Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
%~

rane

BP

mg

a

—o-



HOURS OF
~~ SUNSHINE

Volume: 104 No.3





eT
RM

Oe ar
TL

e Tribune





BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007





PRICE — 75¢









Alleged hitman riddled
with bullets, another
man taken to hospital

Foul lar ie is
suspected in
security officer's
disappearance

: @ By DENISE MAYCOCK
@ By KARIN HERIG At the crime scene police Tribune Freeport
Tribune Staff Reporter marked the spots where close to Reporter

kherig@tribunemedia.net

AN ALLEGED contract
killer, who was notorious in the
East Street area, was gunned
down yesterday in broad daylight
with a “high calibre” firearm.

As New Providence yesterday
prepared to hold a special can-
dlelight vigil in response to the
high murder rate, police recorded
homicide number 69 after two
men were shot in Bain and
Grants Town.

Samuel McKenzie, 35, who was
out on bail for murder, was rid-
died with bullets as he was stand-
ing with another man on Wilson
Street, off Hay Street, shortly
after 9am yesterday.

Speaking at the crime scene
yesterday morning, Chief Supt
Hulan Hanna told the media that
both men had been shot several
times “about the body.”

30 bullet shells fell to the ground.
Both men were taken to

Princess Margaret Hospital

(PMH) by a private vehicle.

McKenzie, better known as
“Mooshae”, was pronounced
dead shortly after arriving at the
emergency room. Doctors were
able to save the other man’s life
and he was in stable condition at
press time last night.

As a result of the nature of the
events surrounding the patient,
the hospital increased its security
measures yesterday.

PMH officials yesterday
assured the public that there is
currently a strong police presence
at the hospital.

Mr Hanna confirmed that
McKenzie is “known to police”
for previous offences.

SEE page three

PLP Chairman won't offer
himself for re-election

f By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Foul play is
suspected in the disappearance
of a 64-year-old security officer
stationed at the Eight Mile
Rock High School, where blood
was discovered.at the scene of
an apparent break-in there on
Thursday morning.

Grand Bahama Police are
seeking the public’s assistance in
locating security officer Vincent
Pedican, who reported for duty
at the school on Wednesday
evening for his midnight to 8am
shift. .

Although there was no trace
of Mr Pedican or his vehicle at
the school campus around 7am
Thursday when another securi-
ty officer arrived to relieve him,
his shoes and hand-held radio,
and blood were discovered in

. SEE page nine
Two students in

hospital, one in
custody after



PLP Chairman Raynard Rig-. ar ep orted





by officially announced yester- m@ By RUPERT : ee '
day his intention not to offer MISSICK Jr stabbing incident
himself for re-election as Chief Reporter

party issick@
chairman at the PLP’s conven- SHbineiietliinek lm By TANEKA
tion in February 2008. ° 5 THOMPSON





Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

While not commenting on his
future plans in politics, Mr Rig-
by has made it known that he

BAHAMIANS gath-
ered in Rawson Square
yesterday for a candlelight



SEE page 11



WHY ARE SO MANY
COMPANIES SWITCHING TO

eh ts) a

eetietele a’

MC ts ae
Let et an Wnty} eee
La ee or Cy a
Pee a nit a



ONE OF many candles held last night in Rawson Square.





Former minister speaks out over
botched housing development

FORMER Minister of
Works Bradley Roberts has
called for an end to the suf-
fering being experienced by
victims of a botched housing
development in the Cow Pen
Road area.

The former law firm of
Labour and Maritime Affairs
Minister Dion Foulkes repre-
sented two of the purchasers
in the Stephen’s Close trans-
action in 2005 and Mr
Roberts, with PLP chairman-
ship candidate Omar Archer,
called on Mr Foulkes to resign
from his post over the matter.

However, Mr Foulkes,

‘whose former firm was hired

to oversee the mortgage trans-
actions of two of the prospec-
tive home buyers, emphatical-

ly denied any wrongdoing by ~

the firm.

At a press conference yes-
terday, Mr Roberts claimed
that the “unapproved” subdi-
vision known as Stephen’s
Close was “doomed from the
start.”

“This project was started in
2004 and was doomed from

SEE page nine

vigil to pray for the heal-
ing of the “wounded
souls” of the nation and
to state with courage and °
determination that we are
“One Bahamas.”

Psychiatrist Dr David
Allen, who spoke yester-
day, said that the gather-
ing emphasises the fact
that the nation stands in
solidarity with the victims
of “our fallen brothers and
sisters especially their chil-
dren.”

“We come not to blame
or point the finger. We
come to say we are sorry.
We confess that we have
not done enough to dispel
the darkness, anger and
fear from our hearts mak-
ing it difficult for the light




















Felipé Major/Tribune staff









A REPORTED “gang
related” stabbing incident left

. two C I Gibson high school

students in hospital yesterday
and one in police custody, The
Tribune has learned.

Amidst the reports follow-
ing the news of this latest
episode of school violence,
school officials maintain the
campus was not in a “state of
chaos” and that classes
resumed as normal after the
students involved in the alter-
cation were isolated.

According to the school’s
principal Elaine Williams, the
incident occurred around
11.15 am at the end of morn-
ing recess.

While details were not con-

SEE page 11

i auth bball bbedatal








ea Pe

\ aXe bs Tae Ra.







PAGE 2, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



DAYS ONLY

this Friday November 23rd
6 Saturday November 24th, 2007

15% OFF STOREWIDE
10% OFF APPLIANCE

= With Any Purchase Register To Win 32 Inch
LCD Television 1 Every Week Until Dec. 22nd



i ws

2 SBUPSTSSS. ail
ora Noes
: NAAN Le

ae

Peet

YOU E
CANNOT
BEAT OUR
PRICES NOT
J/g oe a ean ite cae
MIAMI! Vous

Deena Oe

Call 380-SRSA!

Police still question
chefs and waiters over
Harl Taylor murder

INSIDERS expressed fears yesterday that
the Harl Taylor and Dr Thaddeus McDonald
murder i inquiries would “go cold” because of
the men’s high- -level gay connections.

They said it was important that the culprits
be brought to justice quickly if charges of
“selective justice” were not to arise again.

Up to press time last night, there had been no
change in the status of the investigations into
the brutal killings.

Police were still questioning a group of eight
chefs and waiters in connection with the mur-
der of Taylor.

‘The seven Dominicans and one Bahamian

worked at a wedding reception at Mountbatten
House one day before the designer’s body was
found.

No one has been taken into custody in con-
nection with Dr McDonald’s murder.

A source close to the late Dr McDonald said
yesterday: “This case should be pretty easy to
solve. It is a small community and Queen
Street, where Thaddeus was killed. It is under
CCTV surveillance from the American
Embassy.”

In fact, the US Embassy’s role in police
inquiries has been raised repeatedly by associ-
ates of the dead academic, who is said to have
entertained many young men at his guest house
home.

“The Americans must know who was coming
and going,” said a source, “If they didn’t, then
they have a real security issue.”

The US Embassy was closed for the Thanks-
giving Day holiday yesterday and no one could
be contacted for comment.

Dr McDonald, 59, a faculty dean at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, was found battered to
death in his home on Friday.

Handbag designer Har! Taylor, 37, was found
stabbed to death at his Mountbatten House
home in West Hill Street on Sunday morning.

MURDER VICTIM: Har! Taylor.



inquiry — that they were both murdered by a
jealous third party who resented their closeness,
or that they were involved in a “business deal
gone wrong” which prompted savage revenge.

Mr Taylor, who ran his handbag and interior
design business from Mountbatten House, was
a prominent figure in “high end” gay circles.

One insider told The Tribune: “Harl and he
were, it seemed, having a relationship. How-
ever, I still believe these killings were about
money, not sex. For some reason, this was pay-
back time.”

He added: “From the time it happened, I
said if they are going to crack this thing, they

will do so quickly. However, my fear is that it

will become a cold case. To bring charges
against a gay lover, or even a gay hitman, could



Police are pursuing at least two lines of

possibly compromise a lot of other people.”

AueeeececuscacesceseceeeeecnsseseseeeeeeeeeeSaeeseeGeneeSeenDeeeeeeenseaneeeeeeGeeeSGRGSOSSGSRS OSES EOE RGEHEOHAGEMEApHREEGORBES EGS EG SRS NERDESSERSEHOuEnensuaeeusseseneesensesessssseasesensnTasseneeseees

About 40 teachers, students ‘exposed’ to infection

School tuberculosis alert

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



ABOUT 40 teachers and stu-
dents at C C Sweeting Senior
High School have “tested posi-
tive for exposure to tuberculo-
sis” after a 10th grade student
at the school was diagnosed

Our HELPLINE HEROES will gave the doy!

he cident? i ‘we? ? Break: in?

RSA customers ean now call our 2ahy Helpline.
A Helpline Hero will come to your regeue

& stort filing your claim on the ae

you're in luck!
up to the pump at any Shell station where



"Spot the GREEN TRUCK and.

Paull



you gee

the 380°8RSA track. RSA customers will get @ #50 is eosiaharl

promotion endp ‘1, 80, 2007

Call ns todey & we will pul you in an with one of our Agente!
meshen { 242.328, 7685 f 242, 325 S151



{

",RoyalStar
» Assu rance

~_wirw rsebehamas,com

4



with the potentially fatal illness
last week, education officials
confirmed yesterday.

While a positive reading of
exposure to the disease does
not mean the person actually
has TB, it is an indicator that a
person had sustained exposure
to an infected individual.

The disease can only be
spread to persons who have had
at least eight hours of sustained
contact with an infected per-
son, health officials said.

According to a press release
issued by the Ministry of Edu-
cation yesterday, on November
16 and 19, teachers, auxiliary
staff, 10th grade students, and
school band members were
screened for exposure to the

illness through the Mantoux

skin test.

Test results revealed 24 staff
members and 12 students had
been exposed to the potential-
ly deadly illness.

Those who tested positive for
TB exposure were referred to
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal for x-rays.

Following the results of the x-
rays, health officials will deter-
mine what further steps are to
be taken.

. A 10th grade student was
reportedly diagnosed with the
illness last week, prompting
Ministry of Education and
Health officials to screen those
who may have come into close,
sustained contact with the stu-
dent. Relatives of the student
have been screened for the dis-
ease as well.

The student is currently in

the hospital undergoing treat-

ment for TB.

Last week,.students were
issued school letters informing
parents and guardians of the

Tuberculosis is a com-
mon, infectious and poten-
tially deadly bacterial
infection caused by the
germ mycobacterium
tuberculosis. It commonly
attacks the infected per-
son’s lungs, but can dam-
age the nervous system

‘and other organs of the
body.

TB spreads by air when
a person infected with TB
of the lungs coughs,
sneezes, or talks. Symp-
toms of the illness include:

° a cough lasting three
weeks or longer

° significant weight loss

e coughing up of
blood/mucus

e weakness/fatigue

® fever/chills

e night sweats

Persons with weak
immune systems are more
susceptible to TB infec-
tion.



situation. While teachers and
parents have expressed mount-
ing concerns over the possibili-

~ ty of a TB outbreak, Ministry of

Health and Education officials
assured the public they are tak-
ing all the necessary measures
to ensure the protection of all
students and staff at C C Sweet-
ing Senior High School.

A special assembly is sched-
uled for Monday, November 27
at the school to educate par-
ents and students about the ill-
ness.

AS

oe

a



eases



>

Cae

sat



Aba

—}-—-

4

THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 3





murder

FROM page one

According to members of the East
Street community, McKenzie was a
“killer for hire” and an individual
feared by many.

Police reported yesterday that
McKenzie and his companion were
standing on the side of the road on

_- Wilson Street when a green Kia

Sportage SUV pulled up and the occu-
pant of the vehicle fired a barrage of
shots at the two men.

Arriving at the scene of the murder
of her son, Veronica McKenzie, who
operates a hot dog stand on Bay
Street, screamed out for justice.

“I want justice, I don’t care who it is,

they better get it right and they better
fix it now before the day is out. I will
not rest until I get this solved today,”
she shouted out in grief.

Mrs McKenzie claimed that the
home of her son’s girlfriend was
recently “shot up” and that police
failed to respond in that case.

_ She claimed that police failed to
come to her son’s rescue when he
needed help.

“But they come now, after they
done (shoot) my son seven times,” she
said.

An hour after the shooting, at
10.07am, police received reports that a
green Kia Sportage SUV had been set
on fire on Malcolm Lane, off South
Street — only a few streets away from
the site of the murder.

Officers noted that they saw the col-
umn of smoke from the blaze while
they were working the crime scene on
Wilson Street.

Speaking with the press at the scene
on Malcolm Lane, Assistant Supt Wal-
ter Evans said that an emergency fire
services crew found the vehicle “fully
engulfed in flames.”

An eye-witness claimed he saw a
man wearing a white shirt throw a
“pipe bomb” at the SUV and then run
away.

The fire completely destroyed the
vehicle, but through specks of paint on

the right fender police were able to
determine that the burnt-out KIA

Sportage was originally green in
colour.

_ Police were also able to determine
that the vehicle had a 87777 license

plate number.

“There may be a connection with
the shooting, we’re not sure, but we’re
_ investigating that. Arson is suspected,”

Mr Evans said.

SHOOTING IN BROAD DAYLIGHT

Drive-by PMH enhances security after
admitting shooting victims







ASSISTANT SUPT acs ee said that an emergency Teco mM hareatent an engulfed in flames.’

PLP expected to conclude
Pinewood case next week

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP is expected to con-
clude its case in the Pinewood
election court challenge next
Wednesday, as additional wit-

nesses took the stand yesterday -

acknowledging they were not
ordinary residents of Pinewood,
while a woman was forced to
give details about her relation-
ship with a married man to
determine where she lived.
Philip “Brave” Davis, PLP

- Jead counsel, informed the court

of his plans to wrap up Allyson
Maynard-Gibson’s case at the
beginning of the morning ses-
sion yesterday, before ques-
tioning seven witnesses.

Rodcliffe McPhee, who now
lives off Farrington Road, and is
on the PLP’s list of contested
voters, told the court that he
formerly resided in Pinewood
south of Jacaranda Street, and
east of Thatch Palm Avenue,
when he registered in October
2005. He testified that he then
moved to the Farrington Road
area in June 2006.

Testimony

His admission through testi-
mony that he was not an ordi-
nary resident of Pinewood for at
least six months prior to the
election came as another wit-
ness, Leslie Jones — also on the
PLP’s list — gave a description of
his residence west of Baygera-
nium Avenue that too is out-
side the constituency.

Two witnesses also gave tes-
timony about living in multiple
places, though maintaining that
their actual address was in
Pinewood.

Asa Moss Jr, who has lived
in the area of Foster Street and

ial.
EXTERMINATORS

a PRUE
PHONE: 322-2157



Boyd Road since June 22 this
year, was formerly a resident of
Guinep Street, Pinewood.

Mr Moss told the court that
he did visit his then girlfriend,
now wife, at her Boyd Road
residence, where he did stay at
times.

However, Mr Davis suggest-
ed that he lived there for three
years, rather than Pinewood.
“No,” Mr Moss replied. After
further questioning, Mr Moss
said he did keep clothes in Boyd
Road, but maintained that he
did not live there during that
period.

Berkley Kerr, who has lived
in Cowpen Road for the past
few weeks, testified that before
moving to Cowpen, he lived
between residences. in
Pinewood and Yellow Elder.

When he left his mother’s
Pinewood residence three years
ago, Mr Kerr said, he put some
of his larger items in the storage
area at the back of this house,
while leaving some clothes in a
bedroom that his brother took
over.

When at Pinewood, which
Mr Kerr asserted was his resi-
dence at that time, he said he
stayed in the room with his
brother.

Cheryl Williams, who now
resides in Augusta Street where
she rents, told the court she for-
merly lived on Sapodilla Boule-
vard with her family before
moving into this residence with
Nelson Brennan, who is mar-
ried and currently in divorce
proceeding.

She said that she initially met
Mr Brennan in 2000 at the air-
port. where both’ were
employed.

Ms Williams testified that she
lived with her family in
Pinewood until December 2006,
when she moved in with Mr
Brennan. Mr Davis read from
the BEC records for the Augus-
ta Street residence, which is in
her name along with the lease,
questioning whether Ms
Williams resided there from
October 2002 with Mr Brennan
when the account was activated.

Ms Williams maintained that

she did not, and said the
account was placed in her name
rather than his, as he was going
through legal separation. Under
cross-examination by FNM lead
counsel, Michael Barnett, Ms
Williams also said that due toa
previous problem with an earli-
er pregnancy, she decided to
live with her mother and family
during the period before she

moved in with Mr Brennan,
who is the father of her child.

Under re-examination by Mr
Davis, Ms Williams said that
issues emerged in their rela-
tionship regarding Mr Bren-
nan’s separation and divorce as
early as 2001, though the rela-
tionship was open.

Election court resumes on
Monday at 10am.

FOCOL
HOLDINGS LTD.

DIVIDEND PAYMENT

FOCOL is pleased to announce a

dividend payment of

2 cents per share to all shareholders

of record November 30, 2007

payable December 11, 2007.







@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net



THE Princess Margaret Hospital
initiated “enhanced security mea-
sures” after admitting two persons
who were shot yesterday morning
in what police described as a drive-
by “gangland-style” shooting.

Two men were taken to the
Princess Margaret Hospital with
gunshot wounds.

Samuel McKenzie, 35, who was
in critical condition on arrival at
the hospital, was out on bail on a
murder charge.

McKenzie, an alleged hitman,
who was notorious in the East
Street area, died shortly after
arrival at the hospital. McKenzie is
alleged to have been involved in
the shooting death of Nurse Joan
Lunn in 2001.

Stable

The second patient admitted
with McKenzie was taken to the
operating theatre. His identity was
still being withheld last night, but
he was said to be in stable condi-
tion.

The Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal’s tightened security measures
recalled the ones put in place after
the senseless killing of Nurse
Lunn.

Nurse Lunn was shot dead by a
hit-man in his attempt to
kill one of Nurse Lunn’s patients.

Princess Margaret Hospital man-
agement yesterday promised the
public that it will continue to have
a strong police presence at the hos-
pital.

“(We want to) assure our clients

tinue to work with the Royal
Bahamas Police Force to ensure
the utmost safety and security,”
the hospital said.
Two marked police vehicles and

one armed officer were stationed

at the hospital’s Accident and
Emergency entrance yesterday.

dist may une a

‘The Mall-at-Marathon
BOX: OFFICE OPENS A ATU 10:00 ‘00 AM AM DAILY

rascmsts (00 [380 wu [go [eae [00

cuca 08 [20H [as Jan [0

ae
0 | 00 [WA on [82 |

THE MIST

MR. MAGORIUN’S WONDER TWA | 6:10 | 8:40 [10:40 |
frnepciaust A 1:00 [340 [WA [6:00 [WA | NA
[uonsronuamBs TWA [WA [WA | a | 8:95 [10:50
Se ——— ee ae ma

BEE MOVIE

TYLER PERRY'S WHY DID | GET MARRIED ? eS ae

VEE E999

rises tao | 30s | wa | 600 | 825
pore [suf [or

BEE MOVIE

AMERICAN GANGSTER 7:00 ‘ | 10:00 |

FRED CLAUSE A RB MH

TEL.380-FLIX ¢ 393-9404



and their relatives that we will con- |



PAGE 4, FRIDAY, NOVE ‘MBE ? 23, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

‘THE TRIBUNE



rw " T “ak Li e d
Che Tribune Lumite
NULLIUS ADDICTiS TURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound io Swcaurie The Dogmas of No Master

PKONE FH DULE CTE Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

VE DUPUCTL Kt, O.BLE., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hlon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

SIR ETI

h ditor 1919-1972
editor 1972-199]

Pubushes
Conuibutne
LIL EEN Ge

PUCTI: AKRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-
Published Daily: Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., RO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

[TELEPHONES
Siu rtehboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Vassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
eee fax: (242) 352-9348



cane thing must be done

CHIEF JUSTICE Sir Burton Hall, admit
ting. a “disconnect between the judicial sys-
tem and broad sections of the community”,

gave an excellent talk at the Chamber of

Commerce's annual seminar Monday on the
powers and role of the judiciary,

With criticism mounting against the courts
in the face of escalating crime. Sir Burton, not
only detailed the physical difficulties under
which the courts are expected to function,
but pointed out that judges are appointed

not to “do justice”, but to “do justice accord-
ing to law.” He concluded in fixing the blame
squarely where it belongs. “In sum,” he said,
“while courts might impose punishment upon
conviction achieved after due process, no
court or any other state agency will curtail
objectionable behaviour in which a large
measure of the population insist in chgag
ing.

He reiterated his belief that “the police can .

do precious little to ‘prevent’ crime in the

absence of a broad community consensus of

behaviour which it suuaply will not tolerate.”
In other words we live tna sick society

a society that now reaps what it has sown

over the years. There is no cure for today’s
crime unless each member of society changes
its attitude and fully cooperates with the law

& «and demands. Zero. talevange against those . oo.
in a tool’s “paradise. These persons will never

°

=who don't obey it

“in the nieantine, however, We’ cannot sit
on our hands. complain of our handicaps,
and do nothing.

A caller to a talk show Wednesday morn-
ing likened the police to a greyhound chasing
a rabbit. After catching the rab!
hound turns around only to find

has released the rabbit. The race cits all
over again, a tired grevhound chasing the
same rabbit.

Often the police feel that they are that
greyhound and that the “someone” releasing
the pesky rabbit is the court. Police say that
much of the crimes committed today are by
repeat offenders out on bail Statistics seem to

support their claim
Why are these persons, some accused of

the most heinous crimes, even brutal murdets,
walking the streets? They are there because
the courts do not have the facilities to try
their cases. And so a judge ts duty bound to
administer justice according to the law. Under
the constitution an accused person is not only
presumed innocent. but has aright to a fair

hearing, before a fair and impartial court,

PRE-OWNED

within a reasonable time. However, lan-
guishing in prison for five years is not a “rea-
sonable time”. It is denying an accused, who

-might be innocent, his constitutional rights.

As Sir Burton says the true “victim” might be
an accused who is in fact innocent of the
charge. And so, rather than denying these
persons their rights, the courts are releasing
them into the community. As a result the
community is being held hostage by some of
them, and the exhausted police find that in
many instances they are chasing the same
rabbits.

In the House of Assembly on October. 17
National Security Minister Tommy Turn-
quest told the House that of the 1,359 prison
population some 587 are there on remand. He
said that 189 are now out on bail for armed
robbery, and more than 114 for murder. In
2006. 35 per cent were on bail at the time
they committed their ‘second offence, and
between January and September this year
42 per cent, or 22 murder suspects, were on
bail at the time of a subsequent offence. Up
to September this year 39 persons were out
on bail for rape and more than 189 for armed
robbery.

