Citation
Fairy tales

Material Information

Title:
Fairy tales
Series Title:
Altemus' young people's library
Creator:
Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863
Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859 ( joint author )
Henry Altemus Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publisher:
H. Altemus
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
2 p. l., [7]-255 p. : col. front., illus. ; 17 x 13 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales -- 1898 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1898
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes 16 p. publisher's catalog.
Statement of Responsibility:
by the brothers Grimm ; with sixty-five illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
023388405 ( ALEPH )
06080982 ( OCLC )
AHK9907 ( NOTIS )
98000485 ( LCCN )

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Full Text








Pacsy Sete,
CEteiaiaresa t=







Grimm's Fairy Tales

“« THOU ART MINE AND I AM THINE’”



FAIRY TALES
BY THE BROTHERS GRIMM

With Sixty-five Illustrations

“PHILADELPHIA
HENRY ALTEMUS COMPANY



Copyright 1898
By Henry ALTEMUS



Preface,

ACOB LEWIS GRIMM and his brother, William
Carl Grimm, were two learned Germans, who de- |
voted the whole of their lives to the study of the

German language and literature, and the antiquities,
poetry, and laws of the German people.

Jacob was born at Hanau, in 1785. William was
born in 1786. ‘The two brothers were educated at the
University of Marburg, and were “associated through
life in their studies and labours. From youth to old
age they had all things in common—books, money, and
dwelling. They studied together, and wrote together
in the same works, so that their respective shares can
scarcely be distinguished in the great result of the
united task, and the ‘Brothers Grimm’ became a
recognized duality in literature.” Jacob died in 1863,
and William in 1859.

They collected all the popular tales they could find,
partly from the mouths of the people, partly from
manuscripts and books, and published in 1812-15 the
first edition of these Zales, which have carried the
- names of the brothers Grimm into every household of
the civilized world, and founded the science of what is
tiow called folklore. ‘The tales are a wonderful collec-
tion, as interesting, from a literary point of view, as
they. are delightful as stories.





The Frog King, or Iron Henry.

i old times when wishing still helped one, there
lived a king whose daughters were all beautiful,

but the youngest was so beautiful that the sun
itself, which has seen so much, was astonished when-
ever it shone in her face. Close by the King’s castle
lay a great dark forest, and under an old lime-tree in
the forest was a well, and when the day was very warm,
the King’s child went out into the forest and sat down
by the side of the cool fountain, and when she was
dull she took a golden ball, and threw it up on high
and caught it, and this ball was her favorite plaything.

Now it so happened that on one occasion the
princess’s golden ball did not fall into the little hand
which she was holding up for it, but on to the ground
beyond, and rolled straight into the water. The King’s
daughter followed it with her eyes, but it vanished,
and the well was deep, so deep that the bottom could



& Grimm’s Household Tales.

not be seen. On this she began to cry, and cried
louder and louder, and could not be comforted. And ~
as she thus lamented, some one said to her:

““ What ails thee, King’s daughter? ‘Thou weepest
so that even a stone would show pity.”

She looked round to the side from whencethe voice
came, and saw a frog stretching forth its thick, ugly
head from the water. “Ah! old water-splasher, is it
thou?” said she; “I am weeping for my golden ball,
which has fallen into the well.”

“Be quiet, and do not weep,” answered the frog,
“T can help thee, but what wilt thou give me if I
bring thy plaything up again?”

“ Whatever thou wilt have, dear frog,” said she—
“my clothes, my pearls and jewels, and even the golden
crown which I am wearing.”

‘The frog answered, “I do not care for thy clothes,
thy pearls and jewels, or thy golden crown, but if thou
wilt love me and let me be thy companion and play-
fellow, and sit by thee at thy little table, and eat off thy
little golden plate, and drink out of thy little cup, and
sleep in thy little bed—if thou wilt promise me this I
will go down below, and bring thee thy golden ball up
again.”

“Oh, yes,” said she, “I promise thee all thou
wisuest, if thou wilt but bring me my ball back again.”
She, however, thought, ‘ How the silly frog does talk!
He lives in the water with the other frogs and croaks, |
and can be no companion to any human being!”

But the frog when he had received this promise,
‘put his head into the water and sank down, and in 4



The Frog-King, ot Iron Henry. 9

short time came swimming up again with the ball in
his mouth, and threw it on the grass. ‘The King’s
daughter was delighted to see her pretty plaything once
more, and picked it up andran away with it. “ Wait,
wait,” said the frog, “Take me with thee. I can’t
run as thou canst.” But what did it avail him to
scream his croak, croak, after her, as loudly as he
could? She did not listen to it, but ran home and soon
forgot the poor frog, who was forced to go back into
his well again.

The next day when she had seated herself at table
with the King and all the courtiers, and was eating
from her little golden plate, something came creeping
splish splash, splish splash, up the marble staircase,
and when it had got to the top, it knocked at the door
and cried, ‘‘ Princess, youngest princess, open the door
for me.” She ran to see who was outside, but when
she opened the door, there sat the frog in front of it.
Then she slammed the door to, in great haste, sat down
to dinner again and was quite frightened. ‘The King
saw plainly that her heart was beating violently, and
said, “My child, what art thou so afraid of? Is there per-
chance a giant outside who wants to carry thee away?”

“ Ah, no,” replied she, “it is no giant, but a dis-
gusting frog. »

“What does the frog want with thee?” “Ah, dear
father, yesterday when I was in the forest sitting by
the well, playing, my golden ball fell into the water.
And because I cried so the frog brought it out again
for me, and because he insisted so on it, I promised
him he should be my companion, but I never thought



10 Grimm’s Household Tales.

he would be able to come out of his water! And now
he is outside there, and wants to come in to me.’

In the meantime it knocked a second time, and
cried,

“Princess! youngest princess!
Open the door for me!
Dost thou know what thou saidst to me
Y esterday by the cool waters of the fountain?
Princess, youngest princess!
Open the oor for me!’

Then said the King, “That which thou hast _prom-
ised must thou perform. Go and let him in.” She
went and opened the door, and the frog hopped in and
followed. her, step by step to her chair. There he sat
still and cried, “Lift me up beside thee.” She delayed,
until at last the King commanded her to do it. When
the frog was once on the chair he wanted to be on the
table, and when he was on the table he said, “Now,
push thy little golden plate nearer to me that we may
eat together.” She did this, but it was easy to see that
she did not do it willingly. The frog enjoyed what he
ate, but almost every mouthful she took choked her.
At length he said, “I have eaten and am satisfied; now
I am tired, carry me into thy little room and make thy
little silken bed ready, and we a both lie down and
go to sleep.”

The King’s daughter began to cry, for she was
afraid of the cold frog which she did not like to touch,
and which was now to sleep in her pretty, clean little
bed. But the King grew angry and said, “He wha



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we dant
My

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THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG,



12 Grimm's Household Tales.

helped thee when thou wert in trouble ought not after-
wards to be despised by thee.” So she took hold of
the frog with two fingers, carried him upstairs, and put
him in a corner. But when she was in bed he crept to
her and said, “I am tired, I want to sleep as well as
thou, lift me up or I will tell thy father.” Then she
was terribly angry, and took him up and threw him
with all her might against the wall. ‘“ Now, thou wilt
be quiet, odious frog,” said she. But when he fell down
he was no frog but a king’s son with beautiful kind
eyes. He by her father’s will was now her dear com-
panion and husband. ‘Then he told her how he had
been bewitched by a wicked witch, and how no one
could have delivered him from the well but herself, and
that to-morrow they would go together into his king-
dom. ‘Then they went to sleep, and next morning
when the sun awoke them, a carriage came driving up
with eight white horses, which had white ostrich
feathers on their heads, and were harnessed with golden
chains, and behind stood the young King’s servant,
faithful Henry. Faithful Henry had been so unhappy
when his master was changed into a frog, that he had
caused three iron bands to be laid round his heart, lest
it should burst with grief and sadness. The carriage
was to conduct the young King into his kingdom.
Faithful Henry helped them both in, and placed him-
self behind again, and was full of joy because of this
deliverance. And when they had driven a part of the
way, the King’s son heard a cracking behind him as if
something had broken. So he turned round and cried,
“Henry, the carriage is breaking.”



The Frog-King, or Iron Henry. 13

“No, master, it is not the carriage. It is a band
from my heart, which was put there in my great pain
when you were a frog and imprisoned in the well.”
Again and once again while they were on their way
something cracked, and each time the King’s son
thought the carriage was breaking; but it was only the
bands which were springing from the heart of faithful
Henry because his master was set free and was happy.







The Twelve Brothers.

HERE were once on a time a king and a queen
who lived happily together and had twelve chil-
dren, but they were all boys. Then said the

King to his wife, “If the thirteenth child which thou

art about to bring into the world, is a girl, the twelve

boys shall die, in order that her possessions may be

' great, and that the kingdom may fall to her alone.”
He caused likewise twelve coffins to be made; which
were already filled with shavings, and in each lay the
little pillow for the dead, and he had them taken into
a locked-up room, and then he gave the Queen the
key of it, and bade her not to speak of this to any
one.

_ The mother, however, now sat and lamented all
day long, until the youngest son, who was always with
her, and whom she had named Benjamin, from the
Bible, said to her, “Dear mother, why art thou so
sad >?”

“Dearest child,” she answered, “I may not tell
thee.” But he let her have no rest until she went and



The Twelve Brothers. - 15

unlocked the room, and showed him the twelve coffins
ready filled with shavings. Then she said, “My
dearest Benjamin, thy father has had these coffins”
made for thee and for thy eleven brothers, for if I
bring a little girl into the world, you are all to be
killed and buried in them.’’ And as she wept while
she was saying this, the son comforted her and said,
“Weep not, dear mother, we will save ourselves, and
go hence.” But she said, “Go forth into. the forest
with thy eleven brothers, and let one sit constantly
on the highest tree which can be found, and keep
watch, looking towards the tower here in the castle.
If I give birth to a little son, I will put up a white
flag, and then you may venture to come back, but if
I bear a daughter, I will hoist a red flag, and then fly
hence as quickly as you are able, and may the good
God protect you. And every night I will rise up and
pray for you—in winter that you may be able to
warm yourself at a fire, and in the summer that you
may not faint away in the heat.

After she had blessed her sons therefore, they went
forth into the forest. They each kept watch in turn,
and sat on the highest oak and looked towards the
tower. When: eleven days had passed and the turn
came to Benjamin, he saw that a flag was being
raised. It was, however, not the white, but the blood-
red flag which announced that they were all to die.
When the brothers ‘heard that they were very angry, and
said, “Are we all to suffer death for the sake of a
girl?, We swear that we will avenge ourselves!—
wheresoever we find a girl, her red blood shall flow.”



16 ® Grimm’s Household Tales.

Thereupon they went deeper into the forest, and in
the midst of it, where it was the darkest, they found a
little bewitched hut, which was standing empty. ‘Then
said they, “Here we will dwell, and thou Benjamin,
who art the youngest and weakest, thou shalt stay
at home and keep house, we others will go. out and
get food.” Then they went into the forest and
shot hares, wild deer, birds and pigeons, and what-
soever there was to eat; this they took to Benjamin,
who had to dress it for them in order that they
might appease their hunger. They lived together
ten years in the little hut, and the time did not
appear long to them.

The little daughter which their mother the Queen
had given birth to, was now grown up; she was good
of heart, and fair of face, and had a golden star on her

_. forehead. Once, when it was the great washing, she

saw: twelve men’s shirts among the things, and ‘asked
her mother, “To whom do these twelve shirts belong,
for they are far too small for father?’ Then the
Queen answered with a heavy heart, “Dear child,
these belong to thy twelve brothers.” Said the maiden,
“Where are my twelve brothers, I have never yet
heard of them?’ She replied, “God knows where
they are, they are wandering about the world.” Then
she took the maiden and opened the chamber for her,
and showed her the twelve coffins with the shavings,
and pillows for the head. “These coffins,” said she,
“were destined for thy brothers, but they went away
secretly before thou wert born,” ‘and she related to her
how everything had happened ; then said the maiden,



Wy

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= Vy

YAN
a (h



TWELVE RAVENS FLEW TOWARDS THE QUEEN.



18 Grimm's Household Tales.

“Dear mother, weep not, I will go and seek n,;
brothers.”

So she took the twelve shirts and went forth, and
straight into the great forest. She walked the whole
day, and in the evening she came to the bewitched
hut. Then she entered it and found a young boy, wha
asked, “From whence comest thou, and whither art
thou bound?” and was astonished that she was sa-
beautiful, and wore royal garments, and had a star on
her forehead. And she answered, “I am a king’s
daughter, and am seeking my twelve brothers, and I
will walk as far as the sky is blue until I find them.”
She likewise showed him the twelve shirts which be-
longed to them. Then Benjamin saw that she was
his sister, and said, “I am Benjamin, thy youngest
brother.” And she began te weep for joy, and Ben-
jamin wept also, and they kissed and embraced each
other with the greatest love. But after this he
said, “Dear sister, there is still one difficulty. We
have agreed that every maiden whom we meet shall
die, because we have been obliged to leave our king-
dom on account of a girl.” ‘Then said she, “I will
willingly die, if by so doing, I can deliver my twelve
brothers.”

“No,” answered he, “thou shalt not die, seat thy-
' self beneath this tub until our eleven brothers come,
and then I will soon come to an agreement with
them.”

She did so, and when it was night the others came
from hunting, and their dinner was ready. And as
they were sitting at table, and eating, they asked,



The Twelve Brothers. 19

“What news is there?’ Said Benjamin, “Don’t you
know anything?’ “No,” they answered. He con-
tinued, “You have been in the forest and I have
stayed at home, and yet I know more than you do.”
“Tell us then,’ they cried. He answered, “But
promise me that the first maiden who meets us shall
_ not be killed.” “Yes,” they all cried, “she shall have
mercy, only do tell us.”

Then said he, “Our sister is here,’ and he lifted
up the tub, and the King’s daughter came forth in her
royal garments with the golden star on her forehead,
and she was beautiful, delicate, and fair. Then they
were all rejoiced, and fell on her neck, and kissed and
loved her with all their hearts.

Now she stayed at home with Benjamin and helped
him with the work. The eleven went into the forest
and caught game, and deer, and birds, and wood-pig-
eons that they might have food, and the little sister
and Benjamin took care to make it ready for them.
She sought for the wood for cooking and herbs for
vegetables, and put the pans on the fire so that the
dinner was always ready when the eleven came. She
likewise kept order in the little house, and put
beautifully white clean coverings on the little beds, and
the brothers were always contented and lived in great
harmony with her.

Once ona time the two at home had prepared a
beautiful entertainment, and when they were all to-
gether, they sat down and ate and drank and were full
of gladness. There was, however, a little garden be-
longing to the bewitched house wherein stood twelve

Grimm's.



20 ' Grimm's Household Tales.

lily flowers, which are likewise called students. She
wished to give her brothers pleasure, and plucked the
twelve flowers, and thought she would present each
brother with one while at dinner. But at the selfsame
moment that she plucked the flowers the twelve
brothers were changed into twelve ravens, and flew
away over the forest, and the house and garden van-
ished likewise. And now the poor maiden was alone
in the wild forest, and when she looked around, an old
woman was standing near her who said, “ My child,
what hast thou done? Why didst thou not leave the
twelve white flowers growing? ‘They were thy
brothers, who are now for evermore changed into
ravens.” ‘he maiden said weeping, “Is there no way
of delivering them ?”

“No,” said the woman, “there is but one in the
-whole world, and that is so hard that thou wilt not de
liver them by it, for thou must be dumb for seven’
years, and mayst not speak or laugh, and if thou speak-
est one single word, and only an hour of the seven
years is wanting, all is in vain, and thy brothers will
be killed by the one word.”

Then said the maiden in her heart, “I know with
certainty that I shall set my brothers free,” and went
and sought a high tree and seated herself in it and
span, and neither spoke nor laughed. Now it so hap-
pened that a king was hunting in the forest, who had
a great greyhound which ran to the tree on which the
maiden was sitting, and sprang about it, whining, and
barking at her. Then the King came by and saw the
beautiful King’s daughter with the golden star on her



The Twelve Brothers. ax

brow, and was so charmed with her beauty that he
called to ask her if she would be his wife. She made
no answer, but nodded a little with her head. So he
climbed up the tree himself, carried her down, placed
her on his horse, and bore her home, ‘Then the wed-
ding was solemnized with great magnificence and re-
joicing, but the bride neither spoke ner smiled. When
they had lived happily together for a few years, the
King’s mother, who was a wicked woman, began to
slander the young Queen, and said to the King, “This
is a common beggar g girl whom thou hast brought back
with thee. Who knows what impious: tricks she
practises secretly! Even if she be dumb, and not able
to speak, she still might laugh for once; but those
who do not laugh have bad. consciences.” A first
the King would not believe it, but the old woman
urged this so long, and accused her of so many
evil things, that at last the King let himself be per- .
suaded and sentenced her to death.

And now a great fire was lighted in the courtyard
in which she was to be burned, and the King stood
above at the window and looked on with tearful eyes,
because he still loved her so much. And when she
was bound fast to the stake, and the fire was licking
at her clothes with its red tongue, the last instant of
the seven years expired. Then a whirring sound was
heard in the air, and twelve ravens came flying towards
the place, and sank downwards, and when they touched
the earth they were her twelve brothers, whom she
had delivered. They tore the fire asunder, extin-
guished the flames, set their dear sister free, and kissed



22 Grimm's Household Tales.

and embraced her. And now as she dared to open her
mouth and speak, she told the King why she had been
dumb, and had never laughed. The King rejoiced
when he heard that she was innocent, and they all
lived in great unity until their death. The wicked
step-mother was taken before the judge, and put into
a barrel filled with boiling oil and venomous snakes,
and died an evil death.







Brother and Sister.

be brother took his little sister by the hand
and said, “Since our mother died we have had
no happiness; our step-mother beats us every
day, and if we come near she kicks us away with her
foot. Our meals are the hard crusts of bread that are
left over; and the little dog under the table is better
off, for she often throws it a nice bit. May Heaven
pity us. If our mother only knew!.. Come, we will
go forth together into the wide world.”

They walked the whole day over meadows, fields,
and stony places ; and when it rained the little sister
said, “ Heaven and our hearts are weeping together.”
In the evening they came to a large forest, and they
were so weary with sorrow and hunger and the long
walk, that they lay down in a hollow tree and fell
asleep.

The next day when they awoke, the sun was already
high in the sky, and shone down hot into the tree.



24 Grimm’s Housenold Tales.

Then the brother said, “Sister, I am thirsty; if 1
knew of a little brook I would go and just take q
drink ; I think I hear one running.” ‘The brother
got up and took the little sister by the hand, and they
set off to find the brook.

But the wicked step-mother was a witch, and had
seen how the two children had gone away, and had
crept after them privily, as witches do creep, and
had bewitched all the brooks in the forest.

Now when they found a little brook leaping brightly
over the stones, the brother was going to drink out of
it, but the sister heard how it said as it ran, “ Who
drinks of me will be a tiger; who drinks of me will
be a tiger.” Then the sister cried, “Pray, deat
brother, do not drink, or you will become a wild
beast, and tear me to pieces.” ‘The brother did not
drink, although he was so thirsty, but said, “I wil
wait for the next spring.”

When they came to the next brook the sister heard
this also say, “Who drinks of me will be a wolf s
who drinks of. me will be a wolf.” ‘Then the sister
cried out, “Pray dear brother, do not drink, or you
will become a wolf, and devour me.” ‘The brother did
not drink, and said, “I will wait until we come to the
next spring, but then I must drink, say what you
like ; for my thirst is too great.”

And when they came to the third brook the sister
heard how it said as it ran, “Who drinks of me
will be a roebuck: who drinks of me will be a roe
buck.” The sister said, “ Oh, I pray you, dear brother,
do not drink, or you will become a roebuck, and



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HER BROTHER WAS CHANGED TO A ROEBUCK,



26 Gtimm’s Household Tales.

run away from me.” But the brother had knelt
down at once by the brook, and had bent down and
drank some of the water, and as soon as the first drop
touched his lips he lay there a young roebuck.

And now the sister wept over her poor bewitched
brother, and the little roe wept also, and sat sorrow-
fully near to her. But at last the girl said, “Be quiet,
dear little roe, I will never, never leave you.”

Then she untied her golden garter and put it round
the roebuck’s neck, and she plucked rushes and wove
them into a soft cord. With this she tied the little
beast and led it on, and she walked deeper and deeper
into the forest.

And when they, had gone a very long way they
came at last to a little house, and the girl looked in;
and as it was empty, she thought, “We can stay here
and live.” Then she sought for leaves and moss to
make a soft bed for the roe; and every morning she
went out and gathered roots and berries and nuts for
herself, and brought tender grass for the roe, who ate
out of her hand, and was content and played round
about her. In the evening, when the sister was tired,
and had said her prayer, she laid her head upon the
roebuck’s back: that was her pillow, and she slept
softly on it. And if only the brother had had his
human form it would have been a delightful life.

For some time they were alone like this in the
wilderness. But it happened that the King of the
country held a great hunt in the forest. Then the
blasts of the horns, the barking of dogs, and the
merry shouts of the huntsmen rang through the trees,



Brother and Sister. 27

and the roebuck heard all, and was only too anxious
to be there. “Oh,” said he to his sister, ‘let me be
off to the hunt, I cannot bear it any longer;” and
he begged so much that at last she agreed. “But
said she to him, “come back to me in the evening;
J must shut my door for fear of the rough huntsmen,
so knock and say, “ My little sister, let me in!” that
I may know you; and if you do not say that, I shall
not open the door.” ‘Then the young roebuck sprang
away; so happy was he and so merry in the open
air.
The King and the huntsmen saw the pretty crea-
ture, and started after him, but they could not catch
him, and when they thought that they surely had him,
away he sprang through the bushes and could not
be seen. When it was dark he ran to the cottage,
knocked, and said, ‘‘ My little sister, let mein.” Then
the door was opened for him, and he jumped in, and
rested himself the whole night through upon his soft
bed.

The next day the hunt went on afresh, and when
the roebuck again heard the bugle-horn, and the ho!
ho! of the huntsmen, he had no peace, but said, ‘“Sis-
ter, let me out, I must be off.” His sister opened the’
door for him, and said, “But you must be here again
in the evening and say your pass-word.”

When the King and his huntsmen again saw the
young roebuck with the golden collar, they all chased
him, but he was too quick and nimble for them. This
went on for the whole day, but at last by the evening
the huntsmen had surrounded him, and one of them



28 Grimm's Household Tales,

wounded him a little in the foot, so that he limped and
ran slowly. ‘Then a hunter crept after him to the cot-
tage and heard how he said, “ My little sister, let me
in,’ and saw that the door was opened for him, and
was shut again at once. The huntsman took notice
of itall, and went to the King and told him what he
had seen and heard. ‘hen the King said, “’To-morrow
‘we will hunt once more.”

The little sister, however, was dreadfully frightened
when she saw that her fawn was hurt. She washed
the blood off him, laid herbs on the wound and said,
“Go to your bed, dear roe, that you may get well
again.” But the wound was so slight that the roe
buck, next morning, did not feel it any more. And
when he again heard the sport outside, he said, “I
cannot bear it, I must be there; they shall not find it
so. easy to catch me.” ‘The sister cried, and said,
“This time they will kill you, and here I am alone in
the forest and forsaken by all the world. I will not
let you out.” “Then you will have me die of grief,”
answered the roe; “when I hear the bugle-horns I feel
as if I must jump out of my skin.” ‘Then the sister
could not do otherwise, but opened the door for him
with a heavy heart, and the roebuck, full of health and
joy, bounded into the forest. z

When the King saw him, he said to his huntsman
“ Now chase him all day long till night-tall, but take
care that no one does him any harm.”

As soon as the sun had set, the King said to the
huntsmen, “Now come and show me the cottage in
the wood ;” and when he was at the door, he knocked



Brother and Sister. 20

and called out, ‘Dear little sister, let me in.” Then
the door opened, and the King walked in, and there
stood a maiden more lovely than any he had ever seen.
The maiden was frightened when she saw, not her
little roe, but a man come in who worea golden crown
upon his head. But the King looked kindly at her,
stretched out his hand, and said, “ Will you go with
me to my palace and be my dear wife?” “Yes, in-
deed,” answered the maiden, “but the little roe must
go with me, I cannot leave him.” The King said,
“Tt shall stay with you as long as you live, and shall
want nothing.” Just then he came running in, and
the sister again tied him with the cord of the rushes,
took it in her own hand, and went away with the King
from the cottage.

The King took the lovely maiden upon his horse
and carried her to his palace, where the wedding was
held with great pomp. She was now the Queen, and
they lived for a long time happily together; the roe-
buck was tended and cherished, and ran about in the
palace-garden,

But the wicked step-mother, because of whom the
children had gone out into the world, thought all the
time that the sister had been torn to pieces by the wild
beasts in the wood, and that the brother had been shot
foraroebuck by the huntsmen. Now when she heard
that they were so happy, and so well off, envy and
hatred rose in her heart and left her no peace, and
she thought of nothing but how she could bring ©
them again to misfortune. Her own daughter, who
was as ugly as night, and had only one eye, grumbled



30 Grimm’s Household Tales.

at her and said, “A Queen! that ought to have been -
my luck.”

“Only be quiet,” answered the old woman, and
comforted her by saying, “when the times comes T
shall be ready.”

As time went on, the Queen had a pretty little
boy, and it happened that the King was out hunt-
ing; so the old witch took the form of the chamber-
maid, went into the room where the Queen lay, and
said to-her, “Come the bath is ready: it will do you
good, and give you fresh strength; make haste before
it gets cold.”

The daughter also was close by; so they carried the
weakly Queen into the bath-room, and put her into the
path; then they shut the door and ran away. But in
the bath-room they had made a fire of such deadly
heat that the beautiful young Queen was soon suffo-
cated.

When this was done the old woman took her daugh-
ter, put a nightcap on her head, and laid her in bed in
place of the Queen. She gave her too the shape and
look of the Queen, only she could not make good the
lost eye. But in order that the King might not see
it, she was to lie on the side on which she had no
eye.

In the evening when he came home and heard that
he had a son he was heartily glad, and was going to
the bed of his dear wife to see how she was. But the
old woman quickly called out, “For your life leave
the curtains closed; the Queen ought not to see the
light yet, and must have rest.” The King went away,



Brother and Sister. 31

and did not find out that a false Queen was lying in the
bed.

But at midnight, when all slept, the nurse, who
was sitting in the nursery by the cradle, and who was
the only person awake, saw the door open and the true
Queen walk in. She took the child out of the cradle,
laid it on her arm, and suckled it. ‘Then sheshook up
its pillow, laid the child down again, and covered it
with the little quilt. And she did not forget the roe-
buck, but went into the corner where it lay, and
stroked its back. ‘Then she went quite silently out of
' the door again. ‘The next morning the nurse asked
the guards whether any one had come into the palace
during the night, but they answered, ‘“‘No, we have
seen no one.”

She came thus many nights and never spoke a
word: the nurse always saw her, but she did not dareto
tell any one about it. :

When some time had passed in this manner, the
Queen began to speak in the night, and said—

“<< How fares my child, how fares my roe?
Twice shall I come, then never more.”’

The nurse did not answer, but when the Queen had
come again, went to the King and told him all. ‘The
King said, “Ah heavens! what is this? ‘To-morrow
night I will watch by the child.’ In the evening he
went into the nursery, and at midnight the Queen
again appeared and said—

“How fares my child, how fares my roe?
Once will I come, then never more.”*



32 Grimm's Household Tales.

And she nursed the child as she was wont to do
before she disappeared. ‘The King dared not speak to
her, but on the next night he watched neat ‘Then
she said—

“< How fares my child, how fares my roe?
This time I come, then never more.”’

Then the King could not restrain himself; he sprang
towards her, and said, “You can be none other than
my dear wife.”

She answered, “Yes, I am your dear wife,” and at
the same moment she received life again, and by God’s
grace became fresh, rosy, and full of health.

Then she told the King the evil deed which the
wicked witch and her daughter had been guilty of to-
wards her. The King ordered both to be led before
the judge, and judgment was delivered against them.
‘The daughter was taken into the forest where she was
torn to pieces by wild beasts, but the witch was cast
into the fire and miserably burned. And as soon as she
was burned the roebuck changed his shape, and received
his human form again, so the sister and brother lived
happily together all their lives,







Rapunzel.

HERE were once a man and a woman who haa
long in vain wished for a child. At length the
woman hoped that God was about to grant her

desire. These people had a little window at the back of
their house from which a splendid garden could be seen,
which was full of the most beautiful flowers and herbs.
It was, however, surrounded by a high wall, and no one
dared to go into it because it belonged to an enchant-
ress, who had great power and was dreaded by all the
world. One day the woman was standing by this win-
dow and looking down into the garden, when she saw
a bed which was planted with the most beautiful
rampion (tapunzel), and it looked so fresh and green
that she longed for it, and had the greatest desire to
eat some. ‘This desire increased every day, and as she
knew that she could not get any of it, she quite pined
away, aud looked pale and miserable. ‘Then her hus-
~ band was alarmed, and asked, ‘“ What aileth thee, dear



34 Grimm's Household Tales.

wife?” “Ah,” she replied, “if I can’t get some of
the rampion, which is in the garden behind our house, to
eat, I shall die.’ The man, who loved her, thought,
“ Sooner than let thy wife die, bring her some of the
campion thyself, let it cost thee what it will.” In the
twilight of evening, he clambered down over the wall
into the garden of the enchantress, hastily clutched a
handful. of rampion, and took it to his wife. She at
once made herself a salad of it, and ate it with much
relish. She, however, liked it so much—so very
much, that the next day she longed for it three times
as much as before. If he was to have any rest, her
husband must once more descend into the garden. In
the gloom of evening, therefore, he let himself down
again; but when he had ciambered down the wall he
was terribly afraid, for he saw the enchantress stand-
ing before him. ‘How canst thou dare,” said shie
with angry look, “to descend into my garden and steal
my rampion like a thief? Thou shalt suffer for it!”
“ Ah,” answered he, “let mercy take the place of jus:
tice, I only made up my mind to do it out of neces.
sity. My wife saw your rampion from the window,
and felt such a longing for it that she would have died
if she had not got some to eat.” ‘Then the enchant.
ress allowed her anger to be softened, and said to him,
“Tf the case be as thou sayest, I will allow thee to take
away with thee as much rampion as thou wilt, only I
make one condition, thou must give me the child
which thy wife will bring into the world; it shall be
well treated, and I will care for it like a mother.” The
man in his terror consented to everything, and when



y

35

i) ini

tell

;

iiiiil|

Rapunzel,

the woman was brought to bed, the enchantress ap-

gave the child the name of Rapunze

th her.
Rapunzel grew into the most beautiful child be

1

peared at once,
and took it away w:



THE PRINCE VISITS RAPUNZEL,

When she was twelve years old, the

enchantress shut her into a tower, which lay ina

neath the sun.

38—Grimm’s.



36 Grimm's Household Tales.

forest, and had neither stairs nor door, but quite at the
top was a little window. When the enchantress
wanted to go in, she placed herself beneath this, and
cried,
“* Rapunzel, Rapunzel,
Let down thy hair to me.”

Rapunzel had magnificent long hair, fine as spun gold,
and when she heard the voice of the enchantress she
unfastened her braided tresses, wound them round one
the hooks of the window above, and then the hair fell
twenty ells down, and the enchantress climbed up by it.
After a year or two, it came to pass that the King’s
son rode through the forest and went by the tower.
‘Then he heard a song, which was so charming that he
stood still and listened. This was Rapunzel, who in
her solitude passed her time in letting her sweet voice
resound. ‘The King’s son wanted to climb up to her,
and locked for the door ot the tower, but none was to
be found. He rode home, but the singing had so
deeply touched his heart, that every day he went out
into the forest and listened to it. Once when he was
thus standing behind a tree, he saw that an enchantress
came there, and he heard how she cried,

** Rapunzel, Rapunzel,
Let down thy hair.”

Then Rapunzel let down the braids of her hair, and
the enchantress climbed up to her. “If that is the
ladder by which one mounts, I will for once try my
fortune,” said he, and the next day when it began to
grow dark, he went to the tower and cried,



Rapunzel. 37

‘6 Rapunzel, Rapunzel,
Let down thy hair.”

Immediately the hair fell down and the King’s son
climbed up.

At first Rapunzel was terribly frightened when a
man such as her eyes had never yet beheld, came to
her; but the King’s son began to talk to her quite like
a friend, and told her that his heart had been so stirred
that it had let him have no rest,and he had been forced
to see her. ‘Then Rapunzel lost her fear, and when he
asked her if she would take him for her husband, and
she saw that he was young and handsome, she thought,
«Fie will love me more than old Dame Gothel does;”’
and she said yes, and laid her hand inhis. She said, “I
will willingly go away with thee, but I do not know
how to get down. Bring with thee a skein of silk
every time that thou comest, and I will weave a ladder
with it, and when that is ready I will descend, and thou
wilt take me on thy horse.” ‘They agreed that until
that time he should come to her every evening, for the
old woman came by day. ‘The enchantress remarked
nothing of this, until once Rapunzel said to her, “Tell
me, Dame Gothel, how it happens that you are so much
heavier for me to draw up than the young King’s son
—he is with me in a moment.”

“ Ah! thou wicked child,” cried the enchantress,
“What do I hear thee say! I thought I had separated
thee from all the world, and yet thou.hast deceived
me!” In her anger she clutched Rapunzel’s beautiful
tresses, wrapped them once round her left hand, seized



38 Grimm's Household Tales,

a pair of scissors with her right, and snip, snap, they
were cut off, and the lovely braids lay on the ground.
And she was so pitiless that she took poor Rapunzel
into a desert where she had to live in great grief and
misery.

The same day, however, that she cast out Rapunzel,
the enchantress in the evening fastened the braids of
hair that she had cut off to the hook of the window,
and when the King’s son came and cried,

** Rapunzel, Rapunzel,
Let down thy hair.”’

she let the hair down. ‘The King’s son ascended, but
he did not find his dearest Rapunzel above, but the
enchantress, who gazed at him with wicked and venom-
ous looks. ‘“ Aha!” she cried mockingly, “Thou
wouldst fetch thy dearest, but the beautiful bird sits no
longer singing in the nest; the cat has got it and will
scratch out thy eyes as well. Rapunzel is lost to thee;
_ thou wilt never see her more.”

The King’s son was beside himself with pain, and
in his despair he leaped down from the tower. He
escaped with his life, but the thorns into which he fell,
pierced his eyes. Then he wandered quite blind about
the forest, ate nothing but roots and berries, and did
nothing but lament and weep over the loss of his
dearest wife. Thus he roamed about in misery for
some years, and at length came to the desert where
Rapunzel, with the twins to which she had given birth,
a boy and a girl, lived in wretchedness. He heard a
voice,’and it seemed so familiar to him that he went



ae



THE PRINCE FELL FROM THE TOWER.



40 Grimm's Household Tales.

towards it, and when he approached, Rapunzel knew
him and fell on his neck and wept. ‘Two of her tears
wetted his eyes and they grew clear again, and he could
see with them as before. He led her to his kingdom
where he was joyfully received, and they lived for along
time afterwards, happy and contented.





The Three Little Men in the Wood.

ese was once a man whose wife died, and a
woman whose husband died, and the man had a
daughter, and the woman also had a daughter.

The girls were acquainted with each other, and went

out walking together, and afterwards came to the

woman in her house. Then said she to the man’s
daughter, “ Listen, tell thy father that I would like to
marry him, and then thou shalt wash thyself in milk
every morning, and drink wine, but my own daughter
shali wash herself in water and drink water.” ‘The
girl went home, and told her father what the woman
had said. ‘I'he man said, “ Whatshall I do? Marriage
is a joy and also a torment.” At length as he could
come to no decision, he pulled off his boot, and said,

“Take this boot, it has a hole in the sole of it. Go

with it up to the loft, hang it on the big nail, and

then pour water into it. If it holds the water, then I

will again take a wife, but if runs through, I will not.”

The girl did as she was ordered, but the water drew

the hole together, and the boot became full to the top.

She informed her father how it had turned out. Then

he himself went up, and when he saw that she was

right, he went.to the widow and wooed her, and the ©
wedding was celebrated.

The next morning, when the two girls got up,
there stood before the man’s daughter, milk for her to
wash in and wine for her to drink, but before the
woman’s daughter stood water to wash herself with and



42 Grimm's Household Tales.

water for drinking. On the second morning, stood
water for washing and water for drinking before the
man’s daughter as well as before the woman’s daugh-
ter. And on the third morning stood water for wash-
ing and water for drinking before the man’s daughter,
and milk for washing and wine for drinking, before
the woman’s daughter, and so it continued. ‘The
woman became bitterly unkind to her step-daughter,
and day by day did her best to treat her still worse.
She was envious too because her step-daughter was
beautiful and lovable, and her own daughter ugly and
repulsive.

Once, in winter, when everything was frozen as
hard as a stone, and hill and vale lay covered with
snow, the woman made a frock of paper, called her
step-daughter, and said, ‘Here, put on this dress, and
go out into the wood, and fetch me a little basketful
of strawberries,—I have a fancy for some.” ‘Good
heavens!” said the girl, “no strawberries grow in
wiuter! ‘The ground is frozen, and besides the snow
has covered everything. And why am I to go in this
paper frock? It is so cold outside that one’s very
breath freezes! The wind will blow through the
frock, and the thorns will tear it off my body.” “ Wilt
thou contradict me again?” said the stepmother, “See
that thou goest, and do not show thy face again until
thou hast the basketful of strawberries!” Then she
gave her a little piece of hard bread, and said, “This
will last thee the day,” and thought, “Thou wilt die .
of cold and hunger outside, and wilt never be seen
again by me.”



The Three Little Men in the Wood. 43

Then the maiden was obedient, and put on the
paper frock, and went out with the basket. Far and
wide there was nothing but snow, and not a green

YUMMY

LD:

pl

H)



THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN THE WOOD.

blade to beseen. Whenshe got into the wood she saw
a small house out of which peeped three little dwarfs,
She wished them good day, and knocked modestly at



44 Grimm's Household Tales.

the door. ‘They cried, “Come in,” and she entered
the room and seated herself on the bench by the stove,
where she began to warm herself and eat her break-
fast. ‘The elves said, “Give us, too, some of it.”
“Willingly,” said she, and divided her bit of bread in
two, and gave them the half. They asked, “ What
dost thou here in the forest in the winter time, in thy
thin dress?” “Ah,” she answered, “I am to look for
a basketful of strawberries, and am not to go home un-
til I can take them with me.” When she had eaten
her bread, they gave her a broom and said, “Sweep
away the snow at the back door with it.’ But when
she was outside, the three little men said to each other,
“What shall we give her as she is so good, and has
shared her bread with us?” ‘Then said the first, “‘My
gift is, that she shall every day grow more beautiful.”
‘The second said, “ My gift is, that gold pieces shall
fall out of her mouth every time she speaks.” ‘The
third said, “My gift is, that a king shall come and
take her to wife.” :

The girl, however, did as the little men had bidden
her, swept away the snow behind the little house with
the broom, and what did she find but real ripe straw.
berries, which came up quite dark-red out of the snow!
In her joy she hastily gathered her basket full, thanked
the little men, shook hands with each of them, and ran
home to take her step-mother what she had longed for
so much. When she went in and said good-evening,
a piece of gold at once fell out of her mouth. ‘There-
upon she related what had happened to her in the
wood, but with every word she spoke, gold pieces fell



2

The Three Little Men in The Wood. 45

from her mouth, until very soon the whole room was
covered with them. ‘ Now look at her arrogance,”
cried the step-sister, “to throw about gold in that
way! but she was secretly envious of it, and wanted
to go into the forest also to seek strawberries. The
mother said, “‘No, my dear little daughter, it is too
cold, thou mightest die of cold.’ However, as her
daughter let her have no peace, the mother at last
yielded, made her a magnificent dress of fur, which she
was obliged to put on, and gave her bread-and-butter

~ and cake with her.

The girl went into the forest and straight up to
the little house. The three little elves peeped out
again, but she did not greet them, and without look-
ing round at them and without speaking to them, she
went awkwardiy into the room, seated herself by the
stove, and began to eat her bread-and-butter and cake.
«Give us some of it,” cried the little men; but she re.
plied, “There is not enough for myself, so how can 1
give it away to other people?” When she had done
eating, they said, “There is a broom for thee, sweep
all clean for us outside by the back-door.” ‘Humph!
Sweep for yourselves,” she answered, “I am not your
servant.” When she saw that they were not going to
give her anything, she went out by the door. Then
the little men said to each other, ‘What shali we give
her as she is so naughty, and has a wicked envious
heart, that will never let her do a good turn to any
one?” ‘The first said, “I grant that she may grow
uglier every day.” ‘The second said, “I grant that at
every word she says, a toad shall spring out of her



(

46 Grimm's Household Tales,

mouth.” ‘The third said, “I grant that she may die
a miserable death.” The maiden looked for straw-
berries outside, but as she found none, she went
angrily home. And when she opened her mouth, and
was about to tell her mother what had happened to
her in the wood, with every word she said, a toad
sprang out of her mouth, so that every one was seized
with horror of her.

_ Then the step-mother was still more enraged, and
thought of nothing but how to do every possible in-
jury to the man’s daughter, whose beauty, however,
grew daily greater. At length she took a cauldron,
set it on the fire, and boiled yarn in it. When it was
boiled, she flung it on the poor girl’s shoulder, and
gave her an axe in order that she might go on the
frozen river, cut a hole in the ice, and rinse the yarn.
She was obedient, went thither and cut a hole in the
ice; and while she was in the midst of her cutting, a
splendid carriage came driving up, in which sat the
King. The carriage stopped, and the King asked,
‘““My child, who art thou, and what art thou doing
here?’ “I am a poor girl, and I am rinsing yarn.”
Then the King felt compassion, and when he saw that
she was so very beautiful, he said to her, “Wilt thou
go away with.me?” “Ah, yes, with all my heart,”
she answered, for she was glad to get away from the
mother and sister.

So she got into the carriage and drove away with
the King, and when they arrived at his palace, the
wedding was celebrated with great pomp, as the little
men had granted to the maiden. When a year was



The Three Little Men in the Wood. 47

over, the young Queen bore a son, and as the step-
mother had heard of her great good-fortune, she came
with her daughter to the palace and pretended that
she wanted to pay her a visit. Once, however, when
the King had gone out, and no one else was present,
the wicked woman seized the Queen by the head, and
her daughter seized her by the feet, and they lifted her
out of the bed, and threw her out of the window into
the stream which flowed by. “Then the ugly daughter
laid herself in the bed, and the old woman covered
her up over her head. When the King came home
again and wanted to speak to his wife, the old woman
cried, ‘‘Hush, hush, that can’t be now, she is lying iu
a violent perspiration; you must let her rest to-day.”
The King suspected no evil, and did not come back
again till next morning; and as he talked with his
wife and she answered him, with every word a toad
leaped out, whereas formerly a piece of gold had fallen
out. Then he asked what that could be, but the old
woman said that she had got that from the violent
perspiration, and would soon lose it again. During
the night, however, the scullion saw a duck come
swimming up the gutter, and it said,

‘King. what art thou doing now?
Sleepest thou, or wakest thou?”

And as he returned no answer it said,
“* And my guests, What may they do?"
The scullion said,
“* They are sleeping soundly too:'’



48 __ Grimm's Household Tales.

Then it asked again,

“* What does little baby mine?"
Ale answered,

‘« Sleepeth in her cradle jine.""

‘Then she went upstairs in the form of the Queen,
nursed the baby, shook up its little bed, covered it
over, and then swam away again down the gutter in
the shape of a duck. She came thus for two nights;
on the third, she said to the scullion, ‘Go and tell the
King to take his sword and swing it three times over
me on the threshold.” ‘Then the scullion ran and told
this to the King, who came with his sword and swung
it thrice over the spirit, and at the third time, his wife
stood before him strong, living, and healthy as she had
been before. Thereupon the King was full of great
joy, but he kept the Queen hidden in a chamber until
the Sunday, when the baby was to be christened. And
when it was christened he said, ‘“ What does a person
deserve who drags another out of bed and throws him
in the water?” ‘“’The wretck deserves nothing better,”
answered the old woman, “than to be taken and put
in a barrel stuck full of nails, and rolled down hill into
the water.” ‘ Then,” said the King, “thou hast pro-
nounced thine own sentence ;” and he ordered such a
barrel to be brought, and the old woman to be put
into it with her daughter, and then the top was ham-
mered cn, and the barrel rolled down hill until it went
into the “iver.



The Three Spinners

HIERE was once a girl who was idle and would
not spin, and let her mother say what she would,
she could not bring her to it. At last the mother

was once so overcome with anger and impatience, that
she beat her, on which the girl began to weep loudly.
Now at this very moment the Queen drove by, and
when she heard the weeping she stopped her carriage,
went into the house and asked the mother why she
was beating her daughter so that the cries could be
heard out on the road? Then the woman.was ashamed
to reveal the laziness of her daughter and said, “I can-
not get her to leave off spinning. She insists on spin-.
ning for ever and ever, and I am poor, and cannot
procure the flax.” Then answered the Queen, “There
is nothing that I like better to hear than spinning, and
I am never happier than when the wheels are hum-
ming. Let me have your daughter with me in the
palace, I have flax enough, and there she shall spin as
much as she likes.’ The mother was heartily satis-
fied with this, and the Queen took the girl with her.
When they had arrived at the palace, she led her up
into. three rooms which were filled from the bottom to
the top with the finest flax. ‘Now spin me this flax,”
said she, ‘‘and when thou hast done it, thou shalt have
my eldest son for a husband, even if thou art poor. I
care not for that, thy indefatigable industry is dowry
enough.” The girl was secretly terrified, for she could



50 Grimm's Household Tales.

not have spun the flax, no, not if she have lived till
she was three hundred years old, and had sat at it
every day from morning till night. When therefore
she was alone, she began to weep, and sat thus for
three days without moving a finger. On the third day
came the Queen, and when she saw that nothing had
been spun yet, she was surprised ; but the girl excused
herself by saying that she had not been able to begin
because of her great distress at leaving her mother’s
house. ‘The Queen was satisfied with this, but said
when she was going away, “’I'o-morrow thou must
begin to work.”

When the girl was alone again, she did not know
what to do, and in her distress went to the window.
Then she saw three women coming towards her, the
first of whom had a broad flat foot, the second had
such a great underlip that it hung down over her chin,
and the third had a broad thumb. ‘They remained
standing before the window, looked up, and asked the
girl what was amiss with her? She complained of her
trouble and then they offered her their help and said,
“Tf theu wilt invite us to the wedding, not beashamed
of us, and wilt call us thine aunts, and likewise wilt
place us at thy table, we will spin up the flax for thee,
and that in avery short time.” “With all my heart,”
she replied, “do but come in and begin the work at
once.” ‘Then she let in the three strange women, and
cleared a place in the first room, where they seated
themselves and began their spinning. The one drew
the thread and trod the wheel, the other wetted the
thread, the third twisted it, and struck the table with



The Three Spinners. 51



‘struck it, a skein of thread fell
to the ground that was spun in
the finest manner possible. ‘The
girl concealed the three spinners
from the Queen, and showed her
whenever she came the great
quantity of spun thread, until
the latter could not praise her
enough. When the first room
was empty she went to the sec-
ond, and at last to the third, and
that too was quickly cleared.
Ther the three women took leave
and said to the girl, “Do not for-
get what thou hast promised us
—it will make thy fortune.”
When the maiden showed
the Queen the empty rooms,

d—Grimm's.



