Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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BAHAMAS EDITION

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Volume: 104 No.4





CLASSIFIEDS TRADER

ATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 200

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OCA

SEE SPORTS FRONT PAGE



70th murder of the year

Body found in Grand
Bahama may be that of

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The body of a
man was discovered in bushes off
East Sunrise Highway in Grand
Bahama last night, bringing the
murder total for the year to 70 —
and the llth on Grand
Bahama.

The body, which had some trau-
ma to the head, wasn’t officially
identified, however there -were
reports that it may be missing secu-
rity officer Vincent Pedican.

Last night, Minister of Housing
and National Insurance Kenneth
Russell and other officials were pre-
sent at the scene. Rev Dr Emmett
Weir, pastor of St Paul’s Methodist
Church, where Mr Pedican is a
member, was escorted by police
officers past the crime tape, pre-
sumably to identify the body.

The suspicious disappearance of
a school security officer has high-
lighted the need for additional man-
power among other things at public
schools here on the island, accord-
ing to the chief of school security in

ena ie
WRSSTity
woman is
ye irai!
unharmed

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net



THE SISTER of Bishop
Arnold Josey, who was miss-
ing for more than 30 hours,
has been located unharmed in
Eleuthera.

There were fears for the
safety of Monique Allen, a
teacher and resident of Pas-
tel Gardens, when she was not
seen after visiting her sister’s
house in the McKinney Drive,
Carmichael Road area early
Thursday morning.

Bishop Josey, who spoke
with The Tribune yesterday
before she was located, said
the sisters had a brief conver-

SEE page eight





missing security officer

the northern Bahamas.

Stephen Plakaris, deputy director
of security with the Ministry of
Education in Freeport, met on
Thursday afternoon with more than
40 school security officers
employed at government schools
on the island.

Expressing concern for his offi-
cers, Mr Plakaris stated that he has
been requesting for sometime addi-
tional manpower as well as perime-
ter fencing and video/camera sur-
veillance at public schools.

Missing security officer Vincent
Pedican, 64, was stationed at the
Eight Mile Rock High School on
the midnight to 8am shift. He was
discovered missing around 6.50am
on Thursday after another officer
arrived to relieve him, but could
not locate him.

Mr Pedican’s shoes and his hand-
held radio and blood were found
in the Administration Building,
where an apparent break-in had
taken place.

Police also found the vehicle -
a van license number 431 - driven
by Mr Pedican abandoned in the
Hawksbill area on Thursday morn-
ing.

Mr Pedican was employed as a
security guard for 15 years in the
public school system, and was
scheduled for mandatory retire-
ment at age 65 in March 2008. The
former Customs officer was also
employed full time with Wide
World Forwarding.

’ Mr Plakaris said security officers

are devastated over the incident.
“They are taking this very rough.
Mr Pedican was a very responsible
officer,” he said.

SEE page eight

US police and
FBI are unable
to confirm
Dr Rudy King
being held for
questioning

AMERICAN police and FBI
could not confirm yesterday a
report that Dr Rudy King, the
Nassau events organizer, is being
held for questioning in Los Ange-
les.

Well known numerologist
Jerome Carter told The Tribune
that the FBI had detained Dr
King after he arrived in the city
by private jet last Friday.

Mr Carter said he was going to
visit Dr King at a Federal holding
facility.

Dr King was reported missing
on Wednesday night when he
failed to appear at a special
church service last Sunday, orga-
nized by well know preacher Dr
Michael Bernard Beckwith.

Dr King was to have made a
special award presentation to Mr
Carter at this service, but despite

SEE page eight

In a rush for Junkanoo season



WITH THE Found Day parade less than six weeks away, the Shell Saxons Sea were ORE in n the
shack yesterday preparing for the big event.

Reports: the axe has —

started to fall at NIB —

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

AFTER months of public controversy with staff
alleging victimisation, sexual harassment, verbal abuse
and unfair promotions, the axe has reportedly started to
fall at the National Insurance Board with unconfirmed
reports that the director and four other senior managers
have either received, or are about to receive letters of
termination.

Sources within NIB have told The Tribune that the
information among staff is that Director Lennox
McCartney is set to be removed from his post, along
with Donald Nougez who has reportedly already
received his letter of termination. Three other senior
officials at NIB are also reportedly being considered for
dismissal.

When contacted by The Tribune yesterday, Minister
of Housing and National Insurance Kenneth Russell
would not confirm or deny the reports. He referred

SEE page eight

:» confirmed yesterday

Fight held in
‘connection with
Harl Taylor
murder released

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE seven Dominicafs and one
Bahamian held for questioning in
the Harl Taylor murder case were
released from police custody yes-
terday.

At this point police are not look-
ing at any other specific suspects
in the murder cases of either Mr
Taylor or Dr Thaddeus McDonald.

Chief Supt Hulan Hanna told
The Tribune yesterday that police
were not able to charge any of the
eight persons with any crime.

The seven Dominicans — six men
and one woman — have been hand-
ed over to the Department of
Immigration, Mr Hanna said.

The group consisted of chefs and
waiters who were working at a wed-
ding reception in the gardens of
Mountbatten House the day before
the designer’s body was found.

A source close to the detainees
told The Tribune earlier this week
that he believes that the eight per-
sons were only held by police

SEE page eight

Survivor of drive-by
“shooting ‘facing
multiple charges’

i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE second victim in Thurs-
day’s drive-by shooting, which
claimed the life of alleged hitman
Samuel McKenzie, is also known
to police in connection with pre-
vious offences.

Keith Woodside was taken to

Notice of appeal is .
filed i in Kozeny case

@ By NATARIO hospital with McKenzie, 35, after
McKENZIE both men had been gunned down
while standing on Wilson Street,

PROSECUTORS off Hay Street.

At the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, Woodside had an operation
on his colon, one. of his knees and
one of his arms.-

Chief Supt Hulan Hanna told
The Tribune yesterday that police
will remain stationed at the hos-
pital as long as Woodside remains
a patient there.

PMH yesterday increased its

- security measures yesterday duc
to “the nature of the events sur-
5 : sat _: rounding” the shooting.

Now we just have to wait for the Court of : Woodside was recovering in
Appeal to notify us of a date for the hearing," Mr } the Intensive Care Unit vestet
Klein said. Last month, Supreme Court Justice Jon ; gay. ,

Isaacs ruled against the extradition request by US : On Thursday morning, shortly

SEE page eight

that a notice of appeal
has been filed in the
Court of Appeal
against a Supreme
Court judge's ruling
that denied an extra-
dition request for
Czech-born investor
Viktor Kozeny. i

Loren Klein of the Attorney General's Office }
told The Tribune yesterday that the notice of appeal
was filed on November 13. i

Viktor Kozeny





SEE page eight







WWE



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007

Nassau murder rate
‘six times higher than
New York per capita’

NASSAU’s alarming murder
rate is now six times higher than
New York’s on a per capita basis,
disturbing new statistics revealed
yesterday.

The Big Apple, with its 8.2 mil-
lion population, is expected to
record fewer than 500 homicides
this year.

With the Bahamas on target to
top the 80 mark by the end of
2007, New York - once one of the
most dangerous cities on earth - is
expected to end the year with only
six times more killings.

Yet New York has a popula-
tion 40 times bigger than Nassau’s,
putting the Bahamas murder rate
at roughly six times higher than
the American city’s on a per capi-
ta basis.

A Tribune reader commented:
“There has to be a message here.”

The troubling comparison was
made after The New York Times
published statistics to show that
homicides are likely to be under
500 for the year.

This is the lowest number in a
12-month period since reliable
Police Department statistics began
in 1963.

Nassau, on the other hand, is
set to register an all-time record
high by year’s end, easily out-
stripping the 74 homicides set, in
the year 2000.

This week, a leading academtic
told The Tribune that Nassau is
now effectively a war zone. “This
is a sewer and we are floating in
it,” he said.

And after the brutal murders
of designer Harl Taylor and col-
lege lecturer Dr Thaddeus
McDonald, and the daylight shoot-
ing of Samuel “Mooshae” McKen-
zie, all within a space of six days, a
commentator said the country
faced “a serious problem of home-
grown terror.”:

Bahamian Carvel Francis said
in an Internet statement that the
Bahamas was now host to around
200 criminals expelled from the
United States for violence and
more than 114 on bail for murder,
some having already repeated the









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Statistics reveal a
troubling comparison



crime of murder.

This year’s homicide toll puts
Nassau in the upper reaches of the
world murder league, with the
once extremely violent New York
now a tame urban environment
by comparison.

The New York Times said its
figures were even more striking
because, with roughly half the
city’s killings analysed, only 35
were found to be committed
by strangers, “a microscopic sta-
tistic in a city of more than 8.2 mil-
lion.”

If that trend continues, fewer
than 100 homicide victims in New
York this year will have been
strangers to their assailants.

As in Nassau, the vast majority

of murder victims in New York
die in disputes with friends or
acquaintances, with rival drug
gang members or - “to a far lesser
degree” - romantic partners,
spouses, parents and others.

The Times says the low num-
ber of killings by strangers belies
the common image that New
Yorkers are vulnerable to arbi-
trary attacks on the streets, or die
in robberies that turn fatal.

Criminologists say it will now
be difficult to drive New York’s
homicide rate much lower because
most killings happen inside homes
or within close relationships.

Criminal justice professor Peter
Manning said homicide was the
“least suppressible” crime by



police action, a view shared by
New York police.

The city’s 2007 figures are there-
fore particularly encouraging
because the sub-500 tally will com-
pare with an all-time high of 2,245
in 1990 when scores of killings
resulted from violence between
strangers. By 2002, the yearly rate
had dropped to under 600.

Twenty years ago, New York
was blighted by crack-cocaine wars
with an average of six homicides a
day.

Most killings this year in New
York City have been the result of
“personal motives”, including a
woman who killed her boss and a
man murdered by a relative of his
wife in a child-custody battle.

Based on a figure of 80 mur-
ders for the year, Nassau’s homi-
cide tally for 2007 would be 3,200
if its population were the same
size as New York’s.

That’s nearly 1,000 more mur-
ders than New York’s worst-ever
total 17 years ago.

| DENIC Se at eae USN ToaL
oe i rs Bey ! A

Patrick Hanna/BIS

MINISTER OF Education, Youth, Sports and Culture Carl Bethel speaks on Thursday during the Pri-
mary Principals Association’s universal children’s day thanksgiving service, held at the Diplomat
Centre under the theme: “children worshipping with excellence.”

CHRISTMAS
EXTRAVAGANZA SALE

| this Friday November 23rd
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= INNASSAU



THE TRIBUNE

OP iimirle ele
documents on way
to Privy Council
have gone missing

VALUABLE legal docu-
ments en route from Nassau
to the Privy Council in Lon-
don have gone missing, it was
claimed last night.

The papers were sent by
Nassau couple Greg and
Tanya Cash in what they
hoped would be the final
stage of their five-year court
battle with the Baptist edu-
cational authorities.

The documents were in a
cardboard box reportedly left
with the Nassau office of
UPS, the international deliv-
ery service.

The firm recorded its deliv-
ery to a Downing Street
address, and said it was hand-
ed over to a security official
called “George” for safe-
keeping in a storage room. |

Parcel

Now, according to Mr and
Mrs Cash, the parcel has
gone missing, with neither
Downing Street nor the Privy
Council being able to find it.

A deeply upset Mrs Cash
told The Tribune last night:
“We can’t believe this has
happened. It’s a nightmare.

“It has cost us more than
$400 to date to prepare,
notarise and deliver these
documents. Now they can’t
be found.”

She said both Downing
Street and the Privy Council
had been “very helpful” in
trying to locate the papers,
but so far they had found
nothing.

The loss is the latest obsta-
cle faced by the couple in
their long battle with the
Baptists over the alleged
“unfair dismissal” of Mr Cash
as a sports coach in 2002.

The couple have sought
justice through the Bahamian
courts on a number of issues
surrounding the case, includ-



ing alleged defamation and
infringement of constitution-
al rights.

Unable to secure a hear-
ing before the Court of
Appeal, they applied inde-
pendently for a Privy Council
appearance.

The documents were sent
to London in pursuit of a
hearing.

Mrs Cash said: “We
deposited the parcel with
UPS last Thursday and were
told it would be there by
Monday. Though it reached
London, it has now been nine
days and still the box has not
reached the Privy Council.

“Although we have copies,
it means | will have to spend
many long hours in front of
the computer to get our case
in order again before we can
make another approach.

“We are now wondering
whether we should go over
to London ourselves to deliv-
er the papers personally. It
will cost a lot of money, but
we are determined to get jus-
tice in this case.’

She said the documents
had taken her 50 hours to
prepare.

With a $189 delivery fee,
notary charges and other
expenses, they had spent
more than $400 in trying to
get the papers to the Privy
Council.

At the local UPS office, an
official said he was not
allowed to comment. He
referred The Tribune to the
Miami office, which was
closed for Thanksgiving.

However, The Tribune fol-
lowed Internet tracking of
the parcel last night and con-
firmed the box was delivered
to “George” on Monday,
November 19.

A source said it sometimes
takes five days or more for
packages to clear security
after official delivery.





Man wanted for questioning
in connection with murder

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

. FREEPORT -—- Grand
Bahama Police are searching
for a 38-year-old man who is
wanted for questioning in con-
nection with the murder of
businessman Gifford Martin Jr,
who was shot last Friday.

Dwight Ellsworth Turnquest,
a resident of Bootle Bay, is
considered armed and
extremely dangerous and
should be approached with
caution, police say.

The 32-year-old victim, a
manager at Xtreme Auto and
Supplies, was discovered dead
at his business on Yellow Pine
Street with a gun shot wound
to the head on November 16.

Dwight Ellsworth Turnquest -



His death was the 10th homicide for the year on Grand

Bahama.

Police are appealing to anyone with information concerning . |

Mr Turnquest to contact police in Grand Bahama at 350-3106,

352-9774/5, or 911.

Turnquest is of dark brown complexion, has brown eyes and
short hair. He is about five feet, 11 inches tall and of medium
built. His is a carpenter/caretaker by occupation.

“MAIN SECTION

WEAINEN oem ue curd erraelniPS

CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKEND EDITION 8 PAGES



Weather service:
Straight-line winds,
not tornado hit
Florida Panhandle

H MILTON, Fla.

STRAIGHT-LINE winds
from a violent thunder-
storm, not a suspected tor-
nado, caused about $50,000
damaged to a handful of
Panhandle homes and busi-
ness, weather officials said
Friday, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The Wednesday-night
storm brought winds
between 60 and 70 mph,
which blew out windows
and knocked over some
portable buildings in Santa
Rosa County.

Kirk Caceres, a meteorol-
ogist with the National
Weather Service in Mobile,
Ala., said an assessment
team determined Friday
morning that the storm did
about $50,000 worth of dam-
age.

“There was no evidence
of a twisting formation, it
was all thunderstorm wind
damage,” he said.

There were no injuries
from the storm. Authorities
said three mobile homes,
one house, one vehicle and
12 business had some dam-
age.

Tal
EXTERIMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their

ne ighbour hoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story,












8 6% @e* @4:

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 3



o In brief Over-the-counter cough and cold preparations

Ministry to

“host town

proposed

Long Island
development

THE Ministry of Public

‘Works and Transport has

‘advised to take advantage of

ros

——_ 4 >



announced that it will host a
town meeting to discuss a
proposed development on
Long Island.

The meeting will take
place on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 27 at 7pm in the North
Long Island Simms High
School Auditorium.

The meeting will be held
to discuss the proposed Port
St. George/Caribbean
Heights development near

“Stella Maris.

In attendance will be Min-
ister of Public Works and
Transport Earl Deveaux,
Minister for Lands and Local
Government Sidney Collie,
and Minister of Agriculture
and Marine Resources Larry
Cartwright.

The public is invited to
attend.

UK vacationers and
investors urged to
take advantage of
strength of the pound

VACATIONERS and
investors in the UK are being

the relative strength of the
pound in countries where the
local currency is equivalent
to the US dollar.

Countries which have cur-
rencies directly pegged to the
US dollar include Hong
Kong, Jordan, Bahrain, the
Bahamas, Bermuda, the Cay-
man Islands, Venezuela and
Saudi Arabia among others.

With the pound looking
likely to continue at around
$2 into 2008, the bargains will

‘reportedly come not just

through capital gains but also
in currency gains.

‘not recommended’ for children under six

lm By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of Pae-
diatrics at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital recommends
that parents and health care
providers discontinue the use
of over-the-counter cough
and cold preparations in chil-
dren under six years old.

The statement released by
Dr Delon Brennen, Consul-
tant for paediatric emer-

Statement released by Dr Delon
Brennen, Consultant for paediatric
emergency medicine at PMH



gency medicine at the hospi-
tal, said there has.been a
great deal of renewed inter-
est in the past few weeks
regarding “cough and cold”

—

medications, primarily
because of the meeting of the
Federal Drug Agency (FDA)
Advisory Panel in the United
States on October 18 and 19

Chinese man and Bahamian wife face
charges relating to goods seizure

By NATARIO McKENZIE





A CHINESE man and his Bahamian wife were
back in court yesterday to face charges relating to a
massive seizure of faké designer goods.

Xishan Ma, 31, and Yvette Mitchell Culmer Ma,
32, of East Street, returned before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel at court eight in Bank Lane for a formal
arraignment.

The couple wére brought before the court last
Friday, however at that time they were not arraigned
due to a technical issue.

Magistrate Bethel had indicated that she was not
certain whether she had the jurisdiction to hear the
case, as it was a summary matter and the six-months
time frame within which such matters must be heard
had already expired.

Yesterday, the accused were back.in court and

were arraigned in court eight on all 14 counts of

possession ‘of false trade marks while a registered
trademark existed.

According to court dockets, it is alleged that on
Wednesday, November 29, 2006 the pair were found
in possession of hundreds of fake designer items,
including more than 2000 knock-off Fendi, Louis
Vouitton, Gucci, Prada and Chanel bags, along with
850 belts and a quantity of watches, shirts and
scarves,

The charges stem from a raid last year on a ware-
house on East Street South.

The accused are being represented by attorney
Henry Bostwick.

Both accused pleaded not guilty to all charges.

The prosecutor, Inspector Ercell Dorsette, made
no objection to bail being granted to the accused.

They were each granted bail in the sum of $10,000
with one or two sureties. The case has been
adjourned to June 9 and 10, 2008 for trial.



Xishan Ma



of this year.

At the conclusion of this
meeting, Dr Brennen said, a
position statement was
released proposing that these
preparations should not be
used in children under six
years of age.

Studies

“This statement was issued
after studies were presented
showing that these. medica-
tions are not effective, and
can be dangerous in children
under the age of six. In our
view as paediatricians, who
are charged with the
immense responsibility of

caring for some of the
Bahamas’ most vulnerable
patients, we feel as though
we too should take a stand
on this issue,” he said.

Review

Dr Brennen said that in
their review of the available
health care literature and
peer position statements,
doctors in the Bahamas also
found that there do not
appear to be any distin-
guishable health benefits
from these medications in
the paediatric population.

“Prescribing these medica-
tions is not worth. the associ-
ated risks. We understand
that this statement may
spark some dialogue regard-
ing the use and misuse of
these products, and we

would like to encourage the

public to contact their health.
care providers, or the
Department of Paediatrics
directly,” he said.

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AUTO EXTRAVAGANZA

Monday November 26th, 8:00 am - 5:30 pm

C

COMMONWEALTH BANK

In addition to regular
discounts all 2007 models now
receive $1,000.00 cash

rebate to you the

customer

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Refreshments, Test Drives, Special Prices & More

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co. Ltd.

MC ae oe
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Commonwealth Bank along with J.S. Johnson on site will be there on the spot.





~PAGE 4, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

nn nee nnn nnn
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited | Problems
which are —
pushing our
crime rate

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
We must

A separate peace with Syria

TUESDAY’S PEACE conference in
Annapolis, Md., may or may not lead to fruitful
negotiations between Israel and the Palestinian

.Authority, and Syria may or may not attend
that conference. No matter what happens, Syr-
ia and Israel ought to be negotiating with each
other. ,

Indeed, peace between these two nations
may be easier to forge than a resolution of the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The issues are sim-
pler to resolve than those at the core of the
Israeli-Palestinian dispute. And despite his
heavy-handed conduct in Lebanon and Iraq,
Syrian President Bashar Assad is more able
than Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to
deliver on a peace deal.

