Citation
Darling's delight, or, Picture and story garden

Material Information

Title:
Darling's delight, or, Picture and story garden
Portion of title:
Picture and story garden
Creator:
F.M. Lupton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
F.M. Lupton Publishing Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 26 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Contians prose and verse.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026619559 ( ALEPH )
ALG3567 ( NOTIS )
234189822 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




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DARLING'S DELIGHT.

OR

PICTURE AND STORY GARDEN



| NEW YORK
-F. M. LUPTON PUBLISHING COMPANY



627 Sy, a:
oe oe oe feley.t Hawohdh fhe
CA, Snerry Ohhiijices

Heeb fy! / New Se ct, / 2

es Qe yt eye A ore
Craw ether Coro J reectesh:

C Yur, V/ oO, Uged, Co







MOTES NG, MEO ANED): AO



Topsy, Toby, and Tot, Going a-berrying
Seven, and five, and three; Out in the woods to-day,
As pretty a lot of children small With sun-hats broad and baskets big
As one could wish to see. They merrily speed away.
VP LS
Vig, .






oe
Me, ae



Wipe sj 5 p
Wf “39
(aw > 7





Home when the sun is low, Topsy, Toby, and Tot,

Frocks torn and faces soiled ; All tired as they can be;
With berries few in baskets big, As dirty a lot of children small
And those half-dried or spoiled. As one would care to see.



: a
tn, (Mesa

Vay Ue,





THE ORPHAN CHICKENS.

Dick was a very large and
heavy rooster. He was pure
white, with wings and tail
tipped with black.

A few years ago he had
some grandchildren. After the
mother hen had brooded them
long enough she forsook them,
and went to roost with the
other hens. The young ones
wandered about, not knowing
what to think of it. Dick saw
that they were left to them-
selves. He stalked up to them,
and acted so fatherly that the chickens, after a

while, took refuge under his wings. It was amusing



to see how tenderly he eyed them and covered them with his large wings.
They were glad of a shelter, and liked him for taking pity on them. Fora
long time before he had been in the habit of picking
bugs and worms for them. After the mother left them
he fed them better still, and they followed him all day.
Every night they crept close to him or under his wings.

Was he not good to the orphans? We always liked him
“better after that. Dick was very tame. He would eat
from our hands any time, and allow us to lift him when-
ever we chose. We kept him till he was old and lame;

and, when he died, some genuine tears were shed by one



who loved him. On- the same farm was a little white



kitten with black spots on its head and neck. This

kitten belonged to Millie, whom you see sitting



on the step. Every morning, when Pete the
milkman started to drive into town, Millie’s
kitten would be waiting at the bridge for her
breakfast of fresh milk. And Pete never disap-
pointed her. “Poor Kitty,” he would say, “I
believe you are hungry, and are asking me
to feed you.’ And then he would pour some
milk out of his can into a saucer, and Kitty would run and lap it up as fast as
she could. Then he would pour in more, till
Kitty had eaten all she wanted. When
he had done this, he would say “Good

morning, Kitty,’ and then go on his











way whistling. I was very glad that
Kitty had such a thoughtful friend.

This morning when I left her

rr

she was washing her face, and
stretching herself in the warm
sunshine. She seemed to
feel so comfortable after she
had eaten a nice breakfast.
It was a real pleasure to
look at her. In a short
time, Millie and her little
friend will have a pleasant
time romping in the orchard,
as they usually do right after
breakfast-time. I think everybody ought to be kind to dumb animals,
especially to cats and dogs, and I would include the horse also, at all times.





LITTLE SUNBEAM.



THE SIX CRULLERS.





THE SIX CRULLERS.

One day Percy was with his mother when she was making crullers. She
was mixing the dough in a pan, and on the table were six crullers, fried to a rich
brown, and looking very nice. “May I have one of these?” asked Percy. ‘No,”
said his mother. “I made a mistake and put in too much butter. They are too



rich and would make you sick. I am adding more milk and flour to the dough,
and you shall have some of the new batch when they are fried.” But Percy was
a little boy who never liked to wait for anything. He teased for the rich crullers
until his mother sent him away. The boy sat down under a tree and was sulky,
He thought his mother had treated him very badly. Then he saw her come out



THE SIX CRULLERS.

with the six crullers in her hands. She threw them on the grass, and called,
“Chick! chick!’ Then she went back into the house without seeing Percy. The
chickens came running from the barnyard, but Percy ran, too. He picked up the

_ crullers before the chickens had a chance to peck at them. ‘Mother didn’t seem
to be afraid that these crullers would make the chickens sick,” he thought, “and
why should they hurt me?” So he took a bite out of the largest cruller. It tasted
so good that he kept on biting until the cruller was gone. Then he began on
another, and did not stop until he had eaten all six.



