Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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7v EG SUPPLEMENT AND TWO-PAGE SPREAD INSIDE



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007











‘Shooter i jouble murder

Two gunned down |g.
in assassination

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net



TWO MEN were gunned
down, one at home in front of his
children, in a bold assassination
on St Vincent Street, off Baillou
Hill Road.

The deaths of the men, both °

said to be 27 or 28 years old —
whose names police want with-
held until the notification of next

Cae tate
Eileen Carron’s
BLUR erat
Ute eicin

THE TRIBUNE today cel-
ebrates publisher Eileen Car-
ron’s 50th anniversary as a
journalist with a 164-page
paper — the biggest in our
104-year history.

The paper’s success is also
demonstrated by its growing
circulation. More than 20,000
copies of today’s Tribune are
being printed, a sure sign of
its growing popularity among
readers and advertisers.

Operations director Robert
Carron said: “This is the
biggest Tribune we have pro-
duced since its launch in 1903, .
which goes to show just how
much faith our readers and
advertisers have in the prod-
uct.”

He said the paper’s growth
was a tribute to its fine staff
and was underlined by a cir-
culation that continues to rise
after several years of year-on-

SEE page 19



SY eee

..With a Hot, Fresh and Hearty
Breakfast from Burger King!
Satisfying Platters, Tasty
_Croissan’ wich Combos,
Delicious French Toast Sticks...

of kin —- became the 72nd and
73rd homicides of the year when
a dark coloured car, with at least
three hooded men, pulled up
behind them in the driveway of
one of the men’s homes just after
6 o’clock last evening.

A single assailant is reported,
according to Chief Superinten-
dent Hulan Hanna, to have got
out of the car and opened fire
on the burgundy Chevy Lumina,
hittigg both men multiple times.
The men were not given time to
get out of the Chevy, which one
of them had just driven into his

SEE page 16

Bahamas
is ‘second
best place

to live in
Caribbean’ .

‘By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas is the second
best place to live in the Caribbean
and has climbed three places to
rank 49 among 177 countries on
this year’s United Nation Human
Development Index (HDI).

In United Nation’s Human
Development Report 2007/2008
released on Tuesdays the Bahamas
was rated among the top 50 coun-
tries and is now only outranked by
one other country in the Catibbean
region.

SEE page 19

Don't forget...We’re the only
place where you can have a
Burger for Breakfast too! -

* Bernard Rd. + Hoveld Rd
* Prince Charles
* Frederick Stree? North
* Cable Beach















Felipé Major/Tribune staff

POLICE rN the OCI E RE ut PS the body of one oe the we lies on a pana



Media hits out |

at Ministry over | |
Junkanoo cover |

charge plans

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN media organisa-. }
tions hit out at the Ministry of :
Youth Sports and Culture yes- :
terday after it announced plans :
to cover ;

to charge them
Junkanoo this year.

News editors and publishers :

from all three major. dailies and ;
Cable 12 described the move as
incomprehensible and misguid- |
ed.

“IT don’t know who conceived : :
that idea but this is the first time :
in my 35 years of journalism that :
[have seen something as foolish ;
as that coming from a govern-
said Jones €om- :
munication Network and Bahama
Journal owner Wendell Jones

ment entity,”

yesterday.
He added:

permaneht secretary and all of :
them ought to be condemned.” :

However, Minister of Culture :
Charles Maynard defended his :
ministry’s position, stating that

SEE page 17

“The minister, the :



Real Estate stakeholders hit

PM: hangings
will be carried
out by my govt

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

NOTING the. continuing
increase in the number of murders
throughout the Bahamas, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
promised last night that as the law
allows, hangings will be carried out
by his government.

SEE page 14

out over producers of book

REAL Estate stakeholders
have expressed outrage that the
producers of the Bahamas Real
Estate Book continue to oper-
ate in the country despite lack-
ing proper authorisation to do
so.

Director of Immigration Ver-
non Burrows contirmed earlier
this week that the American
producers of the publication,
which sells space for local real-
tors to print their listings, has
no work permit and no business

licence.

“No, they have no work per-
mit or business licence. Of
course we've been checking to
confirm whether or not the
complaints we've received were
actually true but we have never
come across (the persons in
question),” he said.

One real estate agent who has
refused to advertise in the book
said yesterday: “] am outraged

SEE page 17

Hospital patient
is shot dead by
police after stack

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - A 32-year-old
male hospital patient was shoi
and killed by a police officer fol
lowing an attack at the Accident
and Emergency Section at Rand
Memorial Hospital earl;
Wednesday morning.

The man’s identity and
address were not released by
police up to press time yeste:
day.

According to reports, the
patient had attacked the officer.
putting him in a choke-hold, anc
would not release his grip on the
officer’s neck despite attempts
to subdue him.

Assistant Supt Loretta Mack-
ey confirmed the report. She sai
that police received a call aroun
1.30am on Wednesday about a
disturbance at the hospital.

SEE page 14

Voters point
to residence:
outside of
Pinewood

® By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean @tribunemedia.net

mal

_TWO voters in question
pointed to areas outside thx
Pinewood constituency in elec
tion court yesterday, whil«
another voter was unable to rec-
ognize a young man who carries
his name and might be his son.

Patrick Armbrister, when
asked by PLP lawyer Philip
“Brave” Davis, told the court
that he knows there is a Patrick

SEE page 16

m CORRECTION

IN AN article on page seven
of yesterday's Tribune it was
incorrectly stated that Jaque
line Ferguson Rolle, secretary
to the COB president, suffered
a fire at her home and had to
borrow clothes to attend a
memorial service.

The fire did not occur at the
home of Mrs Ferguson Rolle
but of a colleague.

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this erro
may have caused.





EE

eat fresh



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

hs ol re
——— Police Staff Association |

chief rapped for comments
about former deputy PM

Remarks dubbed offensive and inappropriate

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@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

POLICE Staff Association
president Inspector Bradley
Sands’ comments about former
deputy prime minister Cynthia
Pratt were offensive and inap-
propriate for a police officer,
the PLP said.

The former governing party
said in a statement issued yes-
terday that Inspector Sands
ought to understand his role in
relation to a civilian authority.

On Sunday, the former DPM,
who was a guest on a radio
show, said that there were
police officers in the force who
“did their best” to frustrate the
plans of the former PLP gov-
ernment.

The PLP said that a state-
ment by Mr Sands to the press
in reaction proves Mrs Pratt’s
point that throughout her term
in office, some officers was
obstacles to the good gover-
nance of the police force.

“He has crossed the line. It
was a problem that he had all
during the PLP’s term in office.
Further, Mr Sands has his facts
confused. The Progressive Lib-
eral Party settled all the terms
of the improved health insur-
ance benefits for all uniformed
officers in the public service
before it left office and as early
as February 2007.

These included the police, the
Defence Force, the Prison Ser-
vice, Customs, Immigration and



wl ih JA al

THE TRIBUNE



“He has
crossed the
line. It was a
problem that

he had all dur-
ing the PLP’s
term in office.
Further, Mr.
Sands has his
facts con-
fused.”



The Progressive



NEM ea ela

a section of the Road Traffic:

Department,” the party said.

The opposition said that Mr
Sands was one of the officers
involved, both in the lengthy
negotiations to settle the terms
and the bid process which even-
tually led to the choice of a ben-
efits provider.

“The PLP made arrange-
ments for the allocation to fund
the insurance in the country's

annual budget for 2007/08. Mr |

Sands ought to look now to the
FNM with whom he appears to
side politically for relief in this
area,

“They are now responsible
for carrying out the provisions
of what the PLP left in office,”
the party said. ~

Earlier this week, Mr Sands
said that he was offended by
Mrs Pratt’s claim that his asso-
ciation did all that it could to
“frustrate” the work of her gov-
ernment.

Mr Sands said that the Royal
Bahamas Police Force has
always been a “neutral” organ-

Liberal Party

isation, from the years of the
old PLP and the former FNM
government. a

However, said Mr Sands, the
level of political influence in the
force under the former Christie
administration was “disgusting.”

The opposition said that Mr
Sands cannot escape the fact
that he led his officers clothed in
red shirts at an advanced elec-
tion poll.

“This was in contravention of
an order of the commissioner
of police and gave the impres-
sion that he and his officers sup-
ported the FNM.

“While he is free to make his
own political chdice, he is not
free to jeopardise by his con-
duct, the integrity and perceived
neutrality of the force, ” the
opposition said.

The party asked why no dis-
ciplinary action was taken “for
crossing the line from being a
neutral public servant to
appearing to be a clear advo-
cate and supporter of the Free
National Movement”.

FRI. NOV. 30th
8:30am-9pm

BroapwaY

A
SAC

Sat. Dec. Ist
8:30am-9pm

LU

ean a
eee

OFF





.



THE TRIBUNE



Six BTVI emp

claimed there is only one employee left to man

CSA

GB police:
Body found
identified
as Vincent
Pedican, 64

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Grand
Bahama police say the body
found on Friday has been iden-
tified as 64-year-old Vincent
Pedican.

Assistant Superintendent of
Police Loretta Mackey said
family members identified the
body on Monday.

She said police have been fol-
lowing several leads, but so far,
no suspects have been arrested
in connection with Pedican’s
murder, which was the 11th
homicide for the year on Grand
Bahama.

Pedican, a security officer sta-
tioned at the Eight Mile Rock
High School, went missing fol-
lowing an apparent break-in at
the school. His shoes and hand-
held radio were discovered in
the school’s administration
building along with some blood.

The vehicle driven by Mr
Pedican was discovered in the
Hawksbill area on November
22, and his body was found
through a service road off East
Sunrise Highway on November
23.

He had suffered trauma to
the head, according to reports.

Ms Mackey said police are
continuing their investigation
into the matter.

een
Rods vaNiveal
‘to be closed











iT has been announced that
due to the observance of World
AIDS Day in Rawson and Par-
liament Squares on Friday,
November 30, Bay Street will
be closed from Parliament
Street to East Street between
10am and llam.

The public has been invited
to come to Rawson Square at
10am on Friday and join the
AIDS Foundation and Coli-
nalmperial for the formation of
a Human AIDS Ribbon in
commemoration of World
AIDS Day.

Red T-shirts and Caps will
be available for purchase in
Rawson Square to help fund

_the fight against AIDS.

It was also announced that
traffic will be re-routed for this
period.

GHT
For the stories
beni! the news,

read fisight
on Mondays



ag ati oe en a





rae.

SIX employees of the Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute were fired yesterday,
in what sources claim was a reaction to the
demonstrations held at the school earlier this

month.

However, BTVI head Iva Dahl said that the
firings had nothing to do with the demonstra-
tions. Indeed, she said, they could not have — as
none of the staff in question demonstrated.

All of the sacked employees were from the
administration department, and a source

that office.

The source said he is convinced that the
employees were fired in connection with the

series of recent demonstrations at the school

over a number of human resource issues.

“No one has said these people weren’t per-
forming,” the source said. .

When asked if she could give an explanation
for the firings, Ms Dahl said:

“They were contract workers, that’s it.”



Bahamas’ CO2 emissions
per capita exceed those of
industrialised countries

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

IF all countries were to emit
carbon dioxide at levels similar
to Bahamas, the world would
exceed its current CO2 output
by over 200 per cent, the Unit-
ed Nations found in its
2007/2008 Human Develop-
ment report. ,

The annual report, which
this year focuses on the fight-
ing climate change, states that
the Bahamas’ carbon dioxide
emissions per capita exceed
those of many industrialised
countries such as France, Swe-
den, Switzerland and. Portu-
gal.

With 6.7 tonnes of CO2
being produced per person,
the Bahamas outstrips even
Hong Kong in its emission
rates per capita.

“As a result of past emis-
sions of carbon dioxide and
other greenhouse gases
(GHGs), the world is now on
course ‘for future climate
change,” the UN said.

This latest report, which
includes the 2005 data on
countries worldwide, states
that only because the
Bahamas has a very small pop-
ulation, are its contributions

to global emissions almost
insignificant.

“With 0.0 per cent of the
world’s population, Bahamas
accounts for 0.0 per cent of
global emissions,” the UN
said. °

However, the Bahamas’
emission levels per capita are
above those of all other Latin
America and the Caribbean
countries with similar popula-
tion sizes.

Bound

The UN stated that
although the Bahamas has
. signed and ratified the Kyoto
Protocol, it is a non-Annex I
party to the Protocol and
therefore not bound by spe-
cific targets for greenhouse gas
emissions.

The Kyoto Protocol is a pro-
tocol to the international

_ framework convention which
aims to reduce greenhouse
gases that cause climate
change.

The UN in its 2007/2008
Human Development Report
states that small-island devel-
oping states like the Bahamas
are on the front line of climate
change.

“They are already highly
vulnerable to climate disasters.

We're celebrating

With a 50-centimetre (19.7-
inch) increase in sea levels,
over one-third of the
Caribbean’s beaches would be
lost, with damaging implica-
tions for the region’s tourist
industry,” the report said.

An increase of one metre
(3.2 feet), the UN’said, would
permanently submerge about
11 per cent of the land area in
the Bahamas.

Climate change, the UN
said, is the defining human
development of this genera-
tion.

“All development is ulti-
mately about expanding
human potential and enlarg-
ing human freedom.

Climate change threatens to
erode human freedoms and
limit choice.

“It calls into question the
enlightenment principle that
human progress will make the
future look better than the
past,” the report states.

One of the immediate con-
sequences of climate change,
the UN said, will be under-
mining of international efforts
to combat poverty.

‘“Today, we are witnessing
at first hand what could be the
onset of major human devel-
opment reversal in our life-
time,” the UN said.

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loyees fired |



PAGE 4, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LEE.D. D:Lit.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building,, P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
- Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

A great experiment that failed

YESTERDAY WE TOLD you of our coop-
eration with the late Dean William Granger of
Christ Church Cathedral in his attempt to res-
cue male prisoners from their life of crime.

The Dean was the chaplain at HM Prison,
Fox Hill, for a number of years. He believed
that in the prison population there were several
whose lives could be turned around if only
they could be given a chance. In projects like
these the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, publisher of
this newspaper, was the man everyone turned
to. If it meant helping his fallen brothers, Sir
Etienne’s hand was always the first to be
extended.

So it was only natural that the Dean’s “good

idea” was taken straight to the door of his
good friend, The Tribune publisher. The idea
was that men of good behaviour while in
prison would be given a chance while still serv-
ing their sentences to work in the business
world under proper supervision. It was pro-
posed that The Tribune would be the first to
participate. We were to receive three of the
prison’s brightest — according to the Dean.
. In this column yesterday we told you that
one of the three was eliminated very early in
the programme because of his volatile nature,
which indicated future trouble.

We had great hopes for the remaining two.
They were both men of impressive personali-
ties, good deportment and an ability to report

and write. However, one of them, the most |

impressive of the two, fell by the wayside ear-
ly. He returned to prison, and was immedi-
ately removed from the institution’s release
programme.

However, the remaining one was our prize.
As we told you yesterday we had a bet with the
Dean as to how successful this programme
would be. The good Dean felt that all humans
could be saved from the pitfalls of hell if given
half a chance. We were not so sure. So far two
of the Dean’s men had failed. He was now
depending upon the third to prove his point.
We felt his man would stay the course and do
him proud. >

This particular man came from a respected
Eleuthera family. He had good genes. He now
had a new environment. We expected “nurture
and nature” to come through for him.

He continued on the work programme until
he had completed his prison term. It was rather
difficult for us during that period. The staff
had no idea of his true identity. They accused
us of favouritism because, while they had night
assignments, he never had an assignment after
4.30pm. They did not know that he had to
leave The Tribune at 4.30pm to get to Central
Police station in time to catch the 5pm bus
back to his residence — HM Prison. If any of

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Financing
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them had been standing outside The Tribune
when the police bus passed, they could have
waved to their colleague on his way “home.”

When he had completed his prison term, he
wanted to remain with The Tribune. There
was no reason not to keep him. For the first
time he got a byline over his articles and he did
his full share of night assignments. He was
now a regular.

Everything went well for a long time. And
then one fateful Saturday night we were at
our desk at The Tribune when our telephone
rang. Mr Rubin Bott of Rubin’s department
store, Bay Street, was at the other end. Did we
have a staff member by the name of Mr. X. Mr
Bott, loath to part with his hard-earned cash,
was checking Mr X’s credentials. Our heart
stopped. Almost instinctively we knew what
would follow. Our man had presented him
with a rather large cheque that he wanted
cashed. He said he worked for The Tribune,
but at that time, he told Mr Bott, The Tribune
couldn’t cash the cheque. Mr Bott found that
suspicious, so, unbeknown to Mr X, Mr Bott
decided to call us. We told him to get Mr X out
of his shop as quickly as possible and give him
nothing.

Mr X boldly walked into the newsroom
Monday morning as though nothing had hap-
pened. We hoped he had learned his lesson.
However, the following Saturday with all
reporters sitting at their desks pecking away at
their typewriters, the receptionist called
through to say that two police officers were
there to see us. ;

The policemen entered the newsroom, qui-
etly walked to Mr X’s desk, invited him to
stand up, then handcuffed him. They left as
quietly as they had come with our man, head
down, between them. He went back to prison.
Apparently over a period of time he had tried
—and in some cases been successful because of
his association with The Tribune — to fleece
every business on Bay Street.

Over the years he was like a rolling stone,
writing for the various political propaganda
sheets, not holding any job for any length of
time. We don’t know how many brushes he
had with the law after he left our office in
cuffs. The next we heard of him was when The
Tribune published his obituary a few years
ago. :

The Dean’s great experiment had failed.
However, the inmates’ work release pro-

.gramme has continued at the prison with, we

hope, more success than the Dean had at its
launching.



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THE TRIBUNE





Govt must
reintroduce

EDITOR, The Tribune.

DAY after day crime and
violence is destroying this coun-
try severely. The niurder count
stands at a saddened and abrupt
71 for 2007. Like the song says,
“These are some serious times”,
is definitely true for indeed
these are serious time. For a
miniature country such as ours,
it is despicable for us to have
such a high murder rate. In the
past 10 months the Bahamas
has recorded 71 murders.

Ten homicides in a space of
20 days — November 4-24 — has
given the community cause for

great concern. In spite of these:

alarming statistics, senior police
officers maintained at a crime
seminar last week that they
have “a lid on crime” and that it
was the fear of crime that was
“creating panic in the commu-
nity.”

These crimes are said to be
socially-related crimes and only
connected to young men killing
one another.

It has also beer pointed out
by concerned Bahamian citizens
that since young men are killing
each other continuously, they
are leaving the women here to
take over the country.

On the other hand many
young men kill one another for
simple, small reasons which can
be solved through mature dis-
cussions between or among
them. The country’s crime rate
could possibly damage the
country’s tourism-based econ-
omy which has a chance of leav-
ing the majority of Bahamian
workers unemployed.

It is not to be said that any
one accused of murder should
not be given a trial in court.

For indeed every one has a
right to be given a trial, because
some citizens may be innocent
to charges brought against
them. However the Constitu-
tional rights of citizens must be
upheld when discussing the
issue of bail being granted to
those accused of serious crimes,
according to Acting Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson. He also stated that last
month up to September some
114 people accused of murder
had been released on bail.

Some of these people who
are out continue their normal
routine of committing crime.

I now call on Government to
act on such concerned matters
such as these by reinforcing cap-






LETTERS

letters@triounemedia. net



ital punishment in order to
reduce and alleviate the number
of murders in our country.

Reliable sources have dated
that the last hanging took place
in the Bahamas while the Free
National Movement was the
Government on January 6,
2000.

Supporters of capital punish-
ment should become more
vocal, even to the extent of
organising demonstrations,
insisting that hanging be
resumed.

Although the Judicial Com-
mittee of the Privy Council has
made it more difficult for this to
happen, the landmark ruling by
the Privy Council in March of
2006 abolishing the mandatory
death penalty in the Bahamas
did not mean that hanging was
abolished.

What it did was to leave the -

decision to the discretion of the
judges to determine who should
be sentenced to death, depend-
ing on the nature of the mur-

death penalty

der. If hangings are to be
resumed, fast-track appeal is
necessary, considering an ear-
lier ruling by the Privy Council
in 1993 that persons on death
row for more than five years
should automatically have their
sentences reduced to life in
prison. Because of these Privy
Council rulings, there is a grow-
ing consensus that The
Bahamas should give consider-
ation to cutting its ties to the
Privy Council as the final court
of appeal for this country, as
Jamaica is in the process of
doing. With Jamaica reportedly
set to resume hangings, sup-
posedly by aligning itself with
the Caribbean Court of Justice,
the door has been thrown wide
open for Bahamians to demand
that the Government of this
country take a serious look at
Capital Punishment.

For as a Christian nation we
must not tolerate and engage
in serious crimes as murders
because we are on the edge of
losing our reputation world
wide!

SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau,
November 26, 2007.

Time to stop rigging
annual Cacique Awards

EDITOR, The Tribune.

MANY logically will say oh here we go again the annual Cacique
Awards which under their current process are simply rigged by the
nominees by organising their own nomination and then getting
their friends and family to vote for them.

If the Ministry of Tourism wishes to create a “real” award for
excellence, programme this has to be orchestrated and solely a
reward adjudicated by our customers.

There are many ways this can be done — awards cards left in the
room of the hotels — at the Airports — handed out by Tourism
related businesses or totally electronic, I prefer that obviously,
with the required security to stop any contamination or rigging. The
visitor would use his reservation number as his pin-number to

enter the website and vote.

It continues to be a total waste of energy, resources and the
most important aspect improving the product of The Bahamas if
year after year we prostitute the process with the current system of

The Cacique Awards.

Minister Grant please change things this year once and for all and
let's have a customer responsive awards system totally based on
excellence and performance then a Cacique Award will mean

something.

CYNTHIA SYMONETTE
Nassau,
November 16, 2007.



a

\



eee

THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 5





Police seek public
assistance in

the search for
Theo Bowe-Kelly

POLICE are seeking the
assistance of the public in
their search for 46-year-old
Theo Bowe-Kelly.

Bowe-Kelly is wanted for
questioning in connection
with a grievous harm and
death threats case. The
alleged victim was Regina
Hamilton and the incident is
said to have taken place on
Saturday, November 17 in
Freeport.

He is 5’ 7” tall, brown
skinned and of medium build.
His last known addresses
were Russell Town, Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama
and Market Street, Nassau.

Police warn that Bowe-Kel-
ly is to be considered armed
and dangerous and should be
approached with caution.

Those with information on
his whereabouts are asked to
contact authorities in Grand
Bahama at 350-3106, 352-
9774/5 or police control at
911.


















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Prisoner accused of
escaping custody facing
several serious charges

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A PRISONER accused of
escaping police custody sev-
eral months ago was brought
before a local magistrate yes-
terday to face several serious
charges.

Shervin Knowles, alias
“Worm”, 26, appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel at
court eight in Bank Lane.

Knowles was first arraigned
on charges of burglary, steal-

ing and indecent assault. It is -

alleged that on Sunday, July 8
Knowles entered the home of
Dionette Richardson on Sum-
ner Street with the intent to
commit a felony.

It is further alleged that
while there, Knowles stole a
blue and brown handbag con-
taining $350 in cash. It is also
alleged that during that time,
Knowles indecently assaulted
a 32-year-old woman.

Knowles was not required
to enter pleas to these charges
and was denied bail. The mat-
ters were adjourned to April
16, 2008.

He was then arraigned on
the escape charge. It is alleged
that while at the East Street
South police Station on Mon-
day, July 16, Knowles escaped
the lawful custody of Corporal
961 Skippings. Knowles plead-
ed not guilty to the charge and
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Knowles was also arraigned
on the charge of house-break-
ing. It is alleged that on Thurs-
day, April 26, he broke into
the home of Finicha Jolly at
Windsor Place Road. He
pleaded not guilty to the
charge and the matter was
adjourned to April 23, 2008.

Knowles was also arraigned
on a possession of marijuana
charge. It is alleged that on
Friday, July 13 he was found
in possession of one gram of
marijuana. Knowles also
pleaded not guilty to this
charge.

The matter was adjourned
to February 22, 2008.




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Man pleads guilty
to drug charges

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A 39-YEAR-OLD man pleaded guilty in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday to substantive drug charges in three separate cases.

William Curling appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel at
court eight in Bank Lane, where he pleaded guilty to drugs charges
in three cases, the most recent stemming from the seizure of $2.5
million worth of marijuana in July of this year.

Curling first plead guilty to the charge of possession of marijua-
na with the intent to supply in relation to a 2003 case.

He admitted that on Thursday, November 6, 2003, he was found
in possession of 328 pounds of marijuana which he intended to sup-
ply. Magistrate Bethel sentenced him to four years in prison on the
charge.

He then pleaded guilty to the charges of possession of marijua-
na with the intent to supply and conspiracy to possess with the intent
to supply. Curling admitted that on Wednesday, July 19, 2006, he
and another man were found in possession of 149 pounds of mar-
ijuana. Curling also pleaded guilty to conspiring to possess the
drugs. ‘

He was sentenced to four years in prison on this charge and
was fined $50,000. Failure to pay the fine by the expiration of his
sentence will result in an additional year in prison.

The accused also pleaded guilty to charges relating to the seizure
of $2.5 million worth of marijuana this year.

Curling, who was charged along with three other men in this case,
admitted that on Tuesday, July 3, he was found in possession of
marijuana which he intended to supply, that he had conspired to
posses the drugs and also that he imported the drugs.

Curling was sentenced to four years in prison on the possession
charge.

The other charges were taken into consideration with that charge.
He was also fined $50,000.

Failure to pay the fine will result in an additional year in prison.

All of the sentences are set to run concurrently. Curling, a father
of four, was represented by attorneys Jairam Mangra and Alex Mor-
ley of the law firm Lockhart and Munroe.











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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE









In Celebration of
Christopher -
22nd April, 2002









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x

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Vy
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“Christopher was a true son of The Bahamas, totally committed to an where ever he ie
esh air. We

always with grace. ...He was a source of strength and inspiration, ...like a breath of fre
no longer have his humour, efficiency and zeal for life. ....We are happy and proud to have Known
him.” . Heart Ball Committee, 2003









“Christopher was a unique individual: intelligent, sociable, giving, well-liked, witty, talented,
and a good person. He loved life. Chris touched so many lives, and will truly be missed.”
, John Constantakis








“Daddy Chris” ..as an uncle was honest, loving, sheen persistent and very protective. He
always put a smile on your face... [He] is a saa I will always admire and hope to be like in a
lot of ways. He may have left earth, but fives on in heaven as my guardian angel.”
Felicia Turnquest






Christopher... was a very energetic and enthusiastic person who had a great personality and a
paneaie sense of fun... His management was excellent and he was the most reliable contractor...
[on the site], Christopher throughout maintained a very calm and level head, and often provided
much needed light relief.” Charles Stronach





“Chris and I shared a love of music, ...and we also enjoyed a oe joke... Chris always cg)
considerate in his telling of them, so as not to offend... I could always rely on his assistance... He
qwas an ever present source of comfort.” Linda Munnings




Chris was truly a genuine and compassionate person... an honest businessman, and also a gifted
musician.” Orson Clarke





“Christopher possessed a wonderful sense of humour and an acute sense of balance, which he
applied to all situations. ...he made life better and richer for others...” Robert Sands




“Chris was a true and close friend, gentle, generous, talented, dependable, optimistic, ... never
forgetting the needs of others.” Sean Mathews




Christopher was gentle person... and slow to criticize. He was honest in all ways and in all things.
He hag a good work ethic,... and a fine brain, and used it well. He was a good citizen, a good
son, and a good husband, and he would have been a good father. In fact, the world has too few
people of Christopher’s ability and honesty.” Norman Solomon












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Regatta sailing has the
potential to drive tourism
in Bahamas — McCartney

Right business model essential, says Minister

REGATTA sailing needs to
be restructured to take advan-
tage of the spectacular success
it has become as a business,
Minister of State for Tourism
Bran McCartney said.

“The time may well have
come to treat this sport of
sloop racing in terms of an
event that can be economical-
ly self-sustaining,” he said.

“With the right vision and
business model, regattas can
become a financially viable
vehicle to drive domestic
tourism within the islands of
the Bahamas.”

Mr McCartney said the
Ministry of Tourism “certain-
ly appreciates” the importance
of sloop sailing’s substantial
contribution to the nation’s
number one industry.

“That is why we have over
the years played a significant
role in furtherance of the
development of regattas and
the tourism industry.

“We will continue to make
appropriate donations to this
event and otherwise assist
where we can,” Mr McCart-
ney said.

He added that the lobby to
have sloop racing declared the
national sport of the Bahamas
is growing louder.

“Sloop racing has a die-hard
following.

“Fans of sloops like hall-of-
famers Tida Wave, Southern
Cross, Good News and Coura-
geous for example, follow
them from regatta to regatta.
And that is just in the ‘A’
class.

“When you bring all the












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Concern about environment

ONE of the main concerns of the Ministry of Tourism in
relation to Family Island regattas is the protection of the

environment.

According to Minister of State for Tourism Bran McCart-
ney, “This is perhaps one of the more treacherous of the
shoals we should avoid as we continue to develop regatta
sailing around the islands of the Bahamas.”

Mr McCartney noted that broken glass bottles are
increasingly appearing on beaches, and that tourists are not
going to spend “hard-earned money to come to beaches
where they are in danger of having their feet cut by glass”’.

He also noted that some mail-boat excursion passen-
gers throw their garbage into the sea.

“Tourists are unlikely to return to a place where they.
have to endure unsightly refuse or swim in polluted waters.

‘We need not mention here the overall effect that pol-
lution of our waters will have on the fishing, marine and
water sports industries inclusive of regatta sailing.”

Mr McCartney said the proper disposal by small Fami-
ly Island communities of the increased garbage generated
by regatta festivals — including sewage — is essential to
preserving the “pristine nature” of Family Island destina-

tions.



other classes into the mix then
you can better understand
what I am talking about.”

He said the Ministry of
Tourism is keenly interested
in increasing travel to the
Family Islands, particularly
during the slow tourism peri-
ods. “Regattas, festivals and
homecomings have proven to
be excellent vehicles to
achieve this end.”

Mr McCartney noted that
Family Island vendors look
forward to regattas with great
anticipation.

“For many vendors, these
festivals are the main sources
of their income.

“Patrons are treated to a
wide variety of offerings from
souvenirs to food to enter-
tainment and everything in
between including accommo-

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security. Although we do not
have direct statistics, it is fair
to conclude that vendors
make a handsome profit.”
He added: “Mail boat

excursions are invariably over--
booked. No one, it seems.,:

wants to get left in Nassau.

“Scheduled carriers such as
Bahamasair normally put on
extra flights while charter ser-
vices do a brisk business dur-
ing regatta time.

. “Vehicle rentals on some

islands cannot accommodate
the demand.

“Demand for sleeping quar-
ters exceeds availability.

“The impact of large num-
bers of people on a tradition-
al Family Island community
can be dramatic,” Mr McCart-
ney said.













a ncaa



THE TRIBUNE

e
»
.

Meo ee EE ae ae
US Ambassador backs

pre-clearance facility at

Grand Bahama airport

‘ m@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
, Tribune Freeport Reporter
‘ dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



THE new US Ambassador to
the Bahamas Ned Seigel has
acknowledged the importance
of the pre-clearance facility at
, the Grand Bahama Interna-
' tional Airport.

, , In 2006, the American gov-
ernment had considered clos-
| ing the facility, which allows
' travellers to the US to clear
| American Customs and Border
' Control before leaving-the
Bahamas. However, after dis-
' cussions between the Bahamas
' government and former US
, Ambassador John Rood, the
‘ decision was made to keep the
; facility open.
| “Tam glad to be in Freeport —
| Freeport is very important and
, | appreciate the work that my
' predecessor had accomplished
| in keeping the pre-clearance
facility open here,” Ambassador

Seigel said.

“It is really important, and as

trade and tourism grows here

- we look forward to many more

people using the pre-clearance
facility,”

Ambassador Seigel was mak-
ing his first official visit to
Freeport yesterday as part of a
familiarisation tour and said he

STURT Gatti ee eta eco c

of what I want to bring in my
tenure as ambassador.”

Mr Seigel also stated that his
wife, Stephanie, will continue
the reading programme that
was started by Ambassador
Rood, as well as help with
breast cancer awareness.

“She looks forward to moving
forward ‘with the wonderful
commitment that the ambas-
sador made to the reading pro-
gramme and expects to be very
active in breast Cancer aware-

ness on the island,” he said.“
look forward to supporting
those two initiatives along with
working with the community
and using sports and motiva-
tional speaking to make sure
that the youth of the Bahamas
can say ‘no’ to drugs, and I hope
to be setting up a programme
with some NGOs,” he said.

Ambassador Seigel, who is
Jewish, also visited the Luis B
Torres Synagogue in Freeport
to learn about its history.



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was very impressed with the
state of the airport.

“IT am very impressed and
being here and landing here for
the first time. I was here 30
years ago... and to enter this
airport and see the beautiful
facility and be taken through
the operation is quite impres-
sive,” he said.

While in Grand Bahama, Mr
Seigel met with DEA officials
and US Customs and Border
Patrol officers stationed at the
airport, as well as those sta-

‘tioned at the Freeport Contain-
er Port in connection with the
Megaports container security
programme.

“My priorities today are, try
to spend time with the embassy
family teams that are here and
working with the Bahamian
police in the fight against drugs
and narcotics trafficking, and
meeting with our teams that
work on the container security
initiative, understanding what
they do,” he said at press con-
ference at the airport.

“JT am very impressed just
walking through this facility,
meeting'with the teams and see-
ing the opportunity that this air-
port presents to Freeport,” Mr
Seigel said.

The ambassador also paid a
visit to Grand Bahama Port
Authority CEO Sir Albert
Miller and GBPA president
Albert Gray at the Port Author-
ity Headquarters Building in
Freeport.

“Tam meeting with Sir Albert
Miller and Albert Gray at the
Port Authority to be part of
what they are looking to do now
and in the future of economic
development of the port,” Mr
Seigel said.

He also met with the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce’s newly elected officials
on Wednesday.

Ambassador Seigel said he
felt it was important to meet
with the group because “that is
a critical part of growth and
economic development — invest-
ment and trade — that is a part

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



‘An affront to the citizens of

Fierce controversy
over Albany road
diversion project

Suggestions have been made that the Ingraham administration is trying to conceal it is helping Park Ridge
Securities Corps acquire land from Bahamians in south-west New Providence for ‘a Lyford Cay-style’ devel-
opment

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@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AHAMIANS’

fundamental

rights are set to

be imperiled

and the coun-

try’s image as a safe place to

invest set back if the government

continues to acquire properties

in south-west New Providence

for the Albany development’s

proposed road diversion, it has
been claimed.

“This agreement is an affront

to the citizens of this country,”

- said a concerned citizen who has

studied the development’s heads
of agreement, but who wishes to
remain anonymous. “This is not
about Albany, but about princi-
ples.”

It has been suggested that the
Ingraham administration is
attempting to conceal the fact
that it has “aided and abetted”
the developer, Park Ridge Secu-

' rities Corps, in its effort to

acquire land from Bahamians for
the purposes of their private and
exclusive “Lyford Cay-style”
development.

“This strikes at the heart of
democracy and everything this
country stands for,” it was
alleged.

“How can you say this country
is a stable one to invest in if any
person’s property can be taken
when a billionaire developer
comes along?”

This comes as The Tribune has
received numerous documented
statements in which various gov-
ernment officials involved in the
matter appear to have given dif-
fering responses on the question
of whether the government has
already gone through with clause
9.9 of the Albany heads of agree-
ment — which calls on the gov-
ernment to acquire several per-
sons’ private property for the
developer. ,

That property has been desig-
nated as necessary by the devel-
oper to carry out their contro-
versial intended diversion of
south-west Bay Street to.take it
outside of their project’s bound-
aries. They have stated that the
luxury gated-community cannot
go ahead without the diversion,
as the road currently passes
directly through the property.

The Albany heads of agree-
ment states that the land was to
be acquired by the government
for the developer in accordance
with the Acquisition of Lands
Act. This act gives several justi-
fications for why and when pri-
vate land may be acquired by the
government for “public purpos-
es”, generally seen to be those
which are for the greater benefit
of the public at large, such as
roads, harbour facilities or
tourism.

The source claims that the
exclusive Albany development

represents none of these things |

and if the government pushes
ahead with depriving these per-
sons of their properties for the
benefit of the déveloper in this
instance it will “clearly be work-
ing in the interests of the devel-
oper and against the interests of
the public”, many of whom
objected strongly to the diver-
sion during town meetings sev-
eral months ago.

In October former Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie, under whom
the agreement was negotiated
and signed, said that he stands
firmly behind the Albany and
New South Ocean projects,

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asserting that they will together
act as the massive economic boon
in south west New Providence
that successive governments have
been unable to secure.
However, Mr Christie also said
that on his part the decision to
give the okay to the road diver-
sion and acquisitions was intrin-
sically linked to the relocation of
port facilities to South West New

Providence, which he said would

have made the road diversion
mandatory regardless of the sim-
ilar wishes of the developer.

With this relocation now less
certain, he said that whether to
continue with the acquisitions
and diversion would be a “diffi-
cult decision” that Mr Ingraham
would have to bear.

I: that vein, Prime Minister
Ingraham appeared to
express reservations about the
acquisitions in the House of
Assembly in October, stating that
“it is to be determined whether
the law requires” that the devel-
opers deal directly with the
landowners, taking the govern-
ment out of the picture.

However, while a realisation
of the development’s more “pri-
vate” rather than touristic status
by the Ingraham administration
has been seen to cause the gov-
ernment to review the agreement
as it pertains to the incentives
originally granted in the agree-
ment — with Mr Ingraham stating
emphatically that the private
members’ club could not receive
incentives under the Hotel
Encouragement Act — the ques-
tion of the acquisitions appears to
have not received the same atten-
tion on that basis.

‘Bastardising’

“The government needs to be
principled. They are twisting and
bastardising the law,” the source
added, maintaining that the gov-
ernment is an interloper in the
in pushing the Bahamian
landowners into a sale.

The source has pointed to the
fact that Mr Ingraham’s com-
ments during opposition ques-
tions that month “tony im seek-
ing to put the burden\afrespon-
sibility on the Christie adminis-
tration for “the acquisition of cer-
tain land at Ocean Bight, Exu-
ma, to facilitate the construction
of the marina at the Emerald Bay
Four Seasons Resort” and in the
process, belatedly and disingen-
uously trying to distance his par-
ty from such actions.

The fact remains that the
Emerald Bay heads of agreement
was signed under the FNM, and
yesterday, former works minis-
ter Bradley Roberts confirmed
information previously received
by The Tribune that the acquisi-
tion in question was in fact initi-
ated by the FNM.

He added: “You cannot
acquire land from a private own-
er to then go and turn around
and give it to a private develop-
er.”

The source commented: “If
(the FNM) don’t agree with
acquiring private land for a pri-
vate developer, then why pro-
ceed? If they do — then that is
even more outrageous.”

The status of the acquisitions
in this most recent case has been
deliberately blurred by the cur-
rent government, claims the
source.

Minister of Works Earl
Deveaux told The Tribune in
September that the process of
acquiring the properties had, in
fact, already begun under the for-
mer government following the
signing of the heads of agreement
in late 2006.

He said that the matter of the
land acquisition was “in the
Office of the Prime Minister” but
that the land was yet to be “vest-
ed”.

According to a legal dictio-
nary, this means that the absolute
legal right to ownership of the
properties has not been con-
ferred. f

However, in a mid-October
letter seen by The Tribune, per-
manent secretary Colin Higgs
said: “The government has
agreed to three real estate
appraisers who will value the
land and Albany will deal direct-
ly with the owners based on the
appraisals.”

The position that the govern-
ment would not act as an inter-



;

e

THE TRIBUNE

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ROAD TO THE FUTURE: These trailers line up for work on the Albany project.

mediary in the acquisitions was
reiterated by Creswell Sturrup,
acting permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Works, with a slight
alteration in a letter later that
month.

PR exercise

He added that the government
“would reserve the right to

- acquire the lands if all good faith

efforts (by Albany to acquire the
properties directly) failed,” thus
indicating that the property own-
ers still have no option but to sell

. their land should they be non-

compliant, making it appear that
the government was ultimately
engaged in a public relations
exercise in purportedly seeking
to have the developer take the
lead.

On Friday it was revealed to

_The Tribune by David Davis,

director of investments in the
Office of the Prime Minister, that
none of the property owners
involved had fully accepted the
offers given to them for their
land.

He maintained, however, that
“we are very close to dotting all
the ‘i’s’ and crossing all the ‘t’s’ in
a sale” — apparently again admit-
ting that the developers are not
dealing directly with the
landowners as indicated by Mr
Higgs and Mr Sturrup.

The source maintains that the
government is deliberately side-
stepping making a definite state-
ment on where it stands on the
issue of the “acquisition of pri-
vate land for a private develop-
er”, with a potentially far-reach-
ing negative impact on the,rights
of the average ‘Bahamian.



}

n



Yesterday, Callenders and Co
attorney and spokesperson for
the Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association, Fred Smith,
also roundly condemned the gov-
ernment’s behaviour, calling it
“the most insane and unconsti-
tutional thing (he) could think
of.”

Ai that he hopes
the property owners

legally challenge the government
and the developers, he said: “We
want investors not invaders in
the Bahamas and we certainly
don’t want our own government
exercising the power of eminent
domain to forcefully deprive
Bahamian citizens of their hard-
earned property to give to for-
eign developers for their person-
al profit.”

In a September letter sent by
Ministry of Works official Calvin
Balfour in response to a query
put to Minister of Works Earl
Deveaux about the Ingraham
administration’s position on the
matter, the official appeared to
refute the suggestion that the
FNM would involve itself in such
practices.

Mr Balfour stated the govern-
ment “has not acquired any pri-
vate land in south west New
Providence for the benefit of the
Albany or new South Ocean pro-
jects.”

He stated that he“was directed
by Mr Deveaux to assure that
the government “does not take
lightly the acquisition of private
land” and that any acquisition “is
done in compliance with the rel-
evant legislation and for the long-
term benefit of the Bahamas and
Bahamians.”

aiGO

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“You cannot
acquire land
from a private
owner to then
go and turn
around and give
it to a private
developer.”

Later, in mid-October, perma-
nent secretary Colin Higgs again
stated that the government “will
not acquire land from private
persons for private use.”

It is not entirely clear from
these statements whether the
government is saying that it does
not intend to, or is not, acting as
an intermediary in the land
acquisition or whether it is but
under the premise of doing so
for a “public purpose”.

If it is the latter, it is yet to

state precisely what “public pur-
pose” the diversion and acquisi-
tions serve.

The source maintains that Mr
Deveaux has failed to follow
through on promises that he
would provide copies of the
gazetted notices of acquisition,
which he said would give signifi-
cant insight into the current goy-
ernment’s involvement in the
process.

Attempts to reach Minister of
Works Earl Deveaux for com-
ment yesterday were unsuccessful
as he was said to be out of. the
country. - :








THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 9

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

= a







THE TRIBUNE

Vi



CELEBRATING EILEEN CARRON’S

- Mrs Hazel Chea, The T ribune’s

— longest serving staff member

L IS FITTING in this spe-
cial edition dedicated to
the golden anniversary of The
Tribune's editor and publisher
that special mention should be
made of the longest serving staff
member of this newspaper. She
is Mrs Hazel Chea, the news-
paper's assistant circulation
manager in charge of the news-
paper's street hawkers, who has
been with the paper for over 50
years. She joined The Tribune
in January 1956.

Such a job is a difficult one at
the best of times, but it is one
that Hazel has held tor the past
22 years.

And it's difficult because of
the hours involved. Just listen to
her daily schedule ‘and readers
will be amazed that this Fox Hill
lady can keep up such a regi-
men day after day, week after
week, year after year and still





.

retain her youthful looks and
boundless energy. Hazel loves
her exercise. .

She and a group of four ladies
rise every morning around 1.30
to go walking and jogging round
R M Bailey Park for an hour
or so.

She then drives home to
shower and change, getting her-
self ready for work at the news-

paper.

Deliveries

Before her husband, Alton,
was talken ill, she used to pre-
pare getting him ready to join
her also at The Tribune as he
used to make deliveries of the
newspaper to offices around
town that had bought subscrip-
tions to the paper.

She used to help him "bag
the papers" before he drove the

route and got back to the office.
Around 5 o'clock she is ready to
open up to distribute the news-
paper to the paper boys (street
hawkers) from the newspaper
plant.

She then stays at the office
until around noon every day to
ensure that the paper boys have
all the newspapers they
need for distribution on the
streets,

She also has to count and bag
the cash she receives from the
boys - normally in the form of
quarters or others loose change.

After that she leaves to go
home and is usually in bed
around 7pm ready to face
another day when her alarm
wakes her at |.30am.

Hazel, one of the daughters
of the well-known Leonard and
Muriel Rahming family of Fox
Hill, joined The Tribune from
school at the age of 15.

PLANNING

She went to Government
High School. Her pastor, the
Rev Leroy Roker, a good friend
of Sir Etienne Dupuch, owner
of the newspaper, got her a job
in the paper's bindery depart-
ment, where she spent about 10
years.

She had only been there a
year or so when she met and
fell in love with one of the
young men in the printing
department, Alton Chea.

They were married and have
been together now for nearly
50 years. ,

Hazel and Alton have three.
talented daughters Crystal, Tra-
cy and Gina, a son Clement, a
stepdaughter Althea, and a
stepson Michael. Her son
Clement also works at the
paper.

"T enjoyed it," she says of her
early years. "I was very young
and was taught plenty things,
especially about life from the
elders around me. But I felt I
was with family.

“Sir Etienne always treated
me fine. I was like the daughter
who was not his daughter, if you
know what I mean," she says.
"There were two old men in my
life, my father and Sir Etienne -
and I loved them both." Hazel
eventually became second in
command in the bindery depart-
ment before being moved to the
composing room under foreman
Samuel Haven, becoming head
of the department when Mr
Haven was put in charge of the
overall operation of the press-
room.

OVER 50 years at The Tribune: Hazel Chea



CONGRATU EATIONS TO
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON
ON 50 YEARS IN

BAHAMIAN JOURNALISM

She became supervisor of the
composing and paste-up depart-
ment before being chosen to
take care of the circulation
department.

She says of her time at The
Tribune: "It was a joy to be
around most of the people. It
was like a family to me...and
Sir Etienne treated me won-
derfully. I got to know Joan and
Pierre (children of Sir Etienne)
very well, but did not know Mrs

Carron until she came back
(from her studies) to take over
from her father.

“I don't think I could have
worked anywhere else, because
everyone has been so nice to
me. I have really appreciated
being with the Dupuch and Car-

‘ton families....l “never thought

of them as bosses, but as -my
family. (Readers may read her
tribute to "her boss" in today's
Special Edition. In her own

words and in her own way she
describes her special love and
appreciation for the newspaper
and those who run it). Hazel
plans early in the new year to
take things a little easier. She
will step down from her full-
time duties and assume a well-
deserved part-time role in the

circulation department of the

newspaper that has been her
life since she joined as a teenag-
er.

One of the leading
papers in Caribbean



“OSE SONLIEE

DELETED STIL OEE



ADDRESS

TEL 242.325.7363
WEBSITE

EMAIL. INFO@ALEXIOU.COM

ALEXIOU & ASSOCIATES Lrp.
P,O,BOX N-G72 NASSAU, BAHAMAS
FAX 242.322.7358

WWW.ALEXIOU,.COM

ings in life that will catch
Ue ela el Lan

—

m@ By ROGER CARRON

INCE IT was launched in November,

‘1903, this newspaper has been in the
forefront of most-social developments in the
country and in the newspaper industry and can
now boast of being not only the Bahamas’
leading paper, but also one of the leading
papers in the Caribbean.

Although the Nassau Guardian had been
published since 1844 and was an established
paper for “the establishment”, The Tribune
was in fact the first “daily” in the Bahamas.

Some other “firsts” that The Tribune can
claim are:

¢ The first newspaper to publish colour pho-
tographs in the country

¢ The first newspaper to bring in wire pho-
tographs via The Associated Press for its cov-
erage of the Yarmouth Castle cruise ship dis-
aster in 1965.

e The first newspaper in the country to have
a Goss web-oftset press giving superior printing
over conventional presses.

e The first newspaper to transmit wire pho-
tographs round the world from the Bahamas.

e The first newspaper to receive its wire news
reports and pictures via satellite from The°
Associated Press. ,

e The first newspaper in the country to pro-
duce its pages by pagination on computer.

e The first newspaper to print a foreign news-
paper received by satellite transmission from a
foreign country.

e The first newspaper to produce a 98-page
edition in one day, all published in the
Bahamas by Bahamians for Bahamians at
Christmas in 1988.

After Tropical Storm Noel, The Tribune pub-
lished a 145-page edition in one day and its
daily average count is over 70 pages, with Mon-
day and Thursday publications being over 100
pages.

Today The Tribune is a morning publica-
tion, having changed from its traditional after-
noon publication in June, 1998.

Since its introduction in the mornings it has
gone from strength to strength with many more
sections of interest to all its thousands of read-
ers.

The paper now has a joint operation with
the Nassau Guardian and both serve the com-
munity with all the news that’s fit to print.





THE TRIBUNE

50 YE

NICU TT
living up to
the highest
standards in
journalism

@ By CAROL B HALLETT
former US Ambassador
to The Bahamas













L IS indeed an honour and a
privilege to write this tribute in
honour of The Tribune’s publisher
Eileen Carron on the occasion of her
50th anniversary in journalism.

Few people bring to mind the true
meaning of the masthead of The Tri-
bune “Being Bound to Swear to the
Dogmas of No Master” more quickly
than does Eileen Carron. Eileen has
been steadfast in living up to the high-
est standards in journalism, and I am
sad to say that is somewhat rare today.

In thinking back to my tenure as
Ambassador to The Bahamas in the
late 1980s, I am reminded of the
remarkable courage The Tribune and
Eileen demonstrated in supporting
the United States in our efforts to
control the illegal drug trade that used
and abused The Bahamas to carry |
their cocaine and marijuana to the
United States.

Through responsible journalism,
The Tribune exposed again and again
the illegal activities of the traffickers.

The United States Embassy worked
closely with the Bahamian Defence
Force and the Police Force to carry
out the “Hot Pursuit” programme that
enabled our two nations to jointly
seize tons of cocaine and marijuana
and bring about the capture of many
well-known drug traffickers.

The Tribune under Eileen Carron’s
leadership was diligent in speaking
out in support of these efforts on the
front pages of the newspaper. These
were often not popular stands, but it
made the difference in driving the
drug trade out of the Bahamas during
those difficult days. Eileen was never
afraid to take on an issue that might
not have been popular as long as it
was the right thing to do.

Eileen, you have my gratitude for
your professionalism and dedication,
and my admiration for your willing-
ness to make a difference for our two
countries.















































“An Extraordinary
Woman of Substance”





ARS

Thoughts on Eileen Carron celebrating
50 years of trumpeting democracy

@ By OBIE WILCHCOMBE

N 2004 in the aftermath of a
September cyclone that rav-
aged the West End settlement a
human spirit emerged that salvaged
broken hearts and despair. Eileen
Carron was among those who came,

LOCAL NEWS

IN JOURNALISM

“ground zero,” lifting spirits, soothing
pain, and strengthening the weak.

She did not send help, she brought
help! It was special to see the “jour-
nalist” expressing love for humanity.
The people of West End are appre-
ciative of the good that was given
when they needed it most.

I have often asked myself, where

rm lovin’ it

not searching for a sensational story, | would our nation and our people be
but laden with what we needed. without the journalist and the organ-

We needed care, we needed love __isations in which they work? Yes,
and we needed food. She came to _ that vilified and disrespected scribe

A leader in seeking t
meet her respons

@ By THE MOST REV PATRICK C
PINDER, ARCHBISHOP OF
NASSAU




N THE occasion of her 50th

anniversary in journalism, I would
like to join family, friends and professional
colleagues of Eileen Carron in congratu-
lating her on this wonderful milestone.

Journalists have a special place and
responsibility in the life of any community.
This responsibility involves keeping the
public informed on matters of both local
and international importance on a wide
range of issues. This is no slight responsi-
bility.

The Second Vatican Council in its Decree
on the Means of Social Communication
expresses this responsibility in these words: “If news of facts and happenings
is communicated publicly and without delay, every individual will have per-
manent access to sufficient information and thus will be enabled to con-
tribute effectively to the common good. Further, all of them will more easily
be able to contribute in unison to the prosperity and the progress of society
as a whole.” |

Following in the footsteps of her father, the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, Mrs
Carron has certainly been a leader in seeking to meet her responsibility.
Under her leadership, The Tribune has remained a highly visible institution
in the field of Bahamian journalism. Indeed, it has become a media network
having expanded into the broadcast media in order to meet the changing
demand for information and social communication in our community today.

While no human insititution is perfect or beyond the need to continue to
strive for excellence, The Tribune, as a leader in the local print and broadcast

SEE page 12



-in so doing she has strong-

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAG

who is depended upon, but hated
and despised by the newsmakers
themselves.

I wonder why we refuse to reflect
on the import of their presence in
our society, and give recognition to
the invaluable role that is played.

The liberation of our country, the
pros and the cons of the struggle of
the masses did not occur in the
absence of the Free Press. The
prominence of The Tribune, Etienne
Dupuch “The Dean” of Bahamian
journalism and his daughter Eileen
Carron have captured and chroni-
cled the rise of this nation, the quest
of her people and the struggles of a
demanding society. In fact, it could
be argued that The Tribune was an
instrumental force in the road to
nationhood and the building of the
nation. ;

Eileen Carron has been in the
forefront of safeguarding the
democracy and the freedoms
that we enjoy. A difference
of opinion does not make
an individual an enemy of
democracy. In fact it serves
to test and measure the
level of the progress of
our democracy. It also
tests the maturation of the °
society. Eileen has chal-
lenged the status quo and

ly and courageously put the a
case for the freedom of *
expression.
It is unfortunate that in our *
country the journalist is still not
giyen the honour and/or the
respect that is deserved, and the
profession is not seen and herald-
ed with the dignity that it demands.
Daily the journalists must fight
through the maze of tiny egos, hos-
tility and ignorance. The journalist
has to escape from those who regard
the journalist as a propagandist and
those who expect the journalists
to compromise the integrity of
the profession.
Through what

SEE
page 12 «




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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE






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Thoughts on Eileen Carron

celebrating 50 years of
trumpeting democracy

FROM page 10

might be regarded as the “hazards of the pro-
fession” the journalist must remain focused.
The journalist is obligated to fulfill the sacred
responsibility enshrined in the principles of
the fourth estate.

When Eileen Carron took the pen into her
hands some 50 years ago and began to sketch
the pieces of the contemporary life and histo-
ry of The Bahamas she was no doubt influ-
enced heavily by the “Dean.” She was also
influenced by the dynamism of an evolving
society. In her hands were being placed the
responsibility of ensuring that our new democ-
racy would not be derailed.

We must not forget that when political
change came in the Bahamas, the opposition
parties faulted and it took several years before
any of the groups were stabilised. The Free
Press and The Tribune in particular had to
assume its role as the fourth estate.

The media could not take for granted that
the new leaders would remain focused and not
take advantage of the absence of an organised
opposing group? Fortunately our leaders kept
the nation on a steady path of nation build-
ing.

‘ In chronicling the contemporary history we
have challenged the opinions of Eileen the
Editor consistent with the principles of a
democracy. Let me hasten to add, however,
that I understand that it is not unusual for the
Editorial Page of major newspapers in devel-
oped societies to endorse and openly support a
broad scope of issues inclusive of political per-
sonalities and government policy.

Eileen Carron is entitled to her opinion.
That is a freedom that the PLP of which Jama
member fought for and a freedom that is cher-
ished. We all have a right to our opinion!

I am honoured to be a member of the fra-
ternity of journalists. I celebrate the work of
Eileen Carron. She has gotten respect the old
fashioned way, “She has earned it!”





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A leader in
seeking to
meet her
responsibility

FROM page 10

media, is an exemplary
Bahamian enterprise. The
leadership of Eileen Carron
has certainly been a key factor
in this reality.

Thus, on this occasion, I am
pleased to congratulate Mrs
Eileen Carron for her leader-
ship as an outstanding
Bahamian citizen and as an
outstanding Bahamian pro-
fessional woman whose lead-
ership in the area of commu-
nications media is a matter of
public record.

We wish her every blessing
as we salute with her on her
50th anniversary in the pro-
fession of journalism.



\

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a
\

.



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE

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television talk show “tive sith Hy towards 1° MM. Wiltshire told j

Regis anid Ketiy” tape a sories “Se ‘ fye' ne «luring an inter- on

of live episodes at the A ttaatis View ai the resort yesterday. : i;

Sime eyvcaled that executives no
were in talks ' ha n umber of PE eer rick en ec eae rere.
noyoc Ameren television net- —a rea : nie se HS.
work. fom at ge future shoots
at Atlantis bat these negotia-
tions have slowed down

Resort, Paradice istond cactier
in the weck,.

Over two days, Movember 27
and <8, the shaw s hosis Xcgis
Philbin and Kelly &:pe tiped
four shows in the tropica ack-

ground of ihe resori’s “qua- becato ef the television writ-

venture Pool Deck with » -um- ers SGiike in the United States.

ber of celebrities 1m tow Se However Altantis has a num-
RR,

boro special events lined up,
including the concert special
"Pop Rocks in February. 2008
whieh wilh dros many interna-
tional muster 2. and perform-

‘

The stiow’s line-up ine!vded
tennis champion Venus
Williams, singer/acto® Billy Ray
Cyrus and pop singer Sean
Kingston, among others. Che
show wrapped up its las! day

ot taping on ParaGee Island on “We've partnered up with
Wednesaay and the tam ain ing OXsnorrean radio stations) Z100'

ditt Y (UW agai and we'll do

episodes wiil air today ana Fri-
’ five days of major concerts,”

day morung on ABC neiv: s Ranh
Pen a ame tke show s IN THIS image released by Disney-ABC Domestic Television. talk a
eee show hosts Reais Phiibit lett, a1 Selly Riga, wake then show

Atlantis and showcased th ;
resort’s breathtaking location “Live with Reais aad Kell) tu a varne: chinate, Wednesday, Nov



TKS



is WiltShiie Said.

ninoned artists for the
event include pop singers
Rifenna, Notasha Bedingfield,




















































































the Dolphin Cay interaction 28, 2007. as the Wev york-baseu Morning talk show broad-asts Soon Wine ton, and Elfiot
centre, the brand new tower __ this week tom the A! hint Paradis Istinc resort the Bahamas Yau i .
‘ 1 f Atlantis ar WV-
aus Seeders nd Pow strategy moray te Keep us Wiate i's always good to
. Michele Wiltshire. Vi sips Atlantis resort porsed on the keep exposure strong tron an :
taht of Special Ex nts ed forefront of tourist tihaue advertising stucdoomt its aye
o ¢ © XC ‘ ie EEE
Entertainment at Kerzner |
International, believes the pait-
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to both the producers of the
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tionally renowned ocean-
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ing audience and ‘heir fanbase ff BAY ST. PARTIAL ROAD CLOSURE |
and remind people that this is : . BDUNDAS TOWN, ABACO 5. QUEEN’S COVE, FREEPORT |
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terrific place to come on vaca- FRIDAY NOV, 30, 2007 LOT NO. 91 a portion of LOT NO. 5 Block |
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ie ey have a very strong Tol 11,635 sq. ft. 0.22 acres
low i in speed oa So - uae Motorists are advised via cue to LOCATION: South of the main Dundas Town LOCATION: Along Vicioria Lane Soml!:
Works very well forusanditsa | ; . pe tars Neh
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on location because : looks in Rawson and Parliament Squares on
eee a eee oe Friday, November 30, 2007 . HAWKSBILL SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT 6. BAHAMIA WEST REPLAT SUBDIVISION
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that they can get higher ratings ne sg oe PROPERTY SIZE: Siiigle Family Residence LOT NO. 5 Block 17
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and it rea lly ¢ ends up being a berween aie nents LOCATION: mores ee i bedye baths. 0.23 aotes
mutually beneficia! relation £49 intersection of Inagua Orive & Gout #3 LOCATION: Northern side ef a cul-de-sac
ship.” ers ; APPRAISED VALUE: $82,250 called Churchill Court
Kerzner marketing execu- wists are reminded to observe APPRAISED VALUE: $307.429 |
tives are focused on their high- re-routing of tialfic tor this period . HAWKSBILL SUBDIVISION PHASE I,
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ly successful brand integration
LOT NO. 57 FREEPORT

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence LOT NO. 292

5 187 sq. ft PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
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APPRAISED VALUE: $89 000 LOCATION: Jonn Rut Lane

APPRAISED VALUE $176.00)



» MURPHY TOWN, ABACO

LOT NO. 65 Crown Allotinent 8. BAHAMIA MARINA SECTION ix
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT

10,000 sq. ft LOT NO. 44 Block 30

LOCATION: Front Street Murphy Town PROPERTY SIZE: 5 Bedroom. Sir gi
APPRAISED VALUE: $97 450 Duplex, 12,196.56 sa ft
LOCATION: Stratford Way
APPRAISED VALUE: $305,000



Dye FLL a

Please Be atormed that

Mr. Dominic Sturrup









aro
|
. LUCAYA ESTATES SUBDIVISION, 6. DERBY SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT |
t FREEPORT LOT NO. 9 Block 17 Unit 3 7 4
‘ LOT NO. 22 Block 174 Unit 17 . PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot |
<4 PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot 0.30) acres |
a 1.00 acre LOCATION: Queens Highway &Dagenivny |
LOCATION: On Wilton Lane near Drive
Chesterfield House Drive APPRAISED VALUE: $33,000)
APPRAISED VALUE: $7,500 ,
: 7. GRAND BAHAMA EAST SUB |
: RT LOT NO. 152 Black © D” San tio:
; Nd ax) Se LOT NO. 23 Block 174 Unit 17 PROPERTY SIZE: Single Fanily | 0
ty Ie PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot 0.23 acres |
“ ‘ m — 1.20 acres LOCATION: South side «sf Ka ue Vi
i ; LOCATION: On Wilton Lane near of Drayton Street intersection |
pe wow Chesterfield House Drive : APF RAISED VALUE: $15.0 |
} APPRAISED VALUE: $8,000 ; '
8. ROYAL BAHAMIAN ESTATES cREESO!
. FORTUNE POINT SUBDIVISION, LOT NO. 15 Block 2
| FREEPORT PROPERTY SIZE: Single Far |!
LOT NO. 15 Block 7 Lint 4 { 0.44 acres
‘ PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Unit LOCATION: Northeastern section ©
| 12,075 sq. ft. intersection «1 Ascension Drive & Jehit i
oo LOCATION: Eastern side of Cuoper Roaa APPRAISE!) VALUE: $29,000
f cal APPRAISED VALUE: $35,000 :
AA EON AN SAR 9. BAHAMIA WEST REPLAT, FRE CP OR)

. H . WINDSOR PARK SUBDIVISION, LOT NO. ° Block 19
, he TOP co? " { wWeC A i i i FREEPORT PROPERT SIZE: Single | amily |
iSho ronges 2 hOYE da A) PRM LOT NO. 29 Block 10 0:25 acres
| ; PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot LOCATION: Northern Side of Coun tus
6 ak my wp of Gs i i AAS Ta aN 0.37 acres APPRAISED VALUE: $26,000
Diamonds INnterNatrOM|ad — | PMB ooMer scsnom sin siostnoor ey
a APPRAISED VALUE: $33,000 10. ARDENT FOREST SUBDIVISION
FREEPOR!
. 9 eh Gok Mineepe ee 5. BAHAMIAN WEST REPLAT, FREEPORT. LOT NO. 11 Block 22 Unit 2 |
and is not authorized to transact ' § =~ LOT NO. 19 Block 20 PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family | ot
a z. 8 ss Hy) { ‘ PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot 0.35 acres.
Â¥ CE ay WUSAGQeE ss Ny q jee 85 acres
o cond U ct ASE OM i. - MOS: ’ 0.27 acres LOCATION: South Side of Oijanco |)
on ky Q ray a ir Pa) { A LOCATION: Western Side of Perth Court Arden Forest
Cul-de-sac . APPRAISED VALUE: $30,000

Diamonds International's APPRAISED VALUE: $27,000
Clients, Staff or Stores. .
PROER RR 4

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS (INCLUDE TELEPHONE CONTACT AN!
POSTAL ADDRESS) NASSAU: CHERRY MISSICK, P. O. BOX SS-6263, PHONE NO. (242) S94-0405
FAX NO. (242) 393-2883, OR VIA EMAIL: CHERRY.MISSICK@COMBANKLI1).COM OR
FREEPORT: CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES, BOX F-40876, PHONE NO, (242) 952-8230"

FAX NO. (242) 352-8221 OR VIA EMAIL: CHRISTOPHER.KNOWLES@COMBANIKLTD

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. *WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFF Eis

Mr. Dominic Sturrup is in no way
associated with
Diamonds Internationai
or any other of its affiliates.





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

a ae

FROM page one

Recently back from his heads of
government trip to Uganda, the
prime minister held a press confer-
ence in the VIP section of the Lyn-
den Pindling International Airport
last night. Also present was Attor-
ney General Claire Hepburn,
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette, Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest, Min-
ister of State for Finance Zhivargo
Laing, and Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis.

Prime Minister Ingraham
explained to members of the press
that of the 70-odd murders to date,
the majority of the victims, and sus-
pects had prior criminal records.

