Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
_ ;. al Bahamas International Film Fes-
“-tival awards night on Saturday at



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MP won’t contest
Christie’s position

@ BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net -

WEST END and Bimini MP
_ Obie Wilchcombe will not con-
-;. test the PLP leadership, or seek
any other party office in the
_ PLP's February convention.
_. \ Mr Wilchcombe confirmed

this to The Tribune while dis-
cussing his endorsement of
. Glenys -Hanna-Martin for the
chairmanship of the PLP. This
declaration may ease nervous-



ness in the Perry Christie camp, Rr
- as some commentators have sug- Obie Wilchcombe
gested that Mr Wilchcombe will Hem :
' challenge the vulnerable PLP fy ae not gathered eee

_ Leader.

‘.. "No not at all," said Mr
Wilchcombe when asked if he
will seek any office in the party.
-"I Keep hearing that — no."

.. The PLP leader is now chal-
- lenged to bring the party togeth-
er, said Mr Wilchcombe, as "the

"He has to come and report to
the country and to the PLP on
the elections of the. past. He
must unite the organisation, then
prepare it for the future," said

SEE page 18



FEU res
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honour for

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FILM star Daryl Hannah poses —
on the red carpet at the 4th Annu-


















the Atlantis Theatre. The actress is
- the recipient of the Career Achieve-
_-ment.Award at this year’s festival.

© SEE PAGES 8 & 9

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Tim Aylen



"BAHAMAS EDITION

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007



WAKE UPI

WEEKEND ACTION

Christmas Expressions hits the right note

THE BAHAMAS National Youth Choir performs at the ‘Christmas Expressions’ concert held at the

id



Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts yesterday. The event honoured the memory of the late

Pauline Glasby.

Jeweller joins Tribune, USA Today partnership

‘ANOTHER retailer of high-
end jewellery products has joined
the partnership of The Tribune
and USA Today. Quantum Duty
Free stores has embarked upon a
major marketing effort to tap
into the tourist market by adver-
tising their products in the USA
Today newspaper which is dis-
tributed daily to all occupied
rooms of The Atlantis Resort,
Paradise Island and its sister
properties and to all major hotel
resorts on Paradise Island, down-
town Nassau and Cable Beach.

Robert Carron, the Tribune's
President, is happy to welcome
Quantum to the group. He is
confident that with the reputa-

| Re

tion of both The Tribune and
USA Today advertisers are guar-
anteed excellent value for their
marketing dollars.

Michael Bethell, Sales Exec-
utive, said he is pleased to wel-
come Quantum onboard. Mr
Bethell said that the partnership
is a win-win situation for the
company as the paper has the
readership that Quantum seeks
to attract.

Tamara Smith, Quantum's
marketing manager, said she
chose USA Today as the medi-
um to attract the tourists as they
are enjoying their early morning
cup of coffee. She said when they
were relaxed was a convenient

abitodeabaks kee a3) R

time to get their attention as they
prepared for their day of activi-
ties.

Mr Bethell said The Tribune is
Nassau's leading newspaper and
USA Today is America's news-
paper. This dual combination
makes a fantastic product for

advertisers to get the best of both |

world's — the local and tourist
markets. Ms Smith agrees with
this concept and wants to rein-
force that Quantum sells superi-
or, high-quality merchandise and
excellent prices and showcases
items from the affordable to the
fabulous with two locations
downtown and three on Paradise
Island.

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_ Advocacy group:
govt should be

liable for victims
of those on bail

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT should
be held liable for the deaths or
other injury to persons who
have crimes committed
against them by people who
are out on bail, a spokesper-
son for an advocacy group
said yesterday.

Rev. Glenroy Bethel of
Families for Justice, Grand

-Bahama, ‘said that if persons

accused of murder are not
being brought to trial in a
timely enough fashion to
ensure that they do not
become eligible for bail, or if
they are being granted bail for
what Mr Bethel described as
“inappropriate” reasons, then
government should be held to
account.

Families for Justice is calling
on government — if it is “seri-
ous on crime” — to revise the
Bail Act to make it harder for _

SEE page 18 —
Omar Archer wants
PLP chairmanship

candidates to engage

in national debate

@ By ALISON LOWE vc
Tribune Staff Reporter...
alowe@tribunemedia.net ia

OMAR Archer, a candidate
for the PLP chairmanship, has
expressed his desire to see all
candidates in that race — and
any persons who may declare
their candidacy in the near
future — come together to
engage in a national debate.

“Tam now extending an
invitation to all the candidates
and also to those who may be
considering entering the
race,” said Mr Archer on Fri-
day.

He said that “individuals
within the party and the pub-
lic in general” need to know
where certain persons “who
want to hold political office”
stand on key issues affecting
the country.

“We are at a very critical
time in our prized history. We
live in a time when alterna-
tive lifestyles. and paedophilia
are visibly rampant. Our chil-
dren are being sodomised and

SEE page 18

/ BACON DOUB
Fe Cy City wan



PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





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TO NASSAU

@ “

nor oo A Lionfish spotted around
RU4O1 1O:0Oarn | iOan
— Woodes Hogers Walk area
NASSAU
TO PROVIDENCIALES LIONFISH have been spot-

ted inhabiting the area around
RUGHIT QRPARTS ARRIVES Woodes Rogers Walk.
RU406 12:30pm 2:00pm The pictures of what was said
Days of Ohperasciain: Oaiiy to be a lionfish family, were tak-

en at Woodes Rogers Walk,

downtown Nassau, over the

weekend.

Minister of. Agriculture and
Marine Resources’ Larry

Cartwright has said that govern-
ment is very concerned about
the potential threat of the lion-
fish on the fishing industry in

YSKYKING

hey i Call for reservations and schedules



cy bos j the Bahamas. shores,” he told fishermen in The lionfish originally comes
ate i 649.94 j ~5464 (KING) “The challenge we face inthe Freeport. from the tropical. Indo-Pacific
Pra, f ' wie i BY fishing industry is the new inva- Mr Cartwright said the lion- region of the world. They are
: So é Or call your trayel professional for reserwations and tickets sive species that we have inher- _ fish is “creating havoc.” He is voracious predators and feed
i visit our website at wwow.skyking.tc ited from somewhere — it isa calling on Bahamian fishermen _ heavily on baby shrimp, lobster,

email: res@skyking tc Pacific animal that ismow inthe tospear the predatory fish when — grouper and other. fish.



Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean
Sea, and right around our

they come in contact with it.

“It is not deadly, but it does-
n’t have any predators (in the
sea). And we have been saying
to fishermen, spear-fishermen in
particular, that when they see it
to spear it,” he said.

However, he warns that fish-

ermen should be very careful not’
to touch the beautiful-looking -

fish, which has venomous spines
omits fins and tail.

It has been seen’ throughout
the Bahamas, particularly in
shallow waters and near coral
reefs in Grand Bahama, New
Providence, and Exuma.

The Bahamas commercial
fishing. industry exports nearly

- $100 million of fish products:
> annually. There is a fear that the

lionfish could cause a significant
decline in the country’s fishery
resources,

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THE TRIBUNE



Masked man
with shotgun
rohs couple

POLICE are investigating the
robbery of a man and a woman
who were held up on Saturday
by a masked gunman carrying a
shotgun. The couple were in the
Faith Avenue area when the
gunman robbed them of cash,
two cell phones and a grey
coloured 1999 Cadillac.

Police are currently on the
look out for the vehicle.

Investigations
continue into
three murders

Investigations are continuing
into three homicides on Grand
Bahama.

Police are appealing to mem-
bers of the public with infor-

. mation into the deaths of Vin-

cent Pedican, who was buried
on Saturday, Ryan Wood,
buried on December 5 and

“Julian Nicholls, on December

7. Anyone with information is
asked to call 350-3107/8 or 911
to assist in advancing these mat-
ters to closure.

“We know that there were
other persons present when
these homicides took place and
are asking that-persons call in
without having to identify them-
selves. The Grand Bahama
community has always been
helpful and we (the police) are
seeking that support to resolve
these matters,” police said in a
release yesterday.

Bimini officers

‘Still probing

drug arrest

OFFICERS in Bimini are
continuing their investigations
into a drug arrest made at the
Yacht Club in South Bimini.

At 9.05pm on Saturday, offi-
cers from the Bimini Police Sta-
tion, acting on information,
went to the Yacht Club in South
a where one of the ou

wud by'a eee
Bisse b: isis

a -
Sigil that ly 103 chp |





INGRAHAM IN DISCUSSION WITH IDB PRESIDENT LUIS MORE!

PM: We are talking
with Inter American
Development Bank
about road project

THE Bahamas is currently
in discussions with the Inter
American Development Bank
on the resumption of the New
Providence Road Improvement
Project, Prime Minister and
Minister of Finance Hubert
Ingraham said.

Prime Minister Ingraham’s

comments came at a press con-
ference following the conclusion
of talks in Nassau Friday with
IDB president Luis Alberto
Moreno. Mr. Moreno’s visit
came on the heels of the con-
clusion of a five-year plan
between the IDB and The
Bahamas.

An additional contract is
under negotiation for further
development of The Bahamas
in areas of infrastructure, health
and education.

“The IDB has been most
helpful to The Bahamas,” Mr.
Ingraham said. “They have
helped us considerably with the
electrification of the Family
Islands, in providing potable
water to many of our communi-
ties, and in education. We are
in discussions with them now
about the resumption of the
New Providence Road Improve-
ment Project.”

Mr. Ingraham confirmed that
a top priority of Government is
the resumption of the New
Providence Road Improvement
Project to alleviate congestion
on the island’s streets.

Road work is scheduled to
begin by the first half of 2008.

“We have serious congestion
on the streets of New Provi-
dence and the Government
intends to start next year, major

bush. L e
oun e) ce esscak 100




of suspected marijuana ‘was’ |: discuss with (the IDB) issues
found in a plastic bag in the |": ‘telating to health and environ-

refrigerator and 14 smoked cig-
arettes when police officers
searched the room. é;

The accused man, with the
suspected drugs, were taken
into police custody.

Police find
Haitian with
stah wound

ABACO - Shortly after 9pm

Saturday,: police at the Marsh
Harbour Police Station were
called to the Marsh Harbour
Clinic where.they saw a Haitian
who was suffering from a stab
wound to the stomach.

. Through an interpreter it was
learned that the victim was at
his home in the “Pigeon Pea”
area at 9pm when he was con-
fronted by an armed man who
stabbed him.

The victim, age 34 years, was
treated at the clinic for his
injury and later airlifted to the
Princess Margaret Hospital for
further medical attention. He is
listed in “stable” condition.
Investigations are continuing by
officers in Marsh Harbour.

The Tribune wants to hear
. from people who are

; making news in their

p neighbourhoods. Perhaps
jyou are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
jarea or have won an‘
award. ;

If so, call us on 322- 1986
rand share your story.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
a aA TE
PHONE: 322-2157



“mental matters. The IDB has
also been very helpful to us in
terms of creation of additional
and new solid waste disposable
sites and systems in The
Bahamas on New Providence,
San Salvador, Abaco, Cat
Island, Andros, Bimini, Harbour
Island and elsewhere.”

Regarding financing plans for
the Lynden Pindling Interna-

-tional Airport, the Prime Min-
ister confirmed that while fund-
ing requests have not yet been
made, the Government expects
to consider the airport’s financ-
ing plan early next. year.

“We’ve got short term things
for the airport. We are going to
build a new US. departure ter-
minal and we are going to build
new international and domestic
departure terminals at the air-
port. It’s a four to five year pro-
gramme and it will begin next
year,” he said.

Mr. Ingraham, who has

An

.

pledged that his government will

restore accountability and trans-

parency to public accounting,
said the IDB is a “good source
to go to for loans” because fund-
ing through the Bank provides
an opportunity for oversight,
and the IDB requires project
studies to be conducted to deter-
mine their economic and social
benefits and costs.

He pointed out, meantime,
that the Government does not
expect many grants from the
IDB.

“We are not beggars,” Mr.
Ingraham noted. “We have
received grants in the past from
the Canadians, the Japanese and
others have made available
grants to The Bahamas. And to
the extent to which grant money

is available to conduct feasibili- .

ty studies on a place like The
Bahamas, we will be happy to
access them.

“But generally speaking, we
are borrowers who stand on our
own two feet and we put for-
ward a project that we are able
to pay for.”

Mr. Moreno said he has had a
chance to revisit the challenges
facing The Bahamas to look at
ways in which the Bank can con-
tribute to further development
of the country’s infrastructure; a
critical component in dealing

¢ Ue Te f)

Tyee elie

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 » Robinson Rd,[242] 322-3080 * Fax:[242] 322-5251

with challenges associated with
growth and social areas such as
health and education.

_ “Yes it is true that this coun-
try has a very high income per
capita compared to other
Caribbean countries, but I
believe that despite that, we
should strive to, regardless of
that, to understand that there
are still questions of poverty in
The Bahamas and the Bank
needs to find ways to deal with
the situation,” he said. “I have
personally taken a direct role in
trying to find ways to address
that.”

The IDB, the oldest and
largest regional bank in the
world was founded in 1959 as a
partnership between 19 Latin
American countries and the
United States. The Bahamas
became a member in 1977. It is
the main source of multilateral
financing for economic, social
and institutional development
in Latin America and the
Caribbean.

Its loans and grants help
finance development projects
and support strategies to reduce
poverty, expand growth,

increase trade and investment,
promote regional integration,
and foster private sector devel-
opment and modernization of
the State.



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MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007,

“We are not beggars. We hi:
received grants in the past
from the Canadians, the J:
ese and others have made
available grants to The
Bahamas.”

WORD OF EXPLANATION: Prime Minister Hubert Ingraliar
(centre) explains the needs of The Bahamas during a press
conference on Friday on the official visit of Inter-American
Development Bank President Luis Alberto Moreno, (left). !0
Bahamas. Also pictured is Minister of State for Finance Ziv
go Laing. The press conference was held at the Office of the



Prime Minister, Cable Beach.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR










The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

Statements
misrepresent



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D. D.Litt.




Publisher/Editor 1919-1972












Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

~ TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

MANAMA, Bahrain — One of the most
telling:but little-noted ironies of the U.S.-spon-
sored peace summit meeting in Annapolis,
Md., was who on the Arab side didn’t attend.
Syria, a country we barely talk to, was there.
Saudi Arabia, which never meets with Israelis,
was there. No, the two no-shows were the two
Arab countries liberated by U.S. troops from
the grip of Saddam Hussein: Iraq and Kuwait.

That’s right — Iraq and Kuwait, the two:

Arab countries hosting the most U.S. troops,
and the two Arab countries with probably the
' most active elected parliaments, were both
absent. The Kuwaitis asked not to be invited,

and the Iraqis were invited but declined to.

come.

Don’t get me wrong, I think Annapolis was
useful. But when you toil for a year to throw a
party and some of your worst enemies RSVP,
but the two people whose lives you’ve once
saved don’t show up, it’s beyond rude. It’s
interesting.

It actually reveals the core problem we’re
facing in the Middle East: all of these countries
are deeply internally divided, some with active
civil wars — Palestine, Iraq, Lebanon and
Afghanistan — and some with latent ones.
These divisions date from when these states
were shaped by colonial pens, with bound-
aries that rarely reflected either shared eth-
nicity or a shared desire to live together. For
decades, they were held together by colonial
powers, the Cold War, oil'wealth or iron-fist-
ed military dictators and monarchs.

But lately the lids have started to loosen, and
in those places with real parliaments — like the
Palestinian territories, Lebanon, Iraq and
Kuwait — they tend to expose the depth of lin-
. gering divisions rather than express, or forge,
a new consensus. These are divisions about
basics, like the line between religion and state,
the rights of women and minorities, and the
role of citizens.

Kuwait’s parliament has a liberal minority
and an Islamist majority, which does not like
Israel (and doesn’t like Palestinians much,
either). The Lebanese and Palestinian parlia-
ments are both paralyzed by discord. And
Iraq? Sitting down with Israelis was only one
of many things Iraqis can’t agree on, which is
why the U.S. military surge has not yet pro-
duced an upturn in national-reconciliation.

On Thursday, The Associated Press report-
ed that a shouting match erupted in the Iraqi
parliament when a top Shiite lawmaker, Bahaa
al-Aaraji, said he had evidence that a leading
Sunni politician, Adnan al-Dulaimi, had brand-
ed Shiites “heretics” and had called their mur-
der legitimate. We’re not talking Democrats

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and Republicans here. What we are trying to
do in Iraq is unprecedented: We are hosting
the first real horizontal dialogue in modern
Arab history by the constituents of an Arab
country — on the assumption that if Shiites,
Sunnis and Kurds could actually write their
own social contract, it would mean that some-
thing other than top-down, iron-fist politics
was possible for this part of the world. It is
hugely important — and next to impossible.

Each of the Arab countries and Israel has
“its own Gaza,” said Mamoun Fandy, director
of Middle East programmes at London’s Inter-
national Institute of Strategic Studies. “That is,
an anti-peace, fundamentalist, xenophobic fac-
tion, which wants to hold back any reconcili-
ation. Until each country confronts its own
Gaza, it will have problems.”

Including Iran. I’m in Bahrain, just across
the Persian Gulf from Iran, for the institute’s
annual conference. A big Iranian delegation
was scheduled to attend, alongside a big U.S.
team. The Iranians cancelled at the last minute.
Internal fighting.

“All these countries are like unfinished
novellas,” said Stephen P. Cohen, author of the
upcoming “Beyond America’s Grasp,” a his-
tory of the modern Middle East. Indeed, if
you looked at just the key players — Israel,

’ Lebanon, the Palestinians, Egypt and Saudi

Arabia — “their leaders who went to Annapo-

. lis were all embroiled in struggles with domes-

tic opponents,” which limited their room to
manoeuvre, he said. Each one, he added, has
a “Party of God” back home “that believes it
doesn’t have to pay attention to what the gov-
ernment says because it doesn’t recognize that
government’s legitimacy to make big deci-
sions.” '

That’s why these days big decisions get
made by iron fists or they don’t get made.
Power has become too fragmented. So unless
there is more reconciliation within these coun-
tries, it is hard to see how there will be more
reconciliation between them.

Which is also why, I thought, that instead of
Annapolis, the peace conference should have
been held, symbolically, at Appomattox Court
House, Va., where on Palm: Sunday, 1865,
Gen. R.E. Lee surrendered to Lt. Gen. U.S.
Grant, ending the American Civil War and
reunifying our country. Admission is only $4 -—
and President Bush probably could have got a
group rate.

(This article was written by Thomas L Fried-
man of The New York Times News Service.
Friedman is the author of the book, “The
World is Flat.” —c. 2007). -














Opposition to
Wendy’s plan

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In a Guardian article of the
30th October, Mr. Chris
Tsavoussis complained of being
frustrated in his plans to con-
struct his eighth Wendy's
restaurant location by a small
group of opponents, despite
having an approval in principle
from as far back as 2005.

In fact, Mr. Tsavoussis' state-
ments both misrepresent the
facts and mischaracterize the
nature of the opposition to the
construction of a Wendy's at

. West Bay and Westridge.

Far from being a “group of
nine”, the movement actually
has the tacit support of me and
almost everyone I know in the

area. That a small group has-

maintained the energy to keep
the fire alive does not mean that
it is a minority view.

In fact I am sure that Mr.
Tsavoussis would regret having
raised the issue of signed peti-
tions if the “group of nine” (or
make that ten) decided to take
him up on the challenge by vig-
orous canvassing. The numbers
may enter four digits.

To set out the context, here
is a company proposing to place
a junk-food outlet immediately
adjacent to Nettie Symonette's
heritage-centred resort and
across the street from the new-
ly completed (and highly exclu-
sive) Marley Spa and Resort.
Its rear would face a communi-
ty of hard-working Bahamians
and foreigners who pay a lot to
live in one of the dwindling qui-
et, safe communities on this
island.

It proposes to attract an end-
less stream of drive-through
customers to the main road of
this intensely residential area.
In short, the same problems
now faced by residents of
Twynam would be imposed on
the residents of Cable Beach.

While it is good to hear that
Mr. Tsavoussis' approval in
principle has lapsed, it remains
intriguing in the extreme just
how he managed to get it in the
first place, given the obvious
inappropriateness of his kind of
business in that location.

Far from being the victims
portrayed in that article, the
proprietors of Wendy's have
acted in a surreptitious and
seemingly underhanded man-

Fund Manager seeks Marketing and
Client Service Administrator

Holowesko Partners Ltd. seeks to fill the position of
Marketing and Client Service Administrator for the Firm
and the Funds managed by the Firm. The candidate must
be a university graduate, preferably with a business or
finance major and at least five years of post-graduate
working experience in financial services.

A working knowledge of the investment management °
business will be important in assessing candidates as well
as experience in Microsoft Word, Excel and Powerpoint
applications. The candidate must be a confident self-
starter and have strong written and oral communication

skills.

The job responsibilities will include organizing and
coordinating the many marketing and investor service

functions of the Firm, including client communications,
conference calls and meetings. A modest amount

of travel will be required to meet with clients and
prospective clients. The candidate will be expected to
author and/or assist in the preparation of Firm and Fund

presentations, updates, newsletters and routine letters
to clients and to manage the content and uploads to the

abroad.

Firm’s secure website. Responsibilities will also include
organizing and managing an annual Investor conference
held in Nassau and an annual Firm conference held

Please send written expressions of interest, university
transcripts and résumés by fax to Holowesko Partners at
362 6733 or email to jtownend@templeton.com.

DBAS

letters@tribunemedia. net






ner from the very start. Initially,
they appeared quite content to
quietly benefit from a dubious,
capricious and non-consultative
decision, of which those that
would be most affected were

unaware.

When the residents got wind
of the fait accompli and dam-
age control became necessary,
Mr. Tsavoussis agreed to attend
a public meeting, but had no
more compelling explanation
for his persistence (against the
wishes of the residents) than the
fact that he had already bought
the land.

All along, the attempts to
influence: people to “support”
the project have been sustained
and ludicrous..

I personally only became
aware when I was accosted by a
pretty young model they seem
to have hired for the purpose
of canvassing support among
area locals.

Presented with a rehearsed
and nonsensical story about
how well another fast food joint

- would complement the area, I

asked her how much they were
paying her to talk foolishness.
The pattern seems to be to
find people whose sensibilities
can be worked upon (by, for
instance, presenting the oppo-
sition as “elitist”) and get them
to pretend that they honestly
believe that residential Cable
Beach is just perfectly suited to

another packed, traffic-snarling
American fast food drive-
through. That tactic even
appears to have met some suc-
cess at The Guardian.

All of this brings us back to
that silly, spurious question
posed by Wendy's in the arti-
cle: What foreign and interna->
tional investors will make of a
business environment in which
investors are given approvals in
principle and then find opposi-
tion when it comes to imple-
menting their plans.

Here is the answer: It would
tell investors that, in The
Bahamas, transparency and
accountability mean something.
In fact, they mean so much that
no central department can light-
ly make closed-door decisions
that will affect residents of an
area without first carrying out
wide consultation.

Where such anomalous (and
hopefully rare) situations as the
current one arise, they are cor-
rected.

It would also tell investors
that, when they do business
here, they do not have to fear
accusations of influence-buying,
as the processes are transpar-
ent.

Any investor (local or for-
eign) that is unsatisfied by that
explanation should perhaps
look at alternative locations
where they really need the mon-
ey (with no questions asked).
Port-Au-Prince comes to mind.

Andrew C Allen

Olde Towne Sandyport,
Nassau,

December 7, 2007

The ugly side to America

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I REALISE it is corny to state how many friends one has of any
different nationality or race, but American generosity is legendary
and I have much personal experience of this. However, there is
another side to America which is not so pretty. For many years they
were accused of preferring aid, on their own terms, not trade, and
Britain suffered appalling after the war. Britain was struggling
economically and when America, flush with dollars, put work out
to bid internationally, British costs were sometimes half those of
their American counterparts, but the award always went to US com-
petitors. It got so bad it reached presidential levels.

The “Ugly American” is never far below the surface. I for one
have never had any desire to live there. I was both shocked and dis-
gusted that the 6.5 per cent Florida sales tax addition to exports was
even thought of, let alone seriously proposed, The Tribune Business,
November 23rd. The Bahamas is a small nation of just over 300,000
people, a mid-sized town in America, of which 175,000 are pro-
ductive, and these sick Americans want the tiny Bahamas to sub-
sidize their tax base? Talk of David and Goliath. Or are we being
co-opted as, what is it, the 52nd state, with none of the advantages?
What about allowing us access to Medicare and Medicaid? Will this
imposition simply affect the Bahamas, or will it extend to every oth-
er state and country Florida exports to?

There have been many occasions when overzealous legislators
have cast their eyes on rich pickings, only to find down the line they
have lost out as people refuse to buy or find alternative sources, with
much damage to all concerned, except, of course, the legislators,
who retire with their inflated, inflation proof pensions.

W EG GRATTAN
Nassau,
December 2, 2007.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 5





In brief —

Police find

five handguns
after chasing
group of men

POLICE discovered five
handguns in the bush in western
New Providence on Saturday
evening after chasing a group
of men seen in that area.

According to police press liai-
son officer Walter Evans, offi-
cers from the mobile division
saw the men in the bush at
around 9pm. When the police
approached the men started to
run. Although officers gave
chase, they were unsuccessful
in catching the group.

Returning to the bush they
found five handguns and six live
rounds of ammunition. There
have been no arrests in connec-
tion with this matter. Howev-
er, said Asst Supt Evans, inves-
tigations are continuing.

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Mourners
pack funeral
for Jamaican
track star

®@ KINGSTON, Jamaica — Hun-
dreds of islanders, including
Prime Minister Bruce Golding,
packed a stadium for the funer-
al of a beloved sports hero who
helped usher Jamaica into the
irack and field elite, writes the
\ssociated Press.

The body of track legend
Herb McKenley, a former
world record holder in the 400
meters and one of the first
Jamaicans to win an Olympic
gold medal, was buried with
high honours on Saturday in his
Carih>ean omeland.

MckKenley died last month at
age 85. The cause of death was
not discl-ved. Mourners wept
as his casket, draped with the
black, yellow and green
Jamaican flag, was lowered into
the ground at National Heroes
Park, which is dedicated. to
prominent islanders like the
cour | s first premier, Norman
Manley, and civil rights leader
.larcus Garvey. .

v

\

Rosetta St.

Anti-gay campaigners postpone BED BA

meetings following Harl Taylor,

Thaddeus McDonald murders

ANTI-GAY campaigners
have decided to postpone a series
of planned town meetings in the
aftermath of the Harl Taylor and
Dr Thaddeus McDonald mur-
ders.

But they have vowed to come
out “blazing” once the eulogies
are over in their attempt to get
what they regard as “pro-gay”
legislation rescinded.

Campaign leader Clever Dun-
combe said he was concerned
that two senior police officers
most familiar with the Taylor-
McDonald case have now been
sent away for training.

He said it was reminiscent of
the Sir Harry Oakes murder case
in 1943, when the police com-
missioner was transferred to
Trinidad as investigations got
underway.

And he said it also reminded
him of the Barry Best murder in
Nassau some years ago when the
case went “cold” following a top-
level cover-up.

“We believe this could be a
case of deja vu, which would go a
long way to telling us how pow-
erful this gay community is
here,” said Mr Duncombe.

“I think it could most defi-
nitely prove to be a reprise of
both these situations.”

However, a government
spokesman said today that it
would be irresponsible to draw
such a conclusion. Plans for the
two officers — Ellison
Greenslade and Marvin Dames
— to be sent to Canada for a
year’s training with the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police were
concluded long before the Tay-
lor-McDonald murders were
committed.

It would, therefore, be com-
pletely irresponsible, said the
spokesman, for their transfers to
be interpreted as an attempt to
“cover-up” these murders.

Mr Duncombe said any cover-
up would add impetus to his
campaign to counter gay influ-
ence in Bahamian society and
secure a reversal of a 1991 law
which, he said, made the homo-

PF sexual lifestyle legal.

“I believe that the US
Embassy in Queen Street must
have plenty of evidence to show

RT:

CAMPAIGN LEADER: Clever Duncombe.

what was going on at the home
of Dr McDonald,” he told The
Tribune.

He claimed that among the
men of all ages and races going
through the property were prob-
ably “prominent and influential
people in Nassau. To find Dr
McDonald’s killer, all they need
to do is track back through close-
circuit footage showing those
who last visited his home.”

Mr Duncombe said his own
sources — “including someone
who worked the gate” — had
outlined the volume of night
hours “traffic” into Dr McDon-
ald’s home.

“There was heavy traffic from
sunset to sunrise, all through the
wee hours, and some of the visi-
tors were prominent and well-
known people.

“In this day and time, when
security is an issue, the US
Embassy must have information
of use in this investigation.”

The US Embassy has con-
firmed that it has been working
closely with the police from the
beginning of the case. After
working through the diplomat-
ic, technical and legal difficulties,
said a spokesman, the Embassy
recently gave the police all the
information they had requested
and which the Embassy had
available.

Mr Duncombe said _ his
planned town meetings would
resume once a period had
elapsed for families to pay their
respects to Mr Taylor and Dr
McDonald.

He said he and his supporters
would leave no stone unturned in
their efforts to get the Sexual



Offences Act rescinded so that
the gay lifestyle was once again
outlawed.

“We need to keep the cam-
paign in the eyes of public opin-
ion. We are supported by a wide
cross-section of the community,
but the Christian Council and
legislators are remaining silent.”

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE






@ By Sir Ronald Sanders __

6 Gai: West. Indies

team” to most West

Maranatha
De Centre

FOR THE FINEST
SELECTION OF

West Indian Cricket
team which, until recently, gave
the people of the West Indies
much cause for both pride and
joy as they defeated teams from
all over the world.

Now, “the West indies team”
will also refer to rugby.

A West Indian rugby team
has been shaped in recent years

Drum Sets
}

Keyboards











Acoustic & from regional comp nee and
: : interest is growing in the game
Electric Guitars ee nae years, had only
a small following.
brass & Woodwind What flows from this is a prin-
~~—hastruments-"~ ciple that-helds-as-good for. busi-.
. Mi oh ness as it does for countries and
(cropnones for sport: to compete globally,
Speakers small enterprises need to pool
their resources. Enterprises
“rege drawn from small pools, howev- ,
Amplifiers er talented or creative they may
ee be, simply can not match the
Mixers capability of larger groups.
ic of “West Indi-
Cables The logic of the
pte an” cricket team flowed from
i the reality that not one of the
Instrument & Audio Caribbean territories could by
Accessories itself produce a team that could
ont compete successfully at an inter-
Music Books national level. Had this been
rene attempted, the individual team
Televisions would simply have lacked the














capacity to defeat teams from
larger countries on any consis-
tent basis.

The great cricketing nations
draw their 11-man squad from
populations of tens or hundreds
of millions. The West Indies
picks its team from less than six
million. The numbers alone mil-
itate against teams from indi-
vidual Caribbean nations.

The organisers and adminis-
trators of rugby in several

sibly recognised that teams from
their individual countries also
could not compete successfully
by themselves. Taking a leaf
from the book of West Indian
cricket, they have formed a West



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Lar ULM Cea Cela CT ANU ae aU 1a COM yl
T2HOURSPO WERRESERVE, DOUBLE-BARREL,
BALANCE WITHSCREWS

Indians means the

Caribbean territories have sen=”

over ' the years.

e West In
Rugby j joins cricket"



WORLD VIEW

Indian rugby team.

Nine territories are involved
so far. They are: the Bahamas,
Barbados, Bermuda, the British
Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands,
Guyana, Jamaica, St. Lucia, St.
Vincent and the Grenadines,
Trinidad and Tobago, and the
Turks and Calicos Islands.

Remarkably, at a time when ;

international sports organiza-

tions are.resisting composite _
teams, drawn from several terri- -

tories in a region, the West
Indies Rugby Union has been
accepted as a member of the
North American and West
Indies Rugby Association

_(NAWIRA) together with Rug-

by USA and the Rugby Union
of Canada. NAWIRA is a Mem-
ber of the International Rugby
Board (IRB) and the Regional
governing body of the IRB.
The West Indian rugby team
has participated in several inter-
national competitions since 2000.
In Los Angles in 2005/06 and
again in San Diego in 2007, they
competed against the top 14
ranked countries in the world.
Insufficient financing limited
preparation and pre-tournament
competition and, therefore,
though competitive, the West
Indies did not secure wins in
these tournaments. In the same
years, however, the team com-
peted in Trinidad against such
well known touring sides as Bor-
der Reivers of Scotland and
Atlantis (USA), winning back
to-back-titles,. -.--.. ...
The West Indies rugby team,
therefore, shows potential for
going on to greater heights if it
can attract the commercial sup-
port that West Indian cricket has

BESIR Ronald Sanders

er interest in the
sport has been greatly

assisted by the Rugby World
Cup tournament held in France
earlier this year.

Hundreds of millions of peo-
ple watched the tournament on
television sets across the world.
In European capitals, in South
Africa, New Zealand, Australia
and in the Pacific streets were
devoid of traffic as fans congre
gated to watch the games. The
semi-finals and finals were par-
ticularly gripping, and the final
left millions of people in Eng-
land weeping and millions dane-
ing with joy in South Africa.

The commercial interest in
the game, particularly by televi
sion stations created more than
an iitérest inthe game, it devel
oped a sense of national pride
in the teams.

In South Africa, a nation that
has only relatively recently
emerged from the racial division

TNT

Slip dal T=
240 Bay Street, Opposite The Old Straw Market, Tel 242-328-TIME oe Went as



of Apartheid which plagued it
for many decades, the South
African team’s ascendancy to
the final and its victory over
England, created a sense of
national unity that was openly
displayed by people of all races

joyously celebrating together.

‘The Caribbean has witnessed
the same phenomena with crick-
et:

Above everything else, the
West Indian cricket team has
been a unifying force for the
people of the English-speaking
Caribbean (except Puerto Rico).
Even in the United States Virgin
Islands, now populated with
many immigrants from the for-
micr and current British territo-
ries in the region, the fortunes of
the West Indian cricket team
have been followed avidly.

Regardless of what territory
they are from, people have
rejoiced together in the triumphs
of the West Indian cricket team,
and they endured disappoint-
ment and even grief at their loss-
es.

The important point is that
the people of individual
Caribbean countries, like the
administrators of cricket, recog-
nise that smallness is powerless-
ness, and it is only through pool-
ing of resources that they stand a
chance in global competition.

Several businesses in the
Caribbean, in acknowledgment
of that reality, are either merging
with or acquiring other similar
companies to gear themselves to
vie with external companies, or
they are taking advantage of the
Caribbean Single Market to
expand their operations beyond
their national boundaries.

They recognise that they have

a better chance of survival and of

success if they are ‘Caribbean’
wide.

Because of rules that are
linked to definitions of what is a
country, the countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARICOM)

. have not been able to field a sin-

gle. composite team in many

dies team:



“Global inter-
est in the
sport has been
greatly assist-

ed by the Rug-

*



by World Cup

tournament

held in France
earlier this
year.”



global sports. Hence, even
though there are many talented
footballers in the Caribbean
(and quite a few are now being
contracted by British teams), the
West Indies has been unable to

mount a West Indian football. --

team, or indeed a single team
for the Commonwealth or
Olympic games.

ricket, therefore, has

been the single unify-
ing force in sport for the West
Indian people.

Now, rugby is presenting itself
as another string to the West
Indian bow.

The Caribbean media, the
business‘community and the
governments should encourage
those who have been proud
enough of their joint heritage
and wise enough to recognise
the advantage of union in
launching the West Indies rugby
team.



Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotinail.co
m



(The writer is a business coni-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomiutt)



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 7






LOCAL NEWS


















Anglican Diocese
provides water for
Cat Island in post
Tropical Storm
Noel relief efforts

ARCHDEACON Keith
‘Cartwright, Anglican
Archdeacon of the Southern
Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos Islands, with the help
of Chelsea’s Choice Water
Company and Coca Cola
Bottling Company, donated
500 gallons of purified water
to residents of Port Howe,
Bains’ Town, Zonicle Hill,
McQueen’s and Hawk’s
Nest, all affected by Tropical
Storm Noel.

The storm caused severe
flooding to these settle-
ments, and left residents
without water for a
















‘Bee Z

ens, Cat Island.

Pat

ABOVE: Severe flooding in McQue

LEFT: The Rev Fr. Chester Burton, Anglican priest with responsibility
for Cat Island, prepares to distribute water to Cat Island residents.

»- { x‘ 4 Bahanuanr Gold Coin with two flamingoes

a

AID sponsors automotive
industry technology seminar

AUTOMOTIVE and industrial distributor AID sponsored a
tools and equipment seminar to introduce the latest develop-
ments in diagnostic equipment for 2007 American, Asian and
European automobiles.

The seminar was hosted at its headquarters on Wulff Road.

Co-sponsored by international automotive parts giant, NAPA
(National Automotive Parts Association) the seminar covered
all the recent advances in technology relating to the fast devel-
oping automotive industry. AID will be continuing these sem-
inars that will cover the many aspects of the industry over the
next 12 months and automotive technicians are welcome to
inquire about future course opportunities at AID. Similar cours-
es are offered at other AID outlets throughout The Bahamas.

Pictured above with the course participants are left to right:
Rustin Swain, Retail Store Supervisor, AID; Eric Posner, Tools
and Equipment, NAPA; Russell Eggert, Tools and Equipment,
NAPA; Dean Canduci, Sales Manager, Miami, NAPA; Bob
Hall, Trainer, OTC and Stan High, Territory Sales Manager,
NAPA.




Venezuelans turn their
clocks back half an hour

@ CARACAS, Venezuela from claims that he is a “dicta-
tor.”

VENEZUELANS turned Chavez also traveled to

their clocks back half an hour
on Sunday, putting them in the
company of people in other
nations that offset time in half-
hour increments from Green-
wich Mean Time, like
Afghanistan, India, Iran and
Myanmar.

“This is a public health mea-
sure that benefits the health of
Venezuelan men and women
and, above all, boys and girls,”
the government’s official news
agency said.

The time change, which will
remain in effect year-round, was
initially announced in August,
but confusion ensued as to
whether clocks would be moved
ahead or behind. Senior offi-
cials here recently confirmed
that clocks woyld be turned
back 30 minutes, arguing that
exposing citizens to more sun-
light would improve their
metabolism.

Venezuela will now be in its
own time zone, a half-hour
ahead of Eastern Standard
Time.

The change is part of a set of
announcements in recent days
showing that President Hugo
Chavez is pressing ahead with
policy initiatives despite losing a
referendum last week over con-
stitutional reforms aimed at
transforming Venezuela into a
socialist state.

For instance, Chavez
wrapped up a visit over the
weekend with President
Alexander G. Lukashenko of
Belarus in which the two men
pledged military cooperation.
Chavez defended Lukashenko,
whose rule has been criticized
by human rights groups over his
failure to hold fair elections,

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Buenos Aires, Argentina, on
Sunday to inaugurate the Bank
of the South, a project largely
backed by Venezuela as an
alternative to the World Bank.
And in Caracas, a Vietnamese
delegation prepared to unveil a
symbol fitting of Chavez’s anti-
imperialist fervor: a statue of
the Vietnamese revolutionary
leader Ho Chi Minh. The statue
is to go up Monday on a major
thoroughfare here next to busts
of other revolutionaries like
Che Guevara and Augusto
Cesar Sandino, the Nicaraguan
rebel leader.

c.2007 New York Times
News Service

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





ACTRESS RECEIVES CAREER ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Bahamas International
Film Festival pays
tribute to Daryl Hannah

‘History OF [OURISM

IN [HE BAHAMAS
-A Global Perspective



+. US ACTRESS Daryl Hannah Tet 4 Since Hak FEE
The mM ost “History of Tourism -A Global Perspective continues to make a splash in the
Bahamas.

traces the history of Tourism from the arrival
Y In 1984 it was through her role

complete of the first visitor in 1492 up to the beginning as a mermaid in the family
of the 2Ist century. Presented against the favourite “Splash”, filmed in part
background of world tourism and regional on Castaway Cay.

a oP : And on Saturday it happened
when the Bahamas International
Film Festival paid tribute to her
achievements.

Among those present were
Bahamian resident Sir Sean Con-
nery, acclaimed for his screen role
as British agent James Bond

Part of the celebration took
place at Atlantis, where Ms Han-
nah spoke of her start in acting
and her environmental concerns.

It was a concern dictating her .

Its simply a must read | san iisal ste wie her ow
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documentation
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Tourism ever
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ecade as well as the socio-economic impact
of tourism on the local community.





er Hentsh, which supports the
film festival, led tributes to the
Hollywood star’s career.

“One adorable film, Splash, is
particularly dear to us in The
Bahamas, as it was filmed on our
own Castaway Cay,” he said.

“Ms Hannah is not only a gift
ed artist, but she also truly
embraces some of Lombard Odi
er Darier Hentsch’s intrinsic val-
ues, such as a true love for arts,
but also something you may not
be aware of, the protection of the
environment which is today
everyone’s conern.

*An international voyager and













an appraised and beautiful sip seaN CONNERY poses with Bahamas International Film Festival

actress, she really is unique in so
many ways.”

He added: “The festival has
truly expanded into an interna-
tional cultural event,which we are
very proud to be a part of this
year again and for manv vears to
come.”

The celebration continued dur-
ing a candlelit dinner at Cafe
Matisse attended by Sir Sean and
his wile. Micheline.

Ms Hannah ~ also noted for
her role in 1982’s Blade Runner,
and more recently as Flle Driver

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International Film Festival awards nigiit on Saturday, December 8,
2007 at the Atlantis Theatre.

in Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill: She had a dream aid we
Vol. | & 2 ~~ posed for phe helped turn it into reality,” he
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The film festival is the bra interested in entrepreneurship
child of Bahamian actress | *slic ind creativity. She embodied
Vanderpool. noth. of these.”

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derpool as a visionary. ture.




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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 9



2° OO." 7

Panel focuses on the

‘Art of Collaboration’



THE fourth Annual
Bahamas International Film
Festival began their informa-
tive panel series this weekend
featuring a number of both
well-known and local guests
and speakers.

Held at the scenic Green Par-
rot Bar & Grill, this year’s pan-
els commenced with the Art
and of Collaboration event
headlined by movie star Antho-
ny Mackie and television
actress Tonya Lee Williams.

Alongside Mr Mackie and
Ms Williams, literary and tal-
ent rep Jennifer Konawal and
acting/dialogue coach Greta
Seacat discussed the impor-
tance of professional relation-
ships between actors, agents
and filmmakers.

“Some directors have the
vision but are unable to explain
it to actors,” Ms Seacat said.
“The actors want to please the
director but they don’t know
how to go through the process
to get there.”

The panel also answered
questions pertaining to the con-



flict that can arise during pro-

duction, whether the project be

independent or big-budget.
“The director’s not the end-

all of any production,” Ms |

Williams said. “If you have a
problem with a director you can
go to a screenwriter or a pro-
ducer. Everybody’s a complete
different personality. You have
to know what kind of personal-
ity you’re working with.”

Mackie, who has starred in
Million Dollar Baby and Half
Nelson, agreed.

“Sometimes the director can
get in your way,” he said.
“Sometimes the idea of collab-
oration is put aside. (Some-
times) when directors try to
step in, they dissolve the actor’s
character study.”

By promoting collaboration
between filmmakers from
across the globe, festivals like
the Bahamas International Film
Festival and Ms Williams’ own
ReelWorld Film Festival are
helping bridge the gap between
directors, actors and producers
on different continents.

“It’s important to realise that
we're becoming one world,” Ms

CHOPARD BAHAMAS president and CEO Wayne Chee-a-Tow, left, and
Sir Sean Connery present the Career Achievement tribute to film star
Daryl Hannah at the 4th Annual Bahamas International Film Festival
awards night on Saturday, December 8, 2007 at the Atlantis Theatre.
Hannah's hits include Blade Runner, Steel Magnolias and Splash in
which many of the scenes were filmed in the Bahamas.



SIR SEAN CONNERY carries a wooden sculpture crafted by Antonius

Roberts after being presented with the gift by Bahamas International
Film Festival founder Leslie Vanderpool at the 4th Annual Bahamas
International Film Festival awards night on Saturday, December 8, 2007

at the Atlantis Theatre.



BAHAMAS International Film Festival founder Leslie Vanderpool and
Rodney Chee-a-Tow of Chopard Bahamas welcome guests to the
Chopard/Versace Opening Night Party for the 4th Annual Bahamas
International Film Festival at the Cloisters on Friday, December 7, 2007.





nue NV EXoL aIs3

Williams said. “I think the
future of film is going to be
ensemble pieces filled with all
different ethnicities and focused
on several different cultural
issues. It’s important for festi-
vals to get a diverse group of
people — both in front of the
camera and behind the camera
— that can start collaborating.”

The 4th Annual Bahamas
International Film Festival runs

Merce des-Be a

until Thursday, December 14.



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BIFF 2007

- The Bahamas International ;
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iE TRIBUNE

‘orum gives an education

n scholarships and loans

INDIVIDUALS wishing to
irther their education were
dvised of the various scholar-
hips and loans offered by the
‘ahamas Government at a youth

rum hosted by The Bahamas.

.ational Youth Council (BNYC)
nd the United States Embassy,
yn December 5.

Reginald Saunders, assistant
director of Education in Govern-
ment Scholarships and Loans
Division, in the Ministry of Edu-
cation, Youth Sports and Culture
(MOEYSC), said the Govern-
ment issued more than $16 mil-
lion in scholarships and loans last
year.

“That is a testament to the
commitment the Government has
to ensure that as many of you as
possible are able to study locally
as well as abroad to further your
educational endeavours.”

He explained that the Guaran-
teed Loans programme, which is
the most popular scholarship
scheme offered by the Ministry,
recipients only have to pay the
interest each year while they are
in school.

Subsidy

Mr. Saunders also noted that
the Government has reinstituted
the 50 per cent subsidy, so recip-
ients only have to pay $30 a
month.

“That is the best deal in town,”
he said. “You begin paying back
the principal along with the inter-
est upon completion of your stud-
ies and you have 15 years to pay
that off.”

He added that there has been a
lot of talk about defaulted loans
and it is very important that per-
sons who take advantage of the
loan programme fulfil their oblig-
ations and pay off their loans.

“It is a loan programme, which
means you have to pay it back.
The only way you will benefit and
your children will benefit is if
those who are currently in the
programme, repay their loans.”

Mr. Saunders noted that two
years ago the Government insti-
tuted a National Scholarship Pro-
gramme and there are three types
of scholarship programmes under
this scheme.

’ There is the National Merit
Scholarship Programme, which is
a $25,000 scholarship to any four-
year institution. Recipients
receive $25,000 every year for

¢ Save Big $$ on unlimited number of

four years and seven or eight of
these are given every year.

Hé said the MOEYSC also

offers the National Technical
Scholarship, which is a $10,000
award to any institution and the
National Academic Scholarships
for students studying academic
subjects.

He explained that the Govern-
ment has a Teachers’ Education
Grant and a national bursary
awards programme to attend The
College of The Bahamas (COB).
Recipients of these programmes
also get a stipend.

In order to apply for these two
awards, candidates must have five
BGCSEs with C or above and
Mathematics and English.

Mr. Saunders said the Govern-
ment also gave COB $1 million to
help support other deserving stu-
dents.

The Gerace Scholarship pro-
gramme is another full scholar-
ship offered to a network of 24
universities in the U.S.

He explained that the institu-
tions will pay for the tuition and
the Government pays for room
and board.

The Gerace Research Centre
is located in San Salvador and sci-
entists utilise the centre to con-
duct marine research.

The 24 schools in exchange for
use of that centre made an agree-
ment with Government that it will
provide tuition for Bahamian stu-
dents wishing to attend the
schools.

Mr. Saunders said the Ministry
of Education partners with the
Lyford Cay Foundation for the
All Bahamas Merit Scholarship,
which is a $35,000 scholarship.

The assistant director told stu-
dents to consider attending COB
or other local colleges. Mr. Saun-
ders explained that this would cut
down on the expense of going
abroad to university.

He also encouraged students
to choose careers they would not
only enjoy, but that would pro-
vide them with the resources nec-
essary to live.

“The cost of living is constant-
ly going ups we have students in
the loan programme that spent
over $80,000 over a four year
period to do a particular field of
study and they come home and
they make X amount of dollars,
which cannot support a loan pay-
ment.”

He also said not to wait for an

bags or boxes from Florida to

The Bahamas

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acceptance letter before applying
for any of the scholarships.

“We must have your applica-
tion in before the deadline,” Mr.
Saunders said.

“The acceptance letter could
come later. With most schools
you may not get an acceptance
letter until August.

“So, get the application in with
all of the information and we will
give you the award pending the
receipt of your acceptance Ict-
ter.”

¢ Or Shop and Ship today, Relax and Fly

tomorrow

REGINALD SAUNDERS,
assistant director of Educa-
tion, Government Scholar-
ship and Educational Loans
Division in the Ministry of
Education, Youth, Sports and
Culture, talks to students
about the various scholar-
ships and loans offered by
the Bahamas Government at

a youth forum hosted by The ©

Bahamas National Youth
Council (BNYC) and the Unit-
ed States Embassy, Decem-
ber 5. Virginia Ramadan,
consul general of the U.S.
Embassy, looks on during
the presentation







MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 11

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUN



THE BAHAMAS FINANCIAL SERVICES BOARD: Tax and trade symposium

Selling Bahamas in a global marketplace

The Government plans to
strategically promote and market
the financial services sector with-
in the international community,

Government plans to promote and

“id MiniverofStaeforFinnce Ark et financial services sector

Tax and Trade Symposium, held
by The Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB).

Minister Laing explained that
the current administration is com-
mitted to increasing the country’s
profile and presence within the

global marketplace.

“In this regard there will
increased marketing of the juris-
diction and increased participa-
tion and visibility by the Govern-
ment in conjunction with the



Bahamas Financial Services
Board in (BFSB) strategic inter-
national events,” he said.
Minister Laing also noted that
the Government is increasing its
commitment to public-private

NASSAU LISTINGS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

. CARMICHAEL ROAD
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
Residence 3 bed/ 2 bath
LAND: 11,988 sq. ft.
FLOOR AREA: 1,710 sq. ft.
LOCATION: East on Carmichael Road from
Bacardi Road take the 1st asphalt paved
easement on the right. Property is 150 ft.
south of Carmichael Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $232,000

8._ WINTON MEADOWS SECTION NO.i
LOT NO. 115
PROPERTY: Single Family Residence Land
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling East along Prince
Charles Drive from Culberts Hill take the 1st
corner on the right Jasmine Drive. Heading
South take the 2nd corner on the right Violett
Drive, the subject property is the 4th house
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $274,000

LOT NO. 3018/19
PROPERTY: Single Family Residence

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Traveling East on CW Saunders
Highway from Pinewood Gardens round-
about, take the second corner on the right,
then the 1st paved corner on the left then
the 2nd corner on the left, Pear Tree Avenue,
Property is 2nd house on the left, Light blue
with white asphalt roof.

APPRAISED VALUE: $156,000

PROPERTY SIZE: Split Level Residential
FLOOR AREA: 1,162 sq. ft. Building

LAND: 19,960 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Western Side of John Evans
Road, South of Shirley Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $190,000

10. ROCKY PINE ROAD
LOT NO.A
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Duplex
Apartment

LAND: 7,288 sq. ft.

. CARMICHAEL VILLAGE
PROPERTY: Multi-Family Fourplex
Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: East on Carmichael Road take
1st corner on right after Golden Isles Road.
Property is 2nd lot on left from the dead end.
APPRAISED VALUE: $340,000

LOCATION: Travel West on Rocky Pine Road
property is midway on the 3rd corner on left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

11. GLENISTON GARDENS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 0 Block 7
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Storey Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,875 sq. ft.

LOCATION: East Side of Jean Street off

. GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
PROPERTY: Split Level Triplex incomplete
FLOOR AREA: 2,444 sq. ft.

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141 sq. ft.
LOCATIONS: Heading South on Blue Hill
Road from Faith United Way, take 1st corner

Prince Charles Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $210,000

12. BELLOT ROAD
LOT NO. D

partnerships as part of its man-
date to preserve and advance the
growth and development of the
financial services sector of The
Bahamas.

He said part of this endeavor is
the Government’s focus on the
health of industry associations.

“We were pleased to double
our subvention to the BFSB in
the current fiscal budget from of
$250,000 to $500,000 and to com-
mit to provide a new subvention
to the Bahamas Association of
Compliance Officers (BACO) of
$25,000 for training in the upcom-
ing fiscal budget.”

Minister Laing said the Gov-
ernment is also developing a com-
prehensive international trade
and tax policy.

He added that the most press-
ing international trade issue for
The Bahamas is the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
with the European Union (EU).