Plus, the strategic benefits of a deal between
Syria and Israel may be not only more imme-
diate but also more far-reaching.

Through back channels, the two governments
have recently explored the possibility of a Syr-

ian-Israeli negotiating track. Israelis in the know:

have said these tentative soundings went
nowhere because of the Bush administration’s
recalcitrance. At first, the response from Wash-
ington was that Assad’s defiance of American
dictates in Iraq and Lebanon disqualified Syria
as a negotiating partner. Then, President Bush
let it be known that Israel could explore a dia-
logue with Syria, but that it would have to be
strictly a duet — without any contribution from

the United States.

Predictably, Assad’s response was that Syria
had insufficient incentive to seek a peace accord
with Israel alone. Assad, of course, needs to
retrieve the Golan Heights, which Syria lost to
Israel in the 1967 war. But as added compensa-
tion for a peace deal with Israel, he also wants
the benefits of full acceptance by America.

For Israel, the United States, and those Arab
regimes that seek to counter a perceived threat
from Iran, Assad has a valuable card to offer:
the option of subtracting Syria from an arc of
Iranian influence ,that now stretches through
Iraq and Syria to Lebanon. It is hard to exag-
gerate the strategic benefits of such a reconfig-
uration of the regional balance of power.

This partly explains why Israel’s intelligence
agencies are recommending that Assad’s hints of
a willingness to talk peace - communicated
through Turkish and Russian go-betweens -
ought to be taken seriously. They think he wants
peace and can deliver on any peace deal he
strikes with Israel.

An American president with strategic vision
would come to the same conclusion. An Israeli-
Syrian peace might reduce the regional threat
from Tehran. And, by reducing support for mil-
itant armed groups in Lebanon and among the
Palestinians, it could also, eventually, make it
easier to bring about a negotiated two-state
solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

A respite from airport misery

AIR TRAVEL in the United States has
become an almost uniformly dismal experience.
So it’s newsworthy that in the days leading up to

Thanksgiving, by and large, airline passengers.

actually got to their destinations.

Thanks to cooperative weather and better __
©Ssopened up certain military airspace for com-

advance planning by airlines and authorities,
the flying public thus far has been spared the
usual horror studies — the cancelled flights, the
stranded passengers, the unfestive holiday din-
ner at the airport food court.

Yet the absence of major problems so far
this weekend looks like a temporary respite.
Within the nation’s commercial aviation sys-
tem, fundamental problems are festering.
There’s not enough airspace for planes to fly in,
especially in the crowded Northeast. There
aren’t enough empty seats available to accom-
modate passengers whose flights are cancelled.
Checked luggage ends up where it ends up. :

And yet neither the airlines nor their regula-

tors see the value of minimizing passengers’ .

misery. Hence the need for a strong passenger
bill of rights, to keep airlines from severely
overbooking flights and holding people aboard
delayed planes for hours.

Alas, the changes that eased air travel this
week do not herald better days ahead, for they
are unlikely to recur on a regular basis. For the

Bank
Financing
Available

long Thanksgiving weekend, airlines and avia-
tion authories fully staffed check-in desks, secu-
rity checkpoints, and other potential bottle-

ommpnecks. Imagine — having enough employees

on hand to deal with a crush of travellers! Mean-
while, the Bush administration temporarily

mercial use, thereby speeding traffic to and
from busy airports in the Northeast. This raises
an obvious question: Should the balance
between military and civilian uses of the nation’s
airspace be adjusted year-round?

Sadly, some baleful trends are accelerating.
As The New York Times reported, the number
of bags lost is rising, from one in every 155
checked bags last year to one in 138 this year.
This isn’t just annoying; it also prompts travellers
to carry on whatever luggage they. can. This
means boarding and unloading take longer,
which means more time at the gate.

Commercial aviation today leaves no mar-
gin for error. Airlines and their passengers got
lucky in the days before Thanksgiving. But with-
out more far-reaching changes, travellers year-
round should still be prepared for sleepless
nights on the airport terminal floor.

(This article was written by
The Boston Globe staff - c. 2007).



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MUCH has been said
about the crime rate in our
country. Judges have
weighed in, priests have
weighed in and, educators
have weighed in. So I wish
to take this opportunity to
weigh in.

I feel that I am ina
rather unique position,
being a forensic psycholo-
gist.

This gives me a back-
ground in psychology as
well as law.

Our country has hit a
near crisis point with the
present level of crime. So
far we have recorded 69
murders.

This says many things
about our country, none of
them good.

Our biggest problem at
the moment is not so much
the crime rate but the
problems which are push-
ing our crime rate.

We as a country need to
understand that the crime
rate is only a symptom of
something larger.

The youth of our coun-
try are not going out and
killing people because they
are all temporarily insane.

The way I see it there are
three problems in our
country at the moment.

First we are not teaching
our children to respect oth-
ers.

Telling your children to
treat each other with
respect while showing up
at their school to fight
teachers and other students
is not teaching your child.
We as a country need to
live what we speak.

Children learn by imita-
tion, they do what they see
their parents do.

Yes I do mean that par-
ents should take ultimate
responsibility for their chil-
dren.

Although children are
part of a society their first
and lasting role model win
be their parents.

This leads me to my sec-
ond point. All too often I






ANNUAL MEETING

GENERAL SHAREHOLDERS MEETING
BAHAMAS CYCLE COMPANY LIMITED
THURSDAYS, 6th DECEMBER 2007- 6PM

MAGNOLIA HOUSE

ELIZABETH AVE. & BAY STREET






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia. net

hear people on the radio

complaining, about the

Cabinet Ministers. The
ministers are only respon-
sible

for their own children.
Contrary to popular belief
the Minister of Education
cannot change the national
average.

If children’s parents do
not make sure that they go
to school and study then
there is nothing that the
government can do. What
does this trend of blame
shifting teach our children?
Irresponsibility.

My final point is that
there are too many chil-
dren in our country who
are being abused and
molested, without any hope
of that situation changing.
Now that people are being
forced to be honest and
turn in child molesters the
situation can improve.
However some of these
children are being taken
out of this situation and
not being given the chance
to thrive.

Molestation is not a
death sentence for a child.

They can become
stronger, highly productive
people. It's not always pos-
sible to prevent child
abuse, but you can help the
child heal. There are many
counsellors in our country
who will gladly work with
the children to help them
to thrive. The aim of ther-
apy is not to return people
to their previous level of
functioning but rather to
help them to achieve a
higher level of functioning
and health.

If you have any questions
about anything I said you
can contact me at psych-
hope@hotmail.com.

TAMEKA EVANS
Nassau,
November 21, 2007.



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7 CUBE $445.00

9 CUBE $522.00

415 CUBE $650.00
25 CUBE $995.00

ea CUT i Se Say
When it comes to quality We Don't Compara!



A
x <

acm serit
absolutes
mean
eysstaiseveate

EDITOR, The Tribune. -

AS SANCTIONED
beings most humans are
of the opinion that as
long as they have a point
to argue, all other refer-
ences or points of view
are null and void; this
behaviour reminds us of
the behaviour of infants.
Infants are free to be
infants for a while, but
after a while parents have
to deal with the issues of
right and wrong and teach

' their offspring the differ-

ences; ultimately guiding
them toward what is
acceptable behaviour in
an ordered society.

Canon Kirkley Sands
states that “I am persuad-
ed, however, that the
sanctity of human life
requires that the right to
life be and be seen as an
absolute and inviolable
right”, if he believes this
his argument against capi-
tal punishment is null and
void. If the right to life is
seen as absolute, then we
must agree that the per-
son who violates that
right has taken on the
role of an absolute being.
Therefore, when the state
takes on the task of carry-
ing out the death penalty
it is not because it is bar-
baric, it is because the
person being punished
has stepped beyond
divinely established
boundaries that apply to
all sanctioned beings. We
can also argue the death
penalty is not a deterrent,
but, it is not meant to be.
. The principle behind
the death penalty is that
the person whose life was
taken has or had the same
rights that we all try to
pontificate about. If the
death penalty is not a
deterrent, is there a
known deterrent that we
can apply to those per-
sons who are allowed bail
and still go back to their
business as usual? The
problem with humanity is
stated in all of the histori-
cal documents that we
read, somewhere along
the line we acquire an
opinion that we think is
better than the facts that
brought us to where we
are.
I do not doubt the
Canon’s sincerity, but we,
mere humans, cannot
ever be as wise, as com-
passionate, as forgiving,
as all knowing as the one
who created us.

We who find ourselves
in this post-modernist era,
must see that absolutes
mean something, they are
not something, that we
talk about and dispense in
the way that one would
use a roll of paper towels.

We cannot perform a
right of absolution
through our speaking and
expect things to go away,
like wiping a spill off the
floor.

Some spills go into the
earth and sink very deep
into the soil, they sink so
deeply that the genera-
tions that come after are
living under a curse until
the “indiscretions” are
appeased.

EDWARD
HUTCHESON
Nassau,

November 21, 2007.



7 rn. ae



ss ha 7

THE TRIBUNE

t

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 5



B Power Company staff hold —

© In brief

Kiosk for

purchased
by Exuma
Foundation

THE Exuma Foundation
has purchased a kiosk for
mentally challenged chil-
dren who are students at
the Ministry of Education’s
school for special needs.

The purchase was made
possible through a financial
donation by Scotiabank.

Scotiabank’s account
manager at the Commercial,
Banking Centre and former
branch manager for
Georgetown, Exuma, Uriah
Cartwright said, “It is very
important for Scotiabank to
contribute to the communi-
ty in every town and island

- where we have a branch

presence. This donation
certainly reflects our
involvement and focus and
helps differentiate Scotia-
bank from its competitors.”

The Exuma Foundation
is a non-profit organisation
that exists to support edu-
cation and the enhance-
ment of the quality of life in
Exuma.

Chris Kettel, the founda-
tion’s founder said, “We are
very grateful for this dona-
tion of a touch-screen kiosk
which would eliminate the
need for a mouse Gr key-
board and makes learning
easier for the children.”

UN says 2006 set

record for greenhouse

gases in atmosphere
GENEVA

TWO OF the most impor-
tant Greenhouse gases in the
Earth’s atmosphere reached a
record high in 2006, and mea-
surements show that one —
carbon dioxide — is playing
an increasingly important role
in global warming, the U.N.
weather agency said Friday,
according to Associated Press.
: The,global average con-
centrations of carbon diox-
ide, or CO2, and nitrous
oxide, or N2O, in the atmos-
phere were higher than ever
in measurements coordinat-
ed by the World Meteorolog-
ical Organization, said Geir
Braathen, a climate special-
ist at the Geneva-based
agency. .

Methane, the third of the

- three important greenhouse

~ gases, remained stable
between 2005 and 2006, he
said.

Braathen said measure-
ments show that CO2 is con-
tributing more to global
warming than previously.

CO2 contributed 87 per-
cent to the warming effect
over the last decade, but in
the last five years alone, its
contribution was 91 percent,
Braathen said. “This shows
that CO2 is gaining impor+
tance as a greenhouse gas,”
Braathen said.

The concentration of car-
bon dioxide in the atmos-
phere rose by about half.a
percent last year to reach
381.2 parts per million,
according to the agency.
Nitrous oxide totaled 320.1
parts per billion, which is a
quarter percent higher than
in 2005. ,

Adam & Eve
is havinglll

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany workers held their second demonstration
in a week on Thursday to protest the redun-
dancies that they claim will be announced
before the end of the month.

Pedro Edwards, president of BIEMSU, and
Keith Knowles, president of CEWU, said that
it would be “unconscionable” for the manage-
ment to make workers redundant during the
Christmas season.

“We have sat with the CEO of the company
who has assured us that there was an agree-
ment between Mirant, the former owners, and
Maribeni, the new owners, that there would
be no redundancies or lay-offs of anyone for
the next two years,” he said.

Mr Knowles said that a female employee
who has been working with the company for 25

years is expected to be made redundant at the.

end of November.
Mr Edwards feels that there could be more
redundancies during the holiday season.

“To make a female employee redundant at
this time is so distasteful and disheartening,” he
said. “This is why we are fighting so much for
the buy-out settlement.”

The unions resumed industrial action on
Tuesday after no substantial progress was made
with management over the last three weeks
regarding a buy-out settlement for workers.

Unions

The two unions represent more than 100
workers at the Power Company.

The union and Mirant ‘have been at odds for .

the past two years. Mirant sold its shares in
the company at the height of protracted labour
unrest over a new industrial agreement.

Mr Knowles claims that the negotiation
process is still being stalled.

“It is sad to know that while we are in the
midst of contentious negotiations that some-
thing like this would take place,” he said. ,

“Tt is a cold and heartless act and even if
they were considering this they should have
waited until after Christmas,” he said.

WHY YOU VEX?

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter ce
whyyouvex@
tribunemedia.net

“T vex because they keep
digging’ up the roads mak-
ing these big, dangerous
potholes what is bend up
ya’ rims and they don’t
even have the courtesy to
mark them. I mean if you
ga’ dig the road up at least
mark it so my Honda‘don’t
drop in it.

And when I come out of
my house in the morning I
have to sit in constant traffic
for almost an hour, and plus I
have to go over one million
speedbumps — putting insult
to injury! °

They is put these speed
mountains all over the place
and don’t paint them!

They are probably my two

“T hear

ing out JFK.



the Mortgage Corporation in
all kind of debt, but then I
see them putting up a build-

“T vex that people who claim
to be broke always on their
cell phone, paying Batelco

forty cents a minute,”

Theron, South Beach.

“TI vex because it seems
as if people up at the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs
stop working on Fridays.
I was trying to get
through for over two
hours — either they keep
putting me on hold or they

don’t even pick up the line.
When I finally get through
to someone they have the
audacity to ask me why I
keep calling there because
they can’t help me.”
— Tokoyo, Dan Nottage
Estates



The Four-WAY Test

second demonstration in a week —

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

PPP

biggest stresses everyday of
my life.”

— Raymond,

Nassau Village

That’s a nice, new build-

ing!

How the government could

afford that if they broke?

I vex because of



From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were

concerned with promoting high

The Four-Way Test
“Of the things we think,
say or do




“T vex because all the crim- that.”

inals have their guns, but I
can’t get a legal one! And tell
me why even though crime
is so high, we have a whole
group of people defending
known hit men? I really don’t
know what is be going
through Bahamians heads.”
— Vex in Long Island.



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news .in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

- Come and
check it out

— Kayla, Sea Breeze

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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322-2157



Share your news





questions:













ethical standards in their
professional lives. One of the
world's most widely printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This
24-word Test has been
translated into more than a
hundred languages and
published in thousands of ways.
it asks the following four



1. Is it the truth?

2. Is it fair to all
concerned?

3. Will it build goodwill
and better friendships?

4. Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?”






Rules: SS OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
1. Children ages 10-16 may enter. Judging will be in two N
age categories: 10 - 13 years and 14-16 yearsforafirst Child's Name... Ce ee
and place aia ack caleocy. UR See aS .
2. Write a essay answering the following subject: Age:
“What does the Four-Way Test mean to me.” Explain ORS sd tases ecco cennR or tetanic ee tta nese "
your understanding of the 4-Way Test as it relates to School:
your life, experiences, and/or society in general.” SOON scons
Your essay must include the four princtples.
3. The hody of the essay must not exceed 1,000 wards, RGR ot nc tartrate tein cla
Adults may assist the child in filing out the entry form,
but not in writing the letter, P.O.Box:
4, Limit one essay per child. All entries must be received by
the Rotary Chub of Bast Nassau before Nov 30, 2007, Rmail Address: ; cups sienna ea si
5, Only essays accompanted by original entry formsclipped ee = y
i from the newspaper will be accepted. Photocopy, fiux, Paront’s Name: ioe
aol OF Ole ee ‘; ww AA NY nnn ennnen ARARAAMeAAAnsnannateteeseese: menses sarees Sane aes: preside: wan
6. One winner chosen age category. The , . 3
l} On (Ny decision of the judges 1s final, Pacent's Signature:
TO ee Rébemlaame tne) ON a ,
8. Mall y and paper clipping to All entries become property of the Rotary Club of Bast Nassau and can be used eye :

§ Side walk sale ouside



P.O. Box SS-6320, Nasea,

The Four-Way Test Resay Compotition
Attn: Michele Rassin, The Rotary Club of Bast Nassau,
Bahamas

The Tribune

My Voice. Why Plowgeqper!

and reproduced for any purpose without compensation.



hig, Rotary Club >t

EAST

we NASSAU







PAGE 6, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007



THE TRIBUNE

In Days Gone By:
The Sea Floor Aquarium



_ LITTLE HERMAN the dolphin jumps 20 feet in the air to snatch a
fish from trainer Audley Miller.

Ss
HURC eo

BS

<\ SEN PReA SS

Sunday School T0ant’ °°" FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching.>.itam & 7 aici. EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
wenn P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
nema Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

mel CHURCH SERVICES
ake SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2007
s ig CHRIST THE KING SUNDAY -

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road

11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, :
Prince Charles Drive

11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart



















COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM

7:00PM

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street

11:00AM
7:00PM

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rey. James Neilly

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections - Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rey. Philip Stubbs

Pastor Charles Moss

Mr. Livingston Parks/Youth Service
No Service





Rev. Gerald Richardson
Mr. Percy Sands














Rey. William Higgs
7:00PM Rey. William Higgs

RADIO PROGRAMMES












‘RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. James D. Nelly
‘METHODIST MOMENTS?’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. James D. Nell

SEES A AIRE ICRA RECARO ARK

The Nassau Region of the Bahamas Confrence of The Methodist
Church Women’s Fellowship will hold its Annual Candlelight
Service, as well as a Short Play “The Inkeeper” on Monday,
December 3, 2007 at 7:00 p.m. at St. Michael’s. Methodist
Church, Boyd Subdivison.

We hope you will find it possible to join us at this time.

ost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockheart/Sis. Tezel Anderson
11:00 a.m. Men’s Fellowship Anniversary

‘The Holy

7:00 p.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Board of Lay
ip & Training (HC







Enter into His gates
with thanksgiving, and
His courts with praise: be

thankful unto him,
and bless His name.
Psalms 100:4

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY SERVICES

Morning Worship Semice ....... 8.30 a.m.
Sunday School for allages.., 9.45am.:
Adult Education occeces ve 945M.
WOISHIO SONVICE ...sseessssereen 1.00am.
SPANISH SENVIGE vere rere 8.00 am,
Evening Worship Service... 4.30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 ys.
Missionettes (Gitls Club) 4-14 yrs,

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Minisity Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

“Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

COTE UMCEE Ren LLL
Tal: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793, P.0, Box: N-1566



Email: evtemple@batelnet.bs Web: SAU ur Org














LINUS, THE active and popular dolphin at the Seafloor Aquarium
loves to show off. But what better occasion to show his prowess
than before an audience of enthusiastic US high school biology stu-
dents. Drenched from Linus’s 300 pounds splashing, the students
of “Summer Camp Afloat” were given a special tour.







CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2007

11:30 a.m.. Speaker

Elder Brentfort Isaacs

No Evening Service

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
« Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.

~< @ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
_* Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month) _







Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

Worship Time: lla.m. & 7p.m.
~ Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5
Telephone number:

503
3
Telefax number: 32

5
3
>.

4.2

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future

Worship Time: Jam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping
Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on

Joy 101.9 at 8:30a.m Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs



An

o> engi OO



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 7



Cardinals discuss — CHEVRON BAHAMAS LIMITED TO SPONSOR ANNUAL EVENT

Ninth graders to take part in the third
National Road Safety Youth Symposium

threat from
Pentecostal secls,
Orthotlox progress

@ VATICAN CITY

THE Roman Catholic
Church must figure out
what it is doing wrong in
the battle for souls, because
so many Catholics are leav-
ing the church to join Pen-
tecostal and other evangeli-
cal movements, a top Vati-
can cardinal said Friday,
according to Associated
Press.

Cardinal Walter Kasper,
who heads the Vatican’s

office for relations with oth-
er Christians, told a meeting :

of the world’s cardinals that
the church must undergo a

“self-critical pastoral exami- }

nation of conscience” to
confront the “exponential”
rise of Pentecostal move-
ments.

“We shouldn’t begin by
asking ourselves what is
wrong with the Pente-
costals, but what our own
pastoral shortcomings are,”
Kasper told the gathering,
noting that such evangelical
and charismatic groups
count 400 million faithful
around the world.