And so what happens to these accused?
Are they expected to take to the streets, find
a.job and go straight? To believe this is to live

find a job. And so, without family or friends,
and no work how are they to live? You
guessed it, they prey on the community.
While hard working Bahamians are out earn-
ing an honest living these jobless, hungry
people are perched ready to snatch the first
opportunity to plunder your possessions and
even injure you.

So what is to be done?

It is suggested that more judges be hired
and a court be devoted exclusively to criminal
matters. Sir Burton says that this is not prac-
tical. So what is? The matter is urgent, we
cannot wait until the community has been
educated to accept that the only way to
ensure security is to convince all Bahamians
that it’s important to obey the law, even in
small matters.

Nor can we sit back and. tell Bahamians
that they have brought this all on themselves,
while the killing, maiming and robbing con-
tinues. Nothing is impossible. The so-called
impossible now has to be turned into the pos-
sible.

¢ To be continued Monday.



Granddaughter’s
tribute to a
matriarch’s love

EDITOR, The Tribune.

MY GRANDMOTHER may
not have landed on the moon or
may not have become the first
female Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
but she has made outstanding
achievements to not only her fam-
ily, but to the community as well.

All her life she has worked
hard to take care of herself and
her family. She gave her five chil-
dren the best school education
that she could afford and instilled
in them crucial values that strong
families and communities are
built on.

Since I was a year and ten
months, my grandmother took
me in and helped my mother to
raise me as if I were her own. I
remember growing up and people
would ask her: “Well Mrs.
Roberts, is this your last child?”
and she would respond jokingly —
“Do you think I am that fool!” -

Nonetheless, it was as if I were
her last because I lived with her
all my life. While growing up, she
made it her duty to raise me the
best way she knew how, by instill-
ing in me strong Christian and
moral values. She made sure that
I learned to respect others, elders
and peers alike. I can still remem-
ber our walks to school together
and her and me picking pennies
up along the way to put in our
piggy bank. She would diligently
assist me with my homework until
the wee hours of the morning and
she would always make herself
known to my teachers and made
surprise visits to school to keep
me in line and spoil me with
treats. My aunts and uncles
always secretly regarded me as
spoiled, but in comparison to my
peers and their parents by dis-
tinction, she appeared strict.

In my developing years, my
perception of my grandmother
transformed from peculiar mis-
conception to love and admira-
tion. As I matured, I realized the
importance of and came to be
grateful for the way that she
raised me and values she lived by
and the standards she fought to
uphold. My grandmother is a
woman of strength and courage
and that could be observed by
anyone. She is statuesque and dig-
nified and her presence alone
demands respect. Initially she
may seem a bit intimidating with
her no-nonsense disposition, but
anyone who has come to know

and appreciate her can rightfully ©

testify that she has a warm heart
and a sincere soul.

She often enjoys expressing
her motherly nature with food.
You can be sure that if you visit
her, she is either preparing a deli-
cious meal or has the food on the
stove waiting to be served. Her
direct family, myself included,

neue hm nelaminl =n ula
“Dont just have thanksgiving

CARS & TRUCKS

For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with warranty!

‘99 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA

have thanksliving”

SUNDAY SERVICES

7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 ¢ 393-5798

Fax: 326-4488/394-4819



HEELS

letters@tribuinemedia.:



knows this and takes delight in
visiting her throughout the day,
almost everyday to partake of her
sumptuous Bahamian cooking.

If I can only become half of
the lady and woman that she is —
I would surely be one of the
greatest women on earth. She is
the manifestation of Christiani-
ty, beauty, grace, elegance and
poise, knowledge, loyalty, kind-
ness and love. She has shown me
the meaning of true and uncon-
ditional love. She bestows untar-
nished grace and generosity to
her loved ones and those around
her in her own special, often mis-
understood way. She loves with-
out thinking and without asking
in return. She is indeed a woman
of truth and sincerity, giving
advice and honest opinions when
asked or not asked at all if the
situation calls for it. Without a
doubt, she is the ideal example
of independence never expectant
of a favour in return and fully
capable of taking care of herself
in every aspect. She is a matri-
arch who perpetually mentors
and cares for her loved ones as
well as everyone else with whom
she may encounter. She is a quin-
tessential woman of wisdom, with
every utterance from her lips wise
thoughts and fundamental values
are verbalized. Most of all, she is
a woman of God, who holds firm
to her faith which is engrained in
every part of her being and
essence.

Apart from God, and a few
other important people, she ranks
at the top of the list of persons
whom I regard as my source of
inspiration. She inspires me to be
the remarkable person and
woman that I know I will one day
become. She is the earthly source
of encouragement that stimulates
me to persevere when I feel like
giving up. Thoughts of her efforts
in my development has caused
me to realize that her (along with
others) investment of time love
and money in me must not and
will not go in vain. Her existence
encourages me to be a better per-
son in all aspects of my personal-
ity and development. She is my
earth angel that God has loaned
to me and others. In these press-
ing times, there is a critical need

‘ for more strong role models in

our society to make their pres-
ence felt. Our country requires
more sound adults like my grand-
mother to raise and supervise our
children with love, good values,
morals and discipline now more
than ever with violence on the
rise in our schools and with the
murder count in our country soar-
ing. It is imperative that we instil
these traits in our children, in
order for us to have a productive
and safe society. Our adolescents
and older folks alike need some-
one to look up to. Don’t let our
values die with those who grew
up generations before us.
Moreover, I want the world to
know what a wonderful woman
Sylvia N. Roberts is, I want to
shout it from the rooftops. I want
this country to know that God
has blessed the world with her
presence and that I am so sin-

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

ty De a CCT TE TCLs
322-2157



cerely grateful to have her in my
life. I want to give her the roses
while she is still alive, I want to
honour this wonder of a woman
whom I love with all my heart!

MONTARA ROBERTS
Nassau,
November 21, 2007

Outside
advertising
adding to
ugliness

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WHAT will certain business
houses try next in outside
advertising?

It seems there is a national
competition between the two
soft beverage companies to
see who can litter the
Bahamas the most and the
quickest.

Everywhere today you see
either banners or bottle
shaped images of the beverage
companies products which
fade very quickly and really
look ugly.

Coming from the Airport
yesterday just passing Go
Slow Bend on West Bay
Street and on the perimeter
wall of the first house on the
waterside there is a large ban-
ner for the Americas Cup Sail-
ing Boat tourist attraction —
surely Physical Planning did
not approve that?

Outside most of the food
stores in recent weeks large
banners advertising the in
store promotion of their bev-
erage products — usually the
sign is tied provisionally, nor-
mally not straight and really
adding to the ugliness which
we seem to enjoy.

Editor, there are provisions
under Town Planning that all «
outside advertising materials
require Physical Planning
Board approval — I believe
Michael Major is the Director,
but obviously these business
houses simply erect the signs
knowing that they will stay up
for weeks before something
“might be done”.

Although Physical Planning
Board advised all the political
candidates that their election
signs must be taken down
there are still not just one or
two in very visible locations —
someone has to be blind to
those of B J Nottage and Rev
CB Moss at the light on Blue
Hill and Dillet Street....It is
time these were removed.

It seems in our eyes ugliness
is close to godliness when it is
the total opposite.

Iam so annoyed with the
beverage companies that I and
my family will not purchase
their products as they in my
opinion they not law abiding
and are sending such a nega-
tive message to our young
people.

MARCIA FARRINGTON
Nassau,
November 13, 2007.

SAUNT

O3-c SUZUK | BALENO
‘04 SUZUKI IGNIS
‘95 TC >vOTA A AVALON
‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer
00 HYUNDAI ACCENT
‘O00 HYUNDAI GALILOPER
‘O01 HYUNDAI COUPE -

04 HYUNDAI SANTA FESS

Very on mileage, very clean

‘O06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Very clean
‘06 HYUNDAI TUSCON GLS

VAUtO <=,
ITY ae
LIMITED

HE BAHAMAS
322. a775) ’ a5 3079

Quoans Huy, 352-6422

14.8 Cube
$650.00

@

The toterwattened Scout of The Babarees
FORNDED tee

@® world school

18 Cube
$720.00

se? Ure, %

The Annual General Meeting of

St. Andrew’s School Limited will
take place in the school’s library
on

21 Cube
$962.00

ESTIMATE PREPARED FOR FINANGING AT THE BANK OF YOUR CHOICE
When it comes to quality We Don’t Compare!

betel DISCOUNT FURNITURE AND is

APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE
L MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
t A Lie Lorena}



#1 AUTO DEALER ft
EAST SHIRLEY STREET -
sit our thowroor af Quality huto Salos (Free

or Abaco Motor Mail, Ger

Financial statements and proxy forms may be
obtained the Business Office at St. Andrew’s School





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 5



Ce Ea a Se a
” Father appeals for his

missing wife to return



In brief

Sandals resorts
scoop hat-trick
at British Travel
Awards 2007

THE British Travel
Awards held this month
saw Sandals Resorts hon-
oured as the favourite all
inclusive resort of con-
sumers.

Sandals was also named
best all inclusive resort as
voted by the travel indus-
try, and the company with
the favourite travel adver-
tising campaign among
consumers.

“These awards are the
result of hard work, non-
stop training, our commit-
ment to continuously mod-
ernising and improving our
product and our determi-
nation to settle for nothing
less than number one,”
said Gordon “Butch”
Stewart, chairman of San-
dals Resorts. “These
acknowledgments arrive at
a special time in Sandals’
history as we enter our
new ‘luxury-included’
epoch. We look forward to
remaining at the top of the
travel world tor many
years to come.”

Known for leadership in
Caribbean travel, Sandals
has once again raised the
bar among distinctive
resort destinations with
the introduction of the
Luxury Included Holiday
and a collection of luxury
suites in Jamaica, Antigua,
St Lucia and the Bahamas.

The new luxury experi-
ence at Sandals reportedly
features unprecedented
services and amenities
including private plunge
pools and jacuzzis, exclu-
sive dining options, and
celebrated partnerships
with celebrity designers.

The British Travel
Awards recognises more
than 100 of the best com-
panies in travel as voted
for by industry profession-

als andconsumers. 4% esd











Evamae Kemp-Rolle



A FATHER-OF-THREE last night
appealed for his missing wife to return
home, claiming his children were cry-
ing themselves to sleep over her dis-
appearance.

Beach attendant Paul Rolle, 49, said
his 38-year-old wife Evamae Kemp-
Rolle left home for work two months
ago and had not been seen or heard

from since then.

wife.

Rum Cay Resort developers
announce the winner of
million dollar treasure hunt

RUM CAY — Montana
Holdings Limited, developers
of the Rum Cay Resort and
Marina and platinum spon-
sors for the fifth Oil Baron’s
Ball in’ Dubai, have
announced the winner of their
million dollar treasure hunt.

Karen Sinclair, a resident
of Dubai, was randomly
picked as the winner of the
grand prize — an oceanfront
home site valued at $1.25 mil-
lion.

The luxurious Bahamian
beach front home site is easi-
ly accessible via air and land,
the company said.

“Tam still in a complete
state of shock, this is really a
dream come true,” said an
exhilarated Karen Sinclair.
“My husband has been in the
oil industry for 30 years, and
this time we feel we've truly
struck gold.”

Each guest at the ball was
given a brochure containing
a number and web address.
The web address was activat-
ed immediately after the ball
ended and participants
entered this number on the
website within the seven day
time period.

The Oil Baron’s Ball Dubai
took place on Friday, Novem-
ber 9 on the lawns of the Emi-

rates Golf Club, Dubai.
Considered Dubai’s pre-
mier corporate social event
for executives of the oil and
gas industry, the Oil Baron’s
Ball features the crowning of
the Middle East Oil Baron
2007 and raises money for the
ball’s official charity, the
Make A Wish Foundation.
“We are pleased to
announce that Ms Sinclair is
the winner of our million dol-
lar treasure hunt. The Oil
Baron’s Ball stimulated great
interest in our magnificent
island of Rum Cay and we
look forward to the day that
Ms Sinclair can relay its
exquisite beauty and
ambiance to others,” said
MHL CEO John Mittens.
Rum Cay Resort Marina is
an 897-acre luxury residential
resort marina, which accord-
ing to the company is being
developed “as the premier
destination for the free-spirit-
ed, adventure traveller seek-
ing an authentic Bahamian
‘out island® experience with
unparalleled natural elegance
and superb amenities”.
There are plans for a new,
modern airport with on-site
Customs services as well as a
full-service mega-yacht mari-
na.

The Women’s Ministry Of

HOLY DOVE BAPTIST CHURCH

Fifth Street, The Grove

will host their

wee “Women With Integrity
‘Walking In Authority”

WITH TWO SPECIAL SERVICES
Scriptures text: Esther 4:5-16

| Prophetess

ANN
COAKLEY

Sunday,
November 25,
2007, @ 11am

Minister
FLORENCE
DELEVEAUX

| Monday,
November 26,
2007, @ 7:30pm

Holy Dove Baptist Church honors

SIS. NADEEN EUGENE

Kingdom Woman of the Year
2007-2008

Woman's Ministry President:
Prophetess Koralee
Brathwaite
Pastor Bishop
lan K. Brathwaite



He told The Tribune: “I love my

“Y want her back. The children are

Bank

Available

missing her. They cry themselves to
sleep at night.”

Mrs Rolle, who worked as a room
attendant at Atlantis, was last seen in
September when she left home for
Paradise Island.

“From that day forth we have not
seen her,” said Mr Rolle from his
home in The Grove. “The children are
missing her desperately.”

Asked if she might have left with
another man, Mr Rolle said: “It’s
always a possibility. But ’'m convinced

“Financing

she is still right here on New Provi-
dence.”

He said she had never left home like
this before.

“My kids are between four and eight
years old and they are upset.

“We want her to contact us to say
where she is.”

Mr Rolle said police had been
informed.

He has also placed an advertisement
seeking the public’s help in finding
her.

Insurance
Available
on the

BRING YOUR OLD VEHICLE TO TRADE SO YOU CAN UPGRADE!!!

Located: Thompson Blvd
Tel: 325-0881/2 Open:Mon.-Fri. 8a.m.-5:00p.m.

nosetta Street - Ph: 325-3336





PAGE 6, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Holiday issue: Pictured
(from left) are Jim LaRo-
da Sr, Post Office super-
intendent general; Rowe-
na Rolle, general manag-
er of Authentically
Bahamian Department:
Miralee Rose, artisan; Mr
Grant, Leslie Cartwright,
deputy postmaster and
Cathy Laing, artisan



e Srnail and easy to carry

* Easy to test In low light

* 4 daily alarms

¢ Extra small blood dran
for genta testing



Prreestyle

Ask FOr details





S

Derek Smithy!



Is simplicity
your priority?

« Easy to apply blood
* Simple to review
us results



* Designed ta make
tasting simple

¢ Extra reassurance of
blood ketone testing



’



Precision Xtra

Upgrade’ your meter now. It’s FREE!

- Abbott

~ Diahetes Care

: ~ ‘ t
“Oller excludes currant Preelsion Xia" and FreaStvie “mater Users.

DISTRIBUTED BY
_ LOWE'S WHOLESALE
SOLDIER ROAD ® 393-7171

> Rae



Vote for your favourite Barista.

CT URL MUL Leak eM Lm YLT Ce aa Ce Laer cae oleae
who provides legendary service. (Yost men eal AG TEM as eRe

of espresso~ based coffee drink.

Does your Barista. +» Offer a sense of belonging « Greet you as you walk
through the door + Know you by drink or name « Provide quality beverages + Share their coffee
knowledge , Express passion and excitement of the Starbucks brand?

If so, we invite you to es into any Starbucks location and vote for your

favourite Barista!
' Barista Name:
: Store: _
; Your Name:
; Email:

Tel.:

1 Additional entry forms & drop boxes available at all Starbucks Bahamas locations.

ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SUBMITTED BY MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26th, 200%,

8-8087 + Wyndham Casino, CL ta)
thon, 394-5733 + Oakes Field, 302-2892

Post Office marks Christmas with special issue

Bahamian products win
the stamp of approval

JUST days before the
nation’s largest handicraft
and souvenir show, the Post
Office Department issued
special Christmas postage
stamps featuring authentical-
ly Bahamian products.

Post Office officials pre-
sented the series to Minister
of Tourism and Neko Grant
and the creators of the prod-
ucts featured on the stamps.

The presentation launched
a chain of highly-anticipated
events in the handicraft and
souvenir industry.

The industry’s next signifi-
cant event will be the 13th
annual Authentically
Bahamian Christmas Craft
Show, which is organised by
Ministry of Tourism in con-
junction with Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA).

Mr Grant pointed out the
importance of constantly sup-
porting Bahamian creations.

“The Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation through its var-
ious departments always
seizes the opportunity to
assist in the promotion of
things Bahamian,” he said.

“Tam told that this year
represents the 13th annual
Authentically Bahamian
Christmas Craft show, and
that division is headed by Ms
Rowena Rolle.”

Mr Grant commended Ms
Rolle and artisans Miralee
Rose and Cathy Laing,
whose shell and straw orna-
ments have been pho-
itographed for the special
issue of Christmas stamps.

The work of Ms Rose, the
2005 winner of the Cacique
Award for Handicraft, was
selected for the 1S cent, 25
cent, 50 cent, 65 cent and 80
cent stamps.

Ms Laing’s work will be on
the 70 cents stamp.

Mr Grant also commend-
ed the Post Office Depart-

ment on the selection of

authentically Bahamian craft
items for this year’s Christ-
mas issue.

$39,200°



“The stamp by itself is a beau-
tiful thing to view, and Iam
quite sure the sale will go well
with this issue. It is something
that is completely original and
something authentically

Bahamian.”



Assistant Postmaster Leslie Cartwright

CHANCE OF AWARD

The focus on
Bahamian handi-
crafts will culminate
in the crowning of a
new Cacique Award

winner for Handi-
craft on February 1
when the Cacique -
-Awards honour the
_ best performers in
tourism-related
~ fields. eo

He pointed out that high-
quality Bahamian products
will now be seen around the
world when the stamps are
put into use.

“We sincerely hope that as
we move forward, more
opportunity will be presented
to the promotion of things
Bahamian, not only locally
but certainly international-
ly.” he said.

Ms Rolle, general manager
of the Authentically Bahami-
an Department in the Min-
istry of Tourism, said the
stamps are a testament to the



significant advancement that
has been made for Bahamian
products and the annual
show that displays them.

“When we first started, we
didn’t even have ornaments,”
she said.

“Now, after 13 years, look
what we have today.”

Ms Rolle said that Ms
Rose and Ms Laing take part
in the show every Christmas.

They will display the items
on the postage stamps from
November 30 to December
2, when the Authentically
Bahamian Christmas Craft
Show is held at Wyndham
Nassau Resort.

Leslie Cartwright, assistant
postmaster, said individuals
such as Ms Rose and Ms
Laing help to make the
Christmas stamp programme
a success every year.

“The stamp by itself is a
beautiful thing to view, and I
am quite sure the sale will go
well with this issue,” he said.
“It is something that is com-
pletely original and some-
thing authentically Bahami-
an. So we are really excited
about this issue and we are
looking forward to the pub-
lic’s participation in purchas-
ing these souvenir items this
year.”

muta aS THE
SMART ui: TO a

q ‘6L V8 Automatic
Super Cab XLT

ue

The worlds
best selling
full size
truck
(other
models
available)

During the Ford Model Year Clearance you can experience the
best deals of the year. Don’t miss the truly amazing opportunity
to get behind the wheel of the most stylish vehicles on the road.

Available at

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094



EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas. com SmartChoice





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 7





‘Sun and ?’ hosts
Burgundian Dinner
to celebrate the
release of new wine

MORE than 70 patrons enjoyed the special Burgundian
Dinner at Sun and? Restaurant, held to celebrate the world-
wide release of the 2007 Georges Duboeut Beaujolais Nou-
veau.

The wine is distributed in the Bahamas by Bristol Wines
and Spirits.

Sun and ? chef and owner Ronnie Dykere joined Bristol
wine director Rusty Scates, in organising and creating the
evenings special menu and wine tasting.

Chef Ronnie, as he is generally known, said, "We were very
pleased with the turnout. | enjoyed preparing the special
beaujolais menu and getting people together for the tradi-
tional annual launch of the Beaujolais Nouveau. It's some-
thing different to the usual dining out experience.”

Wine expert Rusty Scates commented, "This year's Beau-
jolais Nouveau from Georges Duboeuf, is a very drinkable
‘fun’ wine, a step up from the 2005 and 2006 Nouveau wines,
which were both a little disappointing.

“The food and the wine were an excellent combination and
all of the patrons 1 spoke with, thoroughly enjoyed the
evening,” he said.

Guests had a delightful choice of dishes to try:

APPETIZERS
¢ Cassolette D’Escargots au Fleurie
Escargots simmered in red beaujolais wine.

° La Caille Rotie Au Beaujolais et Champignons en nid de
Salade Trevise Rouge, Roquette, Arugula

Roasted quail with mushrooms nestled in ficld greens
glazed with a beaujolais sauce.

MAIN COURSE
e Magret De Canard Rotis Au Vinaigre De Miel
Roast duck breast with a honey vinegar sauce.

e Saumon ou Dorade Local Grille a la cream D’Estragon

et Asperges
Grilled salmon or local snapper complemented with a tar-
ragon cream sauce.

DESSERT

¢ Feuillete D’ Anglaise aux Pommes Glace au Caramel

Sliced apples with pastry cream served on puff pastry with
a caramel ice cream

MISSING











EVAMAL KEMP
ROLLE
has been missing
since September
this year, Any one
who knows of her
whereabouts
Please Contact

325-6306

She is missed by
her kids




Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

LOCAL NEWS

Mitchell: PLP concerned

that government has no
plan to deal with crime





the Urban Renewal Project by
the FNM government has con-
tributed to the rise in crime.
Mr Mitchell said the PLP is
concerned that the govern-
ment has no clear direction or
plan to deal with the crime sit-
uation in the Bahamas.
“From our perspective, the
government needs to address
what it is they are doing
about crime — what is their
legislative agenda and
what is their social agen-
da, and it is simply not
clear that they have
any agenda to address
the issue,” he said.
Mr Mitchell, who
was speaking in Grand
Bahama on Tuesday,
said that the PLP stands
ready to support any
programme that will
reduce crime. ”
“Our party met in a par-
liamentary caucus (Mon-
day) night and I can tell you

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport —
Reporter

FREEPORT — Fox Hill MP
Fred Mitchell is claiming that
the “destabilisation” of the
Royal Bahamas
Police
Force
and








































about this issue. We think
that it is necessary
for there to be
a public
state-



4!

all MPs expressed concerns -



“From our perspective, the
government needs to address
what it is they are doing about
crime — what is their legislative
agenda and what is their social

agenda.”



ment at the highest level in the
country, especially when the
country is panicked about the
situation related to crime,” he
said.

