Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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RS

Samuel Knowles
will now be
retried next year

@ CHESTER ROBARDS and
BRENT DEAN as
A MISTRIAL was declared

yesterday in the drug conspiracy

trial of Samuel “Ninety”

Knowles, who will now be retried

on the charges early next year.

The decision was handed
down when a majority of jurors
were unable to reach a decision,
leading to the January 22, 2008
retrial.

Federal Prosecutor George
Karavetsos had, presented clos-
ing arguments on Monday in the
case of USA vs Samuel Knowles,




One of country’s
UMMC teat
caught by police
@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net













POLICE have caught one
of the country’s most wanted
men after a car chase in the
Southern district Monday
night that ended in the cap-
ture of Sherwin Knowles.
Knowles, also known as
“Worm”, was arrested in July,
2007 on suspicion of armed
robbery, rape, and burglary
but managed to escape from
East Street South police sta-
tion in July. He evaded the
police for four months before
being caught shortly before
10pm Monday.
According to a press state-.

SEE page 10



















Samuel ‘Ninety’ Knowles

armed with oversized poster
boards and wiretapped phone
calls. One board featured Samuel
“Ninety” Knowles at the top of
an organizational chart, where he
is depicted as a General with foot
soldiers dispersed across four
countries.

“They carried out his orders
with military precision,” said Mr

SEE page 10

29 Cubans are

intercepted off
Cay Sal Bank

TWENTY-NINE Cubans
were intercepted six miles off
Cay Sal bank by US Coast
Guard and Royal Bahamas
Defence Force boats in a joint-
operation on Monday.

They were said to have been
in the process of being smug-
gled on a go-fast vessel. Two
people are being questioned in

.connection with the incident,

the RBDF said in a statement
yesterday.

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BAHAMAS EDITION

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

CELEBRATING EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON’S

UNPARALLELED

Man

ee - a

a Rit re al
ALVIN MCLEOD’S body lies
near to his bike yesterday
morning.

@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net








A 43-YEAR-OLD man
died on Bacardi Road after
suffering a seizure during a
morning bicycle ride on
Tuesday, police reported.

Assistant Supt Walter
Evans reported that Alvin
McLeod, of Gladstone Road
was biking in the western
area shortly before 9 am yes-
terday when he apparently
suffered a seizure and fell to
the ground, clutching his
chest.

Emergency response tech-
nicians were called and pro-
nounced him dead at the
scene. Foul play is not sus-
pected, ASP Evans said. Mr
McLeod was an employee
of Kamilla Builders.



















50 YEARS IN JOURNALISM

‘Winety’ mistrial declared

dies during bic






Allegations of

corruption within :
_ been printed about

parliamentary
registration
department

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

bdean@tribunemedia.net

ALLEGATIONS of corrup- :
tion within the parliamentary ;
registration department
emerged yesterday in election :
court as testimony alleged that :
Jamaican Manani Taylor paid :
a man called “Keith” $1,000 to :
obtain a Bahamian voters card. }

Steve Mallon, a foreign inves- :
tigator hired by Allyson May- ;
nard-Gibson, gave testimony

SEE page 10








Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Report: claim that
‘misinformation’ has

businessman behind
real estate book

REPRESENTATIVES from
the Bahamas Real Estate Book
are reportedly claiming a series
of “misinformation” and “mis-
conceptions” have been printed
in local dailies about the Amier-
ican businessmen behind the
publication and their legal status
to conduct business in The
Bahamas. :

In an e-mail forwarded to The
Tribune’s offices last week, a
representative from. the
Bahamas Real Estate book
claims the publishers have a

SEE page 10






PRICE =75¢

Rudy King held in
connection with
alleged attempt to
defraud US govt

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

RUDOLPH Kermit King,
also known as Dr Rudy King, is
being held in the Metropolitan
Detention Centre in Los Ange-
les, California.

According to Dr King’s spir-
itual adviser, the well-known
numerologist Jerome Carter, Dr
King is being held in connec-
tion with an alleged attempt to
defraud the United States gov-
ernment of more than $2 mil-
lion.

Dr King is the chairman of
the non-profit King Humani-
tarian and Global Foundation.
However, he is known predom-
inantly for his award cere-
monies that have brought him
notoriety throughout much of
the Caribbean.

Speaking to The Tribune yes-
terday, Mr Carter expressed his
deep disappointment in Dr
King.

“Why would you lie to your
psychic?” Mr Carter began.

SEE page 10

~ Union claims dogs,

security guards set
on secretary general
by Lyford Cay Club

management

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

CHAOS erupted at the
Lyford Cay Club yesterday
after management of the Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers
Union claimed that dogs and
security officers were set on
union Secretary General Leo
Douglas when-club manage-
ment “suddenly” decided not
to hold a scheduled meeting
with the union.

This scene, said union presi-
dent Roy Colebrooke, angered
employees of the club who
came to Mr Douglas’ defence
resulting in the police having to
be called to the property.

Mr Colebrooke said that the
unnecessary and “disappoint-
ing” actions of the Lyford Cay
Club has left the union with no
other choice than to demand a

SEE page 10





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007



TOYOTA and Executive Motors have lent this vehicle to the Bahamas
Against Crime initiative for the duration of the project. The Sign Man pro-
vided the lettering for the car, making it a “virtual moving billboard”.

THE TRIBUNE

‘Let’s fight violence together’

. By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ORGANISERS of the civic
group Bahamas Against Crime
are calling for Bahamians to
come together and be proac-
tive in the fight against vio-
lence.

Contending that the
Bahamas’ crime problem is fun-
damentally a spiritual one, the

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Anti-crime group sends
out plea to Bahamians

group’s leaders have named
Thursday a day of prayer and
fasting.

“Any time between 6am to
6pm, those who know the pow-
er of prayer are encouraged to

go to God in intercessory |

prayer on behalf of our nation,”
Reverend CB Moss, one of the
group’s leaders, said at a press
conference in Rawson Square
yesterday.

At 6pm on Thursday, the
BAC campaign will be official-

ly. launched with a prayer ser-:

vice in Rawson Square.

All concerned citizens are
invited to attend.

The newly launched group is
a project of the Council for
Social and Economic Develop-
ment, the Bahamas Christian
Council and Civil Society
Bahamas.

Reverend C B_ Moss

announced yesterday that the
group aims to:

e change mind-sets about
crime and violence
_ © assemble a Hands Across
Bahamas link as a demonstra-
tion against crime

e raise funds for the fight ©

against crime

Rev Moss noted that the pro-
gramme cannot not be effec-
tive without the help the
Bahamian people.

He challenged Bahamians
not to be “paralyzed into inac-
tion” by fear, but rather to
“step up to the plate.”

“This project is not purport-
ing to be able to reduce crime —
no project can reduce crime —
people reduce crime. So at the
end of the exercise if crime is
not reduced it may be because
the people refuse to do what is
required.”

Rev Moss said the crime
plaguing the nation is sympto-
matic of deep-rooted issues. He
also chastised those who place
the blame for the country’s
unprecedented murder rate on
the police.

“We see the police as an anti-
dote to crime and they’re not -—
they’re just a part of the solu-
tion,” Rev Moss argued, call-
ing for the state, church, and
community to work hand-i -In-
hand.

He issued an appeal to cor-
porate Bahamas to become a
partner in BAC by pledging
monetary support. |“!

The funds raised will be ‘used
to support national youth pro-
grammes, Project Sure, police
community programmes and
crime prevention education.

In a bid to ensure trans-
parency, BAC has contacted
the Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants to provide
financial oversight with external
auditing performed by Deloitte
and Touche. Individual dona-
tions and volunteers are being
sought by the organisation. °

... and let us pray for deliverance from crime

i BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

‘dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - With 71 mur-
ders already recorded this year,
a Grand Bahama pastor is call-
ing on all- religious leaders to
open their churches on Friday
to allow the nation to pray for
deliverance from crime and vio-
lence.

Pastor Phil Grant and his wife

- Co-pastor Ann Grant of Agape

House expressed their concerns
about the murders and violence
that are “robbing us of our
young people”.

They believe that prayer is
necessary if there is to be a
change in the fate of a nation
which currently has the fourth
highest incarceration rate in the
world and one of the highest
murder rates per capita in the
region.

“We are asking every church

GLINTON

COUNSEL

in the country to leave their ‘

doors open all day from 6am to
6pm on November 30 so people
can stop in at their convenience
to pray for our nation,” said
Pastor Grant.

He is also calling for collec-

tive prayer at the hours of 6am,
9am, noon, 3pm and 6pm.
- Pastor Grant said that mem-
bers of Agape House has
embarked on a 90-day-of-prayer
mission, and have been praying
at 5.30am for the past 62 days.

Rev Dr Emmette Weir, pas-

tor of St Paul’s Methodist

Church, also called for “the
churches to call the country to
prayer”.

He said the church must also
become involved in teaching
conflict resolution.

Pastor Grant believes that a
breakdown in family values has
contributed to crime levels.

“We must forgive those who
have murdered, but on the oth-
er hand justice must be served
to those who break the law.

The Partners and Staff of:

“And if that means that we
have to petition the powers that
be to change laws, then so be .
it,” he said.

Pastor Grant said he supports
capital punishment. “The Bible
speaks about capital punish-
ment-in Numbers chapter 35:1
believe that punishment for
crime is somewhat of-a deter-
rent — it will not wipe out mur-
der altogether, but definitely, it
will be a deterrent,” he said: ':

‘Co-pastor Anne Grant said
that Agape House has started a
support group for families of
murder victims. -

“We recognise that the judi-
cial system and government ‘can
only do so much, but when we
raise the volume of our prayer
we will get the answer that is
needed to deter this spirit.of
violence that has captivated the

minds of our young: people,

especially the young men,* pane
said.

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GET ONBOARD THURSDAY NOV 29 AT

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es a

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 3

THE TRIBUNE

NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD: Senior staff controversy

0 In brief

Road closure
plans are
announced

THE government has
announced road closure
plans in connection with the
paving works at Indepen-
dence Roundabout.

“Independence Round-

- about Closed” signs will be
. placed at the following
junctions today and tomor-
row:

e Tonique Williams Dar-
ling Highway/Yellow Elder
Way
e Baillou Hill Road/
Robinson Road

e Palm Tree Avenue/East
Street

e Lincoln Boulevard/
Robinson Road

e Soldier Road/Baillou
Hill Road

e Independence/Robin-
son Road/Prince Charles
Drive ;

East bound traffic travel-
ling on the Tonique
Williams Darling Highway
will be diverted south to
Baillou Hill Road, east to
Soldier Road, north to
Abundant Life Road, or
east onto the East-West
Highway.

Southbound traffic on
East Street will be diverted
east to Robinson Road,
west to the Independence
Drive, south to Abundant
Life Road, or west to Sol-
dier Road.

_ Northbound traffic on
East Street will be diverted
west to Soldier Road, north
to Baillou Hill Road, or
east to Robinson Road.

West bound traffic on
Independence Drive will be
diverted south to Abundant
Life Road, west to Soldier
Road, or north to Baillou
Hill Road.

World AIDS
Day walk
planned for
Saturday

BAHAMIANS are being
invited to “take the lead” in
a special World Aids Day
walk in Nassau on Satur-
day.

Hundreds of walkers are
expected to support the
World Aids Campaign
fund-raising drive in what
organisers hope will be a
fun event for the whole
family.

The walk starts at 6.30am
from Goodman’s Bay ‘park-
ing lot on West Bay Street
and will proceed eastwards
to Arawak Cay. A second
route starts at Perpall Tract
Park to Arawak Cay.

On Friday, a World Aids
Day church service will be
held at Grants Town Sev-
enth Day Adventist Church
in Wellington Street (1pm-
2pm). The public is also
invited on Saturday at
11am.

In a press statement
issued this week, organisers
said: “Presently in the
Bahamas there is an ongo-
ing battle to find adequate
funding for the increasing
demand for anti-retroviral
medications for those who
are infected.

“In the Bahamas, the
reality of the AIDS stigma
and prejudice against per-

. sons with HIV is preventing
some individuals from
being tested for HIV. You
can play a role in helping to
eliminate the HIV/AIDS
discrimination and stigma
in our country by becoming
more knowledgeable.”



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

: on the fate that may befall a
? number of senior staff at the
: National Insurance Board has
: yet to reach the media — despite

Minister of Housing with
: responsibility for National
3 Insurance Kenneth Russell, told
would be prepared and released
regarding the potential changes
this deadline has come and
: gone, repeated calls to the min-
: ister, the chairman of NIB
: Patrick Ward, and the perma-

: were not returned.

: was said to be “very busy” and

Tribune Staff Reporter

turnquest@tribunemedia.net before press time last night.



When The Tribune attempted
to reach Minister Russell yes-
terday morning, he was said to

THE promised statement
from the Ministry of Housing
be “in a meeting”.

the earlier assurances of the
cabinet minister responsible.
On Friday, November 23,

inet.
The Tribune that a statement
“by Monday” (November 26)

at the top of NIB.

However, despite the fact that the matter.

nent secretary Camille Johnson
At llam yesterday, Mr Ward

considered for dismissal.

Bahamas third in domestic violence deaths
in Latin America, Caribbean - UN report



“One in three women may suf- |

fer from abuse and violence in
her lifetime. This is an appalling
human rights violation, yet it
_remains one of the invisible and
-under-recognised pandemics of
_ our time.”

Nicole

Kidman

phicbe reetes wove

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2
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A message was left, outlining
the nature of the inquiry. How-
ever, when a follow up call was
made, Mr Russell was report-
ed to have already left the Min-
istry of Housing to attend Cab-

Also, according to the
Bahamas Information Services
(BIS), no word has reached
them of any statement that was
even “in the works” from the
Ministry of Housing pertaining

Initial reports reaching The
Tribune last week alleged that
the director of the National
Insurance Board Lennox
McCartney, Donald Nougez,
and three other senior officials
at NIB had either received let-
ters of dismissal, or were being

Housing Minister fails to deliver
on his promise of NIB statement

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST would return a call “as soon as

he is free.” He did not do so



THE Bahamas ranks third
in domestic violence fatalities
in Latin America and the
Caribbean, according to a new
United Nations report on vio-
lence against women.

Uruguay tops the list, fol-
lowed by Chile and then the
Bahamas.

The UN Development
Fund for Women (UNIFEM)
on Monday released a new
report, which states that vio-
lence against women in Latin
America and the Caribbean
is an obstacle to economic,
social and democratic devel-
opment.

The report — entitled “No

more! The right of women to
live a life free from violence

teat Ameri¢a and the *

Caribbean” = states’ that

physical, sexual and psy-

chological abuse are staple
practices in Latin America
and the Caribbean.

The report also highlights
the region’s problems with
sexual violence in families
and workplaces, human traf-

ficking and the abuse of AIDS
HIV victims.

Joining the cause of elimi-
nating violence against
women, UN Goodwill
Ambassador and Hollywood
actor Nicole Kidman yester-
day launched an internet cam-
palgn urging people to join the
ight in trying to stop this
“appalling human rights vio-
lation.”

The UNIFEM initiative is
aimed at gathering on-line sig-
natures through a website to
urge politicians to place end-
ing violence against women
high on the global agenda.
The campaign will run until
March 8, 2008 — International
Women’s Day.

“One in three women may
suffer from abuse and violence

TROPICAL

EXTERMINATORS
RUE
dit) sei yaar alg





Give us a
fair deal,
say local
musicians

YOUNG Bahamian musi-
cians are appealing for a fair
deal in their own land, claim-
ing foreign artists are getting
preferential treatment.

They claim young Bahamian
songwriters and entertainers are
struggling to survive while for-
eign recording artists “are treat-
ed like kings and queens.”

The Young Bahamian Music
Society has sent out fliers to
local media highlighting an
alleged lack of official interest in
youth issues.

“At a time when violent
crime is at an all-time high, do
you know why Bahamian youth
can’t get enough civic support to
hold a free ‘Stop the Violence’

































to live positive lives?” the soci-
ety asks.

“When has any country
pulled out their red carpet to
welcome any young Bahamian
recording artist while disre-
specting their own? Never! It
doesn’t happen!

“That’s because Jamaica
takes care of its own. Ameri-
can takes care of its own. Yet
it’s obvious that the Bahamas
is so busy promoting the music
of recording artists from every-
where else that it doesn’t have
the time nor want to use its
resources to take care of its own
dedicated and hard-working
young musical artists.”

The society is staging the
“Stop the Violence” free youth
concert and songwriting com-

petition on December 15.

in her lifetime. This is an
appalling human rights viola-
tion, yet it remains one of the
invisible and under-recognised
pandemics of our time,” Ms
Kidman, said in a statement.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352



Tribune’s experiment with reform

CAN A PERSON who starts life down the
crooked path of crime, be encouraged to change
his ways if he were presented with better choic-
es? i

Early in our career this question took on
practical proportions.

One day the late Dean William Granger,
prison chaplain, came to The Tribune to see
Sir Etienne, then publisher of this newspaper,
and ourselves. He said he had an idea. One
that he thought had great possibilities to reha-
bilitate prisoners and return them as new men to

society. He wanted to introduce the prison ~

release programme. Would we be the first to
help?

Here we were being asked to take prisoners
onto our staff while they were still serving their
sentences. He proposed that we take three.
Two of these were constantly in and out of
prison on charges of theft and fraud. They were
of superior intelligence and good writers. He felt
that their only problem was that they had not
found their niche in life. He believed The Tri-
bune would be just the opportunity that these
men needed to turn their misguided lives
around.

Here we were back to the old “nature or
nurture” question — a question of whether a
person’s genes were more influential than his
social environment in directing his destiny. We
were particularly interested in the subject from
an academic point of view. Our first degree was
in philosophy and psychology from Toronto
University. From our psychology studies we
had left university convinced that many troubled
persons can be helped, but there were others —
those referred to by society as “incorrigible
rogues” — for whom there was no hope, no
matter how hard one tried. They were like a
piece of pottery that had come from the facto-
ty flawed and could only be repaired by being
sent back to the factory. However, the major
problem was that we were dealing with human
beings, and humans could not be returned to the
factory. And so from our case studies we sin-
cerely believed that short of a miracle there
were many who were not salvageable.

Of course, the good Dean was not such a pes-
Simist. He saw good in all God’s creatures.
Whereas he believed there was salvation for
all men on Earth, we saw last minute salvation
only in Heaven for those who could not be
changed on Earth. You know, the repentant
thief hanging on the cross who gets a last minute
reprieve from Jesus to enter his father’s heav-
enly kingdom. :

Well, the bet was on — the Dean convinced
that we were about to change the lives of three
worthy men, and we, doubtful, but deeply inter-
ested in the experiment.

We quickly eliminated one of the three. He
showed signs of a violent temper. We did ‘not
think him safe in a newsroom where conflicting

. ideas were often vigorously debated. The other
two were indeed very smart and quickly set-

tled in.

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One was extremely debonnaire. We felt that
with his self assured air, his courtly manners, his
quick wit and writing ability, he would go far.
He did indeed go far — right back to the prison
cell.

One day on his lunch hour, he, with his “sec-
retary” in tow left The Tribune, crossed the
road to what was then'the Red Cross head-
quarters on Dowdeswell Street, and somehow
took charge of a telephone. He settled his “sec-
retary” in and gave her a list of businessmen to
call. They were told that Sir Etienne wanted
to speak with them. When they came to the
phone our man of business attempted to imper-
sonate Sir Etienne, begging for money for one
of his many charities. They were told where to
send the money. They all thought it strange
because it was not Sir Etienne’s style. Sir Eti-
enne was noted for his charitable work. How-
ever, whenever a charity needed money, he
wrote an article in this column and directed the
donations to the Royal Bank of Canada. Public
donations never passed through his hands. His
friends knew that and so they were concerned.
The first to call Sir Etienne was Sir George
Roberts, president of the Senate, a man who
served on Sir Etienne’s Crippled Children’s
Committee.

Sir Etienne was so alarmed at what Sir
George told him that he was waiting at the front
door to confront our little con man when he
returned from his mischievous lunch. Needless
to say he was on the Spm bus back to prison to
serve the rest of his time behind bars. He never
darkened The Tribune’s newsroom again. Of
course, our staff never knew that they were
rubbing shoulders with two prisoners as they
went about gathering the news. They never

“was being made right under their noses and
Sithey weren’t astute enough to sniff it.

Over the years this particular “bright star” in
the late Dean’s firmament, ricocheted back and
forth from prison to freedom, then back again to
prison. ; :

We also suspected when he was out. We
would get a call from some worried business
person asking us to put an alert notice in The
Tribune warning other shopkeepers not to be
taken in by a well dressed, well educated gen-
tleman who so confused the salesgirl with his
fast talk that he would leave the store with a
small item that he had supposedly purchased
and with a considerable amount of change that
he had received fromthe $100 bill that he had
put on the counter. However, when he had
secured the change and quickly left the store it
was found that his $100 note had left with him.
This had all the hallmarks of our man. A real Mr

Yo-Yo bouncing in and out of prison. He wasa .

master thief — one who had come from the
factory flawed.

Our third man had more staying power and
resisted temptation longer.

We shall tell you his story in this column

tomorrow.

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THE TRIBUNE



Punishment
must fit crime

EDITOR, The Tribune.

OUR once quaint and quiet
country has now recorded
three score and ten murders

for 2007. Should this trend

continue, eighty murders will
be recorded by the end of the
year, equating to a murder
rate of 24 per 100,000 (on
a 330,000 population base).

By way of comparison, the»

US has a murder rate of 5.5
per 100,000 and Italy a murder
rate of 1.3 per 100,000. Closer
to home, Jamaica has a mur-
der rate of 46 per 100,000
while Barbados, with a popu-
lation and economy very sim-
ilar to ours, a murder rate of
11 per 100,000.

While it felt nice to have
quoted the above statistics,
having done so I’m really not

‘ at all certain why I did since,

in my view, the figures really
have little bearing on my top-
ic.
Our murder rate, which has
been unacceptably high for far
too many years, has in recent
times given rise to an out-
pouring of cries, particularly
by those who travail in
anguish having had the life of
a loved’ one mercilessly
snuffed out, for the resump-
tion of capital punishment.
Those for and those opposed
to capital punishment are so
firmly entrenched in their
positions that what I say will
likely have little bearing on
their views. Yet, the perspec-
tive I am about to offer is
somewhat unique and, to a
degree, erudite. Capital pun-
ishment opponents may there-
fore wish to give it a modicum
of consideration.

Those opposed generally
raise two concerns. Firstly
they argue, with some
panache no doubt, that capital
punishment is not a deterrent.

Here, they surely miss the
point. The primary purpose of
capital punishment is not to
prevent murder any more
than the primary purpose of
a fine or incarceration is
intended to prevent any other
form of criminal behaviour.

Retribution, recompense if
you will, extracting from an
offender pay-back similar in
degree to the individual’s
transgression, is the genesis,
the foundation forming the
basis for imposition of a sen-
tence.

The punishment must fit the
crime.

Laws of the Old Testament
characterise it as an “eye for
an eye, a tooth for a tooth.”

In the New Testament Jesus
described it thusly “with which
measure ye mete it shall be









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4

ove aelnnlere lana

measured to you.”

Some New Testament
scholars seemingly wish to
limit Jesus’ words of “giving
back in equal measure” to dis-
pensing of rewards only. I
regard such limitation as being
indicative of intellectual
depravity for surely, the dis-
pensing of punishment (by the
appropriate authority), is
inherent in the words uttered.

The second argument
advanced by opponents is the
possibility of someone being
wrongly convicted given the
finality of capital punishment.

Here again I believe they
miss the point. The wrongful
conviction of anyone for any
crime is abhorrent. And yet,
while wrongful convictions can
and no doubt do occur,
though with significant infre-
quency, I doubt anyone has
the gumption to suggest courts
should discharge every case
that comes before them
because such a risk exists.
Moreover, capital cases by
their very nature receive far
more review than other cas-
es. Hence, the risk of erro-
neous judgment is minimised.

As to the finality of the pun-
ishment, I offer the following
perspective. We describe our-
selves as a Christian nation —
“to live is Christ and to die is
gain”. Also, to quote a good
reverend gentleman I recently
heard: “Death is only a phase
not a finality, it is temporal
rather than terminal”.

Individuals on death row
are ministered to more than
any other grouping of incar-
cerated individuals. I would
proffer that proportionately,
more death row inmates have
found Christ than those
among the general prison pop-
ulation. Surely it would be far
better for an individual to be
deprived of a mortal body
rather than the loss of an
immortal soul.

In closing I offer the fol-
lowing additional perspective.
It is my considered opinion
that lawlessness begets law-
lessness. It is also my consid-
ered opinion that lawlessness
may arise from acts of com-

mission as well as acts of omis-.

sion.

I have it on good authority
that the most recent five-year
period of our history is the
only such period in our mod-
ern Bahamas that the Execu-
tive Branch of Government
failed to carry out the Capi-

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tal punishment statute on our
law books.

Might this omission be con-
sidered an act of lawlessness
thus begetting lawlessness?

Laws are on the books to
be enforced. Those in Gov-
ernment who by dint of con-
science are so strongly
opposed to capital punish-
ment, to the point of not
enforcing the law, should
show the courage of their con-
viction, move for repeal of the
law and be prepared to face
the electorate to whom they
owe their position in Parlia-
ment. Equally though, it is to
be noted that faith without
works is dead.

Mind you, I also believe that
some justices in our court sys-
tem are much too inclined to
show sympathy to individuals
on remand for serious crimes.
Such action not only appears
to ignore the plight of the vic-
tims of crime it also increases
the likelihood of additional
crimes being perpetrated by
the criminally minded as well
as the risk of potential wit-

‘nesses being interferred with.

MICHAEL R MOSS
Freeport,

Bahamas,

November 26, 2007.

Crime in
our beloved
Bahamaland

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me space to
show that we as a nation are-
not serious about the crime
situation in this country.
There is a lot of talk about
crime and the reason for it. To
show we are not serious about
getting rid of it, here is a solu-
tion that would decrease it
immediately and forever, but I
guarantee you it would not be
done, hence my statement we
are not serious about getting
rid of it.

If a person is charged with
murder, that case should be
given immediate attention,
meaning being processed
through the courts. The
appeal process should be
allowed to happen as a priori-
ty until all the process of
appeals are exhausted and if
the result is still guilty an
immediate hanging should
commence. If laws prevent
this from taking place today
then they should be changed. I
know there is a backlog of cas-
es pending, this signifies the
need for more magistrates. I
know this is costly for the
Government but at the rate of
killings going,on in this coun-
try, Tourism which is already
down would go even further. I
know the Christian Counsel
would disagree with capital
punishment, but ask them to
come up with a solution and
you get nothing.

We have too much talking
going on and as we speak the
killings go on. Enough talk, a
solution expressed here will
work. Dammit, time to do
something, innocent lives are
being taken, people are hurt-
ing, families are broken, peo-
ple live in fear. Forget the air-
port project, the straw-market,
the wutless PLP, let’s put the
energy and resources where it
is needed most at this time,
crime. | am in no way suggest-
ing to forget what else needs
to be done but to prioritise. 1
know the straw vendors need
a new straw-market and so on,
but answer this who would
they sell to if no one comes to
the Bahamas because the
crime rate is so high here?

Come on nation, everyone
needs to get together on this
and petition Government and
all other bodies associated to
make the necessary changes to
curb this problem that is crip-
pling our beloved Bahama-
land.

I presented a guaranteed
solution to reduce the prob-
lem considerably. If there is
something else someone
knows will work please make
the suggestion. Where there is
harshness of penalties there is
less crime, check Singapore.

K T JONES
Nassau,
November 21, 2007.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 5



In brief

Book on
Andros is _
published

A BOOK reflecting life on
Andros half a century ago has
just been published by Nassau
author Cynthia Ferguson
Fowler.

_ The book, Life on the Lum-
ber Farm, The Forgotten Indus-
try of the Bahamas, records the
days when Andros was a hive
of industrial activity.

Apart from lumbering,
locals were active as sisal grow-
ers, spongers, charcoal manu-
facturers, handricraft experts
and fishermen,

The book traces the lumber
business on Andros from the
1940s onwards and names the
many families associated with
the operation.

© A review of the book will
appear in a future edition of
The Tribune.

Children’s choir
to perform

a ‘Holiday
Celebration’

THE National Children’s
choir will be performing a
“Holiday Celebration” at
the National Centre for the
Performing Arts on Shirley
Street this Saturday.

Also singing at the event
will be the National Boy’s
Choir and two “surprise”
choirs.

The event begins at Spm,
ends at 7.30pm and entry is
$5, organisers said.

Kidnapped
child found
slain in Haiti

m@ PORT-AU-PRINCE,
Haiti



KIDNAPPERS killed a 7-
year-old boy because his fam-
ily could;not afford to pay.
US$680 in ransom, police said _.
Monday, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The body of Schneider
Hervil was found Friday in the
town of Cabaret, north of the
Haitian capital, about two
weeks after abductors snatched
him from his family’s home,
police spokesman Frantz Lere-
bours told a news conference.
_ The specific cause of his

death was not known, Lere-
bours said.

The child’s family received a
phone call from kidnappers
demanding US$680 for his
release, but was unable to raise
the cash, he said.

No arrests have been made.

At least 16. kidnappings
~ were reported in Haiti through

‘Nov. 20 this year, down from
the nearly 80 reported for the
full month of November 2006,
U.N. peacekeepers said.

indians’ pitcher
Lara critical
after crash

lf SANTO DOMINGO,
Dominican Republic

CLEVELAND Indians
reliever Juan Lara was hospi-
talized in critical condition
Monday after an automobile
accident that killed two peo-
ple on a motorcycle, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Lara, who pitched in one
game for Cleveland last sea-
son, was returning from a
Dominican winter league
game early Sunday in San
Pedro de Macoris when the
sports utility vehicle he was
driving was struck by a speed-
ing motorcycle, killing the dri-
ver and passenger, officials
said.

The 26-year-old Lara, who
has pitched in 10 U.S. Major
League Baseball games over
the past two seasons, fractured
two ribs, sustained a head
injury from the accident and
is breathing with the help of a
ventilator, said Dashira Mar-
tincz, a spokeswoman for the
Plaza de la Salud hospital in
Santo Domingo.

The Estrellas Orientales,
Lara’s winter league team,
reported that the pitcher also
had a perforated lung and a
blood clot from the head
injury.

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Couple believe ‘conspiracy’ behind

A NASSAU couple whose
valuable Privy Council documents
have “gone missing” en route to
London believe they have again
fallen victim to a conspiracy to
deny them justice.

Greg and Tanya Cash, who
have been fighting the Baptist
education authorities through the
courts for five years, are planning
to take legal action against the
firm which accepted the papers
12 days ago for delivery in the
UK

While not blaming the UPS
manager in Nassau, Mr Richard
Ratcliffe, personally the couple
suspect the parcel never left Nas-
sau, and that it might have been

“lost” by someone working for
their adversaries.

“We cannot believe this,” Mrs
Cash told The Tribune yesterday,
“After all we have been through,
for this to happen is the last
straw.”

The package, which was hand-
ed over to UPS’s Nassau office
on November 15, was to have
been delivered to the Privy Coun-
cil offices in London on Novem-
ber 19.

Greg and me OFT

Although the UPS on-line
tracking service records that the
papers were left with a man called
“George” for safekeeping in a
storage room in Downing Street,
London, British authorities have
told Mr and Mrs Cash that no
such person and no such storage
room exists.

As of last night, the package
had still not reached the Privy
Council, even though London



officials working for the council
have tried their best to trace it.

“People there have been very
helpful,” said Mrs Cash, “but the
package is still nowhere to be
found. We are now taking action
against UPS because we entered
a contract with them which, as
far as we are concerned, they
have not fulfilled.”

Mr and Mrs Cash have been
engaged in a bitter legal war with

Cable Bahamas yet to
decide on ‘gay channel’

H By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

CABLE Bahamas has yet to decide whether
the “gay channel” — LOGO — will be included
on its line up of available channels, director of
public affairs at the network said yesterday.

Keith Wisdom said that the programming
department has not as yet returned with a verdict
on the controversial channel.

A call put out in early September by gay rights
group spokesperson Erin Greene for the channel
to be included on the network’s line-up caused an
uproar in the religious community and back and
forth debate over the issue in the public domain
for months after.

The Christian Council, in its first post-summer
session, appointed a subcommittee to specifical-
ly focus on fighting the “gay agenda,” which, it
claimed, such a programme would promote.

Council president Bishop John Humes said



US Ambassador to
PR CESARE
visit to Freeport

FREEPORT - Newly
appointed US Ambassador to
the Bahamas Ned Siegel will
make his first official visit to
Freeport on Wednesday.

Ambassador Siegel is the 12th
US ambassador to the Bahamas.
He replaced Ambassador John
Rood, who demitted office in
April of this year.

During his one-day visit,
Ambassador Siegel will meet
with the director of US Customs
and Border Protection (CBP)
in Freeport Tim Lund, and the
CBP staff at the Grand Bahama
International Airport.

The visit will also include
meetings with executives of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,





US AMBASSADOR to the
Bahamas Ned Siegel

e defending human rights and
advancing democracy

e enhancing joint efforts
against terrorism

that the council was fearful that with “so many
vices” already rampant in the country, the airing
of a gay TV channel would only add to that list by
spreading the “homosexual lifestyle,” which is
“not in accordance with God’s law.”

However, Ms Greene dubbed such responses
representative of the “hysteria” in the Bahamas
surrounding the gay lifestyle. :

She stressed that the channel is “not pornog-
raphy. Just programming. Just sitcoms, informa-
tion, education (and) news” directed towards the
BGLT (bi-sexual, gay, lesbian and transgendered)
community.

In September Mr Wisdom confirmed that
Cable Bahamas had received a request for the
channel.

He said that the programming department had
suggested that it had “no problem taking a look at
the channel.”

