Citation
Grimm's household stories

Material Information

Title:
Grimm's household stories
Uniform Title:
Kinder- und Hausmärchen
Creator:
Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863 ( Author, Primary )
Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859 ( Author, Secondary )
Wehnert, Edward Henry, 1813-1868 ( Illustrator )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Manchester
New York
Publisher:
George Routledge & Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vii, 376 p., [16] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 22 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1896 ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1896 ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1896 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Manchester
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece and some plates printed in colors.
Statement of Responsibility:
with one hundred and twenty-two illustrations and sixteen page plates by E.H. Wehnert.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026796178 ( ALEPH )
ALH1252 ( NOTIS )
15244865 ( OCLC )

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Full Text






University
of

lF
|a
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IE
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&









: GRIMM’S
HOUSEHOLD STORIES











GRIMM’S

HOUSEHOLD STORIES

/s

WITH ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-TWO ILLUSTRATIONS
AND SIXTEEN PAGE PLATES BY E. H. WEHNERT.









LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS, Limirep

BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL
MANCHESTER AND NEW YORK
1896



PREFACE,

Tue “Kinder und Hausmarchen” of the Brothers Grimm is a world-
renowned book. very collector of stcries has borrowed from its
treasures,—hundreds of artists have illustrated it,—plays have been
founded on many of the tales,—and learned essays of deep research have
been written upon it by men of literary eminence.

The Brothers Grimm themselves thus speak of their work :

“ We may see, not seldom, when some heaven-directed storm has beaten
to the earth a whole field of ripening corn, one little spot unscathed, where
yet a few ears of corn stand upright, protected by the hedge or bushes
which grow beside them. The warm sun shines on them day by day, and
unnoticed and forgotten they ripen and are fit for the sickle, which comes
not to reap them that they may be stored in some huge granary. They
remain till they are full ripe, and then the hand of some poor woman
plucks and binds them together and carries them home to store them up
more carefully than a whole sheaf, for perchance they will have to serve
for all the winter, and she cannot tell how long beyond.

“Thus does it appear to us when we consider how little is ‘eft of all
that bloomed in earlier days,—how even that litle is well-nigh lost, save
for the popular ballads, a few legends and traditions, and these innovent
Household Stories. The fire-side hearth and chimney-corner ; the observ-
ance of high-days and holy-days; the solitude of the still forest-glade ;
above all, untroubled fancy ; these have been the hedges which have kept
intact the field of legendary lore and handed it down from age to age.”

In this translation of these “ Household Stories,” it has been simply
endeavoured to render the homely talk of Germany into the homely talk
of our own country. A few short pieces have been omitted to which
English mothers might object, and principally on the score of that
mixture of the sacred and profane which is common in German imagina-
tive composition. It may, perhaps, also be objected that in some of the
Tales the expression, “the greater the rogue, the better his fortune,”
occurs ; to such criticism the Brothers Grimm reply, “The right use of
these narrations will find no evil therein, but, as a good old proverb has
it, a witness of our own hearts. Children point at the stars without fear,
while others, as the popular belief goes, thereby offend the angels.”

Any praise of Mr. Wehnert’s illustrations is quite unnecessary. They
are so full of character, and so happily in accordance with the spirit of
the work, that every one who admires the stories must be delighted with

the pictures. z



CONTENTS.



The Frog Prince . . . . ss
The Cat and the Mouse in Part-

nership. . teeters
The Three cert: sue stiaas
The Woodcutter’s Child . . .
Oh, if I could but Shiver!. . .

The Wolf and the Seven Little

Goats... atte
The Pack of Rani aes
Haithil ORNs tes 3.) oy eet ce
A Good Bargain . .....
The Wonderful Musician . .
The Twelve Brothers

The Three Little Men in the Wood
The Little Brother and Sister .
Hansel and Grethel. . . ..
The Three Snake-Leaves ...
ea pUNZelewtes xsus ep te Keyan ts

The White Snake .

The Fisherman and his Wife .

The Seven Crows. . . ..

The Valiant Little Tailor .

The Straw, the Coal, and the
Bean . . aes

Little Red- Ca

Old Mother Frost.

Cinderella .

The Riddle .

The Spider and the Plea

The Little Mouse, Bird,
Sausage . . '

The Musicians of ner

The Giant with the Three Golden

and

Hairs .
The Three iareaeren Re
The Handless Maiden . ...,
The Singing Bone ....
The Discreet Hans . . . . .
Clever Alice. . . . « » 6

PAGE {

1

an se

18
20
22,
27
81
33
37
41
45
50
53
56
59
63
65

71
72
75
77
82
84

90
95
97
101



103
105

The Three Luck-Children. . .

PAGE
The Wedding of Mrs. Fox . 108
The Little Elves . . . . 110
Thumbling . 112
The Table, the es aia ine Stick 116
The Golden Bird . . 123
The Travels of Thumbling. . . 129
The Godfather Death . 1382
The Robber-Bridegroom . . . 134
The Old Witch . . . . . . 137
Herr Korbes . ... +. + 138
The Feather Bird. . . . . . 1839
The Godfather. . . . . +. J41
The Six Swans. . . .. . . 148
Old: Sultaniey timex. leaps ieee LO
The Almond-Tree. . .. . 148
Briar Rosy coe sy ion eobrcp one OS
King Thrush-Beard . . . . . 157
Rumpelstiltskin . . . . . . 160
Little Snow-White . .. . . 163
The Dog and the Sparrow. . . 169
Roland . 172
The Knapsack, ce Hat, a ane
Horn i 175
The Little Te 179
Jorinde and Joringel . 183
Fir-Apple 185
Catherine and Hirerlericle aie 187
The Two Brothers . .. . . 192
The Golden Goose .... . 207
The Three Feathers... . 210
The Queen Bee perme Le
Allerleirauh (The Coat of all
Colours) 214
The Twelve Tranter 218
The Rogue and his Master. 220
The Wolf and the Fox . "| 229,
The Fox and Godmother-Wolf . 224
The Fox and the Cat . . « . 225





How Six Travelled through the
Wiorl difeiramsssue suisse rere
Clever Grethel. . . 1...
The Pink. . a
The Old Man ana ial Gracdcene "
The WolfandtheMan... .
The Gold Children . ...
The Soaring Lark .....
The Rabbit’s Bride . ... .
The Death of the Cock. . ..
The Water-Sprite .....
Brother Lustig ..... »
Hans:inv luck secure smemiretes
The Fox and the Geese. . . .
The Goose-Girl
The Poor Man and the Rich ters
The Young Giant. .....
Hans Married .
The Dwarfs .
The King of the eslaen aCe
MheeRavenian. vse je tite
Old Hildebrand ......
Mhewlhree Birds sek «ateunele
The Water of Life ,
The Peasant’s Wise Danentce :
Doctor Know-All. . ....
The Two Wanderers. . . ..
The Spirit in the Bottle .

CONTENTS.

PAGE

228
232
234
237
238
239
243
247
249
250
251
258
262
263
268
271
277
278
281
286
290
293
296
300
303
305
312



The Experienced Huntsman. .
Bearskin. . . . a6 0
The Wren and the Been eiaeaaTs
The Sweet Soup . ....-.
The Faithful Beasts... . .
The Three Army Surgeons. . .
Three little Tales about Toads .
The Valiant Tailor ,

The Poor Miller's Son and the Cat
Hans the Hedgehog. . ..
The Child’s Grave Soares
The Two Kings’ Children . .
The Jew among Thorns

The Flail which came from the

OOM A ee Boo o
ThesBlueMbighty evs ss. ieee saees
The Seven Swabians. . .. .

The Three Journeymen.
Ferdinand the Faithful and
Ferdinand the Unfaithful . .
The Shoes which were Danced to
Pieces... ,
The Bright Sun ere on the

Day
The Prince wie was afraid of
IN Oth in giei ears gal eee eae

The Idle Spinner. . ....
The Three Brothers, . . ..

Vil.
PAGE
316
320
324.
326
327
830
832
334
336
339
343
844
349

353
354
357
359

365
368
369

373
3875



FULL-PAGE PLATES.

PAGE
THE Lirttre BRoTHER AND SISTER .

Tur Musicians oF BREMEN . 0
CLEVER ALICE : . . ‘ : ; é : : ; ; » 105
Tur GOLDEN Brirp . 5 6 _ . ; : ; , é ear Ll
Tur ALMOND-TREE : 3 : ‘
Tue Kwapsack, tim Hat, AND THE Torn
Tur TwrLvE Hunters

How Srx TRAVELLED THROUGH THE Worip . .

THE GOLD CHILDREN . . . . ; ; i ; , we 200,

Tue GoosE-GirL : . 7 : 6 é . 5 0 . - 263
Tar WatTER or Lirr. . . . . . . . . ° - 296
THe Two WANDERERS : ‘ . . . : d . . - 805
THE EXPERIENCED HUNTSMAN . 6 . . . . . - 816

Tur Two Kincs’ CHILDREN : . . " ; 0 . 844

FERDINAND THE FAITHFUL AND FERDINAND THE UNFAITHFUL

Tor THREE BROTHERS . . . . 5 . . . . 878



GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.



THE FROG PRINCE.

In the olden time, when wishing was having, there lived a King, whose
daughters were all beautiful; but the youngest was so exceedingly
beautiful that the Sun himself, although he saw her very often, was
enchanted every time she came out into the sunshine.

Near the castle of this King was a large and gloomy forest, and in
the midst stood an old lime-tree, beneath whose branches splashed a
little fountain; so, whenever it was very hot, the King’s youngest
daughter ran off into this wood, and sat down by the side of this
fountain ; and, when she felt dull, would often divert herself by throwing
a golden ball up in the air and catching it. And this was her favourite
amusement.

Now, one day it happened, that this golden ball, when the King’s
daughter threw it into the air, did not fall down into her hand, but on
the grass; and then it rolled past her into the fountain. The King’s
dau zhter followed the ball with her eyes, but it disappeared beneath the
water, which was so deep that no one could see to the bottom. Then
she began to lament, and to cry louder and louder ; and, as she cried, a
voice called out, “Why weepest thou, O King’s daughter? thy tears
would melt even a stone to pity.” And she looked around to the spot
whence the voice came, and saw a Frog stretching his thick ugly head
out of the water. “Ah! you old water-paddler,” said she, “was it you
that spoke? I am weeping for my golden ball which has slippea away
from me into the water.”

“Be griet, and do not cry” answered the Frog; “I can give thee

R



2 GRIMM’S NOUSEHOLD STORIES.

good advice But what wilt thou give me if I fetch thy plaything up
again 2”

~ «What will you have, dear Frog?” said sher “My dresses, my
pearls and jewels, or the golden crown which I wear?”

The Frog answered, “Dresses, or jewels, or golden crowns, are not
for me; but if thou wilt love me, and let me be thy companion and
playfellow, and sit at thy table, and eat from thy little golden plate, and
drink out of thy cup, and sleep in thy little bed,—if thou wilt promise
ine all these, then will I dive down and fetch up thy golden ball.”

“Oh, I will promise you all,” said she, “if you will only get me my
ball.” But she thought to herself, “What is the silly Frog chattering
about? Let him remain in the water with his equals; he cannot mix
in society.” But the Frog, as soon as he had received her promise, drew
his head under the water and dived down. Presently he swam up again
with the ball in his mouth, and threw it on the grass. The King’s
daughter was full of joy when she again saw her beautiful plaything ;
and, taking it up, she ran off immediately. “Stop! stop!” cried the
Frog ; “take me with thee. I cannot run as thou canst.” But all his
croaking was useless ; although it was loud enough, the King’s daughter
did not hear it, but, hastening home, soon forgot the poor Frog, who was
obliged to leap back into the fountain.

The next day, when the King’s daughter was sitting at table with
her father and all his courtiers, and was eating from her own little
golden plate, something was heard coming up the marble stairs, splish-
splash, splish-splash ; and when it arrived at the top, it knocked at the
door, and a voice said, “Open the door, thon youngest daughter of the
King!” So she rose and went to see who it was that called her; but
when she opened the door and caught sight of the Frog, she shut it
again with great vehemence, and sat down at the table, looking very
pale. But the king perceived that her heart was beating violently, and
asked her whether it were a giant who had come to fetch her away who
stood at the door. “Oh, no!” answered she; “it is no giant, but an
ugly Frog.”

“ What does the Frog want with you?” said the King.

“Oh, dear father, when I was sitting yesterday playing by the foun-
tain, my golden ball fell into the water, and this Frog fetched it up again
becausc I cried so much : but first, I must tell you, he pressed me so
much, that I promised him he should be my companion. I never
thought that he could come out of the water, but somehow he hag
ju ped out, and now he wants to come in here.”

At that moment there was another knock, and a voice said,—

“King’s daughter, youngest,

Open the door.

Hast thou forgotten

Thy ptomises made

At the fountain so clear |

’Neath the lime-tree’s shade

King’s daughter, youngest,
Open the door.”







THE FROG PRINCE. 8
Then the King said, “ What you have promised, that you must perform ;
go and let him in.” So the King’s daughter went and opened the door,
and the Frog hopped in after her right up to her chair: and as soon aa
she was seated, the Frog said, “Take me up ;” but she hesitated. se
long that at last the King ordered her to obey. And as soon as the
Frog sat on the chair he jumped onto the table and said, “ Now push thy
plate near me, that we may eat together.” And she did so, but as every
one saw, very unwillingly. The Frog seemed to relish his dinner much,
brit every bit that the King’s daughter ate nearly choked her, till at. last
the Frog said, “I have satisfied my hunger and feel very tired ; wilt thou
carry me upstairs now into thy chamber, and make thy bed ready that
we may sleep together?” At this speech the King’s daughter began to
cry, for she was afraid of the cold Frog, and dared not touch him ; and
besides, he actually wanted to sleep in her own beautiful, clean bed.

But her tears only made the King very angry, and he said, “He
who helped you in the time of your trouble, must not now be despised !”
So she took the Frog up with two fingers, and put him in a corner of her
chamber. But as she lay in her bed, he crept up to it, and said, “I am
so very tired that I shall sleep well; do take me up or I will tell thy
father.” This speech put the King’s daughter in a terrible passion, and
catching the Frog up, she threw him with all her strength against the
wall, saying, “ Now, will you be quiet, you ugly Frog !”

But as he fell he was changed from a frog into a handsome Prince
with beautiful eyes, who after a little while became, with her father’s
consent, her dear companion and betrothed. Then he told her how he
had been transformed by an evil witch, and that no one but herself could
have had the power to take him out of the fountain ; and that on the
morrow they would go together into his own kingdom.

The next morning, as soon as the sun rose, a carriage drawn by
eight white horses, with ostrich feathers on their heads, and golden
bridles, drove up to the door of the palace, and behind the carriage
stood the trusty Henry, the servant of the young Prince. When his
master was changed into a frog, trusty Henry had grieved so much that
he had bound three iron bands round his heart, for fear it should break
with gricf and sorrow. But now that the carriage was ready to carry
the young Prince to his own country, the faithful Henry helped in the
bride and bridegroom, and placed himself in the seat behind, full of joy
at his master’s release. They had not proceeded far when the Prince
heard a crack as if something had broken behind the carriage ; so he
put his head out of the window and asked Henry what was broken, and
Henry answered, “It was not the carriage, my master, but a band which
I bound round my heart when it was in such grief because you were
changed into a frog.”

Twice afterwards on the journey there was the same noise, and each
time the Prince thought that it was some part of the carriage that had
given way ; but it was only the breaking of the bands which bound the
heart of the trusty Henry, who was thenceforward free and happy.





THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PARTNERSHIP.

A Cat having made the acquaintance of a Mouse, told her so much of
the great love and affection that he had for her, that the Mouse at last
consented to live in the same house with the Cat, and to have their
domestic affairs in common, “But we must provide for the winter,”
said the Cat, ‘‘or we shall be starved : you little Mouse cannot go any-
where, or you will meet with an accident.” This advice was followed,
and a pot was brought with some grease in it. However, when they had
got it, they could not imagine where it should be put ; at last, after a
long consideration, the Cat said, “I know no better place to put it than
in the church, for there no one dares to steal anything : we will set it
beneath the organ, and not touch it till we really want it.” So the pot
was put away in safety ; but not a long while afterwards the Cat began
to wish for it again, so he spoke to the Mouse and said, “I have to tell
you that I am asked by my aunt to stand godfather to a little son, white
with brown marks, whom she has just brought into the world, and so I
must go to the christening. Let me go out to-day, and do you stop at
“home and keep house.” “Certainly,” answered the Mouse ; “ pray, go ;
and if you eat anything nice, think of me: I would also willingly drink a
little of the swect red christening-wine.” But it was all a story ; for the
Cat had no aunt, and had not been asked to stand godfather. He went
straight to the church, crept up to the grease-pot, and licked it till he had
eaten off the top ; then he took a walk on the roofs of the houses in the
town, thinking over his situation, and now and then stretching himself
in the sun and stroking his whiskers as often as he thought of the pot of
fat. When it was evening he went home again, and the Mouse said,
“So you have come at last: what a charming day you wust hava
‘ad !”
“Yes,” answered the Cat ; “it went off very well!”
“What have you named the kitten ?” asked the Mouse.
‘Pop-of 1” said the Cat, very quickly,



THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PARTNERSHIP. 5

“ Top-of !” replied the Mouse; “that is a curious and remarkable
bame: is it common in your family ?”

“What does that matter?” said the Cat; “it is not worse than
Crumb-stealer, as your children are called.”

Not long afterwards the Cat felt the same longing as before, and said
to the Mouse, “ You must oblige me by taking care of the house once more
by yourself; Iam again asked to stand godfather, and, since the young-
ster has a white ring round his neck, I cannot get off the invitation.”
So the good little Mouse consented, and the Cat crept away behind the
wall to the church again, and ate half the contents of the grease-pot.
“Nothing tastes better than what one eats by oneself,” said he, quite
contented with his day’s work ; and when he carne home the Mouse
asked how this child was named.

“ Half-out,” answered the Cat.

“ Half-out !_ What do you mean? T never heard such a name before
in my life: I will wager anything it is not in the calendar.”

The Cat’s mouth now began to water again at the recollection of the
feasting. “All good things come in threes,” said he to the Mouse. “TI
am again required to be godfather; this child is quite black, and has
little white claws, but not a single white hair on his body ; such a thing
ouly happens once in two years, so pray excuse me this time.”

“ Lop-of ! Half-out !” answered the Mouse ; “these are such curious
names, they make me a bit suspicious.”

“Ah!” replied the Cat, “there you sit in your grey coat and long
tail, thinking nonsense. That comes of never going out.”

The Mouse busied herself during the Cat’s absence in putting the
house in order, but meanwhile greedy Puss licked the grease-pot clean
cut. “ When it is all done one will rest ia peace,” thought he to him-
self, and as soon as night came he went home fat and tired. The Mouse,
however, again asked what name the third child had received. “It
will not please you any better,” answered the Cat, “for he is called
All-out.” -

“All-out /” exclaimed the Mouse ; “well, that is certainly the most
curious name by far. I have never yet seen it in print. Adl-owt/ What
can that mean?” and, shaking her head, she rolled herself up and went
to sleep.

After that nobody else asked the Cat to stand godfather 3 but the
winter had arrived, and nothing more was to be picked up out-of-doors ;
so the Mouse bethought herself of their store of provision, and said,
“Come, friend Cat, we will go to our grease-pot which we laid by ; it
will taste well now.”

“Yes, indeed,” replied the Cat; “it will taste ay well as if you
stroked your tongue against the window.”

So they set out on their journey, and when they arrived at tk
church the pot stood in its old place—but it was empty! “ Ah,” said
the Mouse, “I see what has happened; now I know you are indeed a
faithful friend. You have eaten the whole as you stood godfather ; first
Lop-off, then Half-out, then ee





6 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

“ Will you be quiet?” cried the Cat. “ Not a word, or rif eat you.”
But the poor Mouse had “ Ad/-oué” at her tongue’s end, and had scarcely
uttered it when the Cat made a spring, seized her in his mouth, and
swallowed her.

This happens every day in the world.



THE THREE SPINSTERS.

THERE was once a lazy girl who would not spin, and let her mother say
what she would she could not get her to work. At last the mother,
getting both angry and impatient, gave her a blow, which made the girl
cry very loud. Just then the Queen passing by, heard the noise, and
stopping the carriage, she stepped into the house and asked the mother
why she beat her daughter in such a way that the passers-by in the
strect heard her shrieks) The mother, however, was ashamed that
her daughter’s laziness should be known, and said, “I cannot make
her icave off spinning ; she will spin for ever and ever, and I am go poor
that I cannot procure the flax.” The Queen replied, “I never heard
anything I like better than spinning, and I am never more pleased than
when the wheels are whirring. Let your daughter go with me to the
castle ; I have flax enough, and she may spin as much as she pleases.”
The mother was very glad at heart, and the Queen took tha girl home
with her. As soon as they entered the castle she led her up into three
rooms, which were all full of the finest flax from top to bottom. “Now,
spin this flax for me,” said the Queen ; “and, when you have prepared
it all, you shail have my eldest son for a husband. Although you are
poor, I do not despise you on that account ; your unwearied industry is
dowry enough.” The girl, however, was inwardly frightened, for she
could not have spun the flax had she sat there from morning to night
antil she was three hundred years old. When she was left alone she
began to cry, and thus she sat three days without stirring a hand, Qa



THE THREE SPINSIERS, 7

the third day the Queen came, and when she saw that ncthing was yet
spun she wondered ; and the maiden excused herself by saying that she
had not been able to begin yet, on account of her great sorrow at leaving
her mother’s house. So the Queen was satisfied ; but on leaving she said,
“You must begin to work for me to-morrow.”

As soon as the girl was again alone, she knew not how to act or help
herself, and in her vexation she went and looked out of the window.
She saw three women passing by ; the first of whom had a broad, flat
foot, the second such a large under-lip that it reached nearly to her chin,
end the third a very big thumb. They stopped before the window, and,
looking up, asked the girl what she wanted. She told them her trouble,
and they offered her their help, saying, “ Will you invite us to the wed-
ding, and not be ashamed of us, but call us your aunts, and let us sit at
your table? If you do all these, we will spin the flax in a very short
time for you.”

“ With all my heart,” replied the girl ; “ come in, and begin at once.”
Then she let in these three women, and, making a clear place in the first
room, they sat themselves down and began spinning. One drew the
thread and trod the wheel, the other moistened the thread, and the third
pressed it and beat with her fingers on the table; and as often as she
did so a pile of thread fell on the ground, which was spun in the finest
manner. The girl hid the three spinsters, however, from the Queen, and
showed her, as often as she came, the heaps of spun yarn; so that she
received no end of praise. When the first room was empty, the three
women went to the second, and at length to the third, so that soon all was
cleared out. Now the three spinsters took leave, saying to the girl, “ Do
not forget what you promised us; it will make your fortune.”

When the girl showed the Queen the empty rooms and the great
pile of thread, the wedding was performed, and the bridegroom was
glad that he had such a clever and industrious wife, and praised her
exceedingly.

“ Thave three aunts,” said the girl, “who have done me much service;
so I would not willingly forget them in my good fortune. Allow me,
therefore, to invite them to the wedding, and to sit with me at table.”
The Queen and the bridegroom asked, “ Why should we not allow it?”

When the feast was begun, the three old maids entered in great splen-
dour, and the bride said, “ You are welcome, dear aunts.”

“ Ah,” said the bridegroora, “how do you come by such ugly friends ?”
And, going up to the one with the big foot, he asked, “ Why have you

~guch a broad foot?” “ From treading, from treading,” she replied. Then
he went to the second, and asked, “ Why have you such an overhanging
lip?” “From licking,” she answered, “from licking.” ‘Then he asked
the third, “ Why have you such a broad thumb?” “From pressing the
thread,” she replied, “from pressing the thread.” At this the Prince was
frightened, and said, “ Therefore my bride shall never touch a spinning-
wheel again.”

And so she was set free frem the unlucky flex-spinning,





THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD.

Once upon a time, near a large forest, there dwelt a woodcutter and his
wife, who had only one child, a little girl three years old ; but they were
so poor that they had scarcely food sufficient for every day in the week,
and often they were puzzled to know what they should get to eat. One
morning the woodcutter, his heart full of care, went into the wood to
work; and, as he chopped the trees, there stood before him a tall and
beautiful woman, having a crown of shining stars upon her head, who
thus addressed him: “I am the Guardian Angel of every Christian
child ; thou art poor and needy ; bring me thy child, and I will take her
with me. I will be her mother, and henceforth she shall be under my
care.” The woodcutter consented, and calling his child, gave her to the
Angel, who carried her to the land of Happiness, There everything
went happily ; she ate sweet bread, and drank pure milk ; her clothes
were gold, and her playfellows were beautiful children. When she
attained her fourteenth year, the Guardian Angel called her to her side,
and said, “ My dear child, I have a long journey for thee. Take these
keys of the thirteen doors of the land of Happiness: twelve of them thou
mayest open, and behold the glories therein; but the thirteenth, to which
this little key belongs, thou art forbidden to open. Beware! if thou dost
disobey, harrn will befall thee.”

The maiden promised to be obedient, and, when the Guardian Angel
was gone, began her visits to the mansions of Happiness. Every day one
door was unclosed, until she had seen all the twelve. In each mansion
there sat an angel, surrounded by a bright light. The maiden rejoiced
at the glory, and the child who accompanied her rejoiced with her. Now
the forbidden door alone remained. A great desire possessed the maiden
to know what was hidden there ; and she said to the child, “I will not
quite open it, nor will I go in, but I will only unlock the door, so that
we may peep through the chink.” “ No, no,” said the child ; “that will
ne asin. The Guardian Angel has forbidden it, and misfortune would
#20n fall upon us.”



THE WOODCUTTER’S CHILD. 9)

At this the maiden was silent, but the desire still remained in her
jieart, and tormented her continually, so that she had no peace. One
day, however, all the children were away, and she thought, “ Now I am
alone and can peep in, no one will know what I do ;” so she found the
keys, and, taking them in her hand, placed the right one in the lock and
tumed it around. ‘hen the door sprang open, and she saw three angels
gitting on a throne, surrounded by a great light. The maiden remained
a little while standing in astonishment ; and then, putting her finger in
the light, she drew it back, and found it covered with gold. Then great
alarm seized her, and, shutting the door hastily, she ran away. But her
fear only increased more and more, and her heart beat so violently that
she thought it would burst ; the gold also on her finger would not come
off, although she washed it and rubbed it with all her strength.

Not long afterwards the Guardian Angel came back from her
journey, and, calling the maiden to her, demanded the keys of the
mansion. As she delivered them up, the Angel looked in her face,
and asked, “Hast thou opened the thirteenth door?” ‘‘ No,” answered
the maiden.

Then the Angel laid her hand upon the maiden’s heart, and felt how
violently it was beating; and she knew that her command had been
disregarded, and that the child had opened the door. Then she asked
again, “Hast thou opened the thirteenth door?” “No,” said the
maiden, for the second time. ;

Then the Angel perceived that the child’s finger had become golden
from touching the light, and she knew that the child was guilty; and
she asked her for the third time, “Hast thou opened the thirteenth
door?” No,” said the maiden again.

Then the Guardian Angel replied, “Thou hast not obeyed me, nor
done my bidding ; therefore thou art no longer worthy to remain among
good children,”

And the maiden sank down into a deep sleep, and when she awoke
she found herself in the midst of a wilderness. She wished to call out,
but she had lost her voice. Then she sprang up, and tried to run away;
but wherever she turned thick bushes held ker back, so that she could
not escape. In the deserted spot in which she was now inclosed, thers
stood an old hollow tree; this was her dwelling-place. In this place
she slept by night; and when it rained and biew she found shelter
within it. Roots and wild berries were her food, azd she sought for
them as far as she could reach. In the autumn she collected the leaves
of the trees, and laid them in her hole; and when the frost and snow
of the winter came, she clothed herself with them, for her clothes had
dropped into rags. But during the sunshine she sat outside the tree,
and her long hair fell down on all sides and covered her like a mantle.
Thus she remained a lung time, experiencing the misery and poverty of
the world.

But, once, when the trees had become green again, the King of the
sountry was hunting in the forest, and, as a bird flew into the bushes
which surrounded the wood, he dismounted, and, tearing the brushwood



16 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

aside, cut a path for himself with his sword. When ha had at last
made his way through, he saw a beautiful maiden, who was clothed
from head to foot with her own golden locks, sitting under the tree.
He stood in silence, and looked at her for some time in astonishment;
at last he said, “ Child, how came you into this wilderness?” But the
maiden answered not, for she had become dumb. Then the King
asked, “Will you go with me to my castle?” At that she nodded hep
nead, and the King, taking her in his arms, put her on his horse and
rode away home. Then he gave her beautiful clothing, and everything
in abundance. Still she could not speak ; but her beauty was so great,
and so won upon the Kine’s heart, that after a little while he married
her.

When about a year had passed away the Queen brought a son into
the world, and the same night, while lying alone in her bed, the Guar-
dian Angel appeared to her, and said—

“Wilt thou tell the truth, and confess that thou didst unlock tha
forbidden door? For then will I open thy mouth, and give thee again
the power of speech; but if thou remainest obstinate in thy sin, ther.
will I take from thee thy new-born babe.”

And the power to answer was given to her, but her heart was
hardened, and she said, “No, I did not open the door ;” and at these
words the Guardian Angel took the child out of her arms and disappeared
with him.

The next morning, when the child was not to be seen, a murmur
arose among the people that their Queen was a murderess, who had
destroyed her only son ; but, although she heard everything, she could
say nothing. But the King did not believe the ill repoit, because of his
great love for her.

About a year afterwards another son was vorn, and on the night of
his birth the Guardian Angel again appeared, and asked, “ Wilt thou
confess that thou didst open the forbidden door? Then will I restore
to thee thy son, and give thee the power of speech ; but if thou hard-
ensst thyself in thy sin, then will I take this new-born babe also with
me.”

Then the Queen answered again, “ No, I did not open the door ;”
so the Angel took, the second child out of her arms and bore him away.
On the morrow, when the infant could not be found, the people said
openly that the Queen had slain him, and the King’s councillors advised
that she should be brought to trial. But the King’s affections was still
so great that he would not believe it, and he commanded his councillors
never again to mention the report on pain of death.

The next year a beautiful little girl was born, and for the third
time the Guardian Angel appeared and said to the Queen, “ Follow
me ;” and tak.ng her by the hand, she led her to the kingdom of Hap-
piness, and showed to her the two other children, who were playing
merrily. The Qucen rejoiced at the sight, and the Angel said, “Is
thy heart not yet softened? If thou wilt confess that thou didst unlock
the forbidden door, then will I restore to thee both thy sons.” But the



“OH, IF I COULD BUT SHIVER!” 11

Queen again answered, “No, I did not open it;” and at these words she
gank upon the earth, and her third child was taken from her.

When this was rumoured abroad the next day, all the people ex-
claimed, “The Queen is 2 murderess! she must be condemned!” and the
King could not this time repulse his councillors. Thereupon a trial
was held, and since the Queen could make no good answer or defence,
she was condemned to die upon a funeral pile. The wood was collected,
she was bound to the stake, and the fire was lighted all around her.
Then the iron pride of her heart began to soften, and she was moved to
repentance, and she thought, “Could I but now, before my death, confess
that I opened the door!” And her tongue was loosened, and she cried
aloud, “ Thou good Angel, I confess.” At these words the rain descended
from heaven and extinguished the fire; then a great light shone above,
and the Angel appeared and descended upon the earth, and by her side
were the Qucen’s to sons, one on her right hand and the other on her
left, and in her arms she bore the new-born babe. Then the Angel
restored to the Queen her three children, and loosening her tongue, pro-
mised her a happy future, and said, “ Whoever will repent and confess
their sins, they shall be forgiven.”



A TALE OF ONE WHO TRAVELLED TO LEARN
WHAT SHIVERING MEANT.

A raruer had two sons, the elder of whom was forward and clever
enough to do almost anything ; but the younger was co stupid that he
could learn nothing, and when the people saw him, they said, * Will thy
father still keep thee as a burden to him?” So if anything was to
be done, the elder had at all times to do it; but sometimes the father
would call him to fetch something in the dead of night, and perhaps the
way led through the churchyard or by a dismal place, and then he usa)



12 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

to answer, “ No, father, I cannot go there, I am afraid,” for he was a
coward. Or sometimes of an evening, tales were told by the fireside
which made one shudder, and the listeners exolaimed, “ Oh, it makes us
shiver!” In a corner, meanwhile, sat the younger son, listening, but
he could not comprehend what was said, and he thought “They say
continually, ‘Oh, it makes us shiver, it makes us shiver!’ but perhaps
shivering is an art which I cannot understand.” One day, however, his
father said to him, “Do you hear, you there in the corner? You are
growing stout and big; you must learn some trade to get your living by.
Do you see how your brother works? But as for you, you are not worth
malt and hops.”

“ Ah, father!” answered he, “I would willingly learn something.
What shall I begin? I want to know what shivering means, for of that
I can understand nothing.”

The elder brother laughed when he heard this speech, and thought to
himself, “Ah! my brother is such a simpleton, that he cannot earn his
own living. Ie who would make a good hedge, must learn betimes to
bend.” But the father sighed and said, “ What zhivering means you may
learn soon enough, but you will never get your bread by that.”

Soon after the parish sexton came in for a gossip, so the father told
him his troubles, and how that his younger son was such a simpleton,
that he knew nothing and could learn nothing. “Just fancy, when I
asked him how he intended to earn his bread, he desired to learn what
shivering meant!” ‘Oh, if that be. all,” answered the sexton, “he can
‘earn that soon enough with me; just send him to my place, and I will
soon teach him.” The father was very glad, because he thought that it
would do the boy good ; so the sexton took him home to ring the bells.
About two. days afterwards he called him up at midnight to go into the
church-tower to toll the bell. ‘“ You shall soon learn what shivering
means,” thought the sexton, and getting up he went out too. As soon as
the boy reached the belfry, and turned himself round to seize the rope,
he saw upon the stairs, near the sounding-hole, a white figure. “ Who’s
there?” he called out; but the figure gave no answer, and neither stirred
nor spoke. “ Answer,” said the boy, “or make haste off; you have no
business here to-night.” But the sexton did not stir, so that the boy
might think it was a ghost.

The boy called out a second time, “What are you doing here ?
Speak, if you are an honest fellow, or else I will throw you down-
stairs.”

The sexton said to himself, ‘That is not a bad thought ;” but he re-
mained quiet as if he were a stone. Then the boy called out for the
third time, but it produced no effect ; so, making a spring, he thr w the
ghost down the stairs, so that it rolled ten steps, and then lay motionless
in a corner. Thereupon he rang the bell, and then going home he went
to bed without saying a word, and fell fast asleep. The sexton’s wife
waited some time for her husband, but he did not come; go at last she
became anxious, woke the boy, and asked him if he knew where her
husband was, who had gone before him to the belfry.



“OH, IF I COULD BUT SHIVER!” 13

* No,” answered the boy; “but there was some one standing on the
steps who would not give any answer, nor go away, so took him for a
thief and threw him downstairs. Go now and see where he is; perhaps
it may be he, but I should be sorry for it.” The wife ran off and
found her husband lying in a corner, groaning, with one of his ribs
broken.

She took him up and ran with loud outcries to the boy’s father, and
told him, “Your son has brought a great misfortune on us; he has
thrown my husband down and broken his bones. Take the good-for-
nothing fellow from our bouse.”

The terrified father came in haste and scolded the boy. ‘“ What do
these wicked tricks mean? They will only bring misfortune upon you.”

“Father,” answered the lad, “hear me! Iam quite innocent. He
stood there at midnight like one who had done some evil; I did not
know who it was, and cried three times, ‘Speak, or be off!”

“Ah!” said the father, “everything goes badly with you. Get out
of my sight ; I do not wish to see you again !”

“Yes, father, willingly; wait but one day, then I will go out and learn
what shivering means, that I may at least understand one business which
will support me.” ak

“Learn what you will,” replied the father, “all is the same to me.
Here are fifty dollars; go forth with them into the world, and tell no
man whence you came, or who your father is, for I am ashamed of you.”

“Yes, father, as you wish; but if you desire nothing else, I shall
esteem that very lightly.” :

As soon as day broke the youth put his fifty dollars into a knapsack
and went out upon the highroad, saying continually, “Oh, if 1 could but
shiver !”

Presently a man came up, who heard the boy talking to himself ;
and, as they were just passing the place where the gallows stood, the
man said, “Do you see? There is the tree where sevan fellows have
married the hempen maid, and now swing to and fro, Sit yourself
down there and wait till midnight, and then you will know what it is to
shiver |”

“Oh, if that be all,” answered the boy, “I can very easily do that:
But if I learn so speedily what shivering is, then you shall have my fifty
dollars if you come again in the morning.”

Then the boy went to the gallows, sat down, and waited for evening,

-and as he felt cold he nude a fire. But about midnight the wind blew
so sharp, that, in spite of the fire, he could not keep himself warm. The
wind blew the bodies against one another, so that they swung backwards
and forwards, and he thought, “If I am cold here below by the fire, how
must they freeze above!” So his compassion was excited, and, contriving
a ladder, he mounted, and, unloosening them one after another, he
brought down all seven. Then he poked and blew the fire, and set them
round that they might warm themselves ; but as they sat still without
moving their clothing caught fire. So he said, “Take care of yourselves,
or I wild hang all of you up again.” The dead heard not, and silently



14 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

allowed their rags to burn. This made him so angry that he said, “I.
you will not hear I cannot help you; but I will not burn with you.” So
he hung them up again in a row, and sitting down by the fire he soon
went to sleep. The next morning the man came, expecting to receive his
fifty dollars, and asked, “ Now do you know what shivering means?”
“No,” he answered ; “how should I know? Those fellows up there have
not opened their mouths, and were so stupid that they let the old rags
on their bodies be burnt.” Then the man saw that he should not carry
away the fifty dollars that day, so he went away saying, “I never met
with such an one before.”

The boy also went on his way and began again to say, “ Ah, if only I
could but shiver—if I could but shiver!” A waggoner walking behind
everheard him, and asked, “ Who are you?”

“T do not know,” answered the boy.

The waggoner asked again, “ What do you here?”

“JT know not.”

Who is your father?”

“T dare not say.”

“ What is it you are continually grumbling about ?” 4

“Oh,” replied the youth, “I wish to learn what shivering is, but
nobody can teach me.”

“Cease your silly talk,” said the waggoner. “Come with me, and I
wil see what I can do for you.” So the boy went with the waggoner,
and about evening time they arrived at an inn where they put up for
the night, and while they were going into the parlour he said, quite
aloud, “Oh, if could but shiver—if I could but shiver!” The host
overheard him and said, laughingly, ‘Oh, if that is all you wish, you
shall soon have the opportunity.” “Hold your tongue,” said his wife ;
“so many imprudent people have already lost their lives, it were a
shame and sin to such beautiful eyes that they should not see the light
again.” But the youth said, “If it were ever so difficult I would at
once learn it; for that reason I left home ;” and he never let the host
have any peace till he told him that not far off stood an enchanted
castle, where any one might soon learn to shiver if he would watch there
three nights. The King had promised his daughter in marriage to whom
ever would venture, and she was the most beautiful young lady that tke
sun ever shone upon. And he further told him that inside the castle
there was an immense amount of treasure guarded by evil spirits; enough
to make any one free, and turn a poor man into a very rich one, Many
had, he added, already ventured into this castle, but no one had ever
come out aguin.

The next morning this youth went to the King, and said, “If you
will allow me, I wish to watch three nights in the enchanted castle.”
The King looked at him, and because his appearance pleased him, he
eaid, “ You may make three requests, but they must be inanimate things
you ask for, and such as you can take with you into the castle.” So the
youth asked for a fire, a lathe, and a cutting-board.

The King let him take these things by day juto the castle, and when



“OH, IF I COULD BUT SHIVER!” 15

it was cvening the youth went in and made himself a bright fire in cne
of the rooms, and, placing his cutting-board and knife near it, he sat
down upon his lathe. “Ah, if I could but shiver!” said he. “But
even here I shall never learn.” At midnight he got up to stir the fire,
and, as he poked it, there shrieked suddenly in one corner, “ Miau,
miau! how cold I am!” “ You simpleton!” he exclaimed, “ what are
you shrieking for? if you are so cold, come and sit down by the fire and
warm yourself!” As he was speaking, two great black cats sprang up
to him with an immense jump and sat down one on each side, looking at
him quite wildly with their fiery eyes. When they had warmed them-
selves for a little while they said, “Comrade, shall we have a game of
cards?” “Certainly,” he replied ; “but let me see your paws first.” So
they stretched out their claws, and he said, “ Ah, what long nails you
have got; wait a bit, I must cut them off first;” and so saying he
caught them up by the necks, and put them on his board and screwed
their feet down. ‘Since I have seen what you are about I have lost my
relish for a game at cards,” said he; and, instantly killing them, threw
them away into the water. But no sooner had he quieted these two and
thought of sitting down again by his fire, than there came out of every
hole and corner black cats and black dogs with glowing chains, continually
more and more, so that he could not hide himself. They howled fear
fully, and jumped upon his fire, and scattered it about as if they would
extinguish it. He looked on quietly for some time, but at last, getting
angry, he took up his knife and called out, “ Away with you, you vaga-
bonds!” and chasing them about a part ran off, and the rest he killed
and threw into the pond. As soon as he returned he blew up the sparks
of his fire again and warmed himself, and while he sat, his eyes began to
feel very heavy and he wished to go to sleep. So looking around he saw
a great bed in one corner, in which he lay down ; but no sooner had he
closed his eyes, than the bed began to move of itself and travelled all
round the castle. “Just so,” said he, “only better still ;” whereupon
the bed gallopped away as if six horses pulled it up and down steps and
stairs, until at last all at once it overset, bottom upwards, and lay upon
him like a mountain; but up he got, threw pillows and mattresses into
the air, and saying, “ Now, he who wishes may travel,” laid himself down
by the fire and slept till day broke. In the morning the King came, and,
seeing the youth lying on the ground, he thought that the spectres had
killed him, and that he was dead ; so he said, “It is a great misfortune
that the finest men are thus killed ;” but the youth, hearing this, sprang
up, saying, “It is not come to that with me yet!” The King was much
astonished, but still very glad, and asked him how he had fared. “ Very
well,” replied he ; “as one night has passed, so also may the other two.”
Soon after he met his landlord, who opened his eyes when he saw him.
“TI never thought to see you alive again,” said he; “have you learnt
now what shivering means?” “No,” said he; “it is all of no use. Oh,
if any one would but tell me!”

The second night ne went up again into the castle, and sitting down
by the fire, began his old song, “If I could but shiver!” When midnight



16 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

-eame, a ringing and a rattling noise was heard, gentle at first and louder
and louder by degrees; then there was a pause, and presently with a
loud outcry half a man’s body came down the chimney and fell at his
feet. “ Holloa ;” he exclaimed, “only half a man answered that ringing ;
that is too little.” Then the ringing began afresh, and a roaring and
howling was heard, and the other half fell down. “ Wait a bit,” said he ;
“T will poke up the fire first.” When he had done so and looked round
again, the two pieces had joined themselves together, and an ugly man
was sitting in his place. “I did not bargain for that,” said the youth ;
“the bench is mine.” The man tried to push him away, but the youth
would not Jet him, and giving him a violent push sat himself down in his
old place. Presently more men fell down the chimney, one after the
other, who brought nine thigh-bones and two skulls, which they set up,
and then they began to play at ninepins. At this the youth wished also
to play, so he asked whether he might join them. “ Yes, if you have
mouey!” “Money enough,” he replied, “but your balls are not quite
round ;” so saying he took up the skulls, and, placing them on his lathe,
turned them round. “Ah, now you will roll well,” said he. “ Holloa !
now we will go at it merrily.” So he played with them and lost some of
his money, but as it struck twelve everything disappeared. hen he lay
down and went to sleep quictly. On the morrow the King came for
news, and asked him how he had fared this time. “I have been playing
ninepins,” he replied, “and lost a couple of dollars.” “ Have you not
thivered?” “No! Ihave enjoyed myself very much ; but I wish some
one would teach me that!”

On the third night he sat down again on his bench, saying in great
vexation, “Oh, if I could only shiver!” When it grew late, six tall men
came in bearing a coffin between them. “ Ah, ah,” said he, “that is
surely my little cousin, who died two days ago ;” and beckoning with his
finger he called, “Come, little cousin, come 1” The men set down the
coffin upon the ground, and he went up and took off the lid, and there
lay a dead man within, and as he felt the face it was as cold as ice.
«Stop a moment,” he cried ; “I will warm it ina trice ;” and stepping
up to the fire he warmed his hands, and then laid them upon the face,
but it remained cold. So he took up the body, and sitting down by the
fire, he laid it on his lap and rubbed the arms that the blood might
circulate again.. But all this was of no avail, and he thought to him-
self if two lie in a bed together they warm each other; so he put the
body in the bed, and covering it up laid himself down by its side. After
a little while the body became warm and began to move about. “See,
my cousin,” he exclaimed, “have I not warmed you?” But the body
got up and exclaimed, “Now I will strangle you.” “Is that your
gratitude?” cried the youth. “Then you shall get into your coffin
again ;” and taking it up, he threw the body in, and made the lid
fast. Then the six men came in again and bore it away. “Oh, deary
me,” said he, “I snall never be able to shiver if I. stop here all my life-
time!” At these words in came a man who was taller than all the
others, and looked more horrible; but he was very old and had a long



“OH, IF I COULD BUT SHIVER!” 17

white beard. “Oh, you wretch,” he exclaimed, “now thou shalt learn
what shiverirg means, for thou shalt die!”

“Not so quick,” answered the youth; “if I die I must be brought
to it first.”

“T will quickly seize you,” replied the ugly one.

“Softly, softly; be not too sure. I am as strong as you, and
perhaps stronger.”

“That we will see,” said the ugly man. “If you are stronger than I,
[ will let you go; come, let us try;” and he led him away through
a dark passage to a smith’s forge. Then taking up an axe he cut
through the anvil at one blow down to the ground. “I can do that
still better,” said the youth, and went to another anvil, while the old
man followed him and watched him with his long beard hanging down.
Then the youth took up an axe, and, splitting the anvil at one blow,
wedged the old man’s beard in it. “Now I have you; now death comes
upon you!” and, taking up an iron bar, he beat the old man until he
groaned, and begged him to stop, and he would give him great riches.
So the youth drew out the axe, and let him loose. Then the old man,
leading him back into the castle, showed him three chests full of gold in
acellar. ‘One share of this,” said he, “belongs to the poor, another to
the King, and a third to yourself.” And just then it struck twelve and
the old man vanished, leaving the youth in the dark. “I must help
myself out here,” said he, and groping round he found his way back to
his room and went to sleep by the fire.

The next morning the King came and inquired, “Now have you
learnt to shiver?” “No,” replied the youth ; “what is it? My dead
vousin came here, and a bearded man, who showed me a lot of gold
down below; but what shivering means, no one has showed me!”
Then the King said, “ You have won the castle, and shall marry my
daughter.”

“That is all very fine,” replied the youth, “but still I don’t know
what shivering means.”

So the gold was fetched, and the wedding was celebrated, but the
young Prince (for the youth was a Prince now), notwithstanding his
love for his bride, and his great contentment, was still continually
crying, “If I could but shiver! if I could but shiver!” At last it fell
out in this wise: one of the chambermaids said to the Princess, “ Let
me bring in my aid to teach him what shivering is.’ So she went to
the brook which fiowed through the garden, and drew up a pail of water
full of little fish ; and, at night, when the young Prince was asleep, his
bride drew away the covering and poured the pail of cold water and the
little fishes over him, so that they slipped all about him. Then the
Prince woke up directly, calling out, “Oh! that makes me shiver!
dear wife, that makes me shiver! Yes, now I know what shivering
means !”

a












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i > iim
Sal
= bere

THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE GOATS,

Once upon a time there lived an old Goat who had seven young ones
whom she loved as every mother loves her children. One day she
wanted to go into the forest to fetch some food, so, calling her seven
young ones together, she said, “ Dear children, I am going away into the
wood ; be on your guard against the Wolf, for if he come here, he will
eat you all up—skin, hair and all. He often disguises himself, but you
may know him by his rough voice and his black-feet.” The little Goats
replied, “Dear mother, we will pay great attention to what you say ;
you may go away without any anxiety.” So the old one bleated and ran
off, quite contented, upon her road.

Not long afterwards, somebody knocked at the hut-door, and called
out, “ Open, my dear children ; your mother is here and has brought you
each something.” But the little Goats perceived from the rough voice
that it was a Wolf, and so they said, “ We will not undo the door; you
are not our mother; she hasa gentle and loving voice ; but yours is
gruff; you are a Wolf.” So the Wolf went to a shop and bought a great
piece of chalk, which he ate, and by that means rendered his voice more
gentle. Then he came back, knocked at the hut-door, and called out,

Open, my dear children ; your mother has come home, and has brought
you each something.” But the Wolf bad placed his black paws upon the
window-sill, so the Goats saw them, and replied, “ No, we will not open
the door: our mother has not black feet; you are a Wolf” So the
Wolf went toa baker and said, “I have hurt my foot, put some dough
on it.” And when the baker had done so, he ran to the miller, saying,
“‘Strew some white flour upon my feet.” But the miller, thinking he
was going to deceive somebody, hesitated, till the Wolf said, “If you do
not do it at once, I will eat you.” This made the miller afraid, so ke
powdered his feet with flour, Such is mankind!



TIE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE GOATS. 19

Now, the villain went for the third time to the hut, and, knocking at
the door, called out, “Open to me, my cluldren ; your dear mother is
come, and has brought with her something for each of you out of the
forest.” The little Goats exclaimed, “Show us first your feet, that we
may see whether you are our mother.” So the Wolf put his feet up on
the window-sill, and when they saw that they were white, they thought
it was all right, and undid the door. But who should come in? The
Wolf. They were terribly frightened, and tried to hide themselves. One
ran under the table, the second got into the bed, the third into the cup-
board, the fourth into the kitchen, the fifth into the oven, the sixth
into the wash-tub, and the scventh into the clock-case. But the Wolf
found them all out, and did not delay, but swallowed them all up
one after another ; only the youngest one, hid in the clock-case, he did
not discover. When the Wolf had satisfied his appetite, he dragged
himself out, and lying down upon the green meadow under a tree, went
fast asleep.

Soon after the old Goat came home out of the forest. Ah, what a
sight she saw! The hut-door stood wide open ; the table, stools, and
benches were overturned ; the wash-tub was broken to pieces, and the
sheets and pillows pulled off the bed. She sought her children, but
could find them nowhere. She called them by name, one after the
other; but no one answered, At last, when she came to the name of
the youngest, a little voice replied, “ Here I am, dear mother, in the
clock-case.’? She took her out, and heard how the Wolf had. come and
swallowed all the others. You cannot think how she wept for her poor
little ones.

At last she went out all in her misery, and the young Goat ran by
her side ; and when they came to the meadow, there lay the Wolf under
the tree, snoring so that the boughs quivered. She viewed him on all
sides, and perceived that something moved and stirred about in his body.
“ Ah, mercy!” thought she, “should my poor children, whom he has
swallowed for his dinner, be yet alive!” So saying, she ran home and
fetched a pair of scissors and a needle and thread. ‘Then she cut open
the monster’s hairy coat, and had scarcely made one slit, before one little
Goat put his head out, and, as she cut further, out jumped one after
another, all six, still alive, and without any injury; for the monster, in
his eagerness, had gulped them down quite whole. ‘There was a joy!
They hugged their dear mother, and jumped about like tailors keeping
their wedding day. But the old mother said, “Go and pick up at once
some large stones, that we may fill the monster's stomach, while he les
fast asleep.’ So the seven little Goats dragged up in great haste a pile
of stones and put them in the Wolf’s stomach, as many as they could
bring ; and then the old mother went, and, looking at him in a great
hurry, saw that he was still insensible, aud did not stir, and so she sewed
up the slit.

When the Wolf at last woke up, he raised himself upon his legs, and
because the stones which were lying in his stomach made him feel thirsty,
ne went to a brook in order to driak, But os he went along, rolling



20 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

from side to side, the stones began to tumble about in his body, and he
called out,—
“ What rattles, what rattles
Against my poor bones?
Not little goats, I think,
But only big stones !”

And when the Wolf came to the brook he stooped down to drink,
and the heavy stones made him lose his balance, so that he fell, and sank
beneath the water.

As soon as the seven little Goats saw this, they came running up,
singing aloud, “The Wolf is dead! the Wolf is dead!” and they danced
for joy around their mother by the side of the brook.



THE PACK OF RAGAMUFFINS.

A Cock once addressed his Hen thus, “It is now the time when the nuts
are ripe, let us go together to the hills, and eat all we can, before the
equirrels carry them away.” “Yes,” answered the Hen, “let us go and
enjoy ourselves.” So they went together to the hills, and as it was a
bright day they stopped till evening. Now I do not know whether they
had eaten too much, or whether they had become proud, but the Hen
would not go home on foot, and the Cock had to build a little carriage
out of the nutshells. Ag soon as it was ready the Hen sat herself in it
and said to the Cock, “ You can harness yourself to it.” “You are very
kind,” said he, “but I would rather walk home than harness my own
gelf ;—no! we did not agree to that. I will willingly be coachman and
sit on the box ; but drag it myself I never will.”

While they were quarrelling a Duck called out hard by, “ You



THE PACK OF RAGAMUFFINS. Dit

thieving folk, who asked you to come to my nut-hill? wait a kit and it
shall cost you dearly ;” and she rushed up to the Cock with oatstretched
beak. But the Cock was not idle either, and attacked the Duck valiantly,
and at last wounded her so badly with his spur that she begged for mercy,
and willingly undertook to draw the carriage as a punishment. The
Cock set himself on the box as coachman, and off they started at a great
rate, crying out, “Quick, Duck! quick!” When they had gone a por-
tion of the way they met two walkers, a Pin and a Needle, who called
out to them to stop, and said it had become too dark to stitch, and
they could not go another step; that it was very dirty upon the road,
and might they get in fora little way. They had been stopping at the
door of the tailor’s house drinking beer and had been delayed. The
Cock, seeing they were thin people, who would not take much room, let
them both get up, but not till they had promised not to tread on the toes
of himself or his Hen. Later in the evening they came to an inn, and
because they could not travel further that evening, and because the Duck
had hurt her foot very much, and staggered from side to side, they turned
in. 'The landlord at first made many objections, saying his house was
already full ; he thought, too, that they were nobody of any consequence ;
but at last, after they had made many fine speeches, and promised that
he should have the egg which the Hen had laid on the road, and the one
which the Duck laid every day, he said at last that they might remain
over night. So when they had refreshed themselves they held a great
revel ana tumult ; but early in the morning, when everybody was asleep,
and it was still dark, the Cock awoke the Hen, and fetching the egg they
broke it, and ate it together, throwing the shell away into the hearth.
Then they went to the Needle, who was still asleep, and, taking him by
the head, stuck him in the cushion of the landlord’s chair, and the Pin
they put in his towel, and then they flew off over the fields andaway. The
Duck, who had gone to sleep in the open air, and had stopped in the yard,
heard them fly past, and, getting up quickly, found a pond, into which
she waddled, and in which she swam much faster than she walked when
she had to pull the carriage. A couple of hours Jater the landlord rose
up from his feather-bed, washed himself, and took up the towel to wipe
himself dry ; then the Pin, in passing over his face, made a red scratch from
one ear to the other; so he went into the kitchen to light his pipe, but
just as he stepped on the hearth the eggshells sprang into his eyes. “This
morning everything happens unlucky to me,” said he, sitting down in
vexation in his grandfather’s chair; but he quickly jumped up again,
crying, “ Woe’s me!” for the Needle had pricked him very badly. This
drove him completely wild, and he laid the mischief on the guests, who
had arrived so late the evening before, and when he went out to look.
after them they were gone. So he swore that he would never again take
such a pack of ragamufins into his house, who destroyed so much, paid
no reckoning, and played mischievous tricks in the place of thanks.





FATTHEFUL JOUN.

ONcE ipon a time there lived an old King, who fell very sick, and
thought he was lying upon his death-bed ; so he said, “ Let faithful John
come to me.” This faithful John was his affectionate servant, and was so
called because he had been true to him all his lifetime. As soon as John
came to the bedside, the King said, “ My faithful John, I feel that my
end approaches, and I have no other care than about my son, who is still
£0 young that he cannot always guide himself aright. If you do not
promise to instruct him in everything he ought to know, and to be his
guardian, I cannot close my eyes in peace.” Then John answered, “1
will never leave him; I will always serve him truly, even if it cost me
my life.” So the old King was comforted, and said, “ Now I can die in
peace. After my death you must show him all the chambers, halls, and
vaults in the castle, and all the treasures which are in them; but the last
room in the long corridor you must not show him, for in it hangs the
portrait of the daughter of the King of the Golden Palace ; if he sees
her picture, he will conceive a great love for her, and will fall down in a
swoon, and on her account undergo great perils, therefore you must
keep him away.” ‘The faithful John pressed his master’s hand again in
token of assent, and scon after the King laid his head upon the pillow
and expired.

After the old King had been borne to his grave, the faithful John
related to the young King all that his father had said upon his deathbed,
and deciared, “All this I will certainly fulfil; I will be as true to you
as I was to him, if it cost me my life.” When the time of mourning was
passed, John said to the young King, “It is now time for you to see your
inheritance ; I will show you your paternal castle.” So he led the King
all over it, up stairs and down stairs, and showed him all the riches, and
all the splendid chambers ; only one room he did not open, containing
the perilous portrait, which was so placed that one saw it directly the
Acor was ovened, and, moreover, it was so beautifully painted, that one



FAITHFUL JOHN. 23

thought it breathed and moved ; nothing in all the world could be more
lifelike or more beautiful. The young King remarked, however, that the
faithful John always passed by one door, so he asked, “ Why do you not
open that one?” ‘There is something in it,” he replied, “ which will
frighten you.”

But the King said, “I have seen all the rest of the castle, and I will
know what is in there ;” and he went and tried to open the door by
force. The faithful John pulled him back, and said, “I promised your
father before he died that you should not see the contents of that room ,
it would bring great misfortunes both upon you and me.”

“ Oh, no,” replied the young King, “if I do not go in, it will be my
certain ruin; I should have no peace night nor day until I had seen it
with my own eyes. Now I will not stir from the place till you unlock
the door.”

Then the faithful John saw that it was of no use talking ; so, with a
heavy heart and many sighs, he picked the key out of the great bunch.
When he had opened the door, he went in first, and thought he would
cover up the picture, that the King should not sce it; but it was of no
use, for the King stepped upon tiptoes and looked over his shoulder; and
as soon as he saw the portrait of the maiden, which was so beautiful and
glittered with precious stones, he fell down on the ground insensible,
The faithful John lifted him up and carried him to his bed, and thought
with great concern, “ Mercy on us! the misfortune has happened ; what
will come of it?” and he gave the young King wine until he came to
himself. The first words he spoke were, “ Who does that beautiful pic-
ture represent?” “That is the daughter of the King of the Golden
Palace,” was the reply.

“ Then,” said the King, “my love for her is so great, that if all the
leaves on the trees had tongues, they should not gainsay it; my life
is set upon the search for her. You are my faithful John, you must
accompany me.”

The trusty servant deliberated for a long while how to set about this
business, for it was very difficult to get into the presence of the King’s
daughter. At last he bethought himself of a way, and said to the King,
“‘ Everything which she has around her is of gold,—chairs, tables, dishes,
howls, and all the household utensils. Among your treasures are five
tons of gold; let one of the goldsmiths of your kingdom manufacture
vessels and utensils of all kinds therefrom—all kinds of birds, and wild
and wonderful beasts, such as will pleaso her; then we will travel with
these, and try our luck.” Then the King summoned all his goldsmiths,
who worked day and night until many very beautiful things were ready.
When all had been placed on board a ship, the faithful John put on mer-
chant’s clothes, and the King likewise, so that they might travel quite
unknown. Then they sailed over the wide sea, and sailed away until
they came to the city where dwelt the daughter of the King of the
Golden Palace.

The faithful John told the King to remain in the ship, and wait for
him. “Perhaps,” said he, “I shall bring the King’s daughter with mg







24 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

therefore take care that all is in order, and set out the golden vessels and
adorn the whole ship.” Thereupon John placed in a napkin some of the
golden cups, stepped upon land, and went straight to the King’s palace.
When he came into the castle-yard, a beautiful maid stood by the brook,
who had two golden pails in her hand, drawing water; and when she had
filled them and had turned round, she saw a strange man, and asked who
he was. Then John answered, “I am a merchant,” and opening his
napkin, he showed her its contents. Then she exclaimed, “ Ob, what
beautiful yolden things!” and, setting the pails down, she looked at the
cups one after another, and said, “The King’s daughter must sce these ;
she is so pleased with anything made of gold that she will buy all these.”
And taking him by the hand, she led him in; for she was the lady’s
maid. When the King’s daughter saw the golden cups, she was much
pleased, and said, “They are so finely worked, that I will purchase them
all.” But the faithful John replied, “I am only the servant of a rich
merchant ; what I have here is nothing in comparison to those which my
master has in his ship, than which nothing more delicate or costly has
ever been worked in gold.” Then the King’s daughter wished to have
them all brought ; but he said, “It would take many days, and so great
is the quantity, that your palace has not halls enough in it to place them
around.” Then her curiosity and desire were still more excited, and at
last she said, “Take me to the ship; I will go myself and look at your
master’s treasure.”

The faithful John conducted her to the ship with great joy, and the
King, when he beheld her, saw that her beauty was still greater than the
picture had represented, and thought nothing else but that his heart
‘would jump out of his mouth. Presently she stepped on board, and the
King conducted her below ; but the faithful John remained on deck by
the steersman, and told him to unmoor the ship and put on all the sail
he could, that it might fly as a bird through the air. Meanwhile the
King showed the Princess all the golden treasures,—the dishes, cups,
bowls, the birds, the wild and wonderful beasts. Many hours passed
away while she looked at everything, and in her joy she did not remark
that the ship sailed on and on. As soon as she had looked at the last,
and thanked the merchant, she wished to depart. But when she came
on deck, she perceived that they were upon the high sea, far from the
shore, and were hastening on with all sail. ‘“ Ah,” she exclaimed in
affright, “I am betrayed ; I am carried off and taken away in the power
of a strange merchart. I would rather die!”

But the King, taking her by the hand, said, “I am not a merchant,
but a king, thine equal in birth. It is true that I have carried thee off ;
but that is because of my overwhelming love for thee. Dost thou know
that when I first saw the portrait of thy beauteous face, that I fell down
in a swoon before it?” When the King’s daughter heard these words,
she was reassured, and her heart was inclined towards him, so that she
willingly became his bride. While they thus went on their voyage on
the high sea, it happened that the faithful John, as he sat on the deck of
th ship, playing music, saw three crows in the air, who came flying



FAITHFUL JOHN. 95

towards them. He stopped playing, and listened to what they were
saying to each other, for he understood them perfectly. The first one
exclaimed, “ There he is, carrying home the daughter of the King of the
Golden Palace.” “But he is not home yet,” replied the second. “ But
he has her,” said the third; “she is sitting by him in the ship.” Then
the first began again, and exclaimed, “ What matters that? When they
go on shore, a fox-coloured horse will spring towards them, on which he
will mount; and as soon as he is on it, it will jump up with him into the
air, so that he will never again see his bride.” The second one asked,
“Tg there no escape?” “ Oh yes, if another mounts behind quickly, and
takes out the firearms which are in the holster, and with them shoots the
horse dead, then the young King will be saved. But who knows that?
And if any one does know it, and tells him, such a one will be turned to
stone from the toe to the knee.” Then the second spoke again, “I know
still more: if the horse should be killed, the young King will not then
retain his bride ; for when they come into the castle, a beautiful bridal
shirt will lie there upon a dish, and seem to be woven of gold and silver,
but it is nothing but sulphur and pitch; and if he puts it on, it will burn
him to his marrow and bones.” Then the third Crow asked, “Is there
no escape?” ‘Oh yes,” answered the second ; “if some one takes up the
shirt with his gloves on, and throws it into the fire, so that it is burnt,
the young King will be saved. But what does that signify? Whoever
knows it, and tells him, will be turned to stone from his knee to his
heart.” Then the third Crow spoke: “I know still more: even if the
bridal shirt be consumed, still the young King will not retain his bride.
For if, after the wedding, a dance is held, while the young Queen dances,
she will suddenly turn pale, and fall down as if dead; and if some one
does not raise her up, and take three drops of blood from her right
breast and throw them away, she will die. But whoever knows that, and
tells it, will have his whole body turned to stone, from the crown of his
head to the toes of his feet.”

After the Crows had thus talked with one another, they flew away,
and the trusty John, who had perfectly understood all they had said, was
from that time very quiet and sad ; for if he concealed from his master
what he had heard, misfortune would happen to him, and if he told him
all he must give up his own life. But at last he thought, “I will save
my master, even if I destroy myself.”

As soon as they came on shore, it happened just as the Crow had
foretold, and an immense fox-red horse sprang up. “Capital!” said the
King ; “this shall carry me to my castle,” and he tried to mount ; but
the faithful John came straight up, and swinging himself quickly on,
drew the firearms out of the holster and shot the horse dead. Then the
other servants of the King, who were not on good terms with the faithful
John, exclaimed, “How shameful to kill the beautiful creature, which
might have borne the King to the castle!” But the King replied, “Be
silent, and let him yo; he is my very faithful John—who knows the good
he may have done?” Now they went into the castle, and there stood a
dish in the hall, and the splendid bridal shirt lay in it, and seemed nothing



26 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

else than gold and silver. The young King went up to it and wished ta
take it up, but the faithful John pushed him away, and taking it up with
his gloves on, bore it quickly to the fire and let it burn. The other
servants thereupon began to murmur, saying, “See, now he is burning
the King’s bridal shirt!” But the young King replied, “Who knows
what good he has done? Let him alone—he is my faithful John.”

Soon after, the wedding was celebrated, and a grand ball was given,
and the bride began to dance. So the faithful John paid great attention,
and watched her countenance; all at once she grew pale, and fell as if dead
to the ground. Then he sprang up hastily, raised her up and bore her
to a chamber, where he laid her down, kneeled beside her, and drawing
the three drops of blood out of her right breast, threw them away. As
soon as she breathed again, she raised herself up; but the young King
had witnessed everything, and not knowing why the faithful John had
done this, was very angry, and called out, “Throw him into prison !”
The next morning the trusty John was brought up for trial, and led to
the gallows ; and as he stood upon them, and was about to be executed,
he said, “ Every one condemned to die may once before his death speak.
Shall I also have that privilege?” “Yes,” answered the King, “ it shall
be granted you.” Then the faithful John replied, “I have been unright-
eously judged, and have always been true to you ;” and he narrated the
conversation of the Crows which he heard at sea; and how, in order to
save his master, he was obliged to do all he had done. ‘Then the King
cried out, “Oh, my most trusty John, pardon, pardon ; lead him away!”
But the trusty John had fallen down at the last word and was turned
into stone.

At this event both the King and the Queen were in great grief, and
the King thought, “ Ah, how wickedly have I rewarded his great
fidelity!” and he had the stone statue raised up and placed in his
sleeping-chamber, near his bed; and as often as he looked at it, he
wept and said, “Ah, could I bring you back to life again, my faithful
Tohn !”

After some time had passed, the Queen bore twins, two little sons,
who were her great joy. Once when the Queen was in church, and the
two children at home playing by their father’s side, he looked up at the
stone statue full of sorrow, and exclaimed with a sigh, “Ah, could I
restore you to life, my faithful John!” At these words the statue began
to speak, saying, “ Yes, you can make me alive again, if you will bestow
on me that which is dearest to you.” The King replied, “ All that I
have in the world I will give up for you.” The statue spake again: “If
you, with your own hand, cut off the heads of both your children and
sprinkle me with their blood, I shall be brought to life again.” The King
was terrified when he heard that he must himself kill his two dear
children ; but he remembered his servant’s great fidelity, and how the
faithful John had died for him, and drawing his sword he cut off the
heads of both his children with his own hand. And as soon as he had
sprinkled the statue with blood, life came back to it, and the trusty
John stood again alive and well before him, and said, “ Your faith shall



A GOOD BARGAIN. 27

not go unrewarded ;” and taking the heals of the two children, he set
them on again, and anointed their wounds with their blood, and there-
apen they healed again in a moment, and the children sprang away and
played as if nothing had happened.

Now the King was full of happiness, and as soon as he saw the Queen
coming, he hid the faithful John and both the children in a great closet.
As soon as she came in he said to her, “ Have you prayed in the church?”
« Yes,” she answered ; “but I thought continually of the faithful John,
who kas come to such misfortune through us.” Then he replied, “ My
dear wife, we can restore his life again to him, but it will cost us both
our little sons, whom he must sacrifice.’ The Queen became pale and
was terrified at heart, but she said, “ We are guilty of his life on account
of his great fidelity.” Then he was very glad that she thought as he
did, and going up to the closet, he unlocked it, brought out the children
and the faithful John, saying, “ God be praised! he is saved, and we have
still our little sons :” and then he told her all that happened. Afterwards
they lived happily together to the end of their days.



A GOOD BARGAIN,

A COUNTRYMAN drove his cow to market, and sold it for seven dollara
On the way home he had to pass by a pond, where he heard from a
distance the Frogs croaking, “ Ack, ack, ack, ack!”* “Yes,” said he,
“they cry ¢x4 so even in their owner’s field; but it is seven which ]

* Mbt ix the German word for eight.



98 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD sTORInS.

hava got, not eight.” As he came up to the water he exclaimed,
“Stupid creatures that you are, do you not know botter? here are
seven dollars, and not eight!” But the Frogs still continued their “ Ack,
ack!” “Now, if you will not believe it I will count them out to you ;”
and, taking the money from his pocket, he counted out the seven dollars,
four-and-twenty groschen in each. The Frogs, however, paid no atten-
tion to his reckoning, and kept calling out, “ Ack, ack, ack!” “Ah!”
exclaimed the Countryman, quite angry, “if you know better than I,
count it yourself!” and, one by one, he threw the pieces of money inte
the water. He stopped and waited till they should be ready to bring
him his own again, but the Frogs were obstinate in their opinion, and
cried continually, “ Ack, ack, ack!” neither did they throw the money
back. So the man waited a long while, until evening approached and it
was time to go home ; then he began to abuse the Frogs, shouting out,
“You water-paddlers, you thick-heads, you blind-eyes! you have indeed
great mouths, and can make noise enough to stun one’s ears, but you
eannot count seven dollars! do you think Iam going to wait here till
you are ready?” And thereupon he went away, but the Frogs cried
still behind his back, “ Ack, ack, ack!” so that he reached home ina
very savage mood !

After a little time he again bargained for a cow, which he killed, and
then he made a calculation that, if he sold the flesh well, he should gain
as much as both the cows were worth, and should have the skin beside.
As he came to town with the flesh, a great troop of dogs was collected
before the gate, and in front was a large greyhound, who sprang around
the flesh, snapping and barking, “Was, was, was!”* As he did not
cease, the Countryman said to him, “I know well you say, ‘Was, was!
because you wish for some of the flesh, but I ought to receive something
as good if I should give it you.” The dog replied only, “ Was, was!”

“Will you not let your comrades there eat with you?” “Was, was !”
said the Dog.

“If you stick to that I will let you have it. I know you well, and
to whom you belong ; but this I tell you, in three days I must have my
money, or it will go ill with you. You can bring it to me.”

Thereupon he unloaded the flesh and turned homewards again, and
the dogs gathering around it, barked loudly, “ Was, was!” The Peasan t,
who heard them at a distance, said, “Mind, you may share it among you,
but the big one must answer for you to me.”

When three days were passed, the Countryman thought to himself,
“This evening I shall have my money in my pocket,” and so made
himself happy. But nobody came to pay the reckoning. “There is
no faith in any one,” said he at last, losing all patience, and he went
into the town to the butcher and demanded his money. The butcher
thought it was a joke, but the Countryman said, “Joking aside, I will
have my money; did not the great dog, three days ago, bring you
nome a whole slaughtered cow?” This put the butcher in a passion,

* That, that.



A GOOD BARGAIN. 2S

and, taking up a broomstick, he hunted the Countryman out of his
doors.

“ Wait a bit,” said the Countryman ; “justice Is to be had in the
world ;” and he went to the King’s palace and requested an audience.
So he was led before the King, who sat there with his daughter, and
asked, “ What misfortune has befallen you ?”

“ Ah,” said he, “frogs and the dogs have taken away my property,
and the butcher has repaid me with a stick ;” and he narrated at length
all that had happened. The King’s daughter laughed aloud at his tale,
and the King said to him, “I cannot give you justice here ; but,
nevertheless, you shall have my daughter for a wife: all her lifetime
she hag not laughed except before you, and I have promised her to
that man who should make her laugh. You may thank God for your
luck.”

“O dear!” replied the Countryman, “I do not wish it at all; I
have one wife at home, who is already too much for me.” This made
the King angry, and he said, “ You are an ill-bred fellow.”

“Ab, my lord the King,” answered the Countryman, “what can
you expect from an ox except beef?”

“Wait a bit,” replied the King, “you shall have another reward.
Now be off at once, and return in three days, and you shall receive five
hundred.”

As the Countryman came to the gate, the sentinel said to him,
“Since you have made the King’s daughter laugh, no doubt you have
received a great reward.” “ Yes, I think so,” answered the Peasant;
“five hundred are to be counted out for me.”

“Indeed!” said the soldier; “give me some of it; what will you
do with all that money ?”

“Since you ask me,” replied the Countryman, “you shall have two
hundred: apply to the King in three days, and they will be counted
out to you.” A Jew, who stood near, and heard their conversation,
ran after the Countryman, and catching him by his coat, cried out,
“O wonderful! what a child of fortune are you! I will change, I will
change with you in small coins! What will you do with the hard
dollars ?”

“You, Jew!” said the Countryman, “you can yet have the threa
hundred ; give me the same amount in small coins, and in three days
after to-day it shall be counted out to you by the King.’ The Jew
rejoiced at his profit, and brought the sum in worn-out farthings, three of
which were equal to two good ones.

After the lapse of three days, the Countryman went before the
King, according to his command. ‘he King called ont, * Pall off his
coat ; he shall have his five hundred!” “Oh!” replied the Country-
man, “they do not belong to me now: IT have presented two huudred
to the sentinel, and the Jew has changed with me for three hundred,
so taut rightly nothing at all belongs to me.”

Meanwhile the soldier and the Jew came in, desiring their shares
for which they had bargained with the Countryman, but, instead of



380 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

dollars, cach received his stripes justly measured out. The soldier bore
his patiently, having already known how they tasted; but the Jew
behaved very badly, crying out, “Ah, woe is me, these ave hard dollars!”
The King was forced to laugh at the Countryman, and, when all his
anger had passed away, he said to him, “Since you lost your reward
before you received it, I will give you compensation ; so go into my
treasure-chamber, and take as much money as you wish for.” The
Countryman did not stop to be told twice, but filled his deep pockets
as full as they would hold, and immediately after went to an inn. and
told out the money. The Jew sneaked after him, and overheard him
muttering to himself, “Now, that thief of a King has again deceived
me. Could he not have given me the money, and then I should have
known what I had got ; but now, how can I tell what I have by good
luck put into my pocket is just ?”

“Heaven preserve us!” said the Jew to himself, “he has spoken
disrespectfully of his Majesty ; I will run and inform against him, and
then £ shall get a reward, and he will be punished.” When the King
heard the speech of the Countryman his anger was excited, and he bade
the Jew go and fetch the offender. So the Jew, running back to the
Countryman, said to him, “You must go before his Majesty the King,
just as you are.”

“TI know ‘better what is becoming,” replied the Countryman; “T
must first have a new coat made. Do you think a man who has so much
money in his pocket ought to go in this old rag of a coat 1” The Jew,
perceiving that the Countryman would not stir without another coat,
and fearing, if the King’s anger should evaporate, he would not get his
reward nor the other the punishment, said to him, “Out of pure friend-
ship, I will lend you a beautiful coat for a short time. What will one
not do out of pure love?”

The Countryman, well pleased, took the coat from the Jew, aud
went off straight to the King, who charged him with the speech which
the Jew had informed about.

“Oh,” said the Countryman, “what a Jew says is nothing, for not
a true word comes out of his mouth; that rascal there is able to assert,
and does assert, that I have his coat on !”

“ What ig that?” screamed the Jew; “is not the coat mine? Have
I not lent it to you out of pure friendship, that you might step in it before
his Majesty the King?” As soon as the King heard this he said, “ The
Jew has deceived ono of us ;” and then he had counted out to him some
more of the hard dollars.

Meanwhile the Countryman went off home in the good coat, and
with the go d gold in his pocket, siaging to himself, “ This time I have
hit it 1”





THE WONDERFUL MUSICIAN.

Once upon a time a wonderful Fiddler was travelling through a woud,
thinking of all sorts of things as he went along, and presently he said
to himself, “I have plenty of time and space in this forest, so T will
fetch a good companion ;” and, taking the fiddle from his back, he
fiddled till the trees re-echoed. Presently a wolf came crashing through
the brushwood.

«“ Ah! a wolf comes, for whom I have no desire,” said the Fiddler ;
but the Wolf, approaching nearer, said, “ Oh, you dear Musician, how
beautifully you play! might I learn how ee

“Tt is soon learnt; you have only to do exactly as I tell you.”
Then the Wolf replied, “I will mind you just as a schoolboy does his
master.’ So the Musician told the Wolf to come with him ; and when
they had gone a little distance together they came to. an old oak-tree,
which was hollow within and split in the middle. “See here,” said the
Musician, “if you wish to learn how to fiddle, pnt your fure-foot in this
cleft.” The Wolf obeyed ; but the Fiddler, snatching up a stone, quickly
wedged both his feet so fast with one blow that the Wolf was stuck fast,
and obliged to remain where he was. “ Wait there till I come again,”
gaid the Fiddler, and went on his way.

‘After a whilo he said to himself a second time, “ T have plenty of
time and space in the forest, so I will fetch another companion ;” and
taking his fiddle, he played away in the wood. Presently a fox cams
sneaking through the trees.

“Ah!” gaid the Musician, “bere cones a fos, whom I did not
aesire.”

The Fox, running up, said, “Ah, you dear Mister Musician, how is :$
you fiddle so beautifully ? might I learn too?”

“Tt ig soon learnt,” answered he; “but you must do all I tell you.”
“J will obey you as a schoolboy does his master,” answered the Foa



32 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

and he followed the Musician. Aftcr they had walked a little distance
he came to a footpath, with high hedges on each side. The Musician
stopped, and pulling the bough of a hazel-tree down to the ground on
one side, he put his foot upon it, and then bent another down on the
other side, saying, “Come, little Fox, if you wish to learn something,
reach me here your left forefoot.” The Fox obeyed, and the Musician
bound the foot to the left bough. “Now reach me the other, little
fox,” said he, and he bound that to the right bough. And as soon as
he saw that the knots were fast he let go, and the boughs sprang back
into the air, carrying the Fox, shaking and quivering, up with them.
“Wait there till I come again,” said the Musician, and went on his
way.

After a little whilo he said again to himself, “Time and space are
not wanting to me in this forest ; I will fetch another companion ;” and,
taking his fiddle, he made the sound re-echo in the woods.

“ Aha !” said he, “a hare! I won’t have him.”

“Oh, you dear Musician!” said the Hare, “ how do you fiddle so
beautifully ? Could I learn it too?”

“Tt is soon learnt,” replied the Musician, “only do all I tell you.”
The little Hare replied, “ I will obey you as a schoolboy does his master ;”
and they went on together till they came to a clear space in the forest
where an aspen-tree stood. The Musician bound a long twine round the
neck of the Hare, and knotted the other end to a tree. “ Now, my lively
little hare, jump twenty times round the tree,” exclaimed the Musician.
The Hare obeyed; and as he jumped round the twentieth time the twine
had wound itself round the tree twenty times also, and made the Hare
prisoner ; and pull and tug as much as he would, the cord only cut the
deeper into his neck. “ Wait there till 1 come again,” said the Musician,
and went on further.

The Wolf, meanwhile, had been pulling, dragging, and biting at the
stone, and worked at it so long that at last he set his feet at liberty, and
drew them again out of the cleft. Then, full of rage and anger, he has-
tened after the Musician, intending to tear him into pieces. As the Fox
saw him running past he began to groan, and shouted with all his power,
“Brother Wolf, come and help me; the Musician has deceived me !”
So the Wolf, pulling the branches down, bit the knot to pieces, and freed
the Fox, who went on with him in order to take revenge on the Musician.
On their way they found the Hare tied, and setting him at liberty, ‘all
three set out in pursuit of their enemy.

The Musician, however, had once more played his fiddle, and this
time had been very lucky, for the notes came to the ears of a poor wood-
cutter, who left off his work directly, whether he wished or not, and with
his axe under his arm, ca:ne up to hear the music.

“At last the right companion has come,” said the Musician ; “ for
I desired a man, and not a wild beast.” And beginning to play, he
played so beautifully and delightfully, that the poor man was as if
enchanted, and his heart beat for joy. While he thus stood, the Wolf,
the Fox, and the Hare came up, and he observed directly that they had



THE TWELVE BROTHERS, 33

some bad design, so raising his bright axe he placed himself before the
Musician, as if he would say, “ Who wishes to attack must take care of
himself.” His looks made the animals afraid, and they ran back into the
forest ; but the Musician, after playing one more tune out of gratitude to
the woodcutter, went on his journey.



THE TWELVE BROTHERS.

Once upon a time there lived happily together a Queen and a King,
who had twelve children—all boys. One day the King said to his con-
sort, “If the thirteenth child, whom you are about to bring into the
world, should be a girl, then shall the twelve boys die, that her riches
may be great, and that the kingdom may fall to her alone.” He then
ordered twelve coffins to be made, which were filled with shavings, and in
each a pillow was placed, and, all of them having been locked up in a
room, he gave the key thereof to the Queen, and bade her tell nobody
about the matter.

But the mother sat crying the whole day long, so that her youngest.
child, who was always with her, and whom she had named Benjamin.
said to her, “ Mother dear, why are you so sorrowful?” “ My dearest
child,” she replied, “I dare not tell you!” But he let her have no
peace until she went and unlocked the room, and showed him the twelve
coftins filled with shavings. Then she said, “My dearest Benjamin
these coffins your father has had prepared for yourself and your eleven
brothers, for, if I bring a little girl into the world, you will all be killed
together and buried in them.” And as she wept while she spoke these
words, the’ son comforted her, saying, “Do not cry, aear mother; we
will help ourselves, and go away.” But she said, “ Go with your eleven
brothers into the wood, and let one of you climb into the hichest tree

D



84 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

which is to be found, and keep watch, looking towards the tower of tha
castle here. If I bear a little son, I will hang out a white flag, and you
may venture home again ; but if I bear a little daughter, I will hang out
a red flag ; and then flee away as quickly as you can, and God preserve
you! Every night I will arise and pray for you: in winter, that you
may have a fire to warm yourselves; and in summer, that you may not
be melted with the heat.”

Soon after she gave her blessing to all her sons, and they went away
into the forest. Each kept watch in turn, sitting upon the highest oak-
tree, and looking towards the tower. When eleven days had passed by,
and it came to Benjamin’s turn, he perceived a flag hung out; but it
was not the white but the red flag, which announced that they must all
die. As the brothers heard this, they became very angry, and said,
“Shall we suffer death on account of a maiden? Let us swear that
we will avenge ourselves; wherever we find a maiden, her blood shall
flow.”

Thereupon they went deeper into the forest, and in the middle, where
it was most gloomy, they found a little charmed cottage standing empty,
and they said, “ Here we will dwell, and you, Benjamin, as you are the
youngest and the weakest, shall stop here and keep house while we go
out to fetch meat.” So they set forth into the forest, and shot hares,
wild fawns, birds, and pigeons, and what else they could find. These
they brought home to Benjamin, who cooked and dressed them for their
different meals. In this little cottage they lived ten years together, and
the time passed very quickly.

The little daughter, whom their mother, the Queen, had borne, was
now grown up: she had a kind heart, was very beautiful, and always
wore a golden star upon her brow. Once, when there was a great wash,
she saw twelve boys’ shirts hanging up, and she asked her mother, “To
wom do these twelve shirts belong, for they are much too small for my
father?” Then she answered with a heavy heart, * My dear child, they
belong to your twelve brothers!” The maiden replied, “ Where are
my twelve brothers? I have never yet heard of them.” The Queen
answered, “God only knows where they are: they have wandered into
the wide world.” Then she took the maiden, and, unlocking the room,
showed her twelve coffins with the shavings and pillows. “ These
coffins,” said she, ‘were ordered for your brothers, but they went away
secretly before you were born ;” and she told her how everything had
happened. Then the maiden said, “Do not cry, dear mother, I will go
forth and seek my brothers ;” and, taking the twelve shirts, she sct out
at once straight into the great forest. All day long she walked on and
on, and in the evening she came to the charmed house, into which she
stepped. There she found a young lad, who asked her, ‘“‘ Whence dost
thou come, and whither gocst thou?” and. he stood astonished to sea
how beautiful she was, and at the queenly robes she wore, and the star
upen her brow. Then she answered, “I am a King’s daughter, and am
secking my twelve brothers, and will go as far as heayen is blue until
{ find them ;” and she showed him the twelve shirts that belonged te



THE TWELVE BROTHERS. 30)

them. Benjamin perceived at once that it was his sister, and he said,
“T am Benjamin, thy youngest brother.” At his words, she began to
weep for joy, and Benjamin wept also, and they kissed and embraced one
another with the greatest affection. Presently he said, “Dear sister, there
is one terrible condition: we have agreed together that every maiden
whom we meet shall die, because we were obliged to leave our kingdom
on account of a maiden.”

Then the maiden replied, “I will willingly die, if I can by that means
release my twelve brothers.”

“ No,” answered he, “thou shalt not die; hide thyself under this tub
until our eleven brothers come home, with whom I shall then be united.”
She did so ; and when night came the others returned from hunting, and
heir dinner was made ready, and as they sat at the table eating, they
asked, “ What is the news?” Benjamin said, “Do you not know?”

“No,” they answered. Then he spoke again: “You have been in the
forest, and I have stopped at home, yet I know more than you.”

“Tell us directly!” they exclaimed. He answered, “ First promisa
me that you will not kill the first maiden who shall meet us” “ Yes,
we promise!” they exclaimed, “she shall have pardon ; now tell us at
once.” Then he said, “ Our sister is here ;” and, lifting up the tub, the
King’s daughter came from beneath, looking most beautiful, delicate, and
gentle in her royal robes, and with the golden star upon her brow. The
sight gladdened them all; and, falling upon her neck, they kissed her,
and loved her with all their hearts.

Now she stopped at home with Benjamin, and helped him in his
work, while the eleven others went into the wood, and caught wild
animals, deer, birds, and pigeons, for their eating, which their sister and
brother took care to make ready. The sister sought for wood for the
fire, and for the vegetables, which she dressed, and put the pots on the
fire, so that their dinner was always ready when the eleven came home.
She also kept order in the cottage, and covered the beds with beautiful
white and clean sheets, and the brothers were always contented, and they
all lived in great unity.

One day, when the brother and sister had made ready a most excellent
meal, and the others had come in, they sat down and ate and drank, and
were full of happiness. But there was a little garden belonging to the
charmed house, in which stood twelve lilies (which one calls also African
marigolds), and the sister, thinking to give her twelve brothers a pleasure,
broke off the twelve flowers, intending to give each of them one. Bué
as she broke off each flower the twelve brothers wers changed, one by one,
into twelve Crows, and flew off into the forest, and at the same moment
the house and garden both disappeared.

Thus the poor maiden was left alone in the wild forest, and as shi
iovoked round an old woman stood near, who said, “ My child, what hast
thou dune? Why didst thou not leave the twelve white flowers? They
were thy brothers, who are now changed into crows!” Then the maiden
asked with tears, “Is there no means of saving them?” “There is but
one way in the whole world,” said the old woman, “but that is so difficult



86 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

that thou canst not free them. Thou must be dum for seven years,—
thou mayest not speak, nor laugh, and if thou speakest but a single
word, even if it wants but one hour of the seven years, all will be in
vain, and thy brothers will die at that single word.”

Then the maiden said in her heart, “I know for certain that I shall
free my brothers ;” and she went and found a tall tree, into the branches
of which she climbed and passed her time spinning, without ever speaking
or laughing.