Minister Laing pointed out that
while the EPA has been under
negotiation from 2002, no region
participating in the negotiations
stand ready to meet the Decem-
ber 31, 2007 deadline set some
five years ago.

“Even CARIFORUM, which
seemed most likely in a position
to sign onto the EPA by the dead-
line, is now unlikely to make the
deadline, notwithstanding last
minute efforts to do so.”

He said, “While CARIFO-
RUM, which is the grouping to
which The Bahamas belongs,
seeks to sign a comprehensive
agreement by the deadline, The
Bahamas has offered to the Euro-
pean Union to sign a limited
“goods only” agreement and is
now awaiting the EU’s response
to the offer.”

Minister Laing said a goods-
only offer is consistent with over-
tures made by the EU to coun-
tries seeking to meet the World
Trade Organization’s (WTO)
deadline of December 31.

He added that it is the best
offer The Bahamas can make at



Kristaan Ingraham/BIS





NASSAU - Persons from throughout the business community turned
attended the one day Trade and Tax Symposium hosted by The
Bahamas Financial Services Board, on December 6, 2007.

International, have to the EU
market on favorable terms.

He noted that any negotiations
toward a services agreement with
the EU will come later, but will
take place within the broader con-
text of a Bahamas International
Trade Policy.

When the Policy is developed
within the next six to 12 months, it
will ensure that the country is able
to deliberate and comprehen-
sively negotiate any and all trade
agreements from its accession to
the WTO, which The Bahamas
will be pursuing actively to the
proposed but now stalled Free
Trade Area of the Americas
(FTAA).

Minister Laing said, “Such a
comprehensive policy developed
by an established, professionally-
staffed, academic-research sup-
ported International Trade Unit
within the Ministry of Finance
will ensure that all implications
of such agreements for our finan-
cial services sector are clearly
defined and addressed.”

The Minister added that the
Government is seeking full indus-
try input on Tax Information
Exchange Agreements (TIEAs).

He said it is no secret that the
nation is receiving numerous
requests from nations’ across the
globe to enter into TIEAs with
them.

“While there is mounting pres-

“Certainly, for our part, any
agreements entered into with oth-
er countries must meet the basic
requirement of advancing the
growth and development of our
economy with clearly defined
gains.

“There must be open and frank
dialogue with industry on this
issue because it is not going away
and determinations will ultimate-
ly have to be made,” Minister
Laing said. “We welcome forums
such as this and others to be able
to explore these issues.”

The Government also wants
the elimination of Exchange Con-
trol. He noted that his adminis-
tration has expressed its intention
to eliminate exchange control dur-
ing its term in office. This, of
course, will take place to the
extent that conditions are sup-
portive.

“In any event,” he said, “we
believe and are considering ini-
tiatives that can make exchange
control more user friendly as well
as identify important growth and
development opportunities for
certain business transactions with-
in the context of existing arrange-
ments.”

Minister Laing said the Gov-
ernment’s ultimate objective is to
advance the hopes, dreams and
aspirations of Bahamians.

“Financial Services has been
important to our wellbeing thus
far and will no doubt continue to

PROPERTY SIZE: Single-Family Residence
on left (Sunrise Road) Heading south on Land 5,995 sq. ft.
Sunrise Road take the 5th corner on left then LOCATION: Traveling West on Bellot Road
first corner on right. Property is 7th lot on from Faith Avenue the subject property is
the right. situated on the Southern side of the road
APPRAISED VALUE: $200,000 about 1,0156 feet West of Faith Avenue
painted green

. STAR ESTATES EASTERN DISTRICT APPRAISED VALUE: $140,000

LOT NO. 54

PROPERTY: Multi-Family Duplex
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Traveling East along Prince
Charles Drive take the 1st corner on the right
past Sea Grape Shopping Plaza. Heading
South on Jupiter Way take the 1st right then
the 2nd left to Venus Avenue. The property
is the 2nd building on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $348,000

13. POLHEMUS GARDENS
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
LAND: 7,700 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling East on Boyd Road
from Providence Avenue take the 3rd corner
on the left. The property is the 3rd lot on the
left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $169,000

. SOUTH BEACH & MARSHALL ROAD
LOT NO. 17D /
PROPERTY: Multi-Family Triplex Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 10, 000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling West on Marshall Road
from South Beach Road, take the first corner
on the right (Tiao End) the subject property
is the 4th building on left painted green with
white trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

14. FLAMINGO GARDENS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Portion of Crown Grant A6
PROPERTY SIZE: Duplex Apartment
LAND: 5,500 sq. ft.

LOCATION: mile South of Carmichael
Road West of Faith Avenue in the Western
District.

APPRAISED VALUE: $240,000

15. PINEWOOD GARDENS
LOT NO. 1685
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
LAND: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Walnut Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $230,000

_ FAITH AVENUE
LOT NO. 5
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Triplex
Apartment
LAND: 11,187 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Sir Milo Butler Highway
travel South on Faith Avenue, first paved
road on left then first left; property on right
side of street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $306,000

VACANT LOTS

1, MALVARIC ESTATES SUBDIVISION,
EASTERN DISTRICT
LOT NO. 5
PROPERTY: Multi-Family Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,114 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading South along High Vista
Drive from East Bay Street, take the first
corner on the left (Citrus Drive) then right
onto Mango Drive take the 4th corner on the
right Andy Tuft to the T Junction, turn left
then take the first corner on the right.
Property is 3rd lot on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $109,000

3. GRANTANNA SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY SIZE: Duplex Building under
construction (at foundation)
LAND: 6,905 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading East on Cowpen Road
from Spinkard Road, paved road on right,
lot is the 13th property on left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $92,000

4, SOUTHERN SHORES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 26
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Residential
Lot - 11,183 sq. ft.
LOCATION: 800 feet North of Marshall Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $89,000

- CORAL HARBOUR SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residential
Lot - 12,113 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Hopkins Drive.
APPRAISED VALUE: $121,000

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS (INCLUDE TELEPHONE CONTACT AND
POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, P. O. BOX SS-6263, PHONE NO. 394-6465;
FAX NO. 393-2883, OR VIA EMAIL: CHERRY.MISSICK@COMBANKLTD.COM FOR FURTHER
INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS

‘©2007 CreativeRelations.net



this time to preserve the access
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sure in this regard, the Govern-
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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 13





LOCAL Wie hS



KEYED UP: Court

: reporters take part ina
. ' j training session
Oe a + a at the Supreme Court
oa Sc aiek eer tae ee ws building on Saturday,
—_ ‘ a Ze December 8, 2007.

‘Trainee court reporters Ileatt their
skills at the Supreme Court building





Absolute Precision



AEPORTING TEAM — Minister of State for Legal Atfairs the Hon: Desmond Bannistet aie and Anita
aul Johnston (right of Minister) pose for a group photograph with participants in the training course
tor court reporters at the Supreme Court building on Saturday, December 8, 2007.

BREITLING



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ON COURSE: Anita Paul Johnston conducts a training course for court reporters at the Supreme Court | proposes oh sit ea as eles %
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REVEREND SOBIG KEMP offers a blessing to the management, staff and workers on Friday November |

THE TRIBUNE



16th, of the Grand Bahama Yacht Club as they prepare next to place the roof upon their new Club

House set to open before the end of winter.

Grand Bahama
Yacht Club blessed

THE management, staff,
and builders of the Grand
Bahama Yacht Club gathered
to bless their new Club House.
It was not your usual blessing,
where a new building is
blessed upon its grand open-
ing, but rather one stemming
from a European tradition,
where the building is blessed
once the highest truss is set
into place.

A wreath to symbolise the
blessing was mounted above
the building like a halo to
commemorate the event

Present at the event was
Reverend Sobig Kemp who
offered a poignant prayer
poolside next to the newly
refurbished GBYC Pool Bar.
His message carried everyone
forward, with a renewed ded-
ication to the task at hand,
that being to complete the
building before the end of the
winter season. The Club
House will be an upscale



REVEREND SOBIG KEMP, Terence Gape, Maria Christiansen, Erik Chris-
tiansen, Steven Olesen, Jessica Marshall, Preben Olesen and Gabriela Cor-
bella stand in front of the new GBYC Club House, Friday November 23rd
set to open by the end of winte 2 :

lounge and bar, along with a
restaurant for Grand Bahama
Yacht Club Members and
guests offering elegant break-










fasts; wonderful lunches and
fine dinners, all overlooking
the pool and surrounding gar-
dens.

FNM Women's
Association of
hold officers
installation

THE Women’s Associa-
tion of the Free National
Movement held its installa-
tion of 2007-2009 officers on
Sunday during a luncheon at
the Royal Bahamian San-
dals Resort on Cable Beach.

The luncheon was held
under the patronage of the
Leader of the FNM, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham,
and Mrs Delores Ingraham,
and the party leader
conducted the install-
ations.

Ms Caron Shepherd,
daughter of the late Mem-
ber of Parliament and FNM
Meritorious Council Mem-
ber James Shepherd, was
the outgoing president of
the Women’s Association.
She was replaced by Ms
Elizabeth Thompson, for-
mer Registrar General of
The Bahamas.

Before the luncheon, the
Prime Minister led a contin-
gent of parliamentarians,
party officers, and FNM
members and supporters at
a special church service held
at the Remnant Tabernacle
of Praise on Carmichael
Road, where the pastor is
the Rev Dr Kendal Stubbs.

The FNM invited all
FNMs and other members
of the public to join in that
service of thanksgiving for
the work and witness of the
Women’s Association in the
party and around the com-
munity.

Through the years, past
presidents of the 1 NM
Women’s Association have
includea Mrs Janet Bost-
wick, the firsi bahamian
woman to be eleci..! to Par-
liament, who also served as
a Cabinet Minister in (he
first FNM Government in J
1992; former St Margaret’s \
MP Sylvia Scriven; and for-
mer Fox Hill MP Juanianne
Dorsett.

oo En re



THE TRIBUNE

St. Augustine College’s class of 1982
helps science and technology department

A $3,000 thank you »

GIVING BACK: St. Augustine College's class of 1982 alumni association gives cheque to alma mater.

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN the spirit of the holiday
season, St Augustine College’s
class of 1982 alumni associa-
tion marked its 25th anniver-
sary by presenting its alma
mater with a $3,000 cheque to
aid the advancement of the
science and technology
department.

The donation was presented
to SAC’s principal, Sonia
Knowles, on December 5 to
purchase 10 microscopes to
better equip the students of
the science department,
Dwayne Woods president of
the alumni association said

yesterday. “It’s important (to
give back) because nobody is
self-made.

“We are all here to help

each other.

“We believe we benefited
tremendously from SAC and
have a responsibility to give
back.

“This is. our way of saying
thank you and in the mean-
time we want to encourage
students, past and present, to
help their fellow man.”

“In January, the alumni plan
to fund a tuition scholarship
for a deserving 12th grade stu-
dent at SAC and will make a
cash donation to Zion Baptist
Church as its culminating
event.

MISSPRO TOCOLEJEWELLER Y

XS
&

The association, led by Mr
Woods, treasurer Dino Moss,
and secretary Kim Conyers
organises celebratory events
every five years.

A memorabilia package of a
pen, tote bag, T-shirt, and
license plate frame bearing the
insignia of SAC class of 1982.

Mr Woods is a technical
officer at the Water and
Sewage Corporation and part
owner of Androsia Steak and
Seafood Restaurant.

Mr Moss is manager of pen-
sion services at Fidelity Bank.
Kim Conyers is the office
manager at First World Engi-
neering (Bahamas) Ltd.

UA

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 15

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE 1 RIBUNE
Reta LOCAL NEWS , a

| Visit of president of Inter-American Development Bank ©





Mr Luis Alberto Moreno, President of the Inter-American
Development Bank, was in The Bahamas this weekend as part
of a familiarisation mission to The Bahamas.

A significant feature of Mr Moreno’s visit was to introduce
the Bahamian private sector to the funding facilities available
from the IDB. Mr Moreno was hosted to two luncheons — one
on Friday in Nassau at the Imperial Ballroom, Adonis Rooms,
Atlantis Conference Centre, hosted by State Minister for
Finance Zhivargo Laing and the other at Our Lucaya in
Freeport on Saturday, co-hosted by Minister Laing and the Port
Authority. At both of these luncheons Mr Moreno had an
opportunity to speak to the private sector. *

The Country Office of the Inter-American Development
Bank also hosted Mr. Moreno to a dinner.

























Luis Moreno

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group's commitment to preserving and developing The Bahamas. The groundbreaking ceremony was
also attended by William Williams Principal, Source Development Group, LLC, Bowman Garrett, Prin-
cipal, Source Development Group, LLC, State Minister for Youth and Sports, Bryan Woodside, Works

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All Girls Fun
Day postponed
to December 15

RACQUEL DEVEAUX,
head of the Crisis Inter-
vention and Prevention
Centre, and Dr Wayne
Thompson, psychologist at
the Centre for Renewing
Relationships have post-
poned their “All Girls Fun
Day”, to Saturday, Decem-
ber 15.

This educational event,
originally scheduled for
Saturday, December 8, will
provide girls with informa-
tion about teen pregnancy
STDs, date rape. gang vio



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. ‘ , lence, and all forms of
The finest home and lite commercial dmuee ney elk ak eel
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isers said.

The fun day will be held
at the L W Young Audito
rium on Bernard Road,
from noon to 4pm, and is
open to all teen girls.

Burns House
donation to feed
needy families

BURNS House’s donation
to the Cleveland Eneas Pii-
mary School was much appre-
ciated by the school’s admin-
istration as it will feed 27
needy families whose children
attend the school.

Bahamas Supermarkets also
contributed,

Vt the schools annual
Christmas carol service. whic li
took place yesterday and was
headed by the schools’ guid-
ance counsellor Donica Ohiv-



er, the families in anced were

handed certificates



THE TRIBUNE





REACH-ing out to

those with autism

CHILDREN: Senate show rl autism affects one in 150 children.

THE REACH committee
hosted a seminar where Ms.
Zonya Mitchell, a Bahamian
Board Certified Associate
Behaviour Analyst (BCABA)
enlightened her audience about
the details surrounding Applied
Behaviour Analysis (ABA).

Among the _ available
approaches to treating autism,
ABA has demonstrated efficacy
in promoting social and lan-
guage development, and in
reducing behaviours that inter-
fere with learning and cognitive
functioning.

Ms Mitchell also highlighted
that the ABA approach teaches
social, motor, and verbal behav-
iours as well as reasoning skills
— problems that many individu-
als with autism encounter. ABA
therapy is used to teach behav-
iours to individuals with autism
who may not otherwise “pick
up” these behaviours sponta-
neously through imitation.

In January 2008, Ms. Mitchell
plans to open an ABA centre in
Nassau called the Nassau
Learning Centre. This center
will be located in Wongs Plaza



«

~ESTEE LAUDER MAKE-UP EVENT
Thursday & Friday, December 13th & 14th, 2007,





in Palmdale. ABA teaches
these skills through use of
behavioural observation and
positive reinforcement or
prompting to teach each step of
a behaviour. Generally ABA
involves intensive training of
the therapists, extensive time
spent in ABA therapy (20-40

hours per week) and weekly |

supervision by experienced clin-
ical supervisors known as a cer-
tified behaviour analyst. ABA
principles can also be used with
arange of "Neurotypical" typ-
ical or atypical individuals
whose issues vary from devel-
opmental delays, significant
behavioural problems or unde-
sirable habits that need to be
corrected.

Today’s statistics now show
that autism affects one in 150
children, in particular one in 94
boys (Centre for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention, 2007). One
often misunderstood concept is
that autism is comparable to
mental retardation, but it is not.
Autism is a complex brain dis-
order that presents itself in ear-
ly childhood and continues



straight into adulthood greatly
affecting an individual’s social
and communication skills.
There are many schools of
thought concerning what causes
autism. Some believe that the
disorder arises as a result of a
genetic predisposition. In recent
times, a more controversial
debate has surfaced suggesting
that high percentages of toxic
heavy metals, present in immu-
nizations, has caused a high

number of children to be diag- .

nosed with autism. Despite the
many proposals, the definitive
cause of autism is still unknown.

Although autism is a lifelong
disorder, many individuals diag-
nosed with the condition are
still promised a bright future
and go on to live very normal
independent lives provided they
are given the necessary support
from family, teachers, doctors
and therapists.

For further information e-
mail questions to either
:mzonya@hotmail.com"
mzonya@hotmail.com or maca-
ba@hotmail.com"
tmacaba@hotmail.com.

ESTEE LAUDER ~
AV Von Qe Ok a Ail

ou are cordially to an

10am - 5pm,

at The Perfume Bar; Tel: 322-7216

Bay & Parliament Streets

Saturday, December 15th, 2007

10am - 5pm,

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PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Advocacy group: govt should be
liable for victims of those on bail

FROM page one

individuals to receive bail.

“You’ve got accused per-
sons being released for mur-

der on $20-$30,000 bail. If
really serious why not raise
bail? Why not half a million a
million (dollars)?” he said.
Furthermore, they claim the

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attorney general’s office is not
living up to its responsibility of
appealing “flippant” rulings
on behalf of the judiciary.

According to Mr Bethel,
Families for Justice was
formed after one of three
young men accused of mur-
dering his 16-year-old son was
granted bail short of two years
after being remanded to
prison.

This happened when —
after the case was brought to
trial within 14 months of his
son’s murder e of the
accused’s lawyers allegedly
failed to show up in court,
causing the trial to be set back.

“We challenge that it should
not have happened (the men
being granted bail) — the case
was ready,” he said.

Among the group are many
families who are awaiting trial
dates for those charged with
killing their loved ones — one
for as long as seven years,
claims Mr Bethel.

Meanwhile, another family



saw four men accused of mur-
dering their relative released
on bail, all within a year of his
death.

Discovering that, according
to section four of the Bail Act,
the court must record the rea-
son for the order of any indi-
vidual’s release, the group
advocated to be told why the
men were granted bail.

Eventually, thanks to their
efforts through the media, Mr
Bethel claims he was contact-
ed personally by newly-
appointed Attorney General
Claire Hepburn who is said to
have told him that, according
to the records, one of the men
was released “because he had
an ear infection,” and another
because he had “complained
of asthma.”

“This is what we are now
challenging. Their constitu-
tional rights had not been vio-

hearing, before a fair and
impartial court, within a rea-
sonable time: An accused also
has a right to apply to the
Supreme Court for bail if their
case has not been heard with-
in a reasonable time. The
court has set two years as the
cut off time for what is rea-
sonable.

Noting that “an ear infec-
tion is not a reasonable rea-
son to release somebody” and
the short amount of time that
had allegedly passed before
he was granted bail, Mr Bethel
contends that the rights of the
victims of these crimes were
violated in this instance.

“Chief Justice Burton Hall
must be accountable for the
actions.of Supreme Court jus-
tices,” said Mr Bethel.

Shortly after discovering the
recorded reason for the men’s
release, the group requested

that the Attorney General’s
office now appeal the deci-
sion, but were told that the
time limit to do so had now

lated. It was under two years,”
he said.

Under the constitution a
person has a right to a fair

a ee
Christie’s position



OOD

FROM page one

Mr Wilchcombe. "He must do that, so there is no reason to challenge
him now. And he should not be challenged right now. In fact, we
should be supporting Christie, and allowing Christie to take our
party through the important phase of reuniting, strengthening and
preparing for the future."

Mr Wilchcombe also told The Tribune that he does not think
there is going to be an early election, as is being speculated by
some. He gave the now discredited voter registration list, of which
numerous claims have been made that non-citizens registered and

voted, as a reason why this cannot occur.

"You see, I don't believe there is going to be an early election. I
don't think that we can have an early election, notwithstanding
what some people think," said Mr Wilchcombe. “So no matter what
people think, in my view, the voter registration list is going to have
to be redone in this country. We're going to need to have a period of
time for that to happen," he said. "And not until that happens are we
even going to consider an election."

If the prime minister decides to dissolve parliament, argued Mr
Wilchcombe, a responsible opposition would have to challenge that
act, "simply because this is a voter registration list that is certainly
showing that there is impropriety; showing that there has been some
bureaucratic mistakes made — or administrative errors."

Mr Wilchcombe also acknowledged in the interview that there has
been some factionalism in the PLP since the party lost the May
2nd election, which needs to be repaired in order for the party to go
forward.

"The PLP needs to heal some of its wounds. At the moment, we
are not as united as we must be," he said, adding that a political par-
ty is obligated to be unified and prepared at all times for any even-

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tinue to perpetuate falsities - gossip - and I think it hurts the party.
And it hurts individuals who are trying to make an effort.

"Tf an individual is trying to do something in the organisation, or
trying to ensure that the party is strong — projecting ideas and vision
of the organisation - well then you-are seen as a threat, or you are
seen as someone who is against the leadership. But, that's not true.
We have individuals who waste more time spreading gossip, as
opposed to spending time trying to lift up the organisation."

Mr Wilchcombe added that there are also individuals in the PLP
who "lack the maturity" to "agree to disagree agreeably."

"It might be Machiavellian; it might be divide and conquer, but that
is not good for an organisation that believes, and that is supposed to
be, rooted in people. And right now I think sometimes we have
too many groups, and it leads to disunity."

The West End and Bimini MP told The Tribune that Glenys
Hanna-Martin, as chairman, can assist in this reunification process.
He emphasized that the PLP must never again miss or skip con-
ventions ~ the last party convention was in 2005.

Along with Mrs Hanna-Martin as the new chairman, some of the
changes Mr Wilchcombe said are necessary for the PLP include, more
creative fund-raising methods: the increased use of young people in
the organisation, along with allowing them to move up the ranks into
positions of authority; and an outreach to white Bahamians.

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passed.

The spokesman said that
had the victim’s families been
made aware of the reasons
why these accused individuals
were being released at the
time they would have
“jumped on it” and demanded
an appeal.

“People are saying right
now that this shouldn’t be
happening,” said Mr Bethel.
“This is where we are right
now — we want to get justice
on this bail issue,” he added.

Families for Justice’s call
has gone out as the country
this weekend set a new record
for the highest number of
murders in a year with the
death of Grand Bahama resi-
dent 22-year-old Julian
Nicholls from a single bullet
shot to the head.

Seventy-five persons were
murdered this year, breaking
the record of 74 set in 2000.

Omar Archer wants
PLP chairmanship —

Candidates to engage
in national debate
FROM page one |

raped, we have a compro-
mised and corrupt national
security force, sexual
immorality within the very"
doors of the church, growing
concerns over widespread
social ills, professionals with- -
in the legal field engaging
in unethical practices — and
there seems to be no end in
sight for those directly
affected,” he said.

Mr Archer, with PLP
MP. Glenys Hanna Martin -
and former senator
Paulette Zonicle, are the
only people who have pub-
licly announced their
intention to run for the
chairmanship — a position |
which has been held by
Raynard Rigby for the last
five years. Mr Rigby said
last week that he does not
intend to run again for the
post.

Sources have speculated
that MICAL MP Alfred
Gray and lawyer Fayne
Thompson may also run.

Mr Archer encouraged all
those who are considering .
throwing their lot into the
ring to come forward and
engage in the debate so
that the Bahamian people
can be informed about
their positions.

“The Bahamian people
deserve to know, it is not a
game,” he said.

Mr Archer, who ran as a
candidate for the Bahamas
Democrati¢ Movement in
the May election before
joining the PLP in the fol-
lowing months, contended
that the public would be
pleased to have an oppor-
tunity to determine where
candidates stand on issues
such as immigration,
crime, education, health-
care, land reform, prison
reform, minimum wage,
the rights of the child,
the bail act and homosexu-
ality.

He said that he would
like to mould the PLP into
a party that could become
“the future government of
the country” as well as
play a part in “creating an
environment where

ahamians can become
active citizens in the day-
to-day decision making of -
the country.”

Mr Archer has suggested
the dates, January 10 or 17,
as possible occasions on
which such a debate could
take place, timing it to fall
several weeks ahead of the
anticipated February party |}
convention. i

His call comes as West
End and Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe publicly ~
threw his support behind |
Mrs Hanna Martinasa} |
future chairman for the)
PLP on Friday, predicting
that she would win the *
post. “
In an interview with The
Tribune on the same day,
Mr Gray also did not rule
out the possibility of his’
entry into the race.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 21



African leaders reject
EU proposals for
trade deal to replace
colonial-era systems

@ LISBON, Portugal

MOST African leaders have
rejected European Union pro-
posals for a free-trade deal that
would replace colonial-era trad-
ing systems, Senegal’s president
said Sunday at a summit marred
by disputes over Zimbabwe and
Darfur, according to Associated
Press.

The two-day meeting in Lis-
bon had been seen as a chance to
push for progress on the deals
known as European Partnership
Agreements, or EPAs.

“It was said several times dur-
ing the plenary session and it was
said again this morning: African
states reject the EPAs,” Sene-
galese President Abdoulaye
Wade said in angry comments at
a news conference.

Wade said he and South
African President Thabo Mbeki
had led African opposition to the
EU’s proposals which, he said,
“aren’t in Africa’s interest.”

He did not provide details.

His tone of indignation reflect-
ed an. increasingly tense atmos-
phere at the end of a summit that
was intended to foster a new era
of close relations between
Europe and Africa.

The meeting between leaders
of the 53-member African Union
and 27-nation EU was their first
in seven years. ‘

As it opened Saturday, deep
differences over the human rights
record of Zimbabwean President
Robert Mugabe and over mea-
sures to end the conflict in the
western Sudanese region of Dar-
fur were evident.

Asked what his message to
Europe was as he arrived at the
summit venue Sunday, Mugabe
said nothing, but raised his arm
and made a fist.

German Chancellor Angela
Merkel said Saturday the EU was
“united” in condemning Mugabe
for what they view as his eco-
nomic mismanagement, failure
to curb corruption and contempt
for democracy. British Prime
Minister Gordon Brown stayed
away from the summit in protest
of Mugabe’s attendance. \

Measures to help end the con-
flict in the western Sudanese

SS Se ae a

region of Darfur brought anoth-
er point of contention. Sudanese
President Omar al-Bashir has so
far refused to allow non-Africans
into a 26,000-strong U.N.-A.U.
peacekeeping force planned for
Darfur. EU nations, meanwhile,
have failed to come up with the
military hardware needed to sup-
port the operation.

On trade, the EU wants to
meet a Dec. 31 deadline set by
the World Trade Organization
for replacing its trading system
with former European colonies
around the world, including in
Africa. The WTO has ruled that
the EU’s 30-year-old preferen-
tial trade agreement with Africa
was unfair to other trading
nations and violated internation-
al rules.

The negotiations have lasted
five years and officials had hoped
the summit would bring a break-
through.

During previous talks, African
governments have said the agree-
ments would do little to boost
their access to European mar-
kets. They also viewed the con-
ditions as an EU attempt to med-
dle in African affairs.

European Commission Presi-
dent Jose Manuel Barroso
acknowledged the difficulty of
reaching free-trade deals between
wealthy European countries and
poor African nations.

“It is a challenge for both
Africans and Europeans and will
require time,” Barroso said in a
speech to the gathering.

The two sides will press ahead
with talks on interim accords with
individual African countries to
assure they continue to enjoy
privileged access to European
markets, he said.

“We are nearly there and we
now need to focus all of our ener-
gy to achieve this priority objec-
tive,” Barroso said.

The EU says a deal will boost
trade and help the development
of African economies. It has
warned that nations with which it
does not forge new agreements
by January will automatically lose
preferential trade privileges and
receive only limited access to EU
markets under existing world
trade rules,



Paulo Duarte/AP

FROM LEFT to right, Eyropeal Commission President Jose Manuel en Ghana’ s President John Kufuor, Portugal s Prime Minister Jose
Socrates and African Union Commission Chairman Alpha Oumar Konare are seen during a final media conference at an EU Africa Summit in Lis-
bon, Sunday Dec. 9, 2007. European and African leaders are scheduled to sign a strategic partnership agreement on Sunday, after a two-day sum-
mit marked by tensions over human rights in Zimbabwe.




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PAGE 22, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Roadside bomb in Iraq kills police chief, two guards



@ BAGHDAD

A ROADSIDE bomb struck
a convoy carrying the police
chief of a predominantly Shiite
province south of Baghdad on
Sunday, killing him and two of
his bodyguards, authorities said,
according to Associated Press.

Defense Minister Abdul-Qad-
er al-Obeidi said preparations
had begun for a military opera-
tion in Diyala, a province north-
east of Baghdad that on Friday
saw more than 20 people killed
in two suicide bombings.

“If we succeed in controlling
areas of Diyala close to Bagh-
dad, the rate of incidents in
Baghdad decreases by 95 per-
cent,” he told The Associated
Press. The area has seen numer-
ous attacks in recent weeks, as
militants flee for more remote



regions to escape the security
campaign in the capital.

“We believe there will be a
secure, stable Diyala in months
to come,” said Rear Adm. Gre-
gory Smith, a chief U.S. military
spokesman.

Convoy

The explosion Sunday in
Hillah, about 60 miles south of
Baghdad, struck a convoy car-
rying the police chief of Babil
province, Brig. Gen. Qais al-
Maamouri, and two guards, offi-
cials said. Fearing more violence,
police imposed an indefinite cur-
few and the streets quickly emp-
tied.

Local authorities acknowl-
edged militia fighters could be
behind the assasination but said





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the primary suspect was al-Qai-
da in Iraq, which maintains a
strong presence in the northern
half of the province that includes
towns in the so-called “triangle
of death” south of the capital.

The head of the provincial
council’s security committee,
Hassan Watwet, said an investi-
gation into Sunday’s explosion
was under way.

“The primary suspect is al-
Qaida, but we do not rule out

the second suspect, the militias,”
_Watwet said. “This criminal act

reflects the deep bitterness inside
the terrorist groups who failed to
destabilize the security of Babil
province due to the great work
of the late police chief.”

The explosion was the latest in
a series of assassinations against
provincial leaders in the mainly
Shiite region south of the capital













as militias and other factions bat-
tle for control of the area with an
eye toward the eventual with-
drawal of U.S.-led forces.

Al-Maamouri was politically
independent and had a reputa-
tion for leading crackdowns
against militia fighters. He is
thought to have resisted pres-
sure from religious and political
groups to release favored mem-
bers from detention.

Police slapped an indefinite
curfew on Hillah, where streets
quickly emptied of residents
amid fears of arrests and clashes
in the wake of the killings.

The oil-rich south of Iraq, also
home to major pilgrimage sites
in the Shiite shrine cities of Najaf
and Karbala, has been a focal
point for rising tensions between
Shiite factions, particularly the
Mahdi Army that is nominally
loyal to radical cleric Muqtada
al-Sadr and the Badr Brigades,
the militant arm of the country’s
most powerful Shiite party —
the Supreme Islamic Iraqi Coun-
cil.

Al-Sadr has in late summer
ordered his fighters to stand
down for six month in the wake
of the death of some 52.people
in fighting out between rival

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groups during a major Shiite pil-
grimage in Karbala. Clashes
between rival Shiite factions
have continued since.

Two southern provincial gov-
ernors were killed earlier in
August — Gov. Mohammed Ali
al-Hassani of Muthanna and
Gov. Khalil Jalil Hamza in
neighboring Qadasiyah province,
raising fears of a violent power
struggle. The provincial police
chief also was killed in the
Qadasiyah attack. .

Targeted

Militants also have targeted
local Iraqi government officials
to try to intimidate those they
accuse of collaborating with the
USS. and Iraqi governments.

Underscoring that danger, the
head of the Ninevah provincial
council survived an assassination
attempt in the northern city of
Mosul.

A roadside bomb exploded

near a car carrying Hisham al-

Hamdani, police said, adding
that the car was damaged but no
casualties were reported.
Smith, the U.S. military
spokesman, said at a news con-



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ference that intelligence gleaned
from Iraqis who have turned
against al-Qaida and American
efforts to track down insurgents’
financing and bomb-making
facilities were key to a decline
in violence around the country.
He said Diyala would soon see’
the same level of improvement.

He cited operations stemming
from tips by Iraqis around the
country that have led to weapons

- caches, safe houses and bomb-

making facilities.

As a result, he said, roadside
bombings had decreased by 15
percent in October and Novem-
ber, and the military’s “found

-and cleared” rate for improvised

explosive devices is now more
than 50 percent — meaning for
every device that blows up, one
is found and cleared.

The Iraqis who have switched
sides to join the fight against al-
Qaida in Iraq, he said, are now
the greatest threat to the terror
group.

He said 72,000 people have
joined the anti-al-Qaida groups,
including 12,000 volunteers. But
many have come under attack
by militants.

“They are often the first line
of defense,” Smith said. |













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MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 23



@ BALI, Indonesia

SLIMY, green and unsight-
ly, seaweed and algae are
among the humblest of plants,
according to Associated Press.

A group of scientists at a cli-
mate conference in Bali say
they could also be a potent
weapon against global warm-
ing, capable of sucking dam-
aging carbon dioxide out of
the atmosphere at rates com-
parable to the mightiest rain
forests.

“The ocean’s role is neglect-
ed because we can’t see the
vegetation,” said Chung Ik-
kyo, a South Korean environ-
mental scientist. “But under
the sea, there is a lot of sea-
weed and sea grass that can
take up carbon dioxide.”

The seaweed research,
backed by scientists in 12
Asian-Pacific countries, is part
of a broad effort to calculate
how much carbon is being
absorbed from the atmosphere
by plants, and to increase that
through reforestation and oth-
er steps.

Such so-called “carbon
sinks” are considered essen-
tial to controlling greenhouse
gases, which trap heat in the
atmosphere and are blamed
for global warming. « °

The conference in Bali is
aimed at launching two-year
negotiations for a new global
warming pact to replace the
Kyoto Protocol when it
expires in 2012, and a major
topic of discussion is the use of

Earth’s natural resources to :

remove carbon from the air.
While most of the attention
to carbon sinks’ has been on
forests, the seaweed scientists
say the world should look to
the oceans, where some 8 mil-
lion tons of seaweed and algae
are harvested from wild or cul-
tivated sources every year.
That solution is a largely
Asian one — and it’s not with-
out complications. Critics say a

rebatenge will be keeping, the -.





absorbed, from

Feenpeacee
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INTERNATIONAL NEWS

SE a STINET i eee |
Scientists at climate conference tout



Ed Wray/AP

INDONESIAN SEAWEED farmers sort the harvest from their farms off the beach in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia, Thursday Dec. 6, 2007. Slimy, green

and unsightly, seaweed and algae are among the humblest plants on earth, but a group of scientists at a climate conference in Bali say they could
also be a potent weapon against global warming, sucking damaging carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere at greater rates than the mightiest rain

forests.

re-entering the atmosphere.
And it’s unclear how a vast
increase in seaweed produc-
tion would affect navigation
or fisheries.

China is by far the world’s
largest producer of seaweed,
followed by South Korea and
Japan. The Asia-Pacific seas,
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Some types of seaweed can
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“These are very productive
ecosystems. They’re drawing
down a lot of carbon,”
Beardall said.

South Korea and Japan are
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eaweed as global warming solution

boost production in nations
with long coastlines.

While the group is not rec-
ommending a specific target
for expansion of seaweed cul-
tivation, Beardall estimated
that the Philippines could con-
ceivably increase its annual
output by more than 100 times
with more intensive produc-
tion techniques.

In addition to storing car-
bon, seaweed would need to
be used to produce clean-
burning biofuels, thereby
ensuring the carbon dioxide
isn’t simply recycled back into
the air as it would be if the
seaweed is eaten.

- The concept, however, has
problems. Skeptics say trees
are effective for carbon stor-
age because they live for many
years, while seaweed is culti-
vated and harvested in cycles
of only months, meaning the
storage will be hard to mea-
sure or control.

“It depends on how long
you keep the materials,” said I
Nyoman Suryadiputra, of Wet-
lands International.

“Because if it is decom-
posed in a month, the carbon
dioxide will go back into the
atmosphere.”

Other obstacles remain.
Some critics wonder if remov-
ing water from the seaweed as
it’s converted to fuel would

require a large amount of.

energy, thereby reducing the
environmental benefits. Sup-
porters say sun-drying is an
option, but it could be diffi-
cult to apply that on an indus-
trial scale.

The environmental impact
of rapid expansion of seaweed
farms has also not been
thought out, scientists con-
cede. Huge floating farms
could complicate fishing, ship-
ping and other maritime activ-
ities.

Chung acknowledged the
idea was in its infancy.

“Tn terms of ball games, we
are just.in the bullpen,” he

- said, “not the main game yet.”

eon






ave to win.
















PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Worshippers pack church
to see first Iraqi cardinal

@ BAGHDAD

THE worshippers. were
searched at the door and
snipers stood guard on the roof,
but Sunday's Mass was a joy-
ful one for more than 200 Iraqis
who packed a church in east-
ern Baghdad to see the first
Iraqi cardinal, according to
Associated Press.

The service, which took place
under heavy guard and was
broadcast live on Iraqi state
television, was capped by a
handshake from a visiting Shi-
ite imam — a symbolic show of
unity between Iraq's majority
Muslim sect and its tiny Chris-
tian community..

Cardinal Emmanuel III Del-
ly, leader of the ancient
Chaldean Church, celebrated
the two-hour Mass, three weeks
after Pope Benedict XVI ele-
vated him to the top ranks of
the Roman Catholic hierarchy.

Delly presided over other
services this week in Baghdad
and the northern Kurdish city
of Irbil, spreading his message
of unity and forgiveness among
Iraq's Christians who have fre-
quently been targeted by Islam-
ic extremists, forcing tens of
thousands to flee and isolating
many of those who remained
in barricaded neighborhoods.

"We are of one family,
everyone should work for the
progress of this country,'' he
said during his sermon.

"We pray today for the sake
of each other and to forgive
each other, as well to be direct-
ed to do good deeds,'' he
added. ''That is my demand for
the Iraqis, moreover I urge the
return home for displaced peo-
ple and immigrants to their
ancestral land."

Many of the people filling the
pews at the elegant brick
Church of the Virgin Mary said
they were taking advantage of a
lull in violence to attend ser-
vices and congratulate Delly for
becoming the first Iraqi to be
named a cardinal.

In a reminder of the dangers
still facing Iraqis, armed police-
men wearing helmets and blue
uniforms were stationed on the
church's roof and others
searched worshippers walking





WAM”

es

Khalid Mohammed/AP

VATICAN AMBASSADOR to Iraq Francis Joulikat, second, from left, Iraqi Cardinal Ernianilal III Delly, second from right, and Archbishop Shilayinon Wardoni, right, cut a cake
after a mass celebrated at the Miriam Church in Palestine Street in east Baghdad, Iraq, on Sunday, Dec. 9, 2007. Delly was elevated to Cardinal by Pope Benedict XVI last month.

toward the stately-briek build-
ing on Palestine Street, a major
thoroughfare i in editenn Bagh-
dad. Several police pickups and
Iraqi armored vehicles blocked
the street.

Church officials said the

weekly afternoon Mass has

been more crowded and -was:

extended by an hour as Iraqis
are less fearful about being out
on the streets late in many
areas of the capital.

"We are proud of this. We

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“IONS

-came here to this;chureh in

order to tell the terrorists that

‘we are not afraid of “them,” said

Hibba Nasser,

housewife.
The high attendance at the

church in mainly Shiite eastern

a 26-year-old








Baghdad was among several

= recent signs that Iraqis are

showing signs of normalcy amid
a sharp decline in violence in
the capital and surrounding
areas, despite persistent attacks

The security situation
remains fragile in the city,
where Iraqis in many areas are
still afraid to venture outside
the concrete barriers erected
by the U.S. military to protect
volatile communities.

Only five people showed up
for Sunday Mass at the Church
of Saint John the Baptist in the
mainly Sunni district of Dora
in southern Baghdad, where
Christians have faced threats
from insurgents that have dri-
ven many away and forced oth-
ers to barricade themselves
inside their neighborhoods.

The priest, Aziz Bolus, said
that church was reopened about
45 days ago, more than a year
after it was closed because of
threats from al-Qaida in Iraq
militants.

"I decided to reopen it due
to the improved security situa-
tion and the return of some
Christian families to the area,"
Bolus said.

One worshipper, Dania
Youhana, said she had fled to
the semiautonomous Kurdish
area in northern Iraq last year
to escape the violence but
decided to return to her house
after hearing that al-Qaida
had been kicked out from the
area

[raqi soldiers guarded the
church, with Associated Press
photos showing one standing
against a concrete wall with
graffiti from insurgents threat-
ening to ''kill the Shiites and
everybody who refuses to col-
laborate with al-Qaida."'

Delly, 80, has been outspo-
ken in the past about the need

~~ to"péeteet, Christians, who con

prise less than 3° percent of
Iraq'8*26 million ‘population. »
But he recently has expressed
optimism about the decline in
attacks in Baghdad and sur-
rounding areas, and he has wel-
comed messages of solidarity
from Muslim leaders and the
Shiite-led government.

The imam of a nearby Shiite
mosque shook hands with Del-
ly in the church's courtyard
after the service.

"IT came here to show the
unity of the Iraqi people," said
the black-turbaned imam Jas-
sim al-Jazairi. ''We are happy
with the cardinal. We are very
proud of any person, whether
Christian or Muslim, who rais-
es the name of Iraq in the inter-
national arena. We came here
to offer our congratulations to
Delly."'

Sectarian violence in Iraq has
declined in recent months due
largely to the security crack-
down in the Baghdad area, a
new U.S. push to enlist Sunni
and Shiite tribal leaders in the
fight against al-Qaida in Iraq
and militants, and a freeze in
the activities of the Mahdi
Army militia, led by the
radical Shiite cleric Muqtada
al-Sadr.

Christians in Iraq, the major-
ity of whom are Chaldean-
Assyrians and Armenians, were
generally left alone under Sad-
dam Hussein's regime. One of
them, Tariq Aziz, served as for-
eign minister and deputy prime
minister.

Attacks against the religious
minority peaked with a coordi-
nated bombing campaign in the
summer of 2004 against Bagh-
dad churches and again last
September after Pope Benedict
made comments perceived to
be anti-Islam.

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THE TRIBUNE

ousands help clean
oil spilled on S
rea’s western coast |



@ MALLIPO BEACH,
South Korea

THOUSANDS of people
mobilized by South Korea’s
Coast Guard used shovels
and buckets Sunday to clean
up a disastrous oil spill pol-
luting a swathe of the coun-
try’s scenic and environmen-
tally rich western coast,
according to Associated
Press.

About 100 ships, including
Coast Guard, navy and pri-
vate fishing boats, were also
to help contain and clean up
South Korea’s worst spill,
said Coast Guard official
Kim Young-hwan.

At total of 7,500 police,
military, civil servants and
volunteers struggled to
remove the oil, some battling
headaches, dizziness and nau-
sea.

The oil started hitting
beaches Saturday, a day after
a Hong Kong-registered
supertanker was slammed by
a South Korean-owned barge
that came unmoored from its
tugboat in rough seas about
seven miles off Mallipo, one
of South Korea’s best-known
beaches.

The area also includes a
national maritime park.

On Saturday, tides of dark
sea water crashed ashore at
Mallipo beach, while the
odor reached areas a half-
mile away.

“Kim Sun-seon, who works
for an ocean clean-up busi-
ness on South Korea’s south-
east coast, wore rubber
gloves and a mask to cope
with the strong smell.

“We don’t know when we
can finish this work,” she
said. “We have been shovel-
ing oil since yesterday but the
waves just keep bringing
more oil. I feel dizzy.”

Nearly 2.8 million gallons
of crude gushed into the
ocean, more than twice as
much as in South Korea’s
worst previous spill in 1995.

Thick, smelly waves of
crude washed ashore, turn-
ing seagulls black and threat-
ening fish farms along an 11-
mile stretch of coast, defying
efforts to contain it by drop-
ping oil fences into the ocean
and using chemicals to break
it up. Mats were placed on
the beach to absorb the oil.

The Coast Guard said the

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Affected area
includes national
maritime park

last of three leaks in the
tanker had been plugged
Sunday morning.

Mallipo, an important
stopover for migrating birds
including snipe, mallards and
great crested grebes, also has
an abundant fishing industry.

Choi Kyung-hwan, a 58-
year-old fisherman, came to
the beach Sunday to help, but
despaired for the area where
he has lived for 30 years.

“Mallipo is finished,” he
said.

Choi, wearing a thick win-
ter coat, said the strong odor
of oil had sickened his wife.

“But I came here because I
have to do something,” he
said. “I don’t know when we
can finish. But we have to
continue.”

Cho Yoo-soon, who runs a
raw fish restaurant at Mallipo
beach, 95 miles southwest of
Seoul, said the situation was
overwhelming. She. said
restaurants in the area were
closing, and she could not
pump fresh sea water into
her tanks.

“Without fresh sea water,
the fish will start going bad
after a week,” she said. “We
can’t even walk around here
because the entire beach is
covered with oil.”

The affected areas include
181 maritime farms that pro-
duce abalone, brown sea-
weed, laver, littleneck clams
and sea cucumbers, said Lee
Seung-yop, an official with
the Taean county govern-
ment, which includes the
beach. Aquatic farmers in the
area number about 4,000, he
said.

“A lot of damage is feared,
to these farms, although we
don’t have an estimate yet,”
Lee said Saturday.

Local raw fish restaurants
such as Lee Ok-hwa’s were
suffering.

“T haven’t had any cus-
tomers since news of the oil
spill Friday,” said Lee, who

had previously served 200
tourists and others a day.

“TI don’t know how to make
a living,” she said. “I don’t
know how to pay the rent. I
believe this situation will last
for at least one year.”

The central government
has designated the oil spill a
“disaster,” which makes it
easier for regional govern-
ments to mobilize personnel,
equipment and material to
cope with the situation. But it
stopped short of declaring
the region a “disaster area,”
which would make residents
eligible for government
financial aid.

Last year, more than 20
million tourists visited the
area, home to 63,800 people.

The Coast Guard said it
was unclear how many days
the clean-up would take.

The accident occurred Fri-
day morning when a barge
carrying a crane en route
from a construction site lost
control after a wire linking it
to the tugboat was cut due to
high winds, waves and cur-
rents,

The vessel then slammed
into the Hebei Spirit tanker.
Neither ship was in danger
of sinking and there were no
casualties.

The tanker had been at
anchor and carrying about
260,000 tons — about 1.8 mil-
lion barrels — of crude oil to
be loaded into boats from a
nearby port.

The size of the leak report-
ed by the authorities would
be about one-fourth that of
the 260,000 barrels, or 11 mil-
lion gallons, spilled into
Alaska’s Prince William
Sound by the Exxon Valdez
in 1989.

The spill was also smaller
than one in Pakistan in 2003
when a Greek-registered ship
ran aground near Karachi,
leaking some 8.2 million gal-
lons of crude that polluted
the city’s main beaches.



MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 25

LOCAL RESIDENTS and soldiers try to remove dense crude oil at
the Mallipo beach, west of Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Dec. 9,
2007. Some 2.7 million gallons of oil gushed Friday froma
146,000-ton Hong Kong-registered supertanker after a barge carry-
ing a crane slammed into it about seven miles off Mallipo beach.
The spill was the country’s largest, involving twice as much oil as a
spill in 1995.

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PAGE 26, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Despite US-driven military buildup,

Colombian guerrillas stubbornly fight on

MLA JULIA, Colombia

COLOMBIA’S defense
minister helicoptered into this
leftist rebel stronghold with a
clutch of U.S. Embassy offi-
cials and heavily armed Amer-
ican soldiers to assert emphat-
ically that Latin America’s
most enduring guerrilla army is
on the run, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

“The state has arrived to
stay, and never again will the
guerrillas control this territo-
ry,” Defense Minister Juan
Manuel Santos proclaimed in
October while inaugurating the
first police post ever in this for-
_ mer hub of the cocaine trade.

But just weeks later, an

» Associated Press’ news team
had to talk its way past testy
rebels just to reach the dirt-
street town, from which hun-
dreds of people have fled since

* police and soldiers meved in.

“It’s silly to say the govern-
ment has finished off the guer-
rillas,” said Gustavo Valencia,
_ a 52-year-old vegetable mer-
. chant, as helmeted soldiers
- shuffled by and an army radio

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nation’s armed forces have
been trying hard to crush the
Revolutionary Armed Forces
of Colombia, known as the
FARC. To try to measure the
campaign’s success, the AP vis-
ited this longtime rebel bastion
120 miles south of the capital,
Bogota.

In La Julia, Santos’ victory
declaration seemed premature,
especially judging from the dis-
trust, even hostility, that towns-
people displayed toward police
and soldiers nervously clutch-
ing assault rifles.

Since the 1960s, the peasant-
based FARC has served as the
only authority in many long-
neglected corners of Colom-
bia. Less than a decade ago, it
was mounting big attacks on

army bases and even briefly .

held a provincial capital, seiz-
ing scores of police and mili-
tary hostages.

But since President Alvaro
Uribe won office in 2002, the
government has reasserted
control over highways where
guerrilla roadblocks once har-
vested kidnap victims. It also
cleared rebels completely from
the province around Bogota.

The FARC’s international
profile was raised by Venezue-
lan President Hugo Chavez’s
recent efforts to broker a pris-
oner swap to free rebel
hostages including three U.S.
military contractors.

Uribe canceled the initiative
last month, saying Chavez
overstepped his authority. But
he said Friday that his govern-
ment is willing to meet with
the FARC in an unspecified
rural area as long as neither

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Fernando Vergara/AP

PEOPLE TRANSPORT food on a boat in the Duda River near La Julia,
Colombia, a longtime rebel bastion 190 kilometers (120 miles) south of
the capital Bogota, on Saturday, Oct. 20, 2007.

side is armed and internation-
al observers are present. There
was no immediate response
from the FARC.

Under the government’s

~ anti-FARC offensive, the num-

ber of professional soldiers has
doubled to almost 80,000 in
seven years, with 12 mobile
brigades and six high moun-
tain battalions added. Plans call
for an all-volunteer army once
a goal of 100,000 professional
soldiers is reached.

Washington’s contribution
under “Plan Colombia,” begun
by President Clinton, shifted
from anti-narcotics to empha-
size counterinsurgency after
the 9/11 attacks..

U.S. Special Forces teams ~

train elite'troops and American =
~ military advisers are attached

to Colombian divisions. The

aid also includes encrypted:

radios and 60 helicopters.
Most important is the real-
time intelligence provided by
the U.S. from satellite imaging
and communications inter-
cepts, Colombian military com-
mander Gen. Freddy Padilla
told the AP in an interview.
“Colombia’s armed forces

are today able to go anywhere :

in the country with surprise,
precision and overwhelming
force,” Padilla said. “We have

“at the moment access to or the
’ support of all technology the

United States employs for its
defense.”

No longer can the FARC
move hundreds of fighters
without detection, said Alfredo
Rangel, Colombia’s top mili-
tary analyst. And the army got
a morale boost when it killed
two senior rebel leaders in sep-
arate operations — including
the boss of the unit that held
Colombia’s current foreign
minister, Fernando Araujo, for
six years until his Jan. 1 escape.

But such gains hardly guar-
antee victory over a roughly
14,000-strong rebel army root-
ed in a history of peasant griev-
ances. Unlike most of its neigh-
bors, Colombia has never
adopted reforms to more equi-
tably distribute farmland.

The FARC could easily sur-
vive Uribe’s frontal assault
unless he can decapitate it by
capturing some of its top lead-
ers. One senior U.S. military
analyst told the AP that the
FARC is on the “strategic
defensive” — with its leader-
ship intact and its ranks easily
replenished despite record
desertions. It is trying to outlast
Uribe and may succeed, said
the analyst, who insisted on
anonymity for his safety
because he frequently travels
in Colombia.

Cocaine has long fueled
Colombia’s conflict, and the
FARC’s durability owes much
to revenues from the coca
crops that once made La Julia
a thriving drug market.

The town was home to three
generations of FARC loyalists
and a stronghold largely
because of its inaccessibility.
The rebels regularly engage
the military in this rugged
region where Andean foothills
meet jungle-laced plains.

Only a few weeks after San-
tos flew in Oct. 5, an AP team
was stopped by the FARC on

i 7Stice cra aga
* Shalfthé people ares!

a bone-jolting dirt road after
rebel sentries spotted the jour-
nalists headed to La Julia.

“We just want to make it
clear ‘that we’re the boss
around here,” said one uni-
formed guerrilla, an AK-47
over his shoulder. “We don’t
want the media going to La
Julia and serving the state’s
propaganda.”

Neither he nor his comman-
der would be photographed or
identified by name.

The AP team found La Julia
a half-deserted town awash in
fear. Commerce was
depressed. Heavily armed
police and soldiers were every-
where.