He later said he could not give a timeline as to
when a decision would be made about the net-
work’s future line-up.

the Baptists ever since Mr Cash
was fired as sports coach from
Jordan Prince William High
School in 2002.

They allege unfair dismissal,
defamation and breach of consti-
tutional rights against the church’s
education authorities, and claim
every effort has been made to
block their progress through the
courts over the last five years.

It was only when they could
not get justice through the
Bahamas court system that Mr
and Mrs Cash bypassed the Court
of Appeal in Nassau and
approached the Privy Council.

Now documents prepared at
considerable expense have failed
to reach the Privy Council offices
in London.

And the couple claim UPS is
not being entirely straightforward
in its explanations of the deba-
cle.

is lost valuable Privy Council documents

“It has now been 12 days,” said
Mrs Cash, “We went to the UPS
office to confront Mr Ratcliffe,
but he would not let us talk to
the supervisor who dealt with our
papers.

“We demand accountability.
The British officials have told us
they know of no ‘George’ and
they know of no storage room
where this package was supposed.
to have been sent.

“Someone is not telling us the
truth. The people at UPS are try-
ing to play us off, but the fact is
they didn’t deliver it to the right
address.”

UPS Nassau manager Mr Rat-
cliffe was unable to comment on
the matter yesterday, but referred
The Tribune to the company’s US
office.

Calls to the contact person
there were not returned up to
press time.

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the Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce and the Freeport
Container Port.

During his presentation of let-
ters of credence to Governor
Arthur Hanna on November 14,
Ambassador Siegel said that he
looks forward to working with
the Bahamian government to
strengthen bilateral relations,
particularly in the following
areas:

° fighting illegal drugs and
illegal migration

¢ building prosperity and
security for both the Bahamas
and the US

He has also pledged his sup-
port to the ongoing initiatives
of Operation Bahamas Turks
and Caicos (OPBAT), as well
as the Megaports and Container
Security Initiative.

Ambassador Siegel said he is
also looking forward to using
his business experience to pro-
mote and expand trade and
investment between the

» Bahamas and the United States.

BAY ST. PARTIAL ROAD CLOSURE
FRIDAY NOV, 30, 2007

Motorists are advised that due to
the observance of World AIDS Day
in Rawson and Parliament Squares on
Friday, November 30, 2007
Bay St. will be closed from
Parliament St. to East St.
between the hours
of 10 a.m. and 11 a.m.
Motorists are reminded to observe
re-routing of traffic for this period.



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

THE TRIBUNE









‘)
NURSE FREDAMAE Mills (right) and Principal Nursing Offic





‘Tele-medicine’ |

tohelp with —
patients in Abaco —

MARSH HARBOUR -
Emergency room techniques
will soon be brought to Aba-
co by way of “tele-medicine”,
Health and the Environment
Minister Dr Hubert Minnis
announced,

Through this technique,
patients in Abaco can be seen
and examined by physicians
from the emergency room at
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal in Nassau, he explained,

Tele-medicine is the quick-
ly developing practise of com-

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES

SCHOOL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE AND RESEARCH, THE BAHAMAS



















Unveiling of Plaque
by Governor General,
H.E. Arthur D. Hanna,
Ceremony, 17th

< October, 2007.

municating medical informa-
tion by telephone, the inter-
net or other networks to allow
for consulting, and even long
distance exams or medical
procedures.

At its most complex, tele-
medicine uses satellites and
video-conferencing to carry
out rapid consultation with
specialists.

“Abaco is in the forefront
for that,” said Dr Minnis.

“That would be on stream

soon. We’re taking emergency
room techniques to Abaconi-
ans.”

Abaco, Exuma_ and
Eleuthera contribute the most
to the increasing cost of air
ambulance services to Nas-
sau. “Once we have the tele-
medicine programme in place

then we would be able to:

decrease the number of
patients that are being
referred to Nassau,” said Dr
Minnis. “That in itself would

be a great saving.”

Staff

Dr Minnis spent Monday
and yesterday inspecting pub-
lic clinics and garbage dispos-
al sites in the Abacos and
meeting with ministry staff.

“Tam more than pleased
with the performance of the
staff,” said Dr Minnis. “They
are working very well. They
are very into their patients. -

“What is very impressive is
that they keep very good
records of the number of dia-
betics and hypertensives and
patients with chronic non-
communicable diseases with-
in their communities.”

Green Turtle Cay, for
example, has a’ healthy
lifestyle programme for dia-
betics and hypertensives, he
noted.

“We have asked them to
look at their statistics to
determine for us what per-

MINISTER OF Health and the Environment Dr Hubert Minnis (right) lis-
tens to concerns from North Abaco Chief Councillor Steve Pedican.

centage of their diabetics and
hypertensives has been able
to decrease their medication
dosage and what percentage
they have been able to take
off medication totally since
they have instituted their pro-
gramme.

“They know that there has
been some decrease — some,
but they could not give me
the percentage,” said Dr Min-
nis.

Other clinics in the Abacos
are also moving towards
implementing healthy lifestyle
programmes.

Future

“The healthy lifestyle pro-
gramme is the future,” he
said. “If implemented and
done properly then obviously
we would be able to decrease
the amount of medication
that is utilised.

“Healthy living assists in
controlling blood pressure
and diabetes. If we have an
unhealthy lifestyle then we
are prone to obesity and obe-
sity can compound both those
problems.

“But I am encouraged by
the positive results as a result
of our healthy lifestyle pro-
gramme.”

Abaco remains “on target”

’ for’a mini-hospital, he said.

Dr Minnis also said that he
is “very impressed” by the
modern garbage disposal site
at Snake Cay.

It will be equipped with
detention ponds to collect liq-
uid waste.

“T have always said that
Abaco is a very organised and
advanced society.” he said,
“and through the various
town meetings, and informa-
tion dissemination, I am hop-
ing that Abaco would be in
the position to, at the house-
hold level, separate their
waste. :



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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
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maeye

tbe

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 7



~ LOCAL NEWS



Memorial service for murdered college dean
Thaddeus McDonald draws about 200 people

@ By COB JOURNALISM
CLASS

A memorial service yesterday
morning capped off a week of
grief and campus memorials fol-
lowing the November 16 murder
of Thaddeus McDonald, a dean at
the College of the Bahamas.

Dr McDonald, who turned 59

November 12, joined the college
as a psychology lecturer in 1988,
and rose to become dean of social
and educational studies in 2005.
Police say he was beaten with an
iron and died in the bedroom of
his house in a gated Queen's
Street community near the Amer-
ican Embassy.

The tear-filled memorial yes-
terday was held in four tents near
the bandshell on campus, and
drew about 200 people, 20 of
them students. The programme
included organ music as well as
drum selections that seemed to

‘flow with the expression of emo-

tion: as the tempo slowed, the
sounds of cries from those gath-
ered increased, according to one
witness.

"Oh my God," cried out a
woman in the audience of mourn-
ers, some wearing funeral attire,
others with small rectangles of
African print cloth attached to
their lapel in honour of McDon-
ald, who often dressed in African
clothes and led trips to Ghana.
"Why?" she asked plaintively, as
people came with tissues to con-
sole her.

In a quavering voice, Dr Earla
Carey-Baines, dean of the faculty
of liberal studies and a close
friend of Dr McDonald, read con-
dolences from members of the
local international community
with whom Dr McDonald was
professionally associated, includ-
ing a Ghanaian chief, chair of the
Panafest Foundation, chair of
Barbados Pan African Commu-
nity, dean of faculty of the
humanities from University of
West Indies, Mona campus and
other dignitaries.

After she finished, she was seen
standing on the side of the stage,
weeping and wiping tears, while
others came to hold her hand and
console her.

* College of the Bahamas presi-

dent Janyne Hodder restrained
her emotions and spoke with
composure when she said, "He
was a strong man with a gentle
voice ... and we must become
the defiant opposition against
those wanting to take human life
. .. We must hold to faith, hope
and charity to get us through
these times."

Her secretary, Jaquline Fergu-
son Rolle had a fire in her house
recently and had nothing to wear.
She said she borrowed clothes
from other people in order to
attend the memorial.

During the service, Krisspin
Sands, a sophomore in the law
programme, read from Psalms 90
and said he didn't think the words
adequately expressed how great a
man the dean was.

Patricia Ellis, assistant director
of human resources, directed the
choir through a rendition of "Be

' Strong in the Lord," a selection

she considered fitting for the
occasion.
"We need each other," she






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TRIBUTE: Rhonda Chipman-Johnson delivers the eulogy.

explained. "The college has to be
strong at this time. The only way
we can get through this is focusing
on the higher power of God. It's
been rough for the choir."

Later during the ceremony,
Bahamas Director of Culture
Nicolette Bethel expressed the
sentiments of many when she
said: "Our hearts are in the coffin
with Dr Mac."

Some were less able to vocalise
their feelings. Dr Brenda Cleare,
dean of pure and applied science,
was holding a box of tissues.

“I just keep moving, so I don't
break down," she told a reporter.
She described Dr McDonald as
a fantastic, wonderful person
always willing to help and always
looking for the good in people.

Franklin Carter, former presi-
dent of the Airport Airline Allied
Workers Union, worked with Dr
McDonald as a consultant for the
Union of Tertiary Educators and
grew up with him in Bain and
Grants Town. “I cried when I first
heard the news,” Mr Carter said.
“As I mourn for him, I mourn for
this country, because my child-
hood friend contributed so much
to this country and he could have
contributed so much more if he
had lived. He helped us all to
realise the beauty within us as
black persons of African
descent.”

The memorial on Tuesday
morning was the last in a series of
on-campus events.

The Monday after his death,
November 19, classes were can-
celled between 1lam and noon
to accommodate an assembly at
the bandshell.

Later that day, Stann Smith,
director of new student orienta-
tion and college dormitory co-
ordinator, offered three hour-long
group grief sessions which 24 peo-
ple attended.

He explained that after dra-
matic, traumatizing situations, stu-














fx







dents and faculty are invited to
the counselling department to
talk about what occurred in pri-
vate.

Mr Smith said he asked those
who came to talk about their
thoughts and describe how they
heard about the murder. Some,
he said, were in the second stage
of grief — anger — which led them
to ask why it happened. He said
others were experiencing depres-
sion while some showed accep-
tance,

“T thought that he was cool,”
said Shannon Evans, an 18-year-

Set Catatandae?

RAYMOND WEIL
GENEVE



old education major. “He was
nice to be around. He made us
laugh. He didn’t have a‘stinking
attitude.”

Dr McDonald’s colleagues
were still despairing. Gloria
Gomez, chair of the School of
Education, said: “Thad was a gen-
erous, helpful, and loving per-
son.”

Sibylline Clarke-Knowles, his
secretary, said that for the five
years they worked together, he
never uttered a harsh word to her.
“The college will never find any-
one like him.”

liance beneath




Doe ;
CLEVELAND Eneas Primary school students who are part of the.
Bahamas National Association Junior Pride Club proudly hold ‘I
Gat Pride’ t-shirts. Standing behind the children, from left, are:
Alpheus Ramsey, past president of the Bahamas National Pride
Association and a member of the board; Judy Williams, board
member; Olvin Reese, chairman of the association; Joanne Johnson,
co-ordinator of the association; Kendra Monroe, teacher and a co-
ordinator of the Junior Pride Club; Peter Brown, director of the
association; lsaac Woodside and Clara McPhee teachers and co-ordi-
nators of the Junior Pride Club.

Students challenged
to keep campus clean

CHAIRMAN of the Bahamas National Pride Association Olvin
Reese challenged students at the Cleveland Eneas Primary School to
keep their campus clean and litter free.

“We do not want any of you to be litterbugs. You can start to make
a difference in your country by going home today and cleaning up your
yard,” Mr Reese said.

“You can make a difference in your country by making sure your class-
rooms are always clean and that your school grounds are always clean.”

Mr Reese was speaking at the installation of officers and members of
the Bahamas National Association’s Junior Pride Club at the school on
Monday. The club is made up of students from grades four through six.
The student president of the club is Alexya Woodside and the vice
president is Mario Calmar.

Accompanying the chairman were Alpheus Ramsey, past president
of the association and a member of the board; Peter Brown, director of
the association; Judy Williams, a board member, and Joanne Johnson,
the co-ordinator.

Mr Reese noted that although the Bahamas Pride Association has
been in existence for 12 years, there is still a litter problem in the coun-
try. He told the students what they could do to keep the Bahamas
clean.He said, “You can help to beautify your campus, you can do pro-
jects into the neighbourhood surrounding your school, you can do pro-
jects in your home, you can do projects wherever.

“And you can always call on us at the Bahamas National Pride Asso-
ciation for any assistance or help.that you would need with your pro-
grammes.”

Mr Reese told the students that they are the future and that the atti-
tudes and the values they adopt will shape the future of the country.

Isaac Woodside, a teacher and one of the co-ordinators of the Junior
Pride Association club at Cleveland Eneas, said the association is com-
mitted to the developing positive attitudes while preserving and beau-
lifying the environment.

He added that the association realises that littering is learned behav-
iour, which can be changed through education.



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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

DAY AT THE RACES





Tourists and locals
enjoy annual Abaco
cart competition

HUNDREDS of tourists and locals were in atten-
dance this weekend for the annual Hope Town, Aba-
co box cart race — a competition held in no other
Bahamian community.

The carts ranged from simple boxes with four
wheels, to much more elaborate designs.

Home made food, sweets, and drinks were on sale to

‘raise funds for various town projects. Admission for
spectators is free and drivers pay $25 to enter their
carts. All entrants are given a free t-shirt.

According to witnesses, several carts went out of
control and went through the side barriers but there
were no injuries.

The first place winner was returning champion
Ricky Sweeting, who was awarded $100 for his efforts.
The second place winner, “Froggies”, won $50 and the
: aos’ ‘ < ‘ third place winner, US entrant Tanner Motta came

RRNA ‘ wo away with $25.

; : This is the 11th year since the event was launched,
but only the ninth race, as races were not held for
two years because of hurricanes.

Stafford Patterson, one of the organisers told The
CEARARE Tribune that the event was one again well attended.
Sa “This year we probably had three or four hundred

basal 7, . : SS people out there. It wasn’t the most we ever had — it
% J CS ee aw Vey rained for about 45 minutes on Saturday, so that may

7 Ser y have put some people off. But it was quite a crowd.”

N Mr Patterson said the event has become quite a

=e SNARE, ‘ » \ . . .
| [- ee Ar : draw for tourists, who not only enjoy watching but also
Resiees
8

“We had one entrant come down and rent a house,”
he said.

According to Mr Patterson, the proceeds from the
event have been used to benefit a number of causes
over the years, many of them youth projects.



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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 9

THE BAHAMAS CAN SET THE PACE FOR OTHER CARIBBEAN NATIONS

Why we need a diverse portfolio
of renewable energy sources

SPECIAL

report by a top

US consulting

firm says the
Bahamas has "abundant
untapped resources" to develop
a strong renewable energy intra-
structure that can cut oil
imports, make more capital
available for investments and
help maintain our leading edge
in regional tourism.

The report says solar power
can be produced here at a cost
similar to existing oil-fired gen-
eration. Even assuming no goy-
ernment support, the cost per
kilowatt hour from rooftop
solar panels would average only
15 cents compared to retail elec-
tricity prices of 25 cents a kilo-
watt that are currently being
charged to most Bahamian con-
sumers.

The report was issued by
Haley & Aldrich — a New Eng-
land-based environmental engi-
neering consultancy founded in
1957.

According to Vice President
Doug Cotton, the firm is work-
ing with clients in the Bahamas
"who could benefit from the
price stability, energy security,
and secondary benefits that
would be created by widespread
adoption of renewable energy
production. ~

"Our interest in helping to
promote renewable energy is
related to the work we are
doing for one of the largest
resort development projects on
New Providence, and because
we are working with some
renewable energy companies
who have an interest in coming
to the Bahamas should there be
changes to the present regula-
tory scheme."

For the past couple of years —
as fuel prices have soared — gov-
ernment has talked about for-
mulating a national energy pol-
icy to help minimise economic
and social disruption in the
event of a global energy crisis,
but this effort has not gone fur-
ther than a basic draft prepared
by an

Inter American Development
Bank consultant. Now Cotton
says his 23-page report was pre-
sented to government in August
and is circulating widely among
officials.

The report evaluates the
potential renewable energy
resources and technologies that
the Bahamas should consider
for its energy future.’

It offers an assessment of
which renewable energy options
have the greatest potential and
recommends measures to
achieve the best results.

Currently, the cost of gener-



LARRY SMITH



“If the government’s goal is to
ensure continued economic
growth with greater energy
security, that means looking at
other options to generate ener-

9

gy.



ating electricity accounts for
about half of our total gross
domestic product, and 1s wholly

based on burning imported fos: -

sil fuels. As the report points
out, this will only get worse as
rising global demand combines
with declining oil supplies.

Future power demand in the
Bahamas is projected to grow
at 8 per cent a year and experts
say that oil price stability is sim-
ply unattainable in today's
world.

And since the Bahamas
relies heavily on tourism it is
especially vulnerable to the neg-
ative consequences of petrole-
um use — air pollution, spills and
climate change. If the govern-
ment's goal is to ensure contin-
ued economic growth with
greater energy Security, that
means looking at other options
to generate energy.

The report reviews halt a
dozen renewable technologies
(including wind, ocean thermal,
tidal, ocean current and bio-
mass) and says solar 1s the best
bet. Photovoltaic units to gen-
erate electricity and solar panels
to heat water have the highest
potential impact for the
Bahamas with the least difficul-
ty of implementation over the
shortest time frame - using
technology that is available
now. In fact, this option could
save an estimated 23 million gal-
lons of oil imports per year if
50 per cent of Bahamian homes
have a 2kw pv system and 75
per cent have solar water
heaters installed _

"The amount of solar energy

reaching the ground in the
Bahamas 1s higher than at loca
tions in Nevada, Spain or Ger-
many, where large scale-solar
generating systems have been
installed over the past couple
of years," Cotton told Tough

Call This is a very good
amount of sunlight - about 5.5
kilowatts per hour that can be
converted fo chery

The report ciled an average
cost of 15 cents per kilowatt
hour to generate solar powet
This was denved Wom a com
puter programme developed by
Natural Resources Canada and
is based on the following
assumptions: a 2 kilowatt sys-
tem. a 25-year life span. and a
US price of $15,850 to buy and
install the system.

"To ensure The Bahamas’
continuing development and
viability, the nation must open
up and breathe new life into its
energy infrastructure.” the
report says. "Solar power is a
proven technology that can pro-
duce electricity in a location
such as The Bahamas tor costs
comparable to those trom diesel
generation."

Uulity-scale solar electricity
projects exist throughout the
world.

An 11 megawatt PV plant
was commissioned recently in
Portugal, for example. The tacil
ity occupies 150 acres, consists
of 52,000 photovoltaic modules
and cost an estimated $75 mil-
lion, which is roughly compa-
rable to BEC's new oil-fired
power plant that is planned for
Clifton.

B iomass (read garbage)
is another potentially
important source of renewable
energy tor the Bahamas. If
burned in a waste-to-energy
plant, the amount of garbage
produced on New Providence
each day can generate about 20
megawatts of electricity, the
report says. And Grand
Bahama could produce about 5
megawatts.

Energy recovery from Bio-

United Nations report urges aid to
world’s poor on global warming

@ RIO DE JANEIRO,
BRAZIL

Developed nations must
immediately help fight global
warming or the world will face
catastrophic floods, droughts
and other disasters, according
to UN report released yester-
day, according to the Associated
Press.

The report said rich nations
will need to provide $86 billion
a year by 2015 to “strengthen
the capacity of vulnerable peo-
ple” to cope with climate-relat-
ed risks.

“The scenario is that our gen-
eration will experience rever-
sals on a grand scale in the areas
of health, education and pover-
ty. For the future there is real
threat of ecological catastro-
phe,” Kevin Watkins, the
report’s lead author, told
reporters in Brasilia, the coun-
try’s capital.

Half the cost, $44 billion,
would go for “climate-proof-
ing” developing nations’ infra-
structure, while $40 billion
would help the poor cope with
climate-related risks. The other
$2 billion would go to strength-
ening responses to natural dis-
asters, the report said.

The report said the United
States and other rich nations
should pay the biggest share.

The Bush administration said
n a Statement that one of its
top priorities is “to alleviate
poverty and spur economic
growth in the developing world
by modernizing energy ser-
vices.”

The nearly 400-page Human
Development Report comes

just a week betore the world’s
nations convene in Bali,
Indonesia, to negotiate a new
climate treaty.

At the report’s release cere-
mony, Brazihan President Luiz
Inacio Lula da Silva called on
rich nations to do their part. '

“In Bali we are’ going to very
seriously discuss the price rich

countries have to pay so that.

poorer countries can preserve
their forests,” Silva said.
“Because you're not going to
convince a poor person in any
country that he can’t cut down a
tree if he doesn’t have the right
to work and eat in exchange |
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percent of the Amazon rain tor-
est — the world’s largest remain-
ing tropical wilderness.

Scientists believe the rain for-
est can act as enormous sponge
to soak up greenhouse gases,
but deforestation and burning
in the rain forest releases mil-
lions of tons of carbon into the
air each year making Brazilian
one of the Jeading emitters of
greenhouse gases.

The report also found that
increased energy efficiency,
alternative fuels and even the
reduction of trade barriers
could go a long way toward
reducing greenhouse gas emis-
sions.



Gams



mass is a Well-established tech-
nology worldwide and one that
can be intevrated in the current
power pene! ation system.
Bermuda has @ waste-lo-energy
plant that processes 300 tons of
garbaye per day to supply 2.5
MW to the national grid.

Taking advantage of these
options will require a significant
laVestmMent mew Systems, but
the portion of energy coming
trom costly fossil fuct imports
will decline as a result. And
strategies can be implemented
to reduce development time
add Anse uf aasition costs.

In addition to tappmig Over-
seas tunding sources, the first
priority is to change the nation's
regulatory framework so that
BEC and Grand

Bahama Power can contract
with independent producers,
and accommodate act metermy
so that non-uulity producers can
sell power to the grid.

Che government should also
enable‘carbon trading and take
advantage ol benetits offered
by the UN's Clean Develop-
ment Mechanism, as Tough Call
has suggested betore.

Private generation facilities
could range from individual
home PV systems, to commer-
cial-scale facilities at warehous-
es or resort hotels, to larger util-
ity-scale projects. Other tncen-
tives, including tax benefits and
provision of low- or no-cost
leases of Crown land. could be
considered to encourage the
growth ot renewable chergy.

Private developers could be
contracted to build utility-scale
facilities, which would let BEC
outsource the generation of
renewable energy projects
rather than risk developing a
project itself. So the govern-
ment would not need to raise
capital and take on additional
debi — developers would invest
their own funds and supply
power to the grid at wholesale
Tales.

The report urges government





tG revise the building code to
require all new commercial
buildings to install photovoltaic
and solar water systems, launch
a bulk buying programme to
supply solar systems to the local
market, give soft loans and/or
tax incentives for homeowners
and small businesses to refit
their buildings with PV systems
and request developers to build
PY uulities on New Providence
Grand Bahama and Abaco

our most populated tslands

Carbon credits could also be . °

applicd to the bulk purchase of
renewable energy systems or
towards new projects to furthes
reduce costs.

Although small-scale wind
power may be viable in some
areas of the Bahamas once poli-
cies are in place that encourage
it through zoning, tax credits

and net metering, the report’

says that wind speeds average
only 4-6 miles per second 1n the
Bahamas, making utility-scale
generation of power impracti-
cal.

cean Thermal Energy
Conversion (OTEC)
is another renewable

technology that can produce
power as well as fresh water and
air conditioning.

The report says that the right
conditions for this technology
exist off Abaco in the
Norhtwest Providence Channel
and off New Providence at
Clifton. Although not a proven
technology, OTEC has the
potential to meet most or all of
the Bahamas’ needs for water
and power and more research
should be undertaken.

Meanwhile. ocean current
veneration is in the prototype
stage in the United States and
Britain, and the report says the
Bahamas has potential tor this
technology off Grand Bahama
and Abaco. Costs are projected
to vary from 15 to 39 cents per
Kilowatt hour, Ocean wave gen-
erating fae s are

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PERI EICSU ED.

“Currently,
the cost of
generating

electricity

accounts for
about half of
our total gross
domestic
product...”



Burope and the cost of electric-
ity for a ulility-scale plant is less
than If cents per kilowatt hou
tor sites with wave energy con-
ditions similar to those in the
Bahamas. *

‘Renewable energy can be
the cornerstone of a programme
of energy security and sustain-
able development." the report
concludes.

"A diverse portfolio of
renewable energy sources will
insulate the Bahamas from sud-
den energy price spikes, the
tourism tndustry will be confi-
dent about energy costs in mak-
ing development decisions, res-
idential customers and busi-
nesses will enjoy energy savings,
and more jobs will be created in
the renewable energy industry."

And perhaps the best thing is ¢
thai the cost of electricity pro-?
vided by renewable sources can
be expected to fall over time.
Clearly we can set the pace for
other Caribbean nations if we!
choose to do so and, in thes
process, secure our develop-
ment and energy security.

t
i
i
i
a
3
3
e
4

What do you think? Send.
comments to larry@tribuneme- .
dia.net

~s Or visitow

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

!
i eee Te eee eer a i ena ne oe
1

{

i]

'

1 :

t i

' ;

'

'

t

t

1

FROM page one

about his interview on August
' 1st this year with Taylor at the
Detention Centre before the
Jamaican was deported by
Immigration officials. Taylor
was deported by Immigration
despite a continuing police
investigation into his possession
of Bahamian voters cards.

Mr Mallon said Taylor told
him he had arrived in the
Bahamas in 1997, Under ques-
tioning by PLP lawyer Philip
“Brave” Davis, he said his
mother was married to a
Bahamian. He also said, accord-
ing to the investigator, that he
attended high school and trade
school in this country.

Taylor reportedly told Mr
Mallon that he was informed
that someone called “Keith” in
Pinewood — where he resided —
‘ could get things done. Upon
meeting him, he was told it
. would cost $1000.

Taylor reportedly informed

his parents of the cost, accord-
ing to Mr Mallon, they gave him
the money, and he paid “Keith’.
He was subsequently instruct-
ed to go to the parliamentary
registry department on Far-
rington Road to pick up the
card. —

Taylor went to the office and
spoke with a woman in her for-
ties. He told her he had come
for his voter’s card. She is said
to have asked him for identifi-
cation, at which time, he
informed her that he did not
bring any, as he did not think it
was necessary. When asked
about his nationality, Taylor,
the investigator continued, is
said to have told the woman he
was born in the Bahamas.

At this time, the testimony
continued, Taylor told the.

investigator that the woman
took his photo and issued a
voter’s card, which he then used
to obtain a driver’s license, and
then a car.
After a question by Dawn
‘Lewis from the attorney gener-
al’s office, who represents Her-

bert Brown, the returning offi- -

cer for the Pinewood con-
stituency, Mr Mallon empha-
sized that Taylor:told him that
he did not provide any identifi-

_ cation to receive the card.
Betty Charles Joseph also
took the witness stand yester-
day. Questions emerged sur-
rounding the nationality of Ms
“Joseph and her son Kendal
; Seraphin — both voters in ques-
ition — from the testimony of

Allegations of
corruption within
parliamentary
registration
department

was alleged that they are
Haitians.

There was difficulty admin- : t
: in Grand Bahama was retained

who told the court that she nei- | on behalf of the company to

: assist them in securing the nec-

istering the oath to Ms Joseph,

ther reads nor writes.

Ms Joseph testified that she :
moved to Pinewood in 2005 :
after living in Union Village for :
15 years. She said that she had :
: the firm maintained he “had no
who lived with her until just ; knowledge” of the publication
: or businessmen in question

six children, including Kendal,

after the May election.

On Monday, Deputy Chief }
Medical Records Officer at the : 1
Princess Margaret Hospital tes- ; nan Burrows told The Tribune
tified that according to hospi- :
tal records, Ms Joseph is Hait- :
ian. She said that there were ;

also records of Ms Joseph’s six : Karavetsos. “He had a well structured organization

: that he put together.”
Mr Karavetsos painted the portrait of a man who
: recruited, trained and deployed his men, teaching
: them nautical routes to and from Jamaica and the
: best ways to evade law enforcement.
: When it became the defence’s turn at closing
arguments, Knowles’s defence lawyer, Jacob Rose,
: tore into each of the cooperating witnesses, warning
; the jury that the testimony was not credible pri-
marily because they were testifying in order to
receive a sentence reduction from the government.
The Prosecution sought to convince the jury,
beyond a reasonable doubt, of Knowles’ guilt, by
: revisiting the testimony of prosecution witnesses
and replaying wiretapped phone recordings of
on the same day. When asked ; Knowles and co-conspirators, some of whom testi-
i i fied against him.
: “You too light for this operation,” Knowles can be
: heard saying to one of his men in the recordings.
“T had to give them my 200,000,” he says in anoth-

children.
During testimony yesterday,

Ms Joseph said that she was
born in the Bahamas in 1961. }

Sometime subsequent to this,
she was taken to Haiti,

returning to the Bahamas with
her mother when she was :

14.

It was revealed in court last :
week by Carolyn Williamson, a :
representative of the Registrar ;
General, that two birth certifi- :
cates are registered for boys }
both born :

both named “Kenol”,

by Mr Davis if she had twins,
Ms Joseph said no.

Eleanor Brennan, the wife of ;
Nelson Brennan also testified. :
Mrs Brennan said that her hus- :
band has lived with Cheryl ;
Williams at Augusta-Street :

since 2002.

This is contrary to testimony : meeting with management and

by Ms Williams — a challenged fijJe a formal complaint with the

voter by the PLP — who last : Banamas Hotel Employers

week said she did not move to }
Augusta Street until December :

7 ae : i,
2006. Before this, she said, she : ing by management and they
Und = wanainion ts : suddenly decided that they
ncer cross-examination by : were not interested in speak-

: ing with us and set security
Mrs Brennan noted that she : g so
: : dogs and Lyford Cay securit

and her husband of 31 years are : eo : y y
not divorced and he still pays : 1 and asked us to leave the
the mortgage at their residence. : property
She also noted that she did not : aig ,
see them at the Augusta Street ; ;

location, but she has passed

lived in Pinewood.

FNM lawyer Michael Barnett,

by and seen both their cars
there.

o’clock this morning.

FROM page one

: work permit in place from the

Department of Immigration

: which “establishes (their) pub-
: lisher (and) salesman status” in

the country —— in spite of earli-

: er statements made by Immi-

investigator John Munroe. It } gration and Labour officials to

the contrary.
The e-mail goes on to say that
the law firm of Cafferata & Co

essary paperwork to legally

operate in the Bahamas.
However, when contacted for

comment a representative from

being clients of the firm.
Director of Immigration Ver-

FROM page one

FROM page one

Association.
“We were invited to a meet-

guards on our secretary gener-
* Mr Colebrooke

He said that although the
union officer was not injured,

Mr Colebrooke described his

: Secretary General’s mood as

Election court.resume 10 : more “hurt and disappointed

NOTICE

Please be informed that

Mr. Dominic Sturrup

is no longer employed at
Diamonds International

and is not authorized to transact
or conduct any business

on behalf of

Diamonds International’s
Clients, Staff or Stores.

Mr. Dominic Sturrup is in no way

associated with

Diamonds International
or any other of its affiliates.



Real estate book

during a telephone interview
last week that as far as he knew
the Americans in question do
not possess a Bahamian busi-
ness licence or work permit to
legally conduct business in The
Bahamas.

“No they have no work per-
mit or business licence. Of
course we've been checking to
confirm whether or not the
complaints we’ve received were
actually true but we have never
come across (the persons in
question).”

Department of Immigration
began the investigation after
receiving a number of com-
plaints about the businessmen
in question about four months
ago, Mr Burrows said.

‘He added that investigations

are still continuing into the
activities of the businessmen :

who are suspected of operating } :
a lucrative advertising agency :
in the country without applying :

for the proper paperwork.

Immigration officials are appar- :
ently “monitoring (their) entry :
into the country.” Mr Burrows }
declined to divulge specific }
details of the Department’s }
investigations for fear of tipping :
i describe how Dr King had

? informed him that he was trav-
Americans have allegedly :

the suspects off.
As reported previously, the

solicited a number of high-end
contend that the advertisers, in

suade Bahamian realtors from
advertising with local dailies
claiming their publications offer
a better competitive advantage.

‘Ninety’ mistrial declared

er of the prosecution’s audio evidence.

Knowles sat unmoved throughout the proceed- ;
ings, looking intently at the Prosecution’s diagrams }
on the computer screen in front of him.

The prosecution, to buttress its case, developed a }
timeline between 1995 and 1996 in which cooperat-
ing witnesses claimed they worked with Knowles
transporting Colombian cocaine, through Jamaica
and the Bahamas to the US.

According to cooperating witness testimony,
Knowles oversaw a small brigade of men who forged
a route for cocaine, incorporating go-fast boats,
some with 3-250 horsepower engines and low flying }

: people who I had readings for,

aircraft. Prosecutors contended that Knowles had i nq these are people I respect.

ties to the Cali Cartel in Colombia, through his liai-
son, Gary McDonald.

H the def sisted that none of the }
CSTE IS coletce eels PE ge ? out he had three names. Then I

events witnesses testified to occurred during the

Union claims

than anything else”.

When The Tribune spoke to
Mr Douglas he said that he was
both shocked and disheart-
ened.

“T feel bad as a Bahamian
and I never expected to see this
thing happening i in this day and
time,” he said.

According to Mr Douglas
the Human Resource Depart-
ment, two weeks ago, arranged
a meeting with the union for 2
pm yesterday. He said that
when he and another union
officer parked their car they
were immediately approached

~by-security officers who said

that they had to be escorted
otf the property.

Mr Douglas said considering
the fact that their presence was
requested by management,
they went inside the lobby of
the Lyford Cay Club to find
out why they were being
requested to leave.

