Citation
Pauline and the matches

Material Information

Title:
Pauline and the matches and Envious Minnie
Series Title:
Red Riding Hood series
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bro's
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[10] p. : col. ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Matches -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Jealousy -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Children's poetry
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
In verse.
General Note:
Text on p. [2]-[3] of cover.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027271743 ( ALEPH )
ALK2705 ( NOTIS )
23103720 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Dag Pte 1896
M Tout Bros.

“Newyork:










PAULINE
and the MATCHES.

Wi AMMaA and Nurse went out one day,
And left Pauline alone at play;
Around the room she gaily sprung,
Clapped her hands, and danced, and sung.
Now, on the table close at hand,
A box of matches chanced to stand,
And kind Mamma and Nurse had told her,
That if she touched them they would scold her;




The Baldwin Library

University | |
mB ei
Florida | _





PAULINE AND THE MATCHES.

But Pauline said, ‘‘Oh, what a pity!
For when they burn, it. is so pretty}
They crackle so, and spit, and flame,
To see them’s better than a game.

I will just light a match or two,

As oft I’ve seen my mother do.”

‘When Mintz and Mauntz, the cats, came by,
They raised their paws and began to cry;
“Me-ow!”’ they said, “me-ow, me- -oh!
You'll burn to death if you do S0,

Your parents have forbid,
you know.”
But Pauline would not
| take advice,
She lit a match, it was
so nice!
It crackled so, and
burned so clear—
Exactly like the picture
hee:
She jumped for joy
and ran about,
And was too pleased to
put it out.



























When Mintz and Mauntz, the cats, saw this,
They said “Oh, naughty, naughty Miss!”
And stretched their claws,

And raised their paws;

“Tis very, very wrong, you know; .
Me-ow, me-oh, me-~ow, me-oh!



PAULINE AND THE MATCHES.

You will be burnt if you do so,
Your mother has forbid you know.”

# % x Ea x *
Now see! oh! see, a dreadful thing!
The fire has caught her apron-string!
Her apron burns, her arms, her hair;
She burns all over, everywhere.
Then how the pussy-cats did mew.
What else, poor pussies, could they do?
They screamed for help, ’twas all in vain,
So then they said, “ We'll scream again;
Make haste, make haste! me-ow, me-oh!
She'll burn to death—we told her 5One :
So she was burnt with all her clothes
And arms, and hands, and eyes, and nose;
Till she had nothing more to lose,
Except her little scarlet. shoes ;
And nothing else but these were found,
- Among her ashes on the ground.
And when the good cats sat beside
The smoking ashes, how they cried!
‘‘Me-ow, me-oh, me-ow, me-oh!
What will Mamma and Nursy do?”
Their tears ran down their cheeks so fast,
They made a little pond at last.





ENVIOUS MINNIE.

Vie had charming eyes of blue,

A figure trim and slender, too,
And gracefully her hair did curl,—
“She was, in truth, a pretty girl.

And yet, with all these beauties rare,
These angel eyes, and curly hair,
Oh, many, many faults had she,

The worst of which was jealousy.



Ei

SIEEET STE

iH}.
»
>
»
Ait
2)








When on the shining
Christmas tree
Saint Nicholas hung
ae his gifts so free,
The envious Minnie could not bear
With any one these gifts to share.

And when her sisters’ birthdays came,
Minnie—it must be told with shame—
Would envy every pretty thing

Which dear Mamma to them would bring.



sa 8

ENVIOUS MINNIE.

Sometimes great tears rolled from her eyes,
Sometimes she filled the air with cries,
For days together she would fret

Because their toys she could not get.

Ah, then, how changed this pretty child,
No longer gentle, sweet, and mild
That fairy form and winsome face

Lost all their sprightliness and grace.

Her tender mother often sighed,

And to reform her daughter tried,
“Oh! Minnie, Minnie,” she would say,
‘Quite yellow you will turn some day.”

Now came the merry Christmas feast;
Saint Nicholas brought to e’en the least
Such pretty presents, rich, and rare,
But all the best for Minnie were.

But Minnie. was not satisfied,

She pouted, fretted, sulked, and cried;
Sisters and brothers had no rest—

She vowed their presents were the best.

Now to her little sister, Bess,

Saint Nicholas brought a yellow dress;
This Minnie longed for, envious child,
And snatched it from her sister mild.



\
RRR \
QO OSaE x7K)



Then all in tears did Bessy run
To tell her mother what was done,
While Minnie went triumphantly
To try the dress on, as you see.

And springing quickly to the glass,
What saw she there? alas! alas!
Oh! what a sad, a deep disgrace !
She found she had a yellow face.

