Citation
Merry mice

Material Information

Title:
Merry mice
Series Title:
Six Palmer Cox Primers
Creator:
Veale, E. ( Author, Primary )
Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924 ( Illustrator )
Ward, Lock, and Co ( Publisher )
Hubbard Publishing Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Ward, Lock & Co.
Hubbard Pub. Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Mice -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1897 ( lcsh )
Advertisements -- 1897 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Children's stories
Advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Summary:
Brief tales about mice.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
illustrations by Palmer Cox ; stories by E. Veale.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027275222 ( ALEPH )
ALK2839 ( NOTIS )
234411950 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




Copyrighted by Huhbard Pan'g Co-, 1897—-Entered ‘at Statinnérs.tHall Ward. Lock & Co. ‘ a
} 7 Limited, Warwick Mouse, Salisbury square Lomlon is. CF ae



> ieee a)








The Celebrated Set of ie
_jaotx’ Palmer Gox Primers .

ate erititled



ee












me bic BONNY BIRDS
: One of the above
books im every
package OF _

JERSEY








ie

None Like en ee WOH

Arexqry ULM Peg oy],









Tiere ‘was once a little gray mouse who

E was no larger or. oles than the other. HUICE, ‘but



row daring the scheme

ate might suggest, she was always ready to do

her part: it: the undertaking. Now. Miss Mousey |
: had been prowling around in the kitchen one
‘thorning and had seen the cook busily at work

making ‘pies ‘and tarts 206 last of all brown, spicy





ginger, snaps. If there. wag. any ¢ one thing in this

., world, that Miss Mousey « dearly.
It quite made her. mouth : water, to 2
and > ‘she made up her ©



loved it was gin-






mind that when the house was hushed for the
night and all had gone to bed, she and her jolly
young friends would visit the kitchen shelf. Well
Miss Mousey knew the big yellow bowl in

which the snaps were kept. The









other mice were highly pleased
with Miss Mousey’s plan and glad
to join her, so just as the big hall
clock struck eleven times, Miss

crc

i










Mouscy and her little band, all carefully mask-
ed, entered the kitchen, quietly and carefully.
But the bitterest disappointment awaited them,
high on the shelf stood the ginger snap’, but not
in the yellow bowl, a strong tin box now held
them and the lid was shut down tight. There

they all stood, a sad and disappointed group,



their prize so near and yet beyond their reach.

But Miss Mousey was not going to spend her

EON et i ; ff et i Hh Ri} RL A
; ull i | ea i :










time in fretting, Her bright little “eyes glanced
sharply around the kitchen to find something else





to satisfy the hunger of herself and her sorrowful
looking friends. She had almost given up in
despair when the glow from the fire fell on the

table and there stood a tall white candle. It was

_ only the work of a minute to call the others,

and then all fell to planning a way to carry off
their prize. Finally after much pulling and tug-
ging, the candle was taken from the holder, and
then all went to work with a will to mount it on
their shoulders and bear it away to some undis-
turbed corner. It was a funny sight to see them
travelling along with their queer burden, but they
did not mind, and were only anxious to get back
to their home before they were discovered. At
last they reached the cellar safe and sound and
then the fun began. There they stood one against
the other on either side of the candle and nib-
bled away until not a thing but the string re-
mained. At first they did not like the taste of the
candle very much, but when: they had finished,

they one and all decided that it was not the worst

. fare in the world after all, and some of them liked

the candle better than they did ginger snaps,



LADY NORRILIES BNMUL

ScratcH! Scratch! Scratch! went the pen of
Lady Nibble. It was a quill that had fallen out
of the old gander’s tail and the bottle of blueing
that the farmer's wife had left on the hanging
shelf served splendidly for ink.

Lady Nibble was writing invitations for a
ball. The farmer's family were going to give a
dance in the new barn. Her Ladyship knew this
was so for she had overheard the: folks talking ©
about it when she went into the kitchen cup-
board after some cheese. She made up her mind
at once that this was the time to entertain her
friends, as there would be lots left to eat after
the farmer’s dance was over. She went right to
work and sent invitations far and near.

Dicky Scratch had been invited to play the
music. He had a fiddle that had once adorned
the children’s Christmas tree, but had been thrown

out as rubbish, until Dicky found it. Peter









:

Squeak was to call out the figures, his voice was
so high and shrill. The old clothes hamper that

had been banished from the house would serve asa



e

‘splendid stand for Dicky and for ‘Peter Squeak also.
Lady Nibble was all in a;flutter of excitement

when the night arrived, and how pleased she was







when she found so many had responded. to her in-
vitation. They came in dress coats, sacque coats,

cutaways and some less fortunate came without

coats—but what they wore made no difference,



for everything y was Tey, and the best of all, Old

Ratty Scamper and little Mousey Shy ‘danced to-
gether perched upon an old been turned up-side-down. How they all laughed



when poor old Ratty forgot the smallness of the
space on which he was dancing, and danced en-
tirely off.

