d45ca32250af809f797228a99
4fb56e50d90db6738cb5ee7f588696907c995143
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVS' 'sip-files00058.txt'
3f3f7cbea258e99f6c692000c1870afc
4e5232536f62ce12710b86b4b836077b4ae3a99d
describe
'9056' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVT' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
bb993fb8cb91f8d0a880cd2aa3cd28ba
4391046d2bb16c7812e76932412abaff8bf7b770
describe
'356329' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVU' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
a65becddb0bd8c98d388aefa94e0e64b
8d03bcfade81814d2f064a4704127d9a0d08b69c
describe
'141018' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVV' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
0595bd5e60ab332ba8d9d378489d0f52
0847a8c93b3aee4851845f5ee1caf647dedda53c
describe
'36906' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVW' 'sip-files00059.pro'
51c90f3afb8357e68c555a142b0f7feb
3cd1dea736934f2bb0ef2db9b4b3823420c09c73
describe
'40153' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVX' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
a63acdb6ed6c1304cecb682e5f204bf8
02797355abec24d887f8f62323b6be47e00b6f64
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVY' 'sip-files00059.tif'
7507b0eaf1b18f7f0a61c618d3c74118
71a4fd3f1913713494a5c1c0d1223a55bbeee9b8
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVVZ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
3bd25836e49d4dbea6148ac8f5281f86
95123431ac5935732c837b6c4b7949e4866b0a57
describe
'9549' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWA' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
1b31a437b94200df7c91f3f1937bcd5c
1664743f18061be9f12812b697e793f139b26e8b
describe
'356184' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWB' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
41e9ad40f9abaa8f90f15343a6c52d35
f795e2070761ba223630df739e1899f0776e8b2f
describe
'139170' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWC' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
76f903731fcc752ae326485f9bfad7f1
b4c2d364ac4958942adcee7c1a58615507ebe2c8
'2011-10-27T22:54:39-04:00'
describe
'35481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWD' 'sip-files00060.pro'
41b05e39eff2e0e8654437788862088a
455466ae033e41e419de74d49459f56c78d80c48
describe
'40063' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWE' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
e603ad08fd57e32a3d0552f129217aab
0bb6177aaae482e940d91164b411edc96003e400
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWF' 'sip-files00060.tif'
588a2057f91894123c2e45da8484ccfa
ad35e5337e3399b686221c4d96c4809eaa212750
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWG' 'sip-files00060.txt'
71b50e58641524a2e96a76eb2a6008de
29f63d474bda2ce3fd88b9305134ff13ddc7c460
describe
'9349' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWH' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
de75a888f39de34cce063e9b3e074b3a
362f43b65f976cfe82416d2ddd0202204f36c7c1
describe
'356133' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWI' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
e37ba41805d12b98ef7764060bcb6a45
9fcf9691b8c5c92ae2127dc8876cc6f01db2ffd2
describe
'148238' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWJ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
f02e58790decb31ba80f22922422d6ff
0289d0be11cfbd78dbb45631cee561f2b2875145
describe
'38936' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWK' 'sip-files00061.pro'
9f1fcebb0c5f8a6d3cb2bac7e68f5442
11bc77e68ab916bd1052048a12774e84bfe75506
describe
'42194' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWL' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
5ff142f58f6ace956c49f6bdec398d4d
aec48247fe3e25ffc069f71975f27f28161506fd
'2011-10-27T22:56:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWM' 'sip-files00061.tif'
cdb53b841091fdd71f37dc87f665ca9f
a3e2fd05819df2d9243ee8d585261996ffc2675f
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWN' 'sip-files00061.txt'
3d78c6357a6199f7d3f343915a252c4e
11c6e8fddf1b46b8fcd43bb50141f2eb00d32fae
describe
'9886' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWO' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3b32a7ec9fe9158c7df890340e359ebf
56cf0fd2ab9588f51035f0ed887c912e292172de
describe
'356103' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWP' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
39c02c8f0b1252c531fc8e692896e056
06dc8be213ca70b640c2ca96d36211452516fd92
describe
'152831' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWQ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
fbab5464db8a770e64d9a0f27531aa36
4bed18118eb78ea2b7b98f92b3b76a57c8a36f5e
describe
'38158' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWR' 'sip-files00062.pro'
c3776b0459b48419ddc8cc16ed03d641
d2bcdc5c5202b9bbbee9e97a5a29ca02bc594e5c
describe
'43627' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWS' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
5d136434495aed8bdffd2fa11ada8c1b
c97e14352df37343a320143b031235199402c164
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWT' 'sip-files00062.tif'
e3de0dad693cd0319e231cbc4c28a8b3
2e0da097fde367520cd6ae5ebcc998f98ee72353
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWU' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f68c8945a18419cadd21bcfb2c2b7a50
fded739d7a0aded802cf3943aab29e9e84b4142d
describe
'10104' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWV' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
d57c4bd19c0735c6ad5890c99bcf15da
bfb6cba77595f67da4c9121b6a24e973de66e13a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWW' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
0dbb1741ec27b64b341ec14798121024
3ab4c954c7d305230dc6e44f6eb1ba22fa82aa74
describe
'149801' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWX' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
20b3ec28c6cd3c83a4544a7c71bd25a6
2ffd004dc2a495cbcdf001312d58edff190df8fe
describe
'37162' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWY' 'sip-files00063.pro'
08335b374ce69fdd1cd674b04c4b7145
3dcee68865141d9e7bb90981765aeab2c799f7a4
describe
'43022' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVWZ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
bf7688a1c5f833ccb18fbc5e7e2aad20
62c8177a2ab914395d75ebff4e5d0992bac1a303
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXA' 'sip-files00063.tif'
031ab9e231526780587d26ea7f34cb6c
060f990828aca6814f991e700a4e03f334c37fa1
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXB' 'sip-files00063.txt'
fa75963b669731d884d9928c7c2c7289
b8778c718de7b0aa7899d7fec211a8886525af90
describe
'9863' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXC' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
be5016ff1fbf909e897f4814cd478423
11ad2c6d4506338c99758016dcedad90e2e13ceb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXD' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
02a9ad64f45eed09294bc4b6ccc7f1fd
2dd9145c7ba7dfb5d4e6f22bc3e98f70bfb0802f
describe
'145890' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXE' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
7474097c864dc3efefa10289189284d2
4970249236fbba2f0f72cbfd1ea0e5907cafdf04
describe
'36481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXF' 'sip-files00064.pro'
215aa549370e072ab26d18610c4f65ba
3502f5899fe124224dd92c425bf386a1ce9591fd
describe
'41837' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXG' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
0ef49958c74d9b1a8e1b727ada90ec95
7b7e04246d9227f4db67d8d8c87f7362f291b410
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXH' 'sip-files00064.tif'
c39c9c589fa2308e82d6ada0cc14baa9
746e784ca3c2ef52d1795918ae7088f95f040400
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXI' 'sip-files00064.txt'
fd6e492306eaf8111290b73d4026a0a6
e1f1a871bb9e8bae99f11b966f272517a90c8cc5
describe
'9782' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXJ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
aae4f6c417032e446f985fc49375744a
07bc935ecc0d1f6446ffc74454d4c6de16650950
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
719e8732033ea1e5311d703af63cd2b9
1f70a85f7731c9f0dd51a1fad4270966a98ee5d4
describe
'148605' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXL' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
5e4ef4f28fd60312784babb2d13d46c3
7df4ecc0d83c730f4bafa61b44ce9c9b91f36e59
describe
'36490' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXM' 'sip-files00065.pro'
7094b28b5c03de9993655d7f295ddfaf
22add04f7de291e2401e5031b75e7d85d4bbd470
describe
'43148' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXN' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
66726905ec55fb71bcec30be5fc1604c
f8debab07bb13fa12887ef465f7768c70aa03862
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXO' 'sip-files00065.tif'
2c7200222c3cd137cfe3e7b1dea74898
dbdfab68b948a983fd11e648d4a6c8f80059fa71
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXP' 'sip-files00065.txt'
82a2996fdea1d8338e86e8b2b5443d0b
a8b1e7ddfc265de871fef373eeab84cd74de6a48
describe
'9976' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXQ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
4d0ab51bf127a618283d997dde02d702
3adbd897339ba03be5cbb6616129f7f9adcd6c5d
'2011-10-27T22:56:35-04:00'
describe
'356151' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXR' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
8d972738d0c7d9b948a5093cfcb8e7a5
0e1aff0774cc7f8239d9105242fcb5980982aceb
describe
'131364' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXS' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
fde261cbcb3fcc0b83dbb1af74e361f5
d5b9ed683d251303a78d7c5e144650af54e383b7
describe
'32845' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXT' 'sip-files00066.pro'
e39c9c258d2f3c234200872e9b51d3e5
08082204640e95c5fd0206a7d20cb900bf81f830
describe
'39017' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXU' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
70d242009f060164d6e2922772baf0f8
68cdc1f3c729986078f782a34cef831f44bd72bc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXV' 'sip-files00066.tif'
2a7c354383a5e7664b4fb56fd4d0365b
c600a3e4a4935650d5cc8b9683879513417221a8
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXW' 'sip-files00066.txt'
30b9bfa1d6ca3568ddf53b8f47d254ee
414da18fc8848f9873e4217fcacf54027bf2c23a
describe
'9435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXX' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
b6a09754c590bbd82d2046591fa4b23c
56d46adfdd65ee6928285313ca38397ab06f6d6b
describe
'356105' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
99613e5b051cc810e6eb869d3104da58
901dd77bb627f3052d06dfe1fe97857851bac079
describe
'135268' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVXZ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
ca6beac8ac91ead4cba236088fdb8f11
5d326b61cd44d683e7c4d866d224943f7a113baa
describe
'34192' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYA' 'sip-files00067.pro'
93a041a1b8950abc109a13796a6429dc
8c9325a8f1fdf3a5a684ea0ca99acdc7493267a3
describe
'39769' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYB' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
b56debbbba089e12cdee9dd0bfc62f4a
3e8adb3c759a906a9ff034dd4ef6c96186c58453
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYC' 'sip-files00067.tif'
62ced7f8dbe693e293c75f2488dfdcd7
d0d4d11086e4c7ff54496520f01e0dfb89b1edda
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYD' 'sip-files00067.txt'
846a6ab3719feebbbd1ea85b49e50162
acba399a9ad47dbedae16096e68953db0796b4a9
describe
'9574' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYE' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
1dcbd7b07a0ddf91676502ccf090a62c
eb6be1fad4067f63ffc0f5ebc81627ba15bd1062
describe
'356167' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYF' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
6d971868cb3b3ae864ac872857d38707
3ffda0bb9418802cf8b7294fcfbe39c25fa78b12
describe
'143429' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYG' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
dbb57962c96b16eb6c045c8fedb0b380
d6fcf4e7b057c84514a4e4aba78348a55888d120
describe
'34714' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYH' 'sip-files00068.pro'
c5d8b04039aade86623edc7bb39ec216
43a50b12d9cb2351f561d0fdfea02e255adb2575
describe
'42279' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYI' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
4370a5ea5ed5a22cf786e91330fa3632
0da7abc6b89e13f9644f39d50fca7a7e862f90c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
7a3ab3f02b5e6a43a94707ab2bd23dc9
3efd84407d6e186dc4a7738a32926fde98834683
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYK' 'sip-files00068.txt'
dc89ece8245f611b44d3b3ff706a1ba9
b1ce243f44b99da565d590b6af454f5497d0a86e
describe
'9664' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYL' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
02d8b680bd90b83d1d77ceb7fbf42f3d
5afc8cdfaabe1f91089a43e92f9a6837d6b00dfd
describe
'356334' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYM' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
1d0ca2c2b982262fbe201738c6325f09
090076d6c5e6a4f0902fe458b4597c8866d09834
describe
'139738' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYN' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
32c8ff323a736d8f504a6a757b4bb798
152ea50db90bee83743d9b05c3ba002a7e9d487c
describe
'33159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYO' 'sip-files00069.pro'
72dac8fcef82b7b0dc826bec56063f0f
918a9d9dd93039b74ff8feeea0490343c53574da
describe
'39577' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
abf321f045c4f36c8dfb9588b451a59a
4753cec33262e150c0d8d74eb4cd28b193e4bcb3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYQ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
df9e1682f3454a06743b9c91c7513a71
111baf844894b30be893d8ea3892d5e417d33124
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYR' 'sip-files00069.txt'
e578f94ce73b2a5586b87c9caf9cdbed