THE THREE SPINNERS-



52 Grimm's Household Tales.

and the great heap of yarn, she gave orders for the
wedding, and the bridegroom rejoiced that he was
to have such a clever and industrious wife, and praised
her mightily. “I have three aunts,” said the gitl,
“and as they have been very kind to me, I should not
like to forget them in my good fortune; allow me to
invite them to the wedding, and let them sit with us
at table.” ‘The Queen and the bridegroom said, “ Why
should we not allow that?” ‘Therefore when the feast
began, the three women entered in strange apparel,
and the bride said, “Welcome, dear aunts.” “ Ah,”
said the bridegroom, “ how comest thou by these odious
friends?” Thereupon he went to the one with the
broad flat foot, and said, ‘‘ How do you come by sucha
broad foot?” “By treading,’ she answered, “ by
treading.” Then the bridegroom went to the second,
and said, “ How do you come by your falling lip?”
“By licking,” she answered, “by licking.’ ‘Then he
asked the third, “How do you come by your broad
thumb?” “By twisting the thread,” she answered,
“by twisting the thread.” On this the King’s son
was alarmed and said, “‘ Neither now nor ever shall my
beautiful bride touch a spinning-wheel.” And thus
she got rid of the hateful flax-spinning.



Hansel and Grethel.

ie by a great forest dwelt a poor wood-cutter

with his wife and his two children. The boy

was called Hansel and the girl Grethel. He had
little to bite and to break, and once when great scarcity
fell on the land, he could no longer procure daily bread.
Now when he thought over this by night in his bed,
and tossed about in his anxiety, he groaned and said to
his wife, ‘“What is to become of us? How are we to
feed our poor children, when we no longer have any.
thing even for ourselves?”

“P11 tell you what, husband,” answered the woman,

“Barly to-morrow morning we will take the children
out into the forest to where it is the thickest, there we
‘will light a fire for them and give each of them one
piece of bread more, and then we will go to our work
and leave them alone. They will not find the way
home again, and we shall be rid of them.”

“No wife,” said the man, “I will not do that; how
can I bear to leave my children alone in the forest >—
the wild animals would soon come and tear them to
pieces.”

“©, thou fool!” said she, “Then we must all four
die of hunger, thou mayest as well plane the planks for
our coffins,” and she left him no peace until he con-
sented.

“But I feel very sorry for the poor children all the
game,”’ said the man.

The two children had also not been able to sleep.



54 Grimm's Household Tales.

for hunger, and had heard what their step-mother had
said to their father. Grethel wept bitter tears, and said
to Hansel, “‘ Now all is over with us.” ‘Be quiet,
Grethel,” said Hansel, “‘do not distress thyself, I will
soon find a way to help us.” And when the old folks
had fallen asleep, he got up, put on his little cvat,
opened the door below, and crept outside. ‘The moon
shone brightly and the white pebbles which lay in
front of the house glittered like real silver pennies.
Hansel stooped and put as many of them in the little
pocket of his coat as he could possibly get in. Then
he went back and said to Grethel, ‘‘ Be comforted, dear
little sister, and sleep in peace, God will not forsake
us,” and he lay down again in his bed. When day
dawned, but before the sun had risen, the woman came
and awoke the two children, saying, “Get up, you
sluggards! we are going into the forest to fetch
wood.” She gave each a little piece of bread, and
said, “There is something for your dinner, but do not
eat it up before then, for you will get nothing else.”
Grethel took ‘the bread under her apron, as Hansel
had the stones in his pocket. ‘Then they all set out
together on the way to the forest. When they had
walked a short time, Hansel stood still and peeped
back at the house, and did so again and again. His
father said, ‘Hansel, what art thou looking at there
and staying behind for? Mind what thou art about,
and do not forget how to use thy legs.” ‘Ah, father,”
said Hansel, “I am looking at my little white cat,
which is sitting up on the roof, and wants to say
_ good-bye to me.” ‘The wife said, ‘‘Fool, that is not



Hansel and Grethel. 55

thy little cat, that is the morning sun which is shin-
ning on the chimneys.” Hansel, however, had not
been looking back at the cat, but had been constantly



AN OLD WITCH OPENED THE DOOR.

throwing one of the white pebble-stones out of his.
pocket on the road.
‘When they had reached the middle of the forest,



56 ' Grimm's Household Tales.

the father said, “Now, children, pile up some wood,
‘and I will light a fire that you may not be cold.”
Hansel and Grethel gathered brushwood together, as
high as a little hill, The brushwood was lighted, and
when the flames were burning very high the woman
said, “Now, children, lay yourselves down by the fire
and rest, we will go into the forest and cut some
wood. When we have done, we will come back and
_ fetch you away.”

Hansel.and Grethel sat by the fire, and when noon
came, each ate a little piece of bread, and as they heard
the strokes of the wood-axe they believed that their
father was near. It was, however, not the axe it was
a branch which he had fastened to a withered tree
which the wind was blowing backwards and forwards.
And as they had been sitting such a long time, their
eyes shut with fatigue, and they fell fast asleep,
When at last they awoke, it was already dark night
Grethel began to cry and said, “How are we to get
out of the forest now?” But Hansel comforted her
and said, ‘Just wait a little, until the moon has risen,
and then we will soon find the way.” And when the
full moon had risen, Hansel took his little sister by
the hand, and followed the pebbles which shone like
newly-coined silver pieces, and showed them the way.

They walked the whole night long, and by break
of day came once more to their father’s house. "They
knocked at the door, and when the woman opened it
and saw that it was Hansel and Grethel, she said,
“You naughty children, why have you slept so long in
‘the forest?—we thought you were never coming back



Hansel and Grethel. . 57

at all!” The father, however, rejoiced, for it had: cut
him to the heart to leave them behind alone.

Not long afterwards, there was once more great
scarcity in all parts, and the children heard their
mother saying at night to their father, “‘ Everything is
eaten again; we have one half loaf left, and after that
there isanend. The children must go, we will take
them farther into the wood, so that they will not find
their way out again; there is no other means of saving
ourselves!” ‘The man’s heart was heavy, and he
thought “it would be better for thee to share the last
mouthful with thy children.” The woman, however,
would listen to nothing he had to say, but scolded and
reproached him. He who says A must say B, likewise,
and as he had yielded the first time, he had to do so
a second time also.

The children were, however, still awake and had
heard the conversation. When the old folks were
asleep, Hansel again got up, and wanted to go out and
pick up pebbles, but the woman had locked the door,
and Hansel could not get out. Nevertheless he com.
forted his little sister, and said, “Do not cry, Grethel,
go to sleep quietly, the good God will help us.”

Early in the morning came the woman, and took
the children out of their beds. ‘Their bit of bread was
piven to them, but it was still smaller than the time
before. On the way into the forest Hansel crumbled
his in his pocket and often stood still and threw a
morsel on the ground. “ Hansel, why dost thou stop
and look round?” said the father, “go on.’ “Iam
looking back at my little pigeon which is sitting on



58 Grimm's Household Tales.

the roof, and wants to say good-bye to me,” answered
Hansel. ‘“Simpleton!” szid the woman, ‘‘that is not
thy little pigeon, that is the morning sun that is
shining on the chimney.” Hansel, however, little by
little, threw all the crumbs on the path.

The woman led the children still deeper into the
jorest, where they had never in their lives been before.
Then a great fire was again made, and the mothet
said, “Just sit there, you children, and when you are
tired you may sleep a little; we are going into the for-
est to cut wood, and in the evening when we are done,
we will come and fetch you away.” When it was
noon, Grethel shared her piece of bread with Hansel,
who had scattered his by the way. ‘Then they fell.
asleep and evening came and went, but no one came to
the poor children. ‘They did not awake until it was
dark night, and Hansel comforted his little sister and
said, “Just wait, Grethel, until the moon rises, and
then we shall see the crumbs of bread which I have
strewn about, they will show us our way home again.”
When the moon came they set out, but they found no
crumbs, for the many thousands of birds which fly
about in the woods and fields, had picked them all up.
Hansel said to Grethel, ‘“‘ Weshall soon find the way,”
but they did not find it. They walked the whole night
and all the next day too from morning till evening,
but they did not get out of the forest, and were. very
hungry, for they had nothing to eat but two or
three berries, which grew on the ground. And as they
were so weary. that their legs would carry them no
longer, they lay down beneath a tree and fell asleep.



Hausel and Grethel. 59

It was now three mornings since they had left their
father’s house. ‘They began to walk again; but they
always got deeper into the forest, and if help did not
come soon, they must die of hunger and weariness.
When it was mid-day, they saw a beautiful snow-white
bird sitting on a bough, which sang so delightfully
that they stood still and listened to it. And when it
had finished its song, it spread its wings and flew away
before them, and they followed it until they reached a
little house, on the roof of which it alighted; and
when they came quite up to the little house they saw
that it was built of bread and covered with cakes, but
that the windows were of clear sugar. ‘We will set
to work on that,” said Hansel, “and have a good
meal. I will eat a bit of the roof, and thou, Grethel,
canst eat some of the window, it will taste sweet.”
Hansel reached up above, and broke off a little of the
roof to try how it tasted, and Grethel leaned against the
window and nibbled at the panes. Then a soft voice
cried from the room,

“< Nibble, nibble, gnaw,
Who ts nibbling at my little house ?””
The children answered,
“ The wind, the wind,
The heaven-born wind,”’
and went on eating without disturbing themselves. -
Hansel, who thought the roof tasted very nice, tore
down a great piece of it, and Grethel pushed out the
whole of one round window-pane, sat down, and en-
joyed herself with it. Suddenly the door opened, and



6o Grimm's Household Tales.

a very, very old woman, who supported herself on
crutches, came creeping out. Hansel and Grethel
were so terribly frightened that they let fall what they
had in their hands. ‘The old woman, however, nodded
her head, and said, “Oh, you dear children, who has
brought you here? Do come in, and stay with me.
No harm shall happen to you.” She took them by
the hand, and led them into her little house. Then
good food was set before them, milk and pancakes,
with sugar, apples, and nuts. Afterwards two pretty
little beds were covered with clean white linen, and
Hansel and Grethel lay down in them, and thought
they were in heaven.

The old woman had only pretended to be so kind;
she was in reality a wicked witch, who lay in wait
for children, and had only built the little bread house
in order to entice them there. When a child fell into
her power, she killed it, cooked and ate it, and that
was a feast day with her. Witches have red eyes, and
cannot see far, but they have a keen scent like the
beasts, and are aware when human beings draw near.
When Hansel and Grethel came into her neighbor-
hood, she laughed maliciously, and said mockingly,
“T have them, they shall not escape me again!” Early
in the morning, before the children were awake, she
was already up, and when she saw both of them sleep-
ing and looking so pretty, with their plump red
cheeks, she muttered to herself, “That will be a
dainty mouthful!” ‘Then she seized Hansel with her
shrivelled hand, carried him into a little stable, and
shut him in with a grated door. He might scream as



Hansel and Grethel. 61

he liked, that was of no use. Then she went to
Grethel, shook her till she awoke, and cried, “Get up,
lazy thing, fetch some water, and cook something good
for thy brother, he is in the stable outside, and is to be
made fat. When he is fat, I willeathim.” Grethel be-
gan to weep bitterly, but it was all in vain, she was
forced to do what the wicked witch ordered her.

And now the best food was cooked for poor Hansel,
but Grethel got nothing but crab-shells. Every morn-
ing the woman crept to the little stable and cried,
“ Hansel, stretch out thy finger that I may feel if thou
wilt soon be fat.”

Hansel, however, stretched out a little bone to her,

-and the old woman, who had dim eyes, could not see
it, and thoughtit was Hansel’s finger and was aston-
ished that there was no way of fattening him. When
four weeks had gone by and Hansel still continued
thin, she was seized with impatience and would not
wait any longer.

“Hola, Grethel,” she cried to the girl, “be active,
‘and bring some water. Let Hansel be fat or lean, to-
morrow I will kill him and cook him.” Ah, how the
poor little sister did lament when she had to fetch the
water, and how her tears did flow down over her
cheeks !

“Dear God, do help us,” she cried. “If the wild
beasts in the forest had but devoured us, we should at
any rate have died together.”

“Just keep thy noise to thyself,” said the old woman,
all that won’t help thee at all.”

Harly in the morning, Grethel had to go out and



62 Grimm's Household Tales.

hang up the cauldron with the water, and light the
fire. “We will bake first,” said the old woman, “I
have already heated the oven and kneaded the dough.”
She pushed poor Grethel out to the oven, from which
flames of fire were already darting. ‘Creep in,” said
‘the witch, “and see if it-is properly heated, so that we
can shut the bread in.” And when once Grethel was
inside, she intended to shut the oven and let her bake
in it, and then she would eat her, too. But Grethel
saw what she had in her mind, and said, “I do not
know how I am to do it; how do you get in?”

“Silly goose,” said the old woman. “The door is
big enough; just look, I can get in myself!” and she
crept up and thrust her head into the oven. ‘Then
Grethel gave hera push that drove her far into it, and
shut the iron door, and fastened the bolt. Oh! then
she began to howl quite horribly, but Grethel ran
away, and the godless witch was miserably burnt to
death.

Grethel, however, ran as quick as lightning to
Hansel, opened his little stable and cried, ‘‘ Hansel,
we are saved! The old witch is dead!” ‘Then Hansel
sprang out like a bird from its cage when the door is
opened for it. How they did rejoice and embrace each
other, and dance about and kiss each other! And as
they had no longer any need to fear her, they went into
the witch’s house, and in every corner there stood
chests full of pearls and jewels. ‘These are far better
than pebbles!” said Hansel, and thrust into his pockets
whatever could be got in, and Grethel said, “‘T, too,
will take something home with me,” and filled her



Hansel and Grethel. | 63

pinafore full. “But now we will go away,” said Han-
sel, “that we may get out of: the witch’s forest.”

When they had walked for two hours they came to
a great piece of water. ‘“‘ We cannot get over,” said
Hansel, “I see*no foot-plank and no bridge.” “And
no boat crosses either,” answered Grethel, ‘“ but a white
duck is swimming there; if I ask her, she will help us
over.’ ‘Then she cried :

‘¢ Little duck, little duck, dost thou see,
Flansel and Grethel are waiting for thee?
There's never a plank, or bridge in sight,
Take us across on thy back so white.”’

‘The duck came to them and Hansel seated himself
on its back and told his sister to sit by him. “No,”
replied Grethel, “that will be too heavy for the little
duck; she shall take us across, one after the other.”
The good little duck did so and when they were once
safely across and had walked for a short time, the
forest seemed to be more and more familiar to them
and at length they saw from afar their father’s house.
Then they began to run, rushed into the parlor and
threw themselves into their father’s arms. The man
had not known one happy hour since he had left the
children in the forest ; the woman, however, was dead.
Grethel emptied her pinafore until pearls and precious
stones ran about the room and Hansel threw one hand-
ful after another out of his pocket to add to them.
Then all anxiety was at an endand they lived together
in perfect happiness. My tale is done, there runs a
mouse, whoever catches it, may make himself a big
fur cap out of it.



The Valiant Little Tailor.

NE summer’s morning a little tailor was sitting
on his table by the window; he was in good
spirits, and sewed with all his might. ‘Then

came a peasant woman down the street crying, “Good
jams, cheap! Good jams, cheap!” This rang pleas-
antly in the tailor’s ears ; he stretched his delicate head
out of the window, and called, “Come up here, dear
woman; here you will get rid of your goods.” ‘The
woman came up the three steps to the tailor with her
heavy basket, and he made her unpack the whole of the
pots for him. He inspected all of them, lifted them
up, put his nose to them, and at length said, “’The jam
seems to me to be good, so weigh me out four ounces,
dear woman, and if it is a quarter of a pound that is
of no consequence.” ‘The woman who had hoped to
find a good sale, gave him what he desired, but went
away quite angry and grumbling. “Now, God bless
the jam to my use,” cried the little tailor, “and give
me health and strength ;” so he brought the bread out
of the cupboard, cut himself a piece right across the
loaf and spread the jam over it. “This won’t taste
bitter,” said he, “but I will just finish the jacket before
I take a bite. He laid the bread near him, sewed on,
and in his joy, made bigger and bigger stitches. In
the meantime the smell of the sweet jam ascended so
fo the wall, where the flies were sitting in great



The Valiant Little Tailor. 6§

numbers, that they were attracted and descended on it
in hosts. ‘Hola! who ifivited you?” said the little
tailor, and drove the unbidden guests away. The flies,
however, who understood no German, would not be
turned away, but came back again in ever-increasing
companies. Then the little tailor at last lost all
patience, and gota bit of cloth from the hole under
his work-table, and saying, “ Wait, and I will give it
to you,” struck it mercilessly on them. When he
drew it away and counted, there lay before him no
fewer than seven, dead and with legs stretched out.
“ Art thou a fellow of that sort?” said he, and could
not help admiring his own bravery. “Ihe whole
town shall know of this!” And the little tailor
hastened to cut himself a girdle, stitched it and
embroidered on it in large letters, “Seven at one
stroke!” “What, the town!” he continued, “The
whole world shall hear of it!” and his heart wagged
with joy like a lamb’s tail. The tailor put on the
girdle, and resolved to go forth into the world, because
he thought his workshop was too small for his valor.
Before he went away, he sought about in the house to
see if there was anything which he could take with
him ; however, he found nothing but an old cheese,
and that he put in his pocket. In front of the door
he observed a bird which had caught itself in the
thicket. It had to go into his pocket with the cheese.
Now he took to the road boldly, and as he was light
and nimble, he felt no fatigue. ‘The road led him up
a mountain, and when he had reached the highest
point of it, there sat a powerful giant looking about



66 Grimm's Household Tales,

him quite comfortably. The little tailor went bravery
up, spoke to him, and said, “Good day, comrade, so
thou art sitting there overlooking the wide-spread.
world! Iam just on my.way thither, and want to try
my luck. Hast thou any inclination to go with me?”
The giant looked contemptuously at the tailor, and
said, “Thou ragamuffiin! ‘Thou miserable creature!”

‘Oh, indeed?” answered the little tailor and un-
_ buttoned his coat. and showed the giant the girdle.
“There mayst thou read what kind of a man I am!”
The giant read, ‘“‘Seven at one stroke,” and thought
‘hat they had been men whom the tailor had killed
and began to feel a little respect for the tiny fellow.
Nevertheless, he wished to try him first and took a
stone in his hand and squeezed it together so that the
water dropped out of it.

“Do that likewise,” said the giant, “if thou hast
strength?” “Is that all?” said the tailor, “that is
child’s play with us!” and put his hand into his pocket,
brought out the soft cheese and pressed it until the
liquid ran out of it. “Faith,” said he, “that was a
little better, wasn’t it?” The giant did not know what
to say and could not believe it of the little man. Then
the giant picked up a stone and threw it so high that
the eye could scarcely follow it.

“Now, little mite of a man, do that likewise.”
“Well thrown,” said the tailor, “but after all the stone
came down to earth again; I will throw you one which
shall never come back at all,” and he put his hand into
his pocket, took out the bird and threw it into the air.
The bird, delighted with its liberty, rose, flew away



The Valiant Little Taifor. 6)

and did not come back. “How does that shot please
you, comrade?’ asked the tailor.
“Thou canst certainly throw,” said the





THE TAILOR MEETS THE GIANT.

giant, “but now we will see if thou art able

to carry anything properly.” He took the little

tailor to a mighty oak tree which lay there
g-—-Grimm’ s.



68 Grimm's Household Tales,

felled on the ground and said, “If thou art strong
enough, help me to carry the tree out of the forest.”
“Readily,” answered the little man; ‘‘take thou the
trunk on thy shoulders and I will raise up the
branches and twigs; after all, they are the heaviest.”
The giant took the trunk on his shoulder, but the
tailor seated himself on a branch, and the giant who
could not look round, had to carry away the whole
tree, and the little tailor into the bargain: he behind,
was quite merry and whistled the song, “Three tailors
rode forth from the gate,” as if carrying the tree were
child’s play. ‘The giant, after he had dragged the
heavy burden part of the way, could go no further, and
cried, ‘Hark you, I shall have to let the tree fall!”
The tailor sprang nimbly down, seized the tree with
both arms as if he had been carrying it, and said to the
giant, ‘Thou art such a great fellow, and yet canst not
even carry the tree!”

They went on together, and as they passed a cherry-
tree, the giant laid hold of the top of the tree where
the ripest fruit was hanging, bent it down, gave it into
the tailor’s hand and bade him eat. But the little
tailor was much too weak to hold the tree, and wnen
the giant let it go, it sprang back again, and the tailor
was hurried into the air with it. When he had fallen
dewn again without injury, the giant said, “ What is
this? Hast thou not strength enough to hold the weak
twig?” “There is no lack of strength,” answered the
little tailor. ‘ Dost thou think that could be anything
to aman who has struck down seven at one blow? I
leaped over the tree because the huntsmen are shooting



The Valiant Little Tailor. 69

down there in the thicket. Jump as I did, if thou canst
do it.” ‘The giant made the attempt, but could not
get over the tree, and remained hanging in the ©
branches, so that in this also the tailor kept the upper
hand.

The giant said, “If thou art such a valiant fellow,
come with me into our cavern and spend the night
with us.” ‘The little tailor was willing, and followed
him. When they went into the cave, other giants were
sitting there by the fire, and each of them had a roasted
sheep in his hand and was eating it. The little tailor
looked round and thought, “It is much more spacious
here than in my workshop.” ‘The giant showed him
a bed, and said he was to lie down in itandsleep. The
bed was, however, too big for the little tailor; he did
not lie down in it, but crept into a corner. When it
was midnight, and the giant thought tkat the little
tailor was lying in sound sieep, he got up, took a great
iron bar, cut through the bed with one blow, and
thought he had given the grasshopper his finishing
stroke. With the earliest dawn the giants went into
the forest, and had quite forgotten the little tailor,
when all at once he walked up to them quite merrily
and boldly. ‘The giants were terrified, they were afraid
that he would strike them all dead, and ran away in a
great hurry.

The little tailor went onwards, always following
his own pointed nose. After he had walked for a long
time, he came to the court-yard of a royal palace, and
as he felt weary, he lay down on the grass and fell
‘asleep. Whilst he lay there, the people came and



o

70 Grimm's Household Tales.

inspected him on all sides, and read on his girdle,
“Seven at one stroke.” “Ah!” said they, “ What does
the great warrior here in the midst of peace? He
must be a mighty lord.” ‘They went and announced
him to the King, and gave it as their opinion that if
war should break out, this would be a weighty and
useful man who ought on no account to be allowed to
depart. ‘The counsel pleased the King, and he sent
one of his courtiers to the little tailor to offer him
military service when he awoke. The ambassador
remained standing by the sleeper, waited until he
stretched his limbs and opened his eyes, and then
conveyed to him this proposal. “For this very reason
‘have I come here,” the tailor replied, “I am ready to
enter the King’s service. He was therefore honorably
received, and a separate dwelling was assigned him.
The soldiers, however, were set against the little
tailor, and wished him a thousand miles away. ‘“ What
is to be the end of this?” they said amongst them-
selves. “If we quarrel with him, and he strikes about
him, seven of us will fall at every blow; not one of us
can stand against him. ‘hey came therefore to a
decision, betook themselves in a body to the King,
and begged for their dismissal. “We are not pre-
pared,” said they, ‘to stay with a man who kills seven
at one stroke.” ‘he King was sorry that for the sake
of one he should lose all his faithful servants, wished
that he had never set eyes on the tailor, and would
willingly have been rid of him again. But he did not
venture to give him his dismissal, for he dreaded lest he
should strike him and all his people dead, and place



The Valiant Littie Tailor. 7

himself on the royal throne. He thought about it for
a long time, and at last found good counsel. He sent
to the little tailor and caused him to be informed that
as he was such a great warrior, he had one request to
make to him. In a forest of his country lived two
giants, who caused great mischief with their robbing,
murdering, ravaging, and burning, and no one could
approach them without putting himself in danger of
death. If the tailor conquered and killed these two
giants, he would give him his only daughter to wife,
and half of his kingdom as a dowry, likewise one
hundred horsemen should go with him to assist him.
“That would indeed be a fine thing for a man like
me!” thought the little tailor. ‘One is not offered a
beautiful princess and half a kingdom every day of
one’s life!’ “Oh, yes,’ he replied, “I will soon
subdue the giants, and do not require the help of the
hundred horsemen to do it; he who can hit seven at
one blow, has no need to be afraid of two.”

The little tailor went forth and the hundred horse-
men followed him. When he came to the outskirts of
the forest, he said to his followers, “ Just stay waiting
here, I alone will soon finish off the giants.” Then he
bounded into the forest and looked about right and
left. After a while he perceived both giants. They
lay sleeping under a tree, and snored so that the
branches waved up and down. The little tailor, not
idle, gathered two pocketfuls of stones, and with these
climbed up the tree. When he was half way up, he
slipped down by a branch, until he sat just above the
sleepers, and then let one stone after another fall on



y2 Grimm’s Household Tales.

the breast of one of the giants. Fora long time the
giant felt nothing, but at last he awoke, pushed his
comrade, and said, ““Why art thou knocking me?”
“Thou must be dreaming,” said the other, “I am not
knocking thee.” ‘They laid themselves down to sleep
again, and the tailor threw a stone down on the second.
“What is the meaning of this?’ cried the other.
“Why art thou pelting me?” “I am not pelting
thee,” answered the first, growling. They disputed
about it fora time, but as they were weary they let
the matter rest, and their eyes closed once more. ‘The
little tailor began his game again, picked out the
biggest stone and threw it with all his might on the
breast of the first giant. ‘That is too bad!” cried he,
and sprang up like a madman, and pushed his com-
panion against the tree until it shook. ‘The other paid
him back in the same coin, and they got into sucha
tage that they tore up trees and belabored each other
so long, that at last they both fell down dead on the
ground at the same time.. Then the little tailor leaped
down. “It is a lucky thing,” said he, “that they did
not tear up the tree on which I was sitting, or I should
have had to spring on to.another like a squirrel; but

we tailors are nimble.” He drew out his sword and .

gave each of them a couple of thrusts in the breast,
and then went out to the horsemen and said, “The
wotk is done; I have given both of them their
finishing stroke, but it was hard work! ‘They tore
up trees in their sore need, and defended themselves
with them, but all that is to no purpose when a man
like myself comes, who can kill seven at one blow.”



The Valiant Little Tailor. 73

“But are you not wounded?” asked the horsemen.
“You need not concern yourself about that,’ answered
the tailor, “They have not bent one hair of mine”
The horsemen would not believe him, and rode into
the forest; there they found the giants swimming in
their blood, and all round about, lay the torn-up trees.

The little tailor demanded of the King the promised
reward; he, however, repented of his promise, and
again bethought himself how he could get rid of the
hero. ‘Before thou receivest my daughter, and the
half of my kingdom,” said he to him, “thou must
perform one more heroic deed. In the forest roams a
unicorn which does great harm, and thou must catch
it first.” “TI fear one unicorn still less than two giants.
Seven at one blow, is my kind of affair.’ He tooka
rope and an axe with him, went forth into the forest,
and again bade those who were sent with him to wait
outside. He had not toseek long. ‘The unicorn soon
came towards him, and rushed directly on the tailor, as
if it would spit him on its horn without more ceremony.
“Softly, softly ; it can’t be done as quickly as that,”
said he, and stood still and waited until the animal
was quite close, and then sprang nimbly behind the
tree. The unicorn ran against the tree with all its
strength, and struck its horn so fast in the trunk that
it had not strength enough to draw it out again, and
thus it was caught. ‘Now, I have got the bird,” said
the tailor, and came out from behind the tree and put
the rope round its neck, and then with his axe he
hewed the horn out of the tree, and when all was
teady he led the beast away, and took it to the King,



94 Grimm's Household Tales.

The King still would not give him the promised
reward, and made a third demand. Before the wedding
the tailor was to catch him a wild boar that made great
havoc in the forest, and the huntsman should give him
their help. ‘Willingly,” said the tailor, “that is
child’s play!” Hedid not take the huntsmen with
him into the forest, and they were well pleased that he
did not, for the wild boar had several times received
them in such a manner that they had no inclination
to lie in wait for him. When the boar perceived the
tailor, it ran on him with foaming mouth and whetted
tusks, and was about to throw him to the ground, but
the active hero sprang into a chapel which was near,
and up to the window at once, and in one bound out
again. ‘he boar ran in after him, but the tailor ran
round outside and shut the door behind it, and then
the raging beast, which was much too heavy and
awkward to leap out of the window, was caught. ‘The
little tailor called the huntsmen thither that they
might see the prisoner with their own eyes. The
hero, however, went to the King, who was now,
whether he iiked it or not, obliged to keep his
promise, and gave him his daughter and half ‘of his
kingdom. Had he known that it was no warlike:
hero, but a little tailor who was standing before him,
it would have gone to his heart still more than it did.
The wedding was held with great magnificence and
small joy, and out of a tailor a king was made.

After some time the young Queen heard | her
husband say in his dreams at night, ‘‘ Boy, make me the
doublet, and patch the pantaloons, or else I will rap the



The Valiant Littie Tailor. 75

yard-measure over thine ears.” ‘Then she discovered
in what state of life the young lord had been born,
and next morning complained of her wrongs to her.
father, and begged him to help her to get rid of her
husband, who was nothing else but a tailor. The
King comforted her and said, “Leave thy bed-room
door open this night, and my servants shall stand
outside, and when he has fallen asleep shall go in,
bind him, and take him on board a ship which shall
carry him into the wide world.” The woman was
satisfied with this; but the King’s armor-bearer, who
had heard all, was friendly with the young lord, and
informed him of the whole plot. “Ill put a screw
into that business,” said the little tailor. At night he
went to bed with his wife at the usual time, and when
she thought that he had fallen asleep, she got up,
opened the door, and then lay down again. ‘he little
tailor, who was only pretending to be asleep, began to
cry out in a clear voice, “‘Boy, make me the doublet
and patch me the pantaloous, or I will rap the yard-
measure over thine ears. I smote seven at one blow,
I killed two giants, I brought away one unicorn, and
caught a wild boar, and am I to fear those who are
standing outside the room.’’ When these men heard
the tailor speaking thus, they were overcome by a
great dread, and ran as if the wild huntsman was
behind them, and none of them would venture any.
thing further against him. So the little tailor was a
king and remained one, to the end of his life.



Cinderella.

HE wife of a rich man fell sick, and as she felt that
her end was drawing near, she called her only
daughter to her bedside and said, ‘‘ Dear child, be

good and pious, and then the good God will always
protect thee, and I will look down on thee from heaven
and be near thee.” ‘Thereupon she closed her eyes
and departed. Every day the maiden went out to her
mother’s grave and wept, and she remained pious and
good. When winter came the snow spread a white
sheet over the grave, and when the spring sun had
drawn it off again, the man had taken another wife.

The woman had brought two daughters into the

house with her, who were beautiful and fair of face,
but vile and black of heart. Now began a bad time
for the poor step-child. ‘Is the stupid goose to sit in
the parlor with us?” “He who wants to eat bread
must earn it; out with the kitchen-wench.” ‘They
took her pretty clothes away from her, put an old
grey bedgown on her, and gave her wooden shoes.
“Just look at the proud princess, how decked out she
is! they cried, and laughed, and led her into the
kitchen. ‘There she had to do hard work from morn-
ing till night, get up before day-break, carry water,
light fires, cook and wash. Besides this, the sisters
did her every imaginable injury—they mocked her
and emptied her peas and lentils into the ashes, so that
she was forced to sit and pick them out again. In the
evening when she had worked till she was weary she



Cinderella. 17

had no bed to go to, but had to sleep by the fireside in
the ashes. And as on that account she always looked



CINDERELLA AND HER SISTERS.

dusty and dirty, they called her Cinderella. It hap-
ened that the father was once going to the fair, and
fe asked his two step-daughters what he should bring



78 Grimm's Household Tales.

back for them. ‘“‘ Beautiful dresses,” said one, ‘‘ Pearls
and jewels,” said thesecond. “And thou Cinderella,”
said he, “what wilt thou have?” ‘Father, break off
for me the first branch which knocks against your hat .
on your way home.” So he bought beautiful dresses,
pearls and jewels for his two step-daughters, and on his
way home, as he was tiding through a green thicket,
a hazel twig brushed against him and knoeked. off his
hat. Then he broke off the branch and took it witk
him. When he reached home he gave his step-daugh-
ters the things which they had wished for, and to
Cinderella he gave the branch from the hazel-bush.
Cinderella thanked him, went to her mother’s grave
and planted the branch on it, and wept so much that
the tears fell down on it and wateredit. It grew,
however, and became a handsome tree. ‘Thrice a day
Cinderella went and sat beneath it, and wept and
prayed, and a little white bird always came on the
tree, and if Cinderella expressed a wish, the bird threw
down to her what she had wished for.

It happened, however, that the King appointed a
festival which was to last three days, and to which all
the beautiful young girls in the country were invited,
in order that his son might choose himself a bride.
When the two step-sisters heard that they too were to
appear among the number, they were delighted, called
Cinderella and said, “‘ Comb our hair for us, brush our
shoes and fasten our buckles, for we are going to the
festival at the King’s palace.” Cinderella obeyed, but
wept, because she too would have liked to go with
them to the dance, and begged her step-mother ta



: Cinderella, : 79°

allow her todoso. ‘Thou go, Cinderella!” said she,
“Thou art dusty and dirty, and wouldst go to the fes-
tival? Thou hast no clothes and shoes, and yet
wouldst dance!’ As, however, Cinderella went on
asking, the step-mother at last said, ““I have emptied
a dish of lentils into the ashes for thee, if thou hast
picked them out again in two hours, thou shalt go
with us.” ‘The maiden went through the back-door
into the garden, and called, ““You tame pigeons, you
turtle-doves, and all you birds beneath the sky, come
- and help me to pick
“The good tnto the pot,
The bad into the crop.’ |

Then two white pigeons came in by the kitchen-
window, and afterwards the turtle-doves, and at last all
the birds beneath the sky came whirring and crowding
in, and alighted amongst the ashes. And the pigeons
nodded with their heads and began pick, pick, pick,
pick, and the rest began also pick, pick, pick, pick, and
gathered all the good grains into the dish. Hardly _
had one hour passed before they had finished and all
flew out again. Then the girl took the dish to her
step-mother and was glad, and believed that now she
would be allowed to go with them to the festival. But
the step-mother said, ‘“‘ No, Cinderella, thou hast no
clothes and thou canst not dance; thou wouldst only
be laughed at.” And as Cinderella wept at this, the
step-mother said, “If thou canst pick two dishes of
lentils out of the ashes for me in one hour, thou shalt
go with us.” And she thought to herself, “That she
most certainly cannot do.” When the step-mother had



80 Gtimm'‘s Household. Tales.

emptied the two dishes of lentils amongst the ashes,
the maiden went through the back-door into the gar-
den and cried, “‘ You tame pigeons, you turtle-doves, and
all you birds under heaven, come and help me to pick
“< The good into the pot,
The bad into the crop.”

Then two white pigeons came in by the kitchen-win-
dow and afterwards the turtle-doves, and at length all
the birds beneath the sky, came whirring and crowd-
ing in, and alighted amongst theashes. And the doves
nodded with their heads and began pick, pick, pick,
pick, and the others began also pick, pick, pick, pick,
and gathered all the good seeds into the dishes and
before half an hour was over they had already finished,
and all flew out again. Then the maiden carried the
dishes to the step-mother and was delighted, and be-
lieved that she might now go with them to the fes-
tival. But the step-mother said, “All this will not
help thee; thou goest not with us, for thou hast no
clothes and canst not dance; we should be ashamed of
thee!” On this she turned her back on Cinderella,
and hurried away with her two proud daughters.

As no one was now at home, Cinderella went to her
mother’s grave beneath the hazel-tree and cried,

‘< Shiver and quiver, little tree,
Silver and gold throw down over me.””

Then the bird threw a gold and silver dress down to
her and slippers embroidered with silk and silver. She
put on the dress with all speed and went to the festival.
Her step-sisters and the step-mother however did not
know her and thought she must be a foreign princess,



Cinderella, 8s

for she looked so beautiful in the golden dress. They
never once thought of Cinderella and believed that she
was sitting at home in the dirt, picking lentils out of the
ashes. ‘The prince went to meet her, took her by the
hand and danced with her. He would dance with no
other maiden and never left loose of her hand, and if any
one else came to invite her, he said, ‘This is my partner.”

She danced till it was evening and then she wanted
to go home. But the King’s son said, “I will go with
thee and bear thee company,” for he wished to see to
whom the beautiful maiden belonged. She escaped
from him, however, and sprang into the pigeon-house.
The King’s son waited until her father came and then
he told him that the stranger maiden had leaped into
the pigeon house. ‘The old man thought, ‘“‘Can it be
Cinderella?” and they had to bring him an axe and a
pickaxe that he might hew the pigeon-house to pieces,
but no one was inside it. And when they got home
Cinderella lay in her dirty clothes among the ashes, and
a dim little oil-lamp was burning on the mantle-piece,
for Cinderella had jumped quickly down from the back
of the pigeon-house and had run to the little hazel-tree
and there she had taken off her beautiful clothes and
laid them on the grave, and the bird had taken them
away again, and then she had placed herself in the
kitchen amongst the ashes in her grey gown.

Next day when the festival began afresh, and her
parents and the step-sisters had gone once more, Cin-
derella went to the hazel-tree and said—

“‘ Shiver and quiver, my little tree,
Siluer and gold throw down over me.”



82 Grimm's Household Tales,

Then the bird threw down a much more beautiful
dress than on the preceding day. And when Cinder-
ella appeared at the festival in this dress, every one was
astonished at her beauty. ‘I‘he King’s son had waited
until she came and instantly took her by the hand and
danced with no one but her. When others came and
invited her, he said, “She is my partner.”’? When even-
ing came she wished to leave and the King’s son fol:
lowed her and wanted to see into which house she
went. But she sprang away from him and into the
garden behind the house. Therein stood a beautiful
tall tree on which hung the most magnificent peais.
She clambered so nimbly between the branches like a

-squirrel, that the King’s son did not know where she

was gone. He waited until her father came and said
to him, “The stranger-maiden has escaped from me,
and I believe she has climbed up the pear-tree.” The
father thought, ‘‘Can it be Cinderella?” and had an
axe brought and cut the tree down, but no one was on
it. And when they got into the kitchen, Cinderella
lay there among the ashes, as usual, for she had
jumped down on the other side of the tree, had taken
the beautiful dress to the bird on the little hazel-tree,
and put on her grey gown.

On the third day, when the parents and sisters had
gone away, Cinderella once more went to her mother’s
grave and said to the little tree—

“< Shiver and quiver, my little tree,
Siluer and gold throw down over me.”

And now the bird threw down to her a dress which

was more splendid and magnificent than any she had












RN TAG N

i PRE
Ke re MY






PPE MT UE PUR pT TAC
Cyl CECE TDS

X,




CINDERELLA LEAVING THE BALL,
6—Grimm’s. 3



84 Grimm's Household Tales.

yet had, and the slippers were golden. And when she
went to the festival in the dress no one knew how to
speak for astonishment. ‘The King’s son danced with
her only and if any one invited her to dance, he said,
“She is my partner.”

When evening came, Cinderella wished to leave,
and the King’s son was anxious to go with her, but
she escaped from him so quickly that he could not fol-
low her. ‘The King’s son had, however, used a strate-
gem and had caused the whole staircase to be smeared
with pitch and there, when she ran down, had the
maiden’s left slipper remained sticking. The King’s
son picked it up and it was small and dainty and all
golden. Next morning he went with it to the father
and said to him, “No one shall be my wife but she
whose foot this golden slipper fits.’ Then were the
two sisters glad for they had pretty feet. ‘The eldest
went with the shoe into her room and wanted to try it
on, and her mother stood by. But she could not get
her big toe into it and the shoe was too small for her.
Then her mother gave her a knife and said, “Cut the
toe off; when thou art Queen thou wilt have no more
need to go on foot.” ‘The maiden cut the toe off,
forced the foot into the shoe, swallowed the pain and
went out to the King’s son. Then he took her on his
horse as his bride and rode away with her. ‘They
were, however, obliged to pass the grave and there, on
the hazel-tree, sat the two pigeons and cried—

‘Turn and peep, turn and pep,
There's blood within the shoe,
Lhe shoe it ts too small for her,
The true bride waits for you.”



Cinderella. 85

Then he looked at her foot and saw how the blood was
streaming from it. He turned his horse round and tock
the false bride home again and said she was not the
true one and that the other sister was to put the shoe
on. ‘Then this one went into her chamber and got
her toes safely into the shoe, but her heel was too
large. So her mother gave her a knife and said, “Cut
a bit off thy Heel; when thou art Queen thou wilt have
no more need to go on foot.” The maiden cut a bit
off her heel, forced her foot into the shoe, swallowed
the pain, and went out to the King’s son. He took
her on his horse as his bride and rode away with hex,
but when they passed by the hazel-tree, two little
pigeons sat on it and cried,
‘* Zurn and peep, turn and peep,

There's blood within the shoe,

The shoe tt is too small for her,

The true bride waits for you.”’
He looked down at her foot and saw how the blood
was tunning-out of her shoe, and how it had stained
her white stocking. ‘Then he turned his horse and
took the false bride home again. ‘This also is not —
the right one,” said he, “have you no other daugh-
ter?” “No,” said the man, “There is still a little
stunted kitchen-wench which my late wife left behind
her, but she cannot possibly be the bride.” ‘The
King’s son said he was to send her up to him; but
the mother answered, “Oh no, she is much too dirty,
she cannot show herself!” He absolutely insisted on
it, and Cinderella had to be called. She first washed
her hands and face clean, and then went and bowed.



86 Gtimm’s Household Tales.

down before the King’s son, who gave her the golden
shoe. Then she seated herself on a stool, drew her
foot out of the heavy wooden shoe, and put it into
the slipper, which fitted like a glove. And when
she rose up and the King’s son looked at her face he
recognized the beautiful maiden who had danced with
him and cried, “ That is the true bride!’ The step-
mother and the two sisters were terrified and became
pale with rage; he, however, took Cinderella on his
horse and rode away with her. As they passed by the
hazel-tree, the two white doves cried,

“Turn and peep, turn and peep,
No blood is in the shoe,
The shoe is not too small for her,
The true bride rides with you.”

and when they had cried that, the two came flying
down and placed themselves on Cinderella’s shoulders,
one on the right, the other on the left, and remained
sitting there.

When the wedding with the King’s son had to be
celebrated, the two false sisters came and wanted
to get into favor with Cinderella and share her good
fortune. When the betrothed couple went to church,
the elder was at the right side and the younger at the
left, and the pigeons pecked out one eye of each of
them. Afterwards as they came back, the elder was
at the left, and the younger at the right, and then the
pigeons pecked out the other eye of each. And thus,
for their wickedness and falsehood, they were punished
with blindness as long as they lived.





The Bremen Town-Musicians.

CERTAIN man had a donkey, which had carried
the corn-sacks to the mill indefatigably for
many a long year ; but his strength was going, and

he was growing more and more unfit for work. Then
his master began to consider how he might best save
his keep; but the donkey, seeing that no good wind
was blowing, ran away and set out on the road to
Bremen. ‘There,’ he thought, “I can surely be
-town-musician.” When he had walked some distance,
he found a hound lying on the road, gasping like one
who had run till he was tired. “What are you gasp-
ing so for, you big fellow?” asked the donkey.

“Ah,” replied the hound, “as I am old, and daily
grow weaker, and no longer can hunt, my master
wanted to kill me, so I took to flight; but now how
am I to earn my bread ?”

“YT tell you what, "said the donkey, “Iam going to



88 Gtrimm’s Household Tales.

Bremen, and shall be town-musician there; go with
me and engage yourself also as a musician. I will
play the lute, and you shall beat the kettledrum.”

The hound agreed, and on they went.

Before long they came to a cat, sitting on the path,
with a face like three rainy days! ‘‘ Now then, old
shaver, what has gone askew with you?” asked the
donkey.

“Who can be merry when his neck is in danger?”
answered the cat. “‘ Because I am now getting old,
and my teeth are worn to stumps, and I prefer to sit
by the fire and spin, rather than hunt about after
mice, my mistress wanted to drown me, so I ran
away. But now good advice is scarce. Where am I
to go?”

“Go with us to Bremen. You understand night-
music, so you can be a town-musician.”’

The cat thought well of it and went with them.
After this the three fugitives came to a farm-yard
where the cock was sitting upon the gate, crowing
with all his might. “Your crow goes through and
through one,” said the donkey. “ What is the mat-
tener

“‘T have been foretelling fine weather, because it is
the day on which Our Lady washes the Christ-child’s
little shirts and wants to dry them,” said the cock;
“but guests are coming for Sunday, so the housewife
has no pity, and has told the cook that she intends to
eat me in the soup to-morrow and this evening I am to
_ have my head cut off. Now I am crowing at full pitch
while I can.”



The Bremen Town-Musicians. — “89

“Ah, but red-comb,’”’ said the donkey, ‘‘vou had
better come away with us. We are going to Bremen;
you can find something better than death everywhere;
you have a good voice and if we make music together ©
it must have some quality!”

The cock agreed to this plan and all four went on

together. They could not, however, reach the city of
Bremen in one day, and in the evening they came to a
forest where they meant to pass the night. The donkey
and the hound laid themselves down under a large
tree, the cat and the cock settled themselves in the
branches; but the cock flew right tothe top, where he
was most safe. Before he went to sleep he looked
round on all the four sides and thought he saw in the
distance a little spark burning; so he called out to his
companions that there must be a house not far off, for
he saw alight. The donkey said, “If so, we had
better get up and go on, for the shelter here is bad.”
The hound thought that a few bones with some meat
on would do him good too!

So they made their way to the place where the ligh,
was and soon saw it shine brighter and grow larges,
until they came to a well-lighted robber’s house. The
donkey, as the biggest, went to the window and
looked in.

“What do you see, my grey-horse?” asked the cock.

“What do I see? ” answered the donkey; “u table
covered with good things to eat and drink and robbers
sitting at it enjoying themselves.”

“That would be the sort of thing for us,” said the
cock. ,



9 Grimm’ Household Tales.

“Yes, yes; ah, how I wish we were there!” said
the donkey. ;

Then the animals took counsel together how they
should manage to drive away the robbers, and at last
they thought of a plan. The donkey was to place
himself with his fore-feet upon the window-ledge, the.
hound was to jump on the donkey’s back, the cat was
to climb upon the dog, and lastly the cock was to fly
up and perch upon the head of the cat.

When this was done, at a given signal, they began
to perform their music together; the donkey brayed,
the hound barked, the cat mewed, and the cock crowed ;
then they burst through the window into the room, so
that the glass clattered! At this horrible din, the rob-
bers sprang up, thinking no otherwise than that a
ghost had come in, and fled in a great fright out into
the forest. The four companions now sat down at the
table, well content with what was left, and ate as if
they were going to fast for a month.