Now it happened once that a King was hunting in the forest, who
Lad a large greyhound, which ran to the tree on which the maiden sat,
and, springing round, barked furiously. So the King came up and saw
the beautiful girl with the golden star upon her brow, and was so
enchanted with her beauty, that he asked her if she would become his
bride. To this she gave no answer, but slightly nodded with her head ;
ao the King, mounting the tree himself, brought her down, and placing
her upon his horse carried her home.

Then the wedding was celebrated with great pomp and joy, but the
bride neither spoke nor laughed.

After they had lived contentedly together two years, the King’s
mother, who was a wicked woman, began to slander the young Queen,
and said to her son, “This is a common beggar girl whom you have
brought home with you: who knows what impish tricks she practised at
home? If she be dumb and not able to speak, she might still laugh
once ; but they who do not laugh have a bad conscience.” The King
would not at first believe it, but the old woman persisted in it so long,
and accused the Queen of so many wicked things, that the King at last
let himself be persuaded, and she was condemned to die.

Now a great fire was kindled in the courtyard in which she was to be
burnt ; and the King standing above at the window, looked on with
tearful eyes, because he still loved her so much. And now she was
bound to the stake, and the fire began to lick her clothing with its red
tongues, and just at that time the last moment of the seven years expired.
Then a whirring was heard in the air, and twelve Crows came flying by,
and sank down to the earth, and as they alighted on the ground they
became her twelve brothers whom she had freed. They tore away the
fire from around her, and, extinguishing the flames, set their sister free,
and kissed and embraced her. And now, as she could open her mouth
and speak, she told the King why she was dumb, and why she never
laughed.

And the King was highly pleased when he heard she was innocers
and they all lived together in great happiness to the end of their lives





THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN THE WOOD.

Once upon a time there lived a man, whose wife had died; and a
woman, also, who had lost her husband: and this man and this woman
had each a daughter. These two maidens were friendly with each
other, and used to walk together, and one day they came by the widow’s
house. Then the widow said to the man’s daughter, “Do you hear,
tell your father I wish to marry him, and you shall every morning wash
in milk and drink wine, but my daughter shall wash in water and drink
water.” So the girl went home and told her father what the woman
had said, and he replied, “ What shall I do? marriage is a comfort, but
it is also a torment.” At last, as he could come to no conclusion, he
drew off his boot and said: ‘“ Take this boot, which has a hole in the
sole, and go with it out-of-doors and hang it on the great nail, and then
pour water into it. If it holds the water, I will again take a wife ; but
if it runs through, I will not have her.” The girl did as he bid her
but the water drew the hole together and the boot became full to over-
flowing. So she told her father how it had happened, and he, getting
up, saw it was quite true; and going to the widow he settled the matter,
and the wedding was celebrated.

The next morning, when the two girls arose, milk to wash in and
wine to drink were set for the man’s daughter, but only water, both for
washing and drinking, for the woman’s daughter. The second morning,
water for washing and drinking stood before both the man’s daughter
and the woman’s; and on the third morniug, water to wash in and
water to drink were set before the man’s daughter, and milk to
wash in and wine to drink before the woman’s daughter, and so it
continued.

Scon the woman conceived a deadly hatred for her step-daughter
and knew not how to behave badly enough to her, from day to day,
She was envious too, because her step-daughter was beautiful and loxely,
and her own daughter was ugly and hateful.



38 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

Once, in the winter time, when the river was frozen as hard as 8
atone, and hill and valley were covered with snow, the woman made a
cloak of paper, and called the maiden to her and said, “Put on this
cloak, and go away into the wood to fetch me a little basketful of straw-
berries, for I have a wish for some.”

“Mercy on us!” said the maiden, “in winter there are no straw-
berries growing ; the ground is frozen, and the snow, too, has covered
everything. And why must I go in that paper cloak? It is so cold
out-of-doors that it freezes one’s breath even, and if the wind docs
not blow off this cloak, the thorns will tear it from my body.”

“Will you dare to contradict me?” said the stepmother. ‘ Make
haste off, and let me not see you again until you have found me a basket
of strawberries.” Then she gave her a small piece of dry bread, saying,
“On that you must subsist the whole day.” But she thought—out-of-
doors she will be frozen and starved, so that my eyes will never see her
again !

So the girl did as she was told, and put on the paper cloak, and
went away with the basket. Far and near there was nothing but snow,
and not a green blade was to be seen. When she came to the forest she
discovered a little cottage, out of which three little Dwarfs were peeping.
The girl wished them good morning, and knocked gently at the door.
They called her in, and entering the room, she sat down on a bench by
the fire to warm herself, and eat her breakfast. The Dwarfs called out,
“Give us some of it!” “ Willingly,” she replied, and, dividing her
bread in two, she gave them half. They asked, ‘What do you here in
the forest, in the winter time, in this thin cloak ?”

«“ Ah!” she answered, “I must seek a basketful of strawberries, and
I dare not return home until I can take them with me.” When she had .
eaten her bread, they gave her a broom, saying, “Sweep away the snow
with this from the back door.” But when she was gone out-of-doors the
threo Dwarfs said one to another, “ What shall we give her, because she
is so gentle and good, and has shared her bread with us?” Then said
the first, “I grant to her that she shall become more beautiful every
day.” The second said, “I grant that a piece of gold shall fall out of
her mouth for every word she speaks.” The third said, “I grant that a
King shall come and make her his bride.”

Meanwhile, the girl had done as the Dwarfs had bidden her, and
had swept away the snow from behind the house. And what do you
think she found there? Actually, ripe strawberries ! which came quite
red and sweet up under the snow. So filling her basket in great glee,
she thanked the little men and gave them each her hand, and then ran
home to take her stepmother what she wished for. As she went in and
said, “ Good evening,” a piece of gold fell from her mouth. There-
upon she related what had happened to her in the forest ; but at
every word she spoke a piece of gold fell, so that the whole floor was
covered.

“Just see her arrogance,” said the step-sister, “to throw away
money in that way!’ bat in her heart she was jealous, and wished to



THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN THE WOOD. 39

go into the forest tov, to seek strawberries. Her mother said, “No, my
dear daughter ; 1t is too cold, you will be frozen !” but as her girl let her
have no peace, she at last consented, and made her a beautiful fur cloak
to put on; she also gave her buttered bread and cooked meat to eat on
her way.

The girl went into the forest and came straight to the little cottage.
The three Dwarfs were peeping out again, but she did not greet them ;
and, stumbling on without looking at them or speaking, she entered the
room, and, seating herself by the fire, began to eat the bread and butter
and meat. “Give us some of that,” exclaimed the Dwarfs; but she
answered, “I have not got enough for myself, so how can I give any
away?” When she had finished they said, “ You have a broom there, go
and sweep the back door clean.” “Oh, sweep it yourself,” she replied ;
“Tam not your servant.” When she saw that they would not give her
anything she went out at the decor, and the three Dwarfs said to each
other, “What shall we give her? she is so ill-behaved, and has such a
bad and envious disposition, that nobody can wish well to her.” The
first said, “I grant that she becomes more ugly every day.” The second
said, “I grant that at every word she speaks a tvad shall spring out of
her mouth.” The third said, “I grant that she shall die a miserable
death.” Meanwhile the girl had been looking for strawberries out-of:
doors, but as she could find none she went home very peevish. When
she opened her mouth to tell her mother what had happened to her in
the forest, a toad jumped out of her mouth at each word, so that every
one fled away from her in horror

The stepmother was now still more vexed, and was always thinking
how she could do the most harm to her husband’s daughter, who every
day became more beautiful. At last she took a kettle, set it on the fire,
and boiled a net therein. When it was sodden she hung it on the
shoulder of the poor girl, and gave her an axe, that she might go upon
the frozen pond and cut a hole in the ice to drag the net. She obeyed,
and went away and cut an ice-hole ; and while she was cutting, an elegant
carriage came by, in which the King sat. The carriage stopped, and the
King asked, “My child, who are you? and what do you here?” “Iam
RB poor girl, and am dragging a net,” said she. Then the King pitied her,
and saw how beautiful she was, and said, “Will you go with me?”
“Yes, indeed, with all my heart,” she replied, for she was glad to get out
of the sight of her mother and sister.

So she was handed into the carriage, and driven away with the King;
and as soon as they arrived at his castle the wedding was celebrated with
great splendour, as the Dwarfs had granted to the maiden, After a year
the young Queen bore a son; and when the stepmother heard of her
great good fortune, she came to the castle with her daughter, and behaved
as if she had come on a visit. But one day, when the King had gone
out, and no one was present, this bad woman seized the Queen by the
head, and her daughter caught hold of her feet, and raising her out of
ved, they threw her out of the window into the river which ran past.
Then, laying her ugly daughter in the bed, the old woman covered her



40 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

up, even over her head; and when the King came back he wished to
speak to his wife, but the old woman exclaimed, “Softly! softly! do not
go near her ; she is lying in a beautiful sleep, and must be kept quiet
to-day.” The King, not thinking of any evil design, came again the
next morning the first thing; and when he spoke to his wife, and she
answered, a toad sprang out of her mouth at every word, as a piece of
gold had done before. So he asked what had happened, and the old
woman said, “That is produced by her weakness, she will soon lose it
ngain.”

But in the night the kitchen-boy saw a Duck swimming through the
brook, and the Duck asked,

“King, King, what are you doing?
Are you sleeping, or are you waking f”

And as he gave no answer the Duck said,
“ What are my guests a-doing ?”

Then the boy answered,

“They all sleep sound.”
And she asked him,

“ How fares my child?”
And he replied,

“Tn his cradle he sleeps.”

Then she came up in the form of the Queen to the cradle, and gave
the child drink, shook up his bed, and covered him up, and then swam
again away as a duck through the brook. The second night she came
again ; and on the third she said to the kitchen-boy, “Go and tell the
King to take his sword, and swing it thrice over me, on the threshold.”
Then the boy ran and told the King, who came with his sword, and
swung it thrice over the Duck; and at the third time his bride stood
before him, bright, living, and healthful, as she had been before.

Now the King was in great happiness, but he hid the Queen in a
chamber until the Sunday when the child was to be christened ; and
when all was finished he asked, “What ought to be done to one who
takes another out of a bed and throws her into the river?” “ Nothing
could be more proper,” said the old woman, “than to put such an one
into a cask, stuck round with nails, and to roll it down the hill into the
water.” Then the King said, “You have spoken your own sentence ;”
and ordering a cask to be fetched, he caused the old woman and her
daughter to be put into it, and the bottom being nailed up, the cask was
rolled down the hill until it fell into the water.





TL

oS
N
N)

Te







THE LITTLE BROTHER AND SISTER.

TAERN was once a little Brother who took his Sister by the hand, and
said, “Since our own dear mother’s death we have not had one happy
hour; our stepmother beats us every day, and, if we come near her,
kicks us away with her foot. Our food is the hard crusts of bread
which are left, and even the dog under the table fares better than we,
for he often gets a nice morsel. Come, let us wander forth into the wide
world.” So the whole day long they travelled over meadows, fields, and
stony roads, and when it rained the Sister said, “It is heaven crying in
sympathy.” By evening they came into a large forest, and were so
wearied with grief, hunger, and their long walk, that they laid themselves
down in a hollow tree, and went to sleep. When they awoke the next
morning, the stn had already risen high in the heavens, and its beams
made the tree so hot, that the little boy said to his Sister, “I am so
thirsty, if I knew where there was a brook I would go and drink. Ab!
I think I hear one running ;” and so saying, he got up, and taking nis
Sister’s hand, they went in search of the brook.
The wicked stepmother, however, was a witch, and had witnessed the
departure of the two children ; so, sneaking after them secretly, as is the
habit of witches, she had enchanted all the springs in the forest.
Presently they found a brook which ran trippingly over the pebbles,
and the Brother would have drunk out of it, but the Sister heard how it
said as it ran along, “ Who drinks of me will become a tiger!” So the
Sister exclaimed, “I pray you, Brother, drink not, or you will become a
tiger, and tear me to pieces!” So the Brother did not drink, although
his thirst was so great, and he said, “I will wait till the next brook.”
As they came to the second, the Sister heard it say, “ Who drinks of me
becomes a wolf!” The Sister ran up crying, “Brother, do not, pray do
not, drink, or you will become a wolf and eat me up!” Then the Brother
did not drink, saying,“I will wait until we come to the next spring, but
then I must drink, you may say what you will; my thirst is much too



42, GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

great.” Just as they reached the third brook, the Sister heard the voica
saying, “ Who drinks of me will become a fawn,—who drinks of me will
become a fawn!” So the Sister said, “O, my Brother! do not drink, or
you will be changed to a fawn, and run away from me!” But he had
already kneeled down, and drunk of the water, and, as the first drops
passed his lips, his shape became that of a fawn.

At first the sister cried over her little changed Brother, and he wept
too, and knelt by her very sorrowful; but at last the maiden said, “ Bo
still, dear little Fawn, and I will never forsake you ;” and, undoing her
golden garter, she put it round his neck, and weaving rushes made a
white girdle to lead him with. This she tied to him, and, taking the
other end in her hand, she led him away, and they travelled deeper and
deeper into the forest. After they had walked a Jong distance they came
to a little hut, and the Maiden, peeping in, found it empty, and thought,
“Here we can stay and dwell.” Then she looked for leaves and moss to
make a soft couch for the Fawn, and every morning she went out and
collected roots and berries and nuts for herself, and tender grass for the
Fawn, which he ate out of her hand, and played happily around her.
In the evening, when the Sister was tired, and had said her prayers, she
laid her head upon the back of the Fawn, which served for a pillow, on
which she slept soundly. Had but the Brother regained his own proper
form, their life would have been happy indeed.

Thus they dwelt in this wilderness, and some time had elapsed, when
it happened that the King of the country held a great hunt in the forest ;
and now resounded through the trees the blowing of horns, the barking
of dogs, and the lusty cries of the hunters, so that the little Fawn heard
them, and wanted very much to join. “Ah!” said he to his Sister, “let
me go to the hunt, I cannot restrain myself any longer ;” and he begged
so hard that at last she consented. ‘ But,” said she to him, “return
again in the evening, for I shall shut my door against the wild huntsmen,
and, that I may know you, do you knock, and say, ‘Sister, let me in,’
and if you do not speak I shall not open the door.” As soon as she had
said this, the little Fawn sprang off, quite glad and merry in the fresh
breeze. The King and his huntsmen perceived the beautiful animal, and
pursued him; but they could not catch him, and when they thought
they had him for certain, he sprang away over the bushes, and got out of
sight. Just as it was getting dark, he ran up to the hut, and, knocking,
said, “Sister mine, let me in.” Then she undid the little door, and he
went in, and rested all night long upon his soft couch. The next morning
the hunt was commenced again, and as soon as the little Fawn heard the
horns and the tally-ho of the sportsmen he could not rest, and said,
“Sister dear, open the door, I must be off.” The Sister opened it,
saying, “ Return at evening, mind, and say the words as before.” When
the King and his huntsmen saw again the Fawn with the golden neck-
lace, they followed him close, but he was too nimble and quick for them.
The whole day long they kept up with him, but towards evening the
huntsmen made a circle round him, and one wounded him slightly in the
foot behind, so that he could only run slowly, Then one of them slipped



THE LITTLE BROTHER AND SISTER. 43

after him to the little hut, and heard him say, “Sister dear, open the
door,” and saw that the door was opened and immediately shut behind.
The huntsman, having observed all this, went and told the King what
he had seen and heard, and he said, “On the morrow I will once more
pursue him.”

The Sister, however, was terribly frightened when she saw that her
Fawn was wounded, and, washing off the blood, she put herbs upon the
foot, and said, “ Go and rest upon your bed, dear Fawn, that the wound
may heal.” It was so slight, that the next morning he felt nothing of it,
and when he heard the hunting cries outside, he exclaimed, “I cannot
stop away—I must be there, and none shall catch me so easily again!”
The Sister wept very much, and told him, “ Soon they will kill you, and I
shall be here all alone in this forest, forsaken by all the world: I cannot
let you go.”

“T shall die here in vexation,” answered the Fawn, “if you do not:
for when I hear the horn, I think I shall jump out of my skin.” The
Sister, finding she could not prevent him, opened the door with a heavy
heart, and the Fawn jumped out, quite delighted, into the forest. As
soon as the King perceived him, he said to his huntsmen, “ Follow him
all day long till the evening, but let no one do him an injury.” When
the sun had set, the King asked his huntsmen to show him the hut ; and
as they came to it, he knocked at the door, and said, “ Let me in, dear
Sister.” Then the door was opened, and, stepping in, the King saw a
maiden more beautiful than he had ever before seen. She was frightened
when she saw not her Fawn, but a man step in, who had a golden crown
‘apon his head. But the King, looking at her with a friendly glance,
reached her his hand, saying, “ Will you go with me to my castle, and be
my dear wife?” “Oh, yes,” replied the maiden; “but the Fawn must
go too: him I will never forsake.” The King replied, “ He shall remain
with you as long as you live, and shall want for nothing.” In the mean-
time the Fawn had come in, and the Sister, binding the girdle to him,
again took it in her hand, and led him away with her out of the hut.

The King took the beautiful maiden upon his horse, and rode to his
castle, where the wedding was celebrated with great splendour, and she
became Queen, and they lived together a long time; while the Fawn was
taken care of and lived well, playing about the castle-garden. The wicked
stepmother, however, on whose account the children had wandered forth
into the world, supposed that long ago the Sister had been torn in pieces
by the wild beasts, and the little Brother hunted to death in his Fawn’s
shape by the hunters. As soon, therefore, as she heard how happy they
had become, and how everything prospered with them, envy and jealousy
were roused in her heart, and left her no peace; and she was always
thinking in what way she could work misfortune to them. Her own
daughter, who was as ugly as night, and had but one eye, for which she
was continually reproached, said, ‘The luck of being a Queen has never
yet happened to me.” “Be quiet now,” said the old woman, “and make
yourself contented : when the time comes, I shall be at hand.” As soon,
then, as the time came when the Queen brought into the world a beautiful



44 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

little boy, which happened when the King was out hunting, the old witch
took the form of a chambermaid, and got into the room where the Queen
was lying, and said to her, “The bath is ready, which will restore you,
and give you fresh strength; be quick, before it gets cold.” Her daughter
being at hand, they carried the weak Queen between them into the room,
and laid her in the bath, and then, shutting the door to, they ran off; but
first they had made up an immense fire in the stove, which must soon
suffocate the young Queen.

When this was done, the old woman took her daughter, and, putting a
cap on her, laid her in the bed in the Queen’s place. She gave her, too,
the form and appearance of the real Queen, as far as she could; but she
could not restore the lost eye, and, so that the King might not notice it,
she turned upon that side where there was no eye. When he came home
at evening, and heard that a son was born to him, he was much delighted,
and prepared to go to his wife’s bedside, to see how she did. So the old
woman called out in a great hurry, “For your life, do not undraw the
curtains ; the Queen must not yet see the light, and must be kept quiet.”
So the King went away, and dia not discover that a false Queen was laid
in the bed.

When midnight came, and every one was asleep, the nurse, who sat by
herself, wide awake, near the oradle, in the nursery, saw the door open
and the true Queen come in. She took the child in her arms, and rocked
it a while, and then, shaking up its pillow, laid it down in its cradle, and
covered it over again. She did not forget the Fawn either, but, going to
the corner where he was, stroked his back, and then went silently out at
the door. The nurse asked in the morning of the guards, if any one had
passed into the castle during the night; but they answered, “No, we
have seen nobody.” For many nights afterwards she came constantly,
and never spoke a word; and the nurse saw her always, but she would
not trust herself to speak about it to any one.

When some time had passed away, the Queen one night began to
speak, and said,—

“ How fares my child, how fares my fawn?
Twice more will I come, but never again.”

The nurse made no reply; but, when she bad disappeared, went to the
King, and told him all. The King exclaimed, “ Oh, heavens.! what doea
this mean ?—the next night I will watch myself by the child.” In the
evening he went into the nursery, and about midnight the Queen ap-
peared, and said,—
“ How fares my child, how fares my fawn?
Once more will I come, but never again.”
And she nursed the child, as she was used to do, and then disappearea.
The King dared not speak ; but he watched the following night, and this
time she said,—
* How fares my child, how fares my fawn ?
This time have I come, but never again.”
At these words, the King could hold back no longer, but sprang up and
said, “ You can be no cther than my dear wife!” Then she answered,



HANSEL AND GRETHEL. 45

‘Yes, I am your dear wife ;” and at that moment her life was restored
by God’s mercy, and she was again as beautiful and charming as ever.
She told the King the fraud which the witch and her daughter had prac-
tised upon him, and he had them both tried and sentence pronounced
against them. The daughter was taken into the forest, where the wild
beasts tore her in pieces, but the old witch was led to the fire and miserably
burnt. And as soon as she was reduced to ashes, the little Fawn was
anbewitched, and received again his human form; and the Brother and
Sister lived happily togethor to the end of their days.



HANSEL AND GRETHEL.

Oncu upon a time there dwelt near a large wood a poor woodeutter, with
his wife and two children by his former marriage, a little boy called
Hansel, and a girl named Grethel. He had little enough to break or
bite ; and once, when there was a great famine in the land, he could not
procure even his daily bread; and as he lay thinking in his bed one
evening, rolling abeut for trouble, he sighed, and said to his wife, “ What
will become ef us? How can we feed our children, when we have no
more than we can eat ourselves ?”

“ Know, then, my husband,” answered she, “ we will lead them away,
quite early in the morning, into the thickest part of the wood, and there
make them a fire, and give them each a little piece of bread ; then we
will go to our work, and leave them alone, so they will not find the way
home again, and we shall be freed from them.” “No, wife,” replied he,
“tbat I can never *9; how can you bring your heart to leave my children
all alone in the wood; for the wild beasts will soon come and tear them
to pieces #”



46 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

“ Oh, you simpleton !” said she, “then we must all four die of hunger;
you had better plane the coffins for us.” But she left him no pea. till he
consented, saying, “ Ah, but I shall regret the poor children.”

The two children, however, had not gone to sleep for very hunger,
and so they overheard what the stepmother said to their father. Grethel
wept bitterly, and said to Hansel, “ What will become of us?” “ Be
quiet, Grethel,” said he; “do not cry—I will soon help you.” And as
soon as their parents had fallen asleep, he got up, put on his coat, and,
unbarring the back door, slipped out. The moon shone brightly, and the
white pebbles which lay before the door seemed like silver pieces, they
glittered so brightly. Hansel stooped down, and put as many into his
pocket as it would hold; and then going back, he said to Grethel, “ Be
comforted, dear sister, and sleep in peace ; God will not forsake us.” And
80 saying, he went to bed again.”

The next morning, before the sun arose, the wife went and awoke the
two children. “Get up, you lazy things ; we are going into the forest to
chop wood.” Then she gave them each a piece of bread, saying, “ There
is something for your dinner; do not eat it before the time, for you will
get nothing else.” Grethel took the bread in her apron, for Hansel’s
pocket was full of pebbles; and so they all set out upon their way,
When they had gone a little distance, Hansel stood still, and peeped back
at the house; and this he repeated several times, till his father said,
“ Hansel, what are you peeping at, and why do you lag behind? Take
care, and remember your legs.”

“ Ah, father,” said Hansel, “I am looking at my white cat sitting upon
the roof of the house, and trying to say good-bye.” “ You simpleton !”
said the wife, “that is not a cat; it is only the sun shining on the white
chimney.” But in reality Hansel was not looking at @ cat; but every
time he stopped, he dropped a pebble out of his pocket wpon the path.

When they came to the middie of the wood, the father told the children
to collect wood, and he would make them a fire, so that they should not
be cold. So Hansel and Grethel gathered together quite a little moun-
tain of twigs. Then they sat fire to them; and as the flame burnt up
high, the wife said, “ Now, you children, lie down near the fire, and rest
yourselves, whilst we go into the forest and chop wood; when we are
ready, I will come and call you.”

Hansel and Grethel sat down by the fire, and when it was noon, each
ate the piece of bread ; and because they could hear the blows of an axe,
they thought their father was near: but it was not an axe, but a branch
which he had bound to a withered tree, so as to be blown to and fre by
the wind. They waited so long, that at last their eyes closed from weari-
ness, and they fell fast asleep. When they awoke, it was quite dark, and
Grethel began to cry, “ How shall we get out of the wood?” But Hansel
tried to comfort her by saying, “ Wait a little while till the moon rises,
and then we will quickly find the way.” The moon soon shone forth, and
Hansel, taking his sister’s hand, followed the pebbles, which glittered like
new-coined silver pieces, and showed them the path. All night long
they walked on, and as day broke they came to their father’s house



HANSEL AND GRETHEL. 47

They knocked at the door, and when the wife opened it, and saw Hansel
‘and Grethel, she exclaimed, “ You wicked children! why did you sleep so
long in the wood? We thought you were never coming home again.’
But their father was very glad, for it had grieved his heart to leave them
all alone.

Not long afterwards there was again great scarcity in every corner
of the land; and one night the children overheard their mother saying
to‘their father, “Everything is again consumed; we have only half a
loaf left, and then the song is ended: the children must be sent away.
We will take them deeper into the wood, so that they may not find the
way out again ; it is the only means of escape for us.”

But her husband felt heavy at heart, and thought, “It were better
to share the last crust with the children.” His wife, however, would
listen to nothing that he said, and scolded and reproached him without
end.

He who says A must say B too; and he who consents the first time
must also the second.

The children, however, had heard the conversation as they lay
awake, and as soon as the old people went to sleep Hansel got up,
intending to pick up some pebbles as before; but the wife had locked
the door, so that he could not get out. Nevertheless he comforted
Grethel, saying, “Do not cry; sleep in quiet; the good God will not
forsake us.”

Early in the morning the stepmother came and pulled them cut of
bed, and gave them each a slice of bread, which was still smaller than the
former piece. On the way, Hansel broke his in his pocket, and, stooping
every now and then, dropped a crumb upon the path. ‘Hansel, why do
you stop and look about?” said the father, “keep in the path.” “Iam
looking at my little dove,” answered Hansel, “nodding a good-bye to
me.” “Simpleton!” said the wife, “that is no dove, but only the sun
shining on the chimney.” But Hansel kept still. dropping crumbs as he
went along.

The mother led the children deep into the wood, where they had
never been before, and there making an immense fire, she said to them,
“Sit down here and rest, and when you feel tired you can sleep for a
little while. We are going into the forest to hew wood, and in the
evening, when we are ready, we will come and fetch you.”

When noon came Grethel shared her bread with Hansel, who had
strewn his on the path. Then they went to sleep; but the evening
arrived and no one came to visit the poor children, and in the dark night
they awoke, and Hansel comforted his sister by saying, “Only wait,
Grethel, till the moon comes out, then we shall see the crumbs of bread
which I have dropped, and they will show us the way home.” The moon
shone and they got up, but they could not sce any crumbs, for the thou-
sands of birds which had been flying about in the woods and fields had
picked them all up. Hansel kept saying to Grethel, “ We will soon find
the way ;” but they did not, and they walked the whole night long and tha
next day. hut still they did not come out of the wood; and they got sv



48 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES,

hungry, for they had nothing to eat but the berries which they found
upon the bushes. Soon they got so tired that they could not drag them-
selves along, so they lay down under a tree and went to sleep.

It was now the third morning since they had left their father’s house,
and they still walked on; but they only got deeper and deeper into the
wood, and Hansel saw that if help did not come very soon they would
die of hunger. As soon as it was noon they saw a beautiful snow-white
bird sitting upon a bough, which sang so sweetly that they stood still
and listened to it. It soon left off, and spreading its wings flew off; and
they followed it until it arrived at a cottage, upon the roof of which it
perched ; and when they went close up to it they saw that the cottage
was made of bread and cakes, and the window-panes were of clear
sugar.

“We will go in there,” said Hansel, “and have a glorious feast. I will
eat a piece of the roof, and you can eat the window. Will they not be
sweet?” So Hansel reached up and broke a piece off the roof, in order
to see how it tasted ; while Grethel stepped up to the window and began
to bite it. Then a sweet voice called out in the room, “Tip-tap, tip-tap,
who raps at my door?” and the children answered, “The wind, the wind,
the child of heaven ;” and they went on eating without interruption.
Hansel thought the roof tasted very nice, aad so he tore off a great piece ;
while Grethel broke a large round pane out of the window, and sat down
quite contentedly. Just then the door opened, and a very old woman,
walking upon crutches, came out. Hansel and Grethel were so frightened
that they let fall what they had in their hands ; but the old woman, nod-
ding her head, said, “ Ah, you dear children, what has brought you here
Come in and stop with me, and no harm shall befall you ;” and so saying
she took them both by the hand, and led them into her cottage. A good
meal of milk and pancakes, with sugar, apples, and nuts, was spread on
the table, and in the back room were two nice little beds, covered with
white, where Hansel and Grethel laid themselves down, and thought them-
selves in heaven. ‘The old woman behaved very kindly to them, but in
reality she was a wicked witch who waylaid children, and built the bread-
house in order to entice them in; but as soon as they were in her power
she killed them, cooked and ate them, and made a great festival of the
day. Witches have red eyes, and cannot see very far ; but they have a
fine sense of smelling, like wild beasts, so that they know when children
ypproach them. When Hansel and Grethei came near the witch’s house
she laughed wickedly, saying, “ Here come two who shall not escape me.”
And early in the morning, before they awoke, she went up to them, and
saw how lovingly they lay sleeping, with their chubby red cheeks; and
ghe mumbled to herself, “That will be a good bite.” ‘Then she took up
Hansel with her rough hand, and shut him up in a little cage with a
lattice-door; and although he screamed loudly it was of no use. Grethel
came next, and, shaking her till she awoke, she said, “Get up, you lazy
thing, and fetch some water to cook something good for your brother
who must remain in that stall and get fat; when he is fat enough I shall
pat him.’ Grethel began to cry, but it was all useless, for the old witch



HANSEL AND GRETHEL. 49

made her do as she wished. Soa nice meal was cooked for Hansel, but
Grethel got nothing else but a crab’s claw.

Every morning the old witch came to the cage and said, “ Hansel,
stretch out your finger that I may feel whether you are getting fat.”
But Hansel used to stretch out a bone, and the old woman, naving very
bad sight, thought it was his finger, and wondered very much that ha
did not get more fat. When four weeks had passed, and Hansel still kept
quite lean, she lost all her patience, and would not wait any longer.
“Grethel,” she called out in a passion, “get some water quickly; be
Hansel fat or lean, this morning I will kill and cook him.” Oh, how the
poor little sister grieved, as she was forced to fetch the water, and fast
the tears ran down her cheeks: “Dear good God, help us now!” she
exclaimed. “Had we only been eaten by the wild beasts in the wood,
then we should have died together.” But the old witch called out, “ Leave
off that noise; it will not help you a bit.”

So early in the morning Grethel was forced to go out and fill the
kettle, and make a fire. “ First, we will bake, however,” said the old
woman; “I have already heated the oven and kneaded the dough ;”
and so saying, she pushed poor Grethel up to the oven, out of which the
flames were burning fiercely. ‘Creep in,” said the witch, “and see if
it is hot enough, and then we will put in the bread; but she intended
when Grethel got in to shut up the oven and let her bake, so that she
might eat her as well as Hansel. Grethel perceived what her thoughts
were, and said, “I do not know how to do it; how shall I get in?”
“You stupid goose,” said she, “the opening is big enough. See, I could
even get in myself!” and she got up, and put her head into the oven.
Then Grethel gave her a push, so that she fell right in, and then shutting
the iron door she bolted it. Oh! how horribly she howled ; but Grethel
ran away, and left the ungodly witch to burn to ashes.

Now she ran to Hansel, and, opening his door, called out, “ Hansel, wa
are saved ; the old witch is dead!” So he sprang out, like a bird out of
his cage when the door is opened ; and they were so glad that they fell
upon each other’s neck, and kissed each other over and over again. And
now. as there was nothing to fear, they went into the witch’s house, where
in every corner were caskets full of pearls and precious stones. “ These
are vetter than pebbles,” said Hansel, putting as many into his pocket as
it would hold ; while Grethel thought, “1 will take some home too,”

ad filled her apron full. ‘We must be off now,” said Hansel, “and get
out of this enchanted forest ;”” but when they had walked for two hours
they came to a large piece of water. “We cannot get over,” said Hansel;
“TI can see no bridge at all.” “And there is no boat either,” said
Grethel, “but there swims a white duck, I will ask her to help us over ;~

and she sang,
Little Duck, good little Duck,
Grethel and Hansel, here we stand;
There is neither stile nor bridge,
Take us on your back to land.”

So the Duck came to them, and Hansel sat himself on, and bade his
&



50 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

sister sit behind him. “No,” answered Grethel, “that will be too much
for the Duck, she shall take us over one at a time.” This the good little
bird did, and when both were happily arrived on the other side, and had
gone a little way, they came to a well-known wood, which they knew the
better every step they went, and at last they perceived their father’s
louse. Then they began to run, and, bursting into the house, they fell
on their father’s neck. He had not had one happy hour since he had
left the children in the forest : and his wife was dead. Grethel shook
her apron, and the pearls and precious stones rolled out upon the floor,
and Hansel threw down one handful after the other out of his pocket.
Then all their sorrows were ended, and they lived together in great
happiness.

My tale is done. There runs a mouse; whoever catches her may
make a great, great cap out of her fur.





THE THREE SNAKE-LEAVES.

\'HERE was once a poor man who was unable to feed his only sun any
fonger; so the son said, “My dear father, everything goes badly with
you, and I am a burden to you ; I would rather go away and try to earn
my own bread.” So the father gave him his blessing, and took leave
of him with great grief. At that time the King of a powerful empire
was at war, and the youth taking service under him, went with him ta
the field. When he came in sight of the enemy, battle was given and
he was in great peril, and the arrows flew so fast that his comrades fell
around him on all sides. And when the captain was killed the rest



THE THREE SNAKE-LEAVES. 51

would have taken to flight ; but the youth, stepping forward, spoke tc
them courageously, exclaiming, “We will not let our fatherland he
ruined!” Then the others followed him, and pressed on so furiously,
that they routed the enemy. As soon as the King heard that he had to
thank the youth for the victory, he raised him above all the others, gave
-him great treasures, and made him first in his kingdom.

Now the King had a daughter who was very beautiful, but she was
also very whimsical. She had made a vow never to take a lord and
husband who would not promise, if she should die first, to let himself be
buried alive with her. “Does he love me with all his heart?” said she:
“what use to him, then, can his life be afterwards?” At the same
time she was prepared to do the same thing, and if her husband should
die first to descend with him to the grave. This vow had hitherto
frightened away all suitors, but the youth was so taken with her beauty
that he waited for nothing, but immediately asked her in marriage of her
father.

“Do you know,” said the King, “what you must promise?”

“JI must go with her into the grave,” he replied, “if I survive her ;
but my love is so great that I mind not the danger.” Then the King
consented, and the wedding was celebrated with great splendour.

For a long time they lived happily and contented with one another,
until it happened that the ycung Queen fell grievously sick, so that no
physician could cure her. When she died the young Prince remembered
his forced promise, and shuddered at the thought of: laying himself alive
in the grave; but there was no escape, for the King had set watchers at
all the doors, and it was not possible to avoid his fate. When the day
came that the body should be laid in the royal vault, he was led away
with it, and the door closed and locked behind him. Near the coffin
stood a table, having upon it four lights, four loaves of bread, and four
bottles of wine: as soon as this supply came to an end he must die ot
hunger. Full of bitterness and sorrow, he sat down, eating each day
but a little morsel of bread, and taking but one draught of wine: every
day he saw death approaching nearer and nearer. Whilst he thus sat
gazing before him he saw a snake creeping out of the corner of the vault,
which approached the dead body. Thinking that it came to feed on the
body, he drew his sword, and exclaiming, ‘So long as I live you shall
not touch her!” he cut it in three pieces. After a while another snake
crawled out of the corner ; but when it saw the other lying dead it went
back, and returned soon with three green leaves in its mouth. Then it
took the three pieces of the snake, and, laying them together so as to join,
it put one leaf on each wound. As soon as the divided parts were joined
the snake moved and was alive again, and both snakes hastened away
together. The leaves remained lying on the ground, and the unfortunate
man, who had seen all, bethought himself whether the miraculous power
of the leaves, which had restored a snake to life, might not help him.
So he picked up the leaves, and laid one on the mouth of the corpse of
his wife, and the other two on her eyes; and he had scarcely done so
when the blood circulated again in the veins, and mounting into the pale

*



52 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

countenance, flushed it with colour. Then she drew her breath, opened
her eyes, and said, “Ah, where am I?” “You are with me, dear wife,”
he replied, and told her how everything had happened, and how he had
brought her to life. Then he helped her to some wine and bread ; and,
when her strength had returned, she raised herself up, and they went to
the door, and knocked and shouted so loudly, that the watchers heard
them and told the King. The King came down himself and opened the
door, and there found them both alive and well, and he rejoiced with
them that their trouble had passed away. But ihe young Prince took
away the three snake-leaves, and gave them to his servant, saying,
“ Proserve them carefully for me, and carry them with you at all times.
Who knows in what necessity they may not help us?”

A change, however, had come over the wife after she was restored to
life, and it was as if all love for her husband had passed out of her heart.
And when, some little time after, he wished to make a voyage over the
sea to his old father, and they had gone on board the ship, she forgot the
great love and fidelity which he had shown, and through which he had
saved her life, and disclosed a wicked plan to the Captain. When the
young Prince lay asleep, she called up the Captain, and, taking the
sleeper by the head, while he carried the feet, they threw the Prince into
the sea. And as soon as the evil deed was done she said to the Captain,
“Now let us return hone, and say he died on the voyage. I will so
praise and commend you to my father that he shall give you to me in
marriage, and you shall sit as his heir.”

But the faithful servant, who had seen all unremarked, let loose a
little boat from the ship, and getting in it himself, rowed after his
master, and let the betrayers sail away. He fished the dead body up
again, and, by the help of the three snake-leaves, which he carried with
him, he brought it happily to life again. Then they both rowed away
with all their strength day and night, and their little boat glided on so
fast that they arrived before the others at the old King’s palace. He
marvelled to see them return alone, and asked what had happened.
When he heard of the wickedness of his daughter, he said, “I can
scarcely believe that she has done such evil ; but the truth will soon come
to light.” Then he bade them both go into a secret chamber, and keep
themselves private from everybody. Soon afterwards the great vessel
came sailing up, and the godless wife appeared before her father with a
sorrowful countenance. “Why are you returned alone?” he asked.
“Where is your husband?” “Alas! dear father,” she replied, “ I return
home with great grief, for my husband was suddenly taken ill during the
voyage and died ; and if the good Captain had not giving me his assis-
tance it would have gone terribly with me; he was present at my
busband’s death, and can tell you all about it.” The King said, “I will
pring the dead to life,” and opening the chamber, he bade the Prince and
his servant both to come forth. As soon as the wife perceived her
husband she was struck as if by lightning, and, falling on her knees, she
begged his pardon. But the King answered, “For you there is no
pardon. He was ready to dio with yon, and gave you life again ; but



RAPUNZEL. 53

you have conspired against nim in his sleep, and shall receive your due
reward.” Then she was put, with her companion in crime, on board a
ehip which was pierced with holes, and drawn out into the sca ; and they
goon sack beneath the waves.



RAPUNZEL.

OncE upon a time there lived a man and his wife, who much wivhed te
have a child, but for a long time in vain. These people had a littla
window in the back part of their house, out of which one could see into
a beautiful garden which was full of fine flowers and vegetables ; but it
was surrounded by a high wall, and no one dared to go in, because it be-
longed to a Witch, who possessed great power, and who was feared by
the whole world. One day the woman stood at this window looking into
the garden, and there she saw a bed which was filled with the most beau-
tiful radishes, and which seemed so fresh and green that she felt quite
glad, and a great desire seized her to eat of these radishes. This wish
tormented her daily, and as she knew that she could not have them she
fell ill, and looked very pale and miserable. This frightened her husband,
who asked her, “ What ails you, my dear wife?”

“ Ah!” she replied, “if I cannot get any of those radishes to eat out
of the garden behind the house I shall die!” The husband, loving her
very much, thought, “Rather than let my wife die, I must fetch her
some radishes, cost what they may.” So, in the gloom of the evening,
he climbed the wall of the Witch’s garden, and, snatching a handful of
radishes in great haste, brought them to his wife, who made herself a
ealad with them, which she relished extremely. However, they were so



54 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

nice and go well-flavoured, that the next day after she felt the same
desire for the third time, and could not get any rest, so that her husband
was obliged to promise her some more, So, in the evening, he made
himself ready, and began clambering up the wall ; but, oh! how terribly
frightened he was, for there he saw the old Witch standing before him.
“ How dare you,’—she began, looking at him with a frightful scowl,—
“how dare you climb over into my garden to take away my radishes like
a thief? Evil shall happen to you for this.”

“Ah!” replied he, “let pardon be granted before justice ; I have
only done this from a great necessity ; my wife saw your radishes frora
her window, and took such a fancy to them that she would have died if
she had not eaten of them.” Then the Witch ran after him in a passion,
saying, “If she behave as you say, I will let you take away all the radishes
you please, but I make one condition ; you must give me the child which
your wife will bring into the world. All shall go well with it, and I will
zare for it like a mother.” In his anxiety the man consented, and when
the child was born the Witch appeared at the same time, gave the child
the name “ Rapunzel,” and took it away with her.

Rapunzel grew to be the most beautiful child under the sun, and
when she was twelve years old the Witch shut her up in a tower, which
stood in a forest, and had neither stairs nor door, and only one little
window just at the top. When the Witch wished to enter, she stood
beneath, and called out,—

“Rapunzel! Rapunzel !
Let down your hair.”

For Rapunzel had long and beautiful hair, as fine as spun gold ; and as
goon as she heard the Witch’s voice she unbound her tresses, opened the
window, and then the hair fell down twenty ells, and the Witch mounted
up by it.

After a couple of years had passed away it happened that the King’s
son was riding through the wood, and came by the tower. There he
heard a song so beautiful that he stood still and listened. It was Rapunzel,
who, to pass the time of her loneliness away, was exercising her sweet
voice. The King’s son wished to ascend to her, and looked for a door in
the tower, but he could not find one. So he rode home, but the song
had touched his heart so much that he went every day to the forest and
listened to it; and as he thus stood one day behind a tree, he saw the
Witck. come up and heard her call out,—

“ Rapunzel! Rapunzel!
Let down your hair.”

‘Then Rapunzel let down her tresses, and the Witch mounted up. “ Is
that the ladder on which one must climb? Then I will try my luck
too,” said the Prince ; and the following day, as he felt quite lonely, he
went to the tower, and said,—

“Rapunzel! Rapunzel !
Let down your hair.”



RAPUNZEL. 55

Then the tresses fell down, and he climbed up. Rapunzel was much
frightened at first when a man came in, for she had never seen one be-
fore ; but the King’s son talked in a loving way to her, and told how his
heart had been so moved by her singing that he had no peace until he
had seen her himself. So Rapunzel lost her terror, and when he asked
her if she would have him for a husband, and she saw that he was young
and handsome, she thought, “ Any one may have me rather than the old
woman :” so, saying “ Yea,” she put her hand within his: “I will will-
ingly go with you, but I know not how I am to descend. When you
come, bring with you a skein of silk each time, out of which I will
weave a ladder, and when it is ready I will come down by it, and you
must take me upon your horse.” Then they agreed that they should
never meet till the evening, as the Witch came in the day time. The
old woman remarked nothing about it, until one day Rapunzel inno-
cently said, “ Tell me, mother, how it happens you find it more difficult
to come up to me than the young King’s son, who is with me in a
moment !” i

“Oh, you wicked child!” exclaimed the Witch ; “what do I hear?

*I thought I had separated you from all the world, and yet you have

deceived me.” And, seizing Rapunzel’s beautiful hair in a fury, she
gave her a couple of blows with her left hand, and, taking a pair of
scissors in her right, snip, snap, she cut off all her beautiful tresses, and
they fell upon the ground. Then she was so hard-hearted that she took
the poor maiden into a great desert, and left her to die in great misery
and grief.

But the same day when the old Witch had carried Rapunzel off, in
the evening she made the tresses fast above to the window-latch, and
when the King’s son came, and called out,—

“Rapunzel! Rapunzel !
Let down your hair.”

she let them down. The Prince mounted ; but when he got to the top
he found, not his dear Rapunzel, but the Witch, who looked at him with
furious and wicked eyes. “Aha!” she exclaimed, scornfully, “ you
would fetch your dear wife ; but the beautiful bird sits no longer in her
nest, singing ; the cat has taken her away, and will now scratch out
your eyes. ‘To you Rapunzel is lost ; you will never see her again.”

The Prince lost his senses with grief at these words, and sprang out
of the window of the tower in his bewilderment. His life he escaped
with, but the thorns into which he fell put out his eyes. So he wan-
dered blind, in the forest, eating nothing but roots and berries, and doing
nothing but weep and lament for the loss of his dear wife. He wandered
about thus, in great misery, for some few years, and at last arrived at
the desert where Rapunzel, with her twins, a boy and a girl which had
been born, lived in great sorrow. Hearing a voice which he thought he
knew he followed in its direction; and, as he approached, Rapunzel
zecognised him, and fell upon his neck and went. Twa hex teara



56 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

moistened his eyes, and they became clear again, so that he could gee as
well as formerly.

Then he led her away to his kingdom, where he was received with
great demonstrations of joy, and where they lived long, contented and
happy. i

What became of the old Witch no one ever knew.



THE WHITE SNAKE.

A tone while ago there lived a King whose wisdom was world-renowned.
Nothing remained unknown to him, and it seemed as if the tidings of
the most hidden things were borne to him through the air. But he had
one strange custom : every noontime, when the table was quite cleared,
and no one was present, his trusty servant had to bring him a dish, which
was covered up, and the servant himself did not know what lay in it,
and no man knew, for the King never uncovered it nor ate thereof until
he was quite alone. This went on for a long time, until one day such a
violent curiosity seized the servant, who as usual carried the dish, that
he could not resist the temptation, and took the dish into his chamber.
As soon as he had carefully locked the door, he raised the cover, ar?
there lay before him a White Snake. At the sight he could not restraix
the desire to taste it, so he cut a piece off and put it in his mouth. But
scarcely had his tongue touched it, when he heard before his window a
curious whispering of low voices. He went and listened, and found out
that it was the Sparrows who were conversing with one another, and re-
ating what each had seen in field or wood. The morsel of the Snake
aad given him the power to understand the speech of animals. Now it
happened just on this day that the Queen lost her finest ring, and suspi+



THE WHITE SNAKE. 57

elon fai om this faithful servant, who had the care of all her jewels, that
he had stolen it. The King ordered him to appear before him, and
threatened in angry words that he should be taken up and tried if he did
not know before the morrow whom to name as the guilty person. He
protested his innocence in vain, and was sent away without any mitiga-
tion of the sentence. In his anxiety and trouble he went away into the
courtyard, thinking how he might help himself. There, on a running
stream of water, the Ducks were congregated familiarly together, and
smoothing themselves down with their beaks while they held a confidential
conversation. The servant stood still and listened to them as they nar-
rated to each other whereabouts they had waddled, and what nice food
they had found ; and one said in a vexed tone, “ Something very hard is
in my stomach, for in my haste I swallowed a ring which lay under the
Queen’s window.” Then the servant caught the speaker up by her neck,
and carried her to the cook, saying, “ Just kill this fowl, it is finely fat.”
“ Yes,” said the cook, weighing it in her hand, “it has spared no trouble
in cramming itself ; it ought to have been roasted long ago.” So saying,
she chopped off its head, and, when she cut it open, in its stomach was
found the Queen’s ring. Now, the servant was able to prove easily his
innocence to the Queen, and, as she wished to repair her injustice, she
granted him her pardon, and promised him the greatest place of honour
which he wished for at court. The servant refused everything, and only
requested a horse and money, for he had a desire to see the world, and to
travel about it for a while. As soon as his request was granted, he set
off on his tour and came one day by a pond, in which he remarked three
fishes which were caught in the reeds, and lay gasping for water. Although
men say Fishes are dumb, yet he understood their complaint, that they
must soon die so miserably. Having a compassionate heart, he dismounted
and put the three prisoners again into the water. They splashed about
for joy, and putting their heads abore water said to him, “ We shall be
grateful, and repay you for saving us.” He rode onwards, and, after a
while, it happened that he heard, as it were, a voice in the sand at his
feet. He listened, and perceived that an Ant King was complaining thus:
“If these men could but keep away with their great fat beasts! Here
comes an awkward horse treading my people under foot unmercifully.”
So he rode on to a side path, and the Ant King called to him, “ We will
be grateful and reward you.” His way led him into a forest, and there
he saw a male and female Crow, standing by their nest, and dragging their
young out. “Off with you, you gallows birds!” they exclaimed, “we
can feed you no longer, you are big enough now to help yourselves.”
The poor young ones lay on the ground fluttering and beating their wings,
ard crying, “ We, helpless children, we must feed ourselves, we who can-
not fly yet! what is left to us but to die here of hunger?” Then the
Servant dismounted, and, killing his horse with his sword, left it for the
young Crows to feed upon. They soon hopped upon it, and when they
were satisfied they exclaimed, “ We will be grateful, and reward you iv
time of need!”

He was obliged now to use his own legs, and after he had gone a long



58 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

way he came to a large town, where in the streets there was a great
crowd and shouting, and a man upon horseback riding along, who pro-
claimed, “The Princess seeks a husband; but he who would win her
must perform a difficult task, and, if he should not luckily complete it,
his life will be forfeited.” Many had tried already, but in vain ; their
life had been forfeited. But the youth, when he had seen the Princess,
was so blinded by her beauty, that he furgot all danger, and stepping
before the King, offered himself as a suitor. Immediately he was con-
ducted to the sea, and a golden ring thrown in before his eyes. Then
the King bade him fetch this ring up again from the bottom of the sea,
adding, “If you rise without the ring, you shall be thrown in again and
again, until you perish in the waves.” Every one pitied the handsome
Youth, and then left him alone on the sea-shore. ‘There he stood con-
sidering what he should do, and presently he saw three Fishes at once
swimming towards him, and they were no others than the three whose
lives he had saved. The middle one bore a mussel-shell in its mouth,
which it laid on the shore at the feet of the Youth, who, taking it up
and opening it, found the gold ring within. Full of joy, he brought it
to the King, expecting that he should receive his promised reward,
But the proud Princess, when she saw that he was not her equal in
birth, was ashamed of him, and desired that he should undertake a second
task. She went into the garden, and strewed there ten bags of millet-
seed in the grass, “These he must pick up by the morning, before the
sun rise, and let him not venture to miss one grain.” The Youth sat
himself down in the garden, thinking how it was possible to perform this
task, but he could imagine no way, so he sat there sorrowfully awaiting
at the dawn of day to be conducted to death. But, as soon as the first
rays of the sun fell on the garden, he saw that the ten sacks were all
filled, and standing by him, while not a single grain remained in the
grass. The Ant King had come in the night with his thousands and
thousands of men, and the grateful insects had collected tho millet with
great industry, and put it into the sacks. The Princess herself came
into the garden, and saw with wonder that the Youth had performed
what was required of him. But still she could not bend her proud heart,
and she said, “ Although he may have done these two tasks, yet he shall
not be my husband until he has brought me an apple from the tree of
life.” The Youth did not know where the tree of life stood ; he got ug
indeed, and was willing to go so long as his legs bore him, but he had 1,
hope of finding it. After he had wandered through three kingdoms, ha
came by evening into a forest, and gitting down-under a tree, he wished
to sleep ; when he heard a rustling in the branches, and a golden apple
fell into hishand. At the same time three Ravens flew down, and settled
on his knee, saying, “ We are the three young ravens whom you saved
from dying of hunger ; when we were grown up, and heard that you
sought the golden apple, then we flew over the sea, even to the end of
the world where stands the tree of life, and we have fetched you the
apple.”

Full of joy, the Youth set out homewards, and presented the golden



THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 59

apple to the beautiful Princess, who now had no more excuses. So they
divided the apple of life, and ate it between them; then her heart was
filled with love towards him, and they lived to a great age in undisturbed
tranquillity.



THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.

THERE was once upon a time a fisherman and his wife, who lived together
in a little hut near the sea, and every day he went down to fish. There
he sat with his rod, and looked out upon the blank water ; and this he
did for many along day. One morning the line went to the bottom,
and when he drew it up a great Flounder was hooked at the end. The
Flounder said, “ Let me go, I pray you, fisherman ; I am not a real fish,
but an enchanted Prince. What good shall I do you if you pull me
up? Ishould not taste well; put me back into the water, and-let me
swim.”

“ Ah,” said the man, “ you need not make such a palaver, a fish which
can speak I would rather let swim ;” and so saying, he put the fish into
the water, and as it sank to the bottom it left a long streak of blood
behind it. Then the fisherman got up, and went back to his wife in
their hut.

“ Have you caught nothing to-day, husband?” said she. “Oh!” he
replied, “I caught a Flounder, who said he was an enchanted Prince ; so
I threw him again into the sea to swim.”

“Did you not wish first?” she inquired. “ No,” said he.

“ Ah,” said the wife, “that is very umacky ; is one to remain in this
hovel for ever? you might have wished for a better hut, at least. Go
again and call him; tell him we choose to have a better hut, and for
certain you'll get it.”



60 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

“Ah!” replied he, “how shall I manage that?” “ Why,” said hia
wife, “ you must catch him again, and before you let him swim away he
will grant what you ask: be quick.” The man was not much pleased,
and wished his wife further ; but, nevertheless, he went down to the sea.
When he: came to the water, it was green and yellow, and looked stil.
more blank ; he stood by it and said,—

“ Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Hither quickly come to me,
For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I dare not tell.”

Then the Fish came swimming up, and said, “What do you want
with me?” “Oh!” said the man, “I was to catch you again ; for my wife
says I ought to have wished before. She won’t stay any longer in her
hovel, and desires a cottage.”

“Go home again,” said the Flounder, “she has it already.” So the
fisherman departed, and there was his wife, no longer in the dirty hovel,
for in its place stood a clean cottage, before whose door she sat upon a
bench. She took him by the hand, saying, “ Come in now and see: is
not this much better?” So in they went, and in the cottage there was
a beautiful parlour, and a fine fireplace, and a chamber where a bed
stood ; there were also a kitchen and a store-room, with nice earthenware,
all of the best; tinware and copper vessels, and everything very clean
and neat. At the back was a large yard, with hens and chickens, as well
as a nice garden, full of fruit-trees and vegetables. “See,” said the wife,
“ig not this charming ?”

“Yes,” said her husband, “so long as 1¢ blooms you will be very well
content with it.”

“We will consider about that,” she replied, and they went to bed.

Thus eight to fourteen days passed on, when the wife said, ‘‘ Hus-
pand, the hut is far too narrow for me, and the yard and garden are so
small; the Flounder may very well give us a larger house. I wisn to
live in a large stone palace ; go, then, to the Flounder, and ask him to
give us a castle.”

“ Ah, wife!” said he, “the cottage is good enough ; why should you
choose to have a castle?”

“Go along,” she replied, “the Flounder will soon give you that.”

“Nay, wife,” he said, “ the Flounder gave us the cottage at first, but
when I go again he will perhaps be angry.”

“ Never you mind,” said she, “he can do what I wish for very easily
and willingly ; go and try.” The husband was vexed at heart, and did
rot like going, and said to himself, “This is not right.” But at last he
set off.

When he came 13 the sea, the water was quite clouded and deep plue
coloured, and black aad thick: it looked green no longer, yet it was calm.
So he went and said,—

“Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Hither quickly come to me,
For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I scarce dare tell.”



THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 61

“ Now, then, what do you want?” said the Fiounder. “Oh,” said the
maa, half-frightened, “she wants to live in a great stone castle.” “Go
home, and see it at your door,” replied the Figh.

The fisherman went away, and lo! where formerly his house stood,
there was a great stone castle ; and his wife called to him from the steps
to come in, and, taking him by the hand, she said, “ Now let us look
about.” So they walked about, and in the castle there was a great hall,
with marble tables, and there were ever so many servants, who ushereé
them through folding-doors into rooms hung all round with tapestry, and
filled with fine golden stools and chairs, with crystal looking-glasses on
the walls ; and all the rooms were similarly fitted up. Outside the house
were large courtyards with horse and cow-stalls, and waggons, all of the
best, and besides a beautiful garden filled with magnificent flowers and
fruit-trees, and a meadow full a mile long, covered with deer, and oxen,
and sheep, as many as one could wish for. “Is not this pretty ?” said the
wife. “Ah,” said her husband, “so long as the humour lasts you will be
content with this, and then you will want something else.”

“We will think about that,” said she, and with that they went to bed.

The next morning the wife woke up just as it was day, and looked
out over the fine country which lay before her. Her husband did not
get up, and there she stood with her arms akimbo, and called out, “‘ Get
up, and come and look here at the window ; see, shali I not be Queen
over all the land? Go, and say to the Flounder, we choose to be King
and Queen.” “Ah,. wife,” said he, “why should I wish to be King?”
“No,” she replied, “you do not wish, so I will be Queen. Go, tell the
Flounder so.”

“Oh, why do you wish this? I cannot say it.”

“Why not? go off at once; I must be Queen.” The husband set
out quite stupified, but she would have her way, and when he came to
the sea it was quite black-looking, and the water splashed up and smelled
very disagreeably. But he stood still, and repeated,—

“ Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Hither quickly come to me;
For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I scarce dare tell.”

‘What does she want now?” asked the Flounder. “Ah!” said he,
“she would be Queen.” “Go home, she is so already,” replied the Fish.
So he departed, and when he came near the palace he saw it had becon:e
much larger, with a great tower and gateway in front of it; and before
the gate stood a herald, and there were many soldiers, with kettledrume
and trumpets. When he came into the house he found everything made
of the purest marble and gold; with magnificent curtains fringed with
gold. Through the hall he went in at the doors where the great court
apartment was, and there sat his wife upon a high throne of gold and
diamonds; haying a crown of gold upon her head, and a sceptre of
precious stones in her hand; and upon each side stood six pages, in a
row, each one a head taller than the other. Then he went up, and said,
“ Ah, wife, are you Queen new?” “Yes,” «aid sha “now I am Queen \*



62 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

There he stood looking for a long time. At last he said, “Ah, wife, how
do you like being Queen? now we have nothing else to choose.” “No,
indeed !” she replied, “I am very dissatisfied ; time and tide do not wait
for me ; I can bear it no longer. Go then to the Flounder : Queen I am;
now I must be Pope.” ‘Ah, wife! what would you? Pope thou canst
not be, the Pope is the head of Christendom, the Flounder cannot make
you that.”

“T will be Pope,” replied the wife, and he was obliged to go, and,
when he came to the shore, the sea was running mountains high, and the
sky was so black that he was quite terrified, and began to say in a great
fright,—

“ Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Quickly, quickly, come to me,

For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I dare not tell.”

«“ What now ?” asked the Flounder. “She wants to be Pope,” said he.
“Go home, and find her so,” was the reply.

So he went back, and found a great church, in which she was sitting
upon a much higher throne, with two rows of candles on each side, some
as thick as towers, down to those no bigger than rushlights, and before
her footstool were Kings and Queens kneeling. ‘“ Wife,” said he, “now be
contented: since you are Pope, you cannot be anything else.” “That I
will consider about,” she replied, and so they went to bed; but she could
not sleep for thinking what she should be next. Very early she rose, and
looked out of the window, and as she saw the sun rising, she thought to
herself, “ Why should I not do that ?” and go she shook her husband, and
called out to him, “Go, tell the Flounder I want to make the sun rise.”
Her husband was so frightened that he tumbled out of bed, but she
would hear nothing, and he was obliged to go.

When he got down to the sea a tremendous storm was raging, and the
ships and boats were tossing about in all directions. Then he shouted
out, though he could not hear his own words,—

“Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Quickly, quickly, come to me;
For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I dare not tell.”

“What would she have now?” said the Fish, “Ah” he replied,
“she wants to be Ruler of the Universe.”

“Return, and find her back in her hovel,” replied the Flounder.

And there the fisherman and bis wife remained for the rest of their
days.





THE SEVEN CROWS.

THERE was a man who had seven sons, but never a daughter, although he
wished very much for one; at last his wife promised him another child,
and when it was born, lo! it was a daughter. Their happiness was great,
but the child was so weak and small that, on account of its delicate health,
it had to be baptized immediately. The father sent one of his sons
hastily to a spring in order to fetch some water, but the other six would
run as well; and as each strove to be first to fill the pitcher, between
them all it fell into the water. They stood by, not knowing what to do,
and none of them dared to go home. As they did not come back, the
father became impatient, saying, “They have forgotten all about it ma
game of play, the godless youths.” Soon he became anxious lest the child
should die unbaptized, and in his haste he exclaimed, “I would they were
all changed into Crows!” Scarcely were the words out of his mouth,
when he heard a whirring over his head, and looking up he saw seven
coal-black Crows flying over the house.

The parents could not recall their curse, and grieved very much for
their lost sons; but they comforted themselves in some measure with
their dear daughter, who soon grew strong, and became more and more
beautiful every day. For a long time she did not know she had any
brothers, for her parents were careful not to mention them ; but one day
accidentally she overheard some people talking about her, and saying,
“She is certainly very beautiful ; but still the guilt of her seven brothess
rests on her head.” This made her very sad, and she went to her parents
and asked whether she had any brothers, and whither they were gone.
The old people durst no longer keep their secret, but said it was the
decree of heaven, and her birth had been the unhappy cause. Now the
maiden daily accused herself, and thought how she could again deliver her
brothers. She kad neither rest nor quiet, until she at last set out



64 GRIMM’s HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

secrefiy, and journeyed into the wide world to seek out her brothers, and
to free them, wherever they were, cost what it might. She took nothing
with her but a ring of her parents’ for a remembrance, a loaf of bread for
hunger’s sake, a bottle of water for thirst’s sake, and a little stool for
weariness.

Now on and on went the maiden, further and further, even to the
world’s end. Then she came to the Sun, but he was too hot and fearful,
and burnt up little children. So she ran hastily away to the Moon, but
she was too cold, and even wicked-looking, and said, “I smell, I smell
man’s flesh!” So she ran away quickly, and went to the Stars, who were
friendly and kind to her, each one sitting upon his own little seat. But
the Morning-star was standing up, and gave her a crooked bone. saying,
“Tf you have not this bone you cannot unlock the glass castle, where
your brothers are.”

The maiden took the bone, and wrapped it well up in a handkerchief,
and then on she went again till she came at last to the glass castle. The
door was closed, and she looked therefore for the little bone ; but when
she unwrapped her handkerchief it was empty—she had lost the present
of the good Star. What was she to do now? She wished to save her
brothers, and she had no key to the glass castle. The good little sister
bent her little finger, and put it in the door, and luckily it unlocked it.
As soon as she entered a little Dwarf came towards her, who said, “ My
child, what do you seek 4”

“T seek my brothers, the seven Crows,” she replied.

The Dwarf answered, “ My Lord Crows are not at home ; but if you
wish to wait their return, come in and sit down.”

Thereupon the little Dwarf carried in the food of the seven Crows
upon seven dishes and in seven cups, and the maiden ate a little piece off
each dish, and drank a little out of every cup; but in the last cup she
dropped the ring which she had brought with her.

All at once she heard a whirring and cawing in the air, and the
Dwarf said, “ My Lord Crows are now flying home.”

Presently they came in and prepared te eat and drink ; each seeking
his own dish and cup. Then one said to the other, “ Who has been eat-
ing off my dish? Who has been drinking out of my cup? There has
been a human mouth here!”

When the seventh came to the bottom of his cup, the little ring
rolled out. He looked at it, and recognised it as a ring of his parents
and said, “God grant that our sister be here ; then are we raved }”

As the maiden, who bad stood behind the door watching, heard these
words, she came forward, and immediately all the Crows received again
their human forms, and embraced and kissed their sister, and then they
al went joyfully home togother.





THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR.

OnE summer’s morning a Tailor was sitting on his bench by the window
in very good spirits, sewing away with all his might, and presently up
the street came a peasant woman, crying, “Good preserves for sale'
Good preserves for sale!” This cry sounded nice in the Tailor’s ears,
and, sticking his diminutive head out of the window, he called out,
“Here, my good woman, just bring your wares here!” The woman
mounted the three steps up to the Tailor’s house with her heavy basket,
and began to unpack all the pots together before him. He looked at
them all, held them up to the light, put his nose to them, and at last
said, “These preserves appear to me to be very nice, so you may weigh
me out four half-ounces, my good woman; I don’t mind even if you
make it a quarter of a pound.” The woman, who expected to have met
with a good customer, gave him what he wished, and went away
grumbling, very much dissatisfied,

“Now!” exclaimed the Tailor, “ Heaven will send me a blessing on
this preserve, and give me fresh strength and vigour ;” and, taking the
bread out of the cupboard, he cut himself a slice the size of the whole loaf,
and spread the preserve upon it. “That will taste by no means badly,”
said he; “but, before I have a bite, I will just get this waistcoat finished.”
So he laid the bread down near him and stitched away, making larger and
larger stitches every time for joy. Meanwhile the smell of the preserve
mounted to the ceiling, where flies were sitting in great numbers, and
enticed them down, so that soon a regular swarm of them had settled on
the bread. “ Holloa! who invited you?” exclaimed the Tailor, hunting
away the unbidden guests; but the flies, not understanding his language,
would not be driven off, and came again in greater numbers than beforo.
This put the little man in a boiling passion, and, snatching up in his rage
a bag of cloth, he brought it down with an unmerciful swoop upon them,
W hen he raised it again he counted no Jess than seven lying dead before

F



66 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

him with outstretched legs. “ What a fellow you are!” said he to him-
self, wondering at his own bravery. “The whole town shall know of
this.” In great haste he cut himself out a band, hemmed it, and then
put on it in large characters, “Snvey at ons Brow!” “ Ah,” said he,
“not one city alone, the whole world shall know it!” and his heart
fluttered with joy, like a lambkin’s tail.

The little Tailor bound the belt round his body, and prepared to travel
forth into the wide world, thinking the workshop too small for his valiant
deeds, Before he set out, however, he locked round his house to see if
there was anything he could take with him; but he foind only an old
cheese, which he pocketed, and remarking a bird before the door which
was entangled in the bushes, he caught it, and put that in his pocket also,
Directly after he set out bravely on his travels ; and, as he was light and
active, he felt no weariness. His road led him up a hill, and when he
reached the highest point of it he found a great Giant sitting there, who
was looking about him very composedly.

The little Tailor, however, went boldly up, and said, “Good day,
comrade ; in faith you sit there and see the whole world stretched below
you. Iam also on my road thither to try my luck. Have youa mind
to go with me ?”

The Giant looked contemptuously at the little Tailor, and said, * You
vagabond ! you miserable fellow !”

“That may be,” replied the Tailor ; “but here you may read what
sort of aman I am;” and, unbuttoning his coat, he showed the Giant
his belt. The Giant read, “ Seven at one blow;” and thinking they were
men whom the Tailor had slain, he conceived a little respect for him,
Still he wished to prove him first ; so taking up a stone, he squeezed it
in his hand, so that water dropped out of it. ‘Do that after me,” said
he to the other, “if you have any strength.”

“If it be nothing worse than that,” said the Tailor, “that’s play to
me.” And, diving into his pocket, he brought out the cheese, and squeezed
it till the whey ran out of it, and said, “ Now, I think, that’s a little
better.”

The Giant did not know what to say, and could not believe it of the
little man ; so, taking up another stone, he threw it so high that one
could scarcely see it with the eye, saying, “There, you mannikin, do that
after me.”

“Well done,” said the Tailor ; “but your stone must fall down again
to the ground. I will throw one up which shall not come back :” and,
dipping into his pocket, he took out the bird and threw it into the air.
The bird, rejoicing in its freedom, flew straight up, and then far away,
and did not return. “ How does that little affair please you, comrade ?”
asked the Tailor.

“ You can throw well, certainly,” replied the Giant ; “ now let us see
if you are in trim to carry something out of the common.” * So saying he
led him to a huge oak-tree, which lay upon the ground, and said, “ If you
are strong enough, just help me to carry this tree out of the forest.”

“ With all my heart,” replied the Tailor; “do you take the trunk



THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR. 67

wpon your shoulder, and I will raise the boughs and branches, which ara
the heaviest, and carry them.”

The Giant took the trunk upon his shoulder, but the Tailor piaced
himself on the branch, so that the Giant, who was not able to look round.
was forced to carry the whole tree and the Tailor besides, He, being be.
hind, was very merry, and chuckled at the trick, and presently began to
whistle the song, ‘“‘ There rode three tailors out at the gate,” as if the
carrying of trees were child’s play. The Giant, after he had staggered
along a short distance with his heavy burden, cculd go no further, and
shouted out, “Do you hear? I must Iet the tree fall.’ The Tailcr,
springing down, quickly embraced the tree with both arms, as if he had
been carrying it, and said to the Giant, ‘“ Are you such a big fellow, and
yet cannot you carry this tree by yourself?”

Then they journeyed on further, and as they came to a cherry-tree,
the Giant seized the top of the tree where the ripest fruits hung, and,
bending it down, gave it to the Tailor to hold, bidding himeat. But the
Tailor was much too weak to hold the tree down, and when the Giant let
go the tree flew up into the air, and the Tailor was carried with it. He
came down on the other side, however, without injury, and the Giant said,
‘What does that mean? Have you not strength enough to hold that
twig?” “My strength did not fail me,” replied the Tailor; “do you
suppose that that was any hard thing for one who has killed seven at one
blow? I have sprung over the tree because the hunters were shooting
below there in the thicket. Spring after me if you can.” The Giant
made the attempt, but could not’clear the tree, and stuck fast in the
branches ; so that in this affair, too, the Tailor was the better man.

After this the Giant said, “Since you are such a valiant fellow, come
with me to our house, and stop a night with us.” The Tailor consented,
and followed him ; and when they entered the cave, there sat by the fire
two other Giants, each having a roast sheep in his hand, of which he
was eating. The Tailor sat down thinking, “Ah, this is much more
like the world than is my workshop.” And soon the Giant showed him
a bed where he might lie down and go to sleep. The bed, however, was
too big for him, so he slipt out of it, and crept into a corner. When
midnight came, and the Giant thought the Tailor would be in a deep
sleep, he got up, and, taking a great iron bar, beat the bed right through
at one stroke, and supposed he had thereby given the Tailor his death-
blow. At the carliest dawn of morning the Giants went forth into the
forest, quite forgetting the Tailor, when presently up he came, quite
merry, and showed himself before them. The Giants were terrified, and,
fearing he would kill them all, they ran away in great haste.

The Tailor journeyed on, always following his nose, and after he had
wandered some long distance, he came into the courtyard of a royal
palace ; and as he felt rather tired he laid himself down on the grass and
went to sleep. Whilst he lay there the people came and viewed him on
all sides, and read upon his belt, “Seven at one blow.” _ “ Ah,” said they,
“ what does this great warrior here in time of peace? This must be some
mighty hero.” So they went and told the King, thinking that, shouid



68 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

war break out, here was an important and useful man, whom one ought
not to part with at any price. The King took counsel, and-sent one of
his courtiers to the Tailor to ask for his fighting services, if he should be
awake. The messenger stopped at the slecper’s side, and waited till he
stretched out his limbs and opened his eyes, and then he laid hefore him
his message. “Solely on that account did I come here,” was the reply ;
“T am quite ready to enter into the King’s service.” Then he was con-
ducted away with great honour, and a fine house was appointed him to
dwell in.

The courtiers, however, became jeaious of the Tailor, and wished he
were a thousand miles away. “What will happen?” said they to one
another. “If we go to battle with him, when he strikes out seven will
fall at one blow, and nothing will be left for us to do.” In their rage
they came to the resolution to resign, and they went all together to the
King, and asked his permission, saying, ‘‘ We are not prepared to keep
company with a man who kills seven at one blow.” The King was
grieved to lose all his faithful servants for the sake of one, and wished
that he had never seen the Tailor, and would willingly have now been rid
of him. He dared not, however, dismiss him, because he feared the Tailor
would kill him and all his subjects, and place himself upon the throne.
For a long time he deliberated, till at last he came to a devision ; and,
sending for the Tailor, he told him that, seeing he was so great a hero,
he wished to ask a favour of him. “In a certain forest in my kingdom,”
said the King, “there live two Giants, who, by murder, rapine, fire, and
robbery, have committed great havoc, and no one dares to approach them
without perilling his own life. If you overcome and kill both these
Giants, I will give you my only daughter in marriage, and the half of my
kingdom for a dowry: a hundred knights shall accompany you, too, in
order to render you assistance.”

“ Ah, that is something for such a man as I,” thought the Tailor to
himself; “a beautiful Princess and half a kingdom are not offered to one
every day.” “Oh, yes,” he replied, “I will soon manage these two
Giants, and a hundred horsemen are not necessary for that purpose; he
who kills seven at one blow need not fear two.”

Thus talking the little Tailor set out, followed by the hundred
knights, to whom he said, at soon as they came to the borders of the
forest, “Do you stay here; I would rather meet these Giants alone.”
Then he sprang off into the forest, peering about him right and left; and
after a while he saw the two Giants lying asleep under a tree, snoring so
loudly, that the branches above them shook violently. The Tailor, full of
courage, filled both his pockets with stones and clambered up the tree.
When he got to the middle of it he crept along a bough, so that he sat
just above the sleepers, and then he let fall one stone after another upon
the breast of one of them. For some time the Giant did not stir, until,
at last awaking, he pushed his companion, and said, “ Why are you
beating me ?”

“You are dreaming,” he replied; “I never hit you.” They laid
themeelves down again to sleep, and presently the Tailor threw a stone



THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR. 69

Aown upon the other. “What is that?” he exclaimed. “What are you
knocking me for ?”

“T did not touch you ; you must dream,” replied the first. So tney
wrangled for a few. minutes ; but, being both very tired with their day’s
work, they soon fell asleep again. Then the Tailor began his sport again,
and, picking out the biggest stone, threw it with all his force upon
the breast of the first Giant. “That is too bad!” he exclaimed ; and,
springing up like a madman, he fell upon his companion, who, feeling
himself equally aggrieved, they set to in such good earnest, that they
rooted up trees and beat one another about until they both fell dead upon
the ground. Now the Tailor jumped down, saying, “ What a piece of
luck they did not uproot the tree on which I sat, or else I must have
jumped on another like a squirrel, for I am not given to flying.” Then
he drew his sword, and, cutting a deep wound in the breast of each, he
went to the horsemen and said, “The deed is done ; I have given each
his death-stroke ; but it was a hard job, for in their necessity they
uprooted trees to defend themselves with ; still, all that is of no use when
such an one as I come, who killed seven at one stroke.”

“ Are you not wounded, then?” asked they.

“That is not to be expected: they have not touched « hair of my
head,” replied the little man. The knights could scarcely believe him,
till, riding away into tho forest, they fcund the Giants lying in their
blood and the uprooted trees around them.

Now the Tailor demanded his promised reward of the King ; but he
repented of his promise, and began to think of some new scheme to get
rid of the hero. “Before you receive my daughter and the half of
wy kingdom,” said he to him, “you must perform one other heroic deed.
In the forest there runs wild a unicorn, which commits great havoc, and
which you must first of all catch.”

“T fear still less for a unicorn than I do for two Giants! Seven at
one blow! that is my motto,” said the Tailor. ‘Then he teck with him e
rope and an axe and went away to the forest, bidding those who were
ordered to accompany him to wait on the outskirts. He had not to
search long, for presently the unicorn came near and prepared to rusb
at him as if it would pierce him on the spot. “ Softly, softly!” he ex-
claimed ; “that is not done so easily ;” and, waiting till the animal waa
close upon him, he sprang nimbly behind a tree. The unicorn, rushing
with all its force against the tree, fixed its horn so fast in the trunk, that
it could not draw it out again, and so it was made prisoner. “ Now
I have got my bird,” said the Tailor ; and, coming from behind the tree,
he first bound the rope around its neck, and then, cutting the hern out
of the tree with his axe, he put all in order, and, leading the animal,
brought it before the King.

The King, however, would not yet deliver up the promised reward,
and made a third request, that, before the wedding, the Tailor should
catch a wild boar which did much injury, and he should have the
bunismen to halp him. “ With pleasure,” was the reply ; ‘it is mere
ehild’s play.” The huntsmen, however, he left behind, to their entire



70 GRIMM’S HOUSRHOLD STORIES.

content, for this wild boar had already so often hunted them, that they
had no pleasure in hunting it. As soon as the boar perceived the Tailor
it ran at him with gaping mouth and glistening teeth, and tried to throw
him on the ground ; but our flying hero sprang into a little chapel which
was near, and out again at a window on the other side in a trice. The
boar ran after him, but he, skipping round, shut the door behind it, and
there the raging beast was caught, for it was much too unwieldy and
heavy to jump out of the window. The Tailor now called the huntsmen
up, that they might see his prisoner with their own eyes; but our hero
presented himself before the King, who was compelled now, whether
he would or no, to keep his promise, and surrender his daughter and the
half of his kingdom.

Had he known that it was no warrior, but only a Tailor, who stood
before him, it would have gone to his heart still more !

So the wedding was celebrated with great splendour, though with
little rejoicing, and out of a Tailor was made a King.

Some little while afterwards the young Queen heard her husband
talking in his sleep, and saying, “Boy, make me a waistcoat, and stitch
up these trowsers, or I will lay the yard-measure over your ears!”
Then she remarked of what condition her lord was, and complained in
the morning to her father, and begged he would deliver her from her
husband, who was nothing else than a tailor, The King comforted her
by saying, “This night leave your chamber door open; my servants
shall stand without, and when he is asleep they shall enter, bind him,
and bear him away to a ship, which shall carry him forth into the wide
world.” The wife was contented with his proposal; but the King’s
grmour-bearer, who had overheard all, went to the young King and dis-
closed the whole plot. “1 will shoot a bolt upon this affair,” said the
brave Tailor. In the evening at their usual time they went to bed,
and when his wife believed he slept she got up, opened the door, and
laid herself down again. The Tailor, however, only feigned to be
asleep, and began to exclaim in a loud voice, “ Boy, make me this waist.
coat, and stitch up these trowsers, or I will beat the yard-measure about
your ears! Seven have I killed with one blow, two Giants have I slain,
a unicorn have I led captive, and a wild boar have I caught, and shall I
be afraid of those who stand without my chamber?” When the men
heard these words spoken by the Tailor, a great fear overcame them,
and they ran away as if the wild huntsmen were behind them ; neither
afterwards durst any man venture to o)pose him. Thus became the
Tailor a King, and so he remained the rest of his daya,

























THE STRAW, THE COAL, AND THE BEAN.

Ix a certain village there dwelt a poor old woman, who had gathered a dist
of beans, which she wished to cook. So she made a fire upon the hearth,
and, that it might burn the quicker, she lighted it with a handful of
straw. And as she shook the beans up in the saucepan, one fell out
unperceived, and came down upon the ground, near a straw ; soon after a
glowing coal burst out of the fire, and fell just by these two. Then the
Straw began to say, “ My dear friend, whence do you come?” The Coal
replied, “By good luck I have sprung out of the fire, and, if I had
not jumped away by force, my death had been certain, and I should have
been reduced to ashes.” The Bean continued, “I also have got away
with a whole skin, but, had the old woman put me in the pot with the
others, I should have been boiled to pieces, as my comrades are.”
“Would a better fate have fallen to my sbare ?” said the Straw; “for
the old woman has suffocated in fire and smoke all my brothers ; sixty
has she put on at once, and deprived of life ; happily, I slipped between
her fingers.” :

“ But what shall we do now ?” asked the Coal.

“JT think,” answered the Bean, “since we have so luckily escaped
death, we will join in partnership, and keep together like good com-
panions: lest a new misfortune overtake us, let us wander forth, and
travel into a strange country.”

This proposition pleased the two others, and they set out together on
their travels. Presently they came to a little stream, over which there
was no bridge nor path, and they did not know how they should get over.
The Straw gave good advice, and said, “I will lay myself across, 80 that
you may cross over upon me, as upon a bridge.” So the Straw stretched
itself from one bank to the other, and the Coal, which was of a fiery
nature, tripped lightly upon the newly-built bridge. But when it came to
the middle of it, and heard the water running along beneath, it was



72 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

frightened, and stood still, not daring to go further. The Straw, how-
ever, beginning to burn, broke in two and fell into the stream, and the
Coal slipping after, hissed as it reached the water, and gave up the ghost.
The Bean, which had prudently remained upon the shore, was forced
to laugh at this accident, and, the joke being so good, it laughed so
immoderately that it burst itself Now they would all have been done for
alike, if a tailor, who was out on his wanderings, had not just then, by
great good luck, sat himself down near the stream. Having a commise-
rating heart, he took out needle and thread, and sewed the Bean together.
The Bean thanked him exceedingly ; but as the tailor used black thread
it has happened since that time, every Bean has a blacx seam.





LITTLE RED-CAP.

Oncr upon a time there lived a sweet little girl, who was beloved by
every one who saw her; but her grandmother was so excessively fond
of her that she never knew when she had thought and done enough
for her.

One day the grandmother presented the little girl with a red velvet
cap ; and as it fitted her very well, she would never wear anything else ;
and so she was called Little Red-Cap. One day her mother said to her,
“Come, Red-Cap, here is a piece of nice meat, and a bottle of wine : take
these to your grandmother ; she is ill and weak, and will relish them.
Make haste before she gets up; go quietly and carefully ; and do not
run, lest you should fall and break the bottle, and then your grandmother
will get nothing. When you go into her room, do not forget to say
© Good-morning ? and do not look about in all the corners.” “TJ will do
everything as you wish,” replicd Red-cap, taking her mother’s hand.

he grandmother dwelt far away in the wood, half an hour’s walk from
the village, and as Little Red-Cap entered among the trees, she met a



LITTLE RED-CAP. 73

wolf; but she did not know what a malicious beast it was. and so she
was not at all afraid. “Good day, Little Red-Cap,” he said.

“Many thanks, Wolf,” said she.

“Whither away so early, Little Red-Cap ?”

“To my grandmother’s,” she replied.

“ What are you carrying under your apron ?”

“Meat and wine,” she answered. “ Yesterday we baked the meat,
that grandmother, who is ill and weak, might have something nice and
strengthening.”

“Where does your grandmother live?” asked the Wolf

“ A good quarter of an hour’s walk further in the forest. The cottage
stands under three great oak-trees; near it are some nut bushes, by
which you will easily know it.”

But the Wolf thought to himself, “She is a nice tender thing, and will
taste better than the old woman: I must act craftily, that I may snap
them both up.”

Presently he came up again to Little Red-Cap, and said, “ Just look
at the beautiful flowers which grow around you; why do you not look
about you? I believe you don’t hear how beautifully the birds sing.
You walk on as if you were going to school; see how merry everything
is around you in the forest.”

So Little Red-Cap opened her eyes; and when she saw how the sun-
beams glanced and danced through the trees, and what splendid flowers
were blooming in her path, she thought, “If I take my grandmother a
fresh nosegay she will be very pleased; and it is so very early that I
can, even then, get there in good time ;” and running into the forest she
looked about for flowers. But when she had once begun she did not
know how to leave off, and kept going deeper and deeper among the
trees in search of some more beautiful flower. The Wolf, however, ran
straight to the house of the old grandmother, and knocked at the door.

“Who's there ?”” asked the old lady.

“Only Little Red-Cap, bringing you some meat and wine: please
open the door,” replied the Wolf.

“ Lift up the latch,” cried the grandmother; “ I am too weak to get
oP

So the Wolf lifted the latch, and the door flew open; and jumping
without a word on the bed, he gobbled up the poor old lady. Then he
put on her clothes, and tied her cap over his head; got into the bed, and
drew the blankets over him. All this time Red-Cap was still gathering
flowers; and when she had plucked as many as she could carry, she
remembered her grandmother, and made haste to the cottage. Sho
wondered very much to see the door wide open; and when she got into
the room, she began to feel very ill, and exclaimed, “ How sad I feel! I
wish I had not come to-day.” Then she said, “Good morning,” but
received no answer; so she went up to the bed, and drew back tha
purtains, and there lay her grandmother, as she thought, with the cap
drawn half over her eyes, looking very fieree.

“Qh, grandmother, what great ears you have

up.

1?



74 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

“Tue better to hear with,” was the reply.

“ And what great eyes you have !”

“The better to see with.”

“ And what great hands you have !”

* The better to touch you with.”

“ But, grandmother, what great teeth you have !”

“The better to eat you with ;” and scarcely were the words out of his
mouth, when the Wolf made a spring out of bed, and swallowed up poor
Little Red-Cap.

As soon as the Wolf had thus satisfied his appetite, he laid himself
down again in the bed, and began to snore very loudly. A huntsman
passing by overheard him, and thought, “ How loudly the old woman
snores! I must see if she wants anything.”

So he stepped into the cottage; and when he came to the bed, he saw
the Wolf lying in it. ‘“ What! do I find you here, you old sinner? I
have long sought you,” exclaimed he; and taking aim with his gun, he
shot the old Wolf dead.

Some folks say that the last story is not the true one, but that one
day, when Red-Cap was taking some baked meats to her grandmother’s,
a Wolf met her, and wanted to mislead her; but she went straight on,
and told her grandmother that she had met a Wolf, who wished her good-
day; but he looked so wickedly out of his great eyes, as if he would have
eaten her had she not been on the highroad.

So the grandmother said, “ Let us shut the door, that he may not
enter.”

Soon afterwards came the Wolf, who knocked, and exclaimed, “J am
Red-Cap, grandmother; I bring you some roast meat.” But they kept
quite still, and did not open the door; so the Wolf, creeping several
times round the house, at last jumped on the roof, intending to wait till

ted-Cap went home in the evening, and then to sneak after her and
devour her in the darkness. The old woman, however, saw all that the
rascal intended; and as there stood before the door a great stone trough,
she said to Little Red-Cap, “'Take this pail, child: yesterday I boiled
some sausages in this water, so pour it into that stone trough.” Red-Cap
poured many times, until the huge trough was quite full, Then the Wolf
sniffed the smell of the sausages, and smacked his lips, and wished very
much to taste; and at last he stretched his neck too far over, so that he
lost his balance, and slipped quite off the roof, right into the great trough
beneath, wherein he was drowned; and Little Red-Cap ran home in high
glee, but no one sorrowed for Mr. Wolf!









OLD MOTHER FROST.

Turner was once a widow who had two daughters, one of whom was
beautiful and industrious, and the other ugly and lazy. She behaved
most kindly, however, to the ugly one, because she was her own daughter ;
and made the other do all the hard work, and live like a kitchen maid.
The poor maiden was forced out daily on the highroad, and had to sit by
a well and spin so much that the blood ran from her fingers. Once it
happened that her spindle became quite covered with blood, so, kneeling
down by the well, she tried to wash it off, but, unhappily, it fell out of
her hands into the water. She ran crying to her stepmother, and told
her misfortune: but she scolded her terribly, and behaved very cruelly,
and at last said, “Since you have let your spindle fall in, you must your-
self fetch it out again!” Then the maiden went back to the well, not
knowing what to do, and, in her distress of mind, she jumped ints
the well to fetch the spindle out. As she fell she lost all consciousness,
and when she came to herself again she found herself in a beautiful
meadow, where the sun was shining, and many thousands of flowers
blooming around her. She got up and walked along till she came to a
baker’s, where the oven was full of bread, which cried out, “ Draw me,
draw me, or I shall be burnt. I have been baked long enough.” Sv
she went up, and, taking the bread-peel, drew out one loaf after the
other. Then she walked on further, and came to an apple tree, whose
fruit hung very thick, and which exclaimed, ‘Shake us, shake us; we
apples are all ripe!” So she shook the tree till the apples fell down like
rain, and, when none were left on, she gathered them all together in a
heap, and went further, At last she came to a cottage, out of which an
old woman was peeping, who had such very large teeth that the maiden
was frightened and ran away. The old woman, however, called her back,
saying, “What are you afraid of, my child? Stop with me: if you will
put all things in order in my house, then shall all go well with you;
only you must take care thas you make my bed well, and shake it



76 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

tremendously, eo that the feathers fly; then it snows upon earth. Iam
‘Old Mother Frost.’” Ag the old woman spoke so kindly, the maiden
took courage, and consented to engage in her service. Now, everything
made her very contented, and she always shook the bed so industriously
that the feathers blew down like flakes of snow; therefore her life was
a happy one, and there were no evil words; and she had roast and baked
meat every day.

