Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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The Tribune |









Volume: 104 No.14

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USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION a

ent) RELIGION
a TODAY’S TRIBUNE






35-year-old man
dies after daylight

drive-by

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas yesterday

afternoon reached the record
number of 74 murders for the
year after a man was gunned
down in a drive-by shooting
in Grand Bahama.
_ With still more than three
weeks to go in 2007, the coun-
try’s murder rate is now
poised to be the highest in at
least the last decade and a
half.

According to a study by
police, which examines mur-
ders that occurred between
1991 and 2003, in the year

Claim that Christie
using possibility. of. .
general election to
maintain PLP control

ll By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia. net.

FORMER Prime Minister Perry
Christie is trying to use the belief that
the FNM will call an early election as
a reason to remain party leader until

the PLP holds its convention in Feb-

ruary, The Tribune was told.

Mr Christie, it was reported, has instructed his PLP colleagues to
“be ready for any eventuality” causing some MPs to even re-open

their constituency offices.

A sustained effort has been made to “reignite” the base sup-

SEE page 19 _



























. 10 Pes. Chicken ¢
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* 4 Biscuits



"319%

shooting

2000, the homicide rate was
at its highest when it peaked
at 74-cases.

Ryan O’Neil-Wood, 35, was
reportedly sitting in his car on
Redwood Lane in Freeport
yesterday afternoon when
another vehicle pulled up
from which a passenger
opened the door and fired on
him. The driver thé spéd off.

The victim was taken to
Rand Memorial Hospital but
was pronounced dead just
before 3.00pm.

Speaking with The Tribune
last night, Chief Supt Emer-

SEE page 19

Perry Christie





Machine readable

passports ‘will help
speed evaluation of

HITUCer LCN NETIC
enter the Bahamas’



IMMIGRATION Director
Vernon Burrows said that the
International Civil Aviation
Organisation requirement that
countries have machine read-
able zones in passports by 2010,
will help his department to
more quickly evaluate the his-

tory of those attempting to.
enter the Bahamas.

“As soon as a swipe can be
captured in our system, imme-
diately we will be able to check
our stop list; we'll be able to
check our database to deter-
mine whether or not the indi-
vidual is on a watch list; whether
or not he is on the stop list;
whether or not he applied for a
work permit, or whatever the
case is,” said Mr Burrows in an
address to the media at the
launch of the ePassport and visa
issuance systems yesterday at
the Passport Office.

“It is going to greatly
enhance our capability of

’ detecting individuals who are

unsavory characters,” he said.
The Immigration Department

SEE page 19

PATRICE JOHNSON, Chief Clerk shows the new system to Minister
of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette along with Minister of State for
Immigration Elma Campbell; Attroney General Claire Hepburn; Min-

ister of Tourism and Aviation Neko Grant as Christine Ervine, Iris

Corp Business analyst looks on.

Derek Carroll

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



US expert:
Esfakis death
attributable
to failure of

hospital staff

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A US expert in burn injuries
and their treatment yesterday
testified in the coroner’s court
that he felt “chills” when he
reviewed the hospital records
outlining the treatment given -
to a burns patient, who later
died, at Doctor’s Hospital.

Addressing the court dur-
ing the fourth non-consecu-

- tive week of testimony in the

inquest into the death of Doc-
tor’s Hospital patient, 42-year-
old Christopher Esfakis, at
that facility in 2002, Dr Arnold
Luterman, medical director of
the University of South
Alabama’s Regional Burn and
Wound Centre and a profes-
sor of surgery, said that in his
opinion Mr Esfakis’ death at
the hospital was attributable

SEE page 16
~ Darold
Miller trial
adjourned

WELL-KNOWN media
personality Darold Miller
returned to court yesterday
for the start of his sexual
harassment trial, but the mat-
ter had to be adjourned.

Miller, with his lawyer
Willie Moss, appeared before
Magistrate Renee McKay at
Court Six, Parliament Street.
Miller is alleged to have sexu-
ally harassed a female employ-
ee at the GEMS News Media
Network between February 1

. and March 31. Miller was

arraigned on the sexual .
harassment charge on August
28. At that time he pleaded
not guilty to the charge and
was granted $5,000 bail with
one surety. Miller has opted
to have his case heard in the
Magistrate’s Court.

Miller was suspended from
his job at the GEMS radig’
network in early April, after

SEE page 19










PAGE 2, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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LOCAL NEWS

Age of the e-Passport

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT
unveiled the new e-Passport and
visa issuance system yesterday.

The machine readable passports ©

contain a data chip that stores facial
scans, fingerprints and digital sig-
natures.

The launch at the passport office
on Thompson Blvd was attended

by numerous diplomats and senior .

civil servants, and is part of a $12.7
million upgrade to the national
passport and visa issuance systems.

Deputy Prime Minister and Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette unveiled the six new
documents, along with Jo Ram,
chief operating officer and vice-

resident of product development
or Indusa Global, the fead com-
pany in the effort.

The new passport types include
diplomatic, official, regular, fre-
quent traveller and children’s doc-
uments, with a sixth type serving
as a certificate of identity in the
form of a passport, without being
one.

Ms Ram explained that passport
management system is fully auto-
mated and will allow the staff at
the passport office to keep a record
for each applicant, scan their appli-
cations, surrounding documents
and photographs, along with cap-
turing fingerprints and a digital sig-
nature in the system before pay-
ment.

“Once the applicant has been
fully enrolled, a three step approval

rocess is initiated by the system,
ding to i a production, chi
encoding, quality control and final-
ly issuance of the new e-Passport,”
said Ms Ram. :

The security for the e-Passports
and e-IDs, Ms Ram explained, is
governed by the public key infra-
structure, and access to the chip is
protected by cryptographic keys.

Data can only be written after
successful authentication with these
keys, and three different 16-digit
keys are generated in order to
ensure that no one person, or even
one agency, holds the entire key,
she said.

It is expected to take two weeks
from the time of application, until
the passport is ready for pick-up,
according to Mr Symonette.

No fees for the new documents
have been announced by the gov-
ernment thus far. However, Mr

told the media yesterday
that he expects to table the rele-
vant regulations in the House of
Assembly next week, and it is envi-



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MINISTER of Foriegn Affairs Brent Symonette shows how the new e-

Passport is going to look yesterday at the passport office on Thomp-

son Boulevard. :

sioned that regular passports will
cost $50.

Along with the e-Passports and a
machine readable visa system, the
contract with Indusa Global also

rovides for an e-Identification
issuance system with smart cards
for holders of work permits, spousal
permits, homeowners residence
permits, permanent residence cards,
and a border control management
system. The e-Passport and
machine readable visa issuance sys-
tems are components associated
with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs;
the e-Identification issuance sys-
tem and border control manage-
ment systems are associated with
the Department of Immigration.

The remaining phases of imple-
mentation for these new systems
will commence in mid-January,

2008 and continue to the end of

July, 2008.

“During these two phases, we
will implement the e-Passport sys-
tem in the passport office, Grand
Bahama, administrators offices in
the Family Islands and in our over-
seas missions,” said Mr Symonette.
“The implementation of the visa
issuance system in our consular divi-
sion in New Providence and our
overseas missions will also occur in
these phases.”

The government anticipates that
e-Passport and visa issuance sys-
tems will be fully operational by
mid-2008, Mr Symonette said dur-
ing his remarks, at which time offi-
cials are expected to be able to ful-
ly service the 170,000-plus passport
holders and 2,000 plus certificate
of identity holders. Currently, only

people with expired passports, or
those whose passports are lost or
stolen, will need to come in for new
passports. “We wish the public to
also know that you should continue
to travel using your current passport
until either it expires or such time as
you are duly notified otherwise —
whichever occurs first,” Mr Symon-
ette said. ‘

As the system is not yet func-
tional in the Family Islands and
overseas missions, both the new
and current passports will be issued
in an effort to accommodate all cit-
izens, until sufficient facilities are
established.

After full implementation of the
system, “persons will be able to
apply for, and be issued with an e-
Passport or certificate of identity
at 19 stations throughout the
Bahamas and at our overseas mis-
sions,” said Mr Symonette.

“Foreign nationals will also be
able to apply for and be issued with
machine readable visas in New
Providence and at our overseas
missions,” he added.

The International Civil Aviation
Organisation (ICAO), of which the
Bahamas is a member, has man-
dated that by 2010, all countries
must issue machine readable pass-
ports. With this new system, the
Bahamas has fulfilled the mandate
well ahead of schedule.

Mr Symonette also emphasised -
yesterday that the public must
assume greater responsibility for
the care and security of their travel
documents, and should ensure
these items are in order well before
travel. :

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 3







© In brief

African culture |
authority to
speak on roots |
of Junkanoo —

“roots” of Junkanoo.
Robert Farris Thompson,

on Fowler Street to explore the

origins of the Bahamian festi- :

val.
Described as
thinker and a>
researcher”,

and dance, and play drums,
during his lectures.

He has been credited with
changing the public perception :
of African art and has organ- :

ised several major exhibitions.

Professor Thompson has lec-

tured at Yale since 1961.

He has also served as cura- !
tor at UCLA’s museum of eth- :

nic arts.

His Nassau lecture, called }

The Three African Roots of :
is due to start at ; lm By ALISON LOWE

Junkanoo,
7pm.

Photo exhibition
on Fred Mitchell ©

cr Mitchell



@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmycock@tribunemedia.net
——__———— | attempted to enter the club to

FREEPORT - A photo- : attend a scheduled meeting with
graphic exhibition of the accom- Mary Eee oe
plishments of Fox Hill MP Fred : nid that the eat ae eunsideaue
ee ei ee : whether to take legal action over
alfairs in the opened an i the incident.

ernment was
Freeport over the weekend.

Church of the Ascension on Fri-
day evening, was attended by
PLP supporters, including for-
mer cabinet. minister Dr Mar-

Bridgewater.

Former Prime Minister Perry :
Christie was expected to offi- }
cially open the exhibition, but :
was unable to attend. His :

remarks were delivered by Dr } property.”

Bethel.

Mr Christie said that Mr / fesponsit
- Mitchell played a major role in : Wishes of the people to the best
heightening the Bahamas’ pro- : of our ability and the wishes of
i the people at the Lyford cay
He said when he first viewed | Property is that they can ne
the exhibition in Nassau (on } longer wom with Freduot that
August 10) as part of the Eman- ; Piequot must 20.
cipation Day activities in Fox ; Wednesday, November 27, as

“it was Instruc- ; akin to the “dark days when

tive and brought back memo- } some Bahamians were not

ries of the accomplishment of } allowed certain privileges or were
: discriminated against in certain
“With Fred as my right hand : places ‘and were not afforded
i ee rightful place as a Bahami-
trade, I Was able to focus on our i
economic future and our :
domestic challenges with con- :
fidence that the nation would :
be well prepared and well
recognised when the presence :

of the prime minister became }

file in international affairs.

Hiil, he thought

the PLP government.”

in foreign affairs and foreign

necessary overseas,” he said.

“T hope that tonight’s display :
will be preserved for posterity :
and more details added over :
time ‘as the need for confiden- :
tiality and official secrecy per- :
mits. [t is vital information for :

the country,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said the purpose :
of the photo exhibition is not }
just to celebrate the work of the }
PLP government in foreign :

affairs over ihe past five years,

but also to bring together PLP :
officials and supporters to cele- :
brate what the PLP government :
has accomplished, review the :
past, and begin to mark out the }

future,
He toid supporters:

workers,

reviewing and

said.

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PLP attacks Ingraham’s overspend claims as ‘disgraceful’

CLAIMS made by Prime Minister

: Hubert Ingraham in the House of Assem-

: bly that the PLP overspent by. $170 million

: can only be described as a “disgraceful

attempt by this inept FNM government
to mislead the Bahamian people and shift

: the focus away from its ruinous policy of
: stop, review and cancel,”
: PLP said yesterday.

the opposition

This policy by the FNM, the party said,

A LEADING authority on i has brought an abrupt halt to the project-

African culture will be speak- ed growth of the Bahamian economy and

ing in Nassau tonight on the | thereby taking $100 million out of the
o 5 ~~ + Bahamian economy.

On Monday Mr Ingraham accused the

> | PLP ofa lapse in judgment when it appar-
professor emeritus at Yale Uni : ently extended more than $170 million

versity, will appear at Big Tent : outside of the nation’s budget during the

: 2006/2007 fiscal year.



However, the
opposition reject-
ed this, saying that
while they were in
government they
were, “good stew-
sy ards” of the
ite Mi Ei Bahamas’ econo-
my. “The facts according to table ii of the
Budget communication for 2007-2008
brought to parliament by none other than
the Prime Minister himself in May, 2007,
show that the recurrent estimated expen-
diture was $1.386 billion and the projected
expenditure was $1.360 billion which actu-
ally shows that on a net basis the PLP
underspent by $26 million on the recurrent
side and not the $101 million as the FNM
is falsely stating,” the PLP said.



Further, the opposition claimed that

" the budgeted capital expenditure for 2006-

2007 was $196 million and the projected
capital expenditure was $200 million, a net
overage of $4 million and not the $77.5
asserted by the FNM.

On the revenue side for 2006-2007 the
PLP estimated $1.347 billion and the pro-
jected revenue was $1.356 billion, what
the party said is an overage of $9 million.

“The PLP spent less than projected and
collected more than was forecast, therefore
supporting the view that based on the facts
the PLP were excellent stewards of the
Bahamian économy and now that the
FNM government realises that it is unable
to match up to the performance of the
Christie administration it has embarked
on an evil and sinister plan to discredit the





stellar management of the Bahamian econ-
omy by the PLP and in doing so are
attempting to mislead the Bahamian peo-
ple,” the opposition said.

The PLP claimed that the FNM is jeal-
ous and envious of its record.

“The truth is the truth and the past the
past so we advise them to marshal all of
their energy and resources to restoring
confidence in the Bahamian economy,
addressing the pressing issues which affect
our social well-being such as crime, edu-
cation and a multitude of social ills facing
the country. Their actions over the past
seven months have clearly demonstrated
that they have no meaningful agenda and
no vision for a Bahamas in the 21st centu-
ry,” the opposition said.

“a brilliant :
tireless }
Professor Thomp- }
son is known to break into song ;



“Some :
people will ask you as campaign }
‘what is the PLP :
doing?’ This is one of the things :
that we have done. We are }
retooling, ;
because the government is ours }
for the retaking. We have to : |
continue to demonstrate that :.
we can and will do it again,” he :

BAHAMAS HOTEL CATERING AND ALLIED WORKERS UNION

Union executives back
members over reported
calls for removal of Lyford
Cay managing director

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EXECUTIVE members of

: the Bahamas Hotel Catering and
: Allied Workers Union yesterday
: said they supported their mem-
: bers employed at the Lyford Cay
: Club in their alleged calls for the
: removal of the club’s managing
: director, Didier Picquot.

Union executives, including

: president Roy Colebrooke, sec-
i retary general Leo Douglas, and
? two vice presidents, accused Mr
: Picquot of hampering union

members in their legitimate
efforts to carry out union busi-
ness on behalf of their members,
of which they say there are
almost 200 at.that site.

This comes just over a week

: after union VP Kirk Wilson and
? Mr Douglas were, they allege,
: threatened with dogs and
’ ? removed from the gated com-

munity by security after they

While not initially calling the

een : i managing director’s name, offi-
The exhibition, which was : cers yesterday sought to lay the

held in the Sam Eric Hall at the ! blame for the episode, which
i they described as “an embar-

i rassment”,

and “numerous
labour issues at the club, at the

: feet of Mr Picquot. They claim
cus Bethel and Senator Pleasant :
? sucha reaction.

that they did nothing to warrant

Mr Colebrooke said: “It has
been an ongoing battle with the
Lyford Cay Club ever since Mr
Didier Picquot came into that

He contiaued: “We have a
responsibility to carry out the

They described the events of

* The union president said that

a at K aa



“It has been
an ongoing
battle with the
Lyford Cay
Club ever
since Mr. Didi-
er Picquot
came into that

property.”
Roy Colebrooke



numerous complaints have been
filed by employees to both for-
mer labour minister Shane Gib-
son and current minister Dion
Foulkes about their “bad treat-
ment” at the club, but to date
nothing had been done to
address them.

“They are not acknowledged,
but just dictated to,” said Mr
Colebrooke.

He claimed that the club’s
union members had said they
would “march on Bay Street” if
they saw no resolution soon to

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WAS'S.
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WAS S60

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was 5.99 wows 4.79
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Home F

their concerns. “We are calling
on the relevant government
authorities to act quickly,” said
Mr Colebrooke.Mr Douglas read
a letter that was sent from chair-
man of the Lyford Cay Property

Owners Association, Christopher

Hampton Davis, to Labour
Director Harcourt Brown, fol-
lowing the November incident
explaining why the union leaders
were stopped at the gate. In the
letter Mr Davis said that “fol-
lowing discussion with...Mr Didi-
er Picquot” he wished to point
out that the reason the men were

‘ treated in such a way was

because there was a breach of
security when the officers failed
to identify themselves at the gate.
Mr Davis added that one of the
passengers was said to have
“averted his face to the right ina
suspicious manner.”

Mr Wilson and Mr Douglas
denied this version of events,
claiming that they positively
identified themselves and gave
their union positions to security
before being granted access to
the property. They said they
were disturbed that this letter
was directed to Mr Brown and
that they have yet to receive an
apology.

A message left for Mr Picquot
was not returned up to press time
yesterday.



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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,



Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.



Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352



_ Student loans not being repaid

IN THE House of Assembly on Monday
Education Minister Carl Bethel did not see
how government could sustain its student loan
programme unless those who borrowed repaid
their loans.

“The whole system,” he said, “is bound to
become unsustainable if persons who have bor-
rowed money do not repay it on the terms that
they have agreed. The entire programme can
only continue if it is put on a firm financial
footing, and this can only occur if the borrowers
repay their loans.”

He told the House that it was unfortunate
that far too many are unwilling to pay. Some
even believe that it is an infringement on their
rights that they should even be asked to repay.

Mr Bethel referred to one loan recipient to
whom government recently had to send a
demand notice for repayment. This former stu-
dent wrote back to the Administrator accusing
him of “making an inhumane demand.”

“The writer further stated that since the
loan was a loan from the government she
‘shouldn't have to repay it,’” an incredulous
Mr Bethel told the House.

“If the carefully chosen words in the type-
written letter reflect the prevailing opinion,”
said Mr Bethel, “then the Education Guaran-
teed Loan arrangement could never be sus-
tainable.”

‘He urged all those Bahamians who had ben-
efited from the loans “to remember the thou-
sands of other Bahamians who are also looking
to benefit from a programme which has given
opportunities to persons who would never oth-
erwise have had a chance to obtain a universi-
ty degree.”

. He urged them “to fully honour their com-
mitments, or to enter into a regularized re-pay-
ment plan.” ;

This is a shocking state of affairs. We have
seen too many Bahamians make all sorts of
pledges as to how they planned to repay loans.
However, as soon as they have secured the
needed money, a broad smile replaces their
tears, and they leave full of gratitude. But as
soon as they close the door one instinctively
knows which one of them is going to quickly
turn that loan into a gift.

We shall never forget one person who holds
a good government job, who even brought her
elderly father to vouch for her reliability. She
got the loan on the basis of her father’s sterling
reputation.

Under embarrassing pressure from her
father she made one small payment. After that
she refused to even receive telephone calls to
remind her of a loan that was made so easy
that it would have taken more than two years
for her to have paid it off. She, obviously, had

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no intention of even making an effort. She not
only let herself down, but she let down the

good name of her father, who would have nev- ~

er condoned such behaviour. Her attitude is
yet another example of the changing standards
from generation to generation.

Mr Bethel was debating the Supplementary
Appropriations Bill in the House when the
question of school loans was raised. He
explained that Bill No.1 referred to the sum
of $6,807,498, allocated to the Ministry of Edu-
cation, Science and Technology during the last
financial year.

“This money,” he said, “was added to the
existing budgetary allocation of $2.5 million
which made up the total sum of $9.3 million;
and was used to settle defaulted Guaranteed
Educational Loans which were on the books of
the Bank of The Bahamas and the Education
Loan Authority.

“The combined sums,” he said, “were divid-
ed and paid, as follows: $3.381 million to the
Bank of The Bahamas and $5.8 million to the
Education Loan Authority.”

He pointed out that the Guaranteed Edu-
cational Loan programme had many benefits,
but also many problems.

“On the positive side,” he said, “3,179
Bahamians benefited and completed courses of
study as of June 2007. Of this number, 68.3 per
cent were female and 31.7 per cent were male.

“Of the academic degrees obtained 66.3 per
cent were Bachelor's degrees, and a further
9.8 per cent were Master's degrees.”

On the down-side, however, he said, is the
fact that “more than 1,552 loans are now in
default to such an extent that the government's
guarantee was invoked — a part of which
involved such as the $6.8 million which is the
subject of Bill No. 1 and as I have said was
paid to Bank of The Bahamas and the Educa-
tion Loan Authority.”

However, he continued, “the entire frame-
work of the Education Guaranteed Loan pro-
gramme proceeds on two critical presumptions:
(1) that people are empowered by education
and that their earning capacity increases and (2)
as earning power increases, people will be bet-
ter able and willing to repay their education
loans.”

Instead, more than 1,552 students reneged on
their loans leaving government, which had
stood guarantor, to pay off their debts totalling
$6.8 million. If this continues, then obviously,
this loan programme is in jeopardy because of
the selfishness of those Bahamians, who despite
their degrees, haven’t got'the common sense to
understand that when they borrow they have a
duty to pay back.














meet deadlines

















I was unaware of
allegations linked
to Ministry's
Freeport HQ>

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Further to our brief dis-
cussion please allow this to
serve as confirmation of the
fact that I never “admitted”
to knowing of the details of

the allegations set out in the’

article written by Ms. Alli-
son Lowe which appeared on
the front page of this morn-
ing's Tribune.

In fact Ms. Lowe never
told me any details of the
allegations relating to the
Freeport Office of the Min-
istry of Education.

I merely told her that as
Minister I have received a
number of anonymous letters
making all sorts of personal
allegations against various
persons involved in the sys-
tem of education in the
Freeport area.

In each case I have noted
the letters and referred them

on for investigation and a.

report.

I specifically informed Ms.

Lowe that we had previously
sent a team from our Human
Resources Section to
Freeport to amalgamate the
two offices I met in place,
since it seemed to me to be
inefficient to have two sepa-
rate offices performing over-

lapping functions, and sur- .

mised that there might be
some dissatisfaction among
staff over the decisions made
by the Human Resources

professionals sent to ratio- _

nalize the system in Freeport.
This was the context of my
remark about separating
“personality from principle”.
Having read Ms. Lowe's

- article I can positively assert

that the first time I was made
aware of those particular
allegations was when I read
the article this morning.

I did express dissatisfac-
tion over the fact that a num-
ber of persons seemed to pre-
fer making anonymous alle-
gations in Freeport rather
than to pursue redress
through official channels.

CARL W. BETHEL
Minister of Education

Nassau,
December 4, 2007.

Marketing Coordinator

A leading wholesaler seeks to identify an ambitious,
highly creative and motivated individual for the
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Interested persons should possess:
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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net




(The article to which Mr
Bethel refers was published
on the front page of Tues-
day’s Tribune under the
heading: Call for a ‘revamp’
of Ministry’s Freeport HQ.

(Said the article in part:

(“Political tribalism and
‘familiar’ relationships
between employees are caus-
ing major problems at the
Freeport headquarters of the
Ministry of Education,
Youth, Sports and Culture,
it was alleged yesterday, as a
call went out for a ‘revamp’
of the institution.

(“Furthermore, according
to several employees at the
office, systematic wastage of

accountability is rife, bol-
stered by close personal affil-
iations.

(“Yesterday, Minister of
Education Carl Bethel ini-
tially said he was ‘unaware of
such claims.

However, he later admit-
ted that human resources
personnel had recently trav-
elled from Nassau to the sec-
ond city because of issues
with “inter-personal rivalries’
between government work-
ers.

(“People need to separate
personality from principle,”
said Mr Bethel. However, he
expressed dissatisfaction with
the fact that persons had cho-
sen to go to the press with
their claims about issues
within the ministry rather
than dealing with them
through ‘official channels.’”



works. Command basic computer skills
Microsoft Word Excel and project scheduling
programs.






Send resume to:



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P.O. Box CB-13005

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Along with a Bachelor’s degree, experience in
sales and marketing is necessary.

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P.O. Box N-7504

Soldier Road

Nassau, Bahamas



public money and a lack of (The article continued).

We need to take a practical

approach to a youth service
EDITOR, The Tribune.

HOPING we don’t continue to go down the totally wrong
road as to the benefits, potential and otherwise, of: youth
service it is certainly not as a military service but as a service
which will embrace in all of our young people responsible dis-
cipline of an upstanding law-abiding citizen.

The Swiss model which Attorney Paul Moss seems to pro-
pose is totally wrong and inappropriate for The Bahamas and
what is diagnosed and the correct medicine for us. The Swiss
model is a standing military force.

We need a practical approach for all young people from the
age of seven years through to 16 years (average school leav-
ing age).

I have never understood why this youth service originally
proposed by Sir Lynden Pindling would cost so much as
essentially a programme should and must be co-ordinated
into the standing education system of our schools.

The young people would be taught civics - Bahamian law
- discipline - health - understanding the use of money - grow-
ing into adulthood with special emphasis on the correctness
for pregnancy and upbringing of children.

Surely it is practical to introduce this after the normal
school hours - three times a week in all schools, private and
Government and irrespective of whether you are Bahamian

"or not?

Editor this needs a decision and 100 per cent of Govern-
ment and us. We have talked the Queen’s image off the coin
a long time ago and society now suffers daily from the cancer
that we have allowed to control the free; safe and unmo-
lested society pretending that “It is Better in The Bahamas”.
Prime Minister, all politicians and civic leaders the 73 murders
of 2007 must have resolutely convinced you surely? .

B FRESNO

Nassau,
November 24, 2007.




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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 5








aboard the Rudyard Lewis.

MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest (foreground) is shown the ropes

Shipshape
RBDF officials tour state-
of-the-art defence vessel

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



SENIOR officials in the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force were treat-
ed to an inspection and tour of a
state-of-the-art defence vessel on its
way to Barbados earlier in the week.

Chief Petty Officer Ralph McK-
inney of the RBDF yesterday said
that the 140-foot Rudyard Lewis,
which was purchased by the Bar-
bados Coast Guard from a Euro-
pean manufacturer, was on its way
to that island when the vessel
docked in Bahamian waters to refu-
el.

RBDF officers took the opportu-
nity to tour the ship because region-
al mariume defence forces use sim-
ilar equipment, he explained.

“The minister (of National Secu-
rity Tommy Turnquest) as well as
other senior officers in the defence
force were able to take an inspection
of '' = brand new piece of equip-
ment and we saw how the vessel
handled, checked some of the

Improved consular protection in prospect
for Bahamas-bound European tourists

machinery and how they worked
and saw the launching of the small
seaboat.

“The engines (of the vessel) are
used here in RBDF vessels as well,
so some of our engineering and
technical staff went out there and
got an opportunity up close to see
and inspect the overall performance
of the vessel.”

The vessel is said to be very fast
for its size and to draw significantly
less water than similar craft.

RBDF officials plan to purchase a
vessel of the same caliber as the
Rudyard Lewis in the near future;
meanwhile they await the arrival of
two vessels from the United States,
Chief Petty Officer McKinney said
yesterday.

“We presently have some marines
in the Florida area training on these
two vessels. It is anticipated that we
receive these two vessels before the
end of December.”

The Commander of the Defence
Force, Commodore, Clitford Scavy-
ella, was reportedly in Barbados
when the vessel docked in Nassau.






DEFENCE FORCE officials (above and below
ona tour of inspection of the vessel.






STATE OF THE ART: The Rudyard Lewis is fitted with modern
equipment.

4” }



st

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
y Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 he






DIVIDEND NOTICE

c

COMMONWEALTH BANK

TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS
The Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank Limited has
declared a Quarterly Dividend for Common, “A”.“B”,“C",“D",
“E”F"“G"“H” and “I” Preference Shares, to all shareholders
of records at December 14. 2007: as follows:-

Common
“A” Preference

“B”’ Preference
2G: Preference
“D” Preference
“EB” Preference
“F” Preference

“G”’ Preference

“HH” Preference .

“TL” Preference

- 4¢ per share :
- 7% per annum payable quarterly

- 7% per annum payable quarterly
.- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly
- 7% per annum payable quarterly

- 7% per annum payable quarterly

The payrient will be made on December 31, 2007 through Colina Finacial
Advisors Limited, the Registrar & Transfer Agent, in the usual manner

Charlene A. Pinder

, Corporate Secretary



@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE thousands of European
tourists who travel to the
Bahamas each year can expect
improved consular protection
in future due to a new action
plan by European Union Com-
mission.

The EU Commission in Brus-
sels yesterday suggested that
citizens of the union should
have the right to demand con-
sular protection from embassies
other than their own written
into their passports.

A plan unveiled by the com-
mission proposes that EU citi-
zens travelling in countries out-
side the EU, where their own
nation is not represented by.an
embassy or an consulate office,
should be able to turn to the

embassies of other EU states to

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ask for help. Only three coun-
tries outside the EU — the Unit-
ed States, Russia and China —
have embassies or consulate
offices for all 27 EU member
states.

There are 18 countries in
which no member stateé is rep-
resented and 17 countries in
which only one member state
is represented.

“This includes popular
tourism destinations for union
citizens, such as Bahamas, Bar-
bados and Maldives,” the. EU
Commission stated.

The commission suggested
that starting July 2009, this right,
which has been officially avail-
able to EU citizens since 1993,
should be written into the new
passports.

According to statistics,
between 30 and 50 million EU
citizens live outside Europe.

It is estimated that only

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around nine per cent of the EU
citizens travelling outside of
Europe go to countries where
their member state does not
have consular or diplomatic rep-
resentation. This constitutes

‘some seven million EU citizens
per year.

According to a “Euro-
barometre” study published in
2006, only 23 per cent EU citi-
zens are aware that they can
turn to another member state
for help if their own country is
not represented in a third coun-
try they are visiting. :

“The right to consular pro-
tection is a concrete expression
of Union citizenship. This
Action Plan marks the begin-
ning of a long-term strategy to
better inform citizens of their
‘rights and ensure that EU citi-
zens are protected world-wide,”
EU justice commissioner Fran-
co Frattini said.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007





























LIMITED



DISTRICT MANAGER





Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading supermarket chain in
The Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company prides itself on delivering
premier service through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong,
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for a District Manager to join this market leader has arisen.

Reporting directly to the Retail Operations Head, the District Manager’s role
is to provide positive leadership and demonstrate first person management by
leading Store Managers and Department Specialists in achieving company
goals in first class customer service, sales, profits, and training.

Key responsibilities and selection criteria include;

_ ...across multiple outlets,

-across multiple outlets.

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5. Bachelor’s degree or equivalent.

6. Ability to analyze a retail P&L and disseminate information as
necessary.

7. Previous experience in the effective control of multiple store profit and
loss accounts.

8. Experienced in large format / Hypermarket operations.

9. Ability to review weekly productivity achievements and opportunities
with the Department Specialists and Store Managers to determine areas
where corrective action is required.

10. Ensure Department Specialists and Store Managers are, thoroughly
trained and understand the company’s sales planning program.

11. Ensure that sales planning tools are used properly and are achieving the
goals and objectives within each store. d

If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging role, forward your
resume and cover letter to:
. Human Resources
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway
P. O. Box N 3738
Nassau, Bahamas
sa siate Misc cinn psa aoe .. Ore-mailto.
humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com
No telephone inquiries please






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THE TRIBUNE



eae eae
Government ‘will not approve of charging

accreditation fees for working members’
of media covering junkanoo parades

DESPITE media reports,
the government is not con-
templating levying accredita-
tion fees for coverage of
junkanoo or any other public
event at any time in the future,
the Cabinet Office announced
yesterday.

“As previously announced,
the government will not
approve of charging accredita-
tion fees for working members
of the media covering the
upcoming junkanoo parades,”
a press release said.

This follows a front page sto-
ry in another newspaper which
quoted Director of Culture Dr
Nicholette Bethel as saying
that the Ministry of Culture
may look into charging the
press for access to junkanoo at

--some-time inthe future,
However the Cabinet office

said that it is committed to

making junkanoo, the premier
cultural street festival in the
Bahamas, accessible to as
many Bahamians as possible
and that is why it was
announced recently that the
prices for seating tickets this
year have been reduced to the
levels charged for the 2001
parades. “The government is”
aware that there are outstand-
ing issues relating to the pro-
tection of intellectual property
and the use of such property
for private commercial pur-
poses and for profit.

“These are issues that must
be addressed but they do not
impinge upon the right of the
media to provide fair coverage
of public events,” the Cabinet
office said. .;

The quotes attributed to Dr
Bethel follow the governmen- |
t’s revocation of an imposition

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of fees.on all media wishing to
cover the parades.

When the fees were
announced last week, local edi-
tors expressed outrage and the
government reversed its posi-
tion the next day.

Paco Nunez, Tribune news
editor said the decision to
impose fees was “ridiculous”
and likened the proposal to
asking media organisations to
“buy tickets to attend parlia-
ment.”

Wendell Jones, CEO of
Jones Communication Net-
work, said that the announce-
ment was the “most foolish”
thing he had heard from a gov-
ernment ministry in his 35
years in journalism.

He said the minister, the.per-
manent secretary “and all of
them ought to be condemned”
for Such “small-mindedness.”

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 7 ©



US to assist CARICOM
countries in fight against

illegal arms trafficking

_Mâ„¢ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE United
States has
announced its
intent .to assist
CARICOM
countries in
fighting the
illegal traftick-
ing of small
arms and light
weapons
through the region.

According to international
reports, this agreement came
out of last March’s meeting
between CARICOM foreign
ministers and US Secretary of
State Condoleezza Rige.

The US said substantial and
realistic measures will be imple-
mented to address illicit traf-
ficking in small arms and light
weapons in the Caribbean.

During an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Deputy

Symonette



Prime Minister and Minister of
Foreign Affairs Brent Symon-
ette welcomed the US’ assis-
tance and expressed confidence
that these new measures could
put a dent in crime.

“Any attempt at resolving the
illegal transfer of small arms
and weapons in the Caribbean
region is welcome. There’s no
question that these guns are

coming from, outside the

Bahamas because obviously we
don’t manufacture them.
“So it is of concern to not

only the police but to the wider |

community as to where these
arms are coming from, how they
are getting into the Bahamas,
and any attempt by the United
States or other countries to help
strengthen our border controls
and (negate) the trans-shipment
of drugs or illegal arms is wel-
comed.”

Representatives from the
United States and CARICOM

' will meet with stakeholders in

the nation’s security next week

to address illicit trafficking of
small arms in the region.

Mr Symonette said the semi-
nar, scheduled for December
11 and 12, will focus on com-
batting illicit trafficking of small
arms in Nassau.

“This will be a roundtable dis-
cussion which Minister (of
National Security) Tommy
Turnquest, the Minister of State
for Finance (Zhivargo) Laing
and others will attend to deal
with export controls, trade law
enforcement and customs issues
(and) the whole question of ille-
gal trafficking of arms.”

Patterns of trafficking and
origins of illicit small arms are
some areas that will be dis-
cussed at the seminar, Dan O’
Connor, Chief Political Officer
at the US Embassy in Nassau,
told The Tribune yesterday.

The Bahamas is on its way to
becoming a part of the United
Nation’s Convention Against
Transnational Organised Crime,
Mr Symonette also said yester-



‘

ADAM STEWART, CEO of Sandals Resorts, was the keynote speaker during 24th annual Leisure Travel Conference

in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

‘There’s no
denying that
luxury is
where the —
market is
and where
it’s going’

_ON December 1 Adam Stew-
art, ‘CEO of Sandals Resorts,
served as the designated
keynote speaker during the 24th
annual Leisure Travel Confer-
ence in Fort Lauderdale, Flori-
da, where he discussed the
importance of selling luxury to
more than 700 travel agents.

Mr Stewart explained that a
fickle economy might be
impacting budget travellers, but
that there are still countless
opportunities for agents to prof-
it within the ever-growing luxu-
ry travel market.

In the Caribbean, for
instance, Mr Stewart highlight-
ed the many upscale offerings
coming online across the region
as early as 2008, and the need
for agents to get out of the price
comparison shopping business,
and focus instead on the
Caribbean’s profitable luxury
arena.

“There’s no denying that lux-
ury is where the market is and
where it’s going,” Mr Stewart
said. “Now, more than ever, it is
crucial to move beyond selling
price to selling the experience.
With the number of high-end
condos, resorts and dedicated
private jet terminals popping
up across the region, the
Caribbean — as an example — is
becoming very profitable are-
na for luxury travel.”

The Leisure Travel Confer-
ence honours the key leaders
of the travel industry and recog-
nises the contributions of the
most dynamic individuals in the
business.

The conference was held at
the Broward County Conven-
tion Centre in Ft Lauderdale,
from November 29 through
December 1.

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Bahamas Co-operative
League: Jaquilia Newton
‘07 scholarship recipient

THE Bahamas Co-operative League has announced that its
scholarship recipient for this year is Jaquilia Newton.

Ms Newton is a 2007 graduate of Bahamas Academy Sec-
ondary School and is presently registered in the bachelor of
business administration management programme at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. — s ; :

. The Bahamas Co-operative League Limited is the apex
body for credit unions and producer-supplier co-operatives and
has been granting a scholarship each year for the past seven

ears.

“Our family of financial co-operatives is proud of all the stu-
dents that have benefited from our scholarship programme,”
said the league in a statement. :





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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007



Important
Notice

From Midnight to 5 a.m. on —
Saturday 8th December, 2007.

As we continue efforts to improve our service to you,
we ask you to take note that our Electronic Banking
System will be temporarily unavailable during the time
listed above while we conduct routine maintenance.

We apologise for any inconvenience that this may cause.

During this period, the following services will be
unavailable:

e ABM
e VISA transactions via ABM
e Internet and Telephone Banking

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this
necessary maintenance.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

é ; ET ERE. TOGETHER.
www.firstcaribbeanbank.com : Es <





Inspired by the sun...

Collection 2008








CHRISTMAS STORE HOURS FROM MONDAY DECEMBER 10TH
MONDAY - SATURDAY 10AM - 5PM
SUNDAY DECEMBER 22ND -10AM-2PM .
CHRISTMAS EVE, DECEBER 24TH - 10AM - 2PM
TELEPHONE 242-394-4111



| Pyahhama Hand Prlits.

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS ; |



SHOWN are Katie Gardiner (left), administrator of the Children Emergency Hostel and Linamae Bowe of ATEL.
The Adventurer Computer (centre) includes a computer, monitor, keyboard, mouse and voltage regulator.

Children’s Emergency
Hostel reaps benefits
of ‘The Adventurer’

A NEW computer system has
hit the Bahamas market and the
children from the Children's
Emergency Hostel are the first
to reap the benefits.

Advanced Technical Enter-
prises Limited (ATEL) has cre-
ated “The Adventurer” — a ful-
ly-loaded computer system that
designers say features high qual-
ity components that ensure
maximum performance,

“It features Maxtor — formal-
ly Seagate — hard drives which
are known for superior perfor-
mance, along with Asus and
Intel technology,” said a press
release. “The Adventurer can

be custom-built to fit individ-
ual needs and anyone from a
student to a teacher, and/or
businessperson, will appreciate
its user-friendliness and inge-
nuity.” :

ATEL said its vision is for
everyone in the Bahamas to
have access to a computer. Tak-
ing a step in the direction of ful-
filling this mission, the company
donated an Adventurer com-
puter to the children at the
Emergency Hostel.

The system is being used sole-
ly by the children as an educa-
tional and recreational tool.

The hostel fosters 37 children

Nags Se ee
at (Montague Motors

Village Road Near Shirley Street
Tel: 394-0323/5 OR 394-1377



tH

“ASS”
CASH
ONLY

SSL M Le MOLL ela ES



ranging in age from one to 12
years old and the computer was
a welcomed gift to the children
— especially those who can now
complete homework assign-
ments and school projects
before the holiday season
begins. :

Administrator at the Chil-~
dren's Emergency Hostel, Katie
Gardiner, said that the com-
puter is an early Christmas gift
from which the children have
already started to reap the ben-
efits.

She noted that the hostel is
in the process of creating a spe-
cial computer area for the chil-
dren so that they will no longer
have to use a section of the
administrative office. She
thanked ATEL's proprietor,
Ethric Bowe, for his kind dona-
tion.

Mr Bowe said he was happy
to donate the computer and
hopes to make other contribu-
tions that will benefit the chil-
dren.

He invited the public to learn
more about the “moderately
priced, user-friendly computer”
and noted that it can be enjoyed
by anyone “from the young to
the young at heart.”



THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 9

Disabled rights activists continue
their ‘independent living’ campaign

DISABLED rights
activists are continuing their
campaign for “independent
living” legislation to be
passed in the Bahamas.

In a statement issued yes-
terday, Jerome Thompson
noted that having a home to
call their own is the “uni-
versal dream” of able-bod-
ied persons in America as
well as in the Bahamas.

“It’s no different for peo-
ple with disabilities”.

“The community of per-
sons in the commonwealth
of the Bahamas with dis-
abilities deserve and
demand the right to inde-

Bid for legislation to
be passed in Bahamas



pendent living in the land of
our birth such as has been
accomplished by our broth-
ers and sisters in other
democratic countries;

notably, the United States
of America and England,”
Mr Thompson said in a
statement issued yesterday.

He pointed to Good Shep-:

herd’s Supported Indepen-
dent Living facility in the
US, which he described as a
“technologically advanced”
apartment complex with 18
housing units, which offers
accessible living arrange-
ments for low-income adults
with physical disabilities.
“This unique housing



Tim Aylen/BIS

Prime Minister to receive ‘Star

Of the Caribbean’ award in Miami

PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Finance Hubert Ingraham (right) greets Minister of Public Works and
Transport Earl Deveaux (left) after he arrived at the Lynden Pindling International Airport on Wednesday
December 5, ta attend the 31st Miami Conference on the Caribbean Basin in Miami, Florida. Minister of
National Security Tommy Turnquest (centre) looks on. The® ‘prime minister will give the keynote address

at the plenary dinner and will receive the “Star of the Caribbean” award.

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Employees of Lowe’ 8 Wholesale, Lowe's Pharmacy
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December 14 on the
Morning Show





complex is designed specifi-
cally for persons with severe
disabilities and is funded by
Good Shepherd, the US
Department of Housing and
Urban Development, and
Federal Home Loan Bank
of Pittsburgh,” Mr Thomp-
son noted.

He said this is what the
Centre for Independent Liv-
ing — which he and his col-
leagues are working to
establish — will be for per-
sons with disabilities in the
Bahamas.

Defined

Mr Thompson said inde-
pendent living, as expressed
by the Independent Living
Movement worldwide, is
defined as “the means and
the right of persons with dis-
abilities to choose to live as
sufficiently and effectively
as they can, without unnec-
essary assistance from oth-
ers.

He said indépendent liv-
ing “does not mean that we
want to do everything by
ourselves, do not need any-
body or like to live in isola-
tion. It simply means that
we demand the same choic-
es and control in our every-
day lives that our non-dis-
abled brothers and sisters,
neighbors and friends take
for granted.”



Monday -



The 2007

Mercedes-Benz
C-Class is a 4-door,
ar tuxury



5-passeny

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

would like to remind our valued
clientle that they can layaway now
and pick up in time for Christmas!

Mackey Street ¢ Telephone: 393-0744
Saturday 9:00am - 5:30pm

Mr Thompson is one of
five disabled occupants of
Cheshire Home, who were
relocated by the former PLP
government and spent years
suffering in a series of inad-
equate housing situations as
a result.

He said the Independent
Living philosophy postulates
that people with disabilities
are the best experts on their
needs, “and therefore they

must take the initiative, indi-:

vidually and collectively, in
designing and promoting
better solutions and must

organise themselves for

political power.

“As citizens in democratic
societies, the Independent
Living Movement claims
that persons with disabili-
ties have the same right to
participation, to the same
range of options, degree of
freedom, control and
self-determination in
every day life and life pro-
jects that able-bodied citi-
zens take for granted,”
Mr Thompson’s statement
said.

He added that the
Bahamian building code is

not being applied as it ought ©

to be with respect.to the
construction of disabled-
friendly public infrastructure

_such as sidewalks as well as

the design and construction
of buildings for public
access.








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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



mS eae eae AANA ote TNE tea TRS SN NRA RR A RT
Annual Festival Noel set for Rand Nature Centre

THE Grand Bahama Branch
of The Bahamas National Trust
is very excited about the 13th
annual Festival Noel, which will
be held at the Rand Nature
Centre on December 7 begin-

ning at 7pm.

Bristol Wines & Spirits are
back once again as one of the
major sponsors of this year’s
event along with co-. »onsors.,
Cool 96, Parfum de Paris, John

Bull, Ginn Sur Mer and
Freeport Advertising and Privit-
ing

Bristol Wines & Spirits, who
have been a sponsor of Festi-
val Noel since tts inception, are

“pulling out all of the stops” as
they provide a wide selection
of wines from all over the
world, said the organisers in a
statement.

According to Robbie Butler,
sales manager at Bristol Wines
& Spirits, the company will be
serving “white wines like sauvi-
gnon blancs, crisp, dry and
refreshing pinot grigios that pro-
duce a taste of honey, pear and
lemon; chardonnays and ries-
lings.”

. Also served will be red wines
“like chiantis, which are simple
and elegant as well as cabernets
and merlots. The wines come
from countries all over the
world, like France, South
Africa, Chile, Argentina, Italy,
Spain, Australia, New Zealand
and America,” Mr Butler said.

Of course, no event is com-
plete without champagne, which
will be opened late in the
evening.

Also back by popular
demand is the Bacardi Mojito
Bar, which will feature peach

NOW HIRING

Maintenance Staff

Highly motivated, qualified applicants must:

Be able to work with little supervision
Be willing to work weekends & flexible hours

Competitive Salary & Great Benefits

Interested persons should e-mail resume to
humanresources@aetosbahamas.com or
hand deliver to the Head Office on Harold Road,
Deadline for application is December 40th, 2007.

No phone calls please.







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Heceeiasteis Tourism’s Finest

he Fae 4 Chesee ,

Cast your vote today!
Select your favorite Bahamian SECULAR songt

() Pie - Stileet
CiThe Water. :
C) Belly Yuk Contest
C] Mosquito Bite

() Bones
Cismokey's Tribute
CiToters

C)Sailboat Mediey - Falcons .
C) Trouble In the Land Bazzie
CJ See Me No More The Valley Ronnie Butler




4

Select your favorite Bahamian GOSPEL song:
CJ On the Rock ~ April Cartwright

O) Evidence Vision

( Singing Hallelujah - Alas

C) Da Way We Praise Him . fapernacle Concert Choir
C) Never Stop Praising the Lord The Apostolic Mass Choi
: C} Who’s Gonna Fill Their Shoes - The Rahming Brothers
® (11 Like Gospel - Christian Massive
| () DJ School DJ Counselor
_() Hark My Soul Brother Errol J
Pick Me Up When | Fall Chris Fox.
















‘ Select One song from both categories.

A Vote for your fe

February 1, 2007 @
Theatre, Wyndha
Resort.

Voting Deadline:
December 7, 2007

Voting Options:
* Deliver this voting ballotto
Ministry of Tourism on your island |
Fax this ballot to 356-6956
Or
‘ Vote online at
_ WWW. Caciqueawards com








ATTENDEES at last year’s Festival Noel are pictured trying some of the 20 wines showcased at the event. This
year, Bristol Wines & Spirits will feature 25 wines, champagnes and a Bacardi Mojito tent.

rum, and guests will also have
an opportunity to try several
martinis,

To compliment the various
wines that will be served at Fes-
tival Noel, the annual Chef Noel
competition will return.

This year, many of the best
restaurants from all over the
island will vie for votes as they

compete in this year’s Chet
Noel Competition.
Last year’s winner, The Har-

bour Room, will be returning
to defend their title. “We are
always excited and ready to sup-
port the Bahamas National
Trust and be a part wherever
food, wine and culinary art is
concerned,” said Jeff Butler of
the Harbour Room.

The competition is reported-
ly already heating up, as restau-
rants such as “Sabor”, Chef
Worly’s newest restaurant at
Pelican Bay, are ready to show
exactly what it is they bring to
the table.

The Ferry House will return
to the competition with their
new head Chef, Pascuel Bur-
rows.

The organising committee
said it is pleased that students
from the College of the
Bahamas’ School of Hospitality,
under the direction of Chef
Maycock. are also attending
thanks to the efforts of Chef
Boulet and Luciano’s.



SHOWN are the Sabor Chef and crew during a visit made to the Rand
Nature Centre as they prepare for Festival Noe! 2007. Sabor will be one
of the seven restaurants competing in this year's Chef Noe! Competition.
The winner of Chef Noel is decided by the attendees who vote for their

favourite restaurant on the night.

They also revealed that Joe
Ret will roasting a “sweet and
succulent pig” over an open
fire,.

“To top off the great wine
and delicious food that every-
one can enjoy, sponsors John
Bull and Parfum de Paris have
donated some fabulous items
to this year’s silent auction,”
said the statement.

John Bull has donated his and
hers Movado watches, a
Dooney & Bourke tote bag.
David Yurman earrings. an

ey
ae

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Parfum de Paris donated a
large basket of perfume for the
silent auction and will promote
four new fragrance lines on the
night.

All proceeds from the auc-
tion will benefit the Grand
Bahama branch of National
Trust fundraising efforts.

Organisers said tickets are on
sale at Bristol Wines & Spirits,
John Bull and The Rand Nature
Centre.

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322-2536 ¢ 325-2040 © 323-7756 * 326-7494



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 11



Film blends Bahamian spirit with
modern wisdom and humour

WITH a dose of Bahamian
spirit, TV personality and psy-
chiatrist Dr David Allen will
bring to this year’s Bahamas
International Film Festival a
delightful parable that touches
on the complexities of hearts
and lives in the modern world.

The short (15 minutes) live-
action, comedy-drama film fea-
tures a talking, cartoon-animat-
ed fish named “Pudgy,” who
gets beached upon the real
Bahamian shore.

Pudgy’s amusing encounters
with various beach-goers reflect
our patterns of living — or not
living fully - in today’s world.

Filmed by Bonnemaison, Inc
in Nassau and Paradise Island
with local crew members, the
film features Bahamian talent,
Dr David Allen, newcomer
Christa Palmer, and 11-year-old
screen actress Morganne
Bethel, who made her debut in
film playing the role of Emily in
John Stockwell's nto the Blue.

The film’s theme song was
composed and performed by
Christian McCabe, a minister
at New Providence Community
Church (NPCC) in Nassau.

BIFF Screenings of
Pudgy: A Bahamian
Parable

e Friday, December 7 —
3.45pm, Atlantis Theatre

e Saturday, December
8 — noon British Colonial
Hilton

e Sunday, December 9
— 2pm British Colonial
Hilton

An international supporting
cast from the US and Latin
America features 11-year-old
Peruvian-American Michelle
Moore as the voice of Pudgy.

The story: Walking along a
beautiful Bahamian shoreline,
a man (Dr Allen) adds his
young granddaughter (Mor-
ganne Bethel) to the story he
tells her about a spunky little
fish named Pudgy.

Too cocky for his own good,
Pudgy gets beached upon the
real Bahamian shore and is
forced to endure humorous
encounters with passers-by from
the modern world as he des-
perately tries to get their atien-
tion, before being saved at the
brink of death.

From various locations, the
lively and spontaneous Dr
Allen delivers insightful solilo-
quies about Pudgy’s calamity,
rousing us to listen to our hearts
to let our own Pudgy live.

A festive local parade and a



IN THE PICTURE: Dr. David Allen is photographed during filming.

beach dance to the Pudgy
theme song bring more Bahami-
an spirit to the big screen. Beau-
tifully filmed tin High Defini-
tion, the film is, made for gen-
eral audiences.

Pudgy: A Bahamian Parable
was crafted by an award-win-
ning team: filmmaker/journal-
ist Mari Bonnemaison as direc-

‘tor/producer; Emmy award-

winning filmmaker/Discovery
Channel narrator Brooks T
Moore as director of photogra-
phy; and filmmaker/performing
artist Marisa Arbona-Ruiz as
screenwriter/co-producer/assis-
tant director.

The film is based on a story
written by Dr Allen, an inter-
nationally known psychiatrist
and author, and Bahamian tele-
vision and radio host.

“His metaphorical story-
telling exemplifies human dra-
ma and the call to recognise the
need to seek help with healing
our past and transforming our
lives,” said a press release about
the film.

Dr Allen conceptualised the
parable after stumbling upon a
fish that had washed up onto
the shore.

“l began to reflect on how,
at some point in our lives, we all
get ‘beached’,” he said. “We get
blindsided by our buried emo-
tions, lifestyles and the trap-
pings of our personalities, yet
we can receive help, and let our
Pudgy live.”

His goal is to help people live
up to their. fullest potential.
“Meeting David was life-chang-
ing for me,” says Mari Bon-
nemaison. “He is a brilliant, yet
down-to-earth doctor with that
ability to look right through
you. We all have that inner
child, our conscience that is call-
ing us. Having seen his story of
Pudgy touch so many people, |
jumped at the chance to work
with David on the film.”







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Screenwriter Arbona-Ruiz
adds, “Bridging entertainment
with wisdom and humour to
dnspire transformation is pow-
erful. Working with David was
a profound and serendipitous
experience.”

Dr David Allen is an inter-
nationally recognised expert on
addiction treatment and gives
seminars on interpersonal and
spiritual development.

He trained in medicine at St
Andrew's University, Scotland,
and in psychiatry and public

_ health at Harvard University.

