Citation
The story of Marco Polo

Material Information

Title:
The story of Marco Polo
Creator:
Polo, Marco, 1254-1323?
Brooks, Noah, 1830-1903
Century Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Century Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xiv, 247 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Explorers -- Biography -- Juvenile literature -- Italy ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile literature -- China ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile literature -- Asia ( lcsh )
Biographies -- 1896 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Biographies ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes index.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Noah Brooks.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026606508 ( ALEPH )
ALG3021 ( NOTIS )
220684013 ( OCLC )

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Full Text








THE STORY OF

Marco Polo



THE KHAN’S FLEET PASSING THROUGH THE INDIAN ARCHIPELAGO,





THE STORY OF

Marco Polo

BY
NOAH BROOKS

AUTHOR OF “AMERICAN STATESMEN,” “ WASHINGTON
IN LINCOLN’S TIME,” ETC,



NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.



Copyright, 1896, 1897, by
THE CENTURY Co.

Printed in U. S. A.



Pak Ae es,

HE story of Marco Polo and his companions is

one of the most romantic and interesting of
medizval or of modern times. The manner of the
return of the Polos long after they had been given up
for dead, the subsequent adventures of Marco Polo,
the incredulity with which his book of travels was
received, the gradual and slow confirmation of the
truth of his reports as later explorations penetrated
the mysterious Orient, and the fact that he may be
justly regarded as the founder of the geography of
Asia, have all combined to give to his narrative a
certain fascination, with which no other story of
travel has been invested. At first read for pure
amusement, Marco Polo’s book eventually became an
authoritative account of regions of the earth which
were almost wholly unknown to Europe up to his
time, and some portions of which even now remain

unexplored by Western travellers.
Vv



vi PREFACE.

In this little book the author and compiler has
endeavoured to give a connected account of the travels
of Marco Polo for the entertainment and instruction
of young readers, with the hope that maturer minds
may find therein a comprehensive and intelligible
summary of the most valuable and trustworthy parts
of the said book. As far as possible he has allowed
the traveller to speak for himself, refraining from that
fashion of condensation, which suppresses the original
author and gives the reader only a narration which
has been coloured by its passage through the mind
of an editor. In his comments on the text of Marco
Polo, the author has made use of the erudite notes of
Colonel Henry Yule, C.B., whose admirable trans-
lation of “The Book of Ser Marco Polo, the
Venetian” (John Murray, London, 1871) has been
made the basis of this volume. The works of the
Abbé Huc, Williams’s “The Middle Kingdom,”
Gilmour's “Among the Mongols,” and other less-
known books have been consulted in quest of light
and information for the better understanding of the
great Venetian’s pages.

NOAH BROOKS.



CONE NLS:

CHAPTER L

CONCERNING MARCO, HIS FATHER, AND HIS UNCLE—MISTY
NOTIONS OF THE FAR EAST HELD BY MEN OF MEDIZVAL
TIMES—HOW THE POLOS WENT TO THE DOMINIONS OF
KUBLAI KHAN AND GOT BACK AGAIN—-A MARVELLOUS
JOURNEY. . ° . . . . . . e

CHAPTER II.

YOUNG MARCO AT THE COURT OF KUBLAI KHAN—THE GREAT
KHAN’S CONDESCENSION TO THE YOUNG TRAVELLER—
THE MANNER OF THE RETURN OF THE POLOS—HOW
MESSER MARCO POLO WAS CAPTURED BY THE GENOESE,
AND HOW HE WROTE HIS FAMOUS BOOK OF TRAVELS .

CHAPTER III.

MARCO DISCOURSES OF ANCIENT ARMENIA—THE KINGDOM
OF GEORGIANIA—THE EXPLOITS OF ALEXANDER THE
GREAT—STORY OF THE MISERLY CALIPH OF BAGDAD
AND HIS GOLD—A GREAT MARVEL. a . . °

vii

PAGE

12

26



viii CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IV.

PAGE
THE THREE KINGS—THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN—

STORIES AND ADVENTURES IN PERSIA—ORIGIN OF THE
ASSASSINS Hrui's SUMia VUE agaist) aun Kl oem aion venom SO

CHAPTER V.
THE GEMS OF BADAKSHAN—A ROYAL PREROGATIVE—THE
CONJURERS OF CASHMERE . i 4 - : . 60
CHAPTER VI.

THE ROOF OF THE WORLD—HOW THE PAMIR COUNTRY
BORDERS ON THREE GREAT EMPIRES—THE GREAT
HORNED SHEEP OF THE STEPPES—A MARVELLOUS STORY
OF SAMARCAND . ; 5 5 A 5 : - 66

CHAPTER VII.

THE SEA OF SAND AND ITS MARVELS—THE FABLED SALA-
MANDER AND ITS TRUE STORY—SOMETHING ABOUT AS-
BESTOS Geos o tate cme sie ee eles ae ak ie a ec ae coma 7 3

CHAPTER VIIL

HOW JENGHIZ KHAN DEFEATED PRESTER JOHN—THE MYTHI-
CAL CHRISTIAN KING AND THE MONGOL CONQUEROR—
DIVINERS AND THEIR TRICKS—TATAR MIGRATIONS . 80

CHAPTER IX,

MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF A STRANGE PEOPLE—CONCERNING
THE TATARS AND THEIR WAYS—THE ORIGIN OF CON-
DENSED MILK . : 5 5 . ‘ dj ; . 86



CONTENTS. 1x

CHAPTER X.

PAGE
TIBET—THE ‘‘GRUNTING OXEN” OF THAT REGION—MUSK-
DEER AND OTHER ANIMALS . ; ; 6 5 - 94

CHAPTER XI.

WHO WERE GOG AND MAGOG?—THE SPLENDOURS OF THE
COURT OF KUBLAI KHAN—COLERIDGE’S POEM “IN XA-
NADU” . ; " 5 ‘i : 3 : - 98

CHAPTER XII.

THE TRICKS OF CHINESE CONJURERS—FLYING CUPS AND
AIR-CLIMBERS . . . . . . . . - 107

CHAPTER XIII.

HOW THE GREAT EMPEROR WENT TO WAR—KUBLAI KHAN’S
VICTORIOUS CAMPAIGN AGAINST A KINSMAN—-HOW THE
KHAN REWARDED THE VALOUR OF HIS CAPTAINS. . III

CHAPTER XIV.

THE BEAUTIFUL PALACE OF KUBLAI KHAN-—-HOW THE EM-
PEROR SPENT HIS TIME—CONCERNING THE MIGHTY
CITY OF CAMBALUC—THE MANNER OF SERVING DINNER
IN THE GREAT KHAN’S PALACE—ANCIENT AND MODERN
PEKING—COSTLY ROBES . . . . . . « 124



x CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XV.
PAGE
THE KHAN AS A MIGHTY HUNTER—HIS FALCONERS, HAWKS,

AND HUNTING GEAR—RIDING IN A CHAMBER ON ELE-
PHANTS’ BACKS—RIGHT ROYAL SPORT . e e - 139

CHAPTER XVI.

KUBLAIS FINANCES AND GOVERNMENT—THE GREAT KHAN
AS A MONEY-SPINNER—PRINTING MONEY TO ORDER—
THE EMPEROR’S VALUABLE MONOPOLIES—THE TWELVE
BARONS AND THEIR POWERS—POST-RUNNERS WHO
TRAVEL FAST—BURNING ‘BLACK STONES” FOR FUEL—
THE KHAN’S PATRIARCHAL RULE. : . ‘ - 147

CHAPTER XVII.

THE GOLDEN KING AND PRESTER JOHN—THE FAMED YEL-
LOW RIVER—SOME OF THE WONDERS OF YUNNAN—THE
TRAVELLER MEETS WITH CROCODILES—"'THE PEOPLE
OF THE GOLD TEETH ”—CURIOSITIES OF TATTOOING—

A FAMOUS BATTLE—THE CITY OF MIEN : ° - 163

CHAPTER XVIII.

IN SOUTHERN CHINA AND LAOS—CURIOUS CUSTOMS OF A
STRANGE PEOPLE—LIONS AND LION-HUNTING DOGS—
MARVELLOUS PRODUCTS OF SILK—THE REBELLION AND
PUNISHMENT OF LIYTAN, : 5 : : . - 185

CHAPTER XIX.

BAYAN HUNDRED-EYES—THE POLO BROTHERS INTRODUCE
WESTERN SIEGE ARTILLERY—THE YANG-TSE-KIANG AND
ITS MONASTERIES—KINSAY (THE CITY OF HEAVEN)
DESCRIBED GM sano tie iui caida akon al el ads Meet OO



CONTENTS. x1

CHAPTER XX,
: PAGE
AN EXCURSION TO CIPANGO, OR JAPAN—INGENIOUS SHIPS

BUILT BY THE CHINESE—THE KHAN FAILS TO CONQUER
JAPAN—THE RHINOCEROS—HISTORY OF SAGAMONI BOR-
CAN, OR BUDDHA—RELIQUES OF ADAM. . . 211



CHAPTER XXI.

THE WONDERS OF INDIA—PEARL-FISHERS AND THEIR PERILS
—A STORY LIKE ONE IN ‘' THE ARABIAN NIGHTS’ EN-
TERTAINMENTS "—HUNTING DIAMONDS WITH EAGLES . 226

CHAPTER XXII.

A PEEP INTO AFRICA—THE MYTHICAL ROC AND ITS MIGHTY
EGGS—THE EXPLOITS OF KING CAIDU’S DAUGHTER—
CONCLUSION Siac ie vec leiec ers connie nRt ye 23 T







LIST OF FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.



THE KHAN’S FLEET PASSING THROUGH THE INDIAN ARCHIPELAGO
Frontispiece
THE POLO BROTHERS RECEIVING THE TABLET OF GOLD Facing page 8

MARCO POLO’S GALLEY . . : 4 sear. aa iene 18
THE THREE KINGS ATTHE WELL. . . : SMO lr AS
THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN . seas : Seer 56
THE MIRACULOUS COLUMN . . . . SE EDeMDe NSN 70
TATARS ON THE MARCH eve : : Aeeerirean ty 99
CHINESE PHEASANT Bs . - oO 5 ; nee sehen 96
THE GREAT WALL AND THE RAMPART OF GOG AND MAGOG ,, 4, 98
A PAVILION OF THE SUMMER PALACE . : : TG een Hee LOO.
A CHINESE CONJURER . heehee gis cL Slane an aL OO:
THE PALACE OF THE GREAT KHAN . . . sie tierdls) telee E20
THE WEST GATE OF PEKING . . : 5 aR ems sede y) Raeal SO
THE EAGLE AND ITS VICTIM . . . . eiueeeewaN ys eaves aa eeT AO)
PART OF THE KHAN’S ENCAMPMENT SHINS : soo Lad.
CATAPULTS, MANGONELS, AND OTHER MACHINES . . 5, 4, 198
AN ISLAND MONASTERY . : : : 5 . GEC Nese zOz
GOLDEN ISLAND. ; Sain . . SG aie aetey
SILVER ISLAND. sets . Spe SHUR ae fee SLO
THE THREE ASIATIC RHINOCEROSES: INDIAN (UPPER),

SUMATRAN (LOWER), JAVANESE (MIDDLE) . ; Hee ee 20)

THE ROC , ; . . . . . . . no» 234
xiii



xiv LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

ILLUSERATIONS IN: THE TEXTE.

THE EMPEROR OF CHINA . . . . . . » Onpage 3
THE CASTLE OF THE FIRE-WORSHIPPERS . . Mlegg haath GAO:
OVIS POLI : icv ip3 : : : SAGE, ait ag OO)
THE GREAT NACCARAS 7 . . . . . © 9 9 IIQ

EAST AFRICAN SHEEP . 3 5 . ° . sense eye oe



THE
STORY OF MARCO POLO









THE

SEORY OF MARCO POLO.

CHAPTER I.

CONCERNING MARCO, HIS FATHER, AND HIS UNCLE—MISTY
NOTIONS OF THE FAR EAST HELD BY MEN OF MEDIZVAL
TIMES—HOW THE POLOS WENT TO THE DOMINIONS OF
KUBLAI KHAN AND GOT BACK AGAIN—A MARVELLOUS
JOURNEY.

ANY hundred years ago, in the year 1295, let

us say, before Columbus discovered America,
or the art of printing had been invented, a strange
thing happened in Venice. Three men, dressed
in outlandish garb, partly European and partly
Asiatic, appeared in the streets of that city, making
their way to the gates of a lofty and handsome house
which was then occupied by members of the ancient
family of Polo. The three strangers, whose speech
had a foreign accent, claimed admittance to the
mansion, saying that they were Maffeo and Nicolo

I



2 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

Polo, brothers, and Marco, son of Nicolo, all of whom
had been absent in the wild and barbarous countries
of the Far East for more than twenty-four years, and
had long since been given up as lost.

In those days nobody in Europe knew much about
the regions in which the three Polos had travelled,
the little that was known being derived from
scanty and vague reports. Two friars, Plano Carpini
and William Rubruquis, it is true, had reached the
borders of Cathay, or Northern China, and had
brought back slender accounts of the wonders of that
mysterious land, of which they had heard from the
subjects of the Great Khan, who reigned over a vast
empire. But nobody among the learned and most
travelled people of Europe knew exactly what manner
of people lived, or what countries lay, beyond the
western boundary of Cathay. None knew aught of
the inhabitants (or if there were inhabitants) of the
regions that we now know as India, Sumatra, Japan,
Corea, and the eastern coasts of Asia and Africa.
It was supposed that the farthest extreme, or eastern
edge, of Cathay ran off into a region of continual
darkness, a bog or marsh where all manner of strange
beasts, hobgoblins, and monsters roamed and howled.
And it was not surprising that, when the three Polos
(for these were they) came back from that desperately
savage country and claimed their own, they were
laughed to scorn. It seemed reasonable to believe



1] RETURN OF THE WANDERERS. 3

that the three, having been gone so many years, had
wandered off into the Sea of Darkness and had
perished miserably, or had been destroyed by the
wild creatures of that terrible region.

How the three Polos so far convinced their rela-
tions, who were in possession of the Polo mansion



Che Eriperor of China
in Venice, as to gain admittance, we do not know;
but John Baptist Ramusio, who has written an
entertaining history of the Polo family, sets forth
what was done by the three Polos to prove that
they were what they claimed to be, after they had
taken possession of their house. They explained
that they had been in the service of the Great
Khan, or Emperor, of the Mongol Empire, and



4 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch,

that they had amassed wealth while in the region
variously known as Cathay, China, Mongolia, and the
Far East. Here is what the good John Baptist
Ramusio has to tell of the device by which Maffeo,
Nicolo, and young Marco Polo finally convinced
their neighbours of the truth of their marvellous
story :

They invited a number of their kindred to an entertain-
ment, which they took care to have prepared with great
state and splendour in that house of theirs ; and when the
hour arrived for sitting down to table, they came forth of
their chamber, all three clothed in crimson satin, fashioned ~
in long robes reaching to the ground, such as people in
those days wore within doors. And when water for the
hands had been served, and the guests were set, they took
off those robes and put on others of crimson damask, whilst
the first suits were by their orders cut up and divided among
the servants. Then after partaking of some of the dishes,
they went out again and came back in robes of crimson
velvet; and when they had again taken their seats, the
second suits were divided as before. When dinner was
over, they did the like with the robes of velvet, after they
had put on dresses of the ordinary fashion worn by the
rest of the company. These proceedings caused much
wonder and amazement among the guests. But when the
cloth had been drawn, and all the servants had been
ordered to retire from the dining-hall, Messer Marco, as
the youngest of the three, rose from table, and, going into
another chamber, brought forth the three shabby dresses
of coarse stuff which they had worn when they first arrived.
Straightway they took sharp knives and began to rip up
some of the seams and welts, and to take. out of them |



1] ALL DOUBTS REMOVED. 5

jewels of the greatest value in vast quantities, such as
rubies, sapphires, carbuncles, diamonds, and emeralds,
which had all been stitched up in those dresses in so artful
a fashion that nobody could have suspected the fact. For
when they took leave of the Great Can, they had changed
all the wealth that he had bestowed upon them into this
mass of rubies, emeralds, and other jewels, being well aware
of the impossibility of carrying with them so great an
amount of gold over a journey of such extreme length and
difficulty. Now this exhibition of such a huge treasure of
jewels and precious stones, all tumbled out upon the table,
threw the guests into fresh amazement, insomuch that they
seemed quite bewildered and dumbfounded. And now
they recognised that in spite of all former doubts these
_ were in truth those honoured and worthy gentlemen of

the Ca’ Polo* that they claimed to be; and so all paid
them the greatest honour and reverence. And when the
story got wind in Venice, straightway the whole city, gentle
and simple, flocked to the house to embrace them, and
to make much of them, with every conceivable demonstra-
tion of affection and respect. On Messer Maffeo, who was
the eldest, they conferred the honours of an office that
was of great dignity in those days; whilst the young men
came daily to visit and converse with the ever polite and
gracious Messer Marco, and to ask him questions about
Cathay and the Great Can, all of which he answered
with such kindly courtesy that every man felt himself in a
manner his debtor. And as it happened that in the story,
which he was constantly called on to repeat, of the mag-
nificence of the Great Can, he would speak of his revenues
as amounting to ten or fifteen mil/ions of gold, and in
like manner, when recounting other instances of great
wealth in those parts, would always make use of the term

* House ot Polo,



6 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

millions, so they gave him the nickname of Messer Marco
Miuioni: a thing which I have noted also in the Public
Books of this Republic where mention is made of him.
The Court of his House, too, at S. Giovanni Chrisostomo,
has always from that time been popularly known as the
Court of the Millioni.

It is with the youngest of the three Polos that
our story has to do; for Marco, the son of Nicolo,
was the author of the book that bears his name;
and he was the most famous traveller of his time,
as we shall presently see. He was seventeen
years old when he first started on his adventurous
journey into Far Cathay. He was forty-one years
old when he returned to his native city of Venice,
with his father and his uncle Maffeo; and it was
not until three or four years later, while he was a
prisoner of war, that he began to write, or dictate,
the tale of his wonderful travels.

The two Polo brothers, Nicolo and Maffeo, began
their wanderings in the Far East before Marco was
born. After several years of trading and travelling
in that region of the world, which was called the
Levant, because the sun was seen to rise there (from
the French verb ver, to rise), the two Polos were
in Constantinople in 1260. From that city they
went on a trading venture round the northern shore
of the Black Sea to the Crimea and the Sea of Azov,
and thence into Western Asia and to Bokhara, where



LJ THE MONGOLS. 7

they remained three years. While there, they heard
distinct and trustworthy tales of the Great Khan,
as he was called—the Emperor of the Mongols—
and they resolved to go and see the splendours of
his court.

At that time the Mongolian Empire was one of
the largest, if not the largest, in the world. The
Mongols, beginning their wandering life in the
northern part of Asia, had overrun all the western
part of that continent, and as far to the southward
as the island of Sumatra, excepting India. To the
eastward, the islands of Cipango, or Japan, alone
resisted the dominion of the Great Khan; and in
the west, his hordes had even broken over the borders
of Europe, had taken possession of the country
now known as Russia, had invaded Poland and
Hungary, and had established themselves on the
mouths of the Danube. During the reign of the
great Jenghiz Khan and his immediate successors,
it has been said, “In Asia and Eastern Europe
scarcely a dog might bark without Mongol leave,
from the borders of Poland and the coast of Cilicia
to the Amur and the Yellow Sea.”

When the two Polos arrived at the chief city of
the Mongol Empire, Kublai Khan, a grandson of
the great Jenghiz, was the reigning Sovereign. The
Khan had never seen any Europeans, and he was
greatly pleased with the appearance of the Polo



8 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

brothers. This is what Marco Polo says of the
reception of his father and uncle by Kublai Khan:

When the Two Brothers got to the Great Kaan, he
received them with great honour and hospitality, and
showed much pleasure at their visit, asking them a great
number of questions. First, he asked about the emperors,
how they maintained their dignity and administered justice
in their dominions, and how they went forth to battle,
and so forth. And then he asked the like questions about
the kings and princes and other potentates.

And then he inquired about the Pope and the Church,
and about all that is done at Rome, and all the customs
of the Latins. And the Two Brothers told him the truth
in all its particulars, with order and good sense, like
sensible men as they were; and this they were able to
do, as they knew the Tartar language well.

When that Prince, whose name was CuBLay Kaan,
Lord of the Tartars all over the earth, and of all the
kingdoms and provinces and territories of that vast quarter
of the world, had heard all that the Brothers had to tell
him about the ways of the Latins, he was greatly pleased,
and he took it into his head that he would send them on
an Embassy to the Pope. So he urgently desired them
to undertake this mission along with one of his Barons ;
and they replied that they would gladly execute all his
commands as those of their Sovereign Lord. Then the
Prince sent to summon to his presence one of his Barons
whose name was CocaTAL, and desired him to get ready,
for it was proposed to send him to the Pope along with
the Two Brothers. The Baron replied that he would
execute the Lord’s commands to the best of his ability.

After this the Prince caused letters from himself to the
Pope to be indited in the Tartar tongue, and committed
them to the Two Brothers and to that Baron of his own,





THE POLO BROTHERS RECEIVING THE TABLET OF GOLD.



I] THE KHAN’S INSTRUCTIONS. 9

and charged them with what he wished them to say to
the Pope. Now the contents of the letter were to this
purport: He begged that the Pope would send as many
as an hundred persons of our Christian faith; intelligent
men, acquainted with the Seven Arts, well qualified to
enter into controversy, and able clearly to prove by force
of argument to idolaters and other kinds of folk, that the
Law of Christ was best, and that all other religions were
false and naught; and if they would prove this, he and
all under him would become Christians and the Church’s
liegemen. Finally he charged his Envoys to bring back
to him some Oil of the Lamp which burns on the Sepulchre
of our Lord at Jerusalem.

When the Prince had charged them with all his com-
mission, he caused to be given them a Tablet of Gold,
on which was inscribed that the three Ambassadors should
be supplied with everything needful in all countries through
which they should pass—with horses, with escorts, and, in
short, with whatever they should require. And when they
had made all needful preparations, the three Ambassadors
took their leave of the Emperor and set out.

So great was the reverence in which the Great
Khan was held by all who frequented his court
that he was called the Lord, or the Lord of the
Earth. Ramusio spells the title variously, sometimes
“ Kaan,” and sometimes “Can.” He also calls him
“Cublay” at times, but most scholars give the
name as Kublai. The Seven Arts which the Great
Khan wanted to have brought to his court by
teachers were: Rhetoric, Logic, Grammar, Arith-
metic, Astronomy, Music and Geometry. These



10 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

were then regarded as the sum of human knowledge;
and if the people of the Great Khan were taught
these, they would know all that the Europeans knew.
Everything went well with the travellers, except that
the Tatar baron fell sick, and had to be left behind.
They reached Acre in 1269, where, finding to their
dismay that the Pope was dead, and that his successor
had not been chosen, they went, says Marco Polo,

to a certain wise Churchman who was Legate for the
whole kingdom of Egypt, and a man of great authority, by
name Theobald of Piacenza, and told him of the mission
on which they were come. When the Legate heard their
story, he was greatly surprised, and deemed the thing to
be of great honour and advantage for the whole of
Christendom. So his answer to the Two Ambassador
Brothers was this: “Gentlemen, ye see that the Pope is
dead ; wherefore ye must needs have patience until a new
Pope be made, and then shall ye be able to execute your
charge.” Seeing well enough that what the Legate’ said
was just, they observed: “ But while the Pope is a-making,
we may as well go to Venice and visit our households.”
So they departed from Acre and went to Negropont, and
from Negropont they continued their voyage to Venice.
On their arrival there, Messer Nicolas found that his wife
was dead, and that she had left behind her a son of fifteen
years of age, whose name was Marco; and ’tis of him this
Book tells. The Two Brothers abode at Venice a couple
of years, tarrying until a Pope should be made.

When the Two Brothers had tarried as long as I have
told you, and saw that never a Pope was made, they said ;
that their return to the Great Kaan must be put off no
longer. So they set out from Venice, taking Marco along



1} POPE GREGORY X. II

with them, and went straight back to Acre, where they
found the Legate of whom we have spoken. They had
a good deal of discourse with him concerning the matter,
and asked his permission to go to Jerusalem to get some
Oil from the Lamp on the Sepulchre, to carry with them
to the Great Kaan, as he had enjoined. The Legate
giving them leave, they went from Acre to Jerusalem and
got some of the Oil, and then returned to Acre, and went
to the Legate and said to him: “As we see no sign of
a Pope’s being made, we desire to return to the Great
Kaan ; for we have already tarried long, and there has been
more than enough delay.” To which the Legate replied:
“Since ’tis your wish to go back, I am well content.”
Wherefore he caused letters to be written for delivery to
the Great Kaan, bearing testimony that the Two Brothers
had come in all good faith to accomplish his charge, but
that as there was no Pope they had been unable to do so.

Armed with these, the Polos started on their
return; but they had not gone far when they were
overjoyed to learn that their good friend, Archdeacon
Tebaldo, had been chosen Pope. The news was sent
after them, and they went back to Acre, where
Tebaldo, afterwards known as Pope Gregory X.,
received them graciously ; but he could supply them
with only two priestly teachers, and these afterwards
became so alarmed by the dangers of the way that
they drew back. It is related that the Great Khan,
in consequence of this failure to supply him with
Christian teachers, resorted to Tibet, where he found
holy men who brought for his unruly subjects in-
struction in the religion of Buddha.



CHAPTER JJ.

YOUNG MARCO AT THE COURT OF KUBLAI KHAN—THE GREAT
KHAN’S CONDESCENSION TO THE YOUNG TRAVELLER—THE
MANNER OF THE RETURN OF THE POLOS—-HOW MESSER
MARCO POLO WAS CAPTURED BY THE GENOESE, AND HOW HE
WROTE HIS FAMOUS BOOK OF TRAVELS.

ARCO and his father and uncle were very

cordially received when they reached the
court.of the Great Khan, which was then established
at the imperial summer residence among the hills to
the north of Cambaluc, or Peking. The palace was
a vast group of buildings, and was known as the City
of Peace, or Chandu: its other names were Kemenfu,
Kaiminfu, and Kaipingfu. Here is young Marco’s
own account of the reception which the three
Venetians had in the City of Peace:

And what shall I tell you? When the Two Brothers
and Mark had arrived at that great city, they went to the
Imperial Palace, and there they found the Sovereigr:
attended by a great company of Barons. So they bent
the knee before him, and paid their respects to him with
all possible reverence, prostrating themselves on the ground,

Then the Lord bade them stand up, and treated them
12



Ch. II.J MARCO, THE LINGUIST. 13

with great honour, showing great pleasure at their coming,
and asked many questions as to their welfare and how they
had sped. They replied that they had in verity sped well,
seeing they had found the Kaan well and safe. Then they
presented the credentials and letters which they had received
from the Pope, which pleased him right well; and after
that they produced the Oil from the Sepulchre, and at
that also he was very glad, for he set great store thereby.
And next, spying Mark, who was then a young gallant,
he asked who was that in their company? “Sire,” said
his father, Messer Nicolo, “‘’tis my son and your liegeman.”
“Welcome is he too,” quoth the Emperor. There was
great rejoicing at the Court because of their arrival; and
they met with attention and honour from everybody. So
they abode at the Court with the other Barons.

Now it.came to pass that Marco, the son of Messer
Nicolo, sped wondrously in learning the customs of the
Tartars as well as their language, their manner of writing,
and their practice of war; in fact, he came in brief space
to know several languages and four sundry written characters.
And he was discreet and prudent in every way, insomuch
that the Emperor held him in great esteem. And so when
he discerned Mark to have so much sense, and to conduct
himself so well and beseemingly, he sent him on an
ambassage of his, to a country which was a good six months’
journey distant. The young gallant executed his com-
mission well and with discretion. Now he had taken note
on several occasions that when the Prince’s ambassadors
returned from different parts of the world they were able
to tell him about nothing except the business on which they
had gone, and that the Prince in consequence held them
for no better than fools and dolts, and would say, ‘I had
far liever hearken about the strange things, and the manners
of the differerit countries you have seen, than merely be
told of the business you went upon”; for he took great



14 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch..

delight in hearing of the affairs of strange countries. Mark,
therefore, as he went and returned, took great pains to:
learn about all kinds of different matters in the countries.
which he visited, in order to be able to tell about them
to the Great Kaan.

When Mark returned from his ambassage, he presented
himself before the Emperor; and after making his report
of the business with which he was charged, and its suc-
cessful accomplishment, he went on to give an account,
in a pleasant and intelligent manner, of all the novelties
and strange things that he had seen and heard ; insomuch
that the Emperor and all such as heard his story were
surprised, and said: “If this young man live, he will
assuredly come to be a person of great worth and ability.”
And so from that time forward he was always entitled
‘Messer Marco Po o, and thus we shall style him hence-
forth in this Book of ours, as is but right.

Thereafter Messer Marco abode in the Kaan’s employ-
ment some seventeen years, continually going and coming,
hither and thither, on the missions that were entrusted
to him by the Lord, and sometimes, with the permission
and authority of the Great Kaan, on his own private affairs.
And as he knew all the Sovereign’s ways, like a sensible
man he always took much pains to gather knowledge of
anything that would be likely to interest him, and then
on his return to Court he would relate everything in regular
order, and thus the Emperor came to hold him in great
love and favour. And for this reason also he would employ
him the oftener on the most weighty and most distant of
his missions. These Messer Marco ever carried out with
discretion and success, God be thanked. So the Emperor
became ever more partial to him, and treated him with
the greater distinction, and kept him so close to his person
that some of the Barons waxed very envious thereat.
And thus it came about that Messer Marco Polo had



IL] MARCO, THE EXPLORER. 15

knowledge of, or had actually visited, a greater number of
the different countries of the World than any other man ;
the more that he was always giving his mind to get
knowledge, and to spy out and inquire into everything, in
order to have matter to relate to the Lord.

It is pleasant to think of this bright young stranger
in the court of Kublai Khan, winning friends for
himself by his zeal in acquiring knowledge of the
peoples and countries subject to the sway of the
Khan. By his intelligence and agreeable manners
he was able to command the means to explore
countries which, even to this day, are very imperfectly
understood by the rest of the world. Within the
memory of men now living, European travellers
have explored, for the first time since Marco Polo’s
visits, the Pamir steppes, other portions of Mongolia,
Tibet, and some of the south-western provinces of
China.

He was the first traveller to trace a route across
the whole length of Asia, says one of his biographers,
“describing kingdom after kingdom that he had seen
with his own eyes.” He was the first traveller to
explore the deserts and the flowering plains of
Persia, to reveal China with its mighty rivers, its
swarming population, and its huge cities and rich
manufactures; the first to visit and bring back
accounts of Tibet, Laos, Burmah, Siam, Cochin China,
Japan, the Indian Archipelago, Ceylon, Farther India,



16 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

and the Andaman Islands ; the first to give any dis-
tinct account of the secluded Christian empire of
Abyssinia; the first to speak even vaguely of
Zanzibar, Madagascar, and other regions in the
mysterious South, and of Siberia and the Arctic
Ocean in the terrible and much dreaded North.
Although centuries have passed since young Marco
Polo grew to man’s estate while threading his danger-
ous way among these distant lands, we must still
look back to his discoveries for much that we know
about those countries; for we have learned nothing
new of many of them since his time.

Years passed while the three Polos were gathering
riches and knowledge in Cathay; the Great Khan
was growing old and infirm, and the father and the
uncle of Marco were now well stricken in years. It
was time that they took back to Venice their gold,
precious stones, and costly stuffs. But the old
Emperor growled a refusal whenever they suggested
that they would like to leave his court. A lucky
chance gave them an opportunity of getting away.

The Khan of Persia, Arghun, who was a great-
nephew of Kublai Khan, had lost his favourite wife,
and, fulfilling her dying request, he now sent to the
Mongol court for a lady of her own kin. The Lady
Kukachin, a lovely damsel of seventeen years, was
selected to be the bride of the Persian Khan, and
three envoys of the widowed ruler were told to take



IL.] A MISSION TO PERSIA. 17

her to him. But the way from Cathay to Persia
was very hazardous, owing to the wars which then
prevailed ; and it was thought best for the party to
take ship from one of the ports of China to Ormus,
on the Persian Gulf. The Tatars are not good
sailors ; and the Persian envoys, who could not get
much help or comfort from their friends in the court
of Kublai Khan when they planned their voyage,
naturally bethought them of engaging the services of
the three hardy and venturous Venetians, who were
voyagers, as well as land travellers.

The Great Khan was most unwilling to part with
his favourite and useful Venetians; but having con-
sented to let them go, he fitted out a noble fleet of
ships; and giving them friendly messages to many
of the kings and potentates of Europe, including the
king of England, he sped them on their way. . They
sailed from Zayton, now called Tsinchau, a seaport
of Fukkien, on the south-east coast of China, but were
so detained by storms and the illness of some of the
suite that it was twenty-six months before they
arrived at their destination. Two of the three
envoys died on the way; and when the three
Venetians and the lady who had been confided to
their care reached the court of Persia, they found
that the Persian Khan was dead, and another,
Kaikhatu, reigned in his stead. In that country and
in those days, the wishes of a lady were not much

2



18 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

considered in the matter of marriage, and the son of
the reigning Khan, Ghazan, married the young lady
who had journeyed so far to find a husband. It is
recorded that the young lady wept sadly when she
parted with the kindly and noble Venetians ; and so
they took their way homeward, and arrived in Venice,
as we have said, in the year 1295—-more than six
hundred years ago.

At that time Venice and Genoa were rival republics,
not merely Italian cities. Each was an independent
state, and held rich possessions in the Levant, the
Crimea, and around the Mediterranean. They were
almost continually at war with each other and with
the republic of Pisa. It was expected and required
of all rich and noble citizens of these republics, that
they should furnish a certain number of fighters and
war vessels whenever a war was brought on; and as
most of the fighting was done on the sea, the great
crafts, propelled by oars and called galleys, were
brought into service. In one of these wars the Polo
family took part, for they were rich and noble; and
Marco Polo, now a man of mature years, was com-
mander of a great and powerful galley. He had the
misfortune to be captured ina battle with the Genoese
fleet, off the island of Curzola, on the Dalmatian
coast, in September, 1298.

After that great defeat, Marco Polo was carried a
prisoner to Genoa, where he was held until some time





MARCO POLO’S GALLEY.



IL] MARCO'S AMANUENSIS. 19

during the following year, probably in August, when,
a treaty of peace between the two warring republics
having been signed, he was restored to his own
country. If Marco Polo had not been captured at the
battle of Curzola, or in some other of the many sea-
fights between the two republics, we probably never
would have had his famous book to enlighten us
concerning the lands he saw and described.

And this is how it happened. We have already
seen that it was Marco’s sensible custom to tell his
adventures to those who came to ask him about his
travels in the heart of Asia; and when he found
himself shut up in the prison of Genoa, he speedily
made the acquaintance of his fellow-prisoner, one
Rusticiano of Pisa, who was also a captive of war.
Luckily for us, Rusticiano was a writer of some repute ;
and hearing from Marco’s lips many tales of mar-
vellois adventure, he besought the traveller to set
these down in writing. But noblemen, and indeed
gentlemen of high degree, in those days did not
think well of writing ; it was no disgrace to be unable
to write anything more than one’s name; and the
high and mighty of the land looked down with con-
tempt upon “scriveners and scribes,’ as writers were
called. The world has gotten bravely over that
notion.

Howbeit, Marco agreed to dictate his story to
Rusticiano, having recourse to his own memory, and



20 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

perhaps to the note-books which he must have written
when he was in the service of the Great Khan, and
which may have been sent to him while he was in
the Genoese prison. It is to the book written by
Rusticiano, as the words fell from the lips of Marco
Polo, that we are indebted for the valuable informa-
tion and the entertaining knowledge of the East
which is now spread over many books. And it is
because it was dictated, or recited, and not written by
Marco’s own hand, that we find that in it Marco is
always spoken of in the third person ; he never says
“J did this and that,’ but always “Messer Marco
Polo” ; or he uses some such modest terms.

As the art of printing had not then been invented,
Rusticiano was obliged to write on parchment the
story of Marco Polo; and for many years afterwards,
copies of that book were very precious, for every one
of them had to be written out with infinite labour,
and some of them were illustrated with drawings and
paintings of the wonders described in the book. The
oldest and most valuable of these manuscript books
in existence is in the Great Paris Library ; and, as it
was undoubtedly written during the lifetime of Marco
Polo, and may have been revised by him, it is
regarded as the most authentic, as it is the oldest, of
all the manuscript copies of Marco Polo’s book. It
may be the original book. There are, all told, more
than seventy-five manuscript copies of Marco’s book



IL] "A FAMOUS BOOK. 21

in various parts of Europe, and written in various
languages. The original work was written in French,
then one of the commonest languages of the com-
mercial world. The first printed edition of the book
was in German, and was produced in Nuremberg in
1477. There have been several editions printed in
English, the most famous and best of which, “ Travels
of Marco Polo,” was translated and edited by Colonel
Henry Yule, an English officer and scholar of renown.
It is from his book that we derive all the information
collected for the readers of these chapters.

The strange knowledge of the world which the book
of Marco Polo contained, confirmed, among other
things, the tales brought from the East by the Friars
Plano Carpini and William Rubruquis in 1246 and
1253 respectively. People now learned that the
eastern part of Asia did not run off into an impene-
trable swamp covered with clouds of perpetual
darkness ; for the three Venetians had sailed from
the south-eastern coast of Cathay, or China, round
to the Persian Gulf. Scholars and travellers were a
long time, however, trying to digest the vast amount
of geographical knowledge brought back by the Polos.
They learned that there was an ocean east of Asia,
as well as an ocean west of Spain and England. Why
didn’t they begin to think of crossing westward from
Spain to the Cathay of which such exact accounts
had been brought by Marco Polo?



22 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

As written books were all that readers had, and
these works were few and costly, the book of Messer _
Marco Polo did not have a wide circulation. As we
have seen, people travelled very slowly in those days,
and news and information of all kinds also spread
with even greater slowness. When Christopher
Columbus, who lived in the very city where Marco
Polo had been imprisoned, and in which his book was
written, began to pick up information about the world,
some two hundred years later, he must have come
across some of the tales told by Marco. But there is
no certainty that he ever saw a copy of Polo’s book.
Columbus derived from other sources, or at second-
hand from Polo, the facts which confirmed him in
his belief that the sea between Europe and Cathay—
the Ocean Sea—was very narrow, and that the round
world was not so big as most people supposed.

But when Columbus finally set forth on his voyage
into “the Sea of Darkness,” bound for India and an
unknown land, he carried with him letters written to
the Great Khan by the sovereigns of Spain, Ferdinand
and Isabella. When he lighted upon what we now
know as the islands of the American Continent, he
supposed that he had touched the dominions of the
Great Khan ; and he was continually on the look-out
for the land of Cipango, spoken of by Marco Polo,
where there were such riches of gold and gems and
fabulously gorgeous commodities.



Il.] MARCO, THE TRUTH-TELLER. 23

In his lifetime, and indeed long after, Marco Polo
was regarded as an inventor of idle tales. Even
within fifty years, thoughtless and ignorant writers
have alluded to him as a great liar ; but time has set
him right, and recent explorations and rediscoveries
have proved that he told the truth about things and
places that he saw. If he sometimes gave currency
to fables and traditions, he never adopted them as
his own ; he told his readers what he had heard, and
then left them to judge whether these things were
true or not. And some of the wonders that he
described, and which seemed incredible, are now
proved to be not so wonderful after all. Now that
we understand what a volcano is, we can admit
that those, who never saw or heard of one, would
be slow to believe a traveller who told of a burn-
ing mountain that continually sent forth fire and
smoke from its inside. To this day some of the
natives of tropical regions refuse to believe that water
becomes a solid mass in the winter of the North, so
that men and boys can walk on it, and drag heavy
weights over it.

Marco Polo was not a great genius inspired with a
lofty enthusiasm, as Christopher Columbus was ; but
he told the truth, and deserves a very high place
among those who have made notable additions to
the knowledge of the world. Perhaps he suffered
some slight from the people who lived during his



24 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

own time, because they found it hard to believe
that the world was inhabited by human beings all
round it; that there was no sea of perpetual darkness,
as they had been taught; and that the people of
Asia were really ingenious and skilful traders and
workers, and not savages and cannibals, as they had
supposed. Perhaps, too, the big, swelling words and
bombastic style, with which the worthy Rusticiano
set forth Marco’s book, caused some people to regard
it with contempt and even suspicion. We cannot
better conclude this chapter than with Rusticiano’s
prologue, or preface, to the book of Marco Polo:

GreAT Princes, Emperors, and Kings, Dukes, and
Marquises, Counts, Knights, and Burgesses ! and People of
all degrees who desire to get knowledge of the various
races of mankind and of the diversities of the sundry
regions of the World, take this Book and cause it to be
read to you. For ye shall find therein all kinds of wonder-
ful things, and the divers histories of the great Hermenia,
and of Persia, and of the Land of the Tartars, and of
India, and of many another country of which our Book
doth speak, particularly and in regular succession, according
to the description of Messer Marco Polo, a wise and noble
citizen of Venice, as he saw them with his own eyes.
Some things indeed there be therein which he beheld not;
but these he heard from men of credit and veracity. And
we shall set down things seen as seen, and things heard as
heard only, so that no jot of falsehood may mar the truth
of our Book, and that all who shall read it or hear it read
may put full faith in the truth of all its contents.

For let me tell you that since our Lord God did mould



I1.] RUSTICIANO’S PROLOGUE. 25

with his hands our first Father Adam, even until this day,
never hath there been Christian, or Pagan, or Tartar, or
Indian, or any man of any nation, who in his own person
hath had so much knowledge and experience of the divers
parts of the World and its Wonders as hatb had this
Messer Marco! And for that reason he bethought himself
that it would be a very great pity did he not cause to be
put in writing all the great marvels that he had seen, or on
sure information heard of, so that other people who had
not these advantages might, by his Book, get such know-
ledge. And I may tell you that in acquiring this knowledge
he spent in those various parts of the World good
six-and-twenty years. Now, being thereafter an inmate of
the Prison of Genoa, he caused Messer Rusticiano of Pisa,
who was in the said Prison likewise, to reduce the whole to
writing ; and this befell in the year 1298 from the birth of |
Jesus.



CHAPTER III.

MARCO DISCOURSES OF ANCIENT ARMENIA—THE KINGDOM OF
GEORGIANIA—THE EXPLOITS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT—
STORY OF THE MISERLY CALIPH OF BAGDAD AND HIS GOLD—
A GREAT MARVEL.

N the former chapter we had the preface to Marco

Polo’s book as it was composed by Rusticiano.
In reading the first chapter of the book itself, we
can imagine the prisoner and illustrious traveller
pacing up and down in his place of confinement,
and dictating to his companion the words that are
to be set down. And this is the first chapter of
the work as dictated by Marco:

HERE THE BOOK BEGINS; AND FIRST IT SPEAKS OF THE
LESSER HERMENIA.

THERE are two Hermenias, the Greater and the Less.
The Lesser Hermenia is governed by a certain King, who
maintains a just rule in his dominions, but is himself
subject to the Tartar. The country contains numerous
towns and villages, and has everything in plenty ; moreover,
it is a great country for sport in the chase of all manner

of beasts and birds. It is, however, by no means a-healthy
26



Ch. III.] ARMENIA. 27

region, but grievously the reverse. In days of old the
nobles there were valiant men, and did doughty deeds of
arms; but nowadays they are poor creatures, and good at
naught. Howbeit, they have a city upon the sea, which
is called Lavas, at which there is a great trade. For you
must know that all the spicery, and the cloths of silk and
gold, and other valuable wares that come from the interior,
are brought to that city. And the merchants of Venice
and Genoa, and other countries, come thither to sell their
goods, and to buy what they lack. And whatsoever persons
would travel to the interior (of the East), merchants or
others, they take their way by this city of Layas.

By “Hermenia” we are to understand that the
traveller is speaking of the country now known as
Armenia, a province of Turkey in Asia, lying to
the westward, embracing the regions of the valley
of the Euphrates and the mountainous Ararat. The
subdivisions of the greater and the less Armenia
are not known and used nowadays. Here is what
Marco has to say about the other division of
Armenia:

DESCRIPTION OF THE GREATER HERMENIA.

This is a great country. It begins at a city called
ARZINGA, at which they weave the best buckrams in the
world. It possesses also the best baths from natural
springs that are anywhere to be found. The people of
the country are Armenians, and are subject to the Tartar.

The country is indeed a passing great one, and in the
summer it is frequented by the whole host of the Tartars
of the Levant, because it then furnishes them with such



28 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

excellent pasture for their cattle. But in winter the cold
is past all bounds, so in that season they quit this country
and go to a warmer region where they find other good
pastures. [At a castle called Paipurtu, that you pass in
going from Trebizond to Tauris, there is a very good
silver mine.]

And you must know that it is in this country of Her-
menia that the Ark of Noah exists on the top of a certain
great mountain, on the summit of which snow is so con-
stant that no one can ascend; for the snow never melts,
and is constantly added to by new falls. Below, however,
the snow does melt, and runs down, producing such rich
and abundant herbage that in summer cattle are sent to
pasture from:a long way round about, and it never fails
them. The melting snow also causes a great amount of
mud on the mountain.

The country is bounded on the south by a kingdom
called Mosul, the people of which are Jacobite and Nes-
torian Christians, of whom I shall have more to tell you
presently. On the north it is bounded by the Land of
the Georgians, of whom also I shall speak. On the con-
fines from Georgiania there is a fountain from which oil
springs in great abundance, insomuch that a hundred ship-
loads might be taken from it at one time. This oil is not
good to use with food, but ’tis good to burn, and is also
used to anoint camels that have the mange. People come
from vast distances to fetch it, for in all the countries
round about they have no other oil.

Between Trebizond and Erzerum was Paipurth,
which must be the Baiburt of our day. Even in
Marco Polo’s time it appears that something was
known about petroleum, or coal-oil; for the fountain
of which he speaks is doubtless in the petroleum



I1.] NOAH’S ARK, 29

region on the peninsula of Baku, on the western
coasts of the Caspian Sea, from which many ship-
loads of oil are now annually exported, chiefly to
Russia, under whose rule the country is now held.
Even later than Marco’s day it was believed that
Noah’s Ark, or fragments of it, rested on the top
of Mount Ararat; but as that mountain ‘is nearly
17,000 feet high, and is covered with perpetual
snow, nobody had the courage to go up and find
the ark, until as late as 1829, when the ascent was
made by Professor Parrot, a German traveller.

Every school-boy knows that Bagdad was the
seat of Arabic learning in ancient times, and that
its name often appears in that most delightful book
“The Arabian Nights’ Entertainments” with that of
_the Caliph, the good Harun-al-Rachid. That famous
personage died long before Marco Polo visited
Bagdad; but the stories of the Arabian Nights
were commonly believed by the people of those parts,
as we shall see later on in Marco’s book.

The kingdom of Georgiania, of which Marco
Polo speaks, is that province of Russia which lies
south of the Caucasian range of mountains, between
the Black Sea and the Caspian. The Georgian —
men and women are still famous for their beauty ;
they represent the purest type of the Caucasian
race now known. From this region, for centuries
Eastern princes and potentates have been wont t¢



30 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

bring the beautiful women of their harems. Other
writers besides Marco refer to the fact that all the
kings of ancient Georgia bore the name of David,
just as each Roman emperor for a time was known
as Czesar. Marco sets down the statement about
the eagle-mark on the right shoulder of the king,
it will be noticed, with some reserve; he says this
was true “in old times,” as if it were a legend in
the country in his day.

The reader will find that Marco uses the words
“Ponent” and “Levant” throughout his book to
distinguish between the extreme East and the more
immediate West. East of the Caspian Sea was,
and is, the Levant: westward, on both sides of
the Black Sea, was the Ponent. Alexander the
Great, whose conquests extended to these parts,
occupied Derbend, or Derbent, a port on the west
shore of the Caspian Sea, where to this day they
will show you the remains of a wall along the -
the mountains, known as “ Alexander’s Rampart.”
The story goes that Alexander drove into the
country beyond the mountains several unclean tribes,
who were cannibals and idolaters, and shut them
in by building a huge iron gate, which kept them
securely behind the Caucasus. .

Concerning the products of the country of which
our traveller speaks, it may be said that boxwood,
a dense, fine-grained wood, used for engraving



III] GEORGIANIA AND ITS KINGS. 31

pictures for printing, is still brought from those
regions, the Turkish boxwood being the most
highly esteemed. The silk of the province of Gil,
or Ghellé, is famed for its high quality. In the
Middle Ages one of the sports of royalty and
nobility in Europe, as well as in Far Cathay, was
hunting game with trained hawks, and the goshawks
of Georgia were said to be the best in the world
for that purpose. Marco’s tale of the lake in which
a great abundance of fish could be found during
Lent, when all good Catholics eat no meat, and
which were gone during the rest of the year, is
only one of many such traditions of sundry rivers
and lakes in different parts of the world. The
same is told of many lands and countries; and if
Marco believed what he heard of the miraculous
fish of “St. Leonard’s,” he really believed one of
the commonest travellers’ tales of his time.

OF GEORGIANIA AND THE KINGS THEREOF.

In Gerorciania there is a King called David Melic,
which is as much as to say “David King”; he is subject
to the Tartar. In old times all the kings were born
with the figure of an eagle upon the right shoulder. The
people are very handsome, capital archers, and most valiant
soldiers. ‘They are Christians of the Greek Rite, and have
a fashion of wearing their hair cropped, like Churchmen.

This is the country beyond which Alexander could not
pass when he wished to penetrate to the region of the
Ponent, because that the defile was so narrow and perilous,



32 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

the sea lying on the one hand, and on the other lofty
mountains impassable to horsemen. The strait extends
like this for four leagues, and a handful of people might
hold it against all the world. Alexander caused a very
strong tower to be built there, to prevent the people
beyond from passing to attack him, and this got the name
of the Iron Gatr. This is the place that the Book of
Alexander speaks of, when it tells us how he shut up the
Tartars between two mountains ; not that they were really
Tartars, however, for there were no Tartars in those days,
but they consisted of a race of people called ComMANIANS
and many besides.

In this province all the forests are of boxwood. There
are numerous towns and villages, and silk is produced in
great abundance. They also weave cloths of gold, and
all kinds of very fine silk stuffs. The country produces
the best goshawks in the world, which are called Avig7.
It has indeed no lack of anything, and the people live
by trade and handicrafts. *Tis a very mountainous region,
and full of strait defiles and of fortresses, insomuch that
the Tartars have never been able to subdue it out and out.

There is in this country a certain Convent of Nuns called
St. Leonard’s, about which I have to tell you a very
wonderful circumstance. Near the church in question
there is a great lake at the foot of a mountain, and in this
lake are found no fish, great or small, throughout the year
till Lent come. On the first day of Lent they find in
it the finest fish in the world, and great store too thereof;
and these continue to be found till Easter Eve. After
that they are found no more till Lent come round again;
and so ’tis every year. "Tis really a passing great miracle!

That sea whereof I spoke as coming so near the moun-
tains is called the Sea of GHEL or GuHELAN, and extends
about seven hundred miles. It is twelve days’ journey
distant from any other sea, and into it flows the great



Hl.) BAGDAD. 33

River Euphrates and many others, whilst it is surrounded
by mountains. Of late the merchants of Genoa have
begun to navigate this sea, carrying ships across and
launching them thereon. It is from the country on this
sea also that the silk called Ghedlé is brought. The said
sea produces quantities of fish, especially sturgeon, at the
river-mouths salmon, and other big kinds of fish.

In Marco’s day Bagdad was known as Baudas;
and one of the chapters of his book runs thus:

OF THE GREAT CITY OF BAUDAS, AND HOW IT
WAS TAKEN.

Baupas is a great city, which used to be the seat of the
Calif of all the Saracens in the world, just as Rome is
the seat of the Pope of all the Christians. A very great
river flows through the city, and by this you can descend
to the Sea of India. There is a great traffic of merchants
with their goods this way; they descend some eighteen
days from Baudas, and then come to a certain city called
Kisi, where they enter the Sea of India. There is also
on the river, as you go from Baudas to Kisi, a great city
called Bastra, surrounded by woods, in which grow the
best dates in the world.

In Baudas they weave many different kinds of silk stuffs
and gold brocades, such as nasich, and nac, and cramoisy,
and many other beautiful tissues richly wrought with figures
of beasts and birds. It is the noblest and greatest city in
all those regions.

Now it came to pass on a day in the year of Christ 1255,
that the Lord of the Tartars of the Levant, whose name
was Alaii, prother to the Great Kaan now reigning, gathered
a mighty host and came up against Baudas and took it by
storm. It was a great enterprise! for in Baudas there were

3



34 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

more than one hundred thousand horse, besides foot soldiers.
And when Alaii had taken the place he found therein a tower
of the Calif’s, which was full of gold and silver and other
treasure ; in fact, the greatest accumulation of treasure in
one spot that was ever known. When he beheld that great
heap of treasure he was astonished, and, summoning the
Calif to his presence, he said to him: “ Calif, tell me now
why thou hast gathered such a huge treasure? What didst
thou mean to do therewith? Knewest thou not that I was
thine enemy, and that I was coming against thee with so
great an host to cast thee forth of thine heritage? -Where-
fore didst thou not take of thy gear and employ it in paying
knights and soldiers to defend thee and thy city?”

The Calif wist not what to answer, and said never a
word. So the Prince continued: ‘‘ Now then, Calif, since
I see what a love thou hast borne thy treasure, I will e’en
give it thee to eat!” So he shut the Calif up in the
Treasure Tower, and bade that neither meat nor drink
should be given him, saying: “Now, Calif, eat of thy
treasure as much as thou wilt, since thou art so fond of it;
for never shalt thou have aught else to eat !”

So the Calif lingered in the tower four days, and then
died like a dog. Truly his treasure would have been of
more service to him had he bestowed it upon men who
would have defended his kingdom and his people, rather
than let himself be taken and deposed and put to death as
he was. Howbeit, since that time, there has been never
another Calif, either at Baudas or anywhere else.

The Bastra of Marco Polo is the modern Basra,
which is situated below the meeting of the Euphrates
and the Tigris, and is still famed for the abundance
of its delicious dates. The beautiful cloths called



Nil.) THE MISERLY CALIPH. 35

by Marco zac, nasich, and cramotsy were woven of
silk and gold threads; and when they found their
way to the courts of Europe, long afterwards, they
were worn by the rich and great. In tales of
the time of good Queen Bess we find references
to cramoztsy.

Many modern writers have made use of the story
of the miserly Caliph of Bagdad who perished so
miserably in the midst of his gold; and it is clear
that the poet Longfellow had in mind the tale
told by Marco Polo when he wrote in his “ Flower-
de-Luce” the poem of “Kambalu,” the chief part
of which runs thus:

I said to the Kalif: Thou art old;

~ Thou hast no need of so much gold. ;
Thou shouldst not have heaped and hidden it here
Till the breath of battle was hot and near,
But have sown through the land these useless hoards,
To spring into shining blades of swords,
And keep thine honour sweet and clear.

Then into his dungeon I locked the drone,
And left him there to feed all alone

In the honey-cells of his golden hive;

Never a prayer nor a cry nor a groan

Was heard from those massive walls of stone,
Nor again was the Kalif seen alive.

This is the story strange and true,
That the great Captain Alati
Told to his brother, the Tartar Khan,
When he rode that day into Kambalu
By the road that leadeth to Ispahan.



36 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch,

Marco Polo now proceeds to tell us of “a great
marvel that occurred between Baudas and Mansul”:

_ There was a Calif of Baudas [probably the predecessor
of our miserly friend] who bore a great hatred to Christians,
and was taken up day and night with the thought how he
might bring those that were in his kingdom over to his
own faith, or might procure them all to be slain. And he
used daily to take counsel about this with the devotees and
priests of his faith, for they all bore the Christians like
malice. And, indeed, it is a fact that the whole body of
Saracens throughout the world are always most malignantly
disposed towards the whole body of Christians.

Now it happened that the Calif, with those shrewd
priests of his, got hold of that passage in our Gospel which
says, that if a Christian had faith as a grain of mustard
seed, and should bid a mountain be removed, it would be
removed. And such indeed is the truth. But when they
had got hold of this text they were delighted, for it seemed
to them the very thing whereby either to force all the
Christians to change their faith, or to bring destruction
upon them all. The Calif therefore called together all the
Christians in his territories, who were extremely numerous,
and when they had come before him he showed them
the Gospel, and made them read the text which I have
mentioned. And when they had read it, he asked them
if that was the truth? The Christians answered that it
assuredly was so. “Well,” said the Calif, “since you say
that it is the truth, I will give you a choice. Among such
a number of you there must needs surely be this small
amount of faith, so you must either move that mountain
there ”—and he pointed to a mountain in the neighbour-
hood—* or you shall die an ill death; unless you choose
to eschew death by all becoming Saracens and adopting



IIl.] THE ONE-EYED COBBLER. 37

our Holy Law. To this end I give you a respite of ten
days ; if the thing be not done by that time, ye shall
die or become Saracens.” And when he had said this he
dismissed them to consider what was to be done in this
strait wherein they were.

All the wisest of the Christians took counsel together,
and among them were a number of bishops and priests ;
but they had no resource except to turn to Him from
whom all good things do come, beseeching Him to protect
them from the cruel hands of the Calif.

So they were all gathered together in prayer, both men
and women, for eight days and eight nights. And whilst
they were thus engaged in prayer it was revealed in a
vision by a Holy Angel of Heaven to a certain Bishop
who was a very good Christian, that he should desire a
certain Cobbler, who had but one eye, to pray to God,
and that God in His goodness would grant such prayer
because of the Cobbler’s holy life.

Now when this vision had visited the Bishop several
times, he related the whole matter to the Christians, and
they agreed with one consent to call the Cobbler before
them. And when he had come, they told him it was their
wish that he should pray, and that God had promised to
accomplish the matter by his means. On hearing their
request, he made many excuses, declaring that he was not
at all so good a man as they represented. But they per-
sisted in their request with so much sweetness, that at last
he said he would not tarry, but do what they desired.

And when the appointed day was come, all the Christians
got up early, men and women, small and great—more than
one hundred thousand persons—and went to church, and
heard the Holy Mass. And after Mass had been sung,
they all went forth together in a great procession to the
plain in front of the mountain, carrying the precious Cross
before them, loudly singing and greatly weeping as they



38 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch. III.

went. And when they arrived at the spot, there they
found the Calif with all his Saracen host armed to slay
them if they would not change their faith ; for the Saracens
believed not in the least that God would grant such favour
to the Christians. These latter stood, indeed, in great
fear and doubt, but nevertheless they rested their hope on
their God Jesus Christ.

So the Cobbler received the Bishop’s benison, and then
threw himself on his knees before the Holy Cross, and
stretched out his hands towards Heaven, and made this
prayer: “Blessed Lord God Almighty, I pray Thee by
Thy goodness that Thou wilt grant this grace unto Thy
people, insomuch that they perish not, nor Thy faith be
cast down, nor abused, nor flouted. Not that I am in
the least worthy to prefer such request unto Thee ; but
for Thy great power and mercy I beseech Thee to hear
this prayer from me Thy servant full of sin.”

And when he had ended this his prayer to God the
Sovereign Father and Giver of all grace, and whilst the
Calif and all the Saracens and other people there were
looking on, the mountain rose out of its place, and moved
to the spot which the Calif had pointed out. And when
the Calif and all his Saracens beheld, they stood amazed
at the wonderful miracle that.God had wrought for the
Christians, insomuch that a great number of the Saracens
became Christians. And even the Calif caused himself to
be baptised in the Name of the Father and of the Son
and of the Holy Ghost, Amen, and became a Christian,
but in secret. Howbeit, when he died, they found a little
cross hung round his neck; and therefore the Saracens
would not bury him with the other Califs, but put him in
a place apart. The Christians exulted greatly at this most
holy miracle, and returned to their homes full of joy,
giving thanks to their Creator for that which He had done.





CHAPTER IV.

THE THREE KINGS—THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN—STORIES
%K AND ADVENTURES IN PERSIA—ORIGIN OF THE ASSASSINS,

‘ OUBTLESS all our readers are well acquainted
with the story of the visit of the Three Kings,
or Magi, to Bethlehem, when the Saviour was born.
There is an ancient Christian tradition that the three
men set out from Persia, and that their names were
Melchior, Balthazar, and Kaspar: these wise men
of the East, as they were called, are supposed to have
returned to Persia after their visit to Palestine ; and
Marco Polo tells this tale as it was told to him:

OF THE GREAT COUNTRY OF PERSIA; WITH SOME
ACCOUNT OF THE THREE KINGS.

Persia is a great country, which was in old times very
illustrious and powerful; but now the Tartars have wasted
and destroyed it.

39



40 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

In Persia is the city of Saba, from which the Three Magi
set out when they went to worship Jesus Christ; and in
this city they are buried, in three very large and beautiful
monuments side by side. And above them there is a
square building, carefully kept. The bodies are still entire
with the hair and beard remaining. Messer Marco Polo



THE CASTLE OF THE FIRE-WORSHIPPERS,

asked a great many questions of the people of that city as
to those Three Magi, but never one could he find that
knew aught of the matter except that these were Three
Kings who were buried there in days of old. However, at
a place three days’ journey distant he heard of what I am

going to tell you. He found a village there which goes by
_ the name of Cala Ataperistan, which is as much as to say,
“The Castle of the Fire-worshippers.” And the name is



IV.] THE THREE MAGL 4I

rightly applied, for the people there do worship fire, and I
will tell you why.

They relate that in old times Three Kings of that country
went away to worship a Prophet that was born, and they
carried with them three manner of offerings, Gold, and
Frankincense, and Myrrh; in order to ascertain whether
that prophet were God, or an earthly king, or a physician.
For, say they, if He take the Gold, then He is an earthly
king; if He take the Incense, He is God; if he take the
Myrrh, he is a physician.

So it came to pass when they had come to the place
where the Child was born, the youngest of the Three Kings
went in first, and found the Child apparently just of his
own age; so he went forth again, marvelling greatly. The
middle one entered next, and like the first he found the
Child seemingly of his own age; so he also went forth
again, and marvelled greatly. Lastly, the eldest went in,
and as it had befallen the other two, so it befell him; and
he went forth very pensive. And when the three had
rejoined one another, each told what he had seen; and
then they all marvelled the more. So they agreed to go
in all three together, and on doing so they beheld the
Child with the appearance of its actual age, to wit, some
thirteen days. Then they adored, and presented their
Gold, and Incense, and Myrrh. And the Child took all
the three offerings, and then gave them a small closed
box; whereupon the Kings departed to return into their
own land.

And when they had ridden many days, they said they
would see what the Child had given them. So they opened
the little box, and inside it they found a stone. On seeing
this they began to wonder what this might be that the
Child had given them, and what was the import thereof.
Now the signification was this: When they presented their
offerings, the Child had accepted all three ; and when they



42 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

saw that, they had said within themselves that He was the

True God, and the True King, and the True Physician.

And what the gift of the stone implied was that this Faith

which had begun in them should abide firm as a rock.

For He well knew what was in their thoughts. Howbeit,

they had no understanding at all of this signification of -
the gift of the stone; so they cast it into a well. Then

straightway a fire from Heaven descended into that well

wherein the stone had been cast.

And when the Three Kings beheld this marvel they were
sore amazed, and it greatly repented them that they had
cast away the stone; for well they then perceived that it
had a great and holy meaning. So they took of that fire,
and carried. it into their own country, and placed it in a
rich and beautiful church. And there the people keep it
continually burning, and worship it as a god, and all the
sacrifices they offer are kindled with that fire. And if ever
the fire becomes extinct, they go to other cities round about
where the same faith is held, and obtain of that fire from
them, and carry it to the church. And this is the reason
why the people of this country worship fire. They will
often go ten days’ journey to get of that fire.

Such then was the story told by the people of that Castle
to Messer Marco Polo; they declared to him for a truth
that such was their history, and that one of the ‘Three
Kings was of the city called Sapa, and the second of Ava,
and the third of that very Castle where they still worship
fire, with the people of all the country round about.

The latter part of this account of the Three Kings
and their doings undoubtedly refers to the ancient
Persian sect of fire-worshippers, known as Parsees.
The custom of worshipping fire as the source of life,





THE THREE KINGS AT THE WELL.



Iv] THE CARSEES 43

light, and warmth is almost as old as the human race.
We can readily imagine how profound must liave
been the reverence and admiration with which the
primitive man regarded fire when first that element
was brought into his view. The warming, kindling
flame, its ruddy and changeful colours and shapes,
and the comforting of its warmth, must have inspired
him with rapture and adoration. The sect founded
by Zoroaster, who flourished about six hundred years
before the Christian era, paid reverence to the four
elements of fire, air, earth, and water; from these
people, it is believed, descended the Persian fire-
worshippers, or Parsees. In the course of time,
however, Persia adopted the Moslem faith, and the
fire-worshippers were expelled from the country.
The greater part of them fled to India, where they
are found in large numbers at the present time ; forty
thousand of them are living in Bombay, and there
are not less than two hundred thousand Parsees in
all India.

The sacred fire which attracted the attention of
Marco Polo is still maintained in the temples of the
Indian fire-worshippers; and if by accident the fire
should die, it is rekindled by coals brought from
another temple, as was the custom among the fire-
worshippers of whom Marco gives account. “The
Towers of Silence,” near Bombay, are isolated, lonely
structures where the Parsees expose their dead to be



44 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

devoured by the flocks of vultures that hover around
the place.

In Polo’s further account, of Persia we have the
following interesting chapter :

OF THE EIGHT KINGDOMS OF PERSIA, AND HOW THEY
ARE NAMED.

Now you must know that Persia is a very great country,
and contains eight kingdoms. I will tell you the names
of them all.

The first kingdom is that at the beginning of Persia, and
it is called Casvin ; the second is further to the south, and
is called Curpistan; the third is called Lor 3 the fourth
SUOLSTAN ; the fifth Isranit ; the sixth SrRazy; the seventh
Soncara ; the eighth Tunocain, which is at the further
extremity of Persia. All these kingdoms lie in a southerly
direction except one, to wit, Tunocain; that lies towards
the east, and borders on the country of the Arbre Sol.

In this country of Persia there is a great supply of fine
horses, and people take them to India for sale, for they are
horses of great price, a single one being worth as much of
their money as is equal to 200 livres Tournois; some will
be more, some less, according to the quality. Here also
are the finest asses in the world, one of them being worth
30 marks of silver, for they are very large and fast, and
acquire a capital amble. Dealers carry their horses to
Kisi and Curmosa, two cities on the shores of the Sea of
India, and there they meet with merchants who take the
horses on to India for sale.

In this country there are many cruel and murderous
people, so that no day passes but there is some homicide
among them. Were it not for the Government, which is
that of the Tartars of the Levant, they would do great



IV.] YASDI AND KERMAN. 45

mischief to merchants; and indeed, maugre the Govern-
ment, they often succeed in doing such mischief. Unless
merchants be well armed they run the risk of being
murdered, or at least robbed of everything; and it some-
times happens that a whole party perishes in this way
when not on their guard. The people are all Saracens,
ze. followers of the Law of Mahommet.

In the cities there are traders and artisans who live by
their labour and crafts, weaving cloths of gold, and silk
stuffs of sundry kinds. They have plenty of cotton produced
in the country ; and abundance of wheat, barley, millet,
panick, and wine, with fruit of all kinds.

CONCERNING THE GREAT CITY OF YASDI.

Yasp1 also is properly in Persia; it is a good and noble
city, and has a great amount of trade. They weave there
quantities of a certain silk tissue known as Yasd¢, which
merchants carry into many quarters to dispose of. The
people are worshippers of Mahommet.

When you leave this city to travel further, you ride for
seven days over great plains, finding harbour to receive
you at three places only. There are many fine woods,
producing dates, upon the way, such as one can easily ride
through ; and in them there is great sport to be had in
hunting and hawking, there being partridges and quails
and abundance of other game, so that the merchants who
pass that way have plenty of diversion. There are also
wild asses, handsome creatures. At the end of those seven
marches over the plain you come toa fine kingdom which
is called Kerman.

CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF KERMAN.

KERMAN is a kingdom which is also properly in Persia,
and formerly it had a hereditary prince. Since the Tartars



46 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch,

conquered the country the rule is no longer hereditary, but
the Tartar sends to administer whatever lord he pleases.
In this kingdom are produced the stones called turquoises
in great abundance; they are found in the mountains,
where they are extracted from the rocks. There are also
plenty of veins of steel and ondanigue. The people
are very skilful in making harness of war; their saddles,
bridles, spurs, swords, bows, quivers, and arms of every
kind are very well made indeed, according to the fashion
of those parts. The ladies of the country and their
daughters also produce exquisite needlework in the em-
broidery of silk stuffs in different colours, with figures of
beasts and birds, trees and flowers, and a variety of other
patterns. They work hangings for the use of noblemen
so deftly that they are marvels to see, as well as cushions,
pillows, quilts, and all sorts of things.

In the mountains of Kerman are found the best falcons
in the world. They are inferior in size to the peregrine,
red on the breast, under the neck, and between the thighs ;
their flight so swift that no bird can escape them.

On quitting the city you ride on for seven days, always
finding towns, villages, and handsome dwelling-houses, so
that it is very pleasant travelling; and there is excellent
sport also to be had by the way in hunting and hawking.
When you have ridden those seven days over a plain
country, you come to a great mountain; and when you
have got to the top of the pass, you find a great descent
which occupies some two days to go down. All along you
find a variety and abundance of fruits ; and in former days
there were plenty of inhabited places on the road, but now
there are none; and you meet with only a few people
looking after their cattle at pasture. From the city of
Kerman to this descent the cold in winter is so great that
you can scarcely abide it, even with a great quantity of
clothing.



Iv.] THE ZEBU. 47

OF THE CITY OF CAMADI AND ITS RUINS ; ALSO TOUCHING
THE CARAONA ROBBERS.

After you have ridden downhill those two days, you find
yourself in a vast plain, and at the beginning thereof there
is a city called Camap1, which formerly was a great and
noble place, but now is of little consequence, for the
Tartars in their incursions have several times ravaged it.
The plain whereof I speak is a very hot region; and the
province that we now enter is called REOBARLES.

The fruits of the country are dates, pistachioes, and
apples of Paradise, with others of the like not found in our
cold climate. There are vast numbers of turtle-doves,
attracted by the abundance of fruits ; but the Saracens never
take them, for they hold them in abomination. And on
this plain there is a kind of bird called francolin, but
different from the francolin of other countries, for their
colour is a mixture of black and white, and the feet and
beak are vermilion colour.

The beasts also are peculiar; and first I will tell you of
their oxen. These are very large, and all over white as
snow ; the hair is very short and smooth, which is owing to
the heat of the country. The horns are short and thick,
not sharp in the point; and between the shoulders they
have a round hump some two palms high. There are no
handsomer creatures in the world. And when they have to
be loaded, they kneel like the camel; once the load is
adjusted, they rise. Their load is a heavy one, for they
are very strong animals. Then there are sheep here as
big as asses ; and their tails are so large and fat that one
tail shall weigh some thirty pounds. They are fine fat
beasts, and afford capital mutton.

In this plain there are a number of villages and towns
which have lofty walls of mud, made as a defence against
the bandittii who are very numerous, and are called



48 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

Caraonas. This name is given them because they are
the sons of Indian mothers by Tartar fathers. And you
must know that when these Caraonas wish to make a
plundering incursion, they have certain devilish enchant-
ments whereby they do bring darkness over the face of
day, insomuch that you can scarcely discern your comrade
riding beside you; and this darkness they will cause to
extend over a space of seven days’ journey. They know
the country thoroughly, and ride abreast, keeping near one
another, sometimes to the number of ten thousand, at other
times more or fewer. In this way they extend across the
whole plain that they are going to harry, and catch every
living thing that is found outside of the towns and villages ;
man, woman, or beast, nothing can escape them! The old
men whom they take in this way they butcher; the young
men and the women they sell for slaves in other countries ;
thus the whole land is ruined, and has become well-nigh a
desert.

The king of these scoundrels is called Nocopar. This
Nogodar had gone to the Court of Chagatai, who was
own brother to the Great Kaan, with some ten thousand
horsemen of his, and abode with him; for Chagatai was
his uncle. And whilst there this Nogodar devised a most
audacious enterprise ; and I will tell you what it was. He
left his uncle, who was then in Greater Armenia, and fled
with a great body of horsemen, cruel, unscrupulous fellows,
first through Bapasuan, and then through another province
called PasHar-Dir, and then through another called
ARIORA-KESHEMUR. There he lost a great number of
his people and of his horses, for the roads were very
narrow and perilous. And when he had conquered all
those provinces, he entered India at the extremity of a
province called Dativar. He established himself in that
city and government, which he took from the King of the
country, ASEDIN SOLDAN by name, a man of great power



IV.] PERSIA. 49

and wealth. And there abideth Nogodar with his army,
afraid of nobody, and waging war with all the Tartars in
his neighbourhood.

Now that I have told you of those scoundrels and their
history, I must add the fact that Messer Marco himself was
all but caught by their bands in such a darkness as that I
have told you of; but, as it pleased God, he got off and
threw himself into a village that was hard by, called
Conosatmi. Howbeit he lost his whole company except
seven persons who escaped along with him. The rest were
caught, and some of them sold, some put to death.

Marco sometimes regards a city as a province, or
even a kingdom, as he does in this list of the “eight
kingdoms of Persia.” It is now supposed by the
most intelligent writers on Persia that Marco refers
to the ancient city of Kazwin, whi h he calls Casvin,
the first on his list. But the province in that
part of Persia, the northern, is now known as Irak.
Curdistan is an old form of spelling Kurdistan. Lor
is Luristan, next to the southward, and the people of
that province are still noted thieves and bandits.
Suolstan, so called by Marco, is probably the modern
Shulistan; the region known by that name was
inhabited by the Shuls, or Shauls. Marco’s Istanit
is now believed to be the famous city of Ispahan ;
and Serazy is readily translatable into the modern
Shiraz. Soncara is the country of the Shawankars ;
Tunocain is Kuhistan, the hill country of Persia, of
which Tun and Kain are the chief cities.

4



50 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ck.

Persian horses are quite as famous for beauty and
speed as they were in the days when our Venetian
traveller explored the country in which they were
bred. These fine animals are still exported to India,
whence a few of them are ultimately carried to
England and other parts of Europe. Colonel Yule,
in his book about Marco Polo, tells of a horse of this
breed that travelled nine hundred miles in eleven
days, and of another that accomplished about eleven
hundred miles within twelve days, taking two days of
that time for rest. The Lure tournois, which Marco
uses as a standard of coin valuation, was worth £1
sterling in modern English money, allowing for the
lower relative value of gold as compared with silver
in those far-off days; so that a fine Persian steed
would cost about £193, English money, or a little
‘more than $950, American money. The silver mark
of that time, thirty of which were paid for a good
donkey, would be about equal to forty English
shillings ; and that sum—thirty marks—again allow-
ing for the lower value of gold as related to silver,
would be equal to £88 sterling, or $440, American
currency.

The fame of Oriental steel blades has extended all
over the world, dating back to the most ancient
times; and marvellous stories are told of the flexibility,
sharpness, and hardness of edged weapons made by
Arabs, Moors, and other warlike tribes of the East.



IV.] FAT-TAILED SHEEP, 51

The ondanzgue of Marco Polo is probably the “ Indian
steel” of which many writers have made mention.
It was so manufactured that a blade of this material
possessed an edge of surpassing keenness and hard-
ness. It was said that a Kerman sabre would cleave
a European metal helmet in twain without turning
its own edge. The embroidered and woven silk
stuffs and carpets of the Kerman region are still
held in high repute on account of their fineness and
beauty. :

The francolin, referred to in the extract above
quoted, is the bird known in England and some parts
of America as the black partridge, and is highly
esteemed for its delicate quality. Any intelligent
youngster will recognise the humped oxen that
attracted the attention of Marco Polo and awakened
his interest. They are to be found in India and
other Eastern countries, and poor is the menagerie
that does not have one or two specimens of the zebu,
or Indian ox, as it is now called. These beasts are
very docile, and are taught to kneel to receive the
loads which they carry on their backs. Fat-tailed
sheep are also common in various portions of Asia
Minor and Africa. The tail is broad and flat,
sometimes weighing fifty or sixty pounds, and is
considered a great delicacy by the inhabitants of
those parts of the world. Some travellers of good
repute have said, that they have seen fat-tailed



52 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

sheep whose tails were so large, that each animal
was provided with a slab of wood, fitted under the
tail, with little trucks, or wheels, attached to the
end that dragged on the ground.

The notion that fogs and mists can be brought
upon the face of the earth by the command of an
enchanter is truly Oriental; this is still believed in
some parts of India, and Mr. F. Marion Crawford,
the novelist, has made use of an enchanted fog in one
of his romances. It is certain, however, that a dry
fog, which seems to be really a dust-storm, is of
common occurrence in Persia and Northern India.
The phenomenon is strange and baffling, and it is
not surprising that the residents of that country, not
understanding why the air should be filled with dry
dust while it is yet perfectly still, should charge this
to the operations of some enchanter. In such a
dust-storm the raids of robbers, who take advantage
of the panic and the obscurity prevailing, would be
successful, and very disastrous to the unfortunates
whose flocks and herds would be captured and driven
off. The Caraonas, nowadays known as Hazaras,
are bold and daring brigands; they have sometimes
ridden up to the very gates of the city of Ispahan on
their wild forays in search of plunder, ravaging the
country and leaving behind them nothing that can be
carried off or destroyed.

Here may be given a few extracts from Marco’s



IV.J STITCHED SHIPS. 53

interesting account of the city of Hormos and its
inhabitants, showing what they eat and drink, how
they build their ships, and how they avoid the
poison-wind and its terrible effects.

Tis, he says, a city of immense trade. There are
plenty of towns and villages under it, but it is the capital.
The King is called Ruomedam Ahomet. It is a very sickly
place, and the heat of the sun is tremendous. If any
foreign merchant dies there, the King takes all his property.

In this country they make a wine of dates mixed with
spices, which is very good. When any one not used to
it first drinks this wine, it causes repeated and violent pains ;
but afterwards he is all the better for it, and gets fat upon
it. The people never eat meat and wheaten bread except
when they are ill, and if they take such food when they are
in health it makes them ill. Their food when in health
consists of dates and salt fish (tunny, to wit) and onions,
and this kind of diet they maintain in order to preserve
their health.

Their ships are wretched affairs, and many of them get
lost ; for they have no iron fastenings, and are only stitched
together with twine made from the husk of the Indian nut.
They beat this husk until it becomes like horsehair, and
from that they spin twine, and with this stitch the planks
of the ships together. It keeps well, and is not corroded
by the sea-water, but it will not stand well in a storm.
The ships are not pitched, but are rubbed with fish-oil.
They have one mast, one sail, and one rudder, and have
no deck, but only a cover spread over the cargo when
loaded. This cover consists of hides, and on the top of
these hides they put the horses which they take to India
for sale. They have no iron to make nails of, and for this
reason they use only wooden trenails in their shipbuilding,



54 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

and then stitch the planks with twine as I have told you.
Hence ’tis a perilous business to go a voyage in one of
those ships, and many of them are lost, for:in that Sea of
India the storms are often terrible.

The people are black, and are worshippers of Mahommet.
The residents avoid living in the cities, for the heat in
summer is so great that it would kill them. Hence they
go out (to sleep) at their gardens in the country, where
there are streams and plenty of water. For all that they
would not escape but for one thing that I will mention.
The fact is, you see, that in summer a wind often blows
across the sands which encompass the plain, so intolerably
hot that it would kill everybody, were it not that, when
they perceive that wind coming, they plunge into water up
to the neck, and so abide until the wind have ceased.

And to prove the great heat of this wind, Messer Mark
related a case that befell when he was there. The Lord
of Hormos, not having paid his tribute to the King of
Kerman, the latter resolved to claim it at the time when
the people of Hormos were residing away from the city.
So he caused a force of sixteen hundred horse and five
thousand foot to be got ready, and sent them by the
route of Reobarles to take the others by surprise. Now it
happened one day that through the fault of their guide
they were not able to reach the place appointed for their
night’s halt, and were obliged to bivouac in the wilderness
not far from Hormos. In the morning as they were starting
on their march they were caught by that wind, and every
man of them was suffocated, so that not one survived to
carry the tidings to their lord. When the people of
Hormos heard of this, they went forth to bury the bodies,
lest they should breed a pestilence. But when they laid
hold of them by the arms to drag them to the pits, the
bodies proved to be so daked, as it were, by that tremendous
heat, that the arms parted from the trunks, and in the



Iv.] THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN. 55

end the people had to dig graves hard by each where it
lay, and so cast them in.

In Marco’s account of Persia we find the hero
Alaii again mentioned by name. It was Alaii who
captured the castle of the miserly Caliph; and he it
was who put an end to the crimes of the wicked
Old Man of the Mountain. Here is the chapter
concerning both of those two personages: A

CONCERNING THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN.

MULEHET is a country in which the Old Man of the
Mountain dwelt in former days; and the name means
% Place of the Aram.” Twill tell you his whole history as
related by Messer Marco Polo, who heard it from several
natives of that region.

The Old Man was called in their language ALoaDIN. He
had caused a certain valley between two mountains to be
enclosed, and had turned it into a garden, the largest and
most beautiful that ever was seen, filled with every variety
of fruit. In it were erected pavilions and palaces, the most
elegant that can be imagined, all covered with gilding and
exquisite painting. And there were runnels, too, flowing
freely with wine and milk and honey and water; and
numbers of ladies, the most beautiful in the world, who
could play on all manner of instruments, and sang most
sweetly, and danced in a manner that it was charming to
behold. For the Old Man desired to make his people
believe that this was actually Paradise. So he had
fashioned it after the description that Mahommet gave of
his Paradise, to wit, that it should be a beautiful garden run-
ning with conduits of wine and milk and honey and water;



56 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

and sure enough the Saracens of those parts believed that
it was Paradise.

Now no man was allowed to enter the Garden save those
whom he intended to be his AsuisHin. There was a
Fortress at the entrance to the Garden, strong enough to
resist all the world; and there was no other way to get in.
He kept at his Court a number of the youths of the country,
from twelve to twenty years of age, such as had a taste for
soldiering, and to these he used to tell tales about Paradise,
just as Mahommet had been wont to do, and they believed
in him just as the Saracens believe in Mahommet. Then he
would introduce them into his Garden, some four, or six,
or ten at a time, having first made them drink a certain
potion which cast them into a deep sleep, and then causing
them to be lifted and carried in. So when they awoke they
found themselves in the Garden.

Now this Prince whom we call the Old One kept his
Court in grand and noble style, and made those simple hill-
folks about him believe firmly that he was a great Prophet.
And when he wanted one of his Ashishin to send on any
mission, he would cause that potion, whereof I spoke, to be
given to one of the youths in the Garden, and then had
him carried into his Palace. So when the young man
awoke, he found himself in the Castle, and no longer in
that Paradise ; whereat he was not over-well pleased. He
was then conducted to the Old Man’s presence, and
bowed before him with great veneration, as believing him-
self to be in the presence of a true Prophet. The Prince
would then ask whence he came, and he would reply that
he came from Paradise! and that it was exactly such as
Mahommet had described it in the Law. This of course
gave the others who stood by, and who had not been
admitted, the greatest desire to enter therein.

So when the Old Man would have any Prince slain, he
would say to such a youth: “Go thou and slay So-and-So; and



: “Sime nae AY
el Yn SO
y 4, aM AY Gite .
he Neg Or
We = Yup

ay Me i,

ge
S
7,
f

=
n
——————

a Wnerass



THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN.



IV.] HIS ASSASSINS. 57

when thou returnest my Angels shall bear thee into Paradise.
And shouldst thou die, natheless even so will I send my
Angels to carry thee back into Paradise.” So he caused them
to believe ; and thus there was no order of his that they
would not affront any peril to execute, for the great desire
they had to get back into that Paradise of his. And in this
manner the Old One got his people to murder any one
whom he desired to get rid of. Thus, too, the great dread
that he inspired all Princes withal made them become his
tributaries, in order that he might abide at peace and amity
with them.

I should also tell you that the Old Man had certain
others under him, who copied his proceedings and acted
exactly in the same manner. One of these was sent into
the territory of Damascus, and the other into Curdistan.

Now it came to pass in the year 1252, that Alati, Lord of
the Tartars of the Levant, heard tell of these great crimes
of the Old Man, and resolved to make an end of him. So
he took and sent one of his Barons with a great Army to
that Castle, and they besieged it for three years, but they
could not take it, so strong was it. And indeed if they had
had food within, it never would have been taken. But after
being besieged those three years they ran short of victual,
and were taken. The Old Man was put to death with all
his men, and the Castle with its Garden of Paradise was
levelled with the ground. And since that time he has had
no successor ; and there was an end to all his villainies.

The region in which, according to Marco Polo, the
Old Man of the Mountain lived and reigned was
the mountainous part of Persia, in the far north.
But in the time of the first Crusaders, which was
some two hundred years earlier, the chief of a band



58 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

of scoundrels and men-slayers, one Hassan-ben-Sabah,
had his stronghold in Mount Lebanon, in the southern
part of Syria; and he was also known as the Old
Man of the Mountain.

It is interesting to know that the story of the Old
One was current all over the East, and that we get
our word “assassin” from the vile practices of that
wicked man, who really did exist, and whose fol-
lowers are still to be found in remote corners of the
East. The drug which he gave to those whom he
desired to enlist in his band was hashish, or Cannabis
Indica. This is a learned name for Indian hemp,
from which the drug is derived. Men who used the
hashish to give them pleasant sleep and beautiful
dreams were called “hashishiyyin”; and it was easy
to make the word “assassin” out of hashishiyyin.

That this is the true origin of the English word
nobody need doubt. As Marco passed by the castle
of the Old Man of the Mountain not long after the
defeat of the latter by the Prince Alaii, we can believe
that he heard a true account of what had happened ;
and it is not unlikely that the followers of this chief,
the Assassins, as they were called, were a numerous
band of fanatics who were spread over a considerable
part of the East.

At Taican, three days’ journey from Badashan,
Marco is much struck (and no wonder) by the moun-
tains of salt:



IV.] MOUNTAINS OF SALT. 59

Taican is a fine place, and the mountains that you see
towards the south are all composed of salt. People from
all the countries round, to some thirty days’ journey, come
to fetch this salt, which is the best in the world, and is so
hard that it-can only be broken with iron picks. ’Tis in
such abundance that it would supply the whole world to the
end of time.



CHAPTER: N:

THE GEMS OF BADAKSHAN—A ROYAL PREROGATIVE—THE
CONJURERS OF CASHMERE.

ADASHAN, of which our traveller wrote an
interesting account, is now known as Badak-
shan ; it lies to the north of that range of mountains
which bears the name of the Hindu Kush, in Central
Asia, south of Bokhara and north of Afghanistan.
Marco’s eyes are now turned eastward, and he writes
thus of the country of which the outside world knew
nothing then:

OF THE PROVINCE OF BADASHAN.

Bapasuan is a Province inhabited by people who worship
Mahommet, and have a peculiar language. It forms a very
great kingdom, and the royalty is hereditary. All those
of the royal blood are descended from King Alexander
and the daughter of -King Darius, who was Lord of the
vast Empire of Persia. And all these kings call themselves
in the Saracen tongue Zulcarniain, which is as much as
to say “ Alexander”; and this out of regard for Alexander
the Great.

It is in this province that those fine and valuable gems,
the Balas Rubies, are found. They are got in certain

60



Ch. V.] GEMS OF BADAKSHAN. 61

rocks among the mountains, and in the search for them
the people dig great caves underground, just as is done
by miners for silver. There is but one special mountain
that produces them, and it is called Syghinan. The stones
are dug on the King’s account, and no one else dares dig
in that mountain on pain of forfeiture of life as well as
goods; nor may any one carry the stones out of the
kingdom. But the King amasses them all, and sends them
to other kings when he has tribute to render, or when he
desires to offer a friendly present; and such only as he
pleases he causes to be sold. Thus he acts in order to
keep the Balas at a high value; for if he were to allow
everybody to dig, they would extract so many that the
world would be glutted with them, and they would cease
to bear any value. Hence it is that he allows so few to
be taken out, and is so strict in the matter.

There is also in the same country another mountain,
in which azure is found; ’tis the finest in the world, and
is got in a vein like silver. There are also other mountains
which contain a great amount of silver ore, so that the
country is a very rich one; but it is also (it must be said)
avery cold one. It produces numbers of excellent horses,
remarkable for their speed. They are not shod at all,
although constantly used in mountainous country and on
very bad roads. They go at a great pace even down steep
descents, where other horses neither would nor could do
the like. And Messer Marco was told that not long ago
they possessed in that province a breed of horses, descended
from Alexander’s horse Bucephalus, all of which had from
their birth a particular mark on the forehead. ‘This breed
was entirely in the hands of an uncle of the King’s; and
in consequence of his refusing to let the King have any of
them, the latter put him to death. The widow then, in
despite, destroyed the whole breed, and it is now extinct.