For some time she remained with the old woman; but, all at once,
she became very sad, and did not herself know what was the matter.
At last she found she was home-sick ; and, although she fared a thousan@
times better than when she was at home, still she longed to go. So shu
told her mistress, “I wish to go home, and if it does not go so well with
me below as up here, I must return.” The mistress replied, “ It appeared
to me that you wanted to go home, and, since you have served me so
truly, I will fetch you up again myself.” So saying, she took her by
the hand and led her before a great door, which she undid; and, when
the maiden was just beneath it, a great shower of gold fell, and a great
deal stuck to her, so that she was covered over and over with gold.
“That you must have for your industry,” said the old woman, giving
her the spindle which had fallen into the well. Thereupon the door was
closed, and the maiden found herself upon the earth, not far from her
mother’s house; and, as she came into the court, the cock sat upon the
house, and called,—

“ Cock-a-doodle-doo !
Our golden maid’s come home again.”
Then she went in to her mother, and, because she was so covered witk
gold, she was well received.

The maiden related all that had happened; and, when the mother
heard how she had come by these great riches, she wished her ugly, lazy
daughter to try her luck. So she was forced to ef. down by the well and
spin; and, in order that her spindle might Lecome bloody, she pricked
her finger by running a thorn into it; and then, throwing the spindle
into the well, she jumped in after it. Then, like the other, she came
upon the beautiful meadow, and travelled on the same path. When she
arrived at the baker’s, the bread called out, “Draw me out, draw me
out, or I shall be burnt. I have been baked long enough.” But she
answered, “I have no wish to make myself dirty about you,” and so
went on. Soon she caine to the apple tree, which called out, “Shake
me, shake me; my apples are all quite ripe.” But she answered, “You
do well to come tu me; perhaps one will fall on my head;” and so she
went on further. When she came to ‘“ Old Mother Frost’s” house she
was not afraid of the teeth, for she had been warned; and so she engaged
herself to her. The first day she set to work in earnest, was very
industrious, and obeyed her mistress in all she said to her, for she thoughg
about the gold which she would present to her. On the second day
however, she began to idle; on the third, still more so; and then she
would not get up of a morning. She did not make the beds, either, as
she ought, and the feathers did not fly. So the old woman got tired,



CINDERELLA. 07

and dismissed her from her service, which pleased the lazy one very well,
for she thought, ‘“ Now the gold-shower will come.” Her mistress led
her to the door; but, when she was beneath it, instead of gold, a tubful
of pitch was poured down upon her. “That is the reward of your ser-
vice,” said “‘Old Mother Frost,” and shut the door to. Then came
Lazy-bones home, but she was quite covered with pitch; and the cock
upon the house when he saw her, cried—

“ Cock-a-doodle doo !
Our dirty maid’s come home again.”

But the pitch stuck to her, and, as long as she lived, would never coms
off again.



CINDERELLA,

Once upon a time the wife of a certain rich man fell very ill, and as she
felt her end drawing nigh she called her only daughter to her bedside,
and said, “ My dear child, be pious and good, and then the good God will
always protect you, and I will look down upon you from heaven and think
of you.” Soon afterwards she closed her eyes and died. Every day the
maiden went to her mother’s grave and wept over it, and she continued
to be good and pious ; but when the winter came, the snow made a white
covering over the grave, and in the spring-time, when the sun had with-
drawn this covering, the father took to himself another wife.

The wife brought home with her two daughters, who were beautiful
and fair in the face, but treacherous and wicked at heart. Then an
unfortunate era began in the poor step-child’s life. “Shall the stupid
goose sit in the parlour with us?” said the two daughters. “They who
would eat bread must earn it; out with the kitchen-maid!” So they



78 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

took off her fine clothes, and put upon her an old grey cloak, and gays
her wooden shoes for her feet. “See how the once proud princess is
decked out now,” said they, and they led her mockinely into the kitchen.
Then she was obliged to work hard from morning to night, and to go out
early to fetch water, to make the fire, and cook and scour. The sisters
treated her besides with every possible insult, derided her, and shook the
peas and beans into the ashes, so that she had to pick them out again.
At night, when she was tired, she had no bed to lie on, but was forced to
sit in the ashes on the hearth ; and because she looked dirty through this,
they named her CINDERELLA,

One day it happened that the father wanted to go to the fair, so he
asked his two daughters what he should bring them. “Some beautiful
dresses,” said one ; “ Pearls and precious stones,” replied the other, “ But
you, Cinderella,” said he, “what will you have?” “The first bough,
father, that knocks against your hat on your way homewards, break it off
for me,” she replied. So he bought the fine dresses, and the pearls and
precious stones, for his two step-daughters ; and on his return, as he rode
through a green thicket, a hazel-bough touched his hat, which he broke
off and took with him. As soon as he got home, he gave his step-
daughters what they had wished for, and to Cinderella he gave the hazel-
branch. She thanked him very much, and going to her mother’s grave
she planted the branch on it, and wept so long that her tears fell and
watered it, so that it grew and became a beautiful tree. Thrice a-day
Cinderella went beneath it to weep and pray ; and each time a little white
Bird flew on the tree, and if she wished aisiia, tnen the little Bird threw
down to her whatever she wished for.

After a time it fell out that the King appointed a festival, which was
to last three days, and to which all the beautiful maidens in the country
were invited, from whom his son was to choose a bride. When the two
step-daughters heard that they might also appear, they were very glad,
and calling Cinderella, they said, “Comb our hair, brush our shoes, and
fasten our buckles, for we are going to the festival at the King’s palace.”
Cinderella obeyed, crying, because she wished to go with them to the
dance ; so she asked her stepmother whether she would allow her.

“You, Cinderella!” said she ; “you are covered with dust and dirt—
will you go to the festival? You have no clothes or shoes, and how can
you dance?” But, as she urged her request, the mother said at last, “I
have now shaken into the ashes a tubful of beans; if you have picked
them up again in two hours, you shall go.”

Then the maiden left the room, and went out at the back-door into the
garden, and called out, “ You tame pigeons, and doves, and all you birds
of heaven, come and help me to gather the good beans into the tub, and the
bad ones you may eat.” Presently, in at the kitchen-window came two
white pigeons, and after them the doves, and soon all the birds under
heaven flew chirping in down upon the ashes. ‘They then began, pick,
pick, pick, and gathered all the good seeds into the tub ; and scarcely an
hour had passed when all was ccmpleted, and the birds flew away again.
Then the maiden took the tub to the steomother, rejoiciug at the thought



CINDERELLA. 79

that she might now go to the festival; but the stepraother said, “No
Cinderella, you have no clothes, and cannot dance; you will only be
laughed at.” As she began to cry, the stepmother said, “If you can pick
up quite clean two tubs of beans which I throw amongst the ashes in one
hour, you shall accompany them ;” and she thought to herself, “She will
never manage it.” As soon as the two tubs had been shot into the ashes,
Cinderella went out at the back door into the garden, and called out as
before, “ You tame pigeons, and doves, and all you birds under heaven,
come and help me to gather the good ones into the tubs, and the bad
ones you may eat.” Presently, in at the kitchen-window came two white
pigeons, and soon after them the doves, and soon all the birds under
heaven flew chirping in down upon the ashes. They then began, pick,
pick, pick, and gathered all the seeds into the tub; and scarcely had
half-an-hour passed before all was picked up, and off they flew again. The
maiden now took the tubs to the stepmother, rejoicing at the thought that
she could go to the festival. But the mother said, “It does not help you
a bit ; you cannot go with us, for you have no clothes, and cannot dance ;
we should be ashamed of you.” Thereupon she turned her back upon
the maiden, and hastened away with her two proud daughters.

As there was no one at home, Cinderella went to her mother’s graye,
under the hazel-tree, and said,—

“ Rustle and shake yourself, dear tree,
And silver and gold throw down to me,’

Then the Bird threw down a dress of gold and silver, and silken
slippers ornamented with silver. These Cinderella put on in great haste,
and then she went to the ball. Her sisters and stepmother did not know
her at all, and took her for some foreign princess, as she looked so beauti-
ful in her golden dress ; for of Cinderella they thought not but that she
was sitting at home picking the beans out of the ashes. Presently the
Prince came up to her, and, taking her by the hand, led her to the dance.
Ile would not dance with any one else, and even would not let go her
hand ; so that when any one else asked her to dance, he said, “ She is my
partner.” They danced till evening, when she wished to go home; but
the Prince said, ‘I will go with you, and see you safe,” for he wanted to
see to whom the maiden belonged. She flew away from him, however,
and sprang into the pigeon-house ; so the Prince waited till the father
came, whom he told that the strange maiden had run into the pigeon-
house. Then the stepmother thought, “Could it be Cinderella?” And
they brought an axe wherewith the Prince might cut open the door, but
no one was found within. And when they came into the house, there lay
Cinderella in her dirty clothes among the ashes, and an oil-lamp was
burning in the chimney ; for she had jumped quickly out on the other
side of the pigeon-house, and had run to the hazel-tree, where she had
taken off her fine clothes, and laid them on the grave, and the Bird had
taken them again, and afterwards she had put on her little grey cloak,
and seated herself among the ashes in the kitchen.

The next day, when the festival was renewed, and her stepmother and



80 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES

her sisters had set out again, Cinderella went to the hazel-tree and sang
as before :—
“Rustle and shake yourself, dear tree,
And silver and gold throw down to me.”

Then the Bird threw down a much more splendid diess than the
former, and when the maiden appeared at the ball every one was asto-
nished at her beauty. The Prince, however, who had waited till she came,
took her hand, and would dance with no one else ; and if others came and
asked, he replied as before, “She is my partner.” As soon as evening
came she wished to depart, and the Prince followed her, wanting to sea
into whose house she went ; but she sprang away from him, and ran into
the garden behind the house. Therein stood a fine large tree, on which
hung the most beautiful pears, and the boughs rustled as though a squirrel
was among them ; but the Prince could not see whence the noise pro-
ceeded. He waited, however, till the father came, and told him, “The
strange maiden ltas escaped from me, and I think she has climbed up into
this tree.” The father thought to himself, “Can it be Cinderella?” and
taking an axe he chopped down the tree, but there was no one on it.
When they went into the kitchen, there lay Cinderella among the ashes,
as before, for she had sprung down on the other side of the tree, and,
having taken her beautiful clothes again to the Bird upon the hazel-tree,
she had put on once more her old grey cloak.

The third day, when her stepmother and her sisters had set out,
Cinderella went again to her mother’s grave, and said,—

© Rustle and shake yourself, dear tree,
And silver and gold throw down to me.”

Then the Bird threw down to her a dress which was more splendid and
glittering than she had ever had before, and the slippers were of pure
gold. When she arrived at the ball they knew not what to say for
wonderment, and the Prince danced with her alone as at first, and replied
to every one who asked her hand, “She is my partner.” As soon as
evening came she wished to go, and as the Prince followed her she ran
away so quickly that he could not overtake her. But he had contrived a
stratagem, and spread the whole way with pitch, so that it happened as
the maiden ran that her left slipper came off. The Prince took it up, and
saw it was smalland graceful, and cf pure gold; so the following morning
he went with it to the father, and said, “ My bride shall be no other than
she whose foot this golden slipper fits.” The two sisters were glad of this,
for they had beautiful feet, and the elder went with it to her chamber to
try it on, while her mother stood by. She could rot, however, get her
great toe into it, and the shoe was much too small; but the mother,
reaching a knife, said, “Cut off your toe, for if you are queen, you ne.
not go any longer on foot.” The maiden cut it off, and squeezed her foot
into the shoe, and, concealing the pain she felt, went down to the Prince.
Then he placed her as his bride upon his horse, and rode off ; and as they
passed by the grave, there sat two little doves upon the hazel-tiee,
singiug,—







CINDERELLA. 81

“ Backwards peep, backwards peep,
There’s blood upon the shoe ;
The shoe’s too small, and she behind
Is not the bride for you.”

Then the Prince looked behind, and saw the blood flowing ; ev he
turned his horse back, and took the false bride home again, saying, she
was not the right one. ‘Then the other sister must needs fit on the shoe,
so she went to the chamber and got her toes nicely into the shoe,
but the heel was too large. The mother, reaching a knife, said, “Cut
a piece off your heel, for when you become queen you need not go any
longer on foot.” She cut a piece off her heel, squeezed her foot into the
shoe, and, concealing the pain she felt, went down to the Prince. Then
he put her upon his horse as his bride, and rode off ; and as they passed
the hazel-tree, there sat two little doves, who sang,—

“Backwards peep, backwards peep,
There’s blood upon the shoe ;
The shoe’s too small, and she behind
Is not the bride for you.”

Then he locked behind, and saw the blood trickling from her shoe,
and that the stocking was dyed quite red ; so he turned his horse back,
and took the false bride home again, saying, “ Neither is this one the
right maiden ; have you no other daughter?” “ No,” replied the father,
“except little Cinderella, daughter of my deceased wife, who cannot
possibly be the bride.” The Prince asked that she might be fetched ;
but the stepmother said, “Oh, no! she is much too dirty ; I dare not let
her be seen.” But the Prince would have his way ; so Cinderella was
called, and she, first washing her hands and face, went in and curtseyed -
to the Prince, who gave her the golden shoe. Cinderella sat down on a
stool, and taking off her heavy wooden shoes, put cn the slipper, whieh
fitted her to a shade ; and as she stood up, the Prince looked in her
face, and recognising the beautiful maiden with whom he had danced,
exclaimed, “This is my true bride.” The stepmother and the two
sisters were amazed and white with rage, but the Prince took Cinderella
upon his horse, and rode away ; and as they came up to the hazel-tree
the two little white doves sang,—

“Eackwards peep, backwards peep,
There’s uo blood on the shoe;

It fits so nice, and she behind
Is the true bride for you.”

And as they finished they flew down and lighted upon Cinderella’s
shoulders, and there they remained ; and the wedding was celebrated with
great festivities, and the two sisters were smitten with blindness as a
-punishment for their wickedness,







THE RIDDLE.

Once upon a time there was a King’s son, who had a mind to see the
world ; so he set forth, and took no one with him but a faithful servant.
One day he came into a great forest, and when evening drew on he
could find no shelter, and did not know where to pass the night. Just
then he perecived a maiden who was going towards a little cottage, and
as he approached he saw that she was young and beautiful, so he asked
her whether he and his servant could find a welcome in the cottage for
the night. “Yes, certainly,” replied the maiden in a sorrowful voice,
“you can; but I advise you not to enter.” “ Why not?” asked the ©
Prince. The maiden sighed, and answered, “My stepmother practises
wicked arts; she acts not hospitably to strangers.” He perceived now
that he was come to a Witch’s cottage ; but because it was very dark,
and he could go no further, he went in, for he was not at all afraid.
The old woman was sitting in an arm-chair by the fire, and looked at
the strangers out of her red eyes. “ Good evening,” she muttered,
appearing very friendly ; “sit yourselves down and rest.” ‘hen she
poked up the fire on which a little pot was boiling. The daughter
warned them both to be cautious, and neither to eat nor drink anything,
for the old woman brewed bad drinks ; so they slept quietly till morning.
As they made ready for their departure, and the Prince was already
mounted on horseback, the old Witch said, “ Wait a bit, I will bring you
a parting draught.” While she went for it the Prince rode away ; but
the servant, who had to buckle his saddle, was left alone when she came
with the draught. “Take that to thy master,” she said, but at the
same moment the glass cracked, and the poison spirted on the horse, and
so strong was it that the poor animal fell backwards dead. The servant
ran after his master, and told him what had occurred ; but as he would
not leave the saddle behind, he went back to fetch it. As he came to
the deal horse he saw a crow perched upon it feeding himself. “ Who
knows whether we shall meet with anything better to-day? said the



THE RIDDLE. 83

servant, and killing the crow he took it with him. The whole day long
they journeyed on in the forest, but could not get ou’ of it; and at the
approach of night, finding an inn, they entered it. ‘The servant gave
the crow to the host, that he might cook it for their supper ; but they
had fallen into a den of thieves, and in the gloom of night twelve ruffians
came, intending to rob and murder the strangers. Before they began,
however, they sat down to table, and the host and the Witch joined them,
and then they all partook of a dish of pottage, in which the flesh of the
crow was boiled. Scareely had they eaten two morsels apiece when they
all fell down dead; for the poison which had killed the horse had
impregnated the flesh of the crow. There was now no one left in the
house but the daughter of the host, who seemed to be honest, and had :
had no share in the wicked deeds She opened all the doors to the
Prince, and showed him the heaped-up. treasure ; but the Prince said
she might keep it all, for he would have none of it, and so rode on
further with his servant.

After they had wandered a long way in the world, they came to a
city where dwelt a beautiful but haughty Princess, who had declared
that whoever propounded to her a riddle which she could not solve
should be her husband ; but if she solved it he must have his head cut
off. Three days was the time given to consider, but she was always so
sharp that she discovered the proposed riddle before the appointed time.
Nine suitors had been sacrificed in this way, when the Prince arrived, and
being blinded with her great beauty, resolved to stake his life upon her.
So he went before her and proposed his riddle ; namely, ‘ What is this ?
One killed no one, and yet killed twelve.” She knew not what it was,
and thought and thought, but she could not make it out ; and, although
she searched through all her riddle books she could find nothing to help
her ; in short, her wisdom was quite at fault. At last at her wits’ ends
how to help herself, she bade her maid slip into the sleeping-room of the
Prince, and there listen to his dreams, thinking perhaps he might talk in
his sleep and unfold the riddle. The bold servant, however, had put
himself instead of his master into the bed; and when the servant came
into the room he tore off the cloak in which she had wrapped herself,
and hunted her cut with a rod. The second night the Princess sent her
chambermaid to see if she could be more fortunate in listening ; but the
servant snatched her mantle away, and hunted her away with a rod.
The third night the Prince himself thought he should be safe, and so he
lay in his own bed; and the Princess herself came, having on a dark
grey cloak, and sat herself down by him. When she thought he was
asleep and dreaming she spoke to him, hoping he would answer, as many
do; but he was awake, and heard and understood everything very well.
First she asked, “One kills none; what is that?’ He answered, “A
crow which ate of a dead and poisoned horse, and died of it.” Further
she asked, “And yet killed twelve ; what is that?” “Twelve robbers
who partook of the crow, and died from eating it”

As soon as she knew the riddle she tried to slip away, but he held
her mantle so fast that she left it behind. The following morning the



&4 GRIMM’S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.

Princess announced that she had discovered the riddle, aud bade the
twelve judges come and she would solve it before them. ‘The Prince,
however, requested a hearing for himself, and said, “She has stolen in
upon me by night and asked me, or she would never have found it out.”
The judges said, “ Bring us a witness.” ‘Then the servant brought up
the three mantles ; 3 and “when the judges saw the dark grey cloak which
the Princess used to wear, they said, “ Let the cloak be adorned with
gold and silver, that it may be a wedding garment.”



THE SPIDER AND THE FLEA,

A Sprper and a Ilea dwelt together in one house, and brewed their beer
in an ege-shell. One day, when the Spider was stirring it up, she fell
in and scalded-herself. Thereupon the Flea began to scream. And then
the Door asked, “ Why are you screaming, Flea?”
“ Because little Spider has scalded herself in the beer-tub,” replied she.
Thereupon the Door began to creak as if it were in pain; and a
Broom, which stood in the corner, asked, “ What are you creaking for,
Door ?”
“ May I not creak ?” it replied :
“The little Spider's scalt herself,
And the lea weeps.”
So the Broom began to sweep industriously, and presently a little
fart came by, and asked the reason. ‘May I not sweep ?” replied the
Breom—
“The little Spider's scalt hereelf,
And the Ilea weeps ;
The little Door creaks with the pain.”



THE SPIDER AND THE FLEA. 85

Thereupon the little Cart said, “So will I run,” and began to run very
fast past a heap of Ashes, which cried out, “Why do you run, little
Cart?”

“ Because,” replied the Cart,

“The little Spider’s scalt herself,
And the Ilea weeps ;
The little Door creaks with the pain,
And the Broom sweeps.”

“Then,” said the Ashes, “I will burn furiously.” Now, next the
Ashes there grew a Tree, which asked, “Little heap, why do yuu
burn ?”

“ Because,” was the reply,

“The little Spider’s scalt herself,
And the Flea weeps;
The little Door creaks with the pain,
And the Broom sweeps ;
The little Cart runs on so fast.”

Thereupon the Tree cried, “I will shake myself!” and went on
shaking till all its leaves fell off.

A little girl passing by with a water-pitcher saw it shaking, and
asked, “ Why do you shake yourself, little Tree ?”

“Why may I not ?” said the Tree—

“ The little Spider's scalt herself,
And the Flea weeps ;
The little Door creaks with the pain,
And the Broom sweeps ;
The little Cart runs on so fast,
And the Ashes burn.”

Then the Maiden said, “If so, I will break my pitcher ;” and she
threw it down and broke it.
At this the Streamlet, from which she drew the water, asked, “ Why
do you break your pitcher, my little Girl?”
“ Why may I not?” she replied ; for
“ The little Spider's scalt herself,
And the Flea weeps ;
The little Door creaks with the pain,
And the Broom sweeps ;
The little Cart runs on so fast,
And the Ashes burr ;

The little Tree shakes down its leaves—
Now it is my turn !”

“ Ah, then,” said the Streamlet, “now must I begin to flow.” And
it flowed and flowed along, in a great stream, which kept getting bigger
and bigger, until at last it swallowed up the little Girl, the little Tree,
the Ashes, the Cart, the Broom, the Door, the Flea and, last of all, the
Spider, all togetber.











THE LITTLE MOUSE, THE LITTLE BIRD, AND THE
SAUSAGE.

Once upon a time a Mouse, a Bird, and a Sausage, went to housekeeping
together, and agreed so well that they accumulated wealth fast. It was
the duty of the Bird to fetch wood, of the Mouse to draw water and make
the fire, and of the Sausage to cook.

They who are prosperous are for ever hankering after something new,
and thus one day the Bird, meeting another bird on her way home, told
him of her condition in a very boastful way. The other bird, however,
blamed her for her great labours for the two who lived at ease at home ;
for when the Mouse had made the fire and drawn the water she could re-
tire to her chamber, and rest till she was called to lay the table ; while
the Sausage remained by the fire, and saw that the food was well cooked,
and when dinner-time approached dressed it with the gravy and vege-
tables, and made it ready with butter and salt. As soon, then, as the
Bird returned and laid down her burden, they sat down to table, and after
their meal was finished they slept till the next morning, and this life was
avery happy one. The next day the Bird would not go for the wood,
saying she had been slave long enough ; for once they must change about
and try another plan. And although the Mouse and the Sausage pro- -
tested earnestly against it, the Bird was unconvinced ; it must be tried.
And go they tossed up, and it fell to the lot of the Sausage to fetch wood,
while the Mouse had to cook, and the Bird to procure water.

What happened? The Sausage went forth into the forest, the Bird
made the fire, the Mouse put on the pot, and waited alone until tho
Sausage should come home, bringing wood for the next day. But it re-
mained away such a long time that they suspected some misfortune, and
the Bird flew round a little way to see, and met near their house a Dog,
which, having met the Sausage, had seized upon it and devoured it. The
Bird complained bitterly against the Dog asa public robber, but it availed







THE MUSICIANS OF BREMEN.

Page 87.