“We have heard from the

police, but the people of the
country want to hear from
their political leaders about
the state of crime in this coun-
try.”
MP Mitchell said the FNM
has not revealed any short
term or long term plans to deal
with the issue.

“We were told when the
House adjourned at summer
time that when it came back
from recess in September, the
plan would be revealed. No
plan was revealed then and
there is no legislative agenda

.

US.

Bae Ca Cee EC EEN YAR art
Marina Village, Paradise Island.- Crystal Court at Atlantis

‘Mall at Marathon .- Harbour Bay -.Palmdale

Marsh Harbour, Abaco - Harbour Island - Emerald Bay Exuma
“Our Lucaya, Freeport, Grand Bahama ‘

WWW.TECHNOMARINE.COM

and we are now dealing with
old history in the House. So
there is nothing really to
advance the whole issue of
what is happening in the area
of crime,” he said.

When the PLP was in office,
Mr Mitchell said it put in place
specific proposals to deal with
crime, and re-organised the
Royal Bahamas Police Force.

The re-organisation which
took place just before the gen-
eral election, aimed to bring a
new perspective and fresh
expertise and training to help
reduce the crime, he claimed.

Mr Mitchell claims that the
force was destabilised by the
reversal of many of these
changes when the FNM came
to office.





PAGE 8, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Be GN a oh LOCAL NEWS





>) TOYOTA moving forward
4Runner ©

im RIGIhE
LOvmment:






|







The Toyota 4Runner has supreme power and style ina
tough, sophisticated form.

Features include: V6 4.0 litre engine, automatic transmission, 2WD system, A/C,
dual airbags, power windows, locks and mirrors, Keyless entry, automatic
power back door window and jam protection system and CD player.

: TOYOTA

vi Backed by a 3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty.

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS.LID

safe



Auto Mall, Shir ley Street (opp. St. Matthew's Church)

Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm San
Sat-8am - |2noon

THE 397-1700

E-GaR ex ecmotor@batelnet.bs

Parts and service guaranteed







AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER












PLP govt abuse ©
of BAIC left a
legacy of debt

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

HE publicly owned

Bahamas Agriculture -

Industrial Corporation is mil-
lions of dollars in debt after
being abused by the “new”
PLP during its single term in
government.

According to a recent
report to parliament by Agri-
culture and Marine Resources
Minister Larry Cartwright,
audited accounts of BAIC’s
financial position show that
the corporation was in debt
by $1.6 million (2003) and
$812,586 (2004).

While farmers, fishermen
and industrialists on the Fam-
ily Islands were in dire need
of financial relief to sustain
their livelihoods, it appears
that some of the principals at
BAIC were gallivanting, fer-
yently spending public funds
on extravagant dinners and

- opulent trips. Prior to the then

minister stepping in to correct
a seemingly piggish state of
affairs, BAIC appeared to
have become the personal
piggy-bank of certain govern-
ment officials. Public funds,
in my estimation, appeared to
have been frivolously spent
on gratuitous professional
fees that also included speech
writing and so-called “special
project services.”

“Travel and entertainment
expenses included costs relat-
ed to airfares, accommoda-
tions, transportation and
meals from travel within and
outside of the Bahamas,” Mr
Cartwright said.

Mr Cartwright stated that
approximately $52,000 was
spent on trade and investment
missions to ‘China, yet there
is no evidence of any remark-
able boost in Bahamas-China



A DR AN



The audited
reports of the
activities at BAIC
in 2003/2004
gives the
impression that
Bahamian tax-
payers were
grossly abused



trade or Chinese investment
in the Bahamas. Or, is it that
these trips were joyrides that
resulted in little to nothing
and counted for naught?

Additionally, there were
large payments to the Royal
Bank of Canada Visa and
Restaurants that were includ-
ed in the Business and Enter-
tainment figure of which
$35,000 was attributed to the
BAIC chairman at the time,
the then Member of Parlia-
ment for Holy Cross. Well
blow me down!

How much food could pos-
sibly be eaten that would have
resulted in a $35,000 bill -in
that time span? And, if all of
this money was spent on
“business lunches”, who were
the businessmen and what
investments or returns did

~ these meétings lead to?

What plausible explanation
can clarify how travel and
entertainment costs signifi-
cantly ballooned from $61,285

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW



GiBpsoOoN

in 2002 to $232,000 in 2003?

Although there was a mora-
torium on public sector hir-
ing during much of the PLP’s
governance, cronyism seems
to have reigned supreme at
BAIC, as 22 new employ-
ees/contractual staff were
employed in 2003, thereby
causing the corporation to be
overstaffed. This subsequent-
ly led to an increasing month-
ly payroll which spiked at an
astounding $140,000!

Mr Cartwright also
expressed concerns that there
was very little movement in
the collection of micro-loans.
Further illustrating the topsy-

._ turvy, do-nothing atmosphere

at the micro-loan facility, the
minister said that it was out
of control!

“There were significant
breaches as far as documen-
tation and overall administra-
tion of the programme were
concerned,” Mr Cartwright
said.

The audited reports of the
activities at BAIC in
2003/2004 gives the impres-
sion that Bahamian taxpayers
were grossly abused. Instead
of encouraging sustainable
development, the public’s
purse was apparently used to
pay for swanky trips, gourmet
dishes and questionable hir-
ing practices! Between 2003
and 2004, the fishermen-and

‘farmers, for whom the corpo-

ration was established, seem
to have been woefully
neglected instead of being giv-

en much desired assistance.

-— Crime — a national crisis

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

EMInSU
elt haa

t appears that more than a handful of Bahamians have
seemingly lost their moral compass and gone insane!

The murderous, sadistic state of affairs presently afflicting the
Bahamas is nothing short of nightmarish. If the current crime
wave continues unabatedly, our nation is on the brink of out-
right anarchy!

The vicious spate of brutal crimes plaguing our society is a
manifestation of more complex social ills—for e.g., absentee
fathers/parents, poor socialization, low academic achievement,
too much exposure to violence and poor conflict resolution skills.
When children spend hour after hour killing each other in violent
video games and listening to music that encourages violence, it
seems that they assume that they can take the same approach in
reality. In our schools, I have heard daily conversations by students
that centre around who among them can fight, which of them can
beat the other and who won a recent brawl. It is high time that par-
ents are also held responsible for the actions of their children.

Staggeringly, one in every 232 Bahamians, primarily young
men, are in prison. For the most part, it appears that Bahamians
have lost all value for life. Further, under no conditions should dan-
gerous offenders be granted bail.

Crime is out of control, but yet our MPs spent a week blowing
hot air and wasting time fighting over semantics. Even more, as the
crime rate soars, the Christian Council is conveniently quiet or
barely talking, with no action. It appears that many churches are ~
doing nothing, but collecting funds! Last night’s prayer vigil,
which was orchestrated by Dr David Allen, was an indication
that crime has finally grabbed the attention of civic leaders.

Two and a half weeks ago, I spoke to a friend who expressed his
grievances about a recent concert held at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports centre. Much commotion had been made about the arrival
of Jamaican singer Jah Cure (Siccature Alcock) who was recent-
ly released from statesville (July 28) after serving an eight-year sen-
tence for rape, robbery and gun possession.

My friend—a popular motivational speaker and gospel artist—
said that what was worse was secing that in the midst of the crime
crisis our nation now faces, national corporations such as BTC and
the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas saw fit to proudly
sponsor a concert headlined by a convicted criminal. According to
him, a gospel concert (FamFest), that featured Bahamian
gospel/motivational artists and encouraged family unity, was
repeatedly snubbed by BTC and several other corporations when
the promoter sought their sponsorship. In the end, the promoters
of FamFest footed an exorbitant bill, particularly since the concert
was free of charge. It was quite disappointing to hear that our
national companies would choose to support a venue headlined by
a convicted rapist instead of positive-minded, young Bahamians.

Undoubtedly, the US embassy is extremely apprehensive about
the level of violent crimes and could soon issue a travel advisory
on the Bahamas. Once an advisory is issued, our already waning
tourist numbers would diminish even more.

1 ama proponent of capital punishment, | am certain that the
death penalty and the cat-o-nine tails, if utilized, would serve as an
ever-present deterrent inthe minds of offenders. Capital punish-
: ment is cited in law, and therefore, after aconvieted murderer has
RUE ani BS SOUT tt . lost all appeals and been sentenced to death, his execution should

hae ans be forthwith.
As a 23-year-old young man, Lam personally appealing to my
peers to stop the violence with the hope that they would read
today’s paper or be told of my petition, The future of our country
and our economy is vt stake, as more than ever before, crime has
weakened the social fabric of our nation and many Bahamians are
again living in fear,

OP RUS



At Master Technicians & Best Buy Furniture, where we've 90
AMAL MUR cl MEMEO MMR ria old Mme) ome HEL AL i: 1 ATo
PMO ee icl eral eM aC NANT l=) Oem coli mae AU 9-10 3

EE OR CAC CEE UrCeMe TCM ltl iet a CU: Siac ne
Pek RMR OK on NO) (A MIRON NACHE AOC TNC HCB ON (LT

{

BUR UCL ng

MC COMORSCMCR ORM EC CmCcnr msc den mata

CUR Ce ees MRO RRL omc LUM dale alec polo) ty a
- WIN 1 of 5 Brand New Vehicles! so COME'IN, SPIN and WIN!

At Master Technicians & Best Buy Furniture, Rules and restrictiong may apply. See in'store for details.

i LULL SM CerLs
393.5310 / 394.2378

www.mastertechbahamas:com
MASA l ther Lr Wut Oat









wonagg iW Rud Merinu:.

THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 9



Foul play suspected in security

officer's disappearance

FROM page one

rooms in the school’s Adminis-
tration Building.

A team of detectives and
scenes of crime officials were
at the school conducting inves-
tigations when students and
ieachers arrived for class at
sam.

School Principal Sheryl
Campbell said school was dis-

‘missed around 8.30am due to

the circumstances.

Assistant Superintendent of
Police Loretta Mackey, report-
ed that police located Mr Pedi-
can’s van licensed number 431
sometime Thursday morniiig in
the Hawksbill area.

Mr Pedican, a resident of No
3 Samoa Drive, Royal Bahamia
Estates, had been employed as
a school security guard for 15
years in the public school sys-
tem. He was also employed full
time with Wide World For-
warding for many years.

Supt Mackey said he was last
seen by a family member at
midnight on Wednesday,
November, 21, when he left his
residence for work at Eight
Mile Rock High School.

Ms Mackey said he was dis-
covered missing around 6.50am
when a security officer arrived
for duty at the school to relieve
him, but could not locate him.

According to Stephen
Plakaris, deputy director of
school security with the Min-
istry of Education, Mr Pedican
was stationed at Eight Mile
Rock High on the midnight to
8am shift.

He reported that security
records indicate that he had
reported for duty at 11.53pm
on Wednesday. Mr Plakaris said
due to manpower shortages
only one ofticer is stationed at
the schools in the evening
hours.

Principal Campbell said she
received a call at home around
7am on Thursday from a secu-
rity officer who reported that
there had been a break-in in the
guidance counsellor’s office sit-
uated in the Administration
Building.

The officer, she ‘said,
informed her that it appeared
that the culprit/culprits had
gained access through the back
door and then gained access to
the office.

“Fle also said that blood was
on the floor in the guidance
counsellor’s room, and that Mr
Pedican’s shoes were on the
floor, and that his walky-talky
radio was in the senior head-
master’s room,” said’ Mrs
Campbell.

Mrs Campbell said that Mr
Pedican was a very dedicated
and professional officer.

“He doesn’t leave the school
until an administrator arrives at
8am. And, when [I arrived this
morning I was unable to gain
access to the staff room, but I
saw his bedding still there and

his shoes were still there, so we
are just trusting and praying
that he is alive.

“I know he is not well
because some blood on the
floor has given us some indica-
tion that something has hap-
pened,” she said.

Mrs Campbell said school
should resume as normal on Fri-
day.

Investigators left with several
bags of evidence and wrapped
up their investigations at the
school around 11.50am.

School security officers and
Mr Pedican’s colleagues at the
Wide World Forwarding were
not taking the news well. “We
are ina state of shock over this
unfortunate news and are pray-

. ing for him,” said a colleague

at Wide World Forwarding.

Supt Mackey said Mr Pedi-
can is described as 6°?” tall, of
slim built and mediunr brown
complexion. He is b:ild and has
a black and grey beard.

Persons are asked call 350-
3107/8, 352-9774/5 or 911 with
any information in relation to
the maiter.

Police are also continuing
investigations iio the murders
of Kenneth Lightbourne 45, and
businessman Gifford Martin Jr

2, who were Grand Bahama’s

ninth and 10th homicides for

the year.

Former minister speaks out over botched housing development

FROM page one

the start as the developer failed to comply with
the Private Roads and Subdivision Acct, failed to
apply for Building Permits by the submission of
plans by approved qualified architects/assistants
in compliance with the Ministry oi Works build-
ing control regulations,” he said.

Mr Roberts acknowledged, as Mr Foulkes pre-
viously asserted, that a letter from the Town
Planning Committee of the Ministry of Works
did grant approval in principle for a subdivision
which was to be known as Stephen's Close in
September 2005.

Mr Foulkes told The Tribune earlier this month
that it was on the basis of this letter that the
developers were able to proceed

However, Mr Roberts claimed: “As is the
norm, the approval in principle was made subject
to certain conditions, including the installation
of infrastructure or posting of a bond to.ensure



Monday November 26th,





C

COMMORNWEALT BANC



the actual instailation of such infrastructure. Nei-
ther of these steps was ever taken and final
approval was never granted.

“Yet the sale of lots did take place and the
construction of houses began, even though no
requests for permits were submitted for such
buildings and therefore no permits were ever
granted by the ministry.

“Upon the discovery of the illegal construc-
tion by the building control division of the Min-
istry of Works, a stop order was issued by the
Ministry of Works on November 21, 2005,” he
said.

Mr Roberts said that to date, the families that
invested in the housing scheme have yet to receive
their home or a refund of their money.

“It is clear that the land is useless to the parties
concerned and immediate action is required to
bring long overdue relief and full reimbursement
and damages to ali the families caught up in this
disgraceful saga,” he said.

m In addition to regular
discounts all 2007 models now
receive $1,000.00 cash
fem Zot tme Aas!

rebate



customer

ey Cis

mecey? Nees ee 200

_ Friday, November 23rd 2007) © eo
Centre at) uC AUG
Ss Nassau

For more information and =
ticket information contact:
SELLS CYC CMe y eS eC shi) lls



‘AUTO EXTRAVAGANZA

8:00 am - 5:30 pm



yg J

we
Mh
Wy
Yili

Commonwealth Bank along with J.S. Johnson on site will be there on the spot.

Refreshments, Test Drives, Special Prices & More

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co. Ltd. :

Montrose Ave.
Phone: 322-1722/Fax: 326-7452







PAGE 10, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
Where’s Solomon?

July 2-9, 1828. Along the south bank of the
Ohio River, Kentucky. ;

THE-STORY.SO FAR:..When Jesse over-
hears the Smiths talk about keeping Louisa and
Solomon, she decides to trick them with a copy of
Papa’s letter.

After a long time, Mr. Smith clears his throat
and frowns. “Don’t look like a man’s hand,” he
says.

“Papa dictated it to me. He couldn’t read or
write.” I point to the wax. “That’s his seal.”

Mr. Smith shoves the diary toward his wife.
“You puzzle it out.” Mrs. Smith reads the way
Louisa does, mouthing the words. “Read so I
can hear,” Mr. Smith says.

Mrs. Smith reads out loud. When she’s fin-
ished, tears roll down her cheeks. “My daddy was
a Mason,” she says. “He took a vow to help wid-
ows and orphans.” She looks at Mr. Smith.
“Their papa asks the Masons to give his children
safe passage. We have to let them go.”

J want to dance a jig, but instead I keep a sugary
smile pasted on my face. “Thank you for your
kindness, ma’am.” I point to the gun, propped
beside their pallet. “Do you like our grandpa’s
Kentucky rifle? The government gave it to him
for bravery.”

- Mr. Smith’s cheeks turn as red as his hair. “I
was fixing to clean it for you,” he says. “It’s a
beauty. Your grandpa must have been a good
man.”

Even though my heart is beating like partridge
wings, I thank him sweetly.

Later that morning we leave with our bellies full
of porridge, the rifle clean and polished, and.a
new wheel spoke. Moses is too lame to ride Pearl,
so he sits beside me in the wagon while his mare
trots behind. The minute we turn onto the trail,
Moses and I howl with laughter. Louisa and
Solomon scramble forward.

“What’s so funny?” Louisa asks.

“Your sister really fooled those people,” Moses
says, nearly choking. He explains how I faked a
copy of Papa’s letter.

Louisa squeezes between us on the seat. “Did
they want ta steal us?”

» “Yes. But Jesse was too smart for them.”

My cheeks feel warm. I’m not used to hearing
praise from Moses.

“But they seemed nice. Mrs. Smith sang to me,
like Mama.” Louisa buries her head on my shoul-
der, “J didn’t mean to tell that we’re orphans,”

er)

Sin

she says.

I pat her knee. “I know. Just be careful next
time.”

A week later we’re creeping along a ridge road
to escape the valley mud. It’s been raining for two
days. We’re all cranky, especially Moses. We've
pulled quilts around our heads to keep off the
rain and mosquitoes. Our cornmeal is wet, and
our salt pork is nearly gone.

Suddenly Sadie’s ears go flat against her head.
Pearl shies, and we hear a noise like a tornado-
but there’s no wind. As the wagon inches forward
the sound becomes a roar. My stomach clenches.
“What is it?” Louisa cries.

We pull up on the edge of a bluff. The noise
comes from a foaming chute in the muddy Ohio
River. Solomon screeches as if he’s been stung,
jumps from the wagon, and runs to the edge of the
bluff. “Look! A boat on fire!” We hurry after
him. A huge boat, with two smoking chimneys,
steams down the river toward a landing above
the rapids. “What is it?” Solomon asks.

“A steamboat.” Moses’s eyes are as big as
Solomon’s. “Papa told me about them. he fire
runs the boat.”

“Can we ride it?” Solomon asks.

Moses shakes his head. “We need our money to
buy food in Louisville.”

Solomon starts to cry, and the rain falls harder,
as if the sky is crying, too. [ take'a deep breath. “If
we sold Pearl, we’d have enough money to travel
by boat awhile—and to buy more food.” I know





it’s mean, but I keep talking. “Traveling in the rain
is miserable—and you can’t even ride Pearl now.”

Moses’s mouth is set straight, like he’s caught
Sadie’s stubbornness. “Pearl’s my mare, my jew-
el. I raised her. And I won’t be lame forever.”

I wonder. His ankle is still swollen, as if he
stepped into a hornet’s nest. “Pearl eats more than
the mule,” I say. “And there’s no grass in the
woods. What if we never get home?”

“Don’t say that,” Louisa pleads.

Just then, smoke puffs from the two chimneys
and the boat eases into the landing. Solomon
pats Moses on the shoulder. “The boat’s turning
upstream. Please can we ride it?”

To my surprise, Moses pulls himself up tall.
“Allright,” he says. “A boat is faster than a poky
mule. Maybe someone getting off that steamer
needs a good horse.” I touch his arm and try to
thank him, but Moses brushes me off. I guess he
doesn’t want my sympathy.

In a few hours we've sold Pearl to a man head-
ed west. Moses kisses the white patch on Pearl’s
nose and turns his back as the man leads her
away. Her sharp whinnies make my eyes sting,
and Moses’s chin trembles as he tucks some mon-
ey into my hand. “Buy four tickets to Cincin-
nati,” he says.

Moses studies our rough map while the crew
loads barrels and crates. “We’re leaving Papa’s
route,” he says. “How will we find the Licking
River?”

“Don't worry,” | say. “Someone on the boat



- This Breakfast Serials story is
- sponsored by

THE TRIBUNE



Aad peta

will tell us.” The crowd pushes us toward the
gangway. Sparks rain from the steamer’s chim-
neys. Solomon bounces with excitement.

Moses ties his bandana over Sadie’s eyes, but
she balks and prances as we pull her through the
crowd onto the ship. A whistle sounds so loud I
clap my hands over my ears. When I uncover
them, Louisa is tugging on my skirt. “Jesse,” she
yells, “the puppy’s gone!” .

“He’s not with you?” .

She shakes her head, biting her lip. The whistle
shrieks again and Louisa wails, “Where’s
Solomon?”

I rush to the railing and shove through the
crowd as the steamer chugs away from the shore.

_ “Solomon!” I scream.

The only answer is the boat’s piercing whistle.
(Continued on Tuesday)

Text copyright © 2007 Liza Ketchum
Illustrations copyright © 2007 C. B. Mordan
Reprinted by permission of

Breakfast Serials, Inc.

www. breakfastserials.com

se UBS




rein



~ THE TRIBUNE

PRIDAR So wethie

v, 2007, PAGE 11

Two students are in |

hospital, one is in
custody after reported |
stabbing incident

FROM page one

clusive up to press time, Ms
Williams told The Tribune
during a telephone interview
yesterday that three male stu-
dents between the ages of 14
to 16 were involved. v

Reportedly a male student
accosted two other students,
stabbing one in his “side” and
the other in his upper arm
before security staff on cam-
pus were able to catch the
juvenile, Ms Williams said.
Quick thinking security staff
apprehended the assailant and
the weapon used during the
stabbing as he tried to flee the
scene.

“Well there was a stabbing

(at the school). It appears to

» be gang related but we’re not

sure. This gang thing seems to
be gaining new strength, but
we are encouraging (students)
not to mimic what is evident in
the wider society.”

Ms Williams indicated that
possible gang rivalry started
outside of the school’s cam-
pus may have been the impe-
tus for the incident. In spite
of this recent spurt of violence
at the Marathon Estates cam-
pus, she contended that a vio-
lence “preventative pro-
gramme” introduced to the
school last year is having pos-
itive and evident effects.

“(The incident) did not
escalate to the level that it
could have in the past. I feel

very proud of my students and
teachers who worked hard to
control the situation — it was-
n’t a chaotic situation.”

The programme is geared
to teach students about being
responsible for their own
actions, however the principal
noted that no matter how
effective it was it could
not reach every at risk stu-
dent.

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans, press liaison
officer, in a telephone inter-
view confirmed with The Tri-
bune that “a stabbing inci-
dent” occurred on the school’s
campus but the medical con-
dition of the two students who
were injured was not known
up to press time.

