Citation
Tales in the kitchen

Material Information

Title:
Tales in the kitchen for clever children
Series Title:
Playmate series
Creator:
Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Lothrop Publishing Company
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Statement of Responsibility:
fully illustrated.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026661084 ( ALEPH )
ALG5309 ( NOTIS )
61214079 ( OCLC )

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TALES IN THE KITCHEN

FOR CLEVER CHILDREN



“ FULLY ILLUSTRATED

BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY



“LoTHRoP “PUBLISHING COMPANY. ~



Es soe Ss : All rights reserved.







To a little stranger from the North,

Who was timid and shy of speech,
We gave — the first she had ever seen —
_ A ripe, beautiful, downy peach.

We caught one glimpse of her big blue eyes
From her drooping lashes beneath,
As into the peach’s curving side
* Went her sharp little milk-white teeth.

She ‘spoke not a word-till all was gone,
Then she cried in a joyous tone;
‘¢]’ve eaten it, cloth and all, mamma,
Now what shall I do with the bone? ’*™-
~ Eleanor A. Hunter.



SUGAR THIEF!

SUGAR THIEF!

Nan was fond of sugar; she often helped herself without being asked.

‘‘Dear me! ’’ said mamma one day, ‘‘ this must be stopped, or we
shall have Nan ill.’”’ So calling her little girl to her, she said :

‘Now, Nan, you must not take any more sugar without asking. Do
you understand ? ’’ ;

“© Yes’m,’’ answered Nan. But though she did understand very well,
I am not at all sure that even then she intended to obey, for it was that
very same evening that what I am going to tell you about happened.

Mamma had company at supper, and Nan was seated beside a gentle-
man of whom she was very fond. He had been telling her a funny story,
and had passed everything to her ‘‘just ’zif I was grown up,”’ said she
to herself’; but now he had turned away, and was talking to sister Kate.
Just at that moment mamma passed Nan her ‘‘cambric tea.’’ Nan
tasted it, and looked as though she did not like it very well, and glanced
longingly at the sugar bowl. But suddenly her face lighted up, and she
slipped her hand into her pocket. When it came out there was a lump
of sugar between her finger and thumb. One; two, three, four, five, six,
seven lumps went into the cambric tea.

‘©Why, Nan!’’:.Nan looked up with a start, and blushed crimson.
Everybody at the table was looking at her, her dear friend among them,
and Nan thought he must feel very, very badly to put his handkerchief

-up to his face like that.

But that was not the end of it. The next morning mamma came to
Nan with a large piece of cardboard, on which was printed, ‘‘ Sugar thief.’

«¢ What’s it for, mamma?’’ asked Nan, in rather a shaky voice.

‘¢ For this,’’ and mamma turned Nan. around and pinned it on her back.

‘¢Now,’’ she said, ‘‘ you must-wear this all day, unless,’’ she added,
‘< you forgot what I told-you about taking sugar yesterday ; did you? ”’

‘*No, mamma,” said Nan, looking down, ‘‘I didn’t forget.’’

‘Very well, then; and now you may go. out and play if you want to.’’

‘¢ Must I go out, mamma? ’”’ Smee



SUGAR THIEF!




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NAN IS HUMILIATED,

‘¢Not unless you want to,’’ said her mother.

‘¢ May I stay in my oe *

‘¢ Certainly, if you choose.’

And so all that long day Nan staid in.her room, and when at night
mamma came to take off the cardboard, Nan told her that she never,
never would take sugar any more without asking.

Annie L. Hannah.

a



TICACHEE AND HER QUEER BABY.



WITH HER YAM BABY. =

TICACHEE AND HER QUEER BABY.

Ticacnre lived on an island home. Great white-winged ships went
sailing by. Sometimes they stopped there; then what a hurrying to take
them tropical fruits to exchange for what the ships carried !

Little Ticachee had only one of the queer-shaped yams, which grow
abundantly in that sunny clime, for a baby. Her yam had prongs for
arms, head and legs; around its. body she fitted the loose: girdle cloth.
— the only garment worn in that land.

Ticachee often waded out into the warm sea-tide, to. give her baby
a bath. Once her little brother Octatamee followed, toddling along. . He
was only:a baby, and as he could not swim, he came near drowning.

When Ticachee saw him, she dropped her precious yam baby right
into the sea, and bravely striking out, rescued her little brother, and carried
him to their palm-leaf-covered home and his mother’s arms. —

When Octatamee was asleep on a leaf-made mat, -Ticachee wandered
back to where the surf washed above her dear little yam baby. Do you |
think it strange that Ticachee shed a few tears? She had mothered it
so much ! _ rs. S. Rosalie Sill. —

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A LAP FULI.



A GREAT SURPRISE.



THE HOLY FAMILY.



A GREAT SURPRISE.

Twas just the jolliest. surprise
Of our whole Christmas Day, because
The door swung back before our eyes,
And there stood Mrs. Santa Claus!

She wore a dress of scarlet bright,
A big fur cloak and collar too;



A GREAT SURPRISE.

Her bonnet was a monstrous fright ;
Her eyes were all that sparkled through.

“© Q, dear!’’ she cried, quite out of breath,
*¢T’ve run till I can hardly limp,

And worried too, almost to death,
And got my hair all out of crimp !

‘* For Santa Claus, dear soul and kind —
Just fancy how the good man feels —
Had really so much on his mind
He quite forgot those small MacNeils.

‘And so I had to scurry round —
I always have to at the end —

And bring the few odd things I found ;
Perhaps you’ve something you could send?

“¢T thought I’d just step in and see ’’ —
And then there was an awful pause,
And Mrs. Santa looked at me,
And I at Mrs. Santa Claus.

I could not give my new wax doll,
Nor my new music-box, could you?

But Tom just seized a book and ball,
And after Mrs. Santa flew.

And then I felt so very queer,

IT took Christina Mirabeau —

She was my Christmas doll last year —
- And firmly told her she must go!

And dear mamma — I saw her watch
And wipe a glimmer from her eye —



A GREAT SURPRISE.

Said, though those small MacNeils were Scotch,
Perhaps they’d like our Christmas pie.

Indeed, they were the most amazed,
Those small MacNeils, that pie to see!

And Annie Laurie sat and gazed
Entranced on Mirabeau and me,

While Rob and Andy crowded near,
And little Ailie tried to hide ;

And, what was very, very queer,
Their truly grown-up mother cried !

“Sit ye, Dame Santa Claus awhile ;
Ye’ll ne’er disguise yoursel frae me,”’
She said at-last. ‘‘ I know your smile ;
I know your sweet and winsome ee.”’

We looked at Mrs. Santa Claus ;
Her cloak and bonnet — off they fell !
You should have heard the wild applause,
For there stood — our own Auntie Belle!

She’d sent a carriage-load of things,
And dainties for a dozen meals ;

And next year, when the Christ-bell rings,
We’ll not forget those small MacNeils.

Emma Huntington Nason.



WINTER FUN,



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FRO.

TO AND

UP AND DOWN,



THE THREE T’S.

THE THREE 1’S. —I.

Sopuiz has three little brothers; their names are Tim, Tom and POE
and she calls them the three T’s. .

One day Aunt Jane gave each one a fine cactus; she said they would
bear large pink flowers. the next winter, if they gave them plenty of sun-
shine and very little water, for they come from a dry country and do not

Pea eras ] Ree er en et ee









SOPHIE HAS: A DREAM ABOUT THE THREE T'S.

like to be wet. Each pot bore the name of the owner in red paint, Tim’s
being the biggest, because he was the eldest.

But in spite of Aunt Jane’s warning the three T’s would fill ‘the green
watering-pot full to the brim, and take turns in holding it over the
plants, feeling the greatest delight in the fine spray that poured out.

Their mother told them that they were foolish little boys, and Sophie
advised and scolded. One night she had a dream about them.

She saw the three pots standing 1 in a row on her table before the open
window. But they did not seem to be exactly flower-pots, but were
the three T’s, who, in some queer way, were shaped like pots, and had
plants growing out of their heads; each had his name painted on the



THE THREE T’S.

rim, and they were bowing and capering about in a very funny way.
She cried, ‘‘ Teddy dear, don’t!’’ but he did not seem to know her.

Soon she saw little spots coming all over them, which grew very fast
into large flowers, but the pots danced about so that the buds fell off as
fast as they opened. Sophie became more and more distressed. ‘*Tim!”’
she cried, ‘‘don’t you see what you are doing ?”’

Just at this moment:the big green watering-pot jumped on the table
full of water; Sophie seized it, and began drenching the ill-behaved
plants, or boys, whichever they were, with water.

They tried hard to get out of the way, and finally Tim ducked, and
jumped out of the window, where he broke to pieces with a great crash.

Sophie screamed, but continued to pour on water until Tom whirled
out of the window, followed by Ted ; they made a dreadful crash as they fell.

At this Sophie threw the watering-pot after them and screamed with
all her might, waking herself up.

Her mother came hurrying into the room to see what was the matter.

«
‘‘Why, they’re all right,”’ said her mother; but the little dreamer
could not go to sleep again until she had seen with her own eyes that they

were all safe, and sound ae in their little white beds.
Clara G. Dolliver.





ENJOYING MAY DAY.



SHY LITTLE ALICE.

SHY LITTLE ALICE.

‘« Now, my dear, won’t you shake hands with me before I go?”’,

Miss Kendall was such a sweet, pretty young lady. She had been
away on a visit to New York, and only returned last week. Now she was
calling on Mrs. Worthington, who is Alice’s mamma.

Such a bright home Alice had. The room where they sat looked like a
conservatory, but it wasn’t. Mrs. Worthington filled the low mantel with
flowers, which were seen again in the mirror. As arule, flowers are more
beautiful than people, and so Mrs. Worthington was wise.

- Miss Kendall talked of what she saw in the great city. :

‘‘T must tell Alice about the Hospital for dear: little babies. There
were rows and rows of babies, not one of them over two years old. Some -
of them had as sweet faces as I ever saw, but others looked so ill and
wasted.’’

‘¢ How pitiful,’’ said ve Worthington.

‘Yes, indeed ; but itis good to know they can be taken care of. Some
were toddling about and had their dolls. I remember one wretched rag
bahy, but the little mother hugged it as if it had been a Paris doll.
Wouldn’t you like to send them a doll or two, Alice ? ”’

Now Alice actually owned ten doll babies, and at that very minute she
was trying to make up her mind how many she could part with to send to
these forlorn human babies. Yet, when. Miss Kendall. asked. her, she
couldn’t say a word, she was so shy.

Her mamma answered for her, ‘‘I am sure my daughter will be
glad to give some of her treasures,’ and Alice smiled with her heart in
her eyes. ©

But when Miss Kendall offered her hand at parting, Alice could
not muster courage to lay her own Huts Rand in it, though she wanted to
very much.

It is painful to be so shy, and we may hope Alice will get over it when
she is older.

Helen A. Hawley. -















THE THREE T’S.

THE THREE T’S. —II.

Tue next day their mother said to the three little boys as they sat at
the supper-table, ‘‘ Aunt Jane is coming to-morrow.’

‘*T wonder if she will want to see my cactus,’
at Tom.

‘* Mine’s all tumbled over,’’ chirped little Teddy.

‘« Of course she’ ll want to see them,’’ said Sophie, ‘‘ and I guess she’ ll
say a good deal when she sees the way you have treated her present.
They are almost drowned, when they ought to be dry as chips.”’

Soon after, the three T’s slipped out and looked at the plants.

‘¢ Let’s put them in the oven to dry,’’ said Tim.

‘¢ Won’t they burn? ’’ asked practical Tom, turning to the other T’s.

?

said Tim, looking



READY FOR THE FLOWER SHOW.

‘¢No; the fire’s most out; ’sides, things don’t burn in the oven;

don’t Betty put cakes there? ”’
<¢’Course!’’ said little Teddy, taking his cactus in his arms, ‘‘ and

apples and everything.”’



THE THREE T’S.

<« But Betty won’t let us,’’ objected Tom.

«She isn’t there! ’’ cried Teddy, marching off triumphantly.

Tom’s pot was pretty heavy, being the biggest, but he managed to
carry it, and the poor plants were soon stowed away in the oven.

“ Aunt Jane on us.”’

<< Then don’t let’s take off our clothes to-night,’’ said Tim, ‘‘ it is so
much trouble to put ’em on again.”’

So the three T’s took off their shoes, slipped their nightgowns on over
their clothes, and jumped into bed. When their mother came to kiss them
good-night, she did not notice in the dark, how fat they looked.

But they slept pretty soundly, and when Tim awoke, he heard Betty
already singing down in the kitchen.

‘‘ Hurry, boys!’’ he cried, as he jumped out of bed, and ran down-

- stairs as quickly as he could.

“¢Faith,’’ said Betty, ‘ they kim near burning up, they did.”’

When Aunt Jane looked them over, the plants stood innocently on the
shelf, not looking much the worse for their baking.

‘¢ They look rather brown,”’ she said; ‘‘ you might give them just a
drop of water about once a week. If they are in bloom at the right time,
we will put them in the Flower Show ; they might take a prize.’’

When Sophie heard that, she hid the green watering-pot in the re-
motest corner of the barn, and thereafter watered her pansies with a dip-
per. In a few months, three thick stalks began to grow from the sides of
the three plants, and just in time for the Flower Show, three beautiful
pink flowers opened to the sunshine.

Somebody — perhaps it was Aunt Jane — offered a prize for children’s
plants, and the three T’s took it.

They were pleased enough, but. Sophie was the proudest little girl in
town. She brought out the watering-pot from its hiding-place, and put it
into Tim’s hand. &

~ ** There,’’ she said, ‘‘ you may water my garden forty times a day if
you want to, I don’t care.’’
- Clara G. Dolliver. —



' FANNIE’S ADVENTURE.

FANNIE’S ADVENTURE.

Fannte and her mother had been out a good while, and had picked a
good many berries. But now they had come to a place where the berries
were so thick that Fannie was sure she could soon finish filling her basket.

‘¢ But most of these are too high for you to reach,’’ said mamma.

‘¢ Can’t you hold me up?’’ said Fannie.

<¢ Not so high as that, dear,’” answered mamma. ‘‘ Suppose we let
them go to-day? ”’

‘©, mamma! I hear Susie and Jane now in the Ae They haven’t
stopped yet. Can’t I stand on the top of the gate ge

‘‘Not unless you are willing to fall off and crack your head,’’ said
Uncle Dick, who was just coming up from behind them.

‘¢Q, Uncle Dick! > cried Fannie; ‘‘ how softly you came. Have

you seen Jane? Has she filled her ae Can you rae me up on the
gate? You're stronger than mamma.’
- ¢¢ Rather stronger,’ said he. ‘‘ But I cannot answer more than one
question at once. Here, get up on my back, Fannie. Mamma will hold
you steady.’’ So Uncle Dick stooped over and leaned on his stick, and
Fannie climbed up, and there she stood and worked away.

«¢ But,’’ said Nannie, as she began to pick, “¢ sha’n’t I tire you?” eG

“¢ Not a bit.’”

«Don’t I seem very heavy ?”’

“¢No. Work away.”’

‘¢ My dear,’’ said mamma, ‘ pick your berries and don’t talk.’”

«¢ But I’m afraid ’’ —

‘¢ Well, I’m rather afraid,’’ said Uncle Dick. <‘‘I’m afraid you are
not,so polite as I expected. When a lady receives a service she does not
keep talking about it. Having accepted the ee she does not keep
wondering whether it would not be better to decline.’

«© Dear me!’’ muttered Fannie, ‘‘I’m sure I want to be polite. BS
thank you, Uncle Dick, and you shall have some of my biggest berries.’

Pamela McArthur Cole.







UNCLE DICK HELPS PICK THE BERRIES.



TERESA.

TERESA.

I wit stand very close to the wall
While they wait in the garden and call;
Then old Peter’ll go looking for me
Under bushes, or up in a tree.

There’s an organ away down the street,
With a drum that the monkey can beat ;
It is naughty to keep the poor thing
Every day at the end of a string.

If I only had wings, and could fly
Like a bird, in the sunny blue sky,

I could see if the world is quite round,
And why it looks flat on the ground.

But that would leave mamma alone,
‘So it’s better perhaps to have none
And sleep in my little white bed,

‘Than a nest with wet leaves overhead.
Louis Hail.



TERESA WAITS IN THE GARDEN.

‘*Ou! I know now’’ —’twas Tommy spoke —
‘Why Lady’s Slippers grow ;

Because sometimes the Brownie folk
Are naughty, don’t you know?’’



ANNIE’S SODA BISCUIT.

ANNIE’S SODA BISCUIT.

Annie is ten years old.

Her mother is teaching her
how to cook. She already has
learned how to make good
bread.

One day she was sent on

an errand to a neighbor who
lives across the pastures. She
found her sick in bed, the
rooms in a muss, and the three
little children fretting for their
dinner.
_ Annie bathed the sick
woman’s head, made her room
and bed tidy, and then looked
in the pantry for food.

She found a plate of dry
biscuit, greenish yellow with
: too much soda.

Ey MAKES A PAN OF BISCUIT. cc That bread was never fit
to eat,’’ Annie thought. ‘‘I will make a pan of biscuits just like
mother’s.’?

The sick woman was very glad to have Annie cook for her, and the
little children forgot to fret, running here and there to show Annie where
they kept their kindlings, baking-pans and flour and mixing for the
biscuit. bts ;

Annie first measured two quarts of flour into a pan. She sifted
into it two teaspoons of soda— full, but not heaped —and a third
teaspoon of salt.

She stirred the soda and the salt through the flour, and then
twice sifted it.









ANNIE’S SODA BISCUIT.

In another pan she measured two pint basins of thick sour milk,
allowing one heaped tablespoon of cream to each pint.

Into this she stirred the prepared flour until she had a dough just right
for biscuit; as soft as it could be to knead on the cake board without
sticking.

Annie kneaded her-.dough one nates just enough to gather it. Then
she dusted her cake board with flour, rolled the dough one half an. inch
thick and cut the biscuit.

She had a hot oven all ready for them — just as hot ‘as it could be and
yet not burn.

She baked the biscuit twelve minutes, and Hey came out as light and
white as a snow feather.

‘¢ | want your little girl to teach me just how to make such beautiful
bread,’’ the children’s mother said to Annie’s mother one day, coming
across the pastures to find her and be taught. ‘‘ Why! I had called that
flour not fit for the pigs to eat. The bread 1 make from it is always green,
or yellow, or both, ae soggy as clay, but Annie’s bread was light and
white as thistle blows.’

The children’s mother then learned’ the secret of making good soda
biscuit. She learned to sift the soda into the flour before putting it into
the mixing.

The children’s mother was Ponty years old, and had spoiled — oh!
hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of biscuit, by dumping her soda
right into the sour milk, letting it foam all the life and yeasty lightness
out of itself before adding the flour.

Clarissa Potter.

I rnovent I saw somebody’s canary
Escaped from the cage to the garden bed ;
» _- T looked again — ’twas a daffodil yellow,
Sunning its pretty head.
Lavinia S. Goodwin.



AN INTERRUPTED MEAL.





JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.















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JOKER IS SORRY FOR HARRY.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
IN THE BUNGALOW.

‘ world? ’’ asked Harry.

Joker looked up from the floor where he was riage with Sede
Joker is called a handsome little fellow. He has a pale face, dark eyes,
and light hair that grows down on his forehead like a bang. He usually
wears a Lord Fauntleroy suit, though sometimes he is dressed in sailor
fashion, making the cunningest of Jacky Tars. He has besides the nat-
tiest soldier uniform Harry ever saw, which is saying a good deal; for
Harry’s papa is colonel of a regiment in India, and Harry has lived
among soldiers all his life.

Is Joker Harry’s brother? Joker is only a clever monkey.



—— Se

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

Joker climbed up on Harry’s knee and made a sound the boy called yes.

‘You shall come with me, then,” said Harry. ‘‘ White children cannot
live in the East Indian climate after they are eight years old, so a m going
with mamma to England and America. Mamma is an American.’

Harry paused. He was thinking how he should miss the bungalow,
the parade, the music of the band and — papa.

Joker did an odd thing. He threw his arms around his young
master’s neck, and put his face close to his cheek, as if to kiss him.

That evening Harry and Joker sat on the railing of the veranda. On
the ground below stood Ginger, the collie dog, with his back towards them.
Casting a sly glance at Harry, Joker leaned over and gave a sharp tweak
to Ginger’s curly tail. The dog turned. Harry was smiling, but Joker
was gazing dreamily at the sky. Ginger snarled at Harry, then took up



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GINGER WAS STANDING WITH HIS BACK TOWARDS THEM,

his position as before. Again Joker gave the tail another jerk. Again
Ginger whisked round and scolded Harry. Joker hugged himself with glee.

Ginger once more turned away. A third time Joker bent over cau-
tiously, but just as he touched the tail, Ginger veered about so suddenly
that the monkey was caught in the act.

Ginger jumped at him and would have punished him well, but Joker,
frightened and crying like a baby, sprang up to the roof of the veranda,
where the dog could not reach him. Mary C. Crowley.



A LITTLE GIRL RULER.

A LITTLE GIRL RULER.

Nor long ago Queen Wilhelmina
of Holland visited Germany. The
Emperor William arranged a series
of grand banquets and receptions in
her honor, and the event was talked
about in our own country as well as
in every part of Europe, because the
Queen is only twelve years old—a
little girl ruler.

The Queen Wilhelmina herself
would have liked better to play with
her dolls, feed her pigeons, or drive her
team of six ponies; but she is Hol-
land’s queen, and so must begin to
take an interest in the pomp and
splendor which is to surround her.

She is too young to actually assume all. queenly duties, but every public
act of the royal power is performed in the name of this little girl ruler.

These royal duties came to her in consequence of the death of her father.
Queen Wilhelmina was the only child of King William and Queen Emma
of Holland, and so the next heir to the Dutch throne.

The little Wilhelmina lives with her mother at the Castle of Loo. The
little Queen leads a quiet, happy life. She rises at seven o’clock in the
morning, and goes at once to kiss her mother. . At eight o’clock the
Queen’s breakfast is served ; from nine o’clock until twelve she is busy with
her studies, and at noon she enjoys a simple lunch of eggs, milk and fruit.
At six she dines with her mother, and at eight o’clock the little Wilhel-
mina is sent promptly to bed. :

Queen Wilhelmina has been’ taught to take an interest in her people,
and this little girl ruler gives promise of peine dearly loved by those whom
she is to serve. E. Addie Heath.



QUEEN WILHELMINA OF HOLLAND.





® MERRY AS A LARK.



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JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

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JOKER MEANT TO BE POLITE.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
MONKEYS THAT GO A-FISHING.

Wuen Joker and Harry reached the sea coast they made the acquaint-
ance of a cousin of Joker’s, who earned his living by catching fish. The
grove near the shore was, indeed, a.regular monkey fishing village.

As they drew near the grove, they saw swinging on the bough of a tree
what Harry supposed to be a little old man; Joker knew it was a large ape.

‘*Halloo, Grand-pop,’’ he called out in his own language. The ape
looked toward them. When he saw a monkey gotten up in such grand
clothes he laughed and laughed. Seeming to remember his manners, how-
ever, he sat up straight, and held out his paw.

Joker stepped forward jauntily and, with a low bow, was just going to
‘shake hands,’’ when, presto, the big hairy hand was withdrawn and,



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

instead of a polite clasp of his funny mites of fingers, Joker received a
sharp box on the ear, which sent him whining back to Harry.

At this, his giant cousin again screamed with mirth. Leaping from the
bough, he bounded across the beach to the water’s edge and, crouching down,
looked into a crab hole which Harry had noticed a few minutes before.

The boy watched him, for he knew that apes of this kind are famous for
catching crabs, and that this one had now gone a-fishing. The monkey-
angler turned his tail into a fishing line, by dropping it into the hole as far
as it would reach. Then he waited. Harry and Joker ventured nearer.

Presently, they saw his mouth close with a snap, he shut his eyes, and
’ tears trickled down his rough cheeks. The ape had a bite, and it hurt.

He bore the pain without moving, so that his prey might take hold
tighter. Another nip having told him that it had done so, the tail with
the poor crab clinging to its tip was jerked quickly from the hole, whirled



JOKER WATCHES HIS GIANT COUSIN CATCH CRABS.

round a second or two, and then dashed to the ground with such force as to |
break the shell to pieces. The fisher’s dinner. was now. ready, and he sat
down to enjoy it, picking out the meat with his claws. He beckoned to
‘his visitor to come and share it, but Joker shook his head. He would not
have any more tricks played upon him.

When Harry and Joker left the beach the fisher series had finished
his meal and was sadly licking his wounded tail. Mary C. Crowley.





A MOMENT OF PERIL. *



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.







JOKER MEETS SEPOY.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A SAILOR MONKEY.

