Citation
The Swiss family Robinson

Material Information

Title:
The Swiss family Robinson the adventures of a family shipwrecked on a desert island
Uniform Title:
Schweizerische Robinson
Creator:
Wyss, Johann David, 1743-1818
Mather, Richard ( Illustrator )
Longmans, Green, and Co ( Publisher )
Edinburgh Press ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Longmans, Green & Co.
Manufacturer:
(Edinburgh Press
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
302 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Castaways -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pirates -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Robinsonades -- 1896 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Robinsonades ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title page printed in red and black.
Statement of Responsibility:
[Johann Wyss] ; with eight illustrations by Richard Mather.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026667169 ( ALEPH )
ALG5554 ( NOTIS )
22122834 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
stasis

taistee kar eatbeeeeaet

datasets









THE
Swiss
FamILy

-RosBinson







A FAMILY PARTY,



THE SWISS FAMILY
ROBINSON

THE ADVENTURES OF A FAMILY SHIPWRECKED ON
A DESERT ISLAND

WITH EIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS

BY

RICHARD MATHER



NEW YORK
LONGMANS, GREEN & CO.

MDCCCXCVI



PREFACE

T the commencement of the present century, a
Swiss Pastor, who had lost his fortune, resolved
to set sail, as a voluntary exile, for one of the newly
discovered regions of the Pacific Ocean, and to seek
there the means of support for himself and family,
denied him by his own country, then convulsed with
the horrors of war.
| He departed accordingly, with his wife and four sons,
varying from six to fifteen years of age, in search of
a new home. A prosperous voyage brought the ship
within sight of New Guinea; when a violent storm
arose, which drove the ill-fated vessel out of its course,
and finally wrecked it on an unknown coast.

It was in this crisis of their affairs that the worthy

Pastor began the journal which is now placed before
the public.







CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.

Shipwreck and preparations for escape .

CHAPTER II.
The landing and first day on land

CHAPTER III.

Voyage of discovery .

CHAPTER IV.
Voyage to the Wreck

CHAPTER V.

‘What passed on land during our absence

CHAPTER VI.
Projects of migration. The dead shark. The bridge .

CHAPTER VII.

The migration. The porcupine. The tiger-cat. The wounded
flamingo :

CHAPTER VIII.
_ The building in the tree .

CHAPTER IX.
Sunday . ;

PAGE

15

20

29

43

50

57

62

74

78



8 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER X.
The hurdle. Thesalmon. The kangaroo

CHAPTER XI.
Second voyage to the vessel

CHAPTER XII.
Third voyage to the vessel. The penguins

CHAPTER XIII.
The bakehouse . z

CHAPTER XIV.

The pinnace . .

CHAPTER XV.
A walk. The wizard of the tree. The wild hog

CHAPTER XVI.
The heath-cock. Wax. The parrot’s nest. _ The india-rubber tree

CHAPTER XVIL

Wax-lights. Butter. Plantations. Last voyage to the vessel. Palm
wine. The buffaloes

CHAPTER XVIII.

Sago. Thebces. The education of the animals

CHAPTER XIX.

The wild ass. Flax. The rainy season

CHAPTER XX.
Return of the fine season. The cavern of salt. The bank of herrings.
The sea dogs

. . .

CHAPTER XXI.
Cotton. The farm. The canoe.

.

92

99

106

LIO

118

/125

130

138

145

153

163



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXII.

The feast of deliverance . , Og : . ‘ .

CHAPTER XXIII.
Divers labours. Expedition against the apes. The whale . 0

CHAPTER XXIV.

The weaving machine. The palanquin. Theboa .

CHAPTER XXV.
Epitaph on the ass. The boa stuffed . : 0 , .

CHAPTER XXVI.

An excursion. A new grotto

CHAPTER XXVII.

Journey to the farm. The cavy. The musk rat . ;

CHAPTER XXVIII.

The peccaries. The gigantic bamboos. Continuation of our journey

CHAPTER XXIX.

Walk in the Savannah. Troop and eggs of ostriches. The green
valley. Fright of Ernest. The bears

CHAPTER XXX.

Labours of the mother during our absence. The condor. Skinning
the bears, and preparing their flesh. Excursion of the three
boys. The Angora rabbits. The antelopes. Fritz’s recital.
The guide cuckoo. The nest of bees

CHAPTER XXXI.

Arab tower. Taking an ostrich. General departure and arrival
at the grotto. The eel. Education of the ostrich. Hydromel.
Making hats . ;

170

175

187

194

197

201

206

209

215

220



‘10 CONTENTS.
CHAPTER XXXII.
Return of the rainy season. Making pottery. A voyage to Requin

Island

CHAPTER XXXIII.

Departure of the boys for a rat hunt. Massacre of devastating pigs.

Return of the young people. Shoal of herrings and sea-dogs

CHAPTER XXXIV.

Trial of the canoe. Disappearance of Fritz. The walrus. The
storm. Anxiety about Fritz

CHAPTER XXXV.

Departure for Waldegg. The hyena. The messenger pigeon.
Fritz’s letter. The black swans. The royal heron. The tapir.
The cranes. The bird of paradise. Ravages made by apes

CHAPTER XXXVI.

Construction of a summer habitation. Fruits of the cacao-tree
and banana tree. The mysterious sack. The sultana hens.
Elephants. Panthers. The amphibious monster. The deceiver
deceived. Restoration of Falcon’s Nest. Construction of a
bodyguard in Requin Island

CHAPTER XXXVII.

Glance at the Colony at the end of ten years. Excursion of: Fritz
in his canoe. The nests. The bay of pearls. The sea-dogs.
The albatross

CHAPTER XXXVIII.

Confidences of Fritz The Englishwoman on the Fiery Rock.
Departure for the pearl-oyster fishery. The unloading

CHAPTER. XXXIX.

James’s fright. The wild boar. Truffles. Lions. Death of Belle.
Fritz’s expedition .

e227)

237

244

259

266

271



CONTENTS.

. CHAPTER XL.
Jenny . .

CHAPTER XLI.

Continuation of Miss Jenny’s history

CHAPTER XLII

Conclusion .

II

279

288

294







LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

A FAMILY PARTY -

“A FLOCK OF FLAMINGOES ROSE IN THE AIR”
CAPTURING THE PENGUINS . ;

A BUFFALO IN HARNESS a

THE STRANDED WHALE :

“A BEAR, A BEAR, FATHER !”

A HERD OF ANTELOPES

AN ADVENTURE WITH A TIGER

frontispiece.

To face page

70
108
143

182






THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



CHAPTER I,
SHIPWRECK AND PREPARATIONS FOR ESCAPE.

THE tempest lasted for six days, and, far from lessening,
redoubled its fury. Driven out of our route to the south-west,
it was impossible for us to recognise our position. The ship
had lost her masts, and took in water on every side. Each
one recommending his soul to God, implored Him for the means
of escaping death. “Children,” said I to my four sons, who
were weeping round their mother, “God can yet save us, if
such be His will; but if He has decided otherwise, let us
submit. We shall, at least, quit this world only to be re-united
in a better.” ete

My wife dried her tears, and, from my example, forced
herself to appear calm, to inspire the children with courage
and resignation. We fell on our knees and prayed with
fervour. Suddenly, through the rioise of the wind and waves,
I heard with delight the cry of “Land! land!” but at the
same instant we felt a dreadful shock, which was followed by
a long and frightful crackling. Then, from the immobility of
the ship, and the deafening noise which the sea made in rushing
round it, I found that: we had struck on the rocks, and that
the vessel had split in the middle.

“We are lost! get out the boats!” cried a voice, which
I recognised as that of the captain. “Lost!” repeated the
children, with looks full of anguish. “Re-assure yourselves,”
said I; “do not yet despair. God will assist the brave. I
will go and see what can be attempted for our safety.”

I quitted the cabin and went on the deck. Blinded by
ae



16 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the surge, I remained for some moments incapable of dis-
tinguishing anything. When at last I had gained the highest
part of the deck, I saw the boats already over-filled with
people, who were striving to get away from the wreck. A
sailor had just cut the last rope. They had forgotten us,

I called aloud, but my voice was lost in the tumult, and
I ascertained with deep horror that we were abandoned on
the shipwrecked vessel. In this terrible extremity, I was con-
soled by finding that the ship had struck in such a manner
that the poop, in which our cabin was situated, could not be
reached by the waves. At the same time, in spite of the thick
rain which was falling, I could perceive, at some distance to
the south, a shore, which, though of desolate aspect, became
henceforward the object of my hope. I returned to my family,
and affecting a tranquillity I was far from feeling, “Take
courage,” said I, “all is not lost. A part of the ship, thank
God, remains fixed above the water. To-morrow the wind
and sea will be calmer, and we may reach the shore.” The
children, with the confidence of their age, accepted this supposi-
tion as a certainty. By a sign of intelligence from my wife,
I found that she penetrated the truth, but I saw, also,
that her faith in God was not diminished. “We shall have,”
said she, “a fearful night to pass; let us take some nourishment ;
the food of the body strengthens the mind.”

The evening was in fact approaching, and the tempest,
still violent, was beating at the ship with such fury that every
instant I feared it would be entirely broken up. Their mother
having hastened the preparations for a simple repast, the
children ate heartily, then went to bed and slept soundly.

Fritz, the eldest, who better understood our position than
his brothers, wished to watch with us. “Father,” said he,
“T have reflected on the means of reaching the shore. If we
had some cork or some bladders to make swimming belts for
my mother and my brothers, you and I could swim without
help.” “Your idea is good, my dear child,” replied I; “let
us prepare some as quickly as we can.” Having then gathered
together a number of small empty barrels, and of those tin
bottles in which, at sea, they keep rations of fresh water, aided
by Fritz I joined them together with handkerchiefs, and fastened



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 17

two of them under the arms of each of the children, and of
my dear, brave wife. Fritz and I then filled our pockets and
theirs with knives, cords, steels, and other things which might
be very necessary to us, should the vessel be broken up during
the night, and we fortunate enough to reach the shore. These
precautions taken, Fritz, re-assured and very much fatigued,
laid down beside his brothers and soon fell asleep.

This terrible night was passed by myself and my wife in
prayer. Towards morning, however, I thought the tempest
had abated. At the first dawn of day I mounted on the
deck. The wind had fallen a little, the sea was calmer, and
a fine dawn tinged the horizon with light. Re-animated by
this view, I called my wife and sons, The children were
alarmed when they saw that we were alone on the ship. “Where
are the sailors?” said they. “Why, if they have gone away,
did they not take us with them? What will become of us?”
“My children,” replied I, “our companions have gone away
in the boats without thinking of us, and it is to be feared
they have perished by their precipitation. At present, they
are perhaps more to be pitied than we are. See, the sky is
clear, the land is not far off; our abandonment is perhaps
fortunate. Let us hope in God, who has not forsaken
us, and consider what must be undertaken to assure our
safety.”

‘Fritz, enterprising and adventurous, persisted in his idea
of swimming to land. Ernest, my second son, aged twelve
years, intelligent, but timid and indolent, was frightened at
the idea of such a venture, and proposed constructing a raft.
I showed him that such a conveyance, besides the time necessary
to construct it, was very difficult to guide. These two con-
siderations made: him abandon his opinion almost immediately.
“Now, my children,” said I, “let us explore the vessel; and
while reflecting on the means of gaining the shore, let us gather
together on the deck everything which may be useful to us
on shore,”

We separated for the search, I went first to the place
where the provisions were kept, to secure the first necessaries
of existence, Fritz visited the magazine of arms and muni-

tions, whence he brought up guns, pistols, powder, balls, and
2



18 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

shot. Ernest rifled the carpenter’s cabin, and returned loaded
with tools and nails. Little Francis, my youngest child, aged
six years, wishing to show. his activity, brought a box full
of fish-hooks, Fritz and Ernest laughed at him; but I
thought we ought not to despise this acquisition, for we might -
be reduced to live by fishing. As to James, our third son,
an urchin of ten years old, he re-appeared with two large
dogs, which he had found shut up in the captain’s cabin, and
being rendered docile by hunger, suffered themselves to be
led by the ears. My wife told me that she had found a cow,
an ass, and two goats, to whom she had given food and drink
just in time to save them, for these poor beasts had had no
food for two days.

Each one appeared to have made useful discoveries, except
James. “You have brought,” said I, “two terrible eaters, who
will cost a great deal, without being of any use.” “I thought,
dear father,” replied he, “that they would help us to hunt,
when we were on land.” “You are right; but we are not yet
on land! Have you thought of any means of arriving there,
dear little one?” “Ah!” said he, “we might sail in the tubs,
as I did formerly in my grandfather’s pond.” “A good idea,”
said I, and immediately went, followed by my children, to
the hold, where several large empty barrels were floating.
I drew out four of them to the planks of the middle deck,
which was near the level of the water. These barrels were
made of strong wood, bound with iron; I judged them very
fit for the execution of our project. Aided by Fritz, I began
by sawing them into two equal parts. When we had thus
obtained eight tubs, which I ranged side by side, I looked for
a flexible plank, long enough to hold them all, and to form
besides at each end a kind of keel. We nailed the tubs firmly
to this plank, and each of them was attached to the other by
bolts. All this being well accomplished, we saw ourselves in
possession of a conveyance which, in a calm sea, would, in my
opinion, be perfectly safe.

It now remained to put it into the water, but it was so
heavy that our united efforts could not move it. I wanted
a screw-jack, Fritz, who recollected having seen one, went to
look for it. By the help of this instrument I raised the heavy



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 19

construction, and Fritz placed some rollers under it; it was
then easy to set it in motion. The children were astonished
at seeing the power of the screw-jack. I promised them to
explain its mechanism at the first leisure moment. A few
minutes after, our barque glided from the deck into the sea, on
which it floated, with such rapidity, that it would have escaped,
if I had not taken the precaution to fix it firmly by a cable
to a joist of the vessel, The children uttered cries of joy
on seeing it float; I was not so well satisfied as they
were. It went all on one side, which discouraged me for the
moment, but I soon found that I could remedy this by ballast.
Seizing all the heavy things that were near my hand, I threw
them into the tubs, and by degrees I saw the boat recover its
equilibrium.

We now wanted oars. Ernest found four which had been
left under a sail-cloth. Recollecting that the savages used a
kind of fly-beam to ensure the steadiness of their canoes, I
resolved to adapt similar ones to our boat. I took two pieces
of yard, which I fixed by pegs to the extremities of the boat,
so that they could turn. At each end of these poles I fixeda
little empty cask, to float on the water right and left. These
kept the boat quite steady.

When these labours were completed, it was too late to think
of putting to sea the same day. We must resign ourselves to
pass another night on the stranded ship. This determination
taken, my wife comforted us materially by a good meal, for we
had taken nothing during the day but a little bread and wine.
Although more satisfied than on the preceding evening, I would
not go to bed without putting on the children their swimming
apparatus. Sleep was not long in coming to us, for the day had
been a busy one. The night passed without any unfortunate
incident.



CHAPTER II,
THE LANDING AND FIRST DAY ON LAND.

AT the break of day we were all awake. As soon as we
had engaged in morning prayer, I said to my children, “We
shall now, with God’s help, attempt our deliverance. Give the
animals provisions for several days, for we must return to fetch
them, if, as I hope, our journey succeed. Collect, then, all that
will be of the greatest use to us after our landing, and take
courage.” I placed among the cargo a barrel of powder, some
guns, several pairs of pistols, some bullets, also some lead and
moulds to make more. Each of us carried a game bag full of
food. I took a chest full of broth-cakes, another of biscuits, a
porridge pot, some knives, hatchets, scythes, pincers, nails,
gimlets, and fishing lines. I took also some sails to make -
a tent. We had amassed so many things, that we were obliged
to leave a great number, though I had exchanged for useful
things the ballast I had thrown into the tubs. My wife thought
that we should do well to take with us some fowls, ducks, geese,
and pigeons. She placed two cocks and twelve hens in one of
the tubs, which I enclosed with a sort of grating formed by
cross pieces of wood. As to the ducks, pigeons, and geese,
‘I gave them their liberty, trusting to their instinct to gain the
land, some by flying, others by swimming. The children had
already embarked in the order J had arranged, when my wife
came from the interior of the vessel, carrying in her arms a
large bag which she threw into the tub occupied by little
Francis. I took no notice of this bag, presuming that the
thoughtful mother had taken it to make a seat for the
child.

As soon as I saw everybody installed, I cut the cable which

20



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 21

retained the boat, and began to row towards the land. In the
first tub was my wife, in the second little Francis, Fritz
occupied the third. The two middle ones contained the
powder, arms, sails, the tools, the food, and the poultry. James
was in the sixth; Ernest in the seventh; and I took the last
one for myself, whence, helm in hand, I directed our naviga-
tion. Each of us had beside him one of our belts of bottles
and barrels to serve in case of accident. As I judged the
dogs too big to embark with us, we left them on the vessel.
When they saw that we were going, they began to howl, but
suddenly decided on throwing themselves into the water and
soon rejoined us. Fearing that the journey was too long for
their strength, I eased them by letting them put their fore
paws from time to time on the balancing poles or on the
barrels. The good animals soon understood this manceuvre,
and could thus follow us without too much fatigue.

The sea curled softly, the sky was pure, the sun radiant.
We rowed with a will, and the tide favoured us. Around us
floated chests, barrels, bales, and other waifs of the shipwrecked
vessel. Fritz and I seized with the oars and fastened to the
boat some of the barrels which we towed along. My wife,
her hand resting on the head of her youngest child, her eyes
raised to heaven, was silently praying. The journey was
happily accomplished, but the nearer we approached the shore,
the more wild and melancholy it appeared. A line of grey
and naked rocks was all we could see.

After a time, however, Fritz, who was very strong sighted,
thought he discovered some trees, among which, he assured us,
were some palm trees. Ernest, naturally dainty, was rejoiced
at the idea of eating cocoa-nuts, which, as he had read, were
much better than the walnuts of Europe.

A discussion arose among the children, on the kind of
trees which Fritz was endeavouring to make them see. As I
was regretting not having brought away the captain’s telescope,
James drew from his pocket a little eye-glass which he had
found in the mate’s room. I could then observe the shore,
Forgetting the subject in dispute, I looked round anxiously
for a place to land at. I noticed a creek towards which the
geese and ducks were making their way. “Do you see the



22 : THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

cocoa-nuts, papa?” said little Francis. “Yes,” said I, smiling,
“Fritz has good eyes; he is not deceived. I distinguish in
the distance some trees which appear to be cocoa-nut trees.”
“IT am very glad,” said the little boy, clapping his hands
together for joy. My wife leant forward to embrace him and
hide a tear. When she raised her head she only showed us
asmile. We bent well to our oars, and landed near the mouth
of a stream, at a place where the water was scarcely deeper
than was necessary to keep our tubs afloat, and where the
shore was very low. The children jumped hastily on shore,
with the exception of Francis, who, in spite of his impatience,
was too young to get out of his tub without his mother’s
assistance. The dogs, who had preceded us, welcomed us
with joyful barks. The ducks and geese already installed
on the shores of the stream, saluted us with their quackings,
with which were mingled the harsh cries of some penguins
who remained motionless on the rock, and of several flamingoes
who ran away frightened.

Our first care, as soon as we touched land, was to throw
ourselves on our knees to thank God who had so mercifully
delivered us, and ask Him to continue His protection. I
clasped my wife and my poor little ones in my arms, The
moist eyes of my wife met mine. “God is good,” said she,
with an angelic smile; “He has left us each other and our
children.” We then proceeded to unload the boat, and every-
thing was soon transported to the shore. Though this booty
was inconsiderable, how rich we thought ourselves in pos-
sessing it!

I chose a convenient place to pitch the tent which was to
shelter us. I fixed in the soil one of the poles which served
to balance our boat; at the top of this pole I placed the
second, resting one end in a cleft of the rock. Then I threw
over it the sail which I extended with pegs, taking care to
fix the edges inside, with our chests of provisions and other
heavy things, and Fritz fixed some hooks to the opening, so
that we might close it at night. I ordered the children to
collect all the dry grass and moss they could find to make
beds. Whilst they were thus occupied I built with some
stones, at a little distance from the tent,a sort of furnace, on



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 23

which I placed several armsful of dead wood, picked up from
the sides of the stream, and I soon kindled a large fire, which
blazed gaily. My wife placed on the hearth the pot full of
water, into which I threw five or six soup-cakes, “What
are you going to glue, papa?” asked little Francis, who took
the soup-cakes for strong glue. His mother, smiling at his
artless question, said I was making soup. “Glue soup,” said
he, making a sour face. “Oh, no,” said his mother, “meat
soup.” “Meat!” cried Francis, opening his eyes, “are you
going to the butcher’s, mama?” His mother laughed, and
told him that what he had taken for glue, was the juice of
meat reduced to this state by long boiling. “They employ
this means,” said she, “to supply fresh meat, which would be
tainted in long sea voyages.”

Fritz, who had loaded his gun, went off up the stream ;
Ernest went the opposite way along by the sea. James began
to search the rocks in the hope of finding mussels. I was busy
drawing from the water the barrels which we had towed along,
when I heard James uttering loud cries. Armed with a hatchet,
I ran to the side whence the voice proceeded. I perceived the
child on his knees in the water. “Papa, papa,” cried he, with
an accent in which triumph and terror were mingled, “come
quickly; I have caught a great beast.” “Well, bring him.”
“J cannot, papa; he holds me.” I could not help laughing
to see this conqueror a prisoner to his captive, but it was time
to go to his assistance. A large lobster was holding him by the
leg, and poor James tried in vain to escape from the claws of
the animal. I went into the sea; the lobster let go his prize
and tried to escape, but I seized him by the middle of the
body, and brought him to land. My scapegrace, proud of
being able to show this fine captive to his mother, hastily seized
the creature with both hands, but scarcely had he touched him,
than he struck his face such a violent blow with his tail, that
he let him fall, and began to cry. While consoling him, I
could not help laughing at his discomfiture. I showed him
that nothing was more simple than to conquer his prisoner by
holding him by the middle of his body. As soon as he was
satisfied, he resumed his road to let his mother admire his
capture. “Mama! Francis! Ernest! Fritz! where is Fritz?”



24 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,

cried he, arriving at the tent; “Come and see! A lobster, a ©
lobster !”

Ernest, after having gravely examined the creature, advised
his mother to put him into the boiling pot, which would
make us a rich soup. My wife did not think much of the
excellence of this receipt, and decided that we should cook the
lobster separately, Ernest then told us that he had also made
a discovery. “I have seen,” said he, “some shell-fish in the
water; but it would wet me to take them.” “I saw them
also,” replied James, with a disdainful air; “but what of that?
Small shell-fish, I would not eat them. Think of my lobster!”
“Who knows?” said Ernest again, “perhaps they are oysters.
I should say they were by the manner in which they stuck to
the rocks, and the depth at which they are found.” “ Well,
soft one,” said I, “if you thought they were oysters, why did
you not bring us some? You were afraid of wetting yourself,
you say; remember, in our position we must give proofs of
energy and self-denial.”

“T also saw,” said Ernest, “some salt among the holes of the
rocks.” I explained this fact by supposing that the sun had
dried the sea-water. “Ah!” cried I, “eternal discoverer! if
you saw salt, you ought to have collected a sack full. Go
then and repair this negligence quickly, that we may not
eat insipid soup.” Ernest set off, and soon returned. The
salt which he brought was so mixed with sand and earth,
that I was on the point of throwing it away, but my wife
prevented me. She threw it into some water, which she then
strained through a cloth, and we used this water to salt our
soup. I, however, scolded Ernest for having taken so little
care.

The soup was ready, but Fritz had not come in, and besides,
standing before the boiling pot, we asked each other, very
foolishly, how we were going to empty it. Must we carry by
turns the great burning pot to our lips, and fish up the biscuit
with our fingers? We found ourselves nearly in the situation
of the fox in the fable, to whom the stork presented food in
a bottle. Our embarrassment was so great that we burst out
laughing. “If we only had some cocoa-nuts,” said Ernest,
“we might make some spoons,” “Yes,” said I, “if it were



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 25

only to wish and have, we might instantly be provided with
magnificent silver covers. But Fritz’s cocoa-nut trees are
yet to be discovered. The rocks separate us from them.
Come my children, invent something that may serve our
purpose. “Could we not,” replied Ernest, “make use of oyster-
shells?” - “Capital!” cried I; “make haste and procure
some.”

Ernest went off again, but was forestalled by James, who
had gone into the water before the indolent one had reached
the shore. James detached the oysters and threw them on
the ground. Ernest was satisfied with picking them up, thus
avoiding wetting his feet. At the same time that our oyster
fishers returned, Fritz came in. He advanced, holding his
hand behind his back, and affecting a sorrowful air. “Have
you found nothing?” I asked. “Nothing at all,” replied he.
But his brothers, who were surrounding him, cried out, “Oh!
a little guinea pig! where did you find it? Let me see it.”
Then Fritz proudly showed the game which he had at first
hidden.

I congratulated him on his hunting; but reprimanded him
for the falsehood he had told, though it was only in jest. He
asked pardon; then told us that he had gone to the other
side of the stream, and had found a very different country from
that in which we were. “There,” said he, “the vegetation
is magnificent; besides, there is on the shore a quantity of
chests, barrels, and other waifs of the shipwreck which the sea
has thrown up. Shall we suffer all these riches to be lost?
Shall we go and fetch the cattle from the vessel? The cow
especially would give us excellent milk to steep our biscuits.
Down below there is plenty of grass to feed her, and beautiful
trees to shelter us. Let us go and settle there. Let us quit
this naked and arid shore.”

“ Patience, patience,” replied I, “every thing in time. First
tell me, have you discovered any trace of our companions?”
“Nothing, either on land or sea. I have seen no other living
beings than a troop of animals like the one I have brought.
These are, I think guinea-pigs, but of a particular kind, for
their paws are made like those of hares, They are so tame
that I could look at them closely. They bounded about in



26 . THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,

the grass, sat, and carried their food to their mouths like
squirrels.” Ernest gravely examined the animal, and said that
according to his natural history, he believed it was an agéuti.
“Ah!” cried Fritz, “see how. the learned impose on us; I say
it is a guinea-pig.”

I interfered in the discussion: “Do not take so high a
tone with your brother,” said I to Fritz; “I have never seen
a living agéuti; but what you hold there is certainly the agéuti
of which the naturalists speak. In the first place, your animal
is much too large for a guinea-pig; he has a flat head, small
ears, a small tail, and short yellow-brown hair. He is about
the size of a large rabbit ; and see, its front teeth are sharp and
bent inwards. A guinea-pig never had such teeth.” “ Father,”
said Ernest, “since the agéutis are so tame, suppose we try
to take some alive. We could bring them up like rabbits,
and should have game always at hand, without the trouble
of hunting it.” “Yes, that would suit your idleness, Ernest.
Try if you like. The agéuti is not difficult to provide for;
but I foresee that these rabbits will give you more trouble
than those of Europe. They are great gnawers, whose teeth
are always at work. Nothing resists them, however hard,
and they have been known to bite through the iron bars of the
cage in which they were confined. Where do you intend to
keep yours?”

James, while his brothers were attentively listening to this
lesson of natural history, was struggling to open an oyster with
his knife; but though he employed all his strength, he could
not succeed. I then took the oysters, placed them on the
hot coals, and they soon opened of themselves. “ Now,” said
I, “my children, this is a very delicious dish; taste it.” Saying
this I sucked up an oyster and swallowed it. James and Fritz
imitated me, but did not hesitate to declare that they were
detestable. Ernest and Francis thought the same. So we
only took that part of the oysters which is usually thrown
away, namely the shells, and using them for spoons, began to
eat our soup.

Whilst we were feasting with a good appetite, the two dogs,
who had good reasons for wishing to imitate us, discovered
Fritz’s agéuti, and began to tear it. Fritz rose furiously, and



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 27

seizing his gun, struck them with it so violently that he broke
the stock; then while the dogs were running away, he threw
stones at aten as long as he could reach them. This was not
the first time that Fritz had shown irritability. And I felt
that I ought to repress this violence of disposition, which
grieved me, and might set a bad example to his brothers.
I scolded him severely, and showed him that in the blindness
of his anger he had not only made his gun useless, but risked
laming poor animals who were intended to be of great
service to us. He saw the justice of my reprimand, and ex-
pressed his sorrow for it. I pardoned him on condition that
he should make his peace with the dogs. Fritz immediately
took a piece of biscuit in each hand, and shortly after these
good animals reappeared with him. Poor Fritz had his eyes
full of tears, “Oh, father,” said he, “even before taking the
biscuit they licked my hand. How could I be so harsh to
such good creatures?” “Anger is always wrong, my dear
child,” said I; “do not forget it.”

As we finished our repast, the sun disappeared in the
horizon. The cocks, hens, and ducks assembled round us.
Then my wife threw them some handfuls of corn, which she
drew from the bag I had seen her put into Francis’s tub, I
praised her highly for her forethought; but remarked that it
would be better still to keep these grains to sow, than to lavish
them on the animals who could be fed with damaged biscuits.
The pigeons took refuge in the crevices of the rocks; the cocks
and hens perched on the ridge of the tent; and the ducks
couched in the tufts of rushes at the mouth of the stream.
We also prepared for repose. The arms were loaded and
placed in such a manner that we could seize them at the
first alarm. We then joined in prayer, and retired into the
tent.

To the great astonishment of the children, darkness suc-
ceeded to daylight very rapidly. I concluded from this that
we must be near the equator, at all events in a tropical region.
I looked once more out of the tent to assure myself that all
was calm around us; then I closed the entrance and went
to bed. The night was very fresh; we were obliged to lie
close together to keep warm. This contrast between the



28 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

temperature of the day and night confirmed mein my opinion
of the situation of the country. My wife slept, and so did the
children. It was agreed between us that I should watch till
the middle of the night, and that I should then call her to
take my place; but sleep insensibly overcame me, and God
alone watched over us on the first night that we passed on
the land of deliverance.



CHAPTER IIL
VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY.

THE cocks did not forget to salute the sun. My wife and I
were awoke by their crowing. Our first care was to arrange
the employment of the day. She agreed with me that we ought
first of all to try and ascertain the fate of our companions. We
,also wished to explore the country, to know in what part to fix
our residence. It was agreed that I should go on this discovery
with Fritz, whilst the mother should remain near the tent with
the other boys. I then begged her to prepare breakfast, and
woke the children, who immediately arose.

I asked James what had become of his lobster. He told me
that he had hid it in a hole of the rock, for fear the dogs should
take it as they had Fritz’s agéuti. “Very well,” said I; “this
is a proof that you are not a careless boy when your own
interests are concerned, and that you learn experience by others’
misfortunes. However, will you give us your lobster’s claws to
eat during our journey?”

“Oh, a journey! a journey!” cried all the children at
once; “take me, papa; take me!” “This time,” said I, “it
is not possible to take the whole family. We should advance
too slowly, and in case of danger it would be more difficult
to defend ourselves. Fritz only will.come with me; one dog,
whom we will call Turk, if you like, shall come with us. You
will remain here with your mother, under care of the other
dog, to whom I propose to give the name of Belle.” Fritz
asked me, with a blush, to let him take another gun instead
of his own, which was useless. I permitted him, without
appearing to remark the confusion which the remembrance
of his fault caused him. I made him put in his belt a pair

of pistols and a hatchet. I armed myself in the same manner.
29



30 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

We took care to fill our game bags with powder, balls, and
some biscuit. Each of us took a tin bottle full of water.

Breakfast was ready. It consisted of the lobster which my
wife had cooked. It was found so hard that we left the greater
part of it. Fritz was of opinion that we should begin our
journey before the great heat came on. “You are right,” said
I; “we will set out; but we have forgotten a very important
thing.” “What?” said he. “To embrace my mother and
brothers; to thank God,” said Ernest eagerly. “Right, my
dear Ernest ; you have understood me.”

I was interrupted by James, who pretended to ring a bell.
“Boom, boom, boom,” cried he, “to prayers! to prayers!”
“Foolish child,” said I; “leave off turning sacred things into
ridicule. To punish you, we will not admit you to pray with
us. Retire.” Confused at this. reprimand, James went away
with a full heart, and knelt down at a distance. Whilst we
were praying, I heard him ask pardon of God for his untimely
jest. Then he came humbly and promised me never more to
commit the same fault. I embraced him, satisfied by finding
that he redeemed his thoughtlessness by an excellent heart.

After having recommended union and obedience to those
children who were to remain with their mother, we separated,
It was not without regret and some tears; for my wife was
uneasy at seeing us set out on this adventure, and I was not
without anxiety for the dear treasure that I left behind me.
We hastened our steps, and soon the noise of the stream by
which we were walking prevented us from hearing the adieus
of our loved ones. To cross the stream it was necessary to
go back to a place where it was enclosed by very steep rocks,
from which fell a cascade,

On the opposite shore nature entirely changed her aspect.
We came first to some high, dry grass, through which we
advanced with difficulty. Scarcely had we gone a hundred
steps when we heard a great noise; turning back, we saw the
grass moving. Fritz loaded his gun and held it ready to receive
the aggressor, whatever it might be. But we soon recognised
Turk, our dog, whom we had forgotten, and who had just
rejoined us. I received the brave animal with caresses, and
congratulated Fritz on his coolness; for he not only faced the



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 31

danger bravely, but abstained from firing before he distinctly
saw what the enemy was.

Continuing our route, we gained the borders of the sea.
We looked all around, endeavouring to find traces of our
companions, but could perceive none. We also attentively
examined the sand, hoping to see men’s footsteps, but this
hope was also disappointed. Fritz said, “Shall we fire from
time to time, that the shipwrecked ones may hear us, if there
are any here?” “That is well thought of,’ I replied; “but
perhaps this noise may attract savages, with whom a meeting

would not be agreeable.” “After all,” said he, “I scarcely
know why we should trouble ourselves about people who
inhumanly abandoned us.” “For several reasons,” I replied.

“First, because it is not christian-like to return evil for evil;
and then because, if our companions have need of us, we also
may have need of them.” “But, dear father, in looking for
them we lose time which may be better employed ; for example,
in saving the cattle which have been left on the ship.”
“Between different duties,” said I, “let us accomplish first
the most important. Besides, my dear child, the animals
have sufficient food for several days, and the sea, which is
calm, does not threaten to carry away the rest of the vessel.”
We quitted the shore. After having walked-two leagues,
looking carefully about us, we entered into a little wood. We
had walked then for nearly two hours; the sun was very high.
We hastened to the borders of a little stream which softly
murmured. Around us flew, warbling, beautiful birds, which
were unknown to us. Fritz thought he saw a monkey on the
branch of a tree. Turk also began to smell about, and bark
in that direction. Fritz rose to ascertain the fact; and as he
was walking with his eyes raised upwards, he struck his foot
against a round thing with bristling hairs, which made him
stumble. He picked this thing up and brought it to me,
saying that it must be the nest of a large bird. “Your nest,
my dear Fritz,” said I, laughing at his mistake, “is a cocoa-
nut.” By a disposition natural to self-love at his young age,
Fritz persisted in his opinion. “There are many birds,” said
he, “which make round nests like this.” “That is true; but
why pronounce with so much precipitation, and then support



32 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

your judgment when you are shown that it is ill founded?
Do not you recollect having read that the cocoa-nut is sur-
rounded with a mass of fibres which cover a thin and brittle
skin? The fruit which you have just found is doubtless old;
the exterior envelope has been destroyed by the air. If you
take away these bristly fibres you will see the nut.” Fritz
obeyed, and found that I was right. Then we broke the
’ nut, in which we found a dry and uneatable kernel. “What,”
said Fritz, “is this the fruit of which Dr Ernest spoke with
so much praise? I thought I should find some delicious milk.”
“We should have done so if we had met with a nut which was
not quite ripe. But in proportion as the nut ripens, the milk
which it contains hardens, and forms a kernel, which later still
dries, unless the fruit falls into suitable ground, and the kernel
germinating, breaks its shell to give birth to a new tree.”
“What,” asked Fritz, astonished, “would the kernel have
strength enough to pierce a shell so solid as this?” “Cer-
tainly; have you not seen peach stones open, and they are
very hard?” “Yes; but the peach stones are naturally formed
in two pieces, which the kernel separates when it is swollen
by moisture.” I praised my son for the correctness of this
remark, and told him that the cocoa-nut grows in a different
manner. I then pointed out three little openings towards the
end of the nut. “These openings,” said I, “are closed, as
you may see, by a hood, less hard than the rest of the shell.
It is there that the germs of the stalk and roots take their
issue.” I was glad to see that my son followed with great
interest these explanations, which initiated him into the wise
laws of creation.
We resumed our route, walking still through the wood, which
appeared to extend a long way. We were often obliged to cut
a passage with our hatches from the innumerable bindweeds
which interlaced the trees. At each step some magnificent
plant or some strange tree came in sight. Fritz, who was more
and more astonished, cried out suddenly, “Oh, papa! what are
these great trees with wens on the trunks?” I recognised the
calibash, whose flexible stalk rolling round the trees forms on
their trunks a kind of gourd, with a hard and dry shell. It may
be employed in making dishes, porringers, bottles, and spoons,



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 33

I told Fritz that the savages even use them to boil water and
cook their victuals. He was greatly astonished, not under-
standing how such utensils could bear fire. I then explained
the method of the savages, which consisted in throwing into the
- water contained in these vases, stones previously made red hot
in the fire, until the water boiled.

While talking, we had each taken a gourd to make into
household utensils. Fritz endeavoured to shape his with his
knife, but did not succeed. He became impatient, and threw
it away. I took care not to imitate him, but surrounded mine
with a string, which I pressed gradually tighter, till I obtained
two porringers of equal size. “I must own,” said Fritz, “that
this is an ingenious idea.” “I have not, my dear child, the
merit of the invention; I only recollected that this method
is employed by people who have no knives, so I put it in
practice.” Fritz wished to know how the bottles were made.
“I understand,” said he, “that by letting the gourd dry we
might extract the marrow through the hole. But could we give
to this round fruit a more convenient form? Could we succeed
in pressing it so as to obtain a neck?” I told him that to
obtain this result, they surround the young fruit with bands of
linen or skin. The part thus tied cannot grow, while the rest
develops at liberty.

Seeing my success, Fritz took courage. We gathered a
sufficient number of gourds, which I exposed to the sun, after
having filled them with fine sand to prevent their shrinking too
much in drying ; then, in order to take them on our return, we
took care to mark the place where we left them.

We then pursued our route, endeavouring to form some
spoons with fragments of calibash. We produced nothing very
remarkable ; coarse as they were, however, these spoons were
much more convenient than the oyster shells which we used the
evening before. Fritz jumped for joy: “Dishes, plates, cups!
ah, how glad my mother will be! She will have something to
serve up our soup in.” And thinking of Francis; “Father, let
us look for a little calibash ; our spoons will stretch his poor
mouth from ear to ear. I will try and make him a little one
for himself.” And as one good thought leads to another, he
also prepared two gourds for Turk and Belle. When his labour

3



34 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

was finished, Fritz took some biscuit and soaked it in fresh
water for Turk. When Turk saw this, his large eyes shone
with tenderness; he gratefully licked his young master’s hand,
and did honour to this unexpected repast.

_ After having walked about three hours more, we arrived at a
neck of land which stretched into the sea, and on which rose a
hill, which, not without some trouble, we ascended. From the
summit, the view embraced a vast extent; but, though aided by
the spy-glass, we discovered no signs of other shipwrecks, nor
anything which would make us suppose that the island was
inhabited.

A most magnificent view stretched before us. Under our
feet shone the calm sea in an immense bay, whose shores were
covered with a rich vegetation, which extended a long way.
This spectacle would have filled us with delight if the fate of
our companions had not saddened us. Yet I could not prevent
an expression of satisfaction in contemplating this country,
whose fertility promised well for our future support. “Well,”
said I, “we are destined to the life of isolated colonists. God
has thus decided for us. Let us submit courageously to His
will.” “But,” said Fritz, “we are in greater numbers than at
the time of Adam and Eve; and who knows if we shall not be
like that patriarch of whom the Bible speaks, the source of
an innumerable nation?” This idea of an Abraham of fifteen
years old made me smile.

At this moment the sun darted its fiercest rays. I told Fritz
to follow me and seek the shade in a grove of palm-trees which
I perceived at some distance. “For,” said I, “my poor Fritz,
it would be sad that we should be burnt up before we have
accomplished our patriarchal destiny.” “Dear father,’ said
Fritz, “I wished to cheer you a little. As to us, do not fear.
Where you and my mother are, what can I and my brothers
want? We shall be very happy, and shall soon grow up and
work so as to save you all trouble.” I pressed the dear child
in my arms, and thanked God for having given me so good a
son.

To gain the wood we had to cross a field of reeds, so close
and entangled, that they very much impeded our walk. As this
place might be a refuge for reptiles, I cut one of the reeds to



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 35

defend myself against unpleasant rencontres. Scarcely had I
taken it, than I felt my hand wet with a glutinous liquid. I put
it to’ my lips, and it was clear to me that we had discovered a
natural plantation of sugar-canes. I did not tell Fritz at first,
wishing to give him the pleasure of making this precious dis-
covery. He was walking before me. I told him to cut a reed,
which would be a safer arm against the serpents than pistols or
knives. He obeyed me, and I soon heard him cry out with
delight, “Sugar-canes! sugar-canes! What an exquisite juice,
what delicious syrup! How glad my mother and little brothers
will be!” He broke his reed into several fragments, that he
might more easily squeeze out the juice, which he eagerly sucked.
“T will,” said he, “carry home a good stock of these canes to regale
my mother and brothers.” I told him not to burden himself
with too heavy a load, for we had still a long way to go; but
he cut a dozen of the largest stalks, which he wrapped up in
their leaves and put under his arm.

Scarcely had we entered the grove of palm-trees, when a
troop of monkeys, frightened at our arrival, and Turk’s bark,
sprang on the trees, from which they looked at us, uttering
piercing cries and making horrible grimaces. Fritz, without
reflecting, threw down his bundle of canes, took his gun and
was going to fire, but I stopped him. “Why do you wish
to kill these animals?” “ Apes,” said he, “are wicked, foolish
beasts; see how they menace us and show their teeth.” “Be
itso; but if they are angry it is not without cause, since we
have come to disturb them; let us be careful not to kill any
creature unnecessarily. It is sufficiently painful, that care for
his life obliges man to kill a great many animals, Suffer
these apes to live; who knows if they may not be useful to
us?” “Useful!” replied Fritz, “how can that be?” “You
will see,” said I. I then threw some stones at the monkeys,
who, obeying their imitative instincts, snatched from the top of
the palm-trees a quantity of cocoa-nuts, which they threw at
us, It was easy to avoid these ill-directed missiles. Fritz
was diverted with the success of my trick. “Thanks, Messrs
Apes,” said he, hiding behind a tree; “many thanks!”

When the hail was a little abated, he picked up as many of
the nuts as he could carry, and we went, to regale ourselves at



36 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,

leisure, out of the reach of the apes, At first, we made with the
point of our knives some openings in the tender places, which
are near the end of the nut, so that we might drink the milk
which they contained. But we were astonished not to find
this liquor so excellent as we expected. The cream which
adhered to the interior seemed much better. After having
opened the nut with a blow from the hatchet, we collected,
by the aid of our spoons, this cream, which we sweetened
with the juice of our canes, and thus made a delicious meal.
Thanks to this windfall, Fritz could spare Turk the remainder
of the lobster and biscuit; a very meagre provision for his
robust appetite, for after having swallowed it, he began to
chew the canes and search for cocoa-nuts.

I tied together. several nuts which adhered to the end
of a stalk, and loaded myself with them; Fritz took what
remained of the sugar-canes; and, strengthened by the repast
which we had made, we resumed our walk to rejoin our
family.

Fritz soon found his burden troublesome; every moment
he changed it from shoulder to shoulder; took it under one
arm, then under the other. At last he said, groaning with
fatigue, “Truly, I was far from thinking that these reeds would
cause me so much embarrassment; yet I do wish to carry
them to the tent, that my mother and brothers may enjoy
them.” “Patience and courage,” said I; “your burden may
be compared to the basket of bread which A#sop carried, and
which became naturally lighter after each meal. In the same
way, we shall diminish our provision of canes before we reach
home. Give me one, which I will use as a pilgrim’s staff, and
a portable honeycomb. Take one also, and you will be relieved
of so much. As to the others, tie them so as to place them
like a cross on your back with your gun.”

We resumed our route. Fritz, seeing that from time to
time I put to my lips the cane which he had given me, wished
to do the same, but could not make the least drop of liquor
come out. He, impatiently, asked me the reason of his
ill success. “Reflect a little,” said I, “and I am persuaded
you will soon find out.” He soon discovered that to give
entrance to the air, it was necessary to pierce a hole above



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 27

the first knot of the cane. This done, he had no difficulty in
extracting the juice, and could refresh himself from this delicious
stick. All at once he observed to me, that if we continued to
use them thus, we should not carry many canes to the tent.
“Never mind,” said I; “the juice will not long keep sweet,
especially when the canes are exposed to the sun. If we
were to walk some time longer, it is probable that on
-our return home we could only offer reeds full of sour

liquor.”
“Well,” replied Fritz, “to make them amends, I have in
my tin bottle a stock of cocoa-nut milk.” “Yes; but you

must know that out of the shell the milk ferments and turns
sour.” Fritz then took out his bottle, but scarcely had he
touched the cork than it flew out, and the liquor escaped from
the neck of the bottle, fizzing like champagne. We tasted this
liquor, which was very agreeable. Fritz found it so much to
his taste, that I was obliged to recommend moderation, fearing
it would affect his head. Whatever this drink might be, it
refreshed us, and we walked on more quickly. We soon
came to the place where we had left our gourds. They
were perfectly dry, so we took them up and carried them
away.

A little farther on Turk sprang barking at a troop of
monkeys, who were quietly feeding, and had not perceived
our approach. At the first bark of the dog these animals
dispersed ; but a female, who was nursing her little one, was
less agile, and was seized by the dog. Fritz sprang forward
to save it; he lost his hat, threw down his bottle and sugar-
canes; but he arrived too late: the poor beast was dead, and
the dog had already begun to devour it. Fritz endeavoured
to prevent Turk from continuing his repast, but I dissuaded
him, as it was for our own safety that Turk’s appetite should
be satisfied, and we could not save his victim. The young
one, in its first movement of fright, had squatted against a
tuft of grass, and ground its teeth at the melancholy scene.
When he perceived Fritz, he sprang on his shoulder and
fastened on him so skilfully, that the poor boy, in spite of
all his efforts, could not get rid of him. The young ape
had no intention of hurting him, but separated from his



38 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

mother, he seemed to ask Fritz’s aid and protection against
the terrible enemy who had just made him an orphan.

Laughing at my son’s embarrassment, I advanced, and
gently removed the little animal. Then holding him in my
arms, as a nurse does a child, I could not help pitying him.
“Poor little being,” said I, “what shall we do with you? for
we must think twice, before we admit a useless mouth into
the number. of our colony.” But Fritz interrupted me im-
mediately. “Oh, papa, pray let me keep it. It would die
if we abandon it. Let me adopt it. I have read that apes,
guided by instinct, know how to distinguish good fruits from
those that are hurtful; if this is true, we should not hesitate
to attach to us our little companion.” “Well, my child, I
acknowledge the goodness of your heart, and the wisdom of
your suggestion. I consent to the adoption of your little
protégé; but remember, you must bring it up properly if you
wish to make it useful.”

Whilst we were thus discussing, Turk had tranquilly finished
his odious repast. “Turk,” said Fritz, with solemnity, showing
him his monkey, “you have made an orphan; you have eaten
the mother of this poor innocent. We pardon you this crime,
because you knew no better. But look well at this little ape,
and promise me to love and respect it for the future. It is
too young, fortunately, to understand the wrong you have done
it. If you are honest and repentant, I engage to recom-
pense your conversion, by making you some good soup,
which will make you disgusted with these vile dinners of raw
flesh.” Turk crouched at Fritz’s feet, as. if he had understood
the gravity of this discourse; he looked from his young master
to the little animal, whom Fritz was caressing before him, to
make him understand that the little ape was to be henceforth
sacred to him. This done, the little animal resumed his place -
on Fritz’s shoulder, and remained there with as much tran-
quillity and confidence as if he had been long accustomed to
it. He appeared frightened, however, when Turk approached
too near him, and endeavoured to hide himself in Fritz’s arms,
Wishing to secure their reconciliation, he again addressed the
culpable Turk: “Wicked one,” said he, “repair thy fault.
Thou hast deprived this poor little one of his support and



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 39

guardian; it is but just that you should replace her.” Pass-
ing a cord round Turk’s neck, he gave the end of it to the
little ape, whom he had placed on the back of the dog.
At first, Turk greatly objected to this, but submitted after
a slight reprimand; and the little ape, completely reassured,
appeared to enjoy the seat in which Fritz had installed him.

“Do you know,” said I to my boy, “that we now look
like jugglers going to a fair. How astonished your brothers
will be when they see us arrive with this equipage!” “Yes,”
said Fritz; “and James, who is so fond of making grimaces,
will have a professor to teach him.” “Do not speak thus of
your brother,” I replied; “when we have to live together and
love each other, it is bad to remark on the faults of our
companions. Mutual indulgence is a guarantee of union and
happiness, for we all have our failings.”

Fritz owned that he had spoken without reflection, and
then turned the conversation. He asked me to tell him all
I knew of the habits of apes. This discourse shortened so
much ‘the length of our road, that we arrived, without think-
ing of it,in the midst of our family, who were awaiting us on
the borders of the stream. The dogs saluted each other from
a distance. This uproar so frightened the ape, that he again
jumped on Fritz’s shoulder, and would not descend. As soon
as the children perceived us, they uttered cries of joy; but
when they saw the little animal, who sat trembling on Fritz’s
shoulder: “Oh, a monkey! a monkey!” cried they. “Where
did you find him? How did you catch him? How pretty
he is!” Then remarking our provisions: “What are these
sticks and these great bowls with which papa is loaded?”
There was such a deluge of questions, that we could not reply
to them. The first transport having a little subsided: “Yes,
thank God,” said I, “we are returned safe and sound, and
have brought you all sorts of good things. But what we
desired, what we went to seek, were men, and we have not
alas! met any. Not the least vestige of our companions.”
“Do not damp our joy,” said the mother, “but let us thank
God, who has permitted us to be reunited. Lay down your
burdens, and relate the incidents of your journey.” Every
one hastened to take some part of our load. Ernest took



40 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the cocoa-nuts, which, however, he had not recognised ; Francis
the gourd utensils, which were very much admired, and he
declared that his own little spoon was better than his old
silver one; James took my gun; his mother the game-bag.
Fritz distributed his sugar-canes, and again placed the little ape
on Turk’s back; then he presented his gun to Ernest, who did
not fail to remark that it was dangerous to carry it as we
had done with such heavy loads. The good mother, com-
prehending this indirect complaint, relieved him of his cocoa-
nuts, and the little caravan began its march towards the
tent.

“Ah,” said Fritz, “if Ernest knew the name of these balls
which he let mamma take, he would not have given them up.

They are cocoa-nuts.” “Cocoa-nuts!” cried Ernest; “cocoa-
nuts! Oh, mamma, pray give them back to me, I will carry
them as well as the gun.” “No, no,” replied the mother, “you

will only grumble; I do. not wish to hear your complaints.”
“T promise you I will say nothing,” replied Ernest; “besides,
I can throw away these long stalks, and carry the gun in my

hand.” “Don’t do that,” said Fritz, “for these stalks are
sugar-canes, and I will show you how to drink the sweet
liquor which they enclose.” “Yes! yes!” cried all the children

together, “let us suck the sugar-canes!” and as Fritz was
walking before with his brothers, to whom he showed the
method I had pointed out to him, I remained alone with
my wife, whose curiosity I satisfied by reciting our little
adventures.

None of the things which we had brought caused so much
pleasure to the good housekeeper as the utensils shaped out
of gourds. I must say that, though imperfect, they were
really useful.

When we arrived at the tent, I was happy to see that
all was prepared for a comfortable repast. On the fire was
the pot full of delicious broth; on one side a spit full of fish ;
on the other, a goose roasting, whose fat fell into a large
shell; near this, a barrel containing some nice Dutch cheese;
everything calculated to excite our appetite. I could not,
however, help remarking to my wife, that she was beginning
very soon to kill our poultry, which had better be left to



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 4I

multiply. “Re-assure yourself,” said my wife; “our poultry-
yard has not contributed to this repast. These fish were
caught by James and Francis; and this roast is the produce
of Ernest’s hunting, who gives a very singular name to his
game.” “I give it its true name,” replied the young doctor,
“and I call it a stupid penguin. I cannot be deceived, for
this animal let me approach and kill it with a stick. Besides,
it had four fingers in its claws united by a membrane, a long,
strong beak, bent at the point. All this accords perfectly
with the description which Jonathan Franklin gives of the
penguin in his book of natural history.” I congratulated my
little savant on the use he had made of his reading, and we
sat down in a circle on the sand, to commence the repast.
Each of us was provided with a shell and a gourd spoon.
The children, while waiting till the soup was cool, broke some
cocoa-nuts, and drank the milk eagerly. Then, the soup eaten,
we attacked the fish, which were rather dry, and the penguin,
which decidedly tasted of train oil. This did not prevent us
from enjoying the good cheer; a good appetite makes every-
thing good.

The monkey was naturally the object of general attention;
the children steeped the corners of their handkerchiefs in
the cocoa-milk, and the little animal appeared to take great
pleasure in sucking this milk, so we were satisfied that it
would be easy to bring him up. It was decided to call him
Knips. Fritz asked me if we would drink his champagne
cocoa-milk. “Taste it first,’ I replied, “and see if it is fit
to offer us.” Scarcely had he put the bottle to his lips, than
he made a frightful grimace, and cried out, “Pooh, it is vine-
gar!” “TI thought so,” said I; “but never mind; misfortune
is sometimes good; this vinegar will serve to relish our fish,
which will not then be so dry.” I then poured a little of the
vinegar in my plate. They all imitated me, and cried “Bravo!”
to the cocoa vinegar.

The repast was finished, and as the sun was disappearing
beneath the horizon, we joined in prayer and went to bed.
Knips had his place between Fritz and James, who covered
him up very carefully that he might not be cold. “This is
our son,” they said, laughing.



42 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

After having satisfied myself that there was no appearance
of any enemy near us, I closed my eyes, and enjoyed the
sleep which I had earned. I had slept but a very little time,
when I was awoke by the howling of the dogs, and the agita- _
tion of the fowls perched on the edge of the tent. I hastened
out, followed by my wife and Fritz, who did not sleep so
soundly as his brothers. We took care to provide ourselves
with arms. By the light of the moon we saw our dogs fight-
ing with ten jackals. Already our brave guardians had brought
three of our nocturnal visitors to the ground; but they would
have been overpowered by numbers, if we had not come to
their assistance. Fritz and I fired together. Two jackals fell
dead; the rest, frightened by the noise, ran away. Fritz
wished to bring into the tent the one he had killed, to show
to his brothers in the morning. I permitted him, and we
returned to the little sleepers, whom neither the firing nor
barking of the dogs had awakened. Then we resumed our
sleep, which was no more troubled,



CHAPTER IV.
VOYAGE TO THE WRECK.

AS soon as day began to break, I called my wife, to
concert with her the employment of the day. “My dear,”
said I, “I see so many things wanting to be done, that
I know not to which to give the preference. For one thing,
I think that if we wish to preserve the cattle, and not lose
a number of things which may be useful to us, we must
make a voyage to the vessel; then again, it will be necessary
to construct a more comfortable abode. I own I am a little
frightened at our task.” “Don’t be afraid,” said she; “with
patience, order, and perseverance, we shall surmount all
obstacles. The courage of a father like you, and brave
children like ours, will suffice for everything, It is not with-
out uneasiness that I shall see you return to the vessel, but
if this voyage is indispensable, I will not oppose it.” “Well,
then,” said I, “I will set out with Fritz, whilst you remain
here with the other children. Come, get up,” cried I; “get
up, the sun has risen; there is no time to lose.”

Fritz appeared the first, and profited by the time which
his brothers took to rub their eyes, to place his dead jackal
on its legs before the tent, in order to see the surprise which
this sight would produce in the children. I had not thought
of the dogs, who, seeing the animal, and doubtless thinking
it still alive, threw themselves upon it, barking furiously.
Fritz had great trouble in driving them off. This un-
accustomed noise hastened the lazy ones, They arrived one
by one; the little monkey on James’s shoulder; but at
sight of the jackal he was so frightened that he ran back

into the tent, and hid himself under our beds, where we could
43



44 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

only see the end of his nose. As Fritz had foreseen, the
children were greatly astonished.

“A wolf!” cried James; “there are wolves on our island!”
“No,” said Ernest, “it is a fox.” “No,” said little Francis,
“it is a yellow dog.” “Ah! ah! Master Ernest,” said Fritz,
with mock vanity, “you could recognise the agéuti; but this
time your knowledge is at fault. What, do you think it is
a fox?” “Yes,” replied Ernest, “I think it is a golden fox.”
“Ah! ah! a golden fox,” repeated Fritz, with a burst of
laughter. Poor Ernest, whose self-love as a scholar seemed
gravely compromised, was so disconcerted that the tears came
in his eyes. “You are unkind,” said he to his brother; “I
may well be deceived; besides you would not have known
the name of this animal, if papa had not told you.” “Come,”
said I, “do not tease each other so much. Besides, though
you thus laugh at your brother, my dear Fritz, you must
know that, according to naturalists, the jackal partakes the
nature of a wolf, a fox,and a dog. There is even a generally
admitted opinion that the domestic dog is descended from the
jackal. So not only was Ernest right in calling this animal
a fox, but so was James, who took it for a wolf, and. Francis,
who thought it was a dog.”

The discussion ended, I reminded my children that we
ought to commend ourselves to God on beginning the day,
and we knelt in prayer. Then we began breakfast, for my
little fellows’ appetites arose as soon as their eyes were opened.
A chest of biscuits was broken open and the barrel of cheese
visited. Suddenly, Ernest, who had been roaming for some
minutes round one of the barrels we had fished up, cried out,
“Qh, papa, how much better we should enjoy our biscuit if
we could spread it with good butter.” “Ah,” said I, “with
your eternal if’s, you only arouse our desires without giving
us the power of satisfying them. Is it not sufficient to have
good cheese?” “I don’t say it is not,” replied he, “but if
some one would open this barrel.” “What barrel?” “This
one; I am certain it contains butter, for at a joint there leaks
out a kind of greasy matter whose smell I recognise.”

After satisfying ourselves that Ernest’s nose had not
deceived him, we concerted how we could extract the butter



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 45

from the tub, Fritz was of opinion that we should knock off
the hoops round the top and take away the head. I thought
that thus the staves would be so disjointed that the butter
would be melted. by the sun. It seemed better to make an
opening with a chisel, by which we could get out the butter
with a little: wooden shovel. This done, we soon had some
excellent bread and butter, the taste of which made us more
anxious to save the cow from the vessel.

The dogs, fatigued with their combat, slept beside us. I
remarked that they had not escaped unhurt from their fight
with the jackals, for they both had large wounds in the neck.
My wife washed some butter in fresh water to take away the
salt, and dressed their wounds with it. Then they began to
lick each other, which made me hope that they would soon be
cured. “It would be useful,” said Fritz, “if on such occasions
our dogs were furnished with pointed collars.” “Ah,” said
James, “if my mother would help me, I would make some
solid ones.” “With all my heart,” replied his mother; “let us
see what you have thought of.”

“Now, Fritz,” said I, “ prepare to accompany me to the ship-
wrecked vessel, and we will endeavour to save the cattle, and
a quantity of things which may be useful to us.”

The boat of tubs was soon ready. At the moment of
departure, we agreed with my wife that she should raise on
the shore, with a pole and a strip of white linen, a signal,
which we could see from the vessel. In case of distress, she
was to lower it, and fire the gun three times, I persuaded
her even, so courageous was this dear wife, to let us pass
the night on the vessel, if it happened that we were too late
to return. In this case, we would light lanterns to show
that all was well. Knowing that there remained some pro-
visions on the wreck, we only took our arms. I permitted
Fritz to carry his little ape, whom he wished to regale with
goat’s milk. We set out, after having embraced and recom-
mended each other to God. f

Fritz rowed vigorously, and I guided the boat. When we
were at some distance to sea, I saw that a very strong stream
ran from the bay. I conjectured that in going towards the
sea, it would form a current, which would help us to reach



46 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the ship. I was not deceived. We floated in the direction of
this current, which carried us, with very little effort on our
part, three parts of the way.

We went on board the wreck, and our boat was fastened
by thick ropes into the notch which I had made on our
departure. Fritz’s first care was to run to the animals, who
at our approach began to bleat and bellow. These poor
beasts seemed to rejoice at again seeing men. We first gave
them some food and fresh water, and then made our own
meal, which was easy to procure, for the ship was provisioned
for a long voyage. Fritz put the goat’s teat to the little
monkey, who joyfully took this delicious beverage. “Now,”
said I, “what shall we begin with?” “I think,” replied Fritz,
“that we should before all things, fix a sail to our boat,”
It did not seem to me at first that this was very necessary ;
but Fritz made me observe that in coming he had felt
some wind, against which we should have had to struggle,
if we had not been helped by the current, and we might
make this wind useful in returning to the shore. He foresaw
that we should have some trouble in making the passage, only
helped by our oars, especially when the boat was heavily laden.

These observations appeared very wise, so we set to work.
I chose a piece of yard thick enough for a mast, and another
thinner piece, to which I fixed a large square of linen. During
this time, Fritz had nailed on to one of the tubs a thick plank,
in which he made a hole to fix the mast. I then attached
some pulleys to the corners of the sail, so as to be able to
work it while holding the rudder. To finish, and with a
disposition to mix play with work, natural at his age, Fritz
tied to the end of the mast a red streamer, which he saw
flying with extreme pleasure. Smiling at this innocent joke,
I fixed towards the land a telescope, which I found in the
captain’s cabin, and I had the joy of seeing that our loved ones
were all right.

It was getting late, and it was clear that we could not
regain the land that evening. The rest of the day was
employed in pillaging the vessel, as if we had been pirates,
and in loading our tubs with every useful thing they would
contain,



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 47

Foreseeing a long abode on this desert land, I gave
preference to the utensils which would assist our industrious
efforts, and to the arms with which we might defend ourselves.
The vessel, intended for the establishment of a colony in the
South Sea, where we intended to settle, was better provided
with utensils and provisions of all sorts than it would have

been for an ordinary voyage. So we had only to choose
‘among the multitude of useful things. I did not forget spoons,
knives, stew-pans, plates, etc. Fritz carried away even a
silver service which was in the captain’s cabin, as well as
a quantity of bottles of wine and liqueurs, also several
Westphalia hams. These luxurious provisions did not make
us disdain the sacks of corn, maize, and other seeds. I took
care not to forget a compass, some spades and other garden
implements, some guns and pistols. We took also some
hammocks and blankets, some balls of cord, some curtains,
and even a little barrel of sulphur, that we might replace
the matches, of which we had only a small quantity left.

I had declared our cargo complete, when Fritz arrived
with a last packet. “Leave that, dear child,” said I, “there
is no more room. This is too large, and appears heavy.”
“Qh, father,” said Fritz, “let me take this packet; they are
the captain’s books. Ernest and my mother will be so de-
lighted.” Dear child,” said I, “you are right; bread for the
mind is as valuable as bread for the body; your packet will
be a treasure to us all.” Our boat was so loaded that the
water almost overflowed it. I should certainly have lightened
it, if the sea had not been perfectly calm. However, we
took care to preserve our belts, in case any accident should
happen.

The night fell, A large fire which we perceived on the
shore told us that nothing had happened on their side. To
reply to this good news, I suspended from the side of the

‘vessel three lighted lanterns. Soon, the firing of a gun told
us that our signal had been perceived. Our arrangements
were soon made to pass the night in our tubs. I would
not sleep on the vessel, for the least wind might dislodge it,
and expose us to danger. Fritz was soon asleep, in spite of
his uncomfortable bed. As for me, I could not close my



48 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

eyes; I was uneasy about the fate of those on land, and I
also wished to keep an incessant watch, to be ready for all
events. Scarcely had day begun to break than I was on the
deck of the vessel, pointing the telescope towards the shore.
I saw my wife come out of the tent, and stop to look around
her. I hoisted a white flag to the top of the mast, and my
wife lowered and raised hers three times, to tell us she had
perceived and comprehended my signal. “God-be praised!”
cried I; “our dear ones are safe and sound. Now we must
find means to transport the cattle to the shore.” “Let us
construct a raft,” said Fritz.

I showed him not only the difficulty of the work, but also
the impossibility of guiding such a machine. “Well,” said
he, “let us throw the animals into the sea; they will swim.
The pig, with his large fat belly, will have no trouble in
supporting himself.” “I believe so; but do you think that
the ass, the cow, the goat, the sheep, will be equally fortunate?
Now, I own that I would willingly sacrifice the pig to save the
others.” “Well,” replied Fritz, “why not put on them some
swimming belts like our own. It will be funny to see them
swim in that manner.” “Bravo, my clever Fritz; your idea,
though droll, seems practicable. To work, my friend, to work ;
let us make the trial on one of our animals.” We took a
sheep, to whose body we fastened our belts, one on each side,
and threw her into the sea, At first, the poor frightened
beast disappeared under the water; but soon came to the
surface, and at last, feeling the support of the belts, she
remained motionless, and we saw with satisfaction that she
swam perfectly well.

Nothing more was necessary to show the excellence of this
method of saving the cattle. All the cork we could find served
for the little animals. As to the ass and the cow, which were
much heavier, we made a particular apparatus for each of them,
composed of two empty barrels fastened to their bodies by
linen bands.

When all our beasts were harnessed in this manner, I
attached a cord to the horns or neck of each, of which we
might hold the end when we were in the boat. Our cattle
were soon in the water, and that without much difficulty. The



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 49

ass alone was obstinate; we were obliged to throw him in
headlong. He beat about at first, but soon began to swim
with so much grace that we could not help applauding him.
As soon as we were all embarked, I untied the rope, and the
wind soon taking the sail, we were driven towards the shore.
Fritz, happy in having succeeded in our undertaking, played
with his monkey, and proudly regarded the red flag which
unrolled so gracefully at the top of the mast. I followed
with heartfelt looks my beloved ones, whom, by the aid of
the telescope, I could see quitting the tent and running to the
shore. Suddenly Fritz cried out, “Oh, father, an enormous fish
is coming towards us.” “To arms!” said I, “and attention.”

Our guns were loaded. The animal whose approach Fritz
had announced was a very large shark. “Let us fire together,”
said I. At the moment when the marine monster, who was
swimming very fast, opened his mouth to seize one of our sheep,
we both fired. The shark disappeared. An instant after, we
perceived on the surface of the sea the brilliant scales of his
belly, and a streak of blood showed us that we were happily
delivered from this terrible corsair. I ordered Fritz to reload
his gun, for it might be that the shark was not alone. Happily
my fears were unfounded. Without any. other incident, we
reached the shore.

My wife and the three children were waiting for us. They
seized the rope which I threw to them to fasten the boat, The
animals who had reached the land, were relieved from their
belts. The ass rolled on the sand in a joyful manner, and then
uttered a formidable hee-haw, to show the joy he felt at finding
himself on firm ground. After having embraced and con-
gratulated each other at meeting again safe and sound, after
this long and perilous separation, we sat down on the grass at
the border of the stream, and I recited all that had happened
to us. I did not forget to give Fritz the praise he merited for
the assistance he had given me.

\ee



CHAPTER V.
WHAT PASSED ON LAND DURING OUR ABSENCE,

FRriTz’s contrivance for the transport of the cattle, excited
general admiration. Good little Francis was delighted with the
sail and streamer. “It is prettier than anything else,” said he;
“yes, I like it better than the stew-pans, the beasts, the pig, and
even the cow.” “Little silly,” said his mother, “you will change
your mind, when I give you every morning a bowl full of good
milk.”

We then described, in detail, all that we had done.

Their curiosity satisfied, we began to unload the tubs.
James, abandoning this employment, went towards the cattle,
and jumping on the donkey’s back, came to us with a majestic
air. We had great trouble in keeping our countenances at this
comic equipage ; but what was our astonishment, on seeing the
little rider encircled with a skin belt, in which he had placed
two pistols. “Where did you get this bandit’s costume?” said
I, “It is all our own make,” replied he, showing the dogs,
each furnished with a collar stuck full of nails to defend them
in case of attack. “Bravo, my son,” said I, “if this is your
invention.” “Mamma helped me,” he replied, “because there
was sewing to do.” “But where did you get the skin, the
thread, the needles?” I asked my wife. “Fritz’s jackal fur-
nished us with the skin,” she replied; “as to the rest,” added
she, smiling, “a good housewife ought always to be provided
with them.”

I could see that Fritz was not pleased that his skin had been
appropriated without his permission. He dissimulated his ill-
humour as well as he could ; but when James came near him,
he held his nose, crying, “pooh! what a frightful smell!” “It

50



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 51

is my belt,” said he, calmly ; “when it is dry, it will not smell.”
As for the little wag, he did not trouble himself about the dis-
agreeable smell, but walked up and down with a superb air,
caressing his pistols. His brothers hastened to throw into the
sea the remains of the jackal.

Seeing that the supper hour approached, I told Fritz to go
and fetch one of the hams which were in the tubs. Fritz soon
returned. “Oh,a ham! a ham!” cried the children, clapping
their hands. “Moderate yourselves,” said the mother, “for if
you do not sup till this ham is cooked, you will fast for a long
time; but I have some turtle’s eggs with which I will make you,
in the frying pan you have had the good sense to bring, a good
omelette, for which, fortunately, butter will not be wanting.”
' “For these eggs,’ said Ernest, always desirous to show his
learning, “are easily recognised by their roundness, and their
membranous shell; besides, it is only turtles who deposit their
eggs in the sand.” “How did you find them?” I asked. “This
belongs to the history of our day,” said our housekeeper ;
“before relating it, I think it will be better to have supper.”
“Right,” said I; “make your omelette, and let us keep the
recital for the repast; it will be an agreeable entertainment.
During that time the children and I will finish and put in its
place the boat’s cargo, and instal the beasts for the night.”

At these words, my sons rose, and followed me to the coast.
We had just finished, when my wife invited us to do honour to
her supper. Nothing was wanting; omelette, cheese, biscuit ;
all was found excellent, and the table service contributed
greatly to the charm of our repast. Francis alone, faithful to
his gourd spoon, would not return to his silver one. The
dogs, fowls, goats and sheep, made a circle around us, as
interested spectators. As to the ducks and geese, I did not
trouble about their food ; the marshy mouth of the stream fur-
nished them with abundance of worms and little crabs, of which
they were very fond. After supper I made Fritz bring a bottle
of excellent wine, found in the captain’s cabin, and begged my
wife to take a glass of this strengthening liquor, before beginning
her recital,

“Itis fortunate,” said she, laughing, “that my turn is come,
at last, to tell my great deeds. I have nothing to relate about



52 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the day, for uneasiness képt me on the shore, without having
the courage to undertake anything. I was not satisfied till I
saw that you had arrived at the vessel. The day had then
passed without our going away from the tent. I formed the
project of going on the morrow to find a more comfortable place
than this shore, where we are exposed to all the rigour of the
sun during the day, and to the cold at night. I thought of the
wood which you had discovered, and resolved to go there. In
the morning, as I was still thinking of my project, without hav-
ing said anything about it to the children, James took down
the jackal, and cut with his knife two large straps out of the
skin, which he cleaned as well as he could. This done he stuck
the straps full of large nails, then with a piece of the sail he
lined the insides, and asked me to sew the linen to the skin, so
as to cover the heads of the nails. JI did as he wished, in spite
of the disagreeable smell. Another strap which he wished to
fold in the same way, was destined to make a belt; but I
showed him that this strap was not yet dry, and would shrink
considerably and render his work useless. Ernest advised him
to stretch the skin on a plank, which he could carry about and
expose to the sun, James, without comprehending that his brother
was joking, put his advice in practice, and I soon saw him,
loaded with his plank, walking gravely in the sun. I communi-
cated to my sons my project of removal, to which they gave
their joyful assent. In the twinkling of an eye they were
loaded with arms and provisions; I carried the water-bottle
and a hatchet. Escorted by the two dogs, we directed our
march to the borders of the stream. Turk recognised the path
you had followed, and preceded us, returning frequently, as if
he understood that he must act as guide. My two young
sons marched resolutely, proud of carrying arms; they felt all
their importance, for I did not conceal from them that our
safety depended on their bravery and address. I was glad that
you had taught our children how to use arms, and thus enabled
them to meet and confront danger.

“We had some trouble in crossing the stream on the wet,
slippery stones. Ernest crossed first, without accident. James
carried my hatchet and water-bottle. I took Francis on my
back, and could scarcely keep my footing with my dear



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 53

burden, who joined his hands round my neck, and clung with
all his strength to my shoulders; at last I reached the other
side; and when we had attained the height from which you
had discovered the landscape of which you spoke with so much
enthusiasm, my heart opened, for the first time since our ship-
wreck, to the pleasure of hope. We soon entered a valley full
of shade and verdure. We saw a little wood at some distance;
but in order to reach it, it was necessary to cross a prairie where
the grass was so high and thick that it almost hid the children.
James at last discovered a path, where we perceived traces
of your passage. These prints conducted us, after several turn-
ings, to the wood. Suddenly we heard a rustling of leaves,
and saw a large bird fly away from the ground. Each of my
little men seized his gun, but the bird was out of sight before
they could fire. ‘What bird was that?’ asked James. ‘An
eagle, no doubt,’ said Francis, ‘for he had very large wings.’
‘That proves nothing, said Ernest, ‘all birds with large wings
are not eagles. ‘I suppose, said I, ‘that he was on his nest
when we drove him away; let us try and find the nest, and
perhaps we shall be better informed. Careless James immedi-
ately sprang towards the place whence the bird had flown, but
at that instant another bird, like the first, flew up, flapping his
large wings in the poor boy’s face, who stood astonished and
almost frightened. The other children, not less astonished,
kept their arms lowered before this new game. ‘ Unskilful
hunters, said I, ‘is it possible that you have missed another
chance?’ Ernest was angry; as to James, he took off his hat,
and making a comic bow to the fugitive, cried out, ‘Au revoir,
Mr. Bird; another time I am your devoted servant.’ Ernest
soon discovered the nest we sought. It was constructed very
clumsily, and only contained some broken shells. We con-
cluded that the nurslings had lately departed. ‘These birds
could not have been eagles,’ remarked Ernest, ‘for eaglets can-
not run so soon after they are born. The contrary is the case
with pintados and other winged fowl of the same family. I
presume, then, that the birds whose nest we have discovered
are bustards, for you must have seen that their plumage was
yellowish white underneath, and a mixture of black and red
above,” ‘Instead of examining it thus, said I, to my little



54 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

scholar, ‘you had better have taken aim at it; you would then
have had a chance of deciding more certainly what it was.
But perhaps, after all, it was best to leave it to its little
ones,’

“Talking thus, we reached the little wood. A crowd of
unknown birds peopled the trees, and made a most varied
concert, The children prepared to fire, but I showed them
that the prodigious height of the trees on which these gay
singers were perched would render their efforts fruitless. The
form and extraordinary thickness of these gigantic trees sur-
prised us greatly. Their trunks were enormous, supported
by powerful roots, which spread along the ground to a con-
siderable extent. James climbed on a root, and measured
with a string the circumference of one of these trunks. Ernest
calculated that it was not less than forty feet, and the height
of the trunk more than twenty-four. Nothing has ever moved
me more than the sight of this-splendid vegetation; ten or
twelve trees formed what we had taken for a wood. The
branches spread so far, and the foliage, which resembled in
form the walnut-trees of Europe, made a delicious shade.
Underneath, the ground was covered with fine green grass,
which invited repose, .

“We sat down. The bags of provisions were opened,
a stream which murmured near furnished us with fresh clear
water, and the multitude of birds singing over our heads
gave to our repast the air of a feast. Our dogs, who had
quitted us for some time, returned. To our great astonish-
ment, they did not ask for food, but laid down on the grass
and slept tranquilly, which showed us that they had found
their own breakfast. The place where we were appeared
so agreeable, that I thought it useless to seek another for
our next establishment. I resolved, then, to return, and go
to the shore, and endeavour to pick up what the wind might
have sent to land from the wreck of the ship. James, before
setting off, begged me to sew the skin belt which he had
not ceased to carry suspended on his back, and which was
now quite dry, This accomplished, he soon put on his belt,
in which he placed his pistols, and, quite proud, walked on
first, to show himself the more quickly, in case you should







THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 55

have got back during our absence. We were obliged to hurry
to keep him in sight.

“On the shore we found little to carry away, for the things
we could reach were too heavy for our strength. During this
time our dogs kept close to the shore, and I saw them plunge
their paws in the water and pull out little crabs, which they
ate eagerly. ‘See, my children’ said I, ‘how industrious
hunger makes them; we need not be uneasy about food
for our dogs, since the sea affords them abundant nourish-
ment?

“On quitting the shore we perceived Belle scratching the
ground, and pulling from it a ball, which she immediately
swallowed. ‘If these should be turtle’s eggs!’ said Ernest.
‘Turtle’s eggs!’ said Francis; ‘are turtles fowls?’ You may
judge how Ernest and James laughed at this question. When
they were calm; ‘let us profit by Belle’s discovery, cried I,
‘for I have heard that these eggs are excellent eating’ ‘I
believe they are,’ said Ernest, who already anticipated the
flavour of this delicate meat. We had some trouble in driving
Belle from this repast, which she found very much to her
taste. She had already eaten several eggs, but there remained
about twenty, which we put carefully into our provision bag.
Looking to sea, we perceived the sail of your boat. Francis
feared that it was savages, who would kill us; but Ernest
affirmed that it was your barque; and he was right, since a
few minutes after you landed and embraced us. Such, my
dear, are our adventures. I sought for a lodging; I found
it, and am delighted; and if you like we will go and settle
ourselves to-morrow, under those magnificent trees; the view
from thence is superb, and the place exquisite.”

“What,” cried I, jokingly, “trees? is that all you have
discovered for our safety and abode? I comprehend that if
they are as big as you say, we might find refuge in them
during the night; but we should want a balloon to mount
them, or else wings.” “Joke as you will,” said she, “but I
know that we could construct on these trees, among the great
branches, a cabin, which we could reach by a staircase. Do
we not often see the same thing in Europe? Do you not.
recollect, for example, that linden-tree in our country which



56 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

inclosed a pavilion, and which they called from that
‘Robinson Crusoe’s tree?’” “Well,” said I, “we will think
by-and-by of executing this difficult work.” However, the
night came, and the prolonged conversation made us forget
the hour of repose. We assembled for evening prayer, then

slept, delighted at being re-united, and woke in the morning
at break of day.



CHAPTER VI.
PROJECTS OF MIGRATION. THE DEAD SHARK. THE BRIDGE.

“J HAVE reflected on your last night’s project,” said I to my
wife, on waking in the morning, “and I think we must not
be in too great a hurry to change our residence. Why aban-
don this place, to which Providence has conducted us? We
are here protected on one side by the sea, on the other by
the rocks. We are also near the vessel, which still holds
many useful things which we should give up if we went else-
where.”

“Your reasons are undoubtedly good,” replied my wife,
“but you do not know how intolerable this abode on the
coast is, when the sun is over our heads. During your excur-
sions with Fritz, you sheltered yourselves in the woods, whose
trees offered you delicious fruits. Here we have no other
asylum than the tent, under which the heat is stifling, which
makes me fear for the health of the little ones, and we find
for food only mussels and oysters, which are very little to our
taste. As to your praise of the security of this retreat, it does
not seem to me to be justified. The jackals came easily to
visit us, and there is nothing to show that lions and tigers
may not do the same. The treasures of the vessel are not
to be despised, it is true, but I would willingly renounce them
to be delivered from the uneasiness which these sea voyages
cause me.”

“Well,” said I to my wife, embracing her, “you defend
your opinion so well, that I am constrained to yield to it;
not, however, without a little restriction. JI think I know a
way of making your ideas agree with mine. We will go,
and inhabit the little wood; but we shall keep here our maga-

zine of provisions, and we will make a sort of fortress to retire
57



538 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to, in case of attack. We will leave among the rocks our
powder, which is of great use to us, but the neighbourhood
of which may be dangerous. This plan being adopted, we
must first throw a bridge over the stream, to render our
moving and daily communications between the two shores
more easy.” “Do you think so?” cried my wife. “The
construction of a bridge will be long and troublesome. Could
we not load the ass and cow with our materials?” I told
her that she exaggerated the importance of this operation,
and the obstacles we should have to surmount. “In this
case,” said she, “let us begin the work without any delay,
for I long to see the migration accomplished.”

Thus was settled the question of our change of residence.
The children, whom we woke and told of our project, agreed
to it with enthusiasm. They immediately baptized the little
wood “The Land of Promise.”

Morning prayers over, each breakfasted as he could. Fritz
did not forget his monkey, whom he placed at the teat of
the goat, his nurse. This example appeared good to James,
who at first tried to milk the cow into his hat, but not having
succeeded, he began to suck the good beast, who let him do
it. “Francis,” cried he, while taking breath, “come here;
here is some good milk, quite warm.” His brothers seeing
him in this singular position, laughed at him unmercifully;
they even called him the little calf, a name which he kept
for some time. His mother reproached him for his gluttony,
and to show him that he need not have recourse to so
summary a proceeding, began to milk the cow most. skil-
fully. Everybody surrounded the active mother, who first
filled the cups which each presented, and then a bowl, which
she put on the fire, to make with some biscuits an excellent
soup.

During this time I prepared our boat of tubs, to fetch
from the vessel some pieces of timber and plank to construct
our bridge. Thinking that we should want some help, I
resolved to take Ernest. We put to sea, and plying well
our oars,soon gained the current of the stream which aided
us as before. As we passed near an islet situated at the
entrance of the bay, we saw a cloud of gulls, albatrosses,



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 59

and other sea birds, who were whirling about the shore,
uttering such piercing cries that we were tempted to stop
our ears. Fritz wished to fire at this troop, but I forbade
him. Such a gathering seemed to be attributable to some
extraordinary cause which I wished to know. I raised the
sail, which filled, and a fresh wind carried us towards the
islet.

Fritz did not take his eyes from the point the birds seemed
to prefer. “Oh!” cried he, suddenly, “they are picking a
marine monster, and feasting joyously without inviting us,”
He was not deceived. Having landed, we fastened our boat,
and then, without being seen, watched the troop of birds,
who were picking with delight an enormous dead fish. Fritz
asked whence this corpse could come, as we had not perceived
it before. “Ah,” said Ernest, “is it not the shark you killed
yesterday?” “Indeed,” replied I, “Ernest is right; it is our
pirate. See his terrible jaw; his rough skin, which is used
to polish iron and smooth wood. It is not certainly one of
the smallest of its kind, for it must measure at least fifteen
feet. God be praised who delivered us from so powerful an
enemy! We will let the gulls feed on his flesh, but I think
we should take away some strips of skin, which may be use-
ful to us.” Ernest drew the ramrod from his gun, and
advanced towards the gulls, striking right and left. He
knocked down some, the others flew away. Fritz then cut
with his knife several large strips from the sides of the shark,
and we regained our boat.

As we were going towards the wreck, I remarked at some
distance from the shores of the islet a great number of joists
and planks which the waves had thrown up; it was not
necessary to continue our voyage, since we found these suit-
able materials for the intended construction. I chose from
the wreck those which might serve us, and formed a kind
of raft, which was tied by a long cord behind the boat, which
we turned homewards. The wind being favourable, we had
no need to row, it was sufficient to steer. Fritz nailed to
the mast the pieces of skin, that the sun might dry them.

During this time Ernest was examining the gulls he had
killed. He did not fail to question me about these birds, to



60 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

which I replied as well as I could. He then wished to
know to what use I destined the skin of the shark. I
told him that I thought of making some graters, and I
added that in Europe they made the skin into what is
called shagreen.

The voyage was finished. On landing we were surprised
not to find any of the family; but at our cries, they soon
came running to us. Francis had on his shoulder a fishing
net,and James carried in his hand a handkerchief carefully
tied up. Arrived near us, he opened it and showed us a
great quantity of fine crabs. “It is I, father! it is I who
discovered them!” cried Francis, proudly. “Yes,” replied
James, “but it is I who caught them. I went into the
water up to my knees, whilst they were dining on Fritz’s
jackal.”

Then James begged me to accompany him to the stream, to
show me what he thought was the most convenient place to
build the bridge. “Well,” cried I, “I will make proof of your
sagacity ; and if the place is well chosen, we will carry the
joists and planks while your mother prepares dinner.” James
conducted us to the place where he thought the bridge should
be fixed, and all things considered, I was of opinion that it
was a favourable one; so we immediately began to transport
our materials; for this we employed the ass and the cow.
But as we had no harness for these animals, I passed round
the neck of each a long cord, forming a halter, the end of
which was attached to the pieces of wood. In a few journeys
the carriage was accomplished, and we were ready to begin
the building.

On the point which James had chosen, the stream was
much narrower than elsewhere, and there were trees on each
side which might serve to fix the beams to. “Now,” said I,
“we must measure the width of the stream, to know if our
pieces of wood are long enough.” There is nothing more easy,”
said Ernest; “we can tie a stone to the end of a string, and
throw it to the other shore: the length of the string will give
us the measure we want.” Having put in practice this simple
and ingenious idea, Ernest calculated that the stream was about
eighteen feet wide. Now, as it was necessary that our principal



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON, 61

joists should rest at least three feet on each shore, we chose
three of twenty-four or twenty-five feet in length. The
greatest difficulty was how we were to get these immense
pieces of wood across the stream. I proposed to my sons
to decide this important question during dinner, which had
already been delayed above an hour.

We returned, then, to the mother, who was impatiently
waiting for us, for the crabs had been cooked some time.
But before beginning to eat, we had to admire with what
patience the skilful manager had made some sail cloth bags
for the ass and cow to carry things in. We applauded it the
more when we knew that having no large needles, she had to
pierce each hole with a nail, The repast was short, for each
was anxious to begin the work.

Though we had consulted on the means of placing the
first beams, none of my children had discovered it. Happily,
I had succeeded better. As soon as we had regained the
dock-yard, I put my idea into execution. I tied one of my
great beams to one of the trees on the borders of the stream ;
to the other end I attached a long cord; then I crossed the
stream to fix a pulley to one of-the trees on the opposite
shore, over which I passed the cord which I had brought
with me. I then returned and tied the ass and cow to this
same cord. The two animals pulled; the beam turned round
the trunk, and its extremity soon touched the other shore.
The children were astonished, and jumped on the beam,
uttering cries of joy. The most difficult part of our labour
was accomplished. Two other beams were placed near the
first ; there remained only to nail on them a series of planks,
and the bridge would be finished. We happily completed our
task before the fall of day; then, greatly fatigued, we slept
more soundly than ever through the night which followed this
well-spent day.



CHAPTER VII.

THE MIGRATION, THE PORCUPINE. THE TIGER-CAT, THE
WOUNDED FLAMINGO,

AT the first approach of day, I woke the children, and gave
them some advice as to their conduct during our migration.
“We are going,” said I, “to enter a country quite new to us.
None of you must venture alone. Let us walk as near as
possible to each other, and if an enemy appears, let me direct
the attack or defence.”

Prayers and breakfast finished, we prepared to depart. The
flock was assembled; the ass and the cow received on their
backs the sacks which my wife had made the evening before,
and which we had filled with the most useful things. We
took care not to forget the captain’s case of bottles, and a
small supply of butter.

As I was completing the animals’ load with our bed cover-
ings, hammocks, and cordages, my wife interfered and claimed
a place for little Francis, as well as for the sack which she
called her enchanted bag. Then she showed me that we
must certainly carry away our fowls and pigeons, who would
not fail to disperse and be lost as soon as we no longer gave
them food. I yielded to these reasons. A commodious place
was made for Francis on the ass’s back, in the space between
the sacks which hung on each side of the animal; the en-
chanted bag served him for a saddle. There remained to
seize the fowls and pigeons. The children pursued them,
but without being able to capture any. Their mother told
them to keep still, saying that she would capture without
‘trouble all the frightened creatures, “We shall see!” cried

the careless ones, “You will see,” replied the mother. Then
62



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 63

she spread on the ground some handfuls of grain, at the sight
of which they all assembled. This grain eaten, she threw
some more, but this time in the interior of the tent; fowls
and pigeons flew in also, and consequently were caught.
“More is done by ingenuity than violence, you see, gentle-
men,” said the mother, closing the entrance of the tent,
where James glided in, and made one after the other prisoners;
we tied their feet and put them on the back of the cow.
When they were all installed there, we extended over them
_a covering, held at some distance by two branches bent into
an arch. Thus plunged into shade, these creatures would
not annoy us by their cries. All the things we left, and
which the rain or sun could not spoil, were shut up in the
tent, whose entrance was carefully closed with stakes, and
barricaded with barrels full and empty; then I gave the signal
for departure,

We were all very well armed, and each of us carried a
game-bag filled with provisions and ammunition. All were
in good humour. Fritz, his gun under his arm, led the march;
behind him came his mother, leading the cow and the ass,
who walked side by side; in the third rank were James and
the goat; in the fourth, Ernest and the sheep. I was the
rear-guard. Our dogs went here and there, barking, watching,
smelling. This caravan, slowly walking, had a truly picturesque
appearance. Looking at it, I could not help crying out to
my eldest son, “Well, Fritz, here is your project beginning
to be accomplished. It is thus that our ancestor Abraham
travelled. What do you think of it, my little patriarch?”
Ernest replied for his brother: “Papa, I think it is charming;
I wonder more people do not embrace a wandering life.”
“That is true,” replied I; “but God grant that we may not
long be reduced to lead this life. You would soon be tired
of it, l assure you. Let us hope that this pilgrimage may be
our last.” “God hears you,” cried his mother; “I hope that
our new abode will please us, and will be so comfortable
that we may never need to quit it.” As we approached the
bridge, the sow, who at first appeared unwilling to follow us,
rejoined us, showing by her grunting the displeasure which this
long walk gave her; but we were not much affected by her bad



64 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

humour, The passage of the stream was effected without accident,
but the rich vegetation on the other shore greatly retarded
our march. The ass, the cow, the goat and the sheep, who
for a long time had not had such a feast, could not resist the
temptation of feeding on the fresh grass ; our dogs were obliged
to keep barking round them and biting their legs to make
them advance.

To avoid such delays, I thought of keeping by the side
of the stream, but scarcely had we gone a few steps in that
direction, when our dogs bounded into the thick grass, howl-
‘ing frightfully, as if they had encountered a ferocious animal.

Fritz, armed with his gun, his finger on the trigger, resolutely
advanced. Ernest came near his mother, not however with-
out having prepared his arms. James sprang intrepidly after
his brother; keeping his gun in his shoulder belt. I prepared
to rejoin them, to protect them in case of danger, when I
heard them cry out loudly, “Oh, papa! come quickly! run! A
porcupine! A monstrous porcupine!” I hastened on, and
saw, indeed, a porcupine, not however so large as James made
out. The dogs were raging round the animal, whom they
could not attack without paying dearly for their rashness. The
porcupine fought after his manner, that is to say by turning
his back to his adversaries; his head between his front paws,
he marched against them, bristling his darts, which, agitated
in this manner, produced a kind of strange clicking. Every
time the dogs attacked him, they received a number of
wounds,

Fritz and I waited for the moment when we could fire
without risk of wounding the dogs; James more impatient,
and not understanding our hesitation, discharged one of his
pistols almost close to the porcupine, who fell dead. Fritz,
envying his brother’s victory, cried out angrily, “Imprudent
one! you might not only have killed the dogs, but also have
wounded us by firing so close.” “Wound you!” replied the
little hunter; “do you think, then, that you alone know how
to manage arms?” Seeing that Fritz was going to reply, I
hastened to interfere: “It is true,” said I, to my eldest son,
“that your brother should have acted with less precipitation,
but you wanted only to deprive him of the opportunity of



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 65

showing his skill. This is wrong, my child. Learn to loyally
applaud others, if you wish to be worthy of being praised
yourself. Come, no anger; our turn will come next. Shake
hands, and let there be no quarrel between you.” The two
children immediately shook hands cordially, and then con-
sidered how they should carry away the game, whose flesh, I
knew, was excellent eating.

James, with his habitual want of thought, had placed his
hands on the animal, and consequently was severely pricked.
“Go and fetch a cord,” said I; “tie the paws of the beast,
and you and your brother can carry it by the help of a stick,

which you will hold at each end.” But impatient to show his

prize to his mother and brothers, James tied his handkerchief
round the porcupine’s neck, and dragged it to the place
where the caravan was waiting. “See,mamma!” cried he, on
arriving; “see, Ernest! look, little Francis; what a fine
animal I have killed. Yes, I killed it. I was not afraid of
his hundred thousand lances; I approached, fired my pistol,
and lo! he fell! Ah, I did not miss him. Papa says it is
excellent eating.”

The mother congratulated her son on his courage and skill.
Ernest, who approached, examined the porcupine very atten-
tively with his usual coolness, and remarked that he had in
each jaw two long incisors, like those of the hare and squirrel,
and short, round ears, something like those of a man. My
wife and I sat down, to extract from the dogs’ muzzles the
quills which remained in them. “There,” said I to James,
“were you not afraid that the porcupine would dart his quills
through your body? They say these animals have that
faculty.” “Oh!” replied he, “I believe that is only a fable.”
“You see, however, that our dogs have not been spared.”
“That is true,” said he, “but it is because they threw them-
selves upon the animal; if they had kept at a distance they
would not have had the least wound.” “You are right, my
child, and I am happy to see that you know how to mistrust
opinions which are contrary to reason. The porcupine has
no power to dart his quills, but it often happens that he loses
some in a combat like that which has just taken place.”

Resolved to carry away the porcupine, I covered him with
5



66 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

a thick coating of grass, rolled it up in one of our blankets,
and tied our parcel on the ass’s crupper, behind little Francis.
Then we resumed our march.

But soon the donkey escaped from my wife’s hand, who
was holding him by the bridle, and sprang before us, jumping
and making a number of grotesque evolutions, which would have
been very diverting, if we had not been frightened on account
of the little horseman he carried. Fritz ran after him, and
aided by our dogs, soon mastered him. Looking to account
for this abrupt change in the usually quiet demeanour of the.
animal, I soon discovered that the quills of the porcupine
coming through the grass and blanket, very disagreeably
tickled his skin. I then placed the dead beast on the enchanted
bag, taking care to warn Francis not to lean on it.

We arrived at the promised land without any other
adventure. “Wonderful!” cried Ernest, when he perceived
the great trees we were approaching; “what gigantic trees!
The spire at Strasburg is not higher, and how rich nature is
here! What an excellent thought of dear mamma’s to make
us quit the desolate shore where we were!” Then he asked
me if I knew the name of these trees. “These trees are
nowhere described, and we are without doubt the first Euro-
peans who have seen them,” replied I. “But I defy the
most agile bears to reach us at the summit of these enormous
trunks, when we have built our house there.” “Well,” said
my wife, “what do you say to our trees?” “I comprehend
your admiration,” said I, “and your choice is perfect.”

We made a halt. Our first care was to unload the beasts
of burden, who were then left to feed in the neighbourhood,
as well as the sheep and goats, first taking the precaution to
tie their fore-feet together. The sow alone was left entire
mistress of her movements. We gave the fowls and pigeons
their liberty. The fowls began to peck around us, the pigeons
flew into the branches of the trees, whence they descended
at the first distribution of grain that was made. We reposed
in the thick grass which carpeted the ground, and held
council how we should construct a house on these giant trees.
All at once, as it was not probable that we could be ‘installed
there the same day, I felt uneasy about passing the night



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 67

in the open country, exposed to all its inclemencies, and
without defence against wild beasts.

I called Fritz, who I thought was among us, to tell him
that I wished to attempt immediately the ascent of the prin-
cipal tree. He did not answer; but two consecutive reports,
fired at some distance, warned us that he was not losing his
time, and we heard him cry out joyfully, “ Hit, hit; there he
is!” He soon advanced, holding by the hinder paws a magni-
ficent tiger-cat, which he held up proudly to show us.

“Bravo! Mr Hunter,” said I; “you have rendered us
signal service by delivering our poultry from this formidable
neighbour, who would soon have dislodged them, even if they
were perched on the top of the tree. If you see any more
prowling about, give them no quarter. How did you discover
him?” “I found him quite near,” replied the hunter; “I
perceived something moving amongst the leaves of a tree,
and approached cautiously to the foot of it, and from there I
fired at the beast, who fell at my feet. As I was going to
take him up, he raised himself, and | finished him by a blow
from my pistol.” “It was fortunate,” said I, “that he did not
spring on you, as he was only wounded; for these animals,
though of small size, are terrible when they are defending
their life. I can affirm this with more certainty, as I recog-
nize in the individual you have just killed, not the tiger-cat,
properly so called, but the margay, very common in South
America, where it is known by its rapacity and audacity.”

