Citation
Rhymes of the states

Material Information

Title:
Rhymes of the states
Creator:
Newkirk, Garrett, 1847-1921
Fenn, Harry, 1838-1911 ( Illustrator )
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Century Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
96 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Territories and possessions -- Juvenile literature -- United States ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- United States ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Summary:
Geographic, demographic and historical facts about each state admited by date of publication (45), with an accompanying map and a poem. Also includes information on the Indian Territory, the Oklahoma Territory and the territory of Alaska.
General Note:
Contains prose and verse.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Garrett Newkirk ; With drawings by Harry Fenn after sketches by the author.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026642591 ( ALEPH )
ALG4558 ( NOTIS )
00550499 ( OCLC )
16003079 ( LCCN )

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Full Text


NEWKIRK

GARRETT

oy








RHVMES OF THE STATES



REY WES OF [Hi STATES

> BY:
GARRETT NEWKIRK

WITH DRAWINGS BY HARRY FENN
AFTER SKETCHES BY THE AUTHOR



NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
1896



Copyright, 1894, 1895, 1896,
by GarreTr NEWKIRK



All rights reserved

THE DE VINNE PRESS.



DEDICATION

TO THE BOYS AND GIRLS OF
ALL THE STATES, WITH THE WISH THAT
EACH ONE MAY BE A GOOD AND FAITHFUL CITIZEN OF
THE STATE, AND OF THE UNITED STATES, THIS
BOOK IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED
BY THE AUTHOR



PREE ACE

“Thirty days hath September,
April, June, and November,
All the rest have thirty-one,
Excepting February alone:
To this we twenty-eight assign,
Till leap-year gives it twenty-nine.”

This well-known rhyme —a familiar aid to every boy and girl in
memorizing the number of days in the twelve months — suggested
to the author of this little book a similar series of rhymes, which
should assist children in studying the history and geography of the
United States. It is no easy task to fix in the mind the location,
outlines, physical features, and historical record of all the States of
our American Union. oe

The author has tried to reduce all these distinctive facts into the
form of simple rhymes, easily impressed upon the memory, and ac-
companied by pictures which illustrate the ideas contained in the
verses. In the pictures, moreover, each State has been shown on
a single page; and, in addition to an outline map of the State,
there is given a caricature sketch of some object or animal which
the State might be said to resemble in form. These, the author
believes, will prove very useful in fixing in the child's mind the
shapes and the main physical features of the different States.

The Rhymes have been carefully and artistically illustrated by
Mr. Harry Fenn, and the entire series of verses and pictures has
been published in the pages of “St. Nicholas” within the last two
years.

The silhouettes of the States, small as they are, are accurately
drawn to scale by Mr. H. L. Bridwell. They make an interesting
and instructive page which not only shows the form but gives the
comparative size of each State.



RHYMES OF THE STATES.

gon SSE ME SSE ASS A OG A pe we eee MEM ee Sey
ae Pas . : t

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N.DAKOTA ai Lae ee

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96030 SM

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“H-BRIDWEL 1a
tS, SIDS k=, K+ SE we rn ee ek GE ke Se Weehe wee wm
. ALL THE STATES SHOWN UPON THE SAME SCALE,

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2 RHYMES OF THE STATES






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MAINE.

Square miles, 33,040.

Population (1890), 661,086.

In rank according to popula-
tion, the 30th State.

Counties, 16.

Representatives in Congress, 4.

Presidential Electoral votes, 6.

For nearly 200 years Maine was under Massa-
chusetts.

First called “Province of Mayne,” by charter of ;
Charles I., 1639.

Admitted into the Union, 1820.

The poet Longfellow was born in Portland, February
27 eOOu

From 12,000 to 15,000 men are engaged directly in
the fisheries.

Yearly value of fisheries products, about $ 3,000,000.

Yearly value of lumber products, about $12,000,000.

Gold and silver (1880), about $8,000.

Principal quarries, limestone.

Popular name: ‘‘ The Pine Tree State.”





oo

RHYMES OF THE STATES

Hurrah for the United) States!
And each link in ‘tke}chain;
= _ Aird. let_our stories here -begin
Sm With*the northeast State of Maine.

Zee e ee

WSS Ws 1

Nell

rees is :
spruce, and pind PERG, |
te built alon oa

nan plane

\ wy mi

A TRS eb
e > aiid

~ Sees

22_Some thousands iat thee oF 1 bao
Go2 ousands ‘of her people go ¥
lin A-fishing in'the séa..--__.- Ly
GThey catch &nough to use at honie, aH
ee Se ee
Aad some for you and me. / Sufi
Bar Bes

x ‘isle has/she

Aher quiet bays, Gy -
le come from other States “A;

2

>=—=-













4 RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 9,305.

Population (1890), 376,530.

In rank according to population, 33d.
Counties, 10.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

First settlements at Dover and Portsmouth, 1623. Al
Annexed to Massachusetts, 1641.
Became again a separate province, 1741.




Value of manufactured boots and shoes, 1890,
nearly $12,000,000.
Value of manufactured cot-

ton goods, nearly $22,-
000,000.
Value of gold and _ silver
product (1880), about
30,000.
Popular name: “ The Granite
State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 5

“The Granite State,” sharp pointed north,
Has mountains called the White,
Because the snow upon their tops
So often makes them bright.

This is a pleasant State wherein
Thro’ summer-time to dwell;

The air is sweet, the nights are cool,
The people treat you well.

Six thousand feet. Mount Washington
Stands higher than the sea,

And from the top a wondrous view
Is had one day in three.*

A large amount of granite stone,
Of color blue or gray, ~

Is taken from the quarries here
To cities far away.





6 RHYMES OF THE STATES

VERMONT.

Square miles, 9,565.

Population (1890), 332,422.

In rank according to population, 36th.
Counties, 14.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.



165 Miles.

First State admitted into the Union after
the formation of the Government;
date of admission, March 4, 1791.

Number of pounds of maple-sugar (1890), 14,123,921.

Gallons of syrup, 218,252.

Value of paper manufactured (1890), $2,289,000.

Value of products of marble and stone works, $3,249,000.

Principal quarries: marble, slate, and
limestone.

Vermont was settled largely from New
Hampshire and Massachusetts.
Claimed for a long time by both
New Hampshire and New York.

Popular name: “The Green Mountain
State.”





RHYMES OF THE STATES











































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SE f Ver-mont we call this pleasant State J

oe = fe, . eam

Vie Pe See Because the hills are green— = -

ee aT
= The cattle in the=pastures graze, | : ‘

NNT HO. rest beneath_the trees; i ae wt

a | We Sweet golden butfer here is made, \ uN

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SS Se3.7- And wholesome bread, and-milk, and. cream,
iad Se And maple-sugar sweet. ==
= How happy must the children be =~ —

With such good things to eat. =a



Me
LIK sen Mounuane Boys,” “the 20908 were : called

A Sa Who followed Gerieral ‘Starkg- =e
~~ “Aid Ethan Allen, when’ a “fort =
Sa Was captured in the dark: Ss ee
otra,



8 RHYMES OF THE STATES







180 Miles . ~,
‘ ) -
SY - ee —K
] o
Bok
x
a Se QW
ws Nort AMPTON. BOSTONS® ,
SR “S or
Zoe g WORCESTER

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Se

MASSACHUSETTS.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES. “4

Square miles, 8,315.

Population (1890), 2,238,943.

In rank according to population, 6th.
Counties, 14.

Representatives in Congress, 13.
Electoral votes, 15.

First settlements at Plymouth in 1620; at Salem,
1628; at Boston, 1630.



Value of boots and shoes, factory product (1890), $116,387,900.

Value of cotton goods (1890), $100, 202,382.

Massachusetts has been the home of several of America’s most
famous poets, Bryant (in early life), Emerson, Longfellow,
Holmes, Whittier, Lowell, Aldrich, and others.

Popularly called “The Old Bay State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

a iS =a =

zx

Tf

i ‘}. With Boston, by the sea, rh eS
| ” Where brave men went aboard the ships “AY Y

oA LX ont EL
i Ge we \ And cast out British tea. —= Si j
o uN ee oe , ar - - f fl J

Tey cant { ae

ne =e
‘ Massachusetts next we come,

=\¢ And)here it was, at Bunker Hill, 2
Cg our forefathers true, LEK.

A gallant\battle bravely fought {: os
+ For freedom and for you KEE

4







2 Here Plymouth, too, and Lexington, —
-_ _ Each has its tale to tell,
Of men who suffered, men who fought,
And did their duty -well., 7,

Pg

WY ier,

foe face pb
EEE
—, And Massachusetts has -an arm;
2 A narrow strip of land—g

gg gee
So pT









Io

RHYMES OF THE STATES

RHODE ISLAND.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED FOR AN ISLAND IN NARRAGANSETT BAY. THIS ISLAND IS
BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN THE ‘“‘VINLAND” VISITED
BY THE NORTHMEN ABOUT A. D. 1000.

Square miles, 1,250.

Population (1890), 345,506.

In rank according to population, 35th.
Counties, 5.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Two capitals, Providence and Newport.

Value of manufactured cotton goods (1890), $27,000,000.

Woolen and worsted goods, about $32,000,000.

Manufactured jewelry, $8,000,000.

General Nathanael Greene and Commodore Oliver H. Perry were
natives of this State.

First settlement, by Roger Williams, at Providence, 1636.

It is popularly called “ Little Rhody.”



CONN,

RHYMES OF THE STATES Il

TOME 1, MORAG ?
Se

TON 7 Sse
i y ee, us Good Roger Williams was a man
He ay Rye oe Who loved his neighbors well;
@\% A | But for his faith they made him. sete Mf
Lo Another place to dwell. yj smtey, Hil
di

h
F 1M)

Among the Indians, in the woods,\Â¥h
To live in peace he went, \
nd down by Narragansett Bay

» He made a settlement.

: , lis census-roll is full, /
Ni\jn/}));, Its mighty factories turn to cloth / @
) Dh Our cotton and our wool. ee ig

awed

‘PROVIDENCEZOMN

71)

a
ag
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lg

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I2 RHYMES OF THE STATES

CONNECTICUT.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 4990.

Population (1890), 746,258.

In rank according to population, 29th.
Counties, 8.

Representatives in Congress, 4.
Electoral votes, 6.

_ First settlement, by the Dutch, at Hartford, 1633; but they soon sold
‘out to the English. Other settlements followed at New Ha-
ven, Windsor, and Weathersfield, by people from Massachusetts.

Value of manufactured brass and copper, and all kinds of brass and
copper ware (1890), about $25,000,000.

Value of manufactured hats and caps, and materials for (1890),
nearly $9,000,000.

Leads in the manufacture of firearms and ammunition.

Principal quarries, red sandstone.

Popular name: ‘The Nutmeg State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

(The State of Cofinecticut +
.2 You may know on
i Because it resembles

= little poys cap,

ee aise el Hartford. = :
= Is. worthy of pride —"F
BE siNew Havens Yale, ee ve LL

i New- England we name,
fe Beenie their first settlers” a













































































T3





RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEW YORK.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.
NAMED IN HONOR OF THE DUKE OF YORK.

Square miles, 49,170.

Population (1890), 5,997,853.

In rank according to population, Ist.
Counties, 60.

Representatives in ene 34.
Electoral votes, 36.

Printing and ee value of products (1890), $69,000,000.

Flouring and grist-mill products (1890), $52,000,000.

Foundry-and machine-shop products (1890), $72,000,000.

Pounds of butter (1890), nearly 100,000,060, greatest product of
any State. :

Hudson River discovered by Henry Hudson, 1609.

First settlement of New York, on Manhattan Island, by the Dutch,
1613-14.

The island was bought from the Indians in 1626 for $24 and a
copper kettle.

There are many beautiful lakes in New York State, and two ranges
of mountains, the Catskills and Adirondacks.

Popular name: ‘‘ The Empire State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

ic Z

Uy,
x 2G Mess ee

CG ;







New York is Sie the “ Soe State” -
And rightly bears the name;

As first in people, wealth, and trade,
No State contests her claim.

Into her ports great vessels throng
To make her rich and great,
nd New York City, like a queen,
Sits proudly at her gate.

he grand old Hudson in
By many a city flows;

And westward roll Niagara /
s| every traveler knows.









ALBANY ae





RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEW JERSEY.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED FOR THE ISLE OF JERSEY, ENGLAND, AND IN HONOR OF SIR
GEORGE CARTERET, BECAUSE HE WAS A NATIVE OF THE ISLE.

Square miles, 7,815.

Population, 1,444,933.

In rank according to population, 18th.
Counties, 21.

Representatives in Congress, 8.
Electoral votes, 10.

Value of manufactured silk and silk-goods (1890), $30,760,371.

Foundry and machine-shop Prodi iron and steel (1890), nearly
$30,000,000.

Leads in the manufacture of pottery and glass.

Value of patent and enameled leather product (1890), $5,430,000.

Number of bushels of potatoes grown (1890), white, 4,055,351.

Number of bushels of potatoes grown (1890), sweet, 2,254,344.

The first settlements of New Jersey were by the Dutch, 1617 to
1623, at Bergen and Fort Nassau.

Popular name: “The Blue State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 17










Ne Seer
{For factories and thriving farms
_ New Jersey is renowned;
“The storied Catskills northward rise,
While southward plains abound.

7
p>.)

For fine sea-bathing thousands come
7 From cities far and near, ae
‘“To Atlantic City, Asbury Park, wf
ip, And Long Branch, every year.

ay AWA SS
7 a ;
lb, If like this State a boy were washed,
ii He surely would go frantic — p

‘His face in the river Delaware, eli

His back by the Atlantic! i-¢





ge 4 & Y
Se:

7» Across the frozen Delaware,
“Your books will tell you when,
|- Washington went to Trenton town

And captured a thousand men.



RHYMES OF THE STATES

PENNSYLVANIA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES,

Square miles, 45,215.

Population (1890), 5,258,014.

In rank according to population, 2d.
Counties, 67.

Representatives in Congress, 30.
Electoral votes, 32.

Value of glass manufactured (1890), over $17,000,000.

Value of foundry and machine-shop products, iron and steel, nails
and iron work (1890), $362,965,647.

Tons of coal produced (1889), 81,719,059.

Dozens of eggs (1890), over 50,000,000.

Philadelphia means “ The City of Brotherly Love.” It was founded
by the Quakers, and Philadelphia has ever been one of the
most peaceable and law-abiding of cities.

The First Continental Congress met here September 5, 1774; and,
with the exception of short periods, Philadelphia was the seat
of government till 1800.

A popular name for Pennsylvania is “The Keystone State,” be-
cause if the original thirteen from New Hampshire to Georgia
were placed in the form of an arch, Pennsylvania would occupy
the middle position, being seventh from either base.



RHYMES OF THE STATES

The map of Pennsylvania
Represents a flag afloat;
And in its southeast corner

Philadelphia we note.

This State was settled by the Friends
(Or “Quakers”) led by Penn;

Who bought the land from Indians,
And treated them like men.

Petroleum, coal, and iron
Are found within her hills;

Fine farms in every valley,
And many rolling-mills.

And once in Philadelphia
Pealed out that famous bell
That rung in Independence Day \. - SS

l

a (AiZ “yy
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ig Lia
Y

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20 RHYMES OF THE STATES

DELAWARE.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 2,050.

Population (1890), 168,493.

In rank according to population, 42d.
Counties, 3.

Representatives in Congress, 1.
Electoral votes, 3.

Railroad and street cars, making and repairing (1890), $3,291,293.

Ship-building (1890), $2,044,313.

Leather, morocco (1890), $4,01 5,694.

The Delaware River was discovered by the Dutch navigator Hud-
son, in 1609.

First settlement made by thirty Hollanders under De Vries, near
Lewes, 1610, and destroyed by the Indians three years later.

Next settlement by Swedes and Finns, in 1638, who called the
country Nya Sveriga, or New Sweden. Their forts’ were at-
tacked and captured by the Dutch, in 1655. The land came
into English possession, 1664. It was governed as part of
Pennsylvania from 1683 to 1703. Declared itself independent
of Great Britain, 1776. Furnished a valiant regiment for the
Revolutionary War, and was the first State to ratify the Con-
stitution, December 7, 1787.

Popular name: “The Blue Hen State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES ; 21

Well, I declare!—here 's Delaware, xz
Shaped like an upturned shoe; » QL
Its capital marks just the place
To put the button, too.
eRe
And Wilmington is near the toe ~
Along the Bay it lies;
For steamships, carriages, and cars
This city takes the prize.

Should go to Delaware;
\ Her orchards are about as good

\\ As you'll find anywhere.
i

aN

By wagon-loads and car-loads, too,
She ships the very best;

In boxes, baskets, crates, and cans
It travels east and west,

Nanna Wes a
2 N DARED fear,

Ang gone
‘han Sv
z = Soe

Sa eas





RHYMES OF THE STATES

MARYLAND.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED IN HONOR OF HENRIETTA MARIA, WIFE OF CHARLES I. OF
ENGLAND.

Square miles, 12,210.

Population (1890), 1,042,390.

In rank according to population, 27th.
Counties, 23.

Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

Tons of coal produced (1889), nearly 3,000,000.

Ounces of gold (1889), 501 (worth about $20 an ounce —a little
over: $10,000).

Value of canned and preserved foods, oysters, fish, fruits, and vege-
tables, $10,030,500.

Value of oysters (1890), $4,467,325.

Two hundred people sent from England by Lord Baltimore, in
1633, to make the settlement of Maryland, were brought over
in two vessels named the ‘“ Ark” and the “ Dove.”

There was for a long time a dispute between Maryland and Penn-
sylvania over their boundary line. This was settled in 1760
by what was called, from the names of the surveyors who lo-
cated it, ““ Mason and Dixon’s line.”

Area of the District-of Columbia, 70 sanaret ee

Population (1890), 230,392.

Popular name: “The Monumental State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

The “Land of Mary,” England’s

Named by Lord Baltimore, y
Upon the Bay of Chesapeake =~
Owns oyster-beds “galore!”

East of the Bay lie farming-lands,
Where corn and wheat are grown;
The western hills for scenery
And minerals are known.

Along the west and southern sides
Potomac River flows; Ty i

—

The District of Columbia eee

The Nation’s Capital is there
With all its weighty cares.

Where Congress and the President
Attend to\our affairs.

72







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<9 Weitre

206 Pviles.
IST
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BALTIMORE: MPF
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3



24

RHYMES OF THE STATES
VIRGINIA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.
NAMED FOR “THE VIRGIN QUEEN” ELIZABETH.