JOKER was glad when he and Harry went aboard the ship bound for
England. He soon felt at home in the little cabin. Harry hung a tiny
hammock above his own berth, and Joker found it a-nice resting-place.
He soon learned that he was to have the company of one of his relations
on the voyage. Sepoy was the captain’s monkey. The two met on deck.
Joker was strutting about in his Jacky Tar suit when, suddenly, something
dropped from the rigging right on to his back. Mad with fright, he started
off upon all-fours in a wild run. Still the thing clung to him. Knocking
against a steamer-chair, however, he lost his balance, rolled over, freed
himself, and the next moment was face to face with Sepoy.

Sepoy was ugly and brown, and wore a shabby suit. As he looked
at Joker he gave a comical shrug and a hitch to his trousers—as he was



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

used to seeing the old salts do—and said, in his monkey speech, ‘‘ Huh!
a dudish, fair-weather sailor.’’

Joker turned his back on the rude creature, and sat looking out to sea.

The next day the waves were high, and Joker felt queer. He thought
he was going to die. He was only seasick. Then Sepoy came along.
Shutting one eye and swelling out his cheek with his tongue, he said,
“¢T told you so.’’ Joker sprang up and chased Sepoy into the rigging.
After that he felt better.

By the end of the week Sepoy became friendly. A storm came, and
then everybody learned to love him. He staid on deck with the captain
when every one else had been ordered below. He cheered the men at the
wheel, he ran up into the rigging and caught the rope of a sail that had
broken loose and could not be taken down quickly enough.

“¢Ah!’’ said Harry, ‘‘ Sepoy’s the right kind of a sailor.’’ And
Joker, wrapped in his red flannel dressing-gown, and lying helpless in his





SEPOY IS THE RIGHT KIND OF A SAILOR,

hammock, glanced at his Jacky Tar suit tossed into a corner, and sighed.
He was learning that it takes more than fine clothes to make a fine fellow.
When pleasant weather came, Harry made a boat for Sepoy. One
of the crew taught him to rig it. The rhonkey watched the work with in-
terest, and was delighted with his present. Mary C. Crowley.

















































































































ON CHRISTMAS MORNING,









FRIEND OR FOE?



THE CHRISTMAS LESSON.

THE CHRISTMAS LESSON.

THERE were four of them. Beth, and Dick, and Mary, and the cat.
Beth was five, Dick was going on four, Mary was two, though she did
sleep in the big old cradle yet, and the cat — well, it’s no matter how
old the cat was. She didn’t say anything only ‘‘ Purr-r, purr-r-r.’’

Not often did the little people take their go-to-bed lunch before the
dining-room fire. This was a special night.

“«The happy night
That to the cottage as the crown,
Brought tidings of salvation down.”

It was fun to sit in their ‘‘ nighties’’ and toast their little feet.

Mamma had just told them about the first Christmas Gift, the Babe of
Bethlehem, how he was given to us, and how through his life and death,
he gave himself to others. Then, because mammas cannot begin too soon
to talk about such things, she said :

*¢ Couldn’t my dears think of some presents for our washerwoman’s
children? Santa Claus will doubtless bring you more toys to-morrow.
You could give away some you have now, as well as not. ‘Try to think
what these others would like.’’

With that she was called out a moment.

Well, it was a poser. Beth tried to think, but of course Dick being a
boy, put-in first.

‘*Le’s div ’em kitty,’’ he said, as plain as he could with his mouth
full.

Kitty whisked her tail as if she didn’t. much like it. Beth shook her
curls, and said between two bites:

‘“*Why, Dick Johnson, I’m s’prised at you! Kitty’s one of the
fam’bly. Might’s well give away the baby! ’’

“¢ Dat’s dess what Dodd did do, any way,’’ said the young logician.

That was like Dick, and Beth didn’t know what to say. Mamma
came back in the nick of time. When the question was put to her, for



THE RARE OLD CHRISTMAS CUP.

some reason or other, she gave Dick a squeeze, and said, ‘ Bless his little.
heart !’’

But she told them they needn’t send the cat, she was pretty sure the
washerwoman’s children had a cat already.

Helped by her suggestions, Beth decided on one of her pretty dolls.
Dick gave a bow and arrows. Even Baby Mary when asked if her danc-
ing Jack could go, said ‘‘ Eth,’’ as if she understood.

Then the children went to bed happy, because they were going to make
somebody else happy.

It was a very nice lesson to learn.

re Helen A. Hawley.

.THE, RARE OLD CHRISTMAS CUP.

Wuart wonderful stories some famous:
drinking cups could tell, if they could
only speak. This rare old Christmas cup.
is one of them. It is soon to be pre-
sented to the British Museum, at a cost
of forty thousand dollars. The cover and
all are of solid gold, beautifully inlaid
with enamel pictures and medallions. It
once belonged to Charles v. of France.
Before the days of the Tudor sovereigns.
it was in the Royal Treasury of England.
Henry vi. and Queen Elizabeth have
touched their lips to it at grand Christmas.
dinners, and James I. presented it to the
‘great. Spaniard Velasco.

A few years ago this rare old Christ-
mas cup was sold at auction, and since
then it has been wandering about, bringing higher and higher prices —
it is considered such a remarkable treasure. H. W. F.





A PRESENT TO A QUEEN.



THE LION CUB FROM AFRICA.

A PRESENT TO A QUEEN.

Queen Victoria has always had a boy-and-girl fondness for animals,

especially for dogs and horses. It is related that on the very day of her
coronation, as she returned to Buckingham Palace, she heard her pet
spaniel barking his welcome, and hurried off her crown and robe of
purple velvet that she might give him his bath. A greyhound, “ Dear
Eos,” as the Queen called her, was a favorite in the royal household
for eleven years. The Queen’s Journals often refer to “dear Noble,”
her Scotch collie, and other dogs. Of landing once at the sea-palace of
Osborne she writes that, along with the children, “‘ Deckel (a favorite
dog), and our new charming kennel-bred Dachs, ‘ Boy,’ also received.
us with joy.”
From the Queen’s oriental dominions often come gifts of strange
and savage creatures that can only be petted behind the iron bars
of cages at the Zodlogical Garden, where they are sent. Once she
received from Java a Liliputian horse, only twenty-seven and a half
inches high when five years old. Only the other day, the Sultan of
Sokoto, in Central Africa, sent to the Queen the lion cub whose portrait
is given above. How like a huge house-cat he looks —as if just ready
for a frolic with the big ball at his feet! ESO:





GATHERING APPLES.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

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RIDING TO DRILL.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
SOLDIER MONKEYS.

Arter they arrived in London, Harry and Joker were entertained by a
company of soldier monkeys. These monkeys belonged to a show, and
went through their military exercises twice a day. -

‘* Ah,’’ thought Joker when Harry said he would take him; ‘‘ this
is something I know about.’’ He was’ still ashamed at having proved
such a poor Jacky Tar; but everybody called Joker a great soldier.

‘* Don’t you remember how we used to ride to the drill in India —I on
my pony Tricksey, and you upon Ginger a

As they entered the hall the band struck up a martial air. Joker stood
up on Harry’s shoulder while he marched down to his seat in the first row.

When the soldier monkeys saw a relation of their own coming towards



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

them in a uniform covered with gold lace, and having a tiny sword at his
side, they thought Joker must be a general.

At a sign from the showman they gave him a formal military salute,
which made the audience laugh and applaud, and caused Harry to shrink
into his place as quickly as possible.

Their uniform was neat, though not nearly so splendid as Joker’s. The
captain was a funny little fellow, who tried very hard to stand up straight,
and directed the maneuvers of his troops in grand style. Harry was
amused at the grace with which he lowered his sword to Joker.

The showman was glad to show off his monkeys so well by means of
the monkey in the audience. They went through the drill finely.

‘* Aren’t they clever!’’ Harry said to Joker. ‘* You would never see
them squabbling like some monkeys I know!’’ Joker did not answer.

Just then a man in the gallery threw a brown paper bag upon the
stage. The bag burst, and a quantity of nuts weresscattered over the floor.

Me \ h
vO

‘* Cricky !’”’ said Harry. What a hubbub there was at once. With a
cry of delight the soldiery broke ranks, threw down their guns and began
to scramble and fight for the dainties. The captain was the most unruly
of all. There was a flutter of scarlet and gold before Harry’s eyes, and
the next moment he saw that Joker had leaped upon the stage and was
struggling for a share of the nuts. Mary C. Crowley.




























THE SOLDIERY BROKE RANKS.





GUESS WHO WILL WIN?

WINTER FUN.

How is the fun
Of winter reckoned,
By boys in country, and boys in town,
Taken all in all, the up and the down?
Snowballs are first ;
Snow forts are second ;
But the boys agree these both give place
To a right-down, well-matched skating-race !





JOLLY WINTER SPORT.

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BOYS AND GIRLS IN SAMOA.

BOYS AND GIRLS IN SAMOA. .

THERE was a great war in Samoa, a few years
ago, and even grown people, when they read
about it, had to stop and ask where Samoa was.
So I suppose that there may be boys and girls,
too, who do not know much about Samoa.

It is the name of some beautiful islands in the
Pacific Ocean. There are all sorts of palm-trees
and orange-trees in Samoa, and wonderful flowers
and beautiful birds ; but they are coral islands,
far away from the mainland, so there are no wild
beasts. The largest island is forty-five miles long, and around our house
you would think one of the finest playgrounds in the world.

It is a little way out from the busy city of Apia, where there are
several other American families, and English and German, too. There
is a beautiful green lawn, running down to a smooth beach of cream-white
sand on one side, an orange grove on another, a hill covered with a real
tropical forest on another, and then the carriage road to Apia on the
other.

Unless some of our foreign children come out from the city for the
afternoon, you would find only native
boys and girls to play with, but you
would have play enough, even then,
for to be a boy or girl in such a
beautiful place as one of the islands
of Samoa and not to play, would be
‘impossible. Only the gamés must
be very different from those we are FISHING IN SAMOA.
used to at home. =

If you are a boy you would like to go fishing, and you will find lots of
boys ready to go with you ; but instead of a pole and line and hook, you
need only the branch of a tree. E



BUILDING A SHIP.





BOYS AND GIRLS IN SAMOA.

You must take off your pretty clothes, for these children wear only a
strip of cloth wound round the waist and hips, and the way they fish is to
go right out into the water. The bay is not deep, and the water is very
warm. They each take a branch of a tree, and then form two lines a hun-
dred feet apart. Single file, they go directly out into the water, and
gradually turn towards each other, till the first boys of each line meet
about waist deep, while the boys at the other ends are only a few steps
from the shore. Then they all turn about to face the shore, and begin
slapping the water with the branches and shouting and laughing and jump-
ing, and walking
up to the shore.

This frightens
all the fish inside
the half-circle
they have made,
and they frighten
them more and
more till they
drive them up into
water so shallow
they cannot swim. ;

THE SITTING-DOWN DANCE.

If you are a ,
girl you like to dance, and so do the Samoan girls, but they dance with
their hands instead of their feet. They all sit down together, and sing
and wave their hands and clap, and swing their heads ina way that is very
pretty, even if it is not quite like our dancing at home.

The great game for boys and girls together is to build a ship. On the
Samoan islands all the natives are great sailors. The children get together
and spend days in building a ship. The boys do the hard work, and the
girls make the ropes from vines and bark, and gather flowers for the rail
and prow. Then when it is finished they have a jolly time playing that
they go out to sea.

_ Soon enough the play becomes real to them, for when they are no more.
than twelve they turn fishermen and sailors in earnest. :



Warren H. Frych.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

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PEPPO SAVES THE BABY.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A HERO MONKEY.

One day when Harry was walking in the streets of London with Joker
he heard a cry of ‘‘Fire!’’? People began running, and Harry ran too.
He soon found himself in a crowd before a handsome house.

The master stood in the doorway directing two or three servants; the
others. had fled in a panic of fear. Through the windows of the rooms
above the mistress could be seen hurrying to and fro. Across the street
was a nursemaid in charge of the children.

Several engines rattled up. A cry of ‘‘ Save yourselves! ’’ broke from
the crowd. » The servants made haste to do so. The lady appeared in the
hall; behind her shone a bright light. Her husband half-carried her to
the other side of the street. ~Presently she turned to the children in care



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
J .

of the maid. Her face grew paler with terror. ‘*‘ My baby ?’’ she asked.
The baby had been forgotten amid the confusion, and was still in the
crib in the nursery. ; é

The firemen were dismayed. ‘The staircase was ablaze; the flames
had reached the upper stories, and the ladders were too short to reach
the nursery window. But soon a dark hand was seen raising the sash

CS



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HARRY READS THE STORY TO JOKER.

‘Tt is Peppo, the monkey,’’ cried the children. ‘‘See! he has the
baby in his arms,’’ they added joyfully. :

It was indeed so. The large ourang-outang, carrying his preciou
burden, began fo make his way down the water-spout at the side of the
building. He reached the ground, and laid the baby in the mother’s arms.

Then what a glad shout rang out from the crowd. Peppo was a hero.

Next morning Harry read the whole story to Joker, and Joker felt
proud of his relative. Like some persons, he seemed to make the mistake
of thinking that having a hero in the family was as good as trying to be
brave and heroic himself. Mary -C. Crowley.

|







|
|



A LITTLE GRANDMOTHER'S STORY.

A LITTLE GRANDMOTHER’S STORY.

“Now, children,” said

_ little Nelly, lifting her eyes

from her book, “I have put

on my grandmother-cap, and

- Twill tell you a story of what

happened to my mamma one

day when I was but a child.
It is a true story.

“On that day my mamma
in company with some of the
other ladies of her parish
(for she lived away out in
the country) met at the-
church in the village to
sweep it and dust it and put
it in order ‘for the winter.
They did this every autumn.

“ Mamma went with old
Prancer and the buggy and
took Aunt Carrie with her.

“T suppose that you all know that a ‘buggy’ is like a carriage with-
out a top; and mamma’s buggy. was shut in at the back.

“When they came to the church, mamma hitched old Prancer and
then she went to the buggy to take out the brooms and pans and rags
that they had brought. When she lifted the curtain of the seat, what
did she see, but a little hen sitting in one corner looking as peaceful as
if on her nest at home. That little hen had crept in under the seat to
lay an egg, and of course she did not expect to take a ride.

“Mamma fasteried her in, to stay while she was at work in the
church, and when they got home, biddy was in one corner and an egg
in another!” | M. C. M. D.



GRANDMOTHER NELLY.





THE FIRST BLUEBIRD.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.



M’LLE FOLICHONE, THE WORLD-RENOWNED ARTIST.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A MONKEY PIANIST.

Waite Harry and Joker were in Paris they attended a droll concert.
First, four seals played on hand-organs; next a troop of dogs danced ;
after that a cat me-owed a solo to the music of a piano, and then the
manager announced that M’lle Folichone, the world-renowned artist, would
perform. :

Presently a funny little figure fluttered out, stepped down to the
footlights and made a deep curtesy.

M’lle was a monkey.

She wore a ball-dress of white satin, with a train a yard long; the
bodice was cut low, and with short sleeves, showing her brown neck, around



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

which was a string of bright beads, and her long arms, upon which jingled
a row of silver bangles ; upon her head was a white toque adorned with a
long plume. .

At a signal from the manager, M’lle drew off her gloves, gave a little
hop, skip and jump, and landed on the piano stool. She opened a music-
book, found her place and struck the keys of the piano; stopped, rolled up
her eyes to the ceiling in an affected manner, and played a tune. Then
she slipped down again and ran behind the curtain.

Harry laughed and clapped his hands, and Joker tried to do the same.

The little musi-
clan again came out.
Once more she
sprang up, but —
Harry could hardly
believe his eyes —
this time she alighted
on the keyboard and
began to play a duet
all by herself! That
is, she played with
her feet as well as
her hands, or rather
.=" with her four hands,
since a monkey’s feet
are really only an ex-
tra pair of hands.

When the end of the
= “page was reached
JOKEK LEARNS TO PLAY. M’lle looked towards
the audience, paused,

bowed, and then turned over the leaf of her music with her tail.

Harry said, ‘‘ Joker, don’t you wish you could play as well?’’ Joker
sulked ; but from that time no one dared to leave the piano open in the
house where Joker lived, and Harry was sorry that he invited him to go
to the concert. ; Mary C. Crowley.





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LITTLE SO-SAT.

LITTLE SO-SAT.

So-sat nestled behind her
mother’s gown, the most fright-
ened little girl in the world.
She was a little Apache Indian
out at the San Carlos agency ;
she had always been as wild ©
and’as free as the birds; and
now the teachers had come to

_take her to school.

Her mother stooped down
and spoke to her, and this is
what she said, only she did
not speak in a tongue that we
should have understood if we
had been listening to her:
<< So-sat, go with them and
learn to do as the white people
do; this is the only way for the
Indians to live now. Be a
good little girl and mind the
white people just as you do
us.’’ She put her arms about

the child, and then led her gently toward the teachers.

This was the way that So-sat went to school when she was nine years
old. All the Indian children were frightened at first, but they grew
acquainted sooner than So-sat. The teachers did not know what to do
with this little one who whenever she could escape from their watchful-
ness ran into a corner and pulled her shawl over her head and very often
cried softly to herself under it. She was pretty and sweet and they loved
her and wanted her to be happy and to be like a little white girl, but they
did not know how they should begin to make her feel at home in the



AS SHE LOOKED IN HER PICTURE.



LITTLE SO-SAT.

school and the new ways. They tried to make her look at some of the
pretty pictures in books and papers that had been sent to the school for
the children, but she was .afraid to come forward, and when they held up
the pictures would hide her head as if something were going to hurt her.

One day So-sat was all alone in the schoolroom. She stood and looked
about her at the blackboards with the drawings on them, at the empty
benches, at the teacher’s table piled with books ; but she would not touch
anything here. At last she saw on another table for the children a paper
book with pictures on it. Softly she went up to it, closer and closer. She
saw on it a dog’s head, and a cat’s, and an owl’s, a girl’s and a boy’s, a
butterfly and a bee, and a funny little mouse, and a bird on a branch. She
could not read ‘‘ Our Little Men and Women ”’ on the cover, but she stood
looking at it. Then suddenly she took it up; she was frightened at first,
but she found it did not hurt her. And then she turned the cover.

_ When she had done this, she gave a little cry and stood looking in de-
light. There was a dog just like the dogs she had: seen in the Indian
camps, only he was sitting upright in a little girl’s lap, and he looked so
happy. And, oh! what a pretty little girl. So-sat looked and looked at
her, and thought that she would do anything and would never be afraid if
she could be as pretty as that. Her hair was all waved about her face.
So-sat put up her hand and found her own hair cut short.

Some of the other Indian children came into the room. Instead of run-
ning away as she used to do, So-sat ran to them and held out the picture.
They all began to talk about it, and So-sat laughed, which she had not
done before since she.came to school. And then the teacher told them how
to say ‘‘ girl’’ in English; they all tried it, and So-sat did well; this
made her laugh again.

And from this day she grew happy and would spend hours looking at
pretty books, but she always liked this one the best of all, and when she
had learned about the pictures she knew a great many English words and
was more like white children.

And this is the way in which some child who sent out her book to
this Indian school helped dear little So-sat to be happy and to learn white
people’s ways.

Frances C. Sparhawk.



A LITTLE BUILDER.





From the crest of a ridge

A spider said,
“¢¢T will build a bridge

Of silken thread.”’
She called the Wind from the river side,
‘¢ Please carry my line across the tide,
And knot to yon leafy branches wide.”’

See it quiver and quake
On air afloat,
Like the waning wake
Of a fairy boat !
The spinner pulled, with her hands so small ;"
Her silver thread was not fast at all —
<¢ More work,”’ said she, ‘‘ or my bridge will fall.”’

Patient spun she a length
That reached the goal,
And tested its strength
By a short patrol.
Passed over at leisure, casting a look
At her image in the amber brook,
Clung hard when the breeze her frail span shook.



THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS. \

Never yet has she thought
How rare a thing
Was thus simply wrought —
Not wealth of a king,
Nor skill of men who had learned at school
The careful use of each cunning tool,
Could match Arachne and nature’s rule.

Lavinia S. Goodwin.



THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS.





































































































































































































































































































































CLEARING THE TRACK OF LOCUSTS.



Once in about twenty years the
locusts come down upon North India
worse than the grasshoppers or apple-
tree worms ever came in America.

Many a time, last spring, you
would have thought that dark clouds
were gathering and that it was going
to rain. There would be a noise,
like a strong wind blowing, and then
locusts would begin to drop here and
there, instead of rain, and looking up
you would see that the whole air was
full of them.

When the locusts caught sight of
a field of tempting grain and began to
settle there, the poor farmers had to
fight with all their might. They

would rush out of their little, low, flat-roofed huts, with branches of trees
or white cloths, or whatever they could lay hands on, and shout and run
back and forth through the grain. Sometimes they would succeed in
frightening the locusts, and the great cloud would rise in the air again.
Then the farmers would sit down on the ground and laugh to see them go.



THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS.

Sometimes the trains were stopped, just as they are stopped in America,
in the winter, by snowdrifts. When there was something green growing
along the track a cloud of locusts would settle there till they covered
the ground and covered the railroad track, and still they would keep
coming till they piled up deeper and deeper, all trying to get at the green.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































IN THE FARMER’S GRAIN.

The engine might try to make its way through this dense black cloud
of locusts, but it crushed so many and made the track so slippery, that it
had to stop.

If the engineer saw the drift of locusts in time he would stop just be-

fore he ran into it. Then he and the fireman would break some branches
off the trees and walk ahead and try to clear the track by frightening
the locusts away. ;

It was a curious sight to see the engineer and fireman clearing a path
for the great express trains in this way, and sometimes the creatures were
so thick, and so determined to stay, that they were hours in working their
way through a single mile of them.



THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS.

The only thing which did not suffer from this greedy army was the
birds. The kites and the crows which live on insects had a fine time, till
they grew so fat and so lazy that they would hardly open their mouths to
pick up a locust right beside them.

When we saw how much damage the insects were doing we were very
glad to have something help us by eating them up, and we used to
watch with interest a large flock of kites and crows fly into one of
those clouds of locusts and pick out the largest of them as fast as they
could.

The kites had the best of it, for they caught the locusts in their claws
and ate them while they were flying, but the crows caught them in their































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE BIRDS FARED THE BEST,

beaks. Sometimes they would try to catch two, but then they had to
light somewhere and pick them to pieces before they could swallow them.
And all the while the kites kept right on in the midst of them.
We were all glad enough when the locusts disappeared.
Warren H. Frych.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.







aoe

¢











TRAVELING IN MEXICO.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

MONKEY HARVESTERS.

Granppapa took Harry and Joker with him upon a trip to Mexico.

‘© Ah! this is like India,’’ said Harry, ‘‘ only much more beautiful.”’

Grandpapa had come on business which made it necessary to go
on horseback far up into the country. Harry rode a pretty Mexican pony
named Chicha (Cheecha). Joker used to ride beside him. All three
were great friends.

Joker often wondered if any of his relations lived in Mexico. So far
he had not met any. One day, however, while riding past a corn field,
he caught sight of a troop of queer little folk making for it. By a pinch
he urged his young master to look that way.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

<¢ What is that moving yonder? Why, there are so many I could not
count them all; what can they be?’’ cried Harry, turning to the man
with the big hat and high boots, and silver lace on his clothes, who acted-
as guide.

*¢Qnly monkeys,’’ he answered, in broken English. ‘‘ The rogues !
they are earliest at the harvest. From behind these trees you can watch ”
them.’

The monkeys drew near. It was the strangest procession Harry ever
saw. An old fellow, the chief of the band, walked ahead upon two legs,
carrying a staff in his hand to help him keep upright. The others fol-

: lowed on all-fours, from
time to time looking to
him for directions.

Then by a queer noise
the leader called a halt.
He motioned to several
monkeys who took their
stand as sentinels at dif-
erent points; for they
seemed to think the owner
might object to having
his corn gleaned by such
harvesters. Then the chief
and the rest of the band
rushed in and began to
plunder and eat as fast
as they could.

After a while other
monkeys took the sen-
tinels’ places, and gave them a chance to rush in and plunder.

Now came the most curious part of it all. When the leader thought
they had eaten enough, he gave a‘signal. All stopped, but instead of
hurrying off each monkey picked up three or four fat ears of corn, and,
thus laden, the whole troop hied homeward as quietly as they had come.

Mary C. ‘Crowley.



IN THE CORN FIELD.



ROMAN GIRLS AND THEIR DOLLS.

ROMAN GIRLS AND THEIR DOLLS.

Everywhere in the world there have always been boys and girls, and
in nearly all countries boys have always played ball and girls have had
dolls. Travelers in far distant lands have found dolls that little children
played with ages ago. Some of the prettiest have been found in ancient
Rome, dolls of different kinds, lovely little images, some of carved wood,
some of ivory.

The ancient Romans were very strict with their children ; they ex-
pected them to take up the duties of grown people while they were very
young.

When a girl became old enough to leave off playing with dolls, her
giving them up was.an occasion of much ceremony.