He taught psychiatry and reli-



gion at Yale and was clinical
professor in psychiatry at
Georgetown Medical School.

Dr Allen has pioneered
addiction treatment pro-
grammes in Washington, DC,
the Czech Republic, and the
Bahamas for which he received
the 1987 Bennett Common-
wealth Prize by the UK Royal
Society of Arts.

Voted one of the most out-
standing psychiatrists in Amer-
ica in 2002-2003, he was named
a Most Distinguished Fellow of
the American Psychiatric Asso-
ciation (2003).











LIFE’S A BEACH: Bahamian crew on the set of Pudgy: A Bahamian
Parable.

AVID YURMAN

DAVID YURMAN 2007



Join us for a special holiday event
to celebrate the launch of our

CGRAPHITE ChE COLLECTION

by David Yurman

Friday. December 7
6:00pm to 8:00pm

David Yurman Boutique
Bay Street



PAGE 12, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



PRIME Minister and |
Minister of Finance
Hubert Ingraham
(right) greets Oscar
E Spencer, new resi-
dent representative
of the Inter-Ameri-
can Development
Bank (IDB), duringa &
courtesy call at the
Office of the Prime
Minister on Tuesday.



Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture
Department of Youth & Sports

VACANCIES FOR SECURITY FIRMS TO PROVIDE
SECURITY SERVICESAT VARIOUS SPORTING FACILITIES.

Tenders bids are invited from suitable qualified security firms to pro-
vide security services at the following sporting facilities with effect

from January Ist, 2008.

Dalia

ANNAN

Phrenas 8. Sinsineswia s

Bssldicy:

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Ubstiy Kadly Barun Mabe: arva
Cary

Ur huaiag! iuoks Covraad ir

“rH Lease Pcle

Hie ses PEE sy Sameteng Fou. dee
DPaatiy Pines Ssetadinet brig, Sandee
rome oe tb Lap dad Sled Pili

St hed Ls bir Seo nee SSE

‘Dhas Sn tr wll peeks

Momeerds © sar aatlyosn PED pura
Bil ua Jade Sarcuy Sai ep hI
neh pwn ar eae

Tas Sov mitly Fria wil peste

Done nan. chttt resar 12 uli he
teeshiconaleadly Sumdiey lu Shula
jab ase | agua peat SP

The teaurity Firtiavda peas nies

Teag pSp Sete dh he ea teiling slahsen
Vind beri danhe Sareeiey Brora
Sule The lad) edie ae
TE som be readings wees Vrezug

Ie ee Ihe hs 300 cas dails Bocredy
these reid Th ete serortty
ears. pear dul

‘The sepsth Linn wb pernules

Per dita oie cube atafly fro, dad

peck aan fot “haa tint ake igs v
Ran dehy Sainady Sirungh

Se ldesy echoes atuieds gedbot par
erik.

Tha Beside Puce ett pode abe

ber gil dorian -h> inn AWiprs de:
aol i. wins fees uadieg!s be 2H
are ilalty 2 etalae Mera halide

wile. concise ada died fg per

Companies interested in providing the security services may contact
Mr. Bruce Walker Deputy, Permanent Secretary, at the Department
of Youth & Sports (502-0600 or 502-0613/22) for further informa-

tion and arrangement of site visits.

All tender bids include the following:

¢ Proposal cost (Outline the fees, they will expect the Ministry
of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture to pay the company per

month)

e Copy of Business License

e National Insurance Board letter of good standing

e Employee and Public liability insurances

The successful companies will be expected ta, provide adequate
communication system and uniformed guards.

Sealed tenders are to be submitted no later than 5: 00pm, on Friday,
December.21st, 2007 and addressed to:

Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture

P.O. Box N-4891
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attention: Mr. Bruce Walker, Deputy Permanent Secretary

Tender for Security Service

The Permanent Secretary reserves the right to reject any and all

tenders.

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture

Tim Aylen/BIS






A chance to cruise

into Christmas!

Customers cruising through
the aisles of City Market this
December could end up cruis-
ing the world on a cruise line
of their choice.

In a partnership promotion
with Asa H Pritchard, the 12
City Market Stores in Grand
Bahama and New Providence

: will give away 24 cruises for

two, as a part of the leading

grocer’s Cruise Into Christ- .

mas promotion.

The first of the 24 cruise
packages, worth $2,000 each,
will be drawn on Sunday,
December 9, at the City Mar-
ket in Harbour Bay from 9am
to Llam.

“We are very excited about
this promotion,” said Azale-
ta Ishmael-Newry, marketing
director of Bahamas Super-
markets Limited, operators of

City Market giving ‘away’
cruises in major holiday
season promotion

City Market Supermarkets.
“It’s our way of saying thank
you to customers who contin-
ue to make us their nuinber
one choice.

“They’ve been so faithful
and supportive over the years

and we wanted to give them |

the chance to enjoy a holiday
of their own.”

The rules are
tomers who purchase any
three of the popular 19 brands
included in the promotion can
enter to win.

The brands include: Heinz,

5 CUBE $318.00
5 CUBE $353.00
7 CUBE $445.00
9 CUBE $522.00
15 CUBE $650.00

25 CUBE $995.00

ESTIMATE PREPARED FOR FINANGING AT THE BANK OF YOUR Se
When it comes to quality We Don't raked

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Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to Riedie vy,



ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING with

simple — cus-

Suzuki's all-new SX4 is a cross between a sporty
compact and a light SUV. The go-anywhere design is
perfect for today’s lifestyle~ efficient daily
transportation and dynamic all-round performance.

Crisco Oil, Mueller’s, Hell-
mann’s, Mahatma, Act II Pop-
corn, Robin Hood, Niagara,
Oh Henry, Wish Bone, Sar-
gento sliced and deli cheeses,
Bounty, Bluebird, Charmin,
Pam Cooking Sprays, Pringles,
Smucker’s Hershey’s and Lib-
by’s canned fruit and vegeta-
bles. Entry Forms must be
verified by a City Market
casbier, the company said.

The winners will be
announced on December 9,
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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS



“ICTURED (L TO R) ARE: John Westwood, director of International Development, ILEX; Dr Pandora Johnson,
‘ice president for outreach College of the Baharnas; Lesley Graham, president ILEX; Glenda Mae Black-
vartwright; Dr Christina Nwosa, director of the Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services (CEES).

Officials pleased with COB’s
delivery of IMEX programmes

TWO senior executives from
‘ne Institute of Legal Execu-
‘ives visited Nassau to discuss
oroadening and developing
‘heir offerings.

{LEX is a British based
organisation that oversees edu-
ational. programmes for peo-
ole wishing to enter the law pro-
fession in many countries
around the world.

Mrs Lesley Graham, presi-
sent ILEX, and John West-
wood, director of international
development for ILEX, met
with College of the Bahamas
vice president for outreach, Dr
Pandora Johnson and the direc-
tor of the Centre for Continuing
Education and Extension Ser-
vices (CEES), Dr Christina
Nwosa.

At the meeting, Mr West-

wood expressed his apprecia- 2PPear in court on their client’s yy with ihe way it has been

: + behalf but also see them eligible easy : ” Bal 1

tion of the way the College has es ee done here fp the Bahamas. In ‘ A . :

administered and delivered [© become members of the judi- fact, we are gom¢ io use the col. vailub! ir Nassau * Bay Street

ILEX programmes and his eed mae Mr Westwood sees — Jege’s work as 9 siodel for 3th- & 17--92-85/1 + wwwiittleswitzerland.com _

Jesire to establish a clear path ESE: VION, ARE SAPeuUee. « er jurisdictions. ,
: 3pportunities i RUBA + 4 PATAD TRANE TURK - KEY WEST » NASSAL
“yom those programmes to the YPPOPtHiitic The 1LEX parea-legs RUBA + BARbr ee oR IND IRK KEY WEST NASSAU
‘.LB and other professional for encour grammic offered in conjunction. N Noo ST KITTS © ST MAARTEN 2 ST THOMAS

‘egal courses.

“We have been in the
Sahaimas toi six years,” stated
‘ir Westwood, “and we have
veen impressed by the rigour
of the work done by the Col-
tege in presenting the para-iegal
programmes. Now we want to
‘alk to the academic board of
ihe College about presenting
professional programmes so the
students will, in effect; become
sawyers here in the Bahamas as
& result of our programmes.”

Dr Johnson added that the
-ollege was hoping to offer its
own LLB programme in the
roreseeable future and Mrs
araham spoke enthusiastically

on the [LEX legal executive
courses, which provide an alter-
native yet thorough way
through part-time study io enter
the legal profession for
those who don’t foliow the
usual university to law school
route.

“in Britain at thé monient, a
legal executive is a lawyer,” she
explained, “but does not have
the status to appear before a
judge in court.

“But that is changing thanks
to the Legal Services Bill going
through parliament at the
moment.”

Opportunities

This Bill will not only grant
legal executives permission to









Bahamians tc consider the gal
executive route to the profes-
sion.

“With improved marketabil-
ity,” he asserted, “Bahamians
will be able to practice around
the world and their opportuni-
ties will increase tremendous-
ly.”

Glenda Mae _— Black-
Cartwright, a secretary in the
Attorney General's Office,
completed the Paralegal Cer-
tificate in Law at the college
and spoke appreciatively of
what she learnt.

She said she feels capable of
coping with anything a legal sec-
retary would have to and feels

she would like to move «> to
another levei by enrolling
another ILEX programme.

Dr Nwosa announced that
CEES would be miroducing
two new courses in the Fali of
2008 to include among its offer-
ings for the li.EX certificates:
one will be Law Office Man-
agement and the other the Law
of the Sea. *

Both will have direct impli-
cations for the Bahamas and Mr
Westwood went on to applaud
the way the content of the
courses at the college has been
coniextualised to reflect the dif-
ferences between Bahamian
and British law.

“We encourage contextuali-
sation in all the countries our
programmes are delivered,” he
explained, “and are very hap-



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Those interestea it. finding
out more should contact the
Centre for Continuing Educa-
tion and Extension Services,
located on Moss Road, or
call 328-0093, 328-1936 or 325-
5714.



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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



NATIONAL YOUTH ROAD SAFETY SYMPOSIUM



By Nor’adila Hafeeza
Hepburn 7

Soa aie mre ©

“1 felt for the man who was
injured. I felt very saddened by
it ~ one day you can walk and
the next day you can’t.”

pre are

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ORE than
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Workers’ House to attend the
third Annual National Youth
Road Safety Symposium.

The all-day event, sponsored
by Chevron Bahamas Limited
in collaboration with the Min-
istry of Works and Transport
and the Road Traffic Depart-
ment, was geared towards edu-
cating young people about the
importance of being safe on
the road.

This year’s theme was
“embracing today’s opportu-

‘nities for a safer tomorrow.”
The keynote speaker was Min-
ister of Works and Transport
Dr Earl Deveaux, who spoke
to students about what they
can do to help combat the ris-
ing number of traffic fatalities,
and how they can improve
their own road safety aware-
ness. .

Dr Deveaux told students that
better enforcement of the law,
cracking down on bad behav-
iour by motorists, and reducing
the number of vehicles on the
road are important in keeping

Jne minute can change the

More than 100 ninth-
grade students spend
a day learning about
the importance of
safety on our roads

drivers safe.

Education

e emphasised that

the biggest weapon

the country has in the fight

against traffic fatalities is pub-

lic education, and applauded

the students for participating
in the one day forum.

“Your presence today is very

important. You can make a dif-

ference in some of the habits
that are stuck with us older
people. Many people do not
know how to use (things such
as) roundabouts. We need bet-
ter public education,” said Dr
Deveaux.

Amando Vegas, district
retail manager for Chevron
Bahamas Limited, said: “I
absolutely agree with Minister
Deveaux. I think the earlier we
start the better it will be.”

“These students are going to



ATTENTIVE: Students listen caiefully ‘using the ania road safety symposium whose theme was
“embracing tbany’ S$ opportunities for a safer tomorrow.”

Cc

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 15



-. LOCAL NEWS



rest of your life,

“These students are going to
be the future drivers on the
road, the more they under-
stand about the importance of
following the rules and using
seatbelts, the better it is going
to be. If they get the good
behaviours from the start, they
will always follow the rules,”
Mr Vegas said.

Through a series of sober-
ing presentations, participants
were shown what can happen
when people do not drive care-
fully or intentionally break the
laws of the road by speeding
or not wearing seatbelts.

Graphic slides

Ninth-graders grimaced as
they viewed graphic slides of
dead bodies covered in blood,
severed limbs, and collapsed
skulls courtesy of Reserve
Assistant Superintendent of
Police, Richard Rahming, one
of the presenters in the sym-
postum. “It-was. gruesome,”
admits one student, “but it
showed us what happens to
people when they speed.”

There was also an informa-
tive session which dealt with
the kinds of injuries that result
from traffic accidents, present-
ed by with Dr Delon Brennen.

The session that was most
effective was a one-on-one ses-
sion with a car crash survivor.

Daniel Bastian shared with
students how one minute can
change the rest of your life.

One night in 1978, Mr Bast-
ian was driving along the road,
when he veered his vehicle into
the bushes to avoid a head-on
collision with a car speeding in
the opposite direction. He was °
left paralysed for the rest of his
life.

To this day, police have nev-
er found the suspect involved
in the accident. “I felt for the
man who was injured,” said
Sandiya Paul, a ninth-grader
from H O Nash Junior High. “I
felt very saddened by it — one
day you can walk and the next’ ~
day you can’t”.

The day ended with a work- ©
shop, where students, grouped
by their respective school, used
their creativity to pen catchy
mottos, bright posters, perform
raps and acted out skits to the
delight of both fellow students
and organisers. Surprise gifts,
and a raffle of a cell-phone
capped off the symposium.

“Educating the next genera-
tion abouteroad safety is of
prime importance to the organ-
isers of the symposium”, said
Mr Jack Thompson, Controller
Road Traffic Department and
one of the organisers of the
event. He stressed that in order
to seriously tackle accidents
and fatalities, focus must
placed on the future genera-

tion.

“When I was growing up,
they had a saying: bend the
tree while it’s young. The soon-
er we can catch our young kids
and instill some things into
them the better. The root of it
is to really catch the younger
ones, ” said Mr Thompson.

Stating that every life lost is
one too many, Mr Thompson
says he believes.that the sym-
posium will be beneficial to the
students who participated, and
that is will resonate with them
for a long time.



a: o- = lus

“These stu-
dents are
going to be
the future dri-
vers on the |
road, the
more they |
understand
about the
importance of ©
following the
rules and
using seat-
belts, the bet- |
ter it is going
to be.”



Amando Vegas

*





KEY MESSAGE: Minister of Works and Transport Earl Deveaux dri-
ves home the safety message.

WORD OF ADVICE: Cordero Minnis, Texax
shares safety tips at the symposium.





o Youth spokesperson



TESTIMONY: A road accident
survivor tells his story during
the all-day conference on road
safety.






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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

Moyo VM] -\ Se

THE TRIBUNE



Expert: Esfakis death attributable
to the failure of hospital staff

that Mr Esfakis should have

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FROM page one

to the failure of hospital staff
to check whether he had an
inhalation injury.

Mr Esfakis was admitted
to Doctor’s Hospital at
around lam on Saturday,
April 20, to be treated for
burns he had sustained after
his shirt caught afire during
a party that Friday evening.
He died in that facility on
Monday, April 22.

Yesterday, Dr Luterman
told the court that Mr
Esfakis “should have sur-
vived” the injuries for which
he was.admitted, “or to put
it another way, if he was
going to die from this injury
it shouldn’t have been in this
way.”

Dr Luterman testified that
he had been asked by one of
the patient’s sisters, Julianna
in 2002 to review the hospi-
tal records detailing her
brother’s treatment because
“she wanted to know more
about whether or not he
could have survived his
injury” if, for example, he
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where.

The Us expert told the
court that upon reviewing
the medical records he saw
that Mr Esfakis was deemed
to have 25 per cent burns
when he was admitted to the
hospital. The deepest burns

“were on his hands, and the

hair in his nose was noted as
“singed”, he said.

He said that the treatment
given to Mr Esfakis in the
Emergency Room included
the application of a cool
compress to the burn areas,
and the initiation of intra-
venous fluids.

Dr Luterman said that
while “in most ER rooms in
the UK and US” medical
staff would check a burn’s
patient’s airway at an early
stage for “smoke breathed
in” there was “no record of
this having happened” in Mr
Esfakis’ case.

The professor said that
medical trainees are taught
“across the board” that
checking the airway is “crit-
ical.”

“It goes ‘A is for airway’,
‘B is for breathing’ - you
start with the airway,” said
Dr Luterman. He said that
when a burns victim’s airway
gets burnt “it will swell”
eventually reaching the point
where it is “near to closing
off.”

He said that Mr Esfakis’
case was “an absolutely clas-
sic example” of why check-
ing for inhalation injuries in
burns patients is something
that is “emphasised” to
those receiving medical
training.

Dr -Luterman then out-
lined the amount of fluid



been administered to
counter “burn shock” stat-
ing that given his weight and
condition he should have
been given six litres of fluid.
He said that medical staff
should then ensure that
patients “maintain adequate
urine output.”

He continued that in Mr
Esfakis’ case he was in fact
“pouring out urine” at a rate

- of around 500cc, when rec-

ommended output should
have been between 30 - S0cc.

“Litres (of fluid) were
being administered and its
as if no one’s watching
(urine output),” he said, lat-
er adding that he had “never
been able to explain the
amount of fluid (Mr Esfakis)
was getting.”

Dr Luterman then out-
lined the type of equipment
that would normally be used
to check for a smoke inhala-
tion injury. “Most ER rooms
have one. When I first
looked at the records I won-
dered whether (Doctor’s
Hospital) had one,” he said.

However, he said that
when records later revealed
that a bronchioscopy was
performed on the patient on
Sunday, Dr Lutermann said
he realised that hospital staff

had had the necessary equip-.

ment to perform this proce-
dure from the start.

He described the fact that
this was not done as “med-
ically unacceptable.”

The expert witnéss then
went on to say that he found
it “disconcerting” that hos-
pital notes showed that when
the nurse noted the patient
began feeling like his neck

Bahamian artists in Miami show

BAHAMIAN artists Lynn and Holly Parotti are among
exhibitors at a Miami show which opens today.
The group exhibition, called Safety Zones, is at the Diaspo-

ta Vibe Gallery.

Painter John Cox of Nassau is also among exhibitors, who
include-leading names from all over the Caribbean.

On Saturday, there will be a special presentation by interna-
tional multi-media artist Chris Cozier.

Author signing

AUTHOR Claire Belgrave will be signing copies of her book
about Bahamian theatre at Chapter One Bookstore on Saturday.
Ms Belgrave will be at the Thompson Boulevard store from
noon to 2pm to sign copies of Theatre in the Bahamas: From OI

Story to Rep Theatre.

The book is published by Nassau-based Guanima Press Ltd.



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

share your news

The Tribune wants to hear












was constricted — “like he’s
choking, strangling” — that
“different doctors” she
called by telephone were
“not answering.”

He then noted that when a
doctor told the nurse to
“loosen the dressings” on Mr
Esfakis’ neck in résponse to °
these symptoms, that this
was “not the problem.”

“T got kind of chills when I
was reading that,” said Dr
Luterman.

“It’s what we try to teach
our students all the way up,
it has to be avoided.”

Hospital records then said
Mr Esfakis “reached the
point where the nurse
noticed he was turning
blue,” said the witness.

He said that when medical
staff consequently per-
formed a tracheotomy on Mr
Esfakis to ease his breath-
ing this “add(ed) another
insult to the third part of his
inhalation injury.”

He further added that the
“enormous amount of fluid”
hospital records showed Mr
Esfakis was receiving would .
have “aggravated any .
swelling” already experi-
enced.

Dr Luterman told the
court that normally 25 per
cent burns on a male in his
40s “is not a lethal injury.”

“It should not have killed
him unless there were some
untoward complications,” he
said. Asked later by magis-
trate William Campbell
whether Mr Esfakis was sub-
ject to any such complica-
tions, Dr Luterman said
“no”.

He said-that these would
include, for example, if
weeks later he were to have
got an infection.

“It’s very unusual to see
this in England or the US,”
Dr Luterman told the court,
adding: “To have that many
physicians come in contact
with the patient and for

.there to be no evaluation of

the airway...”

He said that when the
nurse called doctors noting
that the patient was experi-
encing symptoms such as a
feeling of-strangulation or
“anything to do with that,
he should have been
checked.”

In the US medical staff are
“so paranoid about this kind
of problem (inhalation
injuries in burns patients)
that they do it (check for it),
and then have it done again.
That’s how devastating a
problem it is and why you
do not miss it initially,” said
Dr Luterman.

He told the court that,
according to US guidelines,
Mr Esfakis’ symptoms
should have caused medical
staff to send him for treat-
ment in a specialist burns
centre. “For him to have not
been transferred to a burns
centre, for me, was a failure
of the system,” he said.

The inquest continues this
week in the coroner’s court,
number seven. It is being
heard by Magistrate William
Campbell.

We will re-open for business on
Monday, December 10th, 2007

We Apologize For Any Inconvenience Caused And Would Like To Take
This Opportunity To Wish Our Customers

Happy Holidays!









THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 17

THE TRIBUNE

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| PAGE 18, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 19



NY ARO EY
Claim that Christie using
election possibility to

maintain control of PLP

FROM page one

porters and encourage the belief
that Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham is “uncomfortable”
with the slim margin he cur-
rently enjoys in the House of
Assembly. :

A confidential source within
the PLP reports that Mr
Christie is using this “holding
tactic” to maintain control over
the PLP and block the advances
of PLP MPs Obie Wilchcombe
or Dr Bernard Nottage from
gaining the party reins.

On Tuesday night, Mr
Christie called an emergency
Parliamentary meeting to dis-
cuss a “new plan” to try to raise

money for the party. The party’s
finance committee, it was
reported, made an audio visual
presentation to the national
general council to launch this
fundraising campaign.

However, it is claimed that
to an enlightened few, the tactic
is clear — to create a false sense
of inevitability that would
secure the relevancy of Mr
Christie at the February con-
vention.

Even if the PLP won the
highly contested Pinewood con-
stituency, inside sources main-
tain that the party is still too
financially drained of money to
even attempt a run at.a general
election.

Man dies after

drive-by shooting

FROM page one

ick Seymour of Grand Bahama said that police are very con-
cerned about the nature of this latest murder.

“It was a drive-by shooting in broad daylight as we have
recently seen in Nassau, so we are concerned. We are pulling
out all the stops in our investigation,” he said.

Chief Supt Seymour said this incident brings Grand
Bahama’s murder count for the year to 13 — a high number

for that island.

However, he pointed out that of those 13 murders, police
have so far been able to solve 10 cases.
“That is a very high percentage. Still, one murder i is one too

many,” he said.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey, press liaison officer in Grand
Bahama, reported that several of Grand Bahama’s recent
murders have circumstances in common.

Ms Mackey explained that many of the recent murders
have been either drug related or arose out of domestic dis-

putes and armed robberies.

This latest incident comes just as family, friends and col-
leagues gathered yesterday to pay tribute to the life of 64-
year-old Vincent Pedican - Grand Bahama’s 10th murder vic-

tim for the year.

-The memorial service was held at the auditorium of Eight
Rock’s High School, where Mr Pedican worked the night

pout as a security officer.

Darold Miller trial

' FROM page one

MITT TE

complaints of a sexual nature
were lodged against him.

er was consequently sus-
pended from his duties as
Chief Operating Officer at
GEMS as a result of police
investigations, but has main-

tained his innocence through-
out his ordeal.

The trial was adjourned
yesterday as Magistrate McK-
ay noted that she had been
informed that the prosecutor,

. who is dealing with the case, is

currently off the island on cir-
cuit. The trial was adjourned
to Friday, January 4, 2008.

Machine readable passports

3
i FROM page one

Besides the lack of money, it
was also claimed that neither
the PLP, nor the FNM, would
seek to have another ‘election
on the current voter registra-
tion list, which is riddled
with persons not entitled to
vote.

“Mr Christie is doing this
because he wants to hold the
party in a position of ‘hold’ so
no one would move him,”
added another source within the
PLP.

- “He wants them to think that

it’s going to be a re-election so
you must not change the
leader.”

Political pundits agree that it
would be “extremely unlikely”
that Prime Minister Ingraham
would call an early election.
They cited a number of reasons,
mainly the escalating crime

numbers, the slowing down of

the Bahamian economy, and
the lack of a proper voters’ reg-
ister.

“How could he do that? But
Mr Christie is selling this to his
people to get them excited that
there is going to be an election
so that no one would move him
as leader. That’s what this is all
about,” the source claimed.







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4 so plans to include the photographs and fingerprints of deported
dividuals in the yet unveiled border protection system, which is.
cheduled to begin in Nassau in January 2008, Mr Burrows added.

Indusa Global, a software solutions provider from Greenville,

outh Carolina, which has been working with the Immigration

a. for the last five years to improve the department’s data-
ase, is also assisting in the creation of the new border protection
ystem.

* Though the new ePassport and visa issuance system will bolster

Kama with providing travel and residence documents, Virginia

Ramadan, counsel general at the US embassy, also noted that the
ew machine readable passports will help Bahamians to be
processed at certain US border checkpoints.

' “It’s going to really facilitate Bahamian travel to the United

States, particularly through the ports of entry here in Nassau and

Freeport, ” said Ms Ramadan, as currently Bahamians are unable

to swipe their passports.

, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent

Symonette said at the launch of the changes:

' “The Bahamas’ ePassport, visa, e-Identification and border con-

trol initiative is of significant national and international impor-

tance. It will enhance the security of our State and it is anticipated

pa over time, it will ease the passage of our citizens throughout

the world.”

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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007 ! THE TRIBUNE

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THE TRIBUNE



ipa asia ANAS



US SECRETARY of State Condoleezza Rice listens, as Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, speaks in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Wednesday, Dec. 5,
2007, where Rice called for more African countries to send peacekeepers to Somalia, where an Islamic insurgency has killed thousands of civilians
this year. Rice was in the Ethiopian capital to meet with African leaders after expressing growing unease about deteriorating security and faltering
peace deals in a number of countries on the continent. The United Nations has said Somalia is facing the worst humanitarian crisis in Africa.



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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 21

oe

Rice says
more African
countries

Should send ©
peacekeepers

to Somalia

@ ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia
MORE African countries
should send peacekeepers to
Somalia, where an Islamic insur-
gency has killed thousands of
civilians this year, Secretary of
State Condoleezza Rice said

Wednesday, according to Associ-

ated Press.

Rice was in the Ethiopian cap-
ital, where the African Union is
headquartered, to meet with
African leaders after expressing
growing unease about deteriorat-
ing security and faltering peace
deals-in a number of countries on
the continent. The United
Nations has said Somalia is facing
the worst ‘humanitarian crisis in
Africa.

Uganda has about 1,800 troops
in Somalia, officially as the van-
guard of a larger African Union
peacekeeping force, though so far
no other countries have sent rein-
forcements. Ethiopia, which sent
soldiers to Somalia late last year
to wipe out*Islamic militants, is
not part of the peacekeeping
force and hoping to withdraw.

“We do believe the Ethiopian
forces should not have to stay in
Somalia past a certain point, and
that will require peacekeeping
forces, very robust peacekeeping
force, and so that will be part of
my discussions here,” Rice said.

Peacekeepers have tried to
pacify Somalia before, with trag-
ic results. More than a decade
ago, a massive U.N. relief opera-
tion was launched for thousands
of civilians left starving because of
fighting in Somalia. But 1993
attacks by Somali militiamen that
brought down two Black Hawk
helicopters and killed 18 U.S. ser-
vicemen were followed by the
withdrawal of U.S. troops and the
eventual end of the U.N. peace-
keeping operation.

Rice, who is scheduled to meet
with Somalia’s new prime minis-
ter during her trip, said she will
impress upon him the need be
inclusive in his administration.

“The Somali leadership is going
to have to really reach out to all

' the elements that are not associ-

ated with terrorism,” Rice said.
“It has to be broad and that’s
really my message to the prime
minister. He has to find a way to
broaden his base of support.”

Last year, a radical Islamic
movement accused of links With
al-Qaida seized control of much
of the southern part of Somatia,
prompting Ethiopia to invade in
December 2006 with Washing-
ton’s tacit backing. The Islamic
movement was toppled, but its
supporters have waged an Iraq-
style insurgency. A Somali human
rights groups said over the week-
end that nearly 6,000 civilians
have been killed in the crosgfire
this year.

While in Addis Ababa, Rice
also planned talks with Ethiopian
Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, a
U.S. counterterrorism ally criti-
cized for a crackdown on political
opponents and whose country
shares a tense border with arch-
foe Eritrea.

“We don’t need a use of force
here to deal with what is obvi-
ously a significant border prob-
lem,” Rice told reporters aboard
her plane en route to Addis Aha-
ba, referring to a feared resump-
tion of the 1998-2000 Ethiopian-
Eritrean war that killed tens of
thousands of people. oy

The war ended with a peace
agreement but the border issue
remains unsettled as Ethiopia
never fully accepted the delin-

eation of an independent com-~

mission that disbanded itself last
week after the neighbors were
unable to agree to mark the new
frontier.
Rice is only the fourth secre-

' tary of state to visit Ethiopia and

the first ina decade. Madeleine
Albright made a stop in Addis
Ababa in 1997, according to the
State Department historian’s
office.

In her first meeting Wednes-
day, Rice met with leaders from
Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda and
Congo to discuss fighting in cast
ern Congo that threatens stabili-
ty throughout their Great Lake:
region.

“We had a very thorough dis-
cussion,” Ugandan President
Yoweri Museveni said later.
adding, “Part of the danger in
Africa is handling issues in a
superficial way.”

Rice said dealing with rebels
in eastern Congo is critical to re-
establishing normalcy in a-region
that has been devastated by
decades of war and genocide that
have killed millions.

On Sudan, she said she would
tackle elements of the Darfur
conflict and the faltering peace
deal that ended Sudan’s long-r
ning North-South civil war. But
Sudanese President Omar al-
Bashir’s government skipped 2
meeting with Rice, according to a
list of delegates released by
the U.S. Embassy in Addis Aba
ba.

Rice said she wants to focus on
overcoming logistical hurdles in
Dariur to standing up a joint
U.N.--\frican. Union peacekeep-
ing force for the vast region which
has been ravished by years of con-
flict. “We're just going to have to
remove these obstacles and get
on with it,” Rice said.

As for the 2005 peace deal
between al-Bashir’s government
and southern rebels, she said “it’s
time to refocus our efforts there.”

“That is really an agreement
that we cannot afford to let
unravel.” Rice said.






US defense secretary says sects



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and stable Iraq is within reach

lm BAGHDAD

DEFENSE Secretary Robert Gates said Wednesday he believes a
secure and stable Iraq is within reach, although there’s been an
uptick in violence in the north where al-Qaida is trying to re-establish
a foothold, according to Associated Press.

Gates’ comments came as a car bomb exploded ina largely Shiite
neighborhood of Baghdad, killing at least 14 people, police said.
The explosion happened across the Tigris River from the Green
Zone shortly before Gates’ news conference with Traq’s defense
minister,

Acknowledging the precarious nature of any security gains in the
country, Gates said that much work remains to be done to cnstue
Iraqi forces are ready to take over More military duties from U.S.
troops. Iraqis who have been lighting insurgents on the local level
must be integrated into Iraqi security forces, for example, he said,

“T believe that-a secure, stable Iraq is within reach.” Gates said
However, he added, “We need to be patient.”

Gates noted a decline in overall violence in Iraq during recent
months, which has led to a substantial increase in the number of
refugees returning home as well as international investment in the
country despite nearly five years of war.

This, he said, has “led to a growing sense of normalcy and hope

Still, Gates acknowledged increasing militant and terrorist activi-
ties in northern Iraq, a situation he discussed with U.S. commanders
during his first visit to Mosul earlier Wednesday. He said he was
pleased to learn that Iraqi troops were fighting back.

“IT know the Iraqi people are more than up td the challenses,”
Gates said. *... However, much remains to be done.”

Army Col. Tony ‘Thomas, a brigade commander, told repoi tors
traveling with Gates that he and other senior commanders in the north
are looking for additional U.S. troops and also would like the return
of 1,400 Iraqi troops sent to Baghdad to provide “more combat pos
er” to help stabilize areas such as Diyala province, Mosul and Sania
ra to-counter an uptick in violence, including suicide bombings

Overall, there has been a steady decline in violence in Taq in
recent months, including dips in roadside bombs, other attacks ana ia
both U.S. and Iraqi casualties.

The U.S. is pressing Iraqi leaders to take advantage of the improved
security to make the political reforms needed to stabilize the fledye-
ling democracy.









PAGE 22, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Opposition leaders nearing agreement
on terms for joining Pakistan elections

@ ISLAMABAD, Pakistan

PAKISTAN’S opposition
parties neared agreement
Wednesday on a list of
demands of President Per-
vez Musharraf in return for
calling off a boycott that
could spoil the legitimacy
of January parliamentary
elections, an official said,
according to Associated
Press.

The negotiations came as
the government prepared
to expel two U.S. rights
activists who have protest-
ed the arrest of Supreme
Court justices and leading
lawyers since Musharraf
introduced emergency rule
Nov. 3.

The meeting between
representatives of former
prime ministers Benazir
Bhutto and Nawaz Sharif
and other smaller parties

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PAKISTANI FORMER Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, center, addres



Anjum Naveed/AP



ses

to a rally at Mansehra, Pakistan on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2007.
%

“We have done most of
our job but still need more
time,” Sen. Khursheed
Ahmed, who is on the
eight-member opposition
committee, said after the
talks finished for the night.
“The committee would def-
initely accomplish this task
tomorrow.”

Party leaders have
threatened to boycott the
vote unless their demands
are met. Their refusal to
‘participate in the election
would undercut the efforts
of Musharraf — a key U.S.
ally in the war on terror-
ism — to ease Pakistan
back toward democracy
after eight years of military
rule.

The parties are demand-
ing an end to emergency
tule and the release of for-
mer Supreme Court judges
who were fired amid indi-
cations that they were
preparing to invalidate
Musharraf’s election in
October to a new presi-
dential term.

Chaudhry Shujaat Hus-
sain, chairman of the rul-
ing Pakistan’ Muslim
League, dismissed the
opposition demands as
unrealistic.

“In fact, the two alliances
have nothing to attract
people and are therefore
raising non-issues,” he was
quoted as saying by the
state-run Associated Press
of Pakistan news agency.

Sharif, whose candidacy
has been rejected by elec-
tion officials, and Bhutto
are long-standing political

foes, but the two have been

drawn ‘together since
returning from exile by the

common goal of con-

fronting Musharraf.

Their move to formulate ,

a joint set of conditions

raises the stakes for gov- .

ernment, which they accuse

Your electricity bill is made
up of the basic rate, which is
constant and has not











and the fuel sur-charge, which
is based on the price of
petroleum in the intemational
market and is calculated

nthly usinga fixed formula.






of planning to conduct a
sham election. ;

Ahsan Iqbal, spokesman
for Sharif’s Pakistan Mus-
lim League-N, said the
issues under consideration
included the restoration of
an independent judiciary
and the constitution, cre- ”
ation of a neutral caretaker
government and an inde-
pendent election commis-
sion, along with a deadline
for the government to
accept the demands.

“The present situation
demands that all democra-
tic forces work in unity and
collectively to save the
country from a major cata-
strophe, which will result
after rigged elections,”
Iqbal said.

But another politician,
former cricket star Imran
Khan, insisted the united
opposition should stay
away from the ballot.

“You do not have elec-
tions when fundamental
rights are suspended,”
Khan said on Dawn Tele-
vision.

“Never has any judiciary
been butchered as it has
been in Pakistan (and) by
taking part in elections we
would legitimize everything
Mushartrat has done.”

Since he declared emer-
gency rule, Musharraf has
filled the Supreme Court
with loyalists and jailed
hundreds of human rights
workers, civic activists and
lawyers.

Most have since been
released and Musharraf has
promised to lift the emer-
gency Dec. 16, about three
weeks ahead of the elec-
tions. But repression con-
tinues.

The Human Rights Com-
mission of Pakistan urged
the public to mark Dec. 10
as a “black day” by dis-
playing black flags and
wearing black bands. It
called 2007 one of the
worst years for human
rights.in the country’s his-
tory and rejected Mushar-
raf’s claims that he is
restoring democracy as “a
total farce.”

“The rights of ordinary
people have been violated
by the government with
impunity,” the group said
in a statement.

“Reports of torture,
threats, intimidation, and
arbitrary arrests run into
thousands. Incidents of
extrajudicial killings are
reported but never inves-
tigated. The situation has
now reached alarming pro-
portions. The media is
chained and free expres-
sion censured.”

On Tuesday, two U.S.
human rights aetivists,
identified as Medea Ben-
jamin and Tighe Barry,
were arrested in the east-
ern city of Lahore after
holding protests and call-
ing for the release of
Aitzaz Ahsan, president of
the Supreme Court Bar
Association.

U.S. Embassy spokes-
woman Elizabeth Colton
said the two had been
turned over to U.S. con-
sular officials and were
expected to leave Pakistan
“in the next day or so.”



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 23



TOT, Ho OARS

. LOCAL NEWS 4 ‘

pesume trials at
Guantanamo with )

case against

alleged driver for

Osama bin Laden

i GUANTANAMO BAY

NAVAL BASE, Cuba

THE USS. military will try
once again to prosecute men
held at this isolated tropical
outpost on Wednesday, as the
U.S. Supreme Court meets to
consider the broad rights of
Guantanamo prisoners, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

A military judge, presiding
over a makeshift courtroom at
a former airstrip under heavy
security, is scheduled to hold a
pretrial hearing for Salim
Ahmed Hamdan, a native of
Yemen accused of being a
member of al-Qaida and a dri-
ver for Osama bin Laden.

The Supreme Court show-
down revolves around whether
Guantanamo prisoners can
challenge their detention in
US. civilian courts. At:the
Navy base in Cuba, the hearing
is expected to focus on the
question of whether the Ameri-
can military tribunal system has
jurisdiction over Hamdan and
can proceed to trial more than
three years after he was first
charged.

A legal challenge by Hamdan

prompted the Supreme Court
last year to throw out the previ-
ous rules for military tribunals.

On Wednesday, Hamdan’s
lawyers are expected to argue
he is not an unlawful enemy
combatant but, instead, a pris-
oner of war, and entitled under
the.Geneva Conventions to a
US. military court martial — a
system that detainee advocates
say has higher legal standards
than the commissions proposed
for Guantanamo prisoners.

A top military legal official
said the timing of the hearings
in Guantanamo and Washing-
ton is coincidental. He predict-
ed that the Hamdan hearing is
a signal the long-stalled trials
will soon be on the fast-track.

“We are moving with intensi-

ty and I expect things to pick
up,” Air Force Brig. Gen.
Thomas Hartmann, the legal
adviser to the conimission sys-
tem, told reporters at Guan-
tanamo.

The U.S. holds about 305
prisoners on suspicion of terror-
ism or links to al-Qaida and the
Taliban at,Guantanamo and
plans to pfosecute at least 80,
including the alleged architect .
of the Sept. 11 attacks. So far,
only three detainees have been
formally charged and one, Aus-
tralian David Hicks, was con-
victed in a plea bargain and
sent home.

The military blames the
delays on the difficulty of
preparing cases involving men
captured far away and held five
years or more — and ona
series of legal challenges,
including Hamdan’s.

Hamdan is charged with con- :

spiracy and providing material
support for terrorism.

In June, military judges
threw out the charges against
him and Canadian national
Omar Khadr, ruling the com-

missions lacked the authority to

prosecute them because they

had not been officially designat-

ed “unlawful enemy combat-
ant” as required by the Military
Commissions Act, which was
signed into law by President
Bush in October 2006 after the
Supreme Court’s ruling in
Hamdan’s challenge.

The government appealed

and a newly established military

review court reinstated the
charges, ruling tribunal judges
at Guantanamo have the
authority to make the designa-
tion.

Critics of the tribunal system
believe that Hamdan would be
better off under a traditional
military court martial. Hina

Shamsi, a lawyer for the Ameri-

can Civil Liberties Union, said
the U.S. would not be able to
use evidence obtained through
coercion and would be more
restricted in the use of secret
evidence and proceedings.
“Weare stuck in a thicket
that was created by the Bush
administration’s entire
approach to detention and trial

of terror suspects,” said Shamsi,

who is observing the Guan-
tanamo proceedings against
Hamdan.

Some of the secrecy was on
display this week ahead of the
hearing. Prosecutors and
defense lawyers were prohibit-

ed from discussing details of the
expected testimony or divulging :









x

A COMBO of two photos showing, left, the Polar bear Knut, at his f

S SS RS 3



ag :






Markus Schreiber/AP

irst public appearance on March 23, 2007, and right, his first birthday in the Berlin Zoo, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2007. -

Knut, Berlin’s famous polar bear was born in the zoo on Dec. 5, 2006, was rejected by his mother but went on to win the hearts of millions across the globe, Knut celebrated, Wednes-
day with a cake and free zoo entry for children.

Berlin Zoo’s polar bear Knut
celebrates his first birthday

@ BERLIN :

BERLIN'S tamous polar bear
Knut, who was rejected by his
mother but went on to win the
hearts of millions across the globe,
celebrated his first. birthday
Wednesday with a cake and free
zoo entry for kids, according to
Associated Press.

The Berlin Zoo pulled out all
the stops to [ete its star attraction,
who has gone from a fluffy white
powderpuff of a cub to a full-grown
polar bear with a cheeky curiosity
and a penchant for muddying his
coat by rolling in the dirt.

"He's so dirty! They should have
given him a bath," said 5-year-old
Leni Schmidt, who came with her
mother and a friend to watch Knut
munch his birthday treat of fresh
fruit, vegetables and rice — topped
with a toy wooden candle.

The zoo estimated that some
2,000 people had visited the birth-
day bear by noon and a steady
stream were still heading toward
his pen, despite the cool weather
and overcast skies.

Yet Knut himself seemed more
interested in playing with his toy
candle and licking the crumbs from
the platter that bore his birthday
treat than the crowd of well-wish-
ers.

The zoo said the Knut craze has

bey) ite)

WHILE

generated up to US$14 million over
the past year through ticket sales
that have more than doubled and
the licensing of Knut toys, books
and other trinkets.

Among fans Wednesday was
Sabine Haelter, wrapped in polar
cub-imprinted scarf, who had tray-
eled from central Germany to be at
the zoo for the event, and Berlin
native Marion Maetzeld — a mem-
ber of the zoo who visits regularly.

"We wish him a huge polar bear
cake and, later a nice lady-bear as a
mate," said Maetzeld, snapping pic-
tures of Knut from her perch on a
boulder.

Weighing just 810 grams (nearly
2 pounds) at birth, Knut has bulked
up to more than 110 kilograms (243
pounds), and in July had to be put
on a diet because of concerns that
treats — like his favorite croissants —
were piling on the pounds.

That means he won't be allowed
a slice of a giant birthday cake
baked in his honor _ made from
300 eggs, 15 kilograms (33 pounds)
each of flour and sugar, as well as
10 kilograms (22 pounds) of marzi-
pan. Slices were sold to onlookers
and will go to the zoo's foundation.

Abandoned at birth, along with
his twin brother, who only survived
a couple of days, Knut first attract-
ed attention when Berlin's media
picked up the story of his main

indoor & outdoor
_* Tree Tops
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caregiver camping out at the zoo
to give the cub his bottle every two
hours.

The story angered animal rights
activists, who tried to sue the zoo
for cruelty to animals by preventing
nature from taking its course when
the cub was rejected — even if it
cost him his life.

By that time, Knut was a 3-
month-old white fur ball, with but-
ton eyes and his own fan club, who
had been photographed dozens of
times - including for the cover of
Vanity Fair — and attracted hun-
dreds of thousands to the zoo.

Now that he is grown, zoo offi-
cials say they do not have room to
keep Knut permanently and are
considering other offers from zoos
in Europe, with an eye to finding
him a mate.

Thomas Doerflein, who raised
Knut by hand, cuddling him and
playing with him in addition to
feeding him from a bottle, told Ger-
many's mass-circulation Bild on
Wednesday, he hoped the bear
would soon find a new home in
another zoo.

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the names of witnesses.

Hartmann, however, defend-
ed the tribunals, noting they
afford the accused such protec-
tions as the right to counsel and
appeal.

“We are proud of the system
that we’ve set up.

“We think it’s really unprece-
dented in the number of rights
that we are providing to these
accused,”

VEGETARIAN

— Mushroo™ . VeceTaBLe

tx SOUP





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007



Israeli troops

peatly to move
into Gaza, says
commander

@ JERUSALEM

ISRAEL'S army has com-
pleted plans for a iarge often-
sive in the Gaza Strip and is
only waiting for government
approval, the military chief
said Wednesday, shortly after
two Palestinian militants were
killed by Israeli tank fire in
the coastal area, according to
Associated Press.

Lt. Gen. Gabi Ashkenazi
said that until he receives the
go-ahead for a broad opera-
tion, Israel would continue
. with its policy of airstrikes
and brief ground incursions
to halt Palestinian rocket
attacks.

“If it is necessary, we are
prepared for the possibility of
action,” Ashkenazi told Army
Radio. “Until then I think it is
our duty to exhaust all other
avenues and to operate every
day and night in order to pro-
vide security.”

Defense Minister Ehud
Barak has repeatedly said that
the time for a widespread
ground invasion of Gaza is
drawing closer. But on Tues-
day, he said now is not the
time for a broad operation,
which would likely result in
heavy casualties to Israeli sol-
diers and Palestinian civilians
in Gaza’s crowded urban
landscape.

In Wednesday’s violence,
Israeli tanks fired shells
‘toward a group of Hamas mil-
itants on the outskirts of the
town of Beit Lahiya in the
northern Gaza Strip after
dawn, Palestinian doctors and
residents said. Two of the
Palestinians were killed and
four wounded, one critically,
the doctors said.

The army confirmed the
strike, saying the militants
were preparing to fire mortar
shells toward southern Israel.

Israel’s attack brings to
about 30 the number of mili-
tants in Gaza that Israel has
killed in the past 10 days.

Israel’s army frequently
launches cross-border attacks
and airstrikes on Gaza mili-
tants, but it has been unable
to stop the rocket fire from
the Hamas-controlled territo-

ry.







BX OSL, argnanistan

A-‘SUICIDE bomber rammed
his explosives-laden car into a
minibus carrying Afghan soldiers
south of Kabul on Wednesday,
killing at least 13 people and
wounding 20 others, officials said,
according to Associated Press.

Meanwhile, Afghan forces
clashed with ‘Taliban who had
blocked a main highway in the
south, killing 10 militants, an offi
cial said.

The Kabul blast happened on
the last day of Defense Secre-
tary Robert Gates’ two-day visil
to Afghanistan, but it was not
immediately clear if he was still in
the country at the time. The ‘Tal-
iban claimed responsibility for
the attack.

The suicide bomber’s car
struck a minibus full of soldiers in

the Chihulsutoon area south of

Kabul, said Aziz Ahmad, an

Afghan army officer at the site of

the blast.

Six soldiers and seven civilians
were killed in the attack, and sev-
en other soldiers were wound-
ed, said Gen. Mohammad Zahir
Azimi, a Defense Ministry
spokesman.

At least 13 civilians also were
wounded in the attack, said
Abdullah Fahim, a spokesman
for the Health Ministry. Fou
children were among those
killed, Fahim said.

Purported Taliban spokesman
Zabiullah Mujaheed claimed
responsibility for the blast in a
text message sent to'an Associ-
ated Press reporter in neighbor
ing Pakistan. Mujaheed identi
fied the bomber as Abdul Rah
man, from eastern Khost
province.

Tie mangled frame of the
minibus lay on the side of the
road as the wounded were
whisked to hospitals.

The blast was third suicide
attack in the city in the last eight
days. It followed a similar attack
Tuesday against a NATO con
voy that wounded 22 civilians.

Mohammad Amin, who runs a
bakery near the blast site, said

Sg

Suicide attacks Afghan
oldiers in bus; at least 13 killed





THE | RIBUNE

Sea oman as







Rafiq Maqbool/AP

AN AFGHAN National Army soldier stands guard near a starnapea bus after a suicide bomber targeted the vehicle, south of Kabul, Afghanistan on Wednes-
day, Dec, 5, 2007. The suicide bomber rammed his explosives-laden car into the minibus carrying Afghan soldiers south of Kabul on Wednesday, killing
at least 13 people and wounding 20, officials and witnesses said.

two of his employees were
wounded by flying glass.

“Every day, this bus stops in
front of my bakery to take
employees of the Defense Min-
istry.” Amin said. “Suddenly
today, a very strong explosion
hit the bus.”

Mohammad Ashraf, 13, was
praying inside a mosque when
the flying shrapnel and glass cut
through his flesh, said his father,
Mohammad Akram.

“My other 8-year-old son was
also wounded in the same
mosque,” Akram said.

There has been a series of

attacks in recent months on bus-
es carrying Afghan security
forces as they commute to work





in the morning.

On Sept. 29, a suicide bomber
blew himself up inside an army
bus in Kabul, killing 28 soldiers
and two civilians. In June, anoth-
er bomb ripped through a bus
carrying police instructors in
Kabul, killing 35 people.

Militants have launched more
than 133 suicide attacks this year
—a record number. At least
6,200 people have died in insur-
gency-related violence in 2007,
also a record, according to an
Associated Press tally of figures
from Afghan and Western offi-
cials.

Suicide attacks frequently tar-
get international and Afghan
security forces, but most of the





en

casualties are civilian passers-by.

Separately, an Afghan army
patrol clashed with Taliban fight-
ers in southern Zabul province’s
Shah Joy district on Wednesday
after the militants set up a check-
point on the main highway link-
ing Kabul to the country’s south,
said Abdul Raziq, a provincial
Afghan army commander.

Ten militants were killed, and
soldiers recovered 12 motorbikes
and weapons from alongside the
bodies, Raziq said.

In Helmand province, U.S.-
led coalition troops killed sever
al Taliban militants during raids
on compounds in Garmser dis-
trict, the coalition said. :

The troops “targeted an indi-

GD

o Freeport and N

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vidual believed to be associated
with weapons smuggling opera-
tions in the province,” it said.
“While performing a search of
one of the compounds. coalition
forces killed severai armed mili-
tants who posed an imminent
threat.”

Also in the south, an explo-
sion stiuck @ patrol of NATO-
led troops on ‘Tuesday, leaving
one soldier dead and two others
wounded, the alliance said.

The soldiers: wounds were not
lite-threatening. the statement
said.

NATO. did not disclose the
nationalities of the dead and
wounded soidiers or the exact
location of the attack.




_








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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 25

THE TRIBUNE
| THURSDAY EVENING
| 7:30

- DECEMBER 6, 2007 |

0:30 |









8:00













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Dexter ‘There's Something About
Harry’ (iTV) Doakes tracks Dexter to
his latest kill. (CC)

au & & DIRTY DANCING
1987, Romance) Jennifer Grey,
atrick Swayze. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)







Ne!

pe

Movie

Q i ’
Or : p
; N
ny
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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





JUDGE PARKER

WHAT ARE YOU
TALKING ABOLIT,
KENH?







I PROMISED
MR. CAESAR THAT
ABBEY AND SAM
WOULD SELL AT
A CERTAIN PRICE!





fl







‘I THOUGHT I
COULD CONVINCE
SAM TO TAKE
THE OFFER!

YOU NEVER TOLD
ME THIS! HOW COULD.
YOU DO THAT?



ITS ALL HERE, EVERYTHING
ERIC NEEDS... ‘



TIM KEPT METICULOUS NOTES:
NAMES, ADDRESSES,
PHONE NUMBERS,
MAPS...






NORAS FEARS RETURN. os








HEY, A STREAK'S
A STREAK!



VVE BEEN PLAVING THESE SAME
NUMBERS FOR TEN YEARS AND
I'VE NEVER EVEN COME CLOSE

Boy, THAT'S
ay SOME















Cg
.
in
Si
LON,
(a3



COMICS PAGE





Contract Bridge
By Steve Becker



Keep Your Eye on the Ball

East dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

A declarer occasionally becomes

It does not matter what South
does on this trick — the damage is

would automatically follow low
from dummy to the opening trick
without giving the matter much

UH-O, HERE COMES MOE,
THE CLASS BULLY!