“Whatever it may be,” said Fritz, “look at its beautiful
skin with black and brown spots on a golden ground; I hope
James will not cut up the skin of my margay as he did my
jackal.” “Be tranquil; James, being warned, will not rob you
of it. But what do you intend making of this skin?” “I
must ask you that,” replied the hunter, “and will follow your
advice. I do not wish to keep it entirely for myself”
“Well,” said I, “in that case, as we do not need furs to
clothe us, you shall make with the skin of the body and
thighs, some cases for our table-service, and with the tail
you can make a magnificent hunting- belt, to carry your
knife and pistols.” “And I, father,’ asked James, “what
shall I make of the skin of my porcupine?” “When we



68 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

have taken out a certain number of quills to serve for needles
or arrow-points, I think we may make of the entire skin a
sort of cuirass to fit the body of one of our dogs, to render
him formidable in combat with ferocious animals.” “Oh!
magnificent, magnificent!” cried James; “I long to see Turk
or Belle so harnessed.” And my little rogue left me no repose
till I had consented to show him how to skin his porcupine.
I suspended the animal to a tree by the two hind paws, and
then began to skin it. Fritz, who observed me attentively,
did the same with his margay. The two skins were nailed to
the trunk of a tree, that the air might dry them. A portion
of the flesh of the porcupine was destined for the repast which
the mother began to prepare, and the rest was put by to be
salted.

Ernest ‘had collected some large stones, of which he built
a fire-place, at the same time asking me if the trees under
which we were, were not mango trees. I thought it very
likely, but could not say positively till we had consulted the
captain’s library. “Ah! our dear books,” said he; “when
shall we be able to read them leisurely?” “Patience, my
dear child, let us first do what is necessary; a day will come
when we shall have time for this pleasure.”

Francis, whom his mother had told to collect some dry
wood, arrived dragging some branches, and with his mouth
full of fruit which he seemed to be eating eagerly. “Little
- imprudent one!” cried his mother, springing towards the child ;
“this fruit which you are devouring with so much pleasure,
may be poisonous and kill you. Show me the fruit.” “Kill
me!” repeated the child, who hastened to eject what he was
on the point of swallowing, “I will not die, mother; no, no!”
At the same time he let fall the branch he was carrying,
and drew from his pocket two or three little figs, which I
took from his hands to examine them, I was quickly re-
assured ; for I do not know that there are any poisonous figs.
I asked Francis where he had found them. “Near here,”
replied he, “under one of the trees, where there are a great
many. I thought I might eat them, as I saw the fowls and
the sow regaling on them.” “That is not sufficient test,”
replied I; “for many fruits are eatable for animals which



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 69

are not so for men, and the reverse. But as the physical
constitution of the ape is nearly the same as that of a man,
and as besides, the ape is warned by a secret instinct of the
nature of food, I warn you all to consult the ape when you
find any fruit you desire to eat.”

Scarcely had I pronounced these words, when Francis ran
towards the ape, who was fastened to the foot of the tree,
and offered him one of the figs, of which his pockets were
full. The little animal took the fruit in his hands, looked
at it, smelt it, and at last bit it. “Good! good!” cried
Francis, completely re-assured, and again filled his mouth
with the figs, which he thought delicious. “So then,” said
Ernest, “these are fig-trees?” “Yes,” replied I, “but not
dwarf fig-trees, like those of our country. These belong rather
to the class of mangoes, which throw out immense roots, as
we see here.”

Whilst talking thus, and whilst my wife, assisted by Francis,
was busy laying the cloth, I began to make some needles
with the quills of the porcupine. The point was made
naturally ; there remained only to pierce a hole in the other
extremity ; I succeeded in doing so with a long nail made hot
in the fire. In an little time I had prepared an assortment
of needles, which our housekeeper accepted with great
pleasure.

The children, still astonished at the prodigious height of
the trees in which we had resolved to establish ourselves,
could not devise any way of ascending them; I was, at first,
as embarrassed as they were, but at last I thought of a plan,
which I deferred putting into execution till after dinner ; which
being now ready, we seated ourselves in a circle to partake
of. The flesh of the porcupine and the broth my wife had
made for us, were found excellent; we had for desert some
butter and Dutch cheese.

Thus restored, I resolved to profit by the daylight which
still remained. I asked my wife to make, as quickly as she
could, the straps we should want to tie our beasts of burden
to the pieces of wood we should require for our building,
and which we should have to fetch from the shore. She began
her work directly. I first fixed our hammocks for the night,



70 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

by suspending them to the arched roots of a mango-tree,
above which we extended a sail-cloth, fixed down on each
side to preserve us from the dew and mosquitoes. This done,
I directed Fritz and Ernest to go to the shore and find
some pieces of wood, strong and straight, which might serve
as rungs for the rope-ladder which I had resolved to make.
Ernest discovered on the borders of a little marsh,.a quantity
of bamboos, half buried in the mud. We pulled them out,
and having cut them with a hatchet into pieces three or four
feet long, we made them into three packets, one for each of
us. At some distance from the place where we found the
bamboos, and a little more within the marsh, I perceived a
thick tuft of reeds, towards which I went to cut some, which
I intended to make into arrows. Belle, who was walking
beside me, sprang forward barking, and immediately a
troop of magnificent flamingoes flew away with extreme
rapidity.

Fritz, who was never taken by surprise by events of this
kind, had time to fire before the birds were out of reach.
Two flamingoes fell: one dead, the other only wounded in
the wing. This last would probably have escaped us, if Belle
had not sprung in pursuit, and seized him by the wing. The
brave dog held him, so that when we arrived, I took posses-
sion of him. When I returned to the children, and showed
them my captive, they uttered cries of joy, and said we
must keep this living bird and endeavour to tame it. “What
a beautiful effect it will make with its red and white plumage
among our other fowls,” said ‘Fritz. Ernest remarked that
the flamingo had feet formed for running like swans and
for swimming like geese, and he was astonished that the
two faculties were given to the same individual. I told him
that a certain number of species were thus privileged.

I would not let this hunting incident prevent me from
gathering the reeds which I coveted, so went to cut a number
of the longest, telling my sons that I should make them use-
ful in measuring exactly the height of the tree we were
going to inhabit. “Oh!” cried they with a kind of incredu-
lity,“ you must join a great many together to reach only the
lowest branches,” “ Patience,” replied I; “do you remember





‘© \ FLOCK OF FLAMINGOES ROSE IN THE AIR,”



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 71

the lesson your mother gave to you in catching the fowls. Wait
till you see what I am going to do.” The two children were
silent. Then, loaded with our packets of bamboos, of reeds,
the dead flamingo, and the living one, whose feet I tied
together, we returned to the others. James and Francis
saluted with cries of joy the arrival of the flamingo; but
the mother was uneasy, in seeing that we added another
useless mouth to the already large number of our domestic
animals. Less prompt to be alarmed on such a subject, I
examined the wounds of the bird. I saw that the two
extremities of the wings were fractured, one by the gun, the
other by Belle’s teeth; I dressed them both with a kind of
ointment made of butter, salt, and wine. This done, the
flamingo was attached by a cord to a stake fixed in the
- ground, near the stream. Left to himself, he put his beak
under his wing, and slept on one of his long legs.

Whilst I was proceeding with this cure, the children, who
had tied several reeds together end to end, raised them
against one of the mango-trees to measure its height; but
they scarcely reached the place where the roots joined the
trunk, and I heard them again express their doubt on the
success of the method, which, however, I had not yet com-
municated to them. Letting them say and do, and smiling
at their incredulity, I sharpened some reeds at one end, and
furnished them at the other end with feathers taken from
the dead flamingo. I weighted these arrows by putting some
sand in the hollow of the reeds. Then I began to make a
bow, by bending a flexible bamboo, tied tightly at each
_ end,

James and Fritz, who soon perceived what I was doing,
ran to me crying out, “Oh, a bow and arrows! Papa, let me
shoot! Permit me to try. You will see that I shall be skil-
ful.” “One instant,” said I; “as I had the trouble of making
the bow, I wish to have the honour of trying it first. Besides,
do not think that I intend to use it as a plaything. No, I
have a useful end in view, and I will not delay in proving it
to you.” Then I asked my wife if she could not give me a
ball of stout thread. “Perhaps,” she replied, with a smile;
‘I will consult my enchanted bag.” She put her hand into



72 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

her bag, and pulling it out, said, “Here, I think, is what you
want.” And as she seemed to show some pride in having
so promptly satisfied my demand, James took upon himself
to say: “Truly, it is a great mystery, to find in a bag what
you have put there!” “The mystery is not great, certainly,”
replied I, “but it required some coolness, in the moment of
anxiety which preceded our departure, to think of filling a
bag, as my dear wife has done, with a thousand things, for-
gotten by us, and yet very useful to us all.” James was the
best boy in the world; he threw himself into his mother’s
arms, “I deserve,” said he, “to be sewed up in your bag,
and never to come out of it.” “Naughty boy, too much
beloved,” said his mother; “I should not leave you long, you
know that!” “And you would be right,” said I, laughing,
“the enchanted bag would risk too much if Master James
was shut up in it.”

Having unrolled the greater part of the ball, I tied the
end of the thread to one of the arrows. Then, adjusting this
arrow to the bow and bending it, I drew in the direction of
the branches of the largest mango-trees, The arrow flew, and
fell on the other side of a branch, over which, consequently,
the thread passed. It was then easy, by drawing the arrow
back to the branch, to obtain a length of thread equal to that
of the trunk, so as to know what length to make our ladder.
We found it was fifty feet. I then measured a hundred feet
of strong cord. I divided it in two parts, which I stretched
along the ground. I told Fritz to saw some pieces of bamboo
about two feet long; then aided by James and Ernest, I
fixed these rungs to the cords by knots, and with nails, which
prevented them from slipping. In less than an hour and a
half the ladder was finished.

To hoist it, I] made use of the same means. A new arrow
was shot. At the end of the thread, which I tripled this time,
to make it stronger, was attached a cord, and at the end of the
cord the ladder, which was soon firmly fixed. James and
Fritz disputed who should mount the first. I gave the prefer-
“ence to James, who was lighter than his brother, and as nimble
as a cabin-boy. Before letting him mount, I told him not to
venture on one step, without having tested its solidity, and to



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. ’ 73

descend as soon as he perceived the least danger. He sprang
up, paying little attention to my orders, and arrived, thank
God! without accident to the first branch, which he strided
across, crying out, “Victory! victory!” Fritz then mounted,
and tied the ladder more securely. This precaution taken,
I ventured in my turn. Arrived in the tree, I inspected its
form, to make the plan of our dwelling. The night approached;
it was even by moonlight that I attached to one of the branches,
over-hanging the first, a large pulley which I had brought
with me, to hoist up the pieces of wood for the projected
building. As I was getting ready to descend, I saw neither
Fritz or James. I thought they had already gone down; but
suddenly I heard in the high branches of the tree two fresh
young voices, singing the evening psalm. I would not interrupt
this impromptu concert, for there was in the accents of the
two innocent singers, and above all the thought of thus praising
the Lord, something sweet and touching, which seemed to be
a presage of blessing on our new abode. When they had
finished they rejoined me, and we descended together.

The mother, who had milked the cow and the goats,
offered us some excellent milk soup and some slices of porcu-
pine which remained from the dinner. The cattle were fastened
round our hammocks, under the roots of our tree. Ernest
and Francis had collected, by my orders, a quantity of dead
branches, which would serve to keep up a fire during the night,
to scare away ferocious animals. Prayers having been said,
the children soon went to sleep in the hammocks, which we
had hung on the roots. As for me, I did not go to bed,
resolved that I would watch by the fire which I had kindled.

During the first half of the night, I was kept perfectly
awake by the anxiety which the least noise I heard around
caused me, The murmur of the wind among the leaves was
sufficient to alarm me. But, little by little, I felt overcome
with fatigue, and towards morning I fell asleep so profoundly,
that when I awoke the family were already up.



CHAPTER VIII.
THE BUILDING IN THE TREE.

IMMEDIATELY after breakfast, my wife ordered James and
Ernest to put on the ass and cow the harness she had made
the day before; then with her three youngest sons, she went
to the shore, to collect the load of wood which we wanted
for our aérial building. They had to make several journeys.
I was uneasy at seeing her undertake such labour, which she
was not accustomed to. “Do not be uneasy,” said she;
“this farmer’s wife life suits me better than you think. I
find it good, that we should gain all we want by the sweat
of our brow. This law of God is often forgotten in towns,
but it is sweet to feel that we accomplish it.”

I let her depart, and fortified by her good words and
example, began my work with a joyful heart. I mounted
with Fritz into the tree, in the centre of which, with a saw
and hatchet, we prepared a space for our pavilion, The form
of the first branches, which extended horizontally, served as a
support for the planks. We left some, about six or eight feet
high, to suspend our hammocks ; other, a little higher, to receive
the sail-cloth, which was to form the roof of the habitation.
This preliminary work was not without difficulties, but at
last we made in the thick part of the fig-tree a spacious _
empty place. The beams and planks, which had been
brought in great quantities from the shore, were hoisted by
the aid of the pulley. The floor was fixed, and a balustrade
raised round it.

We worked with so much ardour, that the middle of the
day came, and we had not thought of eating; we contented
ourselves this time with a luncheon. After the repast, we

resumed our task. We now extended the sail-cloth, which
74



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 75

required much effort and skill. As this cloth fell over at
both ends, we fixed it to the balustrade, and we found that
our pavilion, of which the trunk of the tree already formed
one side, was hermetically closed on three of its sides. The
fourth, which faced the sea, remained at present open, though
I thought of closing it, in case of need, by a sail, which could
be raised or lowered at will. When we had fixed the ham-
mocks to the branches which we had reserved for that pur-
pose, our habitation was in a condition to receive us for the
night.

Fritz and I descended from the tree, and though much
fatigued, I began to make with the planks a large table and
some benches, which I fixed under the roots of the tree, in
the place where we had passed the preceding night; for this
place seemed fit to become our future dining-room. This last
work finished, to the great satisfaction of our housekeeper, I
laid down, harassed with fatigue, on one of the benches I had
just made, and said to my wife, wiping my forehead bathed with
perspiration: “I have worked to-day like a negro, and I intend
to rest to-morrow during the whole day.” “You not only can,
but ought,” replied she; “for if I count right, to-morrow is
Sunday; it is even the second we have passed in this place;
we have not thought of celebrating the first.” “I have, like
you, remarked this forgetfulness,” replied 1; “but I thought
that being then in urgent necessity of providing for our safety,
there was no fault in this omission. But now that we are, in
some sort, comfortably established, it would be a great proof
of ingratitude to neglect rendering to God the thanks we owe
Him. It is then agreed that to-morrow shall be entirely con-
secrated to the Lord. Since the children have not heard us, we
will give them an agreeable surprise by not telling them our
determination till to-morrow morning.” “That is agreed,” said
my wife, and she called her sons, who, dispersed round about,
hastened to range themselves round the table on which the
cloth was laid.

The good mother took from the fire an earthen pot which
she brought, and with a large fork took out the flamingo
killed yesterday. “I intended,” said she, “to roast it, but
Ernest dissuaded me, by saying it was an old one, which



76 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

could not fail to be tough; so by his advice I stewed it, and
hope you will find it well done.” The doctor was rallied a
little on his culinary foresight; but we acknowledged that he
was right, for the flamingo thus prepared was excellent, and
eaten to the bone.

Whilst we dined, we had the satisfaction of seeing our
live flamingo mix familiarly, for the first time, with the
fowls who were pecking around us. For some hours we
had detached him from his stake, and left him at liberty.
He had been walking all the afternoon, gravely, slowly, on
his two long red legs, like a person absorbed in profound
meditation. We threw him some pieces of biscuit, which he
caught with dexterity, to the great disappointment of the
fowls, over whom he had the advantage of his long beak
and stilted feet. The ape became, also, more and more
familiar; he jumped from one shoulder to the other, making
a thousand gambols.

At dessert, the sow re-appeared, whom we had not seen
since the evening before. By her peculiar gruntings, she seemed
to shew the pleasure she felt at having found us again. My
wife gave her a gourd full of cow’s milk, which she drank with
avidity. Such liberality appeared to me incompatible with
the principles of economy we ought to follow; I said a word
about it to our housekeeper, who had her answer ready. “Till
we are properly settled, and have all the necessary utensils,
it will be difficult to make the milk that is not wanted for
daily use into butter and cheese. It is better then to distribute
it to the animals; in the first place, to attach them to us; and
secondly, to save our grain, which is precious, and our salt,
which is nearly gone.” “You are right in all things, my dear
wife; so we will soon go to the rocks to collect more salt, and
will not fail to lay in a provision of grain when we make our
next voyage to the vessel.” “Ah!” cried the mother, “the
vessel again! still these dangerous journeys! I shall not be
easy till the day comes when you give up such expeditions.”
“T understand your fears,” said I, “but you know that we only
go when the sea is calm. And you will own that we should
be inexcusable, if we lost, through timidity, the riches which
the vessel still contains,” 5



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 77

Whilst we were thus talking the children had lighted, at
a little distance from the tree, a fire, on which they placed
the longest dry branches they could find, in order that the
fire might last a long time, and protect our cattle from the
approach of dangerous animals. Then we ascended our tree.
Fritz, James, and Ernest went first, and accomplished the
ascent with the agility of a cat. Their mother followed them
slowly, and with precaution. Left to the last, I had a little
more difficulty, as I had detached the ladder from the stakes to
which it was fixed at the bottom, so that I might draw it up
after me, and also because I carried little Francis tied to my
back, as I would not let him mount alone.

However, I arrived without accident; and when I had pulled
up the ladder to the floor of the pavilion, it seemed to my
sons that they were in one of the strong castles of the ancient
chevaliers, asylums impenetrable to all enemies, I thought it
best to load our arms, ready to fire on dangerous visitors, of
whom the dogs, left on guard at the foot of the tree, would
signal the approach. This precaution taken, each mounted into
his hammock. We were soon asleep, and the night passed in
the most perfect calm,



CHAPTER Ix.
SUNDAY.

WHEN we awoke, “What shall we do to-day?” asked the
children. “Nothing, absolutely nothing,” replied I. “Ah!
father, you are joking,” said Fritz. “No; I donot jest. To-day
is Sunday, and we ought to celebrate the day consecrated to
God.”

“Sunday!” cried James. “Ah! I will walk, hunt, fish, in

fact do only what I like.” “There you deceive yourself,” said I;
“T intend to celebrate Sunday in quite another fashion. It is
not a day for idleness and pleasure, but one of prayer.” “ But,”
replied James, “we have no church.” “Nor organ,” added

Francis. “That is true,” replied I, “but God is everywhere;
do you not know that? Could we adore him in a more
magnificent temple than the beautiful scene around us? And
do you not think that our voices will be as pleasing to Him
alone, as when joined to sound of instruments?” “Papa is
right,” said Ernest; “and besides, do we want a church to pray
in every morning and evening?” “Well said, my child,”
replied I. “So then we will pray in common, we will sing
some hymns, and I will relate to you a parable, which I have
prepared for the occasion.” “A parable! Oh! let us hear it,”
cried they all at once. But I told them to have patience; we
must do all things in proper order.

After the prayers and singing we sat down on the grass, and
I gave my auditory, who listened to me with eagerness, the
following recital.

“Once upon a time,” said I, “there lived a great King, whose
kingdom was called the country of Light and Reality, because
there reigned there perpetual activity and unclouded light. On

78



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 79

the most distant frontier, and towards the north, lay another
country, which likewise acknowledged the sway of the great
King, and whose immense extent was known to none but him-
self, From the remotest ages the monarch had preserved its
map in his archives; this other kingdom was called the Land of
Darkness, or the Night, because all was dark and inactive within
its borders.

“Tn the most fertile and agreeable districts of the empire of
Reality, the great King had a magnificent residence called Him-
melsburg, or the Celestial City, where he resided and held the
most magnificent court imaginable; millions of servants executed
his will, and millions held themselves ready to receive his
orders. Some were clothed in garments whiter than snow,
because white was the King’s colour; others were in glittering,
gleaming armour, flaming swords in their hands or cased in
sheaths of gold. Each, at a sign from his lord, flew like light-
ning to accomplish his commands. All these faithful servants,
full of zeal in the service of their King, were so united among
themselves, and so contented with their lord’s favour, that one
could imagine no happiness greater than to be admitted among
them. There also lived, in this glorious city, some of less
exalted rank, who, good, wealthy, and happy, enjoyed not only
the gifts of the King, but also the indescribable happiness of
serving him, and of being treated as his own children.

“Not far from the shores of the empire of Reality was a
large uninhabited island, which the King desired to people and
cultivate, that for a short time it might be the dwelling of those
of his subjects whom he intended to admit by degrees to
the privileges of citizens of Himmelsburg—a favour which he
wished to concede to as many as possible.

“This island was named Erdheim, or the Earthly Home; and
those who by good conduct in this place of trial, and by atten-
tion to the improvement of the country, proved themselves
worthy, would be admitted to Himmelsburg.

“To attain this object, the great King equipped a fleet to
transport the colonists to the island. He chose them from
the inhabitants of the Land of Darkness, and in taking them
thence he summoned them to enjoy the light and the activity
of life; advantages which, previously, they had not known; so



80 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

they entered on their new home in a happy and contented
spirit.

“The island was not only beautiful and fertile, but the col-
onists on arrival found that everything necessary to render their
residence agreeable had been provided, and each had the certain
knowledge that his work and his obedience to the King’s laws
would be recompensed by his future admission to the splendid
city of Himmelsburg.

“ At the time of their embarkation, the good King addressed

_ the colonists thus :-—

“«My children, I have withdrawn you from inaction and in-
sensibility, to render you happy by feeling, activity, and life;
henceforth your happiness and honour will largely depend upon
yourselves,

“*Never forget that Iam your King; and faithfully observe
my commandments in cultivating the country which I have con-
fided to you.

“«Each person, on his arrival at Erdheim, will receive the
piece of ground which he is intended to till; and there you will
find wise and learned men, charged to make known to you my
decrees.

“ ledge necessary for the interpretation of those decrees, I wish
every head of a family to preserve within his house a copy of
my laws, and daily read it with his family, that they may never
be forgotten.

“* Moreover, on the first day of the week, in each establish-
ment, all shall assemble in one place, where my commandments
shall be read and explained to them, and where they shall reflect
on the duties enjoined upon them. Thus will each of you find
out the most advantageous manner of cultivating the land you
have received as your inheritance; and, especially, how you may
uproot the tares and brambles that would choke the good seed.
All your requests, if made with a sincere heart, will come before
me, and if I deem them expedient and suitable, they will be
- granted.

“Tf, to prove your gratitude, you, on the day dedicated to
my service, abandon every other care, and devote yourselves



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 81

wholly to the expression of your feelings towards me, that will
‘find favour in my eyes, and I will take care that the day so
spent shall prove of great use to you, by the repose it will afford.
I will, too, that the animals which I have placed at your disposal
shall, on this day, rest, and that the wild beasts of the fields shall
not dread the hunter.

“Fe who at Erdheim shall obey my commands—who shall
do his duty with a contented and joyous spirit—who shall
maintain his land in the best order, and most fully develop its
resources, shall obtain the richest rewards.

“¢ But he who shall refuse to labour, and who does nothing
but trouble his fellows in their useful works, shall be condemned
for ever to toil in the mines in the bowels of the earth. From
time to time I will despatch my ships to Erdheim, which will
carry away a number of its inhabitants, for reward or punish-
ment,

“None will be able to deceive me, as a marvellous mirror,
placed in my palace, reflects with entire accuracy the conduct of
every inhabitant.’

“The anchor was weighed, and all, full of joy and hope, sailed
to their destination. After a short space of time allowed them
on their arrival to recover from the fatigues of their voyage, each
was shown the plot of ground set apart for his cultivation. He
was supplied with the seeds of useful plants, and was left at full
liberty to act, and to use for his advantage all which had been
entrusted to him,

“But what happened?

“Very soon most of the colonists, instead of following the
instructions they had received—instructions repeated daily by
the good servants of the King—would obey only their own
pleasure. One, instead of tilling his ground so as to obtain from
it an abundant harvest, laid it out like a garden, very agreeable,
but useless. Another, instead of the fruit-trees of which he had
received seedlings, cultivated the most miserable species, and
stated that the worthless fruit they yielded were of the most
precious descriptions. A third, it is true, frequently sowed good
grain; but as he never took pains to distinguish tares from the
wheat, his harvest consisted of weeds and darnels. Many let
their pround remain uncultivated, because they had lost their



82 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

seeds and plants, or spent in other pursuits the season for sow-
ing. Some few had shown an inclination to understand the
king’s orders ; but others tried by all kinds of pretences to elude
them, or alter their meaning.

“However, some brought their ground into a flourishing
state, and in addition to the pleasure they derived from »
being usefully employed while on the island, their hope of
being hereafter admitted to Himmelsburg cheered them in
their work.

“The misfortunes of the others arose from their unwill-
ingness to believe what the King had said to them through his
messengers, and in the disrespect in which they held his
laws. It was true that each head of a household possessed
a copy of the Sovereign’s laws, but he seldom read it. Some
said that these laws were only suited to a past age. Others
professed to discover in them incomprehensible contradic-
tions, while they were careful not to seek those explanations
which the messengers could have furnished. Accordingly, they
declared they were justified in diverging from the laws as
widely as they pleased. Some carried their wicked spirit to
such an extreme as to maintain that there was not a King;
and that, if he lived, he would sometimes show himself to
his subjects. Others said: ‘Yes, the great King lives; but
he is so great, so happy, so powerful, that he has no need
of us; and of what interest to him can be so poor a
colony as ours?’ Many were certain, above all things, that
the magic mirror was a fable; that the great King had no
subterranean mines; that he was too merciful to punish them;
and that all would eventually enter Himmelsburg.

“Owing to these causes, the day of the week consecrated
to the great King was observed with extreme negligence;
and many colonists refrained from attending the general
assembly, ‘We know by heart, they said, ‘our King’s ordin-
ances; what will it profit us to hear the same thing constantly
repeated?’ The colonists who still celebrated his day accord-
ing to the King’s law were few; and even among these
many were inattentive, and few listened devoutly, or profited
by the instructions addressed to them in the name of their
Sovereign.



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 83

“ However, the great King, faithful to his promise, pursued
his course. From time to time ships made their appearance
on the shores of Erdheim. They were followed by a huge
ship named the Grave, which bore the flag of Admiral Death.
This flag was embroidered with green and black; and the
colonists, according to their state, regarded it as the emblem
of Hope or of Despair.

“The fleet always arrived unexpectedly, and its appearance
was usually unwelcome. The admiral immediately sent in
search of those whom he was ordered to bring away. Many
of those who least desired it were suddenly seized, and com-
pelled to go; others who had long been preparing themselves
for the voyage, and whose crops and estate were in admirable
condition, likewise departed; but while the latter set out with
resignation, blended with joy and hope, the former exhibited
so much reluctance that it was necessary to employ force.
All resistance, however, was vain; and as soon as the ship
was loaded, she sailed, and speedily re-entered the port of
Himmelsburg. There the great King received the arrivals,
and with strict justice meted out the rewards and punish-
ments which had been promised to all. The excuses put
forward by negligent colonists availed them nothing; they
were condemned to labour in the mines; while those whose
conduct had conformed to the great King’s laws during
their sojourn in Erdheim, entered with him into the bright
city of Himmelsburg, and enjoyed all the happiness of its
inhabitants.

“T have finished my parable, my dear boys,” added I; “may
you comprehend its meaning, and each of you apply a moral
for himself.

“Now,” said I, when I finished, “if I had in my possession
that excellent book, the Bible, I would read to you some
passages, which I would comment upon as well as I could,
and this reading and my reflections should terminate our
pious exercises.” Whilst I spoke, my wife had risen and
gone away, and I soon saw her return holding in her hand
the book I was wishing for. It was a kind of fairy accom-
plishment of my desire; and with an astonished look, I



84 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

seemed to ask our dear manager whence this riches came;
she said, smiling, “the enchanted bag! still the enchanted
bag!” I could not help, before opening the book, showing
the children the advantages of foresight, of which their mother
was a true model.

After having read different chapters from the holy book,
which I endeavoured to explain to my young family, I declared
the religious exercises of the day finished, and gave them per-
mission to amuse themselves. James asked for my bow, and
tried to arm the arrows with some porcupine’s quills: “If I
had but a little glue,” cried he. I counselled him to melt
in a little water one of our broth-cakes. He followed. my
advice, and a short time after had at his disposal a number
of arrows, which would have been formidable weapons in
the hands of a skilful hunter. I thought it would be desir-
able for my sons to practise shooting with a bow and arrows
till they became expert at it; our provision of powder,
though ample, was not inexhaustible, and we might econo-
mise it. I was disturbed from these reflections by a noise
of fire-arms, and saw fall at my feet five or six dead
birds, which I picked up, and found to be ortolans. It was
our philosopher, who having mounted the tree, and seen a
number of these birds perched on the high branches, had
discharged his gun which was loaded with small shot. He
soon showed himself triumphantly on the platform, crying out,
“Well! have I hit them? am I skilful?” “Very skilful,” said
I, “but you have forgotten that to-day is Sunday; hunting
is not permitted.”

These words stopped Fritz and James, who had already
run for their guns, to imitate the example of their brother.
Ernest himself descended, and coming to me with a confused
air, begged me to pardon his forgetfulness. I did not make
him ask twice. The involuntary fault of our little hunter
had shown me that we had within our reach an abundant
supply of delicate game. These ortolans, attracted by the
fruits of our gigantic fig-trees, peopled all the surrounding
trees. It would be easy, either with snares or firing, to
procure a great number, and as I knew that, for the pleasure
of European gourmands, they preserve these birds half roasted



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 85

in fat, I resolved to make a stock of them, prepared in the
same fashion. My wife took the six ortolans killed by
Ernest, picked them, and began to cook them. Fritz, who
had decided to use the skin of his margay in making bags
for our silver, consulted me how to prepare the skin. I
advised him to rub it with ashes and sand, and then to
soften it with butter and yolk of eggs. Whilst he was
busy with this preparation, came Francis, who was already
possessor of a little bow, which he began to know how to
use, begging me to make him a quiver which he could hang
over his shoulders, to hold his arrows and reeds. I made
him one with four large pieces of skin tied in a point and
fixed over each other. Thus equipped, our baby was at
the height of joy.

Ernest had taken the Bible, and seated at the foot of the
tree, appeared profoundly absorbed in his reading. My wife
called us to dinner; the ortolans were delicious, but certainly
not sufficient to satisfy us. Whilst we were dining, I told
my sons that I wished to make them a very important
proposal. I saw them all look at me with great curiosity.
“Tt would be,” said I, “to give names to the different points.
of this land. By the help of these designations, it would be
much more easy to understand each other. We will, how-
ever, abstain from naming the coasts, for perhaps some
European navigators have already named them; and we ought
to respect the work of our progenitors.” “Oh! what a good
idea,” cried all the children at once. “Yes, let us find some
names,” “J,” said James, “am of opinion that we should take
very extraordinary names; for example, Cowmandel, Chander-
nagor, Zanguebar, Monomaptoa.” “But, little hairbrain,” said
I, “suppose we cannot keep them.” “Then what names
shall we find?” asked he. “That is very simple,” I replied;
“instead of seeking chance names, why should we not make
some from the different events which happened at the places
we wish to name?”

“That is evident,” said Ernest; “and to begin by the
bay where we disembarked, I propose to call it THE BAY
OF DELIVERANCE.” “I,” objected James, “ask that we
should call it LOBSTER Bay, seeing it was there that one



86 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

of those vile animals pinched my leg so terribly.” “Then,”
said the mother, smiling at the egotistical pretension of her
son, “I do not see why we should not call it THE Bay OF
CRIES, for you cried enough on that occasion! But I pro-
pose that we should adopt Ernest’s idea; the gratitude we
owe to God makes it a duty.” “Adopted! adopted! It
shall be THE BAY OF DELIVERANCE,” cried they all.

Successively all the points of our domain received names;
the first habitation was called ZELTHEIM (an abode under
a tent); the little island at the entrance of the bay, THE
ISLE OF REQUIN (or shark), in memory of the address and
courage of Fritz. There was FLAMINGO MARSH, and JACKAL
RIVER. Our new habitation received the name of FALCON’S
NesT; “for,” said I to my sons, “you are bold and adven-
turous like young falcons, and as much disposed to exercise
active pillage in the surrounding lands.” The promontory,
from the top of which Fritz and I had vainly attempted to
discover traces of our unhappy companions, was called THE
CAPE OF DISAPPOINTMENT.

These useful designations thus settled, we rose from table,
and the children were at liberty to amuse themselves. Fritz
was busy with his cases, which he made with the skin of the
animal’s thighs, fixing it out with moulds of wood. James
asked me to help him make for Turk, with the prickly skin
of the porcupine, the coat of mail which I told him of I
did as he wished. After having cleaned the skin, we fixed
it with straps on the dog’s back, who thus covered, looked
like a warrior. He willingly suffered himself to be thus
harnessed, and did not try to get it off; but Belle did not
at all like this costume, for every time she approached her
companion to play with him, she got cruelly pricked; so we
decided that Turk should only put on his warrior’s costume
when he went on important expeditions, With the rest of
the skin James made a helmet, which he wore in military
fashion, and hoped to frighten the savages if we met any.
Ernest and Francis practised shooting with the bow, and I
was pleased to see that they were not awkward at it.

As the sun was getting low and the heat diminishing, I
proposed a walk. We consulted as to which way we should



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 87

go. It was decided that we should go to Zeltheim; certain
of our provisions beginning to get exhausted, it was necessary
to visit our magazine. Fritz and James wanted powder and
ball; the housekeeper had need of butter; Ernest thought of
bringing back a couple of ducks, which would do very well
on the borders of our stream. “Let us set out,” said IJ, “and
prepare for some fatigue, for we shall take a longer road
than that by which we came.” Fritz and James, armed with
their guns, like Ernest and myself, had on, the one his belt
of jackal skin, the other his famous porcupine helmet. Little
Francis carried his bow and quiver; my wife alone had no
arms. The little ape sprang on Turk’s back, his usual seat,
but being pricked in the paws with the quills of the coat of
mail with which the dog was armed, he went, making strong
grimaces, to take refuge with Belle, who kindly consented to
carry the affronted little horseman. Our flamingo, who wished
also to be of the party, began gravely to follow the caravan.
It was comical to see him walking on his stilts, and bending
his long neck.

Keeping close to the stream, we had a very agreeable
walk. My wife and I walked slowly side by side; the children
ran before, scattering right and left. Ernest soon came
back to us showing a stalk, at the end of which hung three
or four little clear green balls: “Potatoes, papa! potatoes!”
I soon saw that he spoke truly, and could not but praise
his spirit of observation which had caused one of the most
precious discoveries we had made since our abode in the
island.

Ernest, delighted, made us hasten to see his field of
potatoes; for in that place, said he, the plain was covered
with them. We quickly reached this precious natural plan-
tation. James went down on his knees and began to scratch
up the earth to extract some roots. The monkey, quitting
his steed, began to imitate his young master. In less than
five minutes they had pulled up a large quantity of potatoes,
which Francis put into a heap as fast as Master Knip and
James threw them on the earth, The whole were put in
our sacks and game-bags, and we resumed our walk, after
having taken care to mark attentively the situation of the



88 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

field, to which we resolved to return and make a complete
harvest. :

We crossed the stream at the foot of a little chain of rocks,
whence it issued, forming a cascade. From this elevated place
we enjoyed a varied and extensive view. We might have
believed ourselves in a European hot-house, with this differ-
ence, that instead of flower pots and tubs containing shrubs,
all the interstices of the rocks were filled with the most magni-
ficent vegetation. All sorts of plants grew here in abundance,
especially the Indian fig-tree, the aloe, the cactus with its
thorny stalks, loaded with scarlet flowers; above all, the
pine-apple, the most delicious of fruits, which my children
knew, and seized with an avidity which I was obliged to
repress, fearing they would make themselves ill.

Among these plants I recognised the karatus, a sort of
aloe, of which I gathered several feet, and which I showed
to my sons, telling them: “I have found there something very
superior to the pine-apples you are devouring so gluttonously.”
“What!” said James with his mouth full, “those vile tufts
of hairy leaves? It is not possible. There is nothing better
than the pine-apple!. The pine-apple is a divine fruit.”
“Glutton!” said I, interrupting this panegyric, which fhe
other children appeared to approve, “you must learn not to
judge so much by appearances. Here, Ernest, take my flint
and steel and make a fire; I want one.” “But, father,” replied
my little scholar, “I have no tinder.”

“Then what should we do if we wanted very much to
procure a fire?” “Well,” said James, “we would rub two
pieces of wood together, as I have heard the savages do.”
“That would be a painful method for people not accustomed
to this exercise. I assure you, my dear child, you might rub
all day without obtaining a single spark.” “In that case,”
replied Ernest, “we should be obliged to seek for a tinder
tree.” “The search would be superfluous,” said I, taking a
dry stalk of karatus, from which I pulled off the bark to
extract the pith. I then placed this pith on the flint, which I
struck with the steel, and it immediately caught fire. “Bravo!
bravo! Long live the tinder plant!” cried the astonished
children,



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 89

“ But,” said I, “you have not yet seen all the treasures which
the karatus furnishes,” Speaking thus, I split a leaf, from which
I drew several lengths of very fine but very strong thread.
“I own,” said Fritz, “that the karatus is a very useful plant;
but I should like to know what is the use of all these prickly
plants that we see around us?”

“You would be very wrong to judge them useless,” replied
I. “The aloe, for example, produces a juice much used in
medicine; the Indian fig-tree, which you see with its prickly
~ leaves, must not be despised, for it grows in sterile lands, where

‘the inhabitants would often die of hunger, without the help of
_ its excellent fruit.” At these words, James ran with open hand
to gather some of these fruits, which he wished to taste; but the
thorns with which they were covered ran into his fingers. He
returned to me crying, and casting an angry look on the Indian
fig-tree. His mother hastened to pull out the thorns which
pained him cruelly; and during this time I showed his brothers
the way to gather and eat these fruits without exposing them-
selves to the same misfortune.

Having cut a stick to a point, I stuck it into a fig, which
I could then easily deprive of its prickles with my knife.
Ernest, who was attentively examining a fig, remarked that
it was covered with a multitude of red insects, who appeared
to be sucking the fruit. “Look, father,” said he, “tell me
the name of these animals, if you know them.” I recognised
the cochineal, and said: “This is decidedly a day of extra-
ordinary discoveries, I will not say that this last is very
precious to us, unless we could sell these insects to the
Europeans, who buy them at a very high price for dying
scarlet.” “However that may be,” said Ernest, “this is the
second plant superior to that pine-apple which at first we so
much boasted of.”

“You are right,” said I, “and, to prove it, I will tell
you another useful quality of the Indian fig-tree, whose thick
tufted branches may make hedges capable of defending the
abodes of men against the attacks of wild beasts, and the
plantations against the ravages of devastating animals.”
“How!” cried James, “the soft leaves serve as a barrier!
A blow of a knife or stick would remove such an obstacle.”



go THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Speaking this, he began to strike vigorously at a magnificent
fig-tree. But one of these prickly leaves fell on his leg,
and implanted there its darts, whose pricks made our mad-
cap utter loud cries, “Well,” said I, “do you understand
now, how formidable such an enclosure would be to
half-naked savages, or to animals -who should try to get
through them?” “We must make one round our habitation,”
said Ernest. “And I think we should do well to gather some
cochineal. The red dye might be useful to us,” said Fritz.
“And I think,” replied I, “that it would be wiser to undertake,
at present, only what is useful; the agreeable may come later.”

We continued our conversation, which became more serious,
and I was several times astonished at the judicious remarks of
Ernest. More than once his eagerness for knowledge made
me consess that I was unable to inform him on some points. I
had not yet looked over the captain’s books, which I had shut
up in a chest, not wishing to leave them in the hands of
children of their age. Many times Ernest had asked me for
the key of this treasure. But everything must have its time,
and it was first necessary to attend to what was required for our
safety and well-being.

Arrived at Jackal stream, we crossed it; and after a few
minutes’ walk, reached Zeltheim, where ening was in the
same order as at our departure. Fritz provided himself
abundantly with powder and lead; I helped my wife to fill
our tin bottle with butter. The young boys ran after the ducks,
who, become wild, would not be easily approached. Ernest
thought of a means of catching them, which succeeded. He
tied a piece of cheese to the end of a thread, and let it float
on the water, where the gluttons came to gobble it; and
were gently taken in the snare. Repeating this trick several
times, he became master of the rebels, who were shut up
separately in a handkerchief, and placed in our game-bags.
We took also a stock of salt, but less than we wished, for we
were already too much loaded; we were obliged to unharness
Turk of his coat of mail to give him a share of the burden.
The formidable, but decidedly useless cuirass, was left in the
tent. “Arms are like soldiers,” said Ernest; “out of battle they
are good for nothing.”



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. gli

We began our march. The laughter and jests provoked by
the thorns and by the contortions of our ducks and the comical
aspect of our caravan, made us forget a little the weight of our
charge. It was not till after our arrival that we felt fatigue.
But our good housekeeper hastened to fill the pot with
potatoes, which she put on a good fire; then she went to milk
the goat and cow to prepare a strengthening repast. The cloth
was soon laid. The expectation of our supper and of the
excellent potatoes, kept us awake; but as soon as supper was
finished, the children went to their hammocks, The mother,
who had been assisting them, came towards me laughing in
spite of her fatigue. “Do you know what little Francis has just
‘added to his prayer?” said she; “I give you ten times to guess
it.” “Give me one, my dear,” replied I, “and tell me at once;
I am dying for sleep.” “ Here it is,’ said she: “‘ Good God, I
thank Thee for having planted such good potatoes in our
island for little Francis, and such large pine-apples for James.’
And then he fell asleep.” “And he did well,” said I to my wife,
wishing her good-night; “be assured his thanksgiving is on high.
Even the smallest prayers go to God.”

We soon fell into a peaceful sleep.



CHAPTER X.,
THE HURDLE, THE SALMON, THE KANGAROO.

I HAD remarked the evening before that the coast was
covered with a great quantity of wood, with which we could
make a hurdle, and transport burdens too heavy to be placed
on the backs of our beasts, I therefore set off at break of
day, accompanied by Ernest and our ass, both of whom I
awoke. A morning walk seemed to me desirable for Ernest,
as his habits of meditation made him somewhat indolent.
The ass dragged a large branch of a tree, which I thought
I should need. “Are you not a little angry,” said I to my
son, “at having quitted your hammock sooner than usual,
where you were sleeping so soundly? Do you not regret
being deprived of the pleasure of shooting pigeons and thrushes
with your brothers?” “Oh, now I am up, I am very glad,”
said he; “as to the birds, no doubt the hunters will leave
me some, for at first they will drive away more than they
will knock down.” “Why so?” asked I. “Because they will
forget to take the balls out of their guns, and to fill them
with small shot. Even if they remember that, they will fire
from below; without thinking that the distance from the ground
to the high branches is much too great.” “Your observations
are just, my child,” said I; “but I do not think it friendly
of you not to have warned your brothers. I should like
to see you less irresolute, less apathetic; for if there are hours
when it is good to reflect and be prudent, there are others
when we ought to know how to take a sudden resolution,
and execute it with energy.”

While continuing to demonstrate to my son, that though

meditation has its value, action also has its worth, we arrived
92



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON, 93

at the shore. I found there several poles and pieces of
wood. We put a number of them on the branch of the
tree, which formed a sort of sledge. I had also found among
the wrecks a closed chest, which I opened with a hatchet
after our arrival at Falcon’s Nest. It contained some sailor’s
clothes and linen, stained with sea-water.

On arriving near Falcon’s Nest, a well-kept-up firing
announced that the hunting was in train; but when they
saw us, cries of joy were heard, and all the family came
towards us.

I had to excuse myself to my wife for having left with-
out telling her. The sight of our beautiful wood, and the
thought of having a convenient sledge to transport the pro-
visions left at Zeltheim, silenced her mild reproach, and we
went gaily to breakfast. I examined the spoil of our hunters ;
it amounted to four dozen birds, as many thrushes as ortolans,
which were scarcely worth the great quantity of powder
and shot expended upon them. In order to save these
articles, which we could not well renew, I showed my young
poachers how to make snares and place them in the branches
of the tree. The threads of. karatus served us to make
these engines. Whilst James and Francis were thus occu-
pied, Fritz and Ernest helped me to make the hurdle.

We had worked for some time, when we were disturbed
by the horrible noise made by our poultry. My wife got
up to see if any voracious animal had caused this alarm;
but she only saw the little ape, who was running towards
the roots of the fig-tree, under one of which he disappeared.
Much puzzled, she followed him, and caught him just as
he had broken an egg to eat it. Looking under the sur-
rounding roots, Ernest discovered a great number of eggs,
which Master Knips had laid up in reserve. The little animal
was very fond of this food, and gluttony had taught him
the trick of stealing and hiding each egg as it was laid.
“T understand now,” said my wife, “how it was I often heard
the fowls cackling as if they had laid eggs, without being
able to find any.” The little thief received a correction, and
it was decided that he should be deprived of his liberty at
the time when fowls are accustomed to lay. We made use



94 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

of him, however, to discover those eggs which the fowls did
not deposit in the usual nests,

When James, who had climbed into the tree to set the
snares, descended, he told us that the pigeons we had brought
from the vessel had constructed a nest in the branches. I
received this news with satisfaction, and prohibited the children
from firing henceforward into the tree, for fear of wounding
our little pensioners; I repented having given the idea of
the snares. But as the prohibition of firing into the tree
had already excited some murmurs on the part of the hunters,
I abstained from giving a counter order.

Little Francis came, with his customary naiveté, to ask
me if it was not possible to sow some gunpowder in a field,
which he would take care of, so that his brothers might have
as much firing as they liked. We were greatly amused with
this idea, which showed the child’s goodness as much as his
ignorance. “My darling Francis,” said Ernest, “powder is a
thing made, and not a product of the earth; it is made by
mixing in nearly equal parts charcoal, sulphur, and saltpetre.”
“Ah! I did not know,” said Francis, “and I thank you for
telling me.”

Leaving my young scholar to the pleasure of instructing
his little brother, I was so busy making the hurdle, that my
wife and two younger sons had picked a great quantity of
birds before I perceived them: It was a proof to me that
the snares had produced their effect. The housekeeper had
stuck all these small pieces of game on a long thin sword,
brought from the vessel, and she proposed to roast them. I
complimented her on her spit, but remarked that she had
prepared three times as many ortolans as we required for
dinner. She replied that she did so because she had heard
me say that we might preserve them, by putting them in
butter when they were half-cooked.

The hurdle being nearly finished, I resolved, in the after-
noon, to make another journey to Zeltheim, and I told Ernest
to accompany me, as he had done in the morning, for I
wished to conquer his indolence and timidity. Francis
stopped me an instant by a question, which amused us.
“Papa,” said he, “Ernest told me that the fire enclosed in



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 95

all bodies is developed by motion and rubbing. Now, if I
ran too fast, could I catch fire?” “Catch fire! no,” said I,
“dear little one, only warm yourself; the legs of little children,
and even of men, are not strong enough to make them run
so quickly as to catch fire. Be assured then, and run as much
as you like” “I am glad,” said he; “I like to run; but I
was afraid.”

The hour of departure being come, Fritz made us a
present of a case which would contain a table service, and
even a small hatchet. I praised him for his ingenious work,
and, after having embraced our dear ones, we departed. The
ass and cow were attached to the hurdle; Ernest and I,
bamboo canes in our hands to serve as whips, our guns
on our backs, walked by the side of the beasts: Belle
followed us. We took the road by the shore, and after a
journey marked by no accident, arrived at the tent.

The beasts when unharnessed began to graze at liberty,
whilst we placed on our sledge the cask of butter, a barrel
of powder, some shot, some cheeses, and some other provi-
sions. This labour engaged us so much that we did not
notice that the ass and cow were gone away, beyond the
bridge, attracted by the sight of the verdant meadow on
the opposite side of the stream. I despatched Ernest to
bring them back, telling him that I would go in quest of
a place where we could bathe conveniently, thinking that
a bath would be very wholesome for us after the fatigue of-
the day.

The interior part of the Bay of Deliverance, which I went
to inspect, offered a place where the rocks, coming out of
a sandy bottom, seemed to form separate bathing places.
Before getting in the water, I called Ernest several times,
but he did not reply. Becoming uneasy, I went towards
the ‘tent, calling him again; still the same silence. I began :,
to fear some accident, when I perceived him asleep under a
tree, a little distance from the stream. The cow and ass were
tranquilly feeding near him. “Idle one!” cried I, “what care
you are taking of the beasts! Do you not think they might
re-pass the bridge, and lose themselves?” “Oh! there is
nothing to fear,” replied he, in a sleepy tone, rubbing his



- 96 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

eyes, “I have taken away several planks of the bridge.” “ Ah!
ah! I see that idleness makes you inventive; but, instead of
sleeping as you have done, would it not have been better to
fill the ass’s saddle-bag with salt, which your mother depended
on our bringing? Busy yourself now in gathering this, and
when you have finished, come to me at the first heap of rocks,
behind which I am going to bathe.” Speaking thus, I showed
him with my hand the place I had chosen, and went back
to it.

As, after having remained nearly half an hour in the water,
I was astonished not to see my salt gatherer appear, I dressed
myself to go and see if he had gone to sleep again. Scarcely
had I gone a few steps, when I heard him cry out: “Oh,
father! father! come and help me, or else he will drag me
in!” J ran, and saw my little philosopher lying on his belly
on the sand, not far from the mouth of the stream, holding
with both hands a line, at the end of which an enormous
fish was struggling. I arrived just in time to spare the
fisherman the grief of seeing his magnificent captive escape.
I took the cord and let the fish into low water, where it was
easy to catch him, after Ernest, going into the water, had
stunned him with a blow of his hatchet. It was a salmon,
weighing at least fifteen pounds.

I complimented my son, not only on his skill as a fisher,
but also on the forethought he had shown in bringing the
lines with him.

Whilst he was bathing, I cleaned the salmon and rubbed
him with salt, then placed him on the hurdle with some
other smaller fishes which Ernest had taken and wrapped in
his handkerchief. I put back the planks of the bridge; then,
when my son came back to me, the beasts were harnessed,
and we returned towards Falcon’s Nest.

We had walked about a quarter of an hour, keeping by
the meadow, when suddenly Belle sprang forward, barking,
towards a large tuft of high grass, from which we saw an
animal come out nearly as large as a sheep, who ran away,
making extraordinary leaps. I fired, but too precipitately,
and failed. Ernest, placed at this moment in the direction
the beast took, fired in his turn, and killed it.



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 97

We ran to examine the singular game we had just killed.
The animal had the muzzle and skin of a mouse, the ears of
a hare, the tail of a tiger, the front paws exceedingly short,
and the hind ones excessively long. I examined it a long
time before I could tell its name. As to Ernest, the joy of
his victory prevented him from observing it carefully. “Ah!”
cried. he, “what will my mother and brothers say on seeing
game of this size, and knowing that I killed it!” “Truly,
you have a good eye and sure hand,” said I, “but I should
not be sorry to know the name of your game. Let us proceed
together to a minute examination of it, and perhaps we shall



arrive ” Ernest interrupted me. “It has,” said he, “four
incisors, and may belong, consequently, to the order of
gnawers,.” ' “That is very well reasoned,” replied I, “but it

has also, below the teats, a pocket, which is the distinctive
sign of the opossum. I think I am not deceived in saying
that this animal is a female kangaroo, an animal unknown to
naturalists till the discovery of New Holland by the celebrated
Captain Cook, who was the first to observe and describe it.
You may congratulate yourself, then, on having made a truly

extraordinary capture.” “Father,” said Ernest, “you appear
glad that I killed this fine game; are you not sorry you did
not kill it yourself?” “No; because I love my son better

than myself, and his success gives me more pleasure than
my own.” “Ah, father!” said he, throwing himself in my
arms,

The kangaroo was placed on the hurdle, and while walking,
I told Ernest all I knew about the kangaroo, of its short fore-
paws, and long hind ones, and of its tail, which serves it almost
like a fifth leg, as a sort of compensation for the insufficiency
of its fore-paws.

As soon as the children left at Falcon’s Nest perceived us,
they uttered cries of joy, and we soon saw them running
towards us, all muffled up, some more comically than the
others. One was enveloped in a long white shirt, another had
his body covered in long trousers which reached to his
shoulders, the third was hid under a waistcoat which descended
to his knees, and make him resemble a walking portmanteau.
Seeing them advance gravely, like the heroes of a theatre,

7



98 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,

I asked them what was the cause of this masquerade. They
- told me that during my absence, their mother having thought
fit to wash their clothes, they were obliged to wait till they
were dry, and wrap themselves up in those found in the chest
we brought from the shore.

After making us laugh at their grotesque accoutrements,
they pressed round the hurdle to inspect its load. The house-
keeper thanked us for the butter, salt, and fish we had brought;
but the attention of the children was concentrated principally
on the salmon and kangaroo, which Ernest was quite proud
of showing to his brothers. James and Francis uttered cries
of admiration at sight of this important piece of game. It
was not quite the same with Fritz, who, I perceived, was looking
at it rather spitefully. At the same time I could see that he was
trying to overcome this feeling of jealousy. “Father,” said he,
approaching me, “will you take me on your next excursion?”
“Yes, my child,” replied I, adding, in a whisper, “to recom-
pense you for the inner combat you have just fought and_
gained.” He embraced me, and went to Ernest, whom he
congratulated sincerely on his skill, showing thus the good-
ness of his heart. On the other side, I remarked with pleasure
the modesty of Ernest, who had the delicacy not to tell that
I had missed the kangaroo.

The hurdle was unloaded, and I distributed some salt to
our animals, who had been deprived of it for sometime. The
kangaroo was suspended to a branch of the tree, and we made
our supper of the small fishes caught by Ernest, and a dish
of potatoes, It now being night, we regained our aérial
abode.



CHAPTER XI.
SECOND VOYAGE TO THE VESSEL.

THE next day, very early, I called Fritz, and told him he
should accompany me in a second voyage to the vessel. My
wife, who heard me, cried out again, as I had foreseen, about
the new dangers we were going torun. I made a fresh appeal
to her reason, by showing that it would be highly culpable in
us to abandon the thousand useful things still enclosed in the
shipwrecked vessel, for want of resolution.

I then descended from the tree, and began to despoil the
kangaroo of its pretty grey fur. The flesh was divided into
two parts; one to be eaten immediately, the other was destined
to be salted. Then we breakfasted, and after the repast I
told Fritz to collect our game-bags and gourds, and the arms
we should take with us. At the moment of departure I
called James and Ernest, to whom I wished to give some
orders for the employment of their time during our absence.
As they did not answer, I asked my wife if she knew what
had become of them. She replied that they were probably
- gone to dig up some potatoes, as she heard them talk of doing
so. I was satisfied when I saw that they had taken Turk with
them. We then set out without waiting for them, leaving Belle
at Falcon’s Nest. —

As we arrived at Jackal Bridge, we suddenly heard shouts
of laughter at some distance, and soon saw Ernest and James
come from behind a bush, appearing very much delighted at
the trick they had played us. I scolded them severely for
having gone away without telling us. They owned that they
had done so in the hope that I should take them to the vessel.