Every Roman girl had her patron goddess to whom she prayed.
She might choose the beautiful Venus, or the huntress Diana, or’ Juno,
queen of all the gods. To her goddess she carried her dolls and hung
them in the temple before the shrine. She carried their clothes, too,
and sometimes all her other playthings.

This ceremony of giving up the dolls was done at different ages, in
different families. Some very strict parents required their children to
give up their toys at seven or eight years. This, I am glad to say, was
not common. :

Sometimes girls did not give up their dolls until the time of their
marriage. Then just before the wedding they had a great festival and
carried their dolls with much ceremony to the temple. .

Of course, on some occasions there were many girls offering their
dolls at once. It must have been a pretty sight when they ali went.
together in procession under the beautiful bright Italian sky to the tem-
ple, themselves and the dolls all dressed in their prettiest, while the
older people looked on and said :

“Well, they're grown-up women now —no more childish plays
for them !”

' Pamela McArthur Cole.





A ROMAN DOLL FESTIVAL.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.



THE MONKEY LINEMEN AT THEIR WORK.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
MONKEYS AND THE TELEGRAPH.

Granppapa’s business had to do-with building a ra‘lroad and carrying
a telegraph line across the wilds of Mexico. Every day for a week
our travelers rode on a hand car, while grandpapa inspected the work.

Harry was surprised to see many telegraph poles oui of place, and the
wires broken or trailing on the ground.

‘Ah!’ said the lineman, “the brigands have been here again.

‘‘Oh! they are nothing but monkeys,’’ he added. ‘‘ We may meet
some of the fellows before we get to our journey’s end.’’
_ Sure enough, before long they came upon a company toiling’ away as
if their wages depended upon getting through their work before night.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

About twenty were upon a single pole. Others swung on the wires
with all their might. There seemed as many as two hundred in all.

The men raised their rifles and shot into the group. ‘‘ Faster,’’ cried
. Harry’s friend. The car spun along the rails. Several monkeys fell
wounded, then the whole horde rushed for the car with a chattering which
scared Joker nearly out of his wits, and made Harry’s cheeks. grow pale.

The men spurred onward, but the monkeys gained upon them, catch-
ing up without stopping, any, stones or nuts that lay in their path, and
hurling them after the car. It was like a hailstorm. Harry had to duck



THEY WAGE WAR UPON THE LINEMEN.

his head to keep clear of them. Joker made himself as small as possible.
Another volley was fired, but still the monkeys continued the chase. They
were close upon the travelers; one, who wielded a heavy stick, actually
leaped upon the car; but grandpapa, parrying a blow, beat the rascal off
with his gun. At the same time fresh hands at the crank sent the car
‘bounding forward with renewed speed, and in a few minutes they were out
of reach of their pursuers.

When the excitement was over grandpapa said: ‘‘ Well, Harry, per-
haps you have heard the sending of misleading messages called ‘ monkeying
with the telegraph,’ but now you know that when this is said in Mexico it
means that real monkeys have been at work.”’ Mary C. Crowley.



HENRY M STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

HENRY M. STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

All children in England and
America know the wonderful
story of the English poorhouse
boy, Henry M. Stanley, the
African explorer, a story as
wonderful as “ Whittington
and His Cat;” how he came
to America and worked on the
great New York newspapers ;
how he was sent to Africa to
‘find David Livingstone who
had been lost in that country
for years, and how he found
the sick, gray-headed old trav-
eler at last; how he has since
been in “ darkest Africa” again
to look up another man who
was in trouble there, Emin
Pasha, and how in doing this
he made his way through terrible forests and deserts where no white
man ever before had set his foot.

You know, too, that he came home to England a few months ago
and was married to a lovely and noble Englishwoman, Miss Dorothy
Tennant, the artist.

The wedding was in Westminster Abbey, the grandest church in
England. The kings and princes of the world, and learned men, and
great people everywhere, were glad to go to the wedding of the famous
poorhouse boy, and to send gifts to his tall, beautiful bride.

When she went up the aisle she was followed by two little pages
dressed as you have seen the children of Charles 1. in Van Dyck’s pict-
ures. There were two small bridesmaids also, who were dressed to



























HENRY M. STANLEY,



HENRY M. STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

match the little pages, in long white gowns, with slender wreaths of
flowers and lockets of pretty gems.

On her way to the altar the bride laid a wreath on the tomb of Liv-
ingstone, the man Mr. Stanley first went to Africa to find; for Living-
stone is buried in the Abbey.

Mr, and Mrs. Stanley are now in America, and many of you have

}



MRS. HENRY M. STANLEY (Dorothy Tennant).

heard him lecture upon Africa, and perhaps have seen Mrs. Stanley too.
She is fond of children, of all children, but especially of the children of
the poor —those who run about in the streets all day like little dogs



HENRY M. STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

and cats, and wear rags. She loves to go among them and watch them
and draw pictures of them. I have seen many of her pictures, but not
one is of a rich, well-dressed child.

Mrs. Stanley says, in her book, that when she was a little girl she
began to draw children in tatters, and that she used to beg to be taken
to walk in the poorer parts of London, and that she used to resolve to
herself that when she grew up she “should be the champion painter of
the poor.”

Mrs. Stanley does not often paint pale little beggars, or sick children ;
she likes best to draw urchins at play, and tomboy girls, and happy,



MISS SILVIA MYERS AND MASTER LEO MYERS, BRIDESMAID AND PAGE AT THE STANLEY WEDDING.
(From a photograph by Mrs. F. W. H. Myers, their mother and Mrs. Stanley's sister.)
'

ragged babies. She says she likes to walk in the streets for hours
just to study babies’ arms and mouths and noses, and the way the
downy hair grows on the backs of their heads, and the way their



HENRY M. STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

clothes get huddled up, and the way their socks run down their bare
legs into their little boots.

The London street children like to go to Mrs. Stanley’s studio to be
painted. Once when she wished to find a little chimney sweep for a
model, one of the boys said if he could go into her sitting-room all by



LONDON STREET CHILDREN.
(Drawn by Dorothy Tennant — Mrs. Stanley.)

himself and sit down and think, he might know where he could get
one. He was gone so long that she went in; and what did she see but
Tommy half-way up the chimney, all soot and dirt, trying to make
himself look like a sweep to please her! He had spoiled a costly
Persian rug that lay before the grate, with the soot ; but she did not
mention it to him.

Her little models have sailed her piano too, for each one wishes
to be taught to play. “God save our gracious Queen!” is always
the piece they choose; and. I think Queen Victoria would be very

pleased to hear of that!
Sophie Scissors.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.



















































































































































|

|

ie
i



Q iy an my on ime

JOKER SALUTES THE SKYE TERRIER.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A BRASS MONKEY.

Durine October Harry and Joker went-to New York. One day they -
called with grandpapa at a house on Madison Avenue. In answer to their
ring a bright skye terrier followed the servant.to the door. He greeted
Harry with a shrill bark, but stopped in amazement at sight of Joker.

He was about to spring at the intruder, when Joker raised his hand,
and lifting his shining beaver, made a low bow to the inhospitable terrier.

Mr. Skye was ashamed of himself. He slunk away to a corner and
would not come out during the visit. ; .

Our friends were shown into the library. Here Joker saw how the
dog came to know him. Perched upon the back of a chair near the fire



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

was a very beautiful monkey. It was not dressed up, but its natural coat
was of a golden color, with a glint of red bronze about the head and tail.
It had eyes of a deep blue, and bright as gems, and teeth like pearls.

The host came in. He shook hands with grandpapa and Harry, and
said to Joker : ‘‘ Glad to know you, sir. I have a relation of yours here.”’

He stroked the head of the splendid creature upon the chair. The
yellow ape sprang upon his arm, then to his shoulder, where it sat with
its great eyes fixed upon the monkey caller.

‘¢ Who is that?’’ asked the gentleman, pointing to Joker. The pet



A RELATION OF JOKER'S,

opened its mouth wide, showing a deep red cavern and a wagging tongue,
as it replied in plain English, ‘‘ Ba-by.”’

Joker was dumb with rage and surprise.

The strange monkey then glared at Joker, and said: ‘‘ Hie, you’re a
cheat! You’re a cheat! ”’

Joker made a dash at him, and would have torn the gleaming figure
to pieces if the gentleman had not hastily thrust it into a cabinet.

‘¢We must be going,’’ said grandpapa.

‘¢Ho! ho!’’ laughed Harry, when they reached the street. or :
think, Joker, that you were fooled by a brass monkey ! ’’

Joker was glum all the way home.

Mary C. Crowley.



HOW BESSIE SAVED HER DOLLS.— SCAT! '

HOW BESSIE SAVED HER DOLLS.

Some years ago the city of Key West was all in flames. The people
were in a panic; they felt that the whole city would be burned.

Among the men, women and children that crowded the sidewalks,
and ran to and fro trying in vain to save property and. goods, was little
Bessie Harris, the daughter of Dr. Harris. All at once she heard a
man say that the money and valuables in the bank of Key West were
being sent on board the revenue steamer Dix for safety. She hurried -
home, and gathered in her arms her two wax dolls with their clothes,
and then she ran through the streets all alone, through the blinding
smoke and the flying cinders, unti] she reached the wharf at the light-
house, where the steamer Dix was moored.

Bessie hurried on board the boat and into the cabin of the captain.
She laid the dolls in the lap of the astonished man, and threw her arms
about his neck, and begged him to save her darlings.

The captain kissed her and made her a faithful promise. Then he
sent a big, strong sailor to take the little girl back to her home.

Those two dolls occupied the post of honor on the steamer Dix, sur-
rounded by government bonds and bank notes, and bags of gold and
silver. But none of the valuables were more precious than Bessie’s
dolls; they were safely guarded until all danger was vassed, and then
they were sent back to the anxious little mother.

Will M. Clemens.

Scat !
A naughty cat,
I’m sure you'll think,
To do like that
With papa’s ink!
Scat !







THE NEW WHIP.
(From the painting by C. Burton Barber.)



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.





















































AT THE ZQO,

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A MONKEY’S NEIGHBORS.

One morning Joker went to call upon his cousins at the Zoo.

In his trip around the gardens he stopped to say, ‘‘ How do you do? ”’
to a black ape named Mischief, whose cage was under that of a bright-
hued cockatoo. The monkey was having a grand frolic. His handsome
neighbor kept crying that he would shake her house down.

At last she spied his tail sticking through the top of the cage and
pounced upon it, holding it fast with her claws and beak. He tried to
free himself, but Miss Cockatoo would not let go. He pulled the tail away,
but at the cost of the hair.

The monkey crept to a corner. A keeper came along, and seeing



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

that there had been trouble, moved the cockatoo’s cage across the aisle.

At this point Joker took from his coat pocket a tiny mirror, into which
he was fond of peeping. Mischief grabbed it. A ray of sunlight shone
upon the mirror. He moved the glass; the reflection danced about, spark-
ling first upon one object, then upon another. Finally it struck the cocka-
too’s cage. She shrieked with terror, and hid her head under her wing.

‘** Ha, ha, madam!’’ said he; ‘‘ now I’ll pay you back.’’

Every time Miss Cockatoo looked up, the monkey would flash the light
into her eyes, leering at Joker when she fluttered and cried with fright.

Ov
Ss

j
y

f
:

SN
S

WN\ SS

\
\



AN UNPRINCIPLED MONKEY.

Next door to Mischief lived a peacock. ‘‘I’ll fix him, too,’’ said he.

Placing a bit of bread where this neighbor could see it, he waited. _

The peacock snapped up the bait, but at the same moment Mischief
thrust his hand between the bars of the cage and caught at its gorgeous
tail. The bird got away, but minus several beautiful feathers.

The noise brought the keeper to the spot... In vain he threatened and
coaxed ; Mischief would not give up the feathers.

Harry held out to him a cooky he had brought for Joker.

Dropping his prize, Mischief seized the cake and began to eat it,
while the keeper secured the feathers.

Harry divided a cooky between the peacock and the cockatoo, and Joker

mumbled something about his ill-mannered relations. Mary C. Crowley.



MY MISTAKE.— THE CHILDREN’S WAY.

MY MISTAKE.

‘I saw him leaning ’gainst a tree
Within a city square,

A tiny, little, ragged chap,
With curly chestnut hair.

One arm, half covered by a sleeve,
Concealed his face from sight ;

The cold fall wind was blowing strong,
Although the sun Shone bright.

“Why are you crying, little one?”
I stroked the curly head ;

“Perhaps you're hungry, cold, or hurt,
Or lost,” I gently said. /

He turned a smiling face to me
E’re I had ceased to ee
“] ain’t a-crying, ma'am ;” he said,
“Tm playin’ hide-and- ae
Cornelia Redmond.

THE CHILDREN’S WAY.

Just as the clock struck seven, the three Brown ‘children tumbled
pell-mell into the house, dropped their hats on the hall floor, and rushed
into the supper-room.

Mamma Brown was just sending out the “hot dish” to be kept
warm for.them.

3



THE CHILDREN’S WAY.

“ Why, children, where have you been?” she exclaimed in astonish-
ment, just as if the little Browns had not been quite as late every
night for a week, just as if they were hot usually as late four nights
out of every six.

“Oh,” cried Bess, before her brothers could speak, “I was having
just the loveliest time at tag, down at Della’s; I forgot all about



THE BUSY B’S IN THE B-HIVE.

that it was supper-time — and really couldn’ t have come if I had
remembered ! ”

“ And her brother Tom has the jolliest tool-chest that ever you
saw,” put in Bob; and Bert added, “ Yes, mamma, we were up in
his play-attic — that’s what they call it—making things—a water-
wheel, and ” — “a derrick and a scroll-saw bracket and a book-case,”
finished Bob. 7

“ And we're as hungry as the ‘ three bears,’ ” cried Bess, who never
waited for her brothers to say the things boys usually do say.



THE CHILDREN’S WAY.

“ Yes,” said Mamma Brown, “no doubt it was very enjoyable, but
all the same these irregular meal times are bad for children’s stomachs,
and unhappy heads and undeveloped muscles result. Besides, it” —

“Tips over all the household arrangements, ” finished Bob, where-
upon all laughed; even Mamma Brown herself smiled to hear her own
frequent phrase.

“ Well, it does that,” said she ; “but worse still is this finding of all
your pleasures away from home. One night it is down the street, an-
other it is up the street, the next it is over the way. Now,” and
Mamma Brown spoke so seriously that even Bob looked thoughtfully
at the sponge cake, “something must be done about it, or you'll be
weaned of the home-nest before you are half-fledged. I shall talk with
Papa Brown about it this very night.”

Bob suddenly looked up from the sponge cake, with a quick light
in his eye as if he had discovered some great and golden secret in the
yellow cubes:

“Tl tell you the very thing that will do it, Mamma Brown —
and Papa Brown will vote for it too, I know — give us a play-attic like
Tom's !”

“Yes, yes,” cried Bess and Bert, so near in a breath I’m not sure
which spoke first.

But I am sure it was Bert who added, “ With scroll saws and jig
saws and chisels and planes and hammers and nails and thin boards
and knives and all the fixings.” ;

* And all sorts of knitting needles, and crochet cecdiee and drawing
pencils, and water colors,” cried Bess.

Bob added modeling clay, and a little library of books telling how
to do things, Indian clubs and a lot of gymnastic apparatus.

Well, Papa Brown voted “ yea,” with both hands, and the children
had their way.

They called their play-attic the “ B-hive,” and soon the three Brown
children were known as “the busy B’s.”

At last reports the “hot dish” had not been sent out to be kept
warm for them for over a month.

C. P. Stuart.













—~

E SHIP.

THE BUILDING OF TH



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

A
Fille “A saat CY
t X\ a .

Pe

v ,
"Gi, PAL sted i wk
tee Me oe RO Cy.
feat Z
ey S Mitide_
(— eS
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es Tm, nly SOT,
AYRES - . i

THE MONKEYS ARE TRAPPED.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
CHRISTMAS MONKEYS.

Ir was a cold night in December. Harry and Joker were sitting by
the fire listening to the stories of an old East Indian hunter. Joker had a
toothache. He was curled up on a hassock, and kept putting his hand to
his face; but every little while, in his interest in watching the stranger,
he forgot to moan and look solemn.

«¢ Ah!’ said the gentleman, glancing down at our monkey friend’s
new red stockings and wee slippers, ‘‘ those funny feet remind: me of a
trick by which a whole colony of monkeys may be caught at once.’’

And the hunter went on to relate how another hunter had some tiny



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

top boots made, which he carried into a grove where monkeys live. He
put his bundle under a great tree and threw himself upon the ground.

He began to pull off his boots and then to put them on again. The
monkeys eyed him curiously. Presently he got up and went away. Then
the rogues scrambled down and each secured a pair of boots. They slipped

their feet into them.

The hunter ran back. The monkeys tried to pull off their boots and
scamper up the tree again, but they all were a tight fit.

So the hunter ae twenty or thirty monkeys and carried them off
in his pack.

The old hunter went on talking to Grandpapa. Joker began to doze.
Harry sat looking into the fire. Suddenly a road opened in the midst of

-— yh ;

Let

IN FRONT OF THE GLOWING COALS,



the glowing coals which seemed to lead to the end of the earth. - Harry
was asleep too. Monkeys were capering about in seven-league boots.
They had come to bid Joker good-by.

Harry looked across at the old hunter. He had changed into Santa
Claus. He was crowding the monkeys into a big book.

‘‘Ha, ha! ’’ laughed he. ‘‘ See all these monkeys that have been
caught in the Christmas stockings of Our Lrrrnz Men anp Women! ”’

Mary C. Crowley.







La lira es stl alll

f

all

Ht

E



AFTER THE CIRCUS.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.









HARRY PICKED UP A PIECE OF QUARTZ,

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS. |
MONKEY GOLD MINERS.

Harry came to the United States, to visit his Grandpapa in South
Carolina. Joker was’ glad to come, he had heard so much -about his
American cousins.

One day Grandpapa took them to see a gold mine. Harry did not
pay much attention to the work itself. He was interested in a “gang of
tiny laborers which Joker watched in surprise.

These were twenty-four monkeys.

‘* At first we had only two, which were pets,’’ said the overseer ;
‘* but finding that these liked to play at helping the miners, I bought more



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

and set them to work. We have no strict rules for them, but they come
and go with the men, and are very steady.’’

The monkeys glanced slyly at the visitors, but went on with what they
were doing. : :

Harry picked up.a piece of quartz to look at the specks of gold in it,
but at once four or five monkeys sprang at him, scolding and chattering,
and took it out of his hand.

‘«They always do so,’’ said the overseer. ‘‘ Sometimes the men
tease the monkeys by pretending to steal a piece of ore, but they always
make them put it back.’’ :

Several of the smartest monkeys were showing sume new ones how to
work. up. and tried to insist upon
teaching Joker, but he drew
away with a grand air, saying :
“‘ Wands off! Don’t you see
T’magentleman? I never did
anything useful in my life.’’

‘¢Then you ought to be
ashamed of yourself! ’’ said

‘the monkey miner gruffly, and
the whole gang began to jeer
at Joker.

When the horn sounded for
dinner, the monkeys stopped
work and scampered towards
a shed which was their board-

DINNER-TIME. ing-house. Harry and Joker

walked over there, too. They

found the little laborers seated in a row around the wall. A darky passed
to each a piece of corn bread, which was eaten with arelish. He said they
liked it better than any other food. Next, every monkey had a drink of
water out of a tin cup. After that they rested, or played pranks for an
hour, when the horn blew and they went to work again. ;
Mary C. Crowley.





a

Rare



MYLORD AND FLOD.

Edwin Landseer.)

or

(After the picture by S



“IN A MINUTE.”

“Tf you start at once, Charlie, you'll have time to take this basket
to Mrs. Smith on Clinton Street, and get to school by nine o’clock,
There are jellies and things for her sick daughter. Be sure to tell her,
too, she will find the money for the sewing she did, in a paper at the
bottom of the basket. I put it there so it wouldn’t get lost. I meant
to take it over myself, but it’s too warm this morning for me to walk so
far, and I don’t like to
have her wait.”

“ All right, mamma.
I will be ready in a
minute.”

“Tn a minute” was
a great word with Char-
lie. He always thought
there was time enough.

“ Well, hurry,” said
his mother. “Get your
books, and here’s the
basket.”

The Bartons lived
nearly a mile from the

CHARLIE KNEW HE WOULD BE TARDY. ss village where Charlie

went to school. Charlie

liked to go “cross lots” as far as he could, especially on so pleasant

a morning as this. The birds sang and the air was full of sweet odors

from the new-mown hay. There had been plenty of sun and rain to.

make the grass grow, and the farmers said they seldom cut the first
growth so early.

“Lots of time,” thought Charlie; so he set down the basket in a
safe place, and rambled about. He could whistle-very well for a small
boy, and he often tried to see if the birds would answer him.





“IN A MINUTE.”

It was a very warm morning and he began to feel the heat.

“T’ll sit down on the grass and cool off before I go,” he said. He
threw down his hat by the basket and wiped his flushed face.

But what was that! He counted.

“ One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine,” the town clock
called across the fields. And he thought the echo said, “Tardy this
time !” :

The first thing he did was to cry —don’t blame him, he was such a
little fellow! Then he put on his hat, picked up the basket, and ran ~
nearly every step of the way to Mrs. Smith’s house.

When he reached it the queerest things were going on. A rough
man was setting rickety old chairs and tables into the street, and Mrs.
Smith was crying.

Charlie told his mother’s message in a breathless way. Mrs. Smith
dived down to the bottom of the basket in a hurry. She fished out the
money, looked at it, and fairly shook a bill in the man’s face.

“There!” she cried, “ take that to Mr. Hardman. It’s the month’s
rent, an’ a week ahead. I only wish it had come half an hour ago,
before I had to move Jenny across the way. I’m afraid ’twill kill the
child, she’s that weak. Bless your mother, boy, she’s kept the roof
over my head, but my poor girl’s been dreadful shook up this morning,
she has.”

Then Charlie knew how much his loitering had cost these poor
people.

He hurried on to school. Of course he had a tardy mark, which
meant that not only he but all the others in his room must stay after
school. The rule worked well, for it became a point of honor not to
make others suffer for one’s own wrong-doing. Charlie felt the disgrace
keenly.

He told his mother when he reached home, for he was a truthful
boy ; and she was grieved.

“Tl never say ‘In a minute’ again, ” he thought.

Altogether it was a miserable time, and all because Charlie Barton
played by the way.

A. A,











































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CONSULTING THE CLERK OF THE WEATHER.



TOMMY.

TOMMY.

Cecil’s papa, Dr. Tem-
ple, was only a boy when
his father (the “old doc-
tor”) gave him the little
white colt of long pedi-
gree; and there were many
funny times while the boy
and the colt were learning
their business in life.

Tommy is now twenty-
one, but he will stand
straight in the air and

_then fly away if the least
sniff of fire-works meets
his sensitive nostrils; he
is still “ coltish” and likes
to kick up his heels in the
pasture.

He is the family horse
and goes to church every
Sunday; if for any rea-
son he is driven past the

- church door on Sunday, after the early bell has rung, he seems vexed.

He is fond of Cecil’s mamma, and insists on walking carefully down
every hill when she rides, and he neighs if he hears her voice. He is
very happy when she comes to the pasture fence to pay him a call.

But Tommy does so love little girls! Cecil is a little girl. He
likes to help her eat her pears. and apples and johnny-cake. Like
other little girls Cecil often runs about while she is eating an apple or
a cookie, and sometimes Tommy takes off her hat to remind her that
he likes what she eats; he even unties his halter and follows her.



TOMMY, AND CECIL’S MAMMA,

\



TOMMY.

When Cecil was five years old she wished to go in the wagon-shed
to see the new kittens, but the horse and carriage stood across the
entrance.

“J s’all come, Tommy,” said she; and under him she went.
Tommy put his head down to watch her, but he stood quite still until
she was out of danger; then he began to paw the ground.

Tommy knows if any strap is not right, and if ever anything is
wrong about the carriage or harness he stops.

One day Cecil was leaning against his leg, chatting with a little
cousin, when a frightened auntie saw that she accented her talk with
little pinches of the shining black skin, and now and then a pull at a
hair of the long tail; Tommy trembled a little, but he made no other
motion.

Tommy even lets Periwinkle, the cat, use his legs for ladders, for
nothing pleases the cat more than to sit on Tommy’s back and watch
for any mouse that may be hunting in the stall for a bit of grain.
Periwinkle always sits.xp like a dog to Tommy and “asks” when about
to run up Tommy’s leg.

Tommy went to make a “professional call” one day. He grew
tired of waiting for his master and went off alone, to the house of a
very sick man; he stood a while before the door, and then turned to-
ward home. He met his master, and had to go back and make a
second visit. Dr. Temple told the story to his patient, and the sick
man laughed so hard that a longed-for perspiration appeared, and he
got well. ° ; Adelaide Cilley Waldron.



VERY STYLISH.



DOT’S CALL.