1481b24a07c4486ea2637ea1ca6067502933fbdb
describe
'10043' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYS' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
7d3a2f0e5dd8f877cbc91a8adfb7680a
1a7f6b0371319f5db13c4baba8e34722d6afa42b
describe
'356161' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYT' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
0e4e60e591a5852acd4677be892660d7
ce56c958b47a9c3367f499a241f2dc51a575ae1f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYU' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
c61fa8e6c3d2009d62f163f3e4e0d98d
825beba53f7392003b796e1542c63819316402d0
describe
'31919' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYV' 'sip-files00070.pro'
c962c9d4b856aa1af4deef014149ed74
1acea0f91c8f5345a322dbc7831fdbb4786f7f3b
describe
'39013' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYW' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
74fa2fa3991b9cad563ce065c2a66bc2
252a8fcd607424fb4d47d6a62f8db977965f58e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYX' 'sip-files00070.tif'
c1db6df54c0d389474e4204e3f2c2687
1fc5923b35925364d67a05c6684c26b4725241f7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYY' 'sip-files00070.txt'
4e1e2efa339c458da4f43f2ad9ca3969
0ad1b6866ba36329133aadc98ad3fe3da8cd4816
describe
'9123' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVYZ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
23e38add6f5a562f4975482cdfaaba15
b1ec9c739a4a10d0ec8e7fbb223dafd3a5a2c851
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZA' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
0d5f078eb27730ce5bccbebdafe3a6c2
cbed6e0a6deced42495af88309d03daacf09a0a5
describe
'141868' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZB' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
673d6fff92d0a8141e66c2ba48c638c0
71aae886be438474c045683995a69a3157c9019b
describe
'34785' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZC' 'sip-files00071.pro'
03673ec9c2e9d543fd13635dc953504c
7562da3d0ea4ec1b8b8a80b501963e270507ba76
describe
'41836' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZD' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
e834bfd88b514bf14fd5c1620e4bde08
771fd155be559035056da217cdf572de8ae88825
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZE' 'sip-files00071.tif'
bc35eaf568cba43ac581ff355fa387b0
8eff20ea5ad7b7e9a32183e9f8c4dd6d6009d796
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZF' 'sip-files00071.txt'
72803522a8dd562a9c96871adf1a7d0e
312ec8aa875dbdf7c123e7b85f31b13aebd5a05f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZG' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
e5fda628634a92c1fbdf25678ea83020
7961ab384515ed55c8484c2ad56c3fef4feefd51
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZH' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
9f100005370a3e612d2664532c36aa14
325b45ef1f28b774eec72009f939468648ad5cf7
describe
'212528' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZI' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
e58c8d1236ca766381b5cd36a7f87b78
02a2f0cf985dc2dfe24e24b8c18f947fe5e53bbd
'2011-10-27T22:56:03-04:00'
describe
'37080' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZJ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
6b28935eb8a0c0c98758154de4b4cfcb
14e8e8cf186c887c24f9e4eebd947a56947bdeb1
describe
'75453' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZK' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
1a2c45d3cd3d339c7ffa78a7655364ce
12f1bd8e312f8f54b883410d4915f5464eb500f7
describe
'2871476' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZL' 'sip-files00072.tif'
f6cce94ce447bb330d0a9ffc742ba374
6ff91c5efe6dfbbe46ad46f69155834dfb29aaa0
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZM' 'sip-files00072.txt'
d16db66253e4187e6d1e1f84c34f4d8d
1ab072a33b368f7ec430555ce7dd10841a1ea17a
describe
'33429' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZN' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
2b2ef339537085c09b093dd95e90736e
a40a5f102d6d2af1bbd91036b6d7e8f0df1dc77e
describe
'356349' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZO' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
f54c014e94026a30dbee1e77f54bcef7
1b53dfa00af1c84453d0061d2512cc5c203aeea3
describe
'140838' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZP' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
45aa287f6d620de3909705b237ace705
0a2813538039b895d9d4fdd3b16ba921885f424b
describe
'33057' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZQ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
22634d50f77eade0d21e3096ba64e542
aa27c52d379a2f00c8b4e72a2e78530a2b5a78fe
'2011-10-27T22:56:06-04:00'
describe
'40688' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZR' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
20685fadaacd86bf134e83a8b0f5c2a7
3aad0c3242a63c26e5a78afaf753be5857e57204
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZS' 'sip-files00073.tif'
835366af4337f9d8a137b390fb14d058
37ea6f80e2ce326daa3e2a9a8ac14c22be2a385f
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZT' 'sip-files00073.txt'
79d19f1cee7db2e053acbe6e2c8084fc
d3a290c4a7dd41857a5ca7f7fd55793ea455b839
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZU' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
cc85801dec06f98a933dad7a406b5452
6e7ce771491f975ef1f229562b038096cded4513
describe
'356181' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZV' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
0a146c1611aaae0d710c5c08415ee332
53ec00ec1bade652b6e9fb6f7dffaa5ba403405f
'2011-10-27T22:57:31-04:00'
describe
'139996' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZW' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
1bece9f32e7774678c48395ecf5276e5
8080de0dafce917cbe6d3c13b9396bff1cc7f59c
'2011-10-27T22:57:34-04:00'
describe
'35418' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZX' 'sip-files00074.pro'
41eeee13bc69a6fcf1e685ffc9c60d3d
95b28b7ad5d7dcbc7757e8a27076163b62cf8a88
describe
'40926' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZY' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
6efad21c774d1acbcbef347bb65f4966
763c11b8640b600e36367cb9ff1b25c96652c5aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACVZZ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
c80c7e88c4e7ea993276c36e96907c4f
d15f1e2843582b43a723bc02dc4704171207d5b9
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAA' 'sip-files00074.txt'
31abd316c3bb0b95bc9458c3e0ff95fb
e9ef1f3f652c5bfd85c4dfea408016fd0403f3df
describe
'9837' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAB' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
25e0e6c28900a4ba7ed7dc95e6bfb72e
7d65deb516219053b17b5c3c364ed2a65a027c97
'2011-10-27T22:54:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAC' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e103ea988fb28d0b85e3830b32e33491
968dba58c9277ddc8aa2bf2f1753c2c07cb86d49
describe
'134059' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAD' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
658837a99a369b9d0acecc354a6cb762
6433d7635a34dc7965ea8fdf2f4c61fcff68b0cc
'2011-10-27T22:56:20-04:00'
describe
'32924' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAE' 'sip-files00075.pro'
60faae8409c6ee9e4b07966816eb565a
712e2872c5cbb51e358207960577de0eddc2c739
describe
'38432' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAF' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
21043809bf3aaa64553ddefa56addd3e
794ddf923243813bc15291650bc926d3894990ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAG' 'sip-files00075.tif'
12e45e788f6388592f5e5c07a32c77d7
da303b387daf0ce63d247d51df35e807bcf3d879
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAH' 'sip-files00075.txt'
63308a3873907026e3778c6c9531bece
fa42cb0db9f342d1800b0ac5d3df684e7cea2e40
describe
'9460' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAI' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
2cfb7bc9788f275e13d683ab230abd2d
54e40d898e30b93aa89cf7f9deff9ae91cdbce02
describe
'356096' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAJ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
3fa25fae898da17d8155c4c05afb1ffc
b368467949780fb9c7b1d821374eaa9d2f200754
describe
'153437' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAK' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
4523b5659c23ee6ceff24753ae6baabb
f6f6041244600343dd68aedc969b77bf3b3dd809
describe
'38834' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAL' 'sip-files00076.pro'
04d87295a1271b4a967bfef335a360e8
3d00edab8f6407e956bba41576b6185f4b01e4c4
describe
'43584' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
5da6506bd6bdba3347cb8e194ee998ed
e94d21829973523240a1fd4daea50b0bec74262a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAN' 'sip-files00076.tif'
71c012dc871dc434dd7d9177a09a70ff
97dca936e40a8bcd05eb7c3469985018d9d1b4b1
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAO' 'sip-files00076.txt'
6a1ca7bc78d6ce062bfa1bd05eb64a35
2ccf749901daa2ad9f356adc5636f3b73b17c252
describe
'9926' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAP' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
0f816191844d50f1123b853ba3a062fe
f95043caff383c47a6cb4c4dde8d68a8021696d1
describe
'356072' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAQ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
211bf03b90d7bb0ca7724c1eed13f3fa
03ac036a4c887163745f145496ce605654c926e8
describe
'178482' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAR' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
60d7095edd70cba4a7f206c5a52c7a0e
607ccbd1d5644d5a8bc36ccadfbe773b89bcda87
describe
'29262' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAS' 'sip-files00077.pro'
dd585a491ca03cd30102806ffe239488
81520ba56bec15ead6bdd0248addaaa2699068b0
describe
'63096' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAT' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
dc6fbf184a931694ca9e4856745dbd7a
2e508bf78095e5b96f2f9a3ba8fcb37041bff836
describe
'2870444' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAU' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f7e5ad81759479d3e41f2e13cd44c5f1
aea2ceda68390f0d41d982d7ff9b10e5ccbc4d2f
'2011-10-27T22:57:38-04:00'
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAV' 'sip-files00077.txt'
9ff3fae94d64034324c348d5b1313672
2ec309832d1f6ee56ef4d5c9f1665cb5f09fde79
describe
'30466' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAW' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
205e764e26d8607968f47d68ecd2c7f8
5d79ce5040e44f577ce0106de9ea6c89e7629974
describe
'356325' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAX' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
61ba8076ec0a44c05cad75ce66b31d23
798ba210a0d8d3f30ae442e9a42ed88fd86fe534
describe
'140756' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAY' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
8ef066a0563811f84d728754a2f675bb
49f2e34e1419db8813ec7d506d9edf4d71ed6eba
describe
'35572' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWAZ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
aaa819076d2b7c07653597f7aa75f6b4
280bb76e6a7771d1189ef9beab48be1f9bc59520
describe
'40679' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBA' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
7d16e3368803b7267b8231a8c98a1932
78b737fbc205987dcfce8392194734e1913d973d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBB' 'sip-files00078.tif'
0938a2729a21da0e758e888ccbf24873
b77a733c61fa330283f7e8120780f4f9b4f2a041
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBC' 'sip-files00078.txt'
159a8c616eb3c9e56ea6f25306ade594
5c33a064b2786efe7a9571450a732de0df093046
describe
'9497' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBD' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
e3918328e24fd26df53542d9a08e30cc
a9a3eef93e5c3d8073ca04e3b91cb7f434642fd1
describe
'356183' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBE' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
aa5b859cca52be9f3fac3fd990aad4c9
964da7d37d2f57310ce3f2453df0a1b6e86c9f9f
describe
'137941' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBF' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
615677c62a59c01709532a3aa24dfa6c
71a64e0c790d7774de0c9680167249287af1f602
describe
'34311' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBG' 'sip-files00079.pro'
95af40b5b932c7f48b586c7e84ccace0
dc56306d2d12816d617abc2894eb64b0fcd23af0
describe
'40751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBH' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
869b0d305b701817e8ad05e0510eba19
d8f216d3cd302c59be3adc40182888c440a24c58
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBI' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1e592b01e444f3ae8d0a5b3b5aaa8b0b
5d804f03c4ba1aa714450cda3d6b6cc180fd147b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBJ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
6d49b6bee8936c98315e8e5cb14fd4dc
7e1512ac92afcea999a9281cecdcf25eafb341ac
describe
'9620' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBK' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
ee06663b79d05d24ebc97256b44f4fa0
44c20bd6f7804f12288ca5d516a0ab2725b2b80e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBL' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
21292bdd272d54675794876165f56e51
2c23d267e912cdf64f6e8066532e81268eca055c
describe
'146395' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBM' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
63132cac895394c7a6a807f9ef9a104f
5665fd0b3f0227d39b0f1db261b0fcdee4960577
describe
'38320' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBN' 'sip-files00080.pro'
aeea9e63a820b51b883806b86bb44e76
09f8f9bd5cd37b36d2554cd77c25c0505cf0f643
describe
'42291' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBO' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
4f2e0a3830808361c8273ff5e9f03984
f451889a8a36fc184683a5cdcb38cad8b349ff70
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBP' 'sip-files00080.tif'