99



Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20081006_AAAAEV' PACKAGE 'UF00085415_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-10-08T09:11:14-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
REQUEST_EVENTS TITLE Disseminate Event
REQUEST_EVENT NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-04T15:10:58-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297626; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2014-01-11T15:32:56-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00327.txt'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2011-11-18T22:09:51-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2011-11-18T22:04:49-05:00'
redup
'573172' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYRU' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
100130acd9f75770ba956f47ef14934b
f73ca983876fd8e2e0b2ae43b6cbe34f14fe06d4
'2011-11-18T22:07:21-05:00'
describe
'154941' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYRV' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
441a0b72bfb287bcac800ee8ee138d2b
ab98bbddf7ce7dbb4da50a96e54a8fe405dcdacb
'2011-11-18T22:10:33-05:00'
describe
'217' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYRW' 'sip-files00001.pro'
78cce75f2342ef65c745fe778ebf697f
58d9d7a30a9e69bf6fbeab1185444a928173bd7e
'2011-11-18T22:06:53-05:00'
describe
'28378' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYRX' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
b7126929cb443c1e49eadf9ce03933b5
faeeb3381f62f7f14467d7fb74ed91680b26327f
'2011-11-18T22:08:36-05:00'
describe
'13773960' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYRY' 'sip-files00001.tif'
8b849a43223bd0d50e4e9b6b25d0e4c0
a1a705aadd43c62462f80d33b96ef5b33c11b9f0
'2011-11-18T22:08:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYRZ' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-18T22:09:59-05:00'
describe
'6645' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSA' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
e43e7ecb43401ba99ced554b36ec7f27
2392796d3e10d6bb2d15df6453bbefb4ad03d51b
'2011-11-18T22:05:05-05:00'
describe
'588535' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSB' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
e0eee98000bf1c6f77bed9a4bfa330de
35764791f0a506da8d4291fd85ed55cef295f562
'2011-11-18T22:09:48-05:00'
describe
'65853' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSC' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
a359b0bbdbb90ae347f9a2901934a321
d3dfdfa07ec6fa9639b502246a56d7dd95bd690d
'2011-11-18T22:07:17-05:00'
describe
'1768' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSD' 'sip-files00002.pro'
022d60aa2fcac96d48237dc7e529306b
437db5bbb89f7bcd465179715193c7885f11935a
'2011-11-18T22:05:13-05:00'
describe
'14765' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
15b7dbcbc0796dd448aed37f541f8c53
da03ba5dac14b110414f710ad5111ae9d917fd74
describe
'14144452' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
d12cae6a055e79342322a0e901d152c7
a0b3bd8e4c7af8359e1364d060000051732f5ff3
'2011-11-18T22:10:19-05:00'
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSG' 'sip-files00002.txt'
dbce09cc3d26856a19a1c91bc34be5e2
a282674006a18b92a9cad44576eb568a5038e58b
'2011-11-18T22:06:32-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'4047' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSH' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
bffa0d6f3387f499c47c4221a2ce4d8d
d452a167c3d1de383febdc6d5826325f8d700dcb
'2011-11-18T22:10:52-05:00'
describe
'479868' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSI' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
cb3e012dfecc276d93cf217d0bfceb11
355e1a2625a7070e993e489b95b10efb89b004bc
'2011-11-18T22:05:41-05:00'
describe
'25257' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSJ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
550836af2da362f0f30e01c9fe5bd704
a9d86656877c380d6c5dd419d23283e33c8d2175
'2011-11-18T22:08:01-05:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSK' 'sip-files00005.pro'
77434842f6cb5cd6088582a0e08d02fc
b405d9516daf4c5b30ef58ed64606324efee03e1
'2011-11-18T22:07:42-05:00'
describe
'6950' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSL' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
e45ad504135ea06ab66b97c349f4e0f8
bacdb6c2a99a319ef71827b3aa6b6d7eb7d99eed
'2011-11-18T22:05:52-05:00'
describe
'3855912' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSM' 'sip-files00005.tif'
81c3f80cf9324deb09384e5781fa5d27
a9ab3cf45bd71c6834a8069b51cb0bca2766fd87
'2011-11-18T22:05:51-05:00'
describe
'39' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSN' 'sip-files00005.txt'
2a6538f55be298d25a152be46572f1ae
f34f9e4501377e1df4090a04ac4aeff8ad9ce1b7
'2011-11-18T22:07:23-05:00'
describe
'2371' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSO' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
2cf9357ff22bd47cf837f29567ebb7f0
f9e9f5fe8b1692eb31e0d48667246bdf73c99ba9
'2011-11-18T22:09:01-05:00'
describe
'479459' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
705a64bb1d8f7952722a908c29409f80
e985903bf26d4f2d494a01c0241aeff6624199ef
'2011-11-18T22:05:50-05:00'
describe
'138986' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSQ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
b1aade4e38f592f67e37d682c4711fbc
e05e1185052069f1f2a7ec30034fc32321c2f3bd
'2011-11-18T22:09:26-05:00'
describe
'1948' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSR' 'sip-files00008.pro'
6b238211d575c1ee70a97827a91dc92c
6f3c3ac9fe39870ed4d9e62a6a14071d92ff05ed
'2011-11-18T22:09:15-05:00'
describe
'34557' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSS' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
9c23ac95c767bc8b7413a3ef73a97cc1
20b5d485732b173a67ce31100d20b8e099c4341b
'2011-11-18T22:08:20-05:00'
describe
'3854416' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYST' 'sip-files00008.tif'
dd19ca5092fabd9c33a3fc6513217457
c95214a70a001bf2dda965a6ba3bbb9e964a10a0
'2011-11-18T22:08:13-05:00'
describe
'183' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSU' 'sip-files00008.txt'
f38793a8c65fb2e562b7b218e2540d81
80d411774cc2a6c30266dd7ff520069ae7e9b6b0
'2011-11-18T22:07:32-05:00'
describe
'9497' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSV' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
047ff216b1c3ddfe6e3a5beeb9304dfd
130c96525a714dec3f433dfea3cdd501a6444a40
'2011-11-18T22:08:55-05:00'
describe
'479674' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSW' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
c46b00168e4bc99a2b20ec564f79589a
7e63d3978cd1ce1d77483e867d7fa98ca0b566eb
describe
'58415' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSX' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4947a15749b4f74998287bcc564215bb
b2cc9da6ad7dca46c2e76c5ebe73b735e4e325e3
'2011-11-18T22:09:03-05:00'
describe
'5311' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSY' 'sip-files00009.pro'
cde8e28b3eb31662a197ca249670ecdf
e026bc4733a4518f56379d86080f6e194dd27c24
'2011-11-18T22:08:30-05:00'
describe
'16658' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYSZ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
f292d5542f73afaad32f524f6f46a518
0e527e7ab9ec1d588eebbc278babdb49fb716d57
'2011-11-18T22:09:19-05:00'
describe
'3857492' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTA' 'sip-files00009.tif'
566bfc8c8c2fa316e7b6ab7abedac0bc
f4d73ba6669e982beb5d7ccf08a8eb7cc33c96dd
'2011-11-18T22:05:57-05:00'
describe
'300' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTB' 'sip-files00009.txt'
442bcf7b1db2179f1d7e5f2f91647172
9bb850f4f3c36b030ae7a32e84bc43a0855be6bd
'2011-11-18T22:09:32-05:00'
describe
'5496' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTC' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
e2fb9aeadeab8580f066c2dd00cbdea6
c48ecb407a02134728c30172814d2b4053f80d8c
'2011-11-18T22:05:17-05:00'
describe
'479690' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTD' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
ec5c01cf9b7cf0e4cd065aa7e72d5146
5bd6306baed433548b334890590cd3e5d2a22af7
'2011-11-18T22:07:08-05:00'
describe
'80012' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTE' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
0ffdf47d8f9d19a5ae2a5777a574b0ee
cfc703f13611971324765851fa33c50a53054d9e
describe
'20144' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTF' 'sip-files00011.pro'
bc0f84f12b0ce26a867b7bc430ec28dd
a73ad5789b2db83059970a5e67322f9ee7b49ba1
'2011-11-18T22:10:40-05:00'
describe
'24862' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTG' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
0f18f8dc60e2a348651857fb12fb4c5d
f8f8deb886802fa570f97b9891c23d95d7f82c7e
'2011-11-18T22:07:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
407fe6fd42f2ebf046f03cb295e602db
47ab7a244ede68cded1998b695ed7cd9c205b312
'2011-11-18T22:10:22-05:00'
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTI' 'sip-files00011.txt'
f5ec69f230be17a49ca5bbb8753ded83
376228141379ef5f0bcb5e4d92513c8aea056b37
'2011-11-18T22:06:08-05:00'
describe
'7115' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTJ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
dd2856f47f1b3a798a0143b14f2028c9
0993ae7bb7be014b7b18d1f2c1e6e3d2fb27a765
'2011-11-18T22:09:21-05:00'
describe
'479892' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTK' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7bb6ed33376cf37423863278b5e63a8e
8eb05841f14565f0c3229bca87f6f2ef11c4a4f2
'2011-11-18T22:09:58-05:00'
describe
'49145' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTL' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
b64706431f119c598f5e9083427f9c5b
2dbe1414c041ba3d442f20adeb4e6a5092e0ee18
describe
'16539' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTM' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b80e99889a2c28c74bc454c8efcc455a
a202d6cb474c07e512e75322857c2e25e58b5a26
'2011-11-18T22:09:16-05:00'
describe
'14295' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTN' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c3a86f98d19702da64d4d92ce9f0af54
ec0faf99844b7d90cfbb29580d66307c1add5f7e
'2011-11-18T22:05:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTO' 'sip-files00013.tif'
61a7a2880b27aaf822df2fb6291546e4
998183b1dfbc5efed59fe6c2c2e10cdc9b3ffe56
'2011-11-18T22:08:15-05:00'
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTP' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ea3c83d424234496f3c8f65e2a026f6a
3bcf2909d6b294619bfbac83b2b053cdffa11886
'2011-11-18T22:07:20-05:00'
describe
'4866' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTQ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
1b099f7bd3366393024e2d48da9c0341
6ec7bf03c4743ee86f2a9e84832105cc631a4c6d
'2011-11-18T22:06:29-05:00'
describe
'479698' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTR' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
c4381afea193370ec5edf3fb679069d3
0cb58d5d5f5760daf9a1ef3d23a99757fed4ba1b
describe
'55292' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTS' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
016af7b1191dca00a08962adaa58bfa4
bd68f6d0383f98d2810e73570dc1f199597ddc64
'2011-11-18T22:10:50-05:00'
describe
'24736' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTT' 'sip-files00014.pro'
10ef838682bf09694df3975e6959ce90
d78aa5fdd189906b64271bdc7e887fa16721f37c
'2011-11-18T22:09:23-05:00'
describe
'19052' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTU' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
99f566b1640741c785f9150267e0347b
1e465e13b4e03294436523e7c38c1c2e9e6bcadb
'2011-11-18T22:09:27-05:00'
describe
'3854412' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTV' 'sip-files00014.tif'
2afe07caaec4ed3fda43345e8146924f
b3422708f85b5d912c5387277e71f401c629d72e
'2011-11-18T22:10:48-05:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTW' 'sip-files00014.txt'
aaa54b4e239a9ef942293eeec3765439
7e33ca59cb713c9c1fd5cb77ab143736c42f0ae4
'2011-11-18T22:05:25-05:00'
describe
'6364' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTX' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
9a2b65ad2de10e6e87eaa6fbdbe81303
a867958bc117799025fdf8c933b865938c8df38b
'2011-11-18T22:06:00-05:00'
describe
'479867' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTY' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
3d9b425ad2bc16e538a30369a6065a6d
f19d96997d980efed8ce8d3156c3d698a1f35be6
'2011-11-18T22:09:13-05:00'
describe
'66194' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYTZ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
dd5d405b263d299ddec7c47d279ab68a
e7372d496ccb537db84bc699e79a373905958bad
'2011-11-18T22:06:06-05:00'
describe
'27995' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUA' 'sip-files00015.pro'
6de9d69bcdf87025c3752633a04004d1
1ffab87bc49568f0a62b874b48e601fb13453313
'2011-11-18T22:10:38-05:00'
describe
'20869' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUB' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
02debd3f0513621df09d56ce7f048942
8bb3a130dc50787e75e9bb4380dde379559a2ce7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
02025846bebb69aad9d5e8b2890da790
614efecaea7c05d00f51ca9f050336e3dd9bc916
'2011-11-18T22:09:08-05:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUD' 'sip-files00015.txt'
2ec13eb605f87850264fc30906ece23e
4d9799c02172542a0844c5a49b38c6ffeab28e20
'2011-11-18T22:10:37-05:00'
describe
'6970' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUE' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
33ac6fd811050dd13475a39555c818cc
64d5b9422764531536e1c02cf2da5352a68e6300
'2011-11-18T22:09:42-05:00'
describe
'479888' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUF' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
7a1eda22dadd97ceaa1754f5623cf4e2
db88a10a94db788e42b1e52bb688757b5982d845
'2011-11-18T22:10:45-05:00'
describe
'80588' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUG' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
fc9fc8ec74231cf75ebb7eb99a5de373
75031373df42a24e304b1bcf1b9a0a20a6d9b681
describe
'34900' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUH' 'sip-files00016.pro'
3828a7d09b55d21caa3a02fa9eedb002
a7775710574d27265a259cdefdc4b1b882e5c087
'2011-11-18T22:07:30-05:00'
describe
'24784' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUI' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
046056ba6f6b6275b52688975289ddc1
f453891c9ce7a2949156a79caee43b9ae4fb0272
'2011-11-18T22:06:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUJ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
b58fc7709cf0e16be4b58ce6f3b65e73
b6056972bfb99e1c4a360225cdc38938b4e0ae7f
'2011-11-18T22:05:44-05:00'
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUK' 'sip-files00016.txt'
ac05a529e1face459aa061627a9ed926
248dbcd21afd7328e72cb768d28d7d3565e17c57
'2011-11-18T22:09:52-05:00'
describe
'7593' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUL' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
e99d0a15a3efce7716e579e3f738bc72
583c33a045e88b691779d68446f164c1feb47574
'2011-11-18T22:06:17-05:00'
describe
'479561' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUM' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
cfe9b9eb5e5d19a331ef810b4f8e713b
6dedbad7dfb7313cfc279075b43e55cc2dd2818d
'2011-11-18T22:08:18-05:00'
describe
'20474' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUN' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b2e8f836d00f28a2c443406b2e5c6896
0cee690403ee5018fa3da720cff81fe847dc9dc7
'2011-11-18T22:05:37-05:00'
describe
'5484' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUO' 'sip-files00017.pro'
31f16f77e92f7f4a1bc06a70bb52248f
5f8f57af6609ce9679339004093cb160c0876f60
describe
'6285' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
67a8b7568a302dad67ea313364b98571
8b61b3cd3482fde5e6be7a26d1f61fbd8d8b34f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUQ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
54feff879498da365975619444fbb25f
5c105e5037459f01d1e4603b4d2bf8052c95fe82
'2011-11-18T22:07:55-05:00'
describe
'371' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUR' 'sip-files00017.txt'
efbf3e3b6887683be2fc24d5481be0be
6625bf78df7d91076127e35f2e8771946ce5dc9b
'2011-11-18T22:07:57-05:00'
describe
'2174' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUS' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
f8e222b94258dacd13e2c31e184f5d05
232f5b55e5726afbfa9a19d050d20dcb74069b71
'2011-11-18T22:07:22-05:00'
describe
'479607' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUT' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
b197874aad089837c85f08e5c9b4e037
1f25a52346364cd5c6f909b54e16995d44a766bc
'2011-11-18T22:08:47-05:00'
describe
'20982' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUU' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
77a2baab0642ff318c32ea6376b6ef70
befdf822c69c71944db672bb77405dacc2b6dddc
'2011-11-18T22:04:58-05:00'
describe
'3593' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
0804d1491742d95ab83023506b18136b
ff42c7b1164c89e04afa155e1ece5f4dddc9ba86
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUW' 'sip-files00018.tif'
d7075c0233ae47d48adbf78f824f659b
0c91c90948132b486714450e249541a24709f43c
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUX' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
6ddd6ef423d6ce0aae183d15dd951a02
b0eda2f1f10aaedf2319d20625a611e8c8d663ee
describe
'479628' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUY' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
fac3c733e11b05e1d306bf8c682b2f22
8a584cdfefa12255078513890756469c54bfd8e7
describe
'37592' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYUZ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
280fdea2a0efb6c77cffe00c04343a9d
9abd4e31c9aa31e4ef19d4ab4ff8ae4ce145fb88
'2011-11-18T22:06:34-05:00'
describe
'7670' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVA' 'sip-files00019.pro'
42adca6f40628091c98361ecef205afb
291f741da2147988a4be1418987b09fc5fbae51b
'2011-11-18T22:05:32-05:00'
describe
'9993' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
315785b007e5983b404112a5e1593fac
6ff8b61e313a6268391845e6e32e63c3ac2aedb4
'2011-11-18T22:06:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
5a36ac3c508388f329be38fd05b67e52
6c1bed308b78a835cbc8fbeea0c0915288347287
'2011-11-18T22:06:40-05:00'
describe
'444' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVD' 'sip-files00019.txt'
429b41437b2c2ce530940bed9497f206
4a499f844005ae953bd311b7b0415b3113f4e70a
'2011-11-18T22:05:58-05:00'
describe
'3025' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVE' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
6f53b5177a528851541b6e960d281eeb
b54b787dc0a884b72919ae9aeb94fd1868b186c4
'2011-11-18T22:09:05-05:00'
describe
'479553' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
21f88963b72d42fc3bf45b4ef3afb02d
d119cb1de975a1f5745cf3eb089b1b6fe5543ae2
'2011-11-18T22:06:07-05:00'
describe
'17404' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
2dc4219324ce8e38c67d052e4e836726
7940c65bdce60b75f4d200947874a1e6a6962e87
describe
'3318' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVH' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
4199c4d93464b96ba642b65fcd88d51c
74a9e07266590ad12a5395dcdaa21db42625e257
'2011-11-18T22:07:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVI' 'sip-files00020.tif'
7f4b9b104a36a7a7915b779d15408a92
e04c4a4d3822b9c17fb733d2468c27fba770f4a6
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVJ' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
40861cfd266f6534632140c0ded5d8ec
71596b4b75138241b2b8b670db843f86ee66735f
'2011-11-18T22:08:14-05:00'
describe
'479649' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVK' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
7ebd203da3e03125725e6dc40e92a6f4
aab2e3142ba3d3f2586370d0d3af2e52741ec402
'2011-11-18T22:08:59-05:00'
describe
'113681' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVL' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0a02401ff328e5e0d892e828e9a7d4e8
7bbcdd074d5b50ce417d22e6d93dc7035d8d41c4
describe
'40271' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVM' 'sip-files00021.pro'
6c36da8f56fa53f1354af17e0e520daf
52bdd485f7942b936c63a1b427d94b4007e83a40
describe
'34412' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
40d98b9a4472dab2614b1e6e34d97bb0
ee9c8608913f4b58d0eae4c66ba0d8d911070e44
'2011-11-18T22:05:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVO' 'sip-files00021.tif'
6354b32a6ba66b479444262f493ef18b
bc97de619673b8afc489759e749482716901a44b
'2011-11-18T22:10:34-05:00'
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVP' 'sip-files00021.txt'
da0adc623486ddebac90b1fc47312c81
23db91e7fb55decb539c4179cd74eb7787f91ae8
'2011-11-18T22:08:54-05:00'
describe
'9365' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVQ' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
2a27d77c7ff2073b0d9af254190cdc8e
c503a46970ab19bce4d03cc32a8838f4c832f78a
'2011-11-18T22:08:08-05:00'
describe
'479661' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVR' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ac84fb19b10b675398b19d1cc8ace652
09c8fdc3e0fc1643be1f5f69b4f2939570f985d5
'2011-11-18T22:06:58-05:00'
describe
'163817' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVS' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
4e44470132626c205cad5a5d958b76f6
224228673dc9ff3aacdae4e79dd7409261251c91
'2011-11-18T22:06:59-05:00'
describe
'61686' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVT' 'sip-files00022.pro'
ae61f628f510d1dd7c95302827fc6eb8
7be892acbe64dc2d0a4a3a46d79827259b519a41
'2011-11-18T22:10:36-05:00'
describe
'47990' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVU' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
c0d4c3f59b1775791093bcc90b6dea6c
86ccb4186640b8844d835d11f76ae1f4ee4b6312
'2011-11-18T22:08:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVV' 'sip-files00022.tif'
6e87cf4e93af79b6ad33e105f37f0069
5c4b84b81203606ad3758abdc2d13d9128bb4ffc
'2011-11-18T22:11:03-05:00'
describe
'2419' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVW' 'sip-files00022.txt'
e053ef14afb8ec2ef1fd0776cc72bb17
e5f45850050b87d942c9e1b867819010bb347fc4
'2011-11-18T22:07:56-05:00'
describe
'12313' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVX' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
4c87b1f7274563c6618209ccfa5f7bf1
1d2f5603259e4bf1fe97d50e478ae746b2127c6b
'2011-11-18T22:06:21-05:00'
describe
'479887' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVY' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
c810c3960b8482e093fef050dc527737
2b8d63db8a9e84e15762898bf3c5929542c1dfc8
describe
'155896' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYVZ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
8441ca5c8a8db2ee67b25b8ab3d17210
19233b06244d213c6067c532f556bf13e3bc5cc0
describe
'58314' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWA' 'sip-files00023.pro'
6cd2baec110e56a23583019315f032bd
36bf8813272461521eb5548cf13b28a36a026a64
'2011-11-18T22:05:54-05:00'
describe
'46033' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWB' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
26cf274bf67bb98cb173ce944a39e994
bdf37d5f3fc6b13899494e7433a0411fee48a5ea
'2011-11-18T22:09:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
19dc6e19f230f407f02445249f95bf20
d9205436882e575bb16b2164141ae5bc59d9d32c
'2011-11-18T22:09:00-05:00'
describe
'2314' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWD' 'sip-files00023.txt'
e91bd064a40f4e60f7abbeb9ed4e8a2c
a9b63f3d3d9af1d2754579bb08b40d86ce75a9ce
'2011-11-18T22:10:29-05:00'
describe
'11937' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWE' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
e54108aa747151645185ae8c7d6ce780
515da903a5351a4cde794f54847c97a4aab2d352
'2011-11-18T22:07:54-05:00'
describe
'479622' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e861b163d0ea71acc85d47a880d4de8a
98f531a41e4faa350427887b929b3396fdfaae1c
describe
'157104' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWG' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
e764f096455c2db17fbcef53619a0e9a
c530518f8bc0821daad57443f8ef1b4f3aeba2c3
'2011-11-18T22:04:57-05:00'
describe
'60011' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWH' 'sip-files00024.pro'
c01394ab0677bce840ff23d2b1f72240
f6c4fb8d77242b02ff3366b649dbbda2d294faba
'2011-11-18T22:10:15-05:00'
describe
'46211' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWI' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
f3353a26e6358b7296383689f9c5c2fd
7aca53267758d03dd570512d4e80170aaa342aec
'2011-11-18T22:08:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWJ' 'sip-files00024.tif'
f906a271bd6c41602a53f9c93c9e2627
e4d9666bfc66e0f912220f4a1c774c0152eb7ef6
'2011-11-18T22:10:06-05:00'
describe
'2347' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWK' 'sip-files00024.txt'
17f3dae08c09b1ad5e500f5645d66a82
0443f9ac65a9201acbd2cdb96c1b808e7ccb47d2
describe
'11777' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWL' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
fdb126d1fb41ead967e3a2ea36d139fe
ab0277ca9c3a4b18dadf7caebf88fa5890015854
'2011-11-18T22:06:44-05:00'
describe
'479873' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWM' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
fdaac2242578444d0cc247abb9a3fb31
da24fe79a95315e40f5a5a256d40d52f03491f34
'2011-11-18T22:07:09-05:00'
describe
'128960' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWN' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
9f880addf90b03ddaeb997f1078a023e
0469cd19a4d5c10218bb4e630c6ee14e4001b3b4
describe
'48105' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWO' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8a12fd8e0d686671fa4375221f43921c
2fccec53f32b31dd9e13a30530b721c18391bf2a
describe
'37214' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWP' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
0a69ef973354a2d94a62d9315959b377
7e953e6b72cb28872dac0ea28ae5ae3f486a7328
'2011-11-18T22:09:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWQ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
af95f62efca12ff04cac5d5bea8c30b0
25de38e880b20ef93e71c1554524d5af8675b7f0
'2011-11-18T22:05:00-05:00'
describe
'1897' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWR' 'sip-files00025.txt'
57d20fd6800b692d9759882fb3355b3e
04b3917f34dbf4be40fea3ac77dd55a989a17564
'2011-11-18T22:09:11-05:00'
describe
'9850' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWS' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
71c2f78fa16962f2b87972e0fa3943c7
6c6817849359c20be07cbbc26c1e9ac79b1ffcf3
'2011-11-18T22:07:36-05:00'
describe
'479711' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWT' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
75890dc3b25e404fac96ab9c307a7eca
0c765af0f0f865a69632cbeb04b4d8fb72415dfe
'2011-11-18T22:06:35-05:00'
describe
'122298' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWU' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c18db86f939f3f4ebb917ac89abe7ba2
e2adeb8dfe02cb47eabbae11eb512a955c6a5ad9
'2011-11-18T22:05:35-05:00'
describe
'44542' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWV' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c7470ed84e18f9ed3fe720fb0ba1dff4
b3312f3cbfc8e55a69e005f764b95529c519cd8b
'2011-11-18T22:10:55-05:00'
describe
'35038' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWW' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
bbe18a38ad6a2a5d1e90d662de2b7679
385e28eb4c5e6e80e3074f92c122bf7ad73afff1
'2011-11-18T22:06:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWX' 'sip-files00026.tif'
c93f6d162d607c0955c8511ba9d35dab
f3c39f2b28fe4362689c120f82c9c4f40719aa76
describe
'1806' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWY' 'sip-files00026.txt'
55b6bcddd81ef7f4f3234fdf40d52d87
9203dd62335e6e11107233023750d6a6da636daa
'2011-11-18T22:07:33-05:00'
describe
'9294' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYWZ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
fa6cc4cb2f06c8b7e0862c381427f729
778bb1c1245a8ccf82c8fd22e5e82dcb6ab68618
describe
'479890' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXA' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
5079514e811dca7c33f9790543396118
9cb0c670f3e5fda6b0bbdc8540770f0b01fb0bfb
'2011-11-18T22:08:06-05:00'
describe
'160773' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXB' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
5a550c9e64c839861b46a237b7bd5ecd
6086c18ce5c6f1b1809e5d2af9dd7baa026efacf
'2011-11-18T22:09:46-05:00'
describe
'59876' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXC' 'sip-files00027.pro'
2ca8e6dd1a17b1ca584b47d096a783dc
35de1f422c0818a1fe5ca4298fb9aaf81321b704
describe
'47137' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXD' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
4217a9a00ad19bb6efa58c879a3bad6a
4c04a64f0ebc2799001867579a6d8b2e33e67ec7
'2011-11-18T22:05:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXE' 'sip-files00027.tif'
fb721053b6eb5d019b1e32c8a2c55d03
129d7e25d41aa31242fe11bac5c088f49b34ab87
'2011-11-18T22:07:35-05:00'
describe
'2362' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXF' 'sip-files00027.txt'
76c4b38f240002474c89b28d7a7e52cd
4ce5c1e1bd6b95baf687512a35f206a4027dfde6
'2011-11-18T22:10:32-05:00'
describe
'12475' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXG' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
4adf57a8304e39b17251fe88dff60b65
20ef481c84514335088a3bee7bb4e44a553216ca
'2011-11-18T22:05:24-05:00'
describe
'479641' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
2c8b46da5a35f6f2f348dc634b35bda4
a9198b48d135f9436ffcc91ccaa4dc0c815e20a7
'2011-11-18T22:07:52-05:00'
describe
'157773' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXI' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
7d6e5665a402210cff831de0a7cf7a10
2267941e6e4945e9cce2a573dc06bbf462ba954f
describe
'58996' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
598780b5ed8d8f5d0507f09b9d012d9e
19dc62971c0c6aa43b922b666854cdcf1275de93
'2011-11-18T22:08:07-05:00'
describe
'47987' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXK' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
537bb55ec31f439407992bdf99ab8351
963a4487b516e56f5f61c2b3119269da4de1b1cd
'2011-11-18T22:10:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXL' 'sip-files00028.tif'
9f452e07e8fff54e465f23d09f2f6471
353e306a285a052f2441d0003125a25becb80219
'2011-11-18T22:10:44-05:00'
describe
'2318' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXM' 'sip-files00028.txt'
4b1f5b0bc07666b2e44cf01eb08a046b
b9706830307dd60802571a410eb26c8add5a5752
describe
'12208' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXN' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6301439e0348d74a6ff5d871b0488c4f
1b31f66ae45552f22d5c8b15b134eeec48f40eb9
describe
'479699' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXO' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
804dc985fc95d85e2daf4b87cd869e36
e1fe1f37a34aaab171244b2c7a52c975cba48a51
'2011-11-18T22:05:18-05:00'
describe
'161769' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXP' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
fcc2420a59db95939dbc4ce2d1d5737f
b6315f817cd3d96a5bbfad05fbac145865410d63
'2011-11-18T22:07:29-05:00'
describe
'61017' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXQ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
15ec3c8a5b8bb701d20fd270afa01d66
e69ab94d6829ec586e32a0346db9af03a01792bc
'2011-11-18T22:04:56-05:00'
describe
'47236' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
8d2287da02e3357a1defbe1c3640ccd7
9bd766e54785bd1af3e3660c8f540efe30efc7a8
'2011-11-18T22:09:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXS' 'sip-files00029.tif'
0f7981548e656d675e2e358a6bc7db51
5c33bf859f933a480adfde37af8b4fe3fac3fef9
describe
'2402' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXT' 'sip-files00029.txt'
74da635257f5169e5efa79d09eff6f69
f0c86e42a7b9fd777bc352354e274f93c5678f60
'2011-11-18T22:06:16-05:00'
describe
'12054' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXU' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
2af0953b97dcd5209ce25d86f7931a34
44a93c8a21307bfbbf29835edf9c04c2ce073f4c
'2011-11-18T22:05:43-05:00'
describe
'479799' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXV' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
e7468ef9177eed89a120df77710c6b87
82254cff21aee0eaee56523b2eca3914c3db21db
'2011-11-18T22:09:25-05:00'
describe
'156777' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXW' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
7a8b3fe5dedcab8fb26d81e58cbedc8e
71cc5715b358ee8feb998e5861d8801571a6a3a9
'2011-11-18T22:07:11-05:00'
describe
'58016' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
d941923e836d0ff4d09d4f35d43e154f
9340ca12a0f10fa2f3729a47ec26a77eb29641e1
describe
'46531' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXY' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
4666fd9ca225e5342b8a6fc2905ed752
fc745640cc477c74d93dbf8979c3cefa07c17ac3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYXZ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
a651847aed0578f3e880fd4cc16d1d11
064c14d46f931f5a690aa8e45e93070375c44703
'2011-11-18T22:06:18-05:00'
describe
'2282' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYA' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f74ddeafb7906d0c6f573ca73d4631c9
504233c01494f61fcd048a387c4ca42261412b58
'2011-11-18T22:05:30-05:00'
describe
'12173' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYB' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
d1ce2cc45430e58b12eb1fd0c06bfef0
bda44bfb97cc49024b20ab5d3e16de5149b1d70e
'2011-11-18T22:10:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYC' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
8609aaf57e0a45c36c20c15822f5497b
45dd2330150fb90361191666289a26594a8c3837
describe
'155044' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYD' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
586cfaf61c7b44987065b5e35a361ce7
62d41f6df9627190c72c2d08b14fd08f61bbf376
'2011-11-18T22:05:55-05:00'
describe
'57812' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYE' 'sip-files00031.pro'
bd81401a87d9b5845d849aeaac7e1c68
0be577baa298253aba38c08f2a298761a6788ea5
'2011-11-18T22:04:55-05:00'
describe
'45876' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYF' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7884db6184b9c12e82f9a3321afa49e8
3183808e1562e917fa9eea155636ded35afb76aa
'2011-11-18T22:07:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYG' 'sip-files00031.tif'
1e5c7daa89dd944bc2de11231ebc59d3
478b9d469feb711f6c2c16800eb47787ad145a1e
'2011-11-18T22:05:06-05:00'
describe
'2288' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYH' 'sip-files00031.txt'
5ad8a02c22dc9e23fc625bc1efaa3862
c334578e1d14ea83df602702c0029e2a88280e04
'2011-11-18T22:09:28-05:00'
describe
'12123' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYI' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
43f389ce8ae1d58c1ea573e9b3d56112
06cf8d312a1541760ed1e5cc328175be433ee187
describe
'479822' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYJ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
c252322261ef1b0d828b4985afba35d3
6fd63a28a462d03b696b53b0d94690d7168b883d
'2011-11-18T22:10:20-05:00'
describe
'152529' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
a26f094b4c2e2a8f1a51522fa59a48bc
7cf572853377f7c78b4d6fcee4f62f1c058c7472
'2011-11-18T22:07:14-05:00'
describe
'59276' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYL' 'sip-files00032.pro'
e909dbec10d189e13c899fac67cb719d
03363cb0de1b15183e1e50e3ee139ce0705b989f
describe
'45695' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYM' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
f6df954cf33054af9d5f52db8fb19629
3d2167ee3fc4e6c9880829f02fb1179f9ffa2026
'2011-11-18T22:10:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
0a37f3cdac0cb68bd507cfabc8655eb8
3e208c3d2227c238c181cddd9515576266948bf7
'2011-11-18T22:05:12-05:00'
describe
'2339' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYO' 'sip-files00032.txt'
c258bab6024ff11f825528e0bc6b94c3
24c4d23e44e1183e10bef4490e9ec84d8077e559
describe
'11767' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYP' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
549bdee984dc724b3d76e214cf0a44a0
311e893bc6477baed9039f7e657edf83fe367b9a
describe
'479849' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYQ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
2a78675f46c0aa121acc3fee7816730e
5bac7429b95decc87be7cfb6e6c76e41aa54043d
'2011-11-18T22:09:34-05:00'
describe
'154029' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYR' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
65590f5fa55e9016f7e30395ff20561d
7a99802ac91fc61f6f64afa4c1e7ddce2f26f306
'2011-11-18T22:07:01-05:00'
describe
'58755' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYS' 'sip-files00033.pro'
9e927c0f883122b41fea97e6ff82a1c9
a53a55ff3860192766c81cfa3f12e327662fda73
'2011-11-18T22:06:27-05:00'
describe
'46486' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYT' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
8fef653a7e2c023c78e09dd81f8a0544
5c77f703e38e3adfe5df03045843204af063086d
'2011-11-18T22:05:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYU' 'sip-files00033.tif'
94d9df26e122ea1c78e3050c749afa6d
70fd2c3d69d5afdc9061b7c9d800344a85aef7fc
'2011-11-18T22:07:44-05:00'
describe
'2315' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYV' 'sip-files00033.txt'
7b50b1e7a0672db5857bb36f748e66e0
fba0afe11da214c626ad083347b1cb15c0a929bf
describe
'12192' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYW' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
5ee70f281b483be38b170de1179fc5d4
633e368dc8bc6b4f8fba25ae3c94145045e92797
describe
'479829' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
c50ae6cac46f1ddf1a167c15b11e13cc
3d29d5a79ef021e6f0f8bace948f80a56a386866
'2011-11-18T22:08:17-05:00'
describe
'40273' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYY' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
12d54ac872ab6a7517b630fd67898e14
1bbfc6bbdee55c36773abd353d6463db71e1cfe7
describe
'11061' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYYZ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
5dee12abe151643de57bdeb6e1f66455
94dd4ba7793018dd00a28d4c9c469e36d9304252
'2011-11-18T22:07:43-05:00'
describe
'11286' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
1dcdd2ef5c2ad808bf95c7a38d286ce7
adfcc2301d41089300cd5eeff5992b996a67db6c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZB' 'sip-files00034.tif'
73853d845cc52aff7e811d905079c117
c18be53f24e1d781c5c782ab10cb1c426e192bd4
'2011-11-18T22:07:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZC' 'sip-files00034.txt'
3a0a211dcc2b7ed221a0e9ffb7564cdb
a23252c1989f85aabf438a22c54fab5c90a82ae8
'2011-11-18T22:05:19-05:00'
describe
'3168' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZD' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
de53dbd581234e3caa95f8b49c03e30d
6b5cafa1826e77d962ab397ebd414f16d3f9b4fb
describe
'479700' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZE' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
329b7d9108b4244c9809ff521017381d
7e7e03951fe5e361699fceeb0811248d57887462
describe
'121280' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c28ae833428f3028b3cedebcf639736f
1bd4cddcd76b5e2b10d6b4fa9d5fd8ba977f2f30
'2011-11-18T22:10:56-05:00'
describe
'45302' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
b1ee91f86656aaf9fdfce90b01878ae3
fecce1c182103872b70c3fe54f5862c6c574b09f
describe
'37063' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
0608f68d56783a9ed04e716b79bd2ed0
f47501816c1b9c6c5ab3d8a3167097b364077cd5
'2011-11-18T22:08:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZI' 'sip-files00035.tif'
75ebc97cbec47d0068d553b32375b82a
7b7591be50de2da2ad9930bf396a0cf0720aea49
'2011-11-18T22:07:48-05:00'
describe
'1848' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZJ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
a8c20663e614b49cb770b14f3cd92d43
cbc5cd841e66d01fcf86612686c32356478a08f9
describe
'9585' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c265b04f8732b5807988100ef73129a7
6866bbf5fd9f42d4004cbef17bacdf9b34d28121
'2011-11-18T22:09:38-05:00'
describe
'479658' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZL' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1aa570954f82e0c10471283fa6e96755
45546b8a1b8c79ce9a30f9e84e1dc188ffff0044
describe
'155328' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZM' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
62193f669e00619e78cec053a1218278
f3169af2fc5392984e5e558c2edcaad021fa9938
'2011-11-18T22:05:31-05:00'
describe
'59566' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZN' 'sip-files00036.pro'
5f5f46b483c6ce4bb22f91bd7916a222
f10564771e869d279c542da0bb83d34e9edce5f3
'2011-11-18T22:06:22-05:00'
describe
'45976' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZO' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
562a6b32e1ef2016f274a87edd01b2e0
af0589816a36d135cc322621d2e7269babdbdf65
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
c70e63c136390b01417e600a0a486e4b
54e1651b93468925b5e377e3139e485bc1b51ad1
'2011-11-18T22:05:22-05:00'
describe
'2375' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZQ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6b71b13349d22a95a824392deb42e11e
f98c195f25eb0a4d1eb72d0bdf356c530849c73a
describe
'11797' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZR' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
dd622597df1abc41e126f6abd2767ed8
4714989e66c6629686a96bb9771ad69e8b1aafce
'2011-11-18T22:06:15-05:00'
describe
'479694' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
3b695dd5afdc85c474f6a67701b00d40
465b7b18b7163eeaf21018110d0030b5f7cff7b2
'2011-11-18T22:08:00-05:00'
describe
'154894' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZT' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c2bb33ef1ae61894bbcca35dddd3ce1c
703f88c0bc3126cad1eda4221a43c0f8f4fcc5bb
'2011-11-18T22:08:42-05:00'
describe
'60575' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZU' 'sip-files00037.pro'
a9c04888cd7e924475a54619901c60e6
867f0e6743fafe8f04bba4da3844ca2d8804667f
'2011-11-18T22:05:47-05:00'
describe
'46452' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZV' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
2e02c4647c6bed6b88b010d0c13b5110
9deb0fcf3a389c67407496b3c877a6b7d142eb26
'2011-11-18T22:10:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZW' 'sip-files00037.tif'
50cd948c1091fd462c37f592fdff9813
8aae5a0d0dcf416617e789d7e35bb5ec799595db
'2011-11-18T22:06:51-05:00'
describe
'2383' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZX' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f7c4bf936c9477dec28c0c85f10610d9
2958724da12348eefb8dcf817e7bfce8b341dfe5
'2011-11-18T22:08:49-05:00'
describe
'11724' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZY' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
48d98214e7a1d29f155ff0f4154bc008
73e2895044538a81f7ad058718f66aae8a7c33bd
describe
'479645' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAYZZ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
2562e306ae53140feee79ed629b553a6
ddecf97ea1a1b47518d6f8a396bd7c1fdaba7678
'2011-11-18T22:08:22-05:00'
describe
'160530' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
824a996e261f266c4a1fa0e279307e16
4fa2016c2d5778c854834d8317dded770adc0328
'2011-11-18T22:10:31-05:00'
describe
'61457' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAB' 'sip-files00038.pro'
5d8cc5364354cdbfde41baf9864c6227
fcd105844fa5274b864e172f4143723b80964066
'2011-11-18T22:11:04-05:00'
describe
'47235' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAC' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
6c9b4f08f447ba9e0735c57a01adc8b3
a5091d9f2dafab16569c4f791233ac2b348d2e97
'2011-11-18T22:06:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAD' 'sip-files00038.tif'
506f46cc2798457d17ae2493c3d05f58
72bafcd643b6a60b65b01c3636aa3d658cae76a6
describe
'2409' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAE' 'sip-files00038.txt'
870636970dd30fca4f57d2339c91f8b8
83e3e01ccd5344d15bafbd3d3ede942b12df0806
describe
'11878' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAF' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
994d7c164540114297ae1bc98985cc51
ebdc52baf32a0cda2048d6a0de9797ebf1d05bfe
'2011-11-18T22:05:36-05:00'
describe
'479863' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAG' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
654bba1fd3a74ee070812d6e1f2034a4
b1adab0b69bac3b5115e101b890666d6e7eed54a
'2011-11-18T22:08:58-05:00'
describe
'159821' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5e769c6e2bf44bb653e0f004c4bbb3fd
b513bf203b305c652f91bc91c531d3700ad29ce2
describe
'60514' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAI' 'sip-files00039.pro'
854b184b1a2239dab06e3ecd71440514
f38f8a92d8d5a3c29cbd1964f8d53bdc23f6dc67
'2011-11-18T22:09:14-05:00'
describe
'46725' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAJ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
76ae5c1e67af0d1d351b144f2ffeaf3c
d1a3a328b2fe4e05c823d6aa293d241506445e42
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAK' 'sip-files00039.tif'
e9263a634be04ed32eefe9c0ea45bd0a
fa07a90d5c37bfb9f35e69a3f673f86225151fd5
describe
'2406' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAL' 'sip-files00039.txt'
47600ad04a9b3ee8402cb2e5c9c4c089
63023233852375adfcc5a572f23530002bb68245
'2011-11-18T22:05:16-05:00'
describe
'12360' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
c92c0d6b0e2c0a6aabb568b628a8daa4
b072f7b0dd29c568434a2e51376dbb9a2035420f
'2011-11-18T22:06:43-05:00'
describe
'479881' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAN' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
1b487f0b558327bf5103e6a8f1997e74
a94a2445837c71411f645b7cb9b6dc77b759853d
describe
'156468' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAO' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
7f30d09a9e2b9037652f0a9c1726cfed
37d1e2dbb5a5d95885cc8770d610864551d5c377
'2011-11-18T22:05:34-05:00'
describe
'58380' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAP' 'sip-files00040.pro'
5d1f21f6d6e637b4c08599bccd446a96
9575fe77847b65315f8b7c6022525f242db46502
'2011-11-18T22:06:52-05:00'
describe
'45487' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAQ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
ebea368b5eaeb4bdd37ef966345870af
e183c421632810a3d757359b875682bf2acfa26c
'2011-11-18T22:06:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAR' 'sip-files00040.tif'
48cc498a859e3a7c4eb73792ed7f8ae8
0ab00fcc50b43f58d84bef34ec9570a413ebdbb4
'2011-11-18T22:07:59-05:00'
describe
'2297' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAS' 'sip-files00040.txt'
1f3624b36208c543be79b76c89f8ab1b
3b8ffd518d9f6e94a4c7dddbb3c96d5b317f247c
'2011-11-18T22:09:50-05:00'
describe
'12187' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
54db662faa0032e92f92c980263bb9bd
9ccd698209e3aa25106bfb754fed97d5a8f5da55
describe
'479850' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
13bb99cf30f4b5eecf73440b6c693200
1c7bd190470bf3cfc59570e82557c6d07a46348e
'2011-11-18T22:05:42-05:00'
describe
'165196' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAV' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
ab6fa9c878ab1039f3a6144507995b93
38a6e2f8bb625fe2d5cff2c6a7882a3cf399612c
'2011-11-18T22:06:57-05:00'
describe
'62093' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
b2b1b2dcdeb109c703cb8672f396a702
d981c82aabc02f9f38dc3725a4b4735f7f48fae1
describe
'47417' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAX' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
55f76a63f677df9029eb70c9ef2435fa
131620722885abee63f62036dcaa1ff3ca25e16c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAY' 'sip-files00041.tif'
107d11d61287a25452bda6fb6ddcb6e7
6953f8e7739e358f63b04bb5207810fe352afca7
'2011-11-18T22:07:00-05:00'
describe
'2441' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZAZ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
d7ce6dd85a2ceb91e0291123dc51e467
6c7bd87f05f9c6d37eb539455d4e27da280250ab
'2011-11-18T22:09:54-05:00'
describe
'12315' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
dac2e99f419b1e602b1ffe20fb60c9fd
ff6bedd74265a48812077de1da616499382a52ed
'2011-11-18T22:06:50-05:00'
describe
'479705' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBB' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
5c2bff6ff07101e572dc37784f628871
b37e97cd891feb0a0f6b3c83257af731ee90f20e
describe
'156833' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f91808ce977bcd9af425473b251aed5e
b0ca7777e7fcdb96781ed3395164621ff6ed8865
describe
'58795' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
bd036513116614f9973aa0b1d19f3974
82cd788dbef0a7c7a399bb1e1c8016c69372e1e3
describe
'46664' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
08749dc72a2d20149d250b5f46bc89a9
6a335f8d9b3edc82cf618b9f6f7d6defd965f8e0
'2011-11-18T22:10:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
10130b460737cbf81750fba73dec1692
9beef4f3ab8d52bdbb018befacf2742ae22bc077
'2011-11-18T22:08:16-05:00'
describe
'2316' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
245d634362bbd4552851c9ab1f7fee8e
f945f75d661617eaa32d460bba9f4dfaf450433b
'2011-11-18T22:09:47-05:00'
describe
'12275' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBH' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
2871472a2696cd8bb346442f6c11657e
f7da41f593e1bc64bf3ccebc64bea94e1c789754
describe
'479666' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
22223a1e1fa4de9abb8a31502ac37daa
185061e260c19c31e0d527f92e76784326864beb
'2011-11-18T22:11:00-05:00'
describe
'155850' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
82d76eaae7c534f1eb6a2992e63fb8b8
6a864d5b2736c084888c45c0fa35b9cb653a7dc0
'2011-11-18T22:09:29-05:00'
describe
'58142' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBK' 'sip-files00043.pro'
fe4964b11ecde5708ac4772ab2e56e13
e255fbc6a5213d9ae1dc14c625b19eaa44a2940e
'2011-11-18T22:06:13-05:00'
describe
'47260' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBL' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
48dd9afe4afee64117c23f71c5976e8b
5ae6f18d50828a19e3cb8b1a688dece0566d51e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBM' 'sip-files00043.tif'
cef85299a417fd31e93028ab00208806
f4929b7eb16e7384f53dc16fc8d0000a2de2d0fd
'2011-11-18T22:09:04-05:00'
describe
'2295' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBN' 'sip-files00043.txt'
06dce14e23fe9cdc1d552c9d16f7b4af
7743b5c082214c0a2b4ce081c23003ab5527498e
'2011-11-18T22:06:38-05:00'
describe
'12284' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBO' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
582ae2c274179680b3f943f6b6999186
567eafc0c7c34542dd9de94895140eb2c32ab999
'2011-11-18T22:07:38-05:00'
describe
'479840' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBP' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
545d01ea4b67904e6ef731c43b58ff15
f89be611480231fa3a4c29fcb8d5a752285d5f99
describe
'164558' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBQ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
778e916c073b2d679a193219bd5dac0d
c056573c2a73dec0704ad55dda2bcbe829a6c60d
'2011-11-18T22:08:11-05:00'
describe
'60503' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBR' 'sip-files00044.pro'
f23b1c5633d1b66afe99a7bda3213b6a
ee0d3b895c8cfa89cc385ebfae951d5d3e91e497
describe
'48680' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c89e184b876b61576023fb80e5f3baf4
a74fe2dac1fa062263c771fdf3fe223ee4aeeaaa
'2011-11-18T22:11:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBT' 'sip-files00044.tif'
1d751e554ef555a8ff01ff795d5df254
4388464b0099d3f8c85aafa5cbdd80c40cb840a0
'2011-11-18T22:08:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBU' 'sip-files00044.txt'
41a063698177faefd6d5a583c4616db7
56ec0af4d7d0534aaabf4121d57fe6f669752914
describe
'12423' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBV' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d1d703e4098c4277a2fa521a9e7dc33e
ab1f8587f7b590ac3a82517c406b4c11158c9134
describe
'479836' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBW' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
039d96fa31d9baeef089bd0a868ea285
ffdb3d90891a9739771ec94446ed6586c34a3e82
'2011-11-18T22:06:30-05:00'
describe
'162702' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
bb94ddbc6e5b4e3466258c8b25dfa630
6fa8cae9810043b769e8e9bd7852d201cb89a3da
'2011-11-18T22:10:35-05:00'
describe
'59937' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBY' 'sip-files00045.pro'
51b0e396ebda631f144cc00ae8d2b938
122104dd99f559d8502a8bad754355fe33878749
describe
'47986' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZBZ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
931bd6d3e6400847ee124919a8eb112e
54e54055188d02b0a7e61ceaa5b81f885842793a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCA' 'sip-files00045.tif'
630819010b5d74a01a826aeafc9c2f3f
57681cf9bbbcfdeb1ca10b3c67adb56c931c0c65
describe
'2357' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCB' 'sip-files00045.txt'
e8874a9775099878b7a5acdc65cb8622
0cbbc4a2276564940cb28862e85f4e4f2e848fba
describe
'12333' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCC' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
cf9237225e51c4b7be006f8d8a38b2d4
26eeecc8e4406d8159b41feb29a3e6f034a05a3b
describe
'480150' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCD' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
41f523757f1a25bb66989214f47f375f
04b498b692548b07b424d7ee36aa74ff2bfc6d39
'2011-11-18T22:08:35-05:00'
describe
'152829' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCE' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
259bfb9b3aef4a9cebb52cea26d49579
fd04eebb5eccf78899caca3f09bfe08134c6e5b1
'2011-11-18T22:06:36-05:00'
describe
'57251' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCF' 'sip-files00046.pro'
2d80bef01f5b9489dd12e654945b1ab0
58e4410db13ce4e640fd425d0ad388206781cd2c
describe
'45715' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
babb336797703d60a8a1c7e4aa418005
9072ac3a39f12e7ce4d3e4d92cbaa2cca65a11af
'2011-11-18T22:08:02-05:00'
describe
'3858476' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCH' 'sip-files00046.tif'
cde97f841d86a5a3c41375eeff8b0c30
3225e53391906d356f76f8429905211a19df5094
'2011-11-18T22:10:12-05:00'
describe
'2271' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCI' 'sip-files00046.txt'
5a4e80279b46368eb8f6bb3ea9de9424
d9be991d8fcb834273f65fca5e2893517be52cc4
'2011-11-18T22:08:29-05:00'
describe
'11811' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCJ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c7b662ce1e0094442cbfcef660d17ecd
d6fecdd30dd60b6cea1b7f9c6a33997cc64d1afa
'2011-11-18T22:08:46-05:00'
describe
'479828' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCK' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
37c120d3209f07db2201002ac4728fd4
be043e2d59074ecded11f84c5920f246ca1dfb51
'2011-11-18T22:09:37-05:00'
describe
'159130' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCL' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
2b3e4f2c7f69c967c29fc2a8c7087220
8b503e6c3d8e0c524b7b552b79925767ae1062fe
'2011-11-18T22:05:38-05:00'
describe
'58661' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCM' 'sip-files00047.pro'
500342cae94f334dc6e097b816b9286d
3204ac3c05760433e95660b2ab74643ba21b4f44
'2011-11-18T22:08:05-05:00'
describe
'47314' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCN' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
182d446c9c96ef52c14c0ed7835c21a5
5a79d016b5fac5244b770bbb7a67411dc299512b
'2011-11-18T22:05:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCO' 'sip-files00047.tif'
e37d8eca281c4037ac97a35b2106fa19
04646b3353a4d18753149f02e3e445f21ff53ff6
'2011-11-18T22:08:26-05:00'
describe
'2305' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCP' 'sip-files00047.txt'
8a70504e19c26bd42d3c8523357f80c3
8310fc05c93179d41adf62bdc492a1cc576ff1a4
'2011-11-18T22:08:31-05:00'
describe
'12292' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCQ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
d0225d4176e6978d0103066479835be8
f45f0fa4b20cff53147e0f363a66e9da15b9e728
describe
'479651' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCR' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
e6e1520b3cf1149c413d5bee00ac3ca6
08d8e0596e29a8e5b6e141af91ac6462b7138510
describe
'86830' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCS' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
ac27ca718c1749ccaec6813fc8871341
9391e5c157d9f35d1869d7a7e046f7df30b33240
describe
'28083' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCT' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8fc24a8ecdb7e7ecbbaf119a5fa9fcd4
b855e1c3c52e316931377f3926c4f7f89a9f6db4
'2011-11-18T22:07:37-05:00'
describe
'24132' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCU' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
74fe028ed19108b8e78de72f9716fded
b767433c4eb487bfb8693cd80d0bccab5cda55ab
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCV' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7553e768c71f58f478ec13d01ff88312
ef8673999ea086e1e6f3ce1d304f11215b007652
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCW' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c24f25293ff75495483d29c32d521c86
4de649200426edac7396713c1b9ec1c48263d19d
describe
'6199' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCX' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
22b62923af42e36f917a70861131d203
b82bf25738536cec7a881a5c99c7ec7159704fd0
'2011-11-18T22:09:02-05:00'
describe
'479806' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCY' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
40e31c1cea49984f7f5325d921093b1f
cad57484c07c9bb4dd4404208384fabca1049842
'2011-11-18T22:08:21-05:00'
describe
'121511' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZCZ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
53b9caa2e98917211784b91be209e655
c3e70922336e765f2da59a84ae0ce43963505fd7
describe
'44089' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDA' 'sip-files00049.pro'
6c4f86c5f1310f04adee0cf15d6cc090
6b6c692e8b6a369d6e41b5381248891345765115
describe
'35491' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDB' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
2baa63b4244213cdc864f5b618d0cd3c
16d1b54bd407f9f105f208322b2aa9b1bb0bfdb7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDC' 'sip-files00049.tif'
1b21e5fde02df5b505e502d0cbf94fa7
4da8989882b80450f95b83b424cfcaf24399377d
describe
'1822' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDD' 'sip-files00049.txt'
88ea9cfcd7e472fe9f1454686450f528
9ea3e845c7a807a264919d3ac31b38eb2e1b736c
'2011-11-18T22:07:46-05:00'
describe
'9481' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDE' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
7d6f6e6365aa8842034d264f55ef29f9
270970f7fedb0e945409e793fcc505de88858dd2
'2011-11-18T22:06:37-05:00'
describe
'479837' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDF' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
4a56253c70123c2f98c0e0feb6ef0999
96e97a0ed6758ac08a82bee56a6d5f8d1b66e2af
'2011-11-18T22:08:34-05:00'
describe
'159501' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDG' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
dbb81d249320d79b3cedcf57a8bbbf34
aa82de2336c87c2dc580ab81503e1ab8c4a41777
describe
'59412' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDH' 'sip-files00050.pro'
cf254478ea75bef2fcd8f3b0d8be72d2
98c145cc8e13922df204271248029cd2b68058fc
describe
'47738' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDI' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
6e599a5e3f519c4d7abc730671bd7d6a
a9771cc2c492024785a4e2ebf31a950daa9240db
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDJ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
fc791e00f971d931d963d5d134092aa5
bfc1fe3dc3348fded39c1996f85dbd2550506912
describe
'2335' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDK' 'sip-files00050.txt'
18f7ecd2c314e7df2ae713b13bb07f82
e0bf93b8eb0fdbd8b90b8a92df42bed21f12ecff
describe
'12197' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDL' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
d3711080b27de595a1dbae22c40fea38
6a184ad611470bf9da5e4ee49d182d3f99d89835
'2011-11-18T22:07:34-05:00'
describe
'479650' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDM' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
a1ed61132183897493f5761404ada976
74d48a6ff12f310b178fbd841dcaa29abc12e96f
describe
'158747' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDN' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
5e3d541cb4492ee5c8127f8243779575
5ea75e6eab27e51f3fe10427a745e8c328e3e4e2
describe
'58426' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDO' 'sip-files00051.pro'
063d4f19f5291c88d7717837ad8c83da
57e30e0a9d1de7e0a5a11168701cd3c6e6ab8717
describe
'47501' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
27010841f87dd4d26f8bebf18f09207e
de26f08a1db857d6ed95a13ec9e522375167f24d
'2011-11-18T22:09:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDQ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
9dac3ddd2ba3ce8592085ea6413132e1
f8a6c11929c1cf585ab1d01561f51770c88410df
'2011-11-18T22:09:40-05:00'
describe
'2303' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDR' 'sip-files00051.txt'
17040fd973b7bdf521c8ecb531f915c8
42397a36e4a506ba3deea1e0b7912e6d56c990a7
'2011-11-18T22:07:47-05:00'
describe
'12097' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDS' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
e536021300ea9e8e774a701902c92a0e
978b300444d1d48dfdd5991db3dae64e76542216
'2011-11-18T22:05:45-05:00'
describe
'480214' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDT' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
6ae0343ad25052b281dda07ae18fd416
6f17bcee3fdd33ea702d49df77ed8d64fc6f7214
describe
'151954' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDU' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
cdd3eec22c3006025e0c74c5caf5b6fb
e16437ba06c82efdcdfe4794ec098179bbf17ade
describe
'58067' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDV' 'sip-files00052.pro'
a93e5ea6446be2a73938ccabff490b38
78c8c930448afde52c094fb29b619c7567f9051d
'2011-11-18T22:10:02-05:00'
describe
'45938' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDW' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
dfb7c20fc3153b0f9eb4f99835a6b213
6af4aa692b7fdfb4cab0cc38e1147d9538584671
'2011-11-18T22:10:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDX' 'sip-files00052.tif'
4d97f2b131b79c4bcc58da22c4b40390
2cb8b9b85d88dec7b421f9c4b2ce940fe2ee5b11
'2011-11-18T22:07:15-05:00'
describe
'2307' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDY' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e6db60b80d9794f8e7fb6a08bc492255
98d4dd5d5bd6607cd2c1e36bf47f5f9f9e7d0034
'2011-11-18T22:05:27-05:00'
describe
'12121' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZDZ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
e96757953d486ff3ae46c730fcc604ce
816f0c9406ce1dc76886eb92d99dd790e3170335
'2011-11-18T22:10:17-05:00'
describe
'479897' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEA' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
32222ec133bc68070876b081035f7a0d
5944e6e370233392534d1fb202b5cb1686c5d10e
'2011-11-18T22:07:16-05:00'
describe
'155410' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEB' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
956517ac0da4ef810afcbb25a8df33be
828481226702f6eb1fc26c45b5d519badf467969
describe
'59286' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEC' 'sip-files00053.pro'
d65b65ee068ee70a523ae46deb70257e
1a882ee2b47a09bfafb55fb656deafb641ed096f
'2011-11-18T22:09:45-05:00'
describe
'47188' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZED' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
4362eaf3705959816cecb56da7a651ab
0b0c2268e1080640d8e626d519464cd695b3bda2
'2011-11-18T22:10:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEE' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ded73673f8021b44e4b75c7134aa4ae9
e4e158183a361f2a0589f79febd01b807a6315a2
describe
'2338' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEF' 'sip-files00053.txt'
32777892b9a718e8a1b011d25ffa3a02
1a147c7eb2a334f595e22ed8ae3ce09a318920dc
'2011-11-18T22:08:43-05:00'
describe
'12261' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEG' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
fcd0afbdb9685c692b0ee4067216ab40
06fbd46be245094a0df42d046f90c51e45b1b01e
'2011-11-18T22:06:47-05:00'
describe
'479877' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEH' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
8c37ac55b386ac80fec853464656e542
a27b9f80332e81379c5e7897ea48f2b10cc8960c
'2011-11-18T22:06:12-05:00'
describe
'152550' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEI' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
49005bb36e16899e0c773d21b188728b
0647d7cbe68dc67879d9c5bfdc073a27598dec8c
'2011-11-18T22:07:05-05:00'
describe
'58431' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEJ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
02305ef35605e362cb56054801d0f0d9
7612e5172385923cac46809a6e60f721582c7888
describe
'45818' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEK' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
ffb97ffae4c640a8d8ed51ae58e59b15
57c16f41e576b9d241d0c7f0a8c5dcb453db2d5b
'2011-11-18T22:07:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEL' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b1ab61e87a8f4712dbc092320ecd36fe
c4293233eea267e42a2e634b8a5a94f6d84c650e
describe
'2298' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEM' 'sip-files00054.txt'
b12ebda08b4f6712c6710a602f7cced8
ceee8c56910675ac36c000bd3702bd02af8474bf
'2011-11-18T22:05:11-05:00'
describe
'12250' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEN' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
930ef67ad249878d8a701098f06ce1e8
50e6598ed6bf767f90c037b281be498f79fb9b64
'2011-11-18T22:05:29-05:00'
describe
'479882' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEO' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
3b0bcc36a0ec880d3128cf1a0a725248
5242284ae21c1a3e5ac0ec21e303f3b1bf82106e
'2011-11-18T22:07:03-05:00'
describe
'138809' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
8d12926923b19d63911d99641d9677e0
49d85ec010d35cdcd670939ab6af0fb1833afb77
'2011-11-18T22:06:09-05:00'
describe
'52525' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEQ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
59096996a436df046ed180d48b34c00a
909f95068aaa6805e6fe81a1fe22c3dd54e1e209
describe
'40971' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZER' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
938761ef3d9b7022393c5bbeb5c06da9
dd8bdbd33f9f7dabdeff16e80036b0dd10ac829f
'2011-11-18T22:04:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZES' 'sip-files00055.tif'
4f415664aefedd1e6f9f492069592ba0
27e710dcd0d46b9197e7dc5e1e6dde9fcf87eb20
'2011-11-18T22:09:07-05:00'
describe
'2066' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZET' 'sip-files00055.txt'
d6a05aa25d441fa1815d5070ee4be0e2
a5483596278500bee21a633b30e92ce603bb6de0
describe
'10734' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEU' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
969df34c394296f49df9a5e7433e79ca
770daa4565fc8f93f830a0daefe2f5c7c026c2fe
describe
'479704' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEV' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
a8f7fba83f9bb38c9e845b2fff405c14
11adb6eed3125c5456dc704d807bfe68e503e9f8
describe
'115951' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEW' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
815c56870bc5dccaa46ac7938a4cf71f
3e296445ea8a3f49193e0de0e90e74d1e68cd8c4
describe
'43679' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEX' 'sip-files00056.pro'
b5cae922d4f64990c0560ae704822e0d
c3df555dc2a823806222b734ab597410a909be42
describe
'34359' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
aab93129746fccf552bde1a429306a6a
75c09bad3789cbab19b15ed184f05f6b430187a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZEZ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
090042255673aa0929d7ceb1829ea0fc
f53531232b1e87ee497ecb577dfea081a6cc09b6
'2011-11-18T22:08:10-05:00'
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
984f6c175e28d59320f1354de203e13e
e5be30bac27b7f558a993ce6cfa4c8f0e8e4e9a5
describe
'9033' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
8c6fc6a8d943f9b7da9b91008cefa88e
2f6bccb426df72df58bb671b88af345c80008af9
describe
'479740' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
42b63da52264f7625ab325a1c1e86bba
f9dacdf5f56eb6f7f955218ea306663f57edd371
describe
'158697' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFD' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
01b898eb9da3e01213d7bb49aba97b17
d1e05789734eea06c6894ef1e7545c772a304480
describe
'61664' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8a2f3d085cacc78b97f2b60c438e8be6
541ad359b4c57c5468e368ffd05f465c9a1a313b
describe
'47599' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
6a35cad8a5e53f8df8facff1094cdea9
b376d70bd50207ca1b472fb345f5574544214444
'2011-11-18T22:08:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
080b03656d5929ca244f1b7068cc4018
68b0ddcc30cb43ea2bb3273a082fd53cafdf3225
'2011-11-18T22:07:27-05:00'
describe
'2433' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
f6acd758cecc576e407f0d00d642ff53
11e6486ce4f9b85b7fe8484333b6f76552dd6354
describe
'12059' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFI' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
13c259e669800fe27c161244e5773f33
4a3879525e13e700f14beb65059e4d6c1cbc97fe
'2011-11-18T22:07:06-05:00'
describe
'480213' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
77cc494bab874b8719338b3a0a268722
2d48c03e63066459dba6547e1d4d64e6f68a0641
describe
'165494' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
ddae91eb58f2646781ba98be097052d1
e5ffd15e157c8d805c7480418bd17ea58e40e4fc
'2011-11-18T22:10:10-05:00'
describe
'62118' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFL' 'sip-files00058.pro'
faccc7a74eca9c17c2967317909682f0
781315e614c8e48fbdfcacdab3d3eef768b20487
describe
'47731' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFM' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
d9220fb3610147e5d397071c2dd53719
7fc45dbcbaf2cdb678ab5a61eb5d8401a126b156
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
5c2df9af1ef34040abb55d409a3eb18c
6433465cd89b83c4c9a68b29db929271acb6ff18
describe
'2431' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFO' 'sip-files00058.txt'
683f7cc8201c26b1b121ba143daaf9d0
6681be3cfc05d0a259129c42ba7f3c331621a0c1
describe
'11987' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFP' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
5c1b214cdd92753d95b5a89e9d3a0bdf
1ea703a265a1fe0362639c92c8cec99a821145fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFQ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
866c451f0d9e0f7781c65d9e817157ae
f1e945df32236435ec11f390615e690ac01369ac
describe
'166615' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFR' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
ccce9f4e5021ec45b3c61e144c6fc344
d4f154999668b41b54e640914272f1abfcc132ff
describe
'63002' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFS' 'sip-files00059.pro'
0a01d801b20250b468eef5d9923ec8ee
9f2c42a32576b5a3ef8f5dc2ab7a15e5e4b5de63
describe
'48650' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFT' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
49bbc364ffcdfae23225aae27274f1b4
db7be33cf3f49cb488f7dda671610bfee34408d8
'2011-11-18T22:10:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFU' 'sip-files00059.tif'
bce630ea71caaa5045915a6686d4d533
b99acc86ec8983201f9decd80f916b0a887ed694
describe
'2467' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFV' 'sip-files00059.txt'
16745aeaf0dca91c30c7e3e5a9143b2a
82770fcc5fc083729348507e4bbe4b98f17e7a74
describe
'12436' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFW' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
5d57a01c5139e9f15b09cc7007be951c
6bbcbd2cee940c40e5cc8025276ca6bb5b851b36
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFX' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
558331da0ca5620e669f928f4adee38a
114695066edddfb1e8e29e5b0f4ee51501e6f84b
'2011-11-18T22:06:25-05:00'
describe
'155626' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFY' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
3df17e7f7dada4359c27d39088f68322
7702e919af593fefef246b3af3b40f3d4bcd8ecd
'2011-11-18T22:05:09-05:00'
describe
'58114' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZFZ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
bfb036d62f708f48f300c798d6672948
ea4c7f45a7b3f9af7b72e2871a5e5d97fe7fc4a5
describe
'47466' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGA' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
9b9938c63d3afb4158e609c52b4be0f8
883223527ada42d3067897b0f23a82f8293d387e
'2011-11-18T22:06:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGB' 'sip-files00060.tif'
b691b6d287c744179a3f67363fa7b9d1
c3223e6995595f6cdb7c6daab709b847f8662b37
describe
'2293' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGC' 'sip-files00060.txt'
f0700f6507f972bbdbc210eb29c87de2
1d64d659382b8ee4f80c85cbaa7b3f301cffc253
describe
'12685' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGD' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
20d38245522dabf6c206ab981037a601
3490c880a691f82085913dfda3ff4ed59aa6ec73
describe
'479891' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGE' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
77b40cc9092d3633388773b18d9c1689
c2844a5806c15960459447a99f5aa3c66a4c0cc5
describe
'153472' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
2ae4bf1361bc34b4839ed23e52bebb36
47ab546d218c1b0c4a8dd3c04cd4d9a6a94aed46
describe
'58408' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGG' 'sip-files00061.pro'
01af0670b11d1dcdc8858306fea9cb43
e332539bc4a321d7aca6e8c5f1cca55564b8866c
describe
'45751' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
fe94593bfa9b241b39f60a9d05da2718
3c77927bfc394bacefa884bc50049cbcb6f3cc89
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGI' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f4943b0c096c22a56aa4e384e41452b7
73c0648e4d20efd3cfd09805663fa46ca417172b
'2011-11-18T22:10:42-05:00'
describe
'2299' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGJ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
6c2955c50cb5cf426523c9d4336c92cb
a35bc9e37cd457c1ff511b03808b324645416b28
describe
'11834' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGK' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
fb430f15cfb27951e45f5619d337d526
d05799678debcc59c10234de8a4ab26d7c2d022e
describe
'480124' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGL' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
58944a1902ccfff1215c30ffbdd10f7e
c781cbb92a30f0815db2f080fab3842749addc95
describe
'37145' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
7323e88467f8480b7d4ce602243937ca
95c0845cd82d4d764c5c2b160152bacfbd2461a5
describe
'10553' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGN' 'sip-files00062.pro'
28efb0b05885594697e2c128d66eaa4e
b92cd63a6875df96f9f1d385b39422bc693cdfca
describe
'10907' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGO' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
5be2cff74a32faee6fa3cda48476ef47
f6ce3f7c2ba997eef8247a6841cf37ccb4667b7a
'2011-11-18T22:06:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3029345dcb2d1a5306161af66d8bd2a2
7a5cf059530353ac38da839c06b22ae86ee8e383
describe
'429' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGQ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
3e7488bcda3a6f7cb324c249d6f38e93
5b38e9710f28b50a1c5c8b5f350215605bb296d5
'2011-11-18T22:07:53-05:00'
describe
'3058' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGR' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
ee2870042cb135cee4aa93a22ccb0a3b
2fd0e7db1601c8ed915cc88a0b3a640192eca92b
'2011-11-18T22:08:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
4d962cda7b6402c6a8e355b5cbf76ab7
9558957106e6f083a438279328ad5b0e59339dde
'2011-11-18T22:08:25-05:00'
describe
'118375' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGT' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
21158022188e6492ec4b578420df91e0
29e86e9f6d7faee028c740ac36eb06c0059a597b
'2011-11-18T22:09:43-05:00'
describe
'44574' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGU' 'sip-files00063.pro'
1f69879967d41bcc92fafe1196c4d46c
ee2543993e1746b18d647591b8b71baf9bbd969c
describe
'35829' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGV' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
9153cd0bb8821faf51c003e8c82793ca
d4690d02b6edc12fc229e2e422d3e6defcc14ae5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
5e48910d92a46310d5474f546a2c7f30
367f3f241e8338ebbee80021d84a47ed448b07ce
'2011-11-18T22:10:00-05:00'
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
67ee5ddf8c6e12c96eb071fab06fb127
f6641cf99e8232958dd2bb39f725f3bc642b06a5
describe
'9719' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGY' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
f6016d83bd7f165d015db777c1368cfb
180c68cdf6f2646e07dbfcea005887f5b1df01ca
describe
'479657' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZGZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
72cd09ed66ad532615babe58b03ebf1c
fee42d8c04723852d0971995e6d4de8a25361436
describe
'151462' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
14b2373b1280abda8ea5af5c753c00ab
1f23427c08fa2f8b216309b94e195f2ffd520d73
'2011-11-18T22:05:10-05:00'
describe
'57502' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
458502168f6e894778754deb84bcabed
ec59afdb3de85313480d6c2c191bb4b57de2582a
describe
'44975' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
16079d0157ededbfa8ceb5fe2cb30c2f
7ba61f345fba5cfd04c88f7ce9108fd0abb51db9
'2011-11-18T22:09:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHD' 'sip-files00064.tif'
eee6fb3b5f780e012ba02ca456bc71f4
17e15cb7718a8c5f5e69644cb3860309eb014e37
'2011-11-18T22:06:05-05:00'
describe
'2272' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
6b9f29217915dc84477873bd075fd6c8
1e6dd83dafc6da95abf45bad9d1ca21ca8c29eab
describe
'11743' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
8ca18fd3b8c3fa65f41b75ddebea9ec6
83ecbaf0617a76a0cdc806f4589d1e639a8cb95d
'2011-11-18T22:05:46-05:00'
describe
'479670' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
bc403ded18e8afecfb1aff401742eafd
a646387b76f3f4f6f2c47546e8468cd31e5499e2
describe
'156078' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
61059fee86e9d77665c251c5a801b22a
c9906b5e1616401d22869227c18ad4c86c1a0ae4
describe
'58589' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
820f70f4f03bb6349785dede0ee37353
33bb7ef42aba221a82c83f5b3f71ebd428577a8a
describe
'47409' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
c9767431bd96d33c92d2d62c882d7e1e
61e8fade76fb1c5de0bb083eed50da99ebf709b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
f74495d3b7302c15e9d2b0bdf8ec7b91
b06b84c96691f09dd9a3156726fafe3e63c20cec
describe
'2313' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
bf0345e8c03b4f41c0385fff6398297f
e14b2adc36f583f8160211efce697f8fd5fea0d9
describe
'12194' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
49b54a6b1d9ca6644f9365e76139c269
cc1808246ba00697c6b108b443fbedff6849cd09
'2011-11-18T22:09:06-05:00'
describe
'479870' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
7a89948ef4393ed4cfbe492b7e1d9e81
8254a4fc81996aa7032c3cab2e86f817bc35dd64
describe
'149866' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
92524bc8bb49e61b88913a8ed428da5c
7590c58090f867fa6545727722cbbe8dfd58338a
describe
'57052' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
ea952245d8cf94c7343d205e456965d7
b1ed3128fa52cd94962ee997e3c5d14b5ade726e
'2011-11-18T22:05:59-05:00'
describe
'45711' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
e056eadf8264fa0f029c22a573580d06
8a831372d72e19a4a078e7a5362ebf4ea7ab3929
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
7b9e758dbc169ad59131a130b0882082
19405b62c969a7ab415c505cffb31b5db790846d
describe
'2263' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHS' 'sip-files00066.txt'
933ccd38eb121bc312606c63d125b01f
302ec78082e17d18b0f9b799b63b9a4099701639
describe
'12028' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHT' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
b535e0cc49ad50c8c7c57f000e678851
244e3d0103fcd6656edcd1d88cb3c56adb6c3c33
'2011-11-18T22:08:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
7974244353fd5fc68cb020dc9ec956be
011d71e7ef772011c449df2e2791481ea228a1be
'2011-11-18T22:07:26-05:00'
describe
'133835' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
edb8cc2206db58a831352c667945019b
e97ebf610f4abd4d3a3b87782703fc96ccd62b81
'2011-11-18T22:09:30-05:00'
describe
'48649' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
794fc03f8f2b16ebc5915a012f8f4ee0
699fafa7c2e9e7c8fccb30489da18e0570cec6b3
describe
'39757' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6d52f28d93dd0af94135600a7140e9e0
72ac32f13fe5589ece17460cd50e18aa2221f859
'2011-11-18T22:06:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
37c38e92e5f63659522a82cc9a503333
bce1dd772176ea920b83928223e7c3f7fdb268ae
describe
'1922' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZHZ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
be5cb6b77b208f1066902bc50822a92a
34ca2caa488b522fa5d0aeefb795cc1867cda5ff
describe
'10212' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
98551a30c79913fdc34a72b8af82ee16
e001ced1c558fd16ea1816124fadada8e1f47cca
describe
'479709' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
7def04fe71065388fd2016f2d0e2a1c4
2372339e27e395cd449560209def37827972bcd6
'2011-11-18T22:07:51-05:00'
describe
'115796' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
cd31fb679f9431261855eed1654c500f
b348b902f5bbd5bafa1b5997b3da6604782bf71a
describe
'42079' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZID' 'sip-files00068.pro'
9ec92d8f85256a4e516a350c7d2d8878
d5d4a4fac5d727435e92a29f75b117543aed90f7
'2011-11-18T22:06:33-05:00'
describe
'34251' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b1bba75f0e84146b17a74e3757388164
47d0e4d34ec9b5c39a9b2956d009defe57ded472
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
89c9024c3b68e495e907244a0b7d0822
a719b7144fc0b7e91923f62aa810dca2fa05cac6
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
3b98e652dc8767bd37a5e0fb3a4866f5
6f973b994448764164b6e7bb9afc355a92a23d64
describe
'9137' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
f42fb94e9a499a9d933c238e8897d4f8
213f280122b728b7d225b27a5068ada24a49722a
describe
'479697' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZII' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
21973f2452447538eab17a8d9fcf8dae
39422ecbcc413aa2965435a0b951dcbe580bfcc9
describe
'161967' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
3ce906098b702cb3ebbe24b637443969
811f71fd3ffa8f5fb0ee138dd81f614cda49541e
describe
'59738' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
23e8ee07c00638d785037c90822a54d3
50f6c7e647b7e75c03159937543489628ffdb58b
describe
'47915' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
a94a97278e8953d128cbcfabecec84da
5b5f1ade21cbce163cb7db739ea6ed78a9c2b913
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
8c08245b622bb77d870f631981232bf7
6c0a4fc0f5c3c9cbe9cac28d283a6e94da1ffdba
describe
'2349' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
64ae28df665ebb2bbf580dbdde2993bd
579b35a0652e3a73533851638fd7e6146bd101a3
describe
'12184' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
2ff59c3f6ae2f9feb2ee57f4018e66d6
8d39c8c0e30b91ae2d57e775cec3b81c72352037
describe
'479889' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
2c4b91561539959f653d8ccadd1afd32
5aecf0766b2d54ffa92300ae1bd29c8a1ad9bc8a
describe
'160181' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
aebc2eb6cd03728d5073eb63d9bf5b9f
f6a485bb9efe9a3548596e9739c359b1d53e67ca
describe
'59114' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
39279554c949e5470a97ce775bbef22a
3ee24362c49169eabe3a15211a2773f3b17dc86b
describe
'46974' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
7004465a973dfa6f2f981bdae0f178f0
a5ec89a0fd6c366fac702247e3680c1778989f6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e824320665fd12fe6a09929da41b46b3
bb7f1082cc97e0c5816d605149572a191639a75f
describe
'2323' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
4ca6de8569a13a59dad5ce4083246416
211cb3e82b4c043ab2e94e3816a3f57f14d08102
'2011-11-18T22:04:54-05:00'
describe
'12065' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
1026cedbf6cdfa3c59b7f10c28625eba
105bb5c701dcaab471a2c7de94a208c816b46cf2
describe
'480024' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
aa61888275422298bf8de01b9b6441cd
902c234f8e392c4a88f6a9bdd52f331ea5082624
describe
'161304' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
6da703f2dd3f4f88cd50ef642d2ba05c
ee2b7fb360dd064c0e3572f1e5b751953330dd8e
describe
'59007' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
0ce983978f4ed5f440e839879d2ed3af
624dfaec6c1f7b8fda8df99245000adad48ba406
'2011-11-18T22:06:14-05:00'
describe
'47336' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZIZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
3c6eacf7299ab01131629b6d852b6a71
1a8ef682c7d7069a33e5058311d527e3dd45ccaa
'2011-11-18T22:05:03-05:00'
describe
'3856980' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
5fba9d52cc3929a1afb7f5df75f76645
ddfe25514db38b5c782a15f9069ab9163f5ae169
describe
'2320' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
73e81751125c92c3ecb90bd58a44043a
7bfc266f1deaa10f52b910a3fb64fd1085fc7702
describe
'12211' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
4c1595b190e59e5de8d2b718608291db
ebff1158c146fab3113eba8c777eec2d5ddf748f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
870de648fdab998fe0b136a704e8815a
df6533dd205bc0e3867c1160bbd9f6272809febd
describe
'156781' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5c6d24f8f84583d2dff5b2e36f223f0d
888168800519775b7984abd769104ee0ef08ef81
'2011-11-18T22:10:14-05:00'
describe
'59910' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
7a90bcd558177fc68dfa556841568989
de17a5ce1af5616f1547a74d44487ac9f0da1f34
describe
'46298' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
5cda7e153cac54583fae1d2665911ac1
2b0ee8b8415f259be7822146f91b41704d9d7a1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
83905007d392a2e51c6a05cde79a78e0
15c54c32dd8bc885fa1496e17ef7bb86d39da3a9
'2011-11-18T22:08:09-05:00'
describe
'2352' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
6f8c4d50a36343f15019b668f9af3b5e
b548fb276c5ba792819bb47554598cbb825f9e7b
'2011-11-18T22:05:14-05:00'
describe
'11738' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
aaabe08dfe8f3cf04e0bd8f824bcc68a
bbed60ccf602d621760b20867cdb79c6c5497ac4
'2011-11-18T22:07:13-05:00'
describe
'479857' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
7a5bdb900444821e841a7b0ba1a4921a
7a2d173bc5900d060654d907b26871adf6bea0ae
describe
'156606' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
28ad2b6b41cacd3502eed485e834e020
ccc7a0b3223cd08700727b3809855c03d070e6c1
describe
'59782' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
0ec3764ffb633b05641dfcb9b15ba8c1
8b46baf93e6358bb95a834cf9e7d17a3540852b0
'2011-11-18T22:07:10-05:00'
describe
'45424' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f9206813eeb2177b8b769b5d63efb9e7
ede8d093ee648345c4037b8a3fa33c8ee855c7ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
5465d38712b32619abac67923809ca68
4b97f63be472539ec691f1a34c05361438d50b6b
describe
'2359' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
aeda9b291a0e31ed358f799dd35a1e60
aae01a331407be8fcdbf8f795701d28471ac4ca4
'2011-11-18T22:09:22-05:00'
describe
'11939' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
43040b71a8bce348761cad0b46cdc9ba
73d6f0f31dd8b75f5a10f2af3ce9a96de7a4eab6
describe
'479898' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
1b5f0e6a73bd1bb161f246f2a142c24d
5155ffa51fc65a88af8fa88c09180855d69488cb
'2011-11-18T22:10:26-05:00'
describe
'158501' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
d722d3afc6fcd0f75d132f4c286a44d6
aba67d168465e04293b9ab8966bd2622881e4730
describe
'59398' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
7559a1745bf8bab7d0eff4989db88849
82a780595745671b9c6a6a95b24526e497303496
describe
'47096' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
7bd934cc31492bc39899afb38056d3ac
1ee6e8b7fbd1d8f29ae1c8ba8eec2c1293931cf1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
7465d346e7a725aeabe266f71a186c6a
13b63a8b76b58e23e7d7347ee5527518e92cafe4
describe
'2342' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJW' 'sip-files00074.txt'
70a29fc01cf218d7d999852bb31ad34a
12cecfcedc7d23d4fb7e0c83dcb4fe7b0d2bbb34
'2011-11-18T22:09:09-05:00'
describe
'12144' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJX' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
17f528dd9d427830a3a747ee76a75322
811a740f2aff8f09316860e607a1f3aeb7830871
describe
'479627' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJY' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
96fd07010f439f84a5a3644921f42de8
d7c37eb587170d79b858376940eb7e47ff0e8b3a
describe
'154491' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZJZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
37f8c504db671626d81a2ebef7e7a9f9
a1c619a77d63d51e85f5b13b6a2602a4d67e45b3
describe
'57398' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
b67cc435f8bfce0ea1fe3d06dbc9755f
55b08c0543c90cb460bed69af21eaaea5832049a
'2011-11-18T22:10:24-05:00'
describe
'46712' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a9bc82e8df74a0e18e5d7203e891e75c
d5a5ef7f4703036fcdc990d13bd6935912597a83
'2011-11-18T22:06:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
13f022e0890bab4cfef8619ffc9e3295
430c117341c968817ecdc266e0129c47ea79dcab
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKD' 'sip-files00075.txt'
10fd5212747e5c036953313c24132f5f
08af2d478d54d5491f6bd95579079d67f2581976
describe
'12072' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
18db3fd5517c384d09dba04d3d0dd2be
55c86230f629c8dbe50b1d4a58307e792b6ff70f
describe
'479652' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
175cfead576aacb9d72dfb069cd7ca6a
fdb24c709a0d8d6e4307e006612320edffff6f13
'2011-11-18T22:06:41-05:00'
describe
'156039' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
5da423d038ce99e99047426b20ececf6
45382c56a063e35a70f3a003612aaae649717612
describe
'58909' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
eb17fd305a7134215794774d3da2f62c
8c97a7b4cc41d01c9bae14df9a686d440c39161a
describe
'47288' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
09429e800aa01458531d7882d8d5cb58
8f7a16597798d95ebbab2f8bfb36078477f9aa98
'2011-11-18T22:06:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
8d73237643e2e3c30c1f8b95efc99176
c1a26d0407acf8b9c3240be71748d4f61d875bc3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
2ae772527e89d56b324c8fec5fb30915
ed59a3c7a83fadd0e5227444ae73f494514922b4
describe
'12303' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKL' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
80046c97fd864f4b37299ab319c89efe
2d9acc4315e3374f500f9955b97971b4704b5a1e
describe
'479784' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
e2681e5e39da23d01418adfb7350065a
25f01e5aeb61ef5ac9ce66757c068806f70ef605
describe
'134202' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
299a30d92361dd9720bfdc0c05ef6e91
415ce94ab773ff2ca6ddb32f55b6a6af8c473437
describe
'3689' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
a1071bac0c950d287ad1d75b38c47669
1f4f8353dfafe8d7e519e388c84ffb272b5ad854
'2011-11-18T22:08:38-05:00'
describe
'35325' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
586d1c77cfec48acc0ade945f5883b7d
034f4c8713afe6a0511f1ab477e9db3a817d9355
'2011-11-18T22:10:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
bb14663ecc6e6bb1d365db43d3a20442
dab1e96184cd7196615f94a387dd7dedea6c7f12
'2011-11-18T22:05:02-05:00'
describe
'231' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
e40291c95f0a40d3e9edaa61f38ca4ab
bc98e262e659b949cc1bd319a3d980dc335b985e
describe
Invalid character
'10047' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
bf06e9e25aeb868edc51b617d4961a27
0506e6f7f019c350ca54004a1342859cdf971a9f
describe
'480212' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKT' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
baacd43a570eb3eb42381a879694f02a
9ea6afc79c0968a589841ad1b3927636e5e068a9
describe
'156401' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKU' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
38db1bf7824270ae703bc16b0b3f3c14
43cf5bdd7bea030125a273c53cba5eca1b79d000
describe
'58339' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKV' 'sip-files00079.pro'
13c10af5b087938cdfdba1a16a1f84a5
6be1cd42b3e30f3fd9d84a19e56b92fec7e2a55e
describe
'47103' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKW' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
bb674c83c7742c3010d5732a03a15a72
a103c35d34b07ef58a1d1dde7daba36dfb6f92da
'2011-11-18T22:11:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKX' 'sip-files00079.tif'
f1eed696ca934bcd82fd4ecf30d04429
40329f7253fc3f01e44f712f3f3cff97ed52973b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKY' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f60c61fc4e650b0cc038a5f0a00d3ec5
274a84e484f0e49d1735b8ae99bb0c22d8c69b7a
describe
'12441' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZKZ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
521058196d1b58c158e9b301e45cee7a
5ec613d8a4775665122975b9e8f1432d86f2fe3b
describe
'479880' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLA' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
4a5f0f7e96ff6f65ad6aef9cc1155bce
90e3208ce3362a291ed19c49299db6a3eacb4190
'2011-11-18T22:09:44-05:00'
describe
'158041' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLB' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
76442d742d6814d5ca6c593c82ff08ff
f1f84e30ee2d16b0f0aa36b72f0bf6ab41da704e
describe
'59630' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLC' 'sip-files00080.pro'
c37d5ead6ca8bcf6cbb105c5937733dd
896b85b9fb8a126635f984053dbd8c98470710f5
describe
'47352' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLD' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
967a94e95cb512db27b08edeae3b878b
3f255d21f629c32fc656e9577eb50c961008a93d
'2011-11-18T22:06:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLE' 'sip-files00080.tif'
807e74bea944723a9f919ea58bc03fd1
db0dbd8a438ff1a050cd74387a76486ebf138a73
'2011-11-18T22:10:59-05:00'
describe
'2346' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLF' 'sip-files00080.txt'
3c03dabceb5ef99b8e21c153ad01976c
240b0da7d22db998ab9fcc51bcc2d836f74ebbe1
describe
'12449' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLG' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
7d93c9d0e929468abb5a4a89b7ff4939
a08ae89d75bba71985d391331edb1b390b5e1ee4
'2011-11-18T22:09:33-05:00'
describe
'479859' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLH' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
bf10f82fd5ac9e11aa0bf4f06b7bf50a
a0dda676d469d3b96dfeb51744e5a82bcb4af7a6
describe
'147430' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLI' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
070ed0015922d795736491b8abeb1b59
4e7983e2be256a6b655534023759d662c6fb616f
describe
'54756' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLJ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
7438dd905ab08dddd8df69cf85a09d06
8f6f3e8b9c8ebf230a9a03867122e7a6fdd26fe7
describe
'43480' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLK' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
9072b89606865d83161e66d5a03d4e7e
2d458a576b10faa9e2c4fd1397e7013bf84c1fc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLL' 'sip-files00081.tif'
ebe1b1e2c8ca757fa0ce4192903e2b84
6932cc430eae8d638f9e2446c93b8ac82f2a67f6
describe
'2150' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLM' 'sip-files00081.txt'
1033b33491689b5362f5a9be42ba05a7
5fd60e97fc9b3eb56e769d3c2f136c18c943abe9
describe
'11434' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLN' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
d187b5713db4ccc4275b7480da3da3b9
8aecb1d08312ce91a1ecf15202c169f3418f3e7a
describe
'479825' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLO' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
c2018fc90a63d7e9a6f71f9ad3c3012c
10c563c3931d275279ce311bef5c965b915c32bb
describe
'121475' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLP' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
79e4ec89c9271e124cf5911bb821965f
a4ca73fc3c797c6fabea7077d0657d99136e029d
describe
'44313' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLQ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6f9cb70eafadd9b6720703da37e01615
30f3b8ad336af5fccc405e010cfa114116ad4ba9
describe
'36449' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLR' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
bd523de58df4b64c2cd5740de17ba64a
1cdc8da6e16ea27016fe3c11bb536be6a741d2e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLS' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3eff9ce3e1cdb92f675cc842e8cd31c0
b79fc8897ecdca3a785ade138a52f5e36cde9c77
'2011-11-18T22:06:46-05:00'
describe
'1815' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLT' 'sip-files00082.txt'
7eca54e50e517e37f26d61cfa0d6f456
fa4b46fe6be82f1da5b40df57cc43e8c241fbf25
describe
'9501' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLU' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
832b2422821ddd0cc8f2d7784e7e7f9a
5df019def600dec9ec076c1ef653fec69f68eaae
'2011-11-18T22:10:53-05:00'
describe
'479703' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLV' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
65d0a8fd3f6b472f69add85f8d063801
f20f1d646a74f831c82b4f768348cc369a78ba02
'2011-11-18T22:10:18-05:00'
describe
'159432' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLW' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
5239ef993771217713089a8110d4f7cb
0789f7133f3ad159b2a6390d34368a35c1e8a59f
describe
'59770' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLX' 'sip-files00083.pro'
2526948642a15fbaf552600a111fcc8e
592503324be3ce888363bb7a8cea038a7d6fc422
'2011-11-18T22:10:30-05:00'
describe
'47538' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLY' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
a81b06d41f5b5f66f3fc2663a8627678
0d33ecf52efa63cec7e9dfdff46c675ee6fec8d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZLZ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
2a8d625a98d890749ca8d9663a6a1a83
5490c934d62f3fc7a79995a496a4684c9f5ceef7
'2011-11-18T22:07:19-05:00'
describe
'2355' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMA' 'sip-files00083.txt'
ec02346833303501e65b1aee39261fbc
fe6a30d857b0baaf06f9203ad244c49bbec22148
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMB' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
155488a3313028e3cd693452dcc5ff85
b70409330404c1ca89d5a4d5e98b58c1549c221c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMC' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
e282c6c6f6c2347aa02af4e2937f5028
954bbf0c55848414c1cade3211038941eb877f61
'2011-11-18T22:06:48-05:00'
describe
'153261' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMD' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
d74c69ad9e4ec7d3d04cbbf9a3a3b150
33cfb84743117fb60a892a6baf82a5db3e752f1e
describe
'59017' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZME' 'sip-files00084.pro'
8ee01dac6c15c8a5453348bce3daed4b
77a7a83fa4d05feca5cff934962d887eccc5f7cb
describe
'46068' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMF' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
362253d9d7816cf4b2d2604b5717aaca
b341dd2cf3134fd57d1ff56405fac0acdc7071e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMG' 'sip-files00084.tif'
295f14e19cc118a8141ff6a7a946a064
23c41b0ff27434db7b4538c332e0b98c4297bd3a
'2011-11-18T22:08:45-05:00'
describe
'2321' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMH' 'sip-files00084.txt'
26f0ef98a684da8725099b0263642ded
575edc7804d4bee55c5236a1b27125f6d2bca6f1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMI' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
12a27bdafcf6f22b3cc9d56adf27ecf7
ccf40641267b65e73f2760b86a80dc761d793855
describe
'479663' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
6a4edb2ee7166cd64996a1eb3df7d286
0e427e91833c28cc839dd217fdad828941bb97be
describe
'90847' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMK' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
73de013fba02783b29e43011a7e0cda8
f79657a1c4abe4b741f375209c7caf90f4acf3e0
describe
'32764' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZML' 'sip-files00085.pro'
127cd152bad41e33d7c5a616cb29409c
850eb1c0aef670ee3542ca2e152481a6b170f5fc
describe
'26509' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMM' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1a3195f41d078f99a6737960f2b91576
90fe13187fd9b3b24d9eb961351e38157243a559
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMN' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f80824339e414df1d92b4bd7adcb1326
de94909cb88effb0248573b1b4d0b01f9978bb08
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMO' 'sip-files00085.txt'
e6b512af4487d100c90a9cd05a060ae5
dfe385a2c61844cab589ff20bb8b99603841dd98
'2011-11-18T22:06:56-05:00'
describe
'7047' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMP' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
a56fbd3b300ef3c4be4347168b2ae391
1cb27e1e94da2fa2084e3453dbf9a5367dd9fc08
'2011-11-18T22:09:10-05:00'
describe
'479668' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMQ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
2d05052d7a5eae437ab96f4419ce9ede
8ec2131f7e00677d9c5b6f36f2891af6f83b5039
'2011-11-18T22:08:57-05:00'
describe
'110870' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMR' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
4d31564195599f53d15cbce0a7bf7cea
007ac0c4737758d3351adcdd205a87f013056207
describe
'41337' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMS' 'sip-files00086.pro'
e8c53d82d1992d7ab553fec139e383e4
ea9ad4c9ebfbaf5f3f8d1b39944d376defde70ba
'2011-11-18T22:08:52-05:00'
describe
'32570' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMT' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
4ee20c2367277df6191903ca010781ac
11aaed99f234627c3b63755245868fd1394d2794
'2011-11-18T22:08:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMU' 'sip-files00086.tif'
8cb1f72cf8573f3d79ca463629ba23f8
b127db54335a5c224e99aeb2b1a2048cb6163164
'2011-11-18T22:09:55-05:00'
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMV' 'sip-files00086.txt'
b6d87d7080282ef1f6979b95cae75734
bf31eaf22017abdcccf6b460304d67ba7b1ead7b
describe
'8765' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMW' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
bd15132f4474e0cabcb30e143d613bfc
6433d7dfe93872d3348aff7fd2910d7ebe95a8e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMX' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
bb6a1ecf00c4cf4cc0e44be06a45e870
7b7dc0d2a2df7a957bedf35c17a25446003139bc
describe
'157238' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMY' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
91a5afbc7d95e2011a1f683f5abc91d6
07d15fd09b9b8a71417326105c4e091ab643ac56
describe
'60593' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZMZ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
f832dbe8ac64a4d1727fd64ec0b2ed41
6f828ffb0ab04175cf89c215b8b622d3874f7ae6
describe
'45859' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNA' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
36bb95b75d096a53d3baaf29216de2dc
1a35767f9e6c893a2cdcc667b86978ac32989765
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNB' 'sip-files00087.tif'
a02db9f37d31b74973616de5e323fe6d
6a691e01c25dbba336f86ca91df00479e5397825
describe
'2405' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNC' 'sip-files00087.txt'
0eeabf69ced7b1df99a392c1984b1624
37b4e9ed4f578802f62497db763385463938842b
describe
'11804' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZND' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
fb3278e9dee9585cc24191d207ee9db6
25d714bd83be6a0b966aa6c5107cd93b88364926
describe
'479893' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNE' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
a13e0e3257c7c3bcc29000b44b7a65db
9d380467d8a33ba85c83a219193b699314782f65
'2011-11-18T22:07:45-05:00'
describe
'141554' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNF' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
a91547616a71a938fbb159a11cb95185
bec1e5b5e432229173a478993eb89c901935e8aa
describe
'52075' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNG' 'sip-files00088.pro'
7aa17fd43e1bfeb85008bb0a2076971a
85000c8541806199845bc915258ee4e71c7a3f1a
describe
'41694' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNH' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
0014356d2547a46b7797c10e9f3f9505
e8b338b6f16a840e212bbd8569aa4dff04703be8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNI' 'sip-files00088.tif'
d1c7be2869145ea4449808f7142608b9
0019c581fbc68d428c6fc6301b899f83b300f319
'2011-11-18T22:08:39-05:00'
describe
'2067' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNJ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
862e810fedb0da61346ada706d6380bd
e90e80d23cb838cc98072d92a0a053134798e21a
describe
'11325' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNK' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
724376ab2eddf76d08d6ccf6a7a6ac2f
884c63fbb2c383417e7ade41923b3c7f9adf7702
describe
'479678' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNL' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ffdd5a1b18d30aac33278ebb4fe286bb
9cfeb594505dd47e15a15f78e998dfdceafe2d07
'2011-11-18T22:08:03-05:00'
describe
'157595' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNM' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
f4397b29ca22a7f56d122b2715871603
0d3846f9164441adb47742726baaca66efceb1a0
describe
'58531' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNN' 'sip-files00089.pro'
71718c434d5ae1a89b9337a46dc89334
4598d226eadaf2cce5c07522a019ef7638d1a64a
describe
'46795' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNO' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
78f56c89aede4176d2ce2860f279c9cc
2e8f162681541d35237d3e5af5e495bff174a82e
'2011-11-18T22:08:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNP' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7eb6761d8faef48769c5aba49a9882e8
01c2992b348011e12ab17df857bbbbf77819ca69
describe
'2341' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNQ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
990883228306825944f5c650bc0d42e8
fb0e99cd4208cf386063f12a85acf64f67bd2f2a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNR' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
081501b59ff7b7c28472ed1a6091061a
59c1e7ddee2f65ef13b1fd92ffa4429e3ad6240a
describe
'479835' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNS' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
649a548f4414f2b0794c98feaef5f169
3abbfa7100c7a5c3b485a8686eb2a304c78ecb09
describe
'155954' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNT' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
6cef32ae4ccf735982b0ed44ed1fc7c3
5282d211e89ce9f6f0916f3b04870a03f6b6fcc5
describe
'57400' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNU' 'sip-files00090.pro'
ae8a88a070df0dcfc2691fa0709da320
eef12e885b942336e8c908159c81811394884a2b
'2011-11-18T22:08:40-05:00'
describe
'46831' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNV' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
e8b33141bcc6721022f471bab7041765
a607133619157b05490f23fd5a0691bda86cf5fc
'2011-11-18T22:10:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNW' 'sip-files00090.tif'
04ff7e61b1572e050e5dc70caa49e62a
0b49045993aaad6cecabbe5e964f7e96ed22ef57
describe
'2259' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNX' 'sip-files00090.txt'
04bae2e1e70c8412c6374747f495603f
1f5b704aeaa6c54cc9aaba186e6312822ef197a5
describe
'11840' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNY' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
4c6b2a86dd77d8e86517520fa9308fd4
e5e6f19f5dc290f504fe5425de722b283805d28a
describe
'479681' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZNZ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
db10ce77aa40decf22e8c7791320feec
e5bbcb08bd641d7b703c9fe8e8af8d772bdfa328
'2011-11-18T22:05:23-05:00'
describe
'150898' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOA' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
d4da47ddc9870956d4d9915e2958b906
dd642fd88318b29f0a7ff31fdf17ef46624c7ec2
describe
'55150' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOB' 'sip-files00091.pro'
4b28de949efafac5d62062e9058262e5
d6f33761bae6887ed293f07f092b315325189895
describe
'46062' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOC' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
4aab462b9c790e971fcdacb0ba219e73
6ad0bd8d415e6fa3bdb484f78a96be5d91e35708
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOD' 'sip-files00091.tif'
6208a92f6dad7944642ca7b6fee8d53b
a89b60133009f1fb5d17f49f787fe4a0e8bf73ec
describe
'2178' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOE' 'sip-files00091.txt'
dece59cd4ddfb96748b1e4054e505c44
9f2b742926835425a70e512b2db1a53c97271f0e
describe
'12026' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOF' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
26b2ea5bcad98e2e34dc5cbafdc6f928
19a0477be9371fc8997c03b13d21d85991618b91
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOG' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
b7a2681b73e4e89f4b628d8d9f07eb8c
a9ae26160351ff55c849497b7e2696f8fc56d51d
describe
'158043' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOH' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
27e99413f96def7bb4a8dae99a8599b0
c663db313f93ffccb935ccc66f43b44680b69282
'2011-11-18T22:07:02-05:00'
describe
'58509' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOI' 'sip-files00092.pro'
2eff749b7ffd3da66783f82ac21f743e
9f6f5125d0dab29e51d5bcac4433f613a6fcf01f
describe
'47416' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOJ' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7d0b6279a67e1d5fd44bbb422058d142
8aa9cc1266656bdc5ee838959e5f2719290621c4
'2011-11-18T22:06:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOK' 'sip-files00092.tif'
3553eaee6ac1a9d793c67970ddd706fb
c2f0cc77fb48d96c293de8a2b3d609c905c55318
describe
'2317' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOL' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b318fa3889a538b1dd034eb6353f7740
3a74a5a8306693347a07a92e95e851ec4cd552e1
describe
'12535' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOM' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
e8b84fa0d204e9bb8c5ae12d312d8a0b
ec0d7c7ca1d16dfbf315c05cf30dd9e2941f8a6d
describe
'479689' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZON' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
9b724f8a7066a1239305e34dc479e8b0
1caa67f91005f4fd6f76c19deb377800e8bf9da0
describe
'152495' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOO' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
7e09adc0348568347cb2193cd5b2e526
c5569762451e795f3b82928bbde25954675a1a00
describe
'57339' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOP' 'sip-files00093.pro'
c0b2b1e8b32e255caba95587d0773375
9cdcd3cc9675bbfb51c843386cc2c07194a3f353
describe
'46760' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOQ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
f6d81f4bac7c07520707bf4c4880c619
3f60a4d1c69fd2d64a688e59c90b84137787063a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOR' 'sip-files00093.tif'
643d871c83e505f0d23f7c627ef5b5ac
0cc7accaf080ec4e44e047125110fadb96c83457
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOS' 'sip-files00093.txt'
96273b2fd2beac02c5245a15a5b6c207
3470d36e47525a3ca1f275c2b56760d32371a6bc
describe
'12329' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOT' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
038d6ee81a7c99eb37ca6efa08b1f2d6
5dc79c6b4c8ca49e99667748bc985960a081b2e8
'2011-11-18T22:06:02-05:00'
describe
'480189' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOU' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
8091cd3af37b4cb0b3dc8d05277c2ad2
c220121a0acecf7ca13668dd93b24ffdf8a2b845
'2011-11-18T22:07:18-05:00'
describe
'159690' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOV' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
a34f3e10ce9cccb80e945cb759c373e9
98a76dae4cc68dbfc4250291c6c3f2e01c986fd2
'2011-11-18T22:08:12-05:00'
describe
'58543' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOW' 'sip-files00094.pro'
0cf2ea37b41d07453587b0aba72426e4
6ab4cd1c7cddba4189770f2eb36c9d4bc7b3766b
'2011-11-18T22:06:11-05:00'
describe
'47047' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOX' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
7686045bff36a63ed738c4275a1818bf
b49b7bd61b41f8dee473d70c654b0e7fea2f9ac7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOY' 'sip-files00094.tif'
76dd16bbedb383e9a8696db1f8951af2
a998a1135770273a51f87a382983b6787b54f4a2
'2011-11-18T22:09:17-05:00'
describe
'2311' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZOZ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
31d8a1b234234ccf9f3a88471c6ee339
b5315779b7e0cc0dfedac3a4aee8159624b89baa
describe
'12277' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPA' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
0b5377a86834de43fc2ac061b5660042
8ac7ece9461c891233766711d48f3e7bac9f223f
describe
'479844' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPB' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
4d70da19eee8d0fce1f81c57fe339419
27ee5cb84f3a066c25d8b3dfe15088a7c81cf2bb
'2011-11-18T22:06:04-05:00'
describe
'155640' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPC' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ecc0c41c37a338df5c2fdc2d5cda15ba
fc8ebd6e32e6a4aaaf1fb95fa4c62482f2bb3333
describe
'58218' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPD' 'sip-files00095.pro'
0e16690f46d0319e422dddc51cc57012
deaafc3c6fb8046ef5d54e0ff9087591d1d6373a
describe
'46912' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPE' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
cc3c69b9d2411240bb63e8b9a4bd0565
f128110a908b4786cf5d548f53b7649cc4d00f38
'2011-11-18T22:08:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPF' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c50a83cf3b59c02bdec25957aedabe26
6a79ad1b27b52cbda00feb581601b5a3ae82d063
describe
'2290' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPG' 'sip-files00095.txt'
a8eacabea52f99281c7de51d350ded93
98d5c54bfbe007555e96e4d79d180cbb264af8a8
describe
'12214' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPH' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
daab2a5bed4cede425f5600aec05aa39
2bd461e4a0a27d8d7c96c3a6f70f75521d2324d8
describe
'479793' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPI' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
136323cca9fb911da19db4696040eaa2
4e86425b30ebfa825df2003c284b1cd41bf90b5b
describe
'154108' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPJ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a16d895a6cc8b5523ad514c964491f2f
434a6af8a81800b68be8e625f418fb70f06f5a17
'2011-11-18T22:10:16-05:00'
describe
'58107' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPK' 'sip-files00096.pro'
34cddb1c6df6f9f3f60abfc4b1127ba8
eb336dd1d1e59281e9fdff134a3ec61154642e5e
describe
'46822' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPL' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
8f2b0202151b2f2844f0ab057f2ad370
d15f6ab34a46deb1906681a7475635f7acd38d2a
'2011-11-18T22:05:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPM' 'sip-files00096.tif'
43763a0a6b1d5f1540235d48ddef012c
4f81b9d2534df0b51ffe30bc08902ad6347d44ca
'2011-11-18T22:05:39-05:00'
describe
'2287' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPN' 'sip-files00096.txt'
65f4f1cb05996b1b882ce4b2f3fbbe7c
df78cab9aee369da6dd62609cafd2bd5323f3f52
describe
'12417' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPO' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
90782f06bab1a8401210b5b686df8d76
9b6f9a2bd0645f793757bbd60f4f5d110cf40db3
describe
'479885' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPP' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
36a72c14a99924843cc26c3cff80b582
1556139b2fb65df55ed62d3c1eef3d005a49ff46
'2011-11-18T22:09:18-05:00'
describe
'158396' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPQ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
ef6f0adc1ebb7c8ab620e09c1c6860f3
9017d38232ef7ee38baaf32b52697f4c16733319
'2011-11-18T22:09:35-05:00'
describe
'59811' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPR' 'sip-files00097.pro'
9df4fe037b7e014978604675d8b45567
80af08b45707199ff436bd0afa7c91d3272d4d35
describe
'47914' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPS' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
2dd11944c24e0941f80a4f3d0a6678f5
b57c2f0fa2142d354d4b91dccf57fdfde1ec3b3e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPT' 'sip-files00097.tif'
1ab012f946a7e5710bb05081c421f7cc
8f05a152f4c9160cbf8aaf17977d38e0ca47e3cc
describe
'2358' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPU' 'sip-files00097.txt'
e5972996c6b97e2eb473d431b5bd5542
98b6e357baf520e33901fc3a5de04a10fb11859d
describe
'12499' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPV' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
c5ece7a41898b9730a3e50c239b239d5
c9523f7d6f1b8f74133afd1ce430c328dc792918
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPW' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
b5282c13e9d9a8755012b329a90b95b8
3816cc652286721a2653a65c619342b18bbbf563
describe
'158714' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPX' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
516b3898fa971015daa21f4c9217a556
8af37b4e31917ab5479595b18b0f2eb8b3e113ed
describe
'59751' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPY' 'sip-files00098.pro'
2873aeb4b4345cb40d67affa8f5ca912
d2db07022793e6b4bff67b97c03a833cf5dff35f
'2011-11-18T22:08:33-05:00'
describe
'47446' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZPZ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
05beca44a805679b1d8431c13b304ec3
5dc6abf666dc11e6e2368008ac9b757d7b8c8d7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQA' 'sip-files00098.tif'
9d2ff2571e826ba9494598de24bd5bce
e9ba12b812971d402de80c86d95eb5f282dabdd2
'2011-11-18T22:07:07-05:00'
describe
'2356' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQB' 'sip-files00098.txt'
68968dd732d4de4cec8c50a4e476668b
028d407042264be5ef5b58f71efd2dfe6f7c9f4d
describe
'12143' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQC' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
bd696e5c3b4ffa3825958fd4a7e583ff
57cd4858fefc546f2ceca643c563758f60412a3f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQD' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
3a0d3cf981e51064a983d6505c0a9374
b1034e6406fa63cf3b9b98d930efa53c6c167bb9
'2011-11-18T22:07:31-05:00'
describe
'95029' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQE' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
1013ed816aef4460f5b126c58d473e9f
4a482d2b17d80a6d76a65db173033a55145dbd35
describe
'33205' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQF' 'sip-files00099.pro'
982f86740f866d0dd2db20d63817a0ef
77fa683e1fa45ab1611e48b88659dbcbe06c2b3d
describe
'26898' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQG' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
0752db5963b22a6d2f8690b4d081becd
9ece0a206ddf1c038fd1b7239469b46efe740c4d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQH' 'sip-files00099.tif'
6877acc1e4daf24a7a93df0e0e674ef7
63eff7686dce826962812d1bb13c0a25b60aeb06
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQI' 'sip-files00099.txt'
5a28bc70962f5c25a1160b9df93c7817
dc06b2e006ca49cd10a2ba017ab4180ff12109f0
'2011-11-18T22:05:48-05:00'
describe
'7043' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQJ' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
19ac9ce4f7318d975f9ea774ad55f466
7913dfb9d697f815e053d7a6e1313382c5ab07c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQK' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
940a17f897deded445c9e68b67d9469d
dcf2499d4f15b288c6bd809a6011e8aae44adaf7
'2011-11-18T22:06:19-05:00'
describe
'120871' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQL' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
7566703f84b15f424bf1a45576b180aa
60335d5b3b03c3120973a8e8e2460d9a743ee682
describe
'43688' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQM' 'sip-files00100.pro'
2137b1960b651e251eb243205ad42a5c
b9315e5fdb5b332fa29c2ddf10bd2674021080b9
describe
'36775' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQN' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
af2c58dc03b430af1997f88fbf1e28c0
b13d633742f057712374c4bd1ff04017f782ee85
'2011-11-18T22:08:37-05:00'
describe
'3855908' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQO' 'sip-files00100.tif'
854192b58dd13780fbbbf739a24b3b1b
5c239d06d39209c4c7442cdadc4d17d8c0bb022e
'2011-11-18T22:09:57-05:00'
describe
'1748' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQP' 'sip-files00100.txt'
b719801a392786fd9a27223f5717a108
55a21410c6fcc961553fde6dbb744aa369bf9105
describe
'9450' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQQ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
e6af20afdd820db1d2089953def3ffe3
211d606853312728f545cb60118bbd476156885c
'2011-11-18T22:10:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQR' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
d29130f07fa18d08ef0658b53b50dc2c
f02372ebec8143b0337a91964aa1acdf8271a68e
describe
'154312' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQS' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
e9c270ca119f162ed827882e0ca73cf8
99729f00b5b4d70d6b3aab07f5d17763816e928a
describe
'57818' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQT' 'sip-files00101.pro'
74eaf9f17a39a7fbeea5e4d7255bd3b0
3c318c2a5933336d99a1711a7ea79d9cc55cdf25
describe
'47269' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQU' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
528f7d45307b6afe4aa52b31d1bb78cd
78a4fb6acef4472032b1038422296e0fae605396
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQV' 'sip-files00101.tif'
910c8b1ba517864dc4002a066edb07ef
1c3fec3ea1694f2ec9f8ad488b769bca4a650b6c
describe
'2286' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQW' 'sip-files00101.txt'
8af720ec452b2688c43f7e248ce5a41d
92d794b41e25ee8924b4e6d3fe12d41ce259d36a
describe
'12694' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQX' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
2494d87a71a04ecdbce7ce3ac2df0900
bc57377620d24c8a0a390ce3d73856569cb258c6
'2011-11-18T22:08:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQY' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
661bf957d611ca19ad3b9607ceb75b01
ebaba8217c6718961ff7c96afad51cb1a8a001b2
describe
'152146' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZQZ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
aa4de3903addd2c3de00cdb4290bb7dd
50699c30eb1b92561bb4be8a12d52746c41902b4
describe
'57598' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRA' 'sip-files00102.pro'
ca697c7a84010c1bcf72b4b4b5c84538
297a73df87d0c5c2f4553e60f50d374528f1f858
describe
'46405' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRB' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
d982d430b66cd43750f29b0885ec9e19
95f5e9735dd6388a91e15069d7b4fabd5e58b4bd
'2011-11-18T22:05:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRC' 'sip-files00102.tif'
35da5ec4b41fdf46956f85f8977d248d
9e7d15b374866e2fea480db537b5ce6fe86c29c8
describe
'2273' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRD' 'sip-files00102.txt'
97b5d77148a2a78c946ca40e874bb543
499c059ea88b80f3896f9c60c29dce9108021242
describe
'12045' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRE' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
71357d9557e042c44e14a0e0b08cd66c
c22e16b17be3deda914aa7c86702787b4b18ba8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRF' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
ad98da29778a3f1b668cc242411a16d2
dbbbde0b2a13798367ee2d1ee198a32aaa34de8f
describe
'151424' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRG' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
00a5203516700c9c96f310e997a62bd0
53cd247f03d6cf2d6f98f210818a6b09f4fa3f4e
describe
'57015' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRH' 'sip-files00103.pro'
e1ec62b529ef8f875193969a92dd28aa
f40be35fcb8eadb3e4cdac41045d1dc4cc49d73e
describe
'46905' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRI' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
d5c6211a7a21b50e7ac93882bed8e2c7
1cc592a54931c331dc42165d1912d7f63bbad544
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRJ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
1c51eda28606fcf51656e9d925ccf044
fccf34cec9bc2998e125c4ce2c99f4627fc236a0
describe
'2260' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRK' 'sip-files00103.txt'
a10b05bb3b3cadda0f381f903fe4a3c9
fc73af67d04c50d19bb36e6c4a98f46e2dbd8f11
describe
'12299' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRL' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
c90ac88434fe3d3d1f439b9b320c051c
01383d58007086df6f6fb39b92cf44ff7d4e5750
describe
'480158' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRM' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
afe2a3eb2e51de0dd346dd407c217b23
0b70fa2398f201f1d9c871bb767229415359f375
describe
'153699' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRN' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
659ddf00fa15f80e3b408dcd925a016d
df13bb268e09159074e3d134e84f2bbaf1dc0ea8
'2011-11-18T22:07:28-05:00'
describe
'56940' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRO' 'sip-files00104.pro'
0dbb02c49d61789eb81e80f4918ab57e
e6826a51c9ab253fdc6cfda51e50e39cf84863dc
describe
'46410' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRP' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
36fe73789aac1c44a3d5857dfe65ac54
c66e4502c682800bbae5b5b4aa22ef93225be0e5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRQ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
3ea28c3366899090d4e4d202253ae902
1f0156f8571e69fce6a8e19677c77f286deca88f
describe
'2239' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRR' 'sip-files00104.txt'
d800127766afeee7f1cdd4f012e5ba22
7c1a71129dee70fe85dfe0ef51e804493a2b1e88
describe
'12174' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRS' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
37d6371eebd773a90c0c6f03b63316f5
20c67e1642164fbb433d3912d92593693c5203e9
describe
'479629' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRT' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
ea3f78c857a3344f9c055bee31a8b636
89d9ba8433d6782e4abf8e05676c0e65c24b144b
describe
'155222' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRU' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
364b6fabe9f9aeaedb1888e1d0bfdd9a
b36fe4ba8445ccdfcb2fb3d6be77eb1b4815d5b9
'2011-11-18T22:07:50-05:00'
describe
'59075' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRV' 'sip-files00105.pro'
2246eca67a95fbb7603f967bd6070dd4
4e30d02d7072a2492be026fd97fcaf562d77c15a
describe
'46221' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRW' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
d6a750ad5bbe5caf20daa39a7b948101
1a9ff0ce4ef7ad0694d61d5e65ebc4229b829a8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRX' 'sip-files00105.tif'
eebcf20904dacec5b0f16f75109347c0
4317a591f4c3466d3519817a5a43aa2fcd5015c7
describe
'2334' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRY' 'sip-files00105.txt'
e040631675351e15e88647213b0cbc28
d269cdaaa03924a475d0825348565c171c97eb73
describe
'12093' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZRZ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
667b0e3c8e91b21af9c1acb6ef05eeb3
573d984f297dd5d4380f2048dc1da6281b41438b
'2011-11-18T22:05:20-05:00'
describe
'479939' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSA' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
dca23a673a065c38512777b196e5869e
bd21b7ac333faa0a0bb29f52a16763d1548e8578
describe
'122138' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSB' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
fe5ac042f24c8a9b86acff8190c53ca1
a183cc5b64fc624d3dd18947459ceaf9bac91c94
'2011-11-18T22:10:13-05:00'
describe
'43306' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSC' 'sip-files00106.pro'
2ecc93aa23bc7759c6dc860bf72689f9
a4774009a772da38021843fb6ddb117b95613abf
describe
'35767' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSD' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
931857d91930f166c37789218e40d9ae
d70805ac09a542298ed0803580474ab5ebb6baea
'2011-11-18T22:07:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSE' 'sip-files00106.tif'
e1bcc253f7d2a3564d9a83372536e32d
440654d809ed124f96617199d592106cf96d30e9
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSF' 'sip-files00106.txt'
e9e2246478326188c5fe0836108f1cb0
43efb0c76cc07228106009f12611d8de899515ec
describe
'9159' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSG' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
3b3d6dd93cd9caa9a6aecf2527f93078
397c239355af39f2a2710e38516cf1e166bbbe42
'2011-11-18T22:07:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSH' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
54f16fba3585376bb680508995009054
be870ec9a22e64ae765932a14bf0c8b8b6531ef5
describe
'113747' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSI' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
235329fb6800dd48165655634914b39d
4fdc1737f525ca0e6bb2c621c1e8561acaf3b447
describe
'41736' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSJ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
293673ce3f7fd8465209d5834299e874
008a95a3bd5269bd380aa9e508fbb673cf46d065
describe
'33445' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSK' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
ef6498bbbee69f8d28372c1bb2ab1b14
53ebced36109d0c36217c5b3e68b38bfb6ffdb1c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSL' 'sip-files00107.tif'
69922b7803fc89288ddc85aa4e4fc493
45663a1c03d6c02b81a8c27116aa91430466b8e9
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSM' 'sip-files00107.txt'
2935a76ce6996166a798850150707f90
30d322d4acac73570b67756e4b3ba15e0481b30f
describe
'8860' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSN' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c5126af50d44709f4ffcf67bc1a6d8c2
e4d3b70ff93f36573f48ed6827c557bcb0a7a5b7
describe
'479846' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSO' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
e1d230233129a63a9a5a989664b51035
290efd27b4800b241fc6427db0c81b42094b6e96
describe
'160679' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSP' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
9918d49e74c1812d6c43fc30f2bfa7c4
4d53ca71c9baf77acc064bbbdd3b69ea4a77ca4d
describe
'59904' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSQ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
1103e8d70d4aa89150e129ab4a9d6664
7ece50236fb52e27956d1548c9e77c2611b7a682
describe
'47735' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSR' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
d4d6f657917f5a7c32fe3a5ab7f01d39
309c90206d68755a6e4919e923b27e314098622c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSS' 'sip-files00108.tif'
9159eef979f11ff971b7da137946d06f
9d2df702cbc24f56632e27f3a1efd05a487380cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZST' 'sip-files00108.txt'
1b75f3feefebdfe9efb496fbc2a93e4b
933cf7b7adcff3e0e167329afd3ef0be15b79acd
describe
'12460' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSU' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
196f71650a7e97647d6951eb063a4ce8
b10ffa533ae6a85b44d11e0f5ef1441a0e657e74
describe
'479862' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSV' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
6d98bedbc249c3c59cfabef12faef917
e6497fd6aea8e217a0ce3afb5b8ba188ec52646c
describe