PLP chairman won't offer
himself for re-election

FROM page one

was pondering the possibility of offering himself

in the last general election. Whether he will do
so in next general election is yet to be seen.
Yesterday marked the fifth year of his elec-
tion to the post of National Chairman of the
PLP, and as Mr Rigby said, his decision not to

offer again for the post only came after “care-

ful” thought and consideration. ° ’

In a short statement from his ‘office, Mr Rig-

by said it was “a great privilege” to have served
as the National Chairman for the past five years,
allowing him the opportunity to work tireless-
ly to build a stronger PLP:

Bristol Wine & Spirits Stores Locations:

GLADSTONE ROAD
BLAKE ROAD
EAST BAY

PRINGE CHARLES

“I have formed many lasting friendships with
sO many party supporters and Bahamians across
our country.

“It was truly a wonderful experience, and I
am ever grateful to have been afforded the
opportunity to play a role in the building of

my party and our country.
“TI look forward to continuing to serve my

_ country so as to ensure that we build a Bahamas

based on the principles of fairness, peace and
equal opportunity for all,” his statement read.

- Currently, PLP MP for Englerston Glenys
Hanna-Martin, Paulette Zonicle, and PLP new-
comer Omar Archer‘are the only three per-
sons to officially announce’ their intention to
vie for the post of chairman.

eS a

Independent Locations:
MILO BUTLER (Blue Hill)

BEST DEALS (Augusta Street)
LIGHTBOURNE & SON (Dunmore Ave)
BASE ROAD (Nassau Street)

WULFF ROAD L/S (Wulff Road)

Prayers for “wounded
souls’ at candlelight vigil

FROM page one

of hope and freedom to shine through,” he said.

Dr Allen said that the gathering was an affir-
mation that love is stronger than death and
“many waters cannot quench it.”

“But like Dostoyevsky we realize that, ‘love in
action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared
with love in dreams’. We come to reclaim the
freedom to love openly and enjoy the privileges
of our chosen relationships.

“We come to reclaim the safety of our homes:

where our children can grow up in an atmos-



SUPERIOR/GOLD
400z for 1 a & RECEIVE



phere of love and follow their dreams. We come
to take back the night and reclaim the beauty
and splendour of the Bahamaland left to us by
our ancestors.

“Ladies and gentlemen, with heavy hearts
and burdened spirits, we gather here tonight to
mourn the loss of so many of our brothers and
sisters who have succumbed to the cruel rav-
ages of murder and violent crimes.

“Overwhelmed by the ongoing human atroc-
ities, we lament in the words of William Butler
Yeats: ‘Things fall apart, the centre cannot
hold’,” Dr Allen said.



BACARDI ard te Gat Devtce are registered tadernarks of Bacents & Company Lid.







PAGE 12, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE -



LOCAL NEWS



HEALTH MINISTER TOURS FACILITIES IN MANGROVE CAY AND DEEP SOUTH

Andros clinics

@ By Gladstone Thurston

Residents of the South
Andros community can look
forward to improved health care
facilities, Minister of Health and
the Environment Dr Hubert
Minnis, said.

Following a tour of public
clinics in Mangrove Cay and the
Deep South on Wednesday, Dr
Minnis promised to address
“serious” concerns “in a very
rapid manner.”

“It is my job to ensure that
there is absolutely no discrimi-
nation in the delivery of med-
ical care throughout the
Bahamas,” said Dr Minnis.

He was accompanied by
South Andros MP Picewell
Forbes, consultant Dr Baldwin
Carey, health undersecretary
Michael Turner, community
physician Dr Swamy Atluri,
administrator Neil Campbell,
chief councillors Zebedee Rolle
and Brian Moxey, deputy direc-
tor of Environmental Health
Services Thomasina Wilson,
project engineer Henry Moxey
and medical staff.

Dr Minnis also met with
Health and Environmental Ser-
vices’ South Andros staff and
local government officials.

“From what I heard from the
minister, I am very optimistic,”
said Mr Forbes. “There has
been much concern over the
past years about repairs to our
clinics. 1 am very hopeful that
we can look forward to some
results in South Andros very
shortly.”

The modern and spacious
Miriam Greene Clinic was con-
structed several years ago in the
Johnson Bay area in the Deep
South.

However, it had to be aban-
doned because the roof leaks.
The ceiling has now collapsed,
and the floor is being eroded
due to flooding.

The clinic has since been
moved to comfortable rental
facilities in The Bluff where
many other government offices

_ are located.

Nursing officer Andrea Lin-
den of the Department of Public
Health reported that there has
been an almost 100 per cent
increase in the number of

patients seen since then.
“What that shows is accessi-
bility and once more patients





Gladstone Thurston/BIS

UNUSED: Dr Hubert Minnis (right) and consultant Dr Baldwin Carey
found a great deal of unused material during their tour of South Andros
clinics on Wednesday.

UNDER Secretary in the Ministry
of Health and the Environment
Michael Turner has his say during
a meeting in South Andros.

are coming out,” said Dr Minnis.
“That in itself is prevention.”

Dr Minnis said relocating the
Miriam Greene Clinic to The
Bluff “is worth looking at.”

“One has to look at making
the clinic more accessible,” he
said, “and once it is more acces-
sible to the community, what
you would find is that just like
how your volume had increased
by 100 per cent, your hospitali-
sation would decrease by 100
per cent. And that’s basically
what you want to do.

“It is our job to keep you
away from hospitals, and clin-
ics and prevention does that.”

Dr Minnis said he was “more
than shocked” at the amount of
medical equipment left unused
in the closed clinic.

CIVIL engineer Henry Moxey (right) explains to Dr Hubert Minnis (left) the layout of the new public dump in Man-



Deep South Chief Councillor
Zebedee Rolle said he was
“very impressed with the con-
cern that Dr Minnis has shown
about to healthcare throughout
South Andros.”

Constant flooding and a fire
three years ago closed Man-
grove Cay’s main clinic at
Dorsett’s.

For a while the clinic was relo-
cated to a church centre while a
nurses’ residence was being ren-
ovated to accommodate it.

However, the nurses’ resi-
dence is situated on a steep
incline which makes it difficult
for patients to access. It has no
wheelchair ramp.

“Whatever the problems with
the clinic, the people would like
to see them resolved,” said
Councillor Moxey. “We need
our clinic repaired.

“I feel comfortable, though,
that Minister Minnis is going to
deliver. I see him a man of
action.”

Mangrove Cay is also getting
a new and modern public
garbage disposal system.

“IT can say with confidence
that you have an excellent dump
site that is being developed with
modern technology,” said Dr
Minnis.

“Once everything goes as
planned then you would not
have any problems in the future
as we have had in the past in
Nassau with dump fires.”

bald

grove Cay, Andros. Also pictured are consultant Dr Baldwin Carey and Chief Councillor Brian Moxey.

oe

nF
oH Hi









na

co
_|a
i ec
f oO
iv | =
Aisle Y
ni? | =
=

—

@

‘=

So

—

n”

uc
ae | =
|

SHOCKED: Dr Hubert Minnis (right) said he was “shocked” by the large amount of medical equipment left unused
in South Andros clinics which had to be abandoned, like this new incubator. Pictured from left are community
physician Dr Swamy Atluri, nursing officer Andrea Linden, and South Andros MP Picewell Forbes.























































Ssatived Wires

Ghawigaane/Sparkling Winte Special



USAT ES







MOL LMI.

GE



TRIBUNE



LDL ELLE

“ERIDAY,



NOVEMBER 23,
























































ver'y close’ to
TORE UCT

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor



BAHA MAR’S $2.4
billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment is “very, very
close” to getting all the
Government approvals
and permits it needs to
finally proxceed with the
full go-ahead of the pro-
ject.

Highly-placed sources
told The Tribune yester-
day that Baha Mar was
hoping to obtain all the
necessary documents and
permits before Christ-
mas, a schedule that the
Albany developers are
also understood to be
working to, the latter
seeking to re-start con-
struction in the New
Year.

In Baha Mar’s case,
initial bids on the con-
tract for the re-routing of
West Bay Street are due
in on December 1, 2007, °
with the developers
anticipating that they will
“imminently” receive the
final approvals necessary
from the Government
and the Office of the
Prime Minister.

Baha Mar has been
seeking to negotiate a
supplemental Heads of
Agreement with the
Government to account
for the fact that the cost
of its proposed project



billion to $2.4 billion.
The April 6, 2005, Heads
of Agreement signed
between Baha Mar and
the Christie government
was for a $1 billion pro-
ject.
According to that
Heads of Agreement,
before the West Bay
Street road re-routing
was to take place, Baha
Mar had to show the
Government it had con-

SEE page 7B



Council told: Still
approve Baker’s Bay

permits on ‘merit’ only

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has urged
the Hope Town District Coun-
cil to keep reviewing permit
applications submitted by the
Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean
Club and approve them only on
“merit”, despite the threat of
legal action hanging over the
council.

A letter from the Ministry of
Lands and Local Government,
which was sent to Cephas
Cooper, administrator of the
central Abaco district, and
Hope Town District Council’s
chief councillor, Jeremy Sweet-
ing, urged the council to con-
tinue reviewing and assessing
all planning and approval appli-
cations submitted by the Guana
Cay-based Baker’s Bay project.

Mr Sweeting yesterday told
The Tribune that the Govern-
ment’s letter backed the posi-
tion he had been advocating
from the start, and could “clear
a lot of things up”.

In particular, he indicated
that it might address the con-
cerns held by three of the Hope
Town District’s seven council-
lors, who had wanted written
central government confirma-
tion that they can still deal with
the developers’ submissions
amid the threat of litigation -
and possible liability - by the
Save Guana Cay Reef Associ-
ation and its attorney, Callen-
ders & Co partner Fred Smith.

This had split the council
right down the middle, and

“slowed down” the processing
of permit and approval appli-
cations for the 175 million

Chamber ‘very concerned’
about 6.5% goods cost rise

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Chamber of Commerce
will seek the newly-appointed
US Ambassador’s help in try-
ing to persuade Florida not to
repeal its 6.5 per cent sales tax
exemption on goods exported
to the Bahamas, its president

‘ yesterday telling The Tribune

he was “very concerned” about
the negative inflationary and
cost of living implications.
Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is
also Superwash’s president, said
the likelihood that Florida’s Tax
and Budget Reform Commis-
sion would place eliminating the
export sales tax exemption on
the ballot presented to Florida
voters in November 2008 would
be “one of the items” raised by
the Chamber when it met with
US Ambassador, Ned Siegel.

* ‘Momentum’ builds in Florida for repeal
of 6.5% sales tax exemption on goods

exported to Bahamas

* Chamber president to raise issue with US
Ambassador, as threatens to spark inflation,
price rises and increased cost of living

Mr D’Aguilar said he hoped
that Mr Siegel, himself a Florida
businessman, would be able to
use his contacts and influence
to assist the Bahamas in efforts
to protect the sales tax exemp-
tion.

If Florida removes the 6.5 per
cent sales tax exemption on
products shipped directly to this
nation, Mr D’ Aguilar said: “It’s
definitely going to add to the
cost of living. It’s a no-brainer.

The cost of shipping goods to
the Bahamas is going to
increase because of that, as a
lot of items and staples are
shipped to the Bahamas
through Florida.”

“[’m very concerned. 6.5 per
cent is a significant amount.”

According to the Department
of Statistics, in 2005, the last
year for which complete trade
data is available, the Bahamas
imported some $2.155 billion

has*increaséd from “$1F«

‘Very close’ on Albany
incentives, road diversion

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



NONE OF the offers for the acquisition of private
land to accommodate the road diversion for the
$1.3 billion Albany Golf & Beach Resort have been
accepted, The Tribune was told yesterday, although
the final details are still being completed, with the
project close to getting a final ‘go-ahead’.

David Davis, director of investments in the Office
of the Prime Minister, told Tribune Business yes-

~terday that while offers had been made to the

landowners whose property is being compulsorily
acuired for the road diversion, to date none had
been fully accepted.

“We are very close to dotting all the ‘i’s’ and
crossing all the ‘t’s’ in a sale,” he said yesterday.

Mr Davis explained that the way the process usu-
ally works is that the Government may request any-
where from one. to four appraisals, ‘and then the
offer is made to the homeowners based on those pro-
posals.

“However, I cannot say how many were done in
this case,” he said. The Tribune understands that out
of the three appraisals requested, two have been
completed and submitted to the Government, which
has acknowledged to the Albany developers it owns
the land.

Mr Davis pointed out that along with the issue of

property acquisitions for the road re-routing, the
other issue the Prime Minister’sOffice is working on

is the completion of the Hotels Encouragement Act
agreement for Albany.

“Despite what you may have heard regarding the
Government stalling, I can tell you that they [the
developers] would have had to negotiate an agree-
ment with whatever government was in office,” he
said.

“I do not know if they have all the permits and
everything. But we are confident that we are
very close to completing those two aspects of the
deal.”

The $1.3 billion Albany project, which was nego-
tiated and signed by the previous PLP administra-
tion, encompasses some 560 acres and includes a
rerouting of the South West Bay Street road, creat-
ing a private and exclusive community. Partners in

the deal are the Tavistock Group and golfers Tiger.

Woods and Ernie Els.

The property is to include 450-600 residences; a
small hotel; an 18 hole championship golf course; a
marina, berthing yachts up to 240 feet; an equestri-
an centre; and a beach club.

The realignment of the road and its junction is by
far the most controversial aspect of the develop-
ment, which the developers say is one of the most
crucial parts of the design.

At a recent government-sponsored town meeting
on both the Albany and South Ocean developments,
the most contentious issue was the road diversion,
with many people questioning why the project could
not proceed without it.



Dionisio eR

worth of goods from Florida,
some 84 per cent of its total
$2.567 billion import bill.

The total amount of goods

imported directly from Florida
was not detailed, but Mr
D’ Aguilar said that even it was
as low as $1 billion, a 6.5 per
cent sales tax imposed on that
figure would raise the cost of
goods imported into the
Bahamas by some $65 million
per annum - a major increase
that is likely to be a severe
underestimate.

Dividing that figure by
300,000, the estimated size of
the Bahamian population, and
this nation’s import bill will rise
by more than $200 per person -
every man, woman and child - if
Florida does away with the sales
tax. exemption.

Ryan Pinder, a Bahamian,
who is a tax specialist and attor-
ney and partner in the Florida-
based law firm, Becker & Poli-

SEE page 6B

Economy likely
to grow ‘lot less’
than 4% forecast

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy is likely to grow in 2008 by a “lot
less” than the 4 per cent forecast by the International Monetary
Fund (IMF) and the Government, a leading banking executive
told The Tribune yesterday, due to the impact the US ‘sub-
prime’ mortgage crisis and ‘global credit crunch would have on
tourism and foreign direct-investment projects. ssi

Anwer Sunderji, chairman and chief executive of Fidelity Bank
& Trust International, said Bahamians were “not connecting
the dots” linking the implications of a US economic downturn to
the Bahamian economy’s performance, with consumer and bank-
ing confidence having taken a big knock from events outside

this nation.

Mr Sunderji explained that the Bahamian economy was depen-
dent on two major factors: US tourists, who accounted for
between 85-90 per cent of visitors to this nation, and US-based
financial institutions, which lent to and financed Bahamas-based
mixed-use resort developments that were heavily dependent on

real estate sales/land speculation.

Some 70 per cent of US economic growth had been driven by
the consumer and his/her willingness to spend, Mr Sunderji
pointed out. In turn, this spending was dependent on the con-
sumer’s ability to borrow, something which in recent years had

SEE page 5B





Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean
Club.

With those three councillors
not wanting to deal with appli-
cations by the developer, Ati-
zona-based Discovery Land |
Company, until they received
government assurances, the
Hope Town District Council
had been split three:three, with
Mr Sweeting using his casting
vote to move the permits for-
ward.

Yet this ‘casting vote’ power
is only available when therc is
a tie, and when one councillor
was absent in August, the
three:two majority held by
those councillors seeking the
assurances meant a slew of
Baker’s Bay approvals were
delayed for one month.

Yet the ministry’s letter,
received on November 20, 2007,
from its permanent secretary,
Harrison Thompson, said that
under Section 14 (1) of the
Local Government Act 1996,
each district council apart from
those specified possessed the
same functions as those
assigned to the Town Planning
Committee under the Town
Planning Act’s provisions.

In addition, it said Subsection
1(b) of the Local Government
Act 1996 gave district councils
the power of the Building Con-
trol Officer to issue and grant
permits under the Building
Regulations Act.

’ Mr Thompson wrote: “he
above authority gives the coun-
cil the right to issue building
permits for all projects in their
district.

SEE page eight





think you can’t afford.

a mortgage?

; cell

Reality Check.

We have affordable loans with

low down payments,

and terms up to 30 years!

Call us in Nassau at 242 396 4040

or in Freeport at 242 352 3670.

Or log on to www.familyguardian.com today! °

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





Bs
"



PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a ee
Pay attention to your ‘deficit’

D O YOU suffer from
Attention Deficit

Disorder? This might be a
rather frivolous question to
ask someone in business. Yet
more and more research indi-
cates that our attention span
has lessened due to the con-
stant interruptions that are
now part of business life.

Attention deficit could kill
your business. And with over
500,000 small businesses clos-
ing every year in the US, the
chances of this happening are
increasing.

Internet marketer Rich
Schefren talks about the
demise of the information age,
and that it is now the atten-
tion age that is upon us. Get-
ting our attention is now the
most prized activity for mar-
keters today. It is also the
most prized activity for our
family, friends and co-work-
ers. Since the advent of e-
mail, instant messaging and
text messaging, we are
plugged into our communica-



tion networks from the time
we wake to the time we go to
bed.

The chief symptom of our
attention deficit is interrup-
tions. Every day we face a bar-
rage of interruptions from our
cell phones, pdas, pagers,
landlines, instant messaging,
work computers, home com-
puters, laptops, blogs, rss, e-
mails, the Internet and tex-
ting. The frequency of inter-
ruptions has increased through
our lifetime. The average
office worker is now inter-

Business

Sense

rupted for nearly two hours
every day. This is a stagger-
ing statistic. With-29 per cent
of our day broken up, it is no
wonder that our productivity
has suffered, and our life
reduced to a series of inter-
rupted interruptions!

How often have you been
interrupted by friends, fami-
ly, co-workers and partners
when you were trying to con-
centrate on something? With
an interruption occurring on
average every 11 minutes, we
have less and less time to

focus on and finish a specific
activity.

Peter Drucker, in The Effec-
tive Executive, wrote that to
do your job you need large
chunks of uninterrupted times,
as dribs and drabs of time -
even if they add up to the
same time - are not the same.
There are several reasons for
this.

Research shows that once
you get interrupted, it
becomes harder for you to get
back on track, as it can take
up to 25 minutes to refocus.
This is because our brains
work a bit like an old-fash-
ioned printing machine.
Every time you focus on a dif-
ferent task, you have to set up
the machine all over again,
which takes time.

Research also shows that
interruptions can wreak havoc
with our short-term memory.
After an interruption, 40 per
cent of the time we go off in
another direction. How often
do you stop and think: “What
was I just doing?" Getting dis-

WHEN NIGHT FALLS

LE Sd Od ol ca a

i oe ee ee ee

CRICKET

BACK FOR MORE =

In THE WEST

a)

JANUARY 2008

STANMFORD2020.C0OmM

tracted can be detrimental to
your efficiency and produc-
tivity.

According to Glenn Wilson,
a psychiatrist at Kings Col-
lege, London, constant inter-
ruptions also make you dumb-
er. He showed that a person’s
IQ dropped up to 10 per cent
during interruptions. It is
amazing to think that any
device which allows you to be
contacted at any time could
make you dumber, and could
limit your earning potential.
The trouble is that we are
addicted to these devices:

Constant interruptions lead
to multi-tasking, where we try
to juggle many different balls
at one time. Multi-tasking, in
itself ,is not a bad thing, but
the habit of not concentrating
and flitting from one thing to
another leads to disconnec-
tion, not connection. Think of
this type of activity as junk
food.

So how can we help our-
selves overcome our attention
deficit? Here are some tips to



hf

Bera baat



help you cope:

* Stop interrupting yourself
by reading e-mails, surfing,
instant messaging and chat-
ting on the phone. Fifty-five
per cent of office workers
open e-mails as soon as they
arrive. Turn your e-mail off
while you are working and
deal with it no more than
three times a day. Set your
Instant Messaging on Do Not
Disturb when you are work-
ing.

* Do one thing at a time,
and do it well without inter-
ruptions, Set 30-minute
chunks of uninterruptible

- time. When you have finished

each 30 minutes, take a break
and put that work aside for
the next chunk or later.

* Prepare a list of key things
you need to achieve today,
and block out time for each
of them.

* Have a countdown timer
when you do online research,
so that you limit your time to
these activities. Make a chart
and keep track of the time you
spend each day doing non-
productive tasks, such as e-
mailing, tinkering with new
technology, surfing, and
watching TV.

* Only review information
that you need now and don’t
waste your time assessing
things that you might need for
later, as it will probably be out
of date when you need it. Step
back and ask yourself whether
the information in front of you
is useful. Just stop researching
for one week and see if that
helps.

* When you are travelling,
turn off your pagers, cell
phones and laptops so that
you can spend more time
thinking. Someone once said
that no problem can withstand
the onslaught of continuous
thinking.

.* Resist buying technology
with too many features. You

“ will probably néver use them

all and you will have to spend
precious time reading the
manual. The more technology
we introduce in our lives, the
more training we need to do.

* Remember, more infor-
mation is not necessarily
advantageous. Knowing too
much can hurt. The mass of
information in the hands of
the US security services did
not prevent Pearl Harbour or
the September 11 attacks.
Malcolm Gladwell, in his book
Blink, shows that more infor-
mation does not necessarily
improve your decision-mak-
ing capabilities.

Attention deficit is a grow-
ing concern in our ‘junk food’
information-addicted society.
While businesses fail for many
reasons, poor management
decisions contribute to most
business failures. Avoid mak-
ing poor decisions by getting
control over your time and
productivity. Take some steps
today before your ADD
becomes incurable. You will
only have yourself to blame.

NB: This column is avail-
able as an eBook at
www.antipreneurship.com

Mark draws on 20 years of
top level business, marketing
and communications experi-
ence in London and the
Bahamas. He is chief operat-
ing officer of www.ezpze-
mail.com, currently lives in
Nassau, and can be contacted
at

markalexpalmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer.
All rights reserved



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 3B



ae
Customs ‘seriously

hindered’ lawful
bonded practices

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Customs Depart-
ment has “seriously hin-
dered” Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA)
licensees who have imple-
mented new, ‘lawful’ meth-
ods of selling ‘over-the-
counter bonded goods’ in
Freeport, a paper submitted
by the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce has
revealed.