“T don’t feel a bit sick,” he thought, as he ran off to play with his tame
rabbit. A couple of hours later Percy's mother went to the door with two of the
‘crullers in her hand. One was a very fat soldier with a cocked hat on his head,
and the other was a horse with a long mane. Percy was lying under a tree, and
his.mother thought him asleep. “Wake up, Percy,” she said. ‘Here are some
fancy crullers for you.”



THE SIX CRULLERS.

But Percy did not answer, and when his mother went close to him she saw
that he was very pale. She lifted him in her arms, carried him into the house,
and put him to bed. He was very sick all night, and cried a great deal. The
next day he was too weak to play. He lay on a sofa, and wished he had let the
chickens eat those six crullers. ‘Mother,’ he said, “I shall feel sure after this
that you know best when you tell me not to eat anything.” ‘You have learned
a very good lesson, Percy,” said his mother.

And the lesson was such a severe one that it was several years before
Percy could eat another ‘cruller, He couldn’t forget what he had suffered from

eating the six he had taken from the chickens.

WE ARE TWO LITTLE CATS,
IWYO) GOOD IONS CaS,

TWO SMALL WHITE CATS ARE WE;
WE TAKE SWEET MILK FOR OUR EARLY MORNING MEAL,
BUT WE MUST HAVE CREAM FOR TEA.







































































































































































































FIDO AND FAN,



ANNABEL’'S PLAYTHINGS.



"HIS is a true story about a wheelbarrow, a pig
named Shorty, and a little girl who lived in the
country. The name of the little girl was Annabel.
Last summer Aunt Amanda went to a farm at
Sea Isle, where she had lived when a little girl.
At this place were some aged people and their
great-granddaughter, who was only five years

- old. This was Annabel. She had no playmates
or no such playthings as very many city children

“have. But she was the sweetest, nicest little thing

you ever met in all your life. Everybody loved her, only

| there were not many people at Sea Isle to love anybody.

One day Aunt Amanda sat by the open window, and heard Annabel

say: ‘Now, my little chicken, you must lay a nice, white egg.” Looking

out, Aunt Amanda saw that she had a large piece of x

“colored glass propped up in an old birds’ nest. After

a while, Annabel said: ‘There, little chicken, you did

lay three nice eggs.” Then she took three small bits

of glass from the nest, and seemed as pleased as if BP
they were truly eggs. Aunt Amanda remembered
that she had an old number of Our Baby in her |
valise. She got it out and read to Annabel a story

Mae ‘ ca



of how a girl named Pauline dressed up some toads in silks and satins,
and put straw bonnets on their heads. Annabel liked the story very
much, and thought it very funny to dress the toads up so, but said she



ANNABEL'S PLAYTHINGS.



couldn’t do that, for she had always been afraid of toads. But one day
Aunt Amanda met her in the lane, with a wheelbarrow, .in which she
had Shorty, the little pig, dressed in a long, white baby dress. Around
his neck was one of Annabel’s white ruffles, and on his head a wreath

\



of golden-rod and red honey-suckle. Shorty didn’t seem to like the
arrangement at all. He wasn’t a bit fashionable. He didn’t want to shine
as a society pig, not a bit of it. He kept squirming and grunting, but
Annabel had tied him in with an old sash ribbon, and he couldn’t get
free. She wheeled him up and down the lane for quite a while.
When Aunt Amanda went back to her city home, the very first thing
she did was to buy a lovely doll and doll-carriage, and send them, by
express, to Annabel. The little girl wrote a letter to her, printed in
big letters with a lead pencil. The most important sentences were these:
“Oh, aunty, I love my Dolly and my doll-carriage very much indeed.
Poor little Shorty is bigger now than the wheelbarrow, and he won’t
let me ride him down the lane any more; but I don’t want to, now
that I have my dear little Dolly to play with. Come down next summer,
and we will have a good time. -I am not afraid of toads now, and I

know where to find a whole lot. Don’t forget to come down.’











































































= mm

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HH WHITAN| |
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CHILD LORE.

There was a fat man of Bombay,
Who was smoking one sunshiny day,
When a bird, called a snipe, |
Flew away with his pipe,

Which vex’d the fat man of Bombay.



Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall;
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall;
Not all the king’s horses, nor all the

e 9
king’s men,



Could set Humpty Dumpty up again.

ps
tb
o

4

_F for fig, and J for jig,
~~ And N for knuckle bones,
I for John the waterman, é

And S for sack of stones. _

UL

CO,

























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:
’
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£ om, y
2 7
.
: 2 2
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Full Text




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© \

5 ata
% Bee

A

Ave



_F.M.Lurton PUBLISHING Co. y x eee :
se : NEW YORK. “y= 2 .


in Library

Z
a)
3
~
2
a

ity

Univers:
mB wi.