'152046' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSW' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
ad6eb67ba1f76cbce5cec355e6c0a3e3
5e44341c694988a3ea816bc6a73c14075fd57f83
describe
'57423' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSX' 'sip-files00109.pro'
4d050be233672474dd47afb4c3cf138c
5a65cd04202a49638da62d85eac849bced6406d4
describe
'45766' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSY' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
1ec314693ed5a48f733fcb2a4cb14cd1
df8f77f66ed31d073574bb2cc1cd54b382f3488c
'2011-11-18T22:10:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZSZ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
1dd1e088a70a81561b15f5c589c7c212
50c90491715af7be0132ea6db7abb3a1aabd3b4b
describe
'2262' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTA' 'sip-files00109.txt'
30b3a34d653d2a8531e323ab2977738d
d7acb5a4894cd661734590b46caa15d4e5c03311
describe
'12435' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTB' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
97eeefa1a3549ed5af4d09e7f1a2308c
59d8911e6e8e9cc55fce8f3f2338e249e466cbd6
describe
'479899' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTC' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
2410075a457790c589adec64274bdfb1
054ee763d9fa1027ad4e7e51b7ebab72c8b405d1
describe
'157771' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTD' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
e85e75da26971cc407227e816504a5f6
e3ed0d4f0175cd2570a7e57bde54b4f3371d58a8
describe
'59920' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTE' 'sip-files00110.pro'
aacfd12436db154ceb5c7cf90efd85c9
7106383c88077f87b44d1a4e47d5de097aeede32
describe
'46500' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTF' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
ff577b8507884ade06b5b961beeba3b2
1b7f6fe7ac12d9ddcd7ec02f327fe6a8766c0aef
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTG' 'sip-files00110.tif'
e4a67c459fec3320cf91528b65a4be8a
f2200a31511abde2ca9d173a2c3b1be8e4411314
describe
'2360' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTH' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b6f7b156de7ada6313545a5113cd1da6
20f142fc4afdbcf770dc4cc78942c49135e394af
describe
'12047' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTI' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f8687ecbe7112c8fe7bf41708b2bd91f
59aaa554125dfde1f935c397c20a6c425bfaff34
describe
'480207' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTJ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e96ae44c740c3b7c58456aac9bc581fd
f44bd9e3d1dbd91318e38e8c8e77906b83c961db
describe
'159959' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTK' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
835683b875c4b4edf5756eaed7caaedf
f3cbca72648a4fd8b6fec87e548df5e757e83679
'2011-11-18T22:05:53-05:00'
describe
'61825' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTL' 'sip-files00111.pro'
1527fccae1b23e3fb59070156464aaea
b5f5d8741a9a3de98846744090d4f866bcf38b5f
describe
'47057' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTM' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
9891de4f55621ce49ef39eaa658beb40
cdfe82c63f2517ea7ba8da138032f11ede2e2c17
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTN' 'sip-files00111.tif'
15e098a3326545db437a78d63786baa8
20694f1092d5cd799f88a746458a05de9ca18b04
describe
'2453' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTO' 'sip-files00111.txt'
8e8d9474d6b3f960c8d70007e716611e
c7f8c3c12ea9684e1805425dc95ce89fefb47e99
describe
'12270' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTP' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
fd51611f3b3c8591401309c1d7e2929d
569d355240aad2641a96ab03ed60ee666b2f8a32
describe
'479693' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTQ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b8f40c1369dfbfa71d0de9ae4bad1e54
c2e1bcb22d0d68660e250007a48552a0e69c569f
describe
'158589' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTR' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
c5f443fe2195266db875f14b95a17491
c9afb232d11c589b242ba70056f2e95a5b6a118d
describe
'58039' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTS' 'sip-files00112.pro'
f3ff3624dfecf8204c22db96144dbf6c
8794eeab5523c8e652596cd5468d33a5cca2f09e
describe
'46495' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTT' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
eb0e864d9da68d78e16a4fb9220dce7e
35a47bd8b194b5beabb98ced9952b6cffab94dc6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTU' 'sip-files00112.tif'
8e03bfaa2d48290fce34f3ba95388dee
a6a10d44aac55854c9cb09a9f054aa2472b3f11e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTV' 'sip-files00112.txt'
3457882f9fbdd5bff8b3350eaadc47d3
b648a1f2dce2806a2a3055271d85fdbd020b430e
describe
'12266' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTW' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
debde57f8e37aeb2e40e570ec8e3070f
1a68306646123d0fa47f110a114ccaee3efc29ce
describe
'479580' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTX' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
0b7a8d4b599d6c4f203d98cf28f95083
01815fa4963043e6a0142dac150e019ce4374d29
describe
'37913' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTY' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
63b3c054d192f93621cc0016f12f6843
167b11a156e506d0cb6760981415db2e9a318a00
describe
'8180' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZTZ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
0e0ff339306e5acb474b732c29be0054
84eb9815a83c4aff89b64b7d911852e5f9779c26
describe
'9629' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUA' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
3ac5c923aca8f7a58856fef650896880
f7da1f6a7d67ace30d6dd54fbeed220974f7f0d1
'2011-11-18T22:08:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUB' 'sip-files00113.tif'
13c74854c29425c900b5f54a464e88b6
d3f171c8bf0efdb60e91819b4252f887f59c4dc1
describe
'350' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUC' 'sip-files00113.txt'
0d188247f3f0d2aeaf9df109ed291305
131ddd79abb5e3b0d21b2448eca0b11860a938dd
'2011-11-18T22:11:01-05:00'
describe
'2622' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUD' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
dfd5d650b15acf5480d049a1d44ce962
2060552d9c31350d7282e266dfae6fda439ad0e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUE' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
ff4a3ef188be0fbb8eb634c49bb4abac
1073dc2257a4cbfcea38db3f82a6ec53b9f40733
describe
'120146' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUF' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
c552958c8a102720add43632b96bc5c2
27e5aa568938fac60421b4eac48816ba440e94f7
describe
'43171' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUG' 'sip-files00114.pro'
dd42eb46ef8939faa498bf18bdaeee36
fb7bc3c9d386fc363902abf106237bd7a0713df8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUH' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
92e05d4e474b660ffdeefd83d103640e
ef289e3dfa2a49f76aacfd4ca36a4eb136f9760b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUI' 'sip-files00114.tif'
5987290da2f051d545f1c1473f5aebfe
def6e8286738669cc84bab93f4b14b325ef93d23
describe
'1770' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUJ' 'sip-files00114.txt'
cf93c90fa0c25f2a750da7db9e1435cf
a6dbce1d0c8c398998adeb5aa738c16131011f4c
describe
'9344' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUK' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
14305b6b192812750763444d3ac5070f
021f17a2e02fc8184b4c05b629c2005c06d8a134
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUL' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
e2f86e92a42deb0a6408652b06de2e70
97a03fadb67374054350173d4d1e26b424a16ab9
describe
'150399' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUM' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
cdce91a8da709af93c3ebe132009d8e8
d0a8252680373ff28577a6b2de73fe83d49dd0d9
describe
'57416' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUN' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a40040a78eaaafaa3bcfcb112791ba2d
d79d65e29fd1d427d50ef6890d78dc229bb3af70
describe
'45366' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUO' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
6eb10ad45a47b692245d6a6f59eb7dea
36237e2452287e25eeb6a7b0db1b6dea725fe9ec
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUP' 'sip-files00115.tif'
ec6382f5d75b468bae850288a37538e2
76649cd75d750e8e6a10d6b2abfb82569376ab8a
'2011-11-18T22:10:51-05:00'
describe
'2268' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUQ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
5ba13b0bbfe7f3083b6637af782d791b
f86ae750bc546e1f018c7cb03d9d3345d0397023
describe
'11893' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUR' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
38fe2ff455f309f9fccddea8b85ccd8a
9634e681f9297a6585bef94d4436f03144907eda
describe
'479865' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUS' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
57c7132573b8532398be37d918205b0a
5ce2782dddb101318d772bb5587e8357d8dd408d
describe
'156642' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUT' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
bfaaad38420b4b7ca607c2ad7683d20c
1c990a5a501771941252d5b395d57ee0b7249f7d
describe
'59512' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUU' 'sip-files00116.pro'
9a17baaa87d95b07e8c8513a35d4164c
758fa6028c00f7f356e8de34498f11cbbf1a22e6
describe
'47844' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUV' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
c2247c4a8b2ed7a594662643376ee086
afee6bd7a46f1bd2af4325741fa591ffab327cb8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUW' 'sip-files00116.tif'
01788b087a7228cf021f2a751bd6cf36
5b0fb62f50b4f8c0d9debe593e417b99bd111a4c
'2011-11-18T22:07:12-05:00'
describe
'2344' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUX' 'sip-files00116.txt'
ea705bc6b2c32f8f495167eb4515b6cf
4d44c6e539b770bed909f88c3b25ab4b598e42a1
describe
'12643' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUY' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
1db0b068a00c32898aed5648575bec0e
5da44d4faa6feab4f3d628527b624810d14c369d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZUZ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
11f9668d9b658933d8510cad06512bd0
a32b56dcc5e3f320db85adec4f04ea6b8b57e0bb
describe
'120034' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVA' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8fbc79c76bfea46bcc4816bd8b124049
af24ea865cef3e0f7176b7bd0e168d29083aea81
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVB' 'sip-files00117.pro'
0c89d20028fe9c3e56d6b81111cb9676
9831795e24c8dd65a6c15da37b48991f82edd4cb
describe
'31088' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVC' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
a971baf121e8a86f40de52463afa4e56
a2358865a4c0e49bb373608ad8882b9ff9b786c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVD' 'sip-files00117.tif'
c42b6472fa49857963f29503488672c4
0e916bd499e944050342c1f1af960ca5461033df
describe
'184' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVE' 'sip-files00117.txt'
822327a22628b0ac9148fe49be899657
d7180053a67c425022f1e9c4dc0d3bdda5ec20af
describe
'8944' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVF' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
d0a8dcfd435c1db68a8b5b28fc214e48
e76294c1b5fef238b7818196a3c32bdb5ceec995
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVG' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
39d27e39fb7b3fd88c1363db90fb6250
b8a9aa63cd4bede164d01cb526e28fbfe72d9fe2
describe
'86951' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVH' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
f1dbfb9e4967aff496e1ee67e1865635
2f20374e8c089d42e4c25d1cdd13f159d7c5bdef
'2011-11-18T22:10:28-05:00'
describe
'31731' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVI' 'sip-files00119.pro'
db52d387d6fa60e39e458108e5b25151
f546d2f73dea446a249c077f3f0921f0cb4aeee3
describe
'27214' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVJ' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
1088b43501e4534bcc4cebd12e108326
7fb88925ee1b2eb20497241e4f993255bbd6322d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVK' 'sip-files00119.tif'
38bbe7899f9dedeeacb9e097cd59c9f4
d09bdbab97033a4614cac3173d24f772c83ad67a
'2011-11-18T22:10:25-05:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVL' 'sip-files00119.txt'
b574df1708f3cbc50635bdfcc3ba5262
24eee32cac4bc7488198b0ca2f08f5627d4e0a39
'2011-11-18T22:09:49-05:00'
describe
'7422' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVM' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
75e9b9cfa375e1ab2ec4cff0a93af4ab
12559b63f18817136e056428baba6be228458c85
describe
'479548' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVN' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
e4fd3b3613ed2d4e1d218764a3fc20cc
76df89cb2a040e600d1b36ee53b1825a24ac1703
describe
'123045' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVO' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
f291d449ab1bbaa533803b48f01be260
c67c01b49d0e9e2b98ea71a34f266a99939c4bda
describe
'45334' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVP' 'sip-files00120.pro'
4d4a452bb792214f32b286f92e19928e
5e7b7d529da0cabbc54f63e9f7c940a7c54553c5
describe
'36169' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVQ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
e9cd441a4b3fbd8805b6605eda012a67
37cdb43240922c64c97145c580df80173bc71957
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVR' 'sip-files00120.tif'
34c01e3d83e6064eae3e9bead57efb11
d79d68cf77d2574c7822411a1e1f9f7de1ffc109
describe
'1869' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVS' 'sip-files00120.txt'
6a5a7474c20173549bda378c5825891e
8d13a8321bb1fd04216cc546555fbc759bc7c31d
describe
'9406' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVT' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
010edb8fec7795505312e62c885cb3e1
44281eece788458179d422932e14ff191dc8ee34
describe
'479642' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVU' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
b8e5895daa54f13b0fd3fed645554854
d23afbe511348c5967d5c0853c4a172437cc8125
describe
'147455' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVV' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d1590a1e239856226c7b830e6a82e0cd
2cfa670ce96be0d0f6135b8aca114f9be93fd62f
describe
'57646' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVW' 'sip-files00121.pro'
459a3d51e167bbb825d203efaafc8220
675efeb58b74021748825537c47a9b9f9be5ffca
describe
'44280' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVX' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
dec02bc683c3e8c30ddf9528508ac3cb
b0101f149372ac59cee63cba87816b01bbf4b411
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVY' 'sip-files00121.tif'
84584b1fa751fb524cd97afee86efe52
a609a08cfd052dde400ffdb6e5419e120cb88a2a
describe
'2289' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZVZ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
ea05391c1bb7fa77c906620d686d8f10
cf86f2c009de615002c2105967b6a0a4e939f653
describe
'11828' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWA' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
a06d5cce067ffaaf68c576a64c33e095
5f0dee26392daed484dd57f309e7beff4b3b042a
'2011-11-18T22:10:23-05:00'
describe
'479616' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWB' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
63dc374b61459eddaf193c07efe35f5c
56c7f9868aa5cbf895102bf94dace2aab55d8249
describe
'92661' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWC' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
b3fbf91e773ae3fc7e40fea65c96c680
af9047801e9c4eff3cda98e9e348330814c66042
describe
'31647' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWD' 'sip-files00122.pro'
6b9a06021c084f5d7637478691daf86a
2b27456d1db7db612e1f5db3071987a2539d8c6e
describe
'26936' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWE' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
3da585b7e148c75d848fc549be6b286e
8273787fc231bc7396acfc543a273cc3270bbc7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWF' 'sip-files00122.tif'
e2b9c1ba31391b067df27e09fc923c47
9b859b1a079bb55f82978978c69112f98392e98c
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWG' 'sip-files00122.txt'
da04603bc757c8145ecb410e17447b5c
0dcb7d37caf1e0139a46414e830e6e09e2169edd
describe
'7451' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWH' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
e060b06ff83babf01396f4e3109e748d
974584647f2e0b6874dbba422fedf5da87a15597
describe
'479787' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWI' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
0a30fd025e97959948bc787c46ce75f6
75f2463238ee9613383799e9b5419e30cee7ffa6
describe
'117897' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWJ' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
be75c38274e17279e382bf912720fc60
5ada4ea554fecc0efdb2606152694b0b6ef22d96
describe
'44301' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWK' 'sip-files00123.pro'
7a01075caecc982d78e41574429cc843
8f2d6d9d94268aff4fe62e176460916770bacd18
describe
'34862' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWL' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
42bdef1ced589571bf4b86e26053e26c
85e6f11749bb390baf62fd8c7a782d412595d6a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWM' 'sip-files00123.tif'
20d38efe96015698c85755a4672d3143
a726b0c49e053a23ed69e3dfad59976fb7d22aef
describe
'1807' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWN' 'sip-files00123.txt'
cc7f7226cca443f8065d6303e451bdea
f421f0177e1b2e193b1a5b3559ac663c3253fb97
describe
'9244' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWO' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
92469f6d50f19995ec8ac0ab41e36cae
2211859a1ef36d36e20893d63c6bf39b1fb7907e
describe
'479876' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWP' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
ac4fd40250567f8dcd1fb72e696dae91
cf0e5dcd283da472e990a4f6e51c19275bc085c8
'2011-11-18T22:06:49-05:00'
describe
'152087' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWQ' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
47b36da51b78df9e0eb5839d161d9656
f891a2d3104009661757ddffc3133d39f3ca74bb
describe
'57334' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWR' 'sip-files00124.pro'
39a80cf4681410d462efadd8f2edc9a0
43fd2f4fdbd52b67a1ecc3ae4dba5783f7fd7626
describe
'45346' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWS' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
fdb29bb0bdf939797ce03a247b8e4fdd
4dd1732ad01462ad1ca21f547803b0f236cdba77
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWT' 'sip-files00124.tif'
c09b87375fec7a81f6905acdcf83ba96
84b7014dc808fd75e3e74be094bac7c11fa692f2
describe
'2257' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWU' 'sip-files00124.txt'
4dfe00bd24c4635ad72db29ca7d20884
d81bf8bc83c42b6da49903ba72046891842366b9
describe
'12287' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWV' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
e273db37b442cea5e26895bd9faf2b46
09bca4942fd3735a57b274fd21906b30d2c19035
describe
'479855' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWW' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
a0e1d933a93e6f33465aa5e6dd554b46
78731b2ddd22ac28110455f5ea9603d1e7713305
'2011-11-18T22:10:41-05:00'
describe
'150610' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWX' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
5a2f2323fd4b2d7eccf8cc4eafb5f8d0
c997bb4de972b7b07bf01455b488d42882f572e1
describe
'57894' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWY' 'sip-files00125.pro'
0170b648e16fd5dad920db0ae130e73a
6934223f20c1f9311b0ce9c12dc0a823814248ac
describe
'45303' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZWZ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
40f412393ab6fd680a12bf6b9f5fb70b
3c566c4f7121c150529248146df42e1a41ebfcac
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXA' 'sip-files00125.tif'
0113a91b971f00124bde5acc5a0ef0ab
1481ab8e6dfd2d0000645b4cc2ca94c9d74318b5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXB' 'sip-files00125.txt'
b1d9b7b947c6df21e8ad9280c71bff4b
2be026d34b61036d4e96dba6a537bf3b5fd40d4d
describe
'12104' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
f991daeafcd5bae05aa89ae598eeb8c2
de2c76b99bce6781da8021d82151820a9d0b2719
describe
'479788' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXD' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
7933ab9c6ebcadf5f09236adcd85dcaa
1565b5ecd9e63e7f2fc47d558d092e87d85cde02
describe
'155269' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXE' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
57f550264baaa1ad41ab7e4df22310b9
cbed5b21b0f074e31ed2f195133b97b001246848
'2011-11-18T22:05:15-05:00'
describe
'59382' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXF' 'sip-files00126.pro'
f94008c22c058bda9bfaba0abb5d46e5
1ef80e670174a89e77462f97bdb83d9d08daeaa5
describe
'45790' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXG' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
f182bcd559992705d4dbb3dd3ad19b89
8e48928d9bb7dfbe4f64ff578e00010689da89d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXH' 'sip-files00126.tif'
55dae6e0ccee708fb10ff948c21857a1
0f2fb637837f6f200cec526ebfb71e851ae4b2a9
'2011-11-18T22:06:45-05:00'
describe
'2328' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXI' 'sip-files00126.txt'
1626eb4fe50b4c06a01a0e5542bce697
10161f192de8a87fea3e21fde347ee798fe26b15
describe
'12177' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXJ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
780d1d582289be616398b2b9a6957958
8534850a30f87c8d2247554488d8ae44f93c41af
describe
'480027' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXK' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
e89fc0a14f7fe424fdc12a919a73bcd1
cec5963428670518650d937690d90ffe17865b91
describe
'68386' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXL' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
1b5844abc97f81329b1ce4a7ff1a9fb8
5d99cfee7bedbb6b612cd9f133fffcf5d5851825
describe
'22987' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXM' 'sip-files00127.pro'
01dfd5d42a4539acc905a20ac8685412
e066ae82afedf0c2bb3e8363953c420469104b55
describe
'20149' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXN' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
3b9732a1c3b9e92b22a5188ef6acd488
c4c84e2fedd4cb40048b58bd43930b92f8ea52b2
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXO' 'sip-files00127.tif'
64febf1a7d928907b4b9c42d095ecccc
0645626457e45a9bb4cbeecbf0a78c7f414d9068
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXP' 'sip-files00127.txt'
6ac0955ec235a036c4a7a3fa77dd0f8f
f908d8c2311cfb42fed79c3b2ff1cb5b471ee684
describe
'5645' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXQ' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
a52764506af9a476b1384c2ecef56ec9
b6746d916b534dc925ba811b3ade45ebe29a4e52
describe
'479834' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXR' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
c26461ea93b5fb250227c335ec5d920c
00f0803398cfb5ab3bad287636353975360f1631
describe
'116551' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXS' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
58832a5f404370152aa3a297e03c9cbf
8486adc4bc5ead91343ea050a0276b856b49fb6c
describe
'43170' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXT' 'sip-files00128.pro'
0719655f85505a15bf26525d502ede67
fdf172532cdc13ea01e9184795ec872d50624f1f
describe
'35764' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXU' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
d6157dc1334f31b6dccd3c71f8ee44d8
648cc615e3db547f2455210d2cad8fa151043ac4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXV' 'sip-files00128.tif'
a5e6b0d56b44ae9dab5fe6cbc67c3399
5dd64e3f071dcda11eae4b8839dc4049adc8116a
describe
'1783' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXW' 'sip-files00128.txt'
6ebf04aaea1d36e481eaf06017b70819
48b4abc98aa5a46821f70e349e9809cbf966f2ee
describe
'9445' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXX' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
0ad65db2921e2d34765da9a55b79234d
e71ef9184b9df19a6343263404e0b33d693dcc21
'2011-11-18T22:10:54-05:00'
describe
'479591' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXY' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
ef304d824cfef08eb06e325c8a59258f
e355df3c96006662abfd5c5ac7b526500cc75e23
describe
'154966' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZXZ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
4469433b1c6c8c1688ac0d05c496928a
d81a424dac91130942b49dd3dcf43cd4542d629c
describe
'57831' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYA' 'sip-files00129.pro'
78a9e1836957d0de4956a933dfcc8111
33bd3d47d66b82edb4ef4d8bb1557d547a395bb1
describe
'45714' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYB' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
e992a4f361ac63e38f055b3c4ec4b0c1
c2d43ea9bae77e96c0f15231799a156b5ecc2eca
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYC' 'sip-files00129.tif'
cb601551efa1bf83115c53f2454e0195
af243d7f7a800b6e9c7a989c573b4a65c9643e36
describe
'2277' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYD' 'sip-files00129.txt'
6e4a6d3baa80d80ee1d69014154c0585
eca737d33c24f8dea2e583f186f8e80e1724248b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYE' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
aced713f2f1828892d4085b86fae31a1
6977fa38ad7a0ba8788b65e5c10435bf0467f8e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYF' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
1feabf37a696d841e7d60b0810061f63
d59e02e4275fcbf5b68db8c066a522a3b1373019
describe
'156935' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYG' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
eb3bde575c16a6f86fe92bd19899610c
1a76ed8fd0bc10b5c4d101d31e591ff9ca212501
describe
'59915' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYH' 'sip-files00130.pro'
1a215a4112f72c045a9371f20aeee9f2
801cf0c21f504345d7dd65f44bd9dc13c12d20b0
describe
'47699' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYI' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
8f46bf73b5f04b9b1fb91aa547bb2341
0acb822c61842535ac0dd0ccc761ed272af5664c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYJ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
193d9215757fca4b0d5bd0c1264f2e91
847193e8c572eff16b6f98fff7ca9fd6557aef48
describe
'2367' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYK' 'sip-files00130.txt'
02c34cd828da387778330aa143c02756
6afcab4ce496c933bd88ed673033ef0c9a698317
describe
'12286' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYL' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
1c955bba92454960b137c1103e16b9f8
072d7f5cd62e651a7ea134a1573e0813d0908fbe
describe
'479654' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYM' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
033b95c83a5739ad597c1562fe8b7938
377b7f174778139d6de398906e9e6ce6a8c92f4a
describe
'152240' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYN' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
1cb79de1ce192b80810d16b7cb891873
82566478d2f291fe5248ffab5ede0c4c69da9454
describe
'57965' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYO' 'sip-files00131.pro'
15f587e77fa7ca026dab479fafd46336
3fe52582d3d74563d3f118f1262fb86d15a3b549
describe
'46269' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYP' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
f147a13f31ce17b0d125ee3cd933371d
cf86e98fe76243913f0adf9410d286453dde487d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYQ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
03138240e81056c8ff597e0fdfeb6e8d
e6addfcedc7d757f15218ed14fefaba8bbaa8bdd
'2011-11-18T22:05:56-05:00'
describe
'2304' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYR' 'sip-files00131.txt'
33a3439439194214460953a078ceecfb
747ac99f6beb48c7e1f86087ef5cd48e76e07754
describe
'12351' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYS' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
fe90c6b6e134dc20e541ea0934f0e8d8
f2bae8babace0e0ef6722c3c6374c9627fff0524
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYT' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
c331587b798e1dbf0d76c94482744afe
f1470dde05e36515be1810fdc5b60184835987cf
describe
'153371' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYU' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
84f5985f485a898006cbcf22330336f9
8c926ecc1664d4b699fe1cd576bfc58051e079db
describe
'57382' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYV' 'sip-files00132.pro'
248057f4b33d743ede0bafa21bed8a66
d31a2dabb641b24592b052e5a57a0a4b02342c30
describe
'46709' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYW' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
184438a51460f97656d24b1f92c5557f
44864d81fffe9ba5a682ac85eb1f0fd1c2b0564c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYX' 'sip-files00132.tif'
8d3bf89def38f3032f5b860ff1eee2ec
d59bc26299765071c47dcd7abce9c0e9636c6cd7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYY' 'sip-files00132.txt'
b7b15600ac7a7c847e27f25a44195aad
1fcd72d9ea3a8894f7223ec7a1708c67d7aa709f
describe
'12148' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZYZ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
14396a27ac45de9f1bee8162398101ab
b2bdd90310f462ad45746d862ba25170bce4c61c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZA' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
2ba231ff3a02fbefdba35a2f0c81328c
83d1d6b38dcc018f94605f57be3ddb686c0640b4
describe
'151335' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZB' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
a084f1c04695fb02665cc124e20924f4
bb5460da8fd2b4c8eb9e8c0a478398ada5aa28b5
describe
'57246' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZC' 'sip-files00133.pro'
7400bf878128b209d5b1e50e338428f7
d5a44202ab3ed3758335ac3f28b53a6dcc7ca501
describe
'45888' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZD' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
cb1b030cef73b966b9f145bc33705e97
f596333cd6411ecb64ffe7c7a1d7bd2cfef058b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZE' 'sip-files00133.tif'
1e3294d186f15f838b92947a236fc7f8
bc4ec61e8cfaadbfbf58699de3ddc6197f7e7c4f
describe
'2256' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZF' 'sip-files00133.txt'
3d5e2b9ba7919322d04f8f213c084110
29a47917b1232f979b234ce868e8f5374b42cfb6
describe
'12316' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZG' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
baf8d54476a8008d15e299823ddb53f2
94691a72944f8fbb11c737f180fe6ae0699bab84
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZH' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
49ff9e6d3f9aacb94eab9966833994f6
e6dd9ec586e7251dd80397d5e9449ded23871b22
describe
'132710' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZI' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
bc27f70c83928e24b026b5866e818869
fa448e987a57f026d81241ab3bca7d898e6e36fd
describe
'49277' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZJ' 'sip-files00134.pro'
c3b12c97fd3fadfcabe919e510799e73
b4017713f632a348a988068a6b9cc01a6796f325
'2011-11-18T22:09:36-05:00'
describe
'40209' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZK' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
83dff8db08a881cac86c7ce40def9f5f
84a9a3ac11b55ee635c685aeaa38dfb3a5147710
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZL' 'sip-files00134.tif'
e2a427d642c543ec0ba0fed03d82f39b
8b7b35665d588a7471a6e585fd0563eabb827d9f
describe
'1937' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZM' 'sip-files00134.txt'
8a8a5ae2d8caba912dedfe4211b8eb18
40c73d62ebbe55881d0a277ffd1e3ca32c448c9e
describe
'10390' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZN' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
f2ee27107fb321af5b5be784aac8f225
051ab4a79229cb098e0b75f815ec1c3fe7221aba
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZO' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
cef4e45289d012e0c05ca6980517f45d
90920437d59645221bb29e326f9c2088a0be5dd3
describe
'108588' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZP' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
3e03793cae34f47513f6317db4196a51
9ab476953e328d7c335b61fa473c5db6c9c296e7
describe
'40144' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZQ' 'sip-files00135.pro'
279d0e855c94ea4991224378899c8784
06974a692f1e92b4a1a2cfe5b2ed3998beee33b6
describe
'32817' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZR' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
c154bc1bb29715c7ba31cabe5ee06852
0dd4ca7bbc4ac88782d79c9797918cb0d8241a2c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZS' 'sip-files00135.tif'
a2746706fd41abcde97427aa269ecbce
030e376f33f1c4f100e877759bd5de3c06bb96e9
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZT' 'sip-files00135.txt'
edb5428c5c0c2971ec357dd61c235027
0aa6bc4e812992d67573450c6f306ef84c1ebd95
describe
'9026' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZU' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
2b1b8701e5ebf6ba704eb7674861f8ae
d24fe73ee83364338e03320f823b7571eacea97f
describe
'479948' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZV' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
6326e321cbc68facac7961c948d88a0a
d079ff5cccefacf8abd3c46b590ae75ab1092943
describe
'154262' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZW' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
0a71fe3d8cb616560eaceb108ee3ffbe
02a7da26046e63efd485e7cf9d6745c62e36427f
describe
'58674' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZX' 'sip-files00136.pro'
c69548f662b51b07a3323c0d8f1087e1
df0a25ea378cdce815f68c690411d5095b8e8fd8
describe
'47038' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZY' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
013961e5879aee6208a257708092e66d
9cb9cf012038c091f1c0e285202e7431dff2f1c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AAAZZZ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
31a783d8a16adf6116045c1bcaf40530
ea54c0cdeaf70673ea6b5f4945b2ec8ae97f7c3a
describe
'2312' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAA' 'sip-files00136.txt'
b3acdbedc27fb978ad4e414ae5a1ae60
18799243e9447d8a65d0c65f74922c57da099cf7
describe
'12041' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAB' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
cd22805dd45a1b00d02d5ce42b76f02b
d7a55eea3e2846f055e1a5bdaebf7c8819013828
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAC' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
f2277122bfb2868f17cad09f1cb01fea
26d29c7e36fdd17e723880b17cd36f7d92b979a6
describe
'150056' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAD' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
9687d27b001d6b172e566a2e5d7f4624
836231ce9f556b2389b045a7f5f088a7f73410cb
describe
'57093' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAE' 'sip-files00137.pro'
25f1ed88b3ff357bddf03423c3b7ad11
c613fb51e37e38c154bf75a85cbfd9f14ad0ba87
describe
'45100' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAF' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
ee98c35b299b60b694f7e3888b8a19e6
138f3298308e00a0cd68a5cf33ddd6d55365f25e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAG' 'sip-files00137.tif'
ec7961339476c09b7da5f23dd06a4649
7f793e4a8e3c339efe94ee128e4755e51ced8d4e
describe
'2258' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAH' 'sip-files00137.txt'
998a60016921515f76a53606f014785b
86abcc000c35843fbeee84064123317d5c9d1353
describe
'12042' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAI' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
a200bf818989da239b1591749045cbe1
82d70c2d9f778d78ae531463f9aa69833ef1fb9f
describe
'479634' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAJ' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
201ea824fb18c11fb4d81804c09c93da
3aa4e7bb708fab65413f3371e08f2cd3e665df2a
describe
'154862' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAK' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
4961540c5ff0f8bb977d87f70d5748db
abfdf4c0e5247900df95ef28943d5cc6181ae99f
describe
'58554' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAL' 'sip-files00138.pro'
7bef832065779c2fe2467a73f35eed5c
f19d5dde1753a84f795828bea13f872eae2bdb22
describe
'46864' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAM' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
f53964ec8edf991b4b585fc5ef92503f
89e9b332d19cba16cdf25d031fe12de4caff302c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAN' 'sip-files00138.tif'
e7f3e4f8d8aabc7340aadd27daf166b1
de8f2a7eafb9e389c6d84d152ec419f07a93caf6
describe
'2300' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAO' 'sip-files00138.txt'
116a96f8328a35fdf93002b4ae05e69a
0cc6b3c9c7f259d1e5b0f2efead23f27bb24077c
describe
'12221' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAP' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
6df1786d909dba2d789971741a951bb8
df89b17799551063b312ce9c092e9a925bfa93c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAQ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
15b3a30faeff175a81d55bcc5c5bf4fb
b4c53665dcc11dbfc7f40341354b3336196f050a
describe
'32293' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAR' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
d7a1de8cae98adb4f63c5aa7f0749cd8
200fde4f9370435aa13ba2261d3aa4044bd481b1
'2011-11-18T22:05:21-05:00'
describe
'7958' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAS' 'sip-files00139.pro'
47e67410b777f739df4e517063e617f3
4a1c7ae60d476a7b9c2c629130f03d49845f998f
describe
'9571' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAT' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
dcdb3977cc5a145937ff72697093d606
6cb7329f68dad457d3ef7b5c58f736cfde72b96e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAU' 'sip-files00139.tif'
7f3a2728a72cb33ed0c79ec74d48c36c
dbfb66862025d9e1750c193601a5ff3e8c9c66ed
describe
'324' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAV' 'sip-files00139.txt'
21f946d7b8a3c310ebd012dd1d6ec8d7
e49032cd0128c93bec32fab923c791cc73e465f6
describe
'2992' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAW' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
02d60a4eade03a9248391b431ee0c324
d8f3e28ed6c2a30f04c924079572317118873ce8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAX' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
0967b326a9dfca4d50541c1555305b70
c84558f4e4b850d9eed4bb1c294c0794b72c1dc9
describe
'114744' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAY' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
77418f88642fac6ec3f2dd3480aeab88
c2871c8809b4594ab90dc5eebbd5ce803f982b54
describe
'40819' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAAZ' 'sip-files00140.pro'
1c378373185f59073d918fe8158f43c1
05f4a3b4d6406225802a1cd98578459cddb9fdf9
describe
'34486' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABA' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
c5ceb1ed2eae5a3efc73563c0050b436
bddab2febbcf6278ecdbb1060501ccf75f399b84
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABB' 'sip-files00140.tif'
b14d027dbc1b41668bcf209a88e8d0e2
5c223f813558b802667c9ec891686bf2c420f8a4
describe
'1675' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABC' 'sip-files00140.txt'
6d23ab753876f093dd3fba02c7c08194
c6f97ec2c94010ae3bf9a855f8359acd52dbffa0
describe
'8716' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABD' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
40c1e5c1a8bfefdb34060a0867344f4b
795381c199dadf74654d71f3db6d7dc649231514
describe
'479820' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABE' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
bca83832e5734e85826ad9904268af5e
e3f44e4da41bca56c706437b20e42da9d9526ace
describe
'153768' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABF' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
daf3da149222927ec64aa53f9822ebf6
53a795678985ffddb8d23e0de091e819dfaaa63e
describe
'57138' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABG' 'sip-files00141.pro'
a29335fc3948d5177dce41c082a977eb
38613a944d3d85fd41e7f5615db3c570b721a9e9
describe
'45760' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABH' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
f953f9fa54bfb802cf28263e5d45130a
321d4e6b6c5c297daa73b8147b95f77144aab4da
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABI' 'sip-files00141.tif'
e25c3f1712a03636558c3aa944cb29c8
e9a965935c2ede8570859ff0ae3c27f6ef5b7fc8
'2011-11-18T22:10:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABJ' 'sip-files00141.txt'
4489e230c4dcbf150f914821938ddf99
196ada9c1207cb5be5bd5f3d69f6fd118ba5a96d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABK' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
316e27e42b4882b1402558018d7dbf2c
487058d2a794a33c3d28e65ac67ef2626f15df71
'2011-11-18T22:10:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABL' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
960b9b44d21cdeaa92198d9755e0b0c2
633d6739f82682db31179f17c407153926f029c6
describe
'155515' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABM' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
8789cdc7e6907fb9cf8c1a2257b3a22e
7cc6082e91436f49bdb1051fe223bdd95f1d8f12
describe
'58422' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABN' 'sip-files00142.pro'
3b7ac0d3fb339c453f8faa851f8da582
bd4341225ebacf56d0cc0ebcf813d1e5e3383f97
describe
'46867' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABO' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
2156432b868f79ef3f3a9148bab8e22e
6a3cd45de23f5ee49ec18fe886ab38eb072e0f22
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABP' 'sip-files00142.tif'
99f786b613e117b6f459101487c0fd82
d127edad86dd0bc8887d62cf95db843f42b5d9d6
describe
'2296' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABQ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
1b4c3c35fdcb0610f9b414fc6c657c92
8c6199ff18efbcd41494b061ea5a79fc7058fc7b
describe
'12378' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABR' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
5c0aa8127e59a68a5c8cdec73f11d2b9
b269076d9edca9231dd84f254076727cad3b5faa
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABS' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
0256ef614ae6d85a351d3f6d7bde0f64
b06dda81d8d930554e8b0a01cdfa17b19f3f2768
describe
'156187' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABT' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
82a3b53c353d217297047b984dc58cec
9efd47ab3c0984fad094b9667bd364377d3a9d14
describe
'58232' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABU' 'sip-files00143.pro'
cae11df76cc46b229400e6119728349a
92c270fd43f530b57085e7071013bc513bbf4f6d
describe
'47066' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABV' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
e2ea7d24bf8e0dbc8f61adbb7a05e491
c7bfed5c1cbac8f220d4afe9cd0baddb2afc8be4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABW' 'sip-files00143.tif'
84689dba8b4c5edac869814fed065343
2a3498fd8e584145d2f7d3b73d8cf1dba8c0386e
'2011-11-18T22:10:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABX' 'sip-files00143.txt'
1039bbb1b55553c4fa8c0ce64c53a838
a504a8241c0578b9db0a430a3aa115dde0bbc8d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABY' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
025ecd4fd0fa1a7a2a36ae596ab09986
5c529dbf42a932ce9d0dcec8db11aa47be9c9145
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABABZ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
c501d8942125b5ae3254bb363d904cd0
24c9ab544c5c750fa8852730894759bbfb9eb93d
describe
'154804' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACA' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
1c4a471ab4e5f5e55ff842cdc2c00b97
6d363cca27212f49f607f9d863ec930aada667ae
describe
'58573' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACB' 'sip-files00144.pro'
7479e9f9da99f8ea1e64c25e4b6578dc
936d1f99c4bdb15f62928f5b9b6e1cd27bbc1ab1
describe
'47308' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACC' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
10bb672217e0fbd8d388f032a6829e7c
4c7f6df65ba605bee4729d20f39f27e22af1a100
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACD' 'sip-files00144.tif'
92bce649500cb298123b708e9cad6968
f206913674ca2442f579af4aa991e90fc21fcae2
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACE' 'sip-files00144.txt'
f36b33a3812d530bd68a23f9caa17cea
3a50ec7081e4351cbe25abbea0220f6c5177434d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACF' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
99cbf8fdfcd4c0a545b527375a622205
938d81813ff355b9b3e565198b0efaea751363dd
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACG' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
5474ddc6beb7ca7f17f89fcfa619f3b5
1f5e5f22af2d71b71dae7fddfb7940904889688c
describe
'158366' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACH' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
bee6a2021ee159e6e035730f992690eb
5bf57d8ce122ff66851b38cc6c7c344a42c5d199
describe
'60149' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACI' 'sip-files00145.pro'
dcb6e71237f9c26aadeb1087e5e31a66
63b07bfe9ad3b9f83cc1ee70c852afd91c34c446
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACJ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
377b72423641fc2a0da7eef5fe23936b
5c9925bb2a9873194b253ec082f6251fb999960f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACK' 'sip-files00145.tif'
a88571baeb2df254f190850206dc5cb4
0b95652d4169627654877c6ca7ead32609b096a1
describe
'2366' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACL' 'sip-files00145.txt'
b6404cb514bd4abd29e2d72d6b497c4d
bd4294e7012b2b2c6edde547bb3bfa1436cdc367
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACM' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
aaeabcb40b799ad28c1837310a5218bc
ab1ffa96e5eba48902aa0a0aeef7bd987cede94c
describe
'479883' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACN' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
a8302e7b7d7955e5852028ef89dbe27f
eb7554b147bf98a68b6aba83d06f2ab99ffc8e81
describe
'155040' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACO' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
f37a23edbeec8752d86b4be7af47070b
8d2454775b4636bef555f981d0d318a427c83308
describe
'57725' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACP' 'sip-files00146.pro'
735aeb8c619c6cb889166840140b8b10
a8d51b616d58021064cab9b16633d1c18670939b
describe
'47321' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACQ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
079d25d6361bf02699498efa8c12be31
ebf4bbf07f9e9fa165e2c1e389c4b14cffe12b71
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACR' 'sip-files00146.tif'
7ef7efe7cd4c216d20b91f5323f91d28
36ebd581eb8992c2ea6608dcdb43bd1a1c65a12c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACS' 'sip-files00146.txt'
b974fa395d3173ab35a0568885766ece
19ceec275041baeac25e697e7327c4f52f79f2bf
describe
'12362' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACT' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
f336ea4727fca9c830c1550ea8055c25
5afaec085c91c685f6ea72e91bac4875dca123c7
'2011-11-18T22:09:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACU' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
e4a06b3f7baf8219795fddb75a3c53bf
02ef185bbbc7ca85843bfecc94ff4ac9c1d5a785
describe
'33755' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACV' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
54a1419f48a6a0512722b8188b03f597
c82886a6eee805c902dc34467af5d741af459299
describe
'8081' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACW' 'sip-files00147.pro'
7231009cd716e8323d9d1200d21afe9b
dfbf30c3c90a7b84346fc5bd62037c6c208a319e
describe
'9554' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACX' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
339dbfb6e4309712de05162a13669644
749d51b3289a0fd4a26f5444e580d6c18f2ba115
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACY' 'sip-files00147.tif'
ada876819a258557bcb3e19086d8e2ed
81d75be978bfac872422a0a9c06107a24f072d8e
describe
'348' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABACZ' 'sip-files00147.txt'
fbfc31d71da2893547cc511053d8a0c5
a41b891214a6e8dcc510c5d71179886408874f99
describe
'2870' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADA' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
ab89d66ad9bc60125ca7a3ba82217ce8
38c3f2ceb53b63491fa29076c643b785c6b832e2
describe
'480007' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADB' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
033bba8119890aadc0eb41a9fd4c8b5b
05250d1b0905f478c34a6e5a6b10e660bc7b2c86
describe
'117648' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADC' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
715f7f41618ed1b71502770e7b10d87e
56bcec7c336bb316cdf3e68f79ab1f47d54ccc30
describe
'43014' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADD' 'sip-files00148.pro'
ed572d39ae57e1c3a78633363b0fc913
d85f98505c02bd52370dd39b25e62cf90c83581d
describe
'34711' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADE' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
5d37ac35e959ed63d7550ec61c2cd52b
5ca0e6066f2eadb41eabaede5619c625bd0f95f6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADF' 'sip-files00148.tif'
13eabcac8d0f0f81794ad25391919d03
1cd40c0f5e62c394401955ecf94cd3cf24fb81a1
describe
'1781' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADG' 'sip-files00148.txt'
885d9e530941419f490eec08d7f55182
f3a01d3e74894e4a48b34bb991645cfd1c16f188
describe
'9411' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADH' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
284f84f02ef4a60f249591079ea3c288
25453b86bee08b92b803b67a3913b680d40bdab7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADI' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
a7d132fee904f37b93f1e49997374359
7decddb476f941d884c5dbe78d9e82f4b58f1bdb
describe
'154815' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADJ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
aa288cd4598604a2d5932c61e4ce2445
9f3d5f84564e41757c64a821411ca62c609a3ba7
describe
'60520' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADK' 'sip-files00149.pro'
3015262471c884a54eba8f51223f6587
aafc6f8d9c81647443dd6016b0fc574ea4d4486f
describe
'47000' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADL' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
21c377705987b10372fb41aa231f2dde
4ce0e59287108522ffdf837ab72d2b35d86a7a65
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADM' 'sip-files00149.tif'
ef586daf46260ff31cc51d9f8e2a88de
ff96e60c7cdacedee670647e431e45609d54577b
describe
'2393' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADN' 'sip-files00149.txt'
c7c3023313a40d522a0bc17f4c4a2478
820b41a701ec23e0a680b3aaba81a8517807e843
describe
'12349' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADO' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
3ed9a616326b262b400c9f8f00387022
ff0fd7fc9ca9017a4a66051a4796f6f1c536d0c9
describe
'479686' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADP' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
483c3c02711a1f4ec4f32d9e2437884e
26a31cfce2ff03a280f095e5c2abd4619e73aa0c
describe
'155300' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADQ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b7a3560724cc605a23249bac18b236e1
9c8d18d2ceef0eef99ef9cfa628b9636ffe278a5
describe
'58260' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADR' 'sip-files00150.pro'
13dcfb79c29587d217b99d2b3c7b348d
f871ce1b34f119993bede5765d5c6905f8998a60
describe
'46605' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADS' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
1d5bab77a012bc393d6159111e3311e3
50d6bd8f67ac1a7f3b2da5a6d974def3d50c3ca7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADT' 'sip-files00150.tif'
a83e186ad8e0f146f61e3a7095ff4472
06bd83f6511c20fe2e8ccacd0c23b764cbb23450
describe
'2309' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADU' 'sip-files00150.txt'
210bde3fc258bbeeb9c5d8c7345be6cf
332f2cfe9fe58bd57dc47ebbda352a18f725dbfc
describe
'12204' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADV' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
d73c61ef13cd7b1d8322ccc5e174a296
c247f5027925d25f44c132457fcdad0da0aaa2fb
'2011-11-18T22:07:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADW' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
95fd588f35a836a321241a84c5f977c9
8e9b4615dbd9933430eb01c4e8083e11750c202f
describe
'155301' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADX' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
bdb472fbc880892efca14aeadffc7c77
f6652efabd6e46be27b01796fbb8f9e1e34e08b9
describe
'58496' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADY' 'sip-files00151.pro'
205496bb8ae09f7ef100a471bde7a648
40144ae7bab846a1e515cda1f44119d5554af7f1
describe
'47674' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABADZ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
4b1a1a53a36cc01edd661f2728ae1232
6f22e02a21baeb969891b8028ba76ffd26d6eb58
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEA' 'sip-files00151.tif'
38fdc396eb984544851495ccebd4be58
291600080b6c74f7b2f1e531afd98137f653c536
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEB' 'sip-files00151.txt'
10ba386bc19b7334530cbd279426bbde
158791ef06e464545d238e1dc28ce02979c1457f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEC' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
e79d54312a13d4c40c82ea9cd0a49178
a6c3c803c9aaa9e6c0b01a6a075f053983ad3f08
describe
'479848' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAED' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
9688a266c0a48650eac6b1d5d76bf46d
70ed3fbce58492b86f87612dbfe27693544ebeb5
describe
'158095' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEE' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
9841ac395c02563eed2f8313ef9732db
56a638798e93cd066b11ae2b934f71d8d7886b4e
describe
'58821' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEF' 'sip-files00152.pro'
aca0ddedbd3b788baaed6d942088ba7c
1f71f4f0f95610b83ef4dcb61ea15b4a4113faa4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEG' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
88084316e344cc23dfab639c1db8a852
c6fc81a4b389964312aa1f003359e86427e84656
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEH' 'sip-files00152.tif'
0a302642bd4b3e997cad1c030a46057b
c85c7269af8b14f140479c431f03abfeef138dc8
describe
'2310' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEI' 'sip-files00152.txt'
7d048ff209f37e0cc5caa837e508814a
a1411f92e69e51d0b8dc4c5f78512730004d0a7a
describe
'12743' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEJ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
58fbb255869cb8076e72d3c4c2db864e
d492c8aa0b81a3d68badbc9fde3f7db2b5255f6b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEK' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
7b487f9d4b95e0551616bc271add322d
5e51b3acd8f1a41a0fb8355d378231fa4c1f6d98
describe
'123806' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEL' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
3529696dc0f927b1c019795c1be4e533
39b021a110684bd449ead385b84053a438a5ac18
describe
'1866' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEM' 'sip-files00154.pro'
ef5a3191e07ac15d826e5d655f8feb67
a5a0e80ef657ca839fdd271137c6c5099403fa86
describe
'31077' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEN' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
ae02ab8c45547a3d7300e0ebce864139
aac82ec5d5939e1611a40dbdc65f758ee6b39ee9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEO' 'sip-files00154.tif'
0c2c5ea0ecc0398aa44d3a45b5e2778a
bbf6dd7d7a010983a974fccbf14fb6e854ac8079
describe
'133' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEP' 'sip-files00154.txt'
55b1e5c6ecc8304598f8a7c594bd9787
e61a175929cfa207b8a554d49afece00f3a954e7
describe
Invalid character
'8939' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEQ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
a68050a447696b89209eca093986f41c
4dca1cca5abb8cfc6d4b633db910398952f6a897
describe
'480030' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAER' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
825a806c0d9d4fe80c78b00742ba9390
54e09526d96eaedba193ada575e593aecd5b6668
describe
'152298' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAES' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
afe9c0a43e8c66713cfc379ae3016bd5
93bd792d8eac44fa32ba4b658c1fc7cb4e5ebe84
describe
'57918' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAET' 'sip-files00155.pro'
d8c7708c8d96beac07fe458d9543c343
e1ff5aae9f837460ba201e622c518cef2f8c918a
describe
'46147' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEU' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
b50f7fa122102f624865c5e785b83db8
4a393febc20d6f26b6f946a894d0011809ec05d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEV' 'sip-files00155.tif'
101be118d98c30851fd5aecc441ebeb2
96e4d94e4f6530c0148dbdfa4b2dc005a137b4a3
'2011-11-18T22:10:05-05:00'
describe
'2306' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEW' 'sip-files00155.txt'
68d6cd085206942874f7821b71d2f41a
1908cbca12ececc1cfb73d32d95d43eca5b04d4b
describe
'12069' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEX' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
12cee9af39071734bf2c56f0879674fd
d18fab2bc9c1f5fc1181251e8dc3d3cb3d0b8bc0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEY' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
4b402af3ab88d40c2fbd1b3aee9a0cfc
4316aaab9acea1078f47c04201d61bf088ce2874
describe
'157768' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAEZ' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
1e09907c7c1c0bf1fac42262043ea1b0
1954b88c4f73dc77f1d9aaa03aed2a1f2763389e
describe
'59154' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFA' 'sip-files00156.pro'
bd94931a164b52a3302cf0200458503e
2836776ee5cf38378fe0cd0fefa28d4a96a643b8
describe
'47421' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFB' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
a08ec7cce8b49055af2bb09dc90b989d
aedc2a443f5befe50ef6a125f31dd4b3b014828d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFC' 'sip-files00156.tif'
0df93d30b33545217de409192a054229
933ccf117dafd144f464dc075af0daa7b0a3b864
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFD' 'sip-files00156.txt'
f7915c3ef9309e956ee46de4bbb720f6
286f18a6a9f06766f1c1fea89e6b289c4bdcff5d
describe
'12335' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFE' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
7d3b22e0a1171f3af4d29e326bb42dc6
de6d9bef33daadc22c1296f31048df3e0107c469
describe
'479879' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFF' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
c81cb08cd6ce43ff78a081963bab7545
21feb9ba79bee333e74d86f8ff4e152d249fd172
describe
'122081' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFG' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
7fa3a5c396bbe36c35441821686e6ce7
a3282571093a6a54f82edf8947025cab82284242
describe
'44912' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFH' 'sip-files00157.pro'
9a98de0c4c41af5663dbcd708bdcf147
d0b5742e9631ba8378d7434f89944c99b23d0362
describe
'36195' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFI' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
29b73b73a868ba4cade07175f859095c
d3d3ce233aa842f2830539daddc398c5fc20e3cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFJ' 'sip-files00157.tif'
ea1e47d588a63819abcd372d5311c831
bf8f5475d61816e1e110bca4ecbc9bc02aa0dda5
describe
'1817' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFK' 'sip-files00157.txt'
f45ae149c4d3f50f0bb5a3b46aaae841
1bfb963ceb64d1ad0eb663d81be88fceeb5ceaef
describe
'9602' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFL' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
a152725951171712c7586e9b2273cd24
c3c1746f53e73b6c7bf06de0f8e42597c15d0c0d
describe
'479684' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFM' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
006e1d0f5cebc9484a2f2ac505be21d7
0aec6be8ba7dff8172d9afd76ef58d802559d8f9
describe
'158340' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFN' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
5900bad4da174132a6e7d35ea48670b0
4629f148f157fefc7100b78ee23612a5c4dc4ba3
describe
'59982' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFO' 'sip-files00158.pro'
10e7f73df67a170fb8ee229dd14f22b1
25f15079cb8c75da3184b643020e4c80a413ce87
describe
'47478' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFP' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
e98c9eb00b0f663cf0d6c5d2452b79f2
569d7bec93d0a9c78ebd0e43c2dcea99a452c7b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFQ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
9c3c6cac09cffc0dc963ecfd726d7f75
e5fbfa0d68a24aea00f540e050deb03f5ec0efa8
describe
'2389' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFR' 'sip-files00158.txt'
034496abbac9ff6e8cae085aa64faf4f
c1f36f877d4bec23633fa974146f710a43ab7d33
describe
'12353' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFS' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
5640ab478a8ee78af940245f1c8394a8
dd76ab2b3d221baf2e0f075513c746499ac380cb
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFT' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
31fd7c1a0d9e38437cc4e721c3a87c28
cb857fce022ad69cee3f7cd0ec918a234804eb7e
describe
'159575' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFU' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
98be402e765143d77d5a2b1dae356aa9
200cba159f4b7eabd49b2a78a9912f215f02ee5d
describe
'59663' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFV' 'sip-files00159.pro'
78e1f739f9a865c8bfbee0d2676241df
57509071f084004d1a79cc2e0c23c1cd7f88027e
describe
'47944' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFW' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
2e5d815bf1a0c0cf33e1af9f8d123157
98d4f7e275fec08d09c1932f9896ec3087dbe4a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFX' 'sip-files00159.tif'
db909b9a81e07847040d164a184f9e22
0085af7a4faa93e9ffd7738eb3c8516173195d9d
describe
'2353' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFY' 'sip-files00159.txt'
4dd0733a411fd5100e60d867188421ba
bca1e09acad51788c0739f57b83c178c4200a10a
describe
'12411' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAFZ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
aeacf7d592d2267f677f0e22097df9bd
ac90fa275e6b3366c4da5e3944552fcdd2b2d9a2
describe
'479635' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGA' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
961336f2902083513fd06724c8192dd3
7a175464f9fb3da36d087328a7239fc2d7301ba1
describe
'158433' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGB' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
c1139da2f4157f39a84981243ec438be
c08e319ede671fdb8b355144842259f23a97c465
describe
'58625' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGC' 'sip-files00160.pro'
d9fdecf8885db9be850aeae7abd2952d
561657cb9397e38697fd3cd3e183ddec1292ea60
describe
'47952' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGD' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
001bb7077e01c3006f1532b36d4381c3
833a8dcf0de0c4ed8ac6ca539560e51b06857a7e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGE' 'sip-files00160.tif'
774d2b0593098d3bb30a32a8f5a1289d
96465342b3ff9395a74e1dd3aafc73434f3e44d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGF' 'sip-files00160.txt'
28311c84ad0b513865e1613163067369
adc37f5b46b649459846490c5c2520a661f65ccb
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGG' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
4b1706482d431c3ac390c6a8dc3bea17
2436d8498581365990569c7f0af47ac732e582e3
describe
'479895' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGH' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
89450a30ded907b2fa7cdc91e8d77fad
7ff94838c71381348c6cec293eff832ca38737d2
describe
'151953' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGI' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
0f117c3fb43d70a10bd54b6452fd8ad8
946635932308d47671af2ccb732250ba5ce902db
describe
'57306' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGJ' 'sip-files00161.pro'
f8afcab66ec23575c3f44ca277f20d08
a296d261df84f88b04b3a1321f498dcb3c8eb408
describe
'46288' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGK' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
02523d728409551941a09f66467b5424
7002520d4a3c351f68bf98d1b1171996f53a9e34
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGL' 'sip-files00161.tif'
e942d6489dac40bd8feb7cebc7875f57
4c73f26a5a1fb75d1772e879d213579f57a287e7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGM' 'sip-files00161.txt'
9e69eca5561cb11f768a2da5e2e7859a
0c4debb60e140cfc00ac4c41d54c4988ce2d5dd4
describe
'12375' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGN' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
5ffed1902138810195d1f556e042965f
1e2b009c182a155910aa545496ae4bbcb040a318
describe
'479633' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGO' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
fe5c4f21b8c9a57efaf518febcaf6f8f
456c98783523df1a82ba13286811b0feb9217dc3
'2011-11-18T22:05:26-05:00'
describe
'155510' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGP' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
ce570e3a0da9eb9c9f20e45fff0bde79
6baaedecb2a654b7be805dcf9331ed8337bb5c03
describe
'58609' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGQ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
0a32210f095996c9589e1a7554924c64
d5352e73918d7020aa73482b31b3ea279ed714c7
describe
'47021' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGR' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
91f1115ef8dad45f2b626551bfb01839
2dedb81f8db0d5c3c97ecdd275b7c6b4e870ea1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGS' 'sip-files00162.tif'
2769f8e663ef0651fbce0418eaae9100
61c0e63f2e6785c6cbe552d7c9a02269a30986c7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGT' 'sip-files00162.txt'
bfd8965beca22efe0a6f3744c2ef26fd
746e647b9a488bc514715bef676bd337d672b6d4
describe
'11962' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGU' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
f5baeaeb3f9c3d4f01b47e9fc2b4a534
14664a1ac3bcef250aebabc3806ea70131c49048
describe
'479856' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGV' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
5dc4dd69b8e6edc37c412f394db7ec13
05c884388c612729db8002051ea239f8504f63d8
describe
'155836' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGW' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
4327951fe1240b46a54cc978d66963e8
808a27e5a953f020989e00d6a58df69883196865
describe
'59132' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGX' 'sip-files00163.pro'
17d6e860dce6876ff3ed3943fe11df82
c3eccc03e36303f03002eb962c2d7b3c5a99d8ac
describe
'46761' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGY' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
9130bf16587dbff5e48e84f863c34960
2f202ef2d0f2182307aa6af4cc8118cac3fd8865
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAGZ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
c2434f340d32d9e86d7af4788a757219
6b38cd72bba4e23d2e358dd95ebed387182e5b55
describe
'2336' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHA' 'sip-files00163.txt'
5d333a914ac901172c6c986c1a413114
e554ae657e561a417c8d5aba4a0ada751de91d38
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHB' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
a3d0b96ddbdc732ffe9bd471b0d66208
a29c63564a9b0453cead04353159054f641818a1
describe
'479659' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHC' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
bcbb87be9e634ab0c24f81f882082d70
e84a86ff406704ebfc1a0fc5b310a1202a7c0b7f
describe
'34390' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHD' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
8a06f0fb37ba6c6a090e5998cad6b60c
bf954d7b5265f493b996c29ed932debccbf2ea77
describe
'7849' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHE' 'sip-files00164.pro'
681c10487bd35a5330065fd3ae46a033
0dcfd9461ba01cb4ab1aa55d722ba87cb3d079dc
describe
'8868' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHF' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
3e23f0659c6aa45c494e23d5742c3070
64b3f627fe0745574c2e4133db6733f02b47fe6c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHG' 'sip-files00164.tif'
2c0a1092ccb093678f86e67be1857354
c4da2cdd72fc547cc18de05d930cc4a76c66d149
describe
'321' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHH' 'sip-files00164.txt'
68d1ee414bff2263c92356cc91a0d1e0
04fd26ee7e2c8e4b438684b27ca69866bdce7dba
describe
'2662' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHI' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
d09103543f8d96625f03123aa55767a3
af1031764e2ba1983676e82a3319309dd0dfcc54
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHJ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
730f164646afbbedeeeb2dc4d086bba3
6cd5c0065ec2ba4ba45fa97e0144c6696e6f4495
describe
'119155' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHK' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
d244425df36771708008cdef136bc3b1
f630f47d6f438138598a7b338c94a92b9504e3ea
describe
'43206' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHL' 'sip-files00165.pro'
a93d71358764335264b7728f4876fe8e
b1fa1b190187fd8378a8cc18f21f6f236fbef3cb
describe
'35724' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHM' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
001f510949eaea5abf171351694a9e0a
ae569f0b7b016fb53dc34b5bb50fded6efe8209d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHN' 'sip-files00165.tif'
9538a99525533b2eda339a9fa0dc3198
966bff43dcabb020d46bcff58ff2df420c0be72e
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHO' 'sip-files00165.txt'
29960914d26a70653df917cb1ea55568
6e7a93c5b9ce20688fc94e72ae89da6e098ae03f
describe
'9451' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHP' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
8360ca064c08c11091f50ba4970f71f5
3b1b402f5484c4506d22eaa96227d80c69258a69
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHQ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
506c4bcc519a1896e43773469df4246f
b3565c140321afaa4b606f9c41be57c22800f6d3
describe
'158988' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHR' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
5bfa2ec7a7dce57840715b71e4e6ab80
6bd2f1705a98ff8163cbc5d47678a016fa75807a
describe
'57842' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHS' 'sip-files00166.pro'
20d7c88d7d36212ed9d2881a7713295c
9ff51899a46c295bd161b43b2f20a67db7be9d54
describe
'46801' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHT' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
807b026eb05f331196f5bfba7f2dced0
e62469877707c3772344d1d95e9a3ebaa3ad0b92
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHU' 'sip-files00166.tif'
549bb2464c2888ae3b5c6a35b5ee8381
aa48eff8ab0ef5aa9c3e721e1a87e60f2451e8c4
describe
'2279' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHV' 'sip-files00166.txt'
aa3f1cad26a3d99c93a04250fc7cc431
27d1870f5be429772d5c0bbe8a023e281fe4b4cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHW' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
718a34568e4eaa9c7b126309332df565
21c4ce871a32b1f79875e4e6e0889f3f1c1fdd54
describe
'479707' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHX' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
c55f2f984cd363d3b86202f3fcd61f49
136e1a712958270a61d566bf4fd4de70bb2f51e3
describe
'158005' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHY' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
4db46d06a2050e74e161cfb105cf17c4
88bda5aae8d8fad97850ca512911fee8931f4923
describe
'58834' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAHZ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
421b3fd6601934234da2c8b130c6c1af
6af7f8978070bfdfaa6bfcc8c1611987f8ef062d
describe
'46480' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIA' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
b656541d3c45ee4317c46f4d283d7ff9
6c431a8cf67ba987fc1f89c100397a598018d2d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIB' 'sip-files00167.tif'
1068b5f5bb8eb454def84aa551b725c7
4ec040d8aac621da746554c4b1c3809c46d0a4ee
describe
'2345' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIC' 'sip-files00167.txt'
63ec7d750a6be02beb03d4801258778f
2f5a58fe636ebe1a028212fd1577ad9f4da6198c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAID' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
86622001002a6baac42e7162ab160736
210a9cba07773c269a49c1083f35edb5c17643d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIE' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
aa4e03da0a0bcc7e026469778cf95011
8440b2f7d9405e0a2199e1c885d4d89f50f48b6b
describe
'155885' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIF' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
b80eff38e4e7c0af7fe4557d3b5b3039
7f1888854714602590eb48895ee4486d9a0db40f
describe
'57759' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIG' 'sip-files00168.pro'
5206904a9e70a4a1e99b80b030193472
0be06c7f4827822ef092ecc9ca879a4d504cf24d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIH' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
ae0f48dd1261cd1bdca3ab3c54f528d0
0698ed740f0f2089d5211d035fae05782711dd91
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAII' 'sip-files00168.tif'
1afdedeff9649cbbf3dfff34b9c4c403
5c00a1d05ae8be09b8ce210bcfe9b8d6fde4760c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIJ' 'sip-files00168.txt'
5cebdc0bf0c7974787d3cec449c1a9ca
f289dbcc9f5b2ec642be6aae5f700f7bf4cca5a9
'2011-11-18T22:09:31-05:00'
describe
'12556' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIK' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
82d843421bb5383606cf00f4e3df789b
3f1d378b416e9585db68b9832a3dad67ea23cecd
describe
'479691' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIL' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
5a3c7c03d2dc8bc396778ca42c107584
8639622c5acc7e1c935a23eb30f0ded20dda13e9
describe
'151657' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIM' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
599c9243e1a69a451fcb4b1c30d624d3
d89a17d5ff52f95d29abf07124c302f05e41eb80
describe
'56545' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIN' 'sip-files00169.pro'
9b3405e9a6bf2082069064215fc2b428
d3b6696ab48e47edc45f8b9908af4784f48a63aa
describe
'47035' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIO' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
9f58c259d5586b054544e05b3c09d4d8
9198dd9ff9d2c2193bd5255141660415398f3975
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIP' 'sip-files00169.tif'
f02b07a3bbb1f1b04fea6c9a1ecdd3e7
8a27bf150236f6a1e55e36dbce37277c30e2c553
describe
'2254' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIQ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
3724239c6829db734867714f6d3de5e8
e36a016d11fee75f45f8a43f0d8f6910dd49c01e
describe
'12549' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIR' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
a10076e44ba52bd5a4079f1de1847233
0d89b49a2f8b3c8996a751b21c60bc1f5488a6ef
describe
'479884' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIS' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
a2cd89306b28287bc63a333910fd7e9b
301ecf863f4343abd71f6bf9d997360694d4ed85
describe
'153622' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIT' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
ee0dce2e5d241120ef4b51f41ee03628
db60e7c0f8600eb3f9f315019b53c046ae3f3b89
describe
'56320' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIU' 'sip-files00170.pro'
13f57687d6fa7e4fe7eb4b914dac08d7
b0a3935eed111e05e31ab9c9bd6248b8a0430c53
describe
'46817' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIV' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
4e694c540e7c684d2dd0267a223498f8
b6124c373907099b6ed5b3f20b666ea1b634d9ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIW' 'sip-files00170.tif'
dee2ffc87b3cce6f1f7bd86038ec7111
76ebda9086cd964e58e0b4943d969448b402883e
describe
'2235' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIX' 'sip-files00170.txt'
de0c9a37a1ee9cc68428e51b17ec48fe
ba91bc66e36e491d61ae8d03cce31fb99b76cb4f
describe
'12330' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIY' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
2d1ada185387082ff86362cd4ddf4715
74d48afed0c33a417ee1073c0661b8ffa10f1eec
describe
'480190' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAIZ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
ba3082dd773e32e8f89e3a5f73603e82
fbdf4673f7e9a42dd825e2f84493bbfa85c13132
describe
'152380' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJA' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
fd2f06555c1ff71c6e8d8d19c5a1d522
a25e7e77cf4332685d390f5e619ec5269b698c68
describe
'57593' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJB' 'sip-files00171.pro'
932cd23e2d65c78a945ca97e93a3ec19
f470651e40c671a7bc609845af6d2c8ac5a526c7
describe
'46415' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJC' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
533dd30bcfcae549af3c4a874f252f71
0c0ff743a453c4fdab0c168ee05b47a6ac3af03c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJD' 'sip-files00171.tif'
03b8f87cd3d1f2d6a4947edb9c2a4346
86691dcfa330fd9d2488e6ef708033d73b145b9a
describe
'2301' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJE' 'sip-files00171.txt'
57006323187fdcc98078d40087bd2c5d
404539837b5edd6b351781eae9be7d6629a0a1b7
describe
'12082' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJF' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
cfe744c4f73da3732df3b01ee66d6922
4c6ca76a326624e9720a79a576fefd3190a28afa
describe
'479676' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJG' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
4961003f5c93da3780291dd160a7bc18
2a5a5c1a6b4b13228e45602ffcdab94f46f8f53b
describe
'156149' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJH' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
303a48e17f2cdf266f8579a087aafa5b
ab96bc4882d8e66d6e6d45ee3d3a4e5847d872c6
describe
'58256' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJI' 'sip-files00172.pro'
e8482dff7bec058f53ce6955bf4c73e2
01bdc8474a748347c090f391048fdd7da848a05a
describe
'47364' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJJ' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
08c19128e0149268dfd928f1aaaafb83
6e56bfa838a4a13173581211af4414ad2af6eab6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJK' 'sip-files00172.tif'
7c89e2e0fe8bfb0387f4102bf337e70f
2f072ef7026d1611f3a66dda432dc990427883b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJL' 'sip-files00172.txt'
0d9784daadf94d5f744a72cce4b077d3
6af94eea4a5ecfc99198ed52ce59b5f2ffe3a01a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJM' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
9e506a1127dfa630abf88d25da1bac41
e5458fa7ab292e76d05f97b46141d9a237de10ae
'2011-11-18T22:08:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJN' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
b71a11d798fdf87b408073580a280344
9ce52fe9902542dfe373b29eba91c4d48e446b2b
describe
'159837' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJO' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
29ccff4a707e0a60ec0ab6767a7d201d
60b1d747e317d9c10c1447f31746b0a0426a3fe6
describe
'60388' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJP' 'sip-files00173.pro'
184fecb0ce1688db6c30b44b0fe7cbce
e90ed22416666c0b5f02a99b4d332c899cdc12c0
describe
'48709' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJQ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
428667ce42b5ab0bc768f67180ca2cab
382dd20f2bf333ab593e1271b683d15d5ed95d8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJR' 'sip-files00173.tif'
6c6d2757fbbb6bf7fd965d8851fe3e3c
3a7f422e063e444b654ccad09230d2f9e534a53a
describe
'2382' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJS' 'sip-files00173.txt'
6c681d7df889cd1ffffa8a3f261c0b79
a65b5774c17909e3a3f9e15525ac46f50c43b269
describe
'12408' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJT' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
44750bec45d91a779183c8d27052524d
8b23d3c48dea5e415d9d94c162ee30bda3625002
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJU' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
31ea958f6a905339375bc49e3d3c2be0
2d91d5a051d61a0b5731da95ca366ea5110d2f40
describe
'92963' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJV' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
f5210fc5f7c3249aa5540239e9e6ba8a
5dada52c44627ae5e89e3fd60707259032f54500
describe
'32218' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJW' 'sip-files00174.pro'
bb6cb0c614f534879490843a118e3934
1717c41b2866ef59baa7af4773f0aabf96c85e67
describe
'27000' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJX' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
86e9bb0d1a2831f9603c1984edf80cc4
1be65c788540846b825bc9e497df16c102e85502
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJY' 'sip-files00174.tif'
7ea286562720329557cef74f9081487e
1253e5c13dca482d3bcd996135e1b365892631a2
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAJZ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
a68182e411b058beed995830ce12d980
7b5e6ffa84435749ed580b02be84b31582540f26
describe
'7340' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKA' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
18994592037fd173d79774181a43fd45
d4943650e3223e4bc684e944107dab008b825db6
describe
'479896' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKB' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
0a7e964e0207ca7cfa55eec40239f31d
2b8b23178f0c70fbc613e2d1c6667dc658da796e
describe
'122740' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKC' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
2e21999c4684fb6ba22cc7c0747bdc9c
8c03bf6192de745bcb20a191a58af9a75ae83ba1
describe
'45573' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKD' 'sip-files00175.pro'
b327a2112c2658e58fa8002941e538e4
844ad19e2054138ffd29a3054e7b3dd5c23941f2
describe
'36762' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKE' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
467272e6da6fe8d41dfd836978f10267
66b87980d6890038b7c4e4a886cfa9920984e73a
'2011-11-18T22:09:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKF' 'sip-files00175.tif'
8295822c8117b93c327c180ecf08b918
7a31b8ef4353bf717530bffce8bf1c3e8ab1b73c
describe
'1858' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKG' 'sip-files00175.txt'
c5f737ee0e438876005b594713fde1c3
ab2006c990222058a744a6e2426a243402589578
describe
'9580' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKH' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
9c438a8c61c290946aea052cb09f7e10
172ae84044535b70afce459f608cb1d886e3d47b
describe
'479953' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKI' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
71396c483185367c8157c5f29eb62471
6744601ee9cc7dc888e47592f773939bc8912554
'2011-11-18T22:05:28-05:00'
describe
'157246' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKJ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
8ee89f33bc793ab53ad8167a88ab049f
633246b9691ad31438454bce7aaa459814200bdc
describe
'58963' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKK' 'sip-files00176.pro'
2e63187d7d40542aa4351b68fac99395
1d5d3df7e80dbda9941304e0d2fcea9c31732194
describe
'47127' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKL' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
7a6fa76be1554707132d202321b1fcf8
18d67a0d2c2638800d83f96a75359fbc3ee2b79f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKM' 'sip-files00176.tif'
54a42083c9c66da40a615ba02a5c918c
b234cb19261e25506beb2ff98edbd185e2ae080d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKN' 'sip-files00176.txt'
ae0d16a2f04c74574bac091b06113688
a693137859f1b63d2c29f9ecca9d00bd7f81722d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKO' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
6715d0beb34d0279c9d7dbc4a4836143
3490b89c53dde97545865962535b8430802abf0a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKP' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
cad64b45a01499e2c0c0830c13734d6b
6fc33129a2cda5eaabbf9a106cfb7da8e6751fad
describe
'155598' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKQ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
0748636f2bf29761ed12ac86db8f8089
55a2c36c13513d939d856cf64f33ae4429881e05
describe
'58773' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKR' 'sip-files00177.pro'
c4ad91924b93b9245aa5502d5a32d7e1
51530471f8894c3da1289e9fe6ae3dcf364b2806
describe
'47545' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKS' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
f22bf0d4105b4e72ea6d7560d024d906
f9047dec03b69afc60e7c1a8896efd4f597747ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKT' 'sip-files00177.tif'
829b15cb6ae970acbd7fb99540bc8597
45ef88b56d9c53faee737a21d43dcb3a9240fea0
describe
'2327' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKU' 'sip-files00177.txt'
0b7e7b5d2b5203e9afdaffd1ed36a790
a23c189eae44582de91073574a6aa7fba096961d
describe
'12190' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKV' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
d999a9fa3a5beebd3d5e6ec85e9b4251
b6c70922912ccce60a7027bb513232f6ddde9dba
describe
'479621' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKW' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
ee2b8fd2f0c3f13e9c58d2c0f5d34c4c
a03c91c377b36c7c2f5993ec0b355f23779e0321
describe
'156698' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKX' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
81ba9aaa7d96c0f5137d6aac3bd2d025
b99f52b53635beeca92041e2d4b184252c799e2a
describe
'58454' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKY' 'sip-files00178.pro'
8c2c235ab27c835f6a7acbd144bf0fe7
d137920dfcae72f75d4e4676ec8e730da38422ed
describe
'47310' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAKZ' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
e878b211d314b8703be4539b9be087dc
45cf8932533286c95dcc975c28c3f5d00ac8fe65
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALA' 'sip-files00178.tif'
f64426e0e8e81a9834f1982ce5649780
c586f9e0c0496944981cce4bc5c60c86f6b4081c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALB' 'sip-files00178.txt'
c22190e9c77284eb2fa98fcf49217053
dd888fe3035af0e9db0d89f1143682ac26f7a776
describe
'12345' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALC' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
71765663955d2e0830428f64d7bd8517
0f032510b25e13ded31751bf98e5df6e52456843
describe
'479852' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALD' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
470b73b789915cef723e873b3eeb0342
f44db4e45b9e1028d0696fa8f51b4fa655db926b
describe
'156197' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALE' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
fde93af83b1e6c7be3f1b8262401eaa0
65d76c5b633387f9c329f7a65adeb992c22ccb7b
describe
'59223' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALF' 'sip-files00179.pro'
759b78cf859ba1cba99d6c54890a31a2
6507a7993032dfbcbc40f41c344341dc647cb86e
describe
'46746' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALG' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
34d7128eca5d4009e45ef2d71c418258
626372103146bd72407fc11f30a0ace088d83bfc
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALH' 'sip-files00179.tif'
142fee37c03701607606e9a782633019
2b5bd4e9170cc4ec69cdfc4063120ac6168b6434
describe
'2330' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALI' 'sip-files00179.txt'
8b82b653ecab7cae7b13183ec0a366dc
b24c5e4186a52df7e2504c2e402898d9883a9d19
describe
'12264' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALJ' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
2e638902f95a949cee050658820acdef
85da692c5f19ead5b8af078d6c85864344163e4f
describe
'479615' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALK' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
2f9bbc59240318a5bff13caa96ea02db
9f9d46a440732e33b452e2e7df700e6f52339dc0
describe
'158982' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALL' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
aac2f6fcf66bb4eba401ca6bc4799794
e927d243e0af89b029dd3b5dba45a0dbe3a1c67c
describe
'58167' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALM' 'sip-files00180.pro'
ade30eed193388a2c592e51d115d37a4
b5cadb5d05a2d42c726b233a2a0c5d4db7135d82
describe
'48792' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALN' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
60f17825427f05ed17a8b8e372203734
1b6b1a64554d3d69e46d00ad9134087d6b6a21f6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALO' 'sip-files00180.tif'
77c2401a801e9b6f842d826641c593d5
c328b9fb83aad27629e873c7420b339a118019b7
describe
'2333' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALP' 'sip-files00180.txt'
4a73a103f12079407f5367be709e3095
d262ca5c1473e0011e3e938705646ee482de47d1
describe
'12569' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALQ' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
217a1fe4ae1204dae1166c54a199d091
e1c068c37e26f88dc5c6a6dec99885befdecb141
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALR' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
0063630bd7543c52d79935b5c1d486f3
109f1d73e78e728a2bc2369b9f1ddf01d7116ec3
describe
'83969' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALS' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
8489b74e829f63cb62157ddcf24d5091
d5b8ddbace934d4371c9ab481e05c7bf4368644a
describe
'28120' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALT' 'sip-files00181.pro'
bfedf2398e1eb57070ee347c7fa8f6e2
7dfd69232c55cb3fc020d56d3e3a14c91ccf5486
describe
'24352' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALU' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
4f0a0a3c412efdca10e894e32e619292
17ba66d4d88ff73513dd035dd9b6224808f4ee11
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALV' 'sip-files00181.tif'
bde05d0367ea223eaac752f69df179a4
eec518d10562b35145476e4ad3ed8c44dca20b21
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALW' 'sip-files00181.txt'
6fb0a0572c6a0bde8d563a62d6048618
6bb7a8ed9bcc588039cb1fd8e756ec170933031f
describe
'6664' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALX' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
ab6969709c97bdde14ab573302378540
88304f7e08420b946dbd5e0546219e20a41144e9
describe
'479772' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALY' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
ae8e353cc9596f4c7b76259dcb65776c
babb7a273bb28da6a2142258f65c89143db420a5
describe
'118105' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABALZ' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
0afa8bc1564acc877ec3968eae73713b
bc4c9d5f84e7b29731f74be0b73a7c179d5fbe02
describe
'42336' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMA' 'sip-files00182.pro'
5bf1afe3787f4ab787c86ea9b5546d9a
f619296250e29b978340d303b941e3bf0980adfb
describe
'35569' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMB' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
db3c5ca107cc2aca417b569fc00e0008
4b45affb932d4abb0fd7395939e30c47eabd53f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMC' 'sip-files00182.tif'
5c585ec6549aab2225d1be84aeae0f38
be735fe451b1e2c0992e89619b3c8c2c23b46b9f
describe
'1756' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMD' 'sip-files00182.txt'
2bbde47a142af6dcb300eda9f208806d
8ac0d712ca9cb47caa0f4b32845607ae3e5ca349
describe
'9589' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAME' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
2827fab7023294a898b2e22377b632db
580a272466e86dc6cdf5ec8dd749d3038c717028
describe
'479851' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMF' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
5c67f5e5a9b2a86337a6eb5d486ff038
8b2f79955aae6cca9e1aa0c990ff1810b2083815
describe
'157407' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMG' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
4f62aa1f7df96b0d007619c79095a599
9e14cbab72e0aead3d94200fd7f96c0ce4c0c0a5
describe
'58792' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMH' 'sip-files00183.pro'
74bf4a0051676f5ea99713bec2fd1dbd
8b542732f39cefeb6240300499a93714fd1d8e89
describe
'47165' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMI' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
bb0878c05c09ad812d410fb73c715361
bdc020f87d292801f774ed8f97ffd563634c30f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMJ' 'sip-files00183.tif'
6d398958c58f95b3b65eafa926fa1d8c
27e03cb25115f2cb70acde5435cc4f299ecc8107
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMK' 'sip-files00183.txt'
ea8c182d80c2e20296d4567a36a70bc0
3f397392adaf2bcc1a29049730ef5ace126b0e51
describe
'12200' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAML' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
7bf8bfdae78d1728606d4a57d2c44974
05988183768c523f4162944282aea0d2148ebec0
describe
'479680' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMM' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
1768fbd7a02187fde5785f39eb6339e4
472b5412eb78b41fb345f40efba695c7e6dbba63
describe
'159892' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMN' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
e0ac136c868573b5533510363781e403
5ea2c245f39b9aed1cb92af2d766271cf678f0ab
describe
'59526' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMO' 'sip-files00184.pro'
958b37b563c266fb471178ccfc030a07
c186d178c4870bfbf8b30f2d74342f41baf6e673
describe
'48189' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMP' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
3718426f0205b9ed23d180991bfc0cd0
3d7c5a7bad0dcd50430e1f4bafcaf551c02de83d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMQ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
62589b4b6d0d827db25b5197ca9b7d60
4dd376a5f3eb9d1fa0ad1d5169b23d4b9d509c3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMR' 'sip-files00184.txt'
2a8ab4e5b426fefb4807ad0f8fb9dc63
7c2e937266a632128b8c363866dabe1dbf42b19f
describe
'12557' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMS' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
35b678544eaaf7cdd57b8b0b5e671a59
1dc299c659b3be130916f4e93bd3e5d40b216eef
describe
'479791' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMT' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
e4e763b40e22a51689cbd603e62c0f93
a00be2551e0b9cfbf1879a6a304252387f0bc39c
describe
'155705' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMU' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
84893a59a6e7b9bcb9e4e78782c66868
e37be709ba70184d93cb0ce3a7ec69f3e25129e2
describe
'59092' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMV' 'sip-files00185.pro'
9476248340c09949c083df9a57364cb3
3b061f66e84f03bb0ef01f877a8bb985f821016c
describe
'47183' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMW' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
e9eaac22e0f4ef97035457cec9a9a268
063bc579efcf326a7e75e096dabf229000d1e820
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMX' 'sip-files00185.tif'
3d37a3246612a0900ce977964a5f1b99
46af44011e63fd6956dce48a853c49a048074b29
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMY' 'sip-files00185.txt'
678facf157ad73012c54c10ba771d942
53a387aeca1bb642583460a917752a567c933b01
describe
'12365' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAMZ' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
2cf05bda8a84183c89d2438d28611022
9ca35920fdf0962f14cd3695f29f74382f74e498
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANA' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
6515b5f7aa46d078dd7c7d26941d84ae
1d7c3dd658c1bbe290bf5fd00634c3311189e963
describe
'151308' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANB' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
e550b5b8d175eaffdf6d245a99bd88ce
705516892213465daef22a67adf170519126dd99
describe
'56928' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANC' 'sip-files00186.pro'
d2dbec3df38548bf493e2e3d45fa14d9
bce6ac95dcb4aadf50056c0c13b7c8c652ad4a6b
describe
'45009' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAND' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
6a46f423ebe0022d05c9e96aa1115b58
fbee1c4cb05ff89f64d2801d9d67cdbc90d207d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANE' 'sip-files00186.tif'
f79827435fbec531479bcd44a1412ad9
0b2c4ad9a66f4a6ff00436abd8c932b80fd8a205
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANF' 'sip-files00186.txt'
9d57c7a1866a8530a0ef75863e49e5c4
4fa5fe2346a2e5699ce7e73e9177ee1342db886c
describe
'11587' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANG' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
4decda2bb0a8ea26a299e8a8299b6ac6
5f6ff582a62e689a0c924439d5189d255c93e979
describe
'479886' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANH' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
39e263e66eb13769abf675712920f08c
8958923c038deb32ea04bb996fb99fef4ca24fe8
describe
'117486' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANI' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
08c7b3df236aa0187b0c2af90563133f
d942c0cd42a269f1a72783507f697b023d292048
describe
'42984' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANJ' 'sip-files00187.pro'
71ff605c998c5a4d7dad1aef3b6f4b13
05d0353a7eb3255b6abd111c203a3ad646a4a1a9
describe
'34528' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANK' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
92a92615d6024a2048fac8caa193cddf
031e1dbab706a125b83cdc0aed8ab0b83b2fc9fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANL' 'sip-files00187.tif'
146dd18f66de0a4404b3626cd0866c19
82075ce5dd17dcd03da184f04b069b8a89796c49
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANM' 'sip-files00187.txt'
172e9273679c4c2cecf802da55dae73b
1482dcc9a25cd8d4e16f939ff698d7b7c89d98c8
describe
'9265' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANN' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
d93795c400d3485f2d4f1e78667b4fc0
e60f0383366b0fff4b05532eef2171779e4523db
describe
'479981' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANO' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
c19239a27c13b2495693b1001fc511fb
b083f691fc6bb0b9e99561708a0e18bbaa1a40b0
describe
'162518' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANP' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
28035ade9858a38ddaf226a0920215e3
fe827a5bdd2948465d3f10c352b32af3c1731590
describe
'58590' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANQ' 'sip-files00188.pro'
8ad8d8e69740718a2ba4c018a1944865
10b332934bf1eb3e72283c0626d385b433a0980a
describe
'48618' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANR' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
bd944ee24b277cee3f7221e55323a22b
a607e573254cb736eb41ca2272f9e023d0e47937
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANS' 'sip-files00188.tif'
684414b9a501b70efb310b486d195c42
3d1a11ca814591096bfc539a2ec480e12a1f3216
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANT' 'sip-files00188.txt'
118c497f48b8f454c3b7de038ab4ad41
741538f883a7279d7b381c5f39625ea5008fe88e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANU' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
a03ac73be0104b7bf2d3da0626d74182
4171cc88f2b838999d07e768b01d9da397ef83f1
describe
'479853' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANV' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
ba8745b938f7ad9946682347e83efb17
597a2828a1bac0c07068618bca382b13e3705dd7
describe
'159443' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANW' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
95bab618342f24f0522a03ebafb3d33f
bb607e122d01e4b5cc7e3c13adab3ad83294a9a8
describe
'58282' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANX' 'sip-files00189.pro'
8df79d164db309a8e16887f04c6934ba
f0d7593e86c1953880ea07b908c7121ff1efc327
describe
'46440' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANY' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
fa973bb57384d9f1bc11201960e14b7c
3bb7cd2c05ddf2252b7c2527ed043efd6970d69f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABANZ' 'sip-files00189.tif'
10d4b461df319a84ca4c6c2e59c2867f
b8818b421a399b690dd3a3da0133dbcb61902554
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOA' 'sip-files00189.txt'
46ed3eea2f0883f961adb9dde25be1d7
abeb7bc6e350b7b3f0abba784cdd2afa2eeeb508
describe
'12400' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOB' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
3bc3eb88d4b26ee2266447f6a4314760
2e7ea5305dc3f1191dc014348d4e84d22cf75384
describe
'479875' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOC' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
a2d90d36657ca1ad6fa5f889590bdbef
a6a241bfe4ba8f02f963703a46eea438e5c98e39
describe
'153185' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOD' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
eeb10f0646dbe8f56fccec6a5f8566e9
6cc9638b7beb4ef86698efdf434db160063dbf1a
describe
'57634' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOE' 'sip-files00190.pro'
99ef855f0d2c908845e9651b258a6466
c05cde9cde8801c07633d2c4750246a4a4cd5352
describe
'45723' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOF' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
2d7b94e15137a9665a6a5a51fda68832
bab6e18629a598888728fe938e166fd93557ee46
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOG' 'sip-files00190.tif'
c9774652eb7b4b23d1c23ff2b4a4876c
1a773a595ed335eb80badee4596cd32f8a81f92d
describe
'2281' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOH' 'sip-files00190.txt'
437469e1a569e60c5fb1e4def3c17c54
6fb5a00f792a73392e6ce6c9b99c881465352719
describe
'12233' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOI' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
129457e399fef666e93a2cd5a042c83d
97a696ff7b7b64efae9f9903c6aa4f10400121a3
describe
'479833' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOJ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
5e0035ec35efb42eea03ae19d04655ef
b97776dea3b17cdb35f2d380c740c92485274bd4
describe
'148477' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOK' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
d86dba55257e9529751888edf46da9d9
31d56771be44a00d040bbc587e3162895a91f49e
describe
'57389' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOL' 'sip-files00191.pro'
0ce1351d6ff1864a9536fb2c6d2727ac
7d3fec2b0272e9813e1ed320543d4a3d64647666
describe
'44776' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOM' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
e920b5975382b690296bd27f34211daa
729041865ed23c4dc3f944e8c00d9ecb541f9c48
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAON' 'sip-files00191.tif'
98eee0a7b809985f7a82dfff8675d054
6ab67d9a6134af1a8426ef4b2edfaf6f045c5954
describe
'2269' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOO' 'sip-files00191.txt'
db773e768002de15ffb7907db1101c7d
752fc95c656ffaa9b86f2dfbb1bc370f54871492
describe
'11867' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOP' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
1f079defc5f74399be0534b3a2a8b61b
d63196b59983b230d1fb216efd551db86f2b3bc5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOQ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
539818bfa23baccd50ee0967a091e515
6d3ddacf2ec776ce41fab0d01e506368981cc710
describe
'156220' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOR' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
4e427b4b9254eb510889b2cf570cc9dd
c4808b25617f5cfdb62e750854e383f4c40d4b52
describe
'57861' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOS' 'sip-files00192.pro'
30d7b5e6881c269bb13748d1ec3c212b
6908133cd108eb98ecc52a5a316ea0c52877e79d
describe
'46300' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOT' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
d327dc46f125de3247187c2e3bf6815f
655221d7dd11029aff6e6bfcff753477607e66ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOU' 'sip-files00192.tif'
2edcceb645cefb852966125b1efa235e
cd9c51af359da8d6761bf1779299e3acc289aadd
describe
'2278' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOV' 'sip-files00192.txt'
56211721186a7baea79a3b668ce4998e
47b0ba7509230ea34a2b86244cb67d8d732be8d8
describe
'12223' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOW' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
14ac72a8f659ab3911b87fc4d2f46fcb
c715a0d79b03623e215221fd19d83f41ea4bb73a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOX' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
2536f85af42e79263737baf10af0c485
1f9ea4d07a0a2d2d2b26cf89dfd806b0910fbb98
describe
'156790' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOY' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
b6e6f5ecdc16017dfc444b9e30f835ee
a3e618d4a2b4eb2a5493e85a67c163d1c8e9f517
describe
'58851' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAOZ' 'sip-files00193.pro'
b0425c731b1c613c2133c084560e9009
f4c3581bdc695cb3b20901de15a3892bfc7ceae2
describe
'46597' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPA' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
dce583f030181a52841bb5d38b9023bb
7d863d6ca268acdd41a307743ee439306143e870
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPB' 'sip-files00193.tif'
1a36f50ac3cf2f8b4834c3d3b971e18e
b6e7f8143cab575067782b32009893a25bbc067f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPC' 'sip-files00193.txt'
a2004757bfd6d933257b4feb685b6c3d
448f4230786d2041c3e61a38d7b1c6b11464e023
describe
'12027' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPD' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
36ad6f4683621c96c9fae849f41d74e0
0e160647e7d8a707c54ed85c242bbcdfc3191e78
describe
'479818' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPE' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
c422e1138b64b5f6c5c28da963918d47
406dbc7f890be58a34ba37e9759e9aad3e6fa35a
describe
'153832' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPF' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
4b05eebb1de291b7bf5887ad14fbcca9
a2ff366aa601969d6757aabd72d283c373fdd6ef
describe
'58887' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPG' 'sip-files00194.pro'
5d587c0d1b00a23b94d78c6d0e2daed9
000a611581c195f97e27f150ee013223dc9b0789
describe
'47088' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPH' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
041923d58ff4135a3c49f71da8900155
e6a72d95f22e724f6d696351f418c4b66a8e778c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPI' 'sip-files00194.tif'
94fd0f0c9ce5dfd8f0ccd051d778711a
69bbc23922ddb64464bd927f7c51103c963b9d2e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPJ' 'sip-files00194.txt'
8de7ba045bcbdecd2c383d3664388da3
913a53a74374fc6ef0d2c733c8919b5ca21c4838
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPK' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
7dcce594b57b7f198afb51279260db62
2d6c0431950a53d90a46327c9399464ccf52cadc
describe
'479770' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPL' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
43c6973d26c7e7227753024f286af0d6
45405c36133b5a6519cf98558ead1ed4115cbfc1
describe
'115978' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPM' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
6fb28b4e6b671a26e9e56c75af63a65a
bc10ce3cff01d4232b052a5b0fade4ecc401d355
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPN' 'sip-files00195.pro'
b67af07960eb31dd89ce7438cf50df65
246f313982da870b4ca8ec346981baf1e8f8b04d
describe
'28661' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPO' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
21d8c3e009253358a5f748722adb614f
289d9f40bf2447c982e599f14c4fb44f3f2b8767
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPP' 'sip-files00195.tif'
a843ba7c0283e94ba672ded0278a36dc
5428c0f293fc1ac8a2841a02ec6760af7cfc3e16
describe
'147' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPQ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
5ea0174c7a86a88fd09785282f1d9208
5b380b83e98a1d909b28c808c7b590f1e7f5098e
describe
Invalid character
'8182' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPR' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
520db320531ea40f5e85fd0910f9aeb6
13c6fbed3ac3095d84caff996f356dd122353c60
describe
'480208' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPS' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
cd661c1f110df2cf0f0e80d74576431e
49990fc1aad0620520aa98a3913cd105c068143f
describe
'154489' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPT' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
9b6bf0f95e2ce97a94128206d090d72b
086a9ea69f9c0d71ffa0e48c37bdbbac51c18974
describe
'58827' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPU' 'sip-files00197.pro'
2adf8c361045521bc2e8f84c0e706483
c4448b32caceb9f8dc2ea77fba01aa5dbb2760c8
describe
'46556' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPV' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
7b3d219ed391cd79ec69a3fb63a25847
43a3b91f7e10e2471e51ac48296906cb9c7525ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPW' 'sip-files00197.tif'
245a7e36157af416949a902519721972
b9ad451a8e53df577da21edfa99effd0fe31942b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPX' 'sip-files00197.txt'
b9020b8039e3ca4c18020e210acbe5b6
382d657fe7a2861f0b7f1418d01d5b28a0009e81
describe
'12193' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPY' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
efb2f4a0782c234f2478819d3197968b
4e1b7d8f08f17bf950fa5c90fd8deca66e0299e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAPZ' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
9dc3d1347256e65237ffd409ace2fa41
4fb0d0d4908c97e18c22756e38eec756f9720383
describe
'158217' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQA' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
b47a584a908a5cf4b27e3f421fcba98c
e6aebdd2ca7fd004b21b54dd5a2d8859b02a81eb
describe
'59301' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQB' 'sip-files00198.pro'
17db168af26b35aa09959aed44173dc7
264e40ccf4d545637f1f467befd2cdf101eb6785
describe
'46414' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQC' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
cd4dc0d750bfd42a8c48065da9ee45b7
42ed9ab99b9ba2de0571ba2394a289663f24c80e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQD' 'sip-files00198.tif'
c71a0802bb94578f6df3b126812c90f4
b4d9f43d3724260b7d6d9dd486cee298c1306f63
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQE' 'sip-files00198.txt'
35088e8952b4b0eb2f78f8c764726a2e
1e28096c70d17f85668881ac76f09c0914f5a938
describe
'12138' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQF' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
554462167ecbc478fb40e8d5f1c6e787
980e2f22decb04a82f5d5a7130562af8fa5db716
describe
'479861' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQG' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
05210c43eeb543171d59c1b11fb58f94
ce6d7417379b121c0e4aa855686ba5ac5c57438a
describe
'156961' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQH' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
c0dd2efe27f4f61ba999be0de9bb9427
c430da19f7866bb81009c4eb10c80fa4609f9f5d
describe
'58860' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQI' 'sip-files00199.pro'
27bec49ca9d1c8622882de789b492d58
09a6ba8774fd8cf170bb08ccc0dbc5234a77ffcd
describe
'47487' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQJ' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
efe27dc2adb58f05b9692e25d13d293f
6bf2596799a3ee6e58fb3cec387bb952bd64e482
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQK' 'sip-files00199.tif'
3e4e96de6e18d14fcf01a85ec3052998
0db3a22649bc517d334e6e6bca379118cf088d0b
describe
'2319' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQL' 'sip-files00199.txt'
49927428887a1e78eb6f35987bb98670
da9194f25694ddd36ad059abef17ea88511e33d8
describe
'12319' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQM' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
7d58b1be01d6e5661af08f531e6e7fb9
d502f75384d177a871606b8a3b9e008c32c4d7f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQN' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
6bea3a3c85d0c481929c22c00a40db8b
bf8e6b45eb7834d578bbd77a501ee4fa022b4029
describe
'107049' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQO' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
9317c07fb916368cdd448e5be8d61963
a2a19272e4d425309c2d595f95bbc742c3a15a0a
describe
'38609' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQP' 'sip-files00200.pro'
fe591b13c40f9af73e23cb592b87d16c
a765b690ccc25af40fb7b2a677ef997ebc3792ff
describe
'31820' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQQ' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
3648d55ec0f057f346d3256dc7274ab3
f191fad8ae616aac09b9b53ce2c145f03eeee38e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQR' 'sip-files00200.tif'
c5da7a6738861bae11b32c3e45dc3685
2944c2767f5c591b6ce4510ff509bb0c8a3e441a
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQS' 'sip-files00200.txt'
e2686dc709947c11109924254fa49548
c0b7036a2271b029b7cab6436e5ef5d2544aa61a
describe
'8598' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQT' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
e76b37ae2ba9a38b19493448858a009d
b8be2b6111cb28dd05aa61e05ceff9a992fc9420
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQU' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
034d100f87a927e7092b092b2a88f1f5
a0acb50391d93d44dc76cce2a1f9afbfe931585a
describe
'116652' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQV' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
8211912eaebf4f6e49a55cb41d117500
f5661b177d9ac706195be076bfa5cbcd5271ee00
describe
'43283' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQW' 'sip-files00201.pro'
b6e912b7058d0fe167628aad4ddc9982
7d6eb294c3f92025993d6ff7d8a5823ec848a32b
describe
'35433' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQX' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
74c36854b0c9ae01fe207afa828f584a
ac5342c1f1bf166528a62e15a26c830cfa7247cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQY' 'sip-files00201.tif'
f162bdc1b4eb619a32cf8d6f1fa08fa8
6ad4a3c447de279b6c360bf783ac438ff0b7474c
describe
'1762' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAQZ' 'sip-files00201.txt'
79e18cbfd23582204be5086a05026b48
c522c2503bcbcd2e848f7c4a70da6e5908086ff6
describe
'9452' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARA' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
dcc6614be402da29595f75b1cb521d84
9c6739a6db35adc9fbd97227adf32cea5c06d23b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARB' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
5e63b36039412a25ecea777f7a7e4993
a7ddfd4b1ff52ec19e191e6448b78dbb2e6d7a96
describe
'156940' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARC' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
cc9fdc5965d29041ae5c6ad1dcc39f28
bcd47a734e44c48a5f85ba97432a5e8b9bee2870
describe
'58429' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARD' 'sip-files00202.pro'
6c5545f7e8747772c079be79032783de
fdd90edbc0bb6cfbf1874fad7df7c92ac5041202
describe
'46248' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARE' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
0c55e1225d390d168df70603f761f967
4c6abdf1ac2b12918c917b6d656e3fc247bbcb18
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARF' 'sip-files00202.tif'
413f1a82c8500a3287da6cb3069ea663
d94da900a6e949d9c4b86c956ae6730041c67864
describe
'2325' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARG' 'sip-files00202.txt'
a7bd77a78b0ca7851e827439ebbb88b4
4de34b9c496881e611ea279bd73bd4d523db3de7
describe
'12249' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARH' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
2708fe2f17ae39cc1389430ba4b09750
cdbc141762c1d94dfbbbae3b5c7eb39d6d55a18f
describe
'480211' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARI' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
1e9e37cf8e8775885a571cac2923396b
03ac59928f8f7d5d1dd019a88c9db9b723ef6fce
describe
'151438' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARJ' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
a61661e115b2ac613b2994fb329fe2f9
8365643e9a1ad5b8cf7539f07cb76e5e9e12de6a
describe
'58778' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARK' 'sip-files00203.pro'
d24ffd39a28f47c68574dee4d4325ff6
2bb9df9d81eaa5b98042bdd251f82a4914e83919
describe
'45699' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARL' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
7006be2b3a86a9b7d98ac9449b26dabc
8b3f39e8381baa331c549e524f73be25abdc47a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARM' 'sip-files00203.tif'
d8d76ee7a2d7c3f82d7e225250057449
d685e2d5fee7545365aa82efaa5c98fbb0c44f5f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARN' 'sip-files00203.txt'
23679f903b152d8a0e1222398604bc44
fecbf8233291680b7aeebfcc84ef4780e0da5c97
describe
'11770' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARO' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
43e48e4d420142b6ef25dae725cb4598
216fd0a0538f021193bc625a9e500408875600af
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARP' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
f5ff80453d55b5a757bf9bd6a46743e8
d4d90b96ecf037a7733b62448220260e8a1cd1bc
describe
'163423' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARQ' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
831e06521f753cacdb9b0ff254516dc0
a08dec5d1cb47ff26e11d621d6cfd905ef376fb1
describe
'60115' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARR' 'sip-files00204.pro'
d1c4316b44c9505d525904b499a1a758
649cb8034ef29a367f2bbe20e9d75836fdcbfd47
describe
'47783' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARS' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
e54f4b9031dfab18282083b7f5bc8701
64efc429a02d0333f2fcaa22f3524b36831f62c4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABART' 'sip-files00204.tif'
649b07b9dee1f4a1d7ae6e1282107a79
afbfacaf30942d68637332a538bb6eabf079a270
describe
'2364' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARU' 'sip-files00204.txt'
9add64698affca55e31e84781a5808a0
a1110a25ea308ffd46e738194730ceccd306111d
describe
'12081' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARV' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
381949e3427739184cb4da678ce133b2
0d17ae90be93471bf7457c630409dd62b77baf53
describe
'479643' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARW' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
576680a6ec6610d7d7c267bca21be07f
68b6abd38eac0066e21983ab3ceb5e53a6e5f3a4
describe
'154315' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARX' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
271ee95ed182ae3c37c8426846a081c1
b2baea3a5dab7d5790f487181867ea4cff11a6d5
describe
'57799' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARY' 'sip-files00205.pro'
75631ca620c59babff85c7ef1aac13d3
8b5d9aa118cb8ffc95a1289d2b1ac57ea22a10b1
describe
'46454' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABARZ' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
a14d5b8b12aec3fe197295c5601094b4
f757289e980e45edea4cece383ad64c2b1a7a1f3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASA' 'sip-files00205.tif'
c23e1a8fbd6ca775c89a8504a02af1b5
968b571cebf119263f8f5e00575050be250c1101
describe
'2302' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASB' 'sip-files00205.txt'
b5657e79e64e441e600a493587f11c5a
f9d863637ccc02070ef73b586ce9e2222be74880
describe
'12188' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASC' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
267d305033e019c4b572aff0cfa1174c
bb51848738933812453a8ba1639134cb1720a6f1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASD' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
b28d4cb47e0fd6e94f7470c4969d8daf
fe10cc9082837d63b564b864654891c2005d86c9
describe
'156188' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASE' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
1c0333d32b147a94efa12f9b340b92a5
85195d9689c831576b382297e07546650b5dd870
describe
'59752' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASF' 'sip-files00206.pro'
13dde8c1b485f91ceeff4c2060f12281
5b72bab56f3f3475f537cea17a9ac0ee116f1116
describe
'46928' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASG' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
bfe1e6abc1c4da8ccde57c3cf575c687
4ffb8df172ef08b5df02d2f2048adb8b6a1d10e3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASH' 'sip-files00206.tif'
1e86ea11a08d2e226b7e3c742989ebeb
33b50de5a0f444025039e548de292b75dbf78c8b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASI' 'sip-files00206.txt'
6b802ebbf3da6d9f1767474fb2a961d7
f821c397c1ea14e1e20b2a38deb0734fbf94907a
describe
'12118' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASJ' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
c365fa3095b33e2974a868ae015cc420
771ccb8d299e3861dcb283291d2d29d376c0256b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASK' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
de3a6acfde04061e2974c051476d3d03
57208266330462e5f358841b39ef2a2ee581b263
describe
'115077' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASL' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
061f136859c56eb7dcba9257fad42a09
e0d52d191f54c354559be083cd8abc5173292259
describe
'42555' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASM' 'sip-files00207.pro'
4bdfd7a6a540ec9ae17ef31da72c2a2c
a849a6536f2b832cfd678af7f0fcf268d017c637
describe
'34346' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASN' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
a665b15ecf7e010b219e20a522a64088
8f841f0977261f4f525c775f80ff728704f31ac2
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASO' 'sip-files00207.tif'
c92419fbf5622e634fb2aa1ae9f1c390
767c1a42f9ba6097d00bf5e34cbb24fb1ae7a425
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASP' 'sip-files00207.txt'
ef34253b30ba09afb724c33b17f45d8c
4676ddf1db1f9f953370a5900e6686d442261fe8
describe
'9123' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASQ' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
5f715470d625007147a054fd83192220
87b3b78a5c0465c1909e4b0219c9ef13cfcdaeba
describe
'479769' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASR' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
a246fdc8a0477b42ee4a78b56d2c0caa
b58111403c367b7d89d169d0f5c6f0a3d3e9bec8
describe
'97636' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASS' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
453283e9bb8e2876e977a67d03e4be57
7943b3d40df902605ab3511be25650ddbb97ffcb
describe
'37047' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAST' 'sip-files00208.pro'
86fe03ce765abb44d2754c5cf7a58f7c
a541e46948062fc28f73cf52c5d28920df2e8e64
describe
'28502' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASU' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
2f814993256577459dd3a214a28af539
d620ac632686d6d8eea8dbb6c7eaa4505319cdff
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASV' 'sip-files00208.tif'
88410916b8ca1005fa17d5db5aa6dd88
d2ae4d972d4a47fd6615d997f7ed2c1d6d8b7f40
describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASW' 'sip-files00208.txt'
22ab34707491b27ce40007c410d5f4c2
f70550dcee84eda6eaa6352287aaf8ee7d977b70
describe
'7945' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASX' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
c36c5eeccc81b825ddc491fa2e679211
918c19a5c4bf0616f17f945a1bf8662d76caddc1
describe
'479672' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASY' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
982b542d0bc43487f350d0abe056043c
39344476c07452ffdefb100c30981a3581ba9acd
describe
'151853' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABASZ' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
e231a98fc10bcc5c0947889dfc4fcad6
f37685fc59d3144e3be73e13b9c4b463adbc2349
describe
'58338' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATA' 'sip-files00209.pro'
ce3a9dd9322fe3bd1bb888cc5fa43c0f
474bee89aa3bd2e1d797b52fe3997588d76a9d46
describe
'45022' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATB' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
24ff080d9990efa0381313c53090f00f
6d2610d6970862897722624815b911ed443c8d89
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATC' 'sip-files00209.tif'
3149d83d6a9d408532c3a3e95abd087a
6787c1852339c709a4bfa6b649db68ca6467a62e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATD' 'sip-files00209.txt'
3c0f6c79cacfd3138174fe0cb7fb1601
23c27efb8028bfcff79dfff15fbbcb42dedb50f6
describe
'11791' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATE' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
302e25d9c32dce7cbdff42828799927f
17b8b2b23d149de27333f50aa8f71489319c395b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATF' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
e4aebf8dd07c3a74f423dbfe35e62d31
eb43f375a952703eb6724357d395d7a5ce6ef445
describe
'80647' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATG' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
1e4fe6640bc0a660560781b7b83b493a
4847dab61f5abc7702e81c98089beacd8c76b414
describe
'24930' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATH' 'sip-files00210.pro'
152319a2040b49d695f42cbe80bf8d9c
21edde499c275bd3e8d0e09b818dc1770f7f1be3
describe
'21651' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATI' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
4ac3fcf1718e0c6527ac56956a8a39fa
689b66f84bb6bd79de7972261afe1befe7a06f4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATJ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
cbedb8cc0fafdb470cf36364736c8df6
c135d90ace9709c92e02446525eea0312da29d0d
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATK' 'sip-files00210.txt'
611718378aeeb868061ece01397fda01
ac8b9a662beb9de592d30a81c8c9c06337009318
describe
'5670' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATL' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
3f596b775ea799a53a339082b995b22f
fa6cc44264c468019ceee7f36c50ed258590d381
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATM' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
260fea733d5049838214cf447deb0777
cb6eb0b465005329f19c355587a1fe3105d95f2d
describe
'114499' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATN' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
4e3296350aa6ade5a1d8df17ae8b5468
34372766bf238af3e3367a1096231650b964a977
describe
'40010' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATO' 'sip-files00211.pro'
9945f3399c5e19be44c4a74a6a724f66
ed9fd829249ba18b20540c0dde97af4ce7edb59c
describe
'33527' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATP' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
b0792de37912c4046c54a2d590bb09ea
1db016d04517ffb95fcb64c9bf20191355998553
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATQ' 'sip-files00211.tif'
f70d089e110abd210009fccaf05635bf
120b349eb0be869ae5499882bf3f32710b400064
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATR' 'sip-files00211.txt'
f4f7d3c73a7a325d33f83d496285d550
5be8956ec00ddd998a99a8f247b950cf78a477c9
describe
'9075' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATS' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
d3f615e297c3e47d6826f27c6ed9aee6
118dd1a2157aa315298e0cb6e6df6c9cac673471
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATT' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
e070ef26aa5d24fce4513c9d9a5c529c
49056733ec62fce80ec194a86f25753c1389d322
describe
'150217' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATU' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
899dd1f0a3316fac1d4f2412727c2d6b
64cfac5ba7007eed7e3a3e0d34de1f12075840c6
describe
'57983' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATV' 'sip-files00212.pro'
4d969e2326980d541db83e63ecbc83b7
e468fdefa62a063f344c0dee8e99f4470e6dceff
describe
'44822' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATW' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
47eca8432859fdcc320a1f5d56841838
0b63f7031ea2ea68bf5fc91567c32bf49a8f88cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATX' 'sip-files00212.tif'
89ddbd17fcc5d648c9d5842b2ed733e9
c4cec59e2c94bb381861558b0f6377a95408e074
describe
'2294' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATY' 'sip-files00212.txt'
cadc046547ff036995d479f1c0722fcb
c105d72fe1af89f775f2a7df099d2eec91e82f63
describe
'11955' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABATZ' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
95fb1dc4064d8719b71f9a5cbb6bfcc5
181d9ac8efb17d821ecbd0352e258a3c7337646d
describe
'479671' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUA' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
04f66fbcbf2fd109caa7cb5a8148c7fc
c3bfefe33cab87216a9efed31cc058bc7e04f7ea
describe
'149989' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUB' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
67ca2fb4dc2ea2c8e1526700490dd95f
df87c29cb14bd658231718b6d64acff0a26a252a
describe
'57931' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUC' 'sip-files00213.pro'
8fa57e04b0af02ca6d755e20df448654
49735ba7ac2d4d2f19a579e301ba32d8c76d186b
describe
'44802' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUD' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
c6cff4d72ffd7db98f7997a5fb9f718e
7f86d8ca064481f059919cf81fac1533409f50de
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUE' 'sip-files00213.tif'
4c05c406ef700b80bfc5de7cb6f219b5
b9179f918ec567510b2501d5d636a210fb9053fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUF' 'sip-files00213.txt'
e43986907fa58f1349d30908af4294dd
8b181f4f09f14eb3325ca572881ba4faa555dad4
describe
'12049' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUG' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
19bee1134efbe4b0372265c31a02ee93
0de2733a5051915bd82fdf5d4d3b79e721c77d00
describe
'479640' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUH' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
8208a9f2c67ea95ea1102048e28438a9
bf59e01fecbdc0db19d701c60cc9bed6113c870d
describe
'41112' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUI' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
ec443bdf70ab5ecb7abf37f86faf87fc
1d4d5dabbf4d4c6e6f70b9ccf3e077887be475f5
describe
'8265' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUJ' 'sip-files00214.pro'
99e910a31ed1a0e84f32cbed96b3d7f1
a9b20d4d7c346f69cc8d6da2da117f77e928efcd
describe
'9601' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUK' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
d194022ff20d73c810dc9a89cc8b01db
c736749ccd4d30deafbddc313d53d2ec771df550
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUL' 'sip-files00214.tif'
f0ccf9e2970405c932260dcb99218385
f3f3da9263c6d09ce063a504ed2856a78751376d
describe
'335' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUM' 'sip-files00214.txt'
36ca53f43c5e376f9dadf0fa187c79c6
a48c986c2b2bf4bfef80a498dce9c1ec223a7474
describe
'2890' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUN' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
e2dd7cb765245749e614c7e84d8b3712
0c1f3e82fe776d5be1b618d87acf85ccf7e4a364
describe
'479801' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUO' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
b5c591f376fb9845e97f86d181243963
b3b0531d4f786d80e377e7e478f9d94f5f5340f7
describe
'123748' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUP' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
6e35430297f3568b867b717073239759
b88d046eee0516495caa6bfccf1fb3d7affd5d38
describe
'44247' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUQ' 'sip-files00215.pro'
bc7e2b8696b273c49b4e917f73c94ece
1c133cda7aa2df4b8fdc34f04fbfb453ca8d6e03
describe
'35676' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUR' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
848b53f8673ca2dfee5893da3fd894fe
be7c903d5bdf903db2f4b8e6d33d1cf4e0b44947
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUS' 'sip-files00215.tif'
363b6a466a85c1bd56dfe6c4a0518ad2
acb2cdb455a1eba11085d710550262ef51b4faeb
describe
'1797' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUT' 'sip-files00215.txt'
e2a96150918820ee1f78ad847be7d0a3
19f8f9c7f8664edea49478dacffe871569eafe3a
describe
'9801' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUU' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
608f3fc5c9035274d714e7dc0d6a36b0
b351707e48f7e5838fdf3c729084dae60e7f8f43
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUV' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
f0ed25ff3216c00ef40bee334cd77fa3