In the mountains there are vast numbers of sheep—



62 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

400, 500, or 600 in a single flock, and all of them wild;
and though many of them are taken, they never seem to
get aught the scarcer.

Those mountains are so lofty that ’tis a hard day’s work,
from morning till evening, to get to the top of them. On
getting up, you find an extensive plain, with great abundance
of grass and trees, and copious springs of pure water running
down through rocks and ravines. In those brooks are
found trout and many other fish of dainty kinds ; and the
air in those regions is so pure, and residence there so
healthful, that when the men who dwell below in the
towns, and in the valleys and plains, find themselves
attacked by any kind of fever or other ailment that may
hap, they lose no time in going to the hills; and after
abiding there two or three days, they quite recover their
health through the excellence of that air. And Messer
Marco said he had proved this by experience; for when
in those parts he had been ill for about a year, but as soon
as he was advised to visit that mountain he did so and
got well at once.

In this kingdom there are many strait and perilous
passes, so difficult to force that the people have no fear
of invasion. Their towns and villages also are on lofty
hills, and in very strong positions. They are excellent
archers, and much given to the chase; indeed, most of
them are dependent for clothing on the skins of beasts,
for stuffs are very dear among them. The great ladies,
however, are arrayed in stuffs, and I will tell you the style
of their dress. They all wear trousers made of cotton
cloth, and into the making of these some will put 60, 80,
or even roo ells of stuff.

OF THE PROVINCE OF PASHAI.

You must know that ten days’ journey to the south of
Badashan there is a Province called Pasuat, the people of



v.] HORSES OF BADAKSHAN. 63

which have a peculiar language, and are Idolaters, of a
brown complexion. They are great adepts in sorceries and
the diabolic arts. The men wear earrings and brooches of
gold and silver set with stones and pearls. They are a
pestilent people and a crafty ; and they live upon flesh and
rice. Their country is very hot.

Now let us proceed and speak of another country which
is seven days’ journey from this one towards the south-east,
and the name of which is KESHIMUR.

The Badakshan country is still famed for its
rubies, although the quality of the gems is not so
high as in earlier times; and the working of the
ruby mines is a monopoly in the hands of the govern-
ment. By “azure” Marco means lapis-lazuli, a
semi-precious stone of a beautiful blue colour, greatly
esteemed by gem-workers. As for the horses that
were claimed to have descended from the famous
Bucephalus of Alexander the Great, we may say
that many Oriental people are famous braggarts ;
and although the horses of Badakshan are still so
beautiful and strong that Afghan robbers continually
raid the country to steal them, it is unlikely that
any progeny of Bucephalus were then to be found
in any quarter of the world.

Keshimur, of which our traveller next speaks, is
readily understood to be Cashmere, lying just south
of the Hindu Kush, and famous for its shawls, attar
of roses, and other products. Here is Marco’s very
brief account of that province:



64 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

OF THE PROVINCE OF KESHIMUR.

Keshimur also is a Province inhabited by a people who
are Idolaters and have a language of their own. They
have an astonishing acquaintance with the devilries of en-
chantment; insomuch that they make their idols to speak.
They can also by their sorceries bring on changes of
weather and produce darkness, and do a number of things
so extraordinary that no one without seeing them would
believe them. Indeed, this country is the very original
source from which Idolatry has spread abroad.

In this direction you can proceed further till you come
to the Sea of India.

The men are brown and lean, but the women, taking
them as brunettes, are very beautiful. The food of the
people is flesh, and milk, and rice. The clime is finely
tempered, being neither very hot nor very cold.

There are in this country Eremites (after the fashion of
those parts). who dwell in seclusion and practise great
abstinence in eating and drinking. They keep from all
sins forbidden in their law, so that they are regarded by
their own folk as holy persons. They live to a great age.

There are also a number of idolatrous abbeys and
monasteries. The people of the province do not kill
‘animals nor spill blood; so if they want to eat meat they
get the Saracens who dwell among them to play the
butcher. The coral which is carried from our parts of
the world has a better sale there than in any other
country.

Now we will quit this country, and not go any further
in the same direction; for if we did so we should enter
India, and that I do not wish to do at present. For, on
our return journey, I mean to tell you about India: all in
regular order. Let us go back therefore to Badashan, for
we cannot otherwise proceed on our journey.



V.J MERE JUGGLERY. 65

The conjurers of Cashmere seem to have made
a great impression on Marco, who had seen them
before at the court of Kublai Khan. They had, and
still have, a wide reputation for their skill. Like
many other so-called magicians, they have the power
of-deceiving on-lookers to so great an extent that men
have soberly reported that they saw iron float in the
water, rocks rise in the air without being touched by
any one, and clouds come and go and mists fall, all
at the bidding of the magician. It is, of course, all
mere jugglery.

Marco’s statement that Buddhism, or “ Idolatry,’
as he styles it, spread from Cashmere, must be taken

?

with some allowance; for although that faith did
spread thence into Tibet and other lands where it
holds great power, it first went into Cashmere from
India. One of the first of the Ten Obligations, or
commandments, of Buddhism is to refrain from
taking life ; and the pious Eremites (or hermits) and
Buddhists whom Marco saw, while they did not
hesitate to eat meat, would not kill with their own
hands the animal that was to be eaten. That is still
the custom of the country ; the good Buddhist will
not cause death if he can possibly avoid it.



CHAPTER VI.

THE ROOF OF THE WORLD—HOW THE PAMIR COUNTRY BORDERS
ON THREE GREAT EMPIRES—-THE GREAT HORNED SHEEP OF
THE STEPPES—A MARVELLOUS STORY OF SAMARCAND.

E have heard much, of late years, about the

Pamir country; and we shall hear more
about it as time goes on: for the Pamir steppe, as
it is sometimes called, lies in the heart of Central
Asia, north-east of Afghanistan, south of Asiatic
Russia, and west of Turkestan. Therefore it borders
on the empires of Russia, China, and British India;
on its lofty plains may be fought more than one
battle for supremacy. It is a series of plateaus,
15,000 feet above the level of the sea; and some of
its loftiest mountain peaks are 25,000 feet above sea-
level. The first account of this wonderful region
was written by Marco Polo, and is as follows

In leaving Badashan you ride twelve days between east
and north-east, ascending a river that runs through land
belonging to a brother of the Prince of Badashan, and
containing a good many towns and villages and scattered
habitations. The people are Mahommetans, and valiant



Ch, VI.] THE ROOF OF THE WORLD. 67

in war. At the end of those twelve days you come to a
province of no great size, extending indeed no more than
three days’ journey in any direction, and this is called
Voxuan. The people worship Mahommet, and they have
a peculiar language. They are gallant soldiers, and they
have a chief whom they call Nonz, which is as much as
‘to say Count, and they are liegemen to the Prince of
Badashan.

There are numbers of wild beasts of all sorts in this
region. And when you leave this little country, and ride
three days north-east, always among mountains, you get
to such a height that ’tis said to be the highest place in
the world! And when you have got to this height, you
find a great lake between two mountains, and out of it a
fine river running through a plain clothed with the finest
pasture in the world; insomuch that a lean beast there
will fatten to your heart’s content in ten days. There are
great numbers of all kinds of wild beasts; among others,
wild sheep of great size, whose horns are a good six palms
in length. From these horns the shepherds make great
bowls to eat from, and they use the horns also to enclose
folds for their cattle at night. Messer Marco was told also
that the wolves were numerous, and killed many of those
wild sheep. Hence quantities of their horns and bones
were found, and these were made into great heaps by the
wayside in order to guide travellers when snow was on the
ground.

The Plain is called Pamrer, and you ride across it for
twelve days together, finding nothing but a desert without
habitations or any green thing, so that travellers are obliged
to carry with them whatever they have need of. The
region is so lofty and cold that you do not even see any
birds flying. And I must notice also that because of this
great cold, fire does not burn so brightly, nor give out so
much heat as usual, nor does it cook food so effectually.



68 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

Now, if we go on with our journey towards the east-
north-east, we travel a good forty days, continually passing
over mountains and hills, or through valleys, and crossing
many rivers and tracts of wilderness. And in all this way
you find neither habitation of man, nor any green thing,
but must carry with you whatever you require. The
country is called Botor. The people dwell high up in
the mountains, and are savage Idolaters, living only by
the chase, and clothing themselves in the skins of beasts.
They are in truth an evil race.

This is an interesting chapter of Marco’s book,
because it describes a region of which the outside
world knew nothing from his time until 1838, when
another European traveller, Captain John Wood,
passed over it, and verified the account written by
Marco Polo, more than six hundred years before.
The Tatars call the loftiest part of the Pamir country
the Bam-i-Duniah, or “ Roof of the World” ; it is the
highest level region to be found anywhere on the
globe. It is swept by cold winds, and even in
summer the dry snow is driven across its surface.

The great sheep of which Marco speaks are still
to be found there, and they have been named the
Ovzs Pol, in honour of Marco Polo, who first
described them. A pair of sheep horns, brought
home by Captain Wood, measured three feet from
tip to tip, and each horn was four feet and eight
inches in length, following the curve of the horn.
The animals are hunted by the Kirghiz who inhabit



VIL] OVIS POLI. 69

the lower steppes of that country; and Wood’s
narrative says: “We saw numbers of horns strewed
about in every direction, the spoils of the Kirghiz
hunter. Some of these were of an astonishingly
large size, and belonged to an animal between a
goat and a sheep, inhabiting the steppes of Pamir.
The ends of the horn projecting above the snow
often indicated the direction of the road,” which is
precisely what Marco has told us. Captain Wood,



OVIS POLI.

who crossed the Pamir in February, says, when-
ever they came in sight of a large number of these
big horns arranged in a semi-circle, they knew that
there had been a summer encampment of the Kirghiz
hunters.

What Marco says of the difficulty of cooking by
a fire at a great height is entirely correct. Water
boils at a lower temperature on the top of a high
mountain than it does in the plain at its foot. The
usual boiling-point is at 212 degrees, as every bright
youngster knows ; but on the tops of high mountains



JO THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

water boils at 179 or 180, and men unused to so
curious a phenomenon are puzzled to see the water
boiling, and the food remaining uncooked. The
pressure of the atmosphere is less on the mountain
top than it is in the plain, and the heat of the fire
causes the boiling of the water more quickly at the
greater altitude. Water boils at the top of Mount
Blanc at a temperature of 185 degrees.

MARCO TELLS A WONDERFUL STORY.

Samarcand lies in the southern part of Turkestan,
just north of Bokhara, and therefore it was behind
Marco Polo when he had passed the Pamir steppes:
evidently, he did not visit Samarcand, and could
not give us any information about the city ; so he

tells us this story:

Samarcan is a great and noble cicy towards the north-
west, inhabited by both Christians and Saracens, who are
subject to the great Kaan’s nephew, Caipou by name;
he is, however, at bitter enmity with the Kaan. I will tell
you of a great marvel that happened at this city.

It is not a great while ago that Sigatay, own brother to
the Great Kaan, who was lord of this country and of many
an one besides, became a Christian. The Christians re
joiced greatly at this, and they built a great church in the
city, in honour of John the Baptist; and by his name the
church was called. And they took a very fine stone which
belonged to the Saracens, and placed it as the pedestal of
a column in the middle of the church, supporting the roof.
It came to pass, however, that Sigatay died. Now the



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THE MIRACULOUS COLUMN,



V1.J A GLORIOUS MIRACLE. 71

Saracens were full of rancour about that stone that had been
theirs, and which had been set up in the church of the
Christians ; and when they saw that the Prince was dead,
they said one to another that now was the time to get back
their stone, by fair means or by foul. And that they might
well do, for they were ten times as many as the Christians.
So they gat together and went to the church and said
that the stone they must and would have. The Christians
acknowledged that it was theirs indeed, but offered to pay
a large sum of money and so be quit. Howbeit, the others
replied that they never would give up the stone for any-
thing in the world. And words ran so high that the Prince
heard thereof, and ordered the Christians either to arrange
to satisfy the Saracens, if it might be, with money, or to
give up the stone. And he allowed them three days to do
either the one thing or the other.

The Saracens would on no account agree to leave the
stone where it was, and this out of pure despite to the
Christians, for they knew well enough that if the stone
were stirred the church would come down by the run. So
the Christians were in great trouble and wist not what to
do. But they did do the best thing possible; they besought
Jesus Christ that He would consider their case, so that the
holy church should not come to destruction, nor the name
of its Patron Saint, John the Baptist, be tarnished by its
ruin. And so when the day fixed by the Prince came
round, they went to the church betimes in the morning,
and lo, they found the stone removed from under the
column ; the foot of the column was without support, and
yet it bore the load as stoutly as before! Between the
foot of the column and the ground there was a space of
three palms. So the Saracens had away their stone, and
mighty little joy withal. It was a glorious miracle, nay,
it is so, for the column still so standeth, and will stand as
long as God pleaseth.



72 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch. VI.

Marco was not often at a loss for real information
concerning the places of which he makes mention.
But in this case he was like some of the geographers,
of whom the wise Plutarch speaks when he says,
that they crowd into the edges of their maps
parts of the world about which they know nothing,
and add notes in the margin to the effect, that
“beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of
wild beasts and unapproachable bogs.” This remark
moved Dean Swift, the author of “ Gulliver’s Travels,”
to say:

So geographers, in Afric maps,
With savage pictures fill their gaps,

And o’er unhabitable downs
Place elephants for want of towns,



CHAPTER VII:

THE SEA OF SAND AND ITS MARVELS—THE FABLED SALAMANDER
AND ITS TRUE STORY—SOMETHING ABOUT ASBESTOS.

EAVING Turkestan, and entering China to the
eastward of Kashgar and Yarkand, Marco Polo
crossed the western end of the Great Sandy Desert
of Gobi, or Shamo, otherwise known to the Chinese
as the Sea of Sand. This vast extent of desert
extends over forty degrees of latitude, and has never
been fully explored even in our own day. In Marco’s
time it was a haunt of mystery, thought to be peopled
by the strange creatures of the air. That part
traversed by Marco is narrow, and he crossed it in a
south-westerly direction. Here is his account of the
Desert of Lop, or, as it is sometimes called, Lob:

Lop is a large town at the edge of the Desert, which is
called the Desert of Lop, and is situated between east
and north-east. It belongs to the Great Kaan, and the
people worship Mahommet. Now, such persons as pro-
pose to cross the Desert take a week’s rest in this town
to refresh themselves and their cattle ; and then they make
ready for the journey, taking with them a month’s supply for
man and beast. On quitting this city they enter the Desert.

73



74 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

The length of this Desert is so great that ’tis said it
‘would take a year and more to ride from one end of it to
the other. And here, where its breadth is least, it takes
a month to cross it. ’Tis all composed of hills and valleys
of sand, and not a thing to eat is to be found on. it.
But after riding for a day and a night you find fresh water
‘enough mayhap for some fifty or a hundred persons with
their beasts, but not for more. And all across the Desert
you will find water in like manner, that is to say, in some
twenty-eight places altogether you will find good water,
but in no great quantity ; and in four places also you find
brackish water.

Beasts there are none; for there is naught for them to
eat. But there is a marvellous thing related of this Desert,
which is that when travellers are on the move by night,
and one of them chances to lag behind, or to fall asleep
or the like, when he tries to gain his company again he
will hear spirits talking, and will suppose them to be his
comrades. Sometimes the spirits will call him by name;
and thus shall a traveller ofttimes be led astray, so that
he never finds his party. And in this way many have
perished. Sometimes the stray travellers will hear as it
were the tramp and hum of a great cavalcade of people
away from the real line of road, and taking this to be their
own company they will follow the sound; and when day
breaks they find that a cheat has been put on them, and
that they are in an ill plight. Even in the daytime one
hears those spirits talking. And sometimes you shall hear-
the sound of a variety of musical instruments, and still
more commonly the sound of drums. Hence in making
this journey ‘tis customary for travellers to keep close
together. All the animals too have bells at their necks,
so that they cannot easily get astray. And at sleeping-time |
a signal is put up to show the direction of the next march.

So thus it is that the Desert is crossed.



VII.) A HAUNTED DESERT. 716

Probably this tale of the desert, told by Marco
Polo, was one of those which gave him a bad name
among people who were ignorant of what really
goes on in the midst of a vast desert. From the
earliest times, men have associated deserts of land or
sea with mystery ; and all sorts of evil spirits were
believed to inhabit the waste places of the earth.
And those who heard Marco’s stories, or read them
afterwards, thought that they were the idle tales of
Oriental romancers.

But Marco’s tale is corroborated by the Chinese
historian Matwanlin, who writes: “You have to
cross a plain of sand, extending for more than one
hundred leagues. You see nothing in any direction
but the sky and the sands, without the slightest trace
of a road ; and travellers find nothing to guide them
but the bones of men and beasts and the droppings
of camels. During the passage of this wilderness
you hear sounds, sometimes of singing, sometimes of
wailing; and it has often happened that travellers,
going aside to see what those sounds might be, have
strayed from their course and been entirely lost;
for they were voices of spirits and goblins.” Another
Chinese writer, Hwen Thsang speaks of illusions,
such as visions of troops marching and halting with
gleaming arms and waving banners, constantly
shifting, vanishing, and reappearing. A voice behind
him calls, “Fear not! fear not!” Troubled by these



76 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

fantasies on one occasion, Hwen Thsang prayed to
Kwanin (a Buddhist divinity), but could not get rid
of them; though as soon as he had pronounced a
few words from the Prajna (a holy book) they
vanished in the twinkling of an eye.

And it is undoubtedly true that strange sounds
are often produced by the shifting of the sands,
especially in the night, after a hot day, when the
sand cools and the wind blows. It would be easy
for a superstitious person to believe that these sounds
were the voices of unseen creatures in the air.
Sometimes the sounds are like those of a bell, or of
a drum; and scientific writers have described the
places where they have been heard in various parts
of the world.

In the story of “The Boy Emigrants,” published in
1876, the author tells of a lad who hears, in the
midst of the Great American Desert, as it was
once called, the nine-o’clock bell ringing in his
New England home, far away. This really hap-
pened, and the author of the book actually thought
he heard the bell ring. So, too, the same party of
boy emigrants saw what they thought were trees,
water, and lovely hills, floating just above the edge
of the desert. That was a mirage; and people have
seen on the sea-coast a strange apparition of towers,
palaces, and lofty pinnacles, most beautiful to behold.
This is a natural phenomenon, and is called the



VII] THE SALAMANDER. 77

fata Morgana. So mueh for this “marvellous”
story, which no doubt has been called “one of
Marco Polo’s lies.”

In what he says about the fabulous salamander
we find some more truth; but he uses it to put to
ridicule an ancient fable. Here is his account:

Chingintalas is also a province at the verge of the Desert,
and lying between north-west and north. It is an extent
of sixteen days’ journey, and belongs to the Great Kaan,
and contains numerous towns and villages. There are
three different races of people in it—Idolaters, Saracens,
and some Nestorian Christians. At the northern extremity
of this province there is a mountain in which are excellent
veins of steel and ondanique. And you must know that
in the same mountain there is a vein of the substance from
which Salamander is made. For the real truth is that the
Salamander is no beast, as they allege in our part of the
world, but is a substance found in the earth; and I will
tell you about it.

Everybody must be aware that it can be no animal’s
nature to live in fire, seeing that every animal is com-
posed of all the four elements. Now I, Marco Polo, had
a Turkish acquaintance of the name of Zurficar, and he
was a very clever fellow. And this Turk related how
he had lived three years in that region on behalf of the
Great Kaan, in order to procure those Salamanders for
him. He said that the way they got them was by digging
- in that mountain till they found a certain vein. The sub-
stance of this vein was then taken and crushed, and when
so treated it divides as it were into fibres of wool, which
they set forth to dry. When dry, these fibres were pounded
in a great copper mortar, and then washed, so as to remove