While sitting in the lobby the
union secretary general said
that a security officer with a
barking and lunging dog
entered the lobby.

Despite this, Mr Douglas
said that he was not afraid. -

“] mean the man had to hold
the dog back. I said to myself

workers then I have to do that,
but we have complained time

Lyford Cay Club,” he said.
Mr Colebrooke insisted that
no previous

ed such a “drastic” response.

manner. Today is a new day,”
he said

considering they were invited

Resource Department.

“When The Tribiine ‘contact-

ed the HR department of the : 1 fect. B
club it was informed that no : then orth ieee ae
one was In a position to com- going to jail — which he didn’t

: tell me — were also perfect.”

ment on the situation at that
time.

The Tribune, was also told ; sae uiderthe naaber “toe
that there would not be any } our.

comment coming from the

aging director.
“Every elected officer of the

do what they did here today.

way,” Mr Colebrooke said.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
PP

IX IoeePP

¢ Fax: 326-7452



i Because first of all, why
: he call me? I’m the one hé was
: coming to for advice, so Why
: call someone yau just met?” Mr
: Carter asked.

THE TRIBUNE

_ Rudy King held in
connection with
alleged attempt to
defraud US govt

FROM page one

The numerologist went on to

elling to Los Angeles to give

T Of high : him an award for his work over
realtors to advertise in print as :
well as online. Tribune sources }

the years in assisting children.
Mr Carter said that he opted

te : not to receive the award, sens-
addition to using “pressure” tac- :
tics on potential clients, dis- ;

ing that something was wrong.
Instead he suggested that the

: award be given to one of his
: clients, Dr Michael Beckwith,
: founder of Agape International
: Spiritual Centre.

“But he said he’d give it to

? me anyhow,” Mr Carter con-
i tinued. “But my little voice said
: not to go. Because people from
: the Bahamas, a lot of people go
: to my website, and people start-

ed e- mailing me from the

: Bahamas telling me that he was

not on the level. |
“T got over 60 people from

: the Bahamas when they saw his
? name on my website, talking
: real bad about him. Now these
i weren’t just people I didn’t
: know. These were people I had
; met in the Bahamas. These are

“So I then had my people

i investigate him. Then we found

time frame in which the indictment charges Knowles : found out he was not even relat-

committed the crimes, and furthermore that none of
their stories could be corroborated.

: ed to Dr Martin Luther King.
: Then I called my friend Will
: Smith, and he told me how he
: (Dr King) lied on him, because

: : : he had announced that Will
that if I have to die for the ? Smith would be at a function

: and Will Smith knew nothing

and time again about the atti- about it,” he said.

tude of management at the King had been honest with him,

: he would have alerted him to

interaction | {he Zee that he wield nat
between union leaders and } ie pomenical work Sat f ar
management could have solicit- a eke

: alleged “very power) financial

“This union at the present et De King said he
does not conduct itself in that ; was. AtleneIng:

Mr Carter added that if Dr

“He kept saying I am:going to

: have a very powerful financial

’ The union president said that njceuns, a eee ee Lee
on Poe othe Eyrord cay : feel good about it, wlivare you
Wb was even mote; Valine i going? So I did the numbers for

to the property by the Human him. But | did the mE ESS for a



Mr Carter said that Dr King

“Four controls banks. Four

: See ; controls finance. Now the num-
INES OF Ines preperty Sanam : ber four also controls law, or

: also controls police. Four also

union has a right to come and controls sovernntpat a a
represent any member of this : P Petes
union. No one has a right to : ernment, But he told me he wey

: going to a financial meeting,”

No one should be treated this he said.

Mr Carter added that Dr

: Beckwith had reportedly been
: asked by Dr King to post a mil-
: lion dollar surety for-him. In
; response to this request, Dr
: Beckwith, allegedly asked Mr
: Carter foriadvice. \

“T said ‘No’. Because‘he (Dr

Beckwith) was going to do it.

“I didn’t feel good about it.
idn’t

One of country’s.
most wanted men
caught by police

FROM page one

: ment issued by Assistant Super-
; intendent Walter Evans yester-
: day, East Street South district
: officers were patrolling Pinewood
: Gardens Monday night when
; they saw three occupants of a red
:?, Nissan Maxima “acting suspi-
i ciously.”

On seeing the police, the car

; sped off in a westerly directon,
: ASP Evans reported. Police
: apparently gave chase before
: police intercepted the vehicle on
: Buttercup Lane off Bamboo
: Boulevard.

Officers conducted a routine

: search of the vehicle and discoy-
: ered the fugitive, who was arrest-
: ed with a male driver and a
: female passenger. An investiga-
: tion will be held to determine
: what new charges, if any, will be
: filed against Knowles, ASP Evans
: said.

ASP Evans also noted that

: under the RBPF’s neighbourhood
: policing initiative, police patrols
i throughout the country will be
: increased in an effort to deter
; those intent on crime. With the
: view of providing “greater secu-
i rity and protection to all resi-
: dents”
} increase response time to report-
: ed matters and try to reduce the
i fear of crime within the commu-
: nity.

, the patrols will also



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 11

Pr ea ee Fishermen Are
‘ Ingraham at the Commonwealth
Heads of Government meeting in Uganda .

.. PLEASED TO
MEET YOU,
PRIME ie
“IVETNISTER © sreznves: pate vipat tubat norton

arrives at the Kampala Serena Hotel for the open-
ing ceremony of the 2007 Commonwealth Heads of
Government Meeting (CHOGM) and is greeted by
outgoing Commonwealth Secretary General Don
McKinnon on Friday, November 23. From left,
Ugandan president Yoweri Museveni, Mrs Janet
Museveni and Mrs Clare de Lore-Mckinnon look
on.



Fishing guides are introducing
guests to the treasures in
Bahamian waters.




LEFT

HAND OF FRIENDSHIP: Prime Minister Ingraham
is greeted by Yoweri Museveni, president of Ugan-
da. From left, Mrs Janet Museveni, Mrs Clare de
Lore-Mckinnon and outgoing Commonwealth Sec-
retary General Don McKinnon {ook on.



S ; r % "

DRAMATIC: The youth of Uganda (above and below) enact a dramatic performance entitled "Uganda's
Journey to Self-Realisation" during the opening ceremony of the meeting.



Raye Sk RU SLI Ase
q5 VanneSi Shi ifait — ACL



pete ae ONE LTT LIE ET PL NET eet

me

=



oy

RESPECTFUL: Heads of Government of the Commonwealth stand
for the playing of the National Anthem of Uganda. Pictured in the
second row, third from left is Prime Minister Ingraham.

~~



=



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE



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‘WEDNESDAY,

a Su ne

Film Studios

proposal to

eovernment
‘in two weeks’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THEBahamian banker
heading the group seeking to
acquire the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios yesterday told The Tri-
bune they hoped to submit
their project proposal to the
Government “within the next
two weeks”, and meet with the
administration in the New
Year to discuss it and chart the





Owen Bethel

way forward.

Owen Bethel, president of
the Nassau-based Montaque
Group, who put together the
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional consortium, told The
Tribune: “We arevhoping to
put to government within the
next two-weeks our submis-
sions on what we propose to
do with the 3,500 acre plot of
land, the main component of
which is the Film Studios.

“We hope that come Janu-
ary, all the principals and
stakeholders in our group will
meet with the Government,
and they will see they are real
persons.”

Although Bahamas FilmIn-

SEE page 6





"NOVEMBER 248,

2007

Disa

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$12.5bn private

firm to acquire BORC

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he world’s leading
private equity spe-
cialist in the energy

i: industry is the pre-
ferred buyer for the Bahamas
Oil Refining Company Inter-
national (BORCO), The Tri-
bune can reveal, with the deal’s
close likely to happen before
year-end.

Sources close to the process
confirmed to this newspaper
yesterday that the Grand
Bahama-based BORCO’s pur-

chaser is almost certainly First
Reserve, a private equity firm
with some $12.5 billion in
assets under management and
offices in London, Houston
and Connecticut.

The 25 year-old company,
backed by institutional
investors such as pension
funds, endowments and foun-
dations, invests exclusively if
the energy industry but was
said not to have been among
the initial bidders for BORCO

when it was put up for sale by

PDVSA, the state-owned
Venezuelan oil company.

One source told The Tri-
bune: “They [First Reserve]
appear to have reached some
agreement by which they
would take over BORCO by
December 1. At the same time,
they have agreements with var-
ious companies and commit-
ments from clients to come in
and take tanks over a period of
time.”

Another contact involved in
the BORCO sales process,
speaking on condition of
anonymity, while confirming
that First Reserve was indeed
the likely purchaser of the

Resort project could employ
up to 875 construction staff

Grand Bahama-based oil stor-
age, bunkering and tranship-
ment facility, questioned the
December 1, 2007, date for the
takeover and deals’ closure.
The purchase, although close
to completion, has not been
sealed yet, and the source sug-
gested that December 31, 2007,
was a more likely completion
date given that it was often the .
year-end for most companies -
a convenient time to add new
assets to the balance sheet and

SEE page 4

SS eee ee]

|
|
|
|



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A PROPOSED multi-million dollar
mixed-use resort project for Long Island
could employ as many as 875 workers
at the peak of construction between its
two components, assessments conducted
for the developers have projected.

The forecasts for the Port St.George
and Caribbean Heights projects, which if
approved will be constructed on land
adjacent to the island’s existing Stella
Maris resort, projected that construction

ary,



é go ri

worker numbers employed on the Port
St George component would range from
a low of 135 to a peak of 675.

And on Caribbean Heights, initially
conceived as an 188-unit condo hotel
and spa, to be located on an 18.8 acre site
in Phase III, section two, of the Stella
Maris subdivision, construction worker
employment was projected by Norton
Consulting, a real estate and leisure advi-
sory company working for the develop-
ers, to range from a low of 20 to a peak
of 200.

Combining the peak construction

employment for the two projects would |
mean that some 875 workers would be |
employed on the Long Island develop- |
ment at the height of construction. |
On Port St George, during the low
point of construction, some 25 workers
were forecast to be employed on the
marina; a further 10 on the golf course
and associated facilities; and 100 on res-
idential/commercial construction. _
At the construction peak, the number

SEE page 7

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Tribune Business Editor

FAMGuard Corporation,
parent of life and health insur-
er Family Guardian, said the
$6.527 million in net income
earned for the first nine
months of 2007 - some 42 per
cent or $1.92 million ahead of
2006 comparatives - had
exceeded last year’s full-year
profits by $611,000.

Reporting to shareholders
on the company’s performance
to September 30, 2007, Nor-

Yet Q3 earnings
down 36.6 per cent

bert Boissiere, FamGuard’s
chairman, attributed the surge
in net income to “continued
strong growth in premium rev-
enue”, especially from the
company’s ordinary life and
BahamaHealth product lines.

Family Guardian had also

SEE page 4

$200m project shows
high-end real estate
demand stays strong

DEMAND for luxury,
upscale Bahamian real estate
remains high despite the glob-
al credit squeeze and US hous-
ing market downturn, with a
Georgia-based development
company due to break ground
next week on a $200 million
residential development. on
West Bay Street.

The project by Source
Development Group LLC,
which will be located,on a 10-
acre site a quarter mile to the
east of The Caves, will be con-
structed in three phases and

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SEE page 9

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHELLIE STAPELETON of
BISHOP ELDON DRIVE, P.O. BOX N-8586, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28TH day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDIA SOVILIEN of
MARKETSTREET, P.O. BOX N-5589, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister resposible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/: naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 28TH day of November, 2007
to the. Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



YOUR CONNECTION’ TO THE WORLD

PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Roundtables key chance
to fix ‘all issues we see as
impeding our businesses’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE private sector has a
golden “opportunity to fix all
the issues we see as impeding
our businesses”, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s exec-
utive director told The Tri-
bune, with the Prime Minister
having requested that it pro-
vide him with details on all
problems experienced in deal-
ing with government and pro-
posed solutions.

Philip Simon explained that
the Chamber’s series of busi-
ness leadership roundtables,
which start tonight under the
theme ‘Vexing Business

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER
LEGAL & REGULATORY

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites a

pplications from suitably

- qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR MANAGER in our Legal &

Regulatory Department.
REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:
This position will report directly to the Vice President,

Interconnection and will be responsible for all regulatory and co
to the Public Utilities Commission.

JOB SUMMARY:

Legal, Regulatory. and
mpliance matters relative

Issues’, were designed to
obtain feedback and possible
solutions to problems the
Bahamian business communi-
ty experienced in dealing with
government bodies and
processes.

He added that the process
had begun earlier this year
through the feedback obtained
from Chamber members via
the organisation’s newsletter,
and the Meet the Ministers
forum that allowed the private

‘sector to direct numerous

questions to various govern-
ment ministers.

Mr Simon said “there were

so many questions” at the min-
isters’ forum that a number
went unanswered due simply
to time constraints.

“The Prime Minister himself
has asked that in order for
them to help us, we help them
by providing a listing of busi-
ness issues or problems in
doing business in the Bahamas
using the civil service, govern-
ment agencies and ministries,
and public sector: processes,”
Mr Simon told The Tribune.

The roundtables are
designed to obtain issues from
Bahamian business owners and
managers on “what are the
issues you think are important
to doing business locally”.

An example of an ineffi-
ciency impacting Bahamian
business, Mr Simon cited a
ground transportation compa-
ny or tour operator having to
take all their vehicles at the
same time to the Road Traf-
fic Department to be licensed
and inspected, when it would
be easier for government
inspectors to come to them.

Chamber executives are
looking to obtain from the

Philip Simon



‘roundtables concerns on “any-

thing that deal with the Gov-
ernment and processes”.

“They can even be legisla-
tion that might be deterring or
imepeding doing business
locally. They want to hear from
us,” Mr Simon said. Apart
from identifying problems and
issues, the Government was
also looking “for proposed
solutions to resolve delays,
inefficiencies or maybe an
opportunity to facilitate busi-
ness

“This is part of the dialogue
we hope to foster with the
Government going forward,
and we hope to institutionalise
the Meet the Ministers. They
should be able to give us infor-
mation in return,” Mr Simon
added.

“I think we might be amazed
at what might happen if we
increase the efficiency with
which we do business. We
need something that’s realis-
tic, that’s practical, and can be

implemented. We complain:

abouts issues all the time.”
The latter aspect is some-
thing that the Prime Minister

has noticed, Mr Simon saying
that in meetings with the
Chamber and other business
executives Mr Ingraham had
delivered the message: ‘You
complain all the time; let me
hear them and let’s fix them’.”
“We want to hear from the
private sector,” Mr Simon said
of the roundtables. “Just look
at crime and any type of prob-
lem. Let’s stop talking about
it and let’s start to fix it.
“This is an opportunity to
fix all the issues we have seen
as acting as an impediment to
our business affairs. Some of
them can be solved quite
quickly, some will take time
and others will be rejected.

_Some will not be implemented

because they are not practical
or realistic. But we must first
have the dialogue.”

An e-mail sent to Chamber
members on the rountables
said: “We will use this occa-
sion to solicit your views about
the kinds of problems, issues
and challenges you encounter
as you navigate through the
maze of governmental agen-
cies, regulations and demands,
etc.

“The output from the latter
discussion will be presented
and discussed with the Prime
Minister and other relevant
ministers. The Prime Minister
has expressed his firm com-
mitment to improving the lev-
el of government service to
Chamber members. This is a
valuable opportunity to get
your positions on the record.”

The roundtables will be held
between 4pm-6pm on these
dates: November 28, 2007;
November 29, 2007; Decem-
ber 4, 2007; December 5, 2007;
December 6, 2007.

Responsible for addressing and coordinating activities related to all regulatory matters
with particular reference to legal maters within and on behalf of the Company. This
position requires significant interaction with the Public Utilities Commission.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Coordinate with the Vice President of Legal and Regulatory on strategies relative
to the Company and its Regulatory requirements.

. Ensure the Company.’s compliance with the legal and regulatory provisions of its
licenses issued by the PUC, the stipulations of the Sector Policy of the Government
of the Bahamas, the Telecommunications Act of 1999 and all other statutory
legislation related thereto.

. Liaise with the PUC on all legal and regulatory matters relating to compliance
-with regulations under the PUC license issued to BTC.

. Liaise with other licensed telecommunications providers on legal matters regarding
interconnection.

. Provide legal opinions on matters of a regulatory nature and peruse, critique, and
analyze all relevant documentation of a regulatory nature

. Assist and advise on the reporting of matters to the Regulator involving fraudulent
activity on BTC’s network by both licensed and unlicensed operators

. Attend at and assist with any regulatory matter requiring reference to a court of
competent jurisdiction

. Represent the Company on any matters of a regulatory nature involving the
Company

. Assist in the preparation of reports on the Company as they relate to legal aspects
of regulatory as required by the PUC

Liaise and coordinate with relevant departments in the compilation of reports on
regulatory matters —

Inform, educate, and update all relevant Company employees on all regulatory
matters

Provide periodic update reports and recommendations on changes in the regulatory
environment to the staff

13. Perform any other duties relevant to the support of the division as determined from
time to time by the Vice President of Legal, Regulatory & Interconnection.

EDUCATION AND/OR EXPERIENCE
Master’s Degree preferred.

LLB, Member of the Bahamas Bar Association, with five (5) years of practice at
the Bar.

Prior experience in a regulatory environment would be an asset.

Exposure to the principles of telecommunications is a plus. Strong leadership
skills are essential, organization, self-motivational and communication skills.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, #21 John F. Kennedy Drive,
no later than Wednesday November 28, 2007 and addressed as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MANAGER/LEGAL & REGULATORY



Scotiabank’
is seeking the services of:

- Managing Director, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

With over 55,000 employees in over 50 countries, Scotiabank places great
importance on recognizing and rewarding strong performance. We offer room

for advancement, a stimulating work environment and the resources to help »

you make the most of your career. Together, we continue to make Scotiabank
a great place to work.

POSITION SUMMARY:

Reporting to the Senior Vice-President Caribbean, as well as to a Board of
Directors, the Managing Director is directly responsible for the profitable
development and maintenance of the commercial and retail banking business
of an assigned group of branches/units, and the maximization of profits. To
do this, the incumbent researches the market and develops strategic objectives
and tactics, ensures the readiness of his or her people, and executes those
tactics.

The incumbent is also responsible for the quality of the retail and commercial
asset and liability portfolios, ensuring adequate controls and procedures are in
place to safeguard the Bank from loss. He or she is also responsible for

providing strong support for the growth of ancillary businesses such as Wealth
.Management. The incumbent has responsibility for planning, organization,
and staffing in the assigned group of branches/units, and is the prime provider
of direction, coaching, advice and other support to the Unit Heads. The
incumbent relates closely with government officials and agencies and regulatory
bodies, and is the Bank's ambassador in The Bahamas.

Qualifications:

¢ MBA or work experience equivalent required

e Experience in a senior role within a large financial institution is an asset

e Proven experience managing people in particular, senior level direct reports.

° Excellent and proven negotiation and conflict resolution skills are essential.

e Ability to learn quickly, adapt to an ever changing environment and adapt to
ever changing priorities are essential.

OTHER INFORMATION:

¢ Frequent travel to the Family Islands & internationally.
e Spanish Language is a bonus in an organization that is expanding rapidly in
Spanish-speaking countries.

The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes
applications from all interested parties. We thank you for your interest, however,
only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit application in writing, marked Private
and Confidential, by Friday, December 07, 2007 to: Sr. Manager, Human
Resources, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd., Main Branch, P.O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail: scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com



ge



THE TRIBUNE .

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 3B



Deer PS es
uana Cay developers move to

strike-out Association’s review

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE developers behind the
$175 million Baker’s Bay Golf
& Ocean Club project and the
Government have issued sum-
monses asking the Supreme
Court to strike out the second
judicial review application
launched against the develop-
ment by the Save Guana Cay
Reef Association.

Graham, Thompson & Co,
attorneys for Arizona-based
Discovery Land Company,
filed a Summons for a hearing
on Thursday, November 29,
last Friday, at which they will
apply to set aside the leave giv-
ing the Association permission
to apply for the second judi-
cial review that was previously
granted by Justice Peter May-
nard.

Discovery Land Company,
and the various holding com-
panies established for differ-
ent components of the Baker’s
Bay development, are arguing
that the judicial review appli-

‘cation should be dismissed
because it was made “more

. than six months” after the per-

mits it is attempting to chal-
lenge were approved and
granted to the developers.
They are also alleging that
the judicial review application
was made “more than three
months after the date” that the
Association “acknowledged

-. they had actual knowledge of

the grant of the permits”.
This, Discovery Land Com-
- pany and its attorneys are
arguing, is “an unreasonable
delay in the making of the
application for judicial review”
that breaches Order 53, Rule 4
of the Supreme Court and
’ prejudice their interests.
In its separate summons to
dismiss the Association’s judi-
- cial review application, which

-.-_ was filed on Monday, Novem-

Fred Smith



ber 26, the Government is
arguing that it should also be
dismissed because it “was not
made promptly” within six
months of the reasons for the
complaint arising.

In addition, the Government
is also seeking a Supreme
Court order that all further
legal proceedings relating to
the Baker’s Bay project be
stayed pending the verdict on
the Association’s first judicial
review application.

That verdict, dealing with
the substantive issues and mer-
its of the case, has been await-
ed from the Court of Appeal
for more than six months, the
court having heard legal argu-
ments from both sides in the
summer.

Responding to the sum-
monses in arguments filed with
the Supreme Court, Mr Smith
said legal actions “should only
be dismissed in plain and obvi-
ous cases”, and the Associa-

tion’s second judicial review
application was not one of
these.

He alleged that the moves
by the devélopers and the
Government were “a replay”
of the action taken with the
Association’s first judicial
review application, adding:
“This is obviously a matter
raising serious issues to be tried
on the merits. The quicker the
court moves this to trial and
resolution, the quicker justice
will be served. It is not a matter
amenable to strike out appli-
cations.”

Mr Smith alleged that the
Association had obtained leave

-for the second judicial review

application within six months
of learning about the issuance
of the permits they are chal-
lenging, on the grounds that
they were issued by govern-
ment ministries, departments
and agencies that did not have
the lawful authority to do so.

“The basis of the Develop-
ers’ summons is miscon-
ceived,” Mr Smith alleged.
“They cannot seriously be
advancing the argument that
having hidden the permits they
received, despite the appli-
cants’ repeated attempts to
obtain them, and which are
now challenged in this judicial
review motion, that leave
should be set aside.

“They are effectively asking
the court to uphold the very
secrecy which deprived the
[Association] of their rights,
which the prevented the [Asso-
ciation] from discovering the
basis of what they were doing
and prevented them from
bringing earlier judicial review
proceedings........

“Further, they have the
temerity to complain of unrea-
sonable delay in the making of
the application for leave to
bring judicial review when the
developers and the Govern-

The Four-WAY Test







ment respondents together hid
the relevant information
despite repeated attempts to
obtain them.”

Mr Smith alleged that Dis-
covery Land Company and the
Government should not have
continued “with any chal-
lenged aspects” of the Baker’s

. Bay project before the Court

of Appeal rendered its verdict
on the first judicial review
application, particularly any
work on the Crown and Trea-
sury land that has been leased
to the developers.

“This is a very serious and
seminal case for the future of





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eels

good governance in the
Bahamas,” Mr Smith conclud-
ed, urging the court to provide
the Association with inter-
locutory relief by ordering
work on Baker’s Bay to be
stopped until the merits of the
second judicial review applica-
tion were heard.

H GRADER HOLDS
E FOR CANCER.

ATTEND AN INFORMATION MEETING TO LEARN MORE:

All Programs

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Freeport, Grand Bahama

Friday, November 30, 2007, at 6:00 p.m.
Bishop Michael Eldon School

Thursday, November 29, 2007, at 6:00 p.m.
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The Four-Way Test

“Of the things we think,

gay or do

1. Is it the truth?

2. Is it fair to all
concerned?

3. Will it build goodwill
and better friendships?

4. Will it be beneficial to

From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were
concerned with promoting high
ethical standards in their
professional lives. One of the
world's most widely. printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This





) \Bahamas Red Cross



The Bahamas Red Cross Society, a humanitarian emergency relief
organization, has an opening for the position of

24-word Test has been all concerned?”
translated inte more than a
hundred languages and SENIOR ADMINISTRATOR

published in thousands of ways. SG
It asks the following four :
. questions:



Duties include:

¢ Day to day management of the Society’s programs

¢ Coordinating all fundraising activities

¢ Act as liaison officer between the National Society and the
International Federation of Red Cross and the International
Committee of Red Cross and other National Societies

¢ Promote partnerships with other national NGOs

¢ Build the volunteer capacity of the National Society

¢ Act as liaison officer between the National Society and
Government Agencies

This is a contractual position for two years in the first instance.
Applicant must have at least three years experience in a similar
position. .

Remuneration:
Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Interested persons should forward their resume, with a cover
letter to:





OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM

1. Children ages 10-16 may enter. Judging will be in two
age categories: 10- 13 yenrs and 14-16 years for a first
and second place winner in each category.

2. Write a essay answering the following subject:

“What does the Four-Way Test mean to me.” Explain
of the 4-Way Test as it relates to
your life, experiences, and/or society in general.”

Your essay must include the four principles.

3. The body of the essay must not exceed 1,000 words,
Adults may assist the child in filling out the entry form,
but not in writing the letter.

4, Limit one essay per child. All entries must be received by
the Rotary Club of Kast Nassau bofore Nov 30, 2007.

5. Only essays accompanied

from the newspaper will be accepted.

carbon or other copies will not be accepted.

Confidential

The Director General
Bahamas Red Cross
P.O. Box N — 8331
Nassau, N.P. Bahamas



6. late led ma a a ad Parent's Signature:
decieton of the judges Petacchi. abc he i
7. Winner must agree to a photo presentation which will J
r eee: ss Telephone comtacts (0) ee semen) Fax: l (242) 323- 7404
. Tele ee ‘iilahtd All entries become property of the Rotary Club of Bast Nassau und can be used
Attn: Michele Rassin, The Rotary Club of Bast Nassau, Se anal

P.O, Box $$-6320, Nassau, Bahamas

The Tribune

My Voice. Wy Vlowspapor!

Rotary Chub of

EAST

NASSAU

All applications should be submitted on or before December 7, 2007







PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007 |
ee ES ee

FAMGUARD, from page 1

experienced “sustained
improvements in our life and
health claims experience”, he
added, another factor that had

buoyed the firm’s results and
driven earnings per share
(EPS) for the first nine months
to $0.65 per share, compared

CLIENT ACCOUNTANT

Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial -institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Malta,
Switzerland and the United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of

services to local and international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Corporate
Services team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Supervisor,

Client Accounting.

Core Responsibilities

¢ — Reconciliation of Bank/Broker Accounts
¢ Preparation of Client Financial Statements
¢ Liaising with External Auditors and Clients as necessary

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration

Desired Qualifications

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or related discipline from a well

recognized university.

3-5 years progressive Accounting experience in.the Financial

Services Industry.

Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, and

customer service skills.

Closing Date: December 7, 2007

Contact
Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@butterfieldbank.bs

www. butterfieldbank.bs



Ae

Butterfield Bank

to $.046 per share for the same
period in 2006.

Net premium revenues and
deposits for the first nine
months of 2007 rose by 5.5 per
cent to $47.721 million, com-
pared to $45.233 million the
previous year. Investment
income was also up to $6.596
million, compared to $6.14 mil-
lion the year before, a 7.4 per
cent increase.

“The buoyancy of the equi-
ties market has also had an
impact on our income, with
unrealised gains in equities
improving by $590,000 over
prior year-to-date,” Mr
Boissiere said.

The unrealised appreciation
on investments in equities,
which effectively means an
increase in the value of Family
Guardian’s paper shares, stood
at $1.368 million for the first

three quarters in 2007, com-
pared to $776,981 the year
before. ,

FamGuard’s total revenues
for the first nine months in
2007 stood at $55.982 million, a
6.9 per cent gain over the pre-
vious year’s $52.379 million.

Meanwhile, total benefits
paid out to policyholders
remained flat in comparison to
last year, although operating

‘expenses did rise by 13 per

cent to $11.749 million, com-
pared to $10.389 million in
2006. ;
Commissions were also up
at $8.227 million, compared to
$7.817 million, with total ben-
efits and expenses for the first
nine months of 2007 up 3.5 per
cent at $49.455 million.
’Meanwhile, Mr Boissiere
said FamGuard had received
the necessary regulatory

approvals for the launching of
its FG Financial and FG Capi-
tal Markets subsidiaries at the
end of October 200.

Their creation will allow
Family Guardian to become
more of a full financial services
company as opposed to a pure
life and health insurer, offering
pensions, mutual funds and
advisory services.

The expertise of Sagicor, the
Barbados-based full financial
services provider, will assist
Family Guardian in this regard,
and the move is likely to be
seen as an attempt by the
BISX-listed Bahamian com-
pany to emulate the model
achieved by the firm that holds
a 20 per cent stake in it.

Mr Boissiere added that
FamGuard was planning to ful-
ly relocate its BahamaHealth
division and client services to

THE TRIBUNE

its new office complex on the
corner of Bay Street and
Church Street, as. renovations
to the property were continu-
ing on schedule.

While the results for the first
nine months were excellent,
FamGuard suffered a dip in its
third quarter performance. Net
income for the three months
to September 30, 2007, slipped
by 36.6 per cent to $1.568 mil-
lion, compared to $2.471 mil-
lion the year before.

Total revenues for the quar-
ter were relatively flat in com-
parison to last year, standing
at $18.649 million compared to
$17.866 million.

Yet benefits rose by more
than’$1 million or 13.9 per cent
to $10.275 million, with total
benefits and expenses growing
from $15.395 million in 2006
to $17.082 million.

$12.5bn private equity firm to acquire BORCO

FROM page 1

income statement.

It is unclear what the BOR-
CO purchase price is, although
The Tribune has heard multi-

le figures - $600-$700 million,
1 billion, $1.1 billion and $1.3
billion.

It seems likely that PDVSA
would receive between $600-
$700 million, with any higher
amount earmarked for upgrad-
ing and expanding BORCO’s
existing oil storage facilities
and infrastructure.

There is little prospect of
First Reserve restarting BOR-
CO’s oil refining capabilities,
which were ‘mothballed’ in the
mid-1980s when PDVSA took
over the company completely
by purchasing Chevron’s 50
per cent stake.

The refinery had been closed
in 1985 amid a global oil supply
gut, and a $2 billion investment
was estimated as being
required to restart refining
with capacity for 500,000 bar-
rels of oil per day.

Instead, sources have sug-
gested that First Reserve will
be more interested in expand-
ing BORCO’s existing storage
and bunkering capacity by
adding more tanks, exploiting

BAHA MAR

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

Legal Career Opportunit

Baha Mar Development Company Ltd. seeks to hire a
talented Commercial Attorney to join its dynamic

legal team.

The successful applicant must:

Have a minimum of 6 years experience in commercial

and corporate practice in The Bahamas.

Have the ability to draft and review documeniation in
connection with complex commercial, real estate and
other transactions.

Be familiar with US and other international commercial

transactions.

Have the ability to work under pressure.

Possess exceptional communication and negotiating

Skills.

successful candidate will report to Baha Mar’s General
Counsel and work with other members of Baha Mar’s

‘legal team.

Please forward curriculum vitae with salary requirements
via e-mail to tgodet @tradeinvest.com or fax to (242) 702-
2018 no later than December, 1 2007. All responses will
be held in the strictest confidence.



the 208 acres of the company’s
500-acre site that have never
been developed.

BORCO currently has stor-
age capacity for about 20 mil-
lion barrels, PDVSA having
invested $40 million in 2001 to
upgrade and repair its 73 tanks.

The BORCO complex also
features two jetties and six
deep sea berths, the facility act-
ing as a ‘break bulk’ destina-
tion, where large oil shipments
are broken down into smaller
consignments for onward
delivery.

The company employs about
105 Grand Bahama-based
staff, plus another 50 contrac-
tors. It-pays about $1 million
per annum to lease the seabed
from the Government.

First Reserve’s latest fund
for energy investing closed in
July 2006 after raising $7.8 bil-
lion. Since 1992, it has com-
pleted 60 business purchases,

investing $3.5 billion of equity ©

in transactions that have a total
cumulative value of $10 billion.

According to the company’s
website, it targets investments
of between $100 million to
$500 million in energy compa-
nies with values ranging from
$300 million to $4 billion.

The energy sectors it targets

are manufacturing and ser- ‘
; vices, such as drilling se¥vices -:

and wellhead manufacturers,
energy infrastructure and ener-
gy reserves.

Its portfolio companies
include holdings in North
America, Europe, Asia and the

Gulf of Mexico.

Other companies that were
interested in acquiring BOR-
CO included PetroChina, the
German company, Oiltanking,
Nustar Energy.from Texas,
and possibly Chevron.

Originally, some 52 bidders
submitted indicative bids for
Borco before the final six were
narrowed down.

PDVSA had appointed Cit-
igroup’s investment banking
arm to run the open transpar-
ent ‘beauty contest’ process,
and indicative bids of as high
as $500 million had been

received during the first round
of BORCO’s auction..

The higher-priced bids were
understood to include the costs
of any environmental clean up,

4, UBS

and capital expenditure main-
tenance to upgrade BORCO’s
tanks jetties, and pipes, pro-
jects that could easily cost

upwards of $15 million.

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial
institutions in the Caribbean. Through our Business Area Wealth
Management International we look after wealthy private clients
by providing them with comprehensive, value enhancing
services. Our client advisors combine. strong personal
relationships with the resources that are available from across
UBS, helping them provide’a full range of wealth management

services.

In order to strengthen our IT team in Nassau, we are looking

to fill the following position:

IT Database Administrator (DBA)

In this challenging position you will be expected to be a selfstarter,
time oriented individual with project management and
documentation skills, strong analytical background, sound
writing, communications, organizational skills and the ability
to work with local and international team members.