Square miles (since the separation of West Virginia),
42,450.

Population (1890), 1,665,980.

In rank according to population, 15th.

Counties, 118.

Representatives in Congress, 10.

Electoral votes, 12.

Value of flour and grist-mill products (1890), $12,000,000.

Value of tobacco grown, and its products, about $22,000,000.
Value of gold produced (1889), about $2,500.

Value of silver (by U. S. Government Report), $12.

First settlement of Virginia was at Jamestown, 1607.

First negro slaves were brought here from Africa, 1619.

Popular names: “The Old Dominion,” and “ Mother of Presidents.”

WEST VIRGINIA.

Square miles, 23,000.

Population, 762,794.

In rank according to population, 28th.
Counties, 54,

Representatives in Congress, 4.
Electoral votes, 6.

Value of steel and iron products (1890), $11,000,000.
Salt produced per year in the Kanawha and Ohio Valleys, about
100,000 barrels.



RHYMES OF THE STATES 25












ES Get inn
AU ace MARE yt BRETT) NAS ‘
at on ee Me
\ 21 Naa eT lh i \\
\\ All this was one Virginia |
we\. \s Till eighteen sixty-three;
I “7 eR \ ‘The land was then divided ae.
Wp eee 4 \. As on your map you see.
| OCA wn HETAME VBA) oP S04 ae




Vey S\N ta














\

‘ ¢It had an earlier settlement‘). tie
veo" Than any other State; ei
: And none can boast a prouder list

Of sons both good and great;










The cradles of Virginia
Rocked seven little boys,





: yo
Who, seven future Presidents,

ie playing with their toys. ————=—=1) |

: t
See Se eae Here Washington and Jefferson,

: |. , _ James Madison and Monroe,

PQne Harrison, Taylor and Tyler, ‘{{j\)

" “Were born long years: ago. :














= tee IK:

In West Virginia there ’s salt
And coal and iron-ore.

But Virginia’s old plantations-~
Are near the eastern short,
py fj a)













ee Lui Ls




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We agate ay ee
ws NS: — ia S rigek We?




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SGN. BRE *




S Y ak

‘S =H stan
sd Ques
i

450 Miles.





RHYMES OF THE STATES

NORTH CAROLINA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 52,250.

Population, 1,617,947.

In rank according to population, 16th.
Counties, 94.

Representatives in Congress, 9.
Electoral votes, 11.

Value of products (1890), cotton goods, $9,563,000 ; tobacco and
snuff, $4,783,000; tar and turpentine, $1,705,000; gold (1889),
$161,291; silver (1889), $3,200. (Tar and turpentine prod-
ucts in 1870 were valued at about $3, 300,000.)

Bushels of sweet potatoes (1890), 5,665,391.

Carolina was at first considered a part of Virginia. Settlements
were attempted before 1600, but all were prevented or de-
stroyed by Indians.

Charter of the Province of Carolina (named for Queen Caroline)
was given by Charles II., 1663.

This charter covered a strip of territory from the Atlantic to the
Pacific Ocean. Nobody knew then how far apart the oceans
were, and people made maps largely by guess. Afterward, for
a time, the State’s western boundary was the Mississippi River.

Carolina was divided into North and South, 1720.

Popular name: ‘“‘ The Old North State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

any a ‘breezy ‘mountain -
2 thus gave TENCE



27



RHYMES OF THE STATES

SOUTH CAROLINA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 30,570.

Population (1890), 1,151,149.

In rank according to population, 23d.
Counties, 32.

Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Acres planted in cotton (1890), 1,987,469.

Number of cotton-bales produced, 747,140.

Acres in rice (1890), 42,238.

Pounds of rice produced, 30,338,951.

Value of fertilizers from phosphate-beds (1890), $4,417,000.

Gold (1889), about $45,000.

Silver (1889), $200.

In 1850 the State produced about 160,000,000 pounds of rice.

The State is famous for a fine cotton known as “ Sea Island Cotton.”

On April 12, 1861, the attack was made on Fort Sumter in Charles-
ton Harbor. This was the beginning, “the first gun,” of our
terrible Civil War.

Popular name: ‘The Palmetto State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

South Carolina raises cotton
And a large amount of rice;

But 't is seldom that her children 2
Can go ‘sliding on the ice!

No horsemen eer were braver
Than: Marion and his band,
Who fought for independence -
And saved their native land.





RHYMES OF THE STATES

GEORGIA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 59,475.

Population (1890), 1,837,353.

In rank according to population, 12th.
Counties, 136.

Representatives in Congress, 11.
Electoral votes, 13. :

Acres planted in cotton (1890), 3,345,104.

Number of bales produced, 1,191,846.

Bushels of wheat (1880), 3,159,771.

Bushels of corn (1890), 29,000,000.

Value of cotton goods manufactured (1890), $12,075,620.

Gold product (1889), $119,000.

Silver product (1889), about $400.

Since 1829 the mines of Georgia have produced between eight and
ten million dollars’ worth of gold.

The first settlement of Georgia was at Savannah, in the spring of
1733.

Atlanta is sometimes called “The Chicago of the South,” because
of its rapid growth since the Civil War.

Popular name: “The Empire State of the South.”



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RHYMES OF THE STATES

General Oglethorpe from England
A colony did bring;

And named the thirteenth of the States
For the second George, his King.

Now Georgia ’s called by many
“The Empire State of the South”;
Its largest port, Savannah,

Is near the Savannah’s mouth.

All grains are grown in Georgia,
And cotton,—many bales;

It is as large as England,
Including also Wales.

The capital, Atlanta,
A city far renowned,
In beauty has arisen,
From her ashes on the ground.

130 Miles --

VN

ethorpe.



31



RHYMES OF THE STATES

FLORIDA.

FOURTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1845.

Square miles, 58,680.

Population (1890), 391,422.

In rank according to population, 32d.
Counties, 39.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Oranges produced in 1885, 900,000 boxes; in 1894, 4,800,000.

Value of lumber products (1890), about $5,500,000.

Value of sponge fisheries product (1890), $281,754.

The first European visitors were Ponce de Leon and his followers,
who landed in 1513 at or near the site of St. Augustine. A
fort was built there in 1565. Land again explored by De Soto
in 1539. Pensacola was settled by Spaniards in 1696.

Florida was ceded to Great Britain by Spain in exchange for Cuba,
1763. Ceded again to Spain by United States, Treaty of 1783.
Restored to the United States by Treaty of 1819. Possession
taken, 1821.

Florida was the home of the Seminole Indians till 1842, when, after
a seven years’ war, most of them were sent to the Indian Ter-
ritory.

Popular name: “The Everglade State,” or ‘The Flowery State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 33

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You all like oranges, I know, s]
And here in Florida they grow. S

Oe

A subject of the Spanish King
Of yore came here to seek a spring:

He hoped its waters would restore
Lost youth and health to him once more.

He found great reptiles with long jaws;
Scales hard like flint, and teeth like saws.

And he was young enough that day
To turn about and-run away.

And in this tropic clime is seen
Our oldest town—St. Augustine.

. . s4o Miles. GA



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34 RHYMES OF THE STATES

ALABAMA.

Once a part of the territory of Georgia, except a strip along the
coast which was held by Spain as part of Florida. This ter-
ritory was made a part of territory of Mississippi, 1798. Sep-
arated from Mississippi in 1817, and admitted to the Union
in 1819.

Square miles, 52,250.

Population, 1,513,017.

In rank according to population, 17th.
Counties, 65.

Representatives in Congress, 9.
Electoral votes, 10.

Acres of cotton-fields (1890), 2,761,165.

Number of cotton-bales produced, 915,210.

Bushels of Indian corn, 30,000,000.

Gallons of molasses and sorghum, 3,576,120.

Tons of coal (1890), 3,572,903.

Foundry and machine-shop products: iron and steel (1890), nearly
$15,000,000; gold (1889), $1500; silver, $85.

First settlement in Alabama was by the French in 1702.

Popular name: “ The Cotton State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES
















ih
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Pad
Wa} South, are the bay and harbor,

35

\ Shame,

Long, long ago some Indians,

By other tribes oppressed,
Found here a home and named it
“ Alabama”—“ Here we rest.”

YA

But white and colored people
Raise cotton, corn, and cane.

if
id

i
There 's Birmingham to northward —'l.’

A growing, busy hive, :

With mines of coal and iron,

; Where manufactures thrive.

And city called Mobile;
But in Montgomery city
Is Alabama’s seal.





36 RHYMES OF THE STATES

MISSISSIPPL

SEVENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION UNDER THE CON-
STITUTION, 1817.

Square miles, 46,310.

Population, 1,289,600.

In rank according to population, 21st.
(ouintics, 70;

Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Bushels of corn (1890), 26,000,000.

Acres of cotton-fields, 2,883,000.

Bales of cotton, 1,154,125.

Value of cotton-seed oil and cake, $2,406,628.
Value of cotton goods manufactured, $1,333,000.
Value of lumber products (1890), $5,670,000.

The southern part of Mississippi was once held by Spain as part
of Florida. The rest was claimed and settled by French
(Natchez founded in 1716). Part of the territory was con-
veyed by Napoleon to the United States by the ‘“ Louisiana

purchase, 1003.
Popular name: “-The Eagle State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 37

Algonquins pointing to the stream Wik She? “EE ie é 7 We REN, Ay
Spake to thei d daughters: NY gee >, | NUR RR
pake to their sons and daughters: My Lad eh * ey [pac

iO

* “The Mississippi 't is,’ they said;
Which means the “Father of Waters.” Be

To where Missouri has its source,
Among Montana's fountains,
The Mississippi should have had

3 Ph Ba
One name,— from Gulf to. mountains. €:1'W4
: |

This State in shape is like a coat:
This will not be forgotten

If you remember that its soil
Ranks high for growing cotton.

And as a name for the capital,
Her people have selected
That of a very valiant man —
A President, twice elected.

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RHYMES OF THE STATES

KENTUCKY.

EXPLORED BY DANIEL BOONE, 1769. FIRST TOWNS, HARRODS-
BURG AND BOONESBOROUGH, 1774-75. MADE A COUNTY
OF VIRGINIA, 1776. THE SECOND STATE
ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1792.

Square miles, 40,400.

Population (1890), 1,858,635.

In rank according to population, 11th.
Counties, 119.

‘Representatives in Congress, II.
Electoral votes, 13.

Number of live-stock on hand (1890), 70,000,000; of which horses
were 401,000; mules were 151,000; and swine were 2,036,000.

Pounds of tobacco, 221,880, 303.

Value of flour and grist-mill products, $9,68 1,000.

Value of cooperage, cordage, and twine, $2,574,000.

Popular name: ‘“ The Blue-Grass State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 39

KENTUCKY

A mighty hunter — Daniel Boone —
There never was one bolder —

Went to Kentucky, all alone, _

With his rifle on his shoulder.


















Then he returned and brought his friends
To help him take possession:

Strong, hardy people, too, they were,
Of courage’ and discretion. - .

BW The blué-grass region” of the State
Saw many a bloody battle:

'T is famous for tobacco farms,
Fine horses, sheep, and cattle.

Kentucky has the Mammoth Cave,—

A palace under ground,—
And there the Echo River flows,



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RHYMES OF THE STATES

‘cE NNESS EE:

THIRD STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1794.

Square miles, 42,050.

Population (1890), 1,767,518.

In rank according to population, 13th.
Counties, 96.

Representatives in Congress, 10.
Electoral votes, 12.

Value of lumber and log products, (1890), over $12,000,000.

Value of flour and grist-mill products (1890), $12,474,000.

Value of marble and stone work, nearly $1,000,000.

Value of gold (1880), 97 ounces, worth nearly $2000.

Gallons of milk (1890), 107,000,000.

Pounds of butter (1890), 28,314,000.

Horses owned, 300,000; mules, 200,000; chickens, 12,000,000.

As told in the Rhyme of North Carolina, Tennessee was at first
part of that State. First permanent settlement made near
Knoxville, in 1756.

During the Civil War, more important battles were fought in Ten-
nessee than in any other State except Virginia.

Popular name: ‘“‘ The Volunteer State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

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= Of Tennessee the meaning
Is, “River with the bend,”
-And rivers run below the State,
And across, at either end.

This State mines coal and iron
And marble, pink or green;
It has a healthy climate,
And many a lovely scene.

Knoxville, Nashville, Memphis,
Are handsome cities three,—
And Chattanooga also
Is worth a trip to see.

The heights of Lookout Mountain
Above the mist and cloud, s
Once knew the tread of armies,

And roar of battle loud. 7h | SE = ae Gy 3

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RHYMES OF THE STATES

OHIO.

FOURTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1802.

Square miles, 41,060.

Population (1890), 3,672,316.

In rank according to population, 4th.
Counties, 88.

Representatives in Congress, 21.
Electoral votes, 23.

Value of flouring and grist-mill products (1890), $39,468,409.

Value of agricultural machinery manufactured, $14,338,258.

Coal (1889), about 10,000,000 tons.

Bushels of apples (1890), 13,789,278.

Number of sheep, 4,060,729.

Pounds of wool, 20,987,574.

Pounds of butter, 74,990, 307.

Ohio was part of the Northwest Territory (set apart 1787, and
slavery prohibited therein).

The Ohio River was discovered by La Salle about 1669. Country
was later claimed by both French and English. Ceded by
France to Great Britain, treaty of 1763. First permanent
settlement, at Marietta, in 1788.

President Wm. Henry Harrison was elected while a resident of
Ohio, though born in Virginia.

President Benjamin Harrison was born in Ohio, but elected while
a resident of Indiana.

The Presidents Grant, Garfield, and Hayes were natives of Ohio.

Popular name, ‘‘ The Buckeye State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

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Ohio is proud of cities three, -
The name of each begins with C.

She ‘s also given Presidents three,
Their names beginning with 7 or G.

‘T is a land of farms, and homes, and schools,
A land where law and order rules.

Remember her capital's name, to know
Who found America; long ago.

Now tell the name —or pay a fine —
Of th’ river along her southern line.

By looking sharp, you will not fail
In Erie Lake to find a whale.

2o0o Miles

[nda



43



RHYMES OF THE STATES

INDIANA.

SIXTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1816.

Square miles, 36,350.

Population (1890), 2,192,404.

In rank according to population, 6th.
Counties, 92.

Representatives in Congress, 13.
Electoral votes, 15.

Value of flour and grist-mill products (1890), $31,239,000.

Value of furniture and cabinet-making, $7,114,000.

Value of carriage and wagon materials, $2,282,000.

Bushels of apples, 8,784,000.

Bushels of cherries, 199,000.

Acres in meadow, 2,330,504.

First settlement of Indiana, by French at Vincennes, about the
year 1700.

Battle of Tippecanoe, November 7, 1812.

Indianapolis, the capital, is known as “ The Railroad City.”

As drawn on the map, the city, with the roads entering it, is often
compared to a spider’s web.

The State has large fields producing natural gas and coal.

Popular name, ‘The Hoosier State.”

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RHYMES OF THE STATES 45













ce
Bi ad
“ear
Indiana was named for the Indians,
Because, when the country was new,
They were there by hundreds and thousands—-
And exceedingly troublesome, too,
4 Till General Harrison whipped them
In the battle of Tippecanoe.

STE 4



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#\’T is now a rich country for farming,
Where children arise with the sun,

And race all about in the orchards
And meadows, with frolic and fun,

) Never caring how many great railroads

To Indianapolis run.



ahs

“1 }Some of her thriving cities

"| As frontier outposts began;

Fort Wayne was named for a general
Who at Stony Point charged in the van,

‘And afterward conquered the Indians,—

A gallant and soldierly man.
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RHYMES OF THE STATES

MICHIGAN.

THIRTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, LOs7-

Square miles, 58,915.

Population (1890), 2,093,884.

In rank according to population, goth.
Counties, 85.

Representatives in Congress, 12.
Electoral votes, 14.

Value of lumber products, logs, etc. (1890), $73,484,306.

Value of planing-mill products, sash, doors, and blinds, $10,007,603.

Value of wooden packing-boxes, $1,243,791.

Value of other timber products, $9,637,663.

Value of flour and grist-mill products, about $23,000,000.

Value of products of ship-building (1890), $4,710,000.

Value of salt, $2,046,000.

Bushels of apples (1889), 13,154,000.

Copper produced (1895), 129,573,876 pounds, average price 10
cents per pound, or $12,957,387. (The copper of Michigan
is “native” pure copper. There is no copper ore to pay for
working.)

Leaving out coal, this State leads all in the value of her mineral
productions in 1889, $70,000,000.

Gold (1889), 4,210 0z., about $97,000.

Silver, 14,607 oz., about $8, 700.

Iron ore (1889), 5,856,169 tons.

Michigan was part of the Northwest Territory, and formed part of
Indiana from 1787 to 1805.

First settlement, French mission, founded by Father Marquette
and others, at Sault (pronounced soo) Ste. Marie.

The city of Detroit was founded by French, under Cadillac, 1701.

Mackinac (final c silent), ‘‘ The Picturesque Isle.”

Popular name, “ Wolverine State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 47

Are in the outlines found.

The northern part is widely known
For copper- and iron-mines;

The southern part for grain and fruit,
And groves of noble pines.

Au
Within the Straits of Mackinac
Behold an island fair—
A The loveliest place among the lakes
To breathe the summer air. |

The fine old city of Detroit,
_ Is on historic ground;
|The University of the State

Is at Ann Arbor found.

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RHYMES OF THE STATES

ILLINOIS.

EIGHTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1818.

Square miles, 56,650.

Population (1890), 3,826,351.

In rank according to population, 3d.
Counties, 102.

Representatives in Congress, 22.
Electoral votes, 24.

Bushels of corn (1890), 289,000,000.

Value of manufactured products: agricultural implements, $24,-
609,660; steel, iron, and iron work, $42,611,431.

Bituminous coal (1889), 12,104,272 tons.

Value of men’s clothing, $47,191,242.

Slaughtering and meat-packing, wholesale, $212,539,000.

Soap and candles, about $10,000,000.

Watches, $3,048,966.

The principal factories are at Elgin, Rockford, and Springfield.

The Illinois region was explored by the Frenchmen La Salle and
Marquette about 1670.

“Fort St. Louis” was built on what is now known as ‘ Starved
Rock,” on the Illinois River.

Population of Chicago (1880), 503,185; 1890, 1,099,850.

Great fire of Chicago, October 8-10, 1871.