Full Text


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title Grimm's household stories
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date 2014
distributor University of Florida Digital Collections
email ufdc@uflib.ufl.edu
idno http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00085068/00001
sourceDesc
biblFull
Grimm's household stories
author Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863
role Author, Secondary Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859
Illustrator Wehnert, Edward Henry, 1813-1868
Publisher George Routledge and Sons
extent vii, 376 p., [16] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 22 cm.
publisher George Routledge & Sons
pubPlace London
Manchester
New York
1896
type ALEPH 002230885
NOTIS ALH1252
OCLC 15244865
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note anchored true with one hundred and twenty-two illustrations and sixteen page plates by E.H. Wehnert.
Frontispiece and some plates printed in colors.
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item Children's stories
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction
Children's stories -- 1896
England -- London
England -- Manchester
United States -- New York -- New York
Fairy tales -- 1896
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1896
Bldn -- 1896
revisionDesc
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div Front Cover
pb n 1 facs 00001.jpg
Aft
2 00002.jpg
N ~ AWARricD ro
Thec Baldwui Lb rarv
Ur, -s~
oku yr.
RttF_ oo I
Matter
3 00003.jpg
Half Title
4 00005.jpg
GRIMM'S
HOUSEHOLD STORIES
Frontispiece
5 00008.jpg
Page
6 00009.jpg
GRIMM'S
HOUSEHOLD STORIES
WITH ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-TWO ILLUSTRATIONS
AND SIXTEEN PAGE PLATES BY E. H. WEHNERT.
LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS, LIMITED
BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL
MANCHESTER AND NEW YORK
Preface
7 00011.jpg
PREFACE.
THE Kinder und Hausmirchen" of the Brothers Grimm is a world-
renowned book. Every collector of stories has borrowed from its
treasures,-hundreds of artists have illustrated it,-plays have been
founded on many of the tales,-and learned essays of deep research have
been written upon it by men of literary eminence.
The Brothers Grimm themselves thus speak of their work:
We may see, not seldom, when some heaven-directed storm has beaten
to the earth a whole field of ripening corn, one little spot unscathed, where
yet a few ears of corn stand upright, protected by the hedge or bushes
which grow beside them. The warm sun shines on them day by day, and
unnoticed and forgotten they ripen and are fit for the sickle, which comes
not to reap them that they may be stored in some huge granary. They
remain till they are full ripe, and then the hand of some poor woman
plucks and binds them together and carries them home to store them up
more carefully than a whole sheaf, for perchance they will have to serve
for all the winter, and she cannot tell how long beyond.
"Thus does it appear to us when we consider how little is :eft of all
that bloomed in earlier days,-how even that little is well-nigh lost, save
for the popular ballads, a few legends and traditions, and these innocent
Household Stories. The fire-side hearth and chimney-corner ; the observ-
ance of high-days and holy-days; the solitude of the still forest-glade;
above all, untroubled fancy; these have been the hedges which have kept
intact the field of legendary lore and handed it down from age to age."
In this translation of these Household Stories," it has been simply
endeavoured to render the homely talk of Germany into the homely talk
of our own country. A few short pieces have been omitted to which
English mothers might object, and principally on the score of that
mixture of the sacred and profane which is common in German imagina-
tive composition. It may, perhaps, also be objected that in some of the
Tales the expression, "the greater the rogue, the better his fortune,"
occurs ; to such criticism the Brothers Grimm reply, "The right use of
these narrations will find no evil therein, but, as a good old proverb has
it, a witness of our own hearts. Children point at the stars without fear,
while others, as the popular belief goes, thereby offend the angels."
Any praise of Mr. Wehnert's illustrations is quite unnecessary. They
are so full of character, and so happily in accordance with the spirit of
the work, that every one who admires the stories must be delighted with
the pictures.
Table of Contents
8 00012.jpg
CONTENTS.
PAGE
The Frog Prince . .. 1
The Cat and the Mouse in Part-
nership . 4
The Three Spinsters. . 6
The Woodcutter's Child .. 8
Oh, if I could but Shiver I 11
The Wolf and the Seven Little
Goats . .. .18
The Pack of Ragamuffins 20
Faithful John . .. .22
A Good Bargain . 27
The Wonderful Musician 31
The Twelve Brothers . 33
The Three Little Men in the Wood 37
The Little Brother and Sister 41
Hansel and Grethel. . 45
The Three Snake-Leaves .50
Rapunzel. ........ 53
The White Snake ..... 56
The Fisherman and his Wife.. 59
The Seven Crows . 63
The Valiant Little Tailor .. 65
The Straw, the Coal, and the
Bean . . 71
Little Red-Cap .... .72
Old Mother Frost. ... .75
Cinderella . ... .77
The Riddle . . 82
The Spider and the Flea 84
The Little Mouse, Bird, and
Sausage . . 86
The Musicians of Bremen .87
The Giant with the Three Golden
Hairs . .90
The Three Languages .. 95
The Handless Maiden . 97
The Singing Bone ... .101
The Discreet Hans ... 103
Clever Alice . ... .105
The Wedding of Mrs. Fox .
The Little Elves . ..
Thumbling .....
The Table, the Ass, and the Stick
The Golden Bird .. ...
The Travels of Thumbling .
The Godfather Death .
The Robber-Bridegroom .
The Old Witch . .
Herr Korbes . .
The Feather Bird . ..
The Godfather .. .
The Six Swans. . .
Old Sultan . .
The Almond-Tree . .
Briar Rose . .
King Thrush-Beard . .
Rumpolstiltskin . .
Little Snow-White . .
The Dog and the Sparrow. .
Roland . .
The Knapsack, the Hat, and the
Horn . .
The Little Farmer ..
Jorinde and Joringel. .
Fir-Apple ....
Catherine and Frederic .
The Two Brothers . .
The Golden Goose . .
The Three Feathers . .
The Queen Bee . .
Allerleirauh (The Coat of all
Colours) . .
The Twelve Hunters .
The Rogue and his Master. .
The Wolf and the Fox .
The Fox and Godmother-Wolf
The Fox and the Cat .
The Three Luck-Children .
9 00013.jpg
CONTENTS.
PAGE
How Six Travelled through the
World . . 228
Clever Grethel. . 232
The Pink . .. 234
The Old Man and his Grandson. 237
The Wolf and the Man. 238
The Gold Children . 239
S The Soaring Lark ... 243
The Rabbit's Bride ... .247
The Death of the Cock 249
The Water-Sprite .... .250
Brother Lustig . .. .251
Hans in Luck . 258
The Fox and the Geese. 262
The Goose-Girl . .. .263
The Poor Man and the Rich Man 268
The Young Giant . .. .271
Hans Married . .. 277
The Dwarfs . ... 278
S The King of the Golden Mountain 281
The Raven . .. .286
Old Hildebrand . .. .290
The Three Birds . .. .293
The Water of Life . 296
The Peasant's Wise Daughter 300
Doctor Know-All. . 303
The Two Wanderers. 305
The Spirit in the Bottle 312
PACE
The Experienced Huntsman 316
Bearskin . . 320
The Wren and the Bear 324
The Sweet Soup . 326
The Faithful Beasts. 327
The Three Army Surgeons. 330
Three little Tales about Toads 332
The Valiant Tailor . 334
The Poor Miller's Son and the Cat 836
Hans the Hedgehog. 339
The Child's Grave .. 343
The Two Kings' Children 844
The Jew among Thorns 349
The Flail which came from the
Clouds . ... 353
The Blue Light . 354
The Seven Swabians. 357
The Three Journeymen. 359
Ferdinand the Faithful and
Ferdinand the Unfaithful 362
The Shoes which were Danced to
Pieces . ..... .365
The Bright Sun brings on the
Day . . 368
The Prince who was afraid of
Nothing .. . .. 369
The Idle Spinner. . 373
The Three Brothers. . 375
List Illustrations
10 00014.jpg
FULL-PAGE PLATES.
THE LITTLE BROTHER AND SISTER .
THE MUSICIANS OF BREMEN .
CLEVER ALICE
THE GOLDEN BIRD
THE ALMOND-TREE
THE KNAPSACK, THE HAT, AND TIE HORN
THE TWELVE HUNTERS
HOW SIX TRAVELLED TIIROUII THE WORLD
THE GOLD CHILDREN .
THE GOOSE-GIRL
THE WATER OF LIFE. .
THE TWO WANDERERS
THE EXPERIENCED HUNTSMAN .
THE TWO KINGS' CHILDREN
FERDINAND THE FAITHFUL AND FERDINAND THE UNFAITHFUL
THE THREE BROTHERS .
PAGE
41
87
105
S 123
S 148
S 175
218
228
239
263
S 296
S 305
316
. 344
362
375
Chapter
head Grimm's household stories
11 00015.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES
THE FROG PRINCE.
IN the olden time, when wishing was having, there lived a King, whose
daughters were all beautiful; but the youngest was so exceedingly
beautiful that the Sun himself, although he saw her very often, was
enchanted every time she came out into the sunshine.
Near the castle of this King was a large and gloomy forest, and in
the midst stood an old lime-tree, beneath whose branches splashed a
little fountain; so, whenever it was very hot, the King's youngest
daughter ran off into this wood, and sat down by the side of this
fountain ; and, when she felt dull would often divert herself by throwing
a golden ball up in the air and catching it. And this was her favourite
amusement.
Now, one day it happened, that this golden ball, when the King's
daughter threw it into the air, did not fall down into her hand, but on
the grass; and then it rolled past her into the fountain. The King's
dau ghter followed the ball with her eyes, but it disappeared beneath the
water, which was so deep that no one could see to the bottom. Then
she began to lament, and to cry louder and louder; and, as she cried, a
voice called out, "Why weepest thou, 0 King's daughter? thy tears
would melt even a stone to pity." And she looked around to the spot
whence the voice came, and saw a Frog stretching his thick ugly head
out of the water. Ah you old water-paddler," said she, "was it you
that spoke 1 I am weeping for my golden ball which has slipped away
from me into the water."
"Be l-ret, and do not cry" answered the Frog; "I can give thee
12 00016.jpg
2 GRIaII'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
good advice But what wilt thou give me if I fetch thy plaything up
again ?"
"What will you have, dear Frog?" said sher "My dresses, my
pearls and jewels, or the golden crown which I wear I"
The Frog answered, "Dresses, or jewels, or golden crowns, are not
for me; but if thou wilt love me, and let me be thy companion and
playfellow, and sit at thy table, and eat from thy little golden plate, and
drink out of thy cup, and sleep in thy little bed,-if thou wilt promise
me all these, then will I dive down and fetch up thy golden ball."
"Oh, I will promise you all," said she, "if you will only get me my
ball." But she thought to herself, "What is the silly Frog chattering
about Let him remain in the water with his equals; he cannot mix
in society." But the Frog, as soon as he had received her promise, drew
his head under the water and dived down. Presently he swam up again
with the ball in his mouth, and threw it on the grass. The King's
daughter was full of joy when she again saw her beautiful plaything;
and, taking it up, she ran off immediately. "Stop! stop !" cried the
Frog; "take me with thee. I cannot run as thou canst." But all his
croaking was useless; although it was loud enough, the King's daughter
did not hear it, but, hastening home, soon forgot the poor Frog, who was
obliged to leap back into the fountain.
The next day, when the King's daughter was sitting at table with
her father and all his courtiers, and was eating from her own little
golden plate, something was heard coming up the marble stairs, splish-
splash, splish-splash; and when it arrived at the top, it knocked at the
door, and a voice said, Open the door, thou youngest daughter of the
King !" So she rose and went to see who it was that called her but
when she opened the door and caught sight of the Frog, she shut it
again with great vehemence, and sat down at the table, looking very
pale. But the king perceived that her heart was beating violently, and
asked her whether it were a giant who had come to fetch her away who
stood at the door. "Oh, no!" answered she; "it is no giant, but an
ugly Frog."
"What does the Frog want with you said the King.
"Oh. dear father, when I was sitting yesterday playing by the foun-
tain, my golden ball fell into the water, and this Frog fetched it up again
because I cried so much : but first, I must tell you, he pressed me so
much, that I promised him he should be my companion. I never
thought that he could come out of the water, but somehow he has
jmrrped out, and now he wants to come in here."
At that moment there was another knock, and a voice said,-
"King's daughter, youngest,
Open the door.
Hast thou forgotten
Thy promises made
At the fountain so clear
'Neath the lime-tree's sha&.
King's daughter, youngest,
Open the door."
13 00017.jpg
14 00019.jpg
THE FROG PRINCE. 0
Then the King said," What you have promised, that you must perform;
go and let him in." So the King's daughter went and opened the door,
and the Frog hopped in after her right up to her chair: and as soon as
she was seated, the Frog said, "Take me up;" but she hesitated. so
long that at last the King ordered her to obey. And as soon as the
Frog sat on the chair he jumped on to the table and said, "Now push thy
plate near me, that we may eat together." And she did so, but as every
one saw, very unwillingly. The Frog seemed to relish his dinner much,
bu't every bit that the King's daughter ate nearly choked her, till at last
the Frog said, I have satisfied my hunger and feel very tired ; wilt thou
carry me upstairs now into thy chamber, and make thy bed ready that
we may sleep together ?" At this speech the King's daughter began to
cry, for she was afraid of the cold Frog, and dared not touch him; and
besides, he actually wanted to sleep in her own beautiful, clean bed.
But her tears only made the King very angry, and he said, "He
who helped you in the time of your trouble, must not now be despised !"
So she took the Frog up with two fingers, and put him in a corner of her
chamber. But as she lay in her bed, he crept up to it, and said, I am
so very tired that I shall sleep well; do take me up or I will tell thy
father." This speech put the King's daughter in a terrible passion, and
catching the Frog up, she threw him with all her strength against the
wall, saying, Now, 'will you be quiet, you ugly Frog !"
But as he fell he was changed from a frog into a handsome Prince
with beautiful eyes, who after a little while became, with her father's
consent, her dear companion and betrothed. Then he told her how he
had been transformed by an evil witch, and that no one but herself could
lave had the power to take him out of the fountain; and that on the
morrow they would go together into his own kingdom.
The next morning, as soon as the sun rose, a carriage drawn by
eight white horses, with ostrich feathers on their heads, and golden
bridles, drove up to the door of the palace, and behind the carriage
stood the trusty Henry, the servant of the young Prince. When his
master was changed into a frog, trusty Henry had grieved so much that
he had bound three iron bands round his heart, for fear it should break
with grief and sorrow. But now that the carriage was ready to carry
the young Prince to his own country, the faithful Henry helped in the
bride and bridegroom, and placed himself in the seat behind, full of joy
at his master's release. They had not proceeded far when the Prince
heard a crack as if something had broken behind the carriage ; so he
put his head out of the window and asked Henry what was broken, and
Henry answered, It was not the carriage, my master, but a band which
I bound round my heart when it was in such grief because you were
changed into a frog."
STwice afterwards on the journey there was the same noise, and each
time the Prince thought that it was some part of the carriage that had
given way; but it was only the breaking of the bands which bound the
heart of the trusty Henry, who was thenceforward free and happy.
15 00020.jpg
THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PARTNERSHIP.
A CAT having made the acquaintance of a Mouse, told her so much of
the great love and affection that he had for her, that the Mouse at last
consented to live in the same house with the Cat, and to have their
domestic affairs in common. But we must provide for the winter,"
said the Cat, or we shall be starved : you little Mouse cannot go any-
where, or you will meet with an accident." This advice was followed,
and a pot was brought with some grease in it. However, when they had
got it, they could not imagine where it should be put ; at last, after a
long consideration, the Cat said, "I know no better place to put it than
in the church, for there no one dares to steal anything : we will set it
beneath the organ, and not touch it till we really want it." So the pot
was put away in safety ; but not a long while afterwards the Cat began
to wish for it again, so he spoke to the Mouse and said, I have to tell
you that I am asked by my aunt to stand godfather to a little son, white
with brown marks, whom she has just brought into the world, and so I
must go to the christening. Let me go out to-day, and do you stop at
home and keep house." "Certainly," answered the Mouse ; "pray, go;
and if you eat anything nice, think of me : I would also willingly drink a
little of the sweet red christening-wine." But it was all a story ; for the
Cat had no aunt, and had not been asked to stand godfather. He went
straight to the church, crept up to the grease-pot, and licked it till he had
eaten off the top ; then he took a walk on the roofs of the houses in the
town, thinking over his situation, and now and then stretching himself
in the sun and stroking his whiskers as often as he thought of the pot of
fat. When it was evening he went home again, and the Mouse said,
SSo you have come at last: what a charming day you must hav'
'ad "
"Yes," answered the Cat; "it went off very well!"
"What have you named the kitten '" asked the Mouse.
Tp-of I said the Cat, very quickly.
16 00021.jpg
THE CAT AND THE MOUSE IN PARTNEESaIP.
Top-of I" replied the Mouse; "that is a curious and remarkable
name: is it common in your family "
"What does that matter ?" said the Cat; "it is not worse than
Crumb-stealer, as your children are called."
Not long afterwards the Cat felt the same longing as before, and said
to the Mouse, You must oblige me by taking care of the house once more
by y urself; I am again asked to stand godfather, and, since the young-
ster has a white ring round his neck, I cannot get off the invitation."
So the good little Mouse consented, and the Cat crept away behind the
wall to the church again, and ate half the contents of the grease-pot.
"Nothing tastes better than what one eats by oneself," said he, quite
contented with his day's work; and when he came home the Mouse
asked how this child was named.
"IIalf-out," answered the Cat.
Half out / What do you mean? I never heard such a name before
in my life: I will wager anything it is not in the calendar."
The Cat's mouth now began to water again at the recollection of the
feasting. "All good things come in threes," said he to the Mouse. "I
am again required to be godfather; this child is quite black, and has
little white claws, but not a single white hair on his body; such a thing
only happens once in two years, so pray excuse me this time."
Top-off Half-out!" answered the Mouse; "these are such curious
names, they make me a bit suspicious."
"Ah !" replied the Cat, "there you sit in your grey coat and long
tail, thinking nonsense. That comes of never going out."
The Mouse busied herself during the Cat's absence in putting the
house in order, but meanwhile greedy Puss licked the grease-pot clean
out. "When it is all done one will rest in peace," thought he to him-
self, and as soon as night came he went home fat and tired. The Mouse,
however, again asked what name the third child had received. "It
will not please you any better," answered the Cat, "for he is called
All-out."
"All-out!" exclaimed the Mouse; "well, that is certainly the most
curious name by far. I have never yet seen it in print. All-out What
cnn that mean and, shaking her head, she rolled herself up and went
to sleep.
After that nobody else asked the Cat to stand godfather; but the
winter had arrived, and nothing more was to be picked up out-of-doors;
so the Mouse bethought herself of their store of provision, and said,
" Come, friend Cat, we will go to our grease-pot which we laid by; it
will taste well now."
"Yes, indeed," replied the Cat; "it will taste as well as if you
stroked your tongue against the window."
So they set out on their journey, and when they arrived at th
church the pot stood in its old place-but it was empty "Ah," said
the Mouse, "I see what has happened; now I know you are indeed a
faithful friend. You have eaten the whole as you stood godfather; first
Top-of, then Half-out, then--"
17 00022.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
"Will you be quiet ?" cried the Cat. "Not a word, or ill eat you."
But the poor Mouse had "All-out" at her tongue's end, and had scarcely
uttered it when the Cat made a spring, seized her in his mouth, and
swallowed her.
This happens every day in the world.
rL-=~- 'I-
THE THREE SPINSTERS.
THERE was once a lazy girl who would not spin, and let her mother say
what she would she could not get her to work. At last the mother,
getting both angry and impatient, gave her a blow, which made the girl
cry very loud. Just then the Queen passing by, heard the noise, and
stopping the carriage, she stepped into the house and asked the mother
why she beat her daughter in such a way that the passers-by in the
street heard her shrieks. The mother, howeoe:-, was ashamed that
her daughter's laziness should be known, and said, "I cannot make
her leave off spinning; she will spin for ever and ever, and I am so poor
that I cannot procure the flax." The Queen replied, "I never heard
anything I like better than spinning, and I am never more pleased than
when the wheels are whirring. Let your daughter go with me to the
castle; I have flax enough, and she may spin as much as she pleases."
The mother was very glad at heart, and the Queen took the girl home
with her. As soon as they entered the castle she led her up into three
rooms, which were all full of the finest flax from top to bottom. Now,
spin this flax for me," said the Queen; "and, when you have prepared
it all, you shall have my eldest son for a husband. Although you are
poor, I do not despise you on that account; your unwearied industry is
dowry enough." The girl, however, was inwardly frightened, for she
could not have spun the flax had she sat there from morning to night
until she was three hundred years old. When she was left alone she
began to cry, and thus she sat three days without stirring a hand. 0Q
18 00023.jpg
THE THREE SPINSrERS.
the third day the Queen came, and when she saw that nothing was yet
spun she wondered; and the maiden excused herself by saying that she
had not been able to begin yet, on account of her great sorrow at leaving
her mother's house. So the Queen was satisfied; but on leaving she said,
"You must begin to work for me to-morrow."
As soon as the girl was again alone, she knew not how to act or help
herself, and in her vexation she went and looked out of the window.
She saw three women passing by ; the first of whom had a broad, flat
foot, the second such a large under-lip that it reached nearly to her chin.
and the third a very big thumb. They stopped before the window, and,
looking up, asked the girl what she wanted. She told them her trouble,
and they offered her their help, saying, Will you invite us to the wed-
ding, and not be ashamed of us, but call us your aunts, and let us sit at
your table ? If you do all these, we will spin the flax in a very short
time for you."
With all my heart," replied the girl; "come in, and begin at once."
Then she let in these three women, and, making a clear place in the first
room, they sat themselves down and began spinning. One drew the
thread and trod the wheel, the other moistened the thread, and the third
pressed it and beat with her fingers on the table; and as often as she
did so a pile of thread fell on the ground, which was spun in the finest
manner. The girl hid the three spinsters, however, from the Queen, and
showed her, as often as she came, the heaps of spun yarn ; so that she
received no end of praise. When the first room was empty, the thine
women went to the second, and at length to the third, so that soon all was:
cleared out. Now the three spinsters took leave, saying to the girl, Do
not forget what you promised us; it will make your fortune."
When the girl showed the Queen the empty rooms and the great
pile of thread, the wedding was performed, and the bridegroom was
glad that he had such a clever and industrious wife, and praised her
exceedingly.
I have three aunts," said the girl, "who have done me much service;
so I would not willingly forget them in my good fortune. Allow me,
therefore, to invite them to the wedding, and to sit with me at table."
The Queen and the bridegroom asked, "Why should we not allow it 1"
When the feast was begun, the three old maids entered in great splen-
dour, and the bride said, You are welcome, dear aunts."
Ah," said the bridegroom, "how do you come by such ugly friends ?"
And, going up to the one with the big foot, he asked," Why have you
such a broad foot 1" From treading, from treading," she replied. Then
he went to the second, and asked, Why have you such an overhanging
lip 1" "From licking," she answered, "from licking." Then lie asked
the third, Why have you such a broad thumb 7" From pressing thp
thread," she replied, "from pressing the thread." At this the Prince was
frightened, and said, "Therefore my bride shall never touch a spinning-
wheel again."
And so she was set free from the unlucky flsx-spinning.
19 00024.jpg
THE WOODCUTTER'S CHILD.
ONCE upon a time, near a large forest, there dwelt a woodcutter and his
wife, who had only one child, a little girl three years old; but they were
so poor that they had scarcely food sufficient for every day in the week,
and often they were puzzled to know what they should get to eat. One
morning the woodcutter, his heart full of care, went into the wood to
work; and, as he chopped the trees, there stood before him a tall and
beautiful woman, having a crown of shining stars upon her head, who
thus addressed him: "I am the Guardian Angel of every Christian
child; thou art poor and needy; bring me thy child, and I will take her
with me. I will be her mother, and henceforth she shall be under my
care." The woodcutter consented, and calling his child, gave her to the
Angel, who carried her to the land of Happiness, There everything
went happily; she ate sweet bread, and drank pure milk; her clothes
were gold, and her playfellows were beautiful children. When she
attained her fourteenth year, the Guardian Angel called her to her side,
and said, My dear child, I have a long journey for thee. Take these
keys of the thirteen doors of the land of Happiness : twelve of them thou
mayest open, and behold the glories therein; but the thirteenth, to which
this little key belongs, thou art forbidden to open. Beware if thou dost
disobey, harm will befall thee."
The maiden promised to be obedient, and, when the Guardian Angel
was gone, began her visits to the mansions of Happiness. Every day one
door was unclosed, until she had seen all the twelve. In each mansion
there sat an angel, surrounded by a bright light. The maiden rejoiced
at the glory, and the child who accompanied her rejoiced with her. Now
the forbidden door alone remained. A great desire possessed the maiden
to know what was hidden there ; and she said to the child, I will not
quite open it, nor will I go in, but I will only unlock the door, so that
we may peep through the chink." No, no," said the child; that will
be a sin. The Guardian Angel has forbidden it, and misfortune would
i-on fall upon us."
20 00025.jpg
THE WOODCUTTER'S CHILD.
At this the maiden was silent, but the desire still remained in her
heart, and tormented her continually, so that she had no peace. One
day, however, all the children were away, and she thought, "Now I am
alone and can peep in, no one will know what I do ;" so she found the
keys, and, taking them in her hand, placed the right one in the lock and
turned it around. Then the door sprang open, and she saw three angels
sitting on a throne, surrounded by a great light. The maiden remained
a little while standing in astonishment; and then, putting her finger in
the light, she drew it back, and found it covered with gold. Then great
alarm seized her, and, shutting the door hastily, she ran away. But her
fear only increased more and more, and her heart beat so violently that
she thought it would burst; the gold also on her finger would not come
off, although she washed it and rubbed it with all her strength.
Not long afterwards the Guardian Angel came back from her
journey, and, calling the maiden to her, demanded the keys of the
mansion. As she delivered them up, the Angel looked in her face,
and asked, Hast thou opened the thirteenth door?" No," answered
the maiden.
Then the Angel laid her hand upon the maiden's heart, and felt how
violently it was beating; and she knew that her command had been
disregarded, and that the child had opened the door. Then she asked
again, "Hast thou opened the thirteenth door?" "No," said the
maiden, for the second time.
Then the Angel perceived that the child's finger had become golden
from touching the light, and she knew that the child was guilty; and
she asked her for the third time, Hast thou opened the thirteenth
door?" "No," said the maiden again.
Then the Guardian Angel replied, Thou hast not obeyed me, nor
done my bidding ; therefore thou art no longer worthy to remain among
good children."
And the maiden sank down into a deep sleep, and when she awoke
she found herself in the midst of a wilderness. She wished to call out,
but she had lost her voice. Then she sprang up, and tried to run away;
but wherever she turned thick bushes held her back, so that she could
not escape. In the deserted spot in which she was now inclosed, there
stood an old hollow tree; this was her dwelling-place. In this place
she slept by night; and when it rained and blew she found shelter
within it. Roots and wild berries were her food, and she sought for
them as far as she could reach. In the autumn she collected the leaves
of the trees, and laid them in her hole ; and when the frost and snow
of the winter came, she clothed herself with them, for her clothes had
dropped into rags. But during the sunshine she sat outside the tree,
and her long hair fell down on all sides and covered her like a mantle.
Thus she remained a long time, experiencing the misery and poverty of
the world.
But, once, when the trees had become green again, the King of the
country was hunting in the forest, and, as a bird flew into the bushes
which surrounded the wood, he dismounted, and, tearing the brushwood
21 00026.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
aside, out a path for himself with his sword. When h3 had at last
made his way through, he saw a beautiful maiden, who was clothed
from head to foot with her own golden locks, sitting under the tree.
He stood in silence, and looked at her for some time in astonishment;
at last he said, "Child, how came you into this wilderness But the
maiden answered not, for she had become dumb. Then the King
asked, "Will you go with me to my castle 1" At that she nodded her
nead, and the King, taking her in his arms, put her on his horse and
rode away home. Then he gave her beautiful clothhig, and everything
in abundance. Still she could not speak; but her beauty was so great,
and so won upon the King's heart, that after a little while he married
her.
When about a year had passed away the Queen brought a son into
the world, and the same night, while lying alone in her bed, the Guar-
dian Angel appeared to her, and said-
"Wilt thou tell the truth, and confess that thou didst unlock th3
forbidden door 1 For then will I open thy mouth, and give thee agair
the power of speech; but if thou remainest obstinate in thy sin, their.
will I take from thee thy new-born babe."
And the power to answer was given to her, but her heart was
hardened, and she said, "No, I did not open the door;" and at these
words the Guardian Angel took the child out of her arms and disappeared
with him.
The next morning, when the child was not to be seen, a murmur
arose among the people that their Queen was a murderess, who had
destroyed her only son; but, although she heard everything, she could
say nothing. But the King did not believe the ill report, because of his
great love for her.
About a year afterwards another son was born, and on the night of
his birth the Guardian Angel again appeared, and asked, Wilt thou
confess that thou didst open the forbidden door 7 Then will I restore
to thee thy son, and give thee the power of speech ; but if thou hard-
ensst thyself in thy sin, then will I take this new-born babe also with
me."
Then the Queen answered again, No, I did not open th, door;"
so the Angel took the second child out of her arms and bore him away.
On the morrow, when the infant could not be found, the people said
openly that the Queen had slain him, and the King's councillors advised
that she should be brought to trial. But the King's affections was still
so great that he would not believe it, and he commanded his councillors
never again to mention the report on pain of death.
The next year a beautiful little girl was born, and for the third
time the Guardian Angel appeared and said to the Queen, "Follow
me;" and taking her by the hand, she led her to the kingdom of Hap-
piness, and showed to her the two other children, who were playing
merrily. The Queen rejoiced at the sight, and the Angel said, "Is
thy heart not yet softened I If thou wilt confess that thou didst unlock
the forbidden door, then will I restore to thee both thy sons." But the
22 00027.jpg
OII, IF I COULD BUT SHIVER 11
Queen again answered, "No, I did not open it;" and at these words she
sank upon the earth, and her third child was taken from her.
When this was rumoured abroad the next day, all the people ex-
claimed, "The Queen is a murderess! she must be condemned! and the
King could not this time repulse his councillors. Thereupon a trial
was held, and since the Queen could make no good answer or defence,
she was condemned to die upon a funeral pile. The wood was collected,
she was bound to the stake, and the fire was lighted all around her.
Then the iron pride of her heart began to soften, and she was moved to
repentance, and she thought, "Could I but now, before my death, confess
that I opened the door And her tongue was loosened, and she cried
aloud, Thou good Angel, I confess." At these words the rain descended
from heaven and extinguished the fire; then a great light shone above,
and the Angel appeared and descended upon the earth, and by her side
were the Queen's two sons, one on her right hand and the other on her
left, and in her arms she bore the new-born babe. Then the Angel
restored to the Queen her three children, and loosening her tongue, pro-
mised her a happy future, and said, "Whoever will repent and confess
their sins, they shall be forgiven."
A TALE OF ONE WHO TRAVELLED TO LEARN
WHAT SHIVERING MEANT.
A FATHER had two sons, the elder of whom was forward and clever
enough to do almost anything; but the younger was so stupid that he
could learn nothing, and when the people saw him, they said, "Will thy
father still keep thee as a burden to him So if anything was to
be done, the elder had at all times to do it; but sometimes the father
would call him to fetch something in the dead of night, and perhaps the
way led through the churchyard or by a dismal place, and then he vjeJ
23 00028.jpg
12 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
to answer, No, father, I cannot go there, I am afraid," for he was a
coward. Or sometimes of an evening, tales were told by the fireside
which made one shudder, and the listeners exclaimed, Oh, it makes us
shiver !" In a corner, meanwhile, sat the younger son, listening, but
he could not comprehend what was said, and he thought "They say
continually, Oh, it makes us shiver, it makes us shiver I' but perhaps
shivering is an art which I cannot understand." One day, however, his
father said to him, "Do you hear, you there in the corner You are
growing stout and big; you must learn some trade to get your living by.
Do you see how your brother works ? But as for you, you are not worth
malt and hops."
Ah, father !" answered he, I would willingly learn something.
What shall I begin I I want to know what shivering means, for of that
I can understand nothing."
The elder brother laughed when he heard this speech, and thought to
himself, "Ah! my brother is such a simpleton, that he cannot earn his
own living. lie who would make a good hedge, must learn betimes to
bend." But the father sighed and said, What shivering means you may
learn soon enough, but you will never get your bread by that."
Soon after the parish sexton came in for a gossip, so the father told
him his troubles, and how that his younger son was such a simpleton,
that he knew nothing and could learn nothing. "Just fancy, when I
asked him how lie intended to earn his bread, he desired to learn what
shivering meant Oh, if that be all," answered the sexton, he can
earn that soon enough with me; just send him to my place, and I will
soon teach him." The father was very glad, because he thought that it
would do the boy good; so the sexton took him home to ring the bells.
About two days afterwards he called him up at midnight to go into the
church-tower to toll the bell. "You shall soon learn what shivering
means," thought the sexton, and getting up he went out too. As soon as
the boy reached the belfry, and turned himself round to seize the rope,
lie saw upon the stairs, near the sounding-hole, a white figure. Who's
there lie called out; but the figure gave no answer, and neither stirred
nor spoke. "Answer," said the boy, "or make haste off; you have no
business here to-night." But the sexton did not stir, so that the boy
might think it was a ghost.
The boy called out a second time, "What are you doing here?
Speak, if you are an honest fellow, or else I will throw you down-
stairs."
The sexton said to himself, "That is not a bad thought;" but he re-
mained quiet as if he were a stone. Then the boy called out for the
third time, but it produced no effect; so, making a spring, he thrN w thl
ghost down the stairs, so that it rolled ten steps, and then lay motionless
in a corner. Thereupon he rang the bell, and then going home he went
to bed without saying a word, and fell fast asleep. The sexton's wife
waited some time for her husband, but he did not come; so at last she
became anxious, woke the boy, and asked him if he knew where her
husband was, who had gone before him to the belfry.
24 00029.jpg
OH, IF I COULD BUT SHIVER !" 13
"No," answered the boy; "but there was some one standing on the
steps who would not give any answer, nor go away, so I took him for a
thief and threw him downstairs. Go now and see where he is; perhaps
it may be he, but I should be sorry for it." The wife ran off and
found her husband lying in a corner, groaning, with one of his ribs
broken.
She took him up and ran with loud outcries to the boy's father, and
told him, "Your son has brought a great misfortune on us; he has
thrown my husband down and broken his bones. Take the good-for-
nothing fellow from our house."
The terrified father came in haste and scolded the boy. What do
these wicked tricks mean I They will only bring misfortune upon you."
"Father," answered the lad, "hear me I am quite innocent. He
stood there at midnight like one who had done some evil; I did not
know who it was, and cried three times, 'Speak, or be off!'"
"Ah !" said the father, "everything goes badly with you. Get out
of my sight; I do not wish to see you again 1"
"Yes, father, willingly; wait but one day, then I will go out and learn
what shivering means, that I may at least understand one business which
will support me."
"Learn what you will," replied the father, "all is the same to me.
Here are fifty dollars; go forth with them into the world, and tell no
man whence you came, or who your father is, for I am ashamed of you."
"Yes, father, as you wish; but if you desire nothing else, I shall
esteem that very lightly."
As soon as day broke the youth put his fifty dollars into a knapsack
and went out upon the highroad, saying continually, Oh, if I could but
shiver !"
Presently a man came up, who heard the boy talking to himself;
and, as they were just passing the place where the gallows stood, the
man said, "Do you see 1 There is the tree where seven fellows have
married the hempen maid, and now swing to and fro. Sit yourself
down there and wait till midnight, and then you will know what it is to
shiver !"
Oh, if that be all," answered the boy, "I can very easily do that
But if I learn so speedily what shivering is, then you shall have my fifty
dollars if you come again in the morning."
Then the boy went to the gallows, sat down, and waited for evening,
and as he felt cold he n ade a fire. But about midnight the wind blew
so sharp, that, in spite of the fire, he could not keep himself warm. The
wind blew the bodies against one another, so that they swung backwards
and forwards, and he thought, If I am cold here below by the fire, how
must they freeze above !" So his compassion was excited, and, contriving
a ladder, he mounted, and, unloosening them one after another, he
brought down all seven. Then he poked and blew the fire, and set them i
round that they might warm themselves; but as they sat still without
moving their clothing caught fire. So he said, Take care of yourselves,
Or I will hang all of you up again." The dead heard not, and silently
25 00030.jpg
14 GRIIMM'S HOUSEIIOLD STORIES.
allowed their rags to burn. This made him so angry that he said, L
you will not hear I cannot help you; but I will not burn with you." So
he hung them up again in a row, and sitting down by the fire he soon
went to sleep. The next morning the man came, expecting to receive his
fifty dollars, and asked, "Now do you know what shivering means?"
"No," he answered; "how should I know? Those fellows up there have
not opened their mouths, and were so stupid that they let the old rags
on their bodies be burnt." Then the man saw that he should not carry
away the fifty dollars that day, so he went away saying, "I never met
with such an one before."
The boy also went on his way and began again to say, "Ah, if only I
could but shiver-if I could but shiver!" A waggoner walking behind
overheard him, and asked, "Who are you "
I do not know," answered the boy.
The waggoner asked again, "What do you here V"
I know not."
Who is your father 1"
I dare not say."
What is it you are continually grumbling about 1"
"Oh," replied the youth, I wish to learn what shivering is, but
nobody can teach me."
"Cease your silly talk," said the waggoner. "Come with me, and I
wi:l see what I can do for you." So the boy went with the aggoner.
and about evening time they arrived at an inn where they put up for
the night, and while they were going into the parlour he said, quite
aloud, "Oh, if could but shiver-if I could but shiver!" The host
overheard him and said, laughingly, "Oh, if that is all you wish, you
shall soon have the opportunity." "Hold your tongue," said his wife;
"so many imprudent people have already lost their lives, it were a
shame and sin to such beautiful eyes that they should not see the light
again." But the youth said, "If it were ever so difficult I would at
once learn it; for that reason I left home;" and he never let the host
have any peace till he told him that not far off stood an enchanted
castle, where any one might soon learn to shiver if he would watch there
three nights. The King had promised his daughter in marriage to whom
ever would venture, and she was the most beautiful young lady that the
sun ever shone upon. And he further told him that inside the castle
there was an immense amount of treasure guarded by evil spirits; enough
to make any one free, and turn a poor man into a very rich one. Many
had, he added, already ventured into this castle, but no one had ever
come out again.
The next morning this youth went to the King, and said, If you
will allow me, I wish to watch three nights in the enchanted castle."
The King looked at him, and because his appearance pleased him, he
said, You may make three requests, but they must be inanimate things
you ask for, and such as you can take with you into the castle." So the
youth asked for a fire, a lathe, and a cutting-board.
The King let him take these things by day into the castle, and when
26 00031.jpg
OH, IF I COULD BUT SHIVER 15
it was evening the youth went in and made himself a bright fire in cne
of the rooms, and, placing his cutting-board and knife near it, he sat
down upon his lathe. "Ah, if I could but shiver!" said he. "But
even here I shall never learn." At midnight he got up to stir the fire,
and, as he poked it, there shrieked suddenly in one corner, "Miau,
miau I how cold I am !" "You simpleton!" he exclaimed, "what are
you shrieking for 7 if you are so cold, come and sit down by the fire and
warm yourself!" As he was speaking, two great black cats sprang up
to him with an immense jump and sat down one on each side, looking at
him quite wildly with their fiery eyes. When they had warmed them-
selves for a little while they said, "Comrade, shall we have a game of
cards ?" "Certainly," he replied; "but let me see your paws first." So
they stretched out their claws, and he said, Ah, what long nails you
have got; wait a bit, I must cut them off first;" and so saying he
caught them up by the necks, and put them on his board and screwed
their feet down. "Since I have seen what you are about I have lost my
relish for a game at cards," said he; and, instantly killing them, threw
them away into the water. But no sooner had he quieted these two and
thought of sitting down again by his fire, than there came out of every
hole and corner black cats and black dogs with glowing chains, continually
more and more, so that he could not hide himself. They howled fear
fully, and jumped upon his fire, and scattered it about as if they would
extinguish it. He looked on quietly for some time, but at last, getting
angry, he took up his knife and called out, "Away with you, you vaga-
bonds! and chasing them about a part ran off, and the rest he killed
and threw into the pond. As soon as he returned he blew up the sparks
of his fire again and warmed himself, and while he sat, his eyes began to
feel very heavy and he wished to go to sleep. So looking around he saw
a great bed in one corner, in which le lay down ; but no sooner had he
closed his eyes, than the bed began to move of itself and travelled all
round the castle. "Just so," said he, "only better still ;" whereupon
the bed gallopped away as if six horses pulled it up and down steps and
stairs, until at last all at once it overset, bottom upwards, and lay upon
him like a mountain; but up he got, threw pillows and mattresses into
the air, and saying, "Now, he who wishes may travel," laid himself down
by the fire and slept till day broke. In the morning the King came, and,
seeing the youth lying on the ground, he thought that the spectres had
killed him, and that he was dead; so he said, It is a great misfortune
that the finest men are thus killed;" but the youth, hearing this, sprang
up, saying, It is not come to that with me yet! The King was much
astonished, but still very glad, and asked him how he had fared. "Very
well," replied he ; "as one night has passed, so also may the other two."
Soon after he met his landlord, who opened his eyes when he saw him.
"I never thought to see you alive again," said he; "have you learnt
now what shivering means ?" No," said he; "it is all of no use. Oh,
if any one would but tell me "
The second night no went up again into the castle, and sitting down
by the fire, began his old song, If I could but shiver !" When midnight
27 00032.jpg
16 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
came, a ringing and a rattling noise was heard, gentle at first and louder
and louder by degrees; then there was a pause, and presently with a
loud outcry half a man's body came down the chimney and fell at his
feet. Holloa ;" he exclaimed, "only half a man answered that ringing;
that is too little." Then the ringing began afresh, and a roaring and
howling was heard, and the other half fell down. "Wait a bit," said he;
"I will poke up the fire first." When he had done so and looked round
again, the two pieces had joined themselves together, and an ugly man
was sitting in his place. "I did not bargain for that," said the youth
"the bench is mine." The man tried to push him away, but the youth
would not let him, and giving him a violent push sat himself down in his
old place. Presently more men fell down the chimney, one after the
other, who brought nine thigh-bones and two skulls, which they set up,
and then they began to play at ninepins. At this the youth wished also
to play, so he asked whether he might join them. "Yes, if you have
money Money enough," he replied, "but your balls are not quite
round ;" so saying he took up the skulls, and, placing them on his lathe,
turned them round. Ah, now you will roll well," said he. Holloa!
now we will go at it merrily." So he played with them and lost some of
his money, but as it struck twelve everything disappeared. Then he lay
down and went to sleep quietly. On the morrow the King came for
news, and asked him how he had fared this time. I have been playing
ninepins," he replied, and lost a couple of dollars." Have you not
shivered No I have enjoyed myself very much; but I wish some
one would teach me that! "
On the third night he sat down again on his bench, saying in great
vexation, "Oh, if I could only shiver 1" When it grew late, six tall men
came in bearing a coffin between them. "Ah, ah," said he, that is
surely my little cousin, who died two days ago ;" and beckoning with his
finger he called, "Come, little cousin, come !" The men set down the
coffin upon the ground, and he went up and took off the lid, and there
lay a dead man within, and as he felt the face it was as cold as ice.
" Stop a moment," he cried; I will warm it in a trice ;" and stepping
up to the fire he warmed his hands, and then laid them upon the face,
but it remained cold. So he took up the body, and sitting down by the
fire, he laid it on his lap and rubbed the arms that the blood might
circulate again.. But all this was of no avail, and he thought to him-
self if two lie in a bed together they warm each other; so he put the
body in the bed, and covering it up laid himself down by its side. After
a little while the body became warm and began to move about. "See,
my cousin," he exclaimed, "have I not warmed you ?" But the body
got up and exclaimed, "Now I will strangle you." Is that your
gratitude cried the youth. "Then you shall get into your coffin
again;" and taking it up, he threw the body in, and made the lid
fabt. Then the six men came in again and bore it away. Oh, deary
me," said he, "I shall never be able to shiver if I stop here all my life-
time I" At these words in came a man who was taller than all the
others, and looked more horrible; but he was very old and had a long
28 00033.jpg
"OH, IF I COULD BUT SHIVER! 17
white beard. "Oh, you wretch," he exclaimed, "now thou shalt learn
what shivering means, for thou shalt die !"
"Not so quick," answered the youth; "if I die I must be brought
to it first."
I will quickly seize you," replied the ugly one.
"Softly, softly; be not too sure. I am as strong as you. and
perhaps stronger."
"That we will see," said the ugly man. "If you are stronger than I,
I will let you go; come, let us try;" and he led him away through
a dark passage to a smith's forge. Then taking up an axe he cut
through the anvil at one blow down to the ground. "I can do that
still better," said the youth, and went to another anvil, while the old
man followed him and watched him with his long beard hanging down.
Then the youth took up an axe, and, splitting the anvil at one blow,
wedged the old man's beard in it. Now I have you; now death comes
upon you 1" and, taking up an iron bar, lie beat the old man until he
groaned, and begged him to stop, and he would give him great riches.
So the youth drew out the axe, and let him loose. Then the old man,
leading him back into the castle, showed him three chests full of gold in
a cellar. "One share of this," said he, "belongs to the poor, another to
the King, and a third to yourself." And just then it struck twelve and
the old man vanished, leaving the youth in the dark. "I must help
myself out here," said he, and groping round he found his way back to
his room and went to sleep by the fire.
The next morning the King came and inquired, "Now have you
learnt to shiver" No," replied the youth; "what is it My dead
cousin came here, and a bearded man, who showed me a lot of gold
down below; but what shivering means, no one has showed me 1"
Then the King said, "You have won the castle, and shall marry my
daughter."
"That is all very fine," replied the youth, "but still I don't know
what shivering means."
So the gold was fetched, and the wedding was celebrated, but the
young Prince (for the youth was a Prince now), notwithstanding his
love for his bride, and his great contentment, was still continually
crying, "If I could but shiver! if I could but shiver !" At last it fell
out in this wise : one of the chambermaids said to the Princess, "Let
me bring in my aid to teach him what shivering is." So she went to
the brook which flowed through the garden, and drew up a pail of water
full of little fish; and, at night, when the young Prince was asleep, his
bride drew away the covering and poured the pail of cold water and the
little fishes over him, so that they slipped all about him. Then the
Prince woke up directly, calling out, Oh! that makes me shiver!
dear wife, that rakes me shiver I Yes, now I know what shivering
means!"
29 00034.jpg
THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE GOATS.
ONcE upon a time there lived an old Goat who had seven young ones
whom she loved as every mother loves her children. One day she
wanted to go into the forest to fetch some food, so, calling her seven
young ones together, she said, "Dear children, I am going away into the
wood; be on your guard against the Wolf, for if he come here, he will
eat you all up-skin, hair and all. lie often disguises himself, but you
may know him by his rough voice and his black feet." The little Goats
replied, "Dear mother, we will pay great attention to what you say;
you may go away without any anxiety." So the old one bleated and ran
off, quite contented, upon her road.
Not long afterwards, somebody knocked at the hut-door, and called
out, Open, my dear children ; your mother is here and has brought you
each something." But the little Goats perceived from the rough voice
that it was a Wolf, and so they said, "We will not undo the door; you
are not our mother; she has a gentle and loving voice; but yours is
gruff; you are a Wolf." So the Wolf went to a shop and bought a great
piece of chalk, which he ate, and by that means rendered his voice more
gentle. Then he came back, knocked at the hut-door, and called out,
Open, my dear children ; your mother has come home, and has brought
you each something." But the Wolf had placed his black paws upon the
window-sill, so the Goats saw them, and replied, No, we will not open
the door; our mother has not black feet; you are a Wolf." So the
Wolf went to a baker and said, "1 Ihave hurt my foot, put some dough
on it." And when the baker had done so, he ran to the miller, saying,
" Strew some white flour upon my feet." But the miller, thinking he
was going to deceive somebody, hesitated, till the Wolf said, If you do
not do it at once, I will eat you." This made the miller afraid, so he
powdered his feet with flour, Such is mankind I
30 00035.jpg
TIHE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE GOATS. 19
Now, the villain went for the third time to the hut, and, knocking at
the door, called out, "Open to me, my children ; your dear mother is
come, and has brought with her something for each of you out of the
forest." The little Goats exclaimed, "Show us first your feet, that we
may see whether you are our mother." So the Wolf put his feet up on
the window-sill, and when they saw that they were white, they thought
it was all right, and undid the door. But who should come in ? The
Wolf. They were terribly frightened, and tried to hide themselves. One
ran under the table, the second got into the bed, the third into the cup-
board, the fourth into the kitchen, the fifth into the oven, the sixth
into the wash-tub, and the seventh into the clock-case. But the Wolf
found them all out, and did not delay, but swallowed them all up
one after another; only the youngest one, hid in the clock-case, he did
not discover. When the Wolf had satisfied his appetite, he dragged
himself out, and lying down upon the green meadow under a tree, went
fast asleep.
Soon after the old Goat came home out of the forest. Ah, what a
sight she saw The hut-door stood wide open; the table, stools, and
benches were overturned; the wash-tub was broken to pieces, and the
sheets and pillows pulled off the bed. She sought her children, hut
could find them nowhere. She called them by name, one after the
other; but no one answered. At last, when she came to the name of
the youngest, a little voice replied, Here I am, dear mother, in the
clock-case." She took her out, and heard how the Wolf had. come and
swallowed all the others. You cannot think how she wept for her poor
little ones.
At last she went out all in her misery, and the young Goat ran by
her side; and when they came to the meadow, there lay the Wolf under
the tree, snoring so that the boughs quivered. She viewed him on all
sides, and perceived that something moved and stirred about in his body.
"Ah, mercy !" thought she, should my poor children, whom he has
swallowed for his dinner, be yet alive !" So saying, she ran home and
fetched a pair of scissors and a needle and thread. Then she cut open
the monster's hairy coat, and had scarcely made one slit, before one little
Goat put his head out, and, as she cut further, out jumped one after
another, all six, still alive, and without any injury : for the monster, in
his eagerness, had gulped them down quite whole. There was a joy 1
They hugged their dear mother, and jumped about like tailors keeping
their wedding day. But the old mother said, Go and pick up at once
some large stones, that we may fill Ih e monster's stomach, while lie lies
fast asleep.' So the seven little Goats dragged up in gceat haste a pile
of stones and put them in the Wolf's stomach, as many as they could
bring; and then the old mother went, and, looking at him in a great
hurry, saw that he was still insensible, and did not stir, and so she sewed
up the slit.
When the Wolf at last woke up, he raised himself upon his legs, and
because the stones which were lying in his stomach made him feel thirsty,
ne went to a brook in order to drink. But m he went along, rolling
31 00036.jpg
20 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
from side to side, the stones began to tumble about in his body, and he
called out,-
"What rattles, what rattles
Against my poor bones ?
Not little goats, I think,
But only big stones !"
And when the Wolf came to the brook he stooped down to drink,
and the heavy stones made him lose his balance, so that he fell, and sank
beneath the water.
As soon as the seven little Goats saw this, they came running up,
singing aloud, The Wolf is dead I the Wolf is dead!" and they danced
for joy around their mother by the side of the brook.
THE PACK OF RAGAMUFFINS.
A CooK once addressed his Hen thus, "It is now the time when the nuta
are ripe, let us go together to the hills, and eat all we can, before the
squirrels carry them away." "Yes," answered the Hen, "let us go and
enjoy ourselves." So they went together to the hills, and as it was a
bright day they stopped till evening. Now I do not know whether they
had eaten too much, or whether they had become proud, but the Hen
would not go home on foot, and the Cock had to build a little carriage
out of the nutshells. As soon as it was ready the Hen sat herself in it
and said to the Cock, You can harness yourself to it." "You are very
kind," said he, "but I would rather walk home than harness my own
self;-no we did not agree to that. I will willingly be coachman and
sit on the box ; but drag it myself I never will."
While they were quarrelling a Duck called out hard by, "You
32 00037.jpg
THE PACK OF EAGAMUFFINS.
thieving folk, who asked you to come to my nut-hill wait A Lit and it
shall cost you dearly; and she rushed up to the Cock with outstretched
beak. But the Cock was not idle either, and attacked the Duck valiantly,
and at last wounded her so badly with his spur that she begged for mercy,
and willingly undertook to draw the carriage as a punishment. The
Cock set himself on the box as coachman, and off they started at a great
rate, crying out, Quick, Duck quick When they had gone a por-
tion of the way they met two walkers, a Pin and a Needle, who called
out to them to stop, and said it had become too dark to stitch, and
they could not go another step; that it was very dirty upon the road,
and might they get in for a little way. They had been stopping at the
door of the tailor's house drinking beer and had been delayed. The
Cock, seeing they were thin people, who would not take much room, let
them both get up, but not till they had promised not to tread on the toes
of himself or his Hen. Later in the evening they came to an inn, and
because they could not travel further that evening, and because the Duck
had hurt her foot very much, and staggered from side to side, they turned
in. The landlord at first made many objections, saying his house was
already full; he thought, too, that they were nobody of any consequence;
but at last, after they had made many fine speeches, and promised that
he should have the egg which the Hen had laid on the road, and the one
which the Duck laid every day, he said at last that they might remain
over night. So when they had refreshed themselves they held a great
revel ana tumult; but early in the morning, when everybody was asleep,
and it was still dark, the Cock awoke the Hen, and fetching the egg they
broke it, and ate it together, throwing the shell away into the hearth.
Then they went to the Needle, who was still asleep, and, taking him by
the head, stuck him in the cushion of the landlord's chair, and the Pin
they put in his towel, and then they flew off over the fields and away. The
Duck, who had gone to sleep in the open air, and had stopped in the yard,
heard them fly past, and, getting up quickly, found a pond, into which
she waddled, and in which she swam much faster than she walked when
she had to pull the carriage. A couple of hours later the landlord rose
up from his feather-bed, washed himself, and took up the towel to wipe
himself dry; then the Pin, in passing over his face, made a red scratch from
one ear to the other; so he went into the kitchen to light his pipe, but
just as he stepped on the hearth the eggshells sprang into his eyes. This
morning everything happens unlucky to me," said lie, sitting down in
vexation in his grandfather's chair; but he quickly jumped up again,
crying, "Woe's me !" for the Needle had pricked him very badly. This
drovo him completely wild, and he laid the mischief on the guests, who
had arrived so late the evening before, and when he went out to look
after them they were gone. So he swore that he would never again take
such a pack of ragamuffins into his house, who destroyed so much, paid
no reckoning, and played mischievous tricks in the place of thanks.
33 00038.jpg
GNCE apon a time there lived an old King, who fell very sick, and
thought lie was lying upon his death-bed ; so he said, "Let faithful John
come to me." This faithful John was his affectionate servant, and was so
called because he had been true to him all his lifetime. As soon as John
came to the bedside, the King said, My faithful John, I feel that my
end approaches, and I have no other care than about my son, who is still
so young that he cannot always guide himself aright. If you do not
promise to instruct him in everything he ought to know, and to be his
guardian, I cannot close my eyes in peace." Then John answered, "I
will never leave him; I will always serve him truly, even if it cost me
my life." So the old King was comforted, and said, "Now I can die in
peace. After my death you must show him all the chambers, halls, and
vaults in the castle, and all the treasures which are in them; but the last
room in the long corridor you must not show him, for in it hangs the
portrait of the daughter of the King of the Golden Palace ; if he sees
her picture, lie will conceive a great love for her, and will fall down in a
swoon, and on her account undergo great perils, therefore you must
keep him away." The faithful John pressed his master's hand again in
token of assent, and soon after the King laid his head upon the pillow
and expired.
After the old King had been borne to his grave, the faithful John
related to the young King all that his father had said upon his deathbed,
and declared, All this I will certainly fulfil; I will be as true to you
as I was to him, if it cost me my lifo." When the time of mourning was
passed, John said to the young King, "It is now time for you to see your
inheritance ; I will show you your paternal castle." So he led the King
all over it, up stairs and down stairs, and showed him all the riches, and
all the splendid chambers ; only one room he did not open, containing
the perilous portrait, which was so placed that one saw it directly the
&dor was opened, and. moreover, it was so beautifully painted, that one
FAITHFUL JOHN.
34 00039.jpg
FAITHFUL JOHN.
thought it breathed and moved; nothing in all the world could be more
lifelike or more beautiful. The young King remarked, however, that the
faithful John always passed by one door, so he asked, Why do you not
open that one 1" "There is something in it," he replied, which will
frighten you."
But the King said, I have seen all the rest of the castle, and I will
know what is in there;" and he went and tried to open the door by
force. The faithful John pulled him back, and said, I promised your
father before he died that you should not see the contents of that room,
it would bring great misfortunes both upon you and me."
Oh, no," replied the young King, "if I do not go in, it will be my
certain ruin ; I should have no peace night nor day until I had seen it
with my own eyes. Now I will not stir from the place till you unlock
the door."
Then the faithful John saw that it was of no use talking; so, with a
heavy heart and many sighs, he picked the key out of the great bunch.
When he had opened the door, he went in first, and thought he would
cover up the picture, that the King should not see it; but it was of no
use, for the King stepped upon tiptoes and looked over his shoulder; and
as soon as he saw the portrait of the maiden, which was so beautiful and
glittered with precious stones, he fell down on the ground insensible,
The faithful John lifted him up and carried him to his bed, and thought
with great concern, Mercy on us the misfortune has happened ; what
will come of it 1" and he gave the young King wine until he came to
himself. The first words he spoke were, Who does that beautiful pic-
ture represent?" That is the daughter of the King of the Golden
Palace," was the reply.
Then," said the King, my love for her is so great, that if all the
leaves on the trees had tongues, they should not gainsay it; my life
is set upon the search for her. You are my faithful John, you must
accompany me."
The trusty servant deliberated for a long while how to set about this
business, for it was very difficult to get into the presence of the King's
daughter. At last he bethought himself of a way, and said to the King,
" Everything which she has around her is of gold,-chairs, tables, dishes,
bowls, and all the household utensils. Among your treasures are five
tons of gold; let one of the goldsmiths of your kingdom manufacture
vessels and utensils of all kinds therefrom-all kinds of birds, and wild
and wonderful beasts, such as will please her; then we will travel with
these, and try our luck." Then the King summoned all his goldsmiths,
who worked day and night until many very beautiful things were ready.
When all had been placed on board a ship, the faithful John put on mer-
chant's clothes, and the King likewise, so that they might travel quite
unknown. Then they sailed over the wide sea, and sailed away until
they came to the city where dwelt the daughter of the King of the
Golden Palace.
The faithful John told the King to remain in the ship, and wait for
him. Perhaps," said he, I shall bring the King's daughter with mea
35 00040.jpg
24 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
therefore take care that all is in order, and set out the golden vessels and
adorn the whole ship." Thereupon John placed in a napkin some of the
golden cups, stepped upon land, and went straight to the King's palace.
When he came into the castle-yard, a beautiful maid stood by the brook,
who had two golden pails in her hand, drawing water; and when she had
filled them and had turned round, she saw a strange man, and asked who
he was. Then John answered, I am a merchant," and opening his
napkin, he showed her its contents. Then she exclaimed, Oh, what
beautiful golden things !" and, setting the pails down, she looked at the
cups one after another, and said, The King's daughter must see these;
she is so pleased with anything made of gold that she will buy all these."
And taking him by the hand, she led him in; for she was the lady's
maid. When the King's daughter saw the golden cups, she was much
pleased, and said, They are so finely worked, that I will purchase them
all." But the faithful John replied, "I am only the servant of a rich
merchant; what I have here is nothing in comparison to those which my
master has in his ship, than which nothing more delicate or costly has
ever been worked in gold." Then the King's daughter wished to have
them all brought; but he said, It would take many days, and so great
is the quantity, that your palace has not halls enough in it to place them
around." Then her curiosity and desire were still more excited, and at
last she said, Take me to the ship; I will go myself and look at your
master's treasure."
The faithful John conducted her to the ship with great joy, and the
King, when he beheld her, saw that her beauty was still greater than the
picture had represented, and thought nothing else but that his heart
would jump out of his mouth. Presently she stepped on board, and the
King conducted her below; but the faithful John remained on deck by
the steersman, and told him to unmoor the ship and put on all the sail
he could, that it might fly as a bird through the air. Meanwhile the
King showed the Princess all the golden treasures,-the dishes, cups,
bowls, the birds, the wild and wonderful beasts. Many hours passed
away while she looked at everything, and in her joy she did not remark
that the ship sailed on and on. As soon as she had looked at the last,
and thanked tle merchant, she wished to depart. But when she came
on deck, she perceived that they were upon the high sea, far from the
shore, and were hastening on with all sail. Ah," she exclaimed in
affright, I am betrayed; I am carried off and taken away in the power
of a strange merchant. I would rather die !"
But the King, taking her by the hand, said, I am not a merchant,
but a king, thine equal in birth. It is true that I have carried thee off;
but that is because of my overwhelming love for thee. Dost thou know
that when I first saw the portrait of thy beauteous face, that I fell down
in a swoon before it 7" When the King's daughter heard these words,
she was reassured, and her heart w,,as inclined towards him, so that she
willingly became his bride. While they thus went on their voyage on
the high sea, it happened that the faithful John, as he sat on the deck of
th) ship, playing music, saw three crows in the air, who came flying
36 00041.jpg
PAITHFUL JOHN. 25
towards them. He stopped playing, and listened to what they were
saying to each other, for he understood them perfectly. The first one
exclaimed, There he is, carrying home the daughter of the King of the
Golden Palace." But he is not home yet," replied the second. But
he has her," said the third; she is sitting by him in the ship." Then
the first began again, and exclaimed, What matters that 1 When they
go on shore, a fox-coloured horse will spring towards them, on which lie
will mount; and as soon as he is on it, it will jump up with him into the
air, so that he will never again see his bride." The second one asked,
"Is there no escape Oh yes, if another mounts behind quickly, and
takes out the firearms which are in the holster, and with them shoots the
horse dead, then the young King will be saved. But who knows that 1
And if any one does know it, and tells him, such a one will be turned to
stone from the toe to the knee." Then the second spoke again, I know
still more : if the horse should be killed, the young King will not then
retain his bride; for when they come into the castle, a beautiful bridal
shirt will lie there upon a dish, and seem to be woven of gold and silver,
but it is nothing but sulphur and pitch; and if he puts it on, it will burn
him to his marrow and bones." Then the third Crow asked, Is there
no escape ?" Oh yes," answered the second; if some one takes up the
shirt with his gloves on, and throws it into the fire, so that it is burnt,
the young King will be saved. But what does that signify 1 Whoever
knows it, and tells him, will be turned to stone from his knee to his
heart." Then the third Crow spoke : I know still more : even if the
bridal shirt be consumed, still the young King will not retain his bride.
For if, after the wedding, a dance is held, while the young Queen dances,
she will suddenly turn pale, and fall down as if dead; and if some one
does not raise her up, and take three drops of blood from her right
breast and throw them away, she will die. But whoever knows that, and
tells it, will have his whole body turned to stone, from the crown of his
head to the toes of his feet."
After the Crows had thus talked with one another, they flew away,
and the trusty John, who had perfectly understood all they had said, was
from that time very quiet and sad ; for if he concealed from his master
what he had heard, misfortune would happen to him, and if he told him
all he must give up his own life. But at last he thought, I will save
my master, even if I destroy myself."
As soon as they came on shore, it happened just as the Crow had
foretold, and an immense fox-red horse sprang up. Capital 1" said the
King ; "this shall carry me to my castle," and he tried to mount; but
the faithful John came straight up, and swinging himself quickly on,
drew the firearms out of the holster and shot the horse dead. Then the
other servants of the King, who were not on good terms with the faithful
John, exclaimed, "How shameful to kill the beautiful creature, which
might have borne the King to the castle !" But the King replied, "Be
silent, and let him go; he is my very faithful John-who knows the good
he may have done ?" Now they went into the castle, and there stood a
dish in the hall, and the splendid bridal shirt lay in it, and seemed nothing
37 00042.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
else than gold and silver. The young King went up to it and wished to
take it up, but the faithful John pushed him away, and taking it up with
his gloves on, bore it quickly to the fire and let it burn. The other
servants thereupon began to murmur, saying, "See, now he is burning
the King's bridal shirt !" But the young King replied, "Who knows
what good he has done 1 Let him alone-ho is my faithful John."
Soon after, the wedding was celebrated, and a grand ball was given,
and the bride began to dance. So the faithful John paid great attention,
and watched her countenance; all at once she grew pale, and fell as if dead
to the ground. Then he sprang up hastily, raised her up and bore her
to a chamber, where he laid her down, kneeled beside her, and drawing
the three drops of blood out of her right breast, threw them away. As
soon as she breathed again, she raised herself up; but the young King
had witnessed everything, and not knowing why the faithful John had
done this, was very angry, and called out, "Throw him into prison !"
The next morning the trusty John was brought up for trial, and led to
the gallows; and as he stood upon them, and was about to be executed,
he said, "Every one condemned to die may once before his death speak.
Shall I also have that privilege 1" "Yes," answered the King, it shall
be granted you." Then the faithful John replied, "I have been unright-
eously judged, and have always been true to you ;" and he narrated the
conversation of the Crows which he heard at sea; and how, in order to
save his master, he was obliged to do all he had done. Then the King
cried out, "Oh, my most trusty John, pardon, pardon; lead him away!"
But the trusty John had fallen down at the last word and was turned
into stone.
At this event both the King and the Queen were in great grief, and
the King thought, Ah, how wickedly have I rewarded his great
fidelity!" and he had the stone statue raised up and placed in his
sleeping-chamber, near his bed; and as often as he looked at it, he
wept and said, Ah, could I bring you back to life again, my faithful
Tohn !"
After some time had passed, the Queen bore twins, two little sons,
who were her great joy. Once when the Queen was in church, and the
two children at home playing by their father's side, he looked up at the
stone statue full of sorrow, and exclaimed with a .sigh, "Ah, could I
restore you to life, my faithful John!" At these words the statue began
to speak, saying, Yes, you can make me alive again, if you will bestow
on me that which is dearest to you." The King replied, "All that I
have in the world I will give up for you." The statue spake again : "If
you, with your own hand, cut off the heads of both your children and
sprinkle me with their blood, I shall be brought to life again." The King
was terrified when le heard that he must himself kill his two dear
children; but he remembered his servant's great fidelity, and how the
faithful John had died for him, and drawing his sword he cut off the
heads of both his children with his own hand. And as soon as he had
sprinkled the statue with blood, life came back to it, and the trusty
John stood again alive and well before him, and said, "Your faith shall
38 00043.jpg
A GOOD BARGAIN.
not go unrewarded;" and taking the heads of the two children, he set
them on again, and anointed their wounds with their blood, and there-
upon they healed again in a moment, and the children sprang away and
played as if nothing had happened.
Now the King was full of happiness, and as soon as he saw the Queen
coming, he hid the faithful John and both the children in a great closet.
As soon as she came in he said to her, Have you prayed in the church?"
"Yes," she answered; "but I thought continually of the faithful John,
who has come to such misfortune through us." Then he replied, "My
dear wife, we can restore his life again to him, but it will cost us both
our little sons, whom he must sacrifice." The Queen became pale and
,fas terrified at heart, but she said, "We are guilty of his life on account
of his great fidelity." Then he was very glad that she thought as he
did, and going up to the closet, he unlocked it, brought out the children
and the faithful John, saying, God be praised! he is saved, and we have
still our little sons :" and then he told her all that happened. Afterwards
they lived happily together to the end of their days.
A GOOD BARGAIN.
A cOUNTRYMAN drove his cow to market, and sold it for seven dollars
On the way home he had to pass by a pond, where he heard from a
distance the Frogs croaking, Ack, ack, ack, ack !" "Yes," said he,
"they cry ca t so even in their owner's field; but it is seven which I
Wbt is the German word for eight.
39 00044.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
bave got, not eight." As he came up to the water he exclaimed,
"Stupid creatures that you are, do you not know better? here are
seven dollars, and not eight !" But the Frogs still continued their "Ack,
ack !" "Now, if you will not believe it I will count them out to you;"
and, taking the money from his pocket, he counted out the seven dollars,
four-and-twenty groschen in each. The Frogs, however, paid no atten-
tion to his reckoning, and kept calling out, Ack, ack, ack Ah !"
exclaimed the Countryman, quite angry, "if you know better than I,
count it yourself!" and, one by one, he threw the pieces of money into
the water. He stopped and waited till they should be ready to bring
him his own again, but the Frogs were obstinate in their opinion, and
cried continually, "Ack, ack, ack !" neither did they throw the money
back. So the man waited a long while, until evening approached and it
was time to go home; then he began to abuse the Frogs, shouting out,
"You water-paddlers, you thick-heads, you blind-eyes you have indeed
great mouths, and can make noise enough to stun one's ears, but you
cannot count seven dollars! do you think I am going to wait here till
you are ready And thereupon he went away, but the Frogs cried
still behind his back, Ack, ack, ack !" so that he reached home in a
very savage mood !
After a little time he again bargained for a cow, which he killed, and
then he made a calculation that, if he sold the flesh well, he should gain
as much as both the cows were worth, and should have the skin beside.
As he came to town with the flesh, a great troop of dogs was collected
before the gate, and in front was a large greyhound, who sprang around
the flesh, snapping and barking, "Was, was, was !"* As he did not
cease, the Countryman said to him, "I know well you say, 'Was, was!
because you wish for some of the flesh, but I ought to receive something
as good if I should give it you." The dog replied only, "Was, was !"
"Will you not let your comrades there eat with you I" Was, was !"
said the Dog.
If you stick to that I will let you have it. I know you well, and
to whom you belong; but this I tell you, in three days I must have my
money, or it will go ill with you. You can bring it to me."
Thereupon he unloaded the flesh and turned homewards again, and
the dogs gathering around it, barked loudly, Was, was !" The Peasant,
who heard them at a distance, said, "Mind, you may share it among you,
but the big one must answer for you to me."
When three days were passed, the Countryman thought to himself,
"This evening I shall have my money in my pocket," and so made
himself happy. But nobody came to pay the reckoning. "There is
no faith in any one," said he at last, losing all patience, and he went
into the town to the butcher and demanded his money. The butcher
thought it was a joke, but the Countryman said, "Joking aside, I will
have my money; did not the great dog, three days ago, bring you
home a whole slaughtered cow This put the butcher in a passion,
That, that.
40 00045.jpg
A GOOD BARGAIN. 29
and, taking up a broomstick, he hunted the Countryman out of his
doors.
"Wait a bit," said the Countryman; "justice Is to be had in the
world ;" and he went to the King's palace and requested an audience.
So he was led before the King, who sat there with his daughter, and
asked, "What misfortune has befallen you i"
Ah," said he, "frogs and the dogs have taken away my property,
and the butcher has repaid me with a stick ;" and he narrated at length
all that had happened. The King's daughter laughed aloud at his tale,
and the King said to him, "I cannot give you justice here; but,
nevertheless, you shall have my daughter for a wife: all her lifetime
she has not laughed except before you, and I have promised her to
that man who should make her laugh. You may thank God for your
luck."
0 dear !" replied the Countryman, I do not wish it at all; I
have one wife at home, who is already too much for me." This made
the King angry, and he said, You are an ill-bred fellow."
"Ah, my lord the King," answered the Countryman, "what can
you expect from an ox except beef?"
"Wait a bit," replied the King, "you shall have another reward.
Now be off at once, and return in three days, and you shall receive five
hundred."
As the Countryman came to the gate, the sentinel said to him,
"Since you have made the King's daughter laugh, no doubt you hare
received a great reward." "Yes, I think so," answered the Peasant;
"five hundred are to be counted out for me."
"Indeed!" said the soldier; "give me some of it; what will you
do with all that money ?"
"Since you ask me," replied the Countryman, "you shall have two
hundred : apply to the King in three days, and they will be counted
out to you." A Jew, who stood near, and heard their conversation,
ran after the Countryman, and catching him by his coat, cried ourt
" 0 wonderful! what a child of fortune are you I will change, I will
change with you in small coins! What will you do with the hard
dollars ?"
"You, Jew!" said the Countryman, "you can yet have the three
hundred; give me the same amount in small coins, and in three days
after to-day it shall be counted out to you by the King." Thie Jew
rejoiced at his profit, and brought the sum in worn-out farthing-s, three of
which were equal to two good ones.
After the lapse of three days, the Countryman went before the
King, according to his command. The King called out. "- Pull off his
coat; lie shall have his five hundred!" Oh !" replied the Countrv-
man, "they do not belong to me now : I have presented two huudred
to the sentinel, and the Jew has changed with me for three hundred,
so tait rightly nothing at all belongs to me."
Meanwhile the soldier and the Jew came in, desiring their shates
for which they had bargained with the Countryman, but, instead of
41 00046.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
dollars, each received his stripes justly measured out. The soldier bore
his patiently, having already known how they tasted; but the Jew
behaved very badly, crying out, "Ah, woe is me, these are hard dollars!"
The King was forced to laugh at the Countryman, and, when all his
anger had passed away, he said to him, Since you lost your reward
before you received it, I will give you compensation; so go into my
treasure-chamber, and take as much money as you wish for." The
Countryman did not stop to be told twice, but filled his deep pockets
as full as they would hold, and immediately after went to an inn. and
told out the money. The Jew sneaked after him, and overheard him
muttering to himself, Now, that thief of a King has again deceived
me. Could he not have given me the money, and then I should have
known what I had got; but now, how can I tell what I have by good
luck put into my pocket is just 9"
"Heaven preserve us!" said the Jew to himself, "he has spoken
disrespectfully of his Majesty; I will run and inform against him, and
then I shall get a reward, and he will be punished." When the King
heard the speech of the Countryman his anger was excited, and he bade
the Jew go and fetch the offender. So the Jew, running back to the
Countryman, said to him, "You must go before his Majesty the King,
just as you are."
"I know better what is becoming," replied the Countryman; "I
must first have a new coat made. Do you think a man who has so much
money in his pocket ought to go in this old rag of a coat I" The Jew,
perceiving that the Countryman would not stir without another coat,
and fearing, if the King's anger should evaporate, he would not get his
reward nor the other the punishment, said to him, Out of pure friend-
ship, I will lend you a beautiful coat for a short time. What will one
not do out of pure love ?"
The Countryman, well pleased, took the coat from the Jew, and
went off straight to the King, who charged him with the speech which
the Jew had informed about.
"Oh," said the Countryman, what a Jew says is nothing, for not
a true word comes out of his mouth ; that rascal there is able to assert,
and does assert, that I have his coat on !"
What is that 7" screamed the Jew ; is not the coat mine 1 Have
I not lent it to you out of pure friendship, that you might step in it before
his Majesty the King ?" As soon as the King heard this he said, "The
Jew has deceived one of us;" and then he had counted out to him some
more of the hard dollars.
Meanwhile the Countryman went off home in the good coat, and
with the go d gold in his pocket, Wanging to himself, This time I have
hit it I"
42 00047.jpg
!M n
THE WONDERFUL MUSICIAN.
ONCE upon a time a wonderful Fiddler was travelling through a wood,
thinking of all sorts of things as he went along, and presently he said
to himself, "I have plenty of time and space in this forest, so I will
fetch a good companion;" and, taking the fiddle from his back, he
fiddled till the trees re-echoed. Presently a wolf came crashing through
the brushwood.
Ah a wolf comes, for whom I have no desire," said the Fiddler;
but the Wolf, approaching nearer, said, "Oh, you dear Musician, how
beautifully you play might I learn how ?"
"It is soon learnt; you have only to do exactly as I tell you."
Then the Wolf replied, "I will mind you just as a schoolboy does his
master." So the Musician told the Wolf to come with him ; and when
they had gone a little distance together they came to. an old oak-tree,
which was hollow within and split in the middle. "See here," said the
Musician, if you wish to learn how to fiddle, put your fore-foot in this
cleft." The Wolf obeyed ; but the Fiddler, snatching up a stone, quickly
wedged both his feet so fast with one blow that the Wolf was stuck fast,
and obliged to remain where he was. Wait there till I come again,"
said the Fiddler, and went on his way.
After a whilo he said to himself a second time, I have plenty of
time and space in the forest, so I will fetch another companion ;" and
taking his fiddle, he played away in the wood. Presently a fox cams
sneaking through the trees.
"Ah!" said the Musician, "here cones a fox, whom I did not
desire."
The Fox, running up, said, "Ah, you dear Mister Musician, how is it
you fiddle so beautifully I might 1 learn too?"
It is soon learnt," answered he; "but you must do all I tell you."
"I will obey you as a schoolboy does his master," answered the YFo
43 00048.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
and he followed the Musician. After they had walked a little distance
ie came to a footpath, with high hedges on each side. The Musician
stopped, and pulling the bough of a hazel-tree down to the ground oa
one side, he put his foot upon it, and then bent another down on the
other side, saying, Come, little Fox, if you wish to learn something,
reach me here your left forefoot." The Fox obeyed, and the Musician
bound the foot to the left bough. Now reach me the other, little
fox," said he, and he bound that to the right bough. And as soon as
he saw that the knots were fast he let go, and the boughs sprang back
into the air, carrying the Fox, shaking and quivering, up with them.
" Wait there till I come again," said the Musician, and went on his
way.
After a little while he said again to himself, Time and space are
not wanting to me in this forest; I will fetch another companion;" and,
taking his fiddle, he made the sound re-echo in the woods.
Aha !" said he, "a hare i I won't have him."
Oh, you dear Musician !" said the Hare, "how do you fiddle so
beautifully ? Could I learn it too "
It is soon learnt," replied the Musician, only do all I tell you."
The little Hare replied, I will obey you as a schoolboy does his master;"
and they went on together till they came to a clear space in the forest
where an aspen-tree stood. The Musician bound a long twine round the
neck of the Hare, and knotted the other end to a tree. Now, my lively
little hare, jump twenty times round the tree," exclaimed the Musician.
The Hare obeyed; and as he jumped round the twentieth time the twine
had wound itself round the tree twenty times also, and made the Hare
prisoner; and pull and tug as much as he would, the cord only cut the
deeper into his neck. Wait there till I come again," said the Musician,
and went on further.
The Wolf, meanwhile, had been pulling, dragging, and biting at the
stone, and worked at it so long that at last he set his feet at liberty, and
drew them again out of the cleft. Then, full of rage and anger, he has-
tened after the Musician, intending to tear him into pieces. As the Fox
saw him running past he began to groan, and shouted with all his power,
Brother Wolf, come and help me; the Musician has deceived me !"
So the Wolf, pulling the branches down, bit the knot to pieces, and freed
the Fox, who went on with him in order to take revenge on the Musician.
On their way they found the Hare tied, and setting him at liberty,'all
three set out in pursuit of their enemy.
The Musician, however, had once more played his fiddle, and this
time had been very lucky, for the notes came to the ears of a poor wood-
cutter, who left off his work directly, whether he wished or not, and with
his axe under his arm, came up to hear the music.
At last the right companion has come," said the Musician; for
I desired a man, and not a wild beast." And beginning to play, he
played so beautifully and delightfully, that the poor man was as if
enchanted, and his heart beat for joy. While he thus stood, the Wolf,
the Fox, and the Hare came up, and he observed directly that they had
44 00049.jpg
THE TWELVE BROTHERS.
some bad design, so raising his bright axe he placed himself before the
Musician, as if he would say, Who wishes to attack must take care of
himself." His looks made the animals afraid, and they ran back into the
forest; but the Musician, after playing one more tune out of gratitude to
the woodcutter, went on his journey.
THE TWELVE BROTHERS.
ONOE upon a time there lived happily together a Queen and a King,
who had twelve children-all boys. One day the King said to his con-
sort, "If the thirteenth child, whom you are about to bring into the
world, should be a girl, then shall the twelve boys die, that her riches
may be great, and that the kingdom may fall to her alone." He then
ordered twelve coffins to be made, which were filled with shavings, and in
each a pillow was placed, and, all of them having been locked up in a
room, he gave the key thereof to the Queen, and bade her tell nobody
about the matter.
But the mother sat crying the whole day long, so that her youngest
child, who was always with her, and whom she had named Benjamin.
said to her, Mother dear, why are you so sorrowful 7 My dearest
child," she replied, "I dare not tell you !" But he let her have no
peace until she went and unlocked the room, and showed him the twelve
coffins filled with shavings. Then she said," My dearest Benjamin
these coffins your father has had prepared for yourself and your eleven
brothers, for, if I bring a little girl into the world, you will all be killed
together and buried in them." And as she wept while she spoke these
woris, the son comforted her, saying, "Do not cry, dear mother; we
will help ourselves, and go away." But she said, Go with your eleven
brothers into the wood, and let one of you climb into the highest tree
D
45 00050.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
which is to be found, and keep watch, looking towards the tower of the
castle hero. If I bear a little son, I will hang out a white flag, and you
may venture home again; but if I bear a little daughter, I will hang out
a red flag, and then flee away as quickly as you can, and God preserve
you! Every night I will arise and pray for you: in winter, that you
may have a fire to warm yourselves and in summer, that you may not
be melted with the heat."
Soon after she gave her blessing to all her sons, and they went away
into the forest. Each kept watch in turn, sitting upon the highest oak-
tree, and looking towards the tower. When eleven days had passed by,
and it came to Benjamin's turn, he perceived a flag hung out; but it
was not the white but the red flag, which announced that they must all
die. As the brothers heard this, they became very angry, and said,
" Shall we suffer death on account of a maiden ? Let us swear that
we will avenge ourselves; wherever we find a maiden, her blood shall
flow."
Thereupon they went deeper into the forest, and in the middle, where
it was most gloomy, they found a little charmed cottage standing empty,
and they said, Here we will dwell, and you, Benjamin, as you are the
youngest and the weakest, shall stop here and keep house while we go
out to fetch meat." So they set forth into the forest, and shot hares,
wild fawns, birds, and pigeons, and what else they could find. These
they brought home to Benjamin, who cooked and dressed them for their
different meals. In this little cottage they lived ten years together, and
the time passed very quickly.
The little daughter, whom their mother, the Queen, had borne, was
now grown up: she had a kind heart, was very beautiful, and always
wore a golden star upon her brow. Once, when there was a great wash,
she saw twelve boys' shirts hanging up, and she asked her mother, "To
whom do these twelve shirts belong, for they are much too small for my
father ?" Then she answered with a heavy heart, Mly dear child, they
belong to your twelve brothers I" The maiden replied, Where are
my twelve brothers? I have never yet heard of them." The Queen
answered, God only knows where they are : they have wandered into
the wide world." Then she took the maiden, and, unlocking the room,
showed her twelve coffins with the shavings and pillows. These
coffins," said she, "were ordered for your brothers, but they went away
secretly before you were born;" and she told her how everything had
happened. Then the maiden said, Do not cry, dear mother, I will go
forth and seek my brothers ;" and, taking the twelve shirts, she set out
at once straight into the great forest. All day long she walked on and
on, and in the evening she came to the charmed house, into which she
stepped. There she found a young lad, who asked her, Whence dost
thou come, and whither goost thou ?" and he stood astonished to see
how beautiful she was, and at the queenly robes she wore, and the star
upcn her brow. Then she answered, "I am a King's daughter, and am
seeking my twelve brothers, and will go as far as heaven is blue until
I find them;" and she showed him the twelve shirts that belonged to
46 00051.jpg
THE TWELVE BROTHERS.
them. Benjamin perceived at once that it was his sister, and he said,
" I am Benjamin, thy youngest brother." At his words, she began to
weep for joy, and Benjamin wept also, and they kissed and embraced one
another with the greatest affection. Presently he said, "Dear sister, there
is one terrible condition: we have agreed together that every maiden
whom we meet shall die, because we were obliged to leave our kingdom
on account of a maiden."
Then the maiden replied, "I will willingly die, if I can by that means
release my twelve brothers."
No," answered he, "thou shalt not die; hide thyself under this tub
until our eleven brothers come home, with whom I shall then be united."
She did so; and when night came the others returned from hunting, and
.heir dinner was made ready, and as they sat at the table eating, they
asked, What is the news Benjamin said, Do you not know 1"
No," they answered. Then he spoke again: You have been in the
forest, and I have stopped at home, yet I know more than you."
Tell us directly they exclaimed. He answered, First promise
me that you will not kill the first maiden who shall meet us "Yes,
we promise they exclaimed, "she shall have pardon; now tell us at
once." Then he said, Our sister is here ;" and, lifting up the tub, the
King's daughter came from beneath, looking most beautiful, delicate, and
gentle in her royal robes, and with the golden star upon her brow. The
sight gladdened them all; and, falling upon her neck, they kissed her,
and loved her with all their hearts.
Now she stopped at home with Benjamin, and helped him in his
work, while the eleven others went into the wood, and caught wild
animals, deer, birds, and pigeons, for their eating, which their sister and
brother took care to make ready. The sister sought for wood for the
fire, and for the vegetables, which she dressed, and put the pots on the
fire, so that their dinner was always ready when the eleven came home.
She also kept order in the cottage, and covered the beds with beautiful
white and clean sheets, and the brothers were always contented, and they
all lived in great unity.
One day, when the brother and sister had made ready a most excellent
meal, and the others had come in, they sat down and ate and drank, and
were full of happiness. But there was a little garden belonging to the
charmed house, in which stood twelve lilies (which one calls also African
marigolds), and the sister, thinking to give her twelve brothers a pleasure,
broke off the twelve flowers, intending to give each of them one. But
as she broke off each flower the twelve brothers wers changed, one by one,
into twelve Crows, and flew off into the forest, and at the same moment
the house and garden both disappeared.
Thus the poor maiden was left alone in the wild forest, and as shi
iooked round an old woman stood near, who said, My child, what hast
lthou done? Why didst thou not leave the twelve white flowers They
were thy brothers, who are now changed into crows!" Then the maiden
asked with tears, Is there no means of saving them? There is but
ane way in the whole world," said the old woman, "but that is so difficult
47 00052.jpg
36 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
that thou cast not free them. Thou must be duml for seven years,-
thou mayest not speak, nor laugh, and if thou speakest but a single
word, even if it wants but one hour of the seven years, all will be in
vain, and thy brothers will die at that single word."
Then the maiden said in her heart, I know for certain that I shall
free my brothers;" and she went and found a tall tree, into the branches
of which she climbed and passed her time spinning, without ever speaking
or laughing.
Now it happened once that a King was hunting in the forest, who
Lad a large greyhound, which ran to the tree on which the maiden sat,
and, springing round, barked furiously. So the King came up and saw
the beautiful girl with the golden star upon her brow, and was so
enchanted with her beauty, that he asked her if she would become his
bride. To this she gave no answer, but slightly nodded with her head;
so the King, mounting the tree himself, brought her down, and placing
her upon his horse carried her home.
Then the wedding was celebrated with great pomp and joy, but the
bride neither spoke nor laughed.
After they had lived contentedly together two years, the King's
mother, who was a wicked woman, began to slander the young Queen,
and said to her son, "This is a common beggar girl whom you have
brought home with you: who knows what impish tricks she practised at
home I If she be dumb and not able to speak, she might still laugh
once; but they who do not laugh have a bad conscience." The King
would not at first believe it, but the old woman persisted in it so long,
and accused the Queen of so many wicked things, that the King at last
let himself be persuaded, and she was condemned to die.
Now a great fire was kindled in the courtyard in which she was to be
burnt; and the King standing above at the window, looked on with
tearful eyes, because he still loved her so much. And now she was
bound to the stake, and the fire began to lick her clothing with its red
tongues, and just at that time the last moment of the seven years expired.
Then a whirring was heard in the air, and twelve Crows came flying by,
and sank down to the earth, and as they alighted on the ground they
became her twelve brothers whom she had freed. They tore away the
fire from around her, and, extinguishing the flames, set their sister free,
and kissed and embraced her. And now, as she could open her mouth
and speak, she told the King why she was dumb, and why she never
laughed.
And the King was highly pleased when he heard she was innoceip
and they all lived together in great happiness to the end of their lives
48 00053.jpg
THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN TIE WOOD.
ONCE upon a time there lived a man, whose wife had died; and a
woman, also, who had lost her husband : and this man and this woman
had each a daughter. These two maidens were friendly with each
other, and used to walk together, and one day they came by the widow's
house. Then the widow said to the man's daughter, Do you hear,
tell your father I wish to marry him, and you shall every morning wash
in milk and drink wine, but my daughter shall wash in water and drink
water." So the girl went home and told her father what the woman
had said, and he replied, What shall I do 7 marriage is a comfort, but
it is also a torment." At last, as he could come to no conclusion, lie
drew off his boot and said : Take this boot, which has a hole in the
sole, and go with it out-of-doors and hang it on the great nail, and then
pour water into it. If it holds the water, I will again take a wife; but
if it runs through, I will not have her." The girl did as he bid her
but the water drew the hole together and the boot became full to over-
flowing. So she told her father how it had happened, and he, getting
up, saw it was quite true; and going to the widow he settled the matter,
and the wedding was celebrated.
The next morning, when the two girls arose, milk to wash in and
wine to drink were set for the man's daughter, but only water, both for
washing and drinking, for the woman's daughter. The second morning,
water for washing and drinking stood before both the man's daughter
and the woman's; and on the third morning, water to wash in and
water to drink were set before the man's daughter, and milk to
wash in and wine to drink before the woman's daughter, and so it
continued.
Soon the woman conceived a deadly hatred for her step-daughter
and knew not how to behave badly enough to her, from day to day.
She was envious too, because her step-daughter was beautiful and lo-vey,
and her own daughter was ugly and hateful
49 00054.jpg
38 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Once, in the winter time, when the river was frozen as hard as a
stone, and hill and valley were covered with snow, the woman made a
cloak of paper, and called the maiden to her and said, "Put on this
cloak, and go away into the wood to fetch me a little basketful of straw-
berries, for I have a wish for some."
"Mercy on us!" said the maiden, "in winter there are no straw-
berries growing; the ground is frozen, and the snow, too, has covered
everything. And why must I go in that paper cloak? It is so cold
out-of-doors that it freezes one's breath even, and if the wind does
not blow off this cloak, the thorns will tear it from my body."
"Will you dare to contradict me 1" said the stepmother. Make
haste off, and let me not see you again until you have found me a basket
of strawberries." Then she gave her a small piece of dry bread, saying,
"On that you must subsist the whole day." But she thought-out-of-
doors she will be frozen and starved, so that my eyes will never see her
again !
So the girl did as she was told, and put on the paper cloak, and
went away with the basket. Far and near there was nothing but snow,
and not a green blade was to be seen. When she came to the forest she
discovered a little cottage, out of which three little Dwarfs were peeping.
The girl wished them good morning, and knocked gently at the door.
They called her in, and entering the room, she sat down on a bench by
the fire to warm herself, and eat her breakfast. The Dwarfs called out,
Give us some of it !" Willingly," she replied, and, dividing her
bread in two, she gave them half. They asked, What do you here in
the forest, in the winter time, in this thin cloak "
Ah !" she answered, I must seek a basketful of strawberries, and
I dare not return home until I can take them with me." When she had
eaten her bread, they gave her a broom, saying, Sweep away the snow
with this from the back door." But when she was gone out-of-doors the
three Dwarfs said one to another, What shall we give her, because she
is so gentle and good, and has shared her bread with us ?" Then said
the first, I grant to her that she shall become more beautiful every
day." The second said, I grant that a piece of gold shall fall out of
her mouth for every word she speaks." The third said, "I grant that a
King shall come and make her his bride."
Meanwhile, the girl had done as the Dwarfs had bidden her, and
had swept away the snow from behind the house. And what do you
think she found there 1 Actually, ripe strawberries which came quite
red and sweet up under the snow. So filling her basket in great glee,
she thanked the little men and gave them each her hand, and then ran
home to take her stepmother what she wished for. As she went in and
said, "Good evening," a piece of gold fell from her mouth. There-
upon she related what had happened to her in the forest; but at
every word she spoke a piece of gold fell, so that the whole floor was
covered.
"Just see her arrogance," said the step-sister, "to throw away
money in that way I bat in her heart she was jealous, and wished to
50 00055.jpg
THE THREE LITTLE MEN IN THE WOOD. f9
go into the forest too, to seek strawberries. Her mother said, No, my
dear daughter ; it is too cold, you will be frozen but as her girl let her
have no peace, she at.last consented, and made her a beautiful fur cloak
to put on; she also gave her buttered bread and cooked meat to eat on
her way.
The girl went into the forest and came straight to the little cottage.
The three Dwarfs were peeping out again, but she did not greet them;
and, stumbling on without looking at them or speaking, she entered the
room, and, seating herself by the fire, began to eat the bread and butter
and meat. "Give us some of that," exclaimed the Dwarfs; but she
answered, "I have not got enough for myself, so how can I give any
away ?" When she had finished they said, You have a broom there, go
and sweep the back door clean." Oh, sweep it yourself," she replied;
" I am not your servant." When she saw that they would not give hei
anything she went out at the door, and the three Dwarfs said to each
other, "What shall we give her? she is so ill-behaved, and has such a
bad and envious disposition, that nobody can wish well to her." The
first said, "I grant that she becomes more ugly every day." The second
said, "I grant that at every word she speaks a toad shall spring out of
her mouth." The third said, "I grant that she shall die a miserable
death." Meanwhile the girl had been looking for strawberries out-of-
doors, but as she could find none she went home very peevish. When
she opened her mouth to tell her mother what had happened to her in
the forest, a toad jumped out of her mouth at each word, so that every
one fled away from her in horror
The stepmother was now still more vexed, and was always thinking
how she could do the most harm to her husband's daughter, who every
day became more beautiful. At last she took a kettle, set it on the fire,
and boiled a net therein. When it was sodden she hung it on the
shoulder of the poor girl, and gave her an axe, that she might go upon
the frozen pond and cut a hole in the ice to drag the net. She obeyed,
and went away and cut an ice-hole; and while she was cutting, an elegant
carriage came by, in which the King sat. The carriage stopped, and the
King asked, "My child, who are you and what do you here ?" "I am
a poor girl, and am dragging a net," said she. Then the King pitied her,
and saw how beautiful she was, and said, "Will you go with me 1"
"Yes, indeed, with all my heart," she replied, for she was glad to get out
of the sight of her mother and sister.
So she was handed into the carriage, and driven away with the King;
and as soon as they arrived at his castle the wedding was celebrated with
great splendour, as the Dwarfs had granted to the maiden. After a year
the young Queen bore a son; and when the stepmother heard of her
great good fortune, she came to the castle with her daughter, and behaved
as if she had come on a visit. But one day, when the King had gone
out, and no one was present, this bad woman seized the Queen by the
head, and her daughter caught hold of her feet, and raising her out of
bod, they throw her out of the window into the river which ran past.
Then, laying her ugly daughter in the bed, the old woman covered her
51 00056.jpg
40 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
up, even over her head; and when the King came back he wished to
speak to his wife, but the old woman exclaimed, Softly! softly 1 do not
go near her; she is lying in a beautiful sleep, and must be kept quiet
to-day." The King, not thinking of any evil design, came again the
next morning the first thing; and when he spoke to his wife, and she
answered, a toad sprang out of her mouth at every word, as a piece of
gold had done before. So he asked what had happened, and the old
woman said, "That is produced by her weakness, she will soon lose it
again."
But in the night the kitchen-boy saw a Duck swimming through the
brook, and the Duck asked,
King, King, what are you doing?
Are you sleeping, or are you waking r'
And as he gave no answer the Duck said,
What are my guests a-doing I
Then the boy answered,
"They all sleep sound:'
And she asked him,
How fares my child "r
And he replied,
"In his cradle he sleeps."
Then she came up in the form of the Queen to the cradle, and gave
tl.e child drink, shook up his bed, and covered him up, and then swam
again away as a duck through the brook. The second night she came
again; and on the third she said to the kitchen-boy, "Go and tell the
King to take his sword, and swing it thrice over me, on the threshold."
Then the boy ran and told the King, who came with his sword, and
swung it thrice over the Duck; and at the third time his bride stood
before him, bright, living, and healthful, as she had been before.
Now the King was in great happiness, but he hid the Queen in a
chamber until the Sunday when the child was to be christened; and
when all was finished he asked, "What ought to be done to one who
takes another out of a bed and throws her into the river 1" "Nothing
could be more proper," said the old woman, "than to put such an one
into a cask, stuck round with nails, and to roll it down the hill into the
water." Then the King said, "You have spoken your own sentence;"
and ordering a cask to be fetched, he caused the old woman and her
daughter to be put into it, and the bottom being nailed up, the cask was
rolled down the hill until it fell into the we ter.
52 00058.jpg
'N
\ \
pN .\~
K '
THE LITIrLE BROTHER AND SISTER.
P'a e 41.
53 00059.jpg
THE LITTLE BROTHER AND SISTER.
THERE wha once a little Brother who took his Sister by the hand, and
said, "Since our own dear mother's death we have not had one happy
hour; our stepmother beats us every day, and, if we come near her,
kicks us away with her foot. Our food is the hard crusts of bread
which are left, and even the dog under the table fares better than we,
for he often gets a nice morsel. Come, let us wander forth into the wide
world." So the whole day long they travelled over meadows, fields, and
stony roads, and when it rained the Sister said, It is heaven crying in
sympathy." By evening they came into a large forest, and were so
wearied with grief, hunger, and their long walk, that they laid themselves
down in a hollow tree, and went to sleep. When they awoke the next
morning, the sun had already risen high in the heavens, and its beams
made the tree so hot, that the little boy said to his Sister, I am so
thirsty, if I knew where there was a brook I would go and drink. Ah 1
I think I hear one running;" and so saying, he got up, and taking nis
Sister's hand, they went in search of the brook.
The wicked stepmother, however, was a witch, and had witnessed the
departure of the two children; so, sneaking after them secretly, as is the
habit of witches, she had enchanted all the springs in the forest.
Presently they found a brook which ran trippingly over the pebbles,
and the Brother would have drunk out of it, but the Sister heard how it
said as it ran along, "Who drinks of me will become a tiger!" So the
Sister exclaimed, "I pray you, Brother, drink not, or you will become a
tiger, and tear me to pieces!" So the Brother did not drink, although
his thirst was so great, and he said, "I will wait till the next brook."
As they came to the second, the Sister heard it say, "Who drinks of me
becomes a wolf!" The Sister ran up crying, "Brother, do not, pray do
not, drink, or you will become a wolf and eat me up I" Then the Brother
did not drink, saying," I will wait until we come to the next spring, but
then I must Irink, you may say what you will; my thirst is much too
54 00060.jpg
42 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
great." Just as they reached the third brook, the Sister heard the voice
saying, Who drinks of me will become a fawn,-who drinks of me will
become a fawn !" So the Sister said, 0, my Brother do not drink, or
you will be changed to a fawn, and run away from me !" But he had
already kneeled down, and drunk of the water, and, as the first drops
passed his lips, his shape became that of a fawn.
At first the sister cried over her little changed Brother, and he wept
too, and knelt by her very sorrowful; but at last the maiden said, "Be
still, dear little Fawn, and I will never forsake you ;" and, undoing her
golden garter, she put it round his neck, and weaving rushes made a
white girdle to lead him with. This she tied to him, and, taking the
other end in her hand, she led him away, and they travelled deeper and
deeper into the forest. After they had walked a long distance they came
to a little hut, and the Maiden, peeping in, found it empty, and thought,
"Here we can stay and dwell." Then she looked for leaves and moss to
make a soft couch for the Fawn, and every morning she went out and
collected roots and berries and nuts for herself, and tender grass for the
Fawn, which he ate out of her hand, and played happily around her.
In the evening, when the Sister was tired, and had said her prayers, she
laid her head upon the back of the Fawn, which served for a pillow, on
which she slept soundly. Had but the Brother regained his own proper
form, their life would have been happy indeed.
Thus they dwelt in this wilderness, and some time had elapsed, when
it happened that the King of the country held a great hunt in the forest;
and now resounded through the trees the blowing of horns, the barking
of dogs, and the lusty cries of the hunters, so that the little Fawn heard
them, and wanted very much to join. Ah i" said he to his Sister, "let
me go to the hunt, I cannot restrain myself any longer;" and he begged
so hard that at last she consented. "But," said she to him, "return
again in the evening, for I shall shut my door against the wild huntsmen,
and, that I may know you, do you knock, and say, Sister, let me in,'
and if you do not speak I shall not open the door." As soon as she had
said this, the little Fawn sprang off, quite glad and merry in the fresh
breeze. The King and his huntsmen perceived the beautiful animal, and
pursued him; but they could not catch him, and when they thought
they had him for certain, he sprang away over the bushes, and got out of
sight. Just as it was getting dark, he ran up to the hut, and, knocking,
said, "Sister mine, let me in." Then she undid the little door, and he
went in, and rested all night long upon his soft couch. The next morning
the hunt was commenced again, and as soon as the little Fawn heard the
horns and the tally-ho of the sportsmen he could not rest, and said,
"Sister dear, open the door, I must be off." The Sister opened it,
saying, Return at evening, mind, and say the words as before." When
the King and his huntsmen saw again the Fawn with the golden neck-
lace, they followed him close, but he was too nimble and quick for them.
The whole day long they kept up with him, but towards evening the
huntsmen made a circle round him, and one wounded him slightly in the
foot behind, so that he could only run slowly. Then one of them slipped
55 00061.jpg
THE LITTLE BROTHER AND SISTER. 43
after him to the little hut, and heard him say, Sister dear, open the
door," and saw that the door was opened and immediately shut behind.
The huntsman, having observed all this, went and told the King what
he had seen and heard, and he said, On the morrow I will once more
pursue him."
The Sister, however, was terribly frightened when she saw that her
Fawn was wounded, and, washing off the blood, she put herbs upon the
foot, and said, Go and rest upon your bed, dear Fawn, that the wound
may heal." It was so slight, that the next morning he felt nothing of it,
and when he heard the hunting cries outside, he exclaimed, I cannot
stop away-I must be there, and none shall catch me so easily again !"
The Sister wept very much, and told him, Soon they will kill you, and I
shall be here all alone in this forest, forsaken by all the world: I cannot
let you go."
I shall die here in vexation," answered the Fawn, "if you do not:
for when I hear the horn, I think I shall jump out of my skin." The
Sister, finding she could not prevent him, opened the door with a heavy
heart, and the Fawn jumped out, quite delighted, into the forest. As
soon as the King perceived him, he said to his huntsmen, Follow him
all day long till the evening, but let no one do him an injury." When
the sun had set, the King asked his huntsmen to show him the hut; and
as they came to it, he knocked at the door, and said, "Let me in, dear
Sister." Then the door was opened, and, stepping in, the King saw a
maiden more beautiful than he had ever before seen. She was frightened
when she saw not her Fawn, but a man step in, who had a golden crown
upon his head. But the King, looking at her with a friendly glance,
reached her his hand, saying, Will you go with me to my castle, and be
my dear wife 7" Oh, yes," replied the maiden ; but the Fawn must
go too : him I will never forsake." The King replied, He shall remain
with you as long as you live, and shall want for nothing." In the mean-