Of this number, 19 per cent, or
10 murders are suspected to have

PM on hanging

been committed by persons who
were previously charged with mur-
der, and 42 per cent, or 22 murder
suspects were actually already on
bail at the time of the offence
“We can do better, and better
we will do; in terms of ensuring that
persons have reasonably speedy tri-
als. I think that based on what |
read that the Chief Justice said that
he thinks three criminal courts for
criminal cases in the Supreme
Court can be had at any given point
in time, and I would suppose that at
least one can be had in Freeport at
any given point in time, if not two.
“So if you add four Supreme
Courts dealing with criminal mat-
ters going you can make a dent in
the number of criminal matters

393-4960 _

going. It will take a while, but you
will make a dent.”

The Prime Minister added that
he also expects that a number of
the death penalty appeals resulting
from the Privy Council ruling that
objected to this mandatory sen-
tence for murder convictions would
be disposed of shortly and deter-
mined.

“Tt is our hope, and expectation

that at the end of the day that some ,

of them will result in the position of
the death penalty. And if they do,
we will carry it out as we have done
in the past.”

When asked if this could mean a
return to hangings in the Bahamas,
Mr Ingraham responded stating: “]
never took it away.”

“We are in the hands of the judi-
cial system at the moment. When
we first came to office in 1992 we

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met the same problem. At that time ;
the argument was that executions }
were unconstitutional and it took us }
nearly four years for the Privy :
Council to finally determine that it :
was constitutional and we began to }
carry it out. And I think that at ;

least five persons were executed,

until we ran into another legal :

obstacle.

“And we have been out of office :
for five years and nothing hap- :
pened on that score and our legal :
obstacles continued. We will cer- :
tainly do our utmost to have these ;
legal obstacles determined in the :

shortest possible time,” he said.

Mr Ingraham outlined that capi- :
tal punishment is permitted not :
only by the Bahamas’ constitution, :
the United Nations Human Rights :
Declaration permits it, and it is per-

mitted by international law.

FROM page one

Supt Mackey said a nurse at
the emergency section had con-
tacted police and requested assis-
tance regarding a male patient
who was acting in a disorderly
manner.

Ms Mackey said several units
were dispatched following the
call and made their way to the
hospital.

“The first two officers to
arrive at the hospital approached
the male patient who was still
acting disorderly,” she said.

“The patient held on to one
of the officers with a choke hold
and refused to let him go.”

Ms Mackey said the other offi-
cer, along with other persons

Gnjoy a

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THE TRIBUNE

Hospital
patient

who were present, attempted to

break the hold but the struggle

continued without success.
“The officer in the choke hold

managed to remove his weapon

from the holster and fired one
shot, hitting the patient in the
neck,” she said.

Supt Mackey said the man
was taken into the emergency
room and treated by the doctor
on duty, but died from his injury.

Investigations by Central
Detective Unit officers are con-
tinuing.

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 15












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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



: LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Armbrister Jr — who ts being
challenged by the PLP — but he
only found out about his cxis-
tence when the boy was 12

years old.

Patrick Sr said that he knows
the man carries his name, but
he does not know if he is his
son. When asked what is the
name of Patrick Jr’s mother,

Mr Armbrister said initially
that he does not remember, as
it was a long time ago. Howev-
er, he then told the court that
her name is Elizabeth “some-
thing”.

Mr Armbrister added that he
did not know where Patrick Jr
or his mother are and he does
not see them, but at one time,
he knew they lived in
Pinewood. He also testified that
he heard some time ago that
Patrick Jr was in jail — which is
an allegation that emerged in
earlier testimony during the
case.

Wayne Storr and Pamela
Whitfield both pointed out to
the court, residences that were
outside the Pinewood bound-
ary lines on a map of the
Pinewood subdivision.

Both voters in question iden-
tified their homes while being
questioned by Mr Davis. In
both instances, FNM lawyer

Voters

Michael Barnett agreed that the
houses were outside the
Pinewood constituency. How-
ever, in the case of Ms Whit-
field, after his admission Mr
Barnett asked the court for
time to drive by the residence
before he confirmed his agree-
ment with Mr Davis that she
falls outside of the constituency.

Customs Officer Warrick
Moss also testified during the
morning session. Mr Moss
acknowledged that he was
transferred to Governor’s Har-
bour in November 2005, where
he has been stationed since.
Yet, Mr Moss still maintained
that he resided on 1606 Wal-
nut Street in Pinewood, where
his mother, sister, niece, and
nephew at times, live.

When he registered on
August 2, 2006, Mr Moss said
he was on vacation in Nassau

’ for a month. The customs offi-

cer added, during cross-exami-
nation by Mr Barnett, that he
returns to Nassau on weekends
—at times, three weekends in a
month.

Mr Moss, who lives in an °

apartment at Palmetto Point
when in Eleuthera, said he has
clothes at the Pinewood resi-
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ital that he tries to see when he
comes on weekends.

When pressed by Mr Davis
during re-examination as to
where he thinks he resides, Mr

_ Moss acknowledged that it is

possible to say he lives in
Eleuthera.

However, when Mr Barnett
followed with a question on the
subject, Mr Moss told the court
that he regards trips to Nassau
as coming home.



Shooting: double murder
FROM page one

driveway.

When The Tribune arrived on the scene, the dead body of the
homeowner was still lying in front of his door covered by a blanket, as
police cased the crime scene. °

Witnesses said that after being shot, the homeowner got out the car
and tried to get inside his home. However, he died just in front of the
door before he could get in.

The second man ran down the street more than a hundred feet, wit-
nesses said, after being shot in the upper chest and neck. He reportedly
fell in the street, gasping for life, until an ambulance took him to hos-
pital. Blood stains remained where he fell. He was taken to the Princess
Margaret Hospital where he died at 7.20pm, just an hour after being
shot.

“All we heard were shots,” one witness said. At first he thought fire-
works were being set off. Another resident said she lost count of the
number of bullets that were fired during the killings. She thought it was
more than seven.

According to a woman who lives in the neighbourhood, there was an
assassination attempt on one of the men on Tuesday night.

“They had around here lit right up with shots,” she said. “This time,
they didn’t miss, though.”

When asked if any of the dead men were wanted by police, Mr
Hanna said:

“I don’t know if they were wanted, but certainly they have a histo-
ry with the police. We know at least one of them fairly well.”

Anger at the level and crime in the country was expressed by several
residents with whom The Tribune spoke. One woman said:

“Police need to come from behind the desk and do more patrols.
These fellas believe they own these areas, and have no fear of police.
If they (police) were more vigilant, these guys would not be doing all
this killing.”

Another source told The Tribune that he saw one of the men who
died last evening in the area of East Street where the 71st murder t6ok
place.

Police last night said they have no motive for the most recent slay-
ings.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 17






FROM page one
the fee would allow media
accreditation for Junkanoo to be
better organtsed, to the benefit
of all involved
Che ministry plans to charge

media companies and other pho-,

tographers and videographers a
$50 fee to be aceredited to cover
the Junior Junkanoo and Sentor
Junkanoo parades.

An additional $300 would be
required if these persons wished
to enter the parade route.

‘The government states that the
fee is being levied as the ministry
is “striving to reduce the number
of persons on the parade route.”

Tribune news editor Paco
Nunez said: “This is a ridiculous
move by the ministry. Apparent-
ly they believe that both Bay
Street and junkanoo belong to
them. and not the Bahamian peo-
se”

He continued: “As far as we
are concerned the government
has no right to charge local press
to cover a national cultural event.
Next thing you know they will
want us to buy tickets to attend
parliament.

“The ministry's stated aim in
making this move is to reduce the
number of persons on the parade
route as they expect a number of
new media companies to request
accreditation. | can only assume

Media hits out
at Ministry over
Junkanoo cover

charge plans

that the number of additional
media companies they refer to
are foreign and therefore this ts
an overt effort to discourage local
reporters from bringing coverage
of the parades to their audiences.
We consider that to be discrimi-
nation.”

Features editor Yolanda Dele-
veaux said that whoever came up
with the idea “ought to be fired.”

“We are simply helping to pro-
mote the culture of the Bahamas.
If they do this then couldn’t we
ask them to pay next time they
have a press conference, or want
a press release to go in?” she
asked,

Both Erica Wells, news editor
at The Nassau Guardian, and
Altovise Munnings, acting news
director at Cable 12, said that
they were going to seek further
clarification from the ministry
as to why this action has been
taken.

Mr Jones, however, was not
seeking clarification, stating sim-
ply that such a suggestion evi-
denced “small mindedness” at the

ministry.

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FROM page one

about this. | have been from the start, that is why we never used
them. | wonder what all the real estate agents who bought pages in
the book are going to say now.”

The Department of Immigration began the investigation after
receiving a number of complaints about the businessmen in ques-
tion several months ago, Mr Burrows said.

He added that investigations are still continuing, and that the
businessmen are suspected of operating a lucrative advertising
agency without applying for the proper paperwork.

One media insider questioned whether the Americans could
even qualify for the necessary business licence in the first place. “As
1 understand it,” he said, “printing and publication in the Bahamas
are reserved exclusively for Bahamians by law.”

Without a business licence, he noted, an individual cannot apply
for a work permit. “I wonder if they had any local employees,
and if so, how they paid National Insurance,” the source added.

Immigration officials are monitoring the businessmen’s entry
into the country, Mr Burrows said, but declined to divulge specif-
ic details of the department’s investigations for fear of tipping the
suspects off. ’ :

The Americans have allegedly solicited a number of high-end
realtors to advertise in print as well as online. ‘Tribune sources
contend that the advertisers, in addition to using “pressure” tactics
on potential clients, dissuade Bahamian realtors from advertising
with local dailies claiming their publications offer a better com-
petitive advantage.

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

Cacique International

kicks off a groovy
kind of Christmas

It was a groovy start to the
Christmas season this year at
the Bahamas National Trust’s
annual Jollification thanks to
Cacique International.

The event planning and cater-
ing company wowed the crowds
with culinary delights that are
specially created and donated
to the Bahamas National
Trust’s Member Cocktail Par-
ty every year.

Well over 500 Trust members
were treated to a preview of the
Jollification offerings at the
cocktail party.

Thousands were to later
indulge in the two day event
that has become known locally
as the official start to the Christ-
mas season.

President and CEO of
Cacique Shawn Sawyer said:
“This was our seventh anniver-
sary at the Bahamas National
Trust’s Jollification and it is
indeed our pleasure to be able
to support the work that they
do in this way. It also gives us a
fantastic opportunity to flex our
artistic muscle and get creative
with our food, décor, and light-
ing — all aimed at exciting the
senses and generally getting
folks ‘in the mood’ for a groovy
Christmas”

Cacique’s Christmas decora-
tions matched with sparkling
fabrics in a Caribbean splash of
colour invoked an energetic
mood reminiscent of the 70s.
Retro mirror balls bounced light
off of psychedelic candle hold-
ers and the Groovy Christmas
Tree-centrepiece — a seven foot
high display of layered gift box-
es fashioned from flowers and
protruding branches hung with
colourful roses.

Mediterranean pasta, hearty
chilli with all the fixings and old
Bahamian favourites like guava
glazed pork kebabs and grouper
kebabs were served on com-
partmentalised trays in a playful
twist of the popular TV dinners



stuffed with smoked duck laced
in a mango sauce.

Executive sous chef Hesley
Rolle said: “We like to raise the
standards every year and this
year’s menu did just that. It was
not only a throw back to anoth-
er era, but also a preview of the
season to come and meant to

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within minutes.

Cacique’s executive pastry
chef, Jorg Stribel and the entire
pastry team delighted the crowd
with handmade chocolate...

Jorg Stribel said: “We like to
inspire the imagination and lux-
uriate the palette, especially
around this time of year when
its not only fun to treat the per-
son, but also important to feed
the soul.”

Bahamas National Trust’s
deputy executive director Lynn
Gape said Cacique has taken
the event from being a very nice
evening “to being a WOW!
evening.

“The themed decorations are
always beautiful and we won-
der each year how they can
make it better than the past
year, but somehow they do.
This year the theme was a
‘Groovy Kind of Christmas’ —
with the wonderful warm
colours and beautiful flower
arrangements they truly created
a mood of fun and festivity. Our
members raved about the food
— wonderful chilli, designer
kebabs and amazing desserts
and pastries made it an unfor-
gettable evening.”

Me tae ce

CCE Akh

’ NK EAA
WOW FACTOR: Seasonal joy

Ss ake etre ie oe eee



of the 70s, along with a crepe ,

Car Oe oe ee eae ee fot en” ti, iy Oar ie i Oe Ge Be eet, es me

oa ee oe 3

fee ee Y



THE TRIBUNE





The Bahamas | 59 years in

FROM page one

Barbados for the second year in
a row placed 31.

In this year’s report the UN pub-
lished the 2005 HDI values of
countries worldwide.

The HDI value is the measure
of life expectancy, literacy, educa-
tion, standard of living and well-
-being of a country’s citizens.

On the high end of the scale,
Norway, after placing first for six
consecutive years, lost its top spot
to Iceland and only ranked sec-
ond, followed by Australia in third
place.

Countries that placed in the
vicinity of the Bahamas on the
UN’s index include Croatia and
Costa Rica at 47 and 48 respec-
tively, and the Seychelles and Cuba
at 50 and 51 respectively. In last
year’s report, the Bahamas ranked
behind Cuba. However, on this
year’s UN index Cuba lost one
spot and the Bahamas gained












three.

The UN in its latest Human
Development Report found that
for every 100,000 people in the
Bahamas, 15.9 persons became the
victims of intentional homicides in
2005.

For every 100, 000 people, there

were 462 persons incarcerated.

Superintendent of Prisons Dr
Elliston Rahming two weeks ago
confirmed that the Bahamas actu-
ally has the eighth highest incar-
ceration per capita ranking in the
world.

Dr Rahming said that one in
every 230 Bahamians is currently
serving a prison sentence.

.The UN’s latest report further
stated that the life expectancy for
Bahamian men is 69.6 years, and
for women, 75 years. For every
1,000 live births, 13 children die in
infancy, the report said. As it con-
cerns adult literacy, the UN found
that 95 per cent of all Bahamians
are literate.

WHOLESALE

is pleased to announce that they will be
serving the Bahamian market with

Please contact 393-7111 or your
Lowe’s Sales Representative for
pricing information.

journalism
FROM page one

year gains.

Mrs Carron, who has been
editor and publisher of The pe
bune since 1972, began her jo
nalistic career as a reporter in
1957. Her grandfather, Leon

Dupuch, founded The Tribune -

in 1903, and her father Sir Eti-
enne Dupuch was publisher for
53 years until his semi-retire-
ment 35 years ago. However,
after stepping down as publish-
er he continued writing his dai-

ly editorials for another 15 years '

before relinquishing his pen to
his daughter in 1987, four years
before his death in 1991.

Read all about Eileen Car-
ron’s remarkable newspaper

‘career in our special supplement

and double-page feature inside.








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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 21



i Se ee

US Embassy in Nassau

observes International
Education Week —

AS PART of the U S
Embassy in Nassau’s activities
in observance of the eighth
annual International Education
Week, embassy staff members
spoke at a variety of venues to
share their insights into Amer-
ican educational programmes,
history and culture

International Education
Week (IEW) is a joint initia-

tive of the U S Department of

State and the US Department
of Education to celebrate the
benefits of international edu-
cation and exchange world-
wide.

It also seeks to develop a
broader understanding of
world cultures and to share
information about the history,
culture and government of the
United States. International
Education Week is observed
across the United States and in
more than 100 other countries.

This year’s theme is “Inter-
national edutalion: globalisa-
tion and respect”

International Education
Week kicked off on Monday,
November 12, with a one-hour
live discussion on the pro-
eramme “Real Talk Live” on
MORE 94 FM radio hosted by
Ortland Bodie.

The programme featured,
Paul Jukic, political officer at
the embassy, Dr Rhonda Chip-
man-Johnson, executive vice
president and vice president of
academic affairs at the College
of the Bahamas, and Kather-
ine Stewart-Gibson, embassy
public affairs specialist.

Both Mr Jukic and Dr Chip-
man-Johnson are former U S
Fulbright Grantees.

Mr Jukic was a Fulbright
recipient as a graduate student
in 1994-95 in Zagreb, Croatia.
Dr Chapman-Johnson earned
her PhD as a Fulbright Gradu-
ate student at Purdue Univer-
sity in West Lafayette, Indiana.

The discussion focused on

the importance of internation- °

al education exchange as a way
of promoting a deeper under-
standing and appreciation of
world cultures.

On November 13, Gunnery
Sergeant Harry Taylor, com-
mander of the United States
Marine Corps Nassau Detach-

LUCAS CARTWRIGHT (left), a

ment, spoke to Boy Scout lead-
ers, Scouts and parents about
the history, customs, and tra-
ditions of the United States
Marine Corps.

In this interactive discussion
with Scouts from seven divi-

_ sions of the Scout Association

of the Bahamas, Gunnery
Sergeant Taylor encouraged
the audience to learn their his-
tory and to be proud of their
heritage and traditions.

“The U S Marines are an
amphibious force in readiness

to support and defend freedom,

peace, and democracy not only
in the United States, but
around the world,” said Gun-
nery Sergeant Taylor.

Gunnery Sergeant Taylor
pointed out that the first
amphibious landing by the U
S Marines took place at Fort
Montague in Nassau on March
2 to 3, 1776. The amphibious
landing became known as the
Battle of Nassau.

Taylor also explained the sig-

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aimember of the 4th Bahamas Scout
Group is presented with the U S Marine Corps official emblem by Gun-
nery Sergeant Harry Taylor, Detachment Commander of the United
States Marine Corps Nassau Detachment.

nificance of the official
Emblem of the U S Marine
Corps — the eagle — which sig-
nifies the nation; the globe,
which signifies world wide ser-
vice; and the anchor, which
depicts naval traditions and
service.

On Thursday, November 15,
as part of the ongoing weekly
reading programme at Wood-
cock Primary School, U S$
Embassy readers shared infor-
mation with Woodcock stu-
dents on their hometowns
and States in the United
States.

Readers talked about the
traditions and history of Rhode
Island, Massachusetts,
Connecticut, New Jersey and
Ohio.




























































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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





CAV ES VIL LAGE

SSS SS NRETAC Beawer:*

INTERNATIONAL NEWS.









Bomb explodes in a suburb

of Sri Lanka’s capital,
killing 16, military says

a NUGEGODA, Sri Lanka _

A BOMB exploded Wednes-
day evening near the entrance
to a popular department store
in a busy Colombo suburb,
killing 16 people and wounding
more than 20 in a rare attack
on civilians near the capital, the
military said, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

It added that the Tamil ‘Tiger
rebel group was responsible for

_ the bombing.

The blast occurred just out-
side the four-story No Limits
store in Nugegoda as com-
muters crowded a nearby bus
stop during the evening rush
hour, officials said.

Authorities did not inmedi-
ately give a mofive for the blast
or speculate who was behind it.
Earlier in the day, a female sui-
cide bomber sent by the rebels
killed one person and wounded
two others in an unsuccessful
attempt to assassinate a gov-
ernment minister in his office
in Colombo.

The rebels’ top leader blamed
the government for a recent
escalation of fighting in the
more than two-decade-old civil

war that has killed an estimated -

70,000 in the Indian Ocean
island nation.

The powerful blast at the
department store shattered win-
dows and sent piles of crumbled
concrete onto the bloodstained

sidewalk, according to an Asso-
ciated Press photographer at
the scene.

Crumpled and charred parts
of motorcycles and three-
wheeled taxis were scattered
nearby.

Police and firefighters
searched the debris for victims.

Military officials said at least
16 people were killed and 20
others wounded. At a nearby
hospital, residents came in
search of missing relatives. One
girl who suffered a broken arm
in the attack sat with her moth-
er as she received treatment.

“| was on the top floor of a
shoe shop with my wife and
child when I heard a big blast
and there were glass pieces all
over us,” resident A. Jayasena
told AP Television News. “As
we ran away, I saw the entrance
of the No Limit shop burning,
and in the midst of it, a school-
girl on the floor trying to get up
and then falling back again.”

Jayasena and his daughter
suffered minor injuries, while
his wife was in the hospital
being treated for more serious
wounds, he said.

The bomb may have explod-

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The suicide bombing targeted
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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
INTERNATIONAL NEWS









PARAQISE IBLAND, SAHAMAS
PRESENTS THE “



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THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 25



Nicolas Sarkozy calls rioting in
French suburbs ‘unacceptable’

®@ PARIS

PRESIDENT Nicolas
Sarkozy said Wednesday that
rioters who shot at police
would be brought to justice as
the new wave of violence that
rocked Paris suburbs
appeared to ebb, according to
Associated Press.

It was the first time Sakon,
who had just returned from
China, entered the fray since
the rioting broke out Sunday
night. The violence eased
Tuesday night after police
were deployed in force and
quickly rounded up youths
lobbing Molotov cocktails and
setting cars ablaze.

“What has happened is
absolutely unacceptable,”
Sarkozy said after meeting
with a wounded police cap-
tain hospitalized in Eaubonne
north of Paris. Sarkozy arrived
straight from the airport after
returning from China.

Those who shot at officers
“will find themselves in a
criminal court,” Sarkozy
vowed. “That has a name, it is
an assassination attempt.”

Rioting erupted after the
deaths of two minority teens
whose motor scooter collided
with a police car in Villiers-
le-Bel, a blue-collar town on
Paris’ northern edge. Resi-
dents claimed the officers left
without helping the teens. But
Prosecutor Marie-Therese de
Givry denied that, saying
police stayed on the.scene
until firefighters arrived.

The violence has drawn
comparisons with riots that
raged through suburbs nation-
wide in 2005, and has shown
that anger still smolders in
poor housing.projects where
many Arabs, blacks and other
minorities live largely isolat-
ed from the rest of society.
The 2005 riots also started in
the suburbs of northern Paris,
when two teens were electro-
cuted in a power substation



Michel Euler/AP

MASKED POLICE patrol the streets as a helicopter uses a spotlight overhead in the nothern Paris suburb Villiers- Bs Bel Tuesday evening, Nov. 27,
2007. France's government vowed to fight with all its might against armed bands of rioters who rampaged in Paris suburbs, torching cars and
buildings and, in a potentially deadly development, firing at police officers. Police reinforcements were sent into the suburbs north of Paris on
Tuesday to try to prevent a third night of rioting. After nightfall Tuesday, the suburb of Villiers-le-Bel, the epicenter of the rioting, appeared calm.

The earlier violence was triggered by the deaths of two teens in a crash with a police car Sunday in Villiers-le-Bel.

while hiding from police.
Sarkozy is unwelcome in the
projects where his hard line
on crime and immigration has
riled many. He was interior
minister in charge of police
during the 2005 riots and took
a tough stance on the violence.
But ever before those riots,
he angered many in the pro-
jects when he called delin-
quents there “scum.” During

his election campaign this
spring, Sarkozy deftly avoided
such neighborhoods, except
for one carefully orchestrated
blitz visit.

Sarkozy described the teens’
deaths as “distressing,” but
said it was no excuse for
shooting police.

He met with families of the
two teens and told them that a
judicial inquiry had been

opened into their deaths, said
their lawyer, Jean-Pierre
Mignard. Such an inquiry
would allow-the parents to
“participate actively in find-
ing out the truth. Nothing will
be hidden,” Mignard said. ~
Sarkozy also had a security
meeting with his top ministers.
Didier Vaillant, mayor of
the working class town of Vil-
liers-le-Bel, asked Sarkozy to

arrange meetings to address
the “difficulties facing the sub-
urbs.”

Among them are the long-
held tensions between
France’s largely white police
force and ethnic minorities in
poor neighborhoods. Heavy
state investments have done
little to improve housing and
create jobs in the depressed
projects that ring Paris, which

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

For The Year Ended July 31, 2

007

‘The recently concluded fiscal year marked
yet another successful year for FOCOL
Holdings Ltd. The results from .the

acquisition of Shell Bahamas in January

2006 and the purchase of the Texaco
service stations on Grand Bahama in
August 2006 have produced results beyond
our expectations. We will continue to
work towards improving our results from
these operations as well as embracing other
opportunities that may become qailable
Part of our plan to improve our profits has
been our aggressive activities in the retail
area. With the opening of the re-developed
site at Queen’s Highway, Grand Bahama
and the addition of the Eight Mile Rock
Grand Bahama site, we have made great
strides in Grand Bahama. We have also
embarked on upgrades in New Providence
that should produce results over the next
few years.

During the year we realized a net income
of $13.87 million which is up from $13.36
million last year, Our share price increased
from $11.21 at July 31, 2006 to $20.73 at
July 31, 2007.

On behalf of the Board of Directors, I
thank the Shareholders, Management and
Staff for their continued confidence in our
company.

pfarrrornsnnnnnnnen srenarctntacn nanny Sc annnnnnnninnnarnnanmnnnnnninnrnnnnnnnnnnns

a

uf! far AL

Sir Albert J. Miller
Chairman & President

FOCOL HOLDINGS LTD
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (AL IDITED)
(B $000)

July 31, 2007

$430,374

72,461

Assets
Liabilities
Total shareholders’ equity.

feel a world apart from the
glamorous tourist attractions a
few miles away.

While cars were set ablaze
for a third night Tuesday, offi-
cials said the violence was less
intense than the two previous
nights.

Interior Minister Michele
Alliot-Marie said the overall
situation was “calm” but
police presence would remain
reinforced “as long as neces-
sary.”

About 20 police officers
were slightly injured Tuesday
night, down from more than
80 the night before, said
Patrice Ribeiro of the Syn-
ergie police union.

Son®: 138 cars were burned
around France overnight
Tuesday, which Ribeiro called
almost “normal.”

Police say as many as 100
cars are burned every night in
scattered incidents around the .
country. ,

Youths lobbed Molotov
cocktails and stones at police
in Villiers-le-Bel but
no ‘firearms were used,
Ribeiro said. On Monday
night, rioters used shotguns
raising fears the clashes could
turn deadly.

The interior minister said
39 people were arrested in the
Paris region Tuesday night.

In the town of Verneil-sur-
Seine west of Paris, eight peo-
ple were arrested after trying
to set fire to a bus, Ribeiro
said.

In the southern city of
Toulouse, 20 cars were set
ablaze, and fires at two
libraries were quickly brought
under control, police said. .

In the town of Verneil-sur-

Seine west of Paris, eight peo-
ple were arrested after trying
to set fire to a bus, Ribeiro
said.
Four young people were
convicted in fast-track trials
Tuesday to several months in
prison for participating in the
violence.

July 31, 2006

111,091
61,470
49,621



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (AUDITED)
(B $000)

Year ended

July 31, 2007

Sale & revenues 279,628
Cost of sales
Gross profit 40,829
(23,452)
( 2,024)
(1,439)

Marketing, administrative and general
Depreciation

Finance cost

Other income (expense)

13,869
(1,505)

Net Income
Preference share dividends

Net income available to common shareholders
$2. 364

Basic earnings per share

Dividends per share

2 fC22 38, 299)

111,091

Year ended
July 31, 2006

207,026
(176,158)

30,868

eee

_$ 12,603
0.37

0.125

Copies of a full set of the audited financial statements can be obtained from Stephen
Adderley (sadderley@focol.com), at the Freeport Oil Company located on Queens Highway,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM.





ar

2

PAGE 26, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







Ka

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Lebanese majority backs army

commander as president, ©
in possible break in impasse

BEIRUT Febanon

THE largest bloc in
Lebanon’s deadlocked parlia-
ment has dropped its opposi-
tion to the army chief becoming
president, bringing Gen. Michel
Suleiman a step closer to being
the new head of state and end-
ing a yearlong political crisis, a

lawmaker said Wednesday,
according to Associated
Press.

The apparent breakthrough,
announced by legislator Ammar
Houry after weeks of political
deadlock, came just one day
after the Mideast peace confer-
ence in Annapolis, Md., a meet-
ing that Lebanon’s powerful

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neighbor, Syria, had chosen to
attend.

It had been widely expected
that tension between the United
States and Syria would ease
after Syria’s participation at
Annapolis.

That was expected to affect
the Lebanon political crisis,
because the Syrian-U.S. tension
has, in part, played itself out
through Lebanon’s complex
politics.

Suleiman is seen as a uniting
figure, whom both the U.S.-
backed majority in Lebanon
and the pro-Syrian opposition
— as well as outside players —
can back. All sides appear to
view him, at least for now, as a
relatively neutral player who
can guarantee that no side in
Lebanon’s fractured politics
dominates the other.

Houry; a legislator with the
Future Movement of Saad
Hariri, said the bloc had
reversed its previous stand
against amending the constitu-
tion to elect a sitting army com-
mander.

“We declare our acceptance
to amend the constitution in
order to reach consensus on the
name of the army commander,
Gen. Michel Suleiman,” he said.

Hariri is effectively the leader
of Lebanon’s parliamentary
majority, and his support is tan-
tamount to the majority’s accep-
tance.

Houry’s statement described
Suleiman as “symbol of the uni-
ty of the military establishment
which has given martyrs and
blood in defense of the nation
against the enemy and against
those who threatened civil
peace.”

Suleiman is also respected by
Hezbollah, which is‘leading the
opposition, suggesting that after
months of being unable to elect
a new leader, the republic may
once more have a president.

The wild card remains
whether Michel Aoun, a leading
Christian opposition politician,
a former army commander and
a presidential candidate him-
self, would go along.

Parliament has been dead-

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locked since September on
electing a president and failed
to pick a head of state before
President Emile Lahoud left
office Friday, resulting in a lead-
ership vacuum.

All sides, howevet, have
accepted the military’s role in
keeping security.

The legislature was scheduled
to meet again Friday to try one
more time to elect a leader. But
Houry said that arrangements
were unlikely to be finalized by
that session, suggesting it would
be put off to a later date.

Suleiman’s name had previ-
ously been floated as a candi-
date, but that would have
required a constitutional
amendment to allow senior
state employees to run while
still in office.

The 59-year-old general, who
has been commander for the
last nine years, appointed with
Syria’s approval when Damas-
cus ran the show in Lebanon,
has been doing the rounds of
the leaders. of Lebanon’s
disparate communities this
week.

He is credited with keeping
the military together in the
political upheaval since the
assassination of former Prime
Minister Rafik Hariri, Saad’s
Hariri’s father, in 2005 and the
subsequent withdrawal of Syri-
an troops from Lebanon.

Hé is also a staunch support-
er of Hezbollah’s right to fight
Israel and refused to crush anti-
Syrian protests. :

But since last year’s Hezbol-
lah war with Israel and the
deployment of the Lebanese
army in southern Lebanon near
the border with Israel, Suleiman
has distanced himself from the
Shiite Muslim guerrillas.

Suleiman rose to national
prominence particularly since
the army crushed al-Qaida-
inspired militants in three
months of fighting in a Pales-
tinian refugee.camp in north-

ern Lebanon, @ battlesthat.cost-

the army more than 160 dead.

The battle ended with hun-
dreds of Fatah Islam militants
killed or captured.



Pah. MMA ALE: hater:
393.5310 / 394.2378

www.mastertechbahamas.com

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Hussein Malla/AP File



ARMY COMMANDER, Gen. Michel Suleiman salutes during a cere-
mony in the Christian town of Jounieh, Lebanon in this Saturday,
Oct. 6, 2007 file photo. The largest bloc in Lebanon's deadlocked
parliament has dropped its opposition to the army chief becoming
the next president, bringing Gen. Michel Suleiman one step closer
to being the new head of state and ending Lebanon's year-long
political crisis, a lawmaker said Wednesday Nov. 28, 2007.







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~ THE TRIBUNE



Thu: .vJ7, PAGE 27

Saudi Arabia says 208 are

arrested in the kingdom’s
~ largest anti-terrorism sweep

@ RIYADH, Saudi Arabia _

MORE than 200 al-Qaida-
linked suspects involved in
different plots against the
kingdom have been arrested
in recent months in Saudi
Arabia’s largest anti-terror-
ism sweep to date, the Inte-
rior Ministry said Wednes-
day, according to Associated
Press.

‘The ministry first reported
the arrest of eight men, said

to be linked to al-Qaida and °

allegedly planning to attack
-oil installations in the king-
dom.

An Interior Ministry state-
ment, carried by the Saudi
Press Agency, said the eight
were part of a terrorist cell
led by a non-Saudi man, who
was one of those arrested.
The planned attacks were to
take place in the eastern
region of the country, which
is home to Saudi’s main oil
resources.

The arrest of.the eight
“pre-empted an imminent
attack on an oil installation,”
the statement said without
naming the target or provid-
ing more details.

The ministry also said 22
other suspects were arrested
for allegedly supporting the






; hess



al-Qaida terror network. This
group plotted to assassinate
the country’s religious lead-
ers and security officials, it
said.

The ministry also gave the
following breakdown of oth-
er arrests:

— 18 suspects, led by an
alleged expert in launching
missiles, were arrested sepa-
rately. “They were planning
to smuggle eight missiles into
the kingdom to carry out ter-
rorist operations,” the min-
istry’s said.

— 112 Saudis were arrest-
ed for links and “coordina-
tion with outside circles” to
assist in smuggling men to
troubled areas — shorthand
for Iraq and Afghanistan —
for training, after which they
would be brought back for
attacks in the kingdom.

— 32 men — both Saudis
and non-Saudis — were
arrested for providing finan-
cial aid to al-Qaida opera-
tions in the kingdom.

— 16 men were arrested in
the holy city of Medina for
colluding to issue a publica-
tion propagating “misleading
ideology” and criminal acts.
The group also worked on
helping volunteers go fight
in Afghanistan and Iraq.

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The ministry said a total of
208 were arrested.

The statement gave no
timeline on the arrests of the
separate groups.

Saudi Arabia, which has a
quarter of the world’s proven
oil reserves, has seen a rise
in attacks by Islamist extrem-
ists over the last few years.

The kingdom, which is the
birthplace of Osama bin
Laden, has been waging a
crackdown on al-Qaida mili-
tants since a wave of attacks
on foreigners in the kingdom
in 2003.

In February 2006, two sui-
cide bombers attacked the oil
facility at Abqaiq on the east

‘coast, killing two security

guards and wounding eight
foreign workers in an inci-
dent later claimed by the
Saudi branch of al-Qaida.
The previous large sweep
by the Saudi authorities was

announced in April, netting .

172 militants, including pilots
they say were trained for oil
refinery attacks using civil-
ian planes.

In August, Saudi Arabia
said it was setting up a
35,000-strong special force to
protect its oil facilities due to
the increasing threats agamst
al-Qaida.















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PAGE 28, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
polaris

\ Wh >
C)
F $ The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism and Aviation

The Bahamas Hotel Association
(next door to Wendy's)





Presents
The 13th Annual

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 29

a

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Albany are

hoping to finish

infrastructure
by mid-summer
in 2009

Developers hopeful for
February 1 construction
start, as ‘95% through’
outstanding issues

with government

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE $1.3 billion Albany Golf }
& Beach Resort’s developers are :
hoping to complete construction :
of the development’s infrastruc- :
ture, roads and amenities by mid- }
summer/mid-autumn 2009, -believ-
ing they are “95 per cent of the ;
way through” resolving all out- }
standing issues with the Govern- :

ment.

Jason Callender, one of }
Albany’s project managers, told :
The Tribune that the developers :
were estimating that they would :
have some 2,4000 applications :
from potential construction work- :
ers to sift through as their two- :
day job fair came to a close last :

night.

been “a great success”.

The project is likely to require :
some 1600 workers at the peak :
of construction, but Mr Callen- :
der told The Tribune that “ini- :
tially we’re looking for 500-600 :

workers”.
As construction progressed,

_ and additional contractors were :
hired-to-comptete various: proe~i
jects at Albany, including ulti- :

mately residential construction,

Mr Callender said the develop-

SEE page 12B

saat

SERRE

THURS SDAY,



NOVEMBER "29,

2007

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net







|? Bank of The Bahamas

e

eater chee nin ria AOE Aina iia A Slit

Money Safe.
Money Fast.

intginational Morey Toanater

at

‘)TNTERNAFIONAL

Galine at

Ethanol blend fuel can

)

boost foreign reserves

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

— THE Bahamas could strengthen and pre-
serve its foreign currency reserves, and
develop a reputation as an eco-friendly
tourism destination by immediately switch-
ing to a 10 per cent ethanol blend for car
gasoline, a business executive told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Tony Joudi, president of construction,
development and project management firm,
FTC, said the 2006 study submitted to the
former Christie administration by its Petro-
leum Usage Review Committee showed
that the Bahamas last year imported 65
million gallons of unleaded gasoline and
50 million gallons of diesel.

In 2006, the Bahamas spent some
$705.782 million in foreign currency on

Businessman says mandatory switch to 10% car fuel
ethanol mix could lower energy import bill, reduce
nation’s carbon dioxide emissions and enhance
nation’s image as eco-friendly for tourism

fuel-related imports, some $157.929 mil-
lion being spent in the first quarter;
$194.738 million in the second quarter;
$209.271 million in the third; and $143.844
million in the final quarter.

Apart from producing a huge outflow of
foreign exchange and currencies from the
Bahamas to purchase this fuel, Mr Joudi
pointed out that there were negative envi-
ronmental consequences to this nation’s
high gasoline consumption and car-depen-

dent economy, namely carbon dioxide emis-
sions that increased global warming.

Given that each gallon of gasoline pro-
duces 20 pounds of carbon dioxide when
combusted, and each gallon of diesel pro-
duces 22 pounds, based on these figures
and multiplying them with the Bahamas
gasoline import bill, Mr Joudi said this
meant this nation could have potentially
generated 2.3 billion pounds of carbon diox-
ide emissions in 2006 alone.

To reduce this nation’s carbon dioxide
emissions, Mr Joudi suggested the Bahamas
make it mandatory that all motorists - and

‘gasoline stations - use a 10 per cent ethanol

blend that can be pumped into their cars
without causing any harm to the vehicle or
its engine.

He added that just a 10 per cent reduc-
tion in the use of ordinary gasoline and
diesel would reduce the Bahamas’ carbon
dioxide emissions by 230 million pounds
per annum, bringing economic as well as
health and environmental benefits to the
Bahamas.

“We want to promote the Bahamas not
only as a tourism destination where you
come and have fun, but as a healthy desti-
nation, and develop a niche as an environ-

Describing the job fair as pro- }
ducing “an excellent turnout” }
from contractors and construc- :
tion workers over.the two days, :
Mr Callender said Albany and its :
developers were “very encour- :
aged” and believed the event had :

SEE page 9B

‘Flight to quality’ boosts Bahamian
high-end property values 13.5%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS-BASED high-end
properties have increased in value
by 13.5 per cent over the last three
years, a principal in a $200 million
luxury residential development
told The Tribune yesterday, and
these rising values coupled with
“the flight to quality” by foreign
buyers will underpin continued
high international demand for
Bahamian real estate.

William W. Williams, a direc-
tor of the Alpharetta, Georgia-
based Source Development
Group LLC, which is developing
Seabridge Bahamas, said that

Family Guardian
to launch new
units in January



H By NEIL HARTNELL




_ Tribune Business Editor




















FAMILY GUARDIAN, the Bahamian life and health insurer, is
planning to launch two new units in January 2008, The Tribune was
‘old yesterday, with the company also seeking to expand its general
insurance agency business and launch a Creditor Life product in the
New Year.

Patricia Hermanns, the company’s president, said now that Fam-
ily Guardian had received regulatory approval for its FG Financial
and FG Capital Markets subsidiaries, “what we are looking to do is
have the launch in J anuary. We’re pune everything together and
structuring it now”.

She added that the two units, which will allow Family Guardian
to become more of a full-product menu financial services company °
as opposed to a pure life and health insurer, offering pensions,
mutual funds and advisory services, were a natural extension of its
existing business.

Ms Hermanns described pensions as being “a natural tie-in to the
type of business we do” on the group side, and were an ideal prod-
uct to offer to Family Guardian’s wide range of clients, especially
on health.

SEE page 8B



a fi . i +
a a | pd Fie
a bb

|

|

Old Bacar ‘He: Con Harbour

while he and his partners had con-
cerns about the impact the global
credit crunch would have on
demand for their product, they

believed its high-end nature would °
enable the development to with-

stand any shocks.
Acknowledging that the credit
crunch might make it more diffi-
cult for property buyers to obtain
mortgages or other forms of
financing, and at acceptable inter-
est rates, Mr Williams said Source

‘Development Group and others

had seen “a flight to quality” as a
result of recent events impacting
the US economy.

“What we're seeing is a flight
to quality, so the high-end, upscale
properties are not as impacted as
the lower-priced ones” by events
such as the ‘sub-prime’ mortgage
crisis, Mr Williams said.

The US$’s decline on the inter-
national currency markets had
made UK real estate buyers a par-
ticular target for Seabridge
Bahamas, he explained, as with
one UK€ giving British citizens
more than two US$, property
prices in the Bahamas and US had
effectively halved in value for
them.



Mr Williams said interest from
US purchasers in the Bahamas
was still strong at the upper end of
the market, due to an
unfavourable tax regime in the US
and falling property and real estate
values there.

property will maintain its value,”
he added. “They've [US real estate
-buyers] recognised the Bahamas

SEABRIDGE BAHAMAS, a $200 mil-
lion upscale residential development
on West Bay Street by Source Devel-
opment Group LLC, is designed to
appeal to Bahamian professionals,
entrepreneurs, retirees or foreign
owners searching for a primary or
secondary home.

“Any beautiful oceanfront

SEE page 13B





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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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TECHNOLOGY Fax: mee 0049

COMPANY LIMITED



‘Minor’ details
over opening
\ bank accounts

-UNDER Section 2(1) of
the Minors Act 1976 (the
Minors Act), a “minor” is
anyone under the age of 18
years-old, which is the age of
majority in the Bahamas.
Therefore, any bank account
opened or likely to be
opened by, or on behalf of,
persons under the age of 18
years-old would be consid-
ered an account operated for
or on behalf of a minor.

Additionally, for the pur-
poses of determining the req-
uisite’age of the individual
account holder, in reference
to the question of whether
the account holder is consid-
ered a minor at the opening
or operation of an account,
Section 3(1) of the Minors
Act states that:

“The time at which a per-
son attains a particular age
expressed in years shall be
the commencement of the
relevant anniversary of the

date of his birth.”

There are two important
considerations that must be



made with regard to the
legality of establishing a
banking relationship between
a bank and a minor:

* The capacity of the minor
to operate an account, even
an account with a credit bal-
ance.

* The enforceability of
loans to a minor, even ona
limited basis, by Bahamian
banks, and the security taken
for such lending.

Under general banking
law, a minor cannot give an
effective discharge for an

by Tyrone Fitzgerald



unperformed obligation, nor
can he release an unpaid
debt. However, where the
discharge is merely the recog-
nition of the performance of
the obligation, such as a
receipt, it is our opinion that
a minor does have the capaci-
ty to accept such a receipt,
however limited the capacity
to do so.

It should also be noted that
there have been some estab-
lished cases, following Eng-
lish Common Law, that have
supported the legal principle
that a minor has the capacity



MEAD JOHNSON NUTRITIONALS LAUNCHES ENFAMIL GENTLEASE LIPIL

The tolerance problems in babies are one of the main causes to visit the Health
Care Professional office worldwide, giving mothers hard times and sleepless
nights. Mead Johnson Nutritionals is leading the way in science-based pediatric
nutrition products, to help give infants and children the best start in life. As part of
this commitment, on November 15th, at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel in Nassau,
the company launched Enfamil Gentlease Lipil, an infant formula designed for
. babies with fussiness or gas, the two main causes of babies intolerance. On this
occasion Dr. Jon A. Vanderhoof, Vice President of Global Affairs at Mead Johnson
Nutritionals conducted’a conference with the theme “Advances in Infant Nutrition
Management”, highlighting the nutritional causes of intolerance in babies and new

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Some of these trademarks may have been discontinued or may be currently owned by other entities.

sh ame



tools to deal with this problem. Several important Health Care Professionals
attended this meeting.

Enfamil Gentlease Lipil was launched in 2005 in the U.S. and since then, has been
an important tool for mothers and Health Care professionals to treat babies with
fussiness or gas. This product contains an easy-to-digest milk protein that has
been partially broken down. Enfamil Gentlease Lipil also has reduced levels of

lactose, for babies with transient intolerance to lactose. The formula is nutritionally

balanced and includes docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA),
nutrients also found in breast milk, that promote brain and oe sel es

where gved health begins”

Lda MMA winiantME 317



to give a discharge for ful-

- filled obligations (receipt for

wages, enforcement of pay-
ment of a debt) .

Section 2 of the Infant
Relief Act 1874 deals with
contracts entered into by
minors for the repayment of
money lent, or to be lent, or
for goods supplied or to be
supplied (other than con-
tracts for necessaries), and all
accounts stated with infants
(which by virtue of the
Minors Act is used inter-
changeably with word
“minor” ). Such contracts are
not legally enforceable by the
aggrieved party, except
where the contract is one
where he is supplied with
goods or services.

However, Section 2 of the
Infant Relief Act also states
that: “This Act shall not
invalidate any contract into
which an infant may by an
existing or future Act, or by...
the rules of common law or
equity, enter, except such as
now by law are voidable”.

Based upon established
case law and jurisprudence,
and general banking practice,
Bahamian banks are general-
ly allowed to open bank
accounts for minors. Howev-
er, it should be stated that as
a matter of caution and good
banking practice, banks
should open bank account for
minors either in the name of
the minor’s parents,
guardian, or legally appoint-.
ed representative.

They would hold the
account “in trust for” or on
behalf of the minor, or in the
minor’s name, on the under-
standing (preferably specified
in writing and signed by the
bank and the minor’s parents
legal guardian, or representa-
tive) that it will be operated
by such persons on the
minor’s behalf.

From a due diligence
standpoint, a bank may
require documentary evi-
dence on the personal details
of the minor and his parents,
legal guardian, or representa-
tive. This may include, but
not be limited to, a certified
copy of the birth certificate of
the minor; evidence of the
legal capacity and authorisa-
tion of the legal guardian or
representative to act on
behalf the minor, where
applicable; contact details of
the minor and legal guardian;
a specific description of the
source of funds/wealth of the:
minor and/or legal guardian;
and a specific explanation of
the reason(s) for opening the
account on behalf of and for
the minor. This must all com-
ply with Bahamian law and
the bank’s Know Your Client
(KYC) and customer due
diligence policies and proce-
dures.

Due to the ‘trust’ element
that exists for accounts of this
type, it should be noted that a
bank may become subject to
fiduciary duties to the minor,
particularly in instances
where the account - operated
by the legal guardian or rep-
resentative - is being done so
contrary to the established
bank mandate; the specific

SEE page 20

a



THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 3B

LO A De SES rs
‘Bottled up’ projects

to challenge Bahamas
workforce capacity

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian workforce
will be challenged like never
before to provide enough
skilled labour for some $5 bil-
lion worth of investment pro-
jects due to “start between
south-west New Providence
and Rose Island over the
next 120 days”, the Bahamian
-Contractors Association’s
(BCA) president said yester-
day.

Stephen Wrinkle said that
with the $1.3 billion Albany
Golf & Beach Club project,
plus Baha Mar’s $2.4 billion
Cable Beach redevelopment
and the Rose Island Ritz-
Carlton all likely to start con-
struction work at the same
time, “we’re going to run out
of skilled labour very quick-
ly”.

He added: “They’ve bot-
tled it up and are about to
unleash this genie. I see over
$5 billion worth of work that
they have committed to start-
ing between Nassau and
Rose Island in the next 120
days.

“T just don’t know how it’s
going to happen. I don’t
know anywhere else in the
world where this level of
development is going on, so
the whole Bahamian work-
force is going to be chal-
lenged in stepping up to the
plate to meet this.”

Once the Atlantis Phase III
expansion had been complet-
ed, the plan had been for
construction workers whose
employment on Paradise
Island was winding down to
migrate over to Cable Beach,
where Baha Mar’s project
was set to pick up the slack.

That development, though,

$5bn work of investments
to ‘start between south-west
New Providence and Rose
Island over the next 120 days’

Baha Mar, Albany and other
major mixed-use resort pro-
jects starting simultaneously
or around the same time,
placing a tremendous strain -
on an already-stretched
Bahamian workforce.

Given the well-document-
ed education problems in the
Bahamas, the supply of skills
as well as the sheer number
of workers is likely to be

inadequate to meet develop-

er needs, forcing them to
import increasing quantities
of expatriate labour.

Mr Wrinkle, who was part
of the BCA contingent man-
ning booths at the two-day
job Albany job fair for con-
tractors and construction
workers, said that exercise
had “gone very well”.

Some 1,000 potential work-
ers had attended the first day
on Tuesday, he added, with
an estimated 150 contractors
also turning up.

“It looks very promising.
There’s a tremendous
amount of interest for this
work. We’re very pleased
with the turnout,” Mr Wrin-
kle said.

He praised the Albany .
developer, Park Ridge Secu-
rities, whose main investors
are the Tavistock Group (the
holding company for invest-

tation and advice on the job
fair and construction aspects
from the BCA and the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BT VI).

“From our point of view, it
represents a long-term part-
nership,” Mr Wrinkle said of
the arrangement. “They’re
creating a Lyford Cay from
scratch, and the economic
impact will be far more
reaching that if they were
constructing a 20-storey hotel
tower.

“There’s far more compo-
nents to this, and the trickle
down effect and the impact
on the economy will be far
more widespread.”

Mr Wrinkle added of
Albany: “I think it will be a
great thing for our economy.
I’ve got really high hopes for
this. I think it’s going to be a
really, really nice impact on
the southwestern corridor of
the island.”

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One-metre sea
level rise to swap
11 per cent of

Bahamian land ee

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

_ EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

& By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A ONE-metre rise in sea
levels “would permanently
submerge” some 11 per cent
of the existing land in the
Bahamas, a United Nations
_ (UN) report revealed yester-
day, indicating the real and
present danger presented by
climate change to this nation
and its tourism industry.

The UN’s Human Develop-
ment Index (HDI) report for
2007-2008 said: “With a 50-cen-
timetre increase in sea levels,
over one-third of the
Caribbean’s beaches would be
lost, with damaging implica-
tions for the region’s tourist
industry.

“An increase of 1 metre

EN

would permanently submerge
about 11 per cent of the land
area in the Bahamas. Mean-
while, the intrusion of salt
water would compromise
freshwater supplies, forcing
governments to undertake
costly investments in desalina-
tion.”

The Bahamas was ranked at
number 49 in the UN’s Human
Development Index, ahead of
all Caribbean counterparts bar
Barbados, which was at 31.



FML Group of Companies Ltd.
is seeking to employ an

| ‘Administrative Assistant

for it human resources department.

LC
"Must be matured, energentic and possess
|| knowledge of word and excel. Must have
i excellent written and communication skills.

|, Human resources experience a plus.

Interested persons may fax their resumes

to 394-2193.



Dr. Thad

Associate Professor of Psychology and
Dean, Faculty of Social and Educational Studies

1948

944 SHANNEN HAAN

- 2007

The College of The Bahamas mourns the passing of a Trusted Colleague,
Genuine Academic, Good Friend, Passionate Africanist, True Nationalist
and Nation Builder.





PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Mine: itt
Call for ‘adequate focus’ on climate change danger

THE minister of tourism and
aviation is hoping “adequate
focus’
states such as the Bahamas,

which are most at risk from ris-
ing sea levels induced by glob-
al climate change.

’ will given to small island
Neko Grant discussed the

x= Piet

Be MCE iee
aera
Manager

"The Grocuate Project
Memagement Certification

Certified International

Project Management Course
A PMP & IAPM Course Inclusive.
Beginning Date: ‘Tuesday, January 8, 2008
Saturday, January 12, 2008

Total Price: $1390 (including all materials & fees)

Course Length: 10 Wks or 10 Saturdays

issue with Francisco'Frangialli,
secretary-general of the United
Nations’
Organisation (UNWTO), dur-

co \ r RS
\ \ a> x \

American Academy of
Project Management

ing a recent courtesy call. The ,

minister is currently attending
the seventh session of the
UNWTO General Assembly
underway in Cartagena de
Indias, Colombia, from
November 22-29, 2007.

Mr Grant said he was look-
ing forward to the UNWTO
General Assembly discussion
on climate change, and hoped
that “adequate focus will be
given to small islands which
are low lying and face the risk
of being submerged due to sea
levels rising over the coming

-decade”.

Mr Grant said the Bahamian
delegation was “very interest-
ed in learning more about
adaptation measures”.

Bahamas

Noting that the Bahamas has
14 island destinations to devel-
op into unique branded desti-
nations, he added that the chal-

lenge is finding resources “to
help us to assess requirements
to create appropriate brand-
ing”.

Thanked —

Mr Grant thanked the
UNWTO secretary general for
offering technical assistance in
this regard, and noted with
interest Dr Yunis’s presenta-
tion regarding local destina-
tions.

Responding to Mr Frangial-
li’s wish for support from the
Bahamas in facilitating the
work of the UNWTO in island
destinations, with particular
emphasis on the economic
impact of the industry on
tourism-dependent island
nations, advancing issues on
climate change and its poten-
tial impacts, and poverty alle-
viation, Mr Grant said the
Bahamas welcomed the oppor-
tunity to work with . the

UNWTO to encourage more
Caribbean nations to join and
avail themselves of the mem-
ber benefits.

The possibility of a
Caribbean Tourism Organisa-
tion (CTO) and UNWTO col-
laboration was raised, as it was
felt that having the UNWTO
consider participating in next
year’s CTO Conference on
Sustainable Development -
scheduled for April in Turks
and Caicos - would help to
underscore the importance of
climate change issues and ele-
vate the level of discussions.

Conference

Mr Grant was accompanied
to the conference by the direc-
tor-general of tourism, Vernice
Walkine, the director of sus-
tainable tourism, Earlston
McPhee, and the director of
onshore communications,
Gabriella Fraser.

Tues & Thurs from 6pm-8pm
OR

Saturdays from Sam-1pm jt

Contact:

Time of Class:

cs

Candice Albury
Lignum Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.
Ph: 393-2164 Fax:394-4971
Email: candice@lignumtech.com






THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCQING & TRAINING RANSNIANS



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



STAFF VACANCY

LIBRARIES & INSTRUCTIONAL
MEDIA SERVICES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:





1. LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II, LAW LIBRARY

The Law Library of The College requires a highly motivated, tactful, people-friendly,
innovative, detail-oriented person:to provideppraprofessional, administrative and basic
reference assistance. Clientele will include students and faculty of the LL.B Programme,
as well as members of the legal profession and the general public.








The successful candidate will perform all duties with minimal supervision, assisting with
the overseeing of the day-today activities and programmes of the Branch in the absence
of the Branch head, so good judgment and professionalism is essential. In addition,
he/she will direct the activities of library assistants and part-timers and will assist with
their training and appraisal. Regular written reports are required.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

Under the direction of the Unit Supervisor, the position performs a variety of paraprofessional
duties with minimal supervision. These include supervision of library assistant(s),
preparation of written and oral reports/correspondence, planning and organizing job
activities, which demonstrates skills such as decision-making, good judgment and
knowledge of library and college policies and procedures. Further, overseeing the
maintenance of collections, participation in the development of policies, services and
programmes, and overseeing the day-to-day activities and programmes of the Unit in the
absence of the Unit Head are to be undertaken. The position works closely with all Units
to ensure the delivery of a high standard of service to patrons.

SPECIFIC DUTIES:

Provides evening and Saturday reference services.
Directs the activities of Library Assistants, and assists in their appraisal.
Assists in the Unit’s budget preparation.
Assists with the updating of policies and procedures manuals.
Responds to reference questions received from patrons by telephone and in person.
Supervises part-time, evening and weekend staff.
Ensures the enforcement of library policies and procedures.
Assists with storage and access to all library resources, e.g. books, microfilm,
CD-ROM databases, microfiche and related equipment.
9. Conducts research in support of the Unit’s work.
10. Assists with the conduct of research and the compilation of bibliographies.
11. Assumes responsibility for deposit of funds collected in the unit.
12. Issues library passes.
. 13. Organizes work schedules for library clearance.
14. Handles Inter-Library loan requests.
15. Assists with the delivery of Bibliographic Instructional programmes.
16. Provides group and individual tours of the unit/library.
18. Assists patrons with the use of computers and other related electronic services
available. .
19. Assists in the development of projects for the making of the library and its resources.
20. Conducts training for Library Assistants on operational procedures.
21. Attends library meetings.
22. Serves on College wide committees
23. Participates in library projects.
24. Drafts letters, reports, proposals as requested.
25. Recommends resources for acquisitions
26. Any other duties which may be assigned.

LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II

QUALIFICATIONS: Normally a Bachelor’s Degree or the equivalent in relevant area,
OR for a technical/vocational or craft area, satisfactory completion of a recognized or
acceptable programme of training at the craft level, AND have at least ten (10) years of
experience working in the craft area, OR have a trained Teacher’s Certificate with

ae rata in the relevant craft area, PLUS at least six (6) years of teaching experience
in the area.

SALARY SCALE: SPS-5 $24,580 x $700 - $35,780

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest along with a completed application
form and an up-to-date resume to the address below by December 6, 2007:

The Director
Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Or to hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please note that applications are available on The College’s website: www.cob.edu.bs
















RAIA A PY hy




























You Are Invited

Youth Leaders,
Youth Pastors —

WEG
S
“
Ve [

aa Viten passe

y

N

MM

a
& \
AY, \

\
\

a
try of Youth; Thompso
[20 ERY TO .

‘De ‘at 9am- 11a

YL
Yj
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SS

2.) ETT
VACANCY NOTICE

CRAFT APPRENTICES
ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Department for Craft
Apprentices. Craft Apprentices are trained to become Electrical and Mechanical
Craftsman.

To qualify as a Craft Apprentice the following criteria should be met:
Must be between 18 and 25 years

Have a minimum of five (5) BUC’s including Maths, English Language and General
Science with grades of “C” or better or

Any other equivalent technical certification or relevant training diploma

Persons recruited from the Family Islands should be a resident of that island. Once
the formal training has been completed, Apprentices will return to their respective
island.

Application forms .can be collected from the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s
Head Office located at Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, Nassau, Bahamas. Family
Island applicants can also collect application forms from the local B. E. C offices.
Applications should be returned duly completed with all of the supporting
documentation to The Manager, Human Resources & Training P.O. Box N-7509,
Nassau, Bahamas on or before: Friday, December 14, 2007.







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 5B





Androsia
returns to
Freeport

ANDROSIA, the supplier *

of Bahamian-made batik fab-
rics, fashions and textiles for
the home, has made its prod-
ucts available again on Grand
Bahama through UNEXSO
and Bahama Fabrics.

The company had closed its
own store in Grand Bahama,
but Jeff Birch, Androsia’s
executive, said: “We're pleased
to announce that Bahama Fab-
Tics is now carrying a full range
of our fabrics, and a wide selec-
tion of Androsia products is
available at UNEXSO in Port
Lucaya.”

“We understand that con-

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or
have won an award.

Ti oo, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.

chief

cerned Freeport residents were
shocked at the closing of the
local Androsia store, and we're
pleased that our line will now
be carried at these two fine
retail establishments."
Traditionally, Androsia has
always had a presence in
Freeport, and at one time dur-
ing the 1980s, opened a factory
on the island. .
“But as things change, we
went back to our roots on
Andros," said Mr Birch.
UNEXSO is located in the

Port Lucaya Marketplace,
while Bahama Fabrics is at 5
West Mall.

Androsia was started by the
Birch family in 1973 as a cot-
tage industry to provide mean-
ingful jobs in the Andros com-
munity. Today, the company
employs more than 20 people.

All the fabric designs and
garments are the original cre-
ations of Androsia. Authentic
Bahamian-made Androsia
products have the ‘Androsia’
name on the design.

Christmas Cleaning Special
Christmas is coming!
Does your house need a good cleaning
before you decorate?
Tis’ the season for family and friends!
Kick back relax and let us clean
your home for the holidays?

&

E ER PARTY CLEAN-UP CREW

AVALLABLE

Give us a call 361-0156 or 535-181







g reservations
s and bedrooms for
ctive November 1, 2007




TO OUR MBA STUDENTS,

THIS IS NOT NUTMEG. |
THIS I$ GLOBAL OPPORTUNITY.

St. George’s University was founded by looking at the
world differently. Our MIB/MBA program was founded
the same way. This program was created for students
interested in applying the international perspective of
St. George’s University toward the global marketplace.
Both the MIB and MBA degrees are designed to be
comprehensive as well as flexible, offering accelerated
and part-time programs. If opportunity is what you seek,
St. George’s University just might be your first step.

St. George’s University

THINK BEYOND



For more information, contact Colin Dowe at 1 (473) 444-4680 or visit www.sgu.edu/mba

©2007 St.

George's University

Grenada, West Indies



PAGE 68, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007





INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

THE TRIBUNE



MUST SELL






NEW PROVIDENCE

LOT No. 21B FRASER ALLOTMENT

OFF SOLDIER ROAD Appraisal: $258,000.00
“engrcen The subject property
AR | \.. con-sisting of 8,400
\i square feet is
' developed with a
split leveled home
' with 1925 square
feet of floor area on
| the ground floor, a
_ porch area of 437
i square feet and
/ second floor area of
| 735 square feet. The






















building is iat sound construction and completed in its entirety. The
ground floor comprises 2 bedrooms, one bath, a kitchen, dining and
family room. The second floor comprises two bedrooms, one bath, living
and dining areas.

Directions to property: Heading East on Soldier, turn left onto first paved
road opposite Lowes Wholesale, 2nd to last house on the road with
chain linked fence.










SANDYPORT Appraisal: $300,000.00

All that lot of land having an area of 9,626 square feet, being lot number 40,
of the subdivision known as SandyPort, situate in the Western District of
New Providence. The property is irregular in shape, Is on a level grade and
zoned as single family residential. An electrical connection outlet is located
near the property. The property is located on Sandy Port Drive Just on the
bend before Governor’s Cay on the Southern Side of the road.






No. 17 WESTRIDGE ESTATES



Appraisal: $930,000.00

All that lot of land having an
area of 30000 square feet,
being lot Number 17 of the
subdivision known as
Westridge Estates Addition.
Situate in the Western District





,on the island of New
' Providence.
Located on the subject
: property is a newly
constructed single story

structure comprising 6,000

SERRE:

three Car Garage.
The building is 75% sompleted and comprises five bedrooms, four and a
half baths study, living/dining, family room, kitchen, laundry and
generator room.
Location: From SuperValue West Bay, take the road heading west into
Westridge, take the first corner on the Right, Westridge Drive. Subject
property will be about the seventh on the right hand side of the road.










SHSHSHRASOCHTOSASEHEHSHAHSEHAEOOTEOD

FREEPORT

|FAIRWAY MANOR CONDOMINIUM Appraisal: dei 000.00



Apartment 402, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms.
Lot 4, Block GN, Edward Birch Curt, Bahamian North

LOT No. 20, BLOCK 1, UNIT 3
FORTUNE POINT SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $38,000.00

All that lot of vacant land having an area of 12,650 sq. ft. being lot No.
20, Block 1 Unit 3 of the Subdivision known and designated as Fortune
Point Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Duplex property zoning with
a rectangle shape.

LINCOLN GREEN, CANEBY CLOSE Appraisal: $38,500.00

Unit 5, Block 17, Lot #48 — Single family residence, Clearwater Close.
Located on fresh water canal. Approximately 17,404 sq. ft.

‘O VIEW PROPERT
n “Real Estate 2

































feet of living space with a‘:










Sy a

LOT No. 37 BLOCK 33
CHURCHILL COURT, BAHAMIA MARINA
& BAHAMIA 4 SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $337,000.00



All that lot of land having : an area of 16, 533 Sq. ft. being lot No. 37
of the subdivision known and designated as Bahamia Marina and
Bahamia Section 4 Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Located
on this property is a structure comprising a 3 year old duplex

structure which covers approximately (3,058) square feet.
Apartment consisting of two 2-bedrooms, 2-bathroom with private |
Jacuzzi in master bath, spacious living and dining room, full service
kitchen, a laundry and utility room, foyer/hallway with linen and
storage closet. The property is fully secured by six foot plastic
coated chain-link fence runs along the side and rear and adjoins the |
painted 4 foot wall, with 5 foot pillars at front with electronic gate.

FAMILY ISLANDS

ABACO Appraisal: $108,000.00

PORTION OF MURPHY TOWN CROWN
ALLOTMENT, MURPHY TOWN, ABACO.

The property is 89 x 100 ft
and rectangular in shape.
~The land is elevated
approximately 15 ft above
road level and
approximately 25 ft above
sea level. Located on this
property is a twenty-year-
old three bedroom, two
bathroom, living, dining,

kitchen and Yiaundey room houias. The structure requires much
attention.










SHSCHSHSHRASSSHSSHRSHOTHSHAHHSHO SED

EXUMA Appraisal: $170,000.00

DUPLEX IN LOT 6625

BAHAMA SOUND No. 8, ee EXUMA

Trapezium shaped lot 35 |
ft. above sea _ ievel
comprising 10,000 sq. fi.
Situated thereon is a 10-
year-old single storey
duplex, 2 bed, 1 bath,
kitchen, living/dining
area and porch.
{Building is in need of
nee



@xecessoveecorsosvesecvergeersoes

EXUMA Appraisal: $673,075.00

CASTELRAG ESTATES, LOTS 129 & 130
ERUMA neneoee eee ee

The subject property is located
on Kingway Road and_ is
developed with an area of
. 20,000 square feet. Situated
thereon is a residence
comprised of 3,645 square feet
of living accommodations,
inclusive of 4 hedrooms, 2
‘ baths, with laundry and utility
spaces and a two bedroom one
jy bath guest cottage of 600
\ square feet. The property is |

a Gazebo at the highest portion



fenced with white picket fencing pes has
of the property.