6e70f28381bafedefb55454c5fae2dde
a92bd37377608d18ef803884565d97ec51bf3c3d
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBQ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
936a53bb7aaac71709935de318521951
9a65dcbf6df1ad4cea46ef2f76ef0351dc82496e
'2011-10-27T22:57:30-04:00'
describe
'9600' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBR' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
0ba0adb7443e3c4aa4c48584faef0973
95214275d871e3cb12842574a86c2f9dc61dbbfa
describe
'355999' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBS' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
6cf494a3f4f3846d0e22e3496c24730f
e9f793d56f7fb74c59042af46bfe4f9428059163
'2011-10-27T22:55:04-04:00'
describe
'170673' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBT' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
44d0b722ca2644641e25ded794668875
828686190fc9f59f388e21dc6c73128834dffbdf
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBU' 'sip-files00081.pro'
830d30f3c60601acab231fbb5c09ec3e
5ca275245818db9a224fb19b58f38985b22ce57e
describe
'41451' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBV' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
ea25485225c1b87e75dbebf04de133ff
afc977b78d40217f941f9a4df5069886d9b254ef
'2011-10-27T22:57:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBW' 'sip-files00081.tif'
9e5c847e4ecf16dd85801c7013750665
46d367a8e2877b5d7df6c89d02a5e4c9912315d1
describe
'152' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBX' 'sip-files00081.txt'
aea25c857f9091d7e6ca741b64d9ed95
5107248b52e250349058b0c96bb3050a33d15677
describe
'9807' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBY' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
50ea778dceb5df0f9fc8659694b64e74
1ce38adf9629f417d3637c75cb0c8c08ce913fc3
describe
'356179' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWBZ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
6de770717fe1d936608a711f6f36e880
f7cc20190eca0c98b0ea10403a5d0d34c0a96591
'2011-10-27T22:55:37-04:00'
describe
'28761' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCA' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
0b49e520f5370d82724b09f6950600d4
5a959fdcf3e3da4a66fe6f96d999eff7ad3ad727
describe
'5174' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCB' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
8292a31c615dee78ff3b3813af968a20
b1c02b65e169098834cca7eda699ee29f86d8ce4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCC' 'sip-files00082.tif'
dfd8f7203de471836cffaa7cd4e24283
1f03d93df50247d5733febcccd9b6f395b80deb6
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCD' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
9b7207e88668b1d8f4de896910465976
1009df22881ac957b11f576cabc48910de1f4854
describe
'356345' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCE' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
a71719d1e99ab8bc425afcb65eb987e9
686727c6f4d2259bdec97bbb119e6fd5e3628de0
describe
'129869' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c9cc30564b48456a109b23c2c384d924
9fc0de8b8f3c5aac36abedfc0d615d544305369f
describe
'32346' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCG' 'sip-files00083.pro'
06ae48e84f59ba02a60c539c40a47cab
190883b148c895008a5e32beb21fc0ce8efea84d
describe
'38181' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCH' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
adbcf84d8ba4a90f6c7b61a19ef3a0ab
8d9d40bcbf7bb1a41403f6e471885526be8bdcda
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCI' 'sip-files00083.tif'
082b75254d787223cdf3a2ba5b792ad5
12eabf80df54d3235ac4a65002bb103f30b0c0ce
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCJ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
48cafefc18f70c0c780f116a15af6253
688c7a72121ffe5031fd7958756d7c064cff0354
describe
'9269' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCK' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
7e6f18944e86f018565db49dc91d86a3
925e1d8d9d16b0aa0dfb79911c19b2498ad56a55
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCL' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
2a74620d09b0b7b5a91e2384527af2bc
b2bba22825e2748b06fce85ff1941ffceb9e11a3
describe
'133964' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCM' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
a704a9e9d81139d9ed0fb0d91a9f762a
9e5ddfb08d1ff9a66ac1b4496abab07da32b1f03
describe
'33034' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCN' 'sip-files00084.pro'
16edc77ed8061cf98df7c9838397bf94
5545a0f4ffbe3113a9823e78e6d813c60ddeba5c
describe
'39173' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCO' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
3c3a6df817efe807a0d4009910bf3a8d
08248d01ec6005eecbd6ee41f603993d53ba426c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCP' 'sip-files00084.tif'
158e0d162b6ccd285a9d809b50bf0408
bbe34e093f77c45ae163c4132bd19fa61f041ed6
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCQ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
cf5e41818c376c291183f35c843c0d61
fd7474c0e641c0189549c1b6bad724fbb26dd3aa
describe
'9101' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCR' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
92f4e85c68a4a05f376fd044cd8b80d6
959dcb5d53a79fa1c66c7b54e76b5c9f4b640276
describe
'355989' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCS' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
14411cd157f50ffd517e2e0513cde43b
d76b254af6c3b62b2a68e537c4deb9db8f2de755
'2011-10-27T22:56:46-04:00'
describe
'74547' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCT' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
1e8eed60fb21ff231e9d638e672d4f2f
ed8f5d0d8d649220aec7fe9270cd60341043d6fa
describe
'14725' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCU' 'sip-files00085.pro'
a17ca93cb443eff64f671e8f9209921a
76133fc5b5397e4095efa2f6ac7329562703ce53
describe
'19998' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCV' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
7eaf40e3dbdae457b02ec91e1f778ad2
721ee597d2764231c09df1e2839a9add2c2c142f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCW' 'sip-files00085.tif'
b6a72a272859eedef41b6748c36b2bd2
6164afdb1ef42d11f949c702e0eee111c2df39ff
describe
'594' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCX' 'sip-files00085.txt'
fbcc132a12304c97ad6b840f64fe0177
1f8ecbe65bb121fa253ebddf51117567e6cde3a0
describe
'4780' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCY' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
b9cd7aba113710ac9280f5ddd402c5ce
8bfffd1be8c46bbae2f14ec7f4dc055a52821a01
describe
'356171' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWCZ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
4b37adbc1abea780bf9a54def9213764
84fdd263a2937a3182a985c0d088ef3e900ae941
describe
'91890' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDA' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
36edaf2c20cdbaafc707453e71a80909
3099c4ada62a9fd4e80f66589e9313ff369f2562
describe
'17695' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDB' 'sip-files00086.pro'
0e3065973b94cefee27baf95626e5c61
e53924de0caa06ff011c47af507ddc6fbcef2cd6
describe
'26828' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDC' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
2c07029f5156f125444bfb3d00e4e432
70fee55ed57ceca651aa64d2820e196f45ef08d7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDD' 'sip-files00086.tif'
ff86caf27e7203f74a09d63b33b3d833
67acd93d669c789e86a0b56578dc7e87d135fb1b
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDE' 'sip-files00086.txt'
d13659977a25159ca1c567915a8709ea
06b31ed9e03089c3db34e01cf8a86812a1abeda5
describe
'6879' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDF' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
b5edbd9f428274d569d3d2da54d9642e
b119278dad2c8e9ce2444cbe951bc70609a4b2cc
describe
'356082' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDG' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
cc84851f017859a3b134b0d060b5fba7
464f7713045ad630ab4686c0b1a170c7e55dde26
describe
'140669' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDH' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
55a5bf5a84c92a190217c3cb75b2802a
20452536f2a1020f57aa69b678bf07233432a944
describe
'35600' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDI' 'sip-files00087.pro'
3f45d9718dbb12f77c1b790e49929cba
f78ebf496cea7282046b175c07a8cb0e74568bee
describe
'41387' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
dfcb9c3f42f7043715a297e1098a6548
b0d13b28284d6e35f05ec5aec3a77957cf02c42d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
0b854aa1d8ef7bd470aff1c741ec27a8
e7041d399de03b3d5849562e72688201bb997bbd
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDL' 'sip-files00087.txt'
d198ea2f7266c0309993d3d3ffaf984e
5b602cdc6c242ec84f8947ce6e98672a1c9ac27d
describe
'9692' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDM' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
500982164986d4a1f6207c1477d80aa6
88eb2d8695caac6a5238ec783f9e6439b460924d
describe
'356172' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDN' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
aa98b917114bcdf980b4fd644b2c7cd7
ccfc1126924453db73a3d3c8265e0e0f1aedf1aa
describe
'132525' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDO' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
2c4e450a60e50657c70873e3927f7c66
909631b81f1e3758c9705faa000fea09096cc62d
describe
'34264' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDP' 'sip-files00088.pro'
4fec96ae168a77647e25e2b04c513618
c14342ea6e3516ba21d8988407500d3e97bba28d
describe
'38094' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDQ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
70de18c66ec90c0d9379670f63e820a1
b72b0ca80dd4d5d01b69c95586054fdf442424d0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDR' 'sip-files00088.tif'
fe3868a71fee2a1bd37acd8a47e20e42
f7efdf79eb032dd169bdb6c3f74e4178acb95225
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDS' 'sip-files00088.txt'
c6c91e70a2ca5563702d8906c64f5d7d
46e5e9ed29160879a1dca4d28fc37df2fad6f52c
describe
'9561' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDT' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
56866624608d0c68e6df7b2576658eee
9b3bc38f3ea88033d8c07260ff2b1d36cb870248
describe
'356122' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDU' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
a0e169f0ff80a2ea38863b1409c10ce7
5dfc7d7cf2509373c874be7813dc59736c4f9842
describe
'136258' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDV' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
f4308c7606ced69769f4595c5cded133
ab7393336e3ee03cd0d4e63096140a8e5023a0cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDW' 'sip-files00089.pro'
b36d801b9ac821f5427619042e238cfa
6acc8a07da1f9531030624e053ec6df5f8f16699
describe
'39746' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDX' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
1340b2d557be6d361ec17d64e39697aa
345fc54260a60cff9a0ddb11dac2536ca588f2fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDY' 'sip-files00089.tif'
c4a2463825dfe65c0440ea65d122d8f2
7782edfcf1dcfce25462a58ef096e1b9c745b378
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWDZ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
d8d55e41e44a9256bc1cad2262b6aab9
4d57e33053f091bd11c206eaaf390058824e004d
describe
'9335' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEA' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
42df8f904594070e70ee4604ad444284
5c16a586091b88dbb299770119837e3291eb41e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEB' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
86b1b6228670db19646482ecc788b044
1b2e6e245884240feceadfb5aa797e8ea0b235c1
describe
'138413' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEC' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
1800b99f6c4d79c86eb84fc5cac5623a
bd5f56512cd1f1c74ba55b20309031727ea649c4
describe
'34343' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWED' 'sip-files00090.pro'
5e2ea36cf50a2052577997a899d94217
b30053421ff877bf5f130a98bd50d2bfc2568822
describe
'40767' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEE' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
2a497bdb9592a0674cc0c4728bddbac1
d3a31073021d37a51015acb77f5db6424420c315
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEF' 'sip-files00090.tif'
8c96f0784be8924da04ab8d35ac7d5e1
a293bb542282b6dc5faf49d087b6159ab573b61b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEG' 'sip-files00090.txt'
7c9b2d6d1f423e8df84837cb39def927
c4217dc398bb93921b50991facc346d6a9ac1833
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEH' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
be0a224ba7f606007835ded76dfdb063
81a118cfbd611ae081284430bb9c2915885263af
describe
'356348' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
b31f775f4499b0cf6e1bdf5d34eadba7
2f86e0390359cfa9a6eaca2c1ade46dd2b316399
describe
'143142' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEJ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
ad8422f2fa25b6be6cbf36d207ac6abd
8179af63af6be73ae90a9c92b28957e41efb458c
describe
'35035' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
6bd6e2787df1148b1b7f682a7e51e7b3
a9fcc9a9be344bdafa982ee10b7d48459e4bb60e
describe
'41354' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
5484cf6f58ccca9b27259c83ee1ec22d
6c17b63804a8adae2ecd8ee8fa1c748485e90788
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEM' 'sip-files00091.tif'
edc9b29b323be5cc2759ef508ff57270
ab30aec1923d42887848c367d2817b12950de077
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEN' 'sip-files00091.txt'
b74062d0bcd8f77cfa5f34d5b1f98449
b1e829e32189e68d44beb30737b6198a7453abb9
describe
'9956' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
49d0d9bf5e2f3f9aa3be79dab6cbb661
1ebcc00e4977144c7eafef276311dc52868af993
describe
'356347' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEP' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
7f5b6ccf1e53c34a465e4693f3d8b75b