6
e€
fled. The size of La Julia’s pop-
ulation is uncertain, but the
town priest, the Rev. Henry
Arias, noted school enrollment
has dropped from 350 to 180.
since troops came. All:incom-
ing and outgoing vehicles.are
searched, and the cocaine trade
has gone underground.

Residents grumble that the
government — much like the
rebels in the past — has done
little to improve people’s lives.

It has failed to deliver on
promises of electricity, running
water and a ferry to cross-the
Duda River. Farmers depend
on motorized dugout canoes
to get their corn, bananas and
yucca across its rushing waters
and to market.

“We don’t have power::We
don’t have (running) water.
We don’t have anything,” said
Father Arias.

The command post “inau-
gurated” in October also ‘has
yet to be built, so police make
do with sandbagged fortifica-
tions and ditches dug into the
moist ochre soil.

Jose Cabezas, president of
the town’s trucking coopera-
tive, said it lost most of its
members last year when secu-
rity forces hauled away 24 peo-
ple accused of rebel ties. He
acknowledged some were
indeed FARC but said most
were not. To date, none has
been tried.

No one in La Julia would
admit to a reporter that they
back the rebels, and only a few
people — all newcomers —

troops arrived:in-June.2'

dared to praise the army.

The town’s police comman-
der, Capt. Rafael Montoya,
acknowledges he’s in hostile
territory, with nearby jungles
dotted with FARC camps.

The militants probe his
defenses nearly nightly, he said.
Men in black throw rocks to
measure the distance to poten-
tial grenade targets, then melt
away into the darkness.

“I’m up every night until
about 3 a:m. Those are the
hours we’re on high alert,” he
said.

Meanwhile, townspeople
strive to stay neutral.

Valencia, the vegetable
merchant, says he won’t invite
officers into his business for
coffee. Even Father Arias is
cautiously neutral, refusing to
celebrate special Masses for
the soldiers.

“They’ ve got their own chap-
lain,” he said.



THE TRIBUNE

MOND+r, |

», 2007, PAGE 27



NES UO ema hee)

Space shuttle launch off until January —

- because of repeated fuel gauge problem

@ CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA on Sunday delayed
the launch of space shuttle
Atlantis until January after a
gauge in the fuel tank failed for
the second time in four days,
according to Associated Press.

With only a few days remain-
ing in the launch window for
the shuttle’s mission to the
international space station,
senior managers decided to
stand down until next month in
hopes of better understanding
the perplexing and persistent
fuel gauge problem.

“We're determined to get to:

the bottom of this,” said LeRoy
,Cain, chairman of the mission
management team.

Whether Atlantis can fly as
early as Jan. 2 “is all going to
depend on what we find out,”
he said.

The trouble with the fuel
gauge resurfaced just before
sunrise Sunday, about an hour
after the launch team began fill-

ing Atlantis’ big external tank‘

for an afternoon liftoff.
Shuttle managers had said
they would halt the countdown



SPACE Shuttle Atlantis is seen
on pad 39A at the Kannedy
Space Center, Fla. Sunday Dec.
9, 2007. NASA managers
delayed the launch of Atlantis
until January after a gauge in
the fuel tank failed for the sec-
ond time in four days.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



and call everything off if any of
the four hydrogen fuel gauges
acted up. Three failed during
Thursday’s launch attempt; no
one knows why.

Launch director Doug Lyons
said Sunday’s failure was similar
to what happened before,
except only one gauge malfunc-
tioned this time.

Test

“We would rather have
launched today, obviously,”
Cain said. “This was going to
be in the very least a good tank-

ing test for us, and that’s what

it’s turned out to be.”
_ NASA quickly established an

. engineering team to come up

with ideas on how to pinpoint
and fix the problem, which has
bedeviled NASA off and on for
the past two years. The engi-
neers will report back to Cain
and other managers on Tues-
day.

Most inspections and repairs
could be carried out at the
launch pad. If the shuttle has
to be returned to its hangar for



more invasive work, there will
be no hope of launching in ear-
ly January, Cain said.

NASA had until Thursday to
launch Atlantis with the Euro-
pean Space Agency’s space sta-
tion laboratory, Columbus.
After that, unfavorable sun
angles and computer concerns
would make it impossible for

'. the shuttle to fly to the inter-
national space station until next.

month. :

Despite objections from some
engineers, NASA tightened up
its launch rules for Sunday’s
attempt in hopes of getting
Atlantis off the ground by the
week’s end.

Not, only did all four of
Atlantis’ fuel gauges have to
work on Sunday. — until now,
only three good gauges were
required — a new instrumenta-
tion system for monitoring
these gauges also had to check

_ out. NASA also shrank its

launch window from five min-
utes to a single minute for
added safety.

The troublesome gauges,
called engine cutoff sensors, are
part of a backup system to pre-



i)

O Aa
5 u ft

Terry Renna/AP

vent the shuttle’s main engines
from shutting down too late and
running without fuel, a poten-
tially catastrophic situation.
They have been a source of spo-
radic trouble ever since flights
resumed in 2005 following the
Columbia tragedy. |

Two groups of.NASA engi-
neers recommended that the
flight be postponed and the fuel
gauge system tested, to figure
out what might be going on. But
they did not oppose a Sunday
launch attempt when it came
time for the final vote.

Shuttle commander Stephen
Frick was deeply involved with

the decisions that were made,
officials said.

Frick and his six crewmates
planned to return to their home
base in Houston later Sunday.
“We hope everyone gets some
well-deserved rest and we will
be back to try again when the
vehicle is ready to fly,” the
astronauts said in a prepared
statement.

Delay

It was another disappointing
delay for the European Space
Agency, which has been wait-

ing for years for its $2 billion
Columbus lab to fly. NASA
space station design problems
in the 1980s and early 1990s
slowed everything down, then
Russian troubles and,
most recently, the 2003 Colum-
bia tragedy stalled the
project.

“Another few weeks isn’t
going to make any difference,”
said Alan Thirkettle, the Euro-
pean space station program
manager. “We want to fly, but
we want to fly safe.”

NASA officials said they
expect little ripple effect on
space station construction.

‘Be sure to tune in to. another new: and
‘informative episode of the show

Saturday at 10:00: am

every
and Monday at 8:30 pm.on ZNS TV.

oe
g
3
8

NE

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=
»

| NAL
| Al



one

moms 2007
eo 2006

a

Your electricity bill is made
up ofthe basic rate, which is
constant and has: not
changed since October 2003,
and the fuel sur-charge, which
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market and Is calculated
monthly using a





DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

VOCs kam As Cee don

DECEMBER

AmericanAirlines
American ag”







ania,

THE TRIBUNE





Laing: ‘No
intention’ |
to renew |
~~ Stamp Tax |
exemption |

@ By NEILHARTNELL |
Tribune Business
Editor



THE Government has |
“no. intention at the |
moment” of.renewing the
Stamp Tax exemption for
_ first-time home buyers |
_ purchasing properties with |
an appraisal value of up to |
$250,000, a move likely to
cause concern in the real
estate and construction
industries, as well as
among middle and low-
income Bahamians.

When asked by The Tri-
_ bune whether the Govern-









SEE page 6 |
sees sisal _....|!





Alternative
energy can
‘open new
ee

“By NEIL HARTNELL._
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Bahamas can “open
new industries”, increase
employment and stimulate
economic growth if it invests
in developing renewable ener-
gy sources, a report supplied
to the Government has con-
cluded, warning that “energy
costs will become a propor-
tionately larger part of the
economy” if the status quo is
maintained.

___ SEE paged...

Doctors
sees EPS

double

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
. Editor




DOCTORS: Hospital
Health Systems (DHHS)
has made no decision on
whether it will continue
with recently re-com-
menced dividend payments,
despite seeing earnings per
share (EPS) for the third
quarter double on the back
of a 74.1 per cent net
income increase.

Charles Sealy, DHHS
chief executive, said the
company had taken “no
decision” on the dividends
issue, adding: “It continues
_| to be a consideration and
we will monitor it on a
month-to-month basis.”

However, the prospects
for the dividend payments

SEE page 8






















MONDAY, DECEMBER

Toulon my business @tribunemedia, net



Government mulls
Excise Tax option

* By placing imports under Excise regime, administration believes

import revenues can be protected from ‘tariff barrier to trade’ charge
“ “Much” initial work done, as sales or VAT tax not only option

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government

is looking to
introduce an
Excise Tax Act to
protect its import
revenues from being targeted
as tariff barriers by various
international trade agreements,
the minister of state for finance
telling The Tribune that “much
work has been done”.
Although the proposal is in
its “preliminary stage” and still
being assessed, Zhivargo Laing
said such an Act would still
allow the Government to col-
lect revenues on imports by
placing them in an excise
regime, removing the duties
collected from the definition
of ‘tariff? under a trade regime
such as the World Trade
Organisation’s (WTO).
Mr Laing told The Tribune:

. “We have said that we believe
the present tax regime has ~

Duty
elimination
urged for

solar power

components

* Tariff wipe-out to
reduce solar PV and
solar thermal costs
by 30%, reducing
cost prohibitive
$60,000 bill for
Bahamian homes
* Net metering and

- Electricity Act reform

also required

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government “must
eliminate” import and Stamp
duties on all components of
Solar Photovoltaic (PV) and
Solar Thermal energy systems
if businesses and residential
users are to achieve a return
on their investment in alterna-
tive energy systems, a leading
business executive told The
Tribune.

Christopher Lowe, opera-
tions manager at Kelly’s

SEE page 12



10,

Zhivargo Laing



served the country well, and

we continue to do so. We are
making moves already that will
allow out tax regime to be
more compliant with what the
.WIOs of this world allow.
“An Excise Tax Act will



2007



take those items regarded as
dutiable items in a trade
regime and, by putting them
in an excise tax regime, this
will remove them from a
sphere where they are treated
like standard barriers to
trade.”

The minister indicated that
the introduction of an Excise
Tax Act would allow the
Bahamas to protect a substan-
tial portion of its import duties,
which are currently the largest
revenue earner for the Gov-
ernment.

In the 2007-2008 fiscal year,

customs duties imposed on
imports are expected to gen-
erate some $605.769 million of
the Government’s $1.356 bil-
lion total revenues, or 44.7 per
cent.

The Government is also pro-
jecting that it will earn some
$199.751 million from stamp
duties imposed on imports in
fiscal 2007-2008, meaning that
total import-related taxes will

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equal some $805.52 million —
59.4 per cent of total public
revenues.

Yet tariff barriers, such as
imports and customs duties,
are under threat from the likes
of the World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO), the body that sets
and administers the rules for
global trading regimes, and
which the Bahamas is seeking
full membership in.

Import and customs duties
are seen as protectionist barri-
ers to trade, and the WTO and |
its member states are seeking
their abolition. The Bahamas
has already indicated it will
make concessions in this area,
giving up $10-$14 million in
taxes on imports European
Union (EU) in return for pre-
serving duty-free market access
to the EU for its exporters.

The major pressure on the
Bahamian tax regime, though,

SEE page 10



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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

Baker’s Bay to
investment wit

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

Tribune Business Reporter

THE Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean
Club developers this weekend said
they had spent more than $160 million
on the Guana Cay project, and are
likely to double that investment with-
in the next year.

Speaking at a press conference on
the island, the developers’ chief exec-

Ingraham urges cou
Do not be intimidate

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Hope Town District Council _
has the full support of central Gov-
ernment over its decision to approve
seven construction permit applica-
tions by the Baker’s Bay Golf &
Ocean Club resort, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham telling council
members not to be intimidated by
the two Judicial Review actions filed
against them by the Save Guana Cay
Reef Association.

Mr Ingraham met with the council
members on Saturday before head-
ing to Guana.Cay to meet the pro-
ject developers.

Litigation

“The Prime Minister just wanted
to reassure us that the Government
fully supported the project and want-
ed to make sure that the council was
not intimidated by the litigation that
is going on.

He has reassured our council

members who have,,had).any ..,






242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-5601

Happy Holidays fram Britist

utive, Michael Meldman, said Dis-

covery Land Company’s build out of _

the project was not the $175 million
that has been reported in the press,
but rather “billions and billions of
dollars”. 3
“The project from a land stand-
point - just a lot sale standpoint - will
be in excess $1 billion - maybe $1.5
billion just in land sales, he added.

This was before homes were con-

doubts,” Jeremy Sweeting chief
councillor of the Hope Town Dis-
trict Council, said following the pri-
vate meeting.

Approved

Mr Sweeting confirmed that the
council had approved seven appli-
cations submitted by Baker’s Bay,
each valued arotind $1.2 million.
They included applications fora
marina village, a boat house and a
few three-storey villas and buildings.

He added that despite the tremen-
dous opposition by the Association,
the council will not be intimidated. ,
“There is a small but very vocal
group who is opposed to the pro-
ject, and the council will not be
intimidated by it.

“We will look at it without fear

or favour - the plans and the appli- '

cations - just like we would anyone
else’s, and if there is a problem with
it we will follow through and make
sure that they have taken all the
appropriate procedures,” Mr Sweet-

ingsaid. =

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‘structed, Mr Mé Idman explained. ie

added that the lots were priced at ah 5

-$10 million. :
Million

“So, let’s say you have a $4 million
lot, and build a 6-10,000 square foot
house. The actual cost that will come
to the economy will be another $6-8
million, so if yqu have 300 houses it

said. “So the build out of the project
as it equates to the Stamp Tax will

be hundreds and hundreds of millions

of dollars. It is a significant economic
impact to the economy of Abaco.

Mr Meldman said $40 million of

the $65 million cost of the marina has
been spent, and within. six to eight
months the golf course should be

THE TRIBUNE

ouble $160m
in the next year —

-would be $3 billion,” Mr Meldman

bees construction
“Of the 250 lots available, 90 have

been sold, and within 90 days con-

struction will begin on about 20 of
them,” he added. .

The staff of Baker’s Bay gave the
Prime Mittister a tour of the devel-

‘opment at the weekend. Mr ingra-

ham said he wanted Bahamians to be
fully aware of just how significant the

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He added that it was hard to pin-
point exactly whaljthe objections to
the project were.

“T think that the are opposed to .
the project in general. It is not one
pinpointed concern, and that is their

right in a free, democratic country,
but we are here and once the plans
pass the Ministry of Works and the

Department of Environmental

Health Services, we review it.”

Mr Sweeting said that in his opin-
ion, Baker’s Bay hand to Guana Cay residents “more
than once“.

'
Project

He said his mother lives on Guana
Cay, he has roots dn the island and it

-was his understanding that the

majority of residents on the island
are in favour of the project

Fred Smith, a partner at Callen-
ders and Co, acting on behalf of the
Association, has named the council
as a defendant in two judicial review
actions launchedyin the Supreme
Court in a bid to halt the project.






nearly done and a few dozen homes



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingranas

Celebrate The Holidays At The Hilton

UPCOMING EVENTS

Christmas Carols in the lobby
2! and 22 December at 6pm
Live Music by the Pool Bar
Wednesday, 26 December

esday, 2 January from 2pm-5pm

eae Woods

Live Jazz at Hilton Palm Court Lounge

eae) mee PA tie tn
New Years Eve from 8pm-lam

True Bahamian Art and Craft Market /

‘iber till 2 January, ‘08 from | |am-4p

Buffet on 25 December
Sc cetera a0
stmas Buffet from Ipm-Spm ($45)
s Day Dinner from 6pm-10.30pm ($42.50)

‘hri

Theme Buffet Nights (starting at $30)

26 till 30 December from 6pm-|!Opm

New Year's Eve Dinner ($75)

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economic value of the, Ervieehivas ‘.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 3B



PM: No basis for continued

Opposition to development

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL ~
Tribune Business
Reporter

THERE is no basis for the
continued opposition to the
$175 million Baker’s Bay Golf
and Ocean Club development
on Guana Cay, Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham said at
the weekend, as all “legitimate
concerns” held by those oppos-
ing the project have been
answered satisfactorily.

Following a tour of progress
at the resort, Mr Ingraham said
the developers have the full
support of the Government.

“We are satisfied that they
are undertaking a project that
is environmentally acceptable
and sustainable, and that they
are doing a development that
is contributing sufficiently to
the economy of Abaco, and
hence the economy of the
Bahamas,” the Prime Minister
said.

Mr Ingraham added that
while the Save Guana Cay
Reef Association did raise sev-
eral legitimate concerns, his
government is satisfied these
have been addressed.

“Firstly they complained
that it was not environmental-
ly sustainable. I think that it is
fair to say, and accurate to say,
that this development exceeds
the environmental standards
established by the Bahamas,
and we are very proud of how
they have respected the envi-
ronment and gone about tak-
ing steps to mitigate any dam-
age whatsoever,” said Mr
Ingraham.

He added that the Associa-
tion’ had-expressed concerns

O










x
‘ hang
| Q

the Government of the
Bahamas was giving away all
of the public land on Guana
Cay that is Crown Land and
Treasury Land We gave con-
sideration to that argument
after we came to office in May,
and sat down with the devel-
opers and told them that we
did not think that they ought to
have access to as much of the
government acreage as was
previously agreed.

“They undertook to return
to the government substantial
portions of what had already
been agreed to be transferred
to them,” the Prime Minister
said.

Mr Ingraham said this had
the net effect that, of the 40
acres of Treasury Land, the
developers will end up with
about eight acres after five-to-

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham

six years on a lease basis, and
with respect to the Crown
Land, 60-plus acres of it is for a
nature preserve that will be
managed by the developers for
the benefit of the public.
“They have a licence. The



anywhere. With respect to
some of the other land, they
have some leases on it. So I
think that with respect to pub-
lic land there is no argument of
any consequence about alien-
ation of that land,” the Prime
Minister said.

The land that will be leased
to the developers will also ben-
efit Guana Cay’s residents, as it
will be used for a water treat-
ment facility, employee hous-
ing and other essential facilities

Mr Ingraham added that the
developers bought 450 acres
of private land to do their
development.

The Association’s third argu-
ment, he said, was that the
approvals granted to Baker’s
Bay had been granted improp-
erly by either the Government
in Nassau or the district coun-



“ernment, and itis not going”

cil in Hope Town.

Mr Ingraham said that as
that matter was before the
courts, he would not comment,
only to say: “The government
of the Bahamas is satisfied that
the development on Baker’s

“Bay is in the public interest of
“the Bahamias, and we will do

whatever is necessary to ensure
that we effectively support and
facilitate and accommodate the
development.

“It is contributing signifi-
cantly to the economy of Aba-
CO, as it is producing in

terms of wages some $1 mil-
lion per month. From a gov-
ernment point of view,

that means that $200,000 of
that comes directly back to the
public treasury as revenue.
Additionally, they are access-
ing lots of goods and service
from Bahamian suppliers and
contractors and we wish we
had many more like them.”

With matters concluded to
the Prime Minister’s satisfac-
tion, he said: “There is not now
a basis for a continued opposi-
tion to the development at
Baker’s Bay.”

Consolidated Water (Bahamas)

Ltd.

Invites application for the position of:

MAINTENANCE TEAM LEADER

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd. operates several Reverse Osmosis
Plants within the Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company enjoys a
reputation of providing a wholesome quality product, whilst maintaining a

strong commitment to its customers,

large.

®

its employees and the community at
e

The Company currently has a vacancy for the position of Maintenance
Team Leader. The successful candidate will report directly to the General
Manager. The Maintenance Team Leader’s role is to provide positive
leadership and demonstrative first person management by leading the
maintenance personnel in achieving the company’s goals with respect to the
planned maintenance of equipment, both preventive and predictive, training
of maintenance personnel and cost management. ,

The prospective candidate must possess the following skills:

° Strong Mechanical & Electrical Engineering skills.
° Have demonstrative history of developing computer

based

preventive

and

management systems.

Strong PC skills,

predictive

maintenance

including working knowledge and

proficiency with Microsoft Office and Maintenance
Management software.

Ability

performance

to review

weekly/monthly
indicators of equipment & personnel,

productivity

monitor and control and report on the same.
Ensure that maintenance planning tools are utilized
properly & efficiently and are achieving the company’s

goals.

Strong Cost Management skills.
Must have proven history of good interpersonal skills.
Must be prepared to work long hours, weekends and
travel to other business centers of the company.

Interested persons can forward their resumes to the following
address on or before December 14, 2007:

The General Manager

Consolidated Wateri(Bahamas) Ltd.

P O Box CR 54030
Nassau, Bahamas





Ingraham speaks following tour
of $175m Baker’s Bay Golf and
Ocean Club development

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THE TRIBUNE





for the Baha

FROM page 1 sultants Haley & Aldrich, said
- oil import and energy costs

were “ becoming an ever-
increasing portion of the

Bahamas gtoss domestic prad-

The report by US-based con-

The Leary of rane ay:

Architects’ wey 2007
December 9-15, 2007

Avchitectire in Transition

Sunday, December 9, 2007
Church Service-St Agnes Parish
Baillou Road
10:30 a.m

Monday, December 10, 2007
Offical Opening Ceremony
National Art Gallery of The Bahamas
‘West Hill Street
6:30p.m.

Wednesday December 12, 2007
Universal Provision Group Presentation

Thursday December 13, 2007
Kevin Mowery-Presentation on
Nana Wall System
12:00 Noon
_Lunch provided.

Saturday, Deceinber 15, 2007
Awards Dinner rae
National Art Gallery of The Bahamas
West Hill Street .
Cocktails: 6:30p.m., Dinner 8:00p.m.
’ Tickets available

Sponors:
‘Stone Work: -
We Care
-Arawak Homes
Universal Frovision Group |



uct”, meaning that to invest in
sources of renewable energy —
such as solar photovoltaic
(PV), wind, ocean thermal
energy conversion (OTEC),
wave and biomass — made
good economic and environ-
mental policy.

Solar energy, given the
Bahamas’ constant exposure

‘to sunlight, was “an excellent

resource”, Haley & Aldrich
said, generating on average 5.5

--kilowatt-hours..per..square... .

metre per day.

Using PV technology, the
report said electricity could be
generated at similar per unit
costs to the Bahamas Electric-
ity Corporation’s (BEC) cur-
rent diésel-driven facilities,
using both utility size and
rooftop systems.

Electricity prices.in New
Providence and Grand
Bahama, incorporating both

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

| you are raising funds fora

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
aréa or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



the basic rate and fuel sur-
charge, varied between $0.22
to $0.25 per kilowatt hour
(Kwh).

Even in the absence of gov-
ernment support, Haley &
Aldrich found: “The cost per
kilowatt hour to produce elec-
tricity using a rooftop PV unit
in the Bahamas would vary
from $0.12 in the summer to
$0.23 in the winter, with an
average cost of $0. 15.”

On solar PV, the consultants
estimated that the purchase of
250 kilowatts of generating
capacity could generate 285
megawatt hours of electricity
capacity per year, cost $1 mil-
lion and save 22,000 gallons of
fuel imports per year. oe

In addition, the consultants

recommended that the
Bahamas’ exposure to sun-
shine could also be used for
solar hot water heating, reduc-
ing energy costs, and lowering
electricity and propane use.

“The cost of a passive solar
thermal system will vary
between $1,000 and $3,000,
depending on the type of sys-
tem and size,” the report said.
“Assuming an installation cost
of $3,000, a solar thermal sys-
tem will pay for itself in four to
eight years and provide for the
hot water needs of a family for
15 to 30 years.”

On solar thermal, Haley &
Aldrich again estimated that a

_. $1 million investment would

fund 500 passive solar systems,
generate 305 megawatt hours
of electricity per annum and
save on 280,000 gallons of fuel
imports for the Bahamas.

To exploit PV and solar

thermal energy, Haley &~--

Aldrich recommended revis-
ing the Bahamas Building
Code so that all large new
commercial and industrial con-
structions used PV systems. IT
also suggested that the Build-
ing Code be revised to require



solar water heating on all new
construction.
It added that one-time incen-

tives be provided to commer-'

cial and industrial firms who
refitted with both PV and solar
thermal technology, and that
low-interest loans be provid-
ed to Bahamian residential and
business owners to purchase
and install P’V units.

On ocean wave generation,
Haley & Aldrich said it had
been estimated that this
method of power generation

from a utility-sized facility ~

could provide electricity priced
between $0.09 to $0.11 per
KWh in locations Buen as the
Bebe

Solid and other wastes also

presented an opportunity for ©

the Bahamas, as energy could
be recovered from its combus-
tion. “Based on the amount of
solid waste generated on New
Providence, approximately 20
MWh (megawatt hours) of
electricity could be generated
from combusting the waste dis-
posed of each day at the Har-
rold Road landfill,” Haley &
Aldrich said.

“Grand Bahama produces
enough waste each day to gen-
erate about SMWh of electric-
ity. Construction and opera-
tion of waste-to-energy facili-
ties at these two locations

“could more than.double the

existing tipping fees being
charged for waste. disposal, ,

although the sale of electricity
could help reduce these
charges.”

potential energy, the report
urged that the landfill sites in
New Providence and Grand
Bahama be fitted with gas col-
lection and energy generation
systems.

It recommended that waste

~~" “By -reducing

-To-tap.into.this-source of...

management systems also be
revised.

The report concluded that
by developing a sustainable
renewable energy programme,
the Bahamas could maintain
its position on “the leading
edge of tourism in the
Caribbean”, helping this nation
to tap into an ecotourism mar-
ket that was growing at about
15-20 per cent per year.

It would also enable the
Bahamas to meet the energy
demands of increased resort
and mixed-use-developments,
such as the Baha Mar, Albany,
South Ocean, Rose Island
Ritz-Carlton and countless
Family Island projects, reduce

_..carbon dioxide emissions and
’ reduce the environmental

impact.

“Use of renewable energy
can also help diversify the
economy and contribute to
increased job creation and
training for Bahamian work-
ers,” Haley & Aldrich wrote.

“From an economic stand-
point, development of renew-
able energy facilities can sta-
bilize and, over time, reduce
the price of power, while
increasing the number of avail-
able jobs.

“Lower energy costs and
higher employment will
increase the amount of income
residents have to spend on
goods and services, thereby
stimulating the entire econo-_
my,"
energy
imports, the Bahamas can
become more energy secure.
Renewable energy also
reduces the production of

greenhouse. gases, protecting _

the future of the Bahamas and
its tourism industry.

“The Bahamas can secure its
future, make itself more eco-
nomically sound, and open
new industries through invest-
ment in renewable energy.”

Delinquent Properties (Vacant Lots
lot # 19, Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road

(proposed gated community with beach access)

New Providence, Bahamas
3 040 sq ft; Appraised Value = $75,600

Lot # 14 Westridge North Subdivision
New Providence, Bahamas.
11,486 sq ft
Appraised Value = $207,000

i

Lot #20 Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road

(proposed gated community with beach access) |

_ New Providence, Bahamas
a 061 sq fi; Appraised Value = $76,000

- Submit bids in writing to:
MORTGAGE DEPARTMENT

P.O, Box N-4815
Nassau, Bahamas,

“Fos ithe enquitis call 461-1087



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Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of
the Royal Island resort and residential project, an
ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals ‘to apply for the following
position with the company

HEAD CHEF

Duties and Responsibilities: ~

e Coordinate and manage multiple food venues.
° Coordinante and manage all food i preparauon
areas. ~ ”
Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.
Planning of menus for all food venues.

- Qualifications: Must have 5 star expereince either
in a restaurant, private residence or yacht, Must
have an “attention to detail” work ethic. Willing to
take directions from management and maintain a
hands on approach. Experience in “Chef’s table”,

“Disgustation” or “tasing menu” style of dining.
The ideal candidate will have to reside on Eleuthera
or its surrounding area.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with
cover letter to:
. Harcourt Management Services Ltd.
~ P.O.Box'N-1991-—---~..
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
_Or Email to: info@ meer com

Royal Island _(Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE





Fiscal deficit
up to $50.7m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s fiscal
deficit jumped to $50.7 mil-
lion for the first quarter of its
2007-2008 fiscal year, the
Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ latest monthly
update revealed, but the min-
ister of state for finance said
he did not “have any con-
cern” about how the public
finances were performing to
date.

Zhivargo Laing said that
while revenue was “continu-
ing to be a little bit behind
last year”, the public finances
in 2006-2007 received a one-
time boost from the Stamp
Tax generated by the multi-
billion dollar transaction that
took Kerzner International,
the Atlantis and One & Only
Ocean Club owner, from
being a public company toa
private one.

Revenue

“There was some extra rev-
enue received in that period.
If those were removed from
last year’s revenue perfor-
mance, we would be at or
ahead of last year,” Mr Laing
told The Tribune.

“Given the global and US
picture, and softening in the
tourism market, we can
understand and appreciate
where we are in terms of rev-
enue.”

He added that government
revenues continued to fluctu-
ate, being either slightly
ahead of or slightly behind
2006-2007 depending on the
day comparisons were done.
Public expenditure, hee

i
b id ad Te

Zhivargo Laing



was still “on cue”.

The Central Bank report
said the deficit incurred in
the first quarter of the 2007-
2008 fiscal year stood in con-
trast to the $3.6 million sur-
plus achieved in the compar-
ative period the previous
year, but also acknowledged
that this was due to the
receipt of extraordinary” rev-
enues from the Kerzner
transaction and Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC) dividends.

For the 2007-2008 first
quarter, revenues were down
10.2 per cent at $293.6 mil-
lion, largely due to a fall in
tax receipts, while total gov-
ernment spending was ahead
by 6.5 percent. _

Payments

Increased payments for
wages and salaries supported

a7.1 percent rise in recur- . ..

rent spending on the Govern-

a

ment’s fixed costs, while capi-
tal expenditure was also
ahead by 1 per cent.

Overall, the Central Bank
said the Bahamian economy
“continued on a positive
growth path” during October
despite reduced inflows from
foreign direct investment and
the tourism industry. The
external reserves also con-
tracted due to the Bahamas’
increased oil import bill and
seasonal increase in demand
for foreign currency.

Demand

“Domestic demand is
anticipated to be sustained
over the remainder of the
year, owing to the seasonal
pick-up in consumer spend-
ing and ongoing stimulus
from construction activity,”
the Central Bank said.

“These developments,
together with the heightened
payments for fuel imports,
are expected to exert addi-
tional demands on external
reserves and liquidity condi-
tions.”

While the Bahamian econ-
omy seemed set to benefit
from major foreign direct
investment projects in the
medium-term, the short-term
downside risks or dangers to
this nation remained the state
of the US economy and rising
global oil prices.

For the first 10 months of
2007, Bahamian dollar credit
expansion slowed by 14.1 per
cent to $526.5 million, with
consumer credit and mort-
gages down by 19.6 per cent
and 9.5 per cent to $155.6
million and $249.2 million
respectively.

OG

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Consolidated Water (Bahamas)
Ltd.

| c

Invites application for the position of:

WELDER/MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd. operates several Reverse Osmosis
Plants within the Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company enjoys a
reputation of providing a wholesome quality product, whilst maintaining a
strong commitment to its customers, its employees and the community at
large.

The Company currently has a vacancy for the position § of
Welder/Mechanical Technician. The successful candidate will report
directly to the Maintenance Team Leader. The Welder/Mechanical
Technician shall be responsible for preventive and predictive maintenance
and repairs of Reverse Osmosis Plant Mechanical and Building Systems.
Additionally duties shall include assisting with other maintenance duties of
the operations.

The prospective candidate must possess the following skills:

e Shall be a Certified Welder for welding associated with
stainless steel and alloy steel high pressure vessels and
high pressure pipe systems.

Shall be capable of welding utilizing Tig and Mig Welding
Machines.

Shall be responsible for performing plant mechanical
repairs of Reverse Osmosis Plant Systems.

Shall be responsible for repairs to Plant and Building
structures.

Shall have a working knowledge and proficiency with
Microsoft Office and Maintenance Management
isoftware.

Ability to prepare weekly/monthly reports of work
performed.

Must have proven history of good interpersonal skills.
Must be prepared to work long hours, weekends and
travel to other business centers of the company.

Interested persons can forward their resumes to the. following
address on or before December 14, 2007:

The General Manager
Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.
P O Box CR 54030
Nassau, Bahamas



Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

ASSISTANT TO RELATIONSHIP MANAGERS

We are accepting applications for an Assistant to Relationship Managers in the Private Banking
Department with the following minimum requirements:

QUALIFICATIONS:

Excellent PC Knowledge
Applicants should possess a degree (or equivalent) in Business Administration, Finance or

Economics and have Private Banking experience.
The applicant must be fluent in English. French and Spanish would be an asset in order to
facilitate relationship with the clients and prospects.

JOB FUNCTIONS:
¢ Reception of clients and prospective clients

Execution of client's instructions
Handling of correspondence, faxes and inquiries
Liaison with the Representative Offices

* Preparation of brochures and marketing materials

PERSONAL QUALITIES:

Strong organization and communication and interpersonal skills
Excellent work attitude

Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

Competitive salary and performance bonus
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS DECEMBER 19, |
2007.

CREDIT SUISSE

»





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007



INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news, read
Insight on Mondays

TECHNOLOGY.

COMPANY LIMITED

December 10th to I deh Open 9am to 6pm
Mon - Fri





December 15th Open 10am to 4pm
Saturday

December I7th to 21st Open Yam to 6pm
Mon - Fri





December 22nd Open I Oam to 6pm
Saturday

December 24th Open 9am to 7pm
Mon - Christmas Eve





CLOSED INVENTORY |
; December 27th - 31st wii



Kingsway Academy

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

FOR SEPTEMBER 2008.

The Entrance = Sane
will be held at the school” o

Bernard Road on Thursday,
January 12, 2008 from 8:00 a.m. -
1:30 p.m. for students wishing to
enter grades seven through ten.

Deadline for applications will be
Thursday,January 10.Aplications.

FROM page 1

ment would extend the Stamp
Tax exemption introduced by
the former Christie adminis-
tration, Zhivargo Laing, min-
ister of state for finance,
replied: “At the moment, the
position is that it has run its
course. There is no intention
to renew it.”

The former PLP government
extended the Stamp Tax
exemption for first-time home
buyers from $100,000 to prop-
erties with an appraisal value
of up to $250,000, believing th:
move would make home own-
ership more affordable for
middle and low-income
Bahamians.

The exemption, though,
expires on December 31, 2007,
which is just three weeks away.

Apart from stimulating the
housing market and enabling
more Bahamians to fulfil their
dream to ‘own a piece of the
rock’, the Christie government

Ee Nasee

also believed there would be
a net benefit produced from
the stimulus given to the con
struction and real estate indus
tries ~ despite the tax revenue
given up.

However, Mr Laing said the
new government instead
planned to focus on the tax
relief outlined in its 2007 Elec
tion Manifesto, namely to
exempt new home owners
from the payment of real prop-
erty tax for a period of five
years following completion of a
new owner-occupied residence.

One realtor, though, who
asked not to be named, said
the increase in the Stamp Tax
exemption threshold had
increased home sales in the
income bracket that it had tar-
geted,.as a major up-front cost
for first-time home buyers was
removed.

“We did a lot of sales as a
result. The Stamp Tax could
make or break a sale.’ * the
source said.

Homes valued at between




RWG Gest

Applicants must:

Christian School

of specialization

uo

Hemspole Checstian igh Phot

TEACHING VACANCY
Temple Christian High Schoo!
Shirley Street

Invites applications irom qualified ‘

the following positions for the-2007-2008-School Year

Math (Gr.7-9)



A. 0 Bea practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple

B. 9 Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the area

) Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diplpma
9 Have at least two years teaching experience in
the relevant subject area with excellent





hristian teachers for









~ paid in full by th

$100,000 to $250,000 were pre-
viously subject to Stamp Tax
quivalent to 8 per cent of the
purchase price. Lhis was usu-
ally split 50/50 between the
purchaser and vendor, mean-
ing each paid 4 per cent, or
buyel
depending on the nature of the
sales agreement.

For example, on a property
ippraised at $230,000, if a first-
time buyer was paying the full
Sper cent Stamp Pax. they
would hav: to p ly $18,400 in
tax to the Ireasury as a one-
‘ime lump sum up front to
lose the transaction. Even at 4
per cent, that is some $9.200.

Shis was what the exemp-
tion removed, and in an econ
omy with a relatively low sav-
ings rate, many Bahamzans liv-
ing from pay cheque to pay
cheque, that is a significant
sum that most would be unable
to finance from their own
resources.

The minister, though, said if
was difficult to assess the
2xtent to which the former
zovernment’s increasing of the
Stamp ‘Tax exemption thresh
old had boosted home owner
hip among middle and lower-

ncome Bahami:z ns who would
L .







Have ween pur asil 2
alued at bet. $3

50 Of 18)

There were many other fac
ors. such as the Bahamas
verall econemic perform:
und increased incomes, 1
whethe1 }

aing said.

However, he added: “T think
t’s tair to say that the extent to
which hundreds of Bahamians
did apply for and get the

ceimptiolt on this. and to the

tent that if represented sav-
ings for other things, 1t did
bring some relief there.”

Mr Laing said he was also
inable to say that the former

emmment. in inercasing the

THE TRIBUNE






exemption threshold, “gave up
{oo much”, given the wide-
ranging investment and incen-
tives regimes the Bahamas has
in place for Bahamian and for-
cign businesses.

“IT can’t really say that it has
been an excessive or exorbi-
tant part of it,” Mr Laing said
cf the Stamp Tax exemption.

While he had asked for data
on the amount of revenue giv-
en up by the threshold
increase, “I can’t say it has giv-
en up too much. We give up a
lot anyway’.

Realtors had previously
complained that there were
problems with how the
increase in the Stamp Tax
exemption to properties val-
ued at $250,000 or below
worked in practice, some say-
ing that unless the appraisal
was for $200,000 or less, the
Ministry of Finance was reluc-
tant to grant the exemption.

The exemption was based on
the appraisal value of the prop-
erty conducted by a realtor,
rather than the purchase price,
:n order to prevent any Stamp
Duty evasion by the under.
reporting of transaction vai-
ues.

Some observers are also like:
'v te argue that the Govern-
mes i replacing like-with-
like if it brings in a five-year
real property tax holiday for
first-time buyers ci cwner-
secupied premises

The Christie government
ased the real proper-
i threshold te
rin $250,000 or
less. meaning any tax holiday
the new admunisiration will
introduce is unlikely to impact
those middle and lower-
income buyers who previously
benefited from the Stamp Tax
exemption.

It is unclear whether the
Government may also seek to
lower that real property tax
exemption threshold.








“NO NOTICE

Notice ts hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Governmet
Registered Stock Certificate as follows:












can be collected at the Business
Office from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

communication skills

L. © Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examination to the 5JC,) BGCSE levels.

0 Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra

s N .
OSG PRR REIT A SEI I 53 TBO SESE EN PT POMBE SET SSE PCT PASE Ts SR As LL OY | ITI Mob ee RITE



: Interest Certificate Maturity
curricular programmes Stock : Rate No. Date Amount
i 2024-2626 ULSLS%HAPR 77-362 05/04/2025 — $3,000.00
ale ae be picked - - the — ava ; 1 intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement
Ee S riley Street d > mre 4 d } oe . “¢ . ° .
SRN ECE LO ACY: oes AU a ae | certificate If this certificate is found, please write to P.O.Box
: full curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph \ .
e “ge alice eiens: : ane | NIS81, Nassau, Bahamas. (DBS8)
For more information please and three reterences to DT kta nce ae eae oe
i ‘ ; Mr. Neil Hamilton "
call telephone numbers Scien
324-8811: 324-3409: or 324-6269 Temple Christian High School '
: P.O.Box N-1566 }
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is December 7th, 2007 }
seem |

Harbourside Marine is looking for Golf Cart
‘Technician with experience in Gas
and Electric repairs/service.

Please fax resume to: 394-7659







-ROTARACT CLUB OF
SOUTHEAST NASSAU CENTENNIAL



- Wednesday 12 December 2007

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:
fe Associate degree in law or business.
Bes Must be conversant with all aspects of company

Nassau Yacht Club — East Bay Street

f incorporation and admunstration, including
an at 0: 00pm Bf liquidation and redomiciliation of International
Are you:
i ; . Meals Business Companies
* Looking to get involved in Community Service Activities? ¢ Excellent wllen and oral communication skills.
°* Expand Your Professional Network? Hee Computer literate, including a working knowledge
¢ Have fun with persons your own age? k poof Lynas 4 Series, Microsoft Word, Excel, Power

Point.
f° At least (vo years work experience with a trust
company or faw firm.

° Between the ages of 18 — 30?

Then Rotoract is Right for YOU!

Rotoract is a member club of Rotary International

} Please write to: Company Administrator
For more information email: rotaract_senc@yahoo.com }

P.O. Box N-10697
Nassau, Bahamas
F.mail-smith @experta.bs





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 7B





- Realtors concerned on

¢ 3

Stamp Tax exempt

mg By ee BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Tribune Business
Reporter

BAHAMIAN realtors have
given a mixed reaction to the
FNM government’s plans to
scrap the Stamp Tax exemp-
tion for first time home-buy-
ers purchasing properties
worth $250,000 and less, and
instead offer a five-year tax
holiday on real property tax.

Several realtors preferred
not to comment on the record,
saying that the issue was a
“hot button one”. However,
they questioned the impact
removing the exemption would
have, aguing that it was a
major incentive for first time
homeowners struggling to

meet the closing costs of their :

new home.

Realty

In fact, Walter Hanchell, of

PGF Realty, told Tribune ,

Business that without the sav-
ing the Stamp Tax exemption
allows, many Bahamians will
not be able to purchase homes.

“This will definitely have an
impact on the real estate indus-
try, and

I think that it will be a strain
on persons buying new homes.



The Tribune wants
to hear from people
who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are
raising funds for a
good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in
the area or have
won an award.

If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your
story.

Share your news



’ ] don’t know how people will

finance homes and it may put a
strain on the economy,” Rev
Hanchell said.

He explained that that the
Stamp Tax paid varies depend-
ing on the value of the home
and real estate involved.

Priced

Homes priced between
$50,000-$100,000 are taxed at 6

er cent, homes between
$100,000 and $250,000 are
taxed at 8 per cent, and homes
above

$250,000 were taxed at 10
per cent.

“So that is a substantial
amount of money added to the
purchase price of the home,”
Mr Hanchell said. “It was cer-
ad a strong selling point for

oie added that most Bahami-
ans have very little savings and
live from pay cheque to pay
cheque.

Another realtor, who asked
not to be named, said that it
would be interesting to see
how the new policy would play
out, although they felt in some
cases that the $250,000 real
property tax exemption thresh-
old was also far too generous
and $150,000 would have been
more appropriate.















SHOGUN REVOLVER

Restaurant ¢ Lounge ¢ Terrace
Modern Asian Dining Concept
¢ Wait staff: Previous experience in high- pales
* dining establishments a must.
° Kitchen Staff: Extensive knowledge of
Asian Cuisine and wines a definite asset.
e Wine Steward/Sommelier: Prévious restaurant
and floor sales experience.
¢ Food Runners: For bussing of bar and table

expedition.

Fax resumes to: 328-8381
or email to: info@shogunrevolver.com





evenings rt hd

alike; then s@d-y
Bahamas @ ox Dibask
certification reqifed.





MAKE A DIFFERENCE WITH
OXFORD LEARNING

If you are enthusiastic, outgoing, positive, and
want to work in an environment that is filled
with lots of energy, then Oxford Learning has a

dove gs; seaders,

a oa oes important
available
g children
7 email to

paetetore WGte8 _ écher’s







Onl

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is the UN’s
global development network. advocating for change and connecting
countries to knowledge. experience and resources to help people build
a better life. We are on the ground in 166 countries, working with
them on their own solutions to global and national development
challenges. As they develop local capacity, they draw on the people
of UNDP and our wide range of partners.





acancy Announcement No: SGP- 2007/ 0001
Deadline For Application: 21 December 2007
Position Title National Coordinator

Nassau, BAHAMAS

An attractive compensation package based on qualifications and
experience

One Year, with the possibility of renewal














Organizational Unit GEF-SGP
The Global Environment Facility (GEF), established in 1991, helps developing countries fund
projects and programs that protect the global environment. GEF grants support projects related to
biodiversity, climate change, international waters, land degradation, the ozone layer, and persistent
organic pollutants. The Small Grants Programme (SGP) embodies the very essence of sustainable
development. SGP channels financial and technical support directly to NGOs and CBOs for
activities that conserve and restore the environment http://sgp.undp.org. GEF is establishing the
SGP in The Bahamas. |





DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES













ext RAPER ArH EA

e Effective management of the GEF-SGP (Global E Envionivent Facility — Small Grants
Programme) local team, the SGP programme and its portfolio -- from programme strategy to
individual project concept and design to technical support to SGP grantees, monitoring and
evaluation -- to ensure compliance with the overall approved global SGP Strategic
Framework, the SGP Operational Guidelines, the SGP annual work programme, the
national environmental and sustainable development priorities, as well as the annual
delivery of the national SGP targets.

ili LAL tic

e Building strategic partnerships with development partners, such as donors, foundations,
private sector and civil society, to promote SGP and mobilize resources.

e Contribution to GEF-SGP’s efforts to develop effective national, regional and global
networks for technical support and knowledge management, within the GEF SGP and with
external institution, including academia.



The Terms of Reference (TOR) may be viewed at www.jobs.undp.org .
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

Advanced university degree in environmental economics, Business Administration or related

field

¢ Atleast 5 years of relevant experience in development work, which should include
programme management preferably with an extended specialized experience in any of the
GEF-SGP focal areas. |

e Excellent analytical and writing skills

e Excellent people management and interpersonal skills

e Ability to communicate effectively

e Good negotiation and problem-solving skills

e Proficiency in word-processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications

Fluency in English



















Send applications including |UNDP/ GEF-SGP National Coordinator
a 5-10 page writing Bahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST) Commission
sample to : Office of the Prime Minister

Nassau Court, P.O. Box CB-10980

Nassau, The Bahamas

via e-mail to registry.jm@undp.org or online at www.jobs.undp.org
This vacancy is open to qualified male and female nationals of the Bahamas.
We thank you for your application but only short listed candidates will be contacted












PAGE 8B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE





For the stories behind
the news, read



Insight Mondays

A leading Law firm with office located in Nassau is seeking to fill the
following position

a

Applicant must:
‘have a minimum of 5 years. experience as alegal Secretary _ .
«have strong typing skills
* formal training in shorthand
* be proficient in Microsoft Office including Word, Excel and Internet

usage
‘be self motivated and able to work without supervision

Applicants with background in Conveyancing, Banking, Civil Litiga-
tion, Wills, Immigration matters encouraged. Medical Insurance and
Pension Plan offered.

Salary commensurate with skills and experience.

Interested persons should apply in writting to:

The Office Manager

FROM page 1

continuing are still more than
reasonable, given that DHHS
generated net income for the
third quarter ended on Octo-

~ ber 31, 2007, of $747,000, com-

pared to the 2006 comparative
of $429,000. ‘
Mr Sealy told The Tribune

that 12.1 per cent growth in
patient revenues to $9.989 mil-
lion in the third quarter had
been driven by “an increase in
patient activities across the
board”, with total revenues for
the hospital and healthcare
provider up by 12.4 per cent
to $10.157 million against last
year’s comparative.

Total expenses, meanwhile,
grew at a slower rate of 9.9 per
cent to $9.176 million, despite






To advertise in The Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 322-1986 today!




pressures from the rising cost
of medical technologies and
supplies, utility costs and staff
salaries and benefits.

Net income from continuing
operations for the three
months to October 31, 2007,
was some 52.6 per cent higher,
standing at $920,000 compared
to $603,000 the year before.

As ever, the only drag on
DHHS results continues to be
the Blake Road-based West-
ern Medical Plaza, which it has
now leased out to other oper-
ators after it failed to find a
buyer.

The loss produced by West-
ern Medical Plaza remained
flat with the prior year’s, stand-
ing at $173,000 compared to
$174,000...

Mr Sealy said in relation to
Western Medical Plaza: “The

property continues to be on :

the market, and we’re looking
at options that exist — selling
it or other business opportu-
nities. Nothing is off the table

um Doctors sees —
EPS double |

at this time. ;
“We have a few interested
parties, but nothing that we

can say shows that a sale is cer- —

tain.”

For the first nine months of
its financial year ending on
January 31, 2008, DHHS saw
patient revenues rise by 7.5 per
cent to $30.721 million, with
total revenues ahead by 7.8 per
cent at $31.224 million.

That growth rate just out-
stripped the 6.1 per cent
increase in expenses to $27.35
million, compared to $25.77
million the year before, with
net income from continuing

operations ahead 25.8 per cent |

at $3.688 million compared to
$2.932 million.

The loss from Western Med-
ical Plaza was also contained,
down to $463,000 from
$529,000, giving DHHS a net
income for the first nine
months of $3.225 million, a
34.2 per cent increase over the
previous year’s $2.403 million.

P.O. Box N-4196
Nassau, Bahamas



VACANCY AS OF JANUARY 3, 2008
A TEACHER OF MODERN LANGUAGES (FRENCH)

IN THE HIGH SCHOOL

Applicants for the above mentioned posts must have a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree
from a recognized University in the relevant subject area and a Post-graduate Certificate in
Education, or teacher certificate. The ability to teach Advanced Placement courses, a second
language or a second subject would be an assef?V& cértified copy of the relevant degree
and ‘teacher. certificateamust-2ceompany the applreation:The names and relevant contact
information of at least two professional references should also be listed. Applications from
unqualified persons and or incomplete applications will not be processed.

The persons offered an appointment will be expected to make a commitment to
work in harmony with Christian principles and to support the emphasis of the
Bahamas Conference of The Methodist Church of which the school is a part.

Queen’s College was established in Nassau in 1890 by the Methodist Church and isa member
of the Intemational Association of Methodist Schools, Colleges and Universities (IAMSCU)

The completed application together with a covering letter and a recent photograph must
be sent to:

The Principal
Queéen’s College
P.O. Box N 7127
Nassau, Bahamas

Or faxed to 242 393 3248 or emailed to: dlynch@qchenceforth.com

Consolidated Water (Bahamas)
Ltd.

e

Invites application for the position of:

CONTROLS/ELECTRICAL TECHNICIAN

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd. operates several Reverse Osmosis
Plants within the Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company enjoys a
reputation of providing a wholesome quality product, whilst maintaining a
strong commitment to its customers, its employees and the community at
large.

The Company currently has a vacancy for the position of Controls/Electrical
Technician. The successful candidate will report directly to the Maintenance
Team Leader. The Controls/Electrical Technician shall be responsible for
preventive and predictive maintenance and repairs of Reverse Osmosis
‘Plant Control Systems and Single and Three Phase Equipment & Building
Systems. Additionally duties shall include assisting with other maintenance
duties of the operations.

> ae
The prospective candidate must possess the following skills:

e¢ Strong Single and Three Phase Electrical Repairs and
Maintenance skills with certification in the same.

e Strong trouble shooting skills of Single, Three Phase -
Electrical Systems, Variable Frequency Drives and
Reverse Osmosis Plant Equipment.

Must have demonstrated experience with Allen
Bradley/Rockwell Power Line Carriers/Motor Starters.
Must have a working knowledge of Schnider PLCs.

Must be familiar with navigating and trouble shooting
Paragon, Devicenet and Controlnet PLC Software.

Strong PC. skills, including. working knowledge and
proficiency with Microsoft Office and Maintenance
Management software.

Ability to prepare weekly/monthly
performed.

e Must have proven history of good interpersonal skills.

¢ Must be prepared to work long hours, weekends and
travel to other business centers of the company.

reports of work

Interested persons can forward their resumes to the following
address on or before December 14, 2007:

The General, Manager
Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.
P O Box CR 54030
Nassau, Bahamas





INVESTMENT PROJECT ADMINISTRATOR

We are seeking an Investment Project Administrator for an international
life science venture fund.





The General Partner of a Bahamas Limited Partnership is seeking an
Investment Project Administrator to assist in the evaluation of investment
opportunities in international markets. The Partnership invests in the
life sciences field and is particularly interested in identifying innovative
approaches to prevent chronic diseases.









The job is specialized and requires that the candidate have a sound degree




experience. Proven expertise and experience in the development and
monitoring of clinical studies for an international pharmaceutical company,
(preferably in an international context) is paramount. Fluent English is a
prerequisite, other language a plus. The candidate will be based at the
company’s office in Nassau. .





A competitive salary package commensurate with experience will be
offered.




Please reply to Inventages Whealth Management Inc., Cable Beach
Courts Unit #1, P.O. Box N-7532, Nassau or FAX: 225-1307 or EMAIL:
hr.nassau@inventages.com for the attention of HUMAN RESOURCES
—Ref: IPA.





” The deadline for applications is December 19", 2007.

jee cement fe Pm eae
Cook Wanted




‘We are looking for a dedicated, hardworking cook to
join our kitchen team. Must have a positive attitude,
excellent customer service skills essential.