As soon as the four minstrels had done, they put
out the light, and each sought for himself a sleeping-
place according to his nature and to what suited him.
The donkey laid himself down upon some straw in the —
yard, the hound behind the door, the cat upon the
hearth near the warm ashes, and the cock perched him-
self upon a beam of the roof; and being tired with
their long walk, they soon went to sleep.

When it was past midnight and the robbers saw -
from afar that the light was no longer burning in
their house and all appeared quiet, the captain said,
“We ought not to have let ourselves be frightened out



The Bremen Town-Musicians.









of our wits;” and or- fl Hm
dered one of them to J \s a
go and examine the Mh i ‘=
louse. I 4 |

|

The messenger
finding all still, went
into the kitchen to
light a candle, and,
taking the glistening
fiery eyes of the cat for
live coals, he held a
lucifer-match to them
to light it. But the
cat did not understand
the joke, and flew in
his face, spitting and
scratching. He was
dreadfully frightened
and ran to the back-
door, but the dog, who
lay there, sprang up
and bit his leg; and as
he ran across the yard
by the straw-heap, the
donkey gave him a
smart kick with its #
hind foot. ‘The cock, :
too, who had been
awakened by the noise €
and had become lively,

THE TOWN MUSICIANS,




gi



g2 Grimm's Household Tales.

cried down from the beam, “ Cock-a-doodle-dco !”

Then the robber ran back as fast as he could to his
captain and said, “‘ Ah, there is a horrible witch sitting
in the house, who spat on me and scratched my face
with her long claws; and by the door stands a man
with a knife, “who stabbed me in the leg; and in the
yard there lies a black monster, who beat me with a
wooden club; and above, upon ‘the roof, sits the judge,
who called out, ‘Bring the rogue here to me!’ so I
got away as well as I could.”

After this the robbers did not trust themselves in
the house again; but it suited the four musicians of
Bremen so well that they did not care to leave it any
more. And the mouth of him who last told this story
is still warm.









The Elves.

First SToRY.

A shoemakea:, by no fault of his own, had become
so poor that at last he had nqthing left but

leather for one pair of shoes. . So in the evening,
he cut out the shoes which he wished to make the
next morning, and as he had a good conscience, he lay
down quietly in his bed, commended himself to God,
and fell asleep. In the morning, after he had said his
ptayers, and was just going to sit down to work, the
two shoes stood quite finish on his table. He was
astounded, and did not know what to say to it. He
took the shoes in his hands to observe them closer,
and they were so neatly made that there was not one
bad stitch in them, just as if they were intended asa
masterpiece. Soon after, too, a buyer came in, and as
the shoes pleased him so well, he paid more for them
than was customary, and, with the money, the shoe.



94 Grimm’‘s Household Tales.

maker was able to purchase leather for two pairs of
shoes. He cut them out at night, and next morning
was about to set to work with fresh courage; but he
had no need to do so, for, when he got up, they were
already made, and buyers also were not wanting, who
gave him money enough to buy leather for four pairs
of shoes. ‘The following morning, too, he found the
four pairs made; and so it went on constantly, what
he cut out in the evening was finished by the morning,
so that he soon had his honest independence again,
and at last became a wealthy man. Now it befell that
one evening not long before Christmas, when the mau
had been cutting out, he said to his wife, before going
to bed, “ What think you if we were to stay up to-night
to see who it is that lends us this helping hand?”
The woman liked the idea, and lighted a candle, and
then they hid themselves in a corner of the room,
_ behind some clothes which were hanging up there, and
watched. When it was midnight, two pretty little
naked men came, sat down by the shoemaker’s table,
took all the work which was cut out before them and
began to stitch and sew, and hammer so skillfully and
so quickly with their little fingers that the shoemaker
could not turn away his eyes for astonishment. ‘They
did not stop until all -was done, and stood finished on
the table, and then they ran quickly away.
Next morning the woman said, “The little: men
‘have made us rich, and we really must show that we
are grateful for it. They run about so, and have
nothing on, and must be cold. I'll tell thee what Pll
do: I will make them little shirts, and coats, and



i

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F a Y

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Ah

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Ht

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SSS

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SS

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THE CHANGELING.



96 Grimm's Household Taies.

vests, and trousers, and knit both of them a pair. of
stockings, and do thou, too, make them two littie
pairs of shoes.” The man said, ‘I shall be very glad
to do it;” and one night, when everything was ready,
they laid their presents all together on the table instead
of the cut-out work, and then concealed themselves to
see how the little men would behave. At midnight
they came bounding in, and wanted to get to work at
once, but as they did not find any leather cut out, but
ouly the pretty little articles of clothing, they were at
first astonished, and then they showed intense delight.
They dressed themselves with the greatest rapidity,
putting the pretty clothes on, and singing,

“¢ Now we are boys so fine to see,
Why should we longer cobblers be ? ie

Then they danced and skipped and leaped over chairs
and benches. At last they danced out of doors., From
that time forth they came no more, but as long as the
shoemaker lived all went well with him, and all his
-undertakings prospered.

SECOND STORY.

There was once a poor servant’ girl, who was
industrious and cleanly, and swept the house every
day, and emptied her sweepings on the great heap in
front of the door. One morning when she was just
going back to her work, she found a letter on this
heap, and as she could not read, she put her broom in
the corner, and took the letter to her master and
mistress, and behold it was an invitation from the



The Elves. 97

elves, who asked the girl to hold a child for them at

its christening. ‘The girl did not know what to do,

but at length, after much persuasion, and as they told

her that it was not right to refuse an invitation of thie

kind, ske consented. ‘Then three elves came and

conducted her to a hollow mountain, where the little

folks lived. Everything there was small, but more

elegant and beautiful than can be described. ‘The

baby’s mother lay in a bed of black ebony ornamented

with pearls, the coverlids were embroidered with gold,

the cradle was of ivory, the bath of gold. The girl

stood as godmother, and then wanted to go home

again, but the little elves earnestly entreated her to

stay three days with them. So she stayed, and passed

the time in pleasure and gaiety, and the little folks did

all they could to make her happy. At last she set out

on ner way home. ‘Then first they filled her pockets .
quite full of money, and after that they led her out of

the mountain again. When she got home, she wanted
_to begin her work, and took the broom, which was still

standing in the corner, in her hand and began to

sweep. Then some strangers came out of the house,

who asked her who she was, and what business she
had there? And she had not, as she thought, been

three days with the little men in the mountains, but

seven years, and in the meantime her former masters

had died.



THIRD STORY.

A certain mother’s child has been taken away out
of its cradle by the elves, anda changeling witha large



93 Grimm's Household Tales.

head and staring eyes, which would do nothing but
eat and drink, laid in its place. In her trouble she
went to her neighbor, and asked her advice. The
neighbor said that she was to carry the changeling
into the kitchen, set it down on the hearth, light a
fire, and boil some water in two egg-shells, which
would make the changeling laugh, and if he laughed,
all would be over with him. ‘The woman did every-
, thing that her neighbor bade her. When she put the
egg-shells with water on the fire, the imp said, “1 am
as old now as the Wester forest, but never yet have I
seen any one boil anything in an egg-shell!” And he
began to laugh at it, Whilst he was laughing, sud-
denly came a host of little elves, who brought the right
child, set it down on the hearth, and took the change-
ling away with them.







The Godfather.

POOR man had so many children that he had
already asked every one in the world to be god-
father, and when still another child was born,

no one else was left whom he could invite. He knew
not what to do, and, in his perplexity, he lay down
and fell asleep. ‘Then he dreamed that he was to go
outside the gate, and ask the first person who met him
to be godfather. When he awoke, he determined to
obey his dream, and went outside the gate, and asked
the first person who came up to him to be godfather.
The stranger presented him with a little glass of water,
and said, “This is a wonderful water, with it thou
canst heal the sick, only thou must see where Death is
standing. If he is standing by the patient’s head,
give the patient some of the water and he will be
healed, but if Death is standing by his feet, all trouble
will be in vain, for the sick man must die.” From
this time forth, the man could always say whether a
patient could be saved or not, and became famous for

7—Grimm's.



TOO Grimm’s Household: Tales.

his skill, and earned a great deal of money. Once
he was called in to the child of the King, and when he
entered, he saw Death standing by the child’s head and:
cured it with the water, and he did the same a second
time, but the third time Death was standing by its
feet, and then he knew the child was forced to die.

Once the man thought he would visit the godfather,
and tell him how he had succeeded with the water.
But when he entered the house, it was such a strange
establishment! On the first flight of stairs, the.broom
and shovel were disputing, and knocking each other
about violently. He .asked them, “Where does the
godfather live!’ The broom replied, “One flight of
stairs higher up.” When he came to the second
flight, he saw a heap of dead fingers lying. He
asked, “Where does the godfather live?’ One of the
fingers replied, “One flight of stairs higher.’ On
the third flight lay a heap of dead heads, which again
directed him to a flight beyond. On the fourth
flight, he saw fishes on the fire, which frizzled in the
pans and baked themselves. They, too, said, “One
flight of stairs higher.’ And when he had ascended
the fifth, he came to the door of a room and peeped
through the keyhole, and there he saw the godfather
who had a pair of long horns. When he opened the
door and went in, the godfather got into bed
in a great hurry and covered himself up. Then
said the man, “Sir godfather, what a strange house-
hold you have! When I came to your first flight of
stairs, the shovel and broom were quarreling, and
beating each other violently.”



Full Text





Pacsy Sete,
CEteiaiaresa t=




Grimm's Fairy Tales

“« THOU ART MINE AND I AM THINE’”
FAIRY TALES
BY THE BROTHERS GRIMM

With Sixty-five Illustrations

“PHILADELPHIA
HENRY ALTEMUS COMPANY
Copyright 1898
By Henry ALTEMUS
Preface,

ACOB LEWIS GRIMM and his brother, William
Carl Grimm, were two learned Germans, who de- |
voted the whole of their lives to the study of the

German language and literature, and the antiquities,
poetry, and laws of the German people.

Jacob was born at Hanau, in 1785. William was
born in 1786. ‘The two brothers were educated at the
University of Marburg, and were “associated through
life in their studies and labours. From youth to old
age they had all things in common—books, money, and
dwelling. They studied together, and wrote together
in the same works, so that their respective shares can
scarcely be distinguished in the great result of the
united task, and the ‘Brothers Grimm’ became a
recognized duality in literature.” Jacob died in 1863,
and William in 1859.

They collected all the popular tales they could find,
partly from the mouths of the people, partly from
manuscripts and books, and published in 1812-15 the
first edition of these Zales, which have carried the
- names of the brothers Grimm into every household of
the civilized world, and founded the science of what is
tiow called folklore. ‘The tales are a wonderful collec-
tion, as interesting, from a literary point of view, as
they. are delightful as stories.


The Frog King, or Iron Henry.

i old times when wishing still helped one, there
lived a king whose daughters were all beautiful,

but the youngest was so beautiful that the sun
itself, which has seen so much, was astonished when-
ever it shone in her face. Close by the King’s castle
lay a great dark forest, and under an old lime-tree in
the forest was a well, and when the day was very warm,
the King’s child went out into the forest and sat down
by the side of the cool fountain, and when she was
dull she took a golden ball, and threw it up on high
and caught it, and this ball was her favorite plaything.

Now it so happened that on one occasion the
princess’s golden ball did not fall into the little hand
which she was holding up for it, but on to the ground
beyond, and rolled straight into the water. The King’s
daughter followed it with her eyes, but it vanished,
and the well was deep, so deep that the bottom could
& Grimm’s Household Tales.

not be seen. On this she began to cry, and cried
louder and louder, and could not be comforted. And ~
as she thus lamented, some one said to her:

““ What ails thee, King’s daughter? ‘Thou weepest
so that even a stone would show pity.”

She looked round to the side from whencethe voice
came, and saw a frog stretching forth its thick, ugly
head from the water. “Ah! old water-splasher, is it
thou?” said she; “I am weeping for my golden ball,
which has fallen into the well.”

“Be quiet, and do not weep,” answered the frog,
“T can help thee, but what wilt thou give me if I
bring thy plaything up again?”

“ Whatever thou wilt have, dear frog,” said she—
“my clothes, my pearls and jewels, and even the golden
crown which I am wearing.”

‘The frog answered, “I do not care for thy clothes,
thy pearls and jewels, or thy golden crown, but if thou
wilt love me and let me be thy companion and play-
fellow, and sit by thee at thy little table, and eat off thy
little golden plate, and drink out of thy little cup, and
sleep in thy little bed—if thou wilt promise me this I
will go down below, and bring thee thy golden ball up
again.”

“Oh, yes,” said she, “I promise thee all thou
wisuest, if thou wilt but bring me my ball back again.”
She, however, thought, ‘ How the silly frog does talk!
He lives in the water with the other frogs and croaks, |
and can be no companion to any human being!”

But the frog when he had received this promise,
‘put his head into the water and sank down, and in 4
The Frog-King, ot Iron Henry. 9

short time came swimming up again with the ball in
his mouth, and threw it on the grass. ‘The King’s
daughter was delighted to see her pretty plaything once
more, and picked it up andran away with it. “ Wait,
wait,” said the frog, “Take me with thee. I can’t
run as thou canst.” But what did it avail him to
scream his croak, croak, after her, as loudly as he
could? She did not listen to it, but ran home and soon
forgot the poor frog, who was forced to go back into
his well again.

The next day when she had seated herself at table
with the King and all the courtiers, and was eating
from her little golden plate, something came creeping
splish splash, splish splash, up the marble staircase,
and when it had got to the top, it knocked at the door
and cried, ‘‘ Princess, youngest princess, open the door
for me.” She ran to see who was outside, but when
she opened the door, there sat the frog in front of it.
Then she slammed the door to, in great haste, sat down
to dinner again and was quite frightened. ‘The King
saw plainly that her heart was beating violently, and
said, “My child, what art thou so afraid of? Is there per-
chance a giant outside who wants to carry thee away?”

“ Ah, no,” replied she, “it is no giant, but a dis-
gusting frog. »

“What does the frog want with thee?” “Ah, dear
father, yesterday when I was in the forest sitting by
the well, playing, my golden ball fell into the water.
And because I cried so the frog brought it out again
for me, and because he insisted so on it, I promised
him he should be my companion, but I never thought
10 Grimm’s Household Tales.

he would be able to come out of his water! And now
he is outside there, and wants to come in to me.’

In the meantime it knocked a second time, and
cried,

“Princess! youngest princess!
Open the door for me!
Dost thou know what thou saidst to me
Y esterday by the cool waters of the fountain?
Princess, youngest princess!
Open the oor for me!’

Then said the King, “That which thou hast _prom-
ised must thou perform. Go and let him in.” She
went and opened the door, and the frog hopped in and
followed. her, step by step to her chair. There he sat
still and cried, “Lift me up beside thee.” She delayed,
until at last the King commanded her to do it. When
the frog was once on the chair he wanted to be on the
table, and when he was on the table he said, “Now,
push thy little golden plate nearer to me that we may
eat together.” She did this, but it was easy to see that
she did not do it willingly. The frog enjoyed what he
ate, but almost every mouthful she took choked her.
At length he said, “I have eaten and am satisfied; now
I am tired, carry me into thy little room and make thy
little silken bed ready, and we a both lie down and
go to sleep.”

The King’s daughter began to cry, for she was
afraid of the cold frog which she did not like to touch,
and which was now to sleep in her pretty, clean little
bed. But the King grew angry and said, “He wha
iy

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eth ilonee ttf

we dant
My

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THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG,
12 Grimm's Household Tales.

helped thee when thou wert in trouble ought not after-
wards to be despised by thee.” So she took hold of
the frog with two fingers, carried him upstairs, and put
him in a corner. But when she was in bed he crept to
her and said, “I am tired, I want to sleep as well as
thou, lift me up or I will tell thy father.” Then she
was terribly angry, and took him up and threw him
with all her might against the wall. ‘“ Now, thou wilt
be quiet, odious frog,” said she. But when he fell down
he was no frog but a king’s son with beautiful kind
eyes. He by her father’s will was now her dear com-
panion and husband. ‘Then he told her how he had
been bewitched by a wicked witch, and how no one
could have delivered him from the well but herself, and
that to-morrow they would go together into his king-
dom. ‘Then they went to sleep, and next morning
when the sun awoke them, a carriage came driving up
with eight white horses, which had white ostrich
feathers on their heads, and were harnessed with golden
chains, and behind stood the young King’s servant,
faithful Henry. Faithful Henry had been so unhappy
when his master was changed into a frog, that he had
caused three iron bands to be laid round his heart, lest
it should burst with grief and sadness. The carriage
was to conduct the young King into his kingdom.
Faithful Henry helped them both in, and placed him-
self behind again, and was full of joy because of this
deliverance. And when they had driven a part of the
way, the King’s son heard a cracking behind him as if
something had broken. So he turned round and cried,
“Henry, the carriage is breaking.”
The Frog-King, or Iron Henry. 13

“No, master, it is not the carriage. It is a band
from my heart, which was put there in my great pain
when you were a frog and imprisoned in the well.”
Again and once again while they were on their way
something cracked, and each time the King’s son
thought the carriage was breaking; but it was only the
bands which were springing from the heart of faithful
Henry because his master was set free and was happy.




The Twelve Brothers.

HERE were once on a time a king and a queen
who lived happily together and had twelve chil-
dren, but they were all boys. Then said the

King to his wife, “If the thirteenth child which thou

art about to bring into the world, is a girl, the twelve

boys shall die, in order that her possessions may be

' great, and that the kingdom may fall to her alone.”
He caused likewise twelve coffins to be made; which
were already filled with shavings, and in each lay the
little pillow for the dead, and he had them taken into
a locked-up room, and then he gave the Queen the
key of it, and bade her not to speak of this to any
one.

_ The mother, however, now sat and lamented all
day long, until the youngest son, who was always with
her, and whom she had named Benjamin, from the
Bible, said to her, “Dear mother, why art thou so
sad >?”

“Dearest child,” she answered, “I may not tell
thee.” But he let her have no rest until she went and
The Twelve Brothers. - 15

unlocked the room, and showed him the twelve coffins
ready filled with shavings. Then she said, “My
dearest Benjamin, thy father has had these coffins”
made for thee and for thy eleven brothers, for if I
bring a little girl into the world, you are all to be
killed and buried in them.’’ And as she wept while
she was saying this, the son comforted her and said,
“Weep not, dear mother, we will save ourselves, and
go hence.” But she said, “Go forth into. the forest
with thy eleven brothers, and let one sit constantly
on the highest tree which can be found, and keep
watch, looking towards the tower here in the castle.
If I give birth to a little son, I will put up a white
flag, and then you may venture to come back, but if
I bear a daughter, I will hoist a red flag, and then fly
hence as quickly as you are able, and may the good
God protect you. And every night I will rise up and
pray for you—in winter that you may be able to
warm yourself at a fire, and in the summer that you
may not faint away in the heat.

After she had blessed her sons therefore, they went
forth into the forest. They each kept watch in turn,
and sat on the highest oak and looked towards the
tower. When: eleven days had passed and the turn
came to Benjamin, he saw that a flag was being
raised. It was, however, not the white, but the blood-
red flag which announced that they were all to die.
When the brothers ‘heard that they were very angry, and
said, “Are we all to suffer death for the sake of a
girl?, We swear that we will avenge ourselves!—
wheresoever we find a girl, her red blood shall flow.”
16 ® Grimm’s Household Tales.

Thereupon they went deeper into the forest, and in
the midst of it, where it was the darkest, they found a
little bewitched hut, which was standing empty. ‘Then
said they, “Here we will dwell, and thou Benjamin,
who art the youngest and weakest, thou shalt stay
at home and keep house, we others will go. out and
get food.” Then they went into the forest and
shot hares, wild deer, birds and pigeons, and what-
soever there was to eat; this they took to Benjamin,
who had to dress it for them in order that they
might appease their hunger. They lived together
ten years in the little hut, and the time did not
appear long to them.

The little daughter which their mother the Queen
had given birth to, was now grown up; she was good
of heart, and fair of face, and had a golden star on her

_. forehead. Once, when it was the great washing, she

saw: twelve men’s shirts among the things, and ‘asked
her mother, “To whom do these twelve shirts belong,
for they are far too small for father?’ Then the
Queen answered with a heavy heart, “Dear child,
these belong to thy twelve brothers.” Said the maiden,
“Where are my twelve brothers, I have never yet
heard of them?’ She replied, “God knows where
they are, they are wandering about the world.” Then
she took the maiden and opened the chamber for her,
and showed her the twelve coffins with the shavings,
and pillows for the head. “These coffins,” said she,
“were destined for thy brothers, but they went away
secretly before thou wert born,” ‘and she related to her
how everything had happened ; then said the maiden,
Wy

AWN
i
= Ai A
= Vy

YAN
a (h



TWELVE RAVENS FLEW TOWARDS THE QUEEN.
18 Grimm's Household Tales.

“Dear mother, weep not, I will go and seek n,;
brothers.”

So she took the twelve shirts and went forth, and
straight into the great forest. She walked the whole
day, and in the evening she came to the bewitched
hut. Then she entered it and found a young boy, wha
asked, “From whence comest thou, and whither art
thou bound?” and was astonished that she was sa-
beautiful, and wore royal garments, and had a star on
her forehead. And she answered, “I am a king’s
daughter, and am seeking my twelve brothers, and I
will walk as far as the sky is blue until I find them.”
She likewise showed him the twelve shirts which be-
longed to them. Then Benjamin saw that she was
his sister, and said, “I am Benjamin, thy youngest
brother.” And she began te weep for joy, and Ben-
jamin wept also, and they kissed and embraced each
other with the greatest love. But after this he
said, “Dear sister, there is still one difficulty. We
have agreed that every maiden whom we meet shall
die, because we have been obliged to leave our king-
dom on account of a girl.” ‘Then said she, “I will
willingly die, if by so doing, I can deliver my twelve
brothers.”

“No,” answered he, “thou shalt not die, seat thy-
' self beneath this tub until our eleven brothers come,
and then I will soon come to an agreement with
them.”

She did so, and when it was night the others came
from hunting, and their dinner was ready. And as
they were sitting at table, and eating, they asked,
The Twelve Brothers. 19

“What news is there?’ Said Benjamin, “Don’t you
know anything?’ “No,” they answered. He con-
tinued, “You have been in the forest and I have
stayed at home, and yet I know more than you do.”
“Tell us then,’ they cried. He answered, “But
promise me that the first maiden who meets us shall
_ not be killed.” “Yes,” they all cried, “she shall have
mercy, only do tell us.”

Then said he, “Our sister is here,’ and he lifted
up the tub, and the King’s daughter came forth in her
royal garments with the golden star on her forehead,
and she was beautiful, delicate, and fair. Then they
were all rejoiced, and fell on her neck, and kissed and
loved her with all their hearts.

Now she stayed at home with Benjamin and helped
him with the work. The eleven went into the forest
and caught game, and deer, and birds, and wood-pig-
eons that they might have food, and the little sister
and Benjamin took care to make it ready for them.
She sought for the wood for cooking and herbs for
vegetables, and put the pans on the fire so that the
dinner was always ready when the eleven came. She
likewise kept order in the little house, and put
beautifully white clean coverings on the little beds, and
the brothers were always contented and lived in great
harmony with her.

Once ona time the two at home had prepared a
beautiful entertainment, and when they were all to-
gether, they sat down and ate and drank and were full
of gladness. There was, however, a little garden be-
longing to the bewitched house wherein stood twelve

Grimm's.
20 ' Grimm's Household Tales.

lily flowers, which are likewise called students. She
wished to give her brothers pleasure, and plucked the
twelve flowers, and thought she would present each
brother with one while at dinner. But at the selfsame
moment that she plucked the flowers the twelve
brothers were changed into twelve ravens, and flew
away over the forest, and the house and garden van-
ished likewise. And now the poor maiden was alone
in the wild forest, and when she looked around, an old
woman was standing near her who said, “ My child,
what hast thou done? Why didst thou not leave the
twelve white flowers growing? ‘They were thy
brothers, who are now for evermore changed into
ravens.” ‘he maiden said weeping, “Is there no way
of delivering them ?”

“No,” said the woman, “there is but one in the
-whole world, and that is so hard that thou wilt not de
liver them by it, for thou must be dumb for seven’
years, and mayst not speak or laugh, and if thou speak-
est one single word, and only an hour of the seven
years is wanting, all is in vain, and thy brothers will
be killed by the one word.”

Then said the maiden in her heart, “I know with
certainty that I shall set my brothers free,” and went
and sought a high tree and seated herself in it and
span, and neither spoke nor laughed. Now it so hap-
pened that a king was hunting in the forest, who had
a great greyhound which ran to the tree on which the
maiden was sitting, and sprang about it, whining, and
barking at her. Then the King came by and saw the
beautiful King’s daughter with the golden star on her
The Twelve Brothers. ax

brow, and was so charmed with her beauty that he
called to ask her if she would be his wife. She made
no answer, but nodded a little with her head. So he
climbed up the tree himself, carried her down, placed
her on his horse, and bore her home, ‘Then the wed-
ding was solemnized with great magnificence and re-
joicing, but the bride neither spoke ner smiled. When
they had lived happily together for a few years, the
King’s mother, who was a wicked woman, began to
slander the young Queen, and said to the King, “This
is a common beggar g girl whom thou hast brought back
with thee. Who knows what impious: tricks she
practises secretly! Even if she be dumb, and not able
to speak, she still might laugh for once; but those
who do not laugh have bad. consciences.” A first
the King would not believe it, but the old woman
urged this so long, and accused her of so many
evil things, that at last the King let himself be per- .
suaded and sentenced her to death.

And now a great fire was lighted in the courtyard
in which she was to be burned, and the King stood
above at the window and looked on with tearful eyes,
because he still loved her so much. And when she
was bound fast to the stake, and the fire was licking
at her clothes with its red tongue, the last instant of
the seven years expired. Then a whirring sound was
heard in the air, and twelve ravens came flying towards
the place, and sank downwards, and when they touched
the earth they were her twelve brothers, whom she
had delivered. They tore the fire asunder, extin-
guished the flames, set their dear sister free, and kissed
22 Grimm's Household Tales.

and embraced her. And now as she dared to open her
mouth and speak, she told the King why she had been
dumb, and had never laughed. The King rejoiced
when he heard that she was innocent, and they all
lived in great unity until their death. The wicked
step-mother was taken before the judge, and put into
a barrel filled with boiling oil and venomous snakes,
and died an evil death.




Brother and Sister.

be brother took his little sister by the hand
and said, “Since our mother died we have had
no happiness; our step-mother beats us every
day, and if we come near she kicks us away with her
foot. Our meals are the hard crusts of bread that are
left over; and the little dog under the table is better
off, for she often throws it a nice bit. May Heaven
pity us. If our mother only knew!.. Come, we will
go forth together into the wide world.”

They walked the whole day over meadows, fields,
and stony places ; and when it rained the little sister
said, “ Heaven and our hearts are weeping together.”
In the evening they came to a large forest, and they
were so weary with sorrow and hunger and the long
walk, that they lay down in a hollow tree and fell
asleep.

The next day when they awoke, the sun was already
high in the sky, and shone down hot into the tree.
24 Grimm’s Housenold Tales.

Then the brother said, “Sister, I am thirsty; if 1
knew of a little brook I would go and just take q
drink ; I think I hear one running.” ‘The brother
got up and took the little sister by the hand, and they
set off to find the brook.

But the wicked step-mother was a witch, and had
seen how the two children had gone away, and had
crept after them privily, as witches do creep, and
had bewitched all the brooks in the forest.

Now when they found a little brook leaping brightly
over the stones, the brother was going to drink out of
it, but the sister heard how it said as it ran, “ Who
drinks of me will be a tiger; who drinks of me will
be a tiger.” Then the sister cried, “Pray, deat
brother, do not drink, or you will become a wild
beast, and tear me to pieces.” ‘The brother did not
drink, although he was so thirsty, but said, “I wil
wait for the next spring.”

When they came to the next brook the sister heard
this also say, “Who drinks of me will be a wolf s
who drinks of. me will be a wolf.” ‘Then the sister
cried out, “Pray dear brother, do not drink, or you
will become a wolf, and devour me.” ‘The brother did
not drink, and said, “I will wait until we come to the
next spring, but then I must drink, say what you
like ; for my thirst is too great.”

And when they came to the third brook the sister
heard how it said as it ran, “Who drinks of me
will be a roebuck: who drinks of me will be a roe
buck.” The sister said, “ Oh, I pray you, dear brother,
do not drink, or you will become a roebuck, and
gM
‘ Q e',
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Ct eet
TAL = CI}

ie ie V4

’ x \ \ ll Nee }
tr \ by, = te “L, KE
Sinden Dy d

{ ihe A
LY Ci ates
hizo dy



HER BROTHER WAS CHANGED TO A ROEBUCK,
26 Gtimm’s Household Tales.

run away from me.” But the brother had knelt
down at once by the brook, and had bent down and
drank some of the water, and as soon as the first drop
touched his lips he lay there a young roebuck.

And now the sister wept over her poor bewitched
brother, and the little roe wept also, and sat sorrow-
fully near to her. But at last the girl said, “Be quiet,
dear little roe, I will never, never leave you.”

Then she untied her golden garter and put it round
the roebuck’s neck, and she plucked rushes and wove
them into a soft cord. With this she tied the little
beast and led it on, and she walked deeper and deeper
into the forest.

And when they, had gone a very long way they
came at last to a little house, and the girl looked in;
and as it was empty, she thought, “We can stay here
and live.” Then she sought for leaves and moss to
make a soft bed for the roe; and every morning she
went out and gathered roots and berries and nuts for
herself, and brought tender grass for the roe, who ate
out of her hand, and was content and played round
about her. In the evening, when the sister was tired,
and had said her prayer, she laid her head upon the
roebuck’s back: that was her pillow, and she slept
softly on it. And if only the brother had had his
human form it would have been a delightful life.

For some time they were alone like this in the
wilderness. But it happened that the King of the
country held a great hunt in the forest. Then the
blasts of the horns, the barking of dogs, and the
merry shouts of the huntsmen rang through the trees,
Brother and Sister. 27

and the roebuck heard all, and was only too anxious
to be there. “Oh,” said he to his sister, ‘let me be
off to the hunt, I cannot bear it any longer;” and
he begged so much that at last she agreed. “But
said she to him, “come back to me in the evening;
J must shut my door for fear of the rough huntsmen,
so knock and say, “ My little sister, let me in!” that
I may know you; and if you do not say that, I shall
not open the door.” ‘Then the young roebuck sprang
away; so happy was he and so merry in the open
air.
The King and the huntsmen saw the pretty crea-
ture, and started after him, but they could not catch
him, and when they thought that they surely had him,
away he sprang through the bushes and could not
be seen. When it was dark he ran to the cottage,
knocked, and said, ‘‘ My little sister, let mein.” Then
the door was opened for him, and he jumped in, and
rested himself the whole night through upon his soft
bed.

The next day the hunt went on afresh, and when
the roebuck again heard the bugle-horn, and the ho!
ho! of the huntsmen, he had no peace, but said, ‘“Sis-
ter, let me out, I must be off.” His sister opened the’
door for him, and said, “But you must be here again
in the evening and say your pass-word.”

When the King and his huntsmen again saw the
young roebuck with the golden collar, they all chased
him, but he was too quick and nimble for them. This
went on for the whole day, but at last by the evening
the huntsmen had surrounded him, and one of them
28 Grimm's Household Tales,

wounded him a little in the foot, so that he limped and
ran slowly. ‘Then a hunter crept after him to the cot-
tage and heard how he said, “ My little sister, let me
in,’ and saw that the door was opened for him, and
was shut again at once. The huntsman took notice
of itall, and went to the King and told him what he
had seen and heard. ‘hen the King said, “’To-morrow
‘we will hunt once more.”

The little sister, however, was dreadfully frightened
when she saw that her fawn was hurt. She washed
the blood off him, laid herbs on the wound and said,
“Go to your bed, dear roe, that you may get well
again.” But the wound was so slight that the roe
buck, next morning, did not feel it any more. And
when he again heard the sport outside, he said, “I
cannot bear it, I must be there; they shall not find it
so. easy to catch me.” ‘The sister cried, and said,
“This time they will kill you, and here I am alone in
the forest and forsaken by all the world. I will not
let you out.” “Then you will have me die of grief,”
answered the roe; “when I hear the bugle-horns I feel
as if I must jump out of my skin.” ‘Then the sister
could not do otherwise, but opened the door for him
with a heavy heart, and the roebuck, full of health and
joy, bounded into the forest. z

When the King saw him, he said to his huntsman
“ Now chase him all day long till night-tall, but take
care that no one does him any harm.”

As soon as the sun had set, the King said to the
huntsmen, “Now come and show me the cottage in
the wood ;” and when he was at the door, he knocked
Brother and Sister. 20

and called out, ‘Dear little sister, let me in.” Then
the door opened, and the King walked in, and there
stood a maiden more lovely than any he had ever seen.
The maiden was frightened when she saw, not her
little roe, but a man come in who worea golden crown
upon his head. But the King looked kindly at her,
stretched out his hand, and said, “ Will you go with
me to my palace and be my dear wife?” “Yes, in-
deed,” answered the maiden, “but the little roe must
go with me, I cannot leave him.” The King said,
“Tt shall stay with you as long as you live, and shall
want nothing.” Just then he came running in, and
the sister again tied him with the cord of the rushes,
took it in her own hand, and went away with the King
from the cottage.

The King took the lovely maiden upon his horse
and carried her to his palace, where the wedding was
held with great pomp. She was now the Queen, and
they lived for a long time happily together; the roe-
buck was tended and cherished, and ran about in the
palace-garden,

But the wicked step-mother, because of whom the
children had gone out into the world, thought all the
time that the sister had been torn to pieces by the wild
beasts in the wood, and that the brother had been shot
foraroebuck by the huntsmen. Now when she heard
that they were so happy, and so well off, envy and
hatred rose in her heart and left her no peace, and
she thought of nothing but how she could bring ©
them again to misfortune. Her own daughter, who
was as ugly as night, and had only one eye, grumbled
30 Grimm’s Household Tales.

at her and said, “A Queen! that ought to have been -
my luck.”

“Only be quiet,” answered the old woman, and
comforted her by saying, “when the times comes T
shall be ready.”

As time went on, the Queen had a pretty little
boy, and it happened that the King was out hunt-
ing; so the old witch took the form of the chamber-
maid, went into the room where the Queen lay, and
said to-her, “Come the bath is ready: it will do you
good, and give you fresh strength; make haste before
it gets cold.”

The daughter also was close by; so they carried the
weakly Queen into the bath-room, and put her into the
path; then they shut the door and ran away. But in
the bath-room they had made a fire of such deadly
heat that the beautiful young Queen was soon suffo-
cated.

When this was done the old woman took her daugh-
ter, put a nightcap on her head, and laid her in bed in
place of the Queen. She gave her too the shape and
look of the Queen, only she could not make good the
lost eye. But in order that the King might not see
it, she was to lie on the side on which she had no
eye.

In the evening when he came home and heard that
he had a son he was heartily glad, and was going to
the bed of his dear wife to see how she was. But the
old woman quickly called out, “For your life leave
the curtains closed; the Queen ought not to see the
light yet, and must have rest.” The King went away,
Brother and Sister. 31

and did not find out that a false Queen was lying in the
bed.

But at midnight, when all slept, the nurse, who
was sitting in the nursery by the cradle, and who was
the only person awake, saw the door open and the true
Queen walk in. She took the child out of the cradle,
laid it on her arm, and suckled it. ‘Then sheshook up
its pillow, laid the child down again, and covered it
with the little quilt. And she did not forget the roe-
buck, but went into the corner where it lay, and
stroked its back. ‘Then she went quite silently out of
' the door again. ‘The next morning the nurse asked
the guards whether any one had come into the palace
during the night, but they answered, ‘“‘No, we have
seen no one.”

She came thus many nights and never spoke a
word: the nurse always saw her, but she did not dareto
tell any one about it. :

When some time had passed in this manner, the
Queen began to speak in the night, and said—

“<< How fares my child, how fares my roe?
Twice shall I come, then never more.”’

The nurse did not answer, but when the Queen had
come again, went to the King and told him all. ‘The
King said, “Ah heavens! what is this? ‘To-morrow
night I will watch by the child.’ In the evening he
went into the nursery, and at midnight the Queen
again appeared and said—

“How fares my child, how fares my roe?
Once will I come, then never more.”*
32 Grimm's Household Tales.

And she nursed the child as she was wont to do
before she disappeared. ‘The King dared not speak to
her, but on the next night he watched neat ‘Then
she said—

“< How fares my child, how fares my roe?
This time I come, then never more.”’

Then the King could not restrain himself; he sprang
towards her, and said, “You can be none other than
my dear wife.”

She answered, “Yes, I am your dear wife,” and at
the same moment she received life again, and by God’s
grace became fresh, rosy, and full of health.

Then she told the King the evil deed which the
wicked witch and her daughter had been guilty of to-
wards her. The King ordered both to be led before
the judge, and judgment was delivered against them.
‘The daughter was taken into the forest where she was
torn to pieces by wild beasts, but the witch was cast
into the fire and miserably burned. And as soon as she
was burned the roebuck changed his shape, and received
his human form again, so the sister and brother lived
happily together all their lives,




Rapunzel.

HERE were once a man and a woman who haa
long in vain wished for a child. At length the
woman hoped that God was about to grant her

desire. These people had a little window at the back of
their house from which a splendid garden could be seen,
which was full of the most beautiful flowers and herbs.
It was, however, surrounded by a high wall, and no one
dared to go into it because it belonged to an enchant-
ress, who had great power and was dreaded by all the
world. One day the woman was standing by this win-
dow and looking down into the garden, when she saw
a bed which was planted with the most beautiful
rampion (tapunzel), and it looked so fresh and green
that she longed for it, and had the greatest desire to
eat some. ‘This desire increased every day, and as she
knew that she could not get any of it, she quite pined
away, aud looked pale and miserable. ‘Then her hus-
~ band was alarmed, and asked, ‘“ What aileth thee, dear
34 Grimm's Household Tales.

wife?” “Ah,” she replied, “if I can’t get some of
the rampion, which is in the garden behind our house, to
eat, I shall die.’ The man, who loved her, thought,
“ Sooner than let thy wife die, bring her some of the
campion thyself, let it cost thee what it will.” In the
twilight of evening, he clambered down over the wall
into the garden of the enchantress, hastily clutched a
handful. of rampion, and took it to his wife. She at
once made herself a salad of it, and ate it with much
relish. She, however, liked it so much—so very
much, that the next day she longed for it three times
as much as before. If he was to have any rest, her
husband must once more descend into the garden. In
the gloom of evening, therefore, he let himself down
again; but when he had ciambered down the wall he
was terribly afraid, for he saw the enchantress stand-
ing before him. ‘How canst thou dare,” said shie
with angry look, “to descend into my garden and steal
my rampion like a thief? Thou shalt suffer for it!”
“ Ah,” answered he, “let mercy take the place of jus:
tice, I only made up my mind to do it out of neces.
sity. My wife saw your rampion from the window,
and felt such a longing for it that she would have died
if she had not got some to eat.” ‘Then the enchant.
ress allowed her anger to be softened, and said to him,
“Tf the case be as thou sayest, I will allow thee to take
away with thee as much rampion as thou wilt, only I
make one condition, thou must give me the child
which thy wife will bring into the world; it shall be
well treated, and I will care for it like a mother.” The
man in his terror consented to everything, and when
y

35

i) ini

tell

;

iiiiil|

Rapunzel,

the woman was brought to bed, the enchantress ap-

gave the child the name of Rapunze

th her.
Rapunzel grew into the most beautiful child be

1

peared at once,
and took it away w:



THE PRINCE VISITS RAPUNZEL,

When she was twelve years old, the

enchantress shut her into a tower, which lay ina

neath the sun.

38—Grimm’s.
36 Grimm's Household Tales.

forest, and had neither stairs nor door, but quite at the
top was a little window. When the enchantress
wanted to go in, she placed herself beneath this, and
cried,
“* Rapunzel, Rapunzel,
Let down thy hair to me.”

Rapunzel had magnificent long hair, fine as spun gold,
and when she heard the voice of the enchantress she
unfastened her braided tresses, wound them round one
the hooks of the window above, and then the hair fell
twenty ells down, and the enchantress climbed up by it.
After a year or two, it came to pass that the King’s
son rode through the forest and went by the tower.
‘Then he heard a song, which was so charming that he
stood still and listened. This was Rapunzel, who in
her solitude passed her time in letting her sweet voice
resound. ‘The King’s son wanted to climb up to her,
and locked for the door ot the tower, but none was to
be found. He rode home, but the singing had so
deeply touched his heart, that every day he went out
into the forest and listened to it. Once when he was
thus standing behind a tree, he saw that an enchantress
came there, and he heard how she cried,

** Rapunzel, Rapunzel,
Let down thy hair.”

Then Rapunzel let down the braids of her hair, and
the enchantress climbed up to her. “If that is the
ladder by which one mounts, I will for once try my
fortune,” said he, and the next day when it began to
grow dark, he went to the tower and cried,
Rapunzel. 37

‘6 Rapunzel, Rapunzel,
Let down thy hair.”

Immediately the hair fell down and the King’s son
climbed up.

At first Rapunzel was terribly frightened when a
man such as her eyes had never yet beheld, came to
her; but the King’s son began to talk to her quite like
a friend, and told her that his heart had been so stirred
that it had let him have no rest,and he had been forced
to see her. ‘Then Rapunzel lost her fear, and when he
asked her if she would take him for her husband, and
she saw that he was young and handsome, she thought,
«Fie will love me more than old Dame Gothel does;”’
and she said yes, and laid her hand inhis. She said, “I
will willingly go away with thee, but I do not know
how to get down. Bring with thee a skein of silk
every time that thou comest, and I will weave a ladder
with it, and when that is ready I will descend, and thou
wilt take me on thy horse.” ‘They agreed that until
that time he should come to her every evening, for the
old woman came by day. ‘The enchantress remarked
nothing of this, until once Rapunzel said to her, “Tell
me, Dame Gothel, how it happens that you are so much
heavier for me to draw up than the young King’s son
—he is with me in a moment.”

“ Ah! thou wicked child,” cried the enchantress,
“What do I hear thee say! I thought I had separated
thee from all the world, and yet thou.hast deceived
me!” In her anger she clutched Rapunzel’s beautiful
tresses, wrapped them once round her left hand, seized
38 Grimm's Household Tales,

a pair of scissors with her right, and snip, snap, they
were cut off, and the lovely braids lay on the ground.
And she was so pitiless that she took poor Rapunzel
into a desert where she had to live in great grief and
misery.

The same day, however, that she cast out Rapunzel,
the enchantress in the evening fastened the braids of
hair that she had cut off to the hook of the window,
and when the King’s son came and cried,

** Rapunzel, Rapunzel,
Let down thy hair.”’

she let the hair down. ‘The King’s son ascended, but
he did not find his dearest Rapunzel above, but the
enchantress, who gazed at him with wicked and venom-
ous looks. ‘“ Aha!” she cried mockingly, “Thou
wouldst fetch thy dearest, but the beautiful bird sits no
longer singing in the nest; the cat has got it and will
scratch out thy eyes as well. Rapunzel is lost to thee;
_ thou wilt never see her more.”

The King’s son was beside himself with pain, and
in his despair he leaped down from the tower. He
escaped with his life, but the thorns into which he fell,
pierced his eyes. Then he wandered quite blind about
the forest, ate nothing but roots and berries, and did
nothing but lament and weep over the loss of his
dearest wife. Thus he roamed about in misery for
some years, and at length came to the desert where
Rapunzel, with the twins to which she had given birth,
a boy and a girl, lived in wretchedness. He heard a
voice,’and it seemed so familiar to him that he went
ae



THE PRINCE FELL FROM THE TOWER.
40 Grimm's Household Tales.

towards it, and when he approached, Rapunzel knew
him and fell on his neck and wept. ‘Two of her tears
wetted his eyes and they grew clear again, and he could
see with them as before. He led her to his kingdom
where he was joyfully received, and they lived for along
time afterwards, happy and contented.


The Three Little Men in the Wood.

ese was once a man whose wife died, and a
woman whose husband died, and the man had a
daughter, and the woman also had a daughter.

The girls were acquainted with each other, and went

out walking together, and afterwards came to the

woman in her house. Then said she to the man’s
daughter, “ Listen, tell thy father that I would like to
marry him, and then thou shalt wash thyself in milk
every morning, and drink wine, but my own daughter
shali wash herself in water and drink water.” ‘The
girl went home, and told her father what the woman
had said. ‘I'he man said, “ Whatshall I do? Marriage
is a joy and also a torment.” At length as he could
come to no decision, he pulled off his boot, and said,

“Take this boot, it has a hole in the sole of it. Go

with it up to the loft, hang it on the big nail, and

then pour water into it. If it holds the water, then I

will again take a wife, but if runs through, I will not.”

The girl did as she was ordered, but the water drew

the hole together, and the boot became full to the top.

She informed her father how it had turned out. Then

he himself went up, and when he saw that she was

right, he went.to the widow and wooed her, and the ©
wedding was celebrated.

The next morning, when the two girls got up,
there stood before the man’s daughter, milk for her to
wash in and wine for her to drink, but before the
woman’s daughter stood water to wash herself with and
42 Grimm's Household Tales.

water for drinking. On the second morning, stood
water for washing and water for drinking before the
man’s daughter as well as before the woman’s daugh-
ter. And on the third morning stood water for wash-
ing and water for drinking before the man’s daughter,
and milk for washing and wine for drinking, before
the woman’s daughter, and so it continued. ‘The
woman became bitterly unkind to her step-daughter,
and day by day did her best to treat her still worse.
She was envious too because her step-daughter was
beautiful and lovable, and her own daughter ugly and
repulsive.

Once, in winter, when everything was frozen as
hard as a stone, and hill and vale lay covered with
snow, the woman made a frock of paper, called her
step-daughter, and said, ‘Here, put on this dress, and
go out into the wood, and fetch me a little basketful
of strawberries,—I have a fancy for some.” ‘Good
heavens!” said the girl, “no strawberries grow in
wiuter! ‘The ground is frozen, and besides the snow
has covered everything. And why am I to go in this
paper frock? It is so cold outside that one’s very
breath freezes! The wind will blow through the
frock, and the thorns will tear it off my body.” “ Wilt
thou contradict me again?” said the stepmother, “See
that thou goest, and do not show thy face again until
thou hast the basketful of strawberries!” Then she
gave her a little piece of hard bread, and said, “This
will last thee the day,” and thought, “Thou wilt die .
of cold and hunger outside, and wilt never be seen
again by me.”
The Three Little Men in the Wood. 43

Then the maiden was obedient, and put on the
paper frock, and went out with the basket. Far and
wide there was nothing but snow, and not a green

YUMMY

LD:

pl

H)



THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN THE WOOD.

blade to beseen. Whenshe got into the wood she saw
a small house out of which peeped three little dwarfs,
She wished them good day, and knocked modestly at
44 Grimm's Household Tales.

the door. ‘They cried, “Come in,” and she entered
the room and seated herself on the bench by the stove,
where she began to warm herself and eat her break-
fast. ‘The elves said, “Give us, too, some of it.”
“Willingly,” said she, and divided her bit of bread in
two, and gave them the half. They asked, “ What
dost thou here in the forest in the winter time, in thy
thin dress?” “Ah,” she answered, “I am to look for
a basketful of strawberries, and am not to go home un-
til I can take them with me.” When she had eaten
her bread, they gave her a broom and said, “Sweep
away the snow at the back door with it.’ But when
she was outside, the three little men said to each other,
“What shall we give her as she is so good, and has
shared her bread with us?” ‘Then said the first, “‘My
gift is, that she shall every day grow more beautiful.”
‘The second said, “ My gift is, that gold pieces shall
fall out of her mouth every time she speaks.” ‘The
third said, “My gift is, that a king shall come and
take her to wife.” :

The girl, however, did as the little men had bidden
her, swept away the snow behind the little house with
the broom, and what did she find but real ripe straw.
berries, which came up quite dark-red out of the snow!
In her joy she hastily gathered her basket full, thanked
the little men, shook hands with each of them, and ran
home to take her step-mother what she had longed for
so much. When she went in and said good-evening,
a piece of gold at once fell out of her mouth. ‘There-
upon she related what had happened to her in the
wood, but with every word she spoke, gold pieces fell
2

The Three Little Men in The Wood. 45

from her mouth, until very soon the whole room was
covered with them. ‘ Now look at her arrogance,”
cried the step-sister, “to throw about gold in that
way! but she was secretly envious of it, and wanted
to go into the forest also to seek strawberries. The
mother said, “‘No, my dear little daughter, it is too
cold, thou mightest die of cold.’ However, as her
daughter let her have no peace, the mother at last
yielded, made her a magnificent dress of fur, which she
was obliged to put on, and gave her bread-and-butter

~ and cake with her.