PARCEL OF LAND, PALMETTO POINT
ELEUTHERA Appraisal: $112,105.00

All that piece, parcel or lot of land 2,743 feet East of the junction of the
Palmetto Point road and main Eleuthera Nighway containing 2.45 acres.
This site encompasses a 28-year-old single storey concrete structure of
approximately 832 square feet of enclosed floor space inclusive of shop
space and rest room facilities.











FOR CONDITIONS OF SALE AND ANY OTHER Misti tes Perse
HARRY COLLIE @ 502-3034 - E-mail Baer ee

fo] g

PHILIP TTR @ 502-3077 —- E-mail philipwhite@scotiabank.com
| Pe 356-3851 - send bids to P. O. Box N-7518 Rosetta Street, Nassau, Lt Lt Le





THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 7

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MUST SELL

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

THE TRIBUNE

B

ty





TRIBUNE,
November 29th, AU fs




Eleuthera Island Shores
Subdivision LOT NO. 1,
BLOCK NO. 45,
ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES

All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 9,644 sq. ft. being lot #1 in
block 45, Section “E” in the subdivision
called and known as Eleuthera Island
Shores Subdivision, situated in the vicinity
of Hatchet Bay Harbour, on the island of

Eleuthera, one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahams. This site encompasses a two storey building which is approximately
14 yrs old and is abandoned. There is a wooden landing approximately 7’-4” wide by 20’-0” on the
upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of enclosed living space, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,
front room, dining room, den, kitchen, and utility room. The wooden porch on the upper level is
approximately 148sq. ft. There is also a water cistern under the dining room floor area. All utilities

and services available.
Appraisal: $151,007.00

This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores.



Must Sell Lot No. 597
Gardens

lot 597 Melvern Road of the subdivision known as
Yellow Elder Gardens, the said subdivision is situated
in the southern district of New Providence Bahamas.
This property is comprised of a 26 yr old single famil
residence consisting of approximately 1,510 sq. 4
of enclosed living space, with 3-bedrooms including
master bedroom, 2-bathrooms, living/dining roorn,
kitchen and utility room. The residence also consists
of a frorit porch and two patios.

The land is on a grade and level; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding aurin annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with improvements including
driveway and walkway. The yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing. ;

ate e $133,395.00
Traveling west along Melvern Road from the sport center road, follow the road to the left. the subject
property is the 5th property left situated between Zris Court and Richie Court, painted White trimmed yellow.

a SS TTT ee ~ OOO

LOT NO. 2 MORIGOLD FARM
SUBDIVISION

All that lot of land having an area of approimately 5,638 sq. ft.
\) being lot No. 2 of the subdivision known as Marigold Farm

} Subdivision, the said subdivision situated in the Eastern District
of New Providence and located Lumumba Lane North off Marigold
Road situated on the property is a 6year old single storey residence
consisting of 3 bedrooms, 2 & 1/2 bathrooms, living, dining, kitchen
and utility room. The Land is on a grade and level and appears
to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding. The property is open from the front but has chain

linked fencing at the sides and back.

Appraisal: $197,107.60
Take Joe Farrington Road heading east, turn onto Marigold Farm Road go pass Marigold Farms, then turn right onto
Lumumba Lane, go almost to the middle of the corner arid the subject property is about the eight house on the right
hand side of the road.



DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

1 3 two bed, 1 bath fourplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no.
% 18b with an area for a small shop. Age 12 years
the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town
Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest
Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter
acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete
block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and
L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26
ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior
walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock
"and the floors of vinyl tiles.



Appraisal: $265,225.00



LOT NO. 1 WESTERN SHORES

All that lot of land having an area of 7,389 sq.
ft., being lot #1 of the Subdivision known as
Western Shores Phase Il, the said Subdivision
situated in the Western District of New Providence,
Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a
single structure comprising of ‘a single family
residence consisting of approximately 2,430 sq.
ft. of enclosed living space. The residence
comprises of 3-bedroom with closets, 2 1/2
bathrooms, living/dining rooms, study, kitchen,
utility room, porch and enclosed garage with electronic door. The land appears to be,Sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The
grounds are fairly well kept with improvements including driveway, walkway and swimming pool.
The-yard is enclosed with walls.

Appraisal: $753,570.00



Traveling west on West Bay Street. Go pass Orange Hill and Indigo Subdivisions, the house is

HAMILTON’S, LONG
ISLAND

All that piece parcel or lot of land and
improvements situated in the settlement
of Hamilton's in the Island of Long Island,
and comprising of approximately 13,547
sq. ft. and is elevated approximately 7-8
ft above sea level. This site encompasses
a 35yr structure. A simple style home consisting of two bedrooms, one bathroom,
kitchen, living and dining room. the home however is consisted of 2 separate
constructions; 613.60 sq. ft of concrete construction and 624 sq. ft of wooden
construction all amenities are to the property such as electricity, water, cable and

telephone.
Appraisal: $112,000.00.



All that lot of land having an area of 3,200 sq ft, being |



located on the left near Tusculum Subdivision and painted all white.

i <°The property is accessed by the main Queen's Highway.

sia
3

Weyl hs

PROPERTIES



Investment Opportunity - Must Sell

Lot No. 20, Block 1 unit 3 Fortune Point Subdivision all that lot of vacant land having an area of 12,650 sq ft, being Lot No.20 block 1 unit 3 of the subdivision known and designated
as fortune point subdivision Freeport, Grand Bahama.. duplex property zoning with a rectangle shape.

Appraisal: $38,000.00





Investment Opportunity - Must Sell - Lot B, Wilson Street, Rock Crusher

All that lot of land having an area of 10,498 sq ft, being lot B, between the subdivision known as Rock Crusher and in the vicinity of Perpall Tract situated in the western district A

of New Providence, Bahamas. This property is zoned multi family/single family. Also located on this property is a structure comprising of a duplex at foundation level under i

construction, and consisting of approximately 1,566 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with a patio consisting of 270, sq. ft. the starter bars are in place and foundation poured. i
. Appraisal: $97,214.00

Traveling West on Farrington Road take a right after the P.L.P headquarters, go about midways through to Wilson Street, go though the corner all the way to the dead

end. The property is located behind the chain linked fence at the back of the yard.



Island Harbour Beach, Exuma

All that parcel or lot of vacant land containing 10,000 (80’X 100’) sq. ft. being Lot No. 9, Block 2, Island Harbour Beach Subdivision situated the western most portion of the Hermitage Estate, Little
Exuma Bahamas. The property is located on an unpaved road known as Stocking Road. The property also has a commanding view of the ocean.

Appraisal: $80,000.00



LOTT. 2 OE ST EME NEE

LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., and being Lot No. 10B situated North of Ingraham’s Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the island of Eleuthera, one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on the north by Lot No. 3B and running thereon for a distance of (90) ft; on the East by Lot No. 11B
and running thereon for a distance of (100) ft; on the south by a 20’ wide road reservation and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said
Lot is overgrown with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy beach. This neighborhood is zoned residential development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately
5Oft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area is approximately 80% developed with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $72,000.00
MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated “E” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the
settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly
the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 393.13 hundredth ft.; outwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft;
eastwardly by the main Queen’s Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft; westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a
distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful and hasa_ 9

topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
. APPRAISAL: $51,421.00

MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth —
of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a distance of 125.462 feet northwestwardly by the landnow = jf
of formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 390.274 hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 128.128
hundredth ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property of the Venor and running thereon for a distance of 322.955 hundredth ft. This property having an area of approximately
44,847.76 sq. ft. This neighbourhood is zoned commercial development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $51,421.00



TTI ETRE



This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as “Mutton Fish Point”



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and designated “F” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about
two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly
by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and
running thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the main Queen’s Highway and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. westwardly by land now or formerly the
property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography

of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,276.00

CLE TE ENOL OA

For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 # email harry.collie@scotiabank.com * Fax 356-3851 -



To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - Click on “Real Estate Mall” - Click on doorway “Enter Online Store”



PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ee (itl
Family Guardian to launch new units in January

FROM page one

In addition, Family Guardian
had received “a fair amount of
interest in wealth creation
products” from its customers,
especially in the individual life
category, making the capital
markets and mutual funds busi-
ness a natural one for it to
enter.

Ms Hermanns said Family
Guardian would use its in-
house expertise, including its
vice-presidents of pensions and
investments, to staff and run
FG Financial and FG Capital
Markets.

“We are looking to hire a few
people to start off with, proba-
bly two to four people, and as
the business grows will expand
the numbers to serve the busi-
ness properly,” Ms Hermanns
said.

She added that Family
Guardian was “looking to
expand and build on” its FG
General Insurance agency in
2008, which offers both home-

owners and motor insurance
policies.

In addition, the company,

whose BISX-listed parent is
FamGuard Corporation, is “tar-
geting” January 2008 for the
launch of its Creditor Life pol-
icy.
“It’s a product financial insti-
tutions use to have a life insur-
ance policy supporting the
credit they give. It’s a product
sold through financial institu-
tions,” Ms Hermanns
explained.

The Family Guardian presi-
dent said the company had
been focused.“on building the
brand over the years”, solidi-
fying its distribution and tech-
nology systems, and investing
in staff training and expanding
its agency force.

“We have the highest num-
ber of Million Dollar Round
Table Producers out of any
insurer in the Bahamas,” Ms

Hermanns told The Tribune.

“Twenty-five per cent of the
financial services agency force
have consistently qualified for
MDRT status.

“We received the Life Insur-
ance Management Resources
association (LIMRA) educa-
tion award for the Latin Amer-
ican and Caribbean region in
2005 and 2006. No other com-
pany in the Bahamas has ever
received that award.”

Adding that Family Guardian

‘had delivered the highest

return on equity out of all
insurance competitors who had
published their results, Ms Her-
manns said that since 2003 the
company had continuously
improved on its prior-year
results.

“This is a very consistent
trend substantiated over the
last five years, and the objec-
tives are to build on that suc-
cess. We’re hopeful we will

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
PRODUCE MANAGER

The Job & Requirements

To manage all aspects of the daily operations on a
profitable basis. Must have firm understanding of
Produce Purchasing, Standard Operating Procedures
and Merchandising. Must have past success in
managing L/D. Possessing excellent communication
skills with proven ability to build teams. Knowledge
of computer based programs is required with a
minimum of 3 - 5 years experience in Produce
Management.

Interested persons are asked to send their resumes
hrjobnow@gmail.com

@ Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED
EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with The Education Guaranteed Fund Loan
program of the Ministry of Education, the Bank of the Bahamas
Limited is pleased that to advise that the cheque disbursement for ALL
Students in the Loan Program will take place at Holy Trinity Activity
Centre, Stapledon Gardens, beginning December 3rd to December
7th, 2007 from 9:00a.m. to 3:00p.m. as follows:

NEW AND RETURNING STUDENT |

Surnames beginning with

A-Clarke
Cleare -G
H-McKin
McPhee-R
S-Z

Monday, December 3, 2007
Tuesday, December 4, 2007
Wednesday, December 5, 2007
Thursday, December 6, 2007
Friday, December 7, 2007

- TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Place: Holy Trinity Activity Centre’
Stapledon Gardens

¢ Returning Students and/or Guarantors should be present and must bring
relevant identification (valid Passport and National Insurance Card).

e New Students and Guarantors should be present and bring relevant
identification, (valid Passport, valid Marriage Certificate (where relevant),
National Insurance Card, Current job letter and copy of a utility bill).

¢ All accounts must be current and all necessary documentation completed
before cheques are released.

NO DISBURSEMENT WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK
(Without a penalty)



continue to improve in 2008,”
she added,

The Tribune reported yes-
terday that FamGuard Corpo-

‘ration, Family’ Guardian’s

BISX-listed parent, . said the
$6.527 million in net income
earned for the first nine months
of 2007 - some 42 per cent or
$1.92 million ahead of 2006
comparatives - had exceeded
last year’s full-year profits by
$611,000.

Yet FamGuard suffered a dip
in its third quarter perfor-

. mance. Net income for the
‘three months to September 30,

2007, slipped by 36.6 per cent to
$1.568 million, compared to
$2.471 million the year before.

Benefits rose by more than
$1 million or 13.9 per cent to
$10.275 million, with total ben-
efits and expenses growing
from $15.395 million in 2006 to
$17.082 million.

Ms Hermanns yesterday said

this performance was “not
unusual”, as Family Guardian
had previously witnessed sea-
sonal variations in its business
involving a peak in insurance
claims/benefits paid during the
third quarter.

She added: “There are sea-
sonal variations in our business.
The way the life and health
business works, there’s a lot of
variations from quarter to quar-

. ter.

“New sales tend to spike in
the last quarter of the year, and
benefits tend to spike in the
third quarter.

“There’s some, seasonality,
some trends in these things, so
it’s not unusual.”

Ms Hermanns said Family
Guardian’s new property on the
corner of Bay and Church
Streets would start operations a
little later than planned, the
company having wanted to
move its BahamaHealth and

client services divisions in
there during the 2007 fourth
quarter.

But to ensure their opera-
tions would not be disrupted
during a busy sales quarter,
Ms Hermanns said the move
would now take place in Janu-
ary. ;

“We are in the process of
renovating an office we recent-
ly leased in Exuma to house
our operations there.

“We now have three agents
on the ground in Exuma, and
are looking to build that a‘ lit-

tle,” Ms Hermanns said.

She added that Family
Guardian’s alliance with Bar-
bados financial services con-
glomerate Sagicor, which holds
a 20 per cent stake in Fam-
Guard, was producing benefits
in product development, and
purchasing IT software and sys-
tems at “a more reasonable
cost”. '

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TEACHERS REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE OF ANNUAL
MEETING TO SHAREHOLDERS

TIME & DATE:
PLACE:

ITEMS OF BUSINESS:

RECORD DATE:

Friday, December 7, 2007 at 6:00pm

Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Head Office, East Street & Independence Drive.

(1) To announce the results of the examination of proxies;
declare a quorum present and proceed to business;

(2) To receive and approve the Minutes of the last Annual
General Meeting held on December 8, 2006.

(3) To receive and consider the Chairman’s report:

(4) To receive and approve the financial statements and
the reports of the Directors and Auditors thereon;

(5) Lo elect Directors for the ensuing year and fix their
remuneration;
(6) To approve the appointment of Deloitte & Touche as

the Auditor of the Company, and authorise the Directors
to fix their remuneration; and

(7) Lo transact such other business as may properly come
beture the meeting and any adjournment thereof.

Holders of 400,000 shares of record at the close of business
on October 25, 2007 are entitled to vote at the meeting.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS: The Company's audited financial statements are included

MAILING DATE:
be

PROXY VOTING:

October 9, 2007



in the Company's 2006 annual report, which is enclosed
as part ol the proxy soliciting material.

The Company will cause the accompanying materials to
,

delivered on November 8, 2007 to the last registered
address.

It is important that your shares be represented and voted
at the meeting. You can Vote your shares by appearing in
person or by completing and returning the proxy form
enclosed, You can revoke a proxy at any time prior to its
exercise at the meeting by following the instructions in
the accompanying proxy statement,

By order of the Board of Directors:

Mrs Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Secretary

es

u_——“—





savas

$I EEN 80 A LO A AO TE LE TOE I RET IE IY 8g OO A EAE ATI BOE LS OE TO PT A EO a aR I




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 9B



Dee SS ER ee
Ethanol blend fuel can boost foreign reserves

FROM page one

mentally, eco-clean island,” Mr
Joudi told The Tribune.

“Global warming is a major
issue and major problem for us
here.”

He pointed out that use of a
10 per cent ethanol blend in car
gasoline had been mandatory in
Minnesota for two years, some-
thing Florida seemed poised to
adopt, while Getty Gest stations
in the northwest were also offer-
ing the ethanol blend.

With the price of oil climbing,
Mr Joudi said the price per gallon
of ethanol, based on July 2007
figures, was some 13 per cent
cheaper, standing at $2.63 per gal-
lon, compared to $3.03 per gal-
lon of ordinary gasoline and $2.96
per gallon of diesel.

Mr Joudi said that mandating
the 10 per cent ethanol blend in



T

the Bahamas would produce
“long range savings” on energy
costs for the Bahamian people,
allow the foreign reserves to
“increase”, and help give this
nation some energy alternatives
and security.

He added that this tied-in with
a previous initiative he had urged
the Bahamas to explore; exploit-
ing the growing global demand
for alternative energy by produc-
ing corn for ethanol production.

Mr Joudi told The Tribune ear-
lier this year that developing such
a sector could give the Bahamas
an export industry that generates
more than $1/2 billion per year
in foreign exchange carnings,
increase entrepreneurship in the

idvertise in The Tritune - the #1 newspaper
‘inccirculation, just call 322-1986 today!

Bahamas, expand foreign cur-
rency reserves, boost the shipping
industry by giving it something
to carry back to the US, diversify
the Bahamian economy and
encourage families to move back
to the Family Islands, reducing
overcrowding and congestion on
New Providence.

urged Bahamians and the Gov-
ernment to exploit this nation’s
proximity to the US, climate and
fertile land for growing corn,
adding that the creation of a
‘corn-for-ethanol’ industry would
be assisted if the Government
could allocate some 500,000 acres
to it on islands such as Andros,
Abaco, Eleuthera and Long
Island.





iuNelmcleel eC ROeLD

WATCH REPAIR

NOTICE

We wish to advise all customers

department for longer than 3 months,

Eig

will be sold

if not collected by

ovember 30, 2007.

eine

284 Bay Street, Tel: 302-2800, Ext. 2869
Open: Monday - Saturday, 9:30 to 5:00pm

Grand Vitara

Super Year

Discounts good

while inventory lasts.



$ SUZUKI

End Specials



One acre could produce 149
bushels of corn, Mr Joudi said,
the average yield per acre in the
US, and the Bahamas’ climate
meant this nation had “the poten-
tial to grow two crops per year”.

With corn ethanol prices cur-
rently pushing upwards to $4 per
bushel, Mr Joudi said that assum-
ing this price and 149 bushels per
acre, this would generate $298
million in gross export income
from one crop if it was exported
to the US for ethanol production.

Given that the Bahamas would
have the ability to produce two

crops per year, this gross export

earnings would double to $596
million per year, Mr Joudi
explained.

Breaking this down, Mr Joudi
said that if 5,000 families were
each able to purchase or be grant-
ed 100 acres for producing
ethanol corn, assuming the $4 per
bushel price, 149 bushels per acre
and two crops per year, each fam-
ily would have the potential to
earn $119,200 in gross income per
year.

Yesterday; Mr Joudi said that if
the 10 per cent ethanol blend
became mandatory by law in the
Bahamas, after a three-year peri-

od in which consumers became
used to it, this percentage could
be increased to 85 per cent.

This increase, he added, could
be achieved using a computer
component called Flex Tek, avail-
able for $400, which changed the
pulse width of a car’s fuel injec-
tors to open them more widely,
providing more fuel for the com-
bustion chamber and enabling the
car to run more efficiently.

Some five million cars in the
US already ran on an 85 per cent

. ethanol blend, Mr Joudi said, and

more were being produced every
year.

JOB OFFERINGS

A leading retailer is seeking the services of:

¢ Accountant

¢ Internal Audit Clerk

¢ General Accounting Clerks (2)
Requirements:

General:

ny

Candidates must be competent, honest, efficient, of high integrity, proficient
in electronic data entry and possess good oral & written communication skills.

Specific:

Accountant must possess a valid certificate from the A.I.C.P.A. or equivalent
professional body, a university degree in accounting, bus. admin., or
finance, and at least 3 years experience performing the functions of a
corporate accountant. Must have demonstrated good leadership, supervisory,
accounting and financial statements preparation skills in former engagements.

Internal Audit Clerk must possess an associate degree in any of the aforementioned
disciplines, and at least 2 years experience performing account analyses and
reconciliations, cash and inventory physical counts, and other related functions.

General Accounting Clerks must possess a certificate in general office practices,
high school diploma, and BGCSE in Maths & English (grade C or better).

Salary and benefits commensurate with level of certification, education,

experience and skills.

Only Bahamians need apply

Send resume to: seekingtalentedbahamians@gmail.com





® Alloy wheels 16"/17” :
© Six dise CD changer ‘
¢ Leather seats

ey Gy -e Build in-ladder-
frame

| _ e Keyless remote system |

_ © Front dual air-bags

y © Power steering, =

(fe eo windows, locks © an

_ J 3) © ABS/EBD

¢ Drive Select 4x4. Auto”

} oe : ° Air conditioning t. : {

; . | ¢ CD/radio/cassette |
ery efficient fuel consumpti new Grand
more passenger room r centre of

or greater stability, reliable performance.

< ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING | —
S$ SUZUKI COMMONWEALTH BANK |
Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,

24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.

QUALITY:

uy #1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

isit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Lid for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

..purchase title insurance.

You've engaged an A-List real estate agent and secured a generous bank loan.
You're well on your way to purchasing your dream home, but you shouldn't
forget to purchase title insurance.

First Bahamas Title Insurance Agency offers added peace of mind to the
process of purchasing real estate by identifying and elimnating any
circumstances that could endanger your right of ownership. Title insurance
indemnifies you against lass, thereby shielding you against title defects caused

by a third party.

“ Low one-time premium
& Reduction of legal fees
Faster turnaround

4. Protection for as long as you or your heirs have an interest in the property

Defence of a valid claim against your property title at No cost to you

For more information call 502.5230, e-mail us at info@firstbahamastitle.com,
or visit us online at www.firstbahamastitle.com.



Protect Your Piece of Paradise.

Bahamas

TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY



i Policies issued by Lawwirs Title

Sammie



U



PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007 THE TRIBUR





















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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 11B

SERINE



sales fall for am th
str aight month

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Sales of existing homes fell for
the eighth consecutive month
in October, with median home
prices falling by a record
amount. Analysts blamed the
worsening housing slump on
the credit crunch that hit in
August.

The National Association of
Realtors reported that sales of
existing single-family homes
and condominiums dropped by
1.2 per cent last month to a
seasonally adjusted annual rate
of 4.97 million units.

The median price of a home
sold last month declined to
$207,800, a drop of 5.1 per cent
from a year ago, the biggest
year-over-year price decline on
record.

Analysts blamed the Octo-
ber weakness on the fallout
from a serious credit crunch
that roiled financial markets in
August. Banks and other
lenders have tightened .credit
standards in response to a soar-
ing level of defaults, especially
on subprime mortgages, loans
provided to borrowers with
weak credit histories.

The worry is that the credit
crisis and a deepening housing
slump could be enough to push
the country into a recession.

In another sign of spreading
economic weakness, the Com-
merce Department reported
Wednesday that orders to fac-
tories for big-ticket manufac-
tured goods declined by 0.4 per
cent in October. It was the
third straight drop, the longest
stretch of weakness in nearly
four years.

By region of the country,
sales were unchanged in the
Northeast and the South and
down by 1.7 per cent in the
Midwest and 4.4 per cent in

the West.

Lawrence Yun, chief econo-
mist for the Realtors, said the
big drop in the West reflected
the fact that the market for so-
called “jumbo mortgages,”
loans higher than $417,000,
tightened considerably this
summer. California, with its
high home prices, depends
heavily on the availability of
jumbo loans.

“Temporary mortgage prob-
lems were peaking back in
August when many of the sales
closed in October were being
negotiated,” Yun said.

“We continue to see the
biggest impact in high-cost
markets that rely on jumbo
loans.”

Drop

Yun said he believed the
drop in sales, which left activi-
ty in October 20.7 per cent
below the level of a year ago,
Was nearing its end. He said a
greater willingness of lenders
to start offering jumbo loans
again and the use of Federal
Housing Administration-
insured loans in place of sub-
prime mortgages will help gen-
erate a rebound.

However, other economists
are predicting housing could
remain depressed, for many
months to come as sellers face
high inventories of unsold
homes.

While economic growth
roared ahead at a rate
approaching five per cent in
the summer, many economists
believe growth has slowed dra-
matically in the current quarter
from the combined blows of
the most severe housing slump
in more than two decades, the
credit crunch and rising energy
prices.

The government will release
its latest look at overall eco-
nomic activity on Thursday



and it is expected to show
growth at an annual rate o!
around 4.9 per cent in the July-
September quarter.

However, growth in the cur-
rent October-December peri-
od is expected to slump to a
barely discernible 1.5 per cent
or even less.

Many economists have
raised the odds that the coun-
try could fall into an outright
recession to as high as 40 per
cent although they believe the
Federal Reserve, which has
already cut interest rates twice
since September, will keep
reducing rates if economic
activity continues to falter.

In remarks Wednesday, Fed-
eral Reserve Vice Chairman
Donald Kohn said the Fed’s
monetary policies need to be
nimble to address current risks.

“The increased (financial
market) turbulence of recent
weeks partly reversed some of
the improvement in market
functioning over the late part
of September and in October.”
Kohn said in remarks to the
Council on Foreign Relations.

One of the troubling aspects
of the report on durable goods
was that orders for capital
goods excluding aircraft, a cat-
egory considered a good proxy
for business investment, fell by
2.3 per cent in October, the
biggest decline since a 2.4 per
cent fall in February.

It had been hoped that busi-
ness investment would offset
part of the slump in housing.
However, the October decline,
if it continues, could’show dusi-
nesses are paring back »lans
to buy new equipment in the
face of widening « conomic
problems.

Excluding the volatile tr: ans-
portation category, durable
goods orders fell by 0.7 per
cent in October, the biggest
drop since a 1.7 per cent fall
in August.

LAMPS
BLENDERS
BAKEWARES
ALL CLOCKS





WALL PICTURES

PICTURE FRAMES

FLATWARE SETS

COQKWARE SETS
GLASSWARE SETS
DINNERWARE SETS







SHARGAERNRG CAM AAR EEE”

PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER :29, 2007

FROM page one

ers now had a comprehensive
database of skills and labour from
which to draw workers.

“The general feeling is very
positive. People are extremely
excited,” Mr. Callender said of
Albany.

“We're finally through the road
matter, and 95 per cent through
on the remaining or outstanding
matters with the Government...

We hope to commence construc- -

tion at the latest on February 1.”

When construction work
begins, Mr Callender said the
immediate focus would be on
Albany’s roads, marina, golf
course, infrastructure and the
shared amenities. As soon as all
necessary permits and approvals

Nassau Airport

Development Company

Albany are hoping to

finish infrastructure by
mid-summer in 2009

were received, the developers
would look to start work on the
residential components of the
project.

“By the middle of next year we
hope to be fully engaged in the
construction process,” Mr Cal-
lender said. “By late
summer/mid-fall of 2009, we want
to have completed the amenities,
roads and infrastructure.”

He added: “We feel we’ve
come to an agreement with the
Government on virtually every-

thing regarding the concessions
[investment incentives], and are
satisfied the Government will
complete what was negotiated for
the road acquisition.”

The issue of the road has
caused some controversy, as pri-
vate land is being acquired from
its owners to facilitate the re-rout-
ing of south-west Bay Street
around Albany.

The land purchases were con-
cluded under the former Christie
administration, with the re-routed

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking bids for Fire
Alarm services from suitably qualified individuals to carry out a project
to design and install a new Fire Alarm system at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Qualified contractors must:-
- Demonstrate an ability to obtain $1,000,000.00 liability insurance
- Provide evidence that all Government tax payments are current
- Provide references from three (3) owners ‘of projects in excess of

$50,000.00

Bid packages can be obtained from the corporate offices of Nassau
Airport Development Company from December 3" - 7" between the

hours of 9am - Spm.

A site visit has been arranged for 10:30am on Thursday, December
13", 2007. Contractors wishing to participate are asked to notify NAD
of their intention no later than 4:00 pm on Wednesday, December 12",
2007 at telephone number 702-1000.

The Deadline for submission of bids is 4:00pm on Friday, December
21*t, 2007. Bid packages should be delivered to the NAD offices no
later than 4:00pm on Friday 21*t December, 2007. All packages

received after this time will be returned unopened.

NAD reserves the pene to selec’ any or all bids.



road intended to link-up with the
proposed road serving the new
shipping port in southwestern
New Providence.

However, it is by no means cer-
tain that the FNM government
will go through with the shipping
facilities relocation to that site,
raising the issue of whether the
land purchases are in the public
interest, or designed to facilitate a
private developer.

Mr Callender confirmed what
David Davis, director of invest-
ments in the Prime Minister’s
Office had told The Tribune last
week, namely that the land acqui-
sitions had been completed and
the only outstanding issue was to
agree a purchase price with the
owners.

Mr Davis said that while offers

had been made to the landowners
whose property is being compul-
sorily acquired for the road diver-
sion, to date none had been fully
accepted.

“We are very close to dotting
all the ‘i’s’ and crossing all the
‘Vs’ ina sale” he said.

Mr Davis explained that the
way the process usually works is
that the Government may request
anywhere from one to four
appraisals, and then the offer is
made to the homeowners based
on those proposals.

“However, I cannot say how

. many were done in this case,” he

said. The Tribune understands
that out of the three appraisals
requested, two have been com-
pleted and submitted to the Gov-
ernment, which has acknowl-

THE TRIBUNE

edged to the Albany developers it
owns the land.

Mr Davis pointed out that
along with the issue of property
acquisitions for the road re-rout-
ing, the other issue the Prime
Minister’s Office is working on is
the completion of the Hotels
Encouragement Act agreement
for Albany.

In relation to the road re-rout-
ing; Mr Callender said: “The
Road is not just for Albany, but
the south-western corridor.
Albany is facilitating the con-
struction and payments for the
road. At the end of the day, it

‘will be the Government’s road.

“We are facilitating the means
through which this corridor will
be acquired through a monetary
contribution, and will build it.”

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.

COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW * NOTARIES PUBLIC

is pleased to announce that ms

Cheryl! T.
Whyms

has Bees made a Partner in the Firm.

Nassau Chambers
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O.Box N-272
Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 322-4130

Fax: (242) 328-1069

Freeport Chambers

‘The First Commercial Centre
3rd Floor, Suite 9
‘P.O.Box F-42451 ,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, ‘Bahamas: my
Tel: (242) 351- Ee

Fut t

POSITION AVAILABLE
INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS SUPERVISOR

A brokers & agency company [an affiliate of a large established company] is looking for an Administrative
Supervisor. The ideal candidate must be detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent organizational,

| interpersonal and communication skills. The ability to work with limited supervision in a fastpaced pomesse

environment is a must.

| Responsibilities:

Receive and submit for processing applications for Home Insurance [property] and other insurance plans
Liaise with sub-agents on all application issues

Maintenance of database

Liaise with Underwriters and Customer Service departments to ensure accurate application processing:
Generate monthly reports on issued contracts

Reconciliation of premiums

Prepare and issue completed quotes and Certificates of Insurance

Handing Internal and External client queries

Supervise Administrative support for all general issues

| Core Competencies:

Ability to work with limited supervision and learn new skills quickly

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Ability to resolve problems with a sense of urgency

Demonstrate a keen eye for details

Ability to work under pressure

Strong interpersonal skills and ability to maintain a harmonious relationship with co-workers
Ability fo maintain confidentiality

Reliable, dependable and flexible team-player

Required Qualifications:
| Bachelors Degree in Business Administration or related field or equivalent work experience.
3+ years experience in a similar position
Excellent computer skills and proficiency in Excel required
Relevant General insurance designations for pats thereof] a plus

Benefits:
Salary commensurate with current salary scales, skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including Life, Health and
Pension.

Submit Resume to Human Resources Administrator, P.O. Box N-4815, Nassau
Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to dlparker@live.com



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THE TRIBUNE

saseeerecrerenveremmuttitetreeem tet a A EE EE

FROM page one

as a value place to invest in, with
the flight to quality.”

Mr Williams explained that the
Bahamas’ tradition of stable gov-
emment, a stable political system,
the rule of law, large international
banking sector, and infrastructure
would continue to prove attrac-
tive to high-end, luxury developers
and buyers alike.

He added that Seabridge
Bahamas’ “price point and type
of market we’re going after”
would further insulate the project
from the global credit crunch, as it
was targeting buyers who would
live in its properties for the long-
term - rather than those who were
more transient - through providing
units that were larger and had
more added amenities.

Nevertheless, to account for the
international environment,
Seabridge Bahamas had adjusted
its ‘cash flow’ model to account
for what it anticipated might be a
slightly slower pace of sales.

Describing initial interest in
Seabridge Bahamas from prospec-
tive buyers as “very strong”, even
though the development had
“tried to stay below the radar
screen” until all necessary
approvals and permits had been
received from the Government,
















A Jolly Thank You

‘Flight to quality’

. boosts Bahamian

‘high-end property
values 14.5%

Mr Williams said the sales process
had just begun “in the last couple
of weeks”,

“All of Phase I we hope to get
done [in terms of saics] in the next
six to 12 months,” Mr Williams
said. The developers were look-
ing to put in the Phase [road tafra-
structure in January, and start on
the units in March.

The developers had still to meet
with a number of key real estate
brokers, he added, having con-
centrated on getting their design
finalised, and the website and all
promotional materials in order.

“We've scen other developers
in the Bahamas do things out of
sequence, and that doesn’t work
very well,” Mr Williams said.

The development will be built in
three phases, with the first encom-
passing 28, three and four-bed-
room luxury townhome resi-
dences, landscaping and multiple
pools, with pre-construction prices
starting at $1.8 million.

At least 50 construction workers
are likely to be employed on that
phase, and the largest of the villas
in Phase one will be four bed-
rooms with four-and-a-half baths,

@ Residents of Village Road
Montagu Heights



Brooklyn Avenu

© To Queen’s College and Family Guardian
Insurance for opening their parking lots.

4,320 square feet of air-condi-
tioned space, and two large bal-
conies with ocean views.

Phase two will include about 25
condominiums and five penthous-
es, and Phase three will be a com-
bination of villas, condominiums
and penthouses. The master plan
calls for about 90 townhomes, with
the initial phase expected to be
completed within 24 months. The
first home in that phase will be
finished in 18 months.

Mr Williams said Seabridge
Bahamas had received all the nec-
essary Town Planning approvals,
and was now submitting all con-
struction and engineering draw-
ings to the relevant government
agencies to obtain its building per-
mits, which they hoped to obtain
in January 2008.

The project by Source Devel-
opment Group LLC, which will
be located on a 10-acre site a quar-
ter mile to the east of The Caves,
will be constructed in three phas-
es and targeted at Bahamian pro-
fessionals and entrepreneurs,
plus retirees and foreign pur-
chasers searching for a second
home.

Ranging in size from 3,690 to
4,320 square feet, the ocean view,
hillside residences will have 24-
hour security, private garages and
pools, without the challenges of
individual home ownership.

We would like to thank our
NEIGHBOURS for your patience
and kindness each year:






® And to Majestic Tours for providing Shuttle
Service to the event

wish all our sponsors and patrons a
stmas and a Happy New Year!

Bahamas National Trust
1317 ¢ bnt@bahamasnationaltrust.org

Scotiabank’

is seeking the services of:

Managing Director, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

With over 55,000 employees in over 50 countries, Scotiabank places great
importance on recognizing and rewarding strong performance. We offer room
for advancement, a stimulating work environment and the resources to help
you make the most of your career. Together, we continue to make Scotiabank
a great place to work.

POSITION SUMMARY:

Reporting to the Senior Vice-President Caribbean, as well as to a Board of
Directors, the Managing Director is directly responsible for the profitable
development and maintenance of the commercial and retail banking business
of an assigned group of branches/units, and the maximization of profits. To
do this, the incumbent researches the market and develops strategic objectives
and tactics, ensures the readiness of his or her people, and executes those
tactics. .

The incumbent is also responsible for the quality of the retail and commercial
asset and liability portfolios, ensuring adequate controls and procedures are in
place to safeguard the Bank from loss. He or she is also responsible for
providing strong support for the growth of ancillary businesses such as Wealth
Management. The incumbent has responsibility for planning, organization,
and staffing in the assigned group of branches/units, and is the prime provider
of direction, coaching, advice and other support to the Unit Heads. The
incumbent relates closely with government officials and agencies and regulatory
bodies, and is the Bank's ambassador in The Bahamas.

Qualifications:

° MBA or work experience equivalent required

¢ Experience in a senior role within a large financial institution is an asset

¢ Proven experience managing people in particular, senior level direct reports.

¢ Excellent and proven negotiation and conflict resolution skills are essential.

¢ Ability to learn quickly, adapt to an ever changing environment and adapt to
ever changing priorities are essential.

OTHER INFORMATION:

¢ Frequent travel to the Family Islands & internationally.
¢ Spanish Language is a bonus in an organization that is expanding rapidly in
Spanish-speaking countries.

The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes
applications from all interested parties. We thank you for your interest, however,
only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit application in writing, marked Private
and Confidential, by Friday, December 07, 2007 to: Sr. Manager, Human
Resources, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd., Main Branch, P.O. Box N-7518,

Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail: scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 13

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PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a a ae
Bush unveils his new top economic adviser

@ By DEB RIECHMANN
Associated Press Writer



WASHINGTON (AP) —
President Bush announced on
Wednesday that Keith Hen-
nessey will become director of
the National Economic Coun-
cil, replacing Al Hubbard, who
is joining a growing line of top
presidential advisers exiting
the White House as the Bush
administration heads into its
final year.

Hennessey, who came to the
White House in 2002, is Hub-
bard’s deputy and has been
deputy to two previous direc-
tors of the council. He served
as a top budget aide to Sen.
Trent Lott, R-Miss., and
worked for the Senate Budget
Committee.

“Keith has been an impor-

tant member of my White
House team for more than five
years,” Bush said in a state-
ment. “He has served as the
deputy to three directors of the
National Economic Council,
and has worked on a broad
range of economic policy
issues.”

Hubbard’s departure comes
as Bush faces one of the
biggest economic challenges of
his presidency, a severe slump
in housing and a credit crisis
that have roiled financial mar-
kets and triggered fears of a
recession.

In a letter to the president,
Hubbard said he was leaving
the White House at the end of
the year with mixed emotions.
“Were it not for my strong
desire to spend more time with
my kids, | would not have con-

sidered departing,” said Hub-
bard, the father of three. Hub-
bard wrote that the Bush
White House was a place of
“forthrightness” and “mutual
respect” in Washington, which
is “often portrayed as an arena
of deception and self-promo-
tion.”

Direct

Hubbard has helped direct
White House policy on enti-
tlement reform, energy secu-
rity, climate change, housing
and trade investment policy.
Among other issues, Hubbard
has been deeply involved in
the debate over the State Chil-
dren’s Health Insurance Pro-
gram and Bush’s proposal for a
major shift in tax policy to, for
the first time, treat health

insurance costs as taxable

" income.

“Al contributed his own
ideas and also worked to
ensure that all views were
brought to the table and given
fair analysis and debate,” Bush
said. “While many of the poli-
cies Al worked to develop are
in place today, other policy ini-
tiatives, including Social Secu-
rity reform and health care
reform, have laid the founda-
tion for policies I believe will
be'‘adopted in the future.”

Hubbard’s departure, by the
end of the year, continues an
exodus of key Bush aides and
confidants. Earlier this month,
Fran Townsend, Bush’s ter-
rorism adviser, announced she
was stepping down after 4 1/2
years. Top aide Karl Rove,
along with press secretary










Nassau Agencies (1995) Ltd.



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STIEFEL



BISk

Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 27 November 200 7

















































ie ie oe Seta a & ANS
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.54 Abaco Markets 1.59 1.59 0.00 0.094 0.000 16.9 0.00%
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.65 11.65 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.8 3.43%
7.88 Bank of Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 0.733 0.260 13.0 2.72%
0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.188 0.020 4.5 2.35%
1.65 Bahamas Waste 3.74 3.74 0.00 0.275 0.090 13.6 2.41%
1.21 Fidelity Bank 2.61 2.61 0.00 0.058 0.040 45.0 1.53%
9.81 Cable Bahamas 11.20 11.30 0.10 1,000 1.030 0.240 11.0 2.12%
1.88 Colina Holdings 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.208 0.080 15.1 2.54%
4.10 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.57 6.67 0.10 2,975 0.426 0.260 15.7 3.90%
4.70 Consolidated Water BDRs 6.20 6.37 0.17 0.129 0.050 48.0 0.81%
2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.26 2.26 0.00 9,000 0.284 0.020 8.0 0.88%
5.54 Famguard 6.70 6.70 0.00 0.713 0.240 9.4 3,58%
12.00 Finco 12.75 12.75 0.00 1,000 0.768 0.570 16.6 4.47%
14.14 FirstCaribbean . 14.66 14.66 - 0.00 0.934 0.470 15.7 3.21%!
5.18 Focol (S) 6.04 6.04 0.00 0.359 0.133 16.8 2.24%
0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.74 0.74 0.00 -0.415 0.000 N/M 0.00%
7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.200 17.6 2.76%
8.52 ‘J. S. Johnson 10.05 10.05 0.991 0.590 10.1 5.87%
i EI 10.00 10.00 i.
il délity Qver-The-Gounter Secur

S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185 13.4

8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000

RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.20 -0.030













- Colina Ovar-The-Counter Seauriti
















ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00
Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4
0.45 0.55 / 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M
‘BISX Listed Mutual Runde °° 5%
NA V YTD% Last 12 Months
Colina Money Market Fund 1.364794"

3,5388"*"
2.938214***
1.279370***
id 11.8192***
NDEX: CLOSE 896160 / YTD 20.69% 72008 34
ET TERMS VIEL! st 12 month divider 3
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fi










BMRA ICDs De Hee
02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks










Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths wee* 31 July 2007



NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(





“7010 / FIDELITY 242-358-7764 / FOR MORE DAT.










































Tony Snow, Attorney General
Alberto Gonzales, Defense
Secretary Donald Rumsfeld
and senior presidential adviser
Dan Bartlett, have already left.

Hubbard, of Indiana, was a
low-profile economic adviser
to the president whose strength
came from his closeness to
Bush. The two both attended
Harvard University together.
Hubbard also has close ties
with Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson. Hubbard accompa-
nied Paulson on some of his
trips to China to lend White
House support to efforts to get
China to reform: its economy
and narrow the huge trade
imbalance between the two
nations.

National

The National Economic
Council was created in the
Clinton administration to coor-
dinate economic policy. The
first NEC director was Robert
Rubin, who went on to
become Clinton’s Treasury
secretary.

Hubbard took the post at
the beginning of Bush’s sec-
ond term, when the adminis-
tration had high hopes for

achieving success on a number
of such major issues as address-
ing Social Security’s funding
problems and overhauling the
tax code. However, as Bush
became mired in problems
involving the Iraq war, his
domestic initiatives failed to
make headway in Congress.

“Al brought to this job more
than the creativity that he’s
known for,” said White House
press secretary Dana Perino.
“He has a great booming
laugh, but he also is a very
honest broker when he works
with everybody at the White
House. Part of his role is to
incorporate all of the thoughts
and concerns and proactive
ideas that members of the
administration have.”

Hubbard first met Bush
when they both attended Har-
vard’s business school in the
1970s, getting MBA degrees.
Hubbard, who later became
president of E&A Industries,
an Indianapolis investment
firm, has owned and operated
several businesses and served
in the Bush-Quayle adminis-
tration as executive director of
a council on competitiveness.
He has not yet announced his
future plans.

NATURE

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“SED with 4 TRACE MINE™

Technician needed to work a 12 hour shift.
Interested person are aked to please
Contact Nautilus Water Company
Phone: (242) 377-0444-6 or Fax a Resume
To (242) 377-0276

Serious Inquires only need apply.



SMOKED SALMON

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e Scottish Smoked Salmon has o:

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European Food Exports

SS









_ Laundry Attendant:

-.RoomAttendant

Public Area Attendant

Jamaican Cook :

Chef ~

Bartender
Bellman

- Houseman

Pool Attendant

All applications are appreciated but only.
qualified individuals will be considered. Please
send yourapplicationto:
admin@marleyresort.com _
with reference to specific area of intere
"may fax it to (242) 327-4393 by Fri
November 30th, 200)


























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ee

THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 15B





China set to resist
currency demands f

@ By DAVID LAGUE
c.2007 New York Times
News Service

BEIJING — China signaled
Tuesday that it would resist
European demands for rapid
appreciation of the yuan and
would instead continue gradual

progress toward a more flexi-.

ble exchange rate.

As Beijing comes under
increasing pressure to curb its
soaring trade surplus with
Europe, Prime Minister Wen
Jiabao told the visiting French
president, Nicolas Sarkozy, on
Monday that China was deter-
mined to.move at its own pace

‘ in permitting its currency to

trade more freely, the state-
run media reported.

The European Union, Chi-
na’s biggest trading partner,
accuses Beijing of holding the
yuan at an artificially low level
to assist Chinese exporters,
contributing to the trade imbal-
ance. China’s surplus is fore-
cast to widen 30 per cent this
year, to 170 billion euros, ($252
billion):

While Sarkozy was winding
up his three-day visit Tuesday,
a delegation of European mon-
etary officials, including the
president of the European
Central Bank, Jean-Claude
Trichet; Prime Minister Jean-

Claude Juncker of Luxem-
bourg; and the European
Union monetary affairs com-
missioner, Joaquin Almunia,
began two days of talks in Bei-
jing.

“We will have a large tour
d’horizon on all matters,
including of course the cur-
rency question,” Trichet said
in Beijing, referring to the
coming broad survey of poli-
cies, Reuters reported.

Partner

The United States, the No.2
trading partner with China,
and other . developed
economies are also demand-
ing that Beijing allow its cur-
rency to appreciate more
rapidly.

Treasury Secretary Henry
M. Paulson Jr. will lead a del-
egation of senior Bush admin-
istration officials to Beijing
next month for a third round of
regular economic talks, during
which China’s trade surplus

will again come under scrutiny,

trade analysts have said.
Senior Chinese leaders have
said they want more balanced
trade but have so far refused to
give ground on currency policy.
While China is criticized for
what its trading partners say
are unfair barriers to foreign

FML Group of Companies Ltd.
is seeking to employ an

Administrative Assistant

_ for it human resources department.

‘Must’ be matured, energentic and possess
knowledge of word and excel. Must have
excellent written and communication skills.
Human resources experience a plus.

Interested persons may fax their resumes

to 394-2193.

_products, rampant intellectual

property theft and the poor
quality of some of its exported
goods, it is the value of its cur-
rency that draws the most hos-
tility, trade specialists say.
Since Beijing allowed a 2.1
per cent increase in the value
of the yuan against the dollar
in July 2005, it has allowed the
currency to appreciate by

almost 10 percent. Most ana-

lysts expect this to continue.

But the Chinese currency
has declined sharply against
the euro, and some European
monetary specialists say it is
undervalued by as much as 25
per cent,

Chinese officials and some
trade experts counter that the
trade statistics alone can be
misleading.

They note that exchange
rates and trade balance figures
are part of increasingly com-
plex international commercial
relationships.

Chinese government officials
say. foreign businesses based
in China are benefiting from
the export boom just as much
as local manufacturers.

More than 50 per cent of
exports from China in the first
nine months of this year were
shipped from factories with
foreign ownership, according
to Chinese government and

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European Union statistics. The
customs value of these exports

when they leave Chinese ports

does not take into account the
value of materials, technology
or design from abroad.

Chinese officials also say the
trade statistics fail to reflect
the benefits that foreign retail-
ers and consumers gain from
the flood of cheap, good-qual-
ity Chinese manufactured
goods now widely available in
international markets.

Some trade experts say that
even if Beijing did allow a

sharp increase in the value of

the yuan, there is no guarantee
that this would lead to an
immediate change in the trade
balance.

They note that in response
to international pressure,
Japan allowed the yen to rise
for long stretches in the 1990s
without significant impact on
its trade surplus.

Foreign companies and gov-
ernments would be better
advised to pay attention to
China’s numerous barriers to
imported goods and services,
according to Chinese and for-
eign trade experts.

The European Union esti-
mates that these barriers cost
European businesses about 20
billion euros in lost trade each
year.













4UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial
institutions in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy
private clients by providing them with comprehensive,
value enhancing services. Our client advisors combine
strong personal relationships with the resources that are
available from across UBS, helping them provide a full
range of wealth management services.

In order to strengthen our accounting team in Nassau, we
are looking to fill the following position:

Accountant

Essential Duties and responsibilities

Ensure the quality, accuracy and completeness of all
financial data according to IFRS standards
Ensure monthly closing process and correct allocation
of costs and revenues

Perform high quality reporting to head office and local
management

Ensure reconciliation of bank accounts

Minimum Requirements —

CPA /CFA designation

Sound working knowledge of IFRS.

Extensive knowledge of MS Office and related
Application Software products. Knowledge of SAP
based accounting applications is a plus.

Minimum of 3 years experience in Accounting. Previous
work in an international financial institution or
accounting firm is a plus.

Preference will also be given to applicants having
obtained or in the process of earning additional
certification such as an MBA, Series 7 or other related
proficiency requirement. .

In addition, the ideal candidate must possess strong
analytical skills and efficient functioning, be a highly
motivated team player, willing to adapt to a dynamic work
environment and able to multi-task, while working
independently and meeting tight deadlines.

Written applications should be addressed, until December
7th, 2007 to:
hrbahamas@ubs.com or UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



Little Switzerland is a company with over 50 years of

experience in luxury retailing with over 25 stores in The
Caribbean and Florida. If you want a career with prospects
and have what it takes to repair fine Swiss watches we
have an immediate opening for the following position:

Watch Maker —Breitling Boutique/ Nassau

This position is a key component of our operation
and our commitment to exceed our customer’s expectations.
‘The successful candidate will be a Certified Watch Maker.
Must have completed factory. training and certification by_
BREITLING, WOSTEP and or a compatible Swiss Watch

Brand_or Association.

‘ The following attributes are desirable:
“sh am! 5

J. Attention to details and the ability to produce
high quality work in areas of follow up and direct
reporting.

2. Good working knowledge of Microsoft Office
applications, and emails.

3. Strong communication skills and ability to work
well with colleagues.

4. Good oral and writing comprehension of the
English Language.

The successful candidate will be responsible:
¢ Maintaining a high quality, precise after sales
service for the repair of watches.
Perform timely and consistent repairs of watches in
accordance with established industry standards and
procedures.
Effectively communicate the needs and take the
lead.in the direction of the after sales service centre.
Implement effective inventory controls that would
facilitate the timely reordering of watch parts and
’ components and maintain compliance with Internal
Audit standards.

To apply, please e-mail or fax your resume with a
cover letter to:

Watch Maker Position in Nassau:
K-Mail: wearey@littleswitzerland.com
Fax: (242) 356-9860
Attn: William Carey



INSIGHT |

Samu de ue
CM CMM ele ar: ud
ee) Celale tN



‘OUNTANT.

CLIENT AC



Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Malta,
Switzerland and the United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of
services to local and international clients.















An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust. & Corporate
Services team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Supervisor.
Client Accounting.

Core Responsibilities
* — Reconciliation of Bank/Broker Accounts

¢ Preparation of Client Financial Statements
* — Liaising with External Auditors and Clients as necessary

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration



Desired Qualifications

® Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or related discipline from a well
recognized university.

= 3-5 years progressive Accounting experience in the Financial
Services Industry.

® Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

® Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, and
customer service skills.

Closing Date: December 7, 2007

Contact '

. Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 393 3772 al
E-mail: recruitment@butterfieldbank.bs ___ «ail

www.butterfieldbank.bs












arate el Bank =






2007
No. 01153

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division








IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, (Â¥59
AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land being
part of John Drudge Grant (D-52) comprising an area of Sixteen and
Sixty-seven Hundredths (16.67) acres situate near the Settlement of The
Bight on Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas and bounded on the NORTH partly by another portion of land
originally granted to John Drudge and running thereon Nine Hundred
and One and Ninety-three Hundredths (901.93) Feet on the EAST by
another portion of land granted originally to John Drudge and running
thereon Seven Hundred and.Eighty-Two and Sixty-two Hundredths
(782.62) Feet on the SOUTH by another portion of land originally
granted to John Drudge and running thereon Eight Hundred and Ninety
two and Sixty-three Hundredths (892.63) Feet and on the WEST by The
Queen’s Highway and running thereon Eight Hundred and Seventy-oue
and Forty Hundredths (871.40) Feet.


































AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of
DELTON RANDOLPH MOREE

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF Delton Randolph Moree in respect ot -
“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land being part of John Drudge
Grant (D-52) comprising an area of Sixteen and Sixty-seven Flundredths

(16.67) acres situate near the Settlement of The Bight on Long Island

- one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and bounded
on the NORTH partly by another portion of land originally granted &
John Drudge and running thereon Nine Hundred and One and Ninety
three Hundredths (901.93) Feet on the EAST by another portion of Land
granted originally to John Drudge and running thereon Seven Hundied
and Eighty-Two and Sixty-two Hundredths (782.62) Feet on the SOUTH
by another portion of land originally granted, to John Drudge and runing
thereon Eight Hundred and Ninety two and Sixty-three Hundiedths
(892.63) Feet and on the WEST by The Queen’s Highway and ranning
thereon Eight Hundred and Seventy-one and Forty Hundredths (871.40)
Feet.

Delton Randolph Moree clams to be the owner of the umneumbered fee suuple

estate in possession of the said land and has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and the Plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal office hours in the following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the City of Nassau,
Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro Road, off Shirley
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these presents, file
in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement
of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith






Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his Claim on ot
before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these
presents will operate as bar to such claim.






LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers

#35 Buen Retiro Road

Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas







Attorneys for the Petitioner





PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



La aa
Home foreclosures in heavy economic hit

@ By MARILYN GEEWAX
Cox News Service

WASHINGTON — Home fore-
closures in metro Atlanta will reduce
the area’s economic growth by $954
million in 2008, according to a report
released Tuesday by the US Confer-
ence of Mayors.

Meanwhile, more bad housing news
came from Standard & Poor’s Case-
Shiller Home Price Indices, a closely
watched survey that showed home
prices in 20 major markets declining
4.9 per cent in September from a year
ago.

“There is no real positive news” in
the statistics, economist Robert Shiller
said in a statement. “Most of the
metro areas continue to show declin-
ing or decelerating returns on both
an annual and monthly basis.”

The mayors’ report was based on
economists’ assumption that another
1.4 million homeowners will face fore-
closure next year, forcing them to
walk away from houses worth a total
of $316 billion.

The resulting turmoil in the housing
sector will reduce economic growth by
$166 billion nationwide, according to
the study conducted for the mayors by
Global Insight Inc., a forecasting firm.

“The foreclosure ‘crisis has the
potential to break the back of our
economy, as well as the backs of mil-
lions of American families if we don’t
do something soon,” Trenton, N.J.,
Mayor Douglas Palmer said in state-
ment on the report, released at meet-
ing in Detroit of mayors, mortgage
industry officials and community
advocacy groups. Palmer is president
of the mayors’ group.

Process

Foreclosure is the legal process by
which property may be sold by a
lender to pay off a defaulting bor-
rower’s loan. The mayors say mort-
gage foreclosures can have a dramat-
ic economic impact as homes sit
vacant, driving down all home prices
and drying up sources of credit.

The report forecasts a home price

decline averaging seven per cent
nationwide, with some California
markets ‘seeing prices drop as much.as
16 per cent.

Such declines likely will translate
into 524,000 fewer jobs being created
and $6.6 billion less in taxes being
collected nationwide, the report said.
The financial stresses will reduce con-
sumer spending enough to make 2008
the worst year for car sales in a
decade, it said.

“The foreclosure crisis is no longer
just about mortgages,” Detroit May-
or Kwame Kilpatrick said in a state-
ment. “This issue is now the No. 1
economic challenge of many major
American cities.” '

The mayors’ report estimates the
national economy will grow at a rate
of 1.9 per cent, which is one per cent
less than it would have in the absence
of the mortgage crisis. The Federal
Reserve Board’s estimate is some-
what more optimistic, predicting
growth of up to 2.5 per cent.

Neither the Fed nor the mayors see
an outright recession, defined at two

consecutive quarters of economic loss-
es. The mortgage crisis “is not going
to bring the economy grinding to a
halt,” the mayors’ study concluded.

Impact

Still, for certain cities, the impact
will be especially painful. The worst
markets include Myrtle Beach, S.C.,
Merced, Calif., and Sarasota, Fla.,
which will see 1.5 to 1.7 percentage
points cut from their already sluggish
growth rates.

In Atlanta, economic growth will
continue at a relatively healthy three
per cent pace, but that will be a 0.6
percentage point, or $954 million, less
than if housing were healthy.

As measured by dollar amounts,
the most-affected metro region will
be New York and northern New Jer-
sey, which will lose $10.4 billion as
housing problems there shave 0.65
percentage point from growth, leaving
the overall expansion rate at 2.1 per
cent. Los Angeles and Dallas-Forth
Worth are the next two most-affected

areas, losing $8.3 billion and $4 billion
respectively.

While the mayors’ report looks
ahead to next year, the Case-Shiller
survey examines what already has
happened.

That study shows the largest
declines over the past year were in
Tampa, Florida, where prices fell 11.1
per cent compared with last year, and
Miami, where prices dropped 10 per
cent.

The cities that saw the biggest price
increases in 2007 were Charlotte,
N.C., and Seattle, which each had
year-to-year increases of 4.7 per.cent.
Still, the downturn is starting to hurt
even them. In September, Charlotte
declined 0.6 per cent from the past
month while Seattle prices slipped 0.2
per cent, the Case-Shiller report said.

Global Insight economist Patrick
Newport, in a written comment on
the Case-Shiller report, said home-
owners shouldn’t look for any positive
reports for a while. “We expect much
weaker numbers the rest of the year,”
he said.

‘

Portuguese firm to build biofuel plant

@ By MATTHEW L. WALD
c.2007 New York Times
News Service

announce Wednesday that it
is building a 6,500-barrel-a-day
plant to make diesel fuel from

UOP, a subsidiary of Honey-
well, and Eni, the Italian ener-
gy company, adds hydrogen to

to make soap.

Crops

UOP. The company argues
that its method produces a fuel
superior to the standard .

cation that would produce jet
fuel from the same feed stocks.
With airlines under pressure

vegetable oils using a method
akin to refining oil.
The method, developed by

A PORTUGUESE oil com-
pany, Galp Energia, plans to

PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FOR A FEW GOOD PEOPLE.




DIESEL TECHNICIAN / MACHINIST

Prior experience on repairs to heavy trucks
mandatory. Experience repairing
International, Mack, and Cummins engines
and Electronics necessary. Extensive
experience in machine shop repairs to diesel
engine parts mandatory. Top wages.
Uniforms furnished after probationary period.







Please come by and fill out an application,
and give us your resume at:

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd.
fg Rock Crusher Road ag

>) Nassau, Bahamas @gere aw
o wa ocenaneiee












NOTICE
KNIK POINT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
25th day of October 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MONTBARD INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
27th day of November 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



oils derived from food crops
to create a substitute that the
companies describe as superior
to ordinary diesel fuel.

The long-term goal is to
modify the process to use oil
from algae or from jatropha,
a hardy shrub from Central
America whose oil has long
been burned in lamps and used

Using algae, jatropha or
oilseed crops like canola as a
source of diesel would reduce
carbon dioxide buildup in the
atmosphere from diesel
engines by SO per cent to 70
per cent, according to Jennifer
Holmgren, director for renew-
able energy and chemicals at

biodiesel already being made
in places like the American
Midwest.

Holmgren said that with
funding from the Defense
Advanced Research Projects
Agency, a Pentagon agency,
UOP was pursuing a modifi-

to reduce their output of glob-
al warming gases, the fuel
could find a ready market.

At 6,500 barrels a day, the
Portuguese plant is tiny by
petroleum standards but large
by the standards of renewable
fuels. To be located in Sines, a
town on Portugal’s southern
coast, it will be the second such

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GALLICO LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
27th day of November 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

s

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LAC DE LIOZON LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
26th day of September 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

OPPORTUNITIES DRAGON LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
27th day of November 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., PO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Sey ene mR

unit; Eni is building one in
Livorno, Italy.

The Galp unit will help meet
a renewable fuels quota set by
the Portuguese government.
The cost of producing diesel
with its technique will be high-
er than the cost of producing
standard diesel, said Holm-
gren, who would not be more
specific. She said the new
diesel might eventually be
competitive when produced at
a larger scale.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
icsreCe Mele ls) 4
on Mondays



°

MARINE STORE

LOOKING FOR

Experience Counter
Sales Person;

must be computer literate and have good
customer relations

PLEASE FAX RESUME TO 394-3885

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, PATRICK L.
ROLLE of Blue Hill Road South, RO. BOX CR-
54128, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to PATRICK L. KEMP. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of













position
available

The Cove @ Atlantis Resorts
Registered Nurse — Full Time

Responsibilities:

@ Provide primary and minor emergency medical
care

e Administration of medication, oxygen,
intravenous fluids as indicated and outlined in the
clinical Protocol Manual

e Provide accurate and comprehensive medical

reports as required

Requirements:

e Holder of current Bahamian licence

e Must have at least three years experience post
graduation

e have current BLS & ALS Certification

e Must be responsible, have good communication
skills and independent. ,

‘THE
CV should be sent via MEDICLINIC
e-mail to mary.epcotmedical
@coralwave.com by
November 31“, 2007.

i ‘TT





geome Rua mer ra aa ee

THE TRIBUNE

“THURSDAY EVENING

~ NOVEMBER 29, 2007.













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PAGE 188, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

j COMICS PAGE



THERE'S NO BAG...
I WON'T BE HERE

: LONG ENOUGH
Sot TO CHANGE CLOTHES!












APS bi] H Are @ & sb? re Ss
gree a eo minniaeanans
I THOUGHT YOU WORK‘ IVE GOT To RUN IT WAS NICE SEEING:
- NG YOU
FOR THE THEATER COMPANY, NICE SEEING yOU TOO, GARY. =
i WD IRD, GARY. BOTH. oS
i) SA 5 2 yy
Ae (GB :

(©2007 by.North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.







| iERE'S TO US FOR WINNNG THAT
4 BIG CONTRACT TODAY, BOSS) Pe wieevosue

HAPPY HOUR

\¢ IT'S YOUR WIFE CALLING, )
MR. DITHERS

You are South, both sides vulner-
able, and the bidding has gone:
North East South West
1¢ Dble ?

What would you bid with each of

the following five hands? ‘

1. # KJ98 ¥ AQB4 5 & Q752

2. @ Q842 ¥ K93 @ J65 & Q87

3. © 965 ¥ K762 ¢ 10 & J9543

4.% 74 ¥ 95 @ Q86532 & A62

5. # A8 F J3 @ 874 & AQ9854

kee

= : 1. Redouble. When partner opens

- SINCE MY the bidding and the nee player hae
HUMAN










bles, you normally take one of the
{ me Le vE RR ee CAAeD following actions: You pass, indicat-
S FIGHTER ing a poor to moderate hand with no



convenient call to make; you bid a
suit, provided you have less than 10
high-card points; you bid one
notrump to show a balanced hand of
six to mine points; or you redouble to
show 10 or more high-card points.
The redouble does not necessarily

procure support for partner’s suit,
t instead srmounces that the dou-
bler is caught between two good
hands and that it might be possible to
exact a substantial penalty. Usually
the opener passes at his next tum in
order to allow the redoubler to show
the true nature of his hand.
2. One notrump. This is a typical
one-notrump response indicating six
to nine points and scattered values. If
pee you were to pass instead, you’d
NUNS GNID s

IIA SORRY...NW LEGAL
TRAINING BLOCKED oUT
EVERNTHING YoU Sip

WHAT | TEACH

one nine-letter word. No
ending in “s”, no words

onenie Soest inkjet printer).
TODAY'S TARGET
Solution Monday.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

tumid





|. CRYPTICPUZZLE :

ACROSS ’ DOWN Hehe | nl sa
"4 — Band possibly taking “4 Bidto get away to anicer part (5) Lo Pl
: trips East (6) Figure to have nineteen
7 team ytesarot® YS La oe
When there's something playable, aa role | ii
peal si Lipaaed 4 Thesortof chaos one finds in pei ee
10 A mineral very hard ; Esher? (5)
to describe (5) : ‘5 Transported ina right and suitable | || ee
| . 13 Atbottom, it's supportive (4) - manner (4) ae fae.
14 It's in Nevada, 6 — Write figures one can rub out (6) = 3
near enough (4) + 9 — Supporter taking no part (6)

> 11° Bitofa good time girl? (3)
‘ Italian stata atthe end of the war (5)
13 Inthe future, a new mode, say (4,3)
15 Ishe expensive to write to? (3)
16 Could be made as a gesture (3)
18 Noplace to monkey
with the bees! (6)
4 20 Warmhearted girl (called Sandy?) (5)
+ 24 For€1,a lotof cover? (3)

15 The type with class (4)
“16 Part of Surbiton (3)
17 Injure for many a
purpose (4)
‘19 Complain bitterly in a bar (4).
21 It gets a driver nowhere faster
than ever (3,6)

wis
—
N




wo
| | &

t

‘Al

fe







23 Incoal mining, it means I : ACROSS OWN
little (4) ; 22 Retiring in company (3) 4 Charm (6) 1 Scum (5)

i 23 She has her own kind of love (6) 7 Disraspact (8) 2 Notions (5)
"4 24 Finished, having been cheated (4) + 25 The force tomake | wa | - eres (6) | thay
ee, . : ine
At] 26 Appear wiling (3) B-__ yougo tying? (3) sel 13 Expensive (4) 5 Fruit (4)
= | 27 Offtoplaysomewhereslea (4) 28 We need some remedy for being thin N 44° Pibbon (4) 6 Against (6)

1) 29° Ithurtsit you miss it and hitit (4) and weak (5) => eens a cane aoe tt)
32 Horse fit for an earl? <4) aa Tana Cou Sow ae > 17 Cupid (4) "12> In that place (6)
33 Isle where the comm paatibns (6): o- 19 Charter (4) 13 Wished (7)

: 31 Finish fooling unfairly with the f 21° Leader (8) 15 Lettuce (3)
mnaeent language (5) y Lud 7 Ascot) apes
; } 24 = Ascen
34 Appreciative look gladly eA (9.3) 3 Nominal, she's not rude (4) 26 Moist (3) ape
35 Soaking in fall (8) 33 Manage tocatch before 27° Atthat time (4) . 21 ean
36 Only fairly fair? (6) closing time (4) 29 Flower (4) 22 Racket (3)
32 Honey drink (4) 23 Smoothly (6)
33 Drinking tube (5) 25 America (3)
f 34 Fast currents (6) 28 H 5
:Yesterday’s cryptic salutions Yesterday's easy solutions 35 Type of film (8) urry (5)
ACROSS: 1, Mali-bu 7, Step on 8, Peke 10, Relaid 11, | ACROSS: 1, Carpet7, Reporter 8, Biro 10, Erased 11, 36 Liquid container (6) ae
A-t-'ve 14, Old 16, Tot-al 17, Cads 19, Rehab 21, Fag-in | Donate 14, Led 16, Noted 17, Told 19, Debit 21, Topic 22, I} 39 es ie 6)
22, Tutus 23, Date 26, So-b-er 28, Nil 29, Island 30, Save | Latin 23, Aloe 26, Sepal 28, Ore 29, Treble 30, Er igage 31, 33 eee
up 31, Ape-X 32, Landsmen 33, Desert Need 32, Reasoned 33, Settle

DOWN: 1, Me-t-ric 2, Ideals 3, Used 4, Spartan 5, Unf-it 6,
Ethel 8, P-L-od 9, Kid 12, Rob 13, V-aunt 15, Be-gun 18,
Adi-O-s 19, Rat 20, His 21, F-um-lsh 22, Tea 23, Divers

- 24, Al-ex 25, Ex-port 26, Silly 27, B-land 28,

Nap 30, Sand

DOWN: 1, Cement 2, Poised 3, Trod 4, Moronic 5, Stoat 6,
Urged 8, Bail 9, Red 12, Not 13, Tempo 15, Sepia 18,
Owner 19, Dot 20, Bin 21; Tallboy 22, Lab 23,

Argent 24, Lead 25, Emerge 26, Stork 27, Pedal 28, One
30, Ends



Bidding Quiz

probably find it impossible to show-

the type of hand you have at your
next tum.