DOT’S CALL. ,

Long ago when Dot was a little girl she went abroad, and one day
she made the acquaintance of two little girls whom she has never
forgotten.

cane was digging away i re sand, and suddenly as she looked up,
she saw two queer children. They were standing right before her.
Dot leaned back on her little sand shovel and looked at them and they
looked at her. Dot thinks they never would have spoken if she had
not spoken first.

“ You are little Dutch girls, aren’t you?” she said.

They nodded. They understood some English, because so many
travelers came there.

« And, little Dutch girls, where do you live?” Dot asked ae

They pointed to a small fishing hut near by, and the next thing
that Dot did was to propose that they go home, and that she go
with them.

They went without a word, and Dot too. The hut stood a little
back from the water, and was protected from the tide by a long bank
of sand. There was an old cook stove, chairs, a table and two bunks
where the little girls said their father and brother slept. Dot saw an
old sail hanging in one corner, and she went and looked behind it. There
was a bed made on the floor. “Little Dutch girls, is this your bed-
room ?” she asked.

The children nodded as before.

Then they put a kettle on the stove and’ poured in some -clams,
and in a very short time they offered their caller a big blue bowl of
hot clam broth. Dot ate the bowl of broth, and then she said, “I must
go now, Dutch children, ne I will come again to-morrow. I am | ever
So sorry you are so poor.”

Dot is a woman now, but she sien thinks of those little girls, and
feels ashamed of herself.

Annabel B.



DOT MAKES NEW ACQUAINTANCRS.





FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

HEN I was a small girl my
teacher called on me to write
a composition about “ Fruit,”
and I thought I had a rich
subject. After I had written
all that I knew about apples,
pears, peaches, grapes, plums,

cherries, melons, berries, oranges, bananas, lemons

and pineapples, I thought I had told of all the

“) fruits on earth. :

Years afterward, I went down into the Torrid
Zone, and when our ship would anchor in the har-
bors of the West Indies or Brazil, I was surprised
and delighted as the -

ORANGE BLossoms anp AtUit boats would come

FRUIT. around us, loaded down

with many fruits un-

known to me, red, yellow or purple, and of

delicious flavor; sometimes there would be

bright-colored parrots or chattering mon-
keys perched among the shining clusters.

Then too there are often many kinds
of one fruit.

There are at least several dozen kinds
of oranges. The wild ones have the thick-
est skins and are called bitter-sweets.

The most delicate orange is the tan-
gerine, sometimes called the spice orange,
or kid glove orange. The inside, as it
ripens, becomes smaller than the rind, and
will rattle if shaken.




THE BANANA,



“RESTLESS!”

There are also many varieties of bananas. Bananas must all be cut
green, as the fruit bursts if allowed to ripen on the tree.
The tree looks like a large lily plant, with shining leaves a yard long.
It bears but one bunch of fruit, and must then be cut down, to make
room for the young trees which sprout up around it.
Anna R. Henderson.





CHRISTMAS EVERGREENS; THE TUG-OF-WAR.



“ RESTLESS!”
( See neat page.)

The little drawings of fowl and barnyard birds in the picture called
“Restless!” were made at a Poultry Show in England. The artist was
much amused by the queer doings of the Cochins and Brahmas, the
gamecocks and pigeons, and caught the fun in his sketches. The
fowl made many sorts of gestures, took many sorts of attitudes; but,
one and all, they were impatient at being shut up and looked at by ten
thousand people. S. 8.



HOW LITA HELPED. ;

HOW LITA HELPED.

Early one morning Lita was in great distress; so unhappy!

A big oak-tree stands close to our house, and one warm May day
Lita had discovered a nest on one of the limbs. Mr. and Mrs. Robin
had built it, and it was all finished and we had known nothing about it.

From this time on, Lita had gone every morning to the chamber
- window and looked down to see if the nest was all right. And Mrs.
Robin was always there, sitting patiently.

After a while Lita had joyfully announced a discovery. There
were some little birdies peering out from the feathers of Mrs. Robin ;
and when Mrs. Robin flew off, Lita had counted four baby robins. To
and fro, day after day, Mrs. Robin had flown, feeding the hungry little
mouths, and always to Lita’s fresh delight.

But this morning, early, we all had heard a great chattering and
scolding at our oak. We could not learn the cause. But when Lita
looked from a lower window she saw the poor robin babies had fallen
to the ground, and the nest was tipped sharply toone side. The parent
robins were not to be seen. But when we all went out to the tree to
pick up the little birds, we heard the old birds twitter fiercely.

Only two of the darlings were alive. Lita said we must make a
home for these. But how? We had no ladder with which the old
nest could be reached. Nor was it safe to make a nest on the ground.

In a moment or two Lita had a happy thought. She brought a
small basket in which she had put some cotton and other soft stuff, and
we set the two little birds into it. Then we hung it for her on a limb
as high as could be reached from a step-ladder. __

; At first the parent robins would not go to the basket. Lita said

they were afraid of some trick. They would fly about and sometimes
come close to the basket; after awhile Mrs. Robin flew into it. Such a
chattering as there was then! After that the parent robins fed the
little birds just as before, as though nothing had happened.

Surely Lita has had a hand in a great happiness. F. EB. Saville.





‘¢ RESTLESS! ’? — SKETCHES AT A POULTRY SHOW.



FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND. —II.

Bs

YAS
bbdadat aber Darred sa ldadal LL ihr
ry rie EN Ret 7
2 \\" 7

A

NE

gr

A COCOA-NUT-TREE,

plant if it is se

before they: ripen.

Did: you ever eat guava jelly?




HE cocoa-nut-tree grows to a height of fifty or

sixty feet. It has no branches, but it has a
cluster of long-stemmed leaves at the very
top. Under this cluster are bunches of great
nuts. These nuts are inclosed in a fibrous
sheath which is two inches thick. This
sheath, when cut off, makes a good scrubbing-
brush. Before the nut is ripe the inside is
soft and creamy, and may be eaten with a

spoon; this becomes hard white nut-meat before we
buy them at the North.

Do you like those three-sided brown Brazil nuts ?
Do you know that several of them grow together
inside a larger shell, almost as big as a cocoa-nut?
they fit:in together like the lobes of an orange?

I have heard of children who thought pine-
apples grew on trees that resembled pine-trees.
Pine-apples grow on little plants which are set in
rows in fields, The
crown of each pine-
apple makes.:a new
t in the ground.
There are several -varieties. The
apples when freshly picked are much
better and juicier than those bought
in Northern lands which are gathered



A’ PINE-APPLE’ PLANT.

The guava looks somewhat. like ace .
a quince, but: the meat is pirtk and it has small hard seeds. “There
is a fruit that looks much like the guava, which is called the areca.



Full Text


Lorarop Pusrisnine (OMPANY |
Boston.




























The Baldwin Library

RmB vice












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*













TALES IN THE KITCHEN

FOR CLEVER CHILDREN



“ FULLY ILLUSTRATED

BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY
“LoTHRoP “PUBLISHING COMPANY. ~



Es soe Ss : All rights reserved.




To a little stranger from the North,

Who was timid and shy of speech,
We gave — the first she had ever seen —
_ A ripe, beautiful, downy peach.

We caught one glimpse of her big blue eyes
From her drooping lashes beneath,
As into the peach’s curving side
* Went her sharp little milk-white teeth.

She ‘spoke not a word-till all was gone,
Then she cried in a joyous tone;
‘¢]’ve eaten it, cloth and all, mamma,
Now what shall I do with the bone? ’*™-
~ Eleanor A. Hunter.
SUGAR THIEF!

SUGAR THIEF!

Nan was fond of sugar; she often helped herself without being asked.

‘‘Dear me! ’’ said mamma one day, ‘‘ this must be stopped, or we
shall have Nan ill.’”’ So calling her little girl to her, she said :

‘Now, Nan, you must not take any more sugar without asking. Do
you understand ? ’’ ;

“© Yes’m,’’ answered Nan. But though she did understand very well,
I am not at all sure that even then she intended to obey, for it was that
very same evening that what I am going to tell you about happened.

Mamma had company at supper, and Nan was seated beside a gentle-
man of whom she was very fond. He had been telling her a funny story,
and had passed everything to her ‘‘just ’zif I was grown up,”’ said she
to herself’; but now he had turned away, and was talking to sister Kate.
Just at that moment mamma passed Nan her ‘‘cambric tea.’’ Nan
tasted it, and looked as though she did not like it very well, and glanced
longingly at the sugar bowl. But suddenly her face lighted up, and she
slipped her hand into her pocket. When it came out there was a lump
of sugar between her finger and thumb. One; two, three, four, five, six,
seven lumps went into the cambric tea.

‘©Why, Nan!’’:.Nan looked up with a start, and blushed crimson.
Everybody at the table was looking at her, her dear friend among them,
and Nan thought he must feel very, very badly to put his handkerchief

-up to his face like that.

But that was not the end of it. The next morning mamma came to
Nan with a large piece of cardboard, on which was printed, ‘‘ Sugar thief.’

«¢ What’s it for, mamma?’’ asked Nan, in rather a shaky voice.

‘¢ For this,’’ and mamma turned Nan. around and pinned it on her back.

‘¢Now,’’ she said, ‘‘ you must-wear this all day, unless,’’ she added,
‘< you forgot what I told-you about taking sugar yesterday ; did you? ”’

‘*No, mamma,” said Nan, looking down, ‘‘I didn’t forget.’’

‘Very well, then; and now you may go. out and play if you want to.’’

‘¢ Must I go out, mamma? ’”’ Smee
SUGAR THIEF!




i]



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fi

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NAN IS HUMILIATED,

‘¢Not unless you want to,’’ said her mother.

‘¢ May I stay in my oe *

‘¢ Certainly, if you choose.’

And so all that long day Nan staid in.her room, and when at night
mamma came to take off the cardboard, Nan told her that she never,
never would take sugar any more without asking.

Annie L. Hannah.

a
TICACHEE AND HER QUEER BABY.



WITH HER YAM BABY. =

TICACHEE AND HER QUEER BABY.

Ticacnre lived on an island home. Great white-winged ships went
sailing by. Sometimes they stopped there; then what a hurrying to take
them tropical fruits to exchange for what the ships carried !

Little Ticachee had only one of the queer-shaped yams, which grow
abundantly in that sunny clime, for a baby. Her yam had prongs for
arms, head and legs; around its. body she fitted the loose: girdle cloth.
— the only garment worn in that land.

Ticachee often waded out into the warm sea-tide, to. give her baby
a bath. Once her little brother Octatamee followed, toddling along. . He
was only:a baby, and as he could not swim, he came near drowning.

When Ticachee saw him, she dropped her precious yam baby right
into the sea, and bravely striking out, rescued her little brother, and carried
him to their palm-leaf-covered home and his mother’s arms. —

When Octatamee was asleep on a leaf-made mat, -Ticachee wandered
back to where the surf washed above her dear little yam baby. Do you |
think it strange that Ticachee shed a few tears? She had mothered it
so much ! _ rs. S. Rosalie Sill. —

&










































































































































































































A LAP FULI.
A GREAT SURPRISE.



THE HOLY FAMILY.



A GREAT SURPRISE.

Twas just the jolliest. surprise
Of our whole Christmas Day, because
The door swung back before our eyes,
And there stood Mrs. Santa Claus!

She wore a dress of scarlet bright,
A big fur cloak and collar too;
A GREAT SURPRISE.

Her bonnet was a monstrous fright ;
Her eyes were all that sparkled through.

“© Q, dear!’’ she cried, quite out of breath,
*¢T’ve run till I can hardly limp,

And worried too, almost to death,
And got my hair all out of crimp !

‘* For Santa Claus, dear soul and kind —
Just fancy how the good man feels —
Had really so much on his mind
He quite forgot those small MacNeils.

‘And so I had to scurry round —
I always have to at the end —

And bring the few odd things I found ;
Perhaps you’ve something you could send?

“¢T thought I’d just step in and see ’’ —
And then there was an awful pause,
And Mrs. Santa looked at me,
And I at Mrs. Santa Claus.

I could not give my new wax doll,
Nor my new music-box, could you?

But Tom just seized a book and ball,
And after Mrs. Santa flew.

And then I felt so very queer,

IT took Christina Mirabeau —

She was my Christmas doll last year —
- And firmly told her she must go!

And dear mamma — I saw her watch
And wipe a glimmer from her eye —
A GREAT SURPRISE.

Said, though those small MacNeils were Scotch,
Perhaps they’d like our Christmas pie.

Indeed, they were the most amazed,
Those small MacNeils, that pie to see!

And Annie Laurie sat and gazed
Entranced on Mirabeau and me,

While Rob and Andy crowded near,
And little Ailie tried to hide ;

And, what was very, very queer,
Their truly grown-up mother cried !

“Sit ye, Dame Santa Claus awhile ;
Ye’ll ne’er disguise yoursel frae me,”’
She said at-last. ‘‘ I know your smile ;
I know your sweet and winsome ee.”’

We looked at Mrs. Santa Claus ;
Her cloak and bonnet — off they fell !
You should have heard the wild applause,
For there stood — our own Auntie Belle!

She’d sent a carriage-load of things,
And dainties for a dozen meals ;

And next year, when the Christ-bell rings,
We’ll not forget those small MacNeils.

Emma Huntington Nason.



WINTER FUN,
ata Oe

Sse ee































































FRO.

TO AND

UP AND DOWN,
THE THREE T’S.

THE THREE 1’S. —I.

Sopuiz has three little brothers; their names are Tim, Tom and POE
and she calls them the three T’s. .

One day Aunt Jane gave each one a fine cactus; she said they would
bear large pink flowers. the next winter, if they gave them plenty of sun-
shine and very little water, for they come from a dry country and do not

Pea eras ] Ree er en et ee









SOPHIE HAS: A DREAM ABOUT THE THREE T'S.

like to be wet. Each pot bore the name of the owner in red paint, Tim’s
being the biggest, because he was the eldest.

But in spite of Aunt Jane’s warning the three T’s would fill ‘the green
watering-pot full to the brim, and take turns in holding it over the
plants, feeling the greatest delight in the fine spray that poured out.

Their mother told them that they were foolish little boys, and Sophie
advised and scolded. One night she had a dream about them.

She saw the three pots standing 1 in a row on her table before the open
window. But they did not seem to be exactly flower-pots, but were
the three T’s, who, in some queer way, were shaped like pots, and had
plants growing out of their heads; each had his name painted on the
THE THREE T’S.

rim, and they were bowing and capering about in a very funny way.
She cried, ‘‘ Teddy dear, don’t!’’ but he did not seem to know her.

Soon she saw little spots coming all over them, which grew very fast
into large flowers, but the pots danced about so that the buds fell off as
fast as they opened. Sophie became more and more distressed. ‘*Tim!”’
she cried, ‘‘don’t you see what you are doing ?”’

Just at this moment:the big green watering-pot jumped on the table
full of water; Sophie seized it, and began drenching the ill-behaved
plants, or boys, whichever they were, with water.

They tried hard to get out of the way, and finally Tim ducked, and
jumped out of the window, where he broke to pieces with a great crash.

Sophie screamed, but continued to pour on water until Tom whirled
out of the window, followed by Ted ; they made a dreadful crash as they fell.

At this Sophie threw the watering-pot after them and screamed with
all her might, waking herself up.

Her mother came hurrying into the room to see what was the matter.

«
‘‘Why, they’re all right,”’ said her mother; but the little dreamer
could not go to sleep again until she had seen with her own eyes that they

were all safe, and sound ae in their little white beds.
Clara G. Dolliver.





ENJOYING MAY DAY.
SHY LITTLE ALICE.

SHY LITTLE ALICE.

‘« Now, my dear, won’t you shake hands with me before I go?”’,

Miss Kendall was such a sweet, pretty young lady. She had been
away on a visit to New York, and only returned last week. Now she was
calling on Mrs. Worthington, who is Alice’s mamma.

Such a bright home Alice had. The room where they sat looked like a
conservatory, but it wasn’t. Mrs. Worthington filled the low mantel with
flowers, which were seen again in the mirror. As arule, flowers are more
beautiful than people, and so Mrs. Worthington was wise.

- Miss Kendall talked of what she saw in the great city. :

‘‘T must tell Alice about the Hospital for dear: little babies. There
were rows and rows of babies, not one of them over two years old. Some -
of them had as sweet faces as I ever saw, but others looked so ill and
wasted.’’

‘¢ How pitiful,’’ said ve Worthington.

‘Yes, indeed ; but itis good to know they can be taken care of. Some
were toddling about and had their dolls. I remember one wretched rag
bahy, but the little mother hugged it as if it had been a Paris doll.
Wouldn’t you like to send them a doll or two, Alice ? ”’

Now Alice actually owned ten doll babies, and at that very minute she
was trying to make up her mind how many she could part with to send to
these forlorn human babies. Yet, when. Miss Kendall. asked. her, she
couldn’t say a word, she was so shy.

Her mamma answered for her, ‘‘I am sure my daughter will be
glad to give some of her treasures,’ and Alice smiled with her heart in
her eyes. ©

But when Miss Kendall offered her hand at parting, Alice could
not muster courage to lay her own Huts Rand in it, though she wanted to
very much.

It is painful to be so shy, and we may hope Alice will get over it when
she is older.

Helen A. Hawley. -









THE THREE T’S.

THE THREE T’S. —II.

Tue next day their mother said to the three little boys as they sat at
the supper-table, ‘‘ Aunt Jane is coming to-morrow.’

‘*T wonder if she will want to see my cactus,’
at Tom.

‘* Mine’s all tumbled over,’’ chirped little Teddy.

‘« Of course she’ ll want to see them,’’ said Sophie, ‘‘ and I guess she’ ll
say a good deal when she sees the way you have treated her present.
They are almost drowned, when they ought to be dry as chips.”’

Soon after, the three T’s slipped out and looked at the plants.

‘¢ Let’s put them in the oven to dry,’’ said Tim.

‘¢ Won’t they burn? ’’ asked practical Tom, turning to the other T’s.

?

said Tim, looking



READY FOR THE FLOWER SHOW.

‘¢No; the fire’s most out; ’sides, things don’t burn in the oven;

don’t Betty put cakes there? ”’
<¢’Course!’’ said little Teddy, taking his cactus in his arms, ‘‘ and

apples and everything.”’
THE THREE T’S.

<« But Betty won’t let us,’’ objected Tom.

«She isn’t there! ’’ cried Teddy, marching off triumphantly.

Tom’s pot was pretty heavy, being the biggest, but he managed to
carry it, and the poor plants were soon stowed away in the oven.

“ Aunt Jane on us.”’

<< Then don’t let’s take off our clothes to-night,’’ said Tim, ‘‘ it is so
much trouble to put ’em on again.”’

So the three T’s took off their shoes, slipped their nightgowns on over
their clothes, and jumped into bed. When their mother came to kiss them
good-night, she did not notice in the dark, how fat they looked.

But they slept pretty soundly, and when Tim awoke, he heard Betty
already singing down in the kitchen.

‘‘ Hurry, boys!’’ he cried, as he jumped out of bed, and ran down-

- stairs as quickly as he could.

“¢Faith,’’ said Betty, ‘ they kim near burning up, they did.”’

When Aunt Jane looked them over, the plants stood innocently on the
shelf, not looking much the worse for their baking.

‘¢ They look rather brown,”’ she said; ‘‘ you might give them just a
drop of water about once a week. If they are in bloom at the right time,
we will put them in the Flower Show ; they might take a prize.’’

When Sophie heard that, she hid the green watering-pot in the re-
motest corner of the barn, and thereafter watered her pansies with a dip-
per. In a few months, three thick stalks began to grow from the sides of
the three plants, and just in time for the Flower Show, three beautiful
pink flowers opened to the sunshine.

Somebody — perhaps it was Aunt Jane — offered a prize for children’s
plants, and the three T’s took it.

They were pleased enough, but. Sophie was the proudest little girl in
town. She brought out the watering-pot from its hiding-place, and put it
into Tim’s hand. &

~ ** There,’’ she said, ‘‘ you may water my garden forty times a day if
you want to, I don’t care.’’
- Clara G. Dolliver. —
' FANNIE’S ADVENTURE.

FANNIE’S ADVENTURE.

Fannte and her mother had been out a good while, and had picked a
good many berries. But now they had come to a place where the berries
were so thick that Fannie was sure she could soon finish filling her basket.

‘¢ But most of these are too high for you to reach,’’ said mamma.

‘¢ Can’t you hold me up?’’ said Fannie.

<¢ Not so high as that, dear,’” answered mamma. ‘‘ Suppose we let
them go to-day? ”’

‘©, mamma! I hear Susie and Jane now in the Ae They haven’t
stopped yet. Can’t I stand on the top of the gate ge

‘‘Not unless you are willing to fall off and crack your head,’’ said
Uncle Dick, who was just coming up from behind them.

‘¢Q, Uncle Dick! > cried Fannie; ‘‘ how softly you came. Have

you seen Jane? Has she filled her ae Can you rae me up on the
gate? You're stronger than mamma.’
- ¢¢ Rather stronger,’ said he. ‘‘ But I cannot answer more than one
question at once. Here, get up on my back, Fannie. Mamma will hold
you steady.’’ So Uncle Dick stooped over and leaned on his stick, and
Fannie climbed up, and there she stood and worked away.

«¢ But,’’ said Nannie, as she began to pick, “¢ sha’n’t I tire you?” eG

“¢ Not a bit.’”

«Don’t I seem very heavy ?”’

“¢No. Work away.”’

‘¢ My dear,’’ said mamma, ‘ pick your berries and don’t talk.’”

«¢ But I’m afraid ’’ —

‘¢ Well, I’m rather afraid,’’ said Uncle Dick. <‘‘I’m afraid you are
not,so polite as I expected. When a lady receives a service she does not
keep talking about it. Having accepted the ee she does not keep
wondering whether it would not be better to decline.’

«© Dear me!’’ muttered Fannie, ‘‘I’m sure I want to be polite. BS
thank you, Uncle Dick, and you shall have some of my biggest berries.’

Pamela McArthur Cole.




UNCLE DICK HELPS PICK THE BERRIES.
TERESA.

TERESA.

I wit stand very close to the wall
While they wait in the garden and call;
Then old Peter’ll go looking for me
Under bushes, or up in a tree.

There’s an organ away down the street,
With a drum that the monkey can beat ;
It is naughty to keep the poor thing
Every day at the end of a string.

If I only had wings, and could fly
Like a bird, in the sunny blue sky,

I could see if the world is quite round,
And why it looks flat on the ground.

But that would leave mamma alone,
‘So it’s better perhaps to have none
And sleep in my little white bed,

‘Than a nest with wet leaves overhead.
Louis Hail.



TERESA WAITS IN THE GARDEN.

‘*Ou! I know now’’ —’twas Tommy spoke —
‘Why Lady’s Slippers grow ;

Because sometimes the Brownie folk
Are naughty, don’t you know?’’
ANNIE’S SODA BISCUIT.

ANNIE’S SODA BISCUIT.

Annie is ten years old.

Her mother is teaching her
how to cook. She already has
learned how to make good
bread.

One day she was sent on

an errand to a neighbor who
lives across the pastures. She
found her sick in bed, the
rooms in a muss, and the three
little children fretting for their
dinner.
_ Annie bathed the sick
woman’s head, made her room
and bed tidy, and then looked
in the pantry for food.

She found a plate of dry
biscuit, greenish yellow with
: too much soda.

Ey MAKES A PAN OF BISCUIT. cc That bread was never fit
to eat,’’ Annie thought. ‘‘I will make a pan of biscuits just like
mother’s.’?

The sick woman was very glad to have Annie cook for her, and the
little children forgot to fret, running here and there to show Annie where
they kept their kindlings, baking-pans and flour and mixing for the
biscuit. bts ;

Annie first measured two quarts of flour into a pan. She sifted
into it two teaspoons of soda— full, but not heaped —and a third
teaspoon of salt.

She stirred the soda and the salt through the flour, and then
twice sifted it.






ANNIE’S SODA BISCUIT.

In another pan she measured two pint basins of thick sour milk,
allowing one heaped tablespoon of cream to each pint.

Into this she stirred the prepared flour until she had a dough just right
for biscuit; as soft as it could be to knead on the cake board without
sticking.

Annie kneaded her-.dough one nates just enough to gather it. Then
she dusted her cake board with flour, rolled the dough one half an. inch
thick and cut the biscuit.

She had a hot oven all ready for them — just as hot ‘as it could be and
yet not burn.

She baked the biscuit twelve minutes, and Hey came out as light and
white as a snow feather.

‘¢ | want your little girl to teach me just how to make such beautiful
bread,’’ the children’s mother said to Annie’s mother one day, coming
across the pastures to find her and be taught. ‘‘ Why! I had called that
flour not fit for the pigs to eat. The bread 1 make from it is always green,
or yellow, or both, ae soggy as clay, but Annie’s bread was light and
white as thistle blows.’

The children’s mother then learned’ the secret of making good soda
biscuit. She learned to sift the soda into the flour before putting it into
the mixing.