The Vatican has been
increasingly lamenting the |
rise of Protestant evangeli-
cal communities, which it
describes as “sects,” in
Latin America, Africa and
elsewhere, and the resulting
flight of Catholics. In Brazil
alone, Roman Catholics
used to account for about

90 percent of the population

in the 1960s; by 2005, it was
down to 67 percent.

Kasper’s comments came
on the eve of Saturday’s
ceremony to elevate 23 new
cardinals. As he did during
his first consistory in 2006,
Pope Benedict XVI asked
the world’s cardinals to
come to Rome early for a
meeting to discuss church
concerns.

This year, Kasper briefed
the cardinals on relations

with other Christians, focus-
ing on the church’s relations :

with the Orthodox, Protes-

tants and Pentecostal move-

ments.

Kasper said the rise of
independent, often “aggres-
sive” evangelical move-
ments in Africa and else-
where had complicated the
church’s ecumenical task.
Nevertheless, Kasper told
reporters that “ecumenism
is not an option but an
obligation.”

Kasper opened his
remarks by updating the
cardinals and cardinal-des-
ignates on an important

new document approved by :

a Vatican-Orthodox theo-
logical commission that has
been working to heal the
1,000-year schism between
the Catholic and Orthodox
churches.

In the document, Catholic

and Orthodox representa-
tives both agreed that the
pope has primacy over all
bishops — although they
disagreed over just what
authority that primacy gives
him.

The development is sig-
nificant since the Great
Schism of 1054 — which
split the Catholic and
Orthodox churches — was
precipitated largely by dis-
agreements over the prima-
cy of the pope.

Kasper told the cardinals
that the document was an
“Important turning point,”
since it marked the first
time that Orthodox church-
es had agreed there is a uni-
versal level of the church,
that it has a primate, and
that according to ancient
church practice, that pri-
mate is the bishop of Rome
— the pope.

Kasper said that the Vati-

’ can’s relations with the
Russian Orthodox Church,
in particular, had become
“significantly smoother” in
recent years.

“We can Say there’s no
longer a freeze but a thaw,”
Kasper said.

Tensions between the two }
churches have been strained :

over Orthodox accusations
that the Vatican is seeking
converts on traditionally

Orthodox territories, partic-

ularly in eastern Europe —
charges that Rome denies.
The rift has precluded a
meeting between a pope
and Patriarch Alexy I, long

sought by Pope John Paul II

and pursued by Benedict.

Kasper noted that
Moscow had “never cate-
gorically excluded” such an
encounter.

MORE than 120 ninth graders
will participate in the third annual
National Road Safety Youth Sym-
posium on Thursday, November
29.

The event will take place at
Workers House on Tonique Dar-
ling Highway and is being hosted
by the ‘Ministry of Works and
Transport, the Road Traffic
Department and Chevron
Bahamas Limited.

Making the announcement dur-
ing a press conference were
Armando Vegas, Chevron
Bahamas Limited’s retail district
manager and Jack Thompson, con-
troller of the Road Traffic Depart-
ment.

Expressing Chevron’s support
for the symposium, Mr Vegas
outlined his company’s
approach to working with the com-
munity.

“Chevron’s approach to com-
munity engagement and invest-
ment is based on three capacity

building areas that we consider .
‘critical to economic development:

¢ providing for basic human
needs

¢ supporting education and
training

¢ aiding in small and medium
sized business development pro-
jects

“It is against this backdrop that
Chevron remains committed to
Road Safety and to the develop-
ment of young people,” he said.

The symposium aims to educate
high school students about the
importance of road safety, and the
theme for the one day event is:
“embracing today’s opportunities
for a safer tomorrow”.

The symposium will be official-
ly opened by Earl Deveaux, Min-
ister of Works and Transport, at
10am.

Mr Thompson said that the
event will be attended by public
and private school students and
promises to be an exciting, infor-
mation packed, thought provok-
ing and eye opening exercise.

“Topics to be covered during
the symposium include common
causes of traffic accidents, mes-
sages from survivors of traffic acci-
dents, common injuries sustained
as a result of traffic accidents, and
conflict resolution.”

Of particular interest are the
planned group sessions, which will
afford participants the opportuni-

ARMANDO VEGAS, Chevron Bahamas Limited’s retail district man-
ager and road safety partners announce the third annual National

Road Safety Youth Symposium.

ty to interact with each other, he
said.

“Each group will be given a pro-
ject to focus on, and at the end of
the day group presentations will
be made,” he said.

Mr Thompson said he expects
that, as in previous years, there
will be many new thoughts and
ideas regarding road safety coming
out of the group discussions.

“The issue of road safety can-
not be over emphasised. We must
lay the safety foundation today for
tomorrow, and it is against this
backdrop that the Road Traffic
Department and Chevron decided
to target ninth grade students. The
facts and statistics are there to sup-
port the need for such pro-
grammes,” he said.

He noted that world wide:

® each year road traffic crashes
kill nearly 1.2 million people, and
injure or disable 20.50 million more

e more than 40 per cent of all
road traffic deaths occur among
the 0 to 25 age group

° road traffic injuries are the sec-
ond leading cause of death for

THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS



CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
= ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES



esr

108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)

“Celebrating 224 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas”

FIFTH LORD’S BEFORE THE NATIVITY, LORD’S DAY
BEFORE ADVENT, Christ the King/ Reigns of Christ

NOVEMBER 25, 2007

COLLECT: God the Father, help us to hear the call of
Christ the King and to follow in his service,

whose kingdom has no end;.for he reigns with you and
the Holy Spirit, one God, one gloryGod the father, help us
to hear the call of Christ the King and follow in his service,
whose kingdom has no end; for he reigns with you and the Holy

Spirit, one God, one glory

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)

7:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
6:30 p.m.

Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins (Holy Communion)
Bro. Arthur Chase
Rev. Edward J. Sykes

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108

Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly

7:00 a.m.

(Holy Communion)

10: 00 a.m..
11:00 a.m.
6:30 p.m.
COKE MEMORIAL, METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m.
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)

11:00 a.m.

Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly
Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly/Youth Group
Prayer Band

Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.

Sis. Cecile Gardiner

HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)

7:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.

Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.
Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins

METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD

8:00 a.m.

Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)

CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)

5:30 p.m. Fridays
9:00 a.m. Sunday

Children’s Club
Circuit Mission & Evangelism Committee

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift

Shop and other Ministries

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN 2007: — All Methodists
of the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice
to prevail in the Methodist Cases. The fast begins weekly
after the evening meal on Thursday and ends at noon on
Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly: “My God and My

Right.”
RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns
of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
“Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the
Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.



young people aged five to 25

© men account for 75 per cent of
all road traffic fatalities among
those less than 25 years old

e it is estimated that road traffic
crashes cost the U S government
around $518 billion annually

Mr Thompson added that in the
Bahamas:

e in 2006, 49 persons died as a
result of traffic accidents

e there have been 39 traffic fatal-
ities so far this year

He thanked Chevron for taking
a leadership role in road safety,
noting that the petroleum compa-
ny has sponsored the symposium
since its inception three years ago.

“T can think of no greater invest-
ment than that of the safety of our
children, and in this regard
Chevron has demonstrated great
leadership,” said Mr Thompson.

The symposium will run from

‘9am to 3pm, and 18 schools will

participate.



NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE IN-
VESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED hereby
gives notice to the public of the resignation of Mr.
Cornelius A. Smith as President and Director of

the Company effective 30th October, 2007.

Dated this 21st day of November A.D., 2007.



UST OCU ae

Metropolitan Bank
(Bahamas) Limited

Senior Accountant

Ani Asian based banking group (“Metrobank”) is currently recruiting for a Senior
Accountant. This person will be one of a small team working for the Metrobank
subsidiary in Nassau. The Bank has a full banking license in the Bahamas and is
expanding it Nassau based operations.

The qualified applicant should have the following Qualifications:

¢ Acollege degree (or equivalent) from a recognized four year program in
accounting or business related topics or qualification as a Chartered Accountant
/ Certified Public Accountant or other similar qualification.
_ © Have 3- 5 years of prior work experience in the areas of banking and or

accounting

e An advanced understanding of accounting and accounting applications (CPA
preferred but not required)

e Strong analytical skills

* Possess a good understanding of investments and securities

e Exceptional written and verbal communication skills

e An advanced understanding of Excel & Word applications

¢ Fluency in Tagalog (written and verbal) is not a requirement but is a “plus”

for this post.

This position will encompass the Duties:

¢ Handle all aspects of the accounting matters of the Bank as they pertain to
the record keeping of the Nassau based operations.
¢ Prepare the monthly financial statements of the Bank and report on these to

Senior Management

e Assist with the day to day operations of the Bank

° Be the Bank’s contact person for Head Office Treasury and other Head Office
points of contact as it relates to accounting matters

e Assist with ensuring that the Bank is in compliance with the requirements of
the Central Bank of The Bahamas

¢ Assist with coordinating monthly management meetings with officers of the

Bank

¢ Draft procedural documents as considered necessary
Prepare an annual budget forecast for the Bank and monitor actual versus

budget results

Coordinate the external audit of the Bank
Assist with coordinating inspections of the Bank by the Central Bank of The
Bahamas and other regulators as required

This Company offers a competitive compensation package and salary will be
consummate to experience of the applicant.

Qualified and interested candidates should submit their resume with salary history to Metropolitan

Bank (Bahamas) Limited attention Ms. Jacqueline Bain, P.O. Box CR-56766, Suite 700, New
Providence Financial Center, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, fax 242-394-2142, e-mail
jacquie @ metrobankbahamas.com





.

PAGE 8, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

According to official security
records, Mr Pedican had reported
for work at Eight Mile Rock High
around [1.53pm.

“Our records show that he
logged into the diary and also
checked in by radio communica-
tion,” said Mr Plakaris.

He explained that all officers on
reporting to work are required to
check the campus to make sure
everything is in order and report
back with the supervisor. “He did
that but he had no other report on
record since that point,” he said.

“When he did not make contact
every hour as he was required our
suspicions were aroused and we
tried contacting by radio, but got no
answer. We could not contact him
by telephone because there was no
phone service at the school and we
couldn't get through by cellular
phone,” he said.

Mr Plakaris said adequate secu-
rity measures are desperately need-
ed to ensure the safety of security
officers and school property.

Due to a manpower shortage, he
said only one officer is stationed at
the schools in the evenings in order
to cover every eight hour shift.

‘The problem we are facing is
that in all shifts we had single offi-
cers and that was a sensitive issue as
we did not want to make that intor-
mation public, but in these circum-

~ stances we have no choice but to

Employment Opportunities

New retail business seeks male and female sales per-
sons for immediate employment. An attractive base
plus a weekly commission and uniform are provided.
Interested persons should contact Mr. Mcintosh by
telephoning 454-6380 to make an appointment for an
interview. Applicants should bring the follgwing docu-
ments to the interview:












a) Valid Passport
b) Police Certificate (Record)
c) National Insurance Card
d) Health Certificate

MUST SELL
OT TOA EN aO aOa

Lot #90-B comprising 22,376 sq.ft. and situated on the
western side of the main eleuthera highway and
approximately 2,219 ft. northerly of four-for-nothing road
in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

North Eleuthera Bahamas.

Murder

speak the truth,” he said.

“We have been requesting all
along every year additional officers
to have the appropriate two-man
officer on the shift at all times, but
we were unable due to budgetary
purposes,”

Mr Plakaris said Bight Mile
Rock High School premises are
wide open to criminal elements.

“There is no fencing and that
again has added to the concern of
officers down there at nights.
School perimeter fencing has also
been a concern of ours, and we
have requested electronic surveil-
lance for quite some time, but again
we have not gotten them for bud-
getary reasons,” he said.

When asked if the time has come
for armed security officers, Mr
Plakaris, a senior police reserve
officer, said it would mean that a
whole new caliber of officers
would have to be employed and
trained.

“Even with regular (police) offi-
cers it requires training and disci-
pline of character. And presently
we might not have persons with the
disposition and comfort level nec-
essary. for anyone to put a weapon
in their hands. But that is a stage
and option that has to be consid-
ered...but that has to be an official
decision made by the Ministry of
Education,” he said.

Infrastructures are in place.
For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact, Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

Woman located

FROM page one

sation through the window of
the house before Ms Allen dis-
appeared.

“Information is sketchy, but
people suspect that she may
have gone on one of the boats
to one of the islands,” said
Bishop Josey. “But nothing is
there to confirm this.”

When he contacted The Tri-
bune yesterday afternoon to
confirm that she had been
found and was safe, Bishop
Josey said that one of his sis-
ters had spoken with her, but
he personally had not as yet
had a chance to see her.

With the rapid rise in homi-
cides and other violent crimes
this year, Bishop Josey
appealed to the public for
information as to Ms Allen’s
whereabouts as, he said, the
family “does not want to take
any chances.”

Chief Superintendent Hulan
had confirmed to The Tribune
that there was an “all out
effort” to locate Ms Allen.
“We take the matter very seri-
ously in light of what has been
going on in the country,” Mr
Hanna said before she was
located.































MUST SELL
VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-E comprising 16,521 sq.ft. and situated on the western side
of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft. northerly
of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

Infrastructures are in place.

North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s Office

P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

. piled first.

FROM page one

because they were most likely the
last persons to see Mr Taylor alive.

Mr Hanna yesterday could not
say whether any information
gleaned from the eight persons will
be of any use to investigators.

Chief Supt Glen Miller, officer in
charge of CDU, said due to a risk
of flight and because it is a homi-
cide case, police sought an exten-
sion in order to hold the seven
Dominicans and one Bahamian
longer for questioning.

Because of the extension, police
were able to hold the group of eight
for 96 hours, instead of the usual 48
hours, without charging them with
a crime.

Those 96 hours were up yester-
day, Mr Hanna said.

In the case of the murder of Mr
Taylor, 37, Mr Hanna said that
police are now exploring “a number
of avenues” in their investigations.

As it concerns the investigation
into the brutal killing of Dr

FROM page one

after 9am, a green KIA Sportage
pulled up to McKenzie and
Woodside and sprayed them with
bullets from a high calibre
firearm.

The two men were hit several
times. Both victims had police
records,

Allan Emmanuel, Prosecutor
in the Attorney General’s Office,
said yesterday that at the time of
his death, McKenzie was facing
charges of murder, attempted
murder, assault on a police offi-
cer, attempted escape and causing
damage to a Central Police Sta-
tion holding cell.

Mr Emmanuel said that
McKenzie, who is notorious in
the East Street area, was also fac-
ing multiple other charges, but
that those files need to be com-

After all documents concern-
ing McKenzie are gathered, the
matters will be brought to the
courts to be declared null and
void now that the accused is dead,
Mr Emmanuel said.

McKenzie was scheduled to
appear in court on the charges of
attempted escape from police cus-
tody and causing damage to a
holding cell on the day that he
was killed.

Among the many pending mat-
ters, McKenzie was also waiting
to stand trial for the murder of
Patrick Rolle, who became the
first homicide victim of 2007
when he was shot on his way
home from the New Year’s Day
Junkanoo Parade.

McKenzie was on bail for that
murder when he was killed on
Thursday.

Following his death, rumours
concerning McKenzie’s check-

Eight released

McDonald, 59, College of the
Bahamas Dean of the Faculty of
Social and Educational Studies, Mr
Hanna said that police are looking
at persons “across the board.”

On Thursday insiders expressed

“fears that the Taylor-McDonald

murder inquiries could “go cold”
because of the men’s high-level gay
connections.

Dr McDonald was found dead
in his bed in his Queen Street home
last Friday. He had reportedly been
beaten “beyond recognition” with a
clothing iron. .

Mr Taylor was found stabbed
to death in his Mountbatten House
residence on West Hill Street on
Sunday morning.

Both men were found dead in
their homes within two days of each
other. The homes of both murder
victims were less than a quarter
mile apart.

Survivor

ered past circulated throughout
New Providence.

Some reports alleged that
McKenzie was involved in the
shooting death of Nurse Joan
Lunn in 2001.

However, Supt Hulan Hanna
said that he had no knowledge of
any connection between these
two cases.

Mr Hanna also denied reports
that McKenzie was helping the
police in other investigations.

Kozeny
FROM page one

authorities, citing that the offences
for which they had requested his
surrender were not extradictable
offences. Justice Isaacs also found
that there was an abuse of process
with respect to the proceedings
because US authorities had failed
to disclose certain material infor-
mation to the government.

Kozeny is wanted by U.S author-
ities to face charges of bribery and
money laundering. US authorities
have accused Kozeny of conspir-
ing to violate the US Foreign Cor-
rupt Practices Act and being the
driving force behind a multi-mil-
lion dollar bribery scheme that
sought to corrupt Azerbaijan offi-
cials to gain a controlling interest in
that country's state-owned oil com-
pany SOCAR in the 1990s.
Kozeny, 44, has been fighting extra-
dition to the U.S since being arrest-
ed at his Lyford Cay residence on
October 15, 2005. Kozeny spent
more than a year in Her Majesty's
Prison but was freed in April of
this year on $300,000 bail.

NIB reports

FROM page one

The Tribune to NIB Chairman
Patrick Ward, but Mr Ward did not
return calls regarding the issue, after
several messages were left for him.

In response to Mr Ward’s eva-
siveness, Mr Russell told The Tri-
bune that a statement will be pre-
pared and released by Monday
regarding the potential changes at
the top of NIB.

No message was returned by Mr
McCartney, who a secretary said
was in a meeting, when The Tri-
bune attempted to reach him yes-
terday afternoon about the matter.

NIB has been the centre of con-
troversy over the last few months.
Staff have made numerous com- °
plaints to the media about sexual
harassment, victimisation, verbal
abuse and unfair promotions. These
reports, and complaints to the min-
ister directly, led Mr Russell to hold
a general meeting with staff in June.

However, out of this meeting
where complaints were again voiced
by staff in front of management and
Mr Russell, several employees were
either terminated or suspended —
with sources telling The Tribune as
many as five employees were sent
home.

This led to a large scale walkout
at NIB headquarters on September
10 when 100 employees expressed
their dissatisfaction over the termi-
nations. At the walk-out, President
of the Public Officers’ Union
Jerome Swann said that since the
general meeting two members were
subject to “termination” and the
union felt strongly “that that was
the result of some victimisation.”

Since then the union released a
public statement just over a week
ago again complaining that a work-
er had not been reinstated after an
investigation cleared the individual
of allegations of wrongdoing.

Dr Rudy King
FROM page one

a large press turn out for the occa-
sion, Dr King did not appear.

Mr Carter asked security at the
Beverly Hilton Hotel to check his
$1,200 pent house suite. For three
successive days, it is said that his
luggage and jewellery had not
been moved and his bathroom
had not been used.

Mr Carter said that he and Dr
Beckwith had “scoured” the city
checking jails and police stations
for Dr King without success.

Later, police told him that Dr
King was being questioned by
FBI agents. However, despite
extensive checking, The Tribune
has been unable to confirm this
report and the FBI said it knew
nothing about him.

MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-C comprising 21,430 sq.ft. and situated on the western
side of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft.
northerly of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas



MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-G comprising 18,926 sq.ft. and situated on the western
side of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft.
northerly of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower
Bogue, North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS



US crew take

part in community projects |

WHILE in port in Nassau
over the past week, the crew ol
the United States Navy war-
ship USS KLAKRING partic-
ipated in two community pro-
jects.

On Friday, November 16,
Commanding Officer lan Pol-
litt and Command Master
Chief Richard Dean accompa-
nied US Embassy representa-
tives Lieutenant Commander
Delong Bonner, First Lieu-

tenant Armand Randolph and’

Sergeant First Class Shona
West to the embassy’s adopted
neighborhood school, Wood-
cock Primary.

At the school, faculty, stati
and students welcomed a
portable basketball hoop with
backboard and basketballs
donated by the crew.

The school’s principal
Deanne Huyler and physical
education teacher Cyril Hanna
thanked the visiting crew for

the donation, noting that with
uimited space at the school, the
studcits are not afforded the
opportunity to enjoy many
physical or social activities. The
baskeiball equipment will be
a great addition to the physical
education curriculum, they
said,

On Saturday, November 17,
40 volunteer crew members
from the USS KLARKING
removed debris and made light
repairs to the Bahamas Asso-
ciation for Social Health
(BAS#I) facilities.