edda881b1348125a66cda5089e6784874a04b47e
describe
'155195' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUW' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
295b0b7db16715dd2cb33eb30515779c
9dc3f17b86e0ba8dff27a08c7d0db3377051c999
describe
'59864' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUX' 'sip-files00216.pro'
2301f6198f8056788627339dd84d66ad
12b91a07528f3cd2fab152685cbe0ef93065759f
describe
'45870' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUY' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
21dcb9a548c041bbd8ea8d6d22ddd5d1
a5d4bb259b2d80840493fa77d458bd32f721c5aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAUZ' 'sip-files00216.tif'
1aa1206fbc774a7247c941c333e69c59
d642bb3b77274f496a799ec81cb7352d197aac29
'2011-11-18T22:10:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVA' 'sip-files00216.txt'
cd97ea7699ce747d8081dc397ffac288
17402494250d446ef89152d98f9db6f738aca3d0
describe
'11991' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVB' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
122045eaa94d3602d8df367a0d11cd5b
47517a74ee72bc2299121b5f60f877475aef458b
describe
'479712' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVC' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
980f5058a8eceba2a5383a0bdfb0a6f1
88304f303dee09b2684eb1a6c5dcad98e0334419
describe
'156600' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVD' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
70ad180198b283d27d8dc635839ac346
d0906cd8e635665fd0914068fc13fdde18d4d275
describe
'58869' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVE' 'sip-files00217.pro'
e83d7d534528ee2359b2ac1d560812ab
87a233749600e7968d76f7765defde99e4d828bc
describe
'47243' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVF' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
4e65aaf3da25b7e4f2a11d6f93da8d16
15030189bbe18709730f92420cc2d17db2e207f9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVG' 'sip-files00217.tif'
824a165a1801e09726293cd994387be5
f1bf5f65bf208576d494ebd129a635892ef293be
describe
'2329' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVH' 'sip-files00217.txt'
10098e8826336ffd360baf5063a1dee0
18c068369d9bd27e21003b778ed3c0953371212f
describe
'12178' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVI' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
bb83cc41a38b26b467f4626afe89435c
cdbac499d05d3c756253a0f709ed84f317cff00b
describe
'479679' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVJ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
e4467be9de97cd5409b408c0faae1bfb
fe6d5b15bc6d611915157a8e1ce07ec8681d3108
describe
'159204' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVK' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
a21b6706902f213747dcfbc06a3a8d70
646123e2468e13b646aded2d789f8d8c081713fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVL' 'sip-files00218.pro'
d39607071e349dcce1bbe9b6c6dc623a
6fda8900f0d6ef107aeef3d45e974ccd1b01f097
describe
'47411' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVM' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
ea29d1a327250be18e2a0fe90c442dc6
c45955571ca4b1703b55a6b7a26c629c21b6a66f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVN' 'sip-files00218.tif'
5920dfe91edcdd89a1ab597a502640c2
f166624630aead3c8d9c79b719c1dc06ab15f289
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVO' 'sip-files00218.txt'
3d927b6ca5c1aa092dafc3208b634222
0860ef53fcee785008ed34474c432dba3b24125e
describe
'12346' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVP' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
0698cd379fe63761e2b96fa9e194ae8d
1ddc33299b45606ccc1acc1b0d077c71a059f688
describe
'479838' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVQ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
3abe9b8182f58eb03d851cf660bbe70e
50096e2d11451a10d70d22155476c252c6f9028f
describe
'106211' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVR' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
073808dc1da8e27197b23da017c98262
4a5e083d347de632fce337424de2e3e500350726
describe
'39022' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVS' 'sip-files00219.pro'
098246927d438171e488409a2a7989cf
5d79c67e7acaa9978c72154dd9386a14eec5bac6
describe
'32268' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVT' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
93548901d9067eec93e696da148eff0a
dac260dff3a78131e0c05b4f03be7bf63928140c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVU' 'sip-files00219.tif'
d7c170c7c910940f30ef246d3af673cb
5605c087be5b925079186aa92f5f89c349acfa3a
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVV' 'sip-files00219.txt'
e263cc9999cdf019e3ba451bd72db8ed
1f1ad1e5739ed76d66c1fee612410b88b7f2d465
describe
'8620' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVW' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
64d1b9b6b9a6f7c2c2da495a26269a69
234af7c61ff3f555b0a2d546787b395f83f9f234
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVX' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
5d14075b2bb714c1113bfbae360e0d63
b5f6cd5403113b422d2e2564561d1d453343dca6
describe
'119389' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVY' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
8c1764494751b59d2c3491374f874aa1
d82b04a02eecbd502e7773841fe737d694e88ed3
describe
'43990' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAVZ' 'sip-files00220.pro'
7f7c360dd346762dd9a041aab759c176
059de3fd2446378ab495cd59e3d40cb94028397e
describe
'35006' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWA' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
62ffdf40762c147105145b47aca479ed
085233a5953f4506697cb995d9a7bd82dd0ca93f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWB' 'sip-files00220.tif'
87104e946a29aa2b947a8757111f3173
069d99d4f31fb608fdcdbb2d11ef307f7b722d7c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWC' 'sip-files00220.txt'
b3b29d72f08270565ec88300bcb73265
1bd4696a5e362e98fd7021eaffab0354515d991d
describe
'9351' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWD' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
2f7b3df37632a27183e346ac1a213364
9a1ce7945b63bddcb1c690f0b5a17e6259d80f14
describe
'479702' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWE' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
13b77cccf6e4075909567dd9e872dae9
3c52ff2c335830af68869d89b57d6548497b3ade
describe
'151103' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWF' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
75538b01a5a3a76ba8efaa5fdb52d92d
ccd7033852d4dd4c85a4898f2ce38237643ed316
describe
'57769' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWG' 'sip-files00221.pro'
d87e8e9ea727a425111b60076a5d9b37
9716d92851d4c6075635375d78ccd09f1bd77650
describe
'45571' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWH' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
e3e29b227f22401c16c8ebd1c32e0538
17cd01665b990fbd4799c2037fa91b6c2dafaf05
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWI' 'sip-files00221.tif'
b3235fbe8fdddb0db37839d727941390
268bf3a26a8f9d018a1d52d678b8cbf9b999f36f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWJ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
1c043f359ff78c53f5cf5b8374a92f5a
77af7f7e7289a02bb866db01de1cb213b30748a3
describe
'11686' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWK' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
d851996fe1124f50cd9ebdbf92d3eaba
6ddfdbac75ef500d741ee0d86b60a454825b4e32
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWL' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
ceaa28b1e81e7ab100547f79fee2a1e1
7b078d6fd32a57752b806ca5635673472d67cc12
describe
'118804' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWM' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
e612133befd15d0e2b68f9fec721978c
0c277ff4fffc24f385106ca603ad86beed2a2bec
describe
'42288' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWN' 'sip-files00222.pro'
6dda34f8c49ca1334be03e782b313910
354309f4e61e938f66d9c1084746c92e61555664
describe
'34810' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWO' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
228f347dd65399df7bf13d2895c6a194
468c740aa3d5373e5cbd7b1c24eebbcb546513b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWP' 'sip-files00222.tif'
12365f8b2fe786df6baf63610dcd1f47
3fb7cd1197618d6ccfe1723a2bbd9161b2e1bcef
describe
'1674' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWQ' 'sip-files00222.txt'
0181910ba1ef861fa468f153b3e5f242
25fe1ac3b3d5beb477af11faab5dc396fbe1ded4
describe
'9131' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWR' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
6c8e034bc898e147023d2133e737de86
c9d259411e33ae65a63eff735a2b766b145967c3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWS' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
3c4eec47971ad801bf9ced7bb64fac3e
4eb9a74fdc8a87bc43945cc190526466e91cde93
describe
'104292' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWT' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
fedcca54b6d8134069beeaf36086f62f
652a0eb558e6eac02b72896819eb51bf6011cbec
describe
'37928' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWU' 'sip-files00223.pro'
360e00be979a72031f6cea5e29b9d8aa
38c7e9cd1d947144f6bcc49a1717fe142b6d4728
describe
'30261' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWV' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
17eb10bf4f9102880c811eb6fd7b8fbf
b595a2ce0f9714d860679697cf1b9236c84737ea
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWW' 'sip-files00223.tif'
46dbb87258a286775ea4f3d72e043a08
9ba6c6c2e7ced7e0e9d7e053cd9b5cc388069c3b
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWX' 'sip-files00223.txt'
b61d301fe1c693b6d53f78c0eb09d2b0
271c99d9ae9f523ec2f96ef583c458eb5806f1b4
describe
'8154' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWY' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
0823776ca933cb16c139c507647063c1
ee72d3300b785ae50509fbf3fd37f3474923ce9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAWZ' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
46631cd5bb77b3956760f14ebbbe541f
d6cfd1c65472f8f8fcb66b2c0f94af326b820a22
describe
'155032' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXA' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
93450af52a62da6ef2dd27e1434b8df9
4c3f8364b16d9e067d188f36dc10a93003a52400
describe
'58322' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXB' 'sip-files00224.pro'
ac2c368f48976f7dc196857560d062f1
420552b4dc677c82bc263a04f1827c0c4e0497a7
describe
'46384' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXC' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
e59546c54e69e98eeb96d91b2bc9bc70
6be98adeedd5a37cb300386bb5644da5ccd115c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXD' 'sip-files00224.tif'
7aca4d96199af7cb97fb43bed5bf9cc0
c14c8f5613d642d889ed34afa2021dfdf530def0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXE' 'sip-files00224.txt'
daa6c5cb0a5ae966cd5fb858ca0a9053
a4353e250d791b53996e9efa6c10ec953aa6ae3b
describe
'12206' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXF' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
15c0303f03b673f4ad47a3539292267f
a16986e6f5ceef137ec6b820a9fa3d4844c8071c
describe
'479842' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXG' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
462ea71bb7988daf7a02f305399b0137
efdabc89e753c00ba25d2dd67da2b5c1da35056a
describe
'150889' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXH' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
2be573964dd525942e6d25ac9aac2248
850004c07f9e997f687bad4c597f6c568d20f78d
describe
'57489' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXI' 'sip-files00225.pro'
abd2ab4b2678acc30c2769d918002081
c260f26d57c303465dd63cce22194e6ba9cce19f
describe
'44759' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXJ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
72ba877d6b282bd1d1aa9ae44cd836db
bced7534922befa4388a2a616c1d598f6edccac8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXK' 'sip-files00225.tif'
b1018a0257813640f6c869cb4c7e0312
643563e9fc2f24d47797135419b62187bf11cc66
describe
'2274' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXL' 'sip-files00225.txt'
d8687618516abb1ecf4e020158d0fba4
b73da544dbb0d4cf1013db210d372c189ccd251e
describe
'11890' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXM' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
434f06725221408b9df809a2b5e50ba1
7ee902dd825d87837f5c418a28b13acef9966c51
describe
'479871' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXN' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
20799e2ef208cdedf8ae9021211dd20e
e2f946efc4e9d577febc46508b63820ada47e358
describe
'155797' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXO' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
02b946411c2cd7d284d5eeae0a2de6b4
3d387526164080627dd2b9ce2b9cdfbcb2aa3331
describe
'59126' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXP' 'sip-files00226.pro'
032a3f3e74109513c1979a667be4e24d
69d75362d05553a2aafdae5ed4c2befdf9997a01
describe
'47617' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXQ' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
8d3b3f2437842017a9cec6c2f2bc8e8a
12b2e62eff288de0cbb98de19402be0e1e8c46fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXR' 'sip-files00226.tif'
27cf87db2215ff331a0d1e7792fcd05e
2e5d059711a7d0f1ec027820440b78e03eeff1ed
describe
'2369' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXS' 'sip-files00226.txt'
773dc8e9d3553608b4450547d2213955
2f30072f863948fc5716fe72ccc2856b8badd262
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXT' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
ec6af4bfcb8c175b7223e2490f2caa7a
88adee957ec6a2372eca48de3d16f312274d0af2
describe
'479967' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXU' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
ead6a9e1f45cfd0cbdcf6692edd89f13
8dd35555b41bbe9a515052581538d860da5c1648
describe
'107305' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXV' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
55239448c9f14c066ab5058c540311ed
4bfbe08d7beb57456fd76609305cbdb5d8bcab9f
describe
'1692' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXW' 'sip-files00227.pro'
b6ed24ee58c96acdc4bdf0a033dd3a6e
27416cf4eb294df006395af78e79963cb5751cb0
describe
'26904' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXX' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
fd91b7ef670ac02c69279e9bfaa6bd2a
cf05856c54140d48716b520e84ecc2bf482f5632
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXY' 'sip-files00227.tif'
6729a1dc58699ef47729c5bf1d858721
810a7d6f70b46ed796350cabc30d173171a96018
describe
'158' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAXZ' 'sip-files00227.txt'
5872123f93d1078158607afa6c799a3f
ea439f877373aacbda9db27f5b1d75ffd7c1e1aa
describe
'7732' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYA' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
241ecc21c43dff6336aeedb40553c568
4cd722524d64f3d05f58eb4c398a6e0e0ad68d7f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYB' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
55ed12d9b077f07fa01ee2400e89c630
6f2b110e706b80d368de78d4ebfd2f43fb004b5f
describe
'157578' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYC' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
42cde191c77342cc29922b58e7a7cbcf
0dc16c3546eb2384fe23a9bd47bf8a97f664a110
describe
'60784' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYD' 'sip-files00229.pro'
5b5a4531abc33d9c16af76ead72c30b4
1554245a96c904bad6c3d2fb999a45e43d56ed55
describe
'48421' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYE' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
d296e81016ef79d21ba87b19be51a4cb
8345fa24543def935a3ebd305dea2750068000e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYF' 'sip-files00229.tif'
c9e40457f6945a4a87882a46696c98c0
89360a98b632e5bc58b5815d71d900f31acecf11
describe
'2395' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYG' 'sip-files00229.txt'
cab9b26238f440ec1146432dc296eaf7
e0d516a8813b3ed8348851774dfd54d9b02f6bf7
describe
'12495' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYH' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
ecfebdff236e0d942db0b13f580237f3
07ce6d24f1ef6beb2d8e60acc9ccc84b17ff982c
describe
'479603' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYI' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
c3dba26cde588693cfa5d79ddb047039
b4a6eebb6db6a04007ee50db613bf8b592f5771c
describe
'40422' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYJ' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
34c9c389e2b38432978c1ed9deb85f5e
450745a8e9e362006f8f186c9ce1beb591751d69
describe
'8189' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYK' 'sip-files00230.pro'
ed9edbd45e5e6304236f40d4b176d311
d949f27481a256e7b64a03b40d60c4017dbff88e
describe
'9628' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYL' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
4ee6612507ce016b439e5463d2f05f24
508cf4c962d13870c507ea59a5f8eeda888949aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYM' 'sip-files00230.tif'
b71172ec3da7249302ae56606fdf5096
53a36a6e950568f05079ddee9535e777bc369313
describe
'332' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYN' 'sip-files00230.txt'
666d76a45d5b055663c8a725c2175043
ccd87816edbe50ac76752a4ddd27bb11f957aafe
describe
'2837' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYO' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
9cb6f88320351fb33fbdb562df70c3df
029861c6aa2ff05b37ac780448894b38f3d45563
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYP' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
5de1b2121728954666f94d8fd52712d3
da6dd231f7dde89508a593926fcad0d5024cbb09
describe
'118924' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYQ' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
73f700cbd58c04582dd6bd5f7d87d365
ba4f9611828af57a03b0b7f37fb512b356e99d64
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYR' 'sip-files00231.pro'
b92a360fe8f096ac9d99932a74df3af4
80c1c103ead5ef9451387374e66cb0484dde1eb3
describe
'34624' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYS' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
09c906a3f0e883749766a39fa97293d3
ad3328b347bbeb448e7e89870618118a05298825
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYT' 'sip-files00231.tif'
70913216e746765c44649ddd68bc2336
2e0c3a7a8feedfbe59dbd12b27cfdae8ac928e01
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYU' 'sip-files00231.txt'
3eb2e0f9f3fe5d3e0a6b37b09ec30ec8
15e1afc5338bd27b56fef9c8056258bf17cc9477
describe
'9215' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYV' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
56ecc28574888c1b22d74c44e1d968eb
c21b22d7c06e1e973778333c26463991d8672cfe
describe
'479821' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYW' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
8f27f2050f1deff2204d2c71515b8378
c97f97a39a49144cf567d6c586e57f68fdc53a4e
describe
'150202' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYX' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
9a427e40d41a2579a7183b56e92c08a5
ed5bf082e038e3360bc1641b78e725b7ad7bde53
describe
'58449' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYY' 'sip-files00232.pro'
8b7ad99854e2f8da881108ed400850d2
f342dcbf884c2e6f52ea619589730b7d50c98d9b
describe
'45501' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAYZ' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
65ce68f739e5eeced72f934d76036ba0
7c1216b106e3ccdf0b252fbec3cfd4e6bbdf129a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZA' 'sip-files00232.tif'
29ed937f4e9b5d964669bc88d4d58620
25a9d594cd07edf20dd283b065f3a0686c233fb0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZB' 'sip-files00232.txt'
9079dfeefa86c77d8a9d9edeaba079e8
d024fea6f66d5af5fbd416fa838c0e1224c7daef
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZC' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
5957b1c3d672bcc83ada945690082bef
8ab281c66909b9e3d75867b72234db2b6d0cf7ca
describe
'479586' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZD' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
3ef0ca23a319547c4307c3887355e606
7eb0f1640544f7771774d403cd93920a53f7c62f
describe
'103598' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZE' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
9daf95b8c80d858219eada5f86b3bde9
d4a5cb3c0bc56a4383db3254825407107ee744cc
describe
'2042' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZF' 'sip-files00234.pro'
14830b8a59c835736fe440ce9665147b
ef3e8390af91c567ae31e5e74516bffeb291b4ff
describe
'26132' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZG' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
249f32459f1d40ffb980db0e8e3f0c1b
1f4db9986e98f1fe6393d1a26770c1ac7db74159
'2011-11-18T22:06:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZH' 'sip-files00234.tif'
0c17af45d5e081b4625070401879e0de
296b947320c21d9765661b9b5063e432e0a770cf
describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZI' 'sip-files00234.txt'
292fa9e163ae8b562182cb96c03fe5f7
ca685bd8705648660ec5ce3336712902ba2ea995
describe
'7673' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZJ' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
ee6adee1e35a32421b8849d09e5625de
a3879ce772d0b9a10d6f1cdefba33972b123fdf9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZK' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
d12c549c42436a7faa1305f2d00c96a7
11fa6ba5662d3b4b08ef4426eeeaeaf618483847
describe
'148267' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZL' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
d863dcbedcdbe32d172ebd517249ebdc
c5751ed4afba16bbd9ec6db33942bd5f0d658e41
describe
'57660' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZM' 'sip-files00235.pro'
6e316e3d9486239bd1ab7bbab2707888
423b0aaea9d6f94f7db71dc72f13fa7e915f1add
describe
'44910' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZN' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
1f59f8406f7e8c5778e5295514700838
6cd8fa0859a293e9235a9302ca10fe784b751c18
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZO' 'sip-files00235.tif'
2a4686c151a0095697a14adcf6e0270a
0d5b2ccc90c286ff32733a14ff0bf11949312db8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZP' 'sip-files00235.txt'
9cd8faefa503706653c0d804b3eb3c27
aa211102ff8625061d44794e04d4fe30535814f4
describe
'11998' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZQ' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
371f0c9b41466540c3d5935d9fa991c2
77ab1a7cdedf8fe8740650ada4093d33bdb81868
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZR' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
5ef5b43246d226a37d4ca26330e16ed4
668e6ad0fbd2c17882e0693f2eff7ba79d6bac3e
describe
'155500' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZS' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
324c76640f6ad7b700dbb34390fc5c57
5f0a25eb16e30aa68f5d33c92bc4b45fe71526fd
describe
'58803' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZT' 'sip-files00236.pro'
fc9922db81e623f0694ba9001553f619
a1112af6da722f76b9aa43ce6882c26470741e5e
describe
'46207' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZU' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
6378fee203e5b7ce9f5be6c6fd680b6b
e42e5b22e155fdd0137e96e146d7bf31f31476fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZV' 'sip-files00236.tif'
b07d0c88e670d33b3e3b73ff68052813
b980a668965b8b91654029cb732bb21577198182
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZW' 'sip-files00236.txt'
3e91946adedb2e73813b6a044c6a7387
54b5c0ab1e45f0f46dcac3cb8f48f5444b2358a1
describe
'12001' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZX' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
8f2f5157627b2fcdb7675f7a06960a40
637e941db395e1ae35a434b5386f2236039ba049
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZY' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
8e7cd7966d9e572bdd82adb5d5119800
77994d0fec12a4ff4d0ffd10f7e6927f8aad3a3f
describe
'150669' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABAZZ' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
4ff657b67368333ee247378524df802a
88b15449fb91d5fffe32f55a958171a5a851b710
describe
'56256' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAA' 'sip-files00237.pro'
eb623c9ec63f7fa894bfb7e4de7f3f6e
a54a2f58c71b96f13bbf02c117709a77a1e6c219
describe
'45929' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAB' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
cbca685d906d8c4036358b02aa414592
8a4cad889378d4f8818ae198fcbb075d5b477ab5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAC' 'sip-files00237.tif'
b12582a76261496c91a0f72f4e10445a
a40ef281a6f195eb3019246f0ccbcc634af0c2ac
describe
'2232' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAD' 'sip-files00237.txt'
1a9a93c6783933455c3bbebfaf9fca45
afcf982bc5f03bc2cb8943433adbb861b65105a9
describe
'11903' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAE' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
fc9c0f36a9e41d9de7b6952b5d3e81c1
21ae8619e392c2e981f61a525bcb54f19ec2f29f
describe
'479638' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAF' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
45fa740859511156014285839fe4e5a1
f035e4cd3391c0a3a1cb5be338dd2db589d0693f
describe
'112063' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAG' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
dcef262510e50208b0c1981638235e97
9959d7dc7d8d92fbce41fcc7570c173602c4813f
describe
'37950' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAH' 'sip-files00238.pro'
7dfe4ac476b37c061b31d24d399f8410
8089c50aaa003d95c9bceaaf94cc3aad1ab72628
describe
'32072' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAI' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
b615bb71dd7081604b6b0e849d5237a3
346a6396700951826bc85906c3a7a87bfb57d4de
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAJ' 'sip-files00238.tif'
402870468264934ce501318bb097737a
3ac83759ccf489001877c0e28bdd7a1718544b67
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAK' 'sip-files00238.txt'
635576da2e4118bbf565fc9caf93d2de
ce065b7b1451bc2c40fb3a34590abe5b4f53ec3a
describe
'8611' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAL' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
cbd7bb2a6fde3117fb4c4059281fe062
0e0a9b5efa700a152569d59e2371c2a5b55613bf
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAM' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
e742c63d2049f4f5a18eb4946237dbfc
3e346a42e45b5cdca585e7880e0f4a9e35987c88
describe
'163664' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAN' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
c4596541bf7fc5d2a880dc27dbd74143
dd77dd163b7ca4be05220fa7f2b23e72c17739f1
describe
'62311' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAO' 'sip-files00239.pro'
0ab803f16ddc35ccc80f8af68595f0f1
8a83b602975af2fad22ad91c5d07ce2de3348378
describe
'47169' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAP' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
7e67c79f9f39375e86feeef21bfb8a2c
e4dc2d22d5e0191a3a26763b61306d438260a541
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAQ' 'sip-files00239.tif'
978e0681e6c896065d859002d3146a58
167aa844555a237779e5663c140527649697a2a1
describe
'2451' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAR' 'sip-files00239.txt'
e45244b9d141f34662a041e52241420d
eb2848e5936648f0199db9eea39fde495c258e63
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAS' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
5694f69c3e73ef3765d476296bb88e70
7b96ea12a7a5d73fff0b701abcc1757bbb1696e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAT' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
737e58f9ad3892b81b2c0943decaef4f
4b9e059bdd04febd4e223505e9cd9702289107d1
describe
'149446' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAU' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
cc587f3e22ed1faccb6bbfd9310839e6
04f813267c2b13600fa76c0b722e682e94c403f5
describe
'57130' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAV' 'sip-files00240.pro'
03f2d3e00d6837a8949244b5db562829
4c9a93cfd073175d8e032e7387e83f66425c1778
describe
'45806' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAW' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
e3ad60a4c7412e3b1142290ecfe4483d
701078d8e60e5ca28c7ef3095b4d093ae1cceb55
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAX' 'sip-files00240.tif'
64c90ef087ac3f42ab182f04983adf73
eca32fccc9a50ac8c22f24bc9c063809e5340b7a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAY' 'sip-files00240.txt'
450fbe0b345e59029182004546680ab0
1e4836e0cb7f89bae76b1874fdd591fded4baff1
describe
'12066' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBAZ' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
b47a404e0de4f6b6bc815cbe4ae2743e
18ef2e0321f4d1d1821bfd837a59ec2b23c2c492
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBA' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
01b3f9468f6e379e72d2d5d255274fa5
71179f30ffe0f9c5c90646761c5b44970ec33a1c
describe
'154993' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBB' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
a67aabbc989a0d003335ca974aeb451d
17b1a50963e5d52dacf3c564574d106dad8f99ee
describe
'58871' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBC' 'sip-files00241.pro'
048762800d26091b3c4388e85ed6f978
06aa3259029f2168f60f6922886418e419df61a8
describe
'46012' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBD' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
56ce1b197724665c171e2993ea6d1459
602377bc7b64180e9644a53de5379ee83f138fab
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBE' 'sip-files00241.tif'
356bba0a3af0edd404f77c751ae80168
e7c54217918fda42fd19134aa11c728f8d46d4e9
describe
'2322' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBF' 'sip-files00241.txt'
2716a8e314a76cc78fc6fd8a7582633f
e0619d473b7b5faa6bb6375e7aca786f942e9abf
describe
'11989' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBG' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
c228b22df175e6ab6da3da081bdc7a5e
db30f6bb3a9b6deae8405c71f6d9c5396a8a8ebc
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBH' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
f4bad9195775a87d86a7ea2989fd31d7
eeb1aceef10516fe7c07d74c017375256ec6b040
describe
'153239' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBI' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
4138a764965a33915c35c819e4d5ce07
06e7cd8c09218917ab874f05dfd809a199a3c9d8
describe
'54967' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBJ' 'sip-files00242.pro'
4f6c58e7fc059bfb220b31ce3935d368
840bec1812c9a532cb0ec1f6de0d9967a6edd276
describe
'44653' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBK' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
33e6178c2df4642478796c9e50a37695
579006d2923822296d4bd56524a1961853c2eb47
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBL' 'sip-files00242.tif'
1e4f35437b9143b9b300541bf04ee8f5
9f9989ff2d8c16e1d1fbc6f64252ff023dbb53f9
describe
'2250' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBM' 'sip-files00242.txt'
648d058155fcdc0e99a863eb93d3ea89
f250aa79aac34755ef96795a1d587bad2e6d6a0c
describe
'11725' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBN' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
d2da89b56c6acb609af0f33fa69088d4
4372ab083e320c7ec1aa9c6056a4ae43446b0402
describe
'479915' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBO' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
6ffe229742b277717e05370f36a440e5
e428e749a205f028202c860063a6d18c0a68f8bd
describe
'162923' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBP' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
6b49f676ebaaeceafa1825a07ca1a9b8
584d42537c6c0d586608353b48ffa20273e055cd
describe
'61754' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBQ' 'sip-files00243.pro'
6deaee5820ff99564f54491af1135827
5f2d14640c85de6d109e767ab10b4cf17fcf0349
describe
'47367' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBR' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
e720387145efe03c9ed70d53d3ebe1b8
54e5b25e4045beb69f512ad20626f69ab25ec20c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBS' 'sip-files00243.tif'
cee73b9d23f8ced1201b98a0ba1de5fd
c3f953ae1a74ef587103bbc37009429cc6d46a8c
describe
'2432' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBT' 'sip-files00243.txt'
603e4f3b40ac46fcc9b3f39a5869262c
b7752446eac55bffe801ff942ffc749e85301416
describe
'12013' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBU' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
33edded9f0ca93eac6a24fe0e05aa14c
1905e8786011755d60529404c92edc93c794d151
describe
'479874' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBV' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
6fd186776ddd4fb64faeb522b97647da
25b78a96a0b207d00856d2b4cfaccccc09474c3e
describe
'146880' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBW' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
e6de8a07cb1357fd3d28f47a7323debb
162db3a2a2d2dcbbd5821d9cae0f3433d4458639
describe
'54769' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBX' 'sip-files00244.pro'
34d84ca38568e7749566433027710707
a65462ddb517a91a95c523de10a733329456e06d
describe
'43644' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBY' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
1344701f2bd77247785f28e41f55bd5c
97420fbe5f955d043fde5cd386c5205082e9c2e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBBZ' 'sip-files00244.tif'
db4791d322737469970e2022af61c098
8a6439d1fe752aed5b3ca0f29a3c88c14aa7679c
describe
'2159' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCA' 'sip-files00244.txt'
3d42e87c7a0411a869a99f813063911a
6ef08b2a87f716f2777563d4b6dde638c9aceff7
describe
'11303' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCB' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
e731e96e6187ae48d41847e211ece2c5
704c81deb4890ed28f8481879b43ebbe4f1cad1b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCC' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
b9f862a013c688b2d4224702afc2a0b3
7577f775e836a45887a36015afacd9504fa971b7
describe
'110267' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCD' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
2ff22be6680836317379c661fe8247fa
b4eaf2625a296b95d7903dd2c5bc6916cde2127f
describe
'38247' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCE' 'sip-files00245.pro'
87cd0d5e0ece729ae17a01da4e3d71e7
ce86843468442f3681230f1da8a5a13fe921c6b4
describe
'32155' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCF' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
18b87cfe8ac8d64d5d82a8144c9aad5a
868a4f5cefe650680524e0bc04a4b21506030753
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCG' 'sip-files00245.tif'
8fb48b0b2dce7bb2de369570b22ef5c1
9b410a344a6e9b3f0adf3e9cd3cfce35c93a6f13
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCH' 'sip-files00245.txt'
bfa9b84a2666ac717914c765cfb7b82b
4aea60900513de6c0a9d67a238904d0b2dad4a6b
describe
'8269' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCI' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
442e9966ace4bd60ba99bbbc518968ea
1fbc90ce7c15eb3247e404b3e81afba37d55b263
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCJ' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
b23e0e2b5b88f23d1e2e3ab12cb0b7af
8c8261cb34466c6aba1ed9125c62e4ce4c9388c6
describe
'155286' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCK' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
c73b884cc65c33705d305a1f26cde075
ae39e0ca2a29b4f23bb09987cad42b714b13b7db
describe
'58833' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCL' 'sip-files00246.pro'
db5bebab37edc11932670af84b4b0f1b
cdec6297acff7a5fe9b5bc4129f1b9eba7dee66b
describe
'46363' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCM' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
3748171c598a5c62e4b013864ee7544d
418bb2ed90bcd1a63d2de518a7dc582e95631bcf
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCN' 'sip-files00246.tif'
70cb725925f0453069e816cf6baf822d
0b4060ebd7817dc44eadd9b097cdd665d0fdff6b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCO' 'sip-files00246.txt'
7a953b9d07e1f7d46c61cf324955851b
675c86697f1b9e11a86d03f82e40df827a65d2ef
describe
'12019' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCP' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
0db7404f69a8e0a08743ff5cd05e9d02
5706c5642d760b89a31064af3996593c596a2f2b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCQ' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
361ccfcff0a560fda41f92380729c3e9
fc04d1483a3600d1c4f07d09772cfdbbc4094205
describe
'155361' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCR' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
d5ea23e7eb7a93945bfd7e6bdf349c5a
7b08658eba8523a98e5758867652d282c4eedcc6
describe
'58750' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCS' 'sip-files00247.pro'
2fd9bcca248673a8bb87fb7c64f44b0c
5a0d6889a8bd1b5e977d49223c35ffa5ab0602ba
describe
'45721' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCT' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
b258c612bd57c67a27f88576b8416983
28fc7c5b3ffd1349fce578f8595814a7fb61af2c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCU' 'sip-files00247.tif'
99c343f3dc1c632fb5dd01e005cf372b
d903ed10ef85faf4171494790c7d84e5e8d35006
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCV' 'sip-files00247.txt'
0eafd90a7acf8d1bfa9b193bd9d45878
979c7427f431496810c461aa58a53501d5fdb8a1
describe
'11889' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCW' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
5120bca5192911a9196cf20fed50325e
6a2c78d66618882309bedc5f42e84fb88fbb9ba5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCX' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
4da83352096b18580b49e05effce4cc3
b77b1a88edbbc65a921438338f253cdde681e555
describe
'155084' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCY' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
38b728095e6db608c42c768fcb00e020
ce228557c0073d308a0b9fca9c45159fdbb008c5
describe
'58943' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBCZ' 'sip-files00248.pro'
9b1bcfe20182bcd891165ea73c569dd5
e45f5fa6029336b1cfa873f83ddf4a620a436be9
describe
'47254' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDA' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
090c606c7fc160ef3e1ed66142462111
2a19587f8109495dde5dc92949e3bdf64afcd837
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDB' 'sip-files00248.tif'
280dae94d7a077b0c96b5371d0a5f0af
f1932c8d2691be2d845a13b172571aaf51759d2f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDC' 'sip-files00248.txt'
e5c7276be1c33918bbb0d62111ea884d
d74602d85e0955be8fadcec5fb5bbc3fedcc2724
describe
'11929' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDD' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
021017563b2a3251560c33365de6369b
9c15c1da668f38dda3f50826e1febf30a083bad0
describe
'479610' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDE' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
cb7ef69bc53ee278f7382a2581256c27
1276d9fc5b796fc58df7f8097fb99b5d77fd7978
describe
'32890' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDF' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
f896f9cfc70dc7e6dc9be3f721e27f17
50d6774b38c854ceaba705c3a88cbcd7714face9
describe
'9526' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDG' 'sip-files00249.pro'
924231536ec7ca70c38bc422d0fcecc6
a77ed2aa1171eab9866ca7ff2620de8927f8495d
describe
'9541' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDH' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
d0e7bc11fb8386a315b28abd3e29f960
5724a13826c8ee5256ffae086fabe69f136ac9b1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDI' 'sip-files00249.tif'
9b931c252348e1e5e4c17e0b56e1f50b
33d178ef367c827a51fec20486f464be98fcedbe
describe
'406' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDJ' 'sip-files00249.txt'
14900241447927bfcd449b106c91460a
dd576df9bbe2160bb1634d004e456155845b11c2
describe
'2914' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDK' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
02ca739d627b4936011e1450b57ca964
a1cb87f43617e127c7842e3a7bbc9f2659bfcbd3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDL' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
907442016eec16e58fb4264cccdf3465
69b92630acddbba384e0797d87620c20dd2c0bdc
describe
'117662' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDM' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
ebd5be4bf988d06e4c310a7f1d0167d7
055f39ae78750f5fb4baf8b6972d6c5f5cdfb796
describe
'41574' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDN' 'sip-files00250.pro'
b00012b53ded6f01d160a0231c04918c
d16586e3687f30a943805e6899c46d27298c82c6
describe
'35606' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDO' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
920422bc311c8c8ade96a2e7c7e2b614
ad2c834b09a16f54b9056a7f289884bacadce6c2
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDP' 'sip-files00250.tif'
1f26f355b8c43578131566d99c155909
725fa45515b047ece3b6e45fedc645f8a05056ba
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDQ' 'sip-files00250.txt'
17804faeaeb489000f37a501183c33ec
b21885beeb6b50264890b49d31facf27dc71aec6
describe
'9345' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDR' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
04e1d7186dd47aff69943b17dfb56e17
894b266a148f5a75d282efd7cfe35c042147bf35
describe
'479894' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDS' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
c6cd1c5e8c4e39d6eec73e12537fab9d
0c67b6d1f5fe14ec8b3dcc6963fcc631e8383fec
describe
'151736' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDT' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
456bb28bf3f9f4844c9a2444ae8ad1b1
6979098ee26120cc9edcde395d0946022cb04068
describe
'56964' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDU' 'sip-files00251.pro'
9b897b73a6f58f9114cf05c5ccbbc811
625dddb1ef7382a501b60783a2e25c4b90027cf2
describe
'45348' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDV' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
710a40198bfad89c051d400334dd6e80
45e8dad50f8109bbafc3af2881018b72a8e87bf6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDW' 'sip-files00251.tif'
302db2c068ea79c66c7c3728624b3735
4b6f2cb76b217f7680486b1c446117a91a3fd798
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDX' 'sip-files00251.txt'
573e73397e6ac5ad37d2097bc71499d7
cc0ad01d62f53bb56cb5a0b4b8274d954d798f1f
describe
'11810' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDY' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
e1f7d5ab765d7936e5489adbf5fb2a0a
a95c64ce7aad93acaa5eb937b0c3db7faacc2ef9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBDZ' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
a92135cb1b67708caae0d02b296003de
e31801c8ebf9857790a9f74f5c00466a3c586646
describe
'156617' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEA' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
ec8e921a93865270dfcd5ec8ccb00836
5799dc1a62d164d4f6e4dc17a9e15303f43007f1
describe
'58495' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEB' 'sip-files00252.pro'
04fa69777f116c7caebd266be2877b8a
3de8035fcca51f68166f17275e4021c7d99f5117
describe
'45400' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEC' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
db21435cf9a33b7b90d3a2a3a969e3c7
19f823542755cd5d9cd4750272203cd0849e4ef4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBED' 'sip-files00252.tif'
1a6bbc5c4e0fff7998599ed4cc4d73cb
85e468febda83f15c77b5242a6e95819b2145b92
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEE' 'sip-files00252.txt'
40b25618d2b44e87c5aff731854a41af
a0d67f9b347cce9525236db877a6b4da5d2706a2
describe
'11964' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEF' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
1b71b42c867033ebf4673d50eb37c483
33346758347f3321436fc356461947cf67a52f76
describe
'479662' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEG' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
49042d52e9ab6250ce52a8d791d64be2
fcd349d659e05bcc8d753b704e1bc0f7e4cc2046
describe
'150134' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEH' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
fc69e8d46e221eb193c12e6d1262999c
ad0c344040b3f8d64c0a18ee242b3729f97627cb
describe
'56675' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEI' 'sip-files00253.pro'
b554f37526cee699cf6c33cdffc633e8
9a45728d8b84bd7764646f2f762f3ca5997a9156
describe
'44735' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEJ' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
bdfdc3599516d223bde996679a9b7aaa
3c3bd937db440a3af032d96bc362d92c6125c8be
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEK' 'sip-files00253.tif'
388a5fc434e7d79f7f121566ed6e254d
601da2ecbe5055d953a0318e87943ea16f3237bb
describe
'2243' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEL' 'sip-files00253.txt'
17046e01ca6a03d10a9984a48a164e46
a7ad1ade09ce722e6724b7bf2152d9bb287c1926
describe
'11894' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEM' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
da3791bd926d630393a59086a9aeefb1
9643614b240c45264439fa464cf753674374cc54
describe
'479812' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEN' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
d243146576cbfe1c5f851a52034c23b9
9e45133815471782c654f9d8cc1525808867f86f
describe
'148560' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEO' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
c6ff03c802f2bd37f32af9da3b119dee
7f7df4a9ecbf00caf4e1391c2bb25c92bc683c3b
describe
'55852' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEP' 'sip-files00254.pro'
9684b1acd736e1ab04442b547b9d80aa
209ecbad194609697d76c14dc5ac9d8574e8595b
describe
'44857' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEQ' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
29c0ff922683dd4cc68b9b308306416c
359c25189c229351bd9edfb81f3bf105ce2c7e90
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBER' 'sip-files00254.tif'
f93c9e24d73c44f3cdebdfefddc994f4
2162e600876b3935d94ed3329c7e963c12ae4ee0
describe
'2204' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBES' 'sip-files00254.txt'
5b3fab9c56d440fcbb6c087fabb7b15f
8c12ef75d9f7bd3ccf314413be7f937013c432bc
describe
'11624' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBET' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
02fa564e9298dad74d661add8fab9973
1906b5048969ac9f3382b6b84ee44963dc752473
describe
'479843' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEU' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
fb47979b53dfd7b894a5f34d6976785f
b2b0bded467ff77dd0e5e966c560388f2f6d0774
describe
'107989' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEV' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
8a2166790d48ab5eb437d6defdf65740
519b1108bf95ce231758a15066ebd3a36d0c971f
describe
'39518' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEW' 'sip-files00255.pro'
240f3a5200504a60164103481e648029
35f79a9f33766ba56fcf61e76b23aab8fee5a5c2
describe
'33116' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEX' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
1fcb24858d217dcdc376cc80de1fded7
62c74f222648443ddbbe2af3605baa81ec3c1dd4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEY' 'sip-files00255.tif'
b9a2d4eac4b36114bea777669234c6f7
7dd97d3f2b33724316d073d2125aaa6643263920
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBEZ' 'sip-files00255.txt'
6c4877975c581a6df96125f3627ba5b6
ebb94686b99d567bab7ccb0dd447eaf056f09045
describe
'8880' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFA' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
d73cd5cae6382b0983f846301c6fa588
88140ce21c5acaa08ea9487bb4b339c136eed4fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFB' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
49a3224593d05e073f8cbffeb896f39f
a1bb8ee6ce2eb02c3da92b3537141b0f2e29e65b
describe
'158033' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFC' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
23a40334e002a8b1d844b6c81c012f02
0e1b1a3e7b9960c69e72f6c3c9a4237e2782622b
describe
'58651' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFD' 'sip-files00256.pro'
c068820a20626486025ddf3932ed8eea
baca5a94d7f02e2714a3214fc93ccacf064fa33e
describe
'47512' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFE' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
7184cde387fc23cfe47c947f2e843eae
6efc9a33fdf15b3a0624a3205c314cbaf2a0ec4c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFF' 'sip-files00256.tif'
6bc2dac0771202c2167cf74b64768398
bf63f17a9ad3a76a177c58bd3b5ab56a548fbbda
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFG' 'sip-files00256.txt'
b276c21688f153f868c38bec43f0f127
58e717a68f35e3245b308326e52dc88b2fdc47cc
describe
'12232' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFH' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
55a39225da935721228a21e104464224
904477620f77bfd91c2019e32658b86b80c95dce
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFI' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
32529332964af57c7f9eef5bb438d14a
28bd609576f3436094ef6481190466f98f9e099a
describe
'156310' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFJ' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
aecac0ab3af5242362c144fb48d9784e
e8975506c8659220183d32eeb68ff264dcc9b098
describe
'59533' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFK' 'sip-files00257.pro'
e39b571c080fad823421aedc0fa6d8d9
c8cef40893dd7cc57e348e0693e72b474dee7d62
describe
'46541' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFL' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
488e483dab0f17ee008baabae4eb53c0
6e3478031ffc06feb4ebdcee157eb8bc5e3d8c9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFM' 'sip-files00257.tif'
d1cc07a30e7685d22bd0250b78932897
cb45b5170b5f6abd50f26aa636fb08b4d85505c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFN' 'sip-files00257.txt'
ff008ff71305386cdd5f86e91aa8dfc2
65b90cfed1d5a54fd0b34b60a29d0452fd5d2f0d
describe
'12055' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFO' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
2684926ca06010472e4a8744bfb2956e
50063e3a08e3cabc1ab597056b8b7eed9c36da33
describe
'479631' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFP' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
dc8aa920ab865700f484038785b6f42f
f0017c3a8cfc8cd9cc2c5d869b989cf5f7c6e394
describe
'156639' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFQ' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
7410ccc641992d65da2f7ff4644aa288
7d6aa482ff6d2706ab3da140d7904c827034d5c1
describe
'58029' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFR' 'sip-files00258.pro'
de700611217a9cdd6ec3cdce35ba89cd
240beef691a465faac2e49244bef8690b77e28ce
describe
'46777' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFS' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
b6299aac0a0d2ec42ba2487e9fc80c44
f6a2b25858a315cb57507d37a58f2b6fee8320ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFT' 'sip-files00258.tif'
309107e83d44aa8ea912c79ff9146d9d
64deea3a2187d4bf7fc4c1af9e62c9461a406691
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFU' 'sip-files00258.txt'
c457e0261e745230b0019894febcc218
0dbea6729ff67e42d5343c121e80e473f459f94d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFV' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
9550869e17f2b264d9958062bdfd9b36
7dc3aad101452bd765cd369e48ce793fc614f24d
describe
'479827' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFW' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
b75d8f29b6a77714a5a12352ecd37ed5
d7b99e463227e30db0be86f832f0735e0cd5c8d7
describe
'155063' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFX' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
6c0e518f9163d449084c93b7417c4bde
59b1ec46094152d8eabfc4d9ae8a24689fe98ca9
describe
'56477' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFY' 'sip-files00259.pro'
39987bdad216e780950571c693325d93
a6fb0542e5116c09ffc865c1247cd99bdeedfec5
describe
'46080' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBFZ' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
7015f0ab6a9c8e521c94912e37a959f4
cc463fa18fd2a11109348dcca49915ec10612f04
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGA' 'sip-files00259.tif'
10c9b1e8edb170f54ccb027124c15990
c9fa3e989e81316b59a8bf0c900f2507341e7a4f
describe
'2265' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGB' 'sip-files00259.txt'
ccb0a2132cc6f7a20481081dc82bbc9d
239af1f9a9d6e14d6ddf0f1d3cb6c69994fe8396
describe
'12424' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGC' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
3305cc9523d087ba34bbc6ef534b3ec1
dea19bfb3dd364617b3496ef3f4c632053d006c5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGD' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
4e25ef0035865ba3844e66853e10979b
a994fed96c87f9c8d7992c47c39f0cf190ecc507
describe
'162007' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGE' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
88228faed6bd4a1cbe9f996de3ccbc78
a595a58f36b3a6e4e47bdfe62b8ae83908d23c0a
describe
'61189' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGF' 'sip-files00260.pro'
900cd36878e345b8fbfaa41740850dbb
963aa051d77046f9736135d3277f8a7edad89a77
describe
'49013' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGG' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
c0f4e57a0810577037ebbde5ad2d5fce
fd01d75a2999fd7f06aa43f0b9fe6458beac9f98
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGH' 'sip-files00260.tif'
fb43944493d68c2c018925f9f50038c7
fc97302ab6f811ef2f8578725a09ef3b50e3ae18
describe
'2423' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGI' 'sip-files00260.txt'
f5c0243703960b8e4c90d190592d7f10
554d973bde5e6e01ed3436af935eb2adc007eedf
describe
'12544' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGJ' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
e9d3dd739aa67284c0f294b8a8add0c5
bd788fd8ce910eb3f187624d0ca1781fb4e8da8d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGK' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
01ec2f246d45bfd7c0666d4512c7db0a
e7b6243a6e8c350da3b3b8582bc07d27eb849d40
describe
'73189' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGL' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
3da8158dd19357f3eee138f8be186869
141f2fffbc44633f766b130e4d1ccdf03d80aecc
describe
'23936' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGM' 'sip-files00261.pro'
d32b1705eb6b8b6b2c058553a60a8817
0d0a3b38a0395181305bc63efecb2a1518372971
describe
'21155' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGN' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
e52db83a948822d746907b243a61ef93
6df0b9f1e8f37c2badd8517497e9d66c7bd8e2ba
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGO' 'sip-files00261.tif'
838ee5cd9d793b1fa4182b155bd33898
d55d714a712f5815e94255aff4dac312abbb9b01
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGP' 'sip-files00261.txt'
331181c71f80e3e63d54464b1c6d6292
8274cc78022496ab26ededc1aec605f1b1a5b361
describe
'5804' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGQ' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
71ddc7cb07827662073b089716c7db48
6aad2f2e71d5086ab4591b319db48b59a4efd09d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGR' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
e9cffbe6ed4a4e93bcc270b3de4e4ff0
a534649f986d0c146bd1831e172d457736afede5
describe
'122350' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGS' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
27b9f11f10256e5b281811b371c34ed9
317249dac3ec61a23ca0b622944f3ef1f06e0fc1
describe
'41109' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGT' 'sip-files00262.pro'
0b7ab77dcc36c03201969a087e815491
1f6f96dfd89e2d8f395b75802131bd3618390f0e
describe
'35766' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGU' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
9edd5176461e2c1a1ec3c2e9447bd99f
b51cbc6142ff1241762a2772bfbbbefe71514ab9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGV' 'sip-files00262.tif'
e2a57a60a1d11468c50549b2b8d6dd09
5ef3ed478138aed09beedd4351cea3c4a12a40c9
describe
'1693' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGW' 'sip-files00262.txt'
b86fcf732931f9eb842b7b70250c5153
d8e948cde9be3a1b3f8dc3accc748c23cf985c3e
describe
'9572' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGX' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
77688d5ec5c1c8b041f9f9abfc2c34bb
cd72823bae4915471b91d2a184fa1bff34ddcab9
describe
'479805' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGY' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
688b0a20ab1a82ea2bd98ded5a63bc94
5241523cd78ac7a1387b23159e228ebf8c2379df
describe
'157201' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBGZ' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
5d4fa171ea118a358d0d61ad592a2e33
34595c1cbe669f01f8ea39cbc4166286e32e591d
describe
'56832' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHA' 'sip-files00263.pro'
bb8a63027b102514979ea8d1a84143e5
80d1522b300b32b86794eab6512ae17c7ba7c0fd
describe
'46445' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHB' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
2ac7dbf6a034f4040d17bc1afb7d765f
f1c17f9d6297316a313427ad5d3ab5f093b9b233
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHC' 'sip-files00263.tif'
a31886b957a2f4d3f825ea1ef9366f91
d86f45b91cdbd367151b4f514495a07bf6272ad3
describe
'2240' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHD' 'sip-files00263.txt'
8ae959b6caa28a39dad5acf3c3713748
ef588ca9e196a5bdadbdf532f9ddcc342dbe918c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHE' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
f89e5dea2050da187f92acf93be93384
64cbf16314a9d18cbd056453c3c891989a80e417
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHF' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
b803dfadbae43f1c96fcfde6ce349594
52a53e1a42f9928acbe6db7e61e3ed6c73decd9d
describe
'153908' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHG' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
1e253386fa6695ed1b9751e57c2a0377
dab5b910880702024ccf4fa4459310af0936aa4c
describe
'56547' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHH' 'sip-files00264.pro'
b0c7dfca4115f5102ec6d87b58b51449
b920b72041e7aed672a4fb42e36c4505884351cd
describe
'46340' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHI' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
0bc9fae2a23ed8417961cef1d7f46fb4
aa2f7cdcdc17b3fc0f79b59fe3442463cb6ddb38
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHJ' 'sip-files00264.tif'
48b57699cae775a8b59199a48663d01f
7293337388b887d68848e8ad228e49fc3324ce3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHK' 'sip-files00264.txt'
b11784bc939786d03bff2cb0e0bb77f1
5d9b4d355e8890b7c717dc1f581bb4465dc5773b
describe
'12376' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHL' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
a672ac04ffdd1626ef57c05bbd2cdba5
90419f612afe199af1e43a71bac96e7e2c84ecb7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHM' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
12141f4d6df70a806964a422f8ca148a
e8f16d08f8a8c10a349329f4558751eeac472cd9
describe
'130996' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHN' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
457a16c54bc16cd1369fecc2796ddad1
6c1df78cc72b7455cfa24b2bf9e16f11d8706a36
describe
'46773' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHO' 'sip-files00265.pro'
141264e63c2ae46f4a0e2d540edc63c3
27048c3a261692014b1dbadd6ebd430f526cbd7c
describe
'39675' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHP' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
c486d913258b005b542e317a0fc97adc
38a6cac189c1b339c91d331d4008074f3c46c17d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHQ' 'sip-files00265.tif'
cfe6a0111260682d4434322293f5a00f
7edc5d482b3b1396aa35af3598cba843b729a0b5
describe
'1993' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHR' 'sip-files00265.txt'
b0248eb598bf696587f3bc668e400bea
dc9144989aeade267dea18efa4b6894cbeae9293
describe
'11207' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHS' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
02fb19e2f7c2b2044d4d6f596252bd10
f076834ddb8dd8c2da68e372a40a179d7ba24a19
describe
'479688' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHT' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
ea3c03b8dda61b5c20e6e6be8a4e6a81
25229982f0da5eded1e8fbedf8af0050a58ebe67
describe
'145818' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHU' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
823fab735b421d87f4e3a61f7f9bbcb8
7c9e76d9749ce1ffd54799d23abd0c793c828972
describe
'51015' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHV' 'sip-files00266.pro'
d929b38eff0a65f23d1f43ef942484d2
2d0977204c97f0f63526192131b752183e6bce35
describe
'44357' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHW' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
8a482ba798d4b2470eb11536a4f50f6c
17efdcaf239508311077e07f60df4c8be8ef38c6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHX' 'sip-files00266.tif'
f3ced478067dee5220fd986405e80f3a
f68055bbded7f21062422741b1f4fc1e84012495
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHY' 'sip-files00266.txt'
d60b4be77e8ba801d4b41d8a8755f5d2
81522850e224a675a0f5cda8ead707a32a101abc
describe
'11915' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBHZ' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
753ffcb82baa1401c6845675af58750b
bad60c52f08295349b5fae236dd267a152fc0492
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIA' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
a86e6d1ac352b0ca1655f3da30f6e646
8ae23c8afb60403187f011c1a2da11ccdf9f8da8
describe
'159552' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIB' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
68142adf055c8ff517107d0ead443294
088e526c6a02bcb2c52fc76dc4e69599de1c3bd9
describe
'57776' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIC' 'sip-files00267.pro'
9cf2358668f927ad90455cab5f898ce0
c309c94541f7d3b424ae90471332837453cfda36
describe
'48673' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBID' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
dfc14af913d48f1b8dedf600f0173be5
fd5050cdb2c3cfa9c99b8a0c0250d136cf01b455
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIE' 'sip-files00267.tif'
5c4c06eb4b64631fa620c8a444120bf3
ad0de72a1267619b12beb0ac9ec6da8ec1c3c4fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIF' 'sip-files00267.txt'
d864a9e6bf5607ef167ace674b74a5c6
554afe108e85d0ba43d4525ef024625649648b35
describe
'12729' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIG' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
6c645c2ba38c0a69b344f421f13ac034
6543244a7dc776429b79e2ca4d114b207dc8e2b3
describe
'480017' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIH' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
2fc05c0b4d8decf768d1b1f592402df9
f386e9a844695501c9787d0f621e7be7e281cd0a
describe
'155876' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBII' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
c01d3eb6758635addc6344bb9e32dd2b
50fd19115695d43359057e443485412b00639706
describe
'57275' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIJ' 'sip-files00268.pro'
ed2c1c05e36be3fd180f40d47b2f0a75
01cc5e9d045b75f69904a844d77cb8e5f878af2f
describe
'46802' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIK' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
5e70b729dc0959ddff61a45abab01976
0272dec7cf50fe022bbdf44156aea0b8f2bbc0fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIL' 'sip-files00268.tif'
2b0d099f7853a7543aa4a54d8493dd92
67d0dc0babade708bd05c01f57b9edc92bca25d6
describe
'2291' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIM' 'sip-files00268.txt'
972de0fa7ba41244b315cddb31e1b8bb
6d6cb669276434f2d0146ac23dcfd5e22ce2e489
describe
'12343' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIN' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
cb138fbbffcafc9fc81fbbd17bb6b2b2
052492d886bd50ee555c505c66c7d3288e68c53d
describe
'480075' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIO' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
755b40f353db28348e0198130e59772d
b525092b8037a912993444aec9bd5d6e46f65107
describe
'51230' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIP' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
3eae3223a55abfaf6d2ca4c47e1df20d
20dece4f52b8fdf289e5b602f6ab0ff7ccaf1bc3
describe
'12735' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIQ' 'sip-files00269.pro'
87be706a622bc467fcfd4c8225ad5eaf
898a67aa77f589205e89ff6d08b8cffdf3908d64
describe
'13604' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIR' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
48be9ccbf701459a335b397746cbc12d
364e86fe2f38b043072e073d11db36f60215a695
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIS' 'sip-files00269.tif'
0485eb9b3381f2607a52ef4a38b92302
b634d4d0368d5e6e1991617e5c6468c4094dbf93
describe
'531' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIT' 'sip-files00269.txt'
bc539343d385ef2e0f018aae4619afcf
023d3dfc4bf82bbb9685fb6e026ab019e9fbb04d
describe
'3853' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIU' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
bc9710c323ec4c1652d93bcc6559faf2
b33701822643486044641fff86aee94da0a4791a
describe
'479800' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIV' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
638d500383e328a20f4e60d50a992d18
7cf0bc9c4687446c6cbe908c5a1a4647acf167aa
describe
'118568' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIW' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
41538862e167909cad172f87ce8f75a7
c3599d8b5a773e95746a86d0596dd2b14fb7ab4c
describe
'40194' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIX' 'sip-files00270.pro'
4e7ec22110726f711dfb91d3d106d8b6
d4d628535f395e87a397542da2dd48c982302ecc
describe
'35538' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIY' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
a46b1268427eb6ea532aec326e9012a3
1f51d27cc29521abc600f6578d16d659ef62f849
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBIZ' 'sip-files00270.tif'
bfa1913e0846373d4e2b1d06c41e4f06
ace6275face85a184a847f16a31e110571becb29
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJA' 'sip-files00270.txt'
4b5e654ef9037234bdaefff83d3d085b
a497d6433200856a277724937b81cf41a4b13382
describe
'9340' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJB' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
3d64dfbe4b1d8ad157cd0b65d438c65b
07b9e66ae9bfa2f5998813c0c8bc59b796b17565
describe
'479878' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJC' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
7045af48fce4fe5ac91a2d555d361ab1
70fe20aaa970debba26c91def9b7edfbadd38cda
describe
'164150' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJD' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
abdf4c46c3582d000ba345df7fe4c0d0
0d99a18f6d68525b64992858117176d28c533ea1
describe
'61372' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJE' 'sip-files00271.pro'
9eda630f14c265c541fce515552e8527
b85499413f3496011334a258464d3e413a75881f
describe
'48947' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJF' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
2f6cdb606aca2bfbb9e5210836606d61
ac6014da7f2adb9f8af70b762a5f0ce2e014e3b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJG' 'sip-files00271.tif'
eb00f4c3c234c6344463d5a6e3bf167d
c8813c24a49ca652afed809789628aedf92ad83e
describe
'2417' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJH' 'sip-files00271.txt'
2e0482bc3662479b833e847aa2b1e570
72a1ae6e6db05c812e441719b8a8967a36d898fd
describe
'12912' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJI' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
40b12b76da1812955e5e54e700725a2d
71db097e09fb4af28fd3e80d0cbb292aa19d4aeb
describe
'479696' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJJ' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
08acb4725aee3cb4ae7f1c48c35ecfe8
2cd13b5739e937d4b89602141fa18a953d09db0a
describe
'163333' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJK' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
a872b2180f725c0dd6a41e107ee8f3fa
c6522d9535c46020811dd937ab99ac5d8d7e27fb
describe
'60398' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJL' 'sip-files00272.pro'
23415b6cc190ff5224a5349283acbc33
df07450d6b04f501f5700e131c0630166680d864
describe
'47834' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJM' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
f48144ee64daeed99f3a2f5988d5654b
cc7578399530f60a0ca485a1bb2e6b000cf86808
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJN' 'sip-files00272.tif'
e7de105b7c503ef88884b05ca0e4954b
a5ed5a7c99aeb82e30559e26d35bf20ee29c58ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJO' 'sip-files00272.txt'
d581da9d817ad71f2ea4aaa9a0b29d4f
6fef10321cb3e1c7bbdc2cbde4e67ed97ee0ed25
describe
'12410' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJP' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
353d3ff40b2ee16b16188ac81a5898a7
33b4df4d05fbaccbab23c48493fa701cfa34827d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJQ' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
944e369f47d7bda40d430d6370e87424
41ea2901563bd079fc6244b5ec86680278fe29dc
describe
'151598' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJR' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
ca154cc6edda0a6d2b092bd789402604
4c82fcc31e713a95b99ef5df6fd1c58141b2d79a
describe
'56008' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJS' 'sip-files00273.pro'
4a7c261184de9df32b3673ec92f941cd
dbdd158111fb1eeb6185ca31aa25c9175b3f3b1a
describe
'47059' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJT' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
87feefd5efc197e3f7d3891cb06e7522
41c51b6463d4da7bf0f6e68e8e087474d88332b0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJU' 'sip-files00273.tif'
f9f204fa3693050a3a068b1d8722d088
93c850ba7b22b2e9a083185e8318dc6bfda23b38
describe
'2211' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJV' 'sip-files00273.txt'
e7bcd21f9362d857fb22b85248b8af50
5317570275b5e75188098ab1206938e265205906
describe
'12359' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJW' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
c7e498be62d5890c3a0791e3f239c73e
a6e5ed259c8cd25ec09bca220603236fc088c806
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJX' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
58ab216781db8dba4889a004473514e3
abdf29a99c3e153857fcfbc2df327d013b4ed266
describe
'161718' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJY' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
b452892373515ca62a72b30123e75126
4605440e4f6afde4c7073264577885266f7932fd
describe
'59783' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBJZ' 'sip-files00274.pro'
0602de86d0dc98d16a4c7d3fc0794892
6494d8290b861f1d833a6a2ab277e349343b88ab
describe
'48934' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKA' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
e51dd1acffbffbe795df1a39ad03b2df
1147fee014ed51056c9432bac45cffe45ee32a99
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKB' 'sip-files00274.tif'
bba14c50d37d3c35c182d07a685078a1
63f0eceed7ce99bc965f61a141352befbe745037
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKC' 'sip-files00274.txt'
d5ea796944ce864fdf0fe6663bff9277
aae8bec8092c4308eb416f2149836bebf32b2ba8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKD' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
8a9b5d090c62dc364fe8ac4505e3dd3a
30ec6cae2152bac07cc3ca39ca4bad1205b2e72f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKE' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
57e89288c54f3ab5d51fc8e66ba38745
6bfec1df1bce2cc1361a9cd6785acddceb92e1d7
describe
'158638' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKF' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
da2eac13e7168bf1a5c9a73cc17a8423
57759cb9750b6645d8e68fb7e57db662ac17ac83
describe
'58958' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKG' 'sip-files00275.pro'
d9bd94d77cb944f75f1bd07c3fd76065
d17a030331a582e9b23b3a4214a441d8fbcdec8c
describe
'47455' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKH' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
5024e80656f1e8af66115ebcf4c33eff
c41392689e1e8a12daccbbbe7ec2bf8bb309790e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKI' 'sip-files00275.tif'
76a1c7c00595aa1e1bb47482d6897012
315ab3a04722fc7d377f8da36d69a82c225a2f54
describe
'2343' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKJ' 'sip-files00275.txt'
702a2b2392e3e0a37eba1c8b3660239a
4bb91395a382a19fc8ec9ba4e6a9c3a0da970c93
describe
'12673' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKK' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
00581f0c79133fbdb749616f860ba1e3
c8349f1f95cdeff57ecaded93373425dd8d26067
describe
'480180' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKL' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
975aa4f149b7028a779908dacd2f4a7a
7ea122cf960ccfdbcc316dac919469f2891ffba7
describe
'148663' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKM' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
462c6b5234f0b03aa275a660688ae09b
6eca841f261b2bba82a33dee01c6834a1ee0b86a
describe
'54504' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKN' 'sip-files00276.pro'
ca8edd075691488aaff73899c4854a2b
dd668aa7971833d55cf637fbe6d96c09478cb170
describe
'46216' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKO' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
f633ef4ca31d30710635985d62e59206
20b72b03d5ccf6aca6057e0c1b8f9e4c34897142
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKP' 'sip-files00276.tif'
9852d726d558c138e05e8aa9827fc966
e3757bef1671dec90793db8f312ab63ce2bdfced
describe
'2148' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKQ' 'sip-files00276.txt'
c45b71eaac7bf68e0292977e77cd0daf
d93b9810ef66c4445218ffb2aa82a62bc3781412
describe
'11879' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKR' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
fd2ef6dda63735fc150c5a59484caacb
2021d99dc456789f19f7596fbdc292d38b1874d6
describe
'479644' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKS' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
155c2cb24b9178aa931e40b88c8924ae
6c799c9be296f32e9fece07f0b3cb03aedd34a94
describe
'107690' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKT' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
7f3c378cd9a5b19e125cc24c0db543d2
b0d5c3a73224917d4112392742ea1e267554f567
describe
'37197' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKU' 'sip-files00277.pro'
0022a9f12b7af48e6c3d7450229df67a
ed1d13273fc90d7687bfaaccb46695aebd338e29
describe
'32194' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKV' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
2bc0cffa4b4e21e9c8151edf4c0bac7f
645d7a6ba5d6618e19b025cffda2fdcecce07698
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKW' 'sip-files00277.tif'
64e7ae790b46defc5ccac298488380fd
e526730008cb0999141c7945195d3b53b40f8a8f
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKX' 'sip-files00277.txt'
f33f40da47ec12c736ce5b2f78a7c2d2
8027c1f91c1bc2fdee1023289549a8ec464b164c
describe
'9083' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKY' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
3bddaa3982da92ddd27f7b78ea3f19aa
695af1a9272724fa683158465c08dcf0e1bdf1ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBKZ' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
4f432b14162462e371fe5cca27147182
61080ff8a131e46879629b2a4ab31c102c6400bc
describe
'164740' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLA' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
712e7a0ac3442705e9f5722429bc4dd0
a962d4e66a8127eda3a17a11f63bb4738b5e42ac
describe
'59298' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLB' 'sip-files00278.pro'
061fb70b16879e5098aa0c4a2e74961f
e5cd97126d44dfdf33522a900ec647e351242300
describe
'49207' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLC' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
6c51c77b93c679041fd6dc52819ac28e
fd762b01ecd5a2f5bf0d5c34948905e8344b3e21
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLD' 'sip-files00278.tif'
9c5c5ff54ddd3621ec56f65308a5358f
7289b31a9236c59297acf29dcfcd400ffda3348f
describe
'2337' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLE' 'sip-files00278.txt'
26461e5b9108e795a0462695945d35a7
8c2b87521ee3042a72018b1bcadd6cc62f429c6b
describe
'12939' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLF' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
ded8ec07c0b51e94dc2036116e18c2a0
22603ec8d6c682ce6473166435a7168793ca9587
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLG' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
a98971b7a3f920cd390c5eb24be49c68
64c470b074852225c3f1d9103bc6d0c11a76c0ac
describe
'161247' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLH' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
91b09348063357826faf36afe494b253
114e886c4abc52f8837d0ae9e71f776bedcae3c0
describe
'57316' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLI' 'sip-files00279.pro'
6eabef980f6b1bcb808c5d260032514d
8bb36bfb879ac269c4c7b2b53cfee2ab425745ce
describe
'49325' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLJ' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
35f2b70619f2cb3fd3c3cfa7290da69c
3d1ab5541c964eefd26b602bea0b7d0bb7c6bb11
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLK' 'sip-files00279.tif'
4390170bd40d469cad3c40d3e4cf7fec
3a9b21891005fed3303ec133c27d35f0528913bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLL' 'sip-files00279.txt'
f7c71d1a2e2cb5cbfe939af2ca682ba9
be8cd0416de6dc5140125480a1ea3a76c690dd81
describe
'13077' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLM' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
400f926c1c8ca9e5b227a52912b1c51f
d5c05a8daf9c09950bd3cb98ac846c0f6461ac66
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLN' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
be9f6a3180cfa31e90f782a403b6d14e
73e217dd8fd3e2c6d79b65b3aaf0e3b18b61c945
describe
'165591' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLO' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
775676070c33d592707b87c9fe330df5
85c507c664c9b44d2eb4af766dabadb76c26d890
describe
'58337' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLP' 'sip-files00280.pro'
545af0771c03e21c877083aa56b572ef
9c9f36705ffaca1e249c761834e1b0241784d8d3
describe
'51825' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLQ' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
4d02ae6a22e825dab15143e8fe17faf5
b0329401ca2751e17eb21dcd892da3248319e172
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLR' 'sip-files00280.tif'
937348df3cf3e264bd6cdaccbd0398e0
bc8d8259437395f1cef25cb9e71345b8bdaf5b70
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLS' 'sip-files00280.txt'
747a37fde18ea541471186c177861bc7
7646add55207f710502714ae2b669a078d17fb9f
describe
'13454' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLT' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
9091ca0876f2ab126580edcf4e6956a3
5f84dd93d19e1bd14f115c2f6d3f63b287c4b642
describe
'479475' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLU' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
c3b5bba4ebe9beb695845883258f58b7
1f5b14017e29ad87d96d1744598388ee56186054
describe
'127418' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLV' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
07975a765523faf70f2e3304cb876bcd
94bdca53f845f97ec0e9d2a2b5eeb34dd31b722f
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLW' 'sip-files00281.pro'
8891fbbe998f55ec97111ee55054ef3c
11b1c341ac6aae23206a78257b82318568cbd8c0
describe
'32162' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLX' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
389822cce25657b93503d4bddf77df62
67909f173166205ba856deeca9b297093756a7fe
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLY' 'sip-files00281.tif'
fde2bd27a38990c4031f37ffde827186
970683711f43616bf330d6ad7849891b6108f3ce
describe
'84' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBLZ' 'sip-files00281.txt'
59a1ab8725dcd7f10954148f8b10925f
8e3d825f5a1eb58eb75f83fbfbd713bb1383de5d
describe
'9158' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMA' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
d024d983934481fc7bfc364602225fd4
2aeca99a017d35b40fe4f805b92fc1570c5a4b89
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMB' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
f67210497809e672055457e3894d3f1b
3208ee9f877f5442c39e585f7a3c639254f7ff00
describe
'164109' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMC' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
4fab56e6ed86ab35f664bf4e4c1a87e2
8b5ef7c5664cf61bd8e119b0836c6af12213e996
describe
'59990' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMD' 'sip-files00283.pro'
a725e9a44497dfc82994e3e9cf0cad0d
e46e66ad751bdea22d321a41f304472493556619
describe
'49710' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBME' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
ace60b87d1ced4d43141ff1f53505fee
a26d1d2e0eeedea1d4b05c1031921e6221da3751
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMF' 'sip-files00283.tif'
c99355a15d1025e512437b824a884c35
5bc8217a1e3b6534bd2d6a917760b1b5d0c625a1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMG' 'sip-files00283.txt'
a3ba029ea11541b48e26dc421292c922
5c200bd5feca350758d43ceefe728b7a35d05733
describe
'13006' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMH' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
2a2a8c2e8f7ed060c6d1c78eb604ff06
5835da9739f50ca302711d7d91f82bb1d02baf8d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMI' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
cc163f87006c70d4ef0ed1cd3d0f3ce2
e78575c1cffeb17e685aff652c01276860a43eb4
describe
'160209' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMJ' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
febec2aadcfb19717ea323dcdc806ea4
a61749bd009e976326bd661c671278b396006403
describe
'58844' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMK' 'sip-files00284.pro'
f00d511294369da2db83b29c3a608e66
02d53ae29ec596a0a4fc5c8d04801a8100566308
describe
'49336' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBML' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
1cc9536347ec4db4cd439e2373c6d125
06e610e5edbdde19a5d41a932d26c47bc2a040fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMM' 'sip-files00284.tif'
59397999b67f8d5aa8d25295704ac5ca
255d79845b9e6ef794619b41f35e7283106dcc76
describe
'2331' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMN' 'sip-files00284.txt'
2bb84bc70a697c6e4c9f7412e01070d4
09ca2a8e536fd401a3c0a5bac00829199a605f32
describe
'12881' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMO' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
d3e6ca5f8ffae3d79c4a21e40ee07016
ee45000727f35be2c2c291dc55372e93057fafaa
describe
'479931' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMP' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
8b31e76ecd0790436c5ef64639e8199a
05819ed835cc3ba180c2acc71e53e2425bee22d3
describe
'78557' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMQ' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
dc1fdc54774057a4caffc41c862e8464
81300b7fcb9a0d7a658733898cfb281b1f87667b
describe
'25993' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMR' 'sip-files00285.pro'
23776f8ca25cb328ac856a901f436ba6
0574206d692667d329b1e9571bf8211fac77727b
describe
'23355' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMS' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
21cb3e783723e16e0777bec51ca5f920
5f556cd445a5ce7d876f2765e4d121c3da052170
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMT' 'sip-files00285.tif'
4bcefd7f031d2af50e61055a4eea270d
bca5aba5d49fe6018293edb9d07001ecf9fe0b5e
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMU' 'sip-files00285.txt'
28620750aebcbf9547f2f1b84f7a8c0c
55122dcb0e341208186c9cf2c4be73cdd87ae0ff
describe
'6421' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMV' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
b88410f3590d54f9e3cea3ff1451b4b3
235b6f4a74bd1c04b8df472ba7fd091e5d9a9f59
describe
'479687' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMW' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
8b19453128716dc6b2269011256198af
d14e9339a7404236db7518799fb299df2bc029b3
describe
'110262' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMX' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
03fe21c4fefc39281b9695c65f69c08b
82fe85e90a79725e701964ae2c34d25b49c20e46
describe
'36879' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMY' 'sip-files00286.pro'
07e558d1e261b2557970458d4ccd1a17
bf4fc5cf210cd4d7d795c7f706da3ed1eeb2b3ec
describe
'32604' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBMZ' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
e508541556ddd51b3fbf8622fd851b93
1e20d530d55c3cbc576a6b06f75a98aa2ac88bc3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNA' 'sip-files00286.tif'
a0614703ad981284512551ab03e49043
4fc87d06a0df659555651506eb03b2604be056c8
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNB' 'sip-files00286.txt'
81d9e59487fe4b637dd2c150416e150a
493c2bee65bfd2863b65a65031f0d2784e859a0c
describe
'8719' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNC' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
1978d59c932a3c94a8d671d10ace7f21
8528f81490fbaf4f522ccec87fadd731c443b4fc
describe
'479685' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBND' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
7511625b81df39ccfa60aafa29de3c50
315f40f42caef05ad1e010abf0589a1f16357e5e
describe
'159342' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNE' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
7ca0480e16ec21d431c4e16af650b2d1
89c68a4a6b38fd5f6ee860b92d63d538233ac373
describe
'57100' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNF' 'sip-files00287.pro'
774b1b5fc0868f7f1cfc17b5b1ff99d8
af336a41f7bdd9bfdfb61f8f4132fde1fe8dc215
describe
'49385' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNG' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
f4c687f514ee0e840324ea08a8b45cf8
3fec982d3fe992a0ddd1a9d1a6fa17f044f9fe9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNH' 'sip-files00287.tif'
c5d1955ff6c5ef740e8386cb65ddea7b
95ce5213ab0ff0d2bf752d638c04d9ccb162f42c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNI' 'sip-files00287.txt'
03fa06aed2d32a754e4ccec72e9e6c3d
f688ff46bad96f99cd8c16a6e8a1e54a370f231a
describe
'12832' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNJ' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
73b8a0c119f57c42157f2a7cb6cef40c
0ba89e910573cb32a22034e83626f1a523d0da23
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNK' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
b45287eb568900419b05462c4b2ad74e
6b7b5c96a8d5fdb278a232914ac2f086d0da0604
describe
'165440' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNL' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
1ab9facc17b7e222dfac7f3b0502af90
f2a7559188c9d72c3688148ee950784974cd8961
describe
'59293' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNM' 'sip-files00288.pro'
0f8ca4ea0809103ce4595e742e27d8e6
7151dda8d67e72578b0ff5c11dd0070bd61695a4
describe
'48398' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNN' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
12b6d6c6735abaa555fab4139988987d
e9e70d800191d9ffe7b30bcae865c9958e8f74a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNO' 'sip-files00288.tif'
aab77e28ea05044c5985437ac34a52bf
68d6c49330766a9f16fe58f347088c0533bf6a4c
describe
'2324' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNP' 'sip-files00288.txt'
bb1a362262fecfdc2679c4eaa8267513
94bd3df2314192d413d2ca0cf3f09ed92ce3f478
describe
'12682' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNQ' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
53bee3d19ece49787d82dfa2e49b7e82
ac9fc842b8223c0e63e8cd651b280cb5b1fcba9e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNR' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
2865e5af163f90f5ec95ebaa517a3e07
ad0fb25a2a0e50508d86e19fe51a21849c128523
describe
'161380' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNS' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
b664ab93649a0f1a22bf2ca8b29eb303
bd4902f11dd776e0523fa8d5c9403563fac4324d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNT' 'sip-files00289.pro'
31c8f2def6e0f28b5045f23cb9ccfd71
3d3177cc065e109777b8ee5cbe16d9518ea9f943
describe
'48512' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNU' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
f162b06b2099a84da21692bbaac9dc68
edb1b07c499ca25eedf489e33ca216032f21da95
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNV' 'sip-files00289.tif'
aca9bcfa9bfca0383251d9cc3da59ba0
4302ac30ac895633621633c2caebd735dabe9bf6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNW' 'sip-files00289.txt'
9b0a34c62f2d744320b0ff89cee361b5
69c2ea4a8a73189e0444689a94cc28def8176a42
describe
'12478' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNX' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
c8af0722eca38d5da4e2dbb4c5c38174
e0a123b67f4111a14f876ed0b563e7a98ce9729c
describe
'479767' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNY' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
f4809f01a64c02948bf93e80794afbca
76fbcd0fb7a161651bae71ce5302613bdb78a360
describe
'39124' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBNZ' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
9b7076094c4ed9d39ca71c6723dfb660
17b242bc389bd50cbd877e8877e658d12b209d77
describe
'9678' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOA' 'sip-files00290.pro'
2d9a46a67613e44ca37dacdd0146e763
e711dac974d4cb7fd277af2cfe48dfd6a261e066
describe
'10922' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOB' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
34d30dba00b18c71f548f0a377b5b70b
8bedb973ab9fba90da6cd5027920341e684a8535
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOC' 'sip-files00290.tif'
b7bc0fdc48c8780042de0fa14d235740
c7bf9d76c43c1465e010ac05cad0b6a7333b8f21
describe
'391' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOD' 'sip-files00290.txt'
6fc70337ec99883f14bb38b8cfc1293f
ea043274c485a86cd35e734c2cbac489c8bbb0cd
describe
'3094' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOE' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
d59f41745d6769ada2f489ce73bf8b40
8775f13fbfaa1f5d5179b48c7d9661a8f6c2b977
describe
'480219' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOF' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
810d89956345d62d1fd23b2dcbe0c197
0bf14a52a19019c6de79801cfdb4669c5aa4c929
describe
'111455' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOG' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
13dc4157f0295f70031d4300df10524c
7ea5ceabb9f98100b78296563c784983b02a3968
describe
'39899' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOH' 'sip-files00291.pro'
2eae8662e3b833a78897875642a1364a
42c0b540dc16667b83ffe9530f669a1786586a64
describe
'34550' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOI' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
e3723af3af0ddf8eac037714555b6694
a091a95c1951e588b1df51fab72395505e946149
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOJ' 'sip-files00291.tif'
e42265009a7ddb8b29fbd0dc421adb23
4aca27f15357dbd3e7135ed31f5c46930d60c3d2
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOK' 'sip-files00291.txt'
dc04ebaef085cb2dad991f93f392211f
d59b26d95a9b73fa6581fddcdd020f16f3006268
describe
'9473' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOL' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
f0b9ac7dd2279d045babc309d48207cc
06a2c7cd962da3de47516e5b5ba4cd05a2648cb8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOM' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
6bf0e51d97ded0095d175e97d6a62ca5
bd5aebab8f993a887dd88cf34f851688f3505b31
describe
'155302' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBON' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
ea8379b8ff3754918a6a562b8bbd05f5
c9dc71a3271bf6ba89bae0602e3c6175ec5517c2
describe
'56677' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOO' 'sip-files00292.pro'
9da87510f7e41bd8363a7d9ccaf5e46b
71bf2bbd9fd5b81e95cef3a0ac9321a76b21e7c6
describe
'47309' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOP' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
83c8d4b61870a655f17e5fc4467e0fee
5bcfb0062428b4716a8d830a8d0fe14e949a358c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOQ' 'sip-files00292.tif'
b5c9c3b08a3e904a1727a1fa6dd94502
0c33d34d96b11037102286b316954243f6b232fd
describe
'2236' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOR' 'sip-files00292.txt'
be26a02663403e96a03708b91face3f7
88c9dac9bfff407292eae9bbe75141eb6c352476
describe
'12786' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOS' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
69188cdd1a76a1bd3eeae747e08fda85
d7e63e02f79ac648bcd25f41c7dce0e50547d7d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOT' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
f65b8c0408c7bef6a765d2f73ac6dbdc
e588132508850b8e02777ad555cf5691f230574d
describe
'159799' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOU' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
f2aba35710740fe417b79b18a42e41bb
c8748c02218388f4684777a910d541354aeb267e
describe
'59342' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOV' 'sip-files00293.pro'
ae819e42878845bd2f038f4a0f74b27c
4940fdb2bb178d7f993d167e120204a363c243b5
describe
'48515' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOW' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
77e1db830119c0c67ed75f10c4cf1159
306c70755297bcc7ae3effb5847d108034a991e9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOX' 'sip-files00293.tif'
f5d1c7743ffd07e72ecd5cf91a14c1c3
e88166c7501eb426706abc254454a563c96afc82
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOY' 'sip-files00293.txt'
cc265e00baee942e3bf6dc85110e72d7
c597c49711edd3325e0340ad81651cf2f9dc79d0
describe
'12616' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBOZ' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
fe4622a2db5acdd03dd9c10a2d59cb25
a1eb27f7f7d6caca416933039e791a93eb6f7448
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPA' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
433be370949297fa5cb7888a9323c5b2
f9e8b1017567664e121725a765d74cdf38e39829
describe
'156650' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPB' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
13d90f44cd7b299792b1b40174bfabcb
049549b456a777143e95d7d5bd516986e95d8668
describe
'57240' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPC' 'sip-files00294.pro'
e0171f156bc13a49c5d1e748ef7fdf54
f87f69dbbfa04255f13e5edc97a505679d00e479
describe
'47048' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPD' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
8aeeb7bcba6b4f233690aeacc4db6268
f2628043885ebb5ce4ce83e9b8610f40cc2f1c37
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPE' 'sip-files00294.tif'
305d6555c190d15f91690fef604faba9
22cc066d9d7f059211b719bb0365aa9788f6ddee
describe
'2276' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPF' 'sip-files00294.txt'
9cea18ac463f8f1c47973654c49121e7
0bfb8901bc803f9a1ff432dfe8e14f58fc6ef887
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPG' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
db008275782e0d5c1d29e634fdbbaa60
03092f52bc8f09cff1fcdc0d200a02fe8b62fa22
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPH' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
63c9b90a0c493fa9fa5563b84a1b93d2
985c3fda5290214e4026fb0b59ab2592396fcf9d
describe
'140523' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPI' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
e0542d7ca56b137f14fd375bb82c36b8
b10ec22e47c33b4a9ccfae7ba8987de9fd86ac9b
describe
'52465' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPJ' 'sip-files00295.pro'
edb1e0d2f8fa0167b0c52686c6b03ea2
0ae45644a2c2defc6747c71955699a596f7029bb
describe
'41895' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPK' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
4db6557b3666dd4a9fd18219a100be85
1c5c052cf6cee88c95364a4c68e7f8c72db8cbd1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPL' 'sip-files00295.tif'
2d31ad08c9eb83d2fc2f71b87d9deed5
052b831cfee46270ef417013b40dffa4fe13dd8c
describe
'2206' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPM' 'sip-files00295.txt'
f72668be7b07c17784f5c6680336ca14
4f0030d6acb27a731f0cf789fa152297a06f1ea4
describe
'11415' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPN' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
fbc7d2ad6fa788d9b800356b3aa3cebd
948cce702d7c40251915c019829492af381fab48
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPO' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
94cb22336e387c22d24a664524be32c2
a2f51fec0850154c3490bd939b480f9849633a29
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPP' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
7cc8f09d59ede0db2f2a832c765a73e6
2471b01ba78db1c5cda74da93ff12f214cd2163c
describe
'59998' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPQ' 'sip-files00296.pro'
acb7de63a55d22a0d0c178b846a18dd2
299f879583cbfc74af07d42a927b290faa1c730b
describe
'47798' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPR' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
d3fe8b49ecd0d3b692e87b191b85237a
fc7b8e329c507c523901a318e74bad5e4d08a5af
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPS' 'sip-files00296.tif'
d8f2ae8905af7da68f9cf74b82256380
3bb54c62aba71e125a71c746c67a8ec35e7b8b59
describe
'2376' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPT' 'sip-files00296.txt'
be8902b05ebe0af7ae74d2296ae5e61e
d031fd616240bc87d26614efd48449543279b0a3
describe
'12740' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPU' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
57d224c0db68ceb7c52bfbd20bb307e9
c3e83f9d1632070bc518850b28817f131034f69e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPV' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
b7a31c319061ca739b3221911fa92956
6831f67ae4d4ada780ea6db9d24284cbcbf27191
describe
'156599' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPW' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
793a799eedd3861d99ae09dc2246d2bb
b411a377f07937e80e51659cfd831f500969a657
describe
'58286' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPX' 'sip-files00297.pro'
d223310c8f071dc7c8d5f39e028e8cc3
afab42ac0aacb7111b8a7dcf632f482a57e0e5e7
describe
'47887' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPY' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
e1c809a2015698b0282a0f5295cd96b3
cdc1bb75823050347821566ff9b7b5fbf9f310d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBPZ' 'sip-files00297.tif'
509f656ec1187997845640e7034fbc1b
9a9edffb25eabc2360691590445e357e874a4edb
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQA' 'sip-files00297.txt'
fc5a5b06bcb675e3a03a70048bfb83db
c52b459749519be068b431f03f3b5ba583998bb6
describe
'12674' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQB' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
2198683fd5ee90fd41ac36f6dd919f22
ce33379090f3286d4267f35e41b2b0e3a8f5b454
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQC' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
53da27edafa37034cda6ace583603e2d
2188a9215d44db434e9bca5a7d56a14b96c4fbf9
describe
'150869' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQD' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
d1b0acbefbf4e5792f67e6813466863a
3d18ca41b9fa00d4e9c21ff32c1872bfa380fa10
describe
'53824' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQE' 'sip-files00298.pro'
5b4a42d5ac0d1084b7f8f5a59c9ef17f
c98ff98f1b8c966d06b8d8661ce0ef22dd64c93b
describe
'43946' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQF' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
c674d484f139904d6ab320088c3af19e
3aaa5118c59cc495fe6c0b1f34352917bba37c8d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQG' 'sip-files00298.tif'
b47587ff2d9e4bf00e119d477cdd5da9
30d3babc52f35e5cd663d3b58f69d633807bc140
describe
'2114' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQH' 'sip-files00298.txt'
b735601f52ac614808fb2130a3199c80
dd5078b56ebc9c776efd21d70603d01bd6d01a29
describe
'11356' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQI' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
8a1ee5d33082b1ed4f5d0178776ee9c2
303d39491432090faa65aa4a0cb403713a48319a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQJ' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
a4818b3b9ecff2c496c60a7cef620aad
8c3e820feb2269b43f31cf79828a4ff040c55bf0
describe
'117323' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQK' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
f16a1d7139f9167f5db8de6b40f16879
3b828d04ca147cfde2abfa8ad045bec39375b7f7
describe
'41120' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQL' 'sip-files00299.pro'
58c47dc9ffbda2c59da35295c9686d36
ca4427caac81cfa9fe4d2f12e79a27c0e0cf5356
describe
'33696' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQM' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
67d1aae69694628586067311fa5711c3
c8adcdbd499521392f4e9b9b4e873b78c81e5af1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQN' 'sip-files00299.tif'
00d22ea23b918a19e659fafe41ed2377
a3d6474aa2b360e46f777a5f6ef18bef5c6ead1a
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQO' 'sip-files00299.txt'
e381a1163015005c7b8e9c36d7cce902
0fd64556b65766362e0513572cbc4a7d78bc4591
describe
'8726' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQP' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
d5347c020bd5dc08f9e103a8c9746e3b
90a5326443e82b1dcaccec1f17358863c1a10cdc
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQQ' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
fb97416f96f725af0266b608579bf101
3f062c10d80dbc88fba1a29af1f623bceb679538
describe
'155507' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQR' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
8777e7b6eed498f3f5f132f8a9e5bb47
2df1601855c612a33d9334f50685cc77c642d276
describe
'57853' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQS' 'sip-files00300.pro'
7cc6f896ba05886caffcb40c7bbcc8e7
e6de5221af0fcedcafd4960d25ecabeb77fe09d8
describe
'46755' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQT' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
46cea748c20cbda124c3939fc02b4566
5710261441ded23f708d8e69af7e5c8a92f88b8d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQU' 'sip-files00300.tif'
3084dfa290675a785754f843872ecab5
871994efa02c8c89d01c9a2eb3e597f3a4a60ab4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQV' 'sip-files00300.txt'
378dd62c6b6f6ad2c3f8ce67df41e08a
8a8f0eb2d0471df44649b473f8624d86f4e17811
describe
'12651' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQW' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
43b0f1d341727a6c8cb7c3c461b34313
8617b2ed18255465c3d8fd498982d8dfd829b7a0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQX' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
763ef78cfb8c82cf8f67d2defd4fafed
82656b611a254b113d52f46ebeffb3edd934b843
describe
'161962' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQY' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
e6c0d429614e2783128c6c68482f7bf0
ce4fedcc0b4ae71963293fd2b47c3169c2ce7f35
describe
'59732' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBQZ' 'sip-files00301.pro'
3bd90b4f01184dde019dbd3ab909639f
a8584adbe028d43e3781db347511884c13b818ce
describe
'49101' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRA' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
a8701343c02089eeda297cbaa1abcd6c
a8d88a2360eb9a0bd717e9a23acdb0edfe6ccb58
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRB' 'sip-files00301.tif'
9333f48624ddb4bdafd077e2a0a05ba5
c65d2668d7e538a91a9f2df37ebcb7e7f5f30d71
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRC' 'sip-files00301.txt'
e0987758f3b2637f2d81fb793d2465cc
6050127ee5f38504de933bfe7cc14a38c43c5168
describe
'13017' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRD' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
a7540e81487228832f27752f1bb66880
ee05a70897501c6c24ed25b7114ac5a09ba23718
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRE' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
95b6a80685f9473fb18accfb7ae885b9
449ce2a3afd50035222a03cedc0dc35677bf8111
describe
'163450' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRF' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
e7cb161c0c1b1aa3c1e452222d87aa55
056481a7d9c96e5be1ba50e781d82bacbfd4db19
describe
'60009' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRG' 'sip-files00302.pro'
7fa92aaf8e8a359d3b0aa7cf4bffe9e9
f43f6c6bd2d44348488b70068bfdf40472a37a16
describe
'48961' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRH' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
cd294c23a627b52e6b8df9e727f9e327
8754588da0438eb9755b5829d1c7d36cf11a600e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRI' 'sip-files00302.tif'
fed6f641450cafb126c14f9084288101
3afb98fb73f8851c900c0588bf167b5b64b0c510
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRJ' 'sip-files00302.txt'
e067a5a0f66e8b473ebc4f4423961245
7877aa4dc0262abee1ebe5c95f3daa3225313f9f
describe
'12749' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRK' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
926638717d189497a470105c1455de70
f54f8ad7efe7d11a6851a7dca91cdc7eda6230f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRL' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
630867effde88ebac74695c29cf61490
a10889ffdffc3e72d68d4e878527f6ce25566c5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRM' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
ad1c152772d94d7505429b701ee7ede6
fb30a366b215da263d3dc60c39784c653e91e2bc
describe
'61142' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRN' 'sip-files00303.pro'
0b361c638de05e0bc74196bf680b9355
e6f09bd5c365571e0935fcaa8d4675ec38ffe4d8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRO' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
0fb9daaedde9069acef5ed0f9282bd62
49d56f109450587991dc65b01a1f58487cd73c8c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRP' 'sip-files00303.tif'
24628e6c3bcb0f1bc8df5d391be95ff1
2e24de73e90e4f72246db6431d6e09c70ee1d22a
describe
'2410' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRQ' 'sip-files00303.txt'
8c4423df41e2b074d6293e80124ffaee
93351b9161810986c9c48caf06060a31f652722f
describe
'12403' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRR' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
c2b2032144067ca23302db2646920fb6
68f361139499cc94bb4d365ba221b819c5e57149
describe
'479847' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRS' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
6e7717f2e824fadf2aa7981d89a32100
7b658c7f77b7c09041510a5c6bd61c76d1a936d6
describe
'158875' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRT' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
5cdeeeec38ea68a46704d4f2a5965da0
9c27e4828ccea81cb1d8d9e3564df1df73271dc6
describe
'58891' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRU' 'sip-files00304.pro'
d23b7638d843f2aeb7a52fb50ef4ef4c
137f860dfe04ba90fe5687251b0fe397bf050da8
describe
'48026' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRV' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
c94246357e4ea2d808d82ef658a55b5c
4c2358c3c10cf97316326b97c7831255a5c4a532
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRW' 'sip-files00304.tif'
0ac64368e8f5f96d57edee056a02c778
1659d296d591f0a4f2ea2f7070f499a49d4622e2
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRX' 'sip-files00304.txt'
e80df862dda86caa18d8e29b02b9a532
7e0103d68bdb5608be0e807971b4b9f8b9649668
describe
'12597' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRY' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
f48bc140bfa309484d4fe7821adf0915
49f80f8a31b01ef951c83cd3b5781edb614435a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBRZ' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
7d3a5deca6dd27dd2c024293c8a57c04
be5d9eddea4d411d290f9a2e82c35482e54caff6
describe
'161063' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSA' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
d6d706504a46c0ed12df2cc807264ab7
2edae3d240c17d5487fafe69be3ab21481551e47
describe
'60209' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSB' 'sip-files00305.pro'
a3cccb623e8b588e4b403b9fb2c4c2e1
02056abcbaa6ff79de3b2e36c2ff3e12892a1cb8
describe
'49360' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSC' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
bbdec8c77d9f970ef4db40e2e455b305
b2975959e1ac857826edbf8afecc25dddc80b500
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSD' 'sip-files00305.tif'
cac2d67e5395bc707187878a77f6057c
502249e1e9ac2fa8357da92788c04f49139fe7f4
describe
'2379' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSE' 'sip-files00305.txt'
74c57657fe3be1a3c5e670a067bdc0a4
a3ac9bdbffd3114029bc8b661b3a04666cd8ae65
describe
'12890' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSF' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
742cb00cdab8be786144ee17202aa8ec
ca692fdafa265fcac56977a87ab95853cc97c0f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSG' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
109f431e2516b8a090145c6a2b9b6151
90f45d17ea3213368664ab8d92814becd568819d
describe
'155719' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSH' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
5c81ebde5a396d90b61d7d4c91df850c
61952f78e8e371b9c3e0d3b6d306a39bb7e91084
describe
'58344' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSI' 'sip-files00306.pro'
5d217eb220b14cc96320dc8a77bb5a2b
65dae33bf9fe970b212067abb0913aaf8fc1684f
describe
'47166' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSJ' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
0eb5bfbfe4105ea7230c8b9e79a0592a
da38138c49030f791ac5037e7c53a4071cefa73d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSK' 'sip-files00306.tif'
deceaed2082be6164deb3da1376c1c7f
b7e5d1262812d867437d07f9e6583eadd7be3b1c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSL' 'sip-files00306.txt'
30ead5f35585932ed7e4472d693d5fc8
67b018690e82192a792c138d4d8cab089ab10cca
describe
'12240' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSM' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
0bb4bb2705b66ce2f5122627383649d4
5d37a99051adc71648d635a5c484f1162565d564
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSN' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
970388d87217db2a710f6be28c4fad11
0928373c22f5c823c92c6b98a3ce44837de82d00
describe
'127214' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSO' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
d1c49d0ecb188de138998e9681310f9d
2572e958ba4024623d92ca658131965a76d6a4ab
describe
'46917' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSP' 'sip-files00307.pro'
85cb265db3e0c8784184e990750e6002
da32a7dfc516a0765d1e57d3319cfa9eed5a42ea
describe
'38715' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSQ' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
1cd31cdd6626d914379ccdafd48157fd
727290eef849265133c43d698fe0339c7394a0f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSR' 'sip-files00307.tif'
a7a44ad8ef8e4e023748d59dbe6f47be
bd9f6cc60588282151037376db8177f1e63ac2af
describe
'1861' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSS' 'sip-files00307.txt'
e581cfb40b9214e139eb73c7f179517d
df51a884d870f92821d48a5e762295d4d38e615c
describe
'10481' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBST' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
99179572e0d9715eef6a22612caec7e4
ff6b2dfe50947d3153fce8c8ebf1ea0c34380a6e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSU' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
56dbf0d92c985ed71c558411aaaf5155
fda84b9079ddaeb904d1d2baf045bb33292ae930
describe
'110600' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSV' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
57029b495b4179e9ba82f89893406f53
97aae5800ce4d74c29bd483e4aae34cd5a48b2c8
describe
'37265' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSW' 'sip-files00308.pro'
d9d092689036e8b68a7943f4bd07f3ed
916ccc6ccad91c3b10066bc4006d0adcbd63b6a8
describe
'32049' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSX' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
769cd56d7bdcd023f79a566ffdf1e6d0
a3d4b97c6f011c59ef75cfd11ef830716aa53eeb
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSY' 'sip-files00308.tif'
2056314af6c99f36f6f3eba2d2f4919a
307f250129b2231210e3e28e86baf9a5c5deb54e
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBSZ' 'sip-files00308.txt'
4b55b04695f465c8e9a4c8f9682b82bf
ca86e1565fd4b7e5344d6ec215aeb6b830af63b3
describe
'9014' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTA' 'sip-files00308thm.jpg'
ded3d02151632a66effc481207c3f79c
06c28ba9255538d21d65d1a3ff6ad147ded5e622
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTB' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
5e0593b459f51055da7e2763838ef86a
62a3735ee0f6be37f69d64be62fefefe1b9aeaa1
describe
'156872' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTC' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
36b16138edac4211718b0ac89dafee43
207798bd0329ac686b032d6c8c71cf8937a41e5e
describe
'55968' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTD' 'sip-files00309.pro'
4995b9d9274b11f28ba27b1fc3544eed
4f7e8b9378332a3afaa479d721566587f36bb5c6
describe
'47880' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTE' 'sip-files00309.QC.jpg'
25ede3bdc84278115da20e0fab07a82f
80524ba805c3f35fc035a33e7ac642fbd3f6d141
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTF' 'sip-files00309.tif'
01af42954dca6c9ffb5f48a7d745b381
102680ab9ef94c6ad4bf4366084e92414b3c84fb
describe
'2237' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTG' 'sip-files00309.txt'
717323c426fb4471df93ed8bd665b3eb
e395de94ae05e7ae77ee09ba44001b297fd2345e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTH' 'sip-files00309thm.jpg'
68a6316ba61a87567ef55a2ac2b08806
ceaeb076fee1bc5afe8cfc5715aa2204624fde3e
describe
'479660' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTI' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
16c7816ff6d7f8c56afb66bfc2379af6
840da3a8664e073483b00a80bed26b700ab7e628
describe
'150440' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTJ' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
6103588b742d03f7639b2d8af118ae5b
83624e2af71c435389a8dbcfa5e8ef1fb11b4b1d
describe
'54617' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTK' 'sip-files00310.pro'
6107cf1570be18a7d2eb00774e7a4348
181b0cccc0309278018e552de317dc1ef0bce147
describe
'47332' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTL' 'sip-files00310.QC.jpg'
b5248368402c998c8084c79cb042986a
fa764bfcf21cec7efb3228f0e0f5204a8acb5df6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTM' 'sip-files00310.tif'
471f543ba332b0763863ff075e16e136
690390d43f9f7fc0b4109fcbe8cf800042713925
describe
'2168' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTN' 'sip-files00310.txt'
c35419fbeea8e7608e35266d69ef4cf5
73c84a31df0c0cf51a9b968715b519042378f475
describe
'12393' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTO' 'sip-files00310thm.jpg'
5b82ed696b271b9b72fa20cf33da4c5e
1fdccdb64a5afe59e82ede7e19d9f6806fef27b1
describe
'479864' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTP' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
f3cdb89b3d0d03b276b9e50a99119609
7e524072ff6df393ef5d0200c109b26f789968dc
describe
'152169' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTQ' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
a30d16e90eda91dea9b7fda4e3300a57
211af3d11de25d7a2b23863275a1c4bfe3bc140b
describe
'56607' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTR' 'sip-files00311.pro'
490d130e2aaadfc865dc2c55235cedb3
6758c731843fdeb791f1ce9606ee9b8e2409c68c
describe
'46730' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTS' 'sip-files00311.QC.jpg'
57e7543078fd7e1cbd90dffee1583a32
26b00e05e47c8cf7785e9bc22215c8038678deb2
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTT' 'sip-files00311.tif'
eacd8d3234590c5b23c240af0d0bcee4
97123fc2d6881822cf34d624ad2566ece96bece7
describe
'2264' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTU' 'sip-files00311.txt'
ac820c1dd42eec32a39c0aa4a4dad2b0
a84b96c2b780bb73d90511eb7ff116b624a55467
describe
'12603' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTV' 'sip-files00311thm.jpg'
52ede8862d48861683eb63899e5dea58
fd117e4dc655d911b41acdfb5f4c83ff3353ae4e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTW' 'sip-files00312.jp2'
3ddfebe06c05854dc732972e9139042a
01ce09d2aa1a71842cf2b58f256fe826f4720ffe
describe
'160157' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTX' 'sip-files00312.jpg'
93855fb0add667d154afc600f123d068
1d0b8a899a4ef4cb9686cfb95d3e364ba8e2c41d
describe
'58413' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTY' 'sip-files00312.pro'
e1d246f67bc049e271d78f2fa2fc512e
9826cc11f92510fafce30da923ccb5e167c1c161
describe
'49600' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBTZ' 'sip-files00312.QC.jpg'
0ee0fb5f915ef82e575bb6fa2f5352fe
117528dcfeb0cfc3509910d08bf86ef1f06b1d2a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUA' 'sip-files00312.tif'
0e76e54504fde4bd3f0015450fb70fc5
216cd8932ec3c373202dc56148d52e34dc2cb513
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUB' 'sip-files00312.txt'
303e0c5a80862d30595829241756a7f8
b6605c3f58727216d334ef78519f243527debd0e
describe
'12914' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUC' 'sip-files00312thm.jpg'
100c0eefb8c938b6d27d688bcf41567c
0a8dc0f0a4b0d9075a5b32b0418e7bc18542071c
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUD' 'sip-files00313.jp2'
946909340c66fc732fc1433f85179175
85ba801c8390778f01193f76f97af9e0e4cdc379
describe
'34887' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUE' 'sip-files00313.jpg'
0990d8c2cc2b93177f0ec83cae0eaef4
9c0480d0288df39ceaa2268de28a47b576eba13f
describe
'7293' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUF' 'sip-files00313.pro'
e39bb9bdd8eddaa458b303764cca8c5d
d1f5ea56cdfdc27caee1d7a9c3c92233609eb64e
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUG' 'sip-files00313.QC.jpg'
a5c389559278e314d9c2f72787247687
24e7a1fc16e6a113dbb979d44e22fdf8833eb1f6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUH' 'sip-files00313.tif'
cffdfaa6cce899afaf412308150f4a4f
738d00314da389c63f8d42c8c3fc7e4299ed5de5
describe
'317' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUI' 'sip-files00313.txt'
f27c99ed3f58bdfc4b4877c832a52e1f
959df329d22ed157c02bb7b0fe1a2aea28e8cafd
describe
'2820' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUJ' 'sip-files00313thm.jpg'
78a429bef21c6e4bf6850959311d28e2
679c399ee2fa3b3101f81a1048b059b13c882990
describe
'479626' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUK' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
131e809af938d3a38b8dcfc01486cb70
1572c33c9c0f725b76018a3dda8301fb38658fbf
describe
'109626' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUL' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
e2e60a7b39436bc93ee802e81dea5862
e01ee4fd2ff32007844908375d8b0fd4ca31bfed
describe
'38470' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUM' 'sip-files00314.pro'
c050d952d55ecba366a701eaad69b4e7
2116d7c8a3e587f3c4e28ef747f33c6126a19878
describe
'32341' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUN' 'sip-files00314.QC.jpg'
79ebe5465c011e61d455fb66925ee661
204a42c68aaaab5ad95a3e6bc92f3d5898f3d93b
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUO' 'sip-files00314.tif'
afe5efd9eee7ea0ce6a35d2eba384361
5e12b32ef017c5b7fa51fb4263568f8892c10706
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUP' 'sip-files00314.txt'
f9a605a1efe4fdc09cab10299a88acd1
40fa96de8d6005303fc50acd2d2fbea01ddd3dcc
describe
'8709' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUQ' 'sip-files00314thm.jpg'
54e2ace484169931d7483fc8789ef5e7
73e3598901184fa59670f1eaeb0ed83aea02b0fa
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUR' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
732e507b3eb32018aeeee03721c7741f
4d3de6a62558df2387f40bbb32d726c7539b40ea
describe
'156572' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUS' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
f61435a502d0f2dc769446071cc8ea11
407080c04bc47ee3eab2814bd42c0ac7ce59eaf6
describe
'57648' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUT' 'sip-files00315.pro'
8c93cc903e0ad4a35af127ba47eb14cb
71141746d2e032aea30ef96cecb6d511d32a75c4
describe
'47725' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUU' 'sip-files00315.QC.jpg'
f98fd57cf859771da9e3b9d564d9e964
60acff01223bc36eb9524671b92105c7e3cddd26
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUV' 'sip-files00315.tif'
b60a5ba2f2df73786787052765f7658e
2aa3b90df88113c6284bc2c36a662b1ecc29fc1d
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUW' 'sip-files00315.txt'
901006dba0ce8f97bb1d14fb17e96dd9
1a77d172fe2e758cbfc8dd1f52e5700daa6895ed
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUX' 'sip-files00315thm.jpg'
6ab6472e348964337017208fda831e03
bda66edace3566413cc62dbb6c32bef507c591e9
describe
'479710' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUY' 'sip-files00316.jp2'
4096e2095fb82e850aa953b242f90fcf
a67ceed946fd7823bf13c887606bff096d06a725
describe
'162965' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBUZ' 'sip-files00316.jpg'
3507abf2be518b374cde4000d9d39562
5787dca8398f2595a24f8bdced3429544a59c100
describe
'59895' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVA' 'sip-files00316.pro'
738200c9076e8583f426ae55a9f90384
2fd9e831796df40442cf706b2fbfec9756759546
describe
'49737' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVB' 'sip-files00316.QC.jpg'
11e754b437965ef31caf0223a959549b
b6a0444c33315d952729ca35d274c768b8003951
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVC' 'sip-files00316.tif'
253cfe144572746ce2c40098aa4775d8
0d00ec023362cedff1bb17ee710e20f03afd10c9
describe
'2363' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVD' 'sip-files00316.txt'
c33c80d98de18f77617b77ea17a15bfd
d876b6aafffb70d4c0c7449949767eca934cf1c2
describe
'13004' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVE' 'sip-files00316thm.jpg'
5d5c17bc0217993fee929d7eb073c5ba
f9c408c92fa30e668f2e6e42c2e8d947026e4b2c
describe
'479839' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVF' 'sip-files00317.jp2'
62f4d6f54d28f76bea173c6e164da684
2ffc4b5648a35dfaf7808d23eff8823867f39bfb
describe
'158522' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVG' 'sip-files00317.jpg'
78fd597a2c499978b00355440c07a784
123ed0614ff62e74075c8d46c43573ae9073733f
describe
'58074' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVH' 'sip-files00317.pro'
62192c2fe8732368a8b772acaffba9c2
3e409528956ad01ad5a0823ce1c87fdd721a27fb
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVI' 'sip-files00317.QC.jpg'
2a1641e76dcbf863762f0ac8c645b130
623a16b526b78036b67c41fe54c2cb22f8d18895
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVJ' 'sip-files00317.tif'
0a4ce80d56ef1959c04a33d2a93faaa4
653667d815cd416a727e03c22d90ad3d74c41b61
describe
'2285' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVK' 'sip-files00317.txt'
f7d245a5ed1c72639d2ff0630a5c7c1e
7bdad1ee942a4089ca576b6788c9552fc254e23c
describe
'12746' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVL' 'sip-files00317thm.jpg'
0a9daba3155bae955f93bc3bf723f908
b6f0583ef09347b4e0e085a3c2b1af6775885b5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVM' 'sip-files00318.jp2'
97ae72257093a91ecbd4e8bbd1853e38
3c81cc4496971bf7ee7998c7f65248cc51de073a
describe
'164941' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVN' 'sip-files00318.jpg'
ee32696a0613fa4cc9c4fc765d4b2f63
03d28b594845a13221470ce6bb21cc1f24b72fd4
describe
'58324' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVO' 'sip-files00318.pro'
da524059182f4d17a2d63bab1bad9040
a142edcd4d6d832b330338e136455e6071b9eed3
describe
'48678' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVP' 'sip-files00318.QC.jpg'
17ed7121672b6c2bd5242ad0852d3110
ca8fd248083d8f06036aeb1b3dea2ef8ab3d32c0
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVQ' 'sip-files00318.tif'
1ec0346c96ab0404a7adfc9e1f9d88cc
baf85463744345dabcc0400ef24a9abc0582fd82
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVR' 'sip-files00318.txt'
8328f9cd4864b7d7581bfddede0f74c8
637df129caa6678fb7dab9f25b30036a55d9fbcb
describe
'12412' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVS' 'sip-files00318thm.jpg'
3b31c2faaa6d3293db1546c92b7b0c60
5c29b9c154b679b5f7bc7841ad75ffcfdb2407a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVT' 'sip-files00319.jp2'
2d3ab12433722e590e4c9cbdb9381e09
d8f9b6b8616f1adc95a1340829c999926f7befa9
describe
'164579' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVU' 'sip-files00319.jpg'
7a8d4d3330f75a5dec906ae942a65b12
f86907f033853cbb41ef83beb6c0dbed429f08b3
describe
'59725' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVV' 'sip-files00319.pro'
de213869d4e7f40a76af5f2625245abd
081b99ab479fe71742aa9f0dec4e75309b92c651
describe
'48582' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVW' 'sip-files00319.QC.jpg'
1e69e787600ce3e08c69a3b330033f23
36f87c6949219182a4779e7078c101108e2ec6a6
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVX' 'sip-files00319.tif'
deb3855ca0b17d0ee66c68a181b0bc65
723fa4de1b873e45757451bf5c181f4547ed1ab7
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVY' 'sip-files00319.txt'
efb47d0ab1fffe848c0edd960e7899e8
fca811032c295816588385bb7838c2d982df467b
describe
'12571' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBVZ' 'sip-files00319thm.jpg'
f0797c9a18a6fad017a446c3cc334992
de4907d48df2e55148bea8b903680876cec0dec5
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWA' 'sip-files00320.jp2'
363c3472b86cb5074edf41d2a442c817
2f7182ecb3f995c865cbef000fa22eab6a035987
describe
'155393' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWB' 'sip-files00320.jpg'
d0d86ac276c94fce5051bea7962f92df
4a76526ead61fcd3777924231d652374b968957f
describe
'57566' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWC' 'sip-files00320.pro'
c7ef32f95924cedd44c59d7b6ddbff83
d41dcf2f8b7f17fb61e04e31025f69fa09032c57
describe
'46546' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWD' 'sip-files00320.QC.jpg'
c7ee52c5c6dc8ee1431e3bd7b7769ece
2508423af6345ef2052fed4a77c1d9a3f4871220
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWE' 'sip-files00320.tif'
d00c0cfff3391e9673c0b2e26347de7e
d84cec46cf268779f0535c8014de195a50460c59
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWF' 'sip-files00320.txt'
489be2960d2e30b2fe7aad92bf4a6313
bf5883f74a95e21f47db2ea4cfedf6c39a3c34c4
describe
'12519' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWG' 'sip-files00320thm.jpg'
3bec2f8b95f0bb6e98c9627b80cc1a4f
6bb7bbed7a1c55e0286a0d4d5f127ef02d7c542f
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWH' 'sip-files00321.jp2'
ecd0678cf3961be5307ce403cc122d79
6c6d19e8056a72b1f69d9ea471ea9f889d6c5bc1
describe
'160365' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWI' 'sip-files00321.jpg'
56e4aeace83d803d54428a6c4008c309
ab03bf1c2ce54308c3ef1936a0505f7af307d2fe
describe
'59804' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWJ' 'sip-files00321.pro'
3164ceb08b971ec7abdb73e3d6c4b53d
a65413257e77e4daec63a03a92971507cd6f5c81
describe
'48264' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWK' 'sip-files00321.QC.jpg'
7d7db1bd40e93a4f15374e56e43748c4
ee4ae07ae3b8b1d3671d6c1d26bd454300df5475
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWL' 'sip-files00321.tif'
b6edfb06e8e86d63c647486e381f381a
d6ea1eeaee359510fd2d5158d1b121713c2f9402
describe
'2361' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWM' 'sip-files00321.txt'
1fb9b585925ddee24552a8520e569d32
afe0dc46ac57c68a6968058730aa363a679d9d30
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWN' 'sip-files00321thm.jpg'
1466f995f0e30b9ec985d16ec74d31e5
28ec8998eded1f29951765263034fe2c05672ce1
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWO' 'sip-files00322.jp2'
26aeae6d4883b4646c87b41cdb30abda
a9b026baa202e072984ca2c03174361dafdef003
describe
'52327' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWP' 'sip-files00322.jpg'
49044650ad87ac5f7e855c41a11bf2f7
dcc419db7e6d5a577ea7f0f09fd457ff5b39f89d
describe
'16193' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWQ' 'sip-files00322.pro'
56796d4b4daca4757193e9f49b165497
5cec0e4022b6d5c28d5ba77cb522c4aaf53449ae
describe
'16346' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWR' 'sip-files00322.QC.jpg'
f932a79843500945b6f14934b4e66998
a7d0b753408f187a19036dc359fb4172694632f4
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWS' 'sip-files00322.tif'
ca8569e004f5f6a980758ccd8f7dc796
8fe99f982faff4b3d0ce755eee52ce353c3a8630
describe
'704' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWT' 'sip-files00322.txt'
87896e7817b60e850fc114a828f65295
315072123696b3f75cf8085c8316354a780fefd9
describe
'4485' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWU' 'sip-files00322thm.jpg'
805b8a5158408829008fb32f1227e358
6caaab138650ac3bfcf5de1a0d8c48fdb18bd433
describe
'563944' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWV' 'sip-files00325.jp2'
783b83254550701e68a751d6128d0d45
3c5eda13c301e6d97cc0bda226171064a02185dc
describe
'64034' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWW' 'sip-files00325.jpg'
5ecba567b24eb2f8164334cc27de8693
63af7e4efbe006db6de0b8eeae3fa25374e062cd
describe
'14234' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWX' 'sip-files00325.QC.jpg'
7946b19b03aa62e5062e83e2bde5a8d0
ddacbca6b6595d7e4ee4687bd12f9efbf011cbc0
describe
'13552928' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWY' 'sip-files00325.tif'
f1797a7c1b8ec2f0609bb86c9b599481
4f6a395ff36d129d4a9ef305e1e0f7877813917a
describe
'4023' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBWZ' 'sip-files00325thm.jpg'
44a3748c770521f29bf82cd3c5220c70
7f23f93651305f4a04cb5cd84263d1b66144e0e5
describe
'581862' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXA' 'sip-files00326.jp2'
a5d867a6f141dfc9147aef2783e3d7ed
1e7f178b49eb8d74e2a7696d2de37a3fe0d44be3
describe
'176677' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXB' 'sip-files00326.jpg'
47fed37089dfa673269235faeb016390
af8d7ca07fbffb13575e5a393a7905cd88755bd4
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXC' 'sip-files00326.QC.jpg'
c001cd894d35d0e20737dbc37fed01be
ec4e04446e272fc6c762fa6bf80be8ff287d976a
describe
'13983424' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXD' 'sip-files00326.tif'
43c41a9c0a4051c6421301de238a820a
d806faab3ea71cc09997b22048bfc157c650f6bd
describe
'7280' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXE' 'sip-files00326thm.jpg'
a5a020920840d8ee699f57cdd00f1009
df19d05c606c4f496106585f32995f29a99692e4
describe
'166089' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXF' 'sip-files00327.jp2'
f225a18cefd481e3c464000395c868b9
486ff31f909795109ac45df723477c76e49363aa
describe
'44636' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXG' 'sip-files00327.jpg'
0a156fdc266646fa407d2d7a2d9a53b8
0e6d3a4eab36c3f6cd3549e855e166d761464398
describe
'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXH' 'sip-files00327.pro'
7fa9a8b898b9583780f9240da961a638
a6376d4c1ee91ab500f907fb50f7fee4f75e3dad
describe
'12442' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXI' 'sip-files00327.QC.jpg'
49e2426244f850ac24788d9ac4effc25
30adb4b96c633c80094b40e28024f514ba74a325
describe
'4005740' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXJ' 'sip-files00327.tif'
fd0c06f9c32a16cadaa86aec00eb9433
cba83ebd4a7570f6e1b5c5b9d54c4e087892faa5
describe
'6762' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXK' 'sip-files00327thm.jpg'
7fa95f84991048ce17aacc41d322662d
b44e2c732d82aff47db702f25bef5720d5374111
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXL' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
df3af664536e22e64c921a5557b8df3a
6c940d872d64419c2b5608e1223b3877a081de55
describe
'518858' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXM' 'sip-filesUF00085415_00001.mets'
0dd5a4c063b96a39caa0d8989f91cf1a
43d22b69de4009cccb3e99e3e568405ec30f1275
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2014-01-11T15:16:35-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'672013' 'info:fdaE20081006_AAAAEVfileF20081008_AABBXP' 'sip-filesUF00085415_00001.xml'
414100d077b37fd1b302168059fd1c88
d9ed08a0fd0bb5e07144026fe07cda735656dfc8
describe
'2014-01-11T15:16:40-05:00'
xml resolution