They danced by twos and they danced by
rights, and before they could realize it, the farmer’s
guests were going home and Lady Nibble had in-
vited them to step into the barn and partake of
refreshments. What a feast they had! Her Lady-
ship had chosen wisely in selecting this night, for
such rich dainties rarely fall to a mouse’s lot with
so little trouble. There were dainty bits of cheese,
crackers, fine chicken and many other nice things,
but the very best of all was the box of chocolates
which old Ratty Scamper found hidden under the
table. Then they found a dish of strawberry
ice cream, which some one had left. They had
never tasted ice cream before, and at first they
were afraid to touch it, but when they once got a
taste, they all voted it very nice.

It was all over at last, for even the eee of
things must end, and as Lady Nibble bade her
guests good-night she felt satisfied that this had

been the great success of her life.



Tale, JUNIUSRIROIP WI) IPAVRIDY.

It was little Dot Mouse’s birthday. It had
been a long while coming, Dot thought, but she
was such a young mouse that time to her did not
seem to have wings as maybe she might have im-
agined it did, had she been a little older. At any
rate her birthday had come at last, and Dot was
a very happy little mouse. Now if this birthday
had been going to be just like any other day in
the week perhaps Dot would not have been so
anxious for it to come, but this was to be a very
different day



great things were to happen.
Mother Mouse had promised Dot a party. Dot
had never had a party, although she had been to
the Christmas party given by the squirrel, and she
remembered that night as the very happiest time in|
all her life. Dot would have liked to ask all the
people she knew, but Mother Mouse had very
different views on the subject, and only the mice

that lived next door and those that lived in the





.

baker’s shop across the way had been invited.
They were very glad to come, and the mice from
the Baker's shop had promised to bring some
dainties if there. was a chance of their carrying
them across without being seen. Yesterday Dot

had found such a pretty frock when she was



TASES SIT



hunting arora the Nursery closet. She often
visited that closet for nurse sometimes left the
lid off the cracker jar, and Dot was as fond of
crackers as the baby. But this time she forgot
all about the crackers she was so pleased over the

pretty pink gown. It must have belonged to a







very tiny doll, for it was just the right size for



Dot, and she was a very, very small mouse.
When the birthday came, Dot rigged herself in





her new dress, and sat down to. wait for her guests.



«Mother Mouse was so slow fixing her ruffled cap

coe that Dot felt sure she would not be ready in time,

but “Mother Mouse knew there was no hurry.







Bye and bye the mice came creeping in and
greeted their little hostess, with best wishes for
a happy birthday. The mice from the baker’s
’ chadsbeen as good as their werd and each had
brought some sweet meats to add to the repast.
So there was no lack of good things for the feast.
Almost every kind of dainty imaginable was
served at the feast, and the mice, little and big,
were very happy.

But alas, alas, their fun was soon to eo
spoiled. Mother Mouse had just nibbled a hole

in the sugar bag when a squeak from her daugh-

~. ter made her look up, and there, almost upon

eo : them stood old Tab, and’ close behind were her








“four little kittens, each one anxidus: to secitre a
= mouse for supper. Then such’ a ‘hurrying and
usciirrying you never saw in all your life. It was
‘00 bad, for poor little Dot expected such fun at
her. party. co i |












ee





All lovers of a delicious cup of coffee are deeply interested i
getting the best coffee that can be purchased for their money.- Goi
coffee must not only be carefully selected’and blended in its ‘green
state, but it is all-important that it shall be quickly and perfectly
roasted to secure the greatest Strength and finest flavor, and: the
Superiority of JERSEY COFFEE over all others is ‘from the
fact that it is the only standard package coffee roasted on the x
Improved Gas Roasting Machines. By these new machines +.‘
Jersey is roasted in about one-third the time it takes by the old #*
process, and instead of having the life, flavor, and strength baked
or fried out of it by slow roasting on superheated cylinders, it is
quickly roasted in the flame of purified gas, the coffee being kept ir):
continual motion, and for that reason all the natural juices and flavor.
of the berry are retained. 7 . ‘® e

‘ A trial of JERSEY COFFEE, made according to any good, - :
recipe (of which there are many), will convince the most Skeptical’.
that our statements are true, and it will be found that for the same.” ,
amount of coffee used it will always be better coffee in the cup, te
having greater strength and a more delicious flavor.than.all’

others. a
~ DAYTON SPICE MILLS CO

. Roasters Jersey Coffee.




