World’s Columbian Exposition, May 1 to October 31, 1893.

Popular name, ‘“‘ The Sucker State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 49
























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The Illinois, an Indian tribe
Once numerous and great,
Were all destroyed, but left their name 3
To a river and a State.

inn
"T is sometimes called the “ Prairie. State,
The soil is rich and fine;
Her pastures green are dotted o'er
With horses, cows, and swine.

Chicago, Queen of Illinois,
Each rival has surpassed ;

Her clothes are never big enough
Because she grows so fast.

A great World's Fair Chicago held
Not very long ago;

Beside the lake grand palaces
By magic seemed to grow.

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50 RHYMES OF THE STATES

WISCONSIN.

SEVENTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1848.

Square miles, 56,040.

Population (1890), 1,686,880.

In rank according to population, 14th.
Counties, 70.

Representatives in Congress, 10.
Electoral votes, 12.

Bushels of oats (1890), 60,739,052.

Barley (1890), 15,225,872.

Buckwheat (1890), 1,064,178.

Value of flour and gristmill products, $24,252,297.

Value of timber and lumber products, all kinds, $67,262,254.

Value of manufactured leather, $11, 161,850.

Wisconsin was part of the Northwest Territory, and was at first
under the government of Michigan. Named for its principal
river —‘Ouisconsin” (Indian) —meaning “wild, rushing river.”

The State contains many hundreds of small lakes.

The Wisconsin and Fox Rivers come so near each other at Portage
that they are connected bya canal a mile and a half long.
The city was so named because this was the place of portage,
where the Indians carried their canoes and luggage from one
river to the other as they came and went often between the
Mississippi River and Lake Michigan. The first white settle-
ment was by the French, and named for the prairie dogs,
Pratrie du Chien.

Popular name, ‘The Badger State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 51















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Oh, wonderful river Wisconsin!

Wwe How lovely are your dells;

Oh, beautiful State of Wisconsin!

' How good are your springs and wells.



Ye «How lovely the breezes that fan you
The glorious summer through,

‘From woods sweet-scented with balsam,
“ That shadow your lakes so blue,




“— Of cities you have Milwaukee,

\ i= Along Lake Michigan shore,

‘\\T_ And Madison, named in honor
Of president number four.

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RHYMES OF THE STATES

MINNESOTA.

NINETEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1858.

Square miles, 83,365.

Population (1890), 1,301,826,

In rank, according to population, 2oth.
Counties, 80.

Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 52,300,247.

Acres in wheat (1890), 3,372,627.

Bushels of oats (1890), 49,958,791.

Bushels of barley (1890), 9,100,683.

Acres in flax (1890), 303,635.

Bushels of flaxseed (1890), 2,721,937.

Value of flour and gristmill products (1890), $60, 158,088.

Value of all timber and lumber products, $30,018, 583.

Value of fur goods, manufactured products, $1,152,360.

Minnesota was explored by the French, under Hennepin and La
Salle, about the year 1780. It was claimed as part of Louisiana
Territory. Organized as a separate territory in 1849.

The Indian war in Minnesota and massacre of settlers by the Sioux
occurred in 1862-3.

The greatest flouring mills in the world are at Minneapolis.

Popular name, ‘‘The Gopher State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 53



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Wy) The tiver brought the Indians
i | _ From prairies of Dakota;
hi So cloudy seemed the water,

i) They called it “ Minnesota,”





Now together are the cities
Minneapolis and.St, Paul,













wh

And the “Laughing Waterfall.” ye



|) The mills in Minnesota
3..-° Are running every hour,
. * Sawing and planing lumber,

And grinding wheat to flour.



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54 RHYMES OF THE STATES

IOWA.

SIXTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1846.

Square miles, 56,025.

Population (1890), 1,911,896.

In rank according to population, roth.
‘Counties, .g9.

Representatives in Congress, 11.
Electoral votes, 13.

Bushels of Indian corn (1890), 313,130,782.

Bushels of oats, 146,679,280.

Bushels of barley, 13,406,122.

Bushels of flaxseed, 2,282,359.

Number of swine (first in United States), 8,200,779.

Number of cattle, 4,892,183.

Tons of hay (for which the State ranks first), 7,264,700.

Pounds of butter (for which the State ranks third, New York rank-
ing first and Pennsylvania second), 72,893,079.

Iowa was included in Louisiana Territory, claimed by France, and
sold to the United States in 1803.

The first settlement was made by a Frenchman, Francis Dubuque,
1788-89, who openedalead mine near where the city of Dubuque
now stands.

‘There are many beautiful small lakes in the northern part of the State.

The name Iowa is Indian, said to mean “ The beautiful land.”

Popular name, ‘The Hawkeye State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 55















dae

=o fae State i lowa lies between
Two rivers, broad and long ;
i Each hastening to their meeting-place
With currents deep and strong.

// From north to south, from east to west,
This State has fertile land;

a W The people of the “Hawkeye” State
a Seek to be wise and good,

‘iJ And so the school and church are found
4 = In every neighborhood.

This State has wealth of yellow maize
To bring her golden. coin;
The capital's in the central part—
A city called Des Moines.
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RHYMES OF THE STATES

MISSOURI.

ELEVENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1821.

Square miles, 69,415.
Population (1890), 2,679,184.
In rank according to population, 5th.
Counties, 115.
Representatives in Congress, 15.
Electoral votes, 17.
Value of products (1890), flour and gristmill, $34,486,795.
Foundry and machine shop, steel and iron work, $18,568,217.
Timber and lumber, $13,289,179.
Confectionery, $3,584,958.
Tons of coal (1889), 2,557,823.
Bushels of wheat (1890), 30,113,821.
Bushels of corn (1890), 196,999,016.
Bushels of apples, 8,698,170.
Bushels of peaches, 1,667,789.
Number of cattle (1890), 2,969,736.
St. Louis was founded by the French in 1764.
Great fire in St. Louis, 1849.
Severe cholera epidemic, same year.
St. Louis ranked in size as the fifth city in the United States, 1890,
having a population of 451,770.
Popular name, ‘‘ The Iron State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

How many States have borrowed names
From rivers by or through them?
How many of these have taken names

From Indians who knew them? i! rs i

Missouri River through the State
Sweeps on with lordly motion,

Then to the Mississippi joins
And with it seeks the ocean.

The State possesses many things
To make the people wealthy:
Rich prairie pastures, timber, coal —

Withal, a climate healthy.

St. Louis on the east we see,
And westward Kansas City;

The capital, half-way between,
"Mid hills and valleys pretty.
oe iiiligit. ron A i

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QO ssourd Rwery a
Jefferson, BTJomic
AS City

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uns

an
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as:

a

we

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att =
eo

LboMiles.

Kansas
Me
>

s

ooo no oes oom Ge

: 220 Miles.
~ FrAckansas«





58 RHYMES OF THE STATES

ARKANSAS.

PART OF LOUISIANA PURCHASE, 1803. ORGANIZED AS A SEPARATE
TERRITORY, 18109.

TWELFTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1836.

Square miles, 53,850.

Population (1890), 1,128,179.

In rank, according to population, 24th.
Counties, 75.

Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

Timber and lumber products (1890), 10,561,949.

Acres in cotton 1,700,578.

Bales of cotton grown, 691,494.

Value of cotton-seed oil and cake, $1,881,668.

Number of cattle, all kinds, 938,264.

Tons of coal (1889), 279,584.

First settlement by the French, 1685.

Many thousands of people visit the Hot Springs every year and take
the baths.

Popular name, “ The Bear State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 59





This State's legislature
Has made it a law

That, in speaking her name,

We must say “Ar-kan-saw.”

Not far from the center
The Hot Springs are found, |

Where scalding hot water
Boils up from the ground.

SS
SS

SS
SS

oe

Her rivers are many,
Her forests spread wide,
Her mountains—the Ozarks,
Are Arkansas’ pride.

The State sells much timber,
And ore, and live stock;

Her capital city
Is called Little Rock.





60 RHYMES OF THE STATES

LOUISIANA.

FIFTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1812.

Square miles, 48,720.

Population (1890), 1,118,587.

In rank according to population, 25th.
Counties (or Parishes), 59.
Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

Pounds of sugar produced (1890), 202,124,050.

Gallons of molasses (1890), 14,439,772.

Rice, acres cultivated, 34,377; pounds produced, 75,645,433.

Cotton, acres cultivated, 1,270,154; bales produced, 659,180.

Value of total: lumber products, $6,965,320.

Louisiana was explored by De Soto, 1541; Marquette, 1673; La
Salle, 1682. Settlement at Biloxi, 1699.

The battle of New Orleans, the last of the war of 1812-14, was fought
January 8th, 1815, more than two weeks after the treaty of peace
had been signed. If there had been an electric telegraph then,
under the sea and over the land, many hundreds of lives would
have been saved.

Popular name, “The Pelican State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 61

| This State was settled by the French,
And for King Louis named:
But fifteen million dollars bought
For us the land they claimed.

She has a warm and sunny clime,
Unvexed by frosts or snows,
And through a delta, like the Nile,

The Mississippi flows.

On this our greatest, central stream,
And very near its mouth,

The famous “Crescent City” stands,
Queen city of the South.

The greatest sugar-making State !—
New Orleans is its port;

And here, behind his cotton-bales,

“Old Hickory” held the fort!

25S Miles

Baton Re Lge

pos





RHYMES OF THE STATES

TEXAS:

FIFTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1845.

Square miles, 265,780.

Population (1890), 2,235,523.

In rank according to population, 7th.
Counties, 261.

Representatives in Congress, 13.
Electoral votes, 15.

Number of horses (1890), 1,026,777.

Number of cattle of all grades, 6,201,522.

Number of sheep, 3,454,858.

Pounds of wool, 14,917,068.

Bushels of peaches, 5,106,332.

Bushels of plums, 160,256.

Lumber products of all kinds, $14,643, 507.

Value of gold, $6,600.

Ounces of gold, 330.

Ounces of silver, 323,438.

Texas was originally part of Mexico, but declared its independence,
March 2, 1836. The massacre of the Alamo took place March
6th, 1836. Texas was an independent republic from 1836 to
1845. Its annexation to the United States, in 1845, was the cause
of the war between the United States and Mexico, 1846-47.

Popular name, ‘The Lone Star State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 63















In our united band,

ce From Louisiana reaching west.
va Ve. 5s Unto a river grand.



Some day the story you will learn
Of fatal “Alamo”;

And how the “ Lone Star” State was won
In war with Mexico.

A harbor fine has Galveston,
Near Trinity River’s mouth;
And many rivers you can see,
All flowing east and south.

Fine growth of cotton, timber, grain,
This fertile State adorns;

Great herds of cattle throng her plains,

With wide, extended horns.

—— >





64

RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEW MEXICO.

ORGANIZED AS A TERRITORY, 1850.

Square miles, 122,580.
Population (1890), 153,593.
In rank according to population, 43d.

Produced tons of coal (1889), 486,943.

Ounces of gold, 39,457, about $900,000.

Ounces of silver, 1,251,124, value about, $1,455,855.

Number of sheep (1890), 1,248,970.

Pounds of wool, 4,074,503.

New Mexico belonged to old Mexico till 1846. It was visited by the
Spaniards as early as 1540. They found the Pueblo Indians
living in villages and cultivating the soil in the valleys. Their
largest village became (about 1640) the town of Santa Fé, and
has been the capital of New Mexico ever since.

Santa Fé is a famous health resort. Very many of its people are
Mexicans, and many live in adoée houses, that is, houses built
of clay.



RHYMES OF THE STATES



































NGO.
Aaa ee

This territory forms a square,

With a little piece, below, to spare.
The waters of a river wide

From north to south the land divide.

Wee 7

The land is mountainous and high;
The air is healthful, pure, and dry.
To the Pacific, loaded trains

Go every day across her plains.

The plains are deserts, wild and free,
With little grass and scarce a tree.
Few cities of our land to-day

Can boast the age of Santa Fé.

FA REA



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66

RHYMES OF THE STATES

ARIZONA.

ORGANIZED AS A TERRITORY, 1863.

Square miles, 113,020.
Population (1890), 59,620.
In rank according to population, 48th.

Ounces of gold (1889), 44,029, about $1,012,500.

Ounces of silver, 1,812,96r.

Total mineral products (1889), $7,248,717.

Arizona was part of New Mexico till 1863.

The cafion of the Colorado river in Arizona is in some places 7,000
feet deep.

There is a mountain not far from the river, near Callville, which con-
sists largely of pure salt.

There are also found in Arizona wonderful forests of petrified wood.

Trees several feet thick have become great masses of agate.

High up on the mountains are found the homes of a race of people,
the wonderful Cliff-Dwellers.



RHYMES OF THE STATES 67















































y
/



























































































A. wealthy miser is this, State,

~ As many a miner ’s found;

ZiHe keeps his silver and his gold
Safe buried in the ground.

And here we find the grandest sight &

S
‘



That man has ever seen,





















{Where Colorado's rapids flow,
4) Deep in their vast ravine.























WA The waters southward go,



SZ

: il IS BSS
SS ai if 4
C SS ae

ey



a

fy And join the Californian gulf
4 By way of Mexico.





The summer days are very long,



~
OF
Wi

The deserts hot and dry;





Hes





68 RHYMES OF THE STATES

INDIAN TERRITORY.

ORIGINALLY A PART OF THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE.

Square miles, 31,400.
Population, Indian (1890), 51,279.

The wealth of the Indians, aside from their land, is largely in cattle,
but their number cannot be accurately stated.
The average wealth among the Cherokees, however, is said to be

greater than that of any other people. The Indians who are
civilized have good schools and colleges.

There is coal in the territory, of which 752,832 tons were mined in
1880.

OKLAHOMA.

Square miles, 39,030.
Population (1890), 61,834, of which 13,177 were Indians.

The population has greatly increased since the opening of the ter-
ritory to white settlers in 1891.



RHYMES OF THE STATES 69










Here are the Apaches,
And there the Kiowas;

Here are bold Comanches,
And there the Chickasaws.

Nees

| ESSSSETR dhe’

Also Sacs and Foxes,
Creeks and Cherokees,

Seminoles and Choctaws,
And Pottawottomies.



















| This country was intended
For the Indians’ very own,
And white men are expected
To leave these lands alone.



‘The part called Oklahoma
Is occupied by whites;

But first we gave the Indians
Protection in their rights.

—
—————




HYUN TPT s

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Comanches:

{ ss
Apaches ichickasaws | Choctaw é:

I








70

RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEBRASKA.

TWENTY-FOURTH STATE ADMITTED, 1867. ORIGINALLY PART OF
LOUISIANA PURCHASE AND MISSOURI TERRITORY.
NAMED FROM THE NEBRASKA RIVER.

Square miles, 77,510.

Population (1890), 1,058,910.

In rank, according to population, 26th.
Counties, go.
Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

First settlement, at Bellevue, 1847.
Organized as a separate territory, 1854.

Tons of hay (1890), 3,115,398.

Bushels of Indian corn, 215,895,996.
Bushels of oats, 43,843,640.

Bushels of wheat, 10,571,050.

Bushels of barley, 1,822,111.

Bushels of flax seed, 1,401,184.

Bushels of rye, 1,085,083.

Bushels of buckwheat, 120,000.
Number of swine, 3,815,647.
Sugar-refining, value (1890), $323,912.
The beet-sugar industry has grown largely since the last census.
Popular name, “‘ Blackwater State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 71












SAB rom Kansas, going north, we come
Kw — Upon Nebraska State,

NN, \ Where people start from Omaha,
Fin route for the “Golden Gate.”










~f)h\
AN ood h( VARS Five hundred miles they ride;
ANN IRIN Sometimes upon the higher ground
ean ve ‘ZX (eee | Sie : 5
LSPS iS WL | AUER Ow Through prairies rolling wide.
f \ UE, (\\¥ MAK il) (a yi ’ * eae
hh BAA A a Ra J Nebraska's fertile prairie lands
, Va : NR RP beeh~ /L
wan? 7S aN SO a Are good for corn and wheat;










Of sugar from the beet.

Oh, mighty prairies of the West,
So boundless and so free!

How glorious roll your waves of green,
Like billows of the sea!

me W
TD akeotoy eS

oe Oa ee ow



wneil
OMAHA Bluffs,

a



Ror
oe Nae an.
4r00 les , 1

Keehn Sse



RHYMES OF THE STATES

KANSAS.

TWENTY-FIRST STATE ADMITTED, JANUARY 29, 1861. ORIGINALLY
PART OF LOUISIANA PURCHASE. ‘‘ KANSAS” WAS
THE NAME OF A TRIBE OF INDIANS.

Square miles, 82,080.

Population (1890), 1,427,096.

In rank, according to population, 19th.
Counties; 106.
Representatives in Congress, 8.
Electoral votes, 10.

Bushels of corn, 1890, 259,574,568.

Bushels of wheat, 30,399,871.

Bushels of peaches, 1,798,781.

Number of cattle, 3,187,033.

Number of swine, 4,023,933.

Tons of coal, 2,221,043.

Value of meat product, wholesale, $44,696,077.

Salt (1890), $697,802. (The product has since greatly increased.)

There was a conflict in Kansas, before the great Civil War, 1854 to
1860, fought mostly with ballots, but sometimes with bullets,
about whether the territory should be made a free or a slave
state. The territory at that time was often referred to as
“Bleeding Kansas.” The story of the territory during those
years is very interesting.

Popular name, the “ Sunflower State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 73

Ay 4) Bok
Ms h.

Bygnteen hundred ae any one
Can ne'er forgotten be;

"T was then that “Bleeding Kansas” came Be?
And joined our family.

ye pos We a

In infancy this thriving child gan ioe ee =i i oar
Through many troubles passed, ~ % ey Joos 3 Sen Se eee ou

‘cal at re i well

lide uae

wh
But ever since she ’s run alone

Few States have grown so fast.

A lovely prairie land is this, ) guy esrises aM on
With many a happy home; ms fMRI SMe 4 ye
And herds of cattle, flocks of sheep,

Where bison used to roam.

The Kansas River, flowing east,
To the broad Missouri goes,

While south and east the Arkansas
To the Mississippi flows.

NERA.



pees

ED Os om or CERN ce CELE MENUEY cate Oty ee GS

co SV“ ies .

“TERR!ITO 5
jo eee INDIAN R Ry



Io



74 RHYMES OF THE STATES

WYOMING.

THIRTY-FIRST STATE ADMITTED, 1890. THE TERRITORY WAS
LARGELY INCLUDED IN THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE.