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bf723d1b308a254dafbb1435f810e7b0
66dd66f80f6579eb1da2b173df0bb372065f6eb3
describe
'166' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKJ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
7edf58fb870b0d3c3a8ec024be14c4ab
d28917e68ef5450239a4d4adc27fbbd9f294d83e
'2011-11-18T02:44:14-05:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKK' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
ef520e27bbbedafb9bd1870ea52527a4
a272db3f3f5e4b1c38264d6bb5fc7d9a320c0831
'2011-11-18T02:44:19-05:00'
describe
'324405' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKL' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
ccdc5cb23d99946cd4ebf96c5d584fc5
67a7638203d246667374ab1dbaf54eb8a7d9feed
'2011-11-18T02:45:09-05:00'
describe
'94545' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKM' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
add8de979722167ddada2e8c3efca844
d8bcd1f9964140e16e3aac42746b1824f9eaad1b
'2011-11-18T02:45:40-05:00'
describe
'23505' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKN' 'sip-files00009.pro'
fa17c1fa6bb9e9c937dfb04feed0990b
1bdc1dc456c5bfa49f70833f03cf9b910bfda949
'2011-11-18T02:43:48-05:00'
describe
'31151' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKO' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
e8d6b4bba5655c8eddd90641a8bb82f3
5193105746f7c33b65aa2308d0fedf7a732a5b58
'2011-11-18T02:46:58-05:00'
describe
'2612104' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKP' 'sip-files00009.tif'
d6b4a1897517ef588a65ee5d9c2f89d0
04f5a429faaf0f3665f3a705392669e567534b2e
'2011-11-18T02:48:24-05:00'
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKQ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
b3dd0c0979d4d94bc4f96fe68d26c10c
803359a567559203580cc9223fbc1632ec630784
'2011-11-18T02:51:35-05:00'
describe
'7891' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKR' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
091f97592674b18b986cd9d961413130
379328398c3e6ef5277ead4d4a7692994c4ea1e6
'2011-11-18T02:54:25-05:00'
describe
'324569' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKS' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
ce46fd74ee4293958198108549d542e2
d6027a541a23bbdc5f2ecdfa55fdf6da3f25e05c
'2011-11-18T02:49:55-05:00'
describe
'110734' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKT' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
35e884dad8aaa6f32525c7bf11801382
bdeddd4650fa5dd454903e9d5956a92010ba1afc
'2011-11-18T02:50:15-05:00'
describe
'29008' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKU' 'sip-files00010.pro'
735c403ba63ae189af3949dc0fa15750
ac49060c935dcdd76c5d1919f8f08b28fd7cbdc2
'2011-11-18T02:42:50-05:00'
describe
'36819' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKV' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
0f1bdf0e131a557a7c0f7fb617137881
aa65ec5db121db0b9b9207b35670ac440d03026a
'2011-11-18T02:41:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKW' 'sip-files00010.tif'
2dc8443c7f163700d178384f7b5e2bd9
8cd3b3ec7205ac7c5594c7a19c6598dfae272035
'2011-11-18T02:43:22-05:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKX' 'sip-files00010.txt'
cbc730bd9dcca41b3945330f6b950b37
d3b29ed79a6c3a72c7b5b4013559a4ea91b88b90
'2011-11-18T02:44:12-05:00'
describe
'9835' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKY' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
26db29ae9016eb11d163a6b9c0de5e3b
54c5e1b624e43894e6d771900423b6b6480fc6ad
'2011-11-18T02:51:47-05:00'
describe
'324774' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOKZ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
55c6276855e7f72e750d4e032de66fb1
208d5d9fa4e23c9639d86386e5772792d6b23128
'2011-11-18T02:46:47-05:00'
describe
'70280' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLA' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
26ff8b2b216d6632e6368d354bbf804f
9d2dde04cfde99cb38ea3c3c4ffb296e0b6acd7e
'2011-11-18T02:43:17-05:00'
describe
'17530' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLB' 'sip-files00011.pro'
ed902e440a7a0fc01b4c1c3978f8b9f2
cf0b148d0cb517211e290c58a0926e02765c5396
describe
'22942' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLC' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
6d52bd5e50e8dd5021ef83730cf75343
497cc5884cb6d5802c4054982cf1d012f03cecf0
'2011-11-18T02:51:21-05:00'
describe
'2615408' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLD' 'sip-files00011.tif'
7531206567e3d16495629638e8a40929
4787e640808fe37530daae08e345c7b8e86f23b8
'2011-11-18T02:50:38-05:00'
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLE' 'sip-files00011.txt'
fe489af02d2e4af2b06a8c53d7e313a3
e1f335b43c64add02537f5c5c8f19373bfe52bd1
'2011-11-18T02:44:38-05:00'
describe
'5885' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLF' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
ce419345bd8c0b102eac8c8a5d5ff180
386261abb86aab616eacf8ced6563b01c59f1c1b
'2011-11-18T02:46:48-05:00'
describe
'324541' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLG' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
f9cb40495888a3b1a054df6e69bc606f
ec4da3bf60613b4832eb524c63d39707f8ffaa37
'2011-11-18T02:47:45-05:00'
describe
'75849' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLH' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
c97d982df5a2e968e17f0e446b5ef1e8
3e6da998a2aace0b6081b68d39e8422db722ea2e
'2011-11-18T02:41:40-05:00'
describe
'23434' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLI' 'sip-files00012.pro'
9f8510dc37a53d65bcf183ed4a71b626
dcda4d40b4e737992c155b197bb23a2fa1e355e1
'2011-11-18T02:45:52-05:00'
describe
'26375' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLJ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
b683ecfcfa1e8ff0b68f1705ef6de98e
dc6e23c13c5cfebe6edc147df9f9ae602238fb1f
'2011-11-18T02:43:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLK' 'sip-files00012.tif'
b77dfbfcc941e083ca218a53eb14a090
e3eb5c0c974c29abb1ef1bdb97b620c6e31a3bf0
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLL' 'sip-files00012.txt'
783d6aae8312e792cdf5501f2658d6be
761716b76ba5c00825c16be4bb252a9683c02fd9
'2011-11-18T02:43:30-05:00'
describe
'7658' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLM' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
4984b380abe3e3a9c04424b9feb68823
85719e1f74d1b002d4d6e89031cf03755fd41aa2
'2011-11-18T02:44:21-05:00'
describe
'324610' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLN' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
93758dbc1d13b748a212646317abdad2
202700d91d757b2b05381356795c936aec685844
'2011-11-18T02:47:04-05:00'
describe
'68661' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLO' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
be0231ddb5c387fadf0c088853c67820
9a5d2a4ce4d179351dd87f7e0f4b86158635a55d
'2011-11-18T02:42:20-05:00'
describe
'19258' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLP' 'sip-files00013.pro'
45880bc76ebc09591b6679974ca7a58e
de471bc6d44080cd14db5a6e21e6d38f23abd1c8
'2011-11-18T02:45:45-05:00'
describe
'23232' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLQ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
a78cb360f0213ca5dd0f39b797a297a5
c62fa01b87fd092bb9e3aa90623a1f8fcf2d8ad9
'2011-11-18T02:45:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLR' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ac7f95ee7fe6ef081e4e15e7b57fe53b
0701339e65a91764536af8055eb38f8ee2a39759
'2011-11-18T02:42:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLS' 'sip-files00013.txt'
794c32fef1af27a99e7cf669f52d5fb9
997b08c39415ca79a55525d907d48cc275dab6cd
'2011-11-18T02:45:41-05:00'
describe
'6702' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLT' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
878bee410feb8ef542381cc7e6694920
ff2112555b2ddb1f1c766188b297f0cdc8c565d5
'2011-11-18T02:55:15-05:00'
describe
'324624' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLU' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
b52d1b167441f3aea0084981fe498e19
d9390c65c6fa9e86605f6e293263deb910adbbed
'2011-11-18T02:43:34-05:00'
describe
'92578' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLV' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
65efe07a4f1e13a12c33a53385968158
2fed906b25e8f3eeb33b1ed3c387f48155ab1d49
'2011-11-18T02:49:09-05:00'
describe
'27588' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLW' 'sip-files00014.pro'
18c1608befa15e75662c1153a3b8f10e
2881fe67f0dd5ce490747ca3725da6cdb932ab99
'2011-11-18T02:42:18-05:00'
describe
'32079' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLX' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
02b4d46bc055f1b070706cf1fecb35f4
45d1b788fc0652abf46b2ae2181838d55495a0c6
'2011-11-18T02:42:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLY' 'sip-files00014.tif'
3d0de1bb2a51516d05aaa5168bbec69d
0be5d4377683b6059b912bafcd6ca839e59cd625
'2011-11-18T02:45:53-05:00'
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOLZ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
2c913ee04d8335e0df5c1801c2a4d178
9554e7f2612631e92cef4a2da631c3665918adaf
'2011-11-18T02:55:02-05:00'
describe
'8192' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMA' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
60545d93aded9a640e69b75ede62c00e
3f0c56a34ae24f02f2e16802dd70c356b57e66a5
'2011-11-18T02:51:16-05:00'
describe
'324276' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMB' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
fe36a0dc0ca39ebe5940f1ec74608231
acf98bcb98771700ccae084a1178633842e06ed7
'2011-11-18T02:50:14-05:00'
describe
'55246' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMC' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
7fb562a5a08c03d9d254a988047f6066
5617698b6546eaccd76e9c29f1e1353dcfba1b23
'2011-11-18T02:50:54-05:00'
describe
'13734' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMD' 'sip-files00015.pro'
d3fe9cee02ef53a002db14752fd9ed49
84c9ae00c527e7d49e99ea97c1ca135b6b86d83c
'2011-11-18T02:54:10-05:00'
describe
'17570' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOME' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f911f29f25e45daa73bae9cd2e898716
2a2c2bed73c26036efbb5b2d135c808773ab8dc3
'2011-11-18T02:51:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMF' 'sip-files00015.tif'
291a90c78d3f0f47800dbae9e26339d7
bd618f0d05fbc00c4adfe33116afe296b3ad7984
'2011-11-18T02:48:40-05:00'
describe
'762' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMG' 'sip-files00015.txt'
a552aac216422eacc1bf765cdac96d27
ecaca57de5350bb2039f1848e58da0cdbd506a78
'2011-11-18T02:43:51-05:00'
describe
'4811' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMH' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
71e71cfbb04f06971a00ef21febd1f95
29ba1d828921719a4ca5d78cba684a4fd871f8ed
'2011-11-18T02:44:02-05:00'
describe
'324814' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMI' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
87ae59937470cab419d0a6257a9c395a
4cff6e736d1fbb420ec3f39149152c230a5b41e0
'2011-11-18T02:48:55-05:00'
describe
'14606' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMJ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
a9729cdd7d6ff68d5be9107e444f4b0e
3e15e5e72d2f213f358e980ec55965d60d4489e4
'2011-11-18T02:54:05-05:00'
describe
'3052' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMK' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
f985f7a0775fbf2d429e9418214b8dec
c893d85f3e0311c0bce18cf876dfcdaf7bd3af4c
'2011-11-18T02:54:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOML' 'sip-files00016.tif'
638c4fd8b64323f4e7eb0f3d499c4cc4
8aa60bc52815f88101edd9bf4f73ccbb778b0248
'2011-11-18T02:49:45-05:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMM' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
ed5d2f430e4582cdada6ffa8373c4ddd
15b577f7ea83138a51733aa8e3372e73f2197843
'2011-11-18T02:49:08-05:00'
describe
'324784' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMN' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
232e1d236aef37c000d67d8659a16204
7feb331267071f5c5ade03a49667de1cacb6bf13
'2011-11-18T02:43:05-05:00'
describe
'71022' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMO' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
3cc6a42bd098fb9e22d4a0fccbe7d736
c5b6f1934f8c31d54bbb4862398a570a936d1d42
'2011-11-18T02:55:22-05:00'
describe
'28085' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMP' 'sip-files00017.pro'
b4804c8e72cc186fdd0fee4c40e639c8
8bc3174c34b765138a802f7ef3277162ff28a44f
'2011-11-18T02:50:05-05:00'
describe
'24372' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMQ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
07a6972e0f9e21a031442b977f270743
775f7d883b2de3616173496adf8a46d80aac6979
'2011-11-18T02:54:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMR' 'sip-files00017.tif'
b9742c6bba16c6f34b5f5c55e879bd81
1871775f1b449d1bc0a9e7c07f77d93fb2d64090
'2011-11-18T02:43:54-05:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMS' 'sip-files00017.txt'
6471added569a1f49bfc8d8461d7fdf6
a6c9e5e8c6f1fbd2ebd24a2923a84b2841b598eb
'2011-11-18T02:46:13-05:00'
describe
'7322' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMT' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
926af6a754367eecac5eadf34488d000
94020c729ab4f9ebcb02c0484ce3346ed4278119
'2011-11-18T02:46:32-05:00'
describe
'324604' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a5f611ed6a93fe89c42db56041a360b2
1063ea74987f98e0bbf633c72b485af985120239
'2011-11-18T02:43:29-05:00'
describe
'32932' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMV' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
8402aa927d911fc97ac2f2747784caf4
0099759243855b01e9a3158a95b18ebfaa07887a
'2011-11-18T02:51:01-05:00'
describe
'6211' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMW' 'sip-files00018.pro'
b1d6256ee5ddd1d95d988acb1d5d2f90
d7f355580c9d01a4aeb875c25ace8379a193d8a4
'2011-11-18T02:48:59-05:00'
describe
'10037' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMX' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
37c136f54f47864eaaabc39064b59b06
ceb6307db040a5b2b8680922a4924aff39e8dcab
'2011-11-18T02:47:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMY' 'sip-files00018.tif'
4b4ca17bca618ce030de18c0a00051e0
50b65cc4118dd6e1bc4e614581fe2df9eda1455e
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOMZ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
cb74f1aa58117595539540fa7a5c0780
ec42296b3de2e6dd3d462930c76544c821489060
'2011-11-18T02:45:57-05:00'
describe
'2776' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONA' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
ab24576a5d092c375f01cae9ad24d561
7d4b61846d151e5bf235e229140fc70b7064b0f3
'2011-11-18T02:51:46-05:00'
describe
'324558' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONB' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
cf87f61cf27235de6d29cdcf77867649
5a89231c96131907aba75fb171571b24dc3757f7
'2011-11-18T02:44:01-05:00'
describe
'22858' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONC' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
6e89aecb2682c134e0953791d4d84c04
b9299510b2a071c8e8fd040039efaa4b1b819746
'2011-11-18T02:45:47-05:00'
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOND' 'sip-files00019.pro'
bb1bf182d04e41a5a10aaa70dc0157ea
04a30ed64fa78a4bc4a74d3d80deae8e373f9e41
describe
'5350' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONE' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
26d519f175f08a78ded8d813c735894e
6d5555be57ce4fac935582157cdb35d96309e1d7
'2011-11-18T02:44:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONF' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c214a12036f90a6dec8a77d91a68be8d
44b24f5585ee49eee12e77560103c082579b6d37
'2011-11-18T02:51:38-05:00'
describe
'68' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONG' 'sip-files00019.txt'
37e64d85557703b9c366d4182eeb8216
cee8d6ee918ab575894c03fca931f2143bc5d726
'2011-11-18T02:46:15-05:00'
describe
'1724' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONH' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8e524430ac957c8668de9a1791e5de4f
53680656a6fdb9a720f793d8783801fac957c1ff
describe
'324772' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONI' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
cdc37b3bb62c2f1c04e1211909e24016
f910c77062bcd739fce6594a9e9065f5a016c506
'2011-11-18T02:52:34-05:00'
describe
'16012' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONJ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
0f09fe03b37280823afcce5cf60e9918
0a2e88a0e507eabb6e408959807f8868230c1ace
'2011-11-18T02:45:51-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
3ccd337557a4f2cb1053ff6671531095
7794e533f1f728764a7e28f9529dfc53e859a855
describe
'3180' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONL' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
271ede26e2d62b5b7e3fe0b05951c760
f6791d4998d3fef7b0cf2d65d66b6c0a54a24726
'2011-11-18T02:49:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONM' 'sip-files00020.tif'
4b184c7a6fc364be9d0df62585275303
149c9aa32070a9f53d5427b4ff44e3389d47a374
'2011-11-18T02:48:33-05:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONN' 'sip-files00020.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-18T02:44:07-05:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONO' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
9e0311122e01886c7acb4dc8268f3422
0794f88fd1b2941e33ff1bda42c83bef8168ce3e
describe
'324509' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONP' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
15bf7781e33dce84fb406133ab0dedc5
71cc6a3f18aa89d9f5515622aeef77b0e8736bef
'2011-11-18T02:49:18-05:00'
describe
'88661' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
61f9a3071dc8aca127d5ae9cbea45ba7
623d567d54070d89606864d82333eae30cd970f1
'2011-11-18T02:54:38-05:00'
describe
'20300' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONR' 'sip-files00021.pro'
aab44c942d0e5f1fa87726bf08fb6087
368e24407a7864258361861f2f9c88f03892a26a
'2011-11-18T02:43:56-05:00'
describe
'29565' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONS' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
e0a5a803a0a2ecaa840ed61957e679dd
091b7e324bf100e996337010010cc2b67c57a049
'2011-11-18T02:51:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONT' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ef9bfad826efaa84f3760ed99819df48
2e46bde6304b49c26735d2d0a3c2fb842a6aef11
'2011-11-18T02:45:01-05:00'
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONU' 'sip-files00021.txt'
b884acd0d70f19f5c544a06db4753c02
d002af1619df63419a3c71954fb3607b57294f7e
'2011-11-18T02:55:01-05:00'
describe
'7854' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONV' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
ac7a48c3a398e4e253457d5c895e54c1
1ec99394e81f8e98493a2f7e73e84bcf86b8c935
'2011-11-18T02:54:19-05:00'
describe
'324803' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONW' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
da4e879b26095155856a704bf6e71386
287c0bcebac375d1c794ec99bfc18263da6d8d9e
'2011-11-18T02:46:20-05:00'
describe
'137883' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONX' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
1a573a3c63ae57717d06c1635df4d190
b5cc5d47b13ad22593bf30232bdb6ae340c07eb0
'2011-11-18T02:54:13-05:00'
describe
'37505' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONY' 'sip-files00022.pro'
7354a27394f56a4f7e839a655f23e18a
546c1f56be44995932e9c42b77f19149077101c4
'2011-11-18T02:49:01-05:00'
describe
'49024' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABONZ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
2f4788aa92a2eef35bd6142e8fb53ade
04980d7e9b2330a518fcb516b5ed3b75ca73e3f6
'2011-11-18T02:43:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOA' 'sip-files00022.tif'
04457154468fbe3cf3e4ce1ebcf43bea
bea6f9785b0a40dd50c7385a6fee84b5b1cef1fa
'2011-11-18T02:52:12-05:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOB' 'sip-files00022.txt'
9421d2e489955258213eb5a258c7e413
514549a0ef4161786f355c2546ecdc5fa87b04c2
'2011-11-18T02:46:04-05:00'
describe
'11906' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOC' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
234a37a859d57a3fc5c74a9c464d02f0
72c49b297292cbf3955684cd9c5a53848fcc4020
'2011-11-18T02:41:50-05:00'
describe
'366487' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOD' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
b61b1c29ac3f82e216f74c3f59333c9a
20e38e50e02bceed44c1033db908f9a79c4a71c2
'2011-11-18T02:48:43-05:00'
describe
'98120' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOE' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
c898a74f417985f811e90f4be3d642c6
18c8dfe4af3f748047ee635021f64d11d92b1f4d
'2011-11-18T02:47:12-05:00'
describe
'18767' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOF' 'sip-files00023.pro'
96b24095667fd04fe0918e687d249b29
ea3fbf267ba6731200ff89c81813805372eb985c
'2011-11-18T02:52:10-05:00'
describe
'31446' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOG' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
2f63db45ac9e3502a9110c4a2f7f8245
f0127851946e19e90cc36f9dcf4770fc8f911c2c
'2011-11-18T02:42:08-05:00'
describe
'2948924' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOH' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7425c62730f43a1c75fa1ba1aa1e07ce
ad9ba60ca6d9172e9f91f842bf30030da0f3aa3d
'2011-11-18T02:47:34-05:00'
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOI' 'sip-files00023.txt'
d44d4a5de6be3a803bae18bd11b999c9
56a1484e05c186c4e8fb0526a68340184fc5a08a
'2011-11-18T02:54:59-05:00'
describe
'8259' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOJ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
228bac937d9820b5bafc4cc2e1d4330f
4481a9825e14bfb120430c2d0331e931c792b0c8
'2011-11-18T02:51:22-05:00'
describe
'366508' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOK' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
443f50c7fa8911e8dc5dfd080ef1092b
3e1fa69324bc0aae14fe007b34f21a2147a84f4d
describe
'143478' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOL' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
7f878650472b6e4bb3bc97033b94fcfa
0027c19b7c45d25d5eb4f1d52afdf9e207dcb47f
'2011-11-18T02:45:39-05:00'
describe
'44021' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOM' 'sip-files00024.pro'
5c45c76b4215da837290041426b47042
3c55da4f9021eb03e5369995755a3ed2d6ac6702
'2011-11-18T02:47:18-05:00'
describe
'45961' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOON' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
6c200d4f3dee7d443f9aa8d198340220
d6f997808b81cc2f1af35c30b11577b6db371617
'2011-11-18T02:54:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOO' 'sip-files00024.tif'
cfbeae3b4ec81493be4034b4fd8c0b4d
7d77c3aec606da0be29b8021b178dbba94fb0978
'2011-11-18T02:54:06-05:00'
describe
'1796' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOP' 'sip-files00024.txt'
9acab95778997d88d94ea9fa875cdcdb
62a9194e4078f5832e268b48700922b16fc68674
'2011-11-18T02:44:20-05:00'
describe
'10822' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOQ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
535e6c14b2d05596ac179b9fed8285a1
ed5ac4e9801c7dbde2f44775ab8ee4adcde73c34
describe
'324777' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOR' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
ac08ff2300d9fd5aa7e37669af685acd
851824997a78c6f546ffd3a93c99d7adba80606d
'2011-11-18T02:54:24-05:00'
describe
'161781' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOS' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b202a6524c7237f8f1d0ea183809b9c2
8d6a78a23596f4a77eac4070fb3f888d32bed90b
describe
'47780' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOT' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8525851353c9a6966be7ee1c656c4191
a62bb6eef6fdcc38af8bbb5cca131c11c85162d1
'2011-11-18T02:51:43-05:00'
describe
'53406' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOU' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
a8bb0cb1fd0d94fdf5b3f5254386bc77
719b1a9538dc85f00b25d01eb2126ee4a8912a3e
'2011-11-18T02:42:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOV' 'sip-files00025.tif'
c93d38244f129e157e36060d306b6d30
bfae97c1989b76665c3a655a670f0b5c55cd4d1e
'2011-11-18T02:49:25-05:00'
describe
'1952' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOW' 'sip-files00025.txt'
d84d3abc54419ae5dfcc0cead3dd0ffe
ea68566562000645733c4fa7052691a4edeedc29
'2011-11-18T02:43:18-05:00'
describe
'12208' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOX' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
837af1821dfe30d63c132dc30219d976
bfe25a58865b946aee45f4a4122a9e65a473fb87
'2011-11-18T02:46:28-05:00'
describe
'324561' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
af78c378ff37aafe8a2969d3a494deff
98edd66aaa603a73a61d593448e25210fe29c9e3
'2011-11-18T02:41:25-05:00'
describe
'132111' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOOZ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
beacb51b5bf7a032b74b55ea1602bef4
5639f9e549a5b0f8c702427071851cc1ec8f844d
'2011-11-18T02:54:41-05:00'
describe
'36804' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPA' 'sip-files00026.pro'
1c28122a977a6cd19cad76a8459f8942
e00262d94bcda9485ed0f47b07ed0e83a3e59887
'2011-11-18T02:44:56-05:00'
describe
'45801' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPB' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
ea5dc9615c91ae2b06eb219874dacf61
3da09877fc047be9fa5df978d735f0d16611d421
'2011-11-18T02:43:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPC' 'sip-files00026.tif'
6e7e0a1cc85e915db9027d8bf140cf9d
e2ed4fdf7ef081ab9a9bd7b42aa7cdf68c3d2bbb
'2011-11-18T02:47:31-05:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPD' 'sip-files00026.txt'
b2a54914b5f40eeeb49754f6a236b37d
fa86f04f6709208c9ecbd717e77f1699965eae5a
'2011-11-18T02:45:38-05:00'
describe
'11436' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPE' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
5901e023cd73a62df49a93c57c922af0
ec037239d358c2de54b17f26c9aad81a7b524b38
'2011-11-18T02:44:45-05:00'
describe
'324812' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPF' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
1f5686fcbe91b162771e80fb66cf4f2a
507e2f744b21dd50dd8c487cb6f09f52da91b48f
'2011-11-18T02:50:52-05:00'
describe
'131640' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d097848841dabf8918363802b1dd626c
a1e68bc711a1c814b7d8044497a3bc985cbff5de
'2011-11-18T02:49:14-05:00'
describe
'34559' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPH' 'sip-files00027.pro'
1d660224ee6eafe6c7ae0350dbefe22a
ad4b040d4ffb7f834d9882e9f79b743b4f931a64
'2011-11-18T02:43:52-05:00'
describe
'46794' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPI' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
a20b3a982bfffb70109d96a0c34dc677
0c65b176491e97ea664c58dc7db3fc89d11b7e6e
'2011-11-18T02:43:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPJ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
a1759eba4538adab2e059d380f604ac5
1748310b1ea0bedf4131b83f9803914e924b0ff6
'2011-11-18T02:41:38-05:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPK' 'sip-files00027.txt'
3182e321f446d0d754e35bfd2c657de4
b9f48358cbc049635b21d8c1d1cd77da6204a08c
'2011-11-18T02:44:16-05:00'
describe
'11797' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPL' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
13e5f09e453dc4d9b740fac84dcf87e5
d442989f73be36210b04bbf4a4bb6527157d3035
'2011-11-18T02:48:25-05:00'
describe
'324526' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPM' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
3f9a7a1c9469062cfb529e0b1e7f9e45
652153db61b2859967f6e6582e2201d5372f18d7
'2011-11-18T02:44:09-05:00'
describe
'158460' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPN' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
6c885a5b9fb1d916052a55104a7c866a
0caeb9ab5764d869ef89e78e07f713024458fa84
'2011-11-18T02:43:11-05:00'
describe
'47342' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPO' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c20740519a2c7c178f9fa3be4573a37f
9a706e59462c5c7d62506b905997cbdb0d390593
'2011-11-18T02:54:44-05:00'
describe
'54395' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
97ee5e683eaa949b7718612caa6ad5f2
3d295457628406f2644eaffa3aea7f92f09ea764
'2011-11-18T02:50:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPQ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
c50adaaf10435b3245226cdf05c526e3
8c893a7c30ce216d7b16266abbbdd6abae97830c
'2011-11-18T02:54:58-05:00'
describe
'1915' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPR' 'sip-files00028.txt'
cba4bbc5267ff2a4e5e5611d14ff9053
005dba14b52f7db7b16b419e79d26eb9cac9e0d3
'2011-11-18T02:43:45-05:00'
describe
'12831' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPS' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
434c3154651bd2f827953be113dbd39f
74a4003925c74fe99db6ea46712a766f28569dcb
'2011-11-18T02:43:43-05:00'
describe
'324424' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPT' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c3eed800e587e27b2767d8a3abe191c9
3a8c20730b0b3bcb259262277dcd3b63f106cf45
'2011-11-18T02:42:45-05:00'
describe
'96847' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPU' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
5117a2951affeb6c8018b1824f624f20
d4f76e00e6bd3762d5bd183f6fee292321c83f86
'2011-11-18T02:43:14-05:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPV' 'sip-files00029.pro'
3d3b4137806c05ced528e897113042f2
fc4f0a7d60f7643625f351d1206e6298b8a5fc74
'2011-11-18T02:50:10-05:00'
describe
'25935' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPW' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
7648f55ac6250f853eed6b3747d2e1db
e9e95e1b3e588a8d9edae7c61f34c1e5457d751c
'2011-11-18T02:50:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPX' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d259bdac9813001042e9b0715b0d75ef
3bfc63b3905e2a7075f2e09e72d4e52548774b09
'2011-11-18T02:47:32-05:00'
describe
'180' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPY' 'sip-files00029.txt'
d0a47a2a7200c93cff1b9cc53ef88104
2918821bb689acf9653f23f5564a86834c3f8659
'2011-11-18T02:43:10-05:00'
describe
'6770' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOPZ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
bf1e70cf5fe793445cb38c96ff51f8ad
6ac1d8d34dd4f6ef4b3d49523fc2c809cbe386b7
'2011-11-18T02:50:36-05:00'
describe
'324802' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQA' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f50b44eefb8bb41e977e0c21cde40159
3527a8c0d54e9412e12481ccb706ac6fc280ad5d
'2011-11-18T02:42:54-05:00'
describe
'144555' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQB' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
949531de2d8ea3ad5834ec7f039e0f14
3a27dab060f9f6e840403fd0c02dff9626851d22
'2011-11-18T02:43:59-05:00'
describe
'40905' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQC' 'sip-files00031.pro'
3674b9e1c1c59af13d9100eb5a0641b6
89783bd4c5d6ab33993b6f1a5689c9c8df069219
describe
'48171' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQD' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
08cab1f192820027f6e512c8981a41d2
0417bc2e778c809219c13cb4ba62eadbf37a4367
'2011-11-18T02:44:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQE' 'sip-files00031.tif'
c27fbd15e5d5be10f1a9ce55c0807005
31737d7d0d4c83cf9ad3790a32d8b441894564e6
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQF' 'sip-files00031.txt'
7482e1209038c56f0c94ea9c6309b289
44b3e7e80b5ee367f2a4fe81a4c4d33e9d19b271
'2011-11-18T02:52:21-05:00'
describe
'11695' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQG' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
71f82f24b00caaa0c98cda34adae9519
57d383404a247b92c15d2b71a6572bf40fdf584c
'2011-11-18T02:41:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQH' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
efd0ea79b69049d3f678184689d35be8
87771867ace08dfaed4be817730db61c8fa50053
describe
'151934' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQI' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
5bfdd3177dc03de478c372ebd359a02e
1d944e9761659c0c064efb50e4a260a5173ab0e9
'2011-11-18T02:44:11-05:00'
describe
'44069' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQJ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
f9cda5e704b500f720c76f1d15aa6646
61d42b42c3c1e237edc6cb209dc7c1443b387e63
'2011-11-18T02:42:52-05:00'
describe
'51522' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQK' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
43b9be1799564a6af8a17be88bf6745a
13a701b8f241b5d7a7ecf403c94d46353ea924da
'2011-11-18T02:54:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQL' 'sip-files00032.tif'
882d76d8ca4efea5a9a94b873fd014a0
5cfa59da033fd6235b112d404a6c5360d1f97f51
'2011-11-18T02:43:36-05:00'
describe
'1826' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQM' 'sip-files00032.txt'
f1ceb1a553371521dc0f1477fb4f32d8
94e602eb77113991ca2def307ac6294d2d3a67a2
'2011-11-18T02:50:09-05:00'
describe
'12496' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQN' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
2d6bf933c98726a95457317f8cb7cdb7
6ca2ad36169a90c87f5d06f45e136c6f754897fe
'2011-11-18T02:43:15-05:00'
describe
'324330' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQO' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
e41c985989e880fc6f1c9413355d0546
923e5cefd3b5d0ea80bc1d07e123b5e906687a25
describe
'147186' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQP' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
60397c8db43d29fdb960cc1335a0f20c
2c5f5d6735294db9707372ceb5dfaecfb1645e7d
'2011-11-18T02:55:16-05:00'
describe
'41116' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQQ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
31a6d476b1713ec797d1c2b86375fda2
ef934c308116c1fc36a725fec186a139adf82264
'2011-11-18T02:45:07-05:00'
describe
'49199' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQR' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
26be83edfbff1456784be0d0a9731cf9
4afb5effa39cf9a1d3ebf4ba36ab68f46c5118b5
'2011-11-18T02:46:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQS' 'sip-files00033.tif'
52ba55b11f71407922d5d33f88836c77
f1b91a3b6e29e72c6c5c8455bc14085b57d66dcc
'2011-11-18T02:42:53-05:00'
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQT' 'sip-files00033.txt'
7c07d6dcd41f3d833dae2e4bbc744ecc
efb3a17f40bac702cd1bfdd9d336a1422a6192f6
describe
'12332' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQU' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
34b808de12a23f5e8102e9e21211c053
e98dcf0dcec5b28e83c6a5480ae3d7ffe53833a2
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQV' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0e9bcdc55cfe209f96548dedbd3a712e
231e5a35c12db9b2547bddd65fe48a1549400844
'2011-11-18T02:45:55-05:00'
describe
'102612' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQW' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
47e4f6ba98d273965a4733523deeabf6
086eb573c64406d6c62263430e970be4a47dc4ea
describe
'28601' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQX' 'sip-files00034.pro'
9ed866c197e52cdd869bb1248cf43b3e
aa3d01e4acad4086b695a56b0cc02a6744c098b2
describe
'34331' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQY' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a7b1c086797fdeb88a925e9e0d594458
c65fca214a8f73272e853577dc64917201c7b2a2
'2011-11-18T02:51:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOQZ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
1576d937397812edca94428a09f681a4
e06abc9c112c6ef2ca12d31f6ad96359337326f8
'2011-11-18T02:46:06-05:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORA' 'sip-files00034.txt'
7ca90b9e7e09673b04db960022064e9c
b52624326d8d9dd39ff9f79c23c449806ce0e950
'2011-11-18T02:41:32-05:00'
describe
'8622' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORB' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
1487cb43ea1be3d1df0b7b63a933d2be
1a4580ffe0e2fc20a0d8fbd6133ebedf9e56837b
describe
'324439' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORC' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
742a003d1c82046551822bd9c5858b65
9de47b4bbef4ef34be63abb596dc1fb257cb9fd4
describe
'163598' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORD' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c770e3f6949a6295bb267138236130cb
6b4dd702b04e3d824dd74b971c4f3c155df8b98b
'2011-11-18T02:49:20-05:00'
describe
'50052' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORE' 'sip-files00035.pro'
bef91ccd4b952dc9cf687e856b105688
82db40128edf557d4a6c9f821f940cbc7063e52d
'2011-11-18T02:47:08-05:00'
describe
'54712' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORF' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
7e2dc461b0e7dcada9a8c4192f4622ff
acd5dc57f43be4a117f521628450044af3a9d655
'2011-11-18T02:44:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORG' 'sip-files00035.tif'
f8fc52d98261e2faf193160a1027c8b2
06e639b06968c235e38ae39de163503a92a7ddc1
'2011-11-18T02:44:51-05:00'
describe
'2056' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORH' 'sip-files00035.txt'
d598a7f5d046ab2ca8c8f080ba505a76
71bfc9de3cabc49228096ff29b3815117b12ac55
'2011-11-18T02:46:34-05:00'
describe
'12640' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORI' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
d6f2de728cb4ed9247005585eef4e5fd
86ec8ab20717d8123340a9bc14845e1954233509
'2011-11-18T02:51:30-05:00'
describe
'324799' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORJ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
f9ddd16b1eafa0af94d2933a48407ba8
8478fffd8d9103aacfa7ce7d9c084c49bdd0342f
describe
'162421' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORK' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
3a3080bcdc86c63d86720dba4fd461de
7b8575c19ba88ab99f6e122c2f5337c27442f763
'2011-11-18T02:48:21-05:00'
describe
'48631' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORL' 'sip-files00036.pro'
fdc2b637b42e1aae5fb2b3807e6d05e3
6d51d5ca26030cdbb9d88a7f389397c8599a1095
'2011-11-18T02:47:17-05:00'
describe
'54309' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORM' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
3cb1f76c8e51c2d752b261e9f4e42b73
38a870bc8f0fcbd4ff529d04f3c1d4b8ad17169a
'2011-11-18T02:45:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORN' 'sip-files00036.tif'
c42ad9e9004dfc7892e1943465f2d0b9
b5e68f586cb8aa270361a64fcdb3271a1a848159
describe
'2000' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORO' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6a4dab71caeeec09b1dad44c8ac6eb64
34bfcc104d49d5850325484e03470668a1830785
'2011-11-18T02:50:45-05:00'
describe
'12620' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORP' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
82d1de0eec805407dd416bd03143c6f3
8cfd946ddfcc150aaba8e711fb8430995a1ba626
describe
'324662' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORQ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f772f28ac9a364ed682d23d20ba8a1b6
d0e04242f64c00abb4e40b7c4602038868df2a2d
'2011-11-18T02:51:50-05:00'
describe
'134359' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORR' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
a8c6d9931b38d11f8a5128c41e8d9dd5
1a5f4c3012023b4592528baec956859ecc209655
'2011-11-18T02:43:31-05:00'
describe
'36835' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORS' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9468781d73e47d767420e1ea607380d3
0ad735f09412f406270dcd8c286ba353b238a854
'2011-11-18T02:52:06-05:00'
describe
'45782' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORT' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
7dd750209afb74f726049c011a674e55
a90fbd0f7735cba0c329954352f8ca8b398b0c05
'2011-11-18T02:41:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORU' 'sip-files00037.tif'
192b2f2cefc85bbbd2978ae698af133e
1dcdb5892747eb7aaa5f04c32316cce1f0c29011
'2011-11-18T02:42:13-05:00'
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORV' 'sip-files00037.txt'
0451df6af73277bb2e4bbd8b594efb2f
8b798f25126e3cb94c3abd4fc31214f3a2fc6bc0
describe
'12193' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORW' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
996475dd35cd5d625de4b0b0951d111e
3849cdb0dafd22b3e1bee8545f3156d2fdda3b09
'2011-11-18T02:49:33-05:00'
describe
'324817' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORX' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
f78c2627be2a349cf604b0092cde05c9
3d0cbbdef16125b5b843e445b0a88a27d0d3d60e
'2011-11-18T02:45:42-05:00'
describe
'133760' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORY' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
a6056614b548bd999d6f97ac7ccc3fd6
1f0de8bf1a6c303d7c540343218bab1b6d8f68d9
'2011-11-18T02:44:58-05:00'
describe
'36703' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABORZ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
831a0a5f08f1b5104cd6d5e660d92f42
17f3f4d59818e4ba644ad51d7dfc8f3770e2775f
'2011-11-18T02:51:26-05:00'
describe
'46203' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSA' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
e86a41dc4888104eda920b4cae298b32
d031c35303b209a8a765e7e08dc4cd8eeb1e7581
'2011-11-18T02:42:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSB' 'sip-files00038.tif'
46848b03e9341cf608310f0ee11dff48
fcef79f25a607f9b191e33cd57e9eb5ebc62d2b6
'2011-11-18T02:54:54-05:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSC' 'sip-files00038.txt'
26f97050de660273c8e32d5bac8391a3
6006c013eecce2475ef9fffb9f5558b41186f278
'2011-11-18T02:45:02-05:00'
describe
'11625' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSD' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
bcfff0ce6ae7c2f4fa45b957dae85c9d
01d64153880280dabbf2073c22bcc7046fc49705
'2011-11-18T02:42:02-05:00'
describe
'324404' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSE' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
9a54521b5789e16ed9e3b93dd5e8fee9
5f7ac87971449c96c4f72e735f0f06dbe24f5690
'2011-11-18T02:44:29-05:00'
describe
'131445' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSF' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
c065cd1c0cc17a5c14783e1e84da2e9f
be4fc3e4c96c8af8c299dca2101d76fb9d0d67ca
'2011-11-18T02:41:33-05:00'
describe
'36664' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSG' 'sip-files00039.pro'
d6ad4eaff845e4d96bbc04914f649cef
03d5ee713a5fe896a448f2759f19f0dcb11a9706
'2011-11-18T02:55:23-05:00'
describe
'46952' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSH' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
83e8c25b51506770874da03e4acadfe5
775a1055c170cd805f2e4ae622f0e04d76dcc380
'2011-11-18T02:41:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSI' 'sip-files00039.tif'
823fd530880a67cf8662ec60c9178bcd
c14f039d8d452e475914c84111d4eec24d30c570
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSJ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
0623e73b91600a79f237f4c2a7024829
fb4c867dbe164d16c9678185c8a22647de8b6626
'2011-11-18T02:42:34-05:00'
describe
'11916' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSK' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
fbb59d3c4f319e8a96b542624a86af94
790e09369a24ce2b22225da6d8e7d3f2a71e5e4a
'2011-11-18T02:54:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSL' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d1bb5138f3a8631b573ddf7186b1474d
63baeeb559fba35b8e23a49298a757b9e304a812
describe
'133470' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSM' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
f6a389e59fc4796285292ad872272ea7
194edd4a02e02c2de0f628a1d1627761eaa2d0b8
'2011-11-18T02:50:50-05:00'
describe
'36667' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSN' 'sip-files00040.pro'
d161c4c89bebd2b270002a00cfc476e2
9cbd9ae75845c323cf0214937cb4a09f6acc8203
describe
'46701' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSO' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
ef97633d9ad38acfcca78c747e240086
1fa7b8901ebfa0bb135ff0fa79f997044f80fefb
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSP' 'sip-files00040.tif'
973a065403bf6eaf61a7b233a2d8ce16
52dea745f9f26e5bcca83185c539beaa1007960a
'2011-11-18T02:48:26-05:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSQ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
9acd4364819370c341f2a0e89abaf370
6674a94cf4e2b8ded20536cb68dcba1e889f7f31
'2011-11-18T02:48:37-05:00'
describe
'11518' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSR' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
325429c8a91fa05059506e6a8f5cd991
3d075a57e8d3f5d45b538fda887fa3a42c09730b
'2011-11-18T02:44:30-05:00'
describe
'324425' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSS' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
1a5a0f2606de88a7c4be61cf7bbe3b22
82cf350308af0df1f130c3999a23ae55019b7b21
describe
'49101' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOST' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
9400f3cffd9b8e525a82119d98323d6f
9af3d84ddf8aff301ab8f22810bd15d839b9a79c
describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSU' 'sip-files00041.pro'
91fc8ed7686dda3d5f04edbbac7414dc
2d5ff6d70269c88e487edf0f283ebe6d21aeb35f
'2011-11-18T02:48:13-05:00'
describe
'13296' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSV' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
8383ab0a52c529cde315ed37fb5df8cb
3a045a7a43fbbf3d7ce82186d08918999f003314
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSW' 'sip-files00041.tif'
ecd8e3a5c6664a633eaf1214261b3e4d
d51b793208516049cc0c490b6a846c4e60921a93
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSX' 'sip-files00041.txt'
c379571cdaec9782db132c575c28f983
38ec5cff4cfe3a196eee8b61e630ca4739f24433
'2011-11-18T02:47:50-05:00'
describe
'3809' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSY' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
0f1539df5bde6809436f44dcbc14424a
2f8ae2aa5b7d33948325747f7dbe9353e79f0545
describe
'324663' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOSZ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
b9aa8cb2d1a42a5a15ca7944bc3550f5
d59fda9be657c0b1dac6cb1b9c09b4ef21aa76a5
'2011-11-18T02:46:11-05:00'
describe
'130199' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTA' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
c938e73902d58cce89d9bbc2dc2aadf9
d4aadc2216dc3f81f69b37abe26c697031cf9c83
'2011-11-18T02:41:42-05:00'
describe
'36037' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTB' 'sip-files00043.pro'
d2d0d1ab02f722ae02c8fd41811e6b26
380a43c3f1dff201b1367e49012aeb73dbe136a7
'2011-11-18T02:44:18-05:00'
describe
'45200' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTC' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
10102073d10cd44ee564cd71007e2df1
866dfc7e129616e8f687ab38d70c3e57203112a2
'2011-11-18T02:41:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTD' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f5840fd79c04749420b6b32c09560d71
9c548624afaca7d7d0d0c535aec59c6d02eab1a3
'2011-11-18T02:46:35-05:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTE' 'sip-files00043.txt'
86820baeece1a143bccc69320b0332ed
1fb1d57dddeb5a080e3a5d9a38c806a55cdc5eb2
describe
'11643' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTF' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
8fef98227789fd44263c3bfcce694691
b2b29c825e1aa94225e8a8707dc196cc96ac5da9
'2011-11-18T02:55:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTG' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
4cfc296581e29d65a3a1cc5e97e02c83
e7e466817b9d9b34d99f6ba550eb2f9ae2a892bc
'2011-11-18T02:52:01-05:00'
describe
'137584' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTH' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
cd27a041d3f80e37e3d32e815a9eb50a
5bc6a34851fe82ece3f78e9eb65ef7fec0534740
describe
'38064' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTI' 'sip-files00044.pro'
6c0c4eabb22c1dbee96865a8261ac76b
cbacb49fe2f0bc383bf6da590d54569326366346
'2011-11-18T02:48:31-05:00'
describe
'48445' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTJ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
78509aedef290686be092452d8c7d207
d1fb2a006f544e7f411d6f58cc30eca779b2c033
'2011-11-18T02:44:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTK' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9f133b65e5333721cb488362b01a78ef
0c905295cec3ca2af873d7d12f71cdef14190c15
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTL' 'sip-files00044.txt'
c1b004bfd7c0ffd62af1e50140434d86
f84a5c10514ef633b627167a1a41198215100f05
'2011-11-18T02:51:19-05:00'
describe
'12084' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTM' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
beaa6a2ec04738321526100470c93dc1
305f0631896c327320807f72811e4af9558a9abc
'2011-11-18T02:43:25-05:00'
describe
'324409' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTN' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
a235130448eeb8886e0bccc6cbf97d09
47a7690bbabee3a272f93f831af2f614dc1064bb
describe
'137148' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
fe1532774dc8e12d8e1d51ae894c3668
793897353d9d1cde64f6985c768cafa8402f4956
'2011-11-18T02:45:05-05:00'
describe
'37085' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTP' 'sip-files00045.pro'
a5cfc391f22a9ac77beaf1aaa47be0ab
846e61a5d8bdb9724fa3a4b9bd53a5b55027f22e
'2011-11-18T02:43:24-05:00'
describe
'47817' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTQ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
850e7ca9ef4c2bfe323f40efa53a3b29
b29a80fc7cf51242d30809a4870a44d4cf701bfd
'2011-11-18T02:44:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTR' 'sip-files00045.tif'
0a607b3a86b5170a1aa1dda119ae123f
f8ff3e80eeeaf7ee90be4b4999b5e458aaf7fbca
'2011-11-18T02:45:46-05:00'
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTS' 'sip-files00045.txt'
a226dc12e6ba0d049eeb016535cedfb8
4db1299286650c09a362e1d48122a8b12524e41e
'2011-11-18T02:50:01-05:00'
describe
'12270' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTT' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
d123f53ffb2f65ce81bd0888d5b7e8fc
94169130fa5fc067167e021673f859e938bc000d
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTU' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
4ee75b9c1e3f961cd429ef39283a03a3
da91e2c04ad58beab636ca7389f2c51e5f29a9c8
describe
'133765' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTV' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
8f2bd46a0092dd6cdd71b9618634926a
25cc85845ab7e1774d1b1fbbad9105d3b459e0d5
describe
'37250' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTW' 'sip-files00046.pro'
5a090c980a18fd13194a551081201ea1
59ed89aab02f4d32d21c7d9f0d672c2b9b4212b5
'2011-11-18T02:50:32-05:00'
describe
'46225' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTX' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
8acf1c5e8ea95489a14fd285a908c39f
f8cc5f7cde5272ee29ab750d0f3172672a9e143a
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTY' 'sip-files00046.tif'
9e6dc1a130c41bd475f07991133a0f8e
dfdb2b9d8a47bb6faf2a7426a3490df335dcb6bb
'2011-11-18T02:52:13-05:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOTZ' 'sip-files00046.txt'
234fa9f6db519cec13884b85130ef9e6
79bce51c8bfe329465c816c7333cbcc3e1826cce
describe
'11764' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
b42e7a87759a70655bfbd1b7e5cfbbd3
dc419246b5fa4bd1d33225972dd8082fc28f7aa0
'2011-11-18T02:43:35-05:00'
describe
'324787' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUB' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
9a0a469a5e6a87253314c2a7aa78ccae
d3f4bdac1ff19100362cb7f93fb9d0c6bbea900d
describe
'129513' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUC' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
169db6a00192958aa558106de58d5190
ccf1d7a401ab14c5b1659e2df06e2e32c6eed3ff
'2011-11-18T02:41:54-05:00'
describe
'36395' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUD' 'sip-files00047.pro'
5d620795c98062bb8574e6762062e6b2
0e0fc7a643e43bcd1c2e9f9fd99197b48b5f0a2b
describe
'45287' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUE' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
bd4e76463cfc5662ff26a832737a58ef
a2c59c9dfe65c0a0c6c6fe4decd1b399cee3c690
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUF' 'sip-files00047.tif'
5eee96443aabb8e68709c3168e1e1dae
f0e1cf6d4a1e368b76629d518e29128359d40de9
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUG' 'sip-files00047.txt'
01f5c07dd59c01eb607d513259913a75
8560af3c2b7fa3b4d19eb2a482b3e51c454656fa
describe
'11723' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUH' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
f77d9441fdd55053b2a038fe455b4087
7a0d6b4b5e13f846a679c9d4594a74932cc099ad
'2011-11-18T02:42:37-05:00'
describe
'324406' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUI' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
4e6142e61940f5a9f2f59a73fc5a016f
2751d33270a9f8dc294457b1096404f4920e5e9a
'2011-11-18T02:51:57-05:00'
describe
'147313' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUJ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
c86f1bbe695f7b0f62455282fb4beba1
469858ea9dc8e5fffe928c847a34a5337830ee3e
'2011-11-18T02:43:28-05:00'
describe
'44369' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUK' 'sip-files00048.pro'
87163d614ed1dc682d23e363b665caea
98cf957179074a1b16d793fdec4de054f27dd205
'2011-11-18T02:45:58-05:00'
describe
'50375' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUL' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
97cfa73a531caec37d5b8d8d4ef82d47
2849616adeb6bbc90450e680eaed062138c65b4c
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d410851b50e5c2180387ceb30a90b9ac
addc8b8a31b33d40ed424aed2fb22e7cb351e170
'2011-11-18T02:50:18-05:00'
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUN' 'sip-files00048.txt'
5fc5242a41060bc6177d40efbc3c6726
db2d35b29ad2f16ef562a44d7e49a612e8f08cfb
describe
'12070' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUO' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
10e5877a42ca34c6f0fddca62ed7bbe9
8ea99014bb7b4892461dc1cbebab12f45cef314a
'2011-11-18T02:52:30-05:00'
describe
'324698' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUP' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
be519ea2dfbfc7cce49932ec12bcaa4e
d9f0a336f697d9f821a422b5687ea4d9631e9be6
'2011-11-18T02:51:41-05:00'
describe
'82594' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUQ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
aac700c7a55e9f010fea573d897fc610
b8f9853f54797e06c5622e7bf4569438e87e0a06
'2011-11-18T02:54:12-05:00'
describe
'24948' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUR' 'sip-files00049.pro'
2d815b7285e7bd9bd235f1a13516279e
ff408e84dce4d960ae5d3f69376e8800161d45d7
'2011-11-18T02:41:35-05:00'
describe
'27147' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUS' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
bbbf63875acc8e14d021492401df423a
2db823dbfb05cec4335ceef920156e03b0e80d7b
'2011-11-18T02:47:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUT' 'sip-files00049.tif'
3d2b343f7c1f325e06d2a6ce6f7e93bf
ba081b7cd4b90bceb15b1240178864eab20e2aa4
'2011-11-18T02:55:21-05:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUU' 'sip-files00049.txt'
a6b7ec59170cf0d1041b705602172ff9
6e60d50eb47d87e0a7ecb5aeb445b5282c7954f6
describe
'6698' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUV' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8e04f2712ab73db134deb1fe47d36575
727f6708d29c936c19619fe80481c860f35b2888
'2011-11-18T02:55:06-05:00'
describe
'324524' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUW' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
32979050a64c9024e508f7a9ec3063db
fd41ed54cc645c63b8b9c136de73b1d3f6fd971f
'2011-11-18T02:49:51-05:00'
describe
'94138' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUX' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
b5f06ee3c8c5c92a0685c83ac28bdac8
0991984ca5a3b305c5892535ad9a8b74996af233
'2011-11-18T02:42:46-05:00'
describe
'26654' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUY' 'sip-files00050.pro'
df7945fdc47f1048fc92ca5f17ee2b02
b5e8b53ebae9f03c9afc7c46e11a289f74d0862b
'2011-11-18T02:42:15-05:00'
describe
'30153' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOUZ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
ccf29ce3afa8f82884fb619fb2337847
b0784211fd8298581f134d217eb4d0467bdba771
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVA' 'sip-files00050.tif'
9f9965ae7299900ad529a0583eaba02b
c91b10c72f2e7f7cd1939b7746ef56fd1302ff15
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVB' 'sip-files00050.txt'
2af42d6c4473f931cac09fb5bceaa46a
4855e29f0e2a3686e0368f09a1bb819119a0470a
describe
'7885' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVC' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
52d95f3fc3a87c9e1c97fe3045821af2
d2d1ed9bafb6bc9babc2de134793b5d0e2753ea6
'2011-11-18T02:53:52-05:00'
describe
'324564' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVD' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
d73cf57638be0102d4892749e9779f0b
2db78de97e6c567df9b7f0de9b3de0375435166b
'2011-11-18T02:52:32-05:00'
describe
'133841' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVE' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
af4b7298a8ff02c07cdcc7737e77b2bb
8e0e391949e4b52023a8d891f3512b66dfa20def
describe
'39663' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVF' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f21a945407330668dda3cc7f80b36a69
36addc2995b6c2f8527ae1185a9d4dc34133a315
'2011-11-18T02:42:40-05:00'
describe
'46076' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVG' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
fefbb37ea9a7ed128d192b025be5260e
0e3fccb77af5655310c73869c40d01b4285b8f34
'2011-11-18T02:46:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVH' 'sip-files00051.tif'
6cd89a3da3f02d57678f79c313732a0a
852d13c23efe99f16d5e841f1887b866c8ecc867
'2011-11-18T02:42:49-05:00'
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVI' 'sip-files00051.txt'
a767968c0a3b120ae70340d88adcd95e
f7b211d85f650d98b227e0a9d9418f96fa911304
'2011-11-18T02:49:06-05:00'
describe
'11558' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVJ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
6dcff30cfaaab0f4dad1f362675b5937
9a0d47d4619dbddd13e22dbdfa8cd6360f3cd31e
'2011-11-18T02:49:42-05:00'
describe
'324797' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVK' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
1919a5d57663a59b0fd5e918a971ee7b
028a7d16ef325ad1a20687c0ad70c981da154f47
'2011-11-18T02:41:29-05:00'
describe
'147574' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVL' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
ff55e1247add6dd979fdf0b0beeca4a1
9383ddcc5a11850d5096626118a205677a985155
describe
'45172' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVM' 'sip-files00052.pro'
7131dc724aa265c6a24c6ecd367e094f
b8af8ec5a9d026642489e9a58802148b6b4bac8e
describe
'49722' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVN' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
cc1d3b31e20510ac7d079d69aa2c2789
889bbf737d65e90806a8e0191bf8044654d1fb51
'2011-11-18T02:44:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVO' 'sip-files00052.tif'
aacc83409e73cd76dc5c29a8bfc16449
8373f7f2aef9a78331245ac63da05a2b762079e6
'2011-11-18T02:45:44-05:00'
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVP' 'sip-files00052.txt'
53248c01bbe1590177ad5db1a581b9db
cee47a923e9484907f978bdc9ba243dd8d215df1
'2011-11-18T02:42:14-05:00'
describe
'12037' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVQ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
b9b376442048836ffbf2bd2bfe19ad4a
5b70f2c43f6f4c422e40881e3bfe32f5dd623c87
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVR' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
2c658fc1f93b1b080c806099d5959f6a
d02e9ab3011ab845db674c17e5ea538e9c681d0d
describe
'136916' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVS' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c11b57c3bb34ad886698762c22b1b09b
c1502d978afbfe33890a854dfa334fdaacec8f89
'2011-11-18T02:44:55-05:00'
describe
'35710' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVT' 'sip-files00053.pro'
2add3b418560c0d815c38b6083419bb2
e56b5c73ffa1a4d127c0808aa3f3f929d4909276
describe
'47373' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVU' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
1e3a23886d22c035edb80d98d172a041
781f865b20ded2e3c93ff6460b6dee2386066faf
'2011-11-18T02:43:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVV' 'sip-files00053.tif'
b8ab0a43ad23a684d274078fe3d4d5be
86b576f0a3214e0e3b63e11bfaf9a6fa99f536dc
'2011-11-18T02:49:17-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVW' 'sip-files00053.txt'
00782e8f5e2934f188736f0f9e4c0941
ce928c7622015244eb6f3d4b66d66c06abc2316a
'2011-11-18T02:51:44-05:00'
describe
'12656' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVX' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
1a63ef0445ef18621b0393632d1bc888
37d49b6f740fa382e178200c9e27f0396835364a
describe
'324809' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
4824af999efa55055044a0c8563247a8
ea680a031b9a4eb7c34bee36567a729e1cb69b5a
'2011-11-18T02:51:58-05:00'
describe
'129503' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOVZ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
5a61b89483f57a6d467bd4d8a7367dd8
81072f01f705b770637d5df37009be7b6feb23a3
'2011-11-18T02:42:23-05:00'
describe
'35015' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWA' 'sip-files00054.pro'
3d06a2031675d28b78ad42c52caf32e3
947b52cfe2a955eb4978048a71c22adc6f4f06ac
'2011-11-18T02:44:26-05:00'
describe
'46308' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWB' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
7aed077ce4e08e4d2540f7059c82a5b5
009ef8e9fc07648bb950fd81d1005fec6ffe1bd1
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWC' 'sip-files00054.tif'
74882cca1e4d3d5cd4d4caee066ec165
4ebbd3506e851c3b1a4c17af68be0c8dafbe8bf1
'2011-11-18T02:41:26-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWD' 'sip-files00054.txt'
5b91d8c7a6a8264abba6efd180f54840
04dc3ac498095abef7488a728a6947a970799aac
'2011-11-18T02:47:15-05:00'
describe
'11962' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWE' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
711af591109662b4f0554fcc762ecb06
10a6335c70c160bcdd400552324a813391fb3783
'2011-11-18T02:52:02-05:00'
describe
'324566' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWF' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
7185419d6f668006eb2e8e9b1d9d3073
a1ec13357081daf7b7f561bf92fabf9a0f1759a7
describe
'137464' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWG' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
c874120839e6895a186b23f2cf93e834
63f82bc7dcb161aa75841b23fc2a610a9e1a37bb
'2011-11-18T02:45:16-05:00'
describe
'39031' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWH' 'sip-files00055.pro'
4b6a183fcab6983c298fba18096b20b5
7f190b69b50e1d3b133893c2bd210ed0c74b18a4
describe
'46245' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWI' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
e526b5d230809c95dc2b4fcacdaf1970
41a3064d8f8a07d30176d657458307f381e26f27
'2011-11-18T02:51:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWJ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
e3fd501aa52f656d5185408dbeba2bf2
b3b84bcc1fc496741f1afc5bc1e40ddf06151fdc
'2011-11-18T02:43:55-05:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWK' 'sip-files00055.txt'
7621b011110d2d02f05f965d1adba6f3
ae33932ba862c38a7d3793381b13e568da388b0f
'2011-11-18T02:43:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWL' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
7c17c2db4f990b494ab0a66911ff8f81
3ab5535ff8a39f444bca1c39b508633ea6b771ad
'2011-11-18T02:43:53-05:00'
describe
'324721' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWM' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
e005c9061718ce0f5f7c30ccadf06896
108304699166d48939843cfc72696a15309f3455
'2011-11-18T02:42:12-05:00'
describe
'162150' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWN' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c72f805b70cfc59f39903cf6702cdadb
8be1ba45a05e8f9b12213e17f81cb62c201693f2
'2011-11-18T02:54:01-05:00'
describe
'50805' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWO' 'sip-files00056.pro'
02a0a4241791ecf887d1e313a2731c62
4ad35a1637699ef3c35e81fe96cba826dfd5d048
'2011-11-18T02:43:44-05:00'
describe
'53467' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWP' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f0be8827a7be824ce83302ebcd75c89e
c26fd87b0576d20caf563c8da42cc2fa2b97e486
'2011-11-18T02:47:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWQ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
27621d2445cb03042e6d9e2a47c28c17
a84653158e60f2514dd4172c5b131fb35c96849b
describe
'2020' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWR' 'sip-files00056.txt'
37d2c1ba8fd24a3065eb83d7abf7d763
571ef267870f0f2bbb576d127ba5e36231264d3f
describe
'12477' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
1496b50ed8e23beb3f70892ae9ae9cb2
9a1be15d7c47a57cb2dceaac802c2e15392cf628
describe
'324567' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWT' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5707456c7cda1067e81c83831ef13e3e
37b1831cf3d1901148be7c9f5dcf1cfae466c5cd
'2011-11-18T02:44:17-05:00'
describe
'139071' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWU' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
5b041cbac8914fbbc15da0f0a3c06a42
1dd753fec53dbc23cd265556b93626ab4ae56369
describe
'43470' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWV' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d357acaf435be64ec0031db01f776b55
d42cdae25a20f820a62e47a7ad731950f54e942e
'2011-11-18T02:46:01-05:00'
describe
'45684' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWW' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
6b778bf4bdbf3f5ff6d297271a2ce7d2
ce953abc2174d5b70289be2fdf7f554a2b54e742
'2011-11-18T02:52:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWX' 'sip-files00057.tif'
5d119550452486d15ac7d4e9557042b3
f5f5758dc8b30176651369e9d6b625380c046e7e
'2011-11-18T02:42:38-05:00'
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWY' 'sip-files00057.txt'
f82fe95188bb57b7b8a5605898667fd6
81e40644916cabcf5567b2130182cba105424eb7
describe
'11026' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOWZ' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
db95a305347a3dd60e19ebc74d4aa00c
79037bffdc9714ec58caa8dc2f47094edef03cc4
'2011-11-18T02:41:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXA' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
d49d6bf37290fec71f56659ee8f1e4c5
c20b3f8d6b6f322e83b20f93c364bd8182d68c04
'2011-11-18T02:41:53-05:00'
describe
'149492' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXB' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
a419f70b92511ecf060f93ec4ecb12d8
de5b026b58e11ee01a48e71b037401a584dfe8a3
'2011-11-18T02:42:11-05:00'
describe
'45829' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXC' 'sip-files00058.pro'
040a4a18bdd1ddccc2089e1b897c4fc9
fed0ee4944f40c10ab511ad9eda771dd99096e99
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXD' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
728c7d58af090ea42fc1c37f035f39db
bca5fea7aec7b0a7b0763e6e5ebb35df8caf82ac
'2011-11-18T02:42:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXE' 'sip-files00058.tif'
0d1b6886d5226660fa9cb30fc3a5746e
9e89955cbfc68b1f50f448ba8c2fbc01e3428aa2
'2011-11-18T02:44:48-05:00'
describe
'1853' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXF' 'sip-files00058.txt'
250d66d297355b9464c07567b9e010a7
a25836da4ba832ded066badcbcdeae4d1171a805
describe
'11489' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXG' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
3db92fca9255d928acd60a689dcecb65
1602a4b6988b118da6fc095474c34eb1c2fcc64b
'2011-11-18T02:41:41-05:00'
describe
'324637' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXH' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
9a8e6af6095dc9aa4629eb0c4de122cd
1a70376402d42f28ecd8f03ea2a619bb96fd3a1d
'2011-11-18T02:47:55-05:00'
describe
'114434' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXI' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
f511af1d0c7c1c17d63a8761110e91ac
73905c57de39887a2664d12cadad1c40bde15639
'2011-11-18T02:45:24-05:00'
describe
'33567' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXJ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
3136307ff488b61da45fb9cf96b36553
139fdc69c10667f8ced6dc8e706edae062a9d93e
describe
'39015' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXK' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
cc220c1875c43a66e47e7a057cf6e53e
e1b675002ca9b6ab2d13b198ba5de4eb3b7a4ef1
'2011-11-18T02:49:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXL' 'sip-files00059.tif'
52594d5d5dd8892888e410d5b43ba3fa
1d424cd8891de52ae9252c46eb4506f760e82fcf
'2011-11-18T02:51:24-05:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXM' 'sip-files00059.txt'
6eba7ac076d69666dd1722f732e1e637
93342af2f577fe59c5b2733d61f396879eaba840
describe
'10058' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXN' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
58d15ab557cbd972b5c36dcb356eeb56
3299ca6a2f8086e2e1d014b09909a12b5106bf5b
'2011-11-18T02:50:48-05:00'
describe
'324813' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXO' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
c36ef98527510e2581338e7c02a7449a
712f4b8f348f59d06cd913950db7fd10c29753db
describe
'155378' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXP' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
253d5591bf790fa1b2903bb44c77f75c
92ada80f23dbbc6ef5a3ba616bb4a91d8fa65984
'2011-11-18T02:51:51-05:00'
describe
'48461' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXQ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
83c1cfa9cb24ccbd4b1489eda9c02c73
ef8241393bdf0413944b8a2e21d534e02248d1fd
'2011-11-18T02:42:09-05:00'
describe
'51032' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXR' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
5e9128cab560704241fc069cec30f319
8d0fa9989846b038c37e0edb9700e58f145b9c42
'2011-11-18T02:48:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXS' 'sip-files00060.tif'
d6a40b5378d3eddad15539a967278af7
1fdd02c601c39f0204c3a435c2a7aa4e7990ef87
'2011-11-18T02:46:39-05:00'
describe
'1942' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXT' 'sip-files00060.txt'
057fa6ff43d6bb0a2760197298b449fe
c9ab2eb6a54ca157de4bc1f69168feb0d23f5ad8
'2011-11-18T02:45:26-05:00'
describe
'11989' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXU' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
dacfe894f709104434f37c45e19e283c
f81ce3cf8cba3bed92792828447a75e8e7cc84ba
'2011-11-18T02:48:12-05:00'
describe
'324547' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXV' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
66589bf4c8749913244d075b51894ddf
715b8b82136772bae4ec7d0c958481882f6fc2cc
'2011-11-18T02:49:19-05:00'
describe
'159195' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXW' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
f761681e40a02dec98bcf0cf46b3b371
c309a1dee9b6ac1b327e5fcdf9db129d58782e44
'2011-11-18T02:55:11-05:00'
describe
'49041' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXX' 'sip-files00061.pro'
7fb2ffa623acfbfd1fcb73b20230498d
92ea4de6cf0607c9bbe1f4996b8f5781f07c9d6c
describe
'52996' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
48b70d7b65163bea05ce086dfb351cb3
0ff7c80f6124cc1a7aa1a47e851bfe26ede18996
'2011-11-18T02:41:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOXZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
fc2e1810e6d2e673b4acbc73c460da97
ee99c8034e63de8fdafaa2984ea311189f543fb2
'2011-11-18T02:42:59-05:00'
describe
'1941' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYA' 'sip-files00061.txt'
643cbf80c5c83abda0cff9be184a983f
893493b18b86c0835ed3a8be4570edf1475ce537
describe
'12658' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
9dfbd72c8c974cb86ea17b660cd0a1a4
4ca00a7438205556441b94cb78d3c3faa5c68ad1
'2011-11-18T02:46:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
939bf24f66c54711bc3b5aff06e46f87
922feff89bcef21ea6848a1f0c41a9d57f2c0ce9
'2011-11-18T02:46:43-05:00'
describe
'159325' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYD' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
81c659d73960d9168d2086cc141bcd10
bf93ec15276db45bb660c776f41b02fe008e7ddb
'2011-11-18T02:50:58-05:00'
describe
'47212' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYE' 'sip-files00062.pro'
2d0a280513a31351d3b1601433fcf05b
9cbe84ad10ef36ce09f229f26b9cfcea22fa018f
'2011-11-18T02:42:05-05:00'
describe
'53019' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
25ee3e5bbe5bb5f3b465b9a6a0e50a0a
3d3b947b222971b5cf8c9e0b0d3b7fc14d594519
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYG' 'sip-files00062.tif'
04bfe9851be7975846f78c530e96b76f
dec66c20b053efd12800ec7e2b03bdb2ebf25176
'2011-11-18T02:44:24-05:00'
describe
'1933' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
e5da613f4bb55e4878cb47bd5f973f07
9b29cb9ec5ebf4f4d366c15e1a791ea92d33b8ff
describe
'11956' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYI' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
efee0beaf1d2223ba917214a3103e833
936a739be32a9577197cddf9640849465472a916
describe
'324375' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
226c64936fc65544cee847b0189cf644
a5c292f3805a60981b8ef56b26051e6622cdc962
'2011-11-18T02:52:08-05:00'
describe
'139363' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYK' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
f09999221e96f3427659a6539f3c299a
c7a16daa72230f7109ee46bff8b0bc29b2d8858f
describe
'21354' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
aee40bd41badf02564db6b23936321e0
1f30dd1fb5532e27f666219ff8130f3a4baa8551
'2011-11-18T02:48:30-05:00'
describe
'41182' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
a9d87e979aa060134d965fed804dd515
f558261f4f43473690be58c21a49f2b2cda14cc4
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYN' 'sip-files00063.tif'
67646a72c73095ff8a4d29fadea13e1a
d3924e4e3c10b5badf1a07b5ea988d6287741682
'2011-11-18T02:46:23-05:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYO' 'sip-files00063.txt'
53ebeeaca706100b7ad6fb15949bf781
0a3d66e36d057e0d8a99112b0c3d77a4fe00dd66
'2011-11-18T02:48:57-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10227' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYP' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
8e078d00e316d60d023634c836010aa7
f913e4da9515a1e55ededae42b00b92f138380ae
describe
'324791' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
74089686637b005935509f84d63d5628
1c16b2f18cf930a6c86b935e612c58dc2b47f70e
'2011-11-18T02:49:13-05:00'
describe
'107650' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
16581efa44174a757f266958f74e1a19
875803602e0a105100364f7158aae2317bfda72b
'2011-11-18T02:46:21-05:00'
describe
'21536' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYS' 'sip-files00064.pro'
d18a1604b6e85b6f2c2f0cfba15626fd
1cf0e2f4a7ed1896ed173c9bb39846ad8c86be5b
'2011-11-18T02:55:14-05:00'
describe
'33871' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
8bad73f5dd03c6b0e2efe6235b6830db
bff41eff89211324fc79149649e6825d08f54f45
'2011-11-18T02:47:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYU' 'sip-files00064.tif'
3281a71271ed323f72f2713ffe62f3f0
d0e22eb4725800328aa9b1e3bb58dd058bf99efb
describe
'887' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
cc51e9ccc8cdcb86d4314ded4c27df1d
00a738a78555d4680c29d974389561cc9b5dad39
'2011-11-18T02:50:37-05:00'
describe
'8473' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
db38dcfc2b4119b5c6396cad15b2658e
329a11018a97da4ad86c8cee6aeb6f1c06437e04
'2011-11-18T02:41:58-05:00'
describe
'323510' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
5e2e1f13a7128164e4b48291a247040b
0410f033104cb6d66f4df37cce15c7988eadf0c9
describe
'154557' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
e8c050680a433b416e8e8c83d6d24430
510f6c320b31ea32f6bb3429a216f328bea90e18
describe
'47881' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOYZ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
fcb521535d88967cd7d2ffb01709048c
751b4a71abc913f85452150f5a97d9e28a265e2b
'2011-11-18T02:42:00-05:00'
describe
'51763' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZA' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
68902f09610de1a629edcff632a8e7e9
22c5019ba251bd180b286a5aecd34ccf680453f0
describe
'2605120' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZB' 'sip-files00065.tif'
d9e3ed23e21bdb5b4db707f53899e941
c14459276d989ff5418962494255b96726064668
'2011-11-18T02:42:41-05:00'
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZC' 'sip-files00065.txt'
31e01a3426cca5bc249ea1f8e133da97
aa7ec0e5246f983920177a52816bea6c5725ba91
'2011-11-18T02:42:22-05:00'
describe
'12265' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZD' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
9366c8e5f55733d5b06d7bf293cba3b1
dd40844bc64877221a055f4a31405e9964b07ac9
'2011-11-18T02:47:56-05:00'
describe
'324818' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZE' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
85b3aab7b0fdb25464af28836c594d51
98cfcaa28f1f4dab2b7ead9cb50eaf593544705e
describe
'149803' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZF' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
a23bb677a0cdfef7062d95f6e15202ec
f20bbd4b2d965e998486b526cacb858ce19594ab
'2011-11-18T02:46:16-05:00'
describe
'46739' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
5039845ec078815830b4ab4c236caf95
c7a6fa7b89c86ef66ed6d0b8b6f8c98b79b23816
describe
'51153' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZH' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
0c1a7cf98fffb6c8b5bdd1665ff198b9
42751ac11061dbc62591be1f1156db4c574fb2ff
'2011-11-18T02:47:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZI' 'sip-files00066.tif'
80bf71c9911b8e879fe4d45105b9d603
3fe6172d6226e9c9adda2ef7841559c68a8db370
'2011-11-18T02:50:08-05:00'
describe
'1861' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
46896bc68e84fa9f487b49d68974e48b
63dbdcd94203ad235d6c142af645dc0a6989df37
'2011-11-18T02:46:41-05:00'
describe
'11936' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZK' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
d8db039519d9121f87dee15ade7bbd1b
5209b8dd14ee5ecbcf7840625c646e326c3ff011
describe
'324504' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZL' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
4abfa0008d81cfa60a6145d0ec4ec7f5
5008864d3522b49a6794ad17d2376ce36f7c795a
'2011-11-18T02:49:31-05:00'
describe
'94306' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZM' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
692af1537f9e381608404b5017eecdf1
d45aa24c0a8bdc8d4842242e0503af96418f998f
'2011-11-18T02:50:30-05:00'
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZN' 'sip-files00067.pro'
73912f0efb14b6a889f2488e2d220b1b
26237d774e2594476aa9dc5a8e7e7fc70968e9d2
'2011-11-18T02:47:57-05:00'
describe
'27529' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZO' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
ab8970aadf3a1d55f61ed01b1c3173d3
f405a304e38707923c003f65e77f276489a8bb71
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZP' 'sip-files00067.tif'
3e9b255e9466819a076e4ba85c6c287c
265d080f4aa5cc803de46556aa643ce65b3c5168
'2011-11-18T02:53:53-05:00'
describe
'153' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZQ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
c43dc726be297d5f2bbc4eb32fbfcb2c
dd4cda564f0b2add587392f881fb8108a4ad4e9d
describe
'7236' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZR' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
b3b3092f45adc4d0d1749c002d9c90bb
f9fbb60209d3852591c5fab592db61715fffb332
'2011-11-18T02:45:48-05:00'
describe
'324545' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZS' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d82017978e56c81e061855e8d2d3edcc
6e819501af10587ce044906f15f4662cc06284d0
'2011-11-18T02:44:22-05:00'
describe
'137441' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZT' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
9e2c7b5407d43b53df7643b1affdc956
4e47db62f8126c912dcf5043a3e6202bce6630e2
describe
'36489' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZU' 'sip-files00069.pro'
ca3537bafeb1a9f4c47b6232a3fed9b2
5c27078f952cffc5034ea5cbb9595d7e8ddcc8cb
'2011-11-18T02:48:27-05:00'
describe
'47805' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZV' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
9e5e6b3699a2138e435255b068877291
4227d04a6c1af00d2505b100dc2da8be3eea0b26
'2011-11-18T02:48:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZW' 'sip-files00069.tif'
2380da6f4835f00d288eee6f4fc6d6f6
fbbc5c7acc259981817e5e10da9478f6a66705b1
'2011-11-18T02:44:25-05:00'
describe
'1439' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZX' 'sip-files00069.txt'
1c6eec5f492e20e44523a6f0e36f798c
1f4fa492dbc422c586ce7834efc1b98cc3499804
'2011-11-18T02:46:38-05:00'
describe
'12236' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZY' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
55bcb64a3ea7e7dce25ff91cd7d1af12
a44ac249bb1de69fcf3dfeada3fbc4246166a3dc
'2011-11-18T02:45:36-05:00'
describe
'324801' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABOZZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
49b702bb06048a401b5e56d09259a3d7
d19817c282c123c56397b398b0b6c7aa396702e3
describe
'136516' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
a7ade7636b3e2ba28e2d0bcaae102a8b
f2c97e76b3856ecc36c7eaf201ba9b79646a62ea
describe
'42316' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAB' 'sip-files00070.pro'
6ac7a6f5e5a51cbcc93f042e86be8f18
d7d3c29c8369030c30912953e15d5f75fed4d585
describe
'46727' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
a18402c07d27643a901a8f472467cc45
83f1055cc5f88f394aaceb3d4483daa47615c375
'2011-11-18T02:46:37-05:00'
describe
'2615404' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
38fa654f6f09d1da661174f6508fcea2
350b0392a60794ce2fd35de71ecd35435ff0dd34
'2011-11-18T02:42:06-05:00'
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAE' 'sip-files00070.txt'
527300fa6afc89642e638b1cb0f32df8
54565ef30a540ca1ea347f3f4ef554ee92da59d7
'2011-11-18T02:46:42-05:00'
describe
'11043' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAF' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
71ef364de5e5f3a51800735ecebc7003
de66d3dc77c367246fced81c0b559d55c43a3528
describe
'324395' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAG' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
e71d4e713bf2b0729be43c7538e1a8a8
27ac2a06ca202ebde59b4a06a58c404d6188fb56
describe
'138030' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAH' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
8eb3f58bfa51337fc4edb0a9342c9d41
4ad772061f41a48e6fc0f3ea7a5d0845f7faadbf
'2011-11-18T02:47:27-05:00'
describe
'43673' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAI' 'sip-files00071.pro'
df3eacc8b89baa8343418c10d974e92d
0ca4681cf189b894b6f757ec0f30172a40b277ca
describe
'46968' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAJ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
559cac7669cd9458d1252173906007fe
2531b9f05a66e40a1b624035b1cd72af649b0308
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAK' 'sip-files00071.tif'
91ef932a04a30b6d3bddbd3014b96629
567a13afb99fa26b4e966f2ec1e1313a142e6a9c
describe
'1777' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAL' 'sip-files00071.txt'
babbb4aca4aff5d4f9246f538d913ef5
ec0522ec041af528c7b6deef5122bcaab75bf344
'2011-11-18T02:54:20-05:00'
describe
'11302' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAM' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
1ddd0d224aeff35d57f11c7b454f450b
07e2c8ae6390cabe9e19521db1d2c9cbfc6707b9
'2011-11-18T02:46:03-05:00'
describe
'324822' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAN' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
bcf274a04e0bb261705636c7b53c2eda
ee39c28ecfcf8c6db137766ff3b09e306cdaae77
describe
'156876' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAO' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
42b7b83963486e89b109db426b330051
89a82c3917f65db8c3cea783b8b11c6c77f29892
describe
'48815' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAP' 'sip-files00072.pro'
e5157c6af70f5b52f0498f33a93ca7d2
bca6eae2cb1e124f011ad99c98769d0bbf7d8a19
describe
'53194' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAQ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
391adf06f341d3875dcd38402661f97a
fcd3cdf64a23f4c716b40f1b2bd6291f55be0d70
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAR' 'sip-files00072.tif'
ab93b4d9d7fe63f90ed0778f906f58a8
d1cd7d156a1d537babfc194deeae902cc3a7b285
'2011-11-18T02:51:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAS' 'sip-files00072.txt'
4f12e062324794652ce6670e629d393a
6e27995be360200ee6f4abd688ea03e587e5adc6
'2011-11-18T02:47:09-05:00'
describe
'12127' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAT' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
e27c18b083bbdc16375e50bed89c1e51
8495d6ea0dc1e407e487ce90cbb6bd6da96d2837
'2011-11-18T02:44:08-05:00'
describe
'324769' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAU' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
f7bcd96dd9a87fd0c1bd150898ebb9a8
5bedbae63a866802641bd0cd61f8a345493864e5
'2011-11-18T02:51:36-05:00'
describe
'149293' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAV' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
68469bb761ce7dc5c32ff6b67fe1932c
02325663556bca41db1db3a8fc3fb3be9b82bf84
'2011-11-18T02:45:19-05:00'
describe
'47598' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAW' 'sip-files00073.pro'
3186597fd2585fcdfa8583ce8f83e240
95fabe084b0de08e5ab6a6a6910164d6a088ea14
'2011-11-18T02:42:55-05:00'
describe
'51305' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAX' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
f06c69a893be958c834312bec351a936
8da2d4b4b20e6ba98f6eb4f4939937d65aa4039f
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAY' 'sip-files00073.tif'
abd6065fa97dc6dfca2e87cf06fb5338
a651f7496529350dfcafc0280599d4e6611f7736
describe
'1903' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPAZ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
ebb7814d031ca335ffd145cdad1202f7
8a60e9be61278aca2da782f4cc792b8c20770843
describe
'11871' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBA' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
9cf6990f53c9eca68900e16747b35b3d
360561586fff7f4450dcb97570e7a5c05c8e79df
'2011-11-18T02:44:13-05:00'
describe
'324811' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBB' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
7a8c4a7349eeeec236ad3d70b135d6aa
5c578e81a8e9a49b0fa20ad4ec8964f30e91c4fc
describe
'158168' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBC' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
cbef4cf45fec0e246b50eadc60942eba
62c354e11b17612a178d6b0642872d7eda4c9c68
describe
'49600' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBD' 'sip-files00074.pro'
6dcafbc1fdf740c94b80f5146be5cdd1
95af0bb6f1f6ba9acb77a2dade8100af8f33cd60
'2011-11-18T02:47:54-05:00'
describe
'53711' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBE' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
1b4221268177e0f69b20c5110ed73494
343e79b9c125597dd40d882ca2f49028e3541d4a
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBF' 'sip-files00074.tif'
5a6cdf91e9dd0541a20165e6d0dc4ad6
2072d9ddd905dc37b5adab7906881f9234391d61
describe
'1968' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBG' 'sip-files00074.txt'
3d6e1ae0b568f68a8c787abf86bcac8b
0f4ee931cfb7e76bdb1c094819335be54e807c2c
'2011-11-18T02:51:05-05:00'
describe
'11990' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBH' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
af137ea5ead3db57106de80c10f64f61
e3afd69b05056c4477786604f004b906b34965e2
describe
'324407' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBI' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
fcd4b996d183cc32e2efe70ab905983f
4c2dbaeacd0357401cb79128f1610859ec4271eb
'2011-11-18T02:45:49-05:00'
describe
'132073' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBJ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
afd21c15f0a994bc7f71a6db7519b74a
8e8b2e7819c120a08d4ece4978fa848e67d5da8e
describe
'38835' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBK' 'sip-files00075.pro'
ce62ad40964281acafdc64825c6294c4
bba5d45a40bbc3866be8d452c46fefaf82deeca6
'2011-11-18T02:48:00-05:00'
describe
'46075' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBL' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
a926f15f439beb861710c83702e0ae13
7f9aed0ace880e89f0d79906e47b59e1cfda0a22
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBM' 'sip-files00075.tif'
bad8b70403b134d40549faf40c877144
34ee560f5b5d8501b6c8904b06e204c1c8cacc8c
'2011-11-18T02:49:34-05:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBN' 'sip-files00075.txt'
6ba458f476dfa6e40efdf0f256e686b4
aebea5c945e238bdf74c29aa059c8a406027a528
'2011-11-18T02:42:03-05:00'
describe
'11631' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBO' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
eabe8210d2bfd2c2dcc1aadf0df651dc
de15353d3f926b3016964a7b8f60e25daad57f6a
'2011-11-18T02:50:25-05:00'
describe
'324825' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBP' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
f5a41a9e5c8522bc24b8b80a0a7fd298
55c023dca947f66142e51c65cebfc49eebec62c3
'2011-11-18T02:45:37-05:00'
describe
'135022' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBQ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
f47d09e75cfcbd46c4b2708aa666a940
4d80334c8009bd17a476fa8c790fdeb4d4b697b5
describe
'36824' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBR' 'sip-files00076.pro'
0ad11125baa2a67aee7dc3dba33792cf
fbba8b2eb14f42d9b96a8ce4fe5bc6831510367e
describe
'47442' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBS' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
38c3e128226ef78e5fc7e1069a379b42
5f09154c21b5e62b656194e4a4c66aeb63586459
'2011-11-18T02:46:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBT' 'sip-files00076.tif'
7e9e6dd286c797e67692f0fd114deec5
461bd7bc3afa804034c296b074925b917d5be7b5
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBU' 'sip-files00076.txt'
2a83164437c2f8557321fb58efda33a6
56f0e659fef1bc7fdd526bd5da2e3b9610b0487e
describe
Invalid character
'12124' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBV' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
ef865febe596def438d3d0786bab45b6
3601f5f5a4e5b6dfa6a5b0cfd11c23e250eb3fc1
'2011-11-18T02:51:27-05:00'
describe
'324562' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBW' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
b5299a833f17708f2efa96c2bf12a018
a043797514a6df08f22b055c9b030ec52d2ca176
describe
'131300' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBX' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
0394376233b27f6f00fdb21156741247
22346ca1fb4b8108f2eb7deff376fa647779dc7a
describe
'35988' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBY' 'sip-files00077.pro'
d4ea44e3acee84e01b13ff1d84f5e65f
923a7b355eb97c266c3592a9d3c4b16ba80ad170
describe
'46486' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPBZ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
029802be93bb8ade5e16c35e3f89a6af
f4f0309ae8fe8faae89a4ccf32c71e697bfe7fe6
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCA' 'sip-files00077.tif'
3d901ae1c45b9a61269eaa600ada5f20
c1ebdafabdcf76280ac98c24728cd4223fed6345
'2011-11-18T02:45:06-05:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCB' 'sip-files00077.txt'
57a442b8fdfeb7379100d08e328ae56f
258f4238f42e1799658524eac9a333331f8e07c5
describe
'11760' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCC' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2a5ccdfe4ffcda717fc23ced0da9f8a5
3aac455033b5c8fc93eb42cc9868055daf2be7a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCD' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
f439159bee5ee9779054b2bdd9ff8f76
0eede6c90edd419ba78dc14142a1d64f95796541
describe
'133338' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCE' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
91bb399dc3af007f35e0db51d5b4ae11
08c2f90635eaeee0a1812a2c28e0240009506a94
describe
'36883' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCF' 'sip-files00078.pro'
e57f774d19725d702fdb70b1a80951cc
b6663eef8c301fdaea901f9c31885bb598c9fd9c
'2011-11-18T02:48:41-05:00'
describe
'46175' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCG' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
2aed02df4931c83fc7e6dd2fefa6313f
235c0664e4ba7278170721efdf45f0caab4d9a97
'2011-11-18T02:43:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCH' 'sip-files00078.tif'
99a67523e60144e39ad4ec885900c75f
9751edf16df1008d34206eca1c3184148d4d6e10
'2011-11-18T02:44:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCI' 'sip-files00078.txt'
8c0fcfdeacd571aee4fd3b4ff86ec1bb
e88286532438573b22150cba314a3f9f705c8a9c
describe
'11682' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCJ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
6b92f9ee19d1019a050e95c53572a213
4c34b73d6a094136810fc6060bc344cc8eeb886a
'2011-11-18T02:44:53-05:00'
describe
'324511' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCK' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
3d84992975a467bfb8545bd609e2ae3f
5f72953e983003b521290debf80f3d3c9459e441
describe
'149587' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCL' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
1f990b025299a10a2be770504b7bd2bd
7db9cabbe25ee2e94801cbb6d492e0f06daf3678
'2011-11-18T02:44:06-05:00'
describe
'47019' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCM' 'sip-files00079.pro'
998f80403783c1a08580b546cb250220
ea516c227904123ec420482c16016cb31be89372
'2011-11-18T02:44:52-05:00'
describe
'51532' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
b223f16ac44a121c5c08531b3c1d7d74
bbcf2ad0d387d34c341782288b822491705c4e29
'2011-11-18T02:49:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCO' 'sip-files00079.tif'
95c8370214379745fb3d886acaa48644
e2f0e02a390e9cac0961143ea6309065fab2c1c7
describe
'1883' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCP' 'sip-files00079.txt'
5bbb7ebbed0ba9bbab86573253784968
a29825280cfb9edec6146ed3f69be3af6b64d77a
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCQ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
9da01e44a59597f70dd91a5a6c136399
4444fec2163d6906418bd9718259f9a58b9faa74
'2011-11-18T02:54:32-05:00'
describe
'324724' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCR' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8691b742896637e5162a26149f71f2c9
324d960785b9a4dbe773299adc0b6b10cc8941ff
describe
'161649' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCS' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
347568bf005edafc360b451dc1219c7d
7a1cecab028d28032c9c3abc486f0a24bc44d09f
describe
'51701' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCT' 'sip-files00080.pro'
76ebcdd901afc1241c871e7ee7e4d3e9
2b32139d8fdcfbcbe45f7ae1abfe3a2a87b244fa
'2011-11-18T02:41:48-05:00'
describe
'54409' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCU' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
00b96177c4299221eb9376b9646ce772
00f9678f9cb9c96ee8f9bc00606939e48c2cb608
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCV' 'sip-files00080.tif'
7204e58f5ae286268f3abc4651b7ae03
6b9cb5cfd9757261488b9279c5a0bd3e01ea51e1
'2011-11-18T02:44:37-05:00'
describe
'2032' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCW' 'sip-files00080.txt'
1d31e64e678e49a4bb71291e348ffd45
824678aa896edf68e17475d5272cb005253aac6a
'2011-11-18T02:46:56-05:00'
describe
'12689' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCX' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
2dd62cce8fde55f3e76307d006c8ed62
a038169df3305b4c50876dbfa7625a2a60b71dec
'2011-11-18T02:48:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCY' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
40b9a2a9ea091ecdba0fef2b99093914
2312f5ae1cb7bd75210cbbaa03c16be879f0586f
'2011-11-18T02:43:19-05:00'
describe
'138304' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPCZ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
2365ec89eeacfc7bd0f920704555426e
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describe
'41205' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDA' 'sip-files00081.pro'
195fa80f3256380658ea80cb95628dd4
ae8bd56a346411dddc9caf15fc027282ce884ee5
'2011-11-18T02:47:37-05:00'
describe
'47478' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDB' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
f5e1138306971cd5670333f71c2a8791
867efdd7e5ea4ba3aa2a548f9ca1e4a67ee7ae23
'2011-11-18T02:49:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDC' 'sip-files00081.tif'
9c4410e7b537cd492466e477c4fe689f
851e61eb8557f0dc144139d8ea180514467fe5c3
'2011-11-18T02:46:24-05:00'
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDD' 'sip-files00081.txt'
01bea6cc3ec94d85b7eccc0e0811b833
4ab238507f2c4e54d67a15645c2824d2d15bf5ec
describe
'11644' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDE' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
de68d3f6da956da5a1d777232bf54593
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describe
'324798' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDF' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
1499d5bce318f128c06a3a9880fccedb
3df6b5e36e1877d5db0b06fede4dfc984539c57c
'2011-11-18T02:46:02-05:00'
describe
'162399' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDG' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
2190d58dab26d53a9ee2b1f96d95f02e
676e93c25b96ff146168b046d0f1ec74a78c98da
'2011-11-18T02:41:59-05:00'
describe
'50120' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDH' 'sip-files00082.pro'
0c5b425b3f197aaf160b3364898a0a94
44416b51bb74be80b18ecb271034e10b82ccb2eb
'2011-11-18T02:48:34-05:00'
describe
'52596' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDI' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
f27f2185c969821e06197e29de5ff503
363742d6a2429e4be72642157dc4c1966a5b3962
'2011-11-18T02:42:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDJ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
f5a937fe08296b877519047027c9fbd6
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describe
'1976' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDK' 'sip-files00082.txt'
1f9250bda7ac077b10078d811852d43e
d979960cbb25b03cfdbcc8d9b6e2246877f08803
'2011-11-18T02:43:16-05:00'
describe
'11950' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDL' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
b880fd818ba8ef78a0e22dee6fadbc9e
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'2011-11-18T02:41:43-05:00'
describe
'324324' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDM' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
105044c2e9f246ec8a8c5aa5f09cf17a
e1f51d61e5db864054ce9072258465e956eaecd3
describe
'131540' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDN' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
3c3dbb77ef6c58e397c5fb9a0ddc5319
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describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDO' 'sip-files00083.pro'
2888d702d5e1aba277d9d91be47ac73e
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describe
'35029' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDP' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
b6e0c2ded854601526745ba74d1f6c88
b29df234208b77e5e47db3e78560f004811b2797
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDQ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
26160ea1e3fe357e1692bec2e28fa02a
e24b17f5e4c98d6c467e634cae7c5d9f527597a8
'2011-11-18T02:49:49-05:00'
describe
'142' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDR' 'sip-files00083.txt'
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describe
'8965' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDS' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
f6472c74c5944950e14f73a4a1ae57ae
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describe
'324377' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDT' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
849f95600e4c6e79884fb0a0dc9a72a5
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describe
'147520' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDU' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
534efda06a4d425b34cf0baf86ad4ecb
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describe
'44537' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDV' 'sip-files00085.pro'
c95b1d65db5c1fc3e6cca8a1e24b18c3
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describe
'50874' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDW' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
f8a893decb4481ea40eab99a29f12a43
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDX' 'sip-files00085.tif'
2dd602231bb0ade9b2b68b01854f7784
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'2011-11-18T02:44:33-05:00'
describe
'1830' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDY' 'sip-files00085.txt'
543776f29c5e3e3fbf5ae7de50c6b202
2af767e93854a3cf5724797f1efc39cacc01d52c
'2011-11-18T02:52:19-05:00'
describe
'11816' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPDZ' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
c5b634d204373cf90e84d0a53f09cac0
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describe
'324815' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEA' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
6ec187cef81b19efcd8fe9576a72d2c8
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'2011-11-18T02:44:27-05:00'
describe
'129431' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEB' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
418bc3a70c434240e8e7dde5f9d45ea8
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describe
'35561' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEC' 'sip-files00086.pro'
0e25f3209169c1a8cf7226a3010216cf
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'2011-11-18T02:51:09-05:00'
describe
'45671' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPED' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
90b5a717de16c878da3b2e4dddc819cc
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'2011-11-18T02:42:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEE' 'sip-files00086.tif'
8be2726430d30ccc5e7de3379ddc4b28
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describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEF' 'sip-files00086.txt'
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'2011-11-18T02:47:01-05:00'
describe
'11496' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEG' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
40fd549f06be6128e9abf424a58cd86d
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'2011-11-18T02:47:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEH' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
08a11f1f6d52b6cb6089c709e8cda08a
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'2011-11-18T02:42:58-05:00'
describe
'44040' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEI' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
62ba53bcc0dc78370509a61ec61c2901
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'2011-11-18T02:55:10-05:00'
describe
'10458' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEJ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
0643f38c93074c0927283f8d95d747b6
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'2011-11-18T02:50:29-05:00'
describe
'13159' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEK' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
d760a9214027e2268acd5d966f6a113d
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'2011-11-18T02:47:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEL' 'sip-files00087.tif'
59f2d13ba77c0dae347c436eca8a6f94
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'2011-11-18T02:50:06-05:00'
describe
'439' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEM' 'sip-files00087.txt'
7d78e5b22c3943e36c77880d43aa69fa
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describe
'3319' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEN' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
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describe
'324677' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEO' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
2975db0f39b5e8a63e29abd71cad700b
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describe
'97300' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEP' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
9f967e25897927a335bd13d7663f5a53
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'2011-11-18T02:54:07-05:00'
describe
'27329' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEQ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
903e5792dd7bfdacb5144ebba6731901
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describe
'33057' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPER' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
1fd59ee8d8035de6e1e92e389bf5c672
e45ec4f9a9957f307e1ea87b47ab448a299c7ef7
'2011-11-18T02:55:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPES' 'sip-files00088.tif'
100a447c37e9e87de040c4ac0b019fe0
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describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPET' 'sip-files00088.txt'
a58411f3f2cd8800e5fe5ec844f74a2f
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'2011-11-18T02:50:11-05:00'
describe
'8214' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEU' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
8a8c8e5a46b42efcde9ef3b878765840
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'2011-11-18T02:48:48-05:00'
describe
'324535' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEV' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ea82c4df357515de1d0da6ea8ed73f9b
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describe
'157962' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEW' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:43:42-05:00'
describe
'51776' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEX' 'sip-files00089.pro'
dc3a912094ed595fc0b38ae04210c8e0
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'2011-11-18T02:45:34-05:00'
describe
'53958' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEY' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
524747831197759730081ca7cafc20f0
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'2011-11-18T02:55:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPEZ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
6847151883f41c86fabc77d009ef9fde
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'2011-11-18T02:41:34-05:00'
describe
'2041' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFA' 'sip-files00089.txt'
42eaed331d06909a6f0708a0ad1ac4b6
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'2011-11-18T02:44:00-05:00'
describe
'12240' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFB' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
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describe
'324403' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFC' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
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describe
'144268' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFD' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
8ecaf6be92e85ec774ce72a292198ef0
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describe
'45424' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFE' 'sip-files00090.pro'
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describe
'48250' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFF' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:47:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFG' 'sip-files00090.tif'
b25d498e03fd65295675af54cf222d69
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describe
'1893' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFH' 'sip-files00090.txt'
51880e8b4709a76dba551e90b7a9acff
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'2011-11-18T02:47:22-05:00'
describe
'11242' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFI' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
96a8e1ddef8ab9fbfd49dce133de3028
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'2011-11-18T02:47:21-05:00'
describe
'324554' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFJ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
23f12f7344de98abdeca59ecd5c397ec
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'2011-11-18T02:49:02-05:00'
describe
'132158' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFK' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
b57fa394c3beb2b05139906d07792ce8
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describe
'37717' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFL' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c7839b675c6617f754d3d67cc298a4c7
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'2011-11-18T02:54:42-05:00'
describe
'46319' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFM' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
82c1235126775ffa2d40599bb1401a65
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'2011-11-18T02:52:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFN' 'sip-files00091.tif'
4bd468546c5606d9f51a3081a511918a
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'2011-11-18T02:51:20-05:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFO' 'sip-files00091.txt'
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describe
'11732' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFP' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
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describe
'324770' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFQ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
2937e7b95a4f9569c4efe7a7ab2c42b5
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'2011-11-18T02:43:00-05:00'
describe
'150427' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFR' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
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describe
'44459' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFS' 'sip-files00092.pro'
d829267a7da29250ada4fb4ed037c7cc
e7bfda0248cb21f9d2ac746359832a27c9da4190
'2011-11-18T02:48:10-05:00'
describe
'49823' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFT' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
8fbb989c48e1be767cb184d6b24554f0
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'2011-11-18T02:49:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFU' 'sip-files00092.tif'
cc91e9a02b1f2f6b7c6f41486e061aeb
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'2011-11-18T02:48:36-05:00'
describe
'1847' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFV' 'sip-files00092.txt'
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describe
'11784' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFW' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
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describe
'324650' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFX' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
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describe
'127807' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFY' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
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describe
'31154' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPFZ' 'sip-files00093.pro'
bf4d131c65bb9962a8929a4317e3693c
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'2011-11-18T02:48:46-05:00'
describe
'41308' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGA' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
ae942ad1124eeedff6d9677e3f347988
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGB' 'sip-files00093.tif'
227bfa5cc76139f37cfd49a07bfc2e5c
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describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGC' 'sip-files00093.txt'
482c04bc40f277fcdefba017a9d72d7e
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describe
'10816' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGD' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
550256e17a16d5c8b59406454498d098
2587f574f540b995288d37d41cabde3a56c7de9b
'2011-11-18T02:43:37-05:00'
describe
'324348' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGE' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c91c5ce0271dcf2f32723c45860daee6
c52284da68c4c887651879adf3faae99f89c0906
describe
'98130' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGF' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
799b532b74d0f4146b5b1e4cc7298c4f
0bda5183b000034acb235baa74972c86e6ec8bd7
describe
'28308' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGG' 'sip-files00094.pro'
836f7927a995b97f4815c84640945e59
471671eb4632a1ea75da9c08add488f8a7499eba
'2011-11-18T02:45:33-05:00'
describe
'34517' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGH' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
3c0c3d4eaea4abd77bfbd2c0047b0494
66104e52be5364f2281f18eab940ba2d2cb71d32
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGI' 'sip-files00094.tif'
a96cb16f80b4be46e38697b0850f0823
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describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGJ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
8da652def31e368621b87ca2a05b86d4
99d94b894ca19442eb2c566c3db22873573619bb
'2011-11-18T02:50:53-05:00'
describe
'8581' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGK' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
f93a0f5434f3b6e253678fa48598a89f
dfa6a696b515ad427552a7298755bdefbca6008b
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGL' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
981c39a658affd87528e8bf3696acc64
2fdd1d56af24cd0c78d0300d961d58a31197c3ed
describe
'152781' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGM' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
ec1a0639a32caa1a69474e22efc89b75
fe311c8b6d9c0e56a9e477559b9786b67a325ae3
'2011-11-18T02:54:49-05:00'
describe
'47984' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGN' 'sip-files00095.pro'
dbbc1187ce0f2d6c8f7f38e08776fc05
1bd13159bf29aafafccf867d1720f202e3ec7a70
describe
'52123' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGO' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
7f5ab47da6b1e3abcc41965d9b573c78
0f9e21b4d4db52b1c11972a24ab57872af7422f2
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGP' 'sip-files00095.tif'
496f285467406515004c6a217d58e684
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGQ' 'sip-files00095.txt'
bd0bc86eee6df10b2474188864a4f10b
0f1c40a9cacb4bb955d3d36472a3a431a6e20b36
describe
'12126' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGR' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
104c0cdb25059e91cf5530ccf05eae6c
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describe
'324788' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGS' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
7992d76e6c91bd29c1556af0b86b62af
8f6565a962bc7ab694116c9701bdaa7eca80d279
'2011-11-18T02:46:00-05:00'
describe
'136748' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGT' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
944265d7d6f10104c8f9d7d4e2eb8520
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describe
'39156' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGU' 'sip-files00096.pro'
04cb5f331e5e57c493f32d65d3956121
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describe
'47777' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGV' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
cc66045357b9ed8e79817cb859f9e64d
4ef3a8b7dc265ee4bfe88ac717749fd3c31c4fcb
'2011-11-18T02:44:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGW' 'sip-files00096.tif'
36e489fe0eb760411cd5a0fb496c5838
1000f2c4f0af50c96563055469692efee4fa9674
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGX' 'sip-files00096.txt'
0afbfa981951df5194ee95f4c2edd09d
d16e792de92580c0630ceb411e2d4ac8dc7ae0bd
'2011-11-18T02:45:25-05:00'
describe
'11528' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGY' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
ef644b67c6d9d416231b6a80168ae307
0df5c8b3be72e35bac47df372997255ab05e77de
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPGZ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
f588d6b6f288b1ef91a576be691e508a
21824092000eb73fc38605bf2cbc5888b838e91a
'2011-11-18T02:54:47-05:00'
describe
'113892' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHA' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
48711a3a2c5a5f22f6a08fb7ac997fed
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describe
'25750' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHB' 'sip-files00097.pro'
152f4e55d828547a194a927e9aa34218
f1d2ea01cbb329c5d128193470cb27bf1c4d4e71
'2011-11-18T02:55:18-05:00'
describe
'38349' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHC' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
513aeef9df2a37e41be8fa7ee8107e1d
b009c80211795687c0907cef933d2e5696a8b518
'2011-11-18T02:48:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHD' 'sip-files00097.tif'
7b16616b1042029ceba96fc0edfdd1d0
826a5c5ec7e492287918731db58ec1acf6673f65
'2011-11-18T02:44:47-05:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHE' 'sip-files00097.txt'
5d1b2f8ccb1b3a0271705d19f0bdf521
4813baf9e156e6715befd3451b50945775af92da
'2011-11-18T02:41:49-05:00'
describe
'10265' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHF' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
edc45e54f01a3a711282a1bede39a744
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describe
'324826' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHG' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
f50977fb743999fda43dff41ec769440
00fd0a84b0b519ebd166871c69b9fe721239290f
describe
'133951' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHH' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
bfbc3b9d20ceca8f753ee7859dde091e
9dfa3b85f585cbd757c16a85b75a24f3616db83b
describe
'39308' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHI' 'sip-files00098.pro'
7cdbe8416c82f0e9ed5b78fffb783fa6
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'2011-11-18T02:41:44-05:00'
describe
'46329' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHJ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
4918fb70f84b191eb0e34bd03e0b2464
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'2011-11-18T02:43:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHK' 'sip-files00098.tif'
1852982fedf9bd443475dcd765e2cf87
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describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHL' 'sip-files00098.txt'
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describe
'11277' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHM' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
cdb70ffa096c86724c2f4351c89eb16b
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'2011-11-18T02:46:51-05:00'
describe
'324484' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHN' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
f0c07b8c2a3eebc7e6097136bf63be38
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describe
'118386' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHO' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
92ab5c5f0257518b8711f120076ad599
c1ee218fc20b1fc49a1436c828574ebdd0f3d4a7
'2011-11-18T02:45:00-05:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHP' 'sip-files00099.pro'
e72f18945de9f7557000e40ed808dd84
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describe
'31771' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHQ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
382d1558f9cbb9b6be7c87369a1d2d15
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHR' 'sip-files00099.tif'
9b2acb16dca7f13ac5ba89c71871e9fb
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'2011-11-18T02:55:04-05:00'
describe
'79' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHS' 'sip-files00099.txt'
1342fa98b8da79d9fdcad2096b559b85
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describe
'8354' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHT' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
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describe
'324755' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHU' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
0e420bbb5a44ef43ce880fe83f1e7c33
445ab623a0ec5d327ca5a526f98d3c78a390744f
'2011-11-18T02:52:31-05:00'
describe
'163425' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHV' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
9874eb9f62d084b30cc52ca4f5b9398c
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describe
'50436' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHW' 'sip-files00101.pro'
8ea53fd6f23f1b73730b65074fbb36d2
8ce5ea58048d124cbacdcf47eabe2c2d36ac70c1
describe
'53966' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHX' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
9ee0b2050ff156df0a5d16326d22a68e
f72de1f1b361b5801b99baabee0cffe224b0a95d
'2011-11-18T02:45:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHY' 'sip-files00101.tif'
d039e2702fe5ee71f42aeb873ca22668
62ba38e31c03a9014ffbf89e4c46c1cbd2c214a7
'2011-11-18T02:51:31-05:00'
describe
'2003' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPHZ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
992ef01913009d5c816e38820f26164c
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describe
'12472' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIA' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
ae424ff4f5fc08f9cb976589e39cb1e5
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIB' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
f42c1ceb7d092fdd1d80feeaf35581b9
907970e34e18c836f0c11b0f0175f56e268b1781
'2011-11-18T02:47:51-05:00'
describe
'76909' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIC' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
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describe
'17814' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPID' 'sip-files00102.pro'
2fab73ae11e9b869b888122e24709590
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'2011-11-18T02:45:59-05:00'
describe
'25023' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIE' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
4cfb6d8c3ea3e0a1cfd7b6494cd0f3c2
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'2011-11-18T02:43:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIF' 'sip-files00102.tif'
84e3c79b554715687867a8d98fcce662
311f4126f1bd5aa27c50dbeb1ccdb512d651d9e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIG' 'sip-files00102.txt'
c87bc15453f2bde7933fdd123e9f70ae
543f18f764640636b2a0b0e9aac4ec4c79aae854
'2011-11-18T02:46:09-05:00'
describe
'6194' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIH' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
c6fd4abb500a95d09e9429b1002979d8
bf51aaa035e4e909aba2f0d775c2a10e1b8cb649
'2011-11-18T02:50:31-05:00'
describe
'324656' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPII' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
2cc01b703de21f6f52f42f7766624fe4
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'2011-11-18T02:49:37-05:00'
describe
'112850' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIJ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
db533ad03391fdabb30b61f59bc8394c
bdf624c7f44caa5330705f5358579278ae51dc6a
describe
'30631' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIK' 'sip-files00103.pro'
c5832ce2e859331fd0bd9dfbec063c12
2cf2c2b042cbef8538d8fab42dc666d04ad92c16
describe
'36654' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIL' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
e274d208d82240b0fa1194801f779b7c
77913821bf11394796e01c18fa105d9bc7a7a5aa
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIM' 'sip-files00103.tif'
8bdd5b40eade7b991cfdc2666cdbc15e
5300c8810be42f2ce255abbfb5b3fdf683354a66
'2011-11-18T02:42:10-05:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIN' 'sip-files00103.txt'
28d24e88894ec91880365df9740716fd
420650a6fdf07324e5d89a1606126ff4006d1586
'2011-11-18T02:46:44-05:00'
describe
'9370' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIO' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
ebb939c74e861047c83a73317af02e6a
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'2011-11-18T02:48:01-05:00'
describe
'324782' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIP' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
7d97dc192c28530f493e1d1550d0d8fa
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describe
'157545' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIQ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
e680bb77880c0743ba9bafcc79b63f98
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describe
'51352' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIR' 'sip-files00104.pro'
9f2d5878b6576fb2fa087f6d2c877d50
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describe
'53346' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIS' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
3d703a71f037c6fffa9f1067d18bfadb
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIT' 'sip-files00104.tif'
5aa9167cfe8431bd425633fc15516b23
bdf9cc18d1c55b5e5b841a93a084ac90bf30451e
'2011-11-18T02:45:56-05:00'
describe
'2022' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIU' 'sip-files00104.txt'
fb166868a91674f8522898fff856b3df
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describe
'12411' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIV' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
1bb7037a7e56c847a6b9310445e30edd
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'2011-11-18T02:45:23-05:00'
describe
'324783' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIW' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
21ad605fa7521a3795888e6970754250
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describe
'137233' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIX' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
00f41a07d178732d3a9ee26e5ab8bfcc
216c0fa74e03a798fb043e7ccb137e4dd3d3474d
describe
'36950' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIY' 'sip-files00105.pro'
f355d7267cb9dcfe9dd962193543e895
15205ac7bdc861ba06ca5c04b240fb453e6aa5ac
'2011-11-18T02:55:00-05:00'
describe
'47585' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPIZ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
9b42390a1daea8c3df317ee36cf19224
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'2011-11-18T02:45:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJA' 'sip-files00105.tif'
6bc4b47a158da3d2c3874e71303b403f
bc7113633bf4dd397f021e3a5b522db6b846e807
'2011-11-18T02:50:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJB' 'sip-files00105.txt'
33d9cacf3bef70434dd7299f33a4a077
a42dd1c063d78421d1889ef56b68dd8c4abd039a
'2011-11-18T02:46:22-05:00'
describe
'11790' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJC' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
d39f52eb385cf382fc839ca760e88ad4
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describe
'324805' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJD' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
b15cf3702575a582b9ab57235992411d
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describe
'130095' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJE' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
785cb1970e6f7351c4721c124c5e5fba
fabf4845f06acfc8bdeb91ca0cd84a13d5260b6b
describe
'36069' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJF' 'sip-files00108.pro'
31106e49bfb9ca37eb4281c18f08f9fb
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'2011-11-18T02:54:55-05:00'
describe
'46018' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJG' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
491e697e57a20fd43a502a46e10f531a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJH' 'sip-files00108.tif'
7d453b504d03031b05d0f67ae2f878ab
139e2b88800ef211929a08878e6144ba0133bfb6
'2011-11-18T02:45:28-05:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJI' 'sip-files00108.txt'
23460607a02589d59dd82ef60f8fcc8c
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describe
'12068' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJJ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
92e88d440051b7254d1d69722e124d71
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJK' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
471e01cf8b643856f8f05cca97a6d744
b592fa97b89c389f88390a457b51444a3c10c7ff
'2011-11-18T02:50:51-05:00'
describe
'141090' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJL' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
8af4cfe46ddda241a89cb552a5ebfde7
cbceabf9d08be80e9e96c8045c8b11ca08d2811c
'2011-11-18T02:43:03-05:00'
describe
'44178' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJM' 'sip-files00109.pro'
1503c14d1ab4449e73891c2d18da5631
1d5f8db8adbdc7404e7da1364c73f8ee0f4f03bb
'2011-11-18T02:46:57-05:00'
describe
'48590' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJN' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
ec94182037282af9a13acc10e7f8b9bf
88ef765222a1ab5cc366556a1970bc07d266c9ac
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJO' 'sip-files00109.tif'
675c3c80c7d1b608cb8c7e6806c18f65
ea7317d84ec7ef4018a91381c9bec4c7b389c3cd
'2011-11-18T02:42:31-05:00'
describe
'1802' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJP' 'sip-files00109.txt'
0ecfeecd658664e1f6b5cdc628e7e4de
3a30d05a52cf9d5fc7f386fb2057ab6dfd2877f5
describe
'11628' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJQ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
8fa5a89c525fd182c72a16b2bdfa8162
938b022ecd1460c802d7abeeb35416ef121d3398
'2011-11-18T02:49:28-05:00'
describe
'324807' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJR' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
8a7d14f2e9d6474f7f7c5995d7f66c23
236001d6e7c54cc03227082cd806a11c7fb0617e
describe
'135780' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJS' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
a5e29e8d56211ae6680d2c0b4a1ce50c
c403980cf140dd4e1e495949723d376c1db02f78
describe
'38897' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJT' 'sip-files00110.pro'
93071bf48094c57909790a6f77f326ea
b3b7683d99b3a3e5a85e4bd90c89091a23fce156
describe
'46636' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJU' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
5b2260f63df90a21f370023418f79919
b2259b8987ddbb7ce95416cf893e986abb86862e
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJV' 'sip-files00110.tif'
ae3c4e0a06fcca7f3c58377832036531
04f4e40ea7fd245fddaf34c21b25f270e038010a
'2011-11-18T02:45:13-05:00'
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJW' 'sip-files00110.txt'
a5ef714512548fa8c6187e70aee44bab
cfc746fbb9cc5617be4dbddd1ce2823f14d4a3af
'2011-11-18T02:43:32-05:00'
describe
'11584' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJX' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
63376e2b407376df12490feafd6efddf
ccb77af681def3a3b183b49a543740950d1ff562
describe
'324523' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJY' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
43e6414582e5b810793ff199f85a937f
114da867c99b1cc8b90c9cdbbe0fa650c1f961c8
'2011-11-18T02:54:56-05:00'
describe
'69111' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPJZ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
6f09c1869d48f37c0921bba6b36a732e
a5966547874d687d8494fd2e0950fe1226c5945d
describe
'16591' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKA' 'sip-files00111.pro'
186763a7068df7b27617a810476d9bf2
0ea9419c5489c881b441d52f85c689193fc597bb
'2011-11-18T02:52:05-05:00'
describe
'22448' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKB' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
c55708e5774e502a2f7031a88e38b525
83eab3b597a2798c9b74a4ce9c3a674c3cb9b8d3
'2011-11-18T02:51:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKC' 'sip-files00111.tif'
954e14a86e84a60253adef27b4fb5764
09d6d639b22faef21f4ed1838628511d9d60a058
'2011-11-18T02:53:55-05:00'
describe
'673' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKD' 'sip-files00111.txt'
6f16e253fe241188605d2a72d9e09d1d
f091372d99b6102f527ea02915f0ec2115587290
describe
'5760' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKE' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
d53f5c0c2978579abd6dcfc2bd975710
30739f68e60caf4eadbbc3584aae525523f929fe
describe
'324710' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKF' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
59da3fe653c51a45021c2aa3069fb764
d4a3793adaec0e62d569c8c5fd16c309475e917b
'2011-11-18T02:48:04-05:00'
describe
'101024' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKG' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
f99880c2300431a7ebe7421220ce61e9
102e7cdc620a4ed5ad7d192c854cafff6b7541cb
describe
'26859' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKH' 'sip-files00112.pro'
c1848ed63d3e4e6f005b3102cd0ed962
5281458476571ff851bb72ee9ada036928f23f93
'2011-11-18T02:51:54-05:00'
describe
'35295' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKI' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
7352f4f79b447b0248eb14f40dd182c2
a8a948e3cbb8090d48cb8782aca34019322b05d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKJ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
a6082ece65562f5398a19693a7960924
554ba9972618e2d06f7afc01b7703951e3bc7608
'2011-11-18T02:47:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKK' 'sip-files00112.txt'
ae20ba9f1af3912675d0421fbd14eb9f
5ca0b7fa998c7704bc1f9421cf737c719e2c08a6
'2011-11-18T02:50:47-05:00'
describe
'9257' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKL' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
cb0ae7b27a1b764683fa23f77cb0ceb6
6c122e06d172eb5180eeab55ca197fdf8214e880
'2011-11-18T02:50:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKM' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
18180896602af176bb0b0d898bc81acf
255ebbc3c4d7e7acba4b42ee8e01d9fe34248a08
describe
'145348' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKN' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
778270954eee754d4b17f0e3b49ae898
01dc9457a7a85d525155d3772fce5d91aaf8f8e4
describe
'43628' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKO' 'sip-files00113.pro'
16ce0dcd3d84bf92a31c81fc12a9cb47
ce0ef496630631168cc8705e6be2796b28c11a34
describe
'48621' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKP' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
ea28ba71e97926042f9a81cca4a7bc17
9c76cd558edc7bcb0661c83872068f732cb450e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKQ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
268731f2d3e2e425d486545e33d3bf5c
1cc7f126c7a83faf19f74672ade85b46ff01d209
'2011-11-18T02:49:04-05:00'
describe
'1806' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKR' 'sip-files00113.txt'
e76122073f4f6d5cf638b489a926de80
09377409bf32d6ad545091a97110402ea4cf1352
'2011-11-18T02:43:50-05:00'
describe
'11318' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKS' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
8c8ca3dec6797d5f552b5652adc95e28
750cdb6183d3f85f672f584132b1dbf6297b04da
describe
'324792' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKT' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
04bec947bd0f7f8ce6a756ab17136dce
0cc5e1b4f9110741b70c202da178255bd11718b5
'2011-11-18T02:45:12-05:00'
describe
'149943' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKU' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
340688b7ff875157d81d81201ddef8c8
17938a94dfea79d9984df7d094f278e8fa2efbf3
describe
'44314' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKV' 'sip-files00114.pro'
b47fa1e107ecbfb8491fcc8e3f5e26df
2f74bf44db8a22624fe0b1b8b9e492e8f8c1da0a
'2011-11-18T02:49:23-05:00'
describe
'48723' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKW' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
32bfee521976c078be2b4508554cd609
dc2c491c452e5e6617d8f8251da5f8f97a7f6ab2
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKX' 'sip-files00114.tif'
3814419627a2fdf76e0ca0cbf525d296
0c78f1308d3dfdc6e568aa54c8d7bfff0225f951
describe
'1838' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKY' 'sip-files00114.txt'
155e0d126353a9c87139a7e712fa1c6b
bb9f59a8e1fbe73ef469c143e8dc971ac1e4518a
describe
'12041' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPKZ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
8501d0b4b9a4f7bf229f3b86456e966c
d5a01f36ce1c565f2c2bc808c86827b3bce83cd3
describe
'324496' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLA' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
a9adb77192a8bfc6acf073ebfc28c322
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describe
'155631' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLB' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
c7a98f286c9c0fbae0aa26e94e424489
7d9d8f611ee0680af4df416cbc68f612806d8e3c
describe
'45292' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLC' 'sip-files00115.pro'
7170a77e1e43918bcbc391a4f55f2bf3
7986ea61867578e7838338ecd98973c852a11bd8
describe
'50980' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLD' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
1319bcd883495dda47f0a72555b47471
42a9ab9ac8c9087b005b2d3ae0e8db8e5321aed2
'2011-11-18T02:51:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLE' 'sip-files00115.tif'
cb81172d79d7b31c34037a4ec73c3bab
a089defae283c26e825a863185df609dcbc43efd
'2011-11-18T02:46:17-05:00'
describe
'1889' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLF' 'sip-files00115.txt'
9e77a035964db3c10953b7bef8639506
5dcbf3291abb871f699542f15eaf4af02f6342bb
describe
'11582' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLG' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
12178c3781c243a9198a3238520d822c
2e4277b9cd3e16fafb75fda2f79b9eaed05d1288
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLH' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
02e0f201f4224735b76e88c233f5750c
179a1f29dcded2af506f72c46524a23e7ce0a711
'2011-11-18T02:53:58-05:00'
describe
'141025' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLI' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
11298d7fbd8f38456e65b702de8870c9
d67753b739869b51cbab71e0b8da461e39d9b492
describe
'43474' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLJ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
8a2f91bd42ea33bbfd16b3d11d724a17
e8fb7c3634345a086870c6f17360fc6cbee181b9
'2011-11-18T02:41:56-05:00'
describe
'48005' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLK' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
3edb76ed7b7df0ffdecad79f7c300ee3
5b5bd0eddb4c23a0440c8f307a9ffd6145e2f838
'2011-11-18T02:42:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLL' 'sip-files00116.tif'
13a2c8b4c05bd7a2cc52ae4996211fee
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describe
'1748' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLM' 'sip-files00116.txt'
d4fa03fbfc027727863c3ac1104e2e33
fc71c3b1a0ee6710824e78968f658f112fa79808
'2011-11-18T02:47:43-05:00'
describe
'11367' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLN' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
c0eb814476793b29b82b48729ef96d0a
1ddbc04a4164148bee994ecc123c31ef0d31650a
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLO' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
4e9af0ce093f49d284061c5ccbb81d34
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'2011-11-18T02:46:31-05:00'
describe
'79511' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLP' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
511f68be9725e7c061b4a78386469572
53c2594b898387f86cc6dfc533197e6983fce229
describe
'19827' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLQ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
9d36dc48083868cebfd501d0c9fc6eb5
280aa1568c378dbe79d4a6407daf60e1ec971b36
describe
'26599' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLR' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
0b3f845cba4b18d2577d229014850097
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLS' 'sip-files00117.tif'
f4734fdd42e012631ebbcdbf29edd942
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describe
'786' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLT' 'sip-files00117.txt'
0dd1c632c1b30398f82bc807a5a1e00e
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describe
'6912' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLU' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
767dc76ae7034d72de92c84f78ae1dc2
1c94b9a2a1bdbb21bb1fef4d10175b576f7885d3
'2011-11-18T02:44:57-05:00'
describe
'324422' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLV' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
5c107d7ed8aca09a35f35a965d2c752d
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describe
'102221' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLW' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
838dc3ca4c8700df07a272d06e9f9a15
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describe
'29212' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLX' 'sip-files00118.pro'
6962a0740502b58b8b20097f51437827
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describe
'34255' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLY' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
1a50b8a50dc5148241880045281109e6
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPLZ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
9e40041cc4019a92e2d590e7f21d962f
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describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMA' 'sip-files00118.txt'
5b8de6ee9aecddf36853fb3d86b33485
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describe
'8424' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMB' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
52a4ea181d267e0716d13fd735ae51fb
455eebfa569f85c748a6a97fb0fc2651ade3c5b2
'2011-11-18T02:49:26-05:00'
describe
'324516' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMC' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
33a82ae28c5fdf2608b05220fdb8494b
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describe
'143023' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMD' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
8ad419b958823d0e9be550fc9b06bb87
c7fe09105ecb6e259b6bc0f3462c31ef5c50f3ce
'2011-11-18T02:48:06-05:00'
describe
'43896' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPME' 'sip-files00119.pro'
36bf510994b4bcbdee82e0b82824a1bd
7de32e12ab4c54786557ca191d4825b68a6420ab
'2011-11-18T02:49:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMF' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
eafefc37adfd6b604e525db967aa4878
ecca2072ffe1423e17e3263fba262065319390cd
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMG' 'sip-files00119.tif'
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describe
'1791' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMH' 'sip-files00119.txt'
e32dfb23c642c21c9b24324583006536
cbd6454db9366c8e706dfaf297781b96eb84cf47
'2011-11-18T02:45:03-05:00'
describe
'11335' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMI' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
296bb41057c2aa2c0340fec282a59835
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describe
'324329' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMJ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
eb506ae421412e36404910d87f4eacb1
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describe
'148843' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMK' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
61132914e8996745bfaeccc44ac71639
e1e352657e4963f329ce4745a3d011a00000c0bf
describe
'45854' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPML' 'sip-files00120.pro'
f774f75c22643a4c5d1608005ec5d81e
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describe
'49512' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMM' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
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8b2272e7f91f3f14e7995110c9d3d8840354c836
'2011-11-18T02:43:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMN' 'sip-files00120.tif'
efe7a95f7d4b53b9dec7e7871ef95e5b
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describe
'1884' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMO' 'sip-files00120.txt'
8f3bdbec380158b947a948be3436b4ff
3b743f2f23019cfe6e384e231e85ea35e5d77cd0
'2011-11-18T02:51:15-05:00'
describe
'11794' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMP' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
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describe
'324501' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMQ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
3300d7a4c8f8d1df23f58f0bdc910fcb
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'2011-11-18T02:46:14-05:00'
describe
'156929' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMR' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
31ffd23333ee0fc383ed49e45fee6e3d
4ecf81c8d6e7e563a05831f489b608ef060069c0
describe
'47992' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMS' 'sip-files00121.pro'
fd7629c9f8e241f6e6de0c71e31e84c3
42a372f050951921b380d33d51cebb09ce89b847
'2011-11-18T02:42:01-05:00'
describe
'52150' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMT' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
f242fc52927e36cb1e7f9413978b758f
ac061e96afa647291255b01dc37dcee333c0abd6
'2011-11-18T02:42:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMU' 'sip-files00121.tif'
1506905a2ee5e516d3631478ad956fd3
4ac5bdab5e6857127c572bfe6da0f5ce68fd6bc0
'2011-11-18T02:50:12-05:00'
describe
'1965' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMV' 'sip-files00121.txt'
5949789ca92b8f984ee96d00a8315e41
991ff06e0d62c16e10dc7a02066b95590d48babd
describe
'12257' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMW' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
bd8031abdf1f2bae28b3112924824784
e8454950d8c2589c3e64d6526880adeee5c146ff
'2011-11-18T02:41:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMX' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
359efba27daa4fa20a5087884442014a
e82c5ea1c8fdc3dc8d9d59c8a32a6918e52ba697
describe
'155771' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMY' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
352637f962c9ec07aed1e3dee77443e8
f5a6e05d3f52b8edbc6ff5d9f4b596a118f3a7a8
describe
'47666' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPMZ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
430ddb393c59466f233b2c77a92abf7b
f829ec149c938b92622a74b5001b1d3660a73532
'2011-11-18T02:47:25-05:00'
describe
'52078' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNA' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
8f658b1cb76370ced107ca243857c78e
313f5835848b560e40bde70f73d604426940e3b3
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNB' 'sip-files00122.tif'
3c2e602c77eb212c8fff411a12c449ad
f2de0f8aa5e9ca6d817fcf3db0cf4dd2f1a0d453
describe
'1879' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNC' 'sip-files00122.txt'
a228e4b61f0d81422d4ecb5625b8da4e
df2aad73b424d6d60e556834e77777279258698f
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPND' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
f2fef514ed9e797e5155adbb6f367d1a
d841cd743eaea4d1f09722d0f499d6a6a98aa02a
describe
'324397' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNE' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
483354dd6d52e025e493e7cd1648e55c
2011ad3fd4d2b71e923605d3c840361ec1d81ce7
describe
'57663' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNF' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
bc8f535895121260020239aff0cfa020
b291001691520ffed6109d41a985a68ee90e3e7c
describe
'767' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNG' 'sip-files00123.pro'
cf81e1a8be6ff8ffabeca05509c324b9
27d041fe91bfcb58a54497437fc88fd63a0dcc76
describe
'14232' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNH' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
c6ad8481c371da28cc44004fa70d23cd
3f47a2a4d87f5a6435eacfd22ff7c1f11519c56b
'2011-11-18T02:44:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNI' 'sip-files00123.tif'
32da6417187601907aa7e41c07fe3cd1
30cf573617c524060f25f320b93397333d8f8cfe
describe
'115' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNJ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
fabbe84ba12ae3f403b18e681802b732
6508f389ce7bf48380b93d8e1c89bdf2ac868612
describe
'4055' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNK' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
6ed9a4255a134f9d30cdd3805674a140
3237025684bc569a160eaffe5470e17ab59ee08d
describe
'324559' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNL' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
718e88b4b7e44bd33f67e44b24f54929
65b7f1baf821dc824c64bdc4b95be366014fa14e
'2011-11-18T02:54:27-05:00'
describe
'127394' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNM' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
50d2c9f24ebf25e25ac61e392c987579
3a1012df187aadc28b8f076833c6fb41242a9780
describe
'35008' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNN' 'sip-files00125.pro'
dfefe57da6156bd9dd842dbd0e0c2dcf
740867a6c4c12a88f6bb86f9d6394d17b3914ce7
describe
'44063' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNO' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
3930ac5b09feb1900999f94ec25830da
416933efb22d7ba4b5285e69e4f3f0cf080ee9f2
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNP' 'sip-files00125.tif'
7a1ea672f660c266abd67e9755ead509
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describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNQ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
6c24288bb6b696da8ecf04a6ad1f3e30
3f79db040192d4d222003e33db6c19c1bbad7a75
describe
'10853' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNR' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
aeaca3f10d50d7aace0c4e6b9d11eecc
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describe
'324816' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNS' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
54f3bd23f355c25592d8862108647cd4
e6a84b900dae11c90a73862b1bcf3b0e2c0b7c68
'2011-11-18T02:53:57-05:00'
describe
'133497' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNT' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
9f998ebe58070823e0b98a6f62ffb530
0b6d7e0e73f6c479c2f69136b307e537b571fe39
describe
'39554' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNU' 'sip-files00126.pro'
3eb4fe12f518ede14a6737b50f0f6b94
02e66121c1809395f94e07f4ed27f0f2f9501abc
describe
'45750' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNV' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
bf64c097ceccb5cdef0afff71db2000c
3982386798f1fd219b171dee388630cf249d4ded
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNW' 'sip-files00126.tif'
39fd3d0baec9dd634a965c9323a2e488
769964daadf1d72f2d347ba0da65cdd2c21537a1
'2011-11-18T02:54:46-05:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNX' 'sip-files00126.txt'
0864a97d2dca7db4e904b30949eee69e
6a0e78ba4843f7414039426e8a03d3f7b2e40c2c
'2011-11-18T02:44:15-05:00'
describe
'11440' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNY' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
560e631a9b49242c2e3a63c5aa2af9fd
9aadec4ea0e8b462ba3c97eb1fbfa74ea39fa806
'2011-11-18T02:55:09-05:00'
describe
'324411' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPNZ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
2bccd24fc0ea20451fa8a0ff8622899e
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describe
'100402' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOA' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
a59b6184a3bf74353dd6ef59bf424e33
6fc29de23e1263a2ace943f8a1439f14ba3ff297
describe
'27935' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOB' 'sip-files00127.pro'
48d66f20faa15968db193c50321488af
b532bb2d5129aa3cf0404a451e037666795ee4ef
'2011-11-18T02:45:32-05:00'
describe
'32627' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOC' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
8644e44c38201e43dd7d8ff54e93ef65
42a9e2b8f58ee547540e0ee73d3dae34a448038e
'2011-11-18T02:48:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOD' 'sip-files00127.tif'
0b33660b1b932e6eaf5ecbdfd557df88
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describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOE' 'sip-files00127.txt'
0360b7840f3d32dce2995ee4dec5152f
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describe
'7900' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOF' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
37e7da40fb9fcd99c70503ee0138f0f2
59fcb13e90f25e0d8a600bf0d9993d62c0678a9c
'2011-11-18T02:46:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOG' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
2f146df302db716151873f165b121196
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describe
'112107' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOH' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
f031377b664db9b8969457a12f84efdb
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describe
'31360' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOI' 'sip-files00128.pro'
d759af1b9ba9dc2c5cf84ea5851b4937
0a55f4d8e83fff30e2541c854dbd18bdf106ac8e
describe
'37819' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOJ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
fa871ea3f36312a438212d12b53ebd51
f7d8fb1ab1fca6545b629743ff820ed23e847840
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOK' 'sip-files00128.tif'
8c764b9dafc9b187ebb5529b173a44b0
da44160581da1a2ed236287d3211399bc386ed2c
'2011-11-18T02:41:51-05:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOL' 'sip-files00128.txt'
4e496eaf0e12d3d88a1f1a9d0f62793e
658806fac7d43e689d44f7256b74e7b3cc7093a9
'2011-11-18T02:48:44-05:00'
describe
'8966' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOM' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
fc9343f9619d2cc8b39e1264d0fb458f
359890e9a3293acc947e7ec8a079f9f338ace5ef
'2011-11-18T02:41:39-05:00'
describe
'324401' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPON' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
6f8ee087d8c6f60de3db91697e36027f
182212718b7f718ce08506e04a76ba5388df360f
describe
'147121' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOO' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
f38123ca682fe8d96db5fbf6d97f0111
5e409715f1abf295bf4a3b598f7392f5c1755613
'2011-11-18T02:46:26-05:00'
describe
'43578' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOP' 'sip-files00129.pro'
150574699f5fd203ff248ade5a3d1496
5907d26a620e2c6ce28523b04ab147d65b345637
describe
'50371' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOQ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
5e3537cf3470ac666092db2e88b33129
7435b4b14ab91f1435bf5292d43df40486253dd9
'2011-11-18T02:54:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOR' 'sip-files00129.tif'
4413ab97e2abbb4cf8ebe707ea7aa36e
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describe
'1790' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOS' 'sip-files00129.txt'
2314b470f9119b63b2dfa22f2dabaa56
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describe
'11949' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOT' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
230df035a03258d7a9f9dda1040cbb91
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describe
'324806' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOU' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
07290d83d83e0e4eb6b6f636e1afbe0a
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describe
'134990' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOV' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
5fd2ef4f7c6078c5e12c07c3691d8497
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describe
'37241' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOW' 'sip-files00130.pro'
c281575bb4d8d2b04b7289c0ebe0a037
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describe
'47590' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOX' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
41e777e605e0f1024cccde0e9d9b1316
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOY' 'sip-files00130.tif'
ba8cc28542d01b79a2ad1f4db4f3fc29
32e2004a7d5e7b1309a7ca9357bb068c2f28f330
'2011-11-18T02:47:40-05:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPOZ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
e7f48a308f67bab5a53131c10f9a1121
fce48073d88720bdf14ede6089582f537d19a033
'2011-11-18T02:45:10-05:00'
describe
'12213' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPA' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
01ab730e1e6824d0480b3ba49ed595dd
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPB' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
9ead225a6d9af22e04618d040f6836c8
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describe
'77026' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPC' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
08ae45cf1a4ab18c399503cb6f1e8bc7
1ff3f63afbb20d526dc0638b144893aed8cc114d
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPD' 'sip-files00131.pro'
465a4569293631a867e67373dd7b67bc
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describe
'21330' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPE' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
9e97c4a237b0738d74887ae0498db7dc
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPF' 'sip-files00131.tif'
c2000c1da7aeca216ea29707957335dd
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describe
'91' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPG' 'sip-files00131.txt'
0e6879fb1ff09e52e0baae05a2774001
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describe
'6006' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPH' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:48:23-05:00'
describe
'324408' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPI' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
66383878e0c256404c0a69ce3be7d705
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'2011-11-18T02:49:05-05:00'
describe
'36136' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPJ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
66ff4b8186f90d8801fb85a042237c63
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describe
'7875' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPK' 'sip-files00133.pro'
b2e7d338e80db36173aa67e97d866b8a
05dac67fa3310adf023eae38c967767179e4001a
describe
'11293' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPL' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
f58b2534fd5c88f9021aeecab0ba9aaf
8f5cc8cf2bfe7cfcd503bb378f25641ecc0234b9
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPM' 'sip-files00133.tif'
cbc94758190b2a04f2883f103b1ec246
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'2011-11-18T02:44:43-05:00'
describe
'332' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPN' 'sip-files00133.txt'
b22515dc96d99145d31ff27040393791
301f36cb8d0e22db805efe39af6eb851b6c0f1a9
'2011-11-18T02:52:25-05:00'
describe
'3207' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPO' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
7525f1271b989ade7c2f5845da9b4249
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describe
'324144' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPP' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
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describe
'93515' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPQ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
82d2602b1c6185a2d0c0ccc9cfb1938b
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'2011-11-18T02:46:54-05:00'
describe
'25318' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPR' 'sip-files00134.pro'
9953494aa7bd491d8463760119493832
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describe
'29228' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPS' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
6bd47ddc65324c688b97ca67ebdeb4d8
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPT' 'sip-files00134.tif'
ef9f36fdcdc3d54d8ffbd0347cab97e9
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'2011-11-18T02:43:39-05:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
5e33095bf7c67965dfdad592b7227d0b
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describe
'7916' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPV' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
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describe
'324346' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
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describe
'64683' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
6d6fdc2317f749c0550cd4eaf7b75311
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describe
'3561' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
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describe
'16288' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPPZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
05a9afea10d8ca26fe9a5ea2ed333fd3
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
174ab185b3b9b3ce20b6d8f461efb1c5
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'2011-11-18T02:43:49-05:00'
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQB' 'sip-files00135.txt'
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describe
Invalid character
'4263' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQC' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQD' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
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describe
'131788' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQE' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
b685efe8095a869ae8264429cc20e7fa
339e850ffd1c47e4d4ca518098ab56333a57a8af
describe
'36008' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQF' 'sip-files00137.pro'
a3d886c7916576a689e0b6f05d8fb9bf
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describe
'46566' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQG' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
0785c80abf899019f185df3085cbbccd
0b39dd23ddb2050c44c791152b4b79c4de049a78
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQH' 'sip-files00137.tif'
5c3a995deb6ac5bddcd3c909bc079689
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describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQI' 'sip-files00137.txt'
7f0d376a263338fd34548f770bc8b2c6
ba8ce3e3b78e75a5f4c9b54f498d6311480768bd
describe
'12214' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQJ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
cd0229ab135534019597601cd96f06f0
0617eb4400c8981ebe4cbff1d5c7a7d98be46016
'2011-11-18T02:48:09-05:00'
describe
'324756' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQK' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
380ecbf315af0bd4a013e767bbd6bc59
70e6af514d92947f147464a27c47a9656cb201e3
describe
'131795' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQL' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
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b600b3e01b8efc769f849ae8ceac06cbe01a14d0
'2011-11-18T02:42:04-05:00'
describe
'36775' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQM' 'sip-files00138.pro'
ae7910e29008d0c17ed5cf474a4db680
62050bcd9e38ab37f9d1426dab5071044ae978ec
describe
'45162' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQN' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
2abe6e55da8c6db9cfe8c843d2268057
49ac91b22f106f2aae22df6825de2022e36c870e
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQO' 'sip-files00138.tif'
7947da046381f510c752ed9a238e6a1f
02229b12dda5fe1ec3c12506af91c7bd67c7c2bf
'2011-11-18T02:54:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQP' 'sip-files00138.txt'
53e747d0cf6ad0c288c6e8276df32ded
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describe
'11092' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQQ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
105e6aacd98a9813120fc3b16fd6bcca
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describe
'324761' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQR' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
442c8c4dc088b2c52f7788523e4d4d72
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describe
'149848' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQS' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
ebeb592cdec09bd9b322f34882fd99e9
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describe
'48632' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQT' 'sip-files00139.pro'
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describe
'49170' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQU' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
304303cae3fc88879d56235fcd6dd3d4
bee28a170af8e505fb7f80561bfe15f9be4b3fbe
'2011-11-18T02:51:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQV' 'sip-files00139.tif'
1ebd27a26fcebcf733608a8d82c42630
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describe
'1989' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQW' 'sip-files00139.txt'
3068f7734a6759998c7d54c1354e627e
72ecac8494814d6cda3c4de25c8b5cca5c84a575
'2011-11-18T02:49:32-05:00'
describe
'11327' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQX' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
c2a693679f229b2e560cbcbbdd42444f
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describe
'324800' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQY' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
3018ae5062a459742460085cf51f726f
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describe
'147933' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPQZ' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
ee5db96b3bcc5905855650e40e3ab5ae
fcd600376fbaa5222500c767e51303d06839fca7
'2011-11-18T02:47:05-05:00'
describe
'48427' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRA' 'sip-files00140.pro'
ce04619982cffe1bb66e7c57f553a14a
bbeb1f2828cdefede3cb9fb64e330fa77a023907
'2011-11-18T02:44:31-05:00'
describe
'49608' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRB' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
2cad4a4c198d5a3cb51d77dbdd8b8e29
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRC' 'sip-files00140.tif'
f06db710e0056648c4f4a9b9e5a07f5b
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describe
'1908' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRD' 'sip-files00140.txt'
4a557e84d8c60e56d4704964cbbcda31
c5ee330d8df8cafc92e42e4c7814d410bccf0a19
'2011-11-18T02:44:05-05:00'
describe
'12034' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRE' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
379e82b355e5c89475283571493fe0f7
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describe
'324793' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRF' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
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describe
'155154' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRG' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
eff123f100e77ded0f8e967fbc5685e0
156746b2e12d45becfbb30f9c775f62218559240
'2011-11-18T02:50:03-05:00'
describe
'48184' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRH' 'sip-files00141.pro'
526d2047576ea3a11af17f4c4185917f
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describe
'52177' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRI' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
8abdc248f28602ae4f26a453eaaf5522
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRJ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
858a41a7552a0e0f7dda0ec4acb45e03
47f963f67af8602b5368253657e1731605bd0e60
'2011-11-18T02:54:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRK' 'sip-files00141.txt'
cd00260fccdd2b32cd6fb10f252b70e6
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRL' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
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describe
'324553' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRM' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
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describe
'150356' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRN' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
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describe
'47004' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRO' 'sip-files00142.pro'
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describe
'50263' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRP' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c199fe1c53cc469648f76d4996fa39d4
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRQ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
1b6357927ad55ac5cb2a5e8768a7a165
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describe
'1917' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRR' 'sip-files00142.txt'
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describe
'11490' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRS' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
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describe
'324565' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRT' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
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describe
'121787' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRU' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
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describe
'35097' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRV' 'sip-files00143.pro'
0b1a874423ce272f6b1e8c0042f7f063
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describe
'40881' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRW' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
5754ca800ef77c2cd55ffb5fe98c2a61
700c92b3afe9e1366545eb51d225bdb54b603a78
'2011-11-18T02:51:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRX' 'sip-files00143.tif'
1c4c7863fd254b458230a047f677b9b5
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describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRY' 'sip-files00143.txt'
0bc569d7fb0170a58a57f8e420c736b0
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describe
'10028' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPRZ' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
5cfa27979fdf68f0ed681a5d3b523fe1
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSA' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
89b5b24369ee2e630a2fa10425ee5389
b3283a67aaab02cdce412999eceb2c5b0f909752
'2011-11-18T02:44:54-05:00'
describe
'117608' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSB' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
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describe
'32423' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSC' 'sip-files00144.pro'
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describe
'39861' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSD' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
573c729fa2dde29ecfc68cfa49693ad9
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSE' 'sip-files00144.tif'
36aa18b0a185e67381c970e031ddeb54
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSF' 'sip-files00144.txt'
e589000ff5402639d77c5cf1ab553967
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describe
'10377' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSG' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
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describe
'324519' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSH' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
543b8555aa2a8799ac26a3650041fb52
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'2011-11-18T02:49:35-05:00'
describe
'113633' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSI' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d38da72568fd721a8f001c4c872635d4
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describe
'1848' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSJ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
417e4a10f48a6170187f951fed5056cf
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describe
'29268' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSK' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
fc8d9dbb36ca07c331b8a8ec24c23783
2a1f5c0a687ae32479a94ddf7cc7c0a575a1305f
'2011-11-18T02:47:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSL' 'sip-files00145.tif'
83eb5a1346ee3afc848899b701734fd7
453a23fdedabe487cf55c8577b0865f300591c4a
'2011-11-18T02:52:24-05:00'
describe
'165' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSM' 'sip-files00145.txt'
0f0d5075790d152a0a492fb89cc754fa
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describe
'7421' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSN' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
002f3a4399cba58a606dfc97483ee97d
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'2011-11-18T02:54:08-05:00'
describe
'324507' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSO' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
7639e19fdc10def32760ecfe36f807e5
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describe
'97555' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSP' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
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describe
'25661' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSQ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
4a5bd17d9862a2d9b1e71bc4840d6e1b
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describe
'32865' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSR' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
90ee975484ce99be22f0b7fa85628ae8
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'2011-11-18T02:44:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSS' 'sip-files00147.tif'
86ce051e939c4002ae766883ae06d330
17036732334ba18cdfb1daecc391af0141636f57
'2011-11-18T02:50:41-05:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPST' 'sip-files00147.txt'
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describe
'8672' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSU' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSV' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
3ad0d468714d08099e5d7605e6b12453
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describe
'143143' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSW' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:45:35-05:00'
describe