KASH is a substance abuse
residential treatment facility
that has been in operation for
the past 17 years. It operates
Earth Village. an eco-friendly
preserve on 150 acres that
offers nature walks and horse
back riding trails to both
tourists and locals.

BASH facilities received
some damage during the pas-

sage of Tropical Storm Noel. U
S Embassy Deputy Chief of
Mission Dr Brent Hardt, Com-
mandiny Officer Pollitt, Com-
mand Master Chief Richard
Dean and embassy Navy offi-
cials were given a brief tour of
the facility by BASH director
Terry Miller.

Following the tour, Dr Hardt
thanked the volunteers for
assisting with the clean-up and
commended Mr Miller for his
ongoing efforts to provide a
rehabiliiation centre for the
community.

Named after Rear Admiral
thomas Klakring, a daring
World War Il submarine com-
mander, the USS
KLAKRING is a 453 foot ship
commissioned on August 20,
1983. The ship’s homeport is
Mayport, Florida and Com-
manding Officer Pollitt
assumed command in August
2007.



UNITED STATES Chargé d’Affaires Dr Brent Hardt, Commanding Officer lan Pollitt, Commanding Officer Richard
Dean, of the USS KLARKING, and BASH director Terry Miler are tlanked by volunteers of the USS KLARK-

ING at the BASH facility.

PARADISE (GLAND, BAHAMAS



Wiiase y

MICHAEL JORDAN
Celebrity Invitational 2008



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Kerzner International

Bahamas

Limited is

recruiting volunteers to assist with the Michael

Jordan Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament

to be held on January 14 - 20, 2008 at the Ocean

Club Golf Course

on Paradise

Island.

Volunteers are needed January17-20, 2008.

To volunteer contact Victoria Bethell by email at
bethell28@hotmail.com by January 5, 2008.



SHOWN (I-r): Lt Shona West, embassy military officer; representatives from the USS KLARKING including
Command Master Chief Richard Dean; principal Deanne Huyler and Cyril Hanna, physical education teacher,
Woodcock Primary; LCDR Delong Bonner, Navy Liaison Officer and Lt Armand Randolph, U S Embassy flanked
by students at Woodcock Primary School.

YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER
LEGAL & REGULATORY

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably
qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR MANAGER in our Legal &
Regulatory Department.

REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:

This position will report directly to the Vice President, Legal, Regulatory and
Interconnection and will be responsible for all regulatory and compliance matters relative
to the Public Utilities Commission.

JOB SUMMARY:

Responsible for addressing and coordinating activities related to all regulatory matters
with particular reference to legal maters within and on behalf of the Company. This
position requires significant interaction with the Public Utilities Commission.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Coordinate with the Vice President of Legal and Regulatory on strategies relative
to the Company and its Regulatory requirements.

. Ensure the Company’s compliance with the legal and regulatory provisions of its .
licenses issued by the PUC, the stipulations of the Sector Policy of the Government
of the Bahamas, the Telecommunications Act of 1999 and all other statutory
legislation related thereto.

. Liaise with the PUC on all legal and regulatory matters relating to compliance
with regulations under the PUC license issued to BTC.

. Liaise with other licensed telecommunications providers on legal matters regarding
interconnection.

. Provide legal opinions on matters of a regulatory nature and peruse, critique, and
analyze all relevant documentation of a regulatory nature.

Assist and advise on the reporting of matters to the Regulator involving fraudulent
activity on BTC’s network by both licensed and unlicensed operators

Attend at and assist with any regulatory matter requiring reference to a court of
competent jurisdiction

. Represent the Company on any matters of a regulatory nature involving the
Company

. Assist in the preparation of reports on the Company as they relate to legal aspects
of regulatory as required by the PUC

Liaise and coordinate with relevant departments in the compilation of reports on
regulatory matters

11. Inform, educate, and update all relevant Company employees on all regulatory
matters

12. Provide periodic update reports and recommendations on changes in the regulatory
environment to the staff

13. Perform any other duties relevant to the support of the division as determined trom
time to time by the Vice President of Legal, Regulatory & Interconnection.

EDUCATION AND/OR EXPERIENCE
Master’s Degree preferred.

LLB, Member of the Bahamas Bar Association, with five (5) years of practice at
the Bar.

Prior experience in a regulatory environment would be an asset.

Exposure to the principles of telecommunications is a plus. Strong leadership
skills are essential, organization, self-motivational and communication skills.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, #21 John F. Kennedy Drive,
no later than. Wednesday November 28, 2007 and addressed as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MANAGER/LEGAL & REGULATORY





OS
*

PAGE 10, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007

THE Baker’s Bay project is
playing a part in making Aba-
co a continued success, the
Guana Cay developers said in
a statement.

“At a time when the US
economy is slowing down and
revised IMF and Central Bank
estimates for growth of the
Bahamas GDP in 2007 are
lower than previously forecast,
the island of Abaco has one of
the strongest economies in the
country,” said Baker’s Bay.
“Apart from the natural
charms and variety of the Aba-
cos, this may be due in some
measure to the presence of
Baker’s Bay Golf and Ocean
Club on Great Guana Cay.”

The statement noted that the
$500 million Baker’s Bay Golf
and Ocean Club, located on
the northern end of Great
Guana Cay, will include a res-
idential community of 585
beachfront and ocean view
acres with around 400 homes.

Plans for the development
also include a villa-styled hotel
(75 to 100 beds), a private golf
club, an 18-hole Tom Fazio-
designed private golf course
and a 33-acre marina village
with a 165-slip “Blue Flag”
marina.

Employed

“Discovery Land Company,
the developers of Baker’s Bay
Golf and Ocean Club have
already invested more than
$200 million in the Bahamas
and Baker’s Bay currently
employ 140 permanent staff.
An additional 150 persons are
also employed in construction
work with Baker’s Bay’s con-
tractors and subcontractors.”

Bahamas Hot Mix, the con-
tractor for earthworks and
road paving at Baker’s Bay,
has been involved with the
project for about a year.
According to Ebrahim Saidi,
general manager at Bahamas
Hot Mix, the project has pro-
vided continuous employment
for. 25 staff, the majority~o:
whom are Abaconians.



MASAMI Meenstattctn building a arnt MOURN CLM aE MI ECet me

“Baker’s Bay has already
generated a large income for
the people of Abaco and as it
builds out it will provide con-
tinuous benefits and increased
income revenue to the Aba-
cos,” Mr Saidi said.

Also working on the project
is Bahamas Marine Construc-
tion, a subcontractor to Amer-
ican Bridge. This 100 per cent
Bahamian company is respon-
sible for a number of aspects of
the project, including building
revetments and breakwaters,
internal dredging and con-
struction of docks.

James Mosko, president of
Bahamas Marine Construction,
says his company has been
growing since working with the
Kerzner development on Par-
adise Island and is now able to
do jobs that would have previ-
oysly been done by companies
out of the United States. With
regard to Baker’s Bay he said

_it feels good to step into anoth-
er large project.
a eHeT HET re high-@nd-They’re

doing everything right. They’re

LOCAL NE

i





not skimping anywhere. We
have about 15 to 18 people up
there and we'll be there for the
better part of a year and half.
We've still got three to four
months to finish the first phase
and then we start the docks
which will take us another
eight months,” Mr Mosko said.

He added that maintaining
a presence in Abaco means
spending money locally. He
expressed confidence that the
developers would see the pro-
ject through.

“In Marsh Harbour we've
got I don’t know how many
homes and rooms rented. All
our food comes from the food
store, we travel on Abaco Air
and Bahamasair .. . we’ve seen
a lot of projects that are half-
baked and get off and they're



under-funded and they go to
hell in a hand basket, but this
isn’t going to happen with this
project,” Mr Mosko said.

In August, construction
began on Baker’s Bay’s 33-acre
Marina Village which consists
of high end residential units,
town houses and some retail
stores.

This work is being carried
out by Woslee Dominion,
another all Bahamian compa-
ny. Prior to Baker’s Bay,
Woslee Dominon completed
the $7 million Mandara Spa
expansion for Kerzner Inter-
national’s phase III, the $38
million Harbourside project
for Kerzner’s second phase and
a number of luxury high-end
homes at Ocean Club Estates.

Ashley Glinton, president

NOTICE

The following practices located at #36 Collins
Avenue, Nassau, will be closed permanently on 22
February, 2008, at the latest:












¢ KENNETH W. KNOWLES, M.D.
e BAHAMAS OPTICAL CENTRE, LTD.




Patients who wish to obtain records are asked to
mail a written request, containing clear patient ID
information etc., to Box N-8322, Nassau. Following
that, specific arrangements may then be made by
telephone at 325-4754, 322-4940. Regretfully, no
further letters can be written.






Bist

Pricing Information As Of:
Friday, 23 N b 00

uri
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

1.66
11.74
9.55
0.85
3.74
2.62
11.20
3.15
6.32
7.22
2.70
6.70
12.80
14.75
6.10
1.00
8.00
10.05
10.00
Wee Le)
52wk-Hi
14.60

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets
/ RND Holdi

Me

52wk-Hi
1.3648
3.5388
2.9382
1.2794

11.8192

52wk-Low
1.3149
2.9449

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
2.4829 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.2037 Colina Bond Fund
11.2596 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

2.938214***
1.279370°**
11.8192***
g i fi
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000,00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume

Today's Close - Current day‘s weighted price for dally volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(3) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(31) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Price

ORE DATA & INFORMATION
YTD 283.98 / YTD % 16.94
ily Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.094 0.000

1.502 0.400
0.733 0.260
0.188 0.020
0.275 0.090
0.051 0.040
1.030 0.240
0.208 0.080
0.426 0.260
0.129 0.050
0.284 0.020
0.804 0.240
0.768 0.570
0.934 0.470
0.359 0.133
-0.415 0.000
0.4114 0.200
0.991 0.590
1.167 0.600

P/E

1,000

Weekly Vol. EPS $
1.160
0.000
-0.030

Div $
85
0.480
0.000

4.450
1.160
-0.030

2.750

14125

0.000
Yield %

Last 12 Months Div $

HOE B4 47%

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

- Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior wook

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for tho last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

16 November 2007
** ~ 30 June 2007
*-~ 31 October 2007
31 July 2007

242) 394-2609

1.53%
2.14%
2.54%
4.11%
0.80%
0.88%
3.58%
4AAT%
3.21%
2.24%
0.00%)
2.76%)
5.87%
6.00%

Yield

8.12%
7.80%

0.00%

6.70%
7.71%
0.00%

-

and owner of Woslee Domin-
ion, says he expects that the
work will last for about two
and a half to three years and at
its peak he will employ at least
200 construction workers from
Abaco, Nassau and other
Bahamian islands.

But big name contractors are
not the only persons benefit-
ting from the development at
Baker’s Bay. The developers
say they also patronise a wide
range of small local businesses
in Abaco from hardware stores
to florists.

Contractors

On Guana Cay, Donna’s
Golf Cart and Cottage Rentals
rents golf carts to Baker’s Bay
on a monthly basis and cot-
tages to the developers and
their contractors as needed.
Guana Cay’s Orchard Bay
Marina also benefits from cot-
tage rentals by Baker’s Bay.

Jimmy Albury of Orchard
Bay Marina says he believes
the development will be good
for Guana Cay and Abaco as
long as it is “controlled and
doesn’t grow too fast”.

“Discovery Land Company
has deep pockets and overall
they’re a good company,” Mr
Albury said. ‘

Donna Sands, proprietor of
Donna’s Golf Carts and Cot-
tage Rentals, pointed out that
Baker’s Bay has not only been
good for business but is helping
people in the community as
well.

“They formed the Fig Tree
Foundation and it’s helped a
guy with cancer, paid some of
his medical expenses and we’ve
got a young guy in Florida in
rehab and the foundation’s
paying for that. Then they just
donated five computers to the



THE TRIBUNE

- Baker’s Bay project
part’ in Abaco’s success

school, brand new desks,
everything. So they are willing
to help the community,” Mrs
Sands said.

The economic impact of the
Baker’s Bay Development has
not been limited to Guana Cay
the developers said, pointing
out that in Marsh Harbour a
number of local businesses also
supply products and services
to the Baker’s Bay develop-
ment.

One such business is the
Harbour View Marina in
Marsh Habour, which supplies
Baker’s Bay with fuel prod-
ucts.

“We provide them with fuel,

gasoline and diesel on a week-,

ly or daily basis depending on
their activity,” says Troy
Cornea, manager of the mari-
na.

“It certainly moves product :

for us, which is very beneficial
and this has been going on for
five or six months now since
we’ve had their account.”

Sherell Fox, the proprietor
of Island Petal florists, has
been producing floral arrange-
ments for Baker’s Bay for the
past two years and is very
upbeat about the developers.
She said she feels they are gen-
uinely interested in helping the
community.

“JT think they are very com-
munity-oriented and they pay
close attention to the small
businesses and want to help
out wherever they can. They
are very supportive and give
back. I think Baker’s Bay will
be great for Abaco. They’ve
provided jobs for construction
workers and the people of
Abaco. You know, our econo-
my is probably the best in the
Bahamas right now and I think
that is in great part due to Bak-
er’s Bay,” Ms Fox said.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALEXANDER HECHAVARRIA
MAYET of JOHNSON TERRACE, LOT 6A, P.O. BOX N-
5613, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
17th day of November, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
BY THIS DEED POLL FOR CHANGE OF NAME made on the 12th
day of November, A.D. 2007, | the undersigned ABIGAIL EUTIRPIE
GIBSON of Tyler Street, Chippingham in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas, the mother and legal guardian of TAl HELEN GIBSON
formerly known as TAl HELEN MISSICK also of the Western District
of the Island of New Providence a minor and a citizen of the siad
Commonwealth of the Bahamas by birth do hereby on behalf of the
said TAl HELEN GIBSON absolutely renounce and abandon the use
of her said surname of MISSICK and in lieu thereof on her behalf
assume as from the date hereof the surname of GIBSON. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.



oF



THE TRIBUNE SATUF LY, NOVEWBEK 24, 2007, PAGE 11















~ SALES
_ PERSONS
EEDED!

e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your
“income.
e You are limited only to
your potential
e Flexible hours available
e Excellent commissions
and benefits



Bahamas Educational

~ Scholarship fund gets
~ more than $3,100

THE National Association of
the Bahamas Miami Chapter
put on its second annual Dine-

and-Dash Scholarship Fundrais- were: the Bahamas Tourist Bahamians, friends of the . ®
_er this month in Minne Office, Bahamasair, the Bahamas and Floridians of . Must have reliable transportation

NAB officials raised more Bahamas Consulate, Laser Bahamian decent living in uae ‘ 7
‘than $3,100 from ticket pro- International Freight Transport, South Florida. e Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
ceeds and donations for the Eastern Financial, Carnival One of the association’s pri- : . : :
Bahamas Educational Scholar- Cruise Lines and Metro Dade _ mary fundraiser goals is to ren- e Excellent written and communication skills.

- ship fund.

. “The event consisted of a
*. whirl-wind dine-around of four
stops where 62 participants
enjoyed the night conversing
and dining at various locations
throughout Miami-Dade,” said
the chapter in a statement.

Bimini Bay Resort and Mari-
na has become a strategic part-
ner, contributing to a number
of charities throughout the
Bahamas.

President of Bimini Bay
Resort and Marina Sean Grim-
berg and wife Catherine, vol-
unteered their home and were
the hosts of the entrée portion
of the event.

Dinner guests were from
organisations and associations
of the Bahamas. Represented

Transit, among others.

Earl Miller, former president
and founder of NAB said that
with the assistance of “co-oper-
ating partners and more impor-
tantly friends like the Grim-
bergs who are willing to assist
and support a great cause, the
organisation will not only afford
to give deserving students a
chance to attend college but
make the world a better place
for all.”

The event was organised by
Earl Miller and current presi-
dent Rosamon Gomez, who
along with board members help
raise funds year-round for the
educational scholarship fund.

The National Association of
the Bahamas is a non-profit
organisation consisting of

der assistance to Bahamian
scholars in need and reach out
to the less fortunate in South
Florida communities.

Established in 1993, the
National Association of the
Bahamas (NAB) is made up of
450 members.

Since Bahamians played such
an important role in the history
of Florida communities, the
group saw the association as an
engine to strengthen social
bonds and preserve the rela-
tionship for future generations.

A chapter was established in
West Palm Beach in 1995 and
the newest chapter was estab-
lished in Orlando in 1998.






Must have a proven track record in sales
Professional appearance a must a

Apply in writing to
Sales Representatives

Box PM-1

C/O The Nassau Guardian

P.O. Box N-3011
Nassau

Bahamas

OFT GOj- 8} er eta





paNan Wve oeye welt |)

Albany Developer Ltd.

in conjuction with

The Department of Labour , BTVI and the Contractors Asseciation

will host a

Job fair

Tuesday November 277" 2007

and

Wednesday November 28" 2007

8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium

We need to see

ALL CONTRACTORS (Big and small
ALL. VENDORS -ALL SUPPLIERS





PAGE 12, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA | -

Justice Cheryl Albury
_ launches Coral Tapestry

THURSDAY 15th November,
2007 marked the debut of a new
: contribution to the Bahamian lit-
e, erary scene. An impressive gath-
: ering of persons from a wide cross
section of the community attend-
ed the launch of Coral Tapestry, a
collection of short stories, at the
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The stories which
depict Bahamian life, past and
present, were written by Justice
Cheryl Albury, who in 1994
authored the popular Anthology:
Perspectives From Inner Win-
dows. Her poetry, which was first
published in the College of the
Bahamas Anthology of Bahamian
Literature in the 1970s has been
anthologised in other publications
in the Bahamas, U.S. Virgin
Islands, United Kingdom, the
Caribbean and Canada.

sae

-

@ Photo 1
s. Photo shows Justice Albury
and Members of the Supreme
isle Court Staff: (L to R) Claudina
Cooper, Secretary; Grace Bost-
wick, Listing Officer of the
Supreme Court; Justice Albury;
Donna Newton, Supreme Court
: - Registrar; and Nelson Hanna,
Court Clerk.

Hf Photo 2

‘Dr. Harold Munnings Jr.,
. Author of A History of the
ee Princess Margaret Hospital; Mari-
on Bethel-Sears, Attorney and
Poet; Business Charles McCart-

f ney; and Architect Russ Thomp-
: son.

@ Photo 3
Mr. Anslem Hall; Attorneys
Deidre Maycock, Danya Wallace;
. Lady Camille Hall; Candia
Albury-Ferguson; and Chief Jus-
tice Burton Hall.

@ Photo 4

The Book Launch was strongly
supported by the local chapter of
the Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA)
Sorority. (L to R) Tiffany Bain;
C.C. Lafleur; Sharon Fernander;
JoyAnne Archer, International
Program Representative; Dr.
Keva Bethel, Honorary Sorority;
Cheryl Albury, Honorary Sorori-
ty; Cindy Dorsette, lst Vice Presi-
dent; Lisa Major, Angelique Mck-
ay; Debra Neymour, 2nd Vice
President and Indira Swaby.

@ Photo 5

(L to R) Attorney Sharon Wil-
son, of Sharon Wilson & Co. for-
mer President of the Senate; Leila
Greene, Permanent Secretary,
Office of the Attorney General;
Justice Albury; and Charlene
Lloyd, Manager, Registrar of
Insurance Office.

H Photo 6
: (L to R) The Most Rev. Patrick
“ Pinder, STD, CMG, Archbishop
of Nassau; Dr. Keva Bethel, Pres-
ident Emerita, College of the
Bahamas (COB); Senator The
Hon. Claire Hepburn, Attorney
General; Justice Cheryl Albury;
Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall;
Janyne Hodder, President, Col-
lege of the Bahamas and Basil H.
Albury.

@ Photo 7

(L to R) Mr. Leroy H. Archer,
Managing Director of Burns
House Limited; Mr. Michael
Symonette, CEO of Symonette
Marketing Group; and Attorney
Alex Ferguson.



fe lari Rerousott
f fi 9 t - aS Trasmsanan \ Aegye .



: ' z : ss ‘Shove ons: Difference”

io . RO. Box NAG80,
©) E Measaga, Balan





Full Text
~Y

ae



i'm lovin’ it.

82F
72F

ge CLOUDS AND |
Soe. SUNSHINE

oe

m Lhe Tribune

up all night!