3. Pass. Lacking the appropriate
values for any other call, you should
take refuge in silence — despite your
singleton diamond. The odds are that

West will bid in response to his part- -

ner’s double. If West passes, your
partner can still rescue himself from
one diamond doubled if he so
desires.

4. Three diamonds. This is a pre-
emptive bid, pure and simple, indi-

cating lots of diamonds and poor’

defensive values. The purpose of the
pre-empt is to make it difficult for
the opponents to exchange informa-
tion. There is good reason to think
that East-West might have a game in
spades or hearts.

5. Redouble. Again you apply the
punciple discussed earlier to tell
partner that you have at least 10
high-card points. That takes prece-

dence over bidding your clubs at this _

point.

It would be correct to bid two clubs_ |

over East’s double if your ace of
spades were a low spade. But
because the spade ace brings your
high-card count to 11 points, you
should redouble rather than bid two
clubs. Note also that if you did bid
two clubs over the double, it would
not be forcing.

HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and there must be at least
lurals, or verb forms

th initial capitals and no

words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. The
first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in



Good 20; very good 30; excellent 41 (or more).

admit aimed amid amide dame datum dime
emit fame famed fume fumed fumigate _
FUMIGATED game gamed gamut geum image
imaged item made maid mate mated mead
meat mega midge midget mite mufti mute
muted tame tamed team tedium time timed



CHESS by Leonard Barden

Valerly Trembach v Alexander
Shevchenko, Ukraine 2007. No, the
black player is not related to the
Chelsea striker — Shevchenko is
_quite a common name in Russia and;
Ukraine. But I reckon that the chess
Shevchenko might have preferred

to be ona football pitch whenhe ——5{/

contemplated the dreadful position
of his king at a4. Material is level
and Black has pawns en route to 3
touchdown, but they are toolate to,
rescue the beleaguered monarch.
Thought it is still possible for White |



to choose a plausible but losing first a

move, the right sequence will soon
force checkmate. Can you defeat
Shevchenko?

Chess 8500: 1 Qd3 (threat 2 Qb3 mate) bxc4 2 Bd7+
Kxb4 3 Qd2+ and if 33 4 Qxc3 mate or Ka3 4 Qa5 :

mate.





THE TRIBUNE

fot.




RASeRneee



Wild











THANKS FoR | You'Re
THE BIS
WELCOME !










THURSDAY, |
. NOV 29
ARIES — March 21/April 20

Your world is a mix of love and
adventure this week, Aries. Impulse
Tuns wild, but it never steers you
wrong. You do your best sharing fon
with friends.

1
TAURUS - April 21/May 21
Don’t start any new projects this
week, Taurus. You are known to
anger easily and sometimes can be
slow to learn new things.-It’s best if
you stick with the basics. !
GEMINI — May 22/June 21!
Expect positive developments in, a
working relationship, friendship or
romance. For you this week, Gemini,
actions speak louder than words, so
‘move forward.
CANCER - June 22/Juty 22
Less is more this week, Cancer,
because it won’t take much for peo-
ple to warm up to you. Consider
curbing spending on any excesses
and concentrate it strictly toward
investments. i

LEO - July 23/August 23
Your senses are alive, Leo, and you're
feeling invincible. You leave a path of
change at work and others are inspired
to follow your lead — with varied
degrees of success. Re i
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 |
You can’t find a system that caters
solely to your needs, Virgo. You
have to admit that sometimes.it
won’t go your way. Keep things
simple for this week. s
LIBRA - Sept 23/Qct 23

It’s a rare day when you have all of
the answers in your hand, Libra. It's
best if you seek the advice of others
when it comes to a big decision.
Work relations improve. ;

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22 «

In a clash of wills this week,
Scorpio, you will come out the losef.
Your opponent has so much power
that a fair fight is impossible. Walk
away with your head high. :

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Time and distance are no match for
Sagittarians who work their exte:j-
sive connections. You are a person
who definitely understands how to
network. Your smile this week is
proof that you’re on top. ,

‘CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
Write a thank-you note to someone who
has done you a favor lately, Capricom. It
is best if you ty to rekindle old friend-
‘ships. A valuable relationship needs 8
be refreshed or reinforced this week.

.| AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18

It’s best if you curb your sudden fee}-
ing of aggression, Aquarius. You can
put the energy to better use. Make &
list of top ideas and put a plan in
motion. Gemini is key to the plan. *

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20 ;
You're feeling a bit disconnected
fram the world, lately, Pisces. it’s
nothing to get worried about. You just
need some time to yourself and then
you’ ll reacquaiart yourself to the norm.

anos © & S © Bete 2 oe OG Fete

Te ie
“Lf foe, ET Te



LEONARD BARDEN

ROP NE Ht mae Mera



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PAGE 20B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





‘Minor’ details over opening bank accounts

FROM page 2 Such accounts should be moni- tially illegal purposes (to defraud sons reading this article and/or col- — Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald. Should © +
tored carefully to prevent abuses by _ creditors, misrepresentation, money —_ umn, generally, are encouraged to you have any comments or

purpose of the account; the overall the legal guardians and representa- laundering), or for purposes other _ seek the relevant legal advice and enquiries regarding the content of
transaction history; specific account __ tive of the bank’s minor account than those contracted with the bank * assistance regarding issues that may _ this article, you may contact Mr
details provided on the opening of holders, and to minimise the on the establishment of the account. _ affect them and may relate to the Fitzgerald at Suite 212, Lagoon
the account; and the due diligence predilection of potential or existing NB: The information contained in _ information presented. Court Building, Olde Towne Mall
information requested, periodically, | adult account holders to use such this article does not constitute nor is Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an at Sandyport, West Bay St., P. O.
during the operation of the account. accounts for inappropriate or poten- __ it a substitute for legal advice. Per- attorney in the Chambers of Box CB-11173, Nassau, Bahamas

esson Oilhasa |.§










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LRG ar





G







wf

Greatest Warrior with a Pen!

© |st Bahamian/woman Publisher/ Editor

© Only Bahamian to have her editorials read from
the floor of the U.S. senate (twice)

© st woman CEO of radio station in Caribbean

© Ist and only Bahamian woman to graduate from
NYC’s famed Columbia School of Journalism

e |st Bahamian woman Pilot

@ 2nd Bahamian woman Lawyer

The Tribune

Aas

~ ASpeciat Section Published by The Tribune @ Nov )
- Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas of No Master

aE a —— | a



' = an a ae __|













Family Guardian congratulates
Eileen Carron on 50 years of
committment in journalism.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



; SALES OFFICES: NASSAU, FREEPORT, ABACO & ELEUTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232



2007 ADWORKS

8

*
€

{





Champion of
a free press

The Hon. Hubert Ingraham
Prime Minister of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

ERHAPS the most fre-

quently quoted comment

about the importance of
the press in a democracy is that
of Thomas Jefferson who said
that if he had to choose
between having a government
without newspapers, or news-
papers without a government,
he would choose the latter.

This American founding
father no doubt never expected
to make such a choice in his
country, nor perhaps did he
expect that those who would
inherit the new republic would
have to make it either. But he
wanted to emphasise the impor-
tance of a free press in a democ-
racy. Indeed, a free press - or
media as we say today to
include electronic publishing -
is indispensable to democracy
and is a nation’s first defence
against demagogues and would-
be tyrants.

We are fortunate in the
Bahamas to have a strong tradi-
tion of press freedom without
which the achievement of social
justice and democratic progress
may have been well nigh impos-
sible. In the shaping of this
magnificent tradition over the
last century The Tribune has
been in the vanguard: first

under Leon Dupuch who

founded the newspaper to give
voice to the voiceless; then
under Sir Etienne Dupuch, who
expanded the horizons of jour-
nalism in The Bahamas and
gained international attention,
and now under the third gener-
ation of this outstanding
Bahamian family.

Eileen Dupuch Carron was
chosen, groomed and prepared
for the job of Editor of The
Tribune by her illustrious
father. He saw to it that her
education was broad and varied
with degrees in journalism and
in law.

Mrs Carron has been either
studying or practising the art of
journalism for half a century
and for 35 years she has sat in
the editorial chair. She has
demonstrated that Sir Etienne’s
judgment about her - as in so
many other matters in his
extraordinarily long career -
was correct.

As Editor and Publisher of
The Tribune she has presided
over the modernisation and
expansion of this institution.
More importantly, she has
maintained the high standard of
journalism which has been the
hallmark of The Tribune.

My colleagues and | congrat-
ulate Mrs Carron and The
Tribune family as they cele-
brate her 50 years in journalism
and we wish her and The
Tribune every success in the
future.





“Mrs
Carron has
maintained
the high
standard of
journalism
which has
been the
hallmark
of The
Tribune.”





A true Bahamian

patriot

By D. Brent Hardt
Chargé d’Affaires, Embassy of
the United States of America



FREEDOM of the press is one
of the core principles enunciat-
ed in the Bill of Rights in the
ist Amendment to the US.
constitution, and it is a funda-
mental pillar of democratic
government in every country.

The Bahamas has been
blessed to have Eileen Carron
on the frontlines of the free
press for half a century.

From my first meeting with
Mrs. Carron in her office just
off the busy Tribune news-
room, it was clear to me that
the Tribune’s motto, “Being
Bound
Dogmas of no Master,” was
something she believed deeply

to Swear to the

and lived every day.

Her unyielding commitment
to digging up the facts and
reporting the truth emerges

clearly as the motivation for
her tireless work.

When presenting editorial
opinions, she calls it as she
sees it, and does not pull
punches.

She does not expect people
to agree with her on every
issue, rather she wants to pro-
mote the debate and dialogue
that form the lifeblood of a
strong, free, and prosperous
Bahamas.

Mrs. Carron is a_ true
Bahamian patriot, deeply
devoted to her country and to
the Bahamian people. She has
also been a true friend of the
United States.

On behalf of the United
States Embassy in Nassau, |
am pleased to congratulate
Eileen Carron on her 50th
anniversary in journalism.

May she and The Bahamas
mark many more such anniver-

sarics,











ee





- Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism





My wonderful wife
of many talents

By Roger Carron

MY WIFE is an amazing
woman. She handles her chores
as a wife, mother, homemaker,
caregiver, counsellor, editor,
publisher, lawyer, and head of
the country’s leading newspa-
per with the easy poise and
grace of a ballerina who is in
full control of all her move-
ments.

And despite all the responsi-
bility, stress and worry that
comes with her various jobs,
she manages still to retain her
femininity. That, to my mind,
makes her quite a unique indi-
vidual. I first met my wife in
1960 just after | had finished
my national service in the
army as a young lieutenant in
the Gurkhas. I was preparing to
take my bar finals at the Inns of
Court in London, England,
having had to delay my legal
career to do national service.
Eileen was taking her law
degree at the University of
London and also trying to cram
for her bar finals at the same
time to save having to spend
extra time in England. She had
to get back to the Bahamas
where her father, Sir Etienne,
was expecting her to take over
the family newspaper, The
Tribune. She had spent several
years away from home gaining
a B.A. in philosophy from
Toronto University in 1954 and
a Masters in Journalism from
Columbia University after that
and was now pursuing an
LL.B. degree from King’s
College, London University.

We met at the law school

where in the class of about 24
there were just two women.
From the moment we first met
] knew that Eileen was some-
one quite special and I wanted
to spend the rest of my life with
her -- if she would have me. As
it worked out it was all rather
remarkable. The first hurdle
was that Eileen was scheduled
to return home to help her
father with the family newspa-
per, so there was no prospect of
staying in England to practice
my law. We decided that in
order to be ready to practice
law in the Bahamas it would be
better if I disbarred myself
from my Inn (Gray’s Inn) and
worked in a solicitor's office for
a year to gain experience on
that side of the law since |
would not be able to practice as
a barrister in the Bahamas for
at least five years - the time it
would take to gain residency
status. (While I was in practice
for a year in England | was for-
tunate to be one of the few
young lawyers who was able to
see a case right through from
initial pleadings to presentation
before the Privy Council in the
House of Lords).

But another setback was that
even as an English solicitor |
would not be able to practice in
the Bahamas as the profession
was closed to outsiders. That
meant rethinking how we were
to manage if we got married
and had to live in the Bahamas.
Eileen’s father came to the res-
cue and suggested that | join
The Tribune - but first | had to
get some training and learn
about the newspaper profes-
sion. I spent another nine
months in England with a fine




























newspaper in Peterborough (the
owner was a friend of Sir
Etienne and I had been at
Cambridge with his eldest son.)
There I worked from
copy boy to copy edi-
tor before joining Sir
Etienne at the
family newspa-
per. From that
time (1962) I
never opened
another law
book, except
to help = my
wife look up
an item = on
defamation
when the
paper was -
served with a
libel writ fron
time to time.

Not all plain
sailing

But when I
arrived in the
Bahamas in 1962
it was not all
going to be plain
sailing. Eileen and
I were scheduled to
be = married sin
November and her
father had planned to
have her called to the Bar in
the morning, take over The
Tribune in the afternoon and
get her married in the evening -
all in the space of one day! But’ post-
it was not to be. It was an elec- poned to
tion year and the newly formed) avoid a_con-
Progressive Liberal Party flict with the elec-
(PLP) was making a big effort tion.
to take over the Government
of the country. It was decided
that the wedding should be




@










I Continued on page 4







oar
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4 ak ae
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COMPANIES

GROUP OF




EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON

PUBLISHER & EDITOR, THE TRIBUNE LIMITED

A Tradition of Shopping Excellence Since 1929





My wonderful wife of many talents

PS

i From page 3

1 was so shocked by the anti-
foreign feeling in the country at
that time that I nearly packed
up to go back home. But we
weathered the storm and got
married in January 1963 and
have been happily married for
44 years.

It has not been an easy life.
We've had our ups and downs,
mainly brought on by issues
taken up by the newspaper that
has put it at odds with the govy-
erning powers. Because of Sir
Etienne’s anti-PLP stance I was
denied citizenship and did not
get my Bahamas Residency
with a right to work until 1992

when the Free National
Movement (FNM) won the
government under Hubert

Ingraham. During much of this
time | was able to assist my wife
at the newspaper working in
various capacities = from
reporter, news editor and then
managing editor.

And during all those 20 years
the paper had to pay a work
permit for me every year -
except for one year when they
refused to renew it.

Life changed forever

After the PLP won the goy-
ernment of the country in 1967,
life as my wife and I knew it
changed forever. The newspa-
per became the target of
vicious political attacks and dis-
crimination, denying us work
permits to employ foreign staff.
At that time all our staff had
degrees and several spoke
other languages. From that
time on we had to employ on
the job training for our local
staff who were untrained and
put out a daily newspaper at
the same time - no easy matter.
Several people who now enjoy
fine jobs outside the newspaper
can thank The Tribune for the

engagement in London, 1961.

ROGER and Eileen Carron pictured on the day they announced their





training they got mainly from
my wife.

After some years the PLP
softened their stance towards
the newspaper and allowed us
to bring in a journalism training
officer from England. We set
up a proper classroom and gave
training to most who applied to
join - not just Tribune
reporters. We also held evening
classes to get several of our

reporters through their GCE
English exams. It was during
this time without help that my
wife and I found ourselves
working round the clock to put
out the newspaper, and only
surviving by the help of her
mother, who made us bowls of
soup that we could eat at our
desks as we worked long hours
into the night. At weekends we
were both so exhausted that we



Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism

took to our beds to try to
recover and gain enough
strength to face another week.
This went on for several years.
We were unable to take a vaca-
tion but managed to enjoy
some long weekends with our
son during public holidays
when the paper was not pub-
lished. We were fortunate to
have some very good friends
who were able to give our son
holidays that we couldn't
because we were unable to get
off from the newspaper.

Stress took its toll

The chronic stress eventually
took its toll, first on Eileen who
had to undergo surgery and
later myself, who just managed

WEDDING DAY

to avoid a major heart attack. |
underwent open-heart surgery
that involved five by-passes.
My wife bravely came back
from her operation the next
day. | took a good six months of
recovery. But I'm happy to say
today that we've both reached
the age of 75 in physically good
health and have much to be
thankful for.

Most people have no idea
how a newspaper is published
every day. You are constantly
working against a deadline as
every section of the paper has
to be on the press at the
appointed time otherwise the
paper will be late, which can
affect your circulation and if
this becomes too regular you
could go out of business. But



NEWLYWEDS - Roger and Eileen Carron walk down the aisle at St Francis
Xavier Catholic Cathedral in Nassau in January 1963 after their wedding cer-

emony. Bishop Leonard Hagarty, OSB, performed the ceremony.





every story that is printed in the
paper has to be written,
proofed and edited before it is
passed for publlication. And if
the story is not true, accurate
and balanced then the publish-
er and writer may have to suf-
fer the consequences of the law,
which could mean an action in
court with costly damages. So
the important aspect of a news-
paper publisher is that he must
be responsible. Unfortunately
today there are many who turn
a blind eye to their responsibil-
ities in this regard.

For the past 35 years - since
1972, a year before
Independence - my wife has not
only read every single major
story that has been published in
The Tribune, but she has also
done much of the editing of
front page stories, besides writ-
ing a daily editorial column that
tries to keep the government of
the day on its toes and true to
its promises to the Bahamian
people. Many people credit her
with helping to keep a balanced
and democratic form of govern-
ment present in the Bahamas.
She has been honoured by the
Queen with a CMG and by the
Bahamian people with a gold
medal on the occasion of the
25th anniversary of
Independence in 1998 for serv-
ices to the Bahamian people
through journalism.

It was at her father’s knee as
a young girl that Eileen was
introduced to the life of a news-
paper man. She adored her
father, who among other
achievements was responsible
for breaking down racial barri-
ers in public places in the
Bahamas in 1956. For this he
received the Mergenthaler
Award. But as he was seriously
ill at the time, Eileen was very
proud to accept the award on
his behalf and travelled to Cuba
where the Inter-American Press
was meeting that year - a year
before Castro took over the coun-
try.

i Continued on page 5


























Congratulations
Eileen Dupuch Carron

on celebrating 50 years of impeccable service in Bahamian journalism

KELLY’S Hardware on Bay Street in the 60's

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NANCY & DAVID REMY explore Selly's Nardwware’s
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YHE KELLY FAMILY §L-R} Ancrew, Gregory,
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Stee



Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism :

My wonderful wife of many talents

i From page 4

Her father holds the record in
the Guinness Book of Records
as the longest serving editor of
a newspaper (64 years) and also
has the unique distinction of
having gained three knight-
hoods, one from the Vatican,
one from the Knights of Malta
and one from the Haitian gov-
ernment.

A world figure

While her father was a world
figure who counted such nota-
bles as Lord Louis
Mountbatten, Lord Beaver-
brook, Sir Robert Neville, Sir
Ralph Grey, Lord Monckton
and Lord and Lady Ranfurly as
personal friends, my wife keeps
a much more modest and low
profile. Not one to boast of her
accomplishments she neverthe-
less has many to her credit.

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON shown at

her call to the Bahamas Bar,
November 13, 1962. Thirteen has
been a lucky number for her and her
husband, Roger, also a lawyer. Both
born on the 13th.

FA a ee Ui





she managed to do it all and
remain so calm and collected ts
a wonder. Yet she did it and
remained a loving and caring
mother and wife.

Never wanted the
newspaper

My wife would be the first to
tell you that she never wanted
the newspaper. And, surpris-
ingly enough, neither did her
father. But both have worn the
mantle of duty and put their
responsibility to the Bahamian
people above that of their own
considerations. Sir Etienne
lived out the promise he made
to his father and my wife has
done the same for her father.
Both made huge sacrifices in
the process. Once Sir Etienne
was offered a fabulous offer by
his friend Lord Beaverbrook to
go and work for him at his famous
Daily Express Newspaper in
England. He could have named
his price, but instead remained at
the helm of his father’s newspa-
per. He said he had a duty to his
Bahamian people.

Sir Etienne was a naturally
gifted writer and his editorials,
written in the first person,
became an institution in the
country. Often his thoughts
would run away with him and
he filled a whole page of his
newspaper. Most people loved
the stories.he told of old
Nassau and especially when he
went on his many trips to dis-
tant lands. Many found his
writings educational and stimu-
lating and often used to thank
him for giving them courage to
face the future.

After Eileen took over the
helm the editorials were short-
ened. It was not her father’s
style, but her own. She never
writes them in the first person.
But her trenchant leaders have





PILOT EILEEN DUPUCH - shown in the pilot's seat of an aircraft in Nassau after she became the first Bahamian

woman to earn a pilot's licence in the 1950s.



° She was the second woman
to be called to the Bahamas
Bar in 1962 - the first was the
late Mrs Patricia Cozzi. Today
my wife is the longest standing
and eldest woman on the roster
of the Bahamas Bar.

° She is the Bahamas’ second
woman newspaper publisher
in the history of the country
- the first was Miss Mary
Moseley of The Nassau
Guardian.

e She is the first CEO of a
radio station (100 Jamz) in
the Bahamas and _ the
Caribbean.

e She is the first Bahamian
woman to graduate from the
Columbia School of
Journalism in New York
City.

° She is the first Bahamian
woman to fly with the
Bahamas Flying Club. These
days she only flies as a com-
mercial passenger.

¢ She is the only Bahamian to
have had her editorials read
into the US Senate record.
This was done at least twice
by Senator Bob Graham (D)
of Florida.

But besides editing and pub-
lishing The Tribune six days a
week, she also managed to be a
mother to our son Robert, run
the home, plan the meals, order
the food, do the laundry and a
myriad other chores that

housewives know have to be
done around the home when
you have young children. How



because of something that was
in the news and needed to be
dealt with. Although the criti-
cism might have meant the loss
of the work permit, my wile
stood by her principles and
never compromised them.

In all the years we have been
running ‘The ‘Tribune | have
never seen my wife lose her
temper with any member of her
staff - although there have been
many times where she may well
have been justified in doing so.
That is not her style.

She never raises her voice to
anyone, but brings a cool head
to the knotty problems that any
businessman will tell you are
faced on a daily basis in the
Bahamas.

Staff members know that
their boss keeps an open door
for them and often counsels
them on personal and family
problems. She not only wins
their confidence and respect,
but also their love and loyalty.

The celebrated — author
Arthur Hailey sometimes
wrote a note to Eileen compli-
menting her on some of her
editorials and I am constantly
amazed at her devotion to duty,
often at the expense of our own
family engagements.

Her reading interests are
wide and varied. And her

curiosity knows no bounds. The
other day she was puzzled as to
where the first recorded piece
of literature can be found. She

remembered reading some

time ago of “The Epic of

Gilgamesh” and that it was sup-
posed to be the first recorded
literature of man. She could not
find it among her extensive

library of ancient histories of

civilization so she looked it up
on the Internet. This is what
she found, and it's fascinating.
Gilgamesh was an_ historical
king of Uruk in Babylonia, on







IN THE CHAIR - A happy moment for Eileen Carron as she sits in her father's

editorial chair at The Tribune.



won her many bouquets and
brickbats. She even won the
soubriquet of being dubbed
“The Iron Lady.” My wife does
not flinch from her responsibil-
ities. Many times when the
newspaper had an application
for a work permit that was due,
she might find herself in the
invidious position of having to
criticise the government minis-
ter responsible for immigration

the River Euphrates in modern
Iraq, and lived about 4700
years ago. Many stories and
myths written about
Gilgamesh, some of which were

were

written down on tablets about
4000 years ago in the Sumerian
language and ina script known as
cuneiform = (which — means
“wedge-shaped”).

§ Continued on page 11









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The Tribune Media Group has
been providing Bahamians with

news and information since
1903.

BOS . ts pleased lo bea
pe aul of, Ghis historte
fouls hicalton



fe. commemoxale
Ce, >
Crleen Dupuch 25
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half Cen luxy of journalism
c é

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eo |
KS UKKFOW I



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Talented 4
journalist 4

with a

business

brain

By Sir Geoffrey Johnstone
Distinguished lawyer,
former head of

Higgs & Johnson law firm

I DID not know Eileen when
she was a little girl. | came to
know her through her father,
the late Sir Etienne Dupuch,

publisher of The Tribune. ©

Eileen was the apple of his eye.

My mother was an avid read-
er of The Tribune and she was
fond of saying to her friends
that she never went to bed at
night without Etienne! She was
a lover of the English language
and she admired his skill with
the English tongue.

I grew to know Sir Etienne
after my return to the Bahamas
in 1950 from my studies in
England and it was then that I
took my first timorous steps
into politics. I was convinced
that change was a necessity
and, although I became
involved with the United
Bahamian Party, I sought to
find a better way forward. Sir
Etienne helped me in that
quest. And so I grew to know
Eileen.

Eileen spent much of her
time abroad, pursuing her stud-
ies in science, English and the
law. And so she became an
extremely well-educated young
lady and was duly called to the

ti)

yt,








GRADUATION - EILEEN DUPUCH on her graduation day in 1954 from
Toronto University, Canada where she majored in Philosophy

Bahamas Bar. Several paths to
the future lay before her, but
there was an ineluctable tug to
the printer’s ink and Eileen fell
into her father’s orbit.

It was not all smooth sailing.
Sir Etienne, like many gifted
people, was a master of the
English language, and the art of
persuasion. He could appeal to
the heart and the mind and the
whole being of man’s nature
and disposition but he was not
bountifully endowed with busi-
ness skills and the harsh tedium
of dollars and cents in running
a commercial — enterprise.
Eileen’s skills lay very much in
her father’s orbit but early in
her exposure to the hard facts
of business life she learned that
business is business and_ that
there is more to the success of a

newspaper enterprise than just
the written word and the print-
ing machines.

Sir Etienne and Lady
Dupuch left the Bahamas and
went to live abroad for several
years in the early 1970s and
lived a somewhat nomadic life
in the Caribbean but the siren
song of family, friends and
memories drew them back to
their homeland and their chil-
dren.

It was then that he perceived
the startling transformation
that the little lady who was his
daughter had wrought in his
absence. And he saw before his
very eyes the enterprise which
had been his life’s work and the
child he had nurtured in the
land of his birth living and
growing and flourishing.

= Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism:

Upholding a glorious,
unbroken tradition

By Arthur A. Foulkes

Former Ambassador to the
United Kingdom

MY FIRST contact with a
great Bahamian editor and pub-
lisher was back in 1943 when I
was one of the after school and
summer vacation apprentices at
The Nassau Guardian. Mary
Moseley, who sat in the editori-
al chair of that institution for
many years, never, or very
rarely ever, came to the printing
plant on Charlotte Street.

So every afternoon before
the press started to roll we shut-
tled galley proofs between the
plant -- through a back exit to
Parliament Street -- and her
house on Bank Lane. There the
grand old lady sat elegantly

attired with pearls around her

neck and her silver gray hair
perfectly coiffed.

She seemed _ peripherally
aware of my presence in the
room as she went about her
work. Whenever she pounced
on a mistake she would deliver
a lecture as if I, the messenger,
had been responsible for the
offending piece.

The Guardian was in those
days well-written, meticulously
proofed and expertly edited.
Miss Moseley herself reported
almost verbatim on the pro-
ceedings of the House of
Assembly.

But The Guardian was decid-
edly upper crust. It unashamed-
ly reflected the activities and
interests of the ruling class of
those days and paid little or no
attention to the activities or
concerns of the majority of the
Bahamian people.

I had also done a summer at
The Tribune on Shirley Street
but did not really get to know
the editor of that newspaper

until I joined the staff as a full-
time employee in 1948. To say
that Etienne Dupuch was dif-
ferent from Mary Moseley
would be quite an understate-
ment.

Sir Etienne was a dynamic,
involved editor who mastered
every process in the production
and printing of his newspaper,
knew every one of his employ-
ees and took a paternal interest
in each of them.

He was also a hard-hitting,
crusading editor who not only
recognized the injustices inher-
ent in Bahamian society at the
time, but waged a relentless
campaign for reform. His edi-
torials were written in a very
personal, free-flowing style, not
at all like the traditional, struc-
tured leaders of Miss Moseley.

Today’s politicians can con-
sider themselves quite lucky
that they are no longer exposed
to the kind of cutting ridicule
that Sir Etienne sometimes
meted out when he became irri-
tated at the excesses of those
who dominated the political
landscape in his day.

Sir Etienne had great person-
al loyalties which he unhesitat-
ingly expressed in his columns,
but he was passionate in his
pursuit of the truth, which he
published without fear or
favour in the news columns of
his paper.

Like all great journalists he
was committed to accuracy. A
mistake -- especially a mistake
of fact -- was to him a calamity
and something that had to be
admitted and corrected at the
earliest opportunity.

While he did fierce battle
with his foes and excoriated the
most arrogant among them, Sir
Etienne made sure that his
newspaper reflected the wider





society and that its columns
were open to all points of view.

In fact, letters taking issue
with him got priority publica-
tion over less interesting ones
waiting for attention in the edi-
torial tray. 1 can give personal
testimony to this because on
occasion I had the temerity to
challenge him in his own news-
paper while I sat at the head of
his news desk.

This is, in brief, the glorious
unbroken tradition of The
Tribune, a tradition which is
upheld today by Eileen Dupuch
Carron who, like Mary Moseley
and then her father, has become
the pre-eminent Bahamian edi-
tor and publisher of her day.

Change has come to The
Tribune under the leadership of
Mrs. Carron, and that was
inevitable. The editorial space
in The Tribune no_ longer
reflects the personal style of Sir
Etienne -- it is doubtful that
anyone could successfully imi-
tate him even if they wanted to
— but neither does it reflect the
staid formal style of Miss
Moseley.

Mrs. Carron is an accom-
plished journalist who knows
how to separate fact from fic-
tion, has a full understanding of
Bahamian history and its inter-
national and local context, and
has the intellectual capacity and
skill to put it all together.

She has inherited her father’s
strong sense of loyalty, but she
has also kept the news and
opinion columns of her newspa-
per open to reflect the activities
and opinions of all segments of
Bahamian society.

She has earned the gratitude
and congratulations of the
Bahamian people and has lived
up to the confidence that Sir
Etienne placed in her.





CONGRATULATIONS TO:

EILEEN



DUPUCH

CARRON





a



“onset

cap pee



() YA #
ae a ‘ ' t
TIES

CMG, MS. BA, LLB
On 50 years in
Bahamian Journalism

tthe,



From: Management and
Staff of Sandy s







Partners

Eoranuct M, Alexiou, BA,
Emerick A. Raowles, B Comm,
E, Tomy Neath, LLB

Reber F Van Wyaen, 8.4. RL BR
Luther H. MeDone’d, BA, 2L 8,



Associates
James F, Knowles, LP
Denawan L. Gabe, LLB

Nagaau
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Nossats, NB, Bahamas
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Marsh Harbour
PQ, Box AB-2018
Great Abooo, Bahamas
Telephone
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Wis. babumasiass.com,

GLoBALAW

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Sale Bahamas Member

ake

BahamasLaw.com



Counsel and Attarnays-at~_aw
Nassau, Bahamas

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
LL

THE FIRM SALUTE

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,

CMG., M.S., BA, LLB.

ON HER MANY 157 ACCOMPLISHMENTS,

BUT IN PARTICULAR, WE

CONGRATULATE HER ON REACHING

A MILESTONE WITH 50 YEARS

OF DEDICATED SERVICE

IN BAHAMIAN JOURNALISM







. Jovember, 2007

Yelebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism





The ‘mother
hen’ who kept
us straight

By Rupert Roberts
President of Super Value
Foodstores

MY FAMILY and I take
great personal pleasure in not
just recognising, but indeed in
celebrating, Eileen Carron’s
50th anniversary as a journalist.
That Mrs Carron would have
inherited a talent for journal-
ism is easily explained - after
all, she is the granddaughter of
Leon Dupuch, who founded
The Tribune over a century
ago, and the daughter of Sir
Etienne Dupuch who is, with-
out doubt, the pre-eminent
journalist in Bahamian history.

That genetic inheritance is
just the beginning of the story,
however. Mrs Carron, on her
watch, has continued to uphold
The Tribune's tradition of fear-
less comment. In so doing, she
has served her profession and
her country in an exemplary
fashion. At a time when the
information age has brought
Bahamians an almost endless
access to news, the fact that
The Tribune remains the first
choice for many speaks vol-
umes.

This anniversary, though,
also. recognises her other
accomplishments: as a manager
and business person. Mrs
Carron has succeeded in man-
aging and evolving The Tribune
into the most successful media
company in The Bahamas.

In making the Tribune
Group financially sound, she
superseded even her forebears.

Ce

HIGGS & JOHNSON

Good, sound Bahamian owned
and operated businesses will
keep our country viable and
create good examples for our
children to emulate.

Eileen Carron is one
Bahamian we wish there were
more of. As a young reporter,
Mrs Carron always placed
emphasis on accuracy, truth
and honesty.

That’s how she
known to us as “Mother Hen”,

became

she kept us all straight. After
Mr Rusty Bethel became asso-
ciated with The tribune, she
always warned me not to do or
say anything that | did not want
to see as headlines in tomor-
row’ Tribune.

Mrs Carron always preached
not to discriminate and to give
to the needy as evidenced when
she encouraged my daughter
Candy and her son Robert to
provide toys for needy children
every Christmas. People who
don’t know Mrs Carron well
would consider her profession-
ally prim and proper. However,
there is another side to this
wonderful lady which was often
revealed on our many pleasant
visits to The Tribune to check
our ads. When Mr and Mrs
Carron would come out of their
office to speak to our group, by
the time we left the whole staff
would be cracking up with
laughter.

The Roberts family and the
Super Value family wish Mrs
Carron a happy 50th anniver-
sary, good health, happiness
and prosperity in the future.

Ions

uz



RWW
W@W QU













EILEEN DUPUCH enjoys a quiet moment feeding some squirrels on the extensive grounds of the Taj Mahal in Agra, India in 1961 during the Commonwealth

Press Union tour of that country



WI

COAT Cea

Mrs. Fileey

Of

50 years

Vmcenareltanal
OTT
ANN
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Broadcasting

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Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism



A woman who doesn’t mince words

By David and Nancy Kelly
Family friends and owners of
Kelly's Home Centre

WHEN we think of Eileen
Carron so many memories
come flooding back, stemming
all the way back to when David
was a young boy, often carpool-
ing with Eileen and her broth-
ers to Queen’s College, Sir
Etienne driving the car over-
flowing with kids but making
room for the Kelly boys. A gen-
eration later, the pattern
repeated itself, our own. chil-
dren carpooling with Eileen’s
son, Robert. There were the
many children’s birthday par-
ties, the kindness and attention
Eileen as Tribune Editor has
always given our business,
Kelly's, the effort that went into
producing the recent Tribune
supplement of which we are so
proud.

But behind it all, no matter
how we picture Eileen Carron

CELEBRATING 100
YEARS - EILEEN’S
MOTHER Lady
Marie Dupuch is
shown her cake on
her 100th

birthday
surrounded by fam-
ily and friends.
From left: Daughers
Bette, Eileen and
Joan, her sister
Rose and brother
Henry, friend
Pamela Stuart and
grandson

Etienne Ill.



it is impossible to separate her
from her profession. We think
of her as a journalist first, a
newswoman, editor, writer who
has made -- and continues to
make -- an immense, lasting
and immeasurable contribution
to this nation. We remember,
too, years when she almost
made it to a social event but at
the last minute called to apolo-
gise because she could not
leave the office. Times when we
would see her car pull into the
driveway as we were getting up
for the morning and she was
coming home from another day
that turned into all night at the
office. An entire year once
without attending a_ single
engagement except one funer-
al, those work habits were a
symbol of the passion she felt
toward her profession to bring
all the information, all the
news, all the ins and outs and
backroom maneuverings and
political manipulation to the

public, information we never
would have had without her.
Yet we do know. Eileen
Carron, the woman with the
tough exterior and the soft
heart, as a friend, a mother, a
wife, a daughter. We saw her
care for her own mother, brush-
ing her long silver hair falling
almost to the waist until she
passed away at the age of 101.
We know the times Eileen left
the paper to run home and
make her family a hot meal
only to jump back in her car
and go back to The Tribune
carrying her own food with her.
We know, too, how much she
loves her family and they her,
with Roger her steadfast com-
panion inside the newspaper
offices and at home, now
Robert carrying on the
Dupuch-Carron news legacy.
How do you thank this
woman who has given her
strength and wisdom to all of us
without reservation for 50 years

so that we may know the truth
even when it is uncomfortable
or painful or too close to home,
truth that helps us to decide
how to govern ourselves, how
to make life better for our chil-
dren, how to protect, preserve,
how to make the right deci-
sions? As we congratulate you
on 50 years of journalistic
excellence and hope you con-
tinue to inspire us with your
poignant editorials, we add our
personal appreciation for the
friendship that began more
than six decades ago with your
father, Sir Etienne, driving you
and the Kelly boys to school.
The world has changed around
us, but here we are in the same
neighbourhood and through
the march of time, you have
never stopped being our friend,
neither has your dedication
weakened nor your pen dulled.
Thank you for all you have
done, all you do, and for being
our friend.












QUIET MOMENT - EILEEN'S MOTHER takes a call from her sister Betty in
California on her 96th birthdpay at the home of Eileen and Roger Carron
where the late Lady Dupuch spent the last eight years of her life after suffer-
ing a series of debilitating strokes.







ce

ee







from the management

and staff of

ongratulations h

MRS EILEEN

DUPUCH CARRON
OnAllOfYour jf
Achievements






















MRS EILEEN
DUPUCH CARRON

CMG,

on all of your achievements

from the management and staff of

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Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism





A highly intelligent Calm in the face of
and charming lady

By Ralph D. Seligman, QC.

1 AM delighted to be given
the opportunity of congratulat-
ing Eileen Carron on her 50
years association with The
Tribune. Coincidentally, I
arrived in the Bahamas in
January 1957 to permanently
reside in Nassau.

Not long afterwards I had the
pleasure of meeting both Eileen
and her distinguished father, Sir
Etienne Dupuch, from which
bonds were forged which, in
Eileen’s case, have endured
over the subsequent 50 years in
the course of which I have had






many sporadic conversations
and meetings with both her and
her husband, Roger (Carron).
Sometimes many months have
passed by without any contact
at all, but whenever there has
been a ‘phone call on either side
it seems as if we last spoke only
a few days previously. The high-
est compliment I can pay Eileen
is that she has never tried in any
way to convert me to her well
known political views. She
knows that as the honorary con-
sul of a foreign country it is not
appropriate for me to express
any views on Bahamian politi-
cal matters. However, it is not
inappropriate of me to say that
whether one might agree or dis-
agree with the views she
expresses in her editorial col-
umn, nobody can deny that she
expresses those views eloquent-
ly and in her honest belief that
she is expressing them tor what
she sees as for the benefit of the
Bahamas. Naturally, she is not
short of hostile ene-

mies, but on a purely personal
basis she has the personal

respect and even friendship of :

many of them. Leaving political
considerations aside I have
found both Eileen and Roger to
be highly intelligent and inter-

: By Peter Young

: Former British High
: Commissioner to The
: Bahamas

esting to talk to on all sorts of }

subjects and in my case particu-

larly on matters of legal inter-
est, since all three of us are bar-
risters at law. Quite apart from
the foregoing, Eileen is person-

ally a very charming lady and

Roger is fortunate in having her
as his wife.

If 1 may borrow a_ phrase
from Sir Etienne I am sure that

both friend and foe will wish

Eileen many more years of edi-

torial activity to brighten up our}

with her comments
whether we think them
absolutely right or thorougly
uncalled for. 1 feel we can rely

lives

on her equally controversial son
Robert to do a fine job in ensur-
ing his mother has a most enjoy-
able ceremony to celebrate so }

unique an anniversary.



ONE OF the first happy
: tasks of a newly-arrived High
: Commissioner is to meet the
: people who play an influential
i role in the life of the country.
The old, — time-honoured
: expression is “leading person-
: alities”, which, translated into
: modern parlance, means the
: local movers and shakers!

So it was that, shortly after
: settling down in Nassau in early
1996, I found myself in the
: imposing panelled — editor’s
: office of The Tribune talking to
: Eileen and Roger Carron who
: subsequently, to my wife’s and
my great good fortune,
became close friends.



Of course,
: before calling






on those movers and shakers
one is supposed to do some
homework about them so that
the conversation can become
something more than one way
traffic. I had read of Eileen’s
legendary father, Sir Etienne
Dupuch, who had handed the
baton of editorship to her as
long ago as 1972. And it was
clear that in the succeeding
years she had made her own
mark. The Tribune, yet to
become Nassau’s leading daily,
appeared in those days in the
afternoon and one could readi-
ly observe the fruit of her
labours.

There was little doubt that I
was going to meet an excep-
tional individual and so it

MEETING IN NASSAU at the residence of the British High Commissioner Peter Young some years ago. Shown from left: Sir Geoffery Johnstone, former British prime minister Lady Thatcher, Eileen
Carron and Sir Durward and Lady Knowles.








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endless deadlines

proved to be: a talented and
experienced writer, journalist
and administrator with a
warmth and friendliness to
which so many must have been
drawn over the years.

It did not take long to discern
her many qualities ? calm, con-
sistent, imperturbable, inde-
fatigable in the face of endless
press deadlines, and possessing
an unmatched historical knowl-
edge about the Bahamas com-
bined with an ability to pro-
duce incisive and informative
editorials which invariably go
to the heart of the matter.

No one can deny that in the
Bahamian media _ Eileen
Carron represents the fearless
voice of reason and justice,
ensuring that those in positions
of power and influence are held
to account for their actions in
relation to their fellow
Bahamians.

That is a heavy responsibility
and how wonderfully well she
discharges it.

Undoubtedly, she was care-
fully groomed for the job. The
family photograph album in
their magnificent new resi-
dence in Camperdown shows a
strikingly attractive young
woman who was already dis-
playing her intellect and com-
mitment in qualifying as a
lawyer in London before
returning with her new hus-
band to Nassau to take on the
mantle established by her fore-
bears.

What a lady and what a
record of achievement! Like
many others, I salute her on the
occasion of her 50 years in jour-
nalism. May she continue her
splendid work for countless
years to come.









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A national treasure with a

passion for her profession

By Sir Albert Miller
President of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority

This is a tribute to Eileen
Dupuch Carron, a woman of
great wisdom and rare accom-
plishments.

1 BELIEVE I first met
Eileen during the early 50's. I
had already served almost 10
years with the Police Force and
now my career landed me a
post with the Criminal
Investigation Department of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force (CID). This would have
been during the early years of
Eileen’s professional career. |
remember her very quiet
demeanour and viewed her as a
deep thinker. As a young court
reporter, Eileen frequented the
CID area, walking into the
department with a look of
excitement and anticipation on
her face. Maybe Eileen would
tell her story a little differently,
but I believe that her involve-
ment with CID and the Courts
strengthened her budding jour-
nalistic passion.

Eileen and | share a fervency
for our careers. By 1957, Eileen
had blossomed and achieved a
level for which she could be
very proud. No longer a
teenager or a court reporter,
Eileen, now in her late 20’s, was
an official reporter for the
Tribune. Because of her aggres-
sive reporting, I was not at all
surprised when she became one
of the first Bahamian female
Publishers. Complacency was
not a welcomed trait for Eileen;

A FAMILY PICTURE - taken
with their baby son Robert
David, now President of The
Tribune

and as soon as it became rou-
tine for me to read her stories
in the Tribune, her reports
came to a halt and she was off
to law school in pursuit of yet
another success as the second
Bahamian female lawyer.

By the year 1962, Eileen now
prefaced her name with the
title Esquire, but even with
these honours bestowed upon
her, she could not leave her first
passion alone.

Eileen and I remained
friends throughout the success-
es of her career, and I was
happy to be a guest at her mar-
riage to Roger.

By ’69 Eileen readily accept-
ed her post as Assistant News
Editor to her husband Roger.
Eileen befriended the Nassau
community. Balancing her
family and social life, she still
found moments to bury herself
in her work. | think Eileen is
one of the fastest researchers |
have ever known. She could
spit out a column or a story in
no time and still make room for
life’s little pleasures.

By 1972, | was settling in my
career in Grand Bahama. | was
no longer on The Force, but |
remained a faithful reader of
The Tribune.

When her father Sir Etienne
retired, Eileen willingly accept-
ed the opportunity to become
the Editor and Publisher of the
National paper, simultaneously
accepting her place in
Bahamian history being the
second Bahamian female
Editor.

Eileen, you have carved out a
career in journalism; achieving
many firsts for Bahamian
women long before — the
women's movement took wind
in The Bahamas. What a joy it
is to know you - a National
Treasure. You have provided
inspiration, guidance, motiva-
tion and continuing encourage-
ment for Bahamians and the
role you play in journalism.

Please receive my heart felt
congratulations and best wishes
for many more years, as you
celebrate an unparalleled 50
years in Bahamian journalism.





ALL THE FAMILY - EILEEN CARRON pictured with husband Roger and son Robert outside the royal residence of
Buckingham Palace, London in June 2000 after she received her CMG from the Queen at a royal investiture. Her
father, the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, had been knighted earlier in 1964 by Her Majesty.



A steadfast media
stalwart who kept faith
with her paper’s motto

By Hon.Oliver F. Clarke, O.J.
Chairman & Managing
Director, The Gleaner
Company Limited

EILEEN Dupuch-Carron is
one of the most prominent fig-
ures in the Bahamas, known for
her outspokenness and commit-
ment to principles of justice, a
reflection of her father’s work on
behalf of the dispossessed in The
Bahamas.

She has remained steadfast in
the face of consistent opposition
to her work, ignoring interests in
government and other influen-
tial sectors as she continues to
lobby in the interest of the











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gail ages FP vas ne ee os By
TANG Sidi



"CHY

AF ene RS

ene iy a aabepe 6 a ‘
aed







Eileen Dupuch Carron
Celebrating 50 years in
Bahamian Journalism



NASSAU OFFICE

P.O. Box N-7120
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 302-4800
FAX: (242) 322-3101

Bahamian people.

Eileen is truly a media stal-
wart and a Caribbean woman
who has determined that not
only will she succeed as a jour-
nalist and media manager, but
she must also facilitate an
improved quality of life for oth-
ers.

The media has been integral
to the progress of the region,
bringing into focus the issues
that affect development.

The Tribune has played this
role for the Bahamas over the
last 105 years, and Eileen
Dupuch-Carron’s work has been
consistent with its motto
‘“Nullius addictus jurare in

verba magistri,” which means,
“Being bound to swear to the
dogmas of no master.”

Eileen was recognised for her
significant impact on Bahamian
society by the Queen in 2000
when she was appointed to the
Order of St. Michael And St.
George for services to the
growth and development of The
Bahamas.

As Eileen celebrates fifty
years in journalism, I add my
own recognition of her work as a
distinguished member of the
Caribbean’s journalistic commu-
nity and within the
Commonwealth Press Union in
the Caribbean.







Deloitte.

CONGRATULATIONS

to

FROM THE PARTNERS AND STAFF OF

DELOITTE & TOUCHE

PARTNERS

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FREEPORT OFFICE

P.O, Box F-43746
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
Teu (242) 373-3015
Fax: (242) 373-1468









————



Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism





JOURNALISM IN
BAHAMAS





















Wonderful fe"

wife of
many
talents

i From page 5

The tablets actually name the
author, Shineqi-unninni. So this
is the first known author in
recorded history. Quite a story
and quite a find by my wife!

So my wife printed out the
entire epic of nearly 80 pages.
And [ have little doubt that she
will read it and get a story out
of it for one of her editorials in
the not too distant future. That
is the most amazing thing about
my wife. She never wastes a
minute of her life if she can
help it. She reads for enjoy-
ment as well as for her general
knowledge. These days I will
do all the driving in town if we
have to go anywhere. She likes
this and because she doesn't
like to sit and do nothing she
usually grabs a French gram-
mar book and passes the time
by improving her French
vocabulary as we drive to the
office or downtown.

Nothing gives her greater
pleasure than sitting at home
with a good book and listening
to something from her exten-
sive music library. She shuns
most television shows, but
enjoys news programmes and
PBS theatre shows.

From all that I have said you
may not gather that my wife is
also a very private person who
shuns publicity and will no
doubt be horrified that I have
disclosed all this information
about her in this manner. But
you may also gather that I am
very proud of her and our son
Robert, who not only brought
The Tribune into the computer
age after leaving Notre Dame





ON THE JOB - TRIBUNE EDITOR Eileen Carron seen talking to lawyer Sir
Orville Turnquest outside the House of Assembly when the newspaper was
called in by House Speaker Sir Clifford Darling in 1985 over a Tribune report
of House proceedings.



University but has kept the
newspaper on the cutting edge
of developments in the fast-
moving technological age of
today.

The Tribune has been at the
forefront of |newpspaper
advances and innovatons in the
country, largely in recent times
thanks to our son Robert. But
it may also be worth recording
some of the achievements of
the newspaper in its 104 year

history. (See separate story)

One that is worth recording
is that The Tribune can claim
the honour of being the first
newspaper outside of the
United States to go entirely
Macintosh computer operated
and only the second newspaper
plant in Mac history. This was
all thanks to our son Robert
who had initiated the move
while he was still a student at
Notre Dame University.







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An editor who plays a major
role in keeping dissent alive

TRE EA ENT SEAR RFE A CT ICR RTE TE AES TER IEE ERE TE TO ERE ET RE EOL TE ORS UR Re.

Dee

—

cows er ere

ESS TSE ERS TEST SST OUT TERS ET,

ree

By Larry Smith
President, Media
Enterprises Ltd

“It’s Eileen Carron again and
her propaganda...” goes a typi-
cal line from her detractors.

But according to Eileen her-
self, she was taught to “respect
the other man’s point of view
and insist on his right to
express that point of view with-
out fear of victimisation.”

How do we reconcile these
two very different characterisa-
tions?

Well, we could start by taking
a look at just what propaganda
is. As most of us understand it,
the term refers to the presenta-
tion of derogatory, biased and

misleading information.
Propaganda presents facts

selectively in loaded messages
aimed at producing an emo-
tional response.

Interestingly, a Nazi manual
published in the 1930s had this
to say about political propagan-
da: “The general line is known.
We are on the attack, on the
march. There is no turning
back, no wavering.” Sound
familiar?

To a great extent, propagan-
da is the presentation of lies
disguised as truth, in order to
manipulate an audience. A
“good” propagandist knows
that the best way to promote a
lie is to discredit the other side
by accusing them of lying,
which leads to all sorts of circu-
lar logic. In fact, some wag
once described propaganda as
“selling lies like cigarettes”.

Perhaps the best exposition
of propaganda appears in
George Orwell’s famous novel
“1984”, which introduced the
concept of Newspeak. This
official re-tooling of the

English language corrupted
words by assigning them to
their conventional opposites:

“War is Peace,” “Freedom ts
Slavery,” “Tonorance is
Strength.” This happens in real
life too. The Soviet propaganda
newspaper, for example, was
named “Pravda,” which trans-
lates as truth.

In fact, this corruption of
words is akin to what some
political propagandists are try-
ing to do in the Bahamas today.
The outlandish charges against
opponents are presented in
exaggerated and fiery lan-
guage. The conspiracy theories
are specially crafted to push
buttons. The insults seek to
chip away at the other side’s
morale, while convincing fence
sitters that there must be some-
thing to what is being said. But
perhaps most significantly, the
lies are presented to distract
attention from real issues and
to discredit independent voic-
es.

A newspaper tries to present
information as accurately and
impartially as possible. But
true objectivity is impossible to
achieve. The very selection of
which news items to publish
and in what order is based on
an editor’s opinions as well as
the state of his liver on any par-
ticular day. And mistakes are
impossible to avoid, no matter
how meticulous the editing
process. There is no such thing
as perfection in journalism, or
in any other human pursuit.
One has to make a judgement
on what information to accept
from which sources, with the
caveat that no information
should be accepted uncritically,
no matter who presents it.

The Tribune developed a
reputation as a reactionary bas-
tion during the quarter-century
of PLP rule, when Sir Lynden
Pindling’s propagandists (some
of whom are still around today)
tried endlessly to discredit the
newspaper and drive its owners



“It is to
their
credit

that Roger
and Eileen
stood up
to the

pressures.”



out of business. It is to their
credit that Eileen and Roger
stood up to the pressures, even
though their political position
was hugely unpopular at the
time.

The bottom line is that you
don't have to agree with every-
thing the Dupuch-Carrons say
to accept that they have played
a major role in keeping dissent
alive in this country. In my
view, that is Eileen’s chief con-
tribution to the development of
the Bahamas.





AT SCHOOL EILEEN DUPUCH - pictured (left) at her convent school in England with her sister Joan and a Belgian
nun. The convent school in now closed.



Joann McPike

‘
ROBERT CARRON with his mother on board a helicopter en route to Grand Bahama after a hurricane in 2005



A side of my mother
that’s rarely seen

By Robert Carron

MOST PEOPLE know Eileen
Dupuch Carron as a crusading
journalist, lawyer, an uncompro-
mising defender of the truth, a
champion of the downtrodden, a
no nonsense, highly intelligent,
talented woman. | know her dif-
ferently. She is my mother and
oh yeah... my boss!!. Its the other
side of Mrs C or Mumma Carron
( to her staff) that’s rarely seen
by many except The Tribune
family and friends.

In fact she’s so caring and wor-
ried about others that on occa-
sions over the years she has
asked me to bail some of our
DJ's out over various indiscre-
tions that the Seargent on Duty
at Central Police station has
asked me * How many black
children ya ma get!” “Plenty,” |
rephied!!

What truly makes mum amaz-
ing: maybe it’s her uncondition-
al love, dedication, and
unselfishness, accepting my
good and challenging me each
and every day to improve my
bad points. Maybe it’s” her
Catholic faith in God and stead-
fast belief in her principles of
honestly, integrity, perseverance
and hard work which she has
honed and sometimes, when
necessary, hammered into me
from a small age. Perhaps it’s her
love for education, her belief in
uplifting oneself no matter the
circumstances; and of course her
amazing ability to put into per-
spective history so that I could
understand, and avoid, a repeat
of the mistakes of the past.

In fact when I was at
University studying my polit-
ical science degree I would
buy 2 sets of books: one for me
and one for my mum. Naturally
I wouldn't tell a soul who the sec-
ond set was for but she would
read them in her spare time
while running The Tribune and
taking care of my grandmother
and dad. Yet although I was
studying full time invariably |
was always a number of chapters
behind her and she was con-
stantly telling me to

pick up the
pace!! Or bet-
ter sull

maybe its
her calm
atti-
tude
when







re
i







I asked if a few people could
come home for Spring break and
she was descended on by a hoard
of drinking, partying college stu-
dents for a week of debauch-
ery!!!

I’ve never known mum to
complain but she always encour-
ages you to strive beyond your
talents and be able to shift with
the moment while being true to
ones self. Perhaps one of mum’s
most endearing attributes is the
way in which she and dad are so
in love that they truly act as one.
There’s no need to ask one then
the other what they think as they
are invariably in unison.

They truly are not happy
unless they are with each other,
except of course when dad plays
golf. Pl always remember when
I first asked Dad how he met
mum and with a good case of
bravado he proudly exclaimed
that your old man “pulled” your
mum from class of some 60 men
when there were only 2 women,
and that it was “love at first sight
when she saw me!!” Ask mum
and she smiles devilshly and says
she was “running for the hills!”
first time dad asked her out!!!

Mum does not like sports, in
fact is probably one of the few
people who could not tell you
what sports Tiger Woods or
Michael Jordon play but could


















recite Plato, Socrates and
Aristotle ad lib.
So it

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CONGRATULATIONS Io:

OF JOURNALISM

‘Cileen Dupuch lena

ON YOUR GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY IN THE FIELD




















would come as no surprise that
mum has no idea how many
holes you play for a round of
golf. Well dad, never to be one
not to capture the moment,
promptly informed mum when
she called one day and asked
where he was, told her that he
was approaching the 19th hole
(the bar) and that it’s a “long one
darling!” There was no further
communication until months
later when one of her friends
promptly informed mum
“Come on Eileen...golf only has
18 holes!” Naturally the cat was
outta the bag and dad was in a
spot of agro!!

I thought the best way to show
you a glimpse of the other side of
mum was to tell some stories
that best relate who she is.

] remember her asking me if 1
wanted to run The Tribune when
I was a small boy. Of course I
thought great idea..so I went and
got changed and put on my
Sunday suit and bow tie and
came to work. She handed me
an overall and spatula and |
asked what this was. She said if I
wanted to learn to run the news-
paper one day then I needed to
start at the very bottom and
learn how to ink it. And so
began my journey in the family
business even to today.

And talking of journeys its
always fun to travel because
mum is reading and not saying
much and dad is chatting to just
about anybody.

So much so that on certain
occasions mum and I just
« laugh and disown him. On
\ one occasion we were
checking into — the
— Chicago Hilton down-
town and there was a
long line.
~ Dad was all dressed
* up in his blazer, tie and
walking around the lobby
while mum and | were in
the line. Two gorgeous

~* SAS flight attendants came

up to him and said “Are you
the manager,” they asked

“No but by God 1 wish I
was,” he replied. “Roger,
\ i Continued on
page 20













‘November, 2007 Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism _ ‘The Tribune | 13





\alutes

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON,

a Trailblazing Journalist,
Publisher & Exemplary Leader

On

50 YEARS of GREATNESS!



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Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism







Standing for principle
and what is right

By Mike Lightbourn
President of Coldwell
Banker/Lightbourn
Real Estate Company

EILEEN Dupuch did not
know what lay in store for

CS oN a





her when she first entered
this world. She was the
daughter of one of the finest
sons this country ever pro-
duced and a very remarkable
woman her father discovered
in a little Pennsylvania town.



SS

ON BEING CALLED TO THE BAR - Eileen Carron is shown with members of the Bahamas Bar in November 1962.

She would have grown up
in an atmosphere of being
taught to stand on principle
and fight for what was right.
Not too many people have
that opportunity. She would
have seen her family sacri-

fice far beyond what might
have been expected,

She would come home
from. school to find her
mother “holding the fort”
while her father was at work
engaging in the battles of the
day.

She was brought up with
the knowledge that much
was expected of her and she
would be given an education
overseas that would equip
her for the rough road

ahead.



s R

S

a SS SS

Seated from left: the Hon. Eugene Dupuch, QC, her uncle and sponsor, Mrs Carron, Chief Justice Ralph Campbell,
Attorney General L.A.W. Orr and the Hon. Godfrey Higgs.
Standing from left: Godfrey Kelly, Harry Sands, Mrs Patricia Cozzi (first Bahamian woman called to the Bar, Mrs



- \ i

Carron was the second), Dawson Roberts,

While in London she met
and was wooed by Roger
Carron who was also study-
ing law.

They came back to the
Bahamas in the early 1960s
and were immediately put to
work at the Tribune to pave
the way for Eileen one day
becoming the Editor to
replace one of my Bahamian
heroes.

When the call came she,
along with the hard work
and unflinching support of

SS

Geoffrey Johnstone







Mars. Carron,
USA TODAY

salutes you for your
50 years of dedication,
professionalism and
trailblazing journalism.

Roger, carried out her job
admirably. Sir Etienne had
trained her well.

Few people realise or
appreciate the number of
man hours the two of them
put into THE TRIBUNE to
keep it going and to provide
a voice for all citizens.

The people of this country
owe a great debt to the
Carrons and it is with great
pleasure that I am able to be
a part of this special celebra-
tion.





(now Sir Geoffrey), Court Bailiff
Arthur Parrish, Orville Turnquest, QC (now Sir Orville and later Governor-General), Kendal Isaacs, QC (later Sir
Kendal and Attorney General), Peter Christie, Leonard Knowles, (later Sir Leonard and a Chief Justice) and Mervyn
Johnson.







By Athena Damianos
Former Tribune
News Editor

It was during the ‘80s - the
height of The Cocaine Wars.
The drug trade permeated the
fabric of society and the
Bahamas was known as ‘A
Nation for Sale.’ Corruption
snaked its way through the law
enforcement agencies and into
the Cabinet. On Norman’s Cay,
a jewel of an island in the
secluded Exumas, the notori-
ous neo-Nazi trafficker Carlos
Lehder flew the Colombian
flag over his drug empire.

When lawmaker Norman
Solomon protested in
Parliament, his house and car
were firebombed. No-one was
safe. A retired American pilot
and his wife - in the wrong
place at the wrong time — were
murdered on their sailboat in
the Exumas. Magistrates hear-
ing drug cases woke up late at
night to the sound of bullets
spraying their homes. People

disappeared. Drug money
flooded the islands.
One Independence Day,

American $100 bills rained
over the Clifford Park cere-
monies with leaflets urging the
DEA to go home.

The Tribune was fighting an
often lonely battle against the
trade which, in many respects,
set the stage for today’s violent
society.

Eileen Carron was in the edi-
tor’s chair with her husband,
Roger, the managing editor,
working alongside her in a
politically hostile environment.

It was against this back-
ground that a well-known local
trafficker swaggered into The
Tribune newsroom one day,
flanked by his flunky. This traf-





ficker was a mean man. A few
weeks earlier, his rival fled
Freeport and sneaked into The
Tribune pleading for help.

Every hair had been singed
off his head and eyelids with an
acetylene torch. His face was
burned and hideously scarred.
He feared for his life.

He was running from the
strapping trafficker who now
stood in the newsroom with his
skinny, balding sidekick.

The trafficker strutted to the
editor’s desk, towered over
Eileen Carron and demanded
that The Tribune cease writing
articles about him. Boasting



When the little lady
defied a drug lord

about political connections and
protection, he — arrogantly
sought to intimidate the editor.
He threatened to have The
Tribune shut down. Fingers
stopped typing in the news-
room as all eyes turned on the
disgusting duo.

Mrs. Carron slowly rose to
her feet, pulled her five foot,
two inch frame fully upright
and faced the big bully square-
ly.

‘How dare you come into
The Tribune to try to intimi-
date my staff!’ she scolded.

She lectured them on their

manners and reminded them of

The ‘Tribune’s motto — ‘Being
Bound to Swear to the Dogmas
of No Master.’

The trafficker was taken
aback.

He’d never met the spunky
editor and was shocked to find
the woman of steel was so
petite. He tried again. She
stood her ground. He gaped
like a grouper. He stuttered.
He apologised. He and _ his
flunky slunk out of the news-
room, tails tucked between
their legs.

Wordlessly, Mrs. Carron
returned to her word proces-
sor. She had a paper to put out.





DAME EUGENIA CHARLES, the late Prime Minister of Dominica and a long-
time friend of the Dupuch family who attended Toronto University with
Eileen’s uncle, the Hon. Eugene Dupuch, QC, shown with Lady Dupuch (seat-
ed) and (standing |-r) Roger and Eileen Carron and their son Robert, now
president of The Tribune. A painting of Eileen’s father, the late Sir Etienne
Dupuch is shown in background.