DARLING'S DELIGHT.

OR

PICTURE AND STORY GARDEN



| NEW YORK
-F. M. LUPTON PUBLISHING COMPANY
627 Sy, a:
oe oe oe feley.t Hawohdh fhe
CA, Snerry Ohhiijices

Heeb fy! / New Se ct, / 2

es Qe yt eye A ore
Craw ether Coro J reectesh:

C Yur, V/ oO, Uged, Co




MOTES NG, MEO ANED): AO



Topsy, Toby, and Tot, Going a-berrying
Seven, and five, and three; Out in the woods to-day,
As pretty a lot of children small With sun-hats broad and baskets big
As one could wish to see. They merrily speed away.
VP LS
Vig, .






oe
Me, ae



Wipe sj 5 p
Wf “39
(aw > 7


Home when the sun is low, Topsy, Toby, and Tot,

Frocks torn and faces soiled ; All tired as they can be;
With berries few in baskets big, As dirty a lot of children small
And those half-dried or spoiled. As one would care to see.



: a
tn, (Mesa

Vay Ue,


THE ORPHAN CHICKENS.

Dick was a very large and
heavy rooster. He was pure
white, with wings and tail
tipped with black.

A few years ago he had
some grandchildren. After the
mother hen had brooded them
long enough she forsook them,
and went to roost with the
other hens. The young ones
wandered about, not knowing
what to think of it. Dick saw
that they were left to them-
selves. He stalked up to them,
and acted so fatherly that the chickens, after a

while, took refuge under his wings. It was amusing



to see how tenderly he eyed them and covered them with his large wings.
They were glad of a shelter, and liked him for taking pity on them. Fora
long time before he had been in the habit of picking
bugs and worms for them. After the mother left them
he fed them better still, and they followed him all day.
Every night they crept close to him or under his wings.

Was he not good to the orphans? We always liked him
“better after that. Dick was very tame. He would eat
from our hands any time, and allow us to lift him when-
ever we chose. We kept him till he was old and lame;

and, when he died, some genuine tears were shed by one



who loved him. On- the same farm was a little white
kitten with black spots on its head and neck. This

kitten belonged to Millie, whom you see sitting



on the step. Every morning, when Pete the
milkman started to drive into town, Millie’s
kitten would be waiting at the bridge for her
breakfast of fresh milk. And Pete never disap-
pointed her. “Poor Kitty,” he would say, “I
believe you are hungry, and are asking me
to feed you.’ And then he would pour some
milk out of his can into a saucer, and Kitty would run and lap it up as fast as
she could. Then he would pour in more, till
Kitty had eaten all she wanted. When
he had done this, he would say “Good

morning, Kitty,’ and then go on his











way whistling. I was very glad that
Kitty had such a thoughtful friend.

This morning when I left her

rr

she was washing her face, and
stretching herself in the warm
sunshine. She seemed to
feel so comfortable after she
had eaten a nice breakfast.
It was a real pleasure to
look at her. In a short
time, Millie and her little
friend will have a pleasant
time romping in the orchard,
as they usually do right after
breakfast-time. I think everybody ought to be kind to dumb animals,
especially to cats and dogs, and I would include the horse also, at all times.


LITTLE SUNBEAM.
THE SIX CRULLERS.





THE SIX CRULLERS.

One day Percy was with his mother when she was making crullers. She
was mixing the dough in a pan, and on the table were six crullers, fried to a rich
brown, and looking very nice. “May I have one of these?” asked Percy. ‘No,”
said his mother. “I made a mistake and put in too much butter. They are too



rich and would make you sick. I am adding more milk and flour to the dough,
and you shall have some of the new batch when they are fried.” But Percy was
a little boy who never liked to wait for anything. He teased for the rich crullers
until his mother sent him away. The boy sat down under a tree and was sulky,
He thought his mother had treated him very badly. Then he saw her come out
THE SIX CRULLERS.

with the six crullers in her hands. She threw them on the grass, and called,
“Chick! chick!’ Then she went back into the house without seeing Percy. The
chickens came running from the barnyard, but Percy ran, too. He picked up the

_ crullers before the chickens had a chance to peck at them. ‘Mother didn’t seem
to be afraid that these crullers would make the chickens sick,” he thought, “and
why should they hurt me?” So he took a bite out of the largest cruller. It tasted
so good that he kept on biting until the cruller was gone. Then he began on
another, and did not stop until he had eaten all six.



