Citation
History of Patton’s Pipe – Apr. 6, 1862

Material Information

Title:
History of Patton’s Pipe – Apr. 6, 1862
Creator:
Baker, Christopher A.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Civil War
Spatial Coverage:
North America
North America -- United States of America -- Florida
North America -- United States of America -- Tennessee
North America -- United States of America

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
29jc

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Full Text





6th of April 1862


The evening of the first day's fight at the Battle of Shiloh, the Northern Army was
repulsed. Genl. Anderson's command opposed a part of Genl. Len Wallace's. They
dropped to the cover of their Gun Boats. Their tents &c fell into our hands, among the
rest, Genl. W.'s own tent, papers etc. & this pipe. The soldier who captured it gave it to
Genl. Anderson. It was to the end of the war quite a hit with Genl. A's Staff Officers.
An old red silk handkerchief was always kept in a convenient place and as soon as the
Genl. quit smoking one of the officers would rub it until it was cool in order to color it
properly. It was considered finely colored by its admirers. Gen. A. always used [?] it
until his death in 1872. In 1868 Gen. A. was planting in spring [?], the levys had been
destroyed by the enemy & there was a heavy overflow. He was going from his house to
the landing in a small skiff-his pipe fell from the stern into the water. It was at night &
he thought it was gone & the next day in going over the same ground he said this must be
about the place I dropt my pipe he put his hand down & sure enough found the pipe. Of
course its falling into the water had caused it to crack. He had a silver band put round it
hoping to preserve it & he did continue to use it until 1872 when it was laid away.
Several years after when opened it was found in the condition it now is. The coloring
could never be restored after the night in the water.

History of Patton's Pipe


Transcribed by Christopher A. Baker, University of Florida, 2008.




Full Text

PAGE 1

6th of April 1862 The evening of the first days fight at th e Battle of Shiloh, the Northern Army was repulsed. Genl. Andersons command opposed a part of Genl. Len Wallaces. They dropped to the cover of their Gun Boats. Th eir tents &c fell into our hands, among the rest, Genl. W.s own tent, papers etc. & this pipe. The soldier who captured it gave it to Genl. Anderson. It was to the end of the war quite a hit with Genl. As Staff Officers. An old red silk handkerchief was always kept in a convenient place and as soon as the Genl. quit smoking one of the officers would ru b it until it was cool in order to color it properly. It was considered fi nely colored by its admirers. Gen. A. always used [?] it until his death in 1872. In 1868 Gen. A. was planting in spring [?], the levys had been destroyed by the enemy & there was a heavy overflow. He was going from his house to the landing in a small skiffhis pipe fell from the stern into the water. It was at night & he thought it was gone & the next day in going over the same ground he said this must be about the place I dropt my pipe he put his hand down & sure enough found the pipe. Of course its falling into the water had caused it to crack. He had a silver band put round it hoping to preserve it & he did continue to use it until 1872 when it was laid away. Several years after when ope ned it was found in the condition it now is. The coloring could never be restored afte r the night in the water. History of Pattons Pipe Transcribed by Christopher A. Baker, University of Florida, 2008.