f17f91cabea68d4fdc3f78e732a0f5d138572731
describe
'144290' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEQ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
172d6d06597b2a9f9a55e39c30650201
70ec333d33cef40928ae2dc4a178518b7e6aebe3
describe
'36067' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWER' 'sip-files00092.pro'
f9c52c5a646615de068b3c0166b8c3be
48bce37eaaba220be2ddc4a81642f181a8247322
describe
'43191' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWES' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
4f56115345af9dd3acd99a3a34aaba62
703cd59bf860f6e7bccd6c06fd8ba385bb2fad1f
describe
'2867644' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWET' 'sip-files00092.tif'
635b07defd44d4067405838b36e499aa
d38a398c164857661367abd038db89d3ee363c97
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEU' 'sip-files00092.txt'
1f1e5dae07cb2af45d703c4621d7ff4f
99aa067d3575f6a18b8d64fdff6a3517804e1c12
describe
'9955' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEV' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
882980f8b78cb3a76b5b2fd72233e548
bf29e99a688404ff919125fde26163f0513f00c9
describe
'356176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEW' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
17f176f20dbedc797d84bf1cf0c95b7f
a4cbc50f2076ae147887f52ebf79300378675770
describe
'139186' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
01b613c849775a6ce3fb42b8804ac270
c10d30b541ec18a5be9abbdea10916bcb93880c3
describe
'34756' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEY' 'sip-files00093.pro'
0984f4f2733b3b8300e27873a3ccd7c6
ab4147b848b1651142905498ff9e600956ad46ee
describe
'39574' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWEZ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
ac4961095d24566078fc06d848b0b5e3
2fc556cfd1a2777d2a25a8b7477e09178aba5fad
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFA' 'sip-files00093.tif'
b80eb3a091ef99c686b4dcf615c0da58
7189a11bafd1ab7723b1db138b4b336cd568e978
'2011-10-27T22:57:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFB' 'sip-files00093.txt'
d4f8ef80edb73974d0935615450bd2ae
7e3208bda300e2d8dcac7827e2fdbaaa70ccf430
describe
'9732' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFC' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
6289d8072a8441734007f462e48490ca
5a307b59c7f944d796d747d8b6fcfb23bc2f3f11
describe
'356350' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFD' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
6913cba33ad6c920080985cb28eee09d
c864fa2ed4c772489c1be6025b5a45f259223df5
describe
'130408' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFE' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
086a6faac38b69a2f419a70fd6c52c0f
7856b7785b63564dc1cc527858335ce36feae44e
describe
'31758' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFF' 'sip-files00094.pro'
8f0cd0335f101b86f23fc32faa2b0031
cef3e339c47de8e68c65d3ff1550edb6448bf19b
describe
'38674' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFG' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
7394236f82b2af240ef156761ce597fd
b43ea5d107fa6ee6f1182e2716a2abb8ad1f08e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFH' 'sip-files00094.tif'
6d03ea65180a09b51ee0aaa4a657c4a1
4f51f375e03e9ee19db643f0781cb76697e1d361
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFI' 'sip-files00094.txt'
0eb3f760e7ea9791918b9d6191c91c49
158f62f950673a376cecf7d8a17da1e00ce269a6
describe
'9463' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFJ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
4187a4f15172df66caf5af92e85e017f
f11f8d40c7269f3d82d419d593a07307b7d8ab76
describe
'356163' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFK' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
62dce105b8254f770f2921179cc8f636
934acf283ef30cb356677e6ad35adbb3892c2bbf
describe
'146396' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFL' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
606cc561d66038b3a2f8d73511f40e2b
3348d26c0d0e49dc76aa5cbc55afde1a968e4a16
describe
'36397' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFM' 'sip-files00095.pro'
df1d88b6cb9a29fe334719fa55295493
cac5563c7e56560858e8f9beeaefe50b39560d5b
describe
'42463' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFN' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
b341903747fa3e35a41ae9c284247e42
cc4e33b96efff720c90fe10c4351928cd8cb69dd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
99754215b75350f4ee078e53cf9746bf
aa3a2e3eab359d1c31d7ecae1066d6a5582c8f45
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFP' 'sip-files00095.txt'
2460cd27179cb0d2647a5aa07719ddda
64a4ebe14ff9341e5af22f0665b1a71d02d638fd
describe
'10021' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFQ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
f1168b720828bb810c2fac6bcf1ee6b0
a29d0c622e5ea5c05e9910dc2c4b7a6581fa2431
describe
'356186' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
291c82fb5f1151e324761125c2a678dd
52bc4755f498f35629462f9caf0784652124280c
describe
'130560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
e2544fc072d3fc8c437bb98d7e651040
3e6c3a1eb216d14b1c192031b387667cb3ad4e90
describe
'33525' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFT' 'sip-files00096.pro'
fbc9c43fa07355b00a34cf1333bf3f7b
f9786aa66b1da9e5fd9829e143876b833eb4f394
describe
'39920' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFU' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
f421c15fcb7430ec9fe88f0d119a28fe
a44b8447494672f46daa2eff70735659c703c94d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFV' 'sip-files00096.tif'
608c27b0b5bdf6c3255b34761dc4efa8
70f6baaa2bba47b19e79d222f9a2259be579e959
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFW' 'sip-files00096.txt'
c6d23bad9069f049dd49625f59d54f49
2d38fc74e26b02729957890f9c76d5904d6fb79e
describe
'9496' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFX' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
3300eef78012441f70dd79a64db42008
70c4d765a599ac05165679bde72065f9ac00ca34
describe
'356154' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFY' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
8d6b8fc1194ab60568a7378c1e8aaace
f4414e8d87dee3de2da8e25595f384f2f6e57cb8
describe
'143452' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWFZ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
315e5d0cd6c8c3c742a68f7ba4ad7cd9
d3d32ddbed4cd6526c908feca9ef996f9389384b
'2011-10-27T22:54:34-04:00'
describe
'37749' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGA' 'sip-files00097.pro'
63e4c2b9b5cb26292d53582b92dbbdea
ef9348c971820343e00ba74b3ab32796493f06bd
describe
'41241' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGB' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d39d9dd24e800e47fc0d4baf93b0a8a3
5668b2416d9eebfb3cdf1167b81735f0e0026775
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGC' 'sip-files00097.tif'
57ab3f14abbca34717d69a0a622ddcac
a1cb068c5dfa12a0bf9b992a273c497ab68f7347
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGD' 'sip-files00097.txt'
cb9c5fb346d71dd608db9d8188cd0b0d
2dcf810cc1c660a9d77dd0acc5a6781ed917b3ce
describe
'9731' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGE' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
464ecf74570455c54a96d639f2ccc3c4
d80a9b6984e443d38d64a278d8bcb571575602d5
describe
'356317' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGF' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
a2a5f50c8e5542d77d65268ad8b505d4
18c38141a9977f2b5fef65eb018eb9b6cc0b8424
describe
'150010' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGG' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
cc11264eef75c06dc04e809ba9d68a50
5dea5f4405f3ebf26b4e1bc80629e9ff5ed25670
describe
'38577' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGH' 'sip-files00098.pro'
ac8c11a86c37adcaa260a36f2275b1d6
e140ccb8b0023cdec0c05fac20946bb51083513b
describe
'42896' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGI' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
1cf8756fb1cc237fe002dc7d2ecfcf95
e9fa0db29e5dea9cf5184bd4552a5bfcb1607865
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGJ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d6af8c8804255e5e55401e92ffe0fd13
dde792f09837a62efed0b762bc192b34c43fbdfd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGK' 'sip-files00098.txt'
184c39ef42afbdfb075df5bf49dee16d
fd8dce83b6c93d3083bcd18d8fb103fdb4648bf9
describe
'10047' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGL' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
f44883ba6b29a1efd88ac0e18cdd4df6
61e0c805dd3307379adb47ddb42ae5a90ecbd579
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGM' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
efa887cbe39b7024682670565368fa5c
2488ddf08abdc37f60ec775b5341e9629f93f474
describe
'135394' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGN' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
bec9d70069549c74785b3766e2638f8f
46d0ccd9c0a9398fee9ed715c475209d381229c2
describe
'34315' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGO' 'sip-files00099.pro'
32289a872b2750c0d50914a53b576d0c
e9578a9267444e3f6a6e9992696d2d4f93919d66
describe
'40481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGP' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
064a8c8614d2f341dc27363cabe5d5a1
676b49720749411129f3069fa8cda24002c29733
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGQ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
1d194cdf15152017c7ba70afd9a32add
3e5a6b6c00cd29c3568cd03d54a547ddb455a64e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGR' 'sip-files00099.txt'
b953e6956b2b1b2119b05902884fefd3
7dced141b187918c4e5e8f70fbf4b36ff744aa69
describe
'9245' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGS' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
5741754c5f1776aa787bac59ec807b4e
dbe0ac21a43714d6c098c2ef45e6906d96c2b1ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGT' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
e8fd507ed066756fa96f8e31d1670cce
96e7a23497ba086db2a5bee3d41a74e37227419e
describe
'146750' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGU' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
4b5d0187920f107d6774b19e147fedd5
6c090156f4b7ec67309a160c3554470707b50400
'2011-10-27T22:55:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGV' 'sip-files00100.pro'
ea8bf163391f3cd9a4e2b1fad86d6670
6b0ba796b226d9650022a2271a12afe026b3c5b2
describe
'43327' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGW' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
bc1ef87b05eefb0699418ae0a6058297
6107f64f56900f60115cee9d9402eecac5fb059f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGX' 'sip-files00100.tif'
a5fb235c11b19022436c425caf4afb21
e39f730718bc1fd805535a702d87965a08de6365
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGY' 'sip-files00100.txt'
4f3011e2802001287e3cfbf5952530d1
bafa7c8b3f50e8d84085d767969fae604338fd3b
describe
'9884' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWGZ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
080de873d7c1e4b7d96d16bcfeb24561
f4b07eb52f198c3e33e84abfee5d9157e95f7268
describe
'356144' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHA' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
0f525faf0c3c59956574c6560fb98817
92ca09b1ec6c32ec9d187655d5505b9450a95b06
describe
'139154' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHB' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
e7bbbe4afc8a188057987e4766b74c42
8fa6a69d3dca93765cb8686f7717068b3c838908
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHC' 'sip-files00101.pro'
e2bebcae1be1097114e93d8de239508a
0c80fd72d9db8f84ea73485b531fa6735d718e68
describe
'42281' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHD' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
4bbefe4320de2034c4a3643d20479e9f
05ca8592764113c7e8868c72af9ddb6454fb3af4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHE' 'sip-files00101.tif'
7a1d82358cf44fa27716bc3576b87af7
1c8e4821efc57ae79ece57c9b056aec289e24cd4
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHF' 'sip-files00101.txt'
47d0c1234b6ff50fa126092f7c55ab4a
875062856bf6f7e88e7914ba191eb4bfc5e8c8d4
describe
'9378' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
783b1b5729561424462f6d2864cb68cf
68b1c77b5900ba106e9fb7e158964a412f7501c3
describe
'355936' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHH' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
e5828ff9cf657ef1782c9cb78e967891
83914fa8d725289125e1f772ab4958eaba0eabc6
describe
'140353' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHI' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
0d9d7db18d2ca75cf45e6aac49ec884b
e2e6b4617364354577915fdff37b8867e6a0e800
describe
'36711' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHJ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
d66808359d3a13329a1117241ae4c507
b9acea5639d948576b41ffd97a47ac0ef41a8e74
describe
'41767' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHK' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
49061dd5900154082c22566b97d5a882
95e92af087e9fae7f8d3db78453ac2a6198a7a01
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHL' 'sip-files00102.tif'
dc20609db17156d17ecad604ecabe83f
07bed1f077687852d71d90f072277da495356456
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHM' 'sip-files00102.txt'
4de7c4903085e5bf87c58ab3dd9d0b36
d7d77f75e9c14c6c879044639b11c8641746b042
describe
'9467' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHN' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
a889179a6a085a7780c57e1f3f02d827
8f977f138370bfe8b10cf00e62d186b0deee73ff
describe
'356185' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHO' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
972a229b80ae8dd1c9c1f0ce62aa69dc
b3b9427d799d5ec70889514013434567fb713006
describe
'134545' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHP' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
67646e1b8c31c74da4c5208ef2dc01b5
a915083d14945b4dcbc9e3531223c4efa4177742