NicDonald’s downtown

drive-thru is now open







BAHAMAS EDITION

24 hours

Fridays 2 Asa





Volume: 104 No.4





CLASSIFIEDS TRADER

ATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 200

ia eae r



PRICE — 75¢

Manet:

OCA

SEE SPORTS FRONT PAGE



70th murder of the year

Body found in Grand
Bahama may be that of

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The body of a
man was discovered in bushes off
East Sunrise Highway in Grand
Bahama last night, bringing the
murder total for the year to 70 —
and the llth on Grand
Bahama.

The body, which had some trau-
ma to the head, wasn’t officially
identified, however there -were
reports that it may be missing secu-
rity officer Vincent Pedican.

Last night, Minister of Housing
and National Insurance Kenneth
Russell and other officials were pre-
sent at the scene. Rev Dr Emmett
Weir, pastor of St Paul’s Methodist
Church, where Mr Pedican is a
member, was escorted by police
officers past the crime tape, pre-
sumably to identify the body.

The suspicious disappearance of
a school security officer has high-
lighted the need for additional man-
power among other things at public
schools here on the island, accord-
ing to the chief of school security in

ena ie
WRSSTity
woman is
ye irai!
unharmed

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net



THE SISTER of Bishop
Arnold Josey, who was miss-
ing for more than 30 hours,
has been located unharmed in
Eleuthera.

There were fears for the
safety of Monique Allen, a
teacher and resident of Pas-
tel Gardens, when she was not
seen after visiting her sister’s
house in the McKinney Drive,
Carmichael Road area early
Thursday morning.

Bishop Josey, who spoke
with The Tribune yesterday
before she was located, said
the sisters had a brief conver-

SEE page eight





missing security officer

the northern Bahamas.

Stephen Plakaris, deputy director
of security with the Ministry of
Education in Freeport, met on
Thursday afternoon with more than
40 school security officers
employed at government schools
on the island.

Expressing concern for his offi-
cers, Mr Plakaris stated that he has
been requesting for sometime addi-
tional manpower as well as perime-
ter fencing and video/camera sur-
veillance at public schools.

Missing security officer Vincent
Pedican, 64, was stationed at the
Eight Mile Rock High School on
the midnight to 8am shift. He was
discovered missing around 6.50am
on Thursday after another officer
arrived to relieve him, but could
not locate him.

Mr Pedican’s shoes and his hand-
held radio and blood were found
in the Administration Building,
where an apparent break-in had
taken place.

Police also found the vehicle -
a van license number 431 - driven
by Mr Pedican abandoned in the
Hawksbill area on Thursday morn-
ing.

Mr Pedican was employed as a
security guard for 15 years in the
public school system, and was
scheduled for mandatory retire-
ment at age 65 in March 2008. The
former Customs officer was also
employed full time with Wide
World Forwarding.

’ Mr Plakaris said security officers

are devastated over the incident.
“They are taking this very rough.
Mr Pedican was a very responsible
officer,” he said.

SEE page eight

US police and
FBI are unable
to confirm
Dr Rudy King
being held for
questioning

AMERICAN police and FBI
could not confirm yesterday a
report that Dr Rudy King, the
Nassau events organizer, is being
held for questioning in Los Ange-
les.

Well known numerologist
Jerome Carter told The Tribune
that the FBI had detained Dr
King after he arrived in the city
by private jet last Friday.

Mr Carter said he was going to
visit Dr King at a Federal holding
facility.

Dr King was reported missing
on Wednesday night when he
failed to appear at a special
church service last Sunday, orga-
nized by well know preacher Dr
Michael Bernard Beckwith.

Dr King was to have made a
special award presentation to Mr
Carter at this service, but despite

SEE page eight

In a rush for Junkanoo season



WITH THE Found Day parade less than six weeks away, the Shell Saxons Sea were ORE in n the
shack yesterday preparing for the big event.

Reports: the axe has —

started to fall at NIB —

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

AFTER months of public controversy with staff
alleging victimisation, sexual harassment, verbal abuse
and unfair promotions, the axe has reportedly started to
fall at the National Insurance Board with unconfirmed
reports that the director and four other senior managers
have either received, or are about to receive letters of
termination.

Sources within NIB have told The Tribune that the
information among staff is that Director Lennox
McCartney is set to be removed from his post, along
with Donald Nougez who has reportedly already
received his letter of termination. Three other senior
officials at NIB are also reportedly being considered for
dismissal.

When contacted by The Tribune yesterday, Minister
of Housing and National Insurance Kenneth Russell
would not confirm or deny the reports. He referred

SEE page eight

:» confirmed yesterday

Fight held in
‘connection with
Harl Taylor
murder released

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE seven Dominicafs and one
Bahamian held for questioning in
the Harl Taylor murder case were
released from police custody yes-
terday.

At this point police are not look-
ing at any other specific suspects
in the murder cases of either Mr
Taylor or Dr Thaddeus McDonald.

Chief Supt Hulan Hanna told
The Tribune yesterday that police
were not able to charge any of the
eight persons with any crime.

The seven Dominicans — six men
and one woman — have been hand-
ed over to the Department of
Immigration, Mr Hanna said.

The group consisted of chefs and
waiters who were working at a wed-
ding reception in the gardens of
Mountbatten House the day before
the designer’s body was found.

A source close to the detainees
told The Tribune earlier this week
that he believes that the eight per-
sons were only held by police

SEE page eight

Survivor of drive-by
“shooting ‘facing
multiple charges’

i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE second victim in Thurs-
day’s drive-by shooting, which
claimed the life of alleged hitman
Samuel McKenzie, is also known
to police in connection with pre-
vious offences.

Keith Woodside was taken to

Notice of appeal is .
filed i in Kozeny case

@ By NATARIO hospital with McKenzie, 35, after
McKENZIE both men had been gunned down
while standing on Wilson Street,

PROSECUTORS off Hay Street.

At the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, Woodside had an operation
on his colon, one. of his knees and
one of his arms.-

Chief Supt Hulan Hanna told
The Tribune yesterday that police
will remain stationed at the hos-
pital as long as Woodside remains
a patient there.

PMH yesterday increased its

- security measures yesterday duc
to “the nature of the events sur-
5 : sat _: rounding” the shooting.

Now we just have to wait for the Court of : Woodside was recovering in
Appeal to notify us of a date for the hearing," Mr } the Intensive Care Unit vestet
Klein said. Last month, Supreme Court Justice Jon ; gay. ,

Isaacs ruled against the extradition request by US : On Thursday morning, shortly

SEE page eight

that a notice of appeal
has been filed in the
Court of Appeal
against a Supreme
Court judge's ruling
that denied an extra-
dition request for
Czech-born investor
Viktor Kozeny. i

Loren Klein of the Attorney General's Office }
told The Tribune yesterday that the notice of appeal
was filed on November 13. i

Viktor Kozeny





SEE page eight







WWE
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007

Nassau murder rate
‘six times higher than
New York per capita’

NASSAU’s alarming murder
rate is now six times higher than
New York’s on a per capita basis,
disturbing new statistics revealed
yesterday.

The Big Apple, with its 8.2 mil-
lion population, is expected to
record fewer than 500 homicides
this year.

With the Bahamas on target to
top the 80 mark by the end of
2007, New York - once one of the
most dangerous cities on earth - is
expected to end the year with only
six times more killings.

Yet New York has a popula-
tion 40 times bigger than Nassau’s,
putting the Bahamas murder rate
at roughly six times higher than
the American city’s on a per capi-
ta basis.

A Tribune reader commented:
“There has to be a message here.”

The troubling comparison was
made after The New York Times
published statistics to show that
homicides are likely to be under
500 for the year.

This is the lowest number in a
12-month period since reliable
Police Department statistics began
in 1963.

Nassau, on the other hand, is
set to register an all-time record
high by year’s end, easily out-
stripping the 74 homicides set, in
the year 2000.

This week, a leading academtic
told The Tribune that Nassau is
now effectively a war zone. “This
is a sewer and we are floating in
it,” he said.

And after the brutal murders
of designer Harl Taylor and col-
lege lecturer Dr Thaddeus
McDonald, and the daylight shoot-
ing of Samuel “Mooshae” McKen-
zie, all within a space of six days, a
commentator said the country
faced “a serious problem of home-
grown terror.”:

Bahamian Carvel Francis said
in an Internet statement that the
Bahamas was now host to around
200 criminals expelled from the
United States for violence and
more than 114 on bail for murder,
some having already repeated the









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CANNOT &&
BEAT OUR
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Statistics reveal a
troubling comparison



crime of murder.

This year’s homicide toll puts
Nassau in the upper reaches of the
world murder league, with the
once extremely violent New York
now a tame urban environment
by comparison.

The New York Times said its
figures were even more striking
because, with roughly half the
city’s killings analysed, only 35
were found to be committed
by strangers, “a microscopic sta-
tistic in a city of more than 8.2 mil-
lion.”

If that trend continues, fewer
than 100 homicide victims in New
York this year will have been
strangers to their assailants.

As in Nassau, the vast majority

of murder victims in New York
die in disputes with friends or
acquaintances, with rival drug
gang members or - “to a far lesser
degree” - romantic partners,
spouses, parents and others.

The Times says the low num-
ber of killings by strangers belies
the common image that New
Yorkers are vulnerable to arbi-
trary attacks on the streets, or die
in robberies that turn fatal.

Criminologists say it will now
be difficult to drive New York’s
homicide rate much lower because
most killings happen inside homes
or within close relationships.

Criminal justice professor Peter
Manning said homicide was the
“least suppressible” crime by



police action, a view shared by
New York police.

The city’s 2007 figures are there-
fore particularly encouraging
because the sub-500 tally will com-
pare with an all-time high of 2,245
in 1990 when scores of killings
resulted from violence between
strangers. By 2002, the yearly rate
had dropped to under 600.

Twenty years ago, New York
was blighted by crack-cocaine wars
with an average of six homicides a
day.

Most killings this year in New
York City have been the result of
“personal motives”, including a
woman who killed her boss and a
man murdered by a relative of his
wife in a child-custody battle.

Based on a figure of 80 mur-
ders for the year, Nassau’s homi-
cide tally for 2007 would be 3,200
if its population were the same
size as New York’s.

That’s nearly 1,000 more mur-
ders than New York’s worst-ever
total 17 years ago.

| DENIC Se at eae USN ToaL
oe i rs Bey ! A

Patrick Hanna/BIS

MINISTER OF Education, Youth, Sports and Culture Carl Bethel speaks on Thursday during the Pri-
mary Principals Association’s universal children’s day thanksgiving service, held at the Diplomat
Centre under the theme: “children worshipping with excellence.”

CHRISTMAS
EXTRAVAGANZA SALE

| this Friday November 23rd
-- == & Saturday November 24th, 2007

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THE TRIBUNE

OP iimirle ele
documents on way
to Privy Council
have gone missing

VALUABLE legal docu-
ments en route from Nassau
to the Privy Council in Lon-
don have gone missing, it was
claimed last night.

The papers were sent by
Nassau couple Greg and
Tanya Cash in what they
hoped would be the final
stage of their five-year court
battle with the Baptist edu-
cational authorities.

The documents were in a
cardboard box reportedly left
with the Nassau office of
UPS, the international deliv-
ery service.

The firm recorded its deliv-
ery to a Downing Street
address, and said it was hand-
ed over to a security official
called “George” for safe-
keeping in a storage room. |

Parcel

Now, according to Mr and
Mrs Cash, the parcel has
gone missing, with neither
Downing Street nor the Privy
Council being able to find it.

A deeply upset Mrs Cash
told The Tribune last night:
“We can’t believe this has
happened. It’s a nightmare.

“It has cost us more than
$400 to date to prepare,
notarise and deliver these
documents. Now they can’t
be found.”

She said both Downing
Street and the Privy Council
had been “very helpful” in
trying to locate the papers,
but so far they had found
nothing.

The loss is the latest obsta-
cle faced by the couple in
their long battle with the
Baptists over the alleged
“unfair dismissal” of Mr Cash
as a sports coach in 2002.

The couple have sought
justice through the Bahamian
courts on a number of issues
surrounding the case, includ-



ing alleged defamation and
infringement of constitution-
al rights.

Unable to secure a hear-
ing before the Court of
Appeal, they applied inde-
pendently for a Privy Council
appearance.

The documents were sent
to London in pursuit of a
hearing.

Mrs Cash said: “We
deposited the parcel with
UPS last Thursday and were
told it would be there by
Monday. Though it reached
London, it has now been nine
days and still the box has not
reached the Privy Council.

“Although we have copies,
it means | will have to spend
many long hours in front of
the computer to get our case
in order again before we can
make another approach.

“We are now wondering
whether we should go over
to London ourselves to deliv-
er the papers personally. It
will cost a lot of money, but
we are determined to get jus-
tice in this case.’

She said the documents
had taken her 50 hours to
prepare.

With a $189 delivery fee,
notary charges and other
expenses, they had spent
more than $400 in trying to
get the papers to the Privy
Council.

At the local UPS office, an
official said he was not
allowed to comment. He
referred The Tribune to the
Miami office, which was
closed for Thanksgiving.

However, The Tribune fol-
lowed Internet tracking of
the parcel last night and con-
firmed the box was delivered
to “George” on Monday,
November 19.

A source said it sometimes
takes five days or more for
packages to clear security
after official delivery.





Man wanted for questioning
in connection with murder

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

. FREEPORT -—- Grand
Bahama Police are searching
for a 38-year-old man who is
wanted for questioning in con-
nection with the murder of
businessman Gifford Martin Jr,
who was shot last Friday.

Dwight Ellsworth Turnquest,
a resident of Bootle Bay, is
considered armed and
extremely dangerous and
should be approached with
caution, police say.

The 32-year-old victim, a
manager at Xtreme Auto and
Supplies, was discovered dead
at his business on Yellow Pine
Street with a gun shot wound
to the head on November 16.

Dwight Ellsworth Turnquest -



His death was the 10th homicide for the year on Grand

Bahama.

Police are appealing to anyone with information concerning . |

Mr Turnquest to contact police in Grand Bahama at 350-3106,

352-9774/5, or 911.

Turnquest is of dark brown complexion, has brown eyes and
short hair. He is about five feet, 11 inches tall and of medium
built. His is a carpenter/caretaker by occupation.

“MAIN SECTION

WEAINEN oem ue curd erraelniPS

CLASSIFIED SECTION 28 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKEND EDITION 8 PAGES



Weather service:
Straight-line winds,
not tornado hit
Florida Panhandle

H MILTON, Fla.

STRAIGHT-LINE winds
from a violent thunder-
storm, not a suspected tor-
nado, caused about $50,000
damaged to a handful of
Panhandle homes and busi-
ness, weather officials said
Friday, according to Associ-
ated Press.

The Wednesday-night
storm brought winds
between 60 and 70 mph,
which blew out windows
and knocked over some
portable buildings in Santa
Rosa County.

Kirk Caceres, a meteorol-
ogist with the National
Weather Service in Mobile,
Ala., said an assessment
team determined Friday
morning that the storm did
about $50,000 worth of dam-
age.

“There was no evidence
of a twisting formation, it
was all thunderstorm wind
damage,” he said.

There were no injuries
from the storm. Authorities
said three mobile homes,
one house, one vehicle and
12 business had some dam-
age.

Tal
EXTERIMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157

Share
your
news

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from people who are
making news in their

ne ighbour hoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story,












8 6% @e* @4:

ee



4
4

We Ww eo. tw. ea ar

=O) eaener*
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 3



o In brief Over-the-counter cough and cold preparations

Ministry to

“host town

proposed

Long Island
development

THE Ministry of Public

‘Works and Transport has

‘advised to take advantage of

ros

——_ 4 >



announced that it will host a
town meeting to discuss a
proposed development on
Long Island.

The meeting will take
place on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 27 at 7pm in the North
Long Island Simms High
School Auditorium.

The meeting will be held
to discuss the proposed Port
St. George/Caribbean
Heights development near

“Stella Maris.

In attendance will be Min-
ister of Public Works and
Transport Earl Deveaux,
Minister for Lands and Local
Government Sidney Collie,
and Minister of Agriculture
and Marine Resources Larry
Cartwright.

The public is invited to
attend.

UK vacationers and
investors urged to
take advantage of
strength of the pound

VACATIONERS and
investors in the UK are being

the relative strength of the
pound in countries where the
local currency is equivalent
to the US dollar.

Countries which have cur-
rencies directly pegged to the
US dollar include Hong
Kong, Jordan, Bahrain, the
Bahamas, Bermuda, the Cay-
man Islands, Venezuela and
Saudi Arabia among others.

With the pound looking
likely to continue at around
$2 into 2008, the bargains will

‘reportedly come not just

through capital gains but also
in currency gains.

‘not recommended’ for children under six

lm By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Department of Pae-
diatrics at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital recommends
that parents and health care
providers discontinue the use
of over-the-counter cough
and cold preparations in chil-
dren under six years old.

The statement released by
Dr Delon Brennen, Consul-
tant for paediatric emer-

Statement released by Dr Delon
Brennen, Consultant for paediatric
emergency medicine at PMH



gency medicine at the hospi-
tal, said there has.been a
great deal of renewed inter-
est in the past few weeks
regarding “cough and cold”

—

medications, primarily
because of the meeting of the
Federal Drug Agency (FDA)
Advisory Panel in the United
States on October 18 and 19

Chinese man and Bahamian wife face
charges relating to goods seizure

By NATARIO McKENZIE





A CHINESE man and his Bahamian wife were
back in court yesterday to face charges relating to a
massive seizure of faké designer goods.

Xishan Ma, 31, and Yvette Mitchell Culmer Ma,
32, of East Street, returned before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel at court eight in Bank Lane for a formal
arraignment.

The couple wére brought before the court last
Friday, however at that time they were not arraigned
due to a technical issue.

Magistrate Bethel had indicated that she was not
certain whether she had the jurisdiction to hear the
case, as it was a summary matter and the six-months
time frame within which such matters must be heard
had already expired.

Yesterday, the accused were back.in court and

were arraigned in court eight on all 14 counts of

possession ‘of false trade marks while a registered
trademark existed.

According to court dockets, it is alleged that on
Wednesday, November 29, 2006 the pair were found
in possession of hundreds of fake designer items,
including more than 2000 knock-off Fendi, Louis
Vouitton, Gucci, Prada and Chanel bags, along with
850 belts and a quantity of watches, shirts and
scarves,

The charges stem from a raid last year on a ware-
house on East Street South.

The accused are being represented by attorney
Henry Bostwick.

Both accused pleaded not guilty to all charges.

The prosecutor, Inspector Ercell Dorsette, made
no objection to bail being granted to the accused.

They were each granted bail in the sum of $10,000
with one or two sureties. The case has been
adjourned to June 9 and 10, 2008 for trial.



Xishan Ma



of this year.

At the conclusion of this
meeting, Dr Brennen said, a
position statement was
released proposing that these
preparations should not be
used in children under six
years of age.

Studies

“This statement was issued
after studies were presented
showing that these. medica-
tions are not effective, and
can be dangerous in children
under the age of six. In our
view as paediatricians, who
are charged with the
immense responsibility of

caring for some of the
Bahamas’ most vulnerable
patients, we feel as though
we too should take a stand
on this issue,” he said.

Review

Dr Brennen said that in
their review of the available
health care literature and
peer position statements,
doctors in the Bahamas also
found that there do not
appear to be any distin-
guishable health benefits
from these medications in
the paediatric population.

“Prescribing these medica-
tions is not worth. the associ-
ated risks. We understand
that this statement may
spark some dialogue regard-
ing the use and misuse of
these products, and we

would like to encourage the

public to contact their health.
care providers, or the
Department of Paediatrics
directly,” he said.

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~PAGE 4, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

nn nee nnn nnn
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited | Problems
which are —
pushing our
crime rate

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
We must

A separate peace with Syria

TUESDAY’S PEACE conference in
Annapolis, Md., may or may not lead to fruitful
negotiations between Israel and the Palestinian

.Authority, and Syria may or may not attend
that conference. No matter what happens, Syr-
ia and Israel ought to be negotiating with each
other. ,

Indeed, peace between these two nations
may be easier to forge than a resolution of the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The issues are sim-
pler to resolve than those at the core of the
Israeli-Palestinian dispute. And despite his
heavy-handed conduct in Lebanon and Iraq,
Syrian President Bashar Assad is more able
than Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to
deliver on a peace deal.

Plus, the strategic benefits of a deal between
Syria and Israel may be not only more imme-
diate but also more far-reaching.