Okay twinky, let's
have that ball,

NEVER ARGUE WITH
bh SIXNEAR-OLD






. THURSDAY,

friend drops by for a visit.
CANCER - June 22/July 22
It seems you’ve gotten yourself
into another work bind. You just



NORTH already done. His ace of hearts is
@K97 forced out, and, sooner or later, when. D EC 6
Â¥42 South gets around to leading dia- .
#Q1043 monds, East takes the ace and con- | ARIES — March 21/April 20
&A1075 tinues hearts to put the contract down Conceit can get you into trouble, Aries,
WEST EAST one. Declarer winds up losing a dia- } but you seem to ignore all warnings
aj8 #106543 mond, a club and three hearts. this week. A co-worker geis defensive
¥KQ63 ¥10987 : as a result. Money matters seem bleak
; 95 , A8 South can make the contract | — ‘econcile bank Becounts:
EVER FEEL LIKE YOU'RE 39842 hK 3 very easily by taking the ace of clubs | TAURUS — April 21/May 21
IN THE WRONG PLACE . SOUTH at trick one and establishing the dia- J} great opportunity arises on
AT THE WRONG TIME ? AQ2 monds. The most he can then lose | Tuesday, but you may be too busy
VAIS against any distribution of the cards . me a Saat It’s best if you take
| #KI762 is the ace of diamonds and three ee nan ae eta of this
Q6 clubs. GEMINI_ Mav 23/1,
i [ — May 22/June 21
ofield ‘ ; haven’t been feeling your best
} A4|| The bidding: Going up with the ace of clubs at Genin end i K & : Fer
5 . 1
PaaS SP (eS Oy /4| East South West North trick one should not be a hard play to Jp b Pa aero
{ CEPR AT Pass 1 NT Pass 3 NT make, since nine tricks are then cer- aie. andiny eee aes
| P Opening lead — four of clubs. tain. Nevertheless, many declarers
4
r
j

so engrossed with trying to make the
maximum number of tricks in a par-
ticular suit that he loses sight of the
far more important goal of making.

thought. can’t seem to find a place to work
that interests you, Cancer. Keep

- Fi looking; don’ j --
The more cautious declarers 8; don't settle for just any





















DANKE...INE NEED To












Le ke Ae \'LL. SELECT A COMMISSION WAN 16 THE ELL,
GRADED AND Word TE HoLP KERRINGS oN THE ONLY TRING SRE \NAAT West
E Ho MATTER ANP GET BACK To LEARNS FRONN ELE 6




WE CAN GET You
FOCUSED ON YouR
SCRCOLINOCRK

YoU IN SUMMER WITHA A FULL
REFORT THAT WON'T RESOLVE

GAERNNENT



é| Hl
a ee ie

at
TIGER
STRIVE WAS SLOBBERING

ON ONE OF MY COOKIES, SO
T PUT IT BACK IN THE SAR

{ Ag RCP
= pny jo
ees {os



www.kingtealures.com

CRYPTIC PUZZLE |

ACROSS DOWN
9 — Immediately put one, folded, round 1 To make trouble for, puts back the
her (9) chit, folded inside (6,2)
10° Somebody going through agonies, 2 Say nothing about the residue |
sadly, when | abandon (9) allowed to borrow (6,6)
12 Collar some have back to front (4) 3 Birds fight when there are scraps
13 Learn | can, having got inside the about (8)
plant (6) Emphasise in the article sins are
14 Agirl, clumsy, mum, and on the big very wrong (6)
side (7) 5 The turn having been given critical
15 And, while\the duo performed out- acclaim, is exalted (8)

6. Playing and, for a change, beating

side, passed round (6,3) (10)

the contract.







For example, take this deal where

leads a low club against three

notrump. Declarer plays low from
dummy, losing to the king, where-
upon East shifts to the ten of hearts.

TA

The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)

HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY’S TARGET

Good 15; very good 22;
excellent 29 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.



be 17 Hit out the other: the one after (9) : ;
| me =] =«-18 They brief one on paints, for a start 7 Having managed to catch the bus,
iT 7) shut up (7)
‘apg | 19° Decree there should be a hole to 8 Right atthe botiom of the bag moth-
W drain off from (6) ers pecning 0)
Oo : 20 ‘Two bands, a small and a large, slot- = ea ‘a
Ly ted into place (4) 19 Having no match when it comes to
4 =23- Compered “Top of the Pops,” but * at "
/ as iiiatad Gy (a eccentricity? (3)
L Was inated Dy (2) 21 What the jockey called his first job?
g | 25 Realising it’s the song | composed, (8,4)
ea can't include (9) 22 Dram | ordered and | imbibed in
d N 26 Earlier — but not early enough! (4) flight (6)
ey 27. The girl got a litle tipsy on wine (4) | 23 Is critical of how one demolishes,
29 Talked : in a month, retiring; bomb- (5,5) ACROSS 32 Discolours (9) 7 Greek restaurant (7)
0 shell that! (7) ~ * | 24 Using long words and being grandil- 9 Team running event |34 Initial advantage (4,5) | 8 — Slow down (10)
32 Bar ely shifting! (9) oquent? (7,3) (5,4) 35 Encounter unexpect- {11 Senseless (5)
N 34 Permission to proceed, as there's 25 Whip round he will swindle us in (3) 10 Chatty (9) __ edly (3,4) 16 Cinders (6)
| room to manoeuvre (9) _ 28 Control the speed of the glue setting 12° Wooden shoe (4) 36 Bursts out (6) 19 Cricket extra (3)
E 35 Sticking into the gap roughly. Isn't in (8) 13 Bomb hole (6) 37 Public school (4) 21 Not much to look at
tailored for (7) 29 Vacancy for a mountaineer (8) 14 Perform surgery (7) |38 _Insipid (9) (12)
36 That's a laugh, twit! Back scrubber! 30 Are cabinetmakers put upon by 15 Usually (2,7) 39 Recklessly bold per- | Cleaves (6)
(6) them? (8) 17 Hypocrilical (9) son (9) 23 Body of voters (10)
37 Having a drink, love; returned from 31. °E i iers wi Te Short prowl pear BON i
, love; mbarking places for soldiers with (7) 1 Having great value | 24 Foreign country (5,5)
ee vial (4) ; weapons (7) 19 Main circus tent (3,3) (8) 22. Foot digit)
at holds one back when the oth- | 33 Supports when one is not working 20 Atmosphere (4) 2 Without warning 28 Scatter (8)
___ @1 aim to enter? (9) : (5) 23 Slaying power (9) (3,2,1,6) 29 Renegades (8)
39 ‘ : : y
He metes out but goes without him- 34 Those that could be dispersed by 25 Happen, occur (4,5) | 3 Wedding (8) 30 Ensnare, enmesh (8)
Self (9) sun? (6) 26 Sea eagle (4) 4 Middle (6) 31 Trailblazer (7)
27 Feeling of resentment | 5 British money (8) 33 Encircles (5)
(6) 6 Thoroughbred horses | 34 Pursues relentlessly
29 Pricklv plant (7) (10) (6)



— Ss

CRYPTIC SOLU IHiUIND



EASY SOLUTIONS



ACROSS: 4, Salmon 7, Pawnshop 8, Epping 10, Clods 13, Clip 14, Kane 15, Hal's
16, Sty 17, P-air 19, True 21, Companion(-way) 23, Note (Eton) 24, Volt 26, Mod

27 d 29, Olaf 32, Si ; k - , Electric 36, t :
, Lea , Ola Sign 33, Broke 34, Tar-tar 35 ric Cygne Sure 32, Flat 33, Aster 34, Repast 35,

ODOZHHNORO

DOWN: 1, Speck 2, S-woo-N 3, As-k-s 4, Spell 5, La-pp’ 6, Ornate 9, Pistil +1,
Law 12, Dep-O-t 13, Car-a-van 15, Hip 16, Sun 18, Amel-l-a 20, Ro-tor 21, Cod
22, No-d 23, No.-tary 25, Yak (Kay) 28, Egret 30, Lo-I-re 31, Fence 32, Stun 33,
Buck



ACROSS: 4, Thumbs 7, Innuendo 8, Trendy 10, Cache 13, Bees 14, Site 15, Temp
16, Let 17, Lean 19, Apes 21, Spare tyre 23, Pass 24, Fuse 26, Bog 27, Emit 29,

Cashmere 36, Stitch

RGET

would not risk losing the contract in
order to try to gain an extra club trick
or two by following low from
dummy. Rather, they would recog-
nize that the contract was assured if
they put up the ace, and would pro-
ceed accordingly.



or be
Boo a 4B
RES 8 &
g
gZeagP Les
88, dQg0"8
ao Bug ©
z Peecises
9 pheiss
ggh has
gSo © Ome
foes sar
ek&sessheq
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> gegbescs
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ee gEGSee
feesesss




new
word

Sauce to flavor
meat or fish





Viktor Korchnoi v Ilia Smirin,
Pivdenny Bank Cup, Odessa 2007.
The legendary Korchnoi survived
the wartime siege of Leningrad
with the aid of ration books from
dead relatives, fought his way to
the international top, defected from
the Soviet Union, then twice met
Anatoly Karpov for the world
crown. Now, at age 76, he still
competes in top tournaments,
fortified by a caviar-rich diet. Here
as White (to move) Korchnoi is a
pawn ahead, but many players
would prefer Black since the white
army is crammed awkwardly in the
south-east of the chessboard.
Certainly you would expect a long
struggle from such a position, but
Korchnoi had foreseen a clever
trick. Just one move, and Black had
to resign. What happened

thing. Aquarius helps out.

LEO - July 23/August 23
Have you been feeling lonely, Leo? It
might be time to invite over some
friends to help beat the pre-winter
blues. Thursday seems a good day for
a late dinner. Romance could follow!

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

Too many road trips have put wear
on your car, Virgo. You just made
the investment, so take it easy for
a while. Tuesday is a good day for
relaxation — something you need.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ve decided to jump in and
finally get that pesky task done
that’s been haunting you. Good for
you! Wednesday is an uneventful
day, so sleep inandenjoy it. .
SCORPIO + Oct 24/Nov 22

A better mood keeps you lively this
week, Scorpio. When you’re on a
roll no one can match your work
effort, so make sure the boss sees all
of your hard work.
SAGITTARIUS-— Novy 23/Dec 21
It seems you’ve been pondering
Starting a new business, Remember,
being self-employed has’ its benefits
but also several downfalls — con-
sider them carefully. Capricorn is
the one to watch out for this week. _
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
A mip to the doctor has you mending some
of your wild ways, Capricom. Now is not
the time for fun and games, but concenta-
tion On setting a course for your future.
Expect Friday to be very exciting.

AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18

No plans for your birthday,
Aquarius? Why not think creatively
and coordinate a hiking trip with
friends. The countryside looks beauti-
ful snow-covered. Virgo will help.
PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
Have you been waiting for some
good luck to come your way, Pisces? -
Well, this week it just may arrive in
the form of an overdue check. Spend
the money wisely, but have fun.

| CHESS by Leonard Barden



LEONARD BARDEN



Chess: 8486: 1 Ncl! Resigns. White threatens both 2

Rxe8+ and 2 Nxd3. If 1...Rxe1 2 Nxd3! forks queen

and rook so wins at least a bishop

DOWN: i, Discs 2, Enact 3, Here 4, Totem 5, Uses 6, Budges 9, Repays 11, Air 12,
Helps 13, Benefit 15, Tar 16, Lee 18, Easels 20, Press 21, Sag 22, Tut 23,
Potent 25, Ore 28, Match 30, Utter 31, Erred 32, Fast 33, Ache





THE TRIBUNE



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PAGE 28, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007







THE TRIBUNE

Washington and Oregon

residents fight to save
heir homes from muddy
waters after killer storm

@ CHEHALIS, Wash.

THE drenching rains and howl-
ing winds were gone but flood-
ing concerns persisted Wednes-
day, as anxious residents waited
for waters to recede so they could
see what was.left after this week’s
fierce storm, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The storm, which killed at least
seven people as it battered the
Pacific Northwest before moving
on Tuesday, left behind flooded
homes, fallen trees and washed-
out roads, including the region’s
largest highway. On Wednesday,
the storm continued pushing east,
dumping snow across the Mid-
west. .

Some were spending Wednes-
day looking for the lost. In the
Lewis County town of Winlock, a
dive team planned to search nor-
mally tiny Wallers Creek for
Richard Hiatt, 81, believed to
have been swept away when a
bank gave out from underneath
him.

“It happened so quickly,’
daughter-in-law Sharon Hiatt said
Tuesday as searches continued.
“That’s the only possibility, that





RRR I

he fell into the creek.”

In many coastal areas, lights
were slowly coming back on
Wednesday morning, said
Aberdeen police Detective
George J. Kelly, a spokesman at
the Grays Harbor County emer-
gency command center.

Kelly couldn’t provide exact
numbers, but said at least half of
downtown Aberdeen had elec-
tricity and Grays Harbor Com-
munity Hospital no longer had to
rely on emergency generators.
Tens of thousands were without
power in Oregon and Washington
state at the height of the storm.

National Guard troops were
summoned ‘carly Wednesday
morning to help evacuate a 20-
unit trailer park near Elma threat-
ened by the flooding Chehalis
River, Kelly said.

Floodwaters about 90 miles
west of Seattle were also
approaching U.S. Highway 12, a
principal link to the Puget Sound
atea, Kelly said.

As the water started to rise out-
side their Lewis County home,
Terry Roberts moved his cars to

higher ground, shepherded his -

wife and two children into their
RV and hit the road.

They didn’t get far.

“We were on dry road and all
of a sudden, the water started
swirling around,” Roberts said,
standing with his wife in a tem-
porary shelter in Chehalis after
being rescued by a Coast Guard
helicopter. “That’s when we got
on the CB and called for help.”

Roberts, 64, was among the
hundreds who fled their homes
after the storm.

Gov. Chris Gregoire,
toured the ravaged region by heli-
copter Tuesday, touched down at
a high school shelter in Chehalis
and offered encouragement to the
roughly 40 people staying there.

She also ordered a plane to
deliver food and emergency sup-
plies to the high school in Pe Ell,
about 25 miles to the west,
because the roads were blocked
by water.

“It’s hard to comprehend 5- to
10-feet under until you see those
houses,” Gregoire said.

The governor also flew to the

who’

water’s edge on Interstate 5,
which has been shut down since
Monday at Centralia because of
flooding. At one point Tuesday,
officials said a three-mile section
of the road was under as much
as LO feet of water from the surg-
ing Chehalis River.

The interstate, which is the
main north-south route between
Portland, Ore., and Seattle, was
expected to be closed at least
through Thursday.

In Tillamook, Ore., home to
large dairy cattle herds, the smell
of manure was pervasive as shop-
keepers downtown shoveled out
their businesses.

At the Wilson River RV Park,
one vehicle was on its side, and
others were in mud 6 inches to 8
inches deep.

-Ben and Amanda Beal had
moved to a motel with their Wwo
young children when police noti-
fied everyone there to evacuate.
Just as they left the parking lot,
waves swelled over Highway LOI.

“T thought we were going to be
swept away,” said Amanda Beal.
“You could feel the water push-
ing the Blazer. The winds were
blowing at 100 miles S per hour.’

“We just panicked,” Ben Beal
said..

With I-5 closed, state officials
were recommending a lengthy
detour — Interstate 90 across the
Cascade mountains and down
U.S. 97 through central Wash-
ington to the Oregon border —a
route that roughly doubles the
three-hour trip from Seattle to
Portland.

David Dye, Washington state’s
deputy transportation secretary.
said workers were cleaning up
lots of debris — “garbage, tires,
dead.rats everywhere” —- while
they waited for the water to
recede.

On the edge of downtown Cen-
tralia, waist-high water the color
of chocolate milk covered streets
as police used small boats to get
to houses in flooded neighbor-
hoods.

More than 300 people had to
be rescued in Lewis County,
many being plucked off their
rooftops by helicopter. Sheriff
Steve Mansfield said.



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“THURSDAY,



Shopping
WE V ATS

on the
increase

By CARA
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter


























































































@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First Holdings,
the parent of Bahamian gener-.
al insurer Bahamas First, is set
to sell a 20 per cent stake to a
major Canadian insurer, a move
likely to bolster its capital base
by just over $10 million.

The Tribune can reveal that
Bahamas First Holdings is due
to sell around seven million
ordinary shares to The Eco-
nomical Insurance Group,
which bills itself as “one of the
largest property and casualty
insurance companies in Cana-
da”, giving that firm a 20 per
cent stake in the company.

‘Insurance industry sources
told The Tribune that The Eco-
nomical Insurance Group was
set to buy-in to Bahamas First
Holdings at a price of $1.49 per
share, meaning that the total

' price paid is likely tobe around

10.43 million.

Given that this is for a 20 per
cent stake, it would value



SHOPPING plaza devel-
opments in Nassau are on
the increase, particularly in
the western and southern
districts, realtors confirmed
to Tribune Business yester-
day, due to population
growth and an influx of
entrepreneurs into the retail
sector.

Paul Ritchie, of Paul
Ritchie Real Estate, said one
"cannot help but notice the
amount of attractive com-
mercial praperties that have
been developed over the last’

five years”.

“There is," he said, "an
ongoing demand for retail
space, which is being fuelled
by more and more Bahami-
ans setting up shop to cater
to the retail market."

Mr Ritchie added that
areas such as East Shirley
Street and the northern end
of Kemp Road were under-
going a-transformation, with
new and upgraded commer-
cial properties, especially
along the strip of Shirley
Street that runs from the
intersection of Kemp and
Fowler Streets down to the
Mackey Street junction.

He said there was also
phenomenal growth of shop
and retail space along
Carmichael Road, from Blue
Hill Road almost right down
to Bacardi Road.

Mr Ritchie said there will
probably be an accelerated
trend of commercial and res-
idential development in the
western area of New Provi-
dence, especially when indi-
vidual lot owners in gated
subdivisions such as West
Winds, Yuma and Indigo
start to develop their lots.

"All things being equal, I
expect the existing trend of
growth in the housing and
commercial sectors to con-

SEE page 10



Bahamas First Holdings at





By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LAWSUIT has been fied
against the British Colonial
Hilton’s holding company and
the resort’s two major share-
holders over the multi-million
dollar marina/resort develop-
ment that was supposed to be
constructed on land adjacent to
the resort, a move that could
impact plans to revitalise a key
part of downtown Nassau.

-New York-based Island
Global Yachting (IGY) has ini-
tiated legal action in New York
against the British Colonial
Development Company, and its
_ two major shareholders, Adu-
rion Investment Management, a
“boutique Swiss/UK investment
house, and the Canadian Com-
mercial Workers Industry Pen-
sion Plan (CCWIPP), after its
attempts to bring the project to
fruition collapsed amid acrimo-
ny and fingerpointing by both
sides.




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Agent: David Lunn; Tel: 242.396.0015; Fax: 242.396.0010;
Email: dlunn@bahamasrealty.bs; Web: www.bahamasrealty.bs

DECEMBER

~

2007

Bahamas First
stake to Cana

The Economical Insurance Group

to buy-in to Bahamian general

insurer, with sources saying seven
million share deal valued at $1.49
per share and worth $10.43m



around $52.15 million.
Details on the deal were
being announced to Bahamas
First shareholders at an Extra-
ordinary General Meeting
(EGM) yesterday evening as
The Tribune went to press.
When contacted yesterday by
The Tribune, Ian Fair, Bahamas
First Holdings’ chairman, said
of The Economical Insurance
Group deal: “We have an
Extraordinary General Meet-
ing with our shareholders this
evening. We will withhold com-
ment until we have communi-
cated with our shareholders.”

Also named as defendants in
the lawsuit are understood to
be Adurion’s parent company
and Allen & Company, the
Florida-based firm that has
been acting as a broker for

-CCWIPP in its efforts to sell its



& ant" stn



Rules: Gift cards



Come in to any Bank of Th

The EGM, previously
revealed by The Tribune, was
called to seek shareholder
approval for. Bahamas First
Holdings to amend its Memo-
randum of Association, allowing
it to increase its authorised

share capital from $5.35 million |

to $5.4 million through the cre-
ation of another five.million
common shares with par value
of $0.01 per share.
Shareholders were also being
asked to approve amendments
to Bahamas First’s Articles of
Association as a result of the
increase in share capital.



Hilton ord ject
embroiled i in lawsuit

Bahamas-based assets, namely
the British Colonial Hilton and
the South Ocean Golf & Beach
Resort.

Sources close to the situation

SEE page 12



Money Safe.
Money Fast.

MoneyGram.

fietasmeativoessal Meneney Teenvexfier

a

®@ Bank of The Bahamas

sells



INTERNATIONAL ¥

Qaatinre oot:

RankBaharmsOniinecor

20%

ian firm

lan Fair

Bahamas First Holdings cur-
rently has an authorised share
capital of 35 million common
shares, but only 28,785,572 mil-
lion have been fully issued to
shareholders.

This means that the remain-
der are likely to be issued to
The Economical Insurance
Group, along with a small por-




m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor


















TRADE unions are “dia-
metrically opposed” to using
biometric fingerprints. as a
means of recognising
Bahamian employees when
they ‘clock in and out’ of
work, a labour leader told
The Tribune, due to uncer-
tainty over whether the data
collected could be used for
other purposes. ~

Obie Ferguson, attorney
and Trades Union Congress
(TUC) president, said: “We
are diametrically opposed to
fingerprinting ‘because we
are not certain that the fin-
gerprint is for the purpose
they say it is for.
“With technology being



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tion of the five million. shares
likely to have been created at |
last night’s EGM. Some 4.214
million shares will be left in the
company’s Treasury.
Insurance industry sources
suggested that a substantial pro-
portion of the proceeds from
The Economical Insurance
Group’s buy-in would be used
to repay a $6 million loan that

Bahamas First Holdings
obtained from Bank of Butter-
field in 2006.

That loan was used to bolster
Bahamas First’s capital base,
after the international insurance
credit rating agency, A.M. Best,
had expressed concerns that the

' company’s premium growth was

outpacing its capital.

Still, Bahamas First’s capital
base is likely to receive a wel-
come $4.43 million boost. Cap-
ital is critical for insurance com-
panies, as possessing more of it
means they can write more new .
premium business, take on addi-

SEE page 10



what it is today, that infor-
mation can be transmitted
all over the world in a mat-
ter of seconds.

“Technology can be made
to say what you want it to
say, and achieve what you
want it to achieve. We are

SEE page nine



2007, Certain Restr





PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Minister to head | a Ab a ;
Business Outlook

‘THE minister
of state for
finance, Zhivar-
go Laing, will
deliver the
keynote address
at next year’s
Bahamas Busi-
ness Outlook

| conference,
| scheduled for January 9, 2008.
| The conference, to be held
under the theme, Improving
Competitiveness for Region-
| al Leadership, provides a plat-
| form to engage more Bahami-
| ans in how they and the
| Bahamas can become leaders
| in all facets of business
| throughout the Caribbean.
| The Counsellors’ president,
| and Bahamas Business Out-
| look executive director, Joan
Albury, said in statement:
| “Over the years, New Provi-
| dence and the Family Islands
have been the benefactors of
much foreign investment.
This seminar is about dis-
cussing how Bahamians can
capitalise on this fact while
on the road to becoming the
| leader in the region in the
| . areas of commerce, education
| health.”
| Other.speakers include
| Minister of Education, Youth,
Sports and Culture, Carl



Bethel; the director-general

in the Ministry of Tourism, |

Vernice Walkine; secretary-
general in the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation, Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace;
Simon Townsend, partner at
KPMG, chairman of the

Bahamas Medical Council,

Dr Duane Sands; managing
partner of Albany, Christo-
pher Anand; chairman of the
Nassau Tourism and Devel-

opment Board, Charles |

Klonaris; chief executive of
the Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company, Craig Rich-
mond; Rhodes Scholar,
Desiree Cox M.D, Ph.D: and
President of the Bahamas

Chamber of Commerce, |

Dionisio D’ Aguilar.
The Counsellors Ltd, which

hosted the first Bahamas |

Business Outlook in 1991,
expanded the franchise to

‘Grand Bahama in 1997.
The agency has since host-_|

ed four conferences in Abaco,

and introduced Exuma Busi- |

ness Outlook in George
Town last year. Since its

inception, the conference has _ |
made history in bringing to |
the forefront vital issues |

affecting the economic growth
and development of the
Bahamas.

‘Simon, executive director of the



ATTENDEES (top) such as Philip

Bahamas Chamber of Commerce;
Charles Sands, underwriting man-
ager.at Summit Insurance; Sophia
Sturrup-Walker, IT Manager at Col-
ina Imperial; and Troy d’Arville,
president of Furniture Plus listen
intently at Providence Technology
Group’s Executive Technology Day

SHOWN (right) at Providence Tech-
nology Group’s Executive Tech-
nology Day are Microsoft's Juan
Carlos Meija and Ricardo Vallecillo
demonstrating the Unified Com-
munications platform.



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| British Colonial Hilton |






New technology
solutions unveiled
to Bahamians

“PROVIDENCE Technology
Group, the Bahamian IT solu-
tions provider, and Microsoft
held an Executive Technology
Day to present Microsoft’s lat-
est solutions.

One of the key messages
communicated was that com-
panies must adapt to the new
way of working to achieve busi-
ness growth. )People have to be
considered an organisation’s
most important asset.

Microsoft ‘said its new solu-
tions developed and supported
a “people ready business” by
promoting teamwork, enabling
people to work anywhere at any
time, and ensuring staff have
information to make the best

One of the solutions demon-
strated was Microsoft’s Unified
Communications platform.
This combines separate
telecommunications platforms
such as telephony, e-mail and
instant messaging, audio, video
and web conferencing and
voicemail into a unified expe-

_tience - one platform for all
your communication networks _

and devices.

Unified Communications,
Microsoft representatives said,
will give you just one contact
address for all your current con-
tact information: work tele-
phone and fax numbers; home
and work e-mail addresses;
home telephone number; telex

decisions.

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7



rE.

THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 3B



Poe ee ae
Court orders

10,000 security
in constitution
related case

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Court of Appeal has.

ordered a foreign law firm and
its Bahamian attorneys to pay
$10,000 as security for costs,
not the $130,000 originally
required, in a case that raised
constitutional issues.

The court made the order in
relation to an interlocutory
issue where Brian Simms, head
of litigation at the Lennox
Paton law firm, argued that it
was unconstitutional and dis-
criminatory for Bahamian
courts to require litigants to
provide security for costs sim-
ply because they were not
incorporated in this jurisdic-
tion.

Mr Simms was representing
the law firm Michael Wilson &
Partners, which has offices in
the British Virgin Islands and
Kazakhstan, in a case where the
substantive issues relate to the
other party, a Thomas lan Sin-
clair, being given leave to serve
his client outside the jurisdic-
tion of the Bahamas.

In its verdict on the security
for costs issue, the Court of
Appeal noted that the sum of
$130,000 had originally been
set.

It ruled: “We have consid-
ered the arguments on both
sides, and we have decided that
Mr Simms. having accepted the
principle :f security for costs
before the Registrar and, in
fact, having indicated to us that
he had offered to put $10,000 as
additional security, we think
$10,000 is adequate and rea-
sonable. ’

“Woe order that additional
security in the sum of $10,000
be placed before the Registrar
by c2sh or bond, Mr Simms, by
December 31, 2007, as security

For more information, contact Colin Dowe at 1 (473) 444-4680 or visit www.sgu.edu/mba

©2007 St. George’s University

for costs of the appeal.”

Mr Simms had argued that
the requirements of providing
security for costs - a form of
bond.- of the opposing party
upfront would not be asked of a
Bahamian company, and
claimed that the particular
request imposed upon Michael
Wilson & Partners was only a
manoevere to frustrate pro-
ceedings before the courts in
the UK.

The same requirements are
not demanded of Bahamian lit-
igants, he had argued, meaning
that the demand imposed on
foreign participants in Bahami-
an legal actions was unconsti-
tutional and: discriminatory.

Costs

The rationale behind
demanding security for costs
from foreign litigants is that it
acts as a kind of performance
bond, or guarantee, that the
other side’s legal costs will
defrayed if the foreign party
flees the Bahamas.

Mr Simms had alleged that
to even look at the assets of a
foreign company was unconsti-



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

tutional, and to ask about the
laws of the country they were
incorporated in was discrimi-
natory as well.

Michael Scott, of Callenders
and Co, appearing for Mr Sin-
clair, had argued that it was
appropriate to ask for security

for costs given that the assets of

the company in question were
not based in the Bahamas. He
said the key issue was whether
the litigant in question had any
assets in the Bahamas, not
whether it was incorporated
here.

Mr Scott had alleged that
there were six legal actions out-
standing against Michael Wil-
son & Partners, and argued that
in at least one case there was
difficulty in getting a settle-
ment.

The case before the Court of
Appeal relates to a dispute over
shares in an entity listed on the
UK’s Alternative Investment
Market (AIM), which are reg-
istered in the name of a
Bahamian International Busi-
ness Company (IBC).

Michael Wilson & Partners
is alleging that it is the true
owner of these shares through a
partnership arrangement.













THIS IS GLOBAL OPPORTUNITY.

Prime Minister |
Che Kt. Hon. Hubewt A. Ingraham
& Ms. Ingraham

Che Wamen's Assaciation

a




Ystallation of Officers
Ceremony & Luncheon
Under the Gheme:
“Women Betevmined to Succeed”
Sunday, 9th December, 2007
at.2 PM
Sandals Royal: Bahamian Resort
Cable Beach












TO OUR MBA STUDENTS,
THIS IS NOT NUTMEG.

St. George’s University was founded by looking at the
world differently. Our MIB/MBA program was founded
the same way. This program was created for students
interested in applying the international perspective of
St. George’s University toward the global marketplace.
Both the MIB and MBA degrees are designed to be
comprehensive as well as flexible, offering accelerated
and part-time programs. If opportunity is what you seek,
St. George’s University just might be your first step.

St. George’s University

THINK BEYOND



Grenada, West Indies



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007





a

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LONG ISLAND — A $110-
million resort and residential
community for north Long
Island is hoping to obtain plan-
ning approval by next Easter,
with the groundbreaking hap-
pening by autumn 2008.

The British developers of the
proposed Port St. George
investment plan to use available
land in the Stella Maris area for
the construction of the project,

_which will include an 18-hole

signature golf course and a
marina. Construction comple-
tion is scheduled for 2015.

Plans for the development
were outlined to Long Islanders
at a town meeting at the gov-
ernment high school in Simms,
on November 27, 2007.

The proposed developers also
announced plans for another
resort for the Stella Maris area
- Caribbean Heights — which’
together with Port St. George
will open opportunities for hun-
dreds of jobs, both during the
construction and post-construc-
tion phases.

More than 400 persons
attended, and many questions
were asked on issues such as
dredging, road elevation, antiq-
uities, solid waste and the recon-
figuration of the Queen’s High-
way.

Port St George, said: “We are in
the planning stages. We hope

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er.”

He told Long Islanders that
the developers are hoping to
break ground by.autumn 2008.

Keith Bishop, of Islands By
Design, said he had been
engaged to do the Environment
Impact Assessment (EIA), and

. reported that he saw a number

of areas that needed redesign-
ing.

Sidney Collie, minister of
lands and local government,
assured Long Islanders that “no
significant investment” will
come to’these islands without
the Government coming direct-
ly to the people, “and as clearly
and as concisely as possible,

$11 Om proj ect

apprise the people of the pro-
posed investment”.

He added that “before the
first soil is turned and the first
brick is laid, you would know
what is coming to your island
and whether you welcome such
investment”.

Earl Deveaux, minister of
public works and transport, said
the airport at Stella Maris was
undergoing expansion, and
work would soon begin to com-

: plete the terminal building and

meet International Civil Avia-
tion Organisation (ICAO) stan-
dards for international securi-

ty.

He said Long Island will.

shortly have an improved Stella
Maris airport in the north to

accommodate the proposed

development.

Mr Deveaux emphasised that
“it is not likely we will have
enough space in the north for a
7,000-foot runway, but we will
accommodate short-haul air-
craft. In the partnership that we
seek to develop in Long Island,
if you need a longer airport we
will invite you to Deadman’s
Cay”.

The minister said the Gov-
ernment intends to complete
the dock in Long Island.

He added: “It is my duty to
tell you that we have selected a
spot in Long Island we feel
could accommodate the year-

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Ministry of Finance ‘advise the general
public that where persons have received approval
for duty free importation of items as a result of
Tropical Storm Noel, and wish to purchase items
through local suppliers, those individuals may lodge
a copy of the approval with the respective local
supplier.

Any ‘supplier to whom such an approval has been :
lodged may present this approval to Bahamas
Customs when the items are being cleared. The
approval will thereby facilitate the duty free
clearance of the imported items.

Ruth Millar (Mrs.)
Financial secretary

TRUST OFFICER

LEADING TRUST COMPANY is seeking a candidate for the

position of Trust Officer

Responsibilities include:

e Liaising with senior management in the provision of
information/execution of transactions and problem

resolution

Managing all associated risks and escalating as appropriate
Preparing periodic administrative reviews of trusts and

companies

Liaising with Compliance/Business Risk Management,
external auditors and regulators as required to ensure
adherence to all internal policies procedures and regulatory

requirements

Ongoing updating and maintenance of trust administration
system as it relates to account management
Projects as assigned from time to time.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED:
e Bachelors degree in law, business administration,

accounting or related field

Minimum 3-5 years experience in trust and company
administration or related experience
Strong oral and written communication skills

STEP qualification is desirable

Sound knowledge of fundamental trust and company laws
and related administrative practice

Basic knowledge of banking and investment products and
their application in overall management and administration

of wealth

Basic understanding and working knowledge of
accounting concepts and their aplications

Ability to identify potential risk issues and solutions and
to communicate these effectively to senior management
Excellent time management, organization and

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Interested Bahamian candidates should forward a copy of

f ‘ their resume to:
| M AC el N ( 1 Auman Resources
Ji SJ P.O.Box N-10697
yy Nassau, Bahamas or

Fax:(242 2) 325- 0911 or
E-mail:smith@experta.bs





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 5B



targets fall ’08 ground-break

bour. We are looking at the
area where BEC (the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation) cur-
rently is, so we have room for
long-term expansion.

“We will go to bids as soon as
the designs are completed on
that dock.”

Mr Deveaux told Long
Islanders that as a result of the
recent passage of Tropical
Storm Noel, “we have had to
re-prioritise our road infra-
structure”.

He indicated that Long Island
was already high on the sched-
ule for sea walls construction,
repairs to the dock at Simms
and additional infrastructure
works.

He said the Government now

Sidney en



round dockage, the low main-
tenance of the sand movement
and deep water sheltered har-

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ATTY

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Company Administrator needed
Ly work in downtown office:

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

e Associate degree in law or business.

e Must be conversant with all aspects of company
incorporation and administration, including
liquidation and redomiciliation of International
Business Companies

e Excellent written and oral communication skills.

e Computer literate, including a working knowledge
of Lynx 4 Series, Microsoft Word, Excel, Power
Point.

e At least two years work experience with a trust
company or law firm.

Please write to: Company Administrator
P.O. Box N-10697
Nassau, Bahamas
E-mail:smith@experta.bs

ACCOUNTS CLERK

A progressive organization seeks to hire an
Accounts Clerk. The successful candidate
will be responsible for recording various
business transactions and generating
monthly financial etalcrnente and reports for
management.

Qualifications .
Candidate must have at least an associate
degree in accounting with a minimum of five
(5) years experience or a bachelor degree
with a minimum of (3) years experience.
Knowledge of Microsoft Excel and Quick

Books would be an advantage.





Salary range: $16,200 -— $25,000 per Annum.

Qualified and interested applicants should
forward a copy of their curriculum vitae to:-

c/o The Tribune
DA Number 5405
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

All responses should be received by
December 18, 2007.





has before it a list of Family
Island roads “so that we can
make some choices in the sense
that Cat Island, Long Island and
Exuma Had exceptionally high
flooding and unexpected dam-
age to their roads. We had to
shift our priorities around so
that we could accommodate
repairs as a result of the flood-
in

agriculture and marine
resources, who is the MP for
Long Island, said: “I believe
that Port St. George will be
something great for Long

Island. And, based on what I :

have heard over the last few
weeks and the amount of excite-
ment this has generated, I
believe Long Islanders are now
ready to accept Port St.

POU TT SA cl 701
the #1 newspaper in circulation,

just call 322-1986 today!



g.
Larry Cartwright, minister of | George.”

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is the UN’s
global development network, advocating for change and connecting
countries to knowledge, experience and resources to help people build
a better life. We are on the ground in 166 countries, working with
them on their own solutions to global and national development
challenges. As they develop local capacity, they draw on the people
of UNDP and our wide range of partners,





acancy Announcement No: SGP- 2007/ 0001
Deadline For Application: 21 December 2007
National Coordinator

Nassau, BAHAMAS

An attractive compensation package based on qualifications and
experience

One Year, with the possibility of renewal











Organizational Unit GEF-SGP
he Global Environment Facility (GEF), established in 1991, helps developing countries fund
projects and programs that protect the global environment. GEF grants support projects related to
biodiversity, climate change, international waters, land degradation, the ozone layer, and persistent
organic pollutants. The Small Grants Programme (SGP) embodies the very essence of sustainable
development. SGP channels financial and technical support directly to NGOs and CBOs for
activities that conserve and restore the environment http: IIsqp. undp.org. GEF is an the
SGP in The Bahamas.







DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES



e Effective management of the GEF-SGP (Global Environment Facility — Small Grants
Programme) local team, the SGP programme anzd its portfolio -- from programme strategy to
individual project concept and design to technical support to SGP grantees, monitoring and
evaluation -- to ensure compliance with the overall approved global SGP Strategic
Framework, the SGP Operational Guidelines, the SGP annual work programme, the
national environmental and sustainable development priorities, as well as the annual
delivery of the national SGP targets.








e Building strategic partnerships with development partners, such as donors, foundations,
private sector and civil society, to promote SGP and mobilize resources.







e Contribution to GEF-SGP’s efforts to develop effective national, regional and global
networks for technical support and knowledge management, within the GEF SGP and with
external institution, including academia.




The Terms of Reference (TOR) may be viewed at www.jobs.undp.org .
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS






e Advanced university degree in environmental economics, Business Administration or related
field

e Atleast 5 years of relevant experience in development work, which should include
programme management preferably with an extended specialized experience in any of the
GEF-SGP focal areas.

e Excellent analytical and writing skills

e Excellent people management and interpersonal skills

e Ability to communicate effectively

¢ Good negotiation and problem-solving skills

e Proficiency in word-processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications

Fluency in English —



















Send applications including |UNDP/ GEF-SGP National Coordinator
a 5-10 page writing Bahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST) Commission
sample to : Office of the Prime Minister

Nassau Court, P.O. Box CB-10980

Nassau, The Bahamas

via e-mail to registry. jm@undp.org or online at www.jobs.undp.org
This vacancy is open to qualified male and female nationals of the Bahamas.
We thank you for your application but only short listed candidates will be contacted

















PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

INVESTMENT




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LOT No. 21B FRASER ALLOTMENT

OFF SOLDIER ROAD ‘App

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con-sisting of 8,400
square feet
| developed. with a
| split leveled home
with 1925 square
feet of floor area on
| the ground floor, a
porch area of 437
square feet and
second floor area of
735 square feet. The








building is of sound construction and completed in its entirety. The

ground floor comprises 2 bedrooms, one bath, a kitchen, dining and
| family room. The second floor comprises two bedrooms, one bath, living
} and dining areas.

Directions to property: Heading East on Soldier, turn left onto first paved

road opposite Lowes Wholesale, 2nd to last house on the road with

chain linked fence.

Sc ca te
SANDYPORT Appraisal: $300,000.00

All that lot of land having an area of 9,626 square feet, being lot number 40,
of the subdivision known as SandyPort, situate in the Western District of
New Providence. The property is irregular in shape, is on a level grade and
zoned as single family residential. An electrical connection outlet is located
near the property. The property is located on Sandy Port Drive just on the
bend before Governor’s Cay on the Southern Side of the road.



No. 17 WESTRIDGE ESTATES Appraisal: $930,000.00

All that lot of land having an
area of 30000 square feet,
being lot Number 17 of the
subdivision known as
Westridge Estates Addition.
, Situate in the Western District

,on the’ island of New
Providence.
Located on the = subject
* property is a newly
. constructed single story
“\ Structure comprising 6,000



feet of living space with a
. three Car Garage.
The building is 75% completed and comprises five bedrooms, four and a
j half baths. study, living/dining, -family room, kitchen, laundry and
generator room. :
Location: From SuperValue West Bay, take the road heading west into
| Westridge, take the first corner on the Right, Westridge Drive. Subject
property will be about the seventh on the right hand side of the road.

FREEPORT



Apartment 402, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms.
Lot 4, Block GN, Edward Birch Curt, Bahamian North

‘

| GREENING GLADE SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $75,000.00

|, All that piece parcel and lot of land described as lot 7 block 21,
Albacore Drive, Victoria Place and Mid Chipman Road, Unit 2,
Greening Glade Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. The lot

|| contains 20,580 sq. ft. and zoned as multi-family residential.

en

|LOT No. 20, BLOCK 1, UNIT 3
FORTUNE POINT SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $38,000.00

|| All that lot of vacant land having an area of 12,650 sq. ft. being lot No.

20, Block 1 Unit 3 of the Subdivision known and designated as Fortune
Point Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Duplex property zoning with
# rectangle shape. ;







i LINCOL
Unit 5, Block 17, Lot #48 — Single family residence, Clearwater Close.
Located on fresh water canal. Approximately 17,404 sq. ft.





TO VIEW PROPERTIES GO TO
Click ON



raisal: $258,000.00

N GREEN, CANEBY CLOSE Appraisal: $38,500.00



“Real Estate Mall’ Click on

THE TRIBUNE

OPPORTUNITY

FREEPORT

LOT No. 37 BLOCK 33

CHURCHILL COURT, BAHAMIA MARINA

& BAHAMIA 4 SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT,

GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $337,000.00








All that lot of land having an area of 16,533 sq. ft. being lot No. 37
of the subdivision known and designated as Bahami





a Marina and
Bahamia Section 4 Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Located
on this property is a structure comprising a 3 year old duplex
structure which covers approximately (3,058) square feet.
Apartment consisting of two 2-bedrooms, 2-bathroom with private
Jacuzzi in master bath, spacious living and dining room, full service
kitchen, a laundry and utility room, foyer/hallway with linen and
storage closet. The property is fully secured by six foot plastic
coated chain-link fence runs along the side and rear and adjoins the
painted 4 foot wall, with 5 foot pillars at front with electronic gate.

FAMILY ISLANDS

ABACO Appraisal: $108,000.00

PORTION OF MURPHY TOWN CROWN
ALLOTMENT, MURPHY TOWN, ABACO.

elooee _ The property is 89 x 100 ft
and rectangular in shape.















rere barmumrmmpmmmuns

The iand is’ elevated
approximately 15 ft above
road level and



approximately 25 ft above
sea level. Located on this
property is a twenty-year-
old three bedroom, two
bathroom, living, dining,

dry room house. The structure ‘requires much



kitchen and laun
attention.

SOSOKOHROOREE HESS ROSH ORBOREEODE

EXUMA Appraisal: $170,000.00

DUPLEX IN LOT 6625

BAHAMA SOUND No. 8, EAST, EXUMA
“SAA NK Trapezium shaped lot 35
& ft. above sea _tevel

| comprising 10,000 sq. ft.
Situated thereon is a 10-
3 year-old single storey

dupiex, 2 bed, 1 bath,

kitchen, living/dining
area and porch.
(Building is in need of
repairs).

SPSS OHS SSRIS AIOE ROO RVERROeTOORS

EXUMA Appraisal: $673,075.00

CASTELRAG ESTATES, LOTS 129 & 130
EXUMA HARBOUR SUBDIVISION

The subject property is located
on Kingway Road and is
developed with an area of
, 20,000 square feet. Situated
thereon is a_ residence
comprised of 3,645 square feet
‘of living accommodations,
yy: inclusive of 4 bedrooms, 2

_ baths, with laundry and utility
se, SPaces and a two bedroom one
bath guest cottage of 600
square feet. The property is

he highest portion











fenced with white picket fencing and has a Gazebo at t
of the property.





INT
ELEUTHERA ‘Appraisal: $112,105.00

All that piece, parcel or lot of land 2,743 feet East of the junction of the
Palmetto Point road and main Eleuthera Highway containing 2.45 acres.
This site encompasses a 28-year-old single storey concrete structure of
approximately 832 square feet of enclosed floor space inclusive of shop
space and rest room facilities.







www.stopnshopbahamas.com
Doorway “Enter Online Store”



FOR CONDITIONS OF SALE AND ANY OTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

HARRY COLLIE @ 502-3034 - E-

PHILIP WHITE @ 502-3077 - E-mail
6-3851 - send bids to P. O. Box N-7

at hae
$$

mail harry.collie@scotiabank.com
or
Philipwhite@scotiabank.com

518 Rosetta Street, Nassau, Bahamas







THE TRIBUNE

MUST

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 7B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

December 6, 2007
The Tribune

S488



MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES |

(Lot No. 62, Lower. Bogue)
ELEUTHERA

{ All that piece parcel or lot of land and
improvements, in the settlement of Lower
Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 62,
comprising of about 34,210 sq. ft., this site
encompasses a 12 year old single storney home
comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front
room, dining, breakfast room, kitchen and
' laundry room, with a total living area of
’ approximately 2,342.06. Property also includes a double car garage, and front entrance
with a total sq. ft. of approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed.
The property is well landscaped with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.

Appraisal: $235,638.00

This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of
Lower Bogue.



KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

4) Lotno. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single
f| story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living
4 room, dining area, family room, kitchen, study,
laundry and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $188,406.00

’



Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the
left, then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st right, house is second on your right
with garage.



Investment Opportunity Must
Sell Lot No. 217 Pinewood
Gardens Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft,
being Lot No. 217 of the Subdivision known as
Pinewood Gardens, the said subdivision situated
in the Southern District of New Providence
Bahamas. Located on this property is a structure
comprising of an approximately 20 yr old single
family residence consisting of 992 sq. ft of
enclosed living space with 3-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, kitchen, drive way and
walk way. The land is on a grade and level and appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow
the possibility of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.

Appraisal: $127,988.00



Traveling south on East Street to the junction of Soldier Road, make a left at the light then turn
right into Kennedy Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn right then first left then right
again toward Mount Tabor Church building, after passing Mount Tabor take first left (sapodilla blvd),
the subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow trimmed green, with green and
white door.



LOT NO. 1490
GOLDEN
GATES
SECTION 2

All that lot of land having
an area of 6,000 sq. ft.
being lot no. 1490 of the
subdivision known and
designated as Golden Gates, the said subdivision situated in the southwestern district of New
Providence, bahamas. This property is comprised of a 25 yer old single family residence consisting
of approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living,
dining rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level, however the site appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the posibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The
grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is
enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement block wall to the front.

Appraisal: $162,400.00

Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith
Ministries Complex, then first left again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the
6th house left painted green trimmed white.



LOT NO. #7, BOILING
HOLE SUBDIVISION

y All that piece parcel or lot of land and
" inprovements situated on the Island of
Eleuthera, North of Governor’s Harbour,
comprising of Lot No. 7 in the Boiling
Hole Subdivision and comprising of
approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site
encompasses a 17 years old duplex with
ne : each unit consisting of 2-bedrooms; 1
bathroom, frontroom, diningroom and kitchen with a gross floor area of approximately 1,474.20
sq. ft. and covered porch area of approximately 164.70 sq. ft. this duplex was built in
accordance with the plan and specification as approved, and at a standard that was acceptable
to the Ministry Of Public Works. This structure is in good condition. Each apartment could
be rented at $800.00 per month. The land is landscaped and planted with ficus trees, but

needs some manicuring.
APPRAISAL: $153,521.00



Lot No. 3 Yamacraw
Beach Estates

All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq
| ft, being lot no. 3 in Yamacraw Beach Estates,
«| in the said subdivision situated in the: eastern
district of New Providence Bahamas. Located
on the subject property is a single-storey triplex
building comprising of 3 units with two 2-
bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living, dining, kitchen



— apartments unit and one unit being used as a-

barber and beauty salon. the land is on a grade
and level; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of
flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: $313,016.00

Traveling south on Fox Hill Road, go pass Yamacraw Hill Road and Joe Farrington
Road. The subject property is located on the left hand side of Fox Hill road painted white
trimmed brown.





Lot No. 130, St. Andrews
Beach Estates

All that lot of land having an area of 8,100
sq ft, being lot no. 130, of the subdivision
} known and designated as st. andrews beach
| estates, the said subdivision situated in the
eastern district of New Providence,
“},Bahamas. located on the subject property
is a structure comprising of anapproximately
eyr old duplex.

Appraisal: $245,237.00

Traveling east on yamacraw hill road take the third corner right. with sign for st andrews

beach estates, then take first left, then first right, the subject property is the 2nd property

on the left side painted beige trimmed orange.

Lot No. 1056 Pinewood
Gardens Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 5,000
sq ft, being lot no. 1056 of the subdivision
)Â¥ known as Pinewood Gardens, the said
subdivision situated in the southern district
of New providence Bahamas. Located on
+, this property is a structure comprising of
an approximately 10 yr old single family
residence consisting of approximately 1,205
sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms with closets, 2-bathroom, linen closet, living, dining rooms, kitchen and
covered front porch. the land is slightly elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding.
the grounds are fairly kept. ‘

Appraisal: $144,977.00

Traveling south on East Street to Sapodilla Boulevard, turn right at thatch Palm Street,
turn left onto Rosewood Street, the subject property is the second on the right hand
side painted blue trimmed white.



VACANT PROPERTIES



Lot B, Marigold Farm Road Allotment 67

All that lot of vacant land having an area of 1,173 acres and being referred to as the plot

. the property is lot No. B and is situated on Marigvld Farm Road in the area known as

Allotment 67, a subdivision situated in the south eastern district of New Providence Bahamas. This property is zoned multi family.

Appraisal: $146,000.00

Traveling from Joe Farrington Road onto Marigold Farm Road heading south. The subject is th 2nd to last property on the left hand side of the road near the pond.



Rainbow Subdivision

All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 14,052.59 sq. ft. being lot no. 3, block 27,

Lot No. 3, Block 27

section b, of Rainbow Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded about

103.44 ft north by Queens Highway, and 137.02 ft. East and about 99.94, ft south of Rainbow Hill Circle. 139.91 ft West. All utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $37, 440.00



BLACKWOOD, ABACO

All that lot of land having an area of approximately 258,064 sq. ft. This property is yet to reach its highest and best use. It is ideally suited to single or multi-family development as is the nature of
surrounding properties within the community. The site may also serve well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original state. It is covered with low
brush aM broad leaf coppice vegetation intersperse with broad strands of mature Yellow Pine indigenous to the area. The property is well drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under
normal conditions.

APPRAISAL: $219,354.40

The subject property is vacant and is situated at the Southeastern entrance of the Community of Blackwood, Abaco. The property.is undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract



NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)

Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and beunded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses
a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly
of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.

Appraisal: $41,275.00 \

For conditions of sale and other ee ee eta

Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 © email harry.collie@scotiabank.com * Fax 356-3851
To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - Click on “Real Estate Mall” - Click on doorway “Enter Online Store”





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007 ee.
ie Bahamin

Your Bateman = emake ( a
“fa SAVINGS














VALUE

UR NCARE
NCA
_ OSU The Bah C (RD

e &
or . Sour er ya QUALITY STAMPS AT BED, BATH a ey:




OCEANSPRAY
Assorted

JUICES

SY i)
REGULARILITE

MAYONNAISE

QUAKER QUICK \

GRITS"














CHEF-BOYARDEE

SPAGHETTI w/ GREEN MACARONI
MEATBALLS [ici hast) & CHEESE












BLUEBIRD








SMACK RAMEN MAX STAR



JUICES Meenas FOIL
11.5 oz. rn 3 oz. 25 sq. ft.







PILLSBURY

INC Ib a

McVITIES






































MALT TONIC| Ne near hy
12 oz. | ny D caickens FROSTINGS wy
2/5 4 19{ $499 : $479 :
CREAM a/ ASST’ D. REGULAR Pecunia. rRASE |
CRACKERS BB lta BAGS
P ) pe 40 ct
had °2°° Wag 8%
JERGENS { a (Renuzit GENERIC
AIR
sae ish LiauiD giaiaat, BLEACH

$ 5” he



UNE

FRESH NATIVE
ASST’D CUT

U.S. CHOICE

CHUCK
STEAKS

per lib

GRILL MASTER

BEEF
PATTIES

5 Ib box

REAKSTON:, 8 oz. FROSTY ACRE, 4 Ears

OUR CREAM. ser$1-99 CORN-ONCOB. cin 2079

ALAXY SANDWICH, Sliced, 10 oz. GREEN GIANT, Asst’d. Frozen, 16 oz.
HEESEoescssscscssssce- 61649 VEGETABLES ocececsneQ 20.29

JNNY DELGHT, 64 oz. PEPPERIDGE FARM ASST’D, 19 oz
ITRUSPUNCH........$2. 99 LAYER CAKES socorcectensne SDs QQ

BAR-S

JUMBO
MEAT OR CHICKEN

HOT DOG

$459

WHOLE ROTISSERIE

CHICKENS

each

SCARMAYER BAR-S

SLCED MEAT
BACON BOLOGNA

12 oz.

$519 i 29

MRS SMITH

>UMPKIN PIES

IDAHO

BAKING
POTATOES

loose

SWEET

WATERMELONS

Mal

MarR Craae oe pcm eT EE

RVEST FRESH

.ETTUCE

man

ae



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 9B



FROM page one

not sure it is going to do what
they say it is.”

Mr Ferguson told The Tri-
bune that a trade union had
recently questioned a major
Bahamian resort employer on
“when the light flashes, where
does the image of the hand
go? No one explained it with
certainty to us”.

“On the job, we are not
comfortable with that,” Mr
Ferguson said of biometric
fingerprinting.

Bahamian employers,
through, are recommending

- to the Government that the

Employment Act be amend-
ed to provide for biometric
fingerprint recognition of
employees, believing that
“thousands of dollars” per
week were being added on to
company payrolls through
time card and ‘clocking in’
scams.

Currently, the Employment

Act 2001 outlaws the use of
fingerprints by all Bahamian
employers, apart from those
in the casino industry.

It stipulates: “No employer
shall, as a requirement for
employment or continued

Unions ‘opposed’

employment, require any per-
son to furnish a set of his fin-
gerprints or take a lie detector
test.”

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employer’s Confederation’s
(BECon) president, told The
Tribune that the Bahamas
needed to stay abreast of
modern technology, meaning
it had to recognise that bio-
metric fingerprints were
becoming increasingly com-
mon as an employee recogni-
tion tool.

In his presentation to the
TRIFOR conference, Mr Nutt
said: “Advances in technology
have given rise to biometrics
becoming widely used as a
means of recognition, includ-
ing the use of fingerprints. In
fact, there are laptop comput-
ers available today that for
security purposes utilise fin-
gerprint biometrics to recog-
nise persons who are
authorised to use the comput-

“We do not advocate that
fingerprints be used for iden-
tification purposes. Instead
this section of the Act should
acknowledge the need to

keep up with advances in
technology by allowing the
use of fingerprints as a means
of recognition.”