The children’s mother was Ponty years old, and had spoiled — oh!
hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of biscuit, by dumping her soda
right into the sour milk, letting it foam all the life and yeasty lightness
out of itself before adding the flour.

Clarissa Potter.

I rnovent I saw somebody’s canary
Escaped from the cage to the garden bed ;
» _- T looked again — ’twas a daffodil yellow,
Sunning its pretty head.
Lavinia S. Goodwin.
AN INTERRUPTED MEAL.


JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.















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JOKER IS SORRY FOR HARRY.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
IN THE BUNGALOW.

‘ world? ’’ asked Harry.

Joker looked up from the floor where he was riage with Sede
Joker is called a handsome little fellow. He has a pale face, dark eyes,
and light hair that grows down on his forehead like a bang. He usually
wears a Lord Fauntleroy suit, though sometimes he is dressed in sailor
fashion, making the cunningest of Jacky Tars. He has besides the nat-
tiest soldier uniform Harry ever saw, which is saying a good deal; for
Harry’s papa is colonel of a regiment in India, and Harry has lived
among soldiers all his life.

Is Joker Harry’s brother? Joker is only a clever monkey.
—— Se

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

Joker climbed up on Harry’s knee and made a sound the boy called yes.

‘You shall come with me, then,” said Harry. ‘‘ White children cannot
live in the East Indian climate after they are eight years old, so a m going
with mamma to England and America. Mamma is an American.’

Harry paused. He was thinking how he should miss the bungalow,
the parade, the music of the band and — papa.

Joker did an odd thing. He threw his arms around his young
master’s neck, and put his face close to his cheek, as if to kiss him.

That evening Harry and Joker sat on the railing of the veranda. On
the ground below stood Ginger, the collie dog, with his back towards them.
Casting a sly glance at Harry, Joker leaned over and gave a sharp tweak
to Ginger’s curly tail. The dog turned. Harry was smiling, but Joker
was gazing dreamily at the sky. Ginger snarled at Harry, then took up



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GINGER WAS STANDING WITH HIS BACK TOWARDS THEM,

his position as before. Again Joker gave the tail another jerk. Again
Ginger whisked round and scolded Harry. Joker hugged himself with glee.

Ginger once more turned away. A third time Joker bent over cau-
tiously, but just as he touched the tail, Ginger veered about so suddenly
that the monkey was caught in the act.

Ginger jumped at him and would have punished him well, but Joker,
frightened and crying like a baby, sprang up to the roof of the veranda,
where the dog could not reach him. Mary C. Crowley.
A LITTLE GIRL RULER.

A LITTLE GIRL RULER.

Nor long ago Queen Wilhelmina
of Holland visited Germany. The
Emperor William arranged a series
of grand banquets and receptions in
her honor, and the event was talked
about in our own country as well as
in every part of Europe, because the
Queen is only twelve years old—a
little girl ruler.

The Queen Wilhelmina herself
would have liked better to play with
her dolls, feed her pigeons, or drive her
team of six ponies; but she is Hol-
land’s queen, and so must begin to
take an interest in the pomp and
splendor which is to surround her.

She is too young to actually assume all. queenly duties, but every public
act of the royal power is performed in the name of this little girl ruler.

These royal duties came to her in consequence of the death of her father.
Queen Wilhelmina was the only child of King William and Queen Emma
of Holland, and so the next heir to the Dutch throne.

The little Wilhelmina lives with her mother at the Castle of Loo. The
little Queen leads a quiet, happy life. She rises at seven o’clock in the
morning, and goes at once to kiss her mother. . At eight o’clock the
Queen’s breakfast is served ; from nine o’clock until twelve she is busy with
her studies, and at noon she enjoys a simple lunch of eggs, milk and fruit.
At six she dines with her mother, and at eight o’clock the little Wilhel-
mina is sent promptly to bed. :

Queen Wilhelmina has been’ taught to take an interest in her people,
and this little girl ruler gives promise of peine dearly loved by those whom
she is to serve. E. Addie Heath.



QUEEN WILHELMINA OF HOLLAND.


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JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

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JOKER MEANT TO BE POLITE.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
MONKEYS THAT GO A-FISHING.

Wuen Joker and Harry reached the sea coast they made the acquaint-
ance of a cousin of Joker’s, who earned his living by catching fish. The
grove near the shore was, indeed, a.regular monkey fishing village.

As they drew near the grove, they saw swinging on the bough of a tree
what Harry supposed to be a little old man; Joker knew it was a large ape.

‘*Halloo, Grand-pop,’’ he called out in his own language. The ape
looked toward them. When he saw a monkey gotten up in such grand
clothes he laughed and laughed. Seeming to remember his manners, how-
ever, he sat up straight, and held out his paw.

Joker stepped forward jauntily and, with a low bow, was just going to
‘shake hands,’’ when, presto, the big hairy hand was withdrawn and,
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

instead of a polite clasp of his funny mites of fingers, Joker received a
sharp box on the ear, which sent him whining back to Harry.

At this, his giant cousin again screamed with mirth. Leaping from the
bough, he bounded across the beach to the water’s edge and, crouching down,
looked into a crab hole which Harry had noticed a few minutes before.

The boy watched him, for he knew that apes of this kind are famous for
catching crabs, and that this one had now gone a-fishing. The monkey-
angler turned his tail into a fishing line, by dropping it into the hole as far
as it would reach. Then he waited. Harry and Joker ventured nearer.

Presently, they saw his mouth close with a snap, he shut his eyes, and
’ tears trickled down his rough cheeks. The ape had a bite, and it hurt.

He bore the pain without moving, so that his prey might take hold
tighter. Another nip having told him that it had done so, the tail with
the poor crab clinging to its tip was jerked quickly from the hole, whirled



JOKER WATCHES HIS GIANT COUSIN CATCH CRABS.

round a second or two, and then dashed to the ground with such force as to |
break the shell to pieces. The fisher’s dinner. was now. ready, and he sat
down to enjoy it, picking out the meat with his claws. He beckoned to
‘his visitor to come and share it, but Joker shook his head. He would not
have any more tricks played upon him.

When Harry and Joker left the beach the fisher series had finished
his meal and was sadly licking his wounded tail. Mary C. Crowley.


A MOMENT OF PERIL. *
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.







JOKER MEETS SEPOY.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A SAILOR MONKEY.

JOKER was glad when he and Harry went aboard the ship bound for
England. He soon felt at home in the little cabin. Harry hung a tiny
hammock above his own berth, and Joker found it a-nice resting-place.
He soon learned that he was to have the company of one of his relations
on the voyage. Sepoy was the captain’s monkey. The two met on deck.
Joker was strutting about in his Jacky Tar suit when, suddenly, something
dropped from the rigging right on to his back. Mad with fright, he started
off upon all-fours in a wild run. Still the thing clung to him. Knocking
against a steamer-chair, however, he lost his balance, rolled over, freed
himself, and the next moment was face to face with Sepoy.

Sepoy was ugly and brown, and wore a shabby suit. As he looked
at Joker he gave a comical shrug and a hitch to his trousers—as he was
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

used to seeing the old salts do—and said, in his monkey speech, ‘‘ Huh!
a dudish, fair-weather sailor.’’

Joker turned his back on the rude creature, and sat looking out to sea.

The next day the waves were high, and Joker felt queer. He thought
he was going to die. He was only seasick. Then Sepoy came along.
Shutting one eye and swelling out his cheek with his tongue, he said,
“¢T told you so.’’ Joker sprang up and chased Sepoy into the rigging.
After that he felt better.

By the end of the week Sepoy became friendly. A storm came, and
then everybody learned to love him. He staid on deck with the captain
when every one else had been ordered below. He cheered the men at the
wheel, he ran up into the rigging and caught the rope of a sail that had
broken loose and could not be taken down quickly enough.

“¢Ah!’’ said Harry, ‘‘ Sepoy’s the right kind of a sailor.’’ And
Joker, wrapped in his red flannel dressing-gown, and lying helpless in his





SEPOY IS THE RIGHT KIND OF A SAILOR,

hammock, glanced at his Jacky Tar suit tossed into a corner, and sighed.
He was learning that it takes more than fine clothes to make a fine fellow.
When pleasant weather came, Harry made a boat for Sepoy. One
of the crew taught him to rig it. The rhonkey watched the work with in-
terest, and was delighted with his present. Mary C. Crowley.














































































































ON CHRISTMAS MORNING,






FRIEND OR FOE?
THE CHRISTMAS LESSON.

THE CHRISTMAS LESSON.

THERE were four of them. Beth, and Dick, and Mary, and the cat.
Beth was five, Dick was going on four, Mary was two, though she did
sleep in the big old cradle yet, and the cat — well, it’s no matter how
old the cat was. She didn’t say anything only ‘‘ Purr-r, purr-r-r.’’

Not often did the little people take their go-to-bed lunch before the
dining-room fire. This was a special night.

“«The happy night
That to the cottage as the crown,
Brought tidings of salvation down.”

It was fun to sit in their ‘‘ nighties’’ and toast their little feet.

Mamma had just told them about the first Christmas Gift, the Babe of
Bethlehem, how he was given to us, and how through his life and death,
he gave himself to others. Then, because mammas cannot begin too soon
to talk about such things, she said :

*¢ Couldn’t my dears think of some presents for our washerwoman’s
children? Santa Claus will doubtless bring you more toys to-morrow.
You could give away some you have now, as well as not. ‘Try to think
what these others would like.’’

With that she was called out a moment.

Well, it was a poser. Beth tried to think, but of course Dick being a
boy, put-in first.

‘*Le’s div ’em kitty,’’ he said, as plain as he could with his mouth
full.

Kitty whisked her tail as if she didn’t. much like it. Beth shook her
curls, and said between two bites:

‘“*Why, Dick Johnson, I’m s’prised at you! Kitty’s one of the
fam’bly. Might’s well give away the baby! ’’

“¢ Dat’s dess what Dodd did do, any way,’’ said the young logician.

That was like Dick, and Beth didn’t know what to say. Mamma
came back in the nick of time. When the question was put to her, for
THE RARE OLD CHRISTMAS CUP.

some reason or other, she gave Dick a squeeze, and said, ‘ Bless his little.
heart !’’

But she told them they needn’t send the cat, she was pretty sure the
washerwoman’s children had a cat already.

Helped by her suggestions, Beth decided on one of her pretty dolls.
Dick gave a bow and arrows. Even Baby Mary when asked if her danc-
ing Jack could go, said ‘‘ Eth,’’ as if she understood.

Then the children went to bed happy, because they were going to make
somebody else happy.

It was a very nice lesson to learn.

re Helen A. Hawley.

.THE, RARE OLD CHRISTMAS CUP.

Wuart wonderful stories some famous:
drinking cups could tell, if they could
only speak. This rare old Christmas cup.
is one of them. It is soon to be pre-
sented to the British Museum, at a cost
of forty thousand dollars. The cover and
all are of solid gold, beautifully inlaid
with enamel pictures and medallions. It
once belonged to Charles v. of France.
Before the days of the Tudor sovereigns.
it was in the Royal Treasury of England.
Henry vi. and Queen Elizabeth have
touched their lips to it at grand Christmas.
dinners, and James I. presented it to the
‘great. Spaniard Velasco.

A few years ago this rare old Christ-
mas cup was sold at auction, and since
then it has been wandering about, bringing higher and higher prices —
it is considered such a remarkable treasure. H. W. F.


A PRESENT TO A QUEEN.



THE LION CUB FROM AFRICA.

A PRESENT TO A QUEEN.

Queen Victoria has always had a boy-and-girl fondness for animals,

especially for dogs and horses. It is related that on the very day of her
coronation, as she returned to Buckingham Palace, she heard her pet
spaniel barking his welcome, and hurried off her crown and robe of
purple velvet that she might give him his bath. A greyhound, “ Dear
Eos,” as the Queen called her, was a favorite in the royal household
for eleven years. The Queen’s Journals often refer to “dear Noble,”
her Scotch collie, and other dogs. Of landing once at the sea-palace of
Osborne she writes that, along with the children, “‘ Deckel (a favorite
dog), and our new charming kennel-bred Dachs, ‘ Boy,’ also received.
us with joy.”
From the Queen’s oriental dominions often come gifts of strange
and savage creatures that can only be petted behind the iron bars
of cages at the Zodlogical Garden, where they are sent. Once she
received from Java a Liliputian horse, only twenty-seven and a half
inches high when five years old. Only the other day, the Sultan of
Sokoto, in Central Africa, sent to the Queen the lion cub whose portrait
is given above. How like a huge house-cat he looks —as if just ready
for a frolic with the big ball at his feet! ESO:


GATHERING APPLES.
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

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RIDING TO DRILL.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
SOLDIER MONKEYS.

Arter they arrived in London, Harry and Joker were entertained by a
company of soldier monkeys. These monkeys belonged to a show, and
went through their military exercises twice a day. -

‘* Ah,’’ thought Joker when Harry said he would take him; ‘‘ this
is something I know about.’’ He was’ still ashamed at having proved
such a poor Jacky Tar; but everybody called Joker a great soldier.

‘* Don’t you remember how we used to ride to the drill in India —I on
my pony Tricksey, and you upon Ginger a

As they entered the hall the band struck up a martial air. Joker stood
up on Harry’s shoulder while he marched down to his seat in the first row.

When the soldier monkeys saw a relation of their own coming towards
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

them in a uniform covered with gold lace, and having a tiny sword at his
side, they thought Joker must be a general.

At a sign from the showman they gave him a formal military salute,
which made the audience laugh and applaud, and caused Harry to shrink
into his place as quickly as possible.

Their uniform was neat, though not nearly so splendid as Joker’s. The
captain was a funny little fellow, who tried very hard to stand up straight,
and directed the maneuvers of his troops in grand style. Harry was
amused at the grace with which he lowered his sword to Joker.

The showman was glad to show off his monkeys so well by means of
the monkey in the audience. They went through the drill finely.

‘* Aren’t they clever!’’ Harry said to Joker. ‘* You would never see
them squabbling like some monkeys I know!’’ Joker did not answer.

Just then a man in the gallery threw a brown paper bag upon the
stage. The bag burst, and a quantity of nuts weresscattered over the floor.

Me \ h
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‘* Cricky !’”’ said Harry. What a hubbub there was at once. With a
cry of delight the soldiery broke ranks, threw down their guns and began
to scramble and fight for the dainties. The captain was the most unruly
of all. There was a flutter of scarlet and gold before Harry’s eyes, and
the next moment he saw that Joker had leaped upon the stage and was
struggling for a share of the nuts. Mary C. Crowley.




























THE SOLDIERY BROKE RANKS.


GUESS WHO WILL WIN?

WINTER FUN.

How is the fun
Of winter reckoned,
By boys in country, and boys in town,
Taken all in all, the up and the down?
Snowballs are first ;
Snow forts are second ;
But the boys agree these both give place
To a right-down, well-matched skating-race !


JOLLY WINTER SPORT.

i a etl
BOYS AND GIRLS IN SAMOA.

BOYS AND GIRLS IN SAMOA. .

THERE was a great war in Samoa, a few years
ago, and even grown people, when they read
about it, had to stop and ask where Samoa was.
So I suppose that there may be boys and girls,
too, who do not know much about Samoa.

It is the name of some beautiful islands in the
Pacific Ocean. There are all sorts of palm-trees
and orange-trees in Samoa, and wonderful flowers
and beautiful birds ; but they are coral islands,
far away from the mainland, so there are no wild
beasts. The largest island is forty-five miles long, and around our house
you would think one of the finest playgrounds in the world.

It is a little way out from the busy city of Apia, where there are
several other American families, and English and German, too. There
is a beautiful green lawn, running down to a smooth beach of cream-white
sand on one side, an orange grove on another, a hill covered with a real
tropical forest on another, and then the carriage road to Apia on the
other.

Unless some of our foreign children come out from the city for the
afternoon, you would find only native
boys and girls to play with, but you
would have play enough, even then,
for to be a boy or girl in such a
beautiful place as one of the islands
of Samoa and not to play, would be
‘impossible. Only the gamés must
be very different from those we are FISHING IN SAMOA.
used to at home. =

If you are a boy you would like to go fishing, and you will find lots of
boys ready to go with you ; but instead of a pole and line and hook, you
need only the branch of a tree. E



BUILDING A SHIP.


BOYS AND GIRLS IN SAMOA.

You must take off your pretty clothes, for these children wear only a
strip of cloth wound round the waist and hips, and the way they fish is to
go right out into the water. The bay is not deep, and the water is very
warm. They each take a branch of a tree, and then form two lines a hun-
dred feet apart. Single file, they go directly out into the water, and
gradually turn towards each other, till the first boys of each line meet
about waist deep, while the boys at the other ends are only a few steps
from the shore. Then they all turn about to face the shore, and begin
slapping the water with the branches and shouting and laughing and jump-
ing, and walking
up to the shore.

This frightens
all the fish inside
the half-circle
they have made,
and they frighten
them more and
more till they
drive them up into
water so shallow
they cannot swim. ;

THE SITTING-DOWN DANCE.

If you are a ,
girl you like to dance, and so do the Samoan girls, but they dance with
their hands instead of their feet. They all sit down together, and sing
and wave their hands and clap, and swing their heads ina way that is very
pretty, even if it is not quite like our dancing at home.

The great game for boys and girls together is to build a ship. On the
Samoan islands all the natives are great sailors. The children get together
and spend days in building a ship. The boys do the hard work, and the
girls make the ropes from vines and bark, and gather flowers for the rail
and prow. Then when it is finished they have a jolly time playing that
they go out to sea.

_ Soon enough the play becomes real to them, for when they are no more.
than twelve they turn fishermen and sailors in earnest. :



Warren H. Frych.
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

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PEPPO SAVES THE BABY.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A HERO MONKEY.

One day when Harry was walking in the streets of London with Joker
he heard a cry of ‘‘Fire!’’? People began running, and Harry ran too.
He soon found himself in a crowd before a handsome house.

The master stood in the doorway directing two or three servants; the
others. had fled in a panic of fear. Through the windows of the rooms
above the mistress could be seen hurrying to and fro. Across the street
was a nursemaid in charge of the children.

Several engines rattled up. A cry of ‘‘ Save yourselves! ’’ broke from
the crowd. » The servants made haste to do so. The lady appeared in the
hall; behind her shone a bright light. Her husband half-carried her to
the other side of the street. ~Presently she turned to the children in care
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
J .

of the maid. Her face grew paler with terror. ‘*‘ My baby ?’’ she asked.
The baby had been forgotten amid the confusion, and was still in the
crib in the nursery. ; é

The firemen were dismayed. ‘The staircase was ablaze; the flames
had reached the upper stories, and the ladders were too short to reach
the nursery window. But soon a dark hand was seen raising the sash

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HARRY READS THE STORY TO JOKER.

‘Tt is Peppo, the monkey,’’ cried the children. ‘‘See! he has the
baby in his arms,’’ they added joyfully. :

It was indeed so. The large ourang-outang, carrying his preciou
burden, began fo make his way down the water-spout at the side of the
building. He reached the ground, and laid the baby in the mother’s arms.

Then what a glad shout rang out from the crowd. Peppo was a hero.

Next morning Harry read the whole story to Joker, and Joker felt
proud of his relative. Like some persons, he seemed to make the mistake
of thinking that having a hero in the family was as good as trying to be
brave and heroic himself. Mary -C. Crowley.

|







|
|
A LITTLE GRANDMOTHER'S STORY.

A LITTLE GRANDMOTHER’S STORY.

“Now, children,” said

_ little Nelly, lifting her eyes

from her book, “I have put

on my grandmother-cap, and

- Twill tell you a story of what

happened to my mamma one

day when I was but a child.
It is a true story.

“On that day my mamma
in company with some of the
other ladies of her parish
(for she lived away out in
the country) met at the-
church in the village to
sweep it and dust it and put
it in order ‘for the winter.
They did this every autumn.

“ Mamma went with old
Prancer and the buggy and
took Aunt Carrie with her.

“T suppose that you all know that a ‘buggy’ is like a carriage with-
out a top; and mamma’s buggy. was shut in at the back.

“When they came to the church, mamma hitched old Prancer and
then she went to the buggy to take out the brooms and pans and rags
that they had brought. When she lifted the curtain of the seat, what
did she see, but a little hen sitting in one corner looking as peaceful as
if on her nest at home. That little hen had crept in under the seat to
lay an egg, and of course she did not expect to take a ride.

“Mamma fasteried her in, to stay while she was at work in the
church, and when they got home, biddy was in one corner and an egg
in another!” | M. C. M. D.



GRANDMOTHER NELLY.


THE FIRST BLUEBIRD.
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.



M’LLE FOLICHONE, THE WORLD-RENOWNED ARTIST.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A MONKEY PIANIST.

Waite Harry and Joker were in Paris they attended a droll concert.
First, four seals played on hand-organs; next a troop of dogs danced ;
after that a cat me-owed a solo to the music of a piano, and then the
manager announced that M’lle Folichone, the world-renowned artist, would
perform. :

Presently a funny little figure fluttered out, stepped down to the
footlights and made a deep curtesy.

M’lle was a monkey.

She wore a ball-dress of white satin, with a train a yard long; the
bodice was cut low, and with short sleeves, showing her brown neck, around
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

which was a string of bright beads, and her long arms, upon which jingled
a row of silver bangles ; upon her head was a white toque adorned with a
long plume. .

At a signal from the manager, M’lle drew off her gloves, gave a little
hop, skip and jump, and landed on the piano stool. She opened a music-
book, found her place and struck the keys of the piano; stopped, rolled up
her eyes to the ceiling in an affected manner, and played a tune. Then
she slipped down again and ran behind the curtain.

Harry laughed and clapped his hands, and Joker tried to do the same.

The little musi-
clan again came out.
Once more she
sprang up, but —
Harry could hardly
believe his eyes —
this time she alighted
on the keyboard and
began to play a duet
all by herself! That
is, she played with
her feet as well as
her hands, or rather
.=" with her four hands,
since a monkey’s feet
are really only an ex-
tra pair of hands.

When the end of the
= “page was reached
JOKEK LEARNS TO PLAY. M’lle looked towards
the audience, paused,

bowed, and then turned over the leaf of her music with her tail.

Harry said, ‘‘ Joker, don’t you wish you could play as well?’’ Joker
sulked ; but from that time no one dared to leave the piano open in the
house where Joker lived, and Harry was sorry that he invited him to go
to the concert. ; Mary C. Crowley.





SN)
SS
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WA,
AZZ I

an

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oS

—

SSS
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SOS
S—————
LITTLE SO-SAT.

LITTLE SO-SAT.

So-sat nestled behind her
mother’s gown, the most fright-
ened little girl in the world.
She was a little Apache Indian
out at the San Carlos agency ;
she had always been as wild ©
and’as free as the birds; and
now the teachers had come to

_take her to school.

Her mother stooped down
and spoke to her, and this is
what she said, only she did
not speak in a tongue that we
should have understood if we
had been listening to her:
<< So-sat, go with them and
learn to do as the white people
do; this is the only way for the
Indians to live now. Be a
good little girl and mind the
white people just as you do
us.’’ She put her arms about

the child, and then led her gently toward the teachers.

This was the way that So-sat went to school when she was nine years
old. All the Indian children were frightened at first, but they grew
acquainted sooner than So-sat. The teachers did not know what to do
with this little one who whenever she could escape from their watchful-
ness ran into a corner and pulled her shawl over her head and very often
cried softly to herself under it. She was pretty and sweet and they loved
her and wanted her to be happy and to be like a little white girl, but they
did not know how they should begin to make her feel at home in the



AS SHE LOOKED IN HER PICTURE.
LITTLE SO-SAT.

school and the new ways. They tried to make her look at some of the
pretty pictures in books and papers that had been sent to the school for
the children, but she was .afraid to come forward, and when they held up
the pictures would hide her head as if something were going to hurt her.

One day So-sat was all alone in the schoolroom. She stood and looked
about her at the blackboards with the drawings on them, at the empty
benches, at the teacher’s table piled with books ; but she would not touch
anything here. At last she saw on another table for the children a paper
book with pictures on it. Softly she went up to it, closer and closer. She
saw on it a dog’s head, and a cat’s, and an owl’s, a girl’s and a boy’s, a
butterfly and a bee, and a funny little mouse, and a bird on a branch. She
could not read ‘‘ Our Little Men and Women ”’ on the cover, but she stood
looking at it. Then suddenly she took it up; she was frightened at first,
but she found it did not hurt her. And then she turned the cover.

_ When she had done this, she gave a little cry and stood looking in de-
light. There was a dog just like the dogs she had: seen in the Indian
camps, only he was sitting upright in a little girl’s lap, and he looked so
happy. And, oh! what a pretty little girl. So-sat looked and looked at
her, and thought that she would do anything and would never be afraid if
she could be as pretty as that. Her hair was all waved about her face.
So-sat put up her hand and found her own hair cut short.

Some of the other Indian children came into the room. Instead of run-
ning away as she used to do, So-sat ran to them and held out the picture.
They all began to talk about it, and So-sat laughed, which she had not
done before since she.came to school. And then the teacher told them how
to say ‘‘ girl’’ in English; they all tried it, and So-sat did well; this
made her laugh again.