LORD LOUIS MOUNTBATTEN - uncle to Queen Elizabeth, shares a joke with his friend and host Sir Etienne Dupuch at the East Hill Club when Lord Louis launched a drive to set up a Foundation
locally to send two Bahamians annually as students to the United World Colleges being set up by Lord Mountbatten throughout the world. Sir Etienne was successful in setting up a Bahama
Foundation. Shown (I-r): Roger Carron, Lord Mountbatten, Sir Etienne and Lady Dupuch and Eileen Dupuch Carron. (Photo: Stanley Toogood)

VeOYS

Congratulations to:

1s, Eileen Dupuch Carron

achieving this milestone in journalism

From: Management and Staff of



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Courageous,
fearless and kind

By Ronald Atkinson
Family friend and
Chartered Accountant

EXACTLY 50 years ago, dur-
ing November 1957, a plane
touched down at Nassau
International Airport and out of
it stepped a young Englishman,
intent on continuing his banking

career with Barclays Bank
Dominion, Colonial &
Overseas. Coincidentally,

another plane also touched
down, but this time from
Canada, and out of it stepped a
young Bahamian woman, intent
on commencing a reporting
career under the tutelage of her
father, a journalistic watchdog
who zealously guarded, defend-
ed and upheld the truth with
every fibre of his titanic being,
in whose hand the pen was, in
every respect, mightier than the
sword.

Under the eagle eye of her
fearless Tribune editor (and
father) and bolstered by further
extensive and variegated studies
abroad (in Canada, the United
States and England) Miss
Eileen M. Dupuch, an intellec-
tually gifted young lady, began
to develop and expand her jour-
nalistic appetite for the truth
behind each story’s facade,
which truth she was never afraid
to reveal and print even when it
worked to the Tribune’s finan-
cial detriment and, paradoxical-
ly, to her father’s (and editor’s)
delight.

Joining the Tribune’s full time
staff in 1962, that momentous
year in which the United
Bahamian Party (UBP) won its
last General Election, she so

developed and honed her natu-
ral journalistic skills through the
ten succeeding tempestuous
years (during which the “chang-
ing of the guard” took place)
that her thankful and grateful
father was thereby enabled, in
1972, to pass on to her his baton
as the Tribune’s editor and pub-
lisher, an honour shared only
with one other Bahamian lady
at that time.

Strengthened and_ bolstered
by her 1963 happy marriage to
Mr. Roger P Carron and subse-
quent arrival of their son
(Robert David), Eileen fearless-
ly and courageously continued
her father’s journalistic struggle
for truth, honour and justice

against those forces concerned.

only with retaining political
power, personal prestige and.
monetary gain to the detriment
of truth, discarding of honour
and rank injustice over people
they were supposed to serve.
During her long and distin-
guished Tribune career, Eileen
has worked with many out-
standing personalities, but per-
haps none so interesting as
Uncle Harcourt (Rusty) Bethel.
who daily could be seen peering
over his spectacles at those
unfortunates who had _ arrived
late, departed early or commit-
ted any of those innumerable
employee faults which there-
after merited a written entry in
his “black book”. And yet he
could be very gracious with his
(work) time as, for instance,
when a certain Methodist cler-
gyman came to his Tribune
office to solicit a charitable
donation, only to receive
instead a two hour lecture on

Rusty’s impeccably Methodist
background but, alas, no dona-
tion.

Courageous and fearless as
the Editor, nevertheless Eileen,
as the employer and an individ-
ual, is not only kind, under-
standing, compassionate, sym-
pathetic and gentle to her
employees, but also considerate
and financially helpful to friends
and foes alike when life’s prob-
lems and difficulties arise (as
they will). Yet, she never men-
tions such kindnesses and ts vis-
ibly embarrassed when others
do in her presence. As for her
genuine caring, you need only
look at the compassionate man-
ner in which she so tenderly
nursed and personally looked
after her late mother during
those many years following Sir
Etienne’s death, while a young
Bahamian lady of my close
still vividly
remembers Eileen’s quiet but

acquaintance
nevertheless — compassionate
kindness to her as an awkward
17 year old employee on her
first job.

The English poet
Wordsworth undoubtedly had
such a woman as Eileen in his
mind when he wrote: - “The
reason firm, the temperate will,
endurance, foresight, strength
and skill; a perfect: woman,
nobly planned, to warn, to com-
fort and command”. In an age
of trivial and shallow relation-
ships, Gloria and | are so thank-
ful that we can enjoy the deep,
abiding friendship of this com-
passionate, understanding but

nevertheless erudite lady of

quality and her scholarly, gen-
tleman husband.

Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Jourmatism:



as cs





FRIENDS IN IRELAND - with their good friend Tommy Gallagher in his lovely home in Dublin. From left: Robert,

Eileen, Tommy and Roger Carron. Robert went to the same public school in England as Tommy's son, Johnny, where
they became firm friends. Both Tommy and Roger were students at Ratcliffe College in different years.



Eileen Carron: a true
Bahamian original

By John Issa
Family friend and head of
SuperClubs Breezes

WHAT words come to mind
when you hear the name Eileen
Carron?

Courageous, perceptive,
decisive, controversial, loyal,
ethical, eloquent, persistent,
decent, good daughter, mother
and intelligent, a
Bahamian original.

I] am fortunate to have
known Eileen and her family
for the past twelve years.
During that time, I have
learned more and more of her
life story and the environment

wife,

that molded her.

This story spans the modern
history of The Bahamas and
the transition from its colonial
past, with all the attendant ills,
to its dynamic democratic pres-
ent with all the hopes and chal-
lenges.

During this time, Eileen
chose not to be a spectator and
in the tradition of her father,
Etienne, she joined the
game,

At times it was rough and
bruising but she never quit.
Her stature was only
enhanced by the stature of
those who opposed her as well
as the stature of those who

supported her.

She championed the causes
in which she believed regard-
less of the consequences so that
the one word that her detrac-
tors have never used against
her is “hypocrite”.

Today’s Bahamas has been
created by conflicting beliefs
and forces.

It continues to develop and
evolve and as a result of these
differing points of views, a new
Bahamas is emerging.

The Bahamas has been fortu-
nate to have had a daughter
like Eileen Carron, a true
Bahamian Original, in the cen-
tre of the fray.





ssanteaninsssninnnatien,

NGNNTY BANCROFT & HUGHES
COUNSEL AND ATTOENIYGATAW

Congratulations t



Mrs Eileen
Dupuch Carton

from the
Stat of
Hughes



Partners, Associates and

McKinney, Bancroft &

my



Se LT







ST, ALBAN'S DRIVE
P.0, BOX N= 1084
TIL (242) 422-8396
PAX? (242) 320-7745



Lee #X
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‘esnemen 207 gem Foautvew VAs ISESSRSISRA NUM WERBIL CRORE PTROOSEE MERE TARR OTTER



THE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF

OF



PREMIER

ile ata eS

CONGRATULATE

Eileen Dupuch Carron,
CMG., MS., B.A., LLB

For

| 50 Years in Bahamian Journalism
_ and Her Many Other Accomplishments

Building Materials To Build Any And Everything!

ae



TOLL PRE: (242) 300-7035

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MACKEY STREET
BRIDGE PLAZA COMMONS
TELAPAX: (242) 395-4210



Son AREY





SIR ETIENNE AND LADY DUPUCH - pictured with their three sons and three daughters. From left: Joan, Bette,
Bernard, Etienne Jr., Pierre and Eileen.





sees Se
&

SIR ETIENNE AND LADY DUPUCH - with their full family taken at their home in Camperdown.

Sitting (L-R): Eileen Canon with her baby son Robert in her arms and nephew Graham standing, Sir Etienne and Lady
Marie, Joan with her son Ricky in her arms. Front row: Valerie and Jimmy Hull (Bette’s children), Jeanne and Etienne
Ill (Etienne’ children) and Ollie (Joan's eldest son). Standing (I-r): Roger Carron, Bette and James Hull with their
daughter Lisa, Susan and Pierre Dupuch, Sylvia and Etienne Jr., and MaryAnn and Bernard Dupuch.













LADY DUPUCH receives communion on her 100th birthday, February 18, 2006 from Monsignor Preston Moss while
being attended by daughter Eileen, whose home she lived in for the last eight years of her life.



Excellence achieved
on a consistent basis

By Archbishop

Drexel Gomez

The Lord Archbishop of The
West Indies Primate and
Metropolitan, and The Bishop
of The Bahamas and the
Turks and Caicos Islands

On behalf of the Anglican
diocesan family in the
Bahamas, and on my own
behalf, I offer heartiest con-
eratulations to Mrs. Eileen
Carron as she celebrates this

significant milestone as
a journalist in our
Bahamaland.

Many of our contemporaries
are unaware of the magnificent
contributions Mrs. Carron has
made to the development of
the “Fourth Estate” in this
country. When Mrs. Carron’s
father, the late Sir Etienne
Dupuch, announced his retire-

ment from the Tribune many
persons expressed doubt about
the future of that highly presti-
gious and influential newspa-
per that had achieved the sta-
tus of an institution in this soci-
ety. Mrs. Carron accepted the
mantle of her esteemed father
and soon removed the doubt
about her ability to keep the
ship afloat.

She has demonstrated
beyond any shadow of doubt
that she was not only up to the
task but has succeeded in
expanding the communica-
tions capacity of the Tribune to
include the print and the
broadcasting media.

It must be acknowledged
that in both of these areas, the
concept of excellence is
demonstrated on a consistent
basis.

All of this has taken place
under the wise direction of

Mrs. Carron in an environ-
ment that was sometimes sup-
portive and at other times
barely tolerated.

Yet, in the spirit of the late
Sir Etienne, Mrs. Carron never
wavered in her commitment to
provide the Bahamas with rel-
evant and competitive media.

In addition to the mantle of
Sir Etienne, Mrs. Carron has
enjoyed the loyal and commit-
ted support of her husband,
family and a loyal staff who
share her vision and hope for a
better Bahamas.

Mrs. Carron, a faithful mem-
ber of the Roman Catholic
Church, has enjoyed the
strength provided by the sacra-
mental and spiritual benefits
provided by her ecclesial tradi-
tion.

We wish Mrs. Carron God’s
continued grace and blessing
for the future.







olin and Richard Durie

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Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism



alism.



The Tribune and SP bringing life to the Bahamian newsprint market
for over 10 years.

100% recyled and promoting a ‘green” earth



Piteen /arron
DW oreciate your dedication to the Bahamas,

its people and the principle of
“Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master”

X

The Firm of Bostwick and Bostwick

Congratulate

Mrs. Eileen Carron

for 50 years of outstanding
journalism and well deserved recognition as
the most courageous, fearless, insightful,
analytical and fair-minded editor of our
time ... second only to her esteemed father.

BOSTWICK AND BOSTWICK
50 GEORGE STREET
P.O. BOX N-1605
NASSAU, N. P.

| c ee : (042)32) ae
: | Phone: (242)322-20:
Ww Damianos Sotheby's Fax: (242)328-2521

Nien . ;
Pea el cists all Email address: bostwick@batelnet.bs

www.siRbahamas.com











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(242) 326-5461

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Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism

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Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism

“The





The Grand Dame Tribune is now

of elite publishers among the best
— in Caribbean

By Jeff Kohler
Circulation executive and
consultant to The Tribune.
Pennsylvania, USA

MRS EILEEN Carron is the “Grand Dame” of
elite publishers in the international newspaper
industry. It has been an honour and privilege to
work with her for nearly 10 years on a range of

media issues.

Asa consultant and adviser in the publishing indus-
try, | work daily with a spectrum of publishers.

Clearly, Mrs. Carron can differentiate herself at
many levels. She is quite unique and special. Her
business ethics, high journalism standards and
uncompromising integrity distinguish Mrs Carron
among her colleagues and peers.

Mrs Carron is a champion for free speech and

the rights of the free press.

And she is a very insightful and intelligent busi-
ness executive with superior business acumen and

instincts.

As she celebrates her “Golden Anniversary” in
journalism and newspapering, | join thousands of
others in sending warm wishes and regards.



A side of my mother
that’s rarely seen

i From page 12

get over here! Mum exclaimed
her eyes not looking up from
her book.

Dad without blinking an eye
shouted back “Coming
Darling... just chatting!!”

And so mum | could go on
forever, but I hope I’ve given
readers a rare glimpse into the
real you.

Congratulations on your
tremendous achievements and

the historic milestones that you
have created.

You truly are a trailblazer and
have been an inspiration for not
only me but hundreds of other
Bahamian men and women.
Mum you have always been
there even under the darkest
days of the PLP under Lynden
Pindling who brutally victim-
ized our family.

It was your singled handed
determination that they would
not win, and the loyal support of

your triends that pulled us
through and allowed The
Tribune to flourish today.

In fact it can be said that this
institution today is a reflection
of the lengthening of yours and
dad’s shadow.

To most Bahamians you are
the Bahamas’ Greatest Warrior
with a Pen.

To me you're the best mother
any son could want.

Love, Robert.

By John Marquis
The Tribune
Managing Editor

MANY and probably most
daily newspapers are today sti-
fled under the dead hand of
accountancy or the crude com-
mercial dictates of the corpo-
rate world.

The great journalistic tradi-
tions promoted by the likes of
HL Mencken - “The Bad Boy
of Baltimore” - now play sec-
ond fiddle to bottom lines,
tight budgets and shareholder
dividends.

The Tribune, to its eternal
credit, remains among. the
diminishing clutch of free-spir-
ited newspapers that cling
doggedly to the exacting stan-
dards of real journalism, what-
ever the cost.

Over the years, this has been
the key to its exceptionally
high standing in the newspaper
world. And its status has been
due entirely to the crusading
family whose journalistic prin-
ciples have been its heart and
soul.

Founder Leon Dupuch and
his long-serving son, Sir
Etienne Dupuch, laid the foun-
dation for this remarkable
enterprise, often in the face of
quite vicious opposition.

Eileen Dupuch Carron, who
took over as the third genera-
tion editor and publisher in
1972, has kept faith with their
ideals by producing a newspa-

per that is deeply respected
locally and abroad and is now
rated one of the best in the
Caribbean region.

Nearly 40 years ago, as a
young political reporter on
The Tribune, I wrote a piece
about Sir Etienne when he
celebrated his 50th anniver-
sary as editor-publisher in
1969,

In it, | quoted him as saying
that, like his father, he
became a sort of Don
Quixote, tilting at windmills,
facing each situation as it
came along and, finally,
reaching a point where he
could no longer be hurt.

“One of the least palatable
features of editorship,” I
wrote, “is that one's friends



are often silent while adver-
saries are sometimes irritat-
ingly vocal.”

Nonetheless, Sir Etienne -
like his daughter - always
refuted any suggestion that
he was courageous. Courage,
he claimed, must emerge
from fear. If there is no fear,
there is no courage.

Eileen Carron has now
spent half a century in jour-
nalism, most of it dedicated
to building a newspaper of
which both her father and
grandfather would be
proud.

It’s to her credit that The
Tribune has become a com-
mercial success while retain-
ing its uniquely powerful
voice.





CONGRATULATIONS

WBcEN DUPUCH CARRON
ON YOUR 50â„¢ YEAR IN
JOURNALISM!

"Three Estates in Parliament; but in the Reporters’ Gallery

yonder, there sat a Fourth estate more important

far than they all."- Edmund Burke













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Long serving employees’
messages for ‘their boss’





By Angela Butler

Classified Advertising
Manager for over 30 years

GRACEFUL, — generous,
thoughtful, firm and dedicated
is the way that I would describe
you. You are a role model to
your staff and everyone looks
up to you because of your
deportment. I have spent all of
my adult years with you at The
Tribune and because of this I
have achieved much. I'm filled
with gratitude to God for the
opportunity that I was able to
work with you these many
years. Congratulations and
may God continue to bless you.
Happy 50th anniversary.





By Jacqueline Johnson

Producton Co-ordinator and
staffer for over 30 years

‘FOR A GREAT BOSS’
YOURS is a God-given gift to
be tenacious. You get the job
done with such peacefulness
and harmony, which is seen
through the genuine belief you
always show for others. This ts
certainly felt by those who
work around you, and encour-
ages each to give their very
best. It has
pleasure to work for you.

indeed been a













By Laura Roberts

Ordering and Stockroom
Manager for over 30 years

APART from being a very
good employer, you have
always been a good friend to
me. More people should pat-
tern their behaviour after you
and the world would be a bet-
ter place. Many thanks for
always looking out not only for
me, but also for your other

employees.

Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism

Tributes from some
staff members at The



By Eloise Poitier

Executive Secretary
Tribune Media Group

I want to congratulate Mrs
Carron on her 50th anniversary
in journalism. It has been a
pleasure working with her,
especially because I have found
her to be very supportive and
understanding. A woman with
unique ideas, a sharp wit and a
head for business, it is perhaps
Mrs Carron's open door policy
that encourages honest com-
munication and dialogue
between herself and her staff
that sets her apart from other
employers. Mrs Carron is
always willing to hear the con-
cerns of those who work with
her. whether the issue is job
related or personal, and to
offer sound advice and careful
guidance.

Even in difficult times - the
loss of a loved one, and during
times of illness - she is always
there as a friend, offering her
support. She is a special gem!




By Barbara Darville

Manager,
Advertising/Page Co-ordinator
Tribune Media Group

Efficient, intelligent, loyal,
energetic, enthusiastic, noble

Congratulations Mrs Carron
on 50 years of journalism. You
are an outstanding gem. You
remind me of a Proverbs 31
woman. It is an honour to have
you as my boss. Keep up the
good work.



By Christopher Bain

Archivist and Librarian
for nearly 30 years

1 FIRST met my boss when I
joined The Tribune in 1979-80.
My first impression of her at
that time was that she was a
“no nonsense” strict person
with a commanding presence.
However, over the years, I also
found her to be compassionate
and understanding towards
staff ready to help in any way
she could. It's a pleasure to
have her as my boss.



By Mrs. Doris Bullard

Retired Librarian,
over 50 years with
The Tribune

Working with Mrs. Eileen
Carron has truly been a one
in a million chance of a life
time. A woman worthy of
praise. 1 will never forget
what I have learnt from her.



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Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism





The greatest B

since

By Hazel Chea
Circulation manager
(50 years with The Tribune)

It is with singular pleasure
and pride that I take this
opportunity to pay a special
tribute to Mrs. Eileen Dupuch
Carron in recognition of her 50
years of unparalleled contribu-
tion to journalism.

I am proud to boast that |
have known Mrs. Carron for
more than 50 years. I joined the
Tribune when I was sixteen,
and have been privileged to
have witnessed, from my van-
tage point as an employee and
a family friend, Mrs. Carron's
extraordinary career advance-
ment from a college student of

the time of

journalism to a stellar icon in
the Bahamian media, and
indeed internationally, as head
of The Tribune dynasty.

I was there when she joined
The Tribune as an enthusiastic
college graduate to understudy
her father, the late Sir Etiene
Dupuch, an unparalleled leg-
end in the annals of Bahamian
journalism; a hard act for a
young aspiring daughter to
emulate!

But today, | can truly attest
that Mrs. Carron has walked
with meticulous precision in
the footsteps of her father in
getting to know and under-
stand the printing business, and
accepting the mantle of leader-
ship he bequeathed to her: To
continue and safeguard his

legacy.

In this pursuit, she has taken
The Tribune to greater heights
of journalistic accomplishments
and social contributions, her
footprints of necessity mean-
dering from her father’s into
unchartered territories, but
emulating always his inspiring
confidence, resoluteness of
purpose, social responsibility
and visionary leadership.

I was there when Mrs.
Carron obtained Law
degree......when she brought
Mr. Roger Carron to The
Tribune to introduce him as her

her

flance ...... when they got mar-
ried... when they showed-off
their new son, Robert..... and
when Mrs. Carron took over

the management of The



EILEEN DUPUCH - is pictured standing next to the
great Indian leader Pandit Nehru (centre) during a
reception in New Delhi to inaugurate the
Commonwealth Press Union's tour of that country

in November 1961.





AT A RECEPTION - during the Commonwealth Press Union tour of India in



#

1961, Eileen Dupuch, then engaged to lawyer Roger Carron, is shown talk-
ing with the wife of the Governor of West Bengal, who held the reception for

the delegates in Calcutta.



amian journalist

Sir Etienne

Tribute from her father.

| spent many hours in her
parent's home and was privi-
leged to see dimensions of her
personality away from the
office environment.

And so I have had the privi-
lege of watching Mrs. Carron
grow into a woman extraordi-
naire, awesome in the depth
and breath of her journalistic
experience
expertise: in her leadership

knowledge, and
stvle and managerial acumen:
in her wisdom in dealing with
the inevitable media criticisms
of The Tribune’s viewpoints
and with employee situations
on the job: awesome in her
understanding and apprecia-
tion of the history and com-
plexities of our Bahamian cul-

ture and her humanity in
enhancing our social welfare;
and awesome as a role model
of 21st Century Womanhood
for women in The Bahamas,
and everywhere, to emulate.

As a long standing employee,
I have had the opportunity to
witness, firsthand, the growing
pains and challenges Mrs.
Carron encountered as she
endeavored to make The
Tribune the extraordinary suc-
cess it is today.

She makes it a point, as her
father did, to involve her
employees, especially her cher-
ished ‘veterans’ in the ups-and-
downs of the firm’s operational
success.

Our love and respect for our
boss lady are implicit in our

nickname for her; we affection-
ately call her “Mother”
although I must admit that
there is sometimes a little trem-
ble in our voices, for “Mother”
can give tough love when nec-
essary in insisting on standards
of excellence in our perform-
ance and loyalty one to another
as members of The Tribune
corporate family.

Mrs. Carron, my family and I
extend our congratulations on
your 50th anniversary as, in our
view, the greatest Bahamian
journalist since your father’s
time; and we wish you immense
joy in your celebrations, and
continued success and accom-
plishments in an already suc-
cessful and accomplished
career.









Salon
Fy

VCF.

MC

HEE ee mae

ees



CONGRATULATIONS

ewer OO Yours fotstandin g

contribution le Ne ©

of Your hehour







re tulations Mrs. Eileen Carror

A FORCE IN BAHAMIAN JOURNALISM

BAHAMAS

For more information: www.bahamaswaste.com

(242) 361-6841 | Fax: (242) 361-6842

oo





























for
50 Years In
Journalism And Her Many
Other Accomplishments







from

lis Publisher and CEO

, Eileen Dupuch Carron,
ve @MG. M.S. BLN 8

Celebrating an unparalleled




in Bahamian journalism

© |st Bahamian Avoman Publisher/ Editor
© Only Bahamian to have her editorials read
from the floor of the U.S. senate (twice)
© |st woman CEO of radio station in Caribbean
© '|st and only Bahamian woman to graduate from
NYC's famed Columbia School of Journalism
Ist Bohomian woman Pilot
d Bahamian woman Lawyer

Bothy cay
Ia tr loline
apgiine.. Miy Vlanrpeper!

PA chor mmm —— aT i

: : : Celebrating ‘An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism







TALE LTLULT



EILEEN DUPUCH represented her father, the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, on the Commonwealth Press Union tour of
India in November 1961, after graduating from London University with a law degree. Here she is shown in front of
the famous Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The mausoleum was built by Shah Jahan (1632-54) to honour his favourite
wife. It is considered a masterpiece of Mougul architecture built of white marble, inlaid with precious stones and {
mosaic work. It is now a world heritage site.



CONGRATULATIONS
ON YOUR 50TH YEAR
IN JOURNALISM!










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7v EG SUPPLEMENT AND TWO-PAGE SPREAD INSIDE



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007











‘Shooter i jouble murder

Two gunned down |g.
in assassination

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net



TWO MEN were gunned
down, one at home in front of his
children, in a bold assassination
on St Vincent Street, off Baillou
Hill Road.

The deaths of the men, both °

said to be 27 or 28 years old —
whose names police want with-
held until the notification of next

Cae tate
Eileen Carron’s
BLUR erat
Ute eicin

THE TRIBUNE today cel-
ebrates publisher Eileen Car-
ron’s 50th anniversary as a
journalist with a 164-page
paper — the biggest in our
104-year history.

The paper’s success is also
demonstrated by its growing
circulation. More than 20,000
copies of today’s Tribune are
being printed, a sure sign of
its growing popularity among
readers and advertisers.

Operations director Robert
Carron said: “This is the
biggest Tribune we have pro-
duced since its launch in 1903, .
which goes to show just how
much faith our readers and
advertisers have in the prod-
uct.”

He said the paper’s growth
was a tribute to its fine staff
and was underlined by a cir-
culation that continues to rise
after several years of year-on-

SEE page 19



SY eee

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of kin —- became the 72nd and
73rd homicides of the year when
a dark coloured car, with at least
three hooded men, pulled up
behind them in the driveway of
one of the men’s homes just after
6 o’clock last evening.

A single assailant is reported,
according to Chief Superinten-
dent Hulan Hanna, to have got
out of the car and opened fire
on the burgundy Chevy Lumina,
hittigg both men multiple times.
The men were not given time to
get out of the Chevy, which one
of them had just driven into his

SEE page 16

Bahamas
is ‘second
best place

to live in
Caribbean’ .

‘By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas is the second
best place to live in the Caribbean
and has climbed three places to
rank 49 among 177 countries on
this year’s United Nation Human
Development Index (HDI).

In United Nation’s Human
Development Report 2007/2008
released on Tuesdays the Bahamas
was rated among the top 50 coun-
tries and is now only outranked by
one other country in the Catibbean
region.

SEE page 19

Don't forget...We’re the only
place where you can have a
Burger for Breakfast too! -

* Bernard Rd. + Hoveld Rd
* Prince Charles
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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

POLICE rN the OCI E RE ut PS the body of one oe the we lies on a pana



Media hits out |

at Ministry over | |
Junkanoo cover |

charge plans

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN media organisa-. }
tions hit out at the Ministry of :
Youth Sports and Culture yes- :
terday after it announced plans :
to cover ;

to charge them
Junkanoo this year.

News editors and publishers :

from all three major. dailies and ;
Cable 12 described the move as
incomprehensible and misguid- |
ed.

“IT don’t know who conceived : :
that idea but this is the first time :
in my 35 years of journalism that :
[have seen something as foolish ;
as that coming from a govern-
said Jones €om- :
munication Network and Bahama
Journal owner Wendell Jones

ment entity,”

yesterday.
He added:

permaneht secretary and all of :
them ought to be condemned.” :

However, Minister of Culture :
Charles Maynard defended his :
ministry’s position, stating that

SEE page 17

“The minister, the :



Real Estate stakeholders hit

PM: hangings
will be carried
out by my govt

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

NOTING the. continuing
increase in the number of murders
throughout the Bahamas, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
promised last night that as the law
allows, hangings will be carried out
by his government.

SEE page 14

out over producers of book

REAL Estate stakeholders
have expressed outrage that the
producers of the Bahamas Real
Estate Book continue to oper-
ate in the country despite lack-
ing proper authorisation to do
so.

Director of Immigration Ver-
non Burrows contirmed earlier
this week that the American
producers of the publication,
which sells space for local real-
tors to print their listings, has
no work permit and no business

licence.

“No, they have no work per-
mit or business licence. Of
course we've been checking to
confirm whether or not the
complaints we've received were
actually true but we have never
come across (the persons in
question),” he said.

One real estate agent who has
refused to advertise in the book
said yesterday: “] am outraged

SEE page 17

Hospital patient
is shot dead by
police after stack

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - A 32-year-old
male hospital patient was shoi
and killed by a police officer fol
lowing an attack at the Accident
and Emergency Section at Rand
Memorial Hospital earl;
Wednesday morning.

The man’s identity and
address were not released by
police up to press time yeste:
day.

According to reports, the
patient had attacked the officer.
putting him in a choke-hold, anc
would not release his grip on the
officer’s neck despite attempts
to subdue him.

Assistant Supt Loretta Mack-
ey confirmed the report. She sai
that police received a call aroun
1.30am on Wednesday about a
disturbance at the hospital.

SEE page 14

Voters point
to residence:
outside of
Pinewood

® By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean @tribunemedia.net

mal

_TWO voters in question
pointed to areas outside thx
Pinewood constituency in elec
tion court yesterday, whil«
another voter was unable to rec-
ognize a young man who carries
his name and might be his son.

Patrick Armbrister, when
asked by PLP lawyer Philip
“Brave” Davis, told the court
that he knows there is a Patrick

SEE page 16

m CORRECTION

IN AN article on page seven
of yesterday's Tribune it was
incorrectly stated that Jaque
line Ferguson Rolle, secretary
to the COB president, suffered
a fire at her home and had to
borrow clothes to attend a
memorial service.

The fire did not occur at the
home of Mrs Ferguson Rolle
but of a colleague.

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this erro
may have caused.





EE

eat fresh
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

hs ol re
——— Police Staff Association |

chief rapped for comments
about former deputy PM

Remarks dubbed offensive and inappropriate

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@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

POLICE Staff Association
president Inspector Bradley
Sands’ comments about former
deputy prime minister Cynthia
Pratt were offensive and inap-
propriate for a police officer,
the PLP said.

The former governing party
said in a statement issued yes-
terday that Inspector Sands
ought to understand his role in
relation to a civilian authority.

On Sunday, the former DPM,
who was a guest on a radio
show, said that there were
police officers in the force who
“did their best” to frustrate the
plans of the former PLP gov-
ernment.

The PLP said that a state-
ment by Mr Sands to the press
in reaction proves Mrs Pratt’s
point that throughout her term
in office, some officers was
obstacles to the good gover-
nance of the police force.

“He has crossed the line. It
was a problem that he had all
during the PLP’s term in office.
Further, Mr Sands has his facts
confused. The Progressive Lib-
eral Party settled all the terms
of the improved health insur-
ance benefits for all uniformed
officers in the public service
before it left office and as early
as February 2007.

These included the police, the
Defence Force, the Prison Ser-
vice, Customs, Immigration and



wl ih JA al

THE TRIBUNE



“He has
crossed the
line. It was a
problem that

he had all dur-
ing the PLP’s
term in office.
Further, Mr.
Sands has his
facts con-
fused.”



The Progressive



NEM ea ela

a section of the Road Traffic:

Department,” the party said.

The opposition said that Mr
Sands was one of the officers
involved, both in the lengthy
negotiations to settle the terms
and the bid process which even-
tually led to the choice of a ben-
efits provider.

“The PLP made arrange-
ments for the allocation to fund
the insurance in the country's

annual budget for 2007/08. Mr |

Sands ought to look now to the
FNM with whom he appears to
side politically for relief in this
area,

“They are now responsible
for carrying out the provisions
of what the PLP left in office,”
the party said. ~

Earlier this week, Mr Sands
said that he was offended by
Mrs Pratt’s claim that his asso-
ciation did all that it could to
“frustrate” the work of her gov-
ernment.

Mr Sands said that the Royal
Bahamas Police Force has
always been a “neutral” organ-

Liberal Party

isation, from the years of the
old PLP and the former FNM
government. a

However, said Mr Sands, the
level of political influence in the
force under the former Christie
administration was “disgusting.”

The opposition said that Mr
Sands cannot escape the fact
that he led his officers clothed in
red shirts at an advanced elec-
tion poll.

“This was in contravention of
an order of the commissioner
of police and gave the impres-
sion that he and his officers sup-
ported the FNM.

“While he is free to make his
own political chdice, he is not
free to jeopardise by his con-
duct, the integrity and perceived
neutrality of the force, ” the
opposition said.

The party asked why no dis-
ciplinary action was taken “for
crossing the line from being a
neutral public servant to
appearing to be a clear advo-
cate and supporter of the Free
National Movement”.

FRI. NOV. 30th
8:30am-9pm

BroapwaY

A
SAC

Sat. Dec. Ist
8:30am-9pm

LU

ean a
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OFF


.



THE TRIBUNE



Six BTVI emp

claimed there is only one employee left to man

CSA

GB police:
Body found
identified
as Vincent
Pedican, 64

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Grand
Bahama police say the body
found on Friday has been iden-
tified as 64-year-old Vincent
Pedican.

Assistant Superintendent of
Police Loretta Mackey said
family members identified the
body on Monday.

She said police have been fol-
lowing several leads, but so far,
no suspects have been arrested
in connection with Pedican’s
murder, which was the 11th
homicide for the year on Grand
Bahama.

Pedican, a security officer sta-
tioned at the Eight Mile Rock
High School, went missing fol-
lowing an apparent break-in at
the school. His shoes and hand-
held radio were discovered in
the school’s administration
building along with some blood.

The vehicle driven by Mr
Pedican was discovered in the
Hawksbill area on November
22, and his body was found
through a service road off East
Sunrise Highway on November
23.

He had suffered trauma to
the head, according to reports.

Ms Mackey said police are
continuing their investigation
into the matter.

een
Rods vaNiveal
‘to be closed











iT has been announced that
due to the observance of World
AIDS Day in Rawson and Par-
liament Squares on Friday,
November 30, Bay Street will
be closed from Parliament
Street to East Street between
10am and llam.

The public has been invited
to come to Rawson Square at
10am on Friday and join the
AIDS Foundation and Coli-
nalmperial for the formation of
a Human AIDS Ribbon in
commemoration of World
AIDS Day.

Red T-shirts and Caps will
be available for purchase in
Rawson Square to help fund

_the fight against AIDS.

It was also announced that
traffic will be re-routed for this
period.

GHT
For the stories
beni! the news,

read fisight
on Mondays



ag ati oe en a





rae.

SIX employees of the Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute were fired yesterday,
in what sources claim was a reaction to the
demonstrations held at the school earlier this

month.

However, BTVI head Iva Dahl said that the
firings had nothing to do with the demonstra-
tions. Indeed, she said, they could not have — as
none of the staff in question demonstrated.

All of the sacked employees were from the
administration department, and a source

that office.

The source said he is convinced that the
employees were fired in connection with the

series of recent demonstrations at the school

over a number of human resource issues.

“No one has said these people weren’t per-
forming,” the source said. .

When asked if she could give an explanation
for the firings, Ms Dahl said:

“They were contract workers, that’s it.”



Bahamas’ CO2 emissions
per capita exceed those of
industrialised countries

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

IF all countries were to emit
carbon dioxide at levels similar
to Bahamas, the world would
exceed its current CO2 output
by over 200 per cent, the Unit-
ed Nations found in its
2007/2008 Human Develop-
ment report. ,

The annual report, which
this year focuses on the fight-
ing climate change, states that
the Bahamas’ carbon dioxide
emissions per capita exceed
those of many industrialised
countries such as France, Swe-
den, Switzerland and. Portu-
gal.

With 6.7 tonnes of CO2
being produced per person,
the Bahamas outstrips even
Hong Kong in its emission
rates per capita.

“As a result of past emis-
sions of carbon dioxide and
other greenhouse gases
(GHGs), the world is now on
course ‘for future climate
change,” the UN said.

This latest report, which
includes the 2005 data on
countries worldwide, states
that only because the
Bahamas has a very small pop-
ulation, are its contributions

to global emissions almost
insignificant.

“With 0.0 per cent of the
world’s population, Bahamas
accounts for 0.0 per cent of
global emissions,” the UN
said. °

However, the Bahamas’
emission levels per capita are
above those of all other Latin
America and the Caribbean
countries with similar popula-
tion sizes.

Bound

The UN stated that
although the Bahamas has
. signed and ratified the Kyoto
Protocol, it is a non-Annex I
party to the Protocol and
therefore not bound by spe-
cific targets for greenhouse gas
emissions.

The Kyoto Protocol is a pro-
tocol to the international

_ framework convention which
aims to reduce greenhouse
gases that cause climate
change.

The UN in its 2007/2008
Human Development Report
states that small-island devel-
oping states like the Bahamas
are on the front line of climate
change.

“They are already highly
vulnerable to climate disasters.

We're celebrating

With a 50-centimetre (19.7-
inch) increase in sea levels,
over one-third of the
Caribbean’s beaches would be
lost, with damaging implica-
tions for the region’s tourist
industry,” the report said.

An increase of one metre
(3.2 feet), the UN’said, would
permanently submerge about
11 per cent of the land area in
the Bahamas.

Climate change, the UN
said, is the defining human
development of this genera-
tion.

“All development is ulti-
mately about expanding
human potential and enlarg-
ing human freedom.

Climate change threatens to
erode human freedoms and
limit choice.

“It calls into question the
enlightenment principle that
human progress will make the
future look better than the
past,” the report states.

One of the immediate con-
sequences of climate change,
the UN said, will be under-
mining of international efforts
to combat poverty.

‘“Today, we are witnessing
at first hand what could be the
onset of major human devel-
opment reversal in our life-
time,” the UN said.

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loyees fired |
PAGE 4, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LEE.D. D:Lit.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building,, P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
- Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

A great experiment that failed

YESTERDAY WE TOLD you of our coop-
eration with the late Dean William Granger of
Christ Church Cathedral in his attempt to res-
cue male prisoners from their life of crime.

The Dean was the chaplain at HM Prison,
Fox Hill, for a number of years. He believed
that in the prison population there were several
whose lives could be turned around if only
they could be given a chance. In projects like
these the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, publisher of
this newspaper, was the man everyone turned
to. If it meant helping his fallen brothers, Sir
Etienne’s hand was always the first to be
extended.

So it was only natural that the Dean’s “good

idea” was taken straight to the door of his
good friend, The Tribune publisher. The idea
was that men of good behaviour while in
prison would be given a chance while still serv-
ing their sentences to work in the business
world under proper supervision. It was pro-
posed that The Tribune would be the first to
participate. We were to receive three of the
prison’s brightest — according to the Dean.
. In this column yesterday we told you that
one of the three was eliminated very early in
the programme because of his volatile nature,
which indicated future trouble.

We had great hopes for the remaining two.
They were both men of impressive personali-
ties, good deportment and an ability to report

and write. However, one of them, the most |

impressive of the two, fell by the wayside ear-
ly. He returned to prison, and was immedi-
ately removed from the institution’s release
programme.

However, the remaining one was our prize.
As we told you yesterday we had a bet with the
Dean as to how successful this programme
would be. The good Dean felt that all humans
could be saved from the pitfalls of hell if given
half a chance. We were not so sure. So far two
of the Dean’s men had failed. He was now
depending upon the third to prove his point.
We felt his man would stay the course and do
him proud. >

This particular man came from a respected
Eleuthera family. He had good genes. He now
had a new environment. We expected “nurture
and nature” to come through for him.

He continued on the work programme until
he had completed his prison term. It was rather
difficult for us during that period. The staff
had no idea of his true identity. They accused
us of favouritism because, while they had night
assignments, he never had an assignment after
4.30pm. They did not know that he had to
leave The Tribune at 4.30pm to get to Central
Police station in time to catch the 5pm bus
back to his residence — HM Prison. If any of

Bank
Financing
Available

them had been standing outside The Tribune
when the police bus passed, they could have
waved to their colleague on his way “home.”

When he had completed his prison term, he
wanted to remain with The Tribune. There
was no reason not to keep him. For the first
time he got a byline over his articles and he did
his full share of night assignments. He was
now a regular.

Everything went well for a long time. And
then one fateful Saturday night we were at
our desk at The Tribune when our telephone
rang. Mr Rubin Bott of Rubin’s department
store, Bay Street, was at the other end. Did we
have a staff member by the name of Mr. X. Mr
Bott, loath to part with his hard-earned cash,
was checking Mr X’s credentials. Our heart
stopped. Almost instinctively we knew what
would follow. Our man had presented him
with a rather large cheque that he wanted
cashed. He said he worked for The Tribune,
but at that time, he told Mr Bott, The Tribune
couldn’t cash the cheque. Mr Bott found that
suspicious, so, unbeknown to Mr X, Mr Bott
decided to call us. We told him to get Mr X out
of his shop as quickly as possible and give him
nothing.

Mr X boldly walked into the newsroom
Monday morning as though nothing had hap-
pened. We hoped he had learned his lesson.
However, the following Saturday with all
reporters sitting at their desks pecking away at
their typewriters, the receptionist called
through to say that two police officers were
there to see us. ;

The policemen entered the newsroom, qui-
etly walked to Mr X’s desk, invited him to
stand up, then handcuffed him. They left as
quietly as they had come with our man, head
down, between them. He went back to prison.
Apparently over a period of time he had tried
—and in some cases been successful because of
his association with The Tribune — to fleece
every business on Bay Street.

Over the years he was like a rolling stone,
writing for the various political propaganda
sheets, not holding any job for any length of
time. We don’t know how many brushes he
had with the law after he left our office in
cuffs. The next we heard of him was when The
Tribune published his obituary a few years
ago. :

The Dean’s great experiment had failed.
However, the inmates’ work release pro-

.gramme has continued at the prison with, we

hope, more success than the Dean had at its
launching.



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THE TRIBUNE





Govt must
reintroduce

EDITOR, The Tribune.

DAY after day crime and
violence is destroying this coun-
try severely. The niurder count
stands at a saddened and abrupt
71 for 2007. Like the song says,
“These are some serious times”,
is definitely true for indeed
these are serious time. For a
miniature country such as ours,
it is despicable for us to have
such a high murder rate. In the
past 10 months the Bahamas
has recorded 71 murders.

Ten homicides in a space of
20 days — November 4-24 — has
given the community cause for

great concern. In spite of these:

alarming statistics, senior police
officers maintained at a crime
seminar last week that they
have “a lid on crime” and that it
was the fear of crime that was
“creating panic in the commu-
nity.”

These crimes are said to be
socially-related crimes and only
connected to young men killing
one another.

It has also beer pointed out
by concerned Bahamian citizens
that since young men are killing
each other continuously, they
are leaving the women here to
take over the country.

On the other hand many
young men kill one another for
simple, small reasons which can
be solved through mature dis-
cussions between or among
them. The country’s crime rate
could possibly damage the
country’s tourism-based econ-
omy which has a chance of leav-
ing the majority of Bahamian
workers unemployed.

It is not to be said that any
one accused of murder should
not be given a trial in court.

For indeed every one has a
right to be given a trial, because
some citizens may be innocent
to charges brought against
them. However the Constitu-
tional rights of citizens must be
upheld when discussing the
issue of bail being granted to
those accused of serious crimes,
according to Acting Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson. He also stated that last
month up to September some
114 people accused of murder
had been released on bail.

Some of these people who
are out continue their normal
routine of committing crime.

I now call on Government to
act on such concerned matters
such as these by reinforcing cap-






LETTERS

letters@triounemedia. net



ital punishment in order to
reduce and alleviate the number
of murders in our country.

Reliable sources have dated
that the last hanging took place
in the Bahamas while the Free
National Movement was the
Government on January 6,
2000.

Supporters of capital punish-
ment should become more
vocal, even to the extent of
organising demonstrations,
insisting that hanging be
resumed.

Although the Judicial Com-
mittee of the Privy Council has
made it more difficult for this to
happen, the landmark ruling by
the Privy Council in March of
2006 abolishing the mandatory
death penalty in the Bahamas
did not mean that hanging was
abolished.

What it did was to leave the -

decision to the discretion of the
judges to determine who should
be sentenced to death, depend-
ing on the nature of the mur-

death penalty

der. If hangings are to be
resumed, fast-track appeal is
necessary, considering an ear-
lier ruling by the Privy Council
in 1993 that persons on death
row for more than five years
should automatically have their
sentences reduced to life in
prison. Because of these Privy
Council rulings, there is a grow-
ing consensus that The
Bahamas should give consider-
ation to cutting its ties to the
Privy Council as the final court
of appeal for this country, as
Jamaica is in the process of
doing. With Jamaica reportedly
set to resume hangings, sup-
posedly by aligning itself with
the Caribbean Court of Justice,
the door has been thrown wide
open for Bahamians to demand
that the Government of this
country take a serious look at
Capital Punishment.

For as a Christian nation we
must not tolerate and engage
in serious crimes as murders
because we are on the edge of
losing our reputation world
wide!

SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau,
November 26, 2007.

Time to stop rigging
annual Cacique Awards

EDITOR, The Tribune.

MANY logically will say oh here we go again the annual Cacique
Awards which under their current process are simply rigged by the
nominees by organising their own nomination and then getting
their friends and family to vote for them.

If the Ministry of Tourism wishes to create a “real” award for
excellence, programme this has to be orchestrated and solely a
reward adjudicated by our customers.

There are many ways this can be done — awards cards left in the
room of the hotels — at the Airports — handed out by Tourism
related businesses or totally electronic, I prefer that obviously,
with the required security to stop any contamination or rigging. The
visitor would use his reservation number as his pin-number to

enter the website and vote.

It continues to be a total waste of energy, resources and the
most important aspect improving the product of The Bahamas if
year after year we prostitute the process with the current system of

The Cacique Awards.

Minister Grant please change things this year once and for all and
let's have a customer responsive awards system totally based on
excellence and performance then a Cacique Award will mean

something.

CYNTHIA SYMONETTE
Nassau,
November 16, 2007.



a

\
eee

THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 5





Police seek public
assistance in

the search for
Theo Bowe-Kelly

POLICE are seeking the
assistance of the public in
their search for 46-year-old
Theo Bowe-Kelly.

Bowe-Kelly is wanted for
questioning in connection
with a grievous harm and
death threats case. The
alleged victim was Regina
Hamilton and the incident is
said to have taken place on
Saturday, November 17 in
Freeport.

He is 5’ 7” tall, brown
skinned and of medium build.
His last known addresses
were Russell Town, Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama
and Market Street, Nassau.

Police warn that Bowe-Kel-
ly is to be considered armed
and dangerous and should be
approached with caution.

Those with information on
his whereabouts are asked to
contact authorities in Grand
Bahama at 350-3106, 352-
9774/5 or police control at
911.


















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Prisoner accused of
escaping custody facing
several serious charges

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A PRISONER accused of
escaping police custody sev-
eral months ago was brought
before a local magistrate yes-
terday to face several serious
charges.

Shervin Knowles, alias
“Worm”, 26, appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel at
court eight in Bank Lane.

Knowles was first arraigned
on charges of burglary, steal-

ing and indecent assault. It is -

alleged that on Sunday, July 8
Knowles entered the home of
Dionette Richardson on Sum-
ner Street with the intent to
commit a felony.

It is further alleged that
while there, Knowles stole a
blue and brown handbag con-
taining $350 in cash. It is also
alleged that during that time,
Knowles indecently assaulted
a 32-year-old woman.

Knowles was not required
to enter pleas to these charges
and was denied bail. The mat-
ters were adjourned to April
16, 2008.

He was then arraigned on
the escape charge. It is alleged
that while at the East Street
South police Station on Mon-
day, July 16, Knowles escaped
the lawful custody of Corporal
961 Skippings. Knowles plead-
ed not guilty to the charge and
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Knowles was also arraigned
on the charge of house-break-
ing. It is alleged that on Thurs-
day, April 26, he broke into
the home of Finicha Jolly at
Windsor Place Road. He
pleaded not guilty to the
charge and the matter was
adjourned to April 23, 2008.

Knowles was also arraigned
on a possession of marijuana
charge. It is alleged that on
Friday, July 13 he was found
in possession of one gram of
marijuana. Knowles also
pleaded not guilty to this
charge.

The matter was adjourned
to February 22, 2008.




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Man pleads guilty
to drug charges

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A 39-YEAR-OLD man pleaded guilty in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday to substantive drug charges in three separate cases.

William Curling appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel at
court eight in Bank Lane, where he pleaded guilty to drugs charges
in three cases, the most recent stemming from the seizure of $2.5
million worth of marijuana in July of this year.

Curling first plead guilty to the charge of possession of marijua-
na with the intent to supply in relation to a 2003 case.

He admitted that on Thursday, November 6, 2003, he was found
in possession of 328 pounds of marijuana which he intended to sup-
ply. Magistrate Bethel sentenced him to four years in prison on the
charge.

He then pleaded guilty to the charges of possession of marijua-
na with the intent to supply and conspiracy to possess with the intent
to supply. Curling admitted that on Wednesday, July 19, 2006, he
and another man were found in possession of 149 pounds of mar-
ijuana. Curling also pleaded guilty to conspiring to possess the
drugs. ‘

He was sentenced to four years in prison on this charge and
was fined $50,000. Failure to pay the fine by the expiration of his
sentence will result in an additional year in prison.

The accused also pleaded guilty to charges relating to the seizure
of $2.5 million worth of marijuana this year.

Curling, who was charged along with three other men in this case,
admitted that on Tuesday, July 3, he was found in possession of
marijuana which he intended to supply, that he had conspired to
posses the drugs and also that he imported the drugs.

Curling was sentenced to four years in prison on the possession
charge.

The other charges were taken into consideration with that charge.
He was also fined $50,000.

Failure to pay the fine will result in an additional year in prison.

All of the sentences are set to run concurrently. Curling, a father
of four, was represented by attorneys Jairam Mangra and Alex Mor-
ley of the law firm Lockhart and Munroe.











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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE









In Celebration of
Christopher -
22nd April, 2002









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yp?

x

Z
Vy
%,






“Christopher was a true son of The Bahamas, totally committed to an where ever he ie
esh air. We

always with grace. ...He was a source of strength and inspiration, ...like a breath of fre
no longer have his humour, efficiency and zeal for life. ....We are happy and proud to have Known
him.” . Heart Ball Committee, 2003









“Christopher was a unique individual: intelligent, sociable, giving, well-liked, witty, talented,
and a good person. He loved life. Chris touched so many lives, and will truly be missed.”
, John Constantakis








“Daddy Chris” ..as an uncle was honest, loving, sheen persistent and very protective. He
always put a smile on your face... [He] is a saa I will always admire and hope to be like in a
lot of ways. He may have left earth, but fives on in heaven as my guardian angel.”
Felicia Turnquest






Christopher... was a very energetic and enthusiastic person who had a great personality and a
paneaie sense of fun... His management was excellent and he was the most reliable contractor...
[on the site], Christopher throughout maintained a very calm and level head, and often provided
much needed light relief.” Charles Stronach





“Chris and I shared a love of music, ...and we also enjoyed a oe joke... Chris always cg)
considerate in his telling of them, so as not to offend... I could always rely on his assistance... He
qwas an ever present source of comfort.” Linda Munnings




Chris was truly a genuine and compassionate person... an honest businessman, and also a gifted
musician.” Orson Clarke





“Christopher possessed a wonderful sense of humour and an acute sense of balance, which he
applied to all situations. ...he made life better and richer for others...” Robert Sands




“Chris was a true and close friend, gentle, generous, talented, dependable, optimistic, ... never
forgetting the needs of others.” Sean Mathews




Christopher was gentle person... and slow to criticize. He was honest in all ways and in all things.
He hag a good work ethic,... and a fine brain, and used it well. He was a good citizen, a good
son, and a good husband, and he would have been a good father. In fact, the world has too few
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Regatta sailing has the
potential to drive tourism
in Bahamas — McCartney

Right business model essential, says Minister

REGATTA sailing needs to
be restructured to take advan-
tage of the spectacular success
it has become as a business,
Minister of State for Tourism
Bran McCartney said.

“The time may well have
come to treat this sport of
sloop racing in terms of an
event that can be economical-
ly self-sustaining,” he said.

“With the right vision and
business model, regattas can
become a financially viable
vehicle to drive domestic
tourism within the islands of
the Bahamas.”

Mr McCartney said the
Ministry of Tourism “certain-
ly appreciates” the importance
of sloop sailing’s substantial
contribution to the nation’s
number one industry.

“That is why we have over
the years played a significant
role in furtherance of the
development of regattas and
the tourism industry.

“We will continue to make
appropriate donations to this
event and otherwise assist
where we can,” Mr McCart-
ney said.

He added that the lobby to
have sloop racing declared the
national sport of the Bahamas
is growing louder.

“Sloop racing has a die-hard
following.

“Fans of sloops like hall-of-
famers Tida Wave, Southern
Cross, Good News and Coura-
geous for example, follow
them from regatta to regatta.
And that is just in the ‘A’
class.

“When you bring all the












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Concern about environment

ONE of the main concerns of the Ministry of Tourism in
relation to Family Island regattas is the protection of the

environment.

According to Minister of State for Tourism Bran McCart-
ney, “This is perhaps one of the more treacherous of the
shoals we should avoid as we continue to develop regatta
sailing around the islands of the Bahamas.”

Mr McCartney noted that broken glass bottles are
increasingly appearing on beaches, and that tourists are not
going to spend “hard-earned money to come to beaches
where they are in danger of having their feet cut by glass”’.

He also noted that some mail-boat excursion passen-
gers throw their garbage into the sea.

“Tourists are unlikely to return to a place where they.
have to endure unsightly refuse or swim in polluted waters.

‘We need not mention here the overall effect that pol-
lution of our waters will have on the fishing, marine and
water sports industries inclusive of regatta sailing.”

Mr McCartney said the proper disposal by small Fami-
ly Island communities of the increased garbage generated
by regatta festivals — including sewage — is essential to
preserving the “pristine nature” of Family Island destina-

tions.



other classes into the mix then
you can better understand
what I am talking about.”

He said the Ministry of
Tourism is keenly interested
in increasing travel to the
Family Islands, particularly
during the slow tourism peri-
ods. “Regattas, festivals and
homecomings have proven to
be excellent vehicles to
achieve this end.”

Mr McCartney noted that
Family Island vendors look
forward to regattas with great
anticipation.

“For many vendors, these
festivals are the main sources
of their income.

“Patrons are treated to a
wide variety of offerings from
souvenirs to food to enter-
tainment and everything in
between including accommo-

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dation, transportation and
security. Although we do not
have direct statistics, it is fair
to conclude that vendors
make a handsome profit.”
He added: “Mail boat

excursions are invariably over--
booked. No one, it seems.,:

wants to get left in Nassau.

“Scheduled carriers such as
Bahamasair normally put on
extra flights while charter ser-
vices do a brisk business dur-
ing regatta time.

. “Vehicle rentals on some

islands cannot accommodate
the demand.

“Demand for sleeping quar-
ters exceeds availability.

“The impact of large num-
bers of people on a tradition-
al Family Island community
can be dramatic,” Mr McCart-
ney said.













a ncaa
THE TRIBUNE

e
»
.

Meo ee EE ae ae
US Ambassador backs

pre-clearance facility at

Grand Bahama airport

‘ m@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
, Tribune Freeport Reporter
‘ dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



THE new US Ambassador to
the Bahamas Ned Seigel has
acknowledged the importance
of the pre-clearance facility at
, the Grand Bahama Interna-
' tional Airport.

, , In 2006, the American gov-
ernment had considered clos-
| ing the facility, which allows
' travellers to the US to clear
| American Customs and Border
' Control before leaving-the
Bahamas. However, after dis-
' cussions between the Bahamas
' government and former US
, Ambassador John Rood, the
‘ decision was made to keep the
; facility open.
| “Tam glad to be in Freeport —
| Freeport is very important and
, | appreciate the work that my
' predecessor had accomplished
| in keeping the pre-clearance
facility open here,” Ambassador

Seigel said.

“It is really important, and as

trade and tourism grows here

- we look forward to many more

people using the pre-clearance
facility,”

Ambassador Seigel was mak-
ing his first official visit to
Freeport yesterday as part of a
familiarisation tour and said he

STURT Gatti ee eta eco c

of what I want to bring in my
tenure as ambassador.”

Mr Seigel also stated that his
wife, Stephanie, will continue
the reading programme that
was started by Ambassador
Rood, as well as help with
breast cancer awareness.

“She looks forward to moving
forward ‘with the wonderful
commitment that the ambas-
sador made to the reading pro-
gramme and expects to be very
active in breast Cancer aware-

ness on the island,” he said.“
look forward to supporting
those two initiatives along with
working with the community
and using sports and motiva-
tional speaking to make sure
that the youth of the Bahamas
can say ‘no’ to drugs, and I hope
to be setting up a programme
with some NGOs,” he said.

Ambassador Seigel, who is
Jewish, also visited the Luis B
Torres Synagogue in Freeport
to learn about its history.



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was very impressed with the
state of the airport.

“IT am very impressed and
being here and landing here for
the first time. I was here 30
years ago... and to enter this
airport and see the beautiful
facility and be taken through
the operation is quite impres-
sive,” he said.

While in Grand Bahama, Mr
Seigel met with DEA officials
and US Customs and Border
Patrol officers stationed at the
airport, as well as those sta-

‘tioned at the Freeport Contain-
er Port in connection with the
Megaports container security
programme.

“My priorities today are, try
to spend time with the embassy
family teams that are here and
working with the Bahamian
police in the fight against drugs
and narcotics trafficking, and
meeting with our teams that
work on the container security
initiative, understanding what
they do,” he said at press con-
ference at the airport.

“JT am very impressed just
walking through this facility,
meeting'with the teams and see-
ing the opportunity that this air-
port presents to Freeport,” Mr
Seigel said.

The ambassador also paid a
visit to Grand Bahama Port
Authority CEO Sir Albert
Miller and GBPA president
Albert Gray at the Port Author-
ity Headquarters Building in
Freeport.

“Tam meeting with Sir Albert
Miller and Albert Gray at the
Port Authority to be part of
what they are looking to do now
and in the future of economic
development of the port,” Mr
Seigel said.

He also met with the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce’s newly elected officials
on Wednesday.

Ambassador Seigel said he
felt it was important to meet
with the group because “that is
a critical part of growth and
economic development — invest-
ment and trade — that is a part

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



‘An affront to the citizens of

Fierce controversy
over Albany road
diversion project

Suggestions have been made that the Ingraham administration is trying to conceal it is helping Park Ridge
Securities Corps acquire land from Bahamians in south-west New Providence for ‘a Lyford Cay-style’ devel-
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@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AHAMIANS’

fundamental

rights are set to

be imperiled

and the coun-

try’s image as a safe place to

invest set back if the government

continues to acquire properties

in south-west New Providence

for the Albany development’s

proposed road diversion, it has
been claimed.

“This agreement is an affront

to the citizens of this country,”

- said a concerned citizen who has

studied the development’s heads
of agreement, but who wishes to
remain anonymous. “This is not
about Albany, but about princi-
ples.”

It has been suggested that the
Ingraham administration is
attempting to conceal the fact
that it has “aided and abetted”
the developer, Park Ridge Secu-

' rities Corps, in its effort to

acquire land from Bahamians for
the purposes of their private and
exclusive “Lyford Cay-style”
development.

“This strikes at the heart of
democracy and everything this
country stands for,” it was
alleged.

“How can you say this country
is a stable one to invest in if any
person’s property can be taken
when a billionaire developer
comes along?”

This comes as The Tribune has
received numerous documented
statements in which various gov-
ernment officials involved in the
matter appear to have given dif-
fering responses on the question
of whether the government has
already gone through with clause
9.9 of the Albany heads of agree-
ment — which calls on the gov-
ernment to acquire several per-
sons’ private property for the
developer. ,

That property has been desig-
nated as necessary by the devel-
oper to carry out their contro-
versial intended diversion of
south-west Bay Street to.take it
outside of their project’s bound-
aries. They have stated that the
luxury gated-community cannot
go ahead without the diversion,
as the road currently passes
directly through the property.

The Albany heads of agree-
ment states that the land was to
be acquired by the government
for the developer in accordance
with the Acquisition of Lands
Act. This act gives several justi-
fications for why and when pri-
vate land may be acquired by the
government for “public purpos-
es”, generally seen to be those
which are for the greater benefit
of the public at large, such as
roads, harbour facilities or
tourism.

The source claims that the
exclusive Albany development

represents none of these things |

and if the government pushes
ahead with depriving these per-
sons of their properties for the
benefit of the déveloper in this
instance it will “clearly be work-
ing in the interests of the devel-
oper and against the interests of
the public”, many of whom
objected strongly to the diver-
sion during town meetings sev-
eral months ago.

In October former Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie, under whom
the agreement was negotiated
and signed, said that he stands
firmly behind the Albany and
New South Ocean projects,

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asserting that they will together
act as the massive economic boon
in south west New Providence
that successive governments have
been unable to secure.
However, Mr Christie also said
that on his part the decision to
give the okay to the road diver-
sion and acquisitions was intrin-
sically linked to the relocation of
port facilities to South West New

Providence, which he said would

have made the road diversion
mandatory regardless of the sim-
ilar wishes of the developer.

With this relocation now less
certain, he said that whether to
continue with the acquisitions
and diversion would be a “diffi-
cult decision” that Mr Ingraham
would have to bear.

I: that vein, Prime Minister
Ingraham appeared to
express reservations about the
acquisitions in the House of
Assembly in October, stating that
“it is to be determined whether
the law requires” that the devel-
opers deal directly with the
landowners, taking the govern-
ment out of the picture.

However, while a realisation
of the development’s more “pri-
vate” rather than touristic status
by the Ingraham administration
has been seen to cause the gov-
ernment to review the agreement
as it pertains to the incentives
originally granted in the agree-
ment — with Mr Ingraham stating
emphatically that the private
members’ club could not receive
incentives under the Hotel
Encouragement Act — the ques-
tion of the acquisitions appears to
have not received the same atten-
tion on that basis.

‘Bastardising’

“The government needs to be
principled. They are twisting and
bastardising the law,” the source
added, maintaining that the gov-
ernment is an interloper in the
in pushing the Bahamian
landowners into a sale.

The source has pointed to the
fact that Mr Ingraham’s com-
ments during opposition ques-
tions that month “tony im seek-
ing to put the burden\afrespon-
sibility on the Christie adminis-
tration for “the acquisition of cer-
tain land at Ocean Bight, Exu-
ma, to facilitate the construction
of the marina at the Emerald Bay
Four Seasons Resort” and in the
process, belatedly and disingen-
uously trying to distance his par-
ty from such actions.

The fact remains that the
Emerald Bay heads of agreement
was signed under the FNM, and
yesterday, former works minis-
ter Bradley Roberts confirmed
information previously received
by The Tribune that the acquisi-
tion in question was in fact initi-
ated by the FNM.

He added: “You cannot
acquire land from a private own-
er to then go and turn around
and give it to a private develop-
er.”

The source commented: “If
(the FNM) don’t agree with
acquiring private land for a pri-
vate developer, then why pro-
ceed? If they do — then that is
even more outrageous.”

The status of the acquisitions
in this most recent case has been
deliberately blurred by the cur-
rent government, claims the
source.

Minister of Works Earl
Deveaux told The Tribune in
September that the process of
acquiring the properties had, in
fact, already begun under the for-
mer government following the
signing of the heads of agreement
in late 2006.

He said that the matter of the
land acquisition was “in the
Office of the Prime Minister” but
that the land was yet to be “vest-
ed”.

According to a legal dictio-
nary, this means that the absolute
legal right to ownership of the
properties has not been con-
ferred. f

However, in a mid-October
letter seen by The Tribune, per-
manent secretary Colin Higgs
said: “The government has
agreed to three real estate
appraisers who will value the
land and Albany will deal direct-
ly with the owners based on the
appraisals.”

The position that the govern-
ment would not act as an inter-
;

e

THE TRIBUNE

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ROAD TO THE FUTURE: These trailers line up for work on the Albany project.

mediary in the acquisitions was
reiterated by Creswell Sturrup,
acting permanent secretary in the
Ministry of Works, with a slight
alteration in a letter later that
month.

PR exercise

He added that the government
“would reserve the right to

- acquire the lands if all good faith

efforts (by Albany to acquire the
properties directly) failed,” thus
indicating that the property own-
ers still have no option but to sell

. their land should they be non-

compliant, making it appear that
the government was ultimately
engaged in a public relations
exercise in purportedly seeking
to have the developer take the
lead.

On Friday it was revealed to

_The Tribune by David Davis,

director of investments in the
Office of the Prime Minister, that
none of the property owners
involved had fully accepted the
offers given to them for their
land.

He maintained, however, that
“we are very close to dotting all
the ‘i’s’ and crossing all the ‘t’s’ in
a sale” — apparently again admit-
ting that the developers are not
dealing directly with the
landowners as indicated by Mr
Higgs and Mr Sturrup.

The source maintains that the
government is deliberately side-
stepping making a definite state-
ment on where it stands on the
issue of the “acquisition of pri-
vate land for a private develop-
er”, with a potentially far-reach-
ing negative impact on the,rights
of the average ‘Bahamian.



}

n



Yesterday, Callenders and Co
attorney and spokesperson for
the Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association, Fred Smith,
also roundly condemned the gov-
ernment’s behaviour, calling it
“the most insane and unconsti-
tutional thing (he) could think
of.”

Ai that he hopes
the property owners

legally challenge the government
and the developers, he said: “We
want investors not invaders in
the Bahamas and we certainly
don’t want our own government
exercising the power of eminent
domain to forcefully deprive
Bahamian citizens of their hard-
earned property to give to for-
eign developers for their person-
al profit.”

In a September letter sent by
Ministry of Works official Calvin
Balfour in response to a query
put to Minister of Works Earl
Deveaux about the Ingraham
administration’s position on the
matter, the official appeared to
refute the suggestion that the
FNM would involve itself in such
practices.

Mr Balfour stated the govern-
ment “has not acquired any pri-
vate land in south west New
Providence for the benefit of the
Albany or new South Ocean pro-
jects.”

He stated that he“was directed
by Mr Deveaux to assure that
the government “does not take
lightly the acquisition of private
land” and that any acquisition “is
done in compliance with the rel-
evant legislation and for the long-
term benefit of the Bahamas and
Bahamians.”

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“You cannot
acquire land
from a private
owner to then
go and turn
around and give
it to a private
developer.”

Later, in mid-October, perma-
nent secretary Colin Higgs again
stated that the government “will
not acquire land from private
persons for private use.”

It is not entirely clear from
these statements whether the
government is saying that it does
not intend to, or is not, acting as
an intermediary in the land
acquisition or whether it is but
under the premise of doing so
for a “public purpose”.

If it is the latter, it is yet to

state precisely what “public pur-
pose” the diversion and acquisi-
tions serve.