Essential Duties and responsibilities

Analyzes business application requirements and develop for

database construction and maintenance.

Maintains and documents all production, UAT and test

databases and interface systems

Provide database support and scripting for critical and BCP
«cp critical: computer applications.

Performs database performance, monitoring, tuning, controls

and user access.

Plans for backup and recovery of databases, as, well as
coordinates software evaluation and installation.

’

Minimum Requirements

- At least 3 years experience in administering Oracle and SQL
Server Databases or related area in a medium to large scale

environment.

B.S. Computer Science, M.I.S. or related field.
Strong expertise in SQL, Oracle databases, Crystal reports,

MS Access and Visual Basic.

Working knowledge in Sybase and DB2. |
Application support background (Banking or Insurance’

applications a plus).

MCP training and/or Oracle or SQL certification a plus.

Written applications should be addressed to:

hrbahamas@ubs.com or UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



GRAHAM, THOMPSON & Co.

COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW * NOTARIES PUBLIC

is pleased to announce that

Cheryl T.

Whyms

has been made a Partner in the Firm.

Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O.Box N-272
Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 322-4130
Fax: (242) 328-1069

Freeport Chambers

The First Commercial Centre
3rd Floor, Suite 9
P.O.Box F-42451

Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 351-7474 _
Fax: (242) 351-7752





THE TRIBUNE ''



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 5B



Strangers swap money
online as person-to-person
lending makes a comeback

@ By JACKIE FARWELL
AP Business Writer

COLIN Nash, 35, was strug-
gling with $12,000 in credit
card debt late last year. Mean-
while, Michael Fisher, 24, was
looking for a new investment.
So, Fisher loaned Nash $200.

The two men, however, had
never met.

Nash and Fisher are mem-
bers of Prosper.com, the Unit-
ed States leader in a growing
trend known as peer-to-peer
lending, which facilitates loans
between complete strangers.

Social lending has been
around since. the days when
needy families turned to the
richest man in town, but the
Web is breathing new life into
the practice. Loans on Pros-
per and Facebook’s Lending-
Club have risen to $100 mil-
lion this year from $27 million
in 2006, according to Online
Banking Report. By 2010, the
report forecasts $1 billion in
peer-to-peer loan originations.

“I’m sure banks are watch-
ing it,” said Jim Bruene, the
report’s author.

Zopa.com, a social lending
site founded in Britain in
March 2005, plans to launch

in the US the week of Decem- ~*

ber 3, according to a company
spokeswoman.

The idea behind the sites is
that borrowers can find better
rates than traditional banks
offer, while lenders can earn
higher returns than from a sav-
ings account or other invest-
ment.

Borrowers on Prosper post
’ how much money they need —
up to $25,000 — the purpose of
the loan and what interest rate
they can afford. Lenders bid
on the loans of their choice,
typically. funding only partial
amounts and diversifying their

risk among dozens or hun-

dreds of Ioans!:
Most loan requests are for

debt consolidation, followed

_ by small business and entre-

preneurial purposes. The aver-
age loan amount totals just

under $7,000. Prosper claims:

it has facilitated $98 million in
loans since launching in Feb-
ruary 2006.

Prosper’s added appeal,
however, goes beyond the bot-
tom line. Photos and personal
narratives accompany bor-
rowers’ requests: A father who
needs $25,000 to equip a house
and car for his son, who has
recently begun using a wheel-
chair. A young couple seeking
$5,000 for their wedding, who
plead, “Please help us get, mar-
ried!” A group of young men
in Montana who want $1,000
to purchase a professional
wrestling ring.

The opportunities for social
connection appeal to users,
said Prosper co-founder and
CEO Chris Larsen. Borrow-
ers can appeal to lenders to
look past a couple of late pay-
ments or spotty credit history,
while lenders enjoy the satis-
faction of seeing their money
help someone in need.

‘When you're dealing with
people, it’s ‘I want to do well
but I also want to feel good
about how I’m doing well,”
said Larsen, who formerly
served as CEO and co-founder
of financial services company
E-LOAN. —

But the numbers matter.
Each Prosper borrower is
assigned a grade based on
their credit score to help
lenders evaluate their risk and
the site verifies borrowers’
identities. The average rate of
return for lenders is 9.28 per
cent, with lower-grade loans
earning 10.45 per cent, accord-
ing to Prosper.

Prosper makes its money by
charging a one per cent or two
per cent closing fee, based on
the borrower’s credit grade,

‘and lenders pay an annual loan



servicing fee of 0.5 per cent to
one per cent. It also collects
fees for late payments on
behalf of lenders and reports
to credit bureaus. After 30
days, a collections agency is
assigned to delinquent loans.
“This is not a free lunch,”
said Greg McBride, senior
financial analyst
Bankrate.com. “You have to
keep up with these payments
just as you would with any oth-
er financial obligation.”
Prosper’s default rate hov-

ers at about 2.7 per cent,

Larsen said, but that figure is
expected to rise as more loans
mature.

According to a July 2007
Deutsche Bank report, about
five per cent of all Prosper
loans originated more than six
months ago have defaulted,
while payments are late on
nearly 10 per cent of all loans.

Prosper user Mike Kost,
who has loaned out about
$5,000 on the site so far, said
he’s observed an uptick in the
number of borrowers missing
payments, one reason he limits
his loan bids to the minimum
$50.

“The risk is not a problem,”
said Kost, who writes a blog
about Prosper. “It’s when you
don’t get paid to take that risk
that it’s a problem.”

Larsen has used Prosper to
lend his housekeeper $25,000
to pay off high interest-rate
loans and credit cards. People
who know each other are’ turn-
ing to another social lending
option.

The market for so-called
“friends-and-family” loans is
dominated in the US by Virgin
Money USA, formerly a
Waltham, Mass.-based venture

called CircleLending. The.

company, which recently sold

- a majority stake to British bil-

lionaire Richard Branson, for-
malizes loans between family
and friends.

e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your

!

income.

e You are limited only to
your potential

e Flexible hours available

e Excellent commissions

and benefits

Must have a proven track record in sales
Professional appearance a must

Must have reliable transportation

Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
Excellent written and communication skills.

Apply in writing to

Sales Representatives -

Box PM-1

C/O The Nassau Guardian

P.O. Box N-3011

Nassau
Bahamas



with ~

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OLIVIA TONY of JEROME AVE.,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement



- of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCYNOTICE

CRAFT APPRENTICES
ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Department for Craft
Apprentices. Craft Apprentices are trained to become Electrical and Mechanical
Craftsman.

To qualify as a Craft Apprentice the following criteria should be met: -

Must be between 18 and 25 years

Have a minimum of five (5) BUC’s including Maths, English Language and General -
Science with grades of “C” or better or

Any other equivalent technical certification or relevant training diploma

Persons recruited from the Family Islands should be a resident of that island. Once

the formal training has been completed, Apprentices will return to their respective
island.

Application forms can be collected from the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s
Head Office located at Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, Nassau, Bahamas. Family
Island applicants can also collect application forms from the local B. E. C offices.
Applications should be returned duly completed with all of the supporting
documentation to The Manager, Human Resources & Training P.O. Box N-7509,

.Nassau, Bahamas on or before: Friday, December 14, 2007.





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under hicense and contig! af The Bank of Nowa Senta

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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Film Studios proposal to government ‘in two weeks’

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TERRANCE L. HIGGS OF
PINEDALE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GENERAL DELIVERY,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of
NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation .
Notice is
Section 138 (4) of the International Business Com-
panies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), M GROUP INC. is ‘in
dissolution. Eduardo A. Martinez Azaro is the Liquidator and
can be contacted at Sarmiento 944 floor 11 City of Buenos
Aires, Argentina. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
21st day of December, 2007.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), FRANCO LEASE FIVE LIMITED is in dissolu-
} tion. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at

Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
December 26, 2007.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), FRANCO LEASE SIX LIMITED is in dissolu-
tion. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
December 26, 2007.

Bistt

Pricing Information As Of:
esday, 27 November 200

TET

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S) .
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings
Ye you EE ey

Le We

00 ABD.

1.364794"
3.5388°*"
2.938214***
1.279370***

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
11.2596 | Fidelity Prime Income Fund
EX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,00
- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
ffactive Date 7/11/2007





hereby given that in accordance with

FROM page 1

vest International signed an
agreement in principle in Octo-
ber 2007 to acquire the
Bahamas Film Studios, many
hurdles besides obtaining gov-
ernment approval remain to
be overcome. The group’s pur-

chase cannot currently move
forward because of litigation
embroiling the Bahamas Film
Studios, and its immediate
holding company, Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises.

Phoenix Engineering
obtained a Supreme Court
injunction blocking the
Bahamas Film Studios’ sale,

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

alleging that it was owed
unpaid sums for work done in
relation to an Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) that
was performed for the com-
plex, which sits on a 3,500-acre
site that used to be the former
US Air Force Missile Base. _

Dealing with that litigation,
and either securing the
removal or varying of that
injunction, will be the key first
step in ensuring the purchase
by Mr Bethel and his group
moves forward.

It, is understood that
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional has agreed to deal with
all legitimate creditors’ claims
brought against the Bahamas
Film Studios bar the Phoenix
Engineering lawsuit, and the

Quigley, one of the company’s
three founding partners, who is
claiming $1.3 million in com-
pensation - a claim understood
to have risen to $2 million -
over sums owed to him after
he was removed from the pro-
ject.

Both those cases will be
dealt with by the seller of the
Bahamas Film Studios,
Nashville-based investment

‘banker Ross Fuller. It is

thought that he is likely to
receive substantially less than
the $14 million he was offered
earlier this year by Mr Bethel’s
group in a deal that ultimately
fell apart.

However, the two parties
ultimately returned to the table
and thrashed out a new agree-

11.8192***
PS ai i aces as 5 a aaa ec agai

YIELO - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
NIM. = Not Meaningtyl <-
OS ARINOEX
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the In-
ternational Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), Touchstone In-

ternational Limited, is in dissolution. Continental Liquidators Inc is

the Liquidator and can be contacted at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906,

Belize City, Belize. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and particulars

of their debts or claims to. the liquidator before December 26, 2007.

B. Foster
For; Continental Liquidators, inc.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) |

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), FRANCO LEASE FOUR LIMITED is in dissolu-
tion. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
December 26, 2007.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), FIRST AIRCRAFT LEASE INTERNATIONAL
LIMITED is in dissolution. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator
and can be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough &
Queen Stréets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to
the Liquidator before December 26, 2007. v

0.00

Last Price Weekly Vol.

Yield %

NAV KEY

*~ 16 November 2007
** . 30 June 2007
***. 31 October 2007
ress 31 July 2007

délity Bandas Stock Index, January 1, 1994 = 100

action initiated by Paul

ment.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SANDRA JEAN LOUIS of
MALCOLM ALLOTMENT, P.O. BOX SS-6360, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28TH day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HARRY DAOUT OF #62
PIONEER’S WAY, P.O. BOX F-41375,GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to. the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of
NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFREY CHARLES of
‘KEMP ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister resposible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of November, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-. 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANGLADE MOMPREMIER
COOPER of PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX N-776,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

2 UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Limited is seeking a suitably
qualified individual to join their growing and
dynamic team as a:

Facility Specialist

This position is open to candidates with a
minimum of 3 years experience and
certification in electrical, plumbing & air-
condition repair & maintenance.

Main responsibilities to include:

* Traditional tasks of building management;

* Oversee all preventative maintenance
programs;

¢ Carry out technical interventions;

* Oversee maintenance service providers;
Oversee churn projects, documentation and
accounting;

Support bank operations with a wide variety
of logistics services.

In addition, candidates must have experience
in report writing with basic working knowledge
of Microsoft Word and Excel. The ideal candidate
must be able to utilize knowledge & experience
to solve routine problems and reply to client
requests.

Interested persons meeting the above criteria
should apply in writing, enclosing a full resume
with cover letter, on or before November 30,
2007 to:

hrbahamas@ubs.com
Or

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N 7757,
Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 7B

eae ee eee |
Resort project could employ up to 875 staff on construction

FROM page 1

of workers employed on the
marina would increase to 115;
grow to 80 on the golf facili-
ties; and some 480 working on
the residential and commercial
construction operations.

The forecasts were made on
the assumption that the marina
and golf facilities were com-
pleted in two years, while 40-
man construction crews were
assumed to be able to com-
plete 10-12 custom homes or
25-30 production homes annu-
ally.

When it came to full-time
operations, the projections
were that Port St George
would directly employ 342
staff. These would be split
between 20 marina employees;
31 at the golf facility; 140 in
hotel operations; 40 in “com-
munity operations”; and a final
111 in the town centre.

Estimates for the Port St
George Town Centre employ-
ment were based on it having
16,500 square feet of retail
space, each shop having an
average size of 1,500 square
feet.

Restaurants were projected

as having an average size of .

3,000 square feet and seating
capacity for 100 persons.

The employment projections
for the developers said: “The
Port St George project will be
the major employer on Long
Island and will influence
employment on-site at the
development and will have the
potential to effectively attract
new businesses (and addition-
al employees) to the area.

“Quality of life for native

.. Bahamians will be enhanced
by the development of the pro-

ject. The Port St George devel-
opment will be act as a catalyst
for other projects that will also
positively impact employment
in the area.”

The original masterplan for
Port St George, which is sub-

. ject to change, called for a

development that features a
boutique hotel with 146
suites/villas; some 60 boutique

~~ villas: plus waterfront lots of
~ 1/3 of an acre and greater size,

with some 180 docking slips

for boats between 80-100 feet
in length, and a further 60 boat
slips for vessels between 40-60
feet in length.

Other components of the
original masterplan, developed
in summer 2006, call for some
306 residential lots between 1/3

to ? of an acre in size with a '

golf course view; 61 oceanfront
residential lots; 331 multi-fam-
ily lots for either single family
or town homes with 200 boat
slips; 119 lakefront lots; 144
multi-family, condo flats or
commercial plots; a beach club;
and Town Centre, which fea-
tures a yacht club, marina with
200 slips, casino; condo flats;

' retail; restaurants; Customs

and Immigration posts; a Har-
bour Master’s office; and fuel
and docking facilities.

On the Caribbean Heights
project, which is conditional
on Port St George going
ahead, full-time direct employ-
ment created by that compo-
nent is expected to be 197 jobs,

of which 173 will be in hotel
operations and 24 in sports and
dive facilities.

The Government and devel-
opers stages a Town Meeting
on the project and its poten-
tial impact on Long Island last
night. [t has already received
approval in principle from the
Government, on condition that
the developers meet four cri-
teria.

These are holding the Town
Meeting; submitting a com-
pleted Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA); consulta-
tions with the utility compa-
nies, which started in March
and will be completed once the
Masterplan is revised; and pro-
viding evidence that all neces-
sary financial backing is in
place.

Jan Moorcroft, one of the
directors and project princi-
pals, said the proposed funding
partners met with Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette last week.

HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION LTD.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Annual General
Meeting of the above-named Company will be held
at Room - Salon III & IV, Wyndham Nassau Resort

& Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas on the 11th day of December, 2007 at 6:00
p.m. for the transaction of the following

1. To elect Directors and Officers for the

ensuing year.

2. To waive the presentation of a Statement
of income and Expenditure and Balance

Sheet.

3. Any other business.

Dated the 26th of November, 2007

Hartis E. Pinder
SECRETARY

POSITION AVAILABLE



INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS SUPERVISOR

A brokers & agency company {an affiliate of a large established company] is looking for an Administrative
Supervisor. The ideal candidate must be detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent organizational,
interpersonal and communication skills. The ability to work with limited supervision in a fast- paced progressive

environment is a must.

# Responsibilities:

Receive and submit for processing applications for Home Insurance |property] and other insurance plans
Liaise with sub-agents on all application issues

Maintenance of database

Liaise with Underwriters and Customer Service departments to ensure accurate application processing
Generate monthly reports on issued contracts

Reconciliation of premiums

Prepare and issue completed quotés and Certificates of Insur urance
Handing Internal and External client queries
Supervise Administrative support for all general issues

Core Competencies:

Ability to work with limited supervision and learn new skills quickly
Excellent oral and written communication skills

Abllity to resolve problems with a sense of urgency

Demonstrate a keen eye for details

Abllity to work under pressure

Strong interpersonal skills and ability to maintain a harmonious relationship with co-workers
Ability to maintain confidentiality
Reliable, dependable and flexible team-player

Required Qualifications:

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration or related field or equivalent work experience.
3+ years experience in a similar position

Excellent computer skills and proficiency in Excel required
Relevant General insurance designations (or pats thereof] a plus

Benefits:

Salary commensurate with current salary scales, skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including Life, Health and

Pension.

Submit Resume to Human Resources Administrator, P.O. Box N-4815, Nassau
Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to dlparker@live.com



“aS well ““s “nembers of the

1.
23
, 3.
4.
D3
6.
i
8.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
ee Ta ee

The Job & Requirements

To manage all aspects of the daily operations on a
profitable basis. Must have firm understanding of
Produce Purchasing. Standard Operating Procedures
and Merchandising. Must have past success in
managing L/D. Possessing excellent communication
skills with proven ability to build teams. Knowledge
of computer based programs is required with a
minimum of 3 - 5 years experience in Produce
Management.

Interested persons are asked to send their resumes
hrjobnow@gmail.com



& OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS



Visit our website at www cob.edu.bs

STAFF VACANCY

LIBRARIES & INSTRUCTIONAL
MEDIA SERVICES

Applications are invited from suitably quaiiiied individuals for the following position:

1. LIBRARY ASSOCIATE th f AW LIBRARY

The Law Library of The College requires a highly motivated, tactful, sates -friendly,
innovative. detail-oriented petson!to provide pi iraprofessional, administrative and basic
reference assistance Chentelé wifi include students and faculty of the LL.B Programme,
legal profession ‘and the general public.

The successful candidate will perform all duties with minimal supervision, assisting with
the overseeing of the day-today activities and programmes of the Branch in the absence
of the Branch head, so good judgment and professionalism is essential. In addition,
he/she will direct the activities of library assistants and part-timers and will assist with
their training and appraisal. Regular written reports are required.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

Under the direction of the Unit Supervisor, the position performs a variety of paraprofessional
duties with minimal supervision. These include supervision of library assistant(s),
preparation of written and oral reports/correspondence, planning and organizing job
activities, which demonstrates skills such as decision-making, good judgment and
knowledge of library and college policies and procedures. Further, overseeing the
maintenance of collections, participation in the development of policies, services and
programmes, and overseeing the day-to-day activities and programmes of the Unit in the
absence of the Unit Head are to be undertaken. The position works closely with all Units
to ensure the delivery. of a high standard of service to patrons.

SPECIFIC DUTIES:

Provides evening and Saturday reference services.
Directs the activities of Library Assistants, and assists in their appraisal.
Assists in the Unit's budget preparation.
Assists with the updating of policies and procedures manuals.
Responds to reference questions received from patrons by telephone and in person.
Supervises. part-time, evening and weekend staff.
Ensures the enforcement of library policies-and procedures.
Assists with storage and access to all library resources, e.g. books, microfilm,
CD-ROM databases, microfiche and related equipment.
Conducts research in support of the Unit’s work.
. Assists with the conduct of research and the compilation of bibliographies.
Assumes responsibility for deposit of funds collected in the unit.
. Issues library passes.
. Organizes work schedules for library clearance.
. Handles Inter-Library loan requests
Assists with the delivery of Bibliographic Instructional programmes.
Provides group and individual tours of the unit/library.
. Assists patrons with the use of computers and other related electronic services
available.
. Assists in the development of projects for the making of the library and its resources.
20. Conducts training for Library Assistants on operational procedures.
. Attends library meetings.
. Serves on College wide committees
. Participates in library projects.
24, Drafts letters, reports, proposals as requested.
25. Recommends resources for acquisitions
. Any other duties which may be assigned.

LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II

QUALIFICATIONS: Normally a Bachelor’s Degree or the equivalent in relevant area,
OR for a technical/vocational or craft area, satisfactory completion of a recognized or
acceptable programme of training at the craft level, AND have at least ten (10) years of
experience working in the craft area, OR have a trained Teacher’s Certificate with :
specialization in the relevant craft area, PLUS at least six (6) years of teaching experience
in the area.

SALARY SCALE: SPS-5 $24,580 x $700 - $35,780

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest along with a. completed application
form and an up-to-date resume to the address below by December 6, 2007:

The Director
Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
P.O Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Or to hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please note that applications are available on The College’s website: www.cob.edu.bs





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

GN-618



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

| COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS |

_ No. 2007/PRO/npr/00599

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

:

| Whereas LEANNA ROLLE-BROWN of |
: 412 Australia Avenue, Elizabeth Estates in the |

: Eastern District of the Island of New
: Providence, one of the Islands of the
| Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made

| application to the Supreme Court of The |
: Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :

BROWN late of 412 Australia Avenue,

THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION

Island of New Providence, one of the Islands

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007. |

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00596

| deceased.
| Notice is hereby given that such applications
Whereas LOLITA MAE JOHNSON of |

;

Wentworth Street in the Island of New |
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made ;

application to the Supreme Court of The |

Bahamas, for letters of administration of the ;
Real and Personal Estate of WHITNEY |;
JOHNSON late of Wentworth Street in the |
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands :

ce COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS |

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration ;

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

2 No. 2007/PRO/npr/00600

: IN THE ESTATE OF PHILIP L. QUINN,
: late of 1645 West Turtle Creek South Bend
: in the State of Indiana, one of the States of |
: the United States of America, deceased |
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :

THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION
29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00597

Whereas CAROL NELLANIE
THOMPSON (nee) POITIER of 1985

: of fourteen days from the date hereof,
: application will be made.to the Supreme Court ;
: of The Bahamas in'the Probate Division by
: E. TERRY NORTH of the Eastern District
: of the Island of New Providence, one of the
i Islands of the Commonwealth of The
? Bahamas, Attorney-At- Law, the Authorized

Thatch Palm Avenue, Pinewood Gardens in :
the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :

application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and.Personal Estate of RONNIE
OSCAR THOMPSON late of 1985 Thatch
Palm Avenue, Pinewood Gardens in the

: LOUISE SOLOMON, the Personal
: Representatives of the Estate, by the State of
: Indiana, St Joseph County in the St. Joseph
: Probate Court, on the 18th day of November

Southern District of the Island of New ;
Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased ;

Notice is hereby given that such applications :
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2 .
: No. 2007/PRO/npr/00601

THE SUPREME COURT

|| COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

PROBATE DIVISION |

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007
No. 2007/PRO/npr/00598

Whereas ADA VIRGINIA MILLER of
Hillside Park off Bernard Road in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of ST. CLAIR ALPHONSO MILLER a.k.a.
ST. CLARE ALPHONSO MILLER a.k.a.
SINCLAIR ALPHONSO MILLER late of
Hillside Park off Bernard Road in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

| IN THE ESTATE OF EUGENE J. WEISS,

| the 3d day of August 1993.

of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by

Real and Personal Estate of WILLIAM :
Elizabeth Estates in the Eastern District of the |

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
_ (for) Registrar

On

THE SUPREME COURT |
PROBATE DIVISION |
29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

eorecsseses.

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration

Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration or
Testamentary in the above estate granted to
PAUL JUDE WEITHMAN and MARY

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

late of 11111 Biscayne Boulevard, Apartment
No. 301 in Dade County in the State of Florida,
one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court |

E. TERRY NORTH of the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration (single
personal representative) in the above estate
granted to ROBERTA L. WEISS, the
Personal Representative of the Estate, by the
Circuit Court for Dade County, Florida, on

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

aenenccscecccacarcerscvosersescoceececoscoscessecoeenesnesecounsesecosecceseseeceeseeeecesonecceee ess ecnsecaeueesececcnaeccesescesescessesscscesccescocccssenees:

THE TRIBUNE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT:

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00602
IN THE ESTATE OF MAGDALENE

SNYDER O’CONNOR, late of 100 John

Knox Road, Tallahassee in the State of Florida,
one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof,

: application will be made to the Supreme Court

of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
JAMES LENNOX MOXEY of Shirley Street
in the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration (single
personal representative) in the above estate
granted to VICTORIA E. HEULER, the
Personal Representative of the Estate, by the
Circuit Court for Leon County, Florida, Probate
Division, on the 6th day of June 2003.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00603
IN THE ESTATE OF BILLIE SCHOLZ

? KIRTLEY, late of 2023 dahlia Avenue,

Jefferson County, Louisville in the State of
Kentucky, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
JAMES LENNOX MOXEY of Shirley Street
in the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Certificate of Qualification in the |
above estate granted to ELIZABETH

MUELLER, the Executrix of the Estate, by
the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Court of
Justice, on the 20th day of March, 2000.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00604

IN THE ESTATE OF CHARLES E.
MURPHY JR., late of Carmel in the State of
California, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
JAMES LENNOX MOXEY of Shirley Street
in the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Order for Probate in the above estate
granted to CHARLES E. MURPHY III, the

' Executor of the Estate, by the Superior Court

of California, County of Monterey, on the 13th

i day of July 2007.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



THE TRIBUNE



~ one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of, The, Bakeranadeceased. eps



GN-618

SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00608

IN THE ESTATE OF THOMAS ROY HOLBIRD, SR., late of
Cherokee County in the State of Georgia, one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from
the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas in the Probate Division by KHALILA W. DORSETT
of the Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
Testamentary in the above estate granted to THOMAS ROY
HOLBIRD, JR., the Executor of the Estate, by the Probate Court
of Cherokee County in the State of Georgia one of the States of the
United States of America on the 12th day of June 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00611

Whereas GEORGE ANDRE WHITE of East Bay, Eastern District,
New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Person Estate of GEORGE
ADDINGTON WHITE a.k.a. GEORGE A WHITE a.k.a.
GEORGE WHITE, late of the Eastern District, New Providence,

ai

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the bol Rt

said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00612

Whereas DANIEL JOHNSON of White’s Subdivision, Eastern
District, New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the

* Real and Personal Estate of FLORA JOHNSON, late of the Eastern

District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

a Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00613 |

Whereas JOYANN MICHELLE GRIFFIN of No.16 East Coral
Estates Subdivision in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of CASTROMER
LASHLERUE GRIFFIN a.k.a. CASTROMER L. GRIFFIN, late
of No. 16 East Coral Estate Subdivision in the City of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

Asians cake Amand AA ke!

a RE

SEABRIDGE BAHAMAS,
a $200 million upscale
residential development
on West Bay Street by
Source Development
Group LLC, is designed
to appeal to Bahamian
professionals, entrepre-
neurs, retirees or foreign
owners searching for a
primary or secondary
home.



‘MARLEY
Resort © Spa

Cable Beach, Nassau Bahamas

Jamaican Cook
Chef
- Bartender



UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial
institutions in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy
private clients by providing them with comprehensive,
value enhancing services. Our client advisors combine
strong personal relationships with the resources that are
available from across UBS, helping them provide a full
range of wealth management services.

In order to strengthen our accounting team in Nassau, we
are looking to fill the following position:

Accountant

Essential Duties and responsibilities

¢ Ensure the quality, accuracy and completeness of all
financial data according to IFRS standards

¢ Ensure monthly closing process and correct allocation
of costs-and revenues

¢ Perform high quality reporting to head office and local
management

e Ensure reconciliation of bank accounts

Minimum Requirements

¢ CPA/CFA designation

¢ Sound working knowledge of IFRS.

e Extensive knowledge of MS Office and related
Application Software products. Knowledge of SAP
based accounting applications is a plus.

Minimum of 3 years experience in Accounting. Previous
work in an international financial institution or
accounting firm is a plus.

Preference will also be given to applicants having
obtained or in the process of earning additional
certification such as an MBA, Series 7 or other related
proficiency requirement.

In addition, the ideal candidate must possess strong
analytical skills and efficient functioning, be a highly
motivated team player, willing to adapt to a dynamic work
environment and able to multi-task, while working
independently and meeting tight deadlines.

Written applications should be addressed, until December
7th, 2007 to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

hrbahamas@ubs.com or



encase as

-UU7, PAGE 9B





$200m
project

FROM page 1

first encompassing 28, three
and four-bedroom luxury resi-
dences, landscaping and mul-
tiple pools, with pre-construc-
tion prices starting at $1.8 mil-

‘lion.

Phase two will include about
25 condominiums and five
penthouses, and Phase three
will be a combination of villas,
condominiums and penthous-
es. The master plan calls for
about 90 townhomes, with the
initial phase expected to be

* completed within 24 months.

The first home in that phase
will be finished in 18 months.

“We are very excited about
Seabridge Bahamas,” said
William W. Williams, a direc-
tor of the Alpharetta, Geor-
gia-based Source Development
Group LLC.

“When we first saw the
property, I think we all had the
same instant response — it was
perfect. We said to each other,
if you could settle anywhere,
where else would you want to
be? The site and the location
offered everything — high ele-
vation with magnificent sea
views, ocean breezes and prox-
imity to Nassau and Paradise

.- Island; only minutes from the

airport. We envisioned a very
special place buyers could call
‘Home’ that would do justice
to this special location.”

Source Development’s prin-
cipals have a track record in
residential and commercial
developments in the US,
Europe and the Caribbean.
One is understood to have
recently constructed the Mar-
tin Luther King High School
in Atlanta, Georgia, which has
earned top reviews, while
another renovated and trans-
formed a Scottish hotel into
one of the world’s best.

This is their first project in
the Bahamas, and apart from
Mr Williams the partners
include Bo and Miriam Gar-
rett and Roger J. Mueller.

The private gated commu-
nity will rise up to 85 feet on
the site slightly east of the
Caves. The largest of the villas
in Phase one will be four bed-
rooms with four-and-a-half
baths, 4,320 square feet of air-
conditioned space, and two
large balconies with ocean
views.

Slightly smaller three-bed-
room units have separate ser-
vice elevators. All have
garages, hurricane-rated glass,
top-of-the-line appliances,
granite counters and limestone
flooring. Purchaser options
include the possible addition
of elevators, plunge pools and
turn-key custom interior design
and furnishing.

Bahamian sales and mar-
keting is being led by HG
Christie Ltd. The architect is
Neil Behagg and Associates
Company of Nassau.

Other Bahamian contracts
have been awarded to Nassau
residents Carleton Blair (CSB
Consultants), Brock Turner
(CVE Construction Value
Engineering Ltd), Lambert
Knowles (Engineering &
Technical Services) and Keith
Bishop (Islands by Design).
Interiors will be designed by
Roomers Ltd, led by Leslie
Callender and Hazel Stirling.

The project will incorporate
extensive landscaping with
existing specimen trees.
“Preservation pays and makes
economic as well as ethical
sense,” said Mrs Garrett. “In
fact, once we started to clear
some of the bush we discov-
ered beautiful palm trees we
did not know were there, and
we have incorporated them
into our entry and overall
design.”



PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

NEW ISSUE

= ) FIDELITY

Fidelity Bahamas International Investment Fund Limited
Index-Linked Sub Fund

Principal Protected T!GRS, Series 1
TOTAL |NDEX-LINKED GLOBAL RETURNS SECURITY





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indices composed of the iShares MSCI Emerging Markets Index
(EEM) (25% weight), S&P 500 index, (25% weight) Dow Jones
Euro STOXX 50 Index (25% weight) and the Nikkei 225 Index
(25% weight)’.

Return is measured from the opening price of the indices on
January 2, 2008 to the closing index levels on June 30, 2011.

100% principal protection provided at maturity.

Invest in Bahamian Dollars.

Maturity June 30, 2011.

iShares MSCI Emerging
Markets Indes (EEM)

S&P 500 Index

Dow Jones Euro STOXX 50
Index

Nikkei 225 Index



From Fidelity obtain, read and fully understand the
Fidelity Bahamas International investment Fund Offering
Memorandum together with the Index Linked Sub Fund
Offering Memorandum and the Pricing Supplement
Terms and Conditions of the Principal Protected TIGRS,

which provide additional important disclosures and

risk factors.

A subscription Form is included with the Pricing Supple-

ment Terms & Conditions.

= ) FIDELITY

Helping You Create & Manage Wealth




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» 100% Participation
Minimum Investment of $10,000

The iShares MSCI Emerging Markets Index (Emerging
Markets) seeks to provide investment results that correspond to
equity market performance in the global emerging markets. Top
holdings include China Mobile, Petroleo Brasileiro and Lukoil.
The S&P 500 Index (U.S.A.) is designed to measure
performance of the broad U.S. economy through changes in

500 stocks representing all major industries. Top-holdings include
General Electric, Citi Group and Google.

The Dow Jones Euro STOXX 50 Index (Europe) represents
the performance of 50 blue-chip Supersector leaders in Europe.
Top holdings include Nestle, GSK, Daimler AG, BP and HSBC.
The Nikkei-225 Index (Japan) is one of Japan’s major stock
market indices representing 225 actively traded issues of the
Tokyo Stock Exchange, First Section. Top holdings Kyocera Corp.,
Toyota and Sony Corp.

@

19,000 —___



17.000 -sgsyeiseeteteite tao ineere eres st tage ements fs Soe aN

oeseetemencenennrmnnernenpempanenenennene nerneaneene:

S
z

€
8

Jan-O5 j
Jul06 1

' Return is net of any incentive fee payable to the Investment Manager. See
the Index Linked Sub Fund Offering Memorandum for details.

The 3.5 year historical Compound Annual |
Growth Rate (CAGR) on the Basket of | |
Indices was 17.50%"

*Past performance is no guarantee of future results,

RETURNS = PRINCIPAL AMOUNT

+ VARIABLE RETURN



Principal Variable

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TAT eum linked to
100% of the upside
Protected at )
NEST ai price of the indices
basket, less the
incentive fees —



51 Frederick Street
PO Box N 4853

Nassau, The Bahamas
T 242.356.7764/5
Email: tigrs@fidelitybahamas.com





Full Text


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McRIB -
PURE BBQ
G00D

HIGH
LOW

WEATHER

?m lovin’ it..