The girl went into the forest and straight up to
the little house. The three little elves peeped out
again, but she did not greet them, and without look-
ing round at them and without speaking to them, she
went awkwardiy into the room, seated herself by the
stove, and began to eat her bread-and-butter and cake.
«Give us some of it,” cried the little men; but she re.
plied, “There is not enough for myself, so how can 1
give it away to other people?” When she had done
eating, they said, “There is a broom for thee, sweep
all clean for us outside by the back-door.” ‘Humph!
Sweep for yourselves,” she answered, “I am not your
servant.” When she saw that they were not going to
give her anything, she went out by the door. Then
the little men said to each other, ‘What shali we give
her as she is so naughty, and has a wicked envious
heart, that will never let her do a good turn to any
one?” ‘The first said, “I grant that she may grow
uglier every day.” ‘The second said, “I grant that at
every word she says, a toad shall spring out of her
(

46 Grimm's Household Tales,

mouth.” ‘The third said, “I grant that she may die
a miserable death.” The maiden looked for straw-
berries outside, but as she found none, she went
angrily home. And when she opened her mouth, and
was about to tell her mother what had happened to
her in the wood, with every word she said, a toad
sprang out of her mouth, so that every one was seized
with horror of her.

_ Then the step-mother was still more enraged, and
thought of nothing but how to do every possible in-
jury to the man’s daughter, whose beauty, however,
grew daily greater. At length she took a cauldron,
set it on the fire, and boiled yarn in it. When it was
boiled, she flung it on the poor girl’s shoulder, and
gave her an axe in order that she might go on the
frozen river, cut a hole in the ice, and rinse the yarn.
She was obedient, went thither and cut a hole in the
ice; and while she was in the midst of her cutting, a
splendid carriage came driving up, in which sat the
King. The carriage stopped, and the King asked,
‘““My child, who art thou, and what art thou doing
here?’ “I am a poor girl, and I am rinsing yarn.”
Then the King felt compassion, and when he saw that
she was so very beautiful, he said to her, “Wilt thou
go away with.me?” “Ah, yes, with all my heart,”
she answered, for she was glad to get away from the
mother and sister.

So she got into the carriage and drove away with
the King, and when they arrived at his palace, the
wedding was celebrated with great pomp, as the little
men had granted to the maiden. When a year was
The Three Little Men in the Wood. 47

over, the young Queen bore a son, and as the step-
mother had heard of her great good-fortune, she came
with her daughter to the palace and pretended that
she wanted to pay her a visit. Once, however, when
the King had gone out, and no one else was present,
the wicked woman seized the Queen by the head, and
her daughter seized her by the feet, and they lifted her
out of the bed, and threw her out of the window into
the stream which flowed by. “Then the ugly daughter
laid herself in the bed, and the old woman covered
her up over her head. When the King came home
again and wanted to speak to his wife, the old woman
cried, ‘‘Hush, hush, that can’t be now, she is lying iu
a violent perspiration; you must let her rest to-day.”
The King suspected no evil, and did not come back
again till next morning; and as he talked with his
wife and she answered him, with every word a toad
leaped out, whereas formerly a piece of gold had fallen
out. Then he asked what that could be, but the old
woman said that she had got that from the violent
perspiration, and would soon lose it again. During
the night, however, the scullion saw a duck come
swimming up the gutter, and it said,

‘King. what art thou doing now?
Sleepest thou, or wakest thou?”

And as he returned no answer it said,
“* And my guests, What may they do?"
The scullion said,
“* They are sleeping soundly too:'’
48 __ Grimm's Household Tales.

Then it asked again,

“* What does little baby mine?"
Ale answered,

‘« Sleepeth in her cradle jine.""

‘Then she went upstairs in the form of the Queen,
nursed the baby, shook up its little bed, covered it
over, and then swam away again down the gutter in
the shape of a duck. She came thus for two nights;
on the third, she said to the scullion, ‘Go and tell the
King to take his sword and swing it three times over
me on the threshold.” ‘Then the scullion ran and told
this to the King, who came with his sword and swung
it thrice over the spirit, and at the third time, his wife
stood before him strong, living, and healthy as she had
been before. Thereupon the King was full of great
joy, but he kept the Queen hidden in a chamber until
the Sunday, when the baby was to be christened. And
when it was christened he said, ‘“ What does a person
deserve who drags another out of bed and throws him
in the water?” ‘“’The wretck deserves nothing better,”
answered the old woman, “than to be taken and put
in a barrel stuck full of nails, and rolled down hill into
the water.” ‘ Then,” said the King, “thou hast pro-
nounced thine own sentence ;” and he ordered such a
barrel to be brought, and the old woman to be put
into it with her daughter, and then the top was ham-
mered cn, and the barrel rolled down hill until it went
into the “iver.
The Three Spinners

HIERE was once a girl who was idle and would
not spin, and let her mother say what she would,
she could not bring her to it. At last the mother

was once so overcome with anger and impatience, that
she beat her, on which the girl began to weep loudly.
Now at this very moment the Queen drove by, and
when she heard the weeping she stopped her carriage,
went into the house and asked the mother why she
was beating her daughter so that the cries could be
heard out on the road? Then the woman.was ashamed
to reveal the laziness of her daughter and said, “I can-
not get her to leave off spinning. She insists on spin-.
ning for ever and ever, and I am poor, and cannot
procure the flax.” Then answered the Queen, “There
is nothing that I like better to hear than spinning, and
I am never happier than when the wheels are hum-
ming. Let me have your daughter with me in the
palace, I have flax enough, and there she shall spin as
much as she likes.’ The mother was heartily satis-
fied with this, and the Queen took the girl with her.
When they had arrived at the palace, she led her up
into. three rooms which were filled from the bottom to
the top with the finest flax. ‘Now spin me this flax,”
said she, ‘‘and when thou hast done it, thou shalt have
my eldest son for a husband, even if thou art poor. I
care not for that, thy indefatigable industry is dowry
enough.” The girl was secretly terrified, for she could
50 Grimm's Household Tales.

not have spun the flax, no, not if she have lived till
she was three hundred years old, and had sat at it
every day from morning till night. When therefore
she was alone, she began to weep, and sat thus for
three days without moving a finger. On the third day
came the Queen, and when she saw that nothing had
been spun yet, she was surprised ; but the girl excused
herself by saying that she had not been able to begin
because of her great distress at leaving her mother’s
house. ‘The Queen was satisfied with this, but said
when she was going away, “’I'o-morrow thou must
begin to work.”

When the girl was alone again, she did not know
what to do, and in her distress went to the window.
Then she saw three women coming towards her, the
first of whom had a broad flat foot, the second had
such a great underlip that it hung down over her chin,
and the third had a broad thumb. ‘They remained
standing before the window, looked up, and asked the
girl what was amiss with her? She complained of her
trouble and then they offered her their help and said,
“Tf theu wilt invite us to the wedding, not beashamed
of us, and wilt call us thine aunts, and likewise wilt
place us at thy table, we will spin up the flax for thee,
and that in avery short time.” “With all my heart,”
she replied, “do but come in and begin the work at
once.” ‘Then she let in the three strange women, and
cleared a place in the first room, where they seated
themselves and began their spinning. The one drew
the thread and trod the wheel, the other wetted the
thread, the third twisted it, and struck the table with
The Three Spinners. 51



‘struck it, a skein of thread fell
to the ground that was spun in
the finest manner possible. ‘The
girl concealed the three spinners
from the Queen, and showed her
whenever she came the great
quantity of spun thread, until
the latter could not praise her
enough. When the first room
was empty she went to the sec-
ond, and at last to the third, and
that too was quickly cleared.
Ther the three women took leave
and said to the girl, “Do not for-
get what thou hast promised us
—it will make thy fortune.”
When the maiden showed
the Queen the empty rooms,

d—Grimm's.



THE THREE SPINNERS-
52 Grimm's Household Tales.

and the great heap of yarn, she gave orders for the
wedding, and the bridegroom rejoiced that he was
to have such a clever and industrious wife, and praised
her mightily. “I have three aunts,” said the gitl,
“and as they have been very kind to me, I should not
like to forget them in my good fortune; allow me to
invite them to the wedding, and let them sit with us
at table.” ‘The Queen and the bridegroom said, “ Why
should we not allow that?” ‘Therefore when the feast
began, the three women entered in strange apparel,
and the bride said, “Welcome, dear aunts.” “ Ah,”
said the bridegroom, “ how comest thou by these odious
friends?” Thereupon he went to the one with the
broad flat foot, and said, ‘‘ How do you come by sucha
broad foot?” “By treading,’ she answered, “ by
treading.” Then the bridegroom went to the second,
and said, “ How do you come by your falling lip?”
“By licking,” she answered, “by licking.’ ‘Then he
asked the third, “How do you come by your broad
thumb?” “By twisting the thread,” she answered,
“by twisting the thread.” On this the King’s son
was alarmed and said, “‘ Neither now nor ever shall my
beautiful bride touch a spinning-wheel.” And thus
she got rid of the hateful flax-spinning.
Hansel and Grethel.

ie by a great forest dwelt a poor wood-cutter

with his wife and his two children. The boy

was called Hansel and the girl Grethel. He had
little to bite and to break, and once when great scarcity
fell on the land, he could no longer procure daily bread.
Now when he thought over this by night in his bed,
and tossed about in his anxiety, he groaned and said to
his wife, ‘“What is to become of us? How are we to
feed our poor children, when we no longer have any.
thing even for ourselves?”

“P11 tell you what, husband,” answered the woman,

“Barly to-morrow morning we will take the children
out into the forest to where it is the thickest, there we
‘will light a fire for them and give each of them one
piece of bread more, and then we will go to our work
and leave them alone. They will not find the way
home again, and we shall be rid of them.”

“No wife,” said the man, “I will not do that; how
can I bear to leave my children alone in the forest >—
the wild animals would soon come and tear them to
pieces.”

“©, thou fool!” said she, “Then we must all four
die of hunger, thou mayest as well plane the planks for
our coffins,” and she left him no peace until he con-
sented.

“But I feel very sorry for the poor children all the
game,”’ said the man.

The two children had also not been able to sleep.
54 Grimm's Household Tales.

for hunger, and had heard what their step-mother had
said to their father. Grethel wept bitter tears, and said
to Hansel, “‘ Now all is over with us.” ‘Be quiet,
Grethel,” said Hansel, “‘do not distress thyself, I will
soon find a way to help us.” And when the old folks
had fallen asleep, he got up, put on his little cvat,
opened the door below, and crept outside. ‘The moon
shone brightly and the white pebbles which lay in
front of the house glittered like real silver pennies.
Hansel stooped and put as many of them in the little
pocket of his coat as he could possibly get in. Then
he went back and said to Grethel, ‘‘ Be comforted, dear
little sister, and sleep in peace, God will not forsake
us,” and he lay down again in his bed. When day
dawned, but before the sun had risen, the woman came
and awoke the two children, saying, “Get up, you
sluggards! we are going into the forest to fetch
wood.” She gave each a little piece of bread, and
said, “There is something for your dinner, but do not
eat it up before then, for you will get nothing else.”
Grethel took ‘the bread under her apron, as Hansel
had the stones in his pocket. ‘Then they all set out
together on the way to the forest. When they had
walked a short time, Hansel stood still and peeped
back at the house, and did so again and again. His
father said, ‘Hansel, what art thou looking at there
and staying behind for? Mind what thou art about,
and do not forget how to use thy legs.” ‘Ah, father,”
said Hansel, “I am looking at my little white cat,
which is sitting up on the roof, and wants to say
_ good-bye to me.” ‘The wife said, ‘‘Fool, that is not
Hansel and Grethel. 55

thy little cat, that is the morning sun which is shin-
ning on the chimneys.” Hansel, however, had not
been looking back at the cat, but had been constantly



AN OLD WITCH OPENED THE DOOR.

throwing one of the white pebble-stones out of his.
pocket on the road.
‘When they had reached the middle of the forest,
56 ' Grimm's Household Tales.

the father said, “Now, children, pile up some wood,
‘and I will light a fire that you may not be cold.”
Hansel and Grethel gathered brushwood together, as
high as a little hill, The brushwood was lighted, and
when the flames were burning very high the woman
said, “Now, children, lay yourselves down by the fire
and rest, we will go into the forest and cut some
wood. When we have done, we will come back and
_ fetch you away.”

Hansel.and Grethel sat by the fire, and when noon
came, each ate a little piece of bread, and as they heard
the strokes of the wood-axe they believed that their
father was near. It was, however, not the axe it was
a branch which he had fastened to a withered tree
which the wind was blowing backwards and forwards.
And as they had been sitting such a long time, their
eyes shut with fatigue, and they fell fast asleep,
When at last they awoke, it was already dark night
Grethel began to cry and said, “How are we to get
out of the forest now?” But Hansel comforted her
and said, ‘Just wait a little, until the moon has risen,
and then we will soon find the way.” And when the
full moon had risen, Hansel took his little sister by
the hand, and followed the pebbles which shone like
newly-coined silver pieces, and showed them the way.

They walked the whole night long, and by break
of day came once more to their father’s house. "They
knocked at the door, and when the woman opened it
and saw that it was Hansel and Grethel, she said,
“You naughty children, why have you slept so long in
‘the forest?—we thought you were never coming back
Hansel and Grethel. . 57

at all!” The father, however, rejoiced, for it had: cut
him to the heart to leave them behind alone.

Not long afterwards, there was once more great
scarcity in all parts, and the children heard their
mother saying at night to their father, “‘ Everything is
eaten again; we have one half loaf left, and after that
there isanend. The children must go, we will take
them farther into the wood, so that they will not find
their way out again; there is no other means of saving
ourselves!” ‘The man’s heart was heavy, and he
thought “it would be better for thee to share the last
mouthful with thy children.” The woman, however,
would listen to nothing he had to say, but scolded and
reproached him. He who says A must say B, likewise,
and as he had yielded the first time, he had to do so
a second time also.

The children were, however, still awake and had
heard the conversation. When the old folks were
asleep, Hansel again got up, and wanted to go out and
pick up pebbles, but the woman had locked the door,
and Hansel could not get out. Nevertheless he com.
forted his little sister, and said, “Do not cry, Grethel,
go to sleep quietly, the good God will help us.”

Early in the morning came the woman, and took
the children out of their beds. ‘Their bit of bread was
piven to them, but it was still smaller than the time
before. On the way into the forest Hansel crumbled
his in his pocket and often stood still and threw a
morsel on the ground. “ Hansel, why dost thou stop
and look round?” said the father, “go on.’ “Iam
looking back at my little pigeon which is sitting on
58 Grimm's Household Tales.

the roof, and wants to say good-bye to me,” answered
Hansel. ‘“Simpleton!” szid the woman, ‘‘that is not
thy little pigeon, that is the morning sun that is
shining on the chimney.” Hansel, however, little by
little, threw all the crumbs on the path.

The woman led the children still deeper into the
jorest, where they had never in their lives been before.
Then a great fire was again made, and the mothet
said, “Just sit there, you children, and when you are
tired you may sleep a little; we are going into the for-
est to cut wood, and in the evening when we are done,
we will come and fetch you away.” When it was
noon, Grethel shared her piece of bread with Hansel,
who had scattered his by the way. ‘Then they fell.
asleep and evening came and went, but no one came to
the poor children. ‘They did not awake until it was
dark night, and Hansel comforted his little sister and
said, “Just wait, Grethel, until the moon rises, and
then we shall see the crumbs of bread which I have
strewn about, they will show us our way home again.”
When the moon came they set out, but they found no
crumbs, for the many thousands of birds which fly
about in the woods and fields, had picked them all up.
Hansel said to Grethel, ‘“‘ Weshall soon find the way,”
but they did not find it. They walked the whole night
and all the next day too from morning till evening,
but they did not get out of the forest, and were. very
hungry, for they had nothing to eat but two or
three berries, which grew on the ground. And as they
were so weary. that their legs would carry them no
longer, they lay down beneath a tree and fell asleep.
Hausel and Grethel. 59

It was now three mornings since they had left their
father’s house. ‘They began to walk again; but they
always got deeper into the forest, and if help did not
come soon, they must die of hunger and weariness.
When it was mid-day, they saw a beautiful snow-white
bird sitting on a bough, which sang so delightfully
that they stood still and listened to it. And when it
had finished its song, it spread its wings and flew away
before them, and they followed it until they reached a
little house, on the roof of which it alighted; and
when they came quite up to the little house they saw
that it was built of bread and covered with cakes, but
that the windows were of clear sugar. ‘We will set
to work on that,” said Hansel, “and have a good
meal. I will eat a bit of the roof, and thou, Grethel,
canst eat some of the window, it will taste sweet.”
Hansel reached up above, and broke off a little of the
roof to try how it tasted, and Grethel leaned against the
window and nibbled at the panes. Then a soft voice
cried from the room,

“< Nibble, nibble, gnaw,
Who ts nibbling at my little house ?””
The children answered,
“ The wind, the wind,
The heaven-born wind,”’
and went on eating without disturbing themselves. -
Hansel, who thought the roof tasted very nice, tore
down a great piece of it, and Grethel pushed out the
whole of one round window-pane, sat down, and en-
joyed herself with it. Suddenly the door opened, and
6o Grimm's Household Tales.

a very, very old woman, who supported herself on
crutches, came creeping out. Hansel and Grethel
were so terribly frightened that they let fall what they
had in their hands. ‘The old woman, however, nodded
her head, and said, “Oh, you dear children, who has
brought you here? Do come in, and stay with me.
No harm shall happen to you.” She took them by
the hand, and led them into her little house. Then
good food was set before them, milk and pancakes,
with sugar, apples, and nuts. Afterwards two pretty
little beds were covered with clean white linen, and
Hansel and Grethel lay down in them, and thought
they were in heaven.

The old woman had only pretended to be so kind;
she was in reality a wicked witch, who lay in wait
for children, and had only built the little bread house
in order to entice them there. When a child fell into
her power, she killed it, cooked and ate it, and that
was a feast day with her. Witches have red eyes, and
cannot see far, but they have a keen scent like the
beasts, and are aware when human beings draw near.
When Hansel and Grethel came into her neighbor-
hood, she laughed maliciously, and said mockingly,
“T have them, they shall not escape me again!” Early
in the morning, before the children were awake, she
was already up, and when she saw both of them sleep-
ing and looking so pretty, with their plump red
cheeks, she muttered to herself, “That will be a
dainty mouthful!” ‘Then she seized Hansel with her
shrivelled hand, carried him into a little stable, and
shut him in with a grated door. He might scream as
Hansel and Grethel. 61

he liked, that was of no use. Then she went to
Grethel, shook her till she awoke, and cried, “Get up,
lazy thing, fetch some water, and cook something good
for thy brother, he is in the stable outside, and is to be
made fat. When he is fat, I willeathim.” Grethel be-
gan to weep bitterly, but it was all in vain, she was
forced to do what the wicked witch ordered her.

And now the best food was cooked for poor Hansel,
but Grethel got nothing but crab-shells. Every morn-
ing the woman crept to the little stable and cried,
“ Hansel, stretch out thy finger that I may feel if thou
wilt soon be fat.”

Hansel, however, stretched out a little bone to her,

-and the old woman, who had dim eyes, could not see
it, and thoughtit was Hansel’s finger and was aston-
ished that there was no way of fattening him. When
four weeks had gone by and Hansel still continued
thin, she was seized with impatience and would not
wait any longer.

“Hola, Grethel,” she cried to the girl, “be active,
‘and bring some water. Let Hansel be fat or lean, to-
morrow I will kill him and cook him.” Ah, how the
poor little sister did lament when she had to fetch the
water, and how her tears did flow down over her
cheeks !

“Dear God, do help us,” she cried. “If the wild
beasts in the forest had but devoured us, we should at
any rate have died together.”

“Just keep thy noise to thyself,” said the old woman,
all that won’t help thee at all.”

Harly in the morning, Grethel had to go out and
62 Grimm's Household Tales.

hang up the cauldron with the water, and light the
fire. “We will bake first,” said the old woman, “I
have already heated the oven and kneaded the dough.”
She pushed poor Grethel out to the oven, from which
flames of fire were already darting. ‘Creep in,” said
‘the witch, “and see if it-is properly heated, so that we
can shut the bread in.” And when once Grethel was
inside, she intended to shut the oven and let her bake
in it, and then she would eat her, too. But Grethel
saw what she had in her mind, and said, “I do not
know how I am to do it; how do you get in?”

“Silly goose,” said the old woman. “The door is
big enough; just look, I can get in myself!” and she
crept up and thrust her head into the oven. ‘Then
Grethel gave hera push that drove her far into it, and
shut the iron door, and fastened the bolt. Oh! then
she began to howl quite horribly, but Grethel ran
away, and the godless witch was miserably burnt to
death.

Grethel, however, ran as quick as lightning to
Hansel, opened his little stable and cried, ‘‘ Hansel,
we are saved! The old witch is dead!” ‘Then Hansel
sprang out like a bird from its cage when the door is
opened for it. How they did rejoice and embrace each
other, and dance about and kiss each other! And as
they had no longer any need to fear her, they went into
the witch’s house, and in every corner there stood
chests full of pearls and jewels. ‘These are far better
than pebbles!” said Hansel, and thrust into his pockets
whatever could be got in, and Grethel said, “‘T, too,
will take something home with me,” and filled her
Hansel and Grethel. | 63

pinafore full. “But now we will go away,” said Han-
sel, “that we may get out of: the witch’s forest.”

When they had walked for two hours they came to
a great piece of water. ‘“‘ We cannot get over,” said
Hansel, “I see*no foot-plank and no bridge.” “And
no boat crosses either,” answered Grethel, ‘“ but a white
duck is swimming there; if I ask her, she will help us
over.’ ‘Then she cried :

‘¢ Little duck, little duck, dost thou see,
Flansel and Grethel are waiting for thee?
There's never a plank, or bridge in sight,
Take us across on thy back so white.”’

‘The duck came to them and Hansel seated himself
on its back and told his sister to sit by him. “No,”
replied Grethel, “that will be too heavy for the little
duck; she shall take us across, one after the other.”
The good little duck did so and when they were once
safely across and had walked for a short time, the
forest seemed to be more and more familiar to them
and at length they saw from afar their father’s house.
Then they began to run, rushed into the parlor and
threw themselves into their father’s arms. The man
had not known one happy hour since he had left the
children in the forest ; the woman, however, was dead.
Grethel emptied her pinafore until pearls and precious
stones ran about the room and Hansel threw one hand-
ful after another out of his pocket to add to them.
Then all anxiety was at an endand they lived together
in perfect happiness. My tale is done, there runs a
mouse, whoever catches it, may make himself a big
fur cap out of it.
The Valiant Little Tailor.

NE summer’s morning a little tailor was sitting
on his table by the window; he was in good
spirits, and sewed with all his might. ‘Then

came a peasant woman down the street crying, “Good
jams, cheap! Good jams, cheap!” This rang pleas-
antly in the tailor’s ears ; he stretched his delicate head
out of the window, and called, “Come up here, dear
woman; here you will get rid of your goods.” ‘The
woman came up the three steps to the tailor with her
heavy basket, and he made her unpack the whole of the
pots for him. He inspected all of them, lifted them
up, put his nose to them, and at length said, “’The jam
seems to me to be good, so weigh me out four ounces,
dear woman, and if it is a quarter of a pound that is
of no consequence.” ‘The woman who had hoped to
find a good sale, gave him what he desired, but went
away quite angry and grumbling. “Now, God bless
the jam to my use,” cried the little tailor, “and give
me health and strength ;” so he brought the bread out
of the cupboard, cut himself a piece right across the
loaf and spread the jam over it. “This won’t taste
bitter,” said he, “but I will just finish the jacket before
I take a bite. He laid the bread near him, sewed on,
and in his joy, made bigger and bigger stitches. In
the meantime the smell of the sweet jam ascended so
fo the wall, where the flies were sitting in great
The Valiant Little Tailor. 6§

numbers, that they were attracted and descended on it
in hosts. ‘Hola! who ifivited you?” said the little
tailor, and drove the unbidden guests away. The flies,
however, who understood no German, would not be
turned away, but came back again in ever-increasing
companies. Then the little tailor at last lost all
patience, and gota bit of cloth from the hole under
his work-table, and saying, “ Wait, and I will give it
to you,” struck it mercilessly on them. When he
drew it away and counted, there lay before him no
fewer than seven, dead and with legs stretched out.
“ Art thou a fellow of that sort?” said he, and could
not help admiring his own bravery. “Ihe whole
town shall know of this!” And the little tailor
hastened to cut himself a girdle, stitched it and
embroidered on it in large letters, “Seven at one
stroke!” “What, the town!” he continued, “The
whole world shall hear of it!” and his heart wagged
with joy like a lamb’s tail. The tailor put on the
girdle, and resolved to go forth into the world, because
he thought his workshop was too small for his valor.
Before he went away, he sought about in the house to
see if there was anything which he could take with
him ; however, he found nothing but an old cheese,
and that he put in his pocket. In front of the door
he observed a bird which had caught itself in the
thicket. It had to go into his pocket with the cheese.
Now he took to the road boldly, and as he was light
and nimble, he felt no fatigue. ‘The road led him up
a mountain, and when he had reached the highest
point of it, there sat a powerful giant looking about
66 Grimm's Household Tales,

him quite comfortably. The little tailor went bravery
up, spoke to him, and said, “Good day, comrade, so
thou art sitting there overlooking the wide-spread.
world! Iam just on my.way thither, and want to try
my luck. Hast thou any inclination to go with me?”
The giant looked contemptuously at the tailor, and
said, “Thou ragamuffiin! ‘Thou miserable creature!”

‘Oh, indeed?” answered the little tailor and un-
_ buttoned his coat. and showed the giant the girdle.
“There mayst thou read what kind of a man I am!”
The giant read, ‘“‘Seven at one stroke,” and thought
‘hat they had been men whom the tailor had killed
and began to feel a little respect for the tiny fellow.
Nevertheless, he wished to try him first and took a
stone in his hand and squeezed it together so that the
water dropped out of it.

“Do that likewise,” said the giant, “if thou hast
strength?” “Is that all?” said the tailor, “that is
child’s play with us!” and put his hand into his pocket,
brought out the soft cheese and pressed it until the
liquid ran out of it. “Faith,” said he, “that was a
little better, wasn’t it?” The giant did not know what
to say and could not believe it of the little man. Then
the giant picked up a stone and threw it so high that
the eye could scarcely follow it.

“Now, little mite of a man, do that likewise.”
“Well thrown,” said the tailor, “but after all the stone
came down to earth again; I will throw you one which
shall never come back at all,” and he put his hand into
his pocket, took out the bird and threw it into the air.
The bird, delighted with its liberty, rose, flew away
The Valiant Little Taifor. 6)

and did not come back. “How does that shot please
you, comrade?’ asked the tailor.
“Thou canst certainly throw,” said the





THE TAILOR MEETS THE GIANT.

giant, “but now we will see if thou art able

to carry anything properly.” He took the little

tailor to a mighty oak tree which lay there
g-—-Grimm’ s.
68 Grimm's Household Tales,

felled on the ground and said, “If thou art strong
enough, help me to carry the tree out of the forest.”
“Readily,” answered the little man; ‘‘take thou the
trunk on thy shoulders and I will raise up the
branches and twigs; after all, they are the heaviest.”
The giant took the trunk on his shoulder, but the
tailor seated himself on a branch, and the giant who
could not look round, had to carry away the whole
tree, and the little tailor into the bargain: he behind,
was quite merry and whistled the song, “Three tailors
rode forth from the gate,” as if carrying the tree were
child’s play. ‘The giant, after he had dragged the
heavy burden part of the way, could go no further, and
cried, ‘Hark you, I shall have to let the tree fall!”
The tailor sprang nimbly down, seized the tree with
both arms as if he had been carrying it, and said to the
giant, ‘Thou art such a great fellow, and yet canst not
even carry the tree!”

They went on together, and as they passed a cherry-
tree, the giant laid hold of the top of the tree where
the ripest fruit was hanging, bent it down, gave it into
the tailor’s hand and bade him eat. But the little
tailor was much too weak to hold the tree, and wnen
the giant let it go, it sprang back again, and the tailor
was hurried into the air with it. When he had fallen
dewn again without injury, the giant said, “ What is
this? Hast thou not strength enough to hold the weak
twig?” “There is no lack of strength,” answered the
little tailor. ‘ Dost thou think that could be anything
to aman who has struck down seven at one blow? I
leaped over the tree because the huntsmen are shooting
The Valiant Little Tailor. 69

down there in the thicket. Jump as I did, if thou canst
do it.” ‘The giant made the attempt, but could not
get over the tree, and remained hanging in the ©
branches, so that in this also the tailor kept the upper
hand.

The giant said, “If thou art such a valiant fellow,
come with me into our cavern and spend the night
with us.” ‘The little tailor was willing, and followed
him. When they went into the cave, other giants were
sitting there by the fire, and each of them had a roasted
sheep in his hand and was eating it. The little tailor
looked round and thought, “It is much more spacious
here than in my workshop.” ‘The giant showed him
a bed, and said he was to lie down in itandsleep. The
bed was, however, too big for the little tailor; he did
not lie down in it, but crept into a corner. When it
was midnight, and the giant thought tkat the little
tailor was lying in sound sieep, he got up, took a great
iron bar, cut through the bed with one blow, and
thought he had given the grasshopper his finishing
stroke. With the earliest dawn the giants went into
the forest, and had quite forgotten the little tailor,
when all at once he walked up to them quite merrily
and boldly. ‘The giants were terrified, they were afraid
that he would strike them all dead, and ran away in a
great hurry.

The little tailor went onwards, always following
his own pointed nose. After he had walked for a long
time, he came to the court-yard of a royal palace, and
as he felt weary, he lay down on the grass and fell
‘asleep. Whilst he lay there, the people came and
o

70 Grimm's Household Tales.

inspected him on all sides, and read on his girdle,
“Seven at one stroke.” “Ah!” said they, “ What does
the great warrior here in the midst of peace? He
must be a mighty lord.” ‘They went and announced
him to the King, and gave it as their opinion that if
war should break out, this would be a weighty and
useful man who ought on no account to be allowed to
depart. ‘The counsel pleased the King, and he sent
one of his courtiers to the little tailor to offer him
military service when he awoke. The ambassador
remained standing by the sleeper, waited until he
stretched his limbs and opened his eyes, and then
conveyed to him this proposal. “For this very reason
‘have I come here,” the tailor replied, “I am ready to
enter the King’s service. He was therefore honorably
received, and a separate dwelling was assigned him.
The soldiers, however, were set against the little
tailor, and wished him a thousand miles away. ‘“ What
is to be the end of this?” they said amongst them-
selves. “If we quarrel with him, and he strikes about
him, seven of us will fall at every blow; not one of us
can stand against him. ‘hey came therefore to a
decision, betook themselves in a body to the King,
and begged for their dismissal. “We are not pre-
pared,” said they, ‘to stay with a man who kills seven
at one stroke.” ‘he King was sorry that for the sake
of one he should lose all his faithful servants, wished
that he had never set eyes on the tailor, and would
willingly have been rid of him again. But he did not
venture to give him his dismissal, for he dreaded lest he
should strike him and all his people dead, and place
The Valiant Littie Tailor. 7

himself on the royal throne. He thought about it for
a long time, and at last found good counsel. He sent
to the little tailor and caused him to be informed that
as he was such a great warrior, he had one request to
make to him. In a forest of his country lived two
giants, who caused great mischief with their robbing,
murdering, ravaging, and burning, and no one could
approach them without putting himself in danger of
death. If the tailor conquered and killed these two
giants, he would give him his only daughter to wife,
and half of his kingdom as a dowry, likewise one
hundred horsemen should go with him to assist him.
“That would indeed be a fine thing for a man like
me!” thought the little tailor. ‘One is not offered a
beautiful princess and half a kingdom every day of
one’s life!’ “Oh, yes,’ he replied, “I will soon
subdue the giants, and do not require the help of the
hundred horsemen to do it; he who can hit seven at
one blow, has no need to be afraid of two.”

The little tailor went forth and the hundred horse-
men followed him. When he came to the outskirts of
the forest, he said to his followers, “ Just stay waiting
here, I alone will soon finish off the giants.” Then he
bounded into the forest and looked about right and
left. After a while he perceived both giants. They
lay sleeping under a tree, and snored so that the
branches waved up and down. The little tailor, not
idle, gathered two pocketfuls of stones, and with these
climbed up the tree. When he was half way up, he
slipped down by a branch, until he sat just above the
sleepers, and then let one stone after another fall on
y2 Grimm’s Household Tales.

the breast of one of the giants. Fora long time the
giant felt nothing, but at last he awoke, pushed his
comrade, and said, ““Why art thou knocking me?”
“Thou must be dreaming,” said the other, “I am not
knocking thee.” ‘They laid themselves down to sleep
again, and the tailor threw a stone down on the second.
“What is the meaning of this?’ cried the other.
“Why art thou pelting me?” “I am not pelting
thee,” answered the first, growling. They disputed
about it fora time, but as they were weary they let
the matter rest, and their eyes closed once more. ‘The
little tailor began his game again, picked out the
biggest stone and threw it with all his might on the
breast of the first giant. ‘That is too bad!” cried he,
and sprang up like a madman, and pushed his com-
panion against the tree until it shook. ‘The other paid
him back in the same coin, and they got into sucha
tage that they tore up trees and belabored each other
so long, that at last they both fell down dead on the
ground at the same time.. Then the little tailor leaped
down. “It is a lucky thing,” said he, “that they did
not tear up the tree on which I was sitting, or I should
have had to spring on to.another like a squirrel; but

we tailors are nimble.” He drew out his sword and .

gave each of them a couple of thrusts in the breast,
and then went out to the horsemen and said, “The
wotk is done; I have given both of them their
finishing stroke, but it was hard work! ‘They tore
up trees in their sore need, and defended themselves
with them, but all that is to no purpose when a man
like myself comes, who can kill seven at one blow.”
The Valiant Little Tailor. 73

“But are you not wounded?” asked the horsemen.
“You need not concern yourself about that,’ answered
the tailor, “They have not bent one hair of mine”
The horsemen would not believe him, and rode into
the forest; there they found the giants swimming in
their blood, and all round about, lay the torn-up trees.

The little tailor demanded of the King the promised
reward; he, however, repented of his promise, and
again bethought himself how he could get rid of the
hero. ‘Before thou receivest my daughter, and the
half of my kingdom,” said he to him, “thou must
perform one more heroic deed. In the forest roams a
unicorn which does great harm, and thou must catch
it first.” “TI fear one unicorn still less than two giants.
Seven at one blow, is my kind of affair.’ He tooka
rope and an axe with him, went forth into the forest,
and again bade those who were sent with him to wait
outside. He had not toseek long. ‘The unicorn soon
came towards him, and rushed directly on the tailor, as
if it would spit him on its horn without more ceremony.
“Softly, softly ; it can’t be done as quickly as that,”
said he, and stood still and waited until the animal
was quite close, and then sprang nimbly behind the
tree. The unicorn ran against the tree with all its
strength, and struck its horn so fast in the trunk that
it had not strength enough to draw it out again, and
thus it was caught. ‘Now, I have got the bird,” said
the tailor, and came out from behind the tree and put
the rope round its neck, and then with his axe he
hewed the horn out of the tree, and when all was
teady he led the beast away, and took it to the King,
94 Grimm's Household Tales.

The King still would not give him the promised
reward, and made a third demand. Before the wedding
the tailor was to catch him a wild boar that made great
havoc in the forest, and the huntsman should give him
their help. ‘Willingly,” said the tailor, “that is
child’s play!” Hedid not take the huntsmen with
him into the forest, and they were well pleased that he
did not, for the wild boar had several times received
them in such a manner that they had no inclination
to lie in wait for him. When the boar perceived the
tailor, it ran on him with foaming mouth and whetted
tusks, and was about to throw him to the ground, but
the active hero sprang into a chapel which was near,
and up to the window at once, and in one bound out
again. ‘he boar ran in after him, but the tailor ran
round outside and shut the door behind it, and then
the raging beast, which was much too heavy and
awkward to leap out of the window, was caught. ‘The
little tailor called the huntsmen thither that they
might see the prisoner with their own eyes. The
hero, however, went to the King, who was now,
whether he iiked it or not, obliged to keep his
promise, and gave him his daughter and half ‘of his
kingdom. Had he known that it was no warlike:
hero, but a little tailor who was standing before him,
it would have gone to his heart still more than it did.
The wedding was held with great magnificence and
small joy, and out of a tailor a king was made.

After some time the young Queen heard | her
husband say in his dreams at night, ‘‘ Boy, make me the
doublet, and patch the pantaloons, or else I will rap the
The Valiant Littie Tailor. 75

yard-measure over thine ears.” ‘Then she discovered
in what state of life the young lord had been born,
and next morning complained of her wrongs to her.
father, and begged him to help her to get rid of her
husband, who was nothing else but a tailor. The
King comforted her and said, “Leave thy bed-room
door open this night, and my servants shall stand
outside, and when he has fallen asleep shall go in,
bind him, and take him on board a ship which shall
carry him into the wide world.” The woman was
satisfied with this; but the King’s armor-bearer, who
had heard all, was friendly with the young lord, and
informed him of the whole plot. “Ill put a screw
into that business,” said the little tailor. At night he
went to bed with his wife at the usual time, and when
she thought that he had fallen asleep, she got up,
opened the door, and then lay down again. ‘he little
tailor, who was only pretending to be asleep, began to
cry out in a clear voice, “‘Boy, make me the doublet
and patch me the pantaloous, or I will rap the yard-
measure over thine ears. I smote seven at one blow,
I killed two giants, I brought away one unicorn, and
caught a wild boar, and am I to fear those who are
standing outside the room.’’ When these men heard
the tailor speaking thus, they were overcome by a
great dread, and ran as if the wild huntsman was
behind them, and none of them would venture any.
thing further against him. So the little tailor was a
king and remained one, to the end of his life.
Cinderella.

HE wife of a rich man fell sick, and as she felt that
her end was drawing near, she called her only
daughter to her bedside and said, ‘‘ Dear child, be

good and pious, and then the good God will always
protect thee, and I will look down on thee from heaven
and be near thee.” ‘Thereupon she closed her eyes
and departed. Every day the maiden went out to her
mother’s grave and wept, and she remained pious and
good. When winter came the snow spread a white
sheet over the grave, and when the spring sun had
drawn it off again, the man had taken another wife.

The woman had brought two daughters into the

house with her, who were beautiful and fair of face,
but vile and black of heart. Now began a bad time
for the poor step-child. ‘Is the stupid goose to sit in
the parlor with us?” “He who wants to eat bread
must earn it; out with the kitchen-wench.” ‘They
took her pretty clothes away from her, put an old
grey bedgown on her, and gave her wooden shoes.
“Just look at the proud princess, how decked out she
is! they cried, and laughed, and led her into the
kitchen. ‘There she had to do hard work from morn-
ing till night, get up before day-break, carry water,
light fires, cook and wash. Besides this, the sisters
did her every imaginable injury—they mocked her
and emptied her peas and lentils into the ashes, so that
she was forced to sit and pick them out again. In the
evening when she had worked till she was weary she
Cinderella. 17

had no bed to go to, but had to sleep by the fireside in
the ashes. And as on that account she always looked



CINDERELLA AND HER SISTERS.

dusty and dirty, they called her Cinderella. It hap-
ened that the father was once going to the fair, and
fe asked his two step-daughters what he should bring
78 Grimm's Household Tales.

back for them. ‘“‘ Beautiful dresses,” said one, ‘‘ Pearls
and jewels,” said thesecond. “And thou Cinderella,”
said he, “what wilt thou have?” ‘Father, break off
for me the first branch which knocks against your hat .
on your way home.” So he bought beautiful dresses,
pearls and jewels for his two step-daughters, and on his
way home, as he was tiding through a green thicket,
a hazel twig brushed against him and knoeked. off his
hat. Then he broke off the branch and took it witk
him. When he reached home he gave his step-daugh-
ters the things which they had wished for, and to
Cinderella he gave the branch from the hazel-bush.
Cinderella thanked him, went to her mother’s grave
and planted the branch on it, and wept so much that
the tears fell down on it and wateredit. It grew,
however, and became a handsome tree. ‘Thrice a day
Cinderella went and sat beneath it, and wept and
prayed, and a little white bird always came on the
tree, and if Cinderella expressed a wish, the bird threw
down to her what she had wished for.

It happened, however, that the King appointed a
festival which was to last three days, and to which all
the beautiful young girls in the country were invited,
in order that his son might choose himself a bride.
When the two step-sisters heard that they too were to
appear among the number, they were delighted, called
Cinderella and said, “‘ Comb our hair for us, brush our
shoes and fasten our buckles, for we are going to the
festival at the King’s palace.” Cinderella obeyed, but
wept, because she too would have liked to go with
them to the dance, and begged her step-mother ta
: Cinderella, : 79°

allow her todoso. ‘Thou go, Cinderella!” said she,
“Thou art dusty and dirty, and wouldst go to the fes-
tival? Thou hast no clothes and shoes, and yet
wouldst dance!’ As, however, Cinderella went on
asking, the step-mother at last said, ““I have emptied
a dish of lentils into the ashes for thee, if thou hast
picked them out again in two hours, thou shalt go
with us.” ‘The maiden went through the back-door
into the garden, and called, ““You tame pigeons, you
turtle-doves, and all you birds beneath the sky, come
- and help me to pick
“The good tnto the pot,
The bad into the crop.’ |

Then two white pigeons came in by the kitchen-
window, and afterwards the turtle-doves, and at last all
the birds beneath the sky came whirring and crowding
in, and alighted amongst the ashes. And the pigeons
nodded with their heads and began pick, pick, pick,
pick, and the rest began also pick, pick, pick, pick, and
gathered all the good grains into the dish. Hardly _
had one hour passed before they had finished and all
flew out again. Then the girl took the dish to her
step-mother and was glad, and believed that now she
would be allowed to go with them to the festival. But
the step-mother said, ‘“‘ No, Cinderella, thou hast no
clothes and thou canst not dance; thou wouldst only
be laughed at.” And as Cinderella wept at this, the
step-mother said, “If thou canst pick two dishes of
lentils out of the ashes for me in one hour, thou shalt
go with us.” And she thought to herself, “That she
most certainly cannot do.” When the step-mother had
80 Gtimm'‘s Household. Tales.

emptied the two dishes of lentils amongst the ashes,
the maiden went through the back-door into the gar-
den and cried, “‘ You tame pigeons, you turtle-doves, and
all you birds under heaven, come and help me to pick
“< The good into the pot,
The bad into the crop.”

Then two white pigeons came in by the kitchen-win-
dow and afterwards the turtle-doves, and at length all
the birds beneath the sky, came whirring and crowd-
ing in, and alighted amongst theashes. And the doves
nodded with their heads and began pick, pick, pick,
pick, and the others began also pick, pick, pick, pick,
and gathered all the good seeds into the dishes and
before half an hour was over they had already finished,
and all flew out again. Then the maiden carried the
dishes to the step-mother and was delighted, and be-
lieved that she might now go with them to the fes-
tival. But the step-mother said, “All this will not
help thee; thou goest not with us, for thou hast no
clothes and canst not dance; we should be ashamed of
thee!” On this she turned her back on Cinderella,
and hurried away with her two proud daughters.

As no one was now at home, Cinderella went to her
mother’s grave beneath the hazel-tree and cried,

‘< Shiver and quiver, little tree,
Silver and gold throw down over me.””

Then the bird threw a gold and silver dress down to
her and slippers embroidered with silk and silver. She
put on the dress with all speed and went to the festival.
Her step-sisters and the step-mother however did not
know her and thought she must be a foreign princess,
Cinderella, 8s

for she looked so beautiful in the golden dress. They
never once thought of Cinderella and believed that she
was sitting at home in the dirt, picking lentils out of the
ashes. ‘The prince went to meet her, took her by the
hand and danced with her. He would dance with no
other maiden and never left loose of her hand, and if any
one else came to invite her, he said, ‘This is my partner.”

She danced till it was evening and then she wanted
to go home. But the King’s son said, “I will go with
thee and bear thee company,” for he wished to see to
whom the beautiful maiden belonged. She escaped
from him, however, and sprang into the pigeon-house.
The King’s son waited until her father came and then
he told him that the stranger maiden had leaped into
the pigeon house. ‘The old man thought, ‘“‘Can it be
Cinderella?” and they had to bring him an axe and a
pickaxe that he might hew the pigeon-house to pieces,
but no one was inside it. And when they got home
Cinderella lay in her dirty clothes among the ashes, and
a dim little oil-lamp was burning on the mantle-piece,
for Cinderella had jumped quickly down from the back
of the pigeon-house and had run to the little hazel-tree
and there she had taken off her beautiful clothes and
laid them on the grave, and the bird had taken them
away again, and then she had placed herself in the
kitchen amongst the ashes in her grey gown.

Next day when the festival began afresh, and her
parents and the step-sisters had gone once more, Cin-
derella went to the hazel-tree and said—

“‘ Shiver and quiver, my little tree,
Siluer and gold throw down over me.”
82 Grimm's Household Tales,

Then the bird threw down a much more beautiful
dress than on the preceding day. And when Cinder-
ella appeared at the festival in this dress, every one was
astonished at her beauty. ‘I‘he King’s son had waited
until she came and instantly took her by the hand and
danced with no one but her. When others came and
invited her, he said, “She is my partner.”’? When even-
ing came she wished to leave and the King’s son fol:
lowed her and wanted to see into which house she
went. But she sprang away from him and into the
garden behind the house. Therein stood a beautiful
tall tree on which hung the most magnificent peais.
She clambered so nimbly between the branches like a

-squirrel, that the King’s son did not know where she

was gone. He waited until her father came and said
to him, “The stranger-maiden has escaped from me,
and I believe she has climbed up the pear-tree.” The
father thought, ‘‘Can it be Cinderella?” and had an
axe brought and cut the tree down, but no one was on
it. And when they got into the kitchen, Cinderella
lay there among the ashes, as usual, for she had
jumped down on the other side of the tree, had taken
the beautiful dress to the bird on the little hazel-tree,
and put on her grey gown.