The document, containing
recommendations for
resolving concerns on the
‘over-the-counter bonded
goods sales’ that are held by
both Customs and GBPA
licensees, said retailers and
wholesalers who had partic-
ipated in the Chamber’s sur-
vey of the practice did not
want to be identified for
fear that it would draw
undue attention from Cus-
toms.

Report

The report said: “It was a
recurring theme, among
many, but not all, that the
vendors did not want to be
identified in this report as
they feared that being iden-
tified would precipitate
them being investigated,
their imports delayed, or
their business interfered
with by Customs.

“They were also unwilling
to be the ‘first’ to imple-
ment a new, lawful, method
of dealing with ‘over-the-
counter-bonded sales, as
they were concerned that
Customs would, as they
_ have done in the past and

BSi

continue to do so, apply a
policy upon them that was
not based on any lawful
authority, but would be a
serious hindrance to their
business.”

The Chamber report,
though, acknowledged that
“Customs must be provid-
ed with the necessary tools
to protect the revenue of
the country”, and had a
duty to investigate fraud,
although they were pre-
vented by Justice Stanley
Moore’s 2002 Supreme
Court judgment from con-
ducting audits of GBPA
licensees.

The report acknowledged
that fraud could be commit-
ted in respect to over-the-
counter bonded goods sales,
particularly with GBPA
licensees purchasing goods
under their bond and then
using them for personal use
or re-selling them outside
Freeport - uses not permit-
ted under the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, and

under which they become *

regarded as ‘consumables’
where import/customs duty
must be paid.

Fraud might also occur,
the Chamber found, when a
customer who was not a
valid signing authority pro-
duced a purchase order
from a GBPA licensee.

Over-the-counter bonded
goods sales involve the sale
of bonded items, which are
imported into Freeport free
from import and customs
duties, by a GBPA licensee
and then sold duty-free to
another licensee, provided
the goods are for use in

their business and do not go ©

outside Freeport.

Customs has seen over-
the-counter bonded goods
sales as depriving the Gov-
ernment of. much-needed
revenue, while the GBPA
licensees have viewed the
Department’s “arbitrary”
attempts to interfere with
the practice and impose
conditions on them as an
unreasonable intrusion into
and interference with their
business.

The Chamber report said:
“Customs has voiced some
concern with respect to the
practice of ‘over-the-
counter sale of bonded
goods’, as they view it as a
possible source of revenue
loss.

Decisions

“Both the licensees and
Customs are frustrated that
there is no set standard with
which the practice is being
managed, and Customs has
made some arbitrary deci-
sions with respect to those
goods.

“A standardised, accept-
able mechanism must be
established for the manage-
ment and reporting of ‘over-
the-counter sale of bonded
goods’ that does not subju-
gate the rights of the
licensees of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority,
while still protecting the
legitimate revenue collec-
tion of the Government of
the Bahamas.

“This mechanism must be
the same for all vendors and
must be derived from with-
in the laws of the Bahamas
and the terms of the
Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.”

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

' BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently accepting

applications for

HEAD RISK MANAGEMENT

Applicants for the position of Head Risk Management must have banking or
financial degree and at least 10 years of experience in the offshore banking sector,
fluency in Italian, French and knowledge of German, proven leadership and
management experience, ability to partner with team members, and have thorough
knowledge of local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international

banking practices.

PERSONAL QUALITIES :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Positive attitude and outlook .

Problem-solving skills

Financial and analytical background
Ability to coach and have mentoring skills
Commitment to quality and service excellence

RESPONSIBILITIES :-

Ability to partner with other managers for the development and implementation
of Risk Management strategies and practices

Supervision and monitoring of the credit exposure
Supervision of credit department: review loan proposals/reports for risk, quality
and credit policy compliance
Liaise and network at group level and with external professionals on matters

related to the position

Responsibility for Central Filing, Credits, Compliance & Internal Controls

units

Supervision of the outgoing reports to regulatory bodies and to group internal

entities

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum

vitae to :-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road

P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 702 1253 or email: julie.benjamin@bsiob.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.





POSITION AVAILABLE
INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS SUPERVISOR

| A brokers & agency company [an affiliate of a large established company] is looking for an Administrative

| Supervisor. The ideal candidate must be detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent organizational,

} interpersonal and communication skills. The ability to work with limited supervision in a fast-paced progressive
i environment is a must. ;

|

| Responsibilities:
| Receive and submit for processing applications for Home Insurance [property] and other insurance plahs
Liaise with sub-agents on all application issues
Maintenance of database .
Liaise with Underwriters and Customer Service departments to ensure accurate application processing
Generate monthly reports on issued contracts
Reconciliation of premiums
Prepare and issue completed quotes and Certificates of Insurance
Handing Internal.and External client queries
Supervise Administrative support for all general issues

| Core Competencies:
| Ability to work with limited supervision andleam new skils quickly
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Ability to resolve problems with a sense of urgency
Demonstrate a keen eye for details
Abllity to work under pressure
Strong interpersonal skills and ability to maintain a harmonious relationship with co-workers
Ability to maintain confidentiality
Reliable, dependable and flexible team-player

| Required Qualifications:
Bachelors Degree in Business Administration or related field or equivalent work experience.
3+ years experience in a similar position
Excellent computer skills and proficiency in Excel required
Relevant General insurance designations for pats thereof] a plus

Benefits:
Salary commensurate with current salary scales, skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including Life, Health and
Pension.

Submit Resume to Human Resources Administrator, P.O. Box N-4815, Nassau
Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to dlparker@live.com

US ED

Metropolitan Bank
(Bahamas) Limited

Senior Accountant

An Asian based banking group (“Metrobank”) is currently recruiting for a Senior
Accountant. This person will be one of a small team working for the Metrobank
subsidiary in Nassau. The Bank has a full banking license in the Bahamas and is
expanding it Nassau based operations.

The qualified applicant should have the following Qualifications:

¢ Acollege degree (or equivalent) from a recognized four year program in
accounting or business related topics or qualification as a Chartered Accountant
/ Certified Public Accountant or other similar qualification.

¢ Have 3- 5 years of prior work experience in the areas of banking and or
accounting

¢ An advanced understanding of accounting and accounting applications (CPA
preferred but not required)

e Strong analytical skills

° Possess a good understanding of investments and securities

¢ Exceptional written and verbal communication skills

¢ An advanced understanding of Excel & Word applications

¢ Fluency in Tagalog (written and verbal) is not a requirement but is a “plus”
for this post.

This position will encompass the Duties:

¢ Handle all aspects of the accounting matters of the Bank as they pertain to
the record keeping of the Nassau based operations.
Prepare the monthly financial statements of the Bank and report on these to
Senior Management
Assist with the day to day operations of the Bank
Be the Bank’s contact person for Head Office Treasury and other Head Office
points of contact as it relates to accounting matters
Assist with ensuring that the Bank is in compliance with the requirements of
the Central Bank of The Bahamas
Assist with coordinating monthly management meetings with officers of the
Bank
Draft procedural documents as considered necessary
Prepare an annual budget forecast for the Bank and monitor actual versus
budget results ,
Coordinate the external audit of the Bank
Assist with coordinating inspections of the Bank by the Central Bank of The
Bahamas and other regulators as required

This Company offers a competitive compensation package and salary will be
consummate to experience of the applicant.

Qualified and interested candidates should submit their resume with salary history to Metropolitan
Bank (Bahamas) Limited attention Ms. Jacqueline Bain, P.O. Box CR-56766, Suite 700, New
Providence Financial Center, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, fax 242-394-2142, e-mail
jacquie @ metrobankbahamas.com



PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







2007/2008 Officers & Directors

President

Kristina M. Fox, CFA

CIT Holdings Ltd

PO Box SS-19140, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 363 1501 Bay. (242) 363 1802

Email kteitco.uk



Vice-President

David Ramirez, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.

PO Box N-4873, Nassau Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 2217 Fay: (242) 327 6610)

Emaildramiftzic pictet.com




Treasurer
Christopher Dorsett, CFA

Citigroup Corporate & Investment Bank

PO Box N 8158, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 8668 Fax: (242) 302 8569
Email: Christopher.a.dorsett( citigroup.com



Sceretary

Sonia Beneby, CFA

ScotiaTrust

PO Box N 3016, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 502 $700 Fax: (242) 326 099]
Email: sonia.benebywscotiatrust.com

Programming

Karen Pinder, CFA

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.

PO Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 502 5400 Fax: (242) 502 5428
Email: karen.pinder@efgbank.com

Education

Pamela Musgrove, CFA

Colina Financial Advisors, Ltd.

PO Box CB 12407, . Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 7008 Fax: (242) 356 3677
Email: pmusgrovewctal.com

Warren Pustam, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.

PO Box N-4873, Nassau Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 2222 Fax: (242) 327 6614
Email: w_pustam@hotmail.com







Membership

Geneen Riviere

Pearl Investment Management Limited
PO Box N 4930, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 502 8022 Fax: (242) 502 8008
Email: geneen.tiviere@ pearl-investment-
management.com





Past President

David Slatter, CFA

KPMG

PO Box N-123, Nassau. Bahamas
Ph: (242) 393 2007

Email: dslatter(a@kpmg.com.bs

INSTITUTE

PROFESS|ONAL
DEVELOPMENT
QUALIFIED ACTIVITY



CFA Society of The Bahamas

Topic: “The Link Between Pensions and Long Term Financial
Stability"

Date Thursday, November 29"" 2007

Time: 12:00 pm General Meeting
12:30 pm Speaker

Location:

Presentation:

Cost: Members

Reservations:








MONTHLY SPEAKER / WEBCAST EVENT










Please arrive promptly!





Luciano’s of Chicago
Cagliari Room
East Bay Street





Larry R. Gibson, CFA
Vice President-Pensions
Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas) Limited





$25.00

Non-Members $35.00

(If paying by cheque, please make cheque payable to: CFA
Society of The Bahamas)








PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED - by Tuesday
November 27, 2007
Karen Pinder, CFA

~ karen.pinder@efgbank.com

*Prepayment required through one of the Board Members

Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Financial Analyst charter holder, is Vice President -
Pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas) Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary
of Colonial Group International Ltd, which owns Atlantic Medical Insurance Ltd and
is a major shareholder of Security & General Insurance Company in The Bahamas.

















He ty a Veteran executive within The Bahamas’ financial services sector, having held
senor executive positions in both international and domestic organizations.





Mr. Gibson has served on numerous public and private sector boards throughout his
career and currently serves as a Director of Commonwealth Bank Limited; Chairman
of the Finance Committee of St. Andrew’s School; and a member of the Anglican
Church Diocesan Finance Committee. ,







He is a regular speaker on financial and economic matters and authors the weekly
column Financial Insight’ tn a local newspaper.




Mr. Larry R. Gibson, CFA, ts a founding member of the CFA Society of The
Bahamas, formerly named Bahamas Society of Financial Analysts.






BAHAMAS FIRST

FIRST IN INSURANCE. TODAY. TOMORROW.

Career opportunity for an ambitious

career oriented individual

Claims Advisor
Role & Responsibilities:

Provide Customer service, advice and assistance to walk-
in customers and over the telephone

Deal with agencies and other insurance companies
Complete reports and input data

Assist with subrogation

Maintain Claims Bordereaux

Assist with on-scene accident investigations

Assistance with special projects

Qualifications:

BUSINESS

Regulations
proposed to aid
foreign banks

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Central Bank of the Bahamas is
seeking comments on a draft regulation
that would allow foreign financial institu-
tions to use this country as a base of oper-
ations in the event of a disaster in their
home country.

This provision would fall under a new set
of proposed regulations, the Banks and
Trust Companies (Temporary Business
Continuity Operations) Regulations
2007.

Agreement

To avail itself of the exemption, the for-
eign bank or trust company would have to
enter into an agreement with a Bahamas
licensed bank or trust company, where the
equipment is to be used during the period
of exemption and the company must be reg-
istered with the Central Bank.

Further the institution would have to
provide a list of the names, addresses and
occupations of the person(s) who will be
working on behalf of the foreign institu-
tion.

The proposed regulations would also
mandate that the duration of the exemp-
tion does not exceed a period of 30 days,
where the person’s home regulator is unable
to continue to exercise regulatory control,



Is the price of gas _
SUZUKILIANA yw

is what you need.

hit by disasters

or 60 days after the occurrence of the dis-
ruptive event.

A major component of the regulations
would be allowing foreign nationals to
arrive in the Bahamas to work on behalf
of the foreign financial institution without
first possessing a valid work permit.

This will, of course, have serious impli-
cations relating to immigration laws and,
in particular, the requirement for obtaining
work permits.

Laws

The Central Bank added that all immi-
gration laws would apply to persons arriving
here under exempted status, including a
letter of request from the employer, a police
certificate covering five years, a valid pass-
port and two recent passport size photos.

In the case of an unplanned event the
results in the operation of banking or trust
business from the Bahamas, the require-
ment for a person who will be conducting
exempt activities on behalf of an exempt
person to obtain a work permit prior to
their arrival in the Bahamas may be waived.

However such persons will besrequired
to apply for a work permit within the time
prescribed by Immigration officials.

Comments on the draft regulations should
be forwarded to the Policy Unit, Bank
Supervision Department by January 11,
2008.





ns

5-door Hatchback



A.A. Degree tn business or related subject

Experience useful but not essential

On the job training will be provided

Computer proficiency required

Strong customer service, communication and interpersonal
skills required

Save in two ways — low price & low gas!

The Liana 4-door sedan & 5-door hatchback feature:
1,6-litre, 4-cylinder engine; automatic transmission;
power steering, windows, door locks & mirrors;
AM/FMICD player; spacious interior with plenty
of leg room.





The Bahamas First Group is the largest property and casualty
insurance company in The Bahamas and has an A-.(Excellent)
Rating from A. M. Best reflecting the company’s financial
stability and sound risk management practices. Compensation
commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications.







$ SUZUKI

Way of Life!

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING
with COMMONWEALTH BANK



Please apply before November 28th, 2007 to:




Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.



Group HR & Training Manager
Bahamas First Corporate Services
32 Collins Avenue
P.O. Box SS-6268
Nassau, Bahamas





#1 AUTO DEALER IN TE

EAST SHIRLEY STREET 32 2-3 | }25-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122

or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916









or email to: careers@bahamasfirst.com








THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 5B





Economy likely to grow
‘lot less’ than 4% forecast

FROM page one

started to increasingly hinge on
real estate values.

In the US, house prices had
increased for the best part of a
decade since 1997, raising the
value of what for most con-
sumers is their number one
asset. Many had become aggres-
sive in borrowing against the
increasing equity value of their
homes, over and above mort-
gage costs and what they had
paid for their properties.

“US consumers have in effect
been able to use it [their homes]
as an ATM with collateral, and
banks have been happy to lend
because prices have been going
up,” Mr Sunderji said.

“Now, the ability of the US
consumer to borrow has been

impacted by the sub-prime prob-
lems, which have resulted in
homes being foreclosed and
house prices decreasing sub-
stantially. Banks have been
tightening up on lending as they
recalibrate risk.

“The ability of consumers to
borrow has been impacted, so
their ability to spend has been
impacted, too.”

With US consumers feeling
less wealthy, Mr Sunderji said
many were likely to cut back on
disposable income, and among
items impacted were likely to be
vacation and travel plans.

As a result, the Bahamian
tourism industry was likely to
feel the effects “some time in
the coming year” through
reduced visitor arrivals and low-
er per capita spending, as visi-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHEFILISE JEAN of APPLE
STREET WEST OFF WULFF ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-54802,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PROVOST
MARSHALL SALE

An auction will be held on 28th Noveme-
ber, 2007 at 10:00 o’ clock at the Supreme
Court Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, The
Bahamas. On auction will be a number of
ts ‘Locman Watches. ip a variety of styles and
colours.

For more information please contact Miss
Cordell Frazier at Gibson & Company at
323-1234 or Mr. Jack Davis a the Supreme
"Court at 356-9101.

g Bank of The Bahamas

M I T BE D

B05 0 (6

Notice is hereby given in
accordance with Section 64
of the Securities Industry Act,
1999 that Mr. Azeal McFall
resigned from bank of The
Bahamas Limited effective

September 21, 2007

Legal Notice

NOTICE



MAYA COM. INC.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MAYA COM. INC. is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137(4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 21st November, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,
BVI

Dated this 23rd day of November, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

tor: traffic was set to “drop off”.

This, Mr Sunderji said, would
affect occupancies, revenue per
available room (RevPAR) and
profits for a major private sector
employer, the Bahamian hotel
industry, leading to lower wages
for employees in the sector.
This, in turn, was likely to man-
ifest itself in a reduced velocity
of circulation for income circu-
lating within the Bahamian
economy.

Mr Sunderji contrasted the
Bahamas’ reliance on US
tourists with the Dominican
Republic’s visitor base, which
was split 55/45 in favour of Euro-
pean tourists compared to
Americans.

“We need a balance along
those lines,” he suggested, as
the increased purchasing power
enjoyed by Canadians and Euro-
peans as a result of the US dol-
lar’s decline, making vacations
in the Bahamas relatively cheap-
er for them. To do so, though,
the Bahamas needed to enhance
airlift from Europe and Cana-
da.

“We live in a global economy,
and need to be aware that the
US$ has devalued very sharply
against the Canadian$, the UK£
and the euro. It means the
Bahamian$ has devalued against
those currencies,” Mr Sunderji
said.

He added that further infla-
tionary pressures were likely to
result from the fact that the oil
producing countries were look-
ing at increasing the price of oil,
and moving away from using the
US$ as a common denominat-
ing currency.

“We will see inflation creeping
in, simply because we will be
able to buy less for our dollar, “*
Mr Sunderji said. “We need to
be far more aware of what is
going on in the global market-
place than we actually are. We
think we are insulated far more
than we are. We are not.”

On the foreign direct invest-
ment side, Mr Sunderji said pro-
posed Bahamas-based develop-
ments might be impacted
“because banks are recalibrat-
ing risk, and might not lend in

Legal Notice

NOTICE

C. ING. CORPO

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) AMERIC. ING. CORPORATION in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 21st November, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,

BVI

Dated this 23rd day of November, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
- Liquidator

ICD UTILITIES LIMITED
Notice To Shareholders

The Board of Directors of

ICD Utilities Limited is pleased

to advise that a dividend of

10 cent per share

has been declared to all Shareholders

of record as at 3rd December, 2007

and payable on 14th December, 2007



areas where it is difficult to get a
return. The sub-prime problems
will impact the US consumer
and the US banks, and the lat-
ter’s ability to fund projects in
this nation”.

He cautioned that the
Caribbean was “littered with
failures” when it came to resort
developments, pointing as an
example to the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay resort, which was
in receivership.

With global financial institu-
tions cautious on lending full
stop, and’ increasing interest
rates and the cost of capital on
projects they were backing, Mr
Sunderji indicated Bahamas-
based foreign direct investment
projects might find it difficult to
attract capital amid the current
credit crunch.

And apart from the develop-
ers themselves, the credit crunch
is also likely to impact financ-
ing for potential buyers of real
estate at these projects. With
such developments heavily
reliant on cash flow from such
sales to drive project build-out,

that is another major headache
for Bahamas-based developers.

“TI see the domestic economy
following [the US], and I think
the 4 per cent GDP growth fore-
cast [for 2008] is a tad opti-
mistic,” Mr Sunderji said.

“I’m hopeful that we will not
have a very bad year, but cer-
tainly it will not be as robust as it
has been in the past couple of
years.

“IT don’t think growth will be
in the 4 per cent range; it will
be a lot less, and depend on
whether one or two of the major
investment projects out there go
through. There is some uncer-
tainty associated with that.”

He added: “I’m sure the Goy-
ernment is working vigorously
to ensure one or two of the large
projects come through, and buoy
the economy.

“Albany and Baha Mar are
said to be imminent. Both of
these will cushion the economy,
clearly, because they will
create jobs and foreign
direct investment will come
through.”

NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE IN-
VESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED hereby
gives notice to the public of the resignation of Mr.
Cornelius A. Smith as President and Director of
the Company effective 30th October, 2007.

Dated this 21st day of November A.D., 2007.



MT SC
eS

Experienced Quantity , Su
in Building required. D:
pricing, contract nego
estimating and prep












Interested applicants are asked to send their :
resume to




Quantity Sar EY0
c/o The Tribune _
P.O. Box N-3027 |

Nassau, Bah .







eSidewalk Salee

Friday 23rd November and Saturday 24th November 2007

10:00a.m. - 5:00p.m.

50-75% off

Household Gifts » Accessories °

Handbags :Watches
And much more!
Fab! Finds Gift Shop

Lyford Cay Shopping Center

Tel: 362-6123





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a a re ee



Chamber ‘very concerned’

about 6.5% goods cost rise




FROM page one

akoff, told The Tribune that
“momentum” was increasing
to repeal all sales tax exemp-
tions in Florida, the proposal
having gone before the Tax
and Budget Reform Commis-
sion’s Finance and Tax
Reform Committee on
Friday.

The committee’s role is to
funnel proposals it considers
worthy up to the Commission
for consideration. With Flori-
da estimating that the sales
tax exemptions cost it $12 bil-
lion in tax revenues per year,
Mr Pinder said the draft
amendments discussed before
the committee were likely to
feature - in some form or oth-
er - in the Commission’s final
proposals for the voter’s bal-

si UBS

lot, due to be decided by
Spring 2008.

Mr Pinder said: “The com-
mittee voted unanimously to
put it [removing all sales tax
exemptions] in.

“It definitely has. a lot.of
momentum behind it, and
with $12 million in sales tax
exemptions, they see a lot of
money in increasing the tax
base.”

The proposed amendment
to the Florida constitution, as
it stands now, would “repeal
sales tax exemptions deter-
mined not to advance or serve
a public purpose”, although
areas where the imposition of
such a tax would be seen as
politically unpopular - such as
food and electricity - have
been spared.

However, the text allows for

individual sales tax exemp-
tions to be reinstated if they
are approved by 60 per cent of
both houses in the Florida
state legislature. ;

Mr Pinder said it would be
“worthwhile” for the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce or the
major retailers/wholesalers in
this nation to hire a US-based
attorney or representative to
give them a voice in the
sales tax exemption delibera-
tions.

He pointed out that there
was a clear opportunity to
influence the discussions, as
the Florida Commission and
its committee were worried
about the economic impact
the sales tax exemption’s
removal would have on the
state’s export industries.

The key, he said, would be

for the Chamber and Bahami-
an companies to provide data
showing the negative eco-
nomic impact for Florida com-
panies if, given the consider-

-able trade and links with this

nation, they switched to pur-
chasing from other US
sources.