stasis

taistee kar eatbeeeeaet

datasets



THE
Swiss
FamILy

-RosBinson




A FAMILY PARTY,
THE SWISS FAMILY
ROBINSON

THE ADVENTURES OF A FAMILY SHIPWRECKED ON
A DESERT ISLAND

WITH EIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS

BY

RICHARD MATHER



NEW YORK
LONGMANS, GREEN & CO.

MDCCCXCVI
PREFACE

T the commencement of the present century, a
Swiss Pastor, who had lost his fortune, resolved
to set sail, as a voluntary exile, for one of the newly
discovered regions of the Pacific Ocean, and to seek
there the means of support for himself and family,
denied him by his own country, then convulsed with
the horrors of war.
| He departed accordingly, with his wife and four sons,
varying from six to fifteen years of age, in search of
a new home. A prosperous voyage brought the ship
within sight of New Guinea; when a violent storm
arose, which drove the ill-fated vessel out of its course,
and finally wrecked it on an unknown coast.

It was in this crisis of their affairs that the worthy

Pastor began the journal which is now placed before
the public.




CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.

Shipwreck and preparations for escape .

CHAPTER II.
The landing and first day on land

CHAPTER III.

Voyage of discovery .

CHAPTER IV.
Voyage to the Wreck

CHAPTER V.

‘What passed on land during our absence

CHAPTER VI.
Projects of migration. The dead shark. The bridge .

CHAPTER VII.

The migration. The porcupine. The tiger-cat. The wounded
flamingo :

CHAPTER VIII.
_ The building in the tree .

CHAPTER IX.
Sunday . ;

PAGE

15

20

29

43

50

57

62

74

78
8 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER X.
The hurdle. Thesalmon. The kangaroo

CHAPTER XI.
Second voyage to the vessel

CHAPTER XII.
Third voyage to the vessel. The penguins

CHAPTER XIII.
The bakehouse . z

CHAPTER XIV.

The pinnace . .

CHAPTER XV.
A walk. The wizard of the tree. The wild hog

CHAPTER XVI.
The heath-cock. Wax. The parrot’s nest. _ The india-rubber tree

CHAPTER XVIL

Wax-lights. Butter. Plantations. Last voyage to the vessel. Palm
wine. The buffaloes

CHAPTER XVIII.

Sago. Thebces. The education of the animals

CHAPTER XIX.

The wild ass. Flax. The rainy season

CHAPTER XX.
Return of the fine season. The cavern of salt. The bank of herrings.
The sea dogs

. . .

CHAPTER XXI.
Cotton. The farm. The canoe.

.

92

99

106

LIO

118

/125

130

138

145

153

163
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXII.

The feast of deliverance . , Og : . ‘ .

CHAPTER XXIII.
Divers labours. Expedition against the apes. The whale . 0

CHAPTER XXIV.

The weaving machine. The palanquin. Theboa .

CHAPTER XXV.
Epitaph on the ass. The boa stuffed . : 0 , .

CHAPTER XXVI.

An excursion. A new grotto

CHAPTER XXVII.

Journey to the farm. The cavy. The musk rat . ;

CHAPTER XXVIII.

The peccaries. The gigantic bamboos. Continuation of our journey

CHAPTER XXIX.

Walk in the Savannah. Troop and eggs of ostriches. The green
valley. Fright of Ernest. The bears

CHAPTER XXX.

Labours of the mother during our absence. The condor. Skinning
the bears, and preparing their flesh. Excursion of the three
boys. The Angora rabbits. The antelopes. Fritz’s recital.
The guide cuckoo. The nest of bees

CHAPTER XXXI.

Arab tower. Taking an ostrich. General departure and arrival
at the grotto. The eel. Education of the ostrich. Hydromel.
Making hats . ;

170

175

187

194

197

201

206

209

215

220
‘10 CONTENTS.
CHAPTER XXXII.
Return of the rainy season. Making pottery. A voyage to Requin

Island

CHAPTER XXXIII.

Departure of the boys for a rat hunt. Massacre of devastating pigs.

Return of the young people. Shoal of herrings and sea-dogs

CHAPTER XXXIV.

Trial of the canoe. Disappearance of Fritz. The walrus. The
storm. Anxiety about Fritz

CHAPTER XXXV.

Departure for Waldegg. The hyena. The messenger pigeon.
Fritz’s letter. The black swans. The royal heron. The tapir.
The cranes. The bird of paradise. Ravages made by apes

CHAPTER XXXVI.

Construction of a summer habitation. Fruits of the cacao-tree
and banana tree. The mysterious sack. The sultana hens.
Elephants. Panthers. The amphibious monster. The deceiver
deceived. Restoration of Falcon’s Nest. Construction of a
bodyguard in Requin Island

CHAPTER XXXVII.

Glance at the Colony at the end of ten years. Excursion of: Fritz
in his canoe. The nests. The bay of pearls. The sea-dogs.
The albatross

CHAPTER XXXVIII.

Confidences of Fritz The Englishwoman on the Fiery Rock.
Departure for the pearl-oyster fishery. The unloading

CHAPTER. XXXIX.

James’s fright. The wild boar. Truffles. Lions. Death of Belle.
Fritz’s expedition .

e227)

237

244

259

266

271
CONTENTS.

. CHAPTER XL.
Jenny . .

CHAPTER XLI.

Continuation of Miss Jenny’s history

CHAPTER XLII

Conclusion .

II

279

288

294

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

A FAMILY PARTY -

“A FLOCK OF FLAMINGOES ROSE IN THE AIR”
CAPTURING THE PENGUINS . ;

A BUFFALO IN HARNESS a

THE STRANDED WHALE :

“A BEAR, A BEAR, FATHER !”

A HERD OF ANTELOPES

AN ADVENTURE WITH A TIGER

frontispiece.

To face page

70
108
143

182
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



CHAPTER I,
SHIPWRECK AND PREPARATIONS FOR ESCAPE.

THE tempest lasted for six days, and, far from lessening,
redoubled its fury. Driven out of our route to the south-west,
it was impossible for us to recognise our position. The ship
had lost her masts, and took in water on every side. Each
one recommending his soul to God, implored Him for the means
of escaping death. “Children,” said I to my four sons, who
were weeping round their mother, “God can yet save us, if
such be His will; but if He has decided otherwise, let us
submit. We shall, at least, quit this world only to be re-united
in a better.” ete

My wife dried her tears, and, from my example, forced
herself to appear calm, to inspire the children with courage
and resignation. We fell on our knees and prayed with
fervour. Suddenly, through the rioise of the wind and waves,
I heard with delight the cry of “Land! land!” but at the
same instant we felt a dreadful shock, which was followed by
a long and frightful crackling. Then, from the immobility of
the ship, and the deafening noise which the sea made in rushing
round it, I found that: we had struck on the rocks, and that
the vessel had split in the middle.

“We are lost! get out the boats!” cried a voice, which
I recognised as that of the captain. “Lost!” repeated the
children, with looks full of anguish. “Re-assure yourselves,”
said I; “do not yet despair. God will assist the brave. I
will go and see what can be attempted for our safety.”

I quitted the cabin and went on the deck. Blinded by
ae
16 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the surge, I remained for some moments incapable of dis-
tinguishing anything. When at last I had gained the highest
part of the deck, I saw the boats already over-filled with
people, who were striving to get away from the wreck. A
sailor had just cut the last rope. They had forgotten us,

I called aloud, but my voice was lost in the tumult, and
I ascertained with deep horror that we were abandoned on
the shipwrecked vessel. In this terrible extremity, I was con-
soled by finding that the ship had struck in such a manner
that the poop, in which our cabin was situated, could not be
reached by the waves. At the same time, in spite of the thick
rain which was falling, I could perceive, at some distance to
the south, a shore, which, though of desolate aspect, became
henceforward the object of my hope. I returned to my family,
and affecting a tranquillity I was far from feeling, “Take
courage,” said I, “all is not lost. A part of the ship, thank
God, remains fixed above the water. To-morrow the wind
and sea will be calmer, and we may reach the shore.” The
children, with the confidence of their age, accepted this supposi-
tion as a certainty. By a sign of intelligence from my wife,
I found that she penetrated the truth, but I saw, also,
that her faith in God was not diminished. “We shall have,”
said she, “a fearful night to pass; let us take some nourishment ;
the food of the body strengthens the mind.”

The evening was in fact approaching, and the tempest,
still violent, was beating at the ship with such fury that every
instant I feared it would be entirely broken up. Their mother
having hastened the preparations for a simple repast, the
children ate heartily, then went to bed and slept soundly.

Fritz, the eldest, who better understood our position than
his brothers, wished to watch with us. “Father,” said he,
“T have reflected on the means of reaching the shore. If we
had some cork or some bladders to make swimming belts for
my mother and my brothers, you and I could swim without
help.” “Your idea is good, my dear child,” replied I; “let
us prepare some as quickly as we can.” Having then gathered
together a number of small empty barrels, and of those tin
bottles in which, at sea, they keep rations of fresh water, aided
by Fritz I joined them together with handkerchiefs, and fastened
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 17

two of them under the arms of each of the children, and of
my dear, brave wife. Fritz and I then filled our pockets and
theirs with knives, cords, steels, and other things which might
be very necessary to us, should the vessel be broken up during
the night, and we fortunate enough to reach the shore. These
precautions taken, Fritz, re-assured and very much fatigued,
laid down beside his brothers and soon fell asleep.

This terrible night was passed by myself and my wife in
prayer. Towards morning, however, I thought the tempest
had abated. At the first dawn of day I mounted on the
deck. The wind had fallen a little, the sea was calmer, and
a fine dawn tinged the horizon with light. Re-animated by
this view, I called my wife and sons, The children were
alarmed when they saw that we were alone on the ship. “Where
are the sailors?” said they. “Why, if they have gone away,
did they not take us with them? What will become of us?”
“My children,” replied I, “our companions have gone away
in the boats without thinking of us, and it is to be feared
they have perished by their precipitation. At present, they
are perhaps more to be pitied than we are. See, the sky is
clear, the land is not far off; our abandonment is perhaps
fortunate. Let us hope in God, who has not forsaken
us, and consider what must be undertaken to assure our
safety.”

‘Fritz, enterprising and adventurous, persisted in his idea
of swimming to land. Ernest, my second son, aged twelve
years, intelligent, but timid and indolent, was frightened at
the idea of such a venture, and proposed constructing a raft.
I showed him that such a conveyance, besides the time necessary
to construct it, was very difficult to guide. These two con-
siderations made: him abandon his opinion almost immediately.
“Now, my children,” said I, “let us explore the vessel; and
while reflecting on the means of gaining the shore, let us gather
together on the deck everything which may be useful to us
on shore,”

We separated for the search, I went first to the place
where the provisions were kept, to secure the first necessaries
of existence, Fritz visited the magazine of arms and muni-

tions, whence he brought up guns, pistols, powder, balls, and
2
18 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

shot. Ernest rifled the carpenter’s cabin, and returned loaded
with tools and nails. Little Francis, my youngest child, aged
six years, wishing to show. his activity, brought a box full
of fish-hooks, Fritz and Ernest laughed at him; but I
thought we ought not to despise this acquisition, for we might -
be reduced to live by fishing. As to James, our third son,
an urchin of ten years old, he re-appeared with two large
dogs, which he had found shut up in the captain’s cabin, and
being rendered docile by hunger, suffered themselves to be
led by the ears. My wife told me that she had found a cow,
an ass, and two goats, to whom she had given food and drink
just in time to save them, for these poor beasts had had no
food for two days.

Each one appeared to have made useful discoveries, except
James. “You have brought,” said I, “two terrible eaters, who
will cost a great deal, without being of any use.” “I thought,
dear father,” replied he, “that they would help us to hunt,
when we were on land.” “You are right; but we are not yet
on land! Have you thought of any means of arriving there,
dear little one?” “Ah!” said he, “we might sail in the tubs,
as I did formerly in my grandfather’s pond.” “A good idea,”
said I, and immediately went, followed by my children, to
the hold, where several large empty barrels were floating.
I drew out four of them to the planks of the middle deck,
which was near the level of the water. These barrels were
made of strong wood, bound with iron; I judged them very
fit for the execution of our project. Aided by Fritz, I began
by sawing them into two equal parts. When we had thus
obtained eight tubs, which I ranged side by side, I looked for
a flexible plank, long enough to hold them all, and to form
besides at each end a kind of keel. We nailed the tubs firmly
to this plank, and each of them was attached to the other by
bolts. All this being well accomplished, we saw ourselves in
possession of a conveyance which, in a calm sea, would, in my
opinion, be perfectly safe.

It now remained to put it into the water, but it was so
heavy that our united efforts could not move it. I wanted
a screw-jack, Fritz, who recollected having seen one, went to
look for it. By the help of this instrument I raised the heavy
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 19

construction, and Fritz placed some rollers under it; it was
then easy to set it in motion. The children were astonished
at seeing the power of the screw-jack. I promised them to
explain its mechanism at the first leisure moment. A few
minutes after, our barque glided from the deck into the sea, on
which it floated, with such rapidity, that it would have escaped,
if I had not taken the precaution to fix it firmly by a cable
to a joist of the vessel, The children uttered cries of joy
on seeing it float; I was not so well satisfied as they
were. It went all on one side, which discouraged me for the
moment, but I soon found that I could remedy this by ballast.
Seizing all the heavy things that were near my hand, I threw
them into the tubs, and by degrees I saw the boat recover its
equilibrium.

We now wanted oars. Ernest found four which had been
left under a sail-cloth. Recollecting that the savages used a
kind of fly-beam to ensure the steadiness of their canoes, I
resolved to adapt similar ones to our boat. I took two pieces
of yard, which I fixed by pegs to the extremities of the boat,
so that they could turn. At each end of these poles I fixeda
little empty cask, to float on the water right and left. These
kept the boat quite steady.

When these labours were completed, it was too late to think
of putting to sea the same day. We must resign ourselves to
pass another night on the stranded ship. This determination
taken, my wife comforted us materially by a good meal, for we
had taken nothing during the day but a little bread and wine.
Although more satisfied than on the preceding evening, I would
not go to bed without putting on the children their swimming
apparatus. Sleep was not long in coming to us, for the day had
been a busy one. The night passed without any unfortunate
incident.
CHAPTER II,
THE LANDING AND FIRST DAY ON LAND.

AT the break of day we were all awake. As soon as we
had engaged in morning prayer, I said to my children, “We
shall now, with God’s help, attempt our deliverance. Give the
animals provisions for several days, for we must return to fetch
them, if, as I hope, our journey succeed. Collect, then, all that
will be of the greatest use to us after our landing, and take
courage.” I placed among the cargo a barrel of powder, some
guns, several pairs of pistols, some bullets, also some lead and
moulds to make more. Each of us carried a game bag full of
food. I took a chest full of broth-cakes, another of biscuits, a
porridge pot, some knives, hatchets, scythes, pincers, nails,
gimlets, and fishing lines. I took also some sails to make -
a tent. We had amassed so many things, that we were obliged
to leave a great number, though I had exchanged for useful
things the ballast I had thrown into the tubs. My wife thought
that we should do well to take with us some fowls, ducks, geese,
and pigeons. She placed two cocks and twelve hens in one of
the tubs, which I enclosed with a sort of grating formed by
cross pieces of wood. As to the ducks, pigeons, and geese,
‘I gave them their liberty, trusting to their instinct to gain the
land, some by flying, others by swimming. The children had
already embarked in the order J had arranged, when my wife
came from the interior of the vessel, carrying in her arms a
large bag which she threw into the tub occupied by little
Francis. I took no notice of this bag, presuming that the
thoughtful mother had taken it to make a seat for the
child.

As soon as I saw everybody installed, I cut the cable which

20
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 21

retained the boat, and began to row towards the land. In the
first tub was my wife, in the second little Francis, Fritz
occupied the third. The two middle ones contained the
powder, arms, sails, the tools, the food, and the poultry. James
was in the sixth; Ernest in the seventh; and I took the last
one for myself, whence, helm in hand, I directed our naviga-
tion. Each of us had beside him one of our belts of bottles
and barrels to serve in case of accident. As I judged the
dogs too big to embark with us, we left them on the vessel.
When they saw that we were going, they began to howl, but
suddenly decided on throwing themselves into the water and
soon rejoined us. Fearing that the journey was too long for
their strength, I eased them by letting them put their fore
paws from time to time on the balancing poles or on the
barrels. The good animals soon understood this manceuvre,
and could thus follow us without too much fatigue.

The sea curled softly, the sky was pure, the sun radiant.
We rowed with a will, and the tide favoured us. Around us
floated chests, barrels, bales, and other waifs of the shipwrecked
vessel. Fritz and I seized with the oars and fastened to the
boat some of the barrels which we towed along. My wife,
her hand resting on the head of her youngest child, her eyes
raised to heaven, was silently praying. The journey was
happily accomplished, but the nearer we approached the shore,
the more wild and melancholy it appeared. A line of grey
and naked rocks was all we could see.

After a time, however, Fritz, who was very strong sighted,
thought he discovered some trees, among which, he assured us,
were some palm trees. Ernest, naturally dainty, was rejoiced
at the idea of eating cocoa-nuts, which, as he had read, were
much better than the walnuts of Europe.

A discussion arose among the children, on the kind of
trees which Fritz was endeavouring to make them see. As I
was regretting not having brought away the captain’s telescope,
James drew from his pocket a little eye-glass which he had
found in the mate’s room. I could then observe the shore,
Forgetting the subject in dispute, I looked round anxiously
for a place to land at. I noticed a creek towards which the
geese and ducks were making their way. “Do you see the
22 : THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

cocoa-nuts, papa?” said little Francis. “Yes,” said I, smiling,
“Fritz has good eyes; he is not deceived. I distinguish in
the distance some trees which appear to be cocoa-nut trees.”
“IT am very glad,” said the little boy, clapping his hands
together for joy. My wife leant forward to embrace him and
hide a tear. When she raised her head she only showed us
asmile. We bent well to our oars, and landed near the mouth
of a stream, at a place where the water was scarcely deeper
than was necessary to keep our tubs afloat, and where the
shore was very low. The children jumped hastily on shore,
with the exception of Francis, who, in spite of his impatience,
was too young to get out of his tub without his mother’s
assistance. The dogs, who had preceded us, welcomed us
with joyful barks. The ducks and geese already installed
on the shores of the stream, saluted us with their quackings,
with which were mingled the harsh cries of some penguins
who remained motionless on the rock, and of several flamingoes
who ran away frightened.

Our first care, as soon as we touched land, was to throw
ourselves on our knees to thank God who had so mercifully
delivered us, and ask Him to continue His protection. I
clasped my wife and my poor little ones in my arms, The
moist eyes of my wife met mine. “God is good,” said she,
with an angelic smile; “He has left us each other and our
children.” We then proceeded to unload the boat, and every-
thing was soon transported to the shore. Though this booty
was inconsiderable, how rich we thought ourselves in pos-
sessing it!

I chose a convenient place to pitch the tent which was to
shelter us. I fixed in the soil one of the poles which served
to balance our boat; at the top of this pole I placed the
second, resting one end in a cleft of the rock. Then I threw
over it the sail which I extended with pegs, taking care to
fix the edges inside, with our chests of provisions and other
heavy things, and Fritz fixed some hooks to the opening, so
that we might close it at night. I ordered the children to
collect all the dry grass and moss they could find to make
beds. Whilst they were thus occupied I built with some
stones, at a little distance from the tent,a sort of furnace, on
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 23

which I placed several armsful of dead wood, picked up from
the sides of the stream, and I soon kindled a large fire, which
blazed gaily. My wife placed on the hearth the pot full of
water, into which I threw five or six soup-cakes, “What
are you going to glue, papa?” asked little Francis, who took
the soup-cakes for strong glue. His mother, smiling at his
artless question, said I was making soup. “Glue soup,” said
he, making a sour face. “Oh, no,” said his mother, “meat
soup.” “Meat!” cried Francis, opening his eyes, “are you
going to the butcher’s, mama?” His mother laughed, and
told him that what he had taken for glue, was the juice of
meat reduced to this state by long boiling. “They employ
this means,” said she, “to supply fresh meat, which would be
tainted in long sea voyages.”

Fritz, who had loaded his gun, went off up the stream ;
Ernest went the opposite way along by the sea. James began
to search the rocks in the hope of finding mussels. I was busy
drawing from the water the barrels which we had towed along,
when I heard James uttering loud cries. Armed with a hatchet,
I ran to the side whence the voice proceeded. I perceived the
child on his knees in the water. “Papa, papa,” cried he, with
an accent in which triumph and terror were mingled, “come
quickly; I have caught a great beast.” “Well, bring him.”
“J cannot, papa; he holds me.” I could not help laughing
to see this conqueror a prisoner to his captive, but it was time
to go to his assistance. A large lobster was holding him by the
leg, and poor James tried in vain to escape from the claws of
the animal. I went into the sea; the lobster let go his prize
and tried to escape, but I seized him by the middle of the
body, and brought him to land. My scapegrace, proud of
being able to show this fine captive to his mother, hastily seized
the creature with both hands, but scarcely had he touched him,
than he struck his face such a violent blow with his tail, that
he let him fall, and began to cry. While consoling him, I
could not help laughing at his discomfiture. I showed him
that nothing was more simple than to conquer his prisoner by
holding him by the middle of his body. As soon as he was
satisfied, he resumed his road to let his mother admire his
capture. “Mama! Francis! Ernest! Fritz! where is Fritz?”
24 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,

cried he, arriving at the tent; “Come and see! A lobster, a ©
lobster !”

Ernest, after having gravely examined the creature, advised
his mother to put him into the boiling pot, which would
make us a rich soup. My wife did not think much of the
excellence of this receipt, and decided that we should cook the
lobster separately, Ernest then told us that he had also made
a discovery. “I have seen,” said he, “some shell-fish in the
water; but it would wet me to take them.” “I saw them
also,” replied James, with a disdainful air; “but what of that?
Small shell-fish, I would not eat them. Think of my lobster!”
“Who knows?” said Ernest again, “perhaps they are oysters.
I should say they were by the manner in which they stuck to
the rocks, and the depth at which they are found.” “ Well,
soft one,” said I, “if you thought they were oysters, why did
you not bring us some? You were afraid of wetting yourself,
you say; remember, in our position we must give proofs of
energy and self-denial.”

“T also saw,” said Ernest, “some salt among the holes of the
rocks.” I explained this fact by supposing that the sun had
dried the sea-water. “Ah!” cried I, “eternal discoverer! if
you saw salt, you ought to have collected a sack full. Go
then and repair this negligence quickly, that we may not
eat insipid soup.” Ernest set off, and soon returned. The
salt which he brought was so mixed with sand and earth,
that I was on the point of throwing it away, but my wife
prevented me. She threw it into some water, which she then
strained through a cloth, and we used this water to salt our
soup. I, however, scolded Ernest for having taken so little
care.

The soup was ready, but Fritz had not come in, and besides,
standing before the boiling pot, we asked each other, very
foolishly, how we were going to empty it. Must we carry by
turns the great burning pot to our lips, and fish up the biscuit
with our fingers? We found ourselves nearly in the situation
of the fox in the fable, to whom the stork presented food in
a bottle. Our embarrassment was so great that we burst out
laughing. “If we only had some cocoa-nuts,” said Ernest,
“we might make some spoons,” “Yes,” said I, “if it were
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 25

only to wish and have, we might instantly be provided with
magnificent silver covers. But Fritz’s cocoa-nut trees are
yet to be discovered. The rocks separate us from them.
Come my children, invent something that may serve our
purpose. “Could we not,” replied Ernest, “make use of oyster-
shells?” - “Capital!” cried I; “make haste and procure
some.”

Ernest went off again, but was forestalled by James, who
had gone into the water before the indolent one had reached
the shore. James detached the oysters and threw them on
the ground. Ernest was satisfied with picking them up, thus
avoiding wetting his feet. At the same time that our oyster
fishers returned, Fritz came in. He advanced, holding his
hand behind his back, and affecting a sorrowful air. “Have
you found nothing?” I asked. “Nothing at all,” replied he.
But his brothers, who were surrounding him, cried out, “Oh!
a little guinea pig! where did you find it? Let me see it.”
Then Fritz proudly showed the game which he had at first
hidden.

I congratulated him on his hunting; but reprimanded him
for the falsehood he had told, though it was only in jest. He
asked pardon; then told us that he had gone to the other
side of the stream, and had found a very different country from
that in which we were. “There,” said he, “the vegetation
is magnificent; besides, there is on the shore a quantity of
chests, barrels, and other waifs of the shipwreck which the sea
has thrown up. Shall we suffer all these riches to be lost?
Shall we go and fetch the cattle from the vessel? The cow
especially would give us excellent milk to steep our biscuits.
Down below there is plenty of grass to feed her, and beautiful
trees to shelter us. Let us go and settle there. Let us quit
this naked and arid shore.”

“ Patience, patience,” replied I, “every thing in time. First
tell me, have you discovered any trace of our companions?”
“Nothing, either on land or sea. I have seen no other living
beings than a troop of animals like the one I have brought.
These are, I think guinea-pigs, but of a particular kind, for
their paws are made like those of hares, They are so tame
that I could look at them closely. They bounded about in
26 . THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,

the grass, sat, and carried their food to their mouths like
squirrels.” Ernest gravely examined the animal, and said that
according to his natural history, he believed it was an agéuti.
“Ah!” cried Fritz, “see how. the learned impose on us; I say
it is a guinea-pig.”

I interfered in the discussion: “Do not take so high a
tone with your brother,” said I to Fritz; “I have never seen
a living agéuti; but what you hold there is certainly the agéuti
of which the naturalists speak. In the first place, your animal
is much too large for a guinea-pig; he has a flat head, small
ears, a small tail, and short yellow-brown hair. He is about
the size of a large rabbit ; and see, its front teeth are sharp and
bent inwards. A guinea-pig never had such teeth.” “ Father,”
said Ernest, “since the agéutis are so tame, suppose we try
to take some alive. We could bring them up like rabbits,
and should have game always at hand, without the trouble
of hunting it.” “Yes, that would suit your idleness, Ernest.
Try if you like. The agéuti is not difficult to provide for;
but I foresee that these rabbits will give you more trouble
than those of Europe. They are great gnawers, whose teeth
are always at work. Nothing resists them, however hard,
and they have been known to bite through the iron bars of the
cage in which they were confined. Where do you intend to
keep yours?”

James, while his brothers were attentively listening to this
lesson of natural history, was struggling to open an oyster with
his knife; but though he employed all his strength, he could
not succeed. I then took the oysters, placed them on the
hot coals, and they soon opened of themselves. “ Now,” said
I, “my children, this is a very delicious dish; taste it.” Saying
this I sucked up an oyster and swallowed it. James and Fritz
imitated me, but did not hesitate to declare that they were
detestable. Ernest and Francis thought the same. So we
only took that part of the oysters which is usually thrown
away, namely the shells, and using them for spoons, began to
eat our soup.

Whilst we were feasting with a good appetite, the two dogs,
who had good reasons for wishing to imitate us, discovered
Fritz’s agéuti, and began to tear it. Fritz rose furiously, and
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 27

seizing his gun, struck them with it so violently that he broke
the stock; then while the dogs were running away, he threw
stones at aten as long as he could reach them. This was not
the first time that Fritz had shown irritability. And I felt
that I ought to repress this violence of disposition, which
grieved me, and might set a bad example to his brothers.
I scolded him severely, and showed him that in the blindness
of his anger he had not only made his gun useless, but risked
laming poor animals who were intended to be of great
service to us. He saw the justice of my reprimand, and ex-
pressed his sorrow for it. I pardoned him on condition that
he should make his peace with the dogs. Fritz immediately
took a piece of biscuit in each hand, and shortly after these
good animals reappeared with him. Poor Fritz had his eyes
full of tears, “Oh, father,” said he, “even before taking the
biscuit they licked my hand. How could I be so harsh to
such good creatures?” “Anger is always wrong, my dear
child,” said I; “do not forget it.”

As we finished our repast, the sun disappeared in the
horizon. The cocks, hens, and ducks assembled round us.
Then my wife threw them some handfuls of corn, which she
drew from the bag I had seen her put into Francis’s tub, I
praised her highly for her forethought; but remarked that it
would be better still to keep these grains to sow, than to lavish
them on the animals who could be fed with damaged biscuits.
The pigeons took refuge in the crevices of the rocks; the cocks
and hens perched on the ridge of the tent; and the ducks
couched in the tufts of rushes at the mouth of the stream.
We also prepared for repose. The arms were loaded and
placed in such a manner that we could seize them at the
first alarm. We then joined in prayer, and retired into the
tent.

To the great astonishment of the children, darkness suc-
ceeded to daylight very rapidly. I concluded from this that
we must be near the equator, at all events in a tropical region.
I looked once more out of the tent to assure myself that all
was calm around us; then I closed the entrance and went
to bed. The night was very fresh; we were obliged to lie
close together to keep warm. This contrast between the
28 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

temperature of the day and night confirmed mein my opinion
of the situation of the country. My wife slept, and so did the
children. It was agreed between us that I should watch till
the middle of the night, and that I should then call her to
take my place; but sleep insensibly overcame me, and God
alone watched over us on the first night that we passed on
the land of deliverance.
CHAPTER IIL
VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY.

THE cocks did not forget to salute the sun. My wife and I
were awoke by their crowing. Our first care was to arrange
the employment of the day. She agreed with me that we ought
first of all to try and ascertain the fate of our companions. We
,also wished to explore the country, to know in what part to fix
our residence. It was agreed that I should go on this discovery
with Fritz, whilst the mother should remain near the tent with
the other boys. I then begged her to prepare breakfast, and
woke the children, who immediately arose.

I asked James what had become of his lobster. He told me
that he had hid it in a hole of the rock, for fear the dogs should
take it as they had Fritz’s agéuti. “Very well,” said I; “this
is a proof that you are not a careless boy when your own
interests are concerned, and that you learn experience by others’
misfortunes. However, will you give us your lobster’s claws to
eat during our journey?”

“Oh, a journey! a journey!” cried all the children at
once; “take me, papa; take me!” “This time,” said I, “it
is not possible to take the whole family. We should advance
too slowly, and in case of danger it would be more difficult
to defend ourselves. Fritz only will.come with me; one dog,
whom we will call Turk, if you like, shall come with us. You
will remain here with your mother, under care of the other
dog, to whom I propose to give the name of Belle.” Fritz
asked me, with a blush, to let him take another gun instead
of his own, which was useless. I permitted him, without
appearing to remark the confusion which the remembrance
of his fault caused him. I made him put in his belt a pair

of pistols and a hatchet. I armed myself in the same manner.
29
30 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

We took care to fill our game bags with powder, balls, and
some biscuit. Each of us took a tin bottle full of water.

Breakfast was ready. It consisted of the lobster which my
wife had cooked. It was found so hard that we left the greater
part of it. Fritz was of opinion that we should begin our
journey before the great heat came on. “You are right,” said
I; “we will set out; but we have forgotten a very important
thing.” “What?” said he. “To embrace my mother and
brothers; to thank God,” said Ernest eagerly. “Right, my
dear Ernest ; you have understood me.”

I was interrupted by James, who pretended to ring a bell.
“Boom, boom, boom,” cried he, “to prayers! to prayers!”
“Foolish child,” said I; “leave off turning sacred things into
ridicule. To punish you, we will not admit you to pray with
us. Retire.” Confused at this. reprimand, James went away
with a full heart, and knelt down at a distance. Whilst we
were praying, I heard him ask pardon of God for his untimely
jest. Then he came humbly and promised me never more to
commit the same fault. I embraced him, satisfied by finding
that he redeemed his thoughtlessness by an excellent heart.

After having recommended union and obedience to those
children who were to remain with their mother, we separated,
It was not without regret and some tears; for my wife was
uneasy at seeing us set out on this adventure, and I was not
without anxiety for the dear treasure that I left behind me.
We hastened our steps, and soon the noise of the stream by
which we were walking prevented us from hearing the adieus
of our loved ones. To cross the stream it was necessary to
go back to a place where it was enclosed by very steep rocks,
from which fell a cascade,

On the opposite shore nature entirely changed her aspect.
We came first to some high, dry grass, through which we
advanced with difficulty. Scarcely had we gone a hundred
steps when we heard a great noise; turning back, we saw the
grass moving. Fritz loaded his gun and held it ready to receive
the aggressor, whatever it might be. But we soon recognised
Turk, our dog, whom we had forgotten, and who had just
rejoined us. I received the brave animal with caresses, and
congratulated Fritz on his coolness; for he not only faced the
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 31

danger bravely, but abstained from firing before he distinctly
saw what the enemy was.

Continuing our route, we gained the borders of the sea.
We looked all around, endeavouring to find traces of our
companions, but could perceive none. We also attentively
examined the sand, hoping to see men’s footsteps, but this
hope was also disappointed. Fritz said, “Shall we fire from
time to time, that the shipwrecked ones may hear us, if there
are any here?” “That is well thought of,’ I replied; “but
perhaps this noise may attract savages, with whom a meeting

would not be agreeable.” “After all,” said he, “I scarcely
know why we should trouble ourselves about people who
inhumanly abandoned us.” “For several reasons,” I replied.

“First, because it is not christian-like to return evil for evil;
and then because, if our companions have need of us, we also
may have need of them.” “But, dear father, in looking for
them we lose time which may be better employed ; for example,
in saving the cattle which have been left on the ship.”
“Between different duties,” said I, “let us accomplish first
the most important. Besides, my dear child, the animals
have sufficient food for several days, and the sea, which is
calm, does not threaten to carry away the rest of the vessel.”
We quitted the shore. After having walked-two leagues,
looking carefully about us, we entered into a little wood. We
had walked then for nearly two hours; the sun was very high.
We hastened to the borders of a little stream which softly
murmured. Around us flew, warbling, beautiful birds, which
were unknown to us. Fritz thought he saw a monkey on the
branch of a tree. Turk also began to smell about, and bark
in that direction. Fritz rose to ascertain the fact; and as he
was walking with his eyes raised upwards, he struck his foot
against a round thing with bristling hairs, which made him
stumble. He picked this thing up and brought it to me,
saying that it must be the nest of a large bird. “Your nest,
my dear Fritz,” said I, laughing at his mistake, “is a cocoa-
nut.” By a disposition natural to self-love at his young age,
Fritz persisted in his opinion. “There are many birds,” said
he, “which make round nests like this.” “That is true; but
why pronounce with so much precipitation, and then support
32 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

your judgment when you are shown that it is ill founded?
Do not you recollect having read that the cocoa-nut is sur-
rounded with a mass of fibres which cover a thin and brittle
skin? The fruit which you have just found is doubtless old;
the exterior envelope has been destroyed by the air. If you
take away these bristly fibres you will see the nut.” Fritz
obeyed, and found that I was right. Then we broke the
’ nut, in which we found a dry and uneatable kernel. “What,”
said Fritz, “is this the fruit of which Dr Ernest spoke with
so much praise? I thought I should find some delicious milk.”
“We should have done so if we had met with a nut which was
not quite ripe. But in proportion as the nut ripens, the milk
which it contains hardens, and forms a kernel, which later still
dries, unless the fruit falls into suitable ground, and the kernel
germinating, breaks its shell to give birth to a new tree.”
“What,” asked Fritz, astonished, “would the kernel have
strength enough to pierce a shell so solid as this?” “Cer-
tainly; have you not seen peach stones open, and they are
very hard?” “Yes; but the peach stones are naturally formed
in two pieces, which the kernel separates when it is swollen
by moisture.” I praised my son for the correctness of this
remark, and told him that the cocoa-nut grows in a different
manner. I then pointed out three little openings towards the
end of the nut. “These openings,” said I, “are closed, as
you may see, by a hood, less hard than the rest of the shell.
It is there that the germs of the stalk and roots take their
issue.” I was glad to see that my son followed with great
interest these explanations, which initiated him into the wise
laws of creation.
We resumed our route, walking still through the wood, which
appeared to extend a long way. We were often obliged to cut
a passage with our hatches from the innumerable bindweeds
which interlaced the trees. At each step some magnificent
plant or some strange tree came in sight. Fritz, who was more
and more astonished, cried out suddenly, “Oh, papa! what are
these great trees with wens on the trunks?” I recognised the
calibash, whose flexible stalk rolling round the trees forms on
their trunks a kind of gourd, with a hard and dry shell. It may
be employed in making dishes, porringers, bottles, and spoons,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 33

I told Fritz that the savages even use them to boil water and
cook their victuals. He was greatly astonished, not under-
standing how such utensils could bear fire. I then explained
the method of the savages, which consisted in throwing into the
- water contained in these vases, stones previously made red hot
in the fire, until the water boiled.

While talking, we had each taken a gourd to make into
household utensils. Fritz endeavoured to shape his with his
knife, but did not succeed. He became impatient, and threw
it away. I took care not to imitate him, but surrounded mine
with a string, which I pressed gradually tighter, till I obtained
two porringers of equal size. “I must own,” said Fritz, “that
this is an ingenious idea.” “I have not, my dear child, the
merit of the invention; I only recollected that this method
is employed by people who have no knives, so I put it in
practice.” Fritz wished to know how the bottles were made.
“I understand,” said he, “that by letting the gourd dry we
might extract the marrow through the hole. But could we give
to this round fruit a more convenient form? Could we succeed
in pressing it so as to obtain a neck?” I told him that to
obtain this result, they surround the young fruit with bands of
linen or skin. The part thus tied cannot grow, while the rest
develops at liberty.

Seeing my success, Fritz took courage. We gathered a
sufficient number of gourds, which I exposed to the sun, after
having filled them with fine sand to prevent their shrinking too
much in drying ; then, in order to take them on our return, we
took care to mark the place where we left them.

We then pursued our route, endeavouring to form some
spoons with fragments of calibash. We produced nothing very
remarkable ; coarse as they were, however, these spoons were
much more convenient than the oyster shells which we used the
evening before. Fritz jumped for joy: “Dishes, plates, cups!
ah, how glad my mother will be! She will have something to
serve up our soup in.” And thinking of Francis; “Father, let
us look for a little calibash ; our spoons will stretch his poor
mouth from ear to ear. I will try and make him a little one
for himself.” And as one good thought leads to another, he
also prepared two gourds for Turk and Belle. When his labour

3
34 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

was finished, Fritz took some biscuit and soaked it in fresh
water for Turk. When Turk saw this, his large eyes shone
with tenderness; he gratefully licked his young master’s hand,
and did honour to this unexpected repast.

_ After having walked about three hours more, we arrived at a
neck of land which stretched into the sea, and on which rose a
hill, which, not without some trouble, we ascended. From the
summit, the view embraced a vast extent; but, though aided by
the spy-glass, we discovered no signs of other shipwrecks, nor
anything which would make us suppose that the island was
inhabited.

A most magnificent view stretched before us. Under our
feet shone the calm sea in an immense bay, whose shores were
covered with a rich vegetation, which extended a long way.
This spectacle would have filled us with delight if the fate of
our companions had not saddened us. Yet I could not prevent
an expression of satisfaction in contemplating this country,
whose fertility promised well for our future support. “Well,”
said I, “we are destined to the life of isolated colonists. God
has thus decided for us. Let us submit courageously to His
will.” “But,” said Fritz, “we are in greater numbers than at
the time of Adam and Eve; and who knows if we shall not be
like that patriarch of whom the Bible speaks, the source of
an innumerable nation?” This idea of an Abraham of fifteen
years old made me smile.

At this moment the sun darted its fiercest rays. I told Fritz
to follow me and seek the shade in a grove of palm-trees which
I perceived at some distance. “For,” said I, “my poor Fritz,
it would be sad that we should be burnt up before we have
accomplished our patriarchal destiny.” “Dear father,’ said
Fritz, “I wished to cheer you a little. As to us, do not fear.
Where you and my mother are, what can I and my brothers
want? We shall be very happy, and shall soon grow up and
work so as to save you all trouble.” I pressed the dear child
in my arms, and thanked God for having given me so good a
son.

To gain the wood we had to cross a field of reeds, so close
and entangled, that they very much impeded our walk. As this
place might be a refuge for reptiles, I cut one of the reeds to
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 35

defend myself against unpleasant rencontres. Scarcely had I
taken it, than I felt my hand wet with a glutinous liquid. I put
it to’ my lips, and it was clear to me that we had discovered a
natural plantation of sugar-canes. I did not tell Fritz at first,
wishing to give him the pleasure of making this precious dis-
covery. He was walking before me. I told him to cut a reed,
which would be a safer arm against the serpents than pistols or
knives. He obeyed me, and I soon heard him cry out with
delight, “Sugar-canes! sugar-canes! What an exquisite juice,
what delicious syrup! How glad my mother and little brothers
will be!” He broke his reed into several fragments, that he
might more easily squeeze out the juice, which he eagerly sucked.
“T will,” said he, “carry home a good stock of these canes to regale
my mother and brothers.” I told him not to burden himself
with too heavy a load, for we had still a long way to go; but
he cut a dozen of the largest stalks, which he wrapped up in
their leaves and put under his arm.

Scarcely had we entered the grove of palm-trees, when a
troop of monkeys, frightened at our arrival, and Turk’s bark,
sprang on the trees, from which they looked at us, uttering
piercing cries and making horrible grimaces. Fritz, without
reflecting, threw down his bundle of canes, took his gun and
was going to fire, but I stopped him. “Why do you wish
to kill these animals?” “ Apes,” said he, “are wicked, foolish
beasts; see how they menace us and show their teeth.” “Be
itso; but if they are angry it is not without cause, since we
have come to disturb them; let us be careful not to kill any
creature unnecessarily. It is sufficiently painful, that care for
his life obliges man to kill a great many animals, Suffer
these apes to live; who knows if they may not be useful to
us?” “Useful!” replied Fritz, “how can that be?” “You
will see,” said I. I then threw some stones at the monkeys,
who, obeying their imitative instincts, snatched from the top of
the palm-trees a quantity of cocoa-nuts, which they threw at
us, It was easy to avoid these ill-directed missiles. Fritz
was diverted with the success of my trick. “Thanks, Messrs
Apes,” said he, hiding behind a tree; “many thanks!”

When the hail was a little abated, he picked up as many of
the nuts as he could carry, and we went, to regale ourselves at
36 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,

leisure, out of the reach of the apes, At first, we made with the
point of our knives some openings in the tender places, which
are near the end of the nut, so that we might drink the milk
which they contained. But we were astonished not to find
this liquor so excellent as we expected. The cream which
adhered to the interior seemed much better. After having
opened the nut with a blow from the hatchet, we collected,
by the aid of our spoons, this cream, which we sweetened
with the juice of our canes, and thus made a delicious meal.
Thanks to this windfall, Fritz could spare Turk the remainder
of the lobster and biscuit; a very meagre provision for his
robust appetite, for after having swallowed it, he began to
chew the canes and search for cocoa-nuts.

I tied together. several nuts which adhered to the end
of a stalk, and loaded myself with them; Fritz took what
remained of the sugar-canes; and, strengthened by the repast
which we had made, we resumed our walk to rejoin our
family.

Fritz soon found his burden troublesome; every moment
he changed it from shoulder to shoulder; took it under one
arm, then under the other. At last he said, groaning with
fatigue, “Truly, I was far from thinking that these reeds would
cause me so much embarrassment; yet I do wish to carry
them to the tent, that my mother and brothers may enjoy
them.” “Patience and courage,” said I; “your burden may
be compared to the basket of bread which A#sop carried, and
which became naturally lighter after each meal. In the same
way, we shall diminish our provision of canes before we reach
home. Give me one, which I will use as a pilgrim’s staff, and
a portable honeycomb. Take one also, and you will be relieved
of so much. As to the others, tie them so as to place them
like a cross on your back with your gun.”

We resumed our route. Fritz, seeing that from time to
time I put to my lips the cane which he had given me, wished
to do the same, but could not make the least drop of liquor
come out. He, impatiently, asked me the reason of his
ill success. “Reflect a little,” said I, “and I am persuaded
you will soon find out.” He soon discovered that to give
entrance to the air, it was necessary to pierce a hole above
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 27

the first knot of the cane. This done, he had no difficulty in
extracting the juice, and could refresh himself from this delicious
stick. All at once he observed to me, that if we continued to
use them thus, we should not carry many canes to the tent.
“Never mind,” said I; “the juice will not long keep sweet,
especially when the canes are exposed to the sun. If we
were to walk some time longer, it is probable that on
-our return home we could only offer reeds full of sour

liquor.”
“Well,” replied Fritz, “to make them amends, I have in
my tin bottle a stock of cocoa-nut milk.” “Yes; but you

must know that out of the shell the milk ferments and turns
sour.” Fritz then took out his bottle, but scarcely had he
touched the cork than it flew out, and the liquor escaped from
the neck of the bottle, fizzing like champagne. We tasted this
liquor, which was very agreeable. Fritz found it so much to
his taste, that I was obliged to recommend moderation, fearing
it would affect his head. Whatever this drink might be, it
refreshed us, and we walked on more quickly. We soon
came to the place where we had left our gourds. They
were perfectly dry, so we took them up and carried them
away.

A little farther on Turk sprang barking at a troop of
monkeys, who were quietly feeding, and had not perceived
our approach. At the first bark of the dog these animals
dispersed ; but a female, who was nursing her little one, was
less agile, and was seized by the dog. Fritz sprang forward
to save it; he lost his hat, threw down his bottle and sugar-
canes; but he arrived too late: the poor beast was dead, and
the dog had already begun to devour it. Fritz endeavoured
to prevent Turk from continuing his repast, but I dissuaded
him, as it was for our own safety that Turk’s appetite should
be satisfied, and we could not save his victim. The young
one, in its first movement of fright, had squatted against a
tuft of grass, and ground its teeth at the melancholy scene.
When he perceived Fritz, he sprang on his shoulder and
fastened on him so skilfully, that the poor boy, in spite of
all his efforts, could not get rid of him. The young ape
had no intention of hurting him, but separated from his
38 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

mother, he seemed to ask Fritz’s aid and protection against
the terrible enemy who had just made him an orphan.

Laughing at my son’s embarrassment, I advanced, and
gently removed the little animal. Then holding him in my
arms, as a nurse does a child, I could not help pitying him.
“Poor little being,” said I, “what shall we do with you? for
we must think twice, before we admit a useless mouth into
the number. of our colony.” But Fritz interrupted me im-
mediately. “Oh, papa, pray let me keep it. It would die
if we abandon it. Let me adopt it. I have read that apes,
guided by instinct, know how to distinguish good fruits from
those that are hurtful; if this is true, we should not hesitate
to attach to us our little companion.” “Well, my child, I
acknowledge the goodness of your heart, and the wisdom of
your suggestion. I consent to the adoption of your little
protégé; but remember, you must bring it up properly if you
wish to make it useful.”

Whilst we were thus discussing, Turk had tranquilly finished
his odious repast. “Turk,” said Fritz, with solemnity, showing
him his monkey, “you have made an orphan; you have eaten
the mother of this poor innocent. We pardon you this crime,
because you knew no better. But look well at this little ape,
and promise me to love and respect it for the future. It is
too young, fortunately, to understand the wrong you have done
it. If you are honest and repentant, I engage to recom-
pense your conversion, by making you some good soup,
which will make you disgusted with these vile dinners of raw
flesh.” Turk crouched at Fritz’s feet, as. if he had understood
the gravity of this discourse; he looked from his young master
to the little animal, whom Fritz was caressing before him, to
make him understand that the little ape was to be henceforth
sacred to him. This done, the little animal resumed his place -
on Fritz’s shoulder, and remained there with as much tran-
quillity and confidence as if he had been long accustomed to
it. He appeared frightened, however, when Turk approached
too near him, and endeavoured to hide himself in Fritz’s arms,
Wishing to secure their reconciliation, he again addressed the
culpable Turk: “Wicked one,” said he, “repair thy fault.
Thou hast deprived this poor little one of his support and
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 39

guardian; it is but just that you should replace her.” Pass-
ing a cord round Turk’s neck, he gave the end of it to the
little ape, whom he had placed on the back of the dog.
At first, Turk greatly objected to this, but submitted after
a slight reprimand; and the little ape, completely reassured,
appeared to enjoy the seat in which Fritz had installed him.

“Do you know,” said I to my boy, “that we now look
like jugglers going to a fair. How astonished your brothers
will be when they see us arrive with this equipage!” “Yes,”
said Fritz; “and James, who is so fond of making grimaces,
will have a professor to teach him.” “Do not speak thus of
your brother,” I replied; “when we have to live together and
love each other, it is bad to remark on the faults of our
companions. Mutual indulgence is a guarantee of union and
happiness, for we all have our failings.”

Fritz owned that he had spoken without reflection, and
then turned the conversation. He asked me to tell him all
I knew of the habits of apes. This discourse shortened so
much ‘the length of our road, that we arrived, without think-
ing of it,in the midst of our family, who were awaiting us on
the borders of the stream. The dogs saluted each other from
a distance. This uproar so frightened the ape, that he again
jumped on Fritz’s shoulder, and would not descend. As soon
as the children perceived us, they uttered cries of joy; but
when they saw the little animal, who sat trembling on Fritz’s
shoulder: “Oh, a monkey! a monkey!” cried they. “Where
did you find him? How did you catch him? How pretty
he is!” Then remarking our provisions: “What are these
sticks and these great bowls with which papa is loaded?”
There was such a deluge of questions, that we could not reply
to them. The first transport having a little subsided: “Yes,
thank God,” said I, “we are returned safe and sound, and
have brought you all sorts of good things. But what we
desired, what we went to seek, were men, and we have not
alas! met any. Not the least vestige of our companions.”
“Do not damp our joy,” said the mother, “but let us thank
God, who has permitted us to be reunited. Lay down your
burdens, and relate the incidents of your journey.” Every
one hastened to take some part of our load. Ernest took
40 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the cocoa-nuts, which, however, he had not recognised ; Francis
the gourd utensils, which were very much admired, and he
declared that his own little spoon was better than his old
silver one; James took my gun; his mother the game-bag.
Fritz distributed his sugar-canes, and again placed the little ape
on Turk’s back; then he presented his gun to Ernest, who did
not fail to remark that it was dangerous to carry it as we
had done with such heavy loads. The good mother, com-
prehending this indirect complaint, relieved him of his cocoa-
nuts, and the little caravan began its march towards the
tent.

“Ah,” said Fritz, “if Ernest knew the name of these balls
which he let mamma take, he would not have given them up.

They are cocoa-nuts.” “Cocoa-nuts!” cried Ernest; “cocoa-
nuts! Oh, mamma, pray give them back to me, I will carry
them as well as the gun.” “No, no,” replied the mother, “you

will only grumble; I do. not wish to hear your complaints.”
“T promise you I will say nothing,” replied Ernest; “besides,
I can throw away these long stalks, and carry the gun in my

hand.” “Don’t do that,” said Fritz, “for these stalks are
sugar-canes, and I will show you how to drink the sweet
liquor which they enclose.” “Yes! yes!” cried all the children

together, “let us suck the sugar-canes!” and as Fritz was
walking before with his brothers, to whom he showed the
method I had pointed out to him, I remained alone with
my wife, whose curiosity I satisfied by reciting our little
adventures.

None of the things which we had brought caused so much
pleasure to the good housekeeper as the utensils shaped out
of gourds. I must say that, though imperfect, they were
really useful.

When we arrived at the tent, I was happy to see that
all was prepared for a comfortable repast. On the fire was
the pot full of delicious broth; on one side a spit full of fish ;
on the other, a goose roasting, whose fat fell into a large
shell; near this, a barrel containing some nice Dutch cheese;
everything calculated to excite our appetite. I could not,
however, help remarking to my wife, that she was beginning
very soon to kill our poultry, which had better be left to
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 4I

multiply. “Re-assure yourself,” said my wife; “our poultry-
yard has not contributed to this repast. These fish were
caught by James and Francis; and this roast is the produce
of Ernest’s hunting, who gives a very singular name to his
game.” “I give it its true name,” replied the young doctor,
“and I call it a stupid penguin. I cannot be deceived, for
this animal let me approach and kill it with a stick. Besides,
it had four fingers in its claws united by a membrane, a long,
strong beak, bent at the point. All this accords perfectly
with the description which Jonathan Franklin gives of the
penguin in his book of natural history.” I congratulated my
little savant on the use he had made of his reading, and we
sat down in a circle on the sand, to commence the repast.
Each of us was provided with a shell and a gourd spoon.
The children, while waiting till the soup was cool, broke some
cocoa-nuts, and drank the milk eagerly. Then, the soup eaten,
we attacked the fish, which were rather dry, and the penguin,
which decidedly tasted of train oil. This did not prevent us
from enjoying the good cheer; a good appetite makes every-
thing good.

The monkey was naturally the object of general attention;
the children steeped the corners of their handkerchiefs in
the cocoa-milk, and the little animal appeared to take great
pleasure in sucking this milk, so we were satisfied that it
would be easy to bring him up. It was decided to call him
Knips. Fritz asked me if we would drink his champagne
cocoa-milk. “Taste it first,’ I replied, “and see if it is fit
to offer us.” Scarcely had he put the bottle to his lips, than
he made a frightful grimace, and cried out, “Pooh, it is vine-
gar!” “TI thought so,” said I; “but never mind; misfortune
is sometimes good; this vinegar will serve to relish our fish,
which will not then be so dry.” I then poured a little of the
vinegar in my plate. They all imitated me, and cried “Bravo!”
to the cocoa vinegar.

The repast was finished, and as the sun was disappearing
beneath the horizon, we joined in prayer and went to bed.
Knips had his place between Fritz and James, who covered
him up very carefully that he might not be cold. “This is
our son,” they said, laughing.
42 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

After having satisfied myself that there was no appearance
of any enemy near us, I closed my eyes, and enjoyed the
sleep which I had earned. I had slept but a very little time,
when I was awoke by the howling of the dogs, and the agita- _
tion of the fowls perched on the edge of the tent. I hastened
out, followed by my wife and Fritz, who did not sleep so
soundly as his brothers. We took care to provide ourselves
with arms. By the light of the moon we saw our dogs fight-
ing with ten jackals. Already our brave guardians had brought
three of our nocturnal visitors to the ground; but they would
have been overpowered by numbers, if we had not come to
their assistance. Fritz and I fired together. Two jackals fell
dead; the rest, frightened by the noise, ran away. Fritz
wished to bring into the tent the one he had killed, to show
to his brothers in the morning. I permitted him, and we
returned to the little sleepers, whom neither the firing nor
barking of the dogs had awakened. Then we resumed our
sleep, which was no more troubled,
CHAPTER IV.
VOYAGE TO THE WRECK.

AS soon as day began to break, I called my wife, to
concert with her the employment of the day. “My dear,”
said I, “I see so many things wanting to be done, that
I know not to which to give the preference. For one thing,
I think that if we wish to preserve the cattle, and not lose
a number of things which may be useful to us, we must
make a voyage to the vessel; then again, it will be necessary
to construct a more comfortable abode. I own I am a little
frightened at our task.” “Don’t be afraid,” said she; “with
patience, order, and perseverance, we shall surmount all
obstacles. The courage of a father like you, and brave
children like ours, will suffice for everything, It is not with-
out uneasiness that I shall see you return to the vessel, but
if this voyage is indispensable, I will not oppose it.” “Well,
then,” said I, “I will set out with Fritz, whilst you remain
here with the other children. Come, get up,” cried I; “get
up, the sun has risen; there is no time to lose.”

Fritz appeared the first, and profited by the time which
his brothers took to rub their eyes, to place his dead jackal
on its legs before the tent, in order to see the surprise which
this sight would produce in the children. I had not thought
of the dogs, who, seeing the animal, and doubtless thinking
it still alive, threw themselves upon it, barking furiously.
Fritz had great trouble in driving them off. This un-
accustomed noise hastened the lazy ones, They arrived one
by one; the little monkey on James’s shoulder; but at
sight of the jackal he was so frightened that he ran back

into the tent, and hid himself under our beds, where we could
43
44 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

only see the end of his nose. As Fritz had foreseen, the
children were greatly astonished.

“A wolf!” cried James; “there are wolves on our island!”
“No,” said Ernest, “it is a fox.” “No,” said little Francis,
“it is a yellow dog.” “Ah! ah! Master Ernest,” said Fritz,
with mock vanity, “you could recognise the agéuti; but this
time your knowledge is at fault. What, do you think it is
a fox?” “Yes,” replied Ernest, “I think it is a golden fox.”
“Ah! ah! a golden fox,” repeated Fritz, with a burst of
laughter. Poor Ernest, whose self-love as a scholar seemed
gravely compromised, was so disconcerted that the tears came
in his eyes. “You are unkind,” said he to his brother; “I
may well be deceived; besides you would not have known
the name of this animal, if papa had not told you.” “Come,”
said I, “do not tease each other so much. Besides, though
you thus laugh at your brother, my dear Fritz, you must
know that, according to naturalists, the jackal partakes the
nature of a wolf, a fox,and a dog. There is even a generally
admitted opinion that the domestic dog is descended from the
jackal. So not only was Ernest right in calling this animal
a fox, but so was James, who took it for a wolf, and. Francis,
who thought it was a dog.”

The discussion ended, I reminded my children that we
ought to commend ourselves to God on beginning the day,
and we knelt in prayer. Then we began breakfast, for my
little fellows’ appetites arose as soon as their eyes were opened.
A chest of biscuits was broken open and the barrel of cheese
visited. Suddenly, Ernest, who had been roaming for some
minutes round one of the barrels we had fished up, cried out,
“Qh, papa, how much better we should enjoy our biscuit if
we could spread it with good butter.” “Ah,” said I, “with
your eternal if’s, you only arouse our desires without giving
us the power of satisfying them. Is it not sufficient to have
good cheese?” “I don’t say it is not,” replied he, “but if
some one would open this barrel.” “What barrel?” “This
one; I am certain it contains butter, for at a joint there leaks
out a kind of greasy matter whose smell I recognise.”

After satisfying ourselves that Ernest’s nose had not
deceived him, we concerted how we could extract the butter
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 45

from the tub, Fritz was of opinion that we should knock off
the hoops round the top and take away the head. I thought
that thus the staves would be so disjointed that the butter
would be melted. by the sun. It seemed better to make an
opening with a chisel, by which we could get out the butter
with a little: wooden shovel. This done, we soon had some
excellent bread and butter, the taste of which made us more
anxious to save the cow from the vessel.

The dogs, fatigued with their combat, slept beside us. I
remarked that they had not escaped unhurt from their fight
with the jackals, for they both had large wounds in the neck.
My wife washed some butter in fresh water to take away the
salt, and dressed their wounds with it. Then they began to
lick each other, which made me hope that they would soon be
cured. “It would be useful,” said Fritz, “if on such occasions
our dogs were furnished with pointed collars.” “Ah,” said
James, “if my mother would help me, I would make some
solid ones.” “With all my heart,” replied his mother; “let us
see what you have thought of.”

“Now, Fritz,” said I, “ prepare to accompany me to the ship-
wrecked vessel, and we will endeavour to save the cattle, and
a quantity of things which may be useful to us.”

The boat of tubs was soon ready. At the moment of
departure, we agreed with my wife that she should raise on
the shore, with a pole and a strip of white linen, a signal,
which we could see from the vessel. In case of distress, she
was to lower it, and fire the gun three times, I persuaded
her even, so courageous was this dear wife, to let us pass
the night on the vessel, if it happened that we were too late
to return. In this case, we would light lanterns to show
that all was well. Knowing that there remained some pro-
visions on the wreck, we only took our arms. I permitted
Fritz to carry his little ape, whom he wished to regale with
goat’s milk. We set out, after having embraced and recom-
mended each other to God. f

Fritz rowed vigorously, and I guided the boat. When we
were at some distance to sea, I saw that a very strong stream
ran from the bay. I conjectured that in going towards the
sea, it would form a current, which would help us to reach
46 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the ship. I was not deceived. We floated in the direction of
this current, which carried us, with very little effort on our
part, three parts of the way.

We went on board the wreck, and our boat was fastened
by thick ropes into the notch which I had made on our
departure. Fritz’s first care was to run to the animals, who
at our approach began to bleat and bellow. These poor
beasts seemed to rejoice at again seeing men. We first gave
them some food and fresh water, and then made our own
meal, which was easy to procure, for the ship was provisioned
for a long voyage. Fritz put the goat’s teat to the little
monkey, who joyfully took this delicious beverage. “Now,”
said I, “what shall we begin with?” “I think,” replied Fritz,
“that we should before all things, fix a sail to our boat,”
It did not seem to me at first that this was very necessary ;
but Fritz made me observe that in coming he had felt
some wind, against which we should have had to struggle,
if we had not been helped by the current, and we might
make this wind useful in returning to the shore. He foresaw
that we should have some trouble in making the passage, only
helped by our oars, especially when the boat was heavily laden.

These observations appeared very wise, so we set to work.
I chose a piece of yard thick enough for a mast, and another
thinner piece, to which I fixed a large square of linen. During
this time, Fritz had nailed on to one of the tubs a thick plank,
in which he made a hole to fix the mast. I then attached
some pulleys to the corners of the sail, so as to be able to
work it while holding the rudder. To finish, and with a
disposition to mix play with work, natural at his age, Fritz
tied to the end of the mast a red streamer, which he saw
flying with extreme pleasure. Smiling at this innocent joke,
I fixed towards the land a telescope, which I found in the
captain’s cabin, and I had the joy of seeing that our loved ones
were all right.

It was getting late, and it was clear that we could not
regain the land that evening. The rest of the day was
employed in pillaging the vessel, as if we had been pirates,
and in loading our tubs with every useful thing they would
contain,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 47

Foreseeing a long abode on this desert land, I gave
preference to the utensils which would assist our industrious
efforts, and to the arms with which we might defend ourselves.
The vessel, intended for the establishment of a colony in the
South Sea, where we intended to settle, was better provided
with utensils and provisions of all sorts than it would have

been for an ordinary voyage. So we had only to choose
‘among the multitude of useful things. I did not forget spoons,
knives, stew-pans, plates, etc. Fritz carried away even a
silver service which was in the captain’s cabin, as well as
a quantity of bottles of wine and liqueurs, also several
Westphalia hams. These luxurious provisions did not make
us disdain the sacks of corn, maize, and other seeds. I took
care not to forget a compass, some spades and other garden
implements, some guns and pistols. We took also some
hammocks and blankets, some balls of cord, some curtains,
and even a little barrel of sulphur, that we might replace
the matches, of which we had only a small quantity left.

I had declared our cargo complete, when Fritz arrived
with a last packet. “Leave that, dear child,” said I, “there
is no more room. This is too large, and appears heavy.”
“Qh, father,” said Fritz, “let me take this packet; they are
the captain’s books. Ernest and my mother will be so de-
lighted.” Dear child,” said I, “you are right; bread for the
mind is as valuable as bread for the body; your packet will
be a treasure to us all.” Our boat was so loaded that the
water almost overflowed it. I should certainly have lightened
it, if the sea had not been perfectly calm. However, we
took care to preserve our belts, in case any accident should
happen.

The night fell, A large fire which we perceived on the
shore told us that nothing had happened on their side. To
reply to this good news, I suspended from the side of the

‘vessel three lighted lanterns. Soon, the firing of a gun told
us that our signal had been perceived. Our arrangements
were soon made to pass the night in our tubs. I would
not sleep on the vessel, for the least wind might dislodge it,
and expose us to danger. Fritz was soon asleep, in spite of
his uncomfortable bed. As for me, I could not close my
48 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

eyes; I was uneasy about the fate of those on land, and I
also wished to keep an incessant watch, to be ready for all
events. Scarcely had day begun to break than I was on the
deck of the vessel, pointing the telescope towards the shore.
I saw my wife come out of the tent, and stop to look around
her. I hoisted a white flag to the top of the mast, and my
wife lowered and raised hers three times, to tell us she had
perceived and comprehended my signal. “God-be praised!”
cried I; “our dear ones are safe and sound. Now we must
find means to transport the cattle to the shore.” “Let us
construct a raft,” said Fritz.

I showed him not only the difficulty of the work, but also
the impossibility of guiding such a machine. “Well,” said
he, “let us throw the animals into the sea; they will swim.
The pig, with his large fat belly, will have no trouble in
supporting himself.” “I believe so; but do you think that
the ass, the cow, the goat, the sheep, will be equally fortunate?
Now, I own that I would willingly sacrifice the pig to save the
others.” “Well,” replied Fritz, “why not put on them some
swimming belts like our own. It will be funny to see them
swim in that manner.” “Bravo, my clever Fritz; your idea,
though droll, seems practicable. To work, my friend, to work ;
let us make the trial on one of our animals.” We took a
sheep, to whose body we fastened our belts, one on each side,
and threw her into the sea, At first, the poor frightened
beast disappeared under the water; but soon came to the
surface, and at last, feeling the support of the belts, she
remained motionless, and we saw with satisfaction that she
swam perfectly well.

Nothing more was necessary to show the excellence of this
method of saving the cattle. All the cork we could find served
for the little animals. As to the ass and the cow, which were
much heavier, we made a particular apparatus for each of them,
composed of two empty barrels fastened to their bodies by
linen bands.

When all our beasts were harnessed in this manner, I
attached a cord to the horns or neck of each, of which we
might hold the end when we were in the boat. Our cattle
were soon in the water, and that without much difficulty. The
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 49

ass alone was obstinate; we were obliged to throw him in
headlong. He beat about at first, but soon began to swim
with so much grace that we could not help applauding him.
As soon as we were all embarked, I untied the rope, and the
wind soon taking the sail, we were driven towards the shore.
Fritz, happy in having succeeded in our undertaking, played
with his monkey, and proudly regarded the red flag which
unrolled so gracefully at the top of the mast. I followed
with heartfelt looks my beloved ones, whom, by the aid of
the telescope, I could see quitting the tent and running to the
shore. Suddenly Fritz cried out, “Oh, father, an enormous fish
is coming towards us.” “To arms!” said I, “and attention.”

Our guns were loaded. The animal whose approach Fritz
had announced was a very large shark. “Let us fire together,”
said I. At the moment when the marine monster, who was
swimming very fast, opened his mouth to seize one of our sheep,
we both fired. The shark disappeared. An instant after, we
perceived on the surface of the sea the brilliant scales of his
belly, and a streak of blood showed us that we were happily
delivered from this terrible corsair. I ordered Fritz to reload
his gun, for it might be that the shark was not alone. Happily
my fears were unfounded. Without any. other incident, we
reached the shore.

My wife and the three children were waiting for us. They
seized the rope which I threw to them to fasten the boat, The
animals who had reached the land, were relieved from their
belts. The ass rolled on the sand in a joyful manner, and then
uttered a formidable hee-haw, to show the joy he felt at finding
himself on firm ground. After having embraced and con-
gratulated each other at meeting again safe and sound, after
this long and perilous separation, we sat down on the grass at
the border of the stream, and I recited all that had happened
to us. I did not forget to give Fritz the praise he merited for
the assistance he had given me.

\ee
CHAPTER V.
WHAT PASSED ON LAND DURING OUR ABSENCE,

FRriTz’s contrivance for the transport of the cattle, excited
general admiration. Good little Francis was delighted with the
sail and streamer. “It is prettier than anything else,” said he;
“yes, I like it better than the stew-pans, the beasts, the pig, and
even the cow.” “Little silly,” said his mother, “you will change
your mind, when I give you every morning a bowl full of good
milk.”

We then described, in detail, all that we had done.

Their curiosity satisfied, we began to unload the tubs.
James, abandoning this employment, went towards the cattle,
and jumping on the donkey’s back, came to us with a majestic
air. We had great trouble in keeping our countenances at this
comic equipage ; but what was our astonishment, on seeing the
little rider encircled with a skin belt, in which he had placed
two pistols. “Where did you get this bandit’s costume?” said
I, “It is all our own make,” replied he, showing the dogs,
each furnished with a collar stuck full of nails to defend them
in case of attack. “Bravo, my son,” said I, “if this is your
invention.” “Mamma helped me,” he replied, “because there
was sewing to do.” “But where did you get the skin, the
thread, the needles?” I asked my wife. “Fritz’s jackal fur-
nished us with the skin,” she replied; “as to the rest,” added
she, smiling, “a good housewife ought always to be provided
with them.”

I could see that Fritz was not pleased that his skin had been
appropriated without his permission. He dissimulated his ill-
humour as well as he could ; but when James came near him,
he held his nose, crying, “pooh! what a frightful smell!” “It

50
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 51

is my belt,” said he, calmly ; “when it is dry, it will not smell.”
As for the little wag, he did not trouble himself about the dis-
agreeable smell, but walked up and down with a superb air,
caressing his pistols. His brothers hastened to throw into the
sea the remains of the jackal.

Seeing that the supper hour approached, I told Fritz to go
and fetch one of the hams which were in the tubs. Fritz soon
returned. “Oh,a ham! a ham!” cried the children, clapping
their hands. “Moderate yourselves,” said the mother, “for if
you do not sup till this ham is cooked, you will fast for a long
time; but I have some turtle’s eggs with which I will make you,
in the frying pan you have had the good sense to bring, a good
omelette, for which, fortunately, butter will not be wanting.”
' “For these eggs,’ said Ernest, always desirous to show his
learning, “are easily recognised by their roundness, and their
membranous shell; besides, it is only turtles who deposit their
eggs in the sand.” “How did you find them?” I asked. “This
belongs to the history of our day,” said our housekeeper ;
“before relating it, I think it will be better to have supper.”
“Right,” said I; “make your omelette, and let us keep the
recital for the repast; it will be an agreeable entertainment.
During that time the children and I will finish and put in its
place the boat’s cargo, and instal the beasts for the night.”

At these words, my sons rose, and followed me to the coast.
We had just finished, when my wife invited us to do honour to
her supper. Nothing was wanting; omelette, cheese, biscuit ;
all was found excellent, and the table service contributed
greatly to the charm of our repast. Francis alone, faithful to
his gourd spoon, would not return to his silver one. The
dogs, fowls, goats and sheep, made a circle around us, as
interested spectators. As to the ducks and geese, I did not
trouble about their food ; the marshy mouth of the stream fur-
nished them with abundance of worms and little crabs, of which
they were very fond. After supper I made Fritz bring a bottle
of excellent wine, found in the captain’s cabin, and begged my
wife to take a glass of this strengthening liquor, before beginning
her recital,

“Itis fortunate,” said she, laughing, “that my turn is come,
at last, to tell my great deeds. I have nothing to relate about
52 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the day, for uneasiness képt me on the shore, without having
the courage to undertake anything. I was not satisfied till I
saw that you had arrived at the vessel. The day had then
passed without our going away from the tent. I formed the
project of going on the morrow to find a more comfortable place
than this shore, where we are exposed to all the rigour of the
sun during the day, and to the cold at night. I thought of the
wood which you had discovered, and resolved to go there. In
the morning, as I was still thinking of my project, without hav-
ing said anything about it to the children, James took down
the jackal, and cut with his knife two large straps out of the
skin, which he cleaned as well as he could. This done he stuck
the straps full of large nails, then with a piece of the sail he
lined the insides, and asked me to sew the linen to the skin, so
as to cover the heads of the nails. JI did as he wished, in spite
of the disagreeable smell. Another strap which he wished to
fold in the same way, was destined to make a belt; but I
showed him that this strap was not yet dry, and would shrink
considerably and render his work useless. Ernest advised him
to stretch the skin on a plank, which he could carry about and
expose to the sun, James, without comprehending that his brother
was joking, put his advice in practice, and I soon saw him,
loaded with his plank, walking gravely in the sun. I communi-
cated to my sons my project of removal, to which they gave
their joyful assent. In the twinkling of an eye they were
loaded with arms and provisions; I carried the water-bottle
and a hatchet. Escorted by the two dogs, we directed our
march to the borders of the stream. Turk recognised the path
you had followed, and preceded us, returning frequently, as if
he understood that he must act as guide. My two young
sons marched resolutely, proud of carrying arms; they felt all
their importance, for I did not conceal from them that our
safety depended on their bravery and address. I was glad that
you had taught our children how to use arms, and thus enabled
them to meet and confront danger.

“We had some trouble in crossing the stream on the wet,
slippery stones. Ernest crossed first, without accident. James
carried my hatchet and water-bottle. I took Francis on my
back, and could scarcely keep my footing with my dear
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 53

burden, who joined his hands round my neck, and clung with
all his strength to my shoulders; at last I reached the other
side; and when we had attained the height from which you
had discovered the landscape of which you spoke with so much
enthusiasm, my heart opened, for the first time since our ship-
wreck, to the pleasure of hope. We soon entered a valley full
of shade and verdure. We saw a little wood at some distance;
but in order to reach it, it was necessary to cross a prairie where
the grass was so high and thick that it almost hid the children.
James at last discovered a path, where we perceived traces
of your passage. These prints conducted us, after several turn-
ings, to the wood. Suddenly we heard a rustling of leaves,
and saw a large bird fly away from the ground. Each of my
little men seized his gun, but the bird was out of sight before
they could fire. ‘What bird was that?’ asked James. ‘An
eagle, no doubt,’ said Francis, ‘for he had very large wings.’
‘That proves nothing, said Ernest, ‘all birds with large wings
are not eagles. ‘I suppose, said I, ‘that he was on his nest
when we drove him away; let us try and find the nest, and
perhaps we shall be better informed. Careless James immedi-
ately sprang towards the place whence the bird had flown, but
at that instant another bird, like the first, flew up, flapping his
large wings in the poor boy’s face, who stood astonished and
almost frightened. The other children, not less astonished,
kept their arms lowered before this new game. ‘ Unskilful
hunters, said I, ‘is it possible that you have missed another
chance?’ Ernest was angry; as to James, he took off his hat,
and making a comic bow to the fugitive, cried out, ‘Au revoir,
Mr. Bird; another time I am your devoted servant.’ Ernest
soon discovered the nest we sought. It was constructed very
clumsily, and only contained some broken shells. We con-
cluded that the nurslings had lately departed. ‘These birds
could not have been eagles,’ remarked Ernest, ‘for eaglets can-
not run so soon after they are born. The contrary is the case
with pintados and other winged fowl of the same family. I
presume, then, that the birds whose nest we have discovered
are bustards, for you must have seen that their plumage was
yellowish white underneath, and a mixture of black and red
above,” ‘Instead of examining it thus, said I, to my little
54 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

scholar, ‘you had better have taken aim at it; you would then
have had a chance of deciding more certainly what it was.
But perhaps, after all, it was best to leave it to its little
ones,’

“Talking thus, we reached the little wood. A crowd of
unknown birds peopled the trees, and made a most varied
concert, The children prepared to fire, but I showed them
that the prodigious height of the trees on which these gay
singers were perched would render their efforts fruitless. The
form and extraordinary thickness of these gigantic trees sur-
prised us greatly. Their trunks were enormous, supported
by powerful roots, which spread along the ground to a con-
siderable extent. James climbed on a root, and measured
with a string the circumference of one of these trunks. Ernest
calculated that it was not less than forty feet, and the height
of the trunk more than twenty-four. Nothing has ever moved
me more than the sight of this-splendid vegetation; ten or
twelve trees formed what we had taken for a wood. The
branches spread so far, and the foliage, which resembled in
form the walnut-trees of Europe, made a delicious shade.
Underneath, the ground was covered with fine green grass,
which invited repose, .

“We sat down. The bags of provisions were opened,
a stream which murmured near furnished us with fresh clear
water, and the multitude of birds singing over our heads
gave to our repast the air of a feast. Our dogs, who had
quitted us for some time, returned. To our great astonish-
ment, they did not ask for food, but laid down on the grass
and slept tranquilly, which showed us that they had found
their own breakfast. The place where we were appeared
so agreeable, that I thought it useless to seek another for
our next establishment. I resolved, then, to return, and go
to the shore, and endeavour to pick up what the wind might
have sent to land from the wreck of the ship. James, before
setting off, begged me to sew the skin belt which he had
not ceased to carry suspended on his back, and which was
now quite dry, This accomplished, he soon put on his belt,
in which he placed his pistols, and, quite proud, walked on
first, to show himself the more quickly, in case you should




THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 55

have got back during our absence. We were obliged to hurry
to keep him in sight.

“On the shore we found little to carry away, for the things
we could reach were too heavy for our strength. During this
time our dogs kept close to the shore, and I saw them plunge
their paws in the water and pull out little crabs, which they
ate eagerly. ‘See, my children’ said I, ‘how industrious
hunger makes them; we need not be uneasy about food
for our dogs, since the sea affords them abundant nourish-
ment?