Yet the Joint Labour Move-
ment’s position on biometrics,
which is being discussed at the
bi-weekly TRIFOR meetings
at the Department of Labour,
is: “The Joint Labour Move-
ment is of the view that the
Act should remain [as is]
because any change will result
in employees being subjected
to the rapid advances in tech-
nology and exposed to new
areas to be victimised.”

Yet Bahamian companies
incurred extra costs and
expenses in hiring timekeep-
ers and security guards to
watch employees clock in and
out, Mr Nutt said.

He added there was no dan-
ger of stored records of
employee fingerprints falling
into the wrong hands.

Biometric machines did not
store images of worker fin-
gerprints, instead matching
the shape of their hands, fin-
gers, eye vessels and retinas
to a mathematical algorithm,
rather than storing them.

MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-C comprising 21,430 sq.ft. and situated on the western
side of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft.
northerly of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,
_ North Eleuthera, Bahamas. -

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

SHEET SETS

BED SKIRTS
_ BED SPREADS
~'TABLECLO THS
THROW PILLOWS

SHOWER CURTAINS
“WINDOW CURTAINS
KITCHEN CURTAINS
CHAIR SLIP COVERS

BLENDERS

BAKEWARES
WALL MIRRORS
SINGLE POTS & FRY PANS
CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS
PFALTZGRAFE
DINNERWARE SETS
ANCHOR HOCKING

LADY SANDRA COMFORTER SETS GLASSWARE SETS

SALE STARTS

MONDAY DECEMBER 3RD - SATURDAY DECEMBER 8TH
LOCATED: HARBOUR BAY SHOPPING CENTER

PH: 393-4440 OR 393-4448





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas First sells 20% stake

PUBLIC NOTICE
Intent To Change Name By Deed Poll

The Public is hereby advised that |, Odessa Francis of Faith
Gardens, Nassau, Bahamas, mother of LaShan Chinikue
Deborah Francis also of Faith Gardens, Nassau, Bahamas

intend to change her name to LaShan Chinikue
Deborah Pratt. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO. Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.



- FROM page one

tional risk, and keep a greater
percentage of premium rev-
enues on their books rather
than cede this to reinsurers.
One industry source suggest-
ed that The Economical Insur-
ance Group was likely to obtain
two seats on Bahamas First
Holdings’ Board of Directors,
which apart from Mr Fair also
currently features the compa-

_ny’s president and chief execu-
‘tive, Patrick Ward; Quentin

Chisnall; John Dunkley;
accountant Graham Garner;
attorney Judy Whitehead from

Ree eee ey
~. Cook Wanted

We are looking for a dedicated, hardworking cook to
join our kitchen team. Must have a positive attitude,
excellent customer service skills essential.

Qualifications:

¢ Experience in an industrial kitchen

¢ Certificate in Culinary Arts a plus
* Food-Handlers health certificate

* Police certificate

Excellent benefits

Salary commensurate with experience

Please fax resume to: 302-4787





Apply now to become an



REQUIREMENTS

sistant Director of Sales

Minimum five (5) years in real estate sales
Strong communication skills
Strong leadership and organizational skills
Minimum of 3 years in a management role

Self-motivated

Ability to deal with high net worth clients

Graham, Thompson & Co, and
Robert Inksater.

Some in the industry, though,
queried why Bahamas First
Holdings needed to find a for-
eign partner to inject capital and

take a substantial stake, and.
_why its Bahamian shareholders

had not put in extra funds.

There were also questions on
why the Bahamian sharehold-
ers would want to see their col-
lective stake diluted from 100
per cent to 80 per cent, although
the compensation is likely to be
the setting of a $1.49 per share
price. .

With this deal, only Summit

Insurance - the tied carrier for
Insurance Management - is left
as a general insurance carrier
that is 100 per cent Bahamian-
owned. RoyalStar Assurance is
25 per cent owned by Trinidad’s

Nemwil; Security & General is ©

majority-owned by the Bermu-
da-based Colonial Group; and
Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB), the carrier
through which J. S. Johnson
places its general insurance
business, also has substantial

- foreign ownership through its

parent.
The deal with The Economi-
cal Insurance Group is likely to



RETAIL MANAGER

Market leading, highly successful Restaurant seeks
applications from qualified individuals for position of
Restaurant and Retail Manager .

Sales and performance driven expertise is required,
combined with strong customer service oriented back
grund and successful track record in man-management, is
an essential quality desired.

Salary is commensurate with experience and market
comparable. Further benefits and bonuses provide an
extremely attractive package to the right individual.

Interested persons may apply via email ONLY to:
nassau_gm@hardrock.com.bs

SERVERS, HOSTS, LINE COOKS, CLEANERS,
RETAIL SALES ASSOCIATES

It must suck not working here,
Hard Rock Cafe is hiring people like you who live without
limits and appreciate good music and great food!
Apply in person to the host stand.

No Phone calls please.

Hard Rock Cafe’
Charlotte Street North, |







































- pleted. e *

we Bahamas First access to the
Gnadian company’s products,
Stvices, expertise and back
ofce systems, and give it better
purchasing power with suppli-
ersi}

Te Economical Insurance
Grop, between 1998 and 2004,
douted in size from $700 mil-
lion t $1.9 billion in gross writ-
ten p>mium, its website pro-
Jectinjthat by 2010 it will see
this figre hit $2.5 billion.

A mtual, which means it is
ownedpy policyholders, not
sharehclers, The Economical
Insurane Group is headquar-

tered i. Ontario, with 19°

brancheand 900 independent
brokers éross Canada.

It has sme 2,000 employees,
and focuss on property, com-
mercial ad auto insurance,
with more1an one million pol-
icyholders1 Canada.

Shopping
phzas
on the

inciease
FROM age one

tinue," he adde,

Another realir, who wished
not to be namectold The Tri-
bune that while reir company
has not seen an itrease in retail
plaza developmets, they have
seen an increas in persons

wishing to purchze apartment’

complexes and dulexes.

However they:dded, that
some of their sale have been
fairly large properts that could
be used for comme:jal activity

“What we are seing is per-
sons coming in andvanting to
purchase property tkt they can
live in, and rent out dortion to
assist with the mortgge. What
we do see sometimes ‘that per-
sons are buying largttracts of
land, in multi -zond areaa,
without saying what thy want it
for,” the realtor said, *

She added that in soie cases,
they may then go to te Min-
istry of Works and get uilding
permits for retail zonig, but
that would occur after thinitial
real estate transaction ws.com-
8

AUCTION

SATURD

U.S. EMBASSY

AY, DECEMBER 8TH, 2007

‘SHIPAHOY COMPLEX

(Western Gate)

West Bay Street, opposite Well’s Service Stations

DOORS OPEN FOR INSPECTION

& REGISTRATION

8:30 A.M. - 9:30 A.M.

AUCTION

9:30 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.

Office Furniture, household furniture, Computer
equipment and other Supplies

Construction and miscellaneous supplies

Vehicles

GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED

amteaprem.
we

| Onsite/In-house All sales are final. All items are sold in

“as 1s” condition and there will be no
Refunds or exchanges.

Qualified applicants are asked to
_ contact Nadia Stubbs in the
Human Resources Department - Ext 65842



a.



THE TRIBUNE

ea ee



‘ THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6 2007, PAGE 11B



BUSINESS







‘State Farm asks appeals court to throw out

$1 million punitive aw.id wi Katrina case

A. , f@ NEW ORLEANS the ase and shouldnt have allowed jurors to weigh
‘ we @ oe a dee ACA ae ® ae Sm f vuye!s ha Maye
‘3 | gs STATE Farm Fire and Casualty Co. asked a Hin HAA APs Lp adsl 5 for Stake
: y ‘ federal appeals court Wednesday to that ov! a 4! iS Pasi we LAL jotand told
’ ‘ass j million punitive damage award to 2 Misswsijj) udges Eiclit, J ics Wiewer Jy. and Edith
, . . couple who sued the insurer for refusing to cover Sy Cwm (Asis
Hurvicane Katrina damage to their home. vevor4- vill Malt lawyer for the Broussard
ing to Associated Fress. . ene x Lugs
: . Acthree-judge panei from the Sto 17%. 6 scum Ae a ational and careful
@ 3y wa SIN poo ductivity ‘vas ° sigwiticant expected to slow.to a barely dis-’ |. Court of Appeals heard argumenis fro: ver way, Walkey said.
CRU! SINGER ip viliaminitiai cernible 1.5 per cent or even - both sides of the case, which was ti Seite concluded State Farin acted tit a ae ;

AF ecouomices wittter
WASHING UN (AP)
Work 2. proauctivity roared
ahead ai the fastest vace in four
years 1 ihe suimmic: Wile wage

PYessares : wopped ree
Ch sour Department
sported ¥ Wednesday thai pre-
ductivity. the amouiit of output
per hous ot work, was up at an
annua! vaie of 6.3 per cent in
ihe thirc ycarter, ihe best show-



"C. TeVISIOL:



icrease, veflecting the
at total output was
re "20d aigher.

sior hopes have been ris-
socent days that the Fed
interest rates for the
me since September
officials hold their last
tang of the year next Tues-






Those hopes were bolstered
by comments last week from





hh ago of a 4.9°

less in the curreni quarter.
Growth at such a slow pace
would increase the zisks that the

country couid dip into a reces-:

sion, felled by the multiple
blows of a prolonged housing
slump, a severe credit crunch,
rising energy costs and falter-
ing consumer confidence.

The Bush administration,
seeking to limit the fallout from
the housing bust, has been prod-
ding the mortgage industry to

:. bya jury in Mississippi. The court diai’t i

i ‘Judge j

,punitive damages to the Broussards



hundreds of Katrina insurance laws:



ately rule ov
AC th

State Farm’s appea.. .
lésion of January's ima., 0 0. 7 isict
T. Senter Jr. took part of ihe case ous vi
jurors’ bands and ruled that State Favii was lianic
fox $223,292 in wind damage to the Biloxi home of
Norman and Genevieve Broussard.

The jury subsequently awarded &







dee

a) 5 million in
out Se

ics

i later reduced that amount to $1 million. Blowsa-

ington, Ill.-based State Farm appealed the jury's
verdict.and several of the judge’s ruiiigs
State Farm’s experts concluded tiat Katisin

iy negligent way” by denying the Broussards’ classi
Phe it idye also seid the company denicd px
HOucrs Katrina claims based on a new “avi Fi

é protocol that is “at odds with other expres
s of Uh nasurance contract.”

Siate Farm claims Senter erred when be ruled
the company had to prove that the Broussards
nore didr: sustain any wind damage or that it had

ogregate wind and water damage to the resi

Aeuece,. .

tones, the Sth Circuit’s chief judge, questioned
why Senter didn’t let a jury decide whether Katy
aa s wind or water was responsibie for destrovi if
ine broussards home.



‘ag since the siunmer of 2003 Fed u Bernanke — freeze rates on a portion of the storm surge was responsible for most, 1 ot al) ALL (Siaic Farm) had to prove is that storm ,
ad far bigger than had been = ana V ice Chairman Donaid two million subprime mortgages the damage to the Broussards’ home. Pie conipa Gee Was a cause, and then a jury had to pros

expected. Kohr. Bou men noted that the — tha) are due to reset to higher ny says its policies cover damage from a hurr GW nuem was storm surge and howemuch wa
Meanwhile. wage pressure economy is likely to slow con- | rates over'the next two years. ‘oane’s wind but nofits rising waicr Inelacing wind nod,” Jouce seid while questioning Walker.

stowed with unit labor casts
dropping at a rate of two pe.
sent In the third quarter, ‘ue
opvest decliae im four years.
The combination of stronger
productivity growth and fewei
We age pressures should ease con-
‘as about inflation at the Fed-
: i Reserve and help clear the
way tor another cut in interest



sicicrably in the current quarter
unde: the impact of such prob-
iems as venewed turbulence in
finaicia: markets.

While overall economic
grow’h, as measured by the
gross domestic product, roared
ahead ai a 4.9 per cent rate in
the third quarter, the fastest
pace in four years, GDP is



The rate freeze program,
which is expected to be
announced on Thursday, would
be offered to homeowners who
have been able to keep current
with they monthly payments at
the jower introductory rates but
are judged to be unable to meet

the sharply higher payments

when the raies reset.



driven surge.

State Farm attorney Clarke Holland said Scaici

made “numerous errors” in evaluating evidence i:
ag EH

=cCipm Manager

"The Graduate Project
Management Certification’



Poiniiay
POT e yar tie



Che excharive between Jones and Waiker gicy
fosty, as the judge accused the lawyer of “playin
wilh words.”

hf PK

American Acadenty oi
Project Management




rates next week to guard against
the threat the economy couia
‘uinble imto.a recession.
Rising wages are good fo.
vorkers. But if higher wages
are no! accompanied by strong
productivity gains, they raise
acerns among Fed policy-
jaakers about inflation.
Che 6.3 per cent increase in

Certified International

Project Management Course
A PMP & IAPM Course Inclusive.

Beginning Date: Tuesday, January 3, 2008
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NOTICE

HE CALEDONIA FUND INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

. Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 133 of the .
international Business Companies Act 2000, that the captioned
Company is in dissolution. Dissolution commenced on Decem-
ber 4, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution were registered
by the Registrar. The Liquidator is James B. Gomez of RTA
Consultants Ltd’, P.O. Box SS-6229, 4TH Floor Centerville
House, 2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Total Price: $1390 (including all materials & fees)

Course Length:

A

thm ey Ugh

10 Wks or 10 Saturdays

Person having debts or claims against the Company are required
io send particulars to the Liquidator on or before December
23, 2007. In defauit thereof they will be excluded from the
benefit of as:y distribution made befor such debts are proved.

Time of Class: Tues & one — 6pm-8pin

Saturdays on 9am-lpm i

Contact:

HEE
ne ey uh

Dated December 6. 2007. Candice AbDEy
Lignuin Technologies (banesas, tod
Ph 393-2104 Kay o9a4975

Email candice @tigniumiech. com

JAMES B. GOMEZ
Liquidator



ee





GOVERNMENT NOTICE

OPERATION OF FOOD COURT ON THE PROPERTY OF
THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, YOUTH, SPORTS
AND CULTURE



TEACHERS REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS LIMITED

| NOTICE OF ANNEAL

MEETING TO SHAREHO! DERS
CIME & DATE:
PLACE:

sducation. Youth, Sports and Cuiture invites
endors & au and suibmit proposals for the
Operation and Mainiienance of a Food Court on the Ground Floor in
the Minisivy of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture Building,
Thompson Boulevard.



The Minisiry of
interested persons/ Vv



Friaay, Decemive, 7. 2007 at Ghoa

‘Teachers & Sai: wied Workers ¢

Head Offics, Bast Six

PEralyve & redit Unite
eet & lik AO PCUGe eC Drive
(1) To anhoviice the resi:
declare a quovui

Wwe CAawHNahon ot pronries

ITEMS OF BUSINESS:
: : : n preseiit ane procecu ws DUsthcss:

: CRITERIA FOR SELECTION

(2) To TECEW SS vith rppic tae Maroutes in se yn

The applicant(s)/ vendor should possess, good food preparation and

General Mecting heldon ecensb ‘O06
service skills, a valid Ministry cf Health Food Handlers Certificate and Gy is eecive siden ihe Olsen evenne

be prepared to submit the toliowing:

(4) To receive and approve aie nviectal stateracats and
' : the reports of the Directors and Avaticrs there.
1. A proposal for the daily speiation and management of the
(5) To elect Directors tor the caso) 2 year aud fix thy
tood cour? tactusive of: remuneration
west 39 HLF hee ‘ 4 eS le (6) To approve the appomirne ator Oehore & Fouche as
e Draft Meri Selection inciuding a variety of healthy,. the Auditor of the Company ana aaithortse the Directors
nutritious dishes which will encourage good eating - EER NE Onion e
habits and practices, (7) To trai ch other owsiness ta perty conn
before Whe big and any a yo coal ol

* The foods/dishes offered: should be well balanced
and include a variety of food groups, freshly
prepared aesthetically appealing;

-¢ The selected vendor will be expected to maintain a
“ean, attractive and some environment.

~ Holders of 400.000 shares of Cord at the Close of bustiess

RECORD DATE:
Bet ae on October 25, 2007 aie entitled to vote at the meetiag,
S: The Company's audited tnancial statements are tactuded

in the Conypany s 2006 6 anual report, which is enclosed
sobicdmg os alerial,



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

as part OF THe prory



MAILING DATE: The Company will cause the accompanying materials to
Food receptacles should be suitable and ‘compatible with the fSods be delivered on November 8. 2007 to the last registered
addtess
sold with appropriate tex perature controls to prevent cross a ,
contamination and the possibility of food poisoning. PROXY VOTING: It is important that your shares be represented and yorcd
; , at the meeting. You can vote your shares by appeacinge a
; ; person or by corupleting and returning the proxy torn
Proposals shguld be submitted on or before 31st December, 2007 and enclosed. You can revoke a proxy at any time prior to is
4 Sen, exercise at the meeting by following the tustructions 1a
addressed: the accompanying proxy statement
Permanent Secretary By order of the Board of Directors
Ministry of Education, Youth, Spats & Culture October 9, 2007 el Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Secretary
Thompson Boulevard :
Nassau, The Bahamas



PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Hilton marina project
embroiled in lawsuit

FROM page one

said the defendants vigorously
denied the allegations in IGY’s
lawsuit, which would be
defended, and they were
preparing to file a counter-
claim.

The lawsuit, which was ini-
tially filed in the State Court of
‘New York, was moved to the
Federal Court in New York
about one month ago following
efforts by the defendants’
attorneys. New York was cho-
sen as the jurisdiction where
any disputes over the mari-
na/resort project would be
arbitrated/litigated when the
parties signed the initial agree-
ment for the project.

It is unclear what impact
IGY’s move to litigation will
have on efforts by the British
Colonial Development Com-
pany, Adurion and CCWIPP
to find a new partner to take
over the project, which was
part of the vision held by

Canadian Ron Kelly when he .

acquired the British Colonial
Hilton in the late 1990s.
It is understood that IGY

has not yet attempted to attach »

a lien to the land, and one

source close to the Hilton and

its owners said the lawsuit “will

not affect our ability to go for-
“ward”,

The Tribune was told that
the resort and its owners were
now talking to Camper &
Nicholson about taking on the
project and the five-to-six acre
site just to the west of the
British Colonial Hilton, which
is being valued at between $20-
$30 million.

IGY’s decision to withdraw
from the project is also a set-
back to efforts to revitalise
downtown Nassau and West
Bay Street, a project that was
started by the previous admin-
istration administration and
seems likely to be taken on,-.in
some form - by the Ingraham

government.

Vincent Peet, the former
minister of financial services
and investments in the Christie
government, said yesterday of
the IGY project: “We thought

that any investment we had in .

train was good for the coun-
try, so we'd like to see them
proceed.”

Acknowledging that he did
not have all the facts relating
to the IGY project’s status, Mr
Peet said: “Once in litigation,
any Government would have
to await the outcome, and we’d
certainly like to see it
resolved.”

He added: “It was a very
progressive project, and would
have done a lot for the coun-
try. It was an integral part, a
critical part, of helping us
develop west of the Hilton.

“Tt would have done a lot to
help bring life and business to
downtown..... It would have
been an expansion of the
Hilton project, and brought a
new sense of life and excite-
ment to downtown, both to
help employment and the
tourism industry.”

Mr Peet said: “Any. new gov-
ernment should move, as
we’ve said for quite a while,
on projects that were left in
train that could benefit the
Bahamian economy and peo-

‘ple. This government has not

done that, and the country has
suffered.”

Most of the negotiations on
the IGY project took place
when the Christie government
was in office, and a major fac-
tor in its failure may have been
that the parties took too long
to close the deal.

Talks were ongoing for
almost three years, The Tri-
bune understands, and the ini-
tial contract allowed both sides
to walk away from the deal if it
was not concluded within two
years - an. option that Adurion,

: CC@WIPP, and the Hilton ulti-

mately exercised. :;;
Dies bed &

SOM

There is a time when all
deals are ‘hot’, but if the two
parties do not consummate the
transaction then, it often goes
cold. Despite numerous meet-
ings and conference calls

between IGY and Adurion .

executives, they were not able
to agree ‘terms on a new deal.

The Tribune reported earli-
er this year how the Canadian
Commercial Workers Industry
Pension Plan (CCWIPP) sold a
majority stake in the British
Colonial Hilton’s holding com-
pany to Adurion Investment
Management, a boutique
Swiss/UK investment house.

Adurion itself has made a
more-than $30 million invest-
ment commitment to revitalise
the hotel, including a $15 mil-
lion refurbishment pro-
gramme, after taking control
of the British Colonial Devel-
opment Company from its
Canadian pension fund part-
ner.

The IGY project had
‘approval in principle’ from the
Government before the Adu-
rion purchase was closed.
IGY’s chairman and chief
executive, Andrew Farkas,
previously told The Tribune
that the project ran into trou-
ble after Adurion allegedly
tried to alter the terms of the
original deal. | ;

He said then: “Right now,
it’s in limbo because Adurion
and the pension fund who own
the property, and have a joint
venture deal with IGY, decid-
ed they wanted to change the
deal.”....

“The Government had
approved everything, and our
deal with the pension fund was
fine. Everything was in great
shape, but then three weeks
later the pension fund decided
to take on a new partner....”

It was suggested that the

blame for the deal’s collapse.

should not be laid at either
party’s door. There was a sug-

gestion that Adurion became’

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concerned when IGY left it,

late to supply it with financial
projections and details on a
project that would be happen-
ing next door to its latest mul-
ti-million dollar investment, as
it needed to know what poten-
tial impact there might be.

In addition, Adurion was
also said to have been uncom-
fortable with the price IGY
was paying under the original
contract to acquire the land it
needed from the British Colo-
nial Development Company,
and wanted to increase it —
something Mr Farkas had pre-
viously confirmed.

Adurion is also said to have
wanted to play a more active
role in the marina project, par-
ticipating as a co-investor in

the project, while there were

concerns about IGY’s initial

designs for the marina, with
docks and jetties encroaching
on to Crown Land and the
Hilton’s beach area.

The former Government
was concerned that [GY’s ini-
tial project design might limit
Bahamian access to the beach
at the Western Esplanade, and
block views of the harbour and
lighthouse.

This was eventually resolved
after the Government agreed
to lease a portion of the seabed
to IGY, but the delay further
extended the negotiations.

An: economic impact study
predicted that the IGY project
would generate “very substan-
tial employment”, creating 700
direct full-time jobs and anoth-
er 400 indirect permanent jobs
for Bahamians. The indirect
jobs would have been created

at suppliers of goods and ser-
vices to the development, and

through services provided to

yachts.
The study also forecast that

the IGY development would

create 200-250 full-time jobs.
during construction, and have
a total economic impact of
$222.8 million over a 20-year
period.

IGY’s proposed marina on
West Bay Street would have
had 72 slips, catering chiefly
to the larger yachts and ves- |
sels, those of between
100-150 feet to 200 feet and
longer.

The development would.
have featured a boutique hotel
of about 150-200 rooms, sev-
eral restaurants, retail and a
parking structure for over 300
cars.

MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-B comprising 22,376 sq.ft. and situated on the
western side of the main eleuthera highway and
approximately 2,219 ft. northerly of four-for-nothing road
in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

North Eleuthera Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

-, The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
“ue Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-G comprising 18,926 sq.ft. and situated on the western
side of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft.
northerly of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower
Bogue, North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas



MUST SELL
VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-E comprising 16,521 sq.ft. and situated on the western side
of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft. northerly
of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s Office

TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY

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P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 13B



aa
Flood damage costs_ Peete ey
United States $4m daily

m@ By ANDREA JAMES
c.2007 Seattle Post-
Intelligencer
SEATTLE -- The storm that

hit Puget Sound on Monday is

having a devastating effect on
commerce after swamping

Interstate 5, the main artery that

connects Seattle to Portland,

and burying in mud several rail

connections north and south of

Seattle.

The impact and closures
could last for days and into the
weekend, according to Wash-
ington’s Department of Trans-
portation.

Hundreds of trucks waited
Tuesday on either side of a 20-
mile stretch of I-5, between
mileposts 68 and 89, while parts
of the highway sat under 10 feet
of water. The highway could be
closed until at least Thursday --
fonger if the roads and bridges
are found damaged after the

iouoding recedes.

About 54,000 vehicles tra-
verse that portion of the high-
way daily, and 10,000 of those
are trucks. The I-5 delays alone
are expected to cost businesses
$4 million a day, the Trans-
portation Department esti-
mates.

The effect on commuters
could be the least of the prob-
lems; road closures are making
it difficult to deliver emergency
supplies and groceries to the
flooded areas, said department
spokesman Stan Suchan.

The department also is con-
cerned about the effect on busi-
ness. “We know that a lot of
companies are using just-in-time

delivery so that they don’t have ,

a huge stock sitting in the back
of their store,“ he said. “They
rely on the trucks on the free-
way to keep them in business.”

To compensate for the block-
age, Horizon Air has added
larger planes to four of its daily

flights between Seattle and’

Portland to handle more pas-
sengers. The airline said it has
seen increased demand for the
‘shuttle flights it operates every
half-hour.

The, latest. I-5 mess also
appears to be doing wonders
for Horizon’s fly-above-it-all-



themed marketing campaign,
the company reported.

Rail blocked

The Burlington Northern
Santa Fe Railway was operating
at 60 percent capacity at midday
Tuesday. Railroad crews strug-
gled the day before, replacing
tracks, clearing mud, picking up
trees and filling in sinkholes.as
they formed.

A. 50-foot section of the track
between Mukilteo and Everett
was washed away Monday, but
crews repaired it by midnight,
said Gus Melonas, spokesman
for BNSF.

“We’ve had crews working
around the clock removing
debris,“ Melonas said.

Problems ‘still exist in Cen-
tralia, where high water is
threatening more than two
miles of the mainline track, he
said. Crews waited Tuesday

afternoon for the water to sub-

side while some freight traffic
was rerouted inland.

“We're positioning trains and
preparing crews to begin oper-
ation on this line as soon as con-
ditions improve,” he said.

Amtrak, which runs on the
BNSF line, canceled its Cas-
cades service and portions of its
Coast Starlight service, leaving
no passenger rail connection
between Seattle and Portland.
That cancellation was expected
to continue until at least 4 p.m.

_ Wednesday, Melonas said.

Mudslides also forced Sound
Transit to . cancel its
Everett/Seattle service for Tues-
day and Wednesday.

Union Pacific, the second
major rail company operating
in the Puget-Sound region, has

.17 trains waiting to travel on

the BNSF track that is out, a
spokeswoman said. That trans-

lates to at least 1,360 carloads of

goods including grain and ship-
ping containers.

Trucks stopped

With hundreds of trucks
backed, up, the Transportation
Department has had to give cer-
tain goods priority. For exam-
ple, Suchan said, the depart-
ment is working with the Wash-
ington State Patrol and local

communities to get emergency
supplies to hospitals in greater
Seattle via alternative: routes.

U.S. 12 offers the shortest
detour, but “we can’t allow all
those trucks through or we’ll
have gridlock,“ Suchan said.

Meanwhile, the recommend-
ed detour that sends trucks
through the Tri-Cities is “bru-
tal,” Suchan said. It turns what
would normally be a 170-mile
trip into a 440-mile one. Other
detours route trucks through
winding mountain roads, and if
bad weather rolls in, the truck-
ers could get stuck.

So, truckers are left doing the
one thing they can do: “They’re
sitting here,“ said Shari Skin-
ner, a cashier at'Gee Cee’s
Truck Stop near Toledo, at exit
57 on I-5.

“We are packed,” she said.
“They come in, they get coffee,
stand around, talk to each other,
get something to eat.“

Truckers who’ve asked for
alternative routes were dis-

mayed to learn that there ©

weren’t many, she said.

Lines of trucks also sat wait-
ing in the Chehalis area at Eagle
Truck Plaza, at exit 71 just south
of the flooding, said cashier
Rebecca Mullis.

“There’s lots of trucks out in
front of my store, all the way
from the freeway up,” Mullis
said. “Nobody’s getting through,
they’ve been sitting here since
yesterday morning.“

Independent truck driver
Floyd Chase delivers building
materials and shipping contain-
ers between Seattle and Port-
land. He waited around at the
exit 71 stop on Tuesday.

“We tried to go through Jack-
son Highway to get through to
the other side of Centralia to
get to Seattle, but we couldn’t
do it, so everybody’s stranded
here,” he said. Chase estimates
that he’s losing $500 a day wait-
ing for the highways to reopen.

“I’m independent -- I’m
responsible for the whole thing,
the good and the bad,“ he said.
“It’s a matter of just sitting and
waiting now, unless you want
to go 400 miles out of your way,
but at $3.50 a gallon, it’s not
going to pay off.”

NDEPENDENT
SALES
PERSONS

EEDED!

e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your

income.

© You are limited only to

_-your potential

e Flexible hours available

e Excellent commissions
and benefits

+ Mt MN emt km ae

¢ Must have a proven track record in sales |

Professional appearance a must

Must have reliable transportation ;
Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
Excellent written and communication skills.

Apply in writing to
Sales Representatives

Box PM-1

C/O The Nassau Guardian

P.O. Box N-3011

Nassau
Bahamas

RBC



RBC]

Royal Bank
_of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each propery:

HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS.

(401) Lots#17 & #18 Crown Allot-
ments, Love Hill Settlement,
Andros. Containing a two sto-
rey residence. Appraised value
$100,000.

(806) Lots#1 & #2, Block 3 witha
parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a4 bedroom
condominium - Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised value
$750,000. ©

(806) Lot#13, Block#4 of Coral
Waterways, Section One, Coral
Harbour, N.P. with two houses
and a swimming pool, #312 New
Providence bounded northwardly
by a canal or waterway of the said
Subdivision known as Flamingo
waterway and running 102.004 ft
eastwardly by lot #14 and 146.145
ft southwardly by a reservation for
a private road. Appraised value
$530,000.

(433) Lot#27 of Village Allotment
#14 in the Eastern District, con-
taining residence situated on
Denver Street off Parkgate Road
in the Ann’s Town Constituency,
New Providence. Property size
2,500 sqft Building size 990 sq ft
Appraised value $50,000.

(304) Lot#2,. Block#8, Steward
Rd, Coral Heights East Sub-
division situated in Western
District of New Providence -approx
size 8,800 sq ft with a split level
containing 2 bed, 2 bath, living,
dining & family rooms, kitchen
and utility room. Approx size of
building 2,658 sqft. Appraised
value: $322,752.

(902) Lot#14, Block#23 (125ft
x 80ft) situated Rainbow Bay,
Eleuthera containing a one
storey house with 2 bed,
1 bath, kitchen, living room and
2 linen closets. Appraised value
$89,998.

(902) Lot of land 94 x 94x 150 x
150 on Queens Highway just south
of Palmetto Point with a two sto-
rey stone building containing two
apartments. Each unit has 3 bed,
2 1/2 bath, kitchen, living room
and 3 linen closets. Appraised
value $287,209.

(100) Developed property
Pinder's, Long Island containing
a split level Mediterranean style
home with kitchen, living room,
dining room, master bed and
-bath, two guest rooms, full and
half guest bathroom on lower

(601) Vacant lot # 1 Hamster Road ;

off Carmichael Road 5969 sqft.
Appraised value $54,000.

(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleu-
thera Island Shores, Seaside Drive
Section B, Block #15, Eleuthera,
Bahamas. 9,691 sqft. Appraised
value $21,805.

(902) 0.281 acre of vacant land off
Queen's Highway in the settlement
of Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera.
Appraised value $31,320.

(800). Vacant. property located
Bahamia South. Block 16 lot 9A,
Freeport, Grand Bahama consist-
“ing of 24,829. 20sqft. Appraised value
$52,000

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sq.
ft.) situated in Mango Lane Sec-
tion “B” Block #15, Eleuthera Island
Shores on the Island of Eleuthera.
Appraised value $25,665.

(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivi-
sion. Grand Bahama, 18750 sqft.
Appraised value: TBA

COMMERCIAL

BANKING CENTRE

Tel: 242-356-8568,

(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
(802) Mr. Brian Knowles
(805) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(806) Mrs Lois Hollis

(807) Mr. Wayne Kendall
(808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
PALMDALE SHOPPING
CENTRE BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-4426/9

or 242-302-3800

(201) Ms. Nicola Walker
(202) Mr. Frank Dean
(203) Mrs. Cedricka Clarke
NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT

Tel: 242-377-7179

(433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR,
ELEUTHERA

Tel: 242-332-2856/8

(902) Mr. Brian Hanna
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel: 242-333-2230

(901) Ms. Velderine Laroda



level. Also garage and breezeway -

—a gross area 4,212 sqft. Kitchen-
ette, master bedroom and bath
and front entry porch features the
upper level, gross area of 780 sqft.
Porches all around the concrete
structure which is 90% complete.
Appraised value $650,000.

(400) Property situated in Cala-
bash Bay on the Island of Andros.
75 ft x 150 ft and containing ther-
eon a small grocery store 480 sqft
and an incomplete 3 bed 2 bath
house.900 sqft. Appraised value
$65,000.

(702) Lot#20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights, N.P.
Appraised value $280,000. -

(400) Lot #14 situated in the set-
tlement of Love Hill on the Island:
of Andros totaling 20,000 sqft.
Property contains a two storey
5 bed, 3 bath residence. Appraised
value $185,000.

(902) Lot containing 3 bed, 2
bath residence situated in the
settlement of Governor's . Har-
bour bounded northwardly by a
19ft road and running thereon
50ft eastwardly and running
thereon 100ft southwardly and
50 ft westwardly. Appraised value
$90,000.

(902) Lot (8,000 sqft) situated
Sand’s Alley, North Palmetto
Point with incomplete triplex (con-
crete structure — belt course 2,529.6
sqft). Appraised value $49,414.

(105) Lot containing two storey
building. with 3 bed, 2 1/2 bath
residence, and 30 ftx 86 ft situated
Bailey Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value $235,000.

(203) Lot B situated on the
north side of Shell Fish Road,
being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster
Road with a one half duplex
residential premises. BEDI
value TBA.

(701) Lot#16. in Block #16
in Section 3 of the Subdivi-
sion called and known as Sea
Breeze Estates situated in
the Eastern’ District of New
Providence. Property © con-
tains a 3 bed, 2 bath residence.
Appraised value TBA.

(701) Lot of land being #11
in Block#10 on a plan of
allotments laid out by Village
Estates Limited and filed in

VACANT PROPERTIES

(402) Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen Drive,
Bahamia West Replat Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12,100 sqft. Appraised value
$51,000.

(902) Lot #46, Block #32, Baha-
mia. Section 1X Freeport, Grand
Bahama 90 ft wide along Stratford
Way and 150 ft along Stratford Court.
Appraised value $26,000.

(723) Vacant lot #20 comprising a
portion of the Murphy Town Crown
Allotment #72 situated in Murphy
Town, Abaco Bahamas.
Appraised value $18,000.00

(724) ‘Vacant lot # 67A of Section 2
of the said Subdivision known as
“Whale Point Estates” in the vicinity
of Bottom Harbour and extending
from Whale Point to Cotton Hole in
the Northern section of the Island
of Eleuthera. Appraised value
$36,000

(724) Vacant lot #595, Jacaranda
Street, Pinewood Gardens, New
Providence. Property size 5,000

OFFICERS ©
ANDROS TOWN
Tel: 242-368-2071
(400) Mrs. Rose, Bethel
NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-8700
(701) Mrs. Stephanie Saunders
(702) Ms. Cherelle Martinbor-
ough
(703) Mrs. Renae Walkine
JEK DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711
(401) Mr. James Strachan
(402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES
SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8
(501) Mr. Keith Lloyd
(505) Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH
Tel: 242-327-6077
(466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420
(908) Mr. Antonio Eyma ~
(909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
(910) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel: 242-347-3031
(105) Mr. Kermit Curry



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‘the Dept of Land & Surveys
as #142 N.P. and situated in the
Eastern District of New Provi-
dence. Property contains 3 bed,
2 bath residence. Appraised
value TBA.

(565) Lot#1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Sub situated in the
Southwestern District of the island
of New Providence containing a
single storey private residence
3 bed, 2 bath. Property approx
size 6,000 sq ft. Building approx
size 2,400 sq ft. Appraised value
$173,176.

(902) Lot of land containing res-
idence in North Palmetto Point
Eleuthera. Appraised value: TBA

(902) Lot of land containing a 2
storey 7 bed/2 bath single fam-
ily residence (2,234squarefeet)
located of Queens Highway in
Tarpum Bay Eleuthera. Appraised
value $77,000.

(902) Lot#31 situated at the
intersection of Albert & Victoria
Streets in Hatchet Bay contain-
ing a 2 storey concrete building
with an incomplete 2bed 1 bath
apt and store downstairs. Prop-
erty approx 2250 sqft. Appraised
value $65,000.

(902) Lot containing commer-
cial building housing a sports
bar, restaurant and a 2 storey
commercial building on Queens
Highway Tarptum Bay Eleuthera.
Value $180,000.

(808) .Lot # 3 Block 24 in the
Centreville Subdivision . Build-
ing #109/Eastern side of Collins
Avenue . Comprising commercial
2,800 sq feet commercial building.
Appraised value $382,000

(108) Single Family Lot #5 Block
#5 Unit #1 Devonshire. ae
value TBA

(902) Lot #17 Block 7 in section “A”
of Eleuthera Island Shores Subdi-
vision Northwest of Hatchet Bay
containing a 3 bed/2 bath house.
Appraised value $99,000.00

(601) Lot #17 located Village
Allotment with fourplex — value
- $500,000 —

(901) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom
2bath concrete structure located
Triana Shores Harbour Island,
Eleuthera. Property size 80’ x 120’
x80’ 120 feet . Appraised valued at
$ 332,735.

sqft. Appraised value $50,006. |
(108) Single Family Lot #57 Blck7 |
# Chesapeake Subdivision (no util-
ities), Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Appraised value$18,000. |

(108) Single Family Lot #5 Block
#21 Leicester County (no utilities),
Freeport, Grand Bahama. Appraised
value $6,000.

(101) Tourist Commercial Canal
Lot #71 Silver Cove Subdivision,
Freeport Grand Bahama. Appraised
value $175,000

(902) Vacant Lots #’s 5 &6 in Block3
of Club Estates Subdivision located
North of Rock Sound Eleuthera com-
prising of 1.48 acres. Appraised value
$55,000.00

(902) Vacant lot of land situated
in South Palmetto Point Eleuthera
measuring 97x127x82x121.
Appraised value $38,000.00

(601) Lot located Fort Fincastle —
value - $25,000



GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-337-0101

(100) Mrs Lucy Wells

LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE

Tel: 242-394-3560

(716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon

(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

(723) Ms. Deidre King

(724) Mrs. Faye Higgs

(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson

(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis

MACKEY STREET

Tel: 242-393-3097

(601) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles

BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-245 1/3

(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson

(303) Mr. Desmond McIntosh

(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson

FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-352-6631/2

(101) Ms. Garnell Frith

(103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
Cartwright

(104) Ms. Jackie Knowles

(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey





Se Royal Bank

Rise of Orel afte t= ie



PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a oe re
China product safety
key for US government

UTM Te 7 [i

the #1 newspaper in circulation,

Se a OL

Legal Notice
NOTICE
KROY INVESTMENTS INC,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) KROY INVESTMENTS INC. is in dissolution

under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 4th December, 2007 when its the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Lynden

Maycock of Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore,
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as sole Liquidator.

‘Dated the Sth day of November 2007.
H & J Corporate Services Ltd,

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

FOR SALE

Delinquent Properties (Vacant Lots)

lot # 19, Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road
(proposed gated community with beach access)
| New Providence, Bahamas

5,040 sq ft; Appraised Value = $75,600









Lot # 14 Westridge North Subdivision
New Providence, Bahamas.
11,486 sq ft
Appraised Value = $207,000




Lot # 20 Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road
(proposed gated community with beach access)
New Providence, Bahamas

5,061 sq ft; Appraised Value = $76,000





Submit bids in writing to:

MORTGAGE DEPARTMENT
P.O. Box N-4815
Nassau, Bahamas




For further enquiries ical 461- 1037

Biss

Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 4 December 200 7

"Previous Close Today's Close

Abaco Markets

@ By FOSTER KLUG
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Treasury Secretary Henry Paul-
son said Wednesday that Chi-
nese product safety will be a key
topic for U.S. officials at high-
level economic talks with China
next week.

Paulson said China’s ability to
manage the safety of its goods
will be an important part of Bei-
jing’s future growth and of its

trade relations with the U.S.

“American consumers need to
have confidence in the safety of
the products they purchase,
whether prouuced at home or
abroad,” Paulson said in a speech
to the Asia Society, an educa-
tion group.

Paulson and other Cabinet-
level officials are going to China
December 12-13 for the third
round of the so-called Strategic
Economic Dialogue. Paulson
launched the talks a year ago,














Legal Notice

Notice

KROY INVESTMENTS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims againts the above-named Com-

pany are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned at

Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-
3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 20th
day of December, 2007. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 5th day of December 2007

LYNDEN MAYCOCK
LIQUIDATOR

©

Feenprle Christian High Pchoed

*Praeh B0e Bvend Tee Woy’, Peete RN

TEACHING VACANCY
Temple Christian High School

Shirley Street



Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers for
the following positions for the 2007-2008 School Year.

Math (Gr.7-9)

Applicants must:

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple
Christian School.

% Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the area
of specialization

9 Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma

> Have at least two years teaching experience in
the relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills.

4 Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examination to the BJC/ BGCSE levels.

9 Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra
curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School
office on Shirley Street and be retumed with a
full curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph
and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School ©
P.O.Box N-1566
_ Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is December 7th, 2007



Change

but so far they have produced
little results. Vice Premier Wu
Yi leads the Chinese side.

The U.S. has pushed China to
improve the safety of its exports
given a string of high-profile
recalls of various items from toys
to toothpaste.

Paulson, in his speech, warned.
of misconceptions in the rela-
tionship “that are influencing the
rise of protectionism and eco-

‘nomic nationalism in both

nations.” He said the high-level
talks are helping improve com-

_ munication between top officials,

which was often lacking before.

The talks, he said, “have
helped keep the U.S.-China eco-
nomic relationship on an even
keel and helped us manage diffi-
cult issues, even in times of ten-
sion. Because we have a frame-
work for senior-level dialogue,
we can — and do — pick up the
phone and we talk. We work
toward solutions.”

Besides Paulson, Commerce
Secretary Carlos Gutierrez,

Health and Human Services Sec-
retary Mike Leavitt, U.S. Trade
Representative Susan Schwab,
Acting Agriculture Secretary
Chuck Conner and Environ-
mental Protection Agency chief

Stephen Johnson are to attend

the talks.

Paulson is expected to contin-
ue to press China to move more
quickly to institute economic
reforms the Bush administration
believes are necessary to dea
with a huge trade gap between
the two nations. The U.S. deficit
with China hit an all-time high of
$233 billion last year and is on
track to surpass that this year.

Members of Congress «are

’ pushing the administration to act

more forcefully to get China to
halt what critics see as unfair
trade practices.

They contend China is manip-

ulating its currency to keep the
value low to boost Chinese
imports into the United States
while making U.S. goods more
expensive in China.

Julius Bar

Julius Baer Group, the leading dedicated Wealth Management
is seeking candidates for the position of:

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES

Client retention and servicing of existing client, relationships with
focus on Italian speaking European Countries

(Italy and Switzerland).
Acquisition of new clients.

Promote Nassau as financial centre and JB Nassau as booking

centre for offshore clients.

REQUIRED SKILLS:

e Excellent Italian verbal and written communication skill

¢ PC literate with strong Excel, Word, PowerPoint
(ability to learn new applications quickly)

e A commitment to service excellence

EXPERIENCE:

¢ Minimum 10 years experience in Swiss Banking or related field

EDUCATION:

SF ARLES

e A Bachelor’s degree with concentration in Bconcianig Business

Administration or equivalent.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

¢ Must speak English and Italian a third language would be an asset

We offer a very competitive and benefits package, a stimulating work
environment and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to
our business while expanding your career.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume
by December 28th, 2007 to the attention of:

By Hand
Personal & Confidential
Human Resources

Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore

East Bay Street
PO.Box N-4890
Nassau, Bahamas

By Mail

Personal & Confidential
Human Resources
P.O.Box N-4890
Nassau, Bahamas

oni Pace
VACANCIES





Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark.

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs —
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol (S)

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johhson

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for positions
available at St. John’s College, St. Anne’s School
and Bishop Michael Eldon School in Freeport.

Primary
Computer/Primary
Spanish
English

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor of Master
Degrees from an accredited University or College
and Teaching Certificate need apply.

Last Price Weekly Vol.

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

For further details and application form, please
contact the Anglican Central Education Authority
on Sands Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.40 RND Holdings

“Last 12Months _Div$ __

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
e Income fund

52wk-Low
1.3149
2.9728
2.4829
1.2037

1.365584"
3.5388°**
2.938214°**
1,.279370**"
11.8192""*

Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required focuments must be
sent by Friday, December 14th, 2007 to the
Anglican Education Department addressed to:-

YIELD - jast 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings pee share for the last 12 mths
NAY - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec02=1 000. 00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
62wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 62 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weigtited price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
'S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Oate 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

*- 16 November 2007

*- 30 June 2007

*** - 31 October 2007
*-31 July 2007

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P. O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas





~~ ee

~ 249-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

THE TRIBUNE



Ask us about:

° A Fixed Rate Annuity
of 5.75%

* British American
Investment Funds

SYMPH@NY

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wf, PAGE 158



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—

lions





From the Manage ment and Staff of

Ag,

P ( PICTET

Pictet Bank & Trust Limited
Bayside Executive Park
Building No. 1
West Bay Street and Blake Road
P.O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas




with offices in Dubai, Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Lausanne, London, Luxembourg, Madrid, Milan, Paris,
Rome, Turin, Zurich, Hong Kong, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore and Tokyo (yO

British Colonial Hilton

Nassau

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aE 16B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007 a
Stocks soar as investors grow more optimistic.
about economy, upcoming interest rate cut



m@ NEW YORK

WALL STREET rallied
Wednesday after new data
showed the overall economy is
holding up, but that it’s not
too strong to prevent the Fed-
eral Reserve from cutting
interest rates again. The Dow
Jones industrial average rose
more than L8O points, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Stocks turned around fol-
lowing two sessions of losses
after a report showed hiring
in the U.S. private sector
expanded at a faster pace in

were added during the month
— an increase that bodes well
for consumer spending.

The report raised hopes for.

a strong November jobs
report from the Labor Depart-
ment on Friday. Investors
were also encouraged
Wednesday after the depart-
ment reported worker pro-
ductivity advanced by an
annual rate of 6.3 percent in
the summer, the fastest pace
in four years, while wage pres-
sures eased.

“The best news for the mar-
ket is good news on the econ-
omy,” said Jack Ablin, chief

Private Bank. “There might
be a general malaise among
homeowners these days, but
as long as more people are
getting paychecks then the
economy can withstand the
stress,”

Uncertainty

Still, there is enough uncer-
tainty in the economy — in
particular the financial sector
that is still struggling from
months of credit problems —
that the market expects the
Fed to lower rates. Some

will go beyond the generally
anticipated quarter’ percent-
age point cut, and lower rates
by a half point.

In midafternoon trading, the
Dow Jones industrial average
rose 183.39, or 1.38 percent,

~ to 13,432.12.

‘Broader indexes also moved
higher, The Standard & Poor’s
500 index added 20.26, or 1.39
percent, to 1,483.05, while the
Nasdaq composite index rose
47.59, or 1.82 percent, to
2,667.42. .

Bond prices fell. The yield
on the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note, which moves

November. ADP Employer

Services said 189,000 jobs

KO COLI MBIeCUKONCIBAMIKMDEl@ecm nario: | art

'US dollar rises; energy futures trade mixed|

investment officer at Harris

_ investors are betting the Fed

opposite its price, rose to 3.91



m NEW YORK



PRECIOUS metals prices slipped Wednesday
after separate reports showing strong job growth
and worker productivity boosted the dollar, less-
ening the appeal of gold and silver as alternative
investments, accordin g to. Associated Press.

Industrial metals pices also slumped, while
energy and agricultural futures fluctuated in
volatile trading. ;

Gold prices trembled around $800 an ounce,
down moderately from a day ago. Silver and plat-
inum prices also fell.

Two economic reports on Wednesday raised
mvestor confidence in the U.S. economy and dol-
lar, and pressured precious metals. ADP Employ-
er Services said 189,000 jobs were added last
month — a sign the job market remains robust.
And the Labor Department said worker produc-
tivity increased by an annual rate of 6.3 percent in

the summer, the fastest growth in four years.

Gold shed $5.30 to $802.30 an ounce on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.

‘The reenback made headway against other
World cu rencies. -

Fun Walk 2007: 36,000 “thank you dollars" for your

But the dollar’s gains could prove brief as the

Federal Reserve's interest rates meeting next ,

Tuesday approaches. The central bank is expect-
ed to lower its benchmark federal funds rate,
Which stands at 4.50 percent, to stimulate slug-
gish economic growth.

Another bit of economic news on Wednesday
bolstered the case for a rate cut. The Institute for
Supply Management said the nation’s service sec-

* tor grew itt November but the expansion was

slower than in October and fell short of analyst

; expectations,

“We have a mixed bag of economic news. ADP
is supportive of dollar, but in the end what counts
for the Fed is the stability of the financial markets
and those are deteriorating day by day,” said Axel
Merk, president of the Merk Hard Currency Fund.

Other precious metals pulled hack. Silver
futures lost 5.5 cents to $14.41 an ounce, while
platinum fell $3.80 to $1,468.50 an ounce on the
Nymex.

In currencies, the euro fell to $1.4663 from
$1.4766 late Tuesday, and the British pound
declined, as traders awaited Thursday’s interest
rate decisions from the European Central Bank

and Bank of England. Both are expected to hold
rates steady.

Analysts are cautioning investors to expect
heightened volatility leading up to next.week’s
Fed meeting.

Another key focus this week is the Labor
Department’ s November Jobs report, due out Fri-

. day.

“The job market is one of the key pillars of
relative stability that has yet to buckle, so many
will be watching that day, especially since a steady
rise in initial claims data over the past few weeks
suggests that job creation could come in on the
weaker side,” said MF Global analyst Edward
Meir, in a report.

Industrial metals prices dipped on the London
Metal Exchange. C opper, zinc, lead and tin prices
fell, while nickel prices edged higher.

Nymex copper for March delive ry rose 1.55
cents to $3.0355 a pound.

Oil prices rose after the Organization for Petro-
leum Exporting Countries decided not to increase
production quotas, and the Energy Information
Administration reported a surprising ‘draw on
crude inventories.

Premier Healthy

altogether better efforts!

A huge thank you to all who took part in this year's annual Funwalk in Nassau and Freeport. Your efforts helped raise $36,000, donated

percent from 3.88 percent late
Tuesday. The dollar was
mixed against other major cur-
rencies, while gold prices fell.
The market is currently
pricing in that there will be a
rate cut next week, Ablin said.
Supporting the case for a cut is
that central banks globally
seem to be open to the idea, a
trend that would give the Fed
even more room to move.
The Bank of Canada cut
rates on Tuesday, while the
Bank of England and Euro-
pean Central Bank will make
rate decisions Thursday.
Investors also weighed a
Commerce Department
report that showed factory
orders unexpectedly rose in
October.
However, that data was
likely offset by a report from

~ the Institute for Supply Man-

agement showing growth in
the service sector cooled
somewhat in November.
Wednesday’s advance was
fed by investors betting that

the Fed might be generous -

and cut rates a half pércentage
point, or, in market lingo, 50
basis points.

“I do believe the market
wants 50, that the Fed needs
to do a lot more work, and
that a quarter is not going to
do it,” said Greg Church, chief
investment officer of Church
Capital Management.

Mildly higher oil prices also
contributed to the gains on
Wall Street. OPEC decided
Wednesday to keep output
ceilings steady for now, a
move that briefly propelled
crude prices above $90 a bar-
rel. Meanwhile, the govern-
ment reported that U.S. oil

to our two main beneficiary charities, The Cancer Society of The Bahamas and The Bahamas Diabetic Association.

It is another example of how we can all pull together for a worthy cause and at the same time feel the benefit of simple, basic exercise and fresh air. Both’

charities have offered warm thanks to all of our Fun Walkers for the immeasurable good that their efforts will bring about.



The Cancer Society of The Bahamas and The Bahamas Diabetic Association were each phedented with donations of $18,000 by Mrs.

Lynda rl EVP and General ee of Atlantic Medical Insurance.

The Funwalk has emerged as a landmark event to demonstrate the commitment of Bahamians in fertile their time and money in.a huge community effort
ate. At the same time it allows us all to focus on the importance of maintaining good health and the value that regular: exercise and

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THE TRIBUNE



pone fell steeply last week
while gasoline stockpiles rose,
both by greater margins than
analysts‘had expected.

Light, sweet crude rose 22
cents to $88.54 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange.

Fannie Mae shares fell 39
cents to $34.79 after it fol-
lowed rival mor tgage financer
Freddie Mac in cutting its div- °

‘ idend and selling special stock

to raise capital. The govern-
ment-sponsored lender hopes
to cushion against mounting
losses from high-risk home
loans.

Comcast Corp. shares
plunged $2.26, or 10.9 percent,
to $18.47 after the cable oper-
ator said it won’t generate as
much cash flow and revenue
for the year because of a
difficult economic environ-
ment. .