time the Fawn had come in, and the Sister, binding the girdle to him,
again took it in her hand, and led him away with her out of the hut.
The King took the beautiful maiden upon his horse, and rode to his
castle, where the wedding was celebrated with great splendour, and she
became Queen, and they lived together a long time; while the Fawn was
taken care of and lived well, playing about the castle-garden. The wicked
stepmother, however, on whose account the children had wandered forth
into the world, supposed that long ago the Sister had been torn in pieces
by the wild beasts, and the little Brother hunted to death in his Fawn's
shape by the hunters. As soon, therefore, as she heard how happy they
had become, and how everything prospered with them, envy and jealousy
were roused in her heart, and left her no peace; and she was always
thinking in what way she could work misfortune to them. Her own
daughter, who was as ugly as night, and had but one eye, for which she
was continually reproached, said, The luck of being.a Queen has never
yet happened to me." "Be quiet now," said the old woman, "and make
yourself contented : when the time comes, I shall be at hand." As soon,
thou, as the time came when the Queen brought into the world a beautiful
56 00062.jpg
44 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
little boy, which happened when the King was out hunting, the old witch
took the form of a chambermaid, and got into the room where the Queen
was lying, and said to her, The bath is ready, which will restore you,
and give you fresh strength; be quick, before it gets cold." Her daughter
being at hand, they carried the weak Queen between them into the room,
and laid her in the bath, and then, shutting the door to, they ran off; but
first they had made up an immense fire in the stove, which must soon
suffocate the young Queen.
When this was done, the old woman took her daughter, and, putting a
cap on her, laid her in the bed in the Queen's place. She gave her, too,
the form and appearance of the real Queen, as far as she could; but she
could not restore the lost eye, and, so that the King might not notice it,
she turned upon that side where there was no eye. When he came home
at evening, and heard that a son was born to him, he was much delighted,
and prepared to go to his wife's bedside, to see how she did. So the old
woman called out in a great hurry, For your life, do not undraw the
curtains; the Queen must not yet see the light, and must be kept quiet."
So the King went away, and dia not discover that a false Queen was laid
in the bed.
When midnight came, and every one was asleep, the nurse, who sat by
herself, wide awake, near the cradle, in the nursery, saw the door open
and the true Queen come in. She took the child in her arms, and rocked
it a while, and then, shaking up its pillow, laid it down in its cradle, and
covered it over again. She did not forget the Fawn either, but, going to
the corner where he was, stroked his back, and then went silently out at
the door. The nurse asked in the morning of the guards, if any one had
passed into the castle during the night; but they answered, "No, we
have seen nobody." For many nights afterwards she came constantly,
and never spoke a word; and the nurse saw her always, but she would
not trust herself to speak about it to any one.
When some time had passed away, the Queen one night began to
speak, and said,-
How fares my child, how fares my fawn ?
Twice more will I come, but never again."
The nurse made no reply; but, when she had disappeared, went to the
King, and told him all. The King exclaimed, Oh, heavens.! what does
this mean ?-the next night I will watch myself by the child." In the
evening he went into the nursery, and about midnight the Queen ap-
peared, and said,-
"How fares my child, how fares my fawn ?
Once more will I come, but never again."
And she nursed the child, as she was used to do, and then disappeared.
The King dared not speak; but he watched the following night, and this
time she said,-
"How fares my child, how fares my fawn I
This time have I come, but never again."
At these words, the King could hold back no longer, but sprang up and
said, You can be no ether than my dear wife 1" Then she answered,
57 00063.jpg
HANSEL AND GRETHEL. 45
"Yes, I am your dear wife;" and at that moment her life was restored
by God's mercy, and she was again as beautiful and charming as ever.
She told the King the fraud which the witch and her daughter had prac-
tised upon him, and he had them both tried and sentence pronounced
against them. The daughter was taken into the forest, where the wild
beasts tore her in pieces, but the old witch was led to the fire and miserably
burnt. And as soon as she was reduced to ashes, the little Fawn was
unbewitched, and received again his human form; and the Brother and
Sister lived happily together to the end of their days.
HANSEL AND GRETHEL.
ONCE upon a time there dwelt near a large wood a poor woodcutter, with
his wife and two children by his former marriage, a little boy called
Hansel, and a girl named Grethel. He had little enough to break or
bite; and once, when there was a great famine in the land, he could not
procure even his daily broad; and as he lay thinking in his bed one
evening, rolling about for trouble, he sighed, and said to his wife, What
will become of usl How can we feed our children, when we have no
more than we can cat ourselves ?"
Know, then, my husband," answered she, "we will lead them away,
quite early in the morning, into the thickest part of the wood, and there
make them a fire, and give them each a little piece of bread; then we
will go to our work, and leave them alone, so they will not find the way
home again, and we shall be freed from them." No, wife," replied he,
"that I can never ; how can you bring your heart to leave my children
all alone in the wood; for the wild beasts will soon come and tear them
tC pieces I"
58 00064.jpg
46 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Oh, you simpleton !" said she, "then we must all four die of hunger;
you had better plane the coffins for us." But she left him no pea,.e till he
consented, saying, "Ah, but I shall regret the poor children."
The two children, however, had not gone to sleep for very hunger,
and so they overheard what the stepmother said to their father. Grethel
wept bitterly, and said to Hansel, What will become of us?" Be
quiet, Grethel," said he; "do not cry-I will soon help you." And as
soon as their parents had fallen asleep, lie got up, put on his coat, and,
unbarring the back door, slipped out. The moon shone brightly, and the
white pebbles which lay before the door seemed like silver pieces, they
glittered so brightly. Hansel stooped down, and put as many into his
pocket as it would hold; and then going back, he said to Grethel, Be
comforted, dear sister, and sleep in peace ; God will not forsake us." And
so saying, he went to bed again."
The next morning, before the sun arose, the wife went and awoke the
two children. Get up, you lazy things; we are going into the forest to
chop wood." Then she gave them each a piece of bread, saying, There
is something for your dinner; do not eat it before the time, for you will
get nothing else." Grethel took the bread in her apron, for Hansel's
pocket was full of pebbles; and so they all set out upon their way.
When they had gone a little distance, Hansel stood still, and peeped back
at the house; and this he repeated several times, till his father said,
" Hansel, what are you peeping at, and why do you lag behind 7 Take
care, and remember your legs."
Ah, father," said Hansel, "I am looking at my white cat sitting upon
the roof of the house, and trying to say good-bye." You simpleton !"
said the wife, that is not a cat; it is only the sun shining on the white
chimney." But in reality Hansel was not looking at a cat; but every
time he stopped, he dropped a pebble out of his pocket upon the path.
When they came to the middle of the wood, the father told the children
to collect wood, and he would make them a fire, so that they should not
be cold. So Hansel and Grethel gathered together quite a little moun-
tain of twigs. Then they sat fire to them; and as the flame burnt up
high, the wife said, Now, you children, lie down near the fire, and rest
yourselves, whilst we go into the forest and chop wood; when we are
ready, I will come and call you."
Hansel and Grethel sat down by the fire, and when it was noon, each
ate the piece of bread ; and because they could hear the blows of an axe,
they thought their father was near: but it was not an axe, but a branch
which he had bound to a withered tree, so as to be blown to and frc by
the wind. They waited so long, that at last their eyes closed from weari-
ness, and they fell fast asleep. When they awoke, it was quite dark, and
Grethel began to cry, How shall we get out of the wood i" But Hansel
tried to comfort her by saying, Wait a little while till the moon rises,
and then we will quickly find the way." The moon soon shone forth, and
Hansel, taking his sister's hand, followed the pebbles, which glittered like
new-coined silver pieces, and showed them the path. All night long
they walked on, and as day broke they came to their father's houa
59 00065.jpg
HANSEL AND GRETHEL.
They knocked at the door, and when the wife opened it, and saw Hansel
and Grethel, she exclaimed, You wicked children why did you sleep so
long in the wood 1 We thought you were never coming home again.'
But their father was very glad, for it had grieved his heart to leave them
all alone.
Not long afterwards there was again great scarcity in every corner
of the land; and one night the children overheard their mother saying
to'their father, "Everything is again consumed; we have only half a
loaf left, and then the song is ended : the children must be sent away.
We will take them deeper into the wood, so that they may not find the
way out again; it is the only means of escape for us."
But her husband felt heavy at heart, and thought, "It were better
to share the last crust with the children." His wife, however, would
listen to nothing that he said, and scolded and reproached him without
end.
He who says A must say B too; and he who consents the first time
must also the second.
The children, however, had heard the conversation as they lay
awake, and as soon as the old people went to sleep Hansel got up,
intending to pick up some pebbles as before; but the wife had locked
the door, so that he could not get out. Nevertheless he comforted
Grethel, saying, "Do not cry; sleep in quiet; the good God will not
forsake us."
Early in the morning the stepmother came and pulled them out of
bed, and gave them each a slice of bread, which was still smaller than the
former piece. On the way, Hansel broke his in his pocket, and, stooping
every now and then, dropped a crumb upon the path. "Hansel, why do
you stop and look about I" said the father, "keep in the path." "I am
looking at my little dove," answered Hansel, "nodding a good-bye to
me." "Simpleton !" said the wife, "that is no dove, but only the sun
shining on the chimney." But Hansel kept still, dropping crumbs as he
went along.
The mother led the children deep into the wood, where they had
never been before, and there making an immense fire, she said to them,
"Sit down here and rest, and when you feel tired you can sleep for a
little while. We are going into the forest to hew wood, and in the
evening, when we are ready, we will come and fetch you."
When noon came Grethel shared her bread with Hansel, who had
strewn his on the path. Then they went to sleep; but the evening
arrived and no one came to visit the poor children, and in the dark night
they awoke, and Hansel comforted his sister by saying, "Only wait,
Grethel, till the moon comes out, then we shall see the crumbs of bread
which I have dropped, and they will show us the way home." The moon
shone and they got up, but they could not see any crumbs, for the thou-
sands of birds which had been flying about in the woods and fields had
picked them all up. Hansel kept saying to Grethel, "We will soon find
the way; but they did not, and they walked the whole night long and the
next day. hut still they did not come out of the wood; and they got su
60 00066.jpg
48 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
hungry, for they had nothing to eat but the berries which they found
upon the bushes. Soon they got so tired that they could not drag them-
selves along, so they lay down under a tree and went to sleep.
It was now the third morning since they had left their father's house,
and they still walked on; but they only got deeper and deeper into the
wood, and Hansel saw that if help did not come very soon they would
die of hunger. As soon as it was noon they saw a beautiful snow-whie
bird sitting upon a bough, which sang so sweetly that they stood still
and listened to it. It soon left off, and spreading its wings flew off; and
they followed it until it arrived at a cottage, upon the roof of which it
perched; and when they went close up to it they saw that the cottage
was made of bread and cakes, and the window-panes were of clear
sugar.
"We will go in there," said Hansel, "and have a glorious feast. I will
eat a piece of the roof, and you can eat the window. Will they not be
sweet So Hansel reached up and broke a piece off the roof, in order
to see how it tasted; while Grethel stepped up to the window and began
to bite it. Then a sweet voice called out in the room, Tip-tap, tip-tap,
who raps at my door ? and the children answered, The wind, the wind,
the child of heaven;" and they went on eating without interruption.
Hansel thought the roof tasted very nice, aad so he tore off a great piece ;
while Grethel broke a large round pane o-t of the window, and sat down
quite contentedly. Just then the door opened, and a very old woman,
walking upon crutches, came out. Hansel and Grethel were so frightened
that they let fall what they had in their hands; but the old woman, nod-
ding her head, said, Ah, you dear children, what has brought you here I
Come in and stop with me, and no harm shall befall you;" and so saying
she took them both by the hand, and led them into her cottage. A good
meal of milk and pancakes, with sugar, apples, and nuts, was spread on
the table, and in the back room were two nice little beds, covered with
white, where Hansel and Grethel laid themselves down, and thought them-
selves in heaven. The old woman behaved very kindly to them, but in
reality she was a wicked witch who waylaid children, and built the bread-
house in order to entice them in; but as soon as they were in her power
she killed them, cooked and ate them, and made a great festival of the
day. Witches have red eyes, and cannot see very far; but they have a
fine sense of smelling, like wild beasts, so that they know when children
approach them. When Hansel and Grethel came near the witch's house
she laughed wickedly, saying, Here come two who shall not escape me."
And early in the morning, before they awoke, she went up to them, and
saw how lovingly they lay sleeping, with their chubby red cheeks; and
she mumbled to herself, "That will be a good bite." Then she took up
Hansel with her rough hand, and shut him up in a little cage with a
lattice-door; and although he screamed loudly it was of no use. Grethel
came next, and, shaking her till she awoke, she said, "Get up, you lazy
thing, and fetch some water to cook something good for your brother
who must remain in that stall and get fat; when he is fat enough I shall
eat him, Grethel began to cry, but it was all useless, for the old witch
61 00067.jpg
IhANSEL AND GRETHEL. 49
made her do as she wished. So a nice meal was cooked for Hansel, but
Grethel got nothing else but a crab's claw.
Every morning the old witch came to the cage and said, "Hansel,
stretch out your finger that I may feel whether you are getting fat."
But Hansel used to stretch out a bone, and the old woman, having very
bad sight, thought it was his finger, and wondered very much that hb
did not get more fat. When four weeks had passed, and Hansel still kept
quite lean, she lost all her patience, and would not wait any longer.
"Grethel," she called out in a passion, "get some water quickly; be
Hansel fat or lean, this morning I will kill and cook him." Oh, how the
poor little sister grieved, as she was forced to fetch the water, and fast
the tears ran down her cheeks "Dear good God, help us now !" she
exclaimed. Had we only been eaten by the wild beasts in the wood,
then we should have died together." But the old witch called out, Leave
off that noise; it will not help you a bit."
So early in the morning Grethel was forced to go out and fill the
kettle, and make a fire. First, we will bake, however," said the old
woman; "I have already heated the oven and kneaded the dough ;"
and so saying, she pushed poor Grethel up to the oven, out of which the
flames were burning fiercely. Creep in," said the witch, "and see if
it is hot enough, and then we will put in the bread; but she intended
when Grethel got in to shut up the oven and let her bake, so that she
might eat her as well as Hansel. Grethel perceived what her thoughts
were, and said, "I do not know how to do it; how shall I get in?"
"You stupid goose," said she, the opening is big enough. See, I could
even get in myself !" and she got up, and put her head into the oven.
Then Grethel gave her a push, so that she fell right in, and then shutting
the iron door she bolted it. Oh how horribly she howled; but Grethel
ran away, and left the ungodly witch to burn to ashes.
Now she ran to Hansel, and, opening his door, called out, Hansel, we
are saved; the old witch is dead So he sprang out, like a bird out of
his cage when the door is opened ; and they were so glad that they fell
upon each other's neck, and kissed each other over and over again. And
now as there was nothing to fear, they went into the witch's house, where
in every corner were caskets full of pearls and precious stones. These
are better than pebbles," said Hansel, putting as many into his pocket as
it would hold ; while Grethel thought, I will take some home too,"
ad filled her apron full. We must be off now," said Hansel, and get
out of this enchanted forest ;" but when they had walked for two hours
they came to a large piece of water. "We cannot get over," said Hansel;
"I can see no bridge at all." "And there is no boat either," said
Grethel, "but there swims a white duck, I will ask her to help us over
and she sang,
Little Duck, good little Duck,
Grethel and Hansel, here we stand;
There is neither stile nor bridge,
Take us on your back to land."
So the Duck came to them, and Hansel sat himself on, and bade his
62 00068.jpg
50 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
sister sit behind him. No," answered Grethel, "that will be too much
for the Duck, she shall take us over one at a time." This the good little
bird did, and when both were happily arrived on the other side, and had
gone a little way, they came to a well-known wood, which they knew the
better every step they went, and at last they perceived their father's
house. Then they began to run, and, bursting into the house, they fell
on their father's neck. He had not had one happy hour since he had
left the children in the forest : and his wife was dead. Grethel shook
her apron, and the pearls and precious stones rolled out upon the floor,
and Hansel throw down one handful after the other out of his pocket.
Then all their sorrows were ended, and they lived together in great
happiness.
My tale is done. There runs a mouse; whoever catches her may
make a great, great cap out of her fur.
THE THREE SNAKE-LEAVES.
VHERE was once a poor man who was unable to feed his only son an.
longer; so the son said, "My dear father, everything goes badly with
you, and I am a burden to you; I would rather go away and try to earn
my own bread." So the father gave him his blessing, and took leave
of him with great grief. At that time the King of a powerful empire
was at war, and the youth taking service under him, went with him to
the field. When he came in sight of the enemy, battle was given and
he was in great peril, and the arrows flew so fast that his comrades fell
around him on all sides. And when the captain was killed the rest
63 00069.jpg
THE THREE SNAKE-LEAVES. il
would have taken to flight ; but the youth, stepping forward, spoke tc
them courageously, exclaiming, \Ve will not let our fatherland be
ruined!" Then the others followed him, and pressed on so furiously,
that they routed the enemy. As soon as the King heard that he had to
thank the youth for the victory, he raised him above all the others, gave
him great treasures, and made him first in his kingdom.
Now the King had a daughter who was very beautiful, but she was
also very whimsical. She had made a vow never to take a lord and
husband who would not promise, if she should die first, to let himself be
buried alive with her. Does he love me with all his heart ?" said she:
"what use to him, then, can his life be afterwards I" At the same
time she was prepared to do the same thing, and if her husband should
die first to descend with him to the grave. This vow had hitherto
frightened away all suitors, but the youth was so taken with her beauty
that he waited for nothing, but immediately asked her in marriage of her
father.
Do you know," said the King, what you must promise ?"
"I must go with her into the grave," he replied, "if I survive her;
but my love is so great that I mind not the danger." Then the King
consented, and the wedding was celebrated with great splendour.
For a long time they lived happily and contented with one another,
until it happened that the young Queen fell grievously sick, so that no
physician could cure her. When she died the young Prince remembered
his forced promise, and shuddered at the thought of-laying himself alive
in the grave; but there was no escape, for the King had set watchers at
all the doors, and it was not possible to avoid his fate. When the day
came that the body should be laid in the royal vault, he was led away
with it, and the door closed and locked behind him. Near the coffin
stood a table, having upon it four lights, four loaves of bread, and four
bottles of wine : as soon as this supply came to an end he must die or
hunger. Full of bitterness and sorrow, he sat down, eating each day
but a little morsel of bread, and taking but one draught of wine : every
day he saw death approaching nearer and nearer. Whilst he thus sat
gazing before him he saw a snake creeping out of the corner of the vault,
which approached the dead body. Thinking that it came to feed on the
body, he drew his sword, and exclaiming, So long as I live you shall
not touch her !" he cut it in three pieces. After a while another snake
crawled out of the corner; but when it saw the other lying dead it went
back, and returned soon with three green leaves in its mouth. Then it
took the three pieces of the snake, and, laying them together so as to join,
it put one leaf on each wound. As soon as the divided parts were joined
the snake moved and was alive again, and both snakes hastened away
together. The leaves remained lying on the ground, and the unfortunate
man, who had seen all, bethought himself whether the miraculous power
of the leaves, which had restored a snake to life, might not help him.
So he picked up the leaves, and laid one on the mouth of the corpse of
his wife, and the other two on her eyes; and he had scarcely done so
when the blood circulated again in the veins, and mounting into the pale
64 00070.jpg
59 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
countenance, flushed it with colour. Then she drew her breath, opened
her eyes, and said, Ah, where am I 1" "You are with me, dear wife,"
he replied, and told her how everything had happened, and how he had
brought her to life. Then he helped her to some wine and bread; and,
when her strength had returned, she raised herself up, and they went to
the door, and knocked and shouted so loudly, that the watchers heard
them and told the King. The King came down himself and opened the
door, and there found them both alive and well, and he rejoiced with
them that their trouble had passed away. But the young Prince took
away the three snake-leaves, and gave them to his servant, saying,
" Preserve them carefully for me, and carry them with you at all times.
Who knows in what necessity they may not help us ?"
A change, however, had come over the wife after she was restored to
life, and it was as if all love for her husband had passed out of her heart.
And when, some little time after, he wished to make a voyage over the
sea to his old father, and they had gone on board the ship, she forgot the
great love and fidelity which he had shown, and through which he had
saved her life, and disclosed a wicked plan to the Captain. When the
young Prince lay asleep, she called up the Captain, and, taking the
sleeper by the head, while he carried the feet, they threw the Prince into
the sea. And as soon as the evil deed was done she said to the Captain,
Now let us return home, and say he died on the voyage. I will so
praise and commend you to my father that he shall give you to me in
marriage, and you shall sit as his heir."
But the faithful servant, who had seen all unremarked, let loose a
littlee boat from the ship, and getting in it himself, owed after his
master, and let the betrayers sail away. He fished the dead body up
again, and, by the help of the three snake-leaves, which he carried with
him, he brought it happily to life again. Then they both rowed away
with all their strength day and night, and their little boat glided on so
fast that they arrived before the others at the old King's palace. He
marvelled to see them return alone, and asked what had happened.
When he heard of the wickedness of his daughter, he said, I can
scarcely believe that she has done such evil; but the truth will soon come
to light." Then he bade them both go into a secret chamber, and keep
themselves private from everybody. Soon afterwards the great vessel
came sailing up, and the godless wife appeared before her father with a
sorrowful countenance. Why are you returned alone he asked.
"Where is your husband ." "Alas dear father," she replied, I return
home with great grief, for my husband was suddenly taken ill during the
voyage and died ; and if the good Captain had not giving me his assis-
tance it would have gone terribly with me; he was present at my
husband's death, and can tell you all about it." The King said, "I will
bring the dead to life," and opening the chamber, he bade the Prince and
his servant both to come forth. As soon as the wife perceived her
husband she was struck as if by lightning, and, falling on her knees, she
begged his pardon. But the King answered, "For you there is no
pardon. He was ready to die with you, and gave you life again; but
65 00071.jpg
RAPUNZEL. 53
you have conspired against nlm in his sleep, and shall receive your due
reward." Then she was put, with her companion in crime, on board a
ship which was pierced with holes, and drawn out into the sra ; and they
soon sank beneath the waves.
RAPUNZEL
ONCE upon a time there lived a man and his wife, who much wishwd to
have a child, but for a long time in vain. These people had a little
window in the back part of their house, out of which one could see intn
a beautiful garden which was full of fine flowers and vegetables; but it
was surrounded by a high wall, and no one dared to go in, because it bi-
longed to a Witch, who possessed great power, and who was feared by
the whole world. One day the woman stood at this window looking into
the garden, and there she saw a bed which was filled with the most beau-
tiful radishes, and which seemed so fresh and green that she felt quite
glad, and a great desire seized her to eat of these radishes. This wish
tormented her daily, and as she knew that she could not have them she
fell ill, and looked very pale and miserable. This frightened her husband,
who asked her, "What ails you, my dear wife ?"
Ah !" she replied, if I cannot get any of those radishes to eat out
of the garden behind the house I shall die !" The husband, loving her
very much, thought, Rather than let my wife die, I must fetch her
some radishes, cost what they may." So, in the gloom of the evening,
he climbed the wall of the Witch's garden, and, snatching a handful of
radishes in great haste, brought them to his wife, who made herself a
salad with them, which she relished extremely. However, they were so
66 00072.jpg
GRIMM S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
nice and so well-flavoured, that the next day after she felt th3 same
desire for the third time, and could not get any rest, so that her husband
was obliged to promise her some more. So, in the evening, he made
himself ready, and began clambering up the wall; but, oh! how terribly
frightened he was, for there he saw the old Witch standing before him.
" How dare you,"-she began, looking at him with a frightful scowl,-
" how dare you climb over into my garden to take away my radishes like
a thief Evil shall happen to you for this."
SAh !" replied he, "let pardon be granted before justice; I have
only done this from a great necessity; my wife saw your radishes from
her window, and took such a fancy to them that she would have died if
she had not eaten of them." Then the Witch ran after him in a passion,
saying, If she behave as you say, I will let you take away all the radishes
you please, but I make one condition; you must give me the child which
your wife will bring into the world. All shall go well with it, and I will
care for it like a mother." In his anxiety the man consented, and when
the child was born the Witch appeared at the same time, gave the child
the name Rapunzel," and took it away with her.
Rapunzel grew to be the most beautiful child under the sun, and
when she was twelve years old the Witch shut her up in a tower, which
stood in a forest, and had neither stairs nor door, and only one little
window just at the top. When the Witch wished to enter, she stood
beneath, and called out,-
"Rapunzel Rapunzel 1
Let down your hair."
For Rapunzel had long and beautiful hair, as fine as spun gold; and as
soon as she heard the Witch's voice she unbound her tresses, opened the
window, and then the hair fell down twenty ells, and the Witch mounted
up by it.
After a couple of years had passed away it happened that the King's
son was riding through the wood, and came by the tower. There he
heard a song so beautiful that he stood still and listened. It was Rapunzel,
who, to pass the time of her loneliness away, was exercising her sweet
voice. The King's son wished to ascend to her, and looked for a door in
the tower, but he could not find one. So he rode home, but the song
had touched his heart so much that he went every day to the forest and
listened to it; and as he thus stood one day behind a tree, he saw the
Witch come up and heard her call out,-
Rapuuzel I Rapunzel I
Let down your hair."
Then Rapunzel let down her tresses, and the Witch mounted up. Is
that the ladder on which one must climb 7 Then I will try my luck
too," said the Prince ; and the following day, as he felt quite lonely, he
went to the tower, and said,-
"Rapunzel! Rapuuzel!
Let down your bair."
67 00073.jpg
RAPUNZEL.
Then the tresses fell down, and he climbed up. Rapunzel was much
frightened at first when a man came in, for she had never seen one be-
fore ; but the King's son talked in a loving way to her, and told how his
heart had been so moved by her singing that he had no peace until he
had seen her himself. So Rapunzel lost her terror, and when he asked
her if she would have him for a husband, and she saw that he was young
and handsome, she thought, "Any one may have me rather than the old
woman :" so, saying Yes," she put her hand within his : "I will will-
ingly go with you, but I know not how I am to descend. When you
come, bring with you a skein of silk each time, out of which I will
weave a ladder, and when it is ready I will come down by it, and you
must take me upon your horse." Then they agreed that they should
never meet till the evening, as the Witch came in the day time. The
old woman remarked nothing about it, until one day Rapunzel inno-
cently said, Tell me, mother, how it happens you find it more difficult
to come up to me than the young King's son, who is with me in a
moment !"
Oh, you wicked child !" exclaimed the Witch ; "what do I hear
I thought I had separated you from all the world, and yet you have
deceived me." And, seizing Rapunzel's beautiful hair in a fury, she
gave her a couple of blows with her left hand, and, taking a pair of
scissors in her right, snip, snap, she cut off all her beautiful tresses, and
they fell upon the ground. Then she was so hard-hearted that she took
the poor maiden into a great desert, and left her to die in great misery
and grief.
But the same day when the old Witch had carried Rapunzel off, in
the evening she made the tresses fast above to the window-latch, and
when the King's son came, and called out,-
"Rapunzel 1 Rapunzel I
Let down your hair."
she let them down. The Prince mounted ; but when lie got to the top
he found, not his dear Rapunzel, but the Witch, who looked at him with
furious and wicked eyes. "Aha!" she exclaimed, scornfully, "you
would fetch your dear wife; but the beautiful bird sits no longer in her
nest, singing; the cat has taken her away, and will now scratch out
your eyes. To you Rapunzel is lost; you will never see her again."
The Prince lost his senses with grief at these words, and sprang out
of the window of the tower in his bewilderment. His life he escaped
with, but the thorns into which he fell put out his eyes. So he wan-
dered blind, in the forest, eating nothing but roots and berries, and doing
nothing but weep and lament for the loss of his dear wife. He wandered
about thus, in great misery, for some few years, and at last arrived at
the desert where Rapunzel, with her twins, a boy and a girl which had
been born, lived in great sorrow. Hearing a voice which he thought he
knew he followed in its direction; and, as he approached, Rapunzel
ecognised him, and fell upon his neck and went. Twa .f hwe tears
68 00074.jpg
56 GRIMI' S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
moistened his eyes, and they became clear again, so that he could see as
well as formerly.
Then he led her away to his kingdom, where he was received with
great demonstrations of joy, and where they lived long, contented and
happy.
What became of the old Witch no one ever knew.
THE WHITE SNAKE.
A LONG while ago there lived a King whose wisdom was world-renowned.
Nothing remained unknown to him, and it seemed as if the tidings of
the most hidden things were borne to him through the air. But he had
one strange custom : every noontime, when the table was quite cleared,
and no one was present, his trusty servant had to bring him a dish, which
was covered up, and the servant himself did not know what lay in it,
and no man knew, for the King never uncovered it nor ate thereof until
he was quite alone. This went on for a long time, until one day such a
violent curiosity seized the servant, who as usual carried the dish, that
he could not resist the temptation, and took the dish into his chamber.
As soon as he had carefully locked the door, he raised the cover, aBv'
there lay before him a White Snake. At the sight he could not restrain
the desire to taste it, so he cut a piece off and put it in his mouth. But
scarcely had his tongue touched it, when he heard before his window a
curious whispering of low voices. He went and listened, and found out
that it was the Sparrows who were conversing with one another, and re-
iating what each had seen in field or wood. The morsel of the Snake
aad given him the power to understand the speech of animals. Now it
happened just on this day that the Quee-i lst her finest ring, and suspi.
69 00075.jpg
THE WHITE SNAKE. 57
cdon fad )a this faithful servant, who had the care of all her jewels, that
he had stolen it. The King ordered him to appear before him, and
threatened in angry words that he should be taken up and tried if he did
uot know before the morrow whom to name as the guilty person. He
protested his innocence in vain, and was sent away without any mitiga-
tion of the sentence. In his anxiety and trouble he went away into the
courtyard, thinking how he might help himself. There, on a running
stream of water, the Ducks were congregated familiarly together, and
smoothing themselves down with their beaks while they held a confidential
conversation. The servant stood still and listened to them as they nar-
rated to each other whereabouts they had waddled, and what nice food
they had found; and one said in a vexed tone, Something very hard is
in my stomach, for in my haste I swallowed a ring which lay under the
Queen's window." Then the servant caught the speaker up by her neck,
and carried her to the cook, saying, "Just kill this fowl, it is finely fat."
Yes," said the cook, weighing it in her hand, it has spared no trouble
in cramming itself; it ought to have been roasted long ago." So saying,
she chopped off its head, and, when she cut it open, in its stomach was
found the Queen's ring. Now, the servant was able to prove easily his
innocence to the Queen, and, as she wished to repair her injustice, she
granted him her pardon, and promised him the greatest place of honour
which he wished for at court. The servant refused everything, and only
requested a horse and money, for he had a desire to see the world, and to
travel about it for a while. As soon as his request was granted, he set
off on his tour and came one day by a pond, in which he remarked three
fishes which were caught in the reeds, and lay gasping for water. Although
men say Fishes are dumb, yet he understood their complaint, that they
must soon die so miserably. Having a compassionate heart, he dismounted
and put the three prisoners again into the water. They splashed about
for joy, and putting their heads abote water said to him, We shall be
grateful, and repay you for savtlg us." He rode onwards, and, after a
while, it happened that he heard, as it were, a voice in the sand at his
feet. He listened, and perceived that an Ant King was complaining thus:
If these men could but keep away with their great fat beasts Here
comes an awkward horse treading my people under foot unmercifully."
So he rode on to a side path, and the Ant King called to him, We will
be grateful and reward you." His way led him into a forest, and there
he saw a male and female Crow, standing by their nest, and dragging their
young out. Off with you, you gallows birds !" they exclaimed, "we
can feed you no longer, you are big enough now to help yourselves."
The poor young ones lay on the ground fluttering and beating their wing,
aLd crying, "We, helpless children, we must feed ourselves, we who can-
not fly yet what is left to us but to die here of hunger Then the
Servant dismounted, and, killing his horse with his sword, left it for the
young Crows to feed upon. They soon hopped upon it, and when they
were satisfied they exclaimed, We will be grateful, and reward you ij
time of need !"
He was obliged now to use his own legs, and after he had gone a long
70 00076.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
way he came to a large town, where in the streets there was a great
crowd and shouting, and a man upon horseback riding along, who pro-
claimed, "The Princess seeks a husband; but he who would win her
must perform a difficult task, and, if he should not luckily complete it,
his life will be forfeited." Many had tried already, but in vain ; their
life had been forfeited. But the youth, when he had seen the Princess,
was so blinded by her beauty, that he forgot all danger, and stepping
before the King, offered himself as a suitor. Immediately he was con-
ducted to the sea, and a golden ring thrown in before his eyes. Then
the King bade him fetch this ring up again from the bottom of the sea,
adding, "If you rise without the ring, you shall be thrown in again and
again, until you perish in the waves." Every one pitied the handsome
Youth, and then left him alone on the sea-shore. There he stood con-
sidering what he should do, and presently lie saw three Fishes at once
swimming towards him, and they were no others than the three whose
lives he had saved. The middle one bore a mussel-shell in its mouth,
which it laid on the shore at the feet of the Youth, who, taking it up
and opening it, found the gold ring within. Full of joy, he brought it
to the King, expecting that he should receive his promised reward.
But the proud Princess, when she saw that he was not her equal in
birth, was ashamed of him, and desired that he should undertake a second
task. She went into the garden, and strewed there ten bags of millet-
seed in the grass, "These he must pick up by the morning, before the
sun rise, and let him not venture to miss one grain." The Youth sat
himself down in the garden, thinking how it was possible to perform this
task, but he could imagine no way, so he sat there sorrowfully awaiting
at the dawn of day to be conducted to death. But, as soon as the first
rays of the sun fell on the garden, he saw that the ten sacks were all
filled, and standing by him, while not a single grain remained in the
grass. The Ant King had come in the night with his thousands and
thousands of men, and the grateful insects had collected the millet with
great industry, and put it into the sacks. The Princess herself came
into the garden, and saw with wonder that the Youth had performed
what was required of him. But still she could not bend her proud heart,
and she said, Although he may have done these two tasks, yet he shall
not be my husband until he has brought me an apple from the tree of
life." The Youth did not know where the tree of life stood ; he got uT;
indeed, and was willing to go so long as his legs bore him, but he had i.zJ
hope of finding it. After he had wandered through three kingdoms, he
came by evening into a forest, and eitting'down-under a tree, he wished
to sleep ; when he heard a rustling in the branches, and a golden apple
fell into his hand. At the same time three Ravens flew down, and settled
on his knee, saying, "We are the three young ravens whom you saved
from dying of hunger; when we were grown up, and heard that you
sought the golden apple, then we flew over the sea, even to the end of
the world where stands the tree of life, and we have fetched you the
apple."
Full of joy, the Youth set out homewards, and presented the golden
71 00077.jpg
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
apple to the beautiful Princess, who now had no more excuses. So they
divided the apple of life, and ate it between them; then her heart was
filled with love towards him, and they lived to a great age in undisturbed
tranquillity.
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
TIIER was once upon a time a fisherman and his wife, who lived together
in a little hut near the sea, and every day he went down to fish. There
he sat with his rod, and looked out upon the blank water; and this he
did for many a long day. One morning the line went to the bottom,
and when he drew it up a great Flounder was hooked at the end. The
Flounder said, Let me go, I pray you, fisherman ; I am not a real fish,
but an enchanted Prince. What good shall I do you if you pull me
up ? I should not taste well; put me back into the water, and. let me
swim."
Ah," said the man, you need not make such a palaver, a fish which
can speak I would rather let swim;" and so saying, he put the fish into
the water, and as it sank to the bottom it left a long streak of blood
behind it. Then the fisherman got up, and went back to his wife in
their hut.
Have you caught nothing to-day, husband?" said she. "Oh !" he
replied, I caught a Flounder, who said he was an enchanted Prince; so
I threw him again into the sea to swim."
"Did you not wish first ?" she inquired. "No," said he.
"Ah," said the wife, "that is very un.nrcky; is one to remain in this
hovel for ever ? you might have wished for a better hut, at least. Go
again and call him; tell him we choose to have a better hut, and for
certain you'll get it."
72 00078.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
"Ah replied he, "how shall I manage that I" "Why," said his
wife, you must catch him again, and before you let him swim away he
will grant what you ask: be quick." The man was not much pleased,
and wished his wife further; but, nevertheless, he went down to the sea.
When he- came to the water, it was green and yellow, and looked still.
more blank; he stood by it and said,-
"Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Hither quickly come to me,
For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I dare not tell."
Then the Fish came swimming up, and said, "What do you want
with me 1" Oh !" said the man, I was to catch you again; for my wife
says I ought to have wished before. She won't stay any longer in her
hovel, and desires a cottage."
"Go home again," said the Flounder, "she has it already." So the
fisherman departed, and there was his wife, no longer in the dirty hovel,
for in its place stood a clean cottage, before whose door she sat upon a
bench. She took him by the hand, saying, "Come in now and see: is
not this much better 7" So in they went, and in the cottage there was
a beautiful parlour, and a fine fireplace, and a chamber where a bed
stood; there were also a kitchen and a store-room, with nice earthenware,
all of the best; tinware and copper vessels, and everything very clean
and neat. At the back was a large yard, with hens and chickens, as well
as a nice garden, full of fruit-trees and vegetables. See," said the wife,
"is not this charming V"
"Yes," said her husband, so long as it blooms you will be very well
content with it."
"We will consider about that," she replied, and they went to bed.
Thus eight to fourteen days passed on, when the wife said, "Hus-
oand, the hut is far too narrow for me, and the yard and garden are so
small; the Flounder may very well give us a larger house. I wida to
live in a large stone palace; go, then, to the Flounder, and ask him to
give us a castle."
"Ah, wife 1" said he, "the cottage is good enough; why should you
choose to have a castle 1"
"Go along," she replied, "the Flounder will soon give you that."
"Nay, wife," he said, "the Flounder gave us the cottage at first, but
when I go again he will perhaps be angry."
Never you mind," said she, "he can do what I wish for very easily
and willingly; go and try." The husband was vexed at heart, and did
not like going, and said to himself, This is not right." But at last he
set off
When he came "; the sea, the water was quite clouded and deep olue
coloured, and black and thick: it looked green no longer, yet it was calm.
So he rent and.said,-
"Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Hither quickly come to me,
For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I scarce dare tell"
73 00079.jpg
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. bl
"Now, then, what do you want 1" said the Flounder. Oh," said the
maa, half-frightened, "she wants to live in a great stone castle." "Go
home, and see it at your door," replied the Fish.
The fisherman went away, and lo where formerly his house stood,
there was a great stone castle ; and his wife called to him from the steps
to come in, and, taking him by the hand, she said, "Now let us look
about." So they walked about, and in the castle there was a great hall,
with marble tables, and there were ever so many servants, who ushered
them through folding-doors into rooms hung all round with tapestry, and
filled with fine golden stools and chairs, with crystal looking-glasses on
the walls; and all the rooms were similarly fitted up. Outside the house
were large courtyards with horse and cow-stalls, and waggons, all of the
best, and besides a beautiful garden filled with magnificent flowers and
fruit-trees, and a meadow full a mile long, covered with deer, and oxen,
and sheep, as many as one could wish for. "Is not this pretty ?" said the
wife. "Ah," said her husband, "so long as the humour lasts you will be
content with this, and then you will want something else."
We will think about that," said she, and with that they went to bed.
The next morning the wife woke up just as it was day, and looked
out over the fine country which lay before her. Her husband did not
get up, and there she stood with her arms akimbo, and called out, Get
up, and come and look here at the window; see, shall I not be Queen
over all the land I Go, and say to the Flounder, we choose to be King
and Queen." "Ah, wife," said he, "why should I wish to be King?"
"No," she replied, "you do not wish, so I will be Queen. Go, tell the
Flounder so."
"Oh, why do you wish this? I cannot say it."
"Why not? go off at once; I must be Queen." The husband set
out quite stupified, but she would have her way, and when he came to
the sea it was quite black-looking, and the water splashed up and smelled
very disagreeably. But he stood still, and repeated,-
Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Hither quickly come to me;
For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I scarce dare tell."
"What does she want now ?" asked the Flounder. "Ahl said he,
"she would be Queen." "Go home, she is so already," replied the Fish.
So he departed, and when he came near the palace he saw it had become
much larger, with a great tower and gateway in front of it; and before
the gate stood a herald, and there were many soldiers, with kettledrums
and trumpets. When he came into the house he found everything made
of the purest marble and gold; with magnificent curtains fringed with
gold. Through the hall he went in at the doors where the great court
apartment was, and there sat his wife upon a high throne of gold and
diamonds; having a crown of gold upon her head, and a sceptre of
precious stones in her hand; and upon each side stood six pages, in a
row, each one a head taller than the other. Then he went up, and said,
"Ah, wife, are you Queen new 1Yes," 'aid sheik "now I am Queen 1"
74 00080.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
There he stood looking for a long time. At last he said, "Ah, wife, how
do you like being Queen 1 now we have nothing else to choose." "No,
indeed!" she replied, "I am very dissatisfied; time and tide do not wait
for me; I can bear it no longer. Go then to the Flounder: Queen I am;
now I must be Pope." "Ah, wife! what would you ? Pope thou canst
not be, the Pope is the head of Christendom, the Flounder cannot make
you that."
"I will be Pope," replied the wife, and he was obliged to go, and,
when he came to the shore, the sea was running mountains high, and the
sky was so black that he was quite terrified, and began to say in a great
fright,-
"Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Quickly, quickly, come to me,
For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I dare not tell."
"What now ?" asked the Flounder. "She wants to be Pope," said he.
"Go home, and find her so," was the reply.
So he went back, and found a great church, in which she was sitting
upon a much higher throne, with two rows of candles on each side, some
as thick as towers, down to those no bigger than rushlights, and before
her footstool were Kings and Queens kneeling. Wife," said he, "now be
contented : since you are Pope, you cannot be anything else." "That I
will consider about," she replied, and so they went to bed; but she could
not sleep for thinking what she should be next. Very early she rose, and
looked out of the window, and as she saw the sun rising, she thought to
herself, "Why should I not do that 7" and so she shook her husband, and
called out to him, "Go, tell the Flounder I want to make the sun rise."
Her husband was so frightened that he tumbled out of bed, but she
would hear nothing, and he was obliged to go.
When he got down to the sea a tremendous storm was raging, and the
ships and boats were tossing about in all directions. Then he shouted
out, though he could not hear his own words,-
"Flounder, Flounder, in the sea,
Quickly, quickly, come to me;
For my wife, dame Isabel,
Wishes what I dare not tell."
"What would she have now?" said the Fish. "Ahi" he replied,
"she wants to be Ruler of the Universe."
"Return, and find her back in her hovel," replied the Flounder.
Aad there the fisherman and his wife remained for the rest of their
days.
75 00081.jpg
THE SEVEN CROWS.
THERE was a man who had seven sons, but never a daughter, although he
wished very much for one; at last his wife promised him another child,
and when it was born, lo! it was a daughter. Their happiness was great,
but the child was so weak and small that, on account of its delicate health,
it had to be baptized immediately. The father sent one of his sons
hastily to a spring in order to fetch some water, but the other six would
run as well; and as each strove to be first to fill the pitcher, between
them all it fell into the water. They stood by, not knowing what to do,
and none of them dared to go home. As they did not come back, the
father became impatient, saying, "They have forgotten all about it in a
game of play, the godless youths." Soon he became anxious lest the child
should die unbaptized, and in his haste he exclaimed, I would they were
all changed into Crows!" Scarcely were the words out of his mouth,
when he heard a whirring over his head, and looking up he saw seven
coal-black Crows flying over the house.
The parents could not recall their curse, and grieved very much for
their lost sons; but they comforted themselves in some measure with
their dear daughter, who soon grew strong, and became more and more
beautiful every day. For a long time she did not know she had any
brothers, for her parents were careful not to mention them; but one day
accidentally she overheard some people talking about her, and saying,
"She is certainly very beautiful; but still the guilt of her seven brothers
rests on her head." This made her very sad, and she went to her parents
and asked whether she had any brothers, and whither they were gone.
The old people durst no longer keep their secret, but said it was the
decree of heaven, and her birth had been the unhappy cause. Now the
maiden daily accused herself, and thought how she could again deliver her
brothers. She had neither rest nor quiet, until she at last set out
76 00082.jpg
64 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
secrecy, and journeyed into the wide world to seek out her brothers, and
to free them, wherever they were, cost what it might. She took nothing
with her but a ring of her parents' for a remembrance, a loaf of bread for
hunger's sake, a bottle of water for thirst's sake, and a little stool for
weariness.
Now on and on went the maiden, further and further, even to the
world's end. Then she came to the Sun, but he was too hot and fearful,
and burnt up little children. So she ran hastily away to the Moon, but
she was too cold, and even wicked-looking, and said, "I smell, I smell
man's flesh !" So she ran away quickly, and went to the Stars, who were
friendly and kind to her, each one sitting upon his own little seat. But
the Morning-star was standing up, and gave her a crooked bone. saying,
"If you have not this bone you cannot unlock the glass castle, where
your brothers are."
The maiden took the bone, and wrapped it well up in a handkerchief,
and then on she went again till she came at last to the glass castle. The
door was closed, and she looked therefore for the little bone; but when
she unwrapped her handkerchief it was empty-she had lost the present
of the good Star. What was she to do now 1 She wished to save her
brothers, and she had no key to the glass castle. The good little sister
bent her little finger, and put it in the door, and luckily it unlocked it.
As soon as she entered a little Dwarf came towards her, who said, "My
child, what do you seek "
I seek my brothers, the seven Crows," she replied.
The Dwarf answered, My Lord Crows are not at home; but if you
wish to wait their return, come in and sit down."
Thereupon the little Dwarf carried in the food of the seven Crows
upon seven dishes and in seven cups, and the maiden ate a little piece off
each dish, and drank a little out of every cup; but in the last cup she
dropped the ring which she had brought with her.
All at once she heard a whirring and cawing in the air, and the
Dwarf said, My Lord Crows are now flying home."
Presently they came in and prepared to eat and drink; each seeking
his own dish and cup. Then one said to the other, "Who has been eat-
ing off my dish Who has been drinking out of my cup ? There has
been a human mouth here 1"
When the seventh came to the bottom of his cup, the little ring
rolled out. He looked at it, and recognized it as a ring of his parents
and said, God grant that our sister be here; then are we saved 1"
As the maiden, who bad stood behind the door watching, heard these
words, she came forward, and immediately all the Crows received again
their human forms, and embraced and kissed their sister, and then they
all went joyfully home together.
77 00083.jpg
THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR.
ONE summer's morning a Tailor was sitting on his bench by the window
in very good spirits, sewing away with all his might, and presently up
the street came a peasant woman, crying, "Good preserves for sale'
Good preserves for sale!" This cry sounded nice in the Tailor's ears,
and, sticking his diminutive head out of the window, he called out,
"Here, my good woman, just bring your wares here!" The woman
mounted the three steps up to the Tailor's house with her heavy basket,
and began to unpack all the pots together before him. He looked at
them all, held them up to the light, put his nose to them, and at last
said, These preserves appear to me to be very nice, so you may weigh
me out four half-ounces, my good woman; I don't mind even if you
make it a quarter of a pound." The woman, who expected to have met
with a good customer, gave him what he wished, and went away
grumbling, very much dissatisfied.
"Now !" exclaimed the Tailor, "Heaven will send me a blessing on
this preserve, and give me fresh strength and vigour ;" and, taking the
bread out of the cupboard, he cut himself a slice the size of the whole loaf,
and spread the preserve upon it. That will taste by no means badly,"
said he; "but, before I have a bite, I will just get this waistcoat finished."
So he laid the bread down near him and stitched away, making larger and
larger stitches every time for joy. Meanwhile the smell of the preserve
mounted to the ceiling, where flies were sitting in great numbers, and
enticed them down, so that soon a regular swarm of them had settled on
the bread. Holloa i who invited you?" exclaimed the Tailor, hunting
away the unbidden guests; but the flies, not understanding his language,
would not be driven off, and came again in greater numbers than before.
This put the little man in a boiling passion, and, snatching up in his rage
a bag of cloth, he brought it down with an unmerciful swoop upon them.
\ hen he raised it again he counted no less than seven lying dead before
F
78 00084.jpg
66 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
him with outstretched legs. What a fellow you are !" said he to him-
self, wondering at his own bravery. "The whole town shall know of
this." In great haste he cut himself out a band, hemmed it, and then
put on it in large characters, "SEVEN AT ONE BLOW Ah," said he,
"not one city alone, the whole world shall know it!" and his heart
fluttered with joy, like a lambkin's tail.
The little Tailor bound the belt round his body, and prepared to travel
fourth into the wide world, thinking the workshop too small for his valiant
deeds. Before he set out, however, he looked round his house to see if
there was anything he could take with him ; but he fond only an old
cheese, which he pocketed, and remarking a bird before the door which
was entangled in the bushes, he caught it, and put that in his pocket also.
Directly after he set out bravely on his travels ; and, as he was light and
active, he felt no weariness. His road led him up a hill, and when he
reached the highest point of it he found a great Giant sitting there, who
was looking about him very composedly.
The little Tailor, however, went boldly up, and said, "Good day,
comrade; in faith you sit there and see the whole world stretched below
you. I am also on my road thither to try my luck. Have you a mind
to go with me 1"
The Giant looked contemptuously at the little Tailor, and said, You
vagabond you miserable fellow 1"
That may be," replied the Tailor; "but here you may read what
sort of a man I am ;" and, unbuttoning his coat, he showed the Giant
his belt. The Giant read, Seven at one blow;" and thinking they were
men whom the Tailor had slain, he conceived a little respect for him,
Still he wished to prove him first; so taking up a stone, he squeezed it
in his hand, so that water dropped out of it. Do that after me," said
he to the other, if you have any strength."
If it be nothing worse than that," said the Tailor, "that's play to
me." And, diving into his pocket, he brought out the cheese, and squeezed
it till the whey ran out of it, and said, Now, I think, that's a little
better."
The Giant did not know what to say, and could not believe it of the
little man; so, taking up another stone, he threw it so high that one
could scarcely see it with the eye, saying, "There, you mannikin, do that
after me."
"Well done," said the Tailor; "but your stone must fall down again
to the ground. I will throw one up which shall not come back :" and,
dipping into his pocket, lie took out the bird and threw it into the air.
The bird, rejoicing in its freedom, flew straight up, and then far away,
and did not return. "How does that little affair please you, comrade T"
asked the Tailor.
You can throw well, certainly," replied the Giant; "now let us see
if you are in trim to carry something out of the common." So saying he
led him to a huge oak-tree, which lay upon the ground, and said, If you
are strong enough, just help me to carry this tree out of the forest."
"With all my heart," replied the Tailor; "do you take the trunk
79 00085.jpg
THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR. 67
tpon your shoulder, and I will raise the boughs and branches, which ar
the heaviest, and carry them."
The Giant took the trunk upon his shoulder, but the Tailor placed
himself on the branch, so that the Giant, who was not able to look round.
was forced to carry the whole tree and the Tailor besides. lie, being be.
hind, was very merry, and chuckled at the trick, and presently began to
whistle the song, There rode three tailors out at the gate," as if th'
carrying of trees were child's play. The Giant, after he had staggered
along a short distance with his heavy burden, cculd go no further, and
shouted out, Do you hear ? I must let the tree fall." The Tailor,
springing down, quickly embraced the tree with both arms, as if he had
been carrying it, and said to the Giant, "Are you such a big fellow, and
yet cannot you carry this tree by yourself?"
Then they journeyed on further, and as they came to a cherry-tree,
the Giant seized the top of the tree where the ripest fruits hung, and,
bending it down, gave it to the Tailor to hold, bidding him eat. But the
Tailor was much too weak to hold the tree down, and when the Giant let
go the tree flew up into the air, and the Tailor was carried with it. He
came down on the other side, however, without injury, and the Giant said.
'What does that mean ? Have you not strength enough to hold that
twig ?" "My strength did not fail me," replied the Tailor; "do you
suppose that that was any hard thing for one who has killed seven at one
blow? I have sprung over the tree because the hunters were shooting
below there in the thicket. Spring after me if you can." The Giant
made the attempt, but could not'clear the tree, and stuck fast in the
branches ; so that in this affair, too, the Tailor was the better man.
After this the Giant said, "Since you are such a valiant fellow, come
with me to our house, and stop a night with us." The Tailor consented,
and followed him; and when they entered the cave, there sat by the fire
two other Giants, each having a roast sheep in his hand, of which he
was eating. The Tailor sat down thinking, "Ah, this is much more
like the world than is my workshop." And soon the Giant showed him
a bed where he might lie down and go to sleep. The bed, however, was
too big for him, so he slipt out of it, and crept into a corner. When
midnight came, and the Giant thought the Tailor would be in a deep
sleep, he got up, and, taking a great iron bar, beat the bed right through
at one stroke, and supposed he had thereby given the Tailor his death-
blow. At the earliest dawn of morning the Giants went forth into the
forest, quite forgetting the Tailor, when presently up he came, quite
merry, and showed himself before them. The Giants were terrified, and,
fearing he would kill them all, they ran away in great haste.
The Tailor journeyed on, always following his nose, and after he had
wandered some long distance, he came into the courtyard of a royal
palace ; and as he felt rather tired he laid himself down on the grass and
went to sleep. Whilst he lay there the people came and viewed him on
all sides, and read upon his belt, Seven at one blow." Ah," said they,
" what does this great warrior here in time of peace ? This must be some
mighty hero." So they went and told the King, thinking that, should
80 00086.jpg
68 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
war break out, here was an important and useful man, whom one ought
not to part with at any price. The King took counsel, and. sent one of
his courtiers to the Tailor to ask for his fighting services, if lie should be
awake. The messenger stopped at the sleeper's side, and waited till he
stretched out his limbs and opened his eyes, and then he laid before him
his message. Solely on that account did I come here," was the reply;
" I am quite ready to enter into the King's service." Then he was con-
ducted away with great honour, and a fine house was appointed him to
dwell in.
The courtiers, however, became jealous of the Tailor, and wished he
were a thousand miles away. "What will happen ?" said they to one
another. If we go to battle with him, when he strikes out seven will
fall at one blow, and nothing will be left for us to do." In their rage
they came to the resolution to resign, and they went all together to the
King, and asked his permission, saying, "We are not prepared to keep
company with a man who kills seven at one blow." The King was
grieved to lose all his faithful servants for the sake of one, and wished
that he had never seen the Tailor, and would willingly have now been rid
of him. He dared not, however, dismiss him, because he feared the Tailor
would kill him and all his subjects, and place himself upon the throne.
For a long time he deliberated, till at last he came to a decision ; and,
sending for the Tailor, he told him that, seeing he was so great a hero,
he wished -to ask a favour of him. In a certain forest in my kingdom,"
said the King, "there live two Giants, who, by murder, rapine, fire, and
robbery, have committed great havoc, and no one dares to approach them
without perilling his own life. If you overcome and kill both these
Giants, I will give you my only daughter in marriage, and the half of my
kingdom for a dowry: a hundred knights shall accompany you, too, in
order to render you assistance."
"Ah, that is something for such a man as I," thought the Tailor to
himself; "a beautiful Princess and half a kingdom are not offered to one
every day." Oh, yes," he replied, I will soon manage these two
Giants, and a hundred horsemen are not necessary for that purpose; he
who kills seven at one blow need not fear two."
Thus talking the little Tailor set out, followed by the hundred
knights, to whom he said, at soon as they came to the borders of the
forest, "Do you stay here ; I would rather meet these Giants alone."
Then he sprang off into the forest, peering about him right and left; and
after a while he saw the two Giants lying asleep under a tree, snoring so
loudly, that the branches above them shook violently. The Tailor, full of
courage, filled both his pockets with stones and clambered up the tree.
When he got to the middle of it he crept along a bough, so that he sat
just above the sleepers, and then he let fall one stone after another upon
the breast of one of them. For some time the Giant did not stir, until,
at last awaking, he pushed his companion, and said, Why are you
beating me ?"
"You are dreaming," he replied; "I never hit you." They laid
themselves down again to sleep, and presently the Tailor threw a stone
81 00087.jpg
THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR. 69
down upon the other. "What is that 7" he exclaimed. "What are you
knocking me for 1"
"I did not touch you ; you must dream," replied the first. So tney
wrangled for a few minutes; but, being both very tired with their day's
work, they soon fell asleep again. Then the Tailor began his sport again,
and, picking out the biggest stone, threw it with all his force upon
the breast of the first Giant. "That is too bad !" he exclaimed; and,
springing up like a madman, he fell upon his companion, who, feeling
himself equally aggrieved, they set to in such good earnest, that they
rooted up trees and beat one another about until they both fell dead upon
the ground. Now the Tailor jumped down, saying, "What a piece of
luck they did not uproot the tree on which I sat, or else I must have
jumped on another like a squirrel, for I am not given to flying." Then
he drew his sword, and, cutting a deep wound in the breast of each, he
went to the horsemen and said, "The deed is done ; I have given each
his death-stroke ; but it was a hard job, for in their necessity they
uprooted trees to defend themselves with ; still, all that is of no use when
such an one as I come, who killed seven at one stroke."
"Are you not wounded, then 7" asked they.
"That is not to be expected: they have not touched a hair of my
head," replied the little man. The knights could scarcely believe him,
till, riding away into the forest, they found the Giants lying in their
blood and the uprooted trees around them.
Now the Tailor demanded his promised reward of the King ; but he
repented of his promise, and began to think of some new scheme to get
rid of the hero. "Before you receive my daughter and the half of
my kingdom," said he to him, "you must perform one other heroic deed.
In the forest there runs wild a unicorn, which commits great havoc, and
which you must first of all catch."
"I fear still less for a unicorn than I do for two Giants Seven at
one blow that is my motto," said the Tailor. Then he took with him a
rope and an axe and went away to the forest, bidding those who were
ordered to accompany him to wait on the outskirts. He had not to
search long, for presently the unicorn came near and prepared to rush
at him as if it would pierce him on the spot. Softly, softly !" he ex-
claimed ; "that is not done so easily;" and, waiting till the animal was
close upon him, he sprang nimbly behind a tree. The unicorn, rushing
with all its force against the tree, fixed its horn so fast in the trunk, that
it could not draw it out again, and so it was made prisoner. Now
I have got my bird," said the Tailor ; and, coming from behind the tree,
he first bound the rope around its neck, and then, cutting the horn out
of the tree with his axe, he put all in order, and, leading the animal,
brought it before the King.
The King, however, would not yet deliver up the promised reward,
and made a third request, that, before the wedding, the Tailor should
catch a wild boar which did much injury, and he should have the
huntsmen to hslp him. "With pleasure," was the reply; "it is more
sbild's play." The huntsmen, however, he left behind, to their entire
82 00088.jpg
70 GrnIM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
content, for this wild boar had already so often hunted them, that thej
had no pleasure in hunting it. As soon as the boar perceived the Tailor
it ran at him with gaping mouth and glistening teeth, and tried to throw
him on the ground ; but our flying hero sprang into a little chapel which
was near, and out again at a window on the other side in a trice. The
boar ran after him, but he, skipping round, shut the door behind it, and
there the raging beast was caught, for it was much too unwieldy and
heavy to jump out of the window. The Tailor now called the huntsmen
up, that they might see his prisoner with their own eyes; but our hero
presented himself before the King, who was compelled now, whether
he would or no, to keep his promise, and surrender his daughter and the
half of his kingdom.
Had he known that it was no warrior, but only a Tailor, who stood
before him, it would have gone to his heart still more !
So the wedding was celebrated with great splendour, though with
little rejoicing, and out of a Tailor was made a King.
Some little while afterwards the young Queen heard her husband
talking in his sleep, and saying, Boy, make me a waistcoat, and stitch
up these trowsers, or I will lay the yard-measure over your ears!"
Then she remarked of what condition her lord was, and complained in
the morning to her father, and begged he would deliver her from her
husband, who was nothing else than a tailor. The King comforted her
by saying, "This night leave your chamber door open; my servants
shall stand without, and when he is asleep they shall enter, bind him,
and bear him away to a ship, which shall carry him forth into the wide
world." The wife was contented with his proposal; but the King's
E.rmour-bearer, who had overheard all, went to the young King and dis-
closed the whole plot. I will shoot a bolt upon this affair," said the
brave Tailor. In the evening at their usual time they went to bed,
and when his wife believed lie slept she got up, opened the door, and
laid herself down again. The Tailor, however, only feigned to be
asleep, and began to exclaim in a loud voice, "Boy, make me this waist-
coat, and stitch up these trousers, or I will beat the yard-measure about
your ears Seven have I killed with one blow, two Giants have I slain,
a unicorn have I led captive, and a wild boar have I caught, and shall I
be afraid of those who stand without my chamber?" When the men
heard these words spoken by the Tailor, a great fear overcame them,
and they ran away as if the wild huntsmen were behind them ; neither
afterwards durst any man venture to oppose him. Thus became the
Tailor a King, and so he remained the rest of his day~
83 00089.jpg
THE STRAW, THE COAL, AND THE BEAN.
Is a certain village there dwelt a poor old woman, who had gathered a disr
of beans, which she wished to cook. So she made a fire upon the hearth,
and, that it might burn the quicker, she lighted it with a handful of
straw. And as she shook the beans up in the saucepan, one fell out
unperceived, and came down upon the ground, near a straw; soon after a
glowing coal burst out of the fire, and fell just by these two. Then the
Straw began to say, "My dear friend, whence do you come ?" The Coal
replied, "By good luck I have sprung out of the fire, and, if I had
not jumped away by force, my death had been certain, and I should have
been reduced to ashes." The Bean continued, "I also have got away
with a whole skin, but, had the old woman put me in the pot with the
others, I should have been boiled to pieces, as my comrades are."
"Would a better fate have fallen to my share 7" said the Straw; "for
the old woman has suffocated in fire and smoke all my brothers; sixty
has she put on at once, and deprived of life; happily, I slipped between
her fingers."
"But what shall we do now ?" asked the Coal.
"I think," answered the Bean, "since we have so luckily escaped
death, we will join in partnership, and keep together like good com-
panions: lest a new misfortune overtake us, let us wander forth, and
travel into a strange country."
This proposition pleased the two others, and they set out together on
their travels. Presently they came to a little stream, over which there
was no bridge nor path, and they did not know how they should get over.
The Straw gave good advice, and said, "I will lay myself across, so that
you may cross over upon me, as upon a bridge." So the Straw stretched
itself from one bank to the other, and the Coal, which was of a fiery
nature, tripped lightly upon the newly-built bridge. But when it came to
the middle of it, and heard the water running along beneath, it wae
84 00090.jpg
72 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
frightened, and stood still, not daring to go further. The Straw, how-
ever, beginning to burn, broke in two and fell into the stream, and the
Coal slipping after, hissed as it reached the water, and gave up the ghost.
The Bean, which had prudently remained upon the shore, was forced
to laugh at this accident, and, the joke being so good, it laughed so
immoderately that it burst itself. Now they would all have been done for
alike, if a tailor, who was out on his wanderings, had not just then, by
great good luck, sat himself down near the stream. Having a commise-
rating heart, he took out needle and thread, and sewed the Bean together.
The Bean thanked him exceedingly; but as the tailor used black thread
it has happened since that time, every Bean has a black seam.
-- Tg- M / 7Z^ w-
LITTLE RED-CAP.
ONCE upon a time there lived a sweet little girl, who was beloved by
every one who saw her; but her grandmother was so excessively fond
of her that she never knew when she had thought and done enough
for her.
One day the grandmother presented the little girl with a red velvet
cap; and as it fitted her very well, she would never wear anything else;
and so she was called Little Red-Cap. One day her mother said to her,
" Come, Red-Cap, here is a piece of nice meat, and a bottle of wine : take
these to your grandmother ; she is ill and weak, and will relish them.
Make haste before she gets up ; go quietly and carefully; and do not
run, lest you should fall and break the bottle, and then your grandmother
will get nothing. When you go into her room, do not forget to say
Good-morning ;' and do not look about in all the corners." I will do
everything as you wish," replied Red-cap, taking her mother's hand.
The grandmother dwelt far away in the wood, half an hour's walk from
the village, and as Little Red-Cap entered among the trees, she met a
85 00091.jpg
LITTLE RED-CAP. 73
wolf; but she did not know what a malicious beast it was. and so she
was not at all afraid. Good day, Little Red-Cap," he said.
"Many thanks, Wolf," said she.
"Whither away so early, Little Red-Cap I"
"To my grandmother's," she replied.
"What are you carrying under your apron 1"
"Meat and wine," she answered. Yesterday we baked the meat,
that grandmother, who is ill and weak, might have something nice and
strengthening."
"Where does your grandmother live 1" asked the Wolf.
"A good quarter of an hour's walk further in the forest. The cottage
stands under three great oak-trees; near it are some nut bushes, by
which you will easily know it."
But the Wolf thought to himself, She is a nice tender thing, and will
taste better than the old woman: I must act craftily, that I may snap
them both up."
Presently he came up again to Little Red-Cap, and said, "Just look
at the beautiful flowers which grow around you; why do you not look
about you I believe you don't hear how beautifully the birds sing.
You walk on as if you were going to school; see how merry everything
is around you in the forest."
So Little Red-Cap opened her eyes; and when she saw how the sun-
beams glanced and danced through the trees, and what splendid flowers
were blooming in her path, she thought, If I take my grandmother a
fresh nosegay she will be very pleased; and it is so very early that I
can, even then, get there in good time;" and running into the forest she
looked about for flowers. But when she had once begun she did not
know how to leave off, and kept going deeper and deeper among the
trees in search of some more beautiful flower. The Wolf, however, ran
straight to the house of the old grandmother, and knocked at the door.
Who's there 1" asked the old lady.
Only Little Red-Cap, bringing you some meat and wine: please
open the door," replied the Wolf.
Lift up the latch," cried the grandmother; I am too weak to get
up."
So the Wolf lifted the latch, and the door flew open; and jumping
without a word on the bed, he gobbled up the poor old lady. Then he
put on her clothes, and tied her cap over his head; got into the bed, and
drew the blankets over him. All this time Red-Cap was still gathering
flowers; and when she had plucked as many as she could carry, she
remembered her grandmother, and made haste to the cottage. She
wondered very much to see the door wide open; and when she got into
the room, she began to feel very ill, and exclaimed, How sad I feel! I
wish I had not come to-day." Then she said, Good morning," but
received no answer; so she went up to the bed, and drew back the
curtains, and there lay her grandmother, as she thought, with the cap
drawn half over her eyes, looking very fierce.
Oh, grandmother, what great ears you have I"
86 00092.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Tie better to hear with," was the reply.
And what great eyes you have !"
The better to see with."
"And what great hands you have !"
The better to touch you with."
But, grandmother, what great teeth you have !"
"The better to eat you with;" and scarcely were the words out of his
mouth, when the Wolf made a spring out of bed, and swallowed up poor
Little Red-Cap.
As soon as the Wolf had thus satisfied his appetite, he laid himself
down again in the bed, and began to snore very loudly. A huntsman
passing by overheard him, and thought, How loudly the old woman
snores I must see if she wants anything."
So he stepped into the cottage; and when he came to the bed, he saw
the Wolf lying in it. What! do I find you here, you old sinner I
have long sought you," exclaimed he; and taking aim with his gun, he
shot the old Wolf dead.
Some folks say that the last story is not the true one, but that one
day, when Red-Cap was taking some baked meats to her grandmother's,
a Wolf met her, and wanted to mislead her; but she went straight on,
and told her grandmother that she had met a Wolf, who wished her good-
day; but he looked so wickedly out of his great eyes, as if he would have
eaten her had she not been on the highroad.
So the grandmother said, "Let us shut the door, that he may not
enter."
Soon afterwards came the Wolf, who knocked, and exclaimed, "I am
Red-Cap, grandmother; I bring you some roast meat." But they kept
quite still, and did not open the door; so the Wolf, creeping several
times round the house, at last jumped on the roof, intending to wait till
led-Cap went home in the evening, and then to sneak after her and
devour her in the darkness. The old woman, however, saw all that the
rascal intended; and as there stood before the door a great stone trough,
she said to Little Red-Cap, Take this pail, child: yesterday I boiled
some sausages in this water, so pour it into that stone trough." Red-Cap
poured many times, until the huge trough was quite full. Then the Wolf
sniffed the smell of the sausages, and smacked his lips, and wished very
much to taste; and at last he stretched his neck too far over, so that he
lost his balance, and slipped quite off the roof, right into the great trough
beneath, wherein he was drowned; and Little Red-Cap ran home in high
glee, but no one sorrowed for Mr. Wolt'l
87 00093.jpg
OLD MOTHER FROST.
THERE was once a widow who had two daughters, one of whom waE
beautiful and industrious, and the other ugly and lazy. She behaved
most kindly, however, to the ugly one, because she was her own daughter;
and made the other do all the hard work, and live like a kitchen maid.
The poor maiden was forced out daily on the highroad, and had to sit by
a well and spin so much that the blood ran from her fingers. Once it
happened that her spindle became quite covered with blood, so, kneeling
down by the well, she tried to wash it off, but, unhappily, it fell out of
her hands into the water. She ran crying to her stepmother, and told
her misfortune: but she scolded her terribly, and behaved very cruelly,
and at last said, Since you have let your spindle fall in, you must your-
self fetch it out again!" Then the maiden went back to the well, not
knowing what to do, and, in her distress of mind, she jumped into
the well to fetch the spindle out. As she fell she lost all consciousness,
and when she came to herself again she found herself in a beautiful
meadow, where the sun was shining, and many thousands of flowers
blooming around her. She got up and walked along till she came to a
baker's, where the oven was fidl of bread, which cried out, "Draw me,
draw me, or I shall be burnt. I have been baked long enough." So
she went up, and, taking the bread-peel, drew out one loaf after the
other. Then she walked on further, and came to an apple tree, whose
fruit hung very thick, and which exclaimed, "Shake us, shake us; we
apples are all ripe!" So she shook the tree till the apples fell down like
rain, and, when none were left on, she gathered them all together in a
heap, and went further. At last she came to a cottage, out of which an
old woman was peeping, who had such very large teeth that the maiden
was frightened and ran away. The old woman, however, called her back,
saying, What are you afraid of, my child? Stop with me: if you will
put all things in order in my house, then shall all go well with you;
only you must take care tha; you make my bed well, and shake it
6,
88 00094.jpg
76 ORIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
tremendously, so that the feathers fly; then it snows upon earth. I am
'Old Mother Frost.'" As the old woman spoke so kindly, the maiden
took courage, and consented to engage in her service. Now, everything
made her very contented, and she always shook the bed so industriously
that the feathers blew down like flakes of snow; therefore her life was
a happy one, and there were no evil words; and she had roast and baked
meat every day.
For some time she remained with the old woman; but, all at once,
she became very sad, and did not herself know what was the matter.
At last she found she was home-sick; and, although she fared a thousand
times better than when she was at home, still she longed to go. So she
told her mistress, I wish to go home, and if it does not go so well with
me below as up here, I must return." The mistress replied, It appeared
to me that you wanted to go home, and, since you have served me so
truly, I will fetch you up again myself." So saying, she took her by
the hand and led her before a great door, which she undid; and, when
the maiden was just beneath it, a great shower of gold fell, and a great
deal stuck to her, so that she was covered over and over with gold.
"That you must have for your industry," said the old woman, giving
her the spindle which had fallen into the well. Thereupon the door was
closed, and the maiden found herself upon the earth, not far from her
mother's house; and, as she came into the court, the cook sat upon the
house, and called,-
Cock-a-doodle-doo !
Our golden maid's come home again."
Then she went in to her mother, and, because she was so covered with
gold, she was well received.
The maiden related all that had happened; and, when the mother
heard how she had come by these great riches, she wished her ugly, lazy
daughter to try her luck. So she was forced to asi down by the well and
spin; and, in order that her spindle might become bloody, she pricked
her finger by running a thorn into it; and then, throwing the spindle
into the well, she jumped in after it. Then, like the other, she came
upon the beautiful meadow, and travelled on the same path. When she
arrived at the baker's, the bread called out, "Draw me out, draw me
out, or I shall be burnt. I have been baked long enough." But she
answered, I have no wish to make myself dirty about you," and so
went on. Soon she came to the apple tree, which called out, Shake
me, shake me; my apples are all quite ripe." But she answered, "You
do well to come to me; perhaps one will fall on my head;" and so she
went on further. When she came to "Old Mother Frost's" house she
was not afraid of the teeth, for she had been warned; and so she engaged
herself to her. The first day she set to work in earnest, was very
industrious, and obeyed her mistress in all she said to her, for she though
about the gold which she would present to her. On the second day
however, she began to idle; on the third, still more so; and then shs
would not get up of a morning. She did not make the beds, either, as
she ought, and the feathers did not fly. So the old woman got tired,
89 00095.jpg
CINDERELLA.
and dismissed her from her service, which pleased the lazy one very well,
for she thought, "Now the gold-shower will come." Her mistress led
her to the door; but, when she was beneath it, instead of gold, a tubful
of pitch was poured down upon her. That is the reward of your ser-
vice," said "Old Mother Frost," and shut the door to. Then came
Lazy-bones home, but she was quite covered with pitch; and the cock
upon the house when he saw her, cried-
"Cock-a-doodle doo !
Our dirty maid's come home again."
But the pitch stuck
off again.
to her, and, as long as she lived, would never come
CINDERELLA.
ONCE upon a time the wife of a certain rich man fell very ill, and as she
felt her end drawing nigh she called her only daughter to her bedside,
and said, "My dear child, be pious and good, and then the good God will
always protect you, and I will look down upon you from heaven and think
of you." Soon afterwards she closed her eyes and died. Every day the
maiden went to her mother's grave and wept over it, and she continued
to be good and pious; but when the winter came, the snow made a white
covering over the grave, and in the spring-time, when the sun had with-
drawn this covering, the father took to himself another wife.
The wife brought home with her two daughters, who were beautiful
and fair in the face, but treacherous and wicked at heart. Then an
unfortunate era began in the poor step-child's life. "Shall the stupid
goose sit in the parlour with us I" said the two daughters. "They who
would eat bread must earn it; out with the kitchen-maid I" So they
90 00096.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
took off her fine clothes, and put upon her an old grey cloak, and gave
her wooden shoes for her feet. See how the once proud princess is
decked out now," said they, and they led her mockingly into the kitchen.
Then she was obliged to work hard from morning to night, and to go out
early to fetch water, to make the fire, and cook and scour. The sisters
treated her besides with every possible insult, derided her, and shook the
peas and beans into the ashes, so that she had to pick them out again.
At night, when she was tired, she had no bed to lie on, but was forced to
sit in the ashes on the hearth ; and because she looked dirty through this,
they named her CINDERELLA.
One day it happened that the father wanted to go to the fair, so ho
asked his two daughters what he should bring them. "Some beautiful
dresses," said one ; "Pearls and precious stones," replied the other, But
you, Cinderella," said he, what will you have The first bough,
father, that knocks against your hat on your way homewards, break it off
for me," she replied. So he bought the fine dresses, and the pearls and
precious stones, for his two step-daughters; and on his return, as lie rode
through a green thicket, a hazel-bough touched his hat, which lie broke
off and took with him. As soon as he got home, he gave his step-
daughters what they had wished for, and to Cinderella he gave the hazel-
branch. She thanked him very much, and going to her mother's grave
she planted the branch on it, and wept so long that her tears fell and
watered it, so that it grew and became a beautiful tree. Thrice a-day
Cinderella went beneath it to weep andpray ; and each time a little white
Bird flew on the tree, and if she wished aizuc;L men the little Bird threw
down to her whatever she wished for.
After a time it fell out that the King appointed a festival, which was
to last three days, and to which all the beautiful maidens in the country
were invited, from whom his son was to choose a bride. When the two
step-daughters heard that they might also appear, they were very glad,
and calling Cinderella, they said, Comb our hair, brush our shoes, and
fasten our buckles, for we are going to the festival at the King's palace."
Cinderella obeyed, crying, because she wished to go with them to the
dance ; so she asked her stepmother whether she would allow her.
"You, Cinderella said she ; "you are covered with dust and dirt-
will you go to the festival? You have no clothes or shoes, and how can
you dance 1" But, as she urged her request, the mother said at last, I
have now shaken into the ashes a tubful of beans; if you have picked
them up again in two hours, you shall go."
Then the maiden left the room, and went out at the back-door into the
garden, and called out, You tame pigeons, and doves, and all you birds
of heaven, come and help me to gather the good beans into the tub, and the
Dad ones you may eat." Presently, in at the kitchen-window came two
white pigeons, and after them the doves, and soon all the birds under
heaven flew chirping in down upon the ashes. They then began, pick,
pick, pick, and gathered all the good seeds into the tub ; and scarcely an
hour had passed when all was completed, and the birds flew away again.
Then the maiden took the tub to the st^nmother, rejoicing at the thought
91 00097.jpg
CINDERELLA. 79
that she might now go to the festival; but the stepmother said, "No
Cinderella, you have no clothes, and cannot dance; you will only be
laughed at." As she began to cry, the stepmother said, If you can pick
up quite clean two tubs of beans which I throw amongst the ashes in one
hour, you shall accompany them ;" and she thought to herself, She will
never manage it." As soon as the two tubs had been shot into the ashes,
Cinderella went out at the back door into the garden, and called out as
before, You tame pigeons, and doves, and all you birds under heaven,
come and help me to gather the good ones into the tubs, and the bad
ones you may eat." Presently, in at the kitchen-window came two white
pigeons, and soon after them the doves, and soon all the birds under
heaven flew chirping in down upon the ashes. They then began, pick,
pick, pick, and gathered all the seeds into the tub; and scarcely had
half-an-hour passed before all was picked up, and off they flew again. The
maiden now took the tubs to the stepmother, rejoicing at the thought that
she could go to the festival. But the mother said, It does not help yoL
a bit; you cannot go with us, for you have no clothes, and cannot dance;
we should be ashamed of you." Thereupon she turned her back upon
the maiden, and hastened away with her two proud daughters.
As there was no one at home, Cinderella went to her mother's grave,
under the hazel-tree, and said,-
"Rustle and shake yourself, dear tree,
And silver and gold throw down to me.'
Then the Bird threw down a dress of gold and silver, and silken
slippers ornamented with silver. These Cinderella put on in great haste,
and then she went to the ball. Her sisters and stepmother did not know
her at all, and took her for some foreign princess, as she looked so beauti-
ful in her golden dress; for of Cinderella they thought not but that she
was sitting at home picking the beans out of the ashes. Presently the
Prince came up to her, and, taking her by the hand, led her to the dance.
lie would not dance with any one else, and even would not let go her
hand; so that when any one else asked her to dance, he said, She is my
partner." They danced till evening, when she wished to go home; but
the Prince said, "I will go with you, and see you safe," for he wanted to
see to whom the maiden belonged. She flew away from him, however,
and sprang into the pigeon-house; so the Prince waited till the father
came, whom he told that the strange maiden had run into the pigeon-
house. Then the stepmother thought, "Could it be Cinderella I" And
they brought an axe wherewith the Prince might cut open the door, but
no one was found within. And when they came into the house, there lay
Cinderella in her dirty clothes among the ashes, and an oil-lamp was
burning in the chimney; for she had jumped quickly out on the other
side of the pigeon-house, and had run to the hazel-tree, where she had
taken off her fine clothes, and laid them on the grave, and the Bird had
taken them again, and afterwards she had put on her little grey cloak,
and seated herself among the ashes in the kitchen.
The next day, when the festival was renewed, and her stepmother and
92 00098.jpg
80 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES
her sisters had set out again, Cinderella went to the hazel-tree and sang
as before -
Rustle and shake yourself, dear tree,
And silver and gold throw down to me."
Then the Bird threw down a much more splendid dress than the
former, and when the maiden appeared at the ball every one was asto-
nished at her beauty. The Prince, however, who had waited till she came,
took her hand, and would dance with no one else; and if others came and
asked, he replied as before, "She is my partner." As soon as evening
came she wished to depart, and the Prince followed her, wanting to sea
into whose house she went; but she sprang away from him, and ran into
the garden behind the house. Therein stood a fine large tree, on which
hung the most beautiful pears, and the boughs rustled as though a squirrel
was among them; but the Prince could not see whence the noise pro-
ceeded. He waited, however, till the father came, and told him, "The
strange maiden has escaped from me, and I think she has climbed up into
this tree." The father thought to himself, "Can it be Cinderella 1" and
taking an axe he chopped down the tree, but there was no one on it.
When they went into the kitchen, there lay Cinderella among the ashes,
as before, for she had sprung down on the other side of the tree, and,
having taken her beautiful clothes again to the Bird upon the hazel-tree,
she had put on once more her old grey cloak.
The third day, when her stepmother and her sisters had set out,
Cinderella went again to her mother's grave, and said,-
Rustle and shake yourself, dear tree,
And silver and gold throw down to me."
Then the Bird threw down to her a dress which was more splendid and
glittering than she had ever had before, and the slippers were of pure
gold. When she arrived at the ball they knew not what to say for
wonderment, and the Prince danced with her alone as at first, and replied
to every one who asked her hand, "She is my partner." As soon as
evening came she wished to go, and as the Prince followed her she ran
away so quickly that he could not overtake her. But he had contrived a
stratagem, and spread the whole way with pitch, so that it happened as
the maiden ran that her left slipper came off. The Prince took it up, and
saw it was small and graceful, and of pure gold; so the following morning
he went with it to the father, and said, My bride shall be no other than
she whose foot this golden slipper fits." The two sisters were glad of this,
for they had beautiful feet, and the elder went with it to her chamber to
try it on, while her mother stood by. She could rot, however, get her
great toe into it, and the shoe was much too small; but the mother,
reaching a knife, said, "Cut off your toe, for if you are queen, you ne.
not go any longer on foot." The maiden cut it off, and squeezed her foot
into the shoe, and, concealing the pain she felt, went down to the Prince.
Then he placed her as his bride upon his horse, and rode off; and as they
passed by thu grave, there sat two little doves upon the hazel-tiee,
singiug,-
93 00100.jpg
94 00101.jpg
CINDERELLA. 1
"Backwards peep, backwards peep,
There's blood upon the shoe;
The shoe's too small, and she behind
Is not the bride for you."
Then the Prince looked behind, and saw the blood flowing ; so he
turned his horse back, and took the false bride home again, saying, she
was not the right one. Then the other sister must needs fit on the shoe,
so she went to the chamber and got her toes nicely into the shoe,
but the heel was too large. The mother, reaching a knife, said, "Cut
a piece off your heel, for when you become queen you need not go any
longer on foot." She cut a piece off her heel, squeezed her foot into the
shoe, and, concealing the pain she felt, went down to the Prince. Then
he put her upon his horse as his bride, and rode off; and as they passed
the hazel-tree, there sat two little doves, who sang,-
"Backwards peep, backwards peep,
There's blood upon the shoe;
The shoe's too small, and she behind
Is not the bride for you."
Then lie looked behind, and saw the blood trickling from her shoe,
and that the stocking was dyed quite red ; so he turned his horse back,
and took the false bride home again, saying, Neither is this one the
right maiden ; have you no other daughter ?" No," replied the father,
"except little Cinderella, daughter of my deceased wife, who cannot
possibly be the bride." The Prince asked that she might be fetched ;
but the stepmother said, Oh, no! she is much too dirty; I dare not let
her be seen." But the Prince would have his way ; so Cinderella was
called, and she, first washing her hands and face, went in and curtseyed
to the Prince, who gave her the golden shoe. Cinderella sat down on a
stool, and taking off her heavy wooden shoes, put on the slipper, which
fitted her to a shade ; and as she stood up, the Prince looked in her
face, and recognizing the beautiful maiden with whom lie had danced,
exclaimed, This is my true bride." The stepmother and the two
sisters were amazed and white with rage, but the Prince took Cinderella
upon his horse, and rode away; and as they came up to the hazel-tree
the two little white doves sang,-
"Backwards peep, backwards peep,
There 's no blood on the shoe;
It fits so nice, and she behind
Is the true bride for you."
And as they finished they flow down and lighted upon Cinderella's
shoulders, and there they remained ; and the wedding was celebrated with
great festivities, and the two sisters were smitten with blindness aa a
-punishment for their wickedness.
95 00102.jpg
THE RIDDLE.
ONCE upon a time there was a King's son, who had a mind to see the
world ; so he set forth, and took no one with him but a faithful servant.
One day he came into a great forest, and when evening drew on he
could find no shelter, and did not know where to pass the night. Just
then he perceived a maiden who was going towards a little cottage, and
as he approached he saw that she was young and beautiful, so lie asked
her whether he and his servant could find a welcome in the cottage for
the night. "Yes, certainly," replied the maiden in a sorrowful voice,
"you can; but I advise you not to enter." "Why not?" asked the
Prince. The maiden sighed, and answered, My stepmother practises
wicked arts; she acts not hospitably to strangers." He perceived now
that he was come to a Witch's cottage; but because it was very dark,
and he could go no further, he went in, for he was not at all afraid.
The old woman was sitting in an arm-chair by the fire, and looked at
the strangers out of her red eyes. Good evening," she muttered,
appearing very friendly ; "sit yourselves down and rest." 'Then she
poked up the fire on which a little pot was boiling. The daughter
warned them both to be cautious, and neither to eat nor drink anything,
for the old woman brewed bad drinks; so they slept quietly till morning.
As they made ready for their departure, and the Prince was already
mounted on horseback, the old Witch said, "Wait a bit, I will bring you
a parting draught." While she went for it the Prince rode away ; but
the servant, who had to buckle his saddle, was left alone when she came
with the draught. Take that to thy master," she said, but at the
same moment the glass cracked, and the poison spirted on the horse, and
so strong was it that the poor animal fell backwards dead. The servant
ran after his master, and told him what had occurred; but as he would
not leave the saddle behind, lie went back to fetch it. As he came to
the deal horse he saw a crow perched upon it feeding himself. '" Who
knows whether we shall meet with anything better to-day ?" said the
96 00103.jpg
THE RIDDLE. 83
servant, and killing the crow he took it with him. The whole day long
they journeyed on in the forest, but could not get out of it; and at the
approach of night, finding an inn, they entered it. The servant gave
the crow to the host, that he might cook it for their supper ; but they
had fallen into a don of thieves, and in the gloom of night twelve ruffians
came, intending to rob and murder the strangers. Before they began,
however, they sat down to table, and the host and the Witch joined them,
and then they all partook of a dish of pottage, in which the flesh of the
crow was boiled. Scarcely had they eaten two morsels apiece when they
all fell down dead; for the poison which had killed the horse had
impregnated the flesh of the crow. There was now no one left in the
house but the daughter of the host, who seemed to be honest, and had
had no share in the wicked deeds She opened all the doors to the
Prince, and showed him the heaped-up. treasure; but the Prince said
she might keep it all, for he would have none of it, and so rode on
further with his servant.
After they had wandered a long way in the world, they came to a
city where dwelt a beautiful but haughty Princess, who had declared
that whoever propounded to her a riddle which she could not solve
should be her husband; but if she solved it he must have his head cut
off. Three days was the time given to consider, but she was always so
sharp that she discovered the proposed riddle before the appointed time.
Nine suitors had been sacrificed in this way. when the Prince arrived, and
being blinded with her great beauty, resolved to stake his life upon her.
So he went before her and proposed his riddle ; namely, What is this ?
One killed no one, and yet killed twelve." She knew not what it was,
and thought and thought, but she could not make it out; and, although
she searched through all her riddle books she could find nothing to help
her; in short, her wisdom was quite at fault. At last at her wits' ends
how to help herself, she bade her maid slip into the sleeping-room of the
Prince, and there listen to his dreams, thinking perhaps he might talk in
his sleep and unfold the riddle. The bold servant, however, had put
himself instead of his master into the bed; and when the servant came
into the room he tore off the cloak in which she had wrapped herself,
and hunted her out with a rod. The second night the Princess sent her
chambermaid to see if she could be more fortunate in listening; but the
servant snatched her mantle away, and hunted her away with a rod.
The third night the Prince himself thought he should be safe, and so he
lay in his own bed ; and the Princess herself came, having on a dark
grey cloak, and sat herself down by him. When she thought he was
asleep and dreaming she spoke to him, hoping he would answer, as many
do; but he was awake, and heard and understood everything very well,
First she asked, One kills none; what is that?" lie answered, A
crow which ate of a dead and poisoned horse, and died of it." Further
she asked, "And yet killed twelve ; what is that 1" "Twelve robbers
who partook of the crow, and died from eating it"
As soon as she knew the riddle she tried to slip away, but he held
her mantle so fast that she left it behind. The following morning the
97 00104.jpg
GcrII!'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Princess announced that she had discovered the riddle, and bade the
twelve judges come and she would solve it before them. The Prince,
however, requested a hearing for himself, and said, "She has stolen in
upon me by night and asked me, or she would never have found it out."
The judges said, Bring us a witness." Then the servant brought up
the three mantles; and when the judges saw the dark grey cloak which
the Princess used to wear, they said, Let the cloak be adorned with
gold and silver, that it may be a wedding garment."
THE SPIDER AND THE FLEA.
A SPIDER and a Flea dwelt together in one house, and brewed their beer
in an egg-shell. One day, when the Spider was stirring it up, she fell
in and scalded herself. Thereupon the Flea began to scream. And then
the Door asked, "Why are you screaming, Flea ?"
"Because little Spider has scalded herself in the beer-tub," replied she.
Thereupon the Door began to creak as if it were in pain; and a
Broom, which stood in the corner, asked, What are you creaking for,
Door 1"
"May I not creak ? it replied :
The little Spider's scUlt herself,
And the Flea weeps."
So the Broom began to sweep industriously, and presently a little
Cart came by, and asked the reason. May I not sweep ?" replied the
Broom-
"' Thl' little Spider's Fcalt herself,
And the Flea weeps;
The little Door creaks with the pain."
98 00105.jpg
THE SPIDER AND THE FLEA.
Thereupon the little Cart said, "So will I run," and began to run very
fast past a heap of Ashes, which cried out, Why do you run, little
Cart?"
"Because," replied the Cart,
"The little Spider's scalt herself,
And the Flea weeps;
The little Door creaks with the pain,
And the Broom sweeps."
"Then," said the Ashes, "I will burn furiously." Now, next the
Ashes there grew a Tree, which asked, "Little heap, why do you
burn I"
"Because," was the reply,
"The little Spider's scalt herself,
And the Flea weeps;
The little Door creaks with the pain,
And the Broom sweeps;
The little Cart runs on so fast."
Thereupon the Tree cried, "I will shake myself!," and went on
shaking till all its leaves fell off.
A little girl passing by with a water-pitcher saw it shaking, and
asked, "Why do you shake yourself, little Tree 1"
"Why may I not V" said the Tree-
"The little Spider's scalt herself,
And the Flea weeps;
The little Door creaks with the pain,
And the Broom sweeps;
The little Cart runs on so fast,
And the Ashes burn."
Then the Maiden said, "If so, I will break my pitcher;" and she
threw it down and broke it.
At this the Streamlet, from which she drew the water, asked, Why
do you break your pitcher, my little Girl?"
"Why may I not '" she replied; for
The little Spider's scalt herself,
And the Flea weeps;
The little Door creaks with the pain,
And the Broom sweeps;
The little Cart runs on so fast,
And the Ashes burn;
The little Tree shakes down its leaves-
Now it is my turn !"
Ah, then," said the Streamlet, "now must I begin to flow." And
it flowed and flowed along, in a great stream, which kept getting bigger
and bigger, until at last it swallowed up the little Girl, the little Tree,
the Ashes, the Cart, the Broom, the Door, the Flea and, last of all, the
Spider, all together.
99 00106.jpg
rHE LITTLE MOUSE, THE LITTLE BIRD, AND THE
SAUSAGE.
ONCE upon a time a Mouse, a Bird, and a Sausage, went to housekeeping
together, and agreed so well that they accumulated wealth fast. It was
the duty of the Bird to fetch wood, of the Mouse to draw water and make
the fire, and of the Sausage to cook.
They who are prosperous are for ever hankering after something new,
and thus one day the Bird, meeting another bird on her way home, told
him of her condition in a very boastful way. The other bird, however,
blamed her for her great labours for the two who lived at ease at home;
for when the Mouse had made the fire and drawn the water she could re-
tire to her chamber, and rest till she was called to lay the table ; while
the Sausage remained by the fire, and saw that the food was well cooked,
and when dinner-time approached dressed it with the gravy and vege-
tables, and made it ready with butter and salt. As soon, then, as the
Bird returned and laid down her burden, they sat down to table, and after
their meal was finished they slept till the next morning, and this life was
a very happy one. The next day the Bird would not go for the wood,
saying she had been slave long enough; for once they must change about
and try another plan. And although the Mouse and the Sausage pro-
tested earnestly against it, the Bird was unconvinced ; it must be tried.
And so they tossed up, and it fell to the lot of the Sausage to fetch wood,
while the Mouse had to cook, and the Bird to procure water.
What happened I The Sausage went forth into the forest, the Bird
made the fire, the Mouse put on the pot, and waited alone until the
Sausage should come home, bringing wood for the next day. But it re-
mained away such a long time that they suspected some misfortune, and
the Bird flew round a little way to see, and met near their house a Dog,
which, having met the Sausage, had seized upon it and devoured it. The
Bird complained lbtterly against the Dog as a public robber, but it availed
100 00108.jpg
THE MUSICIANS OF BREMEN.
,iI
Page 87.
C/; j
-rr
I
101 00109.jpg
THE MUSICIANS OF BREMEN. 87
nothing; for the Dog declared he had fund forged letters upon the
Sausage, for which its life was forfeited.
The Bird, full of grief, took the wood upon her back, and flew home to
relate what she had seen and heard. Both she and the Mouse were very
sad, but agreed to do their best, and remain with one another. Now the
Bird laid the table and the Mouse prepared their meal; and in order to
make it quite fit she got into the pot to stir the vegetables up, and flavour
them as the Sausage had been used to do ; but alas before she had
scarcely got in, her skin and hair came off, and her life was sacrificed.
When the Bird came, and wished to sit down to dinner, no cook was to
be found so, throwing away in a pet the sticks she had gathered, she
called and searched high and low; but no cook could she discover.
From her carelessness the fire reached the wood, and a grand conflagra-
tion commenced; so that the poor Bird hastened to the brook for water
but her pail falling in, she was carried with it, and not being able to ex tri.
cate herself in time, she sank to the bottom.
THE MUSICIANS OF BREMEN.
A CERTAIN man had a Donkey, which had served him faithfully for many
long years, but whose strength was so far gone that at last it was quite
unfit for work. So his master was thinking how much he could make of
the skin, but the Donkey perceiving that no good wind was blowing, ran
away along the road to Bremen. There," thought he, "I can be town
musician." When he had run some way, he found a Hound lying by the
road-side, yawning like one who was very tired. "What are you yawning
for now, you big fellow '" asked the Ass.
"Ab," replied the Hound, "because every day I grow older and
weaker; I cannot go any more to the hunt, and my master has well-nigh
102 00110.jpg
88 GRI~MM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
beaten me to death, so that I took to flight; and now I do not know how
to earn my bread."
Well do you know," said the Ass, I am going to Bremen, to be
town-musician there; suppose you go with me and take a share in the
music. I will play on the lute, and you shall beat the kettle-drums."
The Dog was satisfied, and off they set.
Presently they came to a Cat, sitting in the middle of the path, with
a face like three rainy days "Now then, old shaver, what has crossed
you ?" asked the Ass.
"How can one be merry when one's neck has been pinched like
mine ?" answered the Cat. "Because I am growing old, and my teeth
are all worn to stumps, and because I would rather sit by the fire and
spin, than run after mice, my mistress wanted to drown me; and so I
ran away. But now good advice is dear, and I do not know what to do."
"Go with us to Bremen. You understand nocturnal music, so you
can be town musician." The Cat consented, and went with them. The
three vagabonds soon came near a Farm-yard, where, upon the barn-door,
the Cock was sitting crowing with all his might. You crow through
marrow and bone," said the Ass, "what do you do that for "
That is the way I prophesy fine weather," said the Cock; "but, be-
cause grand guests are coming for the Sunday, the housewife has no pity,
and has told the cookmaid to make me into soup for the morrow; and
this evening my head will be cut off: Now I am crowing with a full
throat as long as I can."
"Ah. but you, Red-comb," replied the Ass, rather come away with
us. We are going to Bremen, to find there something better than death;
you have a good voice, and if we make music together it will have full
play."
The Cock consented to this plan, and so all four travelled on together.
They could not, however, reach Bremen in one day, and at evening they
came into a forest, where they meant to pass the night. The Ass and the
Dog laid themselves down under a large tree, the Cat and the Cock
climbed up into the branches, but the latter flew right to the top, where
he was most safe. Before he went to sleep he looked all round the four
quarters, and soon thought he saw a little spark in the distance ; so, call-
ing his companions, he said they were not far from a house, for he saw a
light. The Ass said, "If it is so, we had better get up and go further, for
the pasturage here is very bad ;" and the Dog continued, Yes, indeed !
a couple of bones with some meat on would also be very acceptable I"
So they made haste towards the spot where the light was, and which
shone now brighter and brighter, until they came to a well-lighted rob-
ber's cottage. The Ass, as the biggest, went to the window and peeped
in. "What do you see, Gray-horse?" asked the Cock. "What do I
see f' replied the Ass; a table laid out with savoury meats and drinks,
with robbers sitting around enjoying themselves."
That were the right sort of thing for us," said the Cock.
"Yes, yes, 1 wish we were there," replied the Ass. Then these
nimale took counsel together how they should contrive to drive away
103 00111.jpg
THE MUSICIANS OF BREMEN. 89
the robbers, and at last they thought of a way. The Ass places his fore
feet upon the window ledge, the Hound got on his back, the Cat climbed
up upon the Dog, and lastly the Cock flew up and perched upon the
head of the Cat. When this was accomplished, at a given signal they
commenced together to perform their music: the Ass brayed, the Dog
barked, the Cat mewed, and the Cock crew; and they made such a tre-
mendous noise, and so loud, that the panes of the window were shivered!
Terrified at these unearthly sounds, the robbers got up with great pre-
cipitation, thinking nothing less than that some spirits had come, and
fled off into the forest. The four companions immediately sat down at
the table, and quickly ate up all that was left, as if they had been fasting
for six weeks.
As soon as the four players had finished, they extinguished the light.
and each sought for himself a sleeping place, according to his nature and
custom. The Ass laid himself down upon some straw, the Hound behind
the door, the Cat upon the hearth, near the warm ashes, and the Cock
flew up upon a beam which ran across the room. Weary with their long
walk, they soon went to sleep.
At midnight, the robbers perceived from their retreat that no light
was burning in their house, and all appeared quiet; so the captain said,
"We need not to have been frightened into fits;" and, calling one of
the band, he sent him forward to reconnoitre. The messenger, finding
all still, went into the kitchen to strike a light, and, taking the glistening
fiery eyes of the Cat for live coals, he held a lucifer-match to them,
expecting it to take fire. But the Cat, not understanding the joke, flew
in his face, spitting and scratching, which dreadfully frightened him, so
that he made for the back door; but the Dog, who laid there, sprang
up and bit his leg; and as he limped upon the straw where the Ass was
stretched out, it gave him a powerful kick with its hind foot. This was
not all, for the Cock, awaking at the noise, clapped his wings, and cried
from the beam, "Cock-a-doodle-doo, cock-a-doodle-doo!"
Then the robber ran back as well as he could to his captain, and said,
"Ah, my master, there dwells a horrible witch in the house, who spat on
me and scratched my face with her long nails; and then before the door
stands a man with a knife, who chopped at my leg; and in the yard
there lies a black monster, who beat me with a great wooden club; and
besides all, upon the roof sits a judge, who called out, Bring the knave
up, do!' so I ran away as fast as I could."
After this the robbers dared not again go near their house; but
everything prospered so well with the four town musicians of Bremen,
that they did not forsake their situation I And there they are to this
day, for anything I know.
104 00112.jpg
TTIE GIANT WIITH THE THREE GOLDEN HAIRS.
THERE was once upon a time a poor woman whose son was born with a
caul, and so it was foretold of him that in his fourteenth year he should
marry the King's daughter. As it happened the King soon after came
into the village, quite unknown to any one, and when he asked the
people what news there was, they answered, "A few days since a child
with a caul was born, which is a sure sign that he will be very lucky;
and, indeed, it has been foretold of him that in his fourteenth year he
will marry the King's daughter."
The King had a wicked heart, and was disturbed concerning this
prophecy, so he went to the parents, and said to them in a most friendly
manner, Give me up your child and I will take care of him." At first
they refused, but the stranger begged for it with much gold, and so at
last they consented and gave him the child, thinking, "It is a luck-child,
and, therefore, everything must go on well with it."
The King laid the child in a box and rode away till he came to a
deep water, into which he threw the box, saying to himself, From this
unsought-for bridegroom have I now freed my daughter."
The box, however, did not sink, but floated along like a boat, ana
not one drop of water penetrated it. It floated at last down to a mill
two miles from the king's palace, and in the mill-dam it stuck fast. The
miller's boy, who was fortunately standing there, observed it, and drew
it ashore with a hook, expecting to find a great treasure. When, how-
ever, he opened the box, he saw a beautiful child alive and merry. IIe
took it to the people at the mill, who, having no children, adopted it for
their own, saying, God has sent it to us." They took good care of the
child, and it grew up a steady, good lad.
It happened one day that the King went into the mill for shelter
during a thunderstorm, and asked the people whether the boy was their
child. "No," they answered; "he is a foundling, who, fourteen years