'40920' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSX' 'sip-files00148.pro'
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describe
'47917' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSY' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
efdec0c8332af908e848bd1e5efe7aeb
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPSZ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
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describe
'1616' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTA' 'sip-files00148.txt'
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describe
'11773' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTB' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:42:19-05:00'
describe
'324532' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTC' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
3b10ab69c4eedebed8ee8aeaac9e11e8
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'2011-11-18T02:55:13-05:00'
describe
'147368' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTD' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
94c08b0c4b9ff084e21bb17497983c68
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'2011-11-18T02:51:00-05:00'
describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTE' 'sip-files00149.pro'
7989e59d52a5a5f42a9240e2d240a3ea
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describe
'33707' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTF' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
bd5f896854b2f97fc6fdd1c53c618e2a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTG' 'sip-files00149.tif'
04ccc6a03b8576edb7c1f32af8ed5a52
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describe
'160' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTH' 'sip-files00149.txt'
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describe
'8427' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTI' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTJ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
26c9131a04f7d47c8c165c6d5f34aba1
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describe
'145895' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTK' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
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describe
'42551' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTL' 'sip-files00151.pro'
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describe
'47928' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTM' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTN' 'sip-files00151.tif'
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describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTO' 'sip-files00151.txt'
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describe
'11645' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTP' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTQ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
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describe
'123880' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTR' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
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409bf1e40eccc13e9a8188eb303d7a9a409afa6d
'2011-11-18T02:54:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTS' 'sip-files00152.pro'
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describe
'39724' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTT' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTU' 'sip-files00152.tif'
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describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTV' 'sip-files00152.txt'
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describe
'9431' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTW' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTX' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
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describe
'105809' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTY' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
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describe
'26825' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPTZ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
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describe
'34224' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUA' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:48:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUB' 'sip-files00153.tif'
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'2011-11-18T02:43:38-05:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUC' 'sip-files00153.txt'
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describe
'8784' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUD' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
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describe
'324563' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUE' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
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'2011-11-18T02:45:14-05:00'
describe
'145216' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUF' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
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describe
'42972' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUG' 'sip-files00154.pro'
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describe
'48054' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUH' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUI' 'sip-files00154.tif'
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describe
'1779' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUJ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
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describe
'11510' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUK' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:51:11-05:00'
describe
'324467' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUL' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
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describe
'154739' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUM' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:47:39-05:00'
describe
'46903' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUN' 'sip-files00155.pro'
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describe
'51178' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUO' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:48:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUP' 'sip-files00155.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUQ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
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describe
'12049' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUR' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUS' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
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'2011-11-18T02:52:20-05:00'
describe
'153592' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUT' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
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describe
'48332' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUU' 'sip-files00156.pro'
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describe
'51197' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUV' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
e8780eac202e77dacb12b4ba02e38132
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'2011-11-18T02:45:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUW' 'sip-files00156.tif'
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'2011-11-18T02:47:24-05:00'
describe
'1898' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUX' 'sip-files00156.txt'
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describe
'12179' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUY' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPUZ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
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describe
'141271' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVA' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
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describe
'43811' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVB' 'sip-files00157.pro'
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describe
'45351' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVC' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:49:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVD' 'sip-files00157.tif'
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'2011-11-18T02:44:35-05:00'
describe
'1798' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVE' 'sip-files00157.txt'
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describe
'10968' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVF' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
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describe
'324762' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVG' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
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describe
'149862' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVH' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
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describe
'46440' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVI' 'sip-files00158.pro'
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describe
'49478' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVJ' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVK' 'sip-files00158.tif'
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describe
'1905' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVL' 'sip-files00158.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVM' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
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describe
'324550' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVN' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
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describe
'143257' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVO' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
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describe
'42689' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVP' 'sip-files00159.pro'
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'2011-11-18T02:50:56-05:00'
describe
'47761' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVQ' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVR' 'sip-files00159.tif'
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'2011-11-18T02:54:53-05:00'
describe
'1781' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVS' 'sip-files00159.txt'
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describe
'11555' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVT' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:42:39-05:00'
describe
'324274' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVU' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
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describe
'149078' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVV' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:51:04-05:00'
describe
'46326' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVW' 'sip-files00160.pro'
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describe
'49023' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVX' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVY' 'sip-files00160.tif'
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describe
'1828' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPVZ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
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describe
'11596' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWA' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
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describe
'324570' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWB' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
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describe
'121816' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWC' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
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describe
'19733' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWD' 'sip-files00161.pro'
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describe
'37912' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWE' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWF' 'sip-files00161.tif'
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'2011-11-18T02:44:32-05:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWG' 'sip-files00161.txt'
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'2011-11-18T02:41:45-05:00'
describe
'10032' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWH' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWI' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
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describe
'129400' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWJ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
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describe
'36694' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWK' 'sip-files00162.pro'
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describe
'44943' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWL' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWM' 'sip-files00162.tif'
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describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWN' 'sip-files00162.txt'
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describe
'11121' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWO' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:52:23-05:00'
describe
'324549' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWP' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
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'2011-11-18T02:48:07-05:00'
describe
'159596' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWQ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:44:23-05:00'
describe
'49821' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWR' 'sip-files00163.pro'
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describe
'53441' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWS' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWT' 'sip-files00163.tif'
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describe
'2044' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWU' 'sip-files00163.txt'
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describe
'12181' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWV' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
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describe
'324821' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWW' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
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'2011-11-18T02:44:50-05:00'
describe
'138106' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWX' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
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describe
'39929' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWY' 'sip-files00164.pro'
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describe
'46382' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPWZ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXA' 'sip-files00164.tif'
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describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXB' 'sip-files00164.txt'
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describe
'11521' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXC' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
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c8d77c82b9e36f3bd38edbb4aac8a97c0b9470e5
describe
'324568' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXD' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
255af605900842924b1a4da144f059dc
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describe
'134580' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXE' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
d14d178ade2e0af29122e88088d496bd
bc0664e7e11d1a09e0d009c1a9cabc7a8c4e4834
'2011-11-18T02:41:47-05:00'
describe
'37157' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXF' 'sip-files00165.pro'
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describe
'46044' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXG' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXH' 'sip-files00165.tif'
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describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXI' 'sip-files00165.txt'
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describe
'10953' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXJ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
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describe
'324199' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXK' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
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describe
'100786' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXL' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
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describe
'27942' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXM' 'sip-files00166.pro'
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describe
'34616' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXN' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXO' 'sip-files00166.tif'
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describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXP' 'sip-files00166.txt'
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describe
'9033' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXQ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
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describe
'324540' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXR' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
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describe
'157473' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXS' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
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describe
'51344' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXT' 'sip-files00167.pro'
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describe
'52377' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXU' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXV' 'sip-files00167.tif'
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describe
'2027' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXW' 'sip-files00167.txt'
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describe
'12227' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXX' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXY' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
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describe
'160527' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPXZ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
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describe
'52465' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYA' 'sip-files00168.pro'
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describe
'52404' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYB' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYC' 'sip-files00168.tif'
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'2011-11-18T02:42:30-05:00'
describe
'2083' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYD' 'sip-files00168.txt'
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describe
'12196' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYE' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
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describe
'324360' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYF' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
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describe
'59769' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYG' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
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describe
'2440' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYH' 'sip-files00169.pro'
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describe
'14972' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYI' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYJ' 'sip-files00169.tif'
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'2011-11-18T02:41:57-05:00'
describe
'116' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYK' 'sip-files00169.txt'
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describe
'3824' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYL' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYM' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
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describe
'159466' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYN' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
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describe
'49354' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYO' 'sip-files00171.pro'
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describe
'53338' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYP' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2613384' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYQ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
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describe
'2029' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYR' 'sip-files00171.txt'
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describe
'12204' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYS' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYT' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
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'2011-11-18T02:50:39-05:00'
describe
'142166' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYU' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:45:11-05:00'
describe
'45235' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYV' 'sip-files00172.pro'
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describe
'47973' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYW' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:51:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYX' 'sip-files00172.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYY' 'sip-files00172.txt'
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describe
'11292' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPYZ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZA' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
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describe
'133883' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZB' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
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describe
'37639' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZC' 'sip-files00173.pro'
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describe
'44785' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZD' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZE' 'sip-files00173.tif'
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describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZF' 'sip-files00173.txt'
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describe
'11319' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZG' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZH' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
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describe
'129712' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZI' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
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describe
'36859' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZJ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
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'2011-11-18T02:52:17-05:00'
describe
'44155' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZK' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:52:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZL' 'sip-files00174.tif'
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'2011-11-18T02:54:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZM' 'sip-files00174.txt'
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describe
'11728' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZN' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
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describe
'324518' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZO' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
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'2011-11-18T02:51:53-05:00'
describe
'52197' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZP' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
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describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZQ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
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describe
'13658' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZR' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZS' 'sip-files00175.tif'
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describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZT' 'sip-files00175.txt'
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describe
'3652' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZU' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZV' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
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'2011-11-18T02:48:15-05:00'
describe
'156314' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZW' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
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describe
'49399' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZX' 'sip-files00177.pro'
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'2011-11-18T02:47:52-05:00'
describe
'51271' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZY' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABPZZ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
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describe
'1953' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAA' 'sip-files00177.txt'
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describe
'11991' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAB' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAC' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
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describe
'137307' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAD' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
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describe
'41102' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAE' 'sip-files00178.pro'
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describe
'46201' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAF' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:54:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAG' 'sip-files00178.tif'
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describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAH' 'sip-files00178.txt'
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'2011-11-18T02:42:51-05:00'
describe
'11127' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAI' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
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describe
'324544' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAJ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
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describe
'141278' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAK' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
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describe
'43413' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAL' 'sip-files00179.pro'
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describe
'47449' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAM' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
69aa94a6f8b9a7bf47692107f0874d70
310fc283e4216aac9fcb9e471752572faf8ff767
'2011-11-18T02:45:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
af6215a37b4e906d21118c668f2a266f
60fbd2841ca7b1f271888df7625cc4339b0ec07e
describe
'1739' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAO' 'sip-files00179.txt'
1abe9cf28b4e862cf08534f1a894db37
6a652522e1c928591e977659526ea91bd330e289
describe
'11174' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAP' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
ace5928a35f4fdb69e3711b6cba03ce6
b9cac12496fa0f8ff6ff9a041ada812a5a3bd1cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAQ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
7ff614a970021d07dfd55357f0b8cd4f
ae0090ba50582836072e8c3faed0fcdc6e1a257b
describe
'165531' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAR' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
1f93754a0ab001055f4f284a03cdddd5
9e886990cd28bf49fad8670ef35b2baf084cafff
describe
'52961' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAS' 'sip-files00180.pro'
fa23b258cb830d5c80e35600cf0ca0bf
d4985eb3e68004249d05dba5501dee0e6ef8d830
describe
'54217' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAT' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
a9e0d970c5f0911b565e478a5d882d17
0c37bc36a8fd95fbc389dfdf71a6b08186da2f60
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAU' 'sip-files00180.tif'
a1db0c5c7f540ce0a12f2abbd75ead37
51bbe4d74947da131971cff60e8a0f08dc04b069
describe
'2104' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAV' 'sip-files00180.txt'
45216d49edea232291fb2d38b714cf7a
d3f186cdca0ea5d1307cc1c92954c86257af6256
describe
'12297' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAW' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
b747565631a8a3dacf393a15eb2f9f30
e9ea9274586055ecb260fc4b5f1045875fd80730
'2011-11-18T02:52:33-05:00'
describe
'324531' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAX' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
4a917b9fca9f0d1a9e01dadc43b99308
ac28ff71db60409f6ba56d5455228e5d13fdabbd
describe
'146467' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAY' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
768845d16f7c095ef8e0709794018cdb
d6b75af96ebb4642f865ebc3cfcb512550df5128
describe
'44154' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQAZ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
899afc4f5390557aa5dbc7b310d803a2
883d6e3147aa74a4846635948b901898a1e04604
describe
'47420' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBA' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
0d2df4e41888727bde270e2238d73e0f
dffc40425154c36f0b1c4d6239b8f586a905a1c9
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBB' 'sip-files00181.tif'
3d76498df008fe1246d5650ea06a6e0d
5e29506b94cae164e0ce87726b5db44362eff569
'2011-11-18T02:47:19-05:00'
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBC' 'sip-files00181.txt'
def41d25dabced1f3a0c00b99ef719b2
83eef9222ef479ac6fbda80faf4f524a175fa150
describe
'11342' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBD' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
083ba31699f34b8b7328c96aaa7b8f51
d924ee54c92416ff66dc1d17afd8946cabe2eafb
describe
'324748' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBE' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
dde81dcd9624ac88fb10414c9eb9ab9f
3f3dbcd07cb8364af68cffb97fff4c4a67c8a870
describe
'124078' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
5fc495ca3e845167756c23b6a4b220fc
e4794fa10e9450445c52153ae35761dbda61fee8
describe
'34604' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBG' 'sip-files00182.pro'
7e1463ba2de85e22eab5793e4e39f4ba
e0f1e69408a15cefcdbfbd577d489984278c42d9
'2011-11-18T02:45:17-05:00'
describe
'43037' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBH' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
51e25d7deeb2cee9830cb593f87cb613
a6f5889cd30830a318944bd46569ba32274628d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBI' 'sip-files00182.tif'
147f9005648c60509923e3d12ef98f5f
c8e4da5f006add20500727c249b95943200cd909
'2011-11-18T02:54:21-05:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBJ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
7790a0ea1fdeca725055db831b07ce22
e82e2e21b9c21e3f631cc61c94216f2b5a91a7cc
'2011-11-18T02:51:37-05:00'
describe
'10799' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBK' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
7675bcca6f76119b282d34c2e39cff2a
a1879715ee77f934e203600b8ecedf261d6eae1a
describe
'324517' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
f3cd23c3f135c8254865149504e8e8dc
9583c49b2619ea4b75d4c76a9c113b798bea5e31
describe
'154270' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBM' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
12e7776728b9d4c9f3f548bda229aa30
506d438e81affd99847c21d7929e767019084340
describe
'50468' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBN' 'sip-files00183.pro'
d2e862ee8aad3ff8602579b35d054441
55b6a9f890e7e09e353c486b2685a85a4fec5b70
describe
'50910' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBO' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
ac484465d1d9ae58cf17ef96f6c60e02
97087991c60b5849b852e76beb244043b7809b9a
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBP' 'sip-files00183.tif'
1a6c5d9bc8319064672012002596b6c2
308e38ab7103618fe6ba5608a0042a1a89dfaaf1
describe
'2005' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBQ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
110782a5312dc395451a02296fcc6541
d88ba854d892d1c9d46e6b0e4592d699849adfe0
describe
'11591' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBR' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
ef1aba48c59b8ee71bf310a77355a451
adf461307a0b6106ec635330b6df5efbb012beaf
describe
'324778' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBS' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
be8823b8a09b073b990651be0c3628af
fa24ca09dc68cedebbc8d6c538037740bcdd8492
'2011-11-18T02:46:19-05:00'
describe
'39327' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBT' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
643db1c0ae21eb00cdadeebd9c419536
f7d39fa1cf7631b72ade441c70c74b371e8aaca2
describe
'7572' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBU' 'sip-files00184.pro'
8ad9623936c0385749204d4240c5ae94
86a38097c5a0b73852a8a625debec29d87a711ba
describe
'10945' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBV' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
7f1287a0cd1658af82765110cd2010ea
359bbd818d1fe7334adf0684cc1f3cd77eebf850
'2011-11-18T02:48:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBW' 'sip-files00184.tif'
7985ed17cc0fa9efec445acf5e53768e
3a9977b8f96bbea5c5d1066c826930d20c8074c2
describe
'319' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBX' 'sip-files00184.txt'
07e45f119c6e09ce6b40b41bffc9a23c
e8b2c99e92e2e409155ac0f54482a51f0b7d125c
describe
'3060' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBY' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
b7af773203055970ae0826fd58ce6c19
12dbf25a87f9701ce1a3cbb955c3537fa3dbad9d
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQBZ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
bb12a2855ea2f51a183c3e9fb4e88607
63c1aeaa7d34accb97ae9ad2aacec680d8a50cee
describe
'109657' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCA' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
5fb4d22ce6afe6292e7e1cb777f49975
fcad50d1ec1ce572b32c8035b0a847aba553af51
describe
'31893' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCB' 'sip-files00185.pro'
70fae35445a890aef93008202a7cd752
271b7152a73839892ce5c2dccedcf191f87a022a
describe
'36596' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCC' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
4cb1dffe205ebabda26d3efea69e4a7a
2be91c69c792bcdfb90b888d0d1c331ada98d1a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCD' 'sip-files00185.tif'
392107c003221a0cadbf9f74143771d2
3b0666d9d6940f756bf8e4f0c0b5bd6cacf9f690
'2011-11-18T02:47:29-05:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCE' 'sip-files00185.txt'
bf76108cb1beeb5861b2fe462c0016a2
de7e13207d57cd5b382bdb6de16e40a471c50eff
describe
'8838' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCF' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
2d54c52749a416c66725576bb0fca021
610d9049836c7612c0b5d30d9fe74b26beeeea79
'2011-11-18T02:43:40-05:00'
describe
'324726' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCG' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
549cb1a28c3723121b2067409098b406
d9c704ce47cf75b9ce5d04babd9c2b73fe61038e
describe
'135751' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCH' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
2b781a16cca99c08a7832f488f227012
51655f17e2f1e6f995366bb6bac56cfda829c33a
describe
'40421' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCI' 'sip-files00186.pro'
f6a477c3249d1464f2a703d4bc6b4fa5
4b3a0d03a07936b9a42aa61e9006f853834a6ec0
describe
'47276' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCJ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
d2bd4ee31f809db6344f5ae2a7b28c39
59441ff36758d3ae888e3d5739ad7a959f06821b
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCK' 'sip-files00186.tif'
19d5a9a0c725fe30ecb6b67e72158735
732789de51a49408c0dabe96843be8a343d51c93
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
a9163c7d25a04cb03a55002b8be0f066
9cff5e76f807dd8b38e744e321f9ad9de58c4d3e
'2011-11-18T02:50:46-05:00'
describe
'11541' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCM' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
b9d9c7cb1b673a2000018d2c1a2a9155
cf26c6567dfdc9e43e109476f38bc3ca1fe44d21
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCN' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
07f72ddb0050d13283cd0eb655105145
da2be29c7b1cb8f44873fbe6f34ed947c426747c
describe
'137549' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCO' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
baba2ef538030d63789eba251ff8a817
c3677c42bdd46543d5041d28285289c6a5634fed
describe
'1765' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCP' 'sip-files00187.pro'
f4cebafe17c064d4ff854316e3525c98
8b35653e9d189b9af678288a822546fe904a64af
'2011-11-18T02:51:52-05:00'
describe
'35571' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCQ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
76747b3b001e7bffee2d237a4d4b2ab5
9a0b669a53ede96cc07675a9542219210cdb6cef
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCR' 'sip-files00187.tif'
9ab27f44c0127b84cc1a246dee31d649
2acf85cec14ff7fe1779d18308d59557992d77d3
describe
'146' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCS' 'sip-files00187.txt'
b40ba1f55517bc35495fd1de651426f6
55ec5c312226466f5718a4be32cff04f304ffe9d
describe
Invalid character
'8520' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCT' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
31d19e98d07faf722fba1e1d822d9580
b72f85e1767fef9e70ae61e9550cd66746ed5971
describe
'324505' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCU' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
c1b4d3ded77e977e1abd644f0bc13318
d0909a29a8efdb1178313dd6c5bc4006b0e38f3c
describe
'156642' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCV' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
9f2ebf2f71c2da6a989f83408c2eb327
059c31ec3a1ff6027418f43efa18968866754c69
'2011-11-18T02:50:34-05:00'
describe
'49915' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCW' 'sip-files00189.pro'
e47efe32947fa85c7fff4421a8e6d198
4918ec808d7e1ff2e3197b713a317715a1acaa5a
describe
'51897' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCX' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
c74fa26a39c8a940c0cedee73e49329b
a1283b77379824d43985fd84c1fa70f56fb1e5f5
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCY' 'sip-files00189.tif'
d23f4782cfa9ecbc5537301756dceb9f
cfb6e1314159164bbcee41e6316a61183ca13653
describe
'1984' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQCZ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
bb796910e2adbc430456d567927f1ecf
ddc843d99d5c06fad4827f47030409e0b92f8ad2
describe
'11838' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDA' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
f561126d08cf2d07f69bc47091ba2be8
04844a73e9da3bcc1409642d9cb9f3355f6b1269
describe
'324475' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDB' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
80ce832371f45fffd772563bf2e06bb8
e8b03259de88364152330a45d1a4683fc1aaf3e7
describe
'161790' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDC' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
f3b94abdbbdb597aed8342e5c02012d4
65ea255b3b30ce8f8d960e94d3682dcee2011ef7
describe
'52361' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDD' 'sip-files00190.pro'
4deb6fc81e6b1a1bd16cf1b942e3eafb
8ef577958282d532231b69110f8768cb792b224a
describe
'53063' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDE' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
c934a697c5e0e1779460cf1f57fc757e
32ee7ca96d3d691c00fed4da18e9d7d0a98b8855
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDF' 'sip-files00190.tif'
5ca0c9eeabc8fe60c2877040f0f243c5
53c8ceaee180967068deaafe6aa6ef57b4106ab5
describe
'2059' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDG' 'sip-files00190.txt'
487e2f6bb9786d55705df2152f9519fc
07f29cd1b67655a3175eeb6e0dcfc63c9abd93d0
describe
'12245' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDH' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
4196c8d8b602f7064c8c6a08948612aa
e4e7698613f4f6bad397cfe46baabe64be2862c2
describe
'324804' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDI' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
d436d628bdfbccaa4fada3b1e291636a
a7b84189ad20657f01e3596e3e0a3022f992cb1a
describe
'161075' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDJ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
99b05c55570023d9986f29d26f13defd
3c13a1097ab2a6c8634b6f8f3daeffca12bc91d5
describe
'51342' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDK' 'sip-files00191.pro'
899e4f1d63235d435c7eb11caa729231
1adf00ef1e4b08ef25bb263c12e75e2a16d7bc41
describe
'52436' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDL' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
c0a2d41f62cd587f33d80d563c96646d
cccaff902f892fa089eed621c526866d39149626
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDM' 'sip-files00191.tif'
6fed443eb1a77ab2e5a4d624530a4d81
b522fd3f637f06edef1397054a235d16868df6fd
describe
'2030' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDN' 'sip-files00191.txt'
aeaa748d8757f7a8c5a0cbd4f9defc3d
4e418b91dbfe710226cf8ffda5dd5c0375e883e1
'2011-11-18T02:54:40-05:00'
describe
'12000' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDO' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
174e715cf3b3db72b93c3f025be98389
ae219fcf9e34b7e0a324955a6d8c74adfb0e855b
describe
'324661' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDP' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
a5f4358bea26b443e0cc48363a877bbb
04fa94657a330294c5c75e9810d272b97fc09caf
describe
'165237' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDQ' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
64e6bc05821db06e60020d5fcfd09a8c
adf986430da0d8bfd64edadd946feddd21a4a026
describe
'53503' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDR' 'sip-files00192.pro'
b72b7d8cfd44f3a3a2defa5a9e4723ad
974e6d8afc068a046eb24a2e7bed45d319d69650
describe
'55166' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDS' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
f5c5386bcc8d98535946c4f5ef65d904
e5f972d893d150c6c5cb9c37879aa276c91b48cc
'2011-11-18T02:51:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDT' 'sip-files00192.tif'
643d5140d9c692077c8343f2cbe70d5e
540db9732ac6645ca96de20c26f7b4569e814d48
describe
'2105' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDU' 'sip-files00192.txt'
60a3b0c2a6d9b53388b2a9a3b5ff42c0
69d8dd942d36256f5796080bd83082d2bcb120b9
describe
'12433' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDV' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
53160b07101442e5bde194f68ac6178a
086798ae27b65f84c8b6c9b678d9c837ed3c1408
describe
'324506' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDW' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
03a0e4f893b39d68394956706291cef4
422963b86af5d646c387a1d5a51e702819ca8e82
describe
'54779' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDX' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
737748e79fce1126b66bafd9dee34418
e142d51a0021865c68c33d4c88efcd3f4a49b81a
describe
'2797' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDY' 'sip-files00193.pro'
be940db57a993c1f23b6aec768ec1680
e3192fa2af5a0832e06b6664c4c84651b7ac94d9
describe
'14491' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQDZ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
a9fd569107eb51275672a0db9f24fa90
c27ccb8e66e9bdf4d0873e7cf50d9abc21a485ba
'2011-11-18T02:47:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEA' 'sip-files00193.tif'
b2e4eef360cfad90fa95ed7afe8b00ce
91a73abdcb54fe4c539ed9597785dd8938726b4a
describe
'172' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEB' 'sip-files00193.txt'
1b62a6961c9647d76085e06500e5ad05
6813b806b604a0afb1cd2321704d75b024438432
'2011-11-18T02:45:18-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3854' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEC' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
6bfb2de6a9cbcb25e28fcbc96a83e530
134c7fddfa2e2d5da85ae26431e9db8afca90974
describe
'324548' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQED' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
85ee6fd3d9ece544c70207ccbf63d096
a17c3e0eabfef477c5ca3f5b5edf690032a3aeee
describe
'162001' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEE' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
64fda9568f4fde80dccb7a6d91a88b44
7218b4aa663f696fd9b54a5350e14ef4edf5e176
'2011-11-18T02:48:20-05:00'
describe
'49365' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEF' 'sip-files00195.pro'
4b43a2fccf1fd09d86c13c5fee08ad7e
23acd0a8986917ff48fc00b9626f6fa52d33bb76
describe
'53840' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEG' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
4509b9143dcb3fc93188d41255c4f7da
158176ce266c709fa91d1c976873be1e4514ff02
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEH' 'sip-files00195.tif'
c9e724f5b2015a89e2315452fdf7ed4f
211d26cac74f7cbee4477ed4bf4a2409b66ccc87
'2011-11-18T02:54:34-05:00'
describe
'2074' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEI' 'sip-files00195.txt'
7bca2b62263910e9f3e7abcad6b682bb
d45fd01383dcac28312205020a1bc2574ab11536
describe
'12491' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEJ' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
56f4c5c91b6af32873cdfe66232693bc
a84df0c72fdc544791864e9dc15d01eb3acb4875
describe
'324735' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEK' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
8164bf2c038b532010135506bf1c1aae
c04b5106192a2463277ed515cb8c8acd2483ed0a
describe
'100315' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEL' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
1d8e00b9e7d8a0fac9916f3f1f2dc2da
29828084e285e560ba1e1cb1236e1ae14105a85b
describe
'27033' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEM' 'sip-files00196.pro'
708fe13027ac371bb2f5f82b1ca81fe7
7d641e4e741e69161b076e798d48c2fd4aaad4f0
describe
'34434' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEN' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
ef51be87bacdb547f91b0c7ce054d216
aef3bae8131628665a8e75b55dde7d6bae680fa0
'2011-11-18T02:49:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEO' 'sip-files00196.tif'
1f7e2854fc57a683de127dea68dc8ba9
aed95c629eea9a82b278fd5ee4ddfaed0981acc4
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEP' 'sip-files00196.txt'
b609afb2915689c45bf3dfd45808a32f
5f88f5477f0ea40ba79ddc40c09a64df437f1e5a
describe
'9086' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEQ' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
60c9872ba44de6c3948d597a8a938c65
519cb033dc6de7b4aabde8346d7916d7e0c55523
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQER' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
4fab36a2d3babeb4a209ae3181bfc568
deb40f441521cbbd17da99ea64ccf4d67795100b
describe
'104314' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQES' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
93c4abab7947591faba80bd020dab1df
2c761f4fe8b5de826ea18c230c88c37b80a7f55b
describe
'28232' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQET' 'sip-files00197.pro'
a14384771681eca0d20547aa9830df31
cad5d167297018e43355a765c963085286cb2e1d
'2011-11-18T02:51:17-05:00'
describe
'37522' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEU' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
df15a2612daccc5800a3dd63be56fe08
a8174f8864b2e24e530588721e18637a525cb090
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEV' 'sip-files00197.tif'
a6fc147dd94fd235a92ead0848ff510f
55ee49212f6c9ee5716920219494a53c198458e0
'2011-11-18T02:51:13-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEW' 'sip-files00197.txt'
a7a19031b5bfdb39e6129d5afa1e22ef
e502f8d9c9400ba9681720ebb96c52e279de937d
'2011-11-18T02:50:17-05:00'
describe
'9014' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEX' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
d3f1ffdd90a3b9e4f4978ee7b226433a
b0a95b5dbb8d1d6c7255b5749d25956f0bf58fcf
describe
'324794' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEY' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
0908dbb2ec83ac0fc158fe5ec021511b
ab8021f50301a186124fcdc853afb867622ba31e
describe
'136276' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQEZ' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
14dd4f26cb658d3bad9bc5055f004a77
e6769b50746407e2f39b44d00742569ed5ae5bf2
describe
'37597' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFA' 'sip-files00198.pro'
f48ee3f0378b6800596459602fb95498
0c6f23b3860a15e3124602d2ab4a353c0b019f71
describe
'47852' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFB' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
b9fa15c000147b2a4185336adc04ef2c
c94f4bf163883ffe418e7722d0677454c208ad6f
'2011-11-18T02:47:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFC' 'sip-files00198.tif'
16f80085224bdf0e46248069b82bf7af
1cf897d6a4eeec23423ba9aca78f318b96ddacc2
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFD' 'sip-files00198.txt'
fc2fc08c5b0e65e850c76e32cbf18e64
43704bbe678e2bb58ad3df82c402b373632c1758
describe
'12010' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFE' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
36bed9ba215010cfa41a966a831220b4
4df133ea4ede57190b46eea1992a2af64f8cb339
'2011-11-18T02:44:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFF' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
a173d93dce0f9bd0fe39a160dcde7806
3f7c0baa38b68fb1b19226a42ec6ea16dbbb22d3
describe
'150850' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFG' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
01dcc82665aa571e4ae58f66532c7f50
4fe8ab30c159ce98b47995d34fbcd550d0a6cae8
describe
'46097' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFH' 'sip-files00199.pro'
b911fb6ea9646cf0f23a9b224fd2f854
f81782bce0f02dd6b363370de395d68d288db0df
describe
'49780' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFI' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
dc363dcea4b4980515f49bb09a596c50
98b854fdbdb886bf90e99ae7f46b17f8b7a59778
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFJ' 'sip-files00199.tif'
8ed6b9c9ea51cc213bf4a1b705ae21c3
095ea6987acdfca2815bf96c66770ced76e4273d
describe
'1891' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFK' 'sip-files00199.txt'
a354c90943cfde34219b9e60bd69db8c
db18c69a4c72e9df7943f214afc4d7a417970390
'2011-11-18T02:42:28-05:00'
describe
'11511' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFL' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
7af0b1e82073eb876a6e4d94c34aa65c
f8c0872564969ba814c68b04bde6889d0f9c5812
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFM' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
61972a1c4be901f99aecc3ed103a8368
f2817cc32b1e7d29333fcaf8ae8192e7cdb050c8
describe
'132391' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFN' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
c02982a9163c484945c00842559195fc
faedd926febcdaa9db994b0e4544f567030c2ee6
describe
'37869' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFO' 'sip-files00200.pro'
ff4e5bca15df2a88096602cfc594076c
a6ce24d49a8c642d2ac38f249153c947eff3db68
'2011-11-18T02:52:11-05:00'
describe
'45432' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFP' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
4dbd98269bf9d43764973ff5b615c3dc
d43a3b6dc21fd9b0766a323388fade8dc401c6d3
'2011-11-18T02:43:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFQ' 'sip-files00200.tif'
573ce964f90b7a71fb2b4502cc5c6f8b
7565eebe09bbd50c30e840d1347d5339ea83721e
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFR' 'sip-files00200.txt'
daf173dffcdff8b8361bec61ebde9292
5a441f43e0b16dcce9b82da9bd1dd98e14aa2372
describe
'11219' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFS' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
ddba791f631511bbd51c86cceeb1bfd2
8b446647fb19fee734aa78f8a873fe26fddad974
'2011-11-18T02:50:20-05:00'
describe
'324521' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFT' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
06d365516f48497a46e0065e6ce899dd
47bb11855e97f60f630fc836f4888ec10c8b657e
describe
'142114' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFU' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
6f0affe7e9076cdb9f7dba31529d617b
59ffc57c1501d207e64e270022b909ddcca3c334
'2011-11-18T02:50:44-05:00'
describe
'42707' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFV' 'sip-files00201.pro'
576b43f08e5fc81f930c32e10d3060d0
fb6ce682b0e8620f3282e708461a5be6e30f3a1f
'2011-11-18T02:47:23-05:00'
describe
'48328' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFW' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
1371daa1590521635200c3c63e2091f6
777ac855b4e8eab67c3d2b1a911750bf6ec50544
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFX' 'sip-files00201.tif'
a415c7c60e0302cd2829308502b59645
7ba37560b9bcac9bd09313d1aeb2b2752e7d0d67
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFY' 'sip-files00201.txt'
1ef8cc30a8f88a0f11fcbd79380793bd
0dd76e087a55272c61f334cb8f634a117688db08
'2011-11-18T02:50:23-05:00'
describe
'12143' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQFZ' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
dcd985f1cfa6032062050340e4d37c58
7884708938976ed9c398cf236b55d048daa8de7e
describe
'324744' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGA' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
8b4138cf11ba2a48d218fd0d1fde96bd
ce0505fde79c01b2d6da900b072b152237b6b02a
describe
'147883' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGB' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
3f1545f4b0991f5ad8d84928339c9c16
711661976e8cd2491f736324ba6807467b646c14
'2011-11-18T02:48:17-05:00'
describe
'45314' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGC' 'sip-files00202.pro'
55ce61945ab37be09a2ecefa3fa1b82e
d515bb3f42e74d0a1794b75684471f59610a673e
describe
'49873' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGD' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
1b39ad9c7013933445981a36c684396f
8211858a6712ac7ce75153344d5cfeda8a3bcf4d
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGE' 'sip-files00202.tif'
66035665908ac93e0a1259497d90c092
9d2263d6feddb1aacf40a96d033cf57daf56e749
describe
'1816' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGF' 'sip-files00202.txt'
5c47f9c28424e3a6f205338b634dd48a
6b3d19dea2e46e85aec7370cbfa9b6cbfcfa6512
describe
'11772' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGG' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
a4437919e9eab0ec7222d867a0522274
ff55365ec74c2817133c25f6b1e8550f5c19d233
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGH' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
dccf20860b548d694ef94f9f02c99b58
9e3cbdb81d0c5c74dd0d28df1e0a7ee9d9f09716
describe
'160389' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGI' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
42b544271affffc83b44a8c056804e46
c9d153794799cec592ef1063e67ef36b23ed0d2c
describe
'50299' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGJ' 'sip-files00203.pro'
6de671bf2214278e07ab47287ffb7b5e
946735a3db090c17fb5aecb2397e1de637742b80
describe
'53436' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGK' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
8754ecaed54fe6528d959e0afb6633f6
01cc932c06937999f73d955bd46750f44c16ab79
'2011-11-18T02:53:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGL' 'sip-files00203.tif'
39f1b98b490ab845a45d372bc2f04de9
8c6631d0dbf4c95b8fbf49344d8f019d9bce846e
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGM' 'sip-files00203.txt'
02c88f4621a4c57ed3446a544b00add6
45db37d2c5744463589797445414d2e365c74097
describe
'12610' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGN' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
f75da96b992bb7ae68133cc5604bbc5f
5b124d4a2dd1fcb7f2d02fdb6cf6256fa6dc531e
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGO' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
c1417bc11bf605ad19052f0a6eeaddb3
8af118b83eed7b69522bda4eecdb2e0901bfeae5
'2011-11-18T02:47:36-05:00'
describe
'158079' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGP' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
8a7c0b538374b0d3264b1620a81f86a1
49dff7f2866bf155f047c758a0d191e02b7eb7e9
describe
'50727' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGQ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
291451565eb4cd750fb23307e864e465
444230393dc07ee405cbdca97c63f0bc64bab9e3
describe
'55008' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGR' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
7cae33b2ef7e555ce49f2c888657af28
b9ebdf7c5912208739d91245c48df29001e42c8f
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGS' 'sip-files00204.tif'
ff0eab7209ce48ae7afdbadc75cd240a
c52768334da441d71dc38fee5e7a0f24a2158d6a
describe
'1999' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGT' 'sip-files00204.txt'
b396ecf5448e468846a7dde184e9c61a
87e945eb1e66bdec2a7cd3343861facdbb6d206a
describe
'12642' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGU' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
ea402ffd1d5e157e24f2ad732d0c03b7
e3c256ba88f4f46bde5ebf56c37bf18f4d9c4f00
describe
'324551' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGV' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
af6309aa30c0d89169a2316a6cee36bb
496776ee622c19e9d6a71c09e8d62726d0446bab
describe
'142651' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGW' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
8416f6adbd1e503e62aec98467c5aa89
548a91a15be8b240fde6591c95e2f08cb446a36f
describe
'42418' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGX' 'sip-files00205.pro'
d910c72c8f9f7880b781463d3072a421
21353dacfb0f8b6c47f18190d191dd53f83329c4
describe
'48222' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGY' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
cf0f36e8d188564474f3f96531b50cd9
6c19562d9bf3106e70495ea170452a16249fb0fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQGZ' 'sip-files00205.tif'
369bc23ee3c7628903adc72f7536df3d
4885f11b7e6d471dd66a2c1e99f1cc267cdaa4e0
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHA' 'sip-files00205.txt'
bca5522148fa4167cda9437ee5d408f5
8fc424feb067e989e5e38e93b6491070e0df4d1b
describe
'11730' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHB' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
f93ca7761a73fe3d2a514bebd608648e
3e4a8d1ac283cc087614ac6401ab2d4f4bf0d787
'2011-11-18T02:52:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHC' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
0ed6e87705363b1abc9f425e9d53c74c
e9c1a67635a331e960e083c5efe55b964e37dccf
describe
'131115' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHD' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
1feae8c4132209a9181ee849faf62912
318708d4bd7efb920a7b96e75383673f3b2a0235
'2011-11-18T02:50:33-05:00'
describe
'37492' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHE' 'sip-files00206.pro'
e6aead57ddc5164c6c751d9ce714ec4a
eefd3a12ee9e88c5325379488e36f458ccca89ae
describe
'44630' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHF' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
e892af3b4eb6dce544596a1df1404fce
7f98e8563850d44941c5f9ec7a540f1bf8b00b06
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHG' 'sip-files00206.tif'
1f648597350195a6e8afc1a76c69b000
41f4fde001a8dc717a8b3a82dda648b0724d4cee
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHH' 'sip-files00206.txt'
6a02442a14f0474db31c401e1d3f0ea6
f33cd39dade41df4c462ffea2e65bbc68bf6de39
'2011-11-18T02:46:50-05:00'
describe
'10678' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHI' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
dc8a60a75e78082359fb1393dbb669e8
9053a58b9fc0f7cafd5c4fef256ed1f5706501e4
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHJ' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
ac662194cc6001521d7b366db61acabb
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describe
'128432' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHK' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
8594d96ec2b9e81f13a0e8fbe6ea57ed
7ecd5dab63c50c65ba8e417c2cacaeaf9e0c4723
describe
'36863' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHL' 'sip-files00207.pro'
cc907862142b65e71fa96f2b4c046b51
cdbca958188882e7331f89e8896fe89f20af2e29
describe
'44580' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHM' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
062199201eb7d8de25aae0d1e653d398
537e7617f86e5c8190494fdb55b10c8fe167745a
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHN' 'sip-files00207.tif'
f3744a7d5bda9a2564bc90cb4d2dc388
8b7e7cc31fa919c26890dafbcd657a2a8f83be33
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHO' 'sip-files00207.txt'
39782665644c8329bc52c0ca0e44212f
94680e6b95b1f760e47b43ec9eba1ca89f3eb43a
describe
'11417' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHP' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
b92e967d3188e6811ab675eaa0b5a96c
dcfff47d671070ac2e9286db8cb8977817b3df35
describe
'324824' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHQ' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
c6241cfedc1bdb2dc686fc42bbbea105
bc18bfd244bcc67ae0e5515193a66ee35e53d8f7
describe
'122684' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHR' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
f260fbc6a2903966fd631de2b0fbf837
a31d2351c8647a3e8152c04c4149de66ac87b1e4
describe
'36992' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHS' 'sip-files00208.pro'
d8a64451284eec0f35e1654699613ca8
1f23ad1365a6d3953a9d6c7479e2eb9bd1890dde
describe
'42350' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHT' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
0cdf35d603b1ffe72af2a76a25345af2
82ab08037f03c24e07ff3c61272363b75a622c8e
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHU' 'sip-files00208.tif'
5b5a792c28c65baa7b78e70f3bfe75e1
fba11f26e186cca1a73d1603de01f2ce75ced28e
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHV' 'sip-files00208.txt'
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2648a974df8fb5b3460c787f9d050b649b7d6f0b
describe
'10677' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHW' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
60f1b9452088c9773fc62fa998d10357
5463e58015589197d86e253a0323b43da81cd9bf
describe
'324560' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHX' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
0a0f1045257d074cd372548dfe607eb4
8a56585b54aa8977ce91f131735c3538933181ef
describe
'152802' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHY' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
92fd280c7bcde723740a06980a2d9a1b
24186445ba4c7fe4174d91aeffe43ea5854175a6
describe
'49152' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQHZ' 'sip-files00209.pro'
16ef396de9d8b6c89bc7fbf58e51feed
485ed2b23930e1fa96899b2745a920af4b135c5a
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIA' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
6dbdf74a915f49e5377d7b6d9ceb1392
cdcefb2b5e29cdb2c31a7b23e29278fbfc566761
'2011-11-18T02:54:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIB' 'sip-files00209.tif'
221ef04a842196ecd1fe3396025c9219
5c3e76632d32ef929388d1bcc5d3f421fc6b8178
describe
'1966' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIC' 'sip-files00209.txt'
ebb2c510bc5503f058375918a0300259
42aeb53d40f3f614533ebd164f7bf4978c05fbcc
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQID' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
524a727807e7caf6a8b7c18e1c0b2c71
969cd8cd63c602b286200d3e57f95f42bf6c024b
describe
'324767' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIE' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
2f5b3b1505d946cc32bd2a0f5abf0a19
84eff4c458df6b6ecb24b2f8be9f021e1f904147
describe
'145540' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIF' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
ae669057cca509206eb2b96ac00bfda8
1eb42f44be93efd4ee36f9f0a418fa2553367b34
describe
'46213' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIG' 'sip-files00210.pro'
e3d47e96f76a7fbda0d4647fb1e76114
1212fa121d8fc07e66259905c92919dd2026a913
describe
'48542' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIH' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
1c8df674bdfd8c1c962efbff9573321c
1d8e560b0f147cfe89202ce3abf976fb9a85abed
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQII' 'sip-files00210.tif'
449e97b7f6a410f2b9d530a7583a507a
608c871eadbf43c85423ba0ed9cd1049c29f289a
describe
'1839' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIJ' 'sip-files00210.txt'
02bb490cfd058eadd1985140c4bd8324
6ca235e2f847061c23be44c8e1caee4459dd4b11
describe
'11610' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIK' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
597c5e277da382895d2e80e4e918d900
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describe
'324796' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIL' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
1e61359bed771d0a4cf17dfe46f92d7c
0f201e42e81c2eb1fa89037dc9ab286de37437b6
describe
'144335' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIM' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
cd68825923627617cc1e201141185d06
da251302f7b51a69e68dc1f4bbce7618fe4a2925
describe
'45353' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIN' 'sip-files00211.pro'
2794194701f1a80ff566c5661603ccab
686fee0f1c2fe26ed02a435c1aae6ec89e0c8bc7
describe
'48653' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIO' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
5501c6f1acc28990ffb1a6bac005a2f8
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIP' 'sip-files00211.tif'
867fe99e9cf5844fb0a23ace7e2587a9
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIQ' 'sip-files00211.txt'
0aba7c6769b5bbb18ee88255b612a4f9
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describe
'11683' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIR' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
22dd99829d636adeb63f511465f9d254
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIS' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
95a368f0fbe81438092b81ed70b80388
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describe
'49486' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIT' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
041f7bc1792b1eee6bba76990ce4621b
65933b75e321432adcf336c724a4506a4b465dda
describe
'11923' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIU' 'sip-files00212.pro'
53fd094d2a61ed9cf9e7799e263bfde4
471cb713fb7f1645840c36cb855931cc2f555bf4
'2011-11-18T02:52:04-05:00'
describe
'15255' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIV' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
bac3034457820e1586b66237747636d3
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIW' 'sip-files00212.tif'
25b0fd5a5b2ac3396f70c063d5d49465
2371746f88b9d3779c69529c0026e45d11b574fb
'2011-11-18T02:48:50-05:00'
describe
'503' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIX' 'sip-files00212.txt'
553344341f31305f70d4c322e490c1b5
bcb36c107aa1f0992d6c6c268835dc71c3f4f56e
describe
'3997' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIY' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
6d1ddc3dc4b4c5a383029509fe156a43
a2f1bcb86e1c819bd6fc89ff7da1fe4213043508
'2011-11-18T02:53:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQIZ' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
75505f96a0890c6dc6c68bf82aee057c
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describe
'102987' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJA' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
32f2329072d018eda6a88a21ba4b76f3
6351ecc83d8343e7b5e186b59f91a517b72ff8a8
'2011-11-18T02:52:26-05:00'
describe
'28921' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJB' 'sip-files00213.pro'
0b473d5255a96fb0e1d58b5b3d285e55
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describe
'36604' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJC' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
356f80855f2ec10b09f3eee061efbc54
109822c40a6e92be0835d276978cc45bef9d1db6
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJD' 'sip-files00213.tif'
1da2dfd880901dd7bcf7be07ba710ce8
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describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJE' 'sip-files00213.txt'
fa70fcecc2b20e3e435ab990331a899f
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describe
'8979' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJF' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJG' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
af8b408ecfac580bf9f8b17674681b96
cda33121b2e2c3b0d10b7f3fabe52cd227857b2c
describe
'144831' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJH' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
451325cc64de331b7f3b6ec1d70157d5
2b95619f07965f620e13b0669f786050d9e00de1
describe
'43907' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJI' 'sip-files00214.pro'
e11f145298dd3ed4f2fe3f4d44fb6d39
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describe
'49697' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJJ' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
afcd294554f7ed6e16f245ca5046357f
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJK' 'sip-files00214.tif'
b2e0b0977463c5ffc900999f86981b14
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJL' 'sip-files00214.txt'
c70720e9ca032b4930a32c6f04251119
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describe
'11519' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJM' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
173cdb24b753574e35ac8abab2eadb0a
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describe
'324538' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJN' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
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describe
'160141' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJO' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
8096c3dbc85f98e555ebc4d085c0acac
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describe
'50020' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJP' 'sip-files00215.pro'
b632dadcf9427012fd287b4df97ce7d3
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describe
'52303' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJQ' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
7a381f78fe2d94af3072cedea6ada127
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJR' 'sip-files00215.tif'
a1751e97c7b04e864038552902f68519
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describe
'2049' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJS' 'sip-files00215.txt'
5ff4e24e2765cd8e0d301f5a2e52f18d
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describe
'12053' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJT' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
1f838480bbfa56aa7e1241cdfcf743e4
929b9ebb6d9a5d965976a64f6348d055118297cc
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJU' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
9008241dca5633f38da97f2987853089
d478bf2430e21b1330d58c47f25f7cf4fd04058f
describe
'136549' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJV' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
fe89ee918c0da8f081a03bd4e53e1de3
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describe
'39639' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJW' 'sip-files00216.pro'
0ee474b4ffad5f66d7c4e3d05bf5fdf8
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describe
'46793' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJX' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
431bcd3aeb8f437d769d3269cd65a26c
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJY' 'sip-files00216.tif'
61ee805debcd0a49aab89269bccd06af
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describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQJZ' 'sip-files00216.txt'
405d7559e84ba807f33c2261b2001804
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describe
'11123' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKA' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
75d9418c689c5582bbef7f8bfe4ed22f
0df8eff0ed0fd788433054e8e1b083c4b01d42cd
describe
'341932' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKB' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
af8ddd10e0153eaf7129ca7c5ef3bc65
c23f9b30b348e16b9410e90e9f1fdf8d617af48e
describe
'132206' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKC' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
82fb854cd05fa638a1a121dd1310f89b
382d50d1d7009ee3c09beff657679c7213e63da2
describe
'39372' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKD' 'sip-files00217.pro'
6fbe982a3708fd00858da4618724365d
8e50a780821e7f3ffdedbacd6ff3a11c9aeea6c4
describe
'45692' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKE' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
149d7a8aca896323258b11729d25b216
e4ae2d538af79ca3c070429fb04f2a3abd3d2e35
'2011-11-18T02:50:28-05:00'
describe
'2752968' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKF' 'sip-files00217.tif'
938e1ff21237e37dbfc39d8e3196a8ad
abd4cc2350a9632107fdc1ca6008b1c38cc7fbc6
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKG' 'sip-files00217.txt'
5ff23843eef15f171a4e3e9b17ac87b3
bf5aca95fd1a9a3859bc6b143d852f1683d2d834
describe
'11600' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKH' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
369b8765921b425f252cecc6a459245f
633c8a31e755a9c9a52d89cf7d5d35563d138bce
describe
'341716' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKI' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
d4996148aa1e87c83b4d4055268c343a
5ac9c416f91bdb0fdc0909780d287dcf67b89a58
describe
'129820' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKJ' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
eb567c358e23a5b5781d1b3054eab5ff
fa68e70d01cfd4a14d40d330e96b60f051b2c739
describe
'38871' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKK' 'sip-files00218.pro'
58186ea8213c91502e7239e40dffcbf6
a6f009dc5942752e06a95691985b5ffe7c14e3db
describe
'44967' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKL' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
349493e97de382bf2f5a62d6a1571afe
ea52a2bcd8e9cb6bbfbf1a53c7d8aadb33acbf49
describe
'2750872' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKM' 'sip-files00218.tif'
4257e44be08f5c0bb737271b67c8a8e4
cc75cb81e0170ae5e46e69b0628762d96066d370
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKN' 'sip-files00218.txt'
2bbbb750624e7d81c0bb2e6ff5c57d22
4a195652867103ee00f856e4af43893d4b17a843
'2011-11-18T02:42:44-05:00'
describe
'10887' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKO' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
e3484fe2fa294183ff3ac51a8102c041
947cd8c2625abd1cde7b2daad9acf321fe7bb411
describe
'342018' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKP' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
27b22e5a33d9d3feb0fea36597a29f9d
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describe
'132142' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKQ' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
66b9ed927921d02e5317914cf96a071b
edfe924da3259ca2d60d09153306dd0360404aea
describe
'40196' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKR' 'sip-files00219.pro'
850b19f5fb8350e14f4728e7a1b3bf61
cb8a93cace5690c48213378a6d18a0ebd19cf047
'2011-11-18T02:50:19-05:00'
describe
'44828' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKS' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
84562f239e968f26504a63dfb1ba37b7
3eabd3e59e1282054ee3915453839a91c6876928
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKT' 'sip-files00219.tif'
67f4a226e6a4ab239fd3d054afd305ba
7b7e8d5f6a2d43b1e0b1c231f09f0e5a7945c116
'2011-11-18T02:50:55-05:00'
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKU' 'sip-files00219.txt'
fb991084aa193f10acc07dc3e17e50d3
e5baecf1996a6107e8cf539b7c703450c4bf0451
describe
'11468' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKV' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
0bd0f7336e4bad1d214b79df911312c7
262c4f992ab7b1ecd09de8be6b2d74ade6b37b52
describe
'341693' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKW' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
32ef72d3c74790247f7ac2ebffed7fd8
b6192a9f1cf5fc38c4dde65a67cfd9e6361724fe
describe
'144084' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKX' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
bae335da9f0882f03538f324c891291e
bfd442e1269e9a1bc4d3430b6b04c583e1ca1196
describe
'47189' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKY' 'sip-files00220.pro'
75773ef33ab2302486db5152354f531f
42ecf643a56e785b6201129536d217a812654933
describe
'48709' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQKZ' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
ec01063c314ffe294ff75c1bc3abffe7
4bbeaaeeb754743638dc269da23afaaaa27f2867
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLA' 'sip-files00220.tif'
088dcd14549d547c740c000ef21646ca
6968ca8ef9980fd164a35ff645dc73e76a023017
describe
'1866' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLB' 'sip-files00220.txt'
ae2c25d4c91829ca80e54f8c53abce48
4a58ce19f4cfd9591ec8f849d36fccabc70eeb40
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLC' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
7df9a04b0e6be4d811cd0f2dfa99737e
d7a79ed6dc2723660ca5a5a1f2e60d3ea9cdc592
describe
'341758' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLD' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
592732e064892c336220d67e280723ae
b8cd86b28f62d203df4b486f47e598637565b8bc
describe
'127428' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLE' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
293e39ae89c067f4ecbf83e90b4a3eaf
5630388d871250a7ceffba42e1e75c4befbae9a8
describe
'39394' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLF' 'sip-files00221.pro'
24ebaccfc7a599c1e2b5e6fa6159cca8
81d3aff2faa147174ccbd4c39240aaf843894f65
'2011-11-18T02:49:15-05:00'
describe
'44084' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLG' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
b00ecd7b774e63d0f81803f5c059cb6a
775c72af8dad5879fb495759181e386462360cf3
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLH' 'sip-files00221.tif'
c7e2157eb9384300f0be6cfdda150644
2f3a2908a1b7a6362dede6d2b8d933a96f38f6e6
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLI' 'sip-files00221.txt'
2bdf3d763f528a3437c4b75ecf3fe77b
0166cd34dcab211dec488390910bba0a0e711373
describe
'11037' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLJ' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
ea664b3fefdd6b1dbab42bdb29099d39
1649d6fea8de376d42e491b1509d234e866dc1d8
describe
'341730' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLK' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
d1934e22edbcd01a4b308c123446d6f8
89d0170b9f4c1303e664a0a09d7d80121c73753f
describe
'145073' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLL' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
02af4f09542725ac550d21d1c3f8eb2a
5c6227fedb1224bbcfceb06e7c4dfe44f0d226f7
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLM' 'sip-files00222.pro'
36522d9ae13f591ddf8bba9f7b3aa1b1
7fb11d64ce91166a291c8026c885512a5a05df67
describe
'48265' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLN' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
e8c8d194ffa12d7e7478015828c788f3
5d5c2c79d83318d858bb406135a4d286f597625c
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLO' 'sip-files00222.tif'
f53788e08897d06cd2280e95c94e3bf1
240f7ff616968fea772458d9437c364df6c5744b
describe
'1961' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLP' 'sip-files00222.txt'
ede7bacef18409cf6fad037a935d69b3
8c5f84d1db7b177b10d9e23d327832f7181d9889
describe
'11538' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLQ' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
baf5bc12a89bce2b7f1333b67eaae524
23096013f78e179cd28b6eb8f4afc71cc7e7c526
describe
'342002' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLR' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
d66a70949111a647e33bdda92bcf0860
179795e649fff265cd87c5ebc9c7b734f4839841
describe
'125384' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLS' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
daab604bdd5becf0c55b2e61bb0a8378
5454765ed435a3820ee73698943e8e4217f748ba
describe
'37699' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLT' 'sip-files00223.pro'
88f262f857098636955a53eefdc92464
d759652ce6c735130e65461be769b821ae39b885
describe
'42541' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLU' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
2a67b5d25591fb566914bc3f5e59d85e
acd1ade468d891021e0fe26c54f031b518e13647
'2011-11-18T02:54:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLV' 'sip-files00223.tif'
1b6304f5478b756e0fdee5594b73ee74
5bc1ce48f25855bf0d12147c7745df8e5f9959b8
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLW' 'sip-files00223.txt'
1aa3a3e2b4ee460a7884b3100cf8aaa2
f12a1051601a77e4b71f02f4794d4bc6d4dd1bc2
describe
'10768' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLX' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
6fc2c100314a90735ccb020b24978d39
3efe3bd9d81b94b5040102e09244ceb9dd004053
describe
'341562' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLY' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
9f1a6d8cb390ce034e7d26bcdf05ba22
c84af006eda829fef5d274d054a0ab4978da0b07
describe
'134144' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQLZ' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
73f4a94af4d9a65fcc0ebbad079f2748
e6ef1f74515cbcb87eda5956b584b0c7f9f8939a
describe
'43351' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMA' 'sip-files00224.pro'
00370029ff692a1e9a7695b10c619286
35a78673ef3277251eb60184d0943825b7283b16
describe
'45049' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMB' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
a0855921bed92f51de400ef01add6795
ecdfdfa2b1a6cf7f13ec1b477e6d3918093e1338
describe
'2749568' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMC' 'sip-files00224.tif'
a08485138f1311f0bf974991f5865061
8afe67e8683236aa31f08ac8c92265abce5df730
'2011-11-18T02:46:33-05:00'
describe
'1756' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMD' 'sip-files00224.txt'
88925949d60b50df6106145ab0b153ae
373d967ac4c53e854cb4c5e16d791367f670f1ba
describe
'11103' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQME' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
b6c3cd160ba160b94f72f82e0c124fce
4dbd515b21150590462d82f1c9170e7a414921d7
describe
'341975' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMF' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
54420423158495d6370e90e453638a4d
aed6cf707b79d09b5b595a4a1bceb8632832bd9c
describe
'149595' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMG' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
7b4301a37ceafb347de7981e287416d6
dc3000c46ff103821a9758bf905b5572f653e96f
'2011-11-18T02:43:21-05:00'
describe
'49015' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMH' 'sip-files00225.pro'
5b87812252984dfac4021ef199933f1a
533831186ac2c19611e624bcdb94b81791fce52c
describe
'49323' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMI' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
c8ddcc8e26619c6476e523f18a4c2cd9
daf8460c0f5ad2c2c3de00e132bda99f2ef8310b
'2011-11-18T02:54:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMJ' 'sip-files00225.tif'
8f125f59d531acc63a912c2f1e39cf51
c99e42d6483451d8ff11de1f72e91226d4922461
describe
'2008' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMK' 'sip-files00225.txt'
c674fce23a224b85749829e6851e637c
c17acf7ac25ef2d8448c4bea23406d93263ebbed
describe
'11640' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQML' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
0859087a39fa814e2cb4b96083c1757b
578108bb9e26a4377bdb1d4a41584759a036809f
describe
'341694' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMM' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
e4951197b7f3fdcb348be07724f503b1
f5e0b4874fe7dac396d75695540d4ceb5285b1a6
describe
'159298' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMN' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
b8ccfa8abec08c075a714bbdc62d2828
d6378c4c7e3b029965a0d1e3e960d4e56d7d7c33
describe
'52728' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMO' 'sip-files00226.pro'
d85dabc489175d1f8bdce1e0a1c2c4a7
b42b10630fc0aaa957d3c3e775ad30aa11fa2846
describe
'51795' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMP' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
71c80bfed37e79591a79246ca918d071
a53da7fc8b556b76f298e5fe35af9cc8833742df
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMQ' 'sip-files00226.tif'
ca169ba64b841790be3802b771bf1862
81ab802cd01c7ac9e7d244d80664774cd6e6872b
describe
'2072' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMR' 'sip-files00226.txt'
462227e636d732285896a06d444abaa7
3e802278096a54a1e2b07da49589a0935166401e
describe
'11856' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMS' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
7529b1d87a77d9b1b0c9c483eb54dc4f
51943818ca8f8cfe288729747c893eee5f8c9787
'2011-11-18T02:50:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMT' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
e28b0a4229436fba3de6d4953b90f6ae
3333e35fa66778cfaef5a972a6ca744d9a579fbd
describe
'144616' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMU' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
06de04b798576fd9f2f03f62b82d9112
1e75e355fdfc2e536240e0e2207813abfb5ac5b9
describe
'46864' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMV' 'sip-files00227.pro'
379312339b8b52d8f6772568a9f50858
e8ed7602da3db78104fdc1f7f648249d00b55850
describe
'46603' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMW' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
5e4cb5c8dc06fe540bb638cf8e04847d
2766459b251d11cc0f7a7c2339b624866464c4a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMX' 'sip-files00227.tif'
f5ddbcd71f7afad8a3db194bdef618c7
b651f52b281ddd3a6ef9a5541680ba35b52b7c1f
describe
'1919' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMY' 'sip-files00227.txt'
c5bba6413d9845b153019b35624107e9
04522bdb6b5e48334cb86701b4fd20db161d7d30
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQMZ' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
1de27263f2f9d618095d338cd87d0fdb
923bbac9548a05f84a9f3d7d0384a76baeada560
describe
'341752' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNA' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
e8a317a8ece1f3447d8f08b12c852a33
f5927372f2495613972ccc533ec33bcadeb555a1
describe
'149570' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNB' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
38b64a8b5724052cfa85c7bf4e8c49c5
c113ee90922ee16daa1adff31d950c4f4ff46560
'2011-11-18T02:46:29-05:00'
describe
'49929' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNC' 'sip-files00228.pro'
14b435249cae29822f74ac2009c0c45a
d66a844f719a8b126fef3d2623e3b13d035d639d
describe
'48951' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQND' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
6174eecf5ac5bde3f7eef032bc29429f
f07e5110e82ff4d89a59cec2ef5ab824867d0c78
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNE' 'sip-files00228.tif'
ab0665a31b9630a42c3d3d9c4adb1164
260fd8e726c6613997f130e8d233364b7bda2c86
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNF' 'sip-files00228.txt'
e6ff32ea814fc151bf42264cf8581053
9eb73015165cc5ac8876f2ab46970ba087213f4f
describe
'11381' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNG' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
0c1222446e1a7c1a5426527bc9ac611d
60a2b219cc649e6fadd039aebe4b1006651b2c59
'2011-11-18T02:49:50-05:00'
describe
'341637' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNH' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
515e10be32e11209f2a68a68ccd8b248
a4fd2b9babfd4be79c23ac73ce4875ad8b1b63f4
describe
'149350' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNI' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
ae577660e71c7d6aeb3dcf24ceceaa24
a3066637507e666c38a292254ef19fe74844120b
describe
'48190' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNJ' 'sip-files00229.pro'
6a0d06f0844c0863f65abf62b913d3ab
f2dfca4b0e54da5677830b1532ef173932a92fe0
describe
'50203' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNK' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
91c02bc74e080e89efcd82c4255248f9
2e6c391e9881627c1e4a1ea141a1c9e257da9379
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNL' 'sip-files00229.tif'
28218624ead72b329da485741496a53e
050ccd00e6dca3a32c8af8f41b1e51116bc945c3
describe
'1977' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNM' 'sip-files00229.txt'
18778eb465e0b9357f61ac82301118ea
cfd82aee7488131c95c78b3549a069e52aa79a54
describe
'11830' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNN' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
869325c1bb82fce205bb4617a12e22bc
fac80138283cea3fcbf7a617a5e538300a4a9988
describe
'341692' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNO' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
ccab3b40dcd59515238f9824508a83e5
3137bde507d4c2c9975f1516e8f79032686a3f6e
'2011-11-18T02:54:09-05:00'
describe
'140236' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNP' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
b9a7a83999a4fbecfc9a228d7ccd87e2
c745c274a3730f539918625a84fa66e03c850343
describe
'45421' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNQ' 'sip-files00230.pro'
248624a5d89b3198e9e78971f38439b7
d2fdf743ec691ef50260b3e66576353dd825c7cc
describe
'45145' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNR' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
302a947ed071517d7d88125f852c6032
25d2531e741b4e586fa306461906bf3ac157b167
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNS' 'sip-files00230.tif'
e2fba0ea9445e2e7a4cde26d027f95b0
1f3e440df7bf908a26d03c726731d8e78ac4cf97
describe
'1836' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNT' 'sip-files00230.txt'
b7883458f17ae17c7b530b1265e94566
ebaf1814a12b8eca936a7cb3f21757e070713403
describe
'11175' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNU' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
a79b33c90ccd69570dc81d71e056b640
6f3321dc331299e432bd7c0235b3bf7af459716a
describe
'341899' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNV' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
8d78b063005deba4c87d6329748423e0
4258b1226f9d016f766f639b3e40bec720ee83cd
describe
'141218' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNW' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
fd926e326d2734c1e0c982fd1e9b8252
61c8c407a161c04be4ce2832b94609ca082307b6
'2011-11-18T02:52:28-05:00'
describe
'46642' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNX' 'sip-files00231.pro'
4eefc7e7de6b7b20b96da8eee5f23b6f
cc9b0a0455d969656c7f5df64179e69b054af3b5
'2011-11-18T02:43:23-05:00'
describe
'46962' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNY' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
44531e3028a2c986b2af76010354d1c8
7727e8232d073a7a16daf09b69e57132bb4617cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQNZ' 'sip-files00231.tif'
5b702fc79e72d97a576a5bc873fb8869
98ef43871e15feb0e0f3e6ac337c74adf04ea45a
describe
'1935' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOA' 'sip-files00231.txt'
0bfe8580fc25201b30b7a9e3fe35d699
b5e763849086c82a8f37f751c9469c7b1ffc290c
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOB' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
6097d1269843fc7eeb4fe9260d87ff2a
46401444fa21c3cd68bd9d68f31ce4336944842b
describe
'341749' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOC' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
761572ddaf2db998676a4e3fd767a19f
f818201f534cda4e71dd1487cb8eedf13dcffeb2
describe
'135564' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOD' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
c846a2dd0c230fe7641ae44b72b1c097
4b5df915e7eaa6c34e163c4ba954059f18d12f39
describe
'40036' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOE' 'sip-files00232.pro'
658e27c72c6652d075dac02df1acec5a
f19614335f928234e117c8ff615de7b1a59b7440
describe
'45150' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOF' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
f6abc1bab27762f47e266dac31c65dec
7c4017145f6946d86b1924e5be0cdd4f468c9e89
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOG' 'sip-files00232.tif'
8d02d1a7c87ba292232f0f8dbd4fe2d7
69bbb5a0599875c927132da9880e8e0220716712
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOH' 'sip-files00232.txt'
7444d1c3a71058d60c48b626689e0dba
afd1e5d98bd702c00511c6203ca3b13ff7d06b88
describe
'11548' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOI' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
3e7ba903c94d72cebcefacde039b4725
51c6d49805317da45b32aeecce2fe0373e550d62
describe
'341728' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOJ' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
5c4fa94368832440864b9a54eab5d847
a03282206d1be5f1eb1da1a97312650cbe11133b
describe
'125359' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOK' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
f0979b9d7b6e8cd75d1fe4a8f7c0f70f
e62681bfe79bcbf3422aca000c7224990686770b
describe
'36369' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOL' 'sip-files00233.pro'
f00e3bdf8888aa86d398122702b325d0
bff197905ee1878ef54f1d43b6a939b676f4d4df
describe
'43516' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOM' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
6581dc3957c6651e0554af18d7226542
cb4643268769784ea34cd092a6d1244213d2144b
'2011-11-18T02:51:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQON' 'sip-files00233.tif'
6b936e739eba27bc1f7aecc90f0984e5
68acdf9b9e5c58502aabb19f8fb97ef48f63c7d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOO' 'sip-files00233.txt'
affecc87c7f86cbce9590fcfc140e70b
346e49c9cbe86139b854f9bd085d7dce1b9a3e6f
describe
'11415' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOP' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
2de54169b714d52be523b3b8f41ea993
ae93266f3a48acdc0c57d2257c7f03ea4f123f80
describe
'341754' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOQ' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
ae70d4288de3a9b7068ab43aee7edb82
7a516131368c3f23407e6aebf1d714b67f8088f4
describe
'119815' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOR' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
2d3b71ca988e9de4d131bdbb9b0c4cca
83724925529a8c7ebcf3b3364241f6c3dfd99355
describe
'33534' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOS' 'sip-files00234.pro'
22949873e0e480a4b874e820f87809b2
d40225633932cb601a72c2fe27001bb9db4e2664
'2011-11-18T02:54:28-05:00'
describe
'41902' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOT' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
b9f7d846dfd650c47f40b2caf3d78f91
646c572cd64c9e4221720b35136d370e8e61d079
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOU' 'sip-files00234.tif'
d02cf7a8b8d47b3fd9e3de36c7184ed6
1113ae27c8ff023b7e4c0cff86d75ac65a5e68c4
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOV' 'sip-files00234.txt'
8f8bce5362b95c3d1083ffa1204692bf
c2cc0b044c256688f49f512b47a7bb0bd5cca70e
describe
'10616' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOW' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
8b5475e607f21b99b768400021ed867e
f7eeb443c3e528038713e956f18f2538364edce4
describe
'341941' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOX' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
6c5493c8266260e073e19fc6e0246fae
746ecf8eb186875ad9a4220ca8eed561b53be90d
'2011-11-18T02:47:33-05:00'
describe
'102355' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOY' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
f8419d1da9417c305f7e07cdd32a7184
c6041b1041644a409aff6160af96b411abf44d8c
describe
'28419' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQOZ' 'sip-files00235.pro'
d817c474adeb448d454165fcf53c3990
c7958ba134dca21f4612f6ad71a967bcf4e3c0aa
describe
'32971' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPA' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
5151a52ee002fd4bf6a1f9a952f7d5e2
75555ff8b9e227db00a091385db677406278aff9
'2011-11-18T02:48:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPB' 'sip-files00235.tif'
f3e27c5eef4c9dbf4aa9febee0af0096
ac025b5a437ab2bbdd3fdbdaa9a1a20bf5967989
'2011-11-18T02:44:10-05:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPC' 'sip-files00235.txt'
1a2ee7df48cbae30f5590797f47702c0
0d332d539bd30c234abcfe03afc8a058bc9a3cf7
describe
'8522' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPD' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
10b0f0e81ac56a8618654cac17d37c01
5416e0b8de74773f6c0b4ac2bdcd21115bd47b6e
describe
'341731' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPE' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
bcd7190d2424448209701640425dfb0b
c84fe717a39a3c22e1e8da33573cc622811d8b01
describe
'138694' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPF' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
b8eafe936884e68cd743f0336ab531a8
60695b5e1d3669e99132bc09d4dadaec5be199c7
describe
'45672' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPG' 'sip-files00236.pro'
8536b92fb391954751a4c73e6400487f
13dddba4cc829a3187c2ce97a1343d933b0b7882
describe
'46832' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPH' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
b0961b30710b99d4d4fdfb82715d2ab8
3276e3a14d6b4ac2b6ac2a8107cf5c8b483585a7
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPI' 'sip-files00236.tif'
24e3da9a07d88bc3915d84cf2c2cf3ea
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPJ' 'sip-files00236.txt'
e0f4d644d5764b8066c190f411ad17f1
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describe
'11485' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPK' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
8fe4ea0bbf743c135ef6788518fa1c81
f2fb50c8b2a6f4e4781804bc6c45aaca1b47a0b4
describe
'342019' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPL' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
7a2f9e8cf52d372b7c7a9a14c7e8d108
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describe
'136574' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPM' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
30185aa35cba105d6f19159ca6020d3d
2cca3608be0334f87c1f440723505e28abb926d0
describe
'44941' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPN' 'sip-files00237.pro'
2a253a46607345d36c6c4370c2bbc714
93b6f06624c915ece120e1072ed516bf6ba0da56
describe
'45677' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPO' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
2e8f1eca483b86d0c71c70efc069584c
ef97dd51c40fa81ecd38d77c9f67c3f71a167d8f
describe
'2752964' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPP' 'sip-files00237.tif'
c1f3dc3e034a1be46178afef7356542c
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describe
'1800' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPQ' 'sip-files00237.txt'
183b92a82c11c25f72cfd6a3f6d74361
330b66ca545010147479e2e37807a141dfe118aa
describe
'11687' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPR' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
bef60a1645a326510d1ac3865b6883e3
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describe
'341757' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPS' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
e6515014f873831b92f5c761e2e9d0f9
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describe
'149722' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPT' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
ef77e3cc40798269cd473a36b020a800
982c44c74cb6c7d94df8f2458855d51d3543a0de
describe
'48625' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPU' 'sip-files00238.pro'
d118c8d33fb48bdb8606a1dc9095bacc
5f9bcf6b9a98838a418eb7633f551f426a008122
describe
'47499' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPV' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
308aaa17a7337385a5e46a1e3e3afe9a
0d58aec6bc9699f1cf83708b2423145d41497c1c
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPW' 'sip-files00238.tif'
c305fa98fa200d4e039ed531a64fa738
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describe
'1992' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPX' 'sip-files00238.txt'
f620e1f9e79370e2f56adc47c0dd98d3
3bf8071314799fb904f3307e34034e6c18265e2c
'2011-11-18T02:54:17-05:00'
describe
'11454' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPY' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
34523e025431583bce6530ef461d42fa
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describe
'341747' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQPZ' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
e3e6f8dfb6cbed46d276850be77c21de
bcd80e93feb0511921a7e12ede54d7d44b93efa1
describe
'134968' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQA' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
a3020531044cdb1539a52c8fe36d6339
fa6e45a139388d401b33e3058ef0fefd6f4e6249
describe
'39904' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQB' 'sip-files00239.pro'
d22fe5ed9cc5872ab195276d840c4ba4
a90940915cb1cb20967df9fb29060746a609d7b6
describe
'45805' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQC' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
73be53694e5e86e6ade7cbfcfb4efa68
48188c783c81838bd2fe26759e0ab1a63faec515
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQD' 'sip-files00239.tif'
7ceee205c1292e4c66f3ce89878f638c
7c67d3516bb95f2c64da0bf5badfed63ac4a07ce
'2011-11-18T02:50:59-05:00'
describe
'1587' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQE' 'sip-files00239.txt'
12daf50992800342632005f68068d32d
43e7585c70fb54148ea6b9204db1246c966c9fd8
describe
'11429' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQF' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
7cd47ec2134c4574d2a3b1f174dc472b
6d83fa124fee28c298220808b3bff68184a0b560
describe
'341759' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQG' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
5094fe59057d8655d256993ce0616729
8d5df526f16e72f00eb0e19326cdf62b93b8bcb5
describe
'131150' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQH' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
446e0f98bdee05313c222269f8f9829f
441401cad93537d39ab43766511668c07fdbb3d4
describe
'38654' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQI' 'sip-files00240.pro'
27995dfd1e43f0979bacea3200a6c21a
ccf686fd54169ab7381ed376b7b30ddc5d78f099
describe
'44665' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQJ' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
729d8dff918e5828d564e7e52cbf17b2
430e33fec1061f632618502b34139282ada633d6
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQK' 'sip-files00240.tif'
2e324dd81bb8e8cab0d2000abc62e3e2
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describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQL' 'sip-files00240.txt'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQM' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
8151105b7fbea5ee3eadae2787e5aa38
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describe
'341948' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQN' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
7b36a8d3d57973f9bdedbd6c9c2bc744
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describe
'131886' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQO' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
d193e883c7f25bfd443c4c1419286590
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describe
'44056' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQP' 'sip-files00241.pro'
d3cab3d13251207fc282b34965db3223
36cbc86ddf624afdccbc4d1467b417d9b08302a7
describe
'44742' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQQ' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
021a4c51f9a1d8791e3ad4bae0a95be1
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQR' 'sip-files00241.tif'
726a9e0b1f177c355c2dd317cbb927e7
81b5946aaefd771e7c9dc9184dd69a2aab51d731
'2011-11-18T02:46:08-05:00'
describe
'1788' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQS' 'sip-files00241.txt'
473f91d1becfa9cbc196f615a8527c68
30db46cd740835a1d22c6deb9b4118f617b383a3
describe
'10833' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQT' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
e65dc8af9c56d3fe97b73401e08ec6ea
dd017f339039d7fc2bb047dcae62ddccbae77d99
describe
'341751' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQU' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
2d2246eb0e22d629da45bf39421712e1
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describe
'150370' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQV' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
46748036e75ee5d913e0fd88fc25cc93
acf56d8893be8652aee4a735ab6e729dd701e231
describe
'47495' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQW' 'sip-files00242.pro'
01c23c2371886323b8e1d83fb75032c8
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describe
'50442' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQX' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
65e150d8a90d76705234d7ef498fae5f
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQY' 'sip-files00242.tif'
8fabcd64ab058c734253b038f6576819
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describe
'1944' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQQZ' 'sip-files00242.txt'
afaee07954005d5eee50ce6d9924c63e
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describe
'11930' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRA' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
e8ff64e1e7c6cf738554b6dc5a04b7ce
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describe
'341591' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRB' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
e5c12b61871f804aae27eaf646e137f7
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describe
'142368' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRC' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRD' 'sip-files00243.pro'
aac18735213c1aa9395ae7ce8f6d219b
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describe
'46510' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRE' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
456f755b7e0aaf3565b30f11845186af
eb4bfa3e0ea42d4e5e6243b7c1b8cae04f434129
'2011-11-18T02:54:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRF' 'sip-files00243.tif'
9867df68f3688961f248489116d0294a
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describe
'1906' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRG' 'sip-files00243.txt'
cad86a90ffa6652f6f14ebfc5b8ac2d5
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describe
'11567' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRH' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
a5aa9627ca27e7873a30046d99cc196a
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describe
'341750' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRI' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
411da24d120bf01a633ba9d538be3bf6
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describe
'137745' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRJ' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
de844521f8bc352f9b2c643944ff2a8e
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describe
'42110' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRK' 'sip-files00244.pro'
41cf5f076e50c56713e349815e259312
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describe
'47092' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRL' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
8b339071305230e9246e3cf963ad93de
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'2011-11-18T02:50:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRM' 'sip-files00244.tif'
c34593df89591ec75384059848244873
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describe
'1766' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRN' 'sip-files00244.txt'
a6e4eedb45910653d20d6d3e85e306f3
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'2011-11-18T02:45:30-05:00'
describe
'11605' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRO' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
0d7d75d2c186fbf82f0c1dff4f168d56
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describe
'341652' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRP' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
9890c517c4cb32f8c0b4844a3ec7f3b9
873c92b9be428377191fb64f74044d0ab18e18b3
'2011-11-18T02:54:37-05:00'
describe
'121066' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRQ' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
5a8ce6a1e8a5889aa096f6f968f2fc40
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describe
'34904' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRR' 'sip-files00245.pro'
54e69f329da0c795189755e1c7a93c2b
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describe
'43480' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRS' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
2f59bad4e2bcef0ca6eaeabb72dba923
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRT' 'sip-files00245.tif'
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describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRU' 'sip-files00245.txt'
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describe
'11452' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRV' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
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63cf09d47e1e5deb9be52050ced4619d12216977
describe
'341715' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRW' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
0987f30b5a8e53a4097beb46a2f04c1a
c661d584040553fcb8d82e382087fa8359127ca5
'2011-11-18T02:47:59-05:00'
describe
'102327' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRX' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
8fccb0620f851e39e47569f66bfb4310
899bbcdee995a1129c62926d266e78c04152ad7c
'2011-11-18T02:45:43-05:00'
describe
'30979' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRY' 'sip-files00246.pro'
27657dd5a1854f2c15e723710ef82b9f
5495f43c43209003b95e2551a9ce8eede83f8456
describe
'34019' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQRZ' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
f4ea25808e3326dfc08b75d88b2a16ee
16feea7f8265e6bdd8f6278d57ce0cb7afc541e6
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSA' 'sip-files00246.tif'
68cb17386958a42dbb3cbe249aec95b0
8b3c8150b0bace328e33cb5241537ece3e6146fa
'2011-11-18T02:52:14-05:00'
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSB' 'sip-files00246.txt'
5cc7dd6455cdc2e15c3a6e54a6557ef5
68ad256c2bde37dc87e6d81d5ba14f932fec4959
describe
'8290' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSC' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
aa160a6fc4109b526616ac52528afa1e
d1ad77f6016a8f9c8e5ce0f57367305dc5788d54
describe
'341722' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSD' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
5bc55aa982accddb4984c27eae404f06
d7857b59ebc5caa89170e8782c9ccd3d93c0352c
describe
'150601' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSE' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
52d0bd21d8a462f00400989c752c86ff
f926749c37a0584c9620a9f83a6bebdd98778f2d
describe
'49076' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSF' 'sip-files00247.pro'
77d89e35f82305185feaf71d5e8d5d4e
493ee8a99b22e5f71d854f637447762deab22554
describe
'49877' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSG' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
b2aa01794cb199c6ea63950a66b75b2f
7ea72c1ee7bf416becc23b5b323295f9561f34be
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSH' 'sip-files00247.tif'
70765b5423bd28c0257853b05816ce69
7bd2648e8d7b1fd07cb52f949b0ffad5589b1b6b
describe
'1967' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSI' 'sip-files00247.txt'
04cbe4df77bc64b4650976b7c08bc61f
c4235b9b28bc5857fc68502d7b5c2221669e9f0b
describe
'11657' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSJ' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
02979fa1657f9263b30e1bb0f6037d2e
90d6a8a09fc1df36d6444eac802e0fe97af23697
describe
'341741' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSK' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
24f8705848dfc4d32dee02556a8be064
d78c7dedf331694b3b12cafc40e4ca5842572403
describe
'139492' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSL' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
7e7d6d2cc1e8ad1ec2cc5e83d68205cb
364cb416a9de471abe5ddd9385d3d6a0c31ad17c
describe
'44243' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSM' 'sip-files00248.pro'
559ba9ffaf9c692e793953a50676743a
b92192e7049fabb4d3f9763ac11a16c950889a3e
describe
'46093' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSN' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
e25afab79b5b14036e5ab202b20717a3
5f4cef43d1aad91ea370f152f808c7ab18deef41
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSO' 'sip-files00248.tif'
5f1c645cac55ad56c99502bec377b388
b39d35813e87d5037345ca6690d2f71ccd9355bb
describe
'1763' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSP' 'sip-files00248.txt'
5da412b49b4663e88341394f53b6e920
56b69be820aebdbfb5b5b664f7f483a563f0ab9b
describe
'11237' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSQ' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
47915fa62491732b0bcde59911302c4d
247101a7063e838d8d26e62e53a20b4464f60ba9
describe
'341697' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSR' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
a67d0af89b3d0a8c66a1ee089afb7fe2
dbd1748786de8835db8410db594ec317afd8ce7b
describe
'44984' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSS' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
986002ef7cd74e445dd7de298369c7c9
9cd8dd855be307c5436f12473502f72b88916bc5
'2011-11-18T02:48:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQST' 'sip-files00249.pro'
c009078e9f03ab36023dcdc4ca9e5463
b4961b01264670f5790012d13a9f6fb789600d18
describe
'13914' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSU' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
faa2cff69c90a50a1828c255a9d9be48
09081367edcd3effb5bda8d4e1994a6ab2e09bcb
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSV' 'sip-files00249.tif'
3cfd279e1fe3db2d90e3f02799229240
21b176ea11967dd50cfe381bb9c3f83ec1cbb8d7
describe
'89' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSW' 'sip-files00249.txt'
3dea8cea7bb292867b7123f6132ea751
b0567be005c5eb1ee1b5b26d8651cd304d08014b
describe
'4426' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSX' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
584f0e7eb198b386184a3cd72fa3d8e0
71f85dee046bff34ba2179081bd58b8175fc2e9e
describe
'341725' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSY' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
c37db2b72db918ec583ac88ee5e05eef
e8371ac406ebb367dba625bd480df3399754cd38
describe
'152866' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQSZ' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
3cf7d44c7d0e12e668bf08ab68faa2cf
15c3abd6a12180f1097833012ab6c87e9e816728
'2011-11-18T02:50:49-05:00'
describe
'49610' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTA' 'sip-files00251.pro'
72a756079f41cc0b7f82ff206581f063
2d8b4f44a07090fce9a0d230c2e6742fd3574c64
describe
'49115' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTB' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
2343aa270ce6def1b39b4c4207a4e0ce
5b05bfdd20cc35ec83d4f545df82bbce2d79fbf4
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTC' 'sip-files00251.tif'
a8df269cc92f318e44ecdac84c554bae
6e3b957f08712822007c69567622b863d26d5878
describe
'1958' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTD' 'sip-files00251.txt'
7abebeaef1d45896a9c691fc21035415
2f305586c1534c93b7ed94ed10468e7a87d33759
describe
'12088' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTE' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
9b7ca832541aae977493b786033ffd8a
8cc7cf4901d660d7ed1630ec8724bd3926f39b07
describe
'341744' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTF' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
7b2adf840bc85408a3640e5fe5ff1315
8575322941fc349932346ca15dea288341c91838
describe
'136288' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTG' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
c34b167ca3bf85078efba2ba8556e68c
90d09f05184442c44e234af42d79ac4dbdbe20dc
describe
'41286' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTH' 'sip-files00252.pro'
67192d91d446624010f5ea15ded25134
8b2998c4270cb06f237a00773aafd0b4d1ba98a6
describe
'46113' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTI' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
0874bda7109d67cc6eae1c41229bca3e
d91f2066dbb4950e8e9cd8d025b1c1fbfe6ce3d4
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTJ' 'sip-files00252.tif'
64a4022c4ff1d19d43c6b605b8a14607
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTK' 'sip-files00252.txt'
dd57ce727221a3856b39b4297a350f29
47225d62cd8106f363d5201a540d71b895a8e90f
describe
'11679' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTL' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
09e9d80f5002a3850174a73701bbb2de
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describe
'341999' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTM' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
c35c0b79f54b2e8b01870cd4a5a90abc
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describe
'132516' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTN' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
863b15e17eb2e60a8ad63d03e482f064
630fc1aef10d03546b7afbcbdfaa78392b01355d
describe
'41604' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTO' 'sip-files00253.pro'
bedd05da14c9edde89e872eca9786485
1fcaeaa7fd95b929098d2fe5f68d76cfa68bc0a7
describe
'44643' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTP' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
afae8c64d68c1cad20512b4476e1bc2e
373be73c22e34b5d2a1fa965fead9cd2cde7e352
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTQ' 'sip-files00253.tif'
7da64ae753544d12b52c79ddaa55582f
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describe
'1643' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTR' 'sip-files00253.txt'
f393197b49bc9043bf6a82f991c6ee0e
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describe
'11052' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTS' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
1bc9a8f31cb18487589c06b602526dc8
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describe
'341963' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTT' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
e819a8b90d09e2667deef1a9451dd87f
a6da731752096d98baa032214dc70e0cffbaf4f3
describe
'139986' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTU' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
b3ba1335ae6603e90e01f0ee9701612a
a5dc30da1fea83e8953e717df2c5b4b4c023317f
describe
'45336' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTV' 'sip-files00254.pro'
87e34bcd502988a8de27b1a396b86d0f
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describe
'45518' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTW' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
92aec8e31863a6318eb10f98ea366601
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTX' 'sip-files00254.tif'
bd84f5e87f024922c8f3e76d1f5412cd
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describe
'1794' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTY' 'sip-files00254.txt'
609fdf51eb7fe9ee744ff1360af26090
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describe
'11141' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQTZ' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
21a64eac5a015124df8c3207f47453c4
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describe
'342006' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUA' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
c6e2e9d1381618ae5607d41cd193e2ae
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describe
'75906' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUB' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
8cb3d7e4f0d3199a8568d9acaaff6a5e
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describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUC' 'sip-files00255.pro'
f1ad9652372010aebf16c23190cff7d8
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describe
'20132' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUD' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
a7a77be0eb7c2ef1a17e5bdbcb0cf3f9
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUE' 'sip-files00255.tif'
e46b9a2a33ac0722f10e2672dd7f0b50
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describe
'200' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUF' 'sip-files00255.txt'
c2b978f7eb2287ee6bd9c98cfd9b391d
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describe
'5554' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUG' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUH' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
ece6a94eb92534a29d2b47363a859118
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describe
'139564' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUI' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
78857d27cbaf8ccb92301e1d5caea54d
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describe
'44061' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUJ' 'sip-files00257.pro'
768831370f4c5b3605a746599e41cc4a
c93921e199198da1ed593b61b1954e3b0459f552
describe
'47630' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUK' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
57fcc74579560c4e35321873ef783b9a
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUL' 'sip-files00257.tif'
79d772e308636a190c696bdad104b0d3
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUM' 'sip-files00257.txt'
753d9e76b770c0eca86c84443b7e9bc9
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describe
'11165' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUN' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
edaceb5346b7e385a933564c331ef3ff
e6c7c5f6507104db51cc5a7fb252854fffd5b6f7
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUO' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
4a763a449fbd7c650ed2caae9477c47b
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describe
'156195' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUP' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
a14b974da0f3e3ee9c029d50958a75e8
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describe
'51554' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUQ' 'sip-files00258.pro'
9840f8460c92a050f6c30b76e3913e58
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describe
'51201' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUR' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
0e8c7158432fdfce907099179f85d3b5
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUS' 'sip-files00258.tif'
5ecd8b1271e68f1e914d79b10a1ab8bc
506a66063e3a25b2845fa95a1cd6daa6a5725595
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUT' 'sip-files00258.txt'
e88939d1ab79b267347b5dcd89130c16
0a525e9d9fc0334e91d5ddda1b36bd3cbf86e909
describe
'11689' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUU' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
ed118c4f17f50dd84cec6eec19209cec
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describe
'341713' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUV' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
303f681f107af7a0d894471af216f581
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describe
'89489' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUW' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
267bd9dde32eb3ce6531388223ba5ea6
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describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUX' 'sip-files00259.pro'
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describe
'24178' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUY' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
ceeeb7e6d386f02ce481d505a1f7d0f4
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQUZ' 'sip-files00259.tif'
d410164dbe5031db92ebb42b9384a981
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describe
'183' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVA' 'sip-files00259.txt'
64836a63e79397d82d791bea8d5e5b7d
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describe
'6675' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVB' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
ab59df7c6c4ec51b827b962a88a73976
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describe
'341917' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVC' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
6e11505a3d6ebcd2b1e7728562994ae4
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describe
'148789' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVD' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
f8eba2b89f05c9915f4a51288681f49d
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describe
'47911' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVE' 'sip-files00261.pro'
f56851e684c719e5ed3c28b3e17607bb
d2809b1b66b544b65a4c042e6eddf4516e7cc978
describe
'48349' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVF' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
91b1fea96a7f14c9e2f92d0cb6d8eac4
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVG' 'sip-files00261.tif'
858c08247634cc8783c4c83bae3d2a4e
1d4e3e4da8f49db76e5299cc090ca8cde657f393
describe
'1964' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVH' 'sip-files00261.txt'
719ee9c6801b6067bb833fca79ee9294
5ee21a0dac391504d652ed4c13ae583d850e51ae
'2011-11-18T02:46:25-05:00'
describe
'11216' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVI' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
243f323d451c4d8bf2de4d4380b63d13
0807d2d7554c6ffdc7f43739cc0b6530696b2ed9
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVJ' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
f55631ce9219132f3389407de0e13312
e8a6fef97df7e0e1bc07426f9d7b334427e2511c
describe
'152157' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVK' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
bfa37c1b3755ac2d81388e47007a2de6
69e3fb25027dbc2d513691e41e7788a855f0e8dc
'2011-11-18T02:46:46-05:00'
describe
'48513' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVL' 'sip-files00262.pro'
fc073088279529eb9e135cd33eda6fa4
63dc242bcf37bd66db7cfc6ff398bab326ce4d2a
'2011-11-18T02:46:18-05:00'
describe
'48979' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVM' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
824ee99e0c797ea5f765ab209a6339d4
a90e18602b75f8394f5ad949d78a78953c70259e
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVN' 'sip-files00262.tif'
69cd62aaf6ede19750924f6ad3000ea2
7d693aa823ddd62a8af7346b599835be055c37d0
describe
'1983' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVO' 'sip-files00262.txt'
b4cd5b9e5ff3ce5a9db2d5c5b9cd79c8
61aca961ecb1092be0de316b4b0057095d0e0192
describe
'11759' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVP' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
915de0a9d27ba89d2bdaf2b50ce77df2
b14df90f7e150491db655429540d17fb0369e7e0
describe
'341558' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVQ' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
c12343824484b1c5f740bbaf3272c7a7
c55d882bb50a571b2d5b8eb5dd7789378b6baec0
describe
'156905' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVR' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
ecbbced282c843f2dba61d2508c8d074
a5e10027b117b091940dfc680bb3cd41865f5904
describe
'51743' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVS' 'sip-files00263.pro'
9f5076ea1a8dcd39195d9a60c27acd1d
8e7aabfee8e0fcf841c676c828dd1299c9a43be5
describe
'51509' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVT' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
bcf0241dd2b517df9d135102a0f058fa
82b3b7d92b74b854caa224aa7ddb1a5b2067834b
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVU' 'sip-files00263.tif'
033b679872d4d51e801735a708187f3e
3a8180d3539767bef382bf9b101e13e24ad2f623
'2011-11-18T02:54:50-05:00'
describe
'2055' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVV' 'sip-files00263.txt'
6d13852056b564e8361d5e541297cbae
52b102a0d3d89a6b2072b45b4948318ac3b53273
describe
'12087' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVW' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
f1a67e6de8b5647d595ef8adadbe6056
de65b0882cc32b8e447a048cb7c1d908e7201fac
describe
'341619' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVX' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
c1b72f61daf5672b3243d0c55ce1c989
813be68f71bd8e19680ff652f94142cb61476492
describe
'154939' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVY' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
32e86ef87211e3b1712b4a4318c8412b
390480e12af866be2d75b7a711e90473173a42f5
'2011-11-18T02:51:28-05:00'
describe
'52299' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQVZ' 'sip-files00264.pro'
d9e1b5dd20699f8d7daa327c371073e6
1297c04ceca0ca02168e90244e8cb33549fae5ec
describe
'49200' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWA' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
b377d26cdfbf5213142d0424a59c2728
65f54ad6d10eac3538065470a0e2fe5ab5b07501
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWB' 'sip-files00264.tif'
66612dc754f2cf4f96595222617b03ed
cdee4ecc3678723fce293dff132be6b9e1f443d0
describe
'2079' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWC' 'sip-files00264.txt'
af3ab4f3fe6def73d16168edfaaabdea
cebb899f41e164e7fbf481a8e3e7e36422c15d9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWD' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
b670922302db1ae46fa40470e633ba16
3e00c470cddd3647eec87ea4b96f576db1e2a670
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWE' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
0e7d3cc0babdb5d1d684932a9fa25e4c
4684cb4327b37e857db4d60deece2763c2ecca61
describe
'154398' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWF' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
28e1e967f430719d1417a05626b9abea
7bf5c7211151517d4b5f7f76317c6e031dab70be
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWG' 'sip-files00265.pro'
c5cc5e0f9d6705a3bacf5bb436abf228
4b3e2f6b6b341f1904d0db11b9c77d0f6e7806b9
describe
'50049' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWH' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
0558eefec07faeb79010642fbc3c4555
c7353436b029890a99662416999ff7c8f7c341f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWI' 'sip-files00265.tif'
91307697e458363640f5d6d47a5e69e5
72676705ac4616547ae5c20009a96fb2ba2e5ddb
describe
'2025' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWJ' 'sip-files00265.txt'
4d38f32adbaf769d9f8f577e3079784b
0babe57c209de826b40517b47bf7546f486188bb
describe
'11819' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWK' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
911e1c7dd73e1153e2648e9b75586d59
c59d1208ab6c5e680efc1a05ef1e08788c8f7082
describe
'341596' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWL' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
72a8fabf589a24d9246af74c145454a9
b77ea517cb95e3229f7a609bae6c7c2e102bd4e1
describe
'121427' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWM' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
284ac80b79355a0d20fe5599dfca4757
cd5e022cb05458b8debf68d907fd476b9f436ddf
describe
'39498' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWN' 'sip-files00266.pro'
61e65a256374d46276a1e38050fb5f74
d37c5692fa240a6cf949c3179aa3669168c66994
describe
'38927' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWO' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
17a0e05ee983e529c44618c8368e2c19
b8467e68049c46083d06d7ff9ff4e66b9abe4e20
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWP' 'sip-files00266.tif'
a6c5c8558a5f2295b8271298e920a40e
907de52de752bcee74ed20703c6fb48b14aee44f
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWQ' 'sip-files00266.txt'
e1a7f28aee9aa3f37559661266d59373
abbb19334864f1021b2ae6f2e69a22d0bc375afe
describe
'9504' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWR' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
74be5427b51bca55851ae673d780ac40
263cc2860effac69831d7b4a9636e6cea86b43bb
describe
'341581' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWS' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
45ede62712e4ef59a810003b5aca15c4
f164f00d1d4f58700eea3adaadec198d36a279c7
describe
'39042' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWT' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
b26eb266efade5959a4c1dd0e2a0c4c7
e88d82f2125cd2f8e95954284607c3be4348c77f
describe
'1664' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWU' 'sip-files00267.pro'
6d83b01f90564e7dbd5a9d10509bbb3a
f8d05eb0919e4c0543b83d54ba786ab211af1124
describe
'10657' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWV' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
c61c551fa018aec4b471694f41317301
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWW' 'sip-files00267.tif'
787be5b0935f44f29c906db36635b772
fbb4e6da3bd13f3dec19063dc3bbf7abfb011f96
describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWX' 'sip-files00267.txt'
6c5166c4339ecff660327d84e3f176f4
cf694bd9e36fbb34a133034e2e24dfc208099043
describe
'3105' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWY' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
bd7778eb97dd99c3ce7f33c91f0d0b40
dbf795c1b0b21cf3c817f4f3b643763347a84743
describe
'341679' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQWZ' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
e26588c1e0e2dfa80ec223089be159a8
75fb9f1f0f01b38d802ff74b1d85bb7c457d0eca
describe
'104927' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXA' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
b780f6f266213d09f0b733f8b2321f77
a1142b247a17ed8b8b82e2e131f7694c9962ecc5
describe
'29785' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXB' 'sip-files00269.pro'
292046c3735015d658f3138fa2e98726
9036974174e9d6c8d52407a0681c71480febf842
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXC' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
077199812690e1306b3b59979eb088d9
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXD' 'sip-files00269.tif'
0e5c3a10601dc0d37a8ae1ee5bcd77d6
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describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXE' 'sip-files00269.txt'
a73d4e13c36349b0ca77c24b8a0091af
df63b449045c6e80edce9028356db03f611a72b8
describe
'8744' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXF' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
9c41845b213aaa610097ecd43124cf8c
b020aa32f695cdbcffc864a8f048a1a54328af33
describe
'341735' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXG' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
386b66a8772c21464e174a794e3bc4ea
42bc843a6a94af84807946895957e95bcedff259
describe
'148624' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXH' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
e804a61079293a17d2d6e42dc0e03ad5
9d4277acbdb3cd1dd30f0e0c1feeaaf66ca81a36
describe
'50510' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXI' 'sip-files00270.pro'
e61d0a624f134a4a359dacb14cafff34
03b17563689e2700f48a388340caeee00539b235
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXJ' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
d7715c6534ff16cf4644585aeb239b8b
546150969a5dc221fe0722c4b0207dea708a8f26
'2011-11-18T02:48:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXK' 'sip-files00270.tif'
9a46b0ef66e6d4931a46cdbf90b045df
5ba66a97fbdddf670afca07bd9ca9d8390988c20
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXL' 'sip-files00270.txt'
583721d508c6e59702b2aae50a42c8f5
df7109923d080c0a59b737296726dcbd7dd0f33e
describe
'11426' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXM' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
53a0fa7ed49882fd8246715036b1db6b
3e70e3ca60cec9bbfa2bdfdb9d76772e91ea09f8
describe
'341962' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXN' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
304394f8bf745e49ee378b67d889b409
e7a3f46b05b729398cc385027ffdd17ba95082ba
describe
'153686' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXO' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
03da7d174afe0eccf3e2b2a45e63fc31
2e9fe2c7a0fd2c709b0293238f43e9a728b18807
describe
'49609' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXP' 'sip-files00271.pro'
a4f32757f067d9c1eb47acf7d3972afc
b19246d1f61a1a1dbda8dba47fc97fdedeafbf53
describe
'50036' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXQ' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
a6edd745109e1aeb9c96a0d3377b9476
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXR' 'sip-files00271.tif'
0e7a83b3cd9b2d983bec0aac5deb7297
b600dd8d648381dd16e2120a0e834b1bc7e7c1b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXS' 'sip-files00271.txt'
304bd0da196bf49ef85a2c424bb44dba
13296cc226e98675d477c47e4f577a03555e2d53
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXT' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
a268688ad8eecb096ccabc75c97e6254
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describe
'341952' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXU' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
f898e1a8a0b4d4d3cd43cc0c5a22a967
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describe
'125018' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXV' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
edda267d68ddce6df51e8fae2e9cc445
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describe
'36450' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXW' 'sip-files00272.pro'
6a2959f526c1a1a351a7acbb9fdbd0be
b77fa453f2e42f4dbdecc92202d199584d469ae2
describe
'42007' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXX' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
b73d0bbe765e775455a85b47c4ba1ae7
0856ff4f520092c479cfcaecad82628c4d5d9e67
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXY' 'sip-files00272.tif'
a72537331d2a3d5c75d3961d0620376d
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQXZ' 'sip-files00272.txt'
28a3e8274d9b91ec9ba66a54155efed4
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describe
'10355' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYA' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
117ad63eb936b95d2e5ea0c5f1ea1555
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describe
'341950' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYB' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
a50bdcdc8ed76d8d550237052bc97552
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describe
'145210' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYC' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
bb8c5b171968207ce1de2b65fa558cb6
344931f7ac96b8aeff32ce90fc20363d01805c7b
describe
'47399' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYD' 'sip-files00273.pro'
358c3e394765917e4266943e25f798ae
28191a66b2e28e7538adeb8be4193c4b1f1eed05
describe
'47214' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYE' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
ff7d237d728c32625db1e7ac2eb8cc8f
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYF' 'sip-files00273.tif'
2dfc46e6038eebd8f2a7667c8fb3cf87
acd21a1bb50a1e0fedad743256094a55514ac5dd
describe
'1888' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYG' 'sip-files00273.txt'
73cdbb4c3e7820d3faa6fc6724f5865d
fa20ff9cece3fbd7c56d9b3c9611480c4bff65f6
describe
'11360' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYH' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
bad847d8b30176ab5a595554b2e20b6f
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describe
'341703' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYI' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
a8c4ca6fd02bb02233dcd39109b82577
8cb9bfb38bf9ceabee1ce8f408b0ffeb10e6466e
'2011-11-18T02:49:41-05:00'
describe
'129109' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYJ' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
c8e676e98fa3d97559880c32911bd851
e3fb63bd27012ddd0db369d36b86608e60b0a8d4
describe
'37397' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYK' 'sip-files00274.pro'
07c1edea48717211385561125cd201f1
2a6b7491d66a65c7cc802fe44c3d45b0804e961d
describe
'44638' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYL' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
85e047c32c33a6e6430cd7c575dcf192
e2a5be5b2f3bd9f3d5a4b1a59aaed3b1a03de9fe
'2011-11-18T02:47:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYM' 'sip-files00274.tif'
d7af6960a9071d5105755c8c3667bbf9
20ceabcc8bf0b1b0aaa5ea0e68c85da6c3c03e2d
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYN' 'sip-files00274.txt'
ebbb0be24690d37ade943142d055579c
135ed5ea94f23bcf95f50b29f8936110fee7fe02
describe
'11291' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYO' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
534a94b328990dbec808eb748a059a63
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describe
'341969' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYP' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
8db8b37edc67f22b5e0d003a2a9ba187
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describe
'135255' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYQ' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
1de65fb5af7aca8fec3986940a3a1f07
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describe
'38238' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYR' 'sip-files00275.pro'
142bfb5a3fac23f8470b161e75d50a85
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describe
'45313' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYS' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
f1735e747814fe88a0eaf016990086b3
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYT' 'sip-files00275.tif'
0babd8f55618d79fcc55490f876c57e6
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describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYU' 'sip-files00275.txt'
1c157889106311237d0da241e7effc55
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describe
'11552' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYV' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
00bf59ed4330cdaa88fdac64bfad7962
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describe
'341532' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYW' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
978e860a6d46adbd3eae5217a74009c4
eab166272158b9e6adf37a52303dd01c0ed5de43
describe
'130847' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYX' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
69ede096f2ef32ed4cdf2539d3eeca31
32b4ff142542f9f78bc719e0fae2f216f7f8611c
describe
'36813' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYY' 'sip-files00276.pro'
a52b3b19d64eadb6650b82eacb9f1ada
6abc7182fa0ed27c7bf21c777ef0b1569113ab8d
describe
'44387' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQYZ' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
2bb9a3794a1b3799a841b54fb7ca4cd9
40cd3ce056372f8fb3ed048c9d1e869ca0f14fac
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZA' 'sip-files00276.tif'
23c30df810886a43744617e79ca27d8c
cf42db586a2b04392d59a244ebec88c6b0e71668
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZB' 'sip-files00276.txt'
a5440af84e9f10cd5c3b8e4eeb03121b
cb41552a6acbe8c26cce061414f7a510d215acdd
describe
'11502' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZC' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
f119bf9c1557e3caef2d0cabd7d41d54
8e040ab751f8490b9e7d23f44526033dd14839b8
describe
'341583' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZD' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
edf58cef24b2729b6a0446e4f442a5c9
9aa5393140dc8f4a35f5876b7ab3d17b978dbf5f
describe
'121137' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZE' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
d54a4f4d2e63ccbca375170acd969f5b
cad621ef7574873979222b72c774446aa19378b3
describe
'34184' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZF' 'sip-files00277.pro'
5313de33e65ce9136aaedf2a159acf5e
312c004014ac03365628e98d0647433d36fb150f
describe
'39746' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZG' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
987a766766a72204fcec8dd02b6227ea
862c06f68863f6519df80f802574bf109e05091c
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZH' 'sip-files00277.tif'
04c7d9fb33f5f3d01ca8903d1a738072
af7160aeef072427becb3ecfc04a3da51fd7b436
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZI' 'sip-files00277.txt'
229c18f7e8df62fbefc3d16605d65bba
d2943f4b0e1bf677209ee96d604aa4814a2e5b65
describe
'10777' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZJ' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
df41b89dc2ab058a60f8844cb4e4921e
0ea522b90ffe3fcb7b9b0b2409b2670d74e15348
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZK' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
580409b5c9431bfe77c85f80e22b0856
62649f6790805007044b297e37370e9d820a4584
describe
'145601' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZL' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
0b584e4b33df3f8ad8bdc2b792d1015b
8db78281e373d2353a9a063cdc4ca3be7141312e
describe
'47089' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZM' 'sip-files00278.pro'
aa2c7a1666c491c47ff8f98205ea01b2
ae27ff841a03161fdd433e4aad8ca1331156a840
describe
'47534' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZN' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
fe4d3d8fac1fac76e81b09ef2c1402fd
2df8891de94488414e2959c90eeab930c2afeb9c
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZO' 'sip-files00278.tif'
15000e96113e84f2d2f44a55b07506d3
10059ad92bfb6057ed77f7f7bb4f64a0b97c9ccb
describe
'1945' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZP' 'sip-files00278.txt'
46881b838d0cf9c898a1ae4674c89fd7
d561e5735ece16c9eb823b213bb1d4070605d2d1
describe
'10884' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZQ' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
a55e4c6ba54440de8d6d2845fe68bef6
bcc3987571b633615ecf07297bf38929ed6bd9ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZR' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
cdedf0d223d3205fbea51d79842f1c61
ebb8f078639848608e59cfc42f773bccf95bc5eb
describe
'116415' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZS' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
37213fe3f6f9bdf975e8ee47ba39a52b
9f9857d8ec77d5a087a0aa3018a41c5cbb07295b
describe
'3704' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZT' 'sip-files00279.pro'
4470688b581d7bafdb403163908e0477
e36b80342fdf28acd3c8f4c43089ac511959ed3f
describe
'31330' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZU' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
5faa634a292ab3021bc40fc04437230c
e64c7f82d969c53041def55a16b3a25f9fb9c939
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZV' 'sip-files00279.tif'
804a2ec48a3500f4c31e9c7c6e206d79
d4124626bd648e0a49d41e76d560b89aa9356952
describe
'265' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZW' 'sip-files00279.txt'
109c3fa15b3d990ad14f68c45a8310e8
67b4a6d4d6a74b24cb53de223b098ef554d07f9b
describe
Invalid character
'8085' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZX' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
632238d8fc64814f506e25d048646736
68765df73b0ed7eed8a5914d2f1f07d9b899174e
describe
'341989' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZY' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
37d65473cd193cc2511f6064944e3945
32768fb2741c33d919cc3f9a9ae94495dee57204
describe
'128711' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABQZZ' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
54ceaa20920cc6db030baad48a576602
35b5299a9be32fe353dcab1886cdf836815c506c
describe
'40354' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAA' 'sip-files00281.pro'
33ff45fece04846b606534c27831ea10
9fe28890c4fbefb8513e0c427953eee681b7b263
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAB' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
8c2c104b4b0bcdabaf2d865ee499122b
5c3b836561af084015a280e4c9f5405d499914a9
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAC' 'sip-files00281.tif'
c9e0d8c0a0dc1c18b480eb16d1f5e8b2
428bad447c16e6cff4728e5995b1284d450134b3
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAD' 'sip-files00281.txt'
40a11123c1d774b79dd792abbb33a047
3a1208f869004df067a6ed8d2160f371462db981
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAE' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
51a26ba3efc842055098c712e15af79a
3cf5a2e0baabaa8ffacc80948a2597bf2b2224e3
describe
'341582' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAF' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
0c611eb20a070d0f3dd8456c7ebf7a98
be7b31f2e8ca536aa7507db896b2dea99c9e0e13
describe
'143016' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAG' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
0ab9bb69c5c2165bd42bfe74474d2f05
efe7c106e247b9ccbf2077ead4fd354260871ea9
describe
'47307' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAH' 'sip-files00282.pro'
2486c5194498e357f738365b0fab8f6b
770807a59758e03183c2089769fb475ba09b944a
describe
'48391' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAI' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
2902210ec8dcaf72bd1ec06b9b38b456
fbc2c1a53d5206a552819ea089c50acb89c0a18d
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAJ' 'sip-files00282.tif'
cffdfc94a475f07370824888e9413b01
4fb7aa232e137cdf6851928051c9078fb3b02934
describe
'1865' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAK' 'sip-files00282.txt'
f46f6969bc277fc25ce20ed12fcd0e65
e7a74da26498b7499afd8830d339d8a81fc58fc1
describe
'11565' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAL' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
200594bf6373c912453dc686c0f96da8
6571558ef0be8ec665034c613c5e516762b1e715
describe
'341826' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAM' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
a5544bfe1b2d4660abbacc0d6eb1face
e794649d40063dc64bb9d6ff60100ff1f03ea5f5
describe
'160384' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAN' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
548e8a03f6dd2ed76c017e1c838269a3
f276e476e571ca317152f62b0530b6950e5eac23
describe
'50444' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAO' 'sip-files00283.pro'
e11c96e708b84b05138c253cdb8150ed
3f2e94c5933ac27b56624b75da2734c977306c67
describe
'51411' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAP' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
c6be0e0b8de7977c72914706fa68dac8
84bc10e7b5e02ed85f21dd89bf802ede490581ac
describe
'2751664' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAQ' 'sip-files00283.tif'
d606f600e7fe22bc2ef16000345c413b
538051430307b1795b983c6ea443d6175203c67b
describe
'2067' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAR' 'sip-files00283.txt'
c1854bbc4288459ff48039d5122b398f
cf86127b105a5a64e9b757b555fea08116ac98db
describe
'12264' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAS' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
cd5e33a88c8fa40f2d893e1289a52cd4
569424ebfa998c2803ef80f92ae05e435047c96b
describe
'341814' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAT' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
450d90d4d9babb61a196c62fdce05e0e
dd7974d61e26cb43b1206adf263e7aac1e8f2135
describe
'151865' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAU' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
4c38a323b44a7b3e0006dd493a1120ce
14975bab12d7b37218123ed79066b0c64d0fb7dd
describe
'50750' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAV' 'sip-files00284.pro'
cfb0ec833cd7c8fb11b5108a7baf4186
e827f1c05385c7e0a842bef8711493fb49a207f2
describe
'48790' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAW' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
3a2d8e8ae6bcc4ceccb73a043a7560a6
31ea51faff5fa098535f20afccde652c632cfec3
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAX' 'sip-files00284.tif'
ee67df38723efc613b6a7b4bf994168e
6b87dce043773c3552b0ce7086dc7c05d22b69f4
describe
'2001' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAY' 'sip-files00284.txt'
90463204155d5c0a01946d9cbd79cec3
c418dd2da18c0a303e54cd68f0c88ca196855cf0
describe
'11761' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRAZ' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
ab90bde70994db43a639a3b756ea37a6
8f3758243f663ca151910b0c71efbedafd1eb7dc
describe
'341533' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBA' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
c7679d22aba0d3f0ed783dfe81c7e310
4ceba343e6cae8207b0ea9f32d6a10b2ca4730ec
describe
'129166' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBB' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
de58dfd640ad69648c5467fb47bc2850
5c3e28674852a01bad1abfb8ad7a0d221f79d429
describe
'40597' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBC' 'sip-files00285.pro'
eb84c152623f349a5878c5f95aee1d01
8e14a72f93098bfd04993ead6f451384f8ee5a73
describe
'39490' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBD' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
d4b67d5409adbb4629dc25bc2dc0ebe7
3b2ab7398ce34e144793406baba9afa219817d92
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBE' 'sip-files00285.tif'
6c4e7570e39238abb9f5eae85f54d7f4
1b89762609d760d5912b9aaf6d112678206c4a74
describe
'1669' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBF' 'sip-files00285.txt'
d1b3ddc99a9d201aebf556b7ecf7d721
4d8dfe46bf4bf540dfe222e9664d1ffc4dfb84f3
describe
'9486' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBG' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
0d0dad8a9be25a24b78174c68dc699c5
e48ed31e1d8ce5315189bd769c8a9d48860016ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBH' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
029b36e1e3f807dfe20ce359ecb1c8d1
bb67f668d50658a61f8102c2da1272acbcb65bed
describe
'95388' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBI' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
b5896f75a015cce4ad5b507a19f3cc8c
65ccfedfc132bd9673396b023a4ad5091c261962
describe
'27200' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBJ' 'sip-files00286.pro'
c0d95c87c60717efa8d96ab0b8327378
9f62c5ffdb414dcb1e70941d6778d429ce2b71e3
describe
'32754' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBK' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
08489adc930253957ed286043c66dc40
11ab3ed8d9816fafd79d6dcae25aa2009460acc0
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBL' 'sip-files00286.tif'
fea4131686f07935dd8c7c8c36adda91
1ed78a98811b9cc5f5b8f9b28deac1cca3ed1a65
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBM' 'sip-files00286.txt'
243f7100134e8ec1b7d42204cf81a064
4af54f1e1ae72866cd51801468df6401c5bec593
describe
'8143' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBN' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
4eea21f12a4718cdd6be85a47257afad
0a187dd5ba5877d5e03f2386eae4173d407e62c8
describe
'341974' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBO' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
f7d56263f37de44e42dd1d489e0c99e9
bca3d23e9a81312e27313061802a5b6a2248a780
describe
'154788' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBP' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
19db3559ec43d783a54ebc2af9fb8f0f
1452d4e744df1befb9aab04102f43c11ce86d032
describe
'49614' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBQ' 'sip-files00287.pro'
bbfcfc02aa600b48de0e5f5c62536e08
e36aa7ea90fb31cb36af4e6d170db88f3cf50046
describe
'50674' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBR' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
1eebea6fdbe38b8d9d6ebf53c1c93c38
41564783be7ef8aedf0e49a234c5493368488148
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBS' 'sip-files00287.tif'
0d269104ab5a284321b30cd3f50f4ec9
ffbfaa3c973168cef2097397704b14db7ad6e3b5
describe
'2064' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBT' 'sip-files00287.txt'
24a5a7c888d53c69864a261be171a6df
482c21e677fd652a8fe6db8ee9e1d16a9ea00eaf
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBU' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
dceef87eb3a368894b00662ff7a62af4
98c2500a3f952d9eb8667ebd7420d6ffa751a8f4
describe
'341723' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBV' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
cd3598066a6e86d5c9d0a9595daf4c79
ce56621d50e15b0b125a86bc85ee37f57f5a556b
describe
'133093' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBW' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
c64d91fa811335a8b5af288dea1ef8ea
ebf59e3d6d226d86c2963c0b628343cdbcd9979a
describe
'40670' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBX' 'sip-files00288.pro'
532736533a7dcfb404cd3a76e57efd20
efd125468b4abab6af1c4b791d510868ab4500ef
describe
'42618' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBY' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
a1735e4e24bb99bc2aa67c4db036b0fd
1e33e4f902547d4bd68f611691c14ba019204739
'2011-11-18T02:50:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRBZ' 'sip-files00288.tif'
3be292b245f2a2ac9d40a01cea78648e
4dd61e7c173c9ccae7da9ae4169cf61ab7a4103c
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCA' 'sip-files00288.txt'
2d8f104288c26443494a61c6494efd73
740c7592ce832f9fba4d5fade6a97420540f1fe5
describe
'10624' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCB' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
e9d76cee35c9c6918490d2dae9e147f3
5291ddf235cc5a2d9bf555230ec1c1c8d038cf2a
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCC' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
0126bd22003cea7c13486dd73fff8b13
a3707a15eb2257d381b8a840953bf90a5a8618a0
describe
'154647' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCD' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
2364171d1440eab30474a145ab1c67a1
0fe3cbbeb6a1a479f951fb461c164eedc1e01caf
describe
'50549' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCE' 'sip-files00289.pro'
77de0b1bac74829ebce4e69adb6d6009
8b1ea2f9c94508d49600e618f296bf1b083c0157
describe
'49303' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCF' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
bdaed43d20dddc85dee902788b2fa944
7405d6732b955f5216df36ea5ea2c2ac1b6c13fd
describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCG' 'sip-files00289.tif'
5d6fcfd8ef5f908afdbae94df5167275
933241643a4e1cb8b03d4a3e546303bab38685f6
describe
'1994' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCH' 'sip-files00289.txt'
295230721fc76c4e2d6c95345ca37644
e5ec334777be9b79ef26bce8ca38143198f5ad9a
describe
'11533' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCI' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
e4547788b99b991d55b41d30a30e8d3a
fccdb3ca68c32f004c3a33d1de7fc9e9423e59c1
'2011-11-18T02:54:33-05:00'
describe
'341588' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCJ' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
bf2e37cc98c958e58e29d1cdf26d9970
043a0591a26a2a3e987cdbedbe6c7f59dfee3a95
describe
'99346' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCK' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
7648cc444bc8eee1cf57ad202998db01
8916cf77df9b269bc3b12e235f73439352bd811b
describe
'27945' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCL' 'sip-files00290.pro'
2f0cb9b508114f09ad1dccaebb5fd0b6
fe346f371e6cf974984189f17713b5a8e6e18f89
describe
'32261' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCM' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCN' 'sip-files00290.tif'
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describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCO' 'sip-files00290.txt'
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describe
'8702' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCP' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
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describe
'341577' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCQ' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
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describe
'103244' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCR' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:53:59-05:00'
describe
'28363' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCS' 'sip-files00291.pro'
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describe
'35456' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCT' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCU' 'sip-files00291.tif'
c535fa4853e5deed72e0e98dc3e982a9
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describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCV' 'sip-files00291.txt'
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describe
'9328' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCW' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
2259642d812364e664bf26e8da967cbc
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describe
'341567' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCX' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
d2d265ff9a94ca75426d6cb6f3be00d0
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'2011-11-18T02:48:53-05:00'
describe
'120259' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCY' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
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describe
'26136' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRCZ' 'sip-files00292.pro'
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describe
'36422' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDA' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDB' 'sip-files00292.tif'
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describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDC' 'sip-files00292.txt'
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describe
'9331' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDD' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
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describe
'342016' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDE' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
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describe
'126098' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDF' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
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describe
'38120' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDG' 'sip-files00293.pro'
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'2011-11-18T02:44:34-05:00'
describe
'39533' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDH' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDI' 'sip-files00293.tif'
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'2011-11-18T02:41:30-05:00'
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDJ' 'sip-files00293.txt'
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describe
'9982' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDK' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDL' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
01f70a73f46edb9a70ed7924f6d1c7ee
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'2011-11-18T02:48:38-05:00'
describe
'155499' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDM' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
d0219ccb654816f12276527f38571b2d
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describe
'52429' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDN' 'sip-files00294.pro'
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describe
'49965' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDO' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDP' 'sip-files00294.tif'
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describe
'2065' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDQ' 'sip-files00294.txt'
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describe
'11361' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDR' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
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describe
'341665' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDS' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
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describe
'73953' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDT' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
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describe
'525' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDU' 'sip-files00295.pro'
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describe
'20816' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDV' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDW' 'sip-files00295.tif'
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describe
'141' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDX' 'sip-files00295.txt'
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describe
'5929' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDY' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
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describe
'342015' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRDZ' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
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describe
'135972' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREA' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
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describe
'42040' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREB' 'sip-files00297.pro'
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'2011-11-18T02:49:30-05:00'
describe
'46783' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREC' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRED' 'sip-files00297.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREE' 'sip-files00297.txt'
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describe
'11483' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREF' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
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describe
'341739' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREG' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
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describe
'123560' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREH' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
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describe
'35516' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREI' 'sip-files00298.pro'
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describe
'42958' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREJ' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREK' 'sip-files00298.tif'
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describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREL' 'sip-files00298.txt'
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describe
'10914' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREM' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
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describe
'341701' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREN' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
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describe
'152888' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREO' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
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describe
'48600' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREP' 'sip-files00299.pro'
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describe
'49723' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREQ' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRER' 'sip-files00299.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRES' 'sip-files00299.txt'
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describe
'11932' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRET' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:52:15-05:00'
describe
'341541' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREU' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
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describe
'156734' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREV' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
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describe
'50065' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREW' 'sip-files00300.pro'
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describe
'49690' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREX' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREY' 'sip-files00300.tif'
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describe
'2070' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABREZ' 'sip-files00300.txt'
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describe
'12224' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFA' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
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'2011-11-18T02:52:09-05:00'
describe
'341676' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFB' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
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describe
'125043' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFC' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
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describe
'39090' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFD' 'sip-files00301.pro'
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describe
'40110' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFE' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFF' 'sip-files00301.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFG' 'sip-files00301.txt'
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describe
'9848' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFH' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
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describe
'341801' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFI' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
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describe
'109222' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFJ' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
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describe
'25751' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFK' 'sip-files00302.pro'
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describe
'34079' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFL' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFM' 'sip-files00302.tif'
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describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFN' 'sip-files00302.txt'
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describe
'8409' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFO' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
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describe
'341736' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFP' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
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describe
'77704' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFQ' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
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describe
'24192' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFR' 'sip-files00303.pro'
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describe
'24435' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFS' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFT' 'sip-files00303.tif'
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describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFU' 'sip-files00303.txt'
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describe
'7044' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFV' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFW' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
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describe
'120472' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFX' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
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describe
'40990' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFY' 'sip-files00304.pro'
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describe
'37952' 'info:fdaE20081004_AAAABLfileF20081005_AABRFZ' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
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describe
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THE STORY OF