Qualifications:
e Experience in an industrial kitchen
¢ Certificate in Culinary Arts a plus
* Food-Handlers health certificate

¢ Police certificate









Excellent benefits
Salary commensurate with experience





Please fax resume to: 302-4787



.dn, Biology, a. minimum. of 3 years’ hands-on analytical and research |}; ”

Seren aeow

Ba se SD SSS SSCS SS a PT nS SS EE sD ceecaseereeeceemcescsast

Ned betel pid coe

© oo

RD mel WG OS me

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ae



- branch in the Bahamas, and have the draft

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 9B





Bank opens
BOB Financial
Services in|
Coral Gables

BANK of the Bahamas International has
today opened its Miami branch, BOB |
Financial Services, located in the SunTrust
Building at 201 Alhambra Circle in Coral
Gables.

-“The opening of a South Florida financial
services centre marks a major milestone in
the history of Bank of The Bahamas, as
we continue to chart new territory to meet
the changing needs of our customers,” said
managing director Paul McWeeney.

The bank changed its name to include
the word International when it anngunced
plans to open in South Florida.

According to Sam Haven, manager of
private banking and international opera-
tions, the service centre will facilitate pre-
sent account holders who need to access
funds for:travel, make purchases for indi-
vidual or business needs and cover medical
expenses. Even though the financial insti-
tution will have a physical presence in
South Florida, the Central Bank of the
Bahamas Exchange Control guidelines
apply.

“Through our Miami centre, you will also
be able to acquire US$ stored value cards,”
said Mr Haven.

“Customers wanting to make a major
purchase such as a vehicle can present the
pro forma invoice in Miami or through a

available at the Miami office, or they can
access funds in their account while they
are actually in Miami.”Loan applications
will not be handled by the Miami. centre at

this tie. Paul McWeeney





Polymers International, Limited
Queens Highway, P.O. Box F-42684
. Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas
Office: (242) 352-3506 Facsimile: (242) 352-2779

Polymers International Limited currently is accepting applications for the
following positions. Resumes can be mailed or dropped off at the main

office on Queens Highway.

‘Human Resources Manager

This person will be responsible for administering all aspects of Company
human resources and functions. This person will assume responsibility for
the effective performance of various human resource functions, including
recruiting, interviewing, hiring, payroll and for insuring corporation-wide
compliance with all related government regulations. This person will provide
recommendations to Senior Management in establishing overall human
resource objectives, policies and plans This person will ensure that Human
Resource activities are conducted in accordance with established Company
policies and within established procedures. This person will also assign,
direct and appraise Human Resources personnel.

This is not an entry-level position. The successful candidate will have
proven abilities in the Human Resources field with a minimum of 5 years
experience. Superior written and spoken communication skills, including
sincere and effective listening skills, are critical. A high degree of
organizational skills is essential. The candidate should possess a bachelor’s
degree or higher in human resources or related field of study.

Information Technology Manager

The Information Technology Manager will maintain and manage all
information technology equipment and assets including file servers, network
infrastructure, software applications, and telephony systems. This person
must keep abreast of current technologies and prepare appropriate project
plans for infrastructure changes. This person will suppor staff and
administrative personnel IT needs.

The successful candidate will have a minimum of a Bachelor of Computer
Science or equivalent and a minimum of 5 years experience providing
network systems support. Technical certifications in Microsoft Windows
a plus. Applicants who additionally have experience in Microsoft SQL
server, Crystal Reports, and Platinum BatchMaster software preferred. This
position requires on-call ‘availability 24/7, 12 months a year. This person
must also be able to work additional hours including weekends and must
possess travel documents for outside the Bahamas. If you have excellent
communication and organizational skills and are looking to work in a team
environment developing technology, mail or drop off your resume.



To advertise in Zhe Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,

just call 322-1986 today!



NEEDED FOR
KIN GSWAY CAFETERIA

FOR JANUARY, 2008.

Kingsway Academy is seeking the serivces

of a cook to prepare meals in the Cafeteria

as of January, 2008. Interested applicants

should collect applications from the Busi-

ness office on Bernard Road from 8:00 - 4:
00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Successful applicants must:

° Be batietpoting, commited born-again
Christian |

¢ Have a minimum of at least five (5)
years experience in food handling and
preparation. .

e Have a valid Health Certificate

e Have a genuine love for children and

young people, etc.

For further information please contact the
following:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton .
Academy Affairs Manager
Telephone: 324-6269 or 324-6887

Deadline for applications - Friday, Decem-
ber 28, 2007



~ FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

‘Our client, a Government Ministry, is seeking applications for the position of Financial

Controller.

JOB OBJECTIVE:

To provide leadership and coordination of the financial si plant and budget
management functions and to ensure the Ministry’s accounting procedures conform
to the Financial Administration and Audit Act of 1973. The position reports to the
Permanent Secretary.:

PRIMARY DUTIES:

* Direct and coordinate the Ministry’s financial planning and budget management
functions.

* Recommend procedures for measuring the financial and operating performance of
divisions and departments.

° Monitor and analyze monthly operating results against er bids

* Oversee daily operations of the finance department.

° Manage the preparation of monthly senentey expenditure reports, financial
outlooks and forecasts.

° Prepare financial analysis for contract negotiations and product investment decisions.

* Work with department managers and corporate staff on business plans for the ministry.

* Establish and implement short and long range Gepartmental goals, Ob IESHVES: policies
and operating procedures.

* Design, establish and maintain an organizational structure and staffing to effectively
accomplish the department’s goals and objectives.

° Oversee financial management of foreign operations.

* Represent the ministry externally to government agencies, funding agencies and the
general public.

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

* Candidates must meet the following criteria:

* Knowledge of finance, accounting, budget, and cost control principles. Knowledge of
the Financial Administration and Accounting Act of 1973. puowidee of US federal
and state financial regulations where: applicable.

* Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial repotts, statements and
projections. ' Working knowledge of short and long term budgeting and forecasting,
project budgets, and other financial. analysis. .

* Professional written and verbal communication and interpersonal skills, Ability to
motivate teams to produce quality material within tight timeframes and simultaneously
manage several projects. Ability to facilitate and pacticipate in group meetings.

¢ Bachelors Degree in Finance and/or Accounting. Professional accounting designation,
ACCA, CA or CPA desirable. Minimum of five years experience in senior-level finance
or accounting position. ~

° Bahamian citizen.

The position offers an attractive salary with a benefits package, reflecting the
successful applicant’s experience and qualifications.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including references before January
15, 2007 to:
Mark E. Munnings
Partner
P.O. Box N 7120,
Nassau, Bahamas

or
Email: mmunnings@deloitte.com.bs





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





INSIGHT




For the stories behind
the news, read Insight

on Mondays

TRUST OFFICER

LEADING TRUST COMPANY is seeking a candidate for the
position of Trust Officer

Responsibilities include:

e Liaising with senior management in the provision of
information/execution of transactions and problem
resolution :

Managing all associated risks and escalating as appropriate
Preparing periodic administrative reviews of trusts and
companies

Liaising with Compliance/Business Risk Management,
external auditors and regulators as required to ensure
adherence to all internal policies/procedures and regulatory
requirements

Ongoing updating and maintenance of trust administration
system as it relates to account management

e Projects as assigned from time to time.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED:

¢ Bachelors degree in law, business administration,
accounting or related field
Minimum 3-5 years experience in trust and company
administration or related experience
Strong oral and written communication skills
STEP qualification is desirable
Sound knowledge of fundamental trust and company laws
and related administrative practice
Basic knowledge of banking and investment products and
their application in overall management and administration
of wealth
Basic understanding and working knowledge of
accounting concepts and their aplications
Ability to identify potential risk issues and solutions and
to communicate these effectively to senior management
Excellent time management, organization and
administrative skills
Strong analytical and problem-solving skills
Strong PC skills; knowledge of 4Series an asset
Strong interpersonal skills and excellent team player

BENEFITS INCLUDE EXCELLENT SALARY,
PERFORMANCE BASED BONUS PAYMENTS, PENSION
BENEFITS AND MEDICAL COVERAGE.

Interested Bahamian candidates should forward a copy of
their resume to:

Human Resources
P.O.Box N-10697
Nassau, Bahamas or
Fax:(242) 325-0911 or
E-mail:smith@experta.bs




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 01153
Common Law and Equity Division




IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND




IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land being
part of John Drudge Grant (D-52) comprising an area of Sixteen and
Sixty-seven Hundredths (16.67) acres situate near the Settlement of The
Bight on Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas and bounded on the NORTH partly by another portion of land
originally granted to John Drudge and running thereon Nine Hundred
and One and Ninety-three Hundredths (901.93) Feet on the EAST by
another portion of land granted originally to John Drudge and running
thereon Seven Hundred and Eighty-Two and Sixty-two Hundredths
(782.62) Feet on the SOUTH by another portion of land originally
granted to John Drudge and running thereon Eight Hundred and Ninety-
two and Sixty-three Hundredths (892.63) Feet and on the WEST by The
Queen’s Highway and running thereon Eight Hundred and Seventy-one
and Forty Hundredths (871.40) Feet.















AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of
DELTON RANDOLPH MOREE





NOTICE

THE PETITION OF Delton Randolph Moree in respect of:-
“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land being part of John Drudge
Grant (D-52) comprising an area of Sixteen and Sixty-seven Hundredths
(16.67) acres situate near the Settlement of The Bight on Long Island
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and bounded
on the NORTH partly by another portion of land originally granted to
John Drudge and running thereon Nine Hundred and One and Ninety-
three Hundredths (901.93) Feet on the EAST by another portion of land
granted originally to John Drudge and running thereon Seven Hundred
and Eighty-Two and Sixty-two Hundredths (782.62) Feet on the SOUTH
by another portion of land originally granted to John Drudge and running
thereon Eight Hundred and Ninety-two and Sixty-three Hundredths
(892.63) Feet and on the WEST by The Queen’s Highway and running
thereon Eight Hundred and Seventy-one and Forty Hundredths (871.40)
Feet.



















Delton Randolph Moree claims to be the owner of the unincumbered fee simple
estate in possession of the said land and has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated andthe
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.






Copies of the Petition and the Plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal office hours in the following places:




1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the City of Nassau,
Bahamas; and





2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro Road, off Shirley
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.








NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Pétition shall on or before the
expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these presents, file
in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement
of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.






Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his Claim on or
before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these
presents will operate as bar to such claim.






LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers

#35 Buen Retiro Road

Off Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas







Attorneys for the Petitioner





Government





The tue



Cea ey
ae

Tl 502 2056
OF ad ta les

we

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Estate of the late Preston Stuart, Jr. (the Estate)

Freeport Taxi Company Limited

First Atlantic Realty Limited

Bahamas Developers, Limited

PAW Distributing Company Limited

Tokyo Investments Limited

Commonwealth Group of Companies Limited

Remax Realty Limited

King O’ Beef Limited

Kensington International Management Company Limited

Stuart Travel Services Limited

Northern Transport Limited

Skate World Limited

Special Venture Associates Limited

Deep Blue Energy (Bahamas) Limited formerly
Nashumi International Limited

TAKE NOTICE, that all persons having claims
against the Estate and or any of the Companies listed above,
as creditors, must, before close of business on Friday the
28" day of December, 2007, send to the Joint Receiver and
Manager at the address shown below, by letter, facsimile or
electronically, full particulars of the amount and nature of
their claim together with invoices, or any other documents
evidencing the same and contact information of the creditor.
Failure to submit a claim by the 28" December, 2007 may
result in a loss of rights with respect to such a claim. The
Joint Receiver and Manager reserve the right to accept or
reject any claim. The Joint Receiver and Manager reserve
the right to require further evidence in support of any claim
before accepting a claim. Creditors submitting claims
with sufficient and proper evidence thereof before the 28"
December, 2007 will be advised in writing of whether
their claim is accepted: Acceptance of claims by the Joint
Receiver and Manager does not impose any liability.on the
Joint Receiver and Manager to pay such claim. Claims which
are accepted in writing by the Joint Receiver and Manager
will be considered for payment depending upon the priorityof

| such claim and the availability of funds to meet such claim.

Dated this 5" day of December A.D., 2007

Kevin D. Seymour

Joint Receiver and Manager
PricewaterhouseCoopers

Regent Centre Hast

P.O. Box I-42682

l'reeport Bahamas

‘Telephone: (242) 352-8471

Facsimile: (242) 352-4810

E-Mail: kevin.d.seymour@bs.pwe.com



te dt Ae














FROM page 1

will come when this nation has
to negotiate a replacement for
the Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) with the US, as this
arrangement is also under
pressure from the WTO
because it is a one-way system
of trade preferences.

To preserve duty-free access
to the US for its exporters, the
Bahamas is likely to have to
reciprocate by removing all
import and tariff barriers on
goods coming into the US.
This will present a major

_ headache for government rey-

enues, as 85-90 per cent of all
imports coming into the
Bahamas originate from that
country.

As a result, many observers
had argued that the Bahamas
would have to address tax
reform as a matter of urgency,
and examine the feasibility of
adopting a sales or value-
added (VAT) tax to replace
lost revenues. An Excise Tax
has never been mentioned,
until now.

East Bay St.

business

management.

NOTICE |

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 131 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Cinque Terre Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 8th day of November, A.D., 2007 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

ACCOUNTS CLERK >

A progressive organization seeks to hire an. |
Accounts Clerk. The successful candidate .
will be responsible for recording various :
transactions
monthly financial statements and reports for |





Qualifications
Candidate must have at least an associate |
degree in accounting with a minimum of five |
(5)‘years experience or a bachelor’ degree
with a minimum of (3) years experience.
Knowledge of Microsoft Excel and Quick

Books would be an advantage.
Salary range: $16,200 — $25,000 per Annum.

Qualified and interested applicants should
forward a copy of their curriculum vitae to:-

c/o The Tribune
DA Number 5405
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

All responses should be received by
December 18, 2007.

mulls Excise
Tax option

“These are some of the tech-
nical areas that are being
looked at at the moment,
which will allow us to modify
our tax regime without having
to go the step of a VAT or
sales tax,” Mr Laing said of the
proposed Excise Tax Act ©

He added that reforming the
Bahamian tax system away
from one that was heavily
reliant on import tariffs and
stamp duty to a VAT or sales
tax regime “continues to be a
consideration, but in all these
matters you have to ensure you
don’t put your revenue base'in
jeopardy, as this is needed to
fund public expenditure, social
spending and government
spending.

“You don’t want to disrupt
the economic flows in your
country because you are adopt-
ing a fiscal system you don’t
know enough about.” {

Some in the private sector,
though, are likely to question
whether the WTO and other
rules-based trading regimes
would treat an Excise Tax any
more kindly than the
Bahamas’ current import sys-
tem, as some might still con-
sider it a dutiable barrier to
trade.







and generating




















=



ae











- THE TRIBUNE
ee Pet oe a
“—y a sg ig _aeoy yyy ; ¢ ‘ \ sey
; OLEE GF Agi
west j wie? Rc ie with

y e

#
waved Booed






Advisement, Registration




Dates and Times



: : & Bill Payment |
| New Student Orientation : Thursday, January 3rd, 2008, |
| Wednesday, January 2nd, 2008 9:00 a.m 7:00 p.m

8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Venue: Band Shell ; Friday, January 4th, 2008
9:00 a. m. — 7:00 p. m.



HOLIDAY HOURS |

218‘ December, 2007
24th December, 2007
27 December, 2007 — 28th, December, 2007
318t December, 2007

Open 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Closed Rh es)
Open 9:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m, .
Ol iXy x ee

Reopen regular hours 2nd, January, 2008.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

INDUSTRY TRAIN ING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — SPRING SEMESTER 612608 (SESSION 02)

eg ene
SEC | CODE
ial

1|8 Feb. 07

SESSION A

LAB
DURATION | DAYS FEE





























Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUC ATING & 7

Please bring the following documents







» PAGE 116

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2UU7






with
you to Advisement (required for Step 2):








Your acceptance letter |
A copy of your past BGCSE results |

International Conference
and Art Exhibition
Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic
Slave Trade: Telling the Story

February 21-23, 2008 ‘
Nassau, The Bahamas

Art Exhibition

February 15-23, 2008

|
|
> |
|

Guidelines for Artists

The Conference on the Abolition of the Pran
Telling The Story, invites all artists to submit up to three (3) ariw
executed in any medium for showing at the confere bruary
21-23, 2008. :

Atlantic Slave Trade:



su





nee Fy
cE

The exhibition will open on Friday, 15 February 2098 at 6.30 in
the evening ai the Performing Arts Centre at The College of th

Bahamas Oakes Field Campus.
All artwork should be sent or brought to the Pro Gallery which is ‘|
located in the S Biock at The College of the Bahamas Oakes Field
Campus one (1) week prior to the opening of the exhibition. Please
address all artworks to Mrs. Joann Behagg or Mr. John Cox.





































































































|
|
Bahamian Pec «| 6:00 - Ail artists should give an indication of how they would wis their | |
Cuisine 06 Thursda 9:00pm $225.00 | $150.00 | MK 3D pieces to be displayed. Photographic images would assist us in
Dc et ee cee ne ae ae ao ees au, determining your display needs.
Gourmet COOK anil! 6:00 - Pore ouaticie ane Hil pelsiedscane. wae the
: ‘oreign artists are welcome. However, all related costs will be the |]
— a 1 eo Feb. 4 Monda aeeem $200.00 | $180.00 | MK responsibility of the artists (packing, shipping, and customs duty, | |
ourme 700 ~ etc.) to and from The Bahamas.
Cooking Il 1 | 824 9:00pm $225.00 | $240.00 | MK ) ae See ee eae | |
tof : | ee ee Te eee a ee Sieg tee ah The Conference Committee will select the works to be exhibited
| . | Cake @ Pastry ~ TRBOK 600- a aera i and al! decisions are final. | |
; | Making | 1 | 813 9:00pm $225.00 $75.00 | LK in a3 |
5 a ae Ne i ke, ntacte |
| | Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00 - Contacts |
pe ena Ces EO 9:00pm | 75.00 | PK Joann Behagg John Cox
i | ee =x Sore a email: jhehage(@cob.cdu.bs joox@eob.edu.bs | |
00 - = Ses re rag “is
| Bread Making” | ~~".4 | 8200.00 |. $90.00 | uk _ ppetephione: 302 4200) sacs ence amones 30244854 | |
i “Cake o ~ fe - , “a #y ED . j
| |_Decorating | 1 Mon/Wed. _ $225.00 | $100.00 The enaee of The Bahamas !
Cake resents an
Decorating Il 1 5 weeks MonWed. ; $225.00 | $150.00 i th ti ( Cc f -
Deadline for applications, January 25, 2008 at 4:00 p.m. nternationa onrerence |
| ba is .. ||
SESSION B Abolition of the trans-Atlantic ||
- ~ TUITION Slave Trade: {|
COURSE CODE BEGINS | DURATION S| TME __—& FEES Slave Trade: |
Bahamian COOK 6:00 - ’ my fe |
war.27_ | oweeks Soop __ $225.00 Telling the Story
fee cee ee eee a [1
Gourmet COOK 6:00 - February 21-23, 2008 |
Cooking! - 1 | 823 Mar.24 | 6 weeks 9:00pm Nassau, The Bahamas I
Gourmet COOK 6:00 |
Cooking Il = 824 Mar. 24 beueees: 4 0 %
Cake & Pastry COOK
Making | 1 | 813 Mar. 25 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. $225.00 =
Cake & Pastry COOK S |
= Making II 1 | 814 Mar. 25 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. $250.00 sy
i COOK Bidoes tas eae ein |
: Bread Making 810 Mar. 27 6 weeks Thursday $200.00 ee een 4 in ich a | |
fe Ve See ee ee ee | ce ~ oe
; Africa, Europe and the Americas Fegister today. ||
i| [Cake COOK , p g YY
i Decorating | 1 | 817 Mar. 24 5 weeks MonWed. | $100.00 | |
|| [Cake COOK P| Seater | |
Decorating II 1 | 818 -Sweeks | Mon/Wed. | 9:00pm__§ $150.00 | PK enary opeakers |
|| Deadline for applications, February 28, 2008 at 4:00 p.m. . se scl |
i “Pee ; Sse : P Dr. Joseph E. Harris, Howard University |
| For further informati to pick lication pl tact the Industry Training department of the Cul & Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus. an ||
! or further information or to pick up an application please contact the (indus ry training department o he Cu inary & . are : 1 sa fi ha Sy uth Atnican | i
|| Hospitality Management Institute, 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175 expelt on Africa and Divector OS our Ewe.
Research and Archivai Project. At the conference |
i All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). his topic center around: “Global sla e trade and |
ql the emergence of communities of Afcan cescen! |
|| CHMI reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials. around tine world” |
ae : ;
THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE - THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS Dr. Rosanne Adderley, Professor o} History al
: EVENTS CALENDER 2007-2008 BY i. MOSS Tulane University and author. Her presentation will!
A ee DAO EVENT eons LECTURERS / PARTICIPA foe ce MENU. | | focus on “Freed Africans in The Bahamas” |
December 6th Presentation by Mr. Absil -- holocaust sur Munnings Roam 2
| Thursday aotearoa I aaa Pa SMe ee illi i \ttorney at Law
| | December 13 MERRY MULTI-CULTURAL, Organization & musical direction: i. Moss | Munnings Room ? | Mr. William Godfrey Davis Esq ; Attol a - Lan
| itursday | CHRISTMAS ALCL, Foreign Lang. Dept. membersand COB | 7PM | and Transformative Mediator, his topic will be
i January 2 Wed | CHINESE NEW YEAR | Presentation by Professor Xu Xianwen | Munnings Room 2. 7P\I | “Reparations for the peoples of the Maafa”.
| January 19 DRUMFEST - A drum summit regrouping Video of Montreal TAM TAM JAM by I. Moss | Band shell i
' Saturday. _| members from all the Junkanoo teams | Director: Chippie? Nei! Symonette? Humblestone? | 2 PM. ~~» | | Mr. Kojo Yankah Presideni of the Africa Institus ||

T.5

>

JUNKANOO ART — designing and pasting ;
costumes - WORKSHOP

January 30"
| Wednesday

Presentation and demonstration by Henry Mos

Munnings Roam .
slide show by I. Moss _

of Journalism & Communications, educator and ||
‘Reconciliation ||
|
1
'



i February 7 | PANEL DISCUSSION: Tourism and Panel members from Tourism, Immigration, ¢ ‘OB | author, he will speak on the rt ypi ;
Thursday ___| Languages _and private tourism businesses Lecture Hall? 7 PM tor the Peopies of the WViaafa” |

February 19 EL PRENC'H FILM - ASTERIX , | Presentation on Roman history background by a Munnings Reom 2



Tuesday | Professor Stephen B. ha 7 Pm | ata .
| March 14 FRENCH FOLK SONG EVENING Slide show by I. Moss, F. Leger on guitar. J, Munnings Room > | | For additional information contact the Scho
| Friday | i? __| Mereus on vocals and other musical friends | 7 PM of Social Sciences, Telephone 397-2606/7

_.| VICTOR HUGO ~ Beyond LES MIZ. Munnings Room 2
JL HAITIANFILM
AN EVENING OF BAHAMIAN MUSIC

| Guests: The DICEY-DO SINGERS |
MAIFEST ,

| March 21 - Fri
April 10
i April 16

' Friday.

i May ©
Tuesday
May 23
[Friday

Lecture and slide show by L. Moss.
_{ Slide presentation: Leper, SCCA

Slide show on Bahamian Musicians and





| Mannings Room 2
New Pertor ce ¢

School of Social Sciences



nter? |





Jessica Minnis, Assoc. Professor, |
j

| The College of The Bahamas

> ~ | PO Bax N4912

E-riail: abolitionconf@cob.adu.ias
Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 397-2608

Munnings R

) ; participation of German- | Munnings |
penn even np SPOAKETS iN Nassau KALCT students cinch ciosigie
CLASSICAL MUSIC EVENING Piano solos by LMoss; Cello / piano duets by HH. Munnings Room 2

---snenenneePeloguin & I-Moss: guests












Dates are subject to change.





PAGE 12B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

Ra ALTE ene aa aR a
Duty elimination

urged for solar ©
power components

CRT eT 7
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 322-1986 today!

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KOTTARELS.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of KOTTAREL S.A. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
__SPARRING POINT
INVESTMENTS LTD.
Notice is hereby given that in aéeardance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SPARRING POINT INVEST-
MENTS LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dis-

solution has been issued and the Company has therefore

been struck off the Register.

__ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



FROM page 1

(Freeport) and the former
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce president, told The
Tribune that apart from elimi-
nating import duties, the Gov-
ernment also needed to intro-
duce net metering — providing
credit to homes and businesses
that provided excess power
from their solar energy systems
to the national power grid — to
encourage the adoption of
alternative energy in this
nation.

Pointing out that it was “the
up front cost that kills”, Mr
Lowe said that it would cur-
rently cost a middle-class
Bahamian household some
$60,000 to install a fully-func-

tional PV system in their
home.

While the long-term return
and savings generated from
having their own natural, alter-
native energy power supply
would more than compensate,
Mr Lowe pointed out that the
substantial costs incurred at
the front end provided a strong
deterrent to Bahamian homes
and businesses going down this
route.

While the Government had
reduced import duties applied
to solar panels and solar water
heaters, Mr Lowe said there
were many more components
in a PV system that were still
attracting full duty rates. It was
these, he added, that needed
to be reduced to make solar
and other alternate energies

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SCIROPPO LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SCIROPPO LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.;
(Liquidator) ose



less cost-prohibitive for
Bahamians.

Among those components
still attracting full duty rates,
Mr Lowe said, were charge
controllers/regulators; deep
cycle storage batteries that
held large amounts of current
for long periods; inverters that
converted the DC battery volt-
age to AC city-type voltage;
and heavy-gauge copper wire
for the battery hook-up, which
was different from household
wire.

“They need to eliminate all
the duty on that stuff associ-
ated with PV, and they need
to implement net metering so
that the initial home invest-
ment of $60,000, for an average
middle class home, can be real-
ized as an investment in selling
back to the grid,” Mr Lowe
told The Tribune.

“T would say that if all tariff
rates were removed from all
the alternative energy source
components, it would drop the
price by 30 per cent at least,
and make it very entry friend-
ly for the average Bahamian
household.”

He added that the Govern-
ment would also have to
amend the Electricity Act, as
the current legislation prohibits
consumers in areas where the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) power supply is
available from generating their
own electricity, except in pow-
er outages. That would penal-
ize alternative energy users.

“The bottom line is that
BEC and Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company still need to look
at net metering,” Mr Lowe

-’said. “This would make it more
viable for resorts and com-

- -emercial properties to invest in

cadded, was “critical for long-

THE TRIBUNE -

<

aoe:

TR US as ES a ERLE GS

SE

the technology, to not only
reduce their own cost of oper- |
ations, but to show a return on §
investment by supplying the t
grid. It makes the grid more

SSSR STE RES

robust.”

All the Government ‘had to
do was eliminate duties, intro-
duce net metering and amend
its legislation, Mr Lowe said,
because the private sector }
would then “jump on this” and
“take over”.

Reducing energy costs, he

term progress” in the}{
Bahamas, especially given that
oil prices were likely to con- ;
tinue rising further when this
nation’s oil import bill was
already equivalent to one-third
of its merchandise imports.
Reducing the Bahamas’ ;
dependency on oil and other
fossil fuels for its energy needs,
apart from benefiting the envi-
ronment, would also enhance
this nation’s energy security, |
reduce carbon dioxide emis-
sions, aid the tourism sector, |)
protect foreign exchange ;
reserves and potentially con-
tribute to increased economic f
growth and employment from }
lower power costs. 4
Kelly’s (Freeport) was pay- i
ing some $16,000 a month to §
Grand Bahama Power Com- |
pany for electricity, a rate that i
would leave the company with ;
an annual power bill of;
$192,000, Mr Lowe said. i
As a result, Bahamians and
companies based in this nation 4
had “to rethink how we oper- |
ate”. After payments to sup- ©
pliers, duties paid to Customs |
and the staff payroll, utilities }
— chiefly electticity COsts — were §
Kelly’s inost expensive month- ;
lyNiné“item,-Mr Lowe said.

a



PT



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH ST. VIL of FOWLER
STREET, P.O. BOX CB-12299, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister resposible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 8TH day of December, 2007
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DISET) OTT) MOIR PTL

SWITCH-BOARD

LOLIK LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of LOLIK LIMITED has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SWITCH-BOARD has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

NOTICE
PATERSON FIDELITY CORP.



EERE IG. EL AP MALE OLY SS ORE EOE DABS | LOLI HEIL FAILS

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Incoporated under the International Business
Companies Act, 2000 of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas registered in the Register of Companies
ARGOSA CORP. INC. under the Registration Number 28451.

(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
(In Voluntary Dissolution)

Notice is hereby given that the dissolution of the
Company is complete and the Company has been
dissolved by the Registrar General.

Bis

Pricing Information As Of:

Dated this 2nd of October, 2007

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas '
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

0.00%
3.43% ‘
2.72%
2.35%
2.46%
1.51%
2.00%
2.54%
3.28%
0.84%
0.88%
3.50%
4.47%
3.22%
2.35%]
0.00%

Daniel Eisenberg
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

FORTALEZA VALLEY LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section

52wk-Low Last Price Weekl
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 16.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) . 6.00

Nt



41.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supérmarkets
a RND Holdings
ee

41.00
14.60
0:45

7.71%
Se 138 (8) of the International Business Compames Act
2000, the dissolution of FORTALEZA VALLEY LY

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

Yield %



NA_V
1.366332"
3.5388°"**

' 2.990218"
1.279370°**



PFET EEE GLEE LI

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

” Fidelit In und

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $: - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume.
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

Register. ‘
*.~ 30 November 2007
** - 30 June 2007
*** . 31 October 2007
sees 31 July 2007

ARGOSA CORP. INC. ‘
(Liquidator)





SSiire--

mate 4 08 2 8 ee 8

THE TRIBUNE.






eo eed 0 Be oo @

gee UUM TENANT :

@e@etueeorseeeos 6
eesti ed ome ts ter.



Doctors Hospital Health System Limited

Interim report
Quarter ended October 31, 2007

Chairman’s Report
Doctors Hospital Health System Limited

Dear Shareholders,

I am pleased to report on your company’s financial results for the three months ended October 31, 2007.
This quarter was a fairly strong one compared to third quarter fiscal 2007. Earnings per share were $0.08
compared to $0.04 in the prior year period. This result was generally attributable to a $1.1 million, or
12.4% increase in total revenues which outstripped a moderate increase in total expenses.

. The: Company’s revenue. performance reflects continued growth in inpatient services, an area where

. DHHS retains a major competitive advantage by offering high quality patient care. Adult Patient Days

* remains an important barometer of the Company’s.success, and after a slight decline in this statistic for
the year ended January 31, 2007, the Company is continuing a positive trend of increases in four of the
last five years. Additionally, surgical services, maternity, and a broad range of outpatient
services—Imaging, Lab, Rehabilitation Services and the ER—continue to maintain dominant positions in
the market.

For the nine months ended October 31, 2007 ‘comings were $3.2 iin an increase of $0.8 million, or
"34.2%, over the comparable period jest year. Total revenues for this period increased 7.8% compared to
an increase in total expenses of 6.1%. The increases in expenses reflect the continuing upward pressure
on the costs required to provide excellent service. Salaries and benefits, medical supplies and services,
and other operating expenses all increased over the -prior year due in part to increased volumes and
inflation in supplier costs.

--On:another positive note for the compaiiy; the: provision for doubtful: acceunts improved over last year
and has assisted in offsetting the trend of rising costs; for the current period, bad debt charges were
reduced-by $0.6 million, or 34%, relative to the prior year, This was possible due to especially strong
collection efforts over the past nine months.

The financial ‘position remained strong. Cash and cash scelvi increased to $5.8 million. Capital
expenditure through the first nine months of the fiscal year was $0.9 million compared to $2.8 million for
the same period last year. The Company expects to invest approximately $4.0. million over the coming six
months for facility upgrades and addition of new medical technologies.

Finally, Jess than two months ago our shareholders received cash dividends for the first time in six years.
We have returned to dividend-strength due to the hard work of our Associates, volunteers and the
continued support of our medical ‘staff. On behalf of the Board of — I thank you for your
——, loyalty to the Hospital.

J oe Krukowski
Chairman '
December 3, 2007

- DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Balance Sheet

October 31, 2007 with comparative figures at January 31, 2007
(Expressed in-thousands of Bahamian dollars) ~: ‘

: October 31, 2007 January 31, 2007

Assets ;
Gach and cash cipuivalon’ > $ 5,789 1,988
Accounts receivable—patients, net (note 2) 909 951
Accounts recelvable—third party payors, set (ncte 2) 5,696 5,521
Inventories 1,308 v4 1,252
Other assets 569 ‘ 322

Assets classified as held for sale (note 3




: tote . : 19,781 . a ~ 15,477
Non-current assets:
_ Investments 3% 30
_ Goodwill, net gid * 431 431
-, Other. intangible are 2,525 2,700
5 1,022
9,359
13,542
Total assets $ ow 29,019
- Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity. a
~ Current liabilities: ; ; ;
Accounts payable and other liabilities 3,733 3,448
Long-term debt, current portion 309 389
Liabilities directly associated with sssets classified ab ;
held for sale (note 3 $,279
9,028 9116 |
Non-current liabilities ‘
Long-term debt : 3,010 3,302
Total liabilities : ; . 12, €30 12,418
Shareholders’ equity:
Share capital: »
Authorized 12,500,000 common shares at par value -
of B$0.04 each (July 31, 2007— ah iddat e
Issued and fully paid 9,971,634 shares o ws :
Quly 31, 2007 - P97 Ga shares) : 399 399
Contributed surplus , 12,358 12,358
Retained earnings i : __ 6,870 . 3,844

Total liabilities and shareholders’



DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Income

Aicbedt ue belay tpi 2007 wit comparative figures forthe thee month ended October 31,
2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars) sie hebg Salhiany atest

eecmabbig than ba ves
ee eee ee eee eee et ee
. ' October 31, 2007 : October 31, 2006
CONTINUING OPERATIONS |
Revenues : : : Pee
Patient service revenue, net ‘ $ ‘9,989 8,910
-+ + Other «> +e Be a a Ede alk! gh bide se See od § hemi ee | o's oe © © o A3Q-
Total revenues et 10,157: 9,040
Expenses : ; ‘
Salaries and benefits PE Saale, Sa tah neh aha tog th 3,772 ane) 3,488
Medical supplies and services _ 2,463 — ; 2,325
_ Other operating ay 4 + Bah " 1,242 ‘ ; 1,003
Provision for doubtful accounts met 416 380
Depreciation and amortization Pala A $36 573
Utilities . : 366 326
Government taxes and fees ‘ 205 182
Repairs and maintenance : 116 75
Total expenses ; 9,176 8,352
Income from continuing operations =. ie
before interest 981 688
Interest ex 6 85
Income from continuing operations 920 toe ae 603
Discontinued operations i oe ; ae | ;
Revenue ; 24 20
Expenses ' (197) (194)
Loss from discontinued operations: One (173) (174)
Net income for the period by Ba 141 429
CRY co RRP LIPTON TELS NI LE LITE EI LE ILE ET AE LOT TE ET EEE

Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):

Basic and fully diluted $ 0.08 0.04
(Unaudited)
i
ron “ Ce ea OH OOM a OMe bees ds

Nine months ended October 31, 2007



MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 13B



DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Income

Nine months ended October 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the nine months ended October 31,
2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

October 31, 2006















CONTINUING OPERATIONS

Revenues
Patient service revenue, net $ 30,721 28,580
Other fs 03 388
Total revenues L ‘34,224 28,968

Expenses
Salaries and benefits 11,479 10,548
Medical supplies and services 7,746 7,162
Other operating 3,494 2,895
Provision for doubtful accounts 1,100 : 1,667
Depreciation and amortization (note 5) 1,588 1,633
Utilities ; 930 865
Government taxes and fees . 628 601
Repairs and maintenance __ 385 399
Total expenses 27,350 25,770
Income frofn continuing operations

before interest 3,874 3,198

Interest expense (186) (266)
Income from continuing operations 3,688 2,932

Discontinued operations







Revenue . 87 : 65

Expenses 650) _ (594)

Loss from discontinued operations re (463) a (529)
Net income for the period 7 $ “3,225 2,403.



Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):

Basic and fully diluted __ $ 7 6.32 0.24



(Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

Nine months ended October 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the nine months ended October 31,

2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)





















October 31, 2007 October 31, 2006
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in):
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income $ 3,225 2,403
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash .
provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization 1,588 1,633
Provision for doubtful accounts 1,100 1,667
Gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment ___ (16) = 3x
§,897 5,703
Increase in accounts receivable (1,248) (987)
(Increase) decrease in inventories (56) ; 74
Increase in prepaid expenses and other assets (251) 59
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable and other liabilities _ 320 (710)
Cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activities 4,662 4,139
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
"Purchase of property, plant and equipment Ps (gqByis LF SLs 3 (1,547)
Purchase of intangible assets (1.26). (1,299)
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment ___ 1,038 ee -
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in) investing activities x OA. na (2,846)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Repayment of long-term debt : (707) (1,501)
Payment of dividends (199) -
Cash and cash equivalents used in financing activities (906) (1,501)
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents _—. - 3,820 (288)
Cash and cash equivalents ot beginning of period 1,988 . 1,284
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period (note 6) Pe $5,808 —_ 7 1,076

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank ead in hand, short-term deposits with an original maturity of six
months or less and bank overdrafts.

Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity

Nine months ended October 31, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)





Number of shares Share capital” Contributed surplus Retained earnings —_
Balance at January 31, 2007 9,971,634 $ * 399 $ 12,358 $ 3,844
Net income for the period - - 3,225
Dividends paid - - (199)
Balance at October 31,2007 9,971,634. $399 $12,358 S__—6,870

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LYMITED

‘Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

EE AL ET TORN TS LT, AT A

1. Significant accounting policies

These interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Intermational Accounting Standard
No. 34, Interim Financial Reporting, using the same accounting policies applied in the January 31, 2007 audited

consolidated financial statements.
2. Accounts receivable

Accounts recéivable are stated net of provisions .r doubtful accorn’ v9 /.8 mifiion.
3. Assets classified as he!d for sale

For the period ended October 31, 2007, total sssets and liabilities of companies which have been discontinued
and for which there is a commitment for disposition are reported im the balance sheet as “held for sale.”

Operating results for these segments are reported in the statement of mcome
These include Westen Medical Plaza Limited and Doctors Hospital (West) Limited.

as “Discontinued operations.”

4. Investment Property

During the period The Company sold 5 acres of undeveloged land in western New Providence. A gain of

$16,000 was recorded.

5. Change in accounting estimate

b The original amortization

During the period The Company changed the period of amo rtization for is t
period for the principal buildings located at Doctors Hospital East were twenty and twen'y-tive years, In
accordance with the provisions of IAS 16, the amortization periods were exten ded to forty years. The effect of
the change for this period was a decrease in amortization charges of approximately $ 161,000

+ dings

6. Cash and cash equivalents
The cash position of $5.808million reported in the statement of cash flows reflects $19,000 in cash for WMP
that is recorded as assets held for sale.

4



PAGE 14B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10 , 2007

THE TRIBUNE



COMICS PAGE












THIS IS WEIRD-..-
NORMALLY I'M THE ONG
«\ BEHIND THE DE6K MAKING
PEOPLE SWEAT!





LIKE MONA LISA. I GUESS IF
YOU HAD A WONDERFUL _»
DAY TOO? ,
















HEY, TOMMIE. WHATS) HU MARGO.
MILE ABOUT? 47 WAST.
" rte SMILING P

COS ys
j Ie
Kd iY] Ast
/ .




North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
@A4
Â¥AJ10
@A73

#1085

Â¥K752
#Q 1094
HA6

i ALWAYS
PICK THE
SLOW LINE



The bidding:

North ast South West
1¢@ Pass 2NT Pass
3NT

Opening lead — three of spades.

During the play of a hand,
declarer must be sure not to take his
eye off the ball — the ball in this case
being the success of his contract. In
today’s deal, South blinked for an
instant, and that was all it took to do
him in.

South won East’s ten of spades
with the jack at trick one and could
count six sure winners — three
age a heart and two diamonds.

club suit was certain to provide
“feat. least three additional tricks, so
e#-South naturally decided to establish
that suit.





















NON SEQUITUR.

(se eoitir Dy

[=TOLBNOUEO B52
AS FNC AS THE
INAIRANCE COMPANY
|5. CONCERNED,
THoZe ARE JUST
VAGUE, HISTORICAL
DOCUMENTS














uses
words ia
the main
See (4 nd 0 body of
NiGER 2ist
= Ama S
THEN TRY TO GLOW posal
HOW
jeters or mae can you hake
from the letters shown here? In

a word, each letter may
be once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY’S TARGET

“43 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.

CRYPTIC PUZZLE



22 Flat stones that possibly shone (5) 19 Assume there's a party’at the end of "J

7 ACROSS 2
i. 1 Like a humorous Scot, say (6) 1 Man almost run out (6)
it 3 | 7 — Subordinate to, for years, being so Man's club? (6)
Pe Payments expected by the head of
U ; young (5,3) staff (4) seats el
H N S 8 — Widow's child? (4) T 4 Having curative effects one may ae
if ** | 10 Intactless extremes, home ones can declaim (7) ;
| oo ; hurt (6) as oo for a nosy: fellow, we hear? ||
fF 4 11 Victimise selectivel 4,2) 6 -
| ey toy Have a look‘round : 5 (3) 0 oe ae Ee
es Barking (5) 28
T _y 16 | Highly regarded cigar manufacturer? 8 Just think about Clio, for instance (4) ee
j iW ’ (5) i] 9 Acommon article, that's define (3) ||
bee, 17 Go back in the side entrance for : Slieeecteadh (3) : (6)
6 what you ne (4) 15 To cause, tee lites as
ee | 19 Not a good thing to fall into (5) (5) i=
4 21 After two tries, he finished a novel 18 He'll make you a millionaire? You'd:



Ba at the garden (3)
A 2: ‘
3 It'll do to see you through (4) 20 Because t's a lettuce (3) cs oft
f ~ .4 26 Teams of borderers? (5) 21 Goand chuck abidt (7) °° fh ACROSS DOWN
2 £4 28 Animal bound to be unable to leg it - 22 That cherishable girt? (3) fe fue 1 Scolds (6)
eA (3) 23. To shoot about ton is very impres- : 7 eee 2 pan
g N 29 Grey as a king and queen (6) sve (6) saree i foes
i ¢ ) 24 Though old, managed without ser- 10 Mythical creature cy)
E j 30 Waster maybe, but does a garden- vant or partes (4) ; (6) \ 5 Bend (5)
ing job (6) 25 Is hidden in cover, this bird (6) 1 Sutten (6) : naa
/ 31 Deeply impressed when married a 26 | see an agent ie out to be sensa- 4 Timid (3) 9 Plaything (3)
C 4 the top fevel (4) : ieee (5) io 16 Lukewarm (5) 12 Colour (3)
e a ‘ 7 Hang around with many a friend (5) 13 Indian instrument
32 Is using it a strain? (8) 7 Animal tat (4)
a : 28 The fr of Anne Hathaway
7 R y 33 Might one feal sheepish eating it? 30 Aina Beda a 4 8 Manaijed (6) 3 5 Ee (5)
0 (6) fired? (4) 24. Sensational (5) 18 Botore (5)
Is Bene 19 Dog (3)
a (5) 20 Mino (3)
PUENTE ETN PL CEO TT Ot NR
S \ 33 Shoot (4) 21 Of the side (7)
; ~ | 26 Flor (5) 2 Policeman (3)
‘ 4 Yesterday's crypus soiutions Yesterday's easy-crosswere seunrens 1
' W ! 28 Barrel (3) 23 Goodwill (6)
ACROSS; 1, Sprat 6, Spade 9, Done-gal 10, Solve 11, Munch | ACROSS: 1, Trust 6, Munch 9, Oration 10, Scary 11, Digh 12, 29. Ran off to wed (6) ° 24 Thing (4)
©) |, 12, drops 13, Cla-Rio-n 15, Go-O 17, Rest 18, D-eport 19, | Limit 13, Foremen 16, Per 17, Arid 18, Fulle 19, Totem 20, 30 Diacose (6) 25 Sign up (6)
1 4 Neve-R 20, Sp-OK-en 22, Rude 24, Tot 25, Sleeper 26, Arieen 22, Lead 24, Lad 25, Broadly 26, Aches 27, Abash 26 Pennies (5)
1} F2 |. Print 27, aisle 28, Hives 29, Aspirin 30, Lean-t 31,Me-ath | 28, Besom 29, Tenures 90, Star 91, Ether Ht Panicie (4) 27 Parasite (5)
| DOWN: 2, Poodle 3, Advert 4, To-E 5, Yea-R-n 6, S-ample-r | DOWN: 2, Rector 3, Sorted 4, Try 5, Stain 6, Modicum 7, 32 Exile (8) 28 Animal doctor
D 7, Plus 8, Doctor 12, Doze-N 13, Crust 14, Ascot 15, Got up | Unit 8, Chisel 12, Lemon 13, Fatal 14, Rigid 15, Pined 16, 33. Frozen dessert (6) (9)
16, Other 18, Dealt 19, Nearest 21, Polit-e 22, Relin-E 23, ao Peere

Ready 18, Fears 19, Teacher 21, Rabbit 22; Latest 23,

Detect(ive) 25, Snail 26, Plan 28, Him Alcove 25, Begun 26, Ast 28, Bee



*YOU FEEL BAD CAUSE YoU SWALLOWED
ABUO? THINK HOW BAP THE Bug FEELS!”

ariel aii

Good 22; very good 33; excellent




The Long-Term View



But since the usual approach
with this club combination is to start
by leading the suit from dummy,
declarer opted to postpone the estab-
lishment of the clubs temporarily and
led a heart to the ten at trick two,
hoping to win the finesse. East won
with the king and returned a spade to
dummy’s ace. Now South led a club
toward his hand.

All would have been well had
East followed low to the first club,
but instead he made the fine play of
rising with the ace and returning a
third spade. South won with the king,
but it didn’t matter what he did next.
West could not be prevented from:
gaining the lead with the queen of
clubs, and when he did he cashed
two spades to put the contract down
one.

Declarer clearly contributed to
his own demise when he departed

from his initial plan to establish the -

clubs and took a heart finesse
instead. This play, which was not
needed to make the contract, opened
the door for the opposition, and they
took full advantage of the placement
of the cards to do the rest.

Had South been less concerned
about losing a trick to the queen of
clubs, he could not have been
defeated. All he had to do was to leads

_a club from his hand at trick two ae

the king is best in case the queen is.

“singleton — and nine tricks would

have been assured.



Bo
8
& §
ag
as,
1
a0)
ouâ„¢
aa

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION
agenda angel angle angled
annal anneal dang dangle
dean elan FANDANGLE fang




A

Wiley ae
| marinade |

Sauce to flavor
meat or fish





Veselin Topalov v Rustam
Kasimdzhanov, Leon 2007. Both
grandmasters are former Fide world
champions, yet they erred like 7|I09%
novices in today’s diagram. The
explanation? Probably the move 40 °
time control, for that was when this 5
episode occurred. Black’s knight has
just captured White's ci bishop, so
* the obvious play for Topalov 3
(White, to move) is to recapture 1
Rxcl. The reply cxd5 would then
give Kasim united central pawns, so
the Bulgarian tried to finesse by 1
d6 Ne2+ 2 Kf Rxd6 3 Rxd6 Qxd6 4
Kxe2 when White's small edge
proved sufficient to win after along
endgame. Can you spot what the
grandmasters missed during this
sequence?







Yaw iow?

Bae Ty e

Marcia nh RG

Se Vrav ue

Grae 122

6

‘MONDAY, :
DEC 10 é

ARIES — March 21/Apri! 20°
Cooler weather has put you in a
mood. You might want to spe
some time at home, Aries, until
you're in better spirits. Post-summér
blues are expected. . 2
TAURUS - April 21/May 215
Financial concerns leave you feeling
nervous this week, Taurus. It’s bet-
ter to pinch some pennies for a
while until you get back on course.
Seek help from Virgo.

GEMINI- May 22/June 21

A special. friend from your past
comes back for a visit, Gemini. It
could lead to interesting things. Keep
your agenda open for Wednesday
when love is in your stars.
CANCER - June 22/July 22
Keep your patience with a family
member on Tuesday, Cancer.
This person is just feeling a little
Stir crazy and really doesn’t mean
all the the things he/she says
Focus on a home project instead.
LEO -— July 23/August 23

A distant family member isn’t visiting
as much as usual, Leo. Something
could be wrong..Drop ‘this perscii a

{line or give him/her:a call. It may help

€ase your concerns.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

‘Stop doing so much for others and

pamper yourself a little bit thie
week, Virgo. Go to a spa, iake a
vacation or just stay home from
work for a day.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ve been feeling very anxious,
Libra, and it’s partially because you
are experiencing low self-esteem.
You have to exert more confidence
or it just will be an endless cycle.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Noy, 22

A close friend really needs your help
on Thursday, Scorpio. Make sure
your schedule is open so that you can
lend a hand. Put work on hold for
some quality time with your mate. 3
SAGITTARIUS- Nov 23/Dec 21=

Have you been spending too mucF-

time at work, Sagittarius? It could bé.
| because you are avoiding a situatior&

at home. That’s not like you. Face
up to the situation. It’s far better t@
be honest with yourself. £
CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 26

It may be time to consider a careeE

*] change, Capricom. You are far too edu8

cated and talented to settle for the workg
you've been doing so far. Have some
confidence and go for your dreams

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 =
Your confidence continues to rises
Aquarius. It could be because of th
good news at work. Consult with Leé
for some good advice on how t&
improve your financial future 3

oc
PISCES -— Feb 19/March 20 3
Be the life of the party on FridayS
Pisces and you just may hook up:
with a winning romance. Look e
Scorpio for some inspiration ang
companionship and sparks will fly.

aos

CHESS by Leonard Barden



LEONARD BARDEN

Chess: 8489: 1d6? Ne2+ 2 Kfl Nf4! and Black stays a
piece ahead since 3 dxe7?allows Rxd1 mate.



BS



MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th, 2007, PAGE 15B



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

abate cial

THE WEATHER REPO

Chee



JESDAY NV EDNES a) iS)

PG ae et ae af
Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.





Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: ENE at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 79° F
ENE at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 79° F
ENE at 15-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 5-7 Miles 78° F
ENE at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 6-7 Miles
ENE at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 5° (BE

















The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the







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oe Mainly clear. Mos y ay ya ery an some ae : sk a n iieatar the ood for eee ated akul croaaeth: ENE at 10-20 Knots 6-7 Miles
Beene High: 82° High: 82° High: 80°
High: 82° Low: 72° lg: 72 Low: [2 glow: 72°






AVA Cremer Lest



| AccuWeather RealFeel Ua)

BC ea erate RealFeel



The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines effects of temperature, a humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for ite ie



“46/7 r






















Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Wedne sdayoi2am. 27 241am. O72 6
ABACO Temperature 9:27 p.m. 2.1 3:35pm. 0.1 as sh
High esc80252... csidhecteeaaee da sesreeene 82° F/28° C ; ee
81°F/27°C Sens Thursday S0lam. 27 3:23am. 0.1
tances Fe Normal tig Teepe 00pm. 22 41pm. 0.4 ACES
; Normal low . ... 68° F/20° C EET ED c
eS Last year's high ... wo 17° FQ25° C 285/29 70/21. pe
a Last year's low . 70° F/21°C 86/30 70/21 Pe
Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:44a.m. Moonrise..... 7:38 a.m.
As of 1pm. yesterday .....ccccscssssssseeeees ose 0,00" Sunset....... 5:21 p.m. Moonset ..... 6:05 p.m.
Year to date ............ Full
Normal year to date ..
AccuWeather.com a PoE SS showers
Forecasts and graphics provided by es cc Havana E : 3 = 82/27 65/18 pe PSS] Test Be | Miami
AccuWeather, inc, ©2007 c. Dec. 23 Dec.31 Jan.@ Helsinki = p, oe eur
een - Hong Kong : Spe TSI #18 pe (g"a"l = om : ali Fronts
High: 84° ~ (slamabad —— Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ,
fe ; ju 7/13 47/8 s! ~ precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Low: 71°F/22°C istanbul pk] Snow Warm aie
: Jerusalem fey) Ice Forecast highfow temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary ogee
= os £ . sohannesburg = a
KEY WEST CATISLAND : ee
eeeeee High: 81° F/27°C ‘London
e Low:67° F/19°C ‘Madrid

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

rs 28/2 pc



7926 55/12 s “56/13 613. ‘sh 75/23 57/13 c
358A 23-5 sn TAA we BAT 7121 pe.
415 310 +r. Minneapolis = 251-3 wl Ss 231-5 Nett c
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; New Orleans 80/26 ean pe 80/28 BaN7 a











Washington, DC 62/16 41/5 +. . S24. 43/6 1. ..

wm ug er
q EAS a te

— . * oo semen Stag Eeal wey ~



PAGE 16B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

UNDG PR TS PA mL NS ALS AS NO RNY SRT EN





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Full Text


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INGEST IEID E2K83EHX6_BFDA2Y INGEST_TIME 2012-01-06T22:08:43Z PACKAGE UF00084249_03060
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MP won’t contest
Christie’s position

@ BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net -

WEST END and Bimini MP
_ Obie Wilchcombe will not con-
-;. test the PLP leadership, or seek
any other party office in the
_ PLP's February convention.
_. \ Mr Wilchcombe confirmed

this to The Tribune while dis-
cussing his endorsement of
. Glenys -Hanna-Martin for the
chairmanship of the PLP. This
declaration may ease nervous-



ness in the Perry Christie camp, Rr
- as some commentators have sug- Obie Wilchcombe
gested that Mr Wilchcombe will Hem :
' challenge the vulnerable PLP fy ae not gathered eee

_ Leader.