82F
72F

PARTLY








RS

Samuel Knowles
will now be
retried next year

@ CHESTER ROBARDS and
BRENT DEAN as
A MISTRIAL was declared

yesterday in the drug conspiracy

trial of Samuel “Ninety”

Knowles, who will now be retried

on the charges early next year.

The decision was handed
down when a majority of jurors
were unable to reach a decision,
leading to the January 22, 2008
retrial.

Federal Prosecutor George
Karavetsos had, presented clos-
ing arguments on Monday in the
case of USA vs Samuel Knowles,




One of country’s
UMMC teat
caught by police
@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net













POLICE have caught one
of the country’s most wanted
men after a car chase in the
Southern district Monday
night that ended in the cap-
ture of Sherwin Knowles.
Knowles, also known as
“Worm”, was arrested in July,
2007 on suspicion of armed
robbery, rape, and burglary
but managed to escape from
East Street South police sta-
tion in July. He evaded the
police for four months before
being caught shortly before
10pm Monday.
According to a press state-.

SEE page 10



















Samuel ‘Ninety’ Knowles

armed with oversized poster
boards and wiretapped phone
calls. One board featured Samuel
“Ninety” Knowles at the top of
an organizational chart, where he
is depicted as a General with foot
soldiers dispersed across four
countries.

“They carried out his orders
with military precision,” said Mr

SEE page 10

29 Cubans are

intercepted off
Cay Sal Bank

TWENTY-NINE Cubans
were intercepted six miles off
Cay Sal bank by US Coast
Guard and Royal Bahamas
Defence Force boats in a joint-
operation on Monday.

They were said to have been
in the process of being smug-
gled on a go-fast vessel. Two
people are being questioned in

.connection with the incident,

the RBDF said in a statement
yesterday.

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BAHAMAS EDITION

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

CELEBRATING EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON’S

UNPARALLELED

Man

ee - a

a Rit re al
ALVIN MCLEOD’S body lies
near to his bike yesterday
morning.

@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net








A 43-YEAR-OLD man
died on Bacardi Road after
suffering a seizure during a
morning bicycle ride on
Tuesday, police reported.

Assistant Supt Walter
Evans reported that Alvin
McLeod, of Gladstone Road
was biking in the western
area shortly before 9 am yes-
terday when he apparently
suffered a seizure and fell to
the ground, clutching his
chest.

Emergency response tech-
nicians were called and pro-
nounced him dead at the
scene. Foul play is not sus-
pected, ASP Evans said. Mr
McLeod was an employee
of Kamilla Builders.



















50 YEARS IN JOURNALISM

‘Winety’ mistrial declared

dies during bic






Allegations of

corruption within :
_ been printed about

parliamentary
registration
department

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

bdean@tribunemedia.net

ALLEGATIONS of corrup- :
tion within the parliamentary ;
registration department
emerged yesterday in election :
court as testimony alleged that :
Jamaican Manani Taylor paid :
a man called “Keith” $1,000 to :
obtain a Bahamian voters card. }

Steve Mallon, a foreign inves- :
tigator hired by Allyson May- ;
nard-Gibson, gave testimony

SEE page 10








Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Report: claim that
‘misinformation’ has

businessman behind
real estate book

REPRESENTATIVES from
the Bahamas Real Estate Book
are reportedly claiming a series
of “misinformation” and “mis-
conceptions” have been printed
in local dailies about the Amier-
ican businessmen behind the
publication and their legal status
to conduct business in The
Bahamas. :

In an e-mail forwarded to The
Tribune’s offices last week, a
representative from. the
Bahamas Real Estate book
claims the publishers have a

SEE page 10






PRICE =75¢

Rudy King held in
connection with
alleged attempt to
defraud US govt

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

RUDOLPH Kermit King,
also known as Dr Rudy King, is
being held in the Metropolitan
Detention Centre in Los Ange-
les, California.

According to Dr King’s spir-
itual adviser, the well-known
numerologist Jerome Carter, Dr
King is being held in connec-
tion with an alleged attempt to
defraud the United States gov-
ernment of more than $2 mil-
lion.

Dr King is the chairman of
the non-profit King Humani-
tarian and Global Foundation.
However, he is known predom-
inantly for his award cere-
monies that have brought him
notoriety throughout much of
the Caribbean.

Speaking to The Tribune yes-
terday, Mr Carter expressed his
deep disappointment in Dr
King.

“Why would you lie to your
psychic?” Mr Carter began.

SEE page 10

~ Union claims dogs,

security guards set
on secretary general
by Lyford Cay Club

management

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

CHAOS erupted at the
Lyford Cay Club yesterday
after management of the Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers
Union claimed that dogs and
security officers were set on
union Secretary General Leo
Douglas when-club manage-
ment “suddenly” decided not
to hold a scheduled meeting
with the union.

This scene, said union presi-
dent Roy Colebrooke, angered
employees of the club who
came to Mr Douglas’ defence
resulting in the police having to
be called to the property.

Mr Colebrooke said that the
unnecessary and “disappoint-
ing” actions of the Lyford Cay
Club has left the union with no
other choice than to demand a

SEE page 10


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007



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THE TRIBUNE

‘Let’s fight violence together’

. By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ORGANISERS of the civic
group Bahamas Against Crime
are calling for Bahamians to
come together and be proac-
tive in the fight against vio-
lence.

Contending that the
Bahamas’ crime problem is fun-
damentally a spiritual one, the

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Anti-crime group sends
out plea to Bahamians

group’s leaders have named
Thursday a day of prayer and
fasting.

“Any time between 6am to
6pm, those who know the pow-
er of prayer are encouraged to

go to God in intercessory |

prayer on behalf of our nation,”
Reverend CB Moss, one of the
group’s leaders, said at a press
conference in Rawson Square
yesterday.

At 6pm on Thursday, the
BAC campaign will be official-

ly. launched with a prayer ser-:

vice in Rawson Square.

All concerned citizens are
invited to attend.

The newly launched group is
a project of the Council for
Social and Economic Develop-
ment, the Bahamas Christian
Council and Civil Society
Bahamas.

Reverend C B_ Moss

announced yesterday that the
group aims to:

e change mind-sets about
crime and violence
_ © assemble a Hands Across
Bahamas link as a demonstra-
tion against crime

e raise funds for the fight ©

against crime

Rev Moss noted that the pro-
gramme cannot not be effec-
tive without the help the
Bahamian people.

He challenged Bahamians
not to be “paralyzed into inac-
tion” by fear, but rather to
“step up to the plate.”

“This project is not purport-
ing to be able to reduce crime —
no project can reduce crime —
people reduce crime. So at the
end of the exercise if crime is
not reduced it may be because
the people refuse to do what is
required.”

Rev Moss said the crime
plaguing the nation is sympto-
matic of deep-rooted issues. He
also chastised those who place
the blame for the country’s
unprecedented murder rate on
the police.

“We see the police as an anti-
dote to crime and they’re not -—
they’re just a part of the solu-
tion,” Rev Moss argued, call-
ing for the state, church, and
community to work hand-i -In-
hand.

He issued an appeal to cor-
porate Bahamas to become a
partner in BAC by pledging
monetary support. |“!

The funds raised will be ‘used
to support national youth pro-
grammes, Project Sure, police
community programmes and
crime prevention education.

In a bid to ensure trans-
parency, BAC has contacted
the Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants to provide
financial oversight with external
auditing performed by Deloitte
and Touche. Individual dona-
tions and volunteers are being
sought by the organisation. °

... and let us pray for deliverance from crime

i BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

‘dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - With 71 mur-
ders already recorded this year,
a Grand Bahama pastor is call-
ing on all- religious leaders to
open their churches on Friday
to allow the nation to pray for
deliverance from crime and vio-
lence.

Pastor Phil Grant and his wife

- Co-pastor Ann Grant of Agape

House expressed their concerns
about the murders and violence
that are “robbing us of our
young people”.

They believe that prayer is
necessary if there is to be a
change in the fate of a nation
which currently has the fourth
highest incarceration rate in the
world and one of the highest
murder rates per capita in the
region.

“We are asking every church

GLINTON

COUNSEL

in the country to leave their ‘

doors open all day from 6am to
6pm on November 30 so people
can stop in at their convenience
to pray for our nation,” said
Pastor Grant.

He is also calling for collec-

tive prayer at the hours of 6am,
9am, noon, 3pm and 6pm.
- Pastor Grant said that mem-
bers of Agape House has
embarked on a 90-day-of-prayer
mission, and have been praying
at 5.30am for the past 62 days.

Rev Dr Emmette Weir, pas-

tor of St Paul’s Methodist

Church, also called for “the
churches to call the country to
prayer”.

He said the church must also
become involved in teaching
conflict resolution.

Pastor Grant believes that a
breakdown in family values has
contributed to crime levels.

“We must forgive those who
have murdered, but on the oth-
er hand justice must be served
to those who break the law.

The Partners and Staff of:

“And if that means that we
have to petition the powers that
be to change laws, then so be .
it,” he said.

Pastor Grant said he supports
capital punishment. “The Bible
speaks about capital punish-
ment-in Numbers chapter 35:1
believe that punishment for
crime is somewhat of-a deter-
rent — it will not wipe out mur-
der altogether, but definitely, it
will be a deterrent,” he said: ':

‘Co-pastor Anne Grant said
that Agape House has started a
support group for families of
murder victims. -

“We recognise that the judi-
cial system and government ‘can
only do so much, but when we
raise the volume of our prayer
we will get the answer that is
needed to deter this spirit.of
violence that has captivated the

minds of our young: people,

especially the young men,* pane
said.

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 3

THE TRIBUNE

NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD: Senior staff controversy

0 In brief

Road closure
plans are
announced

THE government has
announced road closure
plans in connection with the
paving works at Indepen-
dence Roundabout.

“Independence Round-

- about Closed” signs will be
. placed at the following
junctions today and tomor-
row:

e Tonique Williams Dar-
ling Highway/Yellow Elder
Way
e Baillou Hill Road/
Robinson Road

e Palm Tree Avenue/East
Street

e Lincoln Boulevard/
Robinson Road

e Soldier Road/Baillou
Hill Road

e Independence/Robin-
son Road/Prince Charles
Drive ;

East bound traffic travel-
ling on the Tonique
Williams Darling Highway
will be diverted south to
Baillou Hill Road, east to
Soldier Road, north to
Abundant Life Road, or
east onto the East-West
Highway.

Southbound traffic on
East Street will be diverted
east to Robinson Road,
west to the Independence
Drive, south to Abundant
Life Road, or west to Sol-
dier Road.

_ Northbound traffic on
East Street will be diverted
west to Soldier Road, north
to Baillou Hill Road, or
east to Robinson Road.

West bound traffic on
Independence Drive will be
diverted south to Abundant
Life Road, west to Soldier
Road, or north to Baillou
Hill Road.

World AIDS
Day walk
planned for
Saturday

BAHAMIANS are being
invited to “take the lead” in
a special World Aids Day
walk in Nassau on Satur-
day.

Hundreds of walkers are
expected to support the
World Aids Campaign
fund-raising drive in what
organisers hope will be a
fun event for the whole
family.

The walk starts at 6.30am
from Goodman’s Bay ‘park-
ing lot on West Bay Street
and will proceed eastwards
to Arawak Cay. A second
route starts at Perpall Tract
Park to Arawak Cay.

On Friday, a World Aids
Day church service will be
held at Grants Town Sev-
enth Day Adventist Church
in Wellington Street (1pm-
2pm). The public is also
invited on Saturday at
11am.

In a press statement
issued this week, organisers
said: “Presently in the
Bahamas there is an ongo-
ing battle to find adequate
funding for the increasing
demand for anti-retroviral
medications for those who
are infected.

“In the Bahamas, the
reality of the AIDS stigma
and prejudice against per-

. sons with HIV is preventing
some individuals from
being tested for HIV. You
can play a role in helping to
eliminate the HIV/AIDS
discrimination and stigma
in our country by becoming
more knowledgeable.”



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

: on the fate that may befall a
? number of senior staff at the
: National Insurance Board has
: yet to reach the media — despite

Minister of Housing with
: responsibility for National
3 Insurance Kenneth Russell, told
would be prepared and released
regarding the potential changes
this deadline has come and
: gone, repeated calls to the min-
: ister, the chairman of NIB
: Patrick Ward, and the perma-

: were not returned.

: was said to be “very busy” and

Tribune Staff Reporter

turnquest@tribunemedia.net before press time last night.



When The Tribune attempted
to reach Minister Russell yes-
terday morning, he was said to

THE promised statement
from the Ministry of Housing
be “in a meeting”.

the earlier assurances of the
cabinet minister responsible.
On Friday, November 23,

inet.
The Tribune that a statement
“by Monday” (November 26)

at the top of NIB.

However, despite the fact that the matter.

nent secretary Camille Johnson
At llam yesterday, Mr Ward

considered for dismissal.

Bahamas third in domestic violence deaths
in Latin America, Caribbean - UN report



“One in three women may suf- |

fer from abuse and violence in
her lifetime. This is an appalling
human rights violation, yet it
_remains one of the invisible and
-under-recognised pandemics of
_ our time.”

Nicole

Kidman

phicbe reetes wove

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2
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A message was left, outlining
the nature of the inquiry. How-
ever, when a follow up call was
made, Mr Russell was report-
ed to have already left the Min-
istry of Housing to attend Cab-

Also, according to the
Bahamas Information Services
(BIS), no word has reached
them of any statement that was
even “in the works” from the
Ministry of Housing pertaining

Initial reports reaching The
Tribune last week alleged that
the director of the National
Insurance Board Lennox
McCartney, Donald Nougez,
and three other senior officials
at NIB had either received let-
ters of dismissal, or were being

Housing Minister fails to deliver
on his promise of NIB statement

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST would return a call “as soon as

he is free.” He did not do so



THE Bahamas ranks third
in domestic violence fatalities
in Latin America and the
Caribbean, according to a new
United Nations report on vio-
lence against women.

Uruguay tops the list, fol-
lowed by Chile and then the
Bahamas.

The UN Development
Fund for Women (UNIFEM)
on Monday released a new
report, which states that vio-
lence against women in Latin
America and the Caribbean
is an obstacle to economic,
social and democratic devel-
opment.

The report — entitled “No

more! The right of women to
live a life free from violence

teat Ameri¢a and the *

Caribbean” = states’ that

physical, sexual and psy-

chological abuse are staple
practices in Latin America
and the Caribbean.

The report also highlights
the region’s problems with
sexual violence in families
and workplaces, human traf-

ficking and the abuse of AIDS
HIV victims.

Joining the cause of elimi-
nating violence against
women, UN Goodwill
Ambassador and Hollywood
actor Nicole Kidman yester-
day launched an internet cam-
palgn urging people to join the
ight in trying to stop this
“appalling human rights vio-
lation.”

The UNIFEM initiative is
aimed at gathering on-line sig-
natures through a website to
urge politicians to place end-
ing violence against women
high on the global agenda.
The campaign will run until
March 8, 2008 — International
Women’s Day.

“One in three women may
suffer from abuse and violence

TROPICAL

EXTERMINATORS
RUE
dit) sei yaar alg





Give us a
fair deal,
say local
musicians

YOUNG Bahamian musi-
cians are appealing for a fair
deal in their own land, claim-
ing foreign artists are getting
preferential treatment.

They claim young Bahamian
songwriters and entertainers are
struggling to survive while for-
eign recording artists “are treat-
ed like kings and queens.”

The Young Bahamian Music
Society has sent out fliers to
local media highlighting an
alleged lack of official interest in
youth issues.

“At a time when violent
crime is at an all-time high, do
you know why Bahamian youth
can’t get enough civic support to
hold a free ‘Stop the Violence’

































to live positive lives?” the soci-
ety asks.

“When has any country
pulled out their red carpet to
welcome any young Bahamian
recording artist while disre-
specting their own? Never! It
doesn’t happen!

“That’s because Jamaica
takes care of its own. Ameri-
can takes care of its own. Yet
it’s obvious that the Bahamas
is so busy promoting the music
of recording artists from every-
where else that it doesn’t have
the time nor want to use its
resources to take care of its own
dedicated and hard-working
young musical artists.”

The society is staging the
“Stop the Violence” free youth
concert and songwriting com-

petition on December 15.

in her lifetime. This is an
appalling human rights viola-
tion, yet it remains one of the
invisible and under-recognised
pandemics of our time,” Ms
Kidman, said in a statement.

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event to encourage their peers |
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352



Tribune’s experiment with reform

CAN A PERSON who starts life down the
crooked path of crime, be encouraged to change
his ways if he were presented with better choic-
es? i

Early in our career this question took on
practical proportions.

One day the late Dean William Granger,
prison chaplain, came to The Tribune to see
Sir Etienne, then publisher of this newspaper,
and ourselves. He said he had an idea. One
that he thought had great possibilities to reha-
bilitate prisoners and return them as new men to

society. He wanted to introduce the prison ~

release programme. Would we be the first to
help?

Here we were being asked to take prisoners
onto our staff while they were still serving their
sentences. He proposed that we take three.
Two of these were constantly in and out of
prison on charges of theft and fraud. They were
of superior intelligence and good writers. He felt
that their only problem was that they had not
found their niche in life. He believed The Tri-
bune would be just the opportunity that these
men needed to turn their misguided lives
around.

Here we were back to the old “nature or
nurture” question — a question of whether a
person’s genes were more influential than his
social environment in directing his destiny. We
were particularly interested in the subject from
an academic point of view. Our first degree was
in philosophy and psychology from Toronto
University. From our psychology studies we
had left university convinced that many troubled
persons can be helped, but there were others —
those referred to by society as “incorrigible
rogues” — for whom there was no hope, no
matter how hard one tried. They were like a
piece of pottery that had come from the facto-
ty flawed and could only be repaired by being
sent back to the factory. However, the major
problem was that we were dealing with human
beings, and humans could not be returned to the
factory. And so from our case studies we sin-
cerely believed that short of a miracle there
were many who were not salvageable.

Of course, the good Dean was not such a pes-
Simist. He saw good in all God’s creatures.
Whereas he believed there was salvation for
all men on Earth, we saw last minute salvation
only in Heaven for those who could not be
changed on Earth. You know, the repentant
thief hanging on the cross who gets a last minute
reprieve from Jesus to enter his father’s heav-
enly kingdom. :

Well, the bet was on — the Dean convinced
that we were about to change the lives of three
worthy men, and we, doubtful, but deeply inter-
ested in the experiment.

We quickly eliminated one of the three. He
showed signs of a violent temper. We did ‘not
think him safe in a newsroom where conflicting

. ideas were often vigorously debated. The other
two were indeed very smart and quickly set-

tled in.

Bank
Financing
Available

One was extremely debonnaire. We felt that
with his self assured air, his courtly manners, his
quick wit and writing ability, he would go far.
He did indeed go far — right back to the prison
cell.

One day on his lunch hour, he, with his “sec-
retary” in tow left The Tribune, crossed the
road to what was then'the Red Cross head-
quarters on Dowdeswell Street, and somehow
took charge of a telephone. He settled his “sec-
retary” in and gave her a list of businessmen to
call. They were told that Sir Etienne wanted
to speak with them. When they came to the
phone our man of business attempted to imper-
sonate Sir Etienne, begging for money for one
of his many charities. They were told where to
send the money. They all thought it strange
because it was not Sir Etienne’s style. Sir Eti-
enne was noted for his charitable work. How-
ever, whenever a charity needed money, he
wrote an article in this column and directed the
donations to the Royal Bank of Canada. Public
donations never passed through his hands. His
friends knew that and so they were concerned.
The first to call Sir Etienne was Sir George
Roberts, president of the Senate, a man who
served on Sir Etienne’s Crippled Children’s
Committee.

Sir Etienne was so alarmed at what Sir
George told him that he was waiting at the front
door to confront our little con man when he
returned from his mischievous lunch. Needless
to say he was on the Spm bus back to prison to
serve the rest of his time behind bars. He never
darkened The Tribune’s newsroom again. Of
course, our staff never knew that they were
rubbing shoulders with two prisoners as they
went about gathering the news. They never

“was being made right under their noses and
Sithey weren’t astute enough to sniff it.

Over the years this particular “bright star” in
the late Dean’s firmament, ricocheted back and
forth from prison to freedom, then back again to
prison. ; :

We also suspected when he was out. We
would get a call from some worried business
person asking us to put an alert notice in The
Tribune warning other shopkeepers not to be
taken in by a well dressed, well educated gen-
tleman who so confused the salesgirl with his
fast talk that he would leave the store with a
small item that he had supposedly purchased
and with a considerable amount of change that
he had received fromthe $100 bill that he had
put on the counter. However, when he had
secured the change and quickly left the store it
was found that his $100 note had left with him.
This had all the hallmarks of our man. A real Mr

Yo-Yo bouncing in and out of prison. He wasa .

master thief — one who had come from the
factory flawed.

Our third man had more staying power and
resisted temptation longer.

We shall tell you his story in this column

tomorrow.

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THE TRIBUNE



Punishment
must fit crime

EDITOR, The Tribune.

OUR once quaint and quiet
country has now recorded
three score and ten murders

for 2007. Should this trend

continue, eighty murders will
be recorded by the end of the
year, equating to a murder
rate of 24 per 100,000 (on
a 330,000 population base).

By way of comparison, the»

US has a murder rate of 5.5
per 100,000 and Italy a murder
rate of 1.3 per 100,000. Closer
to home, Jamaica has a mur-
der rate of 46 per 100,000
while Barbados, with a popu-
lation and economy very sim-
ilar to ours, a murder rate of
11 per 100,000.

While it felt nice to have
quoted the above statistics,
having done so I’m really not

‘ at all certain why I did since,

in my view, the figures really
have little bearing on my top-
ic.
Our murder rate, which has
been unacceptably high for far
too many years, has in recent
times given rise to an out-
pouring of cries, particularly
by those who travail in
anguish having had the life of
a loved’ one mercilessly
snuffed out, for the resump-
tion of capital punishment.
Those for and those opposed
to capital punishment are so
firmly entrenched in their
positions that what I say will
likely have little bearing on
their views. Yet, the perspec-
tive I am about to offer is
somewhat unique and, to a
degree, erudite. Capital pun-
ishment opponents may there-
fore wish to give it a modicum
of consideration.

Those opposed generally
raise two concerns. Firstly
they argue, with some
panache no doubt, that capital
punishment is not a deterrent.

Here, they surely miss the
point. The primary purpose of
capital punishment is not to
prevent murder any more
than the primary purpose of
a fine or incarceration is
intended to prevent any other
form of criminal behaviour.

Retribution, recompense if
you will, extracting from an
offender pay-back similar in
degree to the individual’s
transgression, is the genesis,
the foundation forming the
basis for imposition of a sen-
tence.

The punishment must fit the
crime.

Laws of the Old Testament
characterise it as an “eye for
an eye, a tooth for a tooth.”

In the New Testament Jesus
described it thusly “with which
measure ye mete it shall be









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LETTERS

4

ove aelnnlere lana

measured to you.”

Some New Testament
scholars seemingly wish to
limit Jesus’ words of “giving
back in equal measure” to dis-
pensing of rewards only. I
regard such limitation as being
indicative of intellectual
depravity for surely, the dis-
pensing of punishment (by the
appropriate authority), is
inherent in the words uttered.

The second argument
advanced by opponents is the
possibility of someone being
wrongly convicted given the
finality of capital punishment.

Here again I believe they
miss the point. The wrongful
conviction of anyone for any
crime is abhorrent. And yet,
while wrongful convictions can
and no doubt do occur,
though with significant infre-
quency, I doubt anyone has
the gumption to suggest courts
should discharge every case
that comes before them
because such a risk exists.
Moreover, capital cases by
their very nature receive far
more review than other cas-
es. Hence, the risk of erro-
neous judgment is minimised.

As to the finality of the pun-
ishment, I offer the following
perspective. We describe our-
selves as a Christian nation —
“to live is Christ and to die is
gain”. Also, to quote a good
reverend gentleman I recently
heard: “Death is only a phase
not a finality, it is temporal
rather than terminal”.

Individuals on death row
are ministered to more than
any other grouping of incar-
cerated individuals. I would
proffer that proportionately,
more death row inmates have
found Christ than those
among the general prison pop-
ulation. Surely it would be far
better for an individual to be
deprived of a mortal body
rather than the loss of an
immortal soul.

In closing I offer the fol-
lowing additional perspective.
It is my considered opinion
that lawlessness begets law-
lessness. It is also my consid-
ered opinion that lawlessness
may arise from acts of com-

mission as well as acts of omis-.

sion.

I have it on good authority
that the most recent five-year
period of our history is the
only such period in our mod-
ern Bahamas that the Execu-
tive Branch of Government
failed to carry out the Capi-

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tal punishment statute on our
law books.

Might this omission be con-
sidered an act of lawlessness
thus begetting lawlessness?

Laws are on the books to
be enforced. Those in Gov-
ernment who by dint of con-
science are so strongly
opposed to capital punish-
ment, to the point of not
enforcing the law, should
show the courage of their con-
viction, move for repeal of the
law and be prepared to face
the electorate to whom they
owe their position in Parlia-
ment. Equally though, it is to
be noted that faith without
works is dead.

Mind you, I also believe that
some justices in our court sys-
tem are much too inclined to
show sympathy to individuals
on remand for serious crimes.
Such action not only appears
to ignore the plight of the vic-
tims of crime it also increases
the likelihood of additional
crimes being perpetrated by
the criminally minded as well
as the risk of potential wit-

‘nesses being interferred with.

MICHAEL R MOSS
Freeport,

Bahamas,

November 26, 2007.

Crime in
our beloved
Bahamaland

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me space to
show that we as a nation are-
not serious about the crime
situation in this country.
There is a lot of talk about
crime and the reason for it. To
show we are not serious about
getting rid of it, here is a solu-
tion that would decrease it
immediately and forever, but I
guarantee you it would not be
done, hence my statement we
are not serious about getting
rid of it.

If a person is charged with
murder, that case should be
given immediate attention,
meaning being processed
through the courts. The
appeal process should be
allowed to happen as a priori-
ty until all the process of
appeals are exhausted and if
the result is still guilty an
immediate hanging should
commence. If laws prevent
this from taking place today
then they should be changed. I
know there is a backlog of cas-
es pending, this signifies the
need for more magistrates. I
know this is costly for the
Government but at the rate of
killings going,on in this coun-
try, Tourism which is already
down would go even further. I
know the Christian Counsel
would disagree with capital
punishment, but ask them to
come up with a solution and
you get nothing.

We have too much talking
going on and as we speak the
killings go on. Enough talk, a
solution expressed here will
work. Dammit, time to do
something, innocent lives are
being taken, people are hurt-
ing, families are broken, peo-
ple live in fear. Forget the air-
port project, the straw-market,
the wutless PLP, let’s put the
energy and resources where it
is needed most at this time,
crime. | am in no way suggest-
ing to forget what else needs
to be done but to prioritise. 1
know the straw vendors need
a new straw-market and so on,
but answer this who would
they sell to if no one comes to
the Bahamas because the
crime rate is so high here?

Come on nation, everyone
needs to get together on this
and petition Government and
all other bodies associated to
make the necessary changes to
curb this problem that is crip-
pling our beloved Bahama-
land.

I presented a guaranteed
solution to reduce the prob-
lem considerably. If there is
something else someone
knows will work please make
the suggestion. Where there is
harshness of penalties there is
less crime, check Singapore.

K T JONES
Nassau,
November 21, 2007.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 5



In brief

Book on
Andros is _
published

A BOOK reflecting life on
Andros half a century ago has
just been published by Nassau
author Cynthia Ferguson
Fowler.

_ The book, Life on the Lum-
ber Farm, The Forgotten Indus-
try of the Bahamas, records the
days when Andros was a hive
of industrial activity.

Apart from lumbering,
locals were active as sisal grow-
ers, spongers, charcoal manu-
facturers, handricraft experts
and fishermen,

The book traces the lumber
business on Andros from the
1940s onwards and names the
many families associated with
the operation.

© A review of the book will
appear in a future edition of
The Tribune.

Children’s choir
to perform

a ‘Holiday
Celebration’

THE National Children’s
choir will be performing a
“Holiday Celebration” at
the National Centre for the
Performing Arts on Shirley
Street this Saturday.

Also singing at the event
will be the National Boy’s
Choir and two “surprise”
choirs.

The event begins at Spm,
ends at 7.30pm and entry is
$5, organisers said.

Kidnapped
child found
slain in Haiti

m@ PORT-AU-PRINCE,
Haiti



KIDNAPPERS killed a 7-
year-old boy because his fam-
ily could;not afford to pay.
US$680 in ransom, police said _.
Monday, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The body of Schneider
Hervil was found Friday in the
town of Cabaret, north of the
Haitian capital, about two
weeks after abductors snatched
him from his family’s home,
police spokesman Frantz Lere-
bours told a news conference.
_ The specific cause of his

death was not known, Lere-
bours said.

The child’s family received a
phone call from kidnappers
demanding US$680 for his
release, but was unable to raise
the cash, he said.

No arrests have been made.

At least 16. kidnappings
~ were reported in Haiti through

‘Nov. 20 this year, down from
the nearly 80 reported for the
full month of November 2006,
U.N. peacekeepers said.

indians’ pitcher
Lara critical
after crash

lf SANTO DOMINGO,
Dominican Republic

CLEVELAND Indians
reliever Juan Lara was hospi-
talized in critical condition
Monday after an automobile
accident that killed two peo-
ple on a motorcycle, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Lara, who pitched in one
game for Cleveland last sea-
son, was returning from a
Dominican winter league
game early Sunday in San
Pedro de Macoris when the
sports utility vehicle he was
driving was struck by a speed-
ing motorcycle, killing the dri-
ver and passenger, officials
said.

The 26-year-old Lara, who
has pitched in 10 U.S. Major
League Baseball games over
the past two seasons, fractured
two ribs, sustained a head
injury from the accident and
is breathing with the help of a
ventilator, said Dashira Mar-
tincz, a spokeswoman for the
Plaza de la Salud hospital in
Santo Domingo.

The Estrellas Orientales,
Lara’s winter league team,
reported that the pitcher also
had a perforated lung and a
blood clot from the head
injury.

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Couple believe ‘conspiracy’ behind

A NASSAU couple whose
valuable Privy Council documents
have “gone missing” en route to
London believe they have again
fallen victim to a conspiracy to
deny them justice.

Greg and Tanya Cash, who
have been fighting the Baptist
education authorities through the
courts for five years, are planning
to take legal action against the
firm which accepted the papers
12 days ago for delivery in the
UK

While not blaming the UPS
manager in Nassau, Mr Richard
Ratcliffe, personally the couple
suspect the parcel never left Nas-
sau, and that it might have been

“lost” by someone working for
their adversaries.

“We cannot believe this,” Mrs
Cash told The Tribune yesterday,
“After all we have been through,
for this to happen is the last
straw.”

The package, which was hand-
ed over to UPS’s Nassau office
on November 15, was to have
been delivered to the Privy Coun-
cil offices in London on Novem-
ber 19.

Greg and me OFT

Although the UPS on-line
tracking service records that the
papers were left with a man called
“George” for safekeeping in a
storage room in Downing Street,
London, British authorities have
told Mr and Mrs Cash that no
such person and no such storage
room exists.

As of last night, the package
had still not reached the Privy
Council, even though London



officials working for the council
have tried their best to trace it.

“People there have been very
helpful,” said Mrs Cash, “but the
package is still nowhere to be
found. We are now taking action
against UPS because we entered
a contract with them which, as
far as we are concerned, they
have not fulfilled.”

Mr and Mrs Cash have been
engaged in a bitter legal war with

Cable Bahamas yet to
decide on ‘gay channel’

H By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

CABLE Bahamas has yet to decide whether
the “gay channel” — LOGO — will be included
on its line up of available channels, director of
public affairs at the network said yesterday.

Keith Wisdom said that the programming
department has not as yet returned with a verdict
on the controversial channel.

A call put out in early September by gay rights
group spokesperson Erin Greene for the channel
to be included on the network’s line-up caused an
uproar in the religious community and back and
forth debate over the issue in the public domain
for months after.

The Christian Council, in its first post-summer
session, appointed a subcommittee to specifical-
ly focus on fighting the “gay agenda,” which, it
claimed, such a programme would promote.

Council president Bishop John Humes said



US Ambassador to
PR CESARE
visit to Freeport

FREEPORT - Newly
appointed US Ambassador to
the Bahamas Ned Siegel will
make his first official visit to
Freeport on Wednesday.

Ambassador Siegel is the 12th
US ambassador to the Bahamas.
He replaced Ambassador John
Rood, who demitted office in
April of this year.

During his one-day visit,
Ambassador Siegel will meet
with the director of US Customs
and Border Protection (CBP)
in Freeport Tim Lund, and the
CBP staff at the Grand Bahama
International Airport.

The visit will also include
meetings with executives of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,





US AMBASSADOR to the
Bahamas Ned Siegel

e defending human rights and
advancing democracy

e enhancing joint efforts
against terrorism

that the council was fearful that with “so many
vices” already rampant in the country, the airing
of a gay TV channel would only add to that list by
spreading the “homosexual lifestyle,” which is
“not in accordance with God’s law.”

However, Ms Greene dubbed such responses
representative of the “hysteria” in the Bahamas
surrounding the gay lifestyle. :

She stressed that the channel is “not pornog-
raphy. Just programming. Just sitcoms, informa-
tion, education (and) news” directed towards the
BGLT (bi-sexual, gay, lesbian and transgendered)
community.

In September Mr Wisdom confirmed that
Cable Bahamas had received a request for the
channel.

He said that the programming department had
suggested that it had “no problem taking a look at
the channel.”

He later said he could not give a timeline as to
when a decision would be made about the net-
work’s future line-up.

the Baptists ever since Mr Cash
was fired as sports coach from
Jordan Prince William High
School in 2002.