Marco Polo
THE KHAN’S FLEET PASSING THROUGH THE INDIAN ARCHIPELAGO,


THE STORY OF

Marco Polo

BY
NOAH BROOKS

AUTHOR OF “AMERICAN STATESMEN,” “ WASHINGTON
IN LINCOLN’S TIME,” ETC,



NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
Copyright, 1896, 1897, by
THE CENTURY Co.

Printed in U. S. A.
Pak Ae es,

HE story of Marco Polo and his companions is

one of the most romantic and interesting of
medizval or of modern times. The manner of the
return of the Polos long after they had been given up
for dead, the subsequent adventures of Marco Polo,
the incredulity with which his book of travels was
received, the gradual and slow confirmation of the
truth of his reports as later explorations penetrated
the mysterious Orient, and the fact that he may be
justly regarded as the founder of the geography of
Asia, have all combined to give to his narrative a
certain fascination, with which no other story of
travel has been invested. At first read for pure
amusement, Marco Polo’s book eventually became an
authoritative account of regions of the earth which
were almost wholly unknown to Europe up to his
time, and some portions of which even now remain

unexplored by Western travellers.
Vv
vi PREFACE.

In this little book the author and compiler has
endeavoured to give a connected account of the travels
of Marco Polo for the entertainment and instruction
of young readers, with the hope that maturer minds
may find therein a comprehensive and intelligible
summary of the most valuable and trustworthy parts
of the said book. As far as possible he has allowed
the traveller to speak for himself, refraining from that
fashion of condensation, which suppresses the original
author and gives the reader only a narration which
has been coloured by its passage through the mind
of an editor. In his comments on the text of Marco
Polo, the author has made use of the erudite notes of
Colonel Henry Yule, C.B., whose admirable trans-
lation of “The Book of Ser Marco Polo, the
Venetian” (John Murray, London, 1871) has been
made the basis of this volume. The works of the
Abbé Huc, Williams’s “The Middle Kingdom,”
Gilmour's “Among the Mongols,” and other less-
known books have been consulted in quest of light
and information for the better understanding of the
great Venetian’s pages.

NOAH BROOKS.
CONE NLS:

CHAPTER L

CONCERNING MARCO, HIS FATHER, AND HIS UNCLE—MISTY
NOTIONS OF THE FAR EAST HELD BY MEN OF MEDIZVAL
TIMES—HOW THE POLOS WENT TO THE DOMINIONS OF
KUBLAI KHAN AND GOT BACK AGAIN—-A MARVELLOUS
JOURNEY. . ° . . . . . . e

CHAPTER II.

YOUNG MARCO AT THE COURT OF KUBLAI KHAN—THE GREAT
KHAN’S CONDESCENSION TO THE YOUNG TRAVELLER—
THE MANNER OF THE RETURN OF THE POLOS—HOW
MESSER MARCO POLO WAS CAPTURED BY THE GENOESE,
AND HOW HE WROTE HIS FAMOUS BOOK OF TRAVELS .

CHAPTER III.

MARCO DISCOURSES OF ANCIENT ARMENIA—THE KINGDOM
OF GEORGIANIA—THE EXPLOITS OF ALEXANDER THE
GREAT—STORY OF THE MISERLY CALIPH OF BAGDAD
AND HIS GOLD—A GREAT MARVEL. a . . °

vii

PAGE

12

26
viii CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IV.

PAGE
THE THREE KINGS—THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN—

STORIES AND ADVENTURES IN PERSIA—ORIGIN OF THE
ASSASSINS Hrui's SUMia VUE agaist) aun Kl oem aion venom SO

CHAPTER V.
THE GEMS OF BADAKSHAN—A ROYAL PREROGATIVE—THE
CONJURERS OF CASHMERE . i 4 - : . 60
CHAPTER VI.

THE ROOF OF THE WORLD—HOW THE PAMIR COUNTRY
BORDERS ON THREE GREAT EMPIRES—THE GREAT
HORNED SHEEP OF THE STEPPES—A MARVELLOUS STORY
OF SAMARCAND . ; 5 5 A 5 : - 66

CHAPTER VII.

THE SEA OF SAND AND ITS MARVELS—THE FABLED SALA-
MANDER AND ITS TRUE STORY—SOMETHING ABOUT AS-
BESTOS Geos o tate cme sie ee eles ae ak ie a ec ae coma 7 3

CHAPTER VIIL

HOW JENGHIZ KHAN DEFEATED PRESTER JOHN—THE MYTHI-
CAL CHRISTIAN KING AND THE MONGOL CONQUEROR—
DIVINERS AND THEIR TRICKS—TATAR MIGRATIONS . 80

CHAPTER IX,

MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF A STRANGE PEOPLE—CONCERNING
THE TATARS AND THEIR WAYS—THE ORIGIN OF CON-
DENSED MILK . : 5 5 . ‘ dj ; . 86
CONTENTS. 1x

CHAPTER X.

PAGE
TIBET—THE ‘‘GRUNTING OXEN” OF THAT REGION—MUSK-
DEER AND OTHER ANIMALS . ; ; 6 5 - 94

CHAPTER XI.

WHO WERE GOG AND MAGOG?—THE SPLENDOURS OF THE
COURT OF KUBLAI KHAN—COLERIDGE’S POEM “IN XA-
NADU” . ; " 5 ‘i : 3 : - 98

CHAPTER XII.

THE TRICKS OF CHINESE CONJURERS—FLYING CUPS AND
AIR-CLIMBERS . . . . . . . . - 107

CHAPTER XIII.

HOW THE GREAT EMPEROR WENT TO WAR—KUBLAI KHAN’S
VICTORIOUS CAMPAIGN AGAINST A KINSMAN—-HOW THE
KHAN REWARDED THE VALOUR OF HIS CAPTAINS. . III

CHAPTER XIV.

THE BEAUTIFUL PALACE OF KUBLAI KHAN-—-HOW THE EM-
PEROR SPENT HIS TIME—CONCERNING THE MIGHTY
CITY OF CAMBALUC—THE MANNER OF SERVING DINNER
IN THE GREAT KHAN’S PALACE—ANCIENT AND MODERN
PEKING—COSTLY ROBES . . . . . . « 124
x CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XV.
PAGE
THE KHAN AS A MIGHTY HUNTER—HIS FALCONERS, HAWKS,

AND HUNTING GEAR—RIDING IN A CHAMBER ON ELE-
PHANTS’ BACKS—RIGHT ROYAL SPORT . e e - 139

CHAPTER XVI.

KUBLAIS FINANCES AND GOVERNMENT—THE GREAT KHAN
AS A MONEY-SPINNER—PRINTING MONEY TO ORDER—
THE EMPEROR’S VALUABLE MONOPOLIES—THE TWELVE
BARONS AND THEIR POWERS—POST-RUNNERS WHO
TRAVEL FAST—BURNING ‘BLACK STONES” FOR FUEL—
THE KHAN’S PATRIARCHAL RULE. : . ‘ - 147

CHAPTER XVII.

THE GOLDEN KING AND PRESTER JOHN—THE FAMED YEL-
LOW RIVER—SOME OF THE WONDERS OF YUNNAN—THE
TRAVELLER MEETS WITH CROCODILES—"'THE PEOPLE
OF THE GOLD TEETH ”—CURIOSITIES OF TATTOOING—

A FAMOUS BATTLE—THE CITY OF MIEN : ° - 163

CHAPTER XVIII.

IN SOUTHERN CHINA AND LAOS—CURIOUS CUSTOMS OF A
STRANGE PEOPLE—LIONS AND LION-HUNTING DOGS—
MARVELLOUS PRODUCTS OF SILK—THE REBELLION AND
PUNISHMENT OF LIYTAN, : 5 : : . - 185

CHAPTER XIX.

BAYAN HUNDRED-EYES—THE POLO BROTHERS INTRODUCE
WESTERN SIEGE ARTILLERY—THE YANG-TSE-KIANG AND
ITS MONASTERIES—KINSAY (THE CITY OF HEAVEN)
DESCRIBED GM sano tie iui caida akon al el ads Meet OO
CONTENTS. x1

CHAPTER XX,
: PAGE
AN EXCURSION TO CIPANGO, OR JAPAN—INGENIOUS SHIPS

BUILT BY THE CHINESE—THE KHAN FAILS TO CONQUER
JAPAN—THE RHINOCEROS—HISTORY OF SAGAMONI BOR-
CAN, OR BUDDHA—RELIQUES OF ADAM. . . 211



CHAPTER XXI.

THE WONDERS OF INDIA—PEARL-FISHERS AND THEIR PERILS
—A STORY LIKE ONE IN ‘' THE ARABIAN NIGHTS’ EN-
TERTAINMENTS "—HUNTING DIAMONDS WITH EAGLES . 226

CHAPTER XXII.

A PEEP INTO AFRICA—THE MYTHICAL ROC AND ITS MIGHTY
EGGS—THE EXPLOITS OF KING CAIDU’S DAUGHTER—
CONCLUSION Siac ie vec leiec ers connie nRt ye 23 T

LIST OF FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS.



THE KHAN’S FLEET PASSING THROUGH THE INDIAN ARCHIPELAGO
Frontispiece
THE POLO BROTHERS RECEIVING THE TABLET OF GOLD Facing page 8

MARCO POLO’S GALLEY . . : 4 sear. aa iene 18
THE THREE KINGS ATTHE WELL. . . : SMO lr AS
THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN . seas : Seer 56
THE MIRACULOUS COLUMN . . . . SE EDeMDe NSN 70
TATARS ON THE MARCH eve : : Aeeerirean ty 99
CHINESE PHEASANT Bs . - oO 5 ; nee sehen 96
THE GREAT WALL AND THE RAMPART OF GOG AND MAGOG ,, 4, 98
A PAVILION OF THE SUMMER PALACE . : : TG een Hee LOO.
A CHINESE CONJURER . heehee gis cL Slane an aL OO:
THE PALACE OF THE GREAT KHAN . . . sie tierdls) telee E20
THE WEST GATE OF PEKING . . : 5 aR ems sede y) Raeal SO
THE EAGLE AND ITS VICTIM . . . . eiueeeewaN ys eaves aa eeT AO)
PART OF THE KHAN’S ENCAMPMENT SHINS : soo Lad.
CATAPULTS, MANGONELS, AND OTHER MACHINES . . 5, 4, 198
AN ISLAND MONASTERY . : : : 5 . GEC Nese zOz
GOLDEN ISLAND. ; Sain . . SG aie aetey
SILVER ISLAND. sets . Spe SHUR ae fee SLO
THE THREE ASIATIC RHINOCEROSES: INDIAN (UPPER),

SUMATRAN (LOWER), JAVANESE (MIDDLE) . ; Hee ee 20)

THE ROC , ; . . . . . . . no» 234
xiii
xiv LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

ILLUSERATIONS IN: THE TEXTE.

THE EMPEROR OF CHINA . . . . . . » Onpage 3
THE CASTLE OF THE FIRE-WORSHIPPERS . . Mlegg haath GAO:
OVIS POLI : icv ip3 : : : SAGE, ait ag OO)
THE GREAT NACCARAS 7 . . . . . © 9 9 IIQ

EAST AFRICAN SHEEP . 3 5 . ° . sense eye oe
THE
STORY OF MARCO POLO



THE

SEORY OF MARCO POLO.

CHAPTER I.

CONCERNING MARCO, HIS FATHER, AND HIS UNCLE—MISTY
NOTIONS OF THE FAR EAST HELD BY MEN OF MEDIZVAL
TIMES—HOW THE POLOS WENT TO THE DOMINIONS OF
KUBLAI KHAN AND GOT BACK AGAIN—A MARVELLOUS
JOURNEY.

ANY hundred years ago, in the year 1295, let

us say, before Columbus discovered America,
or the art of printing had been invented, a strange
thing happened in Venice. Three men, dressed
in outlandish garb, partly European and partly
Asiatic, appeared in the streets of that city, making
their way to the gates of a lofty and handsome house
which was then occupied by members of the ancient
family of Polo. The three strangers, whose speech
had a foreign accent, claimed admittance to the
mansion, saying that they were Maffeo and Nicolo

I
2 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

Polo, brothers, and Marco, son of Nicolo, all of whom
had been absent in the wild and barbarous countries
of the Far East for more than twenty-four years, and
had long since been given up as lost.

In those days nobody in Europe knew much about
the regions in which the three Polos had travelled,
the little that was known being derived from
scanty and vague reports. Two friars, Plano Carpini
and William Rubruquis, it is true, had reached the
borders of Cathay, or Northern China, and had
brought back slender accounts of the wonders of that
mysterious land, of which they had heard from the
subjects of the Great Khan, who reigned over a vast
empire. But nobody among the learned and most
travelled people of Europe knew exactly what manner
of people lived, or what countries lay, beyond the
western boundary of Cathay. None knew aught of
the inhabitants (or if there were inhabitants) of the
regions that we now know as India, Sumatra, Japan,
Corea, and the eastern coasts of Asia and Africa.
It was supposed that the farthest extreme, or eastern
edge, of Cathay ran off into a region of continual
darkness, a bog or marsh where all manner of strange
beasts, hobgoblins, and monsters roamed and howled.
And it was not surprising that, when the three Polos
(for these were they) came back from that desperately
savage country and claimed their own, they were
laughed to scorn. It seemed reasonable to believe
1] RETURN OF THE WANDERERS. 3

that the three, having been gone so many years, had
wandered off into the Sea of Darkness and had
perished miserably, or had been destroyed by the
wild creatures of that terrible region.

How the three Polos so far convinced their rela-
tions, who were in possession of the Polo mansion



Che Eriperor of China
in Venice, as to gain admittance, we do not know;
but John Baptist Ramusio, who has written an
entertaining history of the Polo family, sets forth
what was done by the three Polos to prove that
they were what they claimed to be, after they had
taken possession of their house. They explained
that they had been in the service of the Great
Khan, or Emperor, of the Mongol Empire, and
4 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch,

that they had amassed wealth while in the region
variously known as Cathay, China, Mongolia, and the
Far East. Here is what the good John Baptist
Ramusio has to tell of the device by which Maffeo,
Nicolo, and young Marco Polo finally convinced
their neighbours of the truth of their marvellous
story :

They invited a number of their kindred to an entertain-
ment, which they took care to have prepared with great
state and splendour in that house of theirs ; and when the
hour arrived for sitting down to table, they came forth of
their chamber, all three clothed in crimson satin, fashioned ~
in long robes reaching to the ground, such as people in
those days wore within doors. And when water for the
hands had been served, and the guests were set, they took
off those robes and put on others of crimson damask, whilst
the first suits were by their orders cut up and divided among
the servants. Then after partaking of some of the dishes,
they went out again and came back in robes of crimson
velvet; and when they had again taken their seats, the
second suits were divided as before. When dinner was
over, they did the like with the robes of velvet, after they
had put on dresses of the ordinary fashion worn by the
rest of the company. These proceedings caused much
wonder and amazement among the guests. But when the
cloth had been drawn, and all the servants had been
ordered to retire from the dining-hall, Messer Marco, as
the youngest of the three, rose from table, and, going into
another chamber, brought forth the three shabby dresses
of coarse stuff which they had worn when they first arrived.
Straightway they took sharp knives and began to rip up
some of the seams and welts, and to take. out of them |
1] ALL DOUBTS REMOVED. 5

jewels of the greatest value in vast quantities, such as
rubies, sapphires, carbuncles, diamonds, and emeralds,
which had all been stitched up in those dresses in so artful
a fashion that nobody could have suspected the fact. For
when they took leave of the Great Can, they had changed
all the wealth that he had bestowed upon them into this
mass of rubies, emeralds, and other jewels, being well aware
of the impossibility of carrying with them so great an
amount of gold over a journey of such extreme length and
difficulty. Now this exhibition of such a huge treasure of
jewels and precious stones, all tumbled out upon the table,
threw the guests into fresh amazement, insomuch that they
seemed quite bewildered and dumbfounded. And now
they recognised that in spite of all former doubts these
_ were in truth those honoured and worthy gentlemen of

the Ca’ Polo* that they claimed to be; and so all paid
them the greatest honour and reverence. And when the
story got wind in Venice, straightway the whole city, gentle
and simple, flocked to the house to embrace them, and
to make much of them, with every conceivable demonstra-
tion of affection and respect. On Messer Maffeo, who was
the eldest, they conferred the honours of an office that
was of great dignity in those days; whilst the young men
came daily to visit and converse with the ever polite and
gracious Messer Marco, and to ask him questions about
Cathay and the Great Can, all of which he answered
with such kindly courtesy that every man felt himself in a
manner his debtor. And as it happened that in the story,
which he was constantly called on to repeat, of the mag-
nificence of the Great Can, he would speak of his revenues
as amounting to ten or fifteen mil/ions of gold, and in
like manner, when recounting other instances of great
wealth in those parts, would always make use of the term

* House ot Polo,
6 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

millions, so they gave him the nickname of Messer Marco
Miuioni: a thing which I have noted also in the Public
Books of this Republic where mention is made of him.
The Court of his House, too, at S. Giovanni Chrisostomo,
has always from that time been popularly known as the
Court of the Millioni.

It is with the youngest of the three Polos that
our story has to do; for Marco, the son of Nicolo,
was the author of the book that bears his name;
and he was the most famous traveller of his time,
as we shall presently see. He was seventeen
years old when he first started on his adventurous
journey into Far Cathay. He was forty-one years
old when he returned to his native city of Venice,
with his father and his uncle Maffeo; and it was
not until three or four years later, while he was a
prisoner of war, that he began to write, or dictate,
the tale of his wonderful travels.

The two Polo brothers, Nicolo and Maffeo, began
their wanderings in the Far East before Marco was
born. After several years of trading and travelling
in that region of the world, which was called the
Levant, because the sun was seen to rise there (from
the French verb ver, to rise), the two Polos were
in Constantinople in 1260. From that city they
went on a trading venture round the northern shore
of the Black Sea to the Crimea and the Sea of Azov,
and thence into Western Asia and to Bokhara, where
LJ THE MONGOLS. 7

they remained three years. While there, they heard
distinct and trustworthy tales of the Great Khan,
as he was called—the Emperor of the Mongols—
and they resolved to go and see the splendours of
his court.

At that time the Mongolian Empire was one of
the largest, if not the largest, in the world. The
Mongols, beginning their wandering life in the
northern part of Asia, had overrun all the western
part of that continent, and as far to the southward
as the island of Sumatra, excepting India. To the
eastward, the islands of Cipango, or Japan, alone
resisted the dominion of the Great Khan; and in
the west, his hordes had even broken over the borders
of Europe, had taken possession of the country
now known as Russia, had invaded Poland and
Hungary, and had established themselves on the
mouths of the Danube. During the reign of the
great Jenghiz Khan and his immediate successors,
it has been said, “In Asia and Eastern Europe
scarcely a dog might bark without Mongol leave,
from the borders of Poland and the coast of Cilicia
to the Amur and the Yellow Sea.”

When the two Polos arrived at the chief city of
the Mongol Empire, Kublai Khan, a grandson of
the great Jenghiz, was the reigning Sovereign. The
Khan had never seen any Europeans, and he was
greatly pleased with the appearance of the Polo
8 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

brothers. This is what Marco Polo says of the
reception of his father and uncle by Kublai Khan:

When the Two Brothers got to the Great Kaan, he
received them with great honour and hospitality, and
showed much pleasure at their visit, asking them a great
number of questions. First, he asked about the emperors,
how they maintained their dignity and administered justice
in their dominions, and how they went forth to battle,
and so forth. And then he asked the like questions about
the kings and princes and other potentates.

And then he inquired about the Pope and the Church,
and about all that is done at Rome, and all the customs
of the Latins. And the Two Brothers told him the truth
in all its particulars, with order and good sense, like
sensible men as they were; and this they were able to
do, as they knew the Tartar language well.

When that Prince, whose name was CuBLay Kaan,
Lord of the Tartars all over the earth, and of all the
kingdoms and provinces and territories of that vast quarter
of the world, had heard all that the Brothers had to tell
him about the ways of the Latins, he was greatly pleased,
and he took it into his head that he would send them on
an Embassy to the Pope. So he urgently desired them
to undertake this mission along with one of his Barons ;
and they replied that they would gladly execute all his
commands as those of their Sovereign Lord. Then the
Prince sent to summon to his presence one of his Barons
whose name was CocaTAL, and desired him to get ready,
for it was proposed to send him to the Pope along with
the Two Brothers. The Baron replied that he would
execute the Lord’s commands to the best of his ability.

After this the Prince caused letters from himself to the
Pope to be indited in the Tartar tongue, and committed
them to the Two Brothers and to that Baron of his own,


THE POLO BROTHERS RECEIVING THE TABLET OF GOLD.
I] THE KHAN’S INSTRUCTIONS. 9

and charged them with what he wished them to say to
the Pope. Now the contents of the letter were to this
purport: He begged that the Pope would send as many
as an hundred persons of our Christian faith; intelligent
men, acquainted with the Seven Arts, well qualified to
enter into controversy, and able clearly to prove by force
of argument to idolaters and other kinds of folk, that the
Law of Christ was best, and that all other religions were
false and naught; and if they would prove this, he and
all under him would become Christians and the Church’s
liegemen. Finally he charged his Envoys to bring back
to him some Oil of the Lamp which burns on the Sepulchre
of our Lord at Jerusalem.

When the Prince had charged them with all his com-
mission, he caused to be given them a Tablet of Gold,
on which was inscribed that the three Ambassadors should
be supplied with everything needful in all countries through
which they should pass—with horses, with escorts, and, in
short, with whatever they should require. And when they
had made all needful preparations, the three Ambassadors
took their leave of the Emperor and set out.

So great was the reverence in which the Great
Khan was held by all who frequented his court
that he was called the Lord, or the Lord of the
Earth. Ramusio spells the title variously, sometimes
“ Kaan,” and sometimes “Can.” He also calls him
“Cublay” at times, but most scholars give the
name as Kublai. The Seven Arts which the Great
Khan wanted to have brought to his court by
teachers were: Rhetoric, Logic, Grammar, Arith-
metic, Astronomy, Music and Geometry. These
10 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

were then regarded as the sum of human knowledge;
and if the people of the Great Khan were taught
these, they would know all that the Europeans knew.
Everything went well with the travellers, except that
the Tatar baron fell sick, and had to be left behind.
They reached Acre in 1269, where, finding to their
dismay that the Pope was dead, and that his successor
had not been chosen, they went, says Marco Polo,

to a certain wise Churchman who was Legate for the
whole kingdom of Egypt, and a man of great authority, by
name Theobald of Piacenza, and told him of the mission
on which they were come. When the Legate heard their
story, he was greatly surprised, and deemed the thing to
be of great honour and advantage for the whole of
Christendom. So his answer to the Two Ambassador
Brothers was this: “Gentlemen, ye see that the Pope is
dead ; wherefore ye must needs have patience until a new
Pope be made, and then shall ye be able to execute your
charge.” Seeing well enough that what the Legate’ said
was just, they observed: “ But while the Pope is a-making,
we may as well go to Venice and visit our households.”
So they departed from Acre and went to Negropont, and
from Negropont they continued their voyage to Venice.
On their arrival there, Messer Nicolas found that his wife
was dead, and that she had left behind her a son of fifteen
years of age, whose name was Marco; and ’tis of him this
Book tells. The Two Brothers abode at Venice a couple
of years, tarrying until a Pope should be made.

When the Two Brothers had tarried as long as I have
told you, and saw that never a Pope was made, they said ;
that their return to the Great Kaan must be put off no
longer. So they set out from Venice, taking Marco along
1} POPE GREGORY X. II

with them, and went straight back to Acre, where they
found the Legate of whom we have spoken. They had
a good deal of discourse with him concerning the matter,
and asked his permission to go to Jerusalem to get some
Oil from the Lamp on the Sepulchre, to carry with them
to the Great Kaan, as he had enjoined. The Legate
giving them leave, they went from Acre to Jerusalem and
got some of the Oil, and then returned to Acre, and went
to the Legate and said to him: “As we see no sign of
a Pope’s being made, we desire to return to the Great
Kaan ; for we have already tarried long, and there has been
more than enough delay.” To which the Legate replied:
“Since ’tis your wish to go back, I am well content.”
Wherefore he caused letters to be written for delivery to
the Great Kaan, bearing testimony that the Two Brothers
had come in all good faith to accomplish his charge, but
that as there was no Pope they had been unable to do so.

Armed with these, the Polos started on their
return; but they had not gone far when they were
overjoyed to learn that their good friend, Archdeacon
Tebaldo, had been chosen Pope. The news was sent
after them, and they went back to Acre, where
Tebaldo, afterwards known as Pope Gregory X.,
received them graciously ; but he could supply them
with only two priestly teachers, and these afterwards
became so alarmed by the dangers of the way that
they drew back. It is related that the Great Khan,
in consequence of this failure to supply him with
Christian teachers, resorted to Tibet, where he found
holy men who brought for his unruly subjects in-
struction in the religion of Buddha.
CHAPTER JJ.

YOUNG MARCO AT THE COURT OF KUBLAI KHAN—THE GREAT
KHAN’S CONDESCENSION TO THE YOUNG TRAVELLER—THE
MANNER OF THE RETURN OF THE POLOS—-HOW MESSER
MARCO POLO WAS CAPTURED BY THE GENOESE, AND HOW HE
WROTE HIS FAMOUS BOOK OF TRAVELS.

ARCO and his father and uncle were very

cordially received when they reached the
court.of the Great Khan, which was then established
at the imperial summer residence among the hills to
the north of Cambaluc, or Peking. The palace was
a vast group of buildings, and was known as the City
of Peace, or Chandu: its other names were Kemenfu,
Kaiminfu, and Kaipingfu. Here is young Marco’s
own account of the reception which the three
Venetians had in the City of Peace:

And what shall I tell you? When the Two Brothers
and Mark had arrived at that great city, they went to the
Imperial Palace, and there they found the Sovereigr:
attended by a great company of Barons. So they bent
the knee before him, and paid their respects to him with
all possible reverence, prostrating themselves on the ground,

Then the Lord bade them stand up, and treated them
12
Ch. II.J MARCO, THE LINGUIST. 13

with great honour, showing great pleasure at their coming,
and asked many questions as to their welfare and how they
had sped. They replied that they had in verity sped well,
seeing they had found the Kaan well and safe. Then they
presented the credentials and letters which they had received
from the Pope, which pleased him right well; and after
that they produced the Oil from the Sepulchre, and at
that also he was very glad, for he set great store thereby.
And next, spying Mark, who was then a young gallant,
he asked who was that in their company? “Sire,” said
his father, Messer Nicolo, “‘’tis my son and your liegeman.”
“Welcome is he too,” quoth the Emperor. There was
great rejoicing at the Court because of their arrival; and
they met with attention and honour from everybody. So
they abode at the Court with the other Barons.

Now it.came to pass that Marco, the son of Messer
Nicolo, sped wondrously in learning the customs of the
Tartars as well as their language, their manner of writing,
and their practice of war; in fact, he came in brief space
to know several languages and four sundry written characters.
And he was discreet and prudent in every way, insomuch
that the Emperor held him in great esteem. And so when
he discerned Mark to have so much sense, and to conduct
himself so well and beseemingly, he sent him on an
ambassage of his, to a country which was a good six months’
journey distant. The young gallant executed his com-
mission well and with discretion. Now he had taken note
on several occasions that when the Prince’s ambassadors
returned from different parts of the world they were able
to tell him about nothing except the business on which they
had gone, and that the Prince in consequence held them
for no better than fools and dolts, and would say, ‘I had
far liever hearken about the strange things, and the manners
of the differerit countries you have seen, than merely be
told of the business you went upon”; for he took great
14 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch..

delight in hearing of the affairs of strange countries. Mark,
therefore, as he went and returned, took great pains to:
learn about all kinds of different matters in the countries.
which he visited, in order to be able to tell about them
to the Great Kaan.

When Mark returned from his ambassage, he presented
himself before the Emperor; and after making his report
of the business with which he was charged, and its suc-
cessful accomplishment, he went on to give an account,
in a pleasant and intelligent manner, of all the novelties
and strange things that he had seen and heard ; insomuch
that the Emperor and all such as heard his story were
surprised, and said: “If this young man live, he will
assuredly come to be a person of great worth and ability.”
And so from that time forward he was always entitled
‘Messer Marco Po o, and thus we shall style him hence-
forth in this Book of ours, as is but right.

Thereafter Messer Marco abode in the Kaan’s employ-
ment some seventeen years, continually going and coming,
hither and thither, on the missions that were entrusted
to him by the Lord, and sometimes, with the permission
and authority of the Great Kaan, on his own private affairs.
And as he knew all the Sovereign’s ways, like a sensible
man he always took much pains to gather knowledge of
anything that would be likely to interest him, and then
on his return to Court he would relate everything in regular
order, and thus the Emperor came to hold him in great
love and favour. And for this reason also he would employ
him the oftener on the most weighty and most distant of
his missions. These Messer Marco ever carried out with
discretion and success, God be thanked. So the Emperor
became ever more partial to him, and treated him with
the greater distinction, and kept him so close to his person
that some of the Barons waxed very envious thereat.
And thus it came about that Messer Marco Polo had
IL] MARCO, THE EXPLORER. 15

knowledge of, or had actually visited, a greater number of
the different countries of the World than any other man ;
the more that he was always giving his mind to get
knowledge, and to spy out and inquire into everything, in
order to have matter to relate to the Lord.

It is pleasant to think of this bright young stranger
in the court of Kublai Khan, winning friends for
himself by his zeal in acquiring knowledge of the
peoples and countries subject to the sway of the
Khan. By his intelligence and agreeable manners
he was able to command the means to explore
countries which, even to this day, are very imperfectly
understood by the rest of the world. Within the
memory of men now living, European travellers
have explored, for the first time since Marco Polo’s
visits, the Pamir steppes, other portions of Mongolia,
Tibet, and some of the south-western provinces of
China.

He was the first traveller to trace a route across
the whole length of Asia, says one of his biographers,
“describing kingdom after kingdom that he had seen
with his own eyes.” He was the first traveller to
explore the deserts and the flowering plains of
Persia, to reveal China with its mighty rivers, its
swarming population, and its huge cities and rich
manufactures; the first to visit and bring back
accounts of Tibet, Laos, Burmah, Siam, Cochin China,
Japan, the Indian Archipelago, Ceylon, Farther India,
16 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

and the Andaman Islands ; the first to give any dis-
tinct account of the secluded Christian empire of
Abyssinia; the first to speak even vaguely of
Zanzibar, Madagascar, and other regions in the
mysterious South, and of Siberia and the Arctic
Ocean in the terrible and much dreaded North.
Although centuries have passed since young Marco
Polo grew to man’s estate while threading his danger-
ous way among these distant lands, we must still
look back to his discoveries for much that we know
about those countries; for we have learned nothing
new of many of them since his time.

Years passed while the three Polos were gathering
riches and knowledge in Cathay; the Great Khan
was growing old and infirm, and the father and the
uncle of Marco were now well stricken in years. It
was time that they took back to Venice their gold,
precious stones, and costly stuffs. But the old
Emperor growled a refusal whenever they suggested
that they would like to leave his court. A lucky
chance gave them an opportunity of getting away.

The Khan of Persia, Arghun, who was a great-
nephew of Kublai Khan, had lost his favourite wife,
and, fulfilling her dying request, he now sent to the
Mongol court for a lady of her own kin. The Lady
Kukachin, a lovely damsel of seventeen years, was
selected to be the bride of the Persian Khan, and
three envoys of the widowed ruler were told to take
IL.] A MISSION TO PERSIA. 17

her to him. But the way from Cathay to Persia
was very hazardous, owing to the wars which then
prevailed ; and it was thought best for the party to
take ship from one of the ports of China to Ormus,
on the Persian Gulf. The Tatars are not good
sailors ; and the Persian envoys, who could not get
much help or comfort from their friends in the court
of Kublai Khan when they planned their voyage,
naturally bethought them of engaging the services of
the three hardy and venturous Venetians, who were
voyagers, as well as land travellers.

The Great Khan was most unwilling to part with
his favourite and useful Venetians; but having con-
sented to let them go, he fitted out a noble fleet of
ships; and giving them friendly messages to many
of the kings and potentates of Europe, including the
king of England, he sped them on their way. . They
sailed from Zayton, now called Tsinchau, a seaport
of Fukkien, on the south-east coast of China, but were
so detained by storms and the illness of some of the
suite that it was twenty-six months before they
arrived at their destination. Two of the three
envoys died on the way; and when the three
Venetians and the lady who had been confided to
their care reached the court of Persia, they found
that the Persian Khan was dead, and another,
Kaikhatu, reigned in his stead. In that country and
in those days, the wishes of a lady were not much

2
18 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

considered in the matter of marriage, and the son of
the reigning Khan, Ghazan, married the young lady
who had journeyed so far to find a husband. It is
recorded that the young lady wept sadly when she
parted with the kindly and noble Venetians ; and so
they took their way homeward, and arrived in Venice,
as we have said, in the year 1295—-more than six
hundred years ago.

At that time Venice and Genoa were rival republics,
not merely Italian cities. Each was an independent
state, and held rich possessions in the Levant, the
Crimea, and around the Mediterranean. They were
almost continually at war with each other and with
the republic of Pisa. It was expected and required
of all rich and noble citizens of these republics, that
they should furnish a certain number of fighters and
war vessels whenever a war was brought on; and as
most of the fighting was done on the sea, the great
crafts, propelled by oars and called galleys, were
brought into service. In one of these wars the Polo
family took part, for they were rich and noble; and
Marco Polo, now a man of mature years, was com-
mander of a great and powerful galley. He had the
misfortune to be captured ina battle with the Genoese
fleet, off the island of Curzola, on the Dalmatian
coast, in September, 1298.

After that great defeat, Marco Polo was carried a
prisoner to Genoa, where he was held until some time


MARCO POLO’S GALLEY.
IL] MARCO'S AMANUENSIS. 19

during the following year, probably in August, when,
a treaty of peace between the two warring republics
having been signed, he was restored to his own
country. If Marco Polo had not been captured at the
battle of Curzola, or in some other of the many sea-
fights between the two republics, we probably never
would have had his famous book to enlighten us
concerning the lands he saw and described.

And this is how it happened. We have already
seen that it was Marco’s sensible custom to tell his
adventures to those who came to ask him about his
travels in the heart of Asia; and when he found
himself shut up in the prison of Genoa, he speedily
made the acquaintance of his fellow-prisoner, one
Rusticiano of Pisa, who was also a captive of war.
Luckily for us, Rusticiano was a writer of some repute ;
and hearing from Marco’s lips many tales of mar-
vellois adventure, he besought the traveller to set
these down in writing. But noblemen, and indeed
gentlemen of high degree, in those days did not
think well of writing ; it was no disgrace to be unable
to write anything more than one’s name; and the
high and mighty of the land looked down with con-
tempt upon “scriveners and scribes,’ as writers were
called. The world has gotten bravely over that
notion.

Howbeit, Marco agreed to dictate his story to
Rusticiano, having recourse to his own memory, and
20 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

perhaps to the note-books which he must have written
when he was in the service of the Great Khan, and
which may have been sent to him while he was in
the Genoese prison. It is to the book written by
Rusticiano, as the words fell from the lips of Marco
Polo, that we are indebted for the valuable informa-
tion and the entertaining knowledge of the East
which is now spread over many books. And it is
because it was dictated, or recited, and not written by
Marco’s own hand, that we find that in it Marco is
always spoken of in the third person ; he never says
“J did this and that,’ but always “Messer Marco
Polo” ; or he uses some such modest terms.

As the art of printing had not then been invented,
Rusticiano was obliged to write on parchment the
story of Marco Polo; and for many years afterwards,
copies of that book were very precious, for every one
of them had to be written out with infinite labour,
and some of them were illustrated with drawings and
paintings of the wonders described in the book. The
oldest and most valuable of these manuscript books
in existence is in the Great Paris Library ; and, as it
was undoubtedly written during the lifetime of Marco
Polo, and may have been revised by him, it is
regarded as the most authentic, as it is the oldest, of
all the manuscript copies of Marco Polo’s book. It
may be the original book. There are, all told, more
than seventy-five manuscript copies of Marco’s book
IL] "A FAMOUS BOOK. 21

in various parts of Europe, and written in various
languages. The original work was written in French,
then one of the commonest languages of the com-
mercial world. The first printed edition of the book
was in German, and was produced in Nuremberg in
1477. There have been several editions printed in
English, the most famous and best of which, “ Travels
of Marco Polo,” was translated and edited by Colonel
Henry Yule, an English officer and scholar of renown.
It is from his book that we derive all the information
collected for the readers of these chapters.

The strange knowledge of the world which the book
of Marco Polo contained, confirmed, among other
things, the tales brought from the East by the Friars
Plano Carpini and William Rubruquis in 1246 and
1253 respectively. People now learned that the
eastern part of Asia did not run off into an impene-
trable swamp covered with clouds of perpetual
darkness ; for the three Venetians had sailed from
the south-eastern coast of Cathay, or China, round
to the Persian Gulf. Scholars and travellers were a
long time, however, trying to digest the vast amount
of geographical knowledge brought back by the Polos.
They learned that there was an ocean east of Asia,
as well as an ocean west of Spain and England. Why
didn’t they begin to think of crossing westward from
Spain to the Cathay of which such exact accounts
had been brought by Marco Polo?
22 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

As written books were all that readers had, and
these works were few and costly, the book of Messer _
Marco Polo did not have a wide circulation. As we
have seen, people travelled very slowly in those days,
and news and information of all kinds also spread
with even greater slowness. When Christopher
Columbus, who lived in the very city where Marco
Polo had been imprisoned, and in which his book was
written, began to pick up information about the world,
some two hundred years later, he must have come
across some of the tales told by Marco. But there is
no certainty that he ever saw a copy of Polo’s book.
Columbus derived from other sources, or at second-
hand from Polo, the facts which confirmed him in
his belief that the sea between Europe and Cathay—
the Ocean Sea—was very narrow, and that the round
world was not so big as most people supposed.

But when Columbus finally set forth on his voyage
into “the Sea of Darkness,” bound for India and an
unknown land, he carried with him letters written to
the Great Khan by the sovereigns of Spain, Ferdinand
and Isabella. When he lighted upon what we now
know as the islands of the American Continent, he
supposed that he had touched the dominions of the
Great Khan ; and he was continually on the look-out
for the land of Cipango, spoken of by Marco Polo,
where there were such riches of gold and gems and
fabulously gorgeous commodities.
Il.] MARCO, THE TRUTH-TELLER. 23

In his lifetime, and indeed long after, Marco Polo
was regarded as an inventor of idle tales. Even
within fifty years, thoughtless and ignorant writers
have alluded to him as a great liar ; but time has set
him right, and recent explorations and rediscoveries
have proved that he told the truth about things and
places that he saw. If he sometimes gave currency
to fables and traditions, he never adopted them as
his own ; he told his readers what he had heard, and
then left them to judge whether these things were
true or not. And some of the wonders that he
described, and which seemed incredible, are now
proved to be not so wonderful after all. Now that
we understand what a volcano is, we can admit
that those, who never saw or heard of one, would
be slow to believe a traveller who told of a burn-
ing mountain that continually sent forth fire and
smoke from its inside. To this day some of the
natives of tropical regions refuse to believe that water
becomes a solid mass in the winter of the North, so
that men and boys can walk on it, and drag heavy
weights over it.

Marco Polo was not a great genius inspired with a
lofty enthusiasm, as Christopher Columbus was ; but
he told the truth, and deserves a very high place
among those who have made notable additions to
the knowledge of the world. Perhaps he suffered
some slight from the people who lived during his
24 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

own time, because they found it hard to believe
that the world was inhabited by human beings all
round it; that there was no sea of perpetual darkness,
as they had been taught; and that the people of
Asia were really ingenious and skilful traders and
workers, and not savages and cannibals, as they had
supposed. Perhaps, too, the big, swelling words and
bombastic style, with which the worthy Rusticiano
set forth Marco’s book, caused some people to regard
it with contempt and even suspicion. We cannot
better conclude this chapter than with Rusticiano’s
prologue, or preface, to the book of Marco Polo:

GreAT Princes, Emperors, and Kings, Dukes, and
Marquises, Counts, Knights, and Burgesses ! and People of
all degrees who desire to get knowledge of the various
races of mankind and of the diversities of the sundry
regions of the World, take this Book and cause it to be
read to you. For ye shall find therein all kinds of wonder-
ful things, and the divers histories of the great Hermenia,
and of Persia, and of the Land of the Tartars, and of
India, and of many another country of which our Book
doth speak, particularly and in regular succession, according
to the description of Messer Marco Polo, a wise and noble
citizen of Venice, as he saw them with his own eyes.
Some things indeed there be therein which he beheld not;
but these he heard from men of credit and veracity. And
we shall set down things seen as seen, and things heard as
heard only, so that no jot of falsehood may mar the truth
of our Book, and that all who shall read it or hear it read
may put full faith in the truth of all its contents.

For let me tell you that since our Lord God did mould
I1.] RUSTICIANO’S PROLOGUE. 25

with his hands our first Father Adam, even until this day,
never hath there been Christian, or Pagan, or Tartar, or
Indian, or any man of any nation, who in his own person
hath had so much knowledge and experience of the divers
parts of the World and its Wonders as hatb had this
Messer Marco! And for that reason he bethought himself
that it would be a very great pity did he not cause to be
put in writing all the great marvels that he had seen, or on
sure information heard of, so that other people who had
not these advantages might, by his Book, get such know-
ledge. And I may tell you that in acquiring this knowledge
he spent in those various parts of the World good
six-and-twenty years. Now, being thereafter an inmate of
the Prison of Genoa, he caused Messer Rusticiano of Pisa,
who was in the said Prison likewise, to reduce the whole to
writing ; and this befell in the year 1298 from the birth of |
Jesus.
CHAPTER III.

MARCO DISCOURSES OF ANCIENT ARMENIA—THE KINGDOM OF
GEORGIANIA—THE EXPLOITS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT—
STORY OF THE MISERLY CALIPH OF BAGDAD AND HIS GOLD—
A GREAT MARVEL.

N the former chapter we had the preface to Marco

Polo’s book as it was composed by Rusticiano.
In reading the first chapter of the book itself, we
can imagine the prisoner and illustrious traveller
pacing up and down in his place of confinement,
and dictating to his companion the words that are
to be set down. And this is the first chapter of
the work as dictated by Marco:

HERE THE BOOK BEGINS; AND FIRST IT SPEAKS OF THE
LESSER HERMENIA.

THERE are two Hermenias, the Greater and the Less.
The Lesser Hermenia is governed by a certain King, who
maintains a just rule in his dominions, but is himself
subject to the Tartar. The country contains numerous
towns and villages, and has everything in plenty ; moreover,
it is a great country for sport in the chase of all manner

of beasts and birds. It is, however, by no means a-healthy
26
Ch. III.] ARMENIA. 27

region, but grievously the reverse. In days of old the
nobles there were valiant men, and did doughty deeds of
arms; but nowadays they are poor creatures, and good at
naught. Howbeit, they have a city upon the sea, which
is called Lavas, at which there is a great trade. For you
must know that all the spicery, and the cloths of silk and
gold, and other valuable wares that come from the interior,
are brought to that city. And the merchants of Venice
and Genoa, and other countries, come thither to sell their
goods, and to buy what they lack. And whatsoever persons
would travel to the interior (of the East), merchants or
others, they take their way by this city of Layas.

By “Hermenia” we are to understand that the
traveller is speaking of the country now known as
Armenia, a province of Turkey in Asia, lying to
the westward, embracing the regions of the valley
of the Euphrates and the mountainous Ararat. The
subdivisions of the greater and the less Armenia
are not known and used nowadays. Here is what
Marco has to say about the other division of
Armenia:

DESCRIPTION OF THE GREATER HERMENIA.

This is a great country. It begins at a city called
ARZINGA, at which they weave the best buckrams in the
world. It possesses also the best baths from natural
springs that are anywhere to be found. The people of
the country are Armenians, and are subject to the Tartar.

The country is indeed a passing great one, and in the
summer it is frequented by the whole host of the Tartars
of the Levant, because it then furnishes them with such
28 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

excellent pasture for their cattle. But in winter the cold
is past all bounds, so in that season they quit this country
and go to a warmer region where they find other good
pastures. [At a castle called Paipurtu, that you pass in
going from Trebizond to Tauris, there is a very good
silver mine.]

And you must know that it is in this country of Her-
menia that the Ark of Noah exists on the top of a certain
great mountain, on the summit of which snow is so con-
stant that no one can ascend; for the snow never melts,
and is constantly added to by new falls. Below, however,
the snow does melt, and runs down, producing such rich
and abundant herbage that in summer cattle are sent to
pasture from:a long way round about, and it never fails
them. The melting snow also causes a great amount of
mud on the mountain.

The country is bounded on the south by a kingdom
called Mosul, the people of which are Jacobite and Nes-
torian Christians, of whom I shall have more to tell you
presently. On the north it is bounded by the Land of
the Georgians, of whom also I shall speak. On the con-
fines from Georgiania there is a fountain from which oil
springs in great abundance, insomuch that a hundred ship-
loads might be taken from it at one time. This oil is not
good to use with food, but ’tis good to burn, and is also
used to anoint camels that have the mange. People come
from vast distances to fetch it, for in all the countries
round about they have no other oil.

Between Trebizond and Erzerum was Paipurth,
which must be the Baiburt of our day. Even in
Marco Polo’s time it appears that something was
known about petroleum, or coal-oil; for the fountain
of which he speaks is doubtless in the petroleum
I1.] NOAH’S ARK, 29

region on the peninsula of Baku, on the western
coasts of the Caspian Sea, from which many ship-
loads of oil are now annually exported, chiefly to
Russia, under whose rule the country is now held.
Even later than Marco’s day it was believed that
Noah’s Ark, or fragments of it, rested on the top
of Mount Ararat; but as that mountain ‘is nearly
17,000 feet high, and is covered with perpetual
snow, nobody had the courage to go up and find
the ark, until as late as 1829, when the ascent was
made by Professor Parrot, a German traveller.

Every school-boy knows that Bagdad was the
seat of Arabic learning in ancient times, and that
its name often appears in that most delightful book
“The Arabian Nights’ Entertainments” with that of
_the Caliph, the good Harun-al-Rachid. That famous
personage died long before Marco Polo visited
Bagdad; but the stories of the Arabian Nights
were commonly believed by the people of those parts,
as we shall see later on in Marco’s book.

The kingdom of Georgiania, of which Marco
Polo speaks, is that province of Russia which lies
south of the Caucasian range of mountains, between
the Black Sea and the Caspian. The Georgian —
men and women are still famous for their beauty ;
they represent the purest type of the Caucasian
race now known. From this region, for centuries
Eastern princes and potentates have been wont t¢
30 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

bring the beautiful women of their harems. Other
writers besides Marco refer to the fact that all the
kings of ancient Georgia bore the name of David,
just as each Roman emperor for a time was known
as Czesar. Marco sets down the statement about
the eagle-mark on the right shoulder of the king,
it will be noticed, with some reserve; he says this
was true “in old times,” as if it were a legend in
the country in his day.

The reader will find that Marco uses the words
“Ponent” and “Levant” throughout his book to
distinguish between the extreme East and the more
immediate West. East of the Caspian Sea was,
and is, the Levant: westward, on both sides of
the Black Sea, was the Ponent. Alexander the
Great, whose conquests extended to these parts,
occupied Derbend, or Derbent, a port on the west
shore of the Caspian Sea, where to this day they
will show you the remains of a wall along the -
the mountains, known as “ Alexander’s Rampart.”
The story goes that Alexander drove into the
country beyond the mountains several unclean tribes,
who were cannibals and idolaters, and shut them
in by building a huge iron gate, which kept them
securely behind the Caucasus. .

Concerning the products of the country of which
our traveller speaks, it may be said that boxwood,
a dense, fine-grained wood, used for engraving
III] GEORGIANIA AND ITS KINGS. 31

pictures for printing, is still brought from those
regions, the Turkish boxwood being the most
highly esteemed. The silk of the province of Gil,
or Ghellé, is famed for its high quality. In the
Middle Ages one of the sports of royalty and
nobility in Europe, as well as in Far Cathay, was
hunting game with trained hawks, and the goshawks
of Georgia were said to be the best in the world
for that purpose. Marco’s tale of the lake in which
a great abundance of fish could be found during
Lent, when all good Catholics eat no meat, and
which were gone during the rest of the year, is
only one of many such traditions of sundry rivers
and lakes in different parts of the world. The
same is told of many lands and countries; and if
Marco believed what he heard of the miraculous
fish of “St. Leonard’s,” he really believed one of
the commonest travellers’ tales of his time.

OF GEORGIANIA AND THE KINGS THEREOF.

In Gerorciania there is a King called David Melic,
which is as much as to say “David King”; he is subject
to the Tartar. In old times all the kings were born
with the figure of an eagle upon the right shoulder. The
people are very handsome, capital archers, and most valiant
soldiers. ‘They are Christians of the Greek Rite, and have
a fashion of wearing their hair cropped, like Churchmen.

This is the country beyond which Alexander could not
pass when he wished to penetrate to the region of the
Ponent, because that the defile was so narrow and perilous,
32 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

the sea lying on the one hand, and on the other lofty
mountains impassable to horsemen. The strait extends
like this for four leagues, and a handful of people might
hold it against all the world. Alexander caused a very
strong tower to be built there, to prevent the people
beyond from passing to attack him, and this got the name
of the Iron Gatr. This is the place that the Book of
Alexander speaks of, when it tells us how he shut up the
Tartars between two mountains ; not that they were really
Tartars, however, for there were no Tartars in those days,
but they consisted of a race of people called ComMANIANS
and many besides.

In this province all the forests are of boxwood. There
are numerous towns and villages, and silk is produced in
great abundance. They also weave cloths of gold, and
all kinds of very fine silk stuffs. The country produces
the best goshawks in the world, which are called Avig7.
It has indeed no lack of anything, and the people live
by trade and handicrafts. *Tis a very mountainous region,
and full of strait defiles and of fortresses, insomuch that
the Tartars have never been able to subdue it out and out.

There is in this country a certain Convent of Nuns called
St. Leonard’s, about which I have to tell you a very
wonderful circumstance. Near the church in question
there is a great lake at the foot of a mountain, and in this
lake are found no fish, great or small, throughout the year
till Lent come. On the first day of Lent they find in
it the finest fish in the world, and great store too thereof;
and these continue to be found till Easter Eve. After
that they are found no more till Lent come round again;
and so ’tis every year. "Tis really a passing great miracle!

That sea whereof I spoke as coming so near the moun-
tains is called the Sea of GHEL or GuHELAN, and extends
about seven hundred miles. It is twelve days’ journey
distant from any other sea, and into it flows the great
Hl.) BAGDAD. 33

River Euphrates and many others, whilst it is surrounded
by mountains. Of late the merchants of Genoa have
begun to navigate this sea, carrying ships across and
launching them thereon. It is from the country on this
sea also that the silk called Ghedlé is brought. The said
sea produces quantities of fish, especially sturgeon, at the
river-mouths salmon, and other big kinds of fish.

In Marco’s day Bagdad was known as Baudas;
and one of the chapters of his book runs thus:

OF THE GREAT CITY OF BAUDAS, AND HOW IT
WAS TAKEN.

Baupas is a great city, which used to be the seat of the
Calif of all the Saracens in the world, just as Rome is
the seat of the Pope of all the Christians. A very great
river flows through the city, and by this you can descend
to the Sea of India. There is a great traffic of merchants
with their goods this way; they descend some eighteen
days from Baudas, and then come to a certain city called
Kisi, where they enter the Sea of India. There is also
on the river, as you go from Baudas to Kisi, a great city
called Bastra, surrounded by woods, in which grow the
best dates in the world.

In Baudas they weave many different kinds of silk stuffs
and gold brocades, such as nasich, and nac, and cramoisy,
and many other beautiful tissues richly wrought with figures
of beasts and birds. It is the noblest and greatest city in
all those regions.

Now it came to pass on a day in the year of Christ 1255,
that the Lord of the Tartars of the Levant, whose name
was Alaii, prother to the Great Kaan now reigning, gathered
a mighty host and came up against Baudas and took it by
storm. It was a great enterprise! for in Baudas there were

3
34 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

more than one hundred thousand horse, besides foot soldiers.
And when Alaii had taken the place he found therein a tower
of the Calif’s, which was full of gold and silver and other
treasure ; in fact, the greatest accumulation of treasure in
one spot that was ever known. When he beheld that great
heap of treasure he was astonished, and, summoning the
Calif to his presence, he said to him: “ Calif, tell me now
why thou hast gathered such a huge treasure? What didst
thou mean to do therewith? Knewest thou not that I was
thine enemy, and that I was coming against thee with so
great an host to cast thee forth of thine heritage? -Where-
fore didst thou not take of thy gear and employ it in paying
knights and soldiers to defend thee and thy city?”

The Calif wist not what to answer, and said never a
word. So the Prince continued: ‘‘ Now then, Calif, since
I see what a love thou hast borne thy treasure, I will e’en
give it thee to eat!” So he shut the Calif up in the
Treasure Tower, and bade that neither meat nor drink
should be given him, saying: “Now, Calif, eat of thy
treasure as much as thou wilt, since thou art so fond of it;
for never shalt thou have aught else to eat !”

So the Calif lingered in the tower four days, and then
died like a dog. Truly his treasure would have been of
more service to him had he bestowed it upon men who
would have defended his kingdom and his people, rather
than let himself be taken and deposed and put to death as
he was. Howbeit, since that time, there has been never
another Calif, either at Baudas or anywhere else.

The Bastra of Marco Polo is the modern Basra,
which is situated below the meeting of the Euphrates
and the Tigris, and is still famed for the abundance
of its delicious dates. The beautiful cloths called
Nil.) THE MISERLY CALIPH. 35

by Marco zac, nasich, and cramotsy were woven of
silk and gold threads; and when they found their
way to the courts of Europe, long afterwards, they
were worn by the rich and great. In tales of
the time of good Queen Bess we find references
to cramoztsy.

Many modern writers have made use of the story
of the miserly Caliph of Bagdad who perished so
miserably in the midst of his gold; and it is clear
that the poet Longfellow had in mind the tale
told by Marco Polo when he wrote in his “ Flower-
de-Luce” the poem of “Kambalu,” the chief part
of which runs thus:

I said to the Kalif: Thou art old;

~ Thou hast no need of so much gold. ;
Thou shouldst not have heaped and hidden it here
Till the breath of battle was hot and near,
But have sown through the land these useless hoards,
To spring into shining blades of swords,
And keep thine honour sweet and clear.

Then into his dungeon I locked the drone,
And left him there to feed all alone

In the honey-cells of his golden hive;

Never a prayer nor a cry nor a groan

Was heard from those massive walls of stone,
Nor again was the Kalif seen alive.

This is the story strange and true,
That the great Captain Alati
Told to his brother, the Tartar Khan,
When he rode that day into Kambalu
By the road that leadeth to Ispahan.
36 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch,

Marco Polo now proceeds to tell us of “a great
marvel that occurred between Baudas and Mansul”:

_ There was a Calif of Baudas [probably the predecessor
of our miserly friend] who bore a great hatred to Christians,
and was taken up day and night with the thought how he
might bring those that were in his kingdom over to his
own faith, or might procure them all to be slain. And he
used daily to take counsel about this with the devotees and
priests of his faith, for they all bore the Christians like
malice. And, indeed, it is a fact that the whole body of
Saracens throughout the world are always most malignantly
disposed towards the whole body of Christians.

Now it happened that the Calif, with those shrewd
priests of his, got hold of that passage in our Gospel which
says, that if a Christian had faith as a grain of mustard
seed, and should bid a mountain be removed, it would be
removed. And such indeed is the truth. But when they
had got hold of this text they were delighted, for it seemed
to them the very thing whereby either to force all the
Christians to change their faith, or to bring destruction
upon them all. The Calif therefore called together all the
Christians in his territories, who were extremely numerous,
and when they had come before him he showed them
the Gospel, and made them read the text which I have
mentioned. And when they had read it, he asked them
if that was the truth? The Christians answered that it
assuredly was so. “Well,” said the Calif, “since you say
that it is the truth, I will give you a choice. Among such
a number of you there must needs surely be this small
amount of faith, so you must either move that mountain
there ”—and he pointed to a mountain in the neighbour-
hood—* or you shall die an ill death; unless you choose
to eschew death by all becoming Saracens and adopting
IIl.] THE ONE-EYED COBBLER. 37

our Holy Law. To this end I give you a respite of ten
days ; if the thing be not done by that time, ye shall
die or become Saracens.” And when he had said this he
dismissed them to consider what was to be done in this
strait wherein they were.

All the wisest of the Christians took counsel together,
and among them were a number of bishops and priests ;
but they had no resource except to turn to Him from
whom all good things do come, beseeching Him to protect
them from the cruel hands of the Calif.

So they were all gathered together in prayer, both men
and women, for eight days and eight nights. And whilst
they were thus engaged in prayer it was revealed in a
vision by a Holy Angel of Heaven to a certain Bishop
who was a very good Christian, that he should desire a
certain Cobbler, who had but one eye, to pray to God,
and that God in His goodness would grant such prayer
because of the Cobbler’s holy life.

Now when this vision had visited the Bishop several
times, he related the whole matter to the Christians, and
they agreed with one consent to call the Cobbler before
them. And when he had come, they told him it was their
wish that he should pray, and that God had promised to
accomplish the matter by his means. On hearing their
request, he made many excuses, declaring that he was not
at all so good a man as they represented. But they per-
sisted in their request with so much sweetness, that at last
he said he would not tarry, but do what they desired.

And when the appointed day was come, all the Christians
got up early, men and women, small and great—more than
one hundred thousand persons—and went to church, and
heard the Holy Mass. And after Mass had been sung,
they all went forth together in a great procession to the
plain in front of the mountain, carrying the precious Cross
before them, loudly singing and greatly weeping as they
38 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch. III.

went. And when they arrived at the spot, there they
found the Calif with all his Saracen host armed to slay
them if they would not change their faith ; for the Saracens
believed not in the least that God would grant such favour
to the Christians. These latter stood, indeed, in great
fear and doubt, but nevertheless they rested their hope on
their God Jesus Christ.

So the Cobbler received the Bishop’s benison, and then
threw himself on his knees before the Holy Cross, and
stretched out his hands towards Heaven, and made this
prayer: “Blessed Lord God Almighty, I pray Thee by
Thy goodness that Thou wilt grant this grace unto Thy
people, insomuch that they perish not, nor Thy faith be
cast down, nor abused, nor flouted. Not that I am in
the least worthy to prefer such request unto Thee ; but
for Thy great power and mercy I beseech Thee to hear
this prayer from me Thy servant full of sin.”

And when he had ended this his prayer to God the
Sovereign Father and Giver of all grace, and whilst the
Calif and all the Saracens and other people there were
looking on, the mountain rose out of its place, and moved
to the spot which the Calif had pointed out. And when
the Calif and all his Saracens beheld, they stood amazed
at the wonderful miracle that.God had wrought for the
Christians, insomuch that a great number of the Saracens
became Christians. And even the Calif caused himself to
be baptised in the Name of the Father and of the Son
and of the Holy Ghost, Amen, and became a Christian,
but in secret. Howbeit, when he died, they found a little
cross hung round his neck; and therefore the Saracens
would not bury him with the other Califs, but put him in
a place apart. The Christians exulted greatly at this most
holy miracle, and returned to their homes full of joy,
giving thanks to their Creator for that which He had done.


CHAPTER IV.

THE THREE KINGS—THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN—STORIES
%K AND ADVENTURES IN PERSIA—ORIGIN OF THE ASSASSINS,

‘ OUBTLESS all our readers are well acquainted
with the story of the visit of the Three Kings,
or Magi, to Bethlehem, when the Saviour was born.
There is an ancient Christian tradition that the three
men set out from Persia, and that their names were
Melchior, Balthazar, and Kaspar: these wise men
of the East, as they were called, are supposed to have
returned to Persia after their visit to Palestine ; and
Marco Polo tells this tale as it was told to him:

OF THE GREAT COUNTRY OF PERSIA; WITH SOME
ACCOUNT OF THE THREE KINGS.

Persia is a great country, which was in old times very
illustrious and powerful; but now the Tartars have wasted
and destroyed it.

39
40 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

In Persia is the city of Saba, from which the Three Magi
set out when they went to worship Jesus Christ; and in
this city they are buried, in three very large and beautiful
monuments side by side. And above them there is a
square building, carefully kept. The bodies are still entire
with the hair and beard remaining. Messer Marco Polo



THE CASTLE OF THE FIRE-WORSHIPPERS,

asked a great many questions of the people of that city as
to those Three Magi, but never one could he find that
knew aught of the matter except that these were Three
Kings who were buried there in days of old. However, at
a place three days’ journey distant he heard of what I am

going to tell you. He found a village there which goes by
_ the name of Cala Ataperistan, which is as much as to say,
“The Castle of the Fire-worshippers.” And the name is
IV.] THE THREE MAGL 4I

rightly applied, for the people there do worship fire, and I
will tell you why.

They relate that in old times Three Kings of that country
went away to worship a Prophet that was born, and they
carried with them three manner of offerings, Gold, and
Frankincense, and Myrrh; in order to ascertain whether
that prophet were God, or an earthly king, or a physician.
For, say they, if He take the Gold, then He is an earthly
king; if He take the Incense, He is God; if he take the
Myrrh, he is a physician.

So it came to pass when they had come to the place
where the Child was born, the youngest of the Three Kings
went in first, and found the Child apparently just of his
own age; so he went forth again, marvelling greatly. The
middle one entered next, and like the first he found the
Child seemingly of his own age; so he also went forth
again, and marvelled greatly. Lastly, the eldest went in,
and as it had befallen the other two, so it befell him; and
he went forth very pensive. And when the three had
rejoined one another, each told what he had seen; and
then they all marvelled the more. So they agreed to go
in all three together, and on doing so they beheld the
Child with the appearance of its actual age, to wit, some
thirteen days. Then they adored, and presented their
Gold, and Incense, and Myrrh. And the Child took all
the three offerings, and then gave them a small closed
box; whereupon the Kings departed to return into their
own land.

And when they had ridden many days, they said they
would see what the Child had given them. So they opened
the little box, and inside it they found a stone. On seeing
this they began to wonder what this might be that the
Child had given them, and what was the import thereof.
Now the signification was this: When they presented their
offerings, the Child had accepted all three ; and when they
42 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

saw that, they had said within themselves that He was the

True God, and the True King, and the True Physician.

And what the gift of the stone implied was that this Faith

which had begun in them should abide firm as a rock.

For He well knew what was in their thoughts. Howbeit,

they had no understanding at all of this signification of -
the gift of the stone; so they cast it into a well. Then

straightway a fire from Heaven descended into that well

wherein the stone had been cast.

And when the Three Kings beheld this marvel they were
sore amazed, and it greatly repented them that they had
cast away the stone; for well they then perceived that it
had a great and holy meaning. So they took of that fire,
and carried. it into their own country, and placed it in a
rich and beautiful church. And there the people keep it
continually burning, and worship it as a god, and all the
sacrifices they offer are kindled with that fire. And if ever
the fire becomes extinct, they go to other cities round about
where the same faith is held, and obtain of that fire from
them, and carry it to the church. And this is the reason
why the people of this country worship fire. They will
often go ten days’ journey to get of that fire.

Such then was the story told by the people of that Castle
to Messer Marco Polo; they declared to him for a truth
that such was their history, and that one of the ‘Three
Kings was of the city called Sapa, and the second of Ava,
and the third of that very Castle where they still worship
fire, with the people of all the country round about.

The latter part of this account of the Three Kings
and their doings undoubtedly refers to the ancient
Persian sect of fire-worshippers, known as Parsees.
The custom of worshipping fire as the source of life,


THE THREE KINGS AT THE WELL.
Iv] THE CARSEES 43

light, and warmth is almost as old as the human race.
We can readily imagine how profound must liave
been the reverence and admiration with which the
primitive man regarded fire when first that element
was brought into his view. The warming, kindling
flame, its ruddy and changeful colours and shapes,
and the comforting of its warmth, must have inspired
him with rapture and adoration. The sect founded
by Zoroaster, who flourished about six hundred years
before the Christian era, paid reverence to the four
elements of fire, air, earth, and water; from these
people, it is believed, descended the Persian fire-
worshippers, or Parsees. In the course of time,
however, Persia adopted the Moslem faith, and the
fire-worshippers were expelled from the country.
The greater part of them fled to India, where they
are found in large numbers at the present time ; forty
thousand of them are living in Bombay, and there
are not less than two hundred thousand Parsees in
all India.

The sacred fire which attracted the attention of
Marco Polo is still maintained in the temples of the
Indian fire-worshippers; and if by accident the fire
should die, it is rekindled by coals brought from
another temple, as was the custom among the fire-
worshippers of whom Marco gives account. “The
Towers of Silence,” near Bombay, are isolated, lonely
structures where the Parsees expose their dead to be
44 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

devoured by the flocks of vultures that hover around
the place.

In Polo’s further account, of Persia we have the
following interesting chapter :

OF THE EIGHT KINGDOMS OF PERSIA, AND HOW THEY
ARE NAMED.

Now you must know that Persia is a very great country,
and contains eight kingdoms. I will tell you the names
of them all.

The first kingdom is that at the beginning of Persia, and
it is called Casvin ; the second is further to the south, and
is called Curpistan; the third is called Lor 3 the fourth
SUOLSTAN ; the fifth Isranit ; the sixth SrRazy; the seventh
Soncara ; the eighth Tunocain, which is at the further
extremity of Persia. All these kingdoms lie in a southerly
direction except one, to wit, Tunocain; that lies towards
the east, and borders on the country of the Arbre Sol.

In this country of Persia there is a great supply of fine
horses, and people take them to India for sale, for they are
horses of great price, a single one being worth as much of
their money as is equal to 200 livres Tournois; some will
be more, some less, according to the quality. Here also
are the finest asses in the world, one of them being worth
30 marks of silver, for they are very large and fast, and
acquire a capital amble. Dealers carry their horses to
Kisi and Curmosa, two cities on the shores of the Sea of
India, and there they meet with merchants who take the
horses on to India for sale.

In this country there are many cruel and murderous
people, so that no day passes but there is some homicide
among them. Were it not for the Government, which is
that of the Tartars of the Levant, they would do great
IV.] YASDI AND KERMAN. 45

mischief to merchants; and indeed, maugre the Govern-
ment, they often succeed in doing such mischief. Unless
merchants be well armed they run the risk of being
murdered, or at least robbed of everything; and it some-
times happens that a whole party perishes in this way
when not on their guard. The people are all Saracens,
ze. followers of the Law of Mahommet.

In the cities there are traders and artisans who live by
their labour and crafts, weaving cloths of gold, and silk
stuffs of sundry kinds. They have plenty of cotton produced
in the country ; and abundance of wheat, barley, millet,
panick, and wine, with fruit of all kinds.

CONCERNING THE GREAT CITY OF YASDI.

Yasp1 also is properly in Persia; it is a good and noble
city, and has a great amount of trade. They weave there
quantities of a certain silk tissue known as Yasd¢, which
merchants carry into many quarters to dispose of. The
people are worshippers of Mahommet.