ago, floated into our dam in a box, which the miller's boy drew out of the
water." The King observed at once, that it was no other than the luck-
105 00113.jpg
THE GIANT WITH THE THREE GOLDEN HAIRS. 91
child whom he had thrown into the water, and so said to them, Good
people, could not the youth carry a letter to my wife the Queen ? If so
I will give him two pieces of gold for a reward."
"As my lord the King commands," they replied, and bade the you'.h
get ready.
Then the King wrote a letter to the Queen, wherein he said, "So
soon as this boy arrives with this letter, let him be killed and buried, and
let all be done before I return."
The youth set out on his journey with the letter, but he lost himself,
and at evening came into a great forest. In the gloom he saw a little
light, and going up to it he found a cottage, into which he went, and
perceived an old woman sitting by the fire. As soon as she saw the lad
she was terrified, and exclaimed, "Why do you come here; and what
would you do I"
I am come from the mill," he answered, "and am going to my lady
the Queen to carry a letter; but because I have lost my way in this
forest, I wish to pass the night here."
"Poor boy!" said the woman, "you have come to a den of robbers,
who, when they return, will murder you."
"Let who will come," he replied, "I am not afraid; I am so weary
that I can go no further;" and, stretching himself upon a bench, he
went to sleep. Presently the robbers entered, and asked in a rage what
strange lad was lying there. "Ah," said the old woman, "it is an
innocent youth, who has lost himself in the forest, and whom I have
taken in out of compassion. He carries with him a letter to the
Queen."
The robbers seized the letter and read it, and understood that as soon
as the youth arrived he was to be put to death. Then the robbers also
took compassion on him, and the captain tore up the letter and wrote
another, wherein he declared that the youth upon his arrival was to be
married to the Princess. They let him sleep quietly on his bench till
the morning, and as soon as he awoke they gave him the letter and
showed him the right road.
When the Queen received the letter she did as it commanded, and
caused a splendid marriage feast to be prepared, and the Princess was
given in marriage to the luck-child, who, since he was both young and
handsome, pleased her well, and they were all very happy. Some little
time afterwards the King returned to his palace and found the prophecy
fulfilled, and his daughter married to the luck-child. How did this
happen ?" he asked. "In my letter I gave quite another command."
Then the Queen handed him the letter, that he might read for him-
self what it stated. The king perceived directly that it had been forged
by another person, and he asked the youth what he had done with the
original letter that had been entrusted to him. I know nothing about
it," he replied : it must have been changed in the forest where I passed
the night."
Inflamed with rage the King answered, Thou shalt not escape so
easily; he who would have my daughter must fetch f(r me three golden
106 00114.jpg
92 GRIIM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
hairs from the head of the Giant; bring thou to me what I desire, thea
shalt thou receive my daughter."
The King hoped by this means to get lid of him, but he answered,
"The three Golden hairs I will fetch, for I fear not the Giant;" and so
he took leave and began his wanderings.
The road led him by a large town, where the watchman at the gate
asked him what trade he understood, and what he knew. I know
everything," replied the youth.
"Then you can do us a kindness," said the watch, "if you tell us the
reason why the fountain in our market-place, out of which wine used to
flow, now, all at once, does not even give water."
"That you shall know," was the answer; "but you must wait till I
return."
Then he went on further and came to a rather large city; where the
watchman asked him, as before, what trade he understood, and what he
knew. "I know everything," he replied.
"Then you can do us a kindness, if you tell us the reason why a
tree, growing in our town, which used to bear golden apples, does not
now even have any leaves."
"That you shall know," replied the youth, "if you wait till I
return ;" and so saying he went on further till he came to a great lake,
over which it was necessary that he should pass. The ferryman asked
him what trade he understood, and what he knew. I know every-
thing," he replied.
Then," said the ferryman, you can do me a kindness, if you tell
me why, for ever and ever, I am obliged to row backwards and forwards,
and am never to be released." You shall learn the reason why," replied
the youth; "but wait till I return."
As soon as he got over the water he found the entrance into the
Giant's kingdom. It was black and gloomy, and the Giant was not at
home; but his old grandmother was sitting there in an immense arm-
chair. "What do you want?" said she, looking at him fixedly. "I
want three Golden hairs from the head of the King of these regions,"
replied the youth, else I cannot obtain my bride." "That is a bold
request," said the woman ; for if he comes home and finds you here it
will be a bad thing for you; but still you can remain, and I will see if I
can help you."
Then she changed him into an ant, and told him to creep within the
fold of her gown, where he would be quite safe.
"Yes," he said, "that is all very well; but there are three things I
am desirous of knowing :-Why a fountain, which used to spout wine, in
now dry, and does not even give water.-Why a tree, which used to
bear golden apples, does not now have leaves.-And why a ferryman is
always rowing backwards and forwards and never gets released."
Those are difficult questions," replied the old woman ; but do you
keep quiet, and pay attention to what the King says when I pluck each
of the three golden hairs."
As soon as evening came the Giant returned, and scarcely had he
107 00115.jpg
THE GIANT WITH THE THREE GOLDEN HAIRS.
entered, when lio remarked that the air was not quite pure. I smell !
I smell the flesh of man !" he exclaimed; "all is not right." Then he
peeped into every corner and looked about, but could find nothing.
Presently his old grandmother began to scold, screaming, There now,
just as I have dusted and put everything in order, you are pulling them
all about again : you are for ever having man's flesh in your nose Sit
down and eat your supper."
When he had finished he felt tired, and the old woman took his head
in her lap, and said she would comb his hair a bit. Presently he
yawned, then winked, and at last snored. Then she plucked out a
golden hair and laid it down beside her.
Bah !" cried the King, what are you about ?"
"I have had a bad dream," answered the old woman, and so I
plucked one of your hairs."
What did you dream, then ? asked he.
I dreamt that a market-fountain, which used to spout wine, is
dried up, and does not even give water : what is the matter with it,
pray "
Why, if you must know," answered he, there sits a toad under a
stone in the spring, which, if any one kills, the wine will gush out"
as before."
Then the old woman went on combing till he went to sleep again,
and snored so that the windows shook. Presently she pulled out a
second hair.
"Confound it! what are you about?" exclaimed the King in a
passion.
Don't be angry," said she ; "I did it in a dream."
What did you dream about this time lie asked.
I dreamt that in a certain royal city there grew a fruit-tree, which
formerly bore golden apples, but now has not a leaf upon it : what is the
cause of it 1"
Why," replied the King, at the root a mouse is gnawing. But if
they kill it golden apples will grow again ; if not, the mouse will gnaw
till the tree dies altogether. However, let me go to sleep in peace now
for if you disturb me again you will catch a box on the ears."
Nevertheless the old woman, when she had rocked him again to
sleep, plucked out a third golden hair. Up jumped the King in a fury
and would have ill-treated her, but she pacified him and said, Who
can help bad dreams? "
What did you dream this time 1" he asked, still curious to know.
I dreamt of a ferryman, who is for ever compelled to row backwards
au I forwards, and will never be released. What is the reason thereof. '
Ob, you simpleton! answered the Giant. "When one comes
whio wants to cross over, he must give the oar into his hand; then will
the other be obliged to go to and fro, and lie will be free."
Now, since the old woman had plucked the three golden hairs, and
had received answers to the three questions, she let the Giant lie in
peace, anl he slept on till daybreak.
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94 GRIMIM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
As soon as he went out in the morning the old woman took the ant
out of the fold of her gown, and restored him again to his human form.
There you have the three golden hairs from the King's head, and
what he replied to the three questions you have just heard."
Yes, I have heard, and will well remember," said the luck-child;
and, thanking the old woman for her assistance in his trouble, he left
those regions, well pleased that he had been so lucky in everything.
When he came to the ferryman lie had to give him the promised answer.
But he said, First row me over, and then I will tell you how you may
be freed;" and as soon as they reached the opposite side he gave him
the advice, When another comes this way, and wants to pass over,
give him the oar in his hand."
Then he went on to the first city, where stood the barren tree, and
where the watchman waited for the answer. So he said to him, "Kill
the mouse which gnaws at the root of the tree, and then it will again
bear golden apples." The watchman thanked him, and gave him for a
reward two asses laden with gold, which followed him. Next he came
to the other city, where the dry fountain was, and he told the watch-
man as the Giant had said,-" Under a stone in the spring there sits a
toad, which you must uncover and kill, and then wine will flow again as
before."
The watchman thanked him, and gave to him, as the other had done,
two asses laden with gold.
Now the lucky youth soon reached home, and his dear bride was
very glad when she saw him return, and heard how capitally everything
had gone with him. He brought the King what he had desired-
the three golden hairs from the head of the Giant; and when his
Majesty saw the four asses laden with gold he was quite pleased, ana
said, Now are the conditions fulfilled, and you may have my daughter:
but tell me, dear son-in-law, whence comes all this gold? This is,
indeed, bountiful treasure."
I was ferried over a river," he replied, and there I picked it up,
for it lies upon the shore like sand."
Can I not fetch some as well?" asked the King, feeling quite
covetous.
"As much as you like; there is a ferryman who will row you
across, and then you can fill your sacks on the other side."
The covetous King set out in great haste upon his journey, and
as soon as he came to the river beckoned to the ferryman to take him
over. The man came and bade him step into his boat; and as soon as
they reached the opposite shore, the ferryman put the oar into his hand
and sprang on shore himself.
So the King was obliged to take his place, and there he is obliged to
row to and fro for ever for his sins.
And there he still rows, for no one has yet come to take the oat
from him.
109 00117.jpg
TIE THREE LANGUAGES.
In Switzerland there lived an old Count, who had an only son, who was
quite stupid and never learned anything. One day the father said,
" My son, listen to what I have to say; do all I may, I can knock
nothing into your head. Now you shall go away, and an eminent
master shall try his hand with you."
So the youth was sent to a foreign city, and remained a whole year
with his master, and at the end of that time he returned home. His
father asked him at once what he had learned, and he replied, "My
father, I have learned what the dogs bark."
"Mercy on us exclaimed the father, is this all you have learned 1
I will send you to some other city, to another master." So the youth
went away a second time, and after he had remained a year with this
master, came home again. His father asked him, as before, what he had
learned, and he replied, "I have learned what the birds sing." This
answer put the father in a passion, and he exclaimed, Oh, you
prodigal has all this precious time passed, and have you learned nothing 1
Are you not ashamed to come into my presence Once more, I will
send you to a third master,; but if you learn nothing this time I will no
longer be a father to you."
With this third master the boy remained, as before, a twelvemonth;
and when he came back to his father, he told him that he had learned
the language that the frogs croak. At this the father flew into a great
rage, and, calling his people together, said, This youth is no longer my
son ; I cast him off, and command that you lead him into the forest and
take away his life."
The servants led him away into the forest, but they had not the
neart to kill him, and so they let him go. They cut out, however, the
eyes and the tongue of a fawn, and took them for a token to the old
Count.
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GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
The young man wandered along, and after some time came to a
castle, where he asked for a night's lodging. The Lord of the castle
said, "Yes, if you will sleep down below. There is the tower ; you may
go, but I warn you it is very perilous, for it is full of wild dogs, which
bark and howl at every one, and, at certain hours, a man must be thrown
to them, whom they devour."
Now, on account of these dogs the whole country round was in
terror and sorrow, for no one could prevent their ravages; but the
youth, being afraid of nothing, said, Only let me in to these barking
hounds, and give me something to throw to them; they will not harm
me."
Since he himself wished it, they gave him some meat for the wild
hounds, and let him into the tower. As soon as he entered, the dogs
ran about him quite in a friendly way, wagging their tails, and never
once barking; they ate, also, the meat he brought, and did not attempt
to do him the least injury. The next morning, to the astonishment of
every one, he came forth unharmed, and told the Lord of the castle,
" The hounds have informed me, in their language, why they thus waste
and bring destruction upon the land. They have the guardianship of a
large treasure beneath the tower, and till that is raised, they have no
rest. In what way and manner this is to be done I have also under-
stood from them."
At these words every one began rejoicing, and the Lord promised
him his daughter in marriage, if he could raise the treasure. This task
be happily accomplished, and the wild hounds thereupon disappeared,
and the country was freed from that plague. Then the beautiful maiden
was married to him, and they lived happily together.
After some time, he one day got into a carriage with his wife and
set out on the road to Rome. On their way thither, they passed a
swamp, where the frogs sat croaking. The young Count listened, and
when lie heard what they said, he became quite thoughtful and sad, but
he did not tell his wife the reason. At last they arrived at Rome, and
found the Pope was just dead, and there was a great contention among
the Cardinals as to who should be his successor. They at length
resolved, that he on whom some miraculous sign should be shown
should be elected. Just as they had thus resolved, at the same moment
the young Count stepped into the church, and suddenly two snow-white
doves flew down, one on each of his shoulders, and remained perched
there. The clergy recognized in this circumstance the sign they
required, and asked him on the spot whether he would be Pope. The
young Count was undecided, and knew not whether he were worthy;
but the Doves whispered to him that he might take the honour, and so
he consented. Then he was anointed and consecrated; and so was
fulfilled what the Frogs had prophesied-and which had so disturbed
him,-tlhat he should become the Pope. Upon his election he had to
sing a mass, of which he knew nothing; but the two Doves sitting upoc
his shoulder told him all that he required.
111 00119.jpg
THE HANDLESS MAIDEN.
A CERTAIN Miller had fallen by degrees into great poverty, until he had
nothing left but his mill and a large apple-tree. One day, when he was
going into the forest to cut wood, an old man, whom he had never seen
before, stepped up to him, and said, Why do you trouble yourself with
chopping wood 1 I will make you rich, if you will promise me what
stands behind your mill."
The Miller thought to himself that it could be nothing but his apple-
tree, so he said Yes," and concluded the bargain with the strange man.
The other, however, laughed derisively, and said, After three years I will
come and fetch what belongs to me;" and then he went away.
As soon as the Miller reached home, his wife came to him, and said,
"Tell me, husband, whence comes this sudden flow of gold into our
house ? All at once every chest and cupboard is filled, and yet no man
has brought any in; I cannot tell how it has happened."
The Miller, in reply, told her, It comes from a strange lord, whom
I met in the forest, who offered me great treasure, and I promised him.
in return, what stands behind the mill, for we can very well spare the
great apple-tree."
"Ah, my husband," exclaimed his wife, it is the Evil Spirit whon
vcu have seen; he did not mean the apple-tree, but our daughter, who
was behind the mill sweeping the yard."
This Miller's daughter was a beautiful and pious maiden, and during
all the three years lived in the fear of God without sin. When the
time was up, and the day came when the Evil One was to fetch her, she
washed herself quite clean and made a circle around herself with chalk.
Quite early came the Evil One, but he could not approach her; so, in a
rage, he said to the Miller, Take away from her all water, that she
may not be able to wash herself, else have I no power over her." The
Miller did so, for he was afraid. The next morning came the Evil One
again, but she had wept upon her hands so that they were quite clean
tlen he was baffled again, and ni his anger said to the Miller, Cut
H
112 00120.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
off both her hands, or else I cannot now obtain her." The Miller was
horrified, and said, "How can I cut off the hands of my own child ? "
But the Evil One pressed him, saying, If you do not, you are mine,
and I will take you yourself away !" At last the Miller promised, and
he went to the maiden, and said, My child, if I do not cut off both your
hands, the Evil One will carry me away, and in my terror I have promised
him. Now help me in my trouble, and forgive me fcr the wickedness
I am about to do you."
She replied, "Dear father, do with me what you will; I am your
daughter."
Thereupon she laid down both her hands, and her father cut them off
For the third time now the Evil One came, but the maiden had let fai
so many tears upon her arms, that they were both quite clean. So he
was obliged to give her up, and after this lost all power over her.
The Miller now said to her, I have received so much good through
you, my daughter, that I will care for you most dearly all your life
long."
But she answered, Here I cannot remain; I will wander forth into
the world, where compassionate men will give me as much as I require."
Then she had her arms bound behind her back, and at sunrise departed
on her journey, and walked the whole day long till night fell. At that
time she arrived at a royal garden, and by the light of the moon she saw
a tree standing there bearing most beautiful fruits, but she could not
enter, for there was water all round. Since, however, she had walked
the whole day without tasting a morsel, she was tormented by hunger,
and said to herself, "Ah, would I were there, that I might eat of the
fruit, else shall I perish with hunger." So she kneeled and prayed to God,
and all at once an angel came down, who made a passage through the
water, so that the ground was dry for her to pass over. Then she went
into the garden, and the angel with her. There she saw a tree full of
beautiful pears, but they were all numbered; so she stepped up and ate
one to appease her hunger, but no more. The gardener perceived her do
it, but because the angel stood by he was afraid, and thought the maiden
was a spirit; so'he remained quiet and did not address her. As soon as
she had eaten the pear she was satisfied, and went and hid herself under
the bushes.
The next morning the King to whom the garden belonged came down,
and counting the pears found that one was missing; and he asked the
gardener whither it was gone. The gardener replied, "Last night a spirit
came, who hal no hands, and ate the pear with her mouth." The King
then asked, How did the spirit come through the water ? and whither
did it go after it had eaten the pear "
The gardener answered, One clothed in snow-white garments came
down from heaven and made a passage through the waters, so that the
spirit walked through on dry land. And because it must have been an
angel, I was afraid, and neither called out nor questioned it; and as soon
as the spirit had finished the fruit, she returned as she came."
The King said, If it be as you say, I will this night watch with yol."
113 00121.jpg
THE HANDLESS MAIDEN. 9
As soon as it was dark the King came into the garden, bringing with
him a priest, who was to address the spirit, and all three sat down under
the tree. About midnight the maiden crept out from under the bushes,
and again ate with her mouth a pear off the tree, whilst the angel
clothed in white stood by her. Then the priest went towards her, and
said, Art thou come from God or from earth 1 Art thou a spirit or a
human being She replied, "I am no spirit, but a poor maiden,
deserted by all, save God alone."
The King said, "If you are forsaken by at the world, yet will I not
forsake you ;" and he took her with him to his royal palace, and, because
she was so beautiful and pious, he loved her with all his heart, and
ordered silver hands to be made for her, and made her his bride.
After a year had passed by, the King was obliged to go to war, so
he commended the young Queen to the care of his mother, and told her
to write him word if she had a child born, and to pay her especial
attention. Soon afterwards the Queen bore a fine boy; so the old mother
wrote a letter to her son, containing the joyful news. The messenger,
however, rested on his way by a brook, and, being weary with his
long journey, fell asleep. Then came the Evil One, who had always
been trying to do some evil to the Queen, and changed the letter for
another, wherein it was said that the Queen had brought a changeling
into the world. As soon as the King had read this letter, he was
frightened and much troubled; nevertheless, he wrote an answer to his
mother, that she should take great care of the Queen until his arrival.
The messenger went back with this letter, but on his way rested at the
same spot, and went to sleep. Then the Evil One came a second time,
and put another letter in his pocket, wherein it was said the Queen and
her child should be killed. When the old mother received this letter,
she was struck with horror, and could not believe it; so she wrote
another letter to the King ; but she received no other answer, for the
Evil One again placed a false letter in the messenger's pocket; and in
this last it said that she should preserve the tongue and eyes of the Queen
for a sign that she had fulfilled the order.
The old mother was sorely grieved to shed innocent blood, so she
caused a calf to be fetched by night, and cut out its tongue and eyes.
Then she said to the Queen, I cannot let you be killed, as the King
commands; but you must remain here no longer. Go forth with your
child into the wide world, and never return here again."
Thus saying, she bound the child upon the young Queen's back, anud
the poor wife went away weeping bitterly. Soon she entered a large
wild forest, and there she fell upon her knees and prayed to God; and
the angel appeared, and led her to a little cottage, and over the door was
a shield inscribed with the words, "1Here may every one live freely."
Out of the house came a snow-white maiden, who said, Welcome, Lady
Queen !" and led her in. Then she took the little child from the Queen's
back, and gave it some nourishment, and laid it on a beautifully covered
bed. Presently the Queen asked, "How do you know that I am a
queen and the maiden answered, "I am an angel sent from. God to
114 00122.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
tend you and your child;" and in this cottage she lived seven years, and
was well cared for, and through God's mercy to her, on account of her
piety, her hands grew again as before.
Meanwhile the King had come home again, and his first thought was
to see his wife and child. Then his mother began to weep, and said,
" You wicked husband, why did you write to me that I should put to
3eath two innocent souls !" and, showing him the two letters which the
Evil One had forged, she continued, I have done as you commanded ;"
and she brought him the tokens, the two eyes and the tongue. Then the
King began to weep so bitterly for his dear wife and son that the old
mother pitied him, and said, Be comforted, she lives yet I caused a
calf to be slain, from whom I took these tokens ; but the child I bound
on your wife's back, and I bade them go forth into the wide world ; and
she promised never to return here, because you were so wrathful against
her."
So far as heaven is blue," exclaimed the King, I will go ; and
neither will I eat nor drink until I have found again my dear wife and
child, if they have not perished of hunger by this time."
Thereupon the King set out, and for seven long years sought his wife
in every stony cleft and rocky cave, but found her not; and he began to
think she must have perished. And all this time he neither ate nor
drank, but God sustained him.
At last he came into a large forest, and found there the little cottage
whereon the shield was with the words, Here may every one live
freely." Out of the house came the white maiden, and she took him by
the hand; and, leading him in, said, Be welcome, Great King I Whence
comest thou ?"
He replied, "For seven long years I have sought everywhere for my
wife and child; but I have not succeeded."
Then the angel offered him meat and drink, but he refused both, and
would only rest a litta3 while. So he lay down to sleep, and covered his
face with a napkin.
Now went the angel into the chamber where sat the Queen, with her
son, whom she usually called SORROWFUL," and said to her, Come
down, with your child : your husband is here." So she went to where
he lay, and the napkin fell from off his face ; so the Queen said, "SOR-
ROWFUL, pick up the napkin, and cover again your father's face." The
child did as he was bid; and the King, who heard in his slumber what
passed, let the napkin again fall from off his face. At this the boy
became impatient, and said, Dear mother, how can I cover my father's
face 1 Have I indeed a father on the earth 1 I have learnt the prayer,
' Our Father which art in heaven;' and you have told me my father was
in heaven,-the good God : how can I talk to this wild man; he is not
my father."
As the King heard this he raised himself up, and asked the Queen
who she was. The Queen replied : "I am your wife, and this is your
son, SonnoWFUL." But when he saw her human hands, he said, My
wife had silver hands." The merciful God," said the Queen, has
115 00123.jpg
THE SINGING BONE. 11v
caused my hands to grow again ;" and the angel, going into the chamber,
brought out the silver hands, and showed them to him.
Now he perceived that they were certainly his dear wife and child;
and he kissed them gladly, saying, A heavy stone is taken from my
heart;" and, after eating a meal together with the angel, they went
home to the King's mother.
Their arrival caused great rejoicings everywhere : and the King and
Queen celebrated their marriage again, and ever afterwards lived happily
together to the end of their lives.
THE SINGING BONE.
ONCE upon a time great complaints were made in a certain country of a
Wild Boar, which laid waste the fields of the peasants, killed the cattle,
and often tore to pieces the inhabitants. The King promised a great
reward to whomever should free the land of this plague; but the beast
was so big and strong that no one durst venture in the neighbourhood
of the forest where it raged. At last the King allowed it to be pro-
claimed that whoever should take or kill the Wild Boar, should have his
Only daughter in marriage.
Now, there lived in this country two brothers, the sons of a poor
man, and they each wished to undertake the adventure; the elder, who
was bold and brave, out of pride; the younger, who was innocent and
ignorant, from a good heart. They agreed, that they might the sooner
find the boar, that they should enter the forest on opposite sides; so the
elder departed in the evening, and the other on the following morning.
When the younger had gone a short way, a little Dwarf stepped up to
him, holding a black spear in his hand, and said, "I give you this spear,
because your heart is innocent and good; with it you may boldly attack
the Boar, who can do you no harm."
116 00124.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
He thanked the Dwarf, and, taking the spear, went forward bravely.
In a little while he perceived the Wild Boar, which ran straight at him;
but he held the spear in front of his body, so that, in its blind fury, it
rushed on so rashly that its heart was pierced quite through. Then he
took the beast upon his shoulder, and went home to show it to the King.
However, just as he came out on the other side of the forest, there
stood on the outskirts a house, where the people were making merry,
dancing and drinking. His elder brother was amongst them, exciting
his courage by wine, and never thinking at all that the Boar might be
killed by any other than himself. As soon, therefore, as he saw his
younger brother coming out of the forest laden with his booty, his
envious and ill-natured heart had no rest. Still he called to him,
" Come in here, my dear brother, and rest, and strengthen yourself with
a cup of wine." The younger brother, suspecting no evil, went in and
related his story of the good little Dwarf, who had given him the spear
wherewith he had killed the boar. The elder brother detained him till
evening, and then they went away together. But when they came in
the darkness to a bridge over a stream, the elder, letting his brother
pass on before till he came to the middle of the bridge, gave him a blow
which felled him dead. Then he buried him in the sand below the
bridge, and taking the Boar brought it to the King, representing that
he had killed it, and so received in marriage the Princess. He declared,
moreover, that the Boar had torn in pieces the body of his younger
brother, and, as he did not come back, every one believed the tale to be
true.
But, since nothing is hidden from God's sight, so also this black
deed at last came to light. Many years after, as a peasant was driving
his herd across the brook, he saw lying in the sand below a snow-white
bone, which he thought would make a good mouth-piece. So he stepped
down, took it up, aad fashioned it into a mouth-piece for his horn.
But as soon as he blew through it for the first time, to the great
astonishment of the herdsman, the bone began to sing of itself-
My brother slew me, and buried my bones,
Under the sand and under the stones :
I killed the boar as he came from his lair,
But he won the prize of the lady fair."
"What a wonderful little bone!" exclaimed the herdsman; "it
sings of itself! I must take it to the King."
As soon as he came before the King it began again to repeat its song,
and the King understood it perfectly. So he caused the earth below the
bridge to be dug up, and there all the bones of the younger brother came
to light. The wicked brother could not deny the deed, and, for his
punishment, he was sewed up in a sack and drowned.
And the bones of the other brother were placed in a splendid tomb
in the churchyard.
117 00125.jpg
THE DISCREET HANS.
HANS'S mother asked, "Whither are you going, Hans ?" "To Grethel's,"
replied he. "Behave well, Hans." "I will take care: good bye,
mother." Good bye, Hans."
Hans came to Grethel. "Good day," said he. "Good day," replied
Grethel. "What treasure do you bring to-day "I bring nothing,
Have you anything to give 7" Grethel presented Hans with a needle
"Good bye," said he. "Good bye, Hans." Hans took the needle, stuck
it in a load of hay, and walked home behind the waggon.
"Good evening, mother." Good evening, Hans. Where have you
been?" "To Grethel's." "And what have you given her." "Nothing:
she has given me something." "What has Grethel given you I" "A
needle," said Hans. "And where have you put it In the load of
hay." "Then you have behaved stupidly, Hans ; you should put needles
on your coat-sleeve." "To behave better, do nothing at all," thought
Hans.
"Whither are you going, Hans "To Grethel's, mother." "Be-
have well, Hans." "I will take care : good bye, mother." Good bye,
Hans."
Hans came to Grethel. "Good day," said he. Good day, Hans.
What treasure do you bring 1" "I bring nothing. Have you anything
to give I" Grethel gave Hans a knife. "Good bye, Grethel." "Good
bye, Hans." Hans took the knife, put it in his sleeve, and went home.
Good evening, mother." Good evening, Hans. Where have you
been To Grethel's." "And what did you take to her 1" I took
nothing : she has given to me." "And what did she give you V" "A
-knife," said Hans. "And where have you put it "In my sleeve."
' Then you have behaved foolishly again, Hans: you should put knives
in your pocket." "To behave better, do nothing at all," thought Hans.
"Whither are you going, Hans "To Grethel's, mother." "Be-
have well, Hans." I will take care: good bye, mother." "Good bye,
Hans."
118 00126.jpg
104 GRBIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Hans came to Grethel. "Good day, Grethel." "Good day, Hans.
What treasure do you bring?" "I bring nothing. Have you anything
to give Grethel gave Hans a young goat. "Good bye, Grethel."
"Good bye, Hans." Hans took the goat, tied its legs, and put it in
his pocket.
Just as he reached home it was suffocated. Good evening, mother."
"Good evening, Hans." "Where have you been ?" "To Grethel's."
"And what did you take to her I took nothing; she gave to me."
"And what did Grethel give you ?" A goat." Where did you put
it, Hans?" "In my pocket." "There you acted stupidly, Hans; you
should have tied the goat with a rope." To behave better, do nothing,"
thought Hans.
"Whither away, Hans I" "To Grethel's, mother." "Behave well,
Hans." I'll take care : good bye, mother." "Good bye, Hans."
Hans came to Grethel. Good day," said he. "Good day, Hans.
What treasure do you bring?" "I bring nothing. Have you anything
to give 7" Grethel gave Hans a piece of bacon. "Good bye, Grethel."
"Good bye, Hans." Hans took the bacon, tied it with a rope, and
swung it to and fro so that the dogs came and ate it up. When he
reached home he held the rope in his hand, but there was nothing
on it.
"Good evening, mother," said he. Good evening, Hans. Where
have you been To Grethel's, mother." "What did you take
there ?" "I took nothing: she gave to me." "And what did Grethel
give you "A piece of bacon," said Hans. "And where have you
put it?" "Itied it with a rope, swung it about, and the dogs came
and ate it up." "There you acted stupidly, Hans; you should have
carried the bacon on your head." "To behave better, do nothing,"
thought Hans.
"Whither away, Hans "To Grethel's, mother." "Behave well,
Hans." I'll take care : good bye, mother." Good bye, Hans."
Hans came to Grethel. "Good day," said he. "Good day, Hans.
What treasure do you bring I bring nothing. Have you anything
to give T" Grethel gave Hans a calf. "Good bye," said Hans. "Good
bye." Hans took the calf, set it on his head, and the calf scratched
his face.
Good evening, mother." Good evening, Hans. Where have you
been ?" "To Grethel's." What did you take her?" I took nothing :
she gave to me." "And what did Grethel give you ?" "A calf," said
[fans. "And what did you do with it ?" "I set it on my head, and it
kicked my face." "Then you acted stupidly, Hans; you should have
led the calf home, and put it in the stall." "To behave better, do
nothing," thought Hans.
"Whither away, Hans ?" "To Grethel's, mother." "Behave well,
Hans." "I'll take care: good bye, mother." "Good bye, Hans."
Hans came to Grethel. "Good day," said he. "Good day, Hans.
What treasure do you bring?" "I bring nothing. Have you anything
to give I" Grethel said, I will go with you, Hans." Hans tied a rope
119 00127.jpg
CLEVER ALICE.
round Grethel, led her home, put her in the stall, and made the rope fast;
and then he went to his mother.
"Good evening, mother." Good evening, Hans. Where have you
been 1" "To Grethel's." "What did you take her "I took
nothing." "What did Grethel give you?" "She gave nothing; she
came with me." "And where have you left her, then "I tied her
with a rope, put her in the stall, and threw in some grass." "Then you
acted stupidly, Hans ; you should have looked at her with friendly eyes."
"To behave better, do nothing," thought Hans; and then he went into
the stall, and made sheep's eyes at Grethel.
And after that Grethel became Hans's wife.
CLEVER ALICE.
ONcE apon a time there was a man who had a daughter, who was called
'lever Alice ;" and when she was grown up, her father said, "We must
see about her marrying." Yes, replied her mother, when one comes
who shall be worthy of her."
At last a certain youth, by name Hans, came from a distance to make
a proposal for her, but he put in one condition, that the Clever Alice
should also be very prudent. Oh," said her father, she has got a
head full of brains ;" and the mother added, "Ah, she- can see the wind
olow up the street, and hear the flies cough !"
"Very well," replied Hans, "but if she is not very prudent, I will
not have her." Soon afterwards they sat down. to dinner, and her mother
said, Alice, go down into the cellar and draw some beer."
So Clever Alice took the jug down from the wall, and went into the
dollar, jerking the lid up and down on her way to pass away the time.
120 00128.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
As soon as she got downstairs, she drew a stool and placed it before the
cask, in order that she might not have to stoop, whereby she might do
some injury to her back, and give it an undesirable bend. Then she
placed the can before her and turned the tap, and while the beer was
running, as she did not wish her eyes to be idle, she looked about upon
the wall above and below, and presently perceived, after much peeping
into this and that corner, a hatchet, which the bricklayers had left behind,
sticking out of the ceiling right above her. At the sight of this the
Clever Alice began to cry, saying, "Oh, if I marry Hans, and we have a
child, and he grows up, and we send him into the cellar to draw beer, the
hatchet will fall upon his head and kill him;" and so saying, she sat
there weeping with all her might over the impending misfortune.
Meanwhile the good folks upstairs were waiting for the beer, but as
Clever Alice did not come, her mother told the maid to go and see what
she was stopping for. The maid went down into the cellar, and found
Alice sitting before the cask crying heartily, and she asked, "Alice, what
are you weeping about "Ah," she replied, "have I not cause 1 If I
marry Hans, and we have a child, and he grow up, and wi send him here
to draw beer, that hatchet will fall upon his head and kil him."
Oh," said the maid, what a clever Alice we have 1" And, sitting
down, she began to weep, too, for the misfortune that was to happen.
After a while, and the maid did not return, the good folks above
began to feel very thirsty; so the husband told the boy to go down into
the cellar, and see what had become of Alice and the maid. The boy
went down, and there sat Clever Alice and the maid both crying, so he
asked the reason ; and Alice told him the same tale of the hatchet that
was to fall on her child, as she had told the maid. When she had
finished, the boy exclaimed, "What a clever Alice we have !" and fell
weeping and howling with the others.
Upstairs they were still waiting, and the husband said, when the boy
did not return, "Do you go down, wife, into the cellar and see why Alice
stops." So she went down, and finding all three sitting there crying,
asked the reason, and Alice told her about the hatchet which must in-
evitably fall upon the head of her son. Then the mother likewise
exclaimed, "Oh, what a clever Alice we have !" and, sitting down, began
to weep with the others. Meanwhile the husband waited for his wife's
return; but at last he felt so very thirsty that he said, "I must go
myself down into the cellar and see what Alice stops for." As soon as
he entered the cellar, there he found the four sitting and crying together,
and when he heard the reason, he also exclaimed, "Oh, what a clever
Alice we have !" and sat down to cry with the others. All this time the
bridegroom above sat waiting, but when nobody returned, he thought they
must be waiting for him, and so he went down to see what was the matter.
When he entered, there sat the five crying and groaning, each one in a
louder key than his neighbour. "What misfortune has happened ?" he
asked. "Ah, dear Hans cried Alice, if we should marry one another,
and have a child, and he grow up, and we, perhaps, send him down here
to tap the beer, the hatchet which has been left sticking there may fall
121 00129.jpg
CLEVER ALICE.
on his head, and so kill him; and do you not think that enough to
weep about I"
"Now," said Ti ans, "more prudence than this is not necessary for
my housekeeping because you are such a clever Alice I will have you
for my wife." And, taking her hand, he led her home, and celebrated
the wedding directly.
After they had been married a little while, Han said one morning,
"Wife, I will go out to work and earn some money; do you go into the
field and gather some corn wherewith to make bread."
Yes," she answered, "I will do so, dear Hans." And when he
was gone, she cooked herself a nice mess of pottage to take with her.
As she came to the field, she said to herself, "What shall I do? Shall
I cut first, or eat first ? Ay, I will eat first Then she ate up the
contents of her pot, and when it was finished, she thought to herself,
"Now, shall I reap first or sleep first? Well, I think I will have a
iLap !" and so she laid herself down amongst the corn, and went to sleep.
Meanwhile Hans returned home, but Alice did not come, and so he
said, "Oh, what a prudent Alice I have she is so industrious that she
does not even come home to eat anything." By-and-by, however,
evening came on, and still she did not return; so Hans went out to see
how much she had reaped; but, behold, nothing at all, and there lay
Alice fast asleep among the corn! So home he ran very fast, aA.d
brought a net with little bells hanging on it, which he threw over her
head while she still slept on. When he had done this, he went back
again and shut to the house door, and, seating himself on his stool, began
working very industriously.
At last, when it was quite dark, the Clever Alice awoke, and as
soon as she stood up, the net fell all over her hair, and the bells jingled
at every step she took. This quite frightened her, and she began to
doubt whether she were really Clever Alice, and said to herself, "Am
I she, or am I not ?" This question she could not answer, and she
stood still a long while considering. At last she thought she would go
home and ask whether she were really herself-supposing they would be
able to tell. When she came to the house-door it was shut; so she
tapped at the window, and asked, Hans, is Alice within ?" Yes,"
he replied, "she is." Now she was really terrified, and exclaiming,
"Ah, heaven, then I am not Alice!" she ran up to another house;
but as soon as the folks within heard the jingling of the bells they
would not open their doors, and so nobody would receive her. Then
she ran straight away froQ the village, and no one has ever seen her
binDe
122 00130.jpg
THE WEDDING OF MRS. FOX.
FIRST TALE.
THERE was once upon a time a Fox with nine tails, who thought his
wife was not faithful to him, and determined to put it to the proof. So
he stretched himself along under a bench, and keeping his legs perfectly
still, he appeared as if quite dead. Mrs. Fox, meanwhile, had ascended
to her room, and shut herself in; and her maid, the young Cat, stood
near the hearth cooking. As soon as it was known that Mr. Fox was
dead, several suitors came to pay their respects to his widow. The maid,
hearing some one knocking at the front door, went and looked out, and
saw a young Fox, who asked,
"How do you do, Miss Kitten ?
Is she asleep or awake I"
The maid replied-
I neither sleep nor wake;
Would you know my business ?
Beer and butter both I make;
Come and be my guest."
"I am obliged, Miss Kitten," said the young Fox; "but how is Mra.
Fox ?"
She sits in her chamber,
Weeping so sore;
Her eyes red with crying-
Mr. Fox is no more."
"Tell her then, my maiden, that a young Fox is here, who wishes to
marry her," said he. So the Cat went pit-pat, pit-a-pat up the stairs,
and tapped gently at the door, saying, Are you there, Madam Fox ?"
"Yes, my good little Cat," was the reply. "There is a suitor below."
"What does he look like ?" asked her mistress. Has he nine as beautiful
tails as my late husband Oh, no," answered the maid, he has only
one." Then I will not have him," said the mistress. The young Cat
123 00131.jpg
THE WEDDING OF MRS. FOX.
went down and sent away the suitor; and soon after there came a second
knock at the door from another Fox, with two tails, who wished to marry
the widow; he fared, however, no better than the former one. After-
wards came six more, one after the other, each having one tail more than
ho who preceded him; but these were all turned away. At last there
arrived a Fox with nine tails, like the deceased husband; and when the
widow heard of it, she said, full of joy, to the Cat, Now you may open
all the windows and doors, and turn the old Fox out of the house." But
just as the wedding was about to be celebrated, the old Fox roused him-
self from his sleep beneath the bench, and drubbed the whole rabble,
together with his wife, out of the house, and hunted them far away.
A SECOND ACCOUNT
Narrates that when the old Fox appeared dead, the Wolf came as a
suitor, and knocked at the door; and the Cat, who served as a servant to
the Widow, got up to see who was there.
"Good day, Miss Cat; how does it happen that you are sitting all
alone I What good are you about 1"
The Cat answered, I have been making some bread and milk. Will
my lord be my guest 1"
Thanks, many thanks !" replied the Wolf; "is Madam Fox not at
home l"
The Cat sang,
She sits in her chamber,
Weeping so sore;
Her eyes red with crying-
Mr. Fox is no more."
Then the Wolf said, "If she wishes for another husband she hal
better come down to me."
So the Cat ran up the stairs, her tail trailing behind, and when she
got to the chamber door, she knocked five times, and asked, Is Madam
Fox at home I If so, and she wishes to have another husband, she must
come downstairs."
Mrs. Fox asked, Does the gentleman wear red stockings, and has he
a pointed mouth No," replied the Cat. Then he will not do for
me," said Mrs. Fox, and shut the door.
After the Wolf had been turned away, there came a Dog, a Stag,
a Hare, a Bear, a Lion, and all the beasts of the forest, one after another
But each one was deficient of the particular qualities which the old Fox
had possessed, and the Cat was obliged therefore to turn away every
suitor. At last came a young Fox; and when the question was asked
whether he had red stockings and a pointed mouth, the Cat replied,
"Yes;" and she was bid to call him up and prepare for the wedding.
Then they threw the old Fox out of the window, and the Cat caught and
ate as mauy mice as she could, in celebration of the happy event.
And after the marriage they had a grand ball, and, as I have never
heard to the contrary, perhaps they are dancing still.
124 00132.jpg
THE LITTLE ELVES.
FIRST STORY.
THERE was once a Shoemaker, who, from no fault of his own, had
become so poor that at last he had nothing left, but just sufficient leather
for one pair of shoes. In the evening he cut out the leather, intending
to make it up in the morning ; and, as he had a good conscience, he lay
quietly down to sleep, first commending himself to God. In the morning
he said his prayers, and then sat down to work ; but, behold, the pair of
shoes were already made, and there they stood upon his board. The
poor man was amazed, and knew not what to think; but he took the
shoes into his hand to look at them more closely, and they were so neatly
worked, that not a stitch was wrong ; just as if they had been made for a
prize. Presently a customer came in; and as the shoes pleased him
very much, he paid down -more than was usual; and so much that the
Shoemaker was able to buy with it leather for two pairs. By the even-
ing he had got his leather shaped out; and when he arose the next
morning, he prepared to work with fresh spirit; but there was no need
-for the shoes stood all perfect on his board. He did not want either
for customers; for two came who paid him so liberally for the shoes, that
he bought with the money material for four pairs more. These also-
when he awoke-he found all ready-made, and so it continued; what he
cut out overnight was, in the morning, turned into the neatest shoes
possible. This went on until he had regained his former appearance, and
was even becoming a prosperous man.
One evening-not long before Christmas-as he had cut out the
usual quantity, he said to his wifo before going to bed, "What say you to
stopping up this night, to see who it is that helps us so kindly I" His
wife was satisfied, and fastened up a light; and then they hid them-
solves in the corner of the room, where hung some clothes which con-
coaled them. As soon as it was mndnight in came two little manikins,
who squatted down on the board; and, taking up the prepared work, set
125 00133.jpg
THE LITTLE ELVES.
to with their little fingers, stitching and sewing, and hammering so
swiftly and lightly, that the Shoemaker could not take his eyes off them
for astonishment. They did not cease until all was brought to an end,
and the shoes stood ready on the table; and then they sprang quickly
away.
The following morning the wife said, "The little men have made us
rich, and we must show our gratitude to them; for although they run
about they must be cold, for they have nothing on their bodies. I will
make a little shirt, coat, waistcoat, trousers, and stockings for each, and
lo you make a pair of shoes for each."
The husband assented; and one evening, when all was ready, they
laid presents, instead of the usual work, on the board, and hid themselves
to see the result.
At midnight in came the Elves, jumping about, and soon prepared to
work; but when they saw no leather, but the natty little clothes, they
at first were astonished, but soon showed their rapturous glee. They
drew on their coats, and smoothing them down, sang-
Smart and natty boys are we;
Cobblers we'll no longer be;"
and so they went on hopping and jumping over the stools and chairs, and
at last out at the door. After that evening they did not come again;
but the Shoemaker prospered in all he undertook, and lived happily tc
the end of his days.
SECOND STORY.
Once upon a time there was a poor servant girl, who was both indus-
trious and cleanly, for every day she dusted the house and shook out the
sweepings on a great heap before the door. One morning, just as she
was going to throw them away, she saw a letter lying among them, and,
as she could not read, she put her broom by in a corner, and took it to
her master. It contained an invitation from the Elves, asking the girl
to stand godmother to one of their children. The girl did not know
what to do, but at last, after much consideration, she consented, for the
little men will not easily take a refusal. So there came three Elves,
who conducted her to a hollow mountain where they lived. Everything
was very small of course, but all more neat and elegant than I can tell
you. The mother lay in a bed of ebony studded with pearls, and the
coverings were all wrought with gold; the cradle was made of ivory
and the bath was of gold. The girl stood godmother, and afterwards
wished to return home, but the little Elves pressed her earnestly to stay
three days longer. So she remained, passing the time in pleasure and
play, for the elves behaved very kindly to her. At the end of the time
she prepared to return home, but first they filled her pockets full of
gold, and then .led her out of the hill. As soon as she reached the
house, she took the broom, which still stood in the corner, and went on
with her sweeping; and presently out of the house came some strange
people, who asked her who she was, and what she was doing there.
126 00134.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Then she found Lut that it was not three days, as she had supposed, but
givenn years, that she had passed with the little Elves in the hill, and
that her former master had died in her absence.
THIRD STORY.
The little Elves once stole a child out of its cradle, and put in its
place a changeling, with a clumsy head and red eyes, who would neither
eat nor drink. The mother, in great trouble, went to a neighbour to
ask her advice, and she advised her to carry the changeling into the
kitchen, set it on the hearth, and boil water in two egg-shells. If the
changeling was made to laugh, then its fate was sealed. The woman
did all the neighbour said ; and as she set the egg-shells over the fire,
the creature sang out,-
Though I am as old as the oldest tree,
Cooking in an egg-shell never did I see."
and then it burst into a horse-laugh. While it was laughing, a number
of little Elves entered, bringing the real child, whom they placed on the
hearth, and then took away the changeling with them.
TUMBLING.
ONCE upon a time there lived a poor peasant, who used to sit every
evening by the hearth, poking the fire, while his wife spun. One night,
he said, How sad it is that we have no children everything is so
quiet here, while in other houses it is so noisy and merry."
Ah!" sighed his wife, "if we had but only one, and were he no
bigger than my thumb, I should still be content, and love him with all
my heart." A little while after the wife fell ill and after seven months
127 00135.jpg
THUMBLINa. 113
a child was born, who, although he was perfectly formed in all his
limbs, was not actually bigger than one's thumb. So they said to one
another that it had happened just as they wished ; and they called the
child "Thumbling." Every day they gave him all the food he could
eat; still he did not grow a bit, but remained exactly the height he was
when first born ; he looked about him, however, very knowingly, and
showed himself to be a bold and clever fellow, who would prosper in
everything he undertook.
One morning the peasant was making ready to go into the forest to
ell wood, and said, "Now I wish I had some one who could follow rae
with the cart."
Oh, father exclaimed Thumbling, "I will bring the cart; don't
you trouble yourself; it shall be there at the right time."
The father laughed at this speech, and said, How shall that be 1
You are much too small to lead the horse by the bridle."
That matters not, father. If mother will harness the horse, I can
sit in his ear, and tell him which way to take."
"Well, we will try for once," said the father; and so, when the
hour came, the mother harnessed the horse, and placed Thumbling in
its ear, and told him how to guide it. Then he set out quite like a man,
and the cart went on the right road to the forest; and just as it turned
a corner, and Thumbling called out, "Steady, steady !" two strange
men met it; and one said to the other, My goodness I what is this ?
Here comes a cart, and the driver keeps calling to the horse, but I can
see no one." "That cannot be all right," said the other : "let us follow
and see where the cart stops."
The cart went on safely deep into the forest, and straight to the
place where the wood was cut. As soon as Thumbling saw his father,
he called to him, "Here, father; here I am, you see, with the cart:
just take me down." The peasant caught the bridle of the horse with
his left hand, and with his right took his little son out of its ear, and he
sat himself down merrily on a straw. When the two strangers saw the
little e fellow, they knew not what to say for astonishment; and one of
them took his companion aside, and said, This little fellow might
make our fortune, if we could exhibit him in the towns. Let us buy
nim." They went up to the peasant, and asked, Will you sell us your
son ? We will treat him well." No," replied the man; "he is my
heart's delight, and not to be bought for all the money in the world ."
3ut Thumbling, when he heard what was said, climbed up by his father's
skirt, and sat himself on his shoulder, and whispered in his ear, Let
me go now, and I will soon come back again." So his father gave him to
-he two men for a fine piece of gold, and they asked him where he would
sit. "Oh," replied he, "put me on the rim of your hat, and then I can
walk round and survey the country. I will not fall off." They did as
lie wished ; and when he had taken leave of his father, they set out.
Just as it was getting dark he asked to be lifted down; and, after some
demur, the man on whose hat he was took him off and placed him on
the ground. In an instant Thumbling ran off, and crept into a mouse.
I
128 00136.jpg
GRIMM'lS HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
hole, where they could not see him. "Good evening, masters," said he,
"you can go home without me;" and, with a quiet laugh, he crept into
his hole still further. The two men poked their sticks into the hole, but
all in vain, for Thumbling only went down further; and when it had
grown qu:te dark, they were obliged to return home full of vexation and
with empty pockets.
As soon as Thumbling perceived that they were off, he crawled out
of his hiding-place, and said, How dangerous it is to walk in this field
in the dark: one might soon break one's head or legs !" and so saying
he looked round, and by great good luck he saw an empty snail-shelL
"God be praised !" he exclaimed, "here I can sleep securely;" and
in he went. Just as he was about to fall asleep he heard two men
coming by, one of whom said to the other, How shall we manage to
get at the parson's gold and silver ?"
"That I can tell you," interrupted Thumbling.
"What was that ?" exclaimed the thief, frightened. I heard some
one speak." They stood still and listened ; and then Thumbliug said,
"Take me with you, and I will help you."
Where are you asked the thieves.
Search on the ground, and mark where my voice comes from,"
replied he. The thief looked about, and at last found him; and lifted
him up in the air, What I will you help us, you little wight said they.
Do you see, I can creep between the iron bars into the chamber
of the parson, and reach out to you whatever you require."
Very well ; we will see what you can do," said the thief.
When they came to the house, Thumbling crept into the chamber,
and cried out, with all his might, "Will you have all that is here?"
The thieves were terrified, and said, Speak gently, or some one will
awake."
But Thumbling feigned not to understand, and exclaimed, louder
still, "Will you have all that is here 1"
This awoke the cook, who slept in the room, and sitting up in her
bed she listened. The thieves, however, had run back a little way,
quite frightened; but, taking courage again, and thinking the little fellow
wished to tease them, they came and whispered to him to make haste
and hand them out something. At this, Thumbling cried out still more
loudly, I will give you it all, only put your hands in." The listening
maid heard this clearly, and, springing out of bed, hurried out at the
door. The thieves ran off as if they were pursued by the wild hunts-
man, but the maid, as she could see nothing, went to strike a light,
When she returned, Thumbling escaped without being seen into the
barn, and the maid, after she had looked round, and searched in every
corner, without finding anything, went to bed again, believing she had
been dreaming with her eyes open. Meanwhile Thumbling had crept
in amongst the hay, and found a beautiful place to sleep, where he
intended to rest till daybreak, and then to go home to his parents.
Other things, however, was he to experience, for there is much
tribulation and trouble going on in this world
129 00137.jpg
TUMBLING. 115
The maid got up at dawn of day to feed the cow. Her first walk
was to the barn, where she took an armful of hay, and just the bundle
where poor Thumbling lay asleep. Ho slept so soundly, however, that
he was not conscious, and only awoke when he was in the cow's mouth.
"Ah, goodness !" exclaimed he, how ever came I into this mill!" but
soon he saw where he really was. Then he took care not to come
between the teeth, but presently slipped quite down the cow's throat.
There are no windows in this room," said he to himself, "and no sui
shine, and I brought no light with me." Overhead his quarters seemed
still worse, and, more than all, he felt his room growing narrower, as
the cow swallowed more hay. So he began to call out in terror, as loudly
as he could, Bring me no more food I do not want any more food!"
Just then the maid was milking the cow, and when she heard the voice
without seeing anything, and knew it was the same she had listened to
in the night, she was so frightened that she slipped off her stool and
overturned the milk. In great haste she ran to her master, saying, Oh,
Mr. Parson, the cow has been speaking."
You are crazy," he replied; but still he went himself into the stable
to see what was the matter, and scarcely had. he stepped in when
Thumbling began to shout out again, Bring me no more food, bring
me no more food." This terrified the parson himself, and he thought an
evil spirit had entered into his cow, and so ordered her to be killed.
As soon as that was done, and they were dividing the carcass, a fresh
accident befell Thumbling, for a wolf, who was passing at the time, made
a snatch at the cow, and tore away the part where he was stuck fast.
However, he did not lose courage, but as soon as the wolf had swallowed
him, he called out from inside, Oh, Mr. Wolf, I know of a capital meal
for you." Where is it to be found 7" asked the Wolf. In the house
by the meadow; you must creep through the gutter, and there you will
find cakes, and bacon, and sausages, as many as you can eat," replied
Thumbling, describing exactly his father's house.
The wolf did not wait to be told twice, but in the night crept in, and
ate away in the larder to his heart's content. When he had finished
he tried to escape by the way he entered, but the hole was not large
enough. Thereupon Thumbling, who had reckoned on this, began to
make a tremendous noise inside the poor wolf, screaming and shouting
as loud as he could. Will you be quiet 7 said the Wolf; you will
awake the people." Eh, what !" cried the little man, since you have
satisfied yourself, it is my turn now to make merry;" and he set up a
louder howling than before. At last his father and mother awoke, and
came to the room and looked through the chinks of the door; and as
soon as they perceived the ravages the wolf had committed, they ran and
brought, the man his axe, and the woman the scythe. Stop you behind,"
said the man, as they entered the room; if my blow does not kill him,
you must give him a cut with your weapon, and chop off his head if you
can."
When Thumbling heard his father's voice, he called out, "Father
dear, I am here, in the wolf's body." "Heaven be praised !" said the
130 00138.jpg
113 GInIMm'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
man, full of joy, our dear child is found again ;" and he bade his wife
take away the scythe, lest it should do any harm to his son. T'en he
raised his axe, and gave the wolf, such a blow on its head that it fell
dead, and, taking a knife, he cut it open, and released the little fellow
his son. Ah," said his father, "what trouble we have had about
you!" "Yes, father," replied Thumbling, "I have been travelling a
great deal about the world. Heaven be praised! I breathe fresh air
again."
Where have you been, my son ?" he inquired.
Once I was in a mouse's hole, once inside a cow, and lastly inside
that wolf; and now I will stop here with you," said Thumbling.
Yes," said the old people, "we will not sell you again for all the
riches of the world ;" and they embraced and kissed him with great
affection. Then they gave him plenty to eat and drink, and had new
clothes made for him, for his old ones were worn out with travelling.
THE TABLE, THE ASS, AND THE STICK.
A LONG while ago there lived a Tailor who had three sons, but only a
single Goat, which, as it had to furnish milk for all, was obliged to have
good fodder every day, and to be led into the meadow for it. This the
sons had to do by turns; and one morning the eldest took the Goat into
the churchyard, where grew the finest herbs, which he let it eat, and
then it frisked about undisturbed till the evening, when it was time to
return ; and then he asked, Goat, are you satisfied 1" The Goat re-
plied,-
I am satisfied, quite;
No more can I bite."
131 00139.jpg
THE TABLE, THE ASS, AND THE STICK. 117
Then come home," said the youth; and, catching hold of the rope,
he led it to the stall and made it fast. "Now," said the old Tailor,
"has the Goat had its proper food ?" "Yes," replied the son, "it has
eaten all it can." The father, however, would see for himself; and so,
going into the stall, he stroked the Goat, and asked it whether it was
satisfied. The Goat replied,-
Whereof should I be satisfied?
I only jumped about the graves,
And found not a single leaf."
"What do I hear 1" exclaimed the Tailor; and ran up to his son and
said, Oh, you bad boy you said the Goat was satisfied, and then brought
it away hungry !" and, taking the yard- measure down from the wall, he
hunted his son out of the house in a rage.
The following morning was the second son's turn, and he picked out
a place in the garden-hedge, where some very fine herbs grew, which the
Goat ate up entirely. When, in the evening, he wanted to return, he
asked the Goat first whether it were satisfied, and it replied as before,-
I am satisfied, quite;
No more can I bite."
Then come home," said the youth, and drove it to its stall, and
tied it fast. Soon after the old Tailor asked, Has the Goat had its
usual food ?" Oh, yes answered his son; it ate up all the leaves."
But the Tailor would see for himself, and so he went into the stall, and
asked the Goat whether it had had enough.
Whereof should I be satisfied
I only jumped about the hedge,
And found not a single leaf,"
replied the animal.
"The wicked scamp !" exclaimed the Tailor, "to let such a capital
animal starve !" and, running in-doors, he drove his second son out of
the house with his yard-measure.
It was now the third son's turn, and he, willing to make a good
beginning, sought some bushes full of beautifully tender leaves, of which
he let the Goat partake plentifully; and at evening-time, when he
wished to go home, he asked the Goat the same question as the others
had done, and received the same answer,-
I am satisfied, quite;
No more can I bite."
So then he led it home, and tied it up in its stall; and presently the old
man came and isked whether the Goat had had its regular food, and the
youth replied, "Yes." But he would go and see for himself, a.d then
the wicked beast told him, as it had done before,-
Whereof should I be satisfied?
I only jumped about the bush,
And found not a single leaf."
Oh, the scoundrel!" exclaimed the Tailor, in a rage; "he is just as
careless and forgetful as the others : he shall no longer eat my bread ,"
132 00140.jpg
118 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
and rushing into the house, he dealt his youngest son such tremendous
blows with the yard-measure, that the boy ran quite away.
The old Tailor was now left alone with his Goat, and the following
morning he went to the stall, and fondled the animal, saying, Come,
my dear little creature, I will lead you myself into the meadow;" and,
taking the rope, he brought it to some green lettuces, and let it feed to
its heart's content. When evening arrived he asked it, as his sons had
done before, whether it were satisfied, and it replied,-
"I am satisfied, quite;
No more can I bite."
So he led it home, and tied it up in its stall; but, before he left it, he
turned round and asked once more, "Are you quite satisfied V" The
malicious brute answered in the same manner as before,-
Whereof should I be satisfied ?
I only jumped about the green,
And found not a single leaf."
As soon as the Tailor heard this he was thunderstruck, and perceived
directly that he had driven away his three sons without cause. "Stop
a bit, you ungrateful beast !" he exclaimed. "To drive you away will
be too little punishment; I will mark you so that you shall no more
dare to show yourself among honourable tailors." So saying, he sprang
up with great speed, and, fetching a razor, shaved the Goat's head as
oare as the palm of his hand; and, because the yard-measure was too
honourable for such service, he laid hold of a whip, and gave the animal
such hearty cuts with it, that it ran off as fast as possible.
When the old man sat down again in his house he fell into great grief,
and would only have been too happy to have had his three sons back;
but no one knew whither they had wandered.
The eldest, however, had gone apprentice to a joiner, with whom he
worked industriously and cheerfully; and when his time was out, his
master presented him with a table, which had certainly a very ordinary
appearance, and was made of common wood; but it had one excellent
quality :-If its owner placed it before him, and said, "Table, cover
thyself," the good table was at once covered with a fine cloth, and plates,
and knives and forks, and dishes of roast and baked meat took their
places on it, and a great glass filled with red wine, which gladdened
one's heart. Our young fellow thought, Herewith you have enough
for your lifetime," and went, full of glee, about the world, never troubling
himself whether the inn were good or bad, or whether it contained any
thing or nothing. Whenever he pleased he went to no inn at all, but in
the fieid, or wood, or any meadow; in fact, just where he liked to take
the table off his back, and set it before him, saying, "Table, cover
thyself," he had all he could desire to eat and drink.
At last it came into his head that he would return to his father,
whose anger, he thought, would be abated by time, and with whom he
might live very comfortably with his excellent table. It fell out that,
on his journey home, he one evening arrived at an inn which was full of
people, who made him welcome, and invited him to come in and eat with
133 00141.jpg
THE TABLE, THE ASS, AND THE STICK. 119
them, or he would get nothing at all. But our Joiner replied, No ; I
will not take a couple of bites with you; you must rather be my guests."
At this the others laughed, and thought he was making game of therm;
but he placed his wooden table in the middle of the room, and said,
"Table, cover thyself;" and in the twinkling of an eye it was set out
with meats as good as any that the host could have furnished, and the
smell of which mounted very savoury into the noses of the guests. Be
welcome, good friends," said the Joiner; and the guests, when they saw
he was in earnest, waited not to be asked twice, but, quickly seating
themselves, set to valiantly with their knives. What made them most
wonder, however, was that, when any dish became empty, another full one
instantly took its place; and the landlord, who stood in a corner looking
on, thought to himself, "You could make good use of such a cook as that
in your trade ;" but he said nothing. The Joiner and his companions sat
making merry till late at night; but at last they went to bed, and the
Joiner too, who placed his wishing-table against the wall before going to
sleep. The landlord, however, could not get to sleep, for his thoughts
troubled him, and, suddenly remembering that there stood in his lumber
room an old table which was useless, he went and fetched it, and put it
in the place of the wishing-table. The next morning the Joiner counted
out his lodging-money, and placed the table on his back, ignorant that it
had been changed, and went his way. At noon-day he reached his father's
house, and was received with great joy.
"Now, my dear son," said the old man, what have you learned 1"
"I have become a joiner, father."
"A capital trade, too. But what have you brought home with you
from your travels? "
"The best thing I have brought," said the youth, "is this table."
The father looked at it on every side, and said, "You have made a
-very bad hand of that; it is an old, worthless table."
"But," interrupted his son, "it is one which covers itself; and when
I place it before me and say, 'Table, cover thyself,' it is instantly filled
with the most savoury meats and wine, which will make your heart sing.
Just invite your friends and acquaintances, and you shall soon see how
they will be refreshed and revived."
As soon, then, as the company was arrived he placed his table in the
middle of the room, and called out to it to cover itself. But the table
did not stir, and remained as empty as any other table which does not
understand what is spoken; and the poor Joiner at once perceived that
the table was changed, and he was ashamed to appear thus like an impos-
tor before the guests, who laughed at him, and were obliged to go home
without eating or drinking. So the father took up his mending again,
and stitched away as fast as ever, and the son was obliged to go and work
for a master carpenter.
Meanwhile the second son had been living with a miller, and learning
his trade, and as soon as his time was up, his master said to him, Because
you have served me so wel!, I present you with this ass, which has a
wonderful gift, although it can whether draw a waggon nor carry a sack."
134 00142.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
"For what, then, is it useful ?" asked the youth. It speaks gold,"
replied the miller. If you tie a pocket under his chin and cry Brickle-
brit,' then the good beast will pour out gold coin like hail." That is a
very fine thing," thought the youth ; and, thanking the master, he went
off upon his journey. Now, whenever he needed money, he had only to
say to his ass Bricklebrit," and it rained down gold pieces, so that lie
had no other trouble than to pick them up again from the ground.
Wherever he went, the best only was good enough for him, and the dearer
it was the better, for he had always a full purse. When he had looked
about him for some time in the world, he thought he would go and visit
his father, whose anger he supposed had abated, and, moreover, since he
brought with him an ass of gold, he would no doubt receive him gladly.
It so happened that he came to the very same inn where his brother's
table had been changed, and as he came up, leading his ass by the hand,
the landlord would have taken it and tied it up, but our young master
said to him, "You need not trouble yourself; I will lead my grey beast
myself into the stable and tie him, for I must know where lie stands."
The landlord wondered at this, and he thought that one who looked after
his own beast would not spend much ; but presently our friend, dipping
into his pocket and taking out two pieces of gold, gave them to him, and
oid him fetch the best he could. This made the landlord open his eyes,
and he ran and fetched, in a great hurry, the best he could get. When
he had finished his meal, the youth asked what further he was indebted,
and the landlord, having no mind to spare him, said that a couple of gold
pieces more was due. The youth felt in his pocket, but his money was
just at an end ; so he exclaimed, Wait a bit, my landlord ; I will go and
fetch some gold," and, taking the table-cloth with him, he went out. The
landlord knew not what to think; but, being covetous, he slunk out after
the youth, and, as he bolted the stable-door, the landlord peeped through
a hole in the wall. The youth spread the cloth beneath the ass, and then
called out Bricklebrit," and in a moment the beast began to speak out
gold, as if rain were falling. "By the powers exclaimed the landlord,
" ducats are soon coined so : that is not a bad sort of purse !" The youth
now paid his bill and laid down to sleep; but in the middle of the night
the landlord slipped into the stable and led away the mint-master, and
tied up a different ass in its place.
In the morning early, the youth drove away with his ass, thinking it
was his own, andat noon-day he arrived at his father's, who was very glad
to see him return, and received him kindly. What trade have you
become 1" asked the father. A miller," was the reply. "And whale
have you brought home with you from your wanderings ?" "Nothing
but an ass." Oh, there are plenty of that sort here now ; it had far
better been a goat," said the old man. Yes," replied the son, "but this
is no common animal, but one which, when I say Bricklebris,' speaks
gold right and left. Just call your friends here, and I will make them
all rich in a twinkling." Well," exclaimed the Tailor, that would
please me very well, and so I need not use my needle any more;" and
running out, he called together all his acquaintances. As soon as they
135 00143.jpg
THE TABLE, THE ASS, AND THE BTICK. 1Z1
were assembled, the young Miller bade them make a circle, and, spreading
out a cloth, he brought the ass into the middle of the room. Now, pay
attention," said he to them, and called out Bricklebrit! but not a
single gold piece fell, and it soon appeared that the ass understood not
coining, for it is not every one that can be so taught. The poor young
man began to make a long face, when he saw that he had been deceived;
and he was obliged to beg pardon of the guests, who were forced to
return as poor as they came. So it happened that the old man had to
take to his needle again, and the youth to bind himself to another
master.
Meanwhile, the third brother had gone to a turner to learn his trade;
but he got on very slowly, as it was a very difficult art to acquire. And
while he was there, his brothers sent him word how badly things had gone
with them, and how the landlord had robbed them of their wishing-gifts
on their return home. When the time came round that he had learnt
everything and wished to leave, his master presented him with a sack,
saying, In it there lies a stick."
I will take the sack readily, for it may do me good service," replied
the youth. But what is the stick for 2 it only makes the sack heavier
to carry."
"That I will tell you :-if any one does you an injury, you have only
to say, 'Stick, out of the sack !' and instantly the stick will spring out,
and dance about on the people's backs in such a style that they will not be
able to stir a finger for a week afterwards; and, moreover, it will not leave
off till you say, 'Stick, get back into the sack.' "
The youth thanked him, and hung the sack over his shoulders; and
when any one came too near, and wished to meddle with him, he said,
"Stick, come out of the sack," and immediately it sprang out and began
laying about it; and when he called it back, it disappeared so quickly
that no one could tell where it came from.
One evening he arrived at the inn where his brothers had been basely
robbed, and, laying his knapsack on the table, he began to talk of all the
wonderful things he had seen in the world. Yes," said he, one may
find, indeed, a table which supplies itself, and a golden ass, and suchlike
things-all very good in their place, and I do not despise them; but
they shrink into nothing beside the treasure which I carry with me in
this sack."
The landlord pricked up his ears, saying, "What on earth can it
be ?" but he thought to himself, The sack is certainly full of precious
stones, and I must manage to get hold of them; for all good things comr
in threes."
As soon as it was bedtime our youth stretched himself upon a bench,
and laid his sack down for a pillow; and, when he appeared to be in a
deep sleep, the landlord crept softly to him, and began to pull very
gently and cautiously at the sack, to see if he could manage to draw it
away, and put another in its place. The young Turner, however, had
been waiting for him to do this, and, just as the man gave a good pull,
ho exclaimed, "Stick, out of the sack with you I" Immediately out it
136 00144.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
jumped, and thumped about on the landlord's back and ribs with a good
will.
The landlord began to cry for mercy; but the louder he cried, the
more forcibly did the stick beat time on his back, until at last he fell
exhausted to the ground.
Then the Turner said, "If you do not give up the table which feeds
itself ana the golden ass, that dance shall commence again."
"No, no !" cried the landlord, in a weak voice; "I will give them
up with pleasure, but just let your horrible hobgoblin get back into his
sack."
"I will give you pardon, if you do right; but take care what you
are about," replied the Turner ; and he let him rest, and bade the stick
return.
On the following morning the Turner accordingly went away with
the table and the ass, on his road home to his father, who, as soon as he
saw him, felt very glad, and asked what he had learned in foreign parts.
Dear father," replied he, I have become a turner."
"A difficult business that; but what have you brought back with
you from your travels ?"
"A precious stick," replied the son; a stick in this sack."
"What !" exclaimed the old man, "a stick Well, that is worth the
trouble Why, you can cut one from every tree !"
But not such a stick as this; for, if I say, Stick, out of the sack,'
it instantly jumps out and executes such a dance upon the back of any
one who would injure me, that at last he is beaten to the ground, crying
for mercy. Do you see, with this stick I have got back again the won-
derful table and the golden ass of which the thievish landlord robbed
my brothers 3 Now, let them both be summoned home, and invite all
your acquaintances, and I will not only give them plenty to eat and
drink, but pocketsful of money."
The old Tailor would scarcely believe him; but, nevertheless, he
called in his friends. Then the young Turner placed a tablecloth in the
middle of the room, and led in the ass, saying to his brother, "Now,
speak to him."
The Miller called out "Bricklebrit !" and in a moment the gold
pieces dropped down on the floor in a pelting shower; and so it con-
tinued, until they had all so much that they could carry no more. (I
fancy my readers would have been very happy to have been there too !)
After this the table was fetched in, and the Joiner said, "Table,
cover thyself;" and it was at once filled with the choicest dishes.
Then they began such a meal as the Tailor had never had before in his
house; and the whole company remained till late at night merry and
jovial.
The next day the Tailor forsook needle and thread, and put them all
away, with his measures and goose, in a cupboard, and for ever after lived
happily and contentedly with his three sons.
But now I must tell you what became of the Goat, whoee fault it was
that the three brothers were driven away. It was so ashamed of its
137 00146.jpg
7' I
iHE GOLDEN BIRD.
Page 123,.
l
138 00147.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD. 123
bldd head that it ran into a Fot's hole and hid itself When the Fox
a ie home he saw a pair of great eyes looking at him in the darkness,
which so frightened him that he ran back, and presently met a Bear, who
perceiving how terrified Reynard appeared, said to him, What is the
matter, Brother Fox, that you make such a face 1"
"Ah !" he replied, "in my hole sits a horrible beast, who glared at me
with most fiery eyes."
"Oh we will soon drive it out," said the Bear; and going up to the
nole he peeped in himself; but as soon as he saw the fiery eyes, he also
turned tail, and would have nothing to do with the terrible beast, and so
took to flight. On his way a Bee met him, and soon saw he could not
feel much through his thick coat; and so she said, You are making a
very rueful face, Mr. Bear; pray, where have you left your merry one ?"
Why," answered Bruin, a great horrible beast has laid himself down
in Reynard's house, and glares there with such fearful eyes, we cannot
drive him out."
"Well, Mr. Bear," said the Bee, "I am sorry for you ; I am a poor
creature whom you never notice, but yet I believe I can help you."
So saying, she flew into the Fox's hole, and settling on the clean
shaved head of the Goat, stung it so dreadfully that the poor animal
sprang up and ran madly off; and nobody knows to this hour where it
ran to.
THE GOLDEN BIRD.
A LONG, long while ago there was a King who had, adjoining his palace,
a fine pleasure-garden, in whi-h stood a tree, which bore golden apples,
and as soon as the apples were ripe they were counted, but the next day
one was missing This vexed the King very much, and he ordered that
watch should be aept every night beneath the tree; and having three
sons he sent the eldest, when evening set in, into the garden; but about
139 00148.jpg
124 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
midnight the youth fell into a deep sleep, and in the morning another
apple was missing. The next night the second son had to watch, but he
also fared no better; for about midnight he fell fast asleep, and another
apple was wanting in the morning. The turn came now to the third son,
who was eager to go ; but the King hesitated for a long time, thinking he
would be even less wakeful than his brothers, but at last he consented. The
youth lay down under the tree and watched steadily, without letting
sleep be his master ; and just as twelve o'clock struck something rustled
in the air, and, looking up, he saw a bird flying by, whose feathers were
of bright gold. The bird lighted upon the tree, and had just picked off
one of the apples, when the youth shot a bolt at it, which did not prevent
its flying away, but one of its golden feathers dropped off. The youth
took the feather up, and, showing it the next morning to the King, told
him what he had seen during the night. Thereupon the King assembled
his council, and every one declared that a single feather like this was
worth a kingdom. Well, then," said the King, if this feather is so
costly, I must and will have the whole bird, for one feather is of no use
to me." The eldest son was now sent out on his travels, and, relying on
his own prudence, he doubted not that he should find the Golden Bird.
When he had walked about a mile he saw sitting at the edge of a forest a
Fox, at which he levelled his gun ; but it cried out, "Do not shoot me,
and I will give you a piece of good advice You are now on the road to
the Golden Bird, and this evening you will come into a village where two
inns stand opposite to each other : one will be brightly lit up and much
merriment will be going on inside, but turn not in there; enter rather
into the other, though it seem a poor place to you."
The young man, however, thought to himself, How can such a silly
beast give me rational advice ?" and, going nearer, he shot at the Fox;
but he missed, and the Fox ran away with its tail in the air. After this
adventure he walked on, and towards evening he came to the village where
stood the two public-houses, in one of which singing and dancing were
going on; while the other looked a very ill-conditioned house. I
should be a simpleton," said he to himself, if I were to go into this dirty
inn while that capital one stood opposite." So he entered the dancing-
room, and there, living in feasting and rioting, he forgot the Golden Bird,
his father, and all good manners.
As time passed by and the eldest son did not return home, the
second son set out also on his travels to seek the Golden Bird. The
Fox met him as it had its brother, and gave him good counsel, which he
did not follow. He likewise arrived at the two inns, and out of the
window of the riotous house his brother leaned, and invited him in. He
could not resist, and entered, and lived there only to gratify his
pleasures.
Again a long time elapsed with no news of either brother, and the
youngest wished to go and try his luck; but his father would not con-
sent. "It is useless," said he; "you are still less likely than your
brothers to find the Golden Bird, and, if a misfortune should happen to
you, you cannot help yourself, for you are not very quick." The King
140 00149.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD. 125
at last, however, was forced to consent, for he had no rest while he
refused.
On the edge of the forest the Fox was again sitting, and again it
offered in return for its life the same piece of good advice. The youth
was good-hearted, and said, "Be not afraid, little Fox; I will do you no
harm."
You shall not repent of your goodness," replied the Fox; "but, that
you may travel quicker, get up behind on my tail."
Scarcely had he seated himself when away they went, over hedges
and ditches, uphill and downhill, so fast that their hair whistled in the
wind.
As soon as they arrived at the village the youth dismounted, and,
following the advice he had received, turned, without looking round,
into the mean-looking house, where he passed the night comfortably.
The next morning, when he went into the fields, he found the Fox
already there, who said, I will tell you what further you must do. Go
straight forwards, and you will come to a castle, before which a whole
troop of soldiers will be sleeping and snoring; be not frightened at
them, but go right through the middle of the troop into the castle, and
through all the rooms, till you come into a chamber where a Golden
Bird hangs in a wooden cage. Near by stands an empty golden cage
for show, but take care you do not take the bird out of its ugly cage to
place it in the golden one, or you will fare badly." With these words
the Fox again stretched out its tail, and the King's son mounting as be-
fore, away they went over hill and valley, while their hair whistled in
the wind from the pace they travelled at. When they arrived at the
castle the youth found everything as the Fox had said. He soon dis-
covered the room where the Golden Bird sat in its wooden cage, and by
it stood the golden one, and three golden apples were lying around.
The youth thought it would be a pity to take the bird in such an ugly
and dirty cage, and, opening the door, he put it in the splendid one.
At the moment he did this the bird set up a piercing shriek, which woke
the soldiers, who started up and made him a prisoner. The next morn-
ing he was brought to trial, and when he confessed all he was condemned
to death. Still the King said he would spare his life under one con-
dition; namely, if he brought to him the Golden Horse, which travelled
faster than the wind, and then for a reward he should also receive the
Golden Bird.
The young Prince walked out, sighing and sorrowful, for where was
he to find the Golden Horse All at once he saw his old friend the Fox.
who said, There, you see what has happened, because you did not
mind what I said. But be of good courage ; I will protect you, and tell
you where you may find the horse. You must follow this road straight
till you come to a castle : in the stable there this horse stands. Before
the door a boy will lie fast asleep and snoring, so you must lead away
the horse quietly; but there is one thing you must mind : put on his
back the old saddle of wood and leather, and not the golden one which
hangs chee by, for if you do it will be very unlucky." So saying the
141 00150.jpg
126 GRIIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Fox stretched out its tail, and again they want as fast as the wind
Everything was as the Fox had said, and the youth went into the stall
where the Golden Horse was; but, as he was about to put on the dirty
saddle, he thought it would be a shame if he did not put on such a fine
animal the saddle which appeared to belong to him, and so he took up the
golden saddle. Scarcely had it touched the back of the horse when it set
up a loud neigh, which awoke the stable-boys, who put our hero into con-
finement. The next morning he was condemned to death; but the King
promised to give him his life and the horse, if he would bring the
Beautiful Daughter of the King of the Golden Castle.
With a heavy heart the youth set out, and by great good fortune
soon met the Fox. "I should have left you in your misfortune," it
said; "but I felt compassion for you, and am willing once more to help
you out of your trouble. Your road to the palace lies straight before
you, and when you arrive there, about evening, wait till night, when
the Princess goes to take a bath. As soon as she enters the bath-house,
do you spring up and give her a kiss, and she will follow you wheresoever
you will; only take care that she does not take leave of her parents first,
or all will be lost."
With these words the Fox again stretched out its tail, and the King's
son seating himself thereon, away they went over hill and valley like the
wind. When they arrived at the Golden Palace, the youth found every-
thing as the Fox had foretold, and he waited till midnight when every-
body was in a deep sleep, and at that hour the beautiful Princess went to
her bath, and he sprang up instantly and kissed her. The Princess
said she was willing to go with him, but begged him earnestly, with tears
in her eyes, to permit her first to take leave of her parents. At first he
withstood her prayers ; but, when she wept still more, and even fell at his
feet, he at last consented. Scarcely had the maiden stepped up to her
father's bedside, when he awoke, and all the others who were asleep
awakening too, the poor youth was captured and put in prison.
The next morning the King said to him, Thy life is forfeited, and
thou canst only find mercy if thou clearest away the mountain which lies
before my window, and over which I cannot see; but thou must remove
it within eight days. If thou accomplish this, then thou shalt have my
daughter as a reward."
The King's son at once began digging and shovelling away; but
when, after seven days, he saw how little was effected and that all his
work went for nothing, he fell into great grief and gave up all hope.
But on the evening of the seventh day the Fox appeared and said, You
do not deserve that I should notice you again, but go away and sleep
while I work for you."
When he awoke the next niorning, and looked out of the window.
the hill had disappeared, and he hastened to the King full of joy, and
told him the conditions were fulfilled; and now, whether he liked it or
not, the King was obliged to keep his word, and give up his daughter.
Away then went these two together, and no long time had passed
before they met the faithful Fox. You have the best certainly," said
142 00151.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD. 1Il
he, "but to the Maid of the Golden Castle belongs also the Golden
Horse."
"How shall I obtain it 1" inquired the youth.
That I will tell you," answered the Fox; "first take to the King
who sent you to the Golden Castle the beautiful Princess. Then there
will be unheard-of joy, and they will readily show you the Golden Horse
and give it to you. Do you mount it, and then give your hand to each
for a parting shake, and last of all to the Princess, whom you must keep
tight hold of, and pull her up behind you, and as soon as that is done
ride off, and no one can pursue you, for the horse goes as fast as the
wind." All this was happily accomplished, and the King's son led away
the beautiful Princess in triumph on the Golden Horse. The Fox did
not remain behind, and said to the Prince, Now I will help you to the
Golden Bird. When you come near the castle where it is, let the maiden
get down, and I will take her into my cave. Then do you ride into the
castle-yard, and at the sight of you there will be such joy that they will
readily give you the bird; and as soon as you hold the cage in your hand
ride back to us, and fetch again the maiden."
As soon as this deed was done, and the Prince had ridden back
with his treasure, the Fox said, "Now you must reward me for my
services."
"What do you desire 7" asked the youth.
"When we come into yonder wood, shoot me dead and cut off my
head and feet."
"That were a curious gratitude," said the Prince; "I cannot possibly
do that."
"If you will not do it, I must leave you," replied the Fox; "but
before I depart I will give you one piece of counsel. Beware of these
two points : buy no gallows-flesh, and sit not on the brink of a spring "
With these words it ran into the forest.
The young Prince thought, "Ah, that is a wonderful animal, with
some curious fancies Who would buy gallows-flesh ? and I don't see
the pleasure-of sitting on the brink of a spring !" Onwards he rode
with his beautiful companion, and by chance the way led him through
the village where his two brothers had stopped. There he found a great
uproar and lamentation; and when he asked the reason, he was told
that two persons were about to be hanged. When he came nearer, he
saw that they were his two brothers, who had done some villanous
deeds, besides spending all their money. He inquired if they could not
be freed, and was told by the people that he might buy them off if he
would, but they were not worth his gold, and deserved nothing but
hanging. Nevertheless, he did not hesitate, but paid down the money,
and his two brothers were released.
After this they all four set out in company, and soon came to the
forest where they had first met the Fox; and as it was cool and pleasant
beneath the trees, for the sun was very hot, the two brothers said,
"Come, let us rest awhile here by this spring, and eat and drink."
The youngest consented, forgetting in the heat of conversation the
143 00152.jpg
128 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
warning he had received, and feeling no anxiety; but all at once the
brothers threw him backwards into the water, and taking the maiden,
the horse, and the bird, went home to their father. "We bring you,"
said they to him, "not only the Golden Bird, but also the Golden Horse
and the Princess of the Golden Castle." At their arrival there was great
joy; but the Horse would not eat, the Bird would not sing, and the
Maiden would not speak, but wept bitterly from morning to nignt.
The youngest brother, however, was not dead. The spring, by great
good luck, was dry, and he fell upon soft moss without any injury; but
he could not get out again. Even in this necessity the faithful Fox did
not leave him, but soon came up, and scolded him for not following its
advice. "Still I cannot forsake you," it said ; but I will again help
you to escape. Hold fast upon my tail, and I will draw you up to the
top." When this was done, the Fox said, You are not yet out of danger,
for your brothers are not confident of your death, and have set spies all
round the forest, who are to kill you if they should see you."
The youth thereupon changed clothes with a poor old man who was
sitting near, and in that guise went to the King's palace. Nobody
knew him ; but instantly the Bird began to sing, the Horse began to eat,
and the beautiful Maiden ceased weeping. Bewildered at this change,
the King asked what it meant. "I know not," replied the Maiden;
but I who was sad am now gay, for I feel as if my true husband were
returned." Then she told him all that had happened ; although the
other brothers had threatened her with death if she disclosed anything.
The King summoned before him all the people who were in the castle,
and among them came the poor youth, dressed as a beggar, in his rags;
but the Maiden knew him, and fell upon his neck. The wicked brothers
were seized and tried; but the youngest married the Princess, and
succeeded to the King's inheritance.
But what happened to the poor Fox ? Long after, the Prince went
once again into the wood, and there met the Fox, who said, You have
now everything that you can desire, but to my misfortunes there is no
end, although it lies in your power to release me." And, with tears, it
begged the Prince to cut off its head and feet. At last he did so ; and
scarcely was it accomplished when the Fox became a man, who was no
other than the brother of the Princess, delivered at length from the
charm which bound him. From that day nothing was ever wanting to
the happiness of the Hero of the Golden Bird.
144 00153.jpg
THE TRAVELS OF THUTMBLING.
A CERTAIN Tailor had a son who was so very diminutive in stature that
he went by the nickname of Thumbling ; but the little fellow had a
great deal of courage in his soul, and one day he said to his father, I
must and will travel a little." You are very right, my son," replied hi
father; "take a long darning-needle with you, and stick a lump of sealing-
wax on the end of it, and then you will have a sword to travel with."
Now, the Tailor would eat once more with his son, and so he skipped
into the kitchen to see what his wife had cooked for their last meal.
It was just ready, however, and the dish stood upon the hearth, and he
asked his wife what it was.
"You can see for yourself," replied she.
Just then 'Thumbling jumped on the fender and peeped into the pot;
but, happening to stretch his neck too far over the edge of it, the smoke
cf the hot meat carried him up the chimney. For a little distance lie
rode on the smoke in the air; but at last he sank down on the earth.
The little tailor was now embarked in the wide world, and went and
engaged with a master in his trade ; but with him the eating was not
good, so Thumbling said to the mistress, "If you do not give us better
food, I shall leave you, and early to-morrow morning write on your door
with chalk. Too many potatoes, too little meat; adieu, my lord potato-
king.'" What do you think you will do, grasshopper replied the
mistress, and in a passion she snatched up a piece of cloth, and would
have given him a thrashing; but the little fellow crept nimbly under a
thimble, and peeped out beneath at the mistress, and made faces at her.
So she took up the thimble and tried to catch him; but Thumbling
skipped into the cloth, and as she threw it away to look for him he
slipped into the crevice of the table. "He, he, he, old mistress 1"
145 00154.jpg
100 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
laughed he, putting his head up; and when she would have hit him, he
dropped down into the drawer beneath. At last however, she did catch
him, and hunted him out of the house.
The little tailor wandered about till he came to a great forest, where
he met a band of robbers who were going to steal the King's treasure.
As soon as they saw the tailor, they thought to themselves, Ah, such
a little fellow as that can creep through the keyhole and serve us as a
picklock "Hilloa !" cried one, "you Goliath, will you go with us to
the treasure chamber ? You can easily slip in, and hand us out the
gold and silver."
Thumbling considered for a while, and at last consented and went
with them to the palace. Then he looked all over the doors to see if
there were any chinks, and presently discovered one which was just wide
enough for him to get through. Just as he was about to creep in one of
the watchmen at the door saw him, and said to the other, "What ugly
spider is that crawling there I I will crush it."
Oh, let the poor thing be," said the other ; "he has done nothing
to you." So Thumbling got luckily through the chink into the chamber,
and, opening the window beneath which the robbers stood, threw out,
one by one, the silver dollars. Just as the tailor was in the heat of his
work, he heard the King coming to visit his treasure-chamber, and in a
great hurry le hid himself. The King observed that many dollars were
gone ; but lie could not irragine who could have stolen them, for the
locks and bolts were all fast, and everything appeared quite safe. So he
went away again, and said to the watchmen, "Have a care! there is
some one at my gold." Presently Thumbling began his work again,
and the watchmen heard the gold moving, chinking, and falling down
with a ring ; so they sprang in, and would have seized the thief. But
the tailor, when he heard them coming, was still quicker, and ran into a
corner and covered himself over with a dollar, so that nothing of him
could be seen. Then he called to the watchmen, "Here I am!" and
they went up to the place; but before they could search he was in
another corner, crying, "Ha, ha! here I am !" The watchmen turned
there, but he was off again in a third corner, crying, "He, he, he I here
I am !" So it went on, Thumbling making fools of them each time;
and they ran here and there so often about the chamber, that at last
they were wearied out and went away. Then he threw the dollars out
as before; and, when he came to the last, he gave it a tremendous jerk,
and, jumping out after it, flew down upon it to the ground. The robbers
praised him very highly, saying, "You are a mighty hero; will you be
our captain Thumbling refused, as he wished first to see the world.
So they shared the booty among them; but the little tailor only took a
farthing, because he could not carry any more.
After this deed he buckled his sword again round his body, and,
bidding the robbers good day, set out further on his travels. He went
to several masters seeking work; but none of them would have him, and
at last he engaged himself as waiter at an inn. The maids, however,
could not bear him, for he could see them without their seeing him, and
146 00155.jpg
THE TRAVELS OF TIIUMBLING.
he gave information to the master of what they took secretly from the
larder, and how they helped themselves out of the cellar. So the
servants determined among themselves to serve him out by playing hini
some trick. Not long afterwards one of them was mowing grass in the
garden, and saw Thumbling skipping about from daisy to daisy, so she
mowed down in a great hurry the grass where he was, and tying it in a
bundle together threw it slily into the cows' stall. A great black cow
instantly swallowed it up, and Thumbling, too, without injuring him;
but he was not at all pleased, for it was a very dark place, and no light
to be seen at all! While the cow was being milked, Thumbling called
out, Holloa when will that pail be full V" but the noise of the running
milk prevented his being heard. By-and-bye the master came into the
stable and said, "This cow must be killed to-morrow!" This speech
made Thumbling tremble, and he shouted out in a shrill tone, "Let me
out first, I say; let me out !"
The master heard him but could not tell where the voice came from,
and lie asked, "Where are you 1"
"In the dark," replied Thumbling; but this the master could no
understand, so he went away.
The next morning the cow was killed. Happily Thumbling escaped
without a wound from all the cutting and carving, and was sent away
in the sausage-meat. As soon as the butcher began his work, he cried
with all his might, Don't chop too deep I don't chop too deep But the
whirring of the cleaver again prevented his being heard. Necessity is
the mother of invention, and so Thumbling set his wits to work, and
jumped so cleverly out between the cuts, that he came off with a whole
skin. He was not able to get away very far, but fell into the basin
where the fragments were, and presently le was rolled up in-a skin for a
sausage. He found his quarters here very narrow, but afterwards, when
he was hung up in the chimney to be smoked, the time appeared
dreadfully long to him. At last, one day lie was taken down, for a guest
was to be entertained with a sausage. When the good wife cut the
sausage in half, he took care not to stretch out his neck too far, lest it
should be cut through. Then, seizing his opportunity, he made a jump,
and sprang quite out.
In this house; however, where things had gone so badly, the little
tailor would not stop any longer; so he set out again on his travels.
His liberty did not last very long. In the open fields he met a Fox, who
snapped him up in a twinkling. "Ah, Mr. Fox," called Thumbling, "I
don't want to stick here in your throat ; let me out again."
"You are right," replied the Fox, "you are no use there; but if you
will promise me all the hens in your father's farmyard, I will let you off
scot-free."
"With all my heart," said Thumbling; "you shall have all the fowls
I promise you."
Then the Fox let him out, and carried him home; and as soon a
the farmer saw his dear son again, he gave all the hens instantly to the
Fox as his promised reward. Thereupon Thumbling pulled out the
147 00156.jpg
[32 GRIIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
farthing which he had earned uron his wanderings, and said, See I have
brought home with me a beautiful piece of gold."
"But why did they give the Fox the poor little hens to gobble up ?"
"Why, you simpleton, don't you think your father would rather have
his dear child than all the fowls in his farmyard i"
THE GODFATHER DEATH.
A CEFTAIN poor man had twelve children, and was obliged to work day
and night to find them bread to eat; but when the thirteenth child was
born, he ran out in despair on the highroad to ask the first person he
should meet to stand godfather to it.
Presently he met Death striding along on his withered legs, who
said, Take me for godfather." The man asked him who he was, and
received for reply, "I am Death, who make all things equal." "Then,"
answered the man, you are the right person-you make no difference
between the rich and poor; you shall be godfather to my boy."
Death replied, I will make your child rich and famous; he who
has me for a friend can need nought." Then the man told him the
christening was fixed for the following Sunday, and invited him to come;
and at the right time he did appear, and acted very becomingly on the
occasion.
When the boy arrived at years of discretion, the godfather came and
took him away with him, and leading him into a forest showed him an
herb which grew there. "Now," said Death, "you shall receive your
christening gift. I make you a famous physician. Every time you are
called to a sick person I will appear to you. If I stand at the head of
148 00157.jpg
THE GODFATHER DEATH. 133
your patient, you may speak confidently that you can restore him, and
if you give him a morsel of that vegetable he will speedily get well,
but if I stand at the feet of the sick he is mine, and you may say all
medicine is in vain, for the best physician in the world could not cure
him. Dare not, however, use the herb against my will, for then it will
go ill with you."
In a very short space of time the youth became the most renowned
physician in the world. He only wants just to see the sick person, and
he knows instantly whether he will live or die," said every one to his
neighbour; and so it came to pass, that from far and near people came to
him, bringing him the sick, and giving him so much money that he soon
became a very rich man. Once it happened that the King fell sick, and
our Physician was called in to say if recovery were possible. When he
came to the bedside, he saw that Death stood at the feet of the King.
" Ah," thought he, "if I might this once cheat Death; he will certainly
take offence ; but then I am his godchild, and perhaps he will shut his
eyes to it,-I will venture."
So saying he took up the sick man, and turned him rouud, so that
Death stood at the head of the King ; then he gave the King some of
the herb, and he instantly rose up quite refreshed.
Soon afterwards Death, with an angry and gloomy face, came to the
Physician, and pressed him on the arm, saying, You have put my light
out, but this time I will excuse you, because you are my godchild; how-
ever, do not dare to act so again, for it will cost you your life, and I shall
come and take you away."
Soon after this event the daughter of the King fell into a serious
illness, and, as she was his only child, he wept day and night until his
eyes were almost blinded. He also caused to be made known, that
whoever saved her life should receive her for a bride, and inherit his
crown. When the Physician came to the bedside of the sick, lie per-
:eived Death at her feet, and he remembered the warning of his god-
father ; but the great beauty of the Princess, and the fortune which her
husband would receive, so influenced him that he cast all other thoughts
to the wind. He would not see that Death cast angry looks at him, and
threatened him with his fist; but he raised up his patient, and laid her
head where her feet had been. Then lie gave her a portion of the won-
derful herb, and soon her cheeks regained their colour, and her blood circu-
lated freely.
When Death thus saw his kingdom a second time invaded, and his
power mocked, he strode up swiftly to the side of the Physician and
said, "Now is your turn come ;" and he struck him with his icy-cold
hand so hard, that the Physician was unable to resist, and was obliged
to follow Death to his underground abode. There the Physician saw
thousands upon thousands of lamps burning in immeasurable rows, some
large, others small, and others yet smaller. Every moment some were
extinguished, but others in the same instant blazed out, so that the
flames appeared to dance up here and there in continual variation.
"Do you see?" said Death. "These are the lamps of men's lives.
149 00158.jpg
134i n GIMn 'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
The larger ones belong to children, the next to those iu the flower of
their age, and the smallest to the aged and grey-headed. Yet some of
the children and youth in the world have but the smallest lamps."
The Physician begged to be shown his own lamp, and Death pointed
to one almost expiring, saying, There, that is thine."
"Ah, my dear godfather," exclaimed the Physician, frightened,
"kindle a new one for me ; for your love of me do it, that I may enjoy
some years of life, marry the Princess, and come to the crown."
"I cannot," answered Death; "one lamp must be extinguished before
another can be lighted."
Then place the old one over a new lamp, that its dying fire may
kindle a fresh blaze," said the Physician, entreatingly.
Death made as if he would perform his wish, and prepared a large
and fresh lamp; but he did it very slowly, in order to revenge himself,
and the little flame died before he finished. Then the Physician sank
to the earth, and fell for ever into the hands of Death I
THE ROBBER-BRIDEGROOM.
TnHERE was once a Miller who had a beautiful daughter, whom he much
wished to see well married. Not long after there came a man who
appeared very rich, and the Miller, not knowing anything to his disad-
vantage, promised his daughter to him. The maiden, however, did not
take a fancy to this suitor, nor could she love him as a bride should; and,
moreover, she had no confidence in him, but as often as she looked at
him, or thought about him, her heart sank within her. Once he said to
her, "You are my bride, yet you never visit me." The maiden answered
" I do not know where your house is." It is deep in the shades of the
forest," said the man. Then the maiden tried to excuse herself by say-
150 00159.jpg
THE ROBBER BRIDEGROOM.
ing she should not be able to find it; but the Bridegroom said, "Next
Sunday you must come and visit me ; I have already invited guests, and,
in order that you may find your way through the forest, I will strew the
path with ashes."
When Sunday came, the maiden prepared to set out; but she felt
ver3 anxious and knew not why, and, in order that she might know her
way back, she filled her pockets with beans and peas. These she threw
to the right and left of the path of ashes, which she followed till it lea
her into the thickest part of the forest; there she came to a solitary
house, which looked so gloomy and desolate that she felt quite miserable.
She went in, but no one was there, and the most profound quiet reigned
throughout. Suddenly a voice sang-
Return, fair maid, return to your home;
'Tis to a murderer's den you've come."
The maiden looked round, and perceived that it was a bird in a cage
against the wall which sang the words. Once more it uttered them-
"Return, fair maid, return to your home;
'Tis to a murderer's den you've come."
The maiden went from one room to the other, through the whole
house, but all were empty, and not a human being was to be seen any-
where. At last she went into the cellar, and there sat a withered old
woman, shaking her head. "Can you tell me," asked the maiden,
"whether my bridegroom lives in this house ?"
"Ah, poor girl," said the old woman, when are you to be married 1
You are in a murderer's den. You think to be a bride, and to celebrate
your wedding, but you will only wed with Death See here, I have a
great cauldron filled with water, and if you fall into their power they
will kill you without mercy, cook, and eat you, for they are cannibals.
If I do not have compassion and save you, you are lost."
So saying, the old woman led her behind a great cask, where no on0
could see her. "Be as still as a mouse," said she, "and don't move hand
or foot, or all is lost. At night, when the robbers are asleep, we will
escape; I have long sought an opportunity." She had scarcely finished
speaking when the wicked band returned, dragging with them a poor
girl, to whose shrieks and cries they paid no attention. They gave her
some wine to drink, three glasses, one white, one red, and one yellow,
and at the last she fell down in a swoon. Meanwhile the poor Bride
behind the cask trembled and shuddered to see what a fate would have
been hers. Presently one of the robbers remarked a gold ring on the
finger of the girl, and, as he could not draw it off easily, he took f
hatchet and chopped off the finger. But the finger, with the force of the
blow, flew up and fell behind the cask, right into the lap of the Bride
and the robber, taking a light, went to seek it, but could not find it
Then one of the others asked, "Have you looked behind the cask 1"
"Oh! d) come and eat," cried the old woman in a fright; "come
and eat, and leave your search till the morning: the finger will not
ru'l awav."
151 00160.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
The old woman is right," said the robbers, and, desisting from their
search, they sat down to their meal; and the old woman mixed with
their drink a sleeping draught, so that presently they lay down to sleep
on the floor and snored away. As soon as the Bride heard them, she
came from behind the cask and stepped carefully over the sleepers, who
lay side by side, fearing to awake any of them. Heaven helped her in
her trouble, and she got over this difficulty well; and the old woman
started up too and opened the door, and then they made as much haste
as they could out of the murderers' den. The wind had blown away the
ashes, but the beans and peas the Bride had scattered in the morning
had sprouted up, and now showed the path in the moonlight. All night
long they walked on, and by sunrise they came to the mill, and the poor
girl narrated her adventures to her father the Miller.
Now, when the day came that the wedding was to be celebrated, the
Bridegroom appeared, and the Miller gathered together all his relations
and friends. While they sat at table each kept telling some tale, but
the Bride sat silent, listening. Presently the Bridegroom said, Can
you not tell us something, my heart; do not you know of anything to
tell ?"
Yes," she replied, "I will tell you a dream of mine. I thought I
went through a wood, and by-and-bye I arrived at a house wherein there
was not a human being, but on the wall there hung a bird in a cage,
which sang-
SReturn, fair maid, return to your home;
'Tis to a murderer's den you've come.'
And it sang this twice.-My treasure, thus dreamed I.-Then I wont
through all the rooms, and every one was empty and desolate, and at last
I stepped down into the cellar, and there sat a very old woman, shaking
her head from side to side. I asked her, 'Does my Bridegroom dwell in
this house 1' and she replied, Ah, dear child, you have fallen into a
murderer's den; thy lover does dwell here, but he will kill you.'--My
treasure, thus dreamed I.-Then I thought that the old woman hid me
behind a great cask, and scarcely had she done so when the robbers came
home, dragging a maiden with them, to whom they gave three glasses of
wine, one red, one white, and one yellow; and at the third her heart
snapped.-My treasure, thus dreamed I.-Then one of the robbers saw a
gold ring on her finger, and because he could not draw it off he took up a
hatchet and hewed at it, and the finger flew up, and fell behind the cask
into my lap. And there is the finger with the ring !"
With these words she threw it down before him, and showed it to all
present.
The Robber, who during her narration had become pale as death, now
sprang up, and would have escaped; but the guests held him, and
delivered him up to the judges.
And soon afterwards he and his whole band were condemue I to deatl
for their wicked deeds.
152 00161.jpg
K'-A
THE OLD WITCH.
THERE was once a little girl who was very obstinate and wilful, an I who
never obeyed when her elders spoke to her; and so how could she be
happy ? One day she said to her parents, I have heard so much of the
old Witch, that I will go and see her. People say she is a wonderful
old woman, and has many marvellous things in her house; and I am very
curious to see them."
Her parents, however, forbade her going, saying, "The Witch is a
wicked old woman, who performs many godless deeds; and if you go
near her, you are no longer a child of ours."
The girl, however, would not turn back at her parents' command, but
went to the Witch's house. When she arrived there the woman asked
her, Why are you so pale "
Ah," replied she, trembling all over, "I have frightened myself
so with what I have just seen."
And what did you see?" inquired the old Witch.
I saw a black man on your steps."
That was a collier," replied she.
Then I saw a grey man."
That was a sportsman," said the old woman.
After him I saw a blood-red man."
That was a butcher," replied the woman.
But oh, I was most terrified," continued the girl, when I peeped
through your window, and saw not you, but a creature with a fiery head."
Then you have seen the Witch in her proper dress," said the old
woman; for you I have long waited, and now you shall give me light.'
