Citation
Mother Goose in a new dress

Material Information

Title:
Mother Goose in a new dress : Bramble bush and other rhymes
Uniform Title:
Mother Goose
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Picture books for children ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1896 ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1896
Genre:
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title, and date of publication from inscription.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027415829 ( ALEPH )
ALK9718 ( NOTIS )
234189780 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


COPYRIGHTED



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| [The Baldwin Library

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A diller, a dollar,
A ten oclock scholar,

What makes you come

sO soon? |
You used to come
at ten o'clock,
But now you come

at noon.

Peas pudding hot,
Peas pudding cold,

Peas pudding in the pot,

Nine days old.

Some like it hot,
Some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot,
Nine days old.







Bye, baby, bunting,



Daddy's gone a-hunting,




To get’a little rabbit “skin,




To wrap his baby bunting in.






See-saw, sacradown, sacradown,
Which is the way to Boston town?
One foot up, the other foot down.
That is the way to Boston town.




There was an old woman
lived under the hill,
And if she’s not gone,
she lives there still.
Baked apples she sold,
and cranberry pies,
And she’s the old woman
that never told lies.









As I was going along,
long, long,

A singing a comical song,
song, song,

The lane that I went was
so long, long, long,

And the song that I sung
was so long, long, long,
That I too went singing

_along, long, long.

If I'd as much money
as I could spend,
I never would cry
old chairs to mend
Old chairs to mend,
old chairs to mend;
I never would cry
old chairs to mend,

If Vd as much money
as I could tell,
I never would cry
old clothes to sell;
Old clothes to sell;
old clothes to sell;
I never would cry
old clothes to sell.















: Hot cross buns,
| Hot cross buns,
| One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns. - feels corer
If your daughters.
Don't like ‘em,
Give them to your sons.
One a penny, two a penny,
- Hot cross buns.

A cat came fiddling
out of a barn,
With a pair of bag-pipes
under her arm;
She could sing nothing
but fiddle cum fee,
The mouse has married
the humble-bee
Pipe, cat---dance, mouse,
Well have a wedding
at our good house.

















There was a man in our town,
And he was wondrous wise;

He jumpd into a bramble bush,
And scratch’d out both his eyes;






And when he saw his eyes were out,
With all his might and main,

He jump into another bush,

And seratchd them in again.














Sing a song of sixpence, a pocket full of rye,’

. The king was in the parlor, counting out his money,
Four-and-twenty blackbirds baked in a pie; The queen was in the kitchen, eating bread and honey
When the pie was opened the birds began to sing, The maid was in the garden, hanging out the clothes;
_And was not that a dainty dish to set before the king? !

There came a little blackbird and peck’d off her nose.













Daffy-down-dilly has come up to town,
In a fine petticoat and a green gown.
On a white pony the fair maid is seen

With posies and silver-bells fit for a queen.

There was a fat man

of Bombay,
Who was smoking

one sunshiny day;
When a bird,

called a snipe,
Flew away

with his pipe,
Which: vex'd the fat man
of Bombay.



The fair maid who,
~ the first of May,
Goes fo the fields
at break of day,
And washes in dew
from the hawthorn tree,
Will ever after :
handsome be.













Hush-a-bye, baby,

On the tree top,
When the wind blows,

The cradle will rock;
When the bough breaks,

The cradle will fall,
Down comes hush-a-bye,

Baby, and all.










Little Jack Jingle,
He used to live single;
But when he got tired
of this kind of life,
He left off being single;
and liv’d with his wife.








IT saw a ship a-sailing,
A. sailing on the sea;

And, oh! it was all laden

With pretty things for thee!




There were comfits in the cabin
And apples in the hold:

The sails were made of silk,
And the masts were made of gold.

>






The four-and-twenty sailors,
That stood between the decks,
Were four-and-twenty white mice,
With chains about their necks.






The captain was a duck,

With a packet on his back;
And when the ship began to move,
The captain said, “Quack! quack !”

















There was an Old Woman, and what do you think ?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;
And though victuals and drink were the chief of her diet,

This little Old Woman could never be quiet.











There was an old woman
Lived under a hill;
She put a mouse in a bag,

And sent it to mall.



The miller declard
By the point of his knife,
He never took toll

Of a mouse in his life.









When good king Arthur ruled his land,
He was a goodly king; ;

He stole three packs of barley meal,
To make a bag-pudding.

