Citation
Wright, M.S. to Etta A. Anderson – Mar. 18, 1873 – Memphis, TN

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Title:
Wright, M.S. to Etta A. Anderson – Mar. 18, 1873 – Memphis, TN
Creator:
Wright, M. S.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Civil War
Spatial Coverage:
North America -- Tennessee -- Memphis
North America -- United States of America -- Florida
North America -- United States of America -- Tennessee
North America -- United States of America

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Resource Identifier:
114jc

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Memphis Mar. 18th 1873


Dear Mrs. Anderson,
Today is the first time I've felt able to answer your dear kind note. It gratified me
to think there was one dear friend who thought of me and sympathized not only on
account of bodily sufferings, but my spiritual welfare also. No doubt you have heard it
rumored that I and my husband were both skeptical. I have heard the same but to releave
[relieve] you my dear friend I know of no one that believes more fully in the redeeming
merits of the Savior and through him our only hope of final salvation than Genl. W. I at
times had doubts but he never. His having been to see Foster and other of his persuations
[persuasions] has given rise to his being skeptical.
I would to heaven that he Foster could prove beyond a doubt the immortality of
the souls, "seeing is believing," my faith is not at all times strong. I confess I want
knowledge. Nor do I believe there is a Christian living but what would feel better
satisfied if they could be convinced beyond doubt that their loved ones lived. They are
satisfied perhaps as it is as we are creatures of early impressions and habbits [habits] that
have been instilled in us from childhood yet I believe they would be better contented
were it a certainty. Bennie our little Baptist is now singing at the top of his voice the
clouds are all passing away. I believe in time we will not see dimly as through a glass but
with clear vision. I have encored you and will drop the subject.
For three days I been trying my strength and find out each day, by Saturday when Mattie
can go with me I cam coming to see you if you have an engagement on that day don't
break it on that account as I may in some way be prevented from going. I might have
been to see you before I met with this last accident but judged you by myself. I know
there was no word of comfort no friend could soothe such great grief, such terrible
afflictions as yours has been. I know from sad experience that solitude "to be left alone"
in our first great grief is the best solace to our torn and broken heart. At the time we
forget human nature. We wonder when others smile. It even seems strange that the sun
seems as bright as before. At such time I must be alone. None can comfort it is a
mocking attempt. Ijudge you by myself and stayed away in kindness to you and to
myself as I could not bear to see your once happy, cheerful face so pale and sad then I
have though of you sympathized with you but too big a coward to see you changed from
your happy self, but now you have had time to think, to reason with yourself and with
faith no doubt. To left your thoughts about and with happiness even you think with
delight of that happy reunion with the loved one who has only gone on ahead of you.
Just a little time and we all pass away.
Your friend,
M.S. Wright
I beg of you to excuse this long letter. I had no idea I had trespassed on the last page
until I have found no room to sign my name. I could talk to you all day but have weared
[wearied] I fear. Your affectionate friend M.S. Wright


Transcribed by Christopher A. Baker, University of Florida, 2008.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Memphis Mar. 18th 1873 Dear Mrs. Anderson, Today is the first time Ive felt able to an swer your dear kind note. It gratified me to think there was one dear friend who thought of me and sympathized not only on account of bodily sufferings, but my spiritua l welfare also. No doubt you have heard it rumored that I and my husband were both skeptica l. I have heard the same but to releave [relieve] you my dear friend I know of no one that believes more fully in the redeeming merits of the Savior and through him our only hop e of final salvation than Genl. W. I at times had doubts but he never. His having been to see Foster and othe r of his persuations [persuasions] has given rise to his being skeptical. I would to heaven that he Foster could prove beyond a doubt the immortality of the souls, seeing is believing, my faith is not at all times strong. I confess I want knowledge. Nor do I believe there is a Chri stian living but what would feel better satisfied if they could be convinced beyond doubt that their loved ones lived. They are satisfied perhaps as it is as we are creatures of early impressions and habbits [habits] that have been instilled in us from childhood yet I believe they would be better contented were it a certainty. Bennie our little Baptist is now singing at the top of his voice the clouds are all passing away. I believe in time we will not see dimly as through a glass but with clear vision. I have encored you and will drop the subject. For three days I been trying my strength and find out each day, by Saturday when Mattie can go with me I cam coming to see you if you have an engagement on that day dont break it on that account as I may in some way be prevented from going. I might have been to see you before I met with this la st accident but judged you by myself. I know there was no word of comfort no friend could soothe such great grief, such terrible afflictions as yours has been. I know from sad experience that solitude to be left alone in our first great grief is the best solace to our torn and broken h eart. At the time we forget human nature. We wonder when others smile. It even seems strange that the sun seems as bright as before. At such time I must be alone. None can comfort it is a mocking attempt. I judge you by myself and stayed away in kindness to you and to myself as I could not bear to see your once happy, cheerful face so pale and sad then I have though of you sympathized with you but too big a coward to see you changed from your happy self, but now you have had time to think, to reason with yourself and with faith no doubt. To left your thoughts about and with happiness even you think with delight of that happy reunion with the l oved one who has only gone on ahead of you. Just a little time and we all pass away. Your friend, M.S. Wright I beg of you to excuse this long letter. I had no idea I ha d trespassed on the last page untill I have found no room to sign my name. I could talk to you all day but have weared [wearied] I fear. Your affectionate friend M.S. Wright Transcribed by Christopher A. Baker, University of Florida, 2008.