Mr Pinder said imposition
of the 6.5 per cent sales tax
exemption would result in an
“increase in the cost of goods,
and because margins are so
slim on retail, some compa-
nies will go out of business.
It will act as inflationary pres-
sures, if companies pass the

‘cost of goods on to the con-

sumer”.
He added that while
Bahamian companies could

Legal Notice
NOTICE
JUBILEE SHIPS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

seek out new suppliers and
trading partners in other US

_ states and countries, this

would cost them “time and
money”.

“Whatever happens, it will
definitely result in higher costs
to the business entities in the
Bahamas, and to the general
public and the consumer.
There would be inflationary
pressures. Fuel and food are
going up, and this develop-
ment would result in another
one,” Mr Pinder said.

“As the Bahamas tries to
move from a tourism and
financial services economy to
more of a trading economy,
and its large retail establish-
ments develop and grow, any-
thing with an international tax
aspect coming out of the US is
worth keeping an eye on, both
at a federal and state level.”

Mr Pinder said collecting
due tax revenues and protect-
ing the tax base, amid the
pressure of international trade



treaties, was “ hot button
item” in the US currently.
Tightening the tax collection
system thus had implications
for nations such as the
Bahamas.

“It’s a hugely significant
item that the Bahamas,
Bahamian professionals, and

. the Government should be

keeping an eye on or have
someone keeping an eye on
for them,” Mr Pinder said.
Meanwhile, Mr D’ Aguilar
said companies likely to be
most affected if the sales tax
exemption was repealed were
those “who don’t have the
know how or sophistication to
buy from another state”, such
as Bahamian small business-
es and ‘mom and pop’ stores.
His counterparft in Grand
Bahama, Christopher Lowe,
the Chamber president there,
said building materials costs
in the Bahamas would be
especially impacted if the sales
tax exemption was repealed.

UBS (Bahamas) Limited is seeking a suitably
qualified individual to join their growing and
dynamic team as a:

Facility Specialist

This position is open to candidates with a
minimum of 3 years experience and
certification in electrical, plumbing & air-
condition repair & maintenance.

Main responsibilities to include:

* Traditional tasks of building management;

* Oversee all preventative maintenance
programs;

* Carry out technical interventions;

* Oversee maintenance service providers;
Oversee churn projects, documentation and

__ accounting;. haa aes ee
Support bank operations with a wide variety

of logistics services.- ~~~ =

In addition, candidates must have expérience
in report writing with basic working knowledge
of Microsoft Word and Excel. The ideal candidate
must be able to utilize knowledge & experience
to solve routine problems and reply to client

‘ (a) JUBILEE SHIPS LIMITED is in dissolution
under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000

The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 20th November, 2007 when its the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.
The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Lynden
of Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas, as sole Liquidator.
Dated the 21st day of November 2007

H & J Corporate Services Ltd.

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company



Legal Notite
Notice.

JUBILEE SHIPS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)














NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that AIME LUGENS, MINNIE STREET,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and-that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of
NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, -P.O0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with | _

“Section 138 (4) of the International Business Companies, |=
Act, (No. 45 of 2000), CENS CORPORATION LTD. is in
dissolution. ADAN ARTURO ILLUECA HERRANDO
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at 52St. N°17,
Bella Vista, Panama City, Republic of Panama. All
persons having claims against the above-named com-
pany are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
29th day of November, 2007.

requests. Creditors having debts or claims againts the above-named Com-

Interested persons meeting ine shove Rilera pany are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
should apply in writing, enclosing a full resume
with cover letter, on or before November 30,
2007 to:

at Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box
N-3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 6th
day of December, 2007. In default thereof they will be excluded

ADAN ARTURO a

ts

hrbahamas@ubs.com

:
UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N 7757,
Nassau, Bahamas



Baker's Bay

GOLF @ OCEAN CLUB

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Baharnas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Key Responsibilities

Establish culinary standard

Create menus and recipes for high-end and casual dining to include
international and Bahamian cuisine

Maintain food safety standard

Recruit and train culinary team

Manage and develop culinary team

Control food cost

Determine market list and vendors

Design special events

Qualifications -

Y Bachelor's degree in Culinary Arts or related subject; professional
certifications

Y Minimum ten (10) years experience at a five-star club, resort or restaurant
with at least three (3) years international or off-shore experience.

Y Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and culinary skills,
must be able to train others and execute ideas and standards.

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume

to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, sbowe@bekersbayclub.comn or
by fax at 242-367-0804.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 21st day of November 2007

LYNDEN MAYCOCK
LIQUIDATOR

ENOL,
~ AS

\
Sorngott

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE STTPPLY OF DRUGS
RELATED ITEMS
Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public
Authority and the Ministry of
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Health,

The Tender Document, which includes instruction to

| the Tenderers along with other relevant information,

can be collected from the Bahamas National Drug
Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, Monday
through Friday 9a.m. - 5p.m.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a
sealed envelope or package idenified as “Tender
for the Supply of Drug and Related Items” and
addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
1st Floor, Manx Corporate Centre/Dockendale House
West Bay Street
P.O.Box N-8200
Nassau, The Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address
on a before 5p.m. Friday, December 21st, 2007. A
copy of a valid business license and Nation-
allnsurance Certificate must accompany all
proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all Tender(s).



Hospitals |’

FML Group of Companies Ltd.
is seeking to employ a

Marketing

Manager

Must be young, aggressive and energentic
with experience in marketing and public
relations.

Interested persons may fax their resumes
to 394-2193.

NOTICE

The following practices located at #36 Collins
Avenue, Nassau, will be closed permanently on 22
February, 2008, at the latest:

















e KENNETH W. KNOWLES, M.D.
-¢ BAHAMAS OPTICAL CENTRE, LTD.






Patients who wish to obtain records are asked to
mail a written request, containing clear patient ID
information etc., to Box N-8322, Nassau. Following
that, specific arrangements may then be made by
telephone at 325-4754, 322-4940. Regretfully, no
further letters can be written.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 7B



BUSINESS



Baha Mar ‘very, very —
close’ to full go-ahead

FROM page one

tributed $400 million in
equity to the development,
largely from its principal
investors, Dikran and Sarkis
Izmirlian.

It also had to prove it had
$1 billion in financing in
place, and that could have
been made more difficult -
not only by the increase to
$2.4 billion - but by the
global debt and credit mar-
ket squeeze, which has
increased the cost of capi-
tal and made accessing it
more difficult.

The original Heads of
Agreement said that once
these conditions were satis-
fied, the Government and
Baha Mar would engage a
project manager, and
“mutually agreed” master
planning and civil engineer-
ing firms, to handle the
West Bay re-routing, plus
construction of a corridor
connecting the resort with
JFK Drive.






SPECIFIC DUTIES:

DIHAARWN

12. Issues library passes.

available.

in the area.

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

1. LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II, LAW LIBRARY

The Law Library of The College requires a highly motivated, tactful, people-friendly,
innovative, detail-oriented person to provide paraprofessional, administrative and basic
reference assistance. Clientele will include students and faculty of the LL.B Programme,
as well as members of the legal profession and the general public.

The construction work
would be staged in phases,
with the project manager
selecting the lowest quali-
fied bidder provided they
were able to obtain perfor-
mance bonds and the bids
were reasonable.

The total estimated cost
of the West Bay Street re-
routing and JFK connection
was estimated, at the time
the Heads of Agreement
was signed, to be $90 mil-
lion. This did not include
the $16 million reverse
osmosis plant and sewerage
treatment plant that Baha
Mar would finance itself.

The Government was to
pay $45.3 million towards
the road works costs, almost
exactly what it received for
selling the then-Radisson
and associated lands to
Baha Mar. If the total cost
came to less than $70 mil-
lion, the Government and
Baha Mar would pay 50 per
cent each.

_ Baha Mar first sought a
supplemental Heads of

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

STAFF VACANCY

LIBRARIES & INSTRUCTIONAL
MEDIA SERVICES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:

The successful candidate will perform all duties with minimal supervision, assisting with
the overseeing of the day-today activities and programmes of the Branch in the absence
of the Branch head, so good judgment and professionalism is essential. In addition,
he/she will direct the activities of library assistants and part-timers and will assist with
their training and appraisal. Regular written reports are required.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:
Under the direction of the Unit Supervisor, the position performs a variety of paraprofessional
duties with minimal supervision. These include supervision of library assistant(s),
preparation of written and oral reports/correspondence, planning and organizing job
activities, which demonstrates skills such as decision-making, good judgment and’
knowledge of library and college policies and procedures. Further, overseeing the
maintenance of collections, participation in the development of policies, services and
programmes, and overseeing the day-to-day activities and programmes of the Unit in the
absence of the Unit Head are to be undertaken. The position works closely with all Units
to ensure the delivery of a high standard of service to patrons.

Provides evening and Saturday reference services.
Directs the activities of Library Assistants, and assists in their appraisal.
Assists in the Unit’s budget preparation.
Assists with the updating of policies and procedures manuals.

Responds to reference questions received from patrons by telephone and in person.
Supervises part-time, evening and weekend staff.
Ensures the enforcement of library policies and procedures.

Assists with storage and access to all library resources, e.g. books, microfilm,
CD-ROM databases, microfiche and related equipment.

9. Conducts research in support of the Unit’s work.
10. Assists with the conduct of research and the compilation of bibliographies.
11. Assumes responsibility for deposit of funds collected in the unit.

13. Organizes work schedules for library clearance.
14. Handles Inter-Library loan requests.

15. Assists with the delivery of Bibliographic Instructional programmes.

16. Provides group and individual tours of the unit/library.

18. Assists patrons with the use of computers and other related electronic services

19. Assists in the development of projects for the making of the library and its resources.
20. Conducts training for Library Assistants on o
21. Attends library meetings.

22. Serves on College wide committees
23. Participates in library projects.

24. Drafts letters, reports, proposals as requested.
25. Recommends resources for acquisitions

26. Any other duties which may be assigned.

LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II

QUALIFICATIONS: Normally a Bachelor’s Degree or the equivalent in relevant area,
OR for a technical/vocational or craft area, satisfactory completion of a recognized or
acceptable programme of training at the craft level, AND have at least ten (10) years of
experience working in the craft area, OR have a trained Teacher’s Certificate with
specialization in the relevant craft area, PLUS at least six (6) years of teaching experience

SALARY SCALE: SPS-5 $24,580 x $700 - $35,780

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest along with a completed application
form and an up-to-date resume to the address below by December 6, 2007:

The Director

.Human Resources Department

The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Or to hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please note that applications are available on The-College’s website: www.cob.edu.bs

perational procedures.

Agreement with the
Christie administration, as
it was crucial to cementing
its relationship with Har-
rah’s, the Caesar’s Enter-
tainment parent, which
would take a 43 per cent
equity stake in the project,
and Starwood. ,

Yet no agreement was
concluded before the May
2 general election, and the
Ingraham government’s
position has been that Baha
Mar must start fulfilling its
obligations under the first
Heads of Agreement before
any new deal and extra
investment incentives are
considered.

Yet talks between the
Government and Baha Mar
have continued, as they
have also with Albany’s
developer, Park Ridge
Securities Corporation,
whose investors include
golfers Ernie Els and Tiger
Woods, plus the Tavistock
Group - the worldwide
holding vehicle for invest-
ments by Lyford Cay bil-
























































FML Group of Companies Ltd.
is seeking to employ an

Administrative Assistant

for it human resources department.

lionaire Joe Lewis.

It is understood that
progress has been made in
the Albany negotiations,
with the developers agree-
ing to give up a multi-mil-
lion dollar package of
Hotels Encouragement Act
investment incentives - cus-
toms duties, stamp duties
and real property tax
exemptions - on some 200
condominium units that
would have formed a con-
dotel.

Must be matured, energentic and possess
knowledge of word and excel. Must have
excellent written and communication skills.
Human resources experience a plus.

Interested persons may fax their resumes
to 394-2193.





Employment Opportunities

New retail business seeks male and female sales per-
sons for immediate employment. An attractive base
plus a weekly commission and uniform are provided.
Interested persons should contact Mr. Mcintosh by
telephoning 454-6380 to make an appointment for an
interview. Applicants should bring the following docu-
ments to the interview: |











a) Valid Passport
b) Police Certificate (Record)

)
c) National Insurance Card
d) Health Certificate











SALES
PERSONS




e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your
income.

e You are limited only to
your potential
e Flexible hours available
e Excellent commissions
and benefits








Must have a proven track record in sales
Professional appearance a must
Must have reliable transportation
Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
Excellent written and communication skills.













Apply in writing to
Sales Representatives
Box PM-1
C/O The Nassau Guardian
P.O. Box N-3011
Nassau

Bahamas









*PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
néighbourhoods. Perhaps
‘you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













Legal Notice

NOTICE

OAKCREST VENTURES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)



‘Notice is hereby given that the above-named
‘Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the

‘1 ;25th day of October 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa

Gor. Inc., P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

fe

SVR,

tLe ARGOSA CORP. INC.
aCe (Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BACLIFF VIEW LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, the dissolution of BACLIFF VIEW LIMITED.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

~ ZOLE MANAGEMENT
HOLDINGS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of ZOLE MANAGEMENT HOLD-
INGS LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Pricing Information As Of:

S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson





Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

1.364794"
3.5388***

Colina Money Market Fund



Previous Close Today's Close

Counc

il told: Still

approve Baker’s Bay
permits on ‘merit’ only

FROM page one

“T believe the concerns of
the council might be that Bak-
er’s Bay includes non-
Bahamian entities, but once
a Heads of Agreement is



invites you to our

~ (Lay-aways get 15% discount)

Your friendly little jewelry store thru the International Bazaar, downtown, i
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS SALE

<< Noy. 16 thru Nov. 23 you get 25% discount
Nov. 24 thru Nov. 30 you get 20% discount

Then 15% discount will continue thru the month of December

Mens’ gold rings from $80 ...... Ladies’ gold rings from $32
Babies’ gold rings from $20...... Gold Handchains from $35
Gold anklets from $37 ..... Gold earrings from $13

Gold charms from $10 ..... Gold chains from $35

Let Angie, Eleanor and Ricky help you make your selection Free Giftwraping

LAS TIENDAS
International Bazaar, Bay St. Tel. 325-3333

SAH VA AAT NA WD RANT RAP AT LARA ARRAN

signed it is the duty of the
local council to review all
applications that are present-
ed and make a détermination
based on merit. .
“I would therefore direct
you to invite the council to
consider the plans submitted





|
.

i



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BYLAND INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of BY LAND INVESTMENTS

LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution

has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. ING. 0
(Liquidator) ae

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DARGILE RIVER LTD.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of DARGILE RIVER LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register. |

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
, (Liquidator)

= )FIDELITY

Change Daily Vol.

EPS $

Div $ es

8.12%
7.80%
0.00%












for their consideration and
make a decision one way or
the other. Please advise this
office as soon as a decision is
made.”

Mr Sweeting told The Tri-
bune: “I’ve said this from day
one. It’s basically echoing my
advice to the council, in that
until we get a court order or
such notice from the Govern-
ment telling us to stop, we
should continue to review
these plans [from Baker’s
Bay] as if they were from any-
one else.”

In relation to the concerns
held by the three councillors,
Fred Sweeting and Rory
Russell from Man-O-War
Cay, and Fred Laing from
Great Guana Cay, Mr Sweet-
ing said: “I think this will
clear a lot of things up. I feel
they may still try to find ways

to oppose the project, but
we'll see.”

He had previously accused
the trio of playing politics
over the Baker’s Bay project,
an accusation that Mr Russell
had denied to The Tribune.

“We want to keep this mov-
ing forward for the benefit of
the economy of Abaco,
because it’s a major player
in the economy,” Mr Sweet-
ing said of Baker’s Bay.

“There’s still a very thin
margin [on the council]. It’s
almost an even split, but
we’ve got just enough to keep
things going in the right direc-
tion.”

Another 14 Baker’s Bay
permit applications are up for
consideration at the Hope
Town District Council’s next
meeting on Thursday,
November 29, 2007.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFREY TOUSSAINT

of MARSH HARBOUR,

ABACO, BAHAMAS is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization as a citizen

of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16TH day of
NOVEMBER 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARVIN GARY DARVILLE OF
GEORGE TOWN, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23RD day of NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

is hereby given that LATOYA PLUMMER-
CHEDDESINGH of ST. ALBANS DRIVE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



MARINE STORE
LOOKING FOR

Experience Counter
Sales Person;

must be computer literate and have good
customer relations

PLEASE FAX RESUME TO 394-3885

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RASHAN SEVERE OF SCOTT
STREET, BAIN TOWN, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23RD day of NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.









PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ASJA SHAKARA
GREEN of Soldier Road, Bahamas, intend to change
my name to ASJA SHAKAR TILERAIN. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.
















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DANCINSAN BERCHANT OF
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23RD day of NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

idelity Prime Income Fund

2.938214***
1.279370"**
ioc



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 NAVKEY
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

'S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S:

* © 16 November 2007
** 30 Jurie 2007
*** 31 October 2007
see" 31 July 2007

INFORMATION CALL (242) 9





THE TRIBUNE

Baker’s Bay provides ‘major

if es

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 98



Ya

opportunities’ for Bahamian firms

AT A time when the US
economy is slowing down, and
revised IMF and Central Bank
estimates for the Bahamas GDP
growth in 2007 are lower than
previously forecasted, the island
of Abaco has one of the
strongest. economies in this
nation.

Some of the island’s small
and large companies are expe-
riencing this.economic prosper-
ity due, in part, to the presence
of one of the island’s major
developer,Baker’s Bay Golf and
Ocean Club on Great Guana
Cay.

The developers of the $175
million resort have already
invested more than $200 mil-
lion in the Bahamas and pro-
vided employment for 140 per-
manent staff. An additional 150
persons are also employed in
construction work wiih Baker’s
Bay’s coniractors and subcon-
tractors.

Bahamas Hot Mix Company,
the contractor for earthworks
and road paving at Baker’s Bay,
has been involved with the pro-
ject for one year. Ebrahim Sai-
di, general manager of Bahamas
Hot Mix. said the project has
provided continuous employ-
ment for 25 staff, the majority of
whom are Abaconians, work-
ing directly on-site.

Professional

“It’s kept us busy for the past
year and hopefully into next
year as well. The developers are
very professional. They have all
their permits in place. Every-
thing we’re doing is permitted
by the Ministry of Works, and
it’s all been in compliance with
the rules and regulations. We
execute in accordance with
them. Baker’s Bay has already
generated a large income for
the people of Abaco and as it
builds out it will provide con-
tinuous benefits and increased
income revenue to the Abacos,”
Mr Saidi said. :

Also working on the project
is Bahamas Marine Construc-
tion, a’ subcontractor to Ameri-



can Bridge, which is responsible
for a number of aspects of the
project, including building
revetments and breakwaters,
internal dredging and construc-
tion of the docks.

James Mosko, president of
Bahamas Marine Construction,
said his company has been
growing since working with
Kerzner, and is now able to do
jobs that would have previously
been done by companies out of
the US. He said it feels good to
step into another large project.

“They’re high-end: They're
doing everything right. They’re
not skimping anywhere. We
have about 15 to 18 people up
there, and we'll be there for the
better part of a ycar-and-a-halft.
We've still got three to four
months to finish the first phase,
and then. we start the docks,
which will take us another eight
months,” Mr Mosko said.

He added that maintaining .a
presence in Abaco means
spending money localiy, and
expressed confidence that the
developers would see the pro-
ject through.

“In Marsh Harbour we’ve got
I don’t know how many homes
and rooms rented. All our tood
comes from the food store, wo
travel on Abaco Air and
Bahamasair, any way we
can...we’ve seen a lot of pro-

* jects that are half-baked and get

off and they’re under-funded
and they go to hell in a hand
basket, but this isn’t going to
happen with this project,” Mr
Mosko said. :!

In August, construction
began on Baker's Bay’s 33-acre
Marina Village, which consists
of high-end residential units,
town homes and some retail
stores. This work is being car-
ried out by Woslee Dominion,
another all Bahamian compa-
ny. -
Prior to, Baker’s Bay, Woslee
Dominon completed the $7 mil-
lion dollar Mandara Spa Expan-
sion for Kerzner International's
Phase III expansion, the $38
million Harbourside Ailantis,
and a number of luxury high-

end homes at Ocean Club ''

Estates. Ashley Glinton, presi-
dent and owner of Woslee
Dominion, says he expects the
work will last for about two-
and-a-half to three years, and
at its peak he will employ at
least 200 construction workers
from Abaco, Nassau and other
Bahamian islands.

“] think it’s a wonderful pro-
ject. It’s a very exciting project.
I’ve been involved in other
developments and from what |
can tell and who I’ve communi-
cated with these guys are gen-
uine. They’re sincere in what
they’re going to do. They say
what they’re going to do so far,
and as far as theit commitment
to Abaco and the people and
the environment i have seen
nothing less than what they say
they’re going to do. I think it’s a
model for other developments
in terms of the environment and
the way developments really
should be carried out,” Mr Glin-
ton said.

Benefitted

While the company relied on
Bahamian contractors for the
creation of the resort, a num-
ber of smaller companies have
also benefited from Baker’s Bay
related business.

On Guana Cay, Donna’s
Golf Cart and Cottage Rentals
rents golf carts to Baker’s Bay
on a monthly basis, and cottages
to the developers and their con-

tractors as needed. Guana Cay’s -

Orchard Bay Marina also ben-
efits from cottage rentals by
Baker’s Bay.

Jimmy Albury, of Orchard
Bay Marina, says he believes
the development will be good
for Guana Cay and Abaco as
long as it is “controlled and
doesn’t grow too fast”.

“Discovery Land Company
has deep pockets and overall
they’re a good company,” Mr
Albury said.

Donna Sands, also noted that
the company has assisted the
community. “They formed the
Fig Tree Foundation and it’s

helped a guy with cancer, paid
some of his medical expenses
and we’ve got a young guy in
Florida in rehab and the Foun-
dation’s paying for that

“Vaen they just donated tive
computers to the school, brand
new desks, everything.

“So they are willing to help
the community,” Mrs Sands
said.

In Marsh Harbour, a number
of Bahamian businesses also








on-site in the Bahamas,
Nova Southeastern University

> Are you ready to caus







c/o Bahamas Baptist Community College
8 Jaan Street Gleniston Gardens

2 an effect?

supply products and services to
the Baker’s Bay development.
One such business is the Har-
bour View Marina in Marsh
Harbour that supplies Baker’s
Bay with tuet products.

“We provide them with fuel,
gasoline and diesel on a weekly
or daily basis depending on
their activity,” says Troy
Cornea, manager of the marina.