And from this day she grew happy and would spend hours looking at
pretty books, but she always liked this one the best of all, and when she
had learned about the pictures she knew a great many English words and
was more like white children.

And this is the way in which some child who sent out her book to
this Indian school helped dear little So-sat to be happy and to learn white
people’s ways.

Frances C. Sparhawk.
A LITTLE BUILDER.





From the crest of a ridge

A spider said,
“¢¢T will build a bridge

Of silken thread.”’
She called the Wind from the river side,
‘¢ Please carry my line across the tide,
And knot to yon leafy branches wide.”’

See it quiver and quake
On air afloat,
Like the waning wake
Of a fairy boat !
The spinner pulled, with her hands so small ;"
Her silver thread was not fast at all —
<¢ More work,”’ said she, ‘‘ or my bridge will fall.”’

Patient spun she a length
That reached the goal,
And tested its strength
By a short patrol.
Passed over at leisure, casting a look
At her image in the amber brook,
Clung hard when the breeze her frail span shook.
THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS. \

Never yet has she thought
How rare a thing
Was thus simply wrought —
Not wealth of a king,
Nor skill of men who had learned at school
The careful use of each cunning tool,
Could match Arachne and nature’s rule.

Lavinia S. Goodwin.



THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS.





































































































































































































































































































































CLEARING THE TRACK OF LOCUSTS.



Once in about twenty years the
locusts come down upon North India
worse than the grasshoppers or apple-
tree worms ever came in America.

Many a time, last spring, you
would have thought that dark clouds
were gathering and that it was going
to rain. There would be a noise,
like a strong wind blowing, and then
locusts would begin to drop here and
there, instead of rain, and looking up
you would see that the whole air was
full of them.

When the locusts caught sight of
a field of tempting grain and began to
settle there, the poor farmers had to
fight with all their might. They

would rush out of their little, low, flat-roofed huts, with branches of trees
or white cloths, or whatever they could lay hands on, and shout and run
back and forth through the grain. Sometimes they would succeed in
frightening the locusts, and the great cloud would rise in the air again.
Then the farmers would sit down on the ground and laugh to see them go.
THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS.

Sometimes the trains were stopped, just as they are stopped in America,
in the winter, by snowdrifts. When there was something green growing
along the track a cloud of locusts would settle there till they covered
the ground and covered the railroad track, and still they would keep
coming till they piled up deeper and deeper, all trying to get at the green.

















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































IN THE FARMER’S GRAIN.

The engine might try to make its way through this dense black cloud
of locusts, but it crushed so many and made the track so slippery, that it
had to stop.

If the engineer saw the drift of locusts in time he would stop just be-

fore he ran into it. Then he and the fireman would break some branches
off the trees and walk ahead and try to clear the track by frightening
the locusts away. ;

It was a curious sight to see the engineer and fireman clearing a path
for the great express trains in this way, and sometimes the creatures were
so thick, and so determined to stay, that they were hours in working their
way through a single mile of them.
THE PLAGUE OF LOCUSTS.

The only thing which did not suffer from this greedy army was the
birds. The kites and the crows which live on insects had a fine time, till
they grew so fat and so lazy that they would hardly open their mouths to
pick up a locust right beside them.

When we saw how much damage the insects were doing we were very
glad to have something help us by eating them up, and we used to
watch with interest a large flock of kites and crows fly into one of
those clouds of locusts and pick out the largest of them as fast as they
could.

The kites had the best of it, for they caught the locusts in their claws
and ate them while they were flying, but the crows caught them in their































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE BIRDS FARED THE BEST,

beaks. Sometimes they would try to catch two, but then they had to
light somewhere and pick them to pieces before they could swallow them.
And all the while the kites kept right on in the midst of them.
We were all glad enough when the locusts disappeared.
Warren H. Frych.
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.







aoe

¢











TRAVELING IN MEXICO.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

MONKEY HARVESTERS.

Granppapa took Harry and Joker with him upon a trip to Mexico.

‘© Ah! this is like India,’’ said Harry, ‘‘ only much more beautiful.”’

Grandpapa had come on business which made it necessary to go
on horseback far up into the country. Harry rode a pretty Mexican pony
named Chicha (Cheecha). Joker used to ride beside him. All three
were great friends.

Joker often wondered if any of his relations lived in Mexico. So far
he had not met any. One day, however, while riding past a corn field,
he caught sight of a troop of queer little folk making for it. By a pinch
he urged his young master to look that way.
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

<¢ What is that moving yonder? Why, there are so many I could not
count them all; what can they be?’’ cried Harry, turning to the man
with the big hat and high boots, and silver lace on his clothes, who acted-
as guide.

*¢Qnly monkeys,’’ he answered, in broken English. ‘‘ The rogues !
they are earliest at the harvest. From behind these trees you can watch ”
them.’

The monkeys drew near. It was the strangest procession Harry ever
saw. An old fellow, the chief of the band, walked ahead upon two legs,
carrying a staff in his hand to help him keep upright. The others fol-

: lowed on all-fours, from
time to time looking to
him for directions.

Then by a queer noise
the leader called a halt.
He motioned to several
monkeys who took their
stand as sentinels at dif-
erent points; for they
seemed to think the owner
might object to having
his corn gleaned by such
harvesters. Then the chief
and the rest of the band
rushed in and began to
plunder and eat as fast
as they could.

After a while other
monkeys took the sen-
tinels’ places, and gave them a chance to rush in and plunder.

Now came the most curious part of it all. When the leader thought
they had eaten enough, he gave a‘signal. All stopped, but instead of
hurrying off each monkey picked up three or four fat ears of corn, and,
thus laden, the whole troop hied homeward as quietly as they had come.

Mary C. ‘Crowley.



IN THE CORN FIELD.
ROMAN GIRLS AND THEIR DOLLS.

ROMAN GIRLS AND THEIR DOLLS.

Everywhere in the world there have always been boys and girls, and
in nearly all countries boys have always played ball and girls have had
dolls. Travelers in far distant lands have found dolls that little children
played with ages ago. Some of the prettiest have been found in ancient
Rome, dolls of different kinds, lovely little images, some of carved wood,
some of ivory.

The ancient Romans were very strict with their children ; they ex-
pected them to take up the duties of grown people while they were very
young.

When a girl became old enough to leave off playing with dolls, her
giving them up was.an occasion of much ceremony.

Every Roman girl had her patron goddess to whom she prayed.
She might choose the beautiful Venus, or the huntress Diana, or’ Juno,
queen of all the gods. To her goddess she carried her dolls and hung
them in the temple before the shrine. She carried their clothes, too,
and sometimes all her other playthings.

This ceremony of giving up the dolls was done at different ages, in
different families. Some very strict parents required their children to
give up their toys at seven or eight years. This, I am glad to say, was
not common. :

Sometimes girls did not give up their dolls until the time of their
marriage. Then just before the wedding they had a great festival and
carried their dolls with much ceremony to the temple. .

Of course, on some occasions there were many girls offering their
dolls at once. It must have been a pretty sight when they ali went.
together in procession under the beautiful bright Italian sky to the tem-
ple, themselves and the dolls all dressed in their prettiest, while the
older people looked on and said :

“Well, they're grown-up women now —no more childish plays
for them !”

' Pamela McArthur Cole.


A ROMAN DOLL FESTIVAL.
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.



THE MONKEY LINEMEN AT THEIR WORK.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
MONKEYS AND THE TELEGRAPH.

Granppapa’s business had to do-with building a ra‘lroad and carrying
a telegraph line across the wilds of Mexico. Every day for a week
our travelers rode on a hand car, while grandpapa inspected the work.

Harry was surprised to see many telegraph poles oui of place, and the
wires broken or trailing on the ground.

‘Ah!’ said the lineman, “the brigands have been here again.

‘‘Oh! they are nothing but monkeys,’’ he added. ‘‘ We may meet
some of the fellows before we get to our journey’s end.’’
_ Sure enough, before long they came upon a company toiling’ away as
if their wages depended upon getting through their work before night.
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

About twenty were upon a single pole. Others swung on the wires
with all their might. There seemed as many as two hundred in all.

The men raised their rifles and shot into the group. ‘‘ Faster,’’ cried
. Harry’s friend. The car spun along the rails. Several monkeys fell
wounded, then the whole horde rushed for the car with a chattering which
scared Joker nearly out of his wits, and made Harry’s cheeks. grow pale.

The men spurred onward, but the monkeys gained upon them, catch-
ing up without stopping, any, stones or nuts that lay in their path, and
hurling them after the car. It was like a hailstorm. Harry had to duck



THEY WAGE WAR UPON THE LINEMEN.

his head to keep clear of them. Joker made himself as small as possible.
Another volley was fired, but still the monkeys continued the chase. They
were close upon the travelers; one, who wielded a heavy stick, actually
leaped upon the car; but grandpapa, parrying a blow, beat the rascal off
with his gun. At the same time fresh hands at the crank sent the car
‘bounding forward with renewed speed, and in a few minutes they were out
of reach of their pursuers.

When the excitement was over grandpapa said: ‘‘ Well, Harry, per-
haps you have heard the sending of misleading messages called ‘ monkeying
with the telegraph,’ but now you know that when this is said in Mexico it
means that real monkeys have been at work.”’ Mary C. Crowley.
HENRY M STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

HENRY M. STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

All children in England and
America know the wonderful
story of the English poorhouse
boy, Henry M. Stanley, the
African explorer, a story as
wonderful as “ Whittington
and His Cat;” how he came
to America and worked on the
great New York newspapers ;
how he was sent to Africa to
‘find David Livingstone who
had been lost in that country
for years, and how he found
the sick, gray-headed old trav-
eler at last; how he has since
been in “ darkest Africa” again
to look up another man who
was in trouble there, Emin
Pasha, and how in doing this
he made his way through terrible forests and deserts where no white
man ever before had set his foot.

You know, too, that he came home to England a few months ago
and was married to a lovely and noble Englishwoman, Miss Dorothy
Tennant, the artist.

The wedding was in Westminster Abbey, the grandest church in
England. The kings and princes of the world, and learned men, and
great people everywhere, were glad to go to the wedding of the famous
poorhouse boy, and to send gifts to his tall, beautiful bride.

When she went up the aisle she was followed by two little pages
dressed as you have seen the children of Charles 1. in Van Dyck’s pict-
ures. There were two small bridesmaids also, who were dressed to



























HENRY M. STANLEY,
HENRY M. STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

match the little pages, in long white gowns, with slender wreaths of
flowers and lockets of pretty gems.

On her way to the altar the bride laid a wreath on the tomb of Liv-
ingstone, the man Mr. Stanley first went to Africa to find; for Living-
stone is buried in the Abbey.

Mr, and Mrs. Stanley are now in America, and many of you have

}



MRS. HENRY M. STANLEY (Dorothy Tennant).

heard him lecture upon Africa, and perhaps have seen Mrs. Stanley too.
She is fond of children, of all children, but especially of the children of
the poor —those who run about in the streets all day like little dogs
HENRY M. STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

and cats, and wear rags. She loves to go among them and watch them
and draw pictures of them. I have seen many of her pictures, but not
one is of a rich, well-dressed child.

Mrs. Stanley says, in her book, that when she was a little girl she
began to draw children in tatters, and that she used to beg to be taken
to walk in the poorer parts of London, and that she used to resolve to
herself that when she grew up she “should be the champion painter of
the poor.”

Mrs. Stanley does not often paint pale little beggars, or sick children ;
she likes best to draw urchins at play, and tomboy girls, and happy,



MISS SILVIA MYERS AND MASTER LEO MYERS, BRIDESMAID AND PAGE AT THE STANLEY WEDDING.
(From a photograph by Mrs. F. W. H. Myers, their mother and Mrs. Stanley's sister.)
'

ragged babies. She says she likes to walk in the streets for hours
just to study babies’ arms and mouths and noses, and the way the
downy hair grows on the backs of their heads, and the way their
HENRY M. STANLEY AND HIS WIFE.

clothes get huddled up, and the way their socks run down their bare
legs into their little boots.

The London street children like to go to Mrs. Stanley’s studio to be
painted. Once when she wished to find a little chimney sweep for a
model, one of the boys said if he could go into her sitting-room all by



LONDON STREET CHILDREN.
(Drawn by Dorothy Tennant — Mrs. Stanley.)

himself and sit down and think, he might know where he could get
one. He was gone so long that she went in; and what did she see but
Tommy half-way up the chimney, all soot and dirt, trying to make
himself look like a sweep to please her! He had spoiled a costly
Persian rug that lay before the grate, with the soot ; but she did not
mention it to him.

Her little models have sailed her piano too, for each one wishes
to be taught to play. “God save our gracious Queen!” is always
the piece they choose; and. I think Queen Victoria would be very

pleased to hear of that!
Sophie Scissors.
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.



















































































































































|

|

ie
i



Q iy an my on ime

JOKER SALUTES THE SKYE TERRIER.

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A BRASS MONKEY.

Durine October Harry and Joker went-to New York. One day they -
called with grandpapa at a house on Madison Avenue. In answer to their
ring a bright skye terrier followed the servant.to the door. He greeted
Harry with a shrill bark, but stopped in amazement at sight of Joker.

He was about to spring at the intruder, when Joker raised his hand,
and lifting his shining beaver, made a low bow to the inhospitable terrier.

Mr. Skye was ashamed of himself. He slunk away to a corner and
would not come out during the visit. ; .

Our friends were shown into the library. Here Joker saw how the
dog came to know him. Perched upon the back of a chair near the fire
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

was a very beautiful monkey. It was not dressed up, but its natural coat
was of a golden color, with a glint of red bronze about the head and tail.
It had eyes of a deep blue, and bright as gems, and teeth like pearls.

The host came in. He shook hands with grandpapa and Harry, and
said to Joker : ‘‘ Glad to know you, sir. I have a relation of yours here.”’

He stroked the head of the splendid creature upon the chair. The
yellow ape sprang upon his arm, then to his shoulder, where it sat with
its great eyes fixed upon the monkey caller.

‘¢ Who is that?’’ asked the gentleman, pointing to Joker. The pet



A RELATION OF JOKER'S,

opened its mouth wide, showing a deep red cavern and a wagging tongue,
as it replied in plain English, ‘‘ Ba-by.”’

Joker was dumb with rage and surprise.

The strange monkey then glared at Joker, and said: ‘‘ Hie, you’re a
cheat! You’re a cheat! ”’

Joker made a dash at him, and would have torn the gleaming figure
to pieces if the gentleman had not hastily thrust it into a cabinet.

‘¢We must be going,’’ said grandpapa.

‘¢Ho! ho!’’ laughed Harry, when they reached the street. or :
think, Joker, that you were fooled by a brass monkey ! ’’

Joker was glum all the way home.

Mary C. Crowley.
HOW BESSIE SAVED HER DOLLS.— SCAT! '

HOW BESSIE SAVED HER DOLLS.

Some years ago the city of Key West was all in flames. The people
were in a panic; they felt that the whole city would be burned.

Among the men, women and children that crowded the sidewalks,
and ran to and fro trying in vain to save property and. goods, was little
Bessie Harris, the daughter of Dr. Harris. All at once she heard a
man say that the money and valuables in the bank of Key West were
being sent on board the revenue steamer Dix for safety. She hurried -
home, and gathered in her arms her two wax dolls with their clothes,
and then she ran through the streets all alone, through the blinding
smoke and the flying cinders, unti] she reached the wharf at the light-
house, where the steamer Dix was moored.

Bessie hurried on board the boat and into the cabin of the captain.
She laid the dolls in the lap of the astonished man, and threw her arms
about his neck, and begged him to save her darlings.

The captain kissed her and made her a faithful promise. Then he
sent a big, strong sailor to take the little girl back to her home.

Those two dolls occupied the post of honor on the steamer Dix, sur-
rounded by government bonds and bank notes, and bags of gold and
silver. But none of the valuables were more precious than Bessie’s
dolls; they were safely guarded until all danger was vassed, and then
they were sent back to the anxious little mother.

Will M. Clemens.

Scat !
A naughty cat,
I’m sure you'll think,
To do like that
With papa’s ink!
Scat !




THE NEW WHIP.
(From the painting by C. Burton Barber.)
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.





















































AT THE ZQO,

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
A MONKEY’S NEIGHBORS.

One morning Joker went to call upon his cousins at the Zoo.

In his trip around the gardens he stopped to say, ‘‘ How do you do? ”’
to a black ape named Mischief, whose cage was under that of a bright-
hued cockatoo. The monkey was having a grand frolic. His handsome
neighbor kept crying that he would shake her house down.

At last she spied his tail sticking through the top of the cage and
pounced upon it, holding it fast with her claws and beak. He tried to
free himself, but Miss Cockatoo would not let go. He pulled the tail away,
but at the cost of the hair.

The monkey crept to a corner. A keeper came along, and seeing
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

that there had been trouble, moved the cockatoo’s cage across the aisle.

At this point Joker took from his coat pocket a tiny mirror, into which
he was fond of peeping. Mischief grabbed it. A ray of sunlight shone
upon the mirror. He moved the glass; the reflection danced about, spark-
ling first upon one object, then upon another. Finally it struck the cocka-
too’s cage. She shrieked with terror, and hid her head under her wing.

‘** Ha, ha, madam!’’ said he; ‘‘ now I’ll pay you back.’’

Every time Miss Cockatoo looked up, the monkey would flash the light
into her eyes, leering at Joker when she fluttered and cried with fright.

Ov
Ss

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f
:

SN
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WN\ SS

\
\



AN UNPRINCIPLED MONKEY.

Next door to Mischief lived a peacock. ‘‘I’ll fix him, too,’’ said he.

Placing a bit of bread where this neighbor could see it, he waited. _

The peacock snapped up the bait, but at the same moment Mischief
thrust his hand between the bars of the cage and caught at its gorgeous
tail. The bird got away, but minus several beautiful feathers.

The noise brought the keeper to the spot... In vain he threatened and
coaxed ; Mischief would not give up the feathers.

Harry held out to him a cooky he had brought for Joker.

Dropping his prize, Mischief seized the cake and began to eat it,
while the keeper secured the feathers.

Harry divided a cooky between the peacock and the cockatoo, and Joker

mumbled something about his ill-mannered relations. Mary C. Crowley.
MY MISTAKE.— THE CHILDREN’S WAY.

MY MISTAKE.

‘I saw him leaning ’gainst a tree
Within a city square,

A tiny, little, ragged chap,
With curly chestnut hair.

One arm, half covered by a sleeve,
Concealed his face from sight ;

The cold fall wind was blowing strong,
Although the sun Shone bright.

“Why are you crying, little one?”
I stroked the curly head ;

“Perhaps you're hungry, cold, or hurt,
Or lost,” I gently said. /

He turned a smiling face to me
E’re I had ceased to ee
“] ain’t a-crying, ma'am ;” he said,
“Tm playin’ hide-and- ae
Cornelia Redmond.

THE CHILDREN’S WAY.

Just as the clock struck seven, the three Brown ‘children tumbled
pell-mell into the house, dropped their hats on the hall floor, and rushed
into the supper-room.

Mamma Brown was just sending out the “hot dish” to be kept
warm for.them.

3
THE CHILDREN’S WAY.

“ Why, children, where have you been?” she exclaimed in astonish-
ment, just as if the little Browns had not been quite as late every
night for a week, just as if they were hot usually as late four nights
out of every six.

“Oh,” cried Bess, before her brothers could speak, “I was having
just the loveliest time at tag, down at Della’s; I forgot all about



THE BUSY B’S IN THE B-HIVE.

that it was supper-time — and really couldn’ t have come if I had
remembered ! ”

“ And her brother Tom has the jolliest tool-chest that ever you
saw,” put in Bob; and Bert added, “ Yes, mamma, we were up in
his play-attic — that’s what they call it—making things—a water-
wheel, and ” — “a derrick and a scroll-saw bracket and a book-case,”
finished Bob. 7

“ And we're as hungry as the ‘ three bears,’ ” cried Bess, who never
waited for her brothers to say the things boys usually do say.
THE CHILDREN’S WAY.

“ Yes,” said Mamma Brown, “no doubt it was very enjoyable, but
all the same these irregular meal times are bad for children’s stomachs,
and unhappy heads and undeveloped muscles result. Besides, it” —

“Tips over all the household arrangements, ” finished Bob, where-
upon all laughed; even Mamma Brown herself smiled to hear her own
frequent phrase.

“ Well, it does that,” said she ; “but worse still is this finding of all
your pleasures away from home. One night it is down the street, an-
other it is up the street, the next it is over the way. Now,” and
Mamma Brown spoke so seriously that even Bob looked thoughtfully
at the sponge cake, “something must be done about it, or you'll be
weaned of the home-nest before you are half-fledged. I shall talk with
Papa Brown about it this very night.”

Bob suddenly looked up from the sponge cake, with a quick light
in his eye as if he had discovered some great and golden secret in the
yellow cubes:

“Tl tell you the very thing that will do it, Mamma Brown —
and Papa Brown will vote for it too, I know — give us a play-attic like
Tom's !”

“Yes, yes,” cried Bess and Bert, so near in a breath I’m not sure
which spoke first.

But I am sure it was Bert who added, “ With scroll saws and jig
saws and chisels and planes and hammers and nails and thin boards
and knives and all the fixings.” ;

* And all sorts of knitting needles, and crochet cecdiee and drawing
pencils, and water colors,” cried Bess.

Bob added modeling clay, and a little library of books telling how
to do things, Indian clubs and a lot of gymnastic apparatus.

Well, Papa Brown voted “ yea,” with both hands, and the children
had their way.

They called their play-attic the “ B-hive,” and soon the three Brown
children were known as “the busy B’s.”

At last reports the “hot dish” had not been sent out to be kept
warm for them for over a month.

C. P. Stuart.










—~

E SHIP.

THE BUILDING OF TH
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

A
Fille “A saat CY
t X\ a .

Pe

v ,
"Gi, PAL sted i wk
tee Me oe RO Cy.
feat Z
ey S Mitide_
(— eS
AEE

- 4)

es Tm, nly SOT,
AYRES - . i

THE MONKEYS ARE TRAPPED.



JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.
CHRISTMAS MONKEYS.

Ir was a cold night in December. Harry and Joker were sitting by
the fire listening to the stories of an old East Indian hunter. Joker had a
toothache. He was curled up on a hassock, and kept putting his hand to
his face; but every little while, in his interest in watching the stranger,
he forgot to moan and look solemn.

«¢ Ah!’ said the gentleman, glancing down at our monkey friend’s
new red stockings and wee slippers, ‘‘ those funny feet remind: me of a
trick by which a whole colony of monkeys may be caught at once.’’

And the hunter went on to relate how another hunter had some tiny
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

top boots made, which he carried into a grove where monkeys live. He
put his bundle under a great tree and threw himself upon the ground.

He began to pull off his boots and then to put them on again. The
monkeys eyed him curiously. Presently he got up and went away. Then
the rogues scrambled down and each secured a pair of boots. They slipped

their feet into them.

The hunter ran back. The monkeys tried to pull off their boots and
scamper up the tree again, but they all were a tight fit.

So the hunter ae twenty or thirty monkeys and carried them off
in his pack.

The old hunter went on talking to Grandpapa. Joker began to doze.
Harry sat looking into the fire. Suddenly a road opened in the midst of

-— yh ;

Let

IN FRONT OF THE GLOWING COALS,



the glowing coals which seemed to lead to the end of the earth. - Harry
was asleep too. Monkeys were capering about in seven-league boots.
They had come to bid Joker good-by.

Harry looked across at the old hunter. He had changed into Santa
Claus. He was crowding the monkeys into a big book.

‘‘Ha, ha! ’’ laughed he. ‘‘ See all these monkeys that have been
caught in the Christmas stockings of Our Lrrrnz Men anp Women! ”’

Mary C. Crowley.

La lira es stl alll

f

all

Ht

E



AFTER THE CIRCUS.
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.









HARRY PICKED UP A PIECE OF QUARTZ,

JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS. |
MONKEY GOLD MINERS.

Harry came to the United States, to visit his Grandpapa in South
Carolina. Joker was’ glad to come, he had heard so much -about his
American cousins.

One day Grandpapa took them to see a gold mine. Harry did not
pay much attention to the work itself. He was interested in a “gang of
tiny laborers which Joker watched in surprise.

These were twenty-four monkeys.

‘* At first we had only two, which were pets,’’ said the overseer ;
‘* but finding that these liked to play at helping the miners, I bought more
JOKER AND HIS RELATIONS.

and set them to work. We have no strict rules for them, but they come
and go with the men, and are very steady.’’

The monkeys glanced slyly at the visitors, but went on with what they
were doing. : :

Harry picked up.a piece of quartz to look at the specks of gold in it,
but at once four or five monkeys sprang at him, scolding and chattering,
and took it out of his hand.