‘.. "No not at all," said Mr
Wilchcombe when asked if he
will seek any office in the party.
-"I Keep hearing that — no."

.. The PLP leader is now chal-
- lenged to bring the party togeth-
er, said Mr Wilchcombe, as "the

"He has to come and report to
the country and to the PLP on
the elections of the. past. He
must unite the organisation, then
prepare it for the future," said

SEE page 18



FEU res
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honour for

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FILM star Daryl Hannah poses —
on the red carpet at the 4th Annu-


















the Atlantis Theatre. The actress is
- the recipient of the Career Achieve-
_-ment.Award at this year’s festival.

© SEE PAGES 8 & 9

Aba eeedeeeenenraaeceenseeseerneseenassseseceasscsaeessseeseeees

Tim Aylen



"BAHAMAS EDITION

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007



WAKE UPI

WEEKEND ACTION

Christmas Expressions hits the right note

THE BAHAMAS National Youth Choir performs at the ‘Christmas Expressions’ concert held at the

id



Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts yesterday. The event honoured the memory of the late

Pauline Glasby.

Jeweller joins Tribune, USA Today partnership

‘ANOTHER retailer of high-
end jewellery products has joined
the partnership of The Tribune
and USA Today. Quantum Duty
Free stores has embarked upon a
major marketing effort to tap
into the tourist market by adver-
tising their products in the USA
Today newspaper which is dis-
tributed daily to all occupied
rooms of The Atlantis Resort,
Paradise Island and its sister
properties and to all major hotel
resorts on Paradise Island, down-
town Nassau and Cable Beach.

Robert Carron, the Tribune's
President, is happy to welcome
Quantum to the group. He is
confident that with the reputa-

| Re

tion of both The Tribune and
USA Today advertisers are guar-
anteed excellent value for their
marketing dollars.

Michael Bethell, Sales Exec-
utive, said he is pleased to wel-
come Quantum onboard. Mr
Bethell said that the partnership
is a win-win situation for the
company as the paper has the
readership that Quantum seeks
to attract.

Tamara Smith, Quantum's
marketing manager, said she
chose USA Today as the medi-
um to attract the tourists as they
are enjoying their early morning
cup of coffee. She said when they
were relaxed was a convenient

abitodeabaks kee a3) R

time to get their attention as they
prepared for their day of activi-
ties.

Mr Bethell said The Tribune is
Nassau's leading newspaper and
USA Today is America's news-
paper. This dual combination
makes a fantastic product for

advertisers to get the best of both |

world's — the local and tourist
markets. Ms Smith agrees with
this concept and wants to rein-
force that Quantum sells superi-
or, high-quality merchandise and
excellent prices and showcases
items from the affordable to the
fabulous with two locations
downtown and three on Paradise
Island.

i
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icheonbe Ne als bid

_ Advocacy group:
govt should be

liable for victims
of those on bail

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENT should
be held liable for the deaths or
other injury to persons who
have crimes committed
against them by people who
are out on bail, a spokesper-
son for an advocacy group
said yesterday.

Rev. Glenroy Bethel of
Families for Justice, Grand

-Bahama, ‘said that if persons

accused of murder are not
being brought to trial in a
timely enough fashion to
ensure that they do not
become eligible for bail, or if
they are being granted bail for
what Mr Bethel described as
“inappropriate” reasons, then
government should be held to
account.

Families for Justice is calling
on government — if it is “seri-
ous on crime” — to revise the
Bail Act to make it harder for _

SEE page 18 —
Omar Archer wants
PLP chairmanship

candidates to engage

in national debate

@ By ALISON LOWE vc
Tribune Staff Reporter...
alowe@tribunemedia.net ia

OMAR Archer, a candidate
for the PLP chairmanship, has
expressed his desire to see all
candidates in that race — and
any persons who may declare
their candidacy in the near
future — come together to
engage in a national debate.

“Tam now extending an
invitation to all the candidates
and also to those who may be
considering entering the
race,” said Mr Archer on Fri-
day.

He said that “individuals
within the party and the pub-
lic in general” need to know
where certain persons “who
want to hold political office”
stand on key issues affecting
the country.

“We are at a very critical
time in our prized history. We
live in a time when alterna-
tive lifestyles. and paedophilia
are visibly rampant. Our chil-
dren are being sodomised and

SEE page 18

/ BACON DOUB
Fe Cy City wan
PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





Fhe vaay oa if, a its ie



Sighiing: wit! preside pietieianai

i Sasratin’: tem iiasrini
thon Diemeanbesr 63 waning a 19 sutn Besuleerath SiN iin

SAU FL IGHT S



TO NASSAU

@ “

nor oo A Lionfish spotted around
RU4O1 1O:0Oarn | iOan
— Woodes Hogers Walk area
NASSAU
TO PROVIDENCIALES LIONFISH have been spot-

ted inhabiting the area around
RUGHIT QRPARTS ARRIVES Woodes Rogers Walk.
RU406 12:30pm 2:00pm The pictures of what was said
Days of Ohperasciain: Oaiiy to be a lionfish family, were tak-

en at Woodes Rogers Walk,

downtown Nassau, over the

weekend.

Minister of. Agriculture and
Marine Resources’ Larry

Cartwright has said that govern-
ment is very concerned about
the potential threat of the lion-
fish on the fishing industry in

YSKYKING

hey i Call for reservations and schedules



cy bos j the Bahamas. shores,” he told fishermen in The lionfish originally comes
ate i 649.94 j ~5464 (KING) “The challenge we face inthe Freeport. from the tropical. Indo-Pacific
Pra, f ' wie i BY fishing industry is the new inva- Mr Cartwright said the lion- region of the world. They are
: So é Or call your trayel professional for reserwations and tickets sive species that we have inher- _ fish is “creating havoc.” He is voracious predators and feed
i visit our website at wwow.skyking.tc ited from somewhere — it isa calling on Bahamian fishermen _ heavily on baby shrimp, lobster,

email: res@skyking tc Pacific animal that ismow inthe tospear the predatory fish when — grouper and other. fish.



Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean
Sea, and right around our

they come in contact with it.

“It is not deadly, but it does-
n’t have any predators (in the
sea). And we have been saying
to fishermen, spear-fishermen in
particular, that when they see it
to spear it,” he said.

However, he warns that fish-

ermen should be very careful not’
to touch the beautiful-looking -

fish, which has venomous spines
omits fins and tail.

It has been seen’ throughout
the Bahamas, particularly in
shallow waters and near coral
reefs in Grand Bahama, New
Providence, and Exuma.

The Bahamas commercial
fishing. industry exports nearly

- $100 million of fish products:
> annually. There is a fear that the

lionfish could cause a significant
decline in the country’s fishery
resources,

‘Open tonight
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THE TRIBUNE



Masked man
with shotgun
rohs couple

POLICE are investigating the
robbery of a man and a woman
who were held up on Saturday
by a masked gunman carrying a
shotgun. The couple were in the
Faith Avenue area when the
gunman robbed them of cash,
two cell phones and a grey
coloured 1999 Cadillac.

Police are currently on the
look out for the vehicle.

Investigations
continue into
three murders

Investigations are continuing
into three homicides on Grand
Bahama.

Police are appealing to mem-
bers of the public with infor-

. mation into the deaths of Vin-

cent Pedican, who was buried
on Saturday, Ryan Wood,
buried on December 5 and

“Julian Nicholls, on December

7. Anyone with information is
asked to call 350-3107/8 or 911
to assist in advancing these mat-
ters to closure.

“We know that there were
other persons present when
these homicides took place and
are asking that-persons call in
without having to identify them-
selves. The Grand Bahama
community has always been
helpful and we (the police) are
seeking that support to resolve
these matters,” police said in a
release yesterday.

Bimini officers

‘Still probing

drug arrest

OFFICERS in Bimini are
continuing their investigations
into a drug arrest made at the
Yacht Club in South Bimini.

At 9.05pm on Saturday, offi-
cers from the Bimini Police Sta-
tion, acting on information,
went to the Yacht Club in South
a where one of the ou

wud by'a eee
Bisse b: isis

a -
Sigil that ly 103 chp |





INGRAHAM IN DISCUSSION WITH IDB PRESIDENT LUIS MORE!

PM: We are talking
with Inter American
Development Bank
about road project

THE Bahamas is currently
in discussions with the Inter
American Development Bank
on the resumption of the New
Providence Road Improvement
Project, Prime Minister and
Minister of Finance Hubert
Ingraham said.

Prime Minister Ingraham’s

comments came at a press con-
ference following the conclusion
of talks in Nassau Friday with
IDB president Luis Alberto
Moreno. Mr. Moreno’s visit
came on the heels of the con-
clusion of a five-year plan
between the IDB and The
Bahamas.

An additional contract is
under negotiation for further
development of The Bahamas
in areas of infrastructure, health
and education.

“The IDB has been most
helpful to The Bahamas,” Mr.
Ingraham said. “They have
helped us considerably with the
electrification of the Family
Islands, in providing potable
water to many of our communi-
ties, and in education. We are
in discussions with them now
about the resumption of the
New Providence Road Improve-
ment Project.”

Mr. Ingraham confirmed that
a top priority of Government is
the resumption of the New
Providence Road Improvement
Project to alleviate congestion
on the island’s streets.

Road work is scheduled to
begin by the first half of 2008.

“We have serious congestion
on the streets of New Provi-
dence and the Government
intends to start next year, major

bush. L e
oun e) ce esscak 100




of suspected marijuana ‘was’ |: discuss with (the IDB) issues
found in a plastic bag in the |": ‘telating to health and environ-

refrigerator and 14 smoked cig-
arettes when police officers
searched the room. é;

The accused man, with the
suspected drugs, were taken
into police custody.

Police find
Haitian with
stah wound

ABACO - Shortly after 9pm

Saturday,: police at the Marsh
Harbour Police Station were
called to the Marsh Harbour
Clinic where.they saw a Haitian
who was suffering from a stab
wound to the stomach.

. Through an interpreter it was
learned that the victim was at
his home in the “Pigeon Pea”
area at 9pm when he was con-
fronted by an armed man who
stabbed him.

The victim, age 34 years, was
treated at the clinic for his
injury and later airlifted to the
Princess Margaret Hospital for
further medical attention. He is
listed in “stable” condition.
Investigations are continuing by
officers in Marsh Harbour.

The Tribune wants to hear
. from people who are

; making news in their

p neighbourhoods. Perhaps
jyou are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
jarea or have won an‘
award. ;

If so, call us on 322- 1986
rand share your story.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
a aA TE
PHONE: 322-2157



“mental matters. The IDB has
also been very helpful to us in
terms of creation of additional
and new solid waste disposable
sites and systems in The
Bahamas on New Providence,
San Salvador, Abaco, Cat
Island, Andros, Bimini, Harbour
Island and elsewhere.”

Regarding financing plans for
the Lynden Pindling Interna-

-tional Airport, the Prime Min-
ister confirmed that while fund-
ing requests have not yet been
made, the Government expects
to consider the airport’s financ-
ing plan early next. year.

“We’ve got short term things
for the airport. We are going to
build a new US. departure ter-
minal and we are going to build
new international and domestic
departure terminals at the air-
port. It’s a four to five year pro-
gramme and it will begin next
year,” he said.

Mr. Ingraham, who has

An

.

pledged that his government will

restore accountability and trans-

parency to public accounting,
said the IDB is a “good source
to go to for loans” because fund-
ing through the Bank provides
an opportunity for oversight,
and the IDB requires project
studies to be conducted to deter-
mine their economic and social
benefits and costs.

He pointed out, meantime,
that the Government does not
expect many grants from the
IDB.

“We are not beggars,” Mr.
Ingraham noted. “We have
received grants in the past from
the Canadians, the Japanese and
others have made available
grants to The Bahamas. And to
the extent to which grant money

is available to conduct feasibili- .

ty studies on a place like The
Bahamas, we will be happy to
access them.

“But generally speaking, we
are borrowers who stand on our
own two feet and we put for-
ward a project that we are able
to pay for.”

Mr. Moreno said he has had a
chance to revisit the challenges
facing The Bahamas to look at
ways in which the Bank can con-
tribute to further development
of the country’s infrastructure; a
critical component in dealing

¢ Ue Te f)

Tyee elie

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 » Robinson Rd,[242] 322-3080 * Fax:[242] 322-5251

with challenges associated with
growth and social areas such as
health and education.

_ “Yes it is true that this coun-
try has a very high income per
capita compared to other
Caribbean countries, but I
believe that despite that, we
should strive to, regardless of
that, to understand that there
are still questions of poverty in
The Bahamas and the Bank
needs to find ways to deal with
the situation,” he said. “I have
personally taken a direct role in
trying to find ways to address
that.”

The IDB, the oldest and
largest regional bank in the
world was founded in 1959 as a
partnership between 19 Latin
American countries and the
United States. The Bahamas
became a member in 1977. It is
the main source of multilateral
financing for economic, social
and institutional development
in Latin America and the
Caribbean.

Its loans and grants help
finance development projects
and support strategies to reduce
poverty, expand growth,

increase trade and investment,
promote regional integration,
and foster private sector devel-
opment and modernization of
the State.



ENTIRE STOCK WHITE

WREATHS
a aNYANMG NRSV CRS



MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007,

“We are not beggars. We hi:
received grants in the past
from the Canadians, the J:
ese and others have made
available grants to The
Bahamas.”

WORD OF EXPLANATION: Prime Minister Hubert Ingraliar
(centre) explains the needs of The Bahamas during a press
conference on Friday on the official visit of Inter-American
Development Bank President Luis Alberto Moreno, (left). !0
Bahamas. Also pictured is Minister of State for Finance Ziv
go Laing. The press conference was held at the Office of the



Prime Minister, Cable Beach.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR










The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

Statements
misrepresent



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D. D.Litt.




Publisher/Editor 1919-1972












Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

~ TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

MANAMA, Bahrain — One of the most
telling:but little-noted ironies of the U.S.-spon-
sored peace summit meeting in Annapolis,
Md., was who on the Arab side didn’t attend.
Syria, a country we barely talk to, was there.
Saudi Arabia, which never meets with Israelis,
was there. No, the two no-shows were the two
Arab countries liberated by U.S. troops from
the grip of Saddam Hussein: Iraq and Kuwait.

That’s right — Iraq and Kuwait, the two:

Arab countries hosting the most U.S. troops,
and the two Arab countries with probably the
' most active elected parliaments, were both
absent. The Kuwaitis asked not to be invited,

and the Iraqis were invited but declined to.

come.

Don’t get me wrong, I think Annapolis was
useful. But when you toil for a year to throw a
party and some of your worst enemies RSVP,
but the two people whose lives you’ve once
saved don’t show up, it’s beyond rude. It’s
interesting.

It actually reveals the core problem we’re
facing in the Middle East: all of these countries
are deeply internally divided, some with active
civil wars — Palestine, Iraq, Lebanon and
Afghanistan — and some with latent ones.
These divisions date from when these states
were shaped by colonial pens, with bound-
aries that rarely reflected either shared eth-
nicity or a shared desire to live together. For
decades, they were held together by colonial
powers, the Cold War, oil'wealth or iron-fist-
ed military dictators and monarchs.

But lately the lids have started to loosen, and
in those places with real parliaments — like the
Palestinian territories, Lebanon, Iraq and
Kuwait — they tend to expose the depth of lin-
. gering divisions rather than express, or forge,
a new consensus. These are divisions about
basics, like the line between religion and state,
the rights of women and minorities, and the
role of citizens.

Kuwait’s parliament has a liberal minority
and an Islamist majority, which does not like
Israel (and doesn’t like Palestinians much,
either). The Lebanese and Palestinian parlia-
ments are both paralyzed by discord. And
Iraq? Sitting down with Israelis was only one
of many things Iraqis can’t agree on, which is
why the U.S. military surge has not yet pro-
duced an upturn in national-reconciliation.

On Thursday, The Associated Press report-
ed that a shouting match erupted in the Iraqi
parliament when a top Shiite lawmaker, Bahaa
al-Aaraji, said he had evidence that a leading
Sunni politician, Adnan al-Dulaimi, had brand-
ed Shiites “heretics” and had called their mur-
der legitimate. We’re not talking Democrats

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and Republicans here. What we are trying to
do in Iraq is unprecedented: We are hosting
the first real horizontal dialogue in modern
Arab history by the constituents of an Arab
country — on the assumption that if Shiites,
Sunnis and Kurds could actually write their
own social contract, it would mean that some-
thing other than top-down, iron-fist politics
was possible for this part of the world. It is
hugely important — and next to impossible.

Each of the Arab countries and Israel has
“its own Gaza,” said Mamoun Fandy, director
of Middle East programmes at London’s Inter-
national Institute of Strategic Studies. “That is,
an anti-peace, fundamentalist, xenophobic fac-
tion, which wants to hold back any reconcili-
ation. Until each country confronts its own
Gaza, it will have problems.”

Including Iran. I’m in Bahrain, just across
the Persian Gulf from Iran, for the institute’s
annual conference. A big Iranian delegation
was scheduled to attend, alongside a big U.S.
team. The Iranians cancelled at the last minute.
Internal fighting.

“All these countries are like unfinished
novellas,” said Stephen P. Cohen, author of the
upcoming “Beyond America’s Grasp,” a his-
tory of the modern Middle East. Indeed, if
you looked at just the key players — Israel,

’ Lebanon, the Palestinians, Egypt and Saudi

Arabia — “their leaders who went to Annapo-

. lis were all embroiled in struggles with domes-

tic opponents,” which limited their room to
manoeuvre, he said. Each one, he added, has
a “Party of God” back home “that believes it
doesn’t have to pay attention to what the gov-
ernment says because it doesn’t recognize that
government’s legitimacy to make big deci-
sions.” '

That’s why these days big decisions get
made by iron fists or they don’t get made.
Power has become too fragmented. So unless
there is more reconciliation within these coun-
tries, it is hard to see how there will be more
reconciliation between them.

Which is also why, I thought, that instead of
Annapolis, the peace conference should have
been held, symbolically, at Appomattox Court
House, Va., where on Palm: Sunday, 1865,
Gen. R.E. Lee surrendered to Lt. Gen. U.S.
Grant, ending the American Civil War and
reunifying our country. Admission is only $4 -—
and President Bush probably could have got a
group rate.

(This article was written by Thomas L Fried-
man of The New York Times News Service.
Friedman is the author of the book, “The
World is Flat.” —c. 2007). -














Opposition to
Wendy’s plan

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In a Guardian article of the
30th October, Mr. Chris
Tsavoussis complained of being
frustrated in his plans to con-
struct his eighth Wendy's
restaurant location by a small
group of opponents, despite
having an approval in principle
from as far back as 2005.

In fact, Mr. Tsavoussis' state-
ments both misrepresent the
facts and mischaracterize the
nature of the opposition to the
construction of a Wendy's at

. West Bay and Westridge.

Far from being a “group of
nine”, the movement actually
has the tacit support of me and
almost everyone I know in the

area. That a small group has-

maintained the energy to keep
the fire alive does not mean that
it is a minority view.

In fact I am sure that Mr.
Tsavoussis would regret having
raised the issue of signed peti-
tions if the “group of nine” (or
make that ten) decided to take
him up on the challenge by vig-
orous canvassing. The numbers
may enter four digits.

To set out the context, here
is a company proposing to place
a junk-food outlet immediately
adjacent to Nettie Symonette's
heritage-centred resort and
across the street from the new-
ly completed (and highly exclu-
sive) Marley Spa and Resort.
Its rear would face a communi-
ty of hard-working Bahamians
and foreigners who pay a lot to
live in one of the dwindling qui-
et, safe communities on this
island.

It proposes to attract an end-
less stream of drive-through
customers to the main road of
this intensely residential area.
In short, the same problems
now faced by residents of
Twynam would be imposed on
the residents of Cable Beach.

While it is good to hear that
Mr. Tsavoussis' approval in
principle has lapsed, it remains
intriguing in the extreme just
how he managed to get it in the
first place, given the obvious
inappropriateness of his kind of
business in that location.

Far from being the victims
portrayed in that article, the
proprietors of Wendy's have
acted in a surreptitious and
seemingly underhanded man-

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ner from the very start. Initially,
they appeared quite content to
quietly benefit from a dubious,
capricious and non-consultative
decision, of which those that
would be most affected were

unaware.

When the residents got wind
of the fait accompli and dam-
age control became necessary,
Mr. Tsavoussis agreed to attend
a public meeting, but had no
more compelling explanation
for his persistence (against the
wishes of the residents) than the
fact that he had already bought
the land.

All along, the attempts to
influence: people to “support”
the project have been sustained
and ludicrous..

I personally only became
aware when I was accosted by a
pretty young model they seem
to have hired for the purpose
of canvassing support among
area locals.

Presented with a rehearsed
and nonsensical story about
how well another fast food joint

- would complement the area, I

asked her how much they were
paying her to talk foolishness.
The pattern seems to be to
find people whose sensibilities
can be worked upon (by, for
instance, presenting the oppo-
sition as “elitist”) and get them
to pretend that they honestly
believe that residential Cable
Beach is just perfectly suited to

another packed, traffic-snarling
American fast food drive-
through. That tactic even
appears to have met some suc-
cess at The Guardian.

All of this brings us back to
that silly, spurious question
posed by Wendy's in the arti-
cle: What foreign and interna->
tional investors will make of a
business environment in which
investors are given approvals in
principle and then find opposi-
tion when it comes to imple-
menting their plans.

Here is the answer: It would
tell investors that, in The
Bahamas, transparency and
accountability mean something.
In fact, they mean so much that
no central department can light-
ly make closed-door decisions
that will affect residents of an
area without first carrying out
wide consultation.

Where such anomalous (and
hopefully rare) situations as the
current one arise, they are cor-
rected.

It would also tell investors
that, when they do business
here, they do not have to fear
accusations of influence-buying,
as the processes are transpar-
ent.

Any investor (local or for-
eign) that is unsatisfied by that
explanation should perhaps
look at alternative locations
where they really need the mon-
ey (with no questions asked).
Port-Au-Prince comes to mind.

Andrew C Allen

Olde Towne Sandyport,
Nassau,

December 7, 2007

The ugly side to America

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I REALISE it is corny to state how many friends one has of any
different nationality or race, but American generosity is legendary
and I have much personal experience of this. However, there is
another side to America which is not so pretty. For many years they
were accused of preferring aid, on their own terms, not trade, and
Britain suffered appalling after the war. Britain was struggling
economically and when America, flush with dollars, put work out
to bid internationally, British costs were sometimes half those of
their American counterparts, but the award always went to US com-
petitors. It got so bad it reached presidential levels.

The “Ugly American” is never far below the surface. I for one
have never had any desire to live there. I was both shocked and dis-
gusted that the 6.5 per cent Florida sales tax addition to exports was
even thought of, let alone seriously proposed, The Tribune Business,
November 23rd. The Bahamas is a small nation of just over 300,000
people, a mid-sized town in America, of which 175,000 are pro-
ductive, and these sick Americans want the tiny Bahamas to sub-
sidize their tax base? Talk of David and Goliath. Or are we being
co-opted as, what is it, the 52nd state, with none of the advantages?
What about allowing us access to Medicare and Medicaid? Will this
imposition simply affect the Bahamas, or will it extend to every oth-
er state and country Florida exports to?

There have been many occasions when overzealous legislators
have cast their eyes on rich pickings, only to find down the line they
have lost out as people refuse to buy or find alternative sources, with
much damage to all concerned, except, of course, the legislators,
who retire with their inflated, inflation proof pensions.

W EG GRATTAN
Nassau,
December 2, 2007.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 5





In brief —

Police find

five handguns
after chasing
group of men

POLICE discovered five
handguns in the bush in western
New Providence on Saturday
evening after chasing a group
of men seen in that area.

According to police press liai-
son officer Walter Evans, offi-
cers from the mobile division
saw the men in the bush at
around 9pm. When the police
approached the men started to
run. Although officers gave
chase, they were unsuccessful
in catching the group.

Returning to the bush they
found five handguns and six live
rounds of ammunition. There
have been no arrests in connec-
tion with this matter. Howev-
er, said Asst Supt Evans, inves-
tigations are continuing.

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Mourners
pack funeral
for Jamaican
track star

®@ KINGSTON, Jamaica — Hun-
dreds of islanders, including
Prime Minister Bruce Golding,
packed a stadium for the funer-
al of a beloved sports hero who
helped usher Jamaica into the
irack and field elite, writes the
\ssociated Press.

The body of track legend
Herb McKenley, a former
world record holder in the 400
meters and one of the first
Jamaicans to win an Olympic
gold medal, was buried with
high honours on Saturday in his
Carih>ean omeland.

MckKenley died last month at
age 85. The cause of death was
not discl-ved. Mourners wept
as his casket, draped with the
black, yellow and green
Jamaican flag, was lowered into
the ground at National Heroes
Park, which is dedicated. to
prominent islanders like the
cour | s first premier, Norman
Manley, and civil rights leader
.larcus Garvey. .

v

\

Rosetta St.

Anti-gay campaigners postpone BED BA

meetings following Harl Taylor,

Thaddeus McDonald murders

ANTI-GAY campaigners
have decided to postpone a series
of planned town meetings in the
aftermath of the Harl Taylor and
Dr Thaddeus McDonald mur-
ders.

But they have vowed to come
out “blazing” once the eulogies
are over in their attempt to get
what they regard as “pro-gay”
legislation rescinded.

Campaign leader Clever Dun-
combe said he was concerned
that two senior police officers
most familiar with the Taylor-
McDonald case have now been
sent away for training.

He said it was reminiscent of
the Sir Harry Oakes murder case
in 1943, when the police com-
missioner was transferred to
Trinidad as investigations got
underway.

And he said it also reminded
him of the Barry Best murder in
Nassau some years ago when the
case went “cold” following a top-
level cover-up.

“We believe this could be a
case of deja vu, which would go a
long way to telling us how pow-
erful this gay community is
here,” said Mr Duncombe.

“I think it could most defi-
nitely prove to be a reprise of
both these situations.”

However, a government
spokesman said today that it
would be irresponsible to draw
such a conclusion. Plans for the
two officers — Ellison
Greenslade and Marvin Dames
— to be sent to Canada for a
year’s training with the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police were
concluded long before the Tay-
lor-McDonald murders were
committed.

It would, therefore, be com-
pletely irresponsible, said the
spokesman, for their transfers to
be interpreted as an attempt to
“cover-up” these murders.

Mr Duncombe said any cover-
up would add impetus to his
campaign to counter gay influ-
ence in Bahamian society and
secure a reversal of a 1991 law
which, he said, made the homo-

PF sexual lifestyle legal.

“I believe that the US
Embassy in Queen Street must
have plenty of evidence to show

RT:

CAMPAIGN LEADER: Clever Duncombe.

what was going on at the home
of Dr McDonald,” he told The
Tribune.

He claimed that among the
men of all ages and races going
through the property were prob-
ably “prominent and influential
people in Nassau. To find Dr
McDonald’s killer, all they need
to do is track back through close-
circuit footage showing those
who last visited his home.”

Mr Duncombe said his own
sources — “including someone
who worked the gate” — had
outlined the volume of night
hours “traffic” into Dr McDon-
ald’s home.

“There was heavy traffic from
sunset to sunrise, all through the
wee hours, and some of the visi-
tors were prominent and well-
known people.

“In this day and time, when
security is an issue, the US
Embassy must have information
of use in this investigation.”

The US Embassy has con-
firmed that it has been working
closely with the police from the
beginning of the case. After
working through the diplomat-
ic, technical and legal difficulties,
said a spokesman, the Embassy
recently gave the police all the
information they had requested
and which the Embassy had
available.

Mr Duncombe said _ his
planned town meetings would
resume once a period had
elapsed for families to pay their
respects to Mr Taylor and Dr
McDonald.

He said he and his supporters
would leave no stone unturned in
their efforts to get the Sexual



Offences Act rescinded so that
the gay lifestyle was once again
outlawed.

“We need to keep the cam-
paign in the eyes of public opin-
ion. We are supported by a wide
cross-section of the community,
but the Christian Council and
legislators are remaining silent.”

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE






@ By Sir Ronald Sanders __

6 Gai: West. Indies

team” to most West

Maranatha
De Centre

FOR THE FINEST
SELECTION OF

West Indian Cricket
team which, until recently, gave
the people of the West Indies
much cause for both pride and
joy as they defeated teams from
all over the world.

Now, “the West indies team”
will also refer to rugby.

A West Indian rugby team
has been shaped in recent years

Drum Sets
}

Keyboards











Acoustic & from regional comp nee and
: : interest is growing in the game
Electric Guitars ee nae years, had only
a small following.
brass & Woodwind What flows from this is a prin-
~~—hastruments-"~ ciple that-helds-as-good for. busi-.
. Mi oh ness as it does for countries and
(cropnones for sport: to compete globally,
Speakers small enterprises need to pool
their resources. Enterprises
“rege drawn from small pools, howev- ,
Amplifiers er talented or creative they may
ee be, simply can not match the
Mixers capability of larger groups.
ic of “West Indi-
Cables The logic of the
pte an” cricket team flowed from
i the reality that not one of the
Instrument & Audio Caribbean territories could by
Accessories itself produce a team that could
ont compete successfully at an inter-
Music Books national level. Had this been
rene attempted, the individual team
Televisions would simply have lacked the














capacity to defeat teams from
larger countries on any consis-
tent basis.

The great cricketing nations
draw their 11-man squad from
populations of tens or hundreds
of millions. The West Indies
picks its team from less than six
million. The numbers alone mil-
itate against teams from indi-
vidual Caribbean nations.

The organisers and adminis-
trators of rugby in several

sibly recognised that teams from
their individual countries also
could not compete successfully
by themselves. Taking a leaf
from the book of West Indian
cricket, they have formed a West



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Lar ULM Cea Cela CT ANU ae aU 1a COM yl
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Indians means the

Caribbean territories have sen=”

over ' the years.

e West In
Rugby j joins cricket"



WORLD VIEW

Indian rugby team.

Nine territories are involved
so far. They are: the Bahamas,
Barbados, Bermuda, the British
Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands,
Guyana, Jamaica, St. Lucia, St.
Vincent and the Grenadines,
Trinidad and Tobago, and the
Turks and Calicos Islands.

Remarkably, at a time when ;

international sports organiza-

tions are.resisting composite _
teams, drawn from several terri- -

tories in a region, the West
Indies Rugby Union has been
accepted as a member of the
North American and West
Indies Rugby Association

_(NAWIRA) together with Rug-

by USA and the Rugby Union
of Canada. NAWIRA is a Mem-
ber of the International Rugby
Board (IRB) and the Regional
governing body of the IRB.
The West Indian rugby team
has participated in several inter-
national competitions since 2000.
In Los Angles in 2005/06 and
again in San Diego in 2007, they
competed against the top 14
ranked countries in the world.
Insufficient financing limited
preparation and pre-tournament
competition and, therefore,
though competitive, the West
Indies did not secure wins in
these tournaments. In the same
years, however, the team com-
peted in Trinidad against such
well known touring sides as Bor-
der Reivers of Scotland and
Atlantis (USA), winning back
to-back-titles,. -.--.. ...
The West Indies rugby team,
therefore, shows potential for
going on to greater heights if it
can attract the commercial sup-
port that West Indian cricket has

BESIR Ronald Sanders

er interest in the
sport has been greatly

assisted by the Rugby World
Cup tournament held in France
earlier this year.

Hundreds of millions of peo-
ple watched the tournament on
television sets across the world.
In European capitals, in South
Africa, New Zealand, Australia
and in the Pacific streets were
devoid of traffic as fans congre
gated to watch the games. The
semi-finals and finals were par-
ticularly gripping, and the final
left millions of people in Eng-
land weeping and millions dane-
ing with joy in South Africa.

The commercial interest in
the game, particularly by televi
sion stations created more than
an iitérest inthe game, it devel
oped a sense of national pride
in the teams.

In South Africa, a nation that
has only relatively recently
emerged from the racial division

TNT

Slip dal T=
240 Bay Street, Opposite The Old Straw Market, Tel 242-328-TIME oe Went as



of Apartheid which plagued it
for many decades, the South
African team’s ascendancy to
the final and its victory over
England, created a sense of
national unity that was openly
displayed by people of all races

joyously celebrating together.

‘The Caribbean has witnessed
the same phenomena with crick-
et:

Above everything else, the
West Indian cricket team has
been a unifying force for the
people of the English-speaking
Caribbean (except Puerto Rico).
Even in the United States Virgin
Islands, now populated with
many immigrants from the for-
micr and current British territo-
ries in the region, the fortunes of
the West Indian cricket team
have been followed avidly.

Regardless of what territory
they are from, people have
rejoiced together in the triumphs
of the West Indian cricket team,
and they endured disappoint-
ment and even grief at their loss-
es.

The important point is that
the people of individual
Caribbean countries, like the
administrators of cricket, recog-
nise that smallness is powerless-
ness, and it is only through pool-
ing of resources that they stand a
chance in global competition.

Several businesses in the
Caribbean, in acknowledgment
of that reality, are either merging
with or acquiring other similar
companies to gear themselves to
vie with external companies, or
they are taking advantage of the
Caribbean Single Market to
expand their operations beyond
their national boundaries.

They recognise that they have

a better chance of survival and of

success if they are ‘Caribbean’
wide.

Because of rules that are
linked to definitions of what is a
country, the countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARICOM)

. have not been able to field a sin-

gle. composite team in many

dies team:



“Global inter-
est in the
sport has been
greatly assist-

ed by the Rug-

*



by World Cup

tournament

held in France
earlier this
year.”



global sports. Hence, even
though there are many talented
footballers in the Caribbean
(and quite a few are now being
contracted by British teams), the
West Indies has been unable to

mount a West Indian football. --

team, or indeed a single team
for the Commonwealth or
Olympic games.

ricket, therefore, has

been the single unify-
ing force in sport for the West
Indian people.

Now, rugby is presenting itself
as another string to the West
Indian bow.

The Caribbean media, the
business‘community and the
governments should encourage
those who have been proud
enough of their joint heritage
and wise enough to recognise
the advantage of union in
launching the West Indies rugby
team.



Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotinail.co
m



(The writer is a business coni-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomiutt)
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 7






LOCAL NEWS


















Anglican Diocese
provides water for
Cat Island in post
Tropical Storm
Noel relief efforts

ARCHDEACON Keith
‘Cartwright, Anglican
Archdeacon of the Southern
Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos Islands, with the help
of Chelsea’s Choice Water
Company and Coca Cola
Bottling Company, donated
500 gallons of purified water
to residents of Port Howe,
Bains’ Town, Zonicle Hill,
McQueen’s and Hawk’s
Nest, all affected by Tropical
Storm Noel.

The storm caused severe
flooding to these settle-
ments, and left residents
without water for a
















‘Bee Z

ens, Cat Island.

Pat

ABOVE: Severe flooding in McQue

LEFT: The Rev Fr. Chester Burton, Anglican priest with responsibility
for Cat Island, prepares to distribute water to Cat Island residents.

»- { x‘ 4 Bahanuanr Gold Coin with two flamingoes

a

AID sponsors automotive
industry technology seminar

AUTOMOTIVE and industrial distributor AID sponsored a
tools and equipment seminar to introduce the latest develop-
ments in diagnostic equipment for 2007 American, Asian and
European automobiles.

The seminar was hosted at its headquarters on Wulff Road.

Co-sponsored by international automotive parts giant, NAPA
(National Automotive Parts Association) the seminar covered
all the recent advances in technology relating to the fast devel-
oping automotive industry. AID will be continuing these sem-
inars that will cover the many aspects of the industry over the
next 12 months and automotive technicians are welcome to
inquire about future course opportunities at AID. Similar cours-
es are offered at other AID outlets throughout The Bahamas.

Pictured above with the course participants are left to right:
Rustin Swain, Retail Store Supervisor, AID; Eric Posner, Tools
and Equipment, NAPA; Russell Eggert, Tools and Equipment,
NAPA; Dean Canduci, Sales Manager, Miami, NAPA; Bob
Hall, Trainer, OTC and Stan High, Territory Sales Manager,
NAPA.




Venezuelans turn their
clocks back half an hour

@ CARACAS, Venezuela from claims that he is a “dicta-
tor.”

VENEZUELANS turned Chavez also traveled to

their clocks back half an hour
on Sunday, putting them in the
company of people in other
nations that offset time in half-
hour increments from Green-
wich Mean Time, like
Afghanistan, India, Iran and
Myanmar.

“This is a public health mea-
sure that benefits the health of
Venezuelan men and women
and, above all, boys and girls,”
the government’s official news
agency said.

The time change, which will
remain in effect year-round, was
initially announced in August,
but confusion ensued as to
whether clocks would be moved
ahead or behind. Senior offi-
cials here recently confirmed
that clocks woyld be turned
back 30 minutes, arguing that
exposing citizens to more sun-
light would improve their
metabolism.

Venezuela will now be in its
own time zone, a half-hour
ahead of Eastern Standard
Time.

The change is part of a set of
announcements in recent days
showing that President Hugo
Chavez is pressing ahead with
policy initiatives despite losing a
referendum last week over con-
stitutional reforms aimed at
transforming Venezuela into a
socialist state.

For instance, Chavez
wrapped up a visit over the
weekend with President
Alexander G. Lukashenko of
Belarus in which the two men
pledged military cooperation.
Chavez defended Lukashenko,
whose rule has been criticized
by human rights groups over his
failure to hold fair elections,

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Buenos Aires, Argentina, on
Sunday to inaugurate the Bank
of the South, a project largely
backed by Venezuela as an
alternative to the World Bank.
And in Caracas, a Vietnamese
delegation prepared to unveil a
symbol fitting of Chavez’s anti-
imperialist fervor: a statue of
the Vietnamese revolutionary
leader Ho Chi Minh. The statue
is to go up Monday on a major
thoroughfare here next to busts
of other revolutionaries like
Che Guevara and Augusto
Cesar Sandino, the Nicaraguan
rebel leader.

c.2007 New York Times
News Service

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS





ACTRESS RECEIVES CAREER ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Bahamas International
Film Festival pays
tribute to Daryl Hannah

‘History OF [OURISM

IN [HE BAHAMAS
-A Global Perspective



+. US ACTRESS Daryl Hannah Tet 4 Since Hak FEE
The mM ost “History of Tourism -A Global Perspective continues to make a splash in the
Bahamas.

traces the history of Tourism from the arrival
Y In 1984 it was through her role

complete of the first visitor in 1492 up to the beginning as a mermaid in the family
of the 2Ist century. Presented against the favourite “Splash”, filmed in part
background of world tourism and regional on Castaway Cay.

a oP : And on Saturday it happened
when the Bahamas International
Film Festival paid tribute to her
achievements.

Among those present were
Bahamian resident Sir Sean Con-
nery, acclaimed for his screen role
as British agent James Bond

Part of the celebration took
place at Atlantis, where Ms Han-
nah spoke of her start in acting
and her environmental concerns.

It was a concern dictating her .

Its simply a must read | san iisal ste wie her ow
for all Bahamians. dicestor of Lombard Odier Dart
Get your copy today!

documentation
of Bahamian
Tourism ever
written,



ecade as well as the socio-economic impact
of tourism on the local community.





er Hentsh, which supports the
film festival, led tributes to the
Hollywood star’s career.

“One adorable film, Splash, is
particularly dear to us in The
Bahamas, as it was filmed on our
own Castaway Cay,” he said.

“Ms Hannah is not only a gift
ed artist, but she also truly
embraces some of Lombard Odi
er Darier Hentsch’s intrinsic val-
ues, such as a true love for arts,
but also something you may not
be aware of, the protection of the
environment which is today
everyone’s conern.

*An international voyager and













an appraised and beautiful sip seaN CONNERY poses with Bahamas International Film Festival

actress, she really is unique in so
many ways.”

He added: “The festival has
truly expanded into an interna-
tional cultural event,which we are
very proud to be a part of this
year again and for manv vears to
come.”

The celebration continued dur-
ing a candlelit dinner at Cafe
Matisse attended by Sir Sean and
his wile. Micheline.

Ms Hannah ~ also noted for
her role in 1982’s Blade Runner,
and more recently as Flle Driver

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International Film Festival awards nigiit on Saturday, December 8,
2007 at the Atlantis Theatre.

in Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill: She had a dream aid we
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Vanderpool. noth. of these.”

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 9



2° OO." 7

Panel focuses on the

‘Art of Collaboration’



THE fourth Annual
Bahamas International Film
Festival began their informa-
tive panel series this weekend
featuring a number of both
well-known and local guests
and speakers.

Held at the scenic Green Par-
rot Bar & Grill, this year’s pan-
els commenced with the Art
and of Collaboration event
headlined by movie star Antho-
ny Mackie and television
actress Tonya Lee Williams.

Alongside Mr Mackie and
Ms Williams, literary and tal-
ent rep Jennifer Konawal and
acting/dialogue coach Greta
Seacat discussed the impor-
tance of professional relation-
ships between actors, agents
and filmmakers.

“Some directors have the
vision but are unable to explain
it to actors,” Ms Seacat said.
“The actors want to please the
director but they don’t know
how to go through the process
to get there.”

The panel also answered
questions pertaining to the con-



flict that can arise during pro-

duction, whether the project be

independent or big-budget.
“The director’s not the end-

all of any production,” Ms |

Williams said. “If you have a
problem with a director you can
go to a screenwriter or a pro-
ducer. Everybody’s a complete
different personality. You have
to know what kind of personal-
ity you’re working with.”

Mackie, who has starred in
Million Dollar Baby and Half
Nelson, agreed.

“Sometimes the director can
get in your way,” he said.
“Sometimes the idea of collab-
oration is put aside. (Some-
times) when directors try to
step in, they dissolve the actor’s
character study.”

By promoting collaboration
between filmmakers from
across the globe, festivals like
the Bahamas International Film
Festival and Ms Williams’ own
ReelWorld Film Festival are
helping bridge the gap between
directors, actors and producers
on different continents.

“It’s important to realise that
we're becoming one world,” Ms

CHOPARD BAHAMAS president and CEO Wayne Chee-a-Tow, left, and
Sir Sean Connery present the Career Achievement tribute to film star
Daryl Hannah at the 4th Annual Bahamas International Film Festival
awards night on Saturday, December 8, 2007 at the Atlantis Theatre.
Hannah's hits include Blade Runner, Steel Magnolias and Splash in
which many of the scenes were filmed in the Bahamas.



SIR SEAN CONNERY carries a wooden sculpture crafted by Antonius

Roberts after being presented with the gift by Bahamas International
Film Festival founder Leslie Vanderpool at the 4th Annual Bahamas
International Film Festival awards night on Saturday, December 8, 2007

at the Atlantis Theatre.



BAHAMAS International Film Festival founder Leslie Vanderpool and
Rodney Chee-a-Tow of Chopard Bahamas welcome guests to the
Chopard/Versace Opening Night Party for the 4th Annual Bahamas
International Film Festival at the Cloisters on Friday, December 7, 2007.





nue NV EXoL aIs3

Williams said. “I think the
future of film is going to be
ensemble pieces filled with all
different ethnicities and focused
on several different cultural
issues. It’s important for festi-
vals to get a diverse group of
people — both in front of the
camera and behind the camera
— that can start collaborating.”

The 4th Annual Bahamas
International Film Festival runs

Merce des-Be a

until Thursday, December 14.



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BIFF 2007

- The Bahamas International ;
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iE TRIBUNE

‘orum gives an education

n scholarships and loans

INDIVIDUALS wishing to
irther their education were
dvised of the various scholar-
hips and loans offered by the
‘ahamas Government at a youth

rum hosted by The Bahamas.

.ational Youth Council (BNYC)
nd the United States Embassy,
yn December 5.

Reginald Saunders, assistant
director of Education in Govern-
ment Scholarships and Loans
Division, in the Ministry of Edu-
cation, Youth Sports and Culture
(MOEYSC), said the Govern-
ment issued more than $16 mil-
lion in scholarships and loans last
year.

“That is a testament to the
commitment the Government has
to ensure that as many of you as
possible are able to study locally
as well as abroad to further your
educational endeavours.”

He explained that the Guaran-
teed Loans programme, which is
the most popular scholarship
scheme offered by the Ministry,
recipients only have to pay the
interest each year while they are
in school.

Subsidy

Mr. Saunders also noted that
the Government has reinstituted
the 50 per cent subsidy, so recip-
ients only have to pay $30 a
month.

“That is the best deal in town,”
he said. “You begin paying back
the principal along with the inter-
est upon completion of your stud-
ies and you have 15 years to pay
that off.”

He added that there has been a
lot of talk about defaulted loans
and it is very important that per-
sons who take advantage of the
loan programme fulfil their oblig-
ations and pay off their loans.

“It is a loan programme, which
means you have to pay it back.
The only way you will benefit and
your children will benefit is if
those who are currently in the
programme, repay their loans.”

Mr. Saunders noted that two
years ago the Government insti-
tuted a National Scholarship Pro-
gramme and there are three types
of scholarship programmes under
this scheme.

’ There is the National Merit
Scholarship Programme, which is
a $25,000 scholarship to any four-
year institution. Recipients
receive $25,000 every year for

¢ Save Big $$ on unlimited number of

four years and seven or eight of
these are given every year.

Hé said the MOEYSC also

offers the National Technical
Scholarship, which is a $10,000
award to any institution and the
National Academic Scholarships
for students studying academic
subjects.

He explained that the Govern-
ment has a Teachers’ Education
Grant and a national bursary
awards programme to attend The
College of The Bahamas (COB).
Recipients of these programmes
also get a stipend.

In order to apply for these two
awards, candidates must have five
BGCSEs with C or above and
Mathematics and English.

Mr. Saunders said the Govern-
ment also gave COB $1 million to
help support other deserving stu-
dents.

The Gerace Scholarship pro-
gramme is another full scholar-
ship offered to a network of 24
universities in the U.S.

He explained that the institu-
tions will pay for the tuition and
the Government pays for room
and board.

The Gerace Research Centre
is located in San Salvador and sci-
entists utilise the centre to con-
duct marine research.

The 24 schools in exchange for
use of that centre made an agree-
ment with Government that it will
provide tuition for Bahamian stu-
dents wishing to attend the
schools.

Mr. Saunders said the Ministry
of Education partners with the
Lyford Cay Foundation for the
All Bahamas Merit Scholarship,
which is a $35,000 scholarship.

The assistant director told stu-
dents to consider attending COB
or other local colleges. Mr. Saun-
ders explained that this would cut
down on the expense of going
abroad to university.

He also encouraged students
to choose careers they would not
only enjoy, but that would pro-
vide them with the resources nec-
essary to live.

“The cost of living is constant-
ly going ups we have students in
the loan programme that spent
over $80,000 over a four year
period to do a particular field of
study and they come home and
they make X amount of dollars,
which cannot support a loan pay-
ment.”

He also said not to wait for an

bags or boxes from Florida to

The Bahamas

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acceptance letter before applying
for any of the scholarships.

“We must have your applica-
tion in before the deadline,” Mr.
Saunders said.

“The acceptance letter could
come later. With most schools
you may not get an acceptance
letter until August.

“So, get the application in with
all of the information and we will
give you the award pending the
receipt of your acceptance Ict-
ter.”

¢ Or Shop and Ship today, Relax and Fly

tomorrow

REGINALD SAUNDERS,
assistant director of Educa-
tion, Government Scholar-
ship and Educational Loans
Division in the Ministry of
Education, Youth, Sports and
Culture, talks to students
about the various scholar-
ships and loans offered by
the Bahamas Government at

a youth forum hosted by The ©

Bahamas National Youth
Council (BNYC) and the Unit-
ed States Embassy, Decem-
ber 5. Virginia Ramadan,
consul general of the U.S.
Embassy, looks on during
the presentation







MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 11

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THE TRIBUN



THE BAHAMAS FINANCIAL SERVICES BOARD: Tax and trade symposium

Selling Bahamas in a global marketplace

The Government plans to
strategically promote and market
the financial services sector with-
in the international community,

Government plans to promote and

“id MiniverofStaeforFinnce Ark et financial services sector

Tax and Trade Symposium, held
by The Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB).

Minister Laing explained that
the current administration is com-
mitted to increasing the country’s
profile and presence within the

global marketplace.

“In this regard there will
increased marketing of the juris-
diction and increased participa-
tion and visibility by the Govern-
ment in conjunction with the



Bahamas Financial Services
Board in (BFSB) strategic inter-
national events,” he said.
Minister Laing also noted that
the Government is increasing its
commitment to public-private

NASSAU LISTINGS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

. CARMICHAEL ROAD
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family
Residence 3 bed/ 2 bath
LAND: 11,988 sq. ft.
FLOOR AREA: 1,710 sq. ft.
LOCATION: East on Carmichael Road from
Bacardi Road take the 1st asphalt paved
easement on the right. Property is 150 ft.
south of Carmichael Road.
APPRAISED VALUE: $232,000

8._ WINTON MEADOWS SECTION NO.i
LOT NO. 115
PROPERTY: Single Family Residence Land
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling East along Prince
Charles Drive from Culberts Hill take the 1st
corner on the right Jasmine Drive. Heading
South take the 2nd corner on the right Violett
Drive, the subject property is the 4th house
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $274,000

LOT NO. 3018/19
PROPERTY: Single Family Residence

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Traveling East on CW Saunders
Highway from Pinewood Gardens round-
about, take the second corner on the right,
then the 1st paved corner on the left then
the 2nd corner on the left, Pear Tree Avenue,
Property is 2nd house on the left, Light blue
with white asphalt roof.

APPRAISED VALUE: $156,000

PROPERTY SIZE: Split Level Residential
FLOOR AREA: 1,162 sq. ft. Building

LAND: 19,960 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Western Side of John Evans
Road, South of Shirley Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $190,000

10. ROCKY PINE ROAD
LOT NO.A
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Duplex
Apartment

LAND: 7,288 sq. ft.

. CARMICHAEL VILLAGE
PROPERTY: Multi-Family Fourplex
Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: East on Carmichael Road take
1st corner on right after Golden Isles Road.
Property is 2nd lot on left from the dead end.
APPRAISED VALUE: $340,000

LOCATION: Travel West on Rocky Pine Road
property is midway on the 3rd corner on left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

11. GLENISTON GARDENS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 0 Block 7
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Storey Residence
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,875 sq. ft.

LOCATION: East Side of Jean Street off

. GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
PROPERTY: Split Level Triplex incomplete
FLOOR AREA: 2,444 sq. ft.

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141 sq. ft.
LOCATIONS: Heading South on Blue Hill
Road from Faith United Way, take 1st corner

Prince Charles Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $210,000

12. BELLOT ROAD
LOT NO. D

partnerships as part of its man-
date to preserve and advance the
growth and development of the
financial services sector of The
Bahamas.

He said part of this endeavor is
the Government’s focus on the
health of industry associations.

“We were pleased to double
our subvention to the BFSB in
the current fiscal budget from of
$250,000 to $500,000 and to com-
mit to provide a new subvention
to the Bahamas Association of
Compliance Officers (BACO) of
$25,000 for training in the upcom-
ing fiscal budget.”

Minister Laing said the Gov-
ernment is also developing a com-
prehensive international trade
and tax policy.

He added that the most press-
ing international trade issue for
The Bahamas is the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
with the European Union (EU).

Minister Laing pointed out that
while the EPA has been under
negotiation from 2002, no region
participating in the negotiations
stand ready to meet the Decem-
ber 31, 2007 deadline set some
five years ago.