The source maintains that Mr
Deveaux has failed to follow
through on promises that he
would provide copies of the
gazetted notices of acquisition,
which he said would give signifi-
cant insight into the current goy-
ernment’s involvement in the
process.

Attempts to reach Minister of
Works Earl Deveaux for com-
ment yesterday were unsuccessful
as he was said to be out of. the
country. - :








THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 9

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CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENATIVE

IndiGO Networks is a growing telecommunications company based in
Nassau, Bahamas. The company has a 17-year history in offering innovative
technology and telecommunications solutions to consumers in The Bahamas
and is seeking persons to fill Customer Service Representative positions in
its Nassau office.












Job Description

Working at IndiGO Networks means being a part of a commitment to
-excellence. Persons applying for the Customer Service Position must have
exceptional telephone presence, be highly motivated and demonstrate drive
and enthusiasm while handling customer questions, complaints and billing
inquiries. The Customer Service Representative position will be responsible
for sustaining focus on the company’s service policies, systems, products
and services in order to facilitate our clients.

Responsibilities












e Provide excellent customer service experience by maintaining the highest
degree of courtesy, confidentiality and professionalism

e Handle business transactions in connection with account activations,

adjustments and collections

Perform over-the-counter exchanges of customer defective equipment

Selling of the company’s services

Communicate with customers using web-based tools

Answer a multi-line phone system

Deal directly with customers to resolve outstanding or escalated problems

Greet visitors

Qualifications











Flexibility, adaptability; ability to work in a fast-paced environment
Strong organizational skills

Strong problem-solving and decision-making skills

Ability to multitask

Initiative and ability to learn new tasks quickly

Reliability, punctuality and good interpersonal skills are essential
Excellent oral and written communication skills

Team player
Computer literacy, with a strong working knowledge of Microsoft Office
Products — Word, Outlook and Excel




IndiGO Networks offers a comprehensive benefits package. Salary is
commensurate with experience and qualifications.

«hy
iil Interested candidates should submit their résumés in writing by
m December 7, 2007 to:

Attn.: Customer Service Manager; IndiGO Networks;
P.O. Box N-3920; Nassau, Bahamas
Or
Fax: 242-677-1050
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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

= a







THE TRIBUNE

Vi



CELEBRATING EILEEN CARRON’S

- Mrs Hazel Chea, The T ribune’s

— longest serving staff member

L IS FITTING in this spe-
cial edition dedicated to
the golden anniversary of The
Tribune's editor and publisher
that special mention should be
made of the longest serving staff
member of this newspaper. She
is Mrs Hazel Chea, the news-
paper's assistant circulation
manager in charge of the news-
paper's street hawkers, who has
been with the paper for over 50
years. She joined The Tribune
in January 1956.

Such a job is a difficult one at
the best of times, but it is one
that Hazel has held tor the past
22 years.

And it's difficult because of
the hours involved. Just listen to
her daily schedule ‘and readers
will be amazed that this Fox Hill
lady can keep up such a regi-
men day after day, week after
week, year after year and still





.

retain her youthful looks and
boundless energy. Hazel loves
her exercise. .

She and a group of four ladies
rise every morning around 1.30
to go walking and jogging round
R M Bailey Park for an hour
or so.

She then drives home to
shower and change, getting her-
self ready for work at the news-

paper.

Deliveries

Before her husband, Alton,
was talken ill, she used to pre-
pare getting him ready to join
her also at The Tribune as he
used to make deliveries of the
newspaper to offices around
town that had bought subscrip-
tions to the paper.

She used to help him "bag
the papers" before he drove the

route and got back to the office.
Around 5 o'clock she is ready to
open up to distribute the news-
paper to the paper boys (street
hawkers) from the newspaper
plant.

She then stays at the office
until around noon every day to
ensure that the paper boys have
all the newspapers they
need for distribution on the
streets,

She also has to count and bag
the cash she receives from the
boys - normally in the form of
quarters or others loose change.

After that she leaves to go
home and is usually in bed
around 7pm ready to face
another day when her alarm
wakes her at |.30am.

Hazel, one of the daughters
of the well-known Leonard and
Muriel Rahming family of Fox
Hill, joined The Tribune from
school at the age of 15.

PLANNING

She went to Government
High School. Her pastor, the
Rev Leroy Roker, a good friend
of Sir Etienne Dupuch, owner
of the newspaper, got her a job
in the paper's bindery depart-
ment, where she spent about 10
years.

She had only been there a
year or so when she met and
fell in love with one of the
young men in the printing
department, Alton Chea.

They were married and have
been together now for nearly
50 years. ,

Hazel and Alton have three.
talented daughters Crystal, Tra-
cy and Gina, a son Clement, a
stepdaughter Althea, and a
stepson Michael. Her son
Clement also works at the
paper.

"T enjoyed it," she says of her
early years. "I was very young
and was taught plenty things,
especially about life from the
elders around me. But I felt I
was with family.

“Sir Etienne always treated
me fine. I was like the daughter
who was not his daughter, if you
know what I mean," she says.
"There were two old men in my
life, my father and Sir Etienne -
and I loved them both." Hazel
eventually became second in
command in the bindery depart-
ment before being moved to the
composing room under foreman
Samuel Haven, becoming head
of the department when Mr
Haven was put in charge of the
overall operation of the press-
room.

OVER 50 years at The Tribune: Hazel Chea



CONGRATU EATIONS TO
EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON
ON 50 YEARS IN

BAHAMIAN JOURNALISM

She became supervisor of the
composing and paste-up depart-
ment before being chosen to
take care of the circulation
department.

She says of her time at The
Tribune: "It was a joy to be
around most of the people. It
was like a family to me...and
Sir Etienne treated me won-
derfully. I got to know Joan and
Pierre (children of Sir Etienne)
very well, but did not know Mrs

Carron until she came back
(from her studies) to take over
from her father.

“I don't think I could have
worked anywhere else, because
everyone has been so nice to
me. I have really appreciated
being with the Dupuch and Car-

‘ton families....l “never thought

of them as bosses, but as -my
family. (Readers may read her
tribute to "her boss" in today's
Special Edition. In her own

words and in her own way she
describes her special love and
appreciation for the newspaper
and those who run it). Hazel
plans early in the new year to
take things a little easier. She
will step down from her full-
time duties and assume a well-
deserved part-time role in the

circulation department of the

newspaper that has been her
life since she joined as a teenag-
er.

One of the leading
papers in Caribbean



“OSE SONLIEE

DELETED STIL OEE



ADDRESS

TEL 242.325.7363
WEBSITE

EMAIL. INFO@ALEXIOU.COM

ALEXIOU & ASSOCIATES Lrp.
P,O,BOX N-G72 NASSAU, BAHAMAS
FAX 242.322.7358

WWW.ALEXIOU,.COM

ings in life that will catch
Ue ela el Lan

—

m@ By ROGER CARRON

INCE IT was launched in November,

‘1903, this newspaper has been in the
forefront of most-social developments in the
country and in the newspaper industry and can
now boast of being not only the Bahamas’
leading paper, but also one of the leading
papers in the Caribbean.

Although the Nassau Guardian had been
published since 1844 and was an established
paper for “the establishment”, The Tribune
was in fact the first “daily” in the Bahamas.

Some other “firsts” that The Tribune can
claim are:

¢ The first newspaper to publish colour pho-
tographs in the country

¢ The first newspaper to bring in wire pho-
tographs via The Associated Press for its cov-
erage of the Yarmouth Castle cruise ship dis-
aster in 1965.

e The first newspaper in the country to have
a Goss web-oftset press giving superior printing
over conventional presses.

e The first newspaper to transmit wire pho-
tographs round the world from the Bahamas.

e The first newspaper to receive its wire news
reports and pictures via satellite from The°
Associated Press. ,

e The first newspaper in the country to pro-
duce its pages by pagination on computer.

e The first newspaper to print a foreign news-
paper received by satellite transmission from a
foreign country.

e The first newspaper to produce a 98-page
edition in one day, all published in the
Bahamas by Bahamians for Bahamians at
Christmas in 1988.

After Tropical Storm Noel, The Tribune pub-
lished a 145-page edition in one day and its
daily average count is over 70 pages, with Mon-
day and Thursday publications being over 100
pages.

Today The Tribune is a morning publica-
tion, having changed from its traditional after-
noon publication in June, 1998.

Since its introduction in the mornings it has
gone from strength to strength with many more
sections of interest to all its thousands of read-
ers.

The paper now has a joint operation with
the Nassau Guardian and both serve the com-
munity with all the news that’s fit to print.


THE TRIBUNE

50 YE

NICU TT
living up to
the highest
standards in
journalism

@ By CAROL B HALLETT
former US Ambassador
to The Bahamas













L IS indeed an honour and a
privilege to write this tribute in
honour of The Tribune’s publisher
Eileen Carron on the occasion of her
50th anniversary in journalism.

Few people bring to mind the true
meaning of the masthead of The Tri-
bune “Being Bound to Swear to the
Dogmas of No Master” more quickly
than does Eileen Carron. Eileen has
been steadfast in living up to the high-
est standards in journalism, and I am
sad to say that is somewhat rare today.

In thinking back to my tenure as
Ambassador to The Bahamas in the
late 1980s, I am reminded of the
remarkable courage The Tribune and
Eileen demonstrated in supporting
the United States in our efforts to
control the illegal drug trade that used
and abused The Bahamas to carry |
their cocaine and marijuana to the
United States.

Through responsible journalism,
The Tribune exposed again and again
the illegal activities of the traffickers.

The United States Embassy worked
closely with the Bahamian Defence
Force and the Police Force to carry
out the “Hot Pursuit” programme that
enabled our two nations to jointly
seize tons of cocaine and marijuana
and bring about the capture of many
well-known drug traffickers.

The Tribune under Eileen Carron’s
leadership was diligent in speaking
out in support of these efforts on the
front pages of the newspaper. These
were often not popular stands, but it
made the difference in driving the
drug trade out of the Bahamas during
those difficult days. Eileen was never
afraid to take on an issue that might
not have been popular as long as it
was the right thing to do.

Eileen, you have my gratitude for
your professionalism and dedication,
and my admiration for your willing-
ness to make a difference for our two
countries.















































“An Extraordinary
Woman of Substance”





ARS

Thoughts on Eileen Carron celebrating
50 years of trumpeting democracy

@ By OBIE WILCHCOMBE

N 2004 in the aftermath of a
September cyclone that rav-
aged the West End settlement a
human spirit emerged that salvaged
broken hearts and despair. Eileen
Carron was among those who came,

LOCAL NEWS

IN JOURNALISM

“ground zero,” lifting spirits, soothing
pain, and strengthening the weak.

She did not send help, she brought
help! It was special to see the “jour-
nalist” expressing love for humanity.
The people of West End are appre-
ciative of the good that was given
when they needed it most.

I have often asked myself, where

rm lovin’ it

not searching for a sensational story, | would our nation and our people be
but laden with what we needed. without the journalist and the organ-

We needed care, we needed love __isations in which they work? Yes,
and we needed food. She came to _ that vilified and disrespected scribe

A leader in seeking t
meet her respons

@ By THE MOST REV PATRICK C
PINDER, ARCHBISHOP OF
NASSAU




N THE occasion of her 50th

anniversary in journalism, I would
like to join family, friends and professional
colleagues of Eileen Carron in congratu-
lating her on this wonderful milestone.

Journalists have a special place and
responsibility in the life of any community.
This responsibility involves keeping the
public informed on matters of both local
and international importance on a wide
range of issues. This is no slight responsi-
bility.

The Second Vatican Council in its Decree
on the Means of Social Communication
expresses this responsibility in these words: “If news of facts and happenings
is communicated publicly and without delay, every individual will have per-
manent access to sufficient information and thus will be enabled to con-
tribute effectively to the common good. Further, all of them will more easily
be able to contribute in unison to the prosperity and the progress of society
as a whole.” |

Following in the footsteps of her father, the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, Mrs
Carron has certainly been a leader in seeking to meet her responsibility.
Under her leadership, The Tribune has remained a highly visible institution
in the field of Bahamian journalism. Indeed, it has become a media network
having expanded into the broadcast media in order to meet the changing
demand for information and social communication in our community today.

While no human insititution is perfect or beyond the need to continue to
strive for excellence, The Tribune, as a leader in the local print and broadcast

SEE page 12



-in so doing she has strong-

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAG

who is depended upon, but hated
and despised by the newsmakers
themselves.

I wonder why we refuse to reflect
on the import of their presence in
our society, and give recognition to
the invaluable role that is played.

The liberation of our country, the
pros and the cons of the struggle of
the masses did not occur in the
absence of the Free Press. The
prominence of The Tribune, Etienne
Dupuch “The Dean” of Bahamian
journalism and his daughter Eileen
Carron have captured and chroni-
cled the rise of this nation, the quest
of her people and the struggles of a
demanding society. In fact, it could
be argued that The Tribune was an
instrumental force in the road to
nationhood and the building of the
nation. ;

Eileen Carron has been in the
forefront of safeguarding the
democracy and the freedoms
that we enjoy. A difference
of opinion does not make
an individual an enemy of
democracy. In fact it serves
to test and measure the
level of the progress of
our democracy. It also
tests the maturation of the °
society. Eileen has chal-
lenged the status quo and

ly and courageously put the a
case for the freedom of *
expression.
It is unfortunate that in our *
country the journalist is still not
giyen the honour and/or the
respect that is deserved, and the
profession is not seen and herald-
ed with the dignity that it demands.
Daily the journalists must fight
through the maze of tiny egos, hos-
tility and ignorance. The journalist
has to escape from those who regard
the journalist as a propagandist and
those who expect the journalists
to compromise the integrity of
the profession.
Through what

SEE
page 12 «




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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE






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Thoughts on Eileen Carron

celebrating 50 years of
trumpeting democracy

FROM page 10

might be regarded as the “hazards of the pro-
fession” the journalist must remain focused.
The journalist is obligated to fulfill the sacred
responsibility enshrined in the principles of
the fourth estate.

When Eileen Carron took the pen into her
hands some 50 years ago and began to sketch
the pieces of the contemporary life and histo-
ry of The Bahamas she was no doubt influ-
enced heavily by the “Dean.” She was also
influenced by the dynamism of an evolving
society. In her hands were being placed the
responsibility of ensuring that our new democ-
racy would not be derailed.

We must not forget that when political
change came in the Bahamas, the opposition
parties faulted and it took several years before
any of the groups were stabilised. The Free
Press and The Tribune in particular had to
assume its role as the fourth estate.

The media could not take for granted that
the new leaders would remain focused and not
take advantage of the absence of an organised
opposing group? Fortunately our leaders kept
the nation on a steady path of nation build-
ing.

‘ In chronicling the contemporary history we
have challenged the opinions of Eileen the
Editor consistent with the principles of a
democracy. Let me hasten to add, however,
that I understand that it is not unusual for the
Editorial Page of major newspapers in devel-
oped societies to endorse and openly support a
broad scope of issues inclusive of political per-
sonalities and government policy.

Eileen Carron is entitled to her opinion.
That is a freedom that the PLP of which Jama
member fought for and a freedom that is cher-
ished. We all have a right to our opinion!

I am honoured to be a member of the fra-
ternity of journalists. I celebrate the work of
Eileen Carron. She has gotten respect the old
fashioned way, “She has earned it!”





ia Be




Tel: 502 2356

for ad rates











Tradewinds
Mahogany
Armoire

Eugenia Topiary |

A leader in
seeking to
meet her
responsibility

FROM page 10

media, is an exemplary
Bahamian enterprise. The
leadership of Eileen Carron
has certainly been a key factor
in this reality.

Thus, on this occasion, I am
pleased to congratulate Mrs
Eileen Carron for her leader-
ship as an outstanding
Bahamian citizen and as an
outstanding Bahamian pro-
fessional woman whose lead-
ership in the area of commu-
nications media is a matter of
public record.

We wish her every blessing
as we salute with her on her
50th anniversary in the pro-
fession of journalism.



\

Â¥
a
\

.
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE

’s Revis and Kelly take
their show to Atlantis Resort |

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON q | always | soreof brand inte- 4
Trioune Staff Reporte: eral St ategies that work best 4
tihompson@tribunsineudu.set | fords wh other its television or 4
oA ae gk eS polio becan os poople just have om
NEW YORE based morning more of Qo muri affinity i 4

television talk show “tive sith Hy towards 1° MM. Wiltshire told j

Regis anid Ketiy” tape a sories “Se ‘ fye' ne «luring an inter- on

of live episodes at the A ttaatis View ai the resort yesterday. : i;

Sime eyvcaled that executives no
were in talks ' ha n umber of PE eer rick en ec eae rere.
noyoc Ameren television net- —a rea : nie se HS.
work. fom at ge future shoots
at Atlantis bat these negotia-
tions have slowed down

Resort, Paradice istond cactier
in the weck,.

Over two days, Movember 27
and <8, the shaw s hosis Xcgis
Philbin and Kelly &:pe tiped
four shows in the tropica ack-

ground of ihe resori’s “qua- becato ef the television writ-

venture Pool Deck with » -um- ers SGiike in the United States.

ber of celebrities 1m tow Se However Altantis has a num-
RR,

boro special events lined up,
including the concert special
"Pop Rocks in February. 2008
whieh wilh dros many interna-
tional muster 2. and perform-

‘

The stiow’s line-up ine!vded
tennis champion Venus
Williams, singer/acto® Billy Ray
Cyrus and pop singer Sean
Kingston, among others. Che
show wrapped up its las! day

ot taping on ParaGee Island on “We've partnered up with
Wednesaay and the tam ain ing OXsnorrean radio stations) Z100'

ditt Y (UW agai and we'll do

episodes wiil air today ana Fri-
’ five days of major concerts,”

day morung on ABC neiv: s Ranh
Pen a ame tke show s IN THIS image released by Disney-ABC Domestic Television. talk a
eee show hosts Reais Phiibit lett, a1 Selly Riga, wake then show

Atlantis and showcased th ;
resort’s breathtaking location “Live with Reais aad Kell) tu a varne: chinate, Wednesday, Nov



TKS



is WiltShiie Said.

ninoned artists for the
event include pop singers
Rifenna, Notasha Bedingfield,




















































































the Dolphin Cay interaction 28, 2007. as the Wev york-baseu Morning talk show broad-asts Soon Wine ton, and Elfiot
centre, the brand new tower __ this week tom the A! hint Paradis Istinc resort the Bahamas Yau i .
‘ 1 f Atlantis ar WV-
aus Seeders nd Pow strategy moray te Keep us Wiate i's always good to
. Michele Wiltshire. Vi sips Atlantis resort porsed on the keep exposure strong tron an :
taht of Special Ex nts ed forefront of tourist tihaue advertising stucdoomt its aye
o ¢ © XC ‘ ie EEE
Entertainment at Kerzner |
International, believes the pait-
nering is “mutually beneficial”
to both the producers of the
show as well as the inferna-
tionally renowned ocean-
themed destination.
“Once again we re in a posi-
tion where we have so many |
new assets to show their vie\w-
: Bias a a0 ix fai ase
ing audience and ‘heir fanbase ff BAY ST. PARTIAL ROAD CLOSURE |
and remind people that this is : . BDUNDAS TOWN, ABACO 5. QUEEN’S COVE, FREEPORT |
Cake ss eae me) as > ” & we! a I RB ae ee ee Se |
terrific place to come on vaca- FRIDAY NOV, 30, 2007 LOT NO. 91 a portion of LOT NO. 5 Block |
re ‘ tes PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence PROPERTY SIZE: Single f amily Res dei
ie ey have a very strong Tol 11,635 sq. ft. 0.22 acres
low i in speed oa So - uae Motorists are advised via cue to LOCATION: South of the main Dundas Town LOCATION: Along Vicioria Lane Soml!:
Works very well forusanditsa | ; . pe tars Neh
‘good place for them to cow the observance of World Ai0S5 Day nedd EDL eee
. plies a APPRAISED VALUE: $128,000 APPRAISED VALUE: $170.000
on location because : looks in Rawson and Parliament Squares on
eee a eee oe Friday, November 30, 2007 . HAWKSBILL SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT 6. BAHAMIA WEST REPLAT SUBDIVISION
c Nn i Le ;
always strategically in sweep so Bay St. will be closed from EOLNO i etal ANE FREEPORT :
that they can get higher ratings ne sg oe PROPERTY SIZE: Siiigle Family Residence LOT NO. 5 Block 17
It’s anal Bucinese tat aie tao Pariament St. to East St. 0.12 acres PROPERTY SIZE: Single “anny Hesidence
and it rea lly ¢ ends up being a berween aie nents LOCATION: mores ee i bedye baths. 0.23 aotes
mutually beneficia! relation £49 intersection of Inagua Orive & Gout #3 LOCATION: Northern side ef a cul-de-sac
ship.” ers ; APPRAISED VALUE: $82,250 called Churchill Court
Kerzner marketing execu- wists are reminded to observe APPRAISED VALUE: $307.429 |
tives are focused on their high- re-routing of tialfic tor this period . HAWKSBILL SUBDIVISION PHASE I,
: FREEPORT 7, HUDSON ESTATES SECTION |

ly successful brand integration
LOT NO. 57 FREEPORT

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence LOT NO. 292

5 187 sq. ft PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
LOCATION: Abaco Drive 3 beds/? baths, 6.250 sa tt

APPRAISED VALUE: $89 000 LOCATION: Jonn Rut Lane

APPRAISED VALUE $176.00)



» MURPHY TOWN, ABACO

LOT NO. 65 Crown Allotinent 8. BAHAMIA MARINA SECTION ix
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT

10,000 sq. ft LOT NO. 44 Block 30

LOCATION: Front Street Murphy Town PROPERTY SIZE: 5 Bedroom. Sir gi
APPRAISED VALUE: $97 450 Duplex, 12,196.56 sa ft
LOCATION: Stratford Way
APPRAISED VALUE: $305,000



Dye FLL a

Please Be atormed that

Mr. Dominic Sturrup









aro
|
. LUCAYA ESTATES SUBDIVISION, 6. DERBY SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT |
t FREEPORT LOT NO. 9 Block 17 Unit 3 7 4
‘ LOT NO. 22 Block 174 Unit 17 . PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot |
<4 PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot 0.30) acres |
a 1.00 acre LOCATION: Queens Highway &Dagenivny |
LOCATION: On Wilton Lane near Drive
Chesterfield House Drive APPRAISED VALUE: $33,000)
APPRAISED VALUE: $7,500 ,
: 7. GRAND BAHAMA EAST SUB |
: RT LOT NO. 152 Black © D” San tio:
; Nd ax) Se LOT NO. 23 Block 174 Unit 17 PROPERTY SIZE: Single Fanily | 0
ty Ie PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot 0.23 acres |
“ ‘ m — 1.20 acres LOCATION: South side «sf Ka ue Vi
i ; LOCATION: On Wilton Lane near of Drayton Street intersection |
pe wow Chesterfield House Drive : APF RAISED VALUE: $15.0 |
} APPRAISED VALUE: $8,000 ; '
8. ROYAL BAHAMIAN ESTATES cREESO!
. FORTUNE POINT SUBDIVISION, LOT NO. 15 Block 2
| FREEPORT PROPERTY SIZE: Single Far |!
LOT NO. 15 Block 7 Lint 4 { 0.44 acres
‘ PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Unit LOCATION: Northeastern section ©
| 12,075 sq. ft. intersection «1 Ascension Drive & Jehit i
oo LOCATION: Eastern side of Cuoper Roaa APPRAISE!) VALUE: $29,000
f cal APPRAISED VALUE: $35,000 :
AA EON AN SAR 9. BAHAMIA WEST REPLAT, FRE CP OR)

. H . WINDSOR PARK SUBDIVISION, LOT NO. ° Block 19
, he TOP co? " { wWeC A i i i FREEPORT PROPERT SIZE: Single | amily |
iSho ronges 2 hOYE da A) PRM LOT NO. 29 Block 10 0:25 acres
| ; PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot LOCATION: Northern Side of Coun tus
6 ak my wp of Gs i i AAS Ta aN 0.37 acres APPRAISED VALUE: $26,000
Diamonds INnterNatrOM|ad — | PMB ooMer scsnom sin siostnoor ey
a APPRAISED VALUE: $33,000 10. ARDENT FOREST SUBDIVISION
FREEPOR!
. 9 eh Gok Mineepe ee 5. BAHAMIAN WEST REPLAT, FREEPORT. LOT NO. 11 Block 22 Unit 2 |
and is not authorized to transact ' § =~ LOT NO. 19 Block 20 PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family | ot
a z. 8 ss Hy) { ‘ PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot 0.35 acres.
Â¥ CE ay WUSAGQeE ss Ny q jee 85 acres
o cond U ct ASE OM i. - MOS: ’ 0.27 acres LOCATION: South Side of Oijanco |)
on ky Q ray a ir Pa) { A LOCATION: Western Side of Perth Court Arden Forest
Cul-de-sac . APPRAISED VALUE: $30,000

Diamonds International's APPRAISED VALUE: $27,000
Clients, Staff or Stores. .
PROER RR 4

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS (INCLUDE TELEPHONE CONTACT AN!
POSTAL ADDRESS) NASSAU: CHERRY MISSICK, P. O. BOX SS-6263, PHONE NO. (242) S94-0405
FAX NO. (242) 393-2883, OR VIA EMAIL: CHERRY.MISSICK@COMBANKLI1).COM OR
FREEPORT: CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES, BOX F-40876, PHONE NO, (242) 952-8230"

FAX NO. (242) 352-8221 OR VIA EMAIL: CHRISTOPHER.KNOWLES@COMBANIKLTD

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. *WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFF Eis

Mr. Dominic Sturrup is in no way
associated with
Diamonds Internationai
or any other of its affiliates.


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

a ae

FROM page one

Recently back from his heads of
government trip to Uganda, the
prime minister held a press confer-
ence in the VIP section of the Lyn-
den Pindling International Airport
last night. Also present was Attor-
ney General Claire Hepburn,
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette, Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest, Min-
ister of State for Finance Zhivargo
Laing, and Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis.

Prime Minister Ingraham
explained to members of the press
that of the 70-odd murders to date,
the majority of the victims, and sus-
pects had prior criminal records.

Of this number, 19 per cent, or
10 murders are suspected to have

PM on hanging

been committed by persons who
were previously charged with mur-
der, and 42 per cent, or 22 murder
suspects were actually already on
bail at the time of the offence
“We can do better, and better
we will do; in terms of ensuring that
persons have reasonably speedy tri-
als. I think that based on what |
read that the Chief Justice said that
he thinks three criminal courts for
criminal cases in the Supreme
Court can be had at any given point
in time, and I would suppose that at
least one can be had in Freeport at
any given point in time, if not two.
“So if you add four Supreme
Courts dealing with criminal mat-
ters going you can make a dent in
the number of criminal matters

393-4960 _

going. It will take a while, but you
will make a dent.”

The Prime Minister added that
he also expects that a number of
the death penalty appeals resulting
from the Privy Council ruling that
objected to this mandatory sen-
tence for murder convictions would
be disposed of shortly and deter-
mined.

“Tt is our hope, and expectation

that at the end of the day that some ,

of them will result in the position of
the death penalty. And if they do,
we will carry it out as we have done
in the past.”

When asked if this could mean a
return to hangings in the Bahamas,
Mr Ingraham responded stating: “]
never took it away.”

“We are in the hands of the judi-
cial system at the moment. When
we first came to office in 1992 we

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met the same problem. At that time ;
the argument was that executions }
were unconstitutional and it took us }
nearly four years for the Privy :
Council to finally determine that it :
was constitutional and we began to }
carry it out. And I think that at ;

least five persons were executed,

until we ran into another legal :

obstacle.

“And we have been out of office :
for five years and nothing hap- :
pened on that score and our legal :
obstacles continued. We will cer- :
tainly do our utmost to have these ;
legal obstacles determined in the :

shortest possible time,” he said.

Mr Ingraham outlined that capi- :
tal punishment is permitted not :
only by the Bahamas’ constitution, :
the United Nations Human Rights :
Declaration permits it, and it is per-

mitted by international law.

FROM page one

Supt Mackey said a nurse at
the emergency section had con-
tacted police and requested assis-
tance regarding a male patient
who was acting in a disorderly
manner.

Ms Mackey said several units
were dispatched following the
call and made their way to the
hospital.

“The first two officers to
arrive at the hospital approached
the male patient who was still
acting disorderly,” she said.

“The patient held on to one
of the officers with a choke hold
and refused to let him go.”

Ms Mackey said the other offi-
cer, along with other persons

Gnjoy a

Facial

€

oa 38

ee ra
7 Y Polis

iglesias Bath | ,

THE TRIBUNE

Hospital
patient

who were present, attempted to

break the hold but the struggle

continued without success.
“The officer in the choke hold

managed to remove his weapon

from the holster and fired one
shot, hitting the patient in the
neck,” she said.

Supt Mackey said the man
was taken into the emergency
room and treated by the doctor
on duty, but died from his injury.

Investigations by Central
Detective Unit officers are con-
tinuing.

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 15












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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



: LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

Armbrister Jr — who ts being
challenged by the PLP — but he
only found out about his cxis-
tence when the boy was 12

years old.

Patrick Sr said that he knows
the man carries his name, but
he does not know if he is his
son. When asked what is the
name of Patrick Jr’s mother,

Mr Armbrister said initially
that he does not remember, as
it was a long time ago. Howev-
er, he then told the court that
her name is Elizabeth “some-
thing”.

Mr Armbrister added that he
did not know where Patrick Jr
or his mother are and he does
not see them, but at one time,
he knew they lived in
Pinewood. He also testified that
he heard some time ago that
Patrick Jr was in jail — which is
an allegation that emerged in
earlier testimony during the
case.

Wayne Storr and Pamela
Whitfield both pointed out to
the court, residences that were
outside the Pinewood bound-
ary lines on a map of the
Pinewood subdivision.

Both voters in question iden-
tified their homes while being
questioned by Mr Davis. In
both instances, FNM lawyer

Voters

Michael Barnett agreed that the
houses were outside the
Pinewood constituency. How-
ever, in the case of Ms Whit-
field, after his admission Mr
Barnett asked the court for
time to drive by the residence
before he confirmed his agree-
ment with Mr Davis that she
falls outside of the constituency.

Customs Officer Warrick
Moss also testified during the
morning session. Mr Moss
acknowledged that he was
transferred to Governor’s Har-
bour in November 2005, where
he has been stationed since.
Yet, Mr Moss still maintained
that he resided on 1606 Wal-
nut Street in Pinewood, where
his mother, sister, niece, and
nephew at times, live.

When he registered on
August 2, 2006, Mr Moss said
he was on vacation in Nassau

’ for a month. The customs offi-

cer added, during cross-exami-
nation by Mr Barnett, that he
returns to Nassau on weekends
—at times, three weekends in a
month.

Mr Moss, who lives in an °

apartment at Palmetto Point
when in Eleuthera, said he has
clothes at the Pinewood resi-
dence; he spends Christmas and
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ital that he tries to see when he
comes on weekends.

When pressed by Mr Davis
during re-examination as to
where he thinks he resides, Mr

_ Moss acknowledged that it is

possible to say he lives in
Eleuthera.

However, when Mr Barnett
followed with a question on the
subject, Mr Moss told the court
that he regards trips to Nassau
as coming home.



Shooting: double murder
FROM page one

driveway.

When The Tribune arrived on the scene, the dead body of the
homeowner was still lying in front of his door covered by a blanket, as
police cased the crime scene. °

Witnesses said that after being shot, the homeowner got out the car
and tried to get inside his home. However, he died just in front of the
door before he could get in.

The second man ran down the street more than a hundred feet, wit-
nesses said, after being shot in the upper chest and neck. He reportedly
fell in the street, gasping for life, until an ambulance took him to hos-
pital. Blood stains remained where he fell. He was taken to the Princess
Margaret Hospital where he died at 7.20pm, just an hour after being
shot.

“All we heard were shots,” one witness said. At first he thought fire-
works were being set off. Another resident said she lost count of the
number of bullets that were fired during the killings. She thought it was
more than seven.

According to a woman who lives in the neighbourhood, there was an
assassination attempt on one of the men on Tuesday night.

“They had around here lit right up with shots,” she said. “This time,
they didn’t miss, though.”

When asked if any of the dead men were wanted by police, Mr
Hanna said:

“I don’t know if they were wanted, but certainly they have a histo-
ry with the police. We know at least one of them fairly well.”

Anger at the level and crime in the country was expressed by several
residents with whom The Tribune spoke. One woman said:

“Police need to come from behind the desk and do more patrols.
These fellas believe they own these areas, and have no fear of police.
If they (police) were more vigilant, these guys would not be doing all
this killing.”

Another source told The Tribune that he saw one of the men who
died last evening in the area of East Street where the 71st murder t6ok
place.

Police last night said they have no motive for the most recent slay-
ings.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 17






FROM page one
the fee would allow media
accreditation for Junkanoo to be
better organtsed, to the benefit
of all involved
Che ministry plans to charge

media companies and other pho-,

tographers and videographers a
$50 fee to be aceredited to cover
the Junior Junkanoo and Sentor
Junkanoo parades.

An additional $300 would be
required if these persons wished
to enter the parade route.

‘The government states that the
fee is being levied as the ministry
is “striving to reduce the number
of persons on the parade route.”

Tribune news editor Paco
Nunez said: “This is a ridiculous
move by the ministry. Apparent-
ly they believe that both Bay
Street and junkanoo belong to
them. and not the Bahamian peo-
se”

He continued: “As far as we
are concerned the government
has no right to charge local press
to cover a national cultural event.
Next thing you know they will
want us to buy tickets to attend
parliament.

“The ministry's stated aim in
making this move is to reduce the
number of persons on the parade
route as they expect a number of
new media companies to request
accreditation. | can only assume

Media hits out
at Ministry over
Junkanoo cover

charge plans

that the number of additional
media companies they refer to
are foreign and therefore this ts
an overt effort to discourage local
reporters from bringing coverage
of the parades to their audiences.
We consider that to be discrimi-
nation.”

Features editor Yolanda Dele-
veaux said that whoever came up
with the idea “ought to be fired.”

“We are simply helping to pro-
mote the culture of the Bahamas.
If they do this then couldn’t we
ask them to pay next time they
have a press conference, or want
a press release to go in?” she
asked,

Both Erica Wells, news editor
at The Nassau Guardian, and
Altovise Munnings, acting news
director at Cable 12, said that
they were going to seek further
clarification from the ministry
as to why this action has been
taken.

Mr Jones, however, was not
seeking clarification, stating sim-
ply that such a suggestion evi-
denced “small mindedness” at the

ministry.

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Real Estate
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FROM page one

about this. | have been from the start, that is why we never used
them. | wonder what all the real estate agents who bought pages in
the book are going to say now.”

The Department of Immigration began the investigation after
receiving a number of complaints about the businessmen in ques-
tion several months ago, Mr Burrows said.

He added that investigations are still continuing, and that the
businessmen are suspected of operating a lucrative advertising
agency without applying for the proper paperwork.

One media insider questioned whether the Americans could
even qualify for the necessary business licence in the first place. “As
1 understand it,” he said, “printing and publication in the Bahamas
are reserved exclusively for Bahamians by law.”

Without a business licence, he noted, an individual cannot apply
for a work permit. “I wonder if they had any local employees,
and if so, how they paid National Insurance,” the source added.

Immigration officials are monitoring the businessmen’s entry
into the country, Mr Burrows said, but declined to divulge specif-
ic details of the department’s investigations for fear of tipping the
suspects off. ’ :

The Americans have allegedly solicited a number of high-end
realtors to advertise in print as well as online. ‘Tribune sources
contend that the advertisers, in addition to using “pressure” tactics
on potential clients, dissuade Bahamian realtors from advertising
with local dailies claiming their publications offer a better com-
petitive advantage.

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

Cacique International

kicks off a groovy
kind of Christmas

It was a groovy start to the
Christmas season this year at
the Bahamas National Trust’s
annual Jollification thanks to
Cacique International.

The event planning and cater-
ing company wowed the crowds
with culinary delights that are
specially created and donated
to the Bahamas National
Trust’s Member Cocktail Par-
ty every year.

Well over 500 Trust members
were treated to a preview of the
Jollification offerings at the
cocktail party.

Thousands were to later
indulge in the two day event
that has become known locally
as the official start to the Christ-
mas season.

President and CEO of
Cacique Shawn Sawyer said:
“This was our seventh anniver-
sary at the Bahamas National
Trust’s Jollification and it is
indeed our pleasure to be able
to support the work that they
do in this way. It also gives us a
fantastic opportunity to flex our
artistic muscle and get creative
with our food, décor, and light-
ing — all aimed at exciting the
senses and generally getting
folks ‘in the mood’ for a groovy
Christmas”

Cacique’s Christmas decora-
tions matched with sparkling
fabrics in a Caribbean splash of
colour invoked an energetic
mood reminiscent of the 70s.
Retro mirror balls bounced light
off of psychedelic candle hold-
ers and the Groovy Christmas
Tree-centrepiece — a seven foot
high display of layered gift box-
es fashioned from flowers and
protruding branches hung with
colourful roses.

Mediterranean pasta, hearty
chilli with all the fixings and old
Bahamian favourites like guava
glazed pork kebabs and grouper
kebabs were served on com-
partmentalised trays in a playful
twist of the popular TV dinners



stuffed with smoked duck laced
in a mango sauce.

Executive sous chef Hesley
Rolle said: “We like to raise the
standards every year and this
year’s menu did just that. It was
not only a throw back to anoth-
er era, but also a preview of the
season to come and meant to

Th G.'R. Sweeting's

J




ri

lage,
Clanks



0
off








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NO EXCHANGES “Excluding home for Christmas.”

Sie oak me ST 0 REWI D EF Red ba ; The dessert area dished up

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a : crisp, all of which were gone

tours Ce ee

ma = ine
YAH Hont



Alt



within minutes.

Cacique’s executive pastry
chef, Jorg Stribel and the entire
pastry team delighted the crowd
with handmade chocolate...

Jorg Stribel said: “We like to
inspire the imagination and lux-
uriate the palette, especially
around this time of year when
its not only fun to treat the per-
son, but also important to feed
the soul.”

Bahamas National Trust’s
deputy executive director Lynn
Gape said Cacique has taken
the event from being a very nice
evening “to being a WOW!
evening.

“The themed decorations are
always beautiful and we won-
der each year how they can
make it better than the past
year, but somehow they do.
This year the theme was a
‘Groovy Kind of Christmas’ —
with the wonderful warm
colours and beautiful flower
arrangements they truly created
a mood of fun and festivity. Our
members raved about the food
— wonderful chilli, designer
kebabs and amazing desserts
and pastries made it an unfor-
gettable evening.”

Me tae ce

CCE Akh

’ NK EAA
WOW FACTOR: Seasonal joy

Ss ake etre ie oe eee



of the 70s, along with a crepe ,

Car Oe oe ee eae ee fot en” ti, iy Oar ie i Oe Ge Be eet, es me

oa ee oe 3

fee ee Y
THE TRIBUNE





The Bahamas | 59 years in

FROM page one

Barbados for the second year in
a row placed 31.

In this year’s report the UN pub-
lished the 2005 HDI values of
countries worldwide.

The HDI value is the measure
of life expectancy, literacy, educa-
tion, standard of living and well-
-being of a country’s citizens.

On the high end of the scale,
Norway, after placing first for six
consecutive years, lost its top spot
to Iceland and only ranked sec-
ond, followed by Australia in third
place.

Countries that placed in the
vicinity of the Bahamas on the
UN’s index include Croatia and
Costa Rica at 47 and 48 respec-
tively, and the Seychelles and Cuba
at 50 and 51 respectively. In last
year’s report, the Bahamas ranked
behind Cuba. However, on this
year’s UN index Cuba lost one
spot and the Bahamas gained












three.

The UN in its latest Human
Development Report found that
for every 100,000 people in the
Bahamas, 15.9 persons became the
victims of intentional homicides in
2005.

For every 100, 000 people, there

were 462 persons incarcerated.

Superintendent of Prisons Dr
Elliston Rahming two weeks ago
confirmed that the Bahamas actu-
ally has the eighth highest incar-
ceration per capita ranking in the
world.

Dr Rahming said that one in
every 230 Bahamians is currently
serving a prison sentence.

.The UN’s latest report further
stated that the life expectancy for
Bahamian men is 69.6 years, and
for women, 75 years. For every
1,000 live births, 13 children die in
infancy, the report said. As it con-
cerns adult literacy, the UN found
that 95 per cent of all Bahamians
are literate.

WHOLESALE

is pleased to announce that they will be
serving the Bahamian market with

Please contact 393-7111 or your
Lowe’s Sales Representative for
pricing information.

journalism
FROM page one

year gains.

Mrs Carron, who has been
editor and publisher of The pe
bune since 1972, began her jo
nalistic career as a reporter in
1957. Her grandfather, Leon

Dupuch, founded The Tribune -

in 1903, and her father Sir Eti-
enne Dupuch was publisher for
53 years until his semi-retire-
ment 35 years ago. However,
after stepping down as publish-
er he continued writing his dai-

ly editorials for another 15 years '

before relinquishing his pen to
his daughter in 1987, four years
before his death in 1991.

Read all about Eileen Car-
ron’s remarkable newspaper

‘career in our special supplement

and double-page feature inside.








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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 21



i Se ee

US Embassy in Nassau

observes International
Education Week —

AS PART of the U S
Embassy in Nassau’s activities
in observance of the eighth
annual International Education
Week, embassy staff members
spoke at a variety of venues to
share their insights into Amer-
ican educational programmes,
history and culture

International Education
Week (IEW) is a joint initia-

tive of the U S Department of

State and the US Department
of Education to celebrate the
benefits of international edu-
cation and exchange world-
wide.

It also seeks to develop a
broader understanding of
world cultures and to share
information about the history,
culture and government of the
United States. International
Education Week is observed
across the United States and in
more than 100 other countries.

This year’s theme is “Inter-
national edutalion: globalisa-
tion and respect”

International Education
Week kicked off on Monday,
November 12, with a one-hour
live discussion on the pro-
eramme “Real Talk Live” on
MORE 94 FM radio hosted by
Ortland Bodie.

The programme featured,
Paul Jukic, political officer at
the embassy, Dr Rhonda Chip-
man-Johnson, executive vice
president and vice president of
academic affairs at the College
of the Bahamas, and Kather-
ine Stewart-Gibson, embassy
public affairs specialist.

Both Mr Jukic and Dr Chip-
man-Johnson are former U S
Fulbright Grantees.

Mr Jukic was a Fulbright
recipient as a graduate student
in 1994-95 in Zagreb, Croatia.
Dr Chapman-Johnson earned
her PhD as a Fulbright Gradu-
ate student at Purdue Univer-
sity in West Lafayette, Indiana.

The discussion focused on

the importance of internation- °

al education exchange as a way
of promoting a deeper under-
standing and appreciation of
world cultures.

On November 13, Gunnery
Sergeant Harry Taylor, com-
mander of the United States
Marine Corps Nassau Detach-

LUCAS CARTWRIGHT (left), a

ment, spoke to Boy Scout lead-
ers, Scouts and parents about
the history, customs, and tra-
ditions of the United States
Marine Corps.

In this interactive discussion
with Scouts from seven divi-

_ sions of the Scout Association

of the Bahamas, Gunnery
Sergeant Taylor encouraged
the audience to learn their his-
tory and to be proud of their
heritage and traditions.

“The U S Marines are an
amphibious force in readiness

to support and defend freedom,

peace, and democracy not only
in the United States, but
around the world,” said Gun-
nery Sergeant Taylor.

Gunnery Sergeant Taylor
pointed out that the first
amphibious landing by the U
S Marines took place at Fort
Montague in Nassau on March
2 to 3, 1776. The amphibious
landing became known as the
Battle of Nassau.

Taylor also explained the sig-

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Group is presented with the U S Marine Corps official emblem by Gun-
nery Sergeant Harry Taylor, Detachment Commander of the United
States Marine Corps Nassau Detachment.

nificance of the official
Emblem of the U S Marine
Corps — the eagle — which sig-
nifies the nation; the globe,
which signifies world wide ser-
vice; and the anchor, which
depicts naval traditions and
service.

On Thursday, November 15,
as part of the ongoing weekly
reading programme at Wood-
cock Primary School, U S$
Embassy readers shared infor-
mation with Woodcock stu-
dents on their hometowns
and States in the United
States.

Readers talked about the
traditions and history of Rhode
Island, Massachusetts,
Connecticut, New Jersey and
Ohio.




























































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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





CAV ES VIL LAGE

SSS SS NRETAC Beawer:*

INTERNATIONAL NEWS.









Bomb explodes in a suburb

of Sri Lanka’s capital,
killing 16, military says

a NUGEGODA, Sri Lanka _

A BOMB exploded Wednes-
day evening near the entrance
to a popular department store
in a busy Colombo suburb,
killing 16 people and wounding
more than 20 in a rare attack
on civilians near the capital, the
military said, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

It added that the Tamil ‘Tiger
rebel group was responsible for

_ the bombing.

The blast occurred just out-
side the four-story No Limits
store in Nugegoda as com-
muters crowded a nearby bus
stop during the evening rush
hour, officials said.

Authorities did not inmedi-
ately give a mofive for the blast
or speculate who was behind it.
Earlier in the day, a female sui-
cide bomber sent by the rebels
killed one person and wounded
two others in an unsuccessful
attempt to assassinate a gov-
ernment minister in his office
in Colombo.

The rebels’ top leader blamed
the government for a recent
escalation of fighting in the
more than two-decade-old civil

war that has killed an estimated -

70,000 in the Indian Ocean
island nation.

The powerful blast at the
department store shattered win-
dows and sent piles of crumbled
concrete onto the bloodstained

sidewalk, according to an Asso-
ciated Press photographer at
the scene.

Crumpled and charred parts
of motorcycles and three-
wheeled taxis were scattered
nearby.

Police and firefighters
searched the debris for victims.

Military officials said at least
16 people were killed and 20
others wounded. At a nearby
hospital, residents came in
search of missing relatives. One
girl who suffered a broken arm
in the attack sat with her moth-
er as she received treatment.

“| was on the top floor of a
shoe shop with my wife and
child when I heard a big blast
and there were glass pieces all
over us,” resident A. Jayasena
told AP Television News. “As
we ran away, I saw the entrance
of the No Limit shop burning,
and in the midst of it, a school-
girl on the floor trying to get up
and then falling back again.”

Jayasena and his daughter
suffered minor injuries, while
his wife was in the hospital
being treated for more serious
wounds, he said.

The bomb may have explod-

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ed when a security guard at the
mall became suspicious about
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The suicide bombing targeted
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da, the minister of social ser-
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Eelam People’s Democratic
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inghe, the medical director of
Colombo National Hospital.
The bomber was also
killed.

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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
INTERNATIONAL NEWS









PARAQISE IBLAND, SAHAMAS
PRESENTS THE “



‘ cae ETI Rs
x
—— O
GELEGRITY
DAR A Se



MICHAEL JORDAN

Celebrity Invitational 2008 |
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED



Kerzner International Bahamas Limited is



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To volunteer contact Victoria Bethell by email at << i. watts sn oak
‘ AN ORANGUTAN hangs on at an enclosure at National Zoo in Kuala Lumpur, Monday, Nov. 26,
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THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 25



Nicolas Sarkozy calls rioting in
French suburbs ‘unacceptable’

®@ PARIS

PRESIDENT Nicolas
Sarkozy said Wednesday that
rioters who shot at police
would be brought to justice as
the new wave of violence that
rocked Paris suburbs
appeared to ebb, according to
Associated Press.

It was the first time Sakon,
who had just returned from
China, entered the fray since
the rioting broke out Sunday
night. The violence eased
Tuesday night after police
were deployed in force and
quickly rounded up youths
lobbing Molotov cocktails and
setting cars ablaze.

“What has happened is
absolutely unacceptable,”
Sarkozy said after meeting
with a wounded police cap-
tain hospitalized in Eaubonne
north of Paris. Sarkozy arrived
straight from the airport after
returning from China.

Those who shot at officers
“will find themselves in a
criminal court,” Sarkozy
vowed. “That has a name, it is
an assassination attempt.”

Rioting erupted after the
deaths of two minority teens
whose motor scooter collided
with a police car in Villiers-
le-Bel, a blue-collar town on
Paris’ northern edge. Resi-
dents claimed the officers left
without helping the teens. But
Prosecutor Marie-Therese de
Givry denied that, saying
police stayed on the.scene
until firefighters arrived.

The violence has drawn
comparisons with riots that
raged through suburbs nation-
wide in 2005, and has shown
that anger still smolders in
poor housing.projects where
many Arabs, blacks and other
minorities live largely isolat-
ed from the rest of society.
The 2005 riots also started in
the suburbs of northern Paris,
when two teens were electro-
cuted in a power substation



Michel Euler/AP

MASKED POLICE patrol the streets as a helicopter uses a spotlight overhead in the nothern Paris suburb Villiers- Bs Bel Tuesday evening, Nov. 27,
2007. France's government vowed to fight with all its might against armed bands of rioters who rampaged in Paris suburbs, torching cars and
buildings and, in a potentially deadly development, firing at police officers. Police reinforcements were sent into the suburbs north of Paris on
Tuesday to try to prevent a third night of rioting. After nightfall Tuesday, the suburb of Villiers-le-Bel, the epicenter of the rioting, appeared calm.

The earlier violence was triggered by the deaths of two teens in a crash with a police car Sunday in Villiers-le-Bel.

while hiding from police.
Sarkozy is unwelcome in the
projects where his hard line
on crime and immigration has
riled many. He was interior
minister in charge of police
during the 2005 riots and took
a tough stance on the violence.
But ever before those riots,
he angered many in the pro-
jects when he called delin-
quents there “scum.” During

his election campaign this
spring, Sarkozy deftly avoided
such neighborhoods, except
for one carefully orchestrated
blitz visit.

Sarkozy described the teens’
deaths as “distressing,” but
said it was no excuse for
shooting police.

He met with families of the
two teens and told them that a
judicial inquiry had been

opened into their deaths, said
their lawyer, Jean-Pierre
Mignard. Such an inquiry
would allow-the parents to
“participate actively in find-
ing out the truth. Nothing will
be hidden,” Mignard said. ~
Sarkozy also had a security
meeting with his top ministers.
Didier Vaillant, mayor of
the working class town of Vil-
liers-le-Bel, asked Sarkozy to

arrange meetings to address
the “difficulties facing the sub-
urbs.”

Among them are the long-
held tensions between
France’s largely white police
force and ethnic minorities in
poor neighborhoods. Heavy
state investments have done
little to improve housing and
create jobs in the depressed
projects that ring Paris, which

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

For The Year Ended July 31, 2

007

‘The recently concluded fiscal year marked
yet another successful year for FOCOL
Holdings Ltd. The results from .the

acquisition of Shell Bahamas in January

2006 and the purchase of the Texaco
service stations on Grand Bahama in
August 2006 have produced results beyond
our expectations. We will continue to
work towards improving our results from
these operations as well as embracing other
opportunities that may become qailable
Part of our plan to improve our profits has
been our aggressive activities in the retail
area. With the opening of the re-developed
site at Queen’s Highway, Grand Bahama
and the addition of the Eight Mile Rock
Grand Bahama site, we have made great
strides in Grand Bahama. We have also
embarked on upgrades in New Providence
that should produce results over the next
few years.

During the year we realized a net income
of $13.87 million which is up from $13.36
million last year, Our share price increased
from $11.21 at July 31, 2006 to $20.73 at
July 31, 2007.

On behalf of the Board of Directors, I
thank the Shareholders, Management and
Staff for their continued confidence in our
company.

pfarrrornsnnnnnnnen srenarctntacn nanny Sc annnnnnnninnnarnnanmnnnnnninnrnnnnnnnnnnns

a

uf! far AL

Sir Albert J. Miller
Chairman & President

FOCOL HOLDINGS LTD
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET (AL IDITED)
(B $000)

July 31, 2007

$430,374

72,461

Assets
Liabilities
Total shareholders’ equity.

feel a world apart from the
glamorous tourist attractions a
few miles away.

While cars were set ablaze
for a third night Tuesday, offi-
cials said the violence was less
intense than the two previous
nights.

Interior Minister Michele
Alliot-Marie said the overall
situation was “calm” but
police presence would remain
reinforced “as long as neces-
sary.”

About 20 police officers
were slightly injured Tuesday
night, down from more than
80 the night before, said
Patrice Ribeiro of the Syn-
ergie police union.

Son®: 138 cars were burned
around France overnight
Tuesday, which Ribeiro called
almost “normal.”

Police say as many as 100
cars are burned every night in
scattered incidents around the .
country. ,

Youths lobbed Molotov
cocktails and stones at police
in Villiers-le-Bel but
no ‘firearms were used,
Ribeiro said. On Monday
night, rioters used shotguns
raising fears the clashes could
turn deadly.

The interior minister said
39 people were arrested in the
Paris region Tuesday night.

In the town of Verneil-sur-
Seine west of Paris, eight peo-
ple were arrested after trying
to set fire to a bus, Ribeiro
said.

In the southern city of
Toulouse, 20 cars were set
ablaze, and fires at two
libraries were quickly brought
under control, police said. .

In the town of Verneil-sur-

Seine west of Paris, eight peo-
ple were arrested after trying
to set fire to a bus, Ribeiro
said.
Four young people were
convicted in fast-track trials
Tuesday to several months in
prison for participating in the
violence.

July 31, 2006

111,091
61,470
49,621



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME (AUDITED)
(B $000)

Year ended

July 31, 2007

Sale & revenues 279,628
Cost of sales
Gross profit 40,829
(23,452)
( 2,024)
(1,439)

Marketing, administrative and general
Depreciation

Finance cost

Other income (expense)

13,869
(1,505)

Net Income
Preference share dividends

Net income available to common shareholders
$2. 364

Basic earnings per share

Dividends per share

2 fC22 38, 299)

111,091

Year ended
July 31, 2006

207,026
(176,158)

30,868

eee

_$ 12,603
0.37

0.125

Copies of a full set of the audited financial statements can be obtained from Stephen
Adderley (sadderley@focol.com), at the Freeport Oil Company located on Queens Highway,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM.


ar

2

PAGE 26, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







Ka

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Lebanese majority backs army

commander as president, ©
in possible break in impasse

BEIRUT Febanon

THE largest bloc in
Lebanon’s deadlocked parlia-
ment has dropped its opposi-
tion to the army chief becoming
president, bringing Gen. Michel
Suleiman a step closer to being
the new head of state and end-
ing a yearlong political crisis, a

lawmaker said Wednesday,
according to Associated
Press.

The apparent breakthrough,
announced by legislator Ammar
Houry after weeks of political
deadlock, came just one day
after the Mideast peace confer-
ence in Annapolis, Md., a meet-
ing that Lebanon’s powerful

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neighbor, Syria, had chosen to
attend.

It had been widely expected
that tension between the United
States and Syria would ease
after Syria’s participation at
Annapolis.

That was expected to affect
the Lebanon political crisis,
because the Syrian-U.S. tension
has, in part, played itself out
through Lebanon’s complex
politics.

Suleiman is seen as a uniting
figure, whom both the U.S.-
backed majority in Lebanon
and the pro-Syrian opposition
— as well as outside players —
can back. All sides appear to
view him, at least for now, as a
relatively neutral player who
can guarantee that no side in
Lebanon’s fractured politics
dominates the other.

Houry; a legislator with the
Future Movement of Saad
Hariri, said the bloc had
reversed its previous stand
against amending the constitu-
tion to elect a sitting army com-
mander.

“We declare our acceptance
to amend the constitution in
order to reach consensus on the
name of the army commander,
Gen. Michel Suleiman,” he said.

Hariri is effectively the leader
of Lebanon’s parliamentary
majority, and his support is tan-
tamount to the majority’s accep-
tance.

Houry’s statement described
Suleiman as “symbol of the uni-
ty of the military establishment
which has given martyrs and
blood in defense of the nation
against the enemy and against
those who threatened civil
peace.”

Suleiman is also respected by
Hezbollah, which is‘leading the
opposition, suggesting that after
months of being unable to elect
a new leader, the republic may
once more have a president.

The wild card remains
whether Michel Aoun, a leading
Christian opposition politician,
a former army commander and
a presidential candidate him-
self, would go along.

Parliament has been dead-

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locked since September on
electing a president and failed
to pick a head of state before
President Emile Lahoud left
office Friday, resulting in a lead-
ership vacuum.

All sides, howevet, have
accepted the military’s role in
keeping security.

The legislature was scheduled
to meet again Friday to try one
more time to elect a leader. But
Houry said that arrangements
were unlikely to be finalized by
that session, suggesting it would
be put off to a later date.

Suleiman’s name had previ-
ously been floated as a candi-
date, but that would have
required a constitutional
amendment to allow senior
state employees to run while
still in office.

The 59-year-old general, who
has been commander for the
last nine years, appointed with
Syria’s approval when Damas-
cus ran the show in Lebanon,
has been doing the rounds of
the leaders. of Lebanon’s
disparate communities this
week.

He is credited with keeping
the military together in the
political upheaval since the
assassination of former Prime
Minister Rafik Hariri, Saad’s
Hariri’s father, in 2005 and the
subsequent withdrawal of Syri-
an troops from Lebanon.

Hé is also a staunch support-
er of Hezbollah’s right to fight
Israel and refused to crush anti-
Syrian protests. :

But since last year’s Hezbol-
lah war with Israel and the
deployment of the Lebanese
army in southern Lebanon near
the border with Israel, Suleiman
has distanced himself from the
Shiite Muslim guerrillas.

Suleiman rose to national
prominence particularly since
the army crushed al-Qaida-
inspired militants in three
months of fighting in a Pales-
tinian refugee.camp in north-

ern Lebanon, @ battlesthat.cost-

the army more than 160 dead.

The battle ended with hun-
dreds of Fatah Islam militants
killed or captured.



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Hussein Malla/AP File



ARMY COMMANDER, Gen. Michel Suleiman salutes during a cere-
mony in the Christian town of Jounieh, Lebanon in this Saturday,
Oct. 6, 2007 file photo. The largest bloc in Lebanon's deadlocked
parliament has dropped its opposition to the army chief becoming
the next president, bringing Gen. Michel Suleiman one step closer
to being the new head of state and ending Lebanon's year-long
political crisis, a lawmaker said Wednesday Nov. 28, 2007.







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~ THE TRIBUNE



Thu: .vJ7, PAGE 27

Saudi Arabia says 208 are

arrested in the kingdom’s
~ largest anti-terrorism sweep

@ RIYADH, Saudi Arabia _

MORE than 200 al-Qaida-
linked suspects involved in
different plots against the
kingdom have been arrested
in recent months in Saudi
Arabia’s largest anti-terror-
ism sweep to date, the Inte-
rior Ministry said Wednes-
day, according to Associated
Press.

‘The ministry first reported
the arrest of eight men, said

to be linked to al-Qaida and °

allegedly planning to attack
-oil installations in the king-
dom.

An Interior Ministry state-
ment, carried by the Saudi
Press Agency, said the eight
were part of a terrorist cell
led by a non-Saudi man, who
was one of those arrested.
The planned attacks were to
take place in the eastern
region of the country, which
is home to Saudi’s main oil
resources.

The arrest of.the eight
“pre-empted an imminent
attack on an oil installation,”
the statement said without
naming the target or provid-
ing more details.

The ministry also said 22
other suspects were arrested
for allegedly supporting the






; hess



al-Qaida terror network. This
group plotted to assassinate
the country’s religious lead-
ers and security officials, it
said.

The ministry also gave the
following breakdown of oth-
er arrests:

— 18 suspects, led by an
alleged expert in launching
missiles, were arrested sepa-
rately. “They were planning
to smuggle eight missiles into
the kingdom to carry out ter-
rorist operations,” the min-
istry’s said.

— 112 Saudis were arrest-
ed for links and “coordina-
tion with outside circles” to
assist in smuggling men to
troubled areas — shorthand
for Iraq and Afghanistan —
for training, after which they
would be brought back for
attacks in the kingdom.

— 32 men — both Saudis
and non-Saudis — were
arrested for providing finan-
cial aid to al-Qaida opera-
tions in the kingdom.

— 16 men were arrested in
the holy city of Medina for
colluding to issue a publica-
tion propagating “misleading
ideology” and criminal acts.
The group also worked on
helping volunteers go fight
in Afghanistan and Iraq.

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The ministry said a total of
208 were arrested.

The statement gave no
timeline on the arrests of the
separate groups.

Saudi Arabia, which has a
quarter of the world’s proven
oil reserves, has seen a rise
in attacks by Islamist extrem-
ists over the last few years.

The kingdom, which is the
birthplace of Osama bin
Laden, has been waging a
crackdown on al-Qaida mili-
tants since a wave of attacks
on foreigners in the kingdom
in 2003.

In February 2006, two sui-
cide bombers attacked the oil
facility at Abqaiq on the east

‘coast, killing two security

guards and wounding eight
foreign workers in an inci-
dent later claimed by the
Saudi branch of al-Qaida.
The previous large sweep
by the Saudi authorities was

announced in April, netting .

172 militants, including pilots
they say were trained for oil
refinery attacks using civil-
ian planes.

In August, Saudi Arabia
said it was setting up a
35,000-strong special force to
protect its oil facilities due to
the increasing threats agamst
al-Qaida.















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PAGE 28, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
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Albany are

hoping to finish

infrastructure
by mid-summer
in 2009

Developers hopeful for
February 1 construction
start, as ‘95% through’
outstanding issues

with government

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE $1.3 billion Albany Golf }
& Beach Resort’s developers are :
hoping to complete construction :
of the development’s infrastruc- :
ture, roads and amenities by mid- }
summer/mid-autumn 2009, -believ-
ing they are “95 per cent of the ;
way through” resolving all out- }
standing issues with the Govern- :

ment.

Jason Callender, one of }
Albany’s project managers, told :
The Tribune that the developers :
were estimating that they would :
have some 2,4000 applications :
from potential construction work- :
ers to sift through as their two- :
day job fair came to a close last :

night.

been “a great success”.

The project is likely to require :
some 1600 workers at the peak :
of construction, but Mr Callen- :
der told The Tribune that “ini- :
tially we’re looking for 500-600 :

workers”.
As construction progressed,

_ and additional contractors were :
hired-to-comptete various: proe~i
jects at Albany, including ulti- :

mately residential construction,

Mr Callender said the develop-

SEE page 12B

saat

SERRE

THURS SDAY,



NOVEMBER "29,

2007

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net







|? Bank of The Bahamas

e

eater chee nin ria AOE Aina iia A Slit

Money Safe.
Money Fast.

intginational Morey Toanater

at

‘)TNTERNAFIONAL

Galine at

Ethanol blend fuel can

)

boost foreign reserves

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

— THE Bahamas could strengthen and pre-
serve its foreign currency reserves, and
develop a reputation as an eco-friendly
tourism destination by immediately switch-
ing to a 10 per cent ethanol blend for car
gasoline, a business executive told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Tony Joudi, president of construction,
development and project management firm,
FTC, said the 2006 study submitted to the
former Christie administration by its Petro-
leum Usage Review Committee showed
that the Bahamas last year imported 65
million gallons of unleaded gasoline and
50 million gallons of diesel.

In 2006, the Bahamas spent some
$705.782 million in foreign currency on

Businessman says mandatory switch to 10% car fuel
ethanol mix could lower energy import bill, reduce
nation’s carbon dioxide emissions and enhance
nation’s image as eco-friendly for tourism

fuel-related imports, some $157.929 mil-
lion being spent in the first quarter;
$194.738 million in the second quarter;
$209.271 million in the third; and $143.844
million in the final quarter.

Apart from producing a huge outflow of
foreign exchange and currencies from the
Bahamas to purchase this fuel, Mr Joudi
pointed out that there were negative envi-
ronmental consequences to this nation’s
high gasoline consumption and car-depen-

dent economy, namely carbon dioxide emis-
sions that increased global warming.

Given that each gallon of gasoline pro-
duces 20 pounds of carbon dioxide when
combusted, and each gallon of diesel pro-
duces 22 pounds, based on these figures
and multiplying them with the Bahamas
gasoline import bill, Mr Joudi said this
meant this nation could have potentially
generated 2.3 billion pounds of carbon diox-
ide emissions in 2006 alone.

To reduce this nation’s carbon dioxide
emissions, Mr Joudi suggested the Bahamas
make it mandatory that all motorists - and

‘gasoline stations - use a 10 per cent ethanol

blend that can be pumped into their cars
without causing any harm to the vehicle or
its engine.

He added that just a 10 per cent reduc-
tion in the use of ordinary gasoline and
diesel would reduce the Bahamas’ carbon
dioxide emissions by 230 million pounds
per annum, bringing economic as well as
health and environmental benefits to the
Bahamas.

“We want to promote the Bahamas not
only as a tourism destination where you
come and have fun, but as a healthy desti-
nation, and develop a niche as an environ-

Describing the job fair as pro- }
ducing “an excellent turnout” }
from contractors and construc- :
tion workers over.the two days, :
Mr Callender said Albany and its :
developers were “very encour- :
aged” and believed the event had :

SEE page 9B

‘Flight to quality’ boosts Bahamian
high-end property values 13.5%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS-BASED high-end
properties have increased in value
by 13.5 per cent over the last three
years, a principal in a $200 million
luxury residential development
told The Tribune yesterday, and
these rising values coupled with
“the flight to quality” by foreign
buyers will underpin continued
high international demand for
Bahamian real estate.