describe
'33171' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHQ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
5e396a9634dc8651c5f228d6b594976f
81e0baecd37a2dee236687c1ae7a46750bf4d975
describe
'38906' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHR' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
90a65b9a779b6ae7e13b27e21abff2c6
3aa061fa6fc1773aed84897a00920d094223bbb2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHS' 'sip-files00103.tif'
e0596261432c26f8fb50c908df485260
2d6289cf5f3edbd24ae10d6e48f78bbec0934b38
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHT' 'sip-files00103.txt'
686e711fa391d2dca16b64a690172f4c
873c8e304c9a3a894cd7ef6f14eaa5bb0ce93102
describe
'9374' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHU' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
fc9ed28868da11e73da5004434e4181e
fdfc551a3d218eee0484153ec2e4c4ffc6423a7d
describe
'356162' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHV' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
1e27169633ca56b25206538a00d27d3e
42517c57a25af27b429a2c2ce89d887a4c24a826
describe
'140596' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHW' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
544de5863f6fd419f0c203ce22ecdc33
5d5c1791adb5b0aafe5cc48fef18cdaacf8abe11
'2011-10-27T22:56:58-04:00'
describe
'37356' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHX' 'sip-files00104.pro'
ba38d69b9ca902bc1ebdebeade4661f1
9f4406c8f3a5916cee89d8597c0ffa1de2d26887
describe
'42348' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHY' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
ab132b0a8abee220b7a141b8fe91c109
38c81bd949468acf0863f79efe3fc774c8c7c91c
'2011-10-27T22:57:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWHZ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
aedfcc3b99456b3faa1c57c54c77bfc5
f32212b2534c1d24b7141b2054d2b37edce94513
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIA' 'sip-files00104.txt'
b2961fc4c022fde1fce8dd3a1155b9e5
0f059bd4308e2c0b9803f34d500b99a058bd916f
describe
'9683' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIB' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
c51c24db02f69b5c001c3dd6223f9b99
4dd9ba8c7136e58639fbd92100de41da82e5b9e9
describe
'356129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIC' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
991e7b7e2a5efa63b4817839bd8e15d7
0b003f32d72d924edd0a8e663ac09392ffe74fc5
describe
'142372' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWID' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
72633b2c906cef8cf886d88d8aa5f367
fe69a1b95576a38a434c11ecc7c26b0c1b4282ca
describe
'35831' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIE' 'sip-files00105.pro'
554cf3aae92af1ee49be8b0f96ba9336
37d4d5c3ea89f5abf8210fe8a33552cc81374dce
describe
'42555' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIF' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
d68586496a549d9dacc3625d52ea1b25
c6ac6c51a6dc6e0f0beddd303c470e9276f84c28
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIG' 'sip-files00105.tif'
04ebb72982bd3c65f28157b4e643227f
6b8dcbe46c858bb5d7ead802e2fe646ebfbb64c9
describe
'1422' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIH' 'sip-files00105.txt'
351e109ce52408ea4ea24958ffccb706
7a9ca867d9f725336bd7af4683586f8611286481
describe
'9469' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWII' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
33101dc4097cc29058ff9012026df4f4
a5a4fc2d500db9a3d91a4279b2be964b24a87c12
describe
'356281' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIJ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
157f871c540591ed74904767f69a2d23
b5d11e64f9c6abf6b2447d1e46173e290bbb0786
describe
'148699' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIK' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
9a3a28afc2cb60cc84ae6750042ca807
bdd43321f6548bc22e0d14f4f286476f5d896be0
describe
'37094' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIL' 'sip-files00106.pro'
493b0a788d1ac6c7122f12b23b23f6c0
22c058d94f441d303ee03a678816748120964c66
describe
'43950' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIM' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
0f6d09c05ad116c5c6d26def384a22f2
4326afbb4ec8a3b663f6e0bf0ac62fb55905d53a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIN' 'sip-files00106.tif'
a46d229aa5594d6af2816e84fc489d87
23b0785f50595c9c3c972812ec912fb7a490526f
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIO' 'sip-files00106.txt'
f666d5cbc45db150a781a5e71c78fb69
1b111a87278c67e925ac3976671677f4dc15eae0
describe
'9928' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIP' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
89ade6087215726017014a9c0b141f09
5ec8958822bfbecd72b1fd95ac496b1a662e3404
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIQ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
42fa4d5317d221cfef69c7a4bba6a116
d6b275fdefe3b812370b562ce7f2e2c6b5052ce5
describe
'151367' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIR' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
86e09b45633d89e7796b9d52dd552356
1912460c7b39c94ca3f231f7e687b217201e328e
describe
'37677' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIS' 'sip-files00107.pro'
c9ae110fa0eea58e6f86f2711fd63cd3
0e327c7b10fb9207453dce2727382834c88a18c6
describe
'44681' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIT' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
1981808245d7a597d9eaefe6b318edba
f9368a48c30131edae49cac28e6a670553d1f30a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIU' 'sip-files00107.tif'
dc58111c7747c26a0b49f3d7a16096c7
314be8e487c7da883bb18a4403d2f846158847b0
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIV' 'sip-files00107.txt'
30bf611e0da662aa5f3cb392bbb82f62
73096a6554348acc1ee411a3e570d70d0d962bbe
describe
'9768' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIW' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
1a2522bdedbe0c0ff2aaf3b3efa0e89b
667429e4fd68da2246153ab7affff2488d54fec6
describe
'356343' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIX' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
865ee5cce1b8f81c4f631549548b5112
19f33a44647eeb23bd88fc5793d2aa668db6b114
describe
'137167' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIY' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
c3c1878a70ab8a2449b1ee0763615896
562b1ef8ddd0ca332299b1338bacb352b303f7e7
'2011-10-27T22:57:43-04:00'
describe
'35149' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWIZ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
a454f3d8b730023c20dd78c81799645d
1221b6b7ff2ba5ff5a5e8f933ef14aa6d231e446
describe
'41538' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJA' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
966f778c59352389440802f7f28c041c
f5f731510985ce685fac20d0acc024b5f7c89598
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJB' 'sip-files00108.tif'
5de6f7d6b71447c8d10a012b88d91013
d75b47255db1fba9a48f7bbfb2c45cec1d40718b
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJC' 'sip-files00108.txt'
7af0d4b41436f6c9dcb135b49c21eb16
64fccaad6d24813c00554126738aca7003fdd4be
describe
'9380' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJD' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
ae1fda5e74845ae5e81f93967c9a3b82
95d3ec3b662cf690009fb5c86987284dccd58ee0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJE' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
fcb64c0508e7e004f173f8101ecf47d7
d5309091ffa5fcc276082690f3c949ba179cee7d
describe
'141132' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJF' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
3584a6fc00bbbce33a03e80cfd8c75dd
e2a2c9a01a3f112e65c643086cb454fee6067ffa
describe
'34229' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJG' 'sip-files00109.pro'
56d77e33a50693c4909e0d0415570223
b5eb68b86f50d89b2b4422202e4489047523c829
describe
'41111' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJH' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
29e234f55d73e42088094d3d4924b089
d19a7bbd22bd825bdba53b075144f9558f349ed1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJI' 'sip-files00109.tif'
cd5271106f0d01cfd2a77e973fb56037
570d5f2bc5d688a38053128c01d4c9bea6703d31
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJJ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
d3d0d2510e0d11fcf377065de976d195
6079412f3de5ee7629b1fef3cf406d5d0d057d36
describe
'10256' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJK' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
1b751df32235fa49f618e076fb927c45
23873bee9a8dfa600938079926d2cc4c8a75738e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJL' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
15126821560ea0f2f1080f758f05241d
9a184788b2004971e0f281aeff54156ddc452875
describe
'148785' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJM' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
4bc7ac2b1dc588a557d855a119ff4739
ebd266019f54f2676e3f2ef0728578cd0273ea3e
describe
'35966' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJN' 'sip-files00110.pro'
caa0f79a025568c81d64ac5d1859ce34
4eb016490a08c19468367fdad14609dd7f472beb
describe
'43133' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJO' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
815ec2bb3e627511fd3abb4622ffa789
f343c182b458055435a1e4cea36a43089b6cf1d5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJP' 'sip-files00110.tif'
09759ae98d76508ace146dc95e3d4508
4693c95dadbb83239dd40bbd8912e84191925281
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJQ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
9fa42ba8c59e3ab97e94e6cabd70375a
b9cf4c72fa7d9220dcfe41e1638e0b5a44551b9f
describe
'10041' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJR' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
8d3a5196832f0945a36f5cca0f7e3f7d
e421b520bf5ba6c5e4b1de569e29f4ca3b59cb30
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJS' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
6a2c1eccf8ad57ce379ba6f05c49dfb0
2ddf2a8571a7045db09b47acf4e2fbe99c62e3f0
describe
'147919' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJT' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
f60678dc73cd58a0ee3dfad7f3a775a5
fc3314f0edeb547dda2f3c6f8df006036df277b3
describe
'35434' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJU' 'sip-files00111.pro'
6244827f500380dd1ad89a6d19aecd57
bae495b7e8b57d1c97bfc38ccac1cdb34154d664
describe
'42803' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJV' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
71f62baffdd4afa08287e3e86781846f
c07b9d9107c805e145f1653ac3c5e44aa483985e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJW' 'sip-files00111.tif'
cef4a453c1bb6ce4b431deb9d0be4b47
84848a532eaa4b039ea276b9b69264c672dd909b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJX' 'sip-files00111.txt'
2974e6f1c54bb76fb124f46931ee3ae6
c0efb23f6e7e48e469b699d7b616925e98a6291f
describe
'9996' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJY' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
a629740fa74d9b24fab3db3e54da7fee
9886c975892e6da6102ad9839744dca84951299b
describe
'356337' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWJZ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
a0be6ac306ed8bcf681ef2ab2dff80b0
d538de243366579be47a90bfed889bb413dee16b
describe
'155300' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKA' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
9319e287b314908ed02434e0728f3879
6b694a4c44c0bdf1dd1d89d5cfc6bc6acf29ee7a
describe
'37299' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKB' 'sip-files00112.pro'
11fe571a061730da0f076815af405927
c74b707dc6907ac3bf1a0b2b1946fbf02ff5dbcb
describe
'41852' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKC' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
0d0f26b3b1e6764da450a87f66b3013f
2302850bd300a885367549580cbd18c2757d370e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKD' 'sip-files00112.tif'
7c5e9ba8a177d6e874560a9c55c53167
579b171c8e9c6fc1de276d94e4b4652b25941de7
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKE' 'sip-files00112.txt'
8be7e0fdfe4911b7360cfdc2f2d5ddd3
1bc5ff46cf7a2f632f1c25fd5ab7d7be63f8ca08
describe
'10000' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKF' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
09ec1f8f3fd8587ece3eb85da36ddff6
2ae377ce54d60a98a4cd5a41d7bf05e87544232b
describe
'356222' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKG' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
3f7ef06d6dbe1ac287171749e530308f
f0e64d1f90a4007bb0ba74197fb8915ec69065cf
describe
'197005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKH' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
7e2434d9f985fe9948478ff8690aa535
32ab55e8586a67b8bc22d87882fb4e71647f11d1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKI' 'sip-files00113.pro'
e049a85ff017f7e5f561f1cbdaec23ca
bc94fa0d329329c843b5b46236d680e0de2fed0a
describe
'46672' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKJ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
1cbcbe5d9681e4b8c45822e72b74bcdd
252551bada7068b64d1d2c5117fab70de97a0fa4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKK' 'sip-files00113.tif'
b997bb4e779c9f1614df4e2203d5485a
e5e0575d4f098b4d059915edaef3818a0ca3404c
describe
'108' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKL' 'sip-files00113.txt'
98f9b0757776a0f5a34bf2aa9caed678
40a1aaaadc500e6b1315bbab163d2e3b869a0329
describe
'10459' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKM' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
1e7db3b306d5ddc21120e774028f613a
31a393672608f5c56ae35172e6f962f1bfe80874
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKN' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
0be333619fbb1b36df7e5de4e5ab2d56
33a0329b695e21528699c7eaef57f3f3b8cf470b
describe
'30054' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKO' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