Through back channels, the two governments
have recently explored the possibility of a Syr-

ian-Israeli negotiating track. Israelis in the know:

have said these tentative soundings went
nowhere because of the Bush administration’s
recalcitrance. At first, the response from Wash-
ington was that Assad’s defiance of American
dictates in Iraq and Lebanon disqualified Syria
as a negotiating partner. Then, President Bush
let it be known that Israel could explore a dia-
logue with Syria, but that it would have to be
strictly a duet — without any contribution from

the United States.

Predictably, Assad’s response was that Syria
had insufficient incentive to seek a peace accord
with Israel alone. Assad, of course, needs to
retrieve the Golan Heights, which Syria lost to
Israel in the 1967 war. But as added compensa-
tion for a peace deal with Israel, he also wants
the benefits of full acceptance by America.

For Israel, the United States, and those Arab
regimes that seek to counter a perceived threat
from Iran, Assad has a valuable card to offer:
the option of subtracting Syria from an arc of
Iranian influence ,that now stretches through
Iraq and Syria to Lebanon. It is hard to exag-
gerate the strategic benefits of such a reconfig-
uration of the regional balance of power.

This partly explains why Israel’s intelligence
agencies are recommending that Assad’s hints of
a willingness to talk peace - communicated
through Turkish and Russian go-betweens -
ought to be taken seriously. They think he wants
peace and can deliver on any peace deal he
strikes with Israel.

An American president with strategic vision
would come to the same conclusion. An Israeli-
Syrian peace might reduce the regional threat
from Tehran. And, by reducing support for mil-
itant armed groups in Lebanon and among the
Palestinians, it could also, eventually, make it
easier to bring about a negotiated two-state
solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

A respite from airport misery

AIR TRAVEL in the United States has
become an almost uniformly dismal experience.
So it’s newsworthy that in the days leading up to

Thanksgiving, by and large, airline passengers.

actually got to their destinations.

Thanks to cooperative weather and better __
©Ssopened up certain military airspace for com-

advance planning by airlines and authorities,
the flying public thus far has been spared the
usual horror studies — the cancelled flights, the
stranded passengers, the unfestive holiday din-
ner at the airport food court.

Yet the absence of major problems so far
this weekend looks like a temporary respite.
Within the nation’s commercial aviation sys-
tem, fundamental problems are festering.
There’s not enough airspace for planes to fly in,
especially in the crowded Northeast. There
aren’t enough empty seats available to accom-
modate passengers whose flights are cancelled.
Checked luggage ends up where it ends up. :

And yet neither the airlines nor their regula-

tors see the value of minimizing passengers’ .

misery. Hence the need for a strong passenger
bill of rights, to keep airlines from severely
overbooking flights and holding people aboard
delayed planes for hours.

Alas, the changes that eased air travel this
week do not herald better days ahead, for they
are unlikely to recur on a regular basis. For the

Bank
Financing
Available

long Thanksgiving weekend, airlines and avia-
tion authories fully staffed check-in desks, secu-
rity checkpoints, and other potential bottle-

ommpnecks. Imagine — having enough employees

on hand to deal with a crush of travellers! Mean-
while, the Bush administration temporarily

mercial use, thereby speeding traffic to and
from busy airports in the Northeast. This raises
an obvious question: Should the balance
between military and civilian uses of the nation’s
airspace be adjusted year-round?

Sadly, some baleful trends are accelerating.
As The New York Times reported, the number
of bags lost is rising, from one in every 155
checked bags last year to one in 138 this year.
This isn’t just annoying; it also prompts travellers
to carry on whatever luggage they. can. This
means boarding and unloading take longer,
which means more time at the gate.

Commercial aviation today leaves no mar-
gin for error. Airlines and their passengers got
lucky in the days before Thanksgiving. But with-
out more far-reaching changes, travellers year-
round should still be prepared for sleepless
nights on the airport terminal floor.

(This article was written by
The Boston Globe staff - c. 2007).



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MUCH has been said
about the crime rate in our
country. Judges have
weighed in, priests have
weighed in and, educators
have weighed in. So I wish
to take this opportunity to
weigh in.

I feel that I am ina
rather unique position,
being a forensic psycholo-
gist.

This gives me a back-
ground in psychology as
well as law.

Our country has hit a
near crisis point with the
present level of crime. So
far we have recorded 69
murders.

This says many things
about our country, none of
them good.

Our biggest problem at
the moment is not so much
the crime rate but the
problems which are push-
ing our crime rate.

We as a country need to
understand that the crime
rate is only a symptom of
something larger.

The youth of our coun-
try are not going out and
killing people because they
are all temporarily insane.

The way I see it there are
three problems in our
country at the moment.

First we are not teaching
our children to respect oth-
ers.

Telling your children to
treat each other with
respect while showing up
at their school to fight
teachers and other students
is not teaching your child.
We as a country need to
live what we speak.

Children learn by imita-
tion, they do what they see
their parents do.

Yes I do mean that par-
ents should take ultimate
responsibility for their chil-
dren.

Although children are
part of a society their first
and lasting role model win
be their parents.

This leads me to my sec-
ond point. All too often I






ANNUAL MEETING

GENERAL SHAREHOLDERS MEETING
BAHAMAS CYCLE COMPANY LIMITED
THURSDAYS, 6th DECEMBER 2007- 6PM

MAGNOLIA HOUSE

ELIZABETH AVE. & BAY STREET






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia. net

hear people on the radio

complaining, about the

Cabinet Ministers. The
ministers are only respon-
sible

for their own children.
Contrary to popular belief
the Minister of Education
cannot change the national
average.

If children’s parents do
not make sure that they go
to school and study then
there is nothing that the
government can do. What
does this trend of blame
shifting teach our children?
Irresponsibility.

My final point is that
there are too many chil-
dren in our country who
are being abused and
molested, without any hope
of that situation changing.
Now that people are being
forced to be honest and
turn in child molesters the
situation can improve.
However some of these
children are being taken
out of this situation and
not being given the chance
to thrive.

Molestation is not a
death sentence for a child.

They can become
stronger, highly productive
people. It's not always pos-
sible to prevent child
abuse, but you can help the
child heal. There are many
counsellors in our country
who will gladly work with
the children to help them
to thrive. The aim of ther-
apy is not to return people
to their previous level of
functioning but rather to
help them to achieve a
higher level of functioning
and health.

If you have any questions
about anything I said you
can contact me at psych-
hope@hotmail.com.

TAMEKA EVANS
Nassau,
November 21, 2007.



§ CUBE $318.00
§ CUBE $353.00
7 CUBE $445.00

9 CUBE $522.00

415 CUBE $650.00
25 CUBE $995.00

ea CUT i Se Say
When it comes to quality We Don't Compara!



A
x <

acm serit
absolutes
mean
eysstaiseveate

EDITOR, The Tribune. -

AS SANCTIONED
beings most humans are
of the opinion that as
long as they have a point
to argue, all other refer-
ences or points of view
are null and void; this
behaviour reminds us of
the behaviour of infants.
Infants are free to be
infants for a while, but
after a while parents have
to deal with the issues of
right and wrong and teach

' their offspring the differ-

ences; ultimately guiding
them toward what is
acceptable behaviour in
an ordered society.

Canon Kirkley Sands
states that “I am persuad-
ed, however, that the
sanctity of human life
requires that the right to
life be and be seen as an
absolute and inviolable
right”, if he believes this
his argument against capi-
tal punishment is null and
void. If the right to life is
seen as absolute, then we
must agree that the per-
son who violates that
right has taken on the
role of an absolute being.
Therefore, when the state
takes on the task of carry-
ing out the death penalty
it is not because it is bar-
baric, it is because the
person being punished
has stepped beyond
divinely established
boundaries that apply to
all sanctioned beings. We
can also argue the death
penalty is not a deterrent,
but, it is not meant to be.
. The principle behind
the death penalty is that
the person whose life was
taken has or had the same
rights that we all try to
pontificate about. If the
death penalty is not a
deterrent, is there a
known deterrent that we
can apply to those per-
sons who are allowed bail
and still go back to their
business as usual? The
problem with humanity is
stated in all of the histori-
cal documents that we
read, somewhere along
the line we acquire an
opinion that we think is
better than the facts that
brought us to where we
are.
I do not doubt the
Canon’s sincerity, but we,
mere humans, cannot
ever be as wise, as com-
passionate, as forgiving,
as all knowing as the one
who created us.

We who find ourselves
in this post-modernist era,
must see that absolutes
mean something, they are
not something, that we
talk about and dispense in
the way that one would
use a roll of paper towels.

We cannot perform a
right of absolution
through our speaking and
expect things to go away,
like wiping a spill off the
floor.

Some spills go into the
earth and sink very deep
into the soil, they sink so
deeply that the genera-
tions that come after are
living under a curse until
the “indiscretions” are
appeased.

EDWARD
HUTCHESON
Nassau,

November 21, 2007.



7 rn. ae
ss ha 7

THE TRIBUNE

t

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 5



B Power Company staff hold —

© In brief

Kiosk for

purchased
by Exuma
Foundation

THE Exuma Foundation
has purchased a kiosk for
mentally challenged chil-
dren who are students at
the Ministry of Education’s
school for special needs.

The purchase was made
possible through a financial
donation by Scotiabank.

Scotiabank’s account
manager at the Commercial,
Banking Centre and former
branch manager for
Georgetown, Exuma, Uriah
Cartwright said, “It is very
important for Scotiabank to
contribute to the communi-
ty in every town and island

- where we have a branch

presence. This donation
certainly reflects our
involvement and focus and
helps differentiate Scotia-
bank from its competitors.”

The Exuma Foundation
is a non-profit organisation
that exists to support edu-
cation and the enhance-
ment of the quality of life in
Exuma.

Chris Kettel, the founda-
tion’s founder said, “We are
very grateful for this dona-
tion of a touch-screen kiosk
which would eliminate the
need for a mouse Gr key-
board and makes learning
easier for the children.”

UN says 2006 set

record for greenhouse

gases in atmosphere
GENEVA

TWO OF the most impor-
tant Greenhouse gases in the
Earth’s atmosphere reached a
record high in 2006, and mea-
surements show that one —
carbon dioxide — is playing
an increasingly important role
in global warming, the U.N.
weather agency said Friday,
according to Associated Press.
: The,global average con-
centrations of carbon diox-
ide, or CO2, and nitrous
oxide, or N2O, in the atmos-
phere were higher than ever
in measurements coordinat-
ed by the World Meteorolog-
ical Organization, said Geir
Braathen, a climate special-
ist at the Geneva-based
agency. .

Methane, the third of the

- three important greenhouse

~ gases, remained stable
between 2005 and 2006, he
said.

Braathen said measure-
ments show that CO2 is con-
tributing more to global
warming than previously.

CO2 contributed 87 per-
cent to the warming effect
over the last decade, but in
the last five years alone, its
contribution was 91 percent,
Braathen said. “This shows
that CO2 is gaining impor+
tance as a greenhouse gas,”
Braathen said.

The concentration of car-
bon dioxide in the atmos-
phere rose by about half.a
percent last year to reach
381.2 parts per million,
according to the agency.
Nitrous oxide totaled 320.1
parts per billion, which is a
quarter percent higher than
in 2005. ,

Adam & Eve
is havinglll

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany workers held their second demonstration
in a week on Thursday to protest the redun-
dancies that they claim will be announced
before the end of the month.

Pedro Edwards, president of BIEMSU, and
Keith Knowles, president of CEWU, said that
it would be “unconscionable” for the manage-
ment to make workers redundant during the
Christmas season.

“We have sat with the CEO of the company
who has assured us that there was an agree-
ment between Mirant, the former owners, and
Maribeni, the new owners, that there would
be no redundancies or lay-offs of anyone for
the next two years,” he said.

Mr Knowles said that a female employee
who has been working with the company for 25

years is expected to be made redundant at the.

end of November.
Mr Edwards feels that there could be more
redundancies during the holiday season.

“To make a female employee redundant at
this time is so distasteful and disheartening,” he
said. “This is why we are fighting so much for
the buy-out settlement.”

The unions resumed industrial action on
Tuesday after no substantial progress was made
with management over the last three weeks
regarding a buy-out settlement for workers.

Unions

The two unions represent more than 100
workers at the Power Company.

The union and Mirant ‘have been at odds for .

the past two years. Mirant sold its shares in
the company at the height of protracted labour
unrest over a new industrial agreement.

Mr Knowles claims that the negotiation
process is still being stalled.

“It is sad to know that while we are in the
midst of contentious negotiations that some-
thing like this would take place,” he said. ,

“Tt is a cold and heartless act and even if
they were considering this they should have
waited until after Christmas,” he said.

WHY YOU VEX?

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter ce
whyyouvex@
tribunemedia.net

“T vex because they keep
digging’ up the roads mak-
ing these big, dangerous
potholes what is bend up
ya’ rims and they don’t
even have the courtesy to
mark them. I mean if you
ga’ dig the road up at least
mark it so my Honda‘don’t
drop in it.

And when I come out of
my house in the morning I
have to sit in constant traffic
for almost an hour, and plus I
have to go over one million
speedbumps — putting insult
to injury! °

They is put these speed
mountains all over the place
and don’t paint them!

They are probably my two

“T hear

ing out JFK.



the Mortgage Corporation in
all kind of debt, but then I
see them putting up a build-

“T vex that people who claim
to be broke always on their
cell phone, paying Batelco

forty cents a minute,”

Theron, South Beach.

“TI vex because it seems
as if people up at the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs
stop working on Fridays.
I was trying to get
through for over two
hours — either they keep
putting me on hold or they

don’t even pick up the line.
When I finally get through
to someone they have the
audacity to ask me why I
keep calling there because
they can’t help me.”
— Tokoyo, Dan Nottage
Estates



The Four-WAY Test

second demonstration in a week —

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

PPP

biggest stresses everyday of
my life.”

— Raymond,

Nassau Village

That’s a nice, new build-

ing!

How the government could

afford that if they broke?

I vex because of



From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were

concerned with promoting high

The Four-Way Test
“Of the things we think,
say or do




“T vex because all the crim- that.”

inals have their guns, but I
can’t get a legal one! And tell
me why even though crime
is so high, we have a whole
group of people defending
known hit men? I really don’t
know what is be going
through Bahamians heads.”
— Vex in Long Island.



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news .in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

- Come and
check it out

— Kayla, Sea Breeze

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
Tropical Exterminators
322-2157



Share your news





questions:













ethical standards in their
professional lives. One of the
world's most widely printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This
24-word Test has been
translated into more than a
hundred languages and
published in thousands of ways.
it asks the following four



1. Is it the truth?

2. Is it fair to all
concerned?

3. Will it build goodwill
and better friendships?

4. Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?”






Rules: SS OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
1. Children ages 10-16 may enter. Judging will be in two N
age categories: 10 - 13 years and 14-16 yearsforafirst Child's Name... Ce ee
and place aia ack caleocy. UR See aS .
2. Write a essay answering the following subject: Age:
“What does the Four-Way Test mean to me.” Explain ORS sd tases ecco cennR or tetanic ee tta nese "
your understanding of the 4-Way Test as it relates to School:
your life, experiences, and/or society in general.” SOON scons
Your essay must include the four princtples.
3. The hody of the essay must not exceed 1,000 wards, RGR ot nc tartrate tein cla
Adults may assist the child in filing out the entry form,
but not in writing the letter, P.O.Box:
4, Limit one essay per child. All entries must be received by
the Rotary Chub of Bast Nassau before Nov 30, 2007, Rmail Address: ; cups sienna ea si
5, Only essays accompanted by original entry formsclipped ee = y
i from the newspaper will be accepted. Photocopy, fiux, Paront’s Name: ioe
aol OF Ole ee ‘; ww AA NY nnn ennnen ARARAAMeAAAnsnannateteeseese: menses sarees Sane aes: preside: wan
6. One winner chosen age category. The , . 3
l} On (Ny decision of the judges 1s final, Pacent's Signature:
TO ee Rébemlaame tne) ON a ,
8. Mall y and paper clipping to All entries become property of the Rotary Club of Bast Nassau and can be used eye :

§ Side walk sale ouside



P.O. Box SS-6320, Nasea,

The Four-Way Test Resay Compotition
Attn: Michele Rassin, The Rotary Club of Bast Nassau,
Bahamas

The Tribune

My Voice. Why Plowgeqper!

and reproduced for any purpose without compensation.



hig, Rotary Club >t

EAST

we NASSAU




PAGE 6, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007



THE TRIBUNE

In Days Gone By:
The Sea Floor Aquarium



_ LITTLE HERMAN the dolphin jumps 20 feet in the air to snatch a
fish from trainer Audley Miller.

Ss
HURC eo

BS

<\ SEN PReA SS

Sunday School T0ant’ °°" FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching.>.itam & 7 aici. EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
wenn P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
nema Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

mel CHURCH SERVICES
ake SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2007
s ig CHRIST THE KING SUNDAY -

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road

11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH, :
Prince Charles Drive

11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart



















COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM

7:00PM

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street

11:00AM
7:00PM

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rey. James Neilly

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections - Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rey. Philip Stubbs

Pastor Charles Moss

Mr. Livingston Parks/Youth Service
No Service





Rev. Gerald Richardson
Mr. Percy Sands














Rey. William Higgs
7:00PM Rey. William Higgs

RADIO PROGRAMMES












‘RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. James D. Nelly
‘METHODIST MOMENTS?’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. James D. Nell

SEES A AIRE ICRA RECARO ARK

The Nassau Region of the Bahamas Confrence of The Methodist
Church Women’s Fellowship will hold its Annual Candlelight
Service, as well as a Short Play “The Inkeeper” on Monday,
December 3, 2007 at 7:00 p.m. at St. Michael’s. Methodist
Church, Boyd Subdivison.

We hope you will find it possible to join us at this time.

ost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockheart/Sis. Tezel Anderson
11:00 a.m. Men’s Fellowship Anniversary

‘The Holy

7:00 p.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Board of Lay
ip & Training (HC







Enter into His gates
with thanksgiving, and
His courts with praise: be

thankful unto him,
and bless His name.
Psalms 100:4

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY SERVICES

Morning Worship Semice ....... 8.30 a.m.
Sunday School for allages.., 9.45am.:
Adult Education occeces ve 945M.
WOISHIO SONVICE ...sseessssereen 1.00am.
SPANISH SENVIGE vere rere 8.00 am,
Evening Worship Service... 4.30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 ys.
Missionettes (Gitls Club) 4-14 yrs,

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Minisity Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

“Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

COTE UMCEE Ren LLL
Tal: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793, P.0, Box: N-1566



Email: evtemple@batelnet.bs Web: SAU ur Org














LINUS, THE active and popular dolphin at the Seafloor Aquarium
loves to show off. But what better occasion to show his prowess
than before an audience of enthusiastic US high school biology stu-
dents. Drenched from Linus’s 300 pounds splashing, the students
of “Summer Camp Afloat” were given a special tour.







CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2007

11:30 a.m.. Speaker

Elder Brentfort Isaacs

No Evening Service

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
« Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.

~< @ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
_* Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month) _







Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

Worship Time: lla.m. & 7p.m.
~ Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45a.m.

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5
Telephone number:

503
3
Telefax number: 32

5
3
>.

4.2

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future

Worship Time: Jam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping
Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on

Joy 101.9 at 8:30a.m Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs



An

o> engi OO
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 7



Cardinals discuss — CHEVRON BAHAMAS LIMITED TO SPONSOR ANNUAL EVENT

Ninth graders to take part in the third
National Road Safety Youth Symposium

threat from
Pentecostal secls,
Orthotlox progress

@ VATICAN CITY

THE Roman Catholic
Church must figure out
what it is doing wrong in
the battle for souls, because
so many Catholics are leav-
ing the church to join Pen-
tecostal and other evangeli-
cal movements, a top Vati-
can cardinal said Friday,
according to Associated
Press.

Cardinal Walter Kasper,
who heads the Vatican’s

office for relations with oth-
er Christians, told a meeting :

of the world’s cardinals that
the church must undergo a

“self-critical pastoral exami- }

nation of conscience” to
confront the “exponential”
rise of Pentecostal move-
ments.

“We shouldn’t begin by
asking ourselves what is
wrong with the Pente-
costals, but what our own
pastoral shortcomings are,”
Kasper told the gathering,
noting that such evangelical
and charismatic groups
count 400 million faithful
around the world.