So saying, she changed the girl into a block of wood, and then threw it
into the fire; and when it was fully alight she sat down on the hearth,
warmed herself, and said, Ah, now for once it burns brightly I"
153 00162.jpg
HERR KORBES.
THERE once lived a Cock and a Hen, who agreed to set out on their
travels together. The Cock, therefore, bought a smart carriage, which
had four red wheels, and to which he harnessed four little Mice ; and
then the Hen got inside along with him, and they set off together. They
had not gone far, when they met a Cat, who asked them where they were
going. The Cock answered, "To Herr Korbes." Will you take me
with you ?" said the Cat. Oh, yes, willingly ; but get up behind, for
you might fall out in front, and take care that you do not dirty my red
wheels," replied the Cock; and then he cried, "Now, turn away, little
Wheels, and hurry on, little Mice, or we shall be too late to find Herr
Korbes at home."
On the road there afterwards came a Grindstone, a Pin, an Egg, a
Duck, and, last of all, a Needle, and every one mounted into the carriage
and went on with it. When they arrived at the house, Herr Korbes
was not at home, so the mice drew the carriage into the barn, the Cock
and Hen flew on to a perch, the Cat seated herself on the hearth, the
Duck perched on a wator-butt, the Egg wrapped itself up in the towel,
the Pin hid itself in the cushion of a chair, the Needle jumped on to the
bed and buried itself in the pilow, and the Grindstone placed itself just
over th,. door. Soon afterwards Herr Korbes returned, and going to
the hearth poked the lire; then the Cat threw the ashes in his face.
He ran into the kitchen to wash himself, and the Duck spirted the
water in his eyes; so he took up ihe towel to wipe them, and the Egg
broke and ran about over his chin. All these mishaps made him feel
tired, and he dropped into a chair to rest himself; but the Pin was there
before him, and made him jump up in a rage and throw himself on the
bed; where the Needle in the pillow pricked him so that he shouted
with pain, and ran in terrible wrath out of the room. Just as he got to
the door, the Stone fell down on his head, and knocked him down on the
spot.
Sc we conclude that this I[err Korbes must have been a very bad man.
154 00163.jpg
IN-
THE FEATHER BIRD.
ON upon a time there lived a Sorcerer, who used to take the form of
a beggar, and go begging before the houses, and stealing little girls, and
nobody knew where he took them. One day he appeared before the
house of a man who had three pretty daughters, disguised as a poor,
weak, old cripple, carrying a sack on his back to put all his alms in.
He begged for something to eat, and when the eldest girl came out and
offered him a piece of bread, he only touched her and she was compelled
to jump into his sack. Then he hurried away with great strides, and
carried her through a dark forest to his house, in which everything was
very splendid. There he gave her what she wished, and told her, "All
will be well with you, for you will have all your heart can desire."
This lasted two days, and he then said, "I must be off and leave you
for a short time alone : these are the house-keeping keys, you can look
over everything; but into one room which this little key unlocks, I forbid
you to enter on pain of death." He gave her also an egg, saying,
" Preserve this carefully for me, and always carry it about with you; for
if it be lost, a great misfortune will happen."
She took the key and the egg and promised all he required; but as
soon as he was gone her curiosity overmastered her, and after she had
looked over the whole house, from attic to cellar, she unlocked the for-
bidden door and went in. She was terribly frightened when she entered
the room, for in the middle there stood a large basin, wherein was some
blood. In her terror the egg fell from her hand, and rolled into the
basin; and although she fished it out again directly, and wiped it, it was
of no use, for, scrub and wash all she might, the blood appeared as fresh
as ever. The next day the Sorcerer came home, and demanded the key
and the egg. She handed them to him with trembling; and he instantly
perceived that she had been into the forbidden chamber. Have you
then dared to enter that room against my will ?" said he; "then now
`------_ ~---
~LZ-~~ _
155 00164.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
you enter it again against yours. Your life is forfeited." So saying he
drew her in by the hair and locked her up.
Now I will fetch the second one," said the Sorcerer to himself:
and, assuming the disguise of a beggar, he went and begged before the
house. Then the second girl brought him a piece of bread, and he seized
her, as the first, and bore her away. It happened to her as it had to her
eldest sister, curiosity led her astray, and on the Sorcerer's return she
was locked up for having opened the forbidden door.
He went now and fetched the third sister; but she was prudent and
cunning. As soon as he had given her his directions and had ridden
away, she first carefully laid by the egg, and then went and opened the
forbidden chamber. Ah, what a scene She saw her two dear sisters
lying there half starved. She raised them, however, and gave them food,
and soon they got well and were very happy, and kissed and embraced
one another.
On his return the Sorcerer demanded the key and the egg; and when
he could find no spot of blood on them, he said to the maiden, "You have
withstood temptation ; you shall be my bride, and whatever you desire,
that will I do."
Very well," she replied; then first you must take my father and
mother a sackful of gold, and you must carry it yourself on your back;
in the meantime I will arrange the wedding." Then she ran to her
sisters, whom she had concealed in a chamber, and said, "The moment
has arrived when I can save you ; the Sorcerer himself shall carry you
away; and as soon as you arrive at our home, send me help." Then
she placed them both in a sack, and covered them over with gold, so
that nothing of them could be meen; and then, calling the Sorcerer in,
she said, Now, carry away the sack ; but I shall peep through my
window, and keep a sharp look-out that you do not rest at all on your
journey."
The Sorcerer raised the sack on his shoulder, and went away with it;
but it weighed so heavily that the perspiration ran down his face.
Presently he wished to rest a minute, but a voice called to him out of
the sack, I am looking through my window, and see that you are
stopping: will you go on 7" He thought it was his Bride calling to him,
so he instantly got up again. A little further he would have rested
again ; but the same voice called, I am looking through my window,
and see that you are stopping ; will you go on again 1" And as often as
he stopped he heard the same words; and so he was obliged to keep on,
until he at last arrived, exhausted and out of breath, with the sack of
gold at the house of the father and mother.
Meanwhile, at home the Bride prepared the wedding-feast, and
invited the friends of the Sorcerer to come. Then she took a turnip
and cut out places for the eyes and teeth, and put a head-dress on it
and a crown of flowers, and set it at the topmost window, and left it
there peeping down. As soon as all was ready she dipped herself in a
cask full of honey, and then ripping up the bed, she rolled herself among
the feathers until she looked like a marvellous bird, whom nc one could
156 00165.jpg
THE GODFATHER. 14]
possibly recognize. Aftei this she went out of the house ; and on the way
some of the wedding-guests met her, and asked her whence she came;
and she replied, I come from the house of the Feather King."
How does the young Bride 9" asked they.
She has taken herself to the top of the house, and is peeping out
of the window."
Soon after the Bridegroom met her as he was slowly travelling back,
and asked exactly the same questions as the others, and received the
same answers. Then the Bridegroom looked up and saw the decorate(t
turnip, and he thought it was his Bride, and nodded to it and kissed h.-
hand lovingly. But just as he was gone into the house with his guests,
the brothers and relations of the Bride, who had been sent to her rescue,
arrived. They immediately closed up all the doors of the house, so that
no one could escape, and then set fire to it; and the Sorcerer and all his
accomplices were burnt to ashes.
\ N
THE GODFATHER.
& CERTAIN poor man had so many children that he had already asked
all the world and his wife to stand godfathers and godmothers to them;
and when yet another child was born, he knew not where to find any one
to ask. In great perplexity he went to sleep, and dreamed that he should
go out of his door and ask the first person he met to be godfather.
As soon as he awoke the next morning he resolved to follow out his
dream; so he went out and asked the first person he met. This was a
man who gave him a little glass of water, saying, This is a miraculous
water, with which you can restore the sick to health; only you must
observe where the disease lies. If it is near the head, give the patient
157 00166.jpg
GRIMMil 'S HOUSEHOLD ST0RIfS.
some of the water, and he will become well again; but if it is near the
feet, all your labour will be in vain, the sick person must die."
The man "as now able to say at any time whether such an one would
recover, and through this ability he became famous and earned much
money. Once he was summoned to the child of the King, and as soon
as he entered he saw the disease was situated near the head, and so he
healed it with the water. This happened a second time also, but at the
third time the malady affected the feet, and he knew at once the child
would die.
Not long after this event the man determined to visit the Godfather,
and tell him all his adventures with the water. But when he came to
the house, behold most wonderful doings were going on within I On the
first stair were a Dustpan and a Broom quarrelling and beating one
another, and he asked them where the master lived. The Broom replied,
"A stair higher." On the second stair he saw a number of Fingers
lying, and he asked them where the master lived. One of the Fingers
replied "A stair higher." On the third stair lay a heap of Bowls, who
showed him up a stair higher yet; and on this fourth stair he found some
Fish frying themselves in a pan over the fire, who told him to go a stair
higher yet. When he had mounted this fifth stair, he came to a room
and peeped through the keyhole of the door, and saw the Godfather
there with a pair of long horns on. As soon as the poor man opened
the door and went in, the Godfather got very quickly into a bed and
covered himself up. Then the man said, "Ah, Mr. Godfather, what
wonderful doings are these I see in your house 7 When I mounted the
first stair there were a Broom and a Dustpan quarrelling and beating one
another."
How very simple you are !" replied the Godfather; they were my
boy and maid talking to one another."
But on the second stair I saw some Fingers lying."
Why, how absurd you are !" said the other those were roots of
plants."
But on the third stair I found a heap of Bowls," said the man.
Why, you silly fellow," replied the Godfather; "those were cab-
bages."
But on the fourth stair I saw Fish frying themselves in a pan ;"
and as the man spoke the Fish came and served up themselves on a dish.
And when I mounted the fifth stair, I peeped through the keyhole
of a door, and there I saw you, 0 Godfather, and you wore two very long
horns."
"Holloa that is not true !" exclaimed the Godfather ; which so
frightened the man that he ran straight off, or nobody knows what the
Godfather would have done to him I
158 00167.jpg
THE SIX SWANS.
A KING was once hunting in a large wood, and pursued his game so
hotly, that none of his courtiers could follow him. But when evening
approached he stopped, and looking around him perceived that he had
lost himself. He sought a path out of the forest, but could not find one,
and presently he saw an old woman with a nodding head, who came up
to him. My good woman," said he to her, can you not show me the
way out of the forest 1 "Oh, yes, my lord King," she replied; "I can
do that very well, but upon one condition, which, if you do not fulfil,
you will never again get out of the wood, but will die of hunger."
"What, then, is this condition t asked the King.
"I have a daughter," said the old woman, "who is as beautiful as
any one you can find in the whole world, and well deserves to be your
bride. Now, if you will make her your Queen, I will show you your
way out of the wood." In the anxiety of his heart, the King consented.
and the old woman led him to her cottage, where the daughter was
sitting by the fire. She received the King as if she had expected him,
and he saw at once that she was very beautiful, but yet she did not
quite please him, for he could not look at her without a secret shuddering.
However, after all he took the maiden up on his horse, and the old
woman showed him the way, and the King arrived safely at his palace,
where the wedding was to be celebrated.
The King had been married once before, and had seven children by
his first wife, six boys and a girl, whom he loved above everything else
in the world. He became afraid, soon, that the stepmother might not
treat them very well, and might even do them some great injury, so he
took them away to a lonely castle which stood in the midst of a forest.
This castle was so hidden, a-.d the way to it so difficult to discover, that
he himself could not have found it if a wise woman had not given him
159 00168.jpg
GRIMM'S. HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
a ball of cotton which had the wonderful property, when he threw it
before him, of unrolling itself and showing him the right path. The
King went, however, so often to see his dear children, that the Quesn
noticed his absence, became inquisitive, and wished to know what he
went to fetch out of the forest. So she gave his servants a great
quantity of money, and they disclosed to her the secret, and also told her
of the ball of cotton which alone could show her the way. She had now
no peace until she discovered where this ball was concealed, and then
she made some fine silken shirts, and, as she had learnt of her mother,
she sewed within each one a charm. One day soon after, when the King
was gone out hunting, she took the little shirts and went into the forest,
and the cotton showed her the path. The children, seeing some one
coming in the distance, thought it was their dear father, and ran out
towards her full of joy. Then she threw over each of them a shirt,
which, as it touched their bodies, changed them into Swans, which flew
away over the forest. The Queen then went home quite contented, and
thought she was free of her stepchildren ; but the little girl had not met
her with the brothers, and the Queen did not know of her.
The following day the King went to visit his children, but he found
only the maiden. Where are your brothers ?" asked he. "Ah, dear
father," she replied, "they are gone away and have left me alone ;" and
she told him how she had looked out of the window and seen them
changed into Swans, which had flown over the forest; and then she
showed him the feathers which they had dropped in the courtyard,
and which she had collected together. The King was much grieved,
but he did not think that his wife could have done this wicked deed,
and, as he feared the girl might also be stolen away, he took her with
him. She was, however, so much afraid of the stepmother, that she
begged him not to stop more than one night in the castle.
The poor Maiden thought to herself, This is no longer my place, I
will go and seek my brothers ;" and when night came she escaped and
went quite deep into the wood. She walked all night long and great part
of the next day, until she could go no further from weariness. Just then
she saw a rude hut, and walking in she found a room with six little beds,
but she dared not get into one, but crept under, and, laying herself upon
the hard earth, prepared to pass the night there. Just as the sun was
setting, she heard a rustling, and saw six white Swans come flying in at
the window. They settled on the ground and began blowing one another
until they had blown all their feathers off, and their swan's down stripped
off like a shirt. Then the maiden knew them at once for her brothers,
and gladly crept out from under the bed, and the brothers were not less
glad to see their sister, but their joy was of short duration. Here you
must not stay," said they to her; "this is a robbers' hiding-place ; if
they should return and find you here, they will murder you." "Can you
not protect me, then 7" inquired the sister.
No," they replied; for we can only lay aside our swan's feathers for
a quarter of an hour each evening, and for that time we regain our human
form, but afterwards we resume our changed appearance,"
160 00169.jpg
THE SIX SWANS. 145
Their sister then asked them with tears, Can you not be restored
again i"
"Oh, no," replied they; "the conditions are too difficult. For sir
long years you must neither speak nor laugh, and during that time you
must sew together for us six little shirts of star-flowers, and should there
fall a single word f-om your lips, then all your labour will be vain." Just
as the brother finished speaking, the quarter of an hour elapsed, and they
all flew out of the window again like Swans.
The little sister, however, made a solemn resolution to rescue her
brothers, or die in the attempt; and she left the cottage, and, penetrating
deep into the forest, passed the night amid the branches of a tree. The
next morning she went out and collected the star-flowers to sew together.
She had no one to converse with, and for laughing she had no spirits, so
there up in the tree she sat, intent upon her work. After she had passed
some time there, it happened that the King of that country was hunting
in the forest, and his huntsmen came beneath the tree on which the
Maiden sat. They called to her and asked, "Who art thou ?" But she
gave no answer. "Come down to us," continued they; "we will do thee
no harm." She simply shook her head, and, when they pressed her
further with questions, she threw down to them her gold necklace,
hoping therewith to satisfy them. They did not, however, leave her,
and she threw down her girdle, but in vain; and even her rich dress did
not make them desist. At last the hunter himself climbed the tree and
brought down the maiden, and took her before the King. The King
asked her, "Who art thou? What dost thou upon that tree ?" But
she did not answer; and then he asked her in all the languages that he
knew, but she remained dumb to all. as a fish. Since, however, she was
so beautiful, the King's heart was touched, and he conceived for her a
strong affection. Then he put around her his cloak, and, placing her
before him on his horse, took her to his castle. There he ordered rich
clothing to be made for her, and, although her beauty shone as the sun-
beams, not a word escaped her. The King placed her by his side at
table, and there her dignified mien and manners so won upon him, that
he said, "This Maiden will I marry, and no other in the world;" and
after some days he was united to her.
Now, the King had a wicked stepmother who was discontented with
his marriage, and spoke evil of the young Queen. Who knows when(
the wench comes ?" said she. She who cannot speak is not worthy or
a King." A year after, when the Queen brought her first-born into the
world, the old woman took him away. Then she went to the King and
complained that the Queen was a murderess. The King, however, would
not believe it, and suffered no one to do any injury to his wife, who sat
composedly sewing at her shirts and paying attention to nothing else.
When a second child was born, the false stepmother used the same
deceit, but the King again would not listen to her words, but said, She
is too pious and good tc act so : could she hut speak and defend herself,
her innocence would come to light." But when again, the third time,
the old woman stole away the child, and then accused the Queen, who
161 00170.jpg
146 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
answered not a word to the accusation, the King was obliged to give her
up to be tried, and she was condemned to suffer death by fire.
When the time had elapsed, and the sentence was to be carried out,
it happened that the very day had come round when her dear brothers
should be made free; the six shirts were also ready, all but the last,
which yet wanted the left sleeve. As she was led to the scaffold, she
placed the shirts upon her arm, and just as she had mounted it, and the
fire was about to be kindled, she looked round, and saw six Swans come
flying through the air. Her heart leapt for joy as she perceived her
deliverers approaching, and soon the Swans, flying towards her, alighted
do near that she was enabled to throw over them the shirts, and as soon
as she had so done their feathers fell off and the brothers stood up alive
and well; but the youngest wanted his left arm, instead of which he had
a swan's wing. They embraced and kissed each other, and the Queen,
going to the King, who was thunderstruck, began to say, Now may I
speak, my dear husband, and prove to you that I am innocent and falsely
accused;" and then she told him how the wicked woman had stolen away
and hidden her three children. When she had concluded, the King was
overcome with joy, and the wicked stepmother was led to the scaffold and
bound to the stake and burnt to ashes.
The King and the Queen for ever after lived in peace and prosperity
with their six brothers.
OLD SULTAN.
A UERTAIN Peasant had a trusty dog called Sultan, who had grown quite
old in his service, and had lost all his teeth, so that he could not hold
anything fast. One day the Peasant stood with his wife at the house,
door, and said, "This morning I shall shoot old Sultan, for he is nq
162 00171.jpg
OLD SULTAN. Lt
longer of any use." His Wife, however, compassionating the poor animal,
replied, "Well, since he has served us so long and so faithfully, I think
we may very well afford him food for the rest of his life." Eh, what ?"
replied her husband; "you are not very clever ; he has not a tooth in
his head, and never a thief is afraid of him, so he must trot off. If he
has served us, he has also received every day his dinner."
The poor Dog, lying stretched out in the sun not far from his master,
heard all he said, and was much troubled at learning that the morrow
would be his last day. He had one good friend, the Wolf in the forest,
to whom he slipt at evening, and complained of the sad fate which
awaited him. Be of good courage, my father," said the Wolf; "I will
help you out of your trouble. I have just thought of something. Early
to-morrow morning your master goes haymaking with his wife, and they
will take with them their child, because no one will be left in the house.
And while they are at work they will put him behind the hedge in the
shade, and set you by to watch him. I will then spring out of the wood
and steal away the child, and you must run after me hotly as if you were
pursuing me. I will let it fall, and you shall take it back to its parents,
who will then believe you have saved it, and they will be too thankful to
do you any injury; and so you will come into great favour, and they will
never let you want again."
This plan pleased the Dog, and it was carried out exactly as proposed.
The father cried when he saw the Wolf running off with the child, but
as old Sultan brought it back he was highly pleased, and stroked him,
and said, "Not a hair of your head shall be touched; you shall eat your
meals in comfort to the end of your days." He then told his wife to go
home and cook old Sultan some bread and broth, which would not need
biting, and also to bring the pillow out of his bed, that he might give it
to him for a resting-place. Henceforth old Sultan had as much as he
could wish for himself; and soon afterwards the Wolf visited him and
congratulated him on his prosperous circumstances. "But, my father,"
said he slily, "you will close your eyes if I by accident steal away a fat
sheep from your master." "Reckon not on that," replied the Dog; "my
master believes me faithful; I dare not give you what you ask." The
Wolf, however, thought he was not in earnest, and by night came slinking
into the yard to fetch away the sheep. But the Peasant, to whom the
Dog had communicated the design of the Wolf, caught him and gave
him a sound thrashing with the flail. The Wolf was obliged to scamper
off, but he cried out to the Dog, Wait a bit, you rascal, you shall pay
for this !"
The next morning the Wolf sent the Boar to challenge the Dog, that
they might settle their affair in the forest. Old Sultan, however, could
find no other second than a Cat, who had only three legs, and, as they
went out together, the poor Cat limped along, holding her tail high in
the air from pain. The Wolf and his second were already on the spot
selected, but as they saw their opponent coming they thought he was
bringing a great sabre with him, because they saw in front the erect tail
af the Cat; and, whenever the poor animal hopped on its three legs,
163 00172.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
they thought nothing else than he was going to take up a great stone to
throw at them. Both of them, thereupon, became very nervous, and the
Boar crept into a heap of dead leaves, and the Wolf climbed up a tree.
As soon as the Dog and Cat arrived on the spot they wondered what had
become of their adversary. The wild Boar, however, had not quite con-
cealed himself, for his ears were sticking out; and, while the Cat was
considering them attentively, the Boar twitched one of his ears, and the
Cat took it for a mouse, and, making a spring, gave it a good bite. At
this the Boar shook himself with a great cry, and ran away, calling out,
"There sits the guilty one, up in the tree!" The Dog and the Cat
looked up and saw the Wolf, who was ashamed at himself for being so
fearful, and, begging the Dog's pardon, entered into treaty with h~m.
THE ALMOND-TREE.
LONG, long ago, perhaps two thousand years, there was a rich man who
had a beautiful and pious wife; and they were very fond of one another,
out had no children. Still they wished for some very mucn, and the
wife prayed for them day and night; still they had none.
Before their house was a yard; in it stood an almond-tree, undeI
which the woman stood once in the winter peeling an apple; and as she
peeled the apple she cut her finger, and the blood dropped on to the
snow. "Ah," said the woman, with a deep sigh, and she looked at the
blood before her, and was very sad; "had I but a child as red as blood
and as white as snow!" and as she said that, her heart grew light; and
it seemed to her as if something would come of her wish. Then she
went into the house; and a month passed, the snow disappeared; and
164 00173.jpg
- I
,I 1
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HIi n --
'ii
I;,, \\
THE ALMOND TREE.
Pdge 1S
~i~ta~
A, K
165 00175.jpg
THE ALMOND TREE. 149
two months, then all was green; and three months, then came the
flowers out of the ground; and four months, then all the trees in the
wood squeezed up against one another, and the green boughs all grew
twisted together, and the little birds sang, so that the whole wood
resounded, and the blossoms fell from the trees. When the fifth month
had gone, and she stood under the almond-tree, it smelt so sweet, that
her heart leaped for joy, and she could not help falling down on her
knees; and when the sixth month had passed, the fruits were large, and
she felt very happy; at the end of the seventh month, she snatched the
almonds and ate them so greedily, that she was dreadfully ill; then the
eighth month passed away, and she called her husband and cried, and
said, If I die, bury me under the almond-tree;" then she was quite
easy, and was glad, till the next month was gone ; then she had a child
as white as snow, and as red as blood; and when she saw it, she was so
delighted that she died.
Then her husband buried her under the almond-tree and began to
grieve most violently: a little time and he was easier; and when he had
sorrowed a little longer he left off; and a little time longer and he took
another wife.
With the second wife he had a daughter; but the child by the first
wife was a little son, and was as red as blood, and as white as snow.
When the woman looked at her daughter, she loved her so much; but
then she looked at the little boy, and it seemed to go right through her
heart; and it seemed as if he always stood in her way, and then she was
always thinking how she could get all the fortune for her daughter; and
it was the Evil One who suggested it to her, so that she couldn't bear
the sight of the little boy, and poked him about from one corner to
another, and buffeted him here, and cuffed him there, so that the poor
child was always in fear; and when he came from school he had no
peace.
Once the woman had gone into the store-room, and the little daughter
came up and said, Mother, give me an apple." Ves, my child," said
the woman, and gave her a beautiful apple out of tL box : the box had
a great heavy lid, with a great, sharp iron lock. Mother," said the
little daughter, shall not brother have one too That annoyed the
woman; but she said, "Yes, when he comes from school." And as she
saw out of the window that he was coming, it was just as if the Evil
One came over her, and she snatched the apple away from her daughter
again, and' said, "You shall not have one before your brother She
threw the apple into the box and shut it. Then the little boy came in
at the door; and the Evil One made her say, in a friendly manner,
"My son, will you have an apple ?" and she looked at him wickedly.
"Mother," said the little boy, "how horribly you look! yes, give me
an apple." Then she thought she must pacify him. "Come with me,"
she said, and opened the lid; "reach out an apple;" and as the little
boy bent into the box, the Evil One whispered to her-bang she
slammed the lid to, so that his head flew off and fell amongst the red
apples Then in the fright she thought, "Could I get that off my
166 00176.jpg
RIIMM' S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
mind !" Then she went up into her room to the chest of drawers, and
got out a white cloth from the top drawer, and she set the head on the
throat again and tied the handkerchief round, so that nothing could be
seen; and placed him outside the door on a chair, and gave him the
apple in his hand. After a while little Marline came in the kitchen to
her mother, who stood by the fire and had a kettle with hot water before
her, which she kept stirring round. "Mother," said little Marline,
" brother is sitting outside the door, and looks quite white, and has got
an apple in his hand. I asked him to give me the apple, but he didn't
answer me; then I was quite frightened." "Go again," said the
Mother, "and if he will not answer you, give him a box on the ear."
Then Marline went to her brother, and said, Give me the apple ;" but
he was silent. Then she gave him a box on the ear, and the head
tumbled off, at which she was frightened, and began to cry and sob.
Then she ran to her mother, and said, Oh, mother, I have knocked
my brother's head off!" and she cried and cried, and would not be
pacified. Marline," said the Mother, "what have you done ? But be
quiet, so that nobody may notice it; it can't be helped now ; we'll bury
him under the almond-tree."
Then the mother took the little boy and put him into a box, and put
it under the almond-tree; but little Marline stood by, and cried and
cried, and the tears all fell into the box.
Soon the father came home and sat down to table, and said, Where
is my son ?" Then the mother brought in a great big dish of stew; and
little Marline cried, and could not leave off. Then said the father
again, "Where is my son Oh," said the mother, "he has gone
across the country to Miitten; he is going to stop there a bit !"
"What is he doing there ? and why did he not say good-bye to me I"
" Oh, he wanted to go, and asked me if he might stop there six weeks,
he will be taken care of there !" Ah," said the man, I feel very
sorry; that was not right; he ought to have wished me good-bye."
With that he began to eat, and said to Marline, What are you crying
for ? your brother will soon come back." Oh, wife," said he then, "how
delicious this tastes; give me some more And he ate till all the
broth was done.
Little Marline went to her box and took from the bottom drawer her
best silk handkerchief, and carried it outside the door, and cried bitter
tears. Then she laid herself under the almond-tree on the green grass;
and when she had laid herself there, all at once she felt quite light and
happy, and cried no more. Then the almond-tree began to move, and
the boughs spread out quite wide, and then went back again ; just as
when one is very much pleased and claps with the hands. At the same
time a sort of mist rose from the tree; in the middle of the mist it
burned like a fire; and out of the fire there flew a beautiful bird that
sang very sweetly, and flew high up in the air: and when it had flown
away, the almond-tree was as it had been before. The little Marline was
as light and happy as if her brother were alive still and went into the
house to dinner
167 00177.jpg
THE ALMOND TREE.
The bird flew away and perched upon a Goldsmith's hose, and
began to sing,-
My mother killed me;
My father grieved for me;
My sister, little Marline,
Wept under the almond-tree:
Kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I I"
Th. Goldsmith sat in his workshop and was making a gold chain
when he heard the bird that sat upon his roof and sang, and it seemed to
him so beautiful. Then he got up, and as he stepped over the sill of the
door he lost one of his slippers; but he went straight up the middle of
the street with one slipper and one sock on. He had his leather apron
on, and in the one hand he had the gold chain, and in the other the
pincers, and the sun shone brightly up the street. He went and stood
and looked at the bird. "Bird," said he then, "how beautifully you can
sing Sing me that song again." "Nay," said the Bird, I don't sing
twice for nothing. Give me the gold chain and I will sing it you again."
"There," said the Goldsmith, "take the gold chain; now sing me that
again." Then the bird came and took the gold chain in the right claw,
and sat before the Goldsmith, and sang,-
My mother killed me;
My father grieved for me;
My sister, little Marline,
Wept under the almond-tree:
Kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I!"
Then the bird flew off to a Shoemaker, and perched upon the roof or
his house, and sang,-
"My mother killed me;
My father grieved for me;
My sister, little Marline,
Wept under the almond-tree:
Kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I!'
The Shoemaker heard it, and ran outside the door in his shirt
sleeves and looked up at the roof, and was obliged to hold his hana
before his eyes to prevent the sun from blinding him. "Bird," said &e,
how beautifully you can sing !" Then he called in at the door, "Wife,
come out, here's a bird; look at the bird; he just can sing beautifully."
Then he called his daughter, and children, and apprentices, servant-boy,
and maid; and they all came up the street and looked at the bird : oh,
how beautiful he was, and he had such red and green feathers, and round
about the throat was all like gold, and the eyes sparkled in his head like
stars Bird," said the Shoemaker, "now sing me that piece again."
"Nay," said the Bird, I don't sing twice for nothing ; you must make
me a present of something." "Wife," said the man, "go into the shop;
on the top shelf there stands a pair of red shoes, fetch them down." The
wife went and fetched the shoes. "There, Bird," said the man; "now
168 00178.jpg
152 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
sing me that song again." Then the bird came and took the shoes in
the left claw, and flew up on to the roof again, and sang,-
My mother killed me;
My father grieved for me;
My sister, little Marline,
Wept under the almond-tree:
Kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I!"
And when he had done singing he flew away. The chain lie had in
the right claw, and the shoes in the left claw; and he flew far away to a
mill; and the mill went clipp-clapp, clipp-clrp, clipp-clapp. And in
the mill there sat twenty miller's men; they were shaping a stone, and
chipped away, hick-hack, hick-hack, hick-hack; and the mill went clipp-
clapp, clipp-clapp, clipp-olapp. Then the bird flew and sat on a lime-
tree that stood before the mill, and sang,-
My mother killed me;"
then one left off;
My father grieved for me;"
then two more left off and heard it;
My sister,"
then again four left off;
little Marline,"
now there were only eight chipping away;
"Wept under"
now only five;
"the almond-tree .'
now only one :
Kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I!"
Then the last left off, when he heard the last word. Bird," said he,
"how beautifully you sing let me, too, hear that; sing me that again."
"Nay," said the Bird, "I don't sing twice for nothing. Give me the
millstone and I will sing it again." "Ay," said he, if it belonged to me
alone, you should have it." "Yes," said the others, if he sings again
he shall have it." Then the bird came down, and all the twenty millers
caught hold of a pole, and raised the stone up, hu, uh, upp hu, uh, upp !
And the bird stuck his head through the hole, and took it round his neck
like a collar, and flew back to the tree, and sang,-
"My mother killed me;
My father grieved for me;
My sister, little Marline,
Wept under the almond-tree:
Kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I I"
And when he had done singing he spread his wings, and had in his
right claw the gold chain, in his left the shoes, and round his neck the
millstone, and he flew far away to his father's house.
169 00179.jpg
THE ALMOND TREE. 153
In the room sat the father, the mother, and little Marline, at dinner;
and the father said, "Oh, dear, how light and happy I feel !" "Nay,"
said the mother, I am all of a tremble, just as if there were going to bo
a heavy thunderstorm." But little Marline sat and cried and cried, and
the bird came flying, and as he perched on the roof the father said, I
feel so cheerful, and the sun shines so deliciously outside, it's exactly as if
I were going to see some old acquaintance again." "Nay," said the wife,
"I am so frightened, my teeth chatter, and it's like fire in my veins;"
and she tore open her stays; but little Marline sat in a corner and cried,
and held her plate before her eyes and cried it quite wet. Then the bird
perched on the almond-tree, and sang,-
''My mother killed me;"
Then the mother held her ears and shut her eyes, and would neither see
nor hear ; but it rumbled in her ears like the most terrible storm, and
her eyes burned and twittered like lightning.
My father grieved for me;"
"Oh, mother," said the man, "there is a beautiful bird that sings so
splendidly; the sun shines so warm, and everything smells all like
cinnamon !"
My sister, little Marline,"
Then Marline laid her head on her knees and cried away; but the man
said, I shall go out, I must see the bird close." "Oh, do not go," said
the woman; "it seems as if the whole house shook and were on fire 1"
But the man went out and looked at the bird.
"Wept under the almond-tree:
Kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I!"
And the bird let the gold chain fall, and it fell just round the man's neck,
and fitted beautifully. Then he went in and said, See what an excellent
bird it is; it has given me such a beautiful gold chain, and it looks so
splendid." But the woman was so frightened that she fell her whole
length on the floor, and her cap tumbled off her head. Then the bird
sang again,-
"My mother killed me;"
"Oh, that I were a thousand fathoms under the earth, not to hear that I
"My father grieved for me;"
Then the woman fainted.
"My sister, little Marline,"
"Ah," said Marline, "I will go out too, and see if the bird will give me
something 1" and she went out. Then the bird threw the shoes down.
Wept under the almond-tree:
Kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I I"
170 00180.jpg
154 GrIIMM's HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Then, she was so happy and lively, she put the new red shoes m, and
danced and jumped back again. "Oh," said she, "I was so dull when I
went out, and now I am so happy. That is a splendid bird : he has given
me a pair of red shoes."
"Well," said the woman, and jumped up, and her hair stood on end
like flames of fire, "I feel as if the world were coming to an end; I will
go out too, and see if it will make me easier." And as she stepped outside
the door-bang the bird threw the millstone on to her head, so that she
was completely overwhelmed. The father and little Marline heard it and
went out. Then a smoke, and flames, and fire rose from the place, and
when that had passed there stood the little brother; and he took his
father and little Marline by the hand, and all three embraced one another
heartily, and went into the house to dinner.
BRIAR ROSE.
IN olden times there lived a King and Queen, who lamented day by day
that they had no children, and yet never a one was born. One day, as
the Queen was bathing and thinking of her wishes, a Frog skipped out of
the water, and said to her, "Your wish shall be fulfilled,-before a year
passes you shall have a daughter."
As the Frog had said, so it happened, and a little girl was born who
was so beautiful that the King almost lost his senses, but he ordered a
great feast to be held, and invited to it not only his relatives, friends, and
acquaintances, but also all the wise women who are kind and affectionate
to children. There happened to be thirteen in his dominions, but, since
he had only twelve golden plates out of which they could eat, one had to
171 00181.jpg
BRIAR ROSE.
stop at home. The fAte was celebrated with all the magnificence possible,
and, as soon as it was over, the wise women presented the infant with
their wonderful gifts: one with virtue, another with beauty, a third with
riches, and so on, so that the child had everything that is to be desired in
the world. Just as eleven had given their presents, the thirteenth old
lady stepped in suddenly. She was in a tremendous passion because she
had not been invited, and, without greeting or looking at any one, she
exclaimed loudly, "The Princess shall prick herself with a spindle on her
fifteenth birthday and die!" and without a word further she turned her
back and left the hall. All were terrified, but the twelfth fairy, who had
not yet given her wish, then stepped up, but because she could not take
away the evil wish, but only soften it, she said, "She shall not die, but
shall fall into a sleep of a hundred years' duration."
Then the King, who naturally wished to protect his child from this mis-
fortune, issued a decree commanding that every spindle in the kingdom
should be burnt. Meanwhile all the gifts of the wise women were fulfilled,
and the maiden became so beautiful, gentle, virtuous, and clever, that
every one who saw her fell in love with her. It happened on the day
when she was just fifteen years old that the Queen and the King were not
at home, and so she was left alone in the castle. The maiden looked
about in every place, going through all the rooms and chambers just as
she pleased, until she came at last to an old tower. Up the narrow wind-
ing staircase she tripped until she arrived at a door, in the lock of which
was a rusty key. This she turned, and the door sprang open, and there
in the little room sat an old woman with a spindle spinning flax. Good
day, my good old lady," said the Princess, "what are you doing here "
"I am spinning," said the old woman, nodding her head.
"What thing is that which twists round so merrily 1" inquired the
maiden, and she took the spindle to try her hand at spinning. Scarcely
had she done so when the prophecy was fulfilled, for she pricked her
finger; and at the very same moment she fell back upon a bed which
stood near in a deep sleep. This sleep extended over the whole palace.
The King and Queen, who had just come in, fell asleep in the hall, and
all their courtiers with them-the horses in the stables, the doves upon
the eaves, the flies upon the walls, and even the fire upon the hearth, all
ceased to stir-the meat which was cooking ceased to frizzle, and the cook
at the instant of pulling the hair of the kitchen-boy lost his hold and
began to snore too. The wind also fell entirely, and not a leaf rustled on
the trees round the castle.
Now around the palace a thick hedge of briars began growing, which
every year grew higher and higher, till the castle was quite hid from view,
so that one could not even see the flag upon the tower. Then there went
a legend through the land of the beautiful maiden Briar Rose, for so was
the sleeping Princess named, and from time to time Princes came en-
deavouring to penetrate through the hedge into the castle; but it was
not possible, for the thorns held them, as if by hands, and the youths
were unable to release themselves, and so perished miserably.
After the lapse of many years, there came another H ing's son into the
172 00182.jpg
156 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
country, and heard an old man tell the legend of the hedge of briars;
how that behind it stood a castle where slept a wondrously beauteous
Princess called Briar Rose, who had slumbered nearly a hundred years,
and with her the Queen and King and all their court. The old man
further related what he had heard from his grandfather, that many Princes
had come and tried to penetrate the hedge, and had died a miserable
death. But the youth was not to be daunted, and however much the old
man tried to dissuade him, he would not listen, but cried out, 1 fear not,
I will see this hedge of briars!"
Just at that time came the last day of the hundred years when Briar
Rose was to awake again. As the young Prince approached the hedge, the
thorns turned to fine large flowers, which of their own accord made a way
for him to pass through, and again closed up behind him. In the court-
yard he saw the horses and dogs lying fast asleep, and on the eaves were
the doves with their heads beneath their wings. As soon as he went into
the house, there were the flies asleep upon the wall, the cook still stood
with his hand on the hair of the kitchen-boy, the maid at the board with
the unplucked fowl in her hand. He went on, and in the hall he found
the courtiers lying asleep, and above, by the throne, were the King and
Queen. He went on further, and all was so quiet that he could hear
himself breathe, and at last he came to the tower and opened the door of
the little room where slept Briar Rose. There she lay, looking so
beautiful that he could not turn away his eyes, and he bent over her and
kissed her. Just as he did so she opened her eyes, awoke, and greeted
him with smiles. Then they went down together, and immediately the
King and Queen awoke, and the whole court, and all stared at each other
wondrously. Now the horses in the stable got up and shook themselves,-
the dogs wagged their tails,-the doves upon the eaves drew their heads
from under their wings, looked around, and flew away,-the flies upon
the walls began to crawl, the fire to burn brightly and to cook the meat,-
the meat began again to frizzle,-the cook gave his lad a box upon the ear
which made him call out,-and the maid began to pluck the fowl furiously.
The whole palace was once more in motion as if nothing had occurred, for
the hundred years' sleep had made no change in any one.
By-and-by the wedding of the Prince with Briar Rose was celebrated
with great splendour, and to the end of their lives they lived happy and
Contented.
173 00183.jpg
KING THRUSH-BEARD.
A CERTAIN King had a daughter who was beautiful above all belief, bat
withal so proud and haughty, that no suitor was good enough for her,
and she not only turned back every one who came, but also made game
of them all. Once the King proclaimed a great festival, and invited
thereto from far and near all the marriageable young men. When they
arrived they were all set in a row, according to their rank and standing:
first the Kings, then the Princes, the Dukes, the Marquesses, the Earls,
and last of all the Barons. Then the King's daughter was led down the
rows, but she found something to make game of in all. One was too fat.
"The wine-tub!" said she. Another was too tall. "Long and lanky
has no grace," she remarked. A third was too short and fat. "Too stout
to have any wits," said she. A fourth was too pale. "Like Death him-
self," was her remark; and a fifth who had a great deal of colour she
called "a cockatoo." The sixth was not straight enough, and him she
called "a green log scorched in the oven !" And so she went on, nick-
naming every one of the suitors, but she made particularly merry with a
good young King whose chin had grown rather crooked. "Ha, ha!"
laughed she, "he has a chin like a thrush's beak;" and after that day he
went by the name of Thrush-beard.
The old King, however, when he saw that his daughter did nothing but
mock at and make sport of all the suitors who were collected, became
very angry, and swore that she should take the first decent beggar for a
husband who came to the gate.
A couple of days after this a player came beneath the windows to sing
and earn some bounty if he could. As soon as the King saw him he
ordered him to be called up, and presently he came into the room in all
his dirty ragged clothes, and sang before the King and Princess, and
when he had finished he begged for a slight recompense. The King said,
174 00184.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
" Thy song has pleased so much that I will give thee my daughter for a
wife."
The Princess was terribly frightened, but the King said, "I have
taken an oath, and mean to perform it, that I will give you to the first
beggar." All her remonstrances were in vain, the priest was called, and
the Princess was married in earnest to the player. When the ceremony
was performed, the King said, "Now it cannot be suffered that you
should stop here with your husband, in my house no you must travel
about the country with him."
So the beggarman led her away with him, and she was forced to
trudge along with him on foot. As they came to a large forest she
asked-
"To whom belongs this beautiful wood?"
The echo replied-
"King Thrush-beard the good !
Had you taken him, so was it thine."
"Ah, silly," said she,
What a lot had been mine
Had I happily married King Thrush-berd I"
Next they came to a meadow, and she asked,
"To whom belongs this meadow so green ?"
"To King Thrush-beard," was again the reply.
Then they came to a great city, and she asked,
"To whom does this beautiful town belong?"
"To King Thrush-beard," said one.
"Ah, what a simpleton was I that I did not marry him when I had
the chance !" exclaimed the poor Princess.
Come," broke in the Player, "it does not please me, I can tell you,
that you are always wishing for another husband: am I not good
enough for you "
By-and-by they came to a very small hut, and she said, Ah, heavens,
to whom can this miserable, wretched hovel belong ?"
The Player replied, "That is my house, where we shall live together."
The Princess was obliged to stoop to get in at the door, and when she
was inside, she asked, "Where are the servants?" "What servants?"
exclaimed her husband, "you must yourself do all that you want done.
Now make a fire and put on some water, that you may cook my dinner,
for I am quite tired."
The Princess, however, understood nothing about making fires or
looking, and the beggar had to set to work himself, and as soon as they
had finished their scanty meal they went to bed. In the morning the
husband woke up his wife very early, that she might set the house to
rights, and for a couple of days they lived on in this way, and made an
end of their store. Then the husband said, "Wife, we must not go on in
this way any longer, stopping here, doing nothing : you must weave some
baskets." So he went out and cut some osiers and brought them home,
175 00185.jpg
KING THRUSH-BEARD.
but when his wife attempted to bend them the hard twigs wounded her
hands and made them bleed. "I see that won't suit," said her husband;
"you had better spin, perhaps that will do better."
So she sat down to spin, but the harsh thread cut her tender fingers
very badly, so that the blood flowed freely. "Do you see," said the
husband, "how you are spoiling your work ? I made a bad bargain in
makingg you! Now I must try and make a business in pots and earthen
v3ssels: you shall sit in the market and sell them."
Oh, if anybody out of my father's dominions should come and see
me in the market selling pots," thought the Princess to herself, "how
they will laugh at me!"
However, all her excuses were in vain: she must either do that or die
of hunger.
The first time all went well, for the people bought of the Princess,
because she was so pretty-looking, and not only gave her what she
asked, but some even laid down their money and left the pots behind.
On her earnings this day they lived for some time as long as they lasted;
and then the husband purchased a fresh stock of pots. With these she
placed her stall at a corner of the market, offering them for sale. All at
once a drunken hussar came plunging down the street on his horse, and
rode right into the midst of her earthenware, and shattered it into a
thousand pieces. The accident, as well it might, set her a-weeping, and
in her trouble, not knowing what to do, she ran home crying, Ah, what
will become of me, what will my good man say When she had told
her husband he cried out, "Who ever would have thought of sitting at
the corner of the market to sell earthenware 7 but well, I see you are not
accustomed to any ordinary work. There, leave off crying; I have been
to the King's palace, and asked if they were not in want of a kitchen-
maid, and they have agreed to take you, and there you will live free of
cost."
Now the Princess became a kitchenmaid, and was obliged to do as
the cook bade her, and wash up the dirty things. Then she put a jar
into each of her pockets, and in them she took home what was left
of what fell to her share of the good things, and of these she and her
husband made their meals. Not many days afterwards it happened that
the wedding of the King's eldest son was to be celebrated, and the poor
wife placed herself near the door of the saloon to look on. As the lamps
were lit and guests more and more beautiful entered the room, and all
dressed most sumptuously, she reflected on her fate with a saddened
heart, and repented of the pride and haughtiness which had so humiliated
and impoverished her. Every now and then the servants threw her out
of the dishes morsels of rich delicacies which they carried in, and whose
fragrant smells increased her regrets, and these pieces she put into her
pockets to carry home. Presently the King entered, clothed in silk and
velvet, and having a golden chain round his neck. As soon as he saw
the beautiful maiden standing at the door, he seized her by the hand and
would dance with her, but she, terribly frightened, refused; for she
saw it was King Thrush-beard, who had wooed her, and whom she had
176 00186.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
laughed at. Her struggles were of no avail, he drew her into the ball-
room, and there tore off the band to which the pots were attached, sa
that they fell down and the soup ran over the floor, while the pieces of
meat, &c. skipped about in all directions. When the fine folks saw this
sight they burst into one universal shout of laughter and derision, and
the poor girl was so ashamed that she wished herself a thousand fathoms
below the earth. She ran out at the door and would have escaped; but
on the steps she met a man, who took her back, and when she looked at
him, ic it was King Thrush-beard again. He spake kindly to her, and
said, "Be not afraid; I and the musician, who dwelt with you in the
wretched hut, are one; for love of you I have acted thus; and the
hussar who rode in among the pots was also myself. All this has taken
place in order to humble your haughty disposition, and to punish you
for your pride, which led you to mock me."
At these words she wept bitterly, and said, "I am not worthy to be
your wife, I have done you so great a wrong." But he replied, "Those
evil days are passed : we will now celebrate our marriage."
Immediately after came the bridesmaids, and put on her the most
magnificent dresses: and then her father and his whole court arrived,
and wished her happiness on her wedding-day; and now commenced her
true joy as Queen of the country of King Thrush-beard.
RUMPELSTILTSKIN.
THERE w\Ss once a poor Miller who had a beautiful daughter; and one
day, having to go to speak with the King, he said, in order to make
himself appear of consequence, that he had a daughter who could spin
straw into gold. The King was very fond of gold, and thought to him
177 00187.jpg
UIUMPELSTILTSKIN.
;alf, hat is an art which would please me very well ;" and so he said
to the Miller, If your daughter is so very clever, bring her to the castle
in the morning, and I will put her to the proof."
As soon as she arrived the King led her into a chamber which waj
full of straw ; and, giving her a wheel and a reel, he said, "Now set
yourself to work, and if you have not spun this straw into gold by an
early hour to-morrow, you must die." With these words he shut the
room-door, and left the maiden alone.
There she sat for a long time, thinking how to save her life ; for slh
understood nothing of the art whereby straw might be spun into gold;
and her perplexity increased more and more, till at last she began to
weep. All at once the door opened and in stepped a little Man, who
said, Good evening, fair maiden ; why do you weep so sore 7" "Ah,"
she replied, I must spin this straw into gold, and I am sure I do not
know how."
The little Man asked, What will you give me if I spin it for you "
My necklace," said the maiden.
The Dwarf took it, placed himself in front of the wheel, and whirr,
whirr, whirr, three times round, and the bobbin was full. Then he set
up another, and whirr, whirr, whirr, thrice round again, and a second
bobbin was full; and so he went all night long, until all the straw was
spun, and the bobbins were full of gold. At sunrise the King came,
very much astonished to see the gold; the sight of which gladdened him,-
but did not make his heart less covetous. He caused the maiden to be
led into another room, still larger, full of straw ; and then he bade her
spin it into gold during the night if she valued her life. The maiden
was again quite at a loss what to do; but while she cried the door opened
suddenly, as before, and the Dwarf appeared and asked her what she
would give him in return for his assistance. The ring off my finger,"
The replied. The little Man took the ring and began to spin at once,
and by the morning all the straw was changed to glistening gold. The
King was rejoiced above measure at the sight of this, but still he was not
satisfied ; but, leading the maiden into another still larger room, full of
straw as the others, he said, This you must spin during the night ; but
if you accomplish it you shall be my bride." For," thought he to
himself, a richer wife thou canst not have in all the world."
When the maiden was left alone, the Dwarf again appeared, and
asked, for the third time, What will you give me to do this for you ?"
"I have nothing left that I can gix'o you," replied the maiden.
"Then promise me your first-born child if you become Queen," said
he.
The Miller's daughter thought, "Who can tell if that wi.) ever
happen ?" and, ignorant how else to help herself out of her trouble, she
promised the Dwarf what he desired; and he immediately set about ant
finished the spinning. When morning came, and the King found all he
had wished for done, he celebrated his wedding, and the fair Miller's
daughter became Queen.
About a year after the marriage, when she had ceased to think about
74
178 00188.jpg
GRIMMB'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
the little Dwarf, she brought a fine child into the world; and, suddenly,
soon after its birth, the very man appeared and demanded what she had
promised. The frightened Queen offered him all the riches of the king-
dom if he would leave her her child ; but the Dwarf answered, "No;
something human is dearer to me than all the wealth of the world."
The Queen began to weep and groan so much, that the Dwarf com-
parsonated her, and said, I will leave you three days to consider;
if you in that time discover my name you shall keep your child."
All night long the Queen racked her brains for all the names she
could think of, and sent a messenger through the country to collect far
and wide any new names. The following morning came the Dwarf, and
she began with Caspar," Melchior," Balthassar," and all the odd
names she knew; but at eajh the little Man exclaimed, "That is not my
name." The second day the Queen inquired of all her people for un
common and curious names, and called the Dwarf Ribs-of-Beef," "Sheep-
shank," "Whalebone;" but at each he said, "This is not my name."
The third day the messenger came back and said, I have not found a
single name; but as I came to a high mountain near the edge of a forest,
where foxes and hares say good night to each other, I saw there a little
house, and before the door a fire was burning, and round this fire a very
curious little Man was dancing on one leg, and shouting,-
To-day I stew, and then I'll bake,
To-morrow I shall the Queen's child take;
Ah I how famous it is that nobody knows
That my name is Rumpelstiltskin.' "
When the Queen heard this she was very glad, for now she knew the
name; and soon after came the Dwarf, and asked, "Now, my lady Queen,
what is my name "
First she said, Are you called Conrade I" "No."
Are you called Hal No."
"Are you called Rumpelstiltskin I"
"A witch has told you a witch has told you !" shrieked the little
Man, and stamped his right foot so hard in the ground with rage that he
could not draw it out again. Then he took hold of his left leg with both
his hands, and. pulled away so hard that his right came off in the struggle,
and he hopped away howling terribly. And from that day to this the
Queen has heard no more of her troublesome visitor.
179 00189.jpg
LITTLE SNOW-WHITE.
ONcE upon a time in the depth of winter, when the flakes of snow were
falling like feathers from the clouds, a Queen sat at her palace window,
which had an ebony black frame, stitching her husband's shirts. While
she was thus engaged and looking out at the snow she pricked her finger,
and three drops of blood fell upon the snow. Because the red looked so
well upon the white, she thought to herself, Had I now but a child as
white as this suow, as red as this blood, and as black as the wood of this
frame !" Soon afterwards a little daughter was born to her, who was as
white as snow, and red as blood, and with hair as black as ebony, and
thence she was named Snow-White," and when the child was born the
mother died.
About a year afterwards the King married another wife, who was very
beautiful, but so proud and haughty that she could not bear any one to
he better-looking than herself. She possessed a wonderful mirror, and
when she stepped before it and said,-
Oh, mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is the fairest of us all?"
it replied,-
Thou art the fairest, lady Queen."
Then she was pleased, for she knew that the mirror spoke truly.
Little Snow-White, however, grew up, and became pretty and prettier,
and when she was seven years old her complexion was as clear as the noon-
iay, and more beautiful than the Queen herself. When the Queen now
asked her mirror,-
"Oh, mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is the fairest of us all "
m2
180 00190.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
it replied,-
Thou wert the fairest, lady Queen;
Snow-White is faireet now, I ween."
This answer so frightened the Queen that she became quite yellow with
envy. From that hour, whenever she perceived Snow-White, her heart
was hardened against her, and she hated the maiden. Her envy and
jealousy increased so that she had no rest day nor night, and she said to
a Huntsman, Take the child away into the forest, I will never look upon
her again. You must kill her, and bring me her heart and tongue for a
token."
The Huntsman listened and took the maiden away, but when he
drew out his knife to kill her, she began to cry, saying, Ah, dear
Huntsman, give me my life I will run into the wild forest, and never
some home again."
This speech softened the Iunter's heart, and her beauty so touched
him that he had pity on her and said, Well, run away then, poor child ;"
but he thought to himself, "The wild beasts will soon Icvour you.'
Still he felt as if a stone had been taken from his heart, because her death
was not by his hand. Just at that moment a young boar came roaring
along to the spot, and as soon as he clapt eyes upon it the Huntsman
caught it, and, killing it, took its tongue and heart, and carried them to
the Queen for a token of his deed.
But now the poor little Snow-White was left motherless and alone,
and overcome with grief, she was bewildered at the sight of so many
trees, and knew not which way to turn. Presently she set off running,
and ran over stones and through thorns, and wild beasts sprang up as
she passed them, but they did her no harm. She ran on till her feet
refused to go farther, and as it was getting dark, and she saw a little
house near, she entered in to rest. In this cottage everything was
very small, but more neat and elegant than I can tell you. In the
middle stood a little table with a white cloth over it, and seven little
plates upon it, each plate having a spoon and a knife and a fork, and
there were also seven little mugs. Against the wall were seven little
beds ranged in a row, each covered with snow-white sheets. Little
Snow-White, being both hungry and thirsty, ate a little morsel of
porridge out of each plate, and drank a drop or.two of wine out of each
glass, for she did not wish to take away the whole share of any one.
After that, because she was so tired, she laid herself down on one bed,
but it did not suit; she tried another, but that was too long ; a fourth
was too short, a fifth too'hard, but the seventh was just the thing, and
tucking herself up in it she went to sleep, first commending herself
to God.
When it became quite dark the lords of the cottage came home,
seven Dwarfs, who dug and delved for ore in the mountains. They
first lighted seven little lamps, and perceived at once-for they illumined
the whole apartment-that somebody had been in, for everything was
not in the order in which they had left it. The first asked, "Who has
been sitting on my chair I" The second, "Who has been eating ofl
181 00191.jpg
LITTLE SNOW-WHITE.
my plate 7 The third said, "Who has been nibbling at my bread 'i"
The fourth, Who has been at my porridge I" The fifth, "Who has
been meddling with my fork ?" The sixth grumbled out, "Who has
been cutting with my knife 1" The seventh said, Who has been drink-
ing out of my glass 7" Then the first looking round began again. "Who
has been lying on my bed ?" he asked, for he saw that the sheets were
tumbled. At these words the others came, and looking at theii beds
cried out too, Some one has been lying in our beds But the seventh
little man, running up to his, saw Snow-White sleeping in it; so he
called his companions, who shouted with wonder and held up their seven
torches, so that the light fell upon the maiden. Oh heavens oh
heavens! said they, what a beauty she is I and they were so much
delighted that they would not awaken her, but left her to her repose,
and the seventh Dwarf, in whose bed she was, slept with each of his
fellows one hour, and so passed the night.
As soon as morning dawned Snow-White awoke, and was quite
frightened when she saw the seven little men; but they were very
friendly, and asked her what she was called. "My name is Snow-White,"
was her reply. Why have you entered our cottage? they asked.
Then she told them how her stepmother would have had her killed, but
the Huntsman had spared her life, and how she had wandered about tht
whole day until at last she had found their house. When her tale was
finished the Dwarfs said, Will you see after our household; be our cook,
make the beds, wash, sew, and knit for us, and keep everything in neat
order ? if so, we will keep you here, and you shall want for nothing."
And Snow-White answered, "Yes, with all my heart and will ;" and
so she remained with them, and kept their house in order. In the morn-
ings the Dwarfs went into the mountains and searched for ore and gold,
and in the evenings they came home and found their meals ready for
them. During the day the maiden was left alone, and therefore the good
Dwarfs warned her and said, "Be careful of your stepmother, who will
soon know of your being here ; therefore let nobody enter the cottage."
The Queen meanwhile, supposing that she had eaten the heart and
tongue of her daughter-in-law, did not think but that she was above all
comparison the most beautiful of every one around. One day she stepped
before her mirror, and said,-
Oh, mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is the fairest of us all "
and it replied,-
Thou wert the fairest, lady Queen;
Snow-White is fairest now, I ween.
Amid the forest, darkly green,
She lives with Dwarfs-the hills between."
This reply frightened her, for she knew that the mirror spoke the truth,
and she perceived that the Huntsman had deceived her, and that Snow-
White was still alive Now she thought and thought how she should
182 00192.jpg
GRIMnM'iS HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
accomplish her purpose, for so long as she was not the fairest in the
whole country, jealousy left her no rest. At last a thought struck her,
and she dyed her face and clothed herself as a pedlar woman, so that no
one could recognize her. In this disguise she went over the seven hills
to the seven Dwarfs, knocked at the door of the hut, and called out,
"Fine goods for sale! beautiful goods for sale !" Snow-White peeped
out of the window and said, Good day, my good woman, what have you
to sell ." Fine goods, beautiful goods! she replied, stays of all
colours;" and she held up a pair which was made of variegated silks.
" I may let in this honest woman," thought Snow-White; and she un-
bolted the door and bargained for one pair of stays. You can't think,
my dear, how it becomes you !" exclaimed the old woman, Come, let me
lace it up for you." Snow-White suspected nothing, and let her do as
she wished, but the old woman laced her up so quickly and so tightly
that all her breath went, and she fell down like one dead. "Now,"
thought the old woman to herself, hastening away, "now am I once more
the most beautiful of all "
Not long after her departure, at eventide, the seven Dwarfs came
home, and were much frightened at seeing their dear little maid lying on
the ground, and neither moving nor breathing, as if she were dead. They
raised her up, and when they saw she was laced too tight they cut the
stays in pieces, and presently she began to breathe again, and by little
and little she revived. When the Dwarfs now heard what had taken
place, they said, The old pedlar woman was no other than your wicked
mother-in-law; take more care of yourself, and let no one enter when we
are not with you."
Meanwhile the old Queen had reached home, and, going before her
mirror, she repeated her usual words,-
Oh, mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is the fairest of us all ?"
and it replied as before,-
Thou wert the fairest, lady Queen;
Snow-white is fairest now, I ween.
Amid the forest, darkly green,
She lives with Dwarfs-the hills between.'
As soon td it had finished, all her blood rushed to her heart, for she
was so frightened to hear that Snow-White was yet living. But now,"
thought she to herself, "will I contrive something which shall destroy her
completely." Thus saying, she made a poisond comb, by arts which she
understood, and, then disg: ring herself, she took the form of an old
widow. She went over the seven hills to the house of the seven Dwarfs,
and, knocking at the door, called out, "Good wares to sell to-day!"
Snow-White peeped out and said, "You must go further, for I large not
'tt you in."
But still you may look," said the old woman, drawing out her
.t isoned comb and holding it up. The sight of this pleased the maiden
183 00193.jpg
LITTLE SNOW-WHITE.
so much, that she allowed herself to be persuaded, and opened the door.
As soon as she had made a purchase the old woman said Now let me
for once comb you properly," and Snow-White consented, but scarcely
was the comb drawn through the hair when the poison began to work,
and the maiden soon fell down senseless. "You pattern of beauty,"
cried the wicked old Queen, "it is now all over with you," and so saying
she departed.
Fortunately, evening soon came, and the seven Dwarfs returned, and
as soon as they saw Snow-White lying, like dead, upon the ground, they
suspected the old Queen, and soon discovering the poisoned comb, they
immediately drew it out, and the maiden very soon revived and related all
that had happened. Then they warned her again against the wicked
stepmother, and bade her to open the door to nobody.
Meanwhile the Queen, on her arrival home, had again consulted her
mirror, and received the same answer as twice before. This made her
tremble and foam with rage and jealousy, and she swore Snow-White
should die if it cost her her own life. Thereupon she went into an inner
secret chamber where no one could enter, and there made an apple of the
most deep and subtle poison. Outwardly it looked nice enough, and had
rosy cheeks which would make the mouth of every one who looked at it
water; but whoever ate the smallest piece of it would surely die. As
soon as the apple was ready, the old Queen again dyed her face, and
clothed herself like a peasant's wife, and then over the seven mountains to
the seven Dwarfs she made her way. She knocked at the door, and
Snow-White stretched out her head and said, I dare not let any one
enter; the seven Dwarfs have forbidden me."
"That is hard for me," said the old woman; "for I must take back
my apples : but there is one which I will give you."
"No," answered Snow-White, "no, I dare not take it."
What! are you afraid of it ?" cried the old woman ; "there, see, I
will cut the apple in halves; do you eat the red cheeks, and I will eat the
core.' (The apple was so artfully made that the red cheeks alone were
poisoned.) Snow-White very much wished for the beautiful apple, and
when she saw the woman eating the core she could no longer resist, but,
stretching out her hand, took the poisoned part. Scarcely had she placed
a piece in her mouth when she fell down dead upon the ground. Then
the Queen, looking at her with glittering eyes, and laughing bitterly, ex-
claimed, White as snow, red as blood, black as ebony I This time the
Dwarfs cannot re-awaken you."
When she reached home and consulted her mirror-
Oh, mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is the fairest of us all "
It answered-
Thou art the fairest, lady Queen."
Then her envious heart was at rest, as peacefully as an envious heart can
rest-
When the little Dwarfs returned home in the evening, they found
184 00194.jpg
GRI.IM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Snow-White lying on the ground, and there appeared to be no life in her
"ody; she seemed to be quite dead. They raised her up, and searched if
.ney could find anything poisonous; unlaced her, and even uncombed her
hair, and washed her with water and with wine; but nothing availed:
the dear child was really and truly'dead. Then they laid her upon a
bier, an.d all seven 'placed themselves around it, and wept and wept for
three days without ceasing. Afterwards they would bury her, but she
looked still fresh and lifelike, and even her red cheeks had not deserted
her, so they said to one another, "We cannot bury her in the black
ground," and they ordered a case to be made of transparent glass. In
this one could view the body on all sides, and the Dwarfs wrote her name
with golden letters upon the glass, saying that she was a King's daughter.
Now they placed the glass-case upon the ledge of a rock, and one of them
always remained by it watching. Even the beasts bewailed the loss of
Snow-White ; first came an owl, then a raven, and last of all a dove.
For a long time Snow-White lay peacefully in her case, and changed
not, but looked as if she were only asleep, for she was still white as snow.
red as blood, and black-haired as ebony. By-and-bye it happened that a
King's son was travelling in the forest, and came to the Dwarfs' house to
pass the night. He soon perceived the glass-case upon the rock, and the
beautiful maiden lying within, and he read also the golden inscription
When he had examined it, he said to the Dwarfs, "Let me have
this case, and I will pay what you like for it."
But the Dwarfs replied, "We will not sell it for all the gold in the
world."
"Then give it to me," said the Prince; "for I cannot live without
Snow-White. I will honour and protect her so long as I live."
When the Dwarfs saw he was so much in earnest, they pitied him, and
at last gave him the case, and the Prince ordered it to be carried away on
the shoulders of one of his attendants. Presently it happened that they
stumbled over a rut, and with the shock the piece of poisoned apple
which lay in Snow-White's mouth fell out. Very soon she opened her
eyes, and, raising the lid of the glass-case, she rose up and asked, Where
am I "
Full of joy, the Prince answered, "You are safe with me ;" and he
related to her what she had suffered, and how he would rather have her
than any other for his wife, and he asked her to accompany him home to
the castle of the King his father. Snow-White consented, and when they
arrived there the wedding between them was celebrated as speedily as
possible, with all the splendour and magnificence proportionate to the
happy event.
By chance the old mother-in-law of Snow-White was also invited to
the wedding, and when she was dressed in all her finery to go, she first
stepped in frrnt of ner mirror, and asked,-
" Oh, mirror, mirror on the wel
Who is fairest of no a 01"
185 00195.jpg
THE DOG AND THE SPARROW. ItY
And it replied,
Thou wert the fairest, oh lady Queen;
The Prince's bride is more fair, I ween."
At these words the old Queen was in a fury, and was so terribly mortified!
that she knew not what to do with herself. At first she resolved not to
go to the wedding, but she could not resist the wish for a sight of the
young Queen, and as soon as she entered she recognized Snow-White, and
was so terrified with rage and astonishment that she remained rooted to
the ground. Just then a pair of red-hot iron shoes were brought in with
a pair of tongs and set before her, and these she was forced to put on and
to dance in them till she fell down dead.
THE DOG AND THE SPARROW.
THERE was once a Shepherd's Dog, which had a very bad master, who
never gave him food enough for bis services; and one day, having made
up his mind to endure such treatment no longer, the Dog left the man's
service and took his way, though with much sorrow. On the road the
Dog met a Sparrow, who said "Brother Dog, why are you so glum I"
The Dog replied, "I am hungry and have nothing to eat."
Oh," replied the Sparrow, "come with me, and I will soon satisfy
you."
So they went together to the town, and, when they caime to a
butcher's shop, the bird said, Wait a bit here, I will peck you down a
piece of meat;" and flying into the shop, and looking round to see that
no one observed her, she pecked and pulled at a joint which hung just
186 00196.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
over the window till it fell down. In Dog instantly snatched it, and,
running into a corner, soon devoured it. When he had done, the Spar.
row took him to another shop and pecked down a second piece of meat,
and, when the Dog had finished this, the Sparrow asked, Are you satis.
fied now, Brother Dog i"
Yes," he replied, with flesh ; but I have touched no bread at all
yet."
So the Sparrow, saying, That you shall have if you will come with
me," led him to a baker's, and pushed down a couple of loaves, and,
when the Dog had finished them, she took him to another shop and
pushed down more. As soon as these were consumed the Sparrow asked
again if he were satisfied, and the Dog replied, "Yes; and now we'll
walk awhile rouiid the town."
Off they started now upon the highroad; but it being very warm
weather, they had not walked far, when, as they came to a corner, the
Dog said, I am tired and must go to sleep."
"Very well," replied the Sparrow; "meanwhile I will sit on this
twig." So the Dog laid down in the middle of the road and was soon
fast asleep.
Presently a Carrier came up the road driving a waggon with three
horses, laden with two casks of wine, and as the Sparrow saw that the
man did not turn aside, but kept in the middle of the road where the
Dog lay, she called out, "Carrier, take care what you do, or I will make
you poor !"
But the Carrier, grumbling to himself, "You make me poor, indeed !"
cracked his whip and drove the waggon straight on, so that the wheels
passed over the Dog and killed him. "You have killed my brother the
Dog, and that shall cost you your horses and your cart !"
"Horses and cart, indeed 1" said the Carrier; "what harm can you
do me?" and he drove on.
Then the Sparrow, hopping under the waggon-covering, pecked at
the bunghole of one of the casks until she worked out the cork, so that
all the wine ran out without its being perceived by the Carrier; but
all at once the man looked behind him and saw the wine dropping from
the cart, and, trying the casks, found that one of them was empty.
" Ah," cried he, "now I am a poor man !" Yet not poor enough !"
said the Sparrow, and, flying on to the head of one of the horses, she
pecked out one of its eyes. When the Carrier saw this he drew out his
hatchet and tried to hit the bird, but she flew up, and, instead, he cut
his own horse's head, so that it fell down dead. "Ah," cried he, "now I
am a poor man !"
"Still not poor enough !" said the Sparrow; and, while the Carrier
drove further on with his two horses, she crept again under the covering
of the waggon and pecked out the bung of the second cask, so that all
the wine dripped out. When the man found this he exclaimed again,
Ah, now I am a poor man !" but the Bird replied, "Not poor enough
yet !" and, settling on the head of the second horse, she pecked out its
eyes also. Again the driver lifted his axe and made a cut at the Sparrow
187 00197.jpg
THE DOG AND THE SPARROW.
which flew away, so that the blow fell on his horse and killed it. Ah,
now I am poorer still!" cried the man; but the Bird replied, "Not yet
poor enough 1" and, perching on the third horse, she pecked out its eyes
also. In a terrible passion the driver aimed a blow with his axe as
before at the Sparrow, but, unfortunately missing, hit his own horse
instead, and so killed his third and last animal. "Ah me poorer and
poorer !" exclaimed the Carrier.
"Not yet poor enough 1" reiterated the Sparrow; "now 1 will mako
you poor at home;" and so flew away.
The Carrier was forced to leave his waggon in the road, and went
home full of rage and passion. Oh," said he to his wife, "what misfor-
tunes I have had to endure my wine has all run out, and my horses are
all three dead woe's me !"
"Ah, my husband !" she replied, "and what a wicked bird has come
to this house : she has brought with her all the birds in the world, and
there they sit among our corn and are eating every ear of it !"
The man stepped out, and, behold, thousands on thousands of birds
had alighted upon the ground and had eaten up all the corn, and among
them sat the Sparrow. "Ah me, I am poorer than ever!" he cried.
"Still not poor enough, Carrier; it shall cost you your life !" replied the
Bird, as she flew away.
Thus the Carrier lost all his property, and, now entering the kitchen,
he sat down behind the stove and became quite morose and savage.
The Sparrow, however, remained outside on the window-sill, calling out,
" Carrier, it shall cost you your life !"
At this the man seized his axe and threw it at the Sparrow, but he
only cut the window-frame in two, without hurting the bird. Now the
Sparrow hopped in, and, perching on the stove, said again, Carrier, it
shall cost you your life !" Blinded with rage and fury he only cut the
stove with his axe, and, as the Bird hopped about from one place to
another, he pursued her, and hacked through all his furniture, glasses,
seats, tables, and lastly, the walls even of his house, without once touching
the Bird. However, he at length caught her with his hand, while his
wife asked whether she should kill her. No," said he, that were too
merciful: she shall die much more horribly, for I will eat her." So
saying he swallowed her whole, but she began to flutter about in his
stomach, and presently came again into his mouth, and called out,
" Carrier, it shall cost you your life !"
Thereupon the man handed his wife the axe, saying, "Kill the wretch
for me dead in my mouth I" His wife took it and aimed s blow, but,
missing her mark, she .truck her husband on the head and killed him.
Then the Sparrow flew away and was neier see there again.
188 00198.jpg
ROLAND.
ONcE upon a time there lived a real old Witch who had two daughters
one ugly and wicked, whom she loved very much, because she was her
own child; and the other fair and good, whom she hated, because she
was her stepdaughter. One day the stepchild wore a very pretty apron,
which so pleased the other that she turned jealous, and told her mother
she must and would have the apron. "Be quiet, my child," said she
"you shall have it; your sister has long deserved death. To-night,
when she is asleep, I will come and cut off her head; but take care that
you lie nearest the wall, and push her quite to the side of the bed."
Luckily the poor maiden, hid in a corner, heard this speech, or she
would have been murdered; but all day long she dared not go out of
doors, and when bedtime came she was forced to lie in the place fixed
for her: but happily the other sister soon went to sleep, and then sho
contrived to change places and get quite close to the wall. At midnight
the old Witch sneaked in, holding in her right hand an axe, while with
her left she felt for her intended victim; and then raising the axe in both
her hands, she chopped off the head of her own daughter.
As soon as she went away, the maiden got up and went to her sweet-
heart, who was called Roland, and knocked at his door. When he came
out she said to him, "Dearest Roland, we must flee at once; my step-
mother would have killed me, but in the dark she has murdered her
own child: if day comes, and she discovers what she has done, we are
lost !"
But I advise you," said Roland, first to take away her magic wand,
or we cannot save ourselves if she should follow and catch us."
So the maiden stole away the wand, and taking up the head dropped
three drops of blood upon the ground : one before the bed, one in the
189 00199.jpg
BOLAND.
kitchen, and one upon the step : this done, she hurried away with her
lover.
When the morning came and the old Witch had dressed herself, she
called to her daughter and would have given her the apron, but no one
came. "Where are you she called. Here upon the step," answered
one of the drops of blood. The old woman went out, but seeing nobody
on the step, she called a second time, Where are you ?" Hi, hi, here
in the kitchen ; I am warming myself," replied the second drop of blood,
She went into the kitchen, but could see nobody; and once again she
cried, Where are you I "
"Ah here I sleep in the bed," said the third drop ; and she entered
the room, but what a sight met her eyes! There lay her own child
covered with blood, for she herself had cut off her head.
The old Witch flew into a terrible passion, sprang out of the window,
and looking far and near, presently spied out her stepdaughter, who was
hurrying away with Roland. "That won't help you! she shouted;
" were you twice as far, you should not escape me." So saying, she drew
on her boots, in which she went an hour's walk with every stride, and
before long she overtook the fugitives. But the maiden, as soon as she
saw the Witch in sight, changed her dear Roland into a lake with the
magic wand, and herself into a duck, who could swim upon its surface.
When the old Witch arrived at the shore, she threw in bread-crumbs, and
tried all sorts of means to entice the duck; but it was all of no use, and
she was obliged to go away at evening without accomplishing her ends.
When she was gone the maiden took her natural form, and Roland also,
and all night long till daybreak they travelled onwards. Then the maiden
changed herself into a rose, which grew amid a very thorny hedge, and
Roland became a fiddler. Soon after up came the old Witch, and said to
him, Good player, may I break off your flower ." "Oh! yes," he
replied, "and I will accompany you with a tune." In great haste she
climbed up the bank to reach the flower, and as soon as she was in the
hedge he began to play, and whether she liked it or not she was obliged
to dance to the music, for it was a bewitched tune. The quicker he
played, the higher was she obliged to jump, till the thorns tore all the
clothes off her body, and scratched and wounded her so much that at last
she fell down dead.
Then Roland, when he saw they were saved, said, Now I will go tc
my father, and arrange the wedding."
"Yes," said the maiden, "and meanwhile I will rest here, and wait
for your return, and, that no one may know me, I will change myself into
a red stone."
Roland went away and left her there, but when he reached home he
fell into the snares laid for him by another maiden, and forgot his true
love, who for a long time waited his coming; but at last, in sorrow and
despair of ever seeing him again, she changed herself into a beautiful
flower, and thought that perhaps some one might pluck her and. carry her
to his home.
A day or two after a shepherd who was tending his flock in the field
190 00200.jpg
GIRIMTNA'S IIOUSEHOLD STORMIS.
chanced to see the enchanted flower; and because it was so very beautiful
he broke it off, took it with him, and laid it by in his chest. From that
day everything prospered in the shepherd's house, and marvellous things
happened. When he arose in the morning he found all the work already
done: the room was swept, the chairs and tables dusted, the fire lighted
upon the hearth, and the water fetched; when he came home at noonday
the table was laid, and a good meal prepared for him. He could not
imagine how it was all done, for he could find nobody ever in his house
when he returned, and there was no place for any one to conceal himself.
The good arrangements certainly pleased him well enough, but he became
so anxious at last to know who it was, that he went and asked the advice
of a wise woman. The woman said, "There is some witchery in the busi-
ness; listen one morning if you can hear anything nioving in the room,
and if you do and can see anything, be it what it will, throw a white napkin
over it, and the charm will be dispelled."
The shepherd did as he was bid, and the next morning, just as day
broke, he saw his chest open and the flower come out of it. He instantly
sprang up and threw a white napkin over it, and immediately the spell
was broken, and a beautiful maiden stood before him, who acknowledged
that she was the handmaid who, as a flower, had put his house in order.
She told him her tale, and she pleased the shepherd so much, that he
asked her if she would marry him, but she said, No," for she would still
keep true to her dear Roland, although he had left her; nevertheless, she
promised still to remain with the shepherd, and see after his cottage.
Meanwhile, the time had arrived for the celebration of Roland's
wedding, and, according to the old custom, it was proclaimed through all
the country round, that every maiden might assemble to sing in honour
of the bridal pair. When the poor girl heard this, she was so grieved that
it seemed as if her heart would break, and she would not have gone to the
wedding if others had not come and taken her with them.
When it came to her turn to sing, she stepped back till she was quite
by herself, and as soon as she began, Roland jumped up, exclaiming," I
know the voice I that is my true bride no other will I have All that
he had hitherto forgotten and neglected to think of was suddenly brought
back to his heart's remembrance, and he would not again let her go.
And now the wedding of the faithful maiden to the dear Roland was
celebrated with great magnificence; and their sorrows and troubles being
over, happiness became their lot.
191 00202.jpg
rkQ
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'TlE KNAPSACK, THE IIAT, AND THE IIORN.
Page 175.
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192 00203.jpg
THE KNAPSACK, THE HAT, AND THE HORN.
ONCE upon a time there were three brothers, who every day sank deeper
and deeper in poverty, until at last their need was so great that they
were in danger of death from starvation, having nothing to bite or break.
So they said to one another, "We cannot go on in this way; we had
better go forth into the wide world and seek our fortunes." With these
words they got up and set out, and travelled many a long mile over green
fields and meadows without happening with any luck. One day they
arrived in a large forest, and in the middle of it they found a hill, which,
on their nearer approach, they saw was all silver. At this sight the eldest
brother said, "Now I have met with my expected good fortune, and I
desire nothing better." And, so saying, he took as much of the silver as
he could carry, and turned back again to his house.
The others, however, said, We desire something better than mere
silver and they would not touch it, but went on further. After they
had travelled a couple of days longer, they came to another hill, which
was all gold. There the second brother stopped, and soon became quite
dazzled with the sight. "What shall I do 7" said he to himself; "shall
I take as much gold as I can, that I may have enough to live upon, or,
shall I go further still At last he came to a conlusion, and, putting
what he could in his pockets, he bade his brother good-bye and returned
home. The third brother said, however, "Silver and gold will I not
touch; I will seek my fortune yet; perhaps something better than all
will happen to me."
So he travelled along for three days alone, and at the end of the third
he came to a great forest, which was a great deal more extensive than the
former, and so much so that he could not find the end : and, moreover,
193 00204.jpg
176 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
he was almost perished with hunger and thirst. He climbed up a high
tree to discover if he could by chance find an outlet to the forest; but so
far as his eyes could reach there was nothing but tree-tops to be seen.
His hunger now began to trouble him very much, and he thought to
himself, "Could I now only for this once have a good meal, I might get
on." Scarcely were the words out of his mouth when he saw, to his great
astonishment, a napkin under the tree, spread over with all kinds of good
food, very grateful to his senses. Ah, this time," thought he, my wish
is fulfilled at the very nick :" and, without any consideration as to who
brought or who cooked the dishes, he sat himself down and ate to his
heart's content. When he had finished, he thought it would be a shame
to leave such a fine napkin in the wood, so he packed it up as small as he
could, and carried it away in his pocket. After this he went on again, and
as he felt hungry towards evening, he wished to try his napkin ; and,
spreading it out, he said aloud, I should like to see you again spread
with cheer;" and scarcely had he spoke when as many dishes as there was
room for stood upon the napkin. At the sight he exclaimed, "Now you
are dearer to me than a mountain of silver and gold, for I perceive you
are a wishing-cloth; but, however, he was not yet satisfied, but would
go farther and seek his fortune.
The next evening he came up with a Charcoal-burner, who was busy
with his coals, and who was roasting some potatoes at his fire for his
supper. Good evening, my black fellow," said our hero; "how do you
find yourself in your solitude 7 One day is like another," replied he,
and every night potatoes : have you a mind for some 1 if so, be my
guest."
"Many thanks," replied the traveller ; "but I will not deprive you
of your meal; you did not reckon on having a guest; but, if you have
no objection, you shall yourself have an invitation to supper." Who
will invite me ?" asked the Charcoal-burner; I do not see that you
have got anything with you, and there is no one in the circuit of two
hours' walk who could give you anything."
"And yet there shall be a meal," returned the other, "better than
you have ever seen."
So saying, he took out his napkin, and, spreading it on the ground,
said, Cloth, cover thyself!" and immediately meats boiled and baked, as
Lot as if just out of the kitchen, were spread about. The Charcoal-burner
opened his eyes wide, but did not stare long, but soon began to eat away,
cramming his black mouth as full as he could. When they had finished,
the man, smacking his lips, said, Come, your cloth pleases me; it would
be very convenient for me here in the wood, where I have no one to
cook. I will strike a bargain with you. There hangs a soldier's knap.
sack, which is certainly both old and shabby; but it possesses a wonderful
virtue, and, as I have no more use for it, I will give it you in exchange
for your cloth."
But first I must know in what this wonderful virtue consists," said
the traveller.
I will tell you," replied the other. "If you tap thrice with youz
194 00205.jpg
THE KNAPSACK, THE HAT. AND THE HORN. 177
fingers upon it, out will come a corporal and six men, armed from head
to foot, who will do whatsoever you command them."
"In faith," cried our hero, "I do not think I can do better; let us
change;" and, giving the man his wishing-cloth, he took the knapsack
off its hook, and strode away with it on his back.
He had not gone very far before he wished to try the virtue of his
bargain; so he tapped upon it, and immediately the seven warriors
stepped before him, and the leader asked his commands. What does
my lord and master desire ?"
"March back quickly to the Charcoal-burner, and demand my wishing-
cloth again," said our hero.
The soldiers wheeled round to the left, and before very long they
brought what he desired, having taken it from the Collier without so
much as asking his leave. This done, he dismissed them, and travelled
on again, hoping his luck might shine brighter yet. At sunset he came
to another Charcoal-burner, who was also preparing his supper at the fire,
and asked, Will you sup with me 1 Potatoes and salt, without butter,
is all I have ; sit down if you choose."
No," replied the traveller; "this time you shall be my guest ;" and
he unfolded his cloth, which was at once spread with the most delicate
fare. They ate and drank together, and soon got very merry; and when
their meal was done, the Charcoal-burner said, "Up above there on that
board lies an old worn-out hat, which possesses the wonderful power, if
one puts it on and presses it down on his head, of causing, as it were,
twelve field-pieces to go off, one after the other, and shoot down all that
comes in their way. The hat is of no use to me in that way, and there-
fore I should like to exchange it for your cloth."
Oh I have no objection to that," replied the other; and, taking
the hat, he left his wishing-cloth behind him; but he had not gone very
far before he tapped on his knapsack, and bade the soldiers who appeared
to fetch it back from his guest.
"Ah," thought he t.; himself, one thing happens so soon upon
another, that it seems as if my luck would have no end." And his
thoughts did not deceive him; for he had scarcely gone another day's
journey when he met with a third Charcoal-burner, who invited him, as
the others had, to a potato-supper. However, he spread out his wishing-
cloth, and the feast pleased the Charcoal-burner so well, that he offered
him, in return for his cloth, a horn, which had still more wonderful pro-
perties than either the knapsack or hat; for, when one blew it, every
wall and fortification fell down before its blast, and even whole villages
and towns were overturned. For this horn he gladly gave his cloth, but
he soon sent his soldiers back for it; and now he had not only that, but
also the knapsack, the hat, and the horn.
"Now," said he, "I am a made man, and it is high time that I
should return home and see how my brothers get on."
When he arrived at the old place, he found his brothers had built a
splendid palace wi:~ their gold and silver, and were living in clover. 110
entered their Louse bvt because he came in with a coat torn to rags,
195 00206.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
the shabby hat upon his head, and the old knapsack on his back, his
brothers would not own him. They mocked him, saying, You pretend
to be our brother; why, he despised silver and gold, and sought better
luck for himself; he would come accompanied like a mighty king, not as
a beggar! and they hunted him out of doors.
This treatment put the poor man in such a rage, that he knocked
upon the knapsack so many times till a hundred and fifty men stood
before him in rank and file. He commanded them to surround his
brothers' house, and two of them to take hazel-sticks and thrash them
both until they knew who he was. They set up a tremendous howling,
so that the people ran to the spot and tried to assist the two brothers ;
but they could do nothing against the soldiers. By-and-by the King
himself heard the noise, and he ordered out a captain and troop to drive
the disturber of the peace out of the city; but the man with his knap-
sack soon gathered together a greater company, who beat back the
captain and his men, and sent them home with bleeding noses. At this
the King said, This vagabond fellow shall be driven away;" and the
next day he sent a larger troop against him; but they fared no better
than the first. The beggar, as he was called, soon ranged more men in
opposition, and, in order to do the work quicker, he pressed his hat
down upon his head a couple of times; and immediately the heavy guns
began to play, and soon beat down all the King's people, and put the
rest to flight. Now," said our hero, I will never make peace till the
King gives me his daughter to wife, and he places me upon the throne
as ruler of his whole dominion." This vow which he had taken he
caused to be communicated to the King, who said to his daughter
"Must is a hard nut to crack : what is there left to me but that I do as
this man desires i If I wish for peace, and to keep the crown upon my
head, I must yield."
So the wedding was celebrated; but the Princess was terribly vexed
that her husband was such a common man, and wore not only a very
shabby hat, but also carried about with him everywhere a dirty old
knapsack. She determined to get rid of them; and day and night she
was always thinking how to manage it. It struck her suddenly that
perhaps his wonderful power lay in the knapsack ; so she flattered,
caressed him, saying, "I wish you would lay aside that dirty knapsack;
it becomes you so ill that I am almost ashamed of you."
Dear child," he replied, this knapsack is my greatest treasure; as
long as I possess it I do not fear the greatest power on earth ;" and he
further told her all its wonderful powers. When he had finished, the
Princess fell on his neck as if she would kiss him; but she craftily
untied the knapsack, and, loosening it from his shoulders, ran away
with it. As soon as she was alone she tapped upon it, and ordered the
warriors who appeared to bind fast her husband and lead him out of the
royal palace. They obeyed; and the false wife caused other soldiers to
march behind, who were instructed to hunt the poor man out of the
kingdom. It would have been all over with him had he not still pos-
sessed the hat, which he pressed down on his head as soon as his hands
196 00207.jpg
THE LITTLE FARMER. 179
were free, and immediately the cannons began to go off, and demolished
all before them. The Princess herself was at last obliged to go and beg
pardon of her husband. He at last consented to make peace, being
moved by her supplications and promises to behave better in future,
and she acted so lovingly, and treated him so well for some time after,
that he entrusted her with the secret, that although he might be deprived
of the knapsack, yet so long as he had the hat no one could overcome
him. As soon as she knew this, she waited until he was asleep and then
stole away the hat, and caused her husband to be thrown into a ditch.
The horn, however, was still left to him ; and in a great passion, lie blew
upon it such a blast that in a minute down came tumbling the walls,
forts, houses, and palaces, and buried the King and his daughter in the
ruins. Luckily he ceased to blow for want of breath ; for had he kept it
up any longer all the houses would have been overturned, and not one
stone left upon another. After this feat nobody dared to oppose him,
and he set himself up as King over the whole country.
/- /
THE LITTLE FARMER.
TnERE was a certain village, wherein several rich farmers were settled,
and only one poor one, who was therefore called "The Little Farmer."
He had not even a cow, nor money to buy it, though he and his wife
would have been only too happy to have had one. One day he said to
her, A good thought has just struck me : our father-in-law, the carver,
can make us a calf out of wood and paint it brown, so that it will look
like any other ; in time, perhaps, it will grow big a-d become a cow."
This proposal pleased his wife, and the carver was instructed accord-
ingly, and he cut out the calf, painted it as it should be, and so made i;
that its head was bent down as if eating.
197 00208.jpg
180 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
When, the next morning, the cows were driven out to pasture, the
Farmer called the Shepherd in and said, See, I have here a little calf,
but it is so small that it must as yet be carried." The Shepherd said,
"Very well;" and, taking it under his arm, carried it down to the
meadow and set it among the grass. All day the calf stood there as if
eating, and the Shepherd said, It will soon grow big and go alcne: only
see how it is eating !" At evening time, when he wanted to drive his
flocks home, he said to the calf, Since you can stand there to satisfy
your hunger, you must also be able to walk upon your four legs, and I
shall not carry you home in my arms." The Little Farmer stood before
his house-door waiting for his calf, and as the Shepherd drove his herd
through the village he asked after it. The Shepherd repli,.', "It is still
standing there eating: it would not listen and come witn me." The
Farmer exclaimed, Eh, what ? I must have my calf I" and so they both
went together down to the meadow, but some one had stolen the calf, and
it was gone. The Shepherd said, Perhaps it has run away itself;" but
the Farmer replied, "Not so-that won't do for me ;" and dragging him
before the Mayor, he was condemned for his negligence to give the Little
Farmer a cow in the place of the lost calf.
Now the Farmer and his wife possessed the long-desired cow, and
were very glad; but having no fodder they could give her nothing to eat,
so that very soon they were obliged to kill her. The flesh they salted
down, and the skin the Little Farmer took to the next town to sell, to
buy another calf with what he got for it. On the way he passed a mill,
where a raven was sitting with a broken wing, and out of compassion he
took the bird up and wrapped it in the skin he was carrying. But
the weather being just then very bad, a great storm of wind and rain
falling, he was unable to go further, and, turning into the mill, begged
for shelter. The Miller's wife was at home alone, and said to the Farmer,
Lie down on that straw," and gave him a piece of bread and cheese.
The Farmer ate it and lay down, with his skin near him, and the Miller's
wife thought he was asleep. Presently in came a man, whom she received
very cordially, and invited to sup with her; but the Farmer, when he
heard talk of the feast, was vexed that he should have been treated only
to bread and cheese. So the woman went down into the cellar and
brought up four dishes,-roast meat, salad, boiled meat, and wine. As
they were sitting down to eat there was a knock outside, and the woman
exclaimed, Oh, gracious there is my husband i" In a great hurry she
stuck the roast meat in the oven, the wine under the pillow, the salad
upon the bed, and the boiled meat under it, while her guest stepped into
a closet where she kept the linen. This done she let in her husband, and
said, God be praised you are returned again what weather it is, as if
the world were coming to an end !"
The Miller remarked the man lying on the straw, and asked what the
fellow did there. His Wife said, Ah, the poor fellow came in the wind
and rain and begged for shelter, so I gave him some bread and cheese and
showed him the straw !"
The husband said he had no objecti-. but bade her bring him quickly
198 00209.jpg
THE LITTLE FARIMIE. 161
something to eat. The wife said, "I have nothing but bread and cheese,"
and her husband told her with that lie should be contented, and asked the
Farmer to come and share his meal. The Farmer did not let himself be
twice asked, but got up and ate away. Presently the Miller remarked
the skin lying upon the ground, in which was the raven, and asked,
"What have you there 1" The Farmer replied, "I have a truth-teller
therein." Can it tell me the truth too V" inquired the Miller.
Why not ? said the other; but he will only say four things, and
the fifth he keeps to himself." The Miller was curious, and wished to
hear it spvak, and the Farmer squeezed the raven's head, so that it
squeaked out. The Miller then asked, What did he say ?" and the
Farmer replied, The first thing is, under the pillow lies wine." That
is a rare tell-tale cried the Miller, and went and found the wine.
" Now again," said he. The Farmer made the raven croak again, and
said, Secondly, he declares there is roast meat in the oven." "That is
a gowd tell-tale !" again cried the Miller, and, opening the oven, he took
out the roast meat. Then the Farmer made the raven croak again, and
said, For the third thing, he declares there is salad on the bed."
That is a good tell-tale cried the Miller, and went and found the
salad. Then the Farmer made his bird croak once more, and said, For
the fourth thing, he declares there is boiled meat under the bed."
"That is a capital tell-tale cried the Miller, while he went and
found as it said.
The worthy pair now sat down together at the table, but the Miller's
wife felt terribly anxious, and went to bed, taking all the keys with her.
The Miller was very anxious to know the fifth thing, but the Man said,
"First let us eat quietly these four things, for the other is somewhat
dreadful."
After they had finished their meal, the Miller bargained as to hot-
much he should give for the fifth thing, and at last he agreed for three
hundred dollars. Then the Farmer once more made the raven croak,
and when the Miller asked what it said, he told him, He declares that
in the cupboard where the linen is there is an evil spirit."
The Miller said, The evil spirit must walk out! and tried the door.
but it was locked, and the woman had to give up the key to the Farmer,
who unlocked it. The unbidden guest at once bolted out, and ran out of
the house, while the Miller said, "Ah, I saw the black fellow, that was all
right !" Soon they went to sleep; but at daybreak the Farmer took his
three hundred dollars and made himself scarce.
The Farmer was now quite rich at home, and built himself a fine
house, so that his fellows said, The Little Farmer has certainly found
the golden snow, of which he has brought away a basketful;" and they
summoned him before the Mayor, that he might be made to say whence
his riches came. The man replied, I have sold my cow's skin in the
city for three hundred dollars." And as soon as the others heard this
they desired also to make a similar profit. The farmers ran home, killed
ill their cows, and, taking their skins off, took them to the city to sell
them for so good a pri-e. The Mayor, however, said, "My maid must
199 00210.jpg
GRIMM'IS HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
go first;" and when she arrived at the city she went to the merchant,
but he gave her only three dollars for her skin. And when the rest
came he would not give them so much, saying, What should I do with
all these skins "
The farmers were much vexed at being outwitted by their poor
neighbour, and, bent on revenge, they complained to the Mayor of his
deceit. The innocent Little Farmer was condemned to death unani-
mously, and was to be rolled in a cask full of holes into the sea. He was
led away, and a priest sent for who should say for him the mass for the
dead. Every one else was obliged to remove to a distance, and when the
Farmer looked at the priest he recognized the guest whom he had met at
the mill. So he said to him, I have delivered you out of the cupboard,
now deliver me from this cask." Just at that moment the Shepherd
passed by with a flock of sheep, and the Farmer, knowing that for a long
time the man had desired to be mayor, cried out with all his might,
" No, no I will not do it; if all the world asked me I would not be it!
No, I will not "
When the Shepherd heard this he came up and said, "What are you
doing here ? What will you not do 1"
The Farmer replied, "They will make me mayor if I keep in this
cask; but no, I will not be here! "
Oh," said the Shepherd, "if nothing more is wanting to be mayor
I am willing to put myself in the cask "
"Yes, you will be mayor if you do that," said the Farmer; and,
getting out of the cask, the other got in, and the Farmer nailed the lid
down again. Now he took the Shepherd's flock and drove it away, while
the parson went to the Judge and told him he had said the prayers for
the dead. Then they went and rolled the cask down to the water, and
while it rolled the Shepherd called out, Yes, I should like to be mayor "
They thought it was the Little Farmer who spoke; and saying, Yes, we
mean it; only you must first go below there;" and they sent the cask
right into the sea.
That done the farmers returned home; and as they came into the
village, so came also the Little Farmer, driving a flock of sheep quietly
and cheerfully. The sight astounded the others, and they asked,
" Whence comest thou ? dost thou come out of the water Cer-
tainly," answered he; "I sank deeper and deeper till I got to the
bottom, where I pushed up the head of the cask, and, getting out, there
were beautiful meadows, upon which many lambs were pasturing, and
I brought this flock of them up with me."
"Are there any more? inquired the farmers. "Oh, yes," replied
he, more tlan you know what to do with "
Then the farmers agreed that they would go and each fetch up a
flock for himself; but the Mayor said, "I must go first." So they went
together down to the water, and there happened to be a fine blue sky
with plenty of fleecy clouds over it, which were mirrored in the wata-
and looked like little lambs. The farmers called one to another, Look
there I we can see the sheep already on the ground below the water "
200 00211.jpg
JORINDE AND JORINGEL. Il
and the Mayor, pressing quite forward, said, "I will go first and look
about me, and see if it is a good place, and then call you."
So saying, he jumped in plump, and, as he splashed the water about,
the others thought he was calling Come along I and so one after
another the whole assemblage plunged in in a grand hurry. Thus was
the whole village cleared out, and the "Little Farmer," as their only
heir, became a very rich man.
JORINDE AND JORINGEL.
ONCE upon a time, in a castle in the midst of a large thick wood, there
lived an old Witch all by herself. By day she changed herself into a cat
or an owl; but in the evening she resumed her right form. She was
able also to allure to her the wild animals and birds, whom she killed,
cooked, and ate, for whoever ventured within a hundred steps of her
castle was obliged to stand still, and could not stir from the spot until
she allowed it; but if a pretty maiden came into the circle the Witch
changed her into a bird, and then put her into a basket, which she
carriedd into one of the rooms in the castle ; and in this room were already
many thousand such baskets of rare birds.
Now there was a young maiden called Jorinde, who was exceedingly
pretty,.and she was betrothed to a youth named Joringel, and just at
the time that the events which I am about to relate happened, they were
passing the days together in a round of pleasure. One day they went
into the forest for a walk, and Joringel said, Take care that you do
not go too near the castle." It was a beautiful evening; the sun shinil
201 00212.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
between the stems of the trees, and brightening up the dark green leaves
and the turtle-doves cooing softly upon the may-bushes. Jorinde began
to cry, and sat down in the sunshine with Joringel, who cried too, for
they were quite frightened, and thought they should die, when they
looked round and saw how far they had wandered, and that there was no
house in sight. The sun was yet half above the hills and half below, and
Joringel, looking through the brushwood, saw the old walls of the castle
close by them, which frightened him terribly, so that he fell off bis seat.
Then Jorinde sang,-
My little bird, with his ring so red,
Sings sorrow, and sorrow and woe;
For he sings that the turtle-dove soon wi P b.i de.d,
Oh sorrow, and sorrow-jug, jug, jug."
Joringei 1itted up his head, and saw Jorinde was changed into a night-
ingale, which was singing, "Jug, jug, jug," and presently an owl flew
round thrice, with his eyes glistening, and crying, "Tu wit, tu woo."
Joringel could not stir; there he stood like a stone, and could not weep,
nor speak, nor move hand or foot. Meanwhile the sun set, and, the owl
flying into a bush, out came an ugly old woman, thin and yellow, with
great red eyes, and a crooked nose which reached down to her chin. She
muttered, and seized the nightingale, and carried it away in her hand,
while Joringel remained there incapable of moving or speaking. At last
the Witch returned, and said, with a hollow voice, Greet you, Zachiel!
if the moon shines on your side, release this one at once." Then Joringel
became free, and fell down on his knees before the Witch, and begged her
to give him back Jorindo ; but she refused, and said he should never
again have her, and went away. He cried, and wept, and groaned after
her, but all to no purpose ; and at length he rose and went into a strange
village, where for some time he tended sheep. He often went round
about the enchanted castle, but never too near, and one night, after so
walking, he dreamt that he found a blood-red flower, in the middle of
which lay a fine pearl. This flower, he thought, he broke off, and, going
therewith to the castle, all he touched with it wad free from enchantment,
and thus he regained his Jorinde.
When he awoke next morning he began his search over hill and valley
to find such a flower, but nine days had passed away. At length, early
one morning he discovered it, and in its middle was a large dewdrop, like
a beautiful pearl. Then he carried the flower day and night, till he came
to the castle; and, although he ventured within the enchanted circle, he
was not stopped, but walked on quite to the door. Joringel was now in
high spirits, and touching the door with his flower, it flew open. He
entered, and passed through the hall, listening for the sound of the birds,
which at last he heard. lie found the room, and went in, and there was
the Enchantress feeding the birds in the seven thousand baskets. As
soon as she saw Joringel, she became frightfully enraged, and spat out
poison and gall at him, but she dared not come too close. He would not
turn back for her, but looked at the baskets of birds; but, alas I there
202 00213.jpg
FIf-APPLB. 100
were many hundreds of nightingales, and how was he to know his
Jorinde t While he was examining them he perceived the old woman
secretly taking away one of the baskets, and slipping out of the door.
Joringel flew after her, and touched the basket with his flower, and also
the old woman, so that she could no longer bewitch; and at once Jorinde
stood before him, and fell upon his neck, as beautiful as she ever was.
Afterwards he disenchanted all the other birds, and then returned home
with his Jorinde, and for many years they lived together happily an'
contentedly.
)
FIR-APPLE.
ONCE on a time as a forester was going into the wood he heard a cry like
that of a child, and walking in the direction of the sound he came to a
fir-tree on which sat a little boy. A mother had gone to sleep under the
tree with her child in her lap, and while she slept a golden eagle had
seized it, and borne it away to the topmost bough in his beak. So the
forester mounted and fetched the child down, and took it home to be
brought up with his daughter Helen; and the two grew up together.
The boy whom he had rescued he named Fir-Apple, in remembrance of
his adventure, and Helen and the boy loved each other so fondly, that
they were quite unhappy whenever they were separated. This forester
had also an old Cook, who one evening took two pails and went to fetc[
water; but she did not go once only, but many times to the spring.
Little Helen, seeing her, asked, Why do you carry in so much water,
old Sarah "
If you will promise not to tell any one, I will let you know,' replied
the Cook.
203 00214.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Little Helen promised not to tell, and the Cook said, "Early in the
morning, when the forester is away to the chase, I shall heat the water,
and when it boils I shall throw in Fir-Apple and stew him."
The next day the forester arose with the sun and went out, while the
children were still in bed. Then Helen said to Fir-Apple, Forsake me
not, and so I will never leave you ;" and he replied, Now and for ever
I will stay with you."
Do you know," continued Helen, "yesterday the old Cook fetched
ever so many pails of water, and I asked her why she did so, and she