“It certainly moves product
for us, which is very beneficial

At Nova Southeastern University’s Fischler School, we inspire educators to inspire their students to
change the world. Become inspired by the school that has been svattering the barriers of traditional

learning for more than 35 years. Earn your bachelor s, master © or doctoral degree in education

ATTEND AN INFORMATION MEETING TO LEARN MORE:
Thursday, November 29, 2007 at 6:00 p.m.

242-364-6766

Albany Developer Ltd.

in conjuction with

The Department of Labour , BTVi and the Contractors Association

will host a

Job fair

Tuesday November 27" 2007

and

‘Wednesday November 28" 2007

8 a.m.-4 p.m.

Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium

We need to see

ALL CONTRACTORS (Big and small
ALL YENDORS -ALL SUPPLIERS

NOVAGENtVERSITY

a Fis chlerSchool.nova.edu/Bahamas

and this has been going om for
five or six months now since
we’ve hdd their account.”

“As far as what they’re doing
the scope seems to be in very
good taste. J understand the
company is an extremely rep-'
utable company, so if we’re
going to have development on
Guana Cay or in that area it
seems like these guys are the
ideal candidates to develop it,”
Mr. Cornea said.

ERE,

ich-V.\0) 4-0 (0) ots
OR CANCER.







FISCHLER SCHOOL

OF EDUCATION & HUMAN SERVICES



by the Comanssion
hte ward associate's,







PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

rt a
; Mo) eS cls |

20, WHAT DO ©
CALL YOU..-RED,

OR RUSTY?

ALL MY OLD
FRIC

- €ROM

ALAN TELL6 ERIC ALL ABOUT
[LUANVS LINES See

| SHE’S HOME NOW,
BUT HER HEALTH





LOOK, IT'S OFFICIAL! THERE'S THE
MOST DANGEROUS JOB IN THE

MARVIN

WHOA. MOM

WAS REALLY
MAD ABOUT

WHAT YOU







4

OST, BY UV ERSEA PRIS SYWOIL

7

ATa\ © OT WILEY WK, Wee,



mzo




NeseS
RUNS IT PAST

“OGBOSHHOBOQ



L WONVER HOW
HIGH JULIAN'S

ACROSS
A chap possibly noted in 1
N. America (6)

Being desperate is no good (8)
Pictures a saint with woes (6)

In the dark until explained (5)
Fat lad embracing a redhead (4)
Busy person's mid-afternoon
drink? (4)

Fruit worth £1 to me? (4)

He's plumb suspended! (3)
Fictional captain's exclamation to
a seaman (4)

Calamity due to the wind? (4)
Put on a show just for fun? (5,4)
Interviewed the head of

State, even (4)

It grows in less than

three days (4)

Pretend, partly in play (3)

An animal shot at? (4)

Utter in a semitone (4)

Source of electricity for a small
room? (4)

Cul a key for a flier (5)

This expedition is possibly including
some seafaring (6)

Gone like the truck one got rid of (8)
Boil these in a brew before

closing time (6)

Yesterday’s cryptic solutions

ACROSS: 1, D-rink-S 7, Pen-elope 8, Flea 10, Mai-so-n 11,

Strive 14, Ron 16, Ho.-Ned 17, Lie-n 19, M-one-t. 21,

ViP-er 22, Dixie 23, Rest 26, Sugar 28, Y-EW 29, Team up

30, Dec.-ent 31, Use-R 32, B-utter-ed 33, Swed-E-n
DOWN: 1, Disma-L 2, Nelson 3, Span 4, Heat-fier 5,
Rob-|-n 6, SE-wed 8, Fire 9, Eon 12, Rot 13, Venus 15,

Hop it 18, Is-Sue 19, MIX 20, Nee 21, Vi-ruses 22, Dam. .
23, Recede 24, Ewer 25, Tit-l-an 26, Stubs 27, Gar-th 28,

Yes 30, Duds

", STL

THAT POOR
SAP WHO HAS TO
CHANGE THE GAS
PRICE IN BROAD

DOWN

Has she nothing to exist for? (5)
Questionable strength? (5)

What Theodore or Edward could
bear to be called? (5)

Vehicle useful in back-tracking (4)
The mistake of a girl? (4)

WAS A JUDGE.--HID
NAME WAS DUNCAN!



Plant you can make a brush

out of (5)

The sort of pie to order? (5)
Unexciting place to live? (4)

Where one could amass a

lot of tea (5)

A police department's chemical? (4)
Lacking heart, there could be such
a victory (6)

High-pitched song belter

perhaps? (6)

Catch less than nine trout (3)
Being angry, one has to scold (5)
Would such politicians be a long
time in preparing a bill? (7)

The village recidivist? (3)

Does his body lack a figure? (3)

A supporter apt to be wiry (6)

Left port with cargo (5)

A determined group of people? (3)
Favourite piano quartet finale (3)
Trouble due to foolish capers (6)

A depressed area in the country (3)

Yesterday's easy solutions

ACROSS: 1, Cuspid 7, Athletic 8, Pear 10, Solace 11, Altire

14, Use 16, Taped 17, Sage 19, Ripen 21, Raven

22, Sepia 23, Pint 26, Talon 28, Bad 29, United 30,
Parole 31, Oral 32, Overacts 33, Treble

DOWN: 1, Crisis 2, Please 3, Dare 4, Flatten 5, Strip 6,
Ached 8, Plug 9, Ace 12, Tan 13, Resin 15, Civil

18, Asian 19, Rap 20, Pea 21, Renewal 22, Sot

WELL.,.VESPITE
THE IMPOSING
TITLE, ONWY
TIWo & THESE



| EASY PUZZLE |











COULD BE
ACTLONABLE




GOLOMICS, CoM / RoPSE QU (TURE

r-
| WIL PEC CAPTRLIDE. HET

VID YOU TRY
LOOKING ON THE
TOP SHELF OF HIS

i,

|
‘
‘
i
j
i
i

ACROSS
Royal seat (6)
Journalist (8)
Perceptive (6)
Mud (5)
Quote (4)
Grain store (4)
Greek letter (4)
Favourite (3)
Feline (4)
Close (4)
Overzealous (9)
Injury (4)
Playing cards (4)
Possessive
pronoun (3)
Fever (4)
Paradise (4)
Celebrity (4)

Wind instrument (5)
Floor covering (6)

Revered (8)
Loves (6)

23, Parade 24, Idol 25, Twelve 26, Tudor 27, Liver 28, Bar

30, Post



“WHEN I SA

South dealer.
East-West vulnerable.
NORTH
#93
Â¥KQ6
#KQ742
&QI3
WEST EAST
@K72 #Q10865
¥742 ¥83
095 #31083
AK865 107
SOUTH
bAT4
Â¥AJ1095
A6
&942
The bidding:
South West North East
i Pass 2¢ Pass
2% Pass 4%

Opening lead — king of clubs.

Most errors at the bridge table are
of a simple sort. It is not the difficult
hands that cause the loss of myriads
of points, b’. ~ther the far more fre-
quent run-o.-. s-mill hands that are
responsible for such losses.

Take this hand, for example.
West led the king of clubs, East play-
ing the ten to begin a high-low. West
continued with the ace and another
club, and East miffed to bring his side
to three tricks. East then shifted to a
spade, taken by South with the ace.

Declarer drew three rounds of
trumps and tested the diamond suit
by cashing the A-K-Q. On the third

EN I SAID, RUSTLE UP SOME GRUB,
MA'AM,’ TDIDN’T MEAN VEG-TABLES!”

eo
The Better Way



diamond, South disposed of one of
his spade losers, but when the dia-
monds failed to break 3-3, he had to
go down one.

However, declarer should have
made the contract. In effect, he
banked all his hopes on a 3-3 divi-
sion of the opposing diamonds and
made no provision for the possibility
that the diamonds might be divided
4-2.

After winning the ace of spades,
South should have drawn only two
rounds of trumps, retaining the king
in dummy as a subsequent entry. He
could then cash the A-K of diamonds
and ruff a low diamond with a high

trump.

This would establish the Q-7 as
tricks. 4 heart to the king would then
put him in dummy to cash the two
d:.monds and discard both his spade
losers.

It is important to observe the
effect this line of play has on the
chances of making the contract. In
normal circumstances, a 3-3 break
occurs about 36 percent of the time,
while a 4-2 break is a 48 percent
probability. If declarer can develop
an approach that will succeed against
either a 3-3 or 4-2 division, he can
raise his chances to 84 percent.

In the given case, where East is
known to have started with only two
clubs and West with five, the chance
of a 3-3 break is even less likely, so
declarer has all the more reason to
seek a more viable approach.

TARGET



HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY’S TARGET

Good 16; very good 24;
excellent 32 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.



Angry (5)

Month (5)
Encourage (4)
Characteristic (5)
Ceremony (4)
Gossip (6)
Position (6)

Cover (3)

Tooth (5)
Mythical creature (7)
Snake (3)

Friend (3)
Prisoner (6)
Artist's stand (5)
Distant (3)
Frozen water (3)
Announcer (6)
Moist (3)

Portals (5)

Fool (5)

Poor (5)
Incitement (4)
Run away (4)

~~

fort forte
hereto hetero
retro rort rote
THEREFORE
hhree throe tore

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION
ether ferret fete
. forth fret froth

thereof t!
torr tree

_ Other rete
thee there

Me
word
| plot

the main story




of a play, novel
or poem

Magnus Carlsen v Lauren
Fressinet, Cap d'Agde 2006.
Norway's 16-year-old Carisen Is
the darling of chess fans and
organisers. Many reckon him a
future world champion, while
his zestful attacks and
imaginative tactics make his
games a pleasure to watch and
replay. Carlsen came unstuck in
the Cap d'Agde semi-final when
he was outwitted by his
Ukrainian rival Sergey Karjakin,
also 16, but his finish in today's
diagram was widely considered
the move of the toummament. As
White (to play) he is only a pawn
up while Black threatens Rxb5,
cxb5 and Nxd3. Carisen’s next
tum proved so devastating that
France's Fressinet resigned on
the spot. What was White's
winner?

MOM, CAN T HAVE SOME
MONEY SO HOBRES AND
T CAN COTO A MONE?

T REAL THINK THERE
ARE MORE CONSIRICTINE

THE TRIBUNE















FRIDAY,
NOV 23

ARIES — March 21/April 20
It’s time to curb the paranoia, Aries.
No one is plotting against you. Quit
worrying about what others. think.
Follow your own path to happiness.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21
You are able to make sense of situa-
tions that seem to make no sense at
all. More important, you can deal
with people who have allowed their
emotions to get the better of them.

GEMINI - May 22/June 21

A setback at work is not as serious
as it might first appear, so don’t let it
get you down. Cheer yourself up by
going out on Wednesday instead of
going straight home after work —
the festive lights will lift your spirits.

CANCER - June 22/July 22
Keep telling yourself you are the
best — and believe it, Cancer. Your
confidence may have started to slip,
but the truth is, there is a great
opportunity coming your way.
LEO - July 23/August 23

The good times keep getting better,
and this week is no exception.
However, where joint money mat-
ters are concerned, you must not
take anything for granted.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

Be as kind and forgiving as you can,
this week, even to those who have
been giving you a hard time lately.
It’s not as difficult as it seems.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

As independent as you may be, you
must make the effort to work with
others this week. Luck will come
your way through oe — net-
working is the name of the game.

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
You'll be under the microscope for
most of this week, Scorpio, so you’ll
want to make sure that everything
you do is “‘on the level.” Sparks fly
when you run into a sexy stranger
late in the week. Have fun!

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
The everyday things don’t interest
you at all this week — excitement
and adventure are what you crave.
Carpe diem! Don’t tie yourself down
with the trivia of life.

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
A new business opportunity will
come your way early in the week,
but think long and hard before you
‘sign anything. Will you be able to
commit the time and effort required?

AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb 18
There’s potential for a new love to
blossom — but make sure you’re
ready to be serious. Don’t play
games with anyone else’s heart.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
You’re not feeling as energetic as
usual this week, Pisces. This: could
be a blessing in disguise — you've
been busy as of late and could cer-
tainly use the time off.

‘CHESS by Leonard Barden





Chess solution ¢ 1 (Qf5! Resigns. If Qxf5 2 RxbS+
forces mate. I cxbS or RxdhS 2 Qxf4. If Qc7 2 RxbS+
QxbS 3 Qne6 wins a rook. I RIG 2 Qxt4 Rixf4 3 RbS+

mates.







THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, NOvuwiotrit


FRIDAY EVENING | NOVEMBER 23, 2007 |

[7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

. Issues Round- |Washington |McLaughlin [Bill Moyers Journal (N) (CC) |The Vicar of Di- Bae a the
WPBT [table discussion. |Week (N) 0 Group fy (CC) bley Geraldine [Dead (Part 2 of
» — |(CC) plays Cupid. 2) _|
The Insider (N) [Ghost Whisperer Melinda tries to [Moonlight Beth is jealous when [NUMBSRS A deadly robbery leads
WFOR |n (CC) help a girl understand the git ste Mick starts working closely with a {to the disappearance of an extreme-
has been given. (N) “ (CC) mysterious photographer. (N) “% — ly rare comic book. (N)
)

Access a % & & THE FAMILY MAN (2000, Romance-Comedy) Nicolas Cage, Tea Leoni, Don Cheadle. A Wall Street
WTVJ {wood (N) (CC)

Deco Drive The Next Great American Band Don’t Forget the Lyrics! Singers |News (N) (CC)
@ WSVN Another band leaves; six bands per-|compete. {N) (CC)
form. (N) A (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) /Men in Trees “Sea Change” Marin |Women’s Murder Club Illegal-alien |(:02) 20/20 (N) (CC)
@ WPLG Cc) questions the terms of her relation- |witnesses embroil the Bani an
ship with Jack. (N) (CC) immigration fight. (N) (CC)
CABLE CHANNELS
(:00) CSI: Miami CSI: Miami “Free Fall” A couple, re- |CSI: Miami “Dead Air’ A kidnapped |CSI; Miami The team searches for
A&E Recoil” (CC) |cently released from jail, is targeted |woman misdials a cell-phone num: the killer of two people on a cruise
for death. (CC) ber and begs for help. ship docked in Miami. (CC)
Peschardt’s |BBC World News America BBC News ~ |World Business |BBC News Our World ‘The
BBCI Peo le “Amitabh (Latenight). |Report (Latenight). Prying Game”
achchan”

Access Granted |BET Hip-Hop Awards 2007 (CC Keyshia Cole: |College Hill: In-
BET ; por me The Way ItIs {terns (CC)
A
L

playboy wakes to an alternate suburban existence. \ (CC

intiques Road- {Air Farce Live Rick Mercer Re- |Torchwood ‘They Keep Killin CBC News: The National (N) (CC)
CBC (Cc) port (CC) |Suzie"(N) (CC) :
:00) Kudlow & Fast Mone’ The Suze Orman Show Lowering |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch x :
CNBC [botany (cc Liles eclal ie federal funda, (CC) 3 | et Charlie the
C)

oz;

a
CNN a tice) Out in the Open Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC) B rN lh Amian 5 1p 1p etan d

%* %% LEGALLY BLONDE (2001, ]%* %% BLUE COLLAR COMEDY TOUR RIDES AGAIN (2004, Documentary) Comics Bill Mente ed :
COM dda rer Luke |Engvall, Jeff Foxworthy and others perform. | | WS Sl d ek | ele Dere Ik P ut wit
ilson, Selma Blair

COURT Cops ‘Las Ve- [Most Shocking Forensic Files |Forensic Files [Forensic Files North Mission some SMI les on your
(cc) ‘Order Up” Road cons.)
; le | d ss fa ces.

(:45) Phineas = HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 2 itt Musical Comedy) Zac Efron, Vanes- |The Suite Life of|The Suite Life of
(CC)
it

———

i

DISN and Ferb “Roller-|sa pe Ashley Tisdale, A teen befriends members of a wealthy fami-/Zack & Cody 1 |Zack & Cody
tt ly. 0 ‘NR’ (CC) Stacey's party.

DIY This Old House This Old House |New Yankee |New Yankee [Wood WorksA Burt Buildsa |The Inside Job
n (cc fn (CC) Workshop (CC) |Workshop (CC) |hall table. Band ;
Ich Trage einen |Journal: Tages- [Europa Aktuell jJournal: In Journal: Tages- |Quadriga Ay )
DW esr tome ie | Bring your children to the
The Daily 10 (N) [Patrick Dempsey: The E! True Keeping Up-Kar-|Kimora: Life in |The Soup (N) Wildest Cop . yy
mee Hollywood story A (CC) das ion Pi the Fab Lane , Show Moments ; McH a ) py +] our at McDo nald sin
ot- | NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Miami Heat. From the Americandirlines Arena in Mia-_ [NBA Basketball O \ |
around ve) _ [ie (C) | akes Field every Thursday
Salat ' wine eG Houston Rockets at Miami Heat, From the Americandirlines Arena in Mia- eee = | . 3 0 ' 4 3 0 A \ th
wera de Juego |mi. (Live ntl, Edition tron o 4: rin e
tay Mass: Our |The World Over ° He IsWorth |The Holy Rosary|Defending Life a for Our F 3 F mo Ep i J
iving lope |
ye Max: [Ballroom Bootcamp (CC) —_—*|Get Fresh With Sara Snow “Green |Ice Diaries ‘Let the Games Begin’ MO nth of N ovem be vr 20 0 7 :
tiedrich Wedding” Wedding. (CC)
x Report: |The O'Reilly Factor (CC) Hannity & Colmes (CC) On the Record With Greta Van |
ith Susteren (CC)
FSNFL ~~ NHL Hockey New York Rangers at Florida Panthers. From the BankAtlantic Center in Sun- |Inside the Pan- |The FSN Final |
rise, Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) thers Score (Live) E G E . a f E
:00) Big Break: ]Vijay & Rocco |GolfCentral — |Golf Omega Mission Hills World Cup -- Day 2. From Shenzhen, China. Y
GOLF (me p= Day njoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun
:00) Weakest Who Wants to Be a Millionaire ( |That’s the Ques-/Family Feud |Family Feud Chain Reaction
ink 1 (CC) |(CC) tion (CC) (CC) (CC) rrp
: Ninja Warrior {X-Play “Rock —_ {X-Play “Mass Ef- |Cops “Coast to |Cops Prostitution |Ninja Warrior | Ninja Warrior i
G4éTech |" Bande fc ion. (Coast (0 (CC) sing (C) i & \
A CHRISTMAS VISITOR (2002, Drama) William De- | x A SEASON FOR MIRACLES (1999, Drama) Carla Gugino, David :; va

HALL _\vane, Meredith Baxter. A stranger brings joy to mem- |Conrad, Laura Dern. A woman gives her jailed sister's children a real
bers of a grief-stricken family. ioc) Christmas. (CC)

Buy MeThe ]APlace in Italy [Uncharted Terri-|House Hunters |World’s Most —|Relocation, Relocation Paul and

HGTV {golden rules of Paul and Rima |tory Turkey. (N) International Extreme Homes |Andrew look to buy homes in Lon-
ea —___ freal estate, (CC) |make an.offer, ., (CC)... [Buenos Aires. |. don and Paris. (N) “ (CC)

vl 1... [Morris Cerullo.. |Breakthrough: -|Jay Sekulow .. |Inspiration To- _ /Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Day|The Gospel...

NSE. ne eines lap re (en tan

~|Reba “Proud ane ‘According to — |Family Guy The |Family Gy Pe- |Two and a Half |Two anda Half |

KTLA _|Reba’ 0 (CC) |Kids The Kyles |Jim Jim’s birth- [Griffins inherit ater buys a fishing {Men © (CC) Men Alan offends

attend a funeral. jday gifts. (CC) |mansion.(CC) — |boat. Iec) Charlie, |

Still Standing |Reba‘ItAin't — |Reba Reba’s kids|Lisa Williams: Life Among the |America’s Psychic Challenge
LIFE Judy must apolo- |Over Til the Red-|carouse at dad's Dead Lisa does an office reading for ‘Semifinals’ Four psychics compet. |
gize to Kyle. {head Sings place. 1 Rosemary. (N) (CC) (N) (CC) |
‘MSNBC [tr MSNBC Re- mie Reports Hidden camera |MSNBC Reports Long Beach, Calif. MSNBC Reports Long Beach, Cali.
po operation. . ;
SpongeBob SpongeBob — [SpongeBob |SpongeBob {SpongeBob [George Lopez |George Lopez
NICK SquarePants © {SquarePants © |SquarePants 1 |SquarePants 1 SquarePants an (Cc) e 0 (C0) .
NTV (00) NAcc) Friday Night Lights M (CC) Las Vegas 1 (CC) tc (N) A |News |
abu
SPEED Fe) Unique — |Unique Whips Unique Whips Unique Whips
ips

Rediscover the |Behind the The Hal Lindsey |Joel Osteen Dr. Frederick K. |Praise the Lord (CC)

TBN Kingdom Scenes (CC) |Report(CC) —_|(CC) Price (CC)

Everybody Friends Phoebe |Friends Phoebe | * NATIONAL LAMPOON’S CHRISTMAS VACATION (1989, Comedy),
TBS Loves Raymond |has a fear of fly- has a fear of fly- |Chevy Chase, Beverly D'Angelo, ne Quaid. A traditional Griswold
“Alone Time” ing. (CC) (CC)

ing. (CC) yuletide backfires in comic fashion.
a What Not [What Not to Wear “Erin” Film What Not to Wear “Carrie” Mix-and-|Fashionably Late With Stacy Lon-
TLC 0 Wear “Renee archivist. (CC) match style. (N) (CC) don (Series Premiere) Rebecca
0.” Weight loss. Romijn. (N)
(0) Cold Case |Cold Case El equipo investiga en {Cold Case ‘Forever Blue”A 1968 Cold Case “Knuckle Up" Lilly re-
TNT ishing’ (jun club de corazones solos cuando |case involves a cop suspected of opens the 2006 case of a cle
: (CC) un hombre se suicida. 0 being gay. 1 (cc) bound man’s disappearance, (CC)
TOON Chowder (N) [BEN 10: RACE AGAINST TIME (2007, Action) Gra- |Codename: Kids|Out of Jimmy's |Chowder
ham Phillips, Haley Ramm, Lee Majors. Next Door Head “Mascot”
TV5 (0) pe une |Thalassa “Tour du monde: Shangai-Xiamen” (SC) Le 3950
stoire =
TWC rae Ven- Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
ures
ed Yo Amo a |Amar sin Limites Un hombre lucha |Destilando Amor (N) Alejandro Fernandez: un Regalo
UNIV ry Querendén|para salvar a la mujer que ama. (N) Navidefio
(:00) Law & Or- |Law & Order: Special Victims Unit] x * * ELF ane Camedy) Will Ferrell, James Caan, Bob Newhart. A
der: Criminal In-|A mother who reported statutory man leaves Santa's workshop to search for his family. (CC)
tent © (CC) —_|rape is found murdered.
VH1 One Hit Won- {100 Greatest One Hit Wonders America’s Most Smartest Model || Love New York Blood oath. 1
ders One-hit wonders No. 20 to No.1. {Drunken networking.
vs (:00) College Basketball Legends Classic Tournament/College Basketball Legends Classic Tournament -- Tennessee vs. West
* -- New Mexico State vs. Texas. (Live) Virginia. From Prudential Center in Newark, N.J. (Live)
(00) America’s | x x % MICHAEL (1996, Drama) John Travdlta, Andie MacDowell, WGN News at Nine (N) 4 (CC)
WGN unniest Home |Willam Hurt. Tabloid journalists see the light with an angel's help.
Videos 1 (CC) |(CC)
Family Guy The |WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) © (CC) CW11 News at Ten With Kaity

WPIX [Griffins inherit a Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)
mansion. (CC)

Jeopardy! (N) Dr Phil © (CC) News (N) Jeopardy! (CC) |Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
WSBK (cc) asks a caller's ex |pursues a myste-
yo. on a date, rious caller.