“On quitting the shore we perceived Belle scratching the
ground, and pulling from it a ball, which she immediately
swallowed. ‘If these should be turtle’s eggs!’ said Ernest.
‘Turtle’s eggs!’ said Francis; ‘are turtles fowls?’ You may
judge how Ernest and James laughed at this question. When
they were calm; ‘let us profit by Belle’s discovery, cried I,
‘for I have heard that these eggs are excellent eating’ ‘I
believe they are,’ said Ernest, who already anticipated the
flavour of this delicate meat. We had some trouble in driving
Belle from this repast, which she found very much to her
taste. She had already eaten several eggs, but there remained
about twenty, which we put carefully into our provision bag.
Looking to sea, we perceived the sail of your boat. Francis
feared that it was savages, who would kill us; but Ernest
affirmed that it was your barque; and he was right, since a
few minutes after you landed and embraced us. Such, my
dear, are our adventures. I sought for a lodging; I found
it, and am delighted; and if you like we will go and settle
ourselves to-morrow, under those magnificent trees; the view
from thence is superb, and the place exquisite.”

“What,” cried I, jokingly, “trees? is that all you have
discovered for our safety and abode? I comprehend that if
they are as big as you say, we might find refuge in them
during the night; but we should want a balloon to mount
them, or else wings.” “Joke as you will,” said she, “but I
know that we could construct on these trees, among the great
branches, a cabin, which we could reach by a staircase. Do
we not often see the same thing in Europe? Do you not.
recollect, for example, that linden-tree in our country which
56 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

inclosed a pavilion, and which they called from that
‘Robinson Crusoe’s tree?’” “Well,” said I, “we will think
by-and-by of executing this difficult work.” However, the
night came, and the prolonged conversation made us forget
the hour of repose. We assembled for evening prayer, then

slept, delighted at being re-united, and woke in the morning
at break of day.
CHAPTER VI.
PROJECTS OF MIGRATION. THE DEAD SHARK. THE BRIDGE.

“J HAVE reflected on your last night’s project,” said I to my
wife, on waking in the morning, “and I think we must not
be in too great a hurry to change our residence. Why aban-
don this place, to which Providence has conducted us? We
are here protected on one side by the sea, on the other by
the rocks. We are also near the vessel, which still holds
many useful things which we should give up if we went else-
where.”

“Your reasons are undoubtedly good,” replied my wife,
“but you do not know how intolerable this abode on the
coast is, when the sun is over our heads. During your excur-
sions with Fritz, you sheltered yourselves in the woods, whose
trees offered you delicious fruits. Here we have no other
asylum than the tent, under which the heat is stifling, which
makes me fear for the health of the little ones, and we find
for food only mussels and oysters, which are very little to our
taste. As to your praise of the security of this retreat, it does
not seem to me to be justified. The jackals came easily to
visit us, and there is nothing to show that lions and tigers
may not do the same. The treasures of the vessel are not
to be despised, it is true, but I would willingly renounce them
to be delivered from the uneasiness which these sea voyages
cause me.”

“Well,” said I to my wife, embracing her, “you defend
your opinion so well, that I am constrained to yield to it;
not, however, without a little restriction. JI think I know a
way of making your ideas agree with mine. We will go,
and inhabit the little wood; but we shall keep here our maga-

zine of provisions, and we will make a sort of fortress to retire
57
538 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to, in case of attack. We will leave among the rocks our
powder, which is of great use to us, but the neighbourhood
of which may be dangerous. This plan being adopted, we
must first throw a bridge over the stream, to render our
moving and daily communications between the two shores
more easy.” “Do you think so?” cried my wife. “The
construction of a bridge will be long and troublesome. Could
we not load the ass and cow with our materials?” I told
her that she exaggerated the importance of this operation,
and the obstacles we should have to surmount. “In this
case,” said she, “let us begin the work without any delay,
for I long to see the migration accomplished.”

Thus was settled the question of our change of residence.
The children, whom we woke and told of our project, agreed
to it with enthusiasm. They immediately baptized the little
wood “The Land of Promise.”

Morning prayers over, each breakfasted as he could. Fritz
did not forget his monkey, whom he placed at the teat of
the goat, his nurse. This example appeared good to James,
who at first tried to milk the cow into his hat, but not having
succeeded, he began to suck the good beast, who let him do
it. “Francis,” cried he, while taking breath, “come here;
here is some good milk, quite warm.” His brothers seeing
him in this singular position, laughed at him unmercifully;
they even called him the little calf, a name which he kept
for some time. His mother reproached him for his gluttony,
and to show him that he need not have recourse to so
summary a proceeding, began to milk the cow most. skil-
fully. Everybody surrounded the active mother, who first
filled the cups which each presented, and then a bowl, which
she put on the fire, to make with some biscuits an excellent
soup.

During this time I prepared our boat of tubs, to fetch
from the vessel some pieces of timber and plank to construct
our bridge. Thinking that we should want some help, I
resolved to take Ernest. We put to sea, and plying well
our oars,soon gained the current of the stream which aided
us as before. As we passed near an islet situated at the
entrance of the bay, we saw a cloud of gulls, albatrosses,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 59

and other sea birds, who were whirling about the shore,
uttering such piercing cries that we were tempted to stop
our ears. Fritz wished to fire at this troop, but I forbade
him. Such a gathering seemed to be attributable to some
extraordinary cause which I wished to know. I raised the
sail, which filled, and a fresh wind carried us towards the
islet.

Fritz did not take his eyes from the point the birds seemed
to prefer. “Oh!” cried he, suddenly, “they are picking a
marine monster, and feasting joyously without inviting us,”
He was not deceived. Having landed, we fastened our boat,
and then, without being seen, watched the troop of birds,
who were picking with delight an enormous dead fish. Fritz
asked whence this corpse could come, as we had not perceived
it before. “Ah,” said Ernest, “is it not the shark you killed
yesterday?” “Indeed,” replied I, “Ernest is right; it is our
pirate. See his terrible jaw; his rough skin, which is used
to polish iron and smooth wood. It is not certainly one of
the smallest of its kind, for it must measure at least fifteen
feet. God be praised who delivered us from so powerful an
enemy! We will let the gulls feed on his flesh, but I think
we should take away some strips of skin, which may be use-
ful to us.” Ernest drew the ramrod from his gun, and
advanced towards the gulls, striking right and left. He
knocked down some, the others flew away. Fritz then cut
with his knife several large strips from the sides of the shark,
and we regained our boat.

As we were going towards the wreck, I remarked at some
distance from the shores of the islet a great number of joists
and planks which the waves had thrown up; it was not
necessary to continue our voyage, since we found these suit-
able materials for the intended construction. I chose from
the wreck those which might serve us, and formed a kind
of raft, which was tied by a long cord behind the boat, which
we turned homewards. The wind being favourable, we had
no need to row, it was sufficient to steer. Fritz nailed to
the mast the pieces of skin, that the sun might dry them.

During this time Ernest was examining the gulls he had
killed. He did not fail to question me about these birds, to
60 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

which I replied as well as I could. He then wished to
know to what use I destined the skin of the shark. I
told him that I thought of making some graters, and I
added that in Europe they made the skin into what is
called shagreen.

The voyage was finished. On landing we were surprised
not to find any of the family; but at our cries, they soon
came running to us. Francis had on his shoulder a fishing
net,and James carried in his hand a handkerchief carefully
tied up. Arrived near us, he opened it and showed us a
great quantity of fine crabs. “It is I, father! it is I who
discovered them!” cried Francis, proudly. “Yes,” replied
James, “but it is I who caught them. I went into the
water up to my knees, whilst they were dining on Fritz’s
jackal.”

Then James begged me to accompany him to the stream, to
show me what he thought was the most convenient place to
build the bridge. “Well,” cried I, “I will make proof of your
sagacity ; and if the place is well chosen, we will carry the
joists and planks while your mother prepares dinner.” James
conducted us to the place where he thought the bridge should
be fixed, and all things considered, I was of opinion that it
was a favourable one; so we immediately began to transport
our materials; for this we employed the ass and the cow.
But as we had no harness for these animals, I passed round
the neck of each a long cord, forming a halter, the end of
which was attached to the pieces of wood. In a few journeys
the carriage was accomplished, and we were ready to begin
the building.

On the point which James had chosen, the stream was
much narrower than elsewhere, and there were trees on each
side which might serve to fix the beams to. “Now,” said I,
“we must measure the width of the stream, to know if our
pieces of wood are long enough.” There is nothing more easy,”
said Ernest; “we can tie a stone to the end of a string, and
throw it to the other shore: the length of the string will give
us the measure we want.” Having put in practice this simple
and ingenious idea, Ernest calculated that the stream was about
eighteen feet wide. Now, as it was necessary that our principal
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON, 61

joists should rest at least three feet on each shore, we chose
three of twenty-four or twenty-five feet in length. The
greatest difficulty was how we were to get these immense
pieces of wood across the stream. I proposed to my sons
to decide this important question during dinner, which had
already been delayed above an hour.

We returned, then, to the mother, who was impatiently
waiting for us, for the crabs had been cooked some time.
But before beginning to eat, we had to admire with what
patience the skilful manager had made some sail cloth bags
for the ass and cow to carry things in. We applauded it the
more when we knew that having no large needles, she had to
pierce each hole with a nail, The repast was short, for each
was anxious to begin the work.

Though we had consulted on the means of placing the
first beams, none of my children had discovered it. Happily,
I had succeeded better. As soon as we had regained the
dock-yard, I put my idea into execution. I tied one of my
great beams to one of the trees on the borders of the stream ;
to the other end I attached a long cord; then I crossed the
stream to fix a pulley to one of-the trees on the opposite
shore, over which I passed the cord which I had brought
with me. I then returned and tied the ass and cow to this
same cord. The two animals pulled; the beam turned round
the trunk, and its extremity soon touched the other shore.
The children were astonished, and jumped on the beam,
uttering cries of joy. The most difficult part of our labour
was accomplished. Two other beams were placed near the
first ; there remained only to nail on them a series of planks,
and the bridge would be finished. We happily completed our
task before the fall of day; then, greatly fatigued, we slept
more soundly than ever through the night which followed this
well-spent day.
CHAPTER VII.

THE MIGRATION, THE PORCUPINE. THE TIGER-CAT, THE
WOUNDED FLAMINGO,

AT the first approach of day, I woke the children, and gave
them some advice as to their conduct during our migration.
“We are going,” said I, “to enter a country quite new to us.
None of you must venture alone. Let us walk as near as
possible to each other, and if an enemy appears, let me direct
the attack or defence.”

Prayers and breakfast finished, we prepared to depart. The
flock was assembled; the ass and the cow received on their
backs the sacks which my wife had made the evening before,
and which we had filled with the most useful things. We
took care not to forget the captain’s case of bottles, and a
small supply of butter.

As I was completing the animals’ load with our bed cover-
ings, hammocks, and cordages, my wife interfered and claimed
a place for little Francis, as well as for the sack which she
called her enchanted bag. Then she showed me that we
must certainly carry away our fowls and pigeons, who would
not fail to disperse and be lost as soon as we no longer gave
them food. I yielded to these reasons. A commodious place
was made for Francis on the ass’s back, in the space between
the sacks which hung on each side of the animal; the en-
chanted bag served him for a saddle. There remained to
seize the fowls and pigeons. The children pursued them,
but without being able to capture any. Their mother told
them to keep still, saying that she would capture without
‘trouble all the frightened creatures, “We shall see!” cried

the careless ones, “You will see,” replied the mother. Then
62
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 63

she spread on the ground some handfuls of grain, at the sight
of which they all assembled. This grain eaten, she threw
some more, but this time in the interior of the tent; fowls
and pigeons flew in also, and consequently were caught.
“More is done by ingenuity than violence, you see, gentle-
men,” said the mother, closing the entrance of the tent,
where James glided in, and made one after the other prisoners;
we tied their feet and put them on the back of the cow.
When they were all installed there, we extended over them
_a covering, held at some distance by two branches bent into
an arch. Thus plunged into shade, these creatures would
not annoy us by their cries. All the things we left, and
which the rain or sun could not spoil, were shut up in the
tent, whose entrance was carefully closed with stakes, and
barricaded with barrels full and empty; then I gave the signal
for departure,

We were all very well armed, and each of us carried a
game-bag filled with provisions and ammunition. All were
in good humour. Fritz, his gun under his arm, led the march;
behind him came his mother, leading the cow and the ass,
who walked side by side; in the third rank were James and
the goat; in the fourth, Ernest and the sheep. I was the
rear-guard. Our dogs went here and there, barking, watching,
smelling. This caravan, slowly walking, had a truly picturesque
appearance. Looking at it, I could not help crying out to
my eldest son, “Well, Fritz, here is your project beginning
to be accomplished. It is thus that our ancestor Abraham
travelled. What do you think of it, my little patriarch?”
Ernest replied for his brother: “Papa, I think it is charming;
I wonder more people do not embrace a wandering life.”
“That is true,” replied I; “but God grant that we may not
long be reduced to lead this life. You would soon be tired
of it, l assure you. Let us hope that this pilgrimage may be
our last.” “God hears you,” cried his mother; “I hope that
our new abode will please us, and will be so comfortable
that we may never need to quit it.” As we approached the
bridge, the sow, who at first appeared unwilling to follow us,
rejoined us, showing by her grunting the displeasure which this
long walk gave her; but we were not much affected by her bad
64 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

humour, The passage of the stream was effected without accident,
but the rich vegetation on the other shore greatly retarded
our march. The ass, the cow, the goat and the sheep, who
for a long time had not had such a feast, could not resist the
temptation of feeding on the fresh grass ; our dogs were obliged
to keep barking round them and biting their legs to make
them advance.

To avoid such delays, I thought of keeping by the side
of the stream, but scarcely had we gone a few steps in that
direction, when our dogs bounded into the thick grass, howl-
‘ing frightfully, as if they had encountered a ferocious animal.

Fritz, armed with his gun, his finger on the trigger, resolutely
advanced. Ernest came near his mother, not however with-
out having prepared his arms. James sprang intrepidly after
his brother; keeping his gun in his shoulder belt. I prepared
to rejoin them, to protect them in case of danger, when I
heard them cry out loudly, “Oh, papa! come quickly! run! A
porcupine! A monstrous porcupine!” I hastened on, and
saw, indeed, a porcupine, not however so large as James made
out. The dogs were raging round the animal, whom they
could not attack without paying dearly for their rashness. The
porcupine fought after his manner, that is to say by turning
his back to his adversaries; his head between his front paws,
he marched against them, bristling his darts, which, agitated
in this manner, produced a kind of strange clicking. Every
time the dogs attacked him, they received a number of
wounds,

Fritz and I waited for the moment when we could fire
without risk of wounding the dogs; James more impatient,
and not understanding our hesitation, discharged one of his
pistols almost close to the porcupine, who fell dead. Fritz,
envying his brother’s victory, cried out angrily, “Imprudent
one! you might not only have killed the dogs, but also have
wounded us by firing so close.” “Wound you!” replied the
little hunter; “do you think, then, that you alone know how
to manage arms?” Seeing that Fritz was going to reply, I
hastened to interfere: “It is true,” said I, to my eldest son,
“that your brother should have acted with less precipitation,
but you wanted only to deprive him of the opportunity of
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 65

showing his skill. This is wrong, my child. Learn to loyally
applaud others, if you wish to be worthy of being praised
yourself. Come, no anger; our turn will come next. Shake
hands, and let there be no quarrel between you.” The two
children immediately shook hands cordially, and then con-
sidered how they should carry away the game, whose flesh, I
knew, was excellent eating.

James, with his habitual want of thought, had placed his
hands on the animal, and consequently was severely pricked.
“Go and fetch a cord,” said I; “tie the paws of the beast,
and you and your brother can carry it by the help of a stick,

which you will hold at each end.” But impatient to show his

prize to his mother and brothers, James tied his handkerchief
round the porcupine’s neck, and dragged it to the place
where the caravan was waiting. “See,mamma!” cried he, on
arriving; “see, Ernest! look, little Francis; what a fine
animal I have killed. Yes, I killed it. I was not afraid of
his hundred thousand lances; I approached, fired my pistol,
and lo! he fell! Ah, I did not miss him. Papa says it is
excellent eating.”

The mother congratulated her son on his courage and skill.
Ernest, who approached, examined the porcupine very atten-
tively with his usual coolness, and remarked that he had in
each jaw two long incisors, like those of the hare and squirrel,
and short, round ears, something like those of a man. My
wife and I sat down, to extract from the dogs’ muzzles the
quills which remained in them. “There,” said I to James,
“were you not afraid that the porcupine would dart his quills
through your body? They say these animals have that
faculty.” “Oh!” replied he, “I believe that is only a fable.”
“You see, however, that our dogs have not been spared.”
“That is true,” said he, “but it is because they threw them-
selves upon the animal; if they had kept at a distance they
would not have had the least wound.” “You are right, my
child, and I am happy to see that you know how to mistrust
opinions which are contrary to reason. The porcupine has
no power to dart his quills, but it often happens that he loses
some in a combat like that which has just taken place.”

Resolved to carry away the porcupine, I covered him with
5
66 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

a thick coating of grass, rolled it up in one of our blankets,
and tied our parcel on the ass’s crupper, behind little Francis.
Then we resumed our march.

But soon the donkey escaped from my wife’s hand, who
was holding him by the bridle, and sprang before us, jumping
and making a number of grotesque evolutions, which would have
been very diverting, if we had not been frightened on account
of the little horseman he carried. Fritz ran after him, and
aided by our dogs, soon mastered him. Looking to account
for this abrupt change in the usually quiet demeanour of the.
animal, I soon discovered that the quills of the porcupine
coming through the grass and blanket, very disagreeably
tickled his skin. I then placed the dead beast on the enchanted
bag, taking care to warn Francis not to lean on it.

We arrived at the promised land without any other
adventure. “Wonderful!” cried Ernest, when he perceived
the great trees we were approaching; “what gigantic trees!
The spire at Strasburg is not higher, and how rich nature is
here! What an excellent thought of dear mamma’s to make
us quit the desolate shore where we were!” Then he asked
me if I knew the name of these trees. “These trees are
nowhere described, and we are without doubt the first Euro-
peans who have seen them,” replied I. “But I defy the
most agile bears to reach us at the summit of these enormous
trunks, when we have built our house there.” “Well,” said
my wife, “what do you say to our trees?” “I comprehend
your admiration,” said I, “and your choice is perfect.”

We made a halt. Our first care was to unload the beasts
of burden, who were then left to feed in the neighbourhood,
as well as the sheep and goats, first taking the precaution to
tie their fore-feet together. The sow alone was left entire
mistress of her movements. We gave the fowls and pigeons
their liberty. The fowls began to peck around us, the pigeons
flew into the branches of the trees, whence they descended
at the first distribution of grain that was made. We reposed
in the thick grass which carpeted the ground, and held
council how we should construct a house on these giant trees.
All at once, as it was not probable that we could be ‘installed
there the same day, I felt uneasy about passing the night
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 67

in the open country, exposed to all its inclemencies, and
without defence against wild beasts.

I called Fritz, who I thought was among us, to tell him
that I wished to attempt immediately the ascent of the prin-
cipal tree. He did not answer; but two consecutive reports,
fired at some distance, warned us that he was not losing his
time, and we heard him cry out joyfully, “ Hit, hit; there he
is!” He soon advanced, holding by the hinder paws a magni-
ficent tiger-cat, which he held up proudly to show us.

“Bravo! Mr Hunter,” said I; “you have rendered us
signal service by delivering our poultry from this formidable
neighbour, who would soon have dislodged them, even if they
were perched on the top of the tree. If you see any more
prowling about, give them no quarter. How did you discover
him?” “I found him quite near,” replied the hunter; “I
perceived something moving amongst the leaves of a tree,
and approached cautiously to the foot of it, and from there I
fired at the beast, who fell at my feet. As I was going to
take him up, he raised himself, and | finished him by a blow
from my pistol.” “It was fortunate,” said I, “that he did not
spring on you, as he was only wounded; for these animals,
though of small size, are terrible when they are defending
their life. I can affirm this with more certainty, as I recog-
nize in the individual you have just killed, not the tiger-cat,
properly so called, but the margay, very common in South
America, where it is known by its rapacity and audacity.”

“Whatever it may be,” said Fritz, “look at its beautiful
skin with black and brown spots on a golden ground; I hope
James will not cut up the skin of my margay as he did my
jackal.” “Be tranquil; James, being warned, will not rob you
of it. But what do you intend making of this skin?” “I
must ask you that,” replied the hunter, “and will follow your
advice. I do not wish to keep it entirely for myself”
“Well,” said I, “in that case, as we do not need furs to
clothe us, you shall make with the skin of the body and
thighs, some cases for our table-service, and with the tail
you can make a magnificent hunting- belt, to carry your
knife and pistols.” “And I, father,’ asked James, “what
shall I make of the skin of my porcupine?” “When we
68 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

have taken out a certain number of quills to serve for needles
or arrow-points, I think we may make of the entire skin a
sort of cuirass to fit the body of one of our dogs, to render
him formidable in combat with ferocious animals.” “Oh!
magnificent, magnificent!” cried James; “I long to see Turk
or Belle so harnessed.” And my little rogue left me no repose
till I had consented to show him how to skin his porcupine.
I suspended the animal to a tree by the two hind paws, and
then began to skin it. Fritz, who observed me attentively,
did the same with his margay. The two skins were nailed to
the trunk of a tree, that the air might dry them. A portion
of the flesh of the porcupine was destined for the repast which
the mother began to prepare, and the rest was put by to be
salted.

Ernest ‘had collected some large stones, of which he built
a fire-place, at the same time asking me if the trees under
which we were, were not mango trees. I thought it very
likely, but could not say positively till we had consulted the
captain’s library. “Ah! our dear books,” said he; “when
shall we be able to read them leisurely?” “Patience, my
dear child, let us first do what is necessary; a day will come
when we shall have time for this pleasure.”

Francis, whom his mother had told to collect some dry
wood, arrived dragging some branches, and with his mouth
full of fruit which he seemed to be eating eagerly. “Little
- imprudent one!” cried his mother, springing towards the child ;
“this fruit which you are devouring with so much pleasure,
may be poisonous and kill you. Show me the fruit.” “Kill
me!” repeated the child, who hastened to eject what he was
on the point of swallowing, “I will not die, mother; no, no!”
At the same time he let fall the branch he was carrying,
and drew from his pocket two or three little figs, which I
took from his hands to examine them, I was quickly re-
assured ; for I do not know that there are any poisonous figs.
I asked Francis where he had found them. “Near here,”
replied he, “under one of the trees, where there are a great
many. I thought I might eat them, as I saw the fowls and
the sow regaling on them.” “That is not sufficient test,”
replied I; “for many fruits are eatable for animals which
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 69

are not so for men, and the reverse. But as the physical
constitution of the ape is nearly the same as that of a man,
and as besides, the ape is warned by a secret instinct of the
nature of food, I warn you all to consult the ape when you
find any fruit you desire to eat.”

Scarcely had I pronounced these words, when Francis ran
towards the ape, who was fastened to the foot of the tree,
and offered him one of the figs, of which his pockets were
full. The little animal took the fruit in his hands, looked
at it, smelt it, and at last bit it. “Good! good!” cried
Francis, completely re-assured, and again filled his mouth
with the figs, which he thought delicious. “So then,” said
Ernest, “these are fig-trees?” “Yes,” replied I, “but not
dwarf fig-trees, like those of our country. These belong rather
to the class of mangoes, which throw out immense roots, as
we see here.”

Whilst talking thus, and whilst my wife, assisted by Francis,
was busy laying the cloth, I began to make some needles
with the quills of the porcupine. The point was made
naturally ; there remained only to pierce a hole in the other
extremity ; I succeeded in doing so with a long nail made hot
in the fire. In an little time I had prepared an assortment
of needles, which our housekeeper accepted with great
pleasure.

The children, still astonished at the prodigious height of
the trees in which we had resolved to establish ourselves,
could not devise any way of ascending them; I was, at first,
as embarrassed as they were, but at last I thought of a plan,
which I deferred putting into execution till after dinner ; which
being now ready, we seated ourselves in a circle to partake
of. The flesh of the porcupine and the broth my wife had
made for us, were found excellent; we had for desert some
butter and Dutch cheese.

Thus restored, I resolved to profit by the daylight which
still remained. I asked my wife to make, as quickly as she
could, the straps we should want to tie our beasts of burden
to the pieces of wood we should require for our building,
and which we should have to fetch from the shore. She began
her work directly. I first fixed our hammocks for the night,
70 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

by suspending them to the arched roots of a mango-tree,
above which we extended a sail-cloth, fixed down on each
side to preserve us from the dew and mosquitoes. This done,
I directed Fritz and Ernest to go to the shore and find
some pieces of wood, strong and straight, which might serve
as rungs for the rope-ladder which I had resolved to make.
Ernest discovered on the borders of a little marsh,.a quantity
of bamboos, half buried in the mud. We pulled them out,
and having cut them with a hatchet into pieces three or four
feet long, we made them into three packets, one for each of
us. At some distance from the place where we found the
bamboos, and a little more within the marsh, I perceived a
thick tuft of reeds, towards which I went to cut some, which
I intended to make into arrows. Belle, who was walking
beside me, sprang forward barking, and immediately a
troop of magnificent flamingoes flew away with extreme
rapidity.

Fritz, who was never taken by surprise by events of this
kind, had time to fire before the birds were out of reach.
Two flamingoes fell: one dead, the other only wounded in
the wing. This last would probably have escaped us, if Belle
had not sprung in pursuit, and seized him by the wing. The
brave dog held him, so that when we arrived, I took posses-
sion of him. When I returned to the children, and showed
them my captive, they uttered cries of joy, and said we
must keep this living bird and endeavour to tame it. “What
a beautiful effect it will make with its red and white plumage
among our other fowls,” said ‘Fritz. Ernest remarked that
the flamingo had feet formed for running like swans and
for swimming like geese, and he was astonished that the
two faculties were given to the same individual. I told him
that a certain number of species were thus privileged.

I would not let this hunting incident prevent me from
gathering the reeds which I coveted, so went to cut a number
of the longest, telling my sons that I should make them use-
ful in measuring exactly the height of the tree we were
going to inhabit. “Oh!” cried they with a kind of incredu-
lity,“ you must join a great many together to reach only the
lowest branches,” “ Patience,” replied I; “do you remember


‘© \ FLOCK OF FLAMINGOES ROSE IN THE AIR,”
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 71

the lesson your mother gave to you in catching the fowls. Wait
till you see what I am going to do.” The two children were
silent. Then, loaded with our packets of bamboos, of reeds,
the dead flamingo, and the living one, whose feet I tied
together, we returned to the others. James and Francis
saluted with cries of joy the arrival of the flamingo; but
the mother was uneasy, in seeing that we added another
useless mouth to the already large number of our domestic
animals. Less prompt to be alarmed on such a subject, I
examined the wounds of the bird. I saw that the two
extremities of the wings were fractured, one by the gun, the
other by Belle’s teeth; I dressed them both with a kind of
ointment made of butter, salt, and wine. This done, the
flamingo was attached by a cord to a stake fixed in the
- ground, near the stream. Left to himself, he put his beak
under his wing, and slept on one of his long legs.

Whilst I was proceeding with this cure, the children, who
had tied several reeds together end to end, raised them
against one of the mango-trees to measure its height; but
they scarcely reached the place where the roots joined the
trunk, and I heard them again express their doubt on the
success of the method, which, however, I had not yet com-
municated to them. Letting them say and do, and smiling
at their incredulity, I sharpened some reeds at one end, and
furnished them at the other end with feathers taken from
the dead flamingo. I weighted these arrows by putting some
sand in the hollow of the reeds. Then I began to make a
bow, by bending a flexible bamboo, tied tightly at each
_ end,

James and Fritz, who soon perceived what I was doing,
ran to me crying out, “Oh, a bow and arrows! Papa, let me
shoot! Permit me to try. You will see that I shall be skil-
ful.” “One instant,” said I; “as I had the trouble of making
the bow, I wish to have the honour of trying it first. Besides,
do not think that I intend to use it as a plaything. No, I
have a useful end in view, and I will not delay in proving it
to you.” Then I asked my wife if she could not give me a
ball of stout thread. “Perhaps,” she replied, with a smile;
‘I will consult my enchanted bag.” She put her hand into
72 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

her bag, and pulling it out, said, “Here, I think, is what you
want.” And as she seemed to show some pride in having
so promptly satisfied my demand, James took upon himself
to say: “Truly, it is a great mystery, to find in a bag what
you have put there!” “The mystery is not great, certainly,”
replied I, “but it required some coolness, in the moment of
anxiety which preceded our departure, to think of filling a
bag, as my dear wife has done, with a thousand things, for-
gotten by us, and yet very useful to us all.” James was the
best boy in the world; he threw himself into his mother’s
arms, “I deserve,” said he, “to be sewed up in your bag,
and never to come out of it.” “Naughty boy, too much
beloved,” said his mother; “I should not leave you long, you
know that!” “And you would be right,” said I, laughing,
“the enchanted bag would risk too much if Master James
was shut up in it.”

Having unrolled the greater part of the ball, I tied the
end of the thread to one of the arrows. Then, adjusting this
arrow to the bow and bending it, I drew in the direction of
the branches of the largest mango-trees, The arrow flew, and
fell on the other side of a branch, over which, consequently,
the thread passed. It was then easy, by drawing the arrow
back to the branch, to obtain a length of thread equal to that
of the trunk, so as to know what length to make our ladder.
We found it was fifty feet. I then measured a hundred feet
of strong cord. I divided it in two parts, which I stretched
along the ground. I told Fritz to saw some pieces of bamboo
about two feet long; then aided by James and Ernest, I
fixed these rungs to the cords by knots, and with nails, which
prevented them from slipping. In less than an hour and a
half the ladder was finished.

To hoist it, I] made use of the same means. A new arrow
was shot. At the end of the thread, which I tripled this time,
to make it stronger, was attached a cord, and at the end of the
cord the ladder, which was soon firmly fixed. James and
Fritz disputed who should mount the first. I gave the prefer-
“ence to James, who was lighter than his brother, and as nimble
as a cabin-boy. Before letting him mount, I told him not to
venture on one step, without having tested its solidity, and to
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. ’ 73

descend as soon as he perceived the least danger. He sprang
up, paying little attention to my orders, and arrived, thank
God! without accident to the first branch, which he strided
across, crying out, “Victory! victory!” Fritz then mounted,
and tied the ladder more securely. This precaution taken,
I ventured in my turn. Arrived in the tree, I inspected its
form, to make the plan of our dwelling. The night approached;
it was even by moonlight that I attached to one of the branches,
over-hanging the first, a large pulley which I had brought
with me, to hoist up the pieces of wood for the projected
building. As I was getting ready to descend, I saw neither
Fritz or James. I thought they had already gone down; but
suddenly I heard in the high branches of the tree two fresh
young voices, singing the evening psalm. I would not interrupt
this impromptu concert, for there was in the accents of the
two innocent singers, and above all the thought of thus praising
the Lord, something sweet and touching, which seemed to be
a presage of blessing on our new abode. When they had
finished they rejoined me, and we descended together.

The mother, who had milked the cow and the goats,
offered us some excellent milk soup and some slices of porcu-
pine which remained from the dinner. The cattle were fastened
round our hammocks, under the roots of our tree. Ernest
and Francis had collected, by my orders, a quantity of dead
branches, which would serve to keep up a fire during the night,
to scare away ferocious animals. Prayers having been said,
the children soon went to sleep in the hammocks, which we
had hung on the roots. As for me, I did not go to bed,
resolved that I would watch by the fire which I had kindled.

During the first half of the night, I was kept perfectly
awake by the anxiety which the least noise I heard around
caused me, The murmur of the wind among the leaves was
sufficient to alarm me. But, little by little, I felt overcome
with fatigue, and towards morning I fell asleep so profoundly,
that when I awoke the family were already up.
CHAPTER VIII.
THE BUILDING IN THE TREE.

IMMEDIATELY after breakfast, my wife ordered James and
Ernest to put on the ass and cow the harness she had made
the day before; then with her three youngest sons, she went
to the shore, to collect the load of wood which we wanted
for our aérial building. They had to make several journeys.
I was uneasy at seeing her undertake such labour, which she
was not accustomed to. “Do not be uneasy,” said she;
“this farmer’s wife life suits me better than you think. I
find it good, that we should gain all we want by the sweat
of our brow. This law of God is often forgotten in towns,
but it is sweet to feel that we accomplish it.”

I let her depart, and fortified by her good words and
example, began my work with a joyful heart. I mounted
with Fritz into the tree, in the centre of which, with a saw
and hatchet, we prepared a space for our pavilion, The form
of the first branches, which extended horizontally, served as a
support for the planks. We left some, about six or eight feet
high, to suspend our hammocks ; other, a little higher, to receive
the sail-cloth, which was to form the roof of the habitation.
This preliminary work was not without difficulties, but at
last we made in the thick part of the fig-tree a spacious _
empty place. The beams and planks, which had been
brought in great quantities from the shore, were hoisted by
the aid of the pulley. The floor was fixed, and a balustrade
raised round it.

We worked with so much ardour, that the middle of the
day came, and we had not thought of eating; we contented
ourselves this time with a luncheon. After the repast, we

resumed our task. We now extended the sail-cloth, which
74
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 75

required much effort and skill. As this cloth fell over at
both ends, we fixed it to the balustrade, and we found that
our pavilion, of which the trunk of the tree already formed
one side, was hermetically closed on three of its sides. The
fourth, which faced the sea, remained at present open, though
I thought of closing it, in case of need, by a sail, which could
be raised or lowered at will. When we had fixed the ham-
mocks to the branches which we had reserved for that pur-
pose, our habitation was in a condition to receive us for the
night.

Fritz and I descended from the tree, and though much
fatigued, I began to make with the planks a large table and
some benches, which I fixed under the roots of the tree, in
the place where we had passed the preceding night; for this
place seemed fit to become our future dining-room. This last
work finished, to the great satisfaction of our housekeeper, I
laid down, harassed with fatigue, on one of the benches I had
just made, and said to my wife, wiping my forehead bathed with
perspiration: “I have worked to-day like a negro, and I intend
to rest to-morrow during the whole day.” “You not only can,
but ought,” replied she; “for if I count right, to-morrow is
Sunday; it is even the second we have passed in this place;
we have not thought of celebrating the first.” “I have, like
you, remarked this forgetfulness,” replied 1; “but I thought
that being then in urgent necessity of providing for our safety,
there was no fault in this omission. But now that we are, in
some sort, comfortably established, it would be a great proof
of ingratitude to neglect rendering to God the thanks we owe
Him. It is then agreed that to-morrow shall be entirely con-
secrated to the Lord. Since the children have not heard us, we
will give them an agreeable surprise by not telling them our
determination till to-morrow morning.” “That is agreed,” said
my wife, and she called her sons, who, dispersed round about,
hastened to range themselves round the table on which the
cloth was laid.

The good mother took from the fire an earthen pot which
she brought, and with a large fork took out the flamingo
killed yesterday. “I intended,” said she, “to roast it, but
Ernest dissuaded me, by saying it was an old one, which
76 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

could not fail to be tough; so by his advice I stewed it, and
hope you will find it well done.” The doctor was rallied a
little on his culinary foresight; but we acknowledged that he
was right, for the flamingo thus prepared was excellent, and
eaten to the bone.

Whilst we dined, we had the satisfaction of seeing our
live flamingo mix familiarly, for the first time, with the
fowls who were pecking around us. For some hours we
had detached him from his stake, and left him at liberty.
He had been walking all the afternoon, gravely, slowly, on
his two long red legs, like a person absorbed in profound
meditation. We threw him some pieces of biscuit, which he
caught with dexterity, to the great disappointment of the
fowls, over whom he had the advantage of his long beak
and stilted feet. The ape became, also, more and more
familiar; he jumped from one shoulder to the other, making
a thousand gambols.

At dessert, the sow re-appeared, whom we had not seen
since the evening before. By her peculiar gruntings, she seemed
to shew the pleasure she felt at having found us again. My
wife gave her a gourd full of cow’s milk, which she drank with
avidity. Such liberality appeared to me incompatible with
the principles of economy we ought to follow; I said a word
about it to our housekeeper, who had her answer ready. “Till
we are properly settled, and have all the necessary utensils,
it will be difficult to make the milk that is not wanted for
daily use into butter and cheese. It is better then to distribute
it to the animals; in the first place, to attach them to us; and
secondly, to save our grain, which is precious, and our salt,
which is nearly gone.” “You are right in all things, my dear
wife; so we will soon go to the rocks to collect more salt, and
will not fail to lay in a provision of grain when we make our
next voyage to the vessel.” “Ah!” cried the mother, “the
vessel again! still these dangerous journeys! I shall not be
easy till the day comes when you give up such expeditions.”
“T understand your fears,” said I, “but you know that we only
go when the sea is calm. And you will own that we should
be inexcusable, if we lost, through timidity, the riches which
the vessel still contains,” 5
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 77

Whilst we were thus talking the children had lighted, at
a little distance from the tree, a fire, on which they placed
the longest dry branches they could find, in order that the
fire might last a long time, and protect our cattle from the
approach of dangerous animals. Then we ascended our tree.
Fritz, James, and Ernest went first, and accomplished the
ascent with the agility of a cat. Their mother followed them
slowly, and with precaution. Left to the last, I had a little
more difficulty, as I had detached the ladder from the stakes to
which it was fixed at the bottom, so that I might draw it up
after me, and also because I carried little Francis tied to my
back, as I would not let him mount alone.

However, I arrived without accident; and when I had pulled
up the ladder to the floor of the pavilion, it seemed to my
sons that they were in one of the strong castles of the ancient
chevaliers, asylums impenetrable to all enemies, I thought it
best to load our arms, ready to fire on dangerous visitors, of
whom the dogs, left on guard at the foot of the tree, would
signal the approach. This precaution taken, each mounted into
his hammock. We were soon asleep, and the night passed in
the most perfect calm,
CHAPTER Ix.
SUNDAY.

WHEN we awoke, “What shall we do to-day?” asked the
children. “Nothing, absolutely nothing,” replied I. “Ah!
father, you are joking,” said Fritz. “No; I donot jest. To-day
is Sunday, and we ought to celebrate the day consecrated to
God.”

“Sunday!” cried James. “Ah! I will walk, hunt, fish, in

fact do only what I like.” “There you deceive yourself,” said I;
“T intend to celebrate Sunday in quite another fashion. It is
not a day for idleness and pleasure, but one of prayer.” “ But,”
replied James, “we have no church.” “Nor organ,” added

Francis. “That is true,” replied I, “but God is everywhere;
do you not know that? Could we adore him in a more
magnificent temple than the beautiful scene around us? And
do you not think that our voices will be as pleasing to Him
alone, as when joined to sound of instruments?” “Papa is
right,” said Ernest; “and besides, do we want a church to pray
in every morning and evening?” “Well said, my child,”
replied I. “So then we will pray in common, we will sing
some hymns, and I will relate to you a parable, which I have
prepared for the occasion.” “A parable! Oh! let us hear it,”
cried they all at once. But I told them to have patience; we
must do all things in proper order.

After the prayers and singing we sat down on the grass, and
I gave my auditory, who listened to me with eagerness, the
following recital.

“Once upon a time,” said I, “there lived a great King, whose
kingdom was called the country of Light and Reality, because
there reigned there perpetual activity and unclouded light. On

78
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 79

the most distant frontier, and towards the north, lay another
country, which likewise acknowledged the sway of the great
King, and whose immense extent was known to none but him-
self, From the remotest ages the monarch had preserved its
map in his archives; this other kingdom was called the Land of
Darkness, or the Night, because all was dark and inactive within
its borders.

“Tn the most fertile and agreeable districts of the empire of
Reality, the great King had a magnificent residence called Him-
melsburg, or the Celestial City, where he resided and held the
most magnificent court imaginable; millions of servants executed
his will, and millions held themselves ready to receive his
orders. Some were clothed in garments whiter than snow,
because white was the King’s colour; others were in glittering,
gleaming armour, flaming swords in their hands or cased in
sheaths of gold. Each, at a sign from his lord, flew like light-
ning to accomplish his commands. All these faithful servants,
full of zeal in the service of their King, were so united among
themselves, and so contented with their lord’s favour, that one
could imagine no happiness greater than to be admitted among
them. There also lived, in this glorious city, some of less
exalted rank, who, good, wealthy, and happy, enjoyed not only
the gifts of the King, but also the indescribable happiness of
serving him, and of being treated as his own children.

“Not far from the shores of the empire of Reality was a
large uninhabited island, which the King desired to people and
cultivate, that for a short time it might be the dwelling of those
of his subjects whom he intended to admit by degrees to
the privileges of citizens of Himmelsburg—a favour which he
wished to concede to as many as possible.

“This island was named Erdheim, or the Earthly Home; and
those who by good conduct in this place of trial, and by atten-
tion to the improvement of the country, proved themselves
worthy, would be admitted to Himmelsburg.

“To attain this object, the great King equipped a fleet to
transport the colonists to the island. He chose them from
the inhabitants of the Land of Darkness, and in taking them
thence he summoned them to enjoy the light and the activity
of life; advantages which, previously, they had not known; so
80 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

they entered on their new home in a happy and contented
spirit.

“The island was not only beautiful and fertile, but the col-
onists on arrival found that everything necessary to render their
residence agreeable had been provided, and each had the certain
knowledge that his work and his obedience to the King’s laws
would be recompensed by his future admission to the splendid
city of Himmelsburg.

“ At the time of their embarkation, the good King addressed

_ the colonists thus :-—

“«My children, I have withdrawn you from inaction and in-
sensibility, to render you happy by feeling, activity, and life;
henceforth your happiness and honour will largely depend upon
yourselves,

“*Never forget that Iam your King; and faithfully observe
my commandments in cultivating the country which I have con-
fided to you.

“«Each person, on his arrival at Erdheim, will receive the
piece of ground which he is intended to till; and there you will
find wise and learned men, charged to make known to you my
decrees.

“ ledge necessary for the interpretation of those decrees, I wish
every head of a family to preserve within his house a copy of
my laws, and daily read it with his family, that they may never
be forgotten.

“* Moreover, on the first day of the week, in each establish-
ment, all shall assemble in one place, where my commandments
shall be read and explained to them, and where they shall reflect
on the duties enjoined upon them. Thus will each of you find
out the most advantageous manner of cultivating the land you
have received as your inheritance; and, especially, how you may
uproot the tares and brambles that would choke the good seed.
All your requests, if made with a sincere heart, will come before
me, and if I deem them expedient and suitable, they will be
- granted.

“Tf, to prove your gratitude, you, on the day dedicated to
my service, abandon every other care, and devote yourselves
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 81

wholly to the expression of your feelings towards me, that will
‘find favour in my eyes, and I will take care that the day so
spent shall prove of great use to you, by the repose it will afford.
I will, too, that the animals which I have placed at your disposal
shall, on this day, rest, and that the wild beasts of the fields shall
not dread the hunter.

“Fe who at Erdheim shall obey my commands—who shall
do his duty with a contented and joyous spirit—who shall
maintain his land in the best order, and most fully develop its
resources, shall obtain the richest rewards.

“¢ But he who shall refuse to labour, and who does nothing
but trouble his fellows in their useful works, shall be condemned
for ever to toil in the mines in the bowels of the earth. From
time to time I will despatch my ships to Erdheim, which will
carry away a number of its inhabitants, for reward or punish-
ment,

“None will be able to deceive me, as a marvellous mirror,
placed in my palace, reflects with entire accuracy the conduct of
every inhabitant.’

“The anchor was weighed, and all, full of joy and hope, sailed
to their destination. After a short space of time allowed them
on their arrival to recover from the fatigues of their voyage, each
was shown the plot of ground set apart for his cultivation. He
was supplied with the seeds of useful plants, and was left at full
liberty to act, and to use for his advantage all which had been
entrusted to him,

“But what happened?

“Very soon most of the colonists, instead of following the
instructions they had received—instructions repeated daily by
the good servants of the King—would obey only their own
pleasure. One, instead of tilling his ground so as to obtain from
it an abundant harvest, laid it out like a garden, very agreeable,
but useless. Another, instead of the fruit-trees of which he had
received seedlings, cultivated the most miserable species, and
stated that the worthless fruit they yielded were of the most
precious descriptions. A third, it is true, frequently sowed good
grain; but as he never took pains to distinguish tares from the
wheat, his harvest consisted of weeds and darnels. Many let
their pround remain uncultivated, because they had lost their
82 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

seeds and plants, or spent in other pursuits the season for sow-
ing. Some few had shown an inclination to understand the
king’s orders ; but others tried by all kinds of pretences to elude
them, or alter their meaning.

“However, some brought their ground into a flourishing
state, and in addition to the pleasure they derived from »
being usefully employed while on the island, their hope of
being hereafter admitted to Himmelsburg cheered them in
their work.

“The misfortunes of the others arose from their unwill-
ingness to believe what the King had said to them through his
messengers, and in the disrespect in which they held his
laws. It was true that each head of a household possessed
a copy of the Sovereign’s laws, but he seldom read it. Some
said that these laws were only suited to a past age. Others
professed to discover in them incomprehensible contradic-
tions, while they were careful not to seek those explanations
which the messengers could have furnished. Accordingly, they
declared they were justified in diverging from the laws as
widely as they pleased. Some carried their wicked spirit to
such an extreme as to maintain that there was not a King;
and that, if he lived, he would sometimes show himself to
his subjects. Others said: ‘Yes, the great King lives; but
he is so great, so happy, so powerful, that he has no need
of us; and of what interest to him can be so poor a
colony as ours?’ Many were certain, above all things, that
the magic mirror was a fable; that the great King had no
subterranean mines; that he was too merciful to punish them;
and that all would eventually enter Himmelsburg.

“Owing to these causes, the day of the week consecrated
to the great King was observed with extreme negligence;
and many colonists refrained from attending the general
assembly, ‘We know by heart, they said, ‘our King’s ordin-
ances; what will it profit us to hear the same thing constantly
repeated?’ The colonists who still celebrated his day accord-
ing to the King’s law were few; and even among these
many were inattentive, and few listened devoutly, or profited
by the instructions addressed to them in the name of their
Sovereign.
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 83

“ However, the great King, faithful to his promise, pursued
his course. From time to time ships made their appearance
on the shores of Erdheim. They were followed by a huge
ship named the Grave, which bore the flag of Admiral Death.
This flag was embroidered with green and black; and the
colonists, according to their state, regarded it as the emblem
of Hope or of Despair.

“The fleet always arrived unexpectedly, and its appearance
was usually unwelcome. The admiral immediately sent in
search of those whom he was ordered to bring away. Many
of those who least desired it were suddenly seized, and com-
pelled to go; others who had long been preparing themselves
for the voyage, and whose crops and estate were in admirable
condition, likewise departed; but while the latter set out with
resignation, blended with joy and hope, the former exhibited
so much reluctance that it was necessary to employ force.
All resistance, however, was vain; and as soon as the ship
was loaded, she sailed, and speedily re-entered the port of
Himmelsburg. There the great King received the arrivals,
and with strict justice meted out the rewards and punish-
ments which had been promised to all. The excuses put
forward by negligent colonists availed them nothing; they
were condemned to labour in the mines; while those whose
conduct had conformed to the great King’s laws during
their sojourn in Erdheim, entered with him into the bright
city of Himmelsburg, and enjoyed all the happiness of its
inhabitants.

“T have finished my parable, my dear boys,” added I; “may
you comprehend its meaning, and each of you apply a moral
for himself.

“Now,” said I, when I finished, “if I had in my possession
that excellent book, the Bible, I would read to you some
passages, which I would comment upon as well as I could,
and this reading and my reflections should terminate our
pious exercises.” Whilst I spoke, my wife had risen and
gone away, and I soon saw her return holding in her hand
the book I was wishing for. It was a kind of fairy accom-
plishment of my desire; and with an astonished look, I
84 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

seemed to ask our dear manager whence this riches came;
she said, smiling, “the enchanted bag! still the enchanted
bag!” I could not help, before opening the book, showing
the children the advantages of foresight, of which their mother
was a true model.

After having read different chapters from the holy book,
which I endeavoured to explain to my young family, I declared
the religious exercises of the day finished, and gave them per-
mission to amuse themselves. James asked for my bow, and
tried to arm the arrows with some porcupine’s quills: “If I
had but a little glue,” cried he. I counselled him to melt
in a little water one of our broth-cakes. He followed. my
advice, and a short time after had at his disposal a number
of arrows, which would have been formidable weapons in
the hands of a skilful hunter. I thought it would be desir-
able for my sons to practise shooting with a bow and arrows
till they became expert at it; our provision of powder,
though ample, was not inexhaustible, and we might econo-
mise it. I was disturbed from these reflections by a noise
of fire-arms, and saw fall at my feet five or six dead
birds, which I picked up, and found to be ortolans. It was
our philosopher, who having mounted the tree, and seen a
number of these birds perched on the high branches, had
discharged his gun which was loaded with small shot. He
soon showed himself triumphantly on the platform, crying out,
“Well! have I hit them? am I skilful?” “Very skilful,” said
I, “but you have forgotten that to-day is Sunday; hunting
is not permitted.”

These words stopped Fritz and James, who had already
run for their guns, to imitate the example of their brother.
Ernest himself descended, and coming to me with a confused
air, begged me to pardon his forgetfulness. I did not make
him ask twice. The involuntary fault of our little hunter
had shown me that we had within our reach an abundant
supply of delicate game. These ortolans, attracted by the
fruits of our gigantic fig-trees, peopled all the surrounding
trees. It would be easy, either with snares or firing, to
procure a great number, and as I knew that, for the pleasure
of European gourmands, they preserve these birds half roasted
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 85

in fat, I resolved to make a stock of them, prepared in the
same fashion. My wife took the six ortolans killed by
Ernest, picked them, and began to cook them. Fritz, who
had decided to use the skin of his margay in making bags
for our silver, consulted me how to prepare the skin. I
advised him to rub it with ashes and sand, and then to
soften it with butter and yolk of eggs. Whilst he was
busy with this preparation, came Francis, who was already
possessor of a little bow, which he began to know how to
use, begging me to make him a quiver which he could hang
over his shoulders, to hold his arrows and reeds. I made
him one with four large pieces of skin tied in a point and
fixed over each other. Thus equipped, our baby was at
the height of joy.

Ernest had taken the Bible, and seated at the foot of the
tree, appeared profoundly absorbed in his reading. My wife
called us to dinner; the ortolans were delicious, but certainly
not sufficient to satisfy us. Whilst we were dining, I told
my sons that I wished to make them a very important
proposal. I saw them all look at me with great curiosity.
“Tt would be,” said I, “to give names to the different points.
of this land. By the help of these designations, it would be
much more easy to understand each other. We will, how-
ever, abstain from naming the coasts, for perhaps some
European navigators have already named them; and we ought
to respect the work of our progenitors.” “Oh! what a good
idea,” cried all the children at once. “Yes, let us find some
names,” “J,” said James, “am of opinion that we should take
very extraordinary names; for example, Cowmandel, Chander-
nagor, Zanguebar, Monomaptoa.” “But, little hairbrain,” said
I, “suppose we cannot keep them.” “Then what names
shall we find?” asked he. “That is very simple,” I replied;
“instead of seeking chance names, why should we not make
some from the different events which happened at the places
we wish to name?”

“That is evident,” said Ernest; “and to begin by the
bay where we disembarked, I propose to call it THE BAY
OF DELIVERANCE.” “I,” objected James, “ask that we
should call it LOBSTER Bay, seeing it was there that one
86 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

of those vile animals pinched my leg so terribly.” “Then,”
said the mother, smiling at the egotistical pretension of her
son, “I do not see why we should not call it THE Bay OF
CRIES, for you cried enough on that occasion! But I pro-
pose that we should adopt Ernest’s idea; the gratitude we
owe to God makes it a duty.” “Adopted! adopted! It
shall be THE BAY OF DELIVERANCE,” cried they all.

Successively all the points of our domain received names;
the first habitation was called ZELTHEIM (an abode under
a tent); the little island at the entrance of the bay, THE
ISLE OF REQUIN (or shark), in memory of the address and
courage of Fritz. There was FLAMINGO MARSH, and JACKAL
RIVER. Our new habitation received the name of FALCON’S
NesT; “for,” said I to my sons, “you are bold and adven-
turous like young falcons, and as much disposed to exercise
active pillage in the surrounding lands.” The promontory,
from the top of which Fritz and I had vainly attempted to
discover traces of our unhappy companions, was called THE
CAPE OF DISAPPOINTMENT.

These useful designations thus settled, we rose from table,
and the children were at liberty to amuse themselves. Fritz
was busy with his cases, which he made with the skin of the
animal’s thighs, fixing it out with moulds of wood. James
asked me to help him make for Turk, with the prickly skin
of the porcupine, the coat of mail which I told him of I
did as he wished. After having cleaned the skin, we fixed
it with straps on the dog’s back, who thus covered, looked
like a warrior. He willingly suffered himself to be thus
harnessed, and did not try to get it off; but Belle did not
at all like this costume, for every time she approached her
companion to play with him, she got cruelly pricked; so we
decided that Turk should only put on his warrior’s costume
when he went on important expeditions, With the rest of
the skin James made a helmet, which he wore in military
fashion, and hoped to frighten the savages if we met any.
Ernest and Francis practised shooting with the bow, and I
was pleased to see that they were not awkward at it.

As the sun was getting low and the heat diminishing, I
proposed a walk. We consulted as to which way we should
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 87

go. It was decided that we should go to Zeltheim; certain
of our provisions beginning to get exhausted, it was necessary
to visit our magazine. Fritz and James wanted powder and
ball; the housekeeper had need of butter; Ernest thought of
bringing back a couple of ducks, which would do very well
on the borders of our stream. “Let us set out,” said IJ, “and
prepare for some fatigue, for we shall take a longer road
than that by which we came.” Fritz and James, armed with
their guns, like Ernest and myself, had on, the one his belt
of jackal skin, the other his famous porcupine helmet. Little
Francis carried his bow and quiver; my wife alone had no
arms. The little ape sprang on Turk’s back, his usual seat,
but being pricked in the paws with the quills of the coat of
mail with which the dog was armed, he went, making strong
grimaces, to take refuge with Belle, who kindly consented to
carry the affronted little horseman. Our flamingo, who wished
also to be of the party, began gravely to follow the caravan.
It was comical to see him walking on his stilts, and bending
his long neck.

Keeping close to the stream, we had a very agreeable
walk. My wife and I walked slowly side by side; the children
ran before, scattering right and left. Ernest soon came
back to us showing a stalk, at the end of which hung three
or four little clear green balls: “Potatoes, papa! potatoes!”
I soon saw that he spoke truly, and could not but praise
his spirit of observation which had caused one of the most
precious discoveries we had made since our abode in the
island.

Ernest, delighted, made us hasten to see his field of
potatoes; for in that place, said he, the plain was covered
with them. We quickly reached this precious natural plan-
tation. James went down on his knees and began to scratch
up the earth to extract some roots. The monkey, quitting
his steed, began to imitate his young master. In less than
five minutes they had pulled up a large quantity of potatoes,
which Francis put into a heap as fast as Master Knip and
James threw them on the earth, The whole were put in
our sacks and game-bags, and we resumed our walk, after
having taken care to mark attentively the situation of the
88 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

field, to which we resolved to return and make a complete
harvest. :

We crossed the stream at the foot of a little chain of rocks,
whence it issued, forming a cascade. From this elevated place
we enjoyed a varied and extensive view. We might have
believed ourselves in a European hot-house, with this differ-
ence, that instead of flower pots and tubs containing shrubs,
all the interstices of the rocks were filled with the most magni-
ficent vegetation. All sorts of plants grew here in abundance,
especially the Indian fig-tree, the aloe, the cactus with its
thorny stalks, loaded with scarlet flowers; above all, the
pine-apple, the most delicious of fruits, which my children
knew, and seized with an avidity which I was obliged to
repress, fearing they would make themselves ill.

Among these plants I recognised the karatus, a sort of
aloe, of which I gathered several feet, and which I showed
to my sons, telling them: “I have found there something very
superior to the pine-apples you are devouring so gluttonously.”
“What!” said James with his mouth full, “those vile tufts
of hairy leaves? It is not possible. There is nothing better
than the pine-apple!. The pine-apple is a divine fruit.”
“Glutton!” said I, interrupting this panegyric, which fhe
other children appeared to approve, “you must learn not to
judge so much by appearances. Here, Ernest, take my flint
and steel and make a fire; I want one.” “But, father,” replied
my little scholar, “I have no tinder.”

“Then what should we do if we wanted very much to
procure a fire?” “Well,” said James, “we would rub two
pieces of wood together, as I have heard the savages do.”
“That would be a painful method for people not accustomed
to this exercise. I assure you, my dear child, you might rub
all day without obtaining a single spark.” “In that case,”
replied Ernest, “we should be obliged to seek for a tinder
tree.” “The search would be superfluous,” said I, taking a
dry stalk of karatus, from which I pulled off the bark to
extract the pith. I then placed this pith on the flint, which I
struck with the steel, and it immediately caught fire. “Bravo!
bravo! Long live the tinder plant!” cried the astonished
children,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 89

“ But,” said I, “you have not yet seen all the treasures which
the karatus furnishes,” Speaking thus, I split a leaf, from which
I drew several lengths of very fine but very strong thread.
“I own,” said Fritz, “that the karatus is a very useful plant;
but I should like to know what is the use of all these prickly
plants that we see around us?”

“You would be very wrong to judge them useless,” replied
I. “The aloe, for example, produces a juice much used in
medicine; the Indian fig-tree, which you see with its prickly
~ leaves, must not be despised, for it grows in sterile lands, where

‘the inhabitants would often die of hunger, without the help of
_ its excellent fruit.” At these words, James ran with open hand
to gather some of these fruits, which he wished to taste; but the
thorns with which they were covered ran into his fingers. He
returned to me crying, and casting an angry look on the Indian
fig-tree. His mother hastened to pull out the thorns which
pained him cruelly; and during this time I showed his brothers
the way to gather and eat these fruits without exposing them-
selves to the same misfortune.

Having cut a stick to a point, I stuck it into a fig, which
I could then easily deprive of its prickles with my knife.
Ernest, who was attentively examining a fig, remarked that
it was covered with a multitude of red insects, who appeared
to be sucking the fruit. “Look, father,” said he, “tell me
the name of these animals, if you know them.” I recognised
the cochineal, and said: “This is decidedly a day of extra-
ordinary discoveries, I will not say that this last is very
precious to us, unless we could sell these insects to the
Europeans, who buy them at a very high price for dying
scarlet.” “However that may be,” said Ernest, “this is the
second plant superior to that pine-apple which at first we so
much boasted of.”

“You are right,” said I, “and, to prove it, I will tell
you another useful quality of the Indian fig-tree, whose thick
tufted branches may make hedges capable of defending the
abodes of men against the attacks of wild beasts, and the
plantations against the ravages of devastating animals.”
“How!” cried James, “the soft leaves serve as a barrier!
A blow of a knife or stick would remove such an obstacle.”
go THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Speaking this, he began to strike vigorously at a magnificent
fig-tree. But one of these prickly leaves fell on his leg,
and implanted there its darts, whose pricks made our mad-
cap utter loud cries, “Well,” said I, “do you understand
now, how formidable such an enclosure would be to
half-naked savages, or to animals -who should try to get
through them?” “We must make one round our habitation,”
said Ernest. “And I think we should do well to gather some
cochineal. The red dye might be useful to us,” said Fritz.
“And I think,” replied I, “that it would be wiser to undertake,
at present, only what is useful; the agreeable may come later.”

We continued our conversation, which became more serious,
and I was several times astonished at the judicious remarks of
Ernest. More than once his eagerness for knowledge made
me consess that I was unable to inform him on some points. I
had not yet looked over the captain’s books, which I had shut
up in a chest, not wishing to leave them in the hands of
children of their age. Many times Ernest had asked me for
the key of this treasure. But everything must have its time,
and it was first necessary to attend to what was required for our
safety and well-being.

Arrived at Jackal stream, we crossed it; and after a few
minutes’ walk, reached Zeltheim, where ening was in the
same order as at our departure. Fritz provided himself
abundantly with powder and lead; I helped my wife to fill
our tin bottle with butter. The young boys ran after the ducks,
who, become wild, would not be easily approached. Ernest
thought of a means of catching them, which succeeded. He
tied a piece of cheese to the end of a thread, and let it float
on the water, where the gluttons came to gobble it; and
were gently taken in the snare. Repeating this trick several
times, he became master of the rebels, who were shut up
separately in a handkerchief, and placed in our game-bags.
We took also a stock of salt, but less than we wished, for we
were already too much loaded; we were obliged to unharness
Turk of his coat of mail to give him a share of the burden.
The formidable, but decidedly useless cuirass, was left in the
tent. “Arms are like soldiers,” said Ernest; “out of battle they
are good for nothing.”
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. gli

We began our march. The laughter and jests provoked by
the thorns and by the contortions of our ducks and the comical
aspect of our caravan, made us forget a little the weight of our
charge. It was not till after our arrival that we felt fatigue.
But our good housekeeper hastened to fill the pot with
potatoes, which she put on a good fire; then she went to milk
the goat and cow to prepare a strengthening repast. The cloth
was soon laid. The expectation of our supper and of the
excellent potatoes, kept us awake; but as soon as supper was
finished, the children went to their hammocks, The mother,
who had been assisting them, came towards me laughing in
spite of her fatigue. “Do you know what little Francis has just
‘added to his prayer?” said she; “I give you ten times to guess
it.” “Give me one, my dear,” replied I, “and tell me at once;
I am dying for sleep.” “ Here it is,’ said she: “‘ Good God, I
thank Thee for having planted such good potatoes in our
island for little Francis, and such large pine-apples for James.’
And then he fell asleep.” “And he did well,” said I to my wife,
wishing her good-night; “be assured his thanksgiving is on high.
Even the smallest prayers go to God.”

We soon fell into a peaceful sleep.
CHAPTER X.,
THE HURDLE, THE SALMON, THE KANGAROO.

I HAD remarked the evening before that the coast was
covered with a great quantity of wood, with which we could
make a hurdle, and transport burdens too heavy to be placed
on the backs of our beasts, I therefore set off at break of
day, accompanied by Ernest and our ass, both of whom I
awoke. A morning walk seemed to me desirable for Ernest,
as his habits of meditation made him somewhat indolent.
The ass dragged a large branch of a tree, which I thought
I should need. “Are you not a little angry,” said I to my
son, “at having quitted your hammock sooner than usual,
where you were sleeping so soundly? Do you not regret
being deprived of the pleasure of shooting pigeons and thrushes
with your brothers?” “Oh, now I am up, I am very glad,”
said he; “as to the birds, no doubt the hunters will leave
me some, for at first they will drive away more than they
will knock down.” “Why so?” asked I. “Because they will
forget to take the balls out of their guns, and to fill them
with small shot. Even if they remember that, they will fire
from below; without thinking that the distance from the ground
to the high branches is much too great.” “Your observations
are just, my child,” said I; “but I do not think it friendly
of you not to have warned your brothers. I should like
to see you less irresolute, less apathetic; for if there are hours
when it is good to reflect and be prudent, there are others
when we ought to know how to take a sudden resolution,
and execute it with energy.”

While continuing to demonstrate to my son, that though

meditation has its value, action also has its worth, we arrived
92
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON, 93

at the shore. I found there several poles and pieces of
wood. We put a number of them on the branch of the
tree, which formed a sort of sledge. I had also found among
the wrecks a closed chest, which I opened with a hatchet
after our arrival at Falcon’s Nest. It contained some sailor’s
clothes and linen, stained with sea-water.

On arriving near Falcon’s Nest, a well-kept-up firing
announced that the hunting was in train; but when they
saw us, cries of joy were heard, and all the family came
towards us.

I had to excuse myself to my wife for having left with-
out telling her. The sight of our beautiful wood, and the
thought of having a convenient sledge to transport the pro-
visions left at Zeltheim, silenced her mild reproach, and we
went gaily to breakfast. I examined the spoil of our hunters ;
it amounted to four dozen birds, as many thrushes as ortolans,
which were scarcely worth the great quantity of powder
and shot expended upon them. In order to save these
articles, which we could not well renew, I showed my young
poachers how to make snares and place them in the branches
of the tree. The threads of. karatus served us to make
these engines. Whilst James and Francis were thus occu-
pied, Fritz and Ernest helped me to make the hurdle.

We had worked for some time, when we were disturbed
by the horrible noise made by our poultry. My wife got
up to see if any voracious animal had caused this alarm;
but she only saw the little ape, who was running towards
the roots of the fig-tree, under one of which he disappeared.
Much puzzled, she followed him, and caught him just as
he had broken an egg to eat it. Looking under the sur-
rounding roots, Ernest discovered a great number of eggs,
which Master Knips had laid up in reserve. The little animal
was very fond of this food, and gluttony had taught him
the trick of stealing and hiding each egg as it was laid.
“T understand now,” said my wife, “how it was I often heard
the fowls cackling as if they had laid eggs, without being
able to find any.” The little thief received a correction, and
it was decided that he should be deprived of his liberty at
the time when fowls are accustomed to lay. We made use
94 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

of him, however, to discover those eggs which the fowls did
not deposit in the usual nests,

When James, who had climbed into the tree to set the
snares, descended, he told us that the pigeons we had brought
from the vessel had constructed a nest in the branches. I
received this news with satisfaction, and prohibited the children
from firing henceforward into the tree, for fear of wounding
our little pensioners; I repented having given the idea of
the snares. But as the prohibition of firing into the tree
had already excited some murmurs on the part of the hunters,
I abstained from giving a counter order.

Little Francis came, with his customary naiveté, to ask
me if it was not possible to sow some gunpowder in a field,
which he would take care of, so that his brothers might have
as much firing as they liked. We were greatly amused with
this idea, which showed the child’s goodness as much as his
ignorance. “My darling Francis,” said Ernest, “powder is a
thing made, and not a product of the earth; it is made by
mixing in nearly equal parts charcoal, sulphur, and saltpetre.”
“Ah! I did not know,” said Francis, “and I thank you for
telling me.”

Leaving my young scholar to the pleasure of instructing
his little brother, I was so busy making the hurdle, that my
wife and two younger sons had picked a great quantity of
birds before I perceived them: It was a proof to me that
the snares had produced their effect. The housekeeper had
stuck all these small pieces of game on a long thin sword,
brought from the vessel, and she proposed to roast them. I
complimented her on her spit, but remarked that she had
prepared three times as many ortolans as we required for
dinner. She replied that she did so because she had heard
me say that we might preserve them, by putting them in
butter when they were half-cooked.

The hurdle being nearly finished, I resolved, in the after-
noon, to make another journey to Zeltheim, and I told Ernest
to accompany me, as he had done in the morning, for I
wished to conquer his indolence and timidity. Francis
stopped me an instant by a question, which amused us.
“Papa,” said he, “Ernest told me that the fire enclosed in
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 95

all bodies is developed by motion and rubbing. Now, if I
ran too fast, could I catch fire?” “Catch fire! no,” said I,
“dear little one, only warm yourself; the legs of little children,
and even of men, are not strong enough to make them run
so quickly as to catch fire. Be assured then, and run as much
as you like” “I am glad,” said he; “I like to run; but I
was afraid.”

The hour of departure being come, Fritz made us a
present of a case which would contain a table service, and
even a small hatchet. I praised him for his ingenious work,
and, after having embraced our dear ones, we departed. The
ass and cow were attached to the hurdle; Ernest and I,
bamboo canes in our hands to serve as whips, our guns
on our backs, walked by the side of the beasts: Belle
followed us. We took the road by the shore, and after a
journey marked by no accident, arrived at the tent.

The beasts when unharnessed began to graze at liberty,
whilst we placed on our sledge the cask of butter, a barrel
of powder, some shot, some cheeses, and some other provi-
sions. This labour engaged us so much that we did not
notice that the ass and cow were gone away, beyond the
bridge, attracted by the sight of the verdant meadow on
the opposite side of the stream. I despatched Ernest to
bring them back, telling him that I would go in quest of
a place where we could bathe conveniently, thinking that
a bath would be very wholesome for us after the fatigue of-
the day.

The interior part of the Bay of Deliverance, which I went
to inspect, offered a place where the rocks, coming out of
a sandy bottom, seemed to form separate bathing places.
Before getting in the water, I called Ernest several times,
but he did not reply. Becoming uneasy, I went towards
the ‘tent, calling him again; still the same silence. I began :,
to fear some accident, when I perceived him asleep under a
tree, a little distance from the stream. The cow and ass were
tranquilly feeding near him. “Idle one!” cried I, “what care
you are taking of the beasts! Do you not think they might
re-pass the bridge, and lose themselves?” “Oh! there is
nothing to fear,” replied he, in a sleepy tone, rubbing his
- 96 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

eyes, “I have taken away several planks of the bridge.” “ Ah!
ah! I see that idleness makes you inventive; but, instead of
sleeping as you have done, would it not have been better to
fill the ass’s saddle-bag with salt, which your mother depended
on our bringing? Busy yourself now in gathering this, and
when you have finished, come to me at the first heap of rocks,
behind which I am going to bathe.” Speaking thus, I showed
him with my hand the place I had chosen, and went back
to it.

As, after having remained nearly half an hour in the water,
I was astonished not to see my salt gatherer appear, I dressed
myself to go and see if he had gone to sleep again. Scarcely
had I gone a few steps, when I heard him cry out: “Oh,
father! father! come and help me, or else he will drag me
in!” J ran, and saw my little philosopher lying on his belly
on the sand, not far from the mouth of the stream, holding
with both hands a line, at the end of which an enormous
fish was struggling. I arrived just in time to spare the
fisherman the grief of seeing his magnificent captive escape.
I took the cord and let the fish into low water, where it was
easy to catch him, after Ernest, going into the water, had
stunned him with a blow of his hatchet. It was a salmon,
weighing at least fifteen pounds.

I complimented my son, not only on his skill as a fisher,
but also on the forethought he had shown in bringing the
lines with him.

Whilst he was bathing, I cleaned the salmon and rubbed
him with salt, then placed him on the hurdle with some
other smaller fishes which Ernest had taken and wrapped in
his handkerchief. I put back the planks of the bridge; then,
when my son came back to me, the beasts were harnessed,
and we returned towards Falcon’s Nest.

We had walked about a quarter of an hour, keeping by
the meadow, when suddenly Belle sprang forward, barking,
towards a large tuft of high grass, from which we saw an
animal come out nearly as large as a sheep, who ran away,
making extraordinary leaps. I fired, but too precipitately,
and failed. Ernest, placed at this moment in the direction
the beast took, fired in his turn, and killed it.
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 97

We ran to examine the singular game we had just killed.
The animal had the muzzle and skin of a mouse, the ears of
a hare, the tail of a tiger, the front paws exceedingly short,
and the hind ones excessively long. I examined it a long
time before I could tell its name. As to Ernest, the joy of
his victory prevented him from observing it carefully. “Ah!”
cried. he, “what will my mother and brothers say on seeing
game of this size, and knowing that I killed it!” “Truly,
you have a good eye and sure hand,” said I, “but I should
not be sorry to know the name of your game. Let us proceed
together to a minute examination of it, and perhaps we shall



arrive ” Ernest interrupted me. “It has,” said he, “four
incisors, and may belong, consequently, to the order of
gnawers,.” ' “That is very well reasoned,” replied I, “but it

has also, below the teats, a pocket, which is the distinctive
sign of the opossum. I think I am not deceived in saying
that this animal is a female kangaroo, an animal unknown to
naturalists till the discovery of New Holland by the celebrated
Captain Cook, who was the first to observe and describe it.
You may congratulate yourself, then, on having made a truly

extraordinary capture.” “Father,” said Ernest, “you appear
glad that I killed this fine game; are you not sorry you did
not kill it yourself?” “No; because I love my son better

than myself, and his success gives me more pleasure than
my own.” “Ah, father!” said he, throwing himself in my
arms,

The kangaroo was placed on the hurdle, and while walking,
I told Ernest all I knew about the kangaroo, of its short fore-
paws, and long hind ones, and of its tail, which serves it almost
like a fifth leg, as a sort of compensation for the insufficiency
of its fore-paws.

As soon as the children left at Falcon’s Nest perceived us,
they uttered cries of joy, and we soon saw them running
towards us, all muffled up, some more comically than the
others. One was enveloped in a long white shirt, another had
his body covered in long trousers which reached to his
shoulders, the third was hid under a waistcoat which descended
to his knees, and make him resemble a walking portmanteau.
Seeing them advance gravely, like the heroes of a theatre,

7
98 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON,

I asked them what was the cause of this masquerade. They
- told me that during my absence, their mother having thought
fit to wash their clothes, they were obliged to wait till they
were dry, and wrap themselves up in those found in the chest
we brought from the shore.

After making us laugh at their grotesque accoutrements,
they pressed round the hurdle to inspect its load. The house-
keeper thanked us for the butter, salt, and fish we had brought;
but the attention of the children was concentrated principally
on the salmon and kangaroo, which Ernest was quite proud
of showing to his brothers. James and Francis uttered cries
of admiration at sight of this important piece of game. It
was not quite the same with Fritz, who, I perceived, was looking
at it rather spitefully. At the same time I could see that he was
trying to overcome this feeling of jealousy. “Father,” said he,
approaching me, “will you take me on your next excursion?”
“Yes, my child,” replied I, adding, in a whisper, “to recom-
pense you for the inner combat you have just fought and_
gained.” He embraced me, and went to Ernest, whom he
congratulated sincerely on his skill, showing thus the good-
ness of his heart. On the other side, I remarked with pleasure
the modesty of Ernest, who had the delicacy not to tell that
I had missed the kangaroo.

The hurdle was unloaded, and I distributed some salt to
our animals, who had been deprived of it for sometime. The
kangaroo was suspended to a branch of the tree, and we made
our supper of the small fishes caught by Ernest, and a dish
of potatoes, It now being night, we regained our aérial
abode.
CHAPTER XI.
SECOND VOYAGE TO THE VESSEL.

THE next day, very early, I called Fritz, and told him he
should accompany me in a second voyage to the vessel. My
wife, who heard me, cried out again, as I had foreseen, about
the new dangers we were going torun. I made a fresh appeal
to her reason, by showing that it would be highly culpable in
us to abandon the thousand useful things still enclosed in the
shipwrecked vessel, for want of resolution.

I then descended from the tree, and began to despoil the
kangaroo of its pretty grey fur. The flesh was divided into
two parts; one to be eaten immediately, the other was destined
to be salted. Then we breakfasted, and after the repast I
told Fritz to collect our game-bags and gourds, and the arms
we should take with us. At the moment of departure I
called James and Ernest, to whom I wished to give some
orders for the employment of their time during our absence.
As they did not answer, I asked my wife if she knew what
had become of them. She replied that they were probably
- gone to dig up some potatoes, as she heard them talk of doing
so. I was satisfied when I saw that they had taken Turk with
them. We then set out without waiting for them, leaving Belle
at Falcon’s Nest. —

As we arrived at Jackal Bridge, we suddenly heard shouts
of laughter at some distance, and soon saw Ernest and James
come from behind a bush, appearing very much delighted at
the trick they had played us. I scolded them severely for
having gone away without telling us. They owned that they
had done so in the hope that I should take them to the vessel.

99
100 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

I showed them that the thing was impossible; first, because
their mother would be uneasy if they did not return to her,
and then because their presence in the boat of tubs would be
a great deal more embarrassing than useful; then I sent them
back, charging them to tell their mother, that instead of return-
ing in the evening, we should be obliged to pass the night in
the vessel. I had not been able to make up my mind to
tell my excellent wife my determination when I quitted her.
“Endeavour,” said I, “to return before noon; and,” I added,
addressing Fritz, “that your brothers may not say that they
‘are ignorant of the hour, give Ernest your watch; you can
take another from the vessel, and you shall bring one also
for James.” The two young boys went back, without, how-
ever, taking the direct road to Falcon’s Nest. Soon after we
got into our boat of tubs, and were carried by the current
quickly and without accident to the stranded vessel. My first
care was to seek for materials to construct a raft, according to
a plan which Ernest had proposed the day before, which would
carry a heavier load than our boat of tubs.

There was in the hold a great quantity of empty water
barrels. We chose twelve which we fixed together by joists
thickly nailed; then on the whole I fixed a flooring, surrounded
by a grating about two feet high. This work took us
great part of the day. When we had finished, the night was
too near for us to hope to return to the land with our new
barque properly loaded’ We then made a general inspection
of the vessel, to collect things which we judged worthy of
being taken away. We then retired into the captain’s cabin,
and after a frugal repast, went to sleep on some excellent
mattresses.

At dawn, we were up fresh and ready to load our twe
boats. The room where we had slept was the first visited;
our second visit was to that we had inhabited during the
voyage; I took from it everything of interest and utility that
it contained. The other cabins had their turn; the locks,
the bolts, the fire-irons, the fenders, and even the doors were
soon taken away. Two trunks well filled made part of the
booty; but what gave me most delight was finding the car-
penter’s and gunsmith’s chests. A box which contained gold
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. IOI

and silver watches, snuff-boxes, rings, dazzled us for an instant;
but our attention was soon otherwise fixed by sacks full of
oats, peas, rice, maize; European fruit-trees, which had been
carefully packed to plant on another continent. I saw with
tenderness these productions of my dear country; pear-trees,
cherry-trees, vine-shoots; and promised myself to try and accli-
matise them in our island, What was our joy, besides, on
finding bars of iron, wheels, mattocks, spades, and above all,
a hand-mill. Nothing which might be useful to a new colony
had been forgotten in the loading of the vessel which was
to take us to another world. We could not take away every-
thing. A box full of coins scarcely attracted our attention.
What use would they be to us in comparison with things of
practical utility? From the box of jewels Fritz had only
taken two watches, which he had promised to his brothers.
Fritz asked me to let him take away a fishing-net, a pair
of harpoons, and a spindle of rope, which he chanced to
find.

Our loading took us half a day; at last the moment of
departure arrived. It was not without trouble that we un-
moored our two boats, which we had tied side by side, and
which were somewhat heavily laden. Fortunately, a favourable
wind took the sail which I had hoisted, and materially assisted
us.

I was at the rudder; the sail prevented me from seeing what
Fritz was doing in the fore part of the tub boat, when suddenly
I heard the whistling of the spindle. “In the name of heaven!
Fritz,” cried I, “what have you done?” But the young man
cried out, transported with joy: “Hit! it shall not escape
us.” It was an enormous turtle, which my son had perceived
sleeping on the water, and which he had bravely and skilfully
harpooned, The animal, struck in the neck, dragged our boat
with frightful rapidity. I hastily braced up our sail, and
went towards the prow to cut the cord of the harpoon; but
Fritz begged me not to make him let so fine a prey escape,
assuring me that he would cut the cord if he saw that we
were in danger.

Thus dragged by the animal, we advanced with frightful
quickness, I had much trouble in managing the rudder, to
102 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

avoid the jolts which this singular towing gave our boat.
Soon, seeing that the turtle was going seawards, I again
put up the sail. The wind blew towards the coast, so the
animal, finding the resistance too great, changed its direc-
tion and swam towards land. We at last touched the bottom,
at a gunshot distance from the shore, in front of Falcon’s
Nest. I jumped into the water, to finish the turtle with
a blow of my hatchet; it had gone on to the sand, where I
- found it stranded. At the first blow, the head was separated
from the body. Fritz, happy and proud, had fired, to warn
our people, whom we saw coming towards us. With what
transport, what caresses we were received! My wife scolded
me gently for my long absence; then Fritz related the history
of his turtle. The mother shuddered at the danger we had
run, and every one was astonished at the skill with which
Fritz had struck the beast just in the part of the neck which,
while the animal was asleep, was entirely out of the shell.
My two youngest sons had gone back to Falcon’s Nest, to
fetch our beasts of burden and the sledge, on which were placed
our mattresses and the turtle, which weighed at least three
hundredweight; it required all our strength to raise it. The
rest of the cargo was placed on the shore, out of reach of
the sea, and our boats were anchored with masses of lead
buried in the sand,

During the journey back to Falcon’s Nest, the children over-
whelmed us with questions. The casket, of which Fritz had
spoken, especially excited their curiosity. James claimed a
watch, little Francis a purse full of money. “Do you mean to
sow it, my little man?” said I, laughing. “No, papa,” replied
he, “I will keep it to buy some spice-bread next fair-day, when
the merchants come.” This made us laugh heartily.

Arrived at Falcon’s Nest, I began immediately to despoil
the turtle of his shell. I cut off some pieces of flesh, which I
advised my wife to broil for our repast. “Let me. first take
away this green part which hangs on each side,” said she.
“ No, my dear,” replied I, “for that is the fat, which is the most .
savoury part of the animal.”

“Dear father,” said James, “will you give me the shell?” Each
of the other children made the same request. I told them it
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 103

belonged of right to Fritz. Curious, however, to know how each
would use it, if he had it, I first asked James. He declared that
he would make an elegant little boat to swim on the stream.
Ernest, thinking first of his own safety, said he would use it
as a buckler to defend himself against the savages. Little
Francis thought of making a pretty little cabin, of which the
shell should form the roof. Fritz alone had not given his
opinion. “Well, my dear Fritz,” said I, “what use do you
intend making of your shell?” “Father,” replied he, “I will
make a basin, which I will place near the stream, where mamma
will always have fresh water for her use.” “Good!” cried I;
“this is a project of general utility, and which shall be executed
as soon as we have some clay.”

“Some clay!” cried James ; “I made a great heap of it this
morning under the roots of a neighbouring tree.” “So much
the better,” said I; “ but where did you get it?” “He brought it
from the hill,” replied my wife, “and soiled his clothes so much
that I was obliged to make a complete wash.” “It was not my
fault, mother,” replied the madcap; “the soil was so slippery that
I fell down, and it was in my fall that I discovered the clay.”
“That is another affair,” said the mother; “to hear you this
morning, I should have thought that you owed it less to
accident than to express research.”

“When the basin is fixed,” said Ernest, “I will steep in it
some roots which I found to-day, and which appear to be a kind
of radish or horse-radish. The plant resembles more a shrub
than a herb; I did not dare to taste it, though our sow had
eaten some without taking harm.” “You acted prudently, my
son. I cannot too often repeat to you all, that food which is
hurtful to man, may agree with certain animals. Show me
these roots, and tell me how you got them.” “As I was roam-
ing round,” replied he, “I saw the sow grubbing up the earth
near a bush; I approached, and found her devouring some large
roots, which I brought away.” When I had examined them
attentively—‘ If Iam not deceived,” said I, “you have made a
precious discovery, which joined to that of the potatoes, would
preserve us for ever from famine. I think these roots are those
of the cassava, with which, in the West Indies, they make a kind
of bread. But, to be employed for this use, these roots must
104 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

undergo a preparation which takes away a poisonous substance
which they contain.”

This conversation hindered us in unloading the sledge. I
then went with my children to fetch a second load before night-
fall. The mother remained in company with Francis, who did
not disdain the post of scullion, in which he had always some
little windfall, to prepare the supper. I told them, that to re-
compense our fatigue we relied on their treating us royally,
thanks to the flesh of the turtle.

During the journey, Fritz asked me if our turtle was not of
the precious kind, whose shell serves to make snuff-boxes, etc.,
and if it was not a pity to use it as a basin. I told him that
the turtle of which he spoke is named a tortoise, that its flesh
is not good to eat; and I told him what I knew of the means
employed to take away the superior part of the shell, which is
transparent and will receive a magnificent polish,

Arrived at the raft, the sledge was loaded with a number
of things; among others the hand-mill, which, because of
the discovery of the cassava, seemed to me of the greatest
utility,

When we arrived at Falcon’s Nest, I saw my wife come
towards me smiling. “You have had two days of painful
labour,” said she ; “I will, to strengthen you, offer you a drink
which you did not think to find here; come and see where this

beneficent spring is found.” I followed my wife, and perceived

at the foot of a small fig-tree, a barrel half-buried in the ground,
and covered with thick branches, “I picked that up to-day
along the shore,” said she. “Ernest thinks it is Canary wine ;
I hope it may be, for your sake.” I made a hole in the
cask, and by means of a piece of straw found that Ernest
was not deceived, Immediately a sweet warmth ran through
me.

Whilst I was thanking my wife, the children surrounded me,
begging me to let them taste this precious nectar. I permitted
them; but they were so eager, that I was obliged to stop them,
as I was afraid this generous wine would get in their heads. I
then ordered them to help me to lift on the tree, by means of
pulleys, the mattresses we had brought from the vessel. This
finished, my wife invited us to come to supper. Fritz’s turtle,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 105

well dressed, was enjoyed by all. “That was a very ugly beast,”
said little Francis, stretching himself on his mattress, and rub-
bing his eyes, “but it was jolly good, eh, James?” James was
already asleep; and our mattresses soon produced their effect
upon all of us,
CHAPTER XII.
THIRD VOYAGE TO THE VESSEL, THE PENGUINS.

THE two barques, which we had simply fastened to the shore,
causing me some uneasiness, I rose before the dawn to go
and visit them. All my family slept profoundly. I softly
descended: from the tree, and found the dogs awake; they
began gambolling around me, as if they understood that I
was going for a walk. The cock and hens, joyfully flapping
their wings, quitted their perch. The goats were already
browsing on the fresh grass, The ass, whom I was resolved
to take, was lazily stretched out. To his great displeasure,
I made him rise, and fastened him alone to the sledge,
not wishing to fatigue the cow before she had given her
milk; and accompanied by the two dogs, I went towards the —
coast.

I found my two barques in good condition, and left dry
by the tide, which was now low. I loaded our ass moderately,
to economise his strength, which would be required again in
the day, and in order that I might return the sooner to
Falcon’s Nest. What was my astonishment on arriving at
the tree, to find no one up, though the sun was already high!
I began to strike with a stick on the copper utensils, and
to produce a noise capable of making believe there was an
invasion of savages. I soon saw my wife’s head appear over
the gallery of the tree; she seemed quite confused at having
overslept herself. As I mounted up to her, “it is,” said she,
“the magic power of the mattresses, which has kept me so
long. Our poor children felt it also, for they can scarcely
open their eyes.” Indeed, the little sleepers. yawned, stretched,
and appeared little disposed te" quit the bed. “Up! up!”

IO!
“THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 107

cried I with a loud voice. “No idleness, dear lit:le ones.”
Fritz rose first. Ernest came after all the others, and his look
told how much he regretted his bed.

“Ts it possible,” said I, “that you are so lazy as not to
be up before little Francis!” “Oh!” he said, stretching out
his benumbed arms, “it is so agreeable to go to sleep again
when one has been awoke! I should like to be woke every
morning two hours before day, to feel the sweet sensation of
going to sleep again.” “What refinement of idleness!” cried I.
“If you give yourself up to indolence in this way, my poor
child, you will grow up a man without strength or courage.”
As soon as everybody had assembled, we breakfasted hastily,
and went to the shore to finish bringing away the things we
had left there.

Two journeys were made in a very short time, and as I
saw that the tide had nearly reached our boats, I resolved
to profit by it to take our barques to the Bay of Deliverance,
where they would be in greater safety than on the shore of
Falcon’s Nest.

I sent back my wife and her three young sons, and I
waited with Fritz in our tub-boat till the water floated it.
However, as Master James, who had waited on the shore,
regarded us with an envious eye, I consented to take him
with us. The waves soon surrounded us, and seduced by fine
weather, instead of directing the barques towards the Bay of
Deliverance, I went once more to the ship. But when we
arrived there, it was too late to undertake an important or
heavy load. We nevertheless went over the vessel in all
directions, to get a few things together, so as not to return
empty. I soon saw James drawing a wheelbarrow, and rejoic-
ing at being able for the future to transport heavy burdens
without fatigue. Fritz told me that he had discovered, enclosed
in a partition of planks, a dismounted pinnace, with all its
rigging and even two small cannons.

This news caused me great joy; I abandoned everything
to assure myself of the truth of this fact. Fritz was not
deceived; but I saw that we should have immense trouble
in getting it into the sea, so we put this off till another
day, and contented ourselves with carrying away some house-
108 THE SWISS. FAMILY ROBINSON.

hold utensils, such as boilers, iron dishes, plates, glasses, etc.
I added to these things some tobacco, a mill-stone, another
barrel of powder, and one of gun flints. James’s wheel-
barrow was not forgotten, and we also found several others,
which was a very agreeable discovery to us. We were then ~
obliged to embark hastily, so as not to be surprised on our
return by the land wind, which rose every evening.

Whilst we were rowing towards the coast, we perceived
standing on the shore a troop of little creatures, who appeared
to regard us with curiosity. “Are we in the country of the
pigmies?” said I to James, laughing. “Or in that of the
Lilliputians,” cried James. “I think,” said Fritz, “that we have
before us a regiment of birds, for I perceive their beaks and
wings.” “You are right, my child; they are penguins. These
birds, which are of the Booby genus, swim very well, but
nature has given them such short wings compared with the
size of their bodies, and claws so badly formed for walking,
that it is almost always easy to approach them when they
are on land. Besides, they are so indolent that even at the
approach of men they will scarcely move.”

When we were a few feet from the shore, James suddenly
jumped into the water, armed with one of our oars, and before
the penguins were aware of his arrival, he had reached and
knocked down several. The others soon disappeared. Those
who were only stunned by James’s aggression were tied together
and placed on the shore.

The day was too much advanced for us to undertake the
unloading of our boats. We only put on the wheelbarrows,
the penguins, the tobacco, and some kitchen utensils, and
returned to Falcon’s Nest, where our arrival caused great joy.
The mother was delighted at the discovery of the wheel-
barrows. The tobacco excited a few smiles, which I pre-
tended not to see; then every one examined the penguins, .
several of whom had recovered their senses. I tied them up
with our ducks and geese, to accustom them to the life of
the poultry-yard. Our vigilant housekeeper showed me, in her
turn, a good provision of potatoes and cassava roots, which
had been collected during my absence. Then little Francis
said, with an air of mystery, “Father, how surprised you


CAPTURING THE PENGUINS,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 10g

will be if we soon gather some maize, gourds, melons, and
oats! Mamma has planted some lower down.” “Little tell-
tale!” said my wife, “why have you betrayed me? I meant
to have surprised your father.” “I thank you for your
attention, my dear,” said I, embracing her; “but where have
you found all these seeds?” “In my enchanted bag!” replied
she, smiling, and looking at her sons, “Seeing you constantly
occupied with your eternal voyages to the vessel, I thought
you would not have time to make a kitchen garden, so I
did it myself. I chose the potato field, and it was only
necessary to substitute some of my seeds for each plant we
took out.”

I congratulated her on this excellent idea, and Fritz thought
to give her great pleasure by announcing the discovery of
the pinnace. But our sea voyages caused my dear wife too
much real alarm for her to rejoice that we should have the
means of attempting them anew; but we showed her that
as these voyages must be made, there was less danger
in making them in a proper vessel than in our tub-boat.
The night having come, I gave the signal for retiring, telling
my sons that they must be ready on the morrow to learn a
new trade.
CHAPTER XIIL
THE BAKEHOUSE.

As soon as they were awake, the children, thinking of my last
words the evening before, eagerly asked what was the new
trade I had promised to teach them. “The trade of baker,”
replied J. “But,” cried James, “we have no oven nor flour.”
“We will get the flour from our cassava roots,” said I; “as to
the oven, we will make it with the sheets of iron we brought .
yesterday from the ship.” !

As their astonished looks seemed to ask more ample details,
1 explained the properties of the cassava roots, and the use
which the savage people make of them. I then begged my
wife to make a sack with some sailcloth, whilst my sons with
graters, awaited my orders to enter on their functions. Our
roots had been carefully washed. I distributed several of
them to the boys, and showed them how to grate them. They -
began the work eagerly, not without laughing at their new
occupation, and we soon had a quantity of flour, which re-
sembled the saw-dust of soaked wood.

“Here we are in possession of a magnificent dish of bran,”
said Ernest, laughing, but without interrupting his work. “This
is the first time I have heard of making bread with radishes,”
said James. My wife herself seemed doubtful of my talent as a
baker; so she took care, after having finished the sack which I
asked her to make, to cook some potatoes, in case my trial did
not succeed, But I was not disconcerted. “Cease your jokes,
gentlemen,” said I, “for you will soon do justice to the cassava.
It constitutes the principal nourishment of several nations in
the new world; it is even preferred by some Europeans to
wheaten bread. However, I do not promise you very good |

cakes to-day; but I will give you some specimens, which will
Ilo
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. III

show you the nutritious properties of the cassava, if the sort we
have is good.” :

“Are there several kinds of cassava?” asked Ernest.
“There are three,” I replied. “The two first, eaten raw, are
very hurtful; the third is quite inoffensive. But the two
others are preferred, for they produce more, and ripen more
quickly.” “How!” cried James, “they prefer the poisonous
plant to the wholesome one; how foolish. I will not eat your
poisonous cakes.”

“Don’t be afraid, little coward,” said I, “for it is sufficient
to press our flour very strongly before using it.” “Why press
it?” asked Ernest. “To take away the poison which is found
in the juice; when this juice is extracted, there remains
only most wholesome and most esteemed food. However,
by way of precaution, we will not taste our cakes till after
trying them on the ape and the fowls.” “But,” cried James,
“Y should not like our poor Knips to be poisoned.” “ Fear
nothing,” said I, “it will not be the first time your ape has used
for us the particular instinct with which nature has endowed
him ; and I can affirm that if the food we give him contains any
poison, he will refuse to touch it, or at least will put it out of
his mouth.” 3

James, re-assured by my words, resumed his grater, which he
had let fall, and went on with his work. I soon judged that we
had sufficient. This damp flour was put into the sack, and we
tied it strongly at the top. To press it, I fixed some planks
under one of the roots of the tree. The sack of flour, placed on
this platform, was covered with another plank, on which I put
a lever, one end of which passed under the root, and I suspended
to the other end some stones, some pieces of iron, and other
heavy things. We soon saw the juice run out freely. When
the juice had ceased running, my children pressed me to
begin making the bread. I diminished their ardour a little by
telling them that we should only knead to-day a proof cake for
the fowls.

I spread the flour in the sun to dry it; I then took a
small quantity, which I mixed with water and kneaded care-
fully; then I made the paste into a biscuit, which I placed
on one of our plates of iron over a brisk fire. In a little
I12 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

time we had a cake whose.smell and colour promised a real
feast. It required all my authority to prevent my sons from
biting it.

When the cake was cold, I crumbled it before the ape and
fowls, and saw with pleasure that they devoured it eagerly.
However, I deferred till later trying it ourselves, and a good’
dinner of potatoes appeased our hunger.

After dinner we went to visit our fowls. To our great joy
they appeared well, and the gambols of Master Knips on
our approach proved that his health had suffered no alteration.
I then ordered them to begin the labours of the bakehouse.
“To work,” cried I, “and with courage!” I distributed to
each the utensils he needed. In an instant braziers were
lighted, kneading troughs fixed, cakes, kneaded in great
numbers and the most varied forms, were ranged on plates
of iron, then drawn from the fire when they appeared suffi- .
ciently baked and each began to bite the bread he had made.
It was found excellent, especially when steeped in milk.
Never since we had been on the island had we made so
excellent a meal.

The rest of the day was employed in transporting on our
wheelbarrows some things we had left on the boat.
CHAPTER XIV.
THE PINNACE.

THE Pinnace occupied me seriously, and I would not renounce
the project of taking it away. Though my wife was still
alarmed at our sea voyages, I persuaded her to let me take for
once my three eldest sons to the vessel, for I wanted. several
arms for the enterprise I meditated. After having promised
her to return the same evening, and furnished ourselves with an
ample provision of cassava and cooked potatoes, and with our
swimming belts in case of accidents, we departed.

As soon as we arrived at the ship, our first care was to take
every thing that seemed useful, so as not to return empty. The
pinnace was then examined. I saw with pleasure that each of
the parts was numbered, and that with patience it would be
possible to refit it. But the greatest difficulty was to get it from
the narrow space where it was enclosed, and launch it into the
sea, for we could not think of transporting to a larger dockyard
the enormous pieces which formed the principal frame; our
united strength would not be sufficient. I thought for a long
time, abandoning one project after another. At last, tired with
the uncertainty, I depended on Providence to extricate us
from this embarrassment, and called my sons to help me
demolish with hatchets the partition of planks which enclosed
the pinnace. The evening arrived before our labour was much
advanced, but the desire of possessing a convenient boat
sustained our ardour, and we promised ourselves to come and
finish it to-morrow.

Relying on our punctuality, my wife and Francis were
waiting for us on the coast. She told me that she had resolved
to quit peicons Nest, and remain at Zeltheim whilst we con-

113
II4 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

tinued our journeys to the vessel. I thanked her so much the
more, as I knew how she loved the first residence. The provi-
sions we had brought, namely, two barrels of salt butter, three
of flour, some sacks of rice, some corn, and several household
utensils, were deposited at her feet, and weleomed by her with
the greatest pleasure.

Our voyages to the vessel were to be repeated; they
could not last less than a week. We set off each morning
very early, to return only at sun-setting, and each evening a
joyous repast, followed by a long talk, made us forget the
fatigues of the day.