“Even CARIFORUM, which
seemed most likely in a position
to sign onto the EPA by the dead-
line, is now unlikely to make the
deadline, notwithstanding last
minute efforts to do so.”

He said, “While CARIFO-
RUM, which is the grouping to
which The Bahamas belongs,
seeks to sign a comprehensive
agreement by the deadline, The
Bahamas has offered to the Euro-
pean Union to sign a limited
“goods only” agreement and is
now awaiting the EU’s response
to the offer.”

Minister Laing said a goods-
only offer is consistent with over-
tures made by the EU to coun-
tries seeking to meet the World
Trade Organization’s (WTO)
deadline of December 31.

He added that it is the best
offer The Bahamas can make at



Kristaan Ingraham/BIS





NASSAU - Persons from throughout the business community turned
attended the one day Trade and Tax Symposium hosted by The
Bahamas Financial Services Board, on December 6, 2007.

International, have to the EU
market on favorable terms.

He noted that any negotiations
toward a services agreement with
the EU will come later, but will
take place within the broader con-
text of a Bahamas International
Trade Policy.

When the Policy is developed
within the next six to 12 months, it
will ensure that the country is able
to deliberate and comprehen-
sively negotiate any and all trade
agreements from its accession to
the WTO, which The Bahamas
will be pursuing actively to the
proposed but now stalled Free
Trade Area of the Americas
(FTAA).

Minister Laing said, “Such a
comprehensive policy developed
by an established, professionally-
staffed, academic-research sup-
ported International Trade Unit
within the Ministry of Finance
will ensure that all implications
of such agreements for our finan-
cial services sector are clearly
defined and addressed.”

The Minister added that the
Government is seeking full indus-
try input on Tax Information
Exchange Agreements (TIEAs).

He said it is no secret that the
nation is receiving numerous
requests from nations’ across the
globe to enter into TIEAs with
them.

“While there is mounting pres-

“Certainly, for our part, any
agreements entered into with oth-
er countries must meet the basic
requirement of advancing the
growth and development of our
economy with clearly defined
gains.

“There must be open and frank
dialogue with industry on this
issue because it is not going away
and determinations will ultimate-
ly have to be made,” Minister
Laing said. “We welcome forums
such as this and others to be able
to explore these issues.”

The Government also wants
the elimination of Exchange Con-
trol. He noted that his adminis-
tration has expressed its intention
to eliminate exchange control dur-
ing its term in office. This, of
course, will take place to the
extent that conditions are sup-
portive.

“In any event,” he said, “we
believe and are considering ini-
tiatives that can make exchange
control more user friendly as well
as identify important growth and
development opportunities for
certain business transactions with-
in the context of existing arrange-
ments.”

Minister Laing said the Gov-
ernment’s ultimate objective is to
advance the hopes, dreams and
aspirations of Bahamians.

“Financial Services has been
important to our wellbeing thus
far and will no doubt continue to

PROPERTY SIZE: Single-Family Residence
on left (Sunrise Road) Heading south on Land 5,995 sq. ft.
Sunrise Road take the 5th corner on left then LOCATION: Traveling West on Bellot Road
first corner on right. Property is 7th lot on from Faith Avenue the subject property is
the right. situated on the Southern side of the road
APPRAISED VALUE: $200,000 about 1,0156 feet West of Faith Avenue
painted green

. STAR ESTATES EASTERN DISTRICT APPRAISED VALUE: $140,000

LOT NO. 54

PROPERTY: Multi-Family Duplex
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Traveling East along Prince
Charles Drive take the 1st corner on the right
past Sea Grape Shopping Plaza. Heading
South on Jupiter Way take the 1st right then
the 2nd left to Venus Avenue. The property
is the 2nd building on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $348,000

13. POLHEMUS GARDENS
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
LAND: 7,700 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling East on Boyd Road
from Providence Avenue take the 3rd corner
on the left. The property is the 3rd lot on the
left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $169,000

. SOUTH BEACH & MARSHALL ROAD
LOT NO. 17D /
PROPERTY: Multi-Family Triplex Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 10, 000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling West on Marshall Road
from South Beach Road, take the first corner
on the right (Tiao End) the subject property
is the 4th building on left painted green with
white trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

14. FLAMINGO GARDENS SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Portion of Crown Grant A6
PROPERTY SIZE: Duplex Apartment
LAND: 5,500 sq. ft.

LOCATION: mile South of Carmichael
Road West of Faith Avenue in the Western
District.

APPRAISED VALUE: $240,000

15. PINEWOOD GARDENS
LOT NO. 1685
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
LAND: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Walnut Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $230,000

_ FAITH AVENUE
LOT NO. 5
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Triplex
Apartment
LAND: 11,187 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Sir Milo Butler Highway
travel South on Faith Avenue, first paved
road on left then first left; property on right
side of street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $306,000

VACANT LOTS

1, MALVARIC ESTATES SUBDIVISION,
EASTERN DISTRICT
LOT NO. 5
PROPERTY: Multi-Family Lot
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,114 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading South along High Vista
Drive from East Bay Street, take the first
corner on the left (Citrus Drive) then right
onto Mango Drive take the 4th corner on the
right Andy Tuft to the T Junction, turn left
then take the first corner on the right.
Property is 3rd lot on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $109,000

3. GRANTANNA SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY SIZE: Duplex Building under
construction (at foundation)
LAND: 6,905 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading East on Cowpen Road
from Spinkard Road, paved road on right,
lot is the 13th property on left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $92,000

4, SOUTHERN SHORES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 26
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Residential
Lot - 11,183 sq. ft.
LOCATION: 800 feet North of Marshall Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $89,000

- CORAL HARBOUR SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residential
Lot - 12,113 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Hopkins Drive.
APPRAISED VALUE: $121,000

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS (INCLUDE TELEPHONE CONTACT AND
POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, P. O. BOX SS-6263, PHONE NO. 394-6465;
FAX NO. 393-2883, OR VIA EMAIL: CHERRY.MISSICK@COMBANKLTD.COM FOR FURTHER
INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS

‘©2007 CreativeRelations.net



this time to preserve the access
that companies, such as the fish-
eries exporters and Polymers __yate sector.

sure in this regard, the Govern-
ment is determined to receive full
input into this issue from the pri-
this regard.”



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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 13





LOCAL Wie hS



KEYED UP: Court

: reporters take part ina
. ' j training session
Oe a + a at the Supreme Court
oa Sc aiek eer tae ee ws building on Saturday,
—_ ‘ a Ze December 8, 2007.

‘Trainee court reporters Ileatt their
skills at the Supreme Court building





Absolute Precision



AEPORTING TEAM — Minister of State for Legal Atfairs the Hon: Desmond Bannistet aie and Anita
aul Johnston (right of Minister) pose for a group photograph with participants in the training course
tor court reporters at the Supreme Court building on Saturday, December 8, 2007.

BREITLING



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ON COURSE: Anita Paul Johnston conducts a training course for court reporters at the Supreme Court | proposes oh sit ea as eles %
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Harbour Bay (242) 394 7660 | Marathon Mall (242) 393 7979

REVEREND SOBIG KEMP offers a blessing to the management, staff and workers on Friday November |

THE TRIBUNE



16th, of the Grand Bahama Yacht Club as they prepare next to place the roof upon their new Club

House set to open before the end of winter.

Grand Bahama
Yacht Club blessed

THE management, staff,
and builders of the Grand
Bahama Yacht Club gathered
to bless their new Club House.
It was not your usual blessing,
where a new building is
blessed upon its grand open-
ing, but rather one stemming
from a European tradition,
where the building is blessed
once the highest truss is set
into place.

A wreath to symbolise the
blessing was mounted above
the building like a halo to
commemorate the event

Present at the event was
Reverend Sobig Kemp who
offered a poignant prayer
poolside next to the newly
refurbished GBYC Pool Bar.
His message carried everyone
forward, with a renewed ded-
ication to the task at hand,
that being to complete the
building before the end of the
winter season. The Club
House will be an upscale



REVEREND SOBIG KEMP, Terence Gape, Maria Christiansen, Erik Chris-
tiansen, Steven Olesen, Jessica Marshall, Preben Olesen and Gabriela Cor-
bella stand in front of the new GBYC Club House, Friday November 23rd
set to open by the end of winte 2 :

lounge and bar, along with a
restaurant for Grand Bahama
Yacht Club Members and
guests offering elegant break-










fasts; wonderful lunches and
fine dinners, all overlooking
the pool and surrounding gar-
dens.

FNM Women's
Association of
hold officers
installation

THE Women’s Associa-
tion of the Free National
Movement held its installa-
tion of 2007-2009 officers on
Sunday during a luncheon at
the Royal Bahamian San-
dals Resort on Cable Beach.

The luncheon was held
under the patronage of the
Leader of the FNM, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham,
and Mrs Delores Ingraham,
and the party leader
conducted the install-
ations.

Ms Caron Shepherd,
daughter of the late Mem-
ber of Parliament and FNM
Meritorious Council Mem-
ber James Shepherd, was
the outgoing president of
the Women’s Association.
She was replaced by Ms
Elizabeth Thompson, for-
mer Registrar General of
The Bahamas.

Before the luncheon, the
Prime Minister led a contin-
gent of parliamentarians,
party officers, and FNM
members and supporters at
a special church service held
at the Remnant Tabernacle
of Praise on Carmichael
Road, where the pastor is
the Rev Dr Kendal Stubbs.

The FNM invited all
FNMs and other members
of the public to join in that
service of thanksgiving for
the work and witness of the
Women’s Association in the
party and around the com-
munity.

Through the years, past
presidents of the 1 NM
Women’s Association have
includea Mrs Janet Bost-
wick, the firsi bahamian
woman to be eleci..! to Par-
liament, who also served as
a Cabinet Minister in (he
first FNM Government in J
1992; former St Margaret’s \
MP Sylvia Scriven; and for-
mer Fox Hill MP Juanianne
Dorsett.

oo En re
THE TRIBUNE

St. Augustine College’s class of 1982
helps science and technology department

A $3,000 thank you »

GIVING BACK: St. Augustine College's class of 1982 alumni association gives cheque to alma mater.

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN the spirit of the holiday
season, St Augustine College’s
class of 1982 alumni associa-
tion marked its 25th anniver-
sary by presenting its alma
mater with a $3,000 cheque to
aid the advancement of the
science and technology
department.

The donation was presented
to SAC’s principal, Sonia
Knowles, on December 5 to
purchase 10 microscopes to
better equip the students of
the science department,
Dwayne Woods president of
the alumni association said

yesterday. “It’s important (to
give back) because nobody is
self-made.

“We are all here to help

each other.

“We believe we benefited
tremendously from SAC and
have a responsibility to give
back.

“This is. our way of saying
thank you and in the mean-
time we want to encourage
students, past and present, to
help their fellow man.”

“In January, the alumni plan
to fund a tuition scholarship
for a deserving 12th grade stu-
dent at SAC and will make a
cash donation to Zion Baptist
Church as its culminating
event.

MISSPRO TOCOLEJEWELLER Y

XS
&

The association, led by Mr
Woods, treasurer Dino Moss,
and secretary Kim Conyers
organises celebratory events
every five years.

A memorabilia package of a
pen, tote bag, T-shirt, and
license plate frame bearing the
insignia of SAC class of 1982.

Mr Woods is a technical
officer at the Water and
Sewage Corporation and part
owner of Androsia Steak and
Seafood Restaurant.

Mr Moss is manager of pen-
sion services at Fidelity Bank.
Kim Conyers is the office
manager at First World Engi-
neering (Bahamas) Ltd.

UA

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE 1 RIBUNE
Reta LOCAL NEWS , a

| Visit of president of Inter-American Development Bank ©





Mr Luis Alberto Moreno, President of the Inter-American
Development Bank, was in The Bahamas this weekend as part
of a familiarisation mission to The Bahamas.

A significant feature of Mr Moreno’s visit was to introduce
the Bahamian private sector to the funding facilities available
from the IDB. Mr Moreno was hosted to two luncheons — one
on Friday in Nassau at the Imperial Ballroom, Adonis Rooms,
Atlantis Conference Centre, hosted by State Minister for
Finance Zhivargo Laing and the other at Our Lucaya in
Freeport on Saturday, co-hosted by Minister Laing and the Port
Authority. At both of these luncheons Mr Moreno had an
opportunity to speak to the private sector. *

The Country Office of the Inter-American Development
Bank also hosted Mr. Moreno to a dinner.

























Luis Moreno

spreads Christmas cheer
dren’s Emergency Hostel



e]
















F

d other youth choir stakeholders pay a cour-

he ‘ “SE RK

Kristaan Ingraham/BIS






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MEMBERS of the Polish National Youth Choir, choir directors an



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for the $200 million Seabridge Bahamas luxury townhouse development. The donation is a part of the
group's commitment to preserving and developing The Bahamas. The groundbreaking ceremony was
also attended by William Williams Principal, Source Development Group, LLC, Bowman Garrett, Prin-
cipal, Source Development Group, LLC, State Minister for Youth and Sports, Bryan Woodside, Works

Transport Minister Earl Deveaux, State Minister in the Ministry of Finance Zhivargo Laing, in addi-
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All Girls Fun
Day postponed
to December 15

RACQUEL DEVEAUX,
head of the Crisis Inter-
vention and Prevention
Centre, and Dr Wayne
Thompson, psychologist at
the Centre for Renewing
Relationships have post-
poned their “All Girls Fun
Day”, to Saturday, Decem-
ber 15.

This educational event,
originally scheduled for
Saturday, December 8, will
provide girls with informa-
tion about teen pregnancy
STDs, date rape. gang vio



de

aR



. ‘ , lence, and all forms of
The finest home and lite commercial dmuee ney elk ak eel
‘ i i truths about God's plan for
cardio equiptment i young women,” the organ

isers said.

The fun day will be held
at the L W Young Audito
rium on Bernard Road,
from noon to 4pm, and is
open to all teen girls.

Burns House
donation to feed
needy families

BURNS House’s donation
to the Cleveland Eneas Pii-
mary School was much appre-
ciated by the school’s admin-
istration as it will feed 27
needy families whose children
attend the school.

Bahamas Supermarkets also
contributed,

Vt the schools annual
Christmas carol service. whic li
took place yesterday and was
headed by the schools’ guid-
ance counsellor Donica Ohiv-



er, the families in anced were

handed certificates
THE TRIBUNE





REACH-ing out to

those with autism

CHILDREN: Senate show rl autism affects one in 150 children.

THE REACH committee
hosted a seminar where Ms.
Zonya Mitchell, a Bahamian
Board Certified Associate
Behaviour Analyst (BCABA)
enlightened her audience about
the details surrounding Applied
Behaviour Analysis (ABA).

Among the _ available
approaches to treating autism,
ABA has demonstrated efficacy
in promoting social and lan-
guage development, and in
reducing behaviours that inter-
fere with learning and cognitive
functioning.

Ms Mitchell also highlighted
that the ABA approach teaches
social, motor, and verbal behav-
iours as well as reasoning skills
— problems that many individu-
als with autism encounter. ABA
therapy is used to teach behav-
iours to individuals with autism
who may not otherwise “pick
up” these behaviours sponta-
neously through imitation.

In January 2008, Ms. Mitchell
plans to open an ABA centre in
Nassau called the Nassau
Learning Centre. This center
will be located in Wongs Plaza



«

~ESTEE LAUDER MAKE-UP EVENT
Thursday & Friday, December 13th & 14th, 2007,





in Palmdale. ABA teaches
these skills through use of
behavioural observation and
positive reinforcement or
prompting to teach each step of
a behaviour. Generally ABA
involves intensive training of
the therapists, extensive time
spent in ABA therapy (20-40

hours per week) and weekly |

supervision by experienced clin-
ical supervisors known as a cer-
tified behaviour analyst. ABA
principles can also be used with
arange of "Neurotypical" typ-
ical or atypical individuals
whose issues vary from devel-
opmental delays, significant
behavioural problems or unde-
sirable habits that need to be
corrected.

Today’s statistics now show
that autism affects one in 150
children, in particular one in 94
boys (Centre for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention, 2007). One
often misunderstood concept is
that autism is comparable to
mental retardation, but it is not.
Autism is a complex brain dis-
order that presents itself in ear-
ly childhood and continues



straight into adulthood greatly
affecting an individual’s social
and communication skills.
There are many schools of
thought concerning what causes
autism. Some believe that the
disorder arises as a result of a
genetic predisposition. In recent
times, a more controversial
debate has surfaced suggesting
that high percentages of toxic
heavy metals, present in immu-
nizations, has caused a high

number of children to be diag- .

nosed with autism. Despite the
many proposals, the definitive
cause of autism is still unknown.

Although autism is a lifelong
disorder, many individuals diag-
nosed with the condition are
still promised a bright future
and go on to live very normal
independent lives provided they
are given the necessary support
from family, teachers, doctors
and therapists.

For further information e-
mail questions to either
:mzonya@hotmail.com"
mzonya@hotmail.com or maca-
ba@hotmail.com"
tmacaba@hotmail.com.

ESTEE LAUDER ~
AV Von Qe Ok a Ail

ou are cordially to an

10am - 5pm,

at The Perfume Bar; Tel: 322-7216

Bay & Parliament Streets

Saturday, December 15th, 2007

10am - 5pm,

at Solomon’s Mines, Tel: 394-7771
Mall at Marathon

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE

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PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Advocacy group: govt should be
liable for victims of those on bail

FROM page one

individuals to receive bail.

“You’ve got accused per-
sons being released for mur-

der on $20-$30,000 bail. If
really serious why not raise
bail? Why not half a million a
million (dollars)?” he said.
Furthermore, they claim the

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attorney general’s office is not
living up to its responsibility of
appealing “flippant” rulings
on behalf of the judiciary.

According to Mr Bethel,
Families for Justice was
formed after one of three
young men accused of mur-
dering his 16-year-old son was
granted bail short of two years
after being remanded to
prison.

This happened when —
after the case was brought to
trial within 14 months of his
son’s murder e of the
accused’s lawyers allegedly
failed to show up in court,
causing the trial to be set back.

“We challenge that it should
not have happened (the men
being granted bail) — the case
was ready,” he said.

Among the group are many
families who are awaiting trial
dates for those charged with
killing their loved ones — one
for as long as seven years,
claims Mr Bethel.

Meanwhile, another family



saw four men accused of mur-
dering their relative released
on bail, all within a year of his
death.

Discovering that, according
to section four of the Bail Act,
the court must record the rea-
son for the order of any indi-
vidual’s release, the group
advocated to be told why the
men were granted bail.

Eventually, thanks to their
efforts through the media, Mr
Bethel claims he was contact-
ed personally by newly-
appointed Attorney General
Claire Hepburn who is said to
have told him that, according
to the records, one of the men
was released “because he had
an ear infection,” and another
because he had “complained
of asthma.”

“This is what we are now
challenging. Their constitu-
tional rights had not been vio-

hearing, before a fair and
impartial court, within a rea-
sonable time: An accused also
has a right to apply to the
Supreme Court for bail if their
case has not been heard with-
in a reasonable time. The
court has set two years as the
cut off time for what is rea-
sonable.

Noting that “an ear infec-
tion is not a reasonable rea-
son to release somebody” and
the short amount of time that
had allegedly passed before
he was granted bail, Mr Bethel
contends that the rights of the
victims of these crimes were
violated in this instance.

“Chief Justice Burton Hall
must be accountable for the
actions.of Supreme Court jus-
tices,” said Mr Bethel.

Shortly after discovering the
recorded reason for the men’s
release, the group requested

that the Attorney General’s
office now appeal the deci-
sion, but were told that the
time limit to do so had now

lated. It was under two years,”
he said.

Under the constitution a
person has a right to a fair

a ee
Christie’s position



OOD

FROM page one

Mr Wilchcombe. "He must do that, so there is no reason to challenge
him now. And he should not be challenged right now. In fact, we
should be supporting Christie, and allowing Christie to take our
party through the important phase of reuniting, strengthening and
preparing for the future."

Mr Wilchcombe also told The Tribune that he does not think
there is going to be an early election, as is being speculated by
some. He gave the now discredited voter registration list, of which
numerous claims have been made that non-citizens registered and

voted, as a reason why this cannot occur.

"You see, I don't believe there is going to be an early election. I
don't think that we can have an early election, notwithstanding
what some people think," said Mr Wilchcombe. “So no matter what
people think, in my view, the voter registration list is going to have
to be redone in this country. We're going to need to have a period of
time for that to happen," he said. "And not until that happens are we
even going to consider an election."

If the prime minister decides to dissolve parliament, argued Mr
Wilchcombe, a responsible opposition would have to challenge that
act, "simply because this is a voter registration list that is certainly
showing that there is impropriety; showing that there has been some
bureaucratic mistakes made — or administrative errors."

Mr Wilchcombe also acknowledged in the interview that there has
been some factionalism in the PLP since the party lost the May
2nd election, which needs to be repaired in order for the party to go
forward.

"The PLP needs to heal some of its wounds. At the moment, we
are not as united as we must be," he said, adding that a political par-
ty is obligated to be unified and prepared at all times for any even-

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tinue to perpetuate falsities - gossip - and I think it hurts the party.
And it hurts individuals who are trying to make an effort.

"Tf an individual is trying to do something in the organisation, or
trying to ensure that the party is strong — projecting ideas and vision
of the organisation - well then you-are seen as a threat, or you are
seen as someone who is against the leadership. But, that's not true.
We have individuals who waste more time spreading gossip, as
opposed to spending time trying to lift up the organisation."

Mr Wilchcombe added that there are also individuals in the PLP
who "lack the maturity" to "agree to disagree agreeably."

"It might be Machiavellian; it might be divide and conquer, but that
is not good for an organisation that believes, and that is supposed to
be, rooted in people. And right now I think sometimes we have
too many groups, and it leads to disunity."

The West End and Bimini MP told The Tribune that Glenys
Hanna-Martin, as chairman, can assist in this reunification process.
He emphasized that the PLP must never again miss or skip con-
ventions ~ the last party convention was in 2005.

Along with Mrs Hanna-Martin as the new chairman, some of the
changes Mr Wilchcombe said are necessary for the PLP include, more
creative fund-raising methods: the increased use of young people in
the organisation, along with allowing them to move up the ranks into
positions of authority; and an outreach to white Bahamians.

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passed.

The spokesman said that
had the victim’s families been
made aware of the reasons
why these accused individuals
were being released at the
time they would have
“jumped on it” and demanded
an appeal.

“People are saying right
now that this shouldn’t be
happening,” said Mr Bethel.
“This is where we are right
now — we want to get justice
on this bail issue,” he added.

Families for Justice’s call
has gone out as the country
this weekend set a new record
for the highest number of
murders in a year with the
death of Grand Bahama resi-
dent 22-year-old Julian
Nicholls from a single bullet
shot to the head.

Seventy-five persons were
murdered this year, breaking
the record of 74 set in 2000.

Omar Archer wants
PLP chairmanship —

Candidates to engage
in national debate
FROM page one |

raped, we have a compro-
mised and corrupt national
security force, sexual
immorality within the very"
doors of the church, growing
concerns over widespread
social ills, professionals with- -
in the legal field engaging
in unethical practices — and
there seems to be no end in
sight for those directly
affected,” he said.

Mr Archer, with PLP
MP. Glenys Hanna Martin -
and former senator
Paulette Zonicle, are the
only people who have pub-
licly announced their
intention to run for the
chairmanship — a position |
which has been held by
Raynard Rigby for the last
five years. Mr Rigby said
last week that he does not
intend to run again for the
post.

Sources have speculated
that MICAL MP Alfred
Gray and lawyer Fayne
Thompson may also run.

Mr Archer encouraged all
those who are considering .
throwing their lot into the
ring to come forward and
engage in the debate so
that the Bahamian people
can be informed about
their positions.

“The Bahamian people
deserve to know, it is not a
game,” he said.

Mr Archer, who ran as a
candidate for the Bahamas
Democrati¢ Movement in
the May election before
joining the PLP in the fol-
lowing months, contended
that the public would be
pleased to have an oppor-
tunity to determine where
candidates stand on issues
such as immigration,
crime, education, health-
care, land reform, prison
reform, minimum wage,
the rights of the child,
the bail act and homosexu-
ality.

He said that he would
like to mould the PLP into
a party that could become
“the future government of
the country” as well as
play a part in “creating an
environment where

ahamians can become
active citizens in the day-
to-day decision making of -
the country.”

Mr Archer has suggested
the dates, January 10 or 17,
as possible occasions on
which such a debate could
take place, timing it to fall
several weeks ahead of the
anticipated February party |}
convention. i

His call comes as West
End and Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe publicly ~
threw his support behind |
Mrs Hanna Martinasa} |
future chairman for the)
PLP on Friday, predicting
that she would win the *
post. “
In an interview with The
Tribune on the same day,
Mr Gray also did not rule
out the possibility of his’
entry into the race.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 21



African leaders reject
EU proposals for
trade deal to replace
colonial-era systems

@ LISBON, Portugal

MOST African leaders have
rejected European Union pro-
posals for a free-trade deal that
would replace colonial-era trad-
ing systems, Senegal’s president
said Sunday at a summit marred
by disputes over Zimbabwe and
Darfur, according to Associated
Press.

The two-day meeting in Lis-
bon had been seen as a chance to
push for progress on the deals
known as European Partnership
Agreements, or EPAs.

“It was said several times dur-
ing the plenary session and it was
said again this morning: African
states reject the EPAs,” Sene-
galese President Abdoulaye
Wade said in angry comments at
a news conference.

Wade said he and South
African President Thabo Mbeki
had led African opposition to the
EU’s proposals which, he said,
“aren’t in Africa’s interest.”

He did not provide details.

His tone of indignation reflect-
ed an. increasingly tense atmos-
phere at the end of a summit that
was intended to foster a new era
of close relations between
Europe and Africa.

The meeting between leaders
of the 53-member African Union
and 27-nation EU was their first
in seven years. ‘

As it opened Saturday, deep
differences over the human rights
record of Zimbabwean President
Robert Mugabe and over mea-
sures to end the conflict in the
western Sudanese region of Dar-
fur were evident.

Asked what his message to
Europe was as he arrived at the
summit venue Sunday, Mugabe
said nothing, but raised his arm
and made a fist.

German Chancellor Angela
Merkel said Saturday the EU was
“united” in condemning Mugabe
for what they view as his eco-
nomic mismanagement, failure
to curb corruption and contempt
for democracy. British Prime
Minister Gordon Brown stayed
away from the summit in protest
of Mugabe’s attendance. \

Measures to help end the con-
flict in the western Sudanese

SS Se ae a

region of Darfur brought anoth-
er point of contention. Sudanese
President Omar al-Bashir has so
far refused to allow non-Africans
into a 26,000-strong U.N.-A.U.
peacekeeping force planned for
Darfur. EU nations, meanwhile,
have failed to come up with the
military hardware needed to sup-
port the operation.

On trade, the EU wants to
meet a Dec. 31 deadline set by
the World Trade Organization
for replacing its trading system
with former European colonies
around the world, including in
Africa. The WTO has ruled that
the EU’s 30-year-old preferen-
tial trade agreement with Africa
was unfair to other trading
nations and violated internation-
al rules.

The negotiations have lasted
five years and officials had hoped
the summit would bring a break-
through.

During previous talks, African
governments have said the agree-
ments would do little to boost
their access to European mar-
kets. They also viewed the con-
ditions as an EU attempt to med-
dle in African affairs.

European Commission Presi-
dent Jose Manuel Barroso
acknowledged the difficulty of
reaching free-trade deals between
wealthy European countries and
poor African nations.

“It is a challenge for both
Africans and Europeans and will
require time,” Barroso said in a
speech to the gathering.

The two sides will press ahead
with talks on interim accords with
individual African countries to
assure they continue to enjoy
privileged access to European
markets, he said.

“We are nearly there and we
now need to focus all of our ener-
gy to achieve this priority objec-
tive,” Barroso said.

The EU says a deal will boost
trade and help the development
of African economies. It has
warned that nations with which it
does not forge new agreements
by January will automatically lose
preferential trade privileges and
receive only limited access to EU
markets under existing world
trade rules,



Paulo Duarte/AP

FROM LEFT to right, Eyropeal Commission President Jose Manuel en Ghana’ s President John Kufuor, Portugal s Prime Minister Jose
Socrates and African Union Commission Chairman Alpha Oumar Konare are seen during a final media conference at an EU Africa Summit in Lis-
bon, Sunday Dec. 9, 2007. European and African leaders are scheduled to sign a strategic partnership agreement on Sunday, after a two-day sum-
mit marked by tensions over human rights in Zimbabwe.




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PAGE 22, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Roadside bomb in Iraq kills police chief, two guards



@ BAGHDAD

A ROADSIDE bomb struck
a convoy carrying the police
chief of a predominantly Shiite
province south of Baghdad on
Sunday, killing him and two of
his bodyguards, authorities said,
according to Associated Press.

Defense Minister Abdul-Qad-
er al-Obeidi said preparations
had begun for a military opera-
tion in Diyala, a province north-
east of Baghdad that on Friday
saw more than 20 people killed
in two suicide bombings.

“If we succeed in controlling
areas of Diyala close to Bagh-
dad, the rate of incidents in
Baghdad decreases by 95 per-
cent,” he told The Associated
Press. The area has seen numer-
ous attacks in recent weeks, as
militants flee for more remote



regions to escape the security
campaign in the capital.

“We believe there will be a
secure, stable Diyala in months
to come,” said Rear Adm. Gre-
gory Smith, a chief U.S. military
spokesman.

Convoy

The explosion Sunday in
Hillah, about 60 miles south of
Baghdad, struck a convoy car-
rying the police chief of Babil
province, Brig. Gen. Qais al-
Maamouri, and two guards, offi-
cials said. Fearing more violence,
police imposed an indefinite cur-
few and the streets quickly emp-
tied.

Local authorities acknowl-
edged militia fighters could be
behind the assasination but said





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the primary suspect was al-Qai-
da in Iraq, which maintains a
strong presence in the northern
half of the province that includes
towns in the so-called “triangle
of death” south of the capital.

The head of the provincial
council’s security committee,
Hassan Watwet, said an investi-
gation into Sunday’s explosion
was under way.

“The primary suspect is al-
Qaida, but we do not rule out

the second suspect, the militias,”
_Watwet said. “This criminal act

reflects the deep bitterness inside
the terrorist groups who failed to
destabilize the security of Babil
province due to the great work
of the late police chief.”

The explosion was the latest in
a series of assassinations against
provincial leaders in the mainly
Shiite region south of the capital













as militias and other factions bat-
tle for control of the area with an
eye toward the eventual with-
drawal of U.S.-led forces.

Al-Maamouri was politically
independent and had a reputa-
tion for leading crackdowns
against militia fighters. He is
thought to have resisted pres-
sure from religious and political
groups to release favored mem-
bers from detention.

Police slapped an indefinite
curfew on Hillah, where streets
quickly emptied of residents
amid fears of arrests and clashes
in the wake of the killings.

The oil-rich south of Iraq, also
home to major pilgrimage sites
in the Shiite shrine cities of Najaf
and Karbala, has been a focal
point for rising tensions between
Shiite factions, particularly the
Mahdi Army that is nominally
loyal to radical cleric Muqtada
al-Sadr and the Badr Brigades,
the militant arm of the country’s
most powerful Shiite party —
the Supreme Islamic Iraqi Coun-
cil.

Al-Sadr has in late summer
ordered his fighters to stand
down for six month in the wake
of the death of some 52.people
in fighting out between rival

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groups during a major Shiite pil-
grimage in Karbala. Clashes
between rival Shiite factions
have continued since.

Two southern provincial gov-
ernors were killed earlier in
August — Gov. Mohammed Ali
al-Hassani of Muthanna and
Gov. Khalil Jalil Hamza in
neighboring Qadasiyah province,
raising fears of a violent power
struggle. The provincial police
chief also was killed in the
Qadasiyah attack. .

Targeted

Militants also have targeted
local Iraqi government officials
to try to intimidate those they
accuse of collaborating with the
USS. and Iraqi governments.

Underscoring that danger, the
head of the Ninevah provincial
council survived an assassination
attempt in the northern city of
Mosul.

A roadside bomb exploded

near a car carrying Hisham al-

Hamdani, police said, adding
that the car was damaged but no
casualties were reported.
Smith, the U.S. military
spokesman, said at a news con-



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ference that intelligence gleaned
from Iraqis who have turned
against al-Qaida and American
efforts to track down insurgents’
financing and bomb-making
facilities were key to a decline
in violence around the country.
He said Diyala would soon see’
the same level of improvement.

He cited operations stemming
from tips by Iraqis around the
country that have led to weapons

- caches, safe houses and bomb-

making facilities.

As a result, he said, roadside
bombings had decreased by 15
percent in October and Novem-
ber, and the military’s “found

-and cleared” rate for improvised

explosive devices is now more
than 50 percent — meaning for
every device that blows up, one
is found and cleared.

The Iraqis who have switched
sides to join the fight against al-
Qaida in Iraq, he said, are now
the greatest threat to the terror
group.

He said 72,000 people have
joined the anti-al-Qaida groups,
including 12,000 volunteers. But
many have come under attack
by militants.

“They are often the first line
of defense,” Smith said. |













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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 23



@ BALI, Indonesia

SLIMY, green and unsight-
ly, seaweed and algae are
among the humblest of plants,
according to Associated Press.

A group of scientists at a cli-
mate conference in Bali say
they could also be a potent
weapon against global warm-
ing, capable of sucking dam-
aging carbon dioxide out of
the atmosphere at rates com-
parable to the mightiest rain
forests.

“The ocean’s role is neglect-
ed because we can’t see the
vegetation,” said Chung Ik-
kyo, a South Korean environ-
mental scientist. “But under
the sea, there is a lot of sea-
weed and sea grass that can
take up carbon dioxide.”

The seaweed research,
backed by scientists in 12
Asian-Pacific countries, is part
of a broad effort to calculate
how much carbon is being
absorbed from the atmosphere
by plants, and to increase that
through reforestation and oth-
er steps.

Such so-called “carbon
sinks” are considered essen-
tial to controlling greenhouse
gases, which trap heat in the
atmosphere and are blamed
for global warming. « °

The conference in Bali is
aimed at launching two-year
negotiations for a new global
warming pact to replace the
Kyoto Protocol when it
expires in 2012, and a major
topic of discussion is the use of

Earth’s natural resources to :

remove carbon from the air.
While most of the attention
to carbon sinks’ has been on
forests, the seaweed scientists
say the world should look to
the oceans, where some 8 mil-
lion tons of seaweed and algae
are harvested from wild or cul-
tivated sources every year.
That solution is a largely
Asian one — and it’s not with-
out complications. Critics say a

rebatenge will be keeping, the -.





absorbed, from

Feenpeacee
ie at peep ita .





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

SE a STINET i eee |
Scientists at climate conference tout



Ed Wray/AP

INDONESIAN SEAWEED farmers sort the harvest from their farms off the beach in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia, Thursday Dec. 6, 2007. Slimy, green

and unsightly, seaweed and algae are among the humblest plants on earth, but a group of scientists at a climate conference in Bali say they could
also be a potent weapon against global warming, sucking damaging carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere at greater rates than the mightiest rain

forests.

re-entering the atmosphere.
And it’s unclear how a vast
increase in seaweed produc-
tion would affect navigation
or fisheries.

China is by far the world’s
largest producer of seaweed,
followed by South Korea and
Japan. The Asia-Pacific seas,
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environment.

Some types of seaweed can
grow 9 to 12 feet long in only
three months. Lee Jae-young,
with South Korea’s fisheries
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John Beardall, with Australia’s
Monash University.

“These are very productive
ecosystems. They’re drawing
down a lot of carbon,”
Beardall said.

South Korea and Japan are
leaders in the research. Seoul

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eaweed as global warming solution

boost production in nations
with long coastlines.

While the group is not rec-
ommending a specific target
for expansion of seaweed cul-
tivation, Beardall estimated
that the Philippines could con-
ceivably increase its annual
output by more than 100 times
with more intensive produc-
tion techniques.

In addition to storing car-
bon, seaweed would need to
be used to produce clean-
burning biofuels, thereby
ensuring the carbon dioxide
isn’t simply recycled back into
the air as it would be if the
seaweed is eaten.

- The concept, however, has
problems. Skeptics say trees
are effective for carbon stor-
age because they live for many
years, while seaweed is culti-
vated and harvested in cycles
of only months, meaning the
storage will be hard to mea-
sure or control.

“It depends on how long
you keep the materials,” said I
Nyoman Suryadiputra, of Wet-
lands International.

“Because if it is decom-
posed in a month, the carbon
dioxide will go back into the
atmosphere.”

Other obstacles remain.
Some critics wonder if remov-
ing water from the seaweed as
it’s converted to fuel would

require a large amount of.

energy, thereby reducing the
environmental benefits. Sup-
porters say sun-drying is an
option, but it could be diffi-
cult to apply that on an indus-
trial scale.

The environmental impact
of rapid expansion of seaweed
farms has also not been
thought out, scientists con-
cede. Huge floating farms
could complicate fishing, ship-
ping and other maritime activ-
ities.

Chung acknowledged the
idea was in its infancy.

“Tn terms of ball games, we
are just.in the bullpen,” he

- said, “not the main game yet.”

eon






ave to win.













PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Worshippers pack church
to see first Iraqi cardinal

@ BAGHDAD

THE worshippers. were
searched at the door and
snipers stood guard on the roof,
but Sunday's Mass was a joy-
ful one for more than 200 Iraqis
who packed a church in east-
ern Baghdad to see the first
Iraqi cardinal, according to
Associated Press.

The service, which took place
under heavy guard and was
broadcast live on Iraqi state
television, was capped by a
handshake from a visiting Shi-
ite imam — a symbolic show of
unity between Iraq's majority
Muslim sect and its tiny Chris-
tian community..

Cardinal Emmanuel III Del-
ly, leader of the ancient
Chaldean Church, celebrated
the two-hour Mass, three weeks
after Pope Benedict XVI ele-
vated him to the top ranks of
the Roman Catholic hierarchy.

Delly presided over other
services this week in Baghdad
and the northern Kurdish city
of Irbil, spreading his message
of unity and forgiveness among
Iraq's Christians who have fre-
quently been targeted by Islam-
ic extremists, forcing tens of
thousands to flee and isolating
many of those who remained
in barricaded neighborhoods.

"We are of one family,
everyone should work for the
progress of this country,'' he
said during his sermon.

"We pray today for the sake
of each other and to forgive
each other, as well to be direct-
ed to do good deeds,'' he
added. ''That is my demand for
the Iraqis, moreover I urge the
return home for displaced peo-
ple and immigrants to their
ancestral land."

Many of the people filling the
pews at the elegant brick
Church of the Virgin Mary said
they were taking advantage of a
lull in violence to attend ser-
vices and congratulate Delly for
becoming the first Iraqi to be
named a cardinal.

In a reminder of the dangers
still facing Iraqis, armed police-
men wearing helmets and blue
uniforms were stationed on the
church's roof and others
searched worshippers walking





WAM”

es

Khalid Mohammed/AP

VATICAN AMBASSADOR to Iraq Francis Joulikat, second, from left, Iraqi Cardinal Ernianilal III Delly, second from right, and Archbishop Shilayinon Wardoni, right, cut a cake
after a mass celebrated at the Miriam Church in Palestine Street in east Baghdad, Iraq, on Sunday, Dec. 9, 2007. Delly was elevated to Cardinal by Pope Benedict XVI last month.

toward the stately-briek build-
ing on Palestine Street, a major
thoroughfare i in editenn Bagh-
dad. Several police pickups and
Iraqi armored vehicles blocked
the street.

Church officials said the

weekly afternoon Mass has

been more crowded and -was:

extended by an hour as Iraqis
are less fearful about being out
on the streets late in many
areas of the capital.

"We are proud of this. We

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“IONS

-came here to this;chureh in

order to tell the terrorists that

‘we are not afraid of “them,” said

Hibba Nasser,

housewife.
The high attendance at the

church in mainly Shiite eastern

a 26-year-old








Baghdad was among several

= recent signs that Iraqis are

showing signs of normalcy amid
a sharp decline in violence in
the capital and surrounding
areas, despite persistent attacks

The security situation
remains fragile in the city,
where Iraqis in many areas are
still afraid to venture outside
the concrete barriers erected
by the U.S. military to protect
volatile communities.

Only five people showed up
for Sunday Mass at the Church
of Saint John the Baptist in the
mainly Sunni district of Dora
in southern Baghdad, where
Christians have faced threats
from insurgents that have dri-
ven many away and forced oth-
ers to barricade themselves
inside their neighborhoods.

The priest, Aziz Bolus, said
that church was reopened about
45 days ago, more than a year
after it was closed because of
threats from al-Qaida in Iraq
militants.

"I decided to reopen it due
to the improved security situa-
tion and the return of some
Christian families to the area,"
Bolus said.

One worshipper, Dania
Youhana, said she had fled to
the semiautonomous Kurdish
area in northern Iraq last year
to escape the violence but
decided to return to her house
after hearing that al-Qaida
had been kicked out from the
area

[raqi soldiers guarded the
church, with Associated Press
photos showing one standing
against a concrete wall with
graffiti from insurgents threat-
ening to ''kill the Shiites and
everybody who refuses to col-
laborate with al-Qaida."'

Delly, 80, has been outspo-
ken in the past about the need

~~ to"péeteet, Christians, who con

prise less than 3° percent of
Iraq'8*26 million ‘population. »
But he recently has expressed
optimism about the decline in
attacks in Baghdad and sur-
rounding areas, and he has wel-
comed messages of solidarity
from Muslim leaders and the
Shiite-led government.

The imam of a nearby Shiite
mosque shook hands with Del-
ly in the church's courtyard
after the service.

"IT came here to show the
unity of the Iraqi people," said
the black-turbaned imam Jas-
sim al-Jazairi. ''We are happy
with the cardinal. We are very
proud of any person, whether
Christian or Muslim, who rais-
es the name of Iraq in the inter-
national arena. We came here
to offer our congratulations to
Delly."'

Sectarian violence in Iraq has
declined in recent months due
largely to the security crack-
down in the Baghdad area, a
new U.S. push to enlist Sunni
and Shiite tribal leaders in the
fight against al-Qaida in Iraq
and militants, and a freeze in
the activities of the Mahdi
Army militia, led by the
radical Shiite cleric Muqtada
al-Sadr.

Christians in Iraq, the major-
ity of whom are Chaldean-
Assyrians and Armenians, were
generally left alone under Sad-
dam Hussein's regime. One of
them, Tariq Aziz, served as for-
eign minister and deputy prime
minister.

Attacks against the religious
minority peaked with a coordi-
nated bombing campaign in the
summer of 2004 against Bagh-
dad churches and again last
September after Pope Benedict
made comments perceived to
be anti-Islam.

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THE TRIBUNE

ousands help clean
oil spilled on S
rea’s western coast |



@ MALLIPO BEACH,
South Korea

THOUSANDS of people
mobilized by South Korea’s
Coast Guard used shovels
and buckets Sunday to clean
up a disastrous oil spill pol-
luting a swathe of the coun-
try’s scenic and environmen-
tally rich western coast,
according to Associated
Press.

About 100 ships, including
Coast Guard, navy and pri-
vate fishing boats, were also
to help contain and clean up
South Korea’s worst spill,
said Coast Guard official
Kim Young-hwan.

At total of 7,500 police,
military, civil servants and
volunteers struggled to
remove the oil, some battling
headaches, dizziness and nau-
sea.

The oil started hitting
beaches Saturday, a day after
a Hong Kong-registered
supertanker was slammed by
a South Korean-owned barge
that came unmoored from its
tugboat in rough seas about
seven miles off Mallipo, one
of South Korea’s best-known
beaches.

The area also includes a
national maritime park.

On Saturday, tides of dark
sea water crashed ashore at
Mallipo beach, while the
odor reached areas a half-
mile away.

“Kim Sun-seon, who works
for an ocean clean-up busi-
ness on South Korea’s south-
east coast, wore rubber
gloves and a mask to cope
with the strong smell.

“We don’t know when we
can finish this work,” she
said. “We have been shovel-
ing oil since yesterday but the
waves just keep bringing
more oil. I feel dizzy.”

Nearly 2.8 million gallons
of crude gushed into the
ocean, more than twice as
much as in South Korea’s
worst previous spill in 1995.

Thick, smelly waves of
crude washed ashore, turn-
ing seagulls black and threat-
ening fish farms along an 11-
mile stretch of coast, defying
efforts to contain it by drop-
ping oil fences into the ocean
and using chemicals to break
it up. Mats were placed on
the beach to absorb the oil.

The Coast Guard said the

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Affected area
includes national
maritime park

last of three leaks in the
tanker had been plugged
Sunday morning.

Mallipo, an important
stopover for migrating birds
including snipe, mallards and
great crested grebes, also has
an abundant fishing industry.

Choi Kyung-hwan, a 58-
year-old fisherman, came to
the beach Sunday to help, but
despaired for the area where
he has lived for 30 years.

“Mallipo is finished,” he
said.

Choi, wearing a thick win-
ter coat, said the strong odor
of oil had sickened his wife.

“But I came here because I
have to do something,” he
said. “I don’t know when we
can finish. But we have to
continue.”

Cho Yoo-soon, who runs a
raw fish restaurant at Mallipo
beach, 95 miles southwest of
Seoul, said the situation was
overwhelming. She. said
restaurants in the area were
closing, and she could not
pump fresh sea water into
her tanks.

“Without fresh sea water,
the fish will start going bad
after a week,” she said. “We
can’t even walk around here
because the entire beach is
covered with oil.”

The affected areas include
181 maritime farms that pro-
duce abalone, brown sea-
weed, laver, littleneck clams
and sea cucumbers, said Lee
Seung-yop, an official with
the Taean county govern-
ment, which includes the
beach. Aquatic farmers in the
area number about 4,000, he
said.

“A lot of damage is feared,
to these farms, although we
don’t have an estimate yet,”
Lee said Saturday.

Local raw fish restaurants
such as Lee Ok-hwa’s were
suffering.

“T haven’t had any cus-
tomers since news of the oil
spill Friday,” said Lee, who

had previously served 200
tourists and others a day.

“TI don’t know how to make
a living,” she said. “I don’t
know how to pay the rent. I
believe this situation will last
for at least one year.”

The central government
has designated the oil spill a
“disaster,” which makes it
easier for regional govern-
ments to mobilize personnel,
equipment and material to
cope with the situation. But it
stopped short of declaring
the region a “disaster area,”
which would make residents
eligible for government
financial aid.

Last year, more than 20
million tourists visited the
area, home to 63,800 people.

The Coast Guard said it
was unclear how many days
the clean-up would take.

The accident occurred Fri-
day morning when a barge
carrying a crane en route
from a construction site lost
control after a wire linking it
to the tugboat was cut due to
high winds, waves and cur-
rents,

The vessel then slammed
into the Hebei Spirit tanker.
Neither ship was in danger
of sinking and there were no
casualties.

The tanker had been at
anchor and carrying about
260,000 tons — about 1.8 mil-
lion barrels — of crude oil to
be loaded into boats from a
nearby port.

The size of the leak report-
ed by the authorities would
be about one-fourth that of
the 260,000 barrels, or 11 mil-
lion gallons, spilled into
Alaska’s Prince William
Sound by the Exxon Valdez
in 1989.

The spill was also smaller
than one in Pakistan in 2003
when a Greek-registered ship
ran aground near Karachi,
leaking some 8.2 million gal-
lons of crude that polluted
the city’s main beaches.



MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 25

LOCAL RESIDENTS and soldiers try to remove dense crude oil at
the Mallipo beach, west of Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Dec. 9,
2007. Some 2.7 million gallons of oil gushed Friday froma
146,000-ton Hong Kong-registered supertanker after a barge carry-
ing a crane slammed into it about seven miles off Mallipo beach.
The spill was the country’s largest, involving twice as much oil as a
spill in 1995.

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PAGE 26, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Despite US-driven military buildup,

Colombian guerrillas stubbornly fight on

MLA JULIA, Colombia

COLOMBIA’S defense
minister helicoptered into this
leftist rebel stronghold with a
clutch of U.S. Embassy offi-
cials and heavily armed Amer-
ican soldiers to assert emphat-
ically that Latin America’s
most enduring guerrilla army is
on the run, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

“The state has arrived to
stay, and never again will the
guerrillas control this territo-
ry,” Defense Minister Juan
Manuel Santos proclaimed in
October while inaugurating the
first police post ever in this for-
_ mer hub of the cocaine trade.

But just weeks later, an

» Associated Press’ news team
had to talk its way past testy
rebels just to reach the dirt-
street town, from which hun-
dreds of people have fled since

* police and soldiers meved in.

“It’s silly to say the govern-
ment has finished off the guer-
rillas,” said Gustavo Valencia,
_ a 52-year-old vegetable mer-
. chant, as helmeted soldiers
- shuffled by and an army radio

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U.S, military aid, this Andean

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nation’s armed forces have
been trying hard to crush the
Revolutionary Armed Forces
of Colombia, known as the
FARC. To try to measure the
campaign’s success, the AP vis-
ited this longtime rebel bastion
120 miles south of the capital,
Bogota.

In La Julia, Santos’ victory
declaration seemed premature,
especially judging from the dis-
trust, even hostility, that towns-
people displayed toward police
and soldiers nervously clutch-
ing assault rifles.

Since the 1960s, the peasant-
based FARC has served as the
only authority in many long-
neglected corners of Colom-
bia. Less than a decade ago, it
was mounting big attacks on

army bases and even briefly .

held a provincial capital, seiz-
ing scores of police and mili-
tary hostages.

But since President Alvaro
Uribe won office in 2002, the
government has reasserted
control over highways where
guerrilla roadblocks once har-
vested kidnap victims. It also
cleared rebels completely from
the province around Bogota.

The FARC’s international
profile was raised by Venezue-
lan President Hugo Chavez’s
recent efforts to broker a pris-
oner swap to free rebel
hostages including three U.S.
military contractors.

Uribe canceled the initiative
last month, saying Chavez
overstepped his authority. But
he said Friday that his govern-
ment is willing to meet with
the FARC in an unspecified
rural area as long as neither

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Fernando Vergara/AP

PEOPLE TRANSPORT food on a boat in the Duda River near La Julia,
Colombia, a longtime rebel bastion 190 kilometers (120 miles) south of
the capital Bogota, on Saturday, Oct. 20, 2007.

side is armed and internation-
al observers are present. There
was no immediate response
from the FARC.

Under the government’s

~ anti-FARC offensive, the num-

ber of professional soldiers has
doubled to almost 80,000 in
seven years, with 12 mobile
brigades and six high moun-
tain battalions added. Plans call
for an all-volunteer army once
a goal of 100,000 professional
soldiers is reached.

Washington’s contribution
under “Plan Colombia,” begun
by President Clinton, shifted
from anti-narcotics to empha-
size counterinsurgency after
the 9/11 attacks..

U.S. Special Forces teams ~

train elite'troops and American =
~ military advisers are attached

to Colombian divisions. The

aid also includes encrypted:

radios and 60 helicopters.
Most important is the real-
time intelligence provided by
the U.S. from satellite imaging
and communications inter-
cepts, Colombian military com-
mander Gen. Freddy Padilla
told the AP in an interview.
“Colombia’s armed forces

are today able to go anywhere :

in the country with surprise,
precision and overwhelming
force,” Padilla said. “We have

“at the moment access to or the
’ support of all technology the

United States employs for its
defense.”

No longer can the FARC
move hundreds of fighters
without detection, said Alfredo
Rangel, Colombia’s top mili-
tary analyst. And the army got
a morale boost when it killed
two senior rebel leaders in sep-
arate operations — including
the boss of the unit that held
Colombia’s current foreign
minister, Fernando Araujo, for
six years until his Jan. 1 escape.

But such gains hardly guar-
antee victory over a roughly
14,000-strong rebel army root-
ed in a history of peasant griev-
ances. Unlike most of its neigh-
bors, Colombia has never
adopted reforms to more equi-
tably distribute farmland.

The FARC could easily sur-
vive Uribe’s frontal assault
unless he can decapitate it by
capturing some of its top lead-
ers. One senior U.S. military
analyst told the AP that the
FARC is on the “strategic
defensive” — with its leader-
ship intact and its ranks easily
replenished despite record
desertions. It is trying to outlast
Uribe and may succeed, said
the analyst, who insisted on
anonymity for his safety
because he frequently travels
in Colombia.

Cocaine has long fueled
Colombia’s conflict, and the
FARC’s durability owes much
to revenues from the coca
crops that once made La Julia
a thriving drug market.