They allege unfair dismissal,
defamation and breach of consti-
tutional rights against the church’s
education authorities, and claim
every effort has been made to
block their progress through the
courts over the last five years.

It was only when they could
not get justice through the
Bahamas court system that Mr
and Mrs Cash bypassed the Court
of Appeal in Nassau and
approached the Privy Council.

Now documents prepared at
considerable expense have failed
to reach the Privy Council offices
in London.

And the couple claim UPS is
not being entirely straightforward
in its explanations of the deba-
cle.

is lost valuable Privy Council documents

“It has now been 12 days,” said
Mrs Cash, “We went to the UPS
office to confront Mr Ratcliffe,
but he would not let us talk to
the supervisor who dealt with our
papers.

“We demand accountability.
The British officials have told us
they know of no ‘George’ and
they know of no storage room
where this package was supposed.
to have been sent.

“Someone is not telling us the
truth. The people at UPS are try-
ing to play us off, but the fact is
they didn’t deliver it to the right
address.”

UPS Nassau manager Mr Rat-
cliffe was unable to comment on
the matter yesterday, but referred
The Tribune to the company’s US
office.

Calls to the contact person
there were not returned up to
press time.

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the Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce and the Freeport
Container Port.

During his presentation of let-
ters of credence to Governor
Arthur Hanna on November 14,
Ambassador Siegel said that he
looks forward to working with
the Bahamian government to
strengthen bilateral relations,
particularly in the following
areas:

° fighting illegal drugs and
illegal migration

¢ building prosperity and
security for both the Bahamas
and the US

He has also pledged his sup-
port to the ongoing initiatives
of Operation Bahamas Turks
and Caicos (OPBAT), as well
as the Megaports and Container
Security Initiative.

Ambassador Siegel said he is
also looking forward to using
his business experience to pro-
mote and expand trade and
investment between the

» Bahamas and the United States.

BAY ST. PARTIAL ROAD CLOSURE
FRIDAY NOV, 30, 2007

Motorists are advised that due to
the observance of World AIDS Day
in Rawson and Parliament Squares on
Friday, November 30, 2007
Bay St. will be closed from
Parliament St. to East St.
between the hours
of 10 a.m. and 11 a.m.
Motorists are reminded to observe
re-routing of traffic for this period.



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

THE TRIBUNE









‘)
NURSE FREDAMAE Mills (right) and Principal Nursing Offic





‘Tele-medicine’ |

tohelp with —
patients in Abaco —

MARSH HARBOUR -
Emergency room techniques
will soon be brought to Aba-
co by way of “tele-medicine”,
Health and the Environment
Minister Dr Hubert Minnis
announced,

Through this technique,
patients in Abaco can be seen
and examined by physicians
from the emergency room at
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal in Nassau, he explained,

Tele-medicine is the quick-
ly developing practise of com-

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES

SCHOOL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE AND RESEARCH, THE BAHAMAS



















Unveiling of Plaque
by Governor General,
H.E. Arthur D. Hanna,
Ceremony, 17th

< October, 2007.

municating medical informa-
tion by telephone, the inter-
net or other networks to allow
for consulting, and even long
distance exams or medical
procedures.

At its most complex, tele-
medicine uses satellites and
video-conferencing to carry
out rapid consultation with
specialists.

“Abaco is in the forefront
for that,” said Dr Minnis.

“That would be on stream

soon. We’re taking emergency
room techniques to Abaconi-
ans.”

Abaco, Exuma_ and
Eleuthera contribute the most
to the increasing cost of air
ambulance services to Nas-
sau. “Once we have the tele-
medicine programme in place

then we would be able to:

decrease the number of
patients that are being
referred to Nassau,” said Dr
Minnis. “That in itself would

be a great saving.”

Staff

Dr Minnis spent Monday
and yesterday inspecting pub-
lic clinics and garbage dispos-
al sites in the Abacos and
meeting with ministry staff.

“Tam more than pleased
with the performance of the
staff,” said Dr Minnis. “They
are working very well. They
are very into their patients. -

“What is very impressive is
that they keep very good
records of the number of dia-
betics and hypertensives and
patients with chronic non-
communicable diseases with-
in their communities.”

Green Turtle Cay, for
example, has a’ healthy
lifestyle programme for dia-
betics and hypertensives, he
noted.

“We have asked them to
look at their statistics to
determine for us what per-

MINISTER OF Health and the Environment Dr Hubert Minnis (right) lis-
tens to concerns from North Abaco Chief Councillor Steve Pedican.

centage of their diabetics and
hypertensives has been able
to decrease their medication
dosage and what percentage
they have been able to take
off medication totally since
they have instituted their pro-
gramme.

“They know that there has
been some decrease — some,
but they could not give me
the percentage,” said Dr Min-
nis.

Other clinics in the Abacos
are also moving towards
implementing healthy lifestyle
programmes.

Future

“The healthy lifestyle pro-
gramme is the future,” he
said. “If implemented and
done properly then obviously
we would be able to decrease
the amount of medication
that is utilised.

“Healthy living assists in
controlling blood pressure
and diabetes. If we have an
unhealthy lifestyle then we
are prone to obesity and obe-
sity can compound both those
problems.

“But I am encouraged by
the positive results as a result
of our healthy lifestyle pro-
gramme.”

Abaco remains “on target”

’ for’a mini-hospital, he said.

Dr Minnis also said that he
is “very impressed” by the
modern garbage disposal site
at Snake Cay.

It will be equipped with
detention ponds to collect liq-
uid waste.

“T have always said that
Abaco is a very organised and
advanced society.” he said,
“and through the various
town meetings, and informa-
tion dissemination, I am hop-
ing that Abaco would be in
the position to, at the house-
hold level, separate their
waste. :



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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 7



~ LOCAL NEWS



Memorial service for murdered college dean
Thaddeus McDonald draws about 200 people

@ By COB JOURNALISM
CLASS

A memorial service yesterday
morning capped off a week of
grief and campus memorials fol-
lowing the November 16 murder
of Thaddeus McDonald, a dean at
the College of the Bahamas.

Dr McDonald, who turned 59

November 12, joined the college
as a psychology lecturer in 1988,
and rose to become dean of social
and educational studies in 2005.
Police say he was beaten with an
iron and died in the bedroom of
his house in a gated Queen's
Street community near the Amer-
ican Embassy.

The tear-filled memorial yes-
terday was held in four tents near
the bandshell on campus, and
drew about 200 people, 20 of
them students. The programme
included organ music as well as
drum selections that seemed to

‘flow with the expression of emo-

tion: as the tempo slowed, the
sounds of cries from those gath-
ered increased, according to one
witness.

"Oh my God," cried out a
woman in the audience of mourn-
ers, some wearing funeral attire,
others with small rectangles of
African print cloth attached to
their lapel in honour of McDon-
ald, who often dressed in African
clothes and led trips to Ghana.
"Why?" she asked plaintively, as
people came with tissues to con-
sole her.

In a quavering voice, Dr Earla
Carey-Baines, dean of the faculty
of liberal studies and a close
friend of Dr McDonald, read con-
dolences from members of the
local international community
with whom Dr McDonald was
professionally associated, includ-
ing a Ghanaian chief, chair of the
Panafest Foundation, chair of
Barbados Pan African Commu-
nity, dean of faculty of the
humanities from University of
West Indies, Mona campus and
other dignitaries.

After she finished, she was seen
standing on the side of the stage,
weeping and wiping tears, while
others came to hold her hand and
console her.

* College of the Bahamas presi-

dent Janyne Hodder restrained
her emotions and spoke with
composure when she said, "He
was a strong man with a gentle
voice ... and we must become
the defiant opposition against
those wanting to take human life
. .. We must hold to faith, hope
and charity to get us through
these times."

Her secretary, Jaquline Fergu-
son Rolle had a fire in her house
recently and had nothing to wear.
She said she borrowed clothes
from other people in order to
attend the memorial.

During the service, Krisspin
Sands, a sophomore in the law
programme, read from Psalms 90
and said he didn't think the words
adequately expressed how great a
man the dean was.

Patricia Ellis, assistant director
of human resources, directed the
choir through a rendition of "Be

' Strong in the Lord," a selection

she considered fitting for the
occasion.
"We need each other," she






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TRIBUTE: Rhonda Chipman-Johnson delivers the eulogy.

explained. "The college has to be
strong at this time. The only way
we can get through this is focusing
on the higher power of God. It's
been rough for the choir."

Later during the ceremony,
Bahamas Director of Culture
Nicolette Bethel expressed the
sentiments of many when she
said: "Our hearts are in the coffin
with Dr Mac."

Some were less able to vocalise
their feelings. Dr Brenda Cleare,
dean of pure and applied science,
was holding a box of tissues.

“I just keep moving, so I don't
break down," she told a reporter.
She described Dr McDonald as
a fantastic, wonderful person
always willing to help and always
looking for the good in people.

Franklin Carter, former presi-
dent of the Airport Airline Allied
Workers Union, worked with Dr
McDonald as a consultant for the
Union of Tertiary Educators and
grew up with him in Bain and
Grants Town. “I cried when I first
heard the news,” Mr Carter said.
“As I mourn for him, I mourn for
this country, because my child-
hood friend contributed so much
to this country and he could have
contributed so much more if he
had lived. He helped us all to
realise the beauty within us as
black persons of African
descent.”

The memorial on Tuesday
morning was the last in a series of
on-campus events.

The Monday after his death,
November 19, classes were can-
celled between 1lam and noon
to accommodate an assembly at
the bandshell.

Later that day, Stann Smith,
director of new student orienta-
tion and college dormitory co-
ordinator, offered three hour-long
group grief sessions which 24 peo-
ple attended.

He explained that after dra-
matic, traumatizing situations, stu-














fx







dents and faculty are invited to
the counselling department to
talk about what occurred in pri-
vate.

Mr Smith said he asked those
who came to talk about their
thoughts and describe how they
heard about the murder. Some,
he said, were in the second stage
of grief — anger — which led them
to ask why it happened. He said
others were experiencing depres-
sion while some showed accep-
tance,

“T thought that he was cool,”
said Shannon Evans, an 18-year-

Set Catatandae?

RAYMOND WEIL
GENEVE



old education major. “He was
nice to be around. He made us
laugh. He didn’t have a‘stinking
attitude.”

Dr McDonald’s colleagues
were still despairing. Gloria
Gomez, chair of the School of
Education, said: “Thad was a gen-
erous, helpful, and loving per-
son.”

Sibylline Clarke-Knowles, his
secretary, said that for the five
years they worked together, he
never uttered a harsh word to her.
“The college will never find any-
one like him.”

liance beneath




Doe ;
CLEVELAND Eneas Primary school students who are part of the.
Bahamas National Association Junior Pride Club proudly hold ‘I
Gat Pride’ t-shirts. Standing behind the children, from left, are:
Alpheus Ramsey, past president of the Bahamas National Pride
Association and a member of the board; Judy Williams, board
member; Olvin Reese, chairman of the association; Joanne Johnson,
co-ordinator of the association; Kendra Monroe, teacher and a co-
ordinator of the Junior Pride Club; Peter Brown, director of the
association; lsaac Woodside and Clara McPhee teachers and co-ordi-
nators of the Junior Pride Club.

Students challenged
to keep campus clean

CHAIRMAN of the Bahamas National Pride Association Olvin
Reese challenged students at the Cleveland Eneas Primary School to
keep their campus clean and litter free.

“We do not want any of you to be litterbugs. You can start to make
a difference in your country by going home today and cleaning up your
yard,” Mr Reese said.

“You can make a difference in your country by making sure your class-
rooms are always clean and that your school grounds are always clean.”

Mr Reese was speaking at the installation of officers and members of
the Bahamas National Association’s Junior Pride Club at the school on
Monday. The club is made up of students from grades four through six.
The student president of the club is Alexya Woodside and the vice
president is Mario Calmar.

Accompanying the chairman were Alpheus Ramsey, past president
of the association and a member of the board; Peter Brown, director of
the association; Judy Williams, a board member, and Joanne Johnson,
the co-ordinator.

Mr Reese noted that although the Bahamas Pride Association has
been in existence for 12 years, there is still a litter problem in the coun-
try. He told the students what they could do to keep the Bahamas
clean.He said, “You can help to beautify your campus, you can do pro-
jects into the neighbourhood surrounding your school, you can do pro-
jects in your home, you can do projects wherever.

“And you can always call on us at the Bahamas National Pride Asso-
ciation for any assistance or help.that you would need with your pro-
grammes.”

Mr Reese told the students that they are the future and that the atti-
tudes and the values they adopt will shape the future of the country.

Isaac Woodside, a teacher and one of the co-ordinators of the Junior
Pride Association club at Cleveland Eneas, said the association is com-
mitted to the developing positive attitudes while preserving and beau-
lifying the environment.

He added that the association realises that littering is learned behav-
iour, which can be changed through education.



Patrick Hanna/BIS



284 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas (242) 302-2800

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

DAY AT THE RACES





Tourists and locals
enjoy annual Abaco
cart competition

HUNDREDS of tourists and locals were in atten-
dance this weekend for the annual Hope Town, Aba-
co box cart race — a competition held in no other
Bahamian community.

The carts ranged from simple boxes with four
wheels, to much more elaborate designs.

Home made food, sweets, and drinks were on sale to

‘raise funds for various town projects. Admission for
spectators is free and drivers pay $25 to enter their
carts. All entrants are given a free t-shirt.

According to witnesses, several carts went out of
control and went through the side barriers but there
were no injuries.

The first place winner was returning champion
Ricky Sweeting, who was awarded $100 for his efforts.
The second place winner, “Froggies”, won $50 and the
: aos’ ‘ < ‘ third place winner, US entrant Tanner Motta came

RRNA ‘ wo away with $25.

; : This is the 11th year since the event was launched,
but only the ninth race, as races were not held for
two years because of hurricanes.

Stafford Patterson, one of the organisers told The
CEARARE Tribune that the event was one again well attended.
Sa “This year we probably had three or four hundred

basal 7, . : SS people out there. It wasn’t the most we ever had — it
% J CS ee aw Vey rained for about 45 minutes on Saturday, so that may

7 Ser y have put some people off. But it was quite a crowd.”

N Mr Patterson said the event has become quite a

=e SNARE, ‘ » \ . . .
| [- ee Ar : draw for tourists, who not only enjoy watching but also
Resiees
8

“We had one entrant come down and rent a house,”
he said.

According to Mr Patterson, the proceeds from the
event have been used to benefit a number of causes
over the years, many of them youth projects.



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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 9

THE BAHAMAS CAN SET THE PACE FOR OTHER CARIBBEAN NATIONS

Why we need a diverse portfolio
of renewable energy sources

SPECIAL

report by a top

US consulting

firm says the
Bahamas has "abundant
untapped resources" to develop
a strong renewable energy intra-
structure that can cut oil
imports, make more capital
available for investments and
help maintain our leading edge
in regional tourism.

The report says solar power
can be produced here at a cost
similar to existing oil-fired gen-
eration. Even assuming no goy-
ernment support, the cost per
kilowatt hour from rooftop
solar panels would average only
15 cents compared to retail elec-
tricity prices of 25 cents a kilo-
watt that are currently being
charged to most Bahamian con-
sumers.

The report was issued by
Haley & Aldrich — a New Eng-
land-based environmental engi-
neering consultancy founded in
1957.

According to Vice President
Doug Cotton, the firm is work-
ing with clients in the Bahamas
"who could benefit from the
price stability, energy security,
and secondary benefits that
would be created by widespread
adoption of renewable energy
production. ~

"Our interest in helping to
promote renewable energy is
related to the work we are
doing for one of the largest
resort development projects on
New Providence, and because
we are working with some
renewable energy companies
who have an interest in coming
to the Bahamas should there be
changes to the present regula-
tory scheme."

For the past couple of years —
as fuel prices have soared — gov-
ernment has talked about for-
mulating a national energy pol-
icy to help minimise economic
and social disruption in the
event of a global energy crisis,
but this effort has not gone fur-
ther than a basic draft prepared
by an

Inter American Development
Bank consultant. Now Cotton
says his 23-page report was pre-
sented to government in August
and is circulating widely among
officials.

The report evaluates the
potential renewable energy
resources and technologies that
the Bahamas should consider
for its energy future.’

It offers an assessment of
which renewable energy options
have the greatest potential and
recommends measures to
achieve the best results.

Currently, the cost of gener-



LARRY SMITH



“If the government’s goal is to
ensure continued economic
growth with greater energy
security, that means looking at
other options to generate ener-

9

gy.



ating electricity accounts for
about half of our total gross
domestic product, and 1s wholly

based on burning imported fos: -

sil fuels. As the report points
out, this will only get worse as
rising global demand combines
with declining oil supplies.

Future power demand in the
Bahamas is projected to grow
at 8 per cent a year and experts
say that oil price stability is sim-
ply unattainable in today's
world.

And since the Bahamas
relies heavily on tourism it is
especially vulnerable to the neg-
ative consequences of petrole-
um use — air pollution, spills and
climate change. If the govern-
ment's goal is to ensure contin-
ued economic growth with
greater energy Security, that
means looking at other options
to generate energy.

The report reviews halt a
dozen renewable technologies
(including wind, ocean thermal,
tidal, ocean current and bio-
mass) and says solar 1s the best
bet. Photovoltaic units to gen-
erate electricity and solar panels
to heat water have the highest
potential impact for the
Bahamas with the least difficul-
ty of implementation over the
shortest time frame - using
technology that is available
now. In fact, this option could
save an estimated 23 million gal-
lons of oil imports per year if
50 per cent of Bahamian homes
have a 2kw pv system and 75
per cent have solar water
heaters installed _

"The amount of solar energy

reaching the ground in the
Bahamas 1s higher than at loca
tions in Nevada, Spain or Ger-
many, where large scale-solar
generating systems have been
installed over the past couple
of years," Cotton told Tough

Call This is a very good
amount of sunlight - about 5.5
kilowatts per hour that can be
converted fo chery

The report ciled an average
cost of 15 cents per kilowatt
hour to generate solar powet
This was denved Wom a com
puter programme developed by
Natural Resources Canada and
is based on the following
assumptions: a 2 kilowatt sys-
tem. a 25-year life span. and a
US price of $15,850 to buy and
install the system.

"To ensure The Bahamas’
continuing development and
viability, the nation must open
up and breathe new life into its
energy infrastructure.” the
report says. "Solar power is a
proven technology that can pro-
duce electricity in a location
such as The Bahamas tor costs
comparable to those trom diesel
generation."

Uulity-scale solar electricity
projects exist throughout the
world.

An 11 megawatt PV plant
was commissioned recently in
Portugal, for example. The tacil
ity occupies 150 acres, consists
of 52,000 photovoltaic modules
and cost an estimated $75 mil-
lion, which is roughly compa-
rable to BEC's new oil-fired
power plant that is planned for
Clifton.

B iomass (read garbage)
is another potentially
important source of renewable
energy tor the Bahamas. If
burned in a waste-to-energy
plant, the amount of garbage
produced on New Providence
each day can generate about 20
megawatts of electricity, the
report says. And Grand
Bahama could produce about 5
megawatts.

Energy recovery from Bio-

United Nations report urges aid to
world’s poor on global warming

@ RIO DE JANEIRO,
BRAZIL

Developed nations must
immediately help fight global
warming or the world will face
catastrophic floods, droughts
and other disasters, according
to UN report released yester-
day, according to the Associated
Press.

The report said rich nations
will need to provide $86 billion
a year by 2015 to “strengthen
the capacity of vulnerable peo-
ple” to cope with climate-relat-
ed risks.

“The scenario is that our gen-
eration will experience rever-
sals on a grand scale in the areas
of health, education and pover-
ty. For the future there is real
threat of ecological catastro-
phe,” Kevin Watkins, the
report’s lead author, told
reporters in Brasilia, the coun-
try’s capital.

Half the cost, $44 billion,
would go for “climate-proof-
ing” developing nations’ infra-
structure, while $40 billion
would help the poor cope with
climate-related risks. The other
$2 billion would go to strength-
ening responses to natural dis-
asters, the report said.

The report said the United
States and other rich nations
should pay the biggest share.

The Bush administration said
n a Statement that one of its
top priorities is “to alleviate
poverty and spur economic
growth in the developing world
by modernizing energy ser-
vices.”

The nearly 400-page Human
Development Report comes

just a week betore the world’s
nations convene in Bali,
Indonesia, to negotiate a new
climate treaty.

At the report’s release cere-
mony, Brazihan President Luiz
Inacio Lula da Silva called on
rich nations to do their part. '

“In Bali we are’ going to very
seriously discuss the price rich

countries have to pay so that.

poorer countries can preserve
their forests,” Silva said.
“Because you're not going to
convince a poor person in any
country that he can’t cut down a
tree if he doesn’t have the right
to work and eat in exchange |
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percent of the Amazon rain tor-
est — the world’s largest remain-
ing tropical wilderness.

Scientists believe the rain for-
est can act as enormous sponge
to soak up greenhouse gases,
but deforestation and burning
in the rain forest releases mil-
lions of tons of carbon into the
air each year making Brazilian
one of the Jeading emitters of
greenhouse gases.

The report also found that
increased energy efficiency,
alternative fuels and even the
reduction of trade barriers
could go a long way toward
reducing greenhouse gas emis-
sions.



Gams



mass is a Well-established tech-
nology worldwide and one that
can be intevrated in the current
power pene! ation system.
Bermuda has @ waste-lo-energy
plant that processes 300 tons of
garbaye per day to supply 2.5
MW to the national grid.

Taking advantage of these
options will require a significant
laVestmMent mew Systems, but
the portion of energy coming
trom costly fossil fuct imports
will decline as a result. And
strategies can be implemented
to reduce development time
add Anse uf aasition costs.

In addition to tappmig Over-
seas tunding sources, the first
priority is to change the nation's
regulatory framework so that
BEC and Grand

Bahama Power can contract
with independent producers,
and accommodate act metermy
so that non-uulity producers can
sell power to the grid.

Che government should also
enable‘carbon trading and take
advantage ol benetits offered
by the UN's Clean Develop-
ment Mechanism, as Tough Call
has suggested betore.

Private generation facilities
could range from individual
home PV systems, to commer-
cial-scale facilities at warehous-
es or resort hotels, to larger util-
ity-scale projects. Other tncen-
tives, including tax benefits and
provision of low- or no-cost
leases of Crown land. could be
considered to encourage the
growth ot renewable chergy.

Private developers could be
contracted to build utility-scale
facilities, which would let BEC
outsource the generation of
renewable energy projects
rather than risk developing a
project itself. So the govern-
ment would not need to raise
capital and take on additional
debi — developers would invest
their own funds and supply
power to the grid at wholesale
Tales.

The report urges government





tG revise the building code to
require all new commercial
buildings to install photovoltaic
and solar water systems, launch
a bulk buying programme to
supply solar systems to the local
market, give soft loans and/or
tax incentives for homeowners
and small businesses to refit
their buildings with PV systems
and request developers to build
PY uulities on New Providence
Grand Bahama and Abaco

our most populated tslands

Carbon credits could also be . °

applicd to the bulk purchase of
renewable energy systems or
towards new projects to furthes
reduce costs.

Although small-scale wind
power may be viable in some
areas of the Bahamas once poli-
cies are in place that encourage
it through zoning, tax credits

and net metering, the report’

says that wind speeds average
only 4-6 miles per second 1n the
Bahamas, making utility-scale
generation of power impracti-
cal.

cean Thermal Energy
Conversion (OTEC)
is another renewable

technology that can produce
power as well as fresh water and
air conditioning.

The report says that the right
conditions for this technology
exist off Abaco in the
Norhtwest Providence Channel
and off New Providence at
Clifton. Although not a proven
technology, OTEC has the
potential to meet most or all of
the Bahamas’ needs for water
and power and more research
should be undertaken.

Meanwhile. ocean current
veneration is in the prototype
stage in the United States and
Britain, and the report says the
Bahamas has potential tor this
technology off Grand Bahama
and Abaco. Costs are projected
to vary from 15 to 39 cents per
Kilowatt hour, Ocean wave gen-
erating fae s are

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PERI EICSU ED.

“Currently,
the cost of
generating

electricity

accounts for
about half of
our total gross
domestic
product...”



Burope and the cost of electric-
ity for a ulility-scale plant is less
than If cents per kilowatt hou
tor sites with wave energy con-
ditions similar to those in the
Bahamas. *

‘Renewable energy can be
the cornerstone of a programme
of energy security and sustain-
able development." the report
concludes.

"A diverse portfolio of
renewable energy sources will
insulate the Bahamas from sud-
den energy price spikes, the
tourism tndustry will be confi-
dent about energy costs in mak-
ing development decisions, res-
idential customers and busi-
nesses will enjoy energy savings,
and more jobs will be created in
the renewable energy industry."

And perhaps the best thing is ¢
thai the cost of electricity pro-?
vided by renewable sources can
be expected to fall over time.
Clearly we can set the pace for
other Caribbean nations if we!
choose to do so and, in thes
process, secure our develop-
ment and energy security.

t
i
i
i
a
3
3
e
4

What do you think? Send.
comments to larry@tribuneme- .
dia.net

~s Or visitow

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

!
i eee Te eee eer a i ena ne oe
1

{

i]

'

1 :

t i

' ;

'

'

t

t

1

FROM page one

about his interview on August
' 1st this year with Taylor at the
Detention Centre before the
Jamaican was deported by
Immigration officials. Taylor
was deported by Immigration
despite a continuing police
investigation into his possession
of Bahamian voters cards.

Mr Mallon said Taylor told
him he had arrived in the
Bahamas in 1997, Under ques-
tioning by PLP lawyer Philip
“Brave” Davis, he said his
mother was married to a
Bahamian. He also said, accord-
ing to the investigator, that he
attended high school and trade
school in this country.

Taylor reportedly told Mr
Mallon that he was informed
that someone called “Keith” in
Pinewood — where he resided —
‘ could get things done. Upon
meeting him, he was told it
. would cost $1000.

Taylor reportedly informed

his parents of the cost, accord-
ing to Mr Mallon, they gave him
the money, and he paid “Keith’.
He was subsequently instruct-
ed to go to the parliamentary
registry department on Far-
rington Road to pick up the
card. —

Taylor went to the office and
spoke with a woman in her for-
ties. He told her he had come
for his voter’s card. She is said
to have asked him for identifi-
cation, at which time, he
informed her that he did not
bring any, as he did not think it
was necessary. When asked
about his nationality, Taylor,
the investigator continued, is
said to have told the woman he
was born in the Bahamas.

At this time, the testimony
continued, Taylor told the.

investigator that the woman
took his photo and issued a
voter’s card, which he then used
to obtain a driver’s license, and
then a car.
After a question by Dawn
‘Lewis from the attorney gener-
al’s office, who represents Her-

bert Brown, the returning offi- -

cer for the Pinewood con-
stituency, Mr Mallon empha-
sized that Taylor:told him that
he did not provide any identifi-

_ cation to receive the card.
Betty Charles Joseph also
took the witness stand yester-
day. Questions emerged sur-
rounding the nationality of Ms
“Joseph and her son Kendal
; Seraphin — both voters in ques-
ition — from the testimony of

Allegations of
corruption within
parliamentary
registration
department

was alleged that they are
Haitians.

There was difficulty admin- : t
: in Grand Bahama was retained

who told the court that she nei- | on behalf of the company to

: assist them in securing the nec-

istering the oath to Ms Joseph,

ther reads nor writes.

Ms Joseph testified that she :
moved to Pinewood in 2005 :
after living in Union Village for :
15 years. She said that she had :
: the firm maintained he “had no
who lived with her until just ; knowledge” of the publication
: or businessmen in question

six children, including Kendal,

after the May election.

On Monday, Deputy Chief }
Medical Records Officer at the : 1
Princess Margaret Hospital tes- ; nan Burrows told The Tribune
tified that according to hospi- :
tal records, Ms Joseph is Hait- :
ian. She said that there were ;

also records of Ms Joseph’s six : Karavetsos. “He had a well structured organization

: that he put together.”
Mr Karavetsos painted the portrait of a man who
: recruited, trained and deployed his men, teaching
: them nautical routes to and from Jamaica and the
: best ways to evade law enforcement.
: When it became the defence’s turn at closing
arguments, Knowles’s defence lawyer, Jacob Rose,
: tore into each of the cooperating witnesses, warning
; the jury that the testimony was not credible pri-
marily because they were testifying in order to
receive a sentence reduction from the government.
The Prosecution sought to convince the jury,
beyond a reasonable doubt, of Knowles’ guilt, by
: revisiting the testimony of prosecution witnesses
and replaying wiretapped phone recordings of
on the same day. When asked ; Knowles and co-conspirators, some of whom testi-
i i fied against him.
: “You too light for this operation,” Knowles can be
: heard saying to one of his men in the recordings.
“T had to give them my 200,000,” he says in anoth-

children.
During testimony yesterday,

Ms Joseph said that she was
born in the Bahamas in 1961. }

Sometime subsequent to this,
she was taken to Haiti,

returning to the Bahamas with
her mother when she was :

14.

It was revealed in court last :
week by Carolyn Williamson, a :
representative of the Registrar ;
General, that two birth certifi- :
cates are registered for boys }
both born :

both named “Kenol”,

by Mr Davis if she had twins,
Ms Joseph said no.

Eleanor Brennan, the wife of ;
Nelson Brennan also testified. :
Mrs Brennan said that her hus- :
band has lived with Cheryl ;
Williams at Augusta-Street :

since 2002.

This is contrary to testimony : meeting with management and

by Ms Williams — a challenged fijJe a formal complaint with the

voter by the PLP — who last : Banamas Hotel Employers

week said she did not move to }
Augusta Street until December :

7 ae : i,
2006. Before this, she said, she : ing by management and they
Und = wanainion ts : suddenly decided that they
ncer cross-examination by : were not interested in speak-

: ing with us and set security
Mrs Brennan noted that she : g so
: : dogs and Lyford Cay securit

and her husband of 31 years are : eo : y y
not divorced and he still pays : 1 and asked us to leave the
the mortgage at their residence. : property
She also noted that she did not : aig ,
see them at the Augusta Street ; ;

location, but she has passed

lived in Pinewood.

FNM lawyer Michael Barnett,

by and seen both their cars
there.

o’clock this morning.

FROM page one

: work permit in place from the

Department of Immigration

: which “establishes (their) pub-
: lisher (and) salesman status” in

the country —— in spite of earli-

: er statements made by Immi-

investigator John Munroe. It } gration and Labour officials to

the contrary.
The e-mail goes on to say that
the law firm of Cafferata & Co

essary paperwork to legally

operate in the Bahamas.
However, when contacted for

comment a representative from

being clients of the firm.
Director of Immigration Ver-

FROM page one

FROM page one

Association.
“We were invited to a meet-

guards on our secretary gener-
* Mr Colebrooke

He said that although the
union officer was not injured,

Mr Colebrooke described his

: Secretary General’s mood as

Election court.resume 10 : more “hurt and disappointed

NOTICE

Please be informed that

Mr. Dominic Sturrup

is no longer employed at
Diamonds International

and is not authorized to transact
or conduct any business

on behalf of

Diamonds International’s
Clients, Staff or Stores.

Mr. Dominic Sturrup is in no way

associated with

Diamonds International
or any other of its affiliates.



Real estate book

during a telephone interview
last week that as far as he knew
the Americans in question do
not possess a Bahamian busi-
ness licence or work permit to
legally conduct business in The
Bahamas.

“No they have no work per-
mit or business licence. Of
course we've been checking to
confirm whether or not the
complaints we’ve received were
actually true but we have never
come across (the persons in
question).”

Department of Immigration
began the investigation after
receiving a number of com-
plaints about the businessmen
in question about four months
ago, Mr Burrows said.

‘He added that investigations

are still continuing into the
activities of the businessmen :

who are suspected of operating } :
a lucrative advertising agency :
in the country without applying :

for the proper paperwork.

Immigration officials are appar- :
ently “monitoring (their) entry :
into the country.” Mr Burrows }
declined to divulge specific }
details of the Department’s }
investigations for fear of tipping :
i describe how Dr King had

? informed him that he was trav-
Americans have allegedly :

the suspects off.
As reported previously, the

solicited a number of high-end
contend that the advertisers, in

suade Bahamian realtors from
advertising with local dailies
claiming their publications offer
a better competitive advantage.

‘Ninety’ mistrial declared

er of the prosecution’s audio evidence.

Knowles sat unmoved throughout the proceed- ;
ings, looking intently at the Prosecution’s diagrams }
on the computer screen in front of him.

The prosecution, to buttress its case, developed a }
timeline between 1995 and 1996 in which cooperat-
ing witnesses claimed they worked with Knowles
transporting Colombian cocaine, through Jamaica
and the Bahamas to the US.

According to cooperating witness testimony,
Knowles oversaw a small brigade of men who forged
a route for cocaine, incorporating go-fast boats,
some with 3-250 horsepower engines and low flying }

: people who I had readings for,

aircraft. Prosecutors contended that Knowles had i nq these are people I respect.

ties to the Cali Cartel in Colombia, through his liai-
son, Gary McDonald.

H the def sisted that none of the }
CSTE IS coletce eels PE ge ? out he had three names. Then I

events witnesses testified to occurred during the

Union claims

than anything else”.

When The Tribune spoke to
Mr Douglas he said that he was
both shocked and disheart-
ened.

“T feel bad as a Bahamian
and I never expected to see this
thing happening i in this day and
time,” he said.

According to Mr Douglas
the Human Resource Depart-
ment, two weeks ago, arranged
a meeting with the union for 2
pm yesterday. He said that
when he and another union
officer parked their car they
were immediately approached

~by-security officers who said

that they had to be escorted
otf the property.

Mr Douglas said considering
the fact that their presence was
requested by management,
they went inside the lobby of
the Lyford Cay Club to find
out why they were being
requested to leave.