A bag-pudding the king did make, The king and queen did eat thereof,
4 And stuff'd it well with plums; _ And noblemen beside ;
And in it put great lumps of fat, And what they could not eat that night,

As big as my two thumbs. The queen next morning fried.









ae





Full Text




COPYRIGHTED
Se Cc



S_,



LA

im



mi

¢)
rp oo



My
i! U





;
| [The Baldwin Library

a f 441 ([ University











A diller, a dollar,
A ten oclock scholar,

What makes you come

sO soon? |
You used to come
at ten o'clock,
But now you come

at noon.

Peas pudding hot,
Peas pudding cold,

Peas pudding in the pot,

Nine days old.

Some like it hot,
Some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot,
Nine days old.




Bye, baby, bunting,



Daddy's gone a-hunting,




To get’a little rabbit “skin,




To wrap his baby bunting in.






See-saw, sacradown, sacradown,
Which is the way to Boston town?
One foot up, the other foot down.
That is the way to Boston town.




There was an old woman
lived under the hill,
And if she’s not gone,
she lives there still.
Baked apples she sold,
and cranberry pies,
And she’s the old woman
that never told lies.



As I was going along,
long, long,

A singing a comical song,
song, song,

The lane that I went was
so long, long, long,

And the song that I sung
was so long, long, long,
That I too went singing

_along, long, long.

If I'd as much money
as I could spend,
I never would cry
old chairs to mend
Old chairs to mend,
old chairs to mend;
I never would cry
old chairs to mend,

If Vd as much money
as I could tell,
I never would cry
old clothes to sell;
Old clothes to sell;
old clothes to sell;
I never would cry
old clothes to sell.












: Hot cross buns,
| Hot cross buns,
| One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns. - feels corer
If your daughters.
Don't like ‘em,
Give them to your sons.
One a penny, two a penny,
- Hot cross buns.

A cat came fiddling
out of a barn,
With a pair of bag-pipes
under her arm;
She could sing nothing
but fiddle cum fee,
The mouse has married
the humble-bee
Pipe, cat---dance, mouse,
Well have a wedding
at our good house.

















There was a man in our town,
And he was wondrous wise;

He jumpd into a bramble bush,
And scratch’d out both his eyes;






And when he saw his eyes were out,
With all his might and main,

He jump into another bush,

And seratchd them in again.








Sing a song of sixpence, a pocket full of rye,’

. The king was in the parlor, counting out his money,
Four-and-twenty blackbirds baked in a pie; The queen was in the kitchen, eating bread and honey
When the pie was opened the birds began to sing, The maid was in the garden, hanging out the clothes;
_And was not that a dainty dish to set before the king? !

There came a little blackbird and peck’d off her nose.







Daffy-down-dilly has come up to town,
In a fine petticoat and a green gown.
On a white pony the fair maid is seen

With posies and silver-bells fit for a queen.

There was a fat man

of Bombay,
Who was smoking

one sunshiny day;
When a bird,

called a snipe,
Flew away

with his pipe,
Which: vex'd the fat man
of Bombay.



The fair maid who,
~ the first of May,
Goes fo the fields
at break of day,
And washes in dew
from the hawthorn tree,
Will ever after :
handsome be.










Hush-a-bye, baby,

On the tree top,
When the wind blows,

The cradle will rock;
When the bough breaks,

The cradle will fall,
Down comes hush-a-bye,

Baby, and all.










Little Jack Jingle,
He used to live single;
But when he got tired
of this kind of life,
He left off being single;
and liv’d with his wife.








IT saw a ship a-sailing,
A. sailing on the sea;

And, oh! it was all laden

With pretty things for thee!




There were comfits in the cabin
And apples in the hold:

The sails were made of silk,
And the masts were made of gold.

>






The four-and-twenty sailors,
That stood between the decks,
Were four-and-twenty white mice,
With chains about their necks.






The captain was a duck,

With a packet on his back;
And when the ship began to move,
The captain said, “Quack! quack !”











There was an Old Woman, and what do you think ?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;
And though victuals and drink were the chief of her diet,

This little Old Woman could never be quiet.











There was an old woman
Lived under a hill;
She put a mouse in a bag,

And sent it to mall.



The miller declard
By the point of his knife,
He never took toll

Of a mouse in his life.






When good king Arthur ruled his land,
He was a goodly king; ;

He stole three packs of barley meal,
To make a bag-pudding.

A bag-pudding the king did make, The king and queen did eat thereof,
4 And stuff'd it well with plums; _ And noblemen beside ;
And in it put great lumps of fat, And what they could not eat that night,

As big as my two thumbs. The queen next morning fried.






ae