Square miles, 97,890.

Population (1890), 60,705.

In rank, according to population, 47th.

Counties, 12.

Representative in Congress, 1.
Electoral votes, 3.

Tons of coal mined (1889), 1,388,947.

Ounces of Gold, 711.

Number of cattle (estimated, 1895), 1,000,000.

Number of sheep (1890), 712,520.

Number of pounds of wool, 4,146,773.

The greater part of the National Yellowstone Park was taken from
Wyoming. 5



RHYMES OF THE STATES 75

i 0 eats

se pi Gi i HS ge
ie 2 Sage A hi 0p ALES STEIN 2. i

R90 | rTaanN

ZEUS). Oy
mI Spe

ne

eC Wy ening to the eotth af east
a Has famous pasture ground:
Py go just on the corner, north and west,

The National Park is found

CED,

yy, With mountains high and valleys deep,
ee With springs, both hot and cold;
ees marble walls and agate woods,
All made by fires of old.

y The grandest things 1 in all the world
» This region has in store;

~ And Uncle Sam declared the land

A park forevermore.

The people favor equal rights—
Both men and women vote:

; Wyoming State upon the map

\ Is nearly square, you note.

“BIO PV les





76 RHYMES OF THE STATES

COLORADO.

TWENTY-FIFTH STATE ADMITTED, 1876. NAMED FOR THE COLORADO
RIVER. TERRITORY ACQUIRED IN PART BY LOUISIANA
PURCHASE AND IN PART FROM MEXICO. OR-

GANIZED AS A TERRITORY, I861.

Square miles, 103,925.
Population (1890), 412,198.

In rank, according to population, 31st.
Counties, 55.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Tons of coal produced (1889), 2,597,181.

Ounces of gold, 187,881.

Ounces of silver, 18,375,551.

Total value of all mineral products, $41,126,610.

Number of sheep, (1890), 717,990.

Pounds of wool, 3,334,234.

The City of Denver grew from 35,629 in 1880, to 106,713 in 1890.
Pike’s Peak is 14,147 feet above sea level.

Popular name, ‘Centennial State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 77

DIF

a7
LY:



This State has plains along the east
And westward mountains high, Hs
Where Pike’s Peak lifts his snowy head, Bait}; We,
Aloft to greet the sky. 0 itis

Now all of these west mountain States
Have gold- and silver-mines;

Where great machines break up the ore, |
And furnace fire refines.

And Colorado’s mines are rich:
Her scenery, too, is grand; —
To make the valley farms produce,

They irrigate the land.

The Arkansas and Platte are fed
By little streams, that flow
From showers upon the mountain-sides,
And melted mountain snow.
a Pikes peak
from ‘The Gard en
of the Gods,

Plate

Sebw ORT

2S eo ee ee ne ee os cee

a
Pei

iw
$2 as Co See © peep» EE? Pomme © * aol

Ailes ,





78 RHYMES OF THE STATES

UTAH.

FORTY-FIFTH STATE ADMITTED, 1894. PART OF TERRITORY
ACQUIRED FROM MEXICO, 1848.

Square miles, 84,970.

Population (1890), 207,905.

In rank, according to population, qo
Counties, 26.

Representative in Congress, 1.
Electoral votes, 3.

The State produced (1889), tons of coal, 236,651.
a “ ounces of gold, 23,591.
ge és ounces of silver, 7,005,193.
« « salt valued at $144,300.
. bushels of wheat, 1,515,465.
at “bushels of peaches, 69,910.
gs & bushels of apricots, 4,178.
The territory was settled in 1847, by Mormon emigrants, whose
leader was Brigham Young.
The State is becoming famous for mining and fruit growing.
Popular name, ‘‘ Mormon State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 79







eae Denver and Rio Grande”* road
a a To Utah we may take;
My i a

y Then travel through the northern part,

( e8 ai Ny uy yi : Around the Great Salt Lake.
ae
Zs

iy At forty miles an hour, or more,
We speed upon our way ;
Where “prairie schooners” crawled along,
Scarce twenty miles a day.

First came the Mormons to this land,
With notions rather queer;

From trouble in the Eastern States
They moved, and settled here.

The thriving city of Salt Lake
Affords a’ pleasing sight;

The Lake is of the deepest blue,
With shores of gray and white.

* Pronounced Rio Grand’y.

we wt
ON

S340 Miles -

ee pe cme see Wt eg 0 SERED © Nn et We
f, Zs

Zz
%
D>

265 Miles.





80 RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEVADA.

TWENTY-THIRD STATE ADMITTED, 1864. ORGANIZED AS A TERRI-
TORY, 1861. PART OF THE TERRITORY ACQUIRED FROM
MEXICO, 1848. NAMED FOR ‘‘THE SNOWY RANGE,”

SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS, OF SPAIN.

Square miles, 110,700.

Population (1890), 45,761. -
In rank, according to population, 4o9th.!

Counties, 14.

Representative in Congress, 1.

Electoral votes, 3.

Silver discovered, 1859.

Ounces of gold produced, 1880, 206,460.
te a ie 1889, 169,617.
es silver gf 1880, 9,614,561.
s en ss 1889, 4,696,605.

Number of cattle, 210,900.

Number of sheep, 273,460.

Value of salt, estimated (1880), $92,640.

Popular name, “ Silver State.”

1 In giving rank, the District of Columbia is counted separately as if it were a State, which accounts
for the apparent discrepancy of 49 numbers for 48 States and Territories.



RHYMES OF THE STATES



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ereeeath

To Utah now we'll say good-bye,
And toward the “Golden Gate,”
We ‘ll cross Nevada’s boundary line

Near a corner of the State.

Nevada has a climate dry,
With very little rain;

But while her gold and silver last
Her people won't complain.

From this State's many famous mines
Much silver has come out;

And Carson, capital of the State,
Was named for “ Kit,” the scout.

Nevada has the queerest stream —
A stream that ends on land;
The Humboldt River it is called,

Which sinks in desert sand.

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82

RHYMES OF THE STATES

CALIFORNIA.

EIGHTEENTH STATE ADMITTED, 1850. NAMED BY SPANIARDS FOR
AN ISLAND TOLD OF IN A SPANISH ROMANCE, RICH .IN GOLD
AND PRECIOUS STONES. COAST EXPLORED BY SIR FRANCIS
DRAKE, 1578-79. FIRST SETTLEMENTS, SPANISH MISSIONS :
SAN DIEGO, 1768; SAN FRANCISCO, 1776. TERRITORY ACQUIRED

FROM MEXICO, 1848. GOLD DISCOVERED, FEBRUARY, 1848.

Square miles, 158,360.

Population (1890), 1,208,130.

In rank, according to population, 22d.
Counties, 52.

Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Productions (1890) :

Pounds of wool, 16,358,547.

Pounds of cheese, 3,871,575.

Bushels of wheat, 40,869,337.

Bushels of barley, 17,548,386.

Bushels of peaches, 1,691,019.

Bushels of pears 577,444.

Bushels of oranges (estimate for 1895), 1,000,000 boxes.
Ounces of gold (1889), 829,677.

Ounces of silver, 1,062,578.

Value of quicksilver (estimated), $1,700,000.

Popular name, ‘‘ Golden State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES 83







a WWE Ff)
AWM DEP
Hurrah! we ’ve reac

California's joy and pride,

Where all the ships of all the world
At once might safely ride.

Here San Francisco on her hills
Sits proudly by the sea,

While ships from China and Japan
Cast anchor at her quay.

This is a land of fruit and flowers,
A land of golden grain;

Where winters often are as kind
As summers are in Maine.

The warm Pacific waters lave
A thousand miles of shore,
And California every year
Still prospers more and more.

Yosemite, thé valley grand,
Is found within this State ;

Those who may see it stand in awe

To view the wonder great!






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RHYMES OF THE STATES

OREGON.

PART OF TERRITORY POSSESSION OF WHICH WAS SECURED BY TREATY
WITH GREAT BRITAIN, AUGUST 6, 1846. NAME, SPANISH,
MEANING ‘‘ WILD MARJORAM.” TWENTIETH
STATE ADMITTED, 1859.

Square miles, 96,030.

Population (1890), 313,767.

In rank, according to population, 38th.
Counties, 31.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 9,296,734.

Bushels of oats, 5,948,894.

Bushels of prunes and plums, 199,700.

Bushels of pears, 106,383.

Value of canned fish, oysters, fruits, and vegetables, $1,643,324.

Total fishery products (1880), $2,781,024.

Total fishery products (1889), $1,186,188.

Tons of iron ore (1889), 26,283.

Ounces of gold, 46,648.

Ounces of silver, 17,851.

The Willamette River, running northward to the Columbia, has a
very beautiful and rich valley, about 4o miles wide and 140
miles long. ;

The height of Mt. Hood is 11,225 feet.

Popular name, ‘“‘ Beaver State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

Great Britain once claimed many a league
Along the ocean strand;
We had disputes for forty years
About the western land

Till we at last agreed to take
A part of what we’d claimed;
From which three States were later made, |\/||
As here you have them named. |





























Washington is to the north,
And Oregon below;

Adjoining them upon the east
Is Sister Idaho.













| Three hundred miles has Oregon
Along the ocean tide; SR y)) |
A saddle-back upon the north 3 eS —
Where Washington doth rid 3 YT. Y
a > | \

. ALD
Cie pases, S.

wey 4. ewe
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Wa WO

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RHYMES OF THE STATES

WASHINGTON.

TWENTY-SIXTH STATE ADMITTED, 18809.

Square miles, 69,180.

Population, 349,390.

In rank, according to population, 34th.
Counties, 34.

Representatives in Conpres 2)
Electoral votes, 4.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 6,345,426.

Bushels of oats, 2,273,182.

Bushels of barley, 1,269, 140.

Bushels of cherries, 11,692.

Value of timber products (1890), $19,480, 580.

Fishery products (1880, $181,372.
is “ (G88o), $1,107,847.

Ounces of gold (1889), 9,005.

Ounces of silver (1889), 28,464.

Popular name, ‘‘ Chinook State.”

There are twenty-eight counties in the United States named for
Washington.



—SSS

IS

WS : |
/; ere wide extend the deep, dark woods, i

RHYMES OF THE STATES

fp

WLIW 4 Hie Hac WOO.
ipl NOAA: a i
D heSseaVN NGS

Great northwest State! remember well

\\The honored name you own,

y)And may your children ever be

For truth and valor known.
EN y

aT ae

Yaa AE

i

With their gigantic trees:

#;Some other States have forests fine,

But none so great as these.

|The harbors found in Puget Sound,

Are good as one could wish:

! Columbia River; near its mouth,

Is noted for its fish.





ify The lovely orchards in this state

Have many a cherry-tree,

‘| The map is somewhat bottle-shaped —

Mouth toward the open ‘sea.

: a in

play gadeeyes servi



37



88

RHYMES OF THE STATES

IDAHO.

”

AN INDIAN NAME, MEANING ‘‘GEM OF THE MOUNTAINS.
THIRTIETH STATE ADMITTED, I890.— FIRST SETTLEMENT, CCLUR
D'ALENE, 1840.

Square miles, 84,800.
Population (1890), 84,385.
In rank, according to population, 45th.
Counties, 18.
Representative in Congress, 1.
_ Electoral votes, 3.

Number of sheep (1890), 357,712.

Pounds of wool produced, 2,119,242.

Ounces of gold (1889), 95,983.

Ounces of silver (1880), 359,309.
. “ (1889), 3,137,508.

Tons of iron, 24,072.

Total value of mineral products (1889), $8,385,233.

The climate of southern and western Idaho is favorable to fruit
growing as well as stock raising.

Popular name, ‘“ Gem of the Mountains.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES. 89











ITI.







“J have a thousarid flocks of sheep
Which in my valleys feed:
Of gold and silver I ’ve enough
To buy all things I need.

Ho, Idaho! Ho, Idaho!
I pray you, tell me why
You sit so very straight and prim,
And hold your head so high ?

IV.
Il.
“My capital—you ask the name?
“ Because my mountains are so firm — ’T is Boisé, if you please:
They will not bend at all; The National Park ?— Oh, yes, indeed,
And people’s heads are always high, It rests against my knees.”’

When they are very tall.

wf
iat
;

,

Warh,

Pe are an merece ns cememmas,










MONT
ul YZ, lly gp, \
u BNA iyi hit
= NE Hu
e My Ny reel NATYONAL !
VET TAN) hi PARKS 4 ¢
C “ Ae a tk
"4 SMa linioawier od
a wwe
Oregon, |
SE CER Lee es eh
eee 2wTo: aJite &

NEV UTAH

I2



90

RHYMES OF THE STATES

MONTANA.

A PART OF THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE. ORGANIZED AS A TERRI-
TORY, 1864. TWENTY-SEVENTH STATE ADMITTED, 1889.

Square miles, 146,080.

Population (1890), 132,159.

In rank, according to population, 44th.
Counties, 16.
Representative in Congress, 1.
Electoral votes, 3.

Number of cattle (1890), 881,808.
Number of sheep, 1,859,016.

Pounds of wool, 9,335,551.
Gold discovered, 1861; ounces produced (1880), 87,354.
“ ( (1889), 151,861.
Ounces of silver (1880), 2,246,938.
: “ (1889), 13,511,455:

Tons of coal (1889), 363,301.
Value of all mineral products (1889), $33,737,775:
The Missouri River, from its source in Montana to the Gulf of

Mexico, is 4,200 miles long, the longest ir in the world.
Popular name, ‘‘ Stub-toe State.”



RHYMES OF THE STATES

“A land of THOU this aracd fagaie
The Rocky Mountain chain ;
Extends so far, with all the hills

There ’s left but little plain.

PATO

The Indian hunter’s paradise
Was here, not long ago;

Where roamed the grizzly bear, the elk,
And herds of buffalo.

Missouri River from the west
Comes down with many a leap,
To meet the Yellowstone that flows
Through gorges wild and deep.

"T was in this State that Custer brave |
And many gallant men

Rode forth against the savage foe;
But none rode back again.

ive
Ne

eM Uy Hf
: i wy
ae Way ie
EAN SNE
a yp ENTS MI IN

il





gl



92 RHYMES OF THE STATES
NORTH DAKOTA.
TWENTY-EIGHTH STATE ADMITTED, 1889.

Square miles, 70,795:

Population, 182,719.

In rank, according to population, 41st.

Counties, 39:

. Representative in Congress, 1.

Electoral votes, 3.
Products, 1890: Tons of hay, 531,472.
Bushels of wheat, 26,503,365. Flour and grist-mill products, value,
Bushels of oats, 5,773,129. $2,624,198.
Bushels of barley, 1,570,717. Tons of coal, 28,907.
Flax, bushels of seed, 164,314. Popular name, “ Flickertail State.”

SOUTH DAKOTA.

TWENTY-NINTH STATE ADMITTED, 1880.

Square miles, 77,650.

Population, 328,808.

In rank, according to population, 37th.
Counties, 51.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 16,541,138. Tons of hay, 1,541,524.

Bushels of oats, 7,460,846. Ounces of gold (1889), 149,533.
Bushels of barley, 902,005. Ounces of silver, 104,672.
Flax, bushels of seed, 1,541,524. (From the Black Hill mines.)

Value of flour and grist-mill products, Popular name, “Swinge Cat,” or

«“Singed Cat” State.



RHYMES OF THE STATES 93

INORITL Ss. SOUTH

To North nid South Dakota—, (ig
Two wide and mostly level States —
Just west of Minnesota.

et

es shh



i Here farms are many—some are large,
i And fields of wheat are grand: e
|The flour we buy is often marked

Ly “ Dakota Four X brand”

4.6 7%
Hl Rea River, on their eastern line, a
p Flows north, tow'rd Hudson’s Bay; ‘YAQ@
Our only stream with current wide BB yy sf

Whose waters run that way. 7

Southwest along the line;
A region very rough and wild, *
With many a wealthy mine.

GanudiGw) s=-

B43 7Vles.





Full Text


NEWKIRK

GARRETT

oy


RHVMES OF THE STATES
REY WES OF [Hi STATES

> BY:
GARRETT NEWKIRK

WITH DRAWINGS BY HARRY FENN
AFTER SKETCHES BY THE AUTHOR



NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
1896
Copyright, 1894, 1895, 1896,
by GarreTr NEWKIRK



All rights reserved

THE DE VINNE PRESS.
DEDICATION

TO THE BOYS AND GIRLS OF
ALL THE STATES, WITH THE WISH THAT
EACH ONE MAY BE A GOOD AND FAITHFUL CITIZEN OF
THE STATE, AND OF THE UNITED STATES, THIS
BOOK IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED
BY THE AUTHOR
PREE ACE

“Thirty days hath September,
April, June, and November,
All the rest have thirty-one,
Excepting February alone:
To this we twenty-eight assign,
Till leap-year gives it twenty-nine.”

This well-known rhyme —a familiar aid to every boy and girl in
memorizing the number of days in the twelve months — suggested
to the author of this little book a similar series of rhymes, which
should assist children in studying the history and geography of the
United States. It is no easy task to fix in the mind the location,
outlines, physical features, and historical record of all the States of
our American Union. oe

The author has tried to reduce all these distinctive facts into the
form of simple rhymes, easily impressed upon the memory, and ac-
companied by pictures which illustrate the ideas contained in the
verses. In the pictures, moreover, each State has been shown on
a single page; and, in addition to an outline map of the State,
there is given a caricature sketch of some object or animal which
the State might be said to resemble in form. These, the author
believes, will prove very useful in fixing in the child's mind the
shapes and the main physical features of the different States.

The Rhymes have been carefully and artistically illustrated by
Mr. Harry Fenn, and the entire series of verses and pictures has
been published in the pages of “St. Nicholas” within the last two
years.

The silhouettes of the States, small as they are, are accurately
drawn to scale by Mr. H. L. Bridwell. They make an interesting
and instructive page which not only shows the form but gives the
comparative size of each State.
RHYMES OF THE STATES.

gon SSE ME SSE ASS A OG A pe we eee MEM ee Sey
ae Pas . : t

5 Pye) rs *

We, Ge ‘ Arty
250 Sq Welt f PEA | cS, PT ier é ?
; > x

4990
Sqm











DEL

2050
Sqm -

eee add i



7 |

tral ety



56650 SM

" ILLINOIS

N.DAKOTA ai Lae ee

70795 SM : 77510 SM

NEVADA
COLORADO
Te

OREGON WYOMING 103925 SM ~

97590 SM
96030 SM

MONTANA

Se

265780 SaM ©

S.DAKOTA

a 77650 SM

Ce RTT

WE SEB BEE M SEE MH EE SSE a Rg M SE A Sy HOSE, MO EDK 3g NW -OSSER Y IGE SES

“H-BRIDWEL 1a
tS, SIDS k=, K+ SE we rn ee ek GE ke Se Weehe wee wm
. ALL THE STATES SHOWN UPON THE SAME SCALE,

I I
2 RHYMES OF THE STATES






ae
cw



PG, ily
Pens ae sai
ea

ay





MAINE.