While sitting in the lobby the
union secretary general said
that a security officer with a
barking and lunging dog
entered the lobby.

Despite this, Mr Douglas
said that he was not afraid. -

“] mean the man had to hold
the dog back. I said to myself

workers then I have to do that,
but we have complained time

Lyford Cay Club,” he said.
Mr Colebrooke insisted that
no previous

ed such a “drastic” response.

manner. Today is a new day,”
he said

considering they were invited

Resource Department.

“When The Tribiine ‘contact-

ed the HR department of the : 1 fect. B
club it was informed that no : then orth ieee ae
one was In a position to com- going to jail — which he didn’t

: tell me — were also perfect.”

ment on the situation at that
time.

The Tribune, was also told ; sae uiderthe naaber “toe
that there would not be any } our.

comment coming from the

aging director.
“Every elected officer of the

do what they did here today.

way,” Mr Colebrooke said.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
PP

IX IoeePP

¢ Fax: 326-7452



i Because first of all, why
: he call me? I’m the one hé was
: coming to for advice, so Why
: call someone yau just met?” Mr
: Carter asked.

THE TRIBUNE

_ Rudy King held in
connection with
alleged attempt to
defraud US govt

FROM page one

The numerologist went on to

elling to Los Angeles to give

T Of high : him an award for his work over
realtors to advertise in print as :
well as online. Tribune sources }

the years in assisting children.
Mr Carter said that he opted

te : not to receive the award, sens-
addition to using “pressure” tac- :
tics on potential clients, dis- ;

ing that something was wrong.
Instead he suggested that the

: award be given to one of his
: clients, Dr Michael Beckwith,
: founder of Agape International
: Spiritual Centre.

“But he said he’d give it to

? me anyhow,” Mr Carter con-
i tinued. “But my little voice said
: not to go. Because people from
: the Bahamas, a lot of people go
: to my website, and people start-

ed e- mailing me from the

: Bahamas telling me that he was

not on the level. |
“T got over 60 people from

: the Bahamas when they saw his
? name on my website, talking
: real bad about him. Now these
i weren’t just people I didn’t
: know. These were people I had
; met in the Bahamas. These are

“So I then had my people

i investigate him. Then we found

time frame in which the indictment charges Knowles : found out he was not even relat-

committed the crimes, and furthermore that none of
their stories could be corroborated.

: ed to Dr Martin Luther King.
: Then I called my friend Will
: Smith, and he told me how he
: (Dr King) lied on him, because

: : : he had announced that Will
that if I have to die for the ? Smith would be at a function

: and Will Smith knew nothing

and time again about the atti- about it,” he said.

tude of management at the King had been honest with him,

: he would have alerted him to

interaction | {he Zee that he wield nat
between union leaders and } ie pomenical work Sat f ar
management could have solicit- a eke

: alleged “very power) financial

“This union at the present et De King said he
does not conduct itself in that ; was. AtleneIng:

Mr Carter added that if Dr

“He kept saying I am:going to

: have a very powerful financial

’ The union president said that njceuns, a eee ee Lee
on Poe othe Eyrord cay : feel good about it, wlivare you
Wb was even mote; Valine i going? So I did the numbers for

to the property by the Human him. But | did the mE ESS for a



Mr Carter said that Dr King

“Four controls banks. Four

: See ; controls finance. Now the num-
INES OF Ines preperty Sanam : ber four also controls law, or

: also controls police. Four also

union has a right to come and controls sovernntpat a a
represent any member of this : P Petes
union. No one has a right to : ernment, But he told me he wey

: going to a financial meeting,”

No one should be treated this he said.

Mr Carter added that Dr

: Beckwith had reportedly been
: asked by Dr King to post a mil-
: lion dollar surety for-him. In
; response to this request, Dr
: Beckwith, allegedly asked Mr
: Carter foriadvice. \

“T said ‘No’. Because‘he (Dr

Beckwith) was going to do it.

“I didn’t feel good about it.
idn’t

One of country’s.
most wanted men
caught by police

FROM page one

: ment issued by Assistant Super-
; intendent Walter Evans yester-
: day, East Street South district
: officers were patrolling Pinewood
: Gardens Monday night when
; they saw three occupants of a red
:?, Nissan Maxima “acting suspi-
i ciously.”

On seeing the police, the car

; sped off in a westerly directon,
: ASP Evans reported. Police
: apparently gave chase before
: police intercepted the vehicle on
: Buttercup Lane off Bamboo
: Boulevard.

Officers conducted a routine

: search of the vehicle and discoy-
: ered the fugitive, who was arrest-
: ed with a male driver and a
: female passenger. An investiga-
: tion will be held to determine
: what new charges, if any, will be
: filed against Knowles, ASP Evans
: said.

ASP Evans also noted that

: under the RBPF’s neighbourhood
: policing initiative, police patrols
i throughout the country will be
: increased in an effort to deter
; those intent on crime. With the
: view of providing “greater secu-
i rity and protection to all resi-
: dents”
} increase response time to report-
: ed matters and try to reduce the
i fear of crime within the commu-
: nity.

, the patrols will also
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 11

Pr ea ee Fishermen Are
‘ Ingraham at the Commonwealth
Heads of Government meeting in Uganda .

.. PLEASED TO
MEET YOU,
PRIME ie
“IVETNISTER © sreznves: pate vipat tubat norton

arrives at the Kampala Serena Hotel for the open-
ing ceremony of the 2007 Commonwealth Heads of
Government Meeting (CHOGM) and is greeted by
outgoing Commonwealth Secretary General Don
McKinnon on Friday, November 23. From left,
Ugandan president Yoweri Museveni, Mrs Janet
Museveni and Mrs Clare de Lore-Mckinnon look
on.



Fishing guides are introducing
guests to the treasures in
Bahamian waters.




LEFT

HAND OF FRIENDSHIP: Prime Minister Ingraham
is greeted by Yoweri Museveni, president of Ugan-
da. From left, Mrs Janet Museveni, Mrs Clare de
Lore-Mckinnon and outgoing Commonwealth Sec-
retary General Don McKinnon {ook on.



S ; r % "

DRAMATIC: The youth of Uganda (above and below) enact a dramatic performance entitled "Uganda's
Journey to Self-Realisation" during the opening ceremony of the meeting.



Raye Sk RU SLI Ase
q5 VanneSi Shi ifait — ACL



pete ae ONE LTT LIE ET PL NET eet

me

=



oy

RESPECTFUL: Heads of Government of the Commonwealth stand
for the playing of the National Anthem of Uganda. Pictured in the
second row, third from left is Prime Minister Ingraham.

~~



=
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE



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‘WEDNESDAY,

a Su ne

Film Studios

proposal to

eovernment
‘in two weeks’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THEBahamian banker
heading the group seeking to
acquire the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios yesterday told The Tri-
bune they hoped to submit
their project proposal to the
Government “within the next
two weeks”, and meet with the
administration in the New
Year to discuss it and chart the





Owen Bethel

way forward.

Owen Bethel, president of
the Nassau-based Montaque
Group, who put together the
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional consortium, told The
Tribune: “We arevhoping to
put to government within the
next two-weeks our submis-
sions on what we propose to
do with the 3,500 acre plot of
land, the main component of
which is the Film Studios.

“We hope that come Janu-
ary, all the principals and
stakeholders in our group will
meet with the Government,
and they will see they are real
persons.”

Although Bahamas FilmIn-

SEE page 6





"NOVEMBER 248,

2007

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$12.5bn private

firm to acquire BORC

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he world’s leading
private equity spe-
cialist in the energy

i: industry is the pre-
ferred buyer for the Bahamas
Oil Refining Company Inter-
national (BORCO), The Tri-
bune can reveal, with the deal’s
close likely to happen before
year-end.

Sources close to the process
confirmed to this newspaper
yesterday that the Grand
Bahama-based BORCO’s pur-

chaser is almost certainly First
Reserve, a private equity firm
with some $12.5 billion in
assets under management and
offices in London, Houston
and Connecticut.

The 25 year-old company,
backed by institutional
investors such as pension
funds, endowments and foun-
dations, invests exclusively if
the energy industry but was
said not to have been among
the initial bidders for BORCO

when it was put up for sale by

PDVSA, the state-owned
Venezuelan oil company.

One source told The Tri-
bune: “They [First Reserve]
appear to have reached some
agreement by which they
would take over BORCO by
December 1. At the same time,
they have agreements with var-
ious companies and commit-
ments from clients to come in
and take tanks over a period of
time.”

Another contact involved in
the BORCO sales process,
speaking on condition of
anonymity, while confirming
that First Reserve was indeed
the likely purchaser of the

Resort project could employ
up to 875 construction staff

Grand Bahama-based oil stor-
age, bunkering and tranship-
ment facility, questioned the
December 1, 2007, date for the
takeover and deals’ closure.
The purchase, although close
to completion, has not been
sealed yet, and the source sug-
gested that December 31, 2007,
was a more likely completion
date given that it was often the .
year-end for most companies -
a convenient time to add new
assets to the balance sheet and

SEE page 4

SS eee ee]

|
|
|
|



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A PROPOSED multi-million dollar
mixed-use resort project for Long Island
could employ as many as 875 workers
at the peak of construction between its
two components, assessments conducted
for the developers have projected.

The forecasts for the Port St.George
and Caribbean Heights projects, which if
approved will be constructed on land
adjacent to the island’s existing Stella
Maris resort, projected that construction

ary,



é go ri

worker numbers employed on the Port
St George component would range from
a low of 135 to a peak of 675.

And on Caribbean Heights, initially
conceived as an 188-unit condo hotel
and spa, to be located on an 18.8 acre site
in Phase III, section two, of the Stella
Maris subdivision, construction worker
employment was projected by Norton
Consulting, a real estate and leisure advi-
sory company working for the develop-
ers, to range from a low of 20 to a peak
of 200.

Combining the peak construction

employment for the two projects would |
mean that some 875 workers would be |
employed on the Long Island develop- |
ment at the height of construction. |
On Port St George, during the low
point of construction, some 25 workers
were forecast to be employed on the
marina; a further 10 on the golf course
and associated facilities; and 100 on res-
idential/commercial construction. _
At the construction peak, the number

SEE page 7

FamGuard profits
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@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FAMGuard Corporation,
parent of life and health insur-
er Family Guardian, said the
$6.527 million in net income
earned for the first nine
months of 2007 - some 42 per
cent or $1.92 million ahead of
2006 comparatives - had
exceeded last year’s full-year
profits by $611,000.

Reporting to shareholders
on the company’s performance
to September 30, 2007, Nor-

Yet Q3 earnings
down 36.6 per cent

bert Boissiere, FamGuard’s
chairman, attributed the surge
in net income to “continued
strong growth in premium rev-
enue”, especially from the
company’s ordinary life and
BahamaHealth product lines.

Family Guardian had also

SEE page 4

$200m project shows
high-end real estate
demand stays strong

DEMAND for luxury,
upscale Bahamian real estate
remains high despite the glob-
al credit squeeze and US hous-
ing market downturn, with a
Georgia-based development
company due to break ground
next week on a $200 million
residential development. on
West Bay Street.

The project by Source
Development Group LLC,
which will be located,on a 10-
acre site a quarter mile to the
east of The Caves, will be con-
structed in three phases and

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built in three phases, with the

SEE page 9

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHELLIE STAPELETON of
BISHOP ELDON DRIVE, P.O. BOX N-8586, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28TH day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDIA SOVILIEN of
MARKETSTREET, P.O. BOX N-5589, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister resposible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/: naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 28TH day of November, 2007
to the. Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



YOUR CONNECTION’ TO THE WORLD

PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Roundtables key chance
to fix ‘all issues we see as
impeding our businesses’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE private sector has a
golden “opportunity to fix all
the issues we see as impeding
our businesses”, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s exec-
utive director told The Tri-
bune, with the Prime Minister
having requested that it pro-
vide him with details on all
problems experienced in deal-
ing with government and pro-
posed solutions.

Philip Simon explained that
the Chamber’s series of busi-
ness leadership roundtables,
which start tonight under the
theme ‘Vexing Business

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER
LEGAL & REGULATORY

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites a

pplications from suitably

- qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR MANAGER in our Legal &

Regulatory Department.
REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:
This position will report directly to the Vice President,

Interconnection and will be responsible for all regulatory and co
to the Public Utilities Commission.

JOB SUMMARY:

Legal, Regulatory. and
mpliance matters relative

Issues’, were designed to
obtain feedback and possible
solutions to problems the
Bahamian business communi-
ty experienced in dealing with
government bodies and
processes.

He added that the process
had begun earlier this year
through the feedback obtained
from Chamber members via
the organisation’s newsletter,
and the Meet the Ministers
forum that allowed the private

‘sector to direct numerous

questions to various govern-
ment ministers.

Mr Simon said “there were

so many questions” at the min-
isters’ forum that a number
went unanswered due simply
to time constraints.

“The Prime Minister himself
has asked that in order for
them to help us, we help them
by providing a listing of busi-
ness issues or problems in
doing business in the Bahamas
using the civil service, govern-
ment agencies and ministries,
and public sector: processes,”
Mr Simon told The Tribune.

The roundtables are
designed to obtain issues from
Bahamian business owners and
managers on “what are the
issues you think are important
to doing business locally”.

An example of an ineffi-
ciency impacting Bahamian
business, Mr Simon cited a
ground transportation compa-
ny or tour operator having to
take all their vehicles at the
same time to the Road Traf-
fic Department to be licensed
and inspected, when it would
be easier for government
inspectors to come to them.

Chamber executives are
looking to obtain from the

Philip Simon



‘roundtables concerns on “any-

thing that deal with the Gov-
ernment and processes”.

“They can even be legisla-
tion that might be deterring or
imepeding doing business
locally. They want to hear from
us,” Mr Simon said. Apart
from identifying problems and
issues, the Government was
also looking “for proposed
solutions to resolve delays,
inefficiencies or maybe an
opportunity to facilitate busi-
ness

“This is part of the dialogue
we hope to foster with the
Government going forward,
and we hope to institutionalise
the Meet the Ministers. They
should be able to give us infor-
mation in return,” Mr Simon
added.

“I think we might be amazed
at what might happen if we
increase the efficiency with
which we do business. We
need something that’s realis-
tic, that’s practical, and can be

implemented. We complain:

abouts issues all the time.”
The latter aspect is some-
thing that the Prime Minister

has noticed, Mr Simon saying
that in meetings with the
Chamber and other business
executives Mr Ingraham had
delivered the message: ‘You
complain all the time; let me
hear them and let’s fix them’.”
“We want to hear from the
private sector,” Mr Simon said
of the roundtables. “Just look
at crime and any type of prob-
lem. Let’s stop talking about
it and let’s start to fix it.
“This is an opportunity to
fix all the issues we have seen
as acting as an impediment to
our business affairs. Some of
them can be solved quite
quickly, some will take time
and others will be rejected.

_Some will not be implemented

because they are not practical
or realistic. But we must first
have the dialogue.”

An e-mail sent to Chamber
members on the rountables
said: “We will use this occa-
sion to solicit your views about
the kinds of problems, issues
and challenges you encounter
as you navigate through the
maze of governmental agen-
cies, regulations and demands,
etc.

“The output from the latter
discussion will be presented
and discussed with the Prime
Minister and other relevant
ministers. The Prime Minister
has expressed his firm com-
mitment to improving the lev-
el of government service to
Chamber members. This is a
valuable opportunity to get
your positions on the record.”

The roundtables will be held
between 4pm-6pm on these
dates: November 28, 2007;
November 29, 2007; Decem-
ber 4, 2007; December 5, 2007;
December 6, 2007.

Responsible for addressing and coordinating activities related to all regulatory matters
with particular reference to legal maters within and on behalf of the Company. This
position requires significant interaction with the Public Utilities Commission.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Coordinate with the Vice President of Legal and Regulatory on strategies relative
to the Company and its Regulatory requirements.

. Ensure the Company.’s compliance with the legal and regulatory provisions of its
licenses issued by the PUC, the stipulations of the Sector Policy of the Government
of the Bahamas, the Telecommunications Act of 1999 and all other statutory
legislation related thereto.

. Liaise with the PUC on all legal and regulatory matters relating to compliance
-with regulations under the PUC license issued to BTC.

. Liaise with other licensed telecommunications providers on legal matters regarding
interconnection.

. Provide legal opinions on matters of a regulatory nature and peruse, critique, and
analyze all relevant documentation of a regulatory nature

. Assist and advise on the reporting of matters to the Regulator involving fraudulent
activity on BTC’s network by both licensed and unlicensed operators

. Attend at and assist with any regulatory matter requiring reference to a court of
competent jurisdiction

. Represent the Company on any matters of a regulatory nature involving the
Company

. Assist in the preparation of reports on the Company as they relate to legal aspects
of regulatory as required by the PUC

Liaise and coordinate with relevant departments in the compilation of reports on
regulatory matters —

Inform, educate, and update all relevant Company employees on all regulatory
matters

Provide periodic update reports and recommendations on changes in the regulatory
environment to the staff

13. Perform any other duties relevant to the support of the division as determined from
time to time by the Vice President of Legal, Regulatory & Interconnection.

EDUCATION AND/OR EXPERIENCE
Master’s Degree preferred.

LLB, Member of the Bahamas Bar Association, with five (5) years of practice at
the Bar.

Prior experience in a regulatory environment would be an asset.

Exposure to the principles of telecommunications is a plus. Strong leadership
skills are essential, organization, self-motivational and communication skills.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, #21 John F. Kennedy Drive,
no later than Wednesday November 28, 2007 and addressed as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MANAGER/LEGAL & REGULATORY



Scotiabank’
is seeking the services of:

- Managing Director, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

With over 55,000 employees in over 50 countries, Scotiabank places great
importance on recognizing and rewarding strong performance. We offer room

for advancement, a stimulating work environment and the resources to help »

you make the most of your career. Together, we continue to make Scotiabank
a great place to work.

POSITION SUMMARY:

Reporting to the Senior Vice-President Caribbean, as well as to a Board of
Directors, the Managing Director is directly responsible for the profitable
development and maintenance of the commercial and retail banking business
of an assigned group of branches/units, and the maximization of profits. To
do this, the incumbent researches the market and develops strategic objectives
and tactics, ensures the readiness of his or her people, and executes those
tactics.

The incumbent is also responsible for the quality of the retail and commercial
asset and liability portfolios, ensuring adequate controls and procedures are in
place to safeguard the Bank from loss. He or she is also responsible for

providing strong support for the growth of ancillary businesses such as Wealth
.Management. The incumbent has responsibility for planning, organization,
and staffing in the assigned group of branches/units, and is the prime provider
of direction, coaching, advice and other support to the Unit Heads. The
incumbent relates closely with government officials and agencies and regulatory
bodies, and is the Bank's ambassador in The Bahamas.

Qualifications:

¢ MBA or work experience equivalent required

e Experience in a senior role within a large financial institution is an asset

e Proven experience managing people in particular, senior level direct reports.

° Excellent and proven negotiation and conflict resolution skills are essential.

e Ability to learn quickly, adapt to an ever changing environment and adapt to
ever changing priorities are essential.

OTHER INFORMATION:

¢ Frequent travel to the Family Islands & internationally.
e Spanish Language is a bonus in an organization that is expanding rapidly in
Spanish-speaking countries.

The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes
applications from all interested parties. We thank you for your interest, however,
only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit application in writing, marked Private
and Confidential, by Friday, December 07, 2007 to: Sr. Manager, Human
Resources, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd., Main Branch, P.O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail: scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com



ge
THE TRIBUNE .

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 3B



Deer PS es
uana Cay developers move to

strike-out Association’s review

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE developers behind the
$175 million Baker’s Bay Golf
& Ocean Club project and the
Government have issued sum-
monses asking the Supreme
Court to strike out the second
judicial review application
launched against the develop-
ment by the Save Guana Cay
Reef Association.

Graham, Thompson & Co,
attorneys for Arizona-based
Discovery Land Company,
filed a Summons for a hearing
on Thursday, November 29,
last Friday, at which they will
apply to set aside the leave giv-
ing the Association permission
to apply for the second judi-
cial review that was previously
granted by Justice Peter May-
nard.

Discovery Land Company,
and the various holding com-
panies established for differ-
ent components of the Baker’s
Bay development, are arguing
that the judicial review appli-

‘cation should be dismissed
because it was made “more

. than six months” after the per-

mits it is attempting to chal-
lenge were approved and
granted to the developers.
They are also alleging that
the judicial review application
was made “more than three
months after the date” that the
Association “acknowledged

-. they had actual knowledge of

the grant of the permits”.
This, Discovery Land Com-
- pany and its attorneys are
arguing, is “an unreasonable
delay in the making of the
application for judicial review”
that breaches Order 53, Rule 4
of the Supreme Court and
’ prejudice their interests.
In its separate summons to
dismiss the Association’s judi-
- cial review application, which

-.-_ was filed on Monday, Novem-

Fred Smith



ber 26, the Government is
arguing that it should also be
dismissed because it “was not
made promptly” within six
months of the reasons for the
complaint arising.

In addition, the Government
is also seeking a Supreme
Court order that all further
legal proceedings relating to
the Baker’s Bay project be
stayed pending the verdict on
the Association’s first judicial
review application.

That verdict, dealing with
the substantive issues and mer-
its of the case, has been await-
ed from the Court of Appeal
for more than six months, the
court having heard legal argu-
ments from both sides in the
summer.

Responding to the sum-
monses in arguments filed with
the Supreme Court, Mr Smith
said legal actions “should only
be dismissed in plain and obvi-
ous cases”, and the Associa-

tion’s second judicial review
application was not one of
these.

He alleged that the moves
by the devélopers and the
Government were “a replay”
of the action taken with the
Association’s first judicial
review application, adding:
“This is obviously a matter
raising serious issues to be tried
on the merits. The quicker the
court moves this to trial and
resolution, the quicker justice
will be served. It is not a matter
amenable to strike out appli-
cations.”

Mr Smith alleged that the
Association had obtained leave

-for the second judicial review

application within six months
of learning about the issuance
of the permits they are chal-
lenging, on the grounds that
they were issued by govern-
ment ministries, departments
and agencies that did not have
the lawful authority to do so.

“The basis of the Develop-
ers’ summons is miscon-
ceived,” Mr Smith alleged.
“They cannot seriously be
advancing the argument that
having hidden the permits they
received, despite the appli-
cants’ repeated attempts to
obtain them, and which are
now challenged in this judicial
review motion, that leave
should be set aside.

“They are effectively asking
the court to uphold the very
secrecy which deprived the
[Association] of their rights,
which the prevented the [Asso-
ciation] from discovering the
basis of what they were doing
and prevented them from
bringing earlier judicial review
proceedings........

“Further, they have the
temerity to complain of unrea-
sonable delay in the making of
the application for leave to
bring judicial review when the
developers and the Govern-

The Four-WAY Test







ment respondents together hid
the relevant information
despite repeated attempts to
obtain them.”

Mr Smith alleged that Dis-
covery Land Company and the
Government should not have
continued “with any chal-
lenged aspects” of the Baker’s

. Bay project before the Court

of Appeal rendered its verdict
on the first judicial review
application, particularly any
work on the Crown and Trea-
sury land that has been leased
to the developers.

“This is a very serious and
seminal case for the future of





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eels

good governance in the
Bahamas,” Mr Smith conclud-
ed, urging the court to provide
the Association with inter-
locutory relief by ordering
work on Baker’s Bay to be
stopped until the merits of the
second judicial review applica-
tion were heard.

H GRADER HOLDS
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All Programs

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Friday, November 30, 2007, at 6:00 p.m.
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The Four-Way Test

“Of the things we think,

gay or do

1. Is it the truth?

2. Is it fair to all
concerned?

3. Will it build goodwill
and better friendships?

4. Will it be beneficial to

From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were
concerned with promoting high
ethical standards in their
professional lives. One of the
world's most widely. printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This





) \Bahamas Red Cross



The Bahamas Red Cross Society, a humanitarian emergency relief
organization, has an opening for the position of

24-word Test has been all concerned?”
translated inte more than a
hundred languages and SENIOR ADMINISTRATOR

published in thousands of ways. SG
It asks the following four :
. questions:



Duties include:

¢ Day to day management of the Society’s programs

¢ Coordinating all fundraising activities

¢ Act as liaison officer between the National Society and the
International Federation of Red Cross and the International
Committee of Red Cross and other National Societies

¢ Promote partnerships with other national NGOs

¢ Build the volunteer capacity of the National Society

¢ Act as liaison officer between the National Society and
Government Agencies

This is a contractual position for two years in the first instance.
Applicant must have at least three years experience in a similar
position. .

Remuneration:
Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Interested persons should forward their resume, with a cover
letter to:





OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM

1. Children ages 10-16 may enter. Judging will be in two
age categories: 10- 13 yenrs and 14-16 years for a first
and second place winner in each category.

2. Write a essay answering the following subject:

“What does the Four-Way Test mean to me.” Explain
of the 4-Way Test as it relates to
your life, experiences, and/or society in general.”

Your essay must include the four principles.

3. The body of the essay must not exceed 1,000 words,
Adults may assist the child in filling out the entry form,
but not in writing the letter.

4, Limit one essay per child. All entries must be received by
the Rotary Club of Kast Nassau bofore Nov 30, 2007.

5. Only essays accompanied

from the newspaper will be accepted.

carbon or other copies will not be accepted.

Confidential

The Director General
Bahamas Red Cross
P.O. Box N — 8331
Nassau, N.P. Bahamas



6. late led ma a a ad Parent's Signature:
decieton of the judges Petacchi. abc he i
7. Winner must agree to a photo presentation which will J
r eee: ss Telephone comtacts (0) ee semen) Fax: l (242) 323- 7404
. Tele ee ‘iilahtd All entries become property of the Rotary Club of Bast Nassau und can be used
Attn: Michele Rassin, The Rotary Club of Bast Nassau, Se anal

P.O, Box $$-6320, Nassau, Bahamas

The Tribune

My Voice. Wy Vlowspapor!

Rotary Chub of

EAST

NASSAU

All applications should be submitted on or before December 7, 2007




PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007 |
ee ES ee

FAMGUARD, from page 1

experienced “sustained
improvements in our life and
health claims experience”, he
added, another factor that had

buoyed the firm’s results and
driven earnings per share
(EPS) for the first nine months
to $0.65 per share, compared

CLIENT ACCOUNTANT

Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial -institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in
The Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Malta,
Switzerland and the United Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of

services to local and international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Corporate
Services team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Supervisor,

Client Accounting.

Core Responsibilities

¢ — Reconciliation of Bank/Broker Accounts
¢ Preparation of Client Financial Statements
¢ Liaising with External Auditors and Clients as necessary

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration

Desired Qualifications

Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or related discipline from a well

recognized university.

3-5 years progressive Accounting experience in.the Financial

Services Industry.

Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, and

customer service skills.

Closing Date: December 7, 2007

Contact
Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@butterfieldbank.bs

www. butterfieldbank.bs



Ae

Butterfield Bank

to $.046 per share for the same
period in 2006.

Net premium revenues and
deposits for the first nine
months of 2007 rose by 5.5 per
cent to $47.721 million, com-
pared to $45.233 million the
previous year. Investment
income was also up to $6.596
million, compared to $6.14 mil-
lion the year before, a 7.4 per
cent increase.

“The buoyancy of the equi-
ties market has also had an
impact on our income, with
unrealised gains in equities
improving by $590,000 over
prior year-to-date,” Mr
Boissiere said.

The unrealised appreciation
on investments in equities,
which effectively means an
increase in the value of Family
Guardian’s paper shares, stood
at $1.368 million for the first

three quarters in 2007, com-
pared to $776,981 the year
before. ,

FamGuard’s total revenues
for the first nine months in
2007 stood at $55.982 million, a
6.9 per cent gain over the pre-
vious year’s $52.379 million.

Meanwhile, total benefits
paid out to policyholders
remained flat in comparison to
last year, although operating

‘expenses did rise by 13 per

cent to $11.749 million, com-
pared to $10.389 million in
2006. ;
Commissions were also up
at $8.227 million, compared to
$7.817 million, with total ben-
efits and expenses for the first
nine months of 2007 up 3.5 per
cent at $49.455 million.
’Meanwhile, Mr Boissiere
said FamGuard had received
the necessary regulatory

approvals for the launching of
its FG Financial and FG Capi-
tal Markets subsidiaries at the
end of October 200.

Their creation will allow
Family Guardian to become
more of a full financial services
company as opposed to a pure
life and health insurer, offering
pensions, mutual funds and
advisory services.

The expertise of Sagicor, the
Barbados-based full financial
services provider, will assist
Family Guardian in this regard,
and the move is likely to be
seen as an attempt by the
BISX-listed Bahamian com-
pany to emulate the model
achieved by the firm that holds
a 20 per cent stake in it.

Mr Boissiere added that
FamGuard was planning to ful-
ly relocate its BahamaHealth
division and client services to

THE TRIBUNE

its new office complex on the
corner of Bay Street and
Church Street, as. renovations
to the property were continu-
ing on schedule.

While the results for the first
nine months were excellent,
FamGuard suffered a dip in its
third quarter performance. Net
income for the three months
to September 30, 2007, slipped
by 36.6 per cent to $1.568 mil-
lion, compared to $2.471 mil-
lion the year before.

Total revenues for the quar-
ter were relatively flat in com-
parison to last year, standing
at $18.649 million compared to
$17.866 million.

Yet benefits rose by more
than’$1 million or 13.9 per cent
to $10.275 million, with total
benefits and expenses growing
from $15.395 million in 2006
to $17.082 million.

$12.5bn private equity firm to acquire BORCO

FROM page 1

income statement.

It is unclear what the BOR-
CO purchase price is, although
The Tribune has heard multi-

le figures - $600-$700 million,
1 billion, $1.1 billion and $1.3
billion.

It seems likely that PDVSA
would receive between $600-
$700 million, with any higher
amount earmarked for upgrad-
ing and expanding BORCO’s
existing oil storage facilities
and infrastructure.

There is little prospect of
First Reserve restarting BOR-
CO’s oil refining capabilities,
which were ‘mothballed’ in the
mid-1980s when PDVSA took
over the company completely
by purchasing Chevron’s 50
per cent stake.

The refinery had been closed
in 1985 amid a global oil supply
gut, and a $2 billion investment
was estimated as being
required to restart refining
with capacity for 500,000 bar-
rels of oil per day.

Instead, sources have sug-
gested that First Reserve will
be more interested in expand-
ing BORCO’s existing storage
and bunkering capacity by
adding more tanks, exploiting

BAHA MAR

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

Legal Career Opportunit

Baha Mar Development Company Ltd. seeks to hire a
talented Commercial Attorney to join its dynamic

legal team.

The successful applicant must:

Have a minimum of 6 years experience in commercial

and corporate practice in The Bahamas.

Have the ability to draft and review documeniation in
connection with complex commercial, real estate and
other transactions.

Be familiar with US and other international commercial

transactions.

Have the ability to work under pressure.

Possess exceptional communication and negotiating

Skills.

successful candidate will report to Baha Mar’s General
Counsel and work with other members of Baha Mar’s

‘legal team.

Please forward curriculum vitae with salary requirements
via e-mail to tgodet @tradeinvest.com or fax to (242) 702-
2018 no later than December, 1 2007. All responses will
be held in the strictest confidence.



the 208 acres of the company’s
500-acre site that have never
been developed.

BORCO currently has stor-
age capacity for about 20 mil-
lion barrels, PDVSA having
invested $40 million in 2001 to
upgrade and repair its 73 tanks.

The BORCO complex also
features two jetties and six
deep sea berths, the facility act-
ing as a ‘break bulk’ destina-
tion, where large oil shipments
are broken down into smaller
consignments for onward
delivery.

The company employs about
105 Grand Bahama-based
staff, plus another 50 contrac-
tors. It-pays about $1 million
per annum to lease the seabed
from the Government.

First Reserve’s latest fund
for energy investing closed in
July 2006 after raising $7.8 bil-
lion. Since 1992, it has com-
pleted 60 business purchases,

investing $3.5 billion of equity ©

in transactions that have a total
cumulative value of $10 billion.

According to the company’s
website, it targets investments
of between $100 million to
$500 million in energy compa-
nies with values ranging from
$300 million to $4 billion.

The energy sectors it targets

are manufacturing and ser- ‘
; vices, such as drilling se¥vices -:

and wellhead manufacturers,
energy infrastructure and ener-
gy reserves.

Its portfolio companies
include holdings in North
America, Europe, Asia and the

Gulf of Mexico.

Other companies that were
interested in acquiring BOR-
CO included PetroChina, the
German company, Oiltanking,
Nustar Energy.from Texas,
and possibly Chevron.

Originally, some 52 bidders
submitted indicative bids for
Borco before the final six were
narrowed down.

PDVSA had appointed Cit-
igroup’s investment banking
arm to run the open transpar-
ent ‘beauty contest’ process,
and indicative bids of as high
as $500 million had been

received during the first round
of BORCO’s auction..

The higher-priced bids were
understood to include the costs
of any environmental clean up,

4, UBS

and capital expenditure main-
tenance to upgrade BORCO’s
tanks jetties, and pipes, pro-
jects that could easily cost

upwards of $15 million.

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial
institutions in the Caribbean. Through our Business Area Wealth
Management International we look after wealthy private clients
by providing them with comprehensive, value enhancing
services. Our client advisors combine. strong personal
relationships with the resources that are available from across
UBS, helping them provide’a full range of wealth management

services.

In order to strengthen our IT team in Nassau, we are looking

to fill the following position:

IT Database Administrator (DBA)

In this challenging position you will be expected to be a selfstarter,
time oriented individual with project management and
documentation skills, strong analytical background, sound
writing, communications, organizational skills and the ability
to work with local and international team members.

Essential Duties and responsibilities

Analyzes business application requirements and develop for

database construction and maintenance.

Maintains and documents all production, UAT and test

databases and interface systems

Provide database support and scripting for critical and BCP
«cp critical: computer applications.