The Vatican has been
increasingly lamenting the |
rise of Protestant evangeli-
cal communities, which it
describes as “sects,” in
Latin America, Africa and
elsewhere, and the resulting
flight of Catholics. In Brazil
alone, Roman Catholics
used to account for about

90 percent of the population

in the 1960s; by 2005, it was
down to 67 percent.

Kasper’s comments came
on the eve of Saturday’s
ceremony to elevate 23 new
cardinals. As he did during
his first consistory in 2006,
Pope Benedict XVI asked
the world’s cardinals to
come to Rome early for a
meeting to discuss church
concerns.

This year, Kasper briefed
the cardinals on relations

with other Christians, focus-
ing on the church’s relations :

with the Orthodox, Protes-

tants and Pentecostal move-

ments.

Kasper said the rise of
independent, often “aggres-
sive” evangelical move-
ments in Africa and else-
where had complicated the
church’s ecumenical task.
Nevertheless, Kasper told
reporters that “ecumenism
is not an option but an
obligation.”

Kasper opened his
remarks by updating the
cardinals and cardinal-des-
ignates on an important

new document approved by :

a Vatican-Orthodox theo-
logical commission that has
been working to heal the
1,000-year schism between
the Catholic and Orthodox
churches.

In the document, Catholic

and Orthodox representa-
tives both agreed that the
pope has primacy over all
bishops — although they
disagreed over just what
authority that primacy gives
him.

The development is sig-
nificant since the Great
Schism of 1054 — which
split the Catholic and
Orthodox churches — was
precipitated largely by dis-
agreements over the prima-
cy of the pope.

Kasper told the cardinals
that the document was an
“Important turning point,”
since it marked the first
time that Orthodox church-
es had agreed there is a uni-
versal level of the church,
that it has a primate, and
that according to ancient
church practice, that pri-
mate is the bishop of Rome
— the pope.

Kasper said that the Vati-

’ can’s relations with the
Russian Orthodox Church,
in particular, had become
“significantly smoother” in
recent years.

“We can Say there’s no
longer a freeze but a thaw,”
Kasper said.

Tensions between the two }
churches have been strained :

over Orthodox accusations
that the Vatican is seeking
converts on traditionally

Orthodox territories, partic-

ularly in eastern Europe —
charges that Rome denies.
The rift has precluded a
meeting between a pope
and Patriarch Alexy I, long

sought by Pope John Paul II

and pursued by Benedict.

Kasper noted that
Moscow had “never cate-
gorically excluded” such an
encounter.

MORE than 120 ninth graders
will participate in the third annual
National Road Safety Youth Sym-
posium on Thursday, November
29.

The event will take place at
Workers House on Tonique Dar-
ling Highway and is being hosted
by the ‘Ministry of Works and
Transport, the Road Traffic
Department and Chevron
Bahamas Limited.

Making the announcement dur-
ing a press conference were
Armando Vegas, Chevron
Bahamas Limited’s retail district
manager and Jack Thompson, con-
troller of the Road Traffic Depart-
ment.

Expressing Chevron’s support
for the symposium, Mr Vegas
outlined his company’s
approach to working with the com-
munity.

“Chevron’s approach to com-
munity engagement and invest-
ment is based on three capacity

building areas that we consider .
‘critical to economic development:

¢ providing for basic human
needs

¢ supporting education and
training

¢ aiding in small and medium
sized business development pro-
jects

“It is against this backdrop that
Chevron remains committed to
Road Safety and to the develop-
ment of young people,” he said.

The symposium aims to educate
high school students about the
importance of road safety, and the
theme for the one day event is:
“embracing today’s opportunities
for a safer tomorrow”.

The symposium will be official-
ly opened by Earl Deveaux, Min-
ister of Works and Transport, at
10am.

Mr Thompson said that the
event will be attended by public
and private school students and
promises to be an exciting, infor-
mation packed, thought provok-
ing and eye opening exercise.

“Topics to be covered during
the symposium include common
causes of traffic accidents, mes-
sages from survivors of traffic acci-
dents, common injuries sustained
as a result of traffic accidents, and
conflict resolution.”

Of particular interest are the
planned group sessions, which will
afford participants the opportuni-

ARMANDO VEGAS, Chevron Bahamas Limited’s retail district man-
ager and road safety partners announce the third annual National

Road Safety Youth Symposium.

ty to interact with each other, he
said.

“Each group will be given a pro-
ject to focus on, and at the end of
the day group presentations will
be made,” he said.

Mr Thompson said he expects
that, as in previous years, there
will be many new thoughts and
ideas regarding road safety coming
out of the group discussions.

“The issue of road safety can-
not be over emphasised. We must
lay the safety foundation today for
tomorrow, and it is against this
backdrop that the Road Traffic
Department and Chevron decided
to target ninth grade students. The
facts and statistics are there to sup-
port the need for such pro-
grammes,” he said.

He noted that world wide:

® each year road traffic crashes
kill nearly 1.2 million people, and
injure or disable 20.50 million more

e more than 40 per cent of all
road traffic deaths occur among
the 0 to 25 age group

° road traffic injuries are the sec-
ond leading cause of death for

THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS



CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
= ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES



esr

108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)

“Celebrating 224 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas”

FIFTH LORD’S BEFORE THE NATIVITY, LORD’S DAY
BEFORE ADVENT, Christ the King/ Reigns of Christ

NOVEMBER 25, 2007

COLLECT: God the Father, help us to hear the call of
Christ the King and to follow in his service,

whose kingdom has no end;.for he reigns with you and
the Holy Spirit, one God, one gloryGod the father, help us
to hear the call of Christ the King and follow in his service,
whose kingdom has no end; for he reigns with you and the Holy

Spirit, one God, one glory

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)

7:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
6:30 p.m.

Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins (Holy Communion)
Bro. Arthur Chase
Rev. Edward J. Sykes

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108

Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly

7:00 a.m.

(Holy Communion)

10: 00 a.m..
11:00 a.m.
6:30 p.m.
COKE MEMORIAL, METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m.
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)

11:00 a.m.

Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly
Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly/Youth Group
Prayer Band

Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.

Sis. Cecile Gardiner

HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)

7:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.

Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.
Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins

METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD

8:00 a.m.

Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)

CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)

5:30 p.m. Fridays
9:00 a.m. Sunday

Children’s Club
Circuit Mission & Evangelism Committee

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift

Shop and other Ministries

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN 2007: — All Methodists
of the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice
to prevail in the Methodist Cases. The fast begins weekly
after the evening meal on Thursday and ends at noon on
Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly: “My God and My

Right.”
RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns
of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
“Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the
Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.



young people aged five to 25

© men account for 75 per cent of
all road traffic fatalities among
those less than 25 years old

e it is estimated that road traffic
crashes cost the U S government
around $518 billion annually

Mr Thompson added that in the
Bahamas:

e in 2006, 49 persons died as a
result of traffic accidents

e there have been 39 traffic fatal-
ities so far this year

He thanked Chevron for taking
a leadership role in road safety,
noting that the petroleum compa-
ny has sponsored the symposium
since its inception three years ago.

“T can think of no greater invest-
ment than that of the safety of our
children, and in this regard
Chevron has demonstrated great
leadership,” said Mr Thompson.

The symposium will run from

‘9am to 3pm, and 18 schools will

participate.



NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE IN-
VESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED hereby
gives notice to the public of the resignation of Mr.
Cornelius A. Smith as President and Director of

the Company effective 30th October, 2007.

Dated this 21st day of November A.D., 2007.



UST OCU ae

Metropolitan Bank
(Bahamas) Limited

Senior Accountant

Ani Asian based banking group (“Metrobank”) is currently recruiting for a Senior
Accountant. This person will be one of a small team working for the Metrobank
subsidiary in Nassau. The Bank has a full banking license in the Bahamas and is
expanding it Nassau based operations.

The qualified applicant should have the following Qualifications:

¢ Acollege degree (or equivalent) from a recognized four year program in
accounting or business related topics or qualification as a Chartered Accountant
/ Certified Public Accountant or other similar qualification.
_ © Have 3- 5 years of prior work experience in the areas of banking and or

accounting

e An advanced understanding of accounting and accounting applications (CPA
preferred but not required)

e Strong analytical skills

* Possess a good understanding of investments and securities

e Exceptional written and verbal communication skills

e An advanced understanding of Excel & Word applications

¢ Fluency in Tagalog (written and verbal) is not a requirement but is a “plus”

for this post.

This position will encompass the Duties:

¢ Handle all aspects of the accounting matters of the Bank as they pertain to
the record keeping of the Nassau based operations.
¢ Prepare the monthly financial statements of the Bank and report on these to

Senior Management

e Assist with the day to day operations of the Bank

° Be the Bank’s contact person for Head Office Treasury and other Head Office
points of contact as it relates to accounting matters

e Assist with ensuring that the Bank is in compliance with the requirements of
the Central Bank of The Bahamas

¢ Assist with coordinating monthly management meetings with officers of the

Bank

¢ Draft procedural documents as considered necessary
Prepare an annual budget forecast for the Bank and monitor actual versus

budget results

Coordinate the external audit of the Bank
Assist with coordinating inspections of the Bank by the Central Bank of The
Bahamas and other regulators as required

This Company offers a competitive compensation package and salary will be
consummate to experience of the applicant.

Qualified and interested candidates should submit their resume with salary history to Metropolitan

Bank (Bahamas) Limited attention Ms. Jacqueline Bain, P.O. Box CR-56766, Suite 700, New
Providence Financial Center, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, fax 242-394-2142, e-mail
jacquie @ metrobankbahamas.com


.

PAGE 8, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

According to official security
records, Mr Pedican had reported
for work at Eight Mile Rock High
around [1.53pm.

“Our records show that he
logged into the diary and also
checked in by radio communica-
tion,” said Mr Plakaris.

He explained that all officers on
reporting to work are required to
check the campus to make sure
everything is in order and report
back with the supervisor. “He did
that but he had no other report on
record since that point,” he said.

“When he did not make contact
every hour as he was required our
suspicions were aroused and we
tried contacting by radio, but got no
answer. We could not contact him
by telephone because there was no
phone service at the school and we
couldn't get through by cellular
phone,” he said.

Mr Plakaris said adequate secu-
rity measures are desperately need-
ed to ensure the safety of security
officers and school property.

Due to a manpower shortage, he
said only one officer is stationed at
the schools in the evenings in order
to cover every eight hour shift.

‘The problem we are facing is
that in all shifts we had single offi-
cers and that was a sensitive issue as
we did not want to make that intor-
mation public, but in these circum-

~ stances we have no choice but to

Employment Opportunities

New retail business seeks male and female sales per-
sons for immediate employment. An attractive base
plus a weekly commission and uniform are provided.
Interested persons should contact Mr. Mcintosh by
telephoning 454-6380 to make an appointment for an
interview. Applicants should bring the follgwing docu-
ments to the interview:












a) Valid Passport
b) Police Certificate (Record)
c) National Insurance Card
d) Health Certificate

MUST SELL
OT TOA EN aO aOa

Lot #90-B comprising 22,376 sq.ft. and situated on the
western side of the main eleuthera highway and
approximately 2,219 ft. northerly of four-for-nothing road
in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

North Eleuthera Bahamas.

Murder

speak the truth,” he said.

“We have been requesting all
along every year additional officers
to have the appropriate two-man
officer on the shift at all times, but
we were unable due to budgetary
purposes,”

Mr Plakaris said Bight Mile
Rock High School premises are
wide open to criminal elements.

“There is no fencing and that
again has added to the concern of
officers down there at nights.
School perimeter fencing has also
been a concern of ours, and we
have requested electronic surveil-
lance for quite some time, but again
we have not gotten them for bud-
getary reasons,” he said.

When asked if the time has come
for armed security officers, Mr
Plakaris, a senior police reserve
officer, said it would mean that a
whole new caliber of officers
would have to be employed and
trained.

“Even with regular (police) offi-
cers it requires training and disci-
pline of character. And presently
we might not have persons with the
disposition and comfort level nec-
essary. for anyone to put a weapon
in their hands. But that is a stage
and option that has to be consid-
ered...but that has to be an official
decision made by the Ministry of
Education,” he said.

Infrastructures are in place.
For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact, Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

Woman located

FROM page one

sation through the window of
the house before Ms Allen dis-
appeared.

“Information is sketchy, but
people suspect that she may
have gone on one of the boats
to one of the islands,” said
Bishop Josey. “But nothing is
there to confirm this.”

When he contacted The Tri-
bune yesterday afternoon to
confirm that she had been
found and was safe, Bishop
Josey said that one of his sis-
ters had spoken with her, but
he personally had not as yet
had a chance to see her.

With the rapid rise in homi-
cides and other violent crimes
this year, Bishop Josey
appealed to the public for
information as to Ms Allen’s
whereabouts as, he said, the
family “does not want to take
any chances.”

Chief Superintendent Hulan
had confirmed to The Tribune
that there was an “all out
effort” to locate Ms Allen.
“We take the matter very seri-
ously in light of what has been
going on in the country,” Mr
Hanna said before she was
located.































MUST SELL
VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-E comprising 16,521 sq.ft. and situated on the western side
of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft. northerly
of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

Infrastructures are in place.

North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s Office

P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

. piled first.

FROM page one

because they were most likely the
last persons to see Mr Taylor alive.

Mr Hanna yesterday could not
say whether any information
gleaned from the eight persons will
be of any use to investigators.

Chief Supt Glen Miller, officer in
charge of CDU, said due to a risk
of flight and because it is a homi-
cide case, police sought an exten-
sion in order to hold the seven
Dominicans and one Bahamian
longer for questioning.

Because of the extension, police
were able to hold the group of eight
for 96 hours, instead of the usual 48
hours, without charging them with
a crime.

Those 96 hours were up yester-
day, Mr Hanna said.

In the case of the murder of Mr
Taylor, 37, Mr Hanna said that
police are now exploring “a number
of avenues” in their investigations.

As it concerns the investigation
into the brutal killing of Dr

FROM page one

after 9am, a green KIA Sportage
pulled up to McKenzie and
Woodside and sprayed them with
bullets from a high calibre
firearm.

The two men were hit several
times. Both victims had police
records,

Allan Emmanuel, Prosecutor
in the Attorney General’s Office,
said yesterday that at the time of
his death, McKenzie was facing
charges of murder, attempted
murder, assault on a police offi-
cer, attempted escape and causing
damage to a Central Police Sta-
tion holding cell.

Mr Emmanuel said that
McKenzie, who is notorious in
the East Street area, was also fac-
ing multiple other charges, but
that those files need to be com-

After all documents concern-
ing McKenzie are gathered, the
matters will be brought to the
courts to be declared null and
void now that the accused is dead,
Mr Emmanuel said.

McKenzie was scheduled to
appear in court on the charges of
attempted escape from police cus-
tody and causing damage to a
holding cell on the day that he
was killed.

Among the many pending mat-
ters, McKenzie was also waiting
to stand trial for the murder of
Patrick Rolle, who became the
first homicide victim of 2007
when he was shot on his way
home from the New Year’s Day
Junkanoo Parade.

McKenzie was on bail for that
murder when he was killed on
Thursday.

Following his death, rumours
concerning McKenzie’s check-

Eight released

McDonald, 59, College of the
Bahamas Dean of the Faculty of
Social and Educational Studies, Mr
Hanna said that police are looking
at persons “across the board.”

On Thursday insiders expressed

“fears that the Taylor-McDonald

murder inquiries could “go cold”
because of the men’s high-level gay
connections.

Dr McDonald was found dead
in his bed in his Queen Street home
last Friday. He had reportedly been
beaten “beyond recognition” with a
clothing iron. .

Mr Taylor was found stabbed
to death in his Mountbatten House
residence on West Hill Street on
Sunday morning.

Both men were found dead in
their homes within two days of each
other. The homes of both murder
victims were less than a quarter
mile apart.

Survivor

ered past circulated throughout
New Providence.

Some reports alleged that
McKenzie was involved in the
shooting death of Nurse Joan
Lunn in 2001.

However, Supt Hulan Hanna
said that he had no knowledge of
any connection between these
two cases.

Mr Hanna also denied reports
that McKenzie was helping the
police in other investigations.

Kozeny
FROM page one

authorities, citing that the offences
for which they had requested his
surrender were not extradictable
offences. Justice Isaacs also found
that there was an abuse of process
with respect to the proceedings
because US authorities had failed
to disclose certain material infor-
mation to the government.

Kozeny is wanted by U.S author-
ities to face charges of bribery and
money laundering. US authorities
have accused Kozeny of conspir-
ing to violate the US Foreign Cor-
rupt Practices Act and being the
driving force behind a multi-mil-
lion dollar bribery scheme that
sought to corrupt Azerbaijan offi-
cials to gain a controlling interest in
that country's state-owned oil com-
pany SOCAR in the 1990s.
Kozeny, 44, has been fighting extra-
dition to the U.S since being arrest-
ed at his Lyford Cay residence on
October 15, 2005. Kozeny spent
more than a year in Her Majesty's
Prison but was freed in April of
this year on $300,000 bail.

NIB reports

FROM page one

The Tribune to NIB Chairman
Patrick Ward, but Mr Ward did not
return calls regarding the issue, after
several messages were left for him.

In response to Mr Ward’s eva-
siveness, Mr Russell told The Tri-
bune that a statement will be pre-
pared and released by Monday
regarding the potential changes at
the top of NIB.

No message was returned by Mr
McCartney, who a secretary said
was in a meeting, when The Tri-
bune attempted to reach him yes-
terday afternoon about the matter.

NIB has been the centre of con-
troversy over the last few months.
Staff have made numerous com- °
plaints to the media about sexual
harassment, victimisation, verbal
abuse and unfair promotions. These
reports, and complaints to the min-
ister directly, led Mr Russell to hold
a general meeting with staff in June.

However, out of this meeting
where complaints were again voiced
by staff in front of management and
Mr Russell, several employees were
either terminated or suspended —
with sources telling The Tribune as
many as five employees were sent
home.

This led to a large scale walkout
at NIB headquarters on September
10 when 100 employees expressed
their dissatisfaction over the termi-
nations. At the walk-out, President
of the Public Officers’ Union
Jerome Swann said that since the
general meeting two members were
subject to “termination” and the
union felt strongly “that that was
the result of some victimisation.”

Since then the union released a
public statement just over a week
ago again complaining that a work-
er had not been reinstated after an
investigation cleared the individual
of allegations of wrongdoing.

Dr Rudy King
FROM page one

a large press turn out for the occa-
sion, Dr King did not appear.

Mr Carter asked security at the
Beverly Hilton Hotel to check his
$1,200 pent house suite. For three
successive days, it is said that his
luggage and jewellery had not
been moved and his bathroom
had not been used.

Mr Carter said that he and Dr
Beckwith had “scoured” the city
checking jails and police stations
for Dr King without success.

Later, police told him that Dr
King was being questioned by
FBI agents. However, despite
extensive checking, The Tribune
has been unable to confirm this
report and the FBI said it knew
nothing about him.

MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-C comprising 21,430 sq.ft. and situated on the western
side of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft.
northerly of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,

North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas



MUST SELL

VACANT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

Lot #90-G comprising 18,926 sq.ft. and situated on the western
side of the main eleuthera highway and approximately 2,219 ft.
northerly of four-for-nothing road in the Settlement of Lower
Bogue, North Eleuthera, Bahamas.

Infrastructures are in place.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact: Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management — Managing Director’s
Office P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS



US crew take

part in community projects |

WHILE in port in Nassau
over the past week, the crew ol
the United States Navy war-
ship USS KLAKRING partic-
ipated in two community pro-
jects.

On Friday, November 16,
Commanding Officer lan Pol-
litt and Command Master
Chief Richard Dean accompa-
nied US Embassy representa-
tives Lieutenant Commander
Delong Bonner, First Lieu-

tenant Armand Randolph and’

Sergeant First Class Shona
West to the embassy’s adopted
neighborhood school, Wood-
cock Primary.

At the school, faculty, stati
and students welcomed a
portable basketball hoop with
backboard and basketballs
donated by the crew.

The school’s principal
Deanne Huyler and physical
education teacher Cyril Hanna
thanked the visiting crew for

the donation, noting that with
uimited space at the school, the
studcits are not afforded the
opportunity to enjoy many
physical or social activities. The
baskeiball equipment will be
a great addition to the physical
education curriculum, they
said,

On Saturday, November 17,
40 volunteer crew members
from the USS KLARKING
removed debris and made light
repairs to the Bahamas Asso-
ciation for Social Health
(BAS#I) facilities.