The town was home to three
generations of FARC loyalists
and a stronghold largely
because of its inaccessibility.
The rebels regularly engage
the military in this rugged
region where Andean foothills
meet jungle-laced plains.

Only a few weeks after San-
tos flew in Oct. 5, an AP team
was stopped by the FARC on

i 7Stice cra aga
* Shalfthé people ares!

a bone-jolting dirt road after
rebel sentries spotted the jour-
nalists headed to La Julia.

“We just want to make it
clear ‘that we’re the boss
around here,” said one uni-
formed guerrilla, an AK-47
over his shoulder. “We don’t
want the media going to La
Julia and serving the state’s
propaganda.”

Neither he nor his comman-
der would be photographed or
identified by name.

The AP team found La Julia
a half-deserted town awash in
fear. Commerce was
depressed. Heavily armed
police and soldiers were every-
where.

6
e€
fled. The size of La Julia’s pop-
ulation is uncertain, but the
town priest, the Rev. Henry
Arias, noted school enrollment
has dropped from 350 to 180.
since troops came. All:incom-
ing and outgoing vehicles.are
searched, and the cocaine trade
has gone underground.

Residents grumble that the
government — much like the
rebels in the past — has done
little to improve people’s lives.

It has failed to deliver on
promises of electricity, running
water and a ferry to cross-the
Duda River. Farmers depend
on motorized dugout canoes
to get their corn, bananas and
yucca across its rushing waters
and to market.

“We don’t have power::We
don’t have (running) water.
We don’t have anything,” said
Father Arias.

The command post “inau-
gurated” in October also ‘has
yet to be built, so police make
do with sandbagged fortifica-
tions and ditches dug into the
moist ochre soil.

Jose Cabezas, president of
the town’s trucking coopera-
tive, said it lost most of its
members last year when secu-
rity forces hauled away 24 peo-
ple accused of rebel ties. He
acknowledged some were
indeed FARC but said most
were not. To date, none has
been tried.

No one in La Julia would
admit to a reporter that they
back the rebels, and only a few
people — all newcomers —

troops arrived:in-June.2'

dared to praise the army.

The town’s police comman-
der, Capt. Rafael Montoya,
acknowledges he’s in hostile
territory, with nearby jungles
dotted with FARC camps.

The militants probe his
defenses nearly nightly, he said.
Men in black throw rocks to
measure the distance to poten-
tial grenade targets, then melt
away into the darkness.

“I’m up every night until
about 3 a:m. Those are the
hours we’re on high alert,” he
said.

Meanwhile, townspeople
strive to stay neutral.

Valencia, the vegetable
merchant, says he won’t invite
officers into his business for
coffee. Even Father Arias is
cautiously neutral, refusing to
celebrate special Masses for
the soldiers.

“They’ ve got their own chap-
lain,” he said.
THE TRIBUNE

MOND+r, |

», 2007, PAGE 27



NES UO ema hee)

Space shuttle launch off until January —

- because of repeated fuel gauge problem

@ CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA on Sunday delayed
the launch of space shuttle
Atlantis until January after a
gauge in the fuel tank failed for
the second time in four days,
according to Associated Press.

With only a few days remain-
ing in the launch window for
the shuttle’s mission to the
international space station,
senior managers decided to
stand down until next month in
hopes of better understanding
the perplexing and persistent
fuel gauge problem.

“We're determined to get to:

the bottom of this,” said LeRoy
,Cain, chairman of the mission
management team.

Whether Atlantis can fly as
early as Jan. 2 “is all going to
depend on what we find out,”
he said.

The trouble with the fuel
gauge resurfaced just before
sunrise Sunday, about an hour
after the launch team began fill-

ing Atlantis’ big external tank‘

for an afternoon liftoff.
Shuttle managers had said
they would halt the countdown



SPACE Shuttle Atlantis is seen
on pad 39A at the Kannedy
Space Center, Fla. Sunday Dec.
9, 2007. NASA managers
delayed the launch of Atlantis
until January after a gauge in
the fuel tank failed for the sec-
ond time in four days.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



and call everything off if any of
the four hydrogen fuel gauges
acted up. Three failed during
Thursday’s launch attempt; no
one knows why.

Launch director Doug Lyons
said Sunday’s failure was similar
to what happened before,
except only one gauge malfunc-
tioned this time.

Test

“We would rather have
launched today, obviously,”
Cain said. “This was going to
be in the very least a good tank-

ing test for us, and that’s what

it’s turned out to be.”
_ NASA quickly established an

. engineering team to come up

with ideas on how to pinpoint
and fix the problem, which has
bedeviled NASA off and on for
the past two years. The engi-
neers will report back to Cain
and other managers on Tues-
day.

Most inspections and repairs
could be carried out at the
launch pad. If the shuttle has
to be returned to its hangar for



more invasive work, there will
be no hope of launching in ear-
ly January, Cain said.

NASA had until Thursday to
launch Atlantis with the Euro-
pean Space Agency’s space sta-
tion laboratory, Columbus.
After that, unfavorable sun
angles and computer concerns
would make it impossible for

'. the shuttle to fly to the inter-
national space station until next.

month. :

Despite objections from some
engineers, NASA tightened up
its launch rules for Sunday’s
attempt in hopes of getting
Atlantis off the ground by the
week’s end.

Not, only did all four of
Atlantis’ fuel gauges have to
work on Sunday. — until now,
only three good gauges were
required — a new instrumenta-
tion system for monitoring
these gauges also had to check

_ out. NASA also shrank its

launch window from five min-
utes to a single minute for
added safety.

The troublesome gauges,
called engine cutoff sensors, are
part of a backup system to pre-



i)

O Aa
5 u ft

Terry Renna/AP

vent the shuttle’s main engines
from shutting down too late and
running without fuel, a poten-
tially catastrophic situation.
They have been a source of spo-
radic trouble ever since flights
resumed in 2005 following the
Columbia tragedy. |

Two groups of.NASA engi-
neers recommended that the
flight be postponed and the fuel
gauge system tested, to figure
out what might be going on. But
they did not oppose a Sunday
launch attempt when it came
time for the final vote.

Shuttle commander Stephen
Frick was deeply involved with

the decisions that were made,
officials said.

Frick and his six crewmates
planned to return to their home
base in Houston later Sunday.
“We hope everyone gets some
well-deserved rest and we will
be back to try again when the
vehicle is ready to fly,” the
astronauts said in a prepared
statement.

Delay

It was another disappointing
delay for the European Space
Agency, which has been wait-

ing for years for its $2 billion
Columbus lab to fly. NASA
space station design problems
in the 1980s and early 1990s
slowed everything down, then
Russian troubles and,
most recently, the 2003 Colum-
bia tragedy stalled the
project.

“Another few weeks isn’t
going to make any difference,”
said Alan Thirkettle, the Euro-
pean space station program
manager. “We want to fly, but
we want to fly safe.”

NASA officials said they
expect little ripple effect on
space station construction.

‘Be sure to tune in to. another new: and
‘informative episode of the show

Saturday at 10:00: am

every
and Monday at 8:30 pm.on ZNS TV.

oe
g
3
8

NE

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=
»

| NAL
| Al



one

moms 2007
eo 2006

a

Your electricity bill is made
up ofthe basic rate, which is
constant and has: not
changed since October 2003,
and the fuel sur-charge, which
is based on the price of
petroleum in the Intemational
market and Is calculated
monthly using a


DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

VOCs kam As Cee don

DECEMBER

AmericanAirlines
American ag”




ania,

THE TRIBUNE





Laing: ‘No
intention’ |
to renew |
~~ Stamp Tax |
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@ By NEILHARTNELL |
Tribune Business
Editor



THE Government has |
“no. intention at the |
moment” of.renewing the
Stamp Tax exemption for
_ first-time home buyers |
_ purchasing properties with |
an appraisal value of up to |
$250,000, a move likely to
cause concern in the real
estate and construction
industries, as well as
among middle and low-
income Bahamians.

When asked by The Tri-
_ bune whether the Govern-









SEE page 6 |
sees sisal _....|!





Alternative
energy can
‘open new
ee

“By NEIL HARTNELL._
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Bahamas can “open
new industries”, increase
employment and stimulate
economic growth if it invests
in developing renewable ener-
gy sources, a report supplied
to the Government has con-
cluded, warning that “energy
costs will become a propor-
tionately larger part of the
economy” if the status quo is
maintained.

___ SEE paged...

Doctors
sees EPS

double

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
. Editor




DOCTORS: Hospital
Health Systems (DHHS)
has made no decision on
whether it will continue
with recently re-com-
menced dividend payments,
despite seeing earnings per
share (EPS) for the third
quarter double on the back
of a 74.1 per cent net
income increase.

Charles Sealy, DHHS
chief executive, said the
company had taken “no
decision” on the dividends
issue, adding: “It continues
_| to be a consideration and
we will monitor it on a
month-to-month basis.”

However, the prospects
for the dividend payments

SEE page 8






















MONDAY, DECEMBER

Toulon my business @tribunemedia, net



Government mulls
Excise Tax option

* By placing imports under Excise regime, administration believes

import revenues can be protected from ‘tariff barrier to trade’ charge
“ “Much” initial work done, as sales or VAT tax not only option

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government

is looking to
introduce an
Excise Tax Act to
protect its import
revenues from being targeted
as tariff barriers by various
international trade agreements,
the minister of state for finance
telling The Tribune that “much
work has been done”.
Although the proposal is in
its “preliminary stage” and still
being assessed, Zhivargo Laing
said such an Act would still
allow the Government to col-
lect revenues on imports by
placing them in an excise
regime, removing the duties
collected from the definition
of ‘tariff? under a trade regime
such as the World Trade
Organisation’s (WTO).
Mr Laing told The Tribune:

. “We have said that we believe
the present tax regime has ~

Duty
elimination
urged for

solar power

components

* Tariff wipe-out to
reduce solar PV and
solar thermal costs
by 30%, reducing
cost prohibitive
$60,000 bill for
Bahamian homes
* Net metering and

- Electricity Act reform

also required

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government “must
eliminate” import and Stamp
duties on all components of
Solar Photovoltaic (PV) and
Solar Thermal energy systems
if businesses and residential
users are to achieve a return
on their investment in alterna-
tive energy systems, a leading
business executive told The
Tribune.

Christopher Lowe, opera-
tions manager at Kelly’s

SEE page 12



10,

Zhivargo Laing



served the country well, and

we continue to do so. We are
making moves already that will
allow out tax regime to be
more compliant with what the
.WIOs of this world allow.
“An Excise Tax Act will



2007



take those items regarded as
dutiable items in a trade
regime and, by putting them
in an excise tax regime, this
will remove them from a
sphere where they are treated
like standard barriers to
trade.”

The minister indicated that
the introduction of an Excise
Tax Act would allow the
Bahamas to protect a substan-
tial portion of its import duties,
which are currently the largest
revenue earner for the Gov-
ernment.

In the 2007-2008 fiscal year,

customs duties imposed on
imports are expected to gen-
erate some $605.769 million of
the Government’s $1.356 bil-
lion total revenues, or 44.7 per
cent.

The Government is also pro-
jecting that it will earn some
$199.751 million from stamp
duties imposed on imports in
fiscal 2007-2008, meaning that
total import-related taxes will

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equal some $805.52 million —
59.4 per cent of total public
revenues.

Yet tariff barriers, such as
imports and customs duties,
are under threat from the likes
of the World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO), the body that sets
and administers the rules for
global trading regimes, and
which the Bahamas is seeking
full membership in.

Import and customs duties
are seen as protectionist barri-
ers to trade, and the WTO and |
its member states are seeking
their abolition. The Bahamas
has already indicated it will
make concessions in this area,
giving up $10-$14 million in
taxes on imports European
Union (EU) in return for pre-
serving duty-free market access
to the EU for its exporters.

The major pressure on the
Bahamian tax regime, though,

SEE page 10



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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

Baker’s Bay to
investment wit

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

Tribune Business Reporter

THE Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean
Club developers this weekend said
they had spent more than $160 million
on the Guana Cay project, and are
likely to double that investment with-
in the next year.

Speaking at a press conference on
the island, the developers’ chief exec-

Ingraham urges cou
Do not be intimidate

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Hope Town District Council _
has the full support of central Gov-
ernment over its decision to approve
seven construction permit applica-
tions by the Baker’s Bay Golf &
Ocean Club resort, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham telling council
members not to be intimidated by
the two Judicial Review actions filed
against them by the Save Guana Cay
Reef Association.

Mr Ingraham met with the council
members on Saturday before head-
ing to Guana.Cay to meet the pro-
ject developers.

Litigation

“The Prime Minister just wanted
to reassure us that the Government
fully supported the project and want-
ed to make sure that the council was
not intimidated by the litigation that
is going on.

He has reassured our council

members who have,,had).any ..,






242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-5601

Happy Holidays fram Britist

utive, Michael Meldman, said Dis-

covery Land Company’s build out of _

the project was not the $175 million
that has been reported in the press,
but rather “billions and billions of
dollars”. 3
“The project from a land stand-
point - just a lot sale standpoint - will
be in excess $1 billion - maybe $1.5
billion just in land sales, he added.

This was before homes were con-

doubts,” Jeremy Sweeting chief
councillor of the Hope Town Dis-
trict Council, said following the pri-
vate meeting.

Approved

Mr Sweeting confirmed that the
council had approved seven appli-
cations submitted by Baker’s Bay,
each valued arotind $1.2 million.
They included applications fora
marina village, a boat house and a
few three-storey villas and buildings.

He added that despite the tremen-
dous opposition by the Association,
the council will not be intimidated. ,
“There is a small but very vocal
group who is opposed to the pro-
ject, and the council will not be
intimidated by it.

“We will look at it without fear

or favour - the plans and the appli- '

cations - just like we would anyone
else’s, and if there is a problem with
it we will follow through and make
sure that they have taken all the
appropriate procedures,” Mr Sweet-

ingsaid. =

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‘structed, Mr Mé Idman explained. ie

added that the lots were priced at ah 5

-$10 million. :
Million

“So, let’s say you have a $4 million
lot, and build a 6-10,000 square foot
house. The actual cost that will come
to the economy will be another $6-8
million, so if yqu have 300 houses it

said. “So the build out of the project
as it equates to the Stamp Tax will

be hundreds and hundreds of millions

of dollars. It is a significant economic
impact to the economy of Abaco.

Mr Meldman said $40 million of

the $65 million cost of the marina has
been spent, and within. six to eight
months the golf course should be

THE TRIBUNE

ouble $160m
in the next year —

-would be $3 billion,” Mr Meldman

bees construction
“Of the 250 lots available, 90 have

been sold, and within 90 days con-

struction will begin on about 20 of
them,” he added. .

The staff of Baker’s Bay gave the
Prime Mittister a tour of the devel-

‘opment at the weekend. Mr ingra-

ham said he wanted Bahamians to be
fully aware of just how significant the

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He added that it was hard to pin-
point exactly whaljthe objections to
the project were.

“T think that the are opposed to .
the project in general. It is not one
pinpointed concern, and that is their

right in a free, democratic country,
but we are here and once the plans
pass the Ministry of Works and the

Department of Environmental

Health Services, we review it.”

Mr Sweeting said that in his opin-
ion, Baker’s Bay hand to Guana Cay residents “more
than once“.

'
Project

He said his mother lives on Guana
Cay, he has roots dn the island and it

-was his understanding that the

majority of residents on the island
are in favour of the project

Fred Smith, a partner at Callen-
ders and Co, acting on behalf of the
Association, has named the council
as a defendant in two judicial review
actions launchedyin the Supreme
Court in a bid to halt the project.






nearly done and a few dozen homes



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingranas

Celebrate The Holidays At The Hilton

UPCOMING EVENTS

Christmas Carols in the lobby
2! and 22 December at 6pm
Live Music by the Pool Bar
Wednesday, 26 December

esday, 2 January from 2pm-5pm

eae Woods

Live Jazz at Hilton Palm Court Lounge

eae) mee PA tie tn
New Years Eve from 8pm-lam

True Bahamian Art and Craft Market /

‘iber till 2 January, ‘08 from | |am-4p

Buffet on 25 December
Sc cetera a0
stmas Buffet from Ipm-Spm ($45)
s Day Dinner from 6pm-10.30pm ($42.50)

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economic value of the, Ervieehivas ‘.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 3B



PM: No basis for continued

Opposition to development

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL ~
Tribune Business
Reporter

THERE is no basis for the
continued opposition to the
$175 million Baker’s Bay Golf
and Ocean Club development
on Guana Cay, Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham said at
the weekend, as all “legitimate
concerns” held by those oppos-
ing the project have been
answered satisfactorily.

Following a tour of progress
at the resort, Mr Ingraham said
the developers have the full
support of the Government.

“We are satisfied that they
are undertaking a project that
is environmentally acceptable
and sustainable, and that they
are doing a development that
is contributing sufficiently to
the economy of Abaco, and
hence the economy of the
Bahamas,” the Prime Minister
said.

Mr Ingraham added that
while the Save Guana Cay
Reef Association did raise sev-
eral legitimate concerns, his
government is satisfied these
have been addressed.

“Firstly they complained
that it was not environmental-
ly sustainable. I think that it is
fair to say, and accurate to say,
that this development exceeds
the environmental standards
established by the Bahamas,
and we are very proud of how
they have respected the envi-
ronment and gone about tak-
ing steps to mitigate any dam-
age whatsoever,” said Mr
Ingraham.

He added that the Associa-
tion’ had-expressed concerns

O










x
‘ hang
| Q

the Government of the
Bahamas was giving away all
of the public land on Guana
Cay that is Crown Land and
Treasury Land We gave con-
sideration to that argument
after we came to office in May,
and sat down with the devel-
opers and told them that we
did not think that they ought to
have access to as much of the
government acreage as was
previously agreed.

“They undertook to return
to the government substantial
portions of what had already
been agreed to be transferred
to them,” the Prime Minister
said.

Mr Ingraham said this had
the net effect that, of the 40
acres of Treasury Land, the
developers will end up with
about eight acres after five-to-

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham

six years on a lease basis, and
with respect to the Crown
Land, 60-plus acres of it is for a
nature preserve that will be
managed by the developers for
the benefit of the public.
“They have a licence. The



anywhere. With respect to
some of the other land, they
have some leases on it. So I
think that with respect to pub-
lic land there is no argument of
any consequence about alien-
ation of that land,” the Prime
Minister said.

The land that will be leased
to the developers will also ben-
efit Guana Cay’s residents, as it
will be used for a water treat-
ment facility, employee hous-
ing and other essential facilities

Mr Ingraham added that the
developers bought 450 acres
of private land to do their
development.

The Association’s third argu-
ment, he said, was that the
approvals granted to Baker’s
Bay had been granted improp-
erly by either the Government
in Nassau or the district coun-



“ernment, and itis not going”

cil in Hope Town.

Mr Ingraham said that as
that matter was before the
courts, he would not comment,
only to say: “The government
of the Bahamas is satisfied that
the development on Baker’s

“Bay is in the public interest of
“the Bahamias, and we will do

whatever is necessary to ensure
that we effectively support and
facilitate and accommodate the
development.

“It is contributing signifi-
cantly to the economy of Aba-
CO, as it is producing in

terms of wages some $1 mil-
lion per month. From a gov-
ernment point of view,

that means that $200,000 of
that comes directly back to the
public treasury as revenue.
Additionally, they are access-
ing lots of goods and service
from Bahamian suppliers and
contractors and we wish we
had many more like them.”

With matters concluded to
the Prime Minister’s satisfac-
tion, he said: “There is not now
a basis for a continued opposi-
tion to the development at
Baker’s Bay.”

Consolidated Water (Bahamas)

Ltd.

Invites application for the position of:

MAINTENANCE TEAM LEADER

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd. operates several Reverse Osmosis
Plants within the Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company enjoys a
reputation of providing a wholesome quality product, whilst maintaining a

strong commitment to its customers,

large.

®

its employees and the community at
e

The Company currently has a vacancy for the position of Maintenance
Team Leader. The successful candidate will report directly to the General
Manager. The Maintenance Team Leader’s role is to provide positive
leadership and demonstrative first person management by leading the
maintenance personnel in achieving the company’s goals with respect to the
planned maintenance of equipment, both preventive and predictive, training
of maintenance personnel and cost management. ,

The prospective candidate must possess the following skills:

° Strong Mechanical & Electrical Engineering skills.
° Have demonstrative history of developing computer

based

preventive

and

management systems.

Strong PC skills,

predictive

maintenance

including working knowledge and

proficiency with Microsoft Office and Maintenance
Management software.

Ability

performance

to review

weekly/monthly
indicators of equipment & personnel,

productivity

monitor and control and report on the same.
Ensure that maintenance planning tools are utilized
properly & efficiently and are achieving the company’s

goals.

Strong Cost Management skills.
Must have proven history of good interpersonal skills.
Must be prepared to work long hours, weekends and
travel to other business centers of the company.

Interested persons can forward their resumes to the following
address on or before December 14, 2007:

The General Manager

Consolidated Wateri(Bahamas) Ltd.

P O Box CR 54030
Nassau, Bahamas





Ingraham speaks following tour
of $175m Baker’s Bay Golf and
Ocean Club development

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THE TRIBUNE





for the Baha

FROM page 1 sultants Haley & Aldrich, said
- oil import and energy costs

were “ becoming an ever-
increasing portion of the

Bahamas gtoss domestic prad-

The report by US-based con-

The Leary of rane ay:

Architects’ wey 2007
December 9-15, 2007

Avchitectire in Transition

Sunday, December 9, 2007
Church Service-St Agnes Parish
Baillou Road
10:30 a.m

Monday, December 10, 2007
Offical Opening Ceremony
National Art Gallery of The Bahamas
‘West Hill Street
6:30p.m.

Wednesday December 12, 2007
Universal Provision Group Presentation

Thursday December 13, 2007
Kevin Mowery-Presentation on
Nana Wall System
12:00 Noon
_Lunch provided.

Saturday, Deceinber 15, 2007
Awards Dinner rae
National Art Gallery of The Bahamas
West Hill Street .
Cocktails: 6:30p.m., Dinner 8:00p.m.
’ Tickets available

Sponors:
‘Stone Work: -
We Care
-Arawak Homes
Universal Frovision Group |



uct”, meaning that to invest in
sources of renewable energy —
such as solar photovoltaic
(PV), wind, ocean thermal
energy conversion (OTEC),
wave and biomass — made
good economic and environ-
mental policy.

Solar energy, given the
Bahamas’ constant exposure

‘to sunlight, was “an excellent

resource”, Haley & Aldrich
said, generating on average 5.5

--kilowatt-hours..per..square... .

metre per day.

Using PV technology, the
report said electricity could be
generated at similar per unit
costs to the Bahamas Electric-
ity Corporation’s (BEC) cur-
rent diésel-driven facilities,
using both utility size and
rooftop systems.

Electricity prices.in New
Providence and Grand
Bahama, incorporating both

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

| you are raising funds fora

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
aréa or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



the basic rate and fuel sur-
charge, varied between $0.22
to $0.25 per kilowatt hour
(Kwh).

Even in the absence of gov-
ernment support, Haley &
Aldrich found: “The cost per
kilowatt hour to produce elec-
tricity using a rooftop PV unit
in the Bahamas would vary
from $0.12 in the summer to
$0.23 in the winter, with an
average cost of $0. 15.”

On solar PV, the consultants
estimated that the purchase of
250 kilowatts of generating
capacity could generate 285
megawatt hours of electricity
capacity per year, cost $1 mil-
lion and save 22,000 gallons of
fuel imports per year. oe

In addition, the consultants

recommended that the
Bahamas’ exposure to sun-
shine could also be used for
solar hot water heating, reduc-
ing energy costs, and lowering
electricity and propane use.

“The cost of a passive solar
thermal system will vary
between $1,000 and $3,000,
depending on the type of sys-
tem and size,” the report said.
“Assuming an installation cost
of $3,000, a solar thermal sys-
tem will pay for itself in four to
eight years and provide for the
hot water needs of a family for
15 to 30 years.”

On solar thermal, Haley &
Aldrich again estimated that a

_. $1 million investment would

fund 500 passive solar systems,
generate 305 megawatt hours
of electricity per annum and
save on 280,000 gallons of fuel
imports for the Bahamas.

To exploit PV and solar

thermal energy, Haley &~--

Aldrich recommended revis-
ing the Bahamas Building
Code so that all large new
commercial and industrial con-
structions used PV systems. IT
also suggested that the Build-
ing Code be revised to require



solar water heating on all new
construction.
It added that one-time incen-

tives be provided to commer-'

cial and industrial firms who
refitted with both PV and solar
thermal technology, and that
low-interest loans be provid-
ed to Bahamian residential and
business owners to purchase
and install P’V units.

On ocean wave generation,
Haley & Aldrich said it had
been estimated that this
method of power generation

from a utility-sized facility ~

could provide electricity priced
between $0.09 to $0.11 per
KWh in locations Buen as the
Bebe

Solid and other wastes also

presented an opportunity for ©

the Bahamas, as energy could
be recovered from its combus-
tion. “Based on the amount of
solid waste generated on New
Providence, approximately 20
MWh (megawatt hours) of
electricity could be generated
from combusting the waste dis-
posed of each day at the Har-
rold Road landfill,” Haley &
Aldrich said.

“Grand Bahama produces
enough waste each day to gen-
erate about SMWh of electric-
ity. Construction and opera-
tion of waste-to-energy facili-
ties at these two locations

“could more than.double the

existing tipping fees being
charged for waste. disposal, ,

although the sale of electricity
could help reduce these
charges.”

potential energy, the report
urged that the landfill sites in
New Providence and Grand
Bahama be fitted with gas col-
lection and energy generation
systems.

It recommended that waste

~~" “By -reducing

-To-tap.into.this-source of...

management systems also be
revised.

The report concluded that
by developing a sustainable
renewable energy programme,
the Bahamas could maintain
its position on “the leading
edge of tourism in the
Caribbean”, helping this nation
to tap into an ecotourism mar-
ket that was growing at about
15-20 per cent per year.

It would also enable the
Bahamas to meet the energy
demands of increased resort
and mixed-use-developments,
such as the Baha Mar, Albany,
South Ocean, Rose Island
Ritz-Carlton and countless
Family Island projects, reduce

_..carbon dioxide emissions and
’ reduce the environmental

impact.

“Use of renewable energy
can also help diversify the
economy and contribute to
increased job creation and
training for Bahamian work-
ers,” Haley & Aldrich wrote.

“From an economic stand-
point, development of renew-
able energy facilities can sta-
bilize and, over time, reduce
the price of power, while
increasing the number of avail-
able jobs.

“Lower energy costs and
higher employment will
increase the amount of income
residents have to spend on
goods and services, thereby
stimulating the entire econo-_
my,"
energy
imports, the Bahamas can
become more energy secure.
Renewable energy also
reduces the production of

greenhouse. gases, protecting _

the future of the Bahamas and
its tourism industry.

“The Bahamas can secure its
future, make itself more eco-
nomically sound, and open
new industries through invest-
ment in renewable energy.”

Delinquent Properties (Vacant Lots
lot # 19, Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road

(proposed gated community with beach access)

New Providence, Bahamas
3 040 sq ft; Appraised Value = $75,600

Lot # 14 Westridge North Subdivision
New Providence, Bahamas.
11,486 sq ft
Appraised Value = $207,000

i

Lot #20 Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road

(proposed gated community with beach access) |

_ New Providence, Bahamas
a 061 sq fi; Appraised Value = $76,000

- Submit bids in writing to:
MORTGAGE DEPARTMENT

P.O, Box N-4815
Nassau, Bahamas,

“Fos ithe enquitis call 461-1087



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transfer seamlessly from Success to Nova.
















































‘Save Time - Save Money - Register Now!
Call 324-7770 or 324-7555 for details



Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of
the Royal Island resort and residential project, an
ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals ‘to apply for the following
position with the company

HEAD CHEF

Duties and Responsibilities: ~

e Coordinate and manage multiple food venues.
° Coordinante and manage all food i preparauon
areas. ~ ”
Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.
Planning of menus for all food venues.

- Qualifications: Must have 5 star expereince either
in a restaurant, private residence or yacht, Must
have an “attention to detail” work ethic. Willing to
take directions from management and maintain a
hands on approach. Experience in “Chef’s table”,

“Disgustation” or “tasing menu” style of dining.
The ideal candidate will have to reside on Eleuthera
or its surrounding area.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with
cover letter to:
. Harcourt Management Services Ltd.
~ P.O.Box'N-1991-—---~..
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
_Or Email to: info@ meer com

Royal Island _(Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.


THE TRIBUNE





Fiscal deficit
up to $50.7m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s fiscal
deficit jumped to $50.7 mil-
lion for the first quarter of its
2007-2008 fiscal year, the
Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ latest monthly
update revealed, but the min-
ister of state for finance said
he did not “have any con-
cern” about how the public
finances were performing to
date.

Zhivargo Laing said that
while revenue was “continu-
ing to be a little bit behind
last year”, the public finances
in 2006-2007 received a one-
time boost from the Stamp
Tax generated by the multi-
billion dollar transaction that
took Kerzner International,
the Atlantis and One & Only
Ocean Club owner, from
being a public company toa
private one.

Revenue

“There was some extra rev-
enue received in that period.
If those were removed from
last year’s revenue perfor-
mance, we would be at or
ahead of last year,” Mr Laing
told The Tribune.

“Given the global and US
picture, and softening in the
tourism market, we can
understand and appreciate
where we are in terms of rev-
enue.”

He added that government
revenues continued to fluctu-
ate, being either slightly
ahead of or slightly behind
2006-2007 depending on the
day comparisons were done.
Public expenditure, hee

i
b id ad Te

Zhivargo Laing



was still “on cue”.

The Central Bank report
said the deficit incurred in
the first quarter of the 2007-
2008 fiscal year stood in con-
trast to the $3.6 million sur-
plus achieved in the compar-
ative period the previous
year, but also acknowledged
that this was due to the
receipt of extraordinary” rev-
enues from the Kerzner
transaction and Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC) dividends.

For the 2007-2008 first
quarter, revenues were down
10.2 per cent at $293.6 mil-
lion, largely due to a fall in
tax receipts, while total gov-
ernment spending was ahead
by 6.5 percent. _

Payments

Increased payments for
wages and salaries supported

a7.1 percent rise in recur- . ..

rent spending on the Govern-

a

ment’s fixed costs, while capi-
tal expenditure was also
ahead by 1 per cent.

Overall, the Central Bank
said the Bahamian economy
“continued on a positive
growth path” during October
despite reduced inflows from
foreign direct investment and
the tourism industry. The
external reserves also con-
tracted due to the Bahamas’
increased oil import bill and
seasonal increase in demand
for foreign currency.

Demand

“Domestic demand is
anticipated to be sustained
over the remainder of the
year, owing to the seasonal
pick-up in consumer spend-
ing and ongoing stimulus
from construction activity,”
the Central Bank said.

“These developments,
together with the heightened
payments for fuel imports,
are expected to exert addi-
tional demands on external
reserves and liquidity condi-
tions.”

While the Bahamian econ-
omy seemed set to benefit
from major foreign direct
investment projects in the
medium-term, the short-term
downside risks or dangers to
this nation remained the state
of the US economy and rising
global oil prices.

For the first 10 months of
2007, Bahamian dollar credit
expansion slowed by 14.1 per
cent to $526.5 million, with
consumer credit and mort-
gages down by 19.6 per cent
and 9.5 per cent to $155.6
million and $249.2 million
respectively.

OG

PONG are

Thursday December, 6th, 2007

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 5B

To advertise in The
Tribune - the #1 newspaper

in circulation, just call
nya ECE TE



Consolidated Water (Bahamas)
Ltd.

| c

Invites application for the position of:

WELDER/MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd. operates several Reverse Osmosis
Plants within the Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company enjoys a
reputation of providing a wholesome quality product, whilst maintaining a
strong commitment to its customers, its employees and the community at
large.

The Company currently has a vacancy for the position § of
Welder/Mechanical Technician. The successful candidate will report
directly to the Maintenance Team Leader. The Welder/Mechanical
Technician shall be responsible for preventive and predictive maintenance
and repairs of Reverse Osmosis Plant Mechanical and Building Systems.
Additionally duties shall include assisting with other maintenance duties of
the operations.

The prospective candidate must possess the following skills:

e Shall be a Certified Welder for welding associated with
stainless steel and alloy steel high pressure vessels and
high pressure pipe systems.

Shall be capable of welding utilizing Tig and Mig Welding
Machines.

Shall be responsible for performing plant mechanical
repairs of Reverse Osmosis Plant Systems.

Shall be responsible for repairs to Plant and Building
structures.

Shall have a working knowledge and proficiency with
Microsoft Office and Maintenance Management
isoftware.

Ability to prepare weekly/monthly reports of work
performed.

Must have proven history of good interpersonal skills.
Must be prepared to work long hours, weekends and
travel to other business centers of the company.

Interested persons can forward their resumes to the. following
address on or before December 14, 2007:

The General Manager
Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.
P O Box CR 54030
Nassau, Bahamas



Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

ASSISTANT TO RELATIONSHIP MANAGERS

We are accepting applications for an Assistant to Relationship Managers in the Private Banking
Department with the following minimum requirements:

QUALIFICATIONS:

Excellent PC Knowledge
Applicants should possess a degree (or equivalent) in Business Administration, Finance or

Economics and have Private Banking experience.
The applicant must be fluent in English. French and Spanish would be an asset in order to
facilitate relationship with the clients and prospects.

JOB FUNCTIONS:
¢ Reception of clients and prospective clients

Execution of client's instructions
Handling of correspondence, faxes and inquiries
Liaison with the Representative Offices

* Preparation of brochures and marketing materials

PERSONAL QUALITIES:

Strong organization and communication and interpersonal skills
Excellent work attitude

Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

Competitive salary and performance bonus
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS DECEMBER 19, |
2007.

CREDIT SUISSE

»


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007



INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news, read
Insight on Mondays

TECHNOLOGY.

COMPANY LIMITED

December 10th to I deh Open 9am to 6pm
Mon - Fri





December 15th Open 10am to 4pm
Saturday

December I7th to 21st Open Yam to 6pm
Mon - Fri





December 22nd Open I Oam to 6pm
Saturday

December 24th Open 9am to 7pm
Mon - Christmas Eve





CLOSED INVENTORY |
; December 27th - 31st wii



Kingsway Academy

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

FOR SEPTEMBER 2008.

The Entrance = Sane
will be held at the school” o

Bernard Road on Thursday,
January 12, 2008 from 8:00 a.m. -
1:30 p.m. for students wishing to
enter grades seven through ten.

Deadline for applications will be
Thursday,January 10.Aplications.

FROM page 1

ment would extend the Stamp
Tax exemption introduced by
the former Christie adminis-
tration, Zhivargo Laing, min-
ister of state for finance,
replied: “At the moment, the
position is that it has run its
course. There is no intention
to renew it.”

The former PLP government
extended the Stamp Tax
exemption for first-time home
buyers from $100,000 to prop-
erties with an appraisal value
of up to $250,000, believing th:
move would make home own-
ership more affordable for
middle and low-income
Bahamians.

The exemption, though,
expires on December 31, 2007,
which is just three weeks away.

Apart from stimulating the
housing market and enabling
more Bahamians to fulfil their
dream to ‘own a piece of the
rock’, the Christie government

Ee Nasee

also believed there would be
a net benefit produced from
the stimulus given to the con
struction and real estate indus
tries ~ despite the tax revenue
given up.

However, Mr Laing said the
new government instead
planned to focus on the tax
relief outlined in its 2007 Elec
tion Manifesto, namely to
exempt new home owners
from the payment of real prop-
erty tax for a period of five
years following completion of a
new owner-occupied residence.

One realtor, though, who
asked not to be named, said
the increase in the Stamp Tax
exemption threshold had
increased home sales in the
income bracket that it had tar-
geted,.as a major up-front cost
for first-time home buyers was
removed.

“We did a lot of sales as a
result. The Stamp Tax could
make or break a sale.’ * the
source said.

Homes valued at between




RWG Gest

Applicants must:

Christian School

of specialization

uo

Hemspole Checstian igh Phot

TEACHING VACANCY
Temple Christian High Schoo!
Shirley Street

Invites applications irom qualified ‘

the following positions for the-2007-2008-School Year

Math (Gr.7-9)



A. 0 Bea practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple

B. 9 Have a Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the area

) Have a valid Teacher's Certificate or Diplpma
9 Have at least two years teaching experience in
the relevant subject area with excellent





hristian teachers for









~ paid in full by th

$100,000 to $250,000 were pre-
viously subject to Stamp Tax
quivalent to 8 per cent of the
purchase price. Lhis was usu-
ally split 50/50 between the
purchaser and vendor, mean-
ing each paid 4 per cent, or
buyel
depending on the nature of the
sales agreement.

For example, on a property
ippraised at $230,000, if a first-
time buyer was paying the full
Sper cent Stamp Pax. they
would hav: to p ly $18,400 in
tax to the Ireasury as a one-
‘ime lump sum up front to
lose the transaction. Even at 4
per cent, that is some $9.200.

Shis was what the exemp-
tion removed, and in an econ
omy with a relatively low sav-
ings rate, many Bahamzans liv-
ing from pay cheque to pay
cheque, that is a significant
sum that most would be unable
to finance from their own
resources.

The minister, though, said if
was difficult to assess the
2xtent to which the former
zovernment’s increasing of the
Stamp ‘Tax exemption thresh
old had boosted home owner
hip among middle and lower-

ncome Bahami:z ns who would
L .







Have ween pur asil 2
alued at bet. $3

50 Of 18)

There were many other fac
ors. such as the Bahamas
verall econemic perform:
und increased incomes, 1
whethe1 }

aing said.

However, he added: “T think
t’s tair to say that the extent to
which hundreds of Bahamians
did apply for and get the

ceimptiolt on this. and to the

tent that if represented sav-
ings for other things, 1t did
bring some relief there.”

Mr Laing said he was also
inable to say that the former

emmment. in inercasing the

THE TRIBUNE






exemption threshold, “gave up
{oo much”, given the wide-
ranging investment and incen-
tives regimes the Bahamas has
in place for Bahamian and for-
cign businesses.

“IT can’t really say that it has
been an excessive or exorbi-
tant part of it,” Mr Laing said
cf the Stamp Tax exemption.

While he had asked for data
on the amount of revenue giv-
en up by the threshold
increase, “I can’t say it has giv-
en up too much. We give up a
lot anyway’.

Realtors had previously
complained that there were
problems with how the
increase in the Stamp Tax
exemption to properties val-
ued at $250,000 or below
worked in practice, some say-
ing that unless the appraisal
was for $200,000 or less, the
Ministry of Finance was reluc-
tant to grant the exemption.

The exemption was based on
the appraisal value of the prop-
erty conducted by a realtor,
rather than the purchase price,
:n order to prevent any Stamp
Duty evasion by the under.
reporting of transaction vai-
ues.

Some observers are also like:
'v te argue that the Govern-
mes i replacing like-with-
like if it brings in a five-year
real property tax holiday for
first-time buyers ci cwner-
secupied premises

The Christie government
ased the real proper-
i threshold te
rin $250,000 or
less. meaning any tax holiday
the new admunisiration will
introduce is unlikely to impact
those middle and lower-
income buyers who previously
benefited from the Stamp Tax
exemption.

It is unclear whether the
Government may also seek to
lower that real property tax
exemption threshold.








“NO NOTICE

Notice ts hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Governmet
Registered Stock Certificate as follows:












can be collected at the Business
Office from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

communication skills

L. © Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examination to the 5JC,) BGCSE levels.

0 Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra

s N .
OSG PRR REIT A SEI I 53 TBO SESE EN PT POMBE SET SSE PCT PASE Ts SR As LL OY | ITI Mob ee RITE



: Interest Certificate Maturity
curricular programmes Stock : Rate No. Date Amount
i 2024-2626 ULSLS%HAPR 77-362 05/04/2025 — $3,000.00
ale ae be picked - - the — ava ; 1 intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement
Ee S riley Street d > mre 4 d } oe . “¢ . ° .
SRN ECE LO ACY: oes AU a ae | certificate If this certificate is found, please write to P.O.Box
: full curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph \ .
e “ge alice eiens: : ane | NIS81, Nassau, Bahamas. (DBS8)
For more information please and three reterences to DT kta nce ae eae oe
i ‘ ; Mr. Neil Hamilton "
call telephone numbers Scien
324-8811: 324-3409: or 324-6269 Temple Christian High School '
: P.O.Box N-1566 }
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is December 7th, 2007 }
seem |

Harbourside Marine is looking for Golf Cart
‘Technician with experience in Gas
and Electric repairs/service.

Please fax resume to: 394-7659







-ROTARACT CLUB OF
SOUTHEAST NASSAU CENTENNIAL



- Wednesday 12 December 2007

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:
fe Associate degree in law or business.
Bes Must be conversant with all aspects of company

Nassau Yacht Club — East Bay Street

f incorporation and admunstration, including
an at 0: 00pm Bf liquidation and redomiciliation of International
Are you:
i ; . Meals Business Companies
* Looking to get involved in Community Service Activities? ¢ Excellent wllen and oral communication skills.
°* Expand Your Professional Network? Hee Computer literate, including a working knowledge
¢ Have fun with persons your own age? k poof Lynas 4 Series, Microsoft Word, Excel, Power

Point.
f° At least (vo years work experience with a trust
company or faw firm.

° Between the ages of 18 — 30?

Then Rotoract is Right for YOU!

Rotoract is a member club of Rotary International

} Please write to: Company Administrator
For more information email: rotaract_senc@yahoo.com }

P.O. Box N-10697
Nassau, Bahamas
F.mail-smith @experta.bs


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 7B





- Realtors concerned on

¢ 3

Stamp Tax exempt

mg By ee BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Tribune Business
Reporter

BAHAMIAN realtors have
given a mixed reaction to the
FNM government’s plans to
scrap the Stamp Tax exemp-
tion for first time home-buy-
ers purchasing properties
worth $250,000 and less, and
instead offer a five-year tax
holiday on real property tax.

Several realtors preferred
not to comment on the record,
saying that the issue was a
“hot button one”. However,
they questioned the impact
removing the exemption would
have, aguing that it was a
major incentive for first time
homeowners struggling to

meet the closing costs of their :

new home.

Realty

In fact, Walter Hanchell, of

PGF Realty, told Tribune ,

Business that without the sav-
ing the Stamp Tax exemption
allows, many Bahamians will
not be able to purchase homes.

“This will definitely have an
impact on the real estate indus-
try, and

I think that it will be a strain
on persons buying new homes.



The Tribune wants
to hear from people
who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are
raising funds for a
good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in
the area or have
won an award.

If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your
story.

Share your news



’ ] don’t know how people will

finance homes and it may put a
strain on the economy,” Rev
Hanchell said.

He explained that that the
Stamp Tax paid varies depend-
ing on the value of the home
and real estate involved.

Priced

Homes priced between
$50,000-$100,000 are taxed at 6

er cent, homes between
$100,000 and $250,000 are
taxed at 8 per cent, and homes
above

$250,000 were taxed at 10
per cent.

“So that is a substantial
amount of money added to the
purchase price of the home,”
Mr Hanchell said. “It was cer-
ad a strong selling point for

oie added that most Bahami-
ans have very little savings and
live from pay cheque to pay
cheque.

Another realtor, who asked
not to be named, said that it
would be interesting to see
how the new policy would play
out, although they felt in some
cases that the $250,000 real
property tax exemption thresh-
old was also far too generous
and $150,000 would have been
more appropriate.















SHOGUN REVOLVER

Restaurant ¢ Lounge ¢ Terrace
Modern Asian Dining Concept
¢ Wait staff: Previous experience in high- pales
* dining establishments a must.
° Kitchen Staff: Extensive knowledge of
Asian Cuisine and wines a definite asset.
e Wine Steward/Sommelier: Prévious restaurant
and floor sales experience.
¢ Food Runners: For bussing of bar and table

expedition.

Fax resumes to: 328-8381
or email to: info@shogunrevolver.com





evenings rt hd

alike; then s@d-y
Bahamas @ ox Dibask
certification reqifed.





MAKE A DIFFERENCE WITH
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Onl

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is the UN’s
global development network. advocating for change and connecting
countries to knowledge. experience and resources to help people build
a better life. We are on the ground in 166 countries, working with
them on their own solutions to global and national development
challenges. As they develop local capacity, they draw on the people
of UNDP and our wide range of partners.





acancy Announcement No: SGP- 2007/ 0001
Deadline For Application: 21 December 2007
Position Title National Coordinator

Nassau, BAHAMAS

An attractive compensation package based on qualifications and
experience

One Year, with the possibility of renewal














Organizational Unit GEF-SGP
The Global Environment Facility (GEF), established in 1991, helps developing countries fund
projects and programs that protect the global environment. GEF grants support projects related to
biodiversity, climate change, international waters, land degradation, the ozone layer, and persistent
organic pollutants. The Small Grants Programme (SGP) embodies the very essence of sustainable
development. SGP channels financial and technical support directly to NGOs and CBOs for
activities that conserve and restore the environment http://sgp.undp.org. GEF is establishing the
SGP in The Bahamas. |





DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES













ext RAPER ArH EA

e Effective management of the GEF-SGP (Global E Envionivent Facility — Small Grants
Programme) local team, the SGP programme and its portfolio -- from programme strategy to
individual project concept and design to technical support to SGP grantees, monitoring and
evaluation -- to ensure compliance with the overall approved global SGP Strategic
Framework, the SGP Operational Guidelines, the SGP annual work programme, the
national environmental and sustainable development priorities, as well as the annual
delivery of the national SGP targets.

ili LAL tic

e Building strategic partnerships with development partners, such as donors, foundations,
private sector and civil society, to promote SGP and mobilize resources.

e Contribution to GEF-SGP’s efforts to develop effective national, regional and global
networks for technical support and knowledge management, within the GEF SGP and with
external institution, including academia.



The Terms of Reference (TOR) may be viewed at www.jobs.undp.org .
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

Advanced university degree in environmental economics, Business Administration or related

field

¢ Atleast 5 years of relevant experience in development work, which should include
programme management preferably with an extended specialized experience in any of the
GEF-SGP focal areas. |

e Excellent analytical and writing skills

e Excellent people management and interpersonal skills

e Ability to communicate effectively

e Good negotiation and problem-solving skills

e Proficiency in word-processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications

Fluency in English



















Send applications including |UNDP/ GEF-SGP National Coordinator
a 5-10 page writing Bahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST) Commission
sample to : Office of the Prime Minister

Nassau Court, P.O. Box CB-10980

Nassau, The Bahamas

via e-mail to registry.jm@undp.org or online at www.jobs.undp.org
This vacancy is open to qualified male and female nationals of the Bahamas.
We thank you for your application but only short listed candidates will be contacted









PAGE 8B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE





For the stories behind
the news, read



Insight Mondays

A leading Law firm with office located in Nassau is seeking to fill the
following position

a

Applicant must:
‘have a minimum of 5 years. experience as alegal Secretary _ .
«have strong typing skills
* formal training in shorthand
* be proficient in Microsoft Office including Word, Excel and Internet

usage
‘be self motivated and able to work without supervision

Applicants with background in Conveyancing, Banking, Civil Litiga-
tion, Wills, Immigration matters encouraged. Medical Insurance and
Pension Plan offered.

Salary commensurate with skills and experience.

Interested persons should apply in writting to:

The Office Manager

FROM page 1

continuing are still more than
reasonable, given that DHHS
generated net income for the
third quarter ended on Octo-

~ ber 31, 2007, of $747,000, com-

pared to the 2006 comparative
of $429,000. ‘
Mr Sealy told The Tribune

that 12.1 per cent growth in
patient revenues to $9.989 mil-
lion in the third quarter had
been driven by “an increase in
patient activities across the
board”, with total revenues for
the hospital and healthcare
provider up by 12.4 per cent
to $10.157 million against last
year’s comparative.

Total expenses, meanwhile,
grew at a slower rate of 9.9 per
cent to $9.176 million, despite






To advertise in The Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 322-1986 today!




pressures from the rising cost
of medical technologies and
supplies, utility costs and staff
salaries and benefits.

Net income from continuing
operations for the three
months to October 31, 2007,
was some 52.6 per cent higher,
standing at $920,000 compared
to $603,000 the year before.

As ever, the only drag on
DHHS results continues to be
the Blake Road-based West-
ern Medical Plaza, which it has
now leased out to other oper-
ators after it failed to find a
buyer.

The loss produced by West-
ern Medical Plaza remained
flat with the prior year’s, stand-
ing at $173,000 compared to
$174,000...

Mr Sealy said in relation to
Western Medical Plaza: “The

property continues to be on :

the market, and we’re looking
at options that exist — selling
it or other business opportu-
nities. Nothing is off the table

um Doctors sees —
EPS double |

at this time. ;
“We have a few interested
parties, but nothing that we

can say shows that a sale is cer- —

tain.”

For the first nine months of
its financial year ending on
January 31, 2008, DHHS saw
patient revenues rise by 7.5 per
cent to $30.721 million, with
total revenues ahead by 7.8 per
cent at $31.224 million.

That growth rate just out-
stripped the 6.1 per cent
increase in expenses to $27.35
million, compared to $25.77
million the year before, with
net income from continuing

operations ahead 25.8 per cent |

at $3.688 million compared to
$2.932 million.

The loss from Western Med-
ical Plaza was also contained,
down to $463,000 from
$529,000, giving DHHS a net
income for the first nine
months of $3.225 million, a
34.2 per cent increase over the
previous year’s $2.403 million.

P.O. Box N-4196
Nassau, Bahamas



VACANCY AS OF JANUARY 3, 2008
A TEACHER OF MODERN LANGUAGES (FRENCH)

IN THE HIGH SCHOOL

Applicants for the above mentioned posts must have a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree
from a recognized University in the relevant subject area and a Post-graduate Certificate in
Education, or teacher certificate. The ability to teach Advanced Placement courses, a second
language or a second subject would be an assef?V& cértified copy of the relevant degree
and ‘teacher. certificateamust-2ceompany the applreation:The names and relevant contact
information of at least two professional references should also be listed. Applications from
unqualified persons and or incomplete applications will not be processed.

The persons offered an appointment will be expected to make a commitment to
work in harmony with Christian principles and to support the emphasis of the
Bahamas Conference of The Methodist Church of which the school is a part.

Queen’s College was established in Nassau in 1890 by the Methodist Church and isa member
of the Intemational Association of Methodist Schools, Colleges and Universities (IAMSCU)

The completed application together with a covering letter and a recent photograph must
be sent to:

The Principal
Queéen’s College
P.O. Box N 7127
Nassau, Bahamas

Or faxed to 242 393 3248 or emailed to: dlynch@qchenceforth.com

Consolidated Water (Bahamas)
Ltd.

e

Invites application for the position of:

CONTROLS/ELECTRICAL TECHNICIAN

Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd. operates several Reverse Osmosis
Plants within the Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company enjoys a
reputation of providing a wholesome quality product, whilst maintaining a
strong commitment to its customers, its employees and the community at
large.

The Company currently has a vacancy for the position of Controls/Electrical
Technician. The successful candidate will report directly to the Maintenance
Team Leader. The Controls/Electrical Technician shall be responsible for
preventive and predictive maintenance and repairs of Reverse Osmosis
‘Plant Control Systems and Single and Three Phase Equipment & Building
Systems. Additionally duties shall include assisting with other maintenance
duties of the operations.

> ae
The prospective candidate must possess the following skills:

e¢ Strong Single and Three Phase Electrical Repairs and
Maintenance skills with certification in the same.

e Strong trouble shooting skills of Single, Three Phase -
Electrical Systems, Variable Frequency Drives and
Reverse Osmosis Plant Equipment.

Must have demonstrated experience with Allen
Bradley/Rockwell Power Line Carriers/Motor Starters.
Must have a working knowledge of Schnider PLCs.

Must be familiar with navigating and trouble shooting
Paragon, Devicenet and Controlnet PLC Software.

Strong PC. skills, including. working knowledge and
proficiency with Microsoft Office and Maintenance
Management software.

Ability to prepare weekly/monthly
performed.

e Must have proven history of good interpersonal skills.

¢ Must be prepared to work long hours, weekends and
travel to other business centers of the company.

reports of work

Interested persons can forward their resumes to the following
address on or before December 14, 2007:

The General, Manager
Consolidated Water (Bahamas) Ltd.
P O Box CR 54030
Nassau, Bahamas





INVESTMENT PROJECT ADMINISTRATOR

We are seeking an Investment Project Administrator for an international
life science venture fund.





The General Partner of a Bahamas Limited Partnership is seeking an
Investment Project Administrator to assist in the evaluation of investment
opportunities in international markets. The Partnership invests in the
life sciences field and is particularly interested in identifying innovative
approaches to prevent chronic diseases.