Square miles, 33,040.

Population (1890), 661,086.

In rank according to popula-
tion, the 30th State.

Counties, 16.

Representatives in Congress, 4.

Presidential Electoral votes, 6.

For nearly 200 years Maine was under Massa-
chusetts.

First called “Province of Mayne,” by charter of ;
Charles I., 1639.

Admitted into the Union, 1820.

The poet Longfellow was born in Portland, February
27 eOOu

From 12,000 to 15,000 men are engaged directly in
the fisheries.

Yearly value of fisheries products, about $ 3,000,000.

Yearly value of lumber products, about $12,000,000.

Gold and silver (1880), about $8,000.

Principal quarries, limestone.

Popular name: ‘‘ The Pine Tree State.”


oo

RHYMES OF THE STATES

Hurrah for the United) States!
And each link in ‘tke}chain;
= _ Aird. let_our stories here -begin
Sm With*the northeast State of Maine.

Zee e ee

WSS Ws 1

Nell

rees is :
spruce, and pind PERG, |
te built alon oa

nan plane

\ wy mi

A TRS eb
e > aiid

~ Sees

22_Some thousands iat thee oF 1 bao
Go2 ousands ‘of her people go ¥
lin A-fishing in'the séa..--__.- Ly
GThey catch &nough to use at honie, aH
ee Se ee
Aad some for you and me. / Sufi
Bar Bes

x ‘isle has/she

Aher quiet bays, Gy -
le come from other States “A;

2

>=—=-










4 RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 9,305.

Population (1890), 376,530.

In rank according to population, 33d.
Counties, 10.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

First settlements at Dover and Portsmouth, 1623. Al
Annexed to Massachusetts, 1641.
Became again a separate province, 1741.




Value of manufactured boots and shoes, 1890,
nearly $12,000,000.
Value of manufactured cot-

ton goods, nearly $22,-
000,000.
Value of gold and _ silver
product (1880), about
30,000.
Popular name: “ The Granite
State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 5

“The Granite State,” sharp pointed north,
Has mountains called the White,
Because the snow upon their tops
So often makes them bright.

This is a pleasant State wherein
Thro’ summer-time to dwell;

The air is sweet, the nights are cool,
The people treat you well.

Six thousand feet. Mount Washington
Stands higher than the sea,

And from the top a wondrous view
Is had one day in three.*

A large amount of granite stone,
Of color blue or gray, ~

Is taken from the quarries here
To cities far away.


6 RHYMES OF THE STATES

VERMONT.

Square miles, 9,565.

Population (1890), 332,422.

In rank according to population, 36th.
Counties, 14.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.



165 Miles.

First State admitted into the Union after
the formation of the Government;
date of admission, March 4, 1791.

Number of pounds of maple-sugar (1890), 14,123,921.

Gallons of syrup, 218,252.

Value of paper manufactured (1890), $2,289,000.

Value of products of marble and stone works, $3,249,000.

Principal quarries: marble, slate, and
limestone.

Vermont was settled largely from New
Hampshire and Massachusetts.
Claimed for a long time by both
New Hampshire and New York.

Popular name: “The Green Mountain
State.”


RHYMES OF THE STATES











































ZX /

| FR é ZED

2 : 4

WOR ge

Yj j S

tig 2 Hh)

“ ZIG 3

foes y

i! GZ Ee ss ae
SY WE Z Sa : 3

SE f Ver-mont we call this pleasant State J

oe = fe, . eam

Vie Pe See Because the hills are green— = -

ee aT
= The cattle in the=pastures graze, | : ‘

NNT HO. rest beneath_the trees; i ae wt

a | We Sweet golden butfer here is made, \ uN

ae i fi ie ey een famous cheese. WN Vi UL LL

Le ae )

ett, j

Ugg = 7 : = ——

BZ = : . | (ESS =

ip aa M ty _— =





SS Se3.7- And wholesome bread, and-milk, and. cream,
iad Se And maple-sugar sweet. ==
= How happy must the children be =~ —

With such good things to eat. =a



Me
LIK sen Mounuane Boys,” “the 20908 were : called

A Sa Who followed Gerieral ‘Starkg- =e
~~ “Aid Ethan Allen, when’ a “fort =
Sa Was captured in the dark: Ss ee
otra,
8 RHYMES OF THE STATES







180 Miles . ~,
‘ ) -
SY - ee —K
] o
Bok
x
a Se QW
ws Nort AMPTON. BOSTONS® ,
SR “S or
Zoe g WORCESTER

ea,
x
Se

MASSACHUSETTS.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES. “4

Square miles, 8,315.

Population (1890), 2,238,943.

In rank according to population, 6th.
Counties, 14.

Representatives in Congress, 13.
Electoral votes, 15.

First settlements at Plymouth in 1620; at Salem,
1628; at Boston, 1630.



Value of boots and shoes, factory product (1890), $116,387,900.

Value of cotton goods (1890), $100, 202,382.

Massachusetts has been the home of several of America’s most
famous poets, Bryant (in early life), Emerson, Longfellow,
Holmes, Whittier, Lowell, Aldrich, and others.

Popularly called “The Old Bay State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

a iS =a =

zx

Tf

i ‘}. With Boston, by the sea, rh eS
| ” Where brave men went aboard the ships “AY Y

oA LX ont EL
i Ge we \ And cast out British tea. —= Si j
o uN ee oe , ar - - f fl J

Tey cant { ae

ne =e
‘ Massachusetts next we come,

=\¢ And)here it was, at Bunker Hill, 2
Cg our forefathers true, LEK.

A gallant\battle bravely fought {: os
+ For freedom and for you KEE

4







2 Here Plymouth, too, and Lexington, —
-_ _ Each has its tale to tell,
Of men who suffered, men who fought,
And did their duty -well., 7,

Pg

WY ier,

foe face pb
EEE
—, And Massachusetts has -an arm;
2 A narrow strip of land—g

gg gee
So pT






Io

RHYMES OF THE STATES

RHODE ISLAND.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED FOR AN ISLAND IN NARRAGANSETT BAY. THIS ISLAND IS
BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN THE ‘“‘VINLAND” VISITED
BY THE NORTHMEN ABOUT A. D. 1000.

Square miles, 1,250.

Population (1890), 345,506.

In rank according to population, 35th.
Counties, 5.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Two capitals, Providence and Newport.

Value of manufactured cotton goods (1890), $27,000,000.

Woolen and worsted goods, about $32,000,000.

Manufactured jewelry, $8,000,000.

General Nathanael Greene and Commodore Oliver H. Perry were
natives of this State.

First settlement, by Roger Williams, at Providence, 1636.

It is popularly called “ Little Rhody.”
CONN,

RHYMES OF THE STATES Il

TOME 1, MORAG ?
Se

TON 7 Sse
i y ee, us Good Roger Williams was a man
He ay Rye oe Who loved his neighbors well;
@\% A | But for his faith they made him. sete Mf
Lo Another place to dwell. yj smtey, Hil
di

h
F 1M)

Among the Indians, in the woods,\Â¥h
To live in peace he went, \
nd down by Narragansett Bay

» He made a settlement.

: , lis census-roll is full, /
Ni\jn/}));, Its mighty factories turn to cloth / @
) Dh Our cotton and our wool. ee ig

awed

‘PROVIDENCEZOMN

71)

a
ag
_-
x
O
lg

|
|
|
|


I2 RHYMES OF THE STATES

CONNECTICUT.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 4990.

Population (1890), 746,258.

In rank according to population, 29th.
Counties, 8.

Representatives in Congress, 4.
Electoral votes, 6.

_ First settlement, by the Dutch, at Hartford, 1633; but they soon sold
‘out to the English. Other settlements followed at New Ha-
ven, Windsor, and Weathersfield, by people from Massachusetts.

Value of manufactured brass and copper, and all kinds of brass and
copper ware (1890), about $25,000,000.

Value of manufactured hats and caps, and materials for (1890),
nearly $9,000,000.

Leads in the manufacture of firearms and ammunition.

Principal quarries, red sandstone.

Popular name: ‘The Nutmeg State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

(The State of Cofinecticut +
.2 You may know on
i Because it resembles

= little poys cap,

ee aise el Hartford. = :
= Is. worthy of pride —"F
BE siNew Havens Yale, ee ve LL

i New- England we name,
fe Beenie their first settlers” a













































































T3


RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEW YORK.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.
NAMED IN HONOR OF THE DUKE OF YORK.

Square miles, 49,170.

Population (1890), 5,997,853.

In rank according to population, Ist.
Counties, 60.

Representatives in ene 34.
Electoral votes, 36.

Printing and ee value of products (1890), $69,000,000.

Flouring and grist-mill products (1890), $52,000,000.

Foundry-and machine-shop products (1890), $72,000,000.

Pounds of butter (1890), nearly 100,000,060, greatest product of
any State. :

Hudson River discovered by Henry Hudson, 1609.

First settlement of New York, on Manhattan Island, by the Dutch,
1613-14.

The island was bought from the Indians in 1626 for $24 and a
copper kettle.

There are many beautiful lakes in New York State, and two ranges
of mountains, the Catskills and Adirondacks.

Popular name: ‘‘ The Empire State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

ic Z

Uy,
x 2G Mess ee

CG ;







New York is Sie the “ Soe State” -
And rightly bears the name;

As first in people, wealth, and trade,
No State contests her claim.

Into her ports great vessels throng
To make her rich and great,
nd New York City, like a queen,
Sits proudly at her gate.

he grand old Hudson in
By many a city flows;

And westward roll Niagara /
s| every traveler knows.









ALBANY ae


RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEW JERSEY.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED FOR THE ISLE OF JERSEY, ENGLAND, AND IN HONOR OF SIR
GEORGE CARTERET, BECAUSE HE WAS A NATIVE OF THE ISLE.

Square miles, 7,815.

Population, 1,444,933.

In rank according to population, 18th.
Counties, 21.

Representatives in Congress, 8.
Electoral votes, 10.

Value of manufactured silk and silk-goods (1890), $30,760,371.

Foundry and machine-shop Prodi iron and steel (1890), nearly
$30,000,000.

Leads in the manufacture of pottery and glass.

Value of patent and enameled leather product (1890), $5,430,000.

Number of bushels of potatoes grown (1890), white, 4,055,351.

Number of bushels of potatoes grown (1890), sweet, 2,254,344.

The first settlements of New Jersey were by the Dutch, 1617 to
1623, at Bergen and Fort Nassau.

Popular name: “The Blue State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 17










Ne Seer
{For factories and thriving farms
_ New Jersey is renowned;
“The storied Catskills northward rise,
While southward plains abound.

7
p>.)

For fine sea-bathing thousands come
7 From cities far and near, ae
‘“To Atlantic City, Asbury Park, wf
ip, And Long Branch, every year.

ay AWA SS
7 a ;
lb, If like this State a boy were washed,
ii He surely would go frantic — p

‘His face in the river Delaware, eli

His back by the Atlantic! i-¢





ge 4 & Y
Se:

7» Across the frozen Delaware,
“Your books will tell you when,
|- Washington went to Trenton town

And captured a thousand men.
RHYMES OF THE STATES

PENNSYLVANIA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES,

Square miles, 45,215.

Population (1890), 5,258,014.

In rank according to population, 2d.
Counties, 67.

Representatives in Congress, 30.
Electoral votes, 32.

Value of glass manufactured (1890), over $17,000,000.

Value of foundry and machine-shop products, iron and steel, nails
and iron work (1890), $362,965,647.

Tons of coal produced (1889), 81,719,059.

Dozens of eggs (1890), over 50,000,000.

Philadelphia means “ The City of Brotherly Love.” It was founded
by the Quakers, and Philadelphia has ever been one of the
most peaceable and law-abiding of cities.

The First Continental Congress met here September 5, 1774; and,
with the exception of short periods, Philadelphia was the seat
of government till 1800.

A popular name for Pennsylvania is “The Keystone State,” be-
cause if the original thirteen from New Hampshire to Georgia
were placed in the form of an arch, Pennsylvania would occupy
the middle position, being seventh from either base.
RHYMES OF THE STATES

The map of Pennsylvania
Represents a flag afloat;
And in its southeast corner

Philadelphia we note.

This State was settled by the Friends
(Or “Quakers”) led by Penn;

Who bought the land from Indians,
And treated them like men.

Petroleum, coal, and iron
Are found within her hills;

Fine farms in every valley,
And many rolling-mills.

And once in Philadelphia
Pealed out that famous bell
That rung in Independence Day \. - SS

l

a (AiZ “yy
~
Wa ESE
ig Lia
Y

2 Rr Oe i a Bt a ew es a
MOIS sew! i
na air (eS
a
s

=.
i”
il ysl

PITTSBURG. sv"



C \
SSS \

SSS
20 RHYMES OF THE STATES

DELAWARE.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 2,050.

Population (1890), 168,493.

In rank according to population, 42d.
Counties, 3.

Representatives in Congress, 1.
Electoral votes, 3.

Railroad and street cars, making and repairing (1890), $3,291,293.

Ship-building (1890), $2,044,313.

Leather, morocco (1890), $4,01 5,694.

The Delaware River was discovered by the Dutch navigator Hud-
son, in 1609.

First settlement made by thirty Hollanders under De Vries, near
Lewes, 1610, and destroyed by the Indians three years later.

Next settlement by Swedes and Finns, in 1638, who called the
country Nya Sveriga, or New Sweden. Their forts’ were at-
tacked and captured by the Dutch, in 1655. The land came
into English possession, 1664. It was governed as part of
Pennsylvania from 1683 to 1703. Declared itself independent
of Great Britain, 1776. Furnished a valiant regiment for the
Revolutionary War, and was the first State to ratify the Con-
stitution, December 7, 1787.

Popular name: “The Blue Hen State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES ; 21

Well, I declare!—here 's Delaware, xz
Shaped like an upturned shoe; » QL
Its capital marks just the place
To put the button, too.
eRe
And Wilmington is near the toe ~
Along the Bay it lies;
For steamships, carriages, and cars
This city takes the prize.

Should go to Delaware;
\ Her orchards are about as good

\\ As you'll find anywhere.
i

aN

By wagon-loads and car-loads, too,
She ships the very best;

In boxes, baskets, crates, and cans
It travels east and west,

Nanna Wes a
2 N DARED fear,

Ang gone
‘han Sv
z = Soe

Sa eas


RHYMES OF THE STATES

MARYLAND.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

NAMED IN HONOR OF HENRIETTA MARIA, WIFE OF CHARLES I. OF
ENGLAND.

Square miles, 12,210.

Population (1890), 1,042,390.

In rank according to population, 27th.
Counties, 23.

Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

Tons of coal produced (1889), nearly 3,000,000.

Ounces of gold (1889), 501 (worth about $20 an ounce —a little
over: $10,000).

Value of canned and preserved foods, oysters, fish, fruits, and vege-
tables, $10,030,500.

Value of oysters (1890), $4,467,325.

Two hundred people sent from England by Lord Baltimore, in
1633, to make the settlement of Maryland, were brought over
in two vessels named the ‘“ Ark” and the “ Dove.”

There was for a long time a dispute between Maryland and Penn-
sylvania over their boundary line. This was settled in 1760
by what was called, from the names of the surveyors who lo-
cated it, ““ Mason and Dixon’s line.”

Area of the District-of Columbia, 70 sanaret ee

Population (1890), 230,392.

Popular name: “The Monumental State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

The “Land of Mary,” England’s

Named by Lord Baltimore, y
Upon the Bay of Chesapeake =~
Owns oyster-beds “galore!”

East of the Bay lie farming-lands,
Where corn and wheat are grown;
The western hills for scenery
And minerals are known.

Along the west and southern sides
Potomac River flows; Ty i

—

The District of Columbia eee

The Nation’s Capital is there
With all its weighty cares.

Where Congress and the President
Attend to\our affairs.

72







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206 Pviles.
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3
24

RHYMES OF THE STATES
VIRGINIA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.
NAMED FOR “THE VIRGIN QUEEN” ELIZABETH.

Square miles (since the separation of West Virginia),
42,450.

Population (1890), 1,665,980.

In rank according to population, 15th.

Counties, 118.

Representatives in Congress, 10.

Electoral votes, 12.

Value of flour and grist-mill products (1890), $12,000,000.

Value of tobacco grown, and its products, about $22,000,000.
Value of gold produced (1889), about $2,500.

Value of silver (by U. S. Government Report), $12.

First settlement of Virginia was at Jamestown, 1607.

First negro slaves were brought here from Africa, 1619.

Popular names: “The Old Dominion,” and “ Mother of Presidents.”

WEST VIRGINIA.

Square miles, 23,000.

Population, 762,794.

In rank according to population, 28th.
Counties, 54,

Representatives in Congress, 4.
Electoral votes, 6.

Value of steel and iron products (1890), $11,000,000.
Salt produced per year in the Kanawha and Ohio Valleys, about
100,000 barrels.
RHYMES OF THE STATES 25












ES Get inn
AU ace MARE yt BRETT) NAS ‘
at on ee Me
\ 21 Naa eT lh i \\
\\ All this was one Virginia |
we\. \s Till eighteen sixty-three;
I “7 eR \ ‘The land was then divided ae.
Wp eee 4 \. As on your map you see.
| OCA wn HETAME VBA) oP S04 ae




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‘ ¢It had an earlier settlement‘). tie
veo" Than any other State; ei
: And none can boast a prouder list

Of sons both good and great;










The cradles of Virginia
Rocked seven little boys,





: yo
Who, seven future Presidents,

ie playing with their toys. ————=—=1) |

: t
See Se eae Here Washington and Jefferson,

: |. , _ James Madison and Monroe,

PQne Harrison, Taylor and Tyler, ‘{{j\)

" “Were born long years: ago. :














= tee IK:

In West Virginia there ’s salt
And coal and iron-ore.

But Virginia’s old plantations-~
Are near the eastern short,
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450 Miles.