5d0201db35d394fabc1a8576ac207fa5
945f45a89cf918e3ce088f97edfdc80f3286bff4
describe
'5300' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKP' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
2fb4263714c55d93fa8a0efd35038de6
c17f90402adbe8d508577db3f462811536b85094
'2011-10-27T22:57:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKQ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
ca44f48cce166cb0f3bc58d9d062a122
2d95dd423861e8a8c3b6bbd2d5b0ac758eea2e60
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKR' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
44ccb4f2f3f177b7db6f6b5f8afaa0c2
febb00cfb9b6fed3f695e0324a3cbe8569f1dd8e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKS' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
a65c464f21a88ee75187e67fa253e5ac
3b3ec0bb0e1ed99e39fa07d748f548e13ab45691
describe
'118946' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKT' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
355da36524f4077c752fc7b721a96d03
991460d9a526498ad6316cfa147a706f4320fce8
describe
'28539' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKU' 'sip-files00115.pro'
440f28610b019c997203249f28ce634b
420cfd26892b42d8c4f3489894019f036ce233a4
describe
'35630' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKV' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
69c9eb58c2f5748d246f81fdb4f2218b
8594c0cf850efff09db2f5b45c0a08473aa7845d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKW' 'sip-files00115.tif'
59141aeac97b7a7acb6309c3153f4429
d6e743ba600f9f33d5390a2578d3133780e48abd
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKX' 'sip-files00115.txt'
dea2843222c76c99ee7f4ddf2db9523f
8d0e1f9aeaede2585b1d5158b255f24cd9707f09
describe
'9224' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKY' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
285dd7aaf658a63d6b3ae3962aae1ea3
00754c2e128ef4d29f47de40d09ae6854ea754fb
describe
'356339' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWKZ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
754da6704ca67e96e60859735a087791
5eea5cc89c8aa7d52a39bde0db47b915e376f023
describe
'129065' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLA' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
1a102185a18167915557e0e674102c14
d79896fb5b360cdcd6727f13fde768dfb4ea7346
describe
'30519' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLB' 'sip-files00116.pro'
de9ea16956f3bd60e7b32295205f94e2
1636907070e64da8a4b6002d073a73272057ab26
describe
'38101' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLC' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
cfc6c7124a475c0dd053569fd4a67b83
0cd8977e227d7d2445c17b8f4711b9fd9c292818
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLD' 'sip-files00116.tif'
262bb7c820fe40e600f068f0b5471e58
703f20dfba43ff5e2a9161d1838f976c96dbcd0f
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLE' 'sip-files00116.txt'
bd6ff931748e5356cb2d91a0588c79e5
33b0ce028c9aa7f444c04241c2dc520dc983fd27
describe
'9271' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLF' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
2aa21623445afd49e30c2f76840e9ec8
e589b2cb5a631bd45f7e8acc4797cf5711ad4f1a
describe
'356141' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLG' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
c694cd7c7c3a8ec5394c79e070d4e3f4
1753a837578d5704187212abfeed89394e0793aa
describe
'138446' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLH' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
aed4c5766e6c957d77509186d15ec6b1
8e108e2e1d025c92baed28e98fdcf429f35b1f4b
describe
'34395' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLI' 'sip-files00117.pro'
9905b5ddbdcbea5de2d7f5ea57d07b56
ba21e9e47843a15afb2cc0cc529cad4b1bbbcc64
describe
'39890' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLJ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
e42f303274caae6e548b1730a1288263
1e38880254e38b717dc9004ffb94ec92afd2e122
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLK' 'sip-files00117.tif'
b09b7bbcd5859bdc2fa218f0b72eb9bf
fde1f01d97be99613ac0848141ad0cc253aff332
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLL' 'sip-files00117.txt'
86bd7779758a592b595fa5ddac2ccb13
94084c0da90c84e369a4bb263b78c20b51d1cbc7
describe
'9455' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLM' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
2dcf9ae31d2426b905d6f7cee41ecfcc
19e7413efca6e438422b4e334b461a617fbe979f
describe
'356132' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLN' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
01bc7e0b9f2efdf0c75d9e47377c34d1
c88165464dca8c61c03184ee518693f12372642b
describe
'133532' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLO' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
9e25a6853d4f511ff2b216c0505cb59e
048268ecfa1669ee505b1c29113e92904b2caeb0
describe
'32969' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLP' 'sip-files00118.pro'
a6df7b1563472d2ca03e2f1395b21afd
1abb31eeae3d28033ca343898352e501dceb9fe3
describe
'39895' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLQ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
c50e6adfc9c2938b9b52bd1964733943
3d99284134692c526726197028f42ae5306dc8e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLR' 'sip-files00118.tif'
81508bfc5efa10dd840e6fe59eef188f
23574be5c1893b50ac61fde50350de8e34f0a523
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLS' 'sip-files00118.txt'
92c4750c29fd0c449dc9b1d610b9dba2
2f666aadc4d555635a459868efd970d7d066fe63
describe
'9601' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLT' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
d9e50f65a9e7e99cf7f604168be0748c
b35cb77b92ffa0b9d682c9b40a159e4a14efd208
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLU' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
73d8edc1a7e559288bfc08ed9190866d
f3877e81ade0591ad30cce173df2d87cb0919c0a
describe
'129818' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLV' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
033815251d55a0da8999278f879eb219
a8879217f0fccf8171fa752e3b586f1e92e068f3
describe
'31759' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLW' 'sip-files00119.pro'
63de740b500adbaa38d48ad4089a8d19
1e6b9df9f6d76296180e8d05d44207ce3dc1f791
describe
'38089' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLX' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
8d549846cd78052b85aba70dbe3e313d
f59b9d650e3e8f17a5e4e751c40c17487c3e6b71
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLY' 'sip-files00119.tif'
e1847a46d4bb1a24a4b5703c6ef45236
40a6e228de7bf959670078eaf79ba72b0b9b49a0
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWLZ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
906cbb0e70d6a9ef2775e1fddcd26e49
3b0c14b3d4f43a39d017ba7b29484043cef9c089
describe
'9517' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMA' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
a7d09f486b2d5d2c5e4391cda4ff8f0e
3911e244bf170d2c558e2fd535e9741a585c3dba
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMB' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
107a736abd2764a0e145af42c956c706
66a89cc0a710386ef8e544c318cf612223cf753a
describe
'139838' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMC' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
938b45d34cf55a043c0b68e228367032
354f4564dad0c50b9cfec4fd3218f2197fee5db5
describe
'35021' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMD' 'sip-files00120.pro'
9deaaa81718adfdd3ef54c61ef8cc943
96072203e92a1b6fe22e6415fb476a65b85771c7
describe
'41703' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWME' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
505b103211dd69642e5fb88ba052e091
3458d2431fec39a96d2c7a8da2d6220693dd8c8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMF' 'sip-files00120.tif'
a04a31c42407ec2a7f25a19f9a7f67c3
3e136e5be26920ab38aabfdb4aad4fd63950355c
'2011-10-27T22:57:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMG' 'sip-files00120.txt'
f4884cc9e2d56ea4c97598c924e9329f
d6c8ac4f2416b8091d241e9633bc2fd9ce4203e2
describe
'10034' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMH' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
e6de3b0fa9099a91d33c870f1043a73e
4186783ea6bd9f2b7c8dad66fc08e7b47672a1e9
describe
'356147' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMI' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
31e74585296f3a7716c4a4ff40ecb0b4
6496ececa23d6c74b3544b02467632f6da1f5fea
describe
'133080' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMJ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
1c85169c9b478f16a9cd9db11553dca0
9a2f2518d5f0a603cd09a83f573c797ee14140b9
describe
'31491' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMK' 'sip-files00121.pro'
e54ddeb7cf6c6ee97be3ffc64d8fcde5
5c299db3ede67bdd040e363ec70ec2a7f485c4af
describe
'38231' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWML' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
f6614b2a5491554eeaa1431fdc507441
828bf8bb1d767572f4546603bcdd02ef7d17cb99
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMM' 'sip-files00121.tif'
95db4c794a9ccdb53f77fd759e6a09a5
f7a84763541ff535f8c875f7f5ce546d7ab9b0a0
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMN' 'sip-files00121.txt'
55d022995f526dd1894f098fd71fa37c
5f2f823803bb28fcfc5e505bd3c217f53ab1c579
describe
'8952' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMO' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
7c12536df24d474ab36a12a3e2c7b87a
41d03b3093b7c890056d0a9fc2e2497cc73169ef
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMP' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
49bb46d56f90f3deddac42f3fd4c8d19
10e3db83a23ba4600a85b6c2d9f0f9b915bbaa3d
describe
'87679' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMQ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
4e61c45284991d90e63f924ede9e6bb5
28b05c95618e14a6b0cd7fc60f01b550766878b5
describe
'18293' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMR' 'sip-files00122.pro'
34155640cc978f2fbe45cdbe65389e61
e085bbb251018a3ed2c552840b19db9764f8f2a9
describe
'25055' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMS' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
281066d2a2539afe9c4910e9612f3da2
db1e091a2b2bf456fe6566ee8eba0dee989d9ca9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMT' 'sip-files00122.tif'
9acca0e9663e0ba67a5f9c6bfffc52a2
c1ec5918865eabaee510db107c6f9eec01929f5b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMU' 'sip-files00122.txt'
41630cadc7f833ab736a152c406a44f7
1a42a89536199a2bdbb5eb0d8b7ef425b90ace5c
describe
'6397' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMV' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
8d5eb1c295db0eb5d1c052c6883e320b
be9565a857a2a92991a2281f41e9139327f2b233
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMW' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
fd0046400583c7ed852a1bffc265b85e
0b6ee2e228cfd43839c160a9e966bfb8b7e9d82f
describe
'142612' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMX' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
ba4871e513a1deabac11e74ba453ee22
303294a93717b838004d5a730da2fe39840f4eda
describe
'35616' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMY' 'sip-files00123.pro'
1df929cc46bf947c35f8a10fbc6fcd01
d3043af0694a4d172e9295123e2c881a8ead1c38
describe
'41507' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWMZ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
af5a1ab615cf15a02fafe93ca396ce51
8c80ec9de214781f724561354e2b85ce35c2521a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNA' 'sip-files00123.tif'
54dacaa19a9f1aa85118ef7577bfb086
c6d85c44c0eefeb07e7469a61c5e88e7c95a2f82
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNB' 'sip-files00123.txt'
0c8e1fc184bf9e17eca3d06f3efbb427
72d964e44285c56eadfd290f80caf370fa36b786
describe
'9521' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNC' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
4213c8e89297db88f2f799dd0eb14975
f40a02986af5cc68d5babae4bee3c0f966be2558
describe
'356079' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWND' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
186f1ba779660b410e3c11e18f693cdf
d3e8dbf1efbba17d87ce39a795471f7759f51b84
describe
'147413' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNE' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
add76cb39d188ddf89af97166767f435
76966c0da6e704b5964e126e01b7e7f73e9101eb
describe
'36385' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNF' 'sip-files00124.pro'
da7d5dc5e9acfb26424c6ba79c759b6c
1297e458ce27c483a23d510b311e28a6b8bd2ebd
describe
'42271' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNG' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
d43bc5a52ef942254d6e8ea20abd8468
d0bc62d727b77a7255924c69bd5056a44521e91f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNH' 'sip-files00124.tif'
5611d73e9e33584c3d743d45393c154f
619b0ef37be43634184717933fa59179d03ac0dd
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNI' 'sip-files00124.txt'
17376d158c7b9b3c4f42e500ba8adaa2
07ae0676fdcb8815b0f2084238ad6ec996d82afb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNJ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
5c2e9f1e9e2c920f741e978179a2b5c7
59cb8f107babd5af00b2d85ad204f5286e47b5f4
describe
'356182' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNK' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
d03b11da2641b02968d1f46ddca83daf
8bf2b56ff956be06759e308723521453e5e83a1f
describe
'130426' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNL' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
7dc6945783c906bd8518267a9d62ae3f
5d67c4d07c0d6553a1fcb57bd876d9f1fa8909d7
describe
'33714' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNM' 'sip-files00125.pro'
46393a5cca9b30081d3f4864b191ee6b
c77c858d66b5c815fc2b89e58eff0c0e4094a669
describe
'38974' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNN' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
234686ef3afd1896068deee35d82fa72