‘«They always do so,’’ said the overseer. ‘‘ Sometimes the men
tease the monkeys by pretending to steal a piece of ore, but they always
make them put it back.’’ :

Several of the smartest monkeys were showing sume new ones how to
work. up. and tried to insist upon
teaching Joker, but he drew
away with a grand air, saying :
“‘ Wands off! Don’t you see
T’magentleman? I never did
anything useful in my life.’’

‘¢Then you ought to be
ashamed of yourself! ’’ said

‘the monkey miner gruffly, and
the whole gang began to jeer
at Joker.

When the horn sounded for
dinner, the monkeys stopped
work and scampered towards
a shed which was their board-

DINNER-TIME. ing-house. Harry and Joker

walked over there, too. They

found the little laborers seated in a row around the wall. A darky passed
to each a piece of corn bread, which was eaten with arelish. He said they
liked it better than any other food. Next, every monkey had a drink of
water out of a tin cup. After that they rested, or played pranks for an
hour, when the horn blew and they went to work again. ;
Mary C. Crowley.


a

Rare



MYLORD AND FLOD.

Edwin Landseer.)

or

(After the picture by S
“IN A MINUTE.”

“Tf you start at once, Charlie, you'll have time to take this basket
to Mrs. Smith on Clinton Street, and get to school by nine o’clock,
There are jellies and things for her sick daughter. Be sure to tell her,
too, she will find the money for the sewing she did, in a paper at the
bottom of the basket. I put it there so it wouldn’t get lost. I meant
to take it over myself, but it’s too warm this morning for me to walk so
far, and I don’t like to
have her wait.”

“ All right, mamma.
I will be ready in a
minute.”

“Tn a minute” was
a great word with Char-
lie. He always thought
there was time enough.

“ Well, hurry,” said
his mother. “Get your
books, and here’s the
basket.”

The Bartons lived
nearly a mile from the

CHARLIE KNEW HE WOULD BE TARDY. ss village where Charlie

went to school. Charlie

liked to go “cross lots” as far as he could, especially on so pleasant

a morning as this. The birds sang and the air was full of sweet odors

from the new-mown hay. There had been plenty of sun and rain to.

make the grass grow, and the farmers said they seldom cut the first
growth so early.

“Lots of time,” thought Charlie; so he set down the basket in a
safe place, and rambled about. He could whistle-very well for a small
boy, and he often tried to see if the birds would answer him.


“IN A MINUTE.”

It was a very warm morning and he began to feel the heat.

“T’ll sit down on the grass and cool off before I go,” he said. He
threw down his hat by the basket and wiped his flushed face.

But what was that! He counted.

“ One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine,” the town clock
called across the fields. And he thought the echo said, “Tardy this
time !” :

The first thing he did was to cry —don’t blame him, he was such a
little fellow! Then he put on his hat, picked up the basket, and ran ~
nearly every step of the way to Mrs. Smith’s house.

When he reached it the queerest things were going on. A rough
man was setting rickety old chairs and tables into the street, and Mrs.
Smith was crying.

Charlie told his mother’s message in a breathless way. Mrs. Smith
dived down to the bottom of the basket in a hurry. She fished out the
money, looked at it, and fairly shook a bill in the man’s face.

“There!” she cried, “ take that to Mr. Hardman. It’s the month’s
rent, an’ a week ahead. I only wish it had come half an hour ago,
before I had to move Jenny across the way. I’m afraid ’twill kill the
child, she’s that weak. Bless your mother, boy, she’s kept the roof
over my head, but my poor girl’s been dreadful shook up this morning,
she has.”

Then Charlie knew how much his loitering had cost these poor
people.

He hurried on to school. Of course he had a tardy mark, which
meant that not only he but all the others in his room must stay after
school. The rule worked well, for it became a point of honor not to
make others suffer for one’s own wrong-doing. Charlie felt the disgrace
keenly.

He told his mother when he reached home, for he was a truthful
boy ; and she was grieved.

“Tl never say ‘In a minute’ again, ” he thought.

Altogether it was a miserable time, and all because Charlie Barton
played by the way.

A. A,








































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































CONSULTING THE CLERK OF THE WEATHER.
TOMMY.

TOMMY.

Cecil’s papa, Dr. Tem-
ple, was only a boy when
his father (the “old doc-
tor”) gave him the little
white colt of long pedi-
gree; and there were many
funny times while the boy
and the colt were learning
their business in life.

Tommy is now twenty-
one, but he will stand
straight in the air and

_then fly away if the least
sniff of fire-works meets
his sensitive nostrils; he
is still “ coltish” and likes
to kick up his heels in the
pasture.

He is the family horse
and goes to church every
Sunday; if for any rea-
son he is driven past the

- church door on Sunday, after the early bell has rung, he seems vexed.

He is fond of Cecil’s mamma, and insists on walking carefully down
every hill when she rides, and he neighs if he hears her voice. He is
very happy when she comes to the pasture fence to pay him a call.

But Tommy does so love little girls! Cecil is a little girl. He
likes to help her eat her pears. and apples and johnny-cake. Like
other little girls Cecil often runs about while she is eating an apple or
a cookie, and sometimes Tommy takes off her hat to remind her that
he likes what she eats; he even unties his halter and follows her.



TOMMY, AND CECIL’S MAMMA,

\
TOMMY.

When Cecil was five years old she wished to go in the wagon-shed
to see the new kittens, but the horse and carriage stood across the
entrance.

“J s’all come, Tommy,” said she; and under him she went.
Tommy put his head down to watch her, but he stood quite still until
she was out of danger; then he began to paw the ground.

Tommy knows if any strap is not right, and if ever anything is
wrong about the carriage or harness he stops.

One day Cecil was leaning against his leg, chatting with a little
cousin, when a frightened auntie saw that she accented her talk with
little pinches of the shining black skin, and now and then a pull at a
hair of the long tail; Tommy trembled a little, but he made no other
motion.

Tommy even lets Periwinkle, the cat, use his legs for ladders, for
nothing pleases the cat more than to sit on Tommy’s back and watch
for any mouse that may be hunting in the stall for a bit of grain.
Periwinkle always sits.xp like a dog to Tommy and “asks” when about
to run up Tommy’s leg.

Tommy went to make a “professional call” one day. He grew
tired of waiting for his master and went off alone, to the house of a
very sick man; he stood a while before the door, and then turned to-
ward home. He met his master, and had to go back and make a
second visit. Dr. Temple told the story to his patient, and the sick
man laughed so hard that a longed-for perspiration appeared, and he
got well. ° ; Adelaide Cilley Waldron.



VERY STYLISH.
DOT’S CALL.

DOT’S CALL. ,

Long ago when Dot was a little girl she went abroad, and one day
she made the acquaintance of two little girls whom she has never
forgotten.

cane was digging away i re sand, and suddenly as she looked up,
she saw two queer children. They were standing right before her.
Dot leaned back on her little sand shovel and looked at them and they
looked at her. Dot thinks they never would have spoken if she had
not spoken first.

“ You are little Dutch girls, aren’t you?” she said.

They nodded. They understood some English, because so many
travelers came there.

« And, little Dutch girls, where do you live?” Dot asked ae

They pointed to a small fishing hut near by, and the next thing
that Dot did was to propose that they go home, and that she go
with them.

They went without a word, and Dot too. The hut stood a little
back from the water, and was protected from the tide by a long bank
of sand. There was an old cook stove, chairs, a table and two bunks
where the little girls said their father and brother slept. Dot saw an
old sail hanging in one corner, and she went and looked behind it. There
was a bed made on the floor. “Little Dutch girls, is this your bed-
room ?” she asked.

The children nodded as before.

Then they put a kettle on the stove and’ poured in some -clams,
and in a very short time they offered their caller a big blue bowl of
hot clam broth. Dot ate the bowl of broth, and then she said, “I must
go now, Dutch children, ne I will come again to-morrow. I am | ever
So sorry you are so poor.”

Dot is a woman now, but she sien thinks of those little girls, and
feels ashamed of herself.

Annabel B.
DOT MAKES NEW ACQUAINTANCRS.


FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

HEN I was a small girl my
teacher called on me to write
a composition about “ Fruit,”
and I thought I had a rich
subject. After I had written
all that I knew about apples,
pears, peaches, grapes, plums,

cherries, melons, berries, oranges, bananas, lemons

and pineapples, I thought I had told of all the

“) fruits on earth. :

Years afterward, I went down into the Torrid
Zone, and when our ship would anchor in the har-
bors of the West Indies or Brazil, I was surprised
and delighted as the -

ORANGE BLossoms anp AtUit boats would come

FRUIT. around us, loaded down

with many fruits un-

known to me, red, yellow or purple, and of

delicious flavor; sometimes there would be

bright-colored parrots or chattering mon-
keys perched among the shining clusters.

Then too there are often many kinds
of one fruit.

There are at least several dozen kinds
of oranges. The wild ones have the thick-
est skins and are called bitter-sweets.

The most delicate orange is the tan-
gerine, sometimes called the spice orange,
or kid glove orange. The inside, as it
ripens, becomes smaller than the rind, and
will rattle if shaken.




THE BANANA,
“RESTLESS!”

There are also many varieties of bananas. Bananas must all be cut
green, as the fruit bursts if allowed to ripen on the tree.
The tree looks like a large lily plant, with shining leaves a yard long.
It bears but one bunch of fruit, and must then be cut down, to make
room for the young trees which sprout up around it.
Anna R. Henderson.





CHRISTMAS EVERGREENS; THE TUG-OF-WAR.



“ RESTLESS!”
( See neat page.)

The little drawings of fowl and barnyard birds in the picture called
“Restless!” were made at a Poultry Show in England. The artist was
much amused by the queer doings of the Cochins and Brahmas, the
gamecocks and pigeons, and caught the fun in his sketches. The
fowl made many sorts of gestures, took many sorts of attitudes; but,
one and all, they were impatient at being shut up and looked at by ten
thousand people. S. 8.
HOW LITA HELPED. ;

HOW LITA HELPED.

Early one morning Lita was in great distress; so unhappy!

A big oak-tree stands close to our house, and one warm May day
Lita had discovered a nest on one of the limbs. Mr. and Mrs. Robin
had built it, and it was all finished and we had known nothing about it.

From this time on, Lita had gone every morning to the chamber
- window and looked down to see if the nest was all right. And Mrs.
Robin was always there, sitting patiently.

After a while Lita had joyfully announced a discovery. There
were some little birdies peering out from the feathers of Mrs. Robin ;
and when Mrs. Robin flew off, Lita had counted four baby robins. To
and fro, day after day, Mrs. Robin had flown, feeding the hungry little
mouths, and always to Lita’s fresh delight.

But this morning, early, we all had heard a great chattering and
scolding at our oak. We could not learn the cause. But when Lita
looked from a lower window she saw the poor robin babies had fallen
to the ground, and the nest was tipped sharply toone side. The parent
robins were not to be seen. But when we all went out to the tree to
pick up the little birds, we heard the old birds twitter fiercely.

Only two of the darlings were alive. Lita said we must make a
home for these. But how? We had no ladder with which the old
nest could be reached. Nor was it safe to make a nest on the ground.

In a moment or two Lita had a happy thought. She brought a
small basket in which she had put some cotton and other soft stuff, and
we set the two little birds into it. Then we hung it for her on a limb
as high as could be reached from a step-ladder. __

; At first the parent robins would not go to the basket. Lita said

they were afraid of some trick. They would fly about and sometimes
come close to the basket; after awhile Mrs. Robin flew into it. Such a
chattering as there was then! After that the parent robins fed the
little birds just as before, as though nothing had happened.

Surely Lita has had a hand in a great happiness. F. EB. Saville.


‘¢ RESTLESS! ’? — SKETCHES AT A POULTRY SHOW.
FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND. —II.

Bs

YAS
bbdadat aber Darred sa ldadal LL ihr
ry rie EN Ret 7
2 \\" 7

A

NE

gr

A COCOA-NUT-TREE,

plant if it is se

before they: ripen.

Did: you ever eat guava jelly?




HE cocoa-nut-tree grows to a height of fifty or

sixty feet. It has no branches, but it has a
cluster of long-stemmed leaves at the very
top. Under this cluster are bunches of great
nuts. These nuts are inclosed in a fibrous
sheath which is two inches thick. This
sheath, when cut off, makes a good scrubbing-
brush. Before the nut is ripe the inside is
soft and creamy, and may be eaten with a

spoon; this becomes hard white nut-meat before we
buy them at the North.

Do you like those three-sided brown Brazil nuts ?
Do you know that several of them grow together
inside a larger shell, almost as big as a cocoa-nut?
they fit:in together like the lobes of an orange?

I have heard of children who thought pine-
apples grew on trees that resembled pine-trees.
Pine-apples grow on little plants which are set in
rows in fields, The
crown of each pine-
apple makes.:a new
t in the ground.
There are several -varieties. The
apples when freshly picked are much
better and juicier than those bought
in Northern lands which are gathered



A’ PINE-APPLE’ PLANT.

The guava looks somewhat. like ace .
a quince, but: the meat is pirtk and it has small hard seeds. “There
is a fruit that looks much like the guava, which is called the areca.
CHILDREN’S CONVERSATIONS.

The pomegranate is a refreshing fruit. The pomegranate-trees
bear bright scarlet blossoms; the fruit looks like a large, light-green
apple and it has something which looks like a crown on the blossom-
end ; it is full of red juicy grains as tender and agreeable as the pulp of
an orange. The fruit often bursts open on the tree, and the tempting
red grains peep out.

A pomegranate-tree is a beautiful thing to look at, at the time
when it is full of scarlet blossoms, and at the time when it is full of
ripe bursting fruit. Anna R. Henderson.



ae GO THAT sTRING!”’



CHILDREN’S CONVERSATIONS.

How very much they have to say !

They see each other every day,

But yet there’s scarcely’ time, they find,

To tell each other all their mind ;

They cannot possibly get through
With all the talking they must do!
MY NEW DAY.

MY NEW DAY.

To-day has come; and I

‘In this new day will try
To do with earnest mind
Whatever work I find.

In all my work and play
T’ll try my best to-day
In gentleness to speak,
For others’ joy to seek.

And all the whole day long
I'll try with purpose strong
To keep my spirit true,
And deeds of love to do.

Emilie’ Poulsson.



THE KITTEN AND DUCK, THE DOG AND PARTRIDGE.

Animals act very much as people do; for instance, they often choose
friends. If you have not known this before, it is because you have not
been much with animals, or else you have not noticed what they did.

In a herd of cows you may often see two that keep side by side and
feed near each other day after day. Does not this show that they like
each other more than they like the others ?

If two horses that have worked together and lived together are
taken away from each other, when they meet again they say “ How do
you do?” with much gladness, and they seem to ask each other many
questions.
THE KITTEN AND DUCK, THE DOG AND PARTRIDGE.

Not long ago at an
English farmhouse there
lived a kitten and a large
white duck that were dear
friends. Everywhere the
duck went the kitten
went; she would walk by
her side, and purr, and
rub her head against the
duck’s wing. Now and
them the duck would stop
and run her bill over the
kitten’s fur; the kitten
seemed to like this very
much. Sometimes she
would stand on her two



THE DEAR FRIENDS OUT FOR A WALK.

little black hind-feet and clasp her Ee around the duck’s neck.
The kitten never. took any notice of the other ducks.
At another English farmhouse some partridge eggs were set under



THE KITTEN CARESSES THE DUCK.

a hen. Only one little part-
ridge was hatched.

When he grew up he did
not care for his hen-mother,
or for any of the fowl .in the
farmyard. He “made friends”
with a pet terrier dog, and he
would follow this little dog
for miles. When the dog lay
down to sleep, the partridge
would come and sit by his head
and wait there while he slept.

If any person petted the
terrier, the partridge would fly
into a rage and peck at the
caressing hand; no one knew.
A NEST OF WONDER-BOXES.

whether the bird
did not wish the
terrier to have any
friend but _him-
self, or whether
he was angry be-
cause the caresses
were not given to
him. He would
not be happy un-
til his friend
turned and came
away with him;



and the dog nearly always would come away and walk with his bird-
friend to some spot of green grass where they would have a merry

race, and then the bird would grow good-natured again.
Sophie Scissors.

A NEST OF WONDER-BOXES.

I know of a little brown wonder-box
That will only ope to the south wind’s
knocks,
Holds a thousand of green leaves folded
tight,
Holds a thousand of flowers pink and
white,
Holds a tree with its branches all com-
plete, ey
And fruit that is golden, juicy and sweet —
And all the fruit holds, snugly packed.down,
More and more boxes, tiny and brown!




\ THE RESCUE OF ROSABELLE.
FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND. — III.

ID you ever hear of musk-melons and
grapes that grow on trees?

There are in the tropics two varieties ©
of a fruit called the mamao. The trees
are about eight or ten feet high. They
have no branches, but a crown of large, —
long-stemmed leaves.

The fruit is like a yellow musk-melon
or cantaloupe, and it is eaten with salt
and pepper. In one variety it grows
close around the trunk of the tree, up
under the leaves. In the other kind

- the melons hang on stems more than a
foot long, and’ are very sweet and rich.

One of the largest, handsomest shade
trees of the tropics is the jaboticaba.

It is tall and spreading, with small
leaves that grow in thick clusters. The
massive trunk and the limbs are very
smooth and of a light brown color.

All over the trunk and larger branches come out tiny flowers with-
out stems. They drop off to give place toa grapelike fruit. The-skin
is a little tough, and it has but one seed, but the color is purple ‘and if
you were to see them piled in baskets in the market, you would think
them grapes which had been picked from the stems. They grow so
thickly they almost cover the trunk and larger limbs of the trees.

I know a lovely valley where there is a grove of these trees; and I
used to walk there with a little girl who was fond of the fruit, but the
name was almost too much for her to speak, and though she did not
stammer at other times, she would always ask for “some jaboticab-
boticab-boticabas.” Anna R. Eenderson.



THE MAMAO.








GIVING THE LITTLE DOGGIE A CHANCE.


TWO FRIENDS.



AS GOOD AS IF HE WERE A BOY.

TWO FRIENDS.

They are cosily cuddled together
In the glow of the bright sunshine,
The sweep of the sweet breeze o’er them,
And the tremble of a delicate vine ;
The little lad’s arms are clasping
In a firm and affectionate tie
The little dog’s shaggy shoulders,
As there on the step they lie.

The little lad’s head goes bobbing,
The little lad’s eyelids droop,

But still in the misty dreamland
The joys of the springtime group:
TWO FRIENDS.

“We're a-rushin’ over the meadow,
An’ the May winds blow, blow, blow,
We’re deep, deep down in the marshes
Where the jacks and the buttercups grow.
That old gray owl or some ’un
Flaps out with a terrible noise,
It’s a tryin’ its best to scare us,
Us two little boys!” -

The little dog, winking and blinking,
Crosses his little damp paws,

And between the friskings and yelpings
Creeps the calmest of nature’s laws;
But there’s never a lull in the pleasures

That are crowding the puppy’s brain:





AS GOOD AS IF HE WERE A DOG.

“We're a-steppin’ into the puddles
Made by the glistenin’ rain ;
Were a-coolin’ our heads in the water,
We're a-jumpin’ the mossy logs,
We’re a-stumblin’ an’ screamin’ an’ barkin’,
Us two little dogs.”
Louise R. Baker.
FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND. —IV.

O you like lemonade? I cannot imagine a
boy or girl that would answer “no.” It is
almost the only fruit drink you know of in
this country. But in the tropics they have
many fruits from which to make drinks, and
they are highly prized, as the warm climate
creates thirst.

Right here I will tell you that the next

time you say “as sour as a lemon,” you must

Bee remember that there are plenty of sweet
lemons. Their flavor is a faint and insipid sweet.

One of the delicious fruits from which to make a drink is the caja.

The caja is yellow, slender and oblong;
it is very juicy and very sour.

The tamarind-tree bears long, thick beans.
On breaking one of these beans you find ~
it filled with a sour gummy substance. If
you soak and sweeten these beans a)
make a pleasant drink.

My favorite fruit in the tropics was the
cashew. It is pear-shaped, smooth and yel-
low, and the seed grows on the outside —at.
the blossom-end. This seed is a brown,
kidney-shaped nut; it tastes like a roasted
chestnut if you roast it, but it will blister
your mouth if you eat it raw. As to the
fruit—there is nothing of the fruit to eat;
it is all spongy fiber and juice. But such
delicious juice! It needs no sugar. You may sip it from the soft
pulp, or squeeze it out into a tumbler.





THE CASHEW.

Anna R. ‘Henderson. ;


& GARDEN PARTY. é
AN APPLE THIEF.

AN APPLE THIER,
(A True Story.)

Mark’s father has six colts.

Last summer he pastured them on a run-out farm that has a large
orchard of grafted fruit.

The fences are down, but the apple-trees are large and tall, and
Mark’s father thought if he gathered his apples early the colts could
only get the windfalls and the few they could reach from the lower
branches. :

But the big red baldwins and the russets kept growing less and less
on the trees. On many of the lower limbs all the apples were gone,
even those that were out of reach of the colts.

“Thieves are at work in that orchard,” Mark heard his father say
one day. “But they do not come in the night, else there would be
tracks in the dew; still, every day, there are bushels of apples
taken.” .

“T will watch and have those thieves put in jail!” Mark said. “I
am going up there to fly my kite and I will take the dinner trumpet
and hide in the big fir by the spring, and when you hear the trumpet
blow, you run, father, and help me catch the thieves.”

Mark took his kite and the trumpet and his dinner and supper in a
big lunch basket, and he marched off across the hills to the colts’
pasture.

He had not been gone an hour when they heard his trumpet blow!
blow! blow! and Mark’s father, and Uncle Jacob and the hired man,
all ran for the orchard, but when there, all they could see was Mark
swinging his cap from the fir-tree, and six colts standing by the fence
looking at Mark’s kite as if they were trying to decide what it was.

“T’ve found the thief! Ive found the thief!” Mark shouted.
“It’s that colt, black Dan. He came up to a tree and reached up his
long neck and grabbed a limb between his teeth, and shook it, and
AN APPLE THIEF.

shook it, till the apples rattled down thick and fast, and then he and
the other colts had a jolly time eating them.”

“Let us watch the sly thief,’ Uncle Jacob said.

Mark and the men hid in thefirsand waited.

By and by the colts came trotting back to the orchard.

Black Dan sniffed the air and looked sharply about. He could see
no one.

Then he trotted along under the trees till he came to one which
was loaded with great red nod-heads.



SIX ROGUES.

The other colts followed close at his heels. They watched every
move of Dan’s cunning black head.

He stretched up his long neck and seized a branch in his teeth and
shook it so strongly that every apple tumbled off.

The waiting colts pounced upon them. But that was the last
luncheon of nice grafted apples they had, for Mark’s father sprang out
from the firs and drove the colts from the orchard. The rest of the
season he pastured them in another field where black Dan could not
meddle with the apple-trees. Clarissa Potter.
A MISTAKEN BIRD.

A MISTAKEN BIRD.

AFTER A BUG!



The man who had to keep:
in order al] the telegraph poles
in a certain part of Great
Britain could not understand
who did the mischief! In

“twenty or thirty poles he had
found big holes; the holes
did not reach quite through
the poles; they looked as

. though they had been dug

out with a big roguish jack-
knife. :

‘ boys at it!” the Inspector
called out.

At this a bird, who: sat
close by in the bushes, came
near laughing aloud.

“A boy!” he said. “TI
would like to see a boy who
could climb up and hold on,
and dig out a hole like that! ”

The Inspector set a man
to watch and catch “those
boys.”

But the man did not catch a “boy.” He caught a woodpecker.
The woodpecker had thought the humming sound conducted through
the wood of the poles from the wires was made by insects, and he had

expected to get a good dinner!

The bird and a piece of one of the poles was given by the Inspector

to a museum in Wales. ©

Sophie Scissors.
FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.—V.

~ OUBTLESS you have heard
\ » an old-fashioned song which
begins in this way :

‘¢ Oh, come with me in my little canoe, -

Where the sea is calm and the sky is
blue ;

Oh, come with me, for 1 long to go

To the isles where the mango apples
grow.”



And you have wondered
what “‘mango apples” were. They are
fruits which grow on a large and
spreading tree which is the shade and
» . pride of many a yard in Southern

MANGO APPLES, lands.

The fruit when ripe, looks like a pale green apple, with a slight
flush of red. It is never regular in shape; it always looks as if it
had been a little
mashed on one
side.

The flesh - is
fibrous, and there
is a large seed in
the center. The
mango apple
tastes much more
like a peach than
an apple. It is
not often liked by
strangers, but it is always very highly prized by the Southern people.

There is another fine shade-tree which bears a delicate, acid fruit ‘



PASSION FLOWER VINE.
GRANDMAMMA’S DOLL.

this tree is called the pitanga. The fruit is about the size and color of
a strawberry, but it is star-shaped and it has a hard seed. It is eaten
with sugar and cream.

