Citation
Early cares

Material Information

Title:
Early cares
Series Title:
Pleasure series
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York (890 Broadway)
Publisher:
McLoughlin
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[12] p. (incl. cover) : col. ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Printed on linen.
General Note:
Verses.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
022945578 ( ALEPH )
191235172 ( OCLC )
AHJ6577 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text






MY DOLLY.

aM. Dolly, P a
Angelina Brown,



and a pretty
NG | o little gown ;
“ell SSeS A pretty little bonnet,
With a lovely
feather on it;
Oh, there’s not another hke it to be found in
all the town.

My dolly, Polly, ts a precious little pet;
Her eyes are bright as jewels, and he T
black as jet; =

i hug her, and
I kiss her!

And, oh, | how |
should mniss her

hair aS



if she were taken from s
me! Oh how 1 should +4
grieve and fret!

DUN,

Axexqry ULMPTeg SUL



epuoLy
jo
Aysi2atuy)





My little brother, Charley,
says my dolly




is “a mufl,

And though he’s
very clever
I never, no, I never“
Let him handle her or dandle her, for boys,
you know, are rough.

My dolly’s always smiling; she was never
known to frown;
And she looks so very charming




in her
Sunday hat
and gown,
You really ought
to see her
V To get a good idea
y Of the beauty of my dolly,
. Polly Angelina Brown.








OLLY needs to have a bath
In her little tub,
___Where her pretty hands and feet
I will 1 gently rub;
Twist her hair upon her
head,
. Soit wont get wet,
Then the towels and the
au

And the sponge Ill get.



There now, Dolly, stand just so;
Very quiet keep ;
Fhough the water in the tub
Is not very deep,
It might make you very ill,
Very pale and thin,
If by any chance, my dear,
"You should tumble in.



Where's my dolly ? Oh
dear me!
l told her not to stir!
For oh, you know, all over G
baths,
Do not agree with her!
~And now she is a dreadful
sight,
Not ft to hug or kiss !
Oh, Dolly dear, "how could you serve
Me such a trick as this ?



A BUSY GIRE.

KNOW a little maid,
She's scarcely ten years old,
A busier little maid
This wide world does not hold.



She's up at early dawn,
«nd when her prayers
are said, l
She tidies up her room:
And makes her little

bed.

And does her tasks
right well,
She’s time to do more
: things
Than I have time to tell.

The dishes she will wash,

And sometimes sweep a floor,
And. water all the plants

~About the kitchen door.

Yet she is full of fun,
My busy little maid.

‘You ask her name? Well, “Hat
Is what I have not said.





SEPUL LABOR BRINGS—

Us



EA SITY



WELL-EARNED REPOSE.








ise %

ee
KNOW a very gon ‘
careless girl, gy ey

i
Her hair is always oe

= F : Vig! PN
s Se ‘Ns >
In rags oe :
=| and tatters are herclothes
aay, ;
a ¥ And she's

ae a fright,








a
we
=
=
ee




you may










ugly trail ;
Her sashes always

are untied,
y
<¢ Her dresses always [

oe

gaping wide.



"Tis her delight to tear
and rend;
She does not like

to patch or mend as

' And ’tis no wonder >






that she goes





So out at




elbows. and




at toes,

*
& »The cups and saucers
= she lets fall,
And cannot do
a thing at all
Without
displaying,
I confess,
Her reckless,
hair-brained
carelessness.







MONKEY TRICKS.
‘Oe BEN was full of
monkey-tricks, <



\

Ke

: aad
As full as he r | 4
S } \e
could be, / | ie
ea
Now up, now down, / \bGe

no circus clown =
Was livelter
than he. ~——

He’d run and race, and make grimace,
From morn. till set of sun,
And play all sorts





S\~
ff Rik) } of jokes
12a) on folks
A Who did
not like

buch fun



O’er chairs and sofas
he would leap,
And down the

railings slide,



Tie Amy’s hair

fast to a chair,
And in dark
closets hide.