0c477327ae3f541b4433aeebe7566bc1848467a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNO' 'sip-files00125.tif'
463318e0c1af6a94f9a24bef0c4a1000
c8bbbe1557809f572eb61d4503f0b1086233bb9c
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNP' 'sip-files00125.txt'
1dbb23d01515580dc241c687539a424f
8ba584d51e92a44aff7b649f594019b313c8339f
describe
'9488' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNQ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
795d0b96f0fc4074106feda9c29115dc
f92ce48af738c9ed81245e30c3ce6e6013ea5c9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNR' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
184a93d6de995626a341e1fef65dc301
dca25429c2e1c04c4ba86cc6f58772708fb39595
describe
'134620' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNS' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
2f0aa80f12d24f1d02fe64fff08d74bc
7c3d5ae9fd64aebb6d382e9afa06ee38d110d40a
describe
'32699' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNT' 'sip-files00126.pro'
a98d77032b4c58c41e92837864d78da9
0968dff8dd8c9220b1d8f6863f96789e1ac1a9bb
describe
'40344' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNU' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
4ffbfc20f0ad430d442e951992ec1869
4af6128cfba971f889961ee4b08d147d92535625
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNV' 'sip-files00126.tif'
9e852df00149225a1a2bcd15d41dee7e
898e63fc1fd4164bedfe66e605f718ae806ad40c
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNW' 'sip-files00126.txt'
592b13e805267755afe1e7eea29bb111
f2efcd81248fc265faa72aa058a1987e536511c9
describe
'9501' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNX' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
06468fb0b86543df8e16af5f32fdbc71
227c4e8176fd6f7ca299cf7ec3a4c235dd352f88
describe
'356086' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNY' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
4b6e5dfe3710ccb536df39a3cc6ec4f8
e79c10d627f3007d500e75fac0d994689b3c44a1
describe
'154001' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWNZ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
ecc02d8b43655f5af8d4ba8c2a236a4f
97559449185f15eab159928bd528c1ee1774c07e
describe
'38382' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOA' 'sip-files00127.pro'
51748605311d92487ee9ae91f837e32e
fc9155c2c80cc5b2e7372897a48b4d5901fa0192
describe
'45844' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOB' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
1d88c99a76d6c3a2f9213e8a855771a4
1fc51cfad856b9fe9b2d30a4839aeb57b8f2427d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOC' 'sip-files00127.tif'
c113f016981a5e284861e2e5392fcbd8
560f46afb27ac60a01919e2855182fb3875f94e8
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOD' 'sip-files00127.txt'
cb0f03e536a350755bc91dd616fa1a8e
2c61a84af36aa93af564e2f2ec8933d7e4c584d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOE' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
88c7d63fb5ae60bab624f5a91239e1d4
a163660b57739b748b4cf6eeb8a29512182e6eac
describe
'356292' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOF' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
7d037a7707922e5841afa703d090741e
e1659ed1a2bca1375fa63cf8c040b92a249d6622
describe
'132605' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOG' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
3323c3fb19d2c49e16ceafb04f05fd50
dd13022c1f0c59f8131aa27827d25c211ccd58d8
describe
'34411' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOH' 'sip-files00128.pro'
b72e69b6dac6fddb420f990cafde5e6d
60c09969b58cc251fd7c9df8609a789e3b781d7a
describe
'39446' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOI' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
01d982b416f00afde75148c27a4c29a1
efd5ac99f5b801084b6c67f7a366de07e5da36d9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOJ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
e1002b420eb3026d5e283aa48a1a0366
77f75efda35f4d4bd37c2f475b50cb8f4486a250
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOK' 'sip-files00128.txt'
2615a8b06e4da264fc5ff2c7fbdcd53c
7c218c5fdfa47fb0466fce532f6e61c84c98633f
describe
'9536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOL' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
3f4089fe2058b8882bcd2dac667118ea
faa7492c8ebbf1a9dcc3d43f4a39dfa01cbcd960
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOM' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
47a4f3b7d8cbbfe8ab18b6a182a717a6
906ee4f669007cfbaa14ce4037235037f8d4b35d
describe
'135712' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWON' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
d96ee3264c1064ea343535e6b84c294d
1c358aaec3538742f1dc02c2dded0a6741feac9f
describe
'34256' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOO' 'sip-files00129.pro'
e634f76700fe94dbc7a76b478e274537
5dab9be909867c8de9ac77ef4f6ac1d452cf4748
describe
'40666' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOP' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
275cc5ddfcab73cba253186f1bd57090
5cb929e1b0d8ef4ea2bea2408cd8cb7720b4578c
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOQ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
aacbbc90baeb0e1a1c439159a278dbcd
9328b6b1f74d283fd1c0d8811a45d8bed4b096cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOR' 'sip-files00129.txt'
c2c5ac150a673030f2b9a6ee816615b6
c8d03e65e4d7718911531d48d7d5c97ff56b7805
describe
Invalid character
'9553' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOS' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
2b6ed2b82391713b2d06f40c858f701b
f31e169882bfbf07d757bd651417988c9c0cbad6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOT' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
b8c461c6c690f4154a3d6b36107e03e8
1a6c52c2012b5e4452edf0210634ce1c694aac70
describe
'133679' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOU' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
9d1d3298ef8b04fe730d27d4513a24e0
063f614b55397921269a174081babea230d642eb
describe
'32568' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOV' 'sip-files00130.pro'
aa7aad37e62ec915e8d82914c815e749
8cd81775cab0402513e2e913736c9ab9dcbfbf50
describe
'39542' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOW' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
027cb79f30f7af8e5de07990be35d364
1df39535efc9d87815ff11b43249a6ebdbdc2ac0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOX' 'sip-files00130.tif'
5b8c6b1d00192b4704647c3a293cd5e2
9888de307a55168ed64048902180aebc8fd86de6
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOY' 'sip-files00130.txt'
c424e1336199145c24aa9428aa512edf
56def82f40568e494f5edbfbfeab85c80bb06066
describe
Invalid character
'9552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWOZ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
774aecd7ca49878c618997412087ce1a
54bee07639f640fe7a721c187311f86de0a21714
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPA' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
451ed6c6e96b10974e722d6eabbec051
32739ab73be8fc9ba412bd2888900e1b714101ba
describe
'143551' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPB' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
2af72d132fe979cdde3e3ee4584a5994
5d01e02b4114f4b349752aada7fe2b675960a1cd
describe
'34826' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPC' 'sip-files00131.pro'
53faa747ff32c455f83465407d1a4448
957bdcd54898f36d6a6e3848430e3ec0ef13dd25
describe
'42016' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPD' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
94946fb78f535f33bab9b55187d9b531
5fa05a53c2a1672aabc617556a9956b729a75c24
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPE' 'sip-files00131.tif'
d77324c4dcc2d92957282e7e3bea3da3
78ed902000ce5c593a4e25643834f3b50a9f8e31
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPF' 'sip-files00131.txt'
8f55fc5d523f2c6eae43419dbcd6fe72
98f89d9b2fb6228e388137dd0fae861f99e20c68
describe
'9901' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPG' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
72d04ec7baa9f1ef9b372356685ff5f5
94858133b9545c115b9b2a2abcbb08c60133d65e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPH' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
6bf386bae42acf1830a1853c23084bea
cfd463117a091dbcdcd925b87a25e88b8d264308
describe
'139531' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPI' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
9c94200e732fa63f88979c72934b4d55
a6c5f5307bc607773f6d9ad3d73f7420e8cb83a3
describe
'35022' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPJ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
85f3d6713721cd02f17aa96cc7287104
5591fa8cedd60156204e9b8b35d569ff8019ff2a
describe
'41470' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPK' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
a5d88a312efa2d43a6a63e9953345d57
4a6d8222fc1ebaa1fb2bbb55e13d6a6c0c5f4800
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPL' 'sip-files00132.tif'
9deb6312da12e13f752741c51cd4271f
2efd0bb1e0b9eb5442027dd5459758ab68fb23fb
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPM' 'sip-files00132.txt'
c0f279f116f413abe23b0a243cf16fed
47cc014a50d26b8efd0d32426676c01fcc67d17e
describe
'10014' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPN' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
e109163de92b9e81856578d67544926c
529947fbffc551059f39f3de6e9a6fe3a78b9a74
describe
'356314' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPO' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
166131ad647b8e02cbe094af9c043005
b2519cd5c71694f03a22d2d2328da62cb59046f3
describe
'133575' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPP' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
03501bda111c28d031e51fe91b4ac48e
cbb13e5b7919ef81f3f345ea74467ba807b1521a
describe
'32633' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPQ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
d780c19a44f662fb454ffa20c1b1f341
7c81e48e42f4e97cc8236534679b33ab9de1fb31
describe
'40135' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
0c6b6411c7f4c2ba477d48f4f141911b
433211b58929f4a3bf9a4f46e1806ab55e2fee57
describe
'2867648' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPS' 'sip-files00133.tif'
a94d8f0e643507c5c26967efb3e7688a
62376e8b0e2588445b3a6b8eebfbcd58a358d68a
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPT' 'sip-files00133.txt'
59e176611345629c7da1618d0084f6a9
97a8c80cf2ef396b4a4084f4c44b1ec28118db47
describe
'9152' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPU' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
1eb43541c8442a619c4b6ad3ac9790de
020bc2591c603c767d6a0dc6b08a4c90ce870ef6
describe
'356291' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPV' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
ca5cf8968dd0b8e1ccd4c07406eb727e
e49a8e2b3cfbf260efe5972464a5356f000c9c5d
describe
'138405' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPW' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
74c636238c9aca9f569bb2c9ab9fd377
d58615cb3da8c04e3fc213c35dd6b8f409f4180e
describe
'33819' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPX' 'sip-files00134.pro'
86f74a6b3d2a7ba6790829c57ad06749
19667886467f969bd96e8376d9ef8a73c0513a42
describe
'41023' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPY' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
cd89b441784dd321a909320dcf5077ab
a3d0886a4f8e772ce47a2ae79c2e99cd6a7ec969
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWPZ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
4924d4ac38a3fa1874d22afc5280c0ed
dc30c81dcc45e0806bfd4dae34d5c72374e545c1
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQA' 'sip-files00134.txt'
73d40f799381d175e364a10073f54045
7117925854ae8f345b49baee5c418fbf326a3256
describe
'9964' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQB' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
da28efbc1f69028798ea27e0b05677c5
2ca5ad7cfceb75289d05539b124c5edf14e899b9
describe
'356272' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQC' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
944e79dad8347cfbffb3502deea07c70
398011f173f2d6e782cc243c7720b74c4031891a
describe
'137049' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQD' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
5db3c40419c89cae4b453db99602268d
1d4e1c2f39cafcd3a55b1cc4dafb75dd1c2b0aff
describe
'33156' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQE' 'sip-files00135.pro'
526c826ba57d266e4ee2733a57cd1e1a
8b6fa29f035596819d38f79c9424964230daf550
describe
'40462' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQF' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
943b11f208af6689e6e5d61785a41585
e354c6ac422585aca35a7517741736c8523d8aec
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQG' 'sip-files00135.tif'
db2bce24c39b59c6945104c1707d5582
05cdccde76fa64cb18948b3c05f5952329bcce94
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQH' 'sip-files00135.txt'
8eeae89ad1686bd1dcea04109c5d7960
c1d84431271ca0443fcf9bf4eeaf66737e23b1cd
describe
'9948' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQI' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
3d09009ab579dfbc6a86f79ab8939809
e27fa6349da9624e31f0f03f629805f2a6820ec1
describe
'356332' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQJ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
760ccd7acb40c058993550785b5d7419
e390ec99f0be3eeab049bb0aaef399ec46ed3faa
describe
'124895' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQK' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
9f6ceb5c5d9223bee535dbbf02a10393
4ff4f76be64708305adec5c1381bcf63095bd897
describe
'31310' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQL' 'sip-files00136.pro'
4b9d0b67a48e845c4f4b8bcb643a6fb8
1540e7b28042894038c0d2c5e39675b07161b4e8
describe
'37795' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQM' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
14f51ce0f2a0af125e8c82f2db2d6286
e49001f5117e7271a2cc2680fc7ffd586bf44dc5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQN' 'sip-files00136.tif'