RHYMES OF THE STATES

NORTH CAROLINA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 52,250.

Population, 1,617,947.

In rank according to population, 16th.
Counties, 94.

Representatives in Congress, 9.
Electoral votes, 11.

Value of products (1890), cotton goods, $9,563,000 ; tobacco and
snuff, $4,783,000; tar and turpentine, $1,705,000; gold (1889),
$161,291; silver (1889), $3,200. (Tar and turpentine prod-
ucts in 1870 were valued at about $3, 300,000.)

Bushels of sweet potatoes (1890), 5,665,391.

Carolina was at first considered a part of Virginia. Settlements
were attempted before 1600, but all were prevented or de-
stroyed by Indians.

Charter of the Province of Carolina (named for Queen Caroline)
was given by Charles II., 1663.

This charter covered a strip of territory from the Atlantic to the
Pacific Ocean. Nobody knew then how far apart the oceans
were, and people made maps largely by guess. Afterward, for
a time, the State’s western boundary was the Mississippi River.

Carolina was divided into North and South, 1720.

Popular name: ‘“‘ The Old North State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

any a ‘breezy ‘mountain -
2 thus gave TENCE



27
RHYMES OF THE STATES

SOUTH CAROLINA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 30,570.

Population (1890), 1,151,149.

In rank according to population, 23d.
Counties, 32.

Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Acres planted in cotton (1890), 1,987,469.

Number of cotton-bales produced, 747,140.

Acres in rice (1890), 42,238.

Pounds of rice produced, 30,338,951.

Value of fertilizers from phosphate-beds (1890), $4,417,000.

Gold (1889), about $45,000.

Silver (1889), $200.

In 1850 the State produced about 160,000,000 pounds of rice.

The State is famous for a fine cotton known as “ Sea Island Cotton.”

On April 12, 1861, the attack was made on Fort Sumter in Charles-
ton Harbor. This was the beginning, “the first gun,” of our
terrible Civil War.

Popular name: ‘The Palmetto State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

South Carolina raises cotton
And a large amount of rice;

But 't is seldom that her children 2
Can go ‘sliding on the ice!

No horsemen eer were braver
Than: Marion and his band,
Who fought for independence -
And saved their native land.


RHYMES OF THE STATES

GEORGIA.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL THIRTEEN STATES.

Square miles, 59,475.

Population (1890), 1,837,353.

In rank according to population, 12th.
Counties, 136.

Representatives in Congress, 11.
Electoral votes, 13. :

Acres planted in cotton (1890), 3,345,104.

Number of bales produced, 1,191,846.

Bushels of wheat (1880), 3,159,771.

Bushels of corn (1890), 29,000,000.

Value of cotton goods manufactured (1890), $12,075,620.

Gold product (1889), $119,000.

Silver product (1889), about $400.

Since 1829 the mines of Georgia have produced between eight and
ten million dollars’ worth of gold.

The first settlement of Georgia was at Savannah, in the spring of
1733.

Atlanta is sometimes called “The Chicago of the South,” because
of its rapid growth since the Civil War.

Popular name: “The Empire State of the South.”
“Sd

pW o6c

= —
—————n
—

RHYMES OF THE STATES

General Oglethorpe from England
A colony did bring;

And named the thirteenth of the States
For the second George, his King.

Now Georgia ’s called by many
“The Empire State of the South”;
Its largest port, Savannah,

Is near the Savannah’s mouth.

All grains are grown in Georgia,
And cotton,—many bales;

It is as large as England,
Including also Wales.

The capital, Atlanta,
A city far renowned,
In beauty has arisen,
From her ashes on the ground.

130 Miles --

VN

ethorpe.



31
RHYMES OF THE STATES

FLORIDA.

FOURTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1845.

Square miles, 58,680.

Population (1890), 391,422.

In rank according to population, 32d.
Counties, 39.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Oranges produced in 1885, 900,000 boxes; in 1894, 4,800,000.

Value of lumber products (1890), about $5,500,000.

Value of sponge fisheries product (1890), $281,754.

The first European visitors were Ponce de Leon and his followers,
who landed in 1513 at or near the site of St. Augustine. A
fort was built there in 1565. Land again explored by De Soto
in 1539. Pensacola was settled by Spaniards in 1696.

Florida was ceded to Great Britain by Spain in exchange for Cuba,
1763. Ceded again to Spain by United States, Treaty of 1783.
Restored to the United States by Treaty of 1819. Possession
taken, 1821.

Florida was the home of the Seminole Indians till 1842, when, after
a seven years’ war, most of them were sent to the Indian Ter-
ritory.

Popular name: “The Everglade State,” or ‘The Flowery State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 33

ae

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You all like oranges, I know, s]
And here in Florida they grow. S

Oe

A subject of the Spanish King
Of yore came here to seek a spring:

He hoped its waters would restore
Lost youth and health to him once more.

He found great reptiles with long jaws;
Scales hard like flint, and teeth like saws.

And he was young enough that day
To turn about and-run away.

And in this tropic clime is seen
Our oldest town—St. Augustine.

. . s4o Miles. GA



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34 RHYMES OF THE STATES

ALABAMA.

Once a part of the territory of Georgia, except a strip along the
coast which was held by Spain as part of Florida. This ter-
ritory was made a part of territory of Mississippi, 1798. Sep-
arated from Mississippi in 1817, and admitted to the Union
in 1819.

Square miles, 52,250.

Population, 1,513,017.

In rank according to population, 17th.
Counties, 65.

Representatives in Congress, 9.
Electoral votes, 10.

Acres of cotton-fields (1890), 2,761,165.

Number of cotton-bales produced, 915,210.

Bushels of Indian corn, 30,000,000.

Gallons of molasses and sorghum, 3,576,120.

Tons of coal (1890), 3,572,903.

Foundry and machine-shop products: iron and steel (1890), nearly
$15,000,000; gold (1889), $1500; silver, $85.

First settlement in Alabama was by the French in 1702.

Popular name: “ The Cotton State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES
















ih
Hi
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Pad
Wa} South, are the bay and harbor,

35

\ Shame,

Long, long ago some Indians,

By other tribes oppressed,
Found here a home and named it
“ Alabama”—“ Here we rest.”

YA

But white and colored people
Raise cotton, corn, and cane.

if
id

i
There 's Birmingham to northward —'l.’

A growing, busy hive, :

With mines of coal and iron,

; Where manufactures thrive.

And city called Mobile;
But in Montgomery city
Is Alabama’s seal.


36 RHYMES OF THE STATES

MISSISSIPPL

SEVENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION UNDER THE CON-
STITUTION, 1817.

Square miles, 46,310.

Population, 1,289,600.

In rank according to population, 21st.
(ouintics, 70;

Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Bushels of corn (1890), 26,000,000.

Acres of cotton-fields, 2,883,000.

Bales of cotton, 1,154,125.

Value of cotton-seed oil and cake, $2,406,628.
Value of cotton goods manufactured, $1,333,000.
Value of lumber products (1890), $5,670,000.

The southern part of Mississippi was once held by Spain as part
of Florida. The rest was claimed and settled by French
(Natchez founded in 1716). Part of the territory was con-
veyed by Napoleon to the United States by the ‘“ Louisiana

purchase, 1003.
Popular name: “-The Eagle State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 37

Algonquins pointing to the stream Wik She? “EE ie é 7 We REN, Ay
Spake to thei d daughters: NY gee >, | NUR RR
pake to their sons and daughters: My Lad eh * ey [pac

iO

* “The Mississippi 't is,’ they said;
Which means the “Father of Waters.” Be

To where Missouri has its source,
Among Montana's fountains,
The Mississippi should have had

3 Ph Ba
One name,— from Gulf to. mountains. €:1'W4
: |

This State in shape is like a coat:
This will not be forgotten

If you remember that its soil
Ranks high for growing cotton.

And as a name for the capital,
Her people have selected
That of a very valiant man —
A President, twice elected.

Vs Niiiéw,

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ee

1] hue 1, Gi

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Alas
Vi


RHYMES OF THE STATES

KENTUCKY.

EXPLORED BY DANIEL BOONE, 1769. FIRST TOWNS, HARRODS-
BURG AND BOONESBOROUGH, 1774-75. MADE A COUNTY
OF VIRGINIA, 1776. THE SECOND STATE
ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1792.

Square miles, 40,400.

Population (1890), 1,858,635.

In rank according to population, 11th.
Counties, 119.

‘Representatives in Congress, II.
Electoral votes, 13.

Number of live-stock on hand (1890), 70,000,000; of which horses
were 401,000; mules were 151,000; and swine were 2,036,000.

Pounds of tobacco, 221,880, 303.

Value of flour and grist-mill products, $9,68 1,000.

Value of cooperage, cordage, and twine, $2,574,000.

Popular name: ‘“ The Blue-Grass State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 39

KENTUCKY

A mighty hunter — Daniel Boone —
There never was one bolder —

Went to Kentucky, all alone, _

With his rifle on his shoulder.


















Then he returned and brought his friends
To help him take possession:

Strong, hardy people, too, they were,
Of courage’ and discretion. - .

BW The blué-grass region” of the State
Saw many a bloody battle:

'T is famous for tobacco farms,
Fine horses, sheep, and cattle.

Kentucky has the Mammoth Cave,—

A palace under ground,—
And there the Echo River flows,



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at
RHYMES OF THE STATES

‘cE NNESS EE:

THIRD STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1794.

Square miles, 42,050.

Population (1890), 1,767,518.

In rank according to population, 13th.
Counties, 96.

Representatives in Congress, 10.
Electoral votes, 12.

Value of lumber and log products, (1890), over $12,000,000.

Value of flour and grist-mill products (1890), $12,474,000.

Value of marble and stone work, nearly $1,000,000.

Value of gold (1880), 97 ounces, worth nearly $2000.

Gallons of milk (1890), 107,000,000.

Pounds of butter (1890), 28,314,000.

Horses owned, 300,000; mules, 200,000; chickens, 12,000,000.

As told in the Rhyme of North Carolina, Tennessee was at first
part of that State. First permanent settlement made near
Knoxville, in 1756.

During the Civil War, more important battles were fought in Ten-
nessee than in any other State except Virginia.

Popular name: ‘“‘ The Volunteer State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

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= Of Tennessee the meaning
Is, “River with the bend,”
-And rivers run below the State,
And across, at either end.

This State mines coal and iron
And marble, pink or green;
It has a healthy climate,
And many a lovely scene.

Knoxville, Nashville, Memphis,
Are handsome cities three,—
And Chattanooga also
Is worth a trip to see.

The heights of Lookout Mountain
Above the mist and cloud, s
Once knew the tread of armies,

And roar of battle loud. 7h | SE = ae Gy 3

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42

RHYMES OF THE STATES

OHIO.

FOURTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1802.

Square miles, 41,060.

Population (1890), 3,672,316.

In rank according to population, 4th.
Counties, 88.

Representatives in Congress, 21.
Electoral votes, 23.

Value of flouring and grist-mill products (1890), $39,468,409.

Value of agricultural machinery manufactured, $14,338,258.

Coal (1889), about 10,000,000 tons.

Bushels of apples (1890), 13,789,278.

Number of sheep, 4,060,729.

Pounds of wool, 20,987,574.

Pounds of butter, 74,990, 307.

Ohio was part of the Northwest Territory (set apart 1787, and
slavery prohibited therein).

The Ohio River was discovered by La Salle about 1669. Country
was later claimed by both French and English. Ceded by
France to Great Britain, treaty of 1763. First permanent
settlement, at Marietta, in 1788.

President Wm. Henry Harrison was elected while a resident of
Ohio, though born in Virginia.

President Benjamin Harrison was born in Ohio, but elected while
a resident of Indiana.

The Presidents Grant, Garfield, and Hayes were natives of Ohio.

Popular name, ‘‘ The Buckeye State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

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bes ¢ 5 fi y
tn





Ohio is proud of cities three, -
The name of each begins with C.

She ‘s also given Presidents three,
Their names beginning with 7 or G.

‘T is a land of farms, and homes, and schools,
A land where law and order rules.

Remember her capital's name, to know
Who found America; long ago.

Now tell the name —or pay a fine —
Of th’ river along her southern line.

By looking sharp, you will not fail
In Erie Lake to find a whale.

2o0o Miles

[nda



43
RHYMES OF THE STATES

INDIANA.

SIXTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1816.

Square miles, 36,350.

Population (1890), 2,192,404.

In rank according to population, 6th.
Counties, 92.

Representatives in Congress, 13.
Electoral votes, 15.

Value of flour and grist-mill products (1890), $31,239,000.

Value of furniture and cabinet-making, $7,114,000.

Value of carriage and wagon materials, $2,282,000.

Bushels of apples, 8,784,000.

Bushels of cherries, 199,000.

Acres in meadow, 2,330,504.

First settlement of Indiana, by French at Vincennes, about the
year 1700.

Battle of Tippecanoe, November 7, 1812.

Indianapolis, the capital, is known as “ The Railroad City.”

As drawn on the map, the city, with the roads entering it, is often
compared to a spider’s web.

The State has large fields producing natural gas and coal.

Popular name, ‘The Hoosier State.”

Â¥
RHYMES OF THE STATES 45













ce
Bi ad
“ear
Indiana was named for the Indians,
Because, when the country was new,
They were there by hundreds and thousands—-
And exceedingly troublesome, too,
4 Till General Harrison whipped them
In the battle of Tippecanoe.

STE 4



\










#\’T is now a rich country for farming,
Where children arise with the sun,

And race all about in the orchards
And meadows, with frolic and fun,

) Never caring how many great railroads

To Indianapolis run.



ahs

“1 }Some of her thriving cities

"| As frontier outposts began;

Fort Wayne was named for a general
Who at Stony Point charged in the van,

‘And afterward conquered the Indians,—

A gallant and soldierly man.
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RHYMES OF THE STATES

MICHIGAN.

THIRTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, LOs7-

Square miles, 58,915.

Population (1890), 2,093,884.

In rank according to population, goth.
Counties, 85.

Representatives in Congress, 12.
Electoral votes, 14.

Value of lumber products, logs, etc. (1890), $73,484,306.

Value of planing-mill products, sash, doors, and blinds, $10,007,603.

Value of wooden packing-boxes, $1,243,791.

Value of other timber products, $9,637,663.

Value of flour and grist-mill products, about $23,000,000.

Value of products of ship-building (1890), $4,710,000.

Value of salt, $2,046,000.

Bushels of apples (1889), 13,154,000.

Copper produced (1895), 129,573,876 pounds, average price 10
cents per pound, or $12,957,387. (The copper of Michigan
is “native” pure copper. There is no copper ore to pay for
working.)

Leaving out coal, this State leads all in the value of her mineral
productions in 1889, $70,000,000.

Gold (1889), 4,210 0z., about $97,000.

Silver, 14,607 oz., about $8, 700.

Iron ore (1889), 5,856,169 tons.

Michigan was part of the Northwest Territory, and formed part of
Indiana from 1787 to 1805.

First settlement, French mission, founded by Father Marquette
and others, at Sault (pronounced soo) Ste. Marie.

The city of Detroit was founded by French, under Cadillac, 1701.

Mackinac (final c silent), ‘‘ The Picturesque Isle.”

Popular name, “ Wolverine State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 47

Are in the outlines found.

The northern part is widely known
For copper- and iron-mines;

The southern part for grain and fruit,
And groves of noble pines.

Au
Within the Straits of Mackinac
Behold an island fair—
A The loveliest place among the lakes
To breathe the summer air. |

The fine old city of Detroit,
_ Is on historic ground;
|The University of the State

Is at Ann Arbor found.

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ILLINOIS

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RHYMES OF THE STATES

ILLINOIS.

EIGHTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1818.

Square miles, 56,650.

Population (1890), 3,826,351.

In rank according to population, 3d.
Counties, 102.

Representatives in Congress, 22.
Electoral votes, 24.

Bushels of corn (1890), 289,000,000.

Value of manufactured products: agricultural implements, $24,-
609,660; steel, iron, and iron work, $42,611,431.

Bituminous coal (1889), 12,104,272 tons.

Value of men’s clothing, $47,191,242.

Slaughtering and meat-packing, wholesale, $212,539,000.

Soap and candles, about $10,000,000.

Watches, $3,048,966.

The principal factories are at Elgin, Rockford, and Springfield.

The Illinois region was explored by the Frenchmen La Salle and
Marquette about 1670.

“Fort St. Louis” was built on what is now known as ‘ Starved
Rock,” on the Illinois River.

Population of Chicago (1880), 503,185; 1890, 1,099,850.

Great fire of Chicago, October 8-10, 1871.

World’s Columbian Exposition, May 1 to October 31, 1893.

Popular name, ‘“‘ The Sucker State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 49
























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The Illinois, an Indian tribe
Once numerous and great,
Were all destroyed, but left their name 3
To a river and a State.

inn
"T is sometimes called the “ Prairie. State,
The soil is rich and fine;
Her pastures green are dotted o'er
With horses, cows, and swine.

Chicago, Queen of Illinois,
Each rival has surpassed ;

Her clothes are never big enough
Because she grows so fast.

A great World's Fair Chicago held
Not very long ago;

Beside the lake grand palaces
By magic seemed to grow.

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50 RHYMES OF THE STATES

WISCONSIN.

SEVENTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1848.

Square miles, 56,040.

Population (1890), 1,686,880.

In rank according to population, 14th.
Counties, 70.

Representatives in Congress, 10.
Electoral votes, 12.

Bushels of oats (1890), 60,739,052.

Barley (1890), 15,225,872.

Buckwheat (1890), 1,064,178.

Value of flour and gristmill products, $24,252,297.

Value of timber and lumber products, all kinds, $67,262,254.

Value of manufactured leather, $11, 161,850.

Wisconsin was part of the Northwest Territory, and was at first
under the government of Michigan. Named for its principal
river —‘Ouisconsin” (Indian) —meaning “wild, rushing river.”

The State contains many hundreds of small lakes.

The Wisconsin and Fox Rivers come so near each other at Portage
that they are connected bya canal a mile and a half long.
The city was so named because this was the place of portage,
where the Indians carried their canoes and luggage from one
river to the other as they came and went often between the
Mississippi River and Lake Michigan. The first white settle-
ment was by the French, and named for the prairie dogs,
Pratrie du Chien.

Popular name, ‘The Badger State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 51















= eee
= BZA

ns



Oh, wonderful river Wisconsin!

Wwe How lovely are your dells;

Oh, beautiful State of Wisconsin!

' How good are your springs and wells.