William W. Williams, a direc-
tor of the Alpharetta, Georgia-
based Source Development
Group LLC, which is developing
Seabridge Bahamas, said that

Family Guardian
to launch new
units in January



H By NEIL HARTNELL




_ Tribune Business Editor




















FAMILY GUARDIAN, the Bahamian life and health insurer, is
planning to launch two new units in January 2008, The Tribune was
‘old yesterday, with the company also seeking to expand its general
insurance agency business and launch a Creditor Life product in the
New Year.

Patricia Hermanns, the company’s president, said now that Fam-
ily Guardian had received regulatory approval for its FG Financial
and FG Capital Markets subsidiaries, “what we are looking to do is
have the launch in J anuary. We’re pune everything together and
structuring it now”.

She added that the two units, which will allow Family Guardian
to become more of a full-product menu financial services company °
as opposed to a pure life and health insurer, offering pensions,
mutual funds and advisory services, were a natural extension of its
existing business.

Ms Hermanns described pensions as being “a natural tie-in to the
type of business we do” on the group side, and were an ideal prod-
uct to offer to Family Guardian’s wide range of clients, especially
on health.

SEE page 8B



a fi . i +
a a | pd Fie
a bb

|

|

Old Bacar ‘He: Con Harbour

while he and his partners had con-
cerns about the impact the global
credit crunch would have on
demand for their product, they

believed its high-end nature would °
enable the development to with-

stand any shocks.
Acknowledging that the credit
crunch might make it more diffi-
cult for property buyers to obtain
mortgages or other forms of
financing, and at acceptable inter-
est rates, Mr Williams said Source

‘Development Group and others

had seen “a flight to quality” as a
result of recent events impacting
the US economy.

“What we're seeing is a flight
to quality, so the high-end, upscale
properties are not as impacted as
the lower-priced ones” by events
such as the ‘sub-prime’ mortgage
crisis, Mr Williams said.

The US$’s decline on the inter-
national currency markets had
made UK real estate buyers a par-
ticular target for Seabridge
Bahamas, he explained, as with
one UK€ giving British citizens
more than two US$, property
prices in the Bahamas and US had
effectively halved in value for
them.



Mr Williams said interest from
US purchasers in the Bahamas
was still strong at the upper end of
the market, due to an
unfavourable tax regime in the US
and falling property and real estate
values there.

property will maintain its value,”
he added. “They've [US real estate
-buyers] recognised the Bahamas

SEABRIDGE BAHAMAS, a $200 mil-
lion upscale residential development
on West Bay Street by Source Devel-
opment Group LLC, is designed to
appeal to Bahamian professionals,
entrepreneurs, retirees or foreign
owners searching for a primary or
secondary home.

“Any beautiful oceanfront

SEE page 13B





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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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TECHNOLOGY Fax: mee 0049

COMPANY LIMITED



‘Minor’ details
over opening
\ bank accounts

-UNDER Section 2(1) of
the Minors Act 1976 (the
Minors Act), a “minor” is
anyone under the age of 18
years-old, which is the age of
majority in the Bahamas.
Therefore, any bank account
opened or likely to be
opened by, or on behalf of,
persons under the age of 18
years-old would be consid-
ered an account operated for
or on behalf of a minor.

Additionally, for the pur-
poses of determining the req-
uisite’age of the individual
account holder, in reference
to the question of whether
the account holder is consid-
ered a minor at the opening
or operation of an account,
Section 3(1) of the Minors
Act states that:

“The time at which a per-
son attains a particular age
expressed in years shall be
the commencement of the
relevant anniversary of the

date of his birth.”

There are two important
considerations that must be



made with regard to the
legality of establishing a
banking relationship between
a bank and a minor:

* The capacity of the minor
to operate an account, even
an account with a credit bal-
ance.

* The enforceability of
loans to a minor, even ona
limited basis, by Bahamian
banks, and the security taken
for such lending.

Under general banking
law, a minor cannot give an
effective discharge for an

by Tyrone Fitzgerald



unperformed obligation, nor
can he release an unpaid
debt. However, where the
discharge is merely the recog-
nition of the performance of
the obligation, such as a
receipt, it is our opinion that
a minor does have the capaci-
ty to accept such a receipt,
however limited the capacity
to do so.

It should also be noted that
there have been some estab-
lished cases, following Eng-
lish Common Law, that have
supported the legal principle
that a minor has the capacity



MEAD JOHNSON NUTRITIONALS LAUNCHES ENFAMIL GENTLEASE LIPIL

The tolerance problems in babies are one of the main causes to visit the Health
Care Professional office worldwide, giving mothers hard times and sleepless
nights. Mead Johnson Nutritionals is leading the way in science-based pediatric
nutrition products, to help give infants and children the best start in life. As part of
this commitment, on November 15th, at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel in Nassau,
the company launched Enfamil Gentlease Lipil, an infant formula designed for
. babies with fussiness or gas, the two main causes of babies intolerance. On this
occasion Dr. Jon A. Vanderhoof, Vice President of Global Affairs at Mead Johnson
Nutritionals conducted’a conference with the theme “Advances in Infant Nutrition
Management”, highlighting the nutritional causes of intolerance in babies and new

All product names in this material indicate trademarks of Mead Johnson & Company in various countries.
Some of these trademarks may have been discontinued or may be currently owned by other entities.

sh ame



tools to deal with this problem. Several important Health Care Professionals
attended this meeting.

Enfamil Gentlease Lipil was launched in 2005 in the U.S. and since then, has been
an important tool for mothers and Health Care professionals to treat babies with
fussiness or gas. This product contains an easy-to-digest milk protein that has
been partially broken down. Enfamil Gentlease Lipil also has reduced levels of

lactose, for babies with transient intolerance to lactose. The formula is nutritionally

balanced and includes docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA),
nutrients also found in breast milk, that promote brain and oe sel es

where gved health begins”

Lda MMA winiantME 317



to give a discharge for ful-

- filled obligations (receipt for

wages, enforcement of pay-
ment of a debt) .

Section 2 of the Infant
Relief Act 1874 deals with
contracts entered into by
minors for the repayment of
money lent, or to be lent, or
for goods supplied or to be
supplied (other than con-
tracts for necessaries), and all
accounts stated with infants
(which by virtue of the
Minors Act is used inter-
changeably with word
“minor” ). Such contracts are
not legally enforceable by the
aggrieved party, except
where the contract is one
where he is supplied with
goods or services.

However, Section 2 of the
Infant Relief Act also states
that: “This Act shall not
invalidate any contract into
which an infant may by an
existing or future Act, or by...
the rules of common law or
equity, enter, except such as
now by law are voidable”.

Based upon established
case law and jurisprudence,
and general banking practice,
Bahamian banks are general-
ly allowed to open bank
accounts for minors. Howev-
er, it should be stated that as
a matter of caution and good
banking practice, banks
should open bank account for
minors either in the name of
the minor’s parents,
guardian, or legally appoint-.
ed representative.

They would hold the
account “in trust for” or on
behalf of the minor, or in the
minor’s name, on the under-
standing (preferably specified
in writing and signed by the
bank and the minor’s parents
legal guardian, or representa-
tive) that it will be operated
by such persons on the
minor’s behalf.

From a due diligence
standpoint, a bank may
require documentary evi-
dence on the personal details
of the minor and his parents,
legal guardian, or representa-
tive. This may include, but
not be limited to, a certified
copy of the birth certificate of
the minor; evidence of the
legal capacity and authorisa-
tion of the legal guardian or
representative to act on
behalf the minor, where
applicable; contact details of
the minor and legal guardian;
a specific description of the
source of funds/wealth of the:
minor and/or legal guardian;
and a specific explanation of
the reason(s) for opening the
account on behalf of and for
the minor. This must all com-
ply with Bahamian law and
the bank’s Know Your Client
(KYC) and customer due
diligence policies and proce-
dures.

Due to the ‘trust’ element
that exists for accounts of this
type, it should be noted that a
bank may become subject to
fiduciary duties to the minor,
particularly in instances
where the account - operated
by the legal guardian or rep-
resentative - is being done so
contrary to the established
bank mandate; the specific

SEE page 20

a
THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 3B

LO A De SES rs
‘Bottled up’ projects

to challenge Bahamas
workforce capacity

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian workforce
will be challenged like never
before to provide enough
skilled labour for some $5 bil-
lion worth of investment pro-
jects due to “start between
south-west New Providence
and Rose Island over the
next 120 days”, the Bahamian
-Contractors Association’s
(BCA) president said yester-
day.

Stephen Wrinkle said that
with the $1.3 billion Albany
Golf & Beach Club project,
plus Baha Mar’s $2.4 billion
Cable Beach redevelopment
and the Rose Island Ritz-
Carlton all likely to start con-
struction work at the same
time, “we’re going to run out
of skilled labour very quick-
ly”.

He added: “They’ve bot-
tled it up and are about to
unleash this genie. I see over
$5 billion worth of work that
they have committed to start-
ing between Nassau and
Rose Island in the next 120
days.

“T just don’t know how it’s
going to happen. I don’t
know anywhere else in the
world where this level of
development is going on, so
the whole Bahamian work-
force is going to be chal-
lenged in stepping up to the
plate to meet this.”

Once the Atlantis Phase III
expansion had been complet-
ed, the plan had been for
construction workers whose
employment on Paradise
Island was winding down to
migrate over to Cable Beach,
where Baha Mar’s project
was set to pick up the slack.

That development, though,

$5bn work of investments
to ‘start between south-west
New Providence and Rose
Island over the next 120 days’

Baha Mar, Albany and other
major mixed-use resort pro-
jects starting simultaneously
or around the same time,
placing a tremendous strain -
on an already-stretched
Bahamian workforce.

Given the well-document-
ed education problems in the
Bahamas, the supply of skills
as well as the sheer number
of workers is likely to be

inadequate to meet develop-

er needs, forcing them to
import increasing quantities
of expatriate labour.

Mr Wrinkle, who was part
of the BCA contingent man-
ning booths at the two-day
job Albany job fair for con-
tractors and construction
workers, said that exercise
had “gone very well”.

Some 1,000 potential work-
ers had attended the first day
on Tuesday, he added, with
an estimated 150 contractors
also turning up.

“It looks very promising.
There’s a tremendous
amount of interest for this
work. We’re very pleased
with the turnout,” Mr Wrin-
kle said.

He praised the Albany .
developer, Park Ridge Secu-
rities, whose main investors
are the Tavistock Group (the
holding company for invest-

tation and advice on the job
fair and construction aspects
from the BCA and the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BT VI).

“From our point of view, it
represents a long-term part-
nership,” Mr Wrinkle said of
the arrangement. “They’re
creating a Lyford Cay from
scratch, and the economic
impact will be far more
reaching that if they were
constructing a 20-storey hotel
tower.

“There’s far more compo-
nents to this, and the trickle
down effect and the impact
on the economy will be far
more widespread.”

Mr Wrinkle added of
Albany: “I think it will be a
great thing for our economy.
I’ve got really high hopes for
this. I think it’s going to be a
really, really nice impact on
the southwestern corridor of
the island.”

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One-metre sea
level rise to swap
11 per cent of

Bahamian land ee

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

_ EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

& By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A ONE-metre rise in sea
levels “would permanently
submerge” some 11 per cent
of the existing land in the
Bahamas, a United Nations
_ (UN) report revealed yester-
day, indicating the real and
present danger presented by
climate change to this nation
and its tourism industry.

The UN’s Human Develop-
ment Index (HDI) report for
2007-2008 said: “With a 50-cen-
timetre increase in sea levels,
over one-third of the
Caribbean’s beaches would be
lost, with damaging implica-
tions for the region’s tourist
industry.

“An increase of 1 metre

EN

would permanently submerge
about 11 per cent of the land
area in the Bahamas. Mean-
while, the intrusion of salt
water would compromise
freshwater supplies, forcing
governments to undertake
costly investments in desalina-
tion.”

The Bahamas was ranked at
number 49 in the UN’s Human
Development Index, ahead of
all Caribbean counterparts bar
Barbados, which was at 31.



FML Group of Companies Ltd.
is seeking to employ an

| ‘Administrative Assistant

for it human resources department.

LC
"Must be matured, energentic and possess
|| knowledge of word and excel. Must have
i excellent written and communication skills.

|, Human resources experience a plus.

Interested persons may fax their resumes

to 394-2193.



Dr. Thad

Associate Professor of Psychology and
Dean, Faculty of Social and Educational Studies

1948

944 SHANNEN HAAN

- 2007

The College of The Bahamas mourns the passing of a Trusted Colleague,
Genuine Academic, Good Friend, Passionate Africanist, True Nationalist
and Nation Builder.


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Mine: itt
Call for ‘adequate focus’ on climate change danger

THE minister of tourism and
aviation is hoping “adequate
focus’
states such as the Bahamas,

which are most at risk from ris-
ing sea levels induced by glob-
al climate change.

’ will given to small island
Neko Grant discussed the

x= Piet

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issue with Francisco'Frangialli,
secretary-general of the United
Nations’
Organisation (UNWTO), dur-

co \ r RS
\ \ a> x \

American Academy of
Project Management

ing a recent courtesy call. The ,

minister is currently attending
the seventh session of the
UNWTO General Assembly
underway in Cartagena de
Indias, Colombia, from
November 22-29, 2007.

Mr Grant said he was look-
ing forward to the UNWTO
General Assembly discussion
on climate change, and hoped
that “adequate focus will be
given to small islands which
are low lying and face the risk
of being submerged due to sea
levels rising over the coming

-decade”.

Mr Grant said the Bahamian
delegation was “very interest-
ed in learning more about
adaptation measures”.

Bahamas

Noting that the Bahamas has
14 island destinations to devel-
op into unique branded desti-
nations, he added that the chal-

lenge is finding resources “to
help us to assess requirements
to create appropriate brand-
ing”.

Thanked —

Mr Grant thanked the
UNWTO secretary general for
offering technical assistance in
this regard, and noted with
interest Dr Yunis’s presenta-
tion regarding local destina-
tions.

Responding to Mr Frangial-
li’s wish for support from the
Bahamas in facilitating the
work of the UNWTO in island
destinations, with particular
emphasis on the economic
impact of the industry on
tourism-dependent island
nations, advancing issues on
climate change and its poten-
tial impacts, and poverty alle-
viation, Mr Grant said the
Bahamas welcomed the oppor-
tunity to work with . the

UNWTO to encourage more
Caribbean nations to join and
avail themselves of the mem-
ber benefits.

The possibility of a
Caribbean Tourism Organisa-
tion (CTO) and UNWTO col-
laboration was raised, as it was
felt that having the UNWTO
consider participating in next
year’s CTO Conference on
Sustainable Development -
scheduled for April in Turks
and Caicos - would help to
underscore the importance of
climate change issues and ele-
vate the level of discussions.

Conference

Mr Grant was accompanied
to the conference by the direc-
tor-general of tourism, Vernice
Walkine, the director of sus-
tainable tourism, Earlston
McPhee, and the director of
onshore communications,
Gabriella Fraser.

Tues & Thurs from 6pm-8pm
OR

Saturdays from Sam-1pm jt

Contact:

Time of Class:

cs

Candice Albury
Lignum Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.
Ph: 393-2164 Fax:394-4971
Email: candice@lignumtech.com






THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCQING & TRAINING RANSNIANS



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



STAFF VACANCY

LIBRARIES & INSTRUCTIONAL
MEDIA SERVICES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:





1. LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II, LAW LIBRARY

The Law Library of The College requires a highly motivated, tactful, people-friendly,
innovative, detail-oriented person:to provideppraprofessional, administrative and basic
reference assistance. Clientele will include students and faculty of the LL.B Programme,
as well as members of the legal profession and the general public.








The successful candidate will perform all duties with minimal supervision, assisting with
the overseeing of the day-today activities and programmes of the Branch in the absence
of the Branch head, so good judgment and professionalism is essential. In addition,
he/she will direct the activities of library assistants and part-timers and will assist with
their training and appraisal. Regular written reports are required.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

Under the direction of the Unit Supervisor, the position performs a variety of paraprofessional
duties with minimal supervision. These include supervision of library assistant(s),
preparation of written and oral reports/correspondence, planning and organizing job
activities, which demonstrates skills such as decision-making, good judgment and
knowledge of library and college policies and procedures. Further, overseeing the
maintenance of collections, participation in the development of policies, services and
programmes, and overseeing the day-to-day activities and programmes of the Unit in the
absence of the Unit Head are to be undertaken. The position works closely with all Units
to ensure the delivery of a high standard of service to patrons.

SPECIFIC DUTIES:

Provides evening and Saturday reference services.
Directs the activities of Library Assistants, and assists in their appraisal.
Assists in the Unit’s budget preparation.
Assists with the updating of policies and procedures manuals.
Responds to reference questions received from patrons by telephone and in person.
Supervises part-time, evening and weekend staff.
Ensures the enforcement of library policies and procedures.
Assists with storage and access to all library resources, e.g. books, microfilm,
CD-ROM databases, microfiche and related equipment.
9. Conducts research in support of the Unit’s work.
10. Assists with the conduct of research and the compilation of bibliographies.
11. Assumes responsibility for deposit of funds collected in the unit.
12. Issues library passes.
. 13. Organizes work schedules for library clearance.
14. Handles Inter-Library loan requests.
15. Assists with the delivery of Bibliographic Instructional programmes.
16. Provides group and individual tours of the unit/library.
18. Assists patrons with the use of computers and other related electronic services
available. .
19. Assists in the development of projects for the making of the library and its resources.
20. Conducts training for Library Assistants on operational procedures.
21. Attends library meetings.
22. Serves on College wide committees
23. Participates in library projects.
24. Drafts letters, reports, proposals as requested.
25. Recommends resources for acquisitions
26. Any other duties which may be assigned.

LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II

QUALIFICATIONS: Normally a Bachelor’s Degree or the equivalent in relevant area,
OR for a technical/vocational or craft area, satisfactory completion of a recognized or
acceptable programme of training at the craft level, AND have at least ten (10) years of
experience working in the craft area, OR have a trained Teacher’s Certificate with

ae rata in the relevant craft area, PLUS at least six (6) years of teaching experience
in the area.

SALARY SCALE: SPS-5 $24,580 x $700 - $35,780

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest along with a completed application
form and an up-to-date resume to the address below by December 6, 2007:

The Director
Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Or to hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please note that applications are available on The College’s website: www.cob.edu.bs
















RAIA A PY hy




























You Are Invited

Youth Leaders,
Youth Pastors —

WEG
S
“
Ve [

aa Viten passe

y

N

MM

a
& \
AY, \

\
\

a
try of Youth; Thompso
[20 ERY TO .

‘De ‘at 9am- 11a

YL
Yj
Yj"

SS

2.) ETT
VACANCY NOTICE

CRAFT APPRENTICES
ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Department for Craft
Apprentices. Craft Apprentices are trained to become Electrical and Mechanical
Craftsman.

To qualify as a Craft Apprentice the following criteria should be met:
Must be between 18 and 25 years

Have a minimum of five (5) BUC’s including Maths, English Language and General
Science with grades of “C” or better or

Any other equivalent technical certification or relevant training diploma

Persons recruited from the Family Islands should be a resident of that island. Once
the formal training has been completed, Apprentices will return to their respective
island.

Application forms .can be collected from the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s
Head Office located at Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, Nassau, Bahamas. Family
Island applicants can also collect application forms from the local B. E. C offices.
Applications should be returned duly completed with all of the supporting
documentation to The Manager, Human Resources & Training P.O. Box N-7509,
Nassau, Bahamas on or before: Friday, December 14, 2007.




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 5B





Androsia
returns to
Freeport

ANDROSIA, the supplier *

of Bahamian-made batik fab-
rics, fashions and textiles for
the home, has made its prod-
ucts available again on Grand
Bahama through UNEXSO
and Bahama Fabrics.

The company had closed its
own store in Grand Bahama,
but Jeff Birch, Androsia’s
executive, said: “We're pleased
to announce that Bahama Fab-
Tics is now carrying a full range
of our fabrics, and a wide selec-
tion of Androsia products is
available at UNEXSO in Port
Lucaya.”

“We understand that con-

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or
have won an award.

Ti oo, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.

chief

cerned Freeport residents were
shocked at the closing of the
local Androsia store, and we're
pleased that our line will now
be carried at these two fine
retail establishments."
Traditionally, Androsia has
always had a presence in
Freeport, and at one time dur-
ing the 1980s, opened a factory
on the island. .
“But as things change, we
went back to our roots on
Andros," said Mr Birch.
UNEXSO is located in the

Port Lucaya Marketplace,
while Bahama Fabrics is at 5
West Mall.

Androsia was started by the
Birch family in 1973 as a cot-
tage industry to provide mean-
ingful jobs in the Andros com-
munity. Today, the company
employs more than 20 people.

All the fabric designs and
garments are the original cre-
ations of Androsia. Authentic
Bahamian-made Androsia
products have the ‘Androsia’
name on the design.

Christmas Cleaning Special
Christmas is coming!
Does your house need a good cleaning
before you decorate?
Tis’ the season for family and friends!
Kick back relax and let us clean
your home for the holidays?

&

E ER PARTY CLEAN-UP CREW

AVALLABLE

Give us a call 361-0156 or 535-181







g reservations
s and bedrooms for
ctive November 1, 2007




TO OUR MBA STUDENTS,

THIS IS NOT NUTMEG. |
THIS I$ GLOBAL OPPORTUNITY.

St. George’s University was founded by looking at the
world differently. Our MIB/MBA program was founded
the same way. This program was created for students
interested in applying the international perspective of
St. George’s University toward the global marketplace.
Both the MIB and MBA degrees are designed to be
comprehensive as well as flexible, offering accelerated
and part-time programs. If opportunity is what you seek,
St. George’s University just might be your first step.

St. George’s University

THINK BEYOND



For more information, contact Colin Dowe at 1 (473) 444-4680 or visit www.sgu.edu/mba

©2007 St.

George's University

Grenada, West Indies
PAGE 68, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007





INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

THE TRIBUNE



MUST SELL






NEW PROVIDENCE

LOT No. 21B FRASER ALLOTMENT

OFF SOLDIER ROAD Appraisal: $258,000.00
“engrcen The subject property
AR | \.. con-sisting of 8,400
\i square feet is
' developed with a
split leveled home
' with 1925 square
feet of floor area on
| the ground floor, a
_ porch area of 437
i square feet and
/ second floor area of
| 735 square feet. The






















building is iat sound construction and completed in its entirety. The
ground floor comprises 2 bedrooms, one bath, a kitchen, dining and
family room. The second floor comprises two bedrooms, one bath, living
and dining areas.

Directions to property: Heading East on Soldier, turn left onto first paved
road opposite Lowes Wholesale, 2nd to last house on the road with
chain linked fence.










SANDYPORT Appraisal: $300,000.00

All that lot of land having an area of 9,626 square feet, being lot number 40,
of the subdivision known as SandyPort, situate in the Western District of
New Providence. The property is irregular in shape, Is on a level grade and
zoned as single family residential. An electrical connection outlet is located
near the property. The property is located on Sandy Port Drive Just on the
bend before Governor’s Cay on the Southern Side of the road.






No. 17 WESTRIDGE ESTATES



Appraisal: $930,000.00

All that lot of land having an
area of 30000 square feet,
being lot Number 17 of the
subdivision known as
Westridge Estates Addition.
Situate in the Western District





,on the island of New
' Providence.
Located on the subject
: property is a newly
constructed single story

structure comprising 6,000

SERRE:

three Car Garage.
The building is 75% sompleted and comprises five bedrooms, four and a
half baths study, living/dining, family room, kitchen, laundry and
generator room.
Location: From SuperValue West Bay, take the road heading west into
Westridge, take the first corner on the Right, Westridge Drive. Subject
property will be about the seventh on the right hand side of the road.










SHSHSHRASOCHTOSASEHEHSHAHSEHAEOOTEOD

FREEPORT

|FAIRWAY MANOR CONDOMINIUM Appraisal: dei 000.00



Apartment 402, 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms.
Lot 4, Block GN, Edward Birch Curt, Bahamian North

LOT No. 20, BLOCK 1, UNIT 3
FORTUNE POINT SUBDIVISION Appraisal: $38,000.00

All that lot of vacant land having an area of 12,650 sq. ft. being lot No.
20, Block 1 Unit 3 of the Subdivision known and designated as Fortune
Point Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Duplex property zoning with
a rectangle shape.

LINCOLN GREEN, CANEBY CLOSE Appraisal: $38,500.00

Unit 5, Block 17, Lot #48 — Single family residence, Clearwater Close.
Located on fresh water canal. Approximately 17,404 sq. ft.

‘O VIEW PROPERT
n “Real Estate 2

































feet of living space with a‘:










Sy a

LOT No. 37 BLOCK 33
CHURCHILL COURT, BAHAMIA MARINA
& BAHAMIA 4 SUBDIVISION, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA Appraisal: $337,000.00



All that lot of land having : an area of 16, 533 Sq. ft. being lot No. 37
of the subdivision known and designated as Bahamia Marina and
Bahamia Section 4 Subdivision, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Located
on this property is a structure comprising a 3 year old duplex

structure which covers approximately (3,058) square feet.
Apartment consisting of two 2-bedrooms, 2-bathroom with private |
Jacuzzi in master bath, spacious living and dining room, full service
kitchen, a laundry and utility room, foyer/hallway with linen and
storage closet. The property is fully secured by six foot plastic
coated chain-link fence runs along the side and rear and adjoins the |
painted 4 foot wall, with 5 foot pillars at front with electronic gate.

FAMILY ISLANDS

ABACO Appraisal: $108,000.00

PORTION OF MURPHY TOWN CROWN
ALLOTMENT, MURPHY TOWN, ABACO.

The property is 89 x 100 ft
and rectangular in shape.
~The land is elevated
approximately 15 ft above
road level and
approximately 25 ft above
sea level. Located on this
property is a twenty-year-
old three bedroom, two
bathroom, living, dining,

kitchen and Yiaundey room houias. The structure requires much
attention.










SHSCHSHSHRASSSHSSHRSHOTHSHAHHSHO SED

EXUMA Appraisal: $170,000.00

DUPLEX IN LOT 6625

BAHAMA SOUND No. 8, ee EXUMA

Trapezium shaped lot 35 |
ft. above sea _ ievel
comprising 10,000 sq. fi.
Situated thereon is a 10-
year-old single storey
duplex, 2 bed, 1 bath,
kitchen, living/dining
area and porch.
{Building is in need of
nee



@xecessoveecorsosvesecvergeersoes

EXUMA Appraisal: $673,075.00

CASTELRAG ESTATES, LOTS 129 & 130
ERUMA neneoee eee ee

The subject property is located
on Kingway Road and_ is
developed with an area of
. 20,000 square feet. Situated
thereon is a residence
comprised of 3,645 square feet
of living accommodations,
inclusive of 4 hedrooms, 2
‘ baths, with laundry and utility
spaces and a two bedroom one
jy bath guest cottage of 600
\ square feet. The property is |

a Gazebo at the highest portion



fenced with white picket fencing pes has
of the property.

PARCEL OF LAND, PALMETTO POINT
ELEUTHERA Appraisal: $112,105.00

All that piece, parcel or lot of land 2,743 feet East of the junction of the
Palmetto Point road and main Eleuthera Nighway containing 2.45 acres.
This site encompasses a 28-year-old single storey concrete structure of
approximately 832 square feet of enclosed floor space inclusive of shop
space and rest room facilities.











FOR CONDITIONS OF SALE AND ANY OTHER Misti tes Perse
HARRY COLLIE @ 502-3034 - E-mail Baer ee

fo] g

PHILIP TTR @ 502-3077 —- E-mail philipwhite@scotiabank.com
| Pe 356-3851 - send bids to P. O. Box N-7518 Rosetta Street, Nassau, Lt Lt Le


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 7

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MUST SELL

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

THE TRIBUNE

B

ty





TRIBUNE,
November 29th, AU fs




Eleuthera Island Shores
Subdivision LOT NO. 1,
BLOCK NO. 45,
ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES

All that piece parcel or lot of land having
an area of 9,644 sq. ft. being lot #1 in
block 45, Section “E” in the subdivision
called and known as Eleuthera Island
Shores Subdivision, situated in the vicinity
of Hatchet Bay Harbour, on the island of

Eleuthera, one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahams. This site encompasses a two storey building which is approximately
14 yrs old and is abandoned. There is a wooden landing approximately 7’-4” wide by 20’-0” on the
upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of enclosed living space, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms,
front room, dining room, den, kitchen, and utility room. The wooden porch on the upper level is
approximately 148sq. ft. There is also a water cistern under the dining room floor area. All utilities

and services available.
Appraisal: $151,007.00

This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores.



Must Sell Lot No. 597
Gardens

lot 597 Melvern Road of the subdivision known as
Yellow Elder Gardens, the said subdivision is situated
in the southern district of New Providence Bahamas.
This property is comprised of a 26 yr old single famil
residence consisting of approximately 1,510 sq. 4
of enclosed living space, with 3-bedrooms including
master bedroom, 2-bathrooms, living/dining roorn,
kitchen and utility room. The residence also consists
of a frorit porch and two patios.

The land is on a grade and level; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility
of flooding aurin annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with improvements including
driveway and walkway. The yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing. ;

ate e $133,395.00
Traveling west along Melvern Road from the sport center road, follow the road to the left. the subject
property is the 5th property left situated between Zris Court and Richie Court, painted White trimmed yellow.

a SS TTT ee ~ OOO

LOT NO. 2 MORIGOLD FARM
SUBDIVISION

All that lot of land having an area of approimately 5,638 sq. ft.
\) being lot No. 2 of the subdivision known as Marigold Farm

} Subdivision, the said subdivision situated in the Eastern District
of New Providence and located Lumumba Lane North off Marigold
Road situated on the property is a 6year old single storey residence
consisting of 3 bedrooms, 2 & 1/2 bathrooms, living, dining, kitchen
and utility room. The Land is on a grade and level and appears
to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding. The property is open from the front but has chain

linked fencing at the sides and back.

Appraisal: $197,107.60
Take Joe Farrington Road heading east, turn onto Marigold Farm Road go pass Marigold Farms, then turn right onto
Lumumba Lane, go almost to the middle of the corner arid the subject property is about the eight house on the right
hand side of the road.



DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

1 3 two bed, 1 bath fourplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no.
% 18b with an area for a small shop. Age 12 years
the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town
Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest
Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter
acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete
block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and
L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26
ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior
walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock
"and the floors of vinyl tiles.



Appraisal: $265,225.00



LOT NO. 1 WESTERN SHORES

All that lot of land having an area of 7,389 sq.
ft., being lot #1 of the Subdivision known as
Western Shores Phase Il, the said Subdivision
situated in the Western District of New Providence,
Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a
single structure comprising of ‘a single family
residence consisting of approximately 2,430 sq.
ft. of enclosed living space. The residence
comprises of 3-bedroom with closets, 2 1/2
bathrooms, living/dining rooms, study, kitchen,
utility room, porch and enclosed garage with electronic door. The land appears to be,Sufficiently
elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The
grounds are fairly well kept with improvements including driveway, walkway and swimming pool.
The-yard is enclosed with walls.

Appraisal: $753,570.00



Traveling west on West Bay Street. Go pass Orange Hill and Indigo Subdivisions, the house is

HAMILTON’S, LONG
ISLAND

All that piece parcel or lot of land and
improvements situated in the settlement
of Hamilton's in the Island of Long Island,
and comprising of approximately 13,547
sq. ft. and is elevated approximately 7-8
ft above sea level. This site encompasses
a 35yr structure. A simple style home consisting of two bedrooms, one bathroom,
kitchen, living and dining room. the home however is consisted of 2 separate
constructions; 613.60 sq. ft of concrete construction and 624 sq. ft of wooden
construction all amenities are to the property such as electricity, water, cable and

telephone.
Appraisal: $112,000.00.



All that lot of land having an area of 3,200 sq ft, being |



located on the left near Tusculum Subdivision and painted all white.

i <°The property is accessed by the main Queen's Highway.

sia
3

Weyl hs

PROPERTIES



Investment Opportunity - Must Sell

Lot No. 20, Block 1 unit 3 Fortune Point Subdivision all that lot of vacant land having an area of 12,650 sq ft, being Lot No.20 block 1 unit 3 of the subdivision known and designated
as fortune point subdivision Freeport, Grand Bahama.. duplex property zoning with a rectangle shape.

Appraisal: $38,000.00





Investment Opportunity - Must Sell - Lot B, Wilson Street, Rock Crusher

All that lot of land having an area of 10,498 sq ft, being lot B, between the subdivision known as Rock Crusher and in the vicinity of Perpall Tract situated in the western district A

of New Providence, Bahamas. This property is zoned multi family/single family. Also located on this property is a structure comprising of a duplex at foundation level under i

construction, and consisting of approximately 1,566 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with a patio consisting of 270, sq. ft. the starter bars are in place and foundation poured. i
. Appraisal: $97,214.00

Traveling West on Farrington Road take a right after the P.L.P headquarters, go about midways through to Wilson Street, go though the corner all the way to the dead

end. The property is located behind the chain linked fence at the back of the yard.



Island Harbour Beach, Exuma

All that parcel or lot of vacant land containing 10,000 (80’X 100’) sq. ft. being Lot No. 9, Block 2, Island Harbour Beach Subdivision situated the western most portion of the Hermitage Estate, Little
Exuma Bahamas. The property is located on an unpaved road known as Stocking Road. The property also has a commanding view of the ocean.

Appraisal: $80,000.00



LOTT. 2 OE ST EME NEE

LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., and being Lot No. 10B situated North of Ingraham’s Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the island of Eleuthera, one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on the north by Lot No. 3B and running thereon for a distance of (90) ft; on the East by Lot No. 11B
and running thereon for a distance of (100) ft; on the south by a 20’ wide road reservation and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said
Lot is overgrown with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy beach. This neighborhood is zoned residential development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately
5Oft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area is approximately 80% developed with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $72,000.00
MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated “E” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the
settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly
the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 393.13 hundredth ft.; outwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft;
eastwardly by the main Queen’s Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft; westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a
distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful and hasa_ 9

topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
. APPRAISAL: $51,421.00

MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth —
of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a distance of 125.462 feet northwestwardly by the landnow = jf
of formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 390.274 hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 128.128
hundredth ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property of the Venor and running thereon for a distance of 322.955 hundredth ft. This property having an area of approximately
44,847.76 sq. ft. This neighbourhood is zoned commercial development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $51,421.00



TTI ETRE



This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as “Mutton Fish Point”



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and designated “F” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about
two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly
by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and
running thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the main Queen’s Highway and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. westwardly by land now or formerly the
property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography

of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,276.00

CLE TE ENOL OA

For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 # email harry.collie@scotiabank.com * Fax 356-3851 -



To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - Click on “Real Estate Mall” - Click on doorway “Enter Online Store”
PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ee (itl
Family Guardian to launch new units in January

FROM page one

In addition, Family Guardian
had received “a fair amount of
interest in wealth creation
products” from its customers,
especially in the individual life
category, making the capital
markets and mutual funds busi-
ness a natural one for it to
enter.

Ms Hermanns said Family
Guardian would use its in-
house expertise, including its
vice-presidents of pensions and
investments, to staff and run
FG Financial and FG Capital
Markets.

“We are looking to hire a few
people to start off with, proba-
bly two to four people, and as
the business grows will expand
the numbers to serve the busi-
ness properly,” Ms Hermanns
said.

She added that Family
Guardian was “looking to
expand and build on” its FG
General Insurance agency in
2008, which offers both home-

owners and motor insurance
policies.

In addition, the company,

whose BISX-listed parent is
FamGuard Corporation, is “tar-
geting” January 2008 for the
launch of its Creditor Life pol-
icy.
“It’s a product financial insti-
tutions use to have a life insur-
ance policy supporting the
credit they give. It’s a product
sold through financial institu-
tions,” Ms Hermanns
explained.

The Family Guardian presi-
dent said the company had
been focused.“on building the
brand over the years”, solidi-
fying its distribution and tech-
nology systems, and investing
in staff training and expanding
its agency force.

“We have the highest num-
ber of Million Dollar Round
Table Producers out of any
insurer in the Bahamas,” Ms

Hermanns told The Tribune.

“Twenty-five per cent of the
financial services agency force
have consistently qualified for
MDRT status.

“We received the Life Insur-
ance Management Resources
association (LIMRA) educa-
tion award for the Latin Amer-
ican and Caribbean region in
2005 and 2006. No other com-
pany in the Bahamas has ever
received that award.”

Adding that Family Guardian

‘had delivered the highest

return on equity out of all
insurance competitors who had
published their results, Ms Her-
manns said that since 2003 the
company had continuously
improved on its prior-year
results.

“This is a very consistent
trend substantiated over the
last five years, and the objec-
tives are to build on that suc-
cess. We’re hopeful we will

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
PRODUCE MANAGER

The Job & Requirements

To manage all aspects of the daily operations on a
profitable basis. Must have firm understanding of
Produce Purchasing, Standard Operating Procedures
and Merchandising. Must have past success in
managing L/D. Possessing excellent communication
skills with proven ability to build teams. Knowledge
of computer based programs is required with a
minimum of 3 - 5 years experience in Produce
Management.

Interested persons are asked to send their resumes
hrjobnow@gmail.com

@ Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED
EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with The Education Guaranteed Fund Loan
program of the Ministry of Education, the Bank of the Bahamas
Limited is pleased that to advise that the cheque disbursement for ALL
Students in the Loan Program will take place at Holy Trinity Activity
Centre, Stapledon Gardens, beginning December 3rd to December
7th, 2007 from 9:00a.m. to 3:00p.m. as follows:

NEW AND RETURNING STUDENT |

Surnames beginning with

A-Clarke
Cleare -G
H-McKin
McPhee-R
S-Z

Monday, December 3, 2007
Tuesday, December 4, 2007
Wednesday, December 5, 2007
Thursday, December 6, 2007
Friday, December 7, 2007

- TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Place: Holy Trinity Activity Centre’
Stapledon Gardens

¢ Returning Students and/or Guarantors should be present and must bring
relevant identification (valid Passport and National Insurance Card).

e New Students and Guarantors should be present and bring relevant
identification, (valid Passport, valid Marriage Certificate (where relevant),
National Insurance Card, Current job letter and copy of a utility bill).

¢ All accounts must be current and all necessary documentation completed
before cheques are released.

NO DISBURSEMENT WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK
(Without a penalty)



continue to improve in 2008,”
she added,

The Tribune reported yes-
terday that FamGuard Corpo-

‘ration, Family’ Guardian’s

BISX-listed parent, . said the
$6.527 million in net income
earned for the first nine months
of 2007 - some 42 per cent or
$1.92 million ahead of 2006
comparatives - had exceeded
last year’s full-year profits by
$611,000.

Yet FamGuard suffered a dip
in its third quarter perfor-

. mance. Net income for the
‘three months to September 30,

2007, slipped by 36.6 per cent to
$1.568 million, compared to
$2.471 million the year before.

Benefits rose by more than
$1 million or 13.9 per cent to
$10.275 million, with total ben-
efits and expenses growing
from $15.395 million in 2006 to
$17.082 million.

Ms Hermanns yesterday said

this performance was “not
unusual”, as Family Guardian
had previously witnessed sea-
sonal variations in its business
involving a peak in insurance
claims/benefits paid during the
third quarter.

She added: “There are sea-
sonal variations in our business.
The way the life and health
business works, there’s a lot of
variations from quarter to quar-

. ter.

“New sales tend to spike in
the last quarter of the year, and
benefits tend to spike in the
third quarter.

“There’s some, seasonality,
some trends in these things, so
it’s not unusual.”

Ms Hermanns said Family
Guardian’s new property on the
corner of Bay and Church
Streets would start operations a
little later than planned, the
company having wanted to
move its BahamaHealth and

client services divisions in
there during the 2007 fourth
quarter.

But to ensure their opera-
tions would not be disrupted
during a busy sales quarter,
Ms Hermanns said the move
would now take place in Janu-
ary. ;

“We are in the process of
renovating an office we recent-
ly leased in Exuma to house
our operations there.

“We now have three agents
on the ground in Exuma, and
are looking to build that a‘ lit-

tle,” Ms Hermanns said.

She added that Family
Guardian’s alliance with Bar-
bados financial services con-
glomerate Sagicor, which holds
a 20 per cent stake in Fam-
Guard, was producing benefits
in product development, and
purchasing IT software and sys-
tems at “a more reasonable
cost”. '

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TEACHERS REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE OF ANNUAL
MEETING TO SHAREHOLDERS

TIME & DATE:
PLACE:

ITEMS OF BUSINESS:

RECORD DATE:

Friday, December 7, 2007 at 6:00pm

Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Head Office, East Street & Independence Drive.

(1) To announce the results of the examination of proxies;
declare a quorum present and proceed to business;

(2) To receive and approve the Minutes of the last Annual
General Meeting held on December 8, 2006.

(3) To receive and consider the Chairman’s report:

(4) To receive and approve the financial statements and
the reports of the Directors and Auditors thereon;

(5) Lo elect Directors for the ensuing year and fix their
remuneration;
(6) To approve the appointment of Deloitte & Touche as

the Auditor of the Company, and authorise the Directors
to fix their remuneration; and

(7) Lo transact such other business as may properly come
beture the meeting and any adjournment thereof.

Holders of 400,000 shares of record at the close of business
on October 25, 2007 are entitled to vote at the meeting.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS: The Company's audited financial statements are included

MAILING DATE:
be

PROXY VOTING:

October 9, 2007



in the Company's 2006 annual report, which is enclosed
as part ol the proxy soliciting material.

The Company will cause the accompanying materials to
,

delivered on November 8, 2007 to the last registered
address.

It is important that your shares be represented and voted
at the meeting. You can Vote your shares by appearing in
person or by completing and returning the proxy form
enclosed, You can revoke a proxy at any time prior to its
exercise at the meeting by following the instructions in
the accompanying proxy statement,

By order of the Board of Directors:

Mrs Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Secretary

es

u_——“—


savas

$I EEN 80 A LO A AO TE LE TOE I RET IE IY 8g OO A EAE ATI BOE LS OE TO PT A EO a aR I




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 9B



Dee SS ER ee
Ethanol blend fuel can boost foreign reserves

FROM page one

mentally, eco-clean island,” Mr
Joudi told The Tribune.

“Global warming is a major
issue and major problem for us
here.”

He pointed out that use of a
10 per cent ethanol blend in car
gasoline had been mandatory in
Minnesota for two years, some-
thing Florida seemed poised to
adopt, while Getty Gest stations
in the northwest were also offer-
ing the ethanol blend.

With the price of oil climbing,
Mr Joudi said the price per gallon
of ethanol, based on July 2007
figures, was some 13 per cent
cheaper, standing at $2.63 per gal-
lon, compared to $3.03 per gal-
lon of ordinary gasoline and $2.96
per gallon of diesel.

Mr Joudi said that mandating
the 10 per cent ethanol blend in



T

the Bahamas would produce
“long range savings” on energy
costs for the Bahamian people,
allow the foreign reserves to
“increase”, and help give this
nation some energy alternatives
and security.

He added that this tied-in with
a previous initiative he had urged
the Bahamas to explore; exploit-
ing the growing global demand
for alternative energy by produc-
ing corn for ethanol production.

Mr Joudi told The Tribune ear-
lier this year that developing such
a sector could give the Bahamas
an export industry that generates
more than $1/2 billion per year
in foreign exchange carnings,
increase entrepreneurship in the

idvertise in The Tritune - the #1 newspaper
‘inccirculation, just call 322-1986 today!

Bahamas, expand foreign cur-
rency reserves, boost the shipping
industry by giving it something
to carry back to the US, diversify
the Bahamian economy and
encourage families to move back
to the Family Islands, reducing
overcrowding and congestion on
New Providence.

urged Bahamians and the Gov-
ernment to exploit this nation’s
proximity to the US, climate and
fertile land for growing corn,
adding that the creation of a
‘corn-for-ethanol’ industry would
be assisted if the Government
could allocate some 500,000 acres
to it on islands such as Andros,
Abaco, Eleuthera and Long
Island.





iuNelmcleel eC ROeLD

WATCH REPAIR

NOTICE

We wish to advise all customers

department for longer than 3 months,

Eig

will be sold

if not collected by

ovember 30, 2007.

eine

284 Bay Street, Tel: 302-2800, Ext. 2869
Open: Monday - Saturday, 9:30 to 5:00pm

Grand Vitara

Super Year

Discounts good

while inventory lasts.



$ SUZUKI

End Specials



One acre could produce 149
bushels of corn, Mr Joudi said,
the average yield per acre in the
US, and the Bahamas’ climate
meant this nation had “the poten-
tial to grow two crops per year”.

With corn ethanol prices cur-
rently pushing upwards to $4 per
bushel, Mr Joudi said that assum-
ing this price and 149 bushels per
acre, this would generate $298
million in gross export income
from one crop if it was exported
to the US for ethanol production.

Given that the Bahamas would
have the ability to produce two

crops per year, this gross export

earnings would double to $596
million per year, Mr Joudi
explained.

Breaking this down, Mr Joudi
said that if 5,000 families were
each able to purchase or be grant-
ed 100 acres for producing
ethanol corn, assuming the $4 per
bushel price, 149 bushels per acre
and two crops per year, each fam-
ily would have the potential to
earn $119,200 in gross income per
year.

Yesterday; Mr Joudi said that if
the 10 per cent ethanol blend
became mandatory by law in the
Bahamas, after a three-year peri-

od in which consumers became
used to it, this percentage could
be increased to 85 per cent.

This increase, he added, could
be achieved using a computer
component called Flex Tek, avail-
able for $400, which changed the
pulse width of a car’s fuel injec-
tors to open them more widely,
providing more fuel for the com-
bustion chamber and enabling the
car to run more efficiently.

Some five million cars in the
US already ran on an 85 per cent

. ethanol blend, Mr Joudi said, and

more were being produced every
year.

JOB OFFERINGS

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¢ Accountant

¢ Internal Audit Clerk

¢ General Accounting Clerks (2)
Requirements:

General:

ny

Candidates must be competent, honest, efficient, of high integrity, proficient
in electronic data entry and possess good oral & written communication skills.

Specific:

Accountant must possess a valid certificate from the A.I.C.P.A. or equivalent
professional body, a university degree in accounting, bus. admin., or
finance, and at least 3 years experience performing the functions of a
corporate accountant. Must have demonstrated good leadership, supervisory,
accounting and financial statements preparation skills in former engagements.

Internal Audit Clerk must possess an associate degree in any of the aforementioned
disciplines, and at least 2 years experience performing account analyses and
reconciliations, cash and inventory physical counts, and other related functions.

General Accounting Clerks must possess a certificate in general office practices,
high school diploma, and BGCSE in Maths & English (grade C or better).

Salary and benefits commensurate with level of certification, education,

experience and skills.

Only Bahamians need apply

Send resume to: seekingtalentedbahamians@gmail.com





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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 11B

SERINE



sales fall for am th
str aight month

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Sales of existing homes fell for
the eighth consecutive month
in October, with median home
prices falling by a record
amount. Analysts blamed the
worsening housing slump on
the credit crunch that hit in
August.

The National Association of
Realtors reported that sales of
existing single-family homes
and condominiums dropped by
1.2 per cent last month to a
seasonally adjusted annual rate
of 4.97 million units.

The median price of a home
sold last month declined to
$207,800, a drop of 5.1 per cent
from a year ago, the biggest
year-over-year price decline on
record.

Analysts blamed the Octo-
ber weakness on the fallout
from a serious credit crunch
that roiled financial markets in
August. Banks and other
lenders have tightened .credit
standards in response to a soar-
ing level of defaults, especially
on subprime mortgages, loans
provided to borrowers with
weak credit histories.

The worry is that the credit
crisis and a deepening housing
slump could be enough to push
the country into a recession.

In another sign of spreading
economic weakness, the Com-
merce Department reported
Wednesday that orders to fac-
tories for big-ticket manufac-
tured goods declined by 0.4 per
cent in October. It was the
third straight drop, the longest
stretch of weakness in nearly
four years.

By region of the country,
sales were unchanged in the
Northeast and the South and
down by 1.7 per cent in the
Midwest and 4.4 per cent in

the West.

Lawrence Yun, chief econo-
mist for the Realtors, said the
big drop in the West reflected
the fact that the market for so-
called “jumbo mortgages,”
loans higher than $417,000,
tightened considerably this
summer. California, with its
high home prices, depends
heavily on the availability of
jumbo loans.

“Temporary mortgage prob-
lems were peaking back in
August when many of the sales
closed in October were being
negotiated,” Yun said.

“We continue to see the
biggest impact in high-cost
markets that rely on jumbo
loans.”

Drop

Yun said he believed the
drop in sales, which left activi-
ty in October 20.7 per cent
below the level of a year ago,
Was nearing its end. He said a
greater willingness of lenders
to start offering jumbo loans
again and the use of Federal
Housing Administration-
insured loans in place of sub-
prime mortgages will help gen-
erate a rebound.

However, other economists
are predicting housing could
remain depressed, for many
months to come as sellers face
high inventories of unsold
homes.

While economic growth
roared ahead at a rate
approaching five per cent in
the summer, many economists
believe growth has slowed dra-
matically in the current quarter
from the combined blows of
the most severe housing slump
in more than two decades, the
credit crunch and rising energy
prices.

The government will release
its latest look at overall eco-
nomic activity on Thursday



and it is expected to show
growth at an annual rate o!
around 4.9 per cent in the July-
September quarter.

However, growth in the cur-
rent October-December peri-
od is expected to slump to a
barely discernible 1.5 per cent
or even less.

Many economists have
raised the odds that the coun-
try could fall into an outright
recession to as high as 40 per
cent although they believe the
Federal Reserve, which has
already cut interest rates twice
since September, will keep
reducing rates if economic
activity continues to falter.

In remarks Wednesday, Fed-
eral Reserve Vice Chairman
Donald Kohn said the Fed’s
monetary policies need to be
nimble to address current risks.

“The increased (financial
market) turbulence of recent
weeks partly reversed some of
the improvement in market
functioning over the late part
of September and in October.”
Kohn said in remarks to the
Council on Foreign Relations.

One of the troubling aspects
of the report on durable goods
was that orders for capital
goods excluding aircraft, a cat-
egory considered a good proxy
for business investment, fell by
2.3 per cent in October, the
biggest decline since a 2.4 per
cent fall in February.

It had been hoped that busi-
ness investment would offset
part of the slump in housing.
However, the October decline,
if it continues, could’show dusi-
nesses are paring back »lans
to buy new equipment in the
face of widening « conomic
problems.

Excluding the volatile tr: ans-
portation category, durable
goods orders fell by 0.7 per
cent in October, the biggest
drop since a 1.7 per cent fall
in August.

LAMPS
BLENDERS
BAKEWARES
ALL CLOCKS





WALL PICTURES

PICTURE FRAMES

FLATWARE SETS

COQKWARE SETS
GLASSWARE SETS
DINNERWARE SETS




SHARGAERNRG CAM AAR EEE”

PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER :29, 2007

FROM page one

ers now had a comprehensive
database of skills and labour from
which to draw workers.

“The general feeling is very
positive. People are extremely
excited,” Mr. Callender said of
Albany.

“We're finally through the road
matter, and 95 per cent through
on the remaining or outstanding
matters with the Government...

We hope to commence construc- -

tion at the latest on February 1.”

When construction work
begins, Mr Callender said the
immediate focus would be on
Albany’s roads, marina, golf
course, infrastructure and the
shared amenities. As soon as all
necessary permits and approvals

Nassau Airport

Development Company

Albany are hoping to

finish infrastructure by
mid-summer in 2009

were received, the developers
would look to start work on the
residential components of the
project.

“By the middle of next year we
hope to be fully engaged in the
construction process,” Mr Cal-
lender said. “By late
summer/mid-fall of 2009, we want
to have completed the amenities,
roads and infrastructure.”

He added: “We feel we’ve
come to an agreement with the
Government on virtually every-

thing regarding the concessions
[investment incentives], and are
satisfied the Government will
complete what was negotiated for
the road acquisition.”

The issue of the road has
caused some controversy, as pri-
vate land is being acquired from
its owners to facilitate the re-rout-
ing of south-west Bay Street
around Albany.

The land purchases were con-
cluded under the former Christie
administration, with the re-routed

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking bids for Fire
Alarm services from suitably qualified individuals to carry out a project
to design and install a new Fire Alarm system at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Qualified contractors must:-
- Demonstrate an ability to obtain $1,000,000.00 liability insurance
- Provide evidence that all Government tax payments are current
- Provide references from three (3) owners ‘of projects in excess of

$50,000.00

Bid packages can be obtained from the corporate offices of Nassau
Airport Development Company from December 3" - 7" between the

hours of 9am - Spm.

A site visit has been arranged for 10:30am on Thursday, December
13", 2007. Contractors wishing to participate are asked to notify NAD
of their intention no later than 4:00 pm on Wednesday, December 12",
2007 at telephone number 702-1000.

The Deadline for submission of bids is 4:00pm on Friday, December
21*t, 2007. Bid packages should be delivered to the NAD offices no
later than 4:00pm on Friday 21*t December, 2007. All packages

received after this time will be returned unopened.

NAD reserves the pene to selec’ any or all bids.



road intended to link-up with the
proposed road serving the new
shipping port in southwestern
New Providence.

However, it is by no means cer-
tain that the FNM government
will go through with the shipping
facilities relocation to that site,
raising the issue of whether the
land purchases are in the public
interest, or designed to facilitate a
private developer.

Mr Callender confirmed what
David Davis, director of invest-
ments in the Prime Minister’s
Office had told The Tribune last
week, namely that the land acqui-
sitions had been completed and
the only outstanding issue was to
agree a purchase price with the
owners.

Mr Davis said that while offers

had been made to the landowners
whose property is being compul-
sorily acquired for the road diver-
sion, to date none had been fully
accepted.

“We are very close to dotting
all the ‘i’s’ and crossing all the
‘Vs’ ina sale” he said.

Mr Davis explained that the
way the process usually works is
that the Government may request
anywhere from one to four
appraisals, and then the offer is
made to the homeowners based
on those proposals.

“However, I cannot say how

. many were done in this case,” he

said. The Tribune understands
that out of the three appraisals
requested, two have been com-
pleted and submitted to the Gov-
ernment, which has acknowl-

THE TRIBUNE

edged to the Albany developers it
owns the land.

Mr Davis pointed out that
along with the issue of property
acquisitions for the road re-rout-
ing, the other issue the Prime
Minister’s Office is working on is
the completion of the Hotels
Encouragement Act agreement
for Albany.

In relation to the road re-rout-
ing; Mr Callender said: “The
Road is not just for Albany, but
the south-western corridor.
Albany is facilitating the con-
struction and payments for the
road. At the end of the day, it

‘will be the Government’s road.

“We are facilitating the means
through which this corridor will
be acquired through a monetary
contribution, and will build it.”

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.

COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW * NOTARIES PUBLIC

is pleased to announce that ms

Cheryl! T.
Whyms

has Bees made a Partner in the Firm.

Nassau Chambers
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O.Box N-272
Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 322-4130

Fax: (242) 328-1069

Freeport Chambers

‘The First Commercial Centre
3rd Floor, Suite 9
‘P.O.Box F-42451 ,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, ‘Bahamas: my
Tel: (242) 351- Ee

Fut t

POSITION AVAILABLE
INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS SUPERVISOR

A brokers & agency company [an affiliate of a large established company] is looking for an Administrative
Supervisor. The ideal candidate must be detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent organizational,

| interpersonal and communication skills. The ability to work with limited supervision in a fastpaced pomesse

environment is a must.

| Responsibilities:

Receive and submit for processing applications for Home Insurance [property] and other insurance plans
Liaise with sub-agents on all application issues

Maintenance of database

Liaise with Underwriters and Customer Service departments to ensure accurate application processing:
Generate monthly reports on issued contracts

Reconciliation of premiums

Prepare and issue completed quotes and Certificates of Insurance

Handing Internal and External client queries

Supervise Administrative support for all general issues

| Core Competencies:

Ability to work with limited supervision and learn new skills quickly

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Ability to resolve problems with a sense of urgency

Demonstrate a keen eye for details

Ability to work under pressure

Strong interpersonal skills and ability to maintain a harmonious relationship with co-workers
Ability fo maintain confidentiality

Reliable, dependable and flexible team-player

Required Qualifications:
| Bachelors Degree in Business Administration or related field or equivalent work experience.
3+ years experience in a similar position
Excellent computer skills and proficiency in Excel required
Relevant General insurance designations for pats thereof] a plus

Benefits:
Salary commensurate with current salary scales, skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including Life, Health and
Pension.

Submit Resume to Human Resources Administrator, P.O. Box N-4815, Nassau
Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to dlparker@live.com



Mists
aR AIA?



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THE TRIBUNE

saseeerecrerenveremmuttitetreeem tet a A EE EE

FROM page one

as a value place to invest in, with
the flight to quality.”

Mr Williams explained that the
Bahamas’ tradition of stable gov-
emment, a stable political system,
the rule of law, large international
banking sector, and infrastructure
would continue to prove attrac-
tive to high-end, luxury developers
and buyers alike.

He added that Seabridge
Bahamas’ “price point and type
of market we’re going after”
would further insulate the project
from the global credit crunch, as it
was targeting buyers who would
live in its properties for the long-
term - rather than those who were
more transient - through providing
units that were larger and had
more added amenities.

Nevertheless, to account for the
international environment,
Seabridge Bahamas had adjusted
its ‘cash flow’ model to account
for what it anticipated might be a
slightly slower pace of sales.

Describing initial interest in
Seabridge Bahamas from prospec-
tive buyers as “very strong”, even
though the development had
“tried to stay below the radar
screen” until all necessary
approvals and permits had been
received from the Government,
















A Jolly Thank You

‘Flight to quality’

. boosts Bahamian

‘high-end property
values 14.5%

Mr Williams said the sales process
had just begun “in the last couple
of weeks”,

“All of Phase I we hope to get
done [in terms of saics] in the next
six to 12 months,” Mr Williams
said. The developers were look-
ing to put in the Phase [road tafra-
structure in January, and start on
the units in March.

The developers had still to meet
with a number of key real estate
brokers, he added, having con-
centrated on getting their design
finalised, and the website and all
promotional materials in order.

“We've scen other developers
in the Bahamas do things out of
sequence, and that doesn’t work
very well,” Mr Williams said.

The development will be built in
three phases, with the first encom-
passing 28, three and four-bed-
room luxury townhome resi-
dences, landscaping and multiple
pools, with pre-construction prices
starting at $1.8 million.

At least 50 construction workers
are likely to be employed on that
phase, and the largest of the villas
in Phase one will be four bed-
rooms with four-and-a-half baths,

@ Residents of Village Road
Montagu Heights



Brooklyn Avenu

© To Queen’s College and Family Guardian
Insurance for opening their parking lots.

4,320 square feet of air-condi-
tioned space, and two large bal-
conies with ocean views.

Phase two will include about 25
condominiums and five penthous-
es, and Phase three will be a com-
bination of villas, condominiums
and penthouses. The master plan
calls for about 90 townhomes, with
the initial phase expected to be
completed within 24 months. The
first home in that phase will be
finished in 18 months.

Mr Williams said Seabridge
Bahamas had received all the nec-
essary Town Planning approvals,
and was now submitting all con-
struction and engineering draw-
ings to the relevant government
agencies to obtain its building per-
mits, which they hoped to obtain
in January 2008.

The project by Source Devel-
opment Group LLC, which will
be located on a 10-acre site a quar-
ter mile to the east of The Caves,
will be constructed in three phas-
es and targeted at Bahamian pro-
fessionals and entrepreneurs,
plus retirees and foreign pur-
chasers searching for a second
home.

Ranging in size from 3,690 to
4,320 square feet, the ocean view,
hillside residences will have 24-
hour security, private garages and
pools, without the challenges of
individual home ownership.

We would like to thank our
NEIGHBOURS for your patience
and kindness each year:






® And to Majestic Tours for providing Shuttle
Service to the event

wish all our sponsors and patrons a
stmas and a Happy New Year!

Bahamas National Trust
1317 ¢ bnt@bahamasnationaltrust.org

Scotiabank’

is seeking the services of:

Managing Director, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

With over 55,000 employees in over 50 countries, Scotiabank places great
importance on recognizing and rewarding strong performance. We offer room
for advancement, a stimulating work environment and the resources to help
you make the most of your career. Together, we continue to make Scotiabank
a great place to work.

POSITION SUMMARY:

Reporting to the Senior Vice-President Caribbean, as well as to a Board of
Directors, the Managing Director is directly responsible for the profitable
development and maintenance of the commercial and retail banking business
of an assigned group of branches/units, and the maximization of profits. To
do this, the incumbent researches the market and develops strategic objectives
and tactics, ensures the readiness of his or her people, and executes those
tactics. .

The incumbent is also responsible for the quality of the retail and commercial
asset and liability portfolios, ensuring adequate controls and procedures are in
place to safeguard the Bank from loss. He or she is also responsible for
providing strong support for the growth of ancillary businesses such as Wealth
Management. The incumbent has responsibility for planning, organization,
and staffing in the assigned group of branches/units, and is the prime provider
of direction, coaching, advice and other support to the Unit Heads. The
incumbent relates closely with government officials and agencies and regulatory
bodies, and is the Bank's ambassador in The Bahamas.

Qualifications:

° MBA or work experience equivalent required

¢ Experience in a senior role within a large financial institution is an asset

¢ Proven experience managing people in particular, senior level direct reports.

¢ Excellent and proven negotiation and conflict resolution skills are essential.

¢ Ability to learn quickly, adapt to an ever changing environment and adapt to
ever changing priorities are essential.

OTHER INFORMATION:

¢ Frequent travel to the Family Islands & internationally.
¢ Spanish Language is a bonus in an organization that is expanding rapidly in
Spanish-speaking countries.

The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes
applications from all interested parties. We thank you for your interest, however,
only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit application in writing, marked Private
and Confidential, by Friday, December 07, 2007 to: Sr. Manager, Human
Resources, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd., Main Branch, P.O. Box N-7518,

Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail: scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 13

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¢ Must have a proven track record in sales

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¢ Excellent written and communication skills.

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PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a a ae
Bush unveils his new top economic adviser

@ By DEB RIECHMANN
Associated Press Writer



WASHINGTON (AP) —
President Bush announced on
Wednesday that Keith Hen-
nessey will become director of
the National Economic Coun-
cil, replacing Al Hubbard, who
is joining a growing line of top
presidential advisers exiting
the White House as the Bush
administration heads into its
final year.

Hennessey, who came to the
White House in 2002, is Hub-
bard’s deputy and has been
deputy to two previous direc-
tors of the council. He served
as a top budget aide to Sen.
Trent Lott, R-Miss., and
worked for the Senate Budget
Committee.

“Keith has been an impor-

tant member of my White
House team for more than five
years,” Bush said in a state-
ment. “He has served as the
deputy to three directors of the
National Economic Council,
and has worked on a broad
range of economic policy
issues.”

Hubbard’s departure comes
as Bush faces one of the
biggest economic challenges of
his presidency, a severe slump
in housing and a credit crisis
that have roiled financial mar-
kets and triggered fears of a
recession.

In a letter to the president,
Hubbard said he was leaving
the White House at the end of
the year with mixed emotions.
“Were it not for my strong
desire to spend more time with
my kids, | would not have con-

sidered departing,” said Hub-
bard, the father of three. Hub-
bard wrote that the Bush
White House was a place of
“forthrightness” and “mutual
respect” in Washington, which
is “often portrayed as an arena
of deception and self-promo-
tion.”

Direct

Hubbard has helped direct
White House policy on enti-
tlement reform, energy secu-
rity, climate change, housing
and trade investment policy.
Among other issues, Hubbard
has been deeply involved in
the debate over the State Chil-
dren’s Health Insurance Pro-
gram and Bush’s proposal for a
major shift in tax policy to, for
the first time, treat health

insurance costs as taxable

" income.

“Al contributed his own
ideas and also worked to
ensure that all views were
brought to the table and given
fair analysis and debate,” Bush
said. “While many of the poli-
cies Al worked to develop are
in place today, other policy ini-
tiatives, including Social Secu-
rity reform and health care
reform, have laid the founda-
tion for policies I believe will
be'‘adopted in the future.”

Hubbard’s departure, by the
end of the year, continues an
exodus of key Bush aides and
confidants. Earlier this month,
Fran Townsend, Bush’s ter-
rorism adviser, announced she
was stepping down after 4 1/2
years. Top aide Karl Rove,
along with press secretary










Nassau Agencies (1995) Ltd.