The job is specialized and requires that the candidate have a sound degree




experience. Proven expertise and experience in the development and
monitoring of clinical studies for an international pharmaceutical company,
(preferably in an international context) is paramount. Fluent English is a
prerequisite, other language a plus. The candidate will be based at the
company’s office in Nassau. .





A competitive salary package commensurate with experience will be
offered.




Please reply to Inventages Whealth Management Inc., Cable Beach
Courts Unit #1, P.O. Box N-7532, Nassau or FAX: 225-1307 or EMAIL:
hr.nassau@inventages.com for the attention of HUMAN RESOURCES
—Ref: IPA.





” The deadline for applications is December 19", 2007.

jee cement fe Pm eae
Cook Wanted




‘We are looking for a dedicated, hardworking cook to
join our kitchen team. Must have a positive attitude,
excellent customer service skills essential.







Qualifications:
e Experience in an industrial kitchen
¢ Certificate in Culinary Arts a plus
* Food-Handlers health certificate

¢ Police certificate









Excellent benefits
Salary commensurate with experience





Please fax resume to: 302-4787



.dn, Biology, a. minimum. of 3 years’ hands-on analytical and research |}; ”

Seren aeow

Ba se SD SSS SSCS SS a PT nS SS EE sD ceecaseereeeceemcescsast

Ned betel pid coe

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- branch in the Bahamas, and have the draft

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 9B





Bank opens
BOB Financial
Services in|
Coral Gables

BANK of the Bahamas International has
today opened its Miami branch, BOB |
Financial Services, located in the SunTrust
Building at 201 Alhambra Circle in Coral
Gables.

-“The opening of a South Florida financial
services centre marks a major milestone in
the history of Bank of The Bahamas, as
we continue to chart new territory to meet
the changing needs of our customers,” said
managing director Paul McWeeney.

The bank changed its name to include
the word International when it anngunced
plans to open in South Florida.

According to Sam Haven, manager of
private banking and international opera-
tions, the service centre will facilitate pre-
sent account holders who need to access
funds for:travel, make purchases for indi-
vidual or business needs and cover medical
expenses. Even though the financial insti-
tution will have a physical presence in
South Florida, the Central Bank of the
Bahamas Exchange Control guidelines
apply.

“Through our Miami centre, you will also
be able to acquire US$ stored value cards,”
said Mr Haven.

“Customers wanting to make a major
purchase such as a vehicle can present the
pro forma invoice in Miami or through a

available at the Miami office, or they can
access funds in their account while they
are actually in Miami.”Loan applications
will not be handled by the Miami. centre at

this tie. Paul McWeeney





Polymers International, Limited
Queens Highway, P.O. Box F-42684
. Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas
Office: (242) 352-3506 Facsimile: (242) 352-2779

Polymers International Limited currently is accepting applications for the
following positions. Resumes can be mailed or dropped off at the main

office on Queens Highway.

‘Human Resources Manager

This person will be responsible for administering all aspects of Company
human resources and functions. This person will assume responsibility for
the effective performance of various human resource functions, including
recruiting, interviewing, hiring, payroll and for insuring corporation-wide
compliance with all related government regulations. This person will provide
recommendations to Senior Management in establishing overall human
resource objectives, policies and plans This person will ensure that Human
Resource activities are conducted in accordance with established Company
policies and within established procedures. This person will also assign,
direct and appraise Human Resources personnel.

This is not an entry-level position. The successful candidate will have
proven abilities in the Human Resources field with a minimum of 5 years
experience. Superior written and spoken communication skills, including
sincere and effective listening skills, are critical. A high degree of
organizational skills is essential. The candidate should possess a bachelor’s
degree or higher in human resources or related field of study.

Information Technology Manager

The Information Technology Manager will maintain and manage all
information technology equipment and assets including file servers, network
infrastructure, software applications, and telephony systems. This person
must keep abreast of current technologies and prepare appropriate project
plans for infrastructure changes. This person will suppor staff and
administrative personnel IT needs.

The successful candidate will have a minimum of a Bachelor of Computer
Science or equivalent and a minimum of 5 years experience providing
network systems support. Technical certifications in Microsoft Windows
a plus. Applicants who additionally have experience in Microsoft SQL
server, Crystal Reports, and Platinum BatchMaster software preferred. This
position requires on-call ‘availability 24/7, 12 months a year. This person
must also be able to work additional hours including weekends and must
possess travel documents for outside the Bahamas. If you have excellent
communication and organizational skills and are looking to work in a team
environment developing technology, mail or drop off your resume.



To advertise in Zhe Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,

just call 322-1986 today!



NEEDED FOR
KIN GSWAY CAFETERIA

FOR JANUARY, 2008.

Kingsway Academy is seeking the serivces

of a cook to prepare meals in the Cafeteria

as of January, 2008. Interested applicants

should collect applications from the Busi-

ness office on Bernard Road from 8:00 - 4:
00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Successful applicants must:

° Be batietpoting, commited born-again
Christian |

¢ Have a minimum of at least five (5)
years experience in food handling and
preparation. .

e Have a valid Health Certificate

e Have a genuine love for children and

young people, etc.

For further information please contact the
following:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton .
Academy Affairs Manager
Telephone: 324-6269 or 324-6887

Deadline for applications - Friday, Decem-
ber 28, 2007



~ FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

‘Our client, a Government Ministry, is seeking applications for the position of Financial

Controller.

JOB OBJECTIVE:

To provide leadership and coordination of the financial si plant and budget
management functions and to ensure the Ministry’s accounting procedures conform
to the Financial Administration and Audit Act of 1973. The position reports to the
Permanent Secretary.:

PRIMARY DUTIES:

* Direct and coordinate the Ministry’s financial planning and budget management
functions.

* Recommend procedures for measuring the financial and operating performance of
divisions and departments.

° Monitor and analyze monthly operating results against er bids

* Oversee daily operations of the finance department.

° Manage the preparation of monthly senentey expenditure reports, financial
outlooks and forecasts.

° Prepare financial analysis for contract negotiations and product investment decisions.

* Work with department managers and corporate staff on business plans for the ministry.

* Establish and implement short and long range Gepartmental goals, Ob IESHVES: policies
and operating procedures.

* Design, establish and maintain an organizational structure and staffing to effectively
accomplish the department’s goals and objectives.

° Oversee financial management of foreign operations.

* Represent the ministry externally to government agencies, funding agencies and the
general public.

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

* Candidates must meet the following criteria:

* Knowledge of finance, accounting, budget, and cost control principles. Knowledge of
the Financial Administration and Accounting Act of 1973. puowidee of US federal
and state financial regulations where: applicable.

* Ability to analyze financial data and prepare financial repotts, statements and
projections. ' Working knowledge of short and long term budgeting and forecasting,
project budgets, and other financial. analysis. .

* Professional written and verbal communication and interpersonal skills, Ability to
motivate teams to produce quality material within tight timeframes and simultaneously
manage several projects. Ability to facilitate and pacticipate in group meetings.

¢ Bachelors Degree in Finance and/or Accounting. Professional accounting designation,
ACCA, CA or CPA desirable. Minimum of five years experience in senior-level finance
or accounting position. ~

° Bahamian citizen.

The position offers an attractive salary with a benefits package, reflecting the
successful applicant’s experience and qualifications.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including references before January
15, 2007 to:
Mark E. Munnings
Partner
P.O. Box N 7120,
Nassau, Bahamas

or
Email: mmunnings@deloitte.com.bs


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





INSIGHT




For the stories behind
the news, read Insight

on Mondays

TRUST OFFICER

LEADING TRUST COMPANY is seeking a candidate for the
position of Trust Officer

Responsibilities include:

e Liaising with senior management in the provision of
information/execution of transactions and problem
resolution :

Managing all associated risks and escalating as appropriate
Preparing periodic administrative reviews of trusts and
companies

Liaising with Compliance/Business Risk Management,
external auditors and regulators as required to ensure
adherence to all internal policies/procedures and regulatory
requirements

Ongoing updating and maintenance of trust administration
system as it relates to account management

e Projects as assigned from time to time.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED:

¢ Bachelors degree in law, business administration,
accounting or related field
Minimum 3-5 years experience in trust and company
administration or related experience
Strong oral and written communication skills
STEP qualification is desirable
Sound knowledge of fundamental trust and company laws
and related administrative practice
Basic knowledge of banking and investment products and
their application in overall management and administration
of wealth
Basic understanding and working knowledge of
accounting concepts and their aplications
Ability to identify potential risk issues and solutions and
to communicate these effectively to senior management
Excellent time management, organization and
administrative skills
Strong analytical and problem-solving skills
Strong PC skills; knowledge of 4Series an asset
Strong interpersonal skills and excellent team player

BENEFITS INCLUDE EXCELLENT SALARY,
PERFORMANCE BASED BONUS PAYMENTS, PENSION
BENEFITS AND MEDICAL COVERAGE.

Interested Bahamian candidates should forward a copy of
their resume to:

Human Resources
P.O.Box N-10697
Nassau, Bahamas or
Fax:(242) 325-0911 or
E-mail:smith@experta.bs




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007
IN THE SUPREME COURT No. 01153
Common Law and Equity Division




IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND




IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land being
part of John Drudge Grant (D-52) comprising an area of Sixteen and
Sixty-seven Hundredths (16.67) acres situate near the Settlement of The
Bight on Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas and bounded on the NORTH partly by another portion of land
originally granted to John Drudge and running thereon Nine Hundred
and One and Ninety-three Hundredths (901.93) Feet on the EAST by
another portion of land granted originally to John Drudge and running
thereon Seven Hundred and Eighty-Two and Sixty-two Hundredths
(782.62) Feet on the SOUTH by another portion of land originally
granted to John Drudge and running thereon Eight Hundred and Ninety-
two and Sixty-three Hundredths (892.63) Feet and on the WEST by The
Queen’s Highway and running thereon Eight Hundred and Seventy-one
and Forty Hundredths (871.40) Feet.















AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of
DELTON RANDOLPH MOREE





NOTICE

THE PETITION OF Delton Randolph Moree in respect of:-
“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land being part of John Drudge
Grant (D-52) comprising an area of Sixteen and Sixty-seven Hundredths
(16.67) acres situate near the Settlement of The Bight on Long Island
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and bounded
on the NORTH partly by another portion of land originally granted to
John Drudge and running thereon Nine Hundred and One and Ninety-
three Hundredths (901.93) Feet on the EAST by another portion of land
granted originally to John Drudge and running thereon Seven Hundred
and Eighty-Two and Sixty-two Hundredths (782.62) Feet on the SOUTH
by another portion of land originally granted to John Drudge and running
thereon Eight Hundred and Ninety-two and Sixty-three Hundredths
(892.63) Feet and on the WEST by The Queen’s Highway and running
thereon Eight Hundred and Seventy-one and Forty Hundredths (871.40)
Feet.



















Delton Randolph Moree claims to be the owner of the unincumbered fee simple
estate in possession of the said land and has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated andthe
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.






Copies of the Petition and the Plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal office hours in the following places:




1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the City of Nassau,
Bahamas; and





2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro Road, off Shirley
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.








NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Pétition shall on or before the
expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these presents, file
in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement
of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.






Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his Claim on or
before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these
presents will operate as bar to such claim.






LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers

#35 Buen Retiro Road

Off Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas







Attorneys for the Petitioner





Government





The tue



Cea ey
ae

Tl 502 2056
OF ad ta les

we

PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Estate of the late Preston Stuart, Jr. (the Estate)

Freeport Taxi Company Limited

First Atlantic Realty Limited

Bahamas Developers, Limited

PAW Distributing Company Limited

Tokyo Investments Limited

Commonwealth Group of Companies Limited

Remax Realty Limited

King O’ Beef Limited

Kensington International Management Company Limited

Stuart Travel Services Limited

Northern Transport Limited

Skate World Limited

Special Venture Associates Limited

Deep Blue Energy (Bahamas) Limited formerly
Nashumi International Limited

TAKE NOTICE, that all persons having claims
against the Estate and or any of the Companies listed above,
as creditors, must, before close of business on Friday the
28" day of December, 2007, send to the Joint Receiver and
Manager at the address shown below, by letter, facsimile or
electronically, full particulars of the amount and nature of
their claim together with invoices, or any other documents
evidencing the same and contact information of the creditor.
Failure to submit a claim by the 28" December, 2007 may
result in a loss of rights with respect to such a claim. The
Joint Receiver and Manager reserve the right to accept or
reject any claim. The Joint Receiver and Manager reserve
the right to require further evidence in support of any claim
before accepting a claim. Creditors submitting claims
with sufficient and proper evidence thereof before the 28"
December, 2007 will be advised in writing of whether
their claim is accepted: Acceptance of claims by the Joint
Receiver and Manager does not impose any liability.on the
Joint Receiver and Manager to pay such claim. Claims which
are accepted in writing by the Joint Receiver and Manager
will be considered for payment depending upon the priorityof

| such claim and the availability of funds to meet such claim.

Dated this 5" day of December A.D., 2007

Kevin D. Seymour

Joint Receiver and Manager
PricewaterhouseCoopers

Regent Centre Hast

P.O. Box I-42682

l'reeport Bahamas

‘Telephone: (242) 352-8471

Facsimile: (242) 352-4810

E-Mail: kevin.d.seymour@bs.pwe.com



te dt Ae














FROM page 1

will come when this nation has
to negotiate a replacement for
the Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) with the US, as this
arrangement is also under
pressure from the WTO
because it is a one-way system
of trade preferences.

To preserve duty-free access
to the US for its exporters, the
Bahamas is likely to have to
reciprocate by removing all
import and tariff barriers on
goods coming into the US.
This will present a major

_ headache for government rey-

enues, as 85-90 per cent of all
imports coming into the
Bahamas originate from that
country.

As a result, many observers
had argued that the Bahamas
would have to address tax
reform as a matter of urgency,
and examine the feasibility of
adopting a sales or value-
added (VAT) tax to replace
lost revenues. An Excise Tax
has never been mentioned,
until now.

East Bay St.

business

management.

NOTICE |

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 131 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Cinque Terre Company Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 8th day of November, A.D., 2007 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

ACCOUNTS CLERK >

A progressive organization seeks to hire an. |
Accounts Clerk. The successful candidate .
will be responsible for recording various :
transactions
monthly financial statements and reports for |





Qualifications
Candidate must have at least an associate |
degree in accounting with a minimum of five |
(5)‘years experience or a bachelor’ degree
with a minimum of (3) years experience.
Knowledge of Microsoft Excel and Quick

Books would be an advantage.
Salary range: $16,200 — $25,000 per Annum.

Qualified and interested applicants should
forward a copy of their curriculum vitae to:-

c/o The Tribune
DA Number 5405
P.O. Box N-3207

Nassau, Bahamas

All responses should be received by
December 18, 2007.

mulls Excise
Tax option

“These are some of the tech-
nical areas that are being
looked at at the moment,
which will allow us to modify
our tax regime without having
to go the step of a VAT or
sales tax,” Mr Laing said of the
proposed Excise Tax Act ©

He added that reforming the
Bahamian tax system away
from one that was heavily
reliant on import tariffs and
stamp duty to a VAT or sales
tax regime “continues to be a
consideration, but in all these
matters you have to ensure you
don’t put your revenue base'in
jeopardy, as this is needed to
fund public expenditure, social
spending and government
spending.

“You don’t want to disrupt
the economic flows in your
country because you are adopt-
ing a fiscal system you don’t
know enough about.” {

Some in the private sector,
though, are likely to question
whether the WTO and other
rules-based trading regimes
would treat an Excise Tax any
more kindly than the
Bahamas’ current import sys-
tem, as some might still con-
sider it a dutiable barrier to
trade.







and generating




















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- THE TRIBUNE
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Advisement, Registration




Dates and Times



: : & Bill Payment |
| New Student Orientation : Thursday, January 3rd, 2008, |
| Wednesday, January 2nd, 2008 9:00 a.m 7:00 p.m

8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Venue: Band Shell ; Friday, January 4th, 2008
9:00 a. m. — 7:00 p. m.



HOLIDAY HOURS |

218‘ December, 2007
24th December, 2007
27 December, 2007 — 28th, December, 2007
318t December, 2007

Open 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Closed Rh es)
Open 9:00 a.m. — 5:00 p.m, .
Ol iXy x ee

Reopen regular hours 2nd, January, 2008.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

INDUSTRY TRAIN ING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — SPRING SEMESTER 612608 (SESSION 02)

eg ene
SEC | CODE
ial

1|8 Feb. 07

SESSION A

LAB
DURATION | DAYS FEE





























Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUC ATING & 7

Please bring the following documents







» PAGE 116

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2UU7






with
you to Advisement (required for Step 2):








Your acceptance letter |
A copy of your past BGCSE results |

International Conference
and Art Exhibition
Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic
Slave Trade: Telling the Story

February 21-23, 2008 ‘
Nassau, The Bahamas

Art Exhibition

February 15-23, 2008

|
|
> |
|

Guidelines for Artists

The Conference on the Abolition of the Pran
Telling The Story, invites all artists to submit up to three (3) ariw
executed in any medium for showing at the confere bruary
21-23, 2008. :

Atlantic Slave Trade:



su





nee Fy
cE

The exhibition will open on Friday, 15 February 2098 at 6.30 in
the evening ai the Performing Arts Centre at The College of th

Bahamas Oakes Field Campus.
All artwork should be sent or brought to the Pro Gallery which is ‘|
located in the S Biock at The College of the Bahamas Oakes Field
Campus one (1) week prior to the opening of the exhibition. Please
address all artworks to Mrs. Joann Behagg or Mr. John Cox.





































































































|
|
Bahamian Pec «| 6:00 - Ail artists should give an indication of how they would wis their | |
Cuisine 06 Thursda 9:00pm $225.00 | $150.00 | MK 3D pieces to be displayed. Photographic images would assist us in
Dc et ee cee ne ae ae ao ees au, determining your display needs.
Gourmet COOK anil! 6:00 - Pore ouaticie ane Hil pelsiedscane. wae the
: ‘oreign artists are welcome. However, all related costs will be the |]
— a 1 eo Feb. 4 Monda aeeem $200.00 | $180.00 | MK responsibility of the artists (packing, shipping, and customs duty, | |
ourme 700 ~ etc.) to and from The Bahamas.
Cooking Il 1 | 824 9:00pm $225.00 | $240.00 | MK ) ae See ee eae | |
tof : | ee ee Te eee a ee Sieg tee ah The Conference Committee will select the works to be exhibited
| . | Cake @ Pastry ~ TRBOK 600- a aera i and al! decisions are final. | |
; | Making | 1 | 813 9:00pm $225.00 $75.00 | LK in a3 |
5 a ae Ne i ke, ntacte |
| | Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00 - Contacts |
pe ena Ces EO 9:00pm | 75.00 | PK Joann Behagg John Cox
i | ee =x Sore a email: jhehage(@cob.cdu.bs joox@eob.edu.bs | |
00 - = Ses re rag “is
| Bread Making” | ~~".4 | 8200.00 |. $90.00 | uk _ ppetephione: 302 4200) sacs ence amones 30244854 | |
i “Cake o ~ fe - , “a #y ED . j
| |_Decorating | 1 Mon/Wed. _ $225.00 | $100.00 The enaee of The Bahamas !
Cake resents an
Decorating Il 1 5 weeks MonWed. ; $225.00 | $150.00 i th ti ( Cc f -
Deadline for applications, January 25, 2008 at 4:00 p.m. nternationa onrerence |
| ba is .. ||
SESSION B Abolition of the trans-Atlantic ||
- ~ TUITION Slave Trade: {|
COURSE CODE BEGINS | DURATION S| TME __—& FEES Slave Trade: |
Bahamian COOK 6:00 - ’ my fe |
war.27_ | oweeks Soop __ $225.00 Telling the Story
fee cee ee eee a [1
Gourmet COOK 6:00 - February 21-23, 2008 |
Cooking! - 1 | 823 Mar.24 | 6 weeks 9:00pm Nassau, The Bahamas I
Gourmet COOK 6:00 |
Cooking Il = 824 Mar. 24 beueees: 4 0 %
Cake & Pastry COOK
Making | 1 | 813 Mar. 25 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. $225.00 =
Cake & Pastry COOK S |
= Making II 1 | 814 Mar. 25 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. $250.00 sy
i COOK Bidoes tas eae ein |
: Bread Making 810 Mar. 27 6 weeks Thursday $200.00 ee een 4 in ich a | |
fe Ve See ee ee ee | ce ~ oe
; Africa, Europe and the Americas Fegister today. ||
i| [Cake COOK , p g YY
i Decorating | 1 | 817 Mar. 24 5 weeks MonWed. | $100.00 | |
|| [Cake COOK P| Seater | |
Decorating II 1 | 818 -Sweeks | Mon/Wed. | 9:00pm__§ $150.00 | PK enary opeakers |
|| Deadline for applications, February 28, 2008 at 4:00 p.m. . se scl |
i “Pee ; Sse : P Dr. Joseph E. Harris, Howard University |
| For further informati to pick lication pl tact the Industry Training department of the Cul & Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus. an ||
! or further information or to pick up an application please contact the (indus ry training department o he Cu inary & . are : 1 sa fi ha Sy uth Atnican | i
|| Hospitality Management Institute, 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175 expelt on Africa and Divector OS our Ewe.
Research and Archivai Project. At the conference |
i All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). his topic center around: “Global sla e trade and |
ql the emergence of communities of Afcan cescen! |
|| CHMI reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials. around tine world” |
ae : ;
THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE - THE COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY OF THE BAHAMAS Dr. Rosanne Adderley, Professor o} History al
: EVENTS CALENDER 2007-2008 BY i. MOSS Tulane University and author. Her presentation will!
A ee DAO EVENT eons LECTURERS / PARTICIPA foe ce MENU. | | focus on “Freed Africans in The Bahamas” |
December 6th Presentation by Mr. Absil -- holocaust sur Munnings Roam 2
| Thursday aotearoa I aaa Pa SMe ee illi i \ttorney at Law
| | December 13 MERRY MULTI-CULTURAL, Organization & musical direction: i. Moss | Munnings Room ? | Mr. William Godfrey Davis Esq ; Attol a - Lan
| itursday | CHRISTMAS ALCL, Foreign Lang. Dept. membersand COB | 7PM | and Transformative Mediator, his topic will be
i January 2 Wed | CHINESE NEW YEAR | Presentation by Professor Xu Xianwen | Munnings Room 2. 7P\I | “Reparations for the peoples of the Maafa”.
| January 19 DRUMFEST - A drum summit regrouping Video of Montreal TAM TAM JAM by I. Moss | Band shell i
' Saturday. _| members from all the Junkanoo teams | Director: Chippie? Nei! Symonette? Humblestone? | 2 PM. ~~» | | Mr. Kojo Yankah Presideni of the Africa Institus ||

T.5

>

JUNKANOO ART — designing and pasting ;
costumes - WORKSHOP

January 30"
| Wednesday

Presentation and demonstration by Henry Mos

Munnings Roam .
slide show by I. Moss _

of Journalism & Communications, educator and ||
‘Reconciliation ||
|
1
'



i February 7 | PANEL DISCUSSION: Tourism and Panel members from Tourism, Immigration, ¢ ‘OB | author, he will speak on the rt ypi ;
Thursday ___| Languages _and private tourism businesses Lecture Hall? 7 PM tor the Peopies of the WViaafa” |

February 19 EL PRENC'H FILM - ASTERIX , | Presentation on Roman history background by a Munnings Reom 2



Tuesday | Professor Stephen B. ha 7 Pm | ata .
| March 14 FRENCH FOLK SONG EVENING Slide show by I. Moss, F. Leger on guitar. J, Munnings Room > | | For additional information contact the Scho
| Friday | i? __| Mereus on vocals and other musical friends | 7 PM of Social Sciences, Telephone 397-2606/7

_.| VICTOR HUGO ~ Beyond LES MIZ. Munnings Room 2
JL HAITIANFILM
AN EVENING OF BAHAMIAN MUSIC

| Guests: The DICEY-DO SINGERS |
MAIFEST ,

| March 21 - Fri
April 10
i April 16

' Friday.

i May ©
Tuesday
May 23
[Friday

Lecture and slide show by L. Moss.
_{ Slide presentation: Leper, SCCA

Slide show on Bahamian Musicians and





| Mannings Room 2
New Pertor ce ¢

School of Social Sciences



nter? |





Jessica Minnis, Assoc. Professor, |
j

| The College of The Bahamas

> ~ | PO Bax N4912

E-riail: abolitionconf@cob.adu.ias
Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 397-2608

Munnings R

) ; participation of German- | Munnings |
penn even np SPOAKETS iN Nassau KALCT students cinch ciosigie
CLASSICAL MUSIC EVENING Piano solos by LMoss; Cello / piano duets by HH. Munnings Room 2

---snenenneePeloguin & I-Moss: guests












Dates are subject to change.


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007

Ra ALTE ene aa aR a
Duty elimination

urged for solar ©
power components

CRT eT 7
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 322-1986 today!

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KOTTARELS.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of KOTTAREL S.A. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
__SPARRING POINT
INVESTMENTS LTD.
Notice is hereby given that in aéeardance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SPARRING POINT INVEST-
MENTS LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dis-

solution has been issued and the Company has therefore

been struck off the Register.

__ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



FROM page 1

(Freeport) and the former
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce president, told The
Tribune that apart from elimi-
nating import duties, the Gov-
ernment also needed to intro-
duce net metering — providing
credit to homes and businesses
that provided excess power
from their solar energy systems
to the national power grid — to
encourage the adoption of
alternative energy in this
nation.

Pointing out that it was “the
up front cost that kills”, Mr
Lowe said that it would cur-
rently cost a middle-class
Bahamian household some
$60,000 to install a fully-func-

tional PV system in their
home.

While the long-term return
and savings generated from
having their own natural, alter-
native energy power supply
would more than compensate,
Mr Lowe pointed out that the
substantial costs incurred at
the front end provided a strong
deterrent to Bahamian homes
and businesses going down this
route.

While the Government had
reduced import duties applied
to solar panels and solar water
heaters, Mr Lowe said there
were many more components
in a PV system that were still
attracting full duty rates. It was
these, he added, that needed
to be reduced to make solar
and other alternate energies

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SCIROPPO LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SCIROPPO LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.;
(Liquidator) ose



less cost-prohibitive for
Bahamians.

Among those components
still attracting full duty rates,
Mr Lowe said, were charge
controllers/regulators; deep
cycle storage batteries that
held large amounts of current
for long periods; inverters that
converted the DC battery volt-
age to AC city-type voltage;
and heavy-gauge copper wire
for the battery hook-up, which
was different from household
wire.

“They need to eliminate all
the duty on that stuff associ-
ated with PV, and they need
to implement net metering so
that the initial home invest-
ment of $60,000, for an average
middle class home, can be real-
ized as an investment in selling
back to the grid,” Mr Lowe
told The Tribune.

“T would say that if all tariff
rates were removed from all
the alternative energy source
components, it would drop the
price by 30 per cent at least,
and make it very entry friend-
ly for the average Bahamian
household.”

He added that the Govern-
ment would also have to
amend the Electricity Act, as
the current legislation prohibits
consumers in areas where the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) power supply is
available from generating their
own electricity, except in pow-
er outages. That would penal-
ize alternative energy users.

“The bottom line is that
BEC and Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company still need to look
at net metering,” Mr Lowe

-’said. “This would make it more
viable for resorts and com-

- -emercial properties to invest in

cadded, was “critical for long-

THE TRIBUNE -

<

aoe:

TR US as ES a ERLE GS

SE

the technology, to not only
reduce their own cost of oper- |
ations, but to show a return on §
investment by supplying the t
grid. It makes the grid more

SSSR STE RES

robust.”

All the Government ‘had to
do was eliminate duties, intro-
duce net metering and amend
its legislation, Mr Lowe said,
because the private sector }
would then “jump on this” and
“take over”.

Reducing energy costs, he

term progress” in the}{
Bahamas, especially given that
oil prices were likely to con- ;
tinue rising further when this
nation’s oil import bill was
already equivalent to one-third
of its merchandise imports.
Reducing the Bahamas’ ;
dependency on oil and other
fossil fuels for its energy needs,
apart from benefiting the envi-
ronment, would also enhance
this nation’s energy security, |
reduce carbon dioxide emis-
sions, aid the tourism sector, |)
protect foreign exchange ;
reserves and potentially con-
tribute to increased economic f
growth and employment from }
lower power costs. 4
Kelly’s (Freeport) was pay- i
ing some $16,000 a month to §
Grand Bahama Power Com- |
pany for electricity, a rate that i
would leave the company with ;
an annual power bill of;
$192,000, Mr Lowe said. i
As a result, Bahamians and
companies based in this nation 4
had “to rethink how we oper- |
ate”. After payments to sup- ©
pliers, duties paid to Customs |
and the staff payroll, utilities }
— chiefly electticity COsts — were §
Kelly’s inost expensive month- ;
lyNiné“item,-Mr Lowe said.

a



PT



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH ST. VIL of FOWLER
STREET, P.O. BOX CB-12299, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister resposible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 8TH day of December, 2007
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DISET) OTT) MOIR PTL

SWITCH-BOARD

LOLIK LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of LOLIK LIMITED has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SWITCH-BOARD has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

NOTICE
PATERSON FIDELITY CORP.



EERE IG. EL AP MALE OLY SS ORE EOE DABS | LOLI HEIL FAILS

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Incoporated under the International Business
Companies Act, 2000 of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas registered in the Register of Companies
ARGOSA CORP. INC. under the Registration Number 28451.

(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
(In Voluntary Dissolution)

Notice is hereby given that the dissolution of the
Company is complete and the Company has been
dissolved by the Registrar General.

Bis

Pricing Information As Of:

Dated this 2nd of October, 2007

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas '
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

0.00%
3.43% ‘
2.72%
2.35%
2.46%
1.51%
2.00%
2.54%
3.28%
0.84%
0.88%
3.50%
4.47%
3.22%
2.35%]
0.00%

Daniel Eisenberg
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

FORTALEZA VALLEY LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section

52wk-Low Last Price Weekl
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 16.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) . 6.00

Nt



41.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supérmarkets
a RND Holdings
ee

41.00
14.60
0:45

7.71%
Se 138 (8) of the International Business Compames Act
2000, the dissolution of FORTALEZA VALLEY LY

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

Yield %



NA_V
1.366332"
3.5388°"**

' 2.990218"
1.279370°**



PFET EEE GLEE LI

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

” Fidelit In und

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $: - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume.
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

Register. ‘
*.~ 30 November 2007
** - 30 June 2007
*** . 31 October 2007
sees 31 July 2007

ARGOSA CORP. INC. ‘
(Liquidator)


SSiire--

mate 4 08 2 8 ee 8

THE TRIBUNE.






eo eed 0 Be oo @

gee UUM TENANT :

@e@etueeorseeeos 6
eesti ed ome ts ter.



Doctors Hospital Health System Limited

Interim report
Quarter ended October 31, 2007

Chairman’s Report
Doctors Hospital Health System Limited

Dear Shareholders,

I am pleased to report on your company’s financial results for the three months ended October 31, 2007.
This quarter was a fairly strong one compared to third quarter fiscal 2007. Earnings per share were $0.08
compared to $0.04 in the prior year period. This result was generally attributable to a $1.1 million, or
12.4% increase in total revenues which outstripped a moderate increase in total expenses.

. The: Company’s revenue. performance reflects continued growth in inpatient services, an area where

. DHHS retains a major competitive advantage by offering high quality patient care. Adult Patient Days

* remains an important barometer of the Company’s.success, and after a slight decline in this statistic for
the year ended January 31, 2007, the Company is continuing a positive trend of increases in four of the
last five years. Additionally, surgical services, maternity, and a broad range of outpatient
services—Imaging, Lab, Rehabilitation Services and the ER—continue to maintain dominant positions in
the market.

For the nine months ended October 31, 2007 ‘comings were $3.2 iin an increase of $0.8 million, or
"34.2%, over the comparable period jest year. Total revenues for this period increased 7.8% compared to
an increase in total expenses of 6.1%. The increases in expenses reflect the continuing upward pressure
on the costs required to provide excellent service. Salaries and benefits, medical supplies and services,
and other operating expenses all increased over the -prior year due in part to increased volumes and
inflation in supplier costs.

--On:another positive note for the compaiiy; the: provision for doubtful: acceunts improved over last year
and has assisted in offsetting the trend of rising costs; for the current period, bad debt charges were
reduced-by $0.6 million, or 34%, relative to the prior year, This was possible due to especially strong
collection efforts over the past nine months.

The financial ‘position remained strong. Cash and cash scelvi increased to $5.8 million. Capital
expenditure through the first nine months of the fiscal year was $0.9 million compared to $2.8 million for
the same period last year. The Company expects to invest approximately $4.0. million over the coming six
months for facility upgrades and addition of new medical technologies.

Finally, Jess than two months ago our shareholders received cash dividends for the first time in six years.
We have returned to dividend-strength due to the hard work of our Associates, volunteers and the
continued support of our medical ‘staff. On behalf of the Board of — I thank you for your
——, loyalty to the Hospital.

J oe Krukowski
Chairman '
December 3, 2007

- DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Balance Sheet

October 31, 2007 with comparative figures at January 31, 2007
(Expressed in-thousands of Bahamian dollars) ~: ‘

: October 31, 2007 January 31, 2007

Assets ;
Gach and cash cipuivalon’ > $ 5,789 1,988
Accounts receivable—patients, net (note 2) 909 951
Accounts recelvable—third party payors, set (ncte 2) 5,696 5,521
Inventories 1,308 v4 1,252
Other assets 569 ‘ 322

Assets classified as held for sale (note 3




: tote . : 19,781 . a ~ 15,477
Non-current assets:
_ Investments 3% 30
_ Goodwill, net gid * 431 431
-, Other. intangible are 2,525 2,700
5 1,022
9,359
13,542
Total assets $ ow 29,019
- Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity. a
~ Current liabilities: ; ; ;
Accounts payable and other liabilities 3,733 3,448
Long-term debt, current portion 309 389
Liabilities directly associated with sssets classified ab ;
held for sale (note 3 $,279
9,028 9116 |
Non-current liabilities ‘
Long-term debt : 3,010 3,302
Total liabilities : ; . 12, €30 12,418
Shareholders’ equity:
Share capital: »
Authorized 12,500,000 common shares at par value -
of B$0.04 each (July 31, 2007— ah iddat e
Issued and fully paid 9,971,634 shares o ws :
Quly 31, 2007 - P97 Ga shares) : 399 399
Contributed surplus , 12,358 12,358
Retained earnings i : __ 6,870 . 3,844

Total liabilities and shareholders’



DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Income

Aicbedt ue belay tpi 2007 wit comparative figures forthe thee month ended October 31,
2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars) sie hebg Salhiany atest

eecmabbig than ba ves
ee eee ee eee eee et ee
. ' October 31, 2007 : October 31, 2006
CONTINUING OPERATIONS |
Revenues : : : Pee
Patient service revenue, net ‘ $ ‘9,989 8,910
-+ + Other «> +e Be a a Ede alk! gh bide se See od § hemi ee | o's oe © © o A3Q-
Total revenues et 10,157: 9,040
Expenses : ; ‘
Salaries and benefits PE Saale, Sa tah neh aha tog th 3,772 ane) 3,488
Medical supplies and services _ 2,463 — ; 2,325
_ Other operating ay 4 + Bah " 1,242 ‘ ; 1,003
Provision for doubtful accounts met 416 380
Depreciation and amortization Pala A $36 573
Utilities . : 366 326
Government taxes and fees ‘ 205 182
Repairs and maintenance : 116 75
Total expenses ; 9,176 8,352
Income from continuing operations =. ie
before interest 981 688
Interest ex 6 85
Income from continuing operations 920 toe ae 603
Discontinued operations i oe ; ae | ;
Revenue ; 24 20
Expenses ' (197) (194)
Loss from discontinued operations: One (173) (174)
Net income for the period by Ba 141 429
CRY co RRP LIPTON TELS NI LE LITE EI LE ILE ET AE LOT TE ET EEE

Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):

Basic and fully diluted $ 0.08 0.04
(Unaudited)
i
ron “ Ce ea OH OOM a OMe bees ds

Nine months ended October 31, 2007



MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007, PAGE 13B



DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Income

Nine months ended October 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the nine months ended October 31,
2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

October 31, 2006















CONTINUING OPERATIONS

Revenues
Patient service revenue, net $ 30,721 28,580
Other fs 03 388
Total revenues L ‘34,224 28,968

Expenses
Salaries and benefits 11,479 10,548
Medical supplies and services 7,746 7,162
Other operating 3,494 2,895
Provision for doubtful accounts 1,100 : 1,667
Depreciation and amortization (note 5) 1,588 1,633
Utilities ; 930 865
Government taxes and fees . 628 601
Repairs and maintenance __ 385 399
Total expenses 27,350 25,770
Income frofn continuing operations

before interest 3,874 3,198

Interest expense (186) (266)
Income from continuing operations 3,688 2,932

Discontinued operations







Revenue . 87 : 65

Expenses 650) _ (594)

Loss from discontinued operations re (463) a (529)
Net income for the period 7 $ “3,225 2,403.



Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):

Basic and fully diluted __ $ 7 6.32 0.24



(Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

Nine months ended October 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the nine months ended October 31,

2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)





















October 31, 2007 October 31, 2006
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in):
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income $ 3,225 2,403
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash .
provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization 1,588 1,633
Provision for doubtful accounts 1,100 1,667
Gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment ___ (16) = 3x
§,897 5,703
Increase in accounts receivable (1,248) (987)
(Increase) decrease in inventories (56) ; 74
Increase in prepaid expenses and other assets (251) 59
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable and other liabilities _ 320 (710)
Cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activities 4,662 4,139
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
"Purchase of property, plant and equipment Ps (gqByis LF SLs 3 (1,547)
Purchase of intangible assets (1.26). (1,299)
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment ___ 1,038 ee -
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in) investing activities x OA. na (2,846)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Repayment of long-term debt : (707) (1,501)
Payment of dividends (199) -
Cash and cash equivalents used in financing activities (906) (1,501)
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents _—. - 3,820 (288)
Cash and cash equivalents ot beginning of period 1,988 . 1,284
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period (note 6) Pe $5,808 —_ 7 1,076

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank ead in hand, short-term deposits with an original maturity of six
months or less and bank overdrafts.

Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity

Nine months ended October 31, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)





Number of shares Share capital” Contributed surplus Retained earnings —_
Balance at January 31, 2007 9,971,634 $ * 399 $ 12,358 $ 3,844
Net income for the period - - 3,225
Dividends paid - - (199)
Balance at October 31,2007 9,971,634. $399 $12,358 S__—6,870

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LYMITED

‘Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements

EE AL ET TORN TS LT, AT A

1. Significant accounting policies

These interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Intermational Accounting Standard
No. 34, Interim Financial Reporting, using the same accounting policies applied in the January 31, 2007 audited

consolidated financial statements.
2. Accounts receivable

Accounts recéivable are stated net of provisions .r doubtful accorn’ v9 /.8 mifiion.
3. Assets classified as he!d for sale

For the period ended October 31, 2007, total sssets and liabilities of companies which have been discontinued
and for which there is a commitment for disposition are reported im the balance sheet as “held for sale.”

Operating results for these segments are reported in the statement of mcome
These include Westen Medical Plaza Limited and Doctors Hospital (West) Limited.

as “Discontinued operations.”

4. Investment Property

During the period The Company sold 5 acres of undeveloged land in western New Providence. A gain of

$16,000 was recorded.

5. Change in accounting estimate

b The original amortization

During the period The Company changed the period of amo rtization for is t
period for the principal buildings located at Doctors Hospital East were twenty and twen'y-tive years, In
accordance with the provisions of IAS 16, the amortization periods were exten ded to forty years. The effect of
the change for this period was a decrease in amortization charges of approximately $ 161,000

+ dings

6. Cash and cash equivalents
The cash position of $5.808million reported in the statement of cash flows reflects $19,000 in cash for WMP
that is recorded as assets held for sale.

4
PAGE 14B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10 , 2007

THE TRIBUNE



COMICS PAGE












THIS IS WEIRD-..-
NORMALLY I'M THE ONG
«\ BEHIND THE DE6K MAKING
PEOPLE SWEAT!





LIKE MONA LISA. I GUESS IF
YOU HAD A WONDERFUL _»
DAY TOO? ,
















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MILE ABOUT? 47 WAST.
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Kd iY] Ast
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NORTH
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#1085

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i ALWAYS
PICK THE
SLOW LINE



The bidding:

North ast South West
1¢@ Pass 2NT Pass
3NT

Opening lead — three of spades.

During the play of a hand,
declarer must be sure not to take his
eye off the ball — the ball in this case
being the success of his contract. In
today’s deal, South blinked for an
instant, and that was all it took to do
him in.

South won East’s ten of spades
with the jack at trick one and could
count six sure winners — three
age a heart and two diamonds.

club suit was certain to provide
“feat. least three additional tricks, so
e#-South naturally decided to establish
that suit.





















NON SEQUITUR.

(se eoitir Dy

[=TOLBNOUEO B52
AS FNC AS THE
INAIRANCE COMPANY
|5. CONCERNED,
THoZe ARE JUST
VAGUE, HISTORICAL
DOCUMENTS














uses
words ia
the main
See (4 nd 0 body of
NiGER 2ist
= Ama S
THEN TRY TO GLOW posal
HOW
jeters or mae can you hake
from the letters shown here? In

a word, each letter may
be once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY’S TARGET

“43 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.

CRYPTIC PUZZLE



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f ~ .4 26 Teams of borderers? (5) 21 Goand chuck abidt (7) °° fh ACROSS DOWN
2 £4 28 Animal bound to be unable to leg it - 22 That cherishable girt? (3) fe fue 1 Scolds (6)
eA (3) 23. To shoot about ton is very impres- : 7 eee 2 pan
g N 29 Grey as a king and queen (6) sve (6) saree i foes
i ¢ ) 24 Though old, managed without ser- 10 Mythical creature cy)
E j 30 Waster maybe, but does a garden- vant or partes (4) ; (6) \ 5 Bend (5)
ing job (6) 25 Is hidden in cover, this bird (6) 1 Sutten (6) : naa
/ 31 Deeply impressed when married a 26 | see an agent ie out to be sensa- 4 Timid (3) 9 Plaything (3)
C 4 the top fevel (4) : ieee (5) io 16 Lukewarm (5) 12 Colour (3)
e a ‘ 7 Hang around with many a friend (5) 13 Indian instrument
32 Is using it a strain? (8) 7 Animal tat (4)
a : 28 The fr of Anne Hathaway
7 R y 33 Might one feal sheepish eating it? 30 Aina Beda a 4 8 Manaijed (6) 3 5 Ee (5)
0 (6) fired? (4) 24. Sensational (5) 18 Botore (5)
Is Bene 19 Dog (3)
a (5) 20 Mino (3)
PUENTE ETN PL CEO TT Ot NR
S \ 33 Shoot (4) 21 Of the side (7)
; ~ | 26 Flor (5) 2 Policeman (3)
‘ 4 Yesterday's crypus soiutions Yesterday's easy-crosswere seunrens 1
' W ! 28 Barrel (3) 23 Goodwill (6)
ACROSS; 1, Sprat 6, Spade 9, Done-gal 10, Solve 11, Munch | ACROSS: 1, Trust 6, Munch 9, Oration 10, Scary 11, Digh 12, 29. Ran off to wed (6) ° 24 Thing (4)
©) |, 12, drops 13, Cla-Rio-n 15, Go-O 17, Rest 18, D-eport 19, | Limit 13, Foremen 16, Per 17, Arid 18, Fulle 19, Totem 20, 30 Diacose (6) 25 Sign up (6)
1 4 Neve-R 20, Sp-OK-en 22, Rude 24, Tot 25, Sleeper 26, Arieen 22, Lead 24, Lad 25, Broadly 26, Aches 27, Abash 26 Pennies (5)
1} F2 |. Print 27, aisle 28, Hives 29, Aspirin 30, Lean-t 31,Me-ath | 28, Besom 29, Tenures 90, Star 91, Ether Ht Panicie (4) 27 Parasite (5)
| DOWN: 2, Poodle 3, Advert 4, To-E 5, Yea-R-n 6, S-ample-r | DOWN: 2, Rector 3, Sorted 4, Try 5, Stain 6, Modicum 7, 32 Exile (8) 28 Animal doctor
D 7, Plus 8, Doctor 12, Doze-N 13, Crust 14, Ascot 15, Got up | Unit 8, Chisel 12, Lemon 13, Fatal 14, Rigid 15, Pined 16, 33. Frozen dessert (6) (9)
16, Other 18, Dealt 19, Nearest 21, Polit-e 22, Relin-E 23, ao Peere

Ready 18, Fears 19, Teacher 21, Rabbit 22; Latest 23,

Detect(ive) 25, Snail 26, Plan 28, Him Alcove 25, Begun 26, Ast 28, Bee



*YOU FEEL BAD CAUSE YoU SWALLOWED
ABUO? THINK HOW BAP THE Bug FEELS!”

ariel aii

Good 22; very good 33; excellent




The Long-Term View



But since the usual approach
with this club combination is to start
by leading the suit from dummy,
declarer opted to postpone the estab-
lishment of the clubs temporarily and
led a heart to the ten at trick two,
hoping to win the finesse. East won
with the king and returned a spade to
dummy’s ace. Now South led a club
toward his hand.

All would have been well had
East followed low to the first club,
but instead he made the fine play of
rising with the ace and returning a
third spade. South won with the king,
but it didn’t matter what he did next.
West could not be prevented from:
gaining the lead with the queen of
clubs, and when he did he cashed
two spades to put the contract down
one.

Declarer clearly contributed to
his own demise when he departed

from his initial plan to establish the -

clubs and took a heart finesse
instead. This play, which was not
needed to make the contract, opened
the door for the opposition, and they
took full advantage of the placement
of the cards to do the rest.

Had South been less concerned
about losing a trick to the queen of
clubs, he could not have been
defeated. All he had to do was to leads

_a club from his hand at trick two ae

the king is best in case the queen is.

“singleton — and nine tricks would

have been assured.



Bo
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SATURDAY’S SOLUTION
agenda angel angle angled
annal anneal dang dangle
dean elan FANDANGLE fang




A

Wiley ae
| marinade |

Sauce to flavor
meat or fish





Veselin Topalov v Rustam
Kasimdzhanov, Leon 2007. Both
grandmasters are former Fide world
champions, yet they erred like 7|I09%
novices in today’s diagram. The
explanation? Probably the move 40 °
time control, for that was when this 5
episode occurred. Black’s knight has
just captured White's ci bishop, so
* the obvious play for Topalov 3
(White, to move) is to recapture 1
Rxcl. The reply cxd5 would then
give Kasim united central pawns, so
the Bulgarian tried to finesse by 1
d6 Ne2+ 2 Kf Rxd6 3 Rxd6 Qxd6 4
Kxe2 when White's small edge
proved sufficient to win after along
endgame. Can you spot what the
grandmasters missed during this
sequence?







Yaw iow?

Bae Ty e

Marcia nh RG

Se Vrav ue

Grae 122

6

‘MONDAY, :
DEC 10 é

ARIES — March 21/Apri! 20°
Cooler weather has put you in a
mood. You might want to spe
some time at home, Aries, until
you're in better spirits. Post-summér
blues are expected. . 2
TAURUS - April 21/May 215
Financial concerns leave you feeling
nervous this week, Taurus. It’s bet-
ter to pinch some pennies for a
while until you get back on course.
Seek help from Virgo.

GEMINI- May 22/June 21

A special. friend from your past
comes back for a visit, Gemini. It
could lead to interesting things. Keep
your agenda open for Wednesday
when love is in your stars.
CANCER - June 22/July 22
Keep your patience with a family
member on Tuesday, Cancer.
This person is just feeling a little
Stir crazy and really doesn’t mean
all the the things he/she says
Focus on a home project instead.
LEO -— July 23/August 23

A distant family member isn’t visiting
as much as usual, Leo. Something
could be wrong..Drop ‘this perscii a

{line or give him/her:a call. It may help

€ase your concerns.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

‘Stop doing so much for others and

pamper yourself a little bit thie
week, Virgo. Go to a spa, iake a
vacation or just stay home from
work for a day.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ve been feeling very anxious,
Libra, and it’s partially because you
are experiencing low self-esteem.
You have to exert more confidence
or it just will be an endless cycle.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Noy, 22

A close friend really needs your help
on Thursday, Scorpio. Make sure
your schedule is open so that you can
lend a hand. Put work on hold for
some quality time with your mate. 3
SAGITTARIUS- Nov 23/Dec 21=

Have you been spending too mucF-

time at work, Sagittarius? It could bé.
| because you are avoiding a situatior&

at home. That’s not like you. Face
up to the situation. It’s far better t@
be honest with yourself. £
CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 26

It may be time to consider a careeE

*] change, Capricom. You are far too edu8

cated and talented to settle for the workg
you've been doing so far. Have some
confidence and go for your dreams

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 =
Your confidence continues to rises
Aquarius. It could be because of th
good news at work. Consult with Leé
for some good advice on how t&
improve your financial future 3

oc
PISCES -— Feb 19/March 20 3
Be the life of the party on FridayS
Pisces and you just may hook up:
with a winning romance. Look e
Scorpio for some inspiration ang
companionship and sparks will fly.

aos

CHESS by Leonard Barden



LEONARD BARDEN

Chess: 8489: 1d6? Ne2+ 2 Kfl Nf4! and Black stays a
piece ahead since 3 dxe7?allows Rxd1 mate.
BS



MONDAY, DECEMBER 10th, 2007, PAGE 15B



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

abate cial

THE WEATHER REPO

Chee



JESDAY NV EDNES a) iS)

PG ae et ae af
Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.





Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: ENE at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 79° F
ENE at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 79° F
ENE at 15-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 5-7 Miles 78° F
ENE at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet 6-7 Miles
ENE at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 5° (BE

















The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the







i : ostly sunny and Very windy; ‘cl ith Partial sunshine. 2 7 Mi
oe Mainly clear. Mos y ay ya ery an some ae : sk a n iieatar the ood for eee ated akul croaaeth: ENE at 10-20 Knots 6-7 Miles
Beene High: 82° High: 82° High: 80°
High: 82° Low: 72° lg: 72 Low: [2 glow: 72°






AVA Cremer Lest



| AccuWeather RealFeel Ua)

BC ea erate RealFeel



The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines effects of temperature, a humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for ite ie



“46/7 r






















Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Wedne sdayoi2am. 27 241am. O72 6
ABACO Temperature 9:27 p.m. 2.1 3:35pm. 0.1 as sh
High esc80252... csidhecteeaaee da sesreeene 82° F/28° C ; ee
81°F/27°C Sens Thursday S0lam. 27 3:23am. 0.1
tances Fe Normal tig Teepe 00pm. 22 41pm. 0.4 ACES
; Normal low . ... 68° F/20° C EET ED c
eS Last year's high ... wo 17° FQ25° C 285/29 70/21. pe
a Last year's low . 70° F/21°C 86/30 70/21 Pe
Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:44a.m. Moonrise..... 7:38 a.m.
As of 1pm. yesterday .....ccccscssssssseeeees ose 0,00" Sunset....... 5:21 p.m. Moonset ..... 6:05 p.m.
Year to date ............ Full
Normal year to date ..
AccuWeather.com a PoE SS showers
Forecasts and graphics provided by es cc Havana E : 3 = 82/27 65/18 pe PSS] Test Be | Miami
AccuWeather, inc, ©2007 c. Dec. 23 Dec.31 Jan.@ Helsinki = p, oe eur
een - Hong Kong : Spe TSI #18 pe (g"a"l = om : ali Fronts
High: 84° ~ (slamabad —— Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ,
fe ; ju 7/13 47/8 s! ~ precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Low: 71°F/22°C istanbul pk] Snow Warm aie
: Jerusalem fey) Ice Forecast highfow temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary ogee
= os £ . sohannesburg = a
KEY WEST CATISLAND : ee
eeeeee High: 81° F/27°C ‘London
e Low:67° F/19°C ‘Madrid

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

rs 28/2 pc



7926 55/12 s “56/13 613. ‘sh 75/23 57/13 c
358A 23-5 sn TAA we BAT 7121 pe.
415 310 +r. Minneapolis = 251-3 wl Ss 231-5 Nett c
i OE a
; New Orleans 80/26 ean pe 80/28 BaN7 a











Washington, DC 62/16 41/5 +. . S24. 43/6 1. ..

wm ug er
q EAS a te

— . * oo semen Stag Eeal wey ~
PAGE 16B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

UNDG PR TS PA mL NS ALS AS NO RNY SRT EN





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