Full Text




Copyrighted by Huhbard Pan'g Co-, 1897—-Entered ‘at Statinnérs.tHall Ward. Lock & Co. ‘ a
} 7 Limited, Warwick Mouse, Salisbury square Lomlon is. CF ae



> ieee a)





The Celebrated Set of ie
_jaotx’ Palmer Gox Primers .

ate erititled



ee












me bic BONNY BIRDS
: One of the above
books im every
package OF _

JERSEY








ie

None Like en ee WOH

Arexqry ULM Peg oy],






Tiere ‘was once a little gray mouse who

E was no larger or. oles than the other. HUICE, ‘but



row daring the scheme

ate might suggest, she was always ready to do

her part: it: the undertaking. Now. Miss Mousey |
: had been prowling around in the kitchen one
‘thorning and had seen the cook busily at work

making ‘pies ‘and tarts 206 last of all brown, spicy





ginger, snaps. If there. wag. any ¢ one thing in this

., world, that Miss Mousey « dearly.
It quite made her. mouth : water, to 2
and > ‘she made up her ©



loved it was gin-



mind that when the house was hushed for the
night and all had gone to bed, she and her jolly
young friends would visit the kitchen shelf. Well
Miss Mousey knew the big yellow bowl in

which the snaps were kept. The









other mice were highly pleased
with Miss Mousey’s plan and glad
to join her, so just as the big hall
clock struck eleven times, Miss

crc

i










Mouscy and her little band, all carefully mask-
ed, entered the kitchen, quietly and carefully.
But the bitterest disappointment awaited them,
high on the shelf stood the ginger snap’, but not
in the yellow bowl, a strong tin box now held
them and the lid was shut down tight. There

they all stood, a sad and disappointed group,
their prize so near and yet beyond their reach.

But Miss Mousey was not going to spend her

EON et i ; ff et i Hh Ri} RL A
; ull i | ea i :










time in fretting, Her bright little “eyes glanced
sharply around the kitchen to find something else


to satisfy the hunger of herself and her sorrowful
looking friends. She had almost given up in
despair when the glow from the fire fell on the

table and there stood a tall white candle. It was

_ only the work of a minute to call the others,

and then all fell to planning a way to carry off
their prize. Finally after much pulling and tug-
ging, the candle was taken from the holder, and
then all went to work with a will to mount it on
their shoulders and bear it away to some undis-
turbed corner. It was a funny sight to see them
travelling along with their queer burden, but they
did not mind, and were only anxious to get back
to their home before they were discovered. At
last they reached the cellar safe and sound and
then the fun began. There they stood one against
the other on either side of the candle and nib-
bled away until not a thing but the string re-
mained. At first they did not like the taste of the
candle very much, but when: they had finished,

they one and all decided that it was not the worst

. fare in the world after all, and some of them liked

the candle better than they did ginger snaps,
LADY NORRILIES BNMUL

ScratcH! Scratch! Scratch! went the pen of
Lady Nibble. It was a quill that had fallen out
of the old gander’s tail and the bottle of blueing
that the farmer's wife had left on the hanging
shelf served splendidly for ink.

Lady Nibble was writing invitations for a
ball. The farmer's family were going to give a
dance in the new barn. Her Ladyship knew this
was so for she had overheard the: folks talking ©
about it when she went into the kitchen cup-
board after some cheese. She made up her mind
at once that this was the time to entertain her
friends, as there would be lots left to eat after
the farmer’s dance was over. She went right to
work and sent invitations far and near.

Dicky Scratch had been invited to play the
music. He had a fiddle that had once adorned
the children’s Christmas tree, but had been thrown

out as rubbish, until Dicky found it. Peter






:

Squeak was to call out the figures, his voice was
so high and shrill. The old clothes hamper that

had been banished from the house would serve asa



e

‘splendid stand for Dicky and for ‘Peter Squeak also.
Lady Nibble was all in a;flutter of excitement

when the night arrived, and how pleased she was




when she found so many had responded. to her in-
vitation. They came in dress coats, sacque coats,

cutaways and some less fortunate came without

coats—but what they wore made no difference,



for everything y was Tey, and the best of all, Old

Ratty Scamper and little Mousey Shy ‘danced to-
gether perched upon an old been turned up-side-down. How they all laughed
when poor old Ratty forgot the smallness of the
space on which he was dancing, and danced en-
tirely off.