Popguns he fired,



til] he was tired,

Ene es epee eerily ne seen
And everybody said

ich

Gu ped san see aR
Sach boys as Ben

oO




were

a

nicest when
PSecurely

tucked









Full Text



MY DOLLY.

aM. Dolly, P a
Angelina Brown,



and a pretty
NG | o little gown ;
“ell SSeS A pretty little bonnet,
With a lovely
feather on it;
Oh, there’s not another hke it to be found in
all the town.

My dolly, Polly, ts a precious little pet;
Her eyes are bright as jewels, and he T
black as jet; =

i hug her, and
I kiss her!

And, oh, | how |
should mniss her

hair aS



if she were taken from s
me! Oh how 1 should +4
grieve and fret!

DUN,

Axexqry ULMPTeg SUL



epuoLy
jo
Aysi2atuy)


My little brother, Charley,
says my dolly




is “a mufl,

And though he’s
very clever
I never, no, I never“
Let him handle her or dandle her, for boys,
you know, are rough.

My dolly’s always smiling; she was never
known to frown;
And she looks so very charming




in her
Sunday hat
and gown,
You really ought
to see her
V To get a good idea
y Of the beauty of my dolly,
. Polly Angelina Brown.





OLLY needs to have a bath
In her little tub,
___Where her pretty hands and feet
I will 1 gently rub;
Twist her hair upon her
head,
. Soit wont get wet,
Then the towels and the
au

And the sponge Ill get.



There now, Dolly, stand just so;
Very quiet keep ;
Fhough the water in the tub
Is not very deep,
It might make you very ill,
Very pale and thin,
If by any chance, my dear,
"You should tumble in.



Where's my dolly ? Oh
dear me!
l told her not to stir!
For oh, you know, all over G
baths,
Do not agree with her!
~And now she is a dreadful
sight,
Not ft to hug or kiss !
Oh, Dolly dear, "how could you serve
Me such a trick as this ?
A BUSY GIRE.

KNOW a little maid,
She's scarcely ten years old,
A busier little maid
This wide world does not hold.



She's up at early dawn,
«nd when her prayers
are said, l
She tidies up her room:
And makes her little

bed.

And does her tasks
right well,
She’s time to do more
: things
Than I have time to tell.

The dishes she will wash,

And sometimes sweep a floor,
And. water all the plants

~About the kitchen door.

Yet she is full of fun,
My busy little maid.

‘You ask her name? Well, “Hat
Is what I have not said.


SEPUL LABOR BRINGS—

Us
EA SITY



WELL-EARNED REPOSE.





ise %

ee
KNOW a very gon ‘
careless girl, gy ey

i
Her hair is always oe

= F : Vig! PN
s Se ‘Ns >
In rags oe :
=| and tatters are herclothes
aay, ;
a ¥ And she's

ae a fright,








a
we
=
=
ee




you may










ugly trail ;
Her sashes always

are untied,
y
<¢ Her dresses always [

oe

gaping wide.
"Tis her delight to tear
and rend;
She does not like

to patch or mend as

' And ’tis no wonder >






that she goes





So out at




elbows. and




at toes,

*
& »The cups and saucers
= she lets fall,
And cannot do
a thing at all
Without
displaying,
I confess,
Her reckless,
hair-brained
carelessness.




MONKEY TRICKS.
‘Oe BEN was full of
monkey-tricks, <



\

Ke

: aad
As full as he r | 4
S } \e
could be, / | ie
ea
Now up, now down, / \bGe

no circus clown =
Was livelter
than he. ~——

He’d run and race, and make grimace,
From morn. till set of sun,
And play all sorts





S\~
ff Rik) } of jokes
12a) on folks
A Who did
not like

buch fun
O’er chairs and sofas
he would leap,
And down the

railings slide,



Tie Amy’s hair

fast to a chair,
And in dark
closets hide.

Popguns he fired,



til] he was tired,

Ene es epee eerily ne seen
And everybody said

ich

Gu ped san see aR
Sach boys as Ben

oO




were

a

nicest when
PSecurely

tucked