On the third day, when the parents and sisters had
gone away, Cinderella once more went to her mother’s
grave and said to the little tree—

“< Shiver and quiver, my little tree,
Siluer and gold throw down over me.”

And now the bird threw down to her a dress which

was more splendid and magnificent than any she had









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CINDERELLA LEAVING THE BALL,
6—Grimm’s. 3
84 Grimm's Household Tales.

yet had, and the slippers were golden. And when she
went to the festival in the dress no one knew how to
speak for astonishment. ‘The King’s son danced with
her only and if any one invited her to dance, he said,
“She is my partner.”

When evening came, Cinderella wished to leave,
and the King’s son was anxious to go with her, but
she escaped from him so quickly that he could not fol-
low her. ‘The King’s son had, however, used a strate-
gem and had caused the whole staircase to be smeared
with pitch and there, when she ran down, had the
maiden’s left slipper remained sticking. The King’s
son picked it up and it was small and dainty and all
golden. Next morning he went with it to the father
and said to him, “No one shall be my wife but she
whose foot this golden slipper fits.’ Then were the
two sisters glad for they had pretty feet. ‘The eldest
went with the shoe into her room and wanted to try it
on, and her mother stood by. But she could not get
her big toe into it and the shoe was too small for her.
Then her mother gave her a knife and said, “Cut the
toe off; when thou art Queen thou wilt have no more
need to go on foot.” ‘The maiden cut the toe off,
forced the foot into the shoe, swallowed the pain and
went out to the King’s son. Then he took her on his
horse as his bride and rode away with her. ‘They
were, however, obliged to pass the grave and there, on
the hazel-tree, sat the two pigeons and cried—

‘Turn and peep, turn and pep,
There's blood within the shoe,
Lhe shoe it ts too small for her,
The true bride waits for you.”
Cinderella. 85

Then he looked at her foot and saw how the blood was
streaming from it. He turned his horse round and tock
the false bride home again and said she was not the
true one and that the other sister was to put the shoe
on. ‘Then this one went into her chamber and got
her toes safely into the shoe, but her heel was too
large. So her mother gave her a knife and said, “Cut
a bit off thy Heel; when thou art Queen thou wilt have
no more need to go on foot.” The maiden cut a bit
off her heel, forced her foot into the shoe, swallowed
the pain, and went out to the King’s son. He took
her on his horse as his bride and rode away with hex,
but when they passed by the hazel-tree, two little
pigeons sat on it and cried,
‘* Zurn and peep, turn and peep,

There's blood within the shoe,

The shoe tt is too small for her,

The true bride waits for you.”’
He looked down at her foot and saw how the blood
was tunning-out of her shoe, and how it had stained
her white stocking. ‘Then he turned his horse and
took the false bride home again. ‘This also is not —
the right one,” said he, “have you no other daugh-
ter?” “No,” said the man, “There is still a little
stunted kitchen-wench which my late wife left behind
her, but she cannot possibly be the bride.” ‘The
King’s son said he was to send her up to him; but
the mother answered, “Oh no, she is much too dirty,
she cannot show herself!” He absolutely insisted on
it, and Cinderella had to be called. She first washed
her hands and face clean, and then went and bowed.
86 Gtimm’s Household Tales.

down before the King’s son, who gave her the golden
shoe. Then she seated herself on a stool, drew her
foot out of the heavy wooden shoe, and put it into
the slipper, which fitted like a glove. And when
she rose up and the King’s son looked at her face he
recognized the beautiful maiden who had danced with
him and cried, “ That is the true bride!’ The step-
mother and the two sisters were terrified and became
pale with rage; he, however, took Cinderella on his
horse and rode away with her. As they passed by the
hazel-tree, the two white doves cried,

“Turn and peep, turn and peep,
No blood is in the shoe,
The shoe is not too small for her,
The true bride rides with you.”

and when they had cried that, the two came flying
down and placed themselves on Cinderella’s shoulders,
one on the right, the other on the left, and remained
sitting there.

When the wedding with the King’s son had to be
celebrated, the two false sisters came and wanted
to get into favor with Cinderella and share her good
fortune. When the betrothed couple went to church,
the elder was at the right side and the younger at the
left, and the pigeons pecked out one eye of each of
them. Afterwards as they came back, the elder was
at the left, and the younger at the right, and then the
pigeons pecked out the other eye of each. And thus,
for their wickedness and falsehood, they were punished
with blindness as long as they lived.


The Bremen Town-Musicians.

CERTAIN man had a donkey, which had carried
the corn-sacks to the mill indefatigably for
many a long year ; but his strength was going, and

he was growing more and more unfit for work. Then
his master began to consider how he might best save
his keep; but the donkey, seeing that no good wind
was blowing, ran away and set out on the road to
Bremen. ‘There,’ he thought, “I can surely be
-town-musician.” When he had walked some distance,
he found a hound lying on the road, gasping like one
who had run till he was tired. “What are you gasp-
ing so for, you big fellow?” asked the donkey.

“Ah,” replied the hound, “as I am old, and daily
grow weaker, and no longer can hunt, my master
wanted to kill me, so I took to flight; but now how
am I to earn my bread ?”

“YT tell you what, "said the donkey, “Iam going to
88 Gtrimm’s Household Tales.

Bremen, and shall be town-musician there; go with
me and engage yourself also as a musician. I will
play the lute, and you shall beat the kettledrum.”

The hound agreed, and on they went.

Before long they came to a cat, sitting on the path,
with a face like three rainy days! ‘‘ Now then, old
shaver, what has gone askew with you?” asked the
donkey.

“Who can be merry when his neck is in danger?”
answered the cat. “‘ Because I am now getting old,
and my teeth are worn to stumps, and I prefer to sit
by the fire and spin, rather than hunt about after
mice, my mistress wanted to drown me, so I ran
away. But now good advice is scarce. Where am I
to go?”

“Go with us to Bremen. You understand night-
music, so you can be a town-musician.”’

The cat thought well of it and went with them.
After this the three fugitives came to a farm-yard
where the cock was sitting upon the gate, crowing
with all his might. “Your crow goes through and
through one,” said the donkey. “ What is the mat-
tener

“‘T have been foretelling fine weather, because it is
the day on which Our Lady washes the Christ-child’s
little shirts and wants to dry them,” said the cock;
“but guests are coming for Sunday, so the housewife
has no pity, and has told the cook that she intends to
eat me in the soup to-morrow and this evening I am to
_ have my head cut off. Now I am crowing at full pitch
while I can.”
The Bremen Town-Musicians. — “89

“Ah, but red-comb,’”’ said the donkey, ‘‘vou had
better come away with us. We are going to Bremen;
you can find something better than death everywhere;
you have a good voice and if we make music together ©
it must have some quality!”

The cock agreed to this plan and all four went on

together. They could not, however, reach the city of
Bremen in one day, and in the evening they came to a
forest where they meant to pass the night. The donkey
and the hound laid themselves down under a large
tree, the cat and the cock settled themselves in the
branches; but the cock flew right tothe top, where he
was most safe. Before he went to sleep he looked
round on all the four sides and thought he saw in the
distance a little spark burning; so he called out to his
companions that there must be a house not far off, for
he saw alight. The donkey said, “If so, we had
better get up and go on, for the shelter here is bad.”
The hound thought that a few bones with some meat
on would do him good too!

So they made their way to the place where the ligh,
was and soon saw it shine brighter and grow larges,
until they came to a well-lighted robber’s house. The
donkey, as the biggest, went to the window and
looked in.

“What do you see, my grey-horse?” asked the cock.

“What do I see? ” answered the donkey; “u table
covered with good things to eat and drink and robbers
sitting at it enjoying themselves.”

“That would be the sort of thing for us,” said the
cock. ,
9 Grimm’ Household Tales.

“Yes, yes; ah, how I wish we were there!” said
the donkey. ;

Then the animals took counsel together how they
should manage to drive away the robbers, and at last
they thought of a plan. The donkey was to place
himself with his fore-feet upon the window-ledge, the.
hound was to jump on the donkey’s back, the cat was
to climb upon the dog, and lastly the cock was to fly
up and perch upon the head of the cat.

When this was done, at a given signal, they began
to perform their music together; the donkey brayed,
the hound barked, the cat mewed, and the cock crowed ;
then they burst through the window into the room, so
that the glass clattered! At this horrible din, the rob-
bers sprang up, thinking no otherwise than that a
ghost had come in, and fled in a great fright out into
the forest. The four companions now sat down at the
table, well content with what was left, and ate as if
they were going to fast for a month.

As soon as the four minstrels had done, they put
out the light, and each sought for himself a sleeping-
place according to his nature and to what suited him.
The donkey laid himself down upon some straw in the —
yard, the hound behind the door, the cat upon the
hearth near the warm ashes, and the cock perched him-
self upon a beam of the roof; and being tired with
their long walk, they soon went to sleep.

When it was past midnight and the robbers saw -
from afar that the light was no longer burning in
their house and all appeared quiet, the captain said,
“We ought not to have let ourselves be frightened out
The Bremen Town-Musicians.









of our wits;” and or- fl Hm
dered one of them to J \s a
go and examine the Mh i ‘=
louse. I 4 |

|

The messenger
finding all still, went
into the kitchen to
light a candle, and,
taking the glistening
fiery eyes of the cat for
live coals, he held a
lucifer-match to them
to light it. But the
cat did not understand
the joke, and flew in
his face, spitting and
scratching. He was
dreadfully frightened
and ran to the back-
door, but the dog, who
lay there, sprang up
and bit his leg; and as
he ran across the yard
by the straw-heap, the
donkey gave him a
smart kick with its #
hind foot. ‘The cock, :
too, who had been
awakened by the noise €
and had become lively,

THE TOWN MUSICIANS,




gi
g2 Grimm's Household Tales.

cried down from the beam, “ Cock-a-doodle-dco !”

Then the robber ran back as fast as he could to his
captain and said, “‘ Ah, there is a horrible witch sitting
in the house, who spat on me and scratched my face
with her long claws; and by the door stands a man
with a knife, “who stabbed me in the leg; and in the
yard there lies a black monster, who beat me with a
wooden club; and above, upon ‘the roof, sits the judge,
who called out, ‘Bring the rogue here to me!’ so I
got away as well as I could.”

After this the robbers did not trust themselves in
the house again; but it suited the four musicians of
Bremen so well that they did not care to leave it any
more. And the mouth of him who last told this story
is still warm.






The Elves.

First SToRY.

A shoemakea:, by no fault of his own, had become
so poor that at last he had nqthing left but

leather for one pair of shoes. . So in the evening,
he cut out the shoes which he wished to make the
next morning, and as he had a good conscience, he lay
down quietly in his bed, commended himself to God,
and fell asleep. In the morning, after he had said his
ptayers, and was just going to sit down to work, the
two shoes stood quite finish on his table. He was
astounded, and did not know what to say to it. He
took the shoes in his hands to observe them closer,
and they were so neatly made that there was not one
bad stitch in them, just as if they were intended asa
masterpiece. Soon after, too, a buyer came in, and as
the shoes pleased him so well, he paid more for them
than was customary, and, with the money, the shoe.
94 Grimm’‘s Household Tales.

maker was able to purchase leather for two pairs of
shoes. He cut them out at night, and next morning
was about to set to work with fresh courage; but he
had no need to do so, for, when he got up, they were
already made, and buyers also were not wanting, who
gave him money enough to buy leather for four pairs
of shoes. ‘The following morning, too, he found the
four pairs made; and so it went on constantly, what
he cut out in the evening was finished by the morning,
so that he soon had his honest independence again,
and at last became a wealthy man. Now it befell that
one evening not long before Christmas, when the mau
had been cutting out, he said to his wife, before going
to bed, “ What think you if we were to stay up to-night
to see who it is that lends us this helping hand?”
The woman liked the idea, and lighted a candle, and
then they hid themselves in a corner of the room,
_ behind some clothes which were hanging up there, and
watched. When it was midnight, two pretty little
naked men came, sat down by the shoemaker’s table,
took all the work which was cut out before them and
began to stitch and sew, and hammer so skillfully and
so quickly with their little fingers that the shoemaker
could not turn away his eyes for astonishment. ‘They
did not stop until all -was done, and stood finished on
the table, and then they ran quickly away.
Next morning the woman said, “The little: men
‘have made us rich, and we really must show that we
are grateful for it. They run about so, and have
nothing on, and must be cold. I'll tell thee what Pll
do: I will make them little shirts, and coats, and
i

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THE CHANGELING.
96 Grimm's Household Taies.

vests, and trousers, and knit both of them a pair. of
stockings, and do thou, too, make them two littie
pairs of shoes.” The man said, ‘I shall be very glad
to do it;” and one night, when everything was ready,
they laid their presents all together on the table instead
of the cut-out work, and then concealed themselves to
see how the little men would behave. At midnight
they came bounding in, and wanted to get to work at
once, but as they did not find any leather cut out, but
ouly the pretty little articles of clothing, they were at
first astonished, and then they showed intense delight.
They dressed themselves with the greatest rapidity,
putting the pretty clothes on, and singing,

“¢ Now we are boys so fine to see,
Why should we longer cobblers be ? ie

Then they danced and skipped and leaped over chairs
and benches. At last they danced out of doors., From
that time forth they came no more, but as long as the
shoemaker lived all went well with him, and all his
-undertakings prospered.

SECOND STORY.

There was once a poor servant’ girl, who was
industrious and cleanly, and swept the house every
day, and emptied her sweepings on the great heap in
front of the door. One morning when she was just
going back to her work, she found a letter on this
heap, and as she could not read, she put her broom in
the corner, and took the letter to her master and
mistress, and behold it was an invitation from the
The Elves. 97

elves, who asked the girl to hold a child for them at

its christening. ‘The girl did not know what to do,

but at length, after much persuasion, and as they told

her that it was not right to refuse an invitation of thie

kind, ske consented. ‘Then three elves came and

conducted her to a hollow mountain, where the little

folks lived. Everything there was small, but more

elegant and beautiful than can be described. ‘The

baby’s mother lay in a bed of black ebony ornamented

with pearls, the coverlids were embroidered with gold,

the cradle was of ivory, the bath of gold. The girl

stood as godmother, and then wanted to go home

again, but the little elves earnestly entreated her to

stay three days with them. So she stayed, and passed

the time in pleasure and gaiety, and the little folks did

all they could to make her happy. At last she set out

on ner way home. ‘Then first they filled her pockets .
quite full of money, and after that they led her out of

the mountain again. When she got home, she wanted
_to begin her work, and took the broom, which was still

standing in the corner, in her hand and began to

sweep. Then some strangers came out of the house,

who asked her who she was, and what business she
had there? And she had not, as she thought, been

three days with the little men in the mountains, but

seven years, and in the meantime her former masters

had died.



THIRD STORY.

A certain mother’s child has been taken away out
of its cradle by the elves, anda changeling witha large
93 Grimm's Household Tales.

head and staring eyes, which would do nothing but
eat and drink, laid in its place. In her trouble she
went to her neighbor, and asked her advice. The
neighbor said that she was to carry the changeling
into the kitchen, set it down on the hearth, light a
fire, and boil some water in two egg-shells, which
would make the changeling laugh, and if he laughed,
all would be over with him. ‘The woman did every-
, thing that her neighbor bade her. When she put the
egg-shells with water on the fire, the imp said, “1 am
as old now as the Wester forest, but never yet have I
seen any one boil anything in an egg-shell!” And he
began to laugh at it, Whilst he was laughing, sud-
denly came a host of little elves, who brought the right
child, set it down on the hearth, and took the change-
ling away with them.




The Godfather.

POOR man had so many children that he had
already asked every one in the world to be god-
father, and when still another child was born,

no one else was left whom he could invite. He knew
not what to do, and, in his perplexity, he lay down
and fell asleep. ‘Then he dreamed that he was to go
outside the gate, and ask the first person who met him
to be godfather. When he awoke, he determined to
obey his dream, and went outside the gate, and asked
the first person who came up to him to be godfather.
The stranger presented him with a little glass of water,
and said, “This is a wonderful water, with it thou
canst heal the sick, only thou must see where Death is
standing. If he is standing by the patient’s head,
give the patient some of the water and he will be
healed, but if Death is standing by his feet, all trouble
will be in vain, for the sick man must die.” From
this time forth, the man could always say whether a
patient could be saved or not, and became famous for

7—Grimm's.
TOO Grimm’s Household: Tales.

his skill, and earned a great deal of money. Once
he was called in to the child of the King, and when he
entered, he saw Death standing by the child’s head and:
cured it with the water, and he did the same a second
time, but the third time Death was standing by its
feet, and then he knew the child was forced to die.

Once the man thought he would visit the godfather,
and tell him how he had succeeded with the water.
But when he entered the house, it was such a strange
establishment! On the first flight of stairs, the.broom
and shovel were disputing, and knocking each other
about violently. He .asked them, “Where does the
godfather live!’ The broom replied, “One flight of
stairs higher up.” When he came to the second
flight, he saw a heap of dead fingers lying. He
asked, “Where does the godfather live?’ One of the
fingers replied, “One flight of stairs higher.’ On
the third flight lay a heap of dead heads, which again
directed him to a flight beyond. On the fourth
flight, he saw fishes on the fire, which frizzled in the
pans and baked themselves. They, too, said, “One
flight of stairs higher.’ And when he had ascended
the fifth, he came to the door of a room and peeped
through the keyhole, and there he saw the godfather
who had a pair of long horns. When he opened the
door and went in, the godfather got into bed
in a great hurry and covered himself up. Then
said the man, “Sir godfather, what a strange house-
hold you have! When I came to your first flight of
stairs, the shovel and broom were quarreling, and
beating each other violently.”
The Godfather. 101

“How stupid you are!’ said the godfather.
“That was the boy and the maid talking to each
other.” “But on the second flight I saw dead fingers

eo

aVA-

ste Sara ENS SN
74, Dae.



THE POOR MAN’S CHILDREN.

lying.” “Oh, how silly you are! Those were some
roots of scorzonera.” “On the third flight lay a
heap of dead men’s heads.” “Foolish man, those
102 Grimm's Household Tales.

were cabbages.” ‘On the fourth flight, I saw fishes
in a pan, which were hissing and baking themselves.”
When he had said that, the fishes came and served -
themselves up. ‘And when I got to the fifth flight,

I peeped through the keyhole of a door, and there,
godfather, I saw you, and you had: long, long horns.”

“ Oh, that isa lie!’ ‘The man became alarmed, and
ran out, and if he had not, who knows what the god-
father would have done to him.


Fitcher’s Bird.

HERE was once a wizard who used to take the
form of a poor man, and went to houses and
begged, and caught pretty girls. No one knew

whither he carried them, for they were never seen
more. One day he appeared before the door of a man
who had three pretty daughters ; he looked like a poor
weak beggar, and carried a basket ou his back, as if
he meant to collect charitable gifts in it. He begged
for a little food, and when the eldest daughter came
out and was just reaching him a piece of bread, he
did but touch her, and she was forced to jump into
his basket. Thereupon he hurried away with long
strides, and carried her away into a dark forest to his
house, which stood in the midst of it. Everything
in the house was magnificent; he gave her whatso-
ever she could possibly desire, and said, “‘My darling,
thou wilt certainly be happy with me, for thou hast
everything thy heart can wish for.” ‘his lasted a
few days, and then he said, “I must journey forth,
and leave thee alone for a short time; there are the
keys of the house; thou mayst go everywhere and
look at everything except into one room, which this
little key here opens, and there I forbid thee to go on
pain of death.” He likewise gave her an egg and
said, ‘“ Preserve the egg carefully for me, and carry it
continually about with thee, for a great USERS
would arise from the loss of it.”

She took the keys and the égg, and promived to
-¥O4 Gtimm’s Household Tales.

obey him in everything. When he was gone, she
went all round the house from the bottom to the top,
and examined everything. The rooms shone with
silver and gold, and she thought she had never seen
such great splendor. At lengthshe came to the forbidden
door; sbe wished to pass it by, but curiosity let her
have no rest. She examined the key, it looked just
like any other; she put it in the keyhole and turned
it a little, and the door sprang open. But what did
she see when she went in? A gread bloody basin
stood in she middle of the room, and therein lay hu-
man beings, dead and hewn to pieces, and hard by
was a block of wood, and a gleaming axe lay upon
it. She was so terribly alarmed that the egg which
she held in her hand fell into the basin. She got it
out and washed the blood off, but in vain, it appeared
again ina moment. She washed and scrubbed, but
she could not get it out.

It was not long before the man came back from his
journey and the first things which he asked for were
the key and the egg. She gave them to him, but she
trembled as she did so and he saw by the red spots that
she had been in the bloody chamber.

“Since thou hast gone into the room against my
will,” said he, “thou shalt go back into it against thine
own. ‘Thy life is ended.” :

He threw her down, dragged her thither by her
hair, cut her head off on the block and hewed her in
pieces so that her blood ran on the ground. ‘Then he

xew her into the basin with the rest.

“Now I will fetch myself the second,” said the


THE BEGGAR WIZARD.
Toon Grimm's Household Tales.

wizard, and again he went to the house in the shape of
a poor man and begged. ‘Then the second daughter
brought him a piece of bread; he caught her like the
first, by simply touching her and carried her away.
She did not fare better than her sister. She allowed
herself to be led away by her curiosity, opened: the
door of the bloody chamber, looked in, and had to
atone for it with her life on the wizard’s return. Then
he went and brought the third sister, but she was clever
and crafty. -When he had given her the keys and the
egg and had left her, she first put the egg away with
great care and then she examined the house arid at last
went into the forbidden room. Alas, what did she be-
hold! Both her sisters lay there in the basin, cruelly
murdered and cut in pieces. But she began to gather
their limbs together and put them in order, head, body,
arms and legs. And when nothing further was want-
ing the limbs began to move and unite themselves to-
gether and both the maidens opened their eyes and
were once more alive. Then they rejoiced and kissed
and caressed each other.

On his arrival the man at once demanded the keys
and the egg, and as he could perceive no trace of any
blood on it he said, “Thou hast stood the test, thou
shalt be my bride.” He now had no longer any
power over her, and was forced to do whatsoever she
desired.

“Oh, very well,” said she, “thou shalt first take a
basketful of gold to my father and mother and carry it
thyself on thy back; in the meantime I will prepare
for the wedding.”
The Fitcher Bird. 107

‘Then she ran to her sisters, whom she had hidden
ina little chamber and said, “’T'he moment has come
when I can save you. ‘The wretch shall himself carry
you home again, but as soon as you are at home send
help to me.”

She put both of them in a basket and covered them
quite over with gold, so that nothing of them was to be
seen, then she called in the wizard and said to him,
“Now carry the basket away, but I shall look through
my little window and watch to see if thou stoppest on
the way to stand or to rest.”

The wizard raised the basket on his back and went
away with it, but it weighed him down so heavily that
the perspiration streamed from his face. Then he sat
down and wanted to rest awhile, but immediately one
of the girls in the basket cried, “I am looking through
my little window and I see that thou artresting. Wilt
thou goonatonce?” He thought his bride was callix,
that to him ; and got up on his legsagain. Once more
he was going to sit down, but instantly she cried, “I
am looking through my little window and I see that
thou art resting. Wilt thou go on directly?” And
whenever he stood still, she cried this, and then he was
forced to go onwards, until at last, groaning and out
of breath, he took the basket with the gold and the
two maidens into their parents’ house. At home, how-
ever, the bride prepared the marriage-feast, and sent
invitations to the friends of the wizard. /Then she
took a skull with grinning teeth, put some ornaments
on it and a wreath of flowers, carried it upstairs to the
garret-window, and let it !ook out from thence. When
108 Grimm's Household Tales,

all was ready, she got into a barrel of honey, and then
cut the feather-bed open and rolled herself in it, until
she looked like a wondrous bird and no one could recog:
nize her. Then she went out of the house and o
her way she met some of the wade ere -who
asked,

“*O, Fitcher’s bird, how com’ st thou here?”
“ <“ °‘ from cellar to garret she’s swept all clean,
And now from the window she's peeping, I ween.”’

At last she met the bridegroom, who was coming slowly
back. He, like the others, asked,

“‘O, Fitcher s bird, how com' st thou here ?”’
**T come from Fitcher's house quite near.”’
“(And what may the young bride be doing ?”’
“‘ From cellar to garret she's swept all clean,
And now from the window she’s peeping, I ween."

The bridegroom looked up, saw the decked-out skull,
thought it was his bride and nodded to her, greeting
her kindly. But when he and his guests had all gone
into the house, the brothers and kinsmen of the bride,
who had been sent to rescue her, arrived. They locked
all the doors of the house, that no one might escape,
set fire to it, and the wizard and all his crew had to
burn.


THE CLEVER BRIDE.
King Thrushbeard.

KING had a daughter who was beautiful beyond
all measure, but so proud and haughty withal
that no suitor was good enough for her. She

gent away one after another, and ridiculed them as
well.

Once the King made a great feast and invited
thereto, from far and near, all the young men likely to
marry. ‘They were all marshalled in a row according
to their rank and standing ; first came the kings, then
the grand-dukes, then the princes, the earls, the
barons, and the gentry. Then the King’s daughter
was led through the ranks, but to every one she had
some objection to make ; one was too fat, “’The wine-
cask,” she said. Another was too tall, “Long and
thin has little in.’ ‘The third was too short, “Short
and thick is never quick.” ‘The fourth was too pale,
“As pale as death.” ‘The fifth too red, “A fighting-
cock.” ‘The sixth was not straight enough, “A green
log dried behind the stove.” ~

So she had something to say against every one,
but she made herself especially merry over a good king
who, stood quite high up in the row, and whose chin
had grown a little crooked. ‘ Well,” she cried, and
laughed, “he has a chin like a thrush’s beak!” and
from that time he got the name of King Thrushbeard.

But the old King, when he saw that his daughter
King Thrushbeard. it

did nothing but mock the people, and despised all the
suitors who were gathered there, was very angry, and
swore that she should have for a husband the very first
beggar that came to his door.

A few days afterwards a fiddler came and sang
beneath the windows, trying to earn a small alms.
When the King heard him he said, “Let him come
up.” So the fiddler came in, in his dirty, ragged
clothes, and sang before the King and his daughter,
and when he had ended he asked for a trifling gift.
The King said, “Your song has pleased me so well
that I will give you my daughter there, to wife.”

The King’s daughter shuddered, but the King said,
“F have taken an oath to give you to the very first
beggar-man, and I will keep it’’ All she could say
was in vain; the priest was brought, and she had to
let herself be wedded to the fiddler on the spot. When
that was done the King said, “Now it is not proper
for you, a beggar-womian, to stay any longer in my
palace, you may just go away with your husband.”

The beggar-man led her out by the hand, and she ~
was obliged to walk away on foot with him. When
- they came to a large forest she asked, “To whom does
that beautiful forest belong?’ “It belongs to King
Thrushbeard; if you had taken him, it would have
been yours.” “Ah, unhappy girl that I am, if I had
but taken King Thrushbeard!”’

Afterwards they came to a meadow, and she asked
again, “To whom does this beautiful green meadow
belong?” “It belongs to King Thrushbeard; if you
had taken. him it would have been yours.” “Ah,
2 Gtimm’s Household Tales.

unhappy girl that I am, if I had but taken King
‘Thrushbeard.””

Then they came to a large town, and she asked
again, “’T'o whom does this fine large town belong?”
“Tt belongs to King Thrushbeard; if you had taken
him, it would have been yours.” ‘Ah, unhappy girl
that I am, if I had but taken King Thrushbeard.” __

“Tt does not please me,” said the fiddler, “to head
you always wishing for another husband; am I not
good enough for you?” At last they came to a very
little hut, and she said, “Oh, goodness! what a small
house; to whom does this miserable, mean hovel
belong?” ‘The fiddler answered, “That is my house
and yours, where we shall live together.”

She had to stoop in order to go in at the low door.
“Where are the servants?” said the King’s daughter.
“What servants?’ answered the beggar-man; “you
must yourself do what you wish to have done. Just
make a fire at once, and set on water to cook my
supper, I am quite tired.” But the King’s daughter
knew nothing about lighting fires or cooking, and the
beggar-man had to lend a hand himself to get anything
fairly done. When they had finished their scanty
meal they went to bed; but he forced her to get up
quite early in the morning in order to look after the
house.

For a few days they lived in this way as well as
might be, and finished all their provisions. ‘Then the
man said, ‘“‘ Wife, we cannot go on any longer eating
and drinking here and earning nothing. You must
weave baskets.” He went out, cut some willows, and


THE PRINCESS SCORNED ALL HER SUITORS.
114 Grimm’s Household Tales.

brought them home. ‘Then she began to weave, but
the tough willows wounded her delicate hands.

“‘T see that this will not do,’ said the man; ‘‘ you
had better spin, perhaps you can do that better.’? She
set down and tried to spin, but the hard thread soon
cut her soft fingers so that the blood ran down. ‘‘See,’’
said the man, ‘‘you are fit for no sort of work ; I have
made a bad bargain with you. Now I will try to
make a business with pots and earthenware; you
must sit in the market-place and sell the ware.’
‘Alas,’ thought she, ‘“‘if any of the people from my
father’s kingdom come to the market and see me sit-
ting there, selling, how they will mock me?” But
it was of no use, she had to yield unless she chose to ©
die of hunger.

For the first time she succeeded well, for the peo-
ple were glad to buy the woman’s wares because she
was good-looking, and they paid her what she asked ;
many even gave her the money and left the pots with
her as well. So they lived on what she had earned as
long as it lasted, then the husband bought a lot of new
crockery. With this she sat down at the corner of
the market-place, and set it round about her ready
for sale. But suddenly there came a drunken hussar
galloping along, and he rode right amongst the pots
so that they were all broken into a thousand bits,
She began to weep, and did not know what to do for
fear. “Alas! what will happen to me?” cried she ;
“‘what will my husband say to this?”

She ran home and told him of the misfortune.
‘“‘Who would seat herself at a corner of the market-
King Thrushbeard. 118

place with crockery?” said the man: “leave off cry-
ing, I see very well that you cannot do any ordinary
work, so I have been to our King’s palace and have
asked whether they cannot find a place for a kitchen-
maid, and they have promised me to take you; in
that way you will get your food for nothing.”

The King’s daughter was now a kitchen-maid, and
had to be at the cook’s beck and call, and do the dirt-
iest work. ‘In both her pockets she fastened a little
jar, in which she took home her share of the leavings,
and upon this they lived. ;

It happened that the wedding of the King’s eldest
son was to be celebrated, so the poor woman went up
and placed herself by the door of the hall to look on.
When all the candles were lit, and people, each more
beautiful than the other, entered, and all was full of
pomp and splendor, she thought of her lot with a
sad heart, and cursed the pride and haughtiness which
had humbled her and brought her to so great poverty.

The smell of the delicious dishes which were being
taken in and out reached her, and now and then the
servants threw her a few morsels of them: these she
put in her jars to take home.

All at once the King’s son entered, clothed in vel-
vet and silk, with gold chains about his neck. And
when he saw the beautiful woman standing by the
door he seized her by the hand, and would have danced
with her; but she refused and shrank with fear, for
she saw that it was King Thrushbeard, her suitor
whom she had driven away with scorn. Her strug-
gles were of no avaii, he drew her into the hall; but

8—Grimnt's.
rie Grimm’s Household Tales.

the string by which her pockets were hung broke, the
pots fell down, the soup ran out, and the scraps were
scattered all about. And when the people saw it,
there arose general laughter and derision, and she was
so ashamed that she would rather have been a thou-
sand fathoms below the ground. She sprang to the
door and would have run away, but on the stairs a
man caught her and brought her back; and when she
looked at him it was King Thrushbeard again. He
said to her kindly “ Do not be afraid, I and the fiddler
who has been living with you in that wretched hovel
are one. For love of you I disguised myself so; and I
also was the hussar who rode through your crockery.
This was all done to humble your proud spirit, and to
punish you for the insolence with which you mocked
me.”

Then she wept bitterly and said, “I have done
great wrong, and am not worthy to be your wife.”
But he said, “ Be comforted, the evil days are past;
now we will celebrate our wedding.” ‘Then the maid-
in-waiting came and put on her the most splendid
clothing, and her father and his whole court came and
wished her happiness in her marriage with King
Thrushbeard, and the joy now began in earnest. I
wish you and I had been there too.
The Three Feathers.

HERE was once on a time a King who had three
sous, of whom two were clever and wise, but the
third did not speak much and was simple and

was called the Simpleton. When the King had be-
come ola and weak, and was thinking of his end, he
did not know which of his sons should inherit the
kingdom after him. Then he said to them, “Go forth,
and he who brings me the most beautiful carpet shall
be King after my death.”

And that there should be no dispute amongst them,
he took them outside his castle, blew three feathers in
the air and said, “You shall go as they fly.” One
feather flew to the east, the other to the west, but the
third flew straight up and did not fly far, but soon fell
to the ground. And now one brother went to the
right and the other to the left and they mocked Sim-
pleton, who was forced to stay where the third feather
had fallen. He sat down and was sad, then all at once
he saw that there was a trap-door close by the feather.
He raised it up, found some steps and went down them;
‘and then he came to another door, knocked at it, and
heard somebody inside calling,

“Little green maiden small,
Hopping hither and thither;
Hop to the door,

And quickly see who ts there.”’

The door opened and he saw a great, fat toad sit-
118 Grimm’s Household Tales.

ting, and round about her a crowd of little toads. The
fat toad asked what he wanted? He answered, “I
should like to have the prettiest and finest carpet in
the world.” ‘Then she called a young one and said,

“Little green maiden. small,
Hopping uther and thither;
Hop quickly and bring me
The great box here.”

The young toad brought the box, and the fat toad
opened it and gave Simpleton a carpet out of it, so
beautiful and so fine, that on the earth above, none
could have been woven like it. Then he thanked her,
and ascended again. The two others had, however,
looked on their youngest brother as so stupid that they
believed he would find and bring nothing at all.

“Why should we give ourselves a great deal of
trouble to search?” said they, and got some coarse
handkerchiefs from the first shepherds’ wives whom
they met, and carried them home to the King. At the
same time Simpleton also came back and brought his
beautiful carpet and when the King saw it he was

astonished and said, “If justice be done the Kingdom
belongs to the youngest.’’ But the two others let their
father have no peace, and said that it was impossible
that Simpleton, who in everything lacked understand-
ing, should be King, and entreated him to make a
new agreement with them. Then the father said,
“He who brings me the most beautiful ring shall
inherit the kingdom,” and led the three brothers out,
and blew into the air three feathers, which they were


THE TOADS GAVE SIMPLETON THE CARPET,
120 Gtimm's Household Tales.

to follow. Those of the two eldest again went east
and west, and Simpleton’s feather flew straight up, and
fell down near the door into the earth. ‘Then he went
down again to the fat toad, and told her that he wanted
the most beautiful ring. She at once ordered her great
box to be brought, and gave him a ring out of it,
which sparkled with jewels, and was so beautiful that
no goldsmith on earth would have been able to make
it. The two eldest laughed at Simpleton for going to
seek a golden ring. ‘They gave themselves no trouble,
but knocked the nails out of an old carriage-ring, and
took it to the King; but when Simpleton produced his
golden ting, his father again said, “The kingdom
belongs to him.” ‘The two eldest did not cease from
tormenting the King until he made a third condition,
and declared that the one who brought the most
beautiful woman home, should have the kingdom.
He again blew the three feathers into the air, and they
flew as before.

Then Simpleton without more ado went down to
the fat toad, and said, “I am to take home the most
beautiful woman!” “Oh,” answered the toad, “the
most beautiful woman! She is not at hand at the
moment, but still thou shalt have her.” She gave him
a yellow turnip which had been hollowed out, to which
six mice were harnessed. ‘Then Simpleton said quite
mournfully, “What am I to do with that?” ‘The toad
answered, “Just put one of my little toads into it.”
Then he seized one at random out of the circle, and
put her into the yellow coach, but hardly was she
seated inside it than she turned into a wonderfully
The Three Feathers. 121

beautiful maiden, and the turnip into a coach, and the
six mice into horses. So he kissed her, and drove off
quickly with the horses, and took her to the King,
His brothers came afterwards; they had given them-
selves no trouble at all to seek beautiful girls, but had
brought with them the first peasant women they
chanced to meet. When the King saw them he said,
“After my death the kingdom belongs to my youngest
son.” But the two eldest deafened the King’s ears
afresh with their clamor, “We cannot consent to
Simpleton’s being King,” and demanded that the one
whose wife could leap through a ring which hung in
the centre of the hall should have the preference.
They thought, “The peasant women can do that
easily; they are strong enough, but the delicate maiden
will jump herself to death.” The aged King agreed
likewise to this. Then the two peasant woman jumped,
and jumped through the ring, but were so stout that
they fell, and their coarse arms and legs broke in two.
And then the pretty maiden whom Simpleton had
brought with him, sprang, and sprang through as
lightiy as a deer, and all opposition had to cease. So
he received the crown, and has ruled wisely for a
length of time.
The Pink.

HERE was once on a time a Queen to whom God |
had given no children. Every morning she went
into the garden and prayed to God in heaven to

bestow on her son ora daughter. Then an angel from
heaven came to her and said, “Be at rest, thou shalt
have a son with the power of wishing, so that whatso-
ever in the world he wishes for, that shall he have.”
Then she went to the King, and told him the joyful
tidings, and when the time was come she gave birth to
a son and the King was filled with gladness. Every
morning she went with the child to the garden where
the wild beasts were kept and washed herself there in a
clear stream. It happened once when the child was a
little older, that it was lying in her arms and she fell
asleep. ‘Then came the old cook, who knew that the
child had the power of wishing, and stole it away, and
he took a hen, and cut it in pieces, and dropped some
of its blood on the Queen’s apron and on her dress,
Then he carried the child away to a secret place, where
a nurse was obliged to suckle it and he ran to the King
and accused the Queen of having allowed her child to
be taken from her by the wild beasts. When the King
saw the blood on her apron, he believed this, fell into
such a passion that he ordered a high tower to be built,
in which neither sun nor moon could be seen, and had
his wife put into it and walled up. Here she was to
The Pink. 123

stay for seven years without meat or drink, and die
of hunger. But God sent two angels from heaven
in the shape of white doves, which flew to her twice



THE QUEEN AND HER CHILD.

a day, and carried her food until the seven years were
over.

The cook, however, thought to himself, “if
the child has the power of wishing, and’ I am
x24 Grimm's Household Tales.

here, he might very easily get me into troudle.’!
So he left the palace and went to the boy, wha
was already big enough to speak, and said to him,
“Wish for a beautiful palace for thyself with a
garden and all else that pertains to it.” Scarcely
. were the words out of the boy’s mouth, when every-
thing was there that he had wished for. After a
while the cook said to him, “It is not well for
thee to be so alone, wish for a pretty girl as a com-
panion.” ‘Then the King’s son wished for one, and she
immediately stood before him, and was more beautiful
than any painter could have painted her. ‘The two
played together, and loved each other with all their
hearts and the old cook went out hunting like a noble-
man. ‘The thought, however, occurred to him that
the King’s son might some day wish to be with his
father and thus bring him into great peril. So he
went out and took the maiden aside and said, “ To-
night when the boy is asleep, go to his bed and plunge
this knife into his heart, and bring me his heart and
tongue, and it thou dost not do it, thou shalt lose thy
life.” ‘Thereupon he went away and when he returned
next day she had not done it and said, “ Why should I
shed the blood of an innocent boy who has never
harmed any one?” ‘The cook once more said, “If
thou dost not do it, it shall cost thee thy own life.”
When he had gone away, she had a little hind brought
to her, and ordered her to be killed, and took her heart
and tongue, and laid them on a plate, and when she
saw the old man coming, she said to the boy, “Lie
down in thy bed and draw the clothes over thee.”
The Pink. ahaneezs

Then the wicked wretch came in and said, “Where
are the boy’s heart and tongue?” The girl reached
the plate to him, but the King’s son threw off the quilt
and said, “Thou old sinner, why didst thou want to -
kill me? Now will I pronounce thy sentence. Thou
shalt become a black poodle and have a gold collar
round thy neck and shall eat burning coals till the flames
burst forth from thy throat.’ And when he had spoken
these words, the old man was changed into a poodle
dog, and had a gold collar round his neck and the cooks
were ordered to bring up some live coals, and these he
ate, until the flames broke forth from his throat. The
King’s son remained there a short while longer, and
he thought of his mother, and wondered if she
were still alive. At length he said to the maiden,
“T will go home to my own country; if thou wilt go
with me, I will provide for thee.” “Ah,” she replied,
“the way is so long, and what shall I do in a strange
land where I am unknown?’ As she did not seem
quite willing, and as they could not be parted from
each other, he wished that she might be changed into
a beautiful pink, and took her with him. Then he
went away to his own country, and the poodle’ had to
run after him. He went to the tower in which his
mother was confined, and as it was so high, he wished
for a ladder which would reach up to the very top.
Then he mounted up and. looked inside, and cried,
“Beloved mother, Lady Queen, are you still alive, or
are you dead?” She answered, “I have just eaten,
and am still satisfied,’ for she thought the angels were
there. Said he, “I am your dear son, whom the wild
126 Grimm's Household Tales.

beasts were said to have torn from your arms; but I
am alive still, and will speedily deliver you.” Then
he descended again, and went to his father, and
caused himself to be announced as a.strange huntsman,
and asked if he could give him a place. The King
said yes, it he was skilful and could get game for him,
he should come to him, but that deer had never taken
uptheir quarters in any part of the district or coun-
try. Then the huntsman promised to procure as
much game for him as he could possibly use at the
royal table. So he summoned all the huntsmen to-
gether, and badethem go out into the forest with him.
And he went with them and made them form a great
circle, open at one end where he stationed himself, and
began to wish. T'wo hundred deer and more came
running inside the circle at once, and the -huntsmen
shot them. ‘Then they were all placed on sixty coun-
try carts, and driven hoine to the King, and for once
he was able to deck his table with game, after having
had none at all for years.

. Now the King felt great joy at this, and com.
manded that his entire household should eat with him
next day, and made a great feast. When they were.
all assembled together, he said to the huntsman, “As
thou art so clever, thou shalt sit by me.” He re-
plied, “Lord King, your majesty must excuse me, I
am a poor huntsman.” But the King insisted on it, and
said, “Thou shalt sit by me,” until he did it. Whilst
he was sitting there, he thought of his dearest
mother, and wished that one of the King’s principal
servants would begin to speak of her, and would ask


















THE DOOR OF THE PRISON WAS OPENED,
£28 Grimm's Household Tales.

how it was faring with the Queen in the tower, and
if she were alive still, or had perished. Hardly had
he formed the wish than the marshal began, and said,
“Your majesty, we live joyously here, but how is the
Queen living in the tower? Is she still alive, or has
she died?” But the King replied, “She let my
dear son be torn to pieces by wild beasts; I will not
have her named.” ‘Then the huntsman arose and said,
“Gracious lord father, she is alive still, and I am her
son, and I was not carried away by wild beasts, but
by that wretch the old cook, who tore me from her
arms when she was aleep, and sprinkled her apron
with the blood of a chicken.” ‘Thereupon he took
the dog with the golden collar, and said, ‘‘ That is the
wretch!’ and caused live coals to be brought, and
these the dog was compelled to devour before the sight
of all, until flames burst forth from its throat. On this
the huntmans asked the King if he would like to see
the dog in his true shape, and wished him back into
the form of the cook, in the which he stoodimmediately,
with his white apron, and his knife by his side. When
the King saw him he fell into a passion, and ordered
him to be cast into the deepest dungeon. ‘Then the
huntsman spake further and said, “ Father, will you
see the maiden who brought me up so tenderly and who
was afterwards to murder me, but did not do it, though
her own life depended on it?’ ‘The King replied.
“Ves, I would like to see her.” ‘The son said, “ Most
gracious father, I will show her to you in the form of
a beautiful flower,” and he thrust his hand into his
pocket and brought forth the pink, and placed it on
The Pink, 129

the royal table, and it was so beautiful that the King
had never seen one to equal it. ‘Then’ the son
said, “ Now will I show her to you in her own form,”
and wished that she might become a maiden, and she
stood there looking so beautiful that no painter could
have made her look more so.

And the King sent two waiting-maids and two at-
tendants into the tower, to fetch the Queen and bring
her to the royal table. But when she was led in she
ate nothing, and said, “The gracious and merciful
God who has supported me in the tower, will speedily
deliver me.” She lived three days more, and then died
happily, and when she was buried, the two white.
doves which had brought her food to the tower, and
were angels of heaven, followed her body and seated
themselves on her grave. The aged King ordered the
cook to be torn in four pieces, but grief consumed the
King’s own heart, and he soon died. His son married
the beautiful maiden, whom he had brought with him
as a flower in his pocket, and whether they are still
alive or not, is known to God,


The King of the Golden Mountain. .

HERE was a certain merchant who had two chik
dren, a boy and a girl; they were both young,
and could not walk. And two richly-laden ships

of his sailed forth to sea with ail his property on
board, and just as he was expecting to win much
money by them, news came that they had gone to the
bottom, and now instead of being a rich man he was
a poor one, and had nothing left but one field outside
the town. In order to drive his misfortune a little
out of his thoughts, he went out to this field, and as
he was walking backwards and forwards in it, a little
black mannikin stood suddenly by his side, and asked
why he was so sad, and what he was taking so much to
heart. Then said the merchant, “If thou couldst help
me I would willingly tell thee.’ “Who knows,”
replied the black dwarf. “Perhaps, I can help thee.”
Then the merchant told him that all he possessed had
gone to the bottom of the sea, and that he had nothing
left but this field. “Do not trouble thyself,” said the
dwarf. “If thou wilt promise to give me the first
thing that rubs itself against thy leg when thou art at
home again, and to bring it here to this place in twelve
years’ time, thou shalt have as much money as thou
wilt.” ‘The merchant thought, “ What can that be but
my dog?” and did not remember his little boy, so he -
said yes, gave the black man a written and sealed
promise, and went home.
The King of the Golden Mountain. 131

When he reached home, his little boy was so
‘lelighted that he held by a bench, tottered up to
him and seized him fast by the legs. ‘The father was
shocked, for he remembered his promise, and now
knew what he had pledged himself to do; as, however,
he still found no money in his chest, he thought the
dwarf had only been jesting. A month afterwards he
went up to the garret, intending to gather together
some old tin and to sell it, and saw a great heap of
money lying. Then he was happy again, made
purchases, became a greater merchant than before, and
felt that this world was well governed. In the mean-
time the boy grew tall, and at the same time sharp and
clever. But the nearer the twelfth year approached the
more anxious grew the merchant, so that his distress
might be seen in his face. One day his son asked
what ailed him, but the father would not say. ‘The
boy, however, persisted so long, that at last he told
him that without being aware of what he was doing,
he had promised him to a black dwarf, and had
received much money for doing.so. He said likewise
that he had set his hand and seal to this, and that now
when twelve years had gone by he would have to give
him up. ‘Then said the son, “Oh, father, do not be
uneasy, all will go well. The black man has no
power over ine.” ‘The son had himself blessed by the
priest, and when the time came, father and son went
together to the field, and the son made a circle and
placed himself inside it with his father. ‘Then came
the black dwarf and said to the old man, “Hast thou
brought with thee that which thou bast promised me?”