said to me, 'If you do not say anything I will tell you;' and, as I pro-
mised not to tell, she said, early this morning, when father has gone out,
she should boil the copper full of water and stew you in it. But let us
get up very quickly, and escape while there is time." So saying, they
both arose, and dressing themselves very hastily, ran away as quickly as
they could. When the water had become boiling hot the old Cook went
into the sleeping-room to fetch Fir-Apple; but, lo! as soon as she entered
and stepped up to the beds, she perceived that both the children were off,
and at the sight she grow very anxious, saying to herself, What shall I
say if the forester comes home and finds bcth the children gone I must
send after them and fetch them back."
Thus thinking, she sent after them three slaves, bidding them over-
take the children as quickly as possible and bring them home. But the
children saw the slaves running towards them, and little Helen said,
"Forsake me not, and so I will never leave you."
Now and always I will keep by you," replied Fir-Apple.
Do you then become a rose-stock, and I will be the bud upon it,"
said Helen.
So, when the slaves came up, tha children were nowhere to be found,
and only a rose-tree, with a single bud thereon, to be seen, and the three
agreed there was nothing to do, and went home and told the old Cook
they had seen nothing at all in the world but a rose-tree with a single
flower upon it. At their tale the old Cook began to scold terribly, and
said, "You stupid simpletons, you should have cut the rose-bush in two,
and broken off the flower and brought it home to me : make haste now
and do so." For the second time they had to go out and search, and
the children seeing them at a distance, little Helen asked her companion
the same question as the first time, and when he gave the same reply,
she said, "Do you then become a church and I will be the crown
therein."
When now the three slaves approached, they found nothing but a
church and a crown inside, so they said to one another, "What can we
do here ? let us go home." As soon as they reached the house, the Cook
inquired what they had found; and when they had told their tale she
was very angry, and told them they ought to have pulled down the
church and brought the crown home with them. When she had finished
scolding, she set out herself, walking with the three slaves, after the
children, who espied her coming from a distance. This time little Helen
proposed that she should become a pond, and Fir-Apple a duck, who
204 00215.jpg
CATHERINE AND PREDERICK.
should swim about on it, and so they changed into these immediately.
When the old woman came up and saw the pond, she lay down by it
and began to drink it up, but the Duck swam very quickly toward her,
and without her knowledge struck his beak into her cap and drew her
into the water, where, after vainly endeavouring to save herself, she sank
to the bottom.
After this the children returned home together and were very happy;
and, if they are not dead, I suppose they are still alive and merry.
CATHERINE AND FREDERICK.
ONcE upon a time there was a youth named Frederick, and a girl called
Catherine, who had married and lived together as a young couple. One
day Fred said, I am now going into the fields, dear Catherine, and by
the time I return let there be something hot upon the table, for I shall
be hungry, and something to drink too, for I shall be thirsty."
"Very well, dear Fred," said she, go at once, and I will make all
right for you."
As soon, then, as dinner-time approached, she took down a sausage
but of the chimney, and putting it in a frying-pan with batter set it
over the fire. Soon the sausage began to frizzle and spit while Catherine
stood by holding the handle of the pan and thinking; and among other
things she thought that while the sausage was getting ready she might
go into the cellar and draw some beer. So she took a can and went
down into the cellar to draw the beer, and while it ran into the can, she
bethought herself that perhaps the dog might steal the sausage out of
the pan, and so up the cellar stairs she ran, but too late, for the rogue
205 00216.jpg
1C8 GrIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
had already got the meat in his mouth and was sneaking off. Catlerin
however, pursued the dog for a long way over the fields, but the heart
was quicker than she, and would not let the sausage go, but bolted off
at a great rate. Off is off!" said Catherine, and turned round, and
being very tired and hot, she went home slowly to cool herself. All
this while the beer was running out of the cask, for Catherine had
forgotten to turn the tap off, and so as soon as the can was full the
liquor ran over the floor of the cellar until it was all out. Catherine saw
the misfortune at the top of the steps. "My gracious !" she exclaimed,
" what shall I do that Fred may not find this out 1 She considered for
some time till she remembered that a sack of fine malt yet remained
from the last brewing, in one corner, which she would fetch down aid
stre v about in the beer. Yes," said she, "it was spared at the right
timn to be useful to me now in my necessity; and down she pulled the
sack so hastily that she overturned the can of beer for Fred, and away
it mixed with the rest on the floor. "It is all right," said she; where
one is, the other should be;" and she strewed the malt over the whole
cellar. When it was done she was quite overjoyed at her work, and said,
"How clean and neat it does look to be sure !"
At noontime Fred returned. Now, wife, what have you ready for
me ?" said he. Ah, my dear Fred," she replied, "I would have fried
you a sausage, but while I drew the beer the dog stole it out of the pan,
and while I hunted the dog the beer all ran out, and as I was about to
dry up the beer with the malt, I overturned your can; but be contented,
the cellar is quite dry again now."
'Oh, Catherine, Catherine!" said Fred, "you should not have done
so to let the sausage be stolen and the beer run out! and over all to
shoot our best sack of malt!!!"
"Well, Fred," said she, "I did not know that; you should have
told me."
But the husband thought to himself, if one's wife acts so, one must
look after things one's self. Now, he had collected a tolerable sum of silver
dollars, which he changed into gold, and then he told his wife, Do you
see, these are yellow counters, which I will put in a pot and bury in the
stable under the cow's stall; but mind that you do not meddle with it,
or you will come to some harm. "
Catherine promised to mind what he said, but, as soon as Fred was
gone, some hawkers came into the village with earthenware for sale, and
amongst others they asked her if she would purchase anything. Ah
good people," said Catherine, "I have no money, and cannot buy any-
thing, but if you can make use of yellow counters I will buy them."
Yellow counters I ah I why not ? let us look at them," said they.
Go into the stable," she replied, and dig under the cow's stall, and
there you will find the yellow counters. I dare not go myself."
The rogues went at once, and soon dug up the shining gold, which
they quickly pocketed, and then they ran off, leaving behind them their
pots and dishes in the house. Catherine thought she might as well make
use of the new Ip:ttery, and since she had no need of anything in tle
206 00217.jpg
CATHERINE AND FREDERICK.
kitchen, she set out each pot on the ground, and then put others on the
top of the palings round the house for ornament. When Fred returned,
and saw the fresh decorations, he asked Catherine what she had done.
I have bought them, Fred," said she, with the yellow counters which
lay under the cow's stall; but I did not dig them up myself; the pedlarn
did that."
"Ah, wife, what have you done ?" replied Fred, "they were not
counters, but bright gold, which was all the property we possessed : you
should not have done so."
"Well, dear Fred," replied his wife, "you should have told me so
before. I did not know that."
Catherine stood considering for a while, and presently she began,
Come, Fred, we will soon get the gold back again; let us pursue the
thieves."
*' Well, come along," said Fred; "we will try at all events; but take
butter and cheese with you, that we may have something to eat on our
journey."
"Yes, Fred," said she, and soon made herself ready; but, her husband
being a good walker, she lagged behind. "Ah !" said she, "this is my
luck, for when we turn back I shall be a good bit forward." Presently
she came to a hill, on both sides of which there were very deep ruts.
Oh, see !" said she, how the poor earth is torn, flayed, and wounded :
it will never be well again all its life !" And out of compassion she took
out her butter, and greased the ruts over right and left, so that the
wheels might run more easily through them, and, while she stooped in
doing this, a cheese rolled out of her pocket down the mountain.
Catherine said when she saw it, "I have already once made the journey
up, and I am not coming down after you: another shall run and fetch
you." So saying, she took another cheese out of her pocket, and rolled
it down; but, as it did not return, she thought, "Perhaps they are
waiting for a companion, and don't like to come alone;" and down she
bowled a third cheese. Still all three stayed, and she said, I cannot
think what was this means; perhaps it is that the third cheese has
missed his way: I will send a fourth, that he may call him as he goes
by." But this one acted no better than the others, and Catherine became
so anxious that she threw down a fifth and a sixth cheese also, and they
were the last. For a long time after this she waited, expecting they
would come, but when she found they did not she cried out, You are
nice fellows to send after a dead man! you stop a fine time! but do
you think I shall wait for you ? Oh, no I shall go on; you can follow
me; you have younger legs than I."
So saying, Catherine walked on and came up with Fred, who was
waiting for her, because he needed something to eat. Now," said he,
" give me quickly what you brought." She handed him the dry bread.
"Where are the butter and cheese? cried her husband. "Oh, Fred,
dear," she replied, "with the butter I have smeared the ruts, and the
cheeses will soon come, but one ran away, and I sent the others after it
to call it back I"
207 00218.jpg
190 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
"It was silly of you to do so," said Fred, "to grease tl e roads witl
butter, and to roll cheeses down the hill! "
If you had but told me so," said Catherine, vexatiously.
So they ate the dry bread together, and presently Fred said,
Catherine, did you make things fast at home before you came out "
"No, Fred," said she, "you did not tell me."
Then go back and lock up the house before we go further; bring
something to eat with you, and I will stop here for you."
Back went Catherine, thinking, "Ah Fred will like something else
to eat. Butter and cheese will not please; I will bring with me a bag
of dried apples and a mug of vinegar to drink." When she had put
these things together she bolted the upper half of the door, but the under
door she raised up and carried away on her shoulder, thinking that
certainly the house was well protected if she took such good care of the
door Catherine walked along now very leisurely, for said she to herself,
"Fred will have all the longer rest!" and as soon as she reached him she
gave him the door, saying, "There, Fred, now you have the house door,
you can take care of the house yourself."
Oh my goodness," exclaimed the husband, what a clever wife I
have she has bolted the top door, but brought away the bottom part,
where any one can creep through Now it is too late to go back to
the house, but since you brought the door here you may carry it
onwards."
"The door I will willingly carry," replied Catherine, "but the apples
and the vinegar will be too heavy, so I shall hang them on the door, and
make that carry them !"
Soon after they came into a wood, and looked about for the thieves,
but they could not find them, and when it became dark they climbed up
into a tree to pass the night. But scarcely had they done this when up
came the fellows who carried away what should not go with them, and
find things before they are lost. They laid themselves down right under
the tree upon which Fred and Catherine were, and making a fire, pre-
pared to share their booty. Then Fred slipped down on the other side,
and collected stones, with which he climbed the tree again to beat the
thieves with. The stones, however, did them no harm, for the fellows
called out, Ah it will soon be morning, for the wind is shaking down
the chestnuts." All this while Catherine still had the door upon her
shoulder, and, as it pressed very heavily, she thought the dried apples
were in fault, and said to Fred, "I must throw down these apples."
No, Catherine," said he, not now, they might discover us." Ah, I
must though, they are so heavy."
"Well, then, do it in the hangman's name !" cried Fred.
As they fell down the rogues said, Ah! the birds are palling off the
.eaves."
A little while after Catherine said again, Oi Fred, I must pour
4ut the vinegar, it is so heavy."
"No, no !" said he, "it will discover us."
"Ah! but I must, Fred, it is very heavy," said Catherine
208 00219.jpg
CATHERINE AND FREDERICK.
SWell, then, do it in the hangman's name !" cried Fred.
So she poured out the vinegar, and as it dropped on them the thieves
said, "Ah the dew is beginning to fall."
Not many minutes after Catherine found the door was still quite as
heavy, and said again to Fred, "Now I must throw down this door."
"No, Catherine," said he, "that would certainly discover us."
"Ah I Fred, but I must; it presses me so terribly."
"No, Catherine dear I do hold it fast," said Fred.
"There-it is gone !" said she.
"Then let it go in the hangman's name !" cried Fred, while it fell
crashing through the branches. The rogues below thought the Evil One
was descending the tree, and ran off, leaving everything behind them.
And early in the morning Fred and his wife descended, and found all
their gold under the tree.
As soon as they got home again, Fred said, "Now, Catherine, you
must be very industrious and work hard."
SYes, my dear husband," said she "I will go into the fields to cut
corn." When she was come into the field she said to herself, "Shall I
eat ,before I cut, or sleep first before I cut I" She determined to eat,
and soon became so sleepy over her meal, that when she began to cut she
knew not what she was doing, and cut off half her clothes, gown, petticoat,
and all. When after a long sleep Catherine awoke, she got up half
stripped, and said to herself, Am I myself or am I not ? Ah I I am
not myself." By-and-by night came on, and Catherine ran into the
village and, knocking at her husband's window, called, "Fred !"
"What is the matter i" cried hae
"I want to know if Catherine is in-doors !" said she.
"Yes, yes answered Fred, she is certainly within, fast asleep."
"Then I am at home," said she, and ran away.
Standing outside Catherine found some thieves, wanting to steal, and
going up to them she said, "I will help you."
At this the thieves were very glad, not doubting but that she knew
where to light on what they sought. But Catherine, stepping in front of
the houses, called out, Good people, what have you that we can steal ?"
At this the thieves said, "You will do for us with a vengeance !" and
they wished they had never come near her; but in order to rid them-
selves of her they said, Just before the village the parson has some roots
lying in his field; go and fetch some."
Catharine went as she was bid, and began to grub for them, and soon
made herself very dirty with the earth. Presently a man came by and
saw her, and stood still, for he thought it was the Evil One who was
grovelling so among the roots. Away he ran into the village to the
parson, and told him the Evil One was in his field, rooting up the turnips.
"Ah heavens !" said the parson, "I have a lame foot, and I cannot go
out to exorcise him."
"Then I will carry you a pick-a-back," said the man, and took
nim up.
209 00220.jpg
GRIMM S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
Just as they arrived in the field, Catharine got up and drew herself
up to her full height.
Oh it is the Evil One !" cried the parson, and both he and the
man hurried away; and, behold! the parson ran faster with his lame
legs, through fear and terror, than the countryman could with his
sound legs !
THE TWO BROTHERS.
ONCE upon a time there were two brothers, the one rich and the other
poor. The rich man was a Goldsmith, and of an evil disposition; but
the poor brother maintained himself by mending brooms, and withal was
honest and pious. He had two children,-twins, as like one another as
two drops of water,-who used often to go into their rich uncle's house and
receive a meal off the fragments which he left. One day it happened
when the poor man had gone into the wood for twigs that he saw a bird,
which was of gold, and more beautiful than he had ever before set eyes
on. He picked up a stone and flung it at the bird, and luckily hit it,
but so slightly that only a single feather dropped off. This feather he
took to his brother, who looked at it and said, "It is of pure gold I" and
gave him a good sum of money for it. The next day he climbed up a
birch-tree to lop off a bough or two, when the same bird flew out of the
branches, and as he looked round he found a nest which contained an egg,
also of gold. This he took home as before to his brother, who said it was
of pure gold, and gave him what it was worth, but said that he must
have the bird itself. For the third time now the poor brother went int
210 00221.jpg
TIE TWO BROTHERS.
abe forest, and saw the Golden Bird sitting again upon the tree, and taking
up a stone he threw it at it, and, securing it, took it to his brother, who
gave him for it a large pile of gold. With this the man thought he
might return, and went home light-hearted.
But the Goldsmith was crafty and bold, knowing very well what sort
of a bird it was. He called his wife and said to her, Roast this bird for
me, and take care of whatever falls from it, for I have a mind to eat it by
myself." Now, the bird was not an ordinary one, certainly, for it pos-
sessed this wonderful power, that whoever should eat its heart and liver
would find henceforth every morning a gold piece under his pillow. The
wife made the bird ready, and putting it on a spit, set it down to roast.
Now it happened that while it was at the fire, and the woman had gone
out of the kitchen on some other necessary work, the two children of the
poor Broom-mender ran in, and began to turn the spit round at the
fire for amusement. Presently two little titbits fell down into the pan
out of the bird, and one of the boys said, Let us eat these two little
pieces, I am so hungry, and nobody will find it out." So they quickly
despatched the two morsels, and presently the woman came back, and,
seeing at once that they had eaten something, asked them what it was.
" Two little bits which fell down out of the bird," was the reply. They
were the heart and liver !" exclaimed the woman quite frightened; and,
in order that her husband might not miss them and be in a passion, she
quickly killed a little chicken, and, taking out its liver and heart, put it
inside the Golden Bird. As soon as it was done enough she carried it to
the Goldsmith, who devoured it quite alone, and left nothing at all on the
plate. The next morning, however, when he looked under his pillow,
expecting to find the gold pieces, there was not the smallest one possible
to be seen.
The two children did not know what good luck had fallen upon them,
and, when they got up the next morning, something fell ringing upon the
ground, and as they picked it up they found it was two gold pieces. They
took them to their father, who wondered very much, and considered what
he should do with them ; but as the next morning the same thing hap-
pened, and so on every day, he went to his brother, and narrated to him
the whole story. The Goldsmith perceived at once what had happened,
that the children had eaten the heart and liver of his bird ; and in order
to revenge himself, and because he was so covetous and hard-hearted, he
persuaded the father that his children were in league with the devil, and
warned him not to take the gold, but to turn them out of the house, for
the Evil One had them in his power, and would make them do some mis-
chief. Their father feared the evil one, and, although it cost him a severe
pang, he led his children out into the forest and left them there with a
sad heart.
Now, the two children ran about the wood, seeking the road home,but
could not find it, so that they only wandered further away. At last they
met a Huntsman, who asked them to whom they belonged. "We are
the children of the poor Broom-mender," they replied, and told him that
thair father could no longer keep them at home, because a gold piece lay
211 00222.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
under their pillows every morning. "Well," replied the Iuntiman, inat
does not seem right, if you are honest and not idle." And the good man,
having no children of his own, took home with him the twins, because
they pleased him, and told them he would be their father and bring them
up. With him they learnt all kinds of hunting, and the gold pieces, which
each one found at his uprising, they laid aside against a rainy day.
When now they became quite young men the Huntsman took them
into the forest, and said, To-day you must perform your shooting trial,
that I may make you free huntsmen like myself." So they went with
him, and waited a long time, but no wild beast approached, and the
Huntsman,-looking up, saw a flock of wild geese flying over in the form
)f a triangle. Shoot one from each corner," said he to the twins, and
when they had done this, another flock came flying over in the form of a
figure of two, and from these they were also bid to shoot one at each cor-
ner. When they had likewise performed this deed successfully, their
foster-father said, I now make you free ; for you are capital marks-
men."
Thereupon the two brothers went together into the fcrest, laying
plans and consulting with each other; and, when at evening-time they
sat down to their meal, they said to their foster-father, "We shall not
touch the least morsel of food till you have granted our request,"
He asked them what it was, and they replied,-
We have now learned everything: let us go into the w >rld, and see
what we can do there, and let us set out at once."
"You have spoken like brave huntsmen," cried the old man, over-
joyed; what you have asked is just what I wished; you can set out as
soon as you like, for you will be prosperous."
Then they ate and drank together once more in great joy anl,
hilarity.
When the appointed day arrived, the old Huntsman gave to each
youth a good rifle and a dog, and let them take from the gold pieces as
many as they liked. Then he accompanied them a part of their way,
and at leaving gave them a bare knife, saying, "If you should separate,
stick this knife in a tree by the roadside, and then, if one returns to the
same point, he can tell how his absent brother fares; for the side upon
which there is a mark will, if he die, rust; but as long as he lives it will
be as bright as ever."
The two brothers now journeyed on till they came to a forest so large
that they could not possibly get out of it in one day, so there they passe)
the night, and ate what they had in their hunters' pockets. The second
day they still walked on, but came to no opening, and having nothing to
eat, one said, "We must shoot something, or we shall die of hunger;"
and he loaded his gun and looked around. Just then an .old Hare came
running up, at which he aimed, but it cried out,-
"Dear huntsman, pray now let me live,
And I will two young lev'rets give."
S. saying, it ran back into the brushwood and brought out two harea,
212 00223.jpg
THE TWO BROTHERS. 195
but they played about so prettily and actively that the Hunters could
not make up their mind to kill them. So they took them with them, and
the two leverets followed in their footsteps. Presently a Fox came up
with them, and, as they were about to shoot it, it cried out,-
Dear hunters, pray now let me live,
And I will two young foxes give."
These it brought; and the brothers, instead of killing them, put them
with the young hares, and all four followed. In a little while a Wolf
came out of the brushwood, whom the Hunters also aimed at, but hb
tried out as the others,-
"Dear hunters, pray now let me live,
Two young ones, in return, I'll give."
The Hunters placed the two wolves with the other animals, who still
followed them; and soon they met a Bear, who also begged for his life,
saying,-
"Dear hunters, pray now let me live,
Two young ones, in return, I'll give."
These two bears were added to the others; they made eight; and now
who came last 1 A Lion, shaking his mane. The two brothers were nol
frightened, but aimed at him, and he cried,-
"Dear hunters, pray now let me live,
Two young ones, in return, I'll give."
The Lion then fetched his two young cubs, and now the Huntsmen had
two lions, two bears, two wolves, two foxes, and two hares following and
waiting upon then Meanwhile their hunger had r ceived no satisfao-
tion, and they said to the Foxes, Here, you slinks, got us something
to eat, for you are both sly and crafty."
The Foxes replied, ot far from here lies a village, where we can
procure many fowls, and thither we will show you the way."
So they went into the village, and bought something to eat for them-
selves and their animals, and then went on further, for the Foxes wera
well acquainted with the country where the hen-roosts were, and so could
direct the Huntsmen well.
For some little way they walked on without finding any situations
where they could live together ; so they said to one another, It cannot
be otherwise, we must separate." Then the two brothers divided the
beasts, so that each one had a lion, a bear, a wolf, a fox, and a hare; and
then they took leave of each other, promising to love one another till
death; and the knife which their foster-father gave them they stuck in a
tree, so that one side pointed to the east, and the other to the west.
The younger brother came afterwards with his animals to a town
which was completely hung with black crape. He went into an inn and
inquired if he could lodge his beasts, and the landlord gave him a stable,
and in the wall was a hole through which the hare crept and seized upon
a cabbage; the fox fetched himself a hen, and when he had eaten it he
213 00224.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
stole the cock also ; but the lion, the bear, and the wolf, being too big fou
the hole, could get nothing. The master, therefore, made the host fetch
an ox for them, on which they regaled themselves merrily, and so, having
seen after his beasts, he asked the landlord why the town was all hung in
mourning. The Landlord replied, it was because the next day the King's
only daughter was to die. "Is she then sick unto death V" inquired the
Huntsman.
No," replied the other, "she is well enough; but still she must
die."
How is that? asked the Huntsman.
Out there before the town," said the Landlord, "is a high mountain
on which lives a Dragon, who must every year have a pure maiden, or
he would lay waste all the country. Now, all the maidens have been
given up, and there is but one left, the King's daughter, who must also
be give up, for there is no other escape, and to-morrow morning it is
to happen.
The Huntsman asked, Why is the Dragon not killed ?"
"Ah !" replied the Landlord, "many knights nave tried, but every
one has lost his life; and the King has promised his own daughter to
him who conquers the Dragon, and after his death the inheritance of his
kingdom."
The Huntsman said nothing further at that time, but the next
morning, taking with him his beasts, he climbed the Dragon's mountain.
A little way up stood a chapel, and upon an altar therein were three
cups, and by them was written, Whoever drinks the contents of these
cups will be the strongest man on earth, and may take the sword which
lies buried beneath the threshold." Without drinking, the Huntsman
sought and found the sword in the ground, but he could not move it
from its place ; so he entered, and drank out the cups, and then he easily
pulled out the sword, and was so strong that he waved it about like a
feather.
When the hour arrived that the maiden should be delivered over to
the Dragon, the King and his Marshal accompanied her with all the
court. From a distance they perceived the Huntsman upon the moun-
tain, and took him for the Dragon waiting for them, and so would not
ascend; but at last, because the whole city must otherwise have been
sacrificed, the Princess was forced to make the dreadful ascent. Th
King and his courtiers returned home full of grief, but the Marshal had
to stop and watch it all from a distance.
As the King's daughter reached the top of the hill, she found there,
not the Dragon, but the young Hunter, who comforted her, saying, he
would save her, and, leading her into the chapel, shut her up therein.
In a short time the seven-headed Dragon came roaring up with a tre-
mendous noise, and, as soon as he perceived the Hunter, he was amazed,
and asked, What do you here on my mountain 1"
The Hunter replied that he came to fight him, and the Dragon said,
breathing out fire as he spoke from his seven jaws, Many a knight has
already left his life behind him, and you I will soon kill as dead as they."
214 00225.jpg
THE TWO BROTHERS.
The fire from his throat set the grass in a blaze, and would have suffocated
the Hunter with the smoke, had not his beasts come running up and
stamped it out. Then the Dragon made a dart at the Hunter, but he
swung his sword round so that it whistled in the air, and cut off three of
the beast's heads. The Dragon now became furious, and raised himself
in the air, spitting out fire over his enemy, and trying to overthrow him;
but the Hunter, springing on one side, raised his sword again, and cut
off three more of his heads. The beast was half killed with this, and
sank down, but tried once more to catch the Hunter, but he beat him
off, and, with his last strength, cut off his tail; and then, being unable
to fight longer, he called his beasts, who came and tore the Dragon in
pieces.
As soon as the battle was over, he went to the chapel and unlocked
the door, and found the Princess lying on the floor; for, from anguish
and terror, she had fainted away while the contest was going on. The
Hunter carried her out, and when she came to herself and opened her
eyes, he showed her the Dragon torn to pieces, and said she was now safe
for ever. The sight made her quite happy, and she said, Now you will
be my husband, for my father has promised me to him who should kill
the Dragon." So saying, she took off her necklace of coral, and divided
it among the beasts for a reward, the Lion receiving the gold snap for his
share. But her handkerchief, on which her name was marked, she
presented to the Huntsman, who went and cut out the tongues of the
Dragon's seven mouths, and, wrapping them in the handkerchief, preserved
them carefully.
All this being done, the poor fellow felt so weary with the battle with
the Dragon and the fire, that he said to the Princess, Since we are both
so tired, let us sleep awhile." She consented, and they lay down on the
ground, and the Hunter bid the Lion watch that nobody surprised them.
Soon they began to snore, and the Lion sat down near them to watch;
but he was also weary with fighting, and he said to the Bear, "Do you
lie down near me, for I must sleep a bit; but wake me up if any one
comes." So the Bear did as he was bid ; but soon getting tired, he asked
the Wolf to watch for him. The Wolf consented, but before long he
called the Fox, and said, Do watch for me a little while, I want to have
a nap, and you can wake me if any one comes." The Fox lay down by
his side, but soon felt so tired himself that he called the Hare, and asked
him to take his place and watch while he slept a little. The Hare came,
ind lying down too, soon felt very sleepy; but he had no one to call
in his place, so by degrees he dropped off himself, and began to snore.
Here, then, were sleeping, the Princess, the Huntsman, the Lion, the Bear.
the Wolf, the Fox, and the Hare; and all were very sound asleep.
Meanwhile the Marshal, who had been set to watch below, not seeing
the Dragon fly away with the Princess, and all appearing very quiet, took
heart and climbed up the mountain. There lay the Dragon, dead and
torn to pieces on the ground, and not far off the King's daughter and a
Huntsman with his beasts, all reposing in a deep sleep Now, the Marshal
was very wickedly disposed, and, taking his sword, he cut off the head of
215 00226.jpg
198 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
the Huntsman, and then, taking the maiden under his arm, carried her
down the mountain. At this she awoke, terrified, and the Marshal cried
to her, "You are in my hands : you must say that it was I who have
killed the Dragon."
That I cannot," she replied, for a hunter and his animals did it."
Then he drew his sword, and threatened her with death if she did not
obey, till at last she was forced to consent. Thereupon he brought her
before the King, who went almost beside himself with joy at seeing again
his dear daughter, whom he supposed had been torn in pieces by the
monster. The Marshal tOld the King that he had killed the Dragon, and
freed the Princess and the whole kingdom, and therefore he demanded
her for a wife, as it had been promised. The King inquired of his
daughter if it were true "Ah, yes," she replied, "it must be so ; but
I make a condition, that the wedding shall not take place for a year and
a day;" for she thought to herself that perhaps in that time she might
hear some news of her dear Huntsman.
But up the Dragon's mountain the animals still laid asleep beside
their dead master, when presently a great Bee came and settled on the
Hare's nose, but he lifted his paw and brushed it off. The Bee came a
second time, but the Hare brushed it off again, and went to sleep. For
the third time the Bee settled, and stung the Hare's nose so that he
woke quite up. As soon as he had risen and shaken himself he awoke
the Fox, and tle Fox awoke the Wolf, the Wolf awoke the Bear, and the
Bear awoke the Lion. As soon as the Lion got up and saw that the
maiden was gone and his dear master dead, he began to roar fearfully,
and asked, "Who has done this ? Bear, why did you not wake me?"
The Bear asked the Wolf, Why did you not wake me 7" The Wolf
asked the Fox, "Why did you not wake me?" and the Fox asked the
Hare, Why did you not wake me ?" The poor Hare alone had nothing
to answer, and the blame was attached to him, and the others would
have fallen upon him, but he begged for his life, saying, Do not kill me,
and I will restore our dear master to life. I know a hill where grows a
root, and he who puts it in his mouth is healed immediately from all
diseases or wounds; but this mountain lies two hundred hours' journey
from hence."
The Lion said, In four-and-twenty hours you must go and return
here bringing the root with you."
The Hare immediately ran off, and in four-and-twenty hours returned
with the root in his mouth. Now the Lion put the Huntsman's head
again to his body while the Hare applied the root to the wound, and
immediately the Huntsman began to revive, and his heart beat and life
returned. The Huntsman now awoke, and was frightened to see the
maiden no longer with him, and he thought to himself, Perhaps she ran
away while I slept, to get rid of me." But, in his haste, the Lion had
unluckily set his master's head on the wrong way, but the Hunter did
not find it out till midday, when he wanted to eat, being so occupied
with thinking about the Princess. Then, when he wished to help himself,
he discovered his head was turned to his back, and, unable to imagine the
216 00227.jpg
THE TWO BROTHERS. 199
cause, he asked the animals what had happened to him in his sleep.
The Lion told him that from weariness they had all gone to sleep, and,
on awaking, they had found him dead, with his head cut off; that the
Hare had fetched the life-root, but in his great haste he had turned his
head the wrong way, but that he would make it all right again in no
time. So saying, he cut off the Iuntsman's head and turned it round,
while the Hare healed the wound with the root.
After this the Hunter became very mopish, and went about from
place to place, letting his animals dance to the people for show. It
chanced, after a year's time, that he came again into the same town
where he had rescued the Princess from the Dragon; and this time it
was hung all over with scarlet cloth. He asked the Landlord of the inn,
"What means this 1 a year ago the city was hung with black crape, and
to-day it is all in red !" The Landlord replied, "A year ago our King's
daughter was delivered to the Dragon, but our Marshal fought with it
and slew it, and this day their marriage is to be celebrated; before the
tov n was hung with crape in token of grief and lamentation, but to-day
with scarlet cloth, to show our joy."
The next day, when the wedding was to take place, the Huntsman
said to the Landlord, Believe it or not, mine host, but to-day I will eat
bread at the same table with the King!"
Well," said he, I will wager you a hundred pieces that that doesn't
come true."
The Huntsman took the bet, and laid down his money; and then,
calling the Hare, he said, Go, dear Jumper, and fetch me a bit of bread
such as the King eats."
Now, the Hare was the smallest, and therefore could not intrust his
business to any one else, but was obliged to make himself ready to go.
"Oh !" thought he, if I jump along the streets alone, the butchers' dogs
will come out after me."
While he stood considering it happened as he thought; for the dogs
came behind and were about to seize him for a choice morsel, but he
made a spring (had you but seen it!), and escaped into a sentry-box
without the soldier knowing it. The dogs came and tried to hunt him
out, but the soldier, not understanding their sport, beat them off with a
club so that they ran howling and barking away. As soon as the Hare
saw the coast was clea-, he ran up to the castle and into the room where
the Princess was; and, getting under her stool, began to scratch her foot.
The Princess said, Will you be quiet 2" thinking it was her dog. Then
the Hare scratched her foot a second time, and she said again, Will you
be quiet ?" but the Hare would not leave off, and a third time scratched
her foot; and now she peeped down and recognized the Hare by his
necklace. She took him up in her arms, and carried him into her
chamber, "Dear Hare, what do you want ?" The Hare replied, My
master, who killed the Dragon, is here, and sent me: I am come for a
piece of bread such as the King eats."
At these words she became very glad, and bade her servant bring
her a piece of bread such as the King was accustomed to have. When
217 00228.jpg
200 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
it was brought, the Hare said, The Baker must carry it for me, or the
butchers' dogs will seize it." So the Baker carried it to the door of the
inn, where the Hare got upon his hind legs, and, taking the bread in his
forepaws, carried it to his master. Then the Huntsman said, See here,
my host : the hundred gold pieces are mine.'
The Landlord wondered very much, but the Huntsman said furtlhe,
Yes, I lave got the King's bread, and now I will have some of his
meat." To this the Landlord demurred, but would not bet again; and
his guest, calling the Fox, said, My dear Fox, go and fetch me some of
the meat which the King is to eat to-day."
The Fox was more cunning than the Hare, and went through the
lanes and alleys, without seeing a dog, straight to the royal palace, and
into the room of the Princess, under whose stool he crept. Presently he
scratched her foot, and the Princess, looking down, recognized the Fox
with her necklace, and, taking him into her room, she asked, What do
you want, dear Fox ?" He replied, My master who killed the Dragon
is here, and sent me to beg a piece of the meat such as the King will eat
to-day."
The Princess summoned the cook, and made her prepare a dish of meat
like the King's ; and, when it was ready, carry it for the Fox to the
door of the inn. Then the Fox took the dish himself; and, first driving
the flies away with a whisk of his tail, carried it in to the Hunter.
See here, master Landlord," said he ; here are the bread and meat:
now 1 will have the same vegetables as the King eats."
He called the Wolf, and said, Dear Wolf, go and fetch me some
vegetables the same as the King eats to-day."
The Wolf went straight to the castle like a person who feared nobody,
and, when he came into the Princess's chamber, he plucked at her clothes
behind so that she looked round. The maiden knew the Wolf by h's
necklace, and took him with her into her room, and said, Dear Wolf,
what do you want I"
The beast replied, My master who killed the Dragon is here, and
has sent me for some vegetables like those the King eats to-day."
Then she bade the cook prepare a dish of vegetables the same as
the King's, and carry it to the inn-door for the Wolf, who took it of her
and bore it in to his master. The Hunter said, See here, my host :
now I have bread, meat, and vegetables the same as the King's, but I
will also have the same sweetmeats." Then he called to the Bear,
" Dear Bear, go and fetch me some sweetmeats like those the King has
for his dinner to-day, for you like sweet things." The Bear rolled along
up to the castle, while every one got out of his way; but, when he
came to the guard, he pointed his gun at him and would not let him
pass into the royal apartments. The Bear, however, got up on his hind
legs, and gave the guard right and left a box on the ears with his paw,
which knocked him down; and thereupon he went straight to the room
of the Princess, and, getting behind her, growled slightly. She looked
round, and perceived the Bear, whom she took into her own chamber,
and asked him what he came for. My master who slew the Dravgo
218 00229.jpg
THE TWO BROTHERS. 201
is here," said he, "and has sent me for some sweetmeats such as the
King eats." The Princess let the sugar-baker be called, and bade him
prepare sweetmeats like those the King had, and carry them for the
Bear to the inn. There the Bear took charge of them ; and, first licking
off the sugar which had boiled over, he took them in to his master.
"See here, friend Landlord," said the Huntsman; "now I have
bread, meat, vegetables and sweetmeats from the table of the King; but
I mean also to drink his wine."
He called the Lion, and said, Dear Lion, I should be glad to have a
draught: go and fetch me some wine like that the King drinks."
The Lion strode through the town, where all the people made way
for him, and soon came to the castle, where the watchmen attempted to
stop him at the gates; but, just giving a little bit of a roar, they were
so frightened that they all ran away. He walked on to the royal apart-
ments, and knocked with his tail at the door ; and, when the Princess
opened it, she was at first frightened to see a Lion; but, soon recognizing
him by the gold snap of her necklace which he wore, she took him into
her room, and asked, Dear Lion, what do you wish I"
The Lion replied, My master who killed the Dragon is here, and has
sent me to fetch him wine like that the King drinks at his own table."
The Princess summoned the butler, and told him to give the Lion wine
such as the King drank. But the Lion said, I will go down with you
and see that I have the right." So he went with the butler; and, as
they were come below, he was about to draw the ordinary wine such as
was drunk by the King's servants, but the Lion cried, Hold I will
first taste the wine ;" and, drawing for himself half a cupful, he drank it,
and said, "No that is not the real wine." The butler looked at him
askance, and went to draw from another cask which was made for the
King's Marshal. Then the Lion cried, Hold! first I must taste ;" and,
drawing half a flagon full, he drank it off, and said, This is better; but
still not the right wine." At these words the butler put himself in a
passion, and said, "What does such a stupid calf as you know about
wine V" The Lion gave him a blow behind the ear, so that he fell down
upon the ground; and, as soon as he came to himself, he led the Lion
quite submissively into a peculiar little cellar where the King's wine was
kept, of which no one ever dared to taste. But the Lion, first drawing
for himself half a cupful, tried the wine, and saying, This must be the
real stuff," bade the butler fill six bottles with it. When this was done
they mounted the steps again, and as the Lion came out of the cellar into
the fresh air he reeled about, being a little elevated ; so that the butler
had to carry the wine-basket for him to the inn, where the Lion, taking
it again in his mouth, carried it in to his master. The Hunter called
the Landlord and said, See here : now I have bread, meat, vegetables,
sweetmeats, and wine, the very same as the King will himself eat to-day,
and so I will make my dinner with my animals." They sat down and ate
and drank away, for he gave the Hare, the Fox, the Wolf, the Bear, and
the Lion, their share of the good things, and was very happy, for he
felt the King's daughter still toved him. When he had finished his meal
219 00230.jpg
902 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
he said to the landlord, Now, as I have eaten and drank the same
things as the King, I will even go to the royal palace and marry the
Princess-'
The Landlord said, How can that be, for she is already betrothvl,
and to-day the wedding is to be celebrated 1"
Then the Hunter drew out the handkerchief which the King's daughter
had given him on the Dragon's mountain, and wherein the seven tongues
of the Dragon's seven heads were wrapped, and said, This shall nelp me
to do it."
The Landlord looked at the handkerchief and said, If I believe all
that has been done, still I cannot believe that, and will wager my house
and garden upon it."
Thereupon the Huntsman took out a purse with a thousand gold
pieces in it, and said, I will bet you that against your house and
garden."
Meantime the King asked his daughter, What do all these wild
beasts mean who have come to you to-day, and passed and repassed in
and out of my castle "
She replied, "I dare not tell you, but send and let the master of
these beasts be fetched, and you will do well."
The .King sent a servant to the inn to invite the strange man to
come, and arrived just as the Hunter had concluded his wager with the
Landlord. So he said, See, mine host, the King even sends a servant
to invite me to come, but I do not go yet." And to the servant he said,
I beg that the King will send me royal clothes, and a carriage with six
horses, and servants to wait on me."
When the King heard this answer, he said to his daughter, What
shall I do 1" "Do as he desires, and you will do well," she replied. So
the King sent a suit of royal clothes, a carriage with six horses, and some
servants to wait upon the man. As the Hunter saw them coming, he
said to the Landlord, See here, I am fetched just as I desired," and,
putting on the royal clothes, he took the handkerchief with him and drove
to the King. When the King saw him coming he asked his daughter
how he should receive him, and she said, Go out to meet him, and
you will do well." So the King met him and led him into the palace,
the animals following. The King showed him a seat near himself and
his daughter, and the Marshal sat upon the other side as the bridegroom.
Now, against the walls was the seven-headed Dragon placed, stuffed as if
it were yet alive; and the King said, The seven heads of that Dragon
were cut off by our Marshal, to whom this day I give my daughter in
marriage."
Then the Hunter rose up, and, opening the seven jaws of the Dragon,
asked where were the seven tongues. This frightened the Marshal, and
he turned pale as death, but at last, not knowing what else to say, he
stammered out, Dragons have no tongues."
The Hunter replied, "Liars should have none, but the Dragon's
tongues are the trophies of the Dragon-slayer;" and so saying he
unwrapped the handkerchief, and there lay all seven, and he put one into
220 00231.jpg
THE TWO BROTHERS.
eao. mouth of the monster, and they fitted exactly. Then he took the
handkerchief upon which her name was marked and showed it to the
maiden, and asked her to whom she had given it, and she replied, To
him who slew the Dragon." Then he called his beasts, and taking from
each the necklace, and from the Lion the golden snap, he put them
together, and showing them to the Princess too, asked to whom they
belonged. The Princess said, "The necklace and the snap were mine,
and I shared it among the animals who helped to conquer the Dragon."
Then the Huntsman said, When I was weary and rested after the
fight, the Marshal came and cut off my head, and then took away the
Princess, and gave out that it was he who had conquered the Dragon.
Now that he has lied, I show these tongues, this necklace, and this
handkerchief for proofs." And then he related how the beasts had cured
him with a wonderful root, and that for a year he had wandered, and at
last had come hither again, where he had discovered the deceit of the
Marshal through the innkeeper's tale. Then the King asked his daughter,
"Is it true that this man killed the Dragon ?"
"Yes," she replied, it is true ; for I dared not disclose the treachery
of the Marshal, because he threatened me with instant death. But now
it is known without my mention, and for this reason have I delayed the
wedding a year and a day."
After these words the King ordered twelve councillors to be sum-
moned who should judge the Marshal, and these condemned him to be
torn in pieces by four oxen. So the Marshal was executed, and the
King gave his daughter to the Huntsman, and named him Stadtholder
over all his kingdom. The wedding was celebrated with great joy, and
the young King caused his father and foster-father to be brought to
him, and loaded them with presents. He did not forget either the
Landlord, but bade him welcome, and said to him, "See you here, my
host : I have married the daughter of the King, and thy house and
garden are mine." The Landlord said that was according to right; but
the young King said, "It shall be according to mercy ;" and he gave him
back not only his house and garden, but also presented him with the
thousand gold pieces he had wagered.
Now the young King and Queen were very happy, and lived together
in contentment. He often went out hunting, because he delighted in it;
and the faithful animals always accompanied him.
In the neighbourhood there was a forest which it was said was
haunted, and that if one entered it he did not easily get out again. The
young King, however, took a great fancy to hunt in it, and he let the
old King have no peace till he consented to let him. Away then he rode
with a great company; and, as he approached the forest, he saw a snow-
white hind going into it; so, telling his companions to await his return,
he rode off among the trees, and only his faithful beasts accompanied
him. The courtiers waited and waited till evening, but he did not
return; so they rode home, and told the young Queen that her hus-
band had ridden into the forest after a white doe, and had not again
rome out. The news made her very anxious about him. He. however
221 00232.jpg
GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
had ridden farther and farther into the wood after the beautiful animal
without catching it ; and, when he thought it was within range of his
gun, with one spring it got away, till at last it disappeared altogether.
Then he remarked for the first time how deeply he had plunged into the
thickets; and, taking his horn, he gave a blast, but there was no answer,
for his people could not hear it. Presently night began to close in ; and
perceiving that he could not get home that day, he dismounted, and,
making a fire, prepared to pass the night. While he sat by the fire, with
his beasts lying near all around him, he thought he heard a human
voice, but, on looking round, he could see nobody. Soon after he heard
again a groan, as if from a box; and, looking up, he saw an old Woman
sitting upon the tree, who was groaning and crying, Oh, oh, oh, how I
do freeze !" He called out, "Come down and warm yourself if you
freeze." But she said, "No; your beasts will bite me." He replied,
"They will not harm you, my good lady, if you like to come down."
But she was a Witch, and said, I will throw you down a twig, which if
you beat upon their backs they will then do nothing to me." He did as
was requested ; and immediately they laid down quietly enough, for
they were changed into stones. Now, when the old woman was safe
from the animals, she sprang down, and, touching the King too with a
twig, converted him also into a stone. Thereupon she laughed to her-
self, and buried him and his beasts in a grave where already were many
more stones.
Meantime the young Queen was becoming more and more anxious
and sad when her husband did not return ; and,just then it happened
that the other brother, who had travelled towards the east when they
separated, came into the territory. He had been seeking and had found
no service to enter, and was, therefore, travelling through the country,
and making his animals dance for a living. Once he thought he would
go and look at the knife which they had stuck in a tree at their
separation, in order to see how his brother fared. When he looked at
it, lo his brother's side was half rusty and half bright At this he
was frightened, and thought his brother had fallen into some great
misfortune; but he hoped yet to save him, for one-half of the knife was
bright. He, therefore, went with his beasts towards the west; and, as
he came to the capital city, the watch went out to him, and asked if ho
should mention his arrival to his bride, for the young Queen had for two
days been in great sorrow and distress at his absence, and feared he had
been killed in the enchanted wood. The watchman thought certainly he
was no one else than the young King, for he was so much like him, and
had also the same wild beasts returning after him. The Huntsman per-
ceived he was speaking of his brother, and thought it was all for the best
that he should give himself out as his brother, for so, perhaps, he might
more easily save him. So lie let himself be conducted by the watchman
into the castle, and was there received with great joy, for the young
Queen took him for her husband also, and asked him where he had
topped so long. IIe told her lie had lost his way in a wood, and
oou'd not find his way out earlier.
222 00233.jpg
T11L TWO ~nOTHERS.
For a couple of days he rested at home, but was always asking about
the enchanted wood ; and at last he said, I must hunt there once more."
The King and the young Queen tried to dissuade him, but he was
resolved, and went out with a great number of attendants. As soon as
he got into the wood, it happened to him as to his brother : he saw a
white hind, and told his people to wait his return where they were,
while he hunted the wild animal, and immediately rode off, his beasts
following his footsteps. But be could not catch the hind any more than
his brother ; and he went so deep into the wood that he was forced to
pass the night there. As soon as he had made a fire, he heard some one
groaning above him, and saying, Oh, oh, oh, how I do freeze !" Then
he looked up, and there sat the same old Witch in the tree, and he said
to her, If you freeze, old Woman, why don't you come down and warm
yourself 1" She replied, No, your beasts would bite me ; but if you
will beat them with a twig which I will throw down to you they can do
me no harm." When the Hunter heard this, he doubted the old Woman,
and said to her, I do not beat my beasts; so come down, or I will
fetch you." But she called out, "What are you thinking of, you can do
nothing to me 7" He answered, "Come down, or I will shoot you."
The old Woman laughed, and said, "Shoot away I am not afraid
of your bullets "
He knelt down and shot, but she was bullet proof; and, laughing till
she yelled, called out, You cannot catch me However, the Hunter
knew a trick or two, and tearing three silver buttons from his coat, he
loaded his gun with them ; and, while he was ramming them down, the
old Witch threw herself from the tree with a loud shriek, for she was not
proof against such shot. He placed his foot upon her neck, and said,
Old Witch, if you do not quickly tell me where my brother is, I will
tie your hands together, and throw you into the fire !"
She was in great anguish, begged for mercy, and said, He lies with
his beasts in a grave, turned into stone." Then he forced her to go
with him, threatening her, and saying, "You old cat I now turn my
brother and all the creatures which lie here into their proper forms, or I
will throw you into the fire !"
The old Witch took a twig, and changed the stones back to what they
were, and immediately his brother and the beasts stood before the Hunts-
man, as well as many merchants, work-people, and shepherds, who,
delighted with their freedom, returned home; but the twin brothers,
when they saw each other again, kissed and embraced, and were very
glad. They seized the old Witch, bound her, and laid her on the fire;
and, when she was consumed, the forest itself disappeared, and all was
clear and free from trees, so that one could see the royal palace three
miles off.
Now the two brothers went together home; and on the way told
each other their adventures. And when the younger one said he was
lord over the whole land in place of the King, the other one said, All
that I was well aware of; for, when I went into the city, I was taken for
you. And all kingly honour was paid to me, the young Queen even
223 00234.jpg
206 GRIMIM'S IIOUSEIIOLD STORIES.
mistaking me for her true husband, and making me sit at her table, and
sleep in her room." When the first one heard this, he became very
aogry, and so jealous and passionate, that, drawing his sword, he cut off
the head of his brother. But as soon as he had done so, and saw the red
blood flowing from the dead body, he repented sorely, and said, My
brother has saved me, and I have killed him for so doing;" and he
groaned pitifully. Just then the hare came, and offered to fetch the
healing root, and then, running off, brought it just at the right time, so
that the dead man was restored to life again, and not even the mark of
the wound was to be seen.
After this adventure they went on, and the younger brother said,
" You see that we have both got on royal robes, and have both the same
beasts following us; we will, therefore, enter the city at opposite gates,
rnd arrive from the two quarters the same time before the King."
So they separated; and at the same moment the watchman from
each gate came to the King, and informed him that the young Prince
with the beasts had returned from the hunt. The King said, It is not
possible, for your two gates are a mile asunder But in the meantime
the two brothers had arrived in the castle-yard, and began to mount the
stairs. When they entered, the King said to his daughter, "Tell me
which is your husband, for one appears to me the same as the other, and
I cannot tell." The Princess was in great trouble, and could not tell
which was which ; but at last she bethought herself of the necklace which
she had given to the beasts, and she looked and found on one of the Lions
her golden snap, and then she cried exultingly, He to whom this Lion
belongs is my rightful husband." Then the young King laughed, and
said, "Yes, that is right ;" and they sat down together at table, and ate,
nid drank, and were merry. At night when the young King went to
bed his wife asked him why he had placed on the two previous nights a
sword in the bed, for she thought it was to kill her. Then the young
King knew how faithful his brother had been.
224 00235.jpg
THE GOLDEN GOOSE.
aHERE was once a man who had three sons, the youngest of whom was
named Dummling, and on that account was despised and slighted, and
put back on every occasion. It happened that the eldest wished to go
into the forest to hew wood, and before he went his mother gave him a
fine large pancake and a bottle of wine to take with him. Just as he
got into the forest, he met a grey old man, who bade him good-day, and
said, Give me a piece of your pancake and a sip of your wine, for I am
very hungry and thirsty." The prudent youth, however, would not,
saying, If I should give you my cake and wine, I shall have nothing
left for myself; no, pack off!" and he left the man there and went
onwards. He now began to hew down a tree, but he had not made
many strokes before he missed his aim, and the axe cut into his arm so
deeply, that he was forced to go home and have it bound up. But this
wound came from the little old man.
Afterwards the second son went into the forest, and the mother gave
him, as she had given the eldest, a pancake and a bottle of wine. The
same little old man met him also, and requested a piece of his cake and
a draught from his bottle. But he likewise refused, and said, What I
give to you I cannot have for myself; go, take yourself off!" and, so
speaking, he left the old man there and went onwards. His reward,
however, soon came, for when he had made two strokes at the tree he
cut his own leg, so that he was obliged to return home.
Then Dummling asked his father to let him go and hew wood; but
his father said, No ; your brothers have harmed themselves in so
doing, and so will you, for you do not understand anything about it."
But Dummling begged and prayed so long, that his father at length
said, "Well then, go, and you will become prudent through experience."
His mother gave him only a cake which had been baked in the ashes, and
a bottle of sour beer. As he entered the forest the same grey old man
greeted him, and asked, "Give me a piece of your cake and a draught
out of your bottle, for I am hungry and thirsty."
225 00236.jpg
GIRIMM'S HOUSEIOTMb STORMIB.
Dummling ah'wered, I have only a cake baked in the ashes, aid a
bottle of sour beer; but, if they will suit you, let us sit down and eat."
They sat down, and as soon as Dummling took out his cake, lo it
was changed into a nice pancake, and the sour beer had become wine.
They ate and drank, and when they had done the little man said,
" Because you have a good heart, and have willingly shared what you had,
I will make you lucky. There stands an old tree, cut it down, and you
will find something at the roots." Thereupon the little man took leave.
Dummling went directly and cut down the tree, and when it fell,
there sat amongst the roots a Goose, which had feathers of pure gold.
HIe took it up and carried it with him to an inn, where he intended to
pass the night. The landlord had three daughters, who, as soon as they
saw the Goose, were very covetous of such a wonderful bird, even to have
but one of its feathers. The eldest girl thought she would watch an
opportunity to pluck out one, and, just as Dummling was going out, she
caught hold of one of the wings, but her finger and thumb stuck there,
and she could not move. Soon after came the second, desiring also to
pluck out a feather; but scarcely had she touched her sister, when she was
bound fast to her. At last the third came also, with like intention, and
the others exclaimed, Keep away for heaven's sake keep away !" But
she did not see why she should, and thought, "The others are there,
why should I not be too? and springing up to them, she touched her
sister, and at once was made fast, so they had to pass the night with the
Goose.
The next morning Dummling took the Goose under his arm and
went out, without troubling himself about the three girls, who were still
hanging on, and who were obliged to keep on the run behind him, now
to the left, and now to the right, just as he thought proper. In the
middle of a field the Parson met them, and when he saw the procession
he cried out, For shame, you good-for-nothing wenches! what are you
running after that young man across the fields for 1 Come, pray leave
off that sport !" So saying he took the youngest by the hand and tried
to pull her away; but as soon as he touched her he also stuck fast, and
was forced to follow in the train. Soon after came the Clerk, and saw
his master the Parson following in the footsteps of the three maidens.
The sight astonished him much, and he called, "Holloa, master where
are you going so quickly ? have you forgotten that there is a christening
to-day V" and he ran up to him and caught him by the gown. The
Clerk also could not release himself, and so there tramped the five, one
behind another, till they met two countrymen returning with their
hatchets in their hands. The Parson called out to them, and begged
them to come and release him and the Clerk; but no sooner had they
touched the Clerk, than they stuck fast to him, and so now there were
seven all in a line following behind Dummling and the golden Goose.
By-and-by he came into a city, where a King ruled, who had a daughter
so seriously inclined that no one could make her laugh ; so he had made
a law that whoever should cause her to laugh, should have her to wife.
Now, when Dummling heard this, he went with his Goose and all his
226 00237.jpg
THE GOLDEN GOOSE.
train before the Princess, and, as soon as she saw these seven poor crea-
tures continually on the trot behind one anotSer, she began to laugh so
heartily, as if aie were never going to cease. Dummling thereupon
demanded his bride; but his intended son-in-biw did not please the
King, who, after a variety of excuses, at last said lie must bring him a
man who could drink a cellar-full of wine. Dummliug bethought himself
of the grey little man, who would, no doubt, be able to help him; and,
going into the forest, on the same spot where he had felled the tree, he
saw a man sitting with a very melancholy countenance. Dummlmg
asked him what he was taking to heart so sorely, an I he answered, '- I
have such a great thirst and cannot quench it; for cold water I cannot
bear, and a cask of wine I soon empty; for what good is such a drop as
that to a hot stone "
"There, I can help you," said Dummling; "comr with me, and you
hall be satisfied."
He led him into the King's cellar, and the man drank and drank away
at the cask till his veins swelled; but before the day was out he had
emptied all the wine-barrels. Dummling now demanded his bride again,
but the King was vexed that such an ugly fellow, whom every one called
Dummling, should take away his daughter, and he made a new condition
that he must first find a man who could eat a whole mountain of bread.
Dummling did not consider long, but set off into the forest, where, on
the same spot as before, there sat a man, who was strapping his body
round with a leather strap, and all the while making a horrible face, and
saying, I have eaten a whole oven full of rolls; but what use is that
when one has such a hunger as I? My stomach remains empty still,
and I must strap myself to prevent my dying of hunger !"
At these words Dummling was glad, and said, Get up and come with
me, and you shall eat enough to satisfy you."
He led him to the Royal Palace, where the King had collected all the
meal in his whole kingdom, and had caused a huge mountain of bread to
be baked with it. The man out of the wood, standing before it, began to
eat, and in the course of the day the whole mountain had vanished.
Dummling then, for the third time, demanded his bride, but the King
began again to make fresh excuses, and desired a ship which could travel
both on land and water.
"So soon as you return blessed with that," said the King, "you shall
have my daughter for your bride."
Dummling went, as before, straight into the forest, and there he found
the little old grey man to whom lie had given his cake. When Dummliin
had said what lie wanted, the old mai gave him the vessel which could,
travel both on land and water, with these words, "Since I have eaten and
drunk with you, I give you the ship, and all this I do because you were
good-natured."
As soon now as the King saw the ship, he could not any longer keep
back his daughter, and the wedding was celebrated, and after the King's
death Dummling inherited the kingdom, and lived for a long time con-
tentedly with his bride.
227 00238.jpg
THE THREE FEATHERS.
Omen npon a time there was a King who had three sons, two of whom
were bold and decided, but the third was a simpleton, and, having nothing
to say for himself, was called Dummling. When the King became olU
and weak, and thought his end was approaching, he knew not which of
his sons to appoint to succeed him. So he said to them, "Go out upon
your travels, and whoever brings me back the finest carpet shall be king
at my death." Then, to prevent their quarrelling, he led them out before
the castle, and, blowing three feathers into the air, said, As they fly, so
shall you go."
One feather flew towards the east, another towards the west, but the
third went in a straight direction, and soon fell to the ground. So one
brother went right, another left, laughing at poor Dummling, who had to
remain where the third feather had fallen.
Dummling sat himself down, and was sad at heart; but presently he
remarked that near the feather was a trap-door. He raised it, and, finding
steps, descended below the ground. He came to another door, and knock-
ing, heard a voice singing-
"Frog, with the crooked leg,
Small and light green,
See who 'tis that knocks,
Be quick; let him in I"
The door was opened, and, going in, he saw a large Frog, and round her
were squatted several smaller ones. The big one asked what he desired ?
and he replied, "I seek the finest and most beautiful carpet." The big
Frog then called a young one, and said, Bring me hither the great box."
So the young Frog fetched it; and the old one, opening it, tok out and
228 00239.jpg
THE THREE FEATHERS.
gave to Dummling a carpet more beautiful than any one could make
Dummling thanked her for the gift and came up the steps again.
His two brothers, meanwhile, thinking their youngest brother so
simple, believed that he would not bring home anything at all, and said
to each other, Let us take the best shawl we can from the back of
some shepherd's wife." So they stole the first they met with, and carried
it to the King. At the same time Dummling arrived, bringing his fine
and beautiful carpet, and as soon as the King saw it he was astonished,
and said, By right this kingdom belongs to the youngest of you."
But the two others let the King have no peace, saying, "It is im-
possible that Dummling should have the kingdom, for he lacks common
understanding." So the King then decreed that whoever brought him
the most beautiful ring should be his heir ; and, taking the three brothers
out, he blow, as before, three feathers into the air, for them to follow.
The two eldest went east and west, but Dummling's feather flew again as
far as the trap-door, and there settled down. He descended a second time
to the fat old Frog, and told her he needed the most beautiful ring in the
world. The Frog ordered her jewel-casket to be brought, and gave him
out of it a ring which sparkled with diamonds, and was finer than any
goldsmith in the world could have made. The two eldest brothers gave
themselves no further trouble than the beating of a nail, which they
carried to the King. But as soon as Dnmmling displayed his gold ring,
the father said, The kingdom belongs to him." The two eldest brothers.
however, would not let the King be at peace until he appointed a third
condition, which was, that whoever brought him the prettiest woman
should have the kingdom. A third time he blew the feathers into the
air, and they flew, as before, east and west, and one straight out.
Now Dummling went again down to the fat Frog, and said, "I have to
take home the most beautiful bride I can find." Ah," said the Frog, the
most beautiful bride that is not easy for every one, but you shall have
her;" and, so saying, she gave him a hollow carrot, to which six little
mice were harnessed. Dummling asked sadly what he was to do with
them, and the Frog told him to place in the carriage one of her little
handmaids. He took up one Frog at random out of the circle, and placed
her in the carrot; but no sooner was she seated than she became a beau-
tiful maiden, and the carrot and the six mice were changed into a fine
carriage and horses. Dummling kissed the maiden, and drove away from
the place to the King's palace. His brothers came afterwards, having
given themselves no trouble to find a pretty girl, but taking the first
peasants they met. When the King had seen them all, he said, "At my
death, the kingdom belongs to my youngest son."
But the two elder brothers again besieged the ears of the King with
their cries, saying, We cannot allow that Dummling should be King; "
an,l they requested that there should be a trial for the superiority, to see
whose wife could best jump through a ring which hung in the hall; for
they thought to themselves, These peasant girls will be strong enough,
but that tender thing will kill herself in the attempt." At last the King
consented. The two peasant girls sprang easily through the ring, bti
229 00240.jpg
GRIMM S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
they were so plump that they fell down and broke their arms and legs.
Then the beautiful bride of Dummling sprang through as lightly and
gracefully as a fawn, and all opposition was put an end to. So Dummling,
after all, received the crown, and ruled a long time happily and wisely.
THE QUEEN BEE.
ONCE upon a time two Kings' sons set out to seek adventures, and fell
into such a wild kind of life that they did not return home. So their
youngest brr their, Dummling, went forth to seek them; but when he
found them they mocked him, because of his simplicity. Nevertheless
they journeyed on, all three together, till they came to an ant-hill, which
the two eldest brothers would have overturned, to see how the little ants
would run in their terror, carrying away their eggs; but Dummling
said, Let the little creatures be in peace; I will not suffer them to be
overturned." Then they went further, till they came to a lake, on
which ducks were swimming in myriads. The two brothers wanted to
catch a pair and roast them ; but Dummling would not allow it, saying,
" Let these fowls alone ; I will not suffer them to be killed At last
they came to a bees' nest, in which was so much honey that it was running
out at the mouth of the nest. The two brothers would have laid down
under the tree and caught the bees as they passed, for the sake of their
honey ; but Dummling again held them back, saying, Leave the crea-
tures alone ; I will not suffer them to be touched "
After this the three brothers came to a castle, where in the stable
230 00241.jpg
THE QUEEN BEE. 213
stood several stone horses, but no man was to be seen ; and they went
through all the rooms, until they came to a door quite at the end on
which hung three locks, and in the middle of the door was a hole through
which one could see into the room. Peeping through this hole, they
saw a fierce looking man sitting at the table. They called him once,
twice, but he heard not; but as they called the third time he got up,
opened the door and came out. Not a word did he speak, but led them
to a well-supplied table, and when they had eaten and drunk, he took
each of them into a sleeping chamber. The next morning the man
came to the eldest, and beckoning him up, led him to a stone table on
which were written three sentences. The first was that under the moss
in the wood lay the pearls of the King's daughter, a thousand in number,
which must be sought for, and if at sunset even one was wanting, he
who had searched for them would be changed into stone. The eldest
brother went off and searched the whole day, but only found a hundred,
so that it happened to him as the table had said-he was changed into
stone. The next day the second brother undertook the adventure, but
he fared no better than the other, for he found but two hundred pearls,
and he, therefore, was turned into stone. Then the turn came to
Dummling, who searched the moss, but it was very difficult to find the
pearls, and the work went on but slowly. Then he sat himself down on
a stone, and wept, and while he did so, the Ant-King whose life he had
formerly saved came up with five thousand companions, and before very
long they searched for, and found, and piled in a heap, the whole thousand
pearls. But the second sentence was to fetch the key of the Princess's
sleeping chamber out of a lake which, by chance, the brothers had
passed. When Dummling came to the lake, the Ducks whose lives he
had before saved swam up to him, and diving below the water, quickly
brought up the key. The third sentence, however, was the most
difficult of all: of the three daughters of the King, to pick out the
youngest and prettiest. They were all asleep, and appeared all the
same, without a single mark of difference, except that before they fell
asleep they had eaten different sweetmeats-the eldest a piece of sugar,
the second a little syrup, and th3 youngest a spoonful of honey. Pre-
sently in came the Queen Bee of all the bees, who had been saved by
Dummling from the fire, and tried the mouths of the three. At last sh
settled on the mouth which had eaten the honey, and thus the King's
son soon knew which was the right Princess. Then the spell was
Broken; every one was delivered from the sleep, and those who had been
changed into stone received their human form again. Now Dummling
was married to the youngest and prettiest Princess, and became King at
his father's death; but his two brothers were obliged to bc content with
the two other sisters.
231 00242.jpg
ALLERLEIRAUH.
(THE COAT OF ALL COLOURS.)
TUERE was once a King, whose wife had golden hair, and was altogether
3o beautiful, that her equal was not to be found in the world. It hap.
opened that she fell ill, and when she felt she must soon die she called
the King, and said, If you marry again after my death, take no one
who is not as beautiful as I have been, nor who has not golden hair like
mine, and this you must promise me." After the King had promised
she closed her eyes and soon died.
For a long time the King would not be comforted, and thought not
of taking a second wife, but his councillors said at last that he must
marry again. Then messengers were sent far and wide to seek such
a bride as should be as beautiful as the late Queen, but there was no one
to be found in the whole world so beautiful, and with such golden hair.
So the messengers returned home without accomplishing anything.
Now the King had a daughter, who was just as beautiful as her
dead mother, and had also the same golden hair, and as she grew up, the
King saw how like she was to his lost wife. He told the councillors that
he wished to marry his daughter to his oldest councillor, and that she
should be as Queen. When the oldest councillor heard this he was
delighted. But the daughter was frightened at the resolve of the King,
but hoped yet to turn him from his intention. So she said to him,
"Before I fulfil your wish, I must first have three dresses: one as
golden as the sun, another as silver as the moon, and a third as shining
as the stars; further, I desire a cloak composed of thousands of skins
and hides, and to which every beast in your kingdom must contribute a
portion of his skin.
The Princess thought this would be impossible to do, and so she
232 00243.jpg
ALLERLEIRkAUH. 215
should reclaim her father from his intention. But the King would not
give it up, and the cleverest maidens in his kingdom had to weave the
three dresses,-one as golden as the sun, a second as silver as the moon,
and a third as shining as the stars; while his Huntsmen had to catch all
the beasts in the whole kingdom, and from each take a piece of his skin,
wherewith a mantle of a thousand pieces was made. At length, when all
was ready, the King let the mantle be fetched, and, spreading it before
him, said, To-morrow shall the wedding be."
When the King's daughter now saw that there was no hope left of
turning her father from his resolve, she determined to flee away. In the
night, while all slept, she got up and took three of her treasures,-a
golden ring, a gold spinning-wheel, and a gold reel; she put also in
a nutshell the three dresses of the sun, moon, and stars, and, putting on
the mantle of all skins, she dyed her hands and face black with soot.
Then, commending herself to God, she set off and travelled the whole
night till she came to a large wood, where, feeling very tired, she took
refuge in a hollow tree and went to sleep. The sun arose, and she still
slept and slept on till it was again far into the morning. Then it
happened that the King, who owned this forest, came to hunt in it. As
soon as his dogs ran to the tree they snapped about it, barked, and
growled, so that the King said to his Huntsmen, See what wild animal
it is that is concealed there." The Hunters obeyed his orders, and, when
they returned, they said, "In that hollow lies a wonderful creature,
whose like we have never before seen; its skin is composed of a thousand
different colours, but it lies quite quiet and asleep." The King said,
" Try if you can catch it alive, and then bind it to the carriage, and we
will take it with us."
As soon as the Hunters caught hold of the Maiden, she awoke full
of terror, and called out to them, I am a poor child, forsaken by both
father and mother pray pity me, and take me with you i" They named
her Allerleirauh," because of her mantle, and took her home with them
to serve in the kitchen, and rake out the ashes. They went to the Royal
Palace, and there they showed her a little stable under the step, where
no daylight could enter, and told her she could live and sleep there.
Afterwards she went into the kitchen, and there she had to carry water
and wood to make the fire, to pluck the fowls, to peel the vegetables, to
rake out the ashes, and to do all manner of dirty work.
Here, for a length of time, Allerleirauh lived wretchedly; but it
happened once that a feast was held in the palace, and she asked the
Cook, May Igo and look on for a little while ? I will place myself just
outside the door." The Cook said, Yes; but in half-an-hour's time you
must return and rake out the ashes."
Allerleirauh took an oil-lamp, and, going to her stable, put off the
gown of skins, and washed the soot from her face and hands, so that he'
real beauty was displayed. Then she opened her nut, and took out the
dress which shone as the sun, zad as soon as she was ready she went up
to the ball-room, where every one made way for her, supposing that she
was certainly some Princess. The King himself soon came up to her,
233 00244.jpg
CTMIAM S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
and, taking her hand, danced with her, thinking the while in Lis heart
that he had never seen any one like her. As soon as the dance was
finished she curtsied, and, before the King could look round, she had
disappeared, and nobody knew whither. The Watchmen also at the gates
were called and questioned, but they had not seen her.
She had run back to her stable, and, having quickly taken off her
dress, had again blackened her face and hands, and put on the dress of
all skins, and became Allerleirauh" once more. As soon as she went
into the kitchen to do her work, in sweeping up the ashes, the Cook said,
" Let that be for once till the morning, and cook the King's supper for me
instead, while I go upstairs to have a peep; but mind you do not let one
of your hairs fall in, or you will get nothing to eat for the future."
So saying, she went away, and Allerleirauh cooked the King's supper,
making some soup as good as she possibly could, and when it was ready
she went into the stable and fetched her gold ring, and laid it in the dish.
When the dance was at an end the King ordered his supper to be
brought, which, when he had tasted, he thought he had never eaten any-
thing so nice before. Just as he nearly finished it he saw a gold ring at
the bottom, and, not being able to imagine how it came there, he com-
manded the Cook to be brought before him. The Cook was terrified
when he heard this order, and said to Allerleirauh, "Are you certain
you did not let a hair fall into the soup, for if it is so, you will catch a
beating ?"
Then he came before the King, who asked who had cooked the supper,
and he answered, "I did But the King said, That is not true ; for it
is of a much better kind and much better cooked than usual." Then the
Cook said, "I must confess that not I, but Allerleirauh, cooked it." So
the King commanded that she should be brought up.
When Allerleirauh came the King asked,-
"Who are you 1"
I am a poor child, without father or mother," replied she.
"Why did you come into my palace ?" then inquired the King.
"I am good for nothing ele but to have the boots thrown at my
head," said she.
The King asked again, "Where did you get this ring, then, which
was in the soup I"
Allerleirauh said, I know nothing of it." And, as she would say no
more, she was at last sent away.
After a time there was another ball, and Allerleirauh asked the Cook's
permission to go again and look on, and he consented, and told her,
" Return here in half an hour to cook the King again the same soup
which he liked so much before."
Allerleirauh ran into the stable, and, washing herself quickly, took
out of the shell the dress which was silver as the moon, and put it on.
Then she went up to the ball-room and appeared like a Princess, and the
King, stepping up to her, was very glad to see her again ; and, as the
dancing was just begun, they joined it. But as soon as it was over, his
partner disappeared so quickly, that the King did not notice where sho
234 00245.jpg
ALLERLEIRAUn. 217
went. She ran to her stable and changed her garments again, and then
went into the kitchen to make the soup. While the Cook was upstairs,
she fetched the golden spinning-wheel and put it in the tureen, so that
the soup was served up with it. Afterwards it was brought before the
King, who ate it, and found it taste as good as the former ; and the Cook
was called, who was obliged to confess again that Allerleirauh had made it.
Allerleirath was accordingly taken before the King, but she repeated
what she had before said, that she was of no use but to have boots thrown
at her, and that she knew nothing ot the gold spinning-wheel.
Not long afterwards a third fAte was given by the King, at which
everything went as before. The Cook said to Allerleirauh when she
asked leave to go, You are certainly a witch, and always put something
in the sonp which makes it taste better than mine. Still, since you beg
so hard, you shall go at the usual time." This time she put on the dress
shining as the stars, and stepped with it into the ball-roc-n. The King
danced again with her, and thought he had never seen mny maiden so
beautiful; and while the dance went on he slipped the gold ring on to
her finger without her perceiving it, and told the musicians to prolong the
tune. When at last it ended, he would have kept fast hold of her hand,
but she tore herself away, and sprang so quickly in among the people
that she disappeared from his sight. Allerleirauh ran as well as she
could back to her stable; but she had stayed over and above the half
hour, and she had not time to pull off her beautiful dress, but was
obliged to throw over it her cloak of skins. She did not either quite
finish the blacking of her skin, but left one finger white. Then she ran
into the kitchen, cooked the soup for the King, and put in it thereel,
while the Cook stayed upstairs. Afterwards, when the King found the
reel at the bottom of the soup, he summoned Allerleirauh, and perceived
at once her white finger, and the ring which he had put on it during the
dance. He took her by the hand and held it fast, and when she tried to
force herself from him and run away, her cloak of skins fell partly off,
and the starry dress was displayed to view. The King then pulled the
cloak wholly off, and down came her golden hair, and there she stood in
all her beauty, and could no longer conceal herself. As soon, then, as
the soot and ashes were washed off her face, she stood up and appeared
more beautiful than any one could conceive possible on earth. But the
King said to her, You are my dear bride, and we will never separate
from each other." Thereupon was the wedding celebrated, and they lived
happily to the end of their lves.
235 00246.jpg
THE TWELVE HUNTERS.
A OERTAIN King's son, unknown to his father, was betrothed to a Maiden
whom he loved very much, and once while he was sitting by her side,
happy and contented, news came that his father was very ill, and desired
to see him before his end. So the Prince said to his beloved, I must go
away and leave you; I will give you this ring for a memorial. When I
become King, I will return and take you home with me."
So saying, he rode off; and when he arrived, he found his father at
the point of death. The old King said to him, My dearest son, I have
desired to see you once more before I died, that I may have your promise
to marry according to my wishes;" and he named to him a certain
Princess whom he was to make his bride. The young King was so grieved
that he did not know what he was saying, and so promised his father that
he would fulfil his wish. Soon afterwards the old King closed his eyes in
death.
When the time of mourning for the late King was over, the young
Prince, who had succeeded to the throne, was called upon to fulfil the
promise which he had given to his father, and the Princess was betrothed
to him accordingly. By chance the Maiden heard of this, and grieved
so much about the faithlessness of her beloved that she fast'faded away.
Then her father said to her, "My dear child, why are you sad I whatever
you wish for you shall have."
For a few minutes she considered, and at last said, "Dear father
wish for eleven maidens exactly like myself in figure and stature."
Her father told her that if it were possible her wish should be carrie(
out, and he ordered a search to be made in his country until eleven
maidens were found resembling exactly his daughter in figure and stature.
When they came to the Maiden she had twelve hunters' dresses made
all exactly alike, and each of the maidens had to put on one, while she
herself drew on the twelfth. Thereupon she took leave of her father,
236 00247.jpg
THE TWELVE HUNTERS.
Page 218.
237 00249.jpg
TIE TWELVE HUNTERS. 219
and rode away with her companions to the court of her former betrothed,
whom she loved so much. There she inquired if he needed any Hunts-
men, and if he would not take them all into his service. The King
looked at her without recognizing her, and as they were such handsome
people he consented to take them, and so they became the twelve royal
Huntsmen.
The King, however, possessed a Lion who was such a wonderful
east that he knew all hidden aLd secret affairs. So one evening he
said to the king, "Do you suppose that you have got twelve Hunts-
men ?" "Yes," replied he, -'twelve Huntsmen." "You are mistaken
there," replied the Lion ; "they are twelve maidens."
"That can never be true," said the King; "how will you prove
it to me "
Order some peas to be strewn in your ante-room," said the Lion,
" and you will at once see; for men have a firm tread when walking on
peas, and do not slip; but maidens trip, and stumble, and slide, and
make the peas roll about."
This advice pleased the King, and he ordered peas to be strewn.
Now, there was a servant of the King's who was kind to the Hunts-
men; and, as he heard that they were to be put to this trial, he went
and told them all that had passed, and that the Lion wished to show the
King that they were maidens. The Maiden thanked him and told her
companions to compel themselves to tread firmly on the peas. When,
therefore, the next morning the King summoned the twelve Hunters,
and they came into the ante-room, they trod firmly upon the peas with
so sturdy a step that not one polled or moved in the least. Afterwards,
when they had left the room, the King said to the Lion, "You have
deceived me ; they walk like men !"
The Lion replied, They knew that they were to be put to the proof,
and so summoned all their strength. Let twelve spinning-wheels be now
brought into the ante-room, and, when they come to pass them, they
will be pleased at the sight thereof as no man would be."
This advice also pleased the King, and he caused the twelve spin-
ning-wheels to be placed in the room.
But the servant who was kind to the Hunters went and disclosed the
plan to the Maiden, who instructed her eleven attendants to take no
notice whatever of the spinning-wheels. The following morning the King
summoned his Hunters, and they passed through the ante-room without
once looking round at the spinning-wheels. So the King said to the
Lion again, "You have deceived me; these are men, for they have not
noticed the wheels."
The Lion replied as before, They knew that they would be put on
trial, and they have behaved accordingly ;" but the King would believe
the Lion no more.
After this the twelve Hunters followed the King customarily in his
sporting, and the longer he had them the more he seemed to like them.
Now it happened that once, as they were going out to the hunt, news
came that the Princess who had been betrothed to the young King wan
238 00250.jpg
220 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
vn her way to his court. As soon as the true betrothed heard this, she
was so much overcome that all her strength forsook her, and she fell
heavily to the ground. The King soon perceived that something had
happened to his best Huntsman, and ran up to help him just as his glove
was drawn off. He then saw upon one finger the ring which he had
given to his first love, and, as he looked in the face of the supposed
Huntsman, he recognized her. At the siirlht his heat was so touched
that lie kissed her, and, as she opened her ey;s. he said, You are mine,
and I am thine, and no power on earth shall make it otherwise."
The King then sent a messenger to the Princess, begging her tc
return to her own country, for he had already a bride.
Soon afterwards the wedding was celebrated, and the Lion came
again into favour, because, after all, he had spoken the truth.
THE ROGUE AND HIS MASTER.
A CERTAIN man, named John, was desirous that his son should learn
some trade, and he went into the church to ask the Priest's opinion what
would be most desirable. Just then the Clerk was standing near the
a'tar, and he cried out, The rogue, the rogue !" At these words the
man went away, and told his son he must learn to be a rogue, for so the
Priest had said. So they set out, and asked one man and another whether
he was a rogue, till, at the end of the day, they entered a large forest,
-and there found a little hut with an old woman in it.
John asked the old woman, Do you know any man who can teach
roguery 1" Here," said the old Woman, here you may learn, for my
son is master of the art." Then John asked the son whether he could
239 00251.jpg
THE ROGUE AND HIS MASTER.
teach it perfectly I and the rogue replied, I will teach your son well;
return in four years, and if you know your son then I will not ask any
recompense; but if you do not, then you must give me two hundred
dollars."
John now went home, and left his son to learn roguery and witchcraft.
When the time was up, the father set out to see his son, considering as he
went along by what he should know him. On his way he met a little
man, who stopped him, and asked, Why are you grieving and looking so
mournful 1 Oh," replied John, "four years ago I left my son to learn
roguery, and the master said, if I returned in that time and knew my son,
) should have nothing to pay; but if I did not know him, I must give
him two hundred dollars ; and, since I have no means of recognizing him,
I am troubled where to procure the money."
Then the little man told him to take a basket of bread with him, and
when he came to the Rogue's house to put the basket under a hollow tree
which stood there, and the little Bird which should peep out would be his
son.
John went and did as he was told, and out came a little Bird to peck
at the bread. Holloa, my son I are you here said John. The son
was very glad to hear his father's voice, and said, "Father, let us go "
but first the Rogue-master called out, "The Evil One must have told you
where to find your son I "
So the father and son returned home, and on their way they met a
coach, and the son said to his father, "I will change myself into a fine
greyhound, and then you can earn some money by me."
The Lord who was riding in the coach called gut, Man, will you sell
your dog "
"Yes," replied the father.
"How much do you want for him 1"
"Thirty dollars," was the reply.
"That is too much, my man," said the Lord, but on account of his
very beautiful skin I will buy him of you."
The bargain concluded, the dog was put inside the coach; but when
they had travelled a mile or two the greyhound jumped right out through
the glass, and rejoined his father.
After this adventure they went home together, and the following day
they went to the next village to market. On their way the son said,
"Father, I will change myself into a Horse, and then you can sell me;
but first untie my bridle, and then I can change myself into the borm of
a man.
The father drove his horse to market, and thither came the Rogue-
master and bought him for a hundred dollars, but the father forgot to
untie the bridle.
The Rogue rode his horse home, and put him in the stable, and, when
the maid came with the corn, the Horse said to her, Undo my bridle,
undo my bridle "
"Ah, can you speak ?" said she, terrified, and untied the horsa directly.
The Horse thereupon became a sparrow, and flew away out at the door,
240 00252.jpg
222 GRIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
pursued by the Rogue, who changed himself also into a bird. When they
came up with each other, the Rogue changed himself into water, and the
other into a fish. But the Rogue could not catch him so, and he changed
himself into a cock, but the other instantly became a fox, and bit his
master's head off, so that he died.
And be lies there to this very day.
~fI A'Jfl1
THE WOLF AND THE FOX.
A WOLF, once upon a time, caught a Fox. It happened one day that they
were both going through the forest, and the Wolf said to his companion,
" Get me some food, or I will eat you up."
The Fox replied, "I know a farmyard where there are a couple of
young lambs, which, if you wish, we will fetch."
This proposal pleased the Wolf, so they went, and the Fox, stealing
first one of the lambs, brought it to the Wolf, and then ran away. The
Wolf devoured it quickly, but was not contented, and went to fetch the
other lamb by himself, but he did it so awkwardly that he aroused the
attention of the mother, who began to cry and bleat loudly, so that the
peasants ran up. There they found the Wolf, and beat him so unmerci-
fully that he ran, howling and limping, to the Fox, and said, "You have
led me to a nice place, for, when I went to fetch the other lamb, the
peasants came and beat me terribly 1 "
"Why are you such a glutton ?" asked the Fox.
The next day they went again into the fields, and the covetous Wolf
said to the F x, Get me something to eat now, or I will devour ynu I"
241 00253.jpg
THE WOLF AND THE FOX, 223
The Fox said he knew a country house where the cook was going that
evening to make some pancakes, and thither they went. When they
arrived, the Fox sneaked and crept round the house, until he at last dis-
covered where the dish was standing, out of which he took six pancakes,
and took them to the Wolf, saying, There is something for you to eat!"
and then ran away. The Wolf dispatched these in a minute or two, and,
wishing to taste some more, he went and seized the dish, but took it away
so hurriedly that it broke in pieces. The noise of its fall brought out the
woman, who, as soon as she saw the Wolf, called her people, who, hasten-
ing up, beat him with such a good will that he ran home to the Fox,
howling, with two lame legs What a dirty place have you drawn me
into now," cried he, the peasants have caught me, and dressed my skin
finely!
Why, then, are you such a glutton 1" said the Fox.
When they went out again the third day, the Wolf limping along with
weariness, he said to the Fox, Get me something to eat now, or I will
devour you !
The Fox said he knew a man who had just killed a pig, and salted the
meat down in a cask in his cellar, and that they could get at it. The
Wolf replied that he would go with him on condition that he helped him
if he could not escape. Oh, of course I will, on mine own account "
said the Fox, and showed him the tricks and ways by which they could
get into the cellar. When they went in there was meat in abundance,
And the Wolf was enraptured at the sight. The Fox, too, had a taste,
but kept looking round while eating, and ran frequently to the hole by
which they had entered, to see if his body would slip through it easily.
Presently the Wolf asked, "Why are you running about so, you Fox,
jumping in and out ?" I want to see if any one is coming," replied the
Fox, cunningly; but mind you do not eat too much !"
The Wolf said he would not leave till the cask was quite empty; and
meanwhile the peasant, who had heard the noise made by the Fox, entered
the cellar. The Fox, as soon as he saw him, made a spring, and was
through the hole in ajiffy ; and'the Wolf tried to follow his example, but
he had eaten so much that his body was too big for the hole, and he stuck
fast. Then came the peasant with a cudgel, and beat him to death; but
the Fox leapt a'way into the forest, very glad to get rid of the oldglutton,
242 00254.jpg
-"-Io
THE FOX AND GODMOTHER-WOLF.
A CERTAIN She-Wolf had brought a whelp into the world, and invited the
Fox to stand godfather, for, said she, He is a near relative, and possesses
a good understanding and much cleverness, so that he can instruct my son,
and help him on in the world." The Fox appeared to be very honourable,
and said to the Wolf, "My worthy fellow god-parent, I thank you much
for the honour you show me, and I will so conduct myself that you shall
be quite satisfied." At the feast lie made himself very sociable and
merry ; and when it was over he said to the Wolf, "My dear lady, it is
our duty to care for the child, and therefore he must have good food, that
lie may grow strong. I know a sheepfold whence we can easily fetch
somewhat."
This speech pleased the Wolf, and she went with the Fox to the farm-
yard, and there he showed her the place, and said, "You can creep in there
unseen, and meanwhile I will go round to the other side, and see if I can
pick up a hen."
The Fox, however, did not go as he said, but ran away and stretched
himself upon the ground, near the edge of the forest, to rest. The Wolf
crept into the stall, where lay a dog, who began to bark, so that the
labourers ran in, and, surprising the Wolf, poured a painful of burning
coals over her skin. At last she escaped, and slipped away out of the
stall. and found the Fox lying near the Forest. The Fox made a very
wry fice, and said, "Ah, my dear godmother, how badly I have fared
Tle peasants fell upon me, and have nearly broken all my bones, and,
if you do not wish me to perish here where I lie, you must carry mu
away !"
The poor Wolf could scarcely move herself ; but yet, out of her great
concern for the Fox, she took him upon her back, and carried home,
slowly enough, the really strong and unhurt godfather. When they
reached home, the Fox cried out to the Wolf, Farewell, my dear god-
mother ; may you relish your scorching !" and, so saying, he laughed in
hl:r face, and quickly bolted off I
243 00255.jpg
N
THE FOX AND THE CAT.
ONCE upon a time it fell out that a Cat met a Fox in a wood; anll
thinking him clever and well experienced in the ways of the world, shi
spoke friendly to him, and said, "Good day, dear master Fox; how do
you do, how do you get on, and how do you find your living in these dear
times 1"
The Fox considered the Cat from head to foot with all the pride in
his nature, and doubted for a time whether to answer or not. At last
he said, "Oh, you wretched shaver! you pied simpleton! you hungry
mouse-hunter! what has put it into your head to ask me how I fare 1
what have you learnt 7 how many arts do you understand "
I understand but a single one," replied the Cat, decisively.
And what sort of an art is that inquired the Fox.
"When the dogs pursue me, to climb up a tree, and so save myself,"
said the Cat.
Oh, is that all i" returned the Fox; why, I understand a hundred
arts; and have, moreover, a sackful of cunning! I pity you Come
with me, and I 'ill show you how to escape the hounds."
Presently a Hunter came riding along with four dogs. The Cat ran
lu bly up a tree, and perched herself upon its highest point, where the
branches and leaves completely concealed her, and then called to the Fox,
"Open your sack, my Fox! open your sack?" But the hounds had
already seized poor Reynard, and held him tight. Oh, Mr. Fox," cried
the Cat, when she saw the end, "you are come to a standstill in spite o0
your hundred arts. Now, could you have crept up a tree like me, your
life would not have buen sacrificed!"
244 00256.jpg
THE THREE LUCK-CHILDREN.
hansE was once upon a time a father, who called his three sons to him,
and gave the first a cock, the second a scythe, and the third a cat, and
then addressed them thus :-" I am very old, and my end draweth nigh,
but I wish to show my care for you before I die. Money I have not, and
what I now give you appears of little worth; but do not think that, for
if each of you use his gift carefully, and seek some country where such a
thing is not known, your fortunes will be made."
Soon after, the father died, and the eldest son set out on his travels
with his cock, but wherever he came, such a creature was already well
known. In the towns he saw it from afar, sitting upon the church-
steeples, and turning itself round with the wind; and in the villages he
heard more than one crow, and nobody troubled himself about another,
so that it did not seem as if he would ever make his fortune by it. At
last, however, it fell out that he arrived on an island where the people
knew nothing about cocks, nor even how to divide their time. They
knew, certainly, when it was evening and morning, but at night, if they
did not sleep through it, they could not comprehend the time. See,"
said he to them, "what a proud creature it is, what a fine red crown it
wears on its head, and it has spurs like a knight! Thrice during the
night it will crow at certain hours, and the third time it calls you may
know the sun will soon rise; but, if it crows by day, you may prepare
then for a change of weather."
The good people were well pleased, and the whole night they laid
awake and listened to the cock, which crowed loudly and clearly at two,
four, and six o'clock. The next day they asked if the creature were not
for sale, and how much he asked, and he replied, "As much gold as an
a ls can bear." A ridiculously small sum," said they, "for such a
marvellous creature !" and gave him readily what he asked.
When he returned home with his money, his brothers were astonished,
and the second said he would also go oi)'. and see what luck his scythe
_
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245 00257.jpg
THE THREE LUCK-CHILDREN.
would bring him. But at first it did not seem likely that fortune would
favour him, for all the countrymen he met carried equally good scythes
upon their shoulders. At last, however, he also came to an island whose
people were ignorant of the use of scythes; for when a field of corn was
ripe, they planted great cannons and shot it down I In this way, it was
no uncommon thing that many of them shot quite over it; others hit
the ears instead of the stalks, and shot them quite away, so that a great
quantity was always ruined, and the most doleful lamentations ensued.
But our hero, when he arrived, mowed away so silently and quickly, that
the people held their breath and noses with wonder, and willingly gave
him what he desired, which was a horse laden with as much gold as it
could carry.
On his return the third brother set out with his cat to try his luck,
and it happened to him exactly as it had done to the others : so long as
he kept on the old roads he met with no place which did not already
boast its cat; indeed, so many were there that the new-born kittens were
usually drowned. At last he voyaged to an island where, luckily for
him, cats were unknown animals; and yet, the mice were so numerous
that they danced upon the tables and chairs, whether the master of the
house were at home or not. These people complained continually of the
plague, and the King himself knew not how to deliver them from it; for
in every corner the mice were swarming, and destroyed what they could
not carry away in their teeth. The cat, however, on its arrival, com-
menced a grand hunt ; and so soon cleared a couple of rooms of the
troublesome visitors, that the people begged the King to buy it for the
use of his kingdom. The King gave willingly the price that was asked
for the wonderful animal, and the third brother returned home with a
still larger treasure, in the shape of a mule laden with gold.
Meanwhile the cat was having capital sport in the royal palace witl:
the mice, and bit so many that the dead were not to be numbered. At
last she became very thirsty with the hot work, and stopped, and, raising
its head, cried, "Miau, miau !" At the unusual sound, the King,
together with all his courtiers, were much frightened, and in terror they
ran out of the castle. There the King held a council what it were best
to do, and at length it was resolved to send a herald to the cat, to demand
that it should quit the castle, or force would be used to make it. For,"
said the councillors, "we would rather be plagued by the mice, to which
we are accustomed, than surrender ourselves a prey to this beast." A
page was accordingly sent to the cat to ask whether it would quit the
castle in peace ; but the cat, whose thirst had all the while been increas-
ing, replied nothing but Mian, miau The page understood it to
say, "No, no and brought the King word accordingly. The coun-
cillers agreed then that it should feel their power, and cannons were
brought out and fired, so that the castle was presently in flames. When
the fire reached the room where the c:t was, it sprang out of the
window, but the besiegers ceased not until the whole was levelled with
the ground.
246 00258.jpg
fnERE was once a man who understood a variety ot arts; he haa serveC
in the army, where he had behaved very bravely, but when the war came
to an end he received his discharge, and three dollars only for his services.
" Wait a bit this does not please me," said he ; "if I find the right
people, I will make the King give me the treasures of the whole kingdom."
Thereupon, inflamed with anger, he went into a forest, where he found a
man who had just uprooted six trees as if they were straw, and he asked
him whether he would be his servant, and travel with him. "Yes'
replied the man ; "but I will first take home to my mother this bundle
of firewood;" and, taking up one of the trees, he wound it round the
other five, and, raising the bundle upon his shoulder, bore it away. Soon
he returned, and said to his master," We two shall travel well through the
world They had not gone far before they came up with a hunter who
was kneeling upon one knee, and preparing to take aim with his gun.
The master asked what he was going to shoot, and he replied, Two miles
from hence sits a fly upon the branch of an oak-tree, whose left eye I wish
to shoot out."
"Oh, go with me !" said the man ; "for, if we three are together, we
we must pass easily through the world."
The huntsman consented, and went with him, and soon they arrived
at seven windmills, whose sails were going round at a rattling pace,
although right or left there was no wind and not a leaf stirring. At this
sight the man said, "I wonder what drives these mills, for there is no
breeze !" and they went on : but they had not proceeded more than two
miles when they saw a man sitting upon a tree, who held one nostril
while he blew out of the other. My good fellow," said our hero, what
%-a von driving up there 1 "
247 00259.jpg
HOW SIX TRAVELLED THROUGH I IIE WORLD.
Paqe 228.
CP~--
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248 00261.jpg
HOW SIX TRAVELLED THROUGGH THE WORLD. 229
"Did you not see," replied the man, "two miles from hence, seven
windmills ? it is those which I am blowing, that the sails may go round."
Oh, then come with me," said our hero ; for, if four people like us
travel together, we shall soon get through the world."
So the blower got up and accompanied him, and in a short while they
met with another man standing upon one leg, with the other leg un-
buckled and lying by his side. The leader of the others said, You have
done this, no doubt, to rest yourself 1" "Yes," replied the man, I am !
runner, and in order that I may not spring along too quickly I have
unbuckled one of my legs, for when I wear. both I go as fast as a bird
can fly."
"Well, then, come with me," said our hero; five such fellows as we
are will soon get through the world."
The five heroes went on together, and soon met a man who had a hat
on, which he wore quite over one ear. The captain of the others said to
him, "Manners! manners I don't hang your hat on one side like that;
you look like a simpleton "
"I dare not do so," replied the other; for, if I set my hat straight,
there will come so sharp a frost that the birds in the sky will freeze and
fall dead upon the ground."
Then come with me," said our hero, for it is odd if six fellows like
us cannot travel quickly through the world."
These six new companions went into a city where the King had
proclaimed, that whoever should run a race with his daughter, and bear
away the prize, should become her husband; but if he lost the race lie
should also lose his head. This was mentioned to our hero, who said that
he would have his servant run for him; but the King told him that in
that case he must agree that his servant's life, as well as his own, should
be sacrificed if the wager were lost. To this he agreed and swore, and
then he bade his runner buckle on his other leg, and told him to be care.
ful and to make sure of winning. The wager was, that whoever first
brought back water from a distant spring should be victor. Accordingly
the runner and the princess both received a cup, and they both began to
run at the same moment. But the princess had not proceeded many steps
before the runner was quite out of sight, and it seemed as if but a puff
of wind had passed. In a short time he came to the spring, and, filling
his cup, he turned back again, but had not gone very far, before, feeling
tired he set his cup down again, and laid down to take a nap. He made
his pillow of a horse's skull which lay upon the ground; thinking, from
its being hard, that he would soon awake. Meantime, the princess, who
was a better runner than many of the men at court, had arrived at the
spring, and was returning with her cup of water, when she perceived her
opponent lying asleep. In great joy, she exclaimed, My enemy is given
into my own hands and, emptying his cup, she ran on faster still All
would now have been lost, if, by good luck, the huntsman had not been
standing on the castle, looking on with his sharp eyes. When he saw the
princess was gaining the advantage, he loaded his gun and shot so cleverly
that he married away the horse's skull under the runner's head, without
249 00262.jpg
230 GoIMM'S HOUSEHOLD STORIES.
doing the man any injury. This awoke him, and, jumping up, he found
his cup empty and the princess far in advance. However, he did not lose
courage, but ran back again to the spring, and, filling his cup, returned
home ten minutes earlier than his opponent. See, you," said he, "now
I have used my legs, the former was not worth calling running."
The King was disgusted, and his daughter not less, that a common
soldier should carry off the prize, and they consulted together how they
should get rid of him and his companions. At last the King said, Do
not distress yourself, my dear : I have found a way to prevent their
return." Then he called to the six travellers, and, saying to them,
" You must now eat and drink and be merry," he led them into a room
with a floor of iron, doors of iron, and the windows guarded with iron
bars. In the room was a table set out with choice delicacies, and the
King invited them to enter and refresh themselves, and as soon as they
were inside he locked and bolted all the doors. That done, he summoned
the Cook, and commanded him to keep a fire lighted beneath till the iron
was red-hot. The Cook obeyed, and the six champions, sitting at table,
soon began to feel warm, and at first thought it arose from eating; but
as it kept getting warmer and warmer, they rose to leave the room, and
found the doors and windows all fast. Then they perceived that the King
had some wicked design in hand, and wished to suffocate them. But
he shall not succeed cried the man with the hat; I will summon such
a frost as shall put to shame and crush this fire ;" and, so saying, he put
his hat on straight, and immediately such a frost fell, that all the heat
disappeared, and even the meats upon the dishes began to freeze. When
two hours had passed, the King thought they would be stifled, and he
caused the door to be opened, and went in himself to see after them.
But, as soon as the door was opened, there stood all six fresh and lively,
and requested to come out to warm themselves, for the cold in the room
had been so intense that all the dishes were frozen In a great passion
the King went down to the Cook and scolded him, and asked why he had
not obeyed his instructions. The Cook, however, pointing to the fire, said,
"There is heat enough there, I should think;" and the King was obliged
to own there was, and he saw clearly that he should not be able to get
rid of his visitors in that way.
The King now began to think afresh how he could free himself, and he
caused the master to be summoned, and said, Will you not take money,
and give up your right to my daughter If so, you shall have as much
as you wish."
"Well, my lord King," replied the man, "just give me as much as
my servant can carry, and you are welcome to keep your daughter."
This answer please the King very much, and our hero said that he
would come and fetch the sum in fourteen days. During that time he
collected all the tailors in the kingdom, and made them sew him a sack,
which took up all that time. As soon as it was ready, the Strong Man,
who had uprooted the trees, took the sack upon his shoulder, and carried
it to the King. At the sight of him, the King said, What a powerful
fellow this must be, carrying this great sack uoon his shoulders I and,
250 00263.jpg
HOW SIX TRAVELLED THROUGH THE WORLD.
sorely frightened, he wondered how much gold he would slip in. The
King, first of all, caused a ton of gold to be brought, which required six-
teen ordinary men to lift; but the Strong Man, taking it up with one
hand, shoved it into the sack, saying, Why do you not bring more at a
time ?-this scarcely covers the bottom of the sack." Then by degrees
the King caused all his treasures to be brought, which the Strong Man
put in, and yet tney did not half fill his sack. "Bring more, more '" said
he; "these are only a couple of crumbs." Then they were obliged to
bring seven thousand waggons laden with gold, and all these the man
pushed into his sack-gold, waggons, oxen, and all. Still it was not full,
and the Strong Man offered to take whatever they brought, if they would
but fill his sack. When everything that they could find was put in, the
man said, "Well, I must make an end to this; and, besides, if one's sack
is not quite full, why it can be tied up so mlch the easier !" and, so say-
ing, he hoisted it upon his back, and went away, and his companions with
him.
When the King saw this one man bearing away all the riches of his
kingdom, he got into a tremendous passion, and ordered his cavalry to
pursue the six men, and at all risks to bring back the Strong Man with
the sack. Two regiments accordingly pursued them quickly, and shouted
out to them, "You are our prisoners lay down the sack of gold, or you
will be hewn to pieces !"
What is that you are saying 1" asked the Blower; you will make
us prisoners but first you shall have a dance in the air !" So saying,
he held one nostril, and blew with the other the two regiments right
away into the blue sky, so that one flew over the hills on the right side
and the other on the left. One sergeant begged for mercy : he had nine
wounds, and was a brave fellow undeserving of such disgrace. So the
Blower sent after him a gentle puff which brought him back without
harming him, and then sent him back to the King with a message that,
whatever number of knights he might yet send, all would be blown into
the air like the first lot. When the King heard this message, lh said,
"Let the fellows go! they will meet with their deserts !" So the six
companions took home all the wealth of that kingdom, and, sharing it
%ith one another, lived contentedly all the rest of their days.
251 00264.jpg
THE CLEVER GRETHEL.
ONCE upon a time there was a Cook who wore shoes with red knots, and
when she went out with them on she used to figure her feet about here
and there, and then say to herself, quite complacently, Ah, you are still
a pretty girl!" And when she came home she drank a glass of wine for
joy, and, as the wine made her wish to eat, she used to look out the best
she had, and excuse herself by saying, "The Cook ought to know how
her cooking tastes."
One day it happened that her master said to her Grethel, this
evening a guest is coming, so cook me two fowls." I will do it directly,
master," replied Grethel. She soon killed the fowls, plucked, dressed,
and spitted them, and, as evening came on, she put them down to the
fire to roast. They soon began to brown and warm through, but still
the guest was not come, and Grethel said to the master, If your guest
does not come soon I shall have to take the fowls from the fire, but it
will be a great shame not to eat them soon, when they are just in the
gravy."
The master agreed, therefore, to run out himself and bring home his
guest; and, as soon as he had turned his back, Grethel laid aside the
-pit, with its two fowls, and thought to herself, "Ah, I have stood so
long before the fire, I am quite hot and thirsty; who knows when he
will come? Meanwhile I will run down into the c