When you leave this city to travel further, you ride for
seven days over great plains, finding harbour to receive
you at three places only. There are many fine woods,
producing dates, upon the way, such as one can easily ride
through ; and in them there is great sport to be had in
hunting and hawking, there being partridges and quails
and abundance of other game, so that the merchants who
pass that way have plenty of diversion. There are also
wild asses, handsome creatures. At the end of those seven
marches over the plain you come toa fine kingdom which
is called Kerman.

CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF KERMAN.

KERMAN is a kingdom which is also properly in Persia,
and formerly it had a hereditary prince. Since the Tartars
46 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch,

conquered the country the rule is no longer hereditary, but
the Tartar sends to administer whatever lord he pleases.
In this kingdom are produced the stones called turquoises
in great abundance; they are found in the mountains,
where they are extracted from the rocks. There are also
plenty of veins of steel and ondanigue. The people
are very skilful in making harness of war; their saddles,
bridles, spurs, swords, bows, quivers, and arms of every
kind are very well made indeed, according to the fashion
of those parts. The ladies of the country and their
daughters also produce exquisite needlework in the em-
broidery of silk stuffs in different colours, with figures of
beasts and birds, trees and flowers, and a variety of other
patterns. They work hangings for the use of noblemen
so deftly that they are marvels to see, as well as cushions,
pillows, quilts, and all sorts of things.

In the mountains of Kerman are found the best falcons
in the world. They are inferior in size to the peregrine,
red on the breast, under the neck, and between the thighs ;
their flight so swift that no bird can escape them.

On quitting the city you ride on for seven days, always
finding towns, villages, and handsome dwelling-houses, so
that it is very pleasant travelling; and there is excellent
sport also to be had by the way in hunting and hawking.
When you have ridden those seven days over a plain
country, you come to a great mountain; and when you
have got to the top of the pass, you find a great descent
which occupies some two days to go down. All along you
find a variety and abundance of fruits ; and in former days
there were plenty of inhabited places on the road, but now
there are none; and you meet with only a few people
looking after their cattle at pasture. From the city of
Kerman to this descent the cold in winter is so great that
you can scarcely abide it, even with a great quantity of
clothing.
Iv.] THE ZEBU. 47

OF THE CITY OF CAMADI AND ITS RUINS ; ALSO TOUCHING
THE CARAONA ROBBERS.

After you have ridden downhill those two days, you find
yourself in a vast plain, and at the beginning thereof there
is a city called Camap1, which formerly was a great and
noble place, but now is of little consequence, for the
Tartars in their incursions have several times ravaged it.
The plain whereof I speak is a very hot region; and the
province that we now enter is called REOBARLES.

The fruits of the country are dates, pistachioes, and
apples of Paradise, with others of the like not found in our
cold climate. There are vast numbers of turtle-doves,
attracted by the abundance of fruits ; but the Saracens never
take them, for they hold them in abomination. And on
this plain there is a kind of bird called francolin, but
different from the francolin of other countries, for their
colour is a mixture of black and white, and the feet and
beak are vermilion colour.

The beasts also are peculiar; and first I will tell you of
their oxen. These are very large, and all over white as
snow ; the hair is very short and smooth, which is owing to
the heat of the country. The horns are short and thick,
not sharp in the point; and between the shoulders they
have a round hump some two palms high. There are no
handsomer creatures in the world. And when they have to
be loaded, they kneel like the camel; once the load is
adjusted, they rise. Their load is a heavy one, for they
are very strong animals. Then there are sheep here as
big as asses ; and their tails are so large and fat that one
tail shall weigh some thirty pounds. They are fine fat
beasts, and afford capital mutton.

In this plain there are a number of villages and towns
which have lofty walls of mud, made as a defence against
the bandittii who are very numerous, and are called
48 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

Caraonas. This name is given them because they are
the sons of Indian mothers by Tartar fathers. And you
must know that when these Caraonas wish to make a
plundering incursion, they have certain devilish enchant-
ments whereby they do bring darkness over the face of
day, insomuch that you can scarcely discern your comrade
riding beside you; and this darkness they will cause to
extend over a space of seven days’ journey. They know
the country thoroughly, and ride abreast, keeping near one
another, sometimes to the number of ten thousand, at other
times more or fewer. In this way they extend across the
whole plain that they are going to harry, and catch every
living thing that is found outside of the towns and villages ;
man, woman, or beast, nothing can escape them! The old
men whom they take in this way they butcher; the young
men and the women they sell for slaves in other countries ;
thus the whole land is ruined, and has become well-nigh a
desert.

The king of these scoundrels is called Nocopar. This
Nogodar had gone to the Court of Chagatai, who was
own brother to the Great Kaan, with some ten thousand
horsemen of his, and abode with him; for Chagatai was
his uncle. And whilst there this Nogodar devised a most
audacious enterprise ; and I will tell you what it was. He
left his uncle, who was then in Greater Armenia, and fled
with a great body of horsemen, cruel, unscrupulous fellows,
first through Bapasuan, and then through another province
called PasHar-Dir, and then through another called
ARIORA-KESHEMUR. There he lost a great number of
his people and of his horses, for the roads were very
narrow and perilous. And when he had conquered all
those provinces, he entered India at the extremity of a
province called Dativar. He established himself in that
city and government, which he took from the King of the
country, ASEDIN SOLDAN by name, a man of great power
IV.] PERSIA. 49

and wealth. And there abideth Nogodar with his army,
afraid of nobody, and waging war with all the Tartars in
his neighbourhood.

Now that I have told you of those scoundrels and their
history, I must add the fact that Messer Marco himself was
all but caught by their bands in such a darkness as that I
have told you of; but, as it pleased God, he got off and
threw himself into a village that was hard by, called
Conosatmi. Howbeit he lost his whole company except
seven persons who escaped along with him. The rest were
caught, and some of them sold, some put to death.

Marco sometimes regards a city as a province, or
even a kingdom, as he does in this list of the “eight
kingdoms of Persia.” It is now supposed by the
most intelligent writers on Persia that Marco refers
to the ancient city of Kazwin, whi h he calls Casvin,
the first on his list. But the province in that
part of Persia, the northern, is now known as Irak.
Curdistan is an old form of spelling Kurdistan. Lor
is Luristan, next to the southward, and the people of
that province are still noted thieves and bandits.
Suolstan, so called by Marco, is probably the modern
Shulistan; the region known by that name was
inhabited by the Shuls, or Shauls. Marco’s Istanit
is now believed to be the famous city of Ispahan ;
and Serazy is readily translatable into the modern
Shiraz. Soncara is the country of the Shawankars ;
Tunocain is Kuhistan, the hill country of Persia, of
which Tun and Kain are the chief cities.

4
50 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ck.

Persian horses are quite as famous for beauty and
speed as they were in the days when our Venetian
traveller explored the country in which they were
bred. These fine animals are still exported to India,
whence a few of them are ultimately carried to
England and other parts of Europe. Colonel Yule,
in his book about Marco Polo, tells of a horse of this
breed that travelled nine hundred miles in eleven
days, and of another that accomplished about eleven
hundred miles within twelve days, taking two days of
that time for rest. The Lure tournois, which Marco
uses as a standard of coin valuation, was worth £1
sterling in modern English money, allowing for the
lower relative value of gold as compared with silver
in those far-off days; so that a fine Persian steed
would cost about £193, English money, or a little
‘more than $950, American money. The silver mark
of that time, thirty of which were paid for a good
donkey, would be about equal to forty English
shillings ; and that sum—thirty marks—again allow-
ing for the lower value of gold as related to silver,
would be equal to £88 sterling, or $440, American
currency.

The fame of Oriental steel blades has extended all
over the world, dating back to the most ancient
times; and marvellous stories are told of the flexibility,
sharpness, and hardness of edged weapons made by
Arabs, Moors, and other warlike tribes of the East.
IV.] FAT-TAILED SHEEP, 51

The ondanzgue of Marco Polo is probably the “ Indian
steel” of which many writers have made mention.
It was so manufactured that a blade of this material
possessed an edge of surpassing keenness and hard-
ness. It was said that a Kerman sabre would cleave
a European metal helmet in twain without turning
its own edge. The embroidered and woven silk
stuffs and carpets of the Kerman region are still
held in high repute on account of their fineness and
beauty. :

The francolin, referred to in the extract above
quoted, is the bird known in England and some parts
of America as the black partridge, and is highly
esteemed for its delicate quality. Any intelligent
youngster will recognise the humped oxen that
attracted the attention of Marco Polo and awakened
his interest. They are to be found in India and
other Eastern countries, and poor is the menagerie
that does not have one or two specimens of the zebu,
or Indian ox, as it is now called. These beasts are
very docile, and are taught to kneel to receive the
loads which they carry on their backs. Fat-tailed
sheep are also common in various portions of Asia
Minor and Africa. The tail is broad and flat,
sometimes weighing fifty or sixty pounds, and is
considered a great delicacy by the inhabitants of
those parts of the world. Some travellers of good
repute have said, that they have seen fat-tailed
52 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

sheep whose tails were so large, that each animal
was provided with a slab of wood, fitted under the
tail, with little trucks, or wheels, attached to the
end that dragged on the ground.

The notion that fogs and mists can be brought
upon the face of the earth by the command of an
enchanter is truly Oriental; this is still believed in
some parts of India, and Mr. F. Marion Crawford,
the novelist, has made use of an enchanted fog in one
of his romances. It is certain, however, that a dry
fog, which seems to be really a dust-storm, is of
common occurrence in Persia and Northern India.
The phenomenon is strange and baffling, and it is
not surprising that the residents of that country, not
understanding why the air should be filled with dry
dust while it is yet perfectly still, should charge this
to the operations of some enchanter. In such a
dust-storm the raids of robbers, who take advantage
of the panic and the obscurity prevailing, would be
successful, and very disastrous to the unfortunates
whose flocks and herds would be captured and driven
off. The Caraonas, nowadays known as Hazaras,
are bold and daring brigands; they have sometimes
ridden up to the very gates of the city of Ispahan on
their wild forays in search of plunder, ravaging the
country and leaving behind them nothing that can be
carried off or destroyed.

Here may be given a few extracts from Marco’s
IV.J STITCHED SHIPS. 53

interesting account of the city of Hormos and its
inhabitants, showing what they eat and drink, how
they build their ships, and how they avoid the
poison-wind and its terrible effects.

Tis, he says, a city of immense trade. There are
plenty of towns and villages under it, but it is the capital.
The King is called Ruomedam Ahomet. It is a very sickly
place, and the heat of the sun is tremendous. If any
foreign merchant dies there, the King takes all his property.

In this country they make a wine of dates mixed with
spices, which is very good. When any one not used to
it first drinks this wine, it causes repeated and violent pains ;
but afterwards he is all the better for it, and gets fat upon
it. The people never eat meat and wheaten bread except
when they are ill, and if they take such food when they are
in health it makes them ill. Their food when in health
consists of dates and salt fish (tunny, to wit) and onions,
and this kind of diet they maintain in order to preserve
their health.

Their ships are wretched affairs, and many of them get
lost ; for they have no iron fastenings, and are only stitched
together with twine made from the husk of the Indian nut.
They beat this husk until it becomes like horsehair, and
from that they spin twine, and with this stitch the planks
of the ships together. It keeps well, and is not corroded
by the sea-water, but it will not stand well in a storm.
The ships are not pitched, but are rubbed with fish-oil.
They have one mast, one sail, and one rudder, and have
no deck, but only a cover spread over the cargo when
loaded. This cover consists of hides, and on the top of
these hides they put the horses which they take to India
for sale. They have no iron to make nails of, and for this
reason they use only wooden trenails in their shipbuilding,
54 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

and then stitch the planks with twine as I have told you.
Hence ’tis a perilous business to go a voyage in one of
those ships, and many of them are lost, for:in that Sea of
India the storms are often terrible.

The people are black, and are worshippers of Mahommet.
The residents avoid living in the cities, for the heat in
summer is so great that it would kill them. Hence they
go out (to sleep) at their gardens in the country, where
there are streams and plenty of water. For all that they
would not escape but for one thing that I will mention.
The fact is, you see, that in summer a wind often blows
across the sands which encompass the plain, so intolerably
hot that it would kill everybody, were it not that, when
they perceive that wind coming, they plunge into water up
to the neck, and so abide until the wind have ceased.

And to prove the great heat of this wind, Messer Mark
related a case that befell when he was there. The Lord
of Hormos, not having paid his tribute to the King of
Kerman, the latter resolved to claim it at the time when
the people of Hormos were residing away from the city.
So he caused a force of sixteen hundred horse and five
thousand foot to be got ready, and sent them by the
route of Reobarles to take the others by surprise. Now it
happened one day that through the fault of their guide
they were not able to reach the place appointed for their
night’s halt, and were obliged to bivouac in the wilderness
not far from Hormos. In the morning as they were starting
on their march they were caught by that wind, and every
man of them was suffocated, so that not one survived to
carry the tidings to their lord. When the people of
Hormos heard of this, they went forth to bury the bodies,
lest they should breed a pestilence. But when they laid
hold of them by the arms to drag them to the pits, the
bodies proved to be so daked, as it were, by that tremendous
heat, that the arms parted from the trunks, and in the
Iv.] THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN. 55

end the people had to dig graves hard by each where it
lay, and so cast them in.

In Marco’s account of Persia we find the hero
Alaii again mentioned by name. It was Alaii who
captured the castle of the miserly Caliph; and he it
was who put an end to the crimes of the wicked
Old Man of the Mountain. Here is the chapter
concerning both of those two personages: A

CONCERNING THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN.

MULEHET is a country in which the Old Man of the
Mountain dwelt in former days; and the name means
% Place of the Aram.” Twill tell you his whole history as
related by Messer Marco Polo, who heard it from several
natives of that region.

The Old Man was called in their language ALoaDIN. He
had caused a certain valley between two mountains to be
enclosed, and had turned it into a garden, the largest and
most beautiful that ever was seen, filled with every variety
of fruit. In it were erected pavilions and palaces, the most
elegant that can be imagined, all covered with gilding and
exquisite painting. And there were runnels, too, flowing
freely with wine and milk and honey and water; and
numbers of ladies, the most beautiful in the world, who
could play on all manner of instruments, and sang most
sweetly, and danced in a manner that it was charming to
behold. For the Old Man desired to make his people
believe that this was actually Paradise. So he had
fashioned it after the description that Mahommet gave of
his Paradise, to wit, that it should be a beautiful garden run-
ning with conduits of wine and milk and honey and water;
56 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

and sure enough the Saracens of those parts believed that
it was Paradise.

Now no man was allowed to enter the Garden save those
whom he intended to be his AsuisHin. There was a
Fortress at the entrance to the Garden, strong enough to
resist all the world; and there was no other way to get in.
He kept at his Court a number of the youths of the country,
from twelve to twenty years of age, such as had a taste for
soldiering, and to these he used to tell tales about Paradise,
just as Mahommet had been wont to do, and they believed
in him just as the Saracens believe in Mahommet. Then he
would introduce them into his Garden, some four, or six,
or ten at a time, having first made them drink a certain
potion which cast them into a deep sleep, and then causing
them to be lifted and carried in. So when they awoke they
found themselves in the Garden.

Now this Prince whom we call the Old One kept his
Court in grand and noble style, and made those simple hill-
folks about him believe firmly that he was a great Prophet.
And when he wanted one of his Ashishin to send on any
mission, he would cause that potion, whereof I spoke, to be
given to one of the youths in the Garden, and then had
him carried into his Palace. So when the young man
awoke, he found himself in the Castle, and no longer in
that Paradise ; whereat he was not over-well pleased. He
was then conducted to the Old Man’s presence, and
bowed before him with great veneration, as believing him-
self to be in the presence of a true Prophet. The Prince
would then ask whence he came, and he would reply that
he came from Paradise! and that it was exactly such as
Mahommet had described it in the Law. This of course
gave the others who stood by, and who had not been
admitted, the greatest desire to enter therein.

So when the Old Man would have any Prince slain, he
would say to such a youth: “Go thou and slay So-and-So; and
: “Sime nae AY
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THE OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN.
IV.] HIS ASSASSINS. 57

when thou returnest my Angels shall bear thee into Paradise.
And shouldst thou die, natheless even so will I send my
Angels to carry thee back into Paradise.” So he caused them
to believe ; and thus there was no order of his that they
would not affront any peril to execute, for the great desire
they had to get back into that Paradise of his. And in this
manner the Old One got his people to murder any one
whom he desired to get rid of. Thus, too, the great dread
that he inspired all Princes withal made them become his
tributaries, in order that he might abide at peace and amity
with them.

I should also tell you that the Old Man had certain
others under him, who copied his proceedings and acted
exactly in the same manner. One of these was sent into
the territory of Damascus, and the other into Curdistan.

Now it came to pass in the year 1252, that Alati, Lord of
the Tartars of the Levant, heard tell of these great crimes
of the Old Man, and resolved to make an end of him. So
he took and sent one of his Barons with a great Army to
that Castle, and they besieged it for three years, but they
could not take it, so strong was it. And indeed if they had
had food within, it never would have been taken. But after
being besieged those three years they ran short of victual,
and were taken. The Old Man was put to death with all
his men, and the Castle with its Garden of Paradise was
levelled with the ground. And since that time he has had
no successor ; and there was an end to all his villainies.

The region in which, according to Marco Polo, the
Old Man of the Mountain lived and reigned was
the mountainous part of Persia, in the far north.
But in the time of the first Crusaders, which was
some two hundred years earlier, the chief of a band
58 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

of scoundrels and men-slayers, one Hassan-ben-Sabah,
had his stronghold in Mount Lebanon, in the southern
part of Syria; and he was also known as the Old
Man of the Mountain.

It is interesting to know that the story of the Old
One was current all over the East, and that we get
our word “assassin” from the vile practices of that
wicked man, who really did exist, and whose fol-
lowers are still to be found in remote corners of the
East. The drug which he gave to those whom he
desired to enlist in his band was hashish, or Cannabis
Indica. This is a learned name for Indian hemp,
from which the drug is derived. Men who used the
hashish to give them pleasant sleep and beautiful
dreams were called “hashishiyyin”; and it was easy
to make the word “assassin” out of hashishiyyin.

That this is the true origin of the English word
nobody need doubt. As Marco passed by the castle
of the Old Man of the Mountain not long after the
defeat of the latter by the Prince Alaii, we can believe
that he heard a true account of what had happened ;
and it is not unlikely that the followers of this chief,
the Assassins, as they were called, were a numerous
band of fanatics who were spread over a considerable
part of the East.

At Taican, three days’ journey from Badashan,
Marco is much struck (and no wonder) by the moun-
tains of salt:
IV.] MOUNTAINS OF SALT. 59

Taican is a fine place, and the mountains that you see
towards the south are all composed of salt. People from
all the countries round, to some thirty days’ journey, come
to fetch this salt, which is the best in the world, and is so
hard that it-can only be broken with iron picks. ’Tis in
such abundance that it would supply the whole world to the
end of time.
CHAPTER: N:

THE GEMS OF BADAKSHAN—A ROYAL PREROGATIVE—THE
CONJURERS OF CASHMERE.

ADASHAN, of which our traveller wrote an
interesting account, is now known as Badak-
shan ; it lies to the north of that range of mountains
which bears the name of the Hindu Kush, in Central
Asia, south of Bokhara and north of Afghanistan.
Marco’s eyes are now turned eastward, and he writes
thus of the country of which the outside world knew
nothing then:

OF THE PROVINCE OF BADASHAN.

Bapasuan is a Province inhabited by people who worship
Mahommet, and have a peculiar language. It forms a very
great kingdom, and the royalty is hereditary. All those
of the royal blood are descended from King Alexander
and the daughter of -King Darius, who was Lord of the
vast Empire of Persia. And all these kings call themselves
in the Saracen tongue Zulcarniain, which is as much as
to say “ Alexander”; and this out of regard for Alexander
the Great.

It is in this province that those fine and valuable gems,
the Balas Rubies, are found. They are got in certain

60
Ch. V.] GEMS OF BADAKSHAN. 61

rocks among the mountains, and in the search for them
the people dig great caves underground, just as is done
by miners for silver. There is but one special mountain
that produces them, and it is called Syghinan. The stones
are dug on the King’s account, and no one else dares dig
in that mountain on pain of forfeiture of life as well as
goods; nor may any one carry the stones out of the
kingdom. But the King amasses them all, and sends them
to other kings when he has tribute to render, or when he
desires to offer a friendly present; and such only as he
pleases he causes to be sold. Thus he acts in order to
keep the Balas at a high value; for if he were to allow
everybody to dig, they would extract so many that the
world would be glutted with them, and they would cease
to bear any value. Hence it is that he allows so few to
be taken out, and is so strict in the matter.

There is also in the same country another mountain,
in which azure is found; ’tis the finest in the world, and
is got in a vein like silver. There are also other mountains
which contain a great amount of silver ore, so that the
country is a very rich one; but it is also (it must be said)
avery cold one. It produces numbers of excellent horses,
remarkable for their speed. They are not shod at all,
although constantly used in mountainous country and on
very bad roads. They go at a great pace even down steep
descents, where other horses neither would nor could do
the like. And Messer Marco was told that not long ago
they possessed in that province a breed of horses, descended
from Alexander’s horse Bucephalus, all of which had from
their birth a particular mark on the forehead. ‘This breed
was entirely in the hands of an uncle of the King’s; and
in consequence of his refusing to let the King have any of
them, the latter put him to death. The widow then, in
despite, destroyed the whole breed, and it is now extinct.

In the mountains there are vast numbers of sheep—
62 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

400, 500, or 600 in a single flock, and all of them wild;
and though many of them are taken, they never seem to
get aught the scarcer.

Those mountains are so lofty that ’tis a hard day’s work,
from morning till evening, to get to the top of them. On
getting up, you find an extensive plain, with great abundance
of grass and trees, and copious springs of pure water running
down through rocks and ravines. In those brooks are
found trout and many other fish of dainty kinds ; and the
air in those regions is so pure, and residence there so
healthful, that when the men who dwell below in the
towns, and in the valleys and plains, find themselves
attacked by any kind of fever or other ailment that may
hap, they lose no time in going to the hills; and after
abiding there two or three days, they quite recover their
health through the excellence of that air. And Messer
Marco said he had proved this by experience; for when
in those parts he had been ill for about a year, but as soon
as he was advised to visit that mountain he did so and
got well at once.

In this kingdom there are many strait and perilous
passes, so difficult to force that the people have no fear
of invasion. Their towns and villages also are on lofty
hills, and in very strong positions. They are excellent
archers, and much given to the chase; indeed, most of
them are dependent for clothing on the skins of beasts,
for stuffs are very dear among them. The great ladies,
however, are arrayed in stuffs, and I will tell you the style
of their dress. They all wear trousers made of cotton
cloth, and into the making of these some will put 60, 80,
or even roo ells of stuff.

OF THE PROVINCE OF PASHAI.

You must know that ten days’ journey to the south of
Badashan there is a Province called Pasuat, the people of
v.] HORSES OF BADAKSHAN. 63

which have a peculiar language, and are Idolaters, of a
brown complexion. They are great adepts in sorceries and
the diabolic arts. The men wear earrings and brooches of
gold and silver set with stones and pearls. They are a
pestilent people and a crafty ; and they live upon flesh and
rice. Their country is very hot.

Now let us proceed and speak of another country which
is seven days’ journey from this one towards the south-east,
and the name of which is KESHIMUR.

The Badakshan country is still famed for its
rubies, although the quality of the gems is not so
high as in earlier times; and the working of the
ruby mines is a monopoly in the hands of the govern-
ment. By “azure” Marco means lapis-lazuli, a
semi-precious stone of a beautiful blue colour, greatly
esteemed by gem-workers. As for the horses that
were claimed to have descended from the famous
Bucephalus of Alexander the Great, we may say
that many Oriental people are famous braggarts ;
and although the horses of Badakshan are still so
beautiful and strong that Afghan robbers continually
raid the country to steal them, it is unlikely that
any progeny of Bucephalus were then to be found
in any quarter of the world.

Keshimur, of which our traveller next speaks, is
readily understood to be Cashmere, lying just south
of the Hindu Kush, and famous for its shawls, attar
of roses, and other products. Here is Marco’s very
brief account of that province:
64 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

OF THE PROVINCE OF KESHIMUR.

Keshimur also is a Province inhabited by a people who
are Idolaters and have a language of their own. They
have an astonishing acquaintance with the devilries of en-
chantment; insomuch that they make their idols to speak.
They can also by their sorceries bring on changes of
weather and produce darkness, and do a number of things
so extraordinary that no one without seeing them would
believe them. Indeed, this country is the very original
source from which Idolatry has spread abroad.

In this direction you can proceed further till you come
to the Sea of India.

The men are brown and lean, but the women, taking
them as brunettes, are very beautiful. The food of the
people is flesh, and milk, and rice. The clime is finely
tempered, being neither very hot nor very cold.

There are in this country Eremites (after the fashion of
those parts). who dwell in seclusion and practise great
abstinence in eating and drinking. They keep from all
sins forbidden in their law, so that they are regarded by
their own folk as holy persons. They live to a great age.

There are also a number of idolatrous abbeys and
monasteries. The people of the province do not kill
‘animals nor spill blood; so if they want to eat meat they
get the Saracens who dwell among them to play the
butcher. The coral which is carried from our parts of
the world has a better sale there than in any other
country.

Now we will quit this country, and not go any further
in the same direction; for if we did so we should enter
India, and that I do not wish to do at present. For, on
our return journey, I mean to tell you about India: all in
regular order. Let us go back therefore to Badashan, for
we cannot otherwise proceed on our journey.
V.J MERE JUGGLERY. 65

The conjurers of Cashmere seem to have made
a great impression on Marco, who had seen them
before at the court of Kublai Khan. They had, and
still have, a wide reputation for their skill. Like
many other so-called magicians, they have the power
of-deceiving on-lookers to so great an extent that men
have soberly reported that they saw iron float in the
water, rocks rise in the air without being touched by
any one, and clouds come and go and mists fall, all
at the bidding of the magician. It is, of course, all
mere jugglery.

Marco’s statement that Buddhism, or “ Idolatry,’
as he styles it, spread from Cashmere, must be taken

?

with some allowance; for although that faith did
spread thence into Tibet and other lands where it
holds great power, it first went into Cashmere from
India. One of the first of the Ten Obligations, or
commandments, of Buddhism is to refrain from
taking life ; and the pious Eremites (or hermits) and
Buddhists whom Marco saw, while they did not
hesitate to eat meat, would not kill with their own
hands the animal that was to be eaten. That is still
the custom of the country ; the good Buddhist will
not cause death if he can possibly avoid it.
CHAPTER VI.

THE ROOF OF THE WORLD—HOW THE PAMIR COUNTRY BORDERS
ON THREE GREAT EMPIRES—-THE GREAT HORNED SHEEP OF
THE STEPPES—A MARVELLOUS STORY OF SAMARCAND.

E have heard much, of late years, about the

Pamir country; and we shall hear more
about it as time goes on: for the Pamir steppe, as
it is sometimes called, lies in the heart of Central
Asia, north-east of Afghanistan, south of Asiatic
Russia, and west of Turkestan. Therefore it borders
on the empires of Russia, China, and British India;
on its lofty plains may be fought more than one
battle for supremacy. It is a series of plateaus,
15,000 feet above the level of the sea; and some of
its loftiest mountain peaks are 25,000 feet above sea-
level. The first account of this wonderful region
was written by Marco Polo, and is as follows

In leaving Badashan you ride twelve days between east
and north-east, ascending a river that runs through land
belonging to a brother of the Prince of Badashan, and
containing a good many towns and villages and scattered
habitations. The people are Mahommetans, and valiant
Ch, VI.] THE ROOF OF THE WORLD. 67

in war. At the end of those twelve days you come to a
province of no great size, extending indeed no more than
three days’ journey in any direction, and this is called
Voxuan. The people worship Mahommet, and they have
a peculiar language. They are gallant soldiers, and they
have a chief whom they call Nonz, which is as much as
‘to say Count, and they are liegemen to the Prince of
Badashan.

There are numbers of wild beasts of all sorts in this
region. And when you leave this little country, and ride
three days north-east, always among mountains, you get
to such a height that ’tis said to be the highest place in
the world! And when you have got to this height, you
find a great lake between two mountains, and out of it a
fine river running through a plain clothed with the finest
pasture in the world; insomuch that a lean beast there
will fatten to your heart’s content in ten days. There are
great numbers of all kinds of wild beasts; among others,
wild sheep of great size, whose horns are a good six palms
in length. From these horns the shepherds make great
bowls to eat from, and they use the horns also to enclose
folds for their cattle at night. Messer Marco was told also
that the wolves were numerous, and killed many of those
wild sheep. Hence quantities of their horns and bones
were found, and these were made into great heaps by the
wayside in order to guide travellers when snow was on the
ground.

The Plain is called Pamrer, and you ride across it for
twelve days together, finding nothing but a desert without
habitations or any green thing, so that travellers are obliged
to carry with them whatever they have need of. The
region is so lofty and cold that you do not even see any
birds flying. And I must notice also that because of this
great cold, fire does not burn so brightly, nor give out so
much heat as usual, nor does it cook food so effectually.
68 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

Now, if we go on with our journey towards the east-
north-east, we travel a good forty days, continually passing
over mountains and hills, or through valleys, and crossing
many rivers and tracts of wilderness. And in all this way
you find neither habitation of man, nor any green thing,
but must carry with you whatever you require. The
country is called Botor. The people dwell high up in
the mountains, and are savage Idolaters, living only by
the chase, and clothing themselves in the skins of beasts.
They are in truth an evil race.

This is an interesting chapter of Marco’s book,
because it describes a region of which the outside
world knew nothing from his time until 1838, when
another European traveller, Captain John Wood,
passed over it, and verified the account written by
Marco Polo, more than six hundred years before.
The Tatars call the loftiest part of the Pamir country
the Bam-i-Duniah, or “ Roof of the World” ; it is the
highest level region to be found anywhere on the
globe. It is swept by cold winds, and even in
summer the dry snow is driven across its surface.

The great sheep of which Marco speaks are still
to be found there, and they have been named the
Ovzs Pol, in honour of Marco Polo, who first
described them. A pair of sheep horns, brought
home by Captain Wood, measured three feet from
tip to tip, and each horn was four feet and eight
inches in length, following the curve of the horn.
The animals are hunted by the Kirghiz who inhabit
VIL] OVIS POLI. 69

the lower steppes of that country; and Wood’s
narrative says: “We saw numbers of horns strewed
about in every direction, the spoils of the Kirghiz
hunter. Some of these were of an astonishingly
large size, and belonged to an animal between a
goat and a sheep, inhabiting the steppes of Pamir.
The ends of the horn projecting above the snow
often indicated the direction of the road,” which is
precisely what Marco has told us. Captain Wood,



OVIS POLI.

who crossed the Pamir in February, says, when-
ever they came in sight of a large number of these
big horns arranged in a semi-circle, they knew that
there had been a summer encampment of the Kirghiz
hunters.

What Marco says of the difficulty of cooking by
a fire at a great height is entirely correct. Water
boils at a lower temperature on the top of a high
mountain than it does in the plain at its foot. The
usual boiling-point is at 212 degrees, as every bright
youngster knows ; but on the tops of high mountains
JO THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

water boils at 179 or 180, and men unused to so
curious a phenomenon are puzzled to see the water
boiling, and the food remaining uncooked. The
pressure of the atmosphere is less on the mountain
top than it is in the plain, and the heat of the fire
causes the boiling of the water more quickly at the
greater altitude. Water boils at the top of Mount
Blanc at a temperature of 185 degrees.

MARCO TELLS A WONDERFUL STORY.

Samarcand lies in the southern part of Turkestan,
just north of Bokhara, and therefore it was behind
Marco Polo when he had passed the Pamir steppes:
evidently, he did not visit Samarcand, and could
not give us any information about the city ; so he

tells us this story:

Samarcan is a great and noble cicy towards the north-
west, inhabited by both Christians and Saracens, who are
subject to the great Kaan’s nephew, Caipou by name;
he is, however, at bitter enmity with the Kaan. I will tell
you of a great marvel that happened at this city.

It is not a great while ago that Sigatay, own brother to
the Great Kaan, who was lord of this country and of many
an one besides, became a Christian. The Christians re
joiced greatly at this, and they built a great church in the
city, in honour of John the Baptist; and by his name the
church was called. And they took a very fine stone which
belonged to the Saracens, and placed it as the pedestal of
a column in the middle of the church, supporting the roof.
It came to pass, however, that Sigatay died. Now the
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THE MIRACULOUS COLUMN,
V1.J A GLORIOUS MIRACLE. 71

Saracens were full of rancour about that stone that had been
theirs, and which had been set up in the church of the
Christians ; and when they saw that the Prince was dead,
they said one to another that now was the time to get back
their stone, by fair means or by foul. And that they might
well do, for they were ten times as many as the Christians.
So they gat together and went to the church and said
that the stone they must and would have. The Christians
acknowledged that it was theirs indeed, but offered to pay
a large sum of money and so be quit. Howbeit, the others
replied that they never would give up the stone for any-
thing in the world. And words ran so high that the Prince
heard thereof, and ordered the Christians either to arrange
to satisfy the Saracens, if it might be, with money, or to
give up the stone. And he allowed them three days to do
either the one thing or the other.

The Saracens would on no account agree to leave the
stone where it was, and this out of pure despite to the
Christians, for they knew well enough that if the stone
were stirred the church would come down by the run. So
the Christians were in great trouble and wist not what to
do. But they did do the best thing possible; they besought
Jesus Christ that He would consider their case, so that the
holy church should not come to destruction, nor the name
of its Patron Saint, John the Baptist, be tarnished by its
ruin. And so when the day fixed by the Prince came
round, they went to the church betimes in the morning,
and lo, they found the stone removed from under the
column ; the foot of the column was without support, and
yet it bore the load as stoutly as before! Between the
foot of the column and the ground there was a space of
three palms. So the Saracens had away their stone, and
mighty little joy withal. It was a glorious miracle, nay,
it is so, for the column still so standeth, and will stand as
long as God pleaseth.
72 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch. VI.

Marco was not often at a loss for real information
concerning the places of which he makes mention.
But in this case he was like some of the geographers,
of whom the wise Plutarch speaks when he says,
that they crowd into the edges of their maps
parts of the world about which they know nothing,
and add notes in the margin to the effect, that
“beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of
wild beasts and unapproachable bogs.” This remark
moved Dean Swift, the author of “ Gulliver’s Travels,”
to say:

So geographers, in Afric maps,
With savage pictures fill their gaps,

And o’er unhabitable downs
Place elephants for want of towns,
CHAPTER VII:

THE SEA OF SAND AND ITS MARVELS—THE FABLED SALAMANDER
AND ITS TRUE STORY—SOMETHING ABOUT ASBESTOS.

EAVING Turkestan, and entering China to the
eastward of Kashgar and Yarkand, Marco Polo
crossed the western end of the Great Sandy Desert
of Gobi, or Shamo, otherwise known to the Chinese
as the Sea of Sand. This vast extent of desert
extends over forty degrees of latitude, and has never
been fully explored even in our own day. In Marco’s
time it was a haunt of mystery, thought to be peopled
by the strange creatures of the air. That part
traversed by Marco is narrow, and he crossed it in a
south-westerly direction. Here is his account of the
Desert of Lop, or, as it is sometimes called, Lob:

Lop is a large town at the edge of the Desert, which is
called the Desert of Lop, and is situated between east
and north-east. It belongs to the Great Kaan, and the
people worship Mahommet. Now, such persons as pro-
pose to cross the Desert take a week’s rest in this town
to refresh themselves and their cattle ; and then they make
ready for the journey, taking with them a month’s supply for
man and beast. On quitting this city they enter the Desert.

73
74 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

The length of this Desert is so great that ’tis said it
‘would take a year and more to ride from one end of it to
the other. And here, where its breadth is least, it takes
a month to cross it. ’Tis all composed of hills and valleys
of sand, and not a thing to eat is to be found on. it.
But after riding for a day and a night you find fresh water
‘enough mayhap for some fifty or a hundred persons with
their beasts, but not for more. And all across the Desert
you will find water in like manner, that is to say, in some
twenty-eight places altogether you will find good water,
but in no great quantity ; and in four places also you find
brackish water.

Beasts there are none; for there is naught for them to
eat. But there is a marvellous thing related of this Desert,
which is that when travellers are on the move by night,
and one of them chances to lag behind, or to fall asleep
or the like, when he tries to gain his company again he
will hear spirits talking, and will suppose them to be his
comrades. Sometimes the spirits will call him by name;
and thus shall a traveller ofttimes be led astray, so that
he never finds his party. And in this way many have
perished. Sometimes the stray travellers will hear as it
were the tramp and hum of a great cavalcade of people
away from the real line of road, and taking this to be their
own company they will follow the sound; and when day
breaks they find that a cheat has been put on them, and
that they are in an ill plight. Even in the daytime one
hears those spirits talking. And sometimes you shall hear-
the sound of a variety of musical instruments, and still
more commonly the sound of drums. Hence in making
this journey ‘tis customary for travellers to keep close
together. All the animals too have bells at their necks,
so that they cannot easily get astray. And at sleeping-time |
a signal is put up to show the direction of the next march.

So thus it is that the Desert is crossed.
VII.) A HAUNTED DESERT. 716

Probably this tale of the desert, told by Marco
Polo, was one of those which gave him a bad name
among people who were ignorant of what really
goes on in the midst of a vast desert. From the
earliest times, men have associated deserts of land or
sea with mystery ; and all sorts of evil spirits were
believed to inhabit the waste places of the earth.
And those who heard Marco’s stories, or read them
afterwards, thought that they were the idle tales of
Oriental romancers.

But Marco’s tale is corroborated by the Chinese
historian Matwanlin, who writes: “You have to
cross a plain of sand, extending for more than one
hundred leagues. You see nothing in any direction
but the sky and the sands, without the slightest trace
of a road ; and travellers find nothing to guide them
but the bones of men and beasts and the droppings
of camels. During the passage of this wilderness
you hear sounds, sometimes of singing, sometimes of
wailing; and it has often happened that travellers,
going aside to see what those sounds might be, have
strayed from their course and been entirely lost;
for they were voices of spirits and goblins.” Another
Chinese writer, Hwen Thsang speaks of illusions,
such as visions of troops marching and halting with
gleaming arms and waving banners, constantly
shifting, vanishing, and reappearing. A voice behind
him calls, “Fear not! fear not!” Troubled by these
76 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

fantasies on one occasion, Hwen Thsang prayed to
Kwanin (a Buddhist divinity), but could not get rid
of them; though as soon as he had pronounced a
few words from the Prajna (a holy book) they
vanished in the twinkling of an eye.

And it is undoubtedly true that strange sounds
are often produced by the shifting of the sands,
especially in the night, after a hot day, when the
sand cools and the wind blows. It would be easy
for a superstitious person to believe that these sounds
were the voices of unseen creatures in the air.
Sometimes the sounds are like those of a bell, or of
a drum; and scientific writers have described the
places where they have been heard in various parts
of the world.

In the story of “The Boy Emigrants,” published in
1876, the author tells of a lad who hears, in the
midst of the Great American Desert, as it was
once called, the nine-o’clock bell ringing in his
New England home, far away. This really hap-
pened, and the author of the book actually thought
he heard the bell ring. So, too, the same party of
boy emigrants saw what they thought were trees,
water, and lovely hills, floating just above the edge
of the desert. That was a mirage; and people have
seen on the sea-coast a strange apparition of towers,
palaces, and lofty pinnacles, most beautiful to behold.
This is a natural phenomenon, and is called the
VII] THE SALAMANDER. 77

fata Morgana. So mueh for this “marvellous”
story, which no doubt has been called “one of
Marco Polo’s lies.”

In what he says about the fabulous salamander
we find some more truth; but he uses it to put to
ridicule an ancient fable. Here is his account:

Chingintalas is also a province at the verge of the Desert,
and lying between north-west and north. It is an extent
of sixteen days’ journey, and belongs to the Great Kaan,
and contains numerous towns and villages. There are
three different races of people in it—Idolaters, Saracens,
and some Nestorian Christians. At the northern extremity
of this province there is a mountain in which are excellent
veins of steel and ondanique. And you must know that
in the same mountain there is a vein of the substance from
which Salamander is made. For the real truth is that the
Salamander is no beast, as they allege in our part of the
world, but is a substance found in the earth; and I will
tell you about it.

Everybody must be aware that it can be no animal’s
nature to live in fire, seeing that every animal is com-
posed of all the four elements. Now I, Marco Polo, had
a Turkish acquaintance of the name of Zurficar, and he
was a very clever fellow. And this Turk related how
he had lived three years in that region on behalf of the
Great Kaan, in order to procure those Salamanders for
him. He said that the way they got them was by digging
- in that mountain till they found a certain vein. The sub-
stance of this vein was then taken and crushed, and when
so treated it divides as it were into fibres of wool, which
they set forth to dry. When dry, these fibres were pounded
in a great copper mortar, and then washed, so as to remove
78 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

all the earth, and to leave only the fibres like fibres of
wool. These were then spun, and made into napkins.
When first made, these napkins are not very white, but
by putting them into the fire for a while they come out
as white as snow. And so again whenever they become
dirty they are bleached by being put in the fire.

Now this, and naught else, is the truth about the
Salamander, and the people of the country all say the
same. Any other account. of the matter is fabulous non-
sense. And I may add that they have at Rome a napkin
of this stuff, which the Grand Kaan sent to the Pope.

Modern geographers are uncertain as to the
precise location of the province of Chingintalas;
but probably it lies somewhere east of Kamul,
in Chinese Tatary. The story of the salamander,
an animal which could pass unharmed through
the fire, is one of the oldest in the world. The
ancient Greeks thought it true; and in the Middle
Ages it was believed that the salamander’s body was
covered with a soft white wool which could be made
into threads, and spun and woven into cloth. But
the general belief was that the creature was like a
lizard in shape; and it was said that if anybody
kept a fire burning for one whole year and one day,
without it ever once going out, a salamander would
appear and play about in the live coals.

So far as we know, Marco Polo was the first to
dispose of this fable, and tell the truth about the
salamander. The stuff called by the Tatars “sala-
VIL] ONDANIQUE. 79

mander’s wool” was merely asbestos, a mineral sub-
stance with a considerable fibre, which can be spun
out and woven. It is indestructible by fire; and the
crude mass may be cleaned and made into sheets
for various purposes, such as wrapping steam-pipes
and water-pipes, as is done in our own country. The ,
salamander is heard of nomore. The “ ondanique,” of
which our traveller speaks more than once, is a very
superior kind of iron ore from which the Orientals
made their famous steel sword-blades, which were
of so exceeding fine temper that a blade could be
doubled into a hoop without breaking.
CHAPTER VIII.

HOW JENGHIZ KHAN DEFEATED PRESTER JOHN—THE MYTHICAL
CHRISTIAN KING AND THE MONGOL CONQUEROR—DIVINERS
AND THEIR TRICKS—TATAR MIGRATIONS,

OW we come to a fabulous personage whose
existence was generally believed in by Euro-
peans for hundreds of years and up to the time of
Columbus. This was Presbyter John, a Christian
prince, who was supposed to reign over a rich and
powerful kingdom somewhere in Central Asia “east
of Armenia and Persia,’ which is a pretty vague
way of putting the case. Sometimes he was said
to reign on the eastern coast of Africa; and his
name was shortened from Presbyter to Prester.
Several European potentates sent letters to Prester
John, and tried to find him and his kingdom. But
the mysterious Sovereign was never found. What
Marco Polo says about Prester John, therefore, must
be taken with many degrees of allowance for the
superstitions of the time. What he says about
Jenghiz Khan, however, is worthy of respect and

belief; and this account of the origin of the Mongol
80
Ch, VIII] JENGHIZ KHAN. 81

Empire is interesting, for it is history which Marco
gives us now.

OF CHINGHIS, AND HOW HE BECAME THE FIRST
KAAN OF THE TARTARS.

Now it came to pass in the year 1187 that the Tartars
made them a King whose name was CHINGHIS KAAN.
He was a man of great worth, and of great ability, elo-
quence, and valour. And as soon as the news that he
had been chosen King was spread abroad through those
countries, all the Tartars in the world came to him and
owned him for their Lord. And right well did he main-
tain the Sovereignty they had given him. What shall I
say? The Tartars gathered to him in astonishing mul-
titude, and when he saw such numbers he made a great
furniture of spears and arrows and such other arms as
they used, and set about the conquest of all those regions
till he had conquered eight provinces. When he con-
quered a province he did no harm to the people or their
property, but merely established some of his own men in
the country along with a proportion of theirs, whilst he
led the remainder to the conquest of other provinces.
And when those whom he had conquered became aware
how well and safely he protected them against all others,
and how they suffered no ill at his hands, and saw what a
noble prince he was, then they joined him heart and soul
and became his devoted followers. And when he had
thus gathered such a multitude that they seemed to cover
the earth, he began to think of conquering a great part
of the world. Now in the year 1200 he sent an embassy
to Prester John, and desired to have his daughter to
wife. But when Prester John heard that Chinghis Kaan
demanded his daughter in marriage he waxed very wroth,
and said to the Envoys: “ What impudence is this, to

i 6
82 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. {Ch.

ask my daughter to wife? Wist he not well that he was
my liegeman and serf? Get ye back to him and tell him
that I had liever set my daughter in the fire than give
her in marriage to him, and that he deserves death at my
hand, rebel and traitor that he is!” So he bade the Envoys
begone at once, and never come into his presence again.
The Envoys, on receiving this reply, departed straightway,
and made haste to their master, and related all that Prester
John had ordered them to say, keeping nothing back.

HOW CHINGHIS MUSTERED HIS PEOPLE TO MARCH
AGAINST PRESTER JOHN.

When Chinghis Kaan heard the brutal message that
Prester John had sent him, such rage seized him that his
heart came nigh to bursting within him, for he was a man
of a very lofty spirit. At last he spoke, and that so loud
that all who were present could hear him: “ Never more
might he be Prince if he took not revenge for the brutal
message of Prester John, and such revenge that insult
never in this world was so dearly paid for. And before
long Prester John should know whether he were his serf
or no!”

So then he mustered all his forces, and levied such a’
host as never before was seen or heard of, sending word
to Prester John to be on his defence. And when Prester
John had sure tidings that Chinghis was really coming
against him with such a multitude, he still professed to
treat it as a jest and a trifle, for, quoth he, “ These be no
soldiers.” Natheless he marshalled his forces and mustered
his people, and made great preparations, in order that if
Chinghis did come he might take him and put him to
death. In fact, he marshalled such an host of many
different nations that it was a world’s wonder.

And so both sides gat ready to battle. Chinghis Kaan
VIII.J READY FOR BATTLE. 83

with all his host arrived at a vast and beautiful plain which
was called Tanpuc, belonging to Prester John, and there
he pitched his camp; and so great was the multitude of
his people that it was impossible to number them. And
when he got tidings that Prester John was coming he
rejoiced greatly, for the place afforded a fine and ample
battle-ground, so he was right glad to tarry for him there,
and greatly longed for his arrival.

HOW PRESTER JOHN MARCHED TO MEET CHINGHIS.

Now the story goes that when Prester John became aware
that Chinghis with his host was marching against him, he
went forth to meet him with all his forces, and advanced
until he reached the same plain of Tanduc, and pitched
his camp over against that of Chinghis Kaan, at a distance
of twenty miles. And then both armies remained at rest
for two days that they might be fresher and heartier for
battle.

So when the two great hosts were pitched on the plains
of Tanduc as you have heard, Chinghis Kaan one day
summoned before him his astrologers, both Christians and
Saracens, and desired them to let him know which of the
two hosts would gain the battle, his own or Prester John’s.
The Saracens tried to ascertain, but were unable to give
a true answer; the Christians, however, did give a true
answer, and showed manifestly beforehand how the event
should be. For they got a cane and split it lengthwise, and
laid one half on this side and one half on that, allowing no
one to touch the pieces. And one piece of cane they
called Chinghis Kaan, and the other piece they called
Prester John. And then they said to Chinghis: “ Now
mark! and you will see the event of the battle, and who
shall have the best of it; for whose cane soever shall get
above the other, to him shall victory be.” He replied that
84 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

he would fain see it, and bade them begin. Then the
Christian astrologers read a Psalm out of the Psalter, and
went through other incantations. And lo! whilst all were
beholding, the cane that bore the name of Chinghis Kaan,
without being touched by anybody, advanced to the other
that bore the name of Prester John, and got on the top
of it. When the Prince saw that, he was greatly delighted ;
and seeing how in this matter he found the Christians to
tell the truth, he always treated them with great respect,
and held them for men of truth for ever after.

THE BATTLE BETWEEN CHINGHIS KAAN AND
PRESTER JOHN.

And after both sides had rested well those two days,
they armed for the fight and engaged in desperate combat ;
and it was the greatest battle that ever was seen. The
numbers that were slain on both sides were very great,
but in the end Chinghis Kaan obtained the victory. And
in the battle Prester John was slain. And from that
time forward, day by day, his kingdom passed into the
hands of Chinghis Kaan till the whole was conquered.

I may tell you that Chinghis Kaan reigned six years
after this battle, engaged continually in conquest, and
taking many a province and city and stronghold. But
at the end of those six years he went against a certain
castle that was called Caaju, and there he was shot with
an arrow in the knee, so that he died of his wound. A
great pity it was, for he was a valiant man and a wise.

It is difficult to understand that “Christian” men
were among the astrologers, who practised magical arts
to find out whether the Great Khan or his adversary
would be victorious in the battle which was to be
VIII] DIVINING-RODS. 85

fought. We know, however, that Jenghiz Khan was
one of the mighty conquerors of that age ; and that
he was the victor in the fight with the so-called
Prester John we need have no doubt.

Rods and wands have been used for divining
purposes all over the world, and in some parts of the
world they are used to this day ; not only in Oriental
countries, where the people are ignorant and super-
stitious, but in England and America. Money-
diggers, or men hunting for buried treasure, pretend
to find the gold underground by means of divining-
rods ; and others hunt for water with wands or forked
sticks from a green tree, the notion being that the
stick will bend down to the earth when the “ diviner ”
walks over an underground spring.
CHAPTER EX,

MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF A STRANGE PEOPLE—CONCERNING
THE TATARS AND THEIR WAYS—THE ORIGIN OF CONDENSED
MILK,

ARCO is now on familiar ground, and the

accounts which he gives us of the manners

and customs of the Tatars, both in peace and war,
are not only entertaining but true to life.

CONCERNING THE CUSTOMS OF THE TARTARS.

You should be told that all the Grand Kaans, and all
the descendants of Chinghis their first Lord, are carried
to a mountain that is called Altay to be interred. Where-
soever the Sovereign may die, he is carried to his burial
in that mountain with his predecessors; no matter, an
- the place of his death were one hundred days’ journey
distant, thither must he be carried to his burial.

Let me tell you a strange thing too. When they are
carrying the body of any Emperor to be buried with the
others, the convoy that goes with the body doth put to
the sword all whom they fall in with on the road, saying :
Go and wait upon your Lord in the other world!” For
they do in sooth believe that all such as they slay in this

manner do go to serve their Lord in the other world.
84
Ch. IX.] PORTABLE HUTS. 87

They do the same too with horses; for when the Emperor
dies, they kill all his best horses, in order that he may
have the use of them in the other world, as they believe.
And I tell you as a certain truth, that when Mongou Kaan
died more than twenty thousand persons, who chanced to
meet the body on its way, were slain in the manner I have
told.

Now that we have begun to speak of the Tartars, I
have plenty to tell you on that subject. The Tartar custom
is to spend the winter in warm plains, where they find
good pasture for their cattle, whilst in summer they betake
themselves to a cool climate among the mountains and
valleys, where water is to be found as well as woods
and pastures.

Their houses are circular, and are made of wands covered
with felts. These are carried along with them whithersoever
they go; for the wands are so strongly bound together,
and likewise so well combined, that the frame can be made
very light. Whenever they erect these huts the door is
always to the south. They also have waggons covered
with black felt so efficaciously that no rain can get in.
These are drawn by oxen and camels, and the women
and children travel in them. The women do the buying
and selling, and whatever is necessary to provide for the
husband and household ; for the men all lead the life of
gentlemen, troubling themselves about nothing but hunting
and hawking, and looking after their goshawks and falcons,
unless it be the practice of warlike exercises.

They live on the milk and meat which their herds
supply, and on the produce of the chase; and they eat
all kinds of flesh, including that of horses and dogs, and
Pharaoh’s rats, of which last there are great numbers in
burrows on those plains.
88 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch

CONCERNING THE TARTAR CUSTOMS OF WAR.

All their harness of war is excellent and costly. Their
arms are bows and arrows, sword and mace; but above
all the bow, for they are capital archers, indeed the best
that are known. On their backs they wear armour of
cuirbouly, prepared from buffalo and other hides, which
is very strong. They are excellent soldiers, and passing
valiant in battle. They are also more capable of hardships
than other nations; for many a time, if need be, they
will go for a month without any supply of food, except
milk and such game as their bows may win them. Their
horses also will subsist entirely on the grass of the plains,
so that there is no need to carry store of barley or straw
or oats; and they are very docile to their riders. These,
in case of need, will abide on horseback the livelong night,
armed at all points, while the horse will be continually '
grazing.

Of all troops in the world these are they which endure
the greatest hardship and fatigue, and which cost the
least ; and they are the best of all for making wide con-
quests of country. And this you will perceive from what
you have heard and shall hear in this book; and (as a
fact) there can be no manner of doubt that now they
are the masters of the biggest half of the world. Their
troops are admirably ordered in the manner that I shal]
now relate.

You see, when a Tartar prince goes forth to war, he takes
with him, say, one hundred thousand horse. Well, he
appoints an officer to every ten men, one to every hundred,
one to every thousand, and one to every ten thousand, so
that his own orders have to be given to ten persons only,
and each of these ten persons has to pass the orders only
to other ten, and so on; no one having to give orders
to more than ten. And every one. in turn is responsible
IX] CONDENSED MILK. 89

only to the officer immediately over him ; and the discipline
and order that comes of this method is marvellous, for
they are a people very obedient to their chiefs. Further,
they call the corps of one hundred thousand men a Zuc;
that of ten thousand they call a Zoman; the thousand
they call Aimy; the hundred Guz; the ten On. And
when the army is on the march, they have always two
hundred horsemen, very well mounted, who are sent a
distance of two marches in advance to reconnoitre, and
these always keep ahead. They have a similar party
detached in the rear, and on either flank, so that there is
a good look-out kept on all sides against asurprise. When
they are going on a distant expedition, they take no gear
with them except two leather bottles for milk, a little
earthenware pot to cook their meat in, and a little tent
to shelter them from rain. And in case of great urgency
they will ride ten days without lighting a fire or taking
a meal.

They also have milk dried into a kind of paste to carry
with them; and when they need food they put this into
water, and beat it up till it dissolves, and then drink it.
It is prepared in this way: they boil the milk, and when
the rich part floats on the top they skim it into another
vessel,, and of that they make butter; for the milk will
not become solid till this is removed. Then they put the
milk into the sun to dry. And when they go on an expedi-
tion, every man takes some ten pounds of this dried milk
with him. And of a morning he will take a half-pound of
it and put it in his leather bottle, with as much water
as he pleases. So, as he rides along, the milk-paste and
the water in the bottle get well churned together into a
kind of pap, and that makes his dinner.

When they come to an engagement with the enemy,
they will gain the victory in this fashion. They never let
themselves get into a regular medley, but keep perpetually
go THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

riding round and shooting into the enemy. And as
they do not count it any shame to run away in battle,
they will sometimes pretend to do so, and in running
away they turn in the saddle and shoot hard and strong
at the foe, and in this way make great havoc. Their
horses are trained so perfectly that they will double hither
and thither, just like a dog, in a way that is quite aston-
ishing. Thus they fight to as good purpose in running
away as if they stood and faced the enemy, because of
the vast volleys of arrows that they shoot in this way,
turning round upon their pursuers, who are fancying that
they have won the battle. But when the Tartars see that
they have killed and wounded a good many horses and
men, they wheel round bodily, and return to the charge
in perfect order and with loud cries; and in a very short
time the enemy are routed. In truth, they are stout and
valiant soldiers, and inured to war. And you perceive
that it is just when the enemy sees them run, and imagines
that he has gained the battle, that he has in reality lost
it; for the Tartars wheel round in a moment when they
judge the right time has come. And after this fashion
they have won many a fight.

All this that I have been telling you is true of the
manners and customs of the genuine Tartars. But I must
add also that in these days they are greatly degenerated ;
for those who are settled in Cathay have taken up the
practices of the Idolaters of the country, and have aban-
doned their own institutions ; whilst those who have settled
in the Levant have adopted the customs of the Saracens.

The huts in which the Tatars lived in Marco Polo’s
time were just like those used to-day by the wander-
ing tribes of Central Asia. These slight houses were
built of a light frame-work of osiers, or willow wands,
fa
Oo
a4
<
a
Q
a
a
Zz
3
n
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<
a
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IX.] THE JERBOA. or

bent to form a rounded, dome-like hut; and this
was covered with felt, or cloth, made waterproof by
being soaked in tallow or milk. Some of the larger
huts were built on wheels, and when the tribe was
travelling, the chiefs and their families would ride
within one of these big vehicles very comfortably,
if not luxuriously. One traveller, Friar Rubruquis,
who saw some of the Tatars on their march, measured
the space between the wheels of one of the great
waggons, and found it to be twenty feet. “The
axle,” he says, “was like a ship’s mast, and twenty-
two oxen were yoked to the waggon, eleven abreast.”
One of the huts which Rubruquis saw was thirty
feet in diameter and projected ten feet beyond the
wheels.

The animals to which Marco refers as “ Pharaoh’s
rats” were probably a species of marmot, very
common in Egypt, Asia Minor, and Central Asia,
and sometimes called the jerboa. Behind, it is formed
like a long-legged little beast, and is a famous jumper,
as is the kangaroo rat, which it closely resembles.
The creature feeds on grass and roots, like the
American “prairie dog,” and its flesh is esteemed
a delicacy.

The Tatars fought with bows and arrows of great
power and weight, with which they wrought havoc
among their enemies, so that they were known among
the other nations as “The Archers.” __ They made
92 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

shields and other harness for warlike purposes of
leather, which had been boiled and then moulded to
any desired form while it was soft and warm. This
is the “cuirbouly ” alluded to by Marco.

Evidently the Tatars of those far-off days knew
how to condense milk, although we regard that
process as a modern invention. Marco says that
they dried the milk in the sun. We can understand
how some of his critics would laugh at the notion
that milk could be dried to a paste; but Marco
is right, for it can be done, nevertheless.

Marco Polo’s account of some of the other curious
customs of the Tatars will be found interesting :

CONCERNING THE ADMINISTERING OF JUSTICE AMONG
THE TARTARS.

The way they administer justice is this. When any one
has committed a petty theft, they give him, under the
orders of authority, seven blows of a stick, or seventeen,
or twenty-seven, or thirty-seven, or forty-seven, and so
forth, always increasing by tens in proportion to the injury
done, and running up to one hundred and seven. Of these
beatings sometimes they die. But if the offence be horse-
stealing, or some other great matter, they cut the thief in
two with a sword. Howbeit, if he be able to ransom him-
self by paying nine times the value of the thing stolen, he
is let off. Every Lord or other person who possesses
beasts has them marked with his peculiar brand, be they
horses, mares, camels, oxen, cows, or other great cattle, and
then they are sent abroad to graze over the plains without
IX.] POSTHUMOUS NUPTIALS. 93

any keeper. They get all mixed together, but eventually
every beast is recovered by means of its owner’s brand,
which is known. For their sheep and goats they have
shepherds. All their cattle are remarkably fine, big, and in
good condition.

They have another notable custom, which is this: If
any man have a daughter who dies before marriage, and
another man have had a son also die before marriage, the
parents arrange a grand wedding between the dead lad and
lass. And marry them they do, making a regular contract!
And when the contract papers are made out they put them
in the fire, in order (as they will have it) that the parties
in the other world may know the fact, and so look on each
other as man and wife. And the parents thenceforward
consider themselves sib to each other, just as if their
children had lived and married. Whatever may be agreed
upon between the parties as dowry, those who have to pay
cause it to be painted on pieces of paper, and then put
these in the fire, saying that in that way the dead person
will get all the real articles in the other world.
CHAPTER X.

TIBET—THE ‘GRUNTING OXEN” OF THAT REGION—MUSK-DEER
AND OTHER ANIMALS.

AVING given us some description of the

manners and customs of the Mongol Tatars,
Marco Polo works his way south-westward toward the
frontier of Tibet. In the country of Sinju (as he
calls Siningfu, the Chinese city nearest the Tibetan
frontier), he saw many interesting beasts and birds.
In describing some of these he says:

There are wild cattle in that country almost as big as
elephants, splendid creatures, covered everywhere but on
the back with shaggy hair a good four palms long. They
are partly black, partly white, and really wonderfully fine
creatures, and the hair or wool is extremely fine and white,
finer and whiter than silk. Messer Marco brought some to
Venice as a great curiosity, and so it was reckoned by
those who saw it. There are also plenty of them tame,
which have been caught young. These the people use
commonly for burden and general work, and in the plough
as well; and at the latter they will do full twice as much
work as any other cattle, being such very strong beasts.

In this country, too, is found the best musk in the
world ; and I will tell you how ’tis produced. There exists.

94
Ch. X.] YAKS. 95

in that region a kind of wild animal like a gazelle. It has
feet and tail like the gazelle’s, and stag’s hair of a very
coarse kind, but no horns. It has four tusks, two below,
and two above, about three inches long, and slender in
form, one pair growing upward, and the other downward.
It is a very pretty creature. The musk is found in this
way: When the creature has been taken, they find between
the flesh and the skin something like an impostume full of
blood, which they cut out and remove with all the skin
attached to it. And the blood inside this impostume is
the musk that produces that powerful perfume. There is
an immense number of these beasts in the country we are
speaking of. The flesh is very good to eat. Messer
Marco brought the dried head and feet of one of these
animals to Venice with him.

The people are traders and artisans, and also grow
abundance of corn. The province has an extent of twenty-
six days’ journey. Pheasants are found there twice as big
as ours, indeed nearly as big as a peacock, and having tails
of seven to ten palms in length ; and besides them other
pheasants in aspect like our own, and birds of many other
kinds, and of beautiful variegated plumage. ‘The people,
who are Idolaters, are fat folks with little noses and black
hair, and no beard, except a few hairs on the upper lip.
The women too have very smooth and white skins, and in
every respect are pretty creatures.

The large animals, mentioned first in the extract we
have given, of which Marco speaks as being “almost
as big as elephants,” are yaks, sometimes called
“grunting oxen” on account of the peculiar noise
they make. The yak may be tamed and used as a
beast of burden ; and generations of them have been
96 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

so used in Tibet and China. But the wild yak is
much larger than the captive of its species, and is also
very fierce, with big, curving horns, and long white
hair on its lower parts. These creatures are some-
times six feet high, and seven or eight feet long.

The Chinese pheasant mentioned by our traveller
is a handsome bird, specimens of which have been
brought to this country since the spread of com-
merce between China and the rest of the world.
Marco’s description is not exaggerated. The feathers
of the pheasant are partly golden and partly azure,
mingled with a reddish brown; and the tail feathers
are sometimes seven feet long. Marco’s “ten palms”
length was rather an understatement.

Musk-deer are still hunted on the frontiers of
China and Tibet; and the musk used in the per-
fumery trade comes from China and Burmah,
having been previously brought from the region
referred to by Marco Polo. The little animal, how-
ever, has only two canine teeth, or “tusks,” and not
four, as described by Marco. Formerly musk was
used as a medicine in various parts of the world ; but
doctors in civilised lands do not hold it in high
repute. In China it is still thought to be a very good
medicine ; but the Chinese have queer notions about
cures and charms. Abbé Huc, a distinguished
traveller, says that when a Tatar doctor finds himself
without his drugs and medicines he is not in the





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x] PAPER PILLS. 97

least embarrassed. He writes the names of the needed
drugs on slips of paper, and these, being rolled up in
little balls, are swallowed by the sick man. “To
swallow the name of a remedy, or the remedy itself,”
say the Tatars, “comes to precisely the same thing.”
CHAPTER XI.

WHO WERE GOG AND MAGOG ?—THE SPLENDOURS OF THE COURT
OF KUBLAI KHAN—COLERIDGE’S POEM ‘IN XANADU.”

URNING his face again to the eastward, Marco

takes us to one of the localities near the Great
Wall; for although he never once makes mention
of that wonder of the world, many eminent writers
suppose that he had in his mind its ramparts when
he speaks thus of the region which he says is
Tenduc:

“ Here also is what we call the country of Gog or Magog;
they, however, call it Ung and Mungul, after the names of
two races of people that existed in that province before the
migration of the Tartars. Ung was the title of the people
of the country, and Mungul a name sometimes applied to
Tartars.”

The Great Wall was built before the Tatars, that is
Mongols, had overrun China, and was intended to
keep them out. It begins at the Kiayu Pass, near
the Desert of Gobi, in one of the extreme western

provinces of China, and extends to the mouth of the
98


THE GREAT WALL AND THE RAMPART OF GOG AND MAGOG.
Ch. XL] GOG AND MAGOG. 99

Gulf of Liau-tong, on the eastern coast, about
fourteen hundred miles. Part of the way, the wall is
double, and even triple, so that the actual length of
the builded structure is estimated to be two thousand
miles. Its height varies, but is generally about
twenty feet ; it is twenty-five feet broad at the base,
and fifteen feet at the top. The towers which are
built along the wall are three hundred feet apart, and
about forty feet high. The material used is brick
and stone laid up in thick walls, and filled in with
earth. The part of the wall which lies to the
westward has been called the Rampart of Gog and
Magog.

Who were Gog and Magog? English tradition
says that they were the last of a race of giants who
infested England, until they were destroyed by some
of the Trojans, who went to the British Isles after the
destruction of Troy. Gog and Magog, it is said,
were taken captive to London, where they were
chained at the door of the king’s palace. When
they died, wooden images of the two giants were
put in their places. In course of time a great fire
destroyed these; but now, if you are in London,
you will see in the Guildhall two immense wooden
effigies of men, called Gog and Magog.

But there are other traditions of the two giants.
One is to the effect that, when Alexander the Great
overran Asia, he chased into the mountains of the
100 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. .[Ch.

North an impure, wicked, and man-eating people,
who were twenty-two nations in number, and who
were shut up with a rampart in which were gates of
brass or iron. One of these nations was Goth and
another Magoth, from which we readily get the
names of the mythical giants. It is probable, how-
ever, that the Turks were meant by Gog, and that
the Mongols were the children of Magog. We find
mention made of Gog and Magog in many books,
including the Bible; but there is the Great Wall and
the Rampart of Gog and Magog, whatever may have
been the fact which gave the names of the two giants
to that portion of the structure.

Outside of the walls, and north of Kalgan, was
the summer palace of Kublai Khan, in the city of
Kaipingfu, or City of Peace; and here the three
Polos found the Great Khan when they first came
together to visit him. The palace was called Chandu
by Marco, but Xandu is believed to be the proper
way of spelling the title. The traveller’s description,
as we shall see, is very enjoyable, and we can imagine
that young Marco had a good time viewing its glories
and its magnificence. He says:

And when you have ridden three days from the city
last mentioned, between north-east and north, you come
to a city called Cuanpu, which was built by the Kaan
now reigning. There is at the place a very fine Marble
Palace, the rooms of which are all gilt, and painted with
XI.] A CANF-BUILT PALACE. IOI

figures of men and beasts and birds, and with a variety
of trees and flowers, all executed with such exquisite art
that you regard them with delight and astonishment.

Round this Palace a wall is built, enclosing a compass
of sixteen miles, and inside the Park there are fountains
and rivers and brooks and beautiful meadows, with all
kinds of wild animals (excluding such as are of ferocious
nature), which the Emperor has procured and placed there
to supply food for his gerfalcons and hawks, which he
keeps here in mew. Of these there are more than two
hundred gerfalcons alone, without reckoning the other
hawks. The Kaan himself goes every week to see his
birds sitting in mew, and sometimes he rides through the
Park with a leopard behind him on his horse’s croup ;

and then if he sees any animal that takes his fancy, he
' slips his leopard at it, and the game when taken is
made over to feed the hawks in mew. This he does
for diversion.

Moreover, at a spot in the Park where there is a charm-
ing wood, he has another Palace built of cane, of which
I must give you a description. It is gilt all over, and
most elaborately finished inside. It is stayed on gilt and
lacquered columns, on each side of which is a dragon all
gilt, the tail of which is attached to the column, whilst the
head supports the architrave, and the claws likewise are
stretched out right and left to support the architrave.
The roof, like the rest, is formed of canes, covered with
a varnish so strong and excellent that no amount of rain
will rot them. These canes are a good three palms in
girth, and from ten to fifteen paces in length. They are
cut across at each knot, and then the pieces are split so
as to form from each two hollow tiles, and with these the
house is roofed; only, every such tile of cane has to be
nailed down to prevent the wind from lifting it. In short,
the whole Palace is built of these canes, which serve also
102 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

for a great variety of other useful purposes. The con-
struction of the Palace is so devised that it can be taken
down and put up again with great celerity; and it can
all be taken to pieces and removed whithersoever the
Emperor may command. When erected, it is braced
against mishaps from the wind by more than two hundred
cords of silk.

The Lord abides at this Park of his, dwelling sometimes
in the Marble Palace and sometimes in the Cane Palace
for three months of the year, to wit, June, July, and
August, preferring this residence because it is by no
means hot; in fact, it is a very cool place. When the
28th day of August arrives he takes his departure, and
the Cane Palace is taken to pieces. But I must tell you
what happens when he goes away from this Palace every
year on the 28th of August.

You must know that the Kaan keeps an immense stud of
white horses and mares; in fact, more than ten thousand
of them, and all pure white without a speck. The milk
of these mares is drunk by himself and his family, and
by none else, except by those of one great tribe that
have also the privilege of drinking it. This privilege was
granted them by Chinghis Kaan, on account of a certain
victory that they helped him to win long ago. The name
of the tribe is Horiad.

Now when these mares are passing across the country,
and any one falls in with them, be he the greatest lord
in the land, he must not presume to pass until the mares
have gone by; he must either tarry where he is, or go
a half-day’s journey round if need so be, so as not to
come nigh them; for they are to be treated with the
greatest respect. Well, when the Lord sets out from the
Park on the 28th of August, as I told you, the milk of all
those mares is taken and sprinkled on the ground. And
this is done on the injunction of the Idolaters and Idol
XI.] WEATHER-CONJURERS. 103

Priests, who say that it is an excellent thing to sprinkle
that milk on the ground every 28th of August, so that the
Earth and the Air and the False Gods shall have their
share of it, and the Spirits likewise that inhabit the Ait
and the Earth. And thus those beings will protect and
bless the Kaan and his children and his wives and his
folk and his gear, and his cattle and his horses, his corn,
and all that is his. After this is done, the Emperor is off
and away.

But I must now tell you a strange thing that hitherto
I have forgotten to mention. During the three months
of every year that the Lord resides at that place, if it
should happen to be bad weather, there are certain crafty
enchanters and astrologers in his train, who are such adepts
in necromancy and the diabolic arts, that they are able
to prevent any cloud or storm from passing over the spot
on which the Emperor’s Palace stands. The sorcerers
who do this are called TEpET and KeEsimur, which are the
names of two nations of Idolaters.

There is another marvel performed by those Bacst, of
whom I have been speaking as knowing so many enchant-
ments. For when the Great Kaan is at his capital and
in his great Palace, seated at his table, which stands on
a platform some eight cubits above the ground, his cups
are set before him on a great buffet in the middle of
the hall pavement, at a distance of some ten paces from
his table, and filled with wine, or other good spiced liquor
such as they use. Now when the Lord desires to drink,
these enchanters by their enchantments cause the cups
to move from their places without being touched by any-
body, and to present themselves to the Emperor! This
every one present may witness, and there are ofttimes more
than ten thousand persons thus present. "Tis a truth and
no lie! and so will tell you the sages of our own country
who understand necromancy, for they also can perform it.
104 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

And when the Idol Festivals come round, these Bacsi
go to the Prince and say: “Sire, the feast of such a god
is come” (naming him). ‘My Lord, you know,” the
enchanters will say, “that this god, when he gets no offer-
ings, always sends bad weather and spoils our seasons, So
we pray you to give us such and such a number of
black-faced sheep” (naming whatever number they please).
“ And we beg also, good my Lord, that we may have such
a quantity of incense, and such a quantity of lignaloes,
and”—so much of this, so much of that, and so much
of t’other, according to their fancy—“ that we may perform
a solemn service and a great sacrifice to our Idols, and
that so they may be induced to protect us and all that
is ours.”

The Bacsi say these things to the Barons entrusted
with the stewardship, who stand round the Great Kaan,
and these repeat them to the Kaan, and he then orders
the Barons to give everything that the Bacsi have asked
for. And when they have got the articles, they go and
make a great feast in honour of their god, and hold
great ceremonies of worship with grand illuminations and
quantities of incense of a variety of odours, which they
make up from different aromatic spices. And then they
cook the meat, and set it before the Idols, and sprinkle
the broth hither and thither. Thus it is that they keep
their festivals. You must know that each of the Idols
has a name of his own, and a feast-day, just as our Saints
have their anniversaries.

They have also immense Minsters and Abbeys, some
of them as big as a small town, with more than two
thousand monks (7.e. after their fashion) in a single abbey.
These monks dress more decently than the rest of the
people, and have the head and beard shaven. There are
some among these Bacsi who are allowed by their rule
to take wives, and who have plenty of children.
XL] “IN XANADU.” 105

The glories of Chandu, or Xandu, have been cele-
brated by many travellers since Marco’s time. The
city and the palace have long since disappeared, but
one traveller saw the ruins still standing when he
visited the site, towards the close of the seventeenth
century. It was just after reading Marco Polo’s
description of the splendours of the court of Kublai
Khan at Xandu that Coleridge, the poet, fell asleep
and dreamed the famous poem beginning with these
lines :

In Xanadu did Kublai Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree,

Where Alph, the sacred river, ran,

Through caverns measureless to man,
Down to a sunless sea.

So twice five miles of fertile ground

With walls and towers were girdled round:

And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree;

And here were forests, ancient as the hills,
Enfolding spots of sunny greenery.

The Chinese emperors, long after the descendants
of Kublai Khan had vanished from the Celestial
Empire, were in the habit of spending the hot weather
at a very beautiful summer palace, far to the north of
Peking, which was one of the wonders of the world.
It was wantonly destroyed by the allied armies of
France and England, during the war of 1860. This
palace, which was filled with a vast quantity of
precious objects of art and rare fabrics, was known as
106 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch, XI.

the Yuen-min-Yuen. One of its pavilions may give
our readers some idea of the appearance, though not
of the extent, of the Great Khan’s summer palace
at Xandu.

The “canes” mentioned by Marco as used for
building material were bamboo, of which he might
well say that “it serves also for a great variety of
other useful purposes.”

An intelligent native of Arakan, who accompanied
Colonel Yule in Burmah in 1853, used to ask him
many questions about Europe, and seemed able to
understand almost everything except the possibility
of existence in a country without bamboos. These
bamboo huts are a// of bamboo—posts and walls,
wall-plates and rafters, floor and thatch, and the
withes that bind them. Indeed, it might almost be
said that, among the Indo-Chinese nations, the staff of
life is a bamboo. At any rate, they eat the green
shoots, and of the canes in various stages of growth
they make an immense number of articles, a few of
which are scaffolding and ladders, fishing apparatus,
oars, masts, yards, sails, cables, spears, arrows, bows,
oil-cans, cooking-pots, musical instruments, footballs,
bellows, paper. And in China, to sum up the whole,
the bamboo maintains order throughout the empire !


A PAVILION OF THE SUMMER PALACE,
CHAR PERT,

THE TRICKS OF CHINESE CONJURERS—FLYING CUPS AND
AIR-CLIMBERS, )

ARCO gives a full account of the wonderful
tricks of conjuring which he witnessed at
the court of Kublai Khan. No doubt he saw, or
thought he saw the feats which he says were
done before his eyes. He intended to be strictly
truthful, and says, with some notion that he may
be disbelieved, that these things are true, and no lie.
Other and later travellers have described the same
tricks, and have given no explanation of them,
except to say that the spectators were probably
hypnotised—that is to say, they were made to
believe that they saw what did not exist. At the
present day weather-conjuring is practised in China,
Tatary, and India; and there are so-called conjurers,
who pretend to be able to make fogs and clouds
come and go.
Not many years since, a Chinese emperor found
it necessary to forbid his people to offer prayers for

rain after he had in vain prayed to Heaven for that
107
108 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

blessing. He indignantly said: “If I, offering up
prayer in sincerity, have yet room to fear that it may
please Heaven to leave my prayer unanswered, it is
truly intolerable that mere common people, wishing
for rain, should at their own caprice set up altars
of earth, and bring together a rabble.of Hosgang
[Buddhist priests] to conjure the spirits to gratify
their wishes.”

The court jugglers in the time of Kublai Khan
made it appear to those who looked on as if dishes
from the table actually flew through the air. One of
the travellers, who visited the regions of which Marco
gives us some account, says: “And jugglers cause
cups of gold to fly through the air and offer them-
selves to all who list to drink.” And Ibn Batuta, a
Moor who visited Cathay a century after, gives this
account of a similar incident:

That same night a juggler, who was one of the Kan’s
slaves, made his appearance, and the Amir said to him:
“Come and show us some of your marvels.” Upon this
he took a wooden ball, with several holes in it, through
which long thongs were passed, and (laying hold of one of
these) slung it into the air. It went up so high that we
lost sight of it altogether. (It was the hottest season of the
year, and we were outside in the middle of the palace
court.) There now remained only a little of the end of a
thong in the conjurer’s hand, and he desired one of the
boys who assisted him to lay hold of it and mount. He
did so, climbing by the thong, and we lost sight of him
also! The conjurer then called to him three times, but
A CHINESE CONJURER.


XII.] “TIS ALL HOCUS-POCUS.” 109

getting no answer he snatched up a knife as if in a great
rage, laid hold of the thong, and disappeared also! By-
and-by he threw down one of the boy’s hands, then a foot
then the other hand, and then the other foot, then the
trunk, and last of all the head! Then he came down
himself, all puffing and panting, and with his clothes all
bloody kissed the ground before the Amir, and said some-
thing to him in Chinese. The Amir gave some order in
reply, and our friend then took the lad’s limbs, laid them
together in their places, and gave a kick, when, presto!
: there was the boy, who got up and stood before us! All
this astonished me beyond measure, and I had an attack of
palpitation like that which overcame me once before in
the presence of the Sultan of India, when he showed me
something of the same kind. The Kazi Afkharuddin was
next to me, and quoth he; “ Wallah/—‘tis my opinion
there has been neither going up nor coming down, neither
marring nor mending ; ’tis all hocus-pocus ! ”

Mr. Edward Melton, an Anglo-Dutch traveller,
who visited Java in 1670, gives a long description of
the tricks of some Chinese conjurers, who performed
in Batavia while he was there. After describing
various other feats, he says: “ But now I am going to
relate a thing which surpasses all belief, and which
I would scarcely venture to insert here if it had not
been witnessed by thousands before my own eyes.”
He then goes on to describe a trick very much the
same as those witnessed by Marco Polo and Ibn
Batuta; and he adds: “Then straightway we saw
with these eyes all those limbs creep together again,
and in short time a whole man, who could at once
110 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch. XII.

stand and go just as before, without showing the least
damage!”

Again, we have in the Memoirs of the Emperor
Jahangir a detail of the wonderful performances of
seven jugglers from Bengal, who exhibited before
him. Two of their feats are thus described :

(1) They produced a man whom they divided limb from
limb, actually severing his head from the body. They
scattered these mutilated members along the ground, and
in this state they lay for some time. They then extended
a sheet or curtain over the spot, and one of the men,
putting himself under the sheet, in a few minutes came
from below, followed by the individual supposed to have

“been cut into joints, in perfect health and condition,
having received no wound or injury whatever.

(2) They produced a chain of fifty cubits in length, and
in my presence threw one end of it towards the sky, where
it remained as if fastened to something in the air. A dog,
being then placed at the lower end of the chain, immediately
ran up it, and, reaching the other end, immediately dis-
appeared in the air. In the same manner a hog, a panther,
a lion, and a tiger were successively sent up the chain,
and all equally disappeared at the upper end. At last they
took down the chain and put it into a bag, no one ever
discovering in what way the different animals were made to
vanish into the air.
CHAPTER XIII.

HOW THE GREAT EMPEROR WENT TO WAR—KUBLAI KHAN’S
VICTORIOUS CAMPAIGN AGAINST A KINSMAN—-HOW THE
KHAN REWARDED THE VALOUR OF HIS CAPTAINS.

OUNG Marco devoted a great deal of his space

to accounts of the Great Khan’s wars and fight-
ings, and his hunting. Evidently Marco was himself
fond of sport, for he describes many kinds of game,
both birds and beasts; and it is easy to see that he
must have hunted somewhat himself, although he
modestly. avoids saying much about his own doings
while he was in Cathay. His account of one of the
Great Khan’s battles is so vivid that we must quote
what he has to say of it, as well as what he tells us
of the Khan’s title :

OF CUBLAY KAAN, THE GREAT KAAN NOW REIGNING, AND
OF HIS GREAT PUISSANCE.

Now am I come to the part of our book in which I shall
tell you of the great and wonderful magnificence of the
Great Kaan now reigning, by name Cusptay Kaan; Kaan
being :a title which signifieth ‘‘The Great Lord of Lords,”

or Emperor. And of asurety he hath good right to such
IIt
112 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

a title, for all men know for a certain truth that he is the
most potent man, as regards forces and lands and treasure,
that existeth in the world, or ever hath existed from the
time of our First Father Adam until this day. All this I
will make clear to you for truth, in this book of ours, so
that every one shall be fain to acknowledge that he is
the greatest Lord that is now in the world, or ever hath
been,

CONCERNING THE REVOLT OF NAYAN, WHO WAS UNCLE
TO THE GREAT KAAN CUBLAY.

Now this Cublay Kaan is of the right Imperial lineage,
being descended from Chinghis Kaan, the first sovereign of
all the Tartars. And he is the sixth Lord in that succession,
as I have already told you in this book. He came to the
throne in the year 1256, and the Empire fell to him be-
cause of his ability and valour and great worth, as was right
and reason. His brothers, indeed, and other kinsmen
disputed his claim, but his it remained, both because
maintained by his great valour, and because it was in law
and right his, as being directly sprung of the Imperial
line.

Up to the year now running, to wit, 1298, he hath
reigned two-and-forty years, and his age is about eighty-five,
so that he must have been about forty-three years of age
when he first came to the throne. Before that time he
had often been to the wars, and had shown himself a gallant
soldier and an excellent captain. But after coming to
the throne he never went to the wars in person save once.
This befell in the year 1286, and I will tell you how he
went.

There was a great Tartar Chief, whose name was Nayan,
a young man of thirty, Lord over many lands and many.
provinces, and he was Uncle to the Emperor Cublay Kaan
XIII] NAYAN’S REVOLT. 113

of whom we are speaking. And when he found himself
in authority, this Nayan waxed proud in the insolence of
his youth and his great power ; for indeed he could bring
into the field three hundred thousand horsemen, though all
the time he was liegeman to his nephew the Great Kaan
Cublay as was right and reason. Seeing then what great
power he had, he took it into his head that he would be
the Great Kaan’s vassal no longer; nay, more, he would
fain wrest his empire from him if he could. So this
Nayan sent envoys to another Tartar Prince called Carpu,
also a great and potent Lord, who was a kinsman of his,
and who was a nephew of the Great Kaan and his lawful
liegeman also, though he was in rebellion and at bitter
enmity with his sovereign Lord and Uncle. Now the
message that Nayan sent was this: That he himself was
making ready to march against the Great Kaan with all his
forces (which were great), and he begged Caidu to do like-
wise from his side, so that by attacking Cublay on two
sides at once with such great forces they would be able to
wrest his dominion from him.

And when Caidu heard the message of Nayan he was
right glad thereat, and thought the time was come at last
to gain his object. So he sent back answer that he would
do as requested, and got ready his host, which mustered a
good hundred thousand horsemen.

HOW THE GREAT KAAN MARCHED AGAINST NAYAN.

When the Great Kaan heard what was afoot, he made
his preparations in right good heart, like one who feared
not the issue of an attempt so contrary to justice. Con-
fident in his own conduct and prowess, he was in no degree
disturbed, but vowed that he would never wear crown again
if he brought not those two traitorous and disloyal Tartar
chiefs to an ill end. So swiftly and secretly were his

8
114 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

preparations made that no one knew of them but his Privy
Council, and all were completed within ten or twelve days.
In that time he had assembled good three hundred and
sixty thousand horsemen and one hundred thousand foot-
men—but a small force indeed for him, and consisting only
of those that were in the vicinity. For the rest of his vast
and innumerable forces were too far off to answer so hasty
a summons, being engaged under orders from him on
distant expeditions to conquer divers countries and pro-
vinces. If he had waited to summon all his troops, the
multitude assembled would have been beyond all belief,
a multitude such as never was heard of or told of, past
all counting! In fact, those three hundred and sixty
thousand horsemen that he got together consisted merely
of the falconers and whippers-in that were about the
Court !

And when he had got ready this handful (as it were) of
his troops, he ordered his astrologers to declare whether
he should gain the battle and get the better of his enemies.
After they had made their observations, they told him to go
on boldly, for he would conquer and gain a glorious victory ;
whereat he greatly rejoiced.

So he marched with his army, and after advancing for
twenty days they arrived at a great plain where Nayan lay
with all his host, amounting to some four hundred thousand
horse. Now the Great Kaan’s forces arrived so fast and
so suddenly that the others knew nothing of the matter.
For the Kaan had caused such strict watch to be made in
every direction for scouts that every one that appeared was
instantly captured. Thus Nayan had no warning of his
coming, and was completely taken by surprise; insomuch
that when the Great Kaan’s army came up he was asleep.
So thus you see why it was that the Emperor equipped his
force with such speed and secrecy.
XIII] KUBLAI v. NAYAN. II5

OF THE BATTLE THAT THE GREAT KAAN FOUGHT WITH
NAYAN.

What shall I say about it? When day had well broken,
there was the Kaan with all his host upon a hill overlooking
the plain where Nayan lay in his tent, in all security, with-
out the slightest thought of any one coming thither to do
him hurt. In fact, this confidence of his was such that he
kept no vedettes whether in front or in rear ; for he knew
nothing of the coming of the Great Kaan, owing to all the
approaches having been completely occupied as I told you.
Moreover the place was in a remote wilderness, more than
thirty marches from the Court, though the Kaan had made
the distance in twenty, so eager was he to come to battle
with Nayan.

And what shall I tell you next? The Kaan was there
on the hill, mounted on a great wooden bartizan, which
was borne by four well-trained elephants, and over him
was hoisted his standard, so high aloft that it could be seen
from all sides. His troops were ordered in battles * of
thirty thousand men apiece ; and a great part of the horse-
men had each a foot-soldier armed with a lance set on the
crupper behind him (for it was thus that the footmen were
disposed of) ; and the whole plain seemed to be covered
with his forces. So it was thus that the Great Kaan’s army
was arrayed for battle.

When Nayan and his people saw what happened, they
were sorely confounded, and rushed in haste to arms.
Nevertheless they made them ready in good style and
formed their troops in an orderly manner. And when all
were in battle-array on both sides as I have told you, and
nothing remained but to fall to blows, then might you have
heard a sound arise of many instruments of various music,

* Battalions,
116 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

and of the voices of the whole of the two hosts loudly
singing. For this is a custom of the Tartars, that before
they join battle they all unite in singing and playing on
a certain two-stringed instrument of theirs, a thing right
pleasant to hear. And so they continue in their array of
battle, singing and playing in this pleasing manner, until
the great Naccara of the Prince is heard to sound. As soon
as that begins to sound the fight also begins on both sides ;
and in no case before the Prince’s Naccara sounds dare any
commence fighting.

So then, as they were thus singing and playing, though
ordered and ready for battle, the great Naccara of the
Great Kaan began to sound. And that of Nayan also
began to sound. And thenceforward the din of battle
began to be heard loudly from this side and from that.
And they rushed to work so doughtily with their bows
and their maces, with their lances and swords, and with
the arblasts* of the footmen, that it was a wondrous sight
to see. Now might you behold such flights of arrows
from this side and from that, that the whole heaven was
canopied with them and they fell like rain. Now might
you see on this side and on that full many a cavalier and
man-at-arms fall slain, insomuch that the whole field seemed
covered with them. For fierce and furious was the battle,
and quarter there was none given.

But why should I make a long story of it? You must
know that it was the most parlous and fierce and fearful
battle that ever has been fought in our day. Nor have
there ever been such forces in the field in actual fight,
especially of horsemen, as were then engaged ; for, taking
both sides, there were not fewer than seven hundred and
sixty thousand horsemen—a mighty force !—and that with-
out reckoning the footmen, who were also very numerous.