Ye «How lovely the breezes that fan you
The glorious summer through,

‘From woods sweet-scented with balsam,
“ That shadow your lakes so blue,




“— Of cities you have Milwaukee,

\ i= Along Lake Michigan shore,

‘\\T_ And Madison, named in honor
Of president number four.

les,

BHO ~

S4MADISON

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os
RHYMES OF THE STATES

MINNESOTA.

NINETEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1858.

Square miles, 83,365.

Population (1890), 1,301,826,

In rank, according to population, 2oth.
Counties, 80.

Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 52,300,247.

Acres in wheat (1890), 3,372,627.

Bushels of oats (1890), 49,958,791.

Bushels of barley (1890), 9,100,683.

Acres in flax (1890), 303,635.

Bushels of flaxseed (1890), 2,721,937.

Value of flour and gristmill products (1890), $60, 158,088.

Value of all timber and lumber products, $30,018, 583.

Value of fur goods, manufactured products, $1,152,360.

Minnesota was explored by the French, under Hennepin and La
Salle, about the year 1780. It was claimed as part of Louisiana
Territory. Organized as a separate territory in 1849.

The Indian war in Minnesota and massacre of settlers by the Sioux
occurred in 1862-3.

The greatest flouring mills in the world are at Minneapolis.

Popular name, ‘‘The Gopher State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 53



ick ioe i
Te
em
ee
wae:
















Wy) The tiver brought the Indians
i | _ From prairies of Dakota;
hi So cloudy seemed the water,

i) They called it “ Minnesota,”





Now together are the cities
Minneapolis and.St, Paul,













wh

And the “Laughing Waterfall.” ye



|) The mills in Minnesota
3..-° Are running every hour,
. * Sawing and planing lumber,

And grinding wheat to flour.



Ganada «
oh ',
_— BHO Mies



Wh ay MOI os
he IE HN
S98 tae 4

iy -
3 st i i




Mt
uy
Yi
54 RHYMES OF THE STATES

IOWA.

SIXTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1846.

Square miles, 56,025.

Population (1890), 1,911,896.

In rank according to population, roth.
‘Counties, .g9.

Representatives in Congress, 11.
Electoral votes, 13.

Bushels of Indian corn (1890), 313,130,782.

Bushels of oats, 146,679,280.

Bushels of barley, 13,406,122.

Bushels of flaxseed, 2,282,359.

Number of swine (first in United States), 8,200,779.

Number of cattle, 4,892,183.

Tons of hay (for which the State ranks first), 7,264,700.

Pounds of butter (for which the State ranks third, New York rank-
ing first and Pennsylvania second), 72,893,079.

Iowa was included in Louisiana Territory, claimed by France, and
sold to the United States in 1803.

The first settlement was made by a Frenchman, Francis Dubuque,
1788-89, who openedalead mine near where the city of Dubuque
now stands.

‘There are many beautiful small lakes in the northern part of the State.

The name Iowa is Indian, said to mean “ The beautiful land.”

Popular name, ‘The Hawkeye State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 55















dae

=o fae State i lowa lies between
Two rivers, broad and long ;
i Each hastening to their meeting-place
With currents deep and strong.

// From north to south, from east to west,
This State has fertile land;

a W The people of the “Hawkeye” State
a Seek to be wise and good,

‘iJ And so the school and church are found
4 = In every neighborhood.

This State has wealth of yellow maize
To bring her golden. coin;
The capital's in the central part—
A city called Des Moines.
py

LLP TV PLAS 7 ie
COTTE LE By
(CGCCKCCCO tHE 40
KCC ig
ei CET i
Ben

aC(UUS Cay oe th
wf Ss ONT we

[ST - 4

Missouri .
RHYMES OF THE STATES

MISSOURI.

ELEVENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1821.

Square miles, 69,415.
Population (1890), 2,679,184.
In rank according to population, 5th.
Counties, 115.
Representatives in Congress, 15.
Electoral votes, 17.
Value of products (1890), flour and gristmill, $34,486,795.
Foundry and machine shop, steel and iron work, $18,568,217.
Timber and lumber, $13,289,179.
Confectionery, $3,584,958.
Tons of coal (1889), 2,557,823.
Bushels of wheat (1890), 30,113,821.
Bushels of corn (1890), 196,999,016.
Bushels of apples, 8,698,170.
Bushels of peaches, 1,667,789.
Number of cattle (1890), 2,969,736.
St. Louis was founded by the French in 1764.
Great fire in St. Louis, 1849.
Severe cholera epidemic, same year.
St. Louis ranked in size as the fifth city in the United States, 1890,
having a population of 451,770.
Popular name, ‘‘ The Iron State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

How many States have borrowed names
From rivers by or through them?
How many of these have taken names

From Indians who knew them? i! rs i

Missouri River through the State
Sweeps on with lordly motion,

Then to the Mississippi joins
And with it seeks the ocean.

The State possesses many things
To make the people wealthy:
Rich prairie pastures, timber, coal —

Withal, a climate healthy.

St. Louis on the east we see,
And westward Kansas City;

The capital, half-way between,
"Mid hills and valleys pretty.
oe iiiligit. ron A i

Vea

ey D *M .
QO ssourd Rwery a
Jefferson, BTJomic
AS City

7
uns

an
Rt

as:

a

we

Mewes ne
wt a ey A
att =
eo

LboMiles.

Kansas
Me
>

s

ooo no oes oom Ge

: 220 Miles.
~ FrAckansas«


58 RHYMES OF THE STATES

ARKANSAS.

PART OF LOUISIANA PURCHASE, 1803. ORGANIZED AS A SEPARATE
TERRITORY, 18109.

TWELFTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1836.

Square miles, 53,850.

Population (1890), 1,128,179.

In rank, according to population, 24th.
Counties, 75.

Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

Timber and lumber products (1890), 10,561,949.

Acres in cotton 1,700,578.

Bales of cotton grown, 691,494.

Value of cotton-seed oil and cake, $1,881,668.

Number of cattle, all kinds, 938,264.

Tons of coal (1889), 279,584.

First settlement by the French, 1685.

Many thousands of people visit the Hot Springs every year and take
the baths.

Popular name, “ The Bear State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 59





This State's legislature
Has made it a law

That, in speaking her name,

We must say “Ar-kan-saw.”

Not far from the center
The Hot Springs are found, |

Where scalding hot water
Boils up from the ground.

SS
SS

SS
SS

oe

Her rivers are many,
Her forests spread wide,
Her mountains—the Ozarks,
Are Arkansas’ pride.

The State sells much timber,
And ore, and live stock;

Her capital city
Is called Little Rock.


60 RHYMES OF THE STATES

LOUISIANA.

FIFTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1812.

Square miles, 48,720.

Population (1890), 1,118,587.

In rank according to population, 25th.
Counties (or Parishes), 59.
Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

Pounds of sugar produced (1890), 202,124,050.

Gallons of molasses (1890), 14,439,772.

Rice, acres cultivated, 34,377; pounds produced, 75,645,433.

Cotton, acres cultivated, 1,270,154; bales produced, 659,180.

Value of total: lumber products, $6,965,320.

Louisiana was explored by De Soto, 1541; Marquette, 1673; La
Salle, 1682. Settlement at Biloxi, 1699.

The battle of New Orleans, the last of the war of 1812-14, was fought
January 8th, 1815, more than two weeks after the treaty of peace
had been signed. If there had been an electric telegraph then,
under the sea and over the land, many hundreds of lives would
have been saved.

Popular name, “The Pelican State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 61

| This State was settled by the French,
And for King Louis named:
But fifteen million dollars bought
For us the land they claimed.

She has a warm and sunny clime,
Unvexed by frosts or snows,
And through a delta, like the Nile,

The Mississippi flows.

On this our greatest, central stream,
And very near its mouth,

The famous “Crescent City” stands,
Queen city of the South.

The greatest sugar-making State !—
New Orleans is its port;

And here, behind his cotton-bales,

“Old Hickory” held the fort!

25S Miles

Baton Re Lge

pos


RHYMES OF THE STATES

TEXAS:

FIFTEENTH STATE ADMITTED TO THE UNION, 1845.

Square miles, 265,780.

Population (1890), 2,235,523.

In rank according to population, 7th.
Counties, 261.

Representatives in Congress, 13.
Electoral votes, 15.

Number of horses (1890), 1,026,777.

Number of cattle of all grades, 6,201,522.

Number of sheep, 3,454,858.

Pounds of wool, 14,917,068.

Bushels of peaches, 5,106,332.

Bushels of plums, 160,256.

Lumber products of all kinds, $14,643, 507.

Value of gold, $6,600.

Ounces of gold, 330.

Ounces of silver, 323,438.

Texas was originally part of Mexico, but declared its independence,
March 2, 1836. The massacre of the Alamo took place March
6th, 1836. Texas was an independent republic from 1836 to
1845. Its annexation to the United States, in 1845, was the cause
of the war between the United States and Mexico, 1846-47.

Popular name, ‘The Lone Star State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 63















In our united band,

ce From Louisiana reaching west.
va Ve. 5s Unto a river grand.



Some day the story you will learn
Of fatal “Alamo”;

And how the “ Lone Star” State was won
In war with Mexico.

A harbor fine has Galveston,
Near Trinity River’s mouth;
And many rivers you can see,
All flowing east and south.

Fine growth of cotton, timber, grain,
This fertile State adorns;

Great herds of cattle throng her plains,

With wide, extended horns.

—— >


64

RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEW MEXICO.

ORGANIZED AS A TERRITORY, 1850.

Square miles, 122,580.
Population (1890), 153,593.
In rank according to population, 43d.

Produced tons of coal (1889), 486,943.

Ounces of gold, 39,457, about $900,000.

Ounces of silver, 1,251,124, value about, $1,455,855.

Number of sheep (1890), 1,248,970.

Pounds of wool, 4,074,503.

New Mexico belonged to old Mexico till 1846. It was visited by the
Spaniards as early as 1540. They found the Pueblo Indians
living in villages and cultivating the soil in the valleys. Their
largest village became (about 1640) the town of Santa Fé, and
has been the capital of New Mexico ever since.

Santa Fé is a famous health resort. Very many of its people are
Mexicans, and many live in adoée houses, that is, houses built
of clay.
RHYMES OF THE STATES



































NGO.
Aaa ee

This territory forms a square,

With a little piece, below, to spare.
The waters of a river wide

From north to south the land divide.

Wee 7

The land is mountainous and high;
The air is healthful, pure, and dry.
To the Pacific, loaded trains

Go every day across her plains.

The plains are deserts, wild and free,
With little grass and scarce a tree.
Few cities of our land to-day

Can boast the age of Santa Fé.

FA REA



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66

RHYMES OF THE STATES

ARIZONA.

ORGANIZED AS A TERRITORY, 1863.

Square miles, 113,020.
Population (1890), 59,620.
In rank according to population, 48th.

Ounces of gold (1889), 44,029, about $1,012,500.

Ounces of silver, 1,812,96r.

Total mineral products (1889), $7,248,717.

Arizona was part of New Mexico till 1863.

The cafion of the Colorado river in Arizona is in some places 7,000
feet deep.

There is a mountain not far from the river, near Callville, which con-
sists largely of pure salt.

There are also found in Arizona wonderful forests of petrified wood.

Trees several feet thick have become great masses of agate.

High up on the mountains are found the homes of a race of people,
the wonderful Cliff-Dwellers.
RHYMES OF THE STATES 67















































y
/



























































































A. wealthy miser is this, State,

~ As many a miner ’s found;

ZiHe keeps his silver and his gold
Safe buried in the ground.

And here we find the grandest sight &

S
‘



That man has ever seen,





















{Where Colorado's rapids flow,
4) Deep in their vast ravine.























WA The waters southward go,



SZ

: il IS BSS
SS ai if 4
C SS ae

ey



a

fy And join the Californian gulf
4 By way of Mexico.





The summer days are very long,



~
OF
Wi

The deserts hot and dry;





Hes


68 RHYMES OF THE STATES

INDIAN TERRITORY.

ORIGINALLY A PART OF THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE.

Square miles, 31,400.
Population, Indian (1890), 51,279.

The wealth of the Indians, aside from their land, is largely in cattle,
but their number cannot be accurately stated.
The average wealth among the Cherokees, however, is said to be

greater than that of any other people. The Indians who are
civilized have good schools and colleges.

There is coal in the territory, of which 752,832 tons were mined in
1880.

OKLAHOMA.

Square miles, 39,030.
Population (1890), 61,834, of which 13,177 were Indians.

The population has greatly increased since the opening of the ter-
ritory to white settlers in 1891.
RHYMES OF THE STATES 69










Here are the Apaches,
And there the Kiowas;

Here are bold Comanches,
And there the Chickasaws.

Nees

| ESSSSETR dhe’

Also Sacs and Foxes,
Creeks and Cherokees,

Seminoles and Choctaws,
And Pottawottomies.



















| This country was intended
For the Indians’ very own,
And white men are expected
To leave these lands alone.



‘The part called Oklahoma
Is occupied by whites;

But first we gave the Indians
Protection in their rights.

—
—————




HYUN TPT s

p EI




\ RR





Comanches:

{ ss
Apaches ichickasaws | Choctaw é:

I





70

RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEBRASKA.

TWENTY-FOURTH STATE ADMITTED, 1867. ORIGINALLY PART OF
LOUISIANA PURCHASE AND MISSOURI TERRITORY.
NAMED FROM THE NEBRASKA RIVER.

Square miles, 77,510.

Population (1890), 1,058,910.

In rank, according to population, 26th.
Counties, go.
Representatives in Congress, 6.
Electoral votes, 8.

First settlement, at Bellevue, 1847.
Organized as a separate territory, 1854.

Tons of hay (1890), 3,115,398.

Bushels of Indian corn, 215,895,996.
Bushels of oats, 43,843,640.

Bushels of wheat, 10,571,050.

Bushels of barley, 1,822,111.

Bushels of flax seed, 1,401,184.

Bushels of rye, 1,085,083.

Bushels of buckwheat, 120,000.
Number of swine, 3,815,647.
Sugar-refining, value (1890), $323,912.
The beet-sugar industry has grown largely since the last census.
Popular name, “‘ Blackwater State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 71












SAB rom Kansas, going north, we come
Kw — Upon Nebraska State,

NN, \ Where people start from Omaha,
Fin route for the “Golden Gate.”










~f)h\
AN ood h( VARS Five hundred miles they ride;
ANN IRIN Sometimes upon the higher ground
ean ve ‘ZX (eee | Sie : 5
LSPS iS WL | AUER Ow Through prairies rolling wide.
f \ UE, (\\¥ MAK il) (a yi ’ * eae
hh BAA A a Ra J Nebraska's fertile prairie lands
, Va : NR RP beeh~ /L
wan? 7S aN SO a Are good for corn and wheat;










Of sugar from the beet.

Oh, mighty prairies of the West,
So boundless and so free!

How glorious roll your waves of green,
Like billows of the sea!

me W
TD akeotoy eS

oe Oa ee ow



wneil
OMAHA Bluffs,

a



Ror
oe Nae an.
4r00 les , 1

Keehn Sse
RHYMES OF THE STATES

KANSAS.

TWENTY-FIRST STATE ADMITTED, JANUARY 29, 1861. ORIGINALLY
PART OF LOUISIANA PURCHASE. ‘‘ KANSAS” WAS
THE NAME OF A TRIBE OF INDIANS.

Square miles, 82,080.

Population (1890), 1,427,096.

In rank, according to population, 19th.
Counties; 106.
Representatives in Congress, 8.
Electoral votes, 10.

Bushels of corn, 1890, 259,574,568.

Bushels of wheat, 30,399,871.

Bushels of peaches, 1,798,781.

Number of cattle, 3,187,033.

Number of swine, 4,023,933.

Tons of coal, 2,221,043.

Value of meat product, wholesale, $44,696,077.

Salt (1890), $697,802. (The product has since greatly increased.)

There was a conflict in Kansas, before the great Civil War, 1854 to
1860, fought mostly with ballots, but sometimes with bullets,
about whether the territory should be made a free or a slave
state. The territory at that time was often referred to as
“Bleeding Kansas.” The story of the territory during those
years is very interesting.

Popular name, the “ Sunflower State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 73

Ay 4) Bok
Ms h.

Bygnteen hundred ae any one
Can ne'er forgotten be;

"T was then that “Bleeding Kansas” came Be?
And joined our family.

ye pos We a

In infancy this thriving child gan ioe ee =i i oar
Through many troubles passed, ~ % ey Joos 3 Sen Se eee ou

‘cal at re i well

lide uae

wh
But ever since she ’s run alone

Few States have grown so fast.

A lovely prairie land is this, ) guy esrises aM on
With many a happy home; ms fMRI SMe 4 ye
And herds of cattle, flocks of sheep,

Where bison used to roam.

The Kansas River, flowing east,
To the broad Missouri goes,

While south and east the Arkansas
To the Mississippi flows.

NERA.



pees

ED Os om or CERN ce CELE MENUEY cate Oty ee GS

co SV“ ies .

“TERR!ITO 5
jo eee INDIAN R Ry



Io
74 RHYMES OF THE STATES

WYOMING.

THIRTY-FIRST STATE ADMITTED, 1890. THE TERRITORY WAS
LARGELY INCLUDED IN THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE.

Square miles, 97,890.

Population (1890), 60,705.

In rank, according to population, 47th.

Counties, 12.

Representative in Congress, 1.
Electoral votes, 3.

Tons of coal mined (1889), 1,388,947.

Ounces of Gold, 711.

Number of cattle (estimated, 1895), 1,000,000.

Number of sheep (1890), 712,520.

Number of pounds of wool, 4,146,773.

The greater part of the National Yellowstone Park was taken from
Wyoming. 5
RHYMES OF THE STATES 75

i 0 eats

se pi Gi i HS ge
ie 2 Sage A hi 0p ALES STEIN 2. i

R90 | rTaanN

ZEUS). Oy
mI Spe

ne

eC Wy ening to the eotth af east
a Has famous pasture ground:
Py go just on the corner, north and west,

The National Park is found

CED,

yy, With mountains high and valleys deep,
ee With springs, both hot and cold;
ees marble walls and agate woods,
All made by fires of old.

y The grandest things 1 in all the world
» This region has in store;

~ And Uncle Sam declared the land

A park forevermore.

The people favor equal rights—
Both men and women vote:

; Wyoming State upon the map

\ Is nearly square, you note.

“BIO PV les


76 RHYMES OF THE STATES

COLORADO.