Did you ever see the passion flower? If so you have been struck
with its beauty. The passion flower vine of the tropics bears a fruit
called the maracuja. It looks like the papaw of this country, but it
has small seeds imbedded in a jellied pulp. I have.seen these vines
climbing thickly from one great mango-tree to another; sometimes
they were beautiful with white and purple blossoms; at other times

they were loaded with tempting fruit.
Anna R. Henderson.

GRANDMAMMA’S DOLL.

And were you really Grandmamma’s doll ?
You queer, old-fashioned little stranger,
With your big black eyes both open wide
As if you saw some dreadful danger,
And your painted curls all parted neatly,
And your little red mouth that smiles so sweetly!

Did Grandmamma use to play with you,
You dear old-fashioned, old-time dolly ?
Did she use to kiss you as I kiss mine?
(My doll’s name’s Blanche, and your name’s Polly !}
Oh, dearie me! it seems so queer
To hold you, Polly, beside me here !

For Grandmamma says you're ever so old —
Grandmamma says you're sixty-three }
Why, Blanche is only two and a half,
But just as cunning as she can be.
GRANDMAMMA'’S DOLL.

It seems so queer that you're so old,
And look so young! did Grandmamma scold

When you fell out of the chair one day

And broke your nose ?—or did she cry ?
Or did she cuddle you up and say,

“ Oh, never mind, Polly, by and by
Your little nosey will be all well” ?
Oh, dolly! if only you could tell!

Grandmamma says, for twenty years
You lay in her lower bureau drawer,
Until one day —do you remember?
She took you out — do you know what for ?
She took you out for her little girl —
A dear little girl —her name was Pearl.



And that little girl was my own mother —
Just think of it now, you dear old dolly!
My own girl-mamnia — how queer it seems ! —

Oh, can’t you tell me about her, Polly ?

h How did she look? Was she always good ?

I wish -you could tell me—I wish you
could!

And now J’ve got you, you dear old doll!
And Grandmamma smiles, and mamma



does too,
When I take you out in the park with
Blanche,
And the little girls stop me to look at
you—

GIRL-GRANDMAMMA AND POLLY.

It’s just as funny as it can be

That you look so young at sixty-three !
Harriet Francene Crocker.
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IN THE READING-LESSON.

Tracer: Now, Mary, can you tell me what
a buzzard is ?

Mary: Jt is a bird.

TzacHEeR: What kind of a bird ?

Mary: It is a buz—a buz—its a kind of
buzzing bird ! !


ELEPHANTS IN INDIA.

ELEPHANTS IN INDIA.

If there is one thing which an elephant enjoys above all things else,
it is his bath.

The splashings and gurglings and sport of the great elephants
at their morning bath in the Frog Pond on Boston Common is one of
the favorite sights of Boston children when the big circuses come to
town.

In India elephants are used to draw the great guns of the heavy
batteries. They take their baths in the barracks, at the troughs,
where they drink, and they behave much better about it than many
children.

They cannot duck themselves all over as the traveled elephants do
on Boston Common. Instead, they have to lie down and be patient
while they are washed by their attendants. They turn themselves
about very promptly to suit their convenience.

The attendant rubs the hide with a piece of stone, instead of a
sponge; and if the stone slips out of his hand the elephant politely
picks it up with his trunk and hands it back.

After they have been well scrubbed the elephants give themselves
a shower bath, using their trunks to dash the water upon themselves,
and they can hit any part of their bodies with ease.

After the bath they form into a row, side by side, ready for
breakfast.

Hach elephant has five bundles of straw at this meal, and each
bundle has two pounds of rice init. These bundles are laid down before
the elephants. But they are not permitted to help themselves, because
they would spill and scatter the rice. At the word “Feed!” each
elephant raises its trunk. The attendant then lifts a bundle and lays
it in the elephant’s mouth. So the great elephants are fed like little
babies by the soldier nurses.

Their supper is of sugar-cane and coarse grass.
Sophie Scissors.
a























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE ELEPHANTS AT THEIR BATH.




































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE ELEPHANTS AT THEIR BREAKFAST,


THE SUN-BONNET DOLLS.

THE SUN-BONNET DOLLS.

I do not think that many of you “little men and women” have
ever met Mrs. Hawkeye and her little girl.

The queerest thing about the Hawkeye family is that they always
wear large sun-bonnets.

Mrs. Hawkeye is a paper lady, and all little men and women who
are handy with their scissors may have Hawkeye households of their
own.

In the right-hand section of the picture on the next page you see
Mrs. Hawkeye speaking to her little girl.

In the left-hand section of the picture you see how Mrs. Hawkeye
is cut out of a folded paper.

The line a 6 ¢ shows the whole or folded edge. You can easily
trace the outline which you are to cut. When you have cut it, just
fold over the top part, which is the bonnet, making the fold on the
dotted line ; then you will at once see the crown and cape take shape.
Now fold the arms over and you will have Mrs. Hawkeye complete.

The little girl is made in the same way, except that she is smaller
and her dress is cut a little shorter.

You may make the bonnet a different color by using paper which
is of different colors on the two sides. Ethel Paton.

SENSE BETTER THAN SOUND. .

‘Your parrot does not prattle, Miss,
But sits there all day winking.” _
“ That’s not to her discredit, sir,
She makes it up in thinking.”
Frank H. Stauffer.


MRS. HAWKEYE AND HER LITTLE GIRL.
FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.

FRUITS OF A SUNNY LAND.—VI

The Fruta da Conde is sometimes called the custard apple ; it is as’
large as an apple, but has a rough surface, and is filled with a DUD like
white custard with black seeds in it.

I knew a family where this fruit could be kept only by locking it
in a closet.

A valued fruit is the ameixa; a solid yellow plum which grows
in clusters. The alligator pear when eaten with salt and pepper, is
relished by many.

The cambonca is a round, yellow, smooth-skinned fruit.

The grumichama looks like large whortleberries growing on trees.

The carambola is one of the best acid fruits.

The rose apple is round and pink with a large smooth seed. Its
davor is very delicate. It smells like roses, and I fancied it tasted like
rese leaves.

I wish I could describe to you the many flavors of the fruits I have
named, but that would be as impossible as
for you to tell the taste of a strawberry or a
peach to a person who had never seen them.

In the sunny Southern countries there
are fruits through the year. I have de-
i scribed only a few of them.
eS They are very abundant and cheap ;

“ss but as they perish soon only a few
kinds can be’sent North.

The traveler who has feasted
on them feels a regret as he
sails away that he can no
longer enjoy the rich and delicate refreshment which these strange
fruits afford. He can never taste them again unless he returns to the
strange hot countries where they grow.



THE CUSTARD snes

Anna R. Henderson.


























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































““SPRING FLOWERS, FRESH FROM THE COUNTRY.”
THREE LITTLE MAIDS.

THREE LITTLE MAIDS.

Three little maids
By the great salt sea —
Merry and happy
As maids should be;
Diving and splashing
Where the surf comes dashing —
Floating on the waves
Of the great salt sea!

AT THE BEACH.



Three little maids
In the dusty town;
Very much freckled, .
And ever so brown!
A CHAMPION OF LUNCHEONS. Sue



IN TOWN.

Summer is done,

And so is their fun —
Sorry little maids

To come back to town!

A CHAMPION OF LUNCHEONS.

M. de Lesseps is the famous Frenchman who built the famous Suez
Canal between the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea.
_ ‘This great hundred-mile ditch was dug through the desert isthmus
that connects Asia and Africa. Before this was done European ships
had to sail down all the western coast of Africa, around the Cape of
Good Hope and up the east coast, through the Indian Ocean, to reach
India and China. Now the Suez Canal saves half of this sea-voyage,
for the European ships can go “’cross lots.”
A CHAMPION OF LUNCHEONS.

A few years ago M. de Lesseps tried to build a canal on our Ameri-
can Continent, across the Isthmus of Panama, but this time he did not
succeed.

This famous canal-builder is also famous as the father of a large and
beautiful flock of children. What jolly times the nine de Lesseps boys
and girls must have together—no need to wait for little neighbors to
come before the game can begin, no need to go away from home for
playmates. nee

M. de Lesseps seems likely, too, to become a children’s hero, for he
is the champion of luncheons. I am told he has given orders that every









THE DE LESSEPS FAMILY.

one of his nine little men and women shall have luncheons as many and

as large as they like.
Ah, what is that? I hear the cake-loving girls and the gingerbread-
hungry boys shouting: “Hurrah for M. de Lesseps !”’
VERY LIKH A FAIRY STORY.

Wait a bit—do not be hasty. The de Lesseps luncheons are not
cake and gingerbread luncheons. The de Lesseps luncheons are bread
and butter luncheons—no cake, no cookies, no pie, no gingerbread.

Ah, I hear the cake and gingerbread children cry “Oh! oh! oh!”

M. de Lesseps says any boy or girl hungry enough to eat plain bread
and butter needs a luncheon and will not be harmed by it. Perhaps he
is right.

Sophie Scissors.

VERY LIKE A FAIRY STORY.

Little Gretchen was going home from school when the wonderful
thing happened.

She was in the woods. She was alone. ~ If whistling Hans and
laughing Bertha, and the other noisy, romping ones had been with her,
the Little Man would have hidden himself away. »

As it was, he came out boldly in the path ‘before her and said,
“Little girl, come under the toadstool and tell me your name.”

Gretchen started to say she was too large, for the toadstool was
hardly three inches high, while she was near three feet. Before she
could speak the words, however, she felt herself growing smaller —
smaller than little brother Karl, smaller than baby Greta. The next
minute she was no taller than the Little :Man:himself, as she followed
him under the toadstool and told him her name was Gretchen.

The Little Man seated himself on a small toadstool, beside a middle-
sized toadstool. The big toadstool spread over them like an umbrella.
Then he whisked out a sheet of birch-bark paper, and a quill pen made
of a humming-bird feather. He dipped the pen in a tiny acorn-cup of
ink and wrote down her name. That done, he looked up and smiled
and spoke :

“And you are the little girl who didn’t whisper in school ?— the
little girl who learned her lessons ?— the little girl who comforted poor
VERY LIKE A FAIRY STORY.

lame Lena when she fell and bumped her nose ?— the little girl who
wants to help the house-mother because the house-father is ill and
can’t?”
Little Gretchen was too timid to reply in words, but the blushes
that made her pink cheeks pinker after each question, said “Yes”
- quite as plainly.

The Little Man wrote once more with the humming-bird quill.
Then he smiled again to
Gretchen and said:

“eT was sure you were
the same little girl. Now
youmay go — but remem-
ber this one thing: under
‘the pine at the edge of
the woods, among the
young uncurling ferns,
grows a pink lady’s-slip-
per. Pluck it, and take
it to the house-mother.
Within the flower she will
find the help your loving
little heart longs to take

to her.”
Before Gretchen could

speak her thanks, she

found herself suddenly

shooting up to the height

of the girl she had been,

and when she bent to look

under the toadstool, the

THE LITTLE MAN WROTE DOWN HER NAME. Little Man had vanished.

So Gretchen. hastened

home, plucking the lady’s-slipper under the pine, as she had been told.

When the house-mother heard little Gretchen’s story, she opened.
the flower, and lo! within there was a glittering diamond!


HOMESICK.

She hastened to tell the house-father; he started up in bed, he
looked at it, and at once declared it must be the precious gem the
Princess had lost from her engagement ring, that very day week, when
riding to the hunt, and for which a great reward was offered.

The Princess had halted with the Prince under that very pine, and
when she slipped off her glove that he might kiss her hand, the gem
had fallen from its setting and been cunningly caught in the pouch of
the flower.

Of course Gretchen took the pink lady’s-slipper to the Princess,
with the strange and beautiful dewdrop still glittering within, and then
— why, of course all went well forever after.

C. P. Stuart.



HOMESICK.
A ROSE QUEEN.

A ROSE QUEEN.

In Europe and in the Far East the people care more about flowers
than we do. In Japan the Japanese have a holiday when the cherry-
trees and the plum-trees are in blossom; whole families go to see the
trees in flower. In many parts of England they still keep May Day to
celebrate the return of the spring flowers; the children choose a May
Queen and crown her with wreaths, while the older people go out
into the woods and fields a-Maying to bring home budding vines and
flowering boughs.

In Hungary they choose a Rose Queen instead of a May Queen.
In the season of roses there is a day set apart for the Rose Queen’s
Festival. On that day the Rose Queen and her Court drive through
all the village streets in great state. Her chariot is a country cart
hung thick with garlands of roses. It has an arch wreathed with
roses. Under this arch the Rose Queen sits, and she wears a crown of
roses, and roses are pinned on her gown, and she carries a splendid
bouquet.

Her courtiers walk beside the coach and carry baskets of roses ;
they scatter roses all along the roads, and give nosegays to the neople
that come out to see the show.

Not long ago a Rose Queen was married on her festival day, and
the grand Hungarian Earl, whose castle was near the village, sent a
gypsy band of music to play for the procession ; and he gave the bride
a wedding present of a large sum of money, and he and his wife and
the castle guiests came out to see the procession pass. At night he
gave the village a feast on the green, and there was moonlight danc-
ing until midnight. The pretty peasant oe is still called the
Rie Bride.. :

In our own land we are growing to keep Easter Sunday with flow-
ers in our churches and in our homed and I think that this is the most
beautiful custom of all.

Sophie Scissors.






































































































































THE PROCESSION OF THE ROSE QUEEN.
TOLD IN THE DARK.



‘“¢ SUCH A MANY KITS’ FACES.”

TOLD IN THE DARK.

Leo was in bed. He had said “ NowI lay me;” then he had asked
his mother to turn down the light.

Leo was a very lion to face all outside foes. He was not so brave
when face to face with the little Knight of Right within him. That
was what mother called his conscience — the little Knight of Right.

Mother knew what it meant when Leo asked to have the light
turned out; she sat down on the bed, and took Leo’s hand, and said in
a tender encouraging way:

“Tell mother all about it.”

Leo lay very still for some minutes, then he burst out in a boy’s
way right in the middle of the story:

“ P’r’aps you'll think ’twasn’t so—an’ I don’t know as Id b’lieve it
myself, only I saw them with my own eyes—I did, mother! an’ you'll
say yes, won’t you, mother? I couldn’t help it, really I couldn’t — an’
she’s down in the kitchen!”

Mother smiled. She stroked the little brown fist. She spoke
gently :

“What was the strange sight, and who is ‘she’ ?”

“Well, it was this way. We boys were coming home from skating,
just dark, an’ a cat scatted across the road, an’ all the fellows snow-
balled her —I did too, mother —an’ she tried to squirm through a
picket fence an’ got caught an’ couldn’t get through, or back either, an’
all the boys yelled—an’ that very minute the East Enders fired on us
TOLD IN THE DARK.

from over the wall, an’ we had a reg’lar fight, an’ drove ’em all the way
back, just like the Minute Men that time at Lexington.

“Then it was dark, an’ I came home from the corner alone. An’
along in the pine woods — this is true, mother, ’tis, | saw it with my
own eyes —I saw that kit’s face in the dark, in the air —an’ lots of
other kittens’ faces — the dark was full of them, an’ all the eyes looked
at me, so beggin’-like! Iwas so sorry — an’ —a little bit afraid too —
an’ I just started an’ run.”

“Did you leave the kitten faces behind when you ran home?”
asked mother.

. “T didn’t run heme ee run back the road to where we snow-
balled the kit; an’ there she was, stuck fast in the sone an’ mewin’
just awful —an’ I got her out an’ aroun her home, an’ — an’ — she’s
down in the kitchen now!”

The little brown fingers squirmed oa oer s, as he went on
doubtfully, “ An’ you will say yes, won’t you, mother? I couldn’t help
it —I really couldn’t, mother—an’ we’ve only three other kits, you
know — only three, mother!”

Mother lifted the little brown fist and kissed it. “ We will take
care of her somehow,” she said.

Leo was very still for the next minute or two, then he suddenly
asked :

‘“‘ But the faces, mother, the kittens’ faces in the dark — how came
they there? Such a many kits’ faces—and such eyes!”

Mother kissed Leo again, this time on his red lips, as she replied :

«Perhaps it was the doing of the little Knight of Right !”
Charles Stuart Pratt.



If boys and girls are only good,

_ With happy hearts and faces,

The world will never miss at all
Fine clothes and frills and laces.
A WINGED PEONY.

A WINGED PEONY.

One day, two years ago, a little German boy saw a pretty sight.
He was on the way, with his father and a friend, to visit a famous
cavern not far from the banks of the river Elbe. -It was a beautiful
day. There had been a thunder storm and a shower, and now the sky
was blue, the sun shone, the air was fresh, and everything sparkled.
While the two men walked along in the green meadows, the little boy
ran up the hills. He felt like a little colt and he “ kicked up his heels”
and he rolled over and over and he laughed and he sang. In fact
the little German boy behaved for all the oud like a jolly little
American boy.

All at once he came back in haste.

“Come,” said he, “come with me quick! ‘There is a daisy at the ‘
top of the hill, and six or eight butterflies are sitting on the crown of
the flower. Come quick! It looks like a winged peony.”

The men went up the hill and at the top they saw a great golden-col-
ored peony-like flower. It was a daisy, as the boy had said, and on it
sat ten butterflies, while another was flying and fluttering about
the gorgeous group. While they stood there this butterfly alighted
among the others. ;

The thunder storm had probably lamed their wings and made them
too stupid to fly away, and they had sought the daisy as a support.

One of the men, who was a naturalist, cut the stalk and carried the
daisy in his hand all the way to the cave. The butterflies fluttered
sometimes, but still clung to the flower; and there they sat until the
enh had made a picture in his Teed of the living “ butterfly-
peony.”

The little boy was an insect-collector, and his eyes had been trained
to notice everything on all sides when he was out for a walk. I
know dozens and dozens of boys who would not have noticed this
pretty sight.

Sophie Scissors.


THE WINGED PEONY.
ELSIE’S PLAN.



ELSIE LISTENS WITH ALARM.

ELSIE’S PLAN.

Elsie’s mother at breakfast said, laughing and gay,
“February the second is Candlemas Day,

When weather-wise people watch closely the skies

For weather predictions made plain to their eyes;
Should clouds veil the heavens, they smile as they sing,
‘O cheerful and pleasant the days of this spring !?

* But when the sun shineth most sober they grow, —
And they say, ‘We shall have both tempest and snow —
Far’s the sun shines in on Candlemas Day,

So far will the snow surely blow beforé May.”
HLSIE’S PLAN.

Little Elsie stands listening with wide-open ears;
Every word of her mother’s gay jesting she hears,
And her childish heart throbs with a sense of alarm
Till she suddenly thinks of a shield from the harm;
“‘T wonder,” she says, in the midst of her play,

“ That folk do not do it on Candlemas Day !

I am sure ’tis easy ; I can do it, I know;

This spring there shall be not one day of snow!”
She said, as her head met the pillows that night,

In a soft, sleepy voice, “I must wake before light.”

Next morn before dawn to the window she flies ;

She looks with a frown on the unclouded skies ;

Then dressing herself, with a resolute air

She noiselessly hastens to go down the stair,

And with quick step she enters room after room

And shrouds every window in darkness and gloom.

Mamma, coming after her, wonders to find

Close-drawn every curtain and fastened each blind ;

But Elsie, soon spying her, hastens to say:

‘‘Mamma, dear! you know it is Candlemas Day,

And far in as the sun shines — you know you said so—

Will certainly blow in the cold, drifting snow ;

So I got up real early and tended to it,

And the sun doesn’t shine in — not one single bit!”
Ella W. Ricker.

The Bug says:
“I only just stood up like this,
And, my! O, my!
How quickly the girls ran away —
' I wonder why?”


WHY?







EE
—

=== =

by
fi!
) be, I

iP ih

6¢17’s NOT MUCH FUN TO BE A BOY.”

WHY?

Why can’t boys get to be great men
*Thout taking time to grow?
And what’s the good of button-shoes
And skirts I’d like to know?
MARCH WINDS.— THE DOG WHO WOULD NOT CHURN.

Why can’t I have some reg’ lar pants,
With lots of pockets in?
And what’s the use of horses when
They’re only made of tin?
And why do folks ’most always say,
“Look out!” “Be careful, dear!’ —
It’s not much fun to be a boy
When people are so queer !
Jessie B. McClure.

MARCH WINDS.

What do the March winds do with their blowing ?
They drive back the cold and the snow!

What do the March winds do with their blowing?
They bring us the summer, heigh-ho!

THE DOG WHO WOULD NOT CHURN.

Mr. Brown had a large, strong dog, named Bose. Bose ate so much
. that Mrs. Brown said he ought to be made to work so as to pay for a
part of what he cost them in the way of food.

Bose was a kind dog, and they all were fond of him, and at first
they thought it great fun to see him churn, and they used to give him
meat and bread when he was through. For Mr. Brown had fixed a
tread-mill in such a way that Bose could churn the cream, and on Tues-
days he did the churning.
THE DOG WHO WOULD NOT CHURN.

At last Bose grew tired of the churn. Each week when the time
came for him to churn, he could not be found. He would hide; and
no one could find him until the next day. Then Mrs. Brown changed
the time from week to week so that he could not know on which day
to keep out of sight.

One day he went to the field to see them cut the grass. At noon
Mr. Brown said, “Come, Bose, come home and churn.” He went on to
the bars at the end of the lane, and Bose was walking near him.

When Mr. Brown was half-way up the hill, he turned round and
looked. Bose had run off as fast as he could go, and was now quite

out of sight..
Bose has not been seen since, and we think he had made up his



IT WAS GREAT FUN TO WATCH BOSE.

mind that he would churn no more, though he must lose his nice home
by the means. This story is true, for Mr. Brown lived in the next
house to us, and Bose used to play with me. |
Ellen S. Hastman.


A GROUP OF CHINESE CHILDREN.

“
LEAKY.—SUCH A STORY!

LEAKY.

A winsome little maiden,
Of summers only two,

Was pleading thus with mamma:
“Oh, give me some, please do!”

_ “Be careful with your dress, dear,
To keep it clean and nice,” _
Said mamma, handing to her
The little piece of ice. .

The baby gazes on it,
Then suddenly she speaks,
Hyes wide with childish wonder :
“ Why, mamma, see, it leaks!”
Annis R. Wells.

SUCH A STORY!

“T tell you, Tham,” lisped little Bob, doubling up his fists and look-
ing very fierce, “you'd been thkared!”

“Scared at what?” asked Sam, a shiver running down his back.

“ At that wild beatht!” answered Bob, tole about and brandish-
ing the broom.

“ What wild beast ?— tell me!”

“You thee, Tham, I wath out in the barn with Beth ae Alith,
and the cat and the kittenth. An’ all at onth the cat growled an’ the,
kittenth thpit, and their tailth thtood thtraight up, an’ the girlth hol-
SUCH A STORY!

lered !—an’ there —I tell you, Tham! right in the barn door, thtood
the LION!”

“Ho!” shouted Sam, “ where could a lion come from ? — Barnum’s
heen gone a week or more! I don’t believe it was a lion—now, was
it, Bob?” ;

“ Well —no —it wathn’t really a lion,” answered Bob, dropping



FACING THE WILD BEAST,

“he broom, and quieting down enough to undouble his fists. “It
wathn’t really a lion, you know.
“Then what was it?” —
“Well, Tham —if you mutht know —it wath—our thmall dog
Thnap!”
“Such a story!” cried Sam, rushing at Bob. ;
And the next minute they were both laughing and rolling over and
over in the hay.
Bob’s Aunt.
A BIRD OF PARADISE.

A BIRD OF PARADISE.

The showiest and gayest
birds on our globe live in the
hot countries, in the tropics. I
do not mean the sweetest sing-
ers; most of the sweetest song-
birds live in the cool countries
—even the canary birds came
from islands in the North Tem-
perate. Zone.

I mean the birds of gor-
geous feathers and strange, odd,
showy forms; all these live
quite near the equator.

There is one extremely beau-
tiful race of birds in the het
countries; in fact they are so
singularly beautiful that they
are called Birds of Paradise.
One kind of them is known as
the Black Bird of Paradise. He
shines all over like a brilliant
‘beetle. His long graceful body is covered with black feathers which
turn deep violet in the sunshine. In front his throat and breast °
feathers look as if they were plaited; they stand out and form a sort
of broad breastplate, green and bronze. The feathers back of his head
rise and stand up and look like a wide-open fan and they glitter with
soft, rich, deep colors, like the breastplate. He would be perfect, if he
could sing. :

He, like all the other Paradise birds, lives only in Australia and New
Guinea.



THE BLACK BIRD OF PARADISE.

Sophie Scissors.


ED MEETING.

ECT

UNEXP

AN
In the marshy meadows low,
Where a kit would never go —
Strange it ever should be so —
Pussy-paws and cat-tails grow:
High above the spear-like leaves,
Fiuffy tails of golden brown ;

Swaying on their slender stems,
Pretty paws of softest down.
Pas mae











sabes Cig














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SCOURT CALENDARS. -

REASON has been

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———an attempt by someiff/, :

a ee al peel e U
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throne! ee ag

Two persons of high fi

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The WEAPON of yy
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