Technology stéalkes broadly
advanced after Intel Corp.’s
stock was upgraded on expec-
tations the personal computer
market will be strong next
year. Shares added 94 cents,
or 3.6 percent, to $27.25.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 11.38,
or 1.51 percent, to 763.44.

Advancing issues led declin-
ers by a 4 to 1 basis on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 768.1
million shares.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed up 0.83
percent, while Hong Kong’s
Hang Seng index rose 1.61
percent. Britain’s FTSE 100
closed up 2.83 percent, Ger-
many’s DAX index rose 1.74
percent, and France’s CAC-
40 increased 2.02 percent.



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The Tribune |









Volume: 104 No.14

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Pie acts ee



SUN WITH
SHOWERS

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USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION a

ent) RELIGION
a TODAY’S TRIBUNE






35-year-old man
dies after daylight

drive-by

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas yesterday

afternoon reached the record
number of 74 murders for the
year after a man was gunned
down in a drive-by shooting
in Grand Bahama.
_ With still more than three
weeks to go in 2007, the coun-
try’s murder rate is now
poised to be the highest in at
least the last decade and a
half.

According to a study by
police, which examines mur-
ders that occurred between
1991 and 2003, in the year

Claim that Christie
using possibility. of. .
general election to
maintain PLP control

ll By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia. net.

FORMER Prime Minister Perry
Christie is trying to use the belief that
the FNM will call an early election as
a reason to remain party leader until

the PLP holds its convention in Feb-

ruary, The Tribune was told.

Mr Christie, it was reported, has instructed his PLP colleagues to
“be ready for any eventuality” causing some MPs to even re-open

their constituency offices.

A sustained effort has been made to “reignite” the base sup-

SEE page 19 _



























. 10 Pes. Chicken ¢
«2 Large Sides
* 4 Biscuits



"319%

shooting

2000, the homicide rate was
at its highest when it peaked
at 74-cases.

Ryan O’Neil-Wood, 35, was
reportedly sitting in his car on
Redwood Lane in Freeport
yesterday afternoon when
another vehicle pulled up
from which a passenger
opened the door and fired on
him. The driver thé spéd off.

The victim was taken to
Rand Memorial Hospital but
was pronounced dead just
before 3.00pm.

Speaking with The Tribune
last night, Chief Supt Emer-

SEE page 19

Perry Christie





Machine readable

passports ‘will help
speed evaluation of

HITUCer LCN NETIC
enter the Bahamas’



IMMIGRATION Director
Vernon Burrows said that the
International Civil Aviation
Organisation requirement that
countries have machine read-
able zones in passports by 2010,
will help his department to
more quickly evaluate the his-

tory of those attempting to.
enter the Bahamas.

“As soon as a swipe can be
captured in our system, imme-
diately we will be able to check
our stop list; we'll be able to
check our database to deter-
mine whether or not the indi-
vidual is on a watch list; whether
or not he is on the stop list;
whether or not he applied for a
work permit, or whatever the
case is,” said Mr Burrows in an
address to the media at the
launch of the ePassport and visa
issuance systems yesterday at
the Passport Office.

“It is going to greatly
enhance our capability of

’ detecting individuals who are

unsavory characters,” he said.
The Immigration Department

SEE page 19

PATRICE JOHNSON, Chief Clerk shows the new system to Minister
of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette along with Minister of State for
Immigration Elma Campbell; Attroney General Claire Hepburn; Min-

ister of Tourism and Aviation Neko Grant as Christine Ervine, Iris

Corp Business analyst looks on.

Derek Carroll

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



US expert:
Esfakis death
attributable
to failure of

hospital staff

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A US expert in burn injuries
and their treatment yesterday
testified in the coroner’s court
that he felt “chills” when he
reviewed the hospital records
outlining the treatment given -
to a burns patient, who later
died, at Doctor’s Hospital.

Addressing the court dur-
ing the fourth non-consecu-

- tive week of testimony in the

inquest into the death of Doc-
tor’s Hospital patient, 42-year-
old Christopher Esfakis, at
that facility in 2002, Dr Arnold
Luterman, medical director of
the University of South
Alabama’s Regional Burn and
Wound Centre and a profes-
sor of surgery, said that in his
opinion Mr Esfakis’ death at
the hospital was attributable

SEE page 16
~ Darold
Miller trial
adjourned

WELL-KNOWN media
personality Darold Miller
returned to court yesterday
for the start of his sexual
harassment trial, but the mat-
ter had to be adjourned.

Miller, with his lawyer
Willie Moss, appeared before
Magistrate Renee McKay at
Court Six, Parliament Street.
Miller is alleged to have sexu-
ally harassed a female employ-
ee at the GEMS News Media
Network between February 1

. and March 31. Miller was

arraigned on the sexual .
harassment charge on August
28. At that time he pleaded
not guilty to the charge and
was granted $5,000 bail with
one surety. Miller has opted
to have his case heard in the
Magistrate’s Court.

Miller was suspended from
his job at the GEMS radig’
network in early April, after

SEE page 19







PAGE 2, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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LOCAL NEWS

Age of the e-Passport

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT
unveiled the new e-Passport and
visa issuance system yesterday.

The machine readable passports ©

contain a data chip that stores facial
scans, fingerprints and digital sig-
natures.

The launch at the passport office
on Thompson Blvd was attended

by numerous diplomats and senior .

civil servants, and is part of a $12.7
million upgrade to the national
passport and visa issuance systems.

Deputy Prime Minister and Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette unveiled the six new
documents, along with Jo Ram,
chief operating officer and vice-

resident of product development
or Indusa Global, the fead com-
pany in the effort.

The new passport types include
diplomatic, official, regular, fre-
quent traveller and children’s doc-
uments, with a sixth type serving
as a certificate of identity in the
form of a passport, without being
one.

Ms Ram explained that passport
management system is fully auto-
mated and will allow the staff at
the passport office to keep a record
for each applicant, scan their appli-
cations, surrounding documents
and photographs, along with cap-
turing fingerprints and a digital sig-
nature in the system before pay-
ment.

“Once the applicant has been
fully enrolled, a three step approval

rocess is initiated by the system,
ding to i a production, chi
encoding, quality control and final-
ly issuance of the new e-Passport,”
said Ms Ram. :

The security for the e-Passports
and e-IDs, Ms Ram explained, is
governed by the public key infra-
structure, and access to the chip is
protected by cryptographic keys.

Data can only be written after
successful authentication with these
keys, and three different 16-digit
keys are generated in order to
ensure that no one person, or even
one agency, holds the entire key,
she said.

It is expected to take two weeks
from the time of application, until
the passport is ready for pick-up,
according to Mr Symonette.

No fees for the new documents
have been announced by the gov-
ernment thus far. However, Mr

told the media yesterday
that he expects to table the rele-
vant regulations in the House of
Assembly next week, and it is envi-



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

MINISTER of Foriegn Affairs Brent Symonette shows how the new e-

Passport is going to look yesterday at the passport office on Thomp-

son Boulevard. :

sioned that regular passports will
cost $50.

Along with the e-Passports and a
machine readable visa system, the
contract with Indusa Global also

rovides for an e-Identification
issuance system with smart cards
for holders of work permits, spousal
permits, homeowners residence
permits, permanent residence cards,
and a border control management
system. The e-Passport and
machine readable visa issuance sys-
tems are components associated
with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs;
the e-Identification issuance sys-
tem and border control manage-
ment systems are associated with
the Department of Immigration.

The remaining phases of imple-
mentation for these new systems
will commence in mid-January,

2008 and continue to the end of

July, 2008.

“During these two phases, we
will implement the e-Passport sys-
tem in the passport office, Grand
Bahama, administrators offices in
the Family Islands and in our over-
seas missions,” said Mr Symonette.
“The implementation of the visa
issuance system in our consular divi-
sion in New Providence and our
overseas missions will also occur in
these phases.”

The government anticipates that
e-Passport and visa issuance sys-
tems will be fully operational by
mid-2008, Mr Symonette said dur-
ing his remarks, at which time offi-
cials are expected to be able to ful-
ly service the 170,000-plus passport
holders and 2,000 plus certificate
of identity holders. Currently, only

people with expired passports, or
those whose passports are lost or
stolen, will need to come in for new
passports. “We wish the public to
also know that you should continue
to travel using your current passport
until either it expires or such time as
you are duly notified otherwise —
whichever occurs first,” Mr Symon-
ette said. ‘

As the system is not yet func-
tional in the Family Islands and
overseas missions, both the new
and current passports will be issued
in an effort to accommodate all cit-
izens, until sufficient facilities are
established.

After full implementation of the
system, “persons will be able to
apply for, and be issued with an e-
Passport or certificate of identity
at 19 stations throughout the
Bahamas and at our overseas mis-
sions,” said Mr Symonette.

“Foreign nationals will also be
able to apply for and be issued with
machine readable visas in New
Providence and at our overseas
missions,” he added.

The International Civil Aviation
Organisation (ICAO), of which the
Bahamas is a member, has man-
dated that by 2010, all countries
must issue machine readable pass-
ports. With this new system, the
Bahamas has fulfilled the mandate
well ahead of schedule.

Mr Symonette also emphasised -
yesterday that the public must
assume greater responsibility for
the care and security of their travel
documents, and should ensure
these items are in order well before
travel. :

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 3







© In brief

African culture |
authority to
speak on roots |
of Junkanoo —

“roots” of Junkanoo.
Robert Farris Thompson,

on Fowler Street to explore the

origins of the Bahamian festi- :

val.
Described as
thinker and a>
researcher”,

and dance, and play drums,
during his lectures.

He has been credited with
changing the public perception :
of African art and has organ- :

ised several major exhibitions.

Professor Thompson has lec-

tured at Yale since 1961.

He has also served as cura- !
tor at UCLA’s museum of eth- :

nic arts.

His Nassau lecture, called }

The Three African Roots of :
is due to start at ; lm By ALISON LOWE

Junkanoo,
7pm.

Photo exhibition
on Fred Mitchell ©

cr Mitchell



@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmycock@tribunemedia.net
——__———— | attempted to enter the club to

FREEPORT - A photo- : attend a scheduled meeting with
graphic exhibition of the accom- Mary Eee oe
plishments of Fox Hill MP Fred : nid that the eat ae eunsideaue
ee ei ee : whether to take legal action over
alfairs in the opened an i the incident.

ernment was
Freeport over the weekend.

Church of the Ascension on Fri-
day evening, was attended by
PLP supporters, including for-
mer cabinet. minister Dr Mar-

Bridgewater.

Former Prime Minister Perry :
Christie was expected to offi- }
cially open the exhibition, but :
was unable to attend. His :

remarks were delivered by Dr } property.”

Bethel.

Mr Christie said that Mr / fesponsit
- Mitchell played a major role in : Wishes of the people to the best
heightening the Bahamas’ pro- : of our ability and the wishes of
i the people at the Lyford cay
He said when he first viewed | Property is that they can ne
the exhibition in Nassau (on } longer wom with Freduot that
August 10) as part of the Eman- ; Piequot must 20.
cipation Day activities in Fox ; Wednesday, November 27, as

“it was Instruc- ; akin to the “dark days when

tive and brought back memo- } some Bahamians were not

ries of the accomplishment of } allowed certain privileges or were
: discriminated against in certain
“With Fred as my right hand : places ‘and were not afforded
i ee rightful place as a Bahami-
trade, I Was able to focus on our i
economic future and our :
domestic challenges with con- :
fidence that the nation would :
be well prepared and well
recognised when the presence :

of the prime minister became }

file in international affairs.

Hiil, he thought

the PLP government.”

in foreign affairs and foreign

necessary overseas,” he said.

“T hope that tonight’s display :
will be preserved for posterity :
and more details added over :
time ‘as the need for confiden- :
tiality and official secrecy per- :
mits. [t is vital information for :

the country,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said the purpose :
of the photo exhibition is not }
just to celebrate the work of the }
PLP government in foreign :

affairs over ihe past five years,

but also to bring together PLP :
officials and supporters to cele- :
brate what the PLP government :
has accomplished, review the :
past, and begin to mark out the }

future,
He toid supporters:

workers,

reviewing and

said.

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PLP attacks Ingraham’s overspend claims as ‘disgraceful’

CLAIMS made by Prime Minister

: Hubert Ingraham in the House of Assem-

: bly that the PLP overspent by. $170 million

: can only be described as a “disgraceful

attempt by this inept FNM government
to mislead the Bahamian people and shift

: the focus away from its ruinous policy of
: stop, review and cancel,”
: PLP said yesterday.

the opposition

This policy by the FNM, the party said,

A LEADING authority on i has brought an abrupt halt to the project-

African culture will be speak- ed growth of the Bahamian economy and

ing in Nassau tonight on the | thereby taking $100 million out of the
o 5 ~~ + Bahamian economy.

On Monday Mr Ingraham accused the

> | PLP ofa lapse in judgment when it appar-
professor emeritus at Yale Uni : ently extended more than $170 million

versity, will appear at Big Tent : outside of the nation’s budget during the

: 2006/2007 fiscal year.



However, the
opposition reject-
ed this, saying that
while they were in
government they
were, “good stew-
sy ards” of the
ite Mi Ei Bahamas’ econo-
my. “The facts according to table ii of the
Budget communication for 2007-2008
brought to parliament by none other than
the Prime Minister himself in May, 2007,
show that the recurrent estimated expen-
diture was $1.386 billion and the projected
expenditure was $1.360 billion which actu-
ally shows that on a net basis the PLP
underspent by $26 million on the recurrent
side and not the $101 million as the FNM
is falsely stating,” the PLP said.



Further, the opposition claimed that

" the budgeted capital expenditure for 2006-

2007 was $196 million and the projected
capital expenditure was $200 million, a net
overage of $4 million and not the $77.5
asserted by the FNM.

On the revenue side for 2006-2007 the
PLP estimated $1.347 billion and the pro-
jected revenue was $1.356 billion, what
the party said is an overage of $9 million.

“The PLP spent less than projected and
collected more than was forecast, therefore
supporting the view that based on the facts
the PLP were excellent stewards of the
Bahamian économy and now that the
FNM government realises that it is unable
to match up to the performance of the
Christie administration it has embarked
on an evil and sinister plan to discredit the





stellar management of the Bahamian econ-
omy by the PLP and in doing so are
attempting to mislead the Bahamian peo-
ple,” the opposition said.

The PLP claimed that the FNM is jeal-
ous and envious of its record.

“The truth is the truth and the past the
past so we advise them to marshal all of
their energy and resources to restoring
confidence in the Bahamian economy,
addressing the pressing issues which affect
our social well-being such as crime, edu-
cation and a multitude of social ills facing
the country. Their actions over the past
seven months have clearly demonstrated
that they have no meaningful agenda and
no vision for a Bahamas in the 21st centu-
ry,” the opposition said.

“a brilliant :
tireless }
Professor Thomp- }
son is known to break into song ;



“Some :
people will ask you as campaign }
‘what is the PLP :
doing?’ This is one of the things :
that we have done. We are }
retooling, ;
because the government is ours }
for the retaking. We have to : |
continue to demonstrate that :.
we can and will do it again,” he :

BAHAMAS HOTEL CATERING AND ALLIED WORKERS UNION

Union executives back
members over reported
calls for removal of Lyford
Cay managing director

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EXECUTIVE members of

: the Bahamas Hotel Catering and
: Allied Workers Union yesterday
: said they supported their mem-
: bers employed at the Lyford Cay
: Club in their alleged calls for the
: removal of the club’s managing
: director, Didier Picquot.

Union executives, including

: president Roy Colebrooke, sec-
i retary general Leo Douglas, and
? two vice presidents, accused Mr
: Picquot of hampering union

members in their legitimate
efforts to carry out union busi-
ness on behalf of their members,
of which they say there are
almost 200 at.that site.

This comes just over a week

: after union VP Kirk Wilson and
? Mr Douglas were, they allege,
: threatened with dogs and
’ ? removed from the gated com-

munity by security after they

While not initially calling the

een : i managing director’s name, offi-
The exhibition, which was : cers yesterday sought to lay the

held in the Sam Eric Hall at the ! blame for the episode, which
i they described as “an embar-

i rassment”,

and “numerous
labour issues at the club, at the

: feet of Mr Picquot. They claim
cus Bethel and Senator Pleasant :
? sucha reaction.

that they did nothing to warrant

Mr Colebrooke said: “It has
been an ongoing battle with the
Lyford Cay Club ever since Mr
Didier Picquot came into that

He contiaued: “We have a
responsibility to carry out the

They described the events of

* The union president said that

a at K aa



“It has been
an ongoing
battle with the
Lyford Cay
Club ever
since Mr. Didi-
er Picquot
came into that

property.”
Roy Colebrooke



numerous complaints have been
filed by employees to both for-
mer labour minister Shane Gib-
son and current minister Dion
Foulkes about their “bad treat-
ment” at the club, but to date
nothing had been done to
address them.

“They are not acknowledged,
but just dictated to,” said Mr
Colebrooke.

He claimed that the club’s
union members had said they
would “march on Bay Street” if
they saw no resolution soon to

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their concerns. “We are calling
on the relevant government
authorities to act quickly,” said
Mr Colebrooke.Mr Douglas read
a letter that was sent from chair-
man of the Lyford Cay Property

Owners Association, Christopher

Hampton Davis, to Labour
Director Harcourt Brown, fol-
lowing the November incident
explaining why the union leaders
were stopped at the gate. In the
letter Mr Davis said that “fol-
lowing discussion with...Mr Didi-
er Picquot” he wished to point
out that the reason the men were

‘ treated in such a way was

because there was a breach of
security when the officers failed
to identify themselves at the gate.
Mr Davis added that one of the
passengers was said to have
“averted his face to the right ina
suspicious manner.”

Mr Wilson and Mr Douglas
denied this version of events,
claiming that they positively
identified themselves and gave
their union positions to security
before being granted access to
the property. They said they
were disturbed that this letter
was directed to Mr Brown and
that they have yet to receive an
apology.

A message left for Mr Picquot
was not returned up to press time
yesterday.



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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,



Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.



Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352



_ Student loans not being repaid

IN THE House of Assembly on Monday
Education Minister Carl Bethel did not see
how government could sustain its student loan
programme unless those who borrowed repaid
their loans.

“The whole system,” he said, “is bound to
become unsustainable if persons who have bor-
rowed money do not repay it on the terms that
they have agreed. The entire programme can
only continue if it is put on a firm financial
footing, and this can only occur if the borrowers
repay their loans.”

He told the House that it was unfortunate
that far too many are unwilling to pay. Some
even believe that it is an infringement on their
rights that they should even be asked to repay.

Mr Bethel referred to one loan recipient to
whom government recently had to send a
demand notice for repayment. This former stu-
dent wrote back to the Administrator accusing
him of “making an inhumane demand.”

“The writer further stated that since the
loan was a loan from the government she
‘shouldn't have to repay it,’” an incredulous
Mr Bethel told the House.

“If the carefully chosen words in the type-
written letter reflect the prevailing opinion,”
said Mr Bethel, “then the Education Guaran-
teed Loan arrangement could never be sus-
tainable.”

‘He urged all those Bahamians who had ben-
efited from the loans “to remember the thou-
sands of other Bahamians who are also looking
to benefit from a programme which has given
opportunities to persons who would never oth-
erwise have had a chance to obtain a universi-
ty degree.”

. He urged them “to fully honour their com-
mitments, or to enter into a regularized re-pay-
ment plan.” ;

This is a shocking state of affairs. We have
seen too many Bahamians make all sorts of
pledges as to how they planned to repay loans.
However, as soon as they have secured the
needed money, a broad smile replaces their
tears, and they leave full of gratitude. But as
soon as they close the door one instinctively
knows which one of them is going to quickly
turn that loan into a gift.

We shall never forget one person who holds
a good government job, who even brought her
elderly father to vouch for her reliability. She
got the loan on the basis of her father’s sterling
reputation.

Under embarrassing pressure from her
father she made one small payment. After that
she refused to even receive telephone calls to
remind her of a loan that was made so easy
that it would have taken more than two years
for her to have paid it off. She, obviously, had

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no intention of even making an effort. She not
only let herself down, but she let down the

good name of her father, who would have nev- ~

er condoned such behaviour. Her attitude is
yet another example of the changing standards
from generation to generation.

Mr Bethel was debating the Supplementary
Appropriations Bill in the House when the
question of school loans was raised. He
explained that Bill No.1 referred to the sum
of $6,807,498, allocated to the Ministry of Edu-
cation, Science and Technology during the last
financial year.

“This money,” he said, “was added to the
existing budgetary allocation of $2.5 million
which made up the total sum of $9.3 million;
and was used to settle defaulted Guaranteed
Educational Loans which were on the books of
the Bank of The Bahamas and the Education
Loan Authority.

“The combined sums,” he said, “were divid-
ed and paid, as follows: $3.381 million to the
Bank of The Bahamas and $5.8 million to the
Education Loan Authority.”

He pointed out that the Guaranteed Edu-
cational Loan programme had many benefits,
but also many problems.

“On the positive side,” he said, “3,179
Bahamians benefited and completed courses of
study as of June 2007. Of this number, 68.3 per
cent were female and 31.7 per cent were male.

“Of the academic degrees obtained 66.3 per
cent were Bachelor's degrees, and a further
9.8 per cent were Master's degrees.”

On the down-side, however, he said, is the
fact that “more than 1,552 loans are now in
default to such an extent that the government's
guarantee was invoked — a part of which
involved such as the $6.8 million which is the
subject of Bill No. 1 and as I have said was
paid to Bank of The Bahamas and the Educa-
tion Loan Authority.”

However, he continued, “the entire frame-
work of the Education Guaranteed Loan pro-
gramme proceeds on two critical presumptions:
(1) that people are empowered by education
and that their earning capacity increases and (2)
as earning power increases, people will be bet-
ter able and willing to repay their education
loans.”

Instead, more than 1,552 students reneged on
their loans leaving government, which had
stood guarantor, to pay off their debts totalling
$6.8 million. If this continues, then obviously,
this loan programme is in jeopardy because of
the selfishness of those Bahamians, who despite
their degrees, haven’t got'the common sense to
understand that when they borrow they have a
duty to pay back.














meet deadlines

















I was unaware of
allegations linked
to Ministry's
Freeport HQ>

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Further to our brief dis-
cussion please allow this to
serve as confirmation of the
fact that I never “admitted”
to knowing of the details of

the allegations set out in the’

article written by Ms. Alli-
son Lowe which appeared on
the front page of this morn-
ing's Tribune.

In fact Ms. Lowe never
told me any details of the
allegations relating to the
Freeport Office of the Min-
istry of Education.

I merely told her that as
Minister I have received a
number of anonymous letters
making all sorts of personal
allegations against various
persons involved in the sys-
tem of education in the
Freeport area.

In each case I have noted
the letters and referred them

on for investigation and a.

report.

I specifically informed Ms.

Lowe that we had previously
sent a team from our Human
Resources Section to
Freeport to amalgamate the
two offices I met in place,
since it seemed to me to be
inefficient to have two sepa-
rate offices performing over-

lapping functions, and sur- .

mised that there might be
some dissatisfaction among
staff over the decisions made
by the Human Resources

professionals sent to ratio- _

nalize the system in Freeport.
This was the context of my
remark about separating
“personality from principle”.
Having read Ms. Lowe's

- article I can positively assert

that the first time I was made
aware of those particular
allegations was when I read
the article this morning.

I did express dissatisfac-
tion over the fact that a num-
ber of persons seemed to pre-
fer making anonymous alle-
gations in Freeport rather
than to pursue redress
through official channels.

CARL W. BETHEL
Minister of Education

Nassau,
December 4, 2007.

Marketing Coordinator

A leading wholesaler seeks to identify an ambitious,
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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net




(The article to which Mr
Bethel refers was published
on the front page of Tues-
day’s Tribune under the
heading: Call for a ‘revamp’
of Ministry’s Freeport HQ.

(Said the article in part:

(“Political tribalism and
‘familiar’ relationships
between employees are caus-
ing major problems at the
Freeport headquarters of the
Ministry of Education,
Youth, Sports and Culture,
it was alleged yesterday, as a
call went out for a ‘revamp’
of the institution.

(“Furthermore, according
to several employees at the
office, systematic wastage of

accountability is rife, bol-
stered by close personal affil-
iations.

(“Yesterday, Minister of
Education Carl Bethel ini-
tially said he was ‘unaware of
such claims.

However, he later admit-
ted that human resources
personnel had recently trav-
elled from Nassau to the sec-
ond city because of issues
with “inter-personal rivalries’
between government work-
ers.

(“People need to separate
personality from principle,”
said Mr Bethel. However, he
expressed dissatisfaction with
the fact that persons had cho-
sen to go to the press with
their claims about issues
within the ministry rather
than dealing with them
through ‘official channels.’”



works. Command basic computer skills
Microsoft Word Excel and project scheduling
programs.






Send resume to:



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P.O. Box CB-13005

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Along with a Bachelor’s degree, experience in
sales and marketing is necessary.

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P.O. Box N-7504

Soldier Road

Nassau, Bahamas



public money and a lack of (The article continued).

We need to take a practical

approach to a youth service
EDITOR, The Tribune.

HOPING we don’t continue to go down the totally wrong
road as to the benefits, potential and otherwise, of: youth
service it is certainly not as a military service but as a service
which will embrace in all of our young people responsible dis-
cipline of an upstanding law-abiding citizen.

The Swiss model which Attorney Paul Moss seems to pro-
pose is totally wrong and inappropriate for The Bahamas and
what is diagnosed and the correct medicine for us. The Swiss
model is a standing military force.

We need a practical approach for all young people from the
age of seven years through to 16 years (average school leav-
ing age).

I have never understood why this youth service originally
proposed by Sir Lynden Pindling would cost so much as
essentially a programme should and must be co-ordinated
into the standing education system of our schools.

The young people would be taught civics - Bahamian law
- discipline - health - understanding the use of money - grow-
ing into adulthood with special emphasis on the correctness
for pregnancy and upbringing of children.

Surely it is practical to introduce this after the normal
school hours - three times a week in all schools, private and
Government and irrespective of whether you are Bahamian

"or not?

Editor this needs a decision and 100 per cent of Govern-
ment and us. We have talked the Queen’s image off the coin
a long time ago and society now suffers daily from the cancer
that we have allowed to control the free; safe and unmo-
lested society pretending that “It is Better in The Bahamas”.
Prime Minister, all politicians and civic leaders the 73 murders
of 2007 must have resolutely convinced you surely? .

B FRESNO

Nassau,
November 24, 2007.




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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 5








aboard the Rudyard Lewis.

MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest (foreground) is shown the ropes

Shipshape
RBDF officials tour state-
of-the-art defence vessel

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



SENIOR officials in the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force were treat-
ed to an inspection and tour of a
state-of-the-art defence vessel on its
way to Barbados earlier in the week.

Chief Petty Officer Ralph McK-
inney of the RBDF yesterday said
that the 140-foot Rudyard Lewis,
which was purchased by the Bar-
bados Coast Guard from a Euro-
pean manufacturer, was on its way
to that island when the vessel
docked in Bahamian waters to refu-
el.

RBDF officers took the opportu-
nity to tour the ship because region-
al mariume defence forces use sim-
ilar equipment, he explained.

“The minister (of National Secu-
rity Tommy Turnquest) as well as
other senior officers in the defence
force were able to take an inspection
of '' = brand new piece of equip-
ment and we saw how the vessel
handled, checked some of the

Improved consular protection in prospect
for Bahamas-bound European tourists

machinery and how they worked
and saw the launching of the small
seaboat.

“The engines (of the vessel) are
used here in RBDF vessels as well,
so some of our engineering and
technical staff went out there and
got an opportunity up close to see
and inspect the overall performance
of the vessel.”

The vessel is said to be very fast
for its size and to draw significantly
less water than similar craft.

RBDF officials plan to purchase a
vessel of the same caliber as the
Rudyard Lewis in the near future;
meanwhile they await the arrival of
two vessels from the United States,
Chief Petty Officer McKinney said
yesterday.

“We presently have some marines
in the Florida area training on these
two vessels. It is anticipated that we
receive these two vessels before the
end of December.”

The Commander of the Defence
Force, Commodore, Clitford Scavy-
ella, was reportedly in Barbados
when the vessel docked in Nassau.






DEFENCE FORCE officials (above and below
ona tour of inspection of the vessel.






STATE OF THE ART: The Rudyard Lewis is fitted with modern
equipment.

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TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS
The Board of Directors of Commonwealth Bank Limited has
declared a Quarterly Dividend for Common, “A”.“B”,“C",“D",
“E”F"“G"“H” and “I” Preference Shares, to all shareholders
of records at December 14. 2007: as follows:-

Common
“A” Preference

“B”’ Preference
2G: Preference
“D” Preference
“EB” Preference
“F” Preference

“G”’ Preference

“HH” Preference .

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- 7% per annum payable quarterly

The payrient will be made on December 31, 2007 through Colina Finacial
Advisors Limited, the Registrar & Transfer Agent, in the usual manner

Charlene A. Pinder

, Corporate Secretary



@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE thousands of European
tourists who travel to the
Bahamas each year can expect
improved consular protection
in future due to a new action
plan by European Union Com-
mission.

The EU Commission in Brus-
sels yesterday suggested that
citizens of the union should
have the right to demand con-
sular protection from embassies
other than their own written
into their passports.

A plan unveiled by the com-
mission proposes that EU citi-
zens travelling in countries out-
side the EU, where their own
nation is not represented by.an
embassy or an consulate office,
should be able to turn to the

embassies of other EU states to

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ask for help. Only three coun-
tries outside the EU — the Unit-
ed States, Russia and China —
have embassies or consulate
offices for all 27 EU member
states.

There are 18 countries in
which no member stateé is rep-
resented and 17 countries in
which only one member state
is represented.

“This includes popular
tourism destinations for union
citizens, such as Bahamas, Bar-
bados and Maldives,” the. EU
Commission stated.

The commission suggested
that starting July 2009, this right,
which has been officially avail-
able to EU citizens since 1993,
should be written into the new
passports.

According to statistics,
between 30 and 50 million EU
citizens live outside Europe.

It is estimated that only

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around nine per cent of the EU
citizens travelling outside of
Europe go to countries where
their member state does not
have consular or diplomatic rep-
resentation. This constitutes

‘some seven million EU citizens
per year.

According to a “Euro-
barometre” study published in
2006, only 23 per cent EU citi-
zens are aware that they can
turn to another member state
for help if their own country is
not represented in a third coun-
try they are visiting. :

“The right to consular pro-
tection is a concrete expression
of Union citizenship. This
Action Plan marks the begin-
ning of a long-term strategy to
better inform citizens of their
‘rights and ensure that EU citi-
zens are protected world-wide,”
EU justice commissioner Fran-
co Frattini said.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007





























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Reporting directly to the Retail Operations Head, the District Manager’s role
is to provide positive leadership and demonstrate first person management by
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THE TRIBUNE



eae eae
Government ‘will not approve of charging

accreditation fees for working members’
of media covering junkanoo parades

DESPITE media reports,
the government is not con-
templating levying accredita-
tion fees for coverage of
junkanoo or any other public
event at any time in the future,
the Cabinet Office announced
yesterday.

“As previously announced,
the government will not
approve of charging accredita-
tion fees for working members
of the media covering the
upcoming junkanoo parades,”
a press release said.

This follows a front page sto-
ry in another newspaper which
quoted Director of Culture Dr
Nicholette Bethel as saying
that the Ministry of Culture
may look into charging the
press for access to junkanoo at

--some-time inthe future,
However the Cabinet office

said that it is committed to

making junkanoo, the premier
cultural street festival in the
Bahamas, accessible to as
many Bahamians as possible
and that is why it was
announced recently that the
prices for seating tickets this
year have been reduced to the
levels charged for the 2001
parades. “The government is”
aware that there are outstand-
ing issues relating to the pro-
tection of intellectual property
and the use of such property
for private commercial pur-
poses and for profit.

“These are issues that must
be addressed but they do not
impinge upon the right of the
media to provide fair coverage
of public events,” the Cabinet
office said. .;

The quotes attributed to Dr
Bethel follow the governmen- |
t’s revocation of an imposition

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cover the parades.

When the fees were
announced last week, local edi-
tors expressed outrage and the
government reversed its posi-
tion the next day.

Paco Nunez, Tribune news
editor said the decision to
impose fees was “ridiculous”
and likened the proposal to
asking media organisations to
“buy tickets to attend parlia-
ment.”

Wendell Jones, CEO of
Jones Communication Net-
work, said that the announce-
ment was the “most foolish”
thing he had heard from a gov-
ernment ministry in his 35
years in journalism.

He said the minister, the.per-
manent secretary “and all of
them ought to be condemned”
for Such “small-mindedness.”

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 7 ©



US to assist CARICOM
countries in fight against

illegal arms trafficking

_Mâ„¢ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE United
States has
announced its
intent .to assist
CARICOM
countries in
fighting the
illegal traftick-
ing of small
arms and light
weapons
through the region.

According to international
reports, this agreement came
out of last March’s meeting
between CARICOM foreign
ministers and US Secretary of
State Condoleezza Rige.

The US said substantial and
realistic measures will be imple-
mented to address illicit traf-
ficking in small arms and light
weapons in the Caribbean.

During an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Deputy

Symonette



Prime Minister and Minister of
Foreign Affairs Brent Symon-
ette welcomed the US’ assis-
tance and expressed confidence
that these new measures could
put a dent in crime.

“Any attempt at resolving the
illegal transfer of small arms
and weapons in the Caribbean
region is welcome. There’s no
question that these guns are

coming from, outside the

Bahamas because obviously we
don’t manufacture them.
“So it is of concern to not

only the police but to the wider |

community as to where these
arms are coming from, how they
are getting into the Bahamas,
and any attempt by the United
States or other countries to help
strengthen our border controls
and (negate) the trans-shipment
of drugs or illegal arms is wel-
comed.”

Representatives from the
United States and CARICOM

' will meet with stakeholders in

the nation’s security next week

to address illicit trafficking of
small arms in the region.

Mr Symonette said the semi-
nar, scheduled for December
11 and 12, will focus on com-
batting illicit trafficking of small
arms in Nassau.

“This will be a roundtable dis-
cussion which Minister (of
National Security) Tommy
Turnquest, the Minister of State
for Finance (Zhivargo) Laing
and others will attend to deal
with export controls, trade law
enforcement and customs issues
(and) the whole question of ille-
gal trafficking of arms.”

Patterns of trafficking and
origins of illicit small arms are
some areas that will be dis-
cussed at the seminar, Dan O’
Connor, Chief Political Officer
at the US Embassy in Nassau,
told The Tribune yesterday.

The Bahamas is on its way to
becoming a part of the United
Nation’s Convention Against
Transnational Organised Crime,
Mr Symonette also said yester-



‘

ADAM STEWART, CEO of Sandals Resorts, was the keynote speaker during 24th annual Leisure Travel Conference

in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

‘There’s no
denying that
luxury is
where the —
market is
and where
it’s going’

_ON December 1 Adam Stew-
art, ‘CEO of Sandals Resorts,
served as the designated
keynote speaker during the 24th
annual Leisure Travel Confer-
ence in Fort Lauderdale, Flori-
da, where he discussed the
importance of selling luxury to
more than 700 travel agents.

Mr Stewart explained that a
fickle economy might be
impacting budget travellers, but
that there are still countless
opportunities for agents to prof-
it within the ever-growing luxu-
ry travel market.

In the Caribbean, for
instance, Mr Stewart highlight-
ed the many upscale offerings
coming online across the region
as early as 2008, and the need
for agents to get out of the price
comparison shopping business,
and focus instead on the
Caribbean’s profitable luxury
arena.

“There’s no denying that lux-
ury is where the market is and
where it’s going,” Mr Stewart
said. “Now, more than ever, it is
crucial to move beyond selling
price to selling the experience.
With the number of high-end
condos, resorts and dedicated
private jet terminals popping
up across the region, the
Caribbean — as an example — is
becoming very profitable are-
na for luxury travel.”

The Leisure Travel Confer-
ence honours the key leaders
of the travel industry and recog-
nises the contributions of the
most dynamic individuals in the
business.

The conference was held at
the Broward County Conven-
tion Centre in Ft Lauderdale,
from November 29 through
December 1.

Ud
EXTERMINATORS

ity aby
PHONE: 322-2157



Pete eh
SHERWIN WILLIAMS
PAINT STORE
BT THR
CURSE CBT ey

eye

Ba

day.

The convention deals with
ways to eliminate the illegal
movement of immigrants, the
illegal trafficking of women and
children as well as the manu-
facturing and transportation of
small arms.

Ci

a

Pe
C4

ry

PRINCE GEORGE PLAZA BAY STREET ° TEL: 326-1196

-








Bahamas Co-operative
League: Jaquilia Newton
‘07 scholarship recipient

THE Bahamas Co-operative League has announced that its
scholarship recipient for this year is Jaquilia Newton.

Ms Newton is a 2007 graduate of Bahamas Academy Sec-
ondary School and is presently registered in the bachelor of
business administration management programme at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas. — s ; :

. The Bahamas Co-operative League Limited is the apex
body for credit unions and producer-supplier co-operatives and
has been granting a scholarship each year for the past seven

ears.

“Our family of financial co-operatives is proud of all the stu-
dents that have benefited from our scholarship programme,”
said the league in a statement. :





ples}

storewide

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007



Important
Notice

From Midnight to 5 a.m. on —
Saturday 8th December, 2007.

As we continue efforts to improve our service to you,
we ask you to take note that our Electronic Banking
System will be temporarily unavailable during the time
listed above while we conduct routine maintenance.

We apologise for any inconvenience that this may cause.

During this period, the following services will be
unavailable:

e ABM
e VISA transactions via ABM
e Internet and Telephone Banking

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this
necessary maintenance.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

é ; ET ERE. TOGETHER.
www.firstcaribbeanbank.com : Es <





Inspired by the sun...

Collection 2008








CHRISTMAS STORE HOURS FROM MONDAY DECEMBER 10TH
MONDAY - SATURDAY 10AM - 5PM
SUNDAY DECEMBER 22ND -10AM-2PM .
CHRISTMAS EVE, DECEBER 24TH - 10AM - 2PM
TELEPHONE 242-394-4111



| Pyahhama Hand Prlits.

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS ; |



SHOWN are Katie Gardiner (left), administrator of the Children Emergency Hostel and Linamae Bowe of ATEL.
The Adventurer Computer (centre) includes a computer, monitor, keyboard, mouse and voltage regulator.

Children’s Emergency
Hostel reaps benefits
of ‘The Adventurer’

A NEW computer system has
hit the Bahamas market and the
children from the Children's
Emergency Hostel are the first
to reap the benefits.

Advanced Technical Enter-
prises Limited (ATEL) has cre-
ated “The Adventurer” — a ful-
ly-loaded computer system that
designers say features high qual-
ity components that ensure
maximum performance,

“It features Maxtor — formal-
ly Seagate — hard drives which
are known for superior perfor-
mance, along with Asus and
Intel technology,” said a press
release. “The Adventurer can

be custom-built to fit individ-
ual needs and anyone from a
student to a teacher, and/or
businessperson, will appreciate
its user-friendliness and inge-
nuity.” :

ATEL said its vision is for
everyone in the Bahamas to
have access to a computer. Tak-
ing a step in the direction of ful-
filling this mission, the company
donated an Adventurer com-
puter to the children at the
Emergency Hostel.

The system is being used sole-
ly by the children as an educa-
tional and recreational tool.

The hostel fosters 37 children

Nags Se ee
at (Montague Motors

Village Road Near Shirley Street
Tel: 394-0323/5 OR 394-1377



tH

“ASS”
CASH
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SSL M Le MOLL ela ES



ranging in age from one to 12
years old and the computer was
a welcomed gift to the children
— especially those who can now
complete homework assign-
ments and school projects
before the holiday season
begins. :

Administrator at the Chil-~
dren's Emergency Hostel, Katie
Gardiner, said that the com-
puter is an early Christmas gift
from which the children have
already started to reap the ben-
efits.

She noted that the hostel is
in the process of creating a spe-
cial computer area for the chil-
dren so that they will no longer
have to use a section of the
administrative office. She
thanked ATEL's proprietor,
Ethric Bowe, for his kind dona-
tion.

Mr Bowe said he was happy
to donate the computer and
hopes to make other contribu-
tions that will benefit the chil-
dren.

He invited the public to learn
more about the “moderately
priced, user-friendly computer”
and noted that it can be enjoyed
by anyone “from the young to
the young at heart.”
THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 9

Disabled rights activists continue
their ‘independent living’ campaign

DISABLED rights
activists are continuing their
campaign for “independent
living” legislation to be
passed in the Bahamas.

In a statement issued yes-
terday, Jerome Thompson
noted that having a home to
call their own is the “uni-
versal dream” of able-bod-
ied persons in America as
well as in the Bahamas.

“It’s no different for peo-
ple with disabilities”.

“The community of per-
sons in the commonwealth
of the Bahamas with dis-
abilities deserve and
demand the right to inde-

Bid for legislation to
be passed in Bahamas



pendent living in the land of
our birth such as has been
accomplished by our broth-
ers and sisters in other
democratic countries;

notably, the United States
of America and England,”
Mr Thompson said in a
statement issued yesterday.

He pointed to Good Shep-:

herd’s Supported Indepen-
dent Living facility in the
US, which he described as a
“technologically advanced”
apartment complex with 18
housing units, which offers
accessible living arrange-
ments for low-income adults
with physical disabilities.
“This unique housing



Tim Aylen/BIS

Prime Minister to receive ‘Star

Of the Caribbean’ award in Miami

PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Finance Hubert Ingraham (right) greets Minister of Public Works and
Transport Earl Deveaux (left) after he arrived at the Lynden Pindling International Airport on Wednesday
December 5, ta attend the 31st Miami Conference on the Caribbean Basin in Miami, Florida. Minister of
National Security Tommy Turnquest (centre) looks on. The® ‘prime minister will give the keynote address

at the plenary dinner and will receive the “Star of the Caribbean” award.

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complex is designed specifi-
cally for persons with severe
disabilities and is funded by
Good Shepherd, the US
Department of Housing and
Urban Development, and
Federal Home Loan Bank
of Pittsburgh,” Mr Thomp-
son noted.

He said this is what the
Centre for Independent Liv-
ing — which he and his col-
leagues are working to
establish — will be for per-
sons with disabilities in the
Bahamas.

Defined

Mr Thompson said inde-
pendent living, as expressed
by the Independent Living
Movement worldwide, is
defined as “the means and
the right of persons with dis-
abilities to choose to live as
sufficiently and effectively
as they can, without unnec-
essary assistance from oth-
ers.

He said indépendent liv-
ing “does not mean that we
want to do everything by
ourselves, do not need any-
body or like to live in isola-
tion. It simply means that
we demand the same choic-
es and control in our every-
day lives that our non-dis-
abled brothers and sisters,
neighbors and friends take
for granted.”



Monday -



The 2007

Mercedes-Benz
C-Class is a 4-door,
ar tuxury



5-passeny

ORALEE’S FASHIONS

would like to remind our valued
clientle that they can layaway now
and pick up in time for Christmas!

Mackey Street ¢ Telephone: 393-0744
Saturday 9:00am - 5:30pm

Mr Thompson is one of
five disabled occupants of
Cheshire Home, who were
relocated by the former PLP
government and spent years
suffering in a series of inad-
equate housing situations as
a result.

He said the Independent
Living philosophy postulates
that people with disabilities
are the best experts on their
needs, “and therefore they

must take the initiative, indi-:

vidually and collectively, in
designing and promoting
better solutions and must

organise themselves for

political power.

“As citizens in democratic
societies, the Independent
Living Movement claims
that persons with disabili-
ties have the same right to
participation, to the same
range of options, degree of
freedom, control and
self-determination in
every day life and life pro-
jects that able-bodied citi-
zens take for granted,”
Mr Thompson’s statement
said.

He added that the
Bahamian building code is

not being applied as it ought ©

to be with respect.to the
construction of disabled-
friendly public infrastructure

_such as sidewalks as well as

the design and construction
of buildings for public
access.








The Christian
Book Shop

AND FIND
A GREAT
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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



mS eae eae AANA ote TNE tea TRS SN NRA RR A RT
Annual Festival Noel set for Rand Nature Centre

THE Grand Bahama Branch
of The Bahamas National Trust
is very excited about the 13th
annual Festival Noel, which will
be held at the Rand Nature
Centre on December 7 begin-

ning at 7pm.

Bristol Wines & Spirits are
back once again as one of the
major sponsors of this year’s
event along with co-. »onsors.,
Cool 96, Parfum de Paris, John

Bull, Ginn Sur Mer and
Freeport Advertising and Privit-
ing

Bristol Wines & Spirits, who
have been a sponsor of Festi-
val Noel since tts inception, are

“pulling out all of the stops” as
they provide a wide selection
of wines from all over the
world, said the organisers in a
statement.

According to Robbie Butler,
sales manager at Bristol Wines
& Spirits, the company will be
serving “white wines like sauvi-
gnon blancs, crisp, dry and
refreshing pinot grigios that pro-
duce a taste of honey, pear and
lemon; chardonnays and ries-
lings.”

. Also served will be red wines
“like chiantis, which are simple
and elegant as well as cabernets
and merlots. The wines come
from countries all over the
world, like France, South
Africa, Chile, Argentina, Italy,
Spain, Australia, New Zealand
and America,” Mr Butler said.

Of course, no event is com-
plete without champagne, which
will be opened late in the
evening.

Also back by popular
demand is the Bacardi Mojito
Bar, which will feature peach

NOW HIRING

Maintenance Staff

Highly motivated, qualified applicants must:

Be able to work with little supervision
Be willing to work weekends & flexible hours

Competitive Salary & Great Benefits

Interested persons should e-mail resume to
humanresources@aetosbahamas.com or
hand deliver to the Head Office on Harold Road,
Deadline for application is December 40th, 2007.

No phone calls please.







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CJ On the Rock ~ April Cartwright

O) Evidence Vision

( Singing Hallelujah - Alas

C) Da Way We Praise Him . fapernacle Concert Choir
C) Never Stop Praising the Lord The Apostolic Mass Choi
: C} Who’s Gonna Fill Their Shoes - The Rahming Brothers
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‘ Select One song from both categories.

A Vote for your fe

February 1, 2007 @
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Voting Deadline:
December 7, 2007

Voting Options:
* Deliver this voting ballotto
Ministry of Tourism on your island |
Fax this ballot to 356-6956
Or
‘ Vote online at
_ WWW. Caciqueawards com








ATTENDEES at last year’s Festival Noel are pictured trying some of the 20 wines showcased at the event. This
year, Bristol Wines & Spirits will feature 25 wines, champagnes and a Bacardi Mojito tent.

rum, and guests will also have
an opportunity to try several
martinis,

To compliment the various
wines that will be served at Fes-
tival Noel, the annual Chef Noel
competition will return.

This year, many of the best
restaurants from all over the
island will vie for votes as they

compete in this year’s Chet
Noel Competition.
Last year’s winner, The Har-

bour Room, will be returning
to defend their title. “We are
always excited and ready to sup-
port the Bahamas National
Trust and be a part wherever
food, wine and culinary art is
concerned,” said Jeff Butler of
the Harbour Room.

The competition is reported-
ly already heating up, as restau-
rants such as “Sabor”, Chef
Worly’s newest restaurant at
Pelican Bay, are ready to show
exactly what it is they bring to
the table.

The Ferry House will return
to the competition with their
new head Chef, Pascuel Bur-
rows.

The organising committee
said it is pleased that students
from the College of the
Bahamas’ School of Hospitality,
under the direction of Chef
Maycock. are also attending
thanks to the efforts of Chef
Boulet and Luciano’s.



SHOWN are the Sabor Chef and crew during a visit made to the Rand
Nature Centre as they prepare for Festival Noe! 2007. Sabor will be one
of the seven restaurants competing in this year's Chef Noe! Competition.
The winner of Chef Noel is decided by the attendees who vote for their

favourite restaurant on the night.

They also revealed that Joe
Ret will roasting a “sweet and
succulent pig” over an open
fire,.

“To top off the great wine
and delicious food that every-
one can enjoy, sponsors John
Bull and Parfum de Paris have
donated some fabulous items
to this year’s silent auction,”
said the statement.

John Bull has donated his and
hers Movado watches, a
Dooney & Bourke tote bag.
David Yurman earrings. an

ey
ae

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Parfum de Paris donated a
large basket of perfume for the
silent auction and will promote
four new fragrance lines on the
night.

All proceeds from the auc-
tion will benefit the Grand
Bahama branch of National
Trust fundraising efforts.

Organisers said tickets are on
sale at Bristol Wines & Spirits,
John Bull and The Rand Nature
Centre.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 11



Film blends Bahamian spirit with
modern wisdom and humour

WITH a dose of Bahamian
spirit, TV personality and psy-
chiatrist Dr David Allen will
bring to this year’s Bahamas
International Film Festival a
delightful parable that touches
on the complexities of hearts
and lives in the modern world.

The short (15 minutes) live-
action, comedy-drama film fea-
tures a talking, cartoon-animat-
ed fish named “Pudgy,” who
gets beached upon the real
Bahamian shore.

Pudgy’s amusing encounters
with various beach-goers reflect
our patterns of living — or not
living fully - in today’s world.

Filmed by Bonnemaison, Inc
in Nassau and Paradise Island
with local crew members, the
film features Bahamian talent,
Dr David Allen, newcomer
Christa Palmer, and 11-year-old
screen actress Morganne
Bethel, who made her debut in
film playing the role of Emily in
John Stockwell's nto the Blue.

The film’s theme song was
composed and performed by
Christian McCabe, a minister
at New Providence Community
Church (NPCC) in Nassau.

BIFF Screenings of
Pudgy: A Bahamian
Parable

e Friday, December 7 —
3.45pm, Atlantis Theatre

e Saturday, December
8 — noon British Colonial
Hilton

e Sunday, December 9
— 2pm British Colonial
Hilton

An international supporting
cast from the US and Latin
America features 11-year-old
Peruvian-American Michelle
Moore as the voice of Pudgy.

The story: Walking along a
beautiful Bahamian shoreline,
a man (Dr Allen) adds his
young granddaughter (Mor-
ganne Bethel) to the story he
tells her about a spunky little
fish named Pudgy.

Too cocky for his own good,
Pudgy gets beached upon the
real Bahamian shore and is
forced to endure humorous
encounters with passers-by from
the modern world as he des-
perately tries to get their atien-
tion, before being saved at the
brink of death.

From various locations, the
lively and spontaneous Dr
Allen delivers insightful solilo-
quies about Pudgy’s calamity,
rousing us to listen to our hearts
to let our own Pudgy live.

A festive local parade and a



IN THE PICTURE: Dr. David Allen is photographed during filming.

beach dance to the Pudgy
theme song bring more Bahami-
an spirit to the big screen. Beau-
tifully filmed tin High Defini-
tion, the film is, made for gen-
eral audiences.

Pudgy: A Bahamian Parable
was crafted by an award-win-
ning team: filmmaker/journal-
ist Mari Bonnemaison as direc-

‘tor/producer; Emmy award-

winning filmmaker/Discovery
Channel narrator Brooks T
Moore as director of photogra-
phy; and filmmaker/performing
artist Marisa Arbona-Ruiz as
screenwriter/co-producer/assis-
tant director.

The film is based on a story
written by Dr Allen, an inter-
nationally known psychiatrist
and author, and Bahamian tele-
vision and radio host.

“His metaphorical story-
telling exemplifies human dra-
ma and the call to recognise the
need to seek help with healing
our past and transforming our
lives,” said a press release about
the film.

Dr Allen conceptualised the
parable after stumbling upon a
fish that had washed up onto
the shore.

“l began to reflect on how,
at some point in our lives, we all
get ‘beached’,” he said. “We get
blindsided by our buried emo-
tions, lifestyles and the trap-
pings of our personalities, yet
we can receive help, and let our
Pudgy live.”

His goal is to help people live
up to their. fullest potential.
“Meeting David was life-chang-
ing for me,” says Mari Bon-
nemaison. “He is a brilliant, yet
down-to-earth doctor with that
ability to look right through
you. We all have that inner
child, our conscience that is call-
ing us. Having seen his story of
Pudgy touch so many people, |
jumped at the chance to work
with David on the film.”







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Screenwriter Arbona-Ruiz
adds, “Bridging entertainment
with wisdom and humour to
dnspire transformation is pow-
erful. Working with David was
a profound and serendipitous
experience.”

Dr David Allen is an inter-
nationally recognised expert on
addiction treatment and gives
seminars on interpersonal and
spiritual development.

He trained in medicine at St
Andrew's University, Scotland,
and in psychiatry and public

_ health at Harvard University.

He taught psychiatry and reli-



gion at Yale and was clinical
professor in psychiatry at
Georgetown Medical School.

Dr Allen has pioneered
addiction treatment pro-
grammes in Washington, DC,
the Czech Republic, and the
Bahamas for which he received
the 1987 Bennett Common-
wealth Prize by the UK Royal
Society of Arts.

Voted one of the most out-
standing psychiatrists in Amer-
ica in 2002-2003, he was named
a Most Distinguished Fellow of
the American Psychiatric Asso-
ciation (2003).











LIFE’S A BEACH: Bahamian crew on the set of Pudgy: A Bahamian
Parable.

AVID YURMAN

DAVID YURMAN 2007



Join us for a special holiday event
to celebrate the launch of our

CGRAPHITE ChE COLLECTION

by David Yurman

Friday. December 7
6:00pm to 8:00pm

David Yurman Boutique
Bay Street
PAGE 12, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



PRIME Minister and |
Minister of Finance
Hubert Ingraham
(right) greets Oscar
E Spencer, new resi-
dent representative
of the Inter-Ameri-
can Development
Bank (IDB), duringa &
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Office of the Prime
Minister on Tuesday.



Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture
Department of Youth & Sports

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SECURITY SERVICESAT VARIOUS SPORTING FACILITIES.