9—Grimm's.
132 Grimm's Household Tales.

He was silent, but the son asked, ‘‘ What dost thou wart
here?” ‘Then said the black dwarf, “I have to speak
with thy father, and not with thee.” The son replied,
“Thou hast betrayed and misled my father, give back
the writing.” No,” said the black dwarf, “I will not
give up my rights.” ‘They spoke together for a long
time after this, but at last they agreed that the son, as
- he did not belong to the enemy of mankind, nor yet to
his father, should seat himself in a small boat, which
was flowing away from them, and that the father
should push it off with his own foot, and then the son
should remain given up to the water. So he took
leave of his father, placed himself in a little boat, and
the father had to push it off with his own foot. The
boat capsized so that the keel was uppermost, and the
father believed his son was lost, and went home and
mourned for nim.

The boat, however, did not. sink, but floated quietly
away, and the boy sat safely inside it, and it floated
- thus fora long time, until at last it stopped by an
unknown shore. ‘Then he landed and saw a beautiful
castle before him, and set out to go to it. When he
entered it; however, he found that it was bewitched.
He went through every room, but all were empty until
he reached the last, where a snake lay coiled in a ring.
‘The snake, however, was an enchanted maiden, who
rejoiced to see him, and said, “Hast thou come, oh,
my deliverer? I have already waited twelve years for
thee; this kingdom is bewitched, and thou must set
it free.” “How can I do that?” he inquired. ‘“To-
night come twelve black men, covered with chains who
The King of the Golden Mountain. 133

will ask what thou art doing here; keep silence,
however; give them no answer, and let them do
what they will with thee; they will torment thee,
‘beat thee, stab thee; let everything pass, only



HE DRANK OF THE WATER OF LIFE.

do not speak; at twelve o'clock, they must go away
again. On the second night twelve others will
come; on the third four and twenty, who will
cut off thy head, but at twelve o’clock their power
134 Grimm's Household Tales.

will be over, and then if thou hast endured all, and
hast not spoken the slightest word, I shall be
released. I will. come to thee, ana will have, in a
bottle, some of the water of life. I will rub thee
with that, and then thou wilt come to life again,
and be as healthy as before.” ‘Then said he, “I will
gladly set thee free.” And everything happened just
as she had said; the black men could not force a
single word from him, and on the third night the
snake became a beautiful princess, who came with
the water of life and brought him back to life again.
So she threw herself into his arms and kissed him,
and there was joy and gladness in the whole castle.
After this their marriage was celebrated, and he was
King of the Golden Mountain.

They lived very happily together and the Queen
bore a fine boy. Eight years had already gone by,
when the King bethought him of his father; his heart
was moved, and he wished to visit him. "The Queen,
however, would not let him go away and said, “I know
beforehand that it will cause my unhappiness ;” but
he suffered her to have no rest until she consented. At
their parting she gave him a wishing-ring and said,
“Take this ring and put it on thy finger and then thou
wilt immediately be transported whithersoever thou
wouldst be, only thou must promise me not to use it in
wishing me away from this place and with thy father.”
That he promised her, put the ring on his finger and
wished himself at home, just outside the town where
his father lived. Instantly he found himself there and
made for the town, but when he came to the gate, the
The King of the Golden Mountain. 135

sentries would not let him go in, because he wore such
strange and yet such rich and magnificent clothing.
Then he went to a hill where a shepherd was watching
his sheep, changed clothes with him, put on his old
shepherd’s-coat, and. then entered the town without
hindrance. When he came to his father, he made him-
self known to him, but he did not at all believe that
the shepherd was his son, and said he certainly had had
a son, but that he was dead long ago; however, as he
saw he was a poor, needy shepherd, he would give him
something to eat. Then the shepherd said to his
parents, “I am verily your son. Do you know of no
mark on my body by which you could recognize me?”
“Yes,” said his mother, “our son had a raspberry
mark under his right arm.” He slipped back his
shirt and they saw the raspberry under his right arm,
and no longer doubted that he was their son. Then he
told them that he was King of the Golden Mountain,
and a king’s daughter was his wife and that they had.
a fine son of seven years old. Then said the father,
“That is certainly not true; it is a fine kind of king
who goes about in a ragged shepherd’s-coat.” On this
the son fell in a passion and without thinking of his
promise, turned his ring round and wished both his
wife and child with him. They were there in a second,
but the Queen wept, and reproached him, and said that
he had broken his word, and had brought misfortune
upon her. He said, “I have done it thoughtlessly and
not with evil intention,” and tried to calm her, and she
pretended to believe this; but she had mischief in her
mind.
136 Grimm’s Household Tales.

Tnen he led her out of the town into the field and
showed her the stream where the little boat had been
pushed off, and then he said, “I am tired; sit down;
I will sleep awhile on thy lap.” And he laid his head
on her lap and fell asleep. When he was asleep, she
first drew the ring from his finger, then she drew away
the foot which, was under him, leaving only the slip-
per behind her,:and she took her child in her arms and
wished herself back in her own kingdom. When he

awoke, there he lay* quite deserted, and his wife and
child were gone, and so was the ring from his finger,
the slipper only was still there as a token. “Homie to
thy parents thou canst not return,” thought he; “they
would say that thou wast a wizard; thou must be cff,
and walk on until thou arrivest in thine own king
dom.” So he went away and came at length to a hill
by which three giants were standing, disputing with
each other because ‘they did not. know how -to divide
their father’s property. When they saw him passing
by, they called to him and said little men had quick
wits, and that he was to divide-their inheritance for
them, The inheritance, however, consisted of a sword,
which had this property that if any one took it in his
hand and said, “All heads off but mine,” every head
would lie on the ground; secondly, of a cloak which
made aay on¢d-who put it on invisible; thirdly, ofa pair
of boots which could transport the wearer to any place
he wished in a moment. He said, “Give me the three
things that I may see if they are still in go condi-
tion.” They gave him the cloak and when he had put
it on, he was invisible and changed into a fly. Then
The King of the Golden Mountain. 137

he resumed his own form and said, “The cloak is a good
one, now give me the sword.” ‘They said, “‘ No, we will
not give thee that; if thou wert to say, ‘All heads off
but mine,’ all our heads would be off, and thou alone
wouldst be left with thine.’ Nevertheless they gave
it to him with the condition that he was only to try
it against a tree. ‘This he did, and the sword cut in
two the trunk ofa tree as if it had been a blade of
straw. ‘Then he wanted to have the boots likewise,
but they said, “No, we will not give them; if thou
hadst them on thy feet and wert to wish thyself at the
top of the hill, we should be left down here with
nothing.” ‘Qh, no,” said he, “I will not do that.”
So they gave him the boots as well. And now when
he had got all these things, he thought of nothing but
his wife and his child, and said just as it were to him-
self, “Oh, if I were but on the Golden Mountain,”
and at the same moment he vanished from the sight
of the giants, and thus their, inheritance was divided.
When he was near his palace, he heard sounds of joy,
and fiddles, and flutes, and the people told him that
his wife was celebrating her wedding with another.
Then he fell into a rage, and said, “ False woman, she
_ betrayed and deserted me whilst I was asleep!’ So
he put on his cloak, and unseen by all went into the
palace. When he entered the dining-hall a great table
- was spread with delicious food, and the guests were
eating and drinking, and laughing, and jesting. She
sat on a royal seat in the midst of them in splendid
apparel, with a crown on her head. He placed him-
self behind her, and no one saw him. When she put
138 Grimm's Household Tales.

a piece of meat on a plate for herself, he took it away
and ate it, and when she poured out a glass of wine
for herself, he took it away and drank it. She was
always helping herself to something, and yet she never
got anything, for plate and glass disappeared imme
diately. Then dismayed and ashamed, she arose anc
went to her chamber and wept, but he followed het
there. She said, “Has the devil power over me, o1
did my deliverer never come?” ‘Then he strucx het
im the face, and said, “Did thy deliverer never come?
It is he who has thee in his power, thou traitor. Have
I deserved this from thee?” ‘Then he made himself
visible, went into the hall, and cried, “The wedding is
at an end, the true King has returned.” ‘The kings,
princes and councillors who were assembled there,
-ridiculed and mocked him, but he did not trouble to
answer them, and said, ‘ Will you go away, or not?”
On this they tried to seize him and pressed upon him,
but he drew his sword and said, “All heads off but
mine,” and all the heads rolled on the ground, and he
alone was master, and once more King of the Golden
Mountain.
The Three Little Birds.

BOUT a thousand or more years ago, there were
in this country nothing but small kings, and one
of them lived on the Keuterberg who was very

fond of hunting. Once on a time when he was riding
forth from his castle with his huntsmen, three girls
were watching their cows upon the mountain, and
when they saw the King with all his followers, the
eldest girl pointed to him, and called to the two other
girls “Hilloa! hilloa! If I do not get that one, I will
have none.”’ Then the second girl answered from the
other side of the hill, and pointed to the one who was
on the King’s right hand, “‘Hilloa! hilloa! If I do
not get that one, I will have none.’ And then the
youngest pointed to the one who was on the left hand,
and cried, “Hilloa! hilloa! If I do not get him I will
have no one.” These, however, were the two ministers.
The King heard all this, and when he had come back
from the chase, he caused the three girls to be brought
to him, and asked them what they had said yesterday
on the mountain. They would not tell him that, so
the King asked the eldest if she really would take him
for her husband? Then she said, “Yes,” and the two
ministers married the two sisters, for they were all
three fair and beautiful of face, especially the Queen,
who had hair like flax. But the two sisters had no
children, and once when the King was obliged to go
from home, he invited them to come to the Queen in
order to cheer her, for she was about to bear a child.
140 Grimm's Household Tales.

She had a little boy who brought a bright red star inte
the world with him. ‘Then the two sisters said to each
other that they would throw the beautiful boy into the
_ water. When they had thrown him in (I believe it

was into the Weser), a little bird flew up into the air,
which sang,

“‘To thy death art thou sped,
Ontil God's word be said,
Ln the white lily bloom,
Brave boy, ts thy tomb.”

When the two heard that, they were frightened to
death and ran away in great haste. When the King
came home they told him that the Queen had been
delivered of adog. ‘Then the King said, “ What God
does, is well done!” Buta fisherman who dwelt near
the water fished the little boy out again while he was

. still alive and as his wife had no children they reared
him. When a year had gone by, the King again went
‘away, and the Queen had another little boy, wham the
false sisters likewise took and threw into tke water.
Then up flew a little bird again and sang,

“« To thy death art thou sped
Ontil God's word be said.
Ln the white lily bloom,
Brave boy, ts thy tomb.”

And when the King came back, they told him that the
Queen had once more given birth to a dog and he again
said, “‘ What God does, is well done.” The fisherman,
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SHE MET AN OLD WOMAN.
142 Grimm's Household Tales.

however, fished this one also out of the water, and
reared him.

Then the King again journeyed forth andthe Queen
had a little girl, whom also the false sisters threw inta
the water. Then again a little bird flew up on high
and sang,

“To thy death art thou sped,
Until God’s word be said.
In the white lily bloom,
Bonny girl, is thy tomb.”

‘And when the King came home they told fn that the
Queen had been delivered of a cat. Then the King
grew angry and ordered his wife to be cast into prison,
and therein was she shut up for many long years.

In the meantime the children had grown up. Then
the eldest once went out with some other boys to fish,
but the other boys would not have him with them and
said, “Go thy way, foundling.”

Hereupon he was much troubled and asked the old
fisherman if that was true? The fisherman told him
that once when he was fishing he had drawn him out of
the water. So the boy said he would go forth and seek
his father. The fisherman, however, entreated him to
stay, but he would not let himself be hindered and at —
last the fisherman consented. Then the boy went on
his way and walked for many days together and at last
he came to a great piece of water by the side of which
stood an old woman fishing. “Good day, mother,”
said the boy.

‘ “Many thanks,” said she.
The Three Little Birds. 143

“Thou wilt fish long enough before thou catchest
anything.”

“And thou wilt seek long enough before. thou
findest thy father. How wilt thou get over the water?”
said the woman.

“God knows.”

Then the old woman took him up on her back and
carried him through it, and he sought for a long time,
but could not find his father.

When a year had gone by, the second boy set out
to seek his brother. He came to the water, and all
fared with him just as with his brother. And now
there was no one at home but the daughter, and she
mourned for her brothers so much that at last she also
begged the fisherman to let her set forth, for she wished
to goin search of her brothers. ‘Then she likewise
came to the great piece of water, and she said to the old
woman, ‘Good day, mother.”

“Many thanks,” replied the old woman.

“May God help you with your fishing,” said the
maiden. When the old woman heard that, she became
quite friendly and carried her over the water, gave hera
wand, and said to her, “Go, my daughter, ever
onwards by this road, and when you come toa great
black dog, you must pass it silently and boldly, with- .
out laughing or looking at it. ‘Then you will come to
a gteat high castle, on the threshold of which you will
let the wand -fall, and go straight through the castle,
and out again on the other side. There you will see
an old fountain out of which a large tree has grown,
whereon hangs a bird in a’ cage which you must take
144 Grimm's Household Tales.

down. ‘Take likewise a glass of water out of the
fountain, and with these two things go back by the
same way. Pick up the wand again from the threshold
and take it with you, and when you again pass by the
dog strike him in the face with it, but be sure that
you hit him, and then just come back here to me.”
The maiden found everything exactly as the old
woman had said, and on her way back she found her
two brothers who had sought each other over half the
world. They went together to the place where the
black dog was lying on the road; she struck it in the
face, and it turned into a handsome prince who went
with them to the river. ‘There the old woman was
still standing. She rejoiced much to see them again,
and carried them all over the water, and then she too
went away, for now she was freed. ‘The others, how-
ever, went to the old fisherman, and all were glad that
they had found each other again, but they hung the
-bird on the wall.

But the second son could not settle at home, and
took his cross-bow and went a-hunting. When he
was tired he took his flute, and made music. The
King, however, was hunting too, and heard that and
went thither, and when he met the youth, he said,
“Who has given thee leave to hunt here?”

“Oh, no one.”

‘To whom dost thou belong, then?”

“Tam the fisherman’s son.”

“But he has no children.”

“Tf thou wilt not believe, come with me.”

That the King did and questioned the fisherman,
The Three Little Birds, 145

who told everything to him, and the little bird on the
wall began to sing,

“* The mother sits alone
Dhere in the prison small,
O King of royal blood,
These are thy children ail,
The sisters twain so false, |
They wrought the children woe,
Lhere in the waters deep
Where the fishermen come and go,”

Then they were all terrified, and the King took
the bird, the fisherman and the three children back
with him to the castle, and ordered the prison to be
opened and brought his wife out again. She had,
however, grown quite ill and weak. Then the
daughter gave her some of the water of the fountain
to drink, and she became strong and healthy. But
the two false sisters were burned, and the daughter
mattied the prince.


The Wacer of Life.

HERE was once a King who had an illness, and
no one believed that he would come out of it
with his life He had three sons who were

much distressed about it, and went down into the
palace-garden and wept. ‘There they met an old man
who inquired as to the cause of their grief ‘They
told lkim that their father was so ill that he would
most certainly die, for nothing seemed to cure him.
Then the old man said, “‘I know of one more remedy,
and that is the water of life; if he drinks of it he will
become well again; but it is hard to find.” ‘The
eldest said, “I will manage to find it,” and went to the
sick King, and begged to be allowed to go forth ir,
search of the water of life, for that alone could save
him. ‘‘No,” said the King, “the danger of it is toc
great. Iwould rather die.’ But he begged so long
that the King consented. The prince thought in his
heart, “If I bring the water, then I shall be best
beloved of my father, and shall inherit the kingdom.”
So he set out, and when he had ridden forth a little
distance, a dwarf stood there in the road who called to
him and said, “Whither away so fast?’ “Silly
shrimp,” said the prince, very haughtily, ‘it is noth-
ing to you,” and rodeon. But the little dwarf had
grown angry, and had wished an evil wish. Soon
after this the prince entered a ravine, and the further
he rode the closer the mountains grew together, and
The Water of Life. 147

at last the road became so narrow that he could not
advance a step further; it was impossible either to.
turn his horse or to dismount from the saddle, and he
was shut in there as if in prison. The sick King
waited long for him, but he came not. ‘Then the
second son said, “Father, let me go forth to seek the
water,” and thought to himself, “Tf my brother is dead,
then the kingdom will fall to me.” At first the King
would not allow him to go either, but at last he yielded,
so the prince set out on the same road that his brother
had taken, and he too met the dwarf, who stopped him
to ask, whither he was going in such haste? “Little
shrimp,” said the prince, “that is nothing to thee,” and
rode on without giving him another look. But the
dwarf bewitched him, and he, like the other, got into *
a tavine, and could neither go forwards nor backwards.
So fare haughty people.
As the second son also remained away, the youngest ©
_ begged to Le allowed to go forth to fetch the water and
at last the King was obliged to let him go. .When he
met the dwarf and the latter asked him whither he was
going in such haste, he stopped, gave him an explana-
tion and said, “I am seeking the water of life, for my
father is sick unto death.”

“ Dost thou know, then, where that is to be found?”
No,” said the prince.

« As thou hast borne thyself as is seemly, and not
haughtily like thy false brothers, I will give thee the
information and tell thee how thou mayst obtew the
water of life. It springs from a fountain in the court-
yard of an enchanted castle, but thou wilt not be able

z0o—Grimm's.
48 Grimm's Household Tales.

to make thy way to it, if I do not give thee an iron
wand and two small loaves of bread. Strike thrice
with the wand on the iron door of the castle, and it
will spring open: inside lie two lions with gaping
jaws, but if thou throwest a loaf to each of them, they
will be quieted, then hasten to fetch some of the water
of life before the clock strikes. twelve, else the door will
shut again, and thou wilt be imprisoned.” ‘The prince
thanked him, took the wand and the bread, and set out
on his way. When he arrived, everything was as the
dwarf had said. The door sprang open at the third
stroke of the wand, and when he had appeased the lions
with the bread, he entered into the castle, and came in
a large and splendid hall, wherein sat some enchanted
princes whose rings he drew off their fingers. A sword
and a loaf of bread were lying there, which he carried
away. After this, he entered a chamber, in which was
a beautiful maiden who rejoiced when she saw him,
kissed him, and told him that he had delivered her, -
and should have the whole of her kingdom, and that
if he would return in a year their wedding should be
celebrated; likewise she told him where the spring of
the water of life was, and that he was to hasten and draw
some of it before the clock struck twelve. Then he
went onwards and at last entered a room where there
was a beautiful newly-made bed, and as he was very
weary, he felt inclined to rest a little. So he lay down
and fell asleep. When he awoke, it was striking a
quarter to twelve. He spraug up in a fright, ran to
the spring, drew some water in a cup which stood near
and hastened away. But just as he was passing through
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THE ENCHANTED CASTLE.
150 Grimm's Household Tales.

the iron door, the clock struck twelve, and the door
fell to with such violence that it carried away a piece
of his heel. He, however, rejoicing at having obtained
the water of life, went homewards, and again passed
the dwarf. When the latter saw the sword and the
loaf, he said, ‘‘ With these thou hast won great wealth;
with the sword thou canst slay whole armies, and the
bread will mever come to an end.” But the prince
would not go home to his father without his brothers,
and said, “ Dear dwarf, canst thou not tell me where
my two brothers are? ‘They went out before I did in
search of the water of life and have not returned.”
“They are imprisoned between two mountains,” said
the dwarf. “I have condemned them to stay there,
because they were so haughty.” Then the prince
begged until the dwarf released them; he warned him,
however, and said, “ Beware of them, for they have bad
hearts.” When his brothers came, he rejoiced and told
them how things had gone with him, that he had
found the water of life, and had brought a cupfil away
with him, and had delivered a beautiful princess, who
was willing to wait a year for him, and then their
wedding was to be celebrated, and he would obtain a
great kingdom. After that they rode on together, and
chanced upon a land where war and famine reigned,
and the King already thought that He must perish, for
the scarcity was great. Then the prince went to him
and gave him the loaf, wherewith he fed and satisfied
the whole of his kingdom, and then the prince gave
him the sword alse, wherewith he slew the hosts of
his enemies, and could now live in rest and peace,
The Water of Life. ; I5E

The prince then took back his loaf and his sword, and
the three brothers rode on. But after this they entered
two more countries where war and famine reigned, and
each time the prince gave his loaf and his sword to
the Kings, and had now delivered three kidgdoms, and
after that they went on board a ship and sailed over
the sea. During the passage, the two eldest conversed
apart and said, ‘The youngest has found the water ot
life and not we, for that our father will give him the
kingdom,—the kingdom which belongs to us, and he
will rob us of all our fortune.” They then began to
seek revenge, and plotted with each other to destroy
him. ‘They waited until ofice when they found him
fast asleep, then they poured the water of life out of
the cup, and took it for themselves, but into the cup
they poured salt sea-water. Now therefore, when they
atrived at home, the youngest took his cup to the sick
King in order that he might drink out of it, and be
cured. But scarcely had he drunk a very little of the
salt sea-water than he became still worse than before.
And as he was lamenting over this, the two eldest
brothers came, and accused the youngest of having
intended to poison him, and said that they had brought
him the true water of life, and handed it to him. He
had scarcely tasted it, when he felt his sickness depart-
ing, and became strong and healthy as in the days of
his youth. After that they both went to the youngest,
and mocked him, and said, “You certainly found the
water of life, but you have had the pain, and we the
gain; you should have been sharper, and should have
kept your eyes open. We took it from you whilst you
152 Grimm's Household Tales.

were asleep at sea, and when a year is over, one of us
will go and fetch the beautiful princess. But beware
that you do not disclose ought of this to our father;
indeed he does not trust you, and if you say a single
world, you shall lose your life into the bargain, but if
you keep silent, you shall have it as a gift.”

The old King was angry with his youngest son,
and thought he “had plotted against his life. So he
summoned the court together, and had sentence pro-
nounced upon his son, that he should be secretly shot.
And once when the prince was riding forth to the
chase, suspecting no evil, the King’s huntsman had to
go with him, and when ‘they were quite alone in the
forest, the huntsman looked so sorrowful that the
prince said to him, “Dear huntsman, what ails you?”
The huntsman said, “I cannot tell you and yet I
ought.” ‘Then the prince said, “Say openly what it
is, I will pardon you.” “Alas!” said the huntsman,
“Tam to shoot you dead, the king has ordered me to do
“it.” Then the prince was shocked and said, ‘Dear
huntsman, let me live; there, I give you my royal
garments; give me your common ones in. their stead.”
The huntsman said, “I will willingly do that, indeed I
should not have been able to shoot you.” ‘Then they
exchanged clothes, and the huntsman returned home;
the prince, however, went further into the forest.
After a time three wagons of gold and precious .
‘stones came to the King for his youngest son, which
were sent by the three Kings who had slain their
enemies with the prince’s sword, and maintained their
people with his bread, and who wished to show their |
The Water of Life. 153

gratitude for it.: The old King then thought “Can
iy son have been innocent?” and said to his people,
“Would that he were still alive, how it grieves me
that I. suffered him to be killed!” “He still lives,”
said the huutsman, “I could not find it in my heart te
carry out your command,” and told the King how it
had happened. ‘Then a stone fell from the King’s
heart, and he had it proclaimed in every country that
his son might return and be taken into favor again.

- ‘The princess, however, had a road made up to her
palace which was quite bright and golden, and told her
people that whosoever came riding straight along it to
her, would be the right wooer and was to be admitted
and whoever rode by the side of it, was not the right

. one, and was not to beadmitted. As the time was now
close at hand, the eldest thought he would hasten to go
to the King’s daughter, and give himself out as her de-
fiverer and thus win her for his bride, and the kingdom
to boot. ‘Therefore he rode forth, and when he arrived
in front of the palace, and saw the splendid golden road
he thought it would bea sin and a shame if he were to
ride over that, and turned aside and rode on the right
side of it. But when he came to the door, the ser-
vants told him that he was not the right man, and was.
to go away again. Soon after this the second prince
set out, and when he came to the golden road and his
horse had put one foot on it, he thought it would bea
sin and a shame to tread a piece of it off, and he
turned aside and rede on the left side of it, and when
he reached the door, the attendants told him he was
not the right one and was to go away again. When
154 Gtimm’‘s Household Tales.

at last the year had entirely expired, the third son like.
wise wished to ride out of the forest to his beloved,
' with her to forget his sorrows. So he set out and
thought of her so incessantly and wished -to be
with her so much, that he never noticed the golden
road at all. So his horse rode onwards up the middle
of it, and when he came to the door, it was opened
and the princess received him with joy, and said
he was her deliverer, and lord of the kingdom,
and their wedding was celebrated with great rejoicing.
When it was over she told him that his father invited
him to come to him, and had forgiven him. So he
rode thither and told him everything ; how his broth-
ers had betrayed him, and how he had nevertheless
kept silence. ‘The old King wished to punish them,
but they had put to sea, and never came back as long
as they lived.


The Jew Among Thorns.

HERE was once a rich man, who had a servant
who served him diligently and honestly; he
was every morning the first out of bed, and the

last to go to rest at night; and, whenever there was a
difficult job to be done, which nobody cared to under.
take, he was always the first to set himself to it,
Moreover, he never complained, but was contented with
everything, and always merry.

When a year was ended, his master gave him no
wages, for he said to himself, “That is the cleverest
way; for I shall save something, and he will not go
away, but stay quietly in my service.’ ‘The servant
said nothing, but did his work the second year as he
had done it the first; and when at the end of this,
likewise, he received no wages, he made himself happy,
and still stayed on.

When the third year also was passed, the master
considered, put his hand in his pocket, but pulled
nothing out. ‘Then the setvant said, “Master, for
three years I have served you hozestly, be so good as
to give me what I ought to have; for I wish to leave,

and look about me a little more in the world.”

“Yes, my good fellow,” said the old miser; “you
have served me industriously, and, therefore, you shall
be cheerfully rewarded ;” and he put his hand into his
pocket, but counted out only three farthings, saying,
“Where you have a farthing for each year; that is
large and liberal pay, such as you would have received
from few masters.”
156 Grimm's Household Tales.

The honest servant, who understood little abom
money, put his fortune into his pocket, and thought,
“Ah! now that [ have my purse full, why need I
trouble and plague myself any longer with hard work !”
So on he went, up hill and down dale; and sang and
jumped to his heart’s content. Now it came to pass
that as he was going by a thicket, a little man stepped
out, and called to him, ‘ Whither away, merry brother?
I see you do not carry many cares.” ‘ Why should I
be sad?” answered the servant ; “I have enough; three
years’ wages are jingling in my pocket.”

“Flow much is your treasure?” the dwarf asked him.

“How much? ‘Three farthings sterling, all told.”

“Look here,” said the dwarf, “I am a poor needy
man, give me your three farthings; I can work no
longer, but you are young, and can easily earn your
bread.” And as the servant had a good heart, and
felt pity for the old man, he gave him the three farth-
ings, saying, “Take them in the name of Heaven, I
shall not be any the worse for it.”

Then the little man said, “As I see you have a good
heart I grant you three wishes, one for each farthing,
they shall all be fulfilled.”

‘‘Aha!” said the servant, “ you are one of those who
can work wonders! Well, then, ifit is to be so, I wish,
first, for a gun, which shall hit everything that I aim
at; secondly, for a fiddle, which when I play on it, shall
compel all who hear it to dance; thirdly, that if I ask
a favor of any one he shall not be able to refuse it.”

“All that you shall have,” said the dwarf; and put.
his hand into the bush, and only think, there lay a


—s Ts (me Tae teas Tad Meese

THE JEW AMONG THORNS,
158 Grimm/’s Household Tales.

fiddle and gun, all ready, just as if they had been
ordered. ‘These he gave to the servant, and then said
to him, “Whatever you may ask at any time, no man
in the world shall be able to deny vou.”

“Fleart alive! What can one desire more?” said
the servant to himself, and went merrily onwards.
Soon afterwards he met a Jew with a long goat’s
beard, who was standing listening to the song of a
bird which was sitting up at the top of the tree.
“Good heavens,’ he was exclaiming, “that such a
small creature should have such a fearfully loud voice!
if it were but mine! if only some one would sprinkle
some salt upon its tail!” -

“Tf that is all,” said the servant, “the bird shall
soon be down here;” and taking aim he pulled the
trigger, and down fell the bird into the thorn-bushes.
“Go, you rogue,” he said to the Jew, “and fetch the
bird out for yourself!”

“Oh !” said the Jew, “leave out the rogue, my mas
ter, and I will do it at once. I will get the bird out fot
myself, as you really have hit it.’ Then he lay down
on the ground, and began to crawl into the thicket.”

When he was fast among the thorns, the good ser
vants humor so tempted him that he took up his fiddle
and began to play. In a moment the Jew’s legs began
to move, and to jump into the air, and the more the ser-
vant fiddled the better went the dance. But the thorns
tore his shabby coat for him, combed his beard, and
pricked and plucked him all over the body. “Oh dear,”
cried the Jew, “what do I want with your fiddling? leave
the fiddle alone, master; I do not want to dance.”
The Jew Among Thorns. 159

But the servant did not listen to him, and thought,
“You have fleeced people often enough, now the
thorn-bushes shall do the same for you;” and he began
to play over again, so that the Jew had to jump higher
than ever, and scraps of his coat were left hanging on
the thorns. ‘Oh, woe’s me!” cried the Jew; “I-will
give the gentleman whatsoever he asks if only he
leaves off fiddling—a purse full of gold.” “If you are
so liberal,” said the servant, “I will stop my music; but
this I must say to your credit, that you dance to it so
well that it is quite an art;” and having taken the
purse he went his way.

The Jew stood still and watched the servant quietly
until he was far off and out of sight, and then he
screamed out with all his might, “ You miserable musi-
cian, you beer-house fiddler!” wait till I catch you
alone, I will hunt you till the soles of your shoes fall off!
You ragamuffin | ! just put five farthings in your mouth,
and then you may be worth three halfpence !” and went
on abusing him as fast as he could speak. As soon as
he had refreshed himself a little in this way, and got
his breath again, he ran into the town to the justice.

““My lord judge,” he said, ‘I have come to make a
complaint ; see how a rascal has robbed and ill-treated
me on the public highway! astone on the ground
might pity me; my clothes all torn, my body pricked
and scratched, my little all gone with my purse,—good
ducats, each piece better than the last; for God’s sake
let the man be thrown into prison !”

““Was it a soldier,” said the judge, “who cut you
thus with his sabre?” “Nothing of the sort!” said
160 Grimm’s Household Tales.

the Jew ; it was no sword that he had, but a gun hang:
ing at his back, and a fiddle at his neck ; the wretch
may easily be known.”

So the judge sent his people out after the man, and
they found the good servant, who had been going quite
slowly along, and they found, too, the purse with the
money upon him. As soon as he was taken before
the judge he said, “I did not touch the Jew, nor take
his money; he gave it to me of his own free will, that
Imught leave off fiddling because he could not bear
_ ny music.”

“Heaven defend us!” cried the Jew, “his lies are
as thick as flies upon the wall.”

But the judge also did not believe his tale, and said,
“This is a bad defence, no Jew would do that.” And
because he had committed robbery on the public high-
way, he sentenced the good servant to be hanged. As
he was being led away the Jew again screamed after
him, you vagabond! you dog of a fiddler! now you are
going to receive your well-earned reward! ‘The ser-
vant walked quietly with the hangman up the ladder,
but upon the last step he turned round and said to the
judge, “Grant me just one request before I die.”

“Yes, if you do not ask your life,” said the judge.

“TJ do not ask for life,” answered the servant, ‘‘ but
asa last favor let me play once more upon my fiddle.”

The Jew raised a great cry of “ Murder! murder
for goodness’ sake do not allow it!” But the judge
said, “Why should I not let him have this short
pleasure? it has been granted to him, and he shall
have it.” However, he could not have refused on
The Jew Among Thorns, 162°

account of the gift which had been bestowed on the
servant.

Then the Jew cried, “Oh! woe’s me! tie me, tie
me fast !? while the good servant took his fiddle from
his neck, and made ready. As he gave the first scrape,
they all began to quiver and shake, the judge, his clerk,
and the hangman and his men, and the cord fell out
of the hand of the one who was going to tie the Jew
fast. At the second scrape all raised their legs, and
the hangman let go his hold of the good servant, and
made himself ready to dance. At the third scrape they
all leaped up and began to dance; the judge, and the
Jew being the best at jumping. Soon all who had
gathered in the market-place out of curiosity were
dancing with them; old and young, fat and lean, one
with another. The dogs, likewise, which had run
there got up on their hind legs and capered about; and
the longer he played, the higher sprang the dancers,
so that they knocked against each other’s heads, and
began to shriek terribly.

At length the judge cried, quite out of breath, “I
will give you your life if you will only stop fiddling.”
The good servant thereupon had compassion, took his
fiddle and hung it round his neck again; and stepped
down the ladder. Then he went up to the Jew, who
was lying upon the ground panting for breath, and
said, “You rascal, now confess, whence you got the
money, or I will take my fiddle and begin to play
again.” “T stole it, I stole it!” cried he; “but you
have honestly earned it.’ So the judge had the Jew
taken to the gallows and hanged as a thief,
The Cunning Little Tailor.

HERE was once on a time a princess who ‘was
extremely proud. Ifa wooer came she gave him
some riddle to guess, and if he could not find it

out he was sent contemptuously away. She let it be
made known also that whosoever solved her riddie
should marry her, let him be who he might. At
length, therefore, three. tailors fell in with each other,
the two eldest of whom thought they had done so
many dexterous bits of work successfully that they
could not fail to succeed in this also; the third was a
little useless land-louper, who did not even know his
trade, but thought he must have some luck in this
venture, for where else was it to come from? ‘Then
the two others said to him, “Just stay at home; thou
canst not do much with thy little bit of understand-
ing.” The little tailor, however, did not let himself
be discouraged, and said he had set his head to work
about this for once, and he would manage well enough,
and he went forth as if the whole world were his.

They all three announced themselves to the prin-

cess, and said she was to propound her riddle to them,
and that the right persons were now come, who had
understandings so fine that they coutd be threaded in a
needle. ‘Then said the princess, “I have two kinds of
hair on my head, of what color is it?” “If that be
all,” said the first, “it must be black and white, like
the cloth which is called ‘pepper and salt.” The
The Cunning Little Tailor.

princess said, “Wrongly guessed;
answer.”

163

let the second
Then said the second, “If it be not black



THE LITTLE TAILOR GUESSES THE RIDDLE

and white, then it is brown and red, like my father’s
company coat.’ ‘“Wrongly guessed,” said the’ prin-

rm—Grimm's.
x64 Grimm's Household Tales.

cess, “let the third give the answer, for I see very well
he knows it for certain.” ‘Then the little tailor stepped
boldly forth and said, “The princess has a silver and
a golden hair on her head, and those.are the two differ-
ent colors.” When the princess heard that, she turned
pale and nearly fell down with terror, for the little
tailor had guessed her riddle, and she had firmly
believed that no man on earth could discover it.
When her courage returned she said, “Thou hast not
won me yet by that; there is still something else that
thou must do. Below, in the stable, is a bear with
which thou shalt pass the night, and when I get up in
the morning if thou art still alive, thou shalt marry
me.” She expected, however, she should thus get rid
of the tailor, for the bear had never yet left any one
alive who had fallen into his clutches. The little :
tailor did not let himself be frightened away, but was
quite delighted, and said, “Boldly ventured is half
won.”

When therefore the evening came, our little tailor
was taken down to the bear. The bear was about to
set at the little fellow at once, and give him a hearty
welcome with his paws: “Softly, softly,” said the
little tailor, “I will soon make thee quiet.” ‘Then
quite composedly, and as if he had not an anxiety in
the world, he took some nuts out of his pocket,
cracked them, and ate the kernels. When the bear
saw that, he was seized with a desire to have some
nuts too. ‘The tailor felt in his pockets, and reached
“him a handful; they were, however, not nuts, but
pebbles. ‘The bear put them in his mouth, but could
The Cunning Little Tailor. 165

get nothing out of them, let him bite as he would.
“Eh! thought he, “what a stupid blockhead I am!
I cannot even crack a nut!” and then he said to the
tailor, ‘‘ Here, crack me the nuts.” ‘There, see what a
stupid fellow thou art!” said the tailor, “to have sucha
great mouth, and not be able to crack a small nut!”
Then he took the pebble and nimbly put a nut in his
mouth in the place of it, and crack, it was in two!”
“J must try the thing again,” said the bear ; ““when,I
watch you, I then think I ought to be able to do it
too.” So the tailor once more gave him a pebble and
the bear tried and tried to bite into it with all the
strength of his body. But no one will imagine that
he accomplished it. When that was over, the tailor
took out a violin from beneath his coat, and played a
piece on it to himself. When the bear heard the
music, he could not help beginning to dance, and
when he had danced a while, the thing pleased him so
well that he said to the little lailor, “Hark you, is the
fiddle heavy?” “Light enough fora child. Look, with
the left hand I lay my fingers on it, and with the right
I stroke it with the bow, and then it goes merrily,
hop sa sa vivallalera!” “So,” said the bear ; “ fiddling
is a thing I should like to understand too, that I might
dance whenever I had a fancy. What dost thou think
of that? Wilt thou give me lessons?” “ With all
_my heart,” said the tailor, “if thou hast a talent for
it. But just let me see thy claws, they are terribiy
tong, I must cut thy nails a little.’ ‘Then a vise was
brought, and the bear put his claws in it, and the little
tailor screwed it tight, and said, “ Now wait until I
166 ‘Grimm's Household Tales.

come with the scissors,” and he let the bear growl as
ke liked, and lay down in the corner on a'bundle of
straw, and fell asleep.
When the princess heard the bear growling so
fiercely during the night, she believed nothing else but
that he was growling for joy, and had made an end of
the tailor. In the morning she arose careless and
happy, but when she peeped into the stable, the tailor
stood gaily before her and was as healthy as a fish in
the water. Now she could not say another word
against the wedding because she had given a promise
before every one and the King ordered a carriage to be
brought in which she was to drive to church with the
tailor and there she was to be married. When they had
got into the carriage, the two other tailors, who had
false hearts and envied him his good fortune, went into
the stable and unscrewed the bear again. ‘The bear in
great fury ran after the carriage. ‘The princess heard
him snorting and growling; she was terrified and she
eried, “ Ah, the bear is behind us and wants to get
thee!” ‘The tailor was quick and stood on his head,..
stuck his legs out of the window and cried, “ Dost
thou see the vise? If thou dost not be off thou shalt
be put into it again.” When the bear saw that, he
turned round and ran away. ‘The tailor drove quietly
to church and the princess was married to him at once,
and he lived with her as happy as a woodlark. Who
soever does not believe this, must pay a thaler.
The Blue Light.

‘HERE was once on a time a soldier who for many
years had served the King faithfully, but when
the war came to an end could serve no longer

because of the many wounds which he had received.
The King said to him, ‘Thou mayest return to thy
home, I need thee no longer, and thou wilt not receive
any more money, for he only receives wages who
renders me service for them.” ‘Then the soldier did
not know how to earn a living, went away greatly
troubled, and walked the whole day, until in the even-
ing he entered a forest. When darkness came on,
he saw a light, which he went up to, and came to a

house wherein lived a witch. ‘Do give me one
night’s lodging, and a little to eat and drink,” said he
to her, “or I shall starve.” ‘“ Oho!” she answered,

“who gives anything to a runaway soldier? Yet will
I be compassionate, and take you in, if you will de
what I wish.” ‘“ What do you wish?” said the soldier.”
“That you should dig all round my garden for me,

to-morrow.” ‘The soldier consented, and next day
labored with all his strength, but could not finish it by.
the evening. “I see well enough,” said the witch,

“that you can do no more to-day, but I will keep you
yet another night, in payment for which you must
to-morrow chop me a load of wood, and make it
small.” The soldier spent the whole day in doing it,
and in the evening the witch proposed that he should
stay one night more. “To-morrow you shall oniy do
168 Grimm's Household Tales.

me a very trifling piece of work. Behind nty house,
there is an old dry well, into which my light has
fallen, it burns blue, and never goes out, and you shall
bring it up again for me.” Next day the old woman
took him to the well, and let him down in a basket.
He found the blue light, and made her a signal to draw
him up again. She did draw him up, but when he
came near the edge, she stretched down her hand and
wanted to take the blue light away from him. ‘“ No,”
said he, perceiving her evil intention, “I will not give
thee the light until I am standing with both feet upon
the ground.” The witch fell into a passion, let him
down again into the well, and went away.

The poor soldier fell without injury on the moist
ground, and the blue light went on burning, but of
what use was that to him? He saw very well that
le could not escape death. He sat for a while very
sorrowfully, then suddenly he felt in his pocket and
found his tobacco pipe, which was still half-full.
“This shall be my last pleasure,” thought he, pulled
it out, lit it at the blue light and began to smoke.
When the smoke had circled about the cavern, sud-
denly a little black dwarf stood before him, and said,
“Lord, what are thy commands?” ‘ What commands
have I to gave thee?” replied the soldier, quite
astonished. . “I must do everything thou biddest me,”
said the little man. ‘Good,” said the soldier; ‘then
in the first place help me out of this well.’ The
little man took him by the hand, and led him through
an underground passage, but he did not forget to take
the blue light with him. On the way the dwarf
The Blue Light - 169

showed him the treasures which the witch had col-
lected and hidden there, and the soldier took as much
gold as he could carry. When he was above, he said
to the little man, ‘‘ Now go and bind the old witch, and
carry her before the judge.” In a short time she, with
frightful cries, came riding by, as swift as the wind on
a wild tom-cat, nor was it long after that before the little

man re-appeared. ‘It is all done,” said he, “and the
witch is already hanging on the gallows. What
further commands has my lord?” “At this moment,

none,” answered the soldier ; “thou canst return home,
only be at hand immediately, if I summon thee.”
“Nothing more is needed than that thou shouldst
light thy pipe at the blue light, and I will appear
before thee at once.” Thereupon he vanished from
his sight.

The soldier returned to the town from which he
had come. He went to the best inn, ordered himself
handsome clothes, and then bade the landlord furnish
him a room as handsomely as possible. When it was
ready and the soldier had taken possession of it, he
summoned the little black mannikin and said, “‘ I have
served the King faithfully, but he has dismissed me,
and left me’to hunger, and now I want to take my re-
venge.”

“What am I to do?” asked the little man.

“Tate at night, when the King’s daughter is in
bed, bring her here in her sleep, she shall do servant's.
work for me.”

The mannikin said, “That is an easy thing for me
to do, but a very dangerous thing for you, for if it is
170 Gtimm's Household Tales.

discovered, you will fare ill.” When twelve o’clock
had struck, the door sprang open, and the mannikin
catried in the princess. “Aha! art thou there?”
cried the soldier, “get to thy work at once! Fetch
the broom and sweep the chamber.” When she had
done this, he ordered her to come to his chair, and
then he stretched out his feet and said, “Pull off my
boots for me,” and then he threw them in her face, and
made her pick them up again, and clean and brighten
them. She, however, did everything he bade her, with-
out opposition, silently and with half-shut eyes. When
the first cock crowed, the mannikin carried her back
to the royal palace and laid her in her bed.

- Next morning when the princess arose, she went
to her father and told him that she had had a very
strange dream. ‘TI was carried through the streets
with the rapidity of lightning,” said she, “and taken
into a soldier’s room, and I had to wait upon him like
a servant, sweep his room, clean his boots, and do all
kinds of menial work. It was only a dream, and yet
Iam just as tired as if I really had done everything.”
“The dream may have been true,” said the King, “I
will give thee a piece of advice. Fill thy pocket full
of peas, and make a small hole in it, and then if thou
art carried away again, they will fall out and leave a
track in the streets.” But unseen by the King, the
mannikin was standing beside him when he said that
and heard all. At night when the sleeping princess
was again carried through the streets, some peas cer-
tainly did fall out of her pocket, but they made no
track, for the crafty mannikin had just before scattered


af

roe EL
i. ‘li
VHA) mena



THE SOLDIER TALKS WITH HIS COMRADE.
172 Grimm's Household Tales.

peas in every street there was. And again the princess
was compelled to do servant’s work until cock-crow.

Next morning the King sent his people out to seek
the track, but it was all in vain, for in every street poor
children were sitting, picking up peas, and saying, “It
must have rained peas last night.”

“We must think of something else,” said the
King; “keep thy shoes on when thou goest to bed
and before thou comest back from the place where
thou art taken, hide one of them there, I will soon
contrive to find it.”

The black mannikin heard this plot and at night
when the soldier again ordered him to bring the princess,
revealed it to him and told him that he knew of no
expedient to counteract this strategem, and that if the
shoe was found in the soldier's house it would go
badly with him.”

“Do what I bid thee,” replied the soldier, and again
this third night the princess was obliged to work like
a servant, but before she went away she hid her shoe
under the bed.

Next morning the King had the entire town
searched for his daughter’s shoe. It was found at the
' goldier’s and the soldier himself, who at the entreaty
of the dwarf had gone outside the gate, was soon
brought back, and thrown into prison. In his flight
he had forgotten the most valuable things he had, the
blue light and the gold, and had only one ducat in his
pocket. And now loaded with chains, he was stand-
ing at the window of his dungeon, when he chanced
to see one of his comrades passing by. The soldier
The Blue Light. | 173

tapped at the pane of glass, and when this man came
up, said to him, “Be so kind as to fetch me the small
bundle I have left lying in the inn, and I will give you
- a ducat for doing it.”

His comrade ran thither and brought him what he
wanted. As soon as the soldier was alone again, he
lighted his pipe and summoned the black mannikin.
“Have no fear,’ said the latter to his master. “Go
wheresoever they take you and let them do what they
will, only take the blue light with you.” Next day the
soldier was tried and though he had done nothing
wicked, the judge condemned him to death. When
he was led forth to die, he begged a last favor of the
King. “What is it?’ asked the King. “That I may
smoke one more pipe on my way.” “Thou mayst
smoke three,” answered the King, “but do not imagine
that I will spare thy life.’ Then the soldier pulled
out his pipe and lighted it at the blue light, and as
soon as a few wreaths of smoke had ascended, the
’ mannikin was there with a small cudgel.in his hand
and said, ““What dost my lord command?’ “Strike
down to earth that false judge there and his constable,
and spare not the King who has treated me so ill.”
Then the mannikin fell on them like lightning, dart-
ing this way and that way, and whosoever was so much
as touched by his cudgel fell to earth, and did not ven-
ture to stir again.

The King was terrified; he threw himself on the
soldier’s mercy, and merely to be allowed to live at
all, gave him his kingdom for his own, and the princess
to wife.
The Iron Stove.

(N the days when wishing was still of some use, a
| King’s son was bewitched by a old witch, and shut

up in an iron stove in a forest. ‘There he passed
many years, and no one could deliver him. Then a
King’s daughter came into the forest, who had lost
herself, and could not find her father’s kingdom again.
After she had wandered about for nine days, she at
length came to the iron stove. Then a voice came
forth from it, and asked her, “‘ Whence comest thou, and
’ whither goest thou?” She answered, “I have lost my
father’s kingdom, and cannot get homeagain.” Thena
voice inside the iron stove said, ‘‘I will help thee to get
home again, and that indeed most swiftly, if thou wilt
promise to do what I desire of thee. Iam the son ofa
far greater King than thy father, and I will marry thee.”