“Ah me!” she cried now, in despair,
“Where are my rosy cheeks—oh, where ?”
“Ho!” screamed the parrot, ‘‘now you see
The punishment of jealousy !”







Full Text


Dag Pte 1896
M Tout Bros.

“Newyork:







PAULINE
and the MATCHES.

Wi AMMaA and Nurse went out one day,
And left Pauline alone at play;
Around the room she gaily sprung,
Clapped her hands, and danced, and sung.
Now, on the table close at hand,
A box of matches chanced to stand,
And kind Mamma and Nurse had told her,
That if she touched them they would scold her;




The Baldwin Library

University | |
mB ei
Florida | _


PAULINE AND THE MATCHES.

But Pauline said, ‘‘Oh, what a pity!
For when they burn, it. is so pretty}
They crackle so, and spit, and flame,
To see them’s better than a game.

I will just light a match or two,

As oft I’ve seen my mother do.”

‘When Mintz and Mauntz, the cats, came by,
They raised their paws and began to cry;
“Me-ow!”’ they said, “me-ow, me- -oh!
You'll burn to death if you do S0,

Your parents have forbid,
you know.”
But Pauline would not
| take advice,
She lit a match, it was
so nice!
It crackled so, and
burned so clear—
Exactly like the picture
hee:
She jumped for joy
and ran about,
And was too pleased to
put it out.





















When Mintz and Mauntz, the cats, saw this,
They said “Oh, naughty, naughty Miss!”
And stretched their claws,

And raised their paws;

“Tis very, very wrong, you know; .
Me-ow, me-oh, me-~ow, me-oh!
PAULINE AND THE MATCHES.

You will be burnt if you do so,
Your mother has forbid you know.”

# % x Ea x *
Now see! oh! see, a dreadful thing!
The fire has caught her apron-string!
Her apron burns, her arms, her hair;
She burns all over, everywhere.
Then how the pussy-cats did mew.
What else, poor pussies, could they do?
They screamed for help, ’twas all in vain,
So then they said, “ We'll scream again;
Make haste, make haste! me-ow, me-oh!
She'll burn to death—we told her 5One :
So she was burnt with all her clothes
And arms, and hands, and eyes, and nose;
Till she had nothing more to lose,
Except her little scarlet. shoes ;
And nothing else but these were found,
- Among her ashes on the ground.
And when the good cats sat beside
The smoking ashes, how they cried!
‘‘Me-ow, me-oh, me-ow, me-oh!
What will Mamma and Nursy do?”
Their tears ran down their cheeks so fast,
They made a little pond at last.


ENVIOUS MINNIE.

Vie had charming eyes of blue,

A figure trim and slender, too,
And gracefully her hair did curl,—
“She was, in truth, a pretty girl.

And yet, with all these beauties rare,
These angel eyes, and curly hair,
Oh, many, many faults had she,

The worst of which was jealousy.
Ei

SIEEET STE

iH}.
»
>
»
Ait
2)





When on the shining
Christmas tree
Saint Nicholas hung
ae his gifts so free,
The envious Minnie could not bear
With any one these gifts to share.

And when her sisters’ birthdays came,
Minnie—it must be told with shame—
Would envy every pretty thing

Which dear Mamma to them would bring.
sa 8

ENVIOUS MINNIE.

Sometimes great tears rolled from her eyes,
Sometimes she filled the air with cries,
For days together she would fret

Because their toys she could not get.

Ah, then, how changed this pretty child,
No longer gentle, sweet, and mild
That fairy form and winsome face

Lost all their sprightliness and grace.

Her tender mother often sighed,

And to reform her daughter tried,
“Oh! Minnie, Minnie,” she would say,
‘Quite yellow you will turn some day.”

Now came the merry Christmas feast;
Saint Nicholas brought to e’en the least
Such pretty presents, rich, and rare,
But all the best for Minnie were.

But Minnie. was not satisfied,

She pouted, fretted, sulked, and cried;
Sisters and brothers had no rest—

She vowed their presents were the best.

Now to her little sister, Bess,

Saint Nicholas brought a yellow dress;
This Minnie longed for, envious child,
And snatched it from her sister mild.
\
RRR \
QO OSaE x7K)



Then all in tears did Bessy run
To tell her mother what was done,
While Minnie went triumphantly
To try the dress on, as you see.

And springing quickly to the glass,
What saw she there? alas! alas!
Oh! what a sad, a deep disgrace !
She found she had a yellow face.

“Ah me!” she cried now, in despair,
“Where are my rosy cheeks—oh, where ?”
“Ho!” screamed the parrot, ‘‘now you see
The punishment of jealousy !”