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from January Ist, 2008.

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Companies interested in providing the security services may contact
Mr. Bruce Walker Deputy, Permanent Secretary, at the Department
of Youth & Sports (502-0600 or 502-0613/22) for further informa-

tion and arrangement of site visits.

All tender bids include the following:

¢ Proposal cost (Outline the fees, they will expect the Ministry
of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture to pay the company per

month)

e Copy of Business License

e National Insurance Board letter of good standing

e Employee and Public liability insurances

The successful companies will be expected ta, provide adequate
communication system and uniformed guards.

Sealed tenders are to be submitted no later than 5: 00pm, on Friday,
December.21st, 2007 and addressed to:

Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture

P.O. Box N-4891
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attention: Mr. Bruce Walker, Deputy Permanent Secretary

Tender for Security Service

The Permanent Secretary reserves the right to reject any and all

tenders.

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture

Tim Aylen/BIS






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The first of the 24 cruise
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December 9, at the City Mar-
ket in Harbour Bay from 9am
to Llam.

“We are very excited about
this promotion,” said Azale-
ta Ishmael-Newry, marketing
director of Bahamas Super-
markets Limited, operators of

City Market giving ‘away’
cruises in major holiday
season promotion

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“It’s our way of saying thank
you to customers who contin-
ue to make us their nuinber
one choice.

“They’ve been so faithful
and supportive over the years

and we wanted to give them |

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS



“ICTURED (L TO R) ARE: John Westwood, director of International Development, ILEX; Dr Pandora Johnson,
‘ice president for outreach College of the Baharnas; Lesley Graham, president ILEX; Glenda Mae Black-
vartwright; Dr Christina Nwosa, director of the Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services (CEES).

Officials pleased with COB’s
delivery of IMEX programmes

TWO senior executives from
‘ne Institute of Legal Execu-
‘ives visited Nassau to discuss
oroadening and developing
‘heir offerings.

{LEX is a British based
organisation that oversees edu-
ational. programmes for peo-
ole wishing to enter the law pro-
fession in many countries
around the world.

Mrs Lesley Graham, presi-
sent ILEX, and John West-
wood, director of international
development for ILEX, met
with College of the Bahamas
vice president for outreach, Dr
Pandora Johnson and the direc-
tor of the Centre for Continuing
Education and Extension Ser-
vices (CEES), Dr Christina
Nwosa.

At the meeting, Mr West-

wood expressed his apprecia- 2PPear in court on their client’s yy with ihe way it has been

: + behalf but also see them eligible easy : ” Bal 1

tion of the way the College has es ee done here fp the Bahamas. In ‘ A . :

administered and delivered [© become members of the judi- fact, we are gom¢ io use the col. vailub! ir Nassau * Bay Street

ILEX programmes and his eed mae Mr Westwood sees — Jege’s work as 9 siodel for 3th- & 17--92-85/1 + wwwiittleswitzerland.com _

Jesire to establish a clear path ESE: VION, ARE SAPeuUee. « er jurisdictions. ,
: 3pportunities i RUBA + 4 PATAD TRANE TURK - KEY WEST » NASSAL
“yom those programmes to the YPPOPtHiitic The 1LEX parea-legs RUBA + BARbr ee oR IND IRK KEY WEST NASSAU
‘.LB and other professional for encour grammic offered in conjunction. N Noo ST KITTS © ST MAARTEN 2 ST THOMAS

‘egal courses.

“We have been in the
Sahaimas toi six years,” stated
‘ir Westwood, “and we have
veen impressed by the rigour
of the work done by the Col-
tege in presenting the para-iegal
programmes. Now we want to
‘alk to the academic board of
ihe College about presenting
professional programmes so the
students will, in effect; become
sawyers here in the Bahamas as
& result of our programmes.”

Dr Johnson added that the
-ollege was hoping to offer its
own LLB programme in the
roreseeable future and Mrs
araham spoke enthusiastically

on the [LEX legal executive
courses, which provide an alter-
native yet thorough way
through part-time study io enter
the legal profession for
those who don’t foliow the
usual university to law school
route.

“in Britain at thé monient, a
legal executive is a lawyer,” she
explained, “but does not have
the status to appear before a
judge in court.

“But that is changing thanks
to the Legal Services Bill going
through parliament at the
moment.”

Opportunities

This Bill will not only grant
legal executives permission to









Bahamians tc consider the gal
executive route to the profes-
sion.

“With improved marketabil-
ity,” he asserted, “Bahamians
will be able to practice around
the world and their opportuni-
ties will increase tremendous-
ly.”

Glenda Mae _— Black-
Cartwright, a secretary in the
Attorney General's Office,
completed the Paralegal Cer-
tificate in Law at the college
and spoke appreciatively of
what she learnt.

She said she feels capable of
coping with anything a legal sec-
retary would have to and feels

she would like to move «> to
another levei by enrolling
another ILEX programme.

Dr Nwosa announced that
CEES would be miroducing
two new courses in the Fali of
2008 to include among its offer-
ings for the li.EX certificates:
one will be Law Office Man-
agement and the other the Law
of the Sea. *

Both will have direct impli-
cations for the Bahamas and Mr
Westwood went on to applaud
the way the content of the
courses at the college has been
coniextualised to reflect the dif-
ferences between Bahamian
and British law.

“We encourage contextuali-
sation in all the countries our
programmes are delivered,” he
explained, “and are very hap-



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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



NATIONAL YOUTH ROAD SAFETY SYMPOSIUM



By Nor’adila Hafeeza
Hepburn 7

Soa aie mre ©

“1 felt for the man who was
injured. I felt very saddened by
it ~ one day you can walk and
the next day you can’t.”

pre are

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ORE than
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Workers’ House to attend the
third Annual National Youth
Road Safety Symposium.

The all-day event, sponsored
by Chevron Bahamas Limited
in collaboration with the Min-
istry of Works and Transport
and the Road Traffic Depart-
ment, was geared towards edu-
cating young people about the
importance of being safe on
the road.

This year’s theme was
“embracing today’s opportu-

‘nities for a safer tomorrow.”
The keynote speaker was Min-
ister of Works and Transport
Dr Earl Deveaux, who spoke
to students about what they
can do to help combat the ris-
ing number of traffic fatalities,
and how they can improve
their own road safety aware-
ness. .

Dr Deveaux told students that
better enforcement of the law,
cracking down on bad behav-
iour by motorists, and reducing
the number of vehicles on the
road are important in keeping

Jne minute can change the

More than 100 ninth-
grade students spend
a day learning about
the importance of
safety on our roads

drivers safe.

Education

e emphasised that

the biggest weapon

the country has in the fight

against traffic fatalities is pub-

lic education, and applauded

the students for participating
in the one day forum.

“Your presence today is very

important. You can make a dif-

ference in some of the habits
that are stuck with us older
people. Many people do not
know how to use (things such
as) roundabouts. We need bet-
ter public education,” said Dr
Deveaux.

Amando Vegas, district
retail manager for Chevron
Bahamas Limited, said: “I
absolutely agree with Minister
Deveaux. I think the earlier we
start the better it will be.”

“These students are going to



ATTENTIVE: Students listen caiefully ‘using the ania road safety symposium whose theme was
“embracing tbany’ S$ opportunities for a safer tomorrow.”

Cc

Black Kow

oP Soil
$3


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 15



-. LOCAL NEWS



rest of your life,

“These students are going to
be the future drivers on the
road, the more they under-
stand about the importance of
following the rules and using
seatbelts, the better it is going
to be. If they get the good
behaviours from the start, they
will always follow the rules,”
Mr Vegas said.

Through a series of sober-
ing presentations, participants
were shown what can happen
when people do not drive care-
fully or intentionally break the
laws of the road by speeding
or not wearing seatbelts.

Graphic slides

Ninth-graders grimaced as
they viewed graphic slides of
dead bodies covered in blood,
severed limbs, and collapsed
skulls courtesy of Reserve
Assistant Superintendent of
Police, Richard Rahming, one
of the presenters in the sym-
postum. “It-was. gruesome,”
admits one student, “but it
showed us what happens to
people when they speed.”

There was also an informa-
tive session which dealt with
the kinds of injuries that result
from traffic accidents, present-
ed by with Dr Delon Brennen.

The session that was most
effective was a one-on-one ses-
sion with a car crash survivor.

Daniel Bastian shared with
students how one minute can
change the rest of your life.

One night in 1978, Mr Bast-
ian was driving along the road,
when he veered his vehicle into
the bushes to avoid a head-on
collision with a car speeding in
the opposite direction. He was °
left paralysed for the rest of his
life.

To this day, police have nev-
er found the suspect involved
in the accident. “I felt for the
man who was injured,” said
Sandiya Paul, a ninth-grader
from H O Nash Junior High. “I
felt very saddened by it — one
day you can walk and the next’ ~
day you can’t”.

The day ended with a work- ©
shop, where students, grouped
by their respective school, used
their creativity to pen catchy
mottos, bright posters, perform
raps and acted out skits to the
delight of both fellow students
and organisers. Surprise gifts,
and a raffle of a cell-phone
capped off the symposium.

“Educating the next genera-
tion abouteroad safety is of
prime importance to the organ-
isers of the symposium”, said
Mr Jack Thompson, Controller
Road Traffic Department and
one of the organisers of the
event. He stressed that in order
to seriously tackle accidents
and fatalities, focus must
placed on the future genera-

tion.

“When I was growing up,
they had a saying: bend the
tree while it’s young. The soon-
er we can catch our young kids
and instill some things into
them the better. The root of it
is to really catch the younger
ones, ” said Mr Thompson.

Stating that every life lost is
one too many, Mr Thompson
says he believes.that the sym-
posium will be beneficial to the
students who participated, and
that is will resonate with them
for a long time.



a: o- = lus

“These stu-
dents are
going to be
the future dri-
vers on the |
road, the
more they |
understand
about the
importance of ©
following the
rules and
using seat-
belts, the bet- |
ter it is going
to be.”



Amando Vegas

*





KEY MESSAGE: Minister of Works and Transport Earl Deveaux dri-
ves home the safety message.

WORD OF ADVICE: Cordero Minnis, Texax
shares safety tips at the symposium.





o Youth spokesperson



TESTIMONY: A road accident
survivor tells his story during
the all-day conference on road
safety.






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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

Moyo VM] -\ Se

THE TRIBUNE



Expert: Esfakis death attributable
to the failure of hospital staff

that Mr Esfakis should have

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FROM page one

to the failure of hospital staff
to check whether he had an
inhalation injury.

Mr Esfakis was admitted
to Doctor’s Hospital at
around lam on Saturday,
April 20, to be treated for
burns he had sustained after
his shirt caught afire during
a party that Friday evening.
He died in that facility on
Monday, April 22.

Yesterday, Dr Luterman
told the court that Mr
Esfakis “should have sur-
vived” the injuries for which
he was.admitted, “or to put
it another way, if he was
going to die from this injury
it shouldn’t have been in this
way.”

Dr Luterman testified that
he had been asked by one of
the patient’s sisters, Julianna
in 2002 to review the hospi-
tal records detailing her
brother’s treatment because
“she wanted to know more
about whether or not he
could have survived his
injury” if, for example, he
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where.

The Us expert told the
court that upon reviewing
the medical records he saw
that Mr Esfakis was deemed
to have 25 per cent burns
when he was admitted to the
hospital. The deepest burns

“were on his hands, and the

hair in his nose was noted as
“singed”, he said.

He said that the treatment
given to Mr Esfakis in the
Emergency Room included
the application of a cool
compress to the burn areas,
and the initiation of intra-
venous fluids.

Dr Luterman said that
while “in most ER rooms in
the UK and US” medical
staff would check a burn’s
patient’s airway at an early
stage for “smoke breathed
in” there was “no record of
this having happened” in Mr
Esfakis’ case.

The professor said that
medical trainees are taught
“across the board” that
checking the airway is “crit-
ical.”

“It goes ‘A is for airway’,
‘B is for breathing’ - you
start with the airway,” said
Dr Luterman. He said that
when a burns victim’s airway
gets burnt “it will swell”
eventually reaching the point
where it is “near to closing
off.”

He said that Mr Esfakis’
case was “an absolutely clas-
sic example” of why check-
ing for inhalation injuries in
burns patients is something
that is “emphasised” to
those receiving medical
training.

Dr -Luterman then out-
lined the amount of fluid



been administered to
counter “burn shock” stat-
ing that given his weight and
condition he should have
been given six litres of fluid.
He said that medical staff
should then ensure that
patients “maintain adequate
urine output.”

He continued that in Mr
Esfakis’ case he was in fact
“pouring out urine” at a rate

- of around 500cc, when rec-

ommended output should
have been between 30 - S0cc.

“Litres (of fluid) were
being administered and its
as if no one’s watching
(urine output),” he said, lat-
er adding that he had “never
been able to explain the
amount of fluid (Mr Esfakis)
was getting.”

Dr Luterman then out-
lined the type of equipment
that would normally be used
to check for a smoke inhala-
tion injury. “Most ER rooms
have one. When I first
looked at the records I won-
dered whether (Doctor’s
Hospital) had one,” he said.

However, he said that
when records later revealed
that a bronchioscopy was
performed on the patient on
Sunday, Dr Lutermann said
he realised that hospital staff

had had the necessary equip-.

ment to perform this proce-
dure from the start.

He described the fact that
this was not done as “med-
ically unacceptable.”

The expert witnéss then
went on to say that he found
it “disconcerting” that hos-
pital notes showed that when
the nurse noted the patient
began feeling like his neck

Bahamian artists in Miami show

BAHAMIAN artists Lynn and Holly Parotti are among
exhibitors at a Miami show which opens today.
The group exhibition, called Safety Zones, is at the Diaspo-

ta Vibe Gallery.

Painter John Cox of Nassau is also among exhibitors, who
include-leading names from all over the Caribbean.

On Saturday, there will be a special presentation by interna-
tional multi-media artist Chris Cozier.

Author signing

AUTHOR Claire Belgrave will be signing copies of her book
about Bahamian theatre at Chapter One Bookstore on Saturday.
Ms Belgrave will be at the Thompson Boulevard store from
noon to 2pm to sign copies of Theatre in the Bahamas: From OI

Story to Rep Theatre.

The book is published by Nassau-based Guanima Press Ltd.



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

share your news

The Tribune wants to hear












was constricted — “like he’s
choking, strangling” — that
“different doctors” she
called by telephone were
“not answering.”

He then noted that when a
doctor told the nurse to
“loosen the dressings” on Mr
Esfakis’ neck in résponse to °
these symptoms, that this
was “not the problem.”

“T got kind of chills when I
was reading that,” said Dr
Luterman.

“It’s what we try to teach
our students all the way up,
it has to be avoided.”

Hospital records then said
Mr Esfakis “reached the
point where the nurse
noticed he was turning
blue,” said the witness.

He said that when medical
staff consequently per-
formed a tracheotomy on Mr
Esfakis to ease his breath-
ing this “add(ed) another
insult to the third part of his
inhalation injury.”

He further added that the
“enormous amount of fluid”
hospital records showed Mr
Esfakis was receiving would .
have “aggravated any .
swelling” already experi-
enced.

Dr Luterman told the
court that normally 25 per
cent burns on a male in his
40s “is not a lethal injury.”

“It should not have killed
him unless there were some
untoward complications,” he
said. Asked later by magis-
trate William Campbell
whether Mr Esfakis was sub-
ject to any such complica-
tions, Dr Luterman said
“no”.

He said-that these would
include, for example, if
weeks later he were to have
got an infection.

“It’s very unusual to see
this in England or the US,”
Dr Luterman told the court,
adding: “To have that many
physicians come in contact
with the patient and for

.there to be no evaluation of

the airway...”

He said that when the
nurse called doctors noting
that the patient was experi-
encing symptoms such as a
feeling of-strangulation or
“anything to do with that,
he should have been
checked.”

In the US medical staff are
“so paranoid about this kind
of problem (inhalation
injuries in burns patients)
that they do it (check for it),
and then have it done again.
That’s how devastating a
problem it is and why you
do not miss it initially,” said
Dr Luterman.

He told the court that,
according to US guidelines,
Mr Esfakis’ symptoms
should have caused medical
staff to send him for treat-
ment in a specialist burns
centre. “For him to have not
been transferred to a burns
centre, for me, was a failure
of the system,” he said.

The inquest continues this
week in the coroner’s court,
number seven. It is being
heard by Magistrate William
Campbell.

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THE TRIBUNE

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 19



NY ARO EY
Claim that Christie using
election possibility to

maintain control of PLP

FROM page one

porters and encourage the belief
that Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham is “uncomfortable”
with the slim margin he cur-
rently enjoys in the House of
Assembly. :

A confidential source within
the PLP reports that Mr
Christie is using this “holding
tactic” to maintain control over
the PLP and block the advances
of PLP MPs Obie Wilchcombe
or Dr Bernard Nottage from
gaining the party reins.

On Tuesday night, Mr
Christie called an emergency
Parliamentary meeting to dis-
cuss a “new plan” to try to raise

money for the party. The party’s
finance committee, it was
reported, made an audio visual
presentation to the national
general council to launch this
fundraising campaign.

However, it is claimed that
to an enlightened few, the tactic
is clear — to create a false sense
of inevitability that would
secure the relevancy of Mr
Christie at the February con-
vention.

Even if the PLP won the
highly contested Pinewood con-
stituency, inside sources main-
tain that the party is still too
financially drained of money to
even attempt a run at.a general
election.

Man dies after

drive-by shooting

FROM page one

ick Seymour of Grand Bahama said that police are very con-
cerned about the nature of this latest murder.

“It was a drive-by shooting in broad daylight as we have
recently seen in Nassau, so we are concerned. We are pulling
out all the stops in our investigation,” he said.

Chief Supt Seymour said this incident brings Grand
Bahama’s murder count for the year to 13 — a high number

for that island.

However, he pointed out that of those 13 murders, police
have so far been able to solve 10 cases.
“That is a very high percentage. Still, one murder i is one too

many,” he said.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey, press liaison officer in Grand
Bahama, reported that several of Grand Bahama’s recent
murders have circumstances in common.

Ms Mackey explained that many of the recent murders
have been either drug related or arose out of domestic dis-

putes and armed robberies.

This latest incident comes just as family, friends and col-
leagues gathered yesterday to pay tribute to the life of 64-
year-old Vincent Pedican - Grand Bahama’s 10th murder vic-

tim for the year.

-The memorial service was held at the auditorium of Eight
Rock’s High School, where Mr Pedican worked the night

pout as a security officer.

Darold Miller trial

' FROM page one

MITT TE

complaints of a sexual nature
were lodged against him.

er was consequently sus-
pended from his duties as
Chief Operating Officer at
GEMS as a result of police
investigations, but has main-

tained his innocence through-
out his ordeal.

The trial was adjourned
yesterday as Magistrate McK-
ay noted that she had been
informed that the prosecutor,

. who is dealing with the case, is

currently off the island on cir-
cuit. The trial was adjourned
to Friday, January 4, 2008.

Machine readable passports

3
i FROM page one

Besides the lack of money, it
was also claimed that neither
the PLP, nor the FNM, would
seek to have another ‘election
on the current voter registra-
tion list, which is riddled
with persons not entitled to
vote.

“Mr Christie is doing this
because he wants to hold the
party in a position of ‘hold’ so
no one would move him,”
added another source within the
PLP.

- “He wants them to think that

it’s going to be a re-election so
you must not change the
leader.”

Political pundits agree that it
would be “extremely unlikely”
that Prime Minister Ingraham
would call an early election.
They cited a number of reasons,
mainly the escalating crime

numbers, the slowing down of

the Bahamian economy, and
the lack of a proper voters’ reg-
ister.

“How could he do that? But
Mr Christie is selling this to his
people to get them excited that
there is going to be an election
so that no one would move him
as leader. That’s what this is all
about,” the source claimed.







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4 so plans to include the photographs and fingerprints of deported
dividuals in the yet unveiled border protection system, which is.
cheduled to begin in Nassau in January 2008, Mr Burrows added.

Indusa Global, a software solutions provider from Greenville,

outh Carolina, which has been working with the Immigration

a. for the last five years to improve the department’s data-
ase, is also assisting in the creation of the new border protection
ystem.

* Though the new ePassport and visa issuance system will bolster

Kama with providing travel and residence documents, Virginia

Ramadan, counsel general at the US embassy, also noted that the
ew machine readable passports will help Bahamians to be
processed at certain US border checkpoints.

' “It’s going to really facilitate Bahamian travel to the United

States, particularly through the ports of entry here in Nassau and

Freeport, ” said Ms Ramadan, as currently Bahamians are unable

to swipe their passports.

, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent

Symonette said at the launch of the changes:

' “The Bahamas’ ePassport, visa, e-Identification and border con-

trol initiative is of significant national and international impor-

tance. It will enhance the security of our State and it is anticipated

pa over time, it will ease the passage of our citizens throughout

the world.”

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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007 ! THE TRIBUNE

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ipa asia ANAS



US SECRETARY of State Condoleezza Rice listens, as Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, speaks in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Wednesday, Dec. 5,
2007, where Rice called for more African countries to send peacekeepers to Somalia, where an Islamic insurgency has killed thousands of civilians
this year. Rice was in the Ethiopian capital to meet with African leaders after expressing growing unease about deteriorating security and faltering
peace deals in a number of countries on the continent. The United Nations has said Somalia is facing the worst humanitarian crisis in Africa.



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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 21

oe

Rice says
more African
countries

Should send ©
peacekeepers

to Somalia

@ ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia
MORE African countries
should send peacekeepers to
Somalia, where an Islamic insur-
gency has killed thousands of
civilians this year, Secretary of
State Condoleezza Rice said

Wednesday, according to Associ-

ated Press.

Rice was in the Ethiopian cap-
ital, where the African Union is
headquartered, to meet with
African leaders after expressing
growing unease about deteriorat-
ing security and faltering peace
deals-in a number of countries on
the continent. The United
Nations has said Somalia is facing
the worst ‘humanitarian crisis in
Africa.

Uganda has about 1,800 troops
in Somalia, officially as the van-
guard of a larger African Union
peacekeeping force, though so far
no other countries have sent rein-
forcements. Ethiopia, which sent
soldiers to Somalia late last year
to wipe out*Islamic militants, is
not part of the peacekeeping
force and hoping to withdraw.

“We do believe the Ethiopian
forces should not have to stay in
Somalia past a certain point, and
that will require peacekeeping
forces, very robust peacekeeping
force, and so that will be part of
my discussions here,” Rice said.

Peacekeepers have tried to
pacify Somalia before, with trag-
ic results. More than a decade
ago, a massive U.N. relief opera-
tion was launched for thousands
of civilians left starving because of
fighting in Somalia. But 1993
attacks by Somali militiamen that
brought down two Black Hawk
helicopters and killed 18 U.S. ser-
vicemen were followed by the
withdrawal of U.S. troops and the
eventual end of the U.N. peace-
keeping operation.

Rice, who is scheduled to meet
with Somalia’s new prime minis-
ter during her trip, said she will
impress upon him the need be
inclusive in his administration.

“The Somali leadership is going
to have to really reach out to all

' the elements that are not associ-

ated with terrorism,” Rice said.
“It has to be broad and that’s
really my message to the prime
minister. He has to find a way to
broaden his base of support.”

Last year, a radical Islamic
movement accused of links With
al-Qaida seized control of much
of the southern part of Somatia,
prompting Ethiopia to invade in
December 2006 with Washing-
ton’s tacit backing. The Islamic
movement was toppled, but its
supporters have waged an Iraq-
style insurgency. A Somali human
rights groups said over the week-
end that nearly 6,000 civilians
have been killed in the crosgfire
this year.

While in Addis Ababa, Rice
also planned talks with Ethiopian
Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, a
U.S. counterterrorism ally criti-
cized for a crackdown on political
opponents and whose country
shares a tense border with arch-
foe Eritrea.

“We don’t need a use of force
here to deal with what is obvi-
ously a significant border prob-
lem,” Rice told reporters aboard
her plane en route to Addis Aha-
ba, referring to a feared resump-
tion of the 1998-2000 Ethiopian-
Eritrean war that killed tens of
thousands of people. oy

The war ended with a peace
agreement but the border issue
remains unsettled as Ethiopia
never fully accepted the delin-

eation of an independent com-~

mission that disbanded itself last
week after the neighbors were
unable to agree to mark the new
frontier.
Rice is only the fourth secre-

' tary of state to visit Ethiopia and

the first ina decade. Madeleine
Albright made a stop in Addis
Ababa in 1997, according to the
State Department historian’s
office.

In her first meeting Wednes-
day, Rice met with leaders from
Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda and
Congo to discuss fighting in cast
ern Congo that threatens stabili-
ty throughout their Great Lake:
region.

“We had a very thorough dis-
cussion,” Ugandan President
Yoweri Museveni said later.
adding, “Part of the danger in
Africa is handling issues in a
superficial way.”

Rice said dealing with rebels
in eastern Congo is critical to re-
establishing normalcy in a-region
that has been devastated by
decades of war and genocide that
have killed millions.

On Sudan, she said she would
tackle elements of the Darfur
conflict and the faltering peace
deal that ended Sudan’s long-r
ning North-South civil war. But
Sudanese President Omar al-
Bashir’s government skipped 2
meeting with Rice, according to a
list of delegates released by
the U.S. Embassy in Addis Aba
ba.

Rice said she wants to focus on
overcoming logistical hurdles in
Dariur to standing up a joint
U.N.--\frican. Union peacekeep-
ing force for the vast region which
has been ravished by years of con-
flict. “We're just going to have to
remove these obstacles and get
on with it,” Rice said.

As for the 2005 peace deal
between al-Bashir’s government
and southern rebels, she said “it’s
time to refocus our efforts there.”

“That is really an agreement
that we cannot afford to let
unravel.” Rice said.






US defense secretary says sects



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and stable Iraq is within reach

lm BAGHDAD

DEFENSE Secretary Robert Gates said Wednesday he believes a
secure and stable Iraq is within reach, although there’s been an
uptick in violence in the north where al-Qaida is trying to re-establish
a foothold, according to Associated Press.

Gates’ comments came as a car bomb exploded ina largely Shiite
neighborhood of Baghdad, killing at least 14 people, police said.
The explosion happened across the Tigris River from the Green
Zone shortly before Gates’ news conference with Traq’s defense
minister,

Acknowledging the precarious nature of any security gains in the
country, Gates said that much work remains to be done to cnstue
Iraqi forces are ready to take over More military duties from U.S.
troops. Iraqis who have been lighting insurgents on the local level
must be integrated into Iraqi security forces, for example, he said,

“T believe that-a secure, stable Iraq is within reach.” Gates said
However, he added, “We need to be patient.”

Gates noted a decline in overall violence in Iraq during recent
months, which has led to a substantial increase in the number of
refugees returning home as well as international investment in the
country despite nearly five years of war.

This, he said, has “led to a growing sense of normalcy and hope

Still, Gates acknowledged increasing militant and terrorist activi-
ties in northern Iraq, a situation he discussed with U.S. commanders
during his first visit to Mosul earlier Wednesday. He said he was
pleased to learn that Iraqi troops were fighting back.

“IT know the Iraqi people are more than up td the challenses,”
Gates said. *... However, much remains to be done.”

Army Col. Tony ‘Thomas, a brigade commander, told repoi tors
traveling with Gates that he and other senior commanders in the north
are looking for additional U.S. troops and also would like the return
of 1,400 Iraqi troops sent to Baghdad to provide “more combat pos
er” to help stabilize areas such as Diyala province, Mosul and Sania
ra to-counter an uptick in violence, including suicide bombings

Overall, there has been a steady decline in violence in Taq in
recent months, including dips in roadside bombs, other attacks ana ia
both U.S. and Iraqi casualties.

The U.S. is pressing Iraqi leaders to take advantage of the improved
security to make the political reforms needed to stabilize the fledye-
ling democracy.






PAGE 22, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Opposition leaders nearing agreement
on terms for joining Pakistan elections

@ ISLAMABAD, Pakistan

PAKISTAN’S opposition
parties neared agreement
Wednesday on a list of
demands of President Per-
vez Musharraf in return for
calling off a boycott that
could spoil the legitimacy
of January parliamentary
elections, an official said,
according to Associated
Press.

The negotiations came as
the government prepared
to expel two U.S. rights
activists who have protest-
ed the arrest of Supreme
Court justices and leading
lawyers since Musharraf
introduced emergency rule
Nov. 3.

The meeting between
representatives of former
prime ministers Benazir
Bhutto and Nawaz Sharif
and other smaller parties

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PAKISTANI FORMER Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, center, addres



Anjum Naveed/AP



ses

to a rally at Mansehra, Pakistan on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2007.
%

“We have done most of
our job but still need more
time,” Sen. Khursheed
Ahmed, who is on the
eight-member opposition
committee, said after the
talks finished for the night.
“The committee would def-
initely accomplish this task
tomorrow.”

Party leaders have
threatened to boycott the
vote unless their demands
are met. Their refusal to
‘participate in the election
would undercut the efforts
of Musharraf — a key U.S.
ally in the war on terror-
ism — to ease Pakistan
back toward democracy
after eight years of military
rule.

The parties are demand-
ing an end to emergency
tule and the release of for-
mer Supreme Court judges
who were fired amid indi-
cations that they were
preparing to invalidate
Musharraf’s election in
October to a new presi-
dential term.

Chaudhry Shujaat Hus-
sain, chairman of the rul-
ing Pakistan’ Muslim
League, dismissed the
opposition demands as
unrealistic.

“In fact, the two alliances
have nothing to attract
people and are therefore
raising non-issues,” he was
quoted as saying by the
state-run Associated Press
of Pakistan news agency.

Sharif, whose candidacy
has been rejected by elec-
tion officials, and Bhutto
are long-standing political

foes, but the two have been

drawn ‘together since
returning from exile by the

common goal of con-

fronting Musharraf.

Their move to formulate ,

a joint set of conditions

raises the stakes for gov- .

ernment, which they accuse

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and the fuel sur-charge, which
is based on the price of
petroleum in the intemational
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nthly usinga fixed formula.






of planning to conduct a
sham election. ;

Ahsan Iqbal, spokesman
for Sharif’s Pakistan Mus-
lim League-N, said the
issues under consideration
included the restoration of
an independent judiciary
and the constitution, cre- ”
ation of a neutral caretaker
government and an inde-
pendent election commis-
sion, along with a deadline
for the government to
accept the demands.

“The present situation
demands that all democra-
tic forces work in unity and
collectively to save the
country from a major cata-
strophe, which will result
after rigged elections,”
Iqbal said.

But another politician,
former cricket star Imran
Khan, insisted the united
opposition should stay
away from the ballot.

“You do not have elec-
tions when fundamental
rights are suspended,”
Khan said on Dawn Tele-
vision.

“Never has any judiciary
been butchered as it has
been in Pakistan (and) by
taking part in elections we
would legitimize everything
Mushartrat has done.”

Since he declared emer-
gency rule, Musharraf has
filled the Supreme Court
with loyalists and jailed
hundreds of human rights
workers, civic activists and
lawyers.

Most have since been
released and Musharraf has
promised to lift the emer-
gency Dec. 16, about three
weeks ahead of the elec-
tions. But repression con-
tinues.

The Human Rights Com-
mission of Pakistan urged
the public to mark Dec. 10
as a “black day” by dis-
playing black flags and
wearing black bands. It
called 2007 one of the
worst years for human
rights.in the country’s his-
tory and rejected Mushar-
raf’s claims that he is
restoring democracy as “a
total farce.”

“The rights of ordinary
people have been violated
by the government with
impunity,” the group said
in a statement.

“Reports of torture,
threats, intimidation, and
arbitrary arrests run into
thousands. Incidents of
extrajudicial killings are
reported but never inves-
tigated. The situation has
now reached alarming pro-
portions. The media is
chained and free expres-
sion censured.”

On Tuesday, two U.S.
human rights aetivists,
identified as Medea Ben-
jamin and Tighe Barry,
were arrested in the east-
ern city of Lahore after
holding protests and call-
ing for the release of
Aitzaz Ahsan, president of
the Supreme Court Bar
Association.

U.S. Embassy spokes-
woman Elizabeth Colton
said the two had been
turned over to U.S. con-
sular officials and were
expected to leave Pakistan
“in the next day or so.”
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 23



TOT, Ho OARS

. LOCAL NEWS 4 ‘

pesume trials at
Guantanamo with )

case against

alleged driver for

Osama bin Laden

i GUANTANAMO BAY

NAVAL BASE, Cuba

THE USS. military will try
once again to prosecute men
held at this isolated tropical
outpost on Wednesday, as the
U.S. Supreme Court meets to
consider the broad rights of
Guantanamo prisoners, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

A military judge, presiding
over a makeshift courtroom at
a former airstrip under heavy
security, is scheduled to hold a
pretrial hearing for Salim
Ahmed Hamdan, a native of
Yemen accused of being a
member of al-Qaida and a dri-
ver for Osama bin Laden.

The Supreme Court show-
down revolves around whether
Guantanamo prisoners can
challenge their detention in
US. civilian courts. At:the
Navy base in Cuba, the hearing
is expected to focus on the
question of whether the Ameri-
can military tribunal system has
jurisdiction over Hamdan and
can proceed to trial more than
three years after he was first
charged.

A legal challenge by Hamdan

prompted the Supreme Court
last year to throw out the previ-
ous rules for military tribunals.

On Wednesday, Hamdan’s
lawyers are expected to argue
he is not an unlawful enemy
combatant but, instead, a pris-
oner of war, and entitled under
the.Geneva Conventions to a
US. military court martial — a
system that detainee advocates
say has higher legal standards
than the commissions proposed
for Guantanamo prisoners.

A top military legal official
said the timing of the hearings
in Guantanamo and Washing-
ton is coincidental. He predict-
ed that the Hamdan hearing is
a signal the long-stalled trials
will soon be on the fast-track.

“We are moving with intensi-

ty and I expect things to pick
up,” Air Force Brig. Gen.
Thomas Hartmann, the legal
adviser to the conimission sys-
tem, told reporters at Guan-
tanamo.

The U.S. holds about 305
prisoners on suspicion of terror-
ism or links to al-Qaida and the
Taliban at,Guantanamo and
plans to pfosecute at least 80,
including the alleged architect .
of the Sept. 11 attacks. So far,
only three detainees have been
formally charged and one, Aus-
tralian David Hicks, was con-
victed in a plea bargain and
sent home.

The military blames the
delays on the difficulty of
preparing cases involving men
captured far away and held five
years or more — and ona
series of legal challenges,
including Hamdan’s.

Hamdan is charged with con- :

spiracy and providing material
support for terrorism.

In June, military judges
threw out the charges against
him and Canadian national
Omar Khadr, ruling the com-

missions lacked the authority to

prosecute them because they

had not been officially designat-

ed “unlawful enemy combat-
ant” as required by the Military
Commissions Act, which was
signed into law by President
Bush in October 2006 after the
Supreme Court’s ruling in
Hamdan’s challenge.

The government appealed

and a newly established military

review court reinstated the
charges, ruling tribunal judges
at Guantanamo have the
authority to make the designa-
tion.

Critics of the tribunal system
believe that Hamdan would be
better off under a traditional
military court martial. Hina

Shamsi, a lawyer for the Ameri-

can Civil Liberties Union, said
the U.S. would not be able to
use evidence obtained through
coercion and would be more
restricted in the use of secret
evidence and proceedings.
“Weare stuck in a thicket
that was created by the Bush
administration’s entire
approach to detention and trial

of terror suspects,” said Shamsi,

who is observing the Guan-
tanamo proceedings against
Hamdan.

Some of the secrecy was on
display this week ahead of the
hearing. Prosecutors and
defense lawyers were prohibit-

ed from discussing details of the
expected testimony or divulging :









x

A COMBO of two photos showing, left, the Polar bear Knut, at his f

S SS RS 3



ag :






Markus Schreiber/AP

irst public appearance on March 23, 2007, and right, his first birthday in the Berlin Zoo, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2007. -

Knut, Berlin’s famous polar bear was born in the zoo on Dec. 5, 2006, was rejected by his mother but went on to win the hearts of millions across the globe, Knut celebrated, Wednes-
day with a cake and free zoo entry for children.

Berlin Zoo’s polar bear Knut
celebrates his first birthday

@ BERLIN :

BERLIN'S tamous polar bear
Knut, who was rejected by his
mother but went on to win the
hearts of millions across the globe,
celebrated his first. birthday
Wednesday with a cake and free
zoo entry for kids, according to
Associated Press.

The Berlin Zoo pulled out all
the stops to [ete its star attraction,
who has gone from a fluffy white
powderpuff of a cub to a full-grown
polar bear with a cheeky curiosity
and a penchant for muddying his
coat by rolling in the dirt.

"He's so dirty! They should have
given him a bath," said 5-year-old
Leni Schmidt, who came with her
mother and a friend to watch Knut
munch his birthday treat of fresh
fruit, vegetables and rice — topped
with a toy wooden candle.

The zoo estimated that some
2,000 people had visited the birth-
day bear by noon and a steady
stream were still heading toward
his pen, despite the cool weather
and overcast skies.

Yet Knut himself seemed more
interested in playing with his toy
candle and licking the crumbs from
the platter that bore his birthday
treat than the crowd of well-wish-
ers.

The zoo said the Knut craze has

bey) ite)

WHILE

generated up to US$14 million over
the past year through ticket sales
that have more than doubled and
the licensing of Knut toys, books
and other trinkets.

Among fans Wednesday was
Sabine Haelter, wrapped in polar
cub-imprinted scarf, who had tray-
eled from central Germany to be at
the zoo for the event, and Berlin
native Marion Maetzeld — a mem-
ber of the zoo who visits regularly.

"We wish him a huge polar bear
cake and, later a nice lady-bear as a
mate," said Maetzeld, snapping pic-
tures of Knut from her perch on a
boulder.

Weighing just 810 grams (nearly
2 pounds) at birth, Knut has bulked
up to more than 110 kilograms (243
pounds), and in July had to be put
on a diet because of concerns that
treats — like his favorite croissants —
were piling on the pounds.

That means he won't be allowed
a slice of a giant birthday cake
baked in his honor _ made from
300 eggs, 15 kilograms (33 pounds)
each of flour and sugar, as well as
10 kilograms (22 pounds) of marzi-
pan. Slices were sold to onlookers
and will go to the zoo's foundation.

Abandoned at birth, along with
his twin brother, who only survived
a couple of days, Knut first attract-
ed attention when Berlin's media
picked up the story of his main

indoor & outdoor
_* Tree Tops
* 10” Sphere
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caregiver camping out at the zoo
to give the cub his bottle every two
hours.

The story angered animal rights
activists, who tried to sue the zoo
for cruelty to animals by preventing
nature from taking its course when
the cub was rejected — even if it
cost him his life.

By that time, Knut was a 3-
month-old white fur ball, with but-
ton eyes and his own fan club, who
had been photographed dozens of
times - including for the cover of
Vanity Fair — and attracted hun-
dreds of thousands to the zoo.

Now that he is grown, zoo offi-
cials say they do not have room to
keep Knut permanently and are
considering other offers from zoos
in Europe, with an eye to finding
him a mate.

Thomas Doerflein, who raised
Knut by hand, cuddling him and
playing with him in addition to
feeding him from a bottle, told Ger-
many's mass-circulation Bild on
Wednesday, he hoped the bear
would soon find a new home in
another zoo.

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the names of witnesses.

Hartmann, however, defend-
ed the tribunals, noting they
afford the accused such protec-
tions as the right to counsel and
appeal.

“We are proud of the system
that we’ve set up.

“We think it’s really unprece-
dented in the number of rights
that we are providing to these
accused,”

VEGETARIAN

— Mushroo™ . VeceTaBLe

tx SOUP


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007



Israeli troops

peatly to move
into Gaza, says
commander

@ JERUSALEM

ISRAEL'S army has com-
pleted plans for a iarge often-
sive in the Gaza Strip and is
only waiting for government
approval, the military chief
said Wednesday, shortly after
two Palestinian militants were
killed by Israeli tank fire in
the coastal area, according to
Associated Press.

Lt. Gen. Gabi Ashkenazi
said that until he receives the
go-ahead for a broad opera-
tion, Israel would continue
. with its policy of airstrikes
and brief ground incursions
to halt Palestinian rocket
attacks.

“If it is necessary, we are
prepared for the possibility of
action,” Ashkenazi told Army
Radio. “Until then I think it is
our duty to exhaust all other
avenues and to operate every
day and night in order to pro-
vide security.”

Defense Minister Ehud
Barak has repeatedly said that
the time for a widespread
ground invasion of Gaza is
drawing closer. But on Tues-
day, he said now is not the
time for a broad operation,
which would likely result in
heavy casualties to Israeli sol-
diers and Palestinian civilians
in Gaza’s crowded urban
landscape.

In Wednesday’s violence,
Israeli tanks fired shells
‘toward a group of Hamas mil-
itants on the outskirts of the
town of Beit Lahiya in the
northern Gaza Strip after
dawn, Palestinian doctors and
residents said. Two of the
Palestinians were killed and
four wounded, one critically,
the doctors said.

The army confirmed the
strike, saying the militants
were preparing to fire mortar
shells toward southern Israel.

Israel’s attack brings to
about 30 the number of mili-
tants in Gaza that Israel has
killed in the past 10 days.

Israel’s army frequently
launches cross-border attacks
and airstrikes on Gaza mili-
tants, but it has been unable
to stop the rocket fire from
the Hamas-controlled territo-

ry.







BX OSL, argnanistan

A-‘SUICIDE bomber rammed
his explosives-laden car into a
minibus carrying Afghan soldiers
south of Kabul on Wednesday,
killing at least 13 people and
wounding 20 others, officials said,
according to Associated Press.

Meanwhile, Afghan forces
clashed with ‘Taliban who had
blocked a main highway in the
south, killing 10 militants, an offi
cial said.

The Kabul blast happened on
the last day of Defense Secre-
tary Robert Gates’ two-day visil
to Afghanistan, but it was not
immediately clear if he was still in
the country at the time. The ‘Tal-
iban claimed responsibility for
the attack.

The suicide bomber’s car
struck a minibus full of soldiers in

the Chihulsutoon area south of

Kabul, said Aziz Ahmad, an

Afghan army officer at the site of

the blast.

Six soldiers and seven civilians
were killed in the attack, and sev-
en other soldiers were wound-
ed, said Gen. Mohammad Zahir
Azimi, a Defense Ministry
spokesman.

At least 13 civilians also were
wounded in the attack, said
Abdullah Fahim, a spokesman
for the Health Ministry. Fou
children were among those
killed, Fahim said.

Purported Taliban spokesman
Zabiullah Mujaheed claimed
responsibility for the blast in a
text message sent to'an Associ-
ated Press reporter in neighbor
ing Pakistan. Mujaheed identi
fied the bomber as Abdul Rah
man, from eastern Khost
province.

Tie mangled frame of the
minibus lay on the side of the
road as the wounded were
whisked to hospitals.

The blast was third suicide
attack in the city in the last eight
days. It followed a similar attack
Tuesday against a NATO con
voy that wounded 22 civilians.

Mohammad Amin, who runs a
bakery near the blast site, said

Sg

Suicide attacks Afghan
oldiers in bus; at least 13 killed





THE | RIBUNE

Sea oman as







Rafiq Maqbool/AP

AN AFGHAN National Army soldier stands guard near a starnapea bus after a suicide bomber targeted the vehicle, south of Kabul, Afghanistan on Wednes-
day, Dec, 5, 2007. The suicide bomber rammed his explosives-laden car into the minibus carrying Afghan soldiers south of Kabul on Wednesday, killing
at least 13 people and wounding 20, officials and witnesses said.

two of his employees were
wounded by flying glass.

“Every day, this bus stops in
front of my bakery to take
employees of the Defense Min-
istry.” Amin said. “Suddenly
today, a very strong explosion
hit the bus.”

Mohammad Ashraf, 13, was
praying inside a mosque when
the flying shrapnel and glass cut
through his flesh, said his father,
Mohammad Akram.

“My other 8-year-old son was
also wounded in the same
mosque,” Akram said.

There has been a series of

attacks in recent months on bus-
es carrying Afghan security
forces as they commute to work





in the morning.

On Sept. 29, a suicide bomber
blew himself up inside an army
bus in Kabul, killing 28 soldiers
and two civilians. In June, anoth-
er bomb ripped through a bus
carrying police instructors in
Kabul, killing 35 people.

Militants have launched more
than 133 suicide attacks this year
—a record number. At least
6,200 people have died in insur-
gency-related violence in 2007,
also a record, according to an
Associated Press tally of figures
from Afghan and Western offi-
cials.

Suicide attacks frequently tar-
get international and Afghan
security forces, but most of the





en

casualties are civilian passers-by.

Separately, an Afghan army
patrol clashed with Taliban fight-
ers in southern Zabul province’s
Shah Joy district on Wednesday
after the militants set up a check-
point on the main highway link-
ing Kabul to the country’s south,
said Abdul Raziq, a provincial
Afghan army commander.

Ten militants were killed, and
soldiers recovered 12 motorbikes
and weapons from alongside the
bodies, Raziq said.

In Helmand province, U.S.-
led coalition troops killed sever
al Taliban militants during raids
on compounds in Garmser dis-
trict, the coalition said. :

The troops “targeted an indi-

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vidual believed to be associated
with weapons smuggling opera-
tions in the province,” it said.
“While performing a search of
one of the compounds. coalition
forces killed severai armed mili-
tants who posed an imminent
threat.”

Also in the south, an explo-
sion stiuck @ patrol of NATO-
led troops on ‘Tuesday, leaving
one soldier dead and two others
wounded, the alliance said.

The soldiers: wounds were not
lite-threatening. the statement
said.

NATO. did not disclose the
nationalities of the dead and
wounded soidiers or the exact
location of the attack.




_








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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 25

THE TRIBUNE
| THURSDAY EVENING
| 7:30

- DECEMBER 6, 2007 |

0:30 |









8:00













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| (:00) Law & Or- |NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at Dallas Mavericks. From American Airlines Center in |NBA Basketball:
TNT der “Myth of Fin- |Dallas. (Live) (CC) ; Heat a Trail
fos gerprints” Blazers
ilar Home for Imagi- [Olive, the Other Reindeer © (CC)|My Gym Part- [Grim Adven- Ed, Edd n Eddy |Naruto
| TOON nary Friends ner’s a Monkey |tures



Envoyé spécial (SC) Dossier Scheffer

Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC)

(:00) YoAmo a |Amar sin Limites Un hombre lucha Pasion Una historia que toma lugar

para salvar a la mujer que ama. (N) jentre piratas y fortunas.



Law & Order: Special Victims Unit/Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
Stabler and Beck look for an as- __|Novak calls upon Benson to present
sailant who rapes twice. (CC) evidence against a rapist.

ot Moments 2 Celebri-
ties face humiliation. A

Outdoor Adven- |The World of — |Boxing Yuri Foreman vs. Andrey Tsu
tures Beretta (CC) Also: Ossie Duran vs. Sergio Gabrie

* % CREATURE (1998, Horror) Craig T. Nelson, Kim Cattrall, Matthew
(aay An amphibious monster threatens a scientist and his family. ©









Go-karts. 0







Family Guy Pe-
ter knocks out the
city's cable.

espa )



G18) ), THE
ATIVITY STO-
RY (2006)

Mayweather/Hat-
ton 24/7 1 (CC)

| HBO-E

_HBO-P

ee kk THE
omedy) Meryl St
lands a job at a fa

HBO-W

| HBO-S | /TRUST THE





[ete Big Love ‘Good Guys and Bad
MAN (2005) ‘R’ jHenrickson family. O (CC)

Smallville “Kara” Clark and Lois
discover his cousin Kara’s space-
ship; Clark's superhero training.

Supernatural Dean learns an old
flame has an 8-year-old son who re-
sembles him. 1 (CC)

N) _[deopardy! (CC)







PREMIUM CHANNELS

* & SAND AND SORROW (2007, Documentary) — |(:45) | Am Leg-
Premiere. Filmmaker Paul Freedman examines geno- jend: HBO First
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America’s Most Smartest Model Fabulous Life Of... ‘High-Priced

































“Robert Brous- |Urbania

Aqui y Ahora



Law & Order: Criminal Intent “Un-
tethered” Goren goes under cover in
a prison mental ward. 1

Hollywood Hotness”

rkan. Foreman takes on Tsurkan,
Martinez. From New York.

WGN News at Nine (N) © (CC) |

CW11 News at Ten With Kaity
Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)



Frasier Marin Frasier Niles re-
makes a bet with |searches Sher-
Frasier. 1 ry's past. (CC)











Mayweather/Hat-/Chris Rock
ton 24/7 (N) (CC)|Show Whoopi
Goldberg, JoJo.





+), ALPHA DOG (2006, Crime Drama) Bruce Wills, Emile Hirsch,
Justin Timberlake. Premiere. A teenage drug dealer kidnaps a junkie’s





4 CATCH A FIRE (2006, Dra-
ma) Tim Robbins, Derek Luke. Pre-



younger brother. 1 ‘R’ (CC)

miere. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC



DEVIL WEARS PRADA (2006,
reep. A recent college graduate
shion magazine. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)

(15) % %&% THE NATIVITY STORY (
es, Oscar Isaac, Hiam Abbass, Mary
the birth of Jesus. 1 ‘PG’ (CC)



Guys” Margene’s mother visits the poses a new schedule to his wives.
0 (CC)



STAR WARS-
THE PHANTOM
MENACE

MAX-E

(:15) % % SNAKES ON A PLANE (2006, Horror) Samuel L. Jackson, Ke-

Big Love “Kingdom Come’ Bill pro-

2006, Drama) Keisha Castle-Hugh-
and Joseph travel to Bethlehem for
4 WALK THE LINE (2005, Bi-
ography) Joaquin Phoenix, Reese
itherspoon. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)

* &% MIAMI VICE (2006, Crime



nan Thompson, Julianna Margins An FBI agent contends with a swarm
of deadly serpents, 1 ‘R’ (CC)







SHOW _ [Comedy) French s
Wilson. iTV Premi

(:20) % & PHANTASM Il (1988, Horror) James
MOMAX LeGros, Reggie Bannister. A man finds the sinister

"| mortcian who killed his brother. ‘R’ (CC)

Sel * LOVE STINKS y 999, re) % & SAW II (2005, Horror) Donnie Wahlberg, To-
jomedy) French Stewart, Bridgette |bin

[Gong Li. 1 'R'(CC}

Drama) Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx,



& & & THE LAST KISS (2006, Com



terms with turning 30. 1 'R’ (CC

ell. iTV. A detective must save his son from a
ere. ‘R’ madman’s sadistic game. 1 ‘R’ (CC)





5:30) & & THE
TMC lesen

2005) 'R' (CC)



% SISTER ACT 2: BACK IN THE HABIT (1993, Musical Sa
Whoopi Goldberg, Kathy Najimy, Barnard Hughes. Deloris and friends ral-
ly to save a school from closing. 1 ‘PG’

|
edy-Drama) Zach |(:45) The Erotic
Braff, Casey Affleck, Michael a Friends come to eet “Object
of Desire”




Dexter ‘There's Something About
Harry’ (iTV) Doakes tracks Dexter to
his latest kill. (CC)

au & & DIRTY DANCING
1987, Romance) Jennifer Grey,
atrick Swayze. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)







Ne!

pe

Movie

Q i ’
Or : p
; N
ny
NY:








PAGE 26, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





JUDGE PARKER

WHAT ARE YOU
TALKING ABOLIT,
KENH?







I PROMISED
MR. CAESAR THAT
ABBEY AND SAM
WOULD SELL AT
A CERTAIN PRICE!





fl







‘I THOUGHT I
COULD CONVINCE
SAM TO TAKE
THE OFFER!

YOU NEVER TOLD
ME THIS! HOW COULD.
YOU DO THAT?



ITS ALL HERE, EVERYTHING
ERIC NEEDS... ‘



TIM KEPT METICULOUS NOTES:
NAMES, ADDRESSES,
PHONE NUMBERS,
MAPS...






NORAS FEARS RETURN. os








HEY, A STREAK'S
A STREAK!



VVE BEEN PLAVING THESE SAME
NUMBERS FOR TEN YEARS AND
I'VE NEVER EVEN COME CLOSE

Boy, THAT'S
ay SOME















Cg
.
in
Si
LON,
(a3



COMICS PAGE





Contract Bridge
By Steve Becker



Keep Your Eye on the Ball

East dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

A declarer occasionally becomes

It does not matter what South
does on this trick — the damage is

would automatically follow low
from dummy to the opening trick
without giving the matter much

UH-O, HERE COMES MOE,
THE CLASS BULLY!