* Cross-bows.
XII.) NAYAN’S DEFEAT AND DEATH. 117

The battle endured with various fortune on this side and
on that from morning till noon. But at the last, by God’s
pleasure and the right that was on his side, the Great
Kaan had the victory, and Nayan lost the battle and was
utterly routed. For the army of the Great Kaan performed
such feats of arms that Nayan and his host could stand
against them no longer, so they turned and fled. But this
availed nothing for Nayan ; for he and all the Barons with
him were taken prisoners, and had to surrender to the
Kaan with all their arms.

Now you must know that Nayan was a_ baptised
Christian, and bore the Cross on his banner; but this
naught availed him, seeing how grievously he had done
amiss in rebelling against his Lord. For he was the Great
Kaan’s liegeman, and was bound to hold his lands of him
like all his ancestors before him.

HOW THE GREAT KAAN CAUSED NAYAN TO BE PUT TO
DEATH.

And when the Great Kaan learned that Nayan was taken
right glad was he, and commanded that he should be put
to death straightway and in secret.

And when the Great Kaan had gained this battle, as you
have heard, all the Barons and people of Nayan’s provinces
renewed their fealty to the Kaan. Now these provinces
that had been under the Lordship of Nayan were four in
number, to wit: the first called CuorcHa; the second
Cauty ; the third Barscot ; the fourth SrxintTinjvu. Ofiall
these four great provinces had Nayan been Lord; it was a
very great dominion. A

And after the Great Kaan had conquered Nayan, as you
have heard, it came to pass that the different kinds of
people who were present, Saracens and Idolaters and Jews,
and many others that believed not in God, did gibe those
118 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

that were Christians because of the Cross that Nayan had
borne on his standard, and that so grievously that there
was no bearing it. Thus they would say to the-Christians :
‘‘See now what precious help this Cross of yours hath
rendered Nayan, who was a Christian and a worshipper
thereof.” And such a din arose about the matter that it
reached the Great Kaan’s own ears. When it did so, he
sharply rebuked those who cast these gibes at the Christians;
and he also bade the Christians be of good heart, “for if
the Cross had rendered no help to Nayan, in that It had
done right well; nor could that which was good, as It
was, have done otherwise; for Nayan was a disloyal and
traitorous Rebel against his Lord, and well deserved that
which had befallen him. Wherefore the Cross of your
God did well in that It gave him no help against the right.”
And this he said so loud that everybody heard him. The
Christians then replied to the Great Kaan: “Great King,
you say the truth indeed, for our Cross can render no one
help in wrong-doing ; and therefore it was that It aided not
Nayan, who was guilty of crime and disloyalty, for It would
take no part in his evil deeds.”

And so thenceforward no more was heard of the floutings
of the unbelievers against the Christians; for they heard
very well what the Sovereign said to the latter about the
Cross on Nayan’s banner, and its giving him no help.

Marco makes one or two errors in his account of
the Great Khan’s warlike doings. This was not the
only time that the Emperor went to war in person;
for the Chinese annalists tell of at least one other
occasion when he led his army against his brother
and rival, Arikbuga, in 1261 ; and in his old age he
took the field against Kaidu, a rebel in the North.
XII] WAR-DRUMS. 119

Nayan, whose defeat and tragic death are so vividly
described by Marco, was not the uncle of Kublai
Khan ; he was no more than a cousin many times
removed.

A “bartizan ” was a sort of tower, made of timber,
and used for purposes of defence or attack. It would
appear that the Great Khan went to war in person,



THE GREAT NACCARAS,

riding in a great wooden tower, which was carried on
the backs of four elephants. On an elephant was
also carried the big war-drum which Polo calls a
naccara. This was an immense kettle-drum shaped
like a brass cauldron, tapering to the bottom and
covered with dried buffalo hide, which had been
scraped thin and tightly stretched for the drum-head.
These drums were sometimes three or four feet across
120 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

at the top, and the noise from them when beaten
was something terrific. Two monster drums would
be slung on the back of an elephant, and the drummer,
seated between the two, would beat first one and
then another, when the signal was to be given to the
fighting-men.

Imagine four hundred and sixty thousand soldiers,
infantry and cavalry, marching to battle with the
gigantic drums sounding, flags flying, troops shouting,
and over all the war-banner of the great Emperor,
streaming from his castle borne on the backs of four
elephants. Truly that was a “parlous and fierce
and fearful battle,” the like of which we have never
seen in our day.

Marco does not attempt to conceal his great admira-
tion for the Khan, and takes pleasure in telling of the
grand monarch’s liberality and thoughtfulness for his
captains and his people. Here is a characteristic
chapter from our history:

HOW THE KAAN REWARDED THE VALOUR OF HIS
CAPTAINS.

So we will have done with this matter of Nayan, and go
on with our account of the great state of the Great Kaan.

We have already told you of his lineage and of his age;
but now I must tell you what he did after his return, in
regard to those Barons who had behaved well in the battle.
Him who was before captain of one hundred he made
captain of one thousand ; and him who was captain of
one thousand men he made to be captain of ten thousand,
XIIL] TABLETS OF AUTHORITY. 121

advancing every man according to his deserts and to his
previous rank. Besides that, he also made them presents
of fine silver plate and other rich appointments ; gave them
Tablets of Authority of a higher degree than they held
before ; and bestowed upon them fine jewels of gold and
silver, and pearls and precious stones ; insomuch that the
amount that fell to each of them was something astonishing.
And yet ’twas not so much as they had deserved ; for never
were men seen who did such feats of arms for the love
and honour of their Lord as these had done on that day
of the battle.

Now those Tablets of Authority, of which I have spoken,
are ordered in this way: The officer who is a captain of
one hundred hath a tablet of silver; the captain of one
thousand hath a tablet of gold or silver-gilt ; the commander
of ten thousand hath a tablet of gold with a lion’s head on
it. And I will tell you the weight of the different tablets,
and what they denote. The tablets of the captains of one
hundred and one thousand weigh each of them one hundred
and twenty sagg7; and the tablet with the lion’s head en-
graven on it, which is that of the commander of ten
thousand, weighs two hundred and twenty sagg?. Andon
each of the tablets is inscribed a device, which runs: “ By
the strength of the great God, and of the great grace which
Fe hath accorded to our Emperor, may the name of the Kaan
be blessed ; and let all such as will not obey him be slain
and be destroyed.” And I tell you besides that all who
_ hold these tablets likewise receive warrants in writing,
declaring all their powers and privileges.

I should mention too that an officer who holds the chief
command of one hundred thousand men, or who is general-
in-chief of a great host, is entitled to a tablet that weighs
three hundred saggz. It has an inscription thereon to the
same purport that I have told you already, and below the
inscription there is the figure of a lion, and below the lion
I22 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

the sun and moon, They have warrants also of their high
rank, command, and power. Every one, moreover, who
holds a tablet of this exalted degree is entitled, whenever
he goes abroad, to have a little golden canopy, such as is
called an umbrella, carried on a spear over his head in
token of his high command. And whenever he sits, he sits
in a silver chair.

To certain very great lords also there is given a tablet
with gerfalcons on it; this is only to the very greatest of
the Kaan’s Barons, and it confers on them his own full
power and authority ; so that if one of those chiefs wishes
to send a messenger anywhither, he can seize the horses
of any man, be he even a king, and any other chattels at
his pleasure.

The tablets of gold and silver, given to special
messengers and officers of the Great Khan, are
frequently mentioned in Marco Polo’s book. You
will remember that, when the Khan sent the Polo
brothers to their own country, as narrated in the
first chapter of this book, he gave them a tablet of
gold, on which was engraven an inscription which
would procure for them all things needful for their
journey through his dominions. The smallest of
the tablets mentioned by Marco is said to weigh
one hundred and twenty sagg?. The saggio was a
Venetian weight: as used by Polo, it was reckoned
to be equal to about seventy-four grains troy; and
this would indicate that the smallest of the golden
tablets weighed eighteen and a half ounces troy.

The reader will notice that Polo refers to the
XI] UMBRELLAS. 123

umbrella as if it were carried only by the favoured
ones, who had won the special mark of approbation
of their Sovereign. The history of the useful article,
now so generally carried, wherever, in civilised coun-
tries, the rain or the sun is likely to interfere with
the comfort of men and women, is of very ancient
origin: as suggested by the text above quoted,
it was, at first, probably carried only by great
personages. Among some of the sculptures of old
Egypt may be seen the effigies of royal princesses
protected from the sun by umbrellas. In the
Middle Ages, the umbrella was a large, cumbrous
affair, used in Europe chiefly by the high and
mighty dignitaries of the Church. But in Oriental
countries, the thing was, and still is, employed as a
badge of distinction, being of elaborate and costly
workmanship, and richly decorated. Umbrellas of
inexpensive materials for every-day use were not
common in England and America until very recent
times. The name of Jonas Hanway will always be
connected with this use of the umbrella. Returning
.to England from Persia in delicate health, Mr.
Hanway (who died in 1786) shielded himself from
the sun by one of the outlandish “canopies,” which
. provoked the mirth of wayfarers and excited the
wrath of the drivers of hackney-coaches and the
bearers of sedan-chairs, who thought they saw in
this contrivance a dangerous rival to their vehicles.
CHAPTER XeLVe

THE BEAUTIFUL PALACE OF KUBLAI KHAN—HOW THE EMPEROR
SPENT HIS TIME—CONCERNING THE MIGHTY CITY OF
CAMBALUC—THE MANNER OF SERVING DINNER IN THE
GREAT KHAN’S PALACE—ANCIENT AND MODERN PEKING—
COSTLY ROBES.

HE personal appearance of the Great Khan is
thus described by Marco: “He is of good
stature, neither tall nor short, but of middle height.

He has a becoming amount of flesh, and is very

shapely in all his limbs. His complexion is white

and red, the eyes black and fine, the nose well
formed and well set on.” But the portrait of Kublai

Khan, drawn by a Chinese artist, does not exactly

correspond with the pen portrait given here by Marco.

This drawing leads us to infer that the Emperor was

rather corpulent ; moreover, we know, from Marco’s

own narrative, that he was subject to gout in his later
life. After explaining that the family of the Great

Khan are variously named and provided for, Marco

goes on to tell of the glories of the imperial palace

at Cambaluc, otherwise known as Peking :

You must know that for three months of the year, to
124,
Ch. XIV.] THE KHAN’S WAR-HARNESS. 125

wit, December, January, and February, the Great Kaan
resides in the capital city of Cathay, which is called Cam-
BALUC, and which is at the north-eastern extremity of the
country. In that city stands his Great Palace, and now I
will tell you what it is like.

It is enclosed all round by a great wall forming a square,
each side of which is a mile in length; that is to say, the
whole compass thereof is four miles. It is also very thick
and a good ten paces in height, whitewashed and loop-holed
all round. At each angle of the wall there is a very fine
and rich palace in which the war-harness of the Emperor
is kept, such as bows and quivers, saddles and bridles,
and bowstrings, and everything needful for an army. Also
midway between every two of these Corner Palaces there is
another of the like, so that taking the whole compass of the
enclosure you find eight vast Palaces stored with the Great
King’s harness of war. And you must understand that each
Palace is assigned to only one kind of article; thus, one
is stored with bows, a second with saddles, a third with
bridles, and so on in succession right round.

The great wall has five gates on its southern face, the
middle one being the great gate which is never opened
on any occasion except when the Great Kaan himself
goes forth or enters. Close on either side of this great
gate isa smaller one by which all other people pass; and
then towards each angle is another great gate, also open
to people in general; so that on that side there are five
gates in all.

Inside of this wall there is a second, enclosing a space
that is somewhat greater in length than in breadth. This
enclosure also has eight Palaces corresponding to those of
the outer wall, and stored like them with the King’s harness
of war. This wall also hath five gates on the southern face,
corresponding to those in the outer wall, and hath one gate
on each of the other faces as the outer wall hath also. In
126 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

the middle of the second enclosure is the King’s Great
Palace, and I will tell you what it is like.

You must know that it is the greatest Palace that ever
was. ‘Toward the north it is in contact with the outer
wall, whilst toward the south there is a vacant space which
the Barons and the soldiers are constantly traversing. The
Palace itself hath no upper storey, but is all on the ground
floor, only the basement is raised some ten palms above
the surrounding soil, and this elevation is retained by
a wall of marble raised to the level of the pavement, two
paces in width, and projecting beyond the base of the
Palace so as to form a kind of terrace-walk, by which
people can pass round the building, and which is exposed
to view, whilst on the outer edge of the wall there is a very
fine pillared balustrade; and up to this the people are
allowed tocome. The roof is very lofty, and the walls of the
Palace are all covered with gold and silver. They are also
adorned with representations of dragons, sculptured and
gilt, beasts and birds, knights and idols, and sundry other
subjects. And on the ceiling, too, you see nothing but
gold and silver and painting. On each of the four sides
there is a great marble staircase leading to the top of the
marble wall, and forming the approach to the Palace.

The Hall of the Palace is so large that it could easily dine
six thousand people ; and it is quite a marvel to see how
many rooms there are besides. The building is altogether so
vast, so rich, and so beautiful, that no man on earth could
design anything superior to it. The outside of the roof
also is all coloured with vermilion and yellow and green
and blue and other hues, which are fixed with a varnish so
fine and exquisite that they shine like crystal, and lend
a resplendent lustre to the Palace as seen for a great way
round. This roof is made, too, with such strength and
solidity that it is fit to last for ever.

On the interior side of the Palace are large buildings
vy

et

ay
Batty
aN,



THE PALACE OF THE GREAT KHAN.
XIV.] AN EVERGREEN HOBBY. 127

with halls and chambers, where the Emperor’s private
property is placed, such as his treasures of gold, silver,
gems, pearls, and gold plate, and in which reside the ladies
of the Court.

Between the two walls of the enclosure which I have
described there are fine parks and beautiful trees bearing
a variety of fruits. ‘There are beasts also of sundry kinds,
such as white stags and fallow deer, gazelles and roebucks,
and fine squirrels of various sorts, with numbers also of the
animal that gives the musk, and all manner of other beauti-
ful creatures, insomuch that the whole place is full of them,
and no spot remains void except where there is traffic of
people going and coming. The parks are covered with
abundant grass; and the roads through them being all
paved and raised two cubits above the surface, they never
become muddy, nor does the rain lodge on them, but flows
off into the meadows, quickening the soil and producing
that abundance of herbage.

From that corner of the enclosure which is towards the
north-west there extends a fine lake, containing fish of
different kinds, which the Emperor hath caused to be put
in there, so that whenever he desires any he can have them
at his pleasure. A river enters this lake and issues from it,
but there is a grating of iron or brass put up so that the fish
cannot escape in that way.

Moreover, on the north side of the Palace, about a bow-
shot off, there is a hill which has been made by art from
the earth dug out of the lake; it is a good hundred paces
in height and a mile in compass. This hill is entirely
covered with trees that never lose their leaves, but remain
ever green. And I assure you that wherever a beautiful
tree may exist, and the Emperor gets news of it, he sends
for it, and has it transported bodily with all its roots and the
earth attached to them, and planted on that hill of his. No
matter how big the tree may be, he gets it carried by his
128 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. . [Ch,

elephants ; and in this way he has got together the most
beautiful collection of trees in all the world. And he has
also caused the whole hill to be covered with the ore of
azure, which is very green. And thus not only are the
trees all green, but the hill itself is all green likewise ;
and there is nothing to be seen on it that is not green;
and hence it is called the GREEN Mount; and in good
sooth ’tis named well.

On the top of the hill again there is a fine big palace
which is all green inside and out; and thus the hill, and
the trees, and the palace form together a charming spec-
tacle; and it is marvellous to see their uniformity of
colour! Everybody who sees them is delighted. And
the Great Kaan has caused this beautiful prospect to be
formed for the comfort and solace and delectation of his
heart.

You must know that beside the Palace that we have
been describing, ze. the Great Palace, the Emperor has
caused another to be built just like his own in every
respect, and this he hath done for his son when he shall
reign and be Emperor after him. Hence it is made just
in the same fashion and of the same size, so that every-
thing can be carried on in the same manner after his own
death. It stands on the other side of the lake from the
Great Kaan’s Palace, and there is a bridge crossing the
water from one to the other. The Prince in question
holds now a Seal of Empire, but not with such complete
authority as the Great Kaan, who remains supreme as long
as he lives. .

Now I am going to tell you of the Chief City of Cathay,
in which these Palaces stand; and why it was built,
and how.

Before we take up Marco’s description of the capital
of Cathay, or China, let us look at Peking, to call
XIV.] MODERN PEKING. 129

by its modern name Kublai Khan’s city. We shall
better understand Marco’s pages if we know something
of the capital as it exists to-day ; and it is worthy of
remark that the accuracy of the young Venetian’s
account is well established by comparing it with what
we know of modern Peking.

The city is one of the oldest in the world, but
was not made the capital until Kublai Khan, some-
where about 1282, fixed his court there. Under the
Mongols the name of Peking was Khan-palik, or City
of the Khan ; and this title was easily converted into
Cambaluc, by which name it is known in the accounts
of those times. Peking is now divided into two
parts; the northern portion is the Tatar city, and
contains about twelve square miles; in this are the
palaces, government buildings, and military barracks.
The southern part is the Chinese city, and is more
populous than the Tatar, less of its space being
taken up by gardens and public buildings. The
population is estimated at different figures ; but two
millions appears to be a fair estimate.

A wall separates the Tatar from the Chinese city,
and a wall of varying height surrounds the whole ; that
of the Tatar section being about fifty feet high, and
that round the Chinese section some thirty feet high.
These walls are of brick and stone filled in with earth
and paved on the top with slabs of stone, affording a
promenade twelve feet wide. There are sixteen gates

9
130 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

in all, and each gateway is fortified with towers of
stone, other towers being fixed at intervals of about
sixty yards all round the walls. These towers pro-
ject fifty feet from the outer side of the walls, and
those at the gateways have in front of them a fortifi-
cation of a semicircular shape, so that the gate must
be entered from the side, and not from the front.

The Tatar city is divided into three enclosures, each
being surrounded with its own wall, and each inside
of another. The innermost of these is the Prohibited
City, and contains the imperial palaces and offices.
Its circumference is nearly two miles; the wall is
covered with imperial-yellow tiles, which look brilliant
when seen from a distance. The enclosure next out-
side of this is occupied by the government offices,
and by the army appointed to keep guard over the
Emperor and his family. The next outside of this is
the outermost of all, and consists of dwelling-houses
and shops.

Although Polo begins his account of the chief city
of Cathay with some flourish, he dismisses it, after he
has described the palaces and pleasure-grounds, with-
out many words. This is what he has to say of the
capital of the empire:

CONCERNING THE CITY OF CAMBALUC.

Now there was on that spot in old times a great and
noble city called Cambaluc, which is as much as to say
in our tongue “The City of the Emperor.” But the


THE WEST GATE OF PEKING.
XIV.] ANCIENT PEKING. 131

Great Kaan was informed by his astrologers that this
city would prove rebellious, and raise great disorders
against his imperial authority. So he caused the present
city to be built close beside the old one, with only a river
between them. And he caused the people of the old
city to be removed to the new town that he had founded ;
and this he called Taidu. However, he allowed a portion
of the people whom he did not suspect to remain in the
old city, because the new one would not hold the whole
of them, big as it is.

As regards the size of this new city, you must know
that it has a compass of twenty-four miles, for each side of
it hath a length of six miles, and it is four-square. And
it is all walled round with walls of earth, which have a
thickness of full ten paces at the bottom, and a height
of more than ten paces; but they are not so thick at
the top, for they diminish in thickness as they rise, so
at top they are only about three paces thick. And they
are provided throughout with loop-holed battlements, which
are all whitewashed.

There are twelve gates, and over each gate there is a
great and handsome palace, so that there are on each
side of the square three gates and five palaces; for (I
ought to mention) there is at each angle also a great
and handsome palace. In those palaces are vast halls
in which are kept the arms of the city garrison.

The streets are so straight and wide that you can see
right along them from end to end and from one gate to
the other. And up and down the city there are beautiful
palaces, and many and fine hostelries, and fine houses
in great numbers. All the plots of ground on which the
houses of the city are built are four-square and laid out
in straight lines, and the plots being occupied by great
and spacious palaces, with courts and gardens of pro-
portionate size. All these plots are assigned to different
132 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

heads of families. Each square plot is encompassed by
handsome streets for traffic; and thus the whole city is
arranged in squares just like a chess-board, and disposed
in a manner so perfect and masterly that it is impossible
to give a description that should do it justice.

Moreover, in the middle of the city there is a great
clock—that is to say, a bell, which is struck at night. And
after it has struck three times no one must go out in the
city, unless it be for the needs of a woman in labour or
of the sick. And those who go about on such errands
are bound to carry lanterns with them. Moreover, the
established guard at each gate of the city is one thousand
armed men; not that you are to imagine this guard is
kept up for fear of any attack, but only as a guard of
honour for the Sovereign, who resides there, and to prevent
thieves from doing mischief in the town.

The “great palaces” which Marco saw over the
gates and at the angles of the walls still exist,
although they are now used as defences for the gates
rather than as -palaces. The public clock-towers
were probably provided with water-clocks to indicate
the hour ; these were copper basins set one above the
other in brickwork, like a series of steps; and the
water flowing downward from one basin to another
marked by its fall the flight of time. The hour was
struck by the watchman on a large gong suspended
in the clock-tower.

That the Great Khan maintained great state in this
wonderful city, and whenever he went abroad, can
well be imagined. Marco Polo tells of the twelve
XIV.] HOW THE KHAN DINES. 133

thousand horsemen, or “Knights devoted to their
Lord,” who were continually on guard, three thousand
being detailed to stand guard for three days and
nights, each three thousand being then relieved by
another body of like number, and so on until the
entire army of knights had been on duty. Concern-
ing the great doings in the banquet-halls of the
mighty one, Polo has this glowing description :

THE FASHION OF THE GREAT KAAN’S TABLE AT HIS
HIGH FEASTS.

And when the Great Kaan sits at table on any great
Court occasion it is in this fashion: His table is elevated a
good deal above the others, and he sits at the north end of
the hall, looking towards the south, with his chief wife
beside him on the left. On his right sit his sons and his
nephews and other kinsmen of the Blood Imperial, but
lower, so that their heads are on a level with the Emperor’s
feet. And then the other Barons sit at other tables lower
still. So also with the women; for all the wives of the
Lord’s sons, and of his nephews and other kinsmen, sit at
the lower table to his right; and below them again the
ladies of the other Barons and Knights, each in the place
assigned by the Lord’s orders. The tables are so disposed
that the Emperor can see the whole of them from end to
end, many as they are. Further, you are not to suppose
that everybody sits at table; on the contrary, the greater
part of the soldiers and their officers sit at their meal in the
hall on the carpets. Outside the hall will be found more
than forty thousand people ; for there is a great concourse
of folk bringing presents to the Lord, or come from foreign
countries with curiosities.
134 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch

In a certain part of the hall near where the Great Kaan
holds his table, there is set a large and very beautiful piece
of workmanship in the form of a square coffer, or buffet,
about three paces each way, exquisitely wrought with figures
of animals, finely carved and gilt. The middle is hollow,
and in it stands a great vessel of pure gold, holding as
much as an ordinary butt ; and at each corner of the great
vessel is one of smaller size, of the capacity of a firkin, and
from the former the wine or beverage flavoured with fine
and costly spices is drawn off into the latter. And on the
buffet aforesaid are set all the Lord’s drinking vessels,
among which are certain pitchers of the finest gold, which
are called vernigues, and are big enough to hold drink for
eight or ten persons. And one of these is put between
every two persons, besides a couple of golden cups with
handles, so that every man helps himself from the pitcher
that stands between him and his neighbour. And the
ladies are supplied in the same way. The value of these
pitchers and cups is something immense ; in fact, the Great
Kaan has such a quantity of this kind of plate, and of gold
and silver in other shapes, as no one ever before saw or
heard tell of or could believe.

There are certain Barons specially deputed to see that
foreigners, who do not know the customs of the Court, are
provided with places suited to their rank ; and these Barons
are continually moving to and fro in the hall, looking to the
wants of the guests at table, and causing the servants to
supply them promptly with wine, milk, meat, or whatever
they lack. At every door of the hall (or, indeed, wherever
the Emperor may be) there stand a couple of big men like
giants, one on each side, armed with staves. Their business
is to see that no one steps upon the threshold in entering,
and if this does happen they strip the offender of his
clothes, and he must pay a forfeit to have them back again ;
or in lieu of taking his clothes they give him a certain -
XIV.] WHEN THE KHAN DRINKS. 135

number of blows. If they are foreigners ignorant of the
order, then there are Barons appointed to introduce them,
and explain it to them. They think, in fact, that it brings
bad luck if any one touches the threshold.

And you must know that those who wait upon the Great
Kaan with his dishes and his drink are some of the great
Barons. They have the mouth and nose muffled with fine
napkins of silk and gold, so that no breath nor odour from
their persons should taint the dish or the goblet presented
to the Lord. And when the Emperor is going to drink, all
the musical instruments, of which he has vast store of every
kind, begin to play. And when he takes the cup, all the
Barons and the rest of the company drop on their knees
and make the deepest obeisance before him, and then the
Emperor doth drink. But each time that he does so the
whole ceremony is repeated.

I will say naught about the dishes, as you may easily con-
ceive that there is a great plenty of every possible kind. But
you should know that in every case where a Baron or a Knight
dines at those tables their wives also dine there with the
other ladies. And when all have dined and the tables have
been removed, then come in a great number of players and
jugglers, adepts at all sorts of wonderful feats, and perform
before the Emperor and the rest of the company, creating
great diversion and mirth, so that everybody is full of
laughter and enjoyment. And when the performance is
over, the company breaks up and every one goes to his
quarters.

The modern Chinese practice, which may have
been that of the Mongols of Polo’s time, is to seat at
small tables (two guests at each table) any large
company. In the banqueting-hall of the Great Khan
136 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

there were, probably, many rows of these small tables,
among which the barons, or masters of ceremonies,
moved, looking after the comfort of the guests.
When the feast was over, these tables could be
easily removed, for the better enjoyment of the
sports that were to follow.

The Chinese of our day hold to certain observances
on entering a doorway ; and among the tribes roving
over Mongolia it is not only bad manners, but even
sinful, to touch the ropes of a tent, which are
regarded as representing the threshold. In a
Mahommedan account of an embassy to the court
of one of the Tatar potentates, it is recorded that it
was forbidden to tread on the threshold of the palace.
The reason for this prohibition is not apparent; but
travellers say that, among the Mongols of the present
day, the feeling about visitors meddling with the
tent-ropes is so strong, that those, who have, even
in ignorance, transgressed the unwritten rule, are
thenceforth excluded from the hospitality of the
offended family.

Marco is evidently astonished (and so are we) at
the Khan’s liberality to his barons in the matter of
clothes ; truly it is, as he says, “a huge business,”
Here is the description :

Now you must know that the Great Kaan hath set apart
twelve thousand of his men, who are distinguished by the
XIV.] HOW THE BARONS ARE CLOTHED. 137

name of Keshican, as I have told you before; and on each
of these twelve thousand Barons he bestows thirteen
changes of raiment, which are all different from one
another: I mean that in one set the twelve thousand are
all of one colour; the next twelve thousand of another
colour, and so on; so that they are of thirteen different
colours. These robes are garnished with gems and pearls
and other precious things in a very rich and costly manner.
And along with each of these changes of raiment, Ze.
thirteen times in the year, he bestows on each of those
twelve thousand Barons a fine golden girdle of great rich-
ness and value, and likewise a pair of boots of Camud, that
is to say of Borgal, curiously wrought with silver thread ;
insomuch that when they are clothed in these dresses every
man of them looks like a king! And there is an estab-
lished order as to which dress is to be worn at each of
those thirteen feasts. The Emperor himself also has his
thirteen suits corresponding to those of his Barons; in
colour, I mean (though his are grander, richer, and costlier),
so that he is always arrayed in the same colour as his
Barons, who are, as it were, his comrades. And you may
see that all this costs an amount which it is scarcely
possible to calculate.

Now I have told you of the thirteen changes of raiment
received from the Prince by those twelve thousand Barons,
amounting in all to one hundred and fifty-six thousand
suits of so great cost and value, to say nothing of the
girdles and the boots, which are also worth a great sum of
money. All this the Great Lord hath ordered, that he
may attach the more of grandeur and dignity to his
festivals.

And now I must mention another thing that I had for-
gotten, but which you will be astonished to learn from this
Book. You must know that on the Feast Day a great Lion
is led to the Emperor’s presence, and as soon as it sees him
138 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch. XIV.

it lies down before him with every sign of the greatest
veneration, as if it acknowledged him for its lord; and it
remains there lying before him, and entirely unchained.
Truly this must seem a strange story to those who have
not seen the thing!
CHAP TE RGN.

THE KHAN AS A MIGHTY HUNTER—HIS FALCONERS, HAWKS.
AND HUNTING GEAR—RIDING IN A CHAMBER ON ELEPHANTS’
BACKS—RIGHT ROYAL SPORT,

E have already seen that Marco had a keen

taste for sport, and it is noticeable that he

describes the hunting-scenes of the Khan with great

gusto, as if he had been present at some of them, and

had a good time in the field with the imperial sports-

man. This is what he has to say about the animals
trained to hunt for the Great Khan:

The Emperor hath numbers of leopards trained to the
chase, and hath also a great many lynxes taught in like
manner to catch game, and which afford excellent sport.
He hath also several great Lions, bigger than those of
Babylonia, beasts whose skins are coloured in the most
beautiful way, being striped all along the sides with black,
red, and white. ‘These are trained to catch boars and wild
cattle, bears, wild asses, stags, and other great or fierce
beasts. And ’tisa rare sight, I can tell you, to see those
Lions giving chase to such beasts as I have mentioned !
When they are to be so employed, the Lions are taken out
in a covered cart, and every Lion has a little doggie with
him. They are obliged to approach the game against the

139
140 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

wind, otherwise the animals would scent the approach of
the Lion and be off.

There are also a great number of eagles, all broken to
catch wolves, foxes, deer, and wild goats, and they do catch
them in great numbers. But those especially that are
trained to wolf-catching are very large and powerful birds, |
and no wolf is able to get away from them.

This is an accurate description of the manner of
hunting still in vogue in some parts of India among
the native princes. The “lion,” to which Marco
refers as being trained to hunt, is the cheetah, a
species of leopard, which is carried to the hunting-
field in a box, with its eyes covered by a hood.
When loosed in the field, the cheetah will bound off
in pursuit of any game which may be in sight, and
seldom fails to bring it down. Hawking was a
fashionable diversion in Europe during Marco’s time,
as well as in Cathay. Kublai Khan had hawks of
various kinds taught to fly at feathered game; and
his trained eagles pursued larger game, such as wolves
and foxes. Here is a detailed account of the Great
Khan’s hunting expeditions :

The Emperor hath two Barons who are own brothers,
one called Baian, and the other Mingan ; and these two are
styled Chinuchi (or Cunich?), which is as much as to say,
“The Keepers of the Mastiff Dogs.” Each of these
brothers hath ten thousand men under his orders, each
body of ten thousand being dressed alike, the one in red

and the other in blue; and whenever they accompany the
Kaan to the chase they wear this livery, in order to be
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THE EAGLE AND ITS VICTIM.
XVv.] A MIGHTY HUNT. I4I

recognised. Out of each body of ten thousand there are
two thousand men who are each in charge of one or more
great mastiffs, so that the whole number of these is very
large. And when the Prince goes a-hunting, one of those
Barons, with his ten thousand men and something like
five thousand dogs, goes towards the right, whilst the
other goes towards the left with his party in like manner.
They move along, all abreast of one another, so that the
whole line extends over a full day’s journey, and no animal
can escape them. Truly it is a glorious sight to see the
working of the dogs and the huntsmen on such an occasion !
And as the Kaan rides a-fowling across the plains, you will
see these big hounds coming tearing up, one pack after
a bear, another pack after a stag, or some other beast, as it
may hap, and running the game down now on this side and
now on that, so that it is really a most delightful sport and
spectacle.

The Two Brothers I have mentioned are bound by the
tenure of their office to supply the Kaan’s Court from
October to the end of March with one thousand head of
game daily, whether of beasts or birds, and not counting
quails; and also with fish to the best of their ability,
allowing fish enough for three persons to reckon as equal
to one head of game.

Now I have told you of the Masters of the Hounds and
all about them, and next will I tell you how the Kaan goes
off on an expedition for the space of three months.

After he has stopped at his capital city those three
months that I mentioned, to wit, December, January,
February, he starts off on the rst day of March, and travels
southward toward the Ocean Sea, a journey of two days.
He takes with him full ten thousand falconers, and some
five hundred gerfalcons, besides peregrines, sakers, and other
hawks in great numbers; and goshawks also to fly at the
water-fowl. But do not suppose that he keeps all these
142 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

together by him; they are distributed about, hither and
thither, one hundred together, or two hundred at the utmost,
as he thinks proper. But they are always fowling as they
advance, and the most part of the quarry taken is carried
to the Emperor. And let me tell you when he goes thus
a-fowling with his gerfalcons and other hawks, he is attended
by full ten thousand men, who are disposed in couples ; and
these are called Zoscao/, which is as much as to say,
“Watchers.” And the name describes their business.
They are posted from spot to spot, always in couples, and
thus they. cover a great deal of ground! Every man of
them is provided with a whistle and a hood, so as to be able
to call in a hawk and hold it in hand. And when the
Emperor looses a hawk, there is no need that he follow it
up, for those men I speak of keep so good a lookout that
they never- lose sight of the birds, and if these have need of
help they are ready to render it.

All the Emperor’s hawks, and those of the Barons as
well, have a little label attached to the leg to mark them,
on which is written the names of the owner and the keeper
of the bird. And in this way the hawk, when caught, is at
once identified and handed over to its owner. But if not,
the bird is carried to a certain Baron, who is styled the
Bularguchi, which is as much as to say, “The Keeper of
Lost Property.” And I tell you that whatever may be found
without a known owner, whether it be a horse, or a sword,
or a hawk, or what not, it is carried to that Baron straight-
way, and he takes charge of it. And if the finder neglects
to deliver his find to the Baron, the latter punishes him.
Likewise the loser of any article goes to the Baron, and if
the thing be in his hands it is immediately given up to the
owner. Moreover, the said Baron always pitches on the
highest spot of the camp, with his banner displayed, in
order that those who have lost or found anything may
have no difficulty in finding their way to him. Thus
XV.] THE LUXURY OF SPORT. 143

nothing can be lost but it shall be soon found and restored
without delay.

And so the Emperor follows this road that I have men-
tioned, leading along in the vicinity of the Ocean Sea
(which is within two days’ journey of his capital city,
Cambaluc), and as he goes, there is many a fine sight to
be seen, and plenty of the very best entertainment in
hawking ; in fact, there is no sport in the world to equal it!

The Emperor himself is carried upon four elephants in
a fine chamber made of timber, lined inside with plates of
beaten gold, and outside with lions’ skins, for he always
travels in this way on his fowling expeditions, because he
is troubled with gout. He always keeps beside him a
dozen of his choicest gerfalcons, and is attended by several
of his Barons, who ride on horseback alongside. And
sometimes, as they may be going along, and the Emperor
from his chamber is holding discourse with the Barons, one
of the latter shall exclaim: “Sire! look out for the
cranes!” Then the Emperor instantly has the top of his
chamber thrown open, and, having marked the cranes, he
flies one of his gerfalcons, whichever he pleases; and often
the quarry is struck within his view, so that he has the most
exquisite sport and diversion there, as he sits inhis chamber
or lies on his bed; and all the Barons with him get the
enjoyment of it likewise! So it is not without reason I tell
you that I do not believe there ever existed in the world, or
ever will exist, a man with such sport and enjoyment as he
has, or with such rare opportunities.

And when he has travelled till he reaches a place called
CacHar Monpun, there he finds his tents pitched, with the
tents of his Sons, and his Barons, and those of his ladies
and theirs, so that there shall be full ten thousand tents
in all, and all fine and rich ones. And I will tell you
how his own quarters are disposed. The tent in which he
holds his courts is large enough to give cover easily to one
144 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

thousand souls. It is pitched with its door to the south, and
the Barons and Knights remain in waiting on it, whilst the
Kaan abides in another close to it on the west side. When
he wishes to speak with any one, he causes the person to
be summoned to that other tent. Immediately behind the
Great Tent there is a fine large chamber where the Kaan
sleeps ; and there are also many other tents and chambers,
but they are not in contact with the Great Tent as these
are. The two audience-tents and the sleeping-chamber
are constructed in this way. Each of the audience-tents
has three poles, which are of spice-wood, and are most art-
fully covered with lions’ skins, striped with black and white
and red, so that they do not suffer from any weather. All
three apartments are also covered outside with similar skins
of striped lions, a substance that lasts for ever. And inside
they are all lined with ermine and sable, these two being
the finest and most costly furs in existence. For a robe of
sable, large enough to line a mantle, is worth two thousand
bezants of gold, or one thousand at least, and this kind of
skin is called by the Tartars “The King of Furs.” The
beast itself is about the size of a marten. These two furs
of which I speak are applied and inlaid so exquisitely, that
it is really something worth seeing. All the tent-ropes are
of silk. And, in short, I may say that those tents, to wit
the two audience-halls and the sleeping-chamber, are so
costly that it is not every king could pay for them.

Round about these tents are others, also fine ones and
beautifully pitched, in which are the Emperor’s ladies, and
the ladies of the other princes and officers. And then
there are the tents for the hawks and their keepers, so that
altogether the number of tents there on the plain is some-
thing wonderful. To see the many people that are thronging
to and fro on every side and every day there, you would
take the camp for a good big city. For you must reckon
the Leeches [doctors], and the Astrologers, and the
AUR ae



PART OF THE KHAN’S ENCAMPMENT.
XV.] STRICT GAME-LAWS. 145

Falconers, and all the other attendants on so great a
company ; and add that everybody there has his whole
family with him, for such is their custom.

The Kaan remains encamped there until the spring, and
all that time he does nothing but go hawking round about
among the cane-brakes along the lakes and rivers that
abound in that region, and across fine plains on which are
plenty of cranes and swans, and all sorts of other fowl.
The other gentry of the camp also are never done with
hunting and hawking, and every day they bring home great
store of venison and feathered game of all sorts. Indeed,
without having witnessed it, you would never believe what
quantities of game are taken, and what marvellous sport
and diversion they all have whilst they are in camp there.

There is another thing I should mention; to wit, that
for twenty days’ journey round the spot nobody is allowed,
be he who he may, to keep hawks or hounds, though any-
where else whosoever list may keep them. And further-
more, throughout all the Emperor’s territories, nobody,
however audacious, dares to hunt any of these four animals,
to wit, hare, stag, buck, and roe, from the month of March
to the month of October. Anybody who should do so
would rue it bitterly. But those people are so obedient to
the Kaan’s commands, that even if a man were to find one
of those animals asleep by the roadside he would not touch
it for the world! And thus the game multiplies at such
a rate that the whole country swarms with it, and the
Emperor gets as much as he could desire. Beyond the
term I have mentioned, however, to wit, that from March
to October, everybody may take these animals as he lists.

After the Emperor has tarried in that place, enjoying
his sport as I have related, from March to the middle of
May, he moves with all his people, and returns straight. to
- his capital city of Cambaluc (which is also the capital
of Cathay, as you have been told), but all the while

Io
146 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch. XV.

continuing to take his diversion in hunting and hawking
as he goes along.

In those days, hunting with hawks and falcons
was called a royal sport, although we should consider
it rather cruel to chase the birds of the air with
fierce birds of prey, who are the natural enemies
of the game birds. But that was certainly a royal
manner of hunting in which Kublai Khan went to
the field. Carried in a fine chamber lined with gold
and covered with choice skins, and borne by a double
team. of elephants, Kublai Khan had only to sit
and view the scenery until called by his barons to
look out for the game that had been scared up for
him. No wonder that Marco exclaims in his enthu-
siasm, that he does not believe that any other man
in the world had such rare opportunities for sport !
But the great Emperor had one drawback, which
must have reminded him that he was, after all,
only a common mortal: with all his magnificence,
riches, and opportunities for enjoyment, this gorgeous
monarch had the gout !
CHAPTER XVI.

KUBLAI'’S FINANCES AND GOVERNMENT—THE GREAT KHAN AS
A MONEY-SPINNER — PRINTING MONEY TO ORDER — THE
EMPEROR’S VALUABLE MONOPOLIES—THE TWELVE BARONS
AND THEIR POWERS—POST-RUNNERS WHO TRAVEL FAST
—BURNING “BLACK STONES” FOR FUEL—THE KHAN’S
PATRIARCHAL RULE.

HE Great Khan’s method for supplying himself

with the money needed to maintain his splendid
state and magnificent expenditure must needs have
excited the admiration of Marco Polo. It appears
that the Khan had hit on the scheme of manufactur-
ing paper money, and, contrary to the usages of
modern times, the paper money of the Khan did not
represent gold and silver lying in the vaults of the
imperial treasury. The Khan’s officials printed their
money on a soft fabric made from the inner bark of
the mulberry tree, a paper-like substance which is
still used in China and Japan instead of the paper
made from linen or cotton. The fabric was cut into
pieces of different sizes, and on each piece was
printed the value to be placed on the note; and

Marco says, that each bit of paper was issued with as
147
148 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

much solemnity and authority as if it were pure
gold or silver : on every piece, he adds, “a variety of
officials, whose duty it is, have to write their names,
and to put their seals. And when all is prepared
duly, the chief officer deputed by the Kaan smears
the seal entrusted to him with vermilion, and impresses
it upon the paper, so that the form of the seal remains
stamped upon it in red ; the money is then authentic.
Any one forging it would be punished with death.
And the Kaan causes every year to be made such
a vast quantity of this money, which costs him
nothing, that it must equal in amount all the treasure
in the world.” Curiously enough, the place in which
this paper money was manufactured was called
“The Mint.” Usually, a mint is an establishment
in which metal is coined into money.

By an imperial edict, as we may presume, the Great
Khan caused his paper currency to be accepted as
money “universally over all his kingdoms and
provinces and territories, and whithersoever his power
and sovereignty extends.” It must have been a fine
thing to be able to make money from paper, and then,
by imperial command, under penalty of death, put it
into circulation. For Marco tells us that these notes
were all taken by the people without question ; he
adds: “ And nobody, however important he may think
himself, dares to refuse them, on pain of death.”

Not only did the Emperor make his own money in
XVI] PAPER MONEY. 149

such quantities as he desired, but he had the monopoly
of the markets for all sorts of valuable and costly
commodities. And this was the way in which the
business of buying and selling was managed in the
Great Khan’s capital :

Furthermore, all merchants arriving from India or other
countries, and bringing with them gold or silver or gems
and pearls, are prohibited from selling to any one but the
Emperor. He has twelve experts chosen for this business,
men of shrewdness and experience in such affairs ; these
appraise the articles, and the Emperor then pays a liberal
price for them in those pieces of paper. The merchants
accept his price readily, for in the first place they would not
get so good an one from anybody else, and:secondly they
are paid without any delay. And with this paper money
they can buy what they like anywhere over the Empire,
whilst it is also vastly lighter to carry about on their journeys.
And it is a truth that the merchants will several times in
the year bring wares to the amount of four hundred
thousand bezants, and the Grand Sire pays for all in that
paper. So he buys sucha quantity of those precious things
every year that his treasure is endless, whilst all the time
the money he pays away costs him nothing at all. More-
over, several times in the year proclamation is made through
the city that any one who may have gold or silver or gems
or pearls, by taking them to the Mint, shall get a handsome
price for them. And the owners are glad to do this,
because they would find no other purchaser give so large a
price. Thus the quantity they bring in is marvellous,
though those who do not choose to do so may let it alone.
Still, in this way, nearly all the valuables in the country
come into the Kaan’s possession.

When any of those pieces of paper are spoilt—not that
150 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

they are so very flimsy neither—the owner carries them to
the Mint, and by paying 3 per cent. on the value he gets
new pieces in exchange. And if any Baron or any one
else soever hath need of gold or silver or gems or pearls,
in order to make plate or girdles or the like, he goes to
the Mint and buys as much as he lists, paying in this
paper money.

The bezant of Marco Polo’s time was a gold coin
which originated in Constantinople during the exist-
ence of the Byzantine Empire, from which mighty
power it derives its common name; for the true title
of the coin was the solidus; it was about equal to
the dinar in value; or, to give a more modern com-
parison, a bezant was equal in value to one ounce of
silver. But, in reckoning the value of the silver in
Marco’s time, we should bear in mind that the relation
of gold to silver was not as it is now; it was about
ten to one. History records that the Mongol dynasty,
for years after Marco Polo’s time, kept up the policy
of issuing unlimited quantities of paper money ; and
in the end, this practice was the cause of many
financial disasters and much commercial distress.
But we must not infer that paper money was
exclusively used by Kublai Khan. Similar notes
were issued by the Chinese as early as the ninth
century ; and before Marco was born, money made
of stamped leather was current in Italy. The
Japanese also used paper money before the days of
Kublai Khan.
XVI.] THE TWELVE BARONS. I51

Marco Polo spent so much time at the court of
Kublai Khan, that he not only became very familiar
with the conduct of affairs in that vast empire, but
appears to have been filled with admiration for
the methods pursued by the Sovereign. Here is
some account of the Khan’s system of government
and his management of his people:

CONCERNING THE TWELVE BARONS WHO ARE SET OVER
ALL THE AFFAIRS OF THE GREAT KAAN.

You must know that the Great Kaan hath chosen twelve
great Barons, to whom he hath committed all the necessary
affairs of thirty-four great provinces; and now I will tell
you particulars about them and their establishments.

You must know that these twelve Barons reside alto-
gether in a very rich and handsome palace, which is inside
the city of Cambaluc, and consists of a variety of edifices,
with many suites of apartments. To every province is
assigned a judge and several clerks, and all reside in this
palace, where each has his separate quarters. These
judges and clerks administer all the affairs of the provinces
to which they are attached, under the direction of the
twelve Barons. Howbeit, when an affair is of very great
importance, the twelve Barons lay it before the Emperor,
and he decides as he thinks best. But the power of
those twelve Barons is so great that they choose the
governors for all those thirty-four great provinces that I
have mentioned, and only after they have chosen do
they inform the Emperor of their choice. This he con-
firms, and grants to the person nominated a tablet of gold
such as is appropriate to the rank of his government.

Those twelve Barons also have such authority that they
152 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch

can dispose of the movements of the forces, and send
them whither, and in such strength as, they please. This
is done indeed with the Emperor’s cognisance, but still
the orders are issued on their authority. They are styled
SHIENG, which is as much as to say ‘‘ The Supreme Court,”
and the palace where they abide is also called Shieng.
This body forms the highest authority at the Court of
the Great Kaan; and indeed they can favour and advance
whom they will, I will not now name the thirty-four
provinces to you, because they will be spoken of in
detail in the course of this Book.

HOW THE KAAN’S POSTS AND RUNNERS ARE SPED
THROUGH MANY LANDS AND PROVINCES.

Now you must know that from this city of Cambaluc
proceed many roads and highways leading to a variety of
provinces, one to one province, another to another; and
each road receives the name of the province to which it
leads ; and it is a very sensible plan. And the messengers
of the Emperor in travelling from Cambaluc, be the road
whichsoever they will, find at every twenty-five miles of
the journey a station which they call Yamd, or, as we
should say, the ‘‘ Horse-Post-House.” And at each of
those stations used by the messengers there is a large
and handsome building for them to put up at, in which
they find all the rooms furnished with fine beds and all
other necessary articles in rich silk, and where they are
provided with everything they can want. If even a king
were to arrive at one of these, he would find himself well
lodged. :

At some of these stations, moreover, there shall be
posted some four hundred horses standing ready for the
use of the messengers; at others there shall be two
hundred, according to the requirements, and to what the
XVL] RUNNING POSTMEN, 153

Emperor has established in each case. At every twenty-five
miles, as I said, or anyhow at every thirty miles, you find
one of these stations, on all the principal highways leading
to the different provincial governments; and the same
is the case throughout all the chief provinces subject to
the Great Kaan. Even when the messengers have to
pass through a roadless tract where neither house nor
hostel exists, still there the station-houses have been
established just the same, excepting that the intervals are
somewhat greater, and the day’s journey is fixed at thirty-
five to forty-five miles, instead of twenty-five to thirty. But
they are provided with horses and all the other necessaries
just like those we have described, so that the Emperor’s
messengers, come they from what region they may, find
everything ready for them.

And in sooth this is a thing done on the greatest scale
of magnificence that ever was seen. Never had emperor,
king, or lord such wealth as this manifests! For it is a
fact that on all these posts taken together there are more
than three hundred thousand horses kept up, specially for
the use of the messengers. And the great buildings that
I have mentioned are more than ten thousand in number,
all richly furnished as I have told you. The thing is ona
scale so costly and wonderful that it is hard to bring oneself
to describe it.

But now I will tell you of another thing that I had for-
gotten, but which ought to be told whilst I am on this
subject. You must know that by the Great Kaan’s orders
there has been established between those post-houses at
every interval of three miles a little fort with some forty
houses round about it, in which dwell the people who act
as the Emperor’s foot-runners. Every one of those runners
wears a great wide belt, set all over with bells, so that as
they run the three miles from post to post their bells are
heard jingling a long way off. And thus on reaching the
154 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

post the runner finds another man similarly equipped, and
all ready to take his place, who instantly takes over what-
soever he has in charge, and with it receives a slip of paper
from the clerk who is always on hand for the purpose;
and so the new man sets off and runs his three miles. At
the next station he finds his relief ready in like manner ;
and so the post proceeds, with a change at every three
miles. And in this way the Emperor, who has an immense
number of these runners, receives despatches with news
from places ten days’ journey off in one day and night;
or, if need be, news from a hundred days’ off in ten days
and nights ; and that is no small matter !

In fact, in the fruit season many a time fruit shall be
gathered one morning in Cambaluc, and in the evening of
the next day it shall reach the Great Kaan at Chandu, a
distance of ten days’ journey. The clerk at each of the
posts notes the time of each courier’s arrival and departure ;
and there are often other officers whose business it is to
make monthly visitations of all the posts, and to punish
those runners who have been slack in their work. The
Emperor exempts these men from all tribute and pays
them besides.

Moreover, there are also at those stations other men
equipped similarly with girdles hung with bells, who are
employed for expresses when there is call for great haste
in sending despatches to any governor of a province, or to
give news when any baron has revolted, or in other such
emergencies ; and these men travel a good two hundred
or three hundred miles in the day, and as much in the
night. Ill tell you how it stands. They take a horse
from those at the station which are standing ready saddled,
all fresh and in wind, and mount and go at full speed, as
hard as they can ride in fact. And when those at the
next post hear the bells, they get ready another horse and
a man equipped in the same way, and he takes over the
XVI.J FLEET COURIERS. 155

letter or whatever it be, and is off full speed to the third
station, where again a fresh horse is found all ready, and so
the despatch speeds along from post to post, always at full
gallop with regular change of horses. And the speed at
which they go is marvellous. By night, however, they
cannot go so fast as by day, because they have to be
accompanied by footmen with torches, who could not
keep up with them at full speed.

Those men are highly prized; and they could never do
it did they not bind hard the stomach, chest, and head
with strong bands. And each of them carries with him
a gerfalcon tablet, in sign that he is bound on an urgent
express; so that if perchance his horse break down, or
he meet with other mishap, whomsoever he may fall in
with on the road, he is empowered to make him dismount
and give up his horse. Nobody dares refuse in such a
case; so that the courier hath always a good fresh nag
to carry him.

The system of posting, of which we have this minute
and lucid account, though in existence in the time of
Kublai Khan, was not originated by that monarch ;
it was employed by all the Oriental nations, and is in
vogue to-day in Northern China, Japan, and other
countries, where the railway and the telegraph have
not yet penetrated the vast spaces that lie between
the large cities. The Japanese runners are very fleet ;
and when one of them starts off on a long errand,
he first strips himself of all clothing except a cloth
around his loins: with his light burden slung to
a stick over his shoulder, he will make seven miles

an hour for several consecutive hours. In Burmah
156 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

the kings were accustomed to have delicacies brought
by horse-posts from distant points to their capital
at Ava; and Colonel Yule tells how one of the
caliphs of Cairo in the tenth century, who had a
longing for some of the cherries of Baalbek, was
served by his vizier. The vizier, hearing of the
wish expressed by his master, caused six hundred
pigeons to be let loose in Baalbek, their home being
in Cairo ; and to each leg of each bird was attached
a small silken bag with one cherry therein. So that
the gratified caliph, if all the pigeons came home,
was served with twelve hundred cherries.

In Marco Polo’s time very little was known in
Europe concerning coal as a fuel. But although
mineral coal is more generally used in Europe and
America than it is in China, there are vast deposits
‘of this material in China, where it was used as a
fuel long before our Venetian traveller visited that
country. Here is his account of “the black stones”
which so much excited his admiration :

CONCERNING THE BLACK STONES THAT ARE DUG IN
CATHAY, AND ARE BURNT FOR FUEL.

It is a fact that all over the country of Cathay there is
a kind of black stone existing in beds in the mountains,
which they dig out and burn like firewood. If you supply
a fire with them at night, and see that they are well
kindled, you will find them still alight in the morning; and
they make such capital fuel that no other is used throughout
XVL] COAL. 157

the country. It is true that they have plenty of wood also,

but they do not burn it, because these stones burn better
and cost less.

It is said that coal exists in every province of
China, but it is most plentiful in Northern China,
where there are inexhaustible beds of anthracite;
and the people use it (as Marco says) in preference
to any other kind of fuel. The unwillingness of
the Chinesé Government to allow large commercial
enterprises to be undertaken by foreigners has pre-
vented any liberal opening of these coal mines, and
the people only mine the deposits in a feeble and
fitful way. If any one should wonder at Marco’s
apparent ignorance of the true nature of mineral coal,
he should remember that coal was not burnt in the
South of Europe, where our traveller spent his youth,
until very recent times. Even up to late days coal
was known in England, where it was first used, as
“stone coal,” to distinguish it from charcoal. As far
back as A.D. 850 mention is made, in the records
of Peterborough Abbey, of “fossil fuel”; and it is
believed that the Romans learned from the ancient
Britons the uses of this kind of fuel. Nevertheless,
coal was not commonly used in London until 1240,
some forty years before the time of Marco Polo;
and as communication between London and Venice
was tedious and uncertain, it was not surprising that
the Venetians knew nothing of coal as a fuel,
158 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

The present form of government in China is
beneficent and patriarchal in theory, but by no means
so benevolent in practice, as it would appear to
one who reads only a Chinese version of political
affairs in that empire. Apparently, under Kublai
Khan the administration of the government was
really what the present government professes to
be, as will be seen in the following account taken

from Polo’s book :

HOW THE GREAT KAAN CAUSES STORES OF CORN TO BE
MADE, TO HELP HIS PEOPLE WITHAL IN TIME OF
DEARTH.

You must know that when the Emperor sees that the
corn is cheap and abundant he buys up large quantities,
and has it stored in all his provinces and great granaries,
where it is so well looked after that it will keep for three
or four years.

And this applies, let me tell you, to all kinds of corn,
whether wheat, barley, millet, rice, panic, or what not; and
when there is any scarcity of a particular kind of corn he
causes that to be issued. And if the price of the corn is at
one bezant the measure, he lets them have it at a bezant
for four measures, or at whatever price will produce general
cheapness ; and every one can have food in this way. And
by this providence of the Emperor’s his people can never
suffer from dearth. He does the same over his whole
Empire, causing these supplies to be stored everywhere
according to calculation of the wants and necessities of the
people.
XVI] A CHARITABLE KHAN, 159

OF THE CHARITY OF THE EMPEROR TO THE POOR.

I have told you how the Great Kaan provides for the
distribution of necessaries to his people in time of dearth
by making store in time of cheapness. Now I will tell you
of his alms and great charity to the poor of his city of
Cambaluc.

You see he causes selection to be made of a number of
families in the city which are in a state of indigence, and
of such families some may consist of six in the house,
some of eight, some of ten, more or fewer in each as it
may hap, but the whole number being very great. And
each family he causes annually to be supplied with wheat
and other corn sufficient for the whole year. And this he
never fails to do every year. Moreover, all those who
choose to go to the daily dole at the Court receive a great
loaf apiece hot from the baking, and nobody is denied ; for
so the Lord hath ordered. And so some thirty thousand
people go for it every day from year’s end to year’s end. Now
this is a great goodness in the Emperor to take pity of his
poor people thus! And they benefit so much by it that
they worship him as he were God.

He also provides the poor with clothes. For he lays a
tithe upon all wool, silk, hemp, and the like from which
clothing can be made; and he has these woven and laid
up in a building set apart for the purpose; and as all
artisans are bound to give a day’s labour weekly, in this
way the Kaan has these stuffs made into clothing for those
poor families, suitable for summer or winter, according to
the time of year. He also provides the clothing for his
troops, and has woollens woven for them in every city, the
material for which is furnished by the tithe aforesaid. You
should know that the Tartars, before they were converted
to the religion of the Idolaters, never practised almsgiving.
Indeed, when any poor man begged of them they would tell
160 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

him: “Go with God’s curse, for if He loved you as He
loves me He would have provided for you!” But the
sages of the Idolaters, and especially the Bacs?s mentioned
before, told the Great Kaan that it was a good work to
provide for the poor, and that his idols would be greatly
pleased if he did so. And since then he has taken to do
for the poor so much as you have heard.

CONCERNING THE VIEWS OF THE CATHAYANS [CHINESE]
AS TO THE SOUL, AND THEIR CUSTOMS.

Their view of the immortality of the soul is after this
fashion: They believe that as soon as a man dies his soul °
enters into another body, going from a good to a better, or
from a bad to a worse, according as he hath conducted
himself well or ill. That is to say, a poor man, if he have
passed through life good and sober, shall be born again of
a gentlewoman, and shall be a gentleman ; and on a second
occasion shall be born of a princess, and shall be a prince,
and so on, always rising, till he be absorbed into the Deity.
But if he have borne himself ill, he who was the son of a
gentleman shall be reborn as the son of a boor, and from
a boor shall become a dog, always going down lower and
lower.

The people have an ornate style of speech ; they salute
each other with a cheerful countenance; and with great
politeness ; they behave like gentlemen, and eat with great
propriety. They show great respect to their parents; and
should there be any son who offends his parents, or fails
to minister to their necessities, there is a public office
which has no other charge but that of punishing unnatural
children, who are proved to have acted with ingratitude
towards their parents.

Criminals of sundry kinds who have been imprisoned
are released at a time fixed by the Great Kaan (which
VL] A YEAR’S PROGRAMME. 161

occurs every three years), but on leaving prison they are
branded on one cheek, that they may be recognised.

The Great Kaan hath prohibited all gambling and
sharping, things more prevalent there than in any other
part of the world. In doing this, he said: “I have
conquered you by force of arms, and all that you have is
mine ; if, therefore, you gamble away your property, it is
in fact my property that you are gambling away.” Not
that he took anything from them, however.

I must not omit to tell you of the orderly way in which
the Kaan’s Barons and others conduct themselves in coming
to his presence. In the first place, within a half-mile of
the place where he is, out of reverence for his exalted
majesty, everybody preserves a mien of the greatest meek-
ness and quiet, so that no noise of shrill voices or loud
talk shal be heard.

We may here add Marco’s account of the way in
which the year of the Great Khan is spent:

On arriving at his capital of Cambaluc, he stays in his
palace three days and no more during which time he has
great court entertainments and rejoicings. He then quits
his palace at Cambaluc, and. proceeds to that city which
he has built, as I told you before, and which is called
Chandu, where he has that grand park and palace of cane.
There he spends the summer, to escape the heat, for the
situation is a very cool one. After stopping there from the
beginning of May to the 28th of August, he takes his
departure, and returns to his capital Cambaluc. There he
stops the month of September to keep his Birthday Feast,
and also throughout October, November, December,
January, and February, in which last month he keeps the
grand feast of the New Year, which they call the White

II
162 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch. XVI.

Feast. He then sets out on his march towards the Ocean
Sea, hunting and hawking, and continues out from the
beginning of March to the middle of May; and then
comes back for three days only to the capital, during
which he makes merry, and holds a great court and grand
entertainments. In truth, ’tis something astonishing, the
magnificence displayed by the Emperor in those three
days ; and then he starts off again as you know.
CHAPTER XVIL.

THE GOLDEN KING AND PRESTER JOHN—THE FAMED YELLOW RIVER
—SOME OF THE WONDERS OF YUNNAN—THE TRAVELLER
MEETS WITH CROCODILES—‘‘ THE PEOPLE OF THE GOLD
TEETH ”—CURIOSITIES OF TATTOOING—A FAMOUS BATTLE
—THE CITY OF MIEN.

ARCO, having told his readers many won-

derful things about Kublai Khan and his
court and people, then addressed himself to the
narration of some of his adventures in travelling
about the great Mongolian Empire. This part of
his book he begins by saying:

Now you must know that the Emperor sent the aforesaid
Marco Polo, who is the author of this whole story, on busi-
ness of his into the Western Provinces. On that occasion
he travelled from Cambaluc a good four months’ journey
toward the west. And so now] will tell you all that he saw
on his travels as he went and returned.

The journey which Marco took was along the
boundary of Cathay, or China, nearest to the Indian
Empire ; the provinces of the Mongolian Empire
through which he passed are now known as Shansi,
Szechwan, and Tibet. We are not able to find on

a modern map all the places of which Marco makes
163
164 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch,

mention in his account of his journey through the
Western Provinces. But some of the names of cities
are found easily enough. For example, Pianfu, one
of the cities first mentioned in Marco’s journal,
was undoubtedly Pingyangfu, as the city is now
called. We are not so certain about Chaicu, which
lies two days’ ride farther west.

Here, Marco says, is “a noble castle, built in time
past by a king of that country, whom they used to
call the Golden King,” and then relates this story :

Now I will tell you a pretty passage that befell between
this Golden King and Prester John, as it was related by the
people of the Castle.

It came to pass, as they told the tale, that this Golden
King was at war with Prester John. And the King held a
Position so strong that Prester John was not able to get at
him or to do him any scathe; wherefore he was in great
wrath. So seventeen gallants belonging to Prester John’s
Court came to him in a body, and said that, an he would,
they were ready to bring him the Golden King alive. His
answer was, that he desired nothing better, and would be
much bounden to them if they would do so.

So when they had taken leave of their Lord and Master
Prester John, they set off together, this goodly company of
gallants, and went to the Golden King, and presented
themselves before him, saying that they had come from
foreign parts to enter his service. And he answered by
telling them that they were right welcome, and that he
was glad to have their service, never imagining that they
had any ill intent. And so these mischievous squires took
service with the Golden King, and served him so well
that he grew to love them dearly.
XVII] THESE MISCHIEVOUS SQUIRES. 165

And when they had abode with that King nearly two
years, conducting themselves like persons who thought of
anything but treason, they one day accompanied the King
on a pleasure party when he had, very few else along with
him; for in those gallants the King had perfect trust, and
thus kept them immediately about his person. So after
they had crossed a certain river that is about a mile from
the Castle, and saw that they were alone with the King,
they said one to another that now was the time to achieve that
they had come for. Then they all incontinently drew near,
and told the King that he must go with them and make no
resistance, or they would slay him. The King at this was
in alarm and great astonishment, and said: “ How then,
good my sons, what thing is this ye say ? and whither would
ye have me go?” ‘They answered and said: “You shall
come with us, will ye nill ye, to Prester John our Lord.”

And on this the Golden King was so sorely grieved that
he was like to die. And he said to them: “Good my
sons, for God’s sake have pity and compassion upon me.
Ye wot well what honourable and kindly entertainment ye
have had in my house; and now ye would deliver me into
the hands of mine enemy! In sooth, if ye do what ye say,
ye will do a very naughty and disloyal deed, and a right
villainous.” But they answered only that so it must be,
and away they had him to Prester John their Lord.

And when Prester John beheld the King he was right
glad, and greeted him with something like a malison. The
King answered not a word, as if he wist not what it behoved
him to say. So Prester John ordered him to be taken
forth straightway, and to be put to look after cattle, but to
be well looked after himself also. So they took him and
set him to keep cattle. This did Prester John of the
grudge he bore the King, to heap contumely on him, and
to show what a nothing he was, compared to himself.

And when the King had thus kept cattle for two years,
166 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

Prester John sent for him, and treated him with honour,
and clothed him in rich robes, and said to him: “ Now,
Sir King, art thou satisfied that thou wast in no way a man
to stand against me?” “Truly, my good Lord, I know
well and always did know that I was in no way a man to
stand against thee.” And when he had said this Prester
John replied: “I ask no more; but henceforth thou shalt
be waited on and honourably treated.” So he caused
horses and harness of war to be given him, with a goodly
train, and sent him back to his own country. And after
that he remained ever friendly to Prester John, and held
fast by him.

When Marco goes on to speak of the great fiver
Caramoran, it is easy to identify that watercourse
with one of the famous rivers of China. He says:

When you leave Chaicu, and travel about twenty miles
westward, you come to a river called Caramoran, so big
that no bridge can be thrown across it; for it is of immense
width and depth, and reaches to the Great Ocean that
encircles the Universe—I mean the whole earth. On this
river there are many cities and walled towns, and many
merchants too therein, for much traffic takes place upon the
river, there being a great deal of ginger and a great deal of
silk produced in the country.

This could be none other than the Hoang-Ho,
or Yellow River, sometimes called “The Sorrow of
China,” on account of the great destruction of life
and property it brings by its floods. We must bear
in mind that, when Marco wrote, nobody actually
knew what water or land lay to the eastward of
XVIL] THE YELLOW RIVER. 167

China; therefore he speaks of the “Great Ocean
that encircles the Universe,” and this was usually
known as the “Ocean Sea.” As the Amazon and
the Mississippi rivers were unknown then, the Yellow
River of China was the largest known, and Marco
was the first to bring back to Europe any detailed
account of that stream.

After crossing the Yellow River and travelling
two days westward Marco reached the city of
Chacanfu, and then eight days westward brought
him to Kenjanfu, of which he makes mention after
this manner :

And when you have travelled those eight days’ journey,
you come to that great city which I mentioned, called
KenjanFu, which in old times was a noble, rich, and
powerful realm, and had many great and wealthy and
puissant kings. But now the king thereof is a prince called
Mancatal, the son of the Great Kaan, who hath given
him this realm, and crowned him king thereof. It is a
city of great trade and industry. They have great abun-
dance of silk, from which they weave cloths of silk and gold,
of divers kinds, and they also manufacture all sorts of
equipments for an army. They have every necessary of
man’s life very cheap. The city lies towards the west ;
and outside the city is the palace of the Prince Mangalai,
crowned king, and son of the Great Kaan, as I told you
before.

This is a fine palace and a great, as I will tell you.
It stands in a great plain abounding in lakes and streams
and springs of water. Round about it is a massive and
lofty wall, five miles in compass, well built, and all garnished
168 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch,

with battlements. And within this wall is the King’s
palace, so great and fine that no one could imagine a
finer. There are in it many great and splendid halls,
and many chambers, all painted and embellished with
work in beaten gold. This Mangalai rules his realm
right and well with justice and equity, and is much be-
loved by his people. The troops are quartered round
about the palace, and enjoy the sport that the royal
demesne affords.

Kenjanfu we know to be Singanfu, one of the
ancient and historic cities of China. It was once
the residence of. the Chinese Emperor, and is now
the capital of the province of Shansi. It is renowned
as the seat of a Christian colony, of which a remark-
able memorial remains. The Christian missionaries,
who penetrated this remote region long before the
coming of Marco Polo, were Nestorians from Persia,
or from Constantinople—it is not certain which.
They were Asiatics, and took their name from
Nestorius, one of the early Christian bishops, who
flourished in the fifth century of the Christian era,
and whose seat was in Constantinople. A tablet
has been found in a ruined temple near Singanfu, on
which are inscribed in Chinese and Syriac characters
a full statement of the sum of the Christian doctrine,
an account of the arrival of a Christian missionary
with books, the Emperor’s approval of the doctrines,
and his order for the erection of a church. This
tablet, which is seven feet high and three feet wide,
XVII] BAMBOOZLED ! 169

and is surmounted by a carved likeness of a cross,
is the oldest Christian monument in Asia.

Reaching the southern part of Shansi, Marco
. approaches Manzi, or that part of the empire which
lies south of the Yellow River. The capital of the
province, he says, is called “ Acbalec Manzi, which
signifies ‘The White City of the Manzi Frontier.”
In these later days the Americans have had a
White City, which was built for the Columbian Fair
in Chicago.

Passing through Tibet, Marco notices particularly
the bamboos there. He calls them “canes,” and
exaggerates a little about them; but perhaps ex-
aggeration was natural, because, before gunpowder
became familiar, no sharp explosive sounds of this
kind were known to ordinary experience. This is
what he says:

In this region you find quantities of canes, full three
palms in girth and fifteen paces in length, with some three
palms’ interval between the joints. And let me tell you
that merchants and other travellers are wont at nightfall to
gather these canes and make fires of them; for as they burn
they make such loud reports that the lions and bears and
other wild beasts are greatly frightened, and make off as
fast as possible ; in fact, nothing will induce them to come
nigh a fire of that sort. So you see the travellers make
those fires to protect themselves and their cattle from the
wild beasts, which have so greatly multiplied since the
devastation of the country. And’tis this great multiplication
of the wild beasts that prevents the country from being
170 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch

reoccupied. In fact, but for the help of these canes, which
make such a noise in burning that the beasts are terrified
and kept at a distance, no one would be able even to travel
through the land. 3

I will tell you how it is that the canes make such a noise.
The people cut the green canes, of which there are vast
numbers, and set fire to a heap of them at once. After
they have been awhile burning they burst asunder, and this
makes such a loud report that you might hear it ten miles
off. In fact, any one unused to this noise, who should
hear it unexpectedly, might easily go into a swound or die
of fright. But those who are used to it care nothing about
it. Hence those who are not used to it stuff their ears well
with cotton, and wrap up their heads and faces with all the
clothes they can muster ; and so they get along until they
have become used to the sound. ’Tis just the same with
horses. Those which are unused to these noises are so
alarmed by them that they break away from their halters
and heel-ropes, and many a man has lost his beasts in this
way. So those who would avoid losing their horses take
care to tie all four legs and peg the ropes down strongly,
and to wrap the heads and eyes and ears of the animals
closely, and so they save them. But horses also, when
they have heard the noise several times, cease to mind it.
I tell you the truth, however, when I say that the first time
you hear it nothing can be more alarming. And yet, in
spite of all, the lions and bears and other wild beasts will
sometimes come and do much mischief ; for their numbers
are great in those tracts.

Marco’s next advance was into the province of
Yunnan, in the extreme south-western corner of
China, north of Siam, and east of Burmah. Even
in these modern times very little is known of
XVII.] ALLIGATORS. 171

Yunnan, the best account of the country having
been written by Mr. T. T. Cooper, an English
traveller, who was killed by one of his own native
guard, in Burmah, in 1878. It is not likely that
Kublai Khan knew much about that most remote
of his conquered provinces, and so young Marco
was sent to bring to the Khan whatever information
he could pick up concerning the country and its
resources. Here is part of his report:

MARCO POLO’S REPORT UPON THE PROVINCE OF
YUNNAN.

In this country gold-dust is found in great quantities;
that is to say, in the rivers and lakes, while in the mountains
gold is also found in pieces of larger size. Gold is indeed
so abundant that they give one saggio of gold for only
six of the same weight in silver. And for small change
they use the porcelain shells, as I mentioned before.
These are not found in the country, however, but are
brought from India.

In this province are found snakes and great serpents of
such vast size as to strike fear into those who see them,
and so hideous that the very account of them must excite
the wonder of those who hear it. I will tell you how long
and big they are.

You may be assured that some of them are ten paces
in length; some are more and some less. And in bulk
they are equal to a great cask, for the bigger ones are about
ten palms in girth. The head is very big. The mouth
is large enough to swallow a man whole, and is garnished
with great pointed teeth. And in short they are so fierce-
looking and so hideously ugly, that every man and beast
-172 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch, ;

must stand in fear and trembling of them. There are also
smaller ones, such as of eight paces long, and of five, and of
one pace only.

The way in which they are caught is this: You must
know that by day they live underground because of the
great heat, and in the night they go out to feed, and devour
every animal they can catch. They go also to drink at
the rivers and lakes and springs. And their weight is so
great that when they travel in search of food or drink,
as they do by night, the tail makes a great furrow in the
soil, as if a full tun of liquor had been dragged along. Now
the huntsmen who go after them take them by a certain
gin [trap] which they set in the track over which the
serpent has passed, knowing that the beast will come back
the same way. They plant a stake deep in the ground, and
fix on the head of this a sharp blade of steel made like
a razor or a lance-point, and then they cover the whole with
sand, so that the serpent cannot see it. Indeed, the hunts-
man plants several such stakes and blades on the track.
On coming to the spot, the beast strikes against the iron
blade with such force that it enters his breast and rives
[cuts] him, so that he dies on the spot; and the crows
on seeing the brute dead begin to caw, and then the
huntsmen know that the serpent is dead and come in search
of him.

This then is the way these beasts are taken. Those
who take them proceed to extract the gall from the inside,
and this sells at a great price; for you must know it
furnishes the material for a most precious medicine.
Thus if a person is bitten by a mad dog, and they give
him but a small pennyweight of this medicine to drink,
he is cured in a moment. Again, if one has any disease
of the skin and applies a small quantity of this gall, he
shall speedily be cured. So you see why it sells at such a
high price.
XVIL] SMALL CHANGE. 173

They also sell the flesh of this serpent, for it is excellent
eating, and the people are very fond of it. And when
these serpents are very hungry, sometimes they will
seek out the lairs of lions or bears or other large wild
beasts, and devour their cubs, without the sire and dam
being able to prevent it. Indeed, if they catch the big
ones themselves they devour them too; they can make no
resistance. ,

This was Marco’s first view, we must suppose,
of alligators or crocodiles. No wonder he gazed
upon these horrid “serpents” with so much amaze-
ment. But if we leave out his ignorance of the
name, we shall find that his account of the alligator,
as he is now known, is accurate enough. The
creatures are caught and killed now precisely as
he narrates; and their habits are the same as he
describes them. But we can well imagine that the
incredulous Venetians, to whom these travellers’ tales
were told, winked to each other and smiled “in

”

their sleeves” to hear such marvellous accounts of
strange beasts.

Concerning the use of shells as money, it is hardly
necessary to tell the bright young folks who read
these chapters, that shells of the variety known as
cowrie are still used in some parts of India and in
the islands of the South Pacific for money. Marco
found many people in Tibet and other Indo-Chinese
provinces who used cakes of salt for small change.
Salt is costly ; everybody must have it; and, in
174 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

default of small money, it was and is used in making
change.

The curious customs of the people of Zardandan
attracted the attention of our traveller, who devotes a
large section of one of his chapters to a description
of them:

CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF ZARDANDAN.

When you have left Carajan and have travelled five
days westward, you find a province called ZARDANDAN.
The capital city is called Vocuan.

The people of this country all have their teeth gilt ; or
rather every man covers his teeth with a sort of golden
case made to fit them, both the upper teeth and the under.
The men do this, but not the women. The men also are
wont to gird their arms and legs with bands or fillets
pricked in black, and it is done thus: they take five needles
joined together, and with these they prick the flesh till the
blood comes, and then they rub in a certain black colouring
stuff, and this is perfectly indelible. It is considered a
piece of elegance and the sign of gentility to have this
black band. The men are all gentlemen in their fashion,
and do nothing but go to the wars, or go hunting and
hawking. The ladies do all the business, aided by the
slaves who have been taken in war.

They eat all kinds of meat, both raw and cooked, and
they eat rice with their cooked meat as their fashion is.
Their drink is wine made of rice and spices, and excellent
itis. Their money is gold, and for small change they use
pig-shells. And I can tell you they give one weight of
gold for only five of silver; for there is no silver mine
within five months’ journey. And this induces merchants
to go thither carrying a large supply of silver to change
XVIL] DEVIL-DOCTORS. 175

among that people. And as they have only five weights
of silver to give for one of fine gold, they make immense
profits by their exchange business in that country.

These people have neither idols nor churches, but
worship the progenitor of their family; “for ’tis he,” say
they, “from whom we have all sprung.” They have no
letters or writing ; and ’tis no wonder, for the country is
wild and hard of access, full of great woods and mountains
which ’tis impossible to pass, the air in summer is so
impure and bad; and any foreigners attempting it would
die for certain. When these people have any business
transactions with one another, they take a piece of stick,
round or square, and split it, each taking half. And on
either half they cut two or three notches. And when the
account is settled the debtor receives back the other half
of the stick from the creditor.

And let me tell you that in all those three provinces that
I have been speaking of, to wit, Carajan, Vochan, and
Yachi, there is never a leech. But when any one is ill
they send for their magicians; that is to say, the Devil-
conjurers and those who are the keepers of the idols.
When these are come the sick man tells them what ails
him, and then the conjurers incontinently begin playing
on their instruments and singing and dancing; and the
conjurers dance to such a pitch that at last one of them
shall fall to the ground lifeless, like a dead man. And
then the devil entereth into his body. And when his
comrades see him in this plight they begin to put questions
to him about the sick man’s ailment. And he will reply:
“Such or such a spirit hath been meddling with the man,
for that he hath angered the spirit and done it some
despite.” Then they say: “ We pray thee to pardon him,
and to take of his blood or of his goods what thou wilt
in consideration of thus restoring him to health.” And
when they have so prayed the malignant spirit that is in
176 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

the body of the prostrate man will (mayhap) answer: ‘‘ The
sick man hath also done great despite unto such another
spirit, and that one is so ill-disposed that it will not pardon
him on any account” ;—this at least is the answer they get,
an the patient be like to die. But if he is to get better
the answer will be that they are to bring two sheep, or
maybe three; and to brew ten or twelve jars of drink,
very costly and abundantly spiced. Moreover, it shall be
announced that the sheep must be all black-faced, or of
some other particular colour as it may hap; and then all
those things are to be offered in sacrifice to such and such
a spirit whose name is given. And they are to bring so
many conjurers and so many ladies, and the business is
to be done with a great singing of lauds, and with many
lights, and store of good perfumes. That is the sort of
answer they get if the patient isto get well. And then
the kinsfolk of the sick man go and procure all that has
been commanded, and do as has been bidden, and the
conjurer who had uttered all that gets on his legs again.

So they fetch the sheep of the colour prescribed, and
slaughter them, and sprinkled the blood over such places
as have been enjoined, in honour and propitiation of the
spirit. And the conjurers come, and the ladies, in the
number that was ordered ; and when all are assembled and
everything is ready, they begin to dance and play and sing
in honour of the spirit. And they take flesh-broth, and
drink, and lign-aloes, and a great number of lights, and go
about hither and thither, scattering the broth and the drink
and the meat also. And when they have done this for
a while, again shall one of the conjurers fall flat and wallow
there foaming at the mouth, and then the others will ask if
he have yet pardoned the sick man. And sometimes he
shall answer Yea! and sometimes he shall answer No! And
if the answer be Vo, they shall be told that something or
other has to be done all over again, and tien he will be
XVIL] A FAMOUS BATTLE. T77.

pardoned ; so this they do. And when all that the spirit
has commanded has been done with great ceremony, then
it shall be announced that the man is pardoned and shall
be speedily cured. So when they at length receive such
a reply, they announce that it is all made up with the spirit,
and that he is propitiated, and they fall to eating and
drinking with great joy and mirth, and he who had been
lying lifeless on the ground gets up and takes his share. So
when they have all eaten and drunken, every man departs
home. And presently the sick man gets sound and well.

OF THE BATTLE THAT WAS FOUGHT BY THE GREAT KAAN’S
HOST AGAINST THE KING OF MIEN AND BANGALA.

But I was forgetting to tell you of a famous battle that
was fought in the kingdom of Vochan in the province
of Zardandan, and that ought not to be omitted from our
Book.

You see, in the year of Christ 1272, the Great Kaan sent
a large force into the kingdoms of Carajan and Vochan.
Now there was a certain King called the King of Mien
and Bangala, who was a very puissant Prince, with much
territory and treasure and people. And it came to pass
that when this King heard that the host of the Great Kaan
was at Vochan, he said to himself that it behoved him to
go against them with so great a force as should insure his
cutting off the whole of them, insomuch that the Great Kaan
would be very sorry ever to send an army again thither.

So this King prepared a great force and munitions of
war; and he had, let me tell you, two thousand great
elephants, on each of which was set a tower of timber, well
framed and strong, and carrying from twelve to sixteen
well-armed fighting-men. And besides these, he had of
horsemen and of footmen good sixty thousand men. In
short, he equipped a fine force, as well befitted such a

y 12
178 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

puissant Prince. It was indeed a host capable of doing
great things.

And what shall I tell you? When the King had com-
pleted these great preparations to fight the Tartars, he
tarried not, but straightway marched against them.

And when the Captain of the Tartar host had certain
news that the King aforesaid was coming against him with
so great a force, he waxed uneasy, seeing that he had with
him but twelve thousand horsemen. Natheless he was a
most valiant and able soldier, of great experience in arms,
and an excellent Captain; and his name was Nescradin.
His troops too were very good, and he gave them very
particular orders and cautions how to act, and took every
measure for his own defence and that of his army. And
why should I make a long story of it? The whole force of
the Tartars advanced to receive the enemy in the Plain
of Vochan, and there they waited to give them battle. And
this they did through the good judgment of the excellent
Captain who led them ; for hard by that plain was a great
wood, thick with trees.

And when the army of the King of Mien had arrived in
the plain, and-was within a mile of the enemy, he caused
all the castles that were on the elephants to be ordered for
battle, and the fighting-men to take up their posts on them,
and he arrayed his horse and his foot with all skill, like a
wise King as he was. And when he had completed all his
arrangements, he began to advance to engage the enemy.
The Tartars, seeing the foe advance, showed no dismay,
but came on likewise with good order and discipline to
meet them. And when they were near, and naught re-
mained but to begin the fight, the horses of the Tartars
took such fright at the sight of the elephants that they
could not be got to face the foe, but always swerved and
turned back ; whilst all the time the King and his forces,
and all his elephants, continued to advance upon them.
XVII] A SHREWD GENERAL. 179

And when the Tartars perceived how the case stood,
they were in great wrath, and wist not what to say or do;
for well enough they saw that unless they could get their
horses to advance all would be lost. But their Captain
acted like a wise leader who had considered everything
beforehand. He immediately gave orders that every man
should dismouht and tie his horse to the trees of the
forest that stood hard by, and that then they should take
to their bows, a weapon that they knew how to handle
better than any troops in the world. They did as he
bade them, and plied their bows stoutly, shooting so many
shafts at the advancing elephants that in a short space they
had wounded or slain the greater part of them, as well as of
the men they carried. The enemy also shot at the Tartars,
but the Tartars had the better weapons, and were the
better archers to boot.

And what shall I tell you? Understand that when
the elephants felt the smart of those arrows that pelted
them like rain, they turned tail and fled, and nothing on
earth would have induced them to turn and face the
Tartars. So off they sped with such a noise and uproar
that you would have trowed the world was coming to an
end! And then, too, they plunged into the wood and
rushed this way and that, dashing their castles against
the trees, bursting their harness, and smashing and destroy-
ing everything that was on them.

So when the Tartars saw that the elephants had turned
tail and could not be brought to face the fight again,
they got to horse at once and charged the enemy. And
then the battle began to raze furiously with sword and
mace. Right fiercely did the two hosts rush together, and
deadly were the blows exchanged. ‘The King’s troops were
far more in number than the Tartars, but they were not
of such metal, nor so inured to war; otherwise the Tartars,
who were so few in number, could never have stood against
180 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

them. Then might you see swashing blows dealt and
taken from sword and mace; then might you see knights
and horses and men-at-arms go down; then might you
see arms and hands and legs and heads hewn off; and
besides the dead that fell, many a wounded man, that
never rose again, for the sore press there was. ‘The din
and uproar were so great from this side and from that, that
God might have thundered and no man would have heard
it! Great was the medley, and dire and parlous was the
fight that was fought on both sides; but the Tartars had
the best of it.

In an ill hour indeed for the King and his people was
that battle begun, so many of them were slain therein,
And when they had continued fighting till midday, the
King’s troops could stand against the Tartars no longer,
but felt that they were defeated, and turned and fled. And
when the Tartars saw them routed they gave chase, and
hacked and slew so mercilessly that it was a piteous sight
to see. But after pursuing awhile they gave up, and
returned to the wood to catch the elephants that had run
away ; and to manage this they had to cut down great trees
to bar their passage. Even then they would not have been
able to take them without the help of the King’s own men
who had been taken, and who knew better how to deal
with the beasts than the Tartars did. The elephant is an
animal that has more wit than any other; but in this way
at last they were caught, more than two hundred of them.
And it was from this time forth that the Great Kaan began
to keep numbers of elephants.

OF THE GREAT DESCENT THAT LEADS TOWARDS THE
KINGDOM OF MIEN.

After leaving the province of which I have been speaking,
you come to a great Descent. In fact, you ride for two
XVII] THE CITY OF MIEN. 181

days and a half continually downhill. On all this descent
there is nothing worthy of mention, except only that there
is a large place there where occasionally a great market is
held ; for all the people of the country round come thither
on fixed days, three times a week, and hold a market there,
They exchange gold for silver; for they have gold in
abundance ; and they give one weight of fine gold for five
weights of fine silver; so this induces merchants to come
from various quarters, bringing silver which they exchange
for gold with these people ; and in this way the merchants
make great gain. As regards those people of the country
who dispose of gold so cheaply, you must understand that
nobody is acquainted with their places of abode, for they
dwell in inaccessible positions, in sites so wild and strong
that no one can get at them to meddle with them. Nor
will they allow anybody to accompany them, so as to gain
a knowledge of their abodes.

CONCERNING THE CITY OF MIEN AND THE TWO TOWERS
THAT ARE THEREIN.

In this city there is a thing so rich and rare that I must
tell you about it. You see there was in former days a rich
and puissant King in this city, and when he was about to
die he commanded that by his tomb ‘they should erect two
towers (one at either end), one of gold and the other of
silver, in such fashion as I shall tell you. The towers are
built of fine stone ; and then one of them has been covered
with gold a good finger in thickness, so that the tower
looks as if it were all of solid gold; and the other is
covered with silver in like manner, so that it seems to be all
of solid silver. Each tower is a good ten paces in height
and of breadth in proportion. The upper part of. these
towers is round, and girt all about with bells, the top of
the gold tower with gilded bells and the silver tower with
182 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

silvered bells, insomuch that whenever the wind blows
among these bells they tinkle. The tomb likewise was
plated partly with gold, and partly with silver. The King
caused these towers to be erected to commemorate his
magnificence and for the good of his soul; and really they
do form one of the finest sights in the world, so exquisitely
finished are they, so splendid and costly. And when they
are lighted up by the sun they shine most brilliantly, and
are visible from a vast distance.

The name Zardandan signifies “ Gold Teeth,” and
is derived from the Persian. The custom of covering
the teeth with plates of gold was not confined to the
great ones of Zardandan ; early travellers in Sumatra
tell us, that the wealthy nobles of that country were
accustomed to decorate their teeth in the same
manner. Rashiduddin, who was a contemporary
with Marco Polo, speaks of the Zardandans as inhabit-
ing the province on the frontier of Tibet; and of
them he says: “ These people cover their teeth with
a gold case, which they take off when they eat.”
Vochan, the chief city of the province of Zardandan,
is undoubtedly the Chinese city of Yungchangfu,
a place of considerable importance, on the great high
road which leads to Ava and Tibet. As for the
curious marking of the bodies of men and women by
pricking into the flesh certain pigments, we know
that tattooing is still practised in many parts of the
world. Indeed, the practice is by no means confined
to semi-barbarous peoples. Many a sailor-man in the
XVIL] SCORE AND TALLY. 183

British and American navies has been adorned on
various parts of his body with patriotic emblems and
fanciful pictures, pricked into his flesh in divers
colours.

Yunnan is still noted for its ample yield of gold,
so that it isa common saying in China, when a man
lives extravagantly, that his father “must needs be
governor of Yunnan.” But the relative value of gold
and silver is no longer so variable as it was in the
time of Polo. He says that, in the eastern part of
Yunnan, one weight of gold was equal to eight of
silver ; in the western part, it was six to one, and on
the borders of Ava, it was only five of silver to one of
gold. In those days, we must suppose, communication
was infrequent between the different provinces, so
these great variations in the relative values of the
metals were not unnatural.