They danced by twos and they danced by
rights, and before they could realize it, the farmer’s
guests were going home and Lady Nibble had in-
vited them to step into the barn and partake of
refreshments. What a feast they had! Her Lady-
ship had chosen wisely in selecting this night, for
such rich dainties rarely fall to a mouse’s lot with
so little trouble. There were dainty bits of cheese,
crackers, fine chicken and many other nice things,
but the very best of all was the box of chocolates
which old Ratty Scamper found hidden under the
table. Then they found a dish of strawberry
ice cream, which some one had left. They had
never tasted ice cream before, and at first they
were afraid to touch it, but when they once got a
taste, they all voted it very nice.

It was all over at last, for even the eee of
things must end, and as Lady Nibble bade her
guests good-night she felt satisfied that this had

been the great success of her life.
Tale, JUNIUSRIROIP WI) IPAVRIDY.

It was little Dot Mouse’s birthday. It had
been a long while coming, Dot thought, but she
was such a young mouse that time to her did not
seem to have wings as maybe she might have im-
agined it did, had she been a little older. At any
rate her birthday had come at last, and Dot was
a very happy little mouse. Now if this birthday
had been going to be just like any other day in
the week perhaps Dot would not have been so
anxious for it to come, but this was to be a very
different day



great things were to happen.
Mother Mouse had promised Dot a party. Dot
had never had a party, although she had been to
the Christmas party given by the squirrel, and she
remembered that night as the very happiest time in|
all her life. Dot would have liked to ask all the
people she knew, but Mother Mouse had very
different views on the subject, and only the mice

that lived next door and those that lived in the


.

baker’s shop across the way had been invited.
They were very glad to come, and the mice from
the Baker's shop had promised to bring some
dainties if there. was a chance of their carrying
them across without being seen. Yesterday Dot

had found such a pretty frock when she was



TASES SIT



hunting arora the Nursery closet. She often
visited that closet for nurse sometimes left the
lid off the cracker jar, and Dot was as fond of
crackers as the baby. But this time she forgot
all about the crackers she was so pleased over the

pretty pink gown. It must have belonged to a




very tiny doll, for it was just the right size for



Dot, and she was a very, very small mouse.
When the birthday came, Dot rigged herself in


her new dress, and sat down to. wait for her guests.



«Mother Mouse was so slow fixing her ruffled cap

coe that Dot felt sure she would not be ready in time,

but “Mother Mouse knew there was no hurry.







Bye and bye the mice came creeping in and
greeted their little hostess, with best wishes for
a happy birthday. The mice from the baker’s
’ chadsbeen as good as their werd and each had
brought some sweet meats to add to the repast.
So there was no lack of good things for the feast.
Almost every kind of dainty imaginable was
served at the feast, and the mice, little and big,
were very happy.

But alas, alas, their fun was soon to eo
spoiled. Mother Mouse had just nibbled a hole

in the sugar bag when a squeak from her daugh-

~. ter made her look up, and there, almost upon

eo : them stood old Tab, and’ close behind were her








“four little kittens, each one anxidus: to secitre a
= mouse for supper. Then such’ a ‘hurrying and
usciirrying you never saw in all your life. It was
‘00 bad, for poor little Dot expected such fun at
her. party. co i |









ee





All lovers of a delicious cup of coffee are deeply interested i
getting the best coffee that can be purchased for their money.- Goi
coffee must not only be carefully selected’and blended in its ‘green
state, but it is all-important that it shall be quickly and perfectly
roasted to secure the greatest Strength and finest flavor, and: the
Superiority of JERSEY COFFEE over all others is ‘from the
fact that it is the only standard package coffee roasted on the x
Improved Gas Roasting Machines. By these new machines +.‘
Jersey is roasted in about one-third the time it takes by the old #*
process, and instead of having the life, flavor, and strength baked
or fried out of it by slow roasting on superheated cylinders, it is
quickly roasted in the flame of purified gas, the coffee being kept ir):
continual motion, and for that reason all the natural juices and flavor.
of the berry are retained. 7 . ‘® e

‘ A trial of JERSEY COFFEE, made according to any good, - :
recipe (of which there are many), will convince the most Skeptical’.
that our statements are true, and it will be found that for the same.” ,
amount of coffee used it will always be better coffee in the cup, te
having greater strength and a more delicious flavor.than.all’

others. a
~ DAYTON SPICE MILLS CO

. Roasters Jersey Coffee.