Your Quality Assured Wholesaler
1 (242) 393-4854 Fax 1 (242) 394-0533
Email — nalpharm@batetnet.bs

Website - www.nalpharm.com












\ 4
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“NOVARTIS









ie Adalat’






F Us



am \ Boehringer
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STIEFEL



BISk

Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 27 November 200 7

















































ie ie oe Seta a & ANS
52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.54 Abaco Markets 1.59 1.59 0.00 0.094 0.000 16.9 0.00%
11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.65 11.65 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.8 3.43%
7.88 Bank of Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 0.733 0.260 13.0 2.72%
0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.188 0.020 4.5 2.35%
1.65 Bahamas Waste 3.74 3.74 0.00 0.275 0.090 13.6 2.41%
1.21 Fidelity Bank 2.61 2.61 0.00 0.058 0.040 45.0 1.53%
9.81 Cable Bahamas 11.20 11.30 0.10 1,000 1.030 0.240 11.0 2.12%
1.88 Colina Holdings 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.208 0.080 15.1 2.54%
4.10 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.57 6.67 0.10 2,975 0.426 0.260 15.7 3.90%
4.70 Consolidated Water BDRs 6.20 6.37 0.17 0.129 0.050 48.0 0.81%
2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.26 2.26 0.00 9,000 0.284 0.020 8.0 0.88%
5.54 Famguard 6.70 6.70 0.00 0.713 0.240 9.4 3,58%
12.00 Finco 12.75 12.75 0.00 1,000 0.768 0.570 16.6 4.47%
14.14 FirstCaribbean . 14.66 14.66 - 0.00 0.934 0.470 15.7 3.21%!
5.18 Focol (S) 6.04 6.04 0.00 0.359 0.133 16.8 2.24%
0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.74 0.74 0.00 -0.415 0.000 N/M 0.00%
7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.200 17.6 2.76%
8.52 ‘J. S. Johnson 10.05 10.05 0.991 0.590 10.1 5.87%
i EI 10.00 10.00 i.
il délity Qver-The-Gounter Secur

S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E

14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185 13.4

8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000

RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.20 -0.030













- Colina Ovar-The-Counter Seauriti
















ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00
Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4
0.45 0.55 / 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M
‘BISX Listed Mutual Runde °° 5%
NA V YTD% Last 12 Months
Colina Money Market Fund 1.364794"

3,5388"*"
2.938214***
1.279370***
id 11.8192***
NDEX: CLOSE 896160 / YTD 20.69% 72008 34
ET TERMS VIEL! st 12 month divider 3
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fi










BMRA ICDs De Hee
02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks










Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths wee* 31 July 2007



NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(





“7010 / FIDELITY 242-358-7764 / FOR MORE DAT.










































Tony Snow, Attorney General
Alberto Gonzales, Defense
Secretary Donald Rumsfeld
and senior presidential adviser
Dan Bartlett, have already left.

Hubbard, of Indiana, was a
low-profile economic adviser
to the president whose strength
came from his closeness to
Bush. The two both attended
Harvard University together.
Hubbard also has close ties
with Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson. Hubbard accompa-
nied Paulson on some of his
trips to China to lend White
House support to efforts to get
China to reform: its economy
and narrow the huge trade
imbalance between the two
nations.

National

The National Economic
Council was created in the
Clinton administration to coor-
dinate economic policy. The
first NEC director was Robert
Rubin, who went on to
become Clinton’s Treasury
secretary.

Hubbard took the post at
the beginning of Bush’s sec-
ond term, when the adminis-
tration had high hopes for

achieving success on a number
of such major issues as address-
ing Social Security’s funding
problems and overhauling the
tax code. However, as Bush
became mired in problems
involving the Iraq war, his
domestic initiatives failed to
make headway in Congress.

“Al brought to this job more
than the creativity that he’s
known for,” said White House
press secretary Dana Perino.
“He has a great booming
laugh, but he also is a very
honest broker when he works
with everybody at the White
House. Part of his role is to
incorporate all of the thoughts
and concerns and proactive
ideas that members of the
administration have.”

Hubbard first met Bush
when they both attended Har-
vard’s business school in the
1970s, getting MBA degrees.
Hubbard, who later became
president of E&A Industries,
an Indianapolis investment
firm, has owned and operated
several businesses and served
in the Bush-Quayle adminis-
tration as executive director of
a council on competitiveness.
He has not yet announced his
future plans.

NATURE

@niautilus

Ne pr
“SED with 4 TRACE MINE™

Technician needed to work a 12 hour shift.
Interested person are aked to please
Contact Nautilus Water Company
Phone: (242) 377-0444-6 or Fax a Resume
To (242) 377-0276

Serious Inquires only need apply.



SMOKED SALMON

Real Scottish & American
Now Available
At yourfavorite Bahamian Food Stores

Super Value & Solomon’s

When purchasing Salmon




* Do not be fooled by packaging

e Scottish Smoked Salmon has o:

life depending on process




ly 15-30 GANS shelf



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an expiry date printed om it



¢ It could be hazardous to your health

European Food Exports

SS









_ Laundry Attendant:

-.RoomAttendant

Public Area Attendant

Jamaican Cook :

Chef ~

Bartender
Bellman

- Houseman

Pool Attendant

All applications are appreciated but only.
qualified individuals will be considered. Please
send yourapplicationto:
admin@marleyresort.com _
with reference to specific area of intere
"may fax it to (242) 327-4393 by Fri
November 30th, 200)


























MS


ee

THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 15B





China set to resist
currency demands f

@ By DAVID LAGUE
c.2007 New York Times
News Service

BEIJING — China signaled
Tuesday that it would resist
European demands for rapid
appreciation of the yuan and
would instead continue gradual

progress toward a more flexi-.

ble exchange rate.

As Beijing comes under
increasing pressure to curb its
soaring trade surplus with
Europe, Prime Minister Wen
Jiabao told the visiting French
president, Nicolas Sarkozy, on
Monday that China was deter-
mined to.move at its own pace

‘ in permitting its currency to

trade more freely, the state-
run media reported.

The European Union, Chi-
na’s biggest trading partner,
accuses Beijing of holding the
yuan at an artificially low level
to assist Chinese exporters,
contributing to the trade imbal-
ance. China’s surplus is fore-
cast to widen 30 per cent this
year, to 170 billion euros, ($252
billion):

While Sarkozy was winding
up his three-day visit Tuesday,
a delegation of European mon-
etary officials, including the
president of the European
Central Bank, Jean-Claude
Trichet; Prime Minister Jean-

Claude Juncker of Luxem-
bourg; and the European
Union monetary affairs com-
missioner, Joaquin Almunia,
began two days of talks in Bei-
jing.

“We will have a large tour
d’horizon on all matters,
including of course the cur-
rency question,” Trichet said
in Beijing, referring to the
coming broad survey of poli-
cies, Reuters reported.

Partner

The United States, the No.2
trading partner with China,
and other . developed
economies are also demand-
ing that Beijing allow its cur-
rency to appreciate more
rapidly.

Treasury Secretary Henry
M. Paulson Jr. will lead a del-
egation of senior Bush admin-
istration officials to Beijing
next month for a third round of
regular economic talks, during
which China’s trade surplus

will again come under scrutiny,

trade analysts have said.
Senior Chinese leaders have
said they want more balanced
trade but have so far refused to
give ground on currency policy.
While China is criticized for
what its trading partners say
are unfair barriers to foreign

FML Group of Companies Ltd.
is seeking to employ an

Administrative Assistant

_ for it human resources department.

‘Must’ be matured, energentic and possess
knowledge of word and excel. Must have
excellent written and communication skills.
Human resources experience a plus.

Interested persons may fax their resumes

to 394-2193.

_products, rampant intellectual

property theft and the poor
quality of some of its exported
goods, it is the value of its cur-
rency that draws the most hos-
tility, trade specialists say.
Since Beijing allowed a 2.1
per cent increase in the value
of the yuan against the dollar
in July 2005, it has allowed the
currency to appreciate by

almost 10 percent. Most ana-

lysts expect this to continue.

But the Chinese currency
has declined sharply against
the euro, and some European
monetary specialists say it is
undervalued by as much as 25
per cent,

Chinese officials and some
trade experts counter that the
trade statistics alone can be
misleading.

They note that exchange
rates and trade balance figures
are part of increasingly com-
plex international commercial
relationships.

Chinese government officials
say. foreign businesses based
in China are benefiting from
the export boom just as much
as local manufacturers.

More than 50 per cent of
exports from China in the first
nine months of this year were
shipped from factories with
foreign ownership, according
to Chinese government and

invites you to our

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European Union statistics. The
customs value of these exports

when they leave Chinese ports

does not take into account the
value of materials, technology
or design from abroad.

Chinese officials also say the
trade statistics fail to reflect
the benefits that foreign retail-
ers and consumers gain from
the flood of cheap, good-qual-
ity Chinese manufactured
goods now widely available in
international markets.

Some trade experts say that
even if Beijing did allow a

sharp increase in the value of

the yuan, there is no guarantee
that this would lead to an
immediate change in the trade
balance.

They note that in response
to international pressure,
Japan allowed the yen to rise
for long stretches in the 1990s
without significant impact on
its trade surplus.

Foreign companies and gov-
ernments would be better
advised to pay attention to
China’s numerous barriers to
imported goods and services,
according to Chinese and for-
eign trade experts.

The European Union esti-
mates that these barriers cost
European businesses about 20
billion euros in lost trade each
year.













4UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial
institutions in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy
private clients by providing them with comprehensive,
value enhancing services. Our client advisors combine
strong personal relationships with the resources that are
available from across UBS, helping them provide a full
range of wealth management services.

In order to strengthen our accounting team in Nassau, we
are looking to fill the following position:

Accountant

Essential Duties and responsibilities

Ensure the quality, accuracy and completeness of all
financial data according to IFRS standards
Ensure monthly closing process and correct allocation
of costs and revenues

Perform high quality reporting to head office and local
management

Ensure reconciliation of bank accounts

Minimum Requirements —

CPA /CFA designation

Sound working knowledge of IFRS.

Extensive knowledge of MS Office and related
Application Software products. Knowledge of SAP
based accounting applications is a plus.

Minimum of 3 years experience in Accounting. Previous
work in an international financial institution or
accounting firm is a plus.

Preference will also be given to applicants having
obtained or in the process of earning additional
certification such as an MBA, Series 7 or other related
proficiency requirement. .

In addition, the ideal candidate must possess strong
analytical skills and efficient functioning, be a highly
motivated team player, willing to adapt to a dynamic work
environment and able to multi-task, while working
independently and meeting tight deadlines.

Written applications should be addressed, until December
7th, 2007 to:
hrbahamas@ubs.com or UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



Little Switzerland is a company with over 50 years of

experience in luxury retailing with over 25 stores in The
Caribbean and Florida. If you want a career with prospects
and have what it takes to repair fine Swiss watches we
have an immediate opening for the following position:

Watch Maker —Breitling Boutique/ Nassau

This position is a key component of our operation
and our commitment to exceed our customer’s expectations.
‘The successful candidate will be a Certified Watch Maker.
Must have completed factory. training and certification by_
BREITLING, WOSTEP and or a compatible Swiss Watch

Brand_or Association.

‘ The following attributes are desirable:
“sh am! 5

J. Attention to details and the ability to produce
high quality work in areas of follow up and direct
reporting.

2. Good working knowledge of Microsoft Office
applications, and emails.

3. Strong communication skills and ability to work
well with colleagues.

4. Good oral and writing comprehension of the
English Language.

The successful candidate will be responsible:
¢ Maintaining a high quality, precise after sales
service for the repair of watches.
Perform timely and consistent repairs of watches in
accordance with established industry standards and
procedures.
Effectively communicate the needs and take the
lead.in the direction of the after sales service centre.
Implement effective inventory controls that would
facilitate the timely reordering of watch parts and
’ components and maintain compliance with Internal
Audit standards.

To apply, please e-mail or fax your resume with a
cover letter to:

Watch Maker Position in Nassau:
K-Mail: wearey@littleswitzerland.com
Fax: (242) 356-9860
Attn: William Carey



INSIGHT |

Samu de ue
CM CMM ele ar: ud
ee) Celale tN



‘OUNTANT.

CLIENT AC



Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Malta,
Switzerland and the United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of
services to local and international clients.















An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust. & Corporate
Services team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Supervisor.
Client Accounting.

Core Responsibilities
* — Reconciliation of Bank/Broker Accounts

¢ Preparation of Client Financial Statements
* — Liaising with External Auditors and Clients as necessary

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration



Desired Qualifications

® Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or related discipline from a well
recognized university.

= 3-5 years progressive Accounting experience in the Financial
Services Industry.

® Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

® Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, and
customer service skills.

Closing Date: December 7, 2007

Contact '

. Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 393 3772 al
E-mail: recruitment@butterfieldbank.bs ___ «ail

www.butterfieldbank.bs












arate el Bank =






2007
No. 01153

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division








IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, (Â¥59
AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land being
part of John Drudge Grant (D-52) comprising an area of Sixteen and
Sixty-seven Hundredths (16.67) acres situate near the Settlement of The
Bight on Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas and bounded on the NORTH partly by another portion of land
originally granted to John Drudge and running thereon Nine Hundred
and One and Ninety-three Hundredths (901.93) Feet on the EAST by
another portion of land granted originally to John Drudge and running
thereon Seven Hundred and.Eighty-Two and Sixty-two Hundredths
(782.62) Feet on the SOUTH by another portion of land originally
granted to John Drudge and running thereon Eight Hundred and Ninety
two and Sixty-three Hundredths (892.63) Feet and on the WEST by The
Queen’s Highway and running thereon Eight Hundred and Seventy-oue
and Forty Hundredths (871.40) Feet.


































AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of
DELTON RANDOLPH MOREE

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF Delton Randolph Moree in respect ot -
“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land being part of John Drudge
Grant (D-52) comprising an area of Sixteen and Sixty-seven Flundredths

(16.67) acres situate near the Settlement of The Bight on Long Island

- one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and bounded
on the NORTH partly by another portion of land originally granted &
John Drudge and running thereon Nine Hundred and One and Ninety
three Hundredths (901.93) Feet on the EAST by another portion of Land
granted originally to John Drudge and running thereon Seven Hundied
and Eighty-Two and Sixty-two Hundredths (782.62) Feet on the SOUTH
by another portion of land originally granted, to John Drudge and runing
thereon Eight Hundred and Ninety two and Sixty-three Hundiedths
(892.63) Feet and on the WEST by The Queen’s Highway and ranning
thereon Eight Hundred and Seventy-one and Forty Hundredths (871.40)
Feet.

Delton Randolph Moree clams to be the owner of the umneumbered fee suuple

estate in possession of the said land and has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the Petition and the Plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal office hours in the following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the City of Nassau,
Bahamas; and

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro Road, off Shirley
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these presents, file
in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement
of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith






Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his Claim on ot
before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication of these
presents will operate as bar to such claim.






LOCKHART & MUNROE
Chambers

#35 Buen Retiro Road

Off Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas







Attorneys for the Petitioner


PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



La aa
Home foreclosures in heavy economic hit

@ By MARILYN GEEWAX
Cox News Service

WASHINGTON — Home fore-
closures in metro Atlanta will reduce
the area’s economic growth by $954
million in 2008, according to a report
released Tuesday by the US Confer-
ence of Mayors.

Meanwhile, more bad housing news
came from Standard & Poor’s Case-
Shiller Home Price Indices, a closely
watched survey that showed home
prices in 20 major markets declining
4.9 per cent in September from a year
ago.

“There is no real positive news” in
the statistics, economist Robert Shiller
said in a statement. “Most of the
metro areas continue to show declin-
ing or decelerating returns on both
an annual and monthly basis.”

The mayors’ report was based on
economists’ assumption that another
1.4 million homeowners will face fore-
closure next year, forcing them to
walk away from houses worth a total
of $316 billion.

The resulting turmoil in the housing
sector will reduce economic growth by
$166 billion nationwide, according to
the study conducted for the mayors by
Global Insight Inc., a forecasting firm.

“The foreclosure ‘crisis has the
potential to break the back of our
economy, as well as the backs of mil-
lions of American families if we don’t
do something soon,” Trenton, N.J.,
Mayor Douglas Palmer said in state-
ment on the report, released at meet-
ing in Detroit of mayors, mortgage
industry officials and community
advocacy groups. Palmer is president
of the mayors’ group.

Process

Foreclosure is the legal process by
which property may be sold by a
lender to pay off a defaulting bor-
rower’s loan. The mayors say mort-
gage foreclosures can have a dramat-
ic economic impact as homes sit
vacant, driving down all home prices
and drying up sources of credit.

The report forecasts a home price

decline averaging seven per cent
nationwide, with some California
markets ‘seeing prices drop as much.as
16 per cent.

Such declines likely will translate
into 524,000 fewer jobs being created
and $6.6 billion less in taxes being
collected nationwide, the report said.
The financial stresses will reduce con-
sumer spending enough to make 2008
the worst year for car sales in a
decade, it said.

“The foreclosure crisis is no longer
just about mortgages,” Detroit May-
or Kwame Kilpatrick said in a state-
ment. “This issue is now the No. 1
economic challenge of many major
American cities.” '

The mayors’ report estimates the
national economy will grow at a rate
of 1.9 per cent, which is one per cent
less than it would have in the absence
of the mortgage crisis. The Federal
Reserve Board’s estimate is some-
what more optimistic, predicting
growth of up to 2.5 per cent.

Neither the Fed nor the mayors see
an outright recession, defined at two

consecutive quarters of economic loss-
es. The mortgage crisis “is not going
to bring the economy grinding to a
halt,” the mayors’ study concluded.

Impact

Still, for certain cities, the impact
will be especially painful. The worst
markets include Myrtle Beach, S.C.,
Merced, Calif., and Sarasota, Fla.,
which will see 1.5 to 1.7 percentage
points cut from their already sluggish
growth rates.

In Atlanta, economic growth will
continue at a relatively healthy three
per cent pace, but that will be a 0.6
percentage point, or $954 million, less
than if housing were healthy.

As measured by dollar amounts,
the most-affected metro region will
be New York and northern New Jer-
sey, which will lose $10.4 billion as
housing problems there shave 0.65
percentage point from growth, leaving
the overall expansion rate at 2.1 per
cent. Los Angeles and Dallas-Forth
Worth are the next two most-affected

areas, losing $8.3 billion and $4 billion
respectively.

While the mayors’ report looks
ahead to next year, the Case-Shiller
survey examines what already has
happened.

That study shows the largest
declines over the past year were in
Tampa, Florida, where prices fell 11.1
per cent compared with last year, and
Miami, where prices dropped 10 per
cent.

The cities that saw the biggest price
increases in 2007 were Charlotte,
N.C., and Seattle, which each had
year-to-year increases of 4.7 per.cent.
Still, the downturn is starting to hurt
even them. In September, Charlotte
declined 0.6 per cent from the past
month while Seattle prices slipped 0.2
per cent, the Case-Shiller report said.

Global Insight economist Patrick
Newport, in a written comment on
the Case-Shiller report, said home-
owners shouldn’t look for any positive
reports for a while. “We expect much
weaker numbers the rest of the year,”
he said.

‘

Portuguese firm to build biofuel plant

@ By MATTHEW L. WALD
c.2007 New York Times
News Service

announce Wednesday that it
is building a 6,500-barrel-a-day
plant to make diesel fuel from

UOP, a subsidiary of Honey-
well, and Eni, the Italian ener-
gy company, adds hydrogen to

to make soap.

Crops

UOP. The company argues
that its method produces a fuel
superior to the standard .

cation that would produce jet
fuel from the same feed stocks.
With airlines under pressure

vegetable oils using a method
akin to refining oil.
The method, developed by

A PORTUGUESE oil com-
pany, Galp Energia, plans to

PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FOR A FEW GOOD PEOPLE.




DIESEL TECHNICIAN / MACHINIST

Prior experience on repairs to heavy trucks
mandatory. Experience repairing
International, Mack, and Cummins engines
and Electronics necessary. Extensive
experience in machine shop repairs to diesel
engine parts mandatory. Top wages.
Uniforms furnished after probationary period.







Please come by and fill out an application,
and give us your resume at:

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Ltd.
fg Rock Crusher Road ag

>) Nassau, Bahamas @gere aw
o wa ocenaneiee












NOTICE
KNIK POINT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
25th day of October 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MONTBARD INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
27th day of November 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



oils derived from food crops
to create a substitute that the
companies describe as superior
to ordinary diesel fuel.

The long-term goal is to
modify the process to use oil
from algae or from jatropha,
a hardy shrub from Central
America whose oil has long
been burned in lamps and used

Using algae, jatropha or
oilseed crops like canola as a
source of diesel would reduce
carbon dioxide buildup in the
atmosphere from diesel
engines by SO per cent to 70
per cent, according to Jennifer
Holmgren, director for renew-
able energy and chemicals at

biodiesel already being made
in places like the American
Midwest.

Holmgren said that with
funding from the Defense
Advanced Research Projects
Agency, a Pentagon agency,
UOP was pursuing a modifi-

to reduce their output of glob-
al warming gases, the fuel
could find a ready market.

At 6,500 barrels a day, the
Portuguese plant is tiny by
petroleum standards but large
by the standards of renewable
fuels. To be located in Sines, a
town on Portugal’s southern
coast, it will be the second such

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GALLICO LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
27th day of November 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

s

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LAC DE LIOZON LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
26th day of September 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

OPPORTUNITIES DRAGON LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
27th day of November 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., PO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Sey ene mR

unit; Eni is building one in
Livorno, Italy.

The Galp unit will help meet
a renewable fuels quota set by
the Portuguese government.
The cost of producing diesel
with its technique will be high-
er than the cost of producing
standard diesel, said Holm-
gren, who would not be more
specific. She said the new
diesel might eventually be
competitive when produced at
a larger scale.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
icsreCe Mele ls) 4
on Mondays



°

MARINE STORE

LOOKING FOR

Experience Counter
Sales Person;

must be computer literate and have good
customer relations

PLEASE FAX RESUME TO 394-3885

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, PATRICK L.
ROLLE of Blue Hill Road South, RO. BOX CR-
54128, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to PATRICK L. KEMP. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of













position
available

The Cove @ Atlantis Resorts
Registered Nurse — Full Time

Responsibilities:

@ Provide primary and minor emergency medical
care

e Administration of medication, oxygen,
intravenous fluids as indicated and outlined in the
clinical Protocol Manual

e Provide accurate and comprehensive medical

reports as required

Requirements:

e Holder of current Bahamian licence

e Must have at least three years experience post
graduation

e have current BLS & ALS Certification

e Must be responsible, have good communication
skills and independent. ,

‘THE
CV should be sent via MEDICLINIC
e-mail to mary.epcotmedical
@coralwave.com by
November 31“, 2007.

i ‘TT


geome Rua mer ra aa ee

THE TRIBUNE

“THURSDAY EVENING

~ NOVEMBER 29, 2007.













NETWORK CHANNELS

Colombia: Musica de Mi Tierra A musical journey
| WPBT through Colombia featuring the sits and sounds of
cities where music plays a vital role in life.



Shakira Concert





The Insider (N
@ wror|nicg



Survivor: China One castaway
threatens to shake things up by
blindsiding a close friend. (N) 0









Without a Trace Detectives wonder
ifa eae is connected to the
child's native land. 4 (CC)

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
The team investigates the death of
a go-kart racer. (1 (CC) (DVS)




























a Access Holly- |My Name Is Earl 30 Rock An in- |The Office ‘Back |(:31) Scrubs “My |(:01) ER wes the Limit” Abby
(© WTVd |wood (ny) (ck) “Bum Victim’ (N) |ner-city Little |From Vacation” |Growing Pains” feels uncomfortable when Kovac's
1 (CC) League team. | (CC) (N) (cc) brother visits from Croatia.
| Deco Drive Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grad-|Don’t Forget the Lyrics! Woman |News (N) (CC)
| WSVN A A ee gets an invitation. |gets second chance. (N) © (CC)

(N) A
| Jeopardy! (N) {Ugly Betty Betty remains in denial {Grey's Anatomy Christina, back —_ |(:02) Big Shots Duncan goes to
WPLG icc} about how Henry's departure has af-|from her el trip, searches great lengths to reclaim his title at
fected her. (CC) in vain for Burke. (CC) eveal. (N) 4 (CC)



| A&E Bait’ 0 (CC)





(:00) CSI: Miami

:00) BBC World |BBC News

| BBCI lve America |(Latenight).
















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The First 48 An elderly man is |The First 48 ‘Stray Bullet; Payback” |The First 48 A small-town farmer is
i A family man is shot dead inside his killed while inate buy a used car
apartment. (CC) in Dallas. (N) (CC)

stabbed to death; a man is mur-
dered outside a liquor store. (CC)

BBC News Inside Sport |News
(Latenight).




World Business
Report





The Black Car-
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_ |Who Do You





CBC [think You Are?
:00) Kudlow &
CNBC Sepany (06)



“Orchestra” 1
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DIY A (CC)

| DW Thadeusz ©









:00) Lou Dobb:
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Scrubs Kelso The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- |Chappelle’s
COM finds a bird in the With Jon Stew- |port (CC) Show (CC)
hospital. art (CC)

Cops ‘Virginia
COURT |pekor A (co) al

| The Suite Life of WITCHES TOO (2007, Mystery) Tia Mowry, Tamera |(:35) That's So That's So Raven|Life With Derek
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Keyshia Cole: {College Hill: In- |American Gangster (CC)
The Way ItIs terns (CC) ;

Paris Hilton Inc. Behind-the-scenes|CBC News: The National (N) (CC)
of Paris Hilton Inc. (N)
Deal or No Deal Contestants get a |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
chance to win money. (cc}

Larry King Live (CC)

Sunday Best (CC)



The Nature of Things “Climate
Change: Hot Times in the City’

Fast Money

Out in the Open Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)



South Park The |South Park The Sarah Sil-
boys form a film |"Good Times |verman Program
club. (CC) With Weapons” |(CC)

Bait Car Inside American |Inside American |Forensic Files Forensic Files
ail Jai






Bait Car





ther is alive, Impossible” dog. 0 Sally” (CC)

This Old House |Sweat Equity Cool Tools Cool Tools “Get /Desperate Land-|Wasted Spaces
1 (CC) “Wood Work” —_|a Grip” (N) scapes ~ _|'Valet Cabinet”

Journal: Tages- {Bundesliga Kick |Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Tages- |Im Focus
thema ff Depth thema
























| E! er Daily 10 ") _ maliiee eng ene : ue Next . ne om Next eet ee Te
| ESPN College Football Rutgers at Louisville. (Live) (CC) iencg |
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TV at oe i

| Fox Report-
| FOX NC Shepard Smith

The O'Reilly Factor (CC) Hannity & Colmes (CC) On the Record With Greta Van

/Susteren (CC)







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:00) Law & Or-
USA i Camital In

tent “Seeds”

100 Greatest Ki
VH1 Stars



| FSN FL NHL Hockey’ Boston Bruins at Florida Panthers. From the BankAtlantic Center in Sunrise, Inside the Pan- |The FSN Final

Home for Imagi- |Squirrel Boy |Couragethe © |GrimAdven- {My Gym Part- Ed, Edd n Eddy |Naruto
nary Friends Cowardly Dog tures ner’s a Monkey

VS Ruger’s Adven- |Outdoor Adven- |The World of — |Legends of the Ring Marco Antonio Barrera vs. Erik Morales, from Feb.
. tures tures Beretta (CC) . |19, 2000 in Las Vegas.













Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) thers Score (Live) |
| itish Open Highlight If C M igh- British Highlights 1988 timate Match- |
‘GOLF British Open Highlights 1984 ty entral ; ng Hig ritish Open Highlights 19: a imate Mate |
| GSN a Weakest —|Who Wants to Be a Millionaire ( |That's the Ques-|Family Feud |Family Feud [Chain Reaction |
ink A (CC) |(CC) tion (CC) (CC) (CC)
| (:00) Attack of {X-Play X-Play Cops 2.0 Hous- |Cops 2.0 “Miami” |Ninja Warrior = |Ninja Warrior
-G4TeCH the show! (N) ton. 1 (CC) |Vice sting, |

(00) Walker, |Walker, Texas Ranger A deaf gir |THE CHRISTMAS CARD (2006, Romance) Ed Asner, John Newton, Alice
HALL exas Ranger needs Walker's protection after she |Evans. A soldier falls for a woman who wrote a well-wishing card. (CC) |

1 (CC) witnesses a slaying. O (CC)

' Buy Me “Anne {Holmes on Homes ‘Third Time © |DreamHouse Over Your Head |Disaster DIYA Junk Brothers
HGTV and Jim” © (CC)|Lucky” A woman needs to renovate |Groundbreaking |Repairing uneven | deck is ag, ee cabinet.
ey torpie Mell, her bathroom. (N). (CC) in Tennessee... ffloaring. 0 apart. (N) (CC) | (CC) |
r [Morris Cerullo. [Breakthrough |Lovea Child _-|Inspitation To- |Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Day|The Gospel

INSP (Cc) 3 ay (cc) Truth
:00) Reba ‘Ring-/My Wife and = According to |Family Guy The |Family Gu Two and a Half |Two and a Half
-KTLA Ding’ A (cg Kids “Michael's |Jim ‘The Thin |Griffins get ‘North by North |Men “That a Men Alan's attor-
feet oS Band’ 1 (CC) |Green Line” robbed. 1 (CC) |Quahog’ (CC) cial Tug’ (CC) ney. 1 (CC)
oe Still er Reba “Switch” Reba “A Moment | x NOEL (2004, Drama) Penélope Cruz, Susan Sarandon, Paul Walk-
‘LIFE Brian may fail {Reba tries speed in Time” 1 (CC) Jer. Troubled people find unexpected happiness on the holidays. (CC)
bari gym. 1 (CC) — | dating. |
a rr |(:00) Hardball {Countdown With Keith Olber- | Live With Dan Abrams To Hell and Back Bishop Carlton
“MSNBC |)" am penne ton Peas
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NICK fed School) (Cc) "ile Date (CCilment (Cc) (ment “At Sea” (71 (CC) nce)
UNTV Smarter Thana |Survivor: China “Ready to Bite the |Shark “Every Breath You Take” (N) |News (N) |News |
aN 5th Grader? Apple” (N) M (CC) 0 (CC) (CC)
\¢ Pinks Pinks -- All Out From Jupiter, Fla. |Pinks - All Out From Baytown, © {NOPI Tunervi- |NOPI Tunervi-
SPEED js Texas. sion
eee Against All Behind the Michael Youssef|Bishop T.D. —_|This Is Your Day |Praise the Lord (CC) |
TBN Odds (CC) |Scenes(CC) {Dr Michael dakes(CC) _|(CC) |
— "Youssef. (CC)
Everybody Friends Phoebe |Friends Ross’ | % * * AUSTIN POWERS: THE SPY WHO SHAGGED ME (1999, Com-
TBS Loves Raymond |lacks coordina- teeth glow in the jedy) Mike Myers, Heather Graham, Michael York. Austin travels in time to |
; “Ray's Journal” tion. (CC) dark. icc} get his mojo back. |
fa Overhaulin’|Wrecks to Riches “Plymouth Satel- |American Chopper ‘Silver State | American Chopper “Silver State
TLC inger.Nick lite Roadrunner’ Plymouth Road. Choppers’ Chopper 1" New chal |Choppers’ Chopper 2° The build
Lachey. (CC) — |Runner. (CC) lenges. (CC) continues. (cc
(:00) Law & Or- [NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Boston Celtics. From TD Banknorth Garden in Boston. |NBA Basketball
TNT - |der ‘Marathon’ | (Live) (CC) Nuggets at Lak-
1 (CC) (DVS) ers

Dossier Scheffer “Christian Urbania
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Weather: Evening Edition (CC)

Amar sin Limites Un hombre lucha )Destilando Amor (N) Aqui y Ahora Chavez y la
nj para salvar a la mujer que ama. (N) Venezuela dividida; Fernando
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-|Fin deals with colleagues who ac- | Fin deals with colleagues who ac- fense” (N) 1 (CC)
cuse his son of murder. cuse his son of murder.

d|100 Greatest Kid Stars “Hour 3” |100 Greatest Kid Stars ‘Hour 4” 100 Greatest Kid Stars “Hour 5”
Child celebrities 60 to 41. 0 Child celebrities 40 to 21. 0 Child celebrities 20 to 1. 0

Envoyé spécial (SC)

Abrams & Bettes







% & MAFIA! (1998, Comedy) Jay Mohr, ay Burke, Christina Applegate. {WGN News at Nine (N) (CC)
A godfather's son climbs the criminal hierarchy. (CC)



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Jeopardy! (N) |Dr. Phil Obese children and
WSBK (cc) teenagers. (N) O (CC)

three women together. 1 'R’ (CC)



Bizarro, the last wraith from the

Supernatural Sam and Dean hunt |CW11 News at Ten With Kaity
down hundreds of demons that es- |Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)
caped from the Devil's Gate.
News (N) Jeopardy! (CC) |Frasier Frasier |Frasier “The
speculates who |1,000th Show"
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PREMIUM CHANNELS

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HBO-P _ Iton247 1 (CC) Caste Hughes Mary and Joseph travel to Bethlehem (a First Look |Dave get a rare night alone. 1
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(2007, Comedy) Cedric the Enter-
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[ the propaganda machine. (CC) arena. (1 'R’ (CC)
| ee AMERI- | 4% GET RICH OR DIE TRYIN’ (2005, Crime Drama) Curtis “S0 Cent” |Dexter “Morning Comes” Lila at-
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:05) * & LOOKING FOR KITTY
TMC ea Comedy-Drama) Edward
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% #& BOBBY G, CAN'T SWIM (1999, Drama) John- )RX (2005, Drama) Eric Balfour.
Luke Montias, Susan Mitchell. A drug dealer hopes to |Three friends encounter two drug
rise from his station in life. 'R’ (CC) dealers on a road trip. 'R’

R’(CC)







THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 17B













Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and lay
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your




kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy tlour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of November 9007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

(Th

i'm lovin’ it

‘Seaib OF ute
2 29 08W

nemas.com

or call 380-FLIX, 393-9404

x

; | 4 : ‘ . . . i
iMovie Gift Certificates

make great gifts!f


PAGE 188, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007

j COMICS PAGE



THERE'S NO BAG...
I WON'T BE HERE

: LONG ENOUGH
Sot TO CHANGE CLOTHES!












APS bi] H Are @ & sb? re Ss
gree a eo minniaeanans
I THOUGHT YOU WORK‘ IVE GOT To RUN IT WAS NICE SEEING:
- NG YOU
FOR THE THEATER COMPANY, NICE SEEING yOU TOO, GARY. =
i WD IRD, GARY. BOTH. oS
i) SA 5 2 yy
Ae (GB :

(©2007 by.North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.







| iERE'S TO US FOR WINNNG THAT
4 BIG CONTRACT TODAY, BOSS) Pe wieevosue

HAPPY HOUR

\¢ IT'S YOUR WIFE CALLING, )
MR. DITHERS

You are South, both sides vulner-
able, and the bidding has gone:
North East South West
1¢ Dble ?

What would you bid with each of

the following five hands? ‘

1. # KJ98 ¥ AQB4 5 & Q752

2. @ Q842 ¥ K93 @ J65 & Q87

3. © 965 ¥ K762 ¢ 10 & J9543

4.% 74 ¥ 95 @ Q86532 & A62

5. # A8 F J3 @ 874 & AQ9854

kee

= : 1. Redouble. When partner opens

- SINCE MY the bidding and the nee player hae
HUMAN










bles, you normally take one of the
{ me Le vE RR ee CAAeD following actions: You pass, indicat-
S FIGHTER ing a poor to moderate hand with no



convenient call to make; you bid a
suit, provided you have less than 10
high-card points; you bid one
notrump to show a balanced hand of
six to mine points; or you redouble to
show 10 or more high-card points.
The redouble does not necessarily

procure support for partner’s suit,
t instead srmounces that the dou-
bler is caught between two good
hands and that it might be possible to
exact a substantial penalty. Usually
the opener passes at his next tum in
order to allow the redoubler to show
the true nature of his hand.
2. One notrump. This is a typical
one-notrump response indicating six
to nine points and scattered values. If
pee you were to pass instead, you’d
NUNS GNID s

IIA SORRY...NW LEGAL
TRAINING BLOCKED oUT
EVERNTHING YoU Sip

WHAT | TEACH

one nine-letter word. No
ending in “s”, no words

onenie Soest inkjet printer).
TODAY'S TARGET
Solution Monday.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

tumid





|. CRYPTICPUZZLE :

ACROSS ’ DOWN Hehe | nl sa
"4 — Band possibly taking “4 Bidto get away to anicer part (5) Lo Pl
: trips East (6) Figure to have nineteen
7 team ytesarot® YS La oe
When there's something playable, aa role | ii
peal si Lipaaed 4 Thesortof chaos one finds in pei ee
10 A mineral very hard ; Esher? (5)
to describe (5) : ‘5 Transported ina right and suitable | || ee
| . 13 Atbottom, it's supportive (4) - manner (4) ae fae.
14 It's in Nevada, 6 — Write figures one can rub out (6) = 3
near enough (4) + 9 — Supporter taking no part (6)

> 11° Bitofa good time girl? (3)
‘ Italian stata atthe end of the war (5)
13 Inthe future, a new mode, say (4,3)
15 Ishe expensive to write to? (3)
16 Could be made as a gesture (3)
18 Noplace to monkey
with the bees! (6)
4 20 Warmhearted girl (called Sandy?) (5)
+ 24 For€1,a lotof cover? (3)

15 The type with class (4)
“16 Part of Surbiton (3)
17 Injure for many a
purpose (4)
‘19 Complain bitterly in a bar (4).
21 It gets a driver nowhere faster
than ever (3,6)

wis
—
N




wo
| | &

t

‘Al

fe







23 Incoal mining, it means I : ACROSS OWN
little (4) ; 22 Retiring in company (3) 4 Charm (6) 1 Scum (5)

i 23 She has her own kind of love (6) 7 Disraspact (8) 2 Notions (5)
"4 24 Finished, having been cheated (4) + 25 The force tomake | wa | - eres (6) | thay
ee, . : ine
At] 26 Appear wiling (3) B-__ yougo tying? (3) sel 13 Expensive (4) 5 Fruit (4)
= | 27 Offtoplaysomewhereslea (4) 28 We need some remedy for being thin N 44° Pibbon (4) 6 Against (6)

1) 29° Ithurtsit you miss it and hitit (4) and weak (5) => eens a cane aoe tt)
32 Horse fit for an earl? <4) aa Tana Cou Sow ae > 17 Cupid (4) "12> In that place (6)
33 Isle where the comm paatibns (6): o- 19 Charter (4) 13 Wished (7)

: 31 Finish fooling unfairly with the f 21° Leader (8) 15 Lettuce (3)
mnaeent language (5) y Lud 7 Ascot) apes
; } 24 = Ascen
34 Appreciative look gladly eA (9.3) 3 Nominal, she's not rude (4) 26 Moist (3) ape
35 Soaking in fall (8) 33 Manage tocatch before 27° Atthat time (4) . 21 ean
36 Only fairly fair? (6) closing time (4) 29 Flower (4) 22 Racket (3)
32 Honey drink (4) 23 Smoothly (6)
33 Drinking tube (5) 25 America (3)
f 34 Fast currents (6) 28 H 5
:Yesterday’s cryptic salutions Yesterday's easy solutions 35 Type of film (8) urry (5)
ACROSS: 1, Mali-bu 7, Step on 8, Peke 10, Relaid 11, | ACROSS: 1, Carpet7, Reporter 8, Biro 10, Erased 11, 36 Liquid container (6) ae
A-t-'ve 14, Old 16, Tot-al 17, Cads 19, Rehab 21, Fag-in | Donate 14, Led 16, Noted 17, Told 19, Debit 21, Topic 22, I} 39 es ie 6)
22, Tutus 23, Date 26, So-b-er 28, Nil 29, Island 30, Save | Latin 23, Aloe 26, Sepal 28, Ore 29, Treble 30, Er igage 31, 33 eee
up 31, Ape-X 32, Landsmen 33, Desert Need 32, Reasoned 33, Settle

DOWN: 1, Me-t-ric 2, Ideals 3, Used 4, Spartan 5, Unf-it 6,
Ethel 8, P-L-od 9, Kid 12, Rob 13, V-aunt 15, Be-gun 18,
Adi-O-s 19, Rat 20, His 21, F-um-lsh 22, Tea 23, Divers

- 24, Al-ex 25, Ex-port 26, Silly 27, B-land 28,

Nap 30, Sand

DOWN: 1, Cement 2, Poised 3, Trod 4, Moronic 5, Stoat 6,
Urged 8, Bail 9, Red 12, Not 13, Tempo 15, Sepia 18,
Owner 19, Dot 20, Bin 21; Tallboy 22, Lab 23,

Argent 24, Lead 25, Emerge 26, Stork 27, Pedal 28, One
30, Ends



Bidding Quiz

probably find it impossible to show-

the type of hand you have at your
next tum.

3. Pass. Lacking the appropriate
values for any other call, you should
take refuge in silence — despite your
singleton diamond. The odds are that

West will bid in response to his part- -

ner’s double. If West passes, your
partner can still rescue himself from
one diamond doubled if he so
desires.

4. Three diamonds. This is a pre-
emptive bid, pure and simple, indi-

cating lots of diamonds and poor’

defensive values. The purpose of the
pre-empt is to make it difficult for
the opponents to exchange informa-
tion. There is good reason to think
that East-West might have a game in
spades or hearts.

5. Redouble. Again you apply the
punciple discussed earlier to tell
partner that you have at least 10
high-card points. That takes prece-

dence over bidding your clubs at this _

point.

It would be correct to bid two clubs_ |

over East’s double if your ace of
spades were a low spade. But
because the spade ace brings your
high-card count to 11 points, you
should redouble rather than bid two
clubs. Note also that if you did bid
two clubs over the double, it would
not be forcing.

HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and there must be at least
lurals, or verb forms

th initial capitals and no

words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. The
first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in



Good 20; very good 30; excellent 41 (or more).

admit aimed amid amide dame datum dime
emit fame famed fume fumed fumigate _
FUMIGATED game gamed gamut geum image
imaged item made maid mate mated mead
meat mega midge midget mite mufti mute
muted tame tamed team tedium time timed



CHESS by Leonard Barden

Valerly Trembach v Alexander
Shevchenko, Ukraine 2007. No, the
black player is not related to the
Chelsea striker — Shevchenko is
_quite a common name in Russia and;
Ukraine. But I reckon that the chess
Shevchenko might have preferred

to be ona football pitch whenhe ——5{/

contemplated the dreadful position
of his king at a4. Material is level
and Black has pawns en route to 3
touchdown, but they are toolate to,
rescue the beleaguered monarch.
Thought it is still possible for White |



to choose a plausible but losing first a

move, the right sequence will soon
force checkmate. Can you defeat
Shevchenko?

Chess 8500: 1 Qd3 (threat 2 Qb3 mate) bxc4 2 Bd7+
Kxb4 3 Qd2+ and if 33 4 Qxc3 mate or Ka3 4 Qa5 :

mate.





THE TRIBUNE

fot.




RASeRneee



Wild











THANKS FoR | You'Re
THE BIS
WELCOME !










THURSDAY, |
. NOV 29
ARIES — March 21/April 20

Your world is a mix of love and
adventure this week, Aries. Impulse
Tuns wild, but it never steers you
wrong. You do your best sharing fon
with friends.

1
TAURUS - April 21/May 21
Don’t start any new projects this
week, Taurus. You are known to
anger easily and sometimes can be
slow to learn new things.-It’s best if
you stick with the basics. !
GEMINI — May 22/June 21!
Expect positive developments in, a
working relationship, friendship or
romance. For you this week, Gemini,
actions speak louder than words, so
‘move forward.
CANCER - June 22/Juty 22
Less is more this week, Cancer,
because it won’t take much for peo-
ple to warm up to you. Consider
curbing spending on any excesses
and concentrate it strictly toward
investments. i

LEO - July 23/August 23
Your senses are alive, Leo, and you're
feeling invincible. You leave a path of
change at work and others are inspired
to follow your lead — with varied
degrees of success. Re i
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 |
You can’t find a system that caters
solely to your needs, Virgo. You
have to admit that sometimes.it
won’t go your way. Keep things
simple for this week. s
LIBRA - Sept 23/Qct 23

It’s a rare day when you have all of
the answers in your hand, Libra. It's
best if you seek the advice of others
when it comes to a big decision.
Work relations improve. ;

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22 «

In a clash of wills this week,
Scorpio, you will come out the losef.
Your opponent has so much power
that a fair fight is impossible. Walk
away with your head high. :

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Time and distance are no match for
Sagittarians who work their exte:j-
sive connections. You are a person
who definitely understands how to
network. Your smile this week is
proof that you’re on top. ,

‘CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
Write a thank-you note to someone who
has done you a favor lately, Capricom. It
is best if you ty to rekindle old friend-
‘ships. A valuable relationship needs 8
be refreshed or reinforced this week.

.| AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18

It’s best if you curb your sudden fee}-
ing of aggression, Aquarius. You can
put the energy to better use. Make &
list of top ideas and put a plan in
motion. Gemini is key to the plan. *

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20 ;
You're feeling a bit disconnected
fram the world, lately, Pisces. it’s
nothing to get worried about. You just
need some time to yourself and then
you’ ll reacquaiart yourself to the norm.

anos © & S © Bete 2 oe OG Fete

Te ie
“Lf foe, ET Te



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PAGE 20B, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





‘Minor’ details over opening bank accounts

FROM page 2 Such accounts should be moni- tially illegal purposes (to defraud sons reading this article and/or col- — Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald. Should © +
tored carefully to prevent abuses by _ creditors, misrepresentation, money —_ umn, generally, are encouraged to you have any comments or

purpose of the account; the overall the legal guardians and representa- laundering), or for purposes other _ seek the relevant legal advice and enquiries regarding the content of
transaction history; specific account __ tive of the bank’s minor account than those contracted with the bank * assistance regarding issues that may _ this article, you may contact Mr
details provided on the opening of holders, and to minimise the on the establishment of the account. _ affect them and may relate to the Fitzgerald at Suite 212, Lagoon
the account; and the due diligence predilection of potential or existing NB: The information contained in _ information presented. Court Building, Olde Towne Mall
information requested, periodically, | adult account holders to use such this article does not constitute nor is Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an at Sandyport, West Bay St., P. O.
during the operation of the account. accounts for inappropriate or poten- __ it a substitute for legal advice. Per- attorney in the Chambers of Box CB-11173, Nassau, Bahamas

esson Oilhasa |.§










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LRG ar


G







wf

Greatest Warrior with a Pen!

© |st Bahamian/woman Publisher/ Editor

© Only Bahamian to have her editorials read from
the floor of the U.S. senate (twice)

© st woman CEO of radio station in Caribbean

© Ist and only Bahamian woman to graduate from
NYC’s famed Columbia School of Journalism

e |st Bahamian woman Pilot

@ 2nd Bahamian woman Lawyer

The Tribune

Aas

~ ASpeciat Section Published by The Tribune @ Nov )
- Being Bound To Swear To The Dogmas of No Master

aE a —— | a



' = an a ae __|










Family Guardian congratulates
Eileen Carron on 50 years of
committment in journalism.



FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



; SALES OFFICES: NASSAU, FREEPORT, ABACO & ELEUTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232



2007 ADWORKS

8

*
€

{





Champion of
a free press

The Hon. Hubert Ingraham
Prime Minister of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

ERHAPS the most fre-

quently quoted comment

about the importance of
the press in a democracy is that
of Thomas Jefferson who said
that if he had to choose
between having a government
without newspapers, or news-
papers without a government,
he would choose the latter.

This American founding
father no doubt never expected
to make such a choice in his
country, nor perhaps did he
expect that those who would
inherit the new republic would
have to make it either. But he
wanted to emphasise the impor-
tance of a free press in a democ-
racy. Indeed, a free press - or
media as we say today to
include electronic publishing -
is indispensable to democracy
and is a nation’s first defence
against demagogues and would-
be tyrants.

We are fortunate in the
Bahamas to have a strong tradi-
tion of press freedom without
which the achievement of social
justice and democratic progress
may have been well nigh impos-
sible. In the shaping of this
magnificent tradition over the
last century The Tribune has
been in the vanguard: first

under Leon Dupuch who

founded the newspaper to give
voice to the voiceless; then
under Sir Etienne Dupuch, who
expanded the horizons of jour-
nalism in The Bahamas and
gained international attention,
and now under the third gener-
ation of this outstanding
Bahamian family.

Eileen Dupuch Carron was
chosen, groomed and prepared
for the job of Editor of The
Tribune by her illustrious
father. He saw to it that her
education was broad and varied
with degrees in journalism and
in law.

Mrs Carron has been either
studying or practising the art of
journalism for half a century
and for 35 years she has sat in
the editorial chair. She has
demonstrated that Sir Etienne’s
judgment about her - as in so
many other matters in his
extraordinarily long career -
was correct.

As Editor and Publisher of
The Tribune she has presided
over the modernisation and
expansion of this institution.
More importantly, she has
maintained the high standard of
journalism which has been the
hallmark of The Tribune.

My colleagues and | congrat-
ulate Mrs Carron and The
Tribune family as they cele-
brate her 50 years in journalism
and we wish her and The
Tribune every success in the
future.





“Mrs
Carron has
maintained
the high
standard of
journalism
which has
been the
hallmark
of The
Tribune.”





A true Bahamian

patriot

By D. Brent Hardt
Chargé d’Affaires, Embassy of
the United States of America



FREEDOM of the press is one
of the core principles enunciat-
ed in the Bill of Rights in the
ist Amendment to the US.
constitution, and it is a funda-
mental pillar of democratic
government in every country.

The Bahamas has been
blessed to have Eileen Carron
on the frontlines of the free
press for half a century.

From my first meeting with
Mrs. Carron in her office just
off the busy Tribune news-
room, it was clear to me that
the Tribune’s motto, “Being
Bound
Dogmas of no Master,” was
something she believed deeply

to Swear to the

and lived every day.

Her unyielding commitment
to digging up the facts and
reporting the truth emerges

clearly as the motivation for
her tireless work.

When presenting editorial
opinions, she calls it as she
sees it, and does not pull
punches.

She does not expect people
to agree with her on every
issue, rather she wants to pro-
mote the debate and dialogue
that form the lifeblood of a
strong, free, and prosperous
Bahamas.

Mrs. Carron is a_ true
Bahamian patriot, deeply
devoted to her country and to
the Bahamian people. She has
also been a true friend of the
United States.

On behalf of the United
States Embassy in Nassau, |
am pleased to congratulate
Eileen Carron on her 50th
anniversary in journalism.

May she and The Bahamas
mark many more such anniver-

sarics,








ee





- Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism





My wonderful wife
of many talents

By Roger Carron

MY WIFE is an amazing
woman. She handles her chores
as a wife, mother, homemaker,
caregiver, counsellor, editor,
publisher, lawyer, and head of
the country’s leading newspa-
per with the easy poise and
grace of a ballerina who is in
full control of all her move-
ments.

And despite all the responsi-
bility, stress and worry that
comes with her various jobs,
she manages still to retain her
femininity. That, to my mind,
makes her quite a unique indi-
vidual. I first met my wife in
1960 just after | had finished
my national service in the
army as a young lieutenant in
the Gurkhas. I was preparing to
take my bar finals at the Inns of
Court in London, England,
having had to delay my legal
career to do national service.
Eileen was taking her law
degree at the University of
London and also trying to cram
for her bar finals at the same
time to save having to spend
extra time in England. She had
to get back to the Bahamas
where her father, Sir Etienne,
was expecting her to take over
the family newspaper, The
Tribune. She had spent several
years away from home gaining
a B.A. in philosophy from
Toronto University in 1954 and
a Masters in Journalism from
Columbia University after that
and was now pursuing an
LL.B. degree from King’s
College, London University.

We met at the law school

where in the class of about 24
there were just two women.
From the moment we first met
] knew that Eileen was some-
one quite special and I wanted
to spend the rest of my life with
her -- if she would have me. As
it worked out it was all rather
remarkable. The first hurdle
was that Eileen was scheduled
to return home to help her
father with the family newspa-
per, so there was no prospect of
staying in England to practice
my law. We decided that in
order to be ready to practice
law in the Bahamas it would be
better if I disbarred myself
from my Inn (Gray’s Inn) and
worked in a solicitor's office for
a year to gain experience on
that side of the law since |
would not be able to practice as
a barrister in the Bahamas for
at least five years - the time it
would take to gain residency
status. (While I was in practice
for a year in England | was for-
tunate to be one of the few
young lawyers who was able to
see a case right through from
initial pleadings to presentation
before the Privy Council in the
House of Lords).

But another setback was that
even as an English solicitor |
would not be able to practice in
the Bahamas as the profession
was closed to outsiders. That
meant rethinking how we were
to manage if we got married
and had to live in the Bahamas.
Eileen’s father came to the res-
cue and suggested that | join
The Tribune - but first | had to
get some training and learn
about the newspaper profes-
sion. I spent another nine
months in England with a fine




























newspaper in Peterborough (the
owner was a friend of Sir
Etienne and I had been at
Cambridge with his eldest son.)
There I worked from
copy boy to copy edi-
tor before joining Sir
Etienne at the
family newspa-
per. From that
time (1962) I
never opened
another law
book, except
to help = my
wife look up
an item = on
defamation
when the
paper was -
served with a
libel writ fron
time to time.

Not all plain
sailing

But when I
arrived in the
Bahamas in 1962
it was not all
going to be plain
sailing. Eileen and
I were scheduled to
be = married sin
November and her
father had planned to
have her called to the Bar in
the morning, take over The
Tribune in the afternoon and
get her married in the evening -
all in the space of one day! But’ post-
it was not to be. It was an elec- poned to
tion year and the newly formed) avoid a_con-
Progressive Liberal Party flict with the elec-
(PLP) was making a big effort tion.
to take over the Government
of the country. It was decided
that the wedding should be




@










I Continued on page 4







oar
”

a



A HOLM wy i



coi er ae sooyllosded
4 ak ae
” i



oe



al
+e i






COMPANIES

GROUP OF




EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON

PUBLISHER & EDITOR, THE TRIBUNE LIMITED

A Tradition of Shopping Excellence Since 1929


My wonderful wife of many talents

PS

i From page 3

1 was so shocked by the anti-
foreign feeling in the country at
that time that I nearly packed
up to go back home. But we
weathered the storm and got
married in January 1963 and
have been happily married for
44 years.

It has not been an easy life.
We've had our ups and downs,
mainly brought on by issues
taken up by the newspaper that
has put it at odds with the govy-
erning powers. Because of Sir
Etienne’s anti-PLP stance I was
denied citizenship and did not
get my Bahamas Residency
with a right to work until 1992

when the Free National
Movement (FNM) won the
government under Hubert

Ingraham. During much of this
time | was able to assist my wife
at the newspaper working in
various capacities = from
reporter, news editor and then
managing editor.

And during all those 20 years
the paper had to pay a work
permit for me every year -
except for one year when they
refused to renew it.

Life changed forever

After the PLP won the goy-
ernment of the country in 1967,
life as my wife and I knew it
changed forever. The newspa-
per became the target of
vicious political attacks and dis-
crimination, denying us work
permits to employ foreign staff.
At that time all our staff had
degrees and several spoke
other languages. From that
time on we had to employ on
the job training for our local
staff who were untrained and
put out a daily newspaper at
the same time - no easy matter.
Several people who now enjoy
fine jobs outside the newspaper
can thank The Tribune for the

engagement in London, 1961.

ROGER and Eileen Carron pictured on the day they announced their





training they got mainly from
my wife.

After some years the PLP
softened their stance towards
the newspaper and allowed us
to bring in a journalism training
officer from England. We set
up a proper classroom and gave
training to most who applied to
join - not just Tribune
reporters. We also held evening
classes to get several of our

reporters through their GCE
English exams. It was during
this time without help that my
wife and I found ourselves
working round the clock to put
out the newspaper, and only
surviving by the help of her
mother, who made us bowls of
soup that we could eat at our
desks as we worked long hours
into the night. At weekends we
were both so exhausted that we



Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism

took to our beds to try to
recover and gain enough
strength to face another week.
This went on for several years.
We were unable to take a vaca-
tion but managed to enjoy
some long weekends with our
son during public holidays
when the paper was not pub-
lished. We were fortunate to
have some very good friends
who were able to give our son
holidays that we couldn't
because we were unable to get
off from the newspaper.

Stress took its toll

The chronic stress eventually
took its toll, first on Eileen who
had to undergo surgery and
later myself, who just managed

WEDDING DAY

to avoid a major heart attack. |
underwent open-heart surgery
that involved five by-passes.
My wife bravely came back
from her operation the next
day. | took a good six months of
recovery. But I'm happy to say
today that we've both reached
the age of 75 in physically good
health and have much to be
thankful for.

Most people have no idea
how a newspaper is published
every day. You are constantly
working against a deadline as
every section of the paper has
to be on the press at the
appointed time otherwise the
paper will be late, which can
affect your circulation and if
this becomes too regular you
could go out of business. But



NEWLYWEDS - Roger and Eileen Carron walk down the aisle at St Francis
Xavier Catholic Cathedral in Nassau in January 1963 after their wedding cer-

emony. Bishop Leonard Hagarty, OSB, performed the ceremony.





every story that is printed in the
paper has to be written,
proofed and edited before it is
passed for publlication. And if
the story is not true, accurate
and balanced then the publish-
er and writer may have to suf-
fer the consequences of the law,
which could mean an action in
court with costly damages. So
the important aspect of a news-
paper publisher is that he must
be responsible. Unfortunately
today there are many who turn
a blind eye to their responsibil-
ities in this regard.

For the past 35 years - since
1972, a year before
Independence - my wife has not
only read every single major
story that has been published in
The Tribune, but she has also
done much of the editing of
front page stories, besides writ-
ing a daily editorial column that
tries to keep the government of
the day on its toes and true to
its promises to the Bahamian
people. Many people credit her
with helping to keep a balanced
and democratic form of govern-
ment present in the Bahamas.
She has been honoured by the
Queen with a CMG and by the
Bahamian people with a gold
medal on the occasion of the
25th anniversary of
Independence in 1998 for serv-
ices to the Bahamian people
through journalism.

It was at her father’s knee as
a young girl that Eileen was
introduced to the life of a news-
paper man. She adored her
father, who among other
achievements was responsible
for breaking down racial barri-
ers in public places in the
Bahamas in 1956. For this he
received the Mergenthaler
Award. But as he was seriously
ill at the time, Eileen was very
proud to accept the award on
his behalf and travelled to Cuba
where the Inter-American Press
was meeting that year - a year
before Castro took over the coun-
try.

i Continued on page 5


























Congratulations
Eileen Dupuch Carron

on celebrating 50 years of impeccable service in Bahamian journalism

KELLY’S Hardware on Bay Street in the 60's

J
aearE

&

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Maw

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indoor & Outdoor Furniture
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Coolers & Swim Gear



PCH
y FOO 200 en
OK Os









NANCY & DAVID REMY explore Selly's Nardwware’s
old lagers and journals from: Aue, 1942 ond aarier

ar





SRO EDN PE SIT Eh

Ca

jy
sips neecrgate te sieges ices

YHE KELLY FAMILY §L-R} Ancrew, Gregory,
Nancy OQaved & Scott {ohates by: Rofand ore}

QB





Stee
Celebrating An Unparalleled 50 Years In Bahamian Journalism :

My wonderful wife of many talents

i From page 4

Her father holds the record in
the Guinness Book of Records
as the longest serving editor of
a newspaper (64 years) and also
has the unique distinction of
having gained three knight-
hoods, one from the Vatican,
one from the Knights of Malta
and one from the Haitian gov-
ernment.

A world figure

While her father was a world
figure who counted such nota-
bles as Lord Louis
Mountbatten, Lord Beaver-
brook, Sir Robert Neville, Sir
Ralph Grey, Lord Monckton
and Lord and Lady Ranfurly as
personal friends, my wife keeps
a much more modest and low
profile. Not one to boast of her
accomplishments she neverthe-
less has many to her credit.

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON shown at

her call to the Bahamas Bar,
November 13, 1962. Thirteen has
been a lucky number for her and her
husband, Roger, also a lawyer. Both
born on the 13th.

FA a ee Ui





she managed to do it all and
remain so calm and collected ts
a wonder. Yet she did it and
remained a loving and caring
mother and wife.

Never wanted the
newspaper

My wife would be the first to
tell you that she never wanted
the newspaper. And, surpris-
ingly enough, neither did her
father. But both have worn the
mantle of duty and put their
responsibility to the Bahamian
people above that of their own
considerations. Sir Etienne
lived out the promise he made
to his father and my wife has
done the same for her father.
Both made huge sacrifices in
the process. Once Sir Etienne
was offered a fabulous offer by
his friend Lord Beaverbrook to
go and work for him at his famous
Daily Express Newspaper in
England. He could have named
his price, but instead remained at
the helm of his father’s newspa-
per. He said he had a duty to his
Bahamian people.

Sir Etienne was a naturally
gifted writer and his editorials,
written in the first person,
became an institution in the
country. Often his thoughts
would run away with him and
he filled a whole page of his
newspaper. Most people loved
the stories.he told of old
Nassau and especially when he
went on his many trips to dis-
tant lands. Many found his
writings educational and stimu-
lating and often used to thank
him for giving them courage to
face the future.

After Eileen took over the
helm the editorials were short-
ened. It was not her father’s
style, but her own. She never
writes them in the first person.
But her trenchant leaders have





PILOT EILEEN DUPUCH - shown in the pilot's seat of an aircraft in Nassau after she became the first Bahamian

woman to earn a pilot's licence in the 1950s.



° She was the second woman
to be called to the Bahamas
Bar in 1962 - the first was the
late Mrs Patricia Cozzi. Today
my wife is the longest standing
and eldest woman on the roster
of the Bahamas Bar.

° She is the Bahamas’ second
woman newspaper publisher
in the history of the country
- the first was Miss Mary
Moseley of The Nassau
Guardian.

e She is the first CEO of a
radio station (100 Jamz) in
the Bahamas and _ the
Caribbean.

e She is the first Bahamian
woman to graduate from the
Columbia School of
Journalism in New York
City.

° She is the first Bahamian
woman to fly with the
Bahamas Flying Club. These
days she only flies as a com-
mercial passenger.

¢ She is the only Bahamian to
have had her editorials read
into the US Senate record.
This was done at least twice
by Senator Bob Graham (D)
of Florida.

But besides editing and pub-
lishing The Tribune six days a
week, she also managed to be a
mother to our son Robert, run
the home, plan the meals, order
the food, do the laundry and a
myriad other chores that

housewives know have to be
done around the home when
you have young children. How



because of something that was
in the news and needed to be
dealt with. Although the criti-
cism might have meant the loss
of the work permit, my wile
stood by her principles and
never compromised them.

In all the years we have been
running ‘The ‘Tribune | have
never seen my wife lose her
temper with any member of her
staff - although there have been
many times where she may well
have been justified in doing so.
That is not her style.

She never raises her voice to
anyone, but brings a cool head
to the knotty problems that any
businessman will tell you are
faced on a daily basis in the
Bahamas.

Staff members know that
their boss keeps an open door
for them and often counsels
them on personal and family
problems. She not only wins
their confidence and respect,
but also their love and loyalty.

The celebrated — author
Arthur Hailey sometimes
wrote a note to Eileen compli-
menting her on some of her
editorials and I am constantly
amazed at her devotion to duty,
often at the expense of our own
family engagements.

Her reading interests are
wide and varied. And her

curiosity knows no bounds. The
other day she was puzzled as to
where the first recorded piece
of literature can be found. She

remembered reading some

time ago of “The Epic of

Gilgamesh” and that it was sup-
posed to be the first recorded
literature of man. She could not
find it among her extensive

library of ancient histories of

civilization so she looked it up
on the Internet. This is what
she found, and it's fascinating.
Gilgamesh was an_ historical
king of Uruk in Babylonia, on







IN THE CHAIR - A happy moment for Eileen Carron as she sits in her father's

editorial chair at The Tribune.



won her many bouquets and
brickbats. She even won the
soubriquet of being dubbed
“The Iron Lady.” My wife does
not flinch from her responsibil-
ities. Many times when the
newspaper had an application
for a work permit that was due,
she might find herself in the
invidious position of having to
criticise the government minis-
ter responsible for immigration

the River Euphrates in modern
Iraq, and lived about 4700
years ago. Many stories and
myths written about
Gilgamesh, some of which were

were

written down on tablets about
4000 years ago in the Sumerian
language and ina script known as
cuneiform = (which — means
“wedge-shaped”).

§ Continued on page 11









Since 1908 RBC Royal Bank of
Canada has helped generations

of Bahamian families meet their
personal and business banking
needs. We are committed to the
communities in which we live -
building prosperity by giving
back where it counts most.

The Tribune Media Group has
been providing Bahamians with

news and information since
1903.

BOS . ts pleased lo bea
pe aul of, Ghis historte
fouls hicalton



fe. commemoxale
Ce, >
Crleen Dupuch 25
)) Ps ,
half Cen luxy of journalism
c é

PR,

tn Che Ca ae Ws.

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KS UKKFOW I



LAG
Royal Bank RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED
RBC). of Canada

www, (Heroyalbank con/ennbbean/bahamay

MARTA








Talented 4
journalist 4

with a

business

brain

By Sir Geoffrey Johnstone
Distinguished lawyer,
former head of

Higgs & Johnson law firm

I DID not know Eileen when
she was a little girl. | came to
know her through her father,
the late Sir Etienne Dupuch,

publisher of The Tribune. ©

Eileen was the apple of his eye.

My mother was an avid read-
er of The Tribune and she was
fond of saying to her friends
that she never went to bed at
night without Etienne! She was
a lover of the English language
and she admired his skill with
the English tongue.

I grew to know Sir Etienne
after my return to the Bahamas
in 1950 from my studies in
England and it was then that I
took my first timorous steps
into politics. I was convinced
that change was a necessity
and, although I became
involved with the United
Bahamian Party, I sought to
find a better way forward. Sir
Etienne helped me in that
quest. And so I grew to know
Eileen.

Eileen spent much of her
time abroad, pursuing her stud-
ies in science, English and the
law. And so she became an
extremely well-educated young
lady and was duly called to the

ti)

yt,








GRADUATION - EILEEN DUPUCH on her graduation day in 1954 from
Toronto University, Canada where she majored in Philosophy

Bahamas Bar. Several