“Score and tally” was the primitive method of
keeping accounts among our Anglo-Saxon ancestors ;
and it is a matter of record that the great fire,
which destroyed the Houses of Parliament in 1834,
was caused by overheating the flues of the furnaces,
when a vast number of discarded wooden tallies,
which had accumulated in the cellars of the building,
were being burnt. The tally was a square strip of
wood, on each angle of which were cut notches to
represent numbers, or compounds of numbers; and
the score was a series of marks set down, usually
184 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. ([Ch. XVIL

by fives, on any smooth surface accessible to the
person who kept the account. In a case in court,
once upon a time in England, when a taverner’s
customer demurred against the account of measures
of ale charged to him, the inn-keeper’s door. was
removed from its hinges and produced in court by
way of documentary evidence.

Devil-doctors, or exorcists, are still common among
the half-civilised tribes of all lands. The North
American Indians send for their “medicine-man ”
when one of their number falls ill. This functionary,
assisted by persons whom he calls to his aid, leads
off in a wild chant, and the entire band make a
prodigious clatter with various implements to “ drive
away the evil spirit” who is tormenting the sick man.
If the man dies (and the intolerable din, kept up in
his wigwam, not infrequently hurries him on his
long journey), the medicine-man calmly explains
that the evil spirit was one of the hard and difficult
kind that go not out at the word of any man. All
over the region in which the Aryan race originated,
the custom of devil-dancing, or exorcism, still pre-
vails ; moreover, this strange superstitution, or some-
thing very like it, may be traced in some of the
darker parts of the world, among non-Aryan peoples.
CHAPTER XVIII.

IN SOUTHERN CHINA AND LAOS—CURIOUS CUSTOMS OF A
STRANGE PEOPLE—LIONS AND LION-HUNTING DOGS—MAR-
VELLOUS PRODUCTS OF SILK—THE REBELLION AND PUNISH-
MENT OF LIYTAN.

HE next succeeding chapters of Marco Polo’s
book deal chiefly with regions, which the
famous traveller did not visit, but of which he gave
such accounts as he could procure from the people
among whom he travelled, after he left Yunnan and
passed as far as he chose in the direction of Siam
and Burmah. The region which he next proceeds
to describe, you must understand, lies north of Siam
and east of Burmah.

DISCOURSES OF THE PROVINCE OF CAUGIGU.

Caucicu is a province toward the east, which has a king.
The people are Idolaters, and have made their submission
to the Great Kaan, and send him tribute every year. And
- let me tell you their king is so given to luxury that he hath
at the least three hundred wives ; for whenever he hears of
any beautiful woman in the land, he takes and marries her.

They find in this country a good deal of gold, and they
also have great abundance of spices. But they are such

185
186 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch.

a long way from the sea that the products are of little value,
and thus their price is low. They have elephants in great
numbers, and other cattle of sundry kinds, and plenty of
game. ‘They live on flesh and milk and rice, and have
wine made of rice and good spices. The whole of the
people, or nearly so, have their skin marked with the
needle in patterns representing lions, dragons, birds, and
what not, done in such a way that it can never be obliter-
ated. This work they cause to be wrought over face and
neck and chest, arms and hands, and, in short, the whole
body ; and they look on it as a token of elegance, so that
those who have the largest amount of this embroidery are
regarded with the greatest admiration.

CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF ANIN.

ANIN is a province toward the east, the people of which
are subject to the Great Kaan, and are Idolaters. They
live by cattle and tillage, and have a peculiar language.
The women wear on the legs and arms bracelets of gold
and silver of great value, and the men wear such as are
even yet more costly. They have plenty of horses, which
they sell in great numbers to the Indians, making a great
profit thereby. And they have also vast herds of buffaloes
and oxen, having excellent pastures for these. They have
likewise all the necessaries of life in abundance.

Now you must know that between Anin and Caugigu,
which we have left behind us, there is a distance of twenty-
five days’ journey ; and from Caugigu to Bangala, the third
province in our rear, is thirty days’ journey.

SONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF COLOMAN.

CoLoman is a province eight days’ journey toward the
east, the people of which are Idolaters and have a peculiar
language. They are a tall and very handsome people,
XVIII] INFESTED WITH “LIONS.” 187

though in complexion brown rather than white, and are
good soldiers. They have a good many towns, and a vast
number of villages, among great mountains, and in strong
positions.

When any of them die the bodies are burnt, and then they
take the bones and put them in little chests. These are
carried high up the mountains, and placed in great caverns,
where they are hung up in such wise that neither man nor
beast can come at them.

A good deal of gold is found in the country, and for petty
traffic they use porcelain shells such as I have told you
of before. All these provinces that I have been speaking
of, to wit Bangala and Caugigu and Anin, employ for
currency porcelain shells and gold. There are merchants
in this country who are very rich and dispose of large
quantities of goods. ‘The people live on flesh and rice and
milk, and brew their wine from rice and excellent spices.

CONCERNING THE PROVINCE OF CUIJU.

Curju is a province toward the east. After leaving Colo-
man you travel along a river for twelve days, meeting with
a good number of towns and villages, but nothing worthy
of particular mention. After you have travelled those
twelve days along the river, you come to a great and noble
city which is called FuNcuL.

The people live by trade and handicrafts, and they
manufacture stuffs of the bark of certain trees which form
very fine summer clothing. They are good soldiers, and
have paper money. For you must understand that hence-
forward we are in the countries where the Great Kaan’s
paper money is current.

The country swarms with lions to that degree that no
man can venture to sleep outside his house at night.
Moreover, when you travel on that river, and come to
188 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

a halt at night, unless you keep a good way from the bank
the lions will spring on the boat and snatch one of the crew
and make off with him and devour him. And but for a
certain help that the inhabitants enjoy, no one could
venture to travel in that province, because of the multitude
of those lions, and because of their strength and ferocity.

But you see they have in this province a large breed of
dogs, so fierce and bold that two of them together will
attack a lion. So every man who goes a journey takes
with him a couple of those dogs ; and when a lion appears
they have at him with the greatest boldness, and the lion
turns on them, but can’t touch them, for they are very deft
at eschewing his blows. So they follow him, perpetually
giving tongue, and watching their chance to give him a bite
in the rump or in the thigh, or wherever they may. The
lion makes no reprisal except now and then to turn fiercely
on them, and then indeed were he to catch the dogs it
would be all over with them, but they take good care that
he shall not. So, to escape the dogs’ din, the lion makes
off, and gets into the wood, where mayhap he stands at bay
against a tree. And when the travellers see the lion in this
plight they take to their bows, for they are capital archers,
and shoot their arrows at him till he falls dead. And ’tis
thus that travellers in those parts do deliver themselves-from
those lions.

They have a good deal of silk and other products, which
are carried up and down, by the river of which we spoke,
into various quarters.

You travel along the river for twelve days more, finding
a good many towns all along, and the people always
Idolaters, and subject to the Great Kaan, with paper money
current, and living by trade and handicrafts. There are
also plenty of fighting-men. And after travelling those
twelve days you arrive at the city of Sindafu, of which we
spoke in this Book some time ago.
XVIIL] CAUGIGU OR LAOS. 189

From Sindafu you set out again, and travel some seventy
days through the provinces and cities and towns which
we have already visited, and all which have been already
particularly spoken of in our Book. At the end of those
seventy days you come to Juju, where we were before.

From Juju you set out again and travel four days toward
the south, finding many towns and villages. The people
are great traders and craftsmen, are all Idolaters, and use
the paper money of the Great Kaan their Sovereign. At
the end of those four days you come to the city of Cacanfu,
belonging to the province of Cathay.

There has been a great deal of discussion about
the title, which Polo gives to the country described |
under the name of Caugigu; and it is not easy to
imagine how the native name of the region has
been so often and so widely misunderstood. It is
enough for us to know, that the country here specified
is, by the best authorities, supposed to be the kingdom
of Laos, a country lying north and east of Siam and
tributary to that power. The people of Laos tattoo
themselves in the manner described by Marco Polo,
and their country is shut in from the sea and
abounds in elephants, as our traveller says. The
province of Anin is believed to be the extreme south-
eastern part of Yunnan, the inhabitants of which
have plenty of buffaloes and other domestic animals ;
and they adorn themselves with a profusion of gold
and silver ornaments, as recorded by the great
Venetian. The other provinces of which Marco
190 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

speaks, Coloman and Cuiju, lie to the north-east of
those already mentioned. Cuiju is probably the
ancient name (much distorted) of the Chinese pro-
vince of Kweichau, north-east of Yunnan. “The
great and noble city of Fungul” is set down on
modern maps as Phungan, a city of some wealth and
prominence in Marco Polo’s time, but now of small
note. In that city, however, they still make a fabric
known as grass-cloth, which is manufactured from
vegetable fibres. There are no lions in the Chinese
Empire, the beasts which Polo calls by that name
being undoubtedly tigers, which are very fierce and
common. The great dogs of Kweichau have been
mentioned by modern travellers, and the story of
their pursuing and putting to flight the savage
animals that harass the people is by no means to
be regarded as a fable. And now we pass over into
Pecheli.

CONCERNING THE CITIES OF CACANFU AND OF CHANGLU.

Cacanru is a noble city. The people have plenty of
silk, from which they weave stuffs of silk and gold, and
sandals in large quantities. There are also certain Christians
at this place, who have a church. And the city is at the
head of an important territory containing numerous towns
and villages. A great river passes through it, on which
much merchandise is carried to the city of Cambaluc, for
by many channels and canals it is connected therewith.

We will now set forth again, and travel three days
towards the south, and then we come to a town called
XVIIL] TWO CITIES AND A REBEL. IQI

Cuanciu. This is another. great city belonging to the
Great Kaan, and to the province of Cathay. The people
have paper money and burn their dead. They make salt in
great quantities at this place. I will tell you how ’tis done.

A kind of earth is found there which is exceedingly salt.
This they dig up and pile in great heaps. Upon these
heaps they pour water in quantities till it runs out at the
bottom ; and then they take up this water and boil it well
in great iron cauldrons, and as it cools it deposits a fine
white salt in very small grains. This salt they then carry
about for sale to many neighbouring districts, and get great
profit thereby.

There is nothing else worth mentioning, so let us go
forward five days’ journey, and we shall come to a city called
Chinangli.

CONCERNING THE CITY OF CHINANGLI AND THAT OF
TADINFU, AND THE REBELLION OF LIYTAN.

CHINANGLI is a city of Cathay as you go south. There
runs through the city a great and wide river, on which
a large traffic in silk goods and spices and other costly
merchandise passes up and down.

When you travel south from Chinangli for five days, you
meet everywhere with fine towns and villages, the people
of which live by trade and handicrafts, and have all the
necessaries of life in great abundance ; but there is nothing
particular to mention on the way till you come, at the end
of those five days, to TADINFU.

This, you must know, is a very great city, and in old
times was the seat of a great kingdom; but the Great
Kaan conquered it by force of arms. Nevertheless it is
still the noblest city in all those provinces. There are
very great merchants here who trade on a great scale, and
192 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

the abundance of silk is something marvellous. They
have, moreover, most charming gardens abounding with
fruit of large size. The city of Tadinfu hath also under its
rule eleven imperial cities of great importance, all of which
enjoy a large and profitable trade, owing to that immense
produce of silk.

Now, you must know, that in the year 1273, the Great
Kaan had sent a certain Baron called Livran SANGon,
with some eighty thousand horse, to this province and city
to garrison them. And after the said captain had tarried
there awhile, he formed a disloyal and traitorous plot, and
stirred up the great men of the province to rebel against
the Great Kaan. And so they did; for they broke into
revolt against their Sovereign Lord, and refused all obedience
to him, and made this Liytan, whom their Sovereign had
sent thither for their protection, to be the chief of their
revolt.

When the Great Kaan heard thereof he straightway
despatched two of his Barons, one of whom was called
Acuit and the other Moncotay, giving them one hundred
thousand horse and a great force of infantry. But the affair
was a serious one, for the Barons were met by the rebel
Liytan with all those whom he had collected from the
province, mustering more than one hundred thousand horse
and a large force of foot. Nevertheless in the battle Liytan
and his party were utterly routed, and the two Barons
whom the Emperor had sent won the victory. When the
news came to the Great Kaan he was right well pleased,
and ordered that all the chiefs who had rebelled, or excited
others to rebel, should be put to a cruel death, but that
those of lower rank should receive a pardon. And so it
was done. The two Barons had all the leaders of the
enterprise put to a cruel death, and all of those of lower
rank were pardoned. And thenceforward they conducted
themselves with loyalty towards their Lord.
XVIII] A BISECTED RIVER. 193

CONCERNING THE NOBLE CITY OF SINJUMATU.

On leaving Tadinfu you travel three days towards the
south, always finding numbers of noble and populous towns
and villages flourishing with trade and manufactures.
There is also abundance of game in the country, and every-
thing in profusion.

When you have travelled those three days you come to
the noble city of SrnjumaTu, a rich and fine place, with
great trade and manufactures. The people are subjects of
the Great Kaan, and have paper money, and they have a
river which I can assure you brings them great gain, and I
will tell you about it.

You see the river in question flows from the south to this
city of Sinjumatu. And the people of the city have divided
this larger river in two, making one half of it flow east and
the other half flow west ; that is to say, the one branch flows
towards Manzi and the other towards Cathay. And it is
a fact that the number of vessels at this city is what no
one would believe without seeing them. The quantity of
merchandise also which these vessels transport to Manzi
and Cathay is something marvellous ; and then they return
loaded with other merchandise, so that the amount of goods
borne to and fro on those two rivers is quite astonishing.

CONCERNING THE CITIES OF LINJU AND PIJU.

On leaving the city of Sinjumatu you travel for eight days
toward the south, always coming to great and rich towns
and villages flourishing with trade and manufactures. At
the end of those eight days you come to the city of Linyju,
in the province of the same name, of which it is the capital.
It is a-rich and noble city, and the men are good soldiers,
Natheless they carry on great trade and manufactures.
There is great abundance of game in both beasts and birds,

13
194 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

and all the necessaries of life are in profusion. The place
stands on the river of which I told you above. And they
have here great numbers of vessels, even greater than those
of which I spoke before, and these transport a great amount
of costly merchandise.

So, quitting this province and city of Linju, you travel
three days more towards the south, constantly finding
numbers of rich towns and villages. These still belong to
Cathay and the Great Kaan, whose subjects they are. This
is the finest country for game, whether in beasts or birds,
that is anywhere to be found, and all the necessaries of life
~ are in profusion.

At the end of those three days you find the city of Piyu,
a great, rich, and noble city, with large trade and manu-
factures, and a great production of silk. This city stands at
the entrance to the great province of Manzi, and there
reside at ita great number of merchants who despatch carts
from this place loaded with great quantities of goods to the
different towns of Manzi. The city brings in a great revenue
to the Great Kaan.

Cacanfu is now known as Hokianfu, in Pecheli.
Chinangli is believed to be the modern Thsinanfu,
now the chief city of the province of Shantung.
The identity of Tadinfu is not so easily established.
As this part of Chinais not often visited by European
or American travellers, our knowledge of the country
is derived from ancient accounts, such as Polo’s book ;
and as he did not in all cases see with his own eyes
the countries which he describes, it is greatly to his
credit that the few reports, which we have from
those long-closed regions, correspond so closely with
XVIILJ THE GREAT CANAL. 195

the Venetian’s accounts. Thus Thsinanfu, other-
wise Chinangli, is still a city of some importance,
with several fine temples, and buildings, which prove
that it was the capital of the province. Silk is now
a notable product of the province of Shantung, as it
was when Marco Polo wrote his report concerning
the resources of the country. The silkworm of the
mulberry tree is here a native, and the “immense
produce of silk” of which our traveller speaks has
been going on, according to Chinese annals, for many
thousands of years.

The rebellion of Liytan is described in Chinese
history, but the date, according to those records, was
1262, and not 1273. The word “ Sangon” means “a
general of division,” indicating the military rank of
Liytan, whose revolt was quelled, as Marco Polo
relates. The river, which, he tells us, was divided
here at the city of Sinjumatu, is supposed to be a
section of the Great Canal of China, the famous
waterway which connects the lakes and rivers of
China so ingeniously that it may be said to afford
communication between Canton and Peking, a dis-
tance of .one thousand miles. This canal was
formerly regarded as one of the wonders of the
world ; and even now, after it has been damaged by
wars, inundations, and accidents, it is a work of

great importance and interest.
CHAPTER XIX.

BAYAN HUNDRED-EYES — THE POLO BROTHERS INTRODUCE
WESTERN SIEGE ARTILLERY—THE YANG-TSE-KIANG AND ITS
MONASTERIES—KINSAY (THE CITY OF HEAVEN) DESCRIBED.

FTER Marco had visited Yunnan, he made an

excursion into Burmah and Bengal. Return-

ing to Cathay, he describes some of the cities of
the southern part of that empire, and tells us

HOW THE GREAT KAAN CONQUERED THE PROVINCE OF
MANZI.

You must know that there was a king and sovereign lord
of the great territory of Manzi who was styled Facfur, so
great and puissant a prince that, for vastness of wealth and
number of subjects and extent of dominion, there was
hardly a greater in all the earth except the Great Kaan
himself. But the people of this land were anything rather
than warriors.

In all his dominion there were no horses ; nor were the
people ever inured to battle or arms, or military service of
any kind. Yet the province of Manzi is very strong by
nature, and all the cities are encompassed by sheets of
water of great depth, and more than an arblast-shot in
width ; so that the country never would have been lost,
had the people been but soldiers. But that is just what

they were not ; so lost it was.
196
Ch. XIX.] BARON BAYAN. 197

Now it came to pass, in the year of Christ’s incarnation,
1268, that the Great Kaan, the same that now reigneth,
despatched thither a Baron of his whose name was Bayan
Chincsan, which is as much as to say “ Bayan Hundred-
Eyes.” And you must know that the King of Manzi had
found in his horoscope that he never should lose his
kingdom except through a man that had an hundred eyes;
so he held himself assured in his position, for he could not
believe that any man in existence could have an hundred
eyes. There, however, he deluded himself, in his ignorance
of the name of Bayan.

This Bayan had an immense force of horse and foot
entrusted to him by the Great Kaan, and with these he
entered Manzi, and he had also a great number of boats to
carry both horse and foot when need should be. And
when he, with all his host, entered the territory of Manzi,
and arrived at the city of Coiganju, he summoned the
people thereof to surrender to the Great Kaan; but this
they flatly refused. On this Bayan went on to another
city, with the same result, and then still went forward;
acting thus because he was aware that the Great Kaan
was despatching another great host to follow him up.

What shall I say then? He advanced to five cities in
succession, but got possession of none of them; for he did
not wish to engage in besieging them, and they would not
give themselves up. But when he came to the sixth city
he took that by storm, and so with a second, and a third,
and a fourth, until he had taken twelve cities in succession.
And when he had taken all these, he advanced straight
against the capital city of the kingdom, which was called
Kinsay, and which was the residence of the King and
Queen. ;

And when the King beheld Bayan coming with all his
host he was in great dismay, as one unused to see such
sights. So he and a great company of his people got on
198 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

board a thousand ships and fled to the islands of the Ocean
Sea, whilst the Queen, who remained behind in the city,
took all measures in her power for its defence, like a
valiant lady.

Now it came to pass that the Queen asked what was the
name of the captain of the host, and they told her that
it was Bayan Hundred-Eyes. So when she wist that he
was styled Hundred-Eyes, she called to mind how their
astrologers had foretold that a man of an hundred eyes
should strip them of the kingdom. Wherefore she gave
herself up to Bayan, and surrendered to him the whole
kingdom and all the other cities and fortresses, so that no
resistance was made. And in sooth this was a goodly
conquest, for there was no realm on earth half so wealthy.

Marco then proceeds to relate a curious circum-
stance connected with the capture of ‘the city of
Saianfu, or Siangyangfu, as it is now called, one of
the cities of Manzi, the province lying south of the
Yellow River. He says:

Now you must know that this city held out against the
Great Kaan for three years after the rest of Manzi had
surrendered. The Great Kaan’s troops made incessant
attempts to take it, but they could not succeed because of
the great and deep waters that were round about it, so that
they could approach from one side only, which was the
north. And I tell you they never would have taken it, but
for a circumstance that I am going to relate.

You must know that when the Great Kaan’s host had
lain three years before the city without being able to take
it, they were greatly chafed thereat. Then Messer Nicolo
Polo and Messer Maffeo and Messer Marco said, “We
could find you a way of forcing the city to surrender


CATAPULTS, MANGONELS, AND OTHER MACHINES,
XIX.) SIEGE ARTILLERY. 199

speedily”; whereupon those of the army replied, that they
would be right glad to know how that should be. All this
talk took place in the presence of the Great Kaan. For
messengers had been despatched from the camp to tell him
that there was no taking the city by blockade, for it
continually received supplies of victual from those sides
which they were unable to invest; and the Great Kaan
had sent back word that take it they must, and find a way
how. Then spoke up the Two Brothers and Messer Marco
the son, and said: “‘ Great Prince, we have with us among
our followers men who are able to construct mangonels
which shall cast such great stones that the garrison will
never be able to stand them, but will surrender at once, as
soon as the mangonels or trebuchets shall have shot into
the town.”

The Kaan bade them with all his heart have such
mangonels made as speedily as possible. Now Messer
Nicolo and his brother and his son immediately caused
timber to be brought, as much as they desired, and fit for
the work in hand. And they had two men among their
followers, a German and a Nestorian Christian, who were
masters of that business, and these they directed to con-
struct two or three mangonels capable of casting stones
of three hundred pounds’ weight. Accordingly they made
three fine mangonels, each of which cast stones of three
hundred pounds’ weight and more. And when they were
complete and ready for use, the Emperor and the others
were greatly pleased to see them, and caused several stones
to be shot in their presence; whereat they marvelled
greatly and greatly praised the work. And the Kaan
ordered that the engines should be carried to his army
which was at the leaguer of Saianfu.

And when the engines were got to the camp they were
forthwith set up, to the great admiration of the Tartars.
And what shall I tell you? When the engines were set up
200 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

and put in gear, a stone was shot from each of them into
the town. These took effect among the buildings, crashing
and smashing through everything with huge din and
commotion. And when the townspeople witnessed this
new and strange visitation, they were so astonished and
dismayed that they wist not what to do or say. They took
counsel together, but no counsel could be suggested how to
escape from these engines, for the thing seemed to them
to be done by sorcery. They declared that they were all
dead men if they yielded not, so they determined to
surrender on such conditions as they could get.

So the men of the city surrendered, and were received to
terms ; and this all came about through the exertions of
Messer Nicolo and Messer Maffeo and Messer Marco;
and it was no small matter. For this city and province is
one of the best that the Great Kaan possesses, and brings
him in great revenues.

There is some uncertainty about the story, as here
told by Marco, for history relates that the city was
reduced at a period earlier than the time of the
visit of the Polos; but, possibly, some mistake has
been made in the dates recorded by the Chinese
historians. In any case, however, the employment
of novel engines of war, by the advice of strangers
from the West, was an actual fact; all histories agree
as to that. A mangonel was an engine of timber
designed to throw great stones a long distance with
terrific force, exactly as described by Marco. In
those ancient times, before the invention of gun-
powder, it was customary to use these, and also
XIX,] A VAST RIVER. 201

arblasts, or bows of steel or horn, so tough and
strong that the string had to be drawn back to the
trigger. by a lever or a winch. Other contrivances
for throwing bolts and stones were the catapult
and the ballista. It is related that burning stuff to
corrupt the air was sometimes thrown into a city
by the besiegers who used these machines. The
machines used by the Saracens were called trebu-
chets—a name sometimes applied to the mangonel.

The Yang-tse-Kiang river aroused the admiration
of Marco, and he devotes much space to an account
of its vastness and the volume of its commerce.
The Chinese name for the stream is “Son of the
Ocean,” so great is its depth and width. Of it the
traveller says:

And I assure you this river flows so far and traverses so
many countries and cities that in good sooth there pass and
repass on its waters a great number of vessels, and more
wealth and merchandise than on all the rivers and all the
seas of Christendom put together! It seems indeed more
like a Sea than a River. Messer Marco Polo said that he
once beheld at that city fifteen thousand vessels at one
time. And you may judge, if this city, of no great size, has
such a number, how many must there be altogether,
considering that on the banks of this river there are more
than sixteen provinces and more than two hundred great
cities, besides towns and villages, all possessing vessels ?

Messer Marco Polo aforesaid tells us that he heard from
the officer employed to collect the Great Kaan’s duties on
this river that there passed upstream two hundred thousand
202 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

vessels in the year, without counting those that passed
down! Indeed, as it has a course of such great length,
and receives so many other navigable rivers, it is no wonder
that the merchandise which is borne on it is of vast amount
and value. And the article in largest quantity of all is
salt, which is carried by this river and its branches to all
the cities on their banks, and thence to the other cities in
the interior.

The vessels which ply on this river are decked. They
have but one mast, but they are of great burthen, for I can
assure you they carry, reckoning by our weight, from four
thousand to twelve thousand cantars each. In going
upstream they have to be hauled, for the current is so
strong that they could not make head in any other manner.
Now the tow-line, which is some three hundred paces in
length, is made of nothing but cane. "Tis in this way:
they have those great canes of which I told you before
that they are-some fifteen paces in length ; these they take
and split from end to end into many slender strips, and
then they twist these strips together so as to make a rope
of any length they please. And the ropes so made are
stronger than if they were made of hemp.

There are at many places on this river hills and rocky
eminences on which the idol-monasteries and other edifices
are built, and you find on its shores a constant succession
of villages and inhabited places.

There is very little exaggeration in this account.
By twelve thousand cantars we should understand
that the traveller refers to a weight equal to a little
more than five hundred tons, which is a large cargo.
The “idol-monasteries ” of Marco Polo still stand on
the rocky islets of the Yang-tse-Kiang; they are


AN ISLAND MONASTERY,
XIX.] THE CITY OF HEAVEN. 203

Buddhist monasteries, and are known as Orphan
Rock, Golden Island, and Silver Island. And they
are very picturesque features of the river scenery.

At the beginning of this chapter Marco has told
us about the conquest of the province of Manzi, with
the surrender of Kinsay, its capital: he now describes
Kinsay itself—the name means “The City of
Heaven ”—which, he says, was “beyond dispute the
finest and the noblest in the world.”

First and foremost, the city is so great that it hath an
hundred miles of compass. And there are in it twelve
thousand bridges of stone, for the most part so lofty that a
great fleet could pass beneath them. And let no man
marvel that there are so many bridges, for you see that the
whole city stands as it were in the water and surrounded
by water, so that a great many bridges are required to
give free passage about it. And though the bridges be so
high, the approaches are so well contrived that carts and
horses do cross them.

There are in this city twelve guilds of the different crafts,
and each guild has twelve thousand houses in the occupa-
tion of its workmen. Each of these houses contains at
least twelve men, whilst some contain twenty and some
forty—not that these are all masters, but inclusive of the
journeymen who work under the masters. And yet all
these craftsmen had full occupation, for many other cities
of the kingdom are supplied from this city with what they
require.

The number and wealth of the merchants, and the
amount of goods that passed through their hands, was so
enormous that no man could form a just estimate thereof.
And I should have told you, with regard to those masters of
204. THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

the different crafts who are at the head of such houses as
I have mentioned, that neither they nor their wives ever
touch a piece of work with their own hands, but live as
nicely and delicately as if they were kings and queens.
The wives indeed are most dainty and angelical creatures!
Moreover, it was an ordinance laid down by the King that
every man should follow his father’s business and no other,
no matter if he possessed one hundred thousand bezants.

Inside the city there is a lake which has a compass of
some thirty miles: and all round it are erected beautiful
palaces and mansions, of the richest and most exquisite
structure that you can imagine, belonging to the nobles of
the city. There are also on its shores many abbeys and
churches of the Idolaters. In the middle of the lake are
two islands, on each of which stands a rich, beautiful, and
spacious edifice, furnished in such style as to seem fit for
the palace of an emperor. And when any one of the
citizens desired to hold a marriage feast, or to give any
other entertainment, it used to be done at one of these
palaces. And everything would be found there ready to
order, such as silver plate, trenchers and dishes, napkins
and tablecloths, and whatever else was needful. The King
made this provision for the gratification of his people, and
the place was open to every one who desired to give an
entertainment. Sometimes there would be at these palaces
an hundred different parties; some holding a banquet,
others celebrating a wedding ; and yet all would find good
accommodation in the different apartments and pavilions,
and that in so well-ordered a manner that one party was
never in the way of another.

The houses of the city are provided with lofty towers of
stone, in which articles of value are stored for fear of fire ;
for most of the houses themselves are of timber, and fires
are very frequent in the city.

Since the Great Kaan occupied the city, he has ordained


GOLDEN ISLAND.
XIX.) NIGHT-WATCHMEN. 205

that each of the twelve thousand bridges should be pro-
vided with a guard of ten men, in case of any disturbance,
or of any being so rash as to plot treason or insurrection
against him. Each guard is provided with a hollow instru-
ment of wood and with a metal basin, and with a time-
keeper to enable them to know the hour of the day
or night. And so when one hour of the night is past,
the sentry strikes one on the wooden instrument and
one on the basin, so that the whole quarter of the city
is made aware that one hour of the night is gone. At
the second hour he gives two strokes, and so on, keeping
always wide awake and on the lookout. In the morning
again, from the sunrise, they begin to count anew, and
strike one hour as they did in the night, and so on hour
after hour.

Part of the watch patrols the quarter, to see if any.
light or fire is burning after the lawful hours; if they find
any they mark the door, and in the morning the owner
is summoned before the magistrates, and unless he can
plead a good excuse he is punished. Also if they find
any one going about the streets at unlawful hours they
arrest him, and in the morning they bring him before the
magistrates. If they see that any house has caught fire,
they immediately beat upon that wooden instrument to
give the alarm, and this brings together the watchmen
from the other bridges to help to extinguish it, and to
save the goods of the merchants or others, either by
removing them to the towers above mentioned, or by
putting them in boats and transporting them to the islands
in the lake. For no citizen dares leave his house at
night, or to come near the fire; only those who own the
property, and those watchmen who flock to help, of whom
there shall come one or two thousand at the least.

Moreover, within the city there is an eminence on which
stands a tower, and at the top of the tower is hung a
206 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

slab of wood. Whenever fire or any other alarm breaks
out in the city, a man who stands there with a mallet in
his hand beats upon the slab, making a noise that is
heard to a great distance. So when the blows upon this
slab are heard, everybody is aware that fire has broken
out, or that there is some other cause of alarm.

You must know also that the city of Kinsay has some
three hundred baths, the water of which is supplied by
springs. They are hot baths, and the people take great
delight in them, frequenting them several times a month,
for they are very cleanly in their persons. They are the
finest and largest baths in the world, large enough for
one hundred persons to bathe together.

The people of this country have a custom, that as soon
as a child is born they write down the day and hour and
the planet and sign under which its birth has taken place,
so that every one among them knows the day of his birth.
And when any one intends a journey he goes to the
astrologers, and gives the particulars of his nativity, in
order to learn whether he shall have good luck or no.
Sometimes they will say /Vo, and in that case the journey
is put off till such day as the astrologer may recommend.
These astrologers are very skilful at their business, and
often their words come to pass, so the people have great
faith in them.

There is another thing I must tell you. It is the custom
for every burgess of this city, and in fact for every description
of person in it, to write over his door his own name, the
name of his wife, and those of his children, his slaves, and
all the inmates of his house, and also the number of animals
that he keeps. And if any one dies in the house then the
name of that person is erased, and if any child is born its
name is added. So in this way the Sovereign is able to
know exactly the population of the city.

There exists in this city the palace of the King who
XIX.] A HUGE PALACE. 207

fled, him who was Emperor of Manzi, and that is the
greatest palace in the world, as I shall tell you more
particularly. For you must know its demesne hath a
compass of ten miles, all enclosed with lofty battlemented
walls; and inside the walls are the finest and most
delectable gardens upon the earth, and filled too with the
finest fruits. ‘There are numerous fountains in it also, and
lakes full of fish. In the middle is the palace itself, a great
and splendid building. It contains twenty great and hand-
some halls, one of which is more spacious than the rest,
and affords room for a vast multitude to dine. It is all
painted in gold, with many histories and representations
of beasts and birds, of knights and dames, and many
marvellous things. It forms a really magnificent spectacle,
for over all the walls and all the ceiling you can see nothing
but paintings in gold. And besides these halls the palace
contains one thousand large and handsome chambers, all
painted in gold and divers colours.

The position of the city is such that it has on one side
a lake of fresh and exquisitely clear water (already spoken
of), and on the other a very large river. The waters of
the latter fill a number of canals of all sizes which run
through the different quarters of the city, carry away all
impurities, and then enter the lake, whence they issue
again and flow to the Ocean, thus producing a most
excellent atmosphere. By means of these channels, as
well as by the streets, you can go all about the city. But
the streets and canals are so wide and spacious that carts
on the one and boats on the other can readily pass to and
fro, conveying necessary supplies to the inhabitants.

At the opposite side the city is shut in by a channel,
perhaps forty miles in length, very wide, and full of water
derived from the river aforesaid, which was made by the
ancient kings of the country, in order to relieve the river
when flooding its banks. This serves also as a defence to
208 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

the city, and the earth dug from it has been thrown inwards,
forming a kind of mound enclosing the city.

In this part are the ten principal markets, though besides
these there are a vast number of others in the different
parts of the town. The former are all squares of half a
mile to the side, and along their front passes the main
street, which is forty paces in width, and runs straight from
end to end of the city, crossing many bridges of easy and
commodious approach. At every four miles of its length
comes one of those great squares of two miles in compass.
In each of the squares is held a market three days in the
week, frequented by forty or fifty thousand persons, who
bring thither for sale every possible necessary of life, so
that there is always an ample supply of every kind of meat
and game, and of ducks and geese an infinite quantity.

Those markets make a daily display of every kind of
vegetables and fruits; and among the latter there are in
particular certain pears of enormous size, weighing as much
as ten pounds apiece, and the pulp of which is white and
fragrant like a confection ; besides peaches in their season
both yellow and white, of every delicate flavour.

From the Ocean Sea also come daily supplies of fish in
great quantity. Any one who should see the supply of
fish in the market would suppose it impossible that such
a quantity could ever be sold; and yet in a few hours the
whole shall be cleared away; so great is the number of
inhabitants who are accustomed to delicate living. Indeed,
they eat fish and flesh at the same meal.

To give you an example of the vast consumption in this
city, let us take the article of pepper; and that will enable
you in some measure to estimate what must be the quantity
of victual, such as meat, wine, groceries, which have to
be provided for the general consumption. Now Messer
Marco heard it stated by one of the Great Kaan’s officers
of customs, that the quantity of pepper introduced daily for
XIX.] PLEASURE-BARGES. 209

consumption into the city of Kinsay amounted to forty-
three loads, each load being equal to two hundred and
twenty-three pounds.

The natives of the city are men of peaceful character,
both from education and from the example of their kings,
whose disposition was the same. They know nothing of
handling arms, and keep none in their houses. You hear
of no feuds or noisy quarrels or dissensions of any kind
among them. Both in their commercial dealings and in
their manufactures they are thoroughly honest and truthful,
and there is such a degree of good-will and neighbourly
attachment among both men and women that you would
take the people who live in the same street to be all
one family.

They treat the foreigners who visit them for the sake of
trade with great cordiality, and entertain them in the most
winning manner, affording them every help and advice on
their business. But on the other hand they hate to see
soldiers, and not least those of the Great Kaan’s garrisons,
regarding them as the cause of their having lost their native
kings and lords.

On the lake of which we have spoken there are numbers
of boats and barges of all sizes for parties of pleasure.
These will hold ten, fifteen, twenty, or more persons, and
are from fifteen to twenty paces in length, with flat bottoms
and ample breadth of beaim, so that they always keep their
trim. Any one who desires to go a-pleasuring hires one
of these barges, which are always to be found completely
furnished with tables and chairs and all the other apparatus
for a feast. The roof forms a level deck, on which the
crew stand, and pole the boat along whithersoever may be
desired, for the lake is not more than two paces in depth.
The inside of this roof and the rest of the interior is covered
with ornamental painting in gay colours, with windows all
round that can be shut or opened, so that the party at table

14
210 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch. XIX,

can enjoy all the beauty and variety of the prospects on
both sides as they pass along. And truly a trip on this
lake is a much more charming recreation than can be
enjoyed on land. For on the one side lies the city in its
entire length, so that the spectators in the barges, from the
distance at which they stand, take in the whole prospect
in its full beauty and grandeur, with its numberless palaces,
temples, monasteries, and gardens, full of lofty trees,
sloping to the shore. And the lake is never without a
number of other such boats, laden with pleasure parties ;
for it is the great delight of the citizens here, after they
have disposed of the day’s business, to pass the afternoon
in enjoyment with the ladies of their families, either in
these barges or in driving about the city in carriages.

Of these latter we must also say something, for they afford
one mode of recreation to the citizens in going about the
town, as the boats afford another in going about the lake.
In the main street of the city you meet an infinite succes-
sion of these carriages passing to and fro. They are long
covered vehicles, fitted with curtains and cushions, and
affording room for six persons; and they are in constant
request for ladies and gentlemen going on parties of
pleasure. In these they drive to certain gardens, where
they are entertained by the owners in pavilions erected on
purpose, and there they divert themselves the livelong day,
returning home in the evening in those same carriages.


SILVER ISLAND,
CHAPTER XxX.

AN EXCURSION TO CIPANGO, OR JAPAN —INGENIOUS SHIPS
BUILT BY THE CHINESE—THE KHAN FAILS TO CONQUER
JAPAN—THE RHINOCEROS—HISTORY OF SAGAMONI BORCAN,
OR BUDDHA—RELIQUES OF ADAM.

E have already seen that the first accounts
ever written of the countries lying to the south
and east of China were the work of Marco Polo. But
he did not personally visit all these regions; and
we must be careful not to forget this when reading
his account of the islands of the Indian Archipelago,
concerning which he wrote from the reports given
him by men who had recently come from those parts.
It should also be borne in mind that the people of
Europe knew almost nothing of the remote parts of
the world so described by Polo. Only vague and
misty reports from India had come to Europe when
Marco was writing his book. And considering that
the information given us by the great Venetian was
so derived, it must be admitted that it is all very
full and very accurate. He prefaces his account of
the “Isles of India” thus:
Having finished our discourse concerning those countries

wherewith our Book hath been occupied thus far, we are
211
212 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

now about to enter on the subject of Inp1a, and to tell
you of all the wonders thereof.

And first let us speak of the ships in which merchants
go to and fro amongst the Isles of India.

These ships, you must know, are of fir timber. They
have but one deck, though each of them contains some
fifty or sixty cabins, wherein the merchants abide greatly
at their ease, every man having one to himself. The ship
hath but one rudder, but it hath four masts ; and sometimes
they have two additional masts, which they ship and unship
at pleasure.

Moreover, the larger of their vessels have some thirteen
compartments or severances in the interior, made with
planking strongly framed, in case mayhap the ship should
spring a leak, either by running on a rock or by the blow
of a hungry whale, as shall betide ofttimes; for when the
ship in her course by night sends a ripple back alongside
of the whale, the creature seeing the foam fancies there is
something to eat afloat, and makes a rush forward, whereby
it often shall stave in some part of the ship. In such case
the water that enters the leak flows to the bilge, which is
always kept clear; and the mariners having ascertained
where the damage is, empty the cargo from that com-
partment into those adjoining, for the planking is so well
fitted that the water cannot pass from one compartment to
another. They then stop the leak and replace the lading.

The fastenings are all of good iron nails and the sides are
double, one plank laid over the other, and caulked outside
and in. The planks are not pitched, for those people do
not have any pitch, but they daub the sides with another
matter, deemed by them far better than pitch ; it is this:
You see they take some lime and some chopped hemp, and
these they knead together with a certain wood-oil; and
when the three are thoroughly amalgamated, they hold like
any glue. And with this mixture they do pay their ships.
So CHINESE JUNKS. 213

Each of their great ships requires at least two hundred
mariners, some of them three hundred. They are indeed
of great size, for one ship shall carry five or six thousand
baskets of pepper, and they used formerly to be larger than
they are now. And aboard these ships, you must know,
when there is no wind they use sweeps, and these sweeps
are so big that to pull them requires four mariners to each.
Every great ship has certain large barks or tenders attached
to it; these are large enough to carry one thousand baskets
of pepper, and carry fifty or sixty mariners apiece, some of
them eighty or a hundred, and they are likewise moved by
oars; they assist the great ship by towing her, at such times
as her sweeps are in use, or even when she is under sail,
if the wind be somewhat on the beam—not if the wind be
astern, for then the sails of the big ship would take the
wind out of those of the tenders, and she would run them
down. Each ship has two or three of these barks, but one
is bigger than the others. There are also some ten small
boats for the service of each great ship, to lay out the
anchors, catch fish, bring supplies aboard, and the like.
When the ship is under sail she carries these boats slung
to her sides. And the large tenders have their boats in
like manner.

When the ship has been a year in work and they wish
to repair her, they nail on a third plank over the first two,
and caulk and pay it well; and when another repair is
wanted they nail on yet another plank, and so on year by
year as it is required. Howbeit, they do this only for a
certain number of years, and till there are six thicknesses
of planking. When a ship has come to have six planks on
her sides, one over the other, they take her no more on the
high seas, but make use of her for coasting as long as she
will last, and then they break her up.

Now that I have told you about the ships which sail
upon the Ocean Sea and among the Isles of India, let us
214 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

proceed to speak of the various wonders of India; but first
and foremost I must tell you about a number of Islands
that there are in that part of the Ocean Sea where we now
are—I mean the Islands lying to the eastward. So let us
begin with an Island which is called Chipangu.

The ships of the Great Khan were better for naviga-
tion in distant seas than those of Europe were in
Marco’s time. They were better than the vessels
with which Columbus crossed the Atlantic and dis-
covered the coast of America. But the Chinese have
made no progress since that day. They build their
junks, as they are called, just as they did one thousand
years ago. Still, it is to be noted that the Mongols,
or Chinese, invented and used water-tight compart-
ments in ships; and our modern ship-builders have
copied the Chinese in this respect at least, even
although the Chinese have not invented anything of
importance to mariners since then.

Now let us see what Marco has to say about Japan ;
for that is the country which he names Chipangu,
and which was variously known afterwards, in those
days of spelling by sound, as Cipango, Zipangu, and
Zum pango.

Marco is describing to us the countries subject to
the Great Khan ; and Cipango was interesting to him
because Kublai Khan had lately sent an expedition
against it. He says:

Chipangu is an Island towards the east in the high seas,
XX.] A GOLDEN PALACE. 215

fifteen hundred miles distant from the Continent; and 2
very great Island it is.

The people are white, civilised, and well-favoured. They
are Idolaters, and are dependent on nobody. And I can
tell you the quantity of gold they have is endless; for
they find it in their own Islands, and the King does not
allow it to be exported. Moreover, few merchants visit
this country because it is so far from the mainland, and
thus it comes to pass that their gold is abundant beyond
all measure.

I will tell you a wonderful thing about the Palace of the
Lord of that Island. You must know that he hath a great
Palace which is entirely roofed with fine gold, just as our
churches are roofed with lead, insomuch that it would
scarcely be possible to estimate its value. Moreover, all
the pavement of the Palace and the floors of the chambers
are entirely of gold, in plates like slabs of stone, a good
two fingers thick ; and the windows also are of gold; so that
altogether the richness of this Palace is past all bounds and
all belief.

They have also pearls in abundance, which are of a
rose colour, but fine, big, and round, and quite as valuable
as the white ones. In this Island some of the dead are
buried; and others are burnt. When a body is burnt, they
put one of these pearls in the mouth, for such is their
custom. They have also quantities of other precious
stones.

Cublay, the Grand Kaan who now reigneth, having
heard much of the immense wealth that was in this Island,
formed a plan to get possession of it. For this purpose
he sent two of his Barons with a great navy, and a great
force of horse and foot. These Barons were able and
valiant men, one of them called Asacan and the other
Vonsaincuin, and they weighed with all their company
from the ports of Zayton and Kinsay, and put out to sea.
216 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

They sailed until they reached the Island aforesaid, and
there they landed, and occupied the open country and the
villages, but did not succeed in getting possession of any
city or castle.

Marco Polo next proceeds to explain why the army
of the Great Khan did not succeed in conquering the
kingdom of Cipango. He says, that there was a
bitter jealousy existing between the two Barons in
command of the expedition, “so that one would do
nothing to help the other.” Consequently, when a
storm arose, the fleet was scattered and a great many
of the vessels were lost. About thirty thousand men
took refuge on an uninhabited island, and when fair
weather came again the Emperor of Cipango sent a
fleet to take these fugitives. By some stratagem,
according to Marco Polo’s account, the invaders got
possession of the ships of the enemy and set sail for
Cipango ; and advancing upon the chief city of the
empire under the banners of the absent forces of
the Emperor, they gained possession of the capital,
and were subsequently besieged there by the forces of
the rightful government of the country. After hold-
ing out for seven months, the invaders surrendered
on condition that their lives should be spared and
that they should never leave the island.

Among the other remarkable things told of Cipango,
by those who gave this information to Marco Polo,
was, that eight of the garrison of one of the fortifi-
XX. | A STRANGE TALISMAN. 217

cations taken by the Mongols possessed a’ charm
which prevented their captors from cutting off their
heads, as had been attempted. This charm consisted
of certain stones inserted under the skin of their flesh,
“and the virtue of these stones was such that those
who wore them could never perish by steel. So when
the Barons heard of this they ordered the men to be
beaten to death with clubs. And after their death the
stones were extracted from the bodies of all, and were
highly prized.” In Marco’s time, and indeed up to
a very recent period, charms of this sort were common
among partly civilised nations.

It was this part of Marco’s story that was greatly
disbelieved in Europe, when he returned to tell of the
wonders he had seen in the Far East. Possibly, his
account of the marvellous adventures of the Khan’s
generals in Cipango threw doubt on his whole story.
The expedition was a failure, and it is likely that each
of the leaders attempted to put the blame upon the
other: the result was a long and curious tale of
adventure, which, although you may some day like to
read it for yourselves, need not be told here.

But the marvels of the fabled island of Cipango
took strong hold of the European imagination after
awhile. As we have already said, Columbus expected
to reach India and Cathay by sailing westward, and
one of the objects of his search was the rich island of
Cipango. When he happened on those islands which
218 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. ‘ [Ch

he called mistakenly the West Indies, he was afraid
that he had missed Cipango, and he asked the natives
where the land of gold (Cipango) was situated ; when
they pointed to the south, he made up his mind that
he had sailed by the northern point of Cipango and
had fallen upon one of the Indian islands. Later on,
in 1498, after the discovery of America, John
Cabot and his son Sebastian sailed on an expe-
dition into the west, and they too were searching for
the wealthy island of Cipango, which of course they
never found.

Marco gives glowing accounts of the great maritime
cities of Kinsay and Zayton, on the eastern and south-
eastern coast of China. Hangchau is the modern
name of Kinsay, which, in Marco’s time, was a
port of the very first importance. It is the capital
of Chinkiang. Zayton, which lies south of Hangchau,
and is now known as Chinchau, or Tsinchau, was
the port from which the Khan’s fleets sailed for the
capture of Japan; and from that port also sailed
Marco Polo and his father and uncle on their final
return to Europe, when they took with them the
bride of the Persian Khan. The city was famous,
among other things, for a peculiar, rich, and glossy
silk, which was called satén, from a change of the
name, Zayton, or Zaituni, where it was made and
exported. In the same way, calico takes its name
from the Indian city Calicut, and cambric from
XX.] COCHIN CHINA. 219

Cambrai. Kinsay and Zayton were also objects of
Columbus’ search on his first and second voyages.

Another region in the eastern archipelago noted
by Marco is Cochin China, which he calls Chamba.
Cochin China was conquered by the Great Khan,
and Marco visited the country in 1285, he says.
At that time, according to Marco Polo, the king
had a great many wives; and he also had, “ between
sons and daughters, three hundred and twenty-six
children, of whom at least one hundred and fifty
were men fit to carry arms.” Of the productions of
the country he writes:

There are very great numbers of elephants in this
kingdom, and they have lignaloes in great abundance.
They have also extensive forests of the wood called Bons,
which is jet black, and of which chessmen and pen-cases
are made.

Elephants are still very numerous in Cochin China;
and ebony, the jet-black wood of which Marco speaks,
is also brought from there. We must understand
that lignaloes is the antique name for aloes-wood—
a vegetable product from which is prepared the drug
known in medicine as aloes. ;

The other countries mentioned by Marco are Java,
of which he gives a very meagre account ; Sumatra,
which he calls “Java the Less”; and divers other
islands, which are difficult for us now to identify on
220 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

the modern map. Concerning the strange things he
saw in Sumatra, Marco says:

This also is an independent kingdom, and the people
have a language of their own ; but they are just like beasts,
without laws or religion. They call themselves subjects of
the Great Kaan, but they pay him no tribute ; indeed, they
are so far away that his men could not go thither. Still, all
these Islanders declare themselves to be his subjects, and
sometimes they send him curiosities as presents. There
are wild elephants in the country, and numerous unicorns,
which are very nearly as big. They have hair like that of
a buffalo, feet like those of an elephant, and a horn in the
middle of the forehead, which is black and very thick.
They do no mischief, however, with the horn, but with the
tongue alone; for this is covered all over with long and
strong prickles, and when savage with any one they crush
him under their knees and then rasp him with their tongue.
The head resembles that of a wild boar, and they carry it
ever bent toward the ground. They delight much to abide
in mire and mud. ’Tis a passing ugly beast to look upon.
There are also monkeys here in great numbers and of
sundry kinds, and goshawks as black as crows. These are
very large birds and capital for fowling.

I may tell you, moreover, that when people bring home
Pygmies which they allege to come from India, ’tis all a lie
and a cheat. For those little men, as they call them, are
manufactured on this Island, and I will tell you how. You
see there is on the Island a kind of monkey which is very
small, and has a face just like a man’s. They take these,
and pluck out all the hair except the hair of the beard and
on the breast, and then they dry them and stuff them and
daub them with saffron and other things until they look
like men. But you see it is all a cheat; for nowhere in


THE THREE ASIATIC RHINOCEROSES: INDIAN (UPPER), SUMATRAN
(LOWER), JAVANESE (MIDDLE).
XX]. A WICKED CUSTOM. 221

India nor anywhere else in the world were there ever men
seen so small as these pretended pygmies.

Marco confounds the rhinoceros with the fabulous
unicorn, as many other writers of the olden time have
done. The unicorn, which is represented as “ fighting
for the crown” with the lion, was something like
the horse, with a single horn in his forehead. There
was no such creature ; but the rhinoceros, then very
little known, was mistaken for the unicorn. The
Sumatra rhinoceros, however, usually has two horns ;
it is the Indian beast of this family that has but one
horn. If Marco Polo had with his own eyes seen
the so-called unicorn of Sumatra, he doubtless would
have been very much puzzled.

Marco then makes us shudder by relating a
horrible practice, in which the people of Dagroian
indulged (their island was close to Sumatra):

I will tell you a wicked custom of theirs. When one of
them is ill they send for their sorcerers, and put the
question to them, whether the sick man shall recover of his
sickness or no. If they say that he will recover, then they
let him alone till he gets better. But if the sorcerers fore-
tell that the sick man is to die, the friends send for certain
judges of theirs to put to death him who has thus been
condemned by the sorcerers to die. These men come, and
lay so many clothes upon the sick man’s mouth that they
suffocate him. And when he is dead they have him cooked,
and gather together all the dead man’s kin, and eat him
And when they have eaten him, they collect his bones and
222 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

put them in fine chests, and carry them away, and place
them in caverns among the mountains where no beast nor
other creature can get at them. And you must know also
that if they take prisoner a man of another country, and he
cannot pay a ranson in coin, they kill him and eat him
straightway. It is a very evil custom and a parlous.

When Marco gets to Ceylon (which he calls Seilan),
he narrates the history of Sagamoni Borcan, or
Buddha, and of the beginning of idolatry.

You must know that in the Island of Seilan there is an
exceeding high mountain; it rises right up so steep and
precipitous that no one could ascend it, were it not that
they have taken and fixed to it several great and massive
iron chains, so disposed that, by help of these, men are able
to mount to the top. And I tell you they say that on. this
mountain is the sepulchre of Adam our first parent; at
least that is what the Saracens say. But the Idolaters say
that it is the sepulchre of Sagamoni Borcan, before whose
time there were no idols. They hold him to have been
the best of men, a great saint in fact, according to their
fashion, and the first in whose name idols were made.

He was the son, as their story goes, of a great and
wealthy King. And he was of such an holy temper that
he would never listen to any worldly talk, nor would he
consent to be king. And when the father saw that his son
would not be king, nor yet take any part in affairs, he took
it sorely to heart. And first he tried to tempt him with
great promises, offering to crown him king, and to surrender
all authority into his hands. The son, however, would
none of his offers ; so the father was in great trouble, and
all the more that he had no other son but him, to whom he
might bequeath the kingdom at his own death. So, after
XX.] THE STORY OF BUDDHA. 223

taking thought on the matter, the King caused a great
palace to be built, and placed his son therein, and caused him
to be waited on there by a number of maidens, the most
beautiful that could anywhere be found. And he ordered
them to divert themselves with the Prince, and to sing and
dance before him, so as to draw his heart towards worldly
enjoyments. But ’twas all of no avail. And I assure you
he was so staid a youth that he had never gone out of the
palace, and thus he had never seen a dead man, nor any
one who was not hale and sound; for the father never
allowed any man that was aged or infirm to come into his
presence. It came to pass, however, one day that the young
gentleman took a ride, and by the roadside he beheld a
dead man. The sight dismayed him greatly, as he never
had seen such a sight before. Incontinently he demanded
of those who were with him what thing that was, and they
told him it was a dead man. “How, then,” quoth the
King’s son, “do all mendie?” “Yea, forsooth,” said they.
Whereupon the young gentleman said never a word, but
rode on right pensively. And after he had ridden a good
way he fell in with a very aged man who could no longer
walk, and had not a tooth in his head, having lost all
because of his great age. And when the King’s son beheld
_ this old man, he asked what that might mean, and where-
fore the man could not walk. Those who were with him
replied that it was through old age the man could walk no
longer and had lost all his teeth. And so when the King’s
son had thus learned about the dead man and about the
aged man, he turned back to his palace and said to himself
that he would abide no longer in this evil world, but would go
in search of Him Who dieth not and Who had created him.

So what did he one night but take his departure from the
palace privily, and betake himself to certain lofty and pathless
mountains. And there he did abide, leading a life of great
hardship and sanctity, and keeping great abstinence, just as
224 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

if he had been a Christian. And when he died, they found
his body and brought it to his father. And when the
father saw dead before him that son whom he loved better
than himself, he was near going distraught with sorrow.
And he caused an image in the similitude of his son to be
wrought in gold and precious stones, and caused all his
people to adore it. And they all declared him to be a
god; and so they still say.

They tell, moreover, that he hath died fourscore and four
times. The first time he died as a man, and came to life
again as an ox; and then he died as an ox and came to
life again as a horse, and so on until he had died fourscore
and four times; and every time he became some kind of
animal. But when he died the eighty-fourth time they say
he became a god. And they do hold him for the greatest
of all their gods. And they tell that the aforesaid image of
him was the first idol that the Idolaters ever had; and
from that have originated all the other idols. And this
befell in the Island of Seilan in India.

The Idolaters come thither on pilgrimage from very long
distances and with great devotion ; and they maintain that
the monument on the mountain is that of the King’s son,
according to the story I have been telling you; and that
the teeth, and the hair, and the dish that are there, were
those of the same King’s son, whose name was Sagamoni
Borcan, or Sagamoni the Saint. But the Saracens also
come thither on pilgrimage in great numbers, and ¢hey say
that it is the sepulchre of Adam our first father, and that the
teeth, and the hair, and the dish were those of Adam.

Whose they were in truth God knoweth; howbeit,
according to the Holy Scripture of our Church, the sepulchre
of Adam is not in that part of the world.

Now it befell that the Great Kaan heard how on that
mountain there was the sepulchre of our first father Adam,
and that some of his hair and of his teeth, and the dish from
XX.) RELIQUES OF ADAM? 225

which he used to eat, were still preserved there. So he
thought he would get hold of them somehow or another,
and despatched a great embassy for the purpose, in the
year of Christ 1284. The ambassadors, with a great com-
pany, travelled on by sea and by land until they arrived
at the Island of Seilan, and presented themselves before
the King. And they were so urgent with him that they
succeeded in getting two of the grinder teeth, which were
passing great and thick; and they also got some of the hair,
and the dish from which that personage used to eat, which
is of a very beautiful green porphyry. And when the Great
Kaan’s ambassadors had attained the object for which they
had come they were greatly rejoiced, and returned to their
Lord. And when they drew near to the great city of
Cambaluc, where the Great Kaan was staying, they sent
him word that they had brought back that for which he had
sent them. On learning this, the Great Kaan was passing
glad, and ordered all the ecclesiastics and others to go forth
to meet these reliques, which he was led to believe were
those of Adam.

And why should I make a long story of it? In sooth,
the whole population of Cambaluc went forth to meet those
reliques, and the eccelesiastics took them over and carried
them to the Great Kaan, who received them with great joy
and reverence. And they find it written in their Scriptures
that the virtue of that dish is such that if food for one man
be put therein it shall become enough for five men; and
the Great Kaan averred that he had proved the thing axe"
found that it was really true.
CHAPTER XXI.

THE WONDERS OF INDIA—PEARL-FISHERS AND THEIR PERILS—
A STORY LIKE ONE IN ‘'THE ARABIAN NIGHTS’ ENTERTAIN-
MENTS ”—HUNTING DIAMONDS WITH EAGLES.

r ARCO’S description of the pearl-fishery of
Ceylon is not only very interesting, but also
truthful. The general features of the pearl-fishery
of to-day are the same as in his time. The region,
to which Marco gives the name of “ Maabar,”
is probably that which we now know as the Coro-
mandel coast. The point which he calls “ Bettelar” is
undoubtedly Patlam, on the coast of Ceylon. The
shark-charmers, of whom Marco speaks, are still in
existence. They pretend to be able to charm the
sharks so that the latter will not attack the divers.
~The secret of this charm is usually bequeathed from
father to son, and never goes out of the family ; and
it is believed by everybody, including foreigners, that
these shark-charmers do really keep away the sharks.
Marco says:
When you leave the Island of Seilan and sail westward

about sixty miles, you come to the great Province of
226,
Ch, XXI.] PEARL-FISHERS. 227

Maapar, which is styled InpIA THE GREATER; it is the
best of all the Indies, and is on the mainland.

In this Province there are five kings, who are own
brothers. I will tell you about each in turn. The Province
is the finest and noblest in the world.

At this end of the Province reigns one of those five Royal
Brothers, who is a crowned King, and his name is SonDER
Banpi Davar. In this kingdom they find very fine and
great pearls ; and I will tell you how they are got.

The sea here forms a gulf between the Island of Seilan
and the mainland. And all round this gulf the water has a
depth of no more than ten or twelve fathoms, and in some
places no more than two fathoms. The pearl-fishers take
their vessels, great and small, ai.d proceed into this gulf,
where they stop from the beginning of April till the
middle of May. They go first to a place called
BETTELAR, and then go sixty miles into the gulf. Here
they cast anchor and shift from their large vessels into small
boats. The merchants divide into various companies, and
each of these must engage a number of men on wages, hiring
them for April and half of May. Of all the produce they
have first to pay the King, as his royalty, the tenth part.
And they must also pay those men who charm the great
fishes, to prevent them from injuring the divers whilst
engaged in seeking pearls under water, one twentieth part
of all that they take. These fish-charmers are termed
Abraiaman ; and their charm holds good for that day only,
for at night they dissolve the charm so that the fishes can
work mischief at their will. These Abraiaman know also
how to charm beasts and birds and every living thing.
When the men have got into the small boats they jump into
the water and dive to the bottom, which may be at a depth
of from four to twelve fathoms, and there they remain as
long as they are able. And there they find the shells that
contain the pearls, and these they put into a net bag tied
228 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

round the waist, and mount up to the surface with them,
and then dive anew. When they can’t hold their breath
any longer they come up again, and after a little down they
go once more, and so they go on all day. These shells are
in fashion like oysters or sea-hoods. And in these shells
are found pearls, great and small, of every kind, sticking in
the flesh of the shell-fish.

In this manner pearls are fished in great quantities, for
thence in fact come the pearls which are spread all over the
world. And the King of that State hath a very great receipt
and treasure from his dues upon those pearls.

Now we come to a marvellous tale of diamonds,
and the way they are obtained, which sounds so
much like a chapter out of “The Arabian Nights’
Entertainments” that we must copy it entire. Marco
says that, after one leaves Maabar and travels about
one thousand miles in a northerly direction, one
comes to the kingdom of Mutfili, No such kingdom
now exists, and it is supposed that by this was meant
Motupallé, in the Madras Presidency. It was in
Mutfili that the Golconda diamonds were found;
and this is the tale told to Marco of the finding
of them:

It is in this kingdom that diamonds are got; and I will
tell you how. There are certain lofty mountains in those
parts ; and when the winter rains fall, which are very heavy,
the waters come roaring down the mountains in great
torrents. When the rains are over, and the waters from the
mountains have ceased to flow, they search the beds of the
torrents and find plenty of diamonds. In summer also there
XXL] HOW TO RAISE DIAMONDS. 229

are plenty to be found in the mountains, but the heat of
the sun is so great that it is scarcely possible to go thither,
nor is there then a drop of water to be found. Moreover,
in those mountains great serpents are rife to a marvellous
degree, besides other vermin, and this owing to the great
heat. The serpents are also the most venomous in exist-
ence, insomuch that any one going to that region runs
fearful peril; for many have been destroyed by these evil
reptiles.

Now among these mountains there are certain great and
deep valleys, to the bottom of which there is no access.
Wherefore the men who go in search of the diamonds take
with them pieces of flesh, as lean as they can get, and these
they cast into the bottom of the valley. Now there are
numbers of white eagles that haunt those mountains and
feed upon the serpents. When the eagles see the meat
thrown down they pounce upon it, and carry it up to some
rocky hill-top where they begin to rend it. But there are
men on the watch, and as soon as they see that the eagles
have settled they raise a loud shouting to drive them away.
And when the eagles are thus frightened away the men
recover the pieces of meat, and find them full of diamonds
which have stuck to the meat down in the bottom. For the
abundance of diamonds down there in the depths of the
valleys is astonishing, but nobody can get down; and if one
could, it would be only to be incontinently devoured by the
serpents which are so rife there.

There is also another way of getting the diamonds. The
people go to the nests of those white eagles, of which there
are many, and find plenty of diamonds which the birds have
swallowed in devouring the meat that was cast into the
valleys. And when the eagles themselves are taken,
diamonds are found in their stomachs.

So now I have told you three different ways in which
these stones are found. No other country but this kingdom
230 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch. XXL

of Mutfili produces them, but there they are found both abun-
dantly and of large size. Those that are brought to our part
of the world are only the refuse, as it were, of the finer and
larger stones. For the flower of the diamonds and other
large gems, as well as the largest pearls, are all carried to
the Great Kaan and other Kings and Princes of those
regions ; in truth, they possess all the great treasures of the
world.

The story of the eagles and the diamonds is one
of the oldest in literature. You will find it in the
adventures of Sindbad the Sailor, in “The Arabian
Nights’ Entertainments” ; and as it is very unlikely
that Marco Polo ever saw that book, which had not
been translated in his time, we may assume that his
story and that of Sindbad had a common origin among
the Persians; for it appears in Persian, Chinese,
Arabian, Jewish, and other Oriental legends. In
Herodotus, too, we find a similar narrative, only
the substance got in this indirect way is cinnamon;
and the Arabs procured it by a kindred device.
CHAPTER XXII.

A PEEP INTO AFRICA—-THE MYTHICAL ROC AND ITS MIGHTY
EGGS—THE EXPLOITS OF KING CAIDU’S DAUGHTER—CON-
CLUSION,

HE eastern coast of Africa was an unknown
region in Marco Polo’s day; and when he had
travelled so far to the southern end of Asia that he
began to get glimpses of Africa, he could not believe
that he heard reports from the eastern side of the
African Continent, of which he already knew some-
thing, as it formed the southern border of the
Mediterranean Sea. So he speaks of Madagascar
(which he calls Madeigascar) and Zanzibar (which he
calls Zanghibar) as though they were parts of India.
If we remember that Marco was the first writer,
European or Asiatic, to mention Madagascar by that
name, and almost the first to give the world any
information concerning that unknown land, we may
overlook the fact that his geography is sometimes
mixed. But his descriptions of the people and the
animals of Eastern Africa are pretty accurate, as thus:
They are all black, and go naked, with only a little

covering for decency. Their hair is as black as pepper, and
231
232 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

so frizzly that even with water you can scarcely straighten it.
And their mouths are so large, their noses so turned up,
their lips so thick, their eyes so big and blood-shot, that they
look like very devils ; they are, in fact, so hideously ugly tha
the world has nothing to show more horrible.

There are also lions that are black and quite different from
ours. And their sheep are all exactly alike in colour—the



body all white and the head black; no other kind of sheep
is found there, you may rest assured. They have also many
giraffes. This is a beautiful creature, and I must give you a
description of it. Its body is short and somewhat sloped
to the rear, for its hind legs are short, whilst the fore legs
and the neck are both very long, and thus its head stands
about three paces from the ground. The head is small,
and the animal is not at all mischievous. Its colour is
all red and white in round spots, and it is really a beau-
tiful object.
XXIL] THE MYTHICAL ROC. 233

The women of this Island are the ugliest in the world,
with their great mouths and big eyes and thick noses. The
people live on rice and flesh and milk and dates; and they
make wine of dates and of rice and of good spices and sugar.
There is a great deal of trade, and many merchants and
vessels go thither.

To Abyssinia, which he calls Abash, Marco devotes
a few pages, where we find that branding in the face
with a hot iron forms part of the rite of baptism
among the Abyssinian Christians:

The Christians in this country bear three marks on the
face ; one from the forehead to the middle of the nose, and
one on either cheek. These marks are made with a hot
iron, and form part of their baptism ; for after that they
have been baptised with water, these three marks are made,
partly as a token of gentility, and partly as the completion
of their baptism. There are also Jews in the country, and
these bear two marks, one on either cheek ; and the Saracens
have but one, to wit, on the forehead, extending half-way
down the nose.

It was somewhere in Eastern Africa that Marco
heard of the existence of that marvellous and gigantic
bird, the Roc. Stories like this, no doubt, served to
shake the faith of the Venetians in the truth of the
tales of the Polos when they returned to their native
land. Marco gives us the tale here with some “ grains

of salt,’ as you will see:

You must know that this Island lies so far south that
ships cannot go further south or visit other Islands in that
234 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch,

direction, except this one and that other of which we have
to tell you, called Zanghibar. This is because the sea-current
runs so strong towards the south that the ships which should
attempt it never would get back again. Indeed, the ships
of Maabar which visit this Island of Madeigascar, and that
other of Zanghibar, arrive thither with marvellous speed, for
great as the distance is they accomplish it in twenty days,
whilst the return voyage takes them more than three months.
This is because of the strong current running south, which
continues with such singular force and in the same direction
at all seasons.

’Tis said that in those other Islands to the south, which
the ships are unable to visit because this strong current
prevents their return, is found the bird Gryphon, which
appears there at certain seasons. The description given of
it is, however, entirely different from what our stories and
pictures make it. For persons who had been there and had
seen it told Messer Marco Polo that it was for all the world
like an eagle, but one indeed of enormous size; so big, in
fact, that its wings covered an extent of thirty paces, and
its quills were twelve paces long, and thick in proportion.
And it is so strong that it will seize an elephant in its talons
and carry him high into the air, and drop him so that he is
smashed to pieces; having so killed him, the bird gryphon
swoops down upon him and eats him at leisure. The
people of those isles call the bird Auc, and it has no other
name. So I wot not if this be the real gryphon, or if there
be another manner of bird as great. But this I can tell
you for certain, that they are not half lion and half bird, as
our stories do relate ; but enormous as they be, they are
fashioned just like an eagle.

The Great Kaan sent to those parts to inquire about
these curious matters, and the story was told by those who
went thither. He also sent to procure the release of an
envoy of his who had been despatched thither, and had
(om
ay: I lf
NaH



THE ROC,
XXII] A COLOSSAL FEATHER. 235

been detained ; so both those envoys had many wonderful
things to tell the Great Kaan about those strange islands,
and about the birds I have just mentioned. They brought
(as I heard) to the Great Kaan a feather of the said Ruc,
which was stated to measure ninety spans, whilst the quill
part was two palms in circumference—a marvellous object !
The Great Kaan was delighted with it, and gave great
presents to those who brought it. They also brought two
boar’s tusks, which weighed more than fourteen pounds
a piece; and you may gather how big the boar must have
been that had teeth like that! They related, indeed, that
there were some of these boars as big asa great buffalo.
There are also numbers of giraffes and wild asses ; and, in
fact, a marvellous number of wild beasts of strange aspect.

The measurements, which were common in Marco
Polo’s time, are not much in use nowadays; but if
the reader wants to figure out the dimensions of
Marco’s big bird, a pace may be reckoned as equal
to two and a half feet, a span to nine inches, and
a palm to four inches.

The fable of the Rukh, or Roc, is one of the oldest
in the world—as old as that other which relates the
adventures of the men who got their diamonds from
the valley of the serpents in such curious fashion ;
and we find it in the story of Sindbad the Sailor.
But scientific research has proved that some such
colossal bird did exist in ancient times. There have
been found in Madagascar the remains of an immense
bird, and also a fossil egg of the monster. This egg,
which is in the British Museum, is thirteen and a
236 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. [Ch.

quarter inches long and six and a half inches in
diameter ; its contents would be equal to two and
a half gallons. If the bird were constructed on the
plan of the eagle, for instance, its egg, comparing it
with that of the eagle, would require a bird so big
that its quills would be ten feet long and its wings
would spread over thirty feet.

In New Zealand have been found the bones of a
great bird called the Moa by the natives; this was a
lazy and stupid creature, incapable of flying, and not
unlike the ostrich in structure and habit. The Moa
(Dinornis, as it is named by the scientists) was over
ten feet high. Not long since, there were found, along-
side of the remains of a Moa, the bones of a still
bigger bird which resembled the eagle, and was
evidently a bird of prey twice as big as the Moa.
If this creature lived on the Moa as its prey, why
may not some other gigantic bird, like the Roc, have
preyed on the great bird whose egg and bones were
found in Madagascar?

The next succeeding chapters of Marco Polo’s book
are taken up chiefly with accounts of the wars of
Kublai Khan, beginning with the battle fought
between him and his mutinous nephew, the King of
Caidu. With these we need not concern ourselves,
though the exploits of Caidu’s valiant daughter,
described in Marco’s quaint language, are worth
notice:
Soci] KING CAIDU’S DAUGHTER. 237

Now you must know that King Caidu had a daughter
whose name was Aijaruc, which in the Tartar is as much
as to say “The Bright Moon.” This damsel was very
beautiful, but also so-strong and brave that in all her father’s
realm there was no man who could outdo her in feats of
strength. In all trials she showed greater strength than any
man of them.

Her father often desired to give her in marriage, but she
would none of it. She vowed she would never marry till
she found a man who could vanquish her in every trial;
him she would wed, and none else. And when her father
saw how resolute she was, he gave a formal consent in their
fashion that she should marry whom she list and when she
list. The lady was so tall and muscular, so stout and
shapely withal, that she was almost like a giantess. She had
distributed her challenges over all the kingdoms, declaring
that whosoever should come to try a fall with her, it should
be on these conditions, vz. that if she vanquished him
she should win from him one hundred horses, and if he
vanquished her he should win her to wife. Hence many a
noble youth had come to try his strength against her, but
she beat them all; and in this way she had won more than
ten thousand horses.

Now it came to pass in the year of Christ 1280, that there
presented himself a noble young gallant, the son of a rich
and puissant king, a man of prowess and valiance and great
strength of body, who had heard word of the damsel’s
challenge, and came to match himself against her in the
hope of vanquishing her and winning her to wife. That he
greatly desired, for the young lady was passing fair. He too
was young and handsome, fearless and strong in every way,
insomuch that not a man in all his father’s realm could vie
with him. So he came full confidently, and brought with
him one thousand horses to be forfeited if she should
vanquish him. Thus might she gain one thousand horses at
238 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO, [Ch,

a single stroke! But the young gallant had such confidence
in his own strength that he counted securely to win her.

Now ye must know that King Caidu and the Queen his
wife, the mother of the stout damsel, did privily beseech
their daughter to let herself be vanquished. For they
greatly desired this prince for their daughter, seeing what a
noble youth he was, and the son of a great king. But the
damsel answered that never would she let herself be van-
quished if she could help it; if, indeed, he should get the
better of her, then she would gladly be his wife, according
to the wager, but not otherwise.

Soa day was named for a great gathering at the Palace
of King Caidu, and the King and Queen were there. And
when all the company were assembled, for great numbers
flocked to see the match, the damsel first came forth in a
strait jerkin of sammet; and then came forth the young
bachelor in a jerkin of sendal; and a winsome sight they
were tosee. When both had taken post in the middle of
the hall, they grappled each other by the arms, and wrestled
this way and that, but for a long time neither could get the
better of the other. At last, however, it so befell that the
damsel threw him right valiantly on the palace pavement.
And when he found himself thus thrown, and her standing
over him, great indeed was his shame and discomfiture.
He gat him up straightway, and without more ado departed
with all his company, and returned to his father full of
shame and vexation, that he who had never yet found a man
that could stand before him should have been thus worsted
by a girl! And his one thousand horses he left behind him.

As to King Caidu and his wife, they were greatly annoyed,
as I can tell you; for if they had had their will, this youth
should have won their daughter.

And ye must know that after this her father never went
on a campaign but she went with him. And gladly he took
her, for not a knight in all his train played such feats of
XXIL] RUSTICIANO’S EPILOGUE. 239

arms as she did. Sometimes she would quit her father’s
side, and make a dash at the host of the enemy, and seize
some man thereout, as deftly as a hawk pounces on a bird,
and carry him to her father ; and this she did many a time,

Then Marco skips to the far North, and tells us
of the wandering Tatars of that region, and of the
manners and customs of Siberia.

His description of the far North made no such
profound impression on the mind of Europe as did
his account of the countries in the southern and
eastern parts of Asia, and it need not detain us.

Now we have come to the end of Marco Polo’s
book, and cannot better close our extracts from it
than with the epilogue, or concluding address, which
Rusticiano, or Ramusio, or some of the earliest
copyists, put down here as a finish to the whole:

CONCLUSION.

And now ye have heard all that we can tell you about
the Tartars and the Saracens and their customs, and like-
wise about the other countries of the world, as far as our
researches and information extend. Only we have said
nothing whatever about the GREATER SEA and the provinces
that lie round it, although we know it thoroughly. But it
seems to me a needless and useless task to speak about
places which are visited by people every day. For there
are so many who sail all about that sea constantly, Venetians
and Genoese and Pisans, and many others, that everybody
knows all about it, and that is the reason that I pass it over
and. say nothing of it.
240 THE STORY OF MARCO POLO. (Ch. XXIL

Of the manner in which we took our departure from the
Court of the Great Kaan you have heard at the beginning
of the Book, in that chapter where we told you of all the
vexation and trouble that Messer Maffeo and Messer Nicolo
and Messer Marco had about getting the Great Kaan’s leave
to go; and in the same chapter is related the lucky chance
that led to our departure. And you may be sure that but
for that lucky chance we should never have got away in
spite of all our trouble, and never have got back to our
country again. But I believe it was God’s pleasure that we
should get back, in order that people might learn about the
things that the world contains. For according to what has
been said in the introduction at the beginning of the Book,
there never was a man, be he Christian or Saracen, or
Tartar or Heathen, who ever travelled over so much of the
world as did that noble and illustrious citizen of the City
of Venice, Messer Marco, the son of Messer Nicolo Polo


NDE

ABRAIAMAN
227

Abyssinia (Abash), 233

Acre, 10

Adam, reliques of, 224

Africa, 231

Alati, 33, 57

Alexander the Great, 30; his
horse, Bucephalus, 61

Alligators, 171

Aloadin (the Old Man of the
Mountain), 55; his Assassins,
56

Aloes, 219

Anin, province of, 186

Ararat, Mount, 28

Arghun, Khan of Persia, 16

Armenia, 27

Artillery, siege, 199

Arzinga, city of, 27

Asbestos, 79

Assassins, the, 56

(shark-charmers),

BacslI, or conjurers, 103
Badakshan (Badashan), the gems
of, 60; horses of, 61

241

Bagdad, 33; the miserly Caliph
of, 34

Baiburt, 28

Bamboos, 106, 169

Bam-i-Duniah (‘Roof of the
World”), 68

Barons, Kublai Khan’s, 133, 137,
I5I

Basra (Bastra), 33

Baudas (Bagdad), 33

Bayan Hundred-Eyes, 197

Bengal, 196

Bettelar (Patlam), 226

Bezant, the, 150

Bolor, 68

Bucephalus, 61

Buddha, history of, 222

Buddhism, 65

Burmah, 196

Cacanru (Hokianfu), city of,
194
Caidu, King, 113; his valiant
daughter, 237
Caliph of Bagdad, the miserly,
34
16
242

Camadi, city of, 47

Cambaluc (Khan-palik), 129, 161

Canal, the Great, 159

Cannabis Indica, 58

Caramoran (the Yellow River),
166

Caraonas (Hazaras), the, 48,
52

Carpini, Friar Plano, 2, 21

Cashmere, 63; conjurers of, 64

Casvin (Kazwin), city of, 44, 49

Caugigu (Laos), province of,
185

Ceylon, 222°

Chamba (Cochin China), 219

Chandu (Xandu) palace, 12, 100,
105

Changlu, city of, 191

Cheetahs, 140

Chinangli (Thsinanfu), 194

Chinchau, 218

Chingintalas, 77

Chipangu, Cipango (Japan), 214

Christ, and the Three Magi, 40

Coal, 156

Cobbler, the one-eyed, 37

Cochin China, 219

Coiganju city, 197

Coleridge, S. T. (“In Xanadu”),
105

Coloman, province of, 186

Columbus, Christopher, 22

Column, the miraculous, 70

Conjurers, of Cashmere, 64;
weather-, 103; some of their
tricks, 107

Cooper, T. T., 171

Coromandel coast, the, 226

Crawford, F. Marion, 52

INDEX.

Cremation, 187, 215

Crocodiles, 171

Cuiju (Kweichau), province of,
187

Curzola, the battle of, 18

Dacroian island, 221
Derbend, or Derbent, 30
Devil-doctors, 175
Diamonds, how to get, 228
Dinornis (Moa), 236
Divining-rods, 85

ELEPHANTS, used in battle, 178 ;
in Cochin China, 219
Exorcists, 184

Facrur, King of Manzi, 195
Fata Morgana, 77
Fire-brigade, 205
Fire-worshippers, the, 40
Francolin, 47, 51

Fungul (Phungan), 187

GAME laws, 145

Genoa, Marco a prisoner at, 19
Georgiania, kingdom of, 31
Ghellé, or Gil, 31

Gobi, or Shamo, Desert of, 73
Gog and Magog, 98

Golconda diamonds, 228
Golden Island, 203

Golden King, the, 164

Golden Palace, a, 215

Great Wall of China, the, 98
Gregory X., Pope, 10
Gryphon, the, 234

Guilds, 203

HANGCHAU, 203, 218
INDEX.

Hanway, Jonas, introduces um-
brella into England, 123
Hassan-ben-Sabah, 58
Hazaras, the, 52
Hermenia (Armenia), 27
Hoang-Ho river, 166
Hokianfu, 190, 194
Hormos, city of, 53
Horses, Persian, 50
Huc, Abbé, 96
Huts, portable, 87

Isn Batuta, 108
Idol-monasteries, 202
Istanit (Ispahan), 44, 49

Jauaneir, Emperor, his Memoirs
quoted, 110

Japan, 214

Java, 219

Jenghiz Khan, 7, 81; his death,
84

Jerboa (‘Pharaoh’s rat”), 87,
gl

Jerusalem, I1

Junks, 212

KatxHatu, Khan of Persia, 17

Kaiminfu, 12

Kaipingfu (City of Peace), 12,
100

Kazwin, 44, 49

Kemenfu, 12

Kenjanfu (Singanfu), 167

Kerman, kingdom of, 45

Keshican, Kublai’s Barons, 137

Keshimur (Cashmere), 63

Kettledrums, 116, 119

Khan-palik (Cambaluc), 129

243

King, the Golden, 164

Kinsay (Hangchau), “ the City of
Heaven,” 203

Kisi, city of, 33

Kublai Khan, 7; his reception
of, and instructions to, the
Polos, 8, 9, 12; his titles, 9,
111; the sensible Marco, 13;
sends a mission to Persia, 17 ;
his palaces, 100, 126; his
mares, 102; his court jugglers, |
108 ; how he goes to war, III;
defeats and slays Nayan, 115;
his zaccaras, 116; how he
rewards his officers, 120; his
Tablets of Authority, 121; his
portrait, 124; his war-harness,
125; his evergreens, 127; how
he dines, 133 ; when he drinks,
135 ; liberal to his Barons, 136;
a mighty hunter, 139; his
hawks and eagles, 140; the
luxury of sport, 143 ; his hunt-
ing encampment, 144; his
paper money, 147 ; his system
of government—the Twelve
Barons, 151 ; his postmen, 152;
his stores of corn, and charity,
158, 159; how he passes the
time, 161; defeats King of
Mien and Bangala, 177; quells
Liytan’s rebellion, 192; con-
quers Manzi, 196 ; adopts siege
artillery, 199; fails to conquer
Japan, 215; obtains the
“ reliques” of Adam, 225 ; and
a roc’s feather, 235

Kuhistan, 44, 49

Kukachin, the Lady, 16
Since /’
244

Kurdistan, 44, 49
Kweichau, 187

Laos, 189

Layas, city of, 27

Levant, the, 6, 30

Lignaloes, 219

Linju, 193

Livre tournois, 50

Liytan, rebellion of, 192

Longfellow, poem of ‘‘ Kambalu”
quoted, 35

Lop, or Lob, Desert of, 73

Lor (Luristan), 44, 49

Lost Property Officer, 142

Luristan, 44, 49

MAABaR, 226

Madagascar (Madeigascar), 231

Magi, the Three, 39

Mangalai, Prince, 167

Mangonels, 199

Manzi, province of, 196

Matwanlin, the historian, 75

Melton, Edward, 109

Mien and Bangala, King of,
177

Mien, city of, 181

Milk, condensed, 89

Miracles, stories of, 36, 70

Moa (Dinornis), 236

Monasteries, idol-, 202

Mongols, the, 7

Motupallé (Mutfili), 228

Mount Ararat, 28

Musk-deer, 94, 96

Naccara, the, 116, 119
Nayan, 112

INDEX.

Nestorians, 168
Noah's Ark, 28
Nogodar, 48

OLD Man of the Mountain, 55;
his Assassins, 56

Ondanique, 46, 51, 77

Orphan Rock, 203

Ovis Poli, 68

PaIPuRTH (Baiburt), 28 _

Pamir Steppes, the, 66

Paper money, 147

Parrot, Professor, 29

Parsees, 42

Pashai, province of, 62

Patlam, 226

Pearl-fishing, 227

Peking, 129

Persia, 17, 38; the eight king-
doms of, 44

Petroleum, 28

Pharaoh’s rats, 87

Pheasant, the Chinese, 95

Phungan, Igo

Piju, 194

Poison-wind, the, 54

Polo, Maffeo, 2, 6, 199, 240

Polo, Marco, 2, 4; Kublai’s wel-
come to, 12; a linguist and
ambassador, 13; an explorer,
15; despatched to Persia, 17;
a prisoner at Genoa, 18; his
amanuensis 19; a truth-teller,
23; discourses of Armenia,
Georgiania, Bagdad and its
miserly Caliph, 26-35; of the
miracle worked by the One-
eyed Cobbler, 36 ; of the Three
INDEX.

Magi, 39; of the eight king-
doms of Persia, 44; describes
the zebu, and the fat-tailed
sheep, 47; the Caraonas, 48 ;
the city of Hormos and its
inhabitants, 53; the Old Man
of the Mountain and his Assas-
sins, 55; the mountains of
salt, 59 ; the Badakshan rubies
and horses, 61 ; Cashmere and
its conjurers, 64; the Ovis Poli
on the Roof of the World, 67 ;
his story of the miraculous
column, 70; his tale of the
Lop Desert, 73; ridicules the
salamander, 77; his account
of the origin of the Mongol
Empire under Jenghiz Khan,
81 ; of the Tatar portable huts,
87; of condensed milk, 89;
Tatar justice, 92 ; the grunting
oxen, 94; refers to Gog and
Magog, 98; the Khan's cane-
palace, and his mares, 101,
102; Wweather-conjurers, 103;
on Kublai’s puissance, 111;
Nayan's revolt, defeat, and
death, 112; the Tablets of
Authority, 121; where the
Khan’s war-harness is stored,
125; the greatest palace that
ever was, 126; the Khan’s
evergreen hill, 127 ; Cambaluc,
or Peking, 130; the fashion of
the Khan’s dinner-table, 133 ;
the Khan’s liberality to his
Barons, 137; a mighty hunter,
139; a luxurious sportsman,
143; on Kublai’s finances and

245

government, 147; the Twelve
Barons, 151; a postal service,
152; the Khan’s charity, 159 ;
on the Chinese views of the
soul, 160; how the Khan
passes his time, 161; a pretty
passage between the Golden
King and Prester John, 164;
the Yellow River, 166; quan-
tities of canes, 169; his report
of Yunnan and its crocodiles,
171; of Zardandan and its
devil-doctors, 174; the Khan
v. King of Mien, 177; on the
city of Mien and its two
towers, 181; in Southern China
and Laos, 185 ; two cities and
a rebel, 191 ; Bayan Hundred-
Eyes, 197; introduces siege
artillery, 199; the Yang-tse-
Kiang river, 201 ; his account
of the city of Hormos, 203;
in Japan, 211 ; agolden palace,
215; Cochin China and its
elephants, 219; strange things
in Sumatra, 220; Buddha’s
history, 222; Adam’s “re-
liques,” 224; the pearl-fishers
of Ceylon, 227; how to raise
diamonds, 229; his peep into
Africa, 231; the roc, 233;
the exploits of King Caidu’s
daughter, 237

Polo, Nicolo, 2, 6, 199

Ponent, the, 30

Postmen, running, 152

Presbyter, or Prester, John, 80;
outwits the Golden King, 164

Pygmies, manufacture of, 220
246

ran Ramusio, John Baptist, 3, 9,
239

Rashiduddin, 182

Reobarles, province of, 47

z-Rhinoceros, 220

Roc, or ruc, 233

-Roof of the World, the, 67

Rubruquis, Friar William, 2, 21,
gl

Rusticiano, Marco’s amanuensis,
19, 24, 239

Sacamoni Borcan (Buddha),
222

Saggio, the, 121

Saianfu, 198

St. Leonard’s Convent, 32

Salamander, the, 77

Salt, mountains of, 158; used
for money, 173

Samarcand, 70

Saracens, the, 70

Score and tally, 183

Seilan (Ceylon), 222

Serazy (Shiraz), 44, 49

Shamo, or Gobi, Desert of,
73

Shark-charmers, 226 -

Shawankars, 44, 49

Sheep, fat-tailed, 47, 51; East
African, 232

Shells, used for money, 173

Ship-building, 212

Ships, stitched, 53

Shiraz, 44, 49

Shulistan, 44, 49

Siangyangfu, 198

Sigatay (Kublai’s brother), 70

Silver Island, 203

INDEX.

Singanfu, 168

Siningfu (Sinju), 94
Sinjumatu, 193

Soncara (Shawankars), 44, 49
Sumatra, 219

Suolstan (Shulistan), 44, 49
Swift, Dean, 72

TADINFU, IQI

Taican, and its salt mountains,
58

Talisman, a strange, 217

Tanduc, battle of, 33

Tatars, their manners and cus:
toms, 86-93

Tattooing, 174

Tebaldo of Piacenza (afterwards
Pope Gregory X.), 10

Thsinanfu, 190, 194

Tibet, 94, 169

Trebuchets, 199

‘Tsinchau, 17, 218
| Tunocain (Kuhistan), 44, 49

Turkestan, 70

UMBRELLAS, 123

VENICE, I, 3, 18

Vochan, battle of, 177
Vokhan, 67 /

WALL, the Great, 98
War-drums, 116, 119
Weather-conjurers, 103, 107
Wood, Captain John, 68

XANDU palace, 100, 105

YAKS, or grunting oxen, 95
INDEX. 247

Yang-tse-Kiang river, 201 ZANZIBAR (Zanghibar), 231
Yasdi, city of, 45 Zardandan, 174
Yellow River, the, 166 Zayton (Chinchau, or Tsinchau),

Yule, Colonel (‘Travels of 17, 218

Marco Polo”), 21, 50, 106,156 | Zebu, the, 47, 51
Yungchangfu, 182 Zipangu, Zumpango (Japan), 214
Yunnan, 171 Zurficar, 77
QZBhYSED




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