Then was she afraid, and thought, ‘‘Good Heavens!
What can I do with an iron stove?” Butasshe much
wished to get home to her father, she promised to do
as he desired. But he said, “Thou ‘shalt return here,
and bring a knife with thee, and scrape a hole in the
iron.” ‘Then he gave her a companion who walked
neat her, but did not speak, but in two hours he took
her home; there was great joy in the castle when the
King’s daughter came home, and the old King fell on
her neck, and kissed her. She, however, was sorely
troubled and said, “‘ Dear father, what I have suffered!
J should never have got home again from the great
wild forest, if I had not come to an iron stove, but I
The Iron Stove. 175

have been forced to give my word that I will go back
- to it, set it free, and marry it.” Then the old King
was so terrified that he all but fainted, for he had but
this one daughter. They therefore resolved they would
send, in her place, the miller’s daughter, who was very
beautiful. They took her there, gave her a knife, and
said she was to scrape at the iron stove. So she
scraped at it for four-and-twenty hours, but could not
bring off the least morsel of it. When day dawned, a
voice in the stove said, “It seems to me it is day out-
side.” ‘Then she answered, “It seems so to me too; I
fancy I hear the noise of my father’s mill.”

‘‘So thou art a miller’s daughter! Then go thy
way at once, and let the King’s daughter come here.”
Then she went away at once, and told the old King
that the man outside there, would have none of her—
he wanted the King’s daughter. ‘They however, still
had a swineherd’s daughter, who was even prettier
than the miller’s daughter, and they determined to give
her a piece of gold to go to the iron stove instead of
the King’s daughter. So she was taken thither, and
she also had to scrape for four-and-twenty hours.
She, however, made nothing of it. When day broke,
a voice inside the stove cried, “It seems to me it is day.
outside!” ‘Then answered she, “So it seems to me
also; I fancy I hear my father’s horn blowing.”

“Then thou art a swineherd’s daughter! Go away
at once, and tell the King’s daughter to come, and tell
her all must be done as was promised, arid if she does
not come, everything in the kingdom shall be ruined
and destroyed, and not one stone be left standing on
176 Grimm's Household Tales.

another.” When the King’s daughter heard that she
began to weep, but now there was nothing for it but .
to keep her promise. So she took leave of her father,
put a knife in her pocket, and went forth to the iron
stove in the forest. When she got there she began to
scrape, and the iron gave way, and when two hours
were over, she had already scraped a small hole. Then
she peeped in, and saw a youth so handsome, and sc
brilliant with ‘gold and with precious jewels, that her
very soul was delighted. Now, therefore, she went on
scraping and made the hole so large that he was able
to get out. Then said he, “ Thou art mine, and I am
thine ; thou art my bride, and hast released me.” He
wanted to take her away with him to his kingdom, but
she entreated him to let her go once again to her
father, and the King’s son allowed her to do so, but
she was not tosay more to her father than three words,
and then she was to come back again. So she went
home, but she spoke more than three words, and in-
stantly the iron stove disappeared, and was taken far
away over glass mountains and piercing swords; but
the King’s son was set free, and no longer shut up
in it. After this she bade good-bye to her father, took
some money with her, but not much, and went back
to the great forest, and looked for the iron stove, but
it was nowhere to be found. For nine days she sought
it, and then her hunger grew so great that she did aot
know what to do, for she could no longer live. When
it was evening, she seated herself in a small tree, and
made up her mind to spend the night there, as she was
aitaid of wild beasts. When midnight drew near she


THE THREE PIERCING SWORDS.
178 Grimm's Household Tales, :

saw in the distance a small light, and thought, “ Ah,
there I should be saved !’ She got down from the tree,
and went towards the light, but on the way she prayed.
Then she came to a little old house, and much grass
had grown all about it, and a small heap of wood lay
in front of it. She thought, “Ah, whither have I
come,” and peeped in through the window, but she
saw nothing inside but toads, big and little, except a
table well covered with wine and roast meat, and the
plates and glasses were of silver. Then she took cour-
age, and knocked at the door. ‘The fat toad cried,
“« Little green waiting-maid,

Watting-maid with limping leg,

Little dog of the limping leg,

Lop hither and thither,

And quickly see who is without :”

and a small toad came walking by and opened the doot
to her. When she entered they all bade her welcome,
and she was forced to sit down. ‘They asked, “ Where
hast thou come from, and whither art thou going ?”
Then she related all that had befallen her, and how be-
cause she had transgressed the order which had been
given her not to say more than three words, the stove,
and the King’s son also, had disappeared, and now she
was about to seek him over hill and dale until she
found him. ‘hen the old fat one said,
“* Little green waiting-maid,

Waiting-maid with limping leg, .

Little dog of the limping leg,

Hop hither and chither,

And bring me the. great box.”
The Iron Stove. 179

Then the little one went and brought the box. After
this they gave her meat and drink, and took her to a
well-made bed, which felt like silk and velvet, and she
laid herself therein, in God’s name and slept. When
morning came she arose, and the old toad gave her
three needles out of the great box which she was to
take with her; they would be needed by her, for she
had to cross a high glass mountain, and go over three
piercing swords and a great lake. If she did all this
she would get her lover back again. ‘Then she gave
her three things, which she was to take the greatest
vare of, namely, three large needles, a plough-wheel,
and three nuts. With these she travelled onwards, and
when she came to the glass mountain which was so
slippery, she stuck the three needles first behind her
feet and then before them, and so got over it, and when
she was over it, she hid them in a place which she
matked carefully. After this she came to the three
. piercing swords, and then she seated herself on her
plough-wheel, and rolled over them. At last: she
arrived in front of a great lake, and when she had
crossed it; she came to a large and beautiful castle.
She went in and asked for a place; she was a poor
girl, she said, and would like to be hired. She knew,
however, that the King’s son whom she had released
from the iron stove in the great forest was in the
castle. Then she was taken as a scullery-maid at low
wages. But, already the King’s son had another
maiden by his side whom he wanted to marry, for he .
thought that she had long been dead.

In the evening, when she bad washed up and was

42—Grimm’s.
180 Gtimm's Household Tales,

done, she felt in her pocket and found the three nuts
which the old toad had given her. She cracked one
with her teeth, and was going to eat the kernel when
lo and behold there was a stately royal garment in it!
But when the bride heard of this she came and asked
for the dress, and wanted to buy it, and said, “It is not
a dress for a servant-girl.” But she said, no, she-
would not sell it, but if the bride would grant her one
thing she should have it, and that was, leave to sleep
one night in her bridegroom’s chamber. ‘The bride
gave her permission because the dress was so pretty,
and she had never had one like it. When it was even-
ing she said to her bridegroom, “That silly girl will
sleep in thy room.” “If thou art willing so am Te?
said he. She, however, gave him a glass of wine in
which she had poured a sleeping-draught. So the
bridegroom and the scullery-maid went to sleep in the
room, and he slept so soundly that she could not waken
him.

She wept the whole night and cried, “I set thee
free when thou wert in an iron stove in the wild forest,
I sought thee, and walked over a glass mountain, and
three sharp swords, and a great lake before I found
thee, and yet thou wilt not hear me!”

The servants sat by the chamber door, and heard
how she thus wept the whole night through, and in
the morning they told it to their lord. And the next
evening when she had washed up, she opened the
second nut, and a far more beautiful dress was within
it, and when the bride beheld it, she wished to buy
that also. But the girl would not take money, and
The Iron Stove. “181

begged that she might once again sleep in the bride.



THOU ART MINE, AND I AM THINE.

groom’s chamber. ‘The bride, however, gave him a
sleeping-drink, and he slept so soundly that he could
182 Grimm's Household Tales.

hear nothing. But the scullery-maid wept the whole
night long, and cried, “I set thee free when thou wert -
in an iron stove in the wild forest, I sought thee, and
walked over a glass mountain, and over three’ sharp
swords anda great lake before I found thee, and yet
thou wilt not hear me!” The servants sat by the
chamber-door and heard her weeping the whole night
through, and in the morning informed their lord of it.
And on the third evening, when she had washed up,
she opened the third nut, and within it was a still
more beautiful dress which was stiff with pure gold.
When the bride saw that she wanted to have it, but
the maiden only gave it up on condition that she
might for the third time sleep in the bridegroom’s
apattment. The King’s son was, however, on his
guard, and threw the sleeping-draught away. Now,
therefore, when she began to weep and to cry,
“ Dearest love, I set thee free when thou wert in the
iron stove in the terrible wild forest,” the King’s son
leaped up and said, “Thou art the true one, thou art
mine, and I am thine.’ Thereupon, while it was still
night, he got into a carriage with her, and they took
away the false bride’s clothes so that she could not get
up. When they came to the great lake they sailed
across it, and when they reached the three sharp-cutting
swords they seated themselves on the plough-wheel,
and when they got to the glass mountain they thrust
the three needles in it, and so at length they got to
the little old house; but when they went inside that,
it was a great castle, and the toads were all disen-
chanted, and were King’s children, and full of happi-
The Iron Stove. 183

ness. ‘Then the wedding was celebrated, and the
King’s son and the princess remained in the castle,
which was much larger than the castles of their
fathers. As, however, the old King grieved at being
left alone, they fetched him away, and brought him to
live with them, and they had two kingdoms, and
lived in happy wedlock.

A mouse aid run,
The story ts done.



eet
The Old Woman in the Wood.

Wes servant girl was once traveling with the
family with which she was in service, through a
great forest, and when they were in the midst

of it, robbers came out of the thicket and murdered
all they found. All perished together except the girl,
who had jumped out of the carriage in a fright, and
hidden herself behind a tree. When the robbers had
gone away.with their booty, she came out and beheld
the great disaster. Then she began to weep bitterly
and said, “ What can a poor girl like me do now? I
do not know how to get out of the forest, no human
being lives in it, so I must certainly starve.”
She walked about and looked for a road, but could find
none. When it was evening she seated herself under
a tree, gave herself into God’s keeping, and resolved to:
sit waiting there and not go away, let what might
happen. When, however, she had sat there for a
while, a white dove came flying to her with a little
golden key in its mouth. It put the little key in her
hand, and said, “ Dost thou see that great tree, therein
is a little lock, it opens with the tiny key, and there
thou wilt find food enough and suffer no more hunger.”
Then she went to the tree and opened it and found
toilk in a little dish, and white bread to break into it,
so that she could eat her fill. When she was satisfied,
she said, “‘ It is now the time when the hens at home
go to roost, I am so tired I could go to bed too.” Then
the dove flew to her again, and brought another golden


E IN A GREAT FOREST,

SHE WAS ALON
186 Grimm's Household Tales.

key in its bill, and said, “Open that tree there and
tHou wilt find a bed.” So she opened it and found a
beautiful white bed and she prayed God to protect her
during the night and lay down and slept. In the
morning the dove came for the third time, and again
brought a little key, and said, ‘Open that tree there
and thou wilt find clothes.” And when she opened
it she found garments beset with gold and with jewels
more splendid than those of any king’s daughter. Sc
she lived there for some time and the dove came every
day and provided her with all she needed, and it was a
quiet good life.

Once, however, the dove came and said, “ Wilt thou
do something for my sake?” “With all my heart,”
said the girl, ‘Then said the little dove, “I will guide
thee to a small house; enter it, and inside it, an old
woman will be sitting by the fire and will say, ‘ Good-
day.’ But on thy life give her no answer, let her do
what she will, but pass by her on the right side;
further on there is a door, which open, and thou wilt
enter into a room where a quantity of rings of all
kinds are lying, amongst which are some magnificent

‘ones with shining stones; leave them, however, where
they are, and seek out a plain one, which must like.
wise be amongst them, and bring it here to me as
quickly as thou canst.” ‘The girl went to the little
house, and came to the door. ‘There sat the old woman
who stared when she saw her, and said, “Good-day,
my child.” ‘The girl gave her no answer, and opened
the door. - “ Whither away,” cried the old woman, and
seized her by the gown, and wanted to hold her fast,
The Old Woman in The Wood. x87

saying, “That is my house; no one can go in there if
I choose not to allow it.” But the girl was silent, got
away from her, and went straight into the room. Now
there lay on the table an enormous quantity of rings,
which gleamed and glittered before her eyes. She
turned them over and looked for the plain one, but
could not find it. While she was seeking, she saw the
old woman and how she was stealing away, and want-
ing to get off with a bird-cage which she had in her
hand. So she went after her, and took the cage out
of her hand, and when she raised it up and looked
into it, a bird was inside which had a plain ring in its
-bill. ‘Then she took the ring, and ran quite joyously
home with it, and thought the little white dove would
come and get the ring, but it did not. Then she leaned
against a tree and determined to wait for the dove, and,
as she thus stood, it seemed just as if the tree was soft
and pliant, and was letting its branches down. And
suddenly the branches twined around her, and were
two arms, and when she looked round, the tree was a
handsome man, who embraced and kissed her heartily,
and said, “Thou hast delivered me from the power of
the old woman, who is a wicked witch. She had
changed me into a tree, and every day for two hours I
was a white dove, and so long as she possessed the
ring Icould not regain my human form.” ‘Then his
servants and his horses, who had likewise been changed
into trees, were freed from the enchantment also, and
stood beside him. And he led them forth to his king-
dom, for he was a King’s son, and they married, and
lived happily.
The Devil and His Grandmother.

HERE was a great war, and the King had many
soldiers, but gave them small pay, so small that
they could not live upon it, so three of them

agreed among themselves to desert. One of them said
to the others, “If we are caught we shall be hanged on
the gallows; how shall we manage it?” Another said,
“Look at that great cornfield, if we were to hide our-
selves there, no one could find us; the troops are not
allowed to enter it, and to-morrow they are to march
away.” They crept into the corn, only the troops did
not march away, but remained lying all round about it.
They stayed in the corn for two days and two nights,
and were so hungry that they all but died, but if they
had come out, their death would have been certain.
Then said they, “What is the use of our deserting if
we have to perish miserably here?’ But now a fiery
dragon came flying through the air, and it came
down to them, and asked why they had concealed
themselves there? They answered, “We are three
soldiers who have deserted because the pay was sd
bad, and now we shall have to die of hunger if we
stay here, or to dangle on the gallows if we go out.”
“If you will serve me for seven years,” said the dragon,
“I will convey you through the army so that no one
shall seize you.” “We have no choice and are com-
pelled to accept,” they replied. Then the dragon
caught hold of them with his claws, and carried them


THE SOLDIERS AND THE FIERY DRAG


igo _ Grimm's Household Tales.

away through the air over the army, and put them
down again on the earth far from it; but the dragon
was no other than the Devil. He gave them a small
whip and said, “ Whip with it and crack it, and then
as much gold will spring up round about as you can
wish for; then you can live like great lords, keep
horses, and drive your carriages, but when the seven
years have come to an end, you are my property.”
‘Then he put before them a book which they were all
three forced to sign. ‘I will, however, then set you a
riddle,” said he, “and if you can guess that, you shall
be free, and released from my power.” ‘Then the
dragon flew away from them, and they went away with
their whip, had gold in plenty, ordered themselves rich
apparel, and travelled about the world. Wherever
they were they lived in pleasure and magnificence
rode on horseback, drove in carriages, ate and drank,
but did nothing wicked. The time slipped quickly
away, and when the seven years were coming to an
end, two of them were terribly anxious and alarmed;
but the third took the affair easily, and said, “ Broth-
ers, fear nothing, my head is sharp enough, I shall.
guess the riddle.’ They went out into the open
country and sat down, and the two pulled sorrowful
faces. Then an aged woman came up to them who
inquired why they were so sad? “Alas!” said they,
“how can that concern you? After all, you cannot
help us.” “Who knows?” said she, “confide your
trouble to me.” So they told her that they had been
the Devil’s servants for nearly seven years, and that he
had provided them with gold as plentifully as if it had
The Devil and His Grandmother. 191

been blackberries, but that they had sold themselves
to him, and were forfeited to him, if at the end of seven
years they could not guess a riddle.” ‘The old woman
said, “If youare to be saved, one of you must go into
the forest, there he will come to a fallen tock which
looks like a little house, he must enter that, and then
he will obtain help.” The two melancholy ones’
thought to themselves, “That will not save us,” and
stayed where they were, but the third, the merry one,
got up and walked on in the forest until he found the
rock-house. In the little house, however, a very aged
woman was sitting, who was the Devil’s grandmother,
and asked the soldier where he came from, and what
he wanted there? He told her everything that had
hayypened, and as he pleased her well, she had pity on
him, and said she would help him. She lifted up a
great stone which lay above a cellar, and said, ‘ Con-
ceal thyself there, thou canst hear everything that is
said here; only sit still, and do not stir. When the
dragon comes, I will question him about the riddle, he
tells everything to me, so listen carefully to his
answer.” At twelve o’clock at night, the dragon came
flying thither, and asked for his dinner. ‘The grand.
mother laid the table, and served up food and drinks,
so that he was pleased, and they ate and drank together.
In the course of conversation, she asked him what kind
of a day he had had, and how many souls he had got?
“Nothing went very well to-day,” he answered, “but
I have have laid hold of three soldiers,—I have them
safe.” “Indeed! three soldiers, that’s something like,
,but they may escape you yet.” ‘The Devil said mock:
192 Grimm’s Household Tales.

ingly, “They are mine! I will set them ariddle, which
they will never in this world be able to guess!”
“What riddle is that?” she inquired. “I will tell
you. In the great North Sea lies a dead dog-fish, that
shall be your roast meat, and the rib of a whale shali
be your silver spoon, and a hollow old horse’s hoof
shall be your wine-glass.” When the Devil had gone
to bed, the old grandmother raised up the stone, and
let out the soldier. “Hast thou paid particular atten-
tion to everything?” “Yes,” said he, “I know
enough, and will contrive to save myself.” Then he
had to go back another way, through the window, ~
secretly and with all speed to his companions. He .
told them how the Devil had been overreached by
the old grandmother, and how he had learned the
answer to the riddle from him. ‘Then they were all
joyous, and of good cheer, and took the whip and
whipped so much gold for themselves that it ran all
over the ground. When the seven years had fully
gone by, the Devil came with the book, showed the
signatures, and said, ‘I will take you with me to hell.
There.you shall have a meal! If you can guess what
kind of roast meat you will have to eat, you shall be
free and released from your bargain, and may keep the
whip as well.” ‘Then the first soldier began and said,
“Tn the great North Sea lies a dead dog-fish, that no
doubt is the roast meat.” ‘The Devil was angry, and
began to mutter “Hm! hm! hm!” and asked the
second, “ But what will your spoon be?” “The rib
of a whale, that is to be our silver spoon.” ‘The Devil
made a wry face, again growled, ‘Hm! hm! hm!”
The Devil and His Grandmother. 193

and said to the third, “ And do you also know what
your wine-glass is to be?” “An old horse’s hoof is
to be our wine-glass.” ‘Then the Devil flew away with
a loud cry, and had no more power over them, but the
three kept the whip, whipped as much money for

themselves with it as they wanted, and lived happily
to their end.


One-Eye, T’wo-Eyes, and Three-Eyes.

HERE was once a woman who had three daughters,
the eldest of whom was called One-eye, bécause
she had only one eye in the middle of her fore-

head, and the second, Two-eyes, because she had two
eyes like other folks, and the youngest Three-eyes, be-
cause she had three eyes; and her third eye was also
in the centre of her forehead. However, as Two-eyes
saw just as other human beings did, her sisters and her
mother could not endure her. They said to her, “Thou,
with thy two eyes, art no better than the common
people; thou dost not belong to us!” They pushed her
about, and threw oldclothestoher, and gave her nothing
to eat but what they left, and did everything that they
could to make her unhappy. It came to pass that
Two-eyes had to go out into the fields and tend the
goat, but she was still quite hungry, because her
sisters had given her so little to eat. So she sat
down on a ridge and began to weep, and so bitterly
that two streams ran down from her eyes. And once
when she looked up in her grief, a woman was stand-
ing beside her, who said, ““Why art thou weeping,
little Two-eyes?” Two-eyes answered, “Have I not
reason to weep, when I have two eyes like other
people, and my sisters and mother hate me for it,
and push me from one corner to another, throw old
clothes. at me, and give me nothing to eat but the
scraps they leave? To-day they have given me so
little that I am still quite hungry.” Then the wise







Wi nS 4

: aS wre -

Po Nai 3 _ Ol)
BESS WG
i eae

K ee 0S us SNe He,

cee Mite? pe
se tenes

AN OLD WOMAN STOOD BEFORE TWO-EYES.

13—Grimm's.
1096 Grimm's Household Tales.

woman said, “Wipe away thy tears, T'wo-eyes, and I
will tell thee something to stop thee ever suffering
frora hunger again ; just say to thy goat,

“‘Bleat, my little goat, bleat,
Cover the table with something to eat,’’

and then a clean well-spread little table will stand be-
fore theé, with the most delicious food upon it of
which thou mayst eat as much as thou art inclined for,
and when thou hast had enough, and hast no more
need of the little table, just say,

“‘Bleat, bleat, my little goat, I pray,
And take the table quite away,”

and then it will vanish again from thy sight.” Here-
upon the wise woman departed. But T'wo-eyes thought,
“J must instantly make a trial, and see if what she
said is true, for I am far too hungry,” and she said,

“‘Bleat, my little goat, bleat,
Cover the table with something to eat,’’

and scarcely had she spoken the words than a little
table, covered with a white cloth, was standing there,
and on it was a plate with a knife and fork, and a
silver spoon; and the most delicious food was there |
also, warm and smoking as if it had just come out of
the kitchen. ‘Then I'wo-eyes said the shortest prayer
she knew, “ Lord God, be with us always, Amen,” and
helped herself to some food, and enjcyed it. And
One-Eye, TworEyes, and Three-Eyes. 197

when she was satisfied, she said, as the wise woman
had taught her,

‘‘Bleat, bleat, my little goat, J pray,
And take the table quite away,”’

and immediately the littie table and everything on it
was gone again. “That isa delightful way of keep-
ing house!” thought 'wo-eyes, and was quite glad
and happy.

In the evening, when she went home with her
goat, she found a small earthenware dish with some
food, which her sisters had set ready for her, but she
did not touch it. Next day she again went out with
her goat, and left the few bits of broken bread which
had been handed to her, lying untouched. ‘The first
and second time that she did this, her sisters did not
remark it at all, but as it happened every time they did
observe it and said, “There is something wrong about
‘T'wo-eyes, she always leaves her food untasted and she .
used to eat up everything that was given her; she
must have discovered other ways of getting food.” In
order that they might learn the truth, they resolved to
send One-eye with Two-eyes when she went to drive
her goat to the pasture, to observe what Two-eyes did
when she was there and whether any one brought her
anything to eat and-drink. So when Two-eyes set out
the next time, One-eye went to her and said, “I will
go with you to the pasture and see that the goat is well
taken care of, and driven where there is food.” But
Two-eyes knew what was in One-eye’s mind and drove
the goat into high grass and said, ‘‘Come, One-eye, we
198 Grimm's Household Tales,

will sit down and I will sing something to you.”
One-eye sat down and was tired with the unaccustomea
walk and the heat of the sun, and Two-eyes sang con-
stantly,

“One eye, wakest thou ?
One eye, sleepest thou ?””

antil One-eye shut her one eye and fell asleep, and as
soon as T'wo-eyes saw that One-eye was fast asleep, and
could discover nothing, she said,

““Bleat, my little goat, bleat,
Cover the table with something to eat,”

and seated herself at her table and ate and drank until
she was satisfied and then she again cried,

‘*Bleat, bleat, my little goat, [ pray,
And take the table quite away,”

and in an instant all was gone. ‘Two-eyes now
awakened One-eye, and said, “One-eye, you want to
take care of the goat and go to sleep while you are do-
ing it and in the meantime the goat might run all over
the world. Come, let us go home again.” So they
went home and again T'wo-eyes let her little dish stand
untouched, and One-eye could not tell her mother why
she would not eat it, and to excuse herself said, “I fell
asleep when I was out.”

Next day the mother said to Three-eyes, “This
time thou shalt go and observe if ‘T’wo-eyes eats any-
thing when she is out and if any one fetches her food
ané drink, for she must eat and drink in secret.” So
One-Eye, Two-Eyes, and Three-Eyes. 199

Three-eyes went to Two-eyes and said, “I will go with
you and see if the goat is taken proper care of.” Once
in the pasture Two-eyes sang as before,



















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ENR cee oe

TWO-EYES AND THE MAGIC TABLE,
“Three eyes, are you waking ?”

but then, instead of singing,.
“Three eyes, are you sleeping?”
400 Grimm’s Household Tales.

as she ought to have done, she thoughtlessly sang,
“Two eyes, are you sleeping?”
and sang all the time,

“Three eyes, are you waking?
Two eyes, are you sleeping?”

Then two of the eyes which Three-eyes had, shut and
fell asleep, but the third, as it had not been named in
the song, did not sleep. It is true that Three-eyes shut
it, but only in her cunning, to pretend it was asleep
too, but it blinked and could see everything very well.
And when Two-eyes thought that Three-eyes was fast
asleep, she used her little charm,

“Bleat, my little goat, bleat,
Cover the table with something to eat,”

and ate and drank as much as her heart desired and
then ordered the table to go away again,

“Bleat, bleat, my little goat, I pray,
And take the table quite away,”

and Three-eyes had seen everything. Then Two-eyes
eame to her, waked her and said, “Have you been
asleep, Three-eyes? You are a good care-taker! Come,
we will go home.” And when they got home, Two-
eyes again did not eat, and Three-eyes said to her
mother, “Now, I know why that high-minded thing
dees not eat. When she is out, she says to the goat,

“Bleat, my little goat bleat,
Cover the table with something to eat,”
One-Eye, Two-Eyes, and Three-Eyes, 20%

and then a little table appears’ before her covered with
the best of food, much better than any we have here,
and when she has eaten all she wants, she says,

*‘Bleat, bleat, my little goat, 1 pray,
And take the table quite away,”’

and all disappears. I watched everything closely.
She had put two of my eyes to sleep by using a certain
form of words, but luckily the one in my forehead
kept awake.” ‘Then the envious mother cried, “Dost
thou want to fare better than we do? ‘The desire
shall pass away,”’ and she fetched a butcher’s knife, and
thrust it into the heart of the goat, which fell down
dead.

When T'wo-eyes saw that, she went out full of
trouble, seated herself on the ridge of grass at the edge
of the field, and wept bitter tears. Suddenly the wise
woman once more stood by her side, and said, ‘’I'wo-
eyes, why art thou weeping?” “Have I not reason to
weep?” she answered. “The goat which covered the
table for me every day when I spoke your charm, has
been killed by my mother, and now I shall again have
to bear hunger and want.” ‘The wise woman said,
“Two-eyes, I will give thee a piece of good advice ; ask
thy sisters to give thee the entrails of the slaughtered
goat, and bury them in the ground in front of the
house, and thy fortune will be made.” ‘Then she
vanished, and T'wo-eyes went home and said to her
sisters, ‘“ Dear sisters, do give me some part of my goat ;
I don’t wish for what is good, but give me the
202 Grimm's Household Tales.

entrails.” Then they laughed and said, “If that’s all
you want, you can have it.” So T'wo-eyes took the
entrails and buried them quietly in the evening, in
front of the house-door, as the wise woman had
counselled her to do. -

Next morning, when they all awoke, and went to
the house-door, there stood a strangely magnificent
tree with leaves of silver, and fruit of gold hanging
among them, so that in all the wide world there was
nothing more beautiful or precious. They did not
know how the tree could have come there during the
night, but T'wo-eyes saw that it had grown up out of
the entrails of the goat, for it was standing on the
exact spot where she had buried them. Then the
mother said to One-eye, “Climb up, my child, and
gather some of the fruit of the tree for us.” One-eye
climbed up, but when she was about to get hold of
one of the golden apples, the branch escaped from her
hands, and that happened each time, so that she could
not pluck a single apple, let ‘ter do what she might.
Then said the mother, “’Three-eyes, do you climb
up; you-with your three eyes can look about you
better than One-eye.” One-eye slipped down, and
Three-eyes climbed up. ‘Three-eyes was not more skil-
ful, and might search as she liked, but the golden
apples always escaped her. At length the mother
erew impatient, and climbed up herself, but could get
hold of the fruit no better than One-eye and Three-
eyes, for she always clutched empty air. ‘Then said:
Two-eyes, “I will just go up, perhaps I may succeed
better.” The -sisters cried, ‘You indeed, with your
a <

Ses

QoS

SSS



HE TOOK TWO-EYES ON HIS HORSE,
204 Grimm's Household Tales.

two eyes, what can you do?” But T'wo-eyes climbed
up, and the golden apples did not get out of her way,
but came into her hand of their own accord, so that
she could pluck them one after the other, and brought
a whole apron full down with her. ‘The mother took
them away from her, and instead of treating poor T'wo-
eyes any better for this, she and One-eye and Three-
eyes were only envious, because T'wo-eyes alone had
been able to get the fruit, and they treated her still
mote cruelly.

It so befell that once when they were all standing
together by the tree, a young knight came up.
“Quick, Two-eyes,” cried the two sisters, “creep
under this, and don’t disgrace us!” and with all speed
they turned an empty barrel which was standing close
by the tree over poor T'wo-eyes, and they pushed the
golden apples which she had been gathering, under it
too. When the knight came nearer he was a handsome
lord, who stopped and admired the magnificent gold and
silver tree, and said to the two sisters, “‘’To whom does
this fine tree belong? Any one who would bestow
one branch of it on me might in return for it ask
whatsoever he desired.” Then One-eye and Three-
eyes replied that the tree belonged to them, and that
they would give him a branch. They both took great
trouble, but they were not able to do it, for the
branches and fruit both moved away from them every
time. ‘Then said the knight, “It is very strange that
the tree should belong to you, and that you should
still not be able to break a piece off.’ ‘They again
asserted that the tree was their property. Whilst they
One-Eye, Two-Eyes, and Three-Eyes. 205

were saying so, [wo-eyes rolled out a couple of golden
apples from under the barrel to the feet of the knight,
for she was vexed with One-eye and Three-eyes, for
not speaking the truth. When the knight saw the
apples he was astonished and asked where they came
from. One-eye and Three-eyes answered that they
had another sister, who was not allowed to show her-
self, for she had only two eyes like any common
person. The knight, however, desired to see her, and
cried, ‘““T'wo-eyes, come forth.” Then Two-eyes, quite
comforted, came from beneath the barrel, and the
knight was surprised at her great beauty, and said, .
“Thou, Two-eyes, canst certainly break off a branch.
from the tree for me.” “Yes,” replied Two-eyes, “that
I certainly shall be able to do, for the tree belongs to
me.” And she climbed up, and with the greatest ease
broke off a branch with beautiful silver leaves and
golden fruit, and gave it to the knight. Then said the
knight, “Two-eyes, what shall I give thee for it?”
“Alas!” answered Two-eyes, “I suffer from hunger
and thirst, grief and want, from early morning till late
at night; if you would take me with you, and deliver
me from these things, I should be happy.” So the
knight lifted Two-eyes on to his horse, and took her
home with him to his father’s castle, and there he gave
her beautiful clothes, and. meat and drink to her
heart’s content, and as he loved her so much he mar-
ried her, and the wedding was solemnized with great
rejoicing. When Two-eyes was thus carried away by-
the handsome knight, her two sisters grudged her
good fortune in downright earnest. “The wonderful
206 Grimm's Household Tales.

‘tree, however, still remains with us,” thought they,
and even if we can gather no fruit from it, still every
one will stand still and look at it, and come to us and
admire it. Who knows what good things may be in
store for us?’ But next morning, the tree had
vanished, and all their hopes were at an end. And
when T'wo-eyes looked out of the window of her own
little room, to her great delight it was standing in
front of it, and so it had followed her.

Two-eyes lived along time in happiness. Once
two poor women came to her in her castle, and begged
for alms. She looked in their faces, and recognized
her sisters, One-eye, and Three-eyes, who had fallen
into such poverty that they had to wander about and
beg their bread from door to door. ‘T'wo-eyes, how-
ever, made them welcome, and was very kind to them,
and took care of them, so that they both with all their
hearts repented the evil that they had done their
sister in their youth.




‘The Shoes ‘That Were Danced to Pieces.

HERE was once upona time a King who had
twelve daughters, each one more beautiful than
the other. ‘They all slept together in one cham-

ber, in which their beds stood side by side and every
night when they were in them the King locked the
door and bolted it. But in the morning when he un-
locked the door he saw that their shoes were worn. out
with dancing, and no one could find out how that had
come to pass. ‘Then the King caused it to be pro-
claimed that whosoever could discover where they
danced at night, should choose one of them for his
wife and be King after his death, but that whosoever .
came forward and had not discovered it within three
days and nights, should have forfeited his life. It
was not long before a King’s son presented himself
and offered to undertake the enterprise. He was well
received, and in the evening was led into a room ad-
joining the princesses’ sleeping-chamber. His bed
was placed there, and he was to observe where they
went and danced, and in order that they might do
nothing secretly or go away to some other place, the
door of their room was left open.

But the eyelids of the prince grew heavy as lead
and he fell asleep, and when he awoke in the morning
all twelve had been to the dance, for their shoes were
standing there with holes in the soles. On the second
and third nights it fell out just the same, and then his
208 Grimm's Household Tales.

head was struck off without mercy. Many others
came after this and undertook the enterprise, but all
forfeited their lives. Now it came to pass that a poor
soldier who had a wound and could serve no longer,
found himself on the road to the town where the King
lived. ‘There he met an old woman, who asked him
where he was going. “I hardly know myself,” an-
swered he, and added in jest, “I had half a mind to
discover where the princesses danced their shoes into
holes, and thus become King.” “ That is not so diffi-
cult,” said the old woman, “you must not drink the
wine which will be brought to you at night, and must
pretend to be sound asleep.” With that she gave
him a little cloak, and said, “If you put on that you
will be invisible, and then you can steal after the
twelve.” When the soldier had received this good
advice he went into the thing in earnest, took heart,
went to the King and announced himself as a suitor.
He was as well received as the others, and royal gar-
ments were put upon him. He was conducted that
evening at bed-time into the ante-chamber, and as he
was about to go to bed, the eldest came and brought
him a cup of wine, but he had tied a sponge under
his chin and let the wine run down into it without
drinking a drop. Then he lay down, and when he
_ had lain a while, he began to snore, as if in the deep-
est sleep. The twelve princesses heard that, and
laughed, and the eldest said, “He too might as well
have saved his life.” With that they got up, opened
wardrobes, presses, cupboards, and brought out pretty
dresses ; dressed themselves before the mirrors, sprang
The Shoes That Were Danced to Pieces. 209















about and rejoiced
at the prospect of
the dance. Only
the youngest said,
“T know not how
it is; you are very
happy, but I feel
very strange ; some
misfortune is cer-
tainly about to be-
fall us.” “Thott
art a goose who att
always frightened,” |
said the eldest.
‘Hast thou for-
sotten how
many King’s
sons have al-
ready come here
in vain? I had
hardly any need
to give the sol-
dier a sleeping
draught, in any
case the clown
would not have
awakened.”
When they were
already they
looked carefully
at the soldier.
210 Grimm's Household Tales.

but he had closed his eyes and did not move of
stir, so they felt themselves quite secure. ‘The eldest
then went to her bed and tappedit; it immediately
sank into the earth and one after the other they
descended through the opening, the eldest going
first. Ihe soldier who had watched everything,
tarried no longer, put on his little cloak and went
down last with the youngest. Halfway down the steps
-he just trod a little on her dress; she was terrified at
that and cried out, ‘“‘ What is that? who is pulling at my
dress?” “Don’t beso silly!” said the eldest, “you have
caught itonanail.” ‘Then they went all the way down,
and when they were at the bottom, they were standing in
a wonderfully pretty avenue of trees, all the leaves of
which were of silverand shoneand glistened. Thesoldiez
thought, “I must carry a token away with me,” and
broke off a twig from one of them, on which the tree
cracked with a loud report. ‘The youngest cried out
again, “Something is wrong, did you hear the crack?”
But the eldest said, “It is a gun fired for joy because
we have got rid of our prince so quickly.” After that
they came into an avenue where all the leaves were of
gold and lastly into a third where they were of bright
diamonds; he broke off a twig from each, which made
such a crack each time that the youngest started back
in terror, but the eldest still maintained that they were
salutes. ‘whey went on and came to a great lake
whereon stood twelve little boats and in every boat sat
a handsome prince, all of whom were waiting for the
twelve and each took one of them with him, but the
soldier seated himself by the youngest. ‘Then her


THE PRINCESSES SAT IN THE GARDEN.

Se

%4¢—Grii
212 Grimm's Household ‘Tales.

ptince said, “I can’t tell why the boat is so much
heavier to-day; I shall have to row with all my
strength, if I am to get it across.” ‘‘ What should
cause that,” said the youngest, “ but the warm weather?
I feel very warm too.” On the opposite side of the
lake stood a splendid, brightly-lit castle, from whence
resounded the joyous music of trumpets and kettle-
drums. ‘They rowed over there, entered and each
ptince danced with the girl he loved, but.the soldier
danced with them unseen and when one of them had
a cup of wine in her hand he drank it up, so that the
cup was empty when she carried it to her mouth; the
youngest was alarmed at this, but the eldest always
made her be silent. They danced there till three
o’clock in the morning when all the shoes were danced
into holes and they were forced to leave off; the
princes rowed them back again over the lake, and this
time the soldier seated himself by the eldest. On the
shore they took leave of their princes and promised to
return the following night. When they reached the
stairs the soldier ran on in front and lay down in his
bed and when the twelve had come up slowly and
wearily, he was already snoring so loudly that they
could all hear him and they said, “So far as he is con-
cerned, we are safe.” They took off their beautiful
dresses, laid them away, put the worn-out shoes under
the bed and lay down. Next morning the soldier was
resolved not to speak, but to watch the wonderful go-
ings on and again went with them. Then everything
was done just as it had been done the first time and
each time they danced until their shoes were worn to
A

THE PRINCESSES WENT DOWN THE STAIRWAY,


214 Grimm’s Houszhold Tales.

pieces. But the third time he took a cup away with
him as a token. When the hour had arrived for him
to give his answer he took the three twigs andthe cup
and went to the King, but the twelve stood behind the
door and listened for what he was going to say. When
the King put the question, “ Where have my twelve
daughters danced their shoes to pieces in the night?”
he answered, “In an underground castle with twelve
princes,’ and related how it had come to pass, and
brought out the tokens. The King then summoned
his daughters and asked them if the soldier had told
the truth, and when they saw that they were betrayed,
and that falsehood would be of no avail, they were
obliged to confess all. Thereupon the King asked
which of them he would have to wife? He answered, -
“Tam no longer young, so give me the eldest.”
Then the wedding was celebrated on the self-same
day, and the kingdom was promised him after the
King’s death. But the princes were bewitched for

as many days as they had danced ee with the
twelve.
The Three Black Princesses.

AST INDIA was besieged by an enemy whe
‘ would not retire until he had received six hun-
dred dollars. ‘Then the townsfolk caused it to be
- proclaimed by beat of drum that whosoever was able
to procure the money should be burgomaster. Now
there was a poor fisherman who fished on the lake with
his son, and the enemy came and took the son pris-
oner and gave the father six hundred dollars for him.
So the father went and gave them to the great men of
the town, and the enemy: departed and the fisherman
became burgomaster. ‘Then it was proclaimed that
whosoever did not say, ‘“‘Mr. Burgomaster,” should be
put to death on the gallows.

‘The son got away again from the enemy and came
to a great forest on a high mountain. ‘The mountain
opened and he went into a great enchanted castle,
wherein chairs, tables and benches were all hung with
black. ‘Then came three young princesses who were
entirely dressed in black, but had a little white on their
faces; they told him he was not to be afraid, they
would not hurt him and that he could deliver them. -
Hesaid he would gladly do that, if he did but know |
how. On this, they told him he must for a whole year
not speak to them and also not look at them, and what
he wanted to have he was just to ask for, and if they
dared give him an answer they would doso. When
he had been there for a long while he said he should
like to go to his father and they told him he might go.
He was to take with him this purse with money, put on
this coat and in a week he must be back there again.
216 Grimm's Household Tales.

Then he was caught up and was instantly in East
india. He could no longer find his father in the fish
erman’s hut and asked the people where the poor
fisherman could be and they told him he must not
say that or he would come to the gallows. ‘Then he
went to his father and said, “Fisherman, how hast
thou got here?” ‘Then the father said, “’Thou must
not say that, if the great men of the town knew of
that, thou wouldst come to the gallows.” He, however,
would not stop, and was brought to the gallows. When
he was there he said, “O, my masters, just give me
leave to go to the old fisherman’s hut.” ‘Then he put
on his old smock-frock, and came back to the great
men and said, “Do ye not now see? AmI not the
son of the poor fisherman? Did I not earn bread for
my father and mother in this dress?” Hereupon his
father knew him again, and begged his pardon, and
took him home with him, and then he related all that
had happened to him and how he had gotten into a
forest on a high mountain, and the mountain had
opened and he had gone into an enchanted castle,
‘where all was black, and three young princesses had
come to him who were black, except a little white on
their faces. And they told him not to fear, and that
he could deliver them. Then his mother said that
might very likely not be a good thing to do, and
that he ought to take a holy water vessel with him,
and drop some boiling water on their faces.

He went back again and he was in great fear and he
dropped the water on their faces as they were sleeping
and they all turned half white. Then all the three
The Three Black Princesses. 217

princesses sprang up and said, “Thou accursed dog,
our blood shall cry for vengeance on thee! Now there
is no man born in the world, nor willany ever be born
who can set us free! We have still three brothers who are



HE CAME TO AN ENCHANTED CASTLE,

bound by seven chains—they shall tear thee to pieces.”
Then there was a loud shrieking all over the castle and
he sprang out of the window and broke his leg and the
castle sank into the earth again, the mountains shut to
again and no one knew where the castle had stood.
The Star Money,

HERE was once a little girl whose father and
mother were dead, and she was so poor that she
had nothing but the clothes she was wearing and

a little bit of bread in her hand which some charitable
soul had given her. Forsaken by the world, she went
forth into the open country, trusting in the good God.
A poor man met her who said, “Ah, give me some-
thing to eat, I am so hungry!” She reached him
the whole piece of bread, and said, “May God bless it
to thy use,” and went onwards. Then came a child
who said, ‘“‘My head is so cold, give me something to
cover it with.” So she took off her hood and gave it
to him. When she had gone a little farther she met
another child who had no jacket and was frozen with
cold. She gave it her own, and a little farther on, one
begged for a frock, and she gave that away also. At
length she got intoa forest. It had grown dark and
there came yet another child and asked for a littleshirt
and the good little girl thought to herself, “ It is a dark
night and no one sees thee, thou canst very well give
thy little shirt away,” and took it off and gave that
away also. And as she so stood, suddenly some stars
from heaven fell down and they were nothing else but
hard smooth pieces of money, and although she had
just given her little shirt away, she had a new one’
which was of the very finest linen. Then she gathered
together the money into this, and was rich all the days
of her life.


THE POOR CHILD FINDS THE FLORINS.
The Donkey.

“\ NCE ona time there lived a King and Queen
who were rich, and had everything they wanted,
but no children. The Queen lamented over

this day and night and said, “I am like a field on
which nothing grows.” At last God gave her her wish,
but when the child came into the world it did not look
like a human child, but was a little donkey. When
the mother saw that her lamentations and outcries
began in real earnest; she said she would far rather
have had no child at all than have a donkey, and that
they were to threw: it into the water that the fisheg
might devour it. But the King said, ‘“‘ No, since God
has sent him he shall be my son and heir, and after
my death sit on the royal throne and wear the kingly
crown.” ‘Ihe donkey, therefore, was brought up and
grew bigger, and his ears grew up beautifully high and
straight. He was, however, of a merry disposition,
jumped about, played and had especial pleasure in
music, so that he went to a celebrated musician and
said, ‘‘’Teach me thine art, that I may play the lute as
well as thou dost.” “ Ah, dear little master,” answered
the musician, “that would come very hard to you,
your fingers are certainly not suited to it, and are far
too big. Iam afraid the strings would not last.” No
excuses were of any use. ‘The donkey was determined
to play the lute; he was persevering and industrious
and at last learned to do it as well as the master himself
The young lordling once went out walking full of
The Donkey. 224

thought and came to a well, he looked into itand in the
mirrot—clear water—saw his donkey’s form. He was
so distressed about it that he went out into the wide
world and only took with him one faithful companion.
. They travelled up and down and at last they came

into a kingdom where an old King reigned who had
an only but wonderfully beautiful daughter. The
donkey said, “Here we will stay,” knocked at the
gate and cried, “A guest is without—open, that we
may enter.” As however, the gate was not opened, he
sat down, took his lute and played it in the most delight-
ful manner with his two fore-feet. Then the door-
keeper opened his eyes most wonderfully wide, and
tan to the King and said, “Outside by the gate sits
a young donkey which plays the lute as well as an ex-
perienced master!” “Then let the musician come
to me,” said the King. When, however, a donkey
came in, every one began to laugh at the lute-player.
And now the donkey was to sit down and eat with
the servants. He, however, was unwilling and said,
“T am no common stable-ass, I ama noble one.” Then
they said, “If thatis what thou art seat thyself with
the men of war.” ‘ No,” said he, “I will sit by the
King.” The King smiled and said good-humoredly,
“Ves, it shall be as thou wilt, little ass, come here te
me.” ‘Then he asked, “Little ass; how does my
daughter please thee?” The donkey turned his head
towards her, looked at her nodded and said, “I like
her above measure, I have never yet seen any one so
beautiful as she is.” “Well, then, thou shalt sit next to
her too,” said the King. ‘That is exactly what I. wish,”
222 Grimm's Household Tales.

said the donkey and he placed himself by her side, ate

and drank and knew how to behave himself daintily
and cleanly. When the noble beast had stayed a long
time at the King’s court, he thought “What good does
all this do me, I shall still have to go home again?”
let his head hang sadly and went to the king and
asked for his dismissal. But the King had grown fond
of him and said, “Little ass what ails thee? ‘Thou
lookest as sour as a jug of vinegar, I will give thee
what thou wantest. Dost thou want gold?” “No,”
said the donkey, and shook his head. “ Dost thou want
- jewels and rich dress?” “No.” ‘Dost thou wish for half
my kingdom?” ‘Indeed, no.” ‘Then said the King,
“Tt ( did but know what would make thee content.
Wilt: thou have my pretty daughter to wife?’ “Ah,
yes,” said the ass, ‘I should indeed like her,” and all
at once he became quite merry and full of happiness,
for that was exactly what he was wishing for. Soa
'. great and splendid wedding was held. In the evening,
“when the bride and bridegroom were led into their
bed-room, the King wanted to know if the ass would
behave well, and ordered a servant to hide himself
there. When they were both within, the bridegroom
bolted the door, looked around, and as he believed that
, they were quite alone, he suddenly threw off his ass’s
skin, and stood there in the form of a handsome royal
youth. “Now,” said he, “thou seest who I am, and
seest also that I am not unworthy of thee.’ Then
the bride was glad, and kissed him, and loved him
dearly. When morning came, he jumped up, put his
animal’s skin om again, and no one could have guessed
The Donkey. 223

what kind of a form was hidden beneath it. Soon
came the old King, “Ah,” cried he, “is the little ass
merry? But surely thou art sad,’ said he to his
daughter, “that thou hast this beast for thy husband?”