KASH is a substance abuse
residential treatment facility
that has been in operation for
the past 17 years. It operates
Earth Village. an eco-friendly
preserve on 150 acres that
offers nature walks and horse
back riding trails to both
tourists and locals.

BASH facilities received
some damage during the pas-

sage of Tropical Storm Noel. U
S Embassy Deputy Chief of
Mission Dr Brent Hardt, Com-
mandiny Officer Pollitt, Com-
mand Master Chief Richard
Dean and embassy Navy offi-
cials were given a brief tour of
the facility by BASH director
Terry Miller.

Following the tour, Dr Hardt
thanked the volunteers for
assisting with the clean-up and
commended Mr Miller for his
ongoing efforts to provide a
rehabiliiation centre for the
community.

Named after Rear Admiral
thomas Klakring, a daring
World War Il submarine com-
mander, the USS
KLAKRING is a 453 foot ship
commissioned on August 20,
1983. The ship’s homeport is
Mayport, Florida and Com-
manding Officer Pollitt
assumed command in August
2007.



UNITED STATES Chargé d’Affaires Dr Brent Hardt, Commanding Officer lan Pollitt, Commanding Officer Richard
Dean, of the USS KLARKING, and BASH director Terry Miler are tlanked by volunteers of the USS KLARK-

ING at the BASH facility.

PARADISE (GLAND, BAHAMAS



Wiiase y

MICHAEL JORDAN
Celebrity Invitational 2008



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Kerzner International

Bahamas

Limited is

recruiting volunteers to assist with the Michael

Jordan Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament

to be held on January 14 - 20, 2008 at the Ocean

Club Golf Course

on Paradise

Island.

Volunteers are needed January17-20, 2008.

To volunteer contact Victoria Bethell by email at
bethell28@hotmail.com by January 5, 2008.



SHOWN (I-r): Lt Shona West, embassy military officer; representatives from the USS KLARKING including
Command Master Chief Richard Dean; principal Deanne Huyler and Cyril Hanna, physical education teacher,
Woodcock Primary; LCDR Delong Bonner, Navy Liaison Officer and Lt Armand Randolph, U S Embassy flanked
by students at Woodcock Primary School.

YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD

VACANCY NOTICE

SENIOR MANAGER
LEGAL & REGULATORY

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably
qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR MANAGER in our Legal &
Regulatory Department.

REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:

This position will report directly to the Vice President, Legal, Regulatory and
Interconnection and will be responsible for all regulatory and compliance matters relative
to the Public Utilities Commission.

JOB SUMMARY:

Responsible for addressing and coordinating activities related to all regulatory matters
with particular reference to legal maters within and on behalf of the Company. This
position requires significant interaction with the Public Utilities Commission.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

1. Coordinate with the Vice President of Legal and Regulatory on strategies relative
to the Company and its Regulatory requirements.

. Ensure the Company’s compliance with the legal and regulatory provisions of its .
licenses issued by the PUC, the stipulations of the Sector Policy of the Government
of the Bahamas, the Telecommunications Act of 1999 and all other statutory
legislation related thereto.

. Liaise with the PUC on all legal and regulatory matters relating to compliance
with regulations under the PUC license issued to BTC.

. Liaise with other licensed telecommunications providers on legal matters regarding
interconnection.

. Provide legal opinions on matters of a regulatory nature and peruse, critique, and
analyze all relevant documentation of a regulatory nature.

Assist and advise on the reporting of matters to the Regulator involving fraudulent
activity on BTC’s network by both licensed and unlicensed operators

Attend at and assist with any regulatory matter requiring reference to a court of
competent jurisdiction

. Represent the Company on any matters of a regulatory nature involving the
Company

. Assist in the preparation of reports on the Company as they relate to legal aspects
of regulatory as required by the PUC

Liaise and coordinate with relevant departments in the compilation of reports on
regulatory matters

11. Inform, educate, and update all relevant Company employees on all regulatory
matters

12. Provide periodic update reports and recommendations on changes in the regulatory
environment to the staff

13. Perform any other duties relevant to the support of the division as determined trom
time to time by the Vice President of Legal, Regulatory & Interconnection.

EDUCATION AND/OR EXPERIENCE
Master’s Degree preferred.

LLB, Member of the Bahamas Bar Association, with five (5) years of practice at
the Bar.

Prior experience in a regulatory environment would be an asset.

Exposure to the principles of telecommunications is a plus. Strong leadership
skills are essential, organization, self-motivational and communication skills.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, #21 John F. Kennedy Drive,
no later than. Wednesday November 28, 2007 and addressed as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT
HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MANAGER/LEGAL & REGULATORY


OS
*

PAGE 10, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007

THE Baker’s Bay project is
playing a part in making Aba-
co a continued success, the
Guana Cay developers said in
a statement.

“At a time when the US
economy is slowing down and
revised IMF and Central Bank
estimates for growth of the
Bahamas GDP in 2007 are
lower than previously forecast,
the island of Abaco has one of
the strongest economies in the
country,” said Baker’s Bay.
“Apart from the natural
charms and variety of the Aba-
cos, this may be due in some
measure to the presence of
Baker’s Bay Golf and Ocean
Club on Great Guana Cay.”

The statement noted that the
$500 million Baker’s Bay Golf
and Ocean Club, located on
the northern end of Great
Guana Cay, will include a res-
idential community of 585
beachfront and ocean view
acres with around 400 homes.

Plans for the development
also include a villa-styled hotel
(75 to 100 beds), a private golf
club, an 18-hole Tom Fazio-
designed private golf course
and a 33-acre marina village
with a 165-slip “Blue Flag”
marina.

Employed

“Discovery Land Company,
the developers of Baker’s Bay
Golf and Ocean Club have
already invested more than
$200 million in the Bahamas
and Baker’s Bay currently
employ 140 permanent staff.
An additional 150 persons are
also employed in construction
work with Baker’s Bay’s con-
tractors and subcontractors.”

Bahamas Hot Mix, the con-
tractor for earthworks and
road paving at Baker’s Bay,
has been involved with the
project for about a year.
According to Ebrahim Saidi,
general manager at Bahamas
Hot Mix, the project has pro-
vided continuous employment
for. 25 staff, the majority~o:
whom are Abaconians.



MASAMI Meenstattctn building a arnt MOURN CLM aE MI ECet me

“Baker’s Bay has already
generated a large income for
the people of Abaco and as it
builds out it will provide con-
tinuous benefits and increased
income revenue to the Aba-
cos,” Mr Saidi said.

Also working on the project
is Bahamas Marine Construc-
tion, a subcontractor to Amer-
ican Bridge. This 100 per cent
Bahamian company is respon-
sible for a number of aspects of
the project, including building
revetments and breakwaters,
internal dredging and con-
struction of docks.

James Mosko, president of
Bahamas Marine Construction,
says his company has been
growing since working with the
Kerzner development on Par-
adise Island and is now able to
do jobs that would have previ-
oysly been done by companies
out of the United States. With
regard to Baker’s Bay he said

_it feels good to step into anoth-
er large project.
a eHeT HET re high-@nd-They’re

doing everything right. They’re

LOCAL NE

i





not skimping anywhere. We
have about 15 to 18 people up
there and we'll be there for the
better part of a year and half.
We've still got three to four
months to finish the first phase
and then we start the docks
which will take us another
eight months,” Mr Mosko said.

He added that maintaining
a presence in Abaco means
spending money locally. He
expressed confidence that the
developers would see the pro-
ject through.

“In Marsh Harbour we've
got I don’t know how many
homes and rooms rented. All
our food comes from the food
store, we travel on Abaco Air
and Bahamasair .. . we’ve seen
a lot of projects that are half-
baked and get off and they're



under-funded and they go to
hell in a hand basket, but this
isn’t going to happen with this
project,” Mr Mosko said.

In August, construction
began on Baker’s Bay’s 33-acre
Marina Village which consists
of high end residential units,
town houses and some retail
stores.

This work is being carried
out by Woslee Dominion,
another all Bahamian compa-
ny. Prior to Baker’s Bay,
Woslee Dominon completed
the $7 million Mandara Spa
expansion for Kerzner Inter-
national’s phase III, the $38
million Harbourside project
for Kerzner’s second phase and
a number of luxury high-end
homes at Ocean Club Estates.

Ashley Glinton, president

NOTICE

The following practices located at #36 Collins
Avenue, Nassau, will be closed permanently on 22
February, 2008, at the latest:












¢ KENNETH W. KNOWLES, M.D.
e BAHAMAS OPTICAL CENTRE, LTD.




Patients who wish to obtain records are asked to
mail a written request, containing clear patient ID
information etc., to Box N-8322, Nassau. Following
that, specific arrangements may then be made by
telephone at 325-4754, 322-4940. Regretfully, no
further letters can be written.






Bist

Pricing Information As Of:
Friday, 23 N b 00

uri
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

1.66
11.74
9.55
0.85
3.74
2.62
11.20
3.15
6.32
7.22
2.70
6.70
12.80
14.75
6.10
1.00
8.00
10.05
10.00
Wee Le)
52wk-Hi
14.60

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets
/ RND Holdi

Me

52wk-Hi
1.3648
3.5388
2.9382
1.2794

11.8192

52wk-Low
1.3149
2.9449

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
2.4829 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.2037 Colina Bond Fund
11.2596 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

2.938214***
1.279370°**
11.8192***
g i fi
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000,00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume

Today's Close - Current day‘s weighted price for dally volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(3) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(31) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Last Price

ORE DATA & INFORMATION
YTD 283.98 / YTD % 16.94
ily Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.094 0.000

1.502 0.400
0.733 0.260
0.188 0.020
0.275 0.090
0.051 0.040
1.030 0.240
0.208 0.080
0.426 0.260
0.129 0.050
0.284 0.020
0.804 0.240
0.768 0.570
0.934 0.470
0.359 0.133
-0.415 0.000
0.4114 0.200
0.991 0.590
1.167 0.600

P/E

1,000

Weekly Vol. EPS $
1.160
0.000
-0.030

Div $
85
0.480
0.000

4.450
1.160
-0.030

2.750

14125

0.000
Yield %

Last 12 Months Div $

HOE B4 47%

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

- Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior wook

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for tho last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

16 November 2007
** ~ 30 June 2007
*-~ 31 October 2007
31 July 2007

242) 394-2609

1.53%
2.14%
2.54%
4.11%
0.80%
0.88%
3.58%
4AAT%
3.21%
2.24%
0.00%)
2.76%)
5.87%
6.00%

Yield

8.12%
7.80%

0.00%

6.70%
7.71%
0.00%

-

and owner of Woslee Domin-
ion, says he expects that the
work will last for about two
and a half to three years and at
its peak he will employ at least
200 construction workers from
Abaco, Nassau and other
Bahamian islands.

But big name contractors are
not the only persons benefit-
ting from the development at
Baker’s Bay. The developers
say they also patronise a wide
range of small local businesses
in Abaco from hardware stores
to florists.

Contractors

On Guana Cay, Donna’s
Golf Cart and Cottage Rentals
rents golf carts to Baker’s Bay
on a monthly basis and cot-
tages to the developers and
their contractors as needed.
Guana Cay’s Orchard Bay
Marina also benefits from cot-
tage rentals by Baker’s Bay.

Jimmy Albury of Orchard
Bay Marina says he believes
the development will be good
for Guana Cay and Abaco as
long as it is “controlled and
doesn’t grow too fast”.

“Discovery Land Company
has deep pockets and overall
they’re a good company,” Mr
Albury said. ‘

Donna Sands, proprietor of
Donna’s Golf Carts and Cot-
tage Rentals, pointed out that
Baker’s Bay has not only been
good for business but is helping
people in the community as
well.

“They formed the Fig Tree
Foundation and it’s helped a
guy with cancer, paid some of
his medical expenses and we’ve
got a young guy in Florida in
rehab and the foundation’s
paying for that. Then they just
donated five computers to the



THE TRIBUNE

- Baker’s Bay project
part’ in Abaco’s success

school, brand new desks,
everything. So they are willing
to help the community,” Mrs
Sands said.

The economic impact of the
Baker’s Bay Development has
not been limited to Guana Cay
the developers said, pointing
out that in Marsh Harbour a
number of local businesses also
supply products and services
to the Baker’s Bay develop-
ment.

One such business is the
Harbour View Marina in
Marsh Habour, which supplies
Baker’s Bay with fuel prod-
ucts.

“We provide them with fuel,

gasoline and diesel on a week-,

ly or daily basis depending on
their activity,” says Troy
Cornea, manager of the mari-
na.

“It certainly moves product :

for us, which is very beneficial
and this has been going on for
five or six months now since
we’ve had their account.”

Sherell Fox, the proprietor
of Island Petal florists, has
been producing floral arrange-
ments for Baker’s Bay for the
past two years and is very
upbeat about the developers.
She said she feels they are gen-
uinely interested in helping the
community.

“JT think they are very com-
munity-oriented and they pay
close attention to the small
businesses and want to help
out wherever they can. They
are very supportive and give
back. I think Baker’s Bay will
be great for Abaco. They’ve
provided jobs for construction
workers and the people of
Abaco. You know, our econo-
my is probably the best in the
Bahamas right now and I think
that is in great part due to Bak-
er’s Bay,” Ms Fox said.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALEXANDER HECHAVARRIA
MAYET of JOHNSON TERRACE, LOT 6A, P.O. BOX N-
5613, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
17th day of November, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
BY THIS DEED POLL FOR CHANGE OF NAME made on the 12th
day of November, A.D. 2007, | the undersigned ABIGAIL EUTIRPIE
GIBSON of Tyler Street, Chippingham in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas, the mother and legal guardian of TAl HELEN GIBSON
formerly known as TAl HELEN MISSICK also of the Western District
of the Island of New Providence a minor and a citizen of the siad
Commonwealth of the Bahamas by birth do hereby on behalf of the
said TAl HELEN GIBSON absolutely renounce and abandon the use
of her said surname of MISSICK and in lieu thereof on her behalf
assume as from the date hereof the surname of GIBSON. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.



oF
THE TRIBUNE SATUF LY, NOVEWBEK 24, 2007, PAGE 11















~ SALES
_ PERSONS
EEDED!

e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your
“income.
e You are limited only to
your potential
e Flexible hours available
e Excellent commissions
and benefits



Bahamas Educational

~ Scholarship fund gets
~ more than $3,100

THE National Association of
the Bahamas Miami Chapter
put on its second annual Dine-

and-Dash Scholarship Fundrais- were: the Bahamas Tourist Bahamians, friends of the . ®
_er this month in Minne Office, Bahamasair, the Bahamas and Floridians of . Must have reliable transportation

NAB officials raised more Bahamas Consulate, Laser Bahamian decent living in uae ‘ 7
‘than $3,100 from ticket pro- International Freight Transport, South Florida. e Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
ceeds and donations for the Eastern Financial, Carnival One of the association’s pri- : . : :
Bahamas Educational Scholar- Cruise Lines and Metro Dade _ mary fundraiser goals is to ren- e Excellent written and communication skills.

- ship fund.

. “The event consisted of a
*. whirl-wind dine-around of four
stops where 62 participants
enjoyed the night conversing
and dining at various locations
throughout Miami-Dade,” said
the chapter in a statement.

Bimini Bay Resort and Mari-
na has become a strategic part-
ner, contributing to a number
of charities throughout the
Bahamas.

President of Bimini Bay
Resort and Marina Sean Grim-
berg and wife Catherine, vol-
unteered their home and were
the hosts of the entrée portion
of the event.

Dinner guests were from
organisations and associations
of the Bahamas. Represented

Transit, among others.

Earl Miller, former president
and founder of NAB said that
with the assistance of “co-oper-
ating partners and more impor-
tantly friends like the Grim-
bergs who are willing to assist
and support a great cause, the
organisation will not only afford
to give deserving students a
chance to attend college but
make the world a better place
for all.”

The event was organised by
Earl Miller and current presi-
dent Rosamon Gomez, who
along with board members help
raise funds year-round for the
educational scholarship fund.

The National Association of
the Bahamas is a non-profit
organisation consisting of

der assistance to Bahamian
scholars in need and reach out
to the less fortunate in South
Florida communities.

Established in 1993, the
National Association of the
Bahamas (NAB) is made up of
450 members.

Since Bahamians played such
an important role in the history
of Florida communities, the
group saw the association as an
engine to strengthen social
bonds and preserve the rela-
tionship for future generations.

A chapter was established in
West Palm Beach in 1995 and
the newest chapter was estab-
lished in Orlando in 1998.






Must have a proven track record in sales
Professional appearance a must a

Apply in writing to
Sales Representatives

Box PM-1

C/O The Nassau Guardian

P.O. Box N-3011
Nassau

Bahamas

OFT GOj- 8} er eta





paNan Wve oeye welt |)

Albany Developer Ltd.

in conjuction with

The Department of Labour , BTVI and the Contractors Asseciation

will host a

Job fair

Tuesday November 277" 2007

and

Wednesday November 28" 2007

8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium

We need to see

ALL CONTRACTORS (Big and small
ALL. VENDORS -ALL SUPPLIERS


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA | -

Justice Cheryl Albury
_ launches Coral Tapestry

THURSDAY 15th November,
2007 marked the debut of a new
: contribution to the Bahamian lit-
e, erary scene. An impressive gath-
: ering of persons from a wide cross
section of the community attend-
ed the launch of Coral Tapestry, a
collection of short stories, at the
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas. The stories which
depict Bahamian life, past and
present, were written by Justice
Cheryl Albury, who in 1994
authored the popular Anthology:
Perspectives From Inner Win-
dows. Her poetry, which was first
published in the College of the
Bahamas Anthology of Bahamian
Literature in the 1970s has been
anthologised in other publications
in the Bahamas, U.S. Virgin
Islands, United Kingdom, the
Caribbean and Canada.

sae

-

@ Photo 1
s. Photo shows Justice Albury
and Members of the Supreme
isle Court Staff: (L to R) Claudina
Cooper, Secretary; Grace Bost-
wick, Listing Officer of the
Supreme Court; Justice Albury;
Donna Newton, Supreme Court
: - Registrar; and Nelson Hanna,
Court Clerk.

Hf Photo 2

‘Dr. Harold Munnings Jr.,
. Author of A History of the
ee Princess Margaret Hospital; Mari-
on Bethel-Sears, Attorney and
Poet; Business Charles McCart-

f ney; and Architect Russ Thomp-
: son.

@ Photo 3
Mr. Anslem Hall; Attorneys
Deidre Maycock, Danya Wallace;
. Lady Camille Hall; Candia
Albury-Ferguson; and Chief Jus-
tice Burton Hall.

@ Photo 4

The Book Launch was strongly
supported by the local chapter of
the Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA)
Sorority. (L to R) Tiffany Bain;
C.C. Lafleur; Sharon Fernander;
JoyAnne Archer, International
Program Representative; Dr.
Keva Bethel, Honorary Sorority;
Cheryl Albury, Honorary Sorori-
ty; Cindy Dorsette, lst Vice Presi-
dent; Lisa Major, Angelique Mck-
ay; Debra Neymour, 2nd Vice
President and Indira Swaby.

@ Photo 5

(L to R) Attorney Sharon Wil-
son, of Sharon Wilson & Co. for-
mer President of the Senate; Leila
Greene, Permanent Secretary,
Office of the Attorney General;
Justice Albury; and Charlene
Lloyd, Manager, Registrar of
Insurance Office.

H Photo 6
: (L to R) The Most Rev. Patrick
“ Pinder, STD, CMG, Archbishop
of Nassau; Dr. Keva Bethel, Pres-
ident Emerita, College of the
Bahamas (COB); Senator The
Hon. Claire Hepburn, Attorney
General; Justice Cheryl Albury;
Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall;
Janyne Hodder, President, Col-
lege of the Bahamas and Basil H.
Albury.

@ Photo 7

(L to R) Mr. Leroy H. Archer,
Managing Director of Burns
House Limited; Mr. Michael
Symonette, CEO of Symonette
Marketing Group; and Attorney
Alex Ferguson.



fe lari Rerousott
f fi 9 t - aS Trasmsanan \ Aegye .



: ' z : ss ‘Shove ons: Difference”

io . RO. Box NAG80,
©) E Measaga, Balan







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