3105a77fc1a0668ee77535a50e271f23
ae3caa3f41171721522d56806196238e9dc701c7
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQO' 'sip-files00136.txt'
613e4a7993f866834870f391294297f3
48ae8f424866aa68767796793bd0c3e00d8aeef1
describe
'9300' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQP' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
59a6b74bc392cf668914c20c86f7af07
0795208bbf848589fefd775cffb916a0ef722da4
'2011-10-27T22:54:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQQ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
7f0c9ce4e70f80bd5595b73b0dddf905
e24b2476483bb5ac6d28c9c62cd8b734aa8928c6
describe
'145261' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQR' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
b535b1abd3dc4ecfed4664bf1b795916
57aee2f688c87b73f32be7fa7415249fdb9a5975
describe
'37097' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQS' 'sip-files00137.pro'
4b2b6a8ca7b710f48783ce747e90eaa3
5363d37b9d706317ef34f4d60d02c2165ec94985
describe
'43684' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQT' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
a53628ecbdf35b478dc2d6cbdf4cf0d4
630271f8fd056eee5df5c233ec83e8467fa4bbca
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQU' 'sip-files00137.tif'
999370aaf921e611061eb0a68380e74f
325eeeabd88862540e4db31052335f702d4ae79f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQV' 'sip-files00137.txt'
32c25a4f6f4845d32e04a20732f52806
e2404be5c56b107b3f13be17685ae84bdc6c2b2b
describe
'9831' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQW' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
a5221427e896700d5f4539b5784807c9
8cb4578fde2d54f2f02711b7bca4047e959eb0f7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQX' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
568866df9f5dca7a88e10ceb1e100db9
6804077673b97bd56f5c481e0022fce75f97fc42
describe
'145510' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQY' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
13f2b91102658f9b1dd2a22152ab4454
041155c553f13be91e3bf1ddb9dcf873ba3eacd8
describe
'36862' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWQZ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
46672fa6e6a86a4e95eae26763fa7e51
074e8a863173eadd0cc9dbf9cf2f37ffd2520d5e
describe
'43662' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRA' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
8c553ff63ede59549603e1747bebcb8e
ec5d97292e5810757922189085a6926d2653e300
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRB' 'sip-files00138.tif'
ce87361f0a2387c24d3e144134ec7d20
be883cd6f0f8f60cbc6994656a7b9cfd6a3a90c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRC' 'sip-files00138.txt'
3b6f7c2babee939d7457773d45f4d28c
8ff26fd9f2828fc381eac50551cf96ca02b3f99e
describe
'10268' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRD' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
77fef6d0f8c341898b15c5bf41bb2ce4
d91bcd29fc759b4a1857e60dad7b070716ea0e41
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRE' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
1dac4960f5fa0a4cfd2ae02e2812dd1c
34dfa150cc3b4d93ca21651f01c11030a500cba4
describe
'149513' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRF' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
70e6fb8c048bf9d047b892c4684587f8
79aa7d2f96911f9dd15f3abbaeb9dc8669d37b9d
describe
'36817' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRG' 'sip-files00139.pro'
6bd0cbb21d00bb988123459ccbcb5920
fe60a15ba9bfdeff193e831975bc0424f31d5a42
describe
'45130' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRH' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
234467d45db6ddb84cb9361b7b73632f
13b3e4b6cb3f98cc70b814c5ec73139bba46f31d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRI' 'sip-files00139.tif'
bee335629780ac7d70590740d4f7ee13
3dabec334bd8ff49af8052a694145ebc5528a048
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRJ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
cc656a36a59efbfe0573548dc42bc359
88d20ed19af274558da86315c97ef4bbf25aef13
describe
'10480' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRK' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
c835d94c6144e238db324370cff90122
06ee5745cdf754d4fac6646747683ca337fb5dc9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRL' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
b13967832e25407b0073a5276263e716
adb8389ce75c789a09b2c7c47e9afba66686ea21
describe
'133738' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRM' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
9c1c6c344a5f9674ea863ca0c9837ea0
3045c8a680e400606f2d87f5bd0ddf4d665d5762
describe
'34316' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRN' 'sip-files00140.pro'
62c9ddbbcd0df5b8f903402a143a887a
e2d9c1aca1df37d34807884b4e2c886b32b9efd0
'2011-10-27T22:57:47-04:00'
describe
'40075' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRO' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
5da82071fe501bacc38686bd86687d54
af02232bb2208ca1807754803ffcf1bebe1f0723
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRP' 'sip-files00140.tif'
1bdb506821088c162a4387f6d931c86a
26898b272cfbe5a8e8a639819bb20f1a118f80b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRQ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
e5d946b55697a1af4536867553d34c26
795668aecae6462be0fa1b010385df03e044c4db
describe
'9392' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRR' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
3715cb9e4792cc8dd3b47e56e4541176
727b9f0b4003f3541e2493d770b2441b4141ca2a
describe
'356081' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRS' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
eefaba6f82ac44a22616d4eea2ab2d8e
19794e63d8ec782121c216df3d11ba3867fed50e
describe
'140498' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRT' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
c2eee45689de4ff0b4b509df05ba3158
7c03ca2c6773da26b6be40a6a8f8923338b5add2
describe
'36052' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRU' 'sip-files00141.pro'
595b254a5e825eacb9a11021f25e8130
d9f6b8770875ee82ff807e5f7146ec1dd1cd6bf4
describe
'42711' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRV' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
45148578ac2c20dea55114e673e1999d
7bea439239596851168aa5341f3d07afb1ba8f37
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRW' 'sip-files00141.tif'
c674021f6a55fbee222e478d7c418bcb
5fd7330470a1bcabb2c403f519135c9124752a1d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRX' 'sip-files00141.txt'
dafb98b6b1e41491620ee35b62e69951
d7beff9d4d751f972331f80e723cd46a3c1010c4
describe
'10328' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRY' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
45a12fef1fe2479e3fae8cfe9820275e
3b87ac701bb67c2874f62818a9dd32a4f3a0a824
describe
'356254' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWRZ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
f30d5dd7c9d2918395830ef4f43fb13d
8183685678d4c99a86a3f40a6e9d5e5db875c127
describe
'147394' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
1e1366d1501766fec9513c1ddd8cf488
197c071e143cff25e932301c7da0ea32e1673e88
describe
'37217' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
45a0c0b8a8c98e78146b844555f214b0
cbc468be0414db9f8e7ec1962288d291f5b90e25
describe
'44435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSC' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
659d57a67b0f0bb0d8afb98ce62f069f
94173f2d02d1ee04ce1ff9998e0154c0c254b426
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
3cd8ad0c4c96a477431b1f190f666bcc
d32017891d644bbf3d51b1cf46ec5b6dcf11d5bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSE' 'sip-files00142.txt'
c7536a466dedb70e82b84d4721c691c2
dc058f0edc8288f116aa00f2b4111201ecd5e278
describe
'10453' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSF' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
cd046c76d728be157b5c2cee8d03f57c
e51ffe64a7904ed11f020e3ba8369669a0ae0170
describe
'356130' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSG' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
60cd4f2104d50364a08ed8e6af5f5f34
3a5149e5dc457e1662943f5fc7b549b104300949
describe
'156261' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSH' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
e1192f7dc23d47198e13acc9b806e60c
7cf762d2c7f97e282af521f6aa8a2ca3f8540828
describe
'39519' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSI' 'sip-files00143.pro'
55b415ca3bf9ebd525193d0abb451340
7e8ef3f77c9fe77401f27420698d28a164fd346a
describe
'45435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSJ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
721ab6e2115d5d3db5d7ff7a7480af2f
4f6d073beeeb44731e90714bb44473bebe27bccd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSK' 'sip-files00143.tif'
370a85558b63ac915a809e4ca7ccdf21
c547eed33cde2160aaeb909e6bdede86e2f3ef7c
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSL' 'sip-files00143.txt'
75f22e466e58d03f6e51f591ecf9f294
b3fffd602d15321fd2a4d12e5345b9c811e99906
describe
'10479' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSM' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
a0ed080b2f9b8177048c02b8512bc4cb
a34ea15591476195d09b2896ea37679557002d8e
describe
'356321' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSN' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
3d4bd7476c22875fce9ba82f806f7400
34a1fc300beada2e00f3ebc10379563f38a0f00f
describe
'43569' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSO' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
22889d2f25b0874bc0ba8e963f07bf54
4f7388ee448c1e24bd336f3132c61515edb0e234
describe
'10053' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSP' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
bcccb6d7b349d3ebec0eeaef04ef3caf
97ee65cd6c3474b3c078a60410eaca428845b9ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSQ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
b4892b86f838d233f68513d163887d55
e6d77fd72b425261ce6272522ff822d9a23b8afd
describe
'2565' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSR' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
42b266bfb2de03077d43785ed7b5d1a6
c7acc959dd6c95920e66f8ebdde8fb6a84acfd63
describe
'422942' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSS' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
3ee33cc2b2fca3f4cfb1970e348820b0
260c3c466225bfba752638250a3220165d268c37
describe
'78858' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWST' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
2df5d8ac0a16fb30dd221bb5ef912845
80f297d6deba9fa2badba81fa54f59ddf67ee733
describe
'17819' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSU' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
a5e0851cdc025eba81aaceb0333c27c5
d6704af0a258bb7acebeabbc0b8ed6e63352435a
describe
'10157172' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSV' 'sip-files00147.tif'
4e208185b2abe2e2f8b9dba3f86410d9
589aedfbe762241a52007696e0f1d748705955e1
describe
'4260' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSW' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
ea0d3d2460b3430dca156b2b8e7f6cc6
3590cf9ce968fc3110407844f46cf2cbae1500ab
describe
'412647' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSX' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
36c54226faa5ab71279957081643f77a
c89993a376a4bbce6f3b5b16c70b84c2d74a2317
describe
'109120' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSY' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
d2c94dd5ee2216974a2b4014799ac6f7
8f021c657742f27bbe57440648c2c92f65814f4b
describe
'20641' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWSZ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
fadd4853ef46462882760a9e861a53a3
ccd62cebf9b5ab86804b5f52d99f1d356096c9f9
describe
'9913200' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTA' 'sip-files00148.tif'
c644fb4f3abfaee8671f234c6da1c6ca
fae293ba7622a42467788e28c1a292ede85ffc1b
describe
'4410' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTB' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
e4739d89e1657db48e723bc16344a15b
3e0614306bf1818d9483371319f6ff081ec33821
describe
'82908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTC' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
94ed09f5c27e5f7e0656cd1f6929f137
fb789b749a3465218ba2f6acd878e57ce7b5410f
describe
'41008' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTD' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
498b72838c7520ef184b736080a57ee7
de2ea52db87f74dde3484cce5b5abea4db7072f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTE' 'sip-files00149.pro'
7bc32c273086699d5ffc65b3c5993490
2941dfa558478326f4f53680bcdafad94e5a4f5e
describe
'10131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTF' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
76d63908c5d3139b48095fa627e1a1c4
222b2f9477f394f1283b2d06abd5aedbe7370185
describe
'2007380' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTG' 'sip-files00149.tif'
325653057bf2c58ea22d95291ad3586d
6ee93a479de9f21452a8a127e767169afccaf1dd
describe
'3933' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTH' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
b3b77ebdf11e0c7c5a310e5205b9af8d
41cbff5ea32acbc9fff9c1cb91a05bafe09a7ffc
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTI' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
18b8ca21593b424cb93f93a089cc215d
26b1b6a1adf66dff4fa0a1b18d8ba6e9495cc1e4
describe
'238384' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTJ' 'sip-filesUF00085973_00001.mets'
2d4f1e33c3e82edd89dcc5855ade819c
64ecd1a4b643eb1ad3e37020738e212edb2d5aa1
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-14T18:10:52-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'307926' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAPNfileF20081114_AACWTM' 'sip-filesUF00085973_00001.xml'
c1fdcb30224ee4a12c5cc0c09c1a01d6
b20fa2eedde85df20207d88faec44abb51833c29
describe
'2013-12-14T18:10:54-05:00'
xml resolution