Performs database performance, monitoring, tuning, controls

and user access.

Plans for backup and recovery of databases, as, well as
coordinates software evaluation and installation.

’

Minimum Requirements

- At least 3 years experience in administering Oracle and SQL
Server Databases or related area in a medium to large scale

environment.

B.S. Computer Science, M.I.S. or related field.
Strong expertise in SQL, Oracle databases, Crystal reports,

MS Access and Visual Basic.

Working knowledge in Sybase and DB2. |
Application support background (Banking or Insurance’

applications a plus).

MCP training and/or Oracle or SQL certification a plus.

Written applications should be addressed to:

hrbahamas@ubs.com or UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



GRAHAM, THOMPSON & Co.

COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW * NOTARIES PUBLIC

is pleased to announce that

Cheryl T.

Whyms

has been made a Partner in the Firm.

Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O.Box N-272
Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 322-4130
Fax: (242) 328-1069

Freeport Chambers

The First Commercial Centre
3rd Floor, Suite 9
P.O.Box F-42451

Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 351-7474 _
Fax: (242) 351-7752


THE TRIBUNE ''



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 5B



Strangers swap money
online as person-to-person
lending makes a comeback

@ By JACKIE FARWELL
AP Business Writer

COLIN Nash, 35, was strug-
gling with $12,000 in credit
card debt late last year. Mean-
while, Michael Fisher, 24, was
looking for a new investment.
So, Fisher loaned Nash $200.

The two men, however, had
never met.

Nash and Fisher are mem-
bers of Prosper.com, the Unit-
ed States leader in a growing
trend known as peer-to-peer
lending, which facilitates loans
between complete strangers.

Social lending has been
around since. the days when
needy families turned to the
richest man in town, but the
Web is breathing new life into
the practice. Loans on Pros-
per and Facebook’s Lending-
Club have risen to $100 mil-
lion this year from $27 million
in 2006, according to Online
Banking Report. By 2010, the
report forecasts $1 billion in
peer-to-peer loan originations.

“I’m sure banks are watch-
ing it,” said Jim Bruene, the
report’s author.

Zopa.com, a social lending
site founded in Britain in
March 2005, plans to launch

in the US the week of Decem- ~*

ber 3, according to a company
spokeswoman.

The idea behind the sites is
that borrowers can find better
rates than traditional banks
offer, while lenders can earn
higher returns than from a sav-
ings account or other invest-
ment.

Borrowers on Prosper post
’ how much money they need —
up to $25,000 — the purpose of
the loan and what interest rate
they can afford. Lenders bid
on the loans of their choice,
typically. funding only partial
amounts and diversifying their

risk among dozens or hun-

dreds of Ioans!:
Most loan requests are for

debt consolidation, followed

_ by small business and entre-

preneurial purposes. The aver-
age loan amount totals just

under $7,000. Prosper claims:

it has facilitated $98 million in
loans since launching in Feb-
ruary 2006.

Prosper’s added appeal,
however, goes beyond the bot-
tom line. Photos and personal
narratives accompany bor-
rowers’ requests: A father who
needs $25,000 to equip a house
and car for his son, who has
recently begun using a wheel-
chair. A young couple seeking
$5,000 for their wedding, who
plead, “Please help us get, mar-
ried!” A group of young men
in Montana who want $1,000
to purchase a professional
wrestling ring.

The opportunities for social
connection appeal to users,
said Prosper co-founder and
CEO Chris Larsen. Borrow-
ers can appeal to lenders to
look past a couple of late pay-
ments or spotty credit history,
while lenders enjoy the satis-
faction of seeing their money
help someone in need.

‘When you're dealing with
people, it’s ‘I want to do well
but I also want to feel good
about how I’m doing well,”
said Larsen, who formerly
served as CEO and co-founder
of financial services company
E-LOAN. —

But the numbers matter.
Each Prosper borrower is
assigned a grade based on
their credit score to help
lenders evaluate their risk and
the site verifies borrowers’
identities. The average rate of
return for lenders is 9.28 per
cent, with lower-grade loans
earning 10.45 per cent, accord-
ing to Prosper.

Prosper makes its money by
charging a one per cent or two
per cent closing fee, based on
the borrower’s credit grade,

‘and lenders pay an annual loan



servicing fee of 0.5 per cent to
one per cent. It also collects
fees for late payments on
behalf of lenders and reports
to credit bureaus. After 30
days, a collections agency is
assigned to delinquent loans.
“This is not a free lunch,”
said Greg McBride, senior
financial analyst
Bankrate.com. “You have to
keep up with these payments
just as you would with any oth-
er financial obligation.”
Prosper’s default rate hov-

ers at about 2.7 per cent,

Larsen said, but that figure is
expected to rise as more loans
mature.

According to a July 2007
Deutsche Bank report, about
five per cent of all Prosper
loans originated more than six
months ago have defaulted,
while payments are late on
nearly 10 per cent of all loans.

Prosper user Mike Kost,
who has loaned out about
$5,000 on the site so far, said
he’s observed an uptick in the
number of borrowers missing
payments, one reason he limits
his loan bids to the minimum
$50.

“The risk is not a problem,”
said Kost, who writes a blog
about Prosper. “It’s when you
don’t get paid to take that risk
that it’s a problem.”

Larsen has used Prosper to
lend his housekeeper $25,000
to pay off high interest-rate
loans and credit cards. People
who know each other are’ turn-
ing to another social lending
option.

The market for so-called
“friends-and-family” loans is
dominated in the US by Virgin
Money USA, formerly a
Waltham, Mass.-based venture

called CircleLending. The.

company, which recently sold

- a majority stake to British bil-

lionaire Richard Branson, for-
malizes loans between family
and friends.

e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your

!

income.

e You are limited only to
your potential

e Flexible hours available

e Excellent commissions

and benefits

Must have a proven track record in sales
Professional appearance a must

Must have reliable transportation

Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
Excellent written and communication skills.

Apply in writing to

Sales Representatives -

Box PM-1

C/O The Nassau Guardian

P.O. Box N-3011

Nassau
Bahamas



with ~

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OLIVIA TONY of JEROME AVE.,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement



- of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCYNOTICE

CRAFT APPRENTICES
ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Department for Craft
Apprentices. Craft Apprentices are trained to become Electrical and Mechanical
Craftsman.

To qualify as a Craft Apprentice the following criteria should be met: -

Must be between 18 and 25 years

Have a minimum of five (5) BUC’s including Maths, English Language and General -
Science with grades of “C” or better or

Any other equivalent technical certification or relevant training diploma

Persons recruited from the Family Islands should be a resident of that island. Once

the formal training has been completed, Apprentices will return to their respective
island.

Application forms can be collected from the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s
Head Office located at Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, Nassau, Bahamas. Family
Island applicants can also collect application forms from the local B. E. C offices.
Applications should be returned duly completed with all of the supporting
documentation to The Manager, Human Resources & Training P.O. Box N-7509,

.Nassau, Bahamas on or before: Friday, December 14, 2007.





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under hicense and contig! af The Bank of Nowa Senta

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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Film Studios proposal to government ‘in two weeks’

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TERRANCE L. HIGGS OF
PINEDALE, EIGHT MILE ROCK, GENERAL DELIVERY,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of
NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation .
Notice is
Section 138 (4) of the International Business Com-
panies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), M GROUP INC. is ‘in
dissolution. Eduardo A. Martinez Azaro is the Liquidator and
can be contacted at Sarmiento 944 floor 11 City of Buenos
Aires, Argentina. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
21st day of December, 2007.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), FRANCO LEASE FIVE LIMITED is in dissolu-
} tion. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at

Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
December 26, 2007.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), FRANCO LEASE SIX LIMITED is in dissolu-
tion. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
December 26, 2007.

Bistt

Pricing Information As Of:
esday, 27 November 200

TET

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S) .
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings
Ye you EE ey

Le We

00 ABD.

1.364794"
3.5388°*"
2.938214***
1.279370***

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
11.2596 | Fidelity Prime Income Fund
EX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,00
- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
ffactive Date 7/11/2007





hereby given that in accordance with

FROM page 1

vest International signed an
agreement in principle in Octo-
ber 2007 to acquire the
Bahamas Film Studios, many
hurdles besides obtaining gov-
ernment approval remain to
be overcome. The group’s pur-

chase cannot currently move
forward because of litigation
embroiling the Bahamas Film
Studios, and its immediate
holding company, Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises.

Phoenix Engineering
obtained a Supreme Court
injunction blocking the
Bahamas Film Studios’ sale,

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

alleging that it was owed
unpaid sums for work done in
relation to an Environmental
Impact Assessment (EIA) that
was performed for the com-
plex, which sits on a 3,500-acre
site that used to be the former
US Air Force Missile Base. _

Dealing with that litigation,
and either securing the
removal or varying of that
injunction, will be the key first
step in ensuring the purchase
by Mr Bethel and his group
moves forward.

It, is understood that
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional has agreed to deal with
all legitimate creditors’ claims
brought against the Bahamas
Film Studios bar the Phoenix
Engineering lawsuit, and the

Quigley, one of the company’s
three founding partners, who is
claiming $1.3 million in com-
pensation - a claim understood
to have risen to $2 million -
over sums owed to him after
he was removed from the pro-
ject.

Both those cases will be
dealt with by the seller of the
Bahamas Film Studios,
Nashville-based investment

‘banker Ross Fuller. It is

thought that he is likely to
receive substantially less than
the $14 million he was offered
earlier this year by Mr Bethel’s
group in a deal that ultimately
fell apart.

However, the two parties
ultimately returned to the table
and thrashed out a new agree-

11.8192***
PS ai i aces as 5 a aaa ec agai

YIELO - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
NIM. = Not Meaningtyl <-
OS ARINOEX
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the In-
ternational Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), Touchstone In-

ternational Limited, is in dissolution. Continental Liquidators Inc is

the Liquidator and can be contacted at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906,

Belize City, Belize. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and particulars

of their debts or claims to. the liquidator before December 26, 2007.

B. Foster
For; Continental Liquidators, inc.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) |

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), FRANCO LEASE FOUR LIMITED is in dissolu-
tion. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
December 26, 2007.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of
2000), FIRST AIRCRAFT LEASE INTERNATIONAL
LIMITED is in dissolution. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator
and can be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough &
Queen Stréets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to
the Liquidator before December 26, 2007. v

0.00

Last Price Weekly Vol.

Yield %

NAV KEY

*~ 16 November 2007
** . 30 June 2007
***. 31 October 2007
ress 31 July 2007

délity Bandas Stock Index, January 1, 1994 = 100

action initiated by Paul

ment.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SANDRA JEAN LOUIS of
MALCOLM ALLOTMENT, P.O. BOX SS-6360, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28TH day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HARRY DAOUT OF #62
PIONEER’S WAY, P.O. BOX F-41375,GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to. the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21ST day of
NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFREY CHARLES of
‘KEMP ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister resposible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of November, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-. 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANGLADE MOMPREMIER
COOPER of PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX N-776,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

2 UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Limited is seeking a suitably
qualified individual to join their growing and
dynamic team as a:

Facility Specialist

This position is open to candidates with a
minimum of 3 years experience and
certification in electrical, plumbing & air-
condition repair & maintenance.

Main responsibilities to include:

* Traditional tasks of building management;

* Oversee all preventative maintenance
programs;

¢ Carry out technical interventions;

* Oversee maintenance service providers;
Oversee churn projects, documentation and
accounting;

Support bank operations with a wide variety
of logistics services.

In addition, candidates must have experience
in report writing with basic working knowledge
of Microsoft Word and Excel. The ideal candidate
must be able to utilize knowledge & experience
to solve routine problems and reply to client
requests.

Interested persons meeting the above criteria
should apply in writing, enclosing a full resume
with cover letter, on or before November 30,
2007 to:

hrbahamas@ubs.com
Or

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N 7757,
Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007, PAGE 7B

eae ee eee |
Resort project could employ up to 875 staff on construction

FROM page 1

of workers employed on the
marina would increase to 115;
grow to 80 on the golf facili-
ties; and some 480 working on
the residential and commercial
construction operations.

The forecasts were made on
the assumption that the marina
and golf facilities were com-
pleted in two years, while 40-
man construction crews were
assumed to be able to com-
plete 10-12 custom homes or
25-30 production homes annu-
ally.

When it came to full-time
operations, the projections
were that Port St George
would directly employ 342
staff. These would be split
between 20 marina employees;
31 at the golf facility; 140 in
hotel operations; 40 in “com-
munity operations”; and a final
111 in the town centre.

Estimates for the Port St
George Town Centre employ-
ment were based on it having
16,500 square feet of retail
space, each shop having an
average size of 1,500 square
feet.

Restaurants were projected

as having an average size of .

3,000 square feet and seating
capacity for 100 persons.

The employment projections
for the developers said: “The
Port St George project will be
the major employer on Long
Island and will influence
employment on-site at the
development and will have the
potential to effectively attract
new businesses (and addition-
al employees) to the area.

“Quality of life for native

.. Bahamians will be enhanced
by the development of the pro-

ject. The Port St George devel-
opment will be act as a catalyst
for other projects that will also
positively impact employment
in the area.”

The original masterplan for
Port St George, which is sub-

. ject to change, called for a

development that features a
boutique hotel with 146
suites/villas; some 60 boutique

~~ villas: plus waterfront lots of
~ 1/3 of an acre and greater size,

with some 180 docking slips

for boats between 80-100 feet
in length, and a further 60 boat
slips for vessels between 40-60
feet in length.

Other components of the
original masterplan, developed
in summer 2006, call for some
306 residential lots between 1/3

to ? of an acre in size with a '

golf course view; 61 oceanfront
residential lots; 331 multi-fam-
ily lots for either single family
or town homes with 200 boat
slips; 119 lakefront lots; 144
multi-family, condo flats or
commercial plots; a beach club;
and Town Centre, which fea-
tures a yacht club, marina with
200 slips, casino; condo flats;

' retail; restaurants; Customs

and Immigration posts; a Har-
bour Master’s office; and fuel
and docking facilities.

On the Caribbean Heights
project, which is conditional
on Port St George going
ahead, full-time direct employ-
ment created by that compo-
nent is expected to be 197 jobs,

of which 173 will be in hotel
operations and 24 in sports and
dive facilities.

The Government and devel-
opers stages a Town Meeting
on the project and its poten-
tial impact on Long Island last
night. [t has already received
approval in principle from the
Government, on condition that
the developers meet four cri-
teria.

These are holding the Town
Meeting; submitting a com-
pleted Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA); consulta-
tions with the utility compa-
nies, which started in March
and will be completed once the
Masterplan is revised; and pro-
viding evidence that all neces-
sary financial backing is in
place.

Jan Moorcroft, one of the
directors and project princi-
pals, said the proposed funding
partners met with Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette last week.

HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION LTD.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Annual General
Meeting of the above-named Company will be held
at Room - Salon III & IV, Wyndham Nassau Resort

& Crystal Palace Casino, West Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas on the 11th day of December, 2007 at 6:00
p.m. for the transaction of the following

1. To elect Directors and Officers for the

ensuing year.

2. To waive the presentation of a Statement
of income and Expenditure and Balance

Sheet.

3. Any other business.

Dated the 26th of November, 2007

Hartis E. Pinder
SECRETARY

POSITION AVAILABLE



INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS SUPERVISOR

A brokers & agency company {an affiliate of a large established company] is looking for an Administrative
Supervisor. The ideal candidate must be detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent organizational,
interpersonal and communication skills. The ability to work with limited supervision in a fast- paced progressive

environment is a must.

# Responsibilities:

Receive and submit for processing applications for Home Insurance |property] and other insurance plans
Liaise with sub-agents on all application issues

Maintenance of database

Liaise with Underwriters and Customer Service departments to ensure accurate application processing
Generate monthly reports on issued contracts

Reconciliation of premiums

Prepare and issue completed quotés and Certificates of Insur urance
Handing Internal and External client queries
Supervise Administrative support for all general issues

Core Competencies:

Ability to work with limited supervision and learn new skills quickly
Excellent oral and written communication skills

Abllity to resolve problems with a sense of urgency

Demonstrate a keen eye for details

Abllity to work under pressure

Strong interpersonal skills and ability to maintain a harmonious relationship with co-workers
Ability to maintain confidentiality
Reliable, dependable and flexible team-player

Required Qualifications:

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration or related field or equivalent work experience.
3+ years experience in a similar position

Excellent computer skills and proficiency in Excel required
Relevant General insurance designations (or pats thereof] a plus

Benefits:

Salary commensurate with current salary scales, skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including Life, Health and

Pension.

Submit Resume to Human Resources Administrator, P.O. Box N-4815, Nassau
Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to dlparker@live.com



“aS well ““s “nembers of the

1.
23
, 3.
4.
D3
6.
i
8.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
ee Ta ee

The Job & Requirements

To manage all aspects of the daily operations on a
profitable basis. Must have firm understanding of
Produce Purchasing. Standard Operating Procedures
and Merchandising. Must have past success in
managing L/D. Possessing excellent communication
skills with proven ability to build teams. Knowledge
of computer based programs is required with a
minimum of 3 - 5 years experience in Produce
Management.

Interested persons are asked to send their resumes
hrjobnow@gmail.com



& OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS



Visit our website at www cob.edu.bs

STAFF VACANCY

LIBRARIES & INSTRUCTIONAL
MEDIA SERVICES

Applications are invited from suitably quaiiiied individuals for the following position:

1. LIBRARY ASSOCIATE th f AW LIBRARY

The Law Library of The College requires a highly motivated, tactful, sates -friendly,
innovative. detail-oriented petson!to provide pi iraprofessional, administrative and basic
reference assistance Chentelé wifi include students and faculty of the LL.B Programme,
legal profession ‘and the general public.

The successful candidate will perform all duties with minimal supervision, assisting with
the overseeing of the day-today activities and programmes of the Branch in the absence
of the Branch head, so good judgment and professionalism is essential. In addition,
he/she will direct the activities of library assistants and part-timers and will assist with
their training and appraisal. Regular written reports are required.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

Under the direction of the Unit Supervisor, the position performs a variety of paraprofessional
duties with minimal supervision. These include supervision of library assistant(s),
preparation of written and oral reports/correspondence, planning and organizing job
activities, which demonstrates skills such as decision-making, good judgment and
knowledge of library and college policies and procedures. Further, overseeing the
maintenance of collections, participation in the development of policies, services and
programmes, and overseeing the day-to-day activities and programmes of the Unit in the
absence of the Unit Head are to be undertaken. The position works closely with all Units
to ensure the delivery. of a high standard of service to patrons.

SPECIFIC DUTIES:

Provides evening and Saturday reference services.
Directs the activities of Library Assistants, and assists in their appraisal.
Assists in the Unit's budget preparation.
Assists with the updating of policies and procedures manuals.
Responds to reference questions received from patrons by telephone and in person.
Supervises. part-time, evening and weekend staff.
Ensures the enforcement of library policies-and procedures.
Assists with storage and access to all library resources, e.g. books, microfilm,
CD-ROM databases, microfiche and related equipment.
Conducts research in support of the Unit’s work.
. Assists with the conduct of research and the compilation of bibliographies.
Assumes responsibility for deposit of funds collected in the unit.
. Issues library passes.
. Organizes work schedules for library clearance.
. Handles Inter-Library loan requests
Assists with the delivery of Bibliographic Instructional programmes.
Provides group and individual tours of the unit/library.
. Assists patrons with the use of computers and other related electronic services
available.
. Assists in the development of projects for the making of the library and its resources.
20. Conducts training for Library Assistants on operational procedures.
. Attends library meetings.
. Serves on College wide committees
. Participates in library projects.
24, Drafts letters, reports, proposals as requested.
25. Recommends resources for acquisitions
. Any other duties which may be assigned.

LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II

QUALIFICATIONS: Normally a Bachelor’s Degree or the equivalent in relevant area,
OR for a technical/vocational or craft area, satisfactory completion of a recognized or
acceptable programme of training at the craft level, AND have at least ten (10) years of
experience working in the craft area, OR have a trained Teacher’s Certificate with :
specialization in the relevant craft area, PLUS at least six (6) years of teaching experience
in the area.

SALARY SCALE: SPS-5 $24,580 x $700 - $35,780

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest along with a. completed application
form and an up-to-date resume to the address below by December 6, 2007:

The Director
Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
P.O Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Or to hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please note that applications are available on The College’s website: www.cob.edu.bs


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007

GN-618



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

| COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS |

_ No. 2007/PRO/npr/00599

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

:

| Whereas LEANNA ROLLE-BROWN of |
: 412 Australia Avenue, Elizabeth Estates in the |

: Eastern District of the Island of New
: Providence, one of the Islands of the
| Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made

| application to the Supreme Court of The |
: Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :

BROWN late of 412 Australia Avenue,

THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION

Island of New Providence, one of the Islands

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007. |

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00596

| deceased.
| Notice is hereby given that such applications
Whereas LOLITA MAE JOHNSON of |

;

Wentworth Street in the Island of New |
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made ;

application to the Supreme Court of The |

Bahamas, for letters of administration of the ;
Real and Personal Estate of WHITNEY |;
JOHNSON late of Wentworth Street in the |
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands :

ce COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS |

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration ;

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

2 No. 2007/PRO/npr/00600

: IN THE ESTATE OF PHILIP L. QUINN,
: late of 1645 West Turtle Creek South Bend
: in the State of Indiana, one of the States of |
: the United States of America, deceased |
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :

THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION
29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00597

Whereas CAROL NELLANIE
THOMPSON (nee) POITIER of 1985

: of fourteen days from the date hereof,
: application will be made.to the Supreme Court ;
: of The Bahamas in'the Probate Division by
: E. TERRY NORTH of the Eastern District
: of the Island of New Providence, one of the
i Islands of the Commonwealth of The
? Bahamas, Attorney-At- Law, the Authorized

Thatch Palm Avenue, Pinewood Gardens in :
the Southern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :

application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and.Personal Estate of RONNIE
OSCAR THOMPSON late of 1985 Thatch
Palm Avenue, Pinewood Gardens in the

: LOUISE SOLOMON, the Personal
: Representatives of the Estate, by the State of
: Indiana, St Joseph County in the St. Joseph
: Probate Court, on the 18th day of November

Southern District of the Island of New ;
Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased ;

Notice is hereby given that such applications :
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2 .
: No. 2007/PRO/npr/00601

THE SUPREME COURT

|| COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

PROBATE DIVISION |

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007
No. 2007/PRO/npr/00598

Whereas ADA VIRGINIA MILLER of
Hillside Park off Bernard Road in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of ST. CLAIR ALPHONSO MILLER a.k.a.
ST. CLARE ALPHONSO MILLER a.k.a.
SINCLAIR ALPHONSO MILLER late of
Hillside Park off Bernard Road in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

| IN THE ESTATE OF EUGENE J. WEISS,

| the 3d day of August 1993.

of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by

Real and Personal Estate of WILLIAM :
Elizabeth Estates in the Eastern District of the |

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
_ (for) Registrar

On

THE SUPREME COURT |
PROBATE DIVISION |
29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

eorecsseses.

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration

Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration or
Testamentary in the above estate granted to
PAUL JUDE WEITHMAN and MARY

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

late of 11111 Biscayne Boulevard, Apartment
No. 301 in Dade County in the State of Florida,
one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court |

E. TERRY NORTH of the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration (single
personal representative) in the above estate
granted to ROBERTA L. WEISS, the
Personal Representative of the Estate, by the
Circuit Court for Dade County, Florida, on

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

aenenccscecccacarcerscvosersescoceececoscoscessecoeenesnesecounsesecosecceseseeceeseeeecesonecceee ess ecnsecaeueesececcnaeccesescesescessesscscesccescocccssenees:

THE TRIBUNE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT:

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00602
IN THE ESTATE OF MAGDALENE

SNYDER O’CONNOR, late of 100 John

Knox Road, Tallahassee in the State of Florida,
one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof,

: application will be made to the Supreme Court

of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
JAMES LENNOX MOXEY of Shirley Street
in the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Letters of Administration (single
personal representative) in the above estate
granted to VICTORIA E. HEULER, the
Personal Representative of the Estate, by the
Circuit Court for Leon County, Florida, Probate
Division, on the 6th day of June 2003.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00603
IN THE ESTATE OF BILLIE SCHOLZ

? KIRTLEY, late of 2023 dahlia Avenue,

Jefferson County, Louisville in the State of
Kentucky, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
JAMES LENNOX MOXEY of Shirley Street
in the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Certificate of Qualification in the |
above estate granted to ELIZABETH

MUELLER, the Executrix of the Estate, by
the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Court of
Justice, on the 20th day of March, 2000.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00604

IN THE ESTATE OF CHARLES E.
MURPHY JR., late of Carmel in the State of
California, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
JAMES LENNOX MOXEY of Shirley Street
in the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Order for Probate in the above estate
granted to CHARLES E. MURPHY III, the

' Executor of the Estate, by the Superior Court

of California, County of Monterey, on the 13th

i day of July 2007.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar
THE TRIBUNE



~ one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of, The, Bakeranadeceased. eps



GN-618

SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00608

IN THE ESTATE OF THOMAS ROY HOLBIRD, SR., late of
Cherokee County in the State of Georgia, one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased

Notice is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from
the date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas in the Probate Division by KHALILA W. DORSETT
of the Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
Testamentary in the above estate granted to THOMAS ROY
HOLBIRD, JR., the Executor of the Estate, by the Probate Court
of Cherokee County in the State of Georgia one of the States of the
United States of America on the 12th day of June 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00611

Whereas GEORGE ANDRE WHITE of East Bay, Eastern District,
New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Person Estate of GEORGE
ADDINGTON WHITE a.k.a. GEORGE A WHITE a.k.a.
GEORGE WHITE, late of the Eastern District, New Providence,

ai

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the bol Rt

said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00612

Whereas DANIEL JOHNSON of White’s Subdivision, Eastern
District, New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the

* Real and Personal Estate of FLORA JOHNSON, late of the Eastern

District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

a Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

29TH NOVEMBER, 2007

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00613 |

Whereas JOYANN MICHELLE GRIFFIN of No.16 East Coral
Estates Subdivision in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of CASTROMER
LASHLERUE GRIFFIN a.k.a. CASTROMER L. GRIFFIN, late
of No. 16 East Coral Estate Subdivision in the City of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

Asians cake Amand AA ke!

a RE

SEABRIDGE BAHAMAS,
a $200 million upscale
residential development
on West Bay Street by
Source Development
Group LLC, is designed
to appeal to Bahamian
professionals, entrepre-
neurs, retirees or foreign
owners searching for a
primary or secondary
home.



‘MARLEY
Resort © Spa

Cable Beach, Nassau Bahamas

Jamaican Cook
Chef
- Bartender



UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial
institutions in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy
private clients by providing them with comprehensive,
value enhancing services. Our client advisors combine
strong personal relationships with the resources that are
available from across UBS, helping them provide a full
range of wealth management services.

In order to strengthen our accounting team in Nassau, we
are looking to fill the following position:

Accountant

Essential Duties and responsibilities

¢ Ensure the quality, accuracy and completeness of all
financial data according to IFRS standards

¢ Ensure monthly closing process and correct allocation
of costs-and revenues

¢ Perform high quality reporting to head office and local
management

e Ensure reconciliation of bank accounts

Minimum Requirements

¢ CPA/CFA designation

¢ Sound working knowledge of IFRS.

e Extensive knowledge of MS Office and related
Application Software products. Knowledge of SAP
based accounting applications is a plus.

Minimum of 3 years experience in Accounting. Previous
work in an international financial institution or
accounting firm is a plus.

Preference will also be given to applicants having
obtained or in the process of earning additional
certification such as an MBA, Series 7 or other related
proficiency requirement.

In addition, the ideal candidate must possess strong
analytical skills and efficient functioning, be a highly
motivated team player, willing to adapt to a dynamic work
environment and able to multi-task, while working
independently and meeting tight deadlines.

Written applications should be addressed, until December
7th, 2007 to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

hrbahamas@ubs.com or



encase as

-UU7, PAGE 9B





$200m
project

FROM page 1

first encompassing 28, three
and four-bedroom luxury resi-
dences, landscaping and mul-
tiple pools, with pre-construc-
tion prices starting at $1.8 mil-

‘lion.

Phase two will include about
25 condominiums and five
penthouses, and Phase three
will be a combination of villas,
condominiums and penthous-
es. The master plan calls for
about 90 townhomes, with the
initial phase expected to be

* completed within 24 months.

The first home in that phase
will be finished in 18 months.

“We are very excited about
Seabridge Bahamas,” said
William W. Williams, a direc-
tor of the Alpharetta, Geor-
gia-based Source Development
Group LLC.

“When we first saw the
property, I think we all had the
same instant response — it was
perfect. We said to each other,
if you could settle anywhere,
where else would you want to
be? The site and the location
offered everything — high ele-
vation with magnificent sea
views, ocean breezes and prox-
imity to Nassau and Paradise

.- Island; only minutes from the

airport. We envisioned a very
special place buyers could call
‘Home’ that would do justice
to this special location.”

Source Development’s prin-
cipals have a track record in
residential and commercial
developments in the US,
Europe and the Caribbean.
One is understood to have
recently constructed the Mar-
tin Luther King High School
in Atlanta, Georgia, which has
earned top reviews, while
another renovated and trans-
formed a Scottish hotel into
one of the world’s best.

This is their first project in
the Bahamas, and apart from
Mr Williams the partners
include Bo and Miriam Gar-
rett and Roger J. Mueller.

The private gated commu-
nity will rise up to 85 feet on
the site slightly east of the
Caves. The largest of the villas
in Phase one will be four bed-
rooms with four-and-a-half
baths, 4,320 square feet of air-
conditioned space, and two
large balconies with ocean
views.

Slightly smaller three-bed-
room units have separate ser-
vice elevators. All have
garages, hurricane-rated glass,
top-of-the-line appliances,
granite counters and limestone
flooring. Purchaser options
include the possible addition
of elevators, plunge pools and
turn-key custom interior design
and furnishing.

Bahamian sales and mar-
keting is being led by HG
Christie Ltd. The architect is
Neil Behagg and Associates
Company of Nassau.

Other Bahamian contracts
have been awarded to Nassau
residents Carleton Blair (CSB
Consultants), Brock Turner
(CVE Construction Value
Engineering Ltd), Lambert
Knowles (Engineering &
Technical Services) and Keith
Bishop (Islands by Design).
Interiors will be designed by
Roomers Ltd, led by Leslie
Callender and Hazel Stirling.

The project will incorporate
extensive landscaping with
existing specimen trees.
“Preservation pays and makes
economic as well as ethical
sense,” said Mrs Garrett. “In
fact, once we started to clear
some of the bush we discov-
ered beautiful palm trees we
did not know were there, and
we have incorporated them
into our entry and overall
design.”
PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

NEW ISSUE

= ) FIDELITY

Fidelity Bahamas International Investment Fund Limited
Index-Linked Sub Fund

Principal Protected T!GRS, Series 1
TOTAL |NDEX-LINKED GLOBAL RETURNS SECURITY





OFFERING OPENS

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indices composed of the iShares MSCI Emerging Markets Index
(EEM) (25% weight), S&P 500 index, (25% weight) Dow Jones
Euro STOXX 50 Index (25% weight) and the Nikkei 225 Index
(25% weight)’.

Return is measured from the opening price of the indices on
January 2, 2008 to the closing index levels on June 30, 2011.

100% principal protection provided at maturity.

Invest in Bahamian Dollars.

Maturity June 30, 2011.

iShares MSCI Emerging
Markets Indes (EEM)

S&P 500 Index

Dow Jones Euro STOXX 50
Index

Nikkei 225 Index



From Fidelity obtain, read and fully understand the
Fidelity Bahamas International investment Fund Offering
Memorandum together with the Index Linked Sub Fund
Offering Memorandum and the Pricing Supplement
Terms and Conditions of the Principal Protected TIGRS,

which provide additional important disclosures and

risk factors.

A subscription Form is included with the Pricing Supple-

ment Terms & Conditions.

= ) FIDELITY

Helping You Create & Manage Wealth




100% Principal Protection’
3.5 Year Term
» 100% Participation
Minimum Investment of $10,000

The iShares MSCI Emerging Markets Index (Emerging
Markets) seeks to provide investment results that correspond to
equity market performance in the global emerging markets. Top
holdings include China Mobile, Petroleo Brasileiro and Lukoil.
The S&P 500 Index (U.S.A.) is designed to measure
performance of the broad U.S. economy through changes in

500 stocks representing all major industries. Top-holdings include
General Electric, Citi Group and Google.

The Dow Jones Euro STOXX 50 Index (Europe) represents
the performance of 50 blue-chip Supersector leaders in Europe.
Top holdings include Nestle, GSK, Daimler AG, BP and HSBC.
The Nikkei-225 Index (Japan) is one of Japan’s major stock
market indices representing 225 actively traded issues of the
Tokyo Stock Exchange, First Section. Top holdings Kyocera Corp.,
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@

19,000 —___



17.000 -sgsyeiseeteteite tao ineere eres st tage ements fs Soe aN

oeseetemencenennrmnnernenpempanenenennene nerneaneene:

S
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€
8

Jan-O5 j
Jul06 1

' Return is net of any incentive fee payable to the Investment Manager. See
the Index Linked Sub Fund Offering Memorandum for details.

The 3.5 year historical Compound Annual |
Growth Rate (CAGR) on the Basket of | |
Indices was 17.50%"

*Past performance is no guarantee of future results,

RETURNS = PRINCIPAL AMOUNT

+ VARIABLE RETURN



Principal Variable

Amount Return
TAT eum linked to
100% of the upside
Protected at )
NEST ai price of the indices
basket, less the
incentive fees —



51 Frederick Street
PO Box N 4853

Nassau, The Bahamas
T 242.356.7764/5
Email: tigrs@fidelitybahamas.com