Okay twinky, let's
have that ball,

NEVER ARGUE WITH
bh SIXNEAR-OLD






. THURSDAY,

friend drops by for a visit.
CANCER - June 22/July 22
It seems you’ve gotten yourself
into another work bind. You just



NORTH already done. His ace of hearts is
@K97 forced out, and, sooner or later, when. D EC 6
Â¥42 South gets around to leading dia- .
#Q1043 monds, East takes the ace and con- | ARIES — March 21/April 20
&A1075 tinues hearts to put the contract down Conceit can get you into trouble, Aries,
WEST EAST one. Declarer winds up losing a dia- } but you seem to ignore all warnings
aj8 #106543 mond, a club and three hearts. this week. A co-worker geis defensive
¥KQ63 ¥10987 : as a result. Money matters seem bleak
; 95 , A8 South can make the contract | — ‘econcile bank Becounts:
EVER FEEL LIKE YOU'RE 39842 hK 3 very easily by taking the ace of clubs | TAURUS — April 21/May 21
IN THE WRONG PLACE . SOUTH at trick one and establishing the dia- J} great opportunity arises on
AT THE WRONG TIME ? AQ2 monds. The most he can then lose | Tuesday, but you may be too busy
VAIS against any distribution of the cards . me a Saat It’s best if you take
| #KI762 is the ace of diamonds and three ee nan ae eta of this
Q6 clubs. GEMINI_ Mav 23/1,
i [ — May 22/June 21
ofield ‘ ; haven’t been feeling your best
} A4|| The bidding: Going up with the ace of clubs at Genin end i K & : Fer
5 . 1
PaaS SP (eS Oy /4| East South West North trick one should not be a hard play to Jp b Pa aero
{ CEPR AT Pass 1 NT Pass 3 NT make, since nine tricks are then cer- aie. andiny eee aes
| P Opening lead — four of clubs. tain. Nevertheless, many declarers
4
r
j

so engrossed with trying to make the
maximum number of tricks in a par-
ticular suit that he loses sight of the
far more important goal of making.

thought. can’t seem to find a place to work
that interests you, Cancer. Keep

- Fi looking; don’ j --
The more cautious declarers 8; don't settle for just any





















DANKE...INE NEED To












Le ke Ae \'LL. SELECT A COMMISSION WAN 16 THE ELL,
GRADED AND Word TE HoLP KERRINGS oN THE ONLY TRING SRE \NAAT West
E Ho MATTER ANP GET BACK To LEARNS FRONN ELE 6




WE CAN GET You
FOCUSED ON YouR
SCRCOLINOCRK

YoU IN SUMMER WITHA A FULL
REFORT THAT WON'T RESOLVE

GAERNNENT



é| Hl
a ee ie

at
TIGER
STRIVE WAS SLOBBERING

ON ONE OF MY COOKIES, SO
T PUT IT BACK IN THE SAR

{ Ag RCP
= pny jo
ees {os



www.kingtealures.com

CRYPTIC PUZZLE |

ACROSS DOWN
9 — Immediately put one, folded, round 1 To make trouble for, puts back the
her (9) chit, folded inside (6,2)
10° Somebody going through agonies, 2 Say nothing about the residue |
sadly, when | abandon (9) allowed to borrow (6,6)
12 Collar some have back to front (4) 3 Birds fight when there are scraps
13 Learn | can, having got inside the about (8)
plant (6) Emphasise in the article sins are
14 Agirl, clumsy, mum, and on the big very wrong (6)
side (7) 5 The turn having been given critical
15 And, while\the duo performed out- acclaim, is exalted (8)

6. Playing and, for a change, beating

side, passed round (6,3) (10)

the contract.







For example, take this deal where

leads a low club against three

notrump. Declarer plays low from
dummy, losing to the king, where-
upon East shifts to the ten of hearts.

TA

The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)

HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY’S TARGET

Good 15; very good 22;
excellent 29 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.



be 17 Hit out the other: the one after (9) : ;
| me =] =«-18 They brief one on paints, for a start 7 Having managed to catch the bus,
iT 7) shut up (7)
‘apg | 19° Decree there should be a hole to 8 Right atthe botiom of the bag moth-
W drain off from (6) ers pecning 0)
Oo : 20 ‘Two bands, a small and a large, slot- = ea ‘a
Ly ted into place (4) 19 Having no match when it comes to
4 =23- Compered “Top of the Pops,” but * at "
/ as iiiatad Gy (a eccentricity? (3)
L Was inated Dy (2) 21 What the jockey called his first job?
g | 25 Realising it’s the song | composed, (8,4)
ea can't include (9) 22 Dram | ordered and | imbibed in
d N 26 Earlier — but not early enough! (4) flight (6)
ey 27. The girl got a litle tipsy on wine (4) | 23 Is critical of how one demolishes,
29 Talked : in a month, retiring; bomb- (5,5) ACROSS 32 Discolours (9) 7 Greek restaurant (7)
0 shell that! (7) ~ * | 24 Using long words and being grandil- 9 Team running event |34 Initial advantage (4,5) | 8 — Slow down (10)
32 Bar ely shifting! (9) oquent? (7,3) (5,4) 35 Encounter unexpect- {11 Senseless (5)
N 34 Permission to proceed, as there's 25 Whip round he will swindle us in (3) 10 Chatty (9) __ edly (3,4) 16 Cinders (6)
| room to manoeuvre (9) _ 28 Control the speed of the glue setting 12° Wooden shoe (4) 36 Bursts out (6) 19 Cricket extra (3)
E 35 Sticking into the gap roughly. Isn't in (8) 13 Bomb hole (6) 37 Public school (4) 21 Not much to look at
tailored for (7) 29 Vacancy for a mountaineer (8) 14 Perform surgery (7) |38 _Insipid (9) (12)
36 That's a laugh, twit! Back scrubber! 30 Are cabinetmakers put upon by 15 Usually (2,7) 39 Recklessly bold per- | Cleaves (6)
(6) them? (8) 17 Hypocrilical (9) son (9) 23 Body of voters (10)
37 Having a drink, love; returned from 31. °E i iers wi Te Short prowl pear BON i
, love; mbarking places for soldiers with (7) 1 Having great value | 24 Foreign country (5,5)
ee vial (4) ; weapons (7) 19 Main circus tent (3,3) (8) 22. Foot digit)
at holds one back when the oth- | 33 Supports when one is not working 20 Atmosphere (4) 2 Without warning 28 Scatter (8)
___ @1 aim to enter? (9) : (5) 23 Slaying power (9) (3,2,1,6) 29 Renegades (8)
39 ‘ : : y
He metes out but goes without him- 34 Those that could be dispersed by 25 Happen, occur (4,5) | 3 Wedding (8) 30 Ensnare, enmesh (8)
Self (9) sun? (6) 26 Sea eagle (4) 4 Middle (6) 31 Trailblazer (7)
27 Feeling of resentment | 5 British money (8) 33 Encircles (5)
(6) 6 Thoroughbred horses | 34 Pursues relentlessly
29 Pricklv plant (7) (10) (6)



— Ss

CRYPTIC SOLU IHiUIND



EASY SOLUTIONS



ACROSS: 4, Salmon 7, Pawnshop 8, Epping 10, Clods 13, Clip 14, Kane 15, Hal's
16, Sty 17, P-air 19, True 21, Companion(-way) 23, Note (Eton) 24, Volt 26, Mod

27 d 29, Olaf 32, Si ; k - , Electric 36, t :
, Lea , Ola Sign 33, Broke 34, Tar-tar 35 ric Cygne Sure 32, Flat 33, Aster 34, Repast 35,

ODOZHHNORO

DOWN: 1, Speck 2, S-woo-N 3, As-k-s 4, Spell 5, La-pp’ 6, Ornate 9, Pistil +1,
Law 12, Dep-O-t 13, Car-a-van 15, Hip 16, Sun 18, Amel-l-a 20, Ro-tor 21, Cod
22, No-d 23, No.-tary 25, Yak (Kay) 28, Egret 30, Lo-I-re 31, Fence 32, Stun 33,
Buck



ACROSS: 4, Thumbs 7, Innuendo 8, Trendy 10, Cache 13, Bees 14, Site 15, Temp
16, Let 17, Lean 19, Apes 21, Spare tyre 23, Pass 24, Fuse 26, Bog 27, Emit 29,

Cashmere 36, Stitch

RGET

would not risk losing the contract in
order to try to gain an extra club trick
or two by following low from
dummy. Rather, they would recog-
nize that the contract was assured if
they put up the ace, and would pro-
ceed accordingly.



or be
Boo a 4B
RES 8 &
g
gZeagP Les
88, dQg0"8
ao Bug ©
z Peecises
9 pheiss
ggh has
gSo © Ome
foes sar
ek&sessheq
” Ag on BS
> gegbescs
a Sfeasss5
ee gEGSee
feesesss




new
word

Sauce to flavor
meat or fish





Viktor Korchnoi v Ilia Smirin,
Pivdenny Bank Cup, Odessa 2007.
The legendary Korchnoi survived
the wartime siege of Leningrad
with the aid of ration books from
dead relatives, fought his way to
the international top, defected from
the Soviet Union, then twice met
Anatoly Karpov for the world
crown. Now, at age 76, he still
competes in top tournaments,
fortified by a caviar-rich diet. Here
as White (to move) Korchnoi is a
pawn ahead, but many players
would prefer Black since the white
army is crammed awkwardly in the
south-east of the chessboard.
Certainly you would expect a long
struggle from such a position, but
Korchnoi had foreseen a clever
trick. Just one move, and Black had
to resign. What happened

thing. Aquarius helps out.

LEO - July 23/August 23
Have you been feeling lonely, Leo? It
might be time to invite over some
friends to help beat the pre-winter
blues. Thursday seems a good day for
a late dinner. Romance could follow!

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

Too many road trips have put wear
on your car, Virgo. You just made
the investment, so take it easy for
a while. Tuesday is a good day for
relaxation — something you need.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ve decided to jump in and
finally get that pesky task done
that’s been haunting you. Good for
you! Wednesday is an uneventful
day, so sleep inandenjoy it. .
SCORPIO + Oct 24/Nov 22

A better mood keeps you lively this
week, Scorpio. When you’re on a
roll no one can match your work
effort, so make sure the boss sees all
of your hard work.
SAGITTARIUS-— Novy 23/Dec 21
It seems you’ve been pondering
Starting a new business, Remember,
being self-employed has’ its benefits
but also several downfalls — con-
sider them carefully. Capricorn is
the one to watch out for this week. _
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
A mip to the doctor has you mending some
of your wild ways, Capricom. Now is not
the time for fun and games, but concenta-
tion On setting a course for your future.
Expect Friday to be very exciting.

AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18

No plans for your birthday,
Aquarius? Why not think creatively
and coordinate a hiking trip with
friends. The countryside looks beauti-
ful snow-covered. Virgo will help.
PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
Have you been waiting for some
good luck to come your way, Pisces? -
Well, this week it just may arrive in
the form of an overdue check. Spend
the money wisely, but have fun.

| CHESS by Leonard Barden



LEONARD BARDEN



Chess: 8486: 1 Ncl! Resigns. White threatens both 2

Rxe8+ and 2 Nxd3. If 1...Rxe1 2 Nxd3! forks queen

and rook so wins at least a bishop

DOWN: i, Discs 2, Enact 3, Here 4, Totem 5, Uses 6, Budges 9, Repays 11, Air 12,
Helps 13, Benefit 15, Tar 16, Lee 18, Easels 20, Press 21, Sag 22, Tut 23,
Potent 25, Ore 28, Match 30, Utter 31, Erred 32, Fast 33, Ache


THE TRIBUNE



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PAGE 28, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007







THE TRIBUNE

Washington and Oregon

residents fight to save
heir homes from muddy
waters after killer storm

@ CHEHALIS, Wash.

THE drenching rains and howl-
ing winds were gone but flood-
ing concerns persisted Wednes-
day, as anxious residents waited
for waters to recede so they could
see what was.left after this week’s
fierce storm, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The storm, which killed at least
seven people as it battered the
Pacific Northwest before moving
on Tuesday, left behind flooded
homes, fallen trees and washed-
out roads, including the region’s
largest highway. On Wednesday,
the storm continued pushing east,
dumping snow across the Mid-
west. .

Some were spending Wednes-
day looking for the lost. In the
Lewis County town of Winlock, a
dive team planned to search nor-
mally tiny Wallers Creek for
Richard Hiatt, 81, believed to
have been swept away when a
bank gave out from underneath
him.

“It happened so quickly,’
daughter-in-law Sharon Hiatt said
Tuesday as searches continued.
“That’s the only possibility, that





RRR I

he fell into the creek.”

In many coastal areas, lights
were slowly coming back on
Wednesday morning, said
Aberdeen police Detective
George J. Kelly, a spokesman at
the Grays Harbor County emer-
gency command center.

Kelly couldn’t provide exact
numbers, but said at least half of
downtown Aberdeen had elec-
tricity and Grays Harbor Com-
munity Hospital no longer had to
rely on emergency generators.
Tens of thousands were without
power in Oregon and Washington
state at the height of the storm.

National Guard troops were
summoned ‘carly Wednesday
morning to help evacuate a 20-
unit trailer park near Elma threat-
ened by the flooding Chehalis
River, Kelly said.

Floodwaters about 90 miles
west of Seattle were also
approaching U.S. Highway 12, a
principal link to the Puget Sound
atea, Kelly said.

As the water started to rise out-
side their Lewis County home,
Terry Roberts moved his cars to

higher ground, shepherded his -

wife and two children into their
RV and hit the road.

They didn’t get far.

“We were on dry road and all
of a sudden, the water started
swirling around,” Roberts said,
standing with his wife in a tem-
porary shelter in Chehalis after
being rescued by a Coast Guard
helicopter. “That’s when we got
on the CB and called for help.”

Roberts, 64, was among the
hundreds who fled their homes
after the storm.

Gov. Chris Gregoire,
toured the ravaged region by heli-
copter Tuesday, touched down at
a high school shelter in Chehalis
and offered encouragement to the
roughly 40 people staying there.

She also ordered a plane to
deliver food and emergency sup-
plies to the high school in Pe Ell,
about 25 miles to the west,
because the roads were blocked
by water.

“It’s hard to comprehend 5- to
10-feet under until you see those
houses,” Gregoire said.

The governor also flew to the

who’

water’s edge on Interstate 5,
which has been shut down since
Monday at Centralia because of
flooding. At one point Tuesday,
officials said a three-mile section
of the road was under as much
as LO feet of water from the surg-
ing Chehalis River.

The interstate, which is the
main north-south route between
Portland, Ore., and Seattle, was
expected to be closed at least
through Thursday.

In Tillamook, Ore., home to
large dairy cattle herds, the smell
of manure was pervasive as shop-
keepers downtown shoveled out
their businesses.

At the Wilson River RV Park,
one vehicle was on its side, and
others were in mud 6 inches to 8
inches deep.

-Ben and Amanda Beal had
moved to a motel with their Wwo
young children when police noti-
fied everyone there to evacuate.
Just as they left the parking lot,
waves swelled over Highway LOI.

“T thought we were going to be
swept away,” said Amanda Beal.
“You could feel the water push-
ing the Blazer. The winds were
blowing at 100 miles S per hour.’

“We just panicked,” Ben Beal
said..

With I-5 closed, state officials
were recommending a lengthy
detour — Interstate 90 across the
Cascade mountains and down
U.S. 97 through central Wash-
ington to the Oregon border —a
route that roughly doubles the
three-hour trip from Seattle to
Portland.

David Dye, Washington state’s
deputy transportation secretary.
said workers were cleaning up
lots of debris — “garbage, tires,
dead.rats everywhere” —- while
they waited for the water to
recede.

On the edge of downtown Cen-
tralia, waist-high water the color
of chocolate milk covered streets
as police used small boats to get
to houses in flooded neighbor-
hoods.

More than 300 people had to
be rescued in Lewis County,
many being plucked off their
rooftops by helicopter. Sheriff
Steve Mansfield said.



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Shopping
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increase

By CARA
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter


























































































@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First Holdings,
the parent of Bahamian gener-.
al insurer Bahamas First, is set
to sell a 20 per cent stake to a
major Canadian insurer, a move
likely to bolster its capital base
by just over $10 million.

The Tribune can reveal that
Bahamas First Holdings is due
to sell around seven million
ordinary shares to The Eco-
nomical Insurance Group,
which bills itself as “one of the
largest property and casualty
insurance companies in Cana-
da”, giving that firm a 20 per
cent stake in the company.

‘Insurance industry sources
told The Tribune that The Eco-
nomical Insurance Group was
set to buy-in to Bahamas First
Holdings at a price of $1.49 per
share, meaning that the total

' price paid is likely tobe around

10.43 million.

Given that this is for a 20 per
cent stake, it would value



SHOPPING plaza devel-
opments in Nassau are on
the increase, particularly in
the western and southern
districts, realtors confirmed
to Tribune Business yester-
day, due to population
growth and an influx of
entrepreneurs into the retail
sector.

Paul Ritchie, of Paul
Ritchie Real Estate, said one
"cannot help but notice the
amount of attractive com-
mercial praperties that have
been developed over the last’

five years”.

“There is," he said, "an
ongoing demand for retail
space, which is being fuelled
by more and more Bahami-
ans setting up shop to cater
to the retail market."

Mr Ritchie added that
areas such as East Shirley
Street and the northern end
of Kemp Road were under-
going a-transformation, with
new and upgraded commer-
cial properties, especially
along the strip of Shirley
Street that runs from the
intersection of Kemp and
Fowler Streets down to the
Mackey Street junction.

He said there was also
phenomenal growth of shop
and retail space along
Carmichael Road, from Blue
Hill Road almost right down
to Bacardi Road.

Mr Ritchie said there will
probably be an accelerated
trend of commercial and res-
idential development in the
western area of New Provi-
dence, especially when indi-
vidual lot owners in gated
subdivisions such as West
Winds, Yuma and Indigo
start to develop their lots.

"All things being equal, I
expect the existing trend of
growth in the housing and
commercial sectors to con-

SEE page 10



Bahamas First Holdings at





By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A LAWSUIT has been fied
against the British Colonial
Hilton’s holding company and
the resort’s two major share-
holders over the multi-million
dollar marina/resort develop-
ment that was supposed to be
constructed on land adjacent to
the resort, a move that could
impact plans to revitalise a key
part of downtown Nassau.

-New York-based Island
Global Yachting (IGY) has ini-
tiated legal action in New York
against the British Colonial
Development Company, and its
_ two major shareholders, Adu-
rion Investment Management, a
“boutique Swiss/UK investment
house, and the Canadian Com-
mercial Workers Industry Pen-
sion Plan (CCWIPP), after its
attempts to bring the project to
fruition collapsed amid acrimo-
ny and fingerpointing by both
sides.




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Bahamas First
stake to Cana

The Economical Insurance Group

to buy-in to Bahamian general

insurer, with sources saying seven
million share deal valued at $1.49
per share and worth $10.43m



around $52.15 million.
Details on the deal were
being announced to Bahamas
First shareholders at an Extra-
ordinary General Meeting
(EGM) yesterday evening as
The Tribune went to press.
When contacted yesterday by
The Tribune, Ian Fair, Bahamas
First Holdings’ chairman, said
of The Economical Insurance
Group deal: “We have an
Extraordinary General Meet-
ing with our shareholders this
evening. We will withhold com-
ment until we have communi-
cated with our shareholders.”

Also named as defendants in
the lawsuit are understood to
be Adurion’s parent company
and Allen & Company, the
Florida-based firm that has
been acting as a broker for

-CCWIPP in its efforts to sell its



& ant" stn



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Come in to any Bank of Th

The EGM, previously
revealed by The Tribune, was
called to seek shareholder
approval for. Bahamas First
Holdings to amend its Memo-
randum of Association, allowing
it to increase its authorised

share capital from $5.35 million |

to $5.4 million through the cre-
ation of another five.million
common shares with par value
of $0.01 per share.
Shareholders were also being
asked to approve amendments
to Bahamas First’s Articles of
Association as a result of the
increase in share capital.



Hilton ord ject
embroiled i in lawsuit

Bahamas-based assets, namely
the British Colonial Hilton and
the South Ocean Golf & Beach
Resort.

Sources close to the situation

SEE page 12



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Bahamas First Holdings cur-
rently has an authorised share
capital of 35 million common
shares, but only 28,785,572 mil-
lion have been fully issued to
shareholders.

This means that the remain-
der are likely to be issued to
The Economical Insurance
Group, along with a small por-




m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor


















TRADE unions are “dia-
metrically opposed” to using
biometric fingerprints. as a
means of recognising
Bahamian employees when
they ‘clock in and out’ of
work, a labour leader told
The Tribune, due to uncer-
tainty over whether the data
collected could be used for
other purposes. ~

Obie Ferguson, attorney
and Trades Union Congress
(TUC) president, said: “We
are diametrically opposed to
fingerprinting ‘because we
are not certain that the fin-
gerprint is for the purpose
they say it is for.
“With technology being



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to biometric
fingerprinting

tion of the five million. shares
likely to have been created at |
last night’s EGM. Some 4.214
million shares will be left in the
company’s Treasury.
Insurance industry sources
suggested that a substantial pro-
portion of the proceeds from
The Economical Insurance
Group’s buy-in would be used
to repay a $6 million loan that

Bahamas First Holdings
obtained from Bank of Butter-
field in 2006.

That loan was used to bolster
Bahamas First’s capital base,
after the international insurance
credit rating agency, A.M. Best,
had expressed concerns that the

' company’s premium growth was

outpacing its capital.

Still, Bahamas First’s capital
base is likely to receive a wel-
come $4.43 million boost. Cap-
ital is critical for insurance com-
panies, as possessing more of it
means they can write more new .
premium business, take on addi-

SEE page 10



what it is today, that infor-
mation can be transmitted
all over the world in a mat-
ter of seconds.

“Technology can be made
to say what you want it to
say, and achieve what you
want it to achieve. We are

SEE page nine



2007, Certain Restr


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Minister to head | a Ab a ;
Business Outlook

‘THE minister
of state for
finance, Zhivar-
go Laing, will
deliver the
keynote address
at next year’s
Bahamas Busi-
ness Outlook

| conference,
| scheduled for January 9, 2008.
| The conference, to be held
under the theme, Improving
Competitiveness for Region-
| al Leadership, provides a plat-
| form to engage more Bahami-
| ans in how they and the
| Bahamas can become leaders
| in all facets of business
| throughout the Caribbean.
| The Counsellors’ president,
| and Bahamas Business Out-
| look executive director, Joan
Albury, said in statement:
| “Over the years, New Provi-
| dence and the Family Islands
have been the benefactors of
much foreign investment.
This seminar is about dis-
cussing how Bahamians can
capitalise on this fact while
on the road to becoming the
| leader in the region in the
| . areas of commerce, education
| health.”
| Other.speakers include
| Minister of Education, Youth,
Sports and Culture, Carl



Bethel; the director-general

in the Ministry of Tourism, |

Vernice Walkine; secretary-
general in the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation, Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace;
Simon Townsend, partner at
KPMG, chairman of the

Bahamas Medical Council,

Dr Duane Sands; managing
partner of Albany, Christo-
pher Anand; chairman of the
Nassau Tourism and Devel-

opment Board, Charles |

Klonaris; chief executive of
the Nassau Airport Develop-
ment Company, Craig Rich-
mond; Rhodes Scholar,
Desiree Cox M.D, Ph.D: and
President of the Bahamas

Chamber of Commerce, |

Dionisio D’ Aguilar.
The Counsellors Ltd, which

hosted the first Bahamas |

Business Outlook in 1991,
expanded the franchise to

‘Grand Bahama in 1997.
The agency has since host-_|

ed four conferences in Abaco,

and introduced Exuma Busi- |

ness Outlook in George
Town last year. Since its

inception, the conference has _ |
made history in bringing to |
the forefront vital issues |

affecting the economic growth
and development of the
Bahamas.

‘Simon, executive director of the



ATTENDEES (top) such as Philip

Bahamas Chamber of Commerce;
Charles Sands, underwriting man-
ager.at Summit Insurance; Sophia
Sturrup-Walker, IT Manager at Col-
ina Imperial; and Troy d’Arville,
president of Furniture Plus listen
intently at Providence Technology
Group’s Executive Technology Day

SHOWN (right) at Providence Tech-
nology Group’s Executive Tech-
nology Day are Microsoft's Juan
Carlos Meija and Ricardo Vallecillo
demonstrating the Unified Com-
munications platform.



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| British Colonial Hilton |






New technology
solutions unveiled
to Bahamians

“PROVIDENCE Technology
Group, the Bahamian IT solu-
tions provider, and Microsoft
held an Executive Technology
Day to present Microsoft’s lat-
est solutions.

One of the key messages
communicated was that com-
panies must adapt to the new
way of working to achieve busi-
ness growth. )People have to be
considered an organisation’s
most important asset.

Microsoft ‘said its new solu-
tions developed and supported
a “people ready business” by
promoting teamwork, enabling
people to work anywhere at any
time, and ensuring staff have
information to make the best

One of the solutions demon-
strated was Microsoft’s Unified
Communications platform.
This combines separate
telecommunications platforms
such as telephony, e-mail and
instant messaging, audio, video
and web conferencing and
voicemail into a unified expe-

_tience - one platform for all
your communication networks _

and devices.

Unified Communications,
Microsoft representatives said,
will give you just one contact
address for all your current con-
tact information: work tele-
phone and fax numbers; home
and work e-mail addresses;
home telephone number; telex

decisions.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 3B



Poe ee ae
Court orders

10,000 security
in constitution
related case

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Court of Appeal has.

ordered a foreign law firm and
its Bahamian attorneys to pay
$10,000 as security for costs,
not the $130,000 originally
required, in a case that raised
constitutional issues.

The court made the order in
relation to an interlocutory
issue where Brian Simms, head
of litigation at the Lennox
Paton law firm, argued that it
was unconstitutional and dis-
criminatory for Bahamian
courts to require litigants to
provide security for costs sim-
ply because they were not
incorporated in this jurisdic-
tion.

Mr Simms was representing
the law firm Michael Wilson &
Partners, which has offices in
the British Virgin Islands and
Kazakhstan, in a case where the
substantive issues relate to the
other party, a Thomas lan Sin-
clair, being given leave to serve
his client outside the jurisdic-
tion of the Bahamas.

In its verdict on the security
for costs issue, the Court of
Appeal noted that the sum of
$130,000 had originally been
set.

It ruled: “We have consid-
ered the arguments on both
sides, and we have decided that
Mr Simms. having accepted the
principle :f security for costs
before the Registrar and, in
fact, having indicated to us that
he had offered to put $10,000 as
additional security, we think
$10,000 is adequate and rea-
sonable. ’

“Woe order that additional
security in the sum of $10,000
be placed before the Registrar
by c2sh or bond, Mr Simms, by
December 31, 2007, as security

For more information, contact Colin Dowe at 1 (473) 444-4680 or visit www.sgu.edu/mba

©2007 St. George’s University

for costs of the appeal.”

Mr Simms had argued that
the requirements of providing
security for costs - a form of
bond.- of the opposing party
upfront would not be asked of a
Bahamian company, and
claimed that the particular
request imposed upon Michael
Wilson & Partners was only a
manoevere to frustrate pro-
ceedings before the courts in
the UK.

The same requirements are
not demanded of Bahamian lit-
igants, he had argued, meaning
that the demand imposed on
foreign participants in Bahami-
an legal actions was unconsti-
tutional and: discriminatory.

Costs

The rationale behind
demanding security for costs
from foreign litigants is that it
acts as a kind of performance
bond, or guarantee, that the
other side’s legal costs will
defrayed if the foreign party
flees the Bahamas.

Mr Simms had alleged that
to even look at the assets of a
foreign company was unconsti-



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

tutional, and to ask about the
laws of the country they were
incorporated in was discrimi-
natory as well.

Michael Scott, of Callenders
and Co, appearing for Mr Sin-
clair, had argued that it was
appropriate to ask for security

for costs given that the assets of

the company in question were
not based in the Bahamas. He
said the key issue was whether
the litigant in question had any
assets in the Bahamas, not
whether it was incorporated
here.

Mr Scott had alleged that
there were six legal actions out-
standing against Michael Wil-
son & Partners, and argued that
in at least one case there was
difficulty in getting a settle-
ment.

The case before the Court of
Appeal relates to a dispute over
shares in an entity listed on the
UK’s Alternative Investment
Market (AIM), which are reg-
istered in the name of a
Bahamian International Busi-
ness Company (IBC).

Michael Wilson & Partners
is alleging that it is the true
owner of these shares through a
partnership arrangement.













THIS IS GLOBAL OPPORTUNITY.

Prime Minister |
Che Kt. Hon. Hubewt A. Ingraham
& Ms. Ingraham

Che Wamen's Assaciation

a




Ystallation of Officers
Ceremony & Luncheon
Under the Gheme:
“Women Betevmined to Succeed”
Sunday, 9th December, 2007
at.2 PM
Sandals Royal: Bahamian Resort
Cable Beach












TO OUR MBA STUDENTS,
THIS IS NOT NUTMEG.

St. George’s University was founded by looking at the
world differently. Our MIB/MBA program was founded
the same way. This program was created for students
interested in applying the international perspective of
St. George’s University toward the global marketplace.
Both the MIB and MBA degrees are designed to be
comprehensive as well as flexible, offering accelerated
and part-time programs. If opportunity is what you seek,
St. George’s University just might be your first step.

St. George’s University

THINK BEYOND



Grenada, West Indies
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007





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LONG ISLAND — A $110-
million resort and residential
community for north Long
Island is hoping to obtain plan-
ning approval by next Easter,
with the groundbreaking hap-
pening by autumn 2008.

The British developers of the
proposed Port St. George
investment plan to use available
land in the Stella Maris area for
the construction of the project,

_which will include an 18-hole

signature golf course and a
marina. Construction comple-
tion is scheduled for 2015.

Plans for the development
were outlined to Long Islanders
at a town meeting at the gov-
ernment high school in Simms,
on November 27, 2007.

The proposed developers also
announced plans for another
resort for the Stella Maris area
- Caribbean Heights — which’
together with Port St. George
will open opportunities for hun-
dreds of jobs, both during the
construction and post-construc-
tion phases.

More than 400 persons
attended, and many questions
were asked on issues such as
dredging, road elevation, antiq-
uities, solid waste and the recon-
figuration of the Queen’s High-
way.

Port St George, said: “We are in
the planning stages. We hope

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He told Long Islanders that
the developers are hoping to
break ground by.autumn 2008.

Keith Bishop, of Islands By
Design, said he had been
engaged to do the Environment
Impact Assessment (EIA), and

. reported that he saw a number

of areas that needed redesign-
ing.

Sidney Collie, minister of
lands and local government,
assured Long Islanders that “no
significant investment” will
come to’these islands without
the Government coming direct-
ly to the people, “and as clearly
and as concisely as possible,

$11 Om proj ect

apprise the people of the pro-
posed investment”.

He added that “before the
first soil is turned and the first
brick is laid, you would know
what is coming to your island
and whether you welcome such
investment”.

Earl Deveaux, minister of
public works and transport, said
the airport at Stella Maris was
undergoing expansion, and
work would soon begin to com-

: plete the terminal building and

meet International Civil Avia-
tion Organisation (ICAO) stan-
dards for international securi-

ty.

He said Long Island will.

shortly have an improved Stella
Maris airport in the north to

accommodate the proposed

development.

Mr Deveaux emphasised that
“it is not likely we will have
enough space in the north for a
7,000-foot runway, but we will
accommodate short-haul air-
craft. In the partnership that we
seek to develop in Long Island,
if you need a longer airport we
will invite you to Deadman’s
Cay”.

The minister said the Gov-
ernment intends to complete
the dock in Long Island.

He added: “It is my duty to
tell you that we have selected a
spot in Long Island we feel
could accommodate the year-

MINISTRY OF FINANCE
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Ministry of Finance ‘advise the general
public that where persons have received approval
for duty free importation of items as a result of
Tropical Storm Noel, and wish to purchase items
through local suppliers, those individuals may lodge
a copy of the approval with the respective local
supplier.

Any ‘supplier to whom such an approval has been :
lodged may present this approval to Bahamas
Customs when the items are being cleared. The
approval will thereby facilitate the duty free
clearance of the imported items.

Ruth Millar (Mrs.)
Financial secretary

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Ongoing updating and maintenance of trust administration
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 5B



targets fall ’08 ground-break

bour. We are looking at the
area where BEC (the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation) cur-
rently is, so we have room for
long-term expansion.

“We will go to bids as soon as
the designs are completed on
that dock.”

Mr Deveaux told Long
Islanders that as a result of the
recent passage of Tropical
Storm Noel, “we have had to
re-prioritise our road infra-
structure”.

He indicated that Long Island
was already high on the sched-
ule for sea walls construction,
repairs to the dock at Simms
and additional infrastructure
works.

He said the Government now

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Technician with experience in Gas
and Electric repairs/service.

Please fax resume to: 394-7659

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Company Administrator needed
Ly work in downtown office:

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

e Associate degree in law or business.

e Must be conversant with all aspects of company
incorporation and administration, including
liquidation and redomiciliation of International
Business Companies

e Excellent written and oral communication skills.

e Computer literate, including a working knowledge
of Lynx 4 Series, Microsoft Word, Excel, Power
Point.

e At least two years work experience with a trust
company or law firm.

Please write to: Company Administrator
P.O. Box N-10697
Nassau, Bahamas
E-mail:smith@experta.bs

ACCOUNTS CLERK

A progressive organization seeks to hire an
Accounts Clerk. The successful candidate
will be responsible for recording various
business transactions and generating
monthly financial etalcrnente and reports for
management.

Qualifications .
Candidate must have at least an associate
degree in accounting with a minimum of five
(5) years experience or a bachelor degree
with a minimum of (3) years experience.
Knowledge of Microsoft Excel and Quick

Books would be an advantage.





Salary range: $16,200 -— $25,000 per Annum.

Qualified and interested applicants should
forward a copy of their curriculum vitae to:-

c/o The Tribune
DA Number 5405
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

All responses should be received by
December 18, 2007.





has before it a list of Family
Island roads “so that we can
make some choices in the sense
that Cat Island, Long Island and
Exuma Had exceptionally high
flooding and unexpected dam-
age to their roads. We had to
shift our priorities around so
that we could accommodate
repairs as a result of the flood-
in

agriculture and marine
resources, who is the MP for
Long Island, said: “I believe
that Port St. George will be
something great for Long

Island. And, based on what I :

have heard over the last few
weeks and the amount of excite-
ment this has generated, I
believe Long Islanders are now
ready to accept Port St.

POU TT SA cl 701
the #1 newspaper in circulation,

just call 322-1986 today!



g.
Larry Cartwright, minister of | George.”

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is the UN’s
global development network, advocating for change and connecting
countries to knowledge, experience and resources to help people build
a better life. We are on the ground in 166 countries, working with
them on their own solutions to global and national development
challenges. As they develop local capacity, they draw on the people
of UNDP and our wide range of partners,





acancy Announcement No: SGP- 2007/ 0001
Deadline For Application: 21 December 2007
National Coordinator

Nassau, BAHAMAS

An attractive compensation package based on qualifications and
experience

One Year, with the possibility of renewal











Organizational Unit GEF-SGP
he Global Environment Facility (GEF), established in 1991, helps developing countries fund
projects and programs that protect the global environment. GEF grants support projects related to
biodiversity, climate change, international waters, land degradation, the ozone layer, and persistent
organic pollutants. The Small Grants Programme (SGP) embodies the very essence of sustainable
development. SGP channels financial and technical support directly to NGOs and CBOs for
activities that conserve and restore the environment http: IIsqp. undp.org. GEF is an the
SGP in The Bahamas.







DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES



e Effective management of the GEF-SGP (Global Environment Facility — Small Grants
Programme) local team, the SGP programme anzd its portfolio -- from programme strategy to
individual project concept and design to technical support to SGP grantees, monitoring and
evaluation -- to ensure compliance with the overall approved global SGP Strategic
Framework, the SGP Operational Guidelines, the SGP annual work programme, the
national environmental and sustainable development priorities, as well as the annual
delivery of the national SGP targets.








e Building strategic partnerships with development partners, such as donors, foundations,
private sector and civil society, to promote SGP and mobilize resources.







e Contribution to GEF-SGP’s efforts to develop effective national, regional and global
networks for technical support and knowledge management, within the GEF SGP and with
external institution, including academia.




The Terms of Reference (TOR) may be viewed at www.jobs.undp.org .
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS






e Advanced university degree in environmental economics, Business Administration or related
field

e Atleast 5 years of relevant experience in development work, which should include
programme management preferably with an extended specialized experience in any of the
GEF-SGP focal areas.

e Excellent analytical and writing skills

e Excellent people management and interpersonal skills

e Ability to communicate effectively

¢ Good negotiation and problem-solving skills

e Proficiency in word-processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications

Fluency in English —



















Send applications including |UNDP/ GEF-SGP National Coordinator
a 5-10 page writing Bahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST) Commission
sample to : Office of the Prime Minister

Nassau Court, P.O. Box CB-10980

Nassau, The Bahamas

via e-mail to registry. jm@undp.org or online at www.jobs.undp.org
This vacancy is open to qualified male and female nationals of the Bahamas.
We thank you for your application but only short listed candidates will be contacted














PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

INVESTMENT




NEW PROVIDENCE



LOT No. 21B FRASER ALLOTMENT

OFF SOLDIER ROAD ‘App

ve, The subject property
con-sisting of 8,400
square feet
| developed. with a
| split leveled home
with 1925 square
feet of floor area on
| the ground floor, a
porch area of 437
square feet and
second floor area of
735 square feet. The








building is of sound construction and completed in its entirety. The

ground floor comprises 2 bedrooms, one bath, a kitchen, dining and
| family room. The second floor comprises two bedrooms, one bath, living
} and dining areas.

Directions to property: Heading East on Soldier, turn left onto first paved

road opposite Lowes Wholesale, 2nd to last house on the road with

chain linked fence.

Sc ca te
SANDYPORT Appraisal: $300,000.00

All that lot of land having an area of 9,626 square feet, being lot number 40,
of the subdivision known as SandyPort, situate in the Western District of
New Providence. The property is irregular in shape, is on a level grade and
zoned as single family residential. An electrical connection outlet is located
near the property. The property is located on Sandy Port Drive just on the
bend before Governor’s Cay on the Southern Side of the road.



No. 17 WESTRIDGE ESTATES Appraisal: $930,000.00

All that lot of land having an
area of 30000 square feet,
being lot Number 17 of the
subdivision known as
Westridge Estates Addition.
, Situate in the Western District

,on the’ island of New
Providence.
Located on the = subject
* property is a newly
. constructed single story
“\ Structure comprising 6,000



feet of living space with a
. three Car Garage.
The building is 75% completed and comprises five bedrooms, four and a
j half baths. study, living/dining, -family room, kitchen, laundry and
generator room. :
Location: From SuperValue West Bay, take the road heading west into
| Westridge, take the first corner on the Right, Westridge Drive. Subject
property will be about the seventh on the right hand side of the road.

FREEPORT



Apartment 402, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms.
Lot 4, Block GN, Edward Birch Curt, Bahamian North

‘

| GREENING GLADE SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $75,000.00

|, All that piece parcel and lot of land described as lot 7 block 21,
Albacore Drive, Victoria Place and Mid Chipman Road, Unit 2,
Greening Glade Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. The lot

|| contains 20,580 sq. ft. and zoned as multi-family residential.

en

|LOT No. 20, BLOCK 1, UNIT 3
FORTUNE POINT SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $38,000.00

|| All that lot of vacant land having an area of 12,650 sq. ft. being lot No.

20, Block 1 Unit 3 of the Subdivision known and designated as Fortune
Point Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Duplex property zoning with
# rectangle shape. ;







i LINCOL
Unit 5, Block 17, Lot #48 — Single family residence, Clearwater Close.
Located on fresh water canal. Approximately 17,404 sq. ft.





TO VIEW PROPERTIES GO TO
Click ON



raisal: $258,000.00

N GREEN, CANEBY CLOSE Appraisal: $38,500.00



“Real Estate Mall’ Click on

THE TRIBUNE

OPPORTUNITY

FREEPORT

LOT No. 37 BLOCK 33

CHURCHILL COURT, BAHAMIA MARINA

& BAHAMIA 4 SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT,

GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $337,000.00








All that lot of land having an area of 16,533 sq. ft. being lot No. 37
of the subdivision known and designated as Bahami





a Marina and
Bahamia Section 4 Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Located
on this property is a structure comprising a 3 year old duplex
structure which covers approximately (3,058) square feet.
Apartment consisting of two 2-bedrooms, 2-bathroom with private
Jacuzzi in master bath, spacious living and dining room, full service
kitchen, a laundry and utility room, foyer/hallway with linen and
storage closet. The property is fully secured by six foot plastic
coated chain-link fence runs along the side and rear and adjoins the
painted 4 foot wall, with 5 foot pillars at front with electronic gate.

FAMILY ISLANDS

ABACO Appraisal: $108,000.00

PORTION OF MURPHY TOWN CROWN
ALLOTMENT, MURPHY TOWN, ABACO.

elooee _ The property is 89 x 100 ft
and rectangular in shape.















rere barmumrmmpmmmuns

The iand is’ elevated
approximately 15 ft above
road level and



approximately 25 ft above
sea level. Located on this
property is a twenty-year-
old three bedroom, two
bathroom, living, dining,

dry room house. The structure ‘requires much



kitchen and laun
attention.

SOSOKOHROOREE HESS ROSH ORBOREEODE

EXUMA Appraisal: $170,000.00

DUPLEX IN LOT 6625

BAHAMA SOUND No. 8, EAST, EXUMA
“SAA NK Trapezium shaped lot 35
& ft. above sea _tevel

| comprising 10,000 sq. ft.
Situated thereon is a 10-
3 year-old single storey

dupiex, 2 bed, 1 bath,

kitchen, living/dining
area and porch.
(Building is in need of
repairs).

SPSS OHS SSRIS AIOE ROO RVERROeTOORS

EXUMA Appraisal: $673,075.00

CASTELRAG ESTATES, LOTS 129 & 130
EXUMA HARBOUR SUBDIVISION

The subject property is located
on Kingway Road and is
developed with an area of
, 20,000 square feet. Situated
thereon is a_ residence
comprised of 3,645 square feet
‘of living accommodations,
yy: inclusive of 4 bedrooms, 2

_ baths, with laundry and utility
se, SPaces and a two bedroom one
bath guest cottage of 600
square feet. The property is

he highest portion











fenced with white picket fencing and has a Gazebo at t
of the property.





INT
ELEUTHERA ‘Appraisal: $112,105.00

All that piece, parcel or lot of land 2,743 feet East of the junction of the
Palmetto Point road and main Eleuthera Highway containing 2.45 acres.
This site encompasses a 28-year-old single storey concrete structure of
approximately 832 square feet of enclosed floor space inclusive of shop
space and rest room facilities.







www.stopnshopbahamas.com
Doorway “Enter Online Store”



FOR CONDITIONS OF SALE AND ANY OTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

HARRY COLLIE @ 502-3034 - E-

PHILIP WHITE @ 502-3077 - E-mail
6-3851 - send bids to P. O. Box N-7

at hae
$$

mail harry.collie@scotiabank.com
or
Philipwhite@scotiabank.com

518 Rosetta Street, Nassau, Bahamas




THE TRIBUNE

MUST

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 7B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

December 6, 2007
The Tribune

S488



MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES |

(Lot No. 62, Lower. Bogue)
ELEUTHERA

{ All that piece parcel or lot of land and
improvements, in the settlement of Lower
Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 62,
comprising of about 34,210 sq. ft., this site
encompasses a 12 year old single storney home
comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front
room, dining, breakfast room, kitchen and
' laundry room, with a total living area of
’ approximately 2,342.06. Property also includes a double car garage, and front entrance
with a total sq. ft. of approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed.
The property is well landscaped with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.

Appraisal: $235,638.00

This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of
Lower Bogue.



KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
(NASSAU)

4) Lotno. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single
f| story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living
4 room, dining area, family room, kitchen, study,
laundry and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $188,406.00

’



Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the
left, then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st right, house is second on your right
with garage.



Investment Opportunity Must
Sell Lot No. 217 Pinewood
Gardens Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq ft,
being Lot No. 217 of the Subdivision known as
Pinewood Gardens, the said subdivision situated
in the Southern District of New Providence
Bahamas. Located on this property is a structure
comprising of an approximately 20 yr old single
family residence consisting of 992 sq. ft of
enclosed living space with 3-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, kitchen, drive way and
walk way. The land is on a grade and level and appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow
the possibility of flooding. The grounds are fairly kept and yard is open.

Appraisal: $127,988.00



Traveling south on East Street to the junction of Soldier Road, make a left at the light then turn
right into Kennedy Subdivision, go all the way to T-junction, turn right then first left then right
again toward Mount Tabor Church building, after passing Mount Tabor take first left (sapodilla blvd),
the subject house is about 400 yards on the right painted yellow trimmed green, with green and
white door.



LOT NO. 1490
GOLDEN
GATES
SECTION 2

All that lot of land having
an area of 6,000 sq. ft.
being lot no. 1490 of the
subdivision known and
designated as Golden Gates, the said subdivision situated in the southwestern district of New
Providence, bahamas. This property is comprised of a 25 yer old single family residence consisting
of approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living,
dining rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level, however the site appears to be sufficiently
elevated to disallow the posibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The
grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is
enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement block wall to the front.

Appraisal: $162,400.00

Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith
Ministries Complex, then first left again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the
6th house left painted green trimmed white.



LOT NO. #7, BOILING
HOLE SUBDIVISION

y All that piece parcel or lot of land and
" inprovements situated on the Island of
Eleuthera, North of Governor’s Harbour,
comprising of Lot No. 7 in the Boiling
Hole Subdivision and comprising of
approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site
encompasses a 17 years old duplex with
ne : each unit consisting of 2-bedrooms; 1
bathroom, frontroom, diningroom and kitchen with a gross floor area of approximately 1,474.20
sq. ft. and covered porch area of approximately 164.70 sq. ft. this duplex was built in
accordance with the plan and specification as approved, and at a standard that was acceptable
to the Ministry Of Public Works. This structure is in good condition. Each apartment could
be rented at $800.00 per month. The land is landscaped and planted with ficus trees, but

needs some manicuring.
APPRAISAL: $153,521.00



Lot No. 3 Yamacraw
Beach Estates

All that lot of land having an area of 10,000 sq
| ft, being lot no. 3 in Yamacraw Beach Estates,
«| in the said subdivision situated in the: eastern
district of New Providence Bahamas. Located
on the subject property is a single-storey triplex
building comprising of 3 units with two 2-
bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living, dining, kitchen



— apartments unit and one unit being used as a-

barber and beauty salon. the land is on a grade
and level; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of
flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: $313,016.00

Traveling south on Fox Hill Road, go pass Yamacraw Hill Road and Joe Farrington
Road. The subject property is located on the left hand side of Fox Hill road painted white
trimmed brown.





Lot No. 130, St. Andrews
Beach Estates

All that lot of land having an area of 8,100
sq ft, being lot no. 130, of the subdivision
} known and designated as st. andrews beach
| estates, the said subdivision situated in the
eastern district of New Providence,
“},Bahamas. located on the subject property
is a structure comprising of anapproximately
eyr old duplex.

Appraisal: $245,237.00

Traveling east on yamacraw hill road take the third corner right. with sign for st andrews

beach estates, then take first left, then first right, the subject property is the 2nd property

on the left side painted beige trimmed orange.

Lot No. 1056 Pinewood
Gardens Subdivision

All that lot of land having an area of 5,000
sq ft, being lot no. 1056 of the subdivision
)Â¥ known as Pinewood Gardens, the said
subdivision situated in the southern district
of New providence Bahamas. Located on
+, this property is a structure comprising of
an approximately 10 yr old single family
residence consisting of approximately 1,205
sq. ft of enclosed living space with 3-
bedrooms with closets, 2-bathroom, linen closet, living, dining rooms, kitchen and
covered front porch. the land is slightly elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding.
the grounds are fairly kept. ‘

Appraisal: $144,977.00

Traveling south on East Street to Sapodilla Boulevard, turn right at thatch Palm Street,
turn left onto Rosewood Street, the subject property is the second on the right hand
side painted blue trimmed white.



VACANT PROPERTIES



Lot B, Marigold Farm Road Allotment 67

All that lot of vacant land having an area of 1,173 acres and being referred to as the plot

. the property is lot No. B and is situated on Marigvld Farm Road in the area known as

Allotment 67, a subdivision situated in the south eastern district of New Providence Bahamas. This property is zoned multi family.

Appraisal: $146,000.00

Traveling from Joe Farrington Road onto Marigold Farm Road heading south. The subject is th 2nd to last property on the left hand side of the road near the pond.



Rainbow Subdivision

All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 14,052.59 sq. ft. being lot no. 3, block 27,

Lot No. 3, Block 27

section b, of Rainbow Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded about

103.44 ft north by Queens Highway, and 137.02 ft. East and about 99.94, ft south of Rainbow Hill Circle. 139.91 ft West. All utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $37, 440.00



BLACKWOOD, ABACO

All that lot of land having an area of approximately 258,064 sq. ft. This property is yet to reach its highest and best use. It is ideally suited to single or multi-family development as is the nature of
surrounding properties within the community. The site may also serve well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original state. It is covered with low
brush aM broad leaf coppice vegetation intersperse with broad strands of mature Yellow Pine indigenous to the area. The property is well drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under
normal conditions.

APPRAISAL: $219,354.40

The subject property is vacant and is situated at the Southeastern entrance of the Community of Blackwood, Abaco. The property.is undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract



NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)

Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and beunded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses
a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly
of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean.

Appraisal: $41,275.00 \

For conditions of sale and other ee ee eta

Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 © email harry.collie@scotiabank.com * Fax 356-3851
To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - Click on “Real Estate Mall” - Click on doorway “Enter Online Store”


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007 ee.
ie Bahamin

Your Bateman = emake ( a
“fa SAVINGS














VALUE

UR NCARE
NCA
_ OSU The Bah C (RD

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or . Sour er ya QUALITY STAMPS AT BED, BATH a ey:




OCEANSPRAY
Assorted

JUICES

SY i)
REGULARILITE

MAYONNAISE

QUAKER QUICK \

GRITS"














CHEF-BOYARDEE

SPAGHETTI w/ GREEN MACARONI
MEATBALLS [ici hast) & CHEESE












BLUEBIRD








SMACK RAMEN MAX STAR



JUICES Meenas FOIL
11.5 oz. rn 3 oz. 25 sq. ft.







PILLSBURY

INC Ib a

McVITIES






































MALT TONIC| Ne near hy
12 oz. | ny D caickens FROSTINGS wy
2/5 4 19{ $499 : $479 :
CREAM a/ ASST’ D. REGULAR Pecunia. rRASE |
CRACKERS BB lta BAGS
P ) pe 40 ct
had °2°° Wag 8%
JERGENS { a (Renuzit GENERIC
AIR
sae ish LiauiD giaiaat, BLEACH

$ 5” he
UNE

FRESH NATIVE
ASST’D CUT

U.S. CHOICE

CHUCK
STEAKS

per lib

GRILL MASTER

BEEF
PATTIES

5 Ib box

REAKSTON:, 8 oz. FROSTY ACRE, 4 Ears

OUR CREAM. ser$1-99 CORN-ONCOB. cin 2079

ALAXY SANDWICH, Sliced, 10 oz. GREEN GIANT, Asst’d. Frozen, 16 oz.
HEESEoescssscscssssce- 61649 VEGETABLES ocececsneQ 20.29

JNNY DELGHT, 64 oz. PEPPERIDGE FARM ASST’D, 19 oz
ITRUSPUNCH........$2. 99 LAYER CAKES socorcectensne SDs QQ

BAR-S

JUMBO
MEAT OR CHICKEN

HOT DOG

$459

WHOLE ROTISSERIE

CHICKENS

each

SCARMAYER BAR-S

SLCED MEAT
BACON BOLOGNA

12 oz.

$519 i 29

MRS SMITH

>UMPKIN PIES

IDAHO

BAKING
POTATOES

loose

SWEET

WATERMELONS

Mal

MarR Craae oe pcm eT EE

RVEST FRESH

.ETTUCE

man

ae



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 9B



FROM page one

not sure it is going to do what
they say it is.”

Mr Ferguson told The Tri-
bune that a trade union had
recently questioned a major
Bahamian resort employer on
“when the light flashes, where
does the image of the hand
go? No one explained it with
certainty to us”.

“On the job, we are not
comfortable with that,” Mr
Ferguson said of biometric
fingerprinting.

Bahamian employers,
through, are recommending

- to the Government that the

Employment Act be amend-
ed to provide for biometric
fingerprint recognition of
employees, believing that
“thousands of dollars” per
week were being added on to
company payrolls through
time card and ‘clocking in’
scams.

Currently, the Employment

Act 2001 outlaws the use of
fingerprints by all Bahamian
employers, apart from those
in the casino industry.

It stipulates: “No employer
shall, as a requirement for
employment or continued

Unions ‘opposed’

employment, require any per-
son to furnish a set of his fin-
gerprints or take a lie detector
test.”

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employer’s Confederation’s
(BECon) president, told The
Tribune that the Bahamas
needed to stay abreast of
modern technology, meaning
it had to recognise that bio-
metric fingerprints were
becoming increasingly com-
mon as an employee recogni-
tion tool.

In his presentation to the
TRIFOR conference, Mr Nutt
said: “Advances in technology
have given rise to biometrics
becoming widely used as a
means of recognition, includ-
ing the use of fingerprints. In
fact, there are laptop comput-
ers available today that for
security purposes utilise fin-
gerprint biometrics to recog-
nise persons who are
authorised to use the comput-

“We do not advocate that
fingerprints be used for iden-
tification purposes. Instead
this section of the Act should
acknowledge the need to

keep up with advances in
technology by allowing the
use of fingerprints as a means
of recognition.”

Yet the Joint Labour Move-
ment’s position on biometrics,
which is being discussed at the
bi-weekly TRIFOR meetings
at the Department of Labour,
is: “The Joint Labour Move-
ment is of the view that the
Act should remain [as is]
because any change will result
in employees being subjected
to the rapid advances in tech-
nology and exposed to new
areas to be victimised.”

Yet Bahamian companies
incurred extra costs and
expenses in hiring timekeep-
ers and security guards to
watch employees clock in and
out, Mr Nutt said.

He added there was no dan-
ger of stored records of
employee fingerprints falling
into the wrong hands.

Biometric machines did not
store images of worker fin-
gerprints, instead matching
the shape of their hands, fin-
gers, eye vessels and retinas
to a mathematical algorithm,
rather than storing them.

MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-C comprising 21,430 sq.ft. and situated on the western
side of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft.
northerly of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,
_ North Eleuthera, Bahamas. -

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

SHEET SETS

BED SKIRTS
_ BED SPREADS
~'TABLECLO THS
THROW PILLOWS

SHOWER CURTAINS
“WINDOW CURTAINS
KITCHEN CURTAINS
CHAIR SLIP COVERS

BLENDERS

BAKEWARES
WALL MIRRORS
SINGLE POTS & FRY PANS
CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS
PFALTZGRAFE
DINNERWARE SETS
ANCHOR HOCKING

LADY SANDRA COMFORTER SETS GLASSWARE SETS

SALE STARTS

MONDAY DECEMBER 3RD - SATURDAY DECEMBER 8TH
LOCATED: HARBOUR BAY SHOPPING CENTER

PH: 393-4440 OR 393-4448


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas First sells 20% stake

PUBLIC NOTICE
Intent To Change Name By Deed Poll

The Public is hereby advised that |, Odessa Francis of Faith
Gardens, Nassau, Bahamas, mother of LaShan Chinikue
Deborah Francis also of Faith Gardens, Nassau, Bahamas

intend to change her name to LaShan Chinikue
Deborah Pratt. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO. Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.



- FROM page one

tional risk, and keep a greater
percentage of premium rev-
enues on their books rather
than cede this to reinsurers.
One industry source suggest-
ed that The Economical Insur-
ance Group was likely to obtain
two seats on Bahamas First
Holdings’ Board of Directors,
which apart from Mr Fair also
currently features the compa-

_ny’s president and chief execu-
‘tive, Patrick Ward; Quentin

Chisnall; John Dunkley;
accountant Graham Garner;
attorney Judy Whitehead from

Ree eee ey
~. Cook Wanted

We are looking for a dedicated, hardworking cook to
join our kitchen team. Must have a positive attitude,
excellent customer service skills essential.

Qualifications:

¢ Experience in an industrial kitchen

¢ Certificate in Culinary Arts a plus
* Food-Handlers health certificate

* Police certificate

Excellent benefits

Salary commensurate with experience

Please fax resume to: 302-4787





Apply now to become an



REQUIREMENTS

sistant Director of Sales

Minimum five (5) years in real estate sales
Strong communication skills
Strong leadership and organizational skills
Minimum of 3 years in a management role

Self-motivated

Ability to deal with high net worth clients

Graham, Thompson & Co, and
Robert Inksater.

Some in the industry, though,
queried why Bahamas First
Holdings needed to find a for-
eign partner to inject capital and

take a substantial stake, and.
_why its Bahamian shareholders

had not put in extra funds.

There were also questions on
why the Bahamian sharehold-
ers would want to see their col-
lective stake diluted from 100
per cent to 80 per cent, although
the compensation is likely to be
the setting of a $1.49 per share
price. .

With this deal, only Summit

Insurance - the tied carrier for
Insurance Management - is left
as a general insurance carrier
that is 100 per cent Bahamian-
owned. RoyalStar Assurance is
25 per cent owned by Trinidad’s

Nemwil; Security & General is ©

majority-owned by the Bermu-
da-based Colonial Group; and
Insurance Company of the
Bahamas (ICB), the carrier
through which J. S. Johnson
places its general insurance
business, also has substantial

- foreign ownership through its

parent.
The deal with The Economi-
cal Insurance Group is likely to



RETAIL MANAGER

Market leading, highly successful Restaurant seeks
applications from qualified individuals for position of
Restaurant and Retail Manager .

Sales and performance driven expertise is required,
combined with strong customer service oriented back
grund and successful track record in man-management, is
an essential quality desired.

Salary is commensurate with experience and market
comparable. Further benefits and bonuses provide an
extremely attractive package to the right individual.

Interested persons may apply via email ONLY to:
nassau_gm@hardrock.com.bs

SERVERS, HOSTS, LINE COOKS, CLEANERS,
RETAIL SALES ASSOCIATES

It must suck not working here,
Hard Rock Cafe is hiring people like you who live without
limits and appreciate good music and great food!
Apply in person to the host stand.

No Phone calls please.

Hard Rock Cafe’
Charlotte Street North, |







































- pleted. e *

we Bahamas First access to the
Gnadian company’s products,
Stvices, expertise and back
ofce systems, and give it better
purchasing power with suppli-
ersi}

Te Economical Insurance
Grop, between 1998 and 2004,
douted in size from $700 mil-
lion t $1.9 billion in gross writ-
ten p>mium, its website pro-
Jectinjthat by 2010 it will see
this figre hit $2.5 billion.

A mtual, which means it is
ownedpy policyholders, not
sharehclers, The Economical
Insurane Group is headquar-

tered i. Ontario, with 19°

brancheand 900 independent
brokers éross Canada.

It has sme 2,000 employees,
and focuss on property, com-
mercial ad auto insurance,
with more1an one million pol-
icyholders1 Canada.

Shopping
phzas
on the

inciease
FROM age one

tinue," he adde,

Another realir, who wished
not to be namectold The Tri-
bune that while reir company
has not seen an itrease in retail
plaza developmets, they have
seen an increas in persons

wishing to purchze apartment’

complexes and dulexes.

However they:dded, that
some of their sale have been
fairly large properts that could
be used for comme:jal activity

“What we are seing is per-
sons coming in andvanting to
purchase property tkt they can
live in, and rent out dortion to
assist with the mortgge. What
we do see sometimes ‘that per-
sons are buying largttracts of
land, in multi -zond areaa,
without saying what thy want it
for,” the realtor said, *

She added that in soie cases,
they may then go to te Min-
istry of Works and get uilding
permits for retail zonig, but
that would occur after thinitial
real estate transaction ws.com-
8

AUCTION

SATURD

U.S. EMBASSY

AY, DECEMBER 8TH, 2007

‘SHIPAHOY COMPLEX

(Western Gate)

West Bay Street, opposite Well’s Service Stations

DOORS OPEN FOR INSPECTION

& REGISTRATION

8:30 A.M. - 9:30 A.M.

AUCTION

9:30 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.

Office Furniture, household furniture, Computer
equipment and other Supplies

Construction and miscellaneous supplies

Vehicles

GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED

amteaprem.
we

| Onsite/In-house All sales are final. All items are sold in

“as 1s” condition and there will be no
Refunds or exchanges.

Qualified applicants are asked to
_ contact Nadia Stubbs in the
Human Resources Department - Ext 65842



a.
THE TRIBUNE

ea ee



‘ THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6 2007, PAGE 11B



BUSINESS







‘State Farm asks appeals court to throw out

$1 million punitive aw.id wi Katrina case

A. , f@ NEW ORLEANS the ase and shouldnt have allowed jurors to weigh
‘ we @ oe a dee ACA ae ® ae Sm f vuye!s ha Maye
‘3 | gs STATE Farm Fire and Casualty Co. asked a Hin HAA APs Lp adsl 5 for Stake
: y ‘ federal appeals court Wednesday to that ov! a 4! iS Pasi we LAL jotand told
’ ‘ass j million punitive damage award to 2 Misswsijj) udges Eiclit, J ics Wiewer Jy. and Edith
, . . couple who sued the insurer for refusing to cover Sy Cwm (Asis
Hurvicane Katrina damage to their home. vevor4- vill Malt lawyer for the Broussard
ing to Associated Fress. . ene x Lugs
: . Acthree-judge panei from the Sto 17%. 6 scum Ae a ational and careful
@ 3y wa SIN poo ductivity ‘vas ° sigwiticant expected to slow.to a barely dis-’ |. Court of Appeals heard argumenis fro: ver way, Walkey said.
CRU! SINGER ip viliaminitiai cernible 1.5 per cent or even - both sides of the case, which was ti Seite concluded State Farin acted tit a ae ;

AF ecouomices wittter
WASHING UN (AP)
Work 2. proauctivity roared
ahead ai the fastest vace in four
years 1 ihe suimmic: Wile wage

PYessares : wopped ree
Ch sour Department
sported ¥ Wednesday thai pre-
ductivity. the amouiit of output
per hous ot work, was up at an
annua! vaie of 6.3 per cent in
ihe thirc ycarter, ihe best show-



"C. TeVISIOL:



icrease, veflecting the
at total output was
re "20d aigher.

sior hopes have been ris-
socent days that the Fed
interest rates for the
me since September
officials hold their last
tang of the year next Tues-






Those hopes were bolstered
by comments last week from





hh ago of a 4.9°

less in the curreni quarter.
Growth at such a slow pace
would increase the zisks that the

country couid dip into a reces-:

sion, felled by the multiple
blows of a prolonged housing
slump, a severe credit crunch,
rising energy costs and falter-
ing consumer confidence.

The Bush administration,
seeking to limit the fallout from
the housing bust, has been prod-
ding the mortgage industry to

:. bya jury in Mississippi. The court diai’t i

i ‘Judge j

,punitive damages to the Broussards



hundreds of Katrina insurance laws:



ately rule ov
AC th

State Farm’s appea.. .
lésion of January's ima., 0 0. 7 isict
T. Senter Jr. took part of ihe case ous vi
jurors’ bands and ruled that State Favii was lianic
fox $223,292 in wind damage to the Biloxi home of
Norman and Genevieve Broussard.

The jury subsequently awarded &







dee

a) 5 million in
out Se

ics

i later reduced that amount to $1 million. Blowsa-

ington, Ill.-based State Farm appealed the jury's
verdict.and several of the judge’s ruiiigs
State Farm’s experts concluded tiat Katisin

iy negligent way” by denying the Broussards’ classi
Phe it idye also seid the company denicd px
HOucrs Katrina claims based on a new “avi Fi

é protocol that is “at odds with other expres
s of Uh nasurance contract.”

Siate Farm claims Senter erred when be ruled
the company had to prove that the Broussards
nore didr: sustain any wind damage or that it had

ogregate wind and water damage to the resi

Aeuece,. .

tones, the Sth Circuit’s chief judge, questioned
why Senter didn’t let a jury decide whether Katy
aa s wind or water was responsibie for destrovi if
ine broussards home.



‘ag since the siunmer of 2003 Fed u Bernanke — freeze rates on a portion of the storm surge was responsible for most, 1 ot al) ALL (Siaic Farm) had to prove is that storm ,
ad far bigger than had been = ana V ice Chairman Donaid two million subprime mortgages the damage to the Broussards’ home. Pie conipa Gee Was a cause, and then a jury had to pros

expected. Kohr. Bou men noted that the — tha) are due to reset to higher ny says its policies cover damage from a hurr GW nuem was storm surge and howemuch wa
Meanwhile. wage pressure economy is likely to slow con- | rates over'the next two years. ‘oane’s wind but nofits rising waicr Inelacing wind nod,” Jouce seid while questioning Walker.

stowed with unit labor casts
dropping at a rate of two pe.
sent In the third quarter, ‘ue
opvest decliae im four years.
The combination of stronger
productivity growth and fewei
We age pressures should ease con-
‘as about inflation at the Fed-
: i Reserve and help clear the
way tor another cut in interest



sicicrably in the current quarter
unde: the impact of such prob-
iems as venewed turbulence in
finaicia: markets.

While overall economic
grow’h, as measured by the
gross domestic product, roared
ahead ai a 4.9 per cent rate in
the third quarter, the fastest
pace in four years, GDP is



The rate freeze program,
which is expected to be
announced on Thursday, would
be offered to homeowners who
have been able to keep current
with they monthly payments at
the jower introductory rates but
are judged to be unable to meet

the sharply higher payments

when the raies reset.



driven surge.

State Farm attorney Clarke Holland said Scaici

made “numerous errors” in evaluating evidence i:
ag EH

=cCipm Manager

"The Graduate Project
Management Certification’



Poiniiay
POT e yar tie



Che excharive between Jones and Waiker gicy
fosty, as the judge accused the lawyer of “playin
wilh words.”

hf PK

American Acadenty oi
Project Management




rates next week to guard against
the threat the economy couia
‘uinble imto.a recession.
Rising wages are good fo.
vorkers. But if higher wages
are no! accompanied by strong
productivity gains, they raise
acerns among Fed policy-
jaakers about inflation.
Che 6.3 per cent increase in

Certified International

Project Management Course
A PMP & IAPM Course Inclusive.

Beginning Date: Tuesday, January 3, 2008
Saturday, January 12, 2008











NOTICE

HE CALEDONIA FUND INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

. Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 133 of the .
international Business Companies Act 2000, that the captioned
Company is in dissolution. Dissolution commenced on Decem-
ber 4, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution were registered
by the Registrar. The Liquidator is James B. Gomez of RTA
Consultants Ltd’, P.O. Box SS-6229, 4TH Floor Centerville
House, 2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Total Price: $1390 (including all materials & fees)

Course Length:

A

thm ey Ugh

10 Wks or 10 Saturdays

Person having debts or claims against the Company are required
io send particulars to the Liquidator on or before December
23, 2007. In defauit thereof they will be excluded from the
benefit of as:y distribution made befor such debts are proved.

Time of Class: Tues & one — 6pm-8pin

Saturdays on 9am-lpm i

Contact:

HEE
ne ey uh

Dated December 6. 2007. Candice AbDEy
Lignuin Technologies (banesas, tod
Ph 393-2104 Kay o9a4975

Email candice @tigniumiech. com

JAMES B. GOMEZ
Liquidator



ee





GOVERNMENT NOTICE

OPERATION OF FOOD COURT ON THE PROPERTY OF
THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, YOUTH, SPORTS
AND CULTURE



TEACHERS REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS LIMITED

| NOTICE OF ANNEAL

MEETING TO SHAREHO! DERS
CIME & DATE:
PLACE:

sducation. Youth, Sports and Cuiture invites
endors & au and suibmit proposals for the
Operation and Mainiienance of a Food Court on the Ground Floor in
the Minisivy of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture Building,
Thompson Boulevard.



The Minisiry of
interested persons/ Vv



Friaay, Decemive, 7. 2007 at Ghoa

‘Teachers & Sai: wied Workers ¢

Head Offics, Bast Six

PEralyve & redit Unite
eet & lik AO PCUGe eC Drive
(1) To anhoviice the resi:
declare a quovui

Wwe CAawHNahon ot pronries

ITEMS OF BUSINESS:
: : : n preseiit ane procecu ws DUsthcss:

: CRITERIA FOR SELECTION

(2) To TECEW SS vith rppic tae Maroutes in se yn

The applicant(s)/ vendor should possess, good food preparation and

General Mecting heldon ecensb ‘O06
service skills, a valid Ministry cf Health Food Handlers Certificate and Gy is eecive siden ihe Olsen evenne

be prepared to submit the toliowing:

(4) To receive and approve aie nviectal stateracats and
' : the reports of the Directors and Avaticrs there.
1. A proposal for the daily speiation and management of the
(5) To elect Directors tor the caso) 2 year aud fix thy
tood cour? tactusive of: remuneration
west 39 HLF hee ‘ 4 eS le (6) To approve the appomirne ator Oehore & Fouche as
e Draft Meri Selection inciuding a variety of healthy,. the Auditor of the Company ana aaithortse the Directors
nutritious dishes which will encourage good eating - EER NE Onion e
habits and practices, (7) To trai ch other owsiness ta perty conn
before Whe big and any a yo coal ol

* The foods/dishes offered: should be well balanced
and include a variety of food groups, freshly
prepared aesthetically appealing;

-¢ The selected vendor will be expected to maintain a
“ean, attractive and some environment.

~ Holders of 400.000 shares of Cord at the Close of bustiess

RECORD DATE:
Bet ae on October 25, 2007 aie entitled to vote at the meetiag,
S: The Company's audited tnancial statements are tactuded

in the Conypany s 2006 6 anual report, which is enclosed
sobicdmg os alerial,



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

as part OF THe prory



MAILING DATE: The Company will cause the accompanying materials to
Food receptacles should be suitable and ‘compatible with the fSods be delivered on November 8. 2007 to the last registered
addtess
sold with appropriate tex perature controls to prevent cross a ,
contamination and the possibility of food poisoning. PROXY VOTING: It is important that your shares be represented and yorcd
; , at the meeting. You can vote your shares by appeacinge a
; ; person or by corupleting and returning the proxy torn
Proposals shguld be submitted on or before 31st December, 2007 and enclosed. You can revoke a proxy at any time prior to is
4 Sen, exercise at the meeting by following the tustructions 1a
addressed: the accompanying proxy statement
Permanent Secretary By order of the Board of Directors
Ministry of Education, Youth, Spats & Culture October 9, 2007 el Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Secretary
Thompson Boulevard :
Nassau, The Bahamas
PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Hilton marina project
embroiled in lawsuit

FROM page one

said the defendants vigorously
denied the allegations in IGY’s
lawsuit, which would be
defended, and they were
preparing to file a counter-
claim.

The lawsuit, which was ini-
tially filed in the State Court of
‘New York, was moved to the
Federal Court in New York
about one month ago following
efforts by the defendants’
attorneys. New York was cho-
sen as the jurisdiction where
any disputes over the mari-
na/resort project would be
arbitrated/litigated when the
parties signed the initial agree-
ment for the project.

It is unclear what impact
IGY’s move to litigation will
have on efforts by the British
Colonial Development Com-
pany, Adurion and CCWIPP
to find a new partner to take
over the project, which was
part of the vision held by

Canadian Ron Kelly when he .

acquired the British Colonial
Hilton in the late 1990s.
It is understood that IGY

has not yet attempted to attach »

a lien to the land, and one

source close to the Hilton and

its owners said the lawsuit “will

not affect our ability to go for-
“ward”,

The Tribune was told that
the resort and its owners were
now talking to Camper &
Nicholson about taking on the
project and the five-to-six acre
site just to the west of the
British Colonial Hilton, which
is being valued at between $20-
$30 million.

IGY’s decision to withdraw
from the project is also a set-
back to efforts to revitalise
downtown Nassau and West
Bay Street, a project that was
started by the previous admin-
istration administration and
seems likely to be taken on,-.in
some form - by the Ingraham

government.

Vincent Peet, the former
minister of financial services
and investments in the Christie
government, said yesterday of
the IGY project: “We thought

that any investment we had in .

train was good for the coun-
try, so we'd like to see them
proceed.”

Acknowledging that he did
not have all the facts relating
to the IGY project’s status, Mr
Peet said: “Once in litigation,
any Government would have
to await the outcome, and we’d
certainly like to see it
resolved.”

He added: “It was a very
progressive project, and would
have done a lot for the coun-
try. It was an integral part, a
critical part, of helping us
develop west of the Hilton.

“Tt would have done a lot to
help bring life and business to
downtown..... It would have
been an expansion of the
Hilton project, and brought a
new sense of life and excite-
ment to downtown, both to
help employment and the
tourism industry.”

Mr Peet said: “Any. new gov-
ernment should move, as
we’ve said for quite a while,
on projects that were left in
train that could benefit the
Bahamian economy and peo-

‘ple. This government has not

done that, and the country has
suffered.”

Most of the negotiations on
the IGY project took place
when the Christie government
was in office, and a major fac-
tor in its failure may have been
that the parties took too long
to close the deal.

Talks were ongoing for
almost three years, The Tri-
bune understands, and the ini-
tial contract allowed both sides
to walk away from the deal if it
was not concluded within two
years - an. option that Adurion,

: CC@WIPP, and the Hilton ulti-

mately exercised. :;;
Dies bed &

SOM

There is a time when all
deals are ‘hot’, but if the two
parties do not consummate the
transaction then, it often goes
cold. Despite numerous meet-
ings and conference calls

between IGY and Adurion .

executives, they were not able
to agree ‘terms on a new deal.

The Tribune reported earli-
er this year how the Canadian
Commercial Workers Industry
Pension Plan (CCWIPP) sold a
majority stake in the British
Colonial Hilton’s holding com-
pany to Adurion Investment
Management, a boutique
Swiss/UK investment house.

Adurion itself has made a
more-than $30 million invest-
ment commitment to revitalise
the hotel, including a $15 mil-
lion refurbishment pro-
gramme, after taking control
of the British Colonial Devel-
opment Company from its
Canadian pension fund part-
ner.

The IGY project had
‘approval in principle’ from the
Government before the Adu-
rion purchase was closed.
IGY’s chairman and chief
executive, Andrew Farkas,
previously told The Tribune
that the project ran into trou-
ble after Adurion allegedly
tried to alter the terms of the
original deal. | ;

He said then: “Right now,
it’s in limbo because Adurion
and the pension fund who own
the property, and have a joint
venture deal with IGY, decid-
ed they wanted to change the
deal.”....

“The Government had
approved everything, and our
deal with the pension fund was
fine. Everything was in great
shape, but then three weeks
later the pension fund decided
to take on a new partner....”

It was suggested that the

blame for the deal’s collapse.

should not be laid at either
party’s door. There was a sug-

gestion that Adurion became’

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concerned when IGY left it,

late to supply it with financial
projections and details on a
project that would be happen-
ing next door to its latest mul-
ti-million dollar investment, as
it needed to know what poten-
tial impact there might be.

In addition, Adurion was
also said to have been uncom-
fortable with the price IGY
was paying under the original
contract to acquire the land it
needed from the British Colo-
nial Development Company,
and wanted to increase it —
something Mr Farkas had pre-
viously confirmed.

Adurion is also said to have
wanted to play a more active
role in the marina project, par-
ticipating as a co-investor in

the project, while there were

concerns about IGY’s initial

designs for the marina, with
docks and jetties encroaching
on to Crown Land and the
Hilton’s beach area.

The former Government
was concerned that [GY’s ini-
tial project design might limit
Bahamian access to the beach
at the Western Esplanade, and
block views of the harbour and
lighthouse.

This was eventually resolved
after the Government agreed
to lease a portion of the seabed
to IGY, but the delay further
extended the negotiations.

An: economic impact study
predicted that the IGY project
would generate “very substan-
tial employment”, creating 700
direct full-time jobs and anoth-
er 400 indirect permanent jobs
for Bahamians. The indirect
jobs would have been created

at suppliers of goods and ser-
vices to the development, and

through services provided to

yachts.
The study also forecast that

the IGY development would

create 200-250 full-time jobs.
during construction, and have
a total economic impact of
$222.8 million over a 20-year
period.

IGY’s proposed marina on
West Bay Street would have
had 72 slips, catering chiefly
to the larger yachts and ves- |
sels, those of between
100-150 feet to 200 feet and
longer.

The development would.
have featured a boutique hotel
of about 150-200 rooms, sev-
eral restaurants, retail and a
parking structure for over 300
cars.

MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-B comprising 22,376 sq.ft. and situated on the
western side of the main eleuthera highway and
approximately 2,219 ft. northerly of four-for-nothing road
in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

North Eleuthera Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

-, The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
“ue Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-G comprising 18,926 sq.ft. and situated on the western
side of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft.
northerly of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower
Bogue, North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas



MUST SELL
VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-E comprising 16,521 sq.ft. and situated on the western side
of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft. northerly
of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s Office

TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY

Policies issued by Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation, a LandAmerica Financial Group Inc company, the oldest title insurance company in the world.



P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007, PAGE 13B



aa
Flood damage costs_ Peete ey
United States $4m daily

m@ By ANDREA JAMES
c.2007 Seattle Post-
Intelligencer
SEATTLE -- The storm that

hit Puget Sound on Monday is

having a devastating effect on
commerce after swamping

Interstate 5, the main artery that

connects Seattle to Portland,

and burying in mud several rail

connections north and south of

Seattle.

The impact and closures
could last for days and into the
weekend, according to Wash-
ington’s Department of Trans-
portation.

Hundreds of trucks waited
Tuesday on either side of a 20-
mile stretch of I-5, between
mileposts 68 and 89, while parts
of the highway sat under 10 feet
of water. The highway could be
closed until at least Thursday --
fonger if the roads and bridges
are found damaged after the

iouoding recedes.

About 54,000 vehicles tra-
verse that portion of the high-
way daily, and 10,000 of those
are trucks. The I-5 delays alone
are expected to cost businesses
$4 million a day, the Trans-
portation Department esti-
mates.

The effect on commuters
could be the least of the prob-
lems; road closures are making
it difficult to deliver emergency
supplies and groceries to the
flooded areas, said department
spokesman Stan Suchan.

The department also is con-
cerned about the effect on busi-
ness. “We know that a lot of
companies are using just-in-time

delivery so that they don’t have ,

a huge stock sitting in the back
of their store,“ he said. “They
rely on the trucks on the free-
way to keep them in business.”

To compensate for the block-
age, Horizon Air has added
larger planes to four of its daily

flights between Seattle and’

Portland to handle more pas-
sengers. The airline said it has
seen increased demand for the
‘shuttle flights it operates every
half-hour.

The, latest. I-5 mess also
appears to be doing wonders
for Horizon’s fly-above-it-all-



themed marketing campaign,
the company reported.

Rail blocked

The Burlington Northern
Santa Fe Railway was operating
at 60 percent capacity at midday
Tuesday. Railroad crews strug-
gled the day before, replacing
tracks, clearing mud, picking up
trees and filling in sinkholes.as
they formed.

A. 50-foot section of the track
between Mukilteo and Everett
was washed away Monday, but
crews repaired it by midnight,
said Gus Melonas, spokesman
for BNSF.

“We’ve had crews working
around the clock removing
debris,“ Melonas said.

Problems ‘still exist in Cen-
tralia, where high water is
threatening more than two
miles of the mainline track, he
said. Crews waited Tuesday

afternoon for the water to sub-

side while some freight traffic
was rerouted inland.

“We're positioning trains and
preparing crews to begin oper-
ation on this line as soon as con-
ditions improve,” he said.

Amtrak, which runs on the
BNSF line, canceled its Cas-
cades service and portions of its
Coast Starlight service, leaving
no passenger rail connection
between Seattle and Portland.
That cancellation was expected
to continue until at least 4 p.m.

_ Wednesday, Melonas said.

Mudslides also forced Sound
Transit to . cancel its
Everett/Seattle service for Tues-
day and Wednesday.

Union Pacific, the second
major rail company operating
in the Puget-Sound region, has

.17 trains waiting to travel on

the BNSF track that is out, a
spokeswoman said. That trans-

lates to at least 1,360 carloads of

goods including grain and ship-
ping containers.

Trucks stopped

With hundreds of trucks
backed, up, the Transportation
Department has had to give cer-
tain goods priority. For exam-
ple, Suchan said, the depart-
ment is working with the Wash-
ington State Patrol and local

communities to get emergency
supplies to hospitals in greater
Seattle via alternative: routes.

U.S. 12 offers the shortest
detour, but “we can’t allow all
those trucks through or we’ll
have gridlock,“ Suchan said.

Meanwhile, the recommend-
ed detour that sends trucks
through the Tri-Cities is “bru-
tal,” Suchan said. It turns what
would normally be a 170-mile
trip into a 440-mile one. Other
detours route trucks through
winding mountain roads, and if
bad weather rolls in, the truck-
ers could get stuck.

So, truckers are left doing the
one thing they can do: “They’re
sitting here,“ said Shari Skin-
ner, a cashier at'Gee Cee’s
Truck Stop near Toledo, at exit
57 on I-5.

“We are packed,” she said.
“They come in, they get coffee,
stand around, talk to each other,
get something to eat.“

Truckers who’ve asked for
alternative routes were dis-

mayed to learn that there ©

weren’t many, she said.

Lines of trucks also sat wait-
ing in the Chehalis area at Eagle
Truck Plaza, at exit 71 just south
of the flooding, said cashier
Rebecca Mullis.

“There’s lots of trucks out in
front of my store, all the way
from the freeway up,” Mullis
said. “Nobody’s getting through,
they’ve been sitting here since
yesterday morning.“

Independent truck driver
Floyd Chase delivers building
materials and shipping contain-
ers between Seattle and Port-
land. He waited around at the
exit 71 stop on Tuesday.

“We tried to go through Jack-
son Highway to get through to
the other side of Centralia to
get to Seattle, but we couldn’t
do it, so everybody’s stranded
here,” he said. Chase estimates
that he’s losing $500 a day wait-
ing for the highways to reopen.

“I’m independent -- I’m
responsible for the whole thing,
the good and the bad,“ he said.
“It’s a matter of just sitting and
waiting now, unless you want
to go 400 miles out of your way,
but at $3.50 a gallon, it’s not
going to pay off.”

NDEPENDENT
SALES
PERSONS

EEDED!

e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your

income.

© You are limited only to

_-your potential

e Flexible hours available

e Excellent commissions
and benefits

+ Mt MN emt km ae

¢ Must have a proven track record in sales |

Professional appearance a must

Must have reliable transportation ;
Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
Excellent written and communication skills.

Apply in writing to
Sales Representatives

Box PM-1

C/O The Nassau Guardian

P.O. Box N-3011

Nassau
Bahamas

RBC



RBC]

Royal Bank
_of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each propery:

HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS.

(401) Lots#17 & #18 Crown Allot-
ments, Love Hill Settlement,
Andros. Containing a two sto-
rey residence. Appraised value
$100,000.

(806) Lots#1 & #2, Block 3 witha
parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a4 bedroom
condominium - Sunset View Villas,
West Bay Street. Appraised value
$750,000. ©

(806) Lot#13, Block#4 of Coral
Waterways, Section One, Coral
Harbour, N.P. with two houses
and a swimming pool, #312 New
Providence bounded northwardly
by a canal or waterway of the said
Subdivision known as Flamingo
waterway and running 102.004 ft
eastwardly by lot #14 and 146.145
ft southwardly by a reservation for
a private road. Appraised value
$530,000.

(433) Lot#27 of Village Allotment
#14 in the Eastern District, con-
taining residence situated on
Denver Street off Parkgate Road
in the Ann’s Town Constituency,
New Providence. Property size
2,500 sqft Building size 990 sq ft
Appraised value $50,000.

(304) Lot#2,. Block#8, Steward
Rd, Coral Heights East Sub-
division situated in Western
District of New Providence -approx
size 8,800 sq ft with a split level
containing 2 bed, 2 bath, living,
dining & family rooms, kitchen
and utility room. Approx size of
building 2,658 sqft. Appraised
value: $322,752.

(902) Lot#14, Block#23 (125ft
x 80ft) situated Rainbow Bay,
Eleuthera containing a one
storey house with 2 bed,
1 bath, kitchen, living room and
2 linen closets. Appraised value
$89,998.

(902) Lot of land 94 x 94x 150 x
150 on Queens Highway just south
of Palmetto Point with a two sto-
rey stone building containing two
apartments. Each unit has 3 bed,
2 1/2 bath, kitchen, living room
and 3 linen closets. Appraised
value $287,209.

(100) Developed property
Pinder's, Long Island containing
a split level Mediterranean style
home with kitchen, living room,
dining room, master bed and
-bath, two guest rooms, full and
half guest bathroom on lower

(601) Vacant lot # 1 Hamster Road ;

off Carmichael Road 5969 sqft.
Appraised value $54,000.

(565) Vacant lot #5 located Eleu-
thera Island Shores, Seaside Drive
Section B, Block #15, Eleuthera,
Bahamas. 9,691 sqft. Appraised
value $21,805.

(902) 0.281 acre of vacant land off
Queen's Highway in the settlement
of Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera.
Appraised value $31,320.

(800). Vacant. property located
Bahamia South. Block 16 lot 9A,
Freeport, Grand Bahama consist-
“ing of 24,829. 20sqft. Appraised value
$52,000

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sq.
ft.) situated in Mango Lane Sec-
tion “B” Block #15, Eleuthera Island
Shores on the Island of Eleuthera.
Appraised value $25,665.

(701) Undeveloped lot #149. Sea-
fan Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivi-
sion. Grand Bahama, 18750 sqft.
Appraised value: TBA

COMMERCIAL

BANKING CENTRE

Tel: 242-356-8568,

(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
(802) Mr. Brian Knowles
(805) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(806) Mrs Lois Hollis

(807) Mr. Wayne Kendall
(808) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
PALMDALE SHOPPING
CENTRE BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-4426/9

or 242-302-3800

(201) Ms. Nicola Walker
(202) Mr. Frank Dean
(203) Mrs. Cedricka Clarke
NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT

Tel: 242-377-7179

(433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR,
ELEUTHERA

Tel: 242-332-2856/8

(902) Mr. Brian Hanna
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel: 242-333-2230

(901) Ms. Velderine Laroda



level. Also garage and breezeway -

—a gross area 4,212 sqft. Kitchen-
ette, master bedroom and bath
and front entry porch features the
upper level, gross area of 780 sqft.
Porches all around the concrete
structure which is 90% complete.
Appraised value $650,000.

(400) Property situated in Cala-
bash Bay on the Island of Andros.
75 ft x 150 ft and containing ther-
eon a small grocery store 480 sqft
and an incomplete 3 bed 2 bath
house.900 sqft. Appraised value
$65,000.

(702) Lot#20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights, N.P.
Appraised value $280,000. -

(400) Lot #14 situated in the set-
tlement of Love Hill on the Island:
of Andros totaling 20,000 sqft.
Property contains a two storey
5 bed, 3 bath residence. Appraised
value $185,000.

(902) Lot containing 3 bed, 2
bath residence situated in the
settlement of Governor's . Har-
bour bounded northwardly by a
19ft road and running thereon
50ft eastwardly and running
thereon 100ft southwardly and
50 ft westwardly. Appraised value
$90,000.

(902) Lot (8,000 sqft) situated
Sand’s Alley, North Palmetto
Point with incomplete triplex (con-
crete structure — belt course 2,529.6
sqft). Appraised value $49,414.

(105) Lot containing two storey
building. with 3 bed, 2 1/2 bath
residence, and 30 ftx 86 ft situated
Bailey Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value $235,000.

(203) Lot B situated on the
north side of Shell Fish Road,
being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster
Road with a one half duplex
residential premises. BEDI
value TBA.

(701) Lot#16. in Block #16
in Section 3 of the Subdivi-
sion called and known as Sea
Breeze Estates situated in
the Eastern’ District of New
Providence. Property © con-
tains a 3 bed, 2 bath residence.
Appraised value TBA.

(701) Lot of land being #11
in Block#10 on a plan of
allotments laid out by Village
Estates Limited and filed in

VACANT PROPERTIES

(402) Lot 89, Block 7 Aberdeen Drive,
Bahamia West Replat Subdivision,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12,100 sqft. Appraised value
$51,000.

(902) Lot #46, Block #32, Baha-
mia. Section 1X Freeport, Grand
Bahama 90 ft wide along Stratford
Way and 150 ft along Stratford Court.
Appraised value $26,000.

(723) Vacant lot #20 comprising a
portion of the Murphy Town Crown
Allotment #72 situated in Murphy
Town, Abaco Bahamas.
Appraised value $18,000.00

(724) ‘Vacant lot # 67A of Section 2
of the said Subdivision known as
“Whale Point Estates” in the vicinity
of Bottom Harbour and extending
from Whale Point to Cotton Hole in
the Northern section of the Island
of Eleuthera. Appraised value
$36,000

(724) Vacant lot #595, Jacaranda
Street, Pinewood Gardens, New
Providence. Property size 5,000

OFFICERS ©
ANDROS TOWN
Tel: 242-368-2071
(400) Mrs. Rose, Bethel
NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-8700
(701) Mrs. Stephanie Saunders
(702) Ms. Cherelle Martinbor-
ough
(703) Mrs. Renae Walkine
JEK DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711
(401) Mr. James Strachan
(402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES
SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8
(501) Mr. Keith Lloyd
(505) Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH
Tel: 242-327-6077
(466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420
(908) Mr. Antonio Eyma ~
(909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
(910) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel: 242-347-3031
(105) Mr. Kermit Curry



ee Ps nA YOU SUCCEED

ne mae) Uo)

Vea Pana as



‘the Dept of Land & Surveys
as #142 N.P. and situated in the
Eastern District of New Provi-
dence. Property contains 3 bed,
2 bath residence. Appraised
value TBA.

(565) Lot#1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Sub situated in the
Southwestern District of the island
of New Providence containing a
single storey private residence
3 bed, 2 bath. Property approx
size 6,000 sq ft. Building approx
size 2,400 sq ft. Appraised value
$173,176.

(902) Lot of land containing res-
idence in North Palmetto Point
Eleuthera. Appraised value: TBA

(902) Lot of land containing a 2
storey 7 bed/2 bath single fam-
ily residence (2,234squarefeet)
located of Queens Highway in
Tarpum Bay Eleuthera. Appraised
value $77,000.

(902) Lot#31 situated at the
intersection of Albert & Victoria
Streets in Hatchet Bay contain-
ing a 2 storey concrete building
with an incomplete 2bed 1 bath
apt and store downstairs. Prop-
erty approx 2250 sqft. Appraised
value $65,000.

(902) Lot containing commer-
cial building housing a sports
bar, restaurant and a 2 storey
commercial building on Queens
Highway Tarptum Bay Eleuthera.
Value $180,000.

(808) .Lot # 3 Block 24 in the
Centreville Subdivision . Build-
ing #109/Eastern side of Collins
Avenue . Comprising commercial
2,800 sq feet commercial building.
Appraised value $382,000

(108) Single Family Lot #5 Block
#5 Unit #1 Devonshire. ae
value TBA

(902) Lot #17 Block 7 in section “A”
of Eleuthera Island Shores Subdi-
vision Northwest of Hatchet Bay
containing a 3 bed/2 bath house.
Appraised value $99,000.00

(601) Lot #17 located Village
Allotment with fourplex — value
- $500,000 —

(901) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom
2bath concrete structure located
Triana Shores Harbour Island,
Eleuthera. Property size 80’ x 120’
x80’ 120 feet . Appraised valued at
$ 332,735.

sqft. Appraised value $50,006. |
(108) Single Family Lot #57 Blck7 |
# Chesapeake Subdivision (no util-
ities), Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Appraised value$18,000. |

(108) Single Family Lot #5 Block
#21 Leicester County (no utilities),
Freeport, Grand Bahama. Appraised
value $6,000.

(101) Tourist Commercial Canal
Lot #71 Silver Cove Subdivision,
Freeport Grand Bahama. Appraised
value $175,000

(902) Vacant Lots #’s 5 &6 in Block3
of Club Estates Subdivision located
North of Rock Sound Eleuthera com-
prising of 1.48 acres. Appraised value
$55,000.00

(902) Vacant lot of land situated
in South Palmetto Point Eleuthera
measuring 97x127x82x121.
Appraised value $38,000.00

(601) Lot located Fort Fincastle —
value - $25,000



GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND

Tel: 242-337-0101

(100) Mrs Lucy Wells

LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE

Tel: 242-394-3560

(716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon

(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

(723) Ms. Deidre King

(724) Mrs. Faye Higgs

(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson

(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis

MACKEY STREET

Tel: 242-393-3097

(601) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles

BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-245 1/3

(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson

(303) Mr. Desmond McIntosh

(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson

FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-352-6631/2

(101) Ms. Garnell Frith

(103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
Cartwright

(104) Ms. Jackie Knowles

(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey





Se Royal Bank

Rise of Orel afte t= ie
PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a oe re
China product safety
key for US government

UTM Te 7 [i

the #1 newspaper in circulation,

Se a OL

Legal Notice
NOTICE
KROY INVESTMENTS INC,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) KROY INVESTMENTS INC. is in dissolution

under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 4th December, 2007 when its the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Lynden

Maycock of Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore,
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as sole Liquidator.

‘Dated the Sth day of November 2007.
H & J Corporate Services Ltd,

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company

FOR SALE

Delinquent Properties (Vacant Lots)

lot # 19, Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road
(proposed gated community with beach access)
| New Providence, Bahamas

5,040 sq ft; Appraised Value = $75,600









Lot # 14 Westridge North Subdivision
New Providence, Bahamas.
11,486 sq ft
Appraised Value = $207,000




Lot # 20 Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road
(proposed gated community with beach access)
New Providence, Bahamas

5,061 sq ft; Appraised Value = $76,000





Submit bids in writing to:

MORTGAGE DEPARTMENT
P.O. Box N-4815
Nassau, Bahamas




For further enquiries ical 461- 1037

Biss

Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 4 December 200 7

"Previous Close Today's Close

Abaco Markets

@ By FOSTER KLUG
Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Treasury Secretary Henry Paul-
son said Wednesday that Chi-
nese product safety will be a key
topic for U.S. officials at high-
level economic talks with China
next week.

Paulson said China’s ability to
manage the safety of its goods
will be an important part of Bei-
jing’s future growth and of its

trade relations with the U.S.

“American consumers need to
have confidence in the safety of
the products they purchase,
whether prouuced at home or
abroad,” Paulson said in a speech
to the Asia Society, an educa-
tion group.

Paulson and other Cabinet-
level officials are going to China
December 12-13 for the third
round of the so-called Strategic
Economic Dialogue. Paulson
launched the talks a year ago,














Legal Notice

Notice

KROY INVESTMENTS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims againts the above-named Com-

pany are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned at

Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-
3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 20th
day of December, 2007. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 5th day of December 2007

LYNDEN MAYCOCK
LIQUIDATOR

©

Feenprle Christian High Pchoed

*Praeh B0e Bvend Tee Woy’, Peete RN

TEACHING VACANCY
Temple Christian High School

Shirley Street



Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers for
the following positions for the 2007-2008 School Year.

Math (Gr.7-9)

Applicants must:

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is willing to
subscribe to the Statement of Faith of Temple
Christian School.

% Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the area
of specialization

9 Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma

> Have at least two years teaching experience in
the relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills.

4 Applicants must have the ability to prepare students
for all examination to the BJC/ BGCSE levels.

9 Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra
curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School
office on Shirley Street and be retumed with a
full curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph
and three references to:

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School ©
P.O.Box N-1566
_ Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is December 7th, 2007



Change

but so far they have produced
little results. Vice Premier Wu
Yi leads the Chinese side.

The U.S. has pushed China to
improve the safety of its exports
given a string of high-profile
recalls of various items from toys
to toothpaste.

Paulson, in his speech, warned.
of misconceptions in the rela-
tionship “that are influencing the
rise of protectionism and eco-

‘nomic nationalism in both

nations.” He said the high-level
talks are helping improve com-

_ munication between top officials,

which was often lacking before.

The talks, he said, “have
helped keep the U.S.-China eco-
nomic relationship on an even
keel and helped us manage diffi-
cult issues, even in times of ten-
sion. Because we have a frame-
work for senior-level dialogue,
we can — and do — pick up the
phone and we talk. We work
toward solutions.”

Besides Paulson, Commerce
Secretary Carlos Gutierrez,

Health and Human Services Sec-
retary Mike Leavitt, U.S. Trade
Representative Susan Schwab,
Acting Agriculture Secretary
Chuck Conner and Environ-
mental Protection Agency chief

Stephen Johnson are to attend

the talks.

Paulson is expected to contin-
ue to press China to move more
quickly to institute economic
reforms the Bush administration
believes are necessary to dea
with a huge trade gap between
the two nations. The U.S. deficit
with China hit an all-time high of
$233 billion last year and is on
track to surpass that this year.

Members of Congress «are

’ pushing the administration to act

more forcefully to get China to
halt what critics see as unfair
trade practices.

They contend China is manip-

ulating its currency to keep the
value low to boost Chinese
imports into the United States
while making U.S. goods more
expensive in China.

Julius Bar

Julius Baer Group, the leading dedicated Wealth Management
is seeking candidates for the position of:

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES

Client retention and servicing of existing client, relationships with
focus on Italian speaking European Countries

(Italy and Switzerland).
Acquisition of new clients.

Promote Nassau as financial centre and JB Nassau as booking

centre for offshore clients.

REQUIRED SKILLS:

e Excellent Italian verbal and written communication skill

¢ PC literate with strong Excel, Word, PowerPoint
(ability to learn new applications quickly)

e A commitment to service excellence

EXPERIENCE:

¢ Minimum 10 years experience in Swiss Banking or related field

EDUCATION:

SF ARLES

e A Bachelor’s degree with concentration in Bconcianig Business

Administration or equivalent.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

¢ Must speak English and Italian a third language would be an asset

We offer a very competitive and benefits package, a stimulating work
environment and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to
our business while expanding your career.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume
by December 28th, 2007 to the attention of:

By Hand
Personal & Confidential
Human Resources

Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore

East Bay Street
PO.Box N-4890
Nassau, Bahamas

By Mail

Personal & Confidential
Human Resources
P.O.Box N-4890
Nassau, Bahamas

oni Pace
VACANCIES





Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark.

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs —
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol (S)

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johhson

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for positions
available at St. John’s College, St. Anne’s School
and Bishop Michael Eldon School in Freeport.

Primary
Computer/Primary
Spanish
English

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor of Master
Degrees from an accredited University or College
and Teaching Certificate need apply.

Last Price Weekly Vol.

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

For further details and application form, please
contact the Anglican Central Education Authority
on Sands Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.40 RND Holdings

“Last 12Months _Div$ __

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
e Income fund

52wk-Low
1.3149
2.9728
2.4829
1.2037

1.365584"
3.5388°**
2.938214°**
1,.279370**"
11.8192""*

Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required focuments must be
sent by Friday, December 14th, 2007 to the
Anglican Education Department addressed to:-

YIELD - jast 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings pee share for the last 12 mths
NAY - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec02=1 000. 00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
62wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 62 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weigtited price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
'S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Oate 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

*- 16 November 2007

*- 30 June 2007

*** - 31 October 2007
*-31 July 2007

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P. O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas


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wf, PAGE 158



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From the Manage ment and Staff of

Ag,

P ( PICTET

Pictet Bank & Trust Limited
Bayside Executive Park
Building No. 1
West Bay Street and Blake Road
P.O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas




with offices in Dubai, Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Lausanne, London, Luxembourg, Madrid, Milan, Paris,
Rome, Turin, Zurich, Hong Kong, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore and Tokyo (yO

British Colonial Hilton

Nassau

Trawe!l should! take you places»

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aE 16B, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2007 a
Stocks soar as investors grow more optimistic.
about economy, upcoming interest rate cut



m@ NEW YORK

WALL STREET rallied
Wednesday after new data
showed the overall economy is
holding up, but that it’s not
too strong to prevent the Fed-
eral Reserve from cutting
interest rates again. The Dow
Jones industrial average rose
more than L8O points, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Stocks turned around fol-
lowing two sessions of losses
after a report showed hiring
in the U.S. private sector
expanded at a faster pace in

were added during the month
— an increase that bodes well
for consumer spending.

The report raised hopes for.

a strong November jobs
report from the Labor Depart-
ment on Friday. Investors
were also encouraged
Wednesday after the depart-
ment reported worker pro-
ductivity advanced by an
annual rate of 6.3 percent in
the summer, the fastest pace
in four years, while wage pres-
sures eased.

“The best news for the mar-
ket is good news on the econ-
omy,” said Jack Ablin, chief

Private Bank. “There might
be a general malaise among
homeowners these days, but
as long as more people are
getting paychecks then the
economy can withstand the
stress,”

Uncertainty

Still, there is enough uncer-
tainty in the economy — in
particular the financial sector
that is still struggling from
months of credit problems —
that the market expects the
Fed to lower rates. Some

will go beyond the generally
anticipated quarter’ percent-
age point cut, and lower rates
by a half point.

In midafternoon trading, the
Dow Jones industrial average
rose 183.39, or 1.38 percent,

~ to 13,432.12.

‘Broader indexes also moved
higher, The Standard & Poor’s
500 index added 20.26, or 1.39
percent, to 1,483.05, while the
Nasdaq composite index rose
47.59, or 1.82 percent, to
2,667.42. .

Bond prices fell. The yield
on the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note, which moves

November. ADP Employer

Services said 189,000 jobs

KO COLI MBIeCUKONCIBAMIKMDEl@ecm nario: | art

'US dollar rises; energy futures trade mixed|

investment officer at Harris

_ investors are betting the Fed

opposite its price, rose to 3.91



m NEW YORK



PRECIOUS metals prices slipped Wednesday
after separate reports showing strong job growth
and worker productivity boosted the dollar, less-
ening the appeal of gold and silver as alternative
investments, accordin g to. Associated Press.

Industrial metals pices also slumped, while
energy and agricultural futures fluctuated in
volatile trading. ;

Gold prices trembled around $800 an ounce,
down moderately from a day ago. Silver and plat-
inum prices also fell.

Two economic reports on Wednesday raised
mvestor confidence in the U.S. economy and dol-
lar, and pressured precious metals. ADP Employ-
er Services said 189,000 jobs were added last
month — a sign the job market remains robust.
And the Labor Department said worker produc-
tivity increased by an annual rate of 6.3 percent in

the summer, the fastest growth in four years.

Gold shed $5.30 to $802.30 an ounce on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.

‘The reenback made headway against other
World cu rencies. -

Fun Walk 2007: 36,000 “thank you dollars" for your

But the dollar’s gains could prove brief as the

Federal Reserve's interest rates meeting next ,

Tuesday approaches. The central bank is expect-
ed to lower its benchmark federal funds rate,
Which stands at 4.50 percent, to stimulate slug-
gish economic growth.

Another bit of economic news on Wednesday
bolstered the case for a rate cut. The Institute for
Supply Management said the nation’s service sec-

* tor grew itt November but the expansion was

slower than in October and fell short of analyst

; expectations,

“We have a mixed bag of economic news. ADP
is supportive of dollar, but in the end what counts
for the Fed is the stability of the financial markets
and those are deteriorating day by day,” said Axel
Merk, president of the Merk Hard Currency Fund.

Other precious metals pulled hack. Silver
futures lost 5.5 cents to $14.41 an ounce, while
platinum fell $3.80 to $1,468.50 an ounce on the
Nymex.

In currencies, the euro fell to $1.4663 from
$1.4766 late Tuesday, and the British pound
declined, as traders awaited Thursday’s interest
rate decisions from the European Central Bank

and Bank of England. Both are expected to hold
rates steady.

Analysts are cautioning investors to expect
heightened volatility leading up to next.week’s
Fed meeting.

Another key focus this week is the Labor
Department’ s November Jobs report, due out Fri-

. day.

“The job market is one of the key pillars of
relative stability that has yet to buckle, so many
will be watching that day, especially since a steady
rise in initial claims data over the past few weeks
suggests that job creation could come in on the
weaker side,” said MF Global analyst Edward
Meir, in a report.

Industrial metals prices dipped on the London
Metal Exchange. C opper, zinc, lead and tin prices
fell, while nickel prices edged higher.

Nymex copper for March delive ry rose 1.55
cents to $3.0355 a pound.

Oil prices rose after the Organization for Petro-
leum Exporting Countries decided not to increase
production quotas, and the Energy Information
Administration reported a surprising ‘draw on
crude inventories.

Premier Healthy

altogether better efforts!

A huge thank you to all who took part in this year's annual Funwalk in Nassau and Freeport. Your efforts helped raise $36,000, donated

percent from 3.88 percent late
Tuesday. The dollar was
mixed against other major cur-
rencies, while gold prices fell.
The market is currently
pricing in that there will be a
rate cut next week, Ablin said.
Supporting the case for a cut is
that central banks globally
seem to be open to the idea, a
trend that would give the Fed
even more room to move.
The Bank of Canada cut
rates on Tuesday, while the
Bank of England and Euro-
pean Central Bank will make
rate decisions Thursday.
Investors also weighed a
Commerce Department
report that showed factory
orders unexpectedly rose in
October.
However, that data was
likely offset by a report from

~ the Institute for Supply Man-

agement showing growth in
the service sector cooled
somewhat in November.
Wednesday’s advance was
fed by investors betting that

the Fed might be generous -

and cut rates a half pércentage
point, or, in market lingo, 50
basis points.

“I do believe the market
wants 50, that the Fed needs
to do a lot more work, and
that a quarter is not going to
do it,” said Greg Church, chief
investment officer of Church
Capital Management.

Mildly higher oil prices also
contributed to the gains on
Wall Street. OPEC decided
Wednesday to keep output
ceilings steady for now, a
move that briefly propelled
crude prices above $90 a bar-
rel. Meanwhile, the govern-
ment reported that U.S. oil

to our two main beneficiary charities, The Cancer Society of The Bahamas and The Bahamas Diabetic Association.

It is another example of how we can all pull together for a worthy cause and at the same time feel the benefit of simple, basic exercise and fresh air. Both’

charities have offered warm thanks to all of our Fun Walkers for the immeasurable good that their efforts will bring about.



The Cancer Society of The Bahamas and The Bahamas Diabetic Association were each phedented with donations of $18,000 by Mrs.

Lynda rl EVP and General ee of Atlantic Medical Insurance.

The Funwalk has emerged as a landmark event to demonstrate the commitment of Bahamians in fertile their time and money in.a huge community effort
ate. At the same time it allows us all to focus on the importance of maintaining good health and the value that regular: exercise and

to help
a balanced diet has

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2 again. We look forward to seeing everyone again in 2008 for what will be the 10th annual Funwalk.

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ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD.
« Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, Nassau, Tel, 326-8191

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THE TRIBUNE



pone fell steeply last week
while gasoline stockpiles rose,
both by greater margins than
analysts‘had expected.

Light, sweet crude rose 22
cents to $88.54 a barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange.

Fannie Mae shares fell 39
cents to $34.79 after it fol-
lowed rival mor tgage financer
Freddie Mac in cutting its div- °

‘ idend and selling special stock

to raise capital. The govern-
ment-sponsored lender hopes
to cushion against mounting
losses from high-risk home
loans.

Comcast Corp. shares
plunged $2.26, or 10.9 percent,
to $18.47 after the cable oper-
ator said it won’t generate as
much cash flow and revenue
for the year because of a
difficult economic environ-
ment. .

Technology stéalkes broadly
advanced after Intel Corp.’s
stock was upgraded on expec-
tations the personal computer
market will be strong next
year. Shares added 94 cents,
or 3.6 percent, to $27.25.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 11.38,
or 1.51 percent, to 763.44.

Advancing issues led declin-
ers by a 4 to 1 basis on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 768.1
million shares.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed up 0.83
percent, while Hong Kong’s
Hang Seng index rose 1.61
percent. Britain’s FTSE 100
closed up 2.83 percent, Ger-
many’s DAX index rose 1.74
percent, and France’s CAC-
40 increased 2.02 percent.



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