“T don’t feel a bit sick,” he thought, as he ran off to play with his tame
rabbit. A couple of hours later Percy's mother went to the door with two of the
‘crullers in her hand. One was a very fat soldier with a cocked hat on his head,
and the other was a horse with a long mane. Percy was lying under a tree, and
his.mother thought him asleep. “Wake up, Percy,” she said. ‘Here are some
fancy crullers for you.”
THE SIX CRULLERS.

But Percy did not answer, and when his mother went close to him she saw
that he was very pale. She lifted him in her arms, carried him into the house,
and put him to bed. He was very sick all night, and cried a great deal. The
next day he was too weak to play. He lay on a sofa, and wished he had let the
chickens eat those six crullers. ‘Mother,’ he said, “I shall feel sure after this
that you know best when you tell me not to eat anything.” ‘You have learned
a very good lesson, Percy,” said his mother.

And the lesson was such a severe one that it was several years before
Percy could eat another ‘cruller, He couldn’t forget what he had suffered from

eating the six he had taken from the chickens.

WE ARE TWO LITTLE CATS,
IWYO) GOOD IONS CaS,

TWO SMALL WHITE CATS ARE WE;
WE TAKE SWEET MILK FOR OUR EARLY MORNING MEAL,
BUT WE MUST HAVE CREAM FOR TEA.




































































































































































































FIDO AND FAN,
ANNABEL’'S PLAYTHINGS.



"HIS is a true story about a wheelbarrow, a pig
named Shorty, and a little girl who lived in the
country. The name of the little girl was Annabel.
Last summer Aunt Amanda went to a farm at
Sea Isle, where she had lived when a little girl.
At this place were some aged people and their
great-granddaughter, who was only five years

- old. This was Annabel. She had no playmates
or no such playthings as very many city children

“have. But she was the sweetest, nicest little thing

you ever met in all your life. Everybody loved her, only

| there were not many people at Sea Isle to love anybody.

One day Aunt Amanda sat by the open window, and heard Annabel

say: ‘Now, my little chicken, you must lay a nice, white egg.” Looking

out, Aunt Amanda saw that she had a large piece of x

“colored glass propped up in an old birds’ nest. After

a while, Annabel said: ‘There, little chicken, you did

lay three nice eggs.” Then she took three small bits

of glass from the nest, and seemed as pleased as if BP
they were truly eggs. Aunt Amanda remembered
that she had an old number of Our Baby in her |
valise. She got it out and read to Annabel a story

Mae ‘ ca



of how a girl named Pauline dressed up some toads in silks and satins,
and put straw bonnets on their heads. Annabel liked the story very
much, and thought it very funny to dress the toads up so, but said she
ANNABEL'S PLAYTHINGS.



couldn’t do that, for she had always been afraid of toads. But one day
Aunt Amanda met her in the lane, with a wheelbarrow, .in which she
had Shorty, the little pig, dressed in a long, white baby dress. Around
his neck was one of Annabel’s white ruffles, and on his head a wreath

\
of golden-rod and red honey-suckle. Shorty didn’t seem to like the
arrangement at all. He wasn’t a bit fashionable. He didn’t want to shine
as a society pig, not a bit of it. He kept squirming and grunting, but
Annabel had tied him in with an old sash ribbon, and he couldn’t get
free. She wheeled him up and down the lane for quite a while.
When Aunt Amanda went back to her city home, the very first thing
she did was to buy a lovely doll and doll-carriage, and send them, by
express, to Annabel. The little girl wrote a letter to her, printed in
big letters with a lead pencil. The most important sentences were these:
“Oh, aunty, I love my Dolly and my doll-carriage very much indeed.
Poor little Shorty is bigger now than the wheelbarrow, and he won’t
let me ride him down the lane any more; but I don’t want to, now
that I have my dear little Dolly to play with. Come down next summer,
and we will have a good time. -I am not afraid of toads now, and I

know where to find a whole lot. Don’t forget to come down.’








































































= mm

i
Mi
i

HH WHITAN| |
a |
te h i












































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CHILD LORE.

There was a fat man of Bombay,
Who was smoking one sunshiny day,
When a bird, called a snipe, |
Flew away with his pipe,

Which vex’d the fat man of Bombay.



Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall;
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall;
Not all the king’s horses, nor all the

e 9
king’s men,



Could set Humpty Dumpty up again.

ps
tb
o

4

_F for fig, and J for jig,
~~ And N for knuckle bones,
I for John the waterman, é

And S for sack of stones. _

UL

CO,






















A
+
: «
’
-
4
% rH
~
: Bs 4
:
’
~ XX
ue ~
£ om, y
2 7
.
: 2 2
, 3 , _ %