TWENTY-FIFTH STATE ADMITTED, 1876. NAMED FOR THE COLORADO
RIVER. TERRITORY ACQUIRED IN PART BY LOUISIANA
PURCHASE AND IN PART FROM MEXICO. OR-

GANIZED AS A TERRITORY, I861.

Square miles, 103,925.
Population (1890), 412,198.

In rank, according to population, 31st.
Counties, 55.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Tons of coal produced (1889), 2,597,181.

Ounces of gold, 187,881.

Ounces of silver, 18,375,551.

Total value of all mineral products, $41,126,610.

Number of sheep, (1890), 717,990.

Pounds of wool, 3,334,234.

The City of Denver grew from 35,629 in 1880, to 106,713 in 1890.
Pike’s Peak is 14,147 feet above sea level.

Popular name, ‘Centennial State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 77

DIF

a7
LY:



This State has plains along the east
And westward mountains high, Hs
Where Pike’s Peak lifts his snowy head, Bait}; We,
Aloft to greet the sky. 0 itis

Now all of these west mountain States
Have gold- and silver-mines;

Where great machines break up the ore, |
And furnace fire refines.

And Colorado’s mines are rich:
Her scenery, too, is grand; —
To make the valley farms produce,

They irrigate the land.

The Arkansas and Platte are fed
By little streams, that flow
From showers upon the mountain-sides,
And melted mountain snow.
a Pikes peak
from ‘The Gard en
of the Gods,

Plate

Sebw ORT

2S eo ee ee ne ee os cee

a
Pei

iw
$2 as Co See © peep» EE? Pomme © * aol

Ailes ,


78 RHYMES OF THE STATES

UTAH.

FORTY-FIFTH STATE ADMITTED, 1894. PART OF TERRITORY
ACQUIRED FROM MEXICO, 1848.

Square miles, 84,970.

Population (1890), 207,905.

In rank, according to population, qo
Counties, 26.

Representative in Congress, 1.
Electoral votes, 3.

The State produced (1889), tons of coal, 236,651.
a “ ounces of gold, 23,591.
ge és ounces of silver, 7,005,193.
« « salt valued at $144,300.
. bushels of wheat, 1,515,465.
at “bushels of peaches, 69,910.
gs & bushels of apricots, 4,178.
The territory was settled in 1847, by Mormon emigrants, whose
leader was Brigham Young.
The State is becoming famous for mining and fruit growing.
Popular name, ‘‘ Mormon State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 79







eae Denver and Rio Grande”* road
a a To Utah we may take;
My i a

y Then travel through the northern part,

( e8 ai Ny uy yi : Around the Great Salt Lake.
ae
Zs

iy At forty miles an hour, or more,
We speed upon our way ;
Where “prairie schooners” crawled along,
Scarce twenty miles a day.

First came the Mormons to this land,
With notions rather queer;

From trouble in the Eastern States
They moved, and settled here.

The thriving city of Salt Lake
Affords a’ pleasing sight;

The Lake is of the deepest blue,
With shores of gray and white.

* Pronounced Rio Grand’y.

we wt
ON

S340 Miles -

ee pe cme see Wt eg 0 SERED © Nn et We
f, Zs

Zz
%
D>

265 Miles.


80 RHYMES OF THE STATES

NEVADA.

TWENTY-THIRD STATE ADMITTED, 1864. ORGANIZED AS A TERRI-
TORY, 1861. PART OF THE TERRITORY ACQUIRED FROM
MEXICO, 1848. NAMED FOR ‘‘THE SNOWY RANGE,”

SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS, OF SPAIN.

Square miles, 110,700.

Population (1890), 45,761. -
In rank, according to population, 4o9th.!

Counties, 14.

Representative in Congress, 1.

Electoral votes, 3.

Silver discovered, 1859.

Ounces of gold produced, 1880, 206,460.
te a ie 1889, 169,617.
es silver gf 1880, 9,614,561.
s en ss 1889, 4,696,605.

Number of cattle, 210,900.

Number of sheep, 273,460.

Value of salt, estimated (1880), $92,640.

Popular name, “ Silver State.”

1 In giving rank, the District of Columbia is counted separately as if it were a State, which accounts
for the apparent discrepancy of 49 numbers for 48 States and Territories.
RHYMES OF THE STATES



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ereeeath

To Utah now we'll say good-bye,
And toward the “Golden Gate,”
We ‘ll cross Nevada’s boundary line

Near a corner of the State.

Nevada has a climate dry,
With very little rain;

But while her gold and silver last
Her people won't complain.

From this State's many famous mines
Much silver has come out;

And Carson, capital of the State,
Was named for “ Kit,” the scout.

Nevada has the queerest stream —
A stream that ends on land;
The Humboldt River it is called,

Which sinks in desert sand.

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82

RHYMES OF THE STATES

CALIFORNIA.

EIGHTEENTH STATE ADMITTED, 1850. NAMED BY SPANIARDS FOR
AN ISLAND TOLD OF IN A SPANISH ROMANCE, RICH .IN GOLD
AND PRECIOUS STONES. COAST EXPLORED BY SIR FRANCIS
DRAKE, 1578-79. FIRST SETTLEMENTS, SPANISH MISSIONS :
SAN DIEGO, 1768; SAN FRANCISCO, 1776. TERRITORY ACQUIRED

FROM MEXICO, 1848. GOLD DISCOVERED, FEBRUARY, 1848.

Square miles, 158,360.

Population (1890), 1,208,130.

In rank, according to population, 22d.
Counties, 52.

Representatives in Congress, 7.
Electoral votes, 9.

Productions (1890) :

Pounds of wool, 16,358,547.

Pounds of cheese, 3,871,575.

Bushels of wheat, 40,869,337.

Bushels of barley, 17,548,386.

Bushels of peaches, 1,691,019.

Bushels of pears 577,444.

Bushels of oranges (estimate for 1895), 1,000,000 boxes.
Ounces of gold (1889), 829,677.

Ounces of silver, 1,062,578.

Value of quicksilver (estimated), $1,700,000.

Popular name, ‘‘ Golden State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES 83







a WWE Ff)
AWM DEP
Hurrah! we ’ve reac

California's joy and pride,

Where all the ships of all the world
At once might safely ride.

Here San Francisco on her hills
Sits proudly by the sea,

While ships from China and Japan
Cast anchor at her quay.

This is a land of fruit and flowers,
A land of golden grain;

Where winters often are as kind
As summers are in Maine.

The warm Pacific waters lave
A thousand miles of shore,
And California every year
Still prospers more and more.

Yosemite, thé valley grand,
Is found within this State ;

Those who may see it stand in awe

To view the wonder great!






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RHYMES OF THE STATES

OREGON.

PART OF TERRITORY POSSESSION OF WHICH WAS SECURED BY TREATY
WITH GREAT BRITAIN, AUGUST 6, 1846. NAME, SPANISH,
MEANING ‘‘ WILD MARJORAM.” TWENTIETH
STATE ADMITTED, 1859.

Square miles, 96,030.

Population (1890), 313,767.

In rank, according to population, 38th.
Counties, 31.
Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 9,296,734.

Bushels of oats, 5,948,894.

Bushels of prunes and plums, 199,700.

Bushels of pears, 106,383.

Value of canned fish, oysters, fruits, and vegetables, $1,643,324.

Total fishery products (1880), $2,781,024.

Total fishery products (1889), $1,186,188.

Tons of iron ore (1889), 26,283.

Ounces of gold, 46,648.

Ounces of silver, 17,851.

The Willamette River, running northward to the Columbia, has a
very beautiful and rich valley, about 4o miles wide and 140
miles long. ;

The height of Mt. Hood is 11,225 feet.

Popular name, ‘“‘ Beaver State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

Great Britain once claimed many a league
Along the ocean strand;
We had disputes for forty years
About the western land

Till we at last agreed to take
A part of what we’d claimed;
From which three States were later made, |\/||
As here you have them named. |





























Washington is to the north,
And Oregon below;

Adjoining them upon the east
Is Sister Idaho.













| Three hundred miles has Oregon
Along the ocean tide; SR y)) |
A saddle-back upon the north 3 eS —
Where Washington doth rid 3 YT. Y
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RHYMES OF THE STATES

WASHINGTON.

TWENTY-SIXTH STATE ADMITTED, 18809.

Square miles, 69,180.

Population, 349,390.

In rank, according to population, 34th.
Counties, 34.

Representatives in Conpres 2)
Electoral votes, 4.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 6,345,426.

Bushels of oats, 2,273,182.

Bushels of barley, 1,269, 140.

Bushels of cherries, 11,692.

Value of timber products (1890), $19,480, 580.

Fishery products (1880, $181,372.
is “ (G88o), $1,107,847.

Ounces of gold (1889), 9,005.

Ounces of silver (1889), 28,464.

Popular name, ‘‘ Chinook State.”

There are twenty-eight counties in the United States named for
Washington.
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RHYMES OF THE STATES

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Great northwest State! remember well

\\The honored name you own,

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For truth and valor known.
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With their gigantic trees:

#;Some other States have forests fine,

But none so great as these.

|The harbors found in Puget Sound,

Are good as one could wish:

! Columbia River; near its mouth,

Is noted for its fish.





ify The lovely orchards in this state

Have many a cherry-tree,

‘| The map is somewhat bottle-shaped —

Mouth toward the open ‘sea.

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37
88

RHYMES OF THE STATES

IDAHO.

”

AN INDIAN NAME, MEANING ‘‘GEM OF THE MOUNTAINS.
THIRTIETH STATE ADMITTED, I890.— FIRST SETTLEMENT, CCLUR
D'ALENE, 1840.

Square miles, 84,800.
Population (1890), 84,385.
In rank, according to population, 45th.
Counties, 18.
Representative in Congress, 1.
_ Electoral votes, 3.

Number of sheep (1890), 357,712.

Pounds of wool produced, 2,119,242.

Ounces of gold (1889), 95,983.

Ounces of silver (1880), 359,309.
. “ (1889), 3,137,508.

Tons of iron, 24,072.

Total value of mineral products (1889), $8,385,233.

The climate of southern and western Idaho is favorable to fruit
growing as well as stock raising.

Popular name, ‘“ Gem of the Mountains.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES. 89











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“J have a thousarid flocks of sheep
Which in my valleys feed:
Of gold and silver I ’ve enough
To buy all things I need.

Ho, Idaho! Ho, Idaho!
I pray you, tell me why
You sit so very straight and prim,
And hold your head so high ?

IV.
Il.
“My capital—you ask the name?
“ Because my mountains are so firm — ’T is Boisé, if you please:
They will not bend at all; The National Park ?— Oh, yes, indeed,
And people’s heads are always high, It rests against my knees.”’

When they are very tall.

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RHYMES OF THE STATES

MONTANA.

A PART OF THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE. ORGANIZED AS A TERRI-
TORY, 1864. TWENTY-SEVENTH STATE ADMITTED, 1889.

Square miles, 146,080.

Population (1890), 132,159.

In rank, according to population, 44th.
Counties, 16.
Representative in Congress, 1.
Electoral votes, 3.

Number of cattle (1890), 881,808.
Number of sheep, 1,859,016.

Pounds of wool, 9,335,551.
Gold discovered, 1861; ounces produced (1880), 87,354.
“ ( (1889), 151,861.
Ounces of silver (1880), 2,246,938.
: “ (1889), 13,511,455:

Tons of coal (1889), 363,301.
Value of all mineral products (1889), $33,737,775:
The Missouri River, from its source in Montana to the Gulf of

Mexico, is 4,200 miles long, the longest ir in the world.
Popular name, ‘‘ Stub-toe State.”
RHYMES OF THE STATES

“A land of THOU this aracd fagaie
The Rocky Mountain chain ;
Extends so far, with all the hills

There ’s left but little plain.

PATO

The Indian hunter’s paradise
Was here, not long ago;

Where roamed the grizzly bear, the elk,
And herds of buffalo.

Missouri River from the west
Comes down with many a leap,
To meet the Yellowstone that flows
Through gorges wild and deep.

"T was in this State that Custer brave |
And many gallant men

Rode forth against the savage foe;
But none rode back again.

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92 RHYMES OF THE STATES
NORTH DAKOTA.
TWENTY-EIGHTH STATE ADMITTED, 1889.

Square miles, 70,795:

Population, 182,719.

In rank, according to population, 41st.

Counties, 39:

. Representative in Congress, 1.

Electoral votes, 3.
Products, 1890: Tons of hay, 531,472.
Bushels of wheat, 26,503,365. Flour and grist-mill products, value,
Bushels of oats, 5,773,129. $2,624,198.
Bushels of barley, 1,570,717. Tons of coal, 28,907.
Flax, bushels of seed, 164,314. Popular name, “ Flickertail State.”

SOUTH DAKOTA.

TWENTY-NINTH STATE ADMITTED, 1880.

Square miles, 77,650.

Population, 328,808.

In rank, according to population, 37th.
Counties, 51.

Representatives in Congress, 2.
Electoral votes, 4.

Bushels of wheat (1890), 16,541,138. Tons of hay, 1,541,524.

Bushels of oats, 7,460,846. Ounces of gold (1889), 149,533.
Bushels of barley, 902,005. Ounces of silver, 104,672.
Flax, bushels of seed, 1,541,524. (From the Black Hill mines.)

Value of flour and grist-mill products, Popular name, “Swinge Cat,” or

«“Singed Cat” State.
RHYMES OF THE STATES 93

INORITL Ss. SOUTH

To North nid South Dakota—, (ig
Two wide and mostly level States —
Just west of Minnesota.

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i Here farms are many—some are large,
i And fields of wheat are grand: e
|The flour we buy is often marked

Ly “ Dakota Four X brand”

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Hl Rea River, on their eastern line, a
p Flows north, tow'rd Hudson’s Bay; ‘YAQ@
Our only stream with current wide BB yy sf

Whose waters run that way. 7

Southwest along the line;
A region very rough and wild, *
With many a wealthy mine.

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94

RHYMES OF THE STATES

ALASKA.

Nebraska has 77,510 square miles, Alaska 531,409 square miles,
or nearly seven times the greater area.
Alaska was purchased from Russia by the United States in 1867
through negotiations by the Secretary of State, Wm. H.

Seward. The price paid was $7,200,000.

The entire length of the Yukon river is not. less than 2,000 miles,
several hundred being in British America.

The population of Alaska, by census of 1890, was a little less than
32,000, of which number 4,303 were whites.

According to the same reports the gold product of the territory
(1889) was about $1,000,000. The country is rich in mineral
resources, and its purchase was a good investment for the
United States.

The chief division of the Indian race in Alaska bears the name of
Thlinkit, or Tlinkit. ‘The most dreaded and warlike tribes
of these are the Chilcats and Chilcoots” (Lieut. Schwatka).

In his picture the artist has introduced the careful studies of the
“totem poles” that stand at the doorways of their houses
and of the masks used in their dances. The poles are so
carved that they tell to one skilled in reading them the family
and personal history of their owners. The bow of an Indian
boat is shown also, copied from the real boat in the New York
Museum of Natural History.
RHYMES OF. THE STATES 95















sce TOTEM: POLES.

The territory of Alaska
Is seven times larger than Nebraska.

As Russian America it was known,
Until we bought it for our own.

This land and Asia may be seen
With six and thirty miles between.

Icebergs and glaciers here abound, _-
And islands where the seal is found.

Through eighteen hundred miles or more
The Yukon runs to reach the shore. -~

-= The Chilcat brown and Eskimo ~~

“- Along the waters come and go.






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96 RHYMES OF THE STATES

RANK OF STATES AND TERRITORIES >
ACCORDING TO CERTAIN PRODUCTS AND INDUSTRIES BY U. S. CENSUS REPORTS

1889-1890.
Wheat. Corn. Oats. Apples. Peaches. Butter. _ Leggs.
I. Calif. Towa. Iowa. Ohio. Ga. ING NG, Ohio.
2. Il. Ill. Ill. Mich. Tex. Penn. Iowa.
3. Ind. Kan. Wis. Ky. Ark. Ohio. Ill.
4. Ohio. Neb. Kan. Il. INE Ge Iowa. Penn.
5. Mich. Mo. Neb. Ind. Tenn. Il. Ind.
6. Mo. Ohio. Ohio. Mo. Ala. Mich. N.Y.
Ue Kan. Ind. Mo. Va. Kan. Ind. Kan.
8.* N. Dak. Ky. N. Y. Nea: Calif. Wis. Mich.
9. Penn. Tex. Penn. Tenn. Mo. Kan. Tex.
10. Wis. Tenn. Ind. West Va. Miss. Tex. Wis.
Woolen and General
Cotton. Wool. Cotton Goods. Worsted Goods. Manufactures.
I. Tex. Ohio. Mass. Mass. N. Y.
2 Ga. Calif. R. 1. Penn. Penn.
Bh Miss. - Tex. N. H. R. I. Til.
4. Ala. Ore. Penn. Conn. Mass.
5. Sac Mont. Conn. N. Y. Ohio.
6. Ark. N. Y. Me. N. H. Mo.
Ti La. Penn. Ga, N. J. Wis.
8. NERC: Wis. SC Me. Conn.
9. Tenn. Ind. N. Y Ind. Ind.
10. Fila. Utah. N.C Vt. Calif.
General Timber
Mineral and
Cattle. Swine. Coal. Iron. Gold. Silver. Products. Luniber.
Te Tex. Towa. Penn. Mich. Calif. Col. Penn. Mich.
Ds Towa. Tl. ese Nlas Col. Mont. Mich. Wis.
3. Kan. Mo. Ohio. Penn. Nev. Utah. Col. Penn.
4. Il. Kan. West Va. N. Y. Mont. Nev. Mont. Minn.
Ce Mo. Neb. Iowa. Wis. S. Dak. Idaho. Ohio. Ind.
6. Neb. Ind. Ala. Minn. Idaho, Ari. N. Y. Wash.
hs Ne Ye Ohio = - Vid: Va. (E. & W.) Ore. N. Mex. Calif. N. Y.
8. Ohio. Tex. ‘Ind. Tenn, Ari. Calif. Ti = Ohios
9. Penn. Ga. Col. N. J. Alaska. Tex. Mo., Me.
IO. Wis. Wis. Mo. Ga. N. Mex. S. Dak. Iowa. Tex.

In statistics of industries the small States are at a disadvantage. If area were
taken into account credits would in some cases be differently distributed.

_* North and South Dakota — considered as one — rank Ist, 43,000,000 bushels.






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