“Oh, no, dear father, I love him as well as if he



THE DONKEY WAS CHANGED TO A PRINCE.

were the handsomest in the world, and I will keep
him_as long as I live.’ The King then said to the
servant who had concealed himself, “That cannot be
true.” “Then watch yourself the next night, and you

‘
224 Grimm's Household Tales.

will see it with your own eyes; and hark you, lord
King, if you were to take his skin away and throw
it in the fire, he would be forced to show himself
in his true shape.” ‘Thy advice is good,” said the
King, and at night when they were asleep, he stole
in, and when he got to the bed he saw by the light
of the moon a noble-looking youth lying there, and
the skin lay stretched on the ground. So jhe took
it away, and had a great fire lighted outside, and
threw the skin into it, and remained by it himself
until it was all burned to ashes. As, however, he was
anxious to know how the robbed man would behave
himself, he stayed awake the whole night and watched.
When tke youth had slept his sleep out, he got up by
the first light of morning, and wanted to put on the
ass’s skin, b:t it was not to be found. On this he was
alarmed, and, full of grief and anxiety, said, ‘“‘ Now I
shail have to contrive to escape.” But when he went
out, there stood the King, who said, ‘‘ My son, whither
away in such haste? what hast thou in thy mind?
Stay here, thou art such a handsome man, thou shalt
not go away from me. I will now give thee half my
kingdom, and after my death thou shalt have the
whole of it.” ‘Then I hope that what begins so
well may end well, and I will stay with you,” said the
youth. And the old man gave him half the kingdom,
and in a year’s time, when he died, the youth had the
whole, and after the death of his father he had another
kingdom as well, and lived in all magnificence.
Maid Maleen.

HERE was once a King who had a son who asked
in marriage the daughter of a mighty King; she
was called Maid Maleen and was very beautiful.

As her father wished to give her to another, the prince
was rejected ; but as they both loved each other with
all their hearts, they would not give each other up,
and Maid Maleen said to her father, “I can and will
take no other for my husband.” ‘Then the King flew
into a passion and ordered a dark tower to be built,
into which no ray of sunlight or moonlight should
enter. When it was finished he said, “Therein shalt
thou be imprisoned for seven years and then I will
come and see if thy perverse spirit is broken.” Meat
and drink for the seven years were carried into the
tower and then she and her waiting-woman were led
into it and walled up and thus cut off from the sky
and from the earth. There they sat in the darkness
and knew not when day or night began. ‘The King’s
son often went round and round the tower and called
their names, but no sound from without pierced
through the thick walls. What else could they do but
lament and complain? Meanwhile the time passed
and by the diminution of the food and drink they
knew that the seven years were coming to an end.
They thought the moment of their. deliverance was
come, but no stroke of the hammer was heard, no
stone fell out of the wall, and it seemed to Maid
Maleen that her father had forgotten her. As they
226 Grimm's Household. Tales.

only had food for a short time ionger, and saw a imiser-
able death awaiting them, Maid Maleen said, “We
must try our last chance, and see if we can break
through the wall.” She took the bread-knife and
picked and bored at the mortar of a stone, and when
she was tired, the waiting-maid took her turn. With
great labor they succeeded in getting out one stone
and then a second and third, and when three days were
over the first ray of light fell on their darkness and
and at last the opening was so large that they could
look out. “The sky was blue and a fresh breeze played
on their faces ; but how melancholy everything looked
all around! Her father’s castle lay in ruins, the town
and the villages were, so far as could be seen, destroyed
by fire, the fields far and wide laid to waste, and no
human being was visible. When the opening in the
wall was large enough for them to slip through, the
waiting-maid sprang down first and then Maid Maleen
followed. But where were they to go? ‘The enemy
had ravaged the whole kingdom, driven away the
_ King and slain all the inhabitants. They wandered
forth to seek another country, but nowhere did they
find a shelter or a human being to give them a mouth-
ful of bread, and their need was so great that they
were forced to appease their hunger with nettles.
When, after long journeying, they came into another
country, they tried to get work everywhere, but where-
ever they knocked they were turned away, and no one
would have pity on them. At last they arrived in
a large city and went to the royal palace. ‘There also
they were ordered to go away, but at last the cook
Maid Maleen. 229

said that they might stay in the kitchen and be scul-
lions.
The soa of the King was Maid Maleen’s betrothed.

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THE PRINCE KNELT BEFORE MAID MALEEN,

His father had chosen another bride for him, who,
because of her great ugliness, shut herself in her

room, and allowed no one to see her and Maid
15—Grimm's.
228 Grimm's Household Tales.

Maleen had to take her her meals from the kitchen,
When the day came for the bride and the bridegroom
to go to church, she was ashamed of her ugliness and
afraid that if she showed herself in the streets, she
would be mocked and laughed at by the people. Then
she said to Maid Maleen, “(A great piece of luck has
befallen thee. I have sprained my foot and cannot well
walk through the streets; thou shalt put on my wed-
ding-clothes and take my place ; a greater honor than
‘that thou canst not have!” Maid Maleen, however,
refused it and said, ‘I wish for no honor which is not
suitable for me.’’? It was in vain, too, that the bride
offered her gold. At last she said angrily, “If thou dost
not obey me, it shall cost thee thy life. I have but to
speak the word and thy head will lie at thy feet.” Then
she was forced to obey and put on the bride’s magnifi-
cent clothes and all her jewels. When she entered the
royal hall, every one was amazed at her great beauty and
the King said to his son, ‘This is the bride whom I have
chosen for thee and whom thou must lead to cliurch.”
The bridegroom was astonished and thought, “She is
like my Maid Maleen and I should believe it were she
herself, but she has long been shut up in the tower, or
dead.” He took her by the hand and led her to church.
On the way was a nettle plant, and she said,

“Oh, nettle-plant,
Little nettle-plant,
What dost thou here alone ?
Lt have known the time
When I ate thee unbotled,
When I ate the unroasted."”
Maid Maleen. 229

“What art thou saying there?” asked the King’s
son. ‘ Nothing,” she replied, “I was oniy thinking
of Maid Maleen.” He was surprised that she knew
her, but kept silence. When they came to the foot-
plank into the churchyard she said,

“ Foot-bridge, do not break,
Lam not the true bride.”

“What art thou saying there?” asked the King’s
son. ‘ Nothing,” she replied, “I was only thinking
of Maid Maleen.” ‘Dost thou know Maid Maleen ?”
“No,” she answered, “‘ how should I know her ; I have
only heard of her.’ When they came to the church-
door she said once more,

‘‘Church-door, break not,
Lam not the true bride.”’

“What are thou saying there?” asked he. “ Ah,”
she answered, “I was only thinking of Maid Maleen.”
Then he took out a precious chain, put it round her
neck, and fastened the clasp. ‘Thereupon they entered
the church and the priest joined their hands together
before the altar and married them. He led her home,
but she did not speak a single word the whole way.
When they got back to the royal palace, she hurried
into the bride’s chamber, put off the magnificent
clothes and the jewels, dressed herself in her grey
gown, and kept nothing but the jewel on her neck,
which she had received from the bridegroom.

When the night came and the bride was to be led
230 Grimm’s Household Tales.

into the prince’s apartment, she let her veil fall over
her face, that he might not observe the deception. -As
soon as every one had gone away he said to her, “What
didst thou say to the nettle-plant which was growing
by the wayside?”

“To which nettle-plant?’’ asked she; “I don’t talk
to nettle-plants.” “If thou didst not do it then thou
art not the true bride,” said he. So she bethought her-
self and said,

“I must go out unto my maid,
Who keeps my thoughts for me.”

She went out and sought Maid Maleen. “Girl, what
hast thou been saying to the nettle?’ “TI said noth-
ing but,
“Oh, nettle-plant,
Little netile-plant,
What dost thou here alone?.
I have known the time
When I ate thee unboiled,
When I ate thee unroasted.”

The bride ran back into the chamber and said, “I
know now what I said to the nettle,” and she repeated
the words which she had just heard. “But what didst
thou say to the foot-bridge when we went over it?”
asked. the King’s son. “To the foot-bridge?” she
answered. “I don’t talk to foot-bridges.” “Then thou
art not the true bride.”

She again said,

“T must go out unto my maid,
Who keeps my thoughts for me.”


. MAID MALEEN MARRIED THE PRINCE,
232 ~~ Grimm's Household Tales.

and ran out and found Maid Maleen, “Girl, what didst
thou say to the foot-bridge?” :
“T said nothing but,

‘* Foot-bridge, do not break,
L am. not the true bride.”

“That costs thee thy life!” cried the bride, but
she hurried into the room and said, “I know now
what I said to the, foot-bridge,” and she repeated the
words. “But what didst thou say to the church-door ?”
“To the church-door?” she replied; ‘“‘I don’t tall to
church-doors.” ‘Then thou art not the true bride.”

She went out and found Maid Maleen and said,
“Girl, what didst thou say to the church-door?” “J
said nothing but,

“ L am not the true bride.”

“That will break thy neck for thee!” cried the
bride, and flew into a terrible passion, but she hastened
back into the room and said, “I know now whatI said
to the church-door,” and she repeated the words. “But
where hast thou the jewel which I gave thee at the
church-door ?” ‘What jewel?” she answered; “thou
didst not give me any jewel.” “I myself put it round
thy neck, and I myself fastened it; if thou dost not
know that thou art not the true bride.” He drew the
veil from her face, and when he saw her immeasure-
able ugliness he sprang back terrified and said, ‘“‘ How
Comest thou here? Who art thou?’ “I am thy be
Maid Maleen. 233

trothed bride, but because I feared lest the people
should mock me when they saw me out-of-doors, I
commanded the scullery-maid to dress herself in my
clothes and to go to church instead of me.” ‘“ Where
is the girl,” said he; “I want to see her, go and bring
her here.” She went out and told the servants that the
scullery-maid was an impostor and that they must
take her out into the court-yard and strike off her
head. ‘The servants Jaid hold of Maid Maleen and
wanted to drag her out, but she screamed so loudly
for help that the King’s son heard her voice, hurried
out of his chamber and ordered them to set the
maiden free instantly. Lights were brought and then
he saw on her neck the gold chain which he had given
her at the church-door. “Thou art the true bride,”
said he, “who went with me to church; come with
me now to my room.” When they were both alone
he said, “On the way to the church thou didst name
Maid Maleen, who was my betrothed bride; if I could
believe it possible, I should think she was standing be-
fore me—thou art like her in every respect.” She
answered, “I am Maid Maleen, who for thy sake was
imprisoned seven years in the darkness, who suffered
hunger and thirst and has lived so long in want and
poverty. To-day, however, the sun is shining on me
once more, I was married to thee in the church and
I am thy lawful wife.” ‘Then they kissed each other
and were happy al! the days of their lives. The false
bride was rewarded for what she had done by having
her head cut off.

The tower in which Maid Maleen had been im-
234 Grimm's Household Tales.

prisoned remained standing for a long time, and when
the children passed by it they sang.

“Kling, klang, gloria.
Who sits within this tower ?
A King’s daughter, she sits within,
A sight of her I cannot win,
The wall tt will not break,
The stone cannot be pierced.
Little Hans, with your coat so gay,
Follow me, follow me, fast as you may.”


The Master-Thief.

NE day an old man and his wife were sitting in
front of a miserable house resting a while from
their work. Suddenly a splendid carriage with

four black horses came driving up, and a richly-dressed
man descended from it. ‘The peasant stood up, went
to the great man, and asked what he wanted, and in
what way he could be useful to him? ‘The stranger
stretched out his hand to the old man, and said, “I
want nothing but to enjoy for once a country dish ;
cook me some potatoes, in the way you always have
them, and then I will sit down at your table and eat
them with pleasure.” The peasant smiled and said, “You ~
are a count or prince, or perhaps even a duke; noble
gentlemen often have such fancies, but you.shall have
your wish.” The wife went into the kitchen, and
began to.wash and rub the potatoes, and to make them
into balls, as they are eaten by the country-folks.
Whilst she was busy with this work, the peasant said
to the stranger, “Come into my garden with me fora
while, I have still something to do there.’ He had
dug some holes in the garden, and now wanted to
plant some trees in them. ‘Have you no children,”
asked the stranger, “who could help you with your
work?” “No,” answered the peasant, “I had a son,
it is true, but it is long since he went out into the
world. He was a ne’er-do-well; sharp, and knowing, |
but he would learn nothing and was full of bad tricks.
236 Grimm’s Household Tales.

at last he ran away from me, and since then I have
heard nothing of him.”

The old man took a young tree, put it in a hole,
drove in a post beside it, and when he had shoveled in
some earth and had trampled it firmly down, he tied
the stem of the tree above, below, and in the middle,
fast to the post by a rope of straw. “But tell me,”
said the stranger, “why you don’t turn that crooked
knotted tree, which is lying in the corner there, bent
down almost to the ground, to a post also that it may -
grow straight, as well as these?’ The old man
smiled and said, “Sir, you speak according to your
knowlédge, it is easy to see that you are not familiar
with gardening. That tree there is old, and mis-
shapen, no one can make it straight now. “Trees
must be trained while they are young.” “That is how
it was with your son,” said the stranger, “if you had
trained him while he was still young, he would not
have run away; now he too must have grown hard
and mis-shapen.” “Truly it is a long time since he
went away,’ replied the old man, “he must have
changed.” “Would you know him again if he were
to come to you?” asked the stranger. “Hardly by his
face,” replied the peasant, “but he has a mark about
him, a birthmark on his shoulder, that looks like a
bean.” When he had said that the stranger pulled off
his coat, bared his shoulder, and showed the .peasant
the bean. ‘‘Good God!’ cried the old man, ‘‘thou art
_ really my son!’ and love for his child stirred in his
heart. “But,” he added, “how canst thou be my son,
thou hast become a great lord and livest in wealth and
‘The Master-Thief, 234

luxury? How hast thou contrived to do that?” “ Ah,
father, answered the son, “‘ the young tree was bound
to no post and has grown crooked, now it is too old, it
will never be straight again. Howhave I got all that?
I have become a thief, but do not be alarmed, I ama
master-thief. For me there are neither locks nor bolts,
whatsoever I desire is mine. Do not imagine that I
steal like a common thief, I only-take some of the
superfluity of the rich. Poor people are safe, I would
rather give to them than take anything from them. It
is the same with anything which I can have without
trouble, cunning and dexterity—I never touch it.”
“Alas, my son,” said the father, “it still does not
please me, a thief is still a thief, I tell thee it will end
badly.” He took him to his mother, and when she
heard that was her son, she wept for joy, but when He
told her that he had become a master-thief, two streatns
flowed down over her face. At length she said, “Even
if he has become a thief, he is still my son, and my eyes
have beheld him once more.” ‘They sat down to table,
and once again he ate with his parents the wretched
food which he had not eaten for solong. The father
said, “If our Lord, the count up there in the castle,
learns who thou art, and what trade thou followest, he
will not take thee in his arms and cradle thee in them
as he did when he held thee at the font, but will cause
thee to swing from a halter.” ‘Be easy, father, he
will do me no harm, for I understand my trade. I
will go to him myself this very day.” When evening
drew near, the mastet-thief seated himself in his car-
riage, and drove to the castle. The count received him
238 Grimm’s Household Tales.

civilly, for he took him for a distinguished man.
When, however, the stranger made himself known,
the court turned pale and was quite silent for some
time. At length he said, “Thou art my godson, and
on that account mercy shall take the place of justice,
‘and I will deal leniently with thee. Since thou
pridest thyself on being a master-thief, I will put thy
art to the proof, but if thou dost not stand the test,
thou must marry the rope-maker’s daughter, and the
croaking of the raven must be thy music on the
occasion.” ‘‘Lord count,” answered the. master-thief.
“Think of three things, as difficult as you like, and if
I do not perform your tasks, do with me what you
will.” The count reflected for some minutes and then
said, “Well, then, in the first place, thou shalt steal
the horse I keep for my own riding, out of the stable;
in the next, thou shalt steal the sheet from beneath
the bodies of my wife and myself when we are asleep,
without our observing it, and the wedding-ring of my
wife as well; thirdly and lastly, thou shalt steal away
out of the church, the parson and clerk. Mark what
I am saying, for thy life depends on it.”

The master-thief went to the nearest town; there
he bought the clothes of an old peasant woman, and
put them on. Then he stained his face brown and
painted wrinkles on it as well, so that no one could
have recognized him. Then he filled a small cask with
old Hungary wine in which was mixed a powerful
sleeping-drink. He put the cask in a basket which he
took on his back and walked with slow and totter-
ing steps to the count’s castle. It was already dark
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240 Grimm's Household Tales.

when he arrived. He sat down on a stone in the
court-yard and began to cough like an asthmatic old
woman and to rub his hands as if he were cold. In
front of the door of the stable some soldiers were lying
round a fire; one of them observed the woman and
called out to her, ‘‘ Come nearer, old mother, and warm
thyself beside us. After all thou hast no bed for the
night, and must take one where thou canst find it.”
‘The old woman tottered up to them, begged them to
lift the basket from her back and sat down beside them
at the fire. ‘“ What hast thou got in thy little cask
old lady?” asked one. ‘A good mouthful of wine,”
she answered. “I live by trade, for money and fair”
words, I am quite ready to let you have aglass.” “Let
us have it here then,” said the soldier, and when he
had tasted one glass he said, ‘‘ When wine is good I
like another glass,” and had another poured out for
himself and the rest followed his example. ‘‘ Hallo,
comrades,” cried one of them to those who were in the
stable, “ here is an old goody who has wine that is as
old as herself; take a draught, it will warm your
stomach far better than our fire’ The old woman
carried her cask into the stable. One of the soldiers
had seated himself on the saddled riding-horse, another
held its bridle in his hand, a third had laid hold of
its tail. She poured out as much as they wanted until
the spring ran dry. It was not long before the bridle
fell from the hand of the one, and he fell down and
began to snore, the other left hold of the tail, lay down
and snored still louder. ‘The one who was sitting in
the saddle, did remain sitting, but bent his head almost
The Master-Thief. 241

down to the horse’s neck, and slept and blew with his
mouth like the bellows of a forge. The soldiers out-
side had already been asleep for a long time and were
lying on the ground motionless as if dead. When the
master-thief saw that he had succeeded, he gave the
first a rope in his hand instead of a bridle, and the
other who had been holding the tail, a wisp of straw,
but what was he to do with the one who was sitting
on the horse’s back? He did not want to throw him
down, for he might have awakened and have uttered a

He had a good idea, he unbuckled the girths of
the saddle, tied a couple of ropes which were hanging
to a ring on the wall fast to the saddle and drew
the sleeping rider up into the air on it, then he twisted
the ropes round the posts and made it fast. He soon
unloosed the horse from the chain, but if he had ridden
over the stony pavement of the yard they would have
heard the noise in the castle. So he wrapped the
horse’s hoofs in old rags, led him carefully out, leaped
upon him and galloped off.

When day broke, the master galloped to the castle
on the stolen horse. The count had just got up and
was looking out of the window. ‘Good morning, Sir
Count,” he cried to him, “here is the horse, which I
have got safely out of the stable! Just look, how
beautifully your soldiers are lying there sleeping ; and
if you will but go into the stable you will see how
comfortable your watchers have made it for them-
selves.” ‘The count could not help laughing, then he
said, ‘‘ For once thou hast succeeded, but things won’t
go so well the second time, and I warn thee that if thou
242 Grimm's Household Tales.

comest before me as a thief, I will handle thee as I
would a thief.’ When the countess went to bed that
‘night, she closed Her hand with the wedding-ring
tightly together and the count said, “ All the doors are
locked and bolted, I will keep awake and wait for the
thief, but if he gets in by the window I will shoot him.”
The master-thief, however, went in the dark to the
gallows, cut a poor sinner who was hanging there
down from the halter and carried him on his back to
the castle. Then he set a ladder up to the bedroom,
put the dead body on his shoulders and began to climb
up. When he had got so high that the head of the
dead man showed at the window, the count, who was
watching in his bed, fired a pistol at him, and im-
mediately the master let the poor sinner fall down, and
hid himself in one corner. The night was sufficiently
lighted by the moon, for the master to see distinctly
how the count got out of the window on to the
ladder, came down, carried the dead body into the
garden, and began to dig a hole in which to lay it.
“Now,” thought the thief, “the favorable moment has
come,” stole nimbly out of his corner, and climbed up
the ladder straight into the countess’s bedroom. “ Dear
wife,” he began in the count’s voice, “ the thief is dead,
but, after all, he is my godson, and has been more of a
scape-grace than a villian. I will not put him to open
shame ; besides, I am sorry for the parents. I will bury
him myself before daybreak in the garden that the
thing may not be known, so give me the sheet, I will
wrap up the body in it, and bury him asa dog buries
things by scratching.” The countess gave him the


HE PARSON AND THE CLERE_

16—Grimm's.
244 Grimm's Household Tales.

sheet. “I tell you what,” continued the thief, “I have
a fit of magnanimity on me, give me the ring too,
the unhappy man risked his life for it,so he may
take it with him into his grave.” She would not gain-
say the count, and although she did it unwillingly she
drew the ring from her finger and gave it to him.
The thief made off with both these things, and reached
home safely before the count in the garden had finished
his work of burying.

What a long face the count did pull when the
master came next morning, and brought him the
sheet and the ring. “Art thou a wizard?” said he,
“Who has fetched thee out of the grave in which I
myself laid thee, and brought thee to life again?”
“ You did not bury me,” said the thief, “but the poor
sinner on the gallows,” and he told him exactly how
everything had happened, and the count was forced
to own to him that he was a clever, crafty thief “But
thou hast not reached the end yet,” he added, “thou
hast still to perform the third task, and if thou dost
not succeed in that, all is of no use.” ‘The master
smiled and returned no answer. When night had
fallen he went with a long sack on his back, a bundle
under his arms, and a lantern in his hand to the
village church. In the sack he had some crabs, and
in the bundle short wax-candles. He sat down in the |
churchyard, took out a crab, and stuck a wax-candle
on his back. ‘Then he lighted the little light, put the
crab on the ground, and let it creep about. He took
a second out of the sack,’and treated it in the same
way, and so on until the last was out of the sack
The Master-Thief. 245

Hereupon he put on a long black garment that looked
like a monk’s cowl, and stuck a grey beard on his
chin. When at last he was quite unrecognizable, he
took the sack in which the crabs had been, went into
the church, and ascended the pulpit. The clock in the
tower was just striking twelve; when the last stroke
had sounded, he cried with a loud and piercing voice,
“Hearken, sinful men, the end of all things has come!
The last day is at hand! MHearken! Hearken! Who-
soever wishes to go to heaven with me must creep
into the sack. I am Peter, who opens and shuts
thegate of heaven. Behold how the dead outside
there in the churchyard, are wandering about collect-
ing their bones. Come, come, and creep into the
sack; the world is about to be destroyed!” The cry
echoed through the whole village. The parson and
clerk who lived nearest to the church, heard it first,
and when they. saw the lights which were moving
about the churchyard, they observed that something
unusual was going on, and went into the church.
They listened to the sermon for a while, and then the
clerk nudged the parson and said, “It would not be
amiss if we were to use the opportunity together, and
before the dawning of the last day, find an easy way
of getting to heaven.” ‘To tell the truth,” answered
the parson, “that is what I myself have been think~
ing, so if you ate inclined, we will set out on out’
way.” ‘ Yes,” answered the clerk, “but you, the
pastor, have the precedence, I will follow.” So the
parson went first, and ascended the pulpit where the
~wuaster opened. the sack. The parson crept in first,
246 Grimm's Household Tales.

and then the clerk. ‘The master immediately tied up
the sack tightly, seized it by the middle, and dragged
it down the pulpit-steps, and whenever the heads of
the two fools bumped against the steps, he cried, ‘“‘ We
are going over the mountains.” Then he drew them
through the village in the same way, and when they
wete passing through puddles, he cried, “ Now we are
going through wet clouds,” and when at last he was
dragging them up the steps of the castle, he cried,
‘Now we are on the steps of heaven, and will soon
be in the outer court.” When he had gone to the top,
he pushed the sack into the pigeon-house, and when
the pigeons fluttered about, he said, “‘ Hark how glad
the angels are, and how they are flapping their
wings!” Then he bolted the door upon them, and
went away.

Next morning he went to the count, and told him
that he had performed the third task also, and had carried
the parson and clerk out of the church. ‘“ Where
hast thou left them?” asked the lord. “They are
lying up stairs in a sack in the pigeon-house, and
imagine that they are in heaven.” ‘The count went
up himself, and convinced himself that the master had
told the truth. When he had delivered the parson and
clerk from their captivity, he said, “‘ Thou art an arch-
thief, and has won thy wager. For once thou escapest
with a whole skin, but see that thou leavest my land, for
if ever thou settest foot on it again, thou mayest count
on thy elevation to the gallows.” The arch-thief
took leave of his parents, once more went forth into the
wide world, and no one has ever heard of him since. .
The ‘True Sweetheart.

HERE was once a girl who was young and beaux
tiful, but she had lost her mother when she was
quite a child, and her step-mother did all she

could to make the girl’s life wretched. The harder
the girl worked the more work was put upon her, and
all that the woman thought of was how to make her
life still more miserable.

One day she said to her, “ Here are twelve pounds
of feathers which thou must pick, and if they are not
done this evening thou mayst expect a good beating.”
The poor girl sat down to the work, tears ran down het
cheeks, for she saw that it was quite impossible to
finish the work in cne day.. Whenever she had a little
heap of feathers lying before her, they flew away and
she had to pick them out again and begin her work
anew. ‘hen she put-her elbows on the table, laid her
face in her two hands and cried, “Is there no one then
on God’s earth to have pity on me?” ‘Then she heard a
low voice which said, ‘“‘ Be comforted, my child, I have
come to help thee.” ‘Ihe maiden looked up and an
old woman was by her side. Tell me what is troubling
thee.” The girl told her of her miserable life. “If I
have not done. these feathers by this evening, my
step-mother will beat me.” Her tears began to flow
again, but the good old woman said, ‘‘Do not be afraid
my child; rest a while, and in the meantime I will look
to thy work.” The girl lay down on her bed and soon
248 Grimm's Household Tales.

fell asleep. [he old woman seated herself at the
table with the feathers. The twelve pounds were
soon finished, and when the girl awoke, great
snow-white heaps were lying piled up, and every-
thing in the room was neatly cleared away, but
the old woman had vanished. The step-mother
matvelled to see the work completed. “Just look,
what can be done when people are industrious;”
and then she added, ‘I must give her some work
that is still harder.”

Next morning she said, ‘There is a spoon for
thee; with that thou must empty out for me the
great pond which is beside the garden, and if it
is not done by night, thou knowest what will
happen.”

The girl took the spoon, and saw that it was
full of holes; but even if it had not been, she never
could have emptied the pond with it. She set to work
at once, knelt down by the water, into which het
tears were falling, and began to empty it. The good
old woman appeared again, and when she learned the
cause of her grief, she said, ‘‘Be of good cheer, my
child. Go into the thicket and lie down and sleep; J
will soon do thy work.” As soon as the old woman
was alone, she touched the pond, and a vapor rose up
from the water, and mingled itself with the clouds.
Gradually the pond was emptied, and when the maiden
awoke before sunset and came thither, she saw nothing
but the fishes which were struggling in the mud.
She went to her step-mother, and showed her that the
work was done. “It ought to have been done long


. THE KING'S SON WENT TO MEET HER,
250 Grimm's Household Tales.

before this,” said she, and grew white with anger,
but she meditated something new. Next day the
stepmother said, “’Thou must build me a castle on the
plain there, and it must be ready by the evening. I
will then take possession of it, and if anything is
wanting, even if it be the most trifling thing, thou
knowest what lies before thee.”

When the girl entered the valley, she again met
the old woman, who said, “Lie down there in the
shade and sleep, and I will soon build the castle for
thee. If it would be a pleasure to thee, thou canst
live in it thyself.”
~ 'The castle was built. ‘The stepmother came to ex-
mine it, and was forced to hold her hand before her
eyes, the brilliancy of everything was so dazzling.
Nothing was wanting. ‘Which is the way to the
cellar?” she cried. “If that is not abundantly filled, it
shall go ill with thee.” She herself raised up the trap-
door and descended; she had only made two steps when
the door which was only laid back, fell down. The
girl heard a scream, lifted up the door to go to her
aid, but she had fallen down, and was found lying life-
less at the bottom.

' And now the magnificent castle belonged to the
girl alone. She did not know what to think of her
good fortune. Beautiful dresses were hanging in the
wardrobes, the chests were filled with gold or silver, or
with pearls and jewels, and she never felt a desire that
she was not able to gratify. And soon the fame of the
beauty and riches of the maiden went over all the
world. Wooers presented themselves daily, but none
The True Sweetheart. 251

pleased her. At length the son ef the King came and
he knew how to touch her heart, and she betrothed
herself to him. Inthe garden of the castle was a lime-
tree, under which they were one day sitting together,
when he said to her, “I will go home and obtain ~
my father’s consent to our marriage. I entreat thee
to wait for me here under this lime-tree, I shall
be back with thee in a few hours.” ‘The maiden
kissed him on his left cheek, and said, “‘ Keep true
to me and never let any one else kiss thee on this
cheek. I will wait here under the lime-tree until
thou returnest.” ;

The maid stayed beneath the lime-tree until sunset,
but he did not return. She sat there three days from
morning till evening, waiting for him, but in vain. As
he still was not there by the fourth day, she said,
“Some accident has assuredly befallen him. I will go
out and seek him, and will not come back until I have
found him.” She packed up three of her most beau-
tiful dresses, one embroidered with bright stars, the
second with silver moons, the third with golden suns,
tied up a handful of jewels in her handkerchief, and
set out. She inquired everywhere for her betrothed,
but no one had seen him; no one knew anything
about him. Far and wide did she wander through the
world, but she found him not. At last she hired her-
self to a farmer as a cow-herd, and buried her dresses _
and jewels beneath a stone.

And now she lived as a herdswoman, guarded her
herd, and was very sad and full of longing for her
beloved one; she had alittle calf which she taught to
2520 Grimm's Household Tales.

know her, and fed it out of her own hand, and when
she said,

‘Tittle calf, little calf, kneel by my side,

And do not forget thy shepherd-maid,

As the prince forgot his betrothed bride,
Who watted for him’ neath the lime-tree’s shade.”

the little calf knelt down and she stroked it.

And when she had lived for a couple of years alone
and full of grief, a report was spread over all the land
that the King’s daughter was about to celebrate. her
matriage. The road to the town passed through the vil-
lage where the maiden was living, and it came to pass
that once when the maiden was driving out her herd,
her bridegroom travelled by. He was sitting proudly
on his horse, and never looked round, but when she
saw him she recognized her beloved, and it was just
as if a sharp knife had pierced her heart. ‘Alas!”
said she, “I believed him true to me, but he has for-
gotten me.”

Next day he again came along the road. When
he was near her she said to the little calf,

“‘ Little calf, little calf, kneel by my stde,

And do not forget thy shepherd-maid,

As the prince forgot his betrothed bride,
Who waited for him’ neath the lime-tree’s shade.”

When he was aware of the voice, he looked dowa
and reigned in his horse. He looked into the herd’s
face, then put his hands before his eyes as if he was
trying to remember something, but he soon rode


THOU ART THE TRUE BRIDE.
254 Grimm's Household Tales.

onwards and was out of sight, “Alas!” said she, “he
no longer knows me,” and her grief was ever greater.

Soon after this a great festival three days long was
to be held at the King’s court, and the whole country
was invited to it.

“Now will I try my last chance,” thought the
maiden, and when evening came she went to the stone
under which she had buried her treasures. She took
out the dress with the golden suns, put it on, and
adorned herself with the jewels. She let down her
hair, which she had concealed under a handkerchief,
and it fell down in long curls about her, and thus she
went into the town, and in the darkness was observed
by no one. When she entered the brightly-lighted
hall, every one started back in amazement, but no one
knew who she was. ‘The King’s son went to meet
fer, but he did not recognize her. He led her out to
dance, and was so enchanted with her beauty, that he
thought no more of the other bride. When the feast
was over, she vanished in the crowd, and hastened
before: daybreak to the village, where she once more
put on her herd’s dress.

Next evening she took out the dress with the
silver moons, and put a half-moon made of precious
stones in her hair. When she appeared at the festival,
all eyes were turned upon her, but the King’s son
hastened to meet her, and filled with love for her,
danced with her alone, and no longer so much as
glanced at any one else. Before she went away she
was forced to promise him to come again to the festi-
val on the last evening.
The True Sweetheart. 255

When she appeared for the third time she wore the
star-dress which sparkled at every step she took and
her hair-ribbon and girdle were starred with jewels.
The prince had already been waiting for her for a long
time and forced his way up to her.

“Do but tell who thou art,” said he, “I feel just as
if I had already known thee a long time.”

“ Dost thou not know what I did when thou leftest
me?” ‘Then she stepped up to him and kissed him
on his left cheek and ina moment it was as if scales
fell from his eyes and he recognized the true bride.

“Come,” said he to her, “here I stay no longer,”
He gave her his hand and led her down to the carriage.
The horses hurried away to the magic castie as if the
wind had been harnessed to the carriage. - The illumi-
nated windows already shown in the distance. When
they drove past the lime-tree, countless glow-worms
were swarming aboutit. It shook its branches and sent
forth their fragrance. On the steps flowers were bloom-
ing, and the rooms echoed with the song of strange
birds, but in the hall the entire court was assembled:
and the priest was waiting to marry the bridegroom
to the true bride.

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5. THE SUBMARINE BOYS’ LIGHTNING CRUISE; or, The Young
Kings of the Deep. F

6. THE SUBMARINE BOYS FOR THE FLAG; or, Deeding Their Lives
to Uncle Sam.

7, THE SUBMARINE BOYS AND THE SMUGGLERS; or, Breaking
Up the New Jersey Customs Frauds.

8. THE SUBMARINE BOYS’ SECRET MISSION; or, Beating an Am-
bassador’s Game.
THE PONY RIDER BOYS SERIES

By FRANK GEE PATCHIN

PRICE, $1.00 EACH

This unusual and popular series tells
vividly the story of four adventure-lov-
ing lads, who, with their guardian, spent
their summer vacations in the saddle in
search of recreation and _ healthful
adventure, though for a time it seemed to
them that nature and man had conspired
to defeat them at every turn. Long
journeys over mountain, through the
fastness of primitive forest and across
burning desert, lead them into the wild
places of their native land as well as
into many strange and exciting experi-



| The—~
| | PONY-RIDERBOYS

| IN-THE-ROCKIES

ences. There is not a dull moment in the series for the Pony
Rider Boys nor for those who read: of their summer wander-

ings.

1. THE PONY RIDER BOYS IN THE ROCKIES; or, The Secret of

the Lost Claim,

2. THE PONY RIDER BOYS IN TEXAS; or, The Veiled Riddle of the

Plains.

o>

Old Custer Trail.

THE PONY RIDER BOYS IN MONTANA; or, The Mystery of the

4. THE PONY RIDER BOYS IN THE OZARKS; or, The Secret of

Ruby Mountain.

5. THE PONY RIDER BOYS IN THE ALKALI; or, Finding a Key to

the Desert Maze.

6. THE PONY RIDER BOYS IN NEW MEXICO; or, The End of the

Silver Trail.

7. THE PONY RIDER BOYS IN THE GRAND CANYON; or, The.

Mystery of Bright Angel Gulch.

8. THE PONY RIDER BOYS WITH THE TEXAS Ee NGERS? or, On

the Trail of the Border Bandits.
-THE MEADOW-BROOK GIRLS SERIES

By JANET ALDRIDGE
PRICE, $1.00’ EACH

Four clever girls go hiking around

«| the country and meet with many thril-
B\ers/4| ling and provoking adventures. These
stories pulsate with the atmosphere of
outdoor life.

1. THE MEADOW-BROOK GIRLS UNDER
CANVAS; or, Fun and Frolic in the Sum-
mer Camp.

2. THE MEADOW-BROOK GIRLS ACROSS
COUNTRY; or, The Young Pathfinders
on a Summer Hike.

3. THE MEADOW-BROOK GIRLS AFLOAT;

= or, The Stormy Cruise of the Red Rover.

4, THE MEADOW-BROOK GIRLS IN THE HILLS; or, The Missing

Pilot of the White Mountains.

5. THE MEADOW-BROOK GIRLS BY THE SEA; or, The Loss of the
Lonesome Bar.

6. THE MEADOW-BROOK GIRLS ON THE TENNIS COURTS; or,
Winning Out in the Big Tournament.

THE AUTOMOBILE GIRLS SERIES

By LAURA DENT CRANE
PRICE, $1.00 EACH



Girls as well as boys love wholesome adventure, a mele
of which is found in many forms and in many scenes in the
volumes of this series.

1. THE AUTOMOBILE GIRLS AT NEWPORT; or, Watching the Sum-
mer Parade.

2. THE AUTOMOBILE GIRLS IN THE BERKSHIRES; or, The
Ghost of Lost Man’s Trail.

3. THE AUTOMOBILE GIRLS ALONG THE HUDSON; or, Fighting
Fire in Sleepy Hollow.

4. THE AUTOMOBILE GIRLS AT CHICAGO; or, Winning Out
Against Heavy Odds.

5. THE AUTOMOBILE GIRLS AT PALM BEACH; or, Proving Their
Mettle Under Southern Skies,

6. THE AUTOMOBILE GIRLS AT WASHINGTON;; or, Checkmating
the Plots of Foreign Spies.
THE HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS SERIES

By JESSIE GRAHAM FLOWER, A. M._

PRICE, $1.00 EACH

The scenes, episodes, and adventures £
through which Grace Harlowe and her |h|fGraceHarlowes |

intimate chums pass in the course of | | at High Schoo! i
Lary: ff

these stories are pictured with a vivacity
that at once takes the young feminine
captive.

1. GRACE HARLOWE’S PLEBE YEAR AT
HIGH SCHOOL; or, The Merry Doings of
the Oakdale Freshmen Girls.

2. GRACE HARLOWE’S SOPHOMORE YEAR Snes S
AT HIGH SCHOOL; or, The Record of the Jessie Graham Flower AM.
Girl Chums in Work and Athletics.

3. GRACE HARLOWE’S JUNIOR YEAR AT HIGH SCHOOL; or,
Fast Friends in the Sororities.

4. GRACE HARLOWE’S SENIOR YEAR AT HIGH SCHOOL; or,
The Parting of the Ways.



THE COLLEGE GIRLS SERIES

By JESSIE GRAHAM FLOWER, A. M.
PRICE, $1.00 EACH

Every school and college girl will recognize that the ac-
count of Grace Harlowe’s experiences at Overton College is
true to life.

. GRACE HARLOWE’S FIRST YEAR AT OVERTON COLLEGE.

. GRACE: HARLOWE’S SECOND YEAR AT OVERTON COLLEGE.
-. GRACE HARLOWE’S THIRD YEAR AT OVERTON COLLEGE.

. GRACE HARLOWE’S FOURTH YEAR AT OVERTON COLLEGE.
. GRACE HARLOWE’S RETURN TO OVERTON CAMPUS.

. GRACE HARLOWE’S PROBLEM.

7. GRACE HARLOWE’S GOLDEN SUMMER.

Aa PWN
THE GRACE HARLOWE OVERSEAS
SERIES

By JESSIE GRAHAM FLOWER, A. M.
PRICE, $1.00 EACH ‘

Grace Harlowe went with the Over-
ton College Red Cross Unit to France,
there to serve her country by aiding the
GraceHarlowe ||| American fighting forces. These books

Overseas will interest every girl reader because
they describe the great war from a girl’s
point of view.

1, GRACE HARLOWE OVERSEAS.

2, GRACE HARLOWE WITH THE RED
CROSS IN FRANCE.

'3. GRACE HARLOWE WITH THE MA-

RINES AT CHATEAU THIERRY.

4, GRACE HARLOWE WITH THE JU. S.
TROOPS IN THE ARGONNE.

5. GRACE HARLOWE WITH THE YANKEE
SHOCK BOYS AT ST. QUENTIN.

6. GRACE HARLOWE WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY ON THE
RHINE. ,



THE GRACE HARLOWE OVERLAND
RIDERS SERIES

By JESSIE GRAHAM FLOWER, A. M.
PRICE, $1.00 EACH

Grace Harlowe and her friends of the Overton College Unit

of seek adventure on the mountain trails and in the wilder sec-

tions of their homeland, after their return from service in
France. These are stories of real girls for real girls.

1, GRACE HARLOWE’S OVERLAND RIDERS ON THE OLD
“APACHE TRAIL.

2. GRACE HARLOWE’S OVERLAND RIDERS ON THE GREAT
AMERICAN DESERT.

3. GRACE HARLOWE’S OVERLAND RIDERS AMONG THE KEN-
TUCKY MOUNTAINEERS.

4. GRACE HARLOWE’S OVERLAND RIDERS IN THE GREAT
NORTH WOODS. :
WEE BOOKS FOR WEE FOLKS

For little hands to fondle and for mother to read aloud.
Every ounce of them will give a ton of joy.

WEE BOOKS FOR WEE FOLKS SERIES

. MOTHER GOOSE NURSERY TALES,

. MOTHER GOOSE NURSERY RHYMES.

. A CHILD’S GARDEN OF VERSES. Robert
Louis Stevenson.

. THE FOOLISH FOX.

. THREE LITTLE PIGS.

. THE ROBBER KITTEN.

. LITTLE BLACK SAMBO.

. THE LITTLE SMALL RED HEN,

. THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS.

. THE LITTLE WISE CHICKEN THAT
KNEW IT ALL. Micra

11. PIFFLE’S A B C BOOK OF FUNNY ANIMALS.

. 12,. THE FOUR LITTLE PIGS THAT DIDN’T HAVE ANY MOTHER.

13. THE LITTLE PUPPY THAT WANTED TO KNOW TOO MUCH.

‘14. THE COCK, THE MOUSE AND THE LITTLE RED HEN.

15. GRUNTY GRUNTS AND SMILEY SMILE—INDOORS.

16. GRUNTY GRUNTS AND SMILEY SMILE—OUTDOORS.

WEE FOLKS BIBLE STORIES SERIES

1. WEE FOLKS STORIES FROM THE OLD pred aN In
Words of One Syllable.
2. WEE FOLKS STORIES FROM THE NEW TESTAMENT. In
Words of One Syllable.
. WEE FOLKS LIFE OF CHRIST.
4. WEE FOLKS BIBLE A B C BOOK.
5. LITTLE PRAYERS FOR LITTLE LIPS.

THE WISH FAIRY SERIES

1. THE LONG AGO YEARS STORIES.

2. THE WISH ee OF THE SUNSHINE AND SHADOW
FOREST. ~

. THE WISH FAIRY AND DEWY DEAR.

4. THE MUD WUMPS OF THE SUNSHINE AND SHADOW
FOREST.

PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED IN COLORS, PRICE, 50c, EACH

wd ee

SwWOAON An A

1



wo

wo
e

WEE FOLKS PETER RABBIT SERIES

. THE TALE OF PETER RABBIT.

. HOW PETER RABBIT WENT TO SEA,
. PETER RABBIT AT THE FARM.

. PETER RABBIT’S CHRISTMAS.

. PETER RABBIT’S EASTER.

| WHEN PETER RABBIT WENT TO
SCHOOL.

7. PETER RABBIT’S BIRTHDAY.

— eR ETAT? 8. PETER RABBIT GOES A-VISITING.

9. PETER RABBIT AND JACK-THE-JUMPER.

10. PETER RABBIT, DCE JUMPER, AND THE ACARI BEA BOY.

WEE FOLKS CINDERELLA SERIES
Rhymed and Retold by Kenneth Graham Duffield

A na ff WO ND HF



. THE WONDERFUL STORY OF CINDERELLA.

. THE STORY OF LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

. THE OLDTIME STORY OF THE THREE BEARS.

. THE OLD, OLD STORY OF POOR COCK ROBIN.

. CHICKEN LITTLE,

. PUSS IN BOOTS.

. THREE LITTLE KITTENS THAT LOST THEIR MITTENS.
. JACK THE GIANT KILLER.

LITTLE BUNNIE BUNNIEKIN SERIES

aon a an fF WO ND &.

1, LITTLE BUNNIE BUNNIEKIN.

2, LITTLE LAMBIE LAMBKIN.

3. LITTLE MOUSIE MOUSIEKIN,

4. LITTLE DEARIE DEER.

5. LITTLE SQUIRRELIE SQUIRRELIEKIN.

6. OLD RED REYNARD THE FOX.

PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED IN COLORS. PRICE, 50c. EACH
ALTEMUS’ NEW ILLUSTRATED
YOUNG PEOPLE’S LIBRARY

A series of choice literature for children,
selected from the best and most popular
works. Printed on fine paper from large type,
with numerous illustrations in color and black
and white, by the most famous artists, making

the most attractive series of juvenile classics



before the public.
Fine English Cloth, Handsome New Original Designs
PRICE, 75 Cents Each

THE ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE. 70 illustra-
tions.

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND. 42 illustrations.

THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS AND WHAT ALICE
FOUND THERE. 50 illustrations.

BUNYAN’S PILGRIM’S PROGRESS. 46 illustrations.
A CHILD’S STORY OF THE BIBLE. 72 illustrations.
A CHILD’S LIFE OF CHRIST. 49 illustrations.
AESOP’S FABLES. 62 illustrations.

SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. _ 50 illustrations.

THE MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY. By Edward Everett
Hale. Illustrated.

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS. _ 50 illustrations.

MOTHER GOOSE RHYMES, JINGLES, AND FAIRY TALES.
234 illustrations,

WOOD’S NATURAL HISTORY. 80 illustrations.
BLACK BEAUTY. By Anna Sewell. 50 illustrations.
ARABIAN NIGHTS’ ENTERTAINMENTS. 130 illustrations.
YOUNG PEOPLE’S LIBRARY (Continued)

ANDERSEN’S FAIRY TALES. 75 illustrations.
GRIMM’S FAIRY TALES. 50 illustrations.
GRANDFATHER’S CHAIR. 68 illustrations.

FLOWER FABLES. By Louisa M. Alcott. 50 illustrations.

AUNT MARTHA’S CORNER CUPBOARD. By Mary and
Elizabeth Kirby. 54 illustrations.

WATER BABIES. By Charles Kingsley. 84 illustrations.
UNCLE TOM’S CABIN. 90 illustrations.

TALES FROM SHAKESPEARE. By Charles and Mary Lamb.
65 illustrations.

ADVENTURES IN TOYLAND. $70 illustrations.
ADVENTURES OF A BROWNIE. 18 illustrations.

MIXED PICKLES. 31 illustrations.

LITTLE LAME PRINCE. By Miss Mulock. 24 illustrations.
THE SLEEPY KING. 77 illustrations.

RIP VAN WINKLE. By Washington Irving. 46 illustrations.

A CHILD’S GARDEN OF VERSES. By Robert Louis Steven-
son. 100 illustrations.

ANIMAL STORIES FOR LITTLE PEOPLE. 50 illustrations.
HOW BESSIE KEPT HOUSE. By Amanda M. Douglas.
HELEN’S BABIES. By John Habberton.
AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN.
TANGLEWOOD TALES. By Nathaniel Hawthorne.

GREEK HEROES. By Charles Kingsley.

THE WONDER BOOK. By Nathaniel Hawthorne.

TWO YEARS BEFORE THE MAST. By Richard Henry
Dana.
Stitt ttre

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