However, we succeeded in re-constructing the pinnace.
It was of light structure, and elegant aspect; it had at the
prow a small deck, and possessed a complete rigging. We
had tarred the exterior, and even fixed the two little cannons
behind the deck. Our little building charmed us by its shape;
but it was-immovable on its keel, and we did not know what
means to employ to make it pass from the vessel into the
sea. It was impossible to think of making an opening in the
thick sides of the ship, and yet we did not wish to lose the
fruit of so much trouble and labour. At last, thinking of an
extreme measure, I began to execute it without saying anything
to my sons.

I procured an iron mortar, like those they use in kitchens,
and a strong plank, and I began to fabricate a machine in
my own fashion. To the plank I fixed some iron hooks,
and made a groove, in which I introduced a gun match, long
enough to burn two hours. I put some powder in the mortar,
and covered it with the plank, whose iron hooks fell upon the
handles of the mortar. With some tar I stopped up all the
joints, and saw myself in possession of an enormous petard,
which must, by its explosion, open for the pinnace a way
into the sea. I suspended the mortar in the enclosure, which
contained our little building. When all seemed conveniently
placed, I lighted the match, and hastily embarked with my
sons, without having communicated to them my project, which
I feared would fail.

On arriving at Zeltheim, whilst we were unloading the
things we had brought, we heard a frightful explosion. My
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. II5

wife and sons looked at each other with surprise. “It is the
signal of a vessel in distress,” said Fritz; “let us run to their
assistance.” “No,” said the mother, “the sound comes from
the ship; you have undoubtedly left some fire, which has
reached a barrel of powder.”

I appeared to be of her opinion, and proposed to my sons to
return immediately to the vessel, to ascertain the fact. They
all three jumped into the tub-boat, and curiosity doubling
their strength, they rowed so well, that in a little time we were
at the end of our voyage. I remarked with pleasure that there
was neither flame nor smoke on the ship, which we rowed
round before boarding it.

Arrived in front of an immense opening, the pinnace
appeared to us lying a little on its side, but in good condition;
all around the sea was covered with wreck, and my sons, whom
this spectacle grieved, could not comprehend the joy I mani-
fested. “Victory!” cried I, “the pinnace is ours.” I then
explained to them the means I had used. Their satisfaction
was as great as mine, and they were in ecstacies at my happy
idea. By the help of the crow-bar we made the pinnace glide
over the rollers we had placed under the keel, and uniting our
strength we succeeded in launching it into the sea, where
we had at last the satisfaction of seeing it balance itself
gracefully.

The sight of this little vessel, with its two cannons, its pro-
vision of powder, guns, and pistols, awoke in my sons warlike
ideas. They flattered themselves already that they could defy
and exterminate any savages who might attack us. I told them,
however, that we ought to thank God if we were not put to the
necessity of employing our military strength.

It was necessary to rig our little ship, and furnish it with its
masts and sails; but as the day was too much advanced for this
work, it might be adjourned. Every one agreed, besides, to
say nothing to the mother, whom we wished to surprise by a
triumphal entry into the Bay of Deliverance.

It still required two days to furnish the pinnace with every
thing that was necessary. When all was, at last, finished I gave
the signal for departure.

I held the rudder; Ernest and James were placed beside the
116 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

cannons, which they wished to fire, to announce their arrival ;
Fritz managed the sails. A favourable wind impelled us towards
the land. Our pinnace glided over the water with great rapidity,
drawing the tub-boat, which we had fastened on behind. When
we were at a short distance from land, Fritz, who had reserved
the command, cried out to the cannoneers: “No. 1, fire! No. 2,
fire!” An instant after the rocks resounded the echo of a
double discharge. Fritz, at the same time, discharged his two
pistols, and we uttered joyful hurrahs,

Soon we reached the shore, where my wife and her young son
awaited us. Our cannonade had frightened them, and the sight
of our boat had caused them the greatest surprise. They ran to
meet us.

“Welcome,” said my wife; “but do not for the future frighten
me so much; your artillery terrified us. God knows where I
should have gone to hide little Francis, if I had not heard your
cries almost as soon as your cannons. Well, yes, I own your
little vessel is very pretty; it appears solid and convenient, and
I think even I could, if it were necessary, board it and venture
on the sea, which, however, still frightens me.” “Oh, mother,”
said Fritz, “come into the pinnace, I pray you, if it is only for
an instant. We have given it your name, Zhe Elzabeth! See!
over the cabin.” My wife thanked us for this attention, and
we all walked over the pinnace, to the great joy of the
children, delighted at having conquered their mother’s uneasi-
ness.

When the landing was over: “Do not think,” said my wife,
“that we have been idle whilst you were in the vessel. Our
labours have not less value, though we could not, like you,
announce them with cannon. Follow me, and you shall judge
of the truth of my words.” Saying this, she conducted us to
where Jackal River forms a cascade. There we saw a kitchen
garden perfectly laid out. “There is our work,” said she. “ Here
I have planted potatoes; there cassava roots; on this side
lettuces ; and I have left farther off a place for sugar canes. I
have sown, besides, some seeds of melons, some cabbages, some
peas, some beans, Round each plantation I have taken care to
put some seeds of maize, so that their stalks may shade the
young plants from the sun.”
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 117

I congratulated my wife on her happy idea and her activity,
and did not forget to praise Francis. “I could never have
believed that, with the help of Francis alone, you could have
done so much,” said I. “I did not hope to succeed so well,”
replied my wife; “therefore I told you nothing of my project.
At all events, 1am happy in being able to give you surprise
for surprise. I only regret one thing, that is, having neglected
my journeys to Falcon’s Nest, where our European plants must
be in a bad condition. I beg’ you will go there as soon as
possible.”

I promised her to go the next day. The pinnace was un-
loaded, and fixed on the shore by means of an anchor; then, as
nothing detained us at Zeltheim, we took the road to Falcon’s
Nest, where my wife had only been two or three times’ neues
the ten days, to give food to our animals,
CHAPTER XV.
A WALK. THE WIZARD OF THE TREE. THE WILD HOG.

THE next day was Sunday. This day was set apart for
prayer, reading, pious instructions, and bodily exercises, of
which my sons were very fond. I gave them this day a
lesson in gymnastics, and taught them to climb a hanging
cord, in preparation for manoeuvring the pinnace.

Whilst they were making trials of strength and skill, I
fastened two leaden balls to the two extremities of a long
cord. Ernest, who was the first to perceive it, asked what
it was for. “My dear,” replied I, “J am trying to make a
weapon similar to that which is so formidable in the hands
of the South Americans. I mean the lasso, which the Mexican
and Patagonian hunters use. These intrepid men mount
bare-backed on a swift horse. When they perceive the animal
they wish to catch, they spur on, and passing it at a gallop,
lance the lasso with all their strength, which they have first
tnrned rapidly round their head. The ropes extended, meet-
ing an obstacle, roll together quickly by the weight of the
balls. Thus buffaloes, wild horses, and other strong animals
are stopped suddenly in their course by this singular
weapon, and fall, with legs fettered, into the power of the
hunters.”

The idea of such a hunt pleased greatly the adventurous
spirit of my eldest sons; they begged me to make trial
of the new weapon against a small trunk of a tree close
at hand. My first blow was a masterly one; the cord rolled
so well round the tree that my children not only believed
in the skill of the American hunters, but promised them-
selves to acquire it. Fritz peesn to try it immediately, and,

II
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. TIg

thanks to his particular aptitude, he was soon able to teach
his brothers.

The next day my wife made me go over our domain,
where, thanks to her, many improvements had been made
during our absence. She showed me in our barrels a great
number of thrushes and ortolans, which she had taken in
the snare, and then roasted and placed in butter. Our pigeons,
' who had made their nests in the top branches of our tree,
were preparing to lay. As to the shrubs, I found them so
dry that I was afraid we should lose them, if we did not put
them in the ground at once. The rest of the day was passed
in this work, and before evening all our European vegetables
were properly planted.

The next day, early, all the little colony was on foot,
for I had announced a family walk to the Calibash Wood,
whence we must fetch a fresh stock of vessels. We went by
Flamingo March, behind which we found a plain, the splendour
of which we were never tired of admiring. Fritz, the inde-
fatigable hunter, had strayed from the troop, taking Turk
with him. The high grass hid them both, but we soon heard
the dog bark and a gun-shot, and we saw a large bird fall
heavily to the ground. But this bird, who was only wounded,
ran away. Turk pursued him, Fritz inciting the dog by
voice and gesture. Belle could not remain indifferent. With
a side bound she threw off the ape, who rolled on the ground,
then she sprang into the thicket, seized the fugitive by one
wing, and held him till Fritz came up. But the animal was
not so easily taken as the flamingo; its strong claws, striking
right and left, frightened the young hunter. Turk, who had
ventured near, received such a vigorous blow on the nose, that
he dared not return to the charge. Fritz called me; I ran
as quickly as the weight of my baggage and the high grass
permitted me. Seizing a favourable moment, I threw my
handkerchief over the animal’s head, who, finding himself
blinded, almost immediately ceased to fight. I tied the wings
and claws of the prisoner with a string I had in my pocket.
Then we returned with our capture to our companions, who
awaited us on the border of the marsh.

“It is a bustard goose,” said our little naturalist, after
I20 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

having examined the animal. “A goose!” replied Fritz,
shrugging his shoulders, “a goose! you see that its feet
have no membranes.” “You decide too hastily, my dear
Fritz,” said I, “Ernest is right; it is the bustard, or rather
the slow-goose, so named because of the shortness of its
wings. Among other signs which help me to know it, I
remark particularly the feet without thumbs, and composed
of only three fingers all pointed forward, and if I may judge

by the absence of beard, it is a female.” “Then,” said James,
“it is probably the same we saw rise before, and which we
did not fire at. Do you remember, mother?” “In. that

case,” cried my wife, “I must ask you to let it go, for it
would be painful to think that its natural protection should
be wanted for its little ones, who, when we were here before,
had apparently just left the nest.” “Be satisfied, my dear,”
said I, “about the fate of these little orphans. During
the three weeks that had passed they have learnt to shift
for themselves. As to the mother, whom we have taken,
we will endeavour to domesticate her, if she can be cured
of her wound, and this will be a new source of riches for
our poultry-yard.”

After having tied the goose on the sledge, we resumed our
walk to the Wood of Apes. Arrived there, Fritz related gaily
to his brothers how, at our first visit, the apes had provided us
with cocoa-nuts. Ernest, who had wandered from the troop,
was contemplating the gigantic cocoa-nut trees, loaded with
magnificent nuts. Stopping at some distance from him, I was
amused at seeing on the boy’s face the admiration which he
felt at sight of these prodigies of nature, and the desire of
enjoying the fine fruit which hung from the branches. “You
would like,” said I, “these fine nuts to fall into your mouth?”
“Certainly not,” said he, turning; “I should run great risk of
having my teeth broken.” He was speaking thus, when a
nut fell at his feet. He jumped back; at the same instant
another nut rolled towards me and soon after a third.

“This is like fairy tales,” said the little doctor; “a wish
gratified as soon as made.” “We might believe so; but I
suppose that the enchanter perched in the tree rather in-
tends to drive us away than to accomplish our desires,”
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 121

Whatever it might be, Ernest and I picked up the nuts,
which to judge by their weight must be very full. “The
wizard of the tree would be very kind,” said James, “if he
would send some nuts to little Francis and me.” Then two
nuts fell from the tree. “Father,” cried Fritz, “I see the
sorcerer. It is a horrible beast, of a round form, armed
-with two frightful claws; there he is ready to descend the
trunk.” The strange animal, planting its claws in the bark
of the tree, descended rapidly. When he was only a few
steps from the ground, James went to him and_ struck
with all his strength, but the blow hit the tree and not the
beast, who, falling to the ground, marched bravely against
the aggressor. James struck again, but without success,
for his adversary skilfully avoided the blow. Angry at his
failure, James beat a retreat. His brothers laughed at him,
but the little rogue had his own plan. We saw him, still
running, throw down his gun and game bag, then take off
his waistcoat; then stopping suddenly, he awaited the
animal, upon whom he threw himself, and covered him with
his clothes. “Ah! wicked dragon,” cried he, wrapping him
up as well as he could, “I will teach you to show your
claws in that threatening manner.” Our little fellow looked
so pleasantly heroic, that we could not help laughing at the
efforts he made to master the animal. I went to his aid,
and after some blows with the back of my hatchet on his
waistcoat, I thought that the enemy must be conquered. I
was not deceived; but though dead, he still looked very
formidable.

“What do you call that horrid beast?” asked James.
“Tt is,’ replied I, “the cocoa crab. I doubt if you could
have succeeded in overcoming your antagonist without that
lucky thought, for the cocoa crab has as much courage as
cunning, and he may be a dangerous adversary for a child.”

After having refreshed ourselves with the milk of some
nuts, we placed those which remained, as well as the crab,
on the sledge, and resumed our march. We advanced slowly,
for, as we penetrated into the depths of the wood, the
brambles encumbered the road more and more, so that we
were obliged to use our hatchets, Ernest, with his usual
122 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

observation, remarked that from several stalks which we cut
there ran clear water, which he tasted and found as good
as the best spring water. The other children went to the
stalks, which they sucked hard, without obtaining as much
water as they desired. I reminded them of. the means
employed to fsuck sugar-canes. They immediately made
with their knives some incisions in the stalks, so that the
air might make the liquid flow, and their thirst was soon
satisfied.

After-a few minutes’ walk we reached the Wood of
Calibashes, and halted in the same place were Fritz and I
had before taken such agreeable repose. Having gathered
a great quantity of gourds, we began to fashion them for
different uses. After having shown my children how to
make vases for milk, and forms to drain cheeses, I con-
structed a pretty egg basket for our housekeeper. The plates
and porringers were not forgotten. We even made for our
fowls and pigeons some pretty nests, and Francis was sorry
he was not small enough to have a similar cradle.

While working at these different things, Ernest and James
had formed the project of cooking the crab in the fashion ot
the savages, that is to say, by warming the water with red-
hot stones. They made an enormous gourd in the shape ot
a stewpan. But when they kindled the fire to heat the
stones, they found that they wanted water. As I told them
that I-recollected having seen a spring somewhere near, they
each ran in a different direction to try and find it. Scarcely
had they disappeared, when we heard Ernest call out loudly,
“A wild hog! a wild hog! perhaps a wild boar!” I rose and
ran to where I perceived my little scholar, who was hastily
returning. I soon saw the animal running rapidly through a
thicket. I sent the dogs after him, who departed barking.
“It was there, father,’ said Ernest, “that I found this terrible
beast, making dreadful gruntings.” I perceived, in the place
he showed me, some roots scattered over the freshly moved
earth.

The noise which the dogs now made, shewed me that
they had attacked the animal. I left Ernest to examine the
roots at leisure, and went to the place of combat, where Fritz
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 123

rejoined me. We advanced cautiously, our fingers on the
triggers of our guns; but what was our surprise and laughter,
when, in the animal the dogs were holding, we recognised
our sow, who, delivered from her noisy adversaries, walked
quietly back, behind us.

On our return to Ernest, we joked him well for the fright
which the sight of this terrible animal had given him, and
our jests would have lasted longer, if our attention had not
been drawn to some little apples he had just found on the
ground. Fritz feared that they might be the fruit of the
manchineel tree, of which I had warned them. But as the
sow had eaten this fruit, I would not condemn it till master
Knips had tested it, so I carried some to submit them to his
judgment.

We were preparing to rejoin my wife, who was left with
Francis in the Calibash Wood, when we heard James cry out,
running towards us, “Papa! papa! a crocodile, a crocodile.”
“A crocodile!” replied I, laughing; “a crocodile in a place
where we cannot find a drop of water!” “I assure you,
father,” replied the child, “it is a crocodile; I saw him down
there, sleeping on a rock, in the sun.”

More and more convinced that my boy was deceived, I
went with Fritz to the place pointed out, and soon saw that
what he had taken for a crocodile was nothing more than
a sort of large green lizard, called the iguana, which, though
of large dimensions, is only dangerous when irritated, and its
flesh is much esteemed by the Indians.

Fritz was preparing to fire. “You are in too great a
hurry,” said I, holding his arm; “the iguana is very strong
lived; you might miss your aim and make the animal run
away; I think we may succeed in catching it, by taking
advantage of its sleep.” I cut a switch in the bush, to the
end of which I tied a string with a running knot, and held
it in my left hand; then I took a little whistle in the other
hand, and approached the lizard cautiously. When I was a
short distance from him, I began, to the great astonishment
of the children, to whistle one of our country airs. The
iguana woke, looked round him with an astonished air, and
appeared to listen eagerly; I continued to whistle, and
124 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

though my music was not very harmonious, I soon saw the
animal plunged in a sort of ecstacy. I took advantage of
this to pass round his neck the running knot. I drew it
quickly towards me, and was soon master of our new game.

My sons uttered a cry of triumph, wondering at the
means I had employed to catch the iguana. I owned that I
had only put in practice a method much used in the West
Indies. As we did. not wish to leave our game, I put the
iguana on my back, James, to help me, held his tail. To see
me walking thus, they might have taken me for an oriental
prince, followed by one of his pages carrying the end of his
emerald-broidered mantle.

My wife, whom we had left alone with Francis, began to
be uneasy at our absence; she scolded a little, and was
astonished at seeing us return without water; but the sight
of the iguana was sufficient to justify us. When we had told
her about our hunting, she said that during our absence the
newly-discovered apples had excited the gluttony of master
Knips, and that she had seen him steal them and crunch
them with avidity. I presented one to our bustard, whom we
had tied to a trunk of a tree; she devoured it eagerly. I
was then convinced that there was no danger in eating them.
They were found excellent, and I believed we had discovered
the guava, of which the West Indians are very fond. But
this food was not of a nature to satisfy our appetites, which
exercise had greatly increased; so we had recourse to the
provisions we had brought from Falcon’s Nest, for it was too
late to think of cooking James’s crab.

A little strengthened, we returned, and on our arrival at
Falcon’s Nest the mother began to cook on the fire which
Francis hastened to kindle, a piece of iguana and some
potatoes. The flesh of the iguana appeared to merit fully the
reputation for excellent eating it had received.
CHAPTER XVI.

THE HEATH-COCK. WAX. THE PARROT’S NEST.
THE INDIA-RUBBER TREE.

THE next day I set off with Fritz, under pretence of going
to fetch the rest of our vessels, but in reality to make an
excursion to the chain of rocks, and endeavour to find out
the extent of the land on which we had been thrown.
Besides the dogs, the donkey alone accompanied us,

Arrived at a wood of green oaks, our sow appeared. She’
was tranquilly stretched under the trees, making a copious
breakfast of acorns; we did not disturb her. The wood was
full of birds; Fritz fired and brought down a tufted jay and
two parrots, one of which was of a magnificent red colour.
But whilst the young man was loading again, we heard a
noise similar to the roll of a drum. We thought it was
perhaps the military music of some band of savages; full of
fright, we glided behind a thick bush, and advancing softly,
we soon knew the cause of these strange sounds. On a
trunk of an overturned tree was a superb heath-cock, exe-
cuting the most singular evolutions one can imagine, before
a score of pullets, who seemed to take great pleasure in the
spectacle.

Sometimes he turned round, erecting his necklace of
feathers, which made, round his neck, a brilliant crown;
sometimes he extended his tail like a fan, beat his wings,
and uttered strange cries. I was curious to know how this
exhibition would terminate, when with a shot Fritz extended
the cock on the sand, and dispersed the females. I scolded

him severely for his immoderate ardour, “Why,” said I,
125
126 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

“this rage for death and destruction? Is not the sight of
living nature a thousand times better than this sad
spectacle?” Fritz appeared sincerely to regret his hurry, and
became sad and pensive. To restore his good humour, I
told him to pick up his prey and offer it to his mother. The
cock was placed on the back of the ass, and we returned to
the Wood of Calibashes, where we found all the things we
had left in good condition. It was yet early, and we had
time for the projected excursion to the part of the island
which was unknown to us.

The road was difficult, because of the high grass and
roots which encumbered it. From time to time we came to
little streams, where we could quench our thirst. There grew
in abundance potatoes and cassava. AQ little farther, I re-
marked in a thicket some shrubs, whose berries were covered
with wax, which stuck to our fingers when we tried to gather
them. I knew that there existed in America a kind of shrub,
which botanists name myrica cerifera, or wax-bearer; I did
not doubt that this was it, and was much rejoiced. Fritz,
who noticed my joy, asked of what use these berries were;
I told him that wax was extracted from them, which burnt
as well as that of bees, and which has besides a very agree-
able smell. We collected a good stock of it, which we put
in a bag on our ass’s back.

A little farther on, a singular spectacle excited our curi-
osity. This was a colony of birds, of the shape of our Euro-
pean greenfinches, and covered with a brown and white
plumage. They lived together and inhabited the same nest,
placed on an isolated tree, and skilfully woven. This nest,
which seemed to serve as a refuge to a great number of
families, appeared to be surmounted by a kind of roof made
with rushes and roots interleaved. On the sides we saw
several openings, forming the doors and windows of each
particular cell. The whole resembled an enormous sponge.
A crowd of birds went in and out without being alarmed at
our presence, Whilst we were examining this strange colony,
we perceived several small parrots flying here and there, and
quarrelling with the colonists, with whom they appeared to
dispute the entry of their cells, Fritz, desirous of taking
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 127

some of these birds, put down his gun, and mounted the
tree; arrived at the nest, he passed his hand into the hole
of a cell, and endeavoured to take away the covering which
he found there; but he felt himself pinched so strongly, that
he uttered a loud cry, and pulled his hand out, shaking it.
However, he would not renounce his capture. As soon as
the pain was a little abated, he penetrated with caution into
the cell, and drew out a bird, which he enclosed in his waist-
coat ; then sliding down the trunk, he reached me safe and
sound, and proceeded to examine his little prisoner. It was
a paroquet, with green plumage. Fritz asked me to let him
take it home, and bring it up, and teach it to speak. I con-
sented willingly. According to probability, the nest belonged
to the paroquets, and the birds we had first remarked were
intruders, who tried to take it away from them. Hence the
little combat we had witnessed.

Fritz was delighted at the instinct of the birds inhabiting
a common abode, “We find,” said I, “many classes of build-
ing animals who associate in this way, such as bees, ants,
beavers, and many others.”

This led us to speak of the facts concerning gregarious
animals which naturalists have collected and recorded: we
recalled the ingenious labours of the beavers; the not less
wonderful architecture of bees, hornets, and ants; nor did
I forget to mention the details related by travellers of the
huge ant-hills of America, with their solid and artistically
constructed ramparts, which frequently resemble an oven
in shape.

While talking, we arrived on the borders of a wood which
we did not yet know. The trees resembled wild fig-trees,
and grew to a great height. Fritz remarked that the bark
was covered with a kind of resin which hardened in the air:
he took a small quantity, which he rubbed between his
fingers. When he saw that it softened and distended with
the heat, and that he could only bend, without breaking it,
he came to me, crying out: “Indeed, father, I think I have
discovered the india-rubber tree!” “Well,” said I, “that
will be a great treasure to us.”

Having examined the gum myself, I saw that Fritz was
- 128 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

not deceived; and as he asked me what use the india-rubber
would be, I told him that, amongst other things, we could
make excellent shoes with it. “The india-rubber,” said I,
“falling drop by drop, as you see, from the trees, is collected
in vases; whilst it is still liquid, little earthen bottles are
covered with it and dried by smoke, whence the india-rubber
obtains the black colour which we know; the bottles which
have served as moulds are then broken, the pieces are taken
out from the neck, and there remains only a thin, flexible ~
flagon. This is almost the same method I should employ
in making shoes, We will fill a pair of stockings with sand,
cover them with india-rubber, and we shall have some solid,
impervious boots.”

Rejoiced at our discovery, and shod already in imagina-
tion with our boots, we went on our way. A new wood of
cocoa-nut trees was before us. “Let us make a halt here,”
said I to Fritz. Observing attentively the trees which were
round us, I remarked some which I thought were sago trees.
Not only did I see in the trunk of one of these trees, which
the wind had broken, that succulent marrow, which they sell
in Europe under the name of sago, but still more to confirm
my opinion, the large white worms which the inhabitants of
the West Indies seek for, as a delicious meat, and the value
of which I was determined to try. I took some of these
worms, which I placed on two little wooden forks over the
fire we had lighted. Fritz declared at first that he would
not touch them, but my broil soon emitted such a pleasant
odour that the appetite of the young man was excited, and
he was the first to regale himself with this food which he
had so disdained.

After this repast, our road offered nothing worthy of
remark. There was everywhere a luxuriant but uniform
vegetation. At last we returned to the Calibash Wood; our
donkey was fastened to the sledge, and by evening we
arrived at Falcon’s Nest, where our family were beginning
to be uneasy at our absence. The recital of our excursion
was the subject of the evening’s conversation. But what
excited most delight among the young folks was the paro-
quet ; each wished to be his. teacher, but Fritz declared that
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 129

he should take upon himself the sole charge of the new
comer.

As to the mother, she was delighted at the discovery of
the india-rubber and wax berries, which gave her the hope
of having wax-lights at her disposal. I promised that I
would try and make some the next day.

ee
CHAPTER XVII.

WAX-LIGHTS. BUTTER. PLANTATIONS. LAST VOYAGE TO
THE VESSEL. PALM WINE. THE BUFFALOES.

As soon as we woke, my family left me no rest till I had
fulfilled my promise. I endeavoured to recall what I knew
of the art of wax-making, and began my work. I boiled the
berries in a saucepan of water. The green wax soon showed
itself on the surface of the liquid. I collected it into vases,
which I left near the fire, to prevent the wax from congealing,
When my wife had finished the wicks which she pre-
pared with threads of sail-cloth, I steeped them in the wax,
and suspended them in the air, to let them dry. By doing
this several times, we obtained some wax-lights, which had,
indeed, neither the polish nor roundness of those which are
made in moulds, but whose light, though not very brilliant,
saved us from the melancholy necessity of going to bed at
the close of day.

This first success encouraged us to put in execution
another project, which, if successful, would delight our house-
keeper.

It grieved my wife to lose the cream which was formed on
her pots of milk, and which she would have converted into
butter if she had had a churn. To supply this utensil I took
one of our large gourd bottles, filled it with three quarts of cream,
sealed it hermetically, then I placed it on a piece of linen,
whose four ends were attached to some stakes. I told my
sons to shake the linen well; and this occupation appeared
so amusing, that they made a recreation of it. At the end

of an hour I opened the gourd, and found a small mass of
130
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON, I3I

excellent butter. My wife did not know how to express her
delight, and the boys, who always welcomed a fresh luxury,
were as pleased as she was,

The success of these different trials gave me boldness to
undertake a longer and more difficult labour than any I
had done before. This was to make a little carriage to replace
the sledge, which our animals might draw more easily. I
thought I had examined all sorts of carriages in Europe,
sufficiently to make a simple car; but when it was necessary
to make the wheels, and fix the planks, I was greatly em-
barrassed. The most humble trade demands an apprentice-
ship, study, and a sort of special talent, which we do not
always make proper use of.

At last, after many efforts and many trials, I had a cart
on two wheels, heavy and ugly, I own, but which was of
great use to us in transporting our goods.

Whilst I was busy with these labours, my wife and sons
did not remain idle. They had transplanted our European
trees into the most convenient places. The vine shoots
were set under large trees, whose thick foliage would protect
them from the heat of the sun. A row of chestnut trees,
walnut trees, and cherry trees, bordered the road which led
to Jackal Stream.

We took particular care to embellish Zeltheim. All
those trees which could stand great heat, such as lemon trees,
citron trees, pistachio trees, mulberry trees, and almond trees,
were planted there; thus transforming this arid place into
an agreeable retreat. We made it more of a refuge in case
of danger, by surrounding it with a large hedge of prickly
plants, to shelter it from the attacks of ferocious beasts.

All these arrangements had not taken less than six weeks,
during which we had not omitted to celebrate the Sundays.
I admired the indefatigable ardour of my sons, who after six
days’ painful work found strength enough for their body
exercises, in which they became remarkably skilful.

However, the deplorable condition of our clothes rendered
a voyage to the vessel indispensable, as there still remained
in it some chests of linen and clothes. I persuaded my wife
to let us make this voyage. The first calm day, the pinnace
132 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

took us to the ship. It was very much damaged by the wind
and the fury of the last storm; the chests of clothes and
ammunition had suffered greatly. We loaded our boat with
every thing that could be useful to us, such as kitchen utensils,
arms of all kinds, among others a battery of four pieces ; then,
after taking away, in several successive voyages, all which
could be valuable to us, I resolved to break up the hull
of the ship, to procure the beams and planks, which the
wind would drive on shore. For this purpose I rolled behind
the keel of the vessel a barrel of powder, in which I made
a little opening. At the moment of departure, I put into
it, by the help of a stick, a long lighted match, and we rowed
away as fast as we could,

As soon as we arrived at Zeltheim, I proposed to my wife
to carry our supper to a point of land whence we could
see the vessel, She consented. We had scarcely been an
hour on the coast, when darkness, which in these countries
succeeds daylight without twilight, entirely enveloped us.
Suddenly a terrible explosion was heard, and a large column
of fire, which rose from the sea to the clouds, announced the
complete destruction of our ship. This was the last tie that
united us to Europe; henceforward there was placed between
us and our country an unfathomable abyss. This thought
changed the joyful cries for which my sons were prepared,
into sighs and sobs, which I had some trouble to stifle.

We returned very melancholy to Zeltheim; but the night’s
rest effaced a little these painful impressions. We were on
foot early, and went down to the coast, where a quantity of
wreck was floating about, among which I saw with pleasure
some large barrels, to which I had fastened some copper
cauldrons which I could not put on the pinnace, and which I
wanted to refine some sugar. For several days we were
busy in picking up the wreck which the wind drove to land.
My wife, whilst we were occupied on the shore, discovered
that two of our ducks and one of our geese had hatched a
numerous family of young ones, whose prettiness made her
remember and regret her feathered family at Falcon’s Nest.
Each of us wished to go there, so I agreed to do so the
next day,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 133

On the road, Ernest remarked that the young trees planted
in the avenue leading to Falcon’s Nest were not strong enough
to support themselves alone; so we agreed to make a journey
to the Cape of Disappointment, and bring back some bamboo
canes to make props for them. Our wax-lights were also
diminished, and we wished to get a fresh stock of wax-
balls. Each of the boys found a pretext for going on this
expedition, which I willingly consented to transform into a
pleasure party.

The next day the weather was magnificent, the air pure
and fresh, and all the colony set forth. Some planks were
placed on the car to make seats for the younger boys. We
were plentifully provided with food, and a bottle of excellent
wine from the captain’s chest.

After having crossed the wood of palm trees, and the
Cape of Disappointment, our road led us suddenly into the
most delightful country you can imagine. We had on our
left fields of sugar-cane, on our right bamboos and palm
trees, in front of us the open sea. This charming site pleased
us so much, that we had some idea of abandoning Falcon’s
Nest, and fixing our abode in this paradise, but habit had
already attached our ancient abode to us, and besides we
knew that it was a safe one. We unharnessed our beasts to
let them graze at liberty on the thick grass which grew in
the shade of the palm trees; then we divided, some to gather
bamboos, others sugar-canes, But this labour excited the
appetite of the young people, who came to ask their mother
to give them the provisions destined for supper. The prudent
housekeeper was not quite of their opinion, and told them to
search for something to satisfy their hunger. They then
looked anxiously at the high palm trees, whence hung mag-
nificent nuts; but unless they had been squirrels, how could
they reach such a height? I relieved their embarrassment
by tying round their bodies pieces of shark skin, which would
help their ascent. I taught them also to help themselves by
a knot of cord passed round the trunk, which would give
them the means of resting when they felt fatigued. This
method succeeded beyond my hopes; the young people
reached the summit of the palm trees. With the hatchets
134 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

which they carried in their belts, they knocked down a
quantity of fresh nuts, with which we all regaled ourselves,
without encroaching on our evening provisions.

Fritz and James were proud of their prowess, and rallied
Ernest on his idleness during the great ascent. “Gentlemen
and ladies,” said he, “it is true that I have little taste for
perilous adventures, but I am, on occasion, as courageous as
any other. I hope to make you a present more agreeable
than my brother’s cocoa-nuts, if you will wait a few moments.”
After a grotesque bow, he approached a high palm tree.
“Bravo, bravo, my dear Ernest,” cried I, “the sentiment of
emulation which animates you is worthy of praise.”

I offered him the same assistance as his brothers, and re-
commended him to act prudently. But the young man sprang
nimbly to the palm tree he had chosen, and with an agility
which I did not expect from him, climbed to its summit.
Fritz and James, who did not perceive any fruit on that tree,
began to laugh; but our naturalist, without replying, cut the
upper part of the tree, which fell at our feet. “Oh, the
naughty boy!” cried his mother; “in his anger at not finding
‘cocoa-nuts he has cut off the head of a superb palm tree,
which will now perish.” “Don’t be angry, mother,” said
Ernest from the top of his tree, “for what I send you is a
palm-cabbage, much preferable to the cocoa-nut.” “ Ernest
is perfectly right,” said I; “the palm-cabbage is very delicious,
and much sought after in the Indies, and our naturalist de-
serves admiration rather than the sarcasms which certain
gentlemen have bestowed on him.”

The day was advanced, and as we had resolved to pass
the night in this charming place, we busied ourselves in
erecting a hut of branches to shelter us from the dews of
night. Whilst we were busy at this work, our ass, who
had been browsing tranquilly on the grass at the foot of a
tree, suddenly began uttering formidable hee-haws! then setting
off in a gallop, he disappeared.

We ran after him, but without being able to find him.
We returned quite saddened. This sudden disappearance
made us doubly uneasy. We had lost a useful animal, and
I thought he must have been frightened by the neighbour-
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON, 135

hood of some ferocious animal, This fear made us kindle
great fires round the hut. The night was serene; my family
stretched themselves on beds of moss; as for me, I watched
over their safety till daybreak, when I took a short repose.

In the morning I thought I would go and seek our ass.
I took James with me, leaving the two eldest to watch over
the safety of their mother and Francis. After half-an-hour’s
walk round about, I recognised traces of the donkey’s shoes,
which, a little farther off, appeared to mingle with other
larger prints. These indications conducted us to an immense
plain, extending beyond our sight. In the distance we per-
ceived troops of animals, which seemed to be about the size
of horses. I thought that our ass might be among them,
and went that way. In the marshy land we had to cross,
we saw reeds of prodigious height and thickness; I doubted
not that this was the giant reed of America, which is not less
than thirty or forty feet in height.

Coming out of this covered marsh, we were not more than
a hundred steps: from the animals, which I then saw were
buffaloes. I knew how ferocious these animals are, so not
being able to overcome my terror, I threw on my son a look
of anxiety. I did not even think of loading my gun, so
much did this sight upset me. There was no means of flight;
the buffaloes were there in front of us, regarding us, however,
with more surprise than anger, for, without doubt, we were
the first men they had ever seen. Suddenly, our dogs, who
had remained behind, came up barking. Our efforts to re-
strain them were vain; on perceiving the buffaloes, they ran
into the midst of the troop. The combat became terrible;
the buffaloes ran here and there, uttering horrible roarings,
beating the ground with their feet, butting with their horns,
and throwing themselves with fury on our dogs, who would
not be intimidated, and clung to the ears of their adversaries.
We had had time to load our arms and retreat a few steps.
Soon, our dogs, who were both hanging to the ears of a
young buffalo, approached us, dragging the animal, who bel-
lowed in a frightful manner. His mother, furious, came to
his assistance, and we saw her try to rip one of our dogs with
her horns, when James, at a sign I made him, stopped the
136 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

attempt with his gun. At this noise the frightened troop
rapidly took flight. In an instant they were all out of sight,
and we only heard their bellowing at a distance.

Our brave dogs had not let go the young buffalo, The
mother, on whom I had also fired, and who was struck with
two balls, had rolled in the dust. Delivered from an im-
minent peril, I breathed more freely, and I congratulated
James on the courage he had shown.

However, we had still to master the young buffalo, who was

beating about against the dogs; I wanted to take him away
alive, to replace our ass. James thought of using his lasso;
he threw it so skilfully that the animal, tied by the hind
legs, fell down. I immediately ran, took away the dogs,
and replaced the lasso by shackles. But it was not an
easy thing to make him follow us. At last I had recourse
to a cruel but safe means. Whilst the young buffalo had
his legs firmly tied, and the dogs held his ears, I pierced
his nostrils with the point of my knife, and passed a cord
‘through them to guide him; I fastened this cord to a tree,
and began to cut up the dead animal. As we had no proper
utensils for this operation, I only took the tongue and some
pieces of flesh, which we rubbed with salt, of which we had
always a small provision with us. The rest of the buffalo
was left to the vultures and other birds of prey.

After having taken some food we resumed our road, lead-
ing by the cord the young buffalo, who did not show himself
very obstinate. As we went over a little hill our dogs
pursued a female jackal, and seized her as she was going to
enter a hole in the rock, where she had left her little ones,
The dogs, after having killed the poor mother, attacked
the young ones. James, prompt as he was, could only snatch
one of them, which he asked my permission to keep. I
consented to it so much the more willingly, as I thought
this animal might render us some service, if we could teach it
to hunt. James was delighted; he could not sufficiently admire
his pretty pupil, with its gold-coloured skin and bright
eyes.

It was only as night fell that we reached our family,
who were awaiting us with anxiety. You may imagine the
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 137

deluge of questions which assailed us, and to which James
replied with his usual vivacity. This recital so captivated
the attention of his auditors, that the supper hour approached
before I could put in a few words to ask my wife what
they had done during my absence,
CHAPTER XVIIL
SAGO, THE BEES, THE EDUCATION OF THE ANIMALS.

My wife told me, at last, that she must greatly praise her
sons, with whom she had gone to the Cape of Disappointment.
They had pulled down by themselves the enormous palm-
tree of which Ernest had cut the top. They had used
their hatchets, and by fastening a strong cord at the top of
the crown, they had felled it without accident.

Whilst they were occupied in this labour, a band of
monkeys, invading the hut, had caused so much damage
there, that it took my sons at least an hour to repair it.

Fritz had caught a young bird, which I recognised as
the Malabar eagle. I recollected having read that this bird
is easily brought up, and I told my son to take care of his,
and bring it up as the falconers did formerly. Ernest im-
mediately began to tell all he knew about falconry, and it
was agreed that Fritz’s eagle should be taught to catch
game, When, on each side, curiosity was satisfied, we kindled
a fire of green wood, whose thick smoke dried the pieces of
meat we had brought and suspended over the hearth. The
young buffalo, to whom my wife had given a meal of potatoes
steeped in milk, showed himself so docile, that he was given as
a companion to our cow.

The supper was very gay. We had taken the same
precautions for our safety as on the previous night, and
our beds of moss procured us excellent sleep. The next
day, after breakfast, I wished to give the signal for departure,
but the young people had another project. “My dear,”
said my wife, “we will not go without taking part of the

palm-tree which the children pulled down yesterday. Ernest
138
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 139

says that the pith must be sago, and I own that if our little
doctor is right, I should be glad to take away a stock of this
wholesome and agreeable food.”

I examined the tree, and found that Ernest was not
deceived ; but it was no small trouble to open and extract
the pith from the trunk, which measured at least fifty feet.
It required extraordinary efforts to cleave the palm-tree, but at
last we accomplished it. While working at this difficult
operation, I thought of reserving the two parts of the trunk
to make troughs, to bring from Jackal Stream the water
necessary for the kitchen garden. One of the extremities of the
tree was hollowed to serve as a bucket. We put in it the
pith, which we sprinkled with water, and two of the children,
their sleeves turned up, rubbed it very small. When the paste
appeared to be a proper thickness, I fastened a tobacco grater to
one end of the bucket, then pushing the paste on this side, we
soon saw come from each hole of the grater little grains of
flour, which we put to dry in the sun, after having collected
them on linen. I had even a fancy to make some vermicelli.
I had only to make the paste thicker, and exercise a continued
pressure, which caused little threads of paste to spring from
the holes, twisting over the linen on which they fell.

The next morning, at break of day, we were on the road
to Falcon’s Nest. The cow and the buffalo had been
harnessed to the car, and we could not but praise the latter’s
docility. We soon reached our sacks of berries, and the
gourds we had left at the foot of the india-rubber trees were
filled with gum. As we crossed the little wood of guavas,
our dogs sprang, barking, into a thicket, whence they im-
mediately came out. Thinking some wild beast must be
there, we all surrounded this thicket, ready armed; when
James, who had laid down to discover the cause of this
alarm, cried out, “Ah! it is our sow again, who has got
some young ones.” A well-known grunting replied to the
boy’s exclamation, and to this grunting succeeded a general
laugh, The poor beast had got six pretty little pigs, which
appeared to have been born four or five days. After having
deliberated on what we should do with all these little animals,
it was resolved that we would take two only, and that the
140 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

others should be left in the wood, where they would
multiply. ;

Our arrival at Falcon’s Nest was a real triumph; we felt
great joy at seeing our animals again, who also seemed glad
of our return. The buffalo and jackal were fastened up.
Fritz’s eagle was also tied up; but my son was so im-
prudent as to take off the bandage with which the bird’s
eyes were covered. Immediately it began to give blows
right and left with his claws and terrible beak, with which
the paroquet, who was near him, was torn in pieces in a
moment. Fritz was very angry, and wished to punish the

murderer with death. “Give him to me,” said Ernest, “I
will undertake to make him mild and tame.” “No, indeed,”
replied Fritz, “I caught him, and I shall keep him. Tell
me your secret.” “If you keep your eagle,” said Ernest, “I

shall keep my secret.” I was obliged to interfere in the dis-
cussion. “Why,” said I to Fritz, “do you wish your brother
to reveal his secret without any compensation ?”

They came to an agreement. Fritz yielded his ape to
Ernest, who showed the way of calming his eagle. His
method consisted in blowing some tobacco smoke under the
bird’s nostrils, who, feeling himself dizzy, lost all his ferocity.
Ernest took a pipe and some tobacco, and began to smoke
under the eagle’s head, who, after a few puffs, was entirely
calmed. Little by little he lost his strength, tottered on his
legs, and became motionless. Fritz, who thought he was
dead, regretted having permitted such a trial, but the bird
soon recovered from this state, and then showed himself as
quiet and tractable as he had been savage and violent.

The next morning the bamboo props which we had
brought were fixed beside our young shrubs. We put on
our car a good stock of sugar-canes, and a long pointed iron
to hollow the ground at the foot of the trees, then we set
off, recommending my wife and little Francis, who alone
remained at the lodge, to prepare us a good dinner with the
palm-cabbage and the sago paste. The cow being sufficient
to draw the carriage, which was moderately loaded, the
buffalo was left in the stable; I did not wish to make him
work till the wound in his nostrils was healed. The props
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. I4I

were of great use, for our trees were all bent down by the
violent winds which had blown over the shore the preceding days.

We finished our work about noon, and returned to
Falcon’s Nest, where an excellent repast awaited us.

The execution of a project which we had formed for
some time, occupied our afternoon. It was to substitute a
fixed staircase for the rope ladder which led to our aérial
castle; the ascent of which was perilous, especially for my
wife and youngest son. I could not think of constructing
this staircase outside; it would have been too difficult, if not
impossible. I resolved, therefore, to make it in the trunk
‘of the fig-tree, which I supposed to be hollow, because it
served as an asylum to a swarm of bees.

To sound the cavity of the tree, my children and I took
each a hatchet, with the back of which we struck here and
there along the trunk. This noise disturbed the bees; they
came out in great numbers, and threw themselves with fury
on my careless James, who, in spite of my orders, had ven-
tured too near the hole serving as issue to the hive. His
face and hands were instantly covered with stings, which
caused him great pain. I relieved the poor little fellow by
rubbing him with wet earth.

Whilst I was thinking how to manage the removal of the
bees, I remarked in the opening of the hive an unusual
activity; the bees came out and went in, going and coming
with extraordinary agitation; I found that a new swarm
was going to separate from the mother hive. In a few
minutes, an immense number of bees came out of the trunk,
flew about in the air for some time, and then rested in a
mass on the first branch of a small tree, where they were
suspended like a large bunch of grapes. I had several times
seen the way in which they gathered a swarm, and resolved
to adopt the same method, I covered my head with a piece
of linen, in which I had cut some small holes, to enable me
to see and breathe, and wrapped my hands in a handker-
chief. I approached the tree and placed the hive I had pre-
pared under the branch where the bees were. This done, I
shook the tree, when the greater part of the swarm fell into
the hive, which I hastened to place on a plank fixed at the
I42 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

foot of the trunk. The most difficult part was done; I took
care to have at the top an opening by which the bees could
go in and out. A great buzzing took place between the
bees that remained on the tree and those in the hive; an
hour afterwards the entire swarm had taken possession of
their new abode. In the evening, when the bees were
asleep, the hive was carried into a corner of our kitchen
garden, the entry turned towards the south, and the next
day the little colony began to work. Thus, possessors of a
swarm which promised, by multiplying, to assure us in the
future a provision of honey and wax, we less regretted sacri-
ficing that which was in possession of the trunk of our fig-
tree. We, therefore, put in the opening two or three matches
of lighted sulphur, and sealed it closely. The next day, we
not only obtained the provisions which they had accumulated
during several years, but could construct our staircase with-
out hindrance.

I then sounded the trunk of the tree, and found, to my
great satisfaction, that it was hollow from the bottom to the
branches on which we had fixed the flooring of our house.
I was then sure of being able to construct a staircase in the
interior. Without losing time, I began to work, aided by
my three eldest sons. We first made in the bottom of the
tree a large opening, in which we fixed the door of the
captain’s cabin. Thus our abode was well shut up. A long
and thick beam from the vessel was fixed upright in the
middle of the trunk, to support one end of the steps, which
rested at their other extremity in the hollow grooves inside
the tree; and some openings, in which we fixed the windows
we had brought from the vessel, were made in the trunk of
the tree at equal distances, and made of the trunk a sort of
tower, surmounted by a house half hid in the foliage. This
work, which occupied several days, could not boast much
elegance of architecture, but it was solid and convenient, and
appeared to us superb.

Whilst we were working at our staircase, Belle had two
little pups, a male and female, and I permitted James to join
his jackal to the little pups as a sucking brother. The docile
bitch made no difficulty of suckling the new nursling, who


A BUFFALO IN HARNESS,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 143

was well pleased with this adoption. The two goats, had,
almost at the same time, given each a couple of little kids,
and the sheep five or six lambs.

We saw with pleasure our flocks increase; but foreseeing
that our animals might take it into their heads to run away
like the ass, James thought of attaching to their necks some
little bells which we had found in the ship, whose noise
would show us ...e direction of their flight.

The incision which I had made in our young buffalo was
quite healed; I passed through it a little stick, with which
we could lead him, as with a bit. Thanks to the expedient,
he soon became easy to lead; but it was not without trouble
that he suffered himself to be mounted, or to carry burdens.

Fritz was very earnest in the education of his eagle. The
bird knew his master, and obeyed his voice; but he still
showed himself too desirous to regain his liberty for us to
relieve him of the cord which bound him.

Ernest also undertook to instruct the monkey which
Fritz had given him. It was a truly comic spectacle to see
the phlegmatic boy use his patience to conquer the giddiness
and turbulence of his pupil. The lazy professor, for whom
the smallest burdens seemed always too heavy, had an idea
to make Knips carry them. He fastened on his back, with
two thongs, a little basket which he had weaved with reeds,
in which he first put light loads. The ape, not liking the
exercise, rolled in the sand, ground his teeth, and made use
of all kinds of tricks to get rid of this burden. But by al-
ternate corrections and coaxings, Ernest taught him to
carry, with the best grace, little packets, suitable to his size.

James, in his turn, began to teach his jackal, whom he
had named Hunter, and whom he intended to make a sort of
setter-dog, standing still before living game and bringing it
after it is killed. The animal did not take well to this
training. He would bring back things that they threw to
him, but he would not do the standing still. However, James
did not despair of success.

Scarcely was our staircase finished than we had to make
more wax-lights; our reed moulds were very useful. We
were in want of wicks, for my wife refused, not without
I44 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

reason, to let us tear up our handkerchief and cotton cravats.
I had an idea of trying a kind of inflammable wood, known
in the Antilles under the name of light-wood. I cut some
thin slips of it, which I placed in the middle of the moulds.
The mother, not thinking much of these wooden wicks,
thought of making some with threads, drawn from the karatas
leaves, which she dried in the sun and then twisted. When
the moulds were filled with these different wicks, we put in
a boiler a like quantity of bees-wax and tree-wax, which we
melted over a gentle fire. As soon as the mixture was -hot,
the moulds, whose lower ends were set in cold water, so that
the wax might cool instantly, were filled with wax by the
help of spoons. As soon as we could take the wax-lights
from the moulds, I lighted two, one of each sort, so as to
judge which was best. Alas! neither could replace the
cotton; the wood-light consumed too quickly, and the karatas-
threads burnt dull. We had to consider then how we could.
obtain cotton without destroying our linen.

After the fabrication of wax-lights, I turned my moans
to making india-rubber shoes. I employed the means I had
spoken of to Fritz, when we found the india-rubber tree. I
filled a pair of stockings with sand, and covered them with
clay, which I then dried in the sun, then with a pencil of
goat’s hair I spread over the stocking some liquid india-
rubber ; when this coat was dry I put on another, and so on
till it appeared thick enough. I then suspended them in an
airy place, and when I was sure that the india-rubber was
solidified, I emptied the sand, and carefully pulled out the
stockings and clay, when I found myself in possession of
some comfortable boots, and my sons begged me to make
some for them.

As it often happened that the children, in drawing water
from the stream, made it thick, because they shook the vases,
I resolved to fix the turtle-shell basin in such a manner that
the sago-tree boughs might bring the water to it.

It was thus that from day to day we formed and executed
some project. Each of our discoveries was saluted by cries
of joy from the children, and the thanks which my wife and
I addressed to God, who so visibly blessed our efforts.
CHAPTER XIX.
THE WILD ASS, FLAX. THE RAINY SEASON.

ONE morning, as we were going to begin work, some extra-
_ordinary and terrible noises were heard in the distance; it
was a sort of howling, mixed with a shrill hissing, which
terminated in lamentable sounds. Fearing some aggression,
we hastened to assemble our cattle under the roots of the
tree, and place our children in our strong castle, whilst our
dogs prepared for defence. Silence was restored for some
minutes, then the strange sounds began again, but this time
much nearer. We all looked in the direction whence came
the cries; when, suddenly, Fritz, who had more piercing eyes
than any of us, threw down his gun, and burst out laughing:
“Jt is our ass; yes, it is he, announcing his return. His
voice is improved; what a singer!” The children felt angry
at being alarmed by the approach of such an enemy; I was
not so sure as they were. “It may be our ass making this
strange music,” said I to Fritz, “but that is certainly not all.”
“Father,” said Fritz, “you are right, for our ass brings com-
pany.” I looked in the direction to which Fritz pointed, and
saw a magnificent wild ass trotting by the side of ours.

I thought of how we could catch it. I gently descended
the tree, followed by Fritz, after having told them all to
make as little noise as possible. I took a long cord, the end
of which I fastened to one of the roots of our tree, and in
this I made a running knot, which a small stick held open.
With a piece of bamboo I made a sort of pincers, of which
_ Fritz was much puzzled to know the use. In his impatience
to capture the wild ass, he wished to employ his lasso; I

stopped him by affirming that my method was preferable.
10 145
146 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

The two animals approaching the tree, the wild ass per-
ceived us; as he saw for the first time a human face, he
recoiled, frightened. But, at this moment, Fritz presented to
our ass his hand full of oats; he advanced to it with such
avidity, that the wild ass, judging of the savour of the meat
by the eagerness of his companion, imitated him without mis-
trust. I profited by this instant to throw round his neck the
running knot, which I held at the end of a pole. He im-
mediately made a vigorous bound backwards, to run away,
but the knot pressed him so strongly, that the poor beast
fell to the ground, almost suffocated. I hastened to take
away the cord, and replace it by our ass’s halter; then, be-
fore the wild ass had recovered from his stupor, I pressed his
nostrils with my bamboo pincers, which I tied at the bottom
with string, employing, to conquer this animal, the means
which farriers use with a restive horse. I then tied the bridle
with two long cords to the roots of the tree, and I waited
till our captive came to himself, to know what it would be
necessary to do to conquer him entirely.

During this time all the family had descended the tree.
Standing round the animal, we could not but admire the
grace of form which raises this kind of ass almost to the
dignity of the horse. In a few minutes he rose and en-
deavoured to regain his liberty; but the pain which the
bamboo pincers gave him greatly abated his ardour, and he
showed himself docile enough to be led to the place which
was to serve for his stable. Besides this, we had to prevent
a second escape of our ass, as our confidence in his fidelity
was justly shaken. Having then put some shackles on his
fore-feet, I tied him beside the wild ass, so that this forced
society might accustom the stranger to his new kind of life.

It was no small trouble to conquer our new acquisition.
We subjected him to privations, and even blows, but I could
only master him by employing, from time to time, a severe
method used in America, which consists in biting the ear of
the restive animal. At the end of a few weeks, Lightfoot
(that was the name we gave to the wild ass) was so sub-
missive that we mounted him without fear,

During this time our hens had given us more than forty


THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 147

chickens, which ran about cackling joyfully. This augmenta-
tion of our poultry, joined to the acquisition of the wild ass,
recalled to me a project I had formed some time since, to
make, before the rainy season, a stable and an enclosed
poultry-yard. Over the arched roots of our abode we con-
structed a roof with bamboo canes, fastened strongly together,
and interlaced with thinner canes; we covered this frame
with moss and clay, and then with a coat of tar; we had
thus a solid roof, over which we might walk without fear.
We surrounded it with a pretty balustrade, so that it looked
like a terrace. The interior was divided into several compart-
ments, serving, some for stable or barn, others for a milking-
house, and store-place for provisions which we amassed in
preparation for the rainy season, which constitutes the winter
of regions situated in tropical latitudes.

One evening when we were returning from digging
potatoes, I left my wife and two youngest boys to conduct
the procession to Falcon’s Nest, whilst Ernest and Fritz
followed me to the Green Oak Wood, to join to the booty
of the day a stock of sweet acorns. Fritz was mounted
proudly on the wild ass; Ernest carried his ape on_ his
shoulder. We carried some empty sacks, proposing to fill
them, and let them be carried back by Lightfoot, whom we
taught to render services of this kind, since he refused to be
harnessed. When we arrived in the middle of the wood we
fastened Lightfoot to a tree, and began to fill our sacks,
which was soon done, the harvest being very abundant. As
we were thus busied, our ape suddenly bounded into a
neighbouring thicket, before which he had for some minutes
appeared to be lying in wait. We heard at the same time
cries of birds and beating of wings, which made us suspect a
combat between Master Knips and some inhabitant of the
bushes. Ernest, who was nearest the field of battle, advanced
cautiously, and soon cried out: “Come, Fritz! here is a nest
full of eggs; come and take them, whilst I hold Master
Knips. The hen has just escaped.” Fritz ran in all haste
towards the bush, and a few minutes after brought me one
of those tufted fowls said to be from Canada. I helped
Fritz to tie the legs of this animal, whose capture appeared
148 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

a valuable acquisition to our poultry-yard. Ernest, who had
driven off Master Knips, returned with his hat full of eggs,
and covered with leaves, similar to those of the iris. Showing
me his prize, he said: “I have brought some of the leaves
of which the nest was made; they resemble lances, and little
Francis will amuse himself with them.” Our sacks were
placed on the back of Lightfoot, reserving still a place for
Fritz, the animal’s usual rider; and the prudent Ernest
carrying his eggs, and I the hen, we went towards. Falcon’s
Nest. The joy of my wife was great at sight of our new
prize. She took so much care of the hen, that she sat
quietly on her eggs, and gave us, at the end of twenty days,
fifteen chickens.

Some time after, as the sword-leaves which had served
as playthings for Francis, and which were then dry, were
found scattered round our tree, Fritz said to the child,
intending to amuse him: “Francis, we will make some whips
with your playthings, which will serve to drive our cattle.”
After having pulled some of these leaves into three or four
strips, he began to form them into long braids. By chance
I saw him making them. Seeing the flexibility and strength
of these strips, I examined them closely, and had the pleasure
of recognising the pharmium tenax, a plant which the Indians
use the same as our European flax. Our housekeeper was
equally rejoiced, and cried out: “That is the best discovery
you have made. Pick as many of these leaves as you can,
and I will make you shirts and clothes of all kinds!” She
forgot, dear woman, how much there is between the first
simple material and the prepared linen.

Whilst I endeavoured to make her comprehend this, I saw
Fritz mount the wild ass, and James the buffalo; then,
without saying anything, disappear, at a gallop, in the
direction of the Green Oak Wood. A quarter of an hour
afterwards we saw them return. Like foraging hunters, they
had hung on each side of their beasts enormous packets of
flax plants, which they laid down at our feet. I congratu-
lated them on their eagerness, and promised my wife that
though it might be only a trial, we would do the best we
could with our flax. “First,” said I, “we must soak it.” “How
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 149

must we soak it, father?” said Fritz; “must we have a fire?”
“No, we do not want a fire,” I replied, “for the soaking
consists in exposing the flax alternately to the damp and
air, to let the plant corrupt to a certain degree. The soft
parts then separate easily from the long threads; the
vegetable paste which unites them dissolves, and we obtain
the linen thread by pounding or peeling the stalks.” “But ~
do not these threads get rotten with the rest?” asked
Fritz, “That might happen,” said I, “if they did not stop
the soaking soon enough. However, the strength of the
threads makes this accident very rare. Besides, there is
nothing to fear if, instead of exposing the plant to the heat
of the sun, they simply put it to rot in the water.”

My wife thought it would be better, because of the great
heat of this country, to employ this method of steeping, and
pointed out the Flamingo Marsh, as a convenient place for
this operation. The idea was good, and the next morning
we harnessed our ass to the car, on which we had piled our
bundles of flax. Francis and Knips took their place in the
middle. Armed with our shovels and mattocks, we followed
the convoy. When we arrived there, the bunches, divided
into several little packets, were placed at the bottom of the
water, and loaded with large stones, that the flax might be
entirely submerged.

While working, my sons had an opportunity of admiring
the instinct of the flamingoes in the construction of their
nests, several of which were abandoned. These nests are
in the form of a truncated cone, rising above the water;
the eggs are at the bottom, so that the female may sit
having her legs in the water. These nests are built in
earth, so well heaped up that the water, can neither dissolve
nor overturn them till the covey had passed, and the little
ones were no longer in danger of perishing.

At the end of a fortnight our housekeeper, thinking the
flax was sufficiently soaked, asked us to draw it from the water.
We extended it on the grass in the sun. In a single day
it was quite dry. We carried it back to Falcon’s Nest,
putting off till later the peeling, spinning, and weaving
of it.
150 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

As I foresaw the approach of the rainy season, I thought
we.had better busy ourselves in making provision of food. .
For some days it happened, now and then, that the weather,
which had been till then warm and clear, became gloomy ;
the sky was often obscured with thick clouds, the wind
blew with violence, and now and then heavy showers fell.
All the potatoes and cassava, which were to be the basis
of our winter food, were picked and put in heaps. We
collected also a large stock of cocoa-nuts and sweet acorns.
In the place of the cassava plants and potatoes, I sowed
some corn, for, in spite of the numerous and delicate ali-
ments which this fertile country offered, we still missed our
bread. We took care to transplant also to Zeltheim a
quantity of young cocoa-nut trees and sugar canes. In spite
of our activity, the rain surprised us sooner than we ex-
pected. It fell in such torrents that little Francis, seriously
alarmed, asked me if there was going to be a deluge, and
if we ought not to construct an ark, like the patriarch
Noah. We could no longer inhabit our aérial castle, where
the violence of the wind and rain greatly incommoded us.
We were obliged to change our abode to the bottom of the
tree, under the roof of reeds. But the chambers were so
full of provisions, tools, and cattle, that we could scarcely
move. The worst was that we were almost choked when we
wished to light a fire. To make a little room, a great many
things were placed in the staircase, and all our animals were
confined in the same compartment; we could thus work,
and stretch ourselves at our ease to sleep. As to the cook-
ing, we did as little as possible; our appetites yielded to the
frightful torment the smoke caused us. Besides, we had
collected but a small quantity of wood. So we had reason
to bless God that the temperature was mild.

My wife was seized with a fear that she could not over-
come, thinking that her children might fall sick; all her
resignation vanished before this thought. Happily, her fears
seemed to be vain, They were all strong, beautiful, and
healthy.

Our reserve of forage was exhausted in a short time; it
was impossible to supply it by potatoes or other provisions,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 151

without exposing ourselves to perish with hunger. We
then determined to set at liberty, to seek their own food,
those of our animals who were inhabitants of the country.
But as it was important not to restore them to savage life,
Fritz and I several times during the day, and every evening,
sought them, and assembled them at the foot of our tree.
The mother, seeing that in each of our journeys we were
wet to the skin, thought of making us each a waterproof
coat. She took two sailor’s shirts, to which she fastened
a hood to put over the head, and spread them with india-
rubber. Covered with these mantles, we could go out in
the rain without fearing for our clothes or our health.

It was during this first winter quarter that I undertook,
as a pastime, to write a journal of our life in this desert
land. I was obliged to have recourse to the memory of
my wife and sons, to make a recital of the events that had
taken place from the day of our shipwreck. The children
instructed each other by their mutual questions; Ernest
took notes, so as to forget nothing he knew; little Francis
and James were his pupils; the pious mother taught them
morality, and I preached hope and courage to all.

These were our recreations; other labours abridged the
hours, which sometimes seemed very long. The captain’s
chest of books had been opened; it was a great help to
us; there were several good books; amongst others, some
scientific dictionaries, ornamented with plates. These books
were not perfect; we sometimes found the authors at fault,
especially about plants, trees, or exotic animals, which we
had had under our eyes. Ernest immediately noticed the
errors on the margin, and altered what personal experience
had shown us to be contrary to the truth. But what good
and useful lessons we found by the side of these imper-
fections! What a benefit is printing, which advances
science, and loses nothing it has once gained! The work
my wife appreciated most was making a large and small
card to dress the flax. To do this, I rounded and sharpened
with a file some long nails, which I fixed at equal distances
in a plate of tin; the edge of the sheet was bent all round,
and formed a box, into which we poured some melted lead,
152 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to fix the nails. I soldered on this card some little straps,
which were to be nailed on to a rest. My invention ap-
peared so solid and convenient that my wife, anxious to
make trial of it, was impatient for the sun to dry our flax,
so that we might card it,
CHAPTER XxX.

RETURN OF THE FINE SEASON. THE CAVERN OF SALT.
THE BANK OF HERRINGS. THE SEA-DOGS.

IN cities winter has it pleasures; the well-closed houses, the
unions of families round the hearth, and brilliant fétes, make
us sometimes forget that winter is a time of trial for the
poor. I think, however, that no one can be insensible to the
return of fine days. As to us, it would be impossible to de-
scribe our joy, when, after long weeks of privations of all
kinds, and forced seclusion, we saw the sky brighten, and the
sun shine radiant over rejoicing nature. It was with real
transport that we quitted our unwholesome chambers, breathed
the fresh air, and contemplated the beautiful vegetation that
surrounded us. Everything seemed refreshed; we felt ani-
mated with such ardour that we threw far behind us the
remembrance of the weariness and troubles of winter. My
wife blessed God who had at last restored the sun to the
already paled cheeks of our young children, and the hope of
labour to their benumbed limbs.

One of our first cares was to visit what we called our
domains. Our plantation of shrubs was in good condition;
the seeds we had sown had come up, the foliage of the trees
was renewed, and the fertile soil was covered with an infinite
number of flowers, whose sweet scent filled the air. On all
sides birds of various plumage were singing gaily. Never had
we seen so smiling a spring.

The mother wished to begin directly carding and spinning
flax. Whilst the youngest boys took the cattle to feed on
the fresh grass, Fritz and I spread in the sun the packets of

flax. When the stalks were sufficiently dry, we thrashed,
: 153
154 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

peeled, and combed it. The boys, each armed with a large
stick, beat the stalks, The courageous housekeeper, aided by
Francis and Ernest, undertook the peeling. I did the combing,
and succeeded so well, that the mother, delighted and inde-
fatigable, begged me to make, without delay, a spindle, so
that she may convert into thread my beautiful tufts of flax.
By skill and application I succeeded in making not only
a spindle, but a spinning wheel. My wife, transported with
zeal, began to work without allowing herself a walk, of which
she had been deprived so long; she willingly consented to
remain alone with Francis whilst we went on an excursion to
Zeltheim, her only desire at the moment being to provide us
with clothes.

I went then with my eldest sons to the tent. It was in
avery sad state. A part had been carried away by the wind;
the greater part of our provisions were spoilt by the rain.
We immediately dried all that appeared fit for use. Happily
the pinnace had not suffered. Our tub-boat, on the contrary,
was entirely out of service.

The loss which afflicted me most was that of two barrels
of powder, which I had left under the tent instead of carrying
them into the magazine in the rocks, where, fortunately, I
had placed four others. This accident made me conceive the
project of constructing a winter quarter, where we, as well
as our provisions, might find shelter from the torrents of rain.
I dared not hope that, according to the bold proposal of
Fritz, we could hollow an abode in the side of the rock, for,
with our tools and small strength, several summers would
not be sufficient for this work; but I wished to try to hollow
a cave, to enclose our most precious provisions. I set off
one morning with Fritz and James, loaded with levers,
mattocks, and hammers. I chose a place where the rock
rose almost perpendicularly from the earth. I marked with
coal the shape of the opening we wished to make, and began
to work.

By the end of the day our labour was so little advanced
that we were on the point of abandoning it. However, we
took courage, by remarking that the stone became less hard
as we advanced, and that in certain places we could even
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 155

detach it with the spade. We had penetrated to a depth of
seven feet when James, who had entered into the cavity,
and was trying with a lever to detach a piece of rock, cried
out suddenly: “I have pierced! Father, I have pierced!”
“Pierced what?” I asked; “part of the mountain?” “Yes,
I have pierced the mountain!” replied he, full of joy. “He
is right!” cried Fritz, who had hastened to him; “and the
proof is, that his lever has fallen within.”

I advanced and convinced myself of the truth of these
words. With a vigorous blow from my mattock I struck the
rock, which fell down before us, showing an opening, where
each of the boys wished to enter directly. I stopped them,
for the air which came out of this hole was suffocating, and
I felt very dizzy when I approached to look at the interior
of the excavation. To try it, we threw into the opening some
lighted bunches of dried grass, which were instantly extin-
guished. J had then recourse to a method which I thought
would be more efficacious.

We had saved a cask of fusees and rockets, such as they
employ in vessels for nocturnal signals, I took some of
those pieces, which I placed on the border of the opening,
and lighted them. The fusees hissed, the grenades shone,
and by their light we saw the interior of the cave, which
appeared to us very deep, and the sides sparkled as if they
had been studded with diamonds; then all fell back into
obscurity and silence, and there remained only puffs of smoke
at the entrance of the grotto.

When we had fired two or three times, I made a second
trial with a tuft of grass, which this time burnt perfectly well.
I therefore concluded that there was no longer any danger
in penetrating into the grotto. But as it was profoundly dark,
and there might be precipices, or masses of water, I thought
it prudent not to venture without a light. I sent James to
Falcon’s Nest to announce the happy discovery to those who
remained there, and to tell them to come and join us, and
bring some wax-lights, which were necessary to explore the
grotto. During James’ absence, aided by Fritz I enlarged the
entrance and cleared away the rubbish which obstructed it.

We had just finished this work, when we saw my wife and
156 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

three sons advancing in the cart. Ernest and Francis waved
their hats in token of joy. We all entered the cavern; each
of us carried a lighted taper. Fritz and I were provided
with steels in case the lights went out. Our expedition was
somewhat grave and solemn. I led the way, sounding the
earth and inspecting the vault. My sons, incited by curiosity,
followed me bravely. The soil of this cavern, which a provi-
dential hand seemed to have prepared to receive us, was firm,
and covered with a very dry, fine sand. Having examined
the crystallisation of a fragment, which I detached from one
side, and carried to my lips, I recognised that the grotto
was hollowed in a bed of mineral salt.

This discovery caused me great joy, for it secured to us
and our cattle a stock of salt easy to collect, and much
better than what we gathered with so much trouble from
the sea-shore. .

' Penetrating farther into the grotto, our admiration was
excited by its wonderful structure. Large blocks rose majes-
tically in twisted columns to the top, covered with strange
figures, which took, according to the disposition of our lights,
the appearance of men or fabulous animals, Farther on there
were oriental seats, lustres, and Gothic lamps, Little Francis
thought he was in a cathedral—James in a fairy palace.
Pensive Ernest examined and reflected. My wife pressed my
hands. “No more winter for the little ones,’ murmured she.
Fritz said joyfully, “It is a diamond castle, the most beautiful
in the world!” “And God is the architect, my son,” said his
mother. Fritz embraced her. “God is powerful,” said he
to his mother, with tearful eyes, “He has made all that is
great, all that is good; but what is best of all, He has given
to us a perfect mother.” “Ah! what happiness to be beloved,”
said my wife, embracing her children.

I found, in some places, pieces of crystal, which appeared
to be detached from the vault. This made us fear more
falling in, but I soon found that these pieces came from our
discharges of powder, and not from damp. When we had
decided on choosing this grotto for a winter residence,
numerous projects were formed as to the arrangement of this
new habitation. ;
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 2 157

Falcon’s Nest remained our summer residence, but we
no longer thought of the improvements we had _ resolved
to make against the bad season. Our attention was directed
to the subterranean castle, which would secure us a comfort-
able retreat during the rainy epoch. First of all I made the
entry a proper shape, and hollowed out some windows each
side of the rock. I fitted to them the door and windows
from Falcon’s Nest, which were not required there, since the
aerial castle was to be only a summer residence.

The cavern was very spacious; it was divided into
several compartments by the columns. On the right of the
entry was our sitting-room, on the left the kitchen, the
stables, and the working-room. At the bottom were the
cellar and store-room. The part destined for habitation
was divided into several pieces. The first was our bed-
room, the second the dining-room; then my _ sons’ bed-
room and the hall, where we placed the books, arms,
and some curious things we had collected. In the compart-
ment destined for the kitchen we constructed a large fire-
place, with a chimney. high enough to carry off the smoke.
All our tools and provisions had their fixed places; we
also made numerous arrangements to lodge our fowls and
cattle. Never since we lived in this place had we displayed
so much skill and activity.

Whilst we were working at the grotto we were forced
to inhabit the tent, and our principal food was the eggs
and flesh of some turtles, which we found on the shore.
I formed an enclosure for the turtles, so that we might take
them when we required them for table. As soon as we
perceived one of these indolent animals, Fritz or James
ran and cut off its retreat; we helped them to turn it on its
back, then with a gimlet we pierced a hole at the edge of
the shell, through which we passed a cord, fixed to a stake.
The turtle had liberty to plunge into the sea, but could not
get away.

One morning when we were going from Falcon’s Nest
to the Bay of Deliverance, we saw a strange spectacle.
Over the sea a large extent of water seemed in motion, and
sparkled in the sun. Above these shining waves a cloud
158 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

of gulls and other birds flew, uttering sharp cries. My sons
were lost in conjectures, for this curious phenomenon was
seen for the first time.

Fritz thought a subterranean volcano had burst. The
mother suspected the existence of a bank of sand, which
we had not remarked; the doctor declared this motion of
the waves must be caused by a marine monster. This idea
appeared very acceptable to the children, always ready to
see something marvellous in the unknown. But an instant’s
observation made me know the truth. It was clear to me
that a shoal of herrings had arrived. “You are not ignorant,”
said I to my sons, “that they thus name a multitude of
herrings, which come in such numbers that they often
cover an extent of several leagues.”

Whilst I spoke, the shoal of herrings came so fast into
the bay that the fishes hurt themselves by jumping over
each other; thus was explained the scintillation of the sea
we had first observed. -

I resolved to profit by this new source of food which
Providence sent us. Fritz went into the sea with a basket,
which he had only to immerse when it was full of fish.
He then threw the herrings on the sand. Francis picked
them up, and brought them to Ernest and James, who
cleaned them with a knife. I arranged them in the old
tubs from the boat, and the mother spread salt between
each layer of fish, We thus filled all our tubs. I nailed
planks closely over them, and the ass and cow trans-
ported them to our store-house in the grotto, This labour
occupied us three days. Scarcely had we finished with this .
fishing and salting, than we saw the bay haunted with a
troop of sea-dogs, who had, no doubt, followed the herrings.
They played and pursued each other even to the shore,
without appearing frightened at our presence. We killed a
dozen of them, but I only kept the skin and fat. The skin
was destined to make harness for our cattle, and even clothes
for ourselves. The fat, after being melted, furnished us with
a sort of oil, which saved our wax-lights,

We threw the flesh into Jackal Stream, which swarmed
with crabs, They came in thousands to seize the food we
THE SWISS FAMILY. ROBINSON, 159

offered them. The children caught a great number, and by
my advice placed them in a cask, which they pierced with
several holes, and then fixed on the border of the stream,
loading it with large stones to keep it submerged. We thus
kept alive in the water fishes, which one or other of my sons
caught every day. We also shut up for a time about a
hundred herrings.

The fishing finished, we again went on arranging our
subterranean abode. Examining some pieces of rock which
we found scattered over the soil of the grotto, I found that
they were detached from a bed of plaster stone. I then in-
spected the grotto at all points, and at the bottom, beside
our store-room, I discovered the vein of this precious mineral.
With a mattock I detached several pieces, which I heated
in the fire, and which, powdered, gave us a plaster of ex-
cellent quality. This discovery enabled us to perfect the
division and ornamentation of our new abode. For the
time I used it to cover over the bottom of the barrels where
we had put our herrings, to preserve them from contact with
the outer air; but we reserved two barrels to make smoked
or red herrings. To do this, we constructed, at some dis-
tance from the grotto, a large hut of branches and reeds
interlaced. The herrings were ranged on hurdles, and
underneath we made a fire of moss and damp grass, which
caused a great smoke. By renewing this operation several
times, I obtained some very dry herrings of a yellow brown
colour, which were enclosed in sacks, and placed in the store-room.

About a month after the herrings had disappeared, our
stream was invaded by a number of salmon and sturgeons,
who tried to go up the current, after the manner of their
species, to deposit their eggs in the fresh water. James,
who first perceived these new visitors, took them for young
whales. I showed him his error, and began to reflect on
the means we should employ to catch some of these fish.
James, remarking my embarrassment, ran quickly to the
grotto, crying to me, “Wait, wait, papa! you shall see; I
know the way.”

He soon returned, bringing a bow, some arrows with
bent hooks, a packet of thread, and two or three sea-dog
160 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

skin bladders. Anxious to know the method he had in-
vented, we all made a circle round him. He tied round a
bladder the thread, which he attached at one end to an
arrow, and at. the other “to an enormous stone, which
he found on the shore. Then bending his bow, he aimed
at one of the largest salmon. The arrow flew, and was
buried deeply in the body of the fish, “Hit! hit!” cried
the little archer, jumping for joy. The salmon plunged,
and tried to get away, but it was held both by the stone
and by the air contained in the bladder. This struggle,
joined to the pain of the arrow, soon exhausted its strength,
and we could easily draw it to the shore.

James’ success induced us to try our skill, Fritz
went to fetch the harpoon and the spindle; I armed my-
self, like Neptune, with a trident; Ernest provided himself
with hooks, which he bated with pieces of salmon; and the
fishing commenced in earnest. James did not renounce the
method which had so well succeeded. He discharged two or
three more arrows, of which only one attained the end, and it
was not without great effort that he could take his new
victim. A sturgeon bit Ernest’s hook, who was helped by
Francis and his mother to pull him out of the water. I
struck two fishes, but could not capture one, my instrument
being the least suitable of all.

As to Fritz he would not launch his harpoon till he saw
near him a sturgeon, which was at least ten feet long. The
enormous fish, stuck in the back, fought terribly, jumping
and making the water fy. We were all obliged to hold the cord
of the spindle to prevent him from escaping. Little by little
we drew him into low water. To master him completely,
one ofus had to go into the water, and pass behind the
animal’s fins the running knot of the cord, to which the
buffalo was attached to draw him to land. When we had
cleaned the fishes, I put on one side the eggs and bladders
of the sturgeons, which I destined for a particular use. The
greater part of the flesh, cut into pieces, was salted like the
herrings. I tried to pickle the rest. For this purpose, I had
it cooked in very salt water, and then enclosed in a barrel,
and over it I poured a quantity of oil.
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 161

My wife, thinking that we could not use the eggs and bladders,
was going to throw them into the stream, but I told her that
I intended to make with the eggs a very recherché dish, which
the Russians call caviare, and with the bladders some isinglass.
-I washed the eggs, which weighed thirty pounds, carefully
in the sea. We let them steep in the salt water for several hours.
We then put them into gourds pierced with holes, where
they drained, and we had then a dozen firm and compact
loaves, which we placed in the hut to be smoked, and thus
augmented our winter provisions. I recollected having read
of the method employed in making isinglass, and resolved
to put it in practice. I cut the bladders into strips, which
we steeped in water to soften them, and then dried them
in the sun. We thus obtained a kind of chips, which, thrown
into boiling water, melted, and became a very pure jelly.
This jelly, poured on a dish, formed in cooling transparent
sheets, which I hoped to make use of to glaze our windows.

The garden at Zeltheim was in full prosperity, and gave
us; almost without culture, excellent vegetables of all kinds.
It was only necessary to water it to obtain a rich vegetation,
and this cost us but little trouble, for we had formed, by
help of the sago-tree, a system of canals, bringing the water
_ from Jackal Stream. The generality of the seeds and plants
confided to this land were perfectly acclimatised. The rampant
stalks of the melons and cucumbers were already loaded with
a quantity of beautiful fruit, the pine-apples gave magnificent
‘promise, and the maize showed numerous ripe ears. To judge
by the state of this plantation near our abode, we augured
well for our distant ones. One morning we set off together
to visit them.

Going towards Falcon’s Nest, we made a halt at the
old potato field which my wife had sown. There we saw
some wonderful vegetation; the barley, peas, lentils, millet,
oats, and several other kinds of corn had grown magnificently
in this fertile ground. I remarked one part covered with
gigantic maize plants in full maturity. As we approached
the maize plantation to gather it, there rose up half-a-dozen
bustards, and a quantity of smaller birds, which I recognised
to be young quails, Two or three kangaroos also leaped

Il
162 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

out of it, and our dogs pursued without being able to catch
them. Fritz sent off his eagle, who first rose like an arrow
in the air, and then pounced on a magnificent bustard, which
he seized without wounding it much, so that we could keep
it alive. James’s jackal, who was becoming an excellent hunter,
caught a dozen very fat quails, which made us a good dinner.

We resumed our road, and towards the middle of the
afternoon reached Falcon’s Nest. As the heat of the day
and the walk had made us very thirsty, my wife prepared
us a new kind of drink. Crushing some grains of tender
maize, and pressing them in linen, she obtained a paste,
which she mixed in water sweetened with the juice of
the sugar-cane. It made a sort of milk, which was very
refreshing.

The rest of the day was employed in grinding our maize,
and preparing for the execution of a project which I had formed
several days before. It was to make, in the open country,
‘a colony of animals, which, if they acclimatised and pro-
pagated, would spare us the very difficult task of watching
and feeding them. I could venture to attempt this trial, for
our. poultry and flock were numerous enough to enable us
to sacrifice some of each kind,
CHAPTER XXI.
COTTON. THE FARM, THE CANOE.

THE next morning then, at break of day, we set off; putting
on the carriage, besides provisions, a dozen hens, two cocks,
three young pigs, and couple of goats. The cow, the
buffalo, and the ass were harnessed; Fritz, mounted on the
wild ass, rode before at some distance from the caravan.
Our course was directed towards a point of our domains which
we had not yet explored; that is to say, the country which
extended from Falcon’s Nest to the great bay, beyond the
observatory and Cape Disappointment. At the beginning,
we had more than once to make a road by using our hatchets,
for we crossed fields obstructed by high grass and bushes ; but
we soon reached a little wood, coming out of which we saw
before us a plain covered with shrubs loaded with white flock.
“Snow! snow!” cried Francis joyfully, jumping down
from the cart on which he was seated. “This is a country
where there is really winter; not like that below, where there
was only tiresome rain.” And repeating “Snow! snow!” he
ran to make snowballs. Laughing at the child, I hastened
to examine the nature of this pretended snow. Ernest laughed
also. “Well,” said I to him, “do you know the name of
these shrubs?” “I guess it,” replied he; “as well as I can
judge, these are cotton plants, and if so, we can procure,
without trouble, an ample stock of cotton.” Ernest was
right. It was a very curious spectacle. The pods of the
shrubs, opening at maturity, had let out the down of which
they were full; a part hung to the branches of the trees, the
rest whitened the ground. This discovery caused us all
great joy; but my wife more particularly. She immediately

asked me if it were possible to make a weaving machine,
163
164 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

and seemed already to be able to renew our linen, when it
was worn out. I promised to think of the means of satisfying
her demands. We filled with cotton all the sacks that remained
empty. My wife then gathered a quantity of seed which she
proposed to sow near Zeltheim, so as to naturalise the precious
shrub close to our habitation. :

This done, we continued. our road. We soon reached a
little hill, from the top of which we had a magnificent- view,
whose extent was covered with the richest vegetation. Below
extended the plain we had just crossed, fertilised by water
from a large stream. Every one approved, when I proposed
to choose this ‘place for the projected establishment. The
tent was immediately raised ; and the mother, aided by Francis
and James, busied herself in preparing a meal. During. this
time, I went, accompanied by Fritz and Ernest, to explore
the country and choose the most favourable place for the
foundation of our colony. I remarked a group of trees
disposed so conveniently with regard to each other, that I
resolved immediately to make them serve for pillars to the
edifice we wished to build. Our plans formed for the labours
of the morrow, we returned to the tent, where an excellent
supper awaited us. My wife had divided the cotton, so
that each of us had a comfortable pillow for the night. We
owed to this care the sweetest sleep we had enjoyed for a
long time.

The trees I had chosen for building the cabin were six
in number, disposed in a square, of which one side looked
towards the sea. In the trunks of the three nearest the
shore, I made, about twelve feet from the ground, some
notches in which a strong pole was fixed; I made’‘the same
in the trunks of three others, but only at the height of eight
feet. Then on each of these poles I fixed smaller ones, close
together, and covered them with plates of bark similar to
tiles. By the help of bindweed and flexible reeds woven
strongly together, the sides were raised to a height of five feet;
the empty space which extended to the roof was furnished
with a light lattice, which permitted air and light to penetrate
into the interior. The door opened in front of the sea, on
the principal side of the house. The inside was arranged
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 165

suitably to the end proposed. One partition which rose to
half the height of the cabin, divided it into two unequal parts ;
the largest one was intended for the sheep-fold, in which I
made a reserved place for the fowls, by means of palisades
whose barriers would only give entrance to fowls. A door
led from the sheep-fold into the other parts of the cabin, of
' which we made our resting place.

All this had been done quickly, and consequently left
much to be desired; but I promised myself to improve it
when we had more time. For the present it was sufficient
that our cattle were under shelter. To accustom them to
return every evening to the stable, the troughs were filled with
grain mixed with salt, and it was agreed that this repast
should be renewed till the colonists were accustomed to their
new abode. These labours, which we had thought to finish
in three or four days, took us more than a week; so that
our provisions were nearly exhausted. However, we would
not return to Falcon’s Nest till we had finished the establish-
ment of our farm. I therefore sent Fritz and James to
re-victual us, and give food for several days to the cattle we
had left below. They took the ass to carry the burdens and
the ass and buffalo to ride on.

During their absence I went with Ernest to search, in the
hope of finding some potatoes and cocoa-nuts, and also to
obtain a more complete knowledge of the place where we
were. A short walk conducted us to a little lake, whose
aspect was most picturesque; the shores were entirely covered
with plants of wild rice, on which a troop of birds were
regaling, who, seeing us, flew away with a great noise. I
succeeded in striking down five or six tufted fowls, but our
skill would have been fruitless if the jackal, who had followed
us, had not gone into the water for each one that fell, and
brought it to us.

A little farther on, Knips, who was riding on Belle’s back,
descended quickly, and ran towards a little thicket, where I
discovered him eating some magnificent raspberries. We
could not have met with any thing better to refresh our dry
throats. This delicious fruit was so abundant, that we not
only satisfied ourselves, but filled Knips’ basket, which I
166 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

covered with a little clean linen, and some leaves, tightly tied
down, in case our porter should overturn his load to eat its
contents.

Repassing by the lake, we saw on the water some
magnificent black swans, swimming gracefully. I would not
disturb so beautiful a spectacle, and one so new to us; but
Belle, who did not partake our admiration, sprang into the
water before we could stop her, and drew from it a beast
of strange form, which I took, at a distance, for an otter.
Having arrived in time to snatch the animal, already dead,
from the dog, who was ready to devour it, I examined it
carefully. The feet were furnished with a membrane for .
swimming; it had a long hairy tail, bent upwards; a very
small head, scarcely any eyes and ears; the snout, or rather
the beak, resembled that of a duck. So singular a form
made me laugh heartily, but my knowledge of natural history
gave me no idea of the species to which this individual
belonged, who participated in the nature of the bird, the fish,
and the quadruped. I told Ernest to carry it home, for I
proposed to stuff it, and preserve it as a rarity. “I know it,”
said my scholar; “it is the ornithorhynchus. I read its
description in one of the captain’s books; it has already
puzzled the learned.” “Well,” replied I, laughing, “it will be
the beginning of our cabinet of natural history.” Loaded
with our booty, we regained the farm, almost at the same
time as Fritz and James, who related to us in detail what
they had done at Falcon’s Nest; I saw with satisfaction that
not only had they obeyed my orders, but had thought of
several useful things.

The next day, after having abundantly provided with food
the beasts that we left, we quitted the farm, to which we had
given the name of Wuldegg. In the first wood we came to
on our road, we found a troop of apes, who welcomed us by
horrible cries, accompanied by a shower of fir-apples; I fired
in the air several times to send them off. Then we resumed
our route, and soon arrived at the Cape of Disappointment,
on which I had resolved to erect a pavilion, which might
serve us for a resting place in any excursions on this side of
the island. We went courageously to work. The trial of
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. 167

our talent at Wuldegg had made us skilful, so in less than a
week we had finished the edifice, and named it Prospect
Hill.

For some time I had been in search of a tree whose bark
might serve me to make a small boat, at once strong and
light, but though my search had hitherto been fruitless, I had
not lost hope. As soon as the new building was finished, I
began to explore the neighbourhood, which abounded in rare
trees. I found some at last which might have been taken
for oaks by their height and foliage, if the fruit which they
bore, otherwise similar to acorns, had not differed from them
by their extreme smallness. After having chosen the one
which seemed best suited to my design, with Fritz’s help I
fastened the rope ladder we had brought to the lowest
branches, Fritz, arrived at the extremity of the trunk, cut
the bark through to the sap, whilst I did the same at the
bottom. I then took away in its whole length a slight band.
Then by means of wedges of wood, carefully inserted, the
rest was separated little by little. As the tree was in full
sap, and the bark was flexible, this part of the work per-
fectly succeeded. But the most difficult remained to do; it
was to form this large plank of bark into a convenient boat.
Whilst the bark was yet moist and supple, I gave it the
form I desired. I made with my hatchet a large cleft in the
two ends, which, naturally reunited, forming a roll of the
thickness of the trunk which we had despoiled; I joined
with nails the two separated pieces, so that in reuniting,
they formed a point at each extremity. I had in this way
two peaks, which would greatly facilitate the navigation of
my boat. The middle still remained flat; with cords I
pressed the two sides, to make them take a more vertical
position. I succeeded tolerably well; but as, to put the last
finish to my work, I wanted several tools, I sent James and
Fritz to the tent, telling them to bring the sledge, to which
I had fixed the wheels of one of the cannons found in the
ship; I proposed to load it with the boat, which I wished to
transport to a more convenient place to finish it.

While waiting, Ernest and I made another tour in the
environs, where I found a certain tree, named light-wood by
168 : THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the Indians, who employ it to light them in their nocturnal
expeditions. I cut also some staves to serve as bands to
the boat. At the same time we discovered a new resin,
which in drying became firm and impenetrable, of which I
collected a large stock, for I saw it would be preferable to
mastic and turpentine for tarring the canoe. My two boys
rejoined us as night fell, but as it was too late to undertake
the loading, it was put off till to-morrow.

Very early the next day we placed on the sledge the
canoe, the pieces of wood, and every thing that might be
useful to us when we left for Zeltheim. We stopped at
Falcon’s Nest only two hours, to dine and feed our animals.
We returned to the tent before sunset, but too much fatigued
to do anything that evening.

The whole of the next day was employed in finishing the
canoe. To consolidate it, I nailed under each of the beaks
a piece of bent wood, and in the whole length a solid keel.
At the top we made a border of flexible laths and poles, to
which were fixed.rings for the cordage of the mast. I threw
in the bottom, as ballast, some stones and clay; the whole
covered with a flooring, on which we could stand conveniently.
Some movable seats were placed across. In the middle
rose our mast, furnished with a triangular sail; behind, I
fixed the rudder. There came to me a happy idea to render
lighter still our little boat. I asked my wife to make some
bottles of sea-dog skin; I filled them with air, tarred them all
over, and fastened them to the exterior. These bladders
would not only help to float the boat, but prevented it from
turning over and being submerged.

I omitted to notice at the time the birth of a calf, which
took place soon after the rainy season. I consulted with the
family as to its name. They settled that it should be
“Brummer” (the murmurer), because he was always making
little murmurings. They then fixed names for the buffalo
and the two young dogs. The buffalo was called “Sturm”
(tempest); one dog was named “Braun” (brown), and the
other “Falb” (fawn), because of the colours of their skin.

For two whole months we worked to separate, by
partitions of planks or mats, different compartments of the
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. : 169

cavern, to render this habitation as convenient as possible,
reserving till winter the task of embellishing it. The great
quantity of beams, planks, and materials of all kinds that we
possessed, rendered our labour less difficult than we had
thought. The floor of our room was covered with a thick
bed of clay, stuck full of small flint stones; as to the plaster
with which we had covered the walls, we relied on the last
days of summer to dry them. We thought of making, with
the hair of our goats and the wool of our sheep, some felt
carpets for the dining-room and hall. For this we put on
a piece of sail-cloth a bed of hair, which we had first carded,
and which I moistened with boiling water, in which we had
dissolved some isinglass. I then rolled up the sail-cloth, on
which they beat with all their strength with large sticks.
The operation with warm water was renewed, and having
beat long and vigorously, we opened the linen, whence came
out a long piece of felt, which, dried in the sun, answered
perfectly the end proposed.
CHAPTER XXII.
THE FEAST OF DELIVERANCE.

ONE morning, when I awoke sooner than usual, and did
not wish, by rising, to disturb the sleep of my family, I
endeavoured to count the time which had passed since we
had been on the island. My calculations showed, to my
great astonishment, that it was just the eve of the anniversary
of that day. After some involuntary sad thoughts over the
past, I told myself that I was ungrateful. My heart melted
at the thought, that God had not only saved us all from
death, but, in His goodness, had provided us an asylum in
a sort of terrestrial paradise, where all our labour had _ its
recompense, and where the least of our efforts had been
visibly blessed. A hymn of gratitude rose from my soul
towards Him who had taken such care of my beloved wife,
and our dear little children. I resolved not to let pass
unnoticed so important an epoch in our existence, and to
consecrate it by a solemnity commemorative of the senti-
ments with which our situation, past and present, ought to
inspire us.

That evening, at supper, as I had not yet decided any-
thing for the morrow, “Dear little ones,” said I, “to-morrow .
is a great day, a date which should be marked for ever in
our life! To-morrow is the anniversary of our landing on
our charming island, and of miraculous deliverance. It must
be a féte day, memorable to all of us, and we must be ready
early to celebrate it.” This news astonished them all. They
could not imagine that we had lived a year in our solitude.
“Are you not mistaken in your calculations?” asked my

wife, much moved: “what, a whole year?” “I am_ not
170
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.’ 171

deceived, dear wife,’ I replied; “we were stranded on the
3oth January, last year. The almanac, which I fortunately
saved, tells us that it was the 2nd of February that we
landed on this island, and we will celebrate to-morrow the
anniversary of our safety.” After talking till very late, we
went to bed. “For the féte,” said my wife, embracing my
children; “I will make you a good dinner.” The boys, pre-
occupied with the morrow, were little disposed to sleep. I
heard them say to each other, “What is it that father has
prepared for to-morrow? what will this féte consist of?” I
feigned not to hear, and left them to their conjectures.

The morrow, at day-break, a sound of cannon from the
shore awoke us with a start. We all rose, looking astonished,
and seeming to ask each other whether we were frightened
or rejoiced at this noise. But when I saw that James and
Fritz were not in their beds, I was reassured. They soon
returned, “Well, what do you say to that thunder?” cried
James, proudly. But Fritz, who had remarked that I did not
look pleased, said, “ Pardon, father, the liberty we have taken,
in opening, by firing a cannon, the féte of deliverance. We
only thought of surprising you all, without intending to
trouble your sleep.” J then told them, that I blamed them
less for having abruptly awoke, and even frightened us, than
for having expended a large quantity of powder, our most
precious treasure, which we had not yet found the means of
replacing. However, they had acted with a good intention,
and I did not wish to sadden them.

Immediately after breakfast, which we took in the open
air, at the door of the grotto, I opened the solemnity by
reading from my journal, so as to refresh their memory on
all the circumstances of our deliverance. Then came the
pious exercises of each Sunday; then a walk to Safety Bay.
On our return, the mother gave us for dinner two roast
fowls, and a delicious cream. At the end of the repast, I
rose, and giving the signal, “Now, my children,” said I,
“prepare to give us some brilliant proofs of your skill in
gymnastic exercises; some magnificent prizes shall be given
to the conquerers.” The children replied to my appeal, in
the English fashion, by a loud hurrah.
172 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

I decided that they should begin by shooting; for this
purpose I fixed, about a hundred paces off, a plank, which
might be about the size of a kangaroo, and which we
fashioned with a hatchet, so as to be nearly the shape of
that animal, Two small pieces, nailed on, formed the ears,
a strap of leather the tail, two sticks represented the fore-legs,
The pretended kangaroo was stuck up obliquely, as he is
seated on the ground. Then each of the boys, little Francis
excepted, loaded his gun and fired; Fritz, the skilful gunner,
twice touched the head; Ernest, less skilful, placed a ball in
the body. At the first shot James failed, but the second
time he knocked off both ears; we saluted this skilful shot
with a burst of laughter. Then they fired with pistols, in
which Fritz again obtained the advantage. I then told the
young people to fill their guns with small shot, and for each
I threw as high as I could an old hat, which they were to
strike before it fell to the ground. There the prudent and
circumspect Ernest showed a skill almost equal to that of
Fritz; but the careless James did not lodge a single shot in
the hat. In shooting with a bow, which next succeeded, I
saw, with pleasure, that my sons had acquired great skill.
. I gave them several kinds of this exercise, which might be
of great assistance when our powder was exhausted. Francis,
who had been admitted to this trial, did not show himself —
a bad archer. His brothers made him a crown of leaves,
which, in his youthful pride, he would not have exchanged
for that of a king.

They took a little rest before beginning the race. I chose
for the race-ground the space between the place where we
were and Falcon’s Nest, exacting that the runner who should
first reach the end should bring me a knife which I had left
on the table. The three eldest only were of the party. At
the signal agreed, Fritz and James sprang forward with im-
petuosity, whilst Ernest went behind them with an equal
and steady step, which made me presume that he would
reach the end sooner than his brothers. An hour afterwards
I saw James return, galloping on his buffalo. “Oh, oh!
master equerry,” cried I, “it was not the agility of your
buffalo that we wished to judge, but that of your legs.” “I
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON, 173

am not so simple as to exhaust myself with running to get
nothing,” replied the boy. “As soon as I saw that, in spite
of my efforts, I was the last, I renounced the prize for
racing, and when I reached Falcon’s Nest mounted my
buffalo to return.” At that moment Fritz arrived, and some
paces behind him, Ernest, holding the knife, as a sign of
victory. As I was surprised that he, the victor, should re-
turn last, he replied, that when he was sure of the prize, he
thought it was not necessary to hurry. I could not help
smiling at this reply, which accorded with his prudent in-
dolence. I then told the children to show us their skill in
the art of climbing trees.

James sprang towards a large palm-tree, to the top of
which he mounted, and then descended with the agility of
a squirrel; he ascended just as easily a second tree, then a
third; it was curious to see him going from tree to tree,
turning round the trunk, joking and making grimaces. Fritz
and Ernest were the first to clap their hands and own them-
selves incapable of competing with him. James was not less
skilful in riding, and Fritz alone could compete with him.
They both galloped without saddle or bridle, jumped on the
ground, then remounted, helping themselves simply by their
courser’s mane when he was in full gallop. Ernest declared
this exercise beyond his strength. Francis, who till now
had been only a spectator, wished to show his skill in guid-
ing Brummer. His mother had made him a saddle with the
skin of the kangaroo. A copper ring was passed through
the animal’s nostrils, who, equipped in this manner, was
brought before us. “Attention, gentlemen,” said the little
equerry, with an important air, “the famous bull conqueror
is going to divert you.” After having exec