PREMIUM CHANNELS

(0) Inside the | x x» MIAMI VICE (2006, Crime Drama) Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx, Gong i 5) Michigan vs. Ohio State: The
HBO-E [NFL n (cc) L, ae Crockett and Tubbs take on drug lords in South Florida. © |Rivalry © (CC)

a x % THE!Curb Your En- Curb Your En- {Curb YourEn- [Curb YourEn- |Curb Your En- {Curb Your En-
HBO-P PRODUCERS thusiasm ‘Meet |thusiasm © —|thusiasm Sam- |thusiasm Dog- |thusiasm ‘The _|thusiasm Exter-

(2005) (CC) the Blacks” 1 |(CC) ple-abusers. ( |gie-bag dispute. |Freak Book” ( |minator friend.

:45) The Making] % % x HAPPY FEET (2006, Adventure) Voices of Elijah Wood, Robin Inside the NFL © (CC
HBO-W tek e

g Kong |Williams, Brittany Murphy. Animated. An emperor penguin expresses him-
(CC self through tap-dancing, © ‘PG’ (CC)
% THE RETURN (2006, Suspense) Sarah Michelle | x» BECAUSE | SAID SO (2007) Diane Keaton, eo Making
HBO-S _|Gollar.A young woman has visions of the murder of a |Mandy Moore. A meddlesome woman tries to find the JOf: The Depart-
woman she has never met. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) perfect man for her daughter. ‘PG-13' (CC) ed 1 (CC)
5:20) ke %e% | ee NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM (2006, Fantasy) Ben Stiller, Carla Gugi- | & % % & THE UNTOUCHABLES
MAX-E SPeRMAN RE- |no, Dick Van Dyke. Museum exhibits spring to ie when the sun goes : (907 Crime Dre Kevin Costner,



a
3
a
so
LY â„¢%

=
wo
>
wm
ss
3



@
=
m
na
wu
=

nNOS

5/5
of -
z\iz
=a\e2lee
ral
=
g

E




?m lovin’ it










TURNS (CC) —|down. A ‘PG’ (CC) ean Connery. 1 'R’ (CC) cae ; @ wn. ae
6:40) * & x» FIGHT CLUB (1999, Suspense) Brad |x» CODE NAME: THE CLEANER (2007) Cedric the |BUSTY COPS 2: om G ( ki ( rt f { MOMAX fi A ard Norton, Men vent their ra aby beating —|Entertainer. Premiere. An amnesiac (iva betes he |MORE COPS, c K e | \ Ca ad |
: e i

_ Jeach other in a secret arena. 1 'R’ (CC) is a secret agent. ( ‘PG-13' (CC) BIGGER BUSTS st

6:00) x kx |(7:55) ku IN THE MIX (2005) Usher Raymond. iTV. A |Weeds "Go" (TV)[Brotherhood “Shelter From the oa mM k £ £ ft If
SHOW BAD NEWS —_/disc jockey becomes a bodyguard for a mobsters. =| 1 (CC) a Storm 1:1-2” Ae ee clears his ; : > ad e€ reat d S oa
BEARS (2005) |daughter. 1 'PG-13' (CC) conscience. £1 (CC) a < ‘

6:05) Neil % & & STRANGE BEDFELLOWS (2004, Comedy) —|(:45) * x THE BAXTER (2005, Romance-Comedy)
TMC oung;: Heart of |Paul Hogan. Two men pretend to be a same-sex cou- |Michael Showalter. A bridegroom has an anxious two
Gold 1 (CC) _ ple to receive a tax break. 1 'R’ (CC) ; weeks before his wedding. © 'PG-13' (CC)











PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



oF

New partnership focuses on next

generation of automobile power

@ GREENVILLE, S.C.
Associated Press

.WITH A growing stake in
automobiles and the research to
make them run cleaner and
cheaper, the South isn’t taking
sides in the ethanol vs. hydrogen
fuel cells debate.

The future of fuel dominated
the agenda at a meeting this
week that signaled a new auto-
motive power partnership

Future of fuel dominates agenda at meeting



between South Carolina and the
Tennessee Valley Corridor, an
economic development initia-
tive for Tennessee, north Alaba-
ma, southern Kentucky, and
southwest Virginia.

Speaking alongside promot-
ers of hydrogen and fuel cell
research and a top BMW engi-

neer who described models .

already using some hydrogen
power, University of Tennessee
President John Petersen made
a pitch for plans to grow switch-
grass as a replacement for gaso-
line.

No one booed. Although the
approaches to alternative fuels

differ, the theme of the Mon-
day meeting was working
together instead of competing.

The Tennessee Valley Corri-
dor automotive sessions were
hosted by the Clemson Univer-
sity International Center for
Automotive Research. The still
unfinished campus, in the same

Boeing beats its own sales record

@ By JAMES WALLACE
c.2007 Seattle Post-Intelligencer

SEATTLE - For the third consecutive
year, The Boeing Co. has won orders for
more than 1,000 jetliners and has already
eclipsed its own sales record set last year,
when it beat rival Airbus for the first time
since 2000.

Boeing announced Wednesday that is has
won 1,057 gross orders, or 1,047 net, so far in
2007.

That makes 2007 the best order year ever
for Boeing. Its previous high came last year
when it won 1,050 gross orders, or 1,044 net.
The net figure includes cancellations. The
gross total is the actual number of firm orders
won in a given year.

In the past week, Boeing added 72 new
orders, all but one from unidentified cus-
tomers. They were for 15 777s and 57 737s.

For the year, Boeing has won 584 gross
orders for its 737, and its order count for the
more profitable widebody jets is nearing 500.

But keeping the title of order king is likely
to be short-lived. The crown appears almost
certain to go back to Airbus at the end of
2007 because Airbus is having a record year,
too -- an industry record.

Over the past three years, Boeing and Air-
bus have combined for well over 6,000 orders.
Backlogs are at record levels.

And the jetliner buying frenzy could con-
tinue into 2008, although both airplane mak-
ers are predicting a fall-off next year.

In 2004, with the airline industry still in a

tailspin from the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Air-
bus and Boeing combined for only 638 orders.
It was even worse the previous year.

Then airlines, starting with those in Asia
and later Europe, went on a spending spree
the likes of which the industry has never seen

before.

Boeing won more than, 1,000 orders in 2005,
as did Airbus.

But it was not until last year that Boeing
finally topped Airbus for the first time in six
years. And Airbus still had an excellent year,
winning 824 gross orders, its second-best year
ever. But the year was marked by serious
delays with its A380 jumbo jet and senior
management changes.

This year, Airbus has come back strong.
The A380 has entered service with Singapore
Airlines, and Airbus is winning orders and
praise for its A350, which will challenge Boe-
ing’s 787.

Through October, Airbus had won orders

for 1,021 planes, but that figure will go up ©

substantially when orders are added from
this month’s big-Dubai air show.

With five weeks remaining in 2007, Boe-
ing’s order total will grow, too, especially
when deals announced in Dubai are final-
ized. But Airbus won far more orders and
commitments at the show than Boeing.

Boeing and Airbus do not count commit-
ments in their order totals. They must first be
turned into firm orders. _

At the air show, Dubai Aerospace Enter-
prise, a newcomer to the aircraft leasing busi-
ness, said it will order 70 A320s and 30 A350s
from Airbus, as well as 70 737s, five 747-9
freighters, 10 777-300ERs and 15 787s from
Boeing. Those orders are not yet firm.

And Qantas recently announced that it will
order about 100 more jets from Boeing and
Airbus. Those orders, of which about 60 per-
cent are for Airbus planes, could become
firm before the end of the year

Until 2007, the best order year for Airbus
was 2005, when it sold 1,111 planes. Its net
total for that year was 1,055.

That broke what was believed to be the

Open a new account today
PC MiGm@e dite emmy eh

$20,000

f (ery \ a fou deposit get
Aviti in the |

ronthly

industry order record set by Boeing and
McDonnell Douglas in 1989.

After merging with McDonnell Douglas
in 1997, Boeing changed its historical order
charts to include planes sold by McDonnell
Douglas. By that measure, the companies
combined for 1,107 gross orders in 1989,
according to Boeing’s historical order num-
bers. But Boeing has said it was not really
sure how many planes it and McDonnell Dou-
glas sold in 1989, and the number 1,107 might
have been based on bad information.

Regardless, Airbus will easily beat its 2005 .

order total this year. It won 163 firm orders at
the Dubai air show, along with another 132
commitments, many of which could be turned
into firm orders before the end of the year.
And the orders keep coming.
OceanAir, a Brazilian carrier that plans to

add domestic and international flights in Latin.

America, said Wednesday it has agreed to
buy seven A330-200 widebody planes from
Airbus, as well as 14 A319s and seven A320s.

Heading into 2007, neither Boeing nor Air-
bus expected to have the kind of year both
have enjoyed. But the current industry boom
-- the industry’s best ever -- has not slowed. It
followed the industry’s worst-ever downturn,
which tarted even before the Sept. 11 attacks
sent airlines, especially those in the United
States, into a financial tumble.

In recent interviews, top executives at Boe-
ing and Airbus have said they believe orders
could peak this year and drop sharply in 2008.

But they have said that before.

Still to be heard from in the’current heated
order cycle are the legacy U'S. carriers that
held off buying large numbers of new jets to
replace old ones because they needed to first
recover financially. Delta, Continental, Amer-
ican and United all could place sizeable os
in 2008 or 2009.

4

cqravws

For more information visit any branch of FirstCaribbean International Bank,

Ov call:

New Providence - 502-6800/01
Family islands - 1-242-300-2255



region as a BMW Manufactur-
ing Co. plant at Greer, already
offers master’s and doctorate
programs in automotive engi-
neering.

U.S. Rep. Bob Inglis, R-S.C.,
said he wants to see “plenty of
collaboration between the
Savannah River National Lab
and the Oak Ridge National
Lab.”

Other members of Congress
from Tennessee and South Car-
olina detailed efforts to get fed-
eral dollars for the region’s vary-
ing research interests in the hunt
for alternatives to fossil fuels.

Petersen described the uni-
versity’s role in developing a $40
million pilot plant for making
cellulosic ethanol — grassoline
— from switchgrass by the sum-
mer of 2009.

Proponents maintain the ven-
ture could eventually create
4,000 jobs in rural communities,
generate $100 million in new
farm revenue and help switch-
grass supplant corn as the best
and cheapest source for the
ethanol industry.

“Tennessee happens to be an
ideal climate for switchgrass,”
Petersen said.

A Joint Institute for Biologi-
cal Sciences at the Oak Ridge
National Laboratory that will
research new processes for pro-
cessing switchgrass is also
planned.

Tom Baloga, BMW of North
America’s vice president of
engineering in the United
States, predicted that some bal-
ance between hydrogen and bat-
teries will replace gasoline.

“We think the answer is
hydrogen,” Baloga said.

The technology combines
hydrogen with oxygen in the
vehicle’s fuel-cell stack, and
energy from the reaction is con-
verted into electricity that pow-
ers the vehicle. The vehicle’s
only emission is water.

South Carolina lawmakers

this year pledged $15 million to
lure companies involved in
hydrogen fuel research to the
state.

Shannon Baxter-Clemmons,
director of the South Carolina
Hydrogen and Fuel Cell
Alliance, said the Center for
Hydrogen Research in Aiken
County, affiliated with the
Savannah River National Labo-
ratory, was financed partly by
the community.

“They are excited about
hydrogen and fuel cells,” Bax-
ter-Clemmons said. “There are
second and third graders telling
me what a fuel cell is.”

In recent decades, Japanese,
German and Korean automak-
ers have built assembly plants
across the South and in stark
contrast to Detroit, employees
at those plants have not union-
ized. Nissan North America Inc.
last year moved its corporate
headquarters from California to
Tennessee, where it is finishing
construction on a building in
the Nashville suburb of
Franklin.

Clemson University President
James F. Barker said statistics
from the South Carolina
Department of Commerce show
that nearly one in six of the
state’s manufacturing workers
is employed by an automotive
company.

Peter Brown, associate pub-
lisher and editorial director of
Automotive News, told the
meeting that “the American
South is a place on the way up
in the automotive world,” and
fuel economy is the industry's
overriding issue.

Brown warned that the
South’s appeal to automakers
could be temporary.

He said the region’s ascent “is
in large part due to the absence
of the UAW (United Auto
Workers)” and lower costs
could eventually take the jobs
to Mexico, China and India.

The prizes get bigger
and bigger every month!

November - $1,500
December - $2,500

January -

$3,500

February - $5,000

Grand Prize $20,000
paid over a 12 month
period in $1,666 installments,

Wee ae AEs be Het R ean tah, come

FIRSTCARIBREAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK
HET THERE, TOGETHER:







Full Text
%~

rane

BP

mg

a

—o-



HOURS OF
~~ SUNSHINE

Volume: 104 No.3





eT
RM

Oe ar
TL

e Tribune





BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007





PRICE — 75¢









Alleged hitman riddled
with bullets, another
man taken to hospital

Foul lar ie is
suspected in
security officer's
disappearance

: @ By DENISE MAYCOCK
@ By KARIN HERIG At the crime scene police Tribune Freeport
Tribune Staff Reporter marked the spots where close to Reporter

kherig@tribunemedia.net

AN ALLEGED contract
killer, who was notorious in the
East Street area, was gunned
down yesterday in broad daylight
with a “high calibre” firearm.

As New Providence yesterday
prepared to hold a special can-
dlelight vigil in response to the
high murder rate, police recorded
homicide number 69 after two
men were shot in Bain and
Grants Town.

Samuel McKenzie, 35, who was
out on bail for murder, was rid-
died with bullets as he was stand-
ing with another man on Wilson
Street, off Hay Street, shortly
after 9am yesterday.

Speaking at the crime scene
yesterday morning, Chief Supt
Hulan Hanna told the media that
both men had been shot several
times “about the body.”

30 bullet shells fell to the ground.
Both men were taken to

Princess Margaret Hospital

(PMH) by a private vehicle.

McKenzie, better known as
“Mooshae”, was pronounced
dead shortly after arriving at the
emergency room. Doctors were
able to save the other man’s life
and he was in stable condition at
press time last night.

As a result of the nature of the
events surrounding the patient,
the hospital increased its security
measures yesterday.

PMH officials yesterday
assured the public that there is
currently a strong police presence
at the hospital.

Mr Hanna confirmed that
McKenzie is “known to police”
for previous offences.

SEE page three

PLP Chairman won't offer
himself for re-election

f By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Foul play is
suspected in the disappearance
of a 64-year-old security officer
stationed at the Eight Mile
Rock High School, where blood
was discovered.at the scene of
an apparent break-in there on
Thursday morning.

Grand Bahama Police are
seeking the public’s assistance in
locating security officer Vincent
Pedican, who reported for duty
at the school on Wednesday
evening for his midnight to 8am
shift. .

Although there was no trace
of Mr Pedican or his vehicle at
the school campus around 7am
Thursday when another securi-
ty officer arrived to relieve him,
his shoes and hand-held radio,
and blood were discovered in

. SEE page nine
Two students in

hospital, one in
custody after



PLP Chairman Raynard Rig-. ar ep orted





by officially announced yester- m@ By RUPERT : ee '
day his intention not to offer MISSICK Jr stabbing incident
himself for re-election as Chief Reporter

party issick@
chairman at the PLP’s conven- SHbineiietliinek lm By TANEKA
tion in February 2008. ° 5 THOMPSON





Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

While not commenting on his
future plans in politics, Mr Rig-
by has made it known that he

BAHAMIANS gath-
ered in Rawson Square
yesterday for a candlelight



SEE page 11



WHY ARE SO MANY
COMPANIES SWITCHING TO

eh ts) a

eetietele a’

MC ts ae
Let et an Wnty} eee
La ee or Cy a
Pee a nit a



ONE OF many candles held last night in Rawson Square.





Former minister speaks out over
botched housing development

FORMER Minister of
Works Bradley Roberts has
called for an end to the suf-
fering being experienced by
victims of a botched housing
development in the Cow Pen
Road area.

The former law firm of
Labour and Maritime Affairs
Minister Dion Foulkes repre-
sented two of the purchasers
in the Stephen’s Close trans-
action in 2005 and Mr
Roberts, with PLP chairman-
ship candidate Omar Archer,
called on Mr Foulkes to resign
from his post over the matter.

However, Mr Foulkes,

‘whose former firm was hired

to oversee the mortgage trans-
actions of two of the prospec-
tive home buyers, emphatical-

ly denied any wrongdoing by ~

the firm.

At a press conference yes-
terday, Mr Roberts claimed
that the “unapproved” subdi-
vision known as Stephen’s
Close was “doomed from the
start.”

“This project was started in
2004 and was doomed from

SEE page nine

vigil to pray for the heal-
ing of the “wounded
souls” of the nation and
to state with courage and °
determination that we are
“One Bahamas.”

Psychiatrist Dr David
Allen, who spoke yester-
day, said that the gather-
ing emphasises the fact
that the nation stands in
solidarity with the victims
of “our fallen brothers and
sisters especially their chil-
dren.”

“We come not to blame
or point the finger. We
come to say we are sorry.
We confess that we have
not done enough to dispel
the darkness, anger and
fear from our hearts mak-
ing it difficult for the light




















Felipé Major/Tribune staff









A REPORTED “gang
related” stabbing incident left

. two C I Gibson high school

students in hospital yesterday
and one in police custody, The
Tribune has learned.

Amidst the reports follow-
ing the news of this latest
episode of school violence,
school officials maintain the
campus was not in a “state of
chaos” and that classes
resumed as normal after the
students involved in the alter-
cation were isolated.

According to the school’s
principal Elaine Williams, the
incident occurred around
11.15 am at the end of morn-
ing recess.

While details were not con-

SEE page 11

i auth bball bbedatal








ea Pe

\ aXe bs Tae Ra.




PAGE 2, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



DAYS ONLY

this Friday November 23rd
6 Saturday November 24th, 2007

15% OFF STOREWIDE
10% OFF APPLIANCE

= With Any Purchase Register To Win 32 Inch
LCD Television 1 Every Week Until Dec. 22nd



i ws

2 SBUPSTSSS. ail
ora Noes
: NAAN Le

ae

Peet

YOU E
CANNOT
BEAT OUR
PRICES NOT
J/g oe a ean ite cae
MIAMI! Vous

Deena Oe

Call 380-SRSA!

Police still question
chefs and waiters over
Harl Taylor murder

INSIDERS expressed fears yesterday that
the Harl Taylor and Dr Thaddeus McDonald
murder i inquiries would “go cold” because of
the men’s high- -level gay connections.

They said it was important that the culprits
be brought to justice quickly if charges of
“selective justice” were not to arise again.

Up to press time last night, there had been no
change in the status of the investigations into
the brutal killings.

Police were still questioning a group of eight
chefs and waiters in connection with the mur-
der of Taylor.

‘The seven Dominicans and one Bahamian

worked at a wedding reception at Mountbatten
House one day before the designer’s body was
found.

No one has been taken into custody in con-
nection with Dr McDonald’s murder.

A source close to the late Dr McDonald said
yesterday: “This case should be pretty easy to
solve. It is a small community and Queen
Street, where Thaddeus was killed. It is under
CCTV surveillance from the American
Embassy.”

In fact, the US Embassy’s role in police
inquiries has been raised repeatedly by associ-
ates of the dead academic, who is said to have
entertained many young men at his guest house
home.

“The Americans must know who was coming
and going,” said a source, “If they didn’t, then
they have a real security issue.”

The US Embassy was closed for the Thanks-
giving Day holiday yesterday and no one could
be contacted for comment.

Dr McDonald, 59, a faculty dean at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, was found battered to
death in his home on Friday.

Handbag designer Har! Taylor, 37, was found
stabbed to death at his Mountbatten House
home in West Hill Street on Sunday morning.

MURDER VICTIM: Har! Taylor.



inquiry — that they were both murdered by a
jealous third party who resented their closeness,
or that they were involved in a “business deal
gone wrong” which prompted savage revenge.

Mr Taylor, who ran his handbag and interior
design business from Mountbatten House, was
a prominent figure in “high end” gay circles.

One insider told The Tribune: “Harl and he
were, it seemed, having a relationship. How-
ever, I still believe these killings were about
money, not sex. For some reason, this was pay-
back time.”

He added: “From the time it happened, I
said if they are going to crack this thing, they

will do so quickly. However, my fear is that it

will become a cold case. To bring charges
against a gay lover, or even a gay hitman, could



Police are pursuing at least two lines of

possibly compromise a lot of other people.”

AueeeececuscacesceseceeeeecnsseseseeeeeeeeeeSaeeseeGeneeSeenDeeeeeeenseaneeeeeeGeeeSGRGSOSSGSRS OSES EOE RGEHEOHAGEMEApHREEGORBES EGS EG SRS NERDESSERSEHOuEnensuaeeusseseneesensesessssseasesensnTasseneeseees

About 40 teachers, students ‘exposed’ to infection

School tuberculosis alert

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



ABOUT 40 teachers and stu-
dents at C C Sweeting Senior
High School have “tested posi-
tive for exposure to tuberculo-
sis” after a 10th grade student
at the school was diagnosed

Our HELPLINE HEROES will gave the doy!

he cident? i ‘we? ? Break: in?

RSA customers ean now call our 2ahy Helpline.
A Helpline Hero will come to your regeue

& stort filing your claim on the ae

you're in luck!
up to the pump at any Shell station where



"Spot the GREEN TRUCK and.

Paull



you gee

the 380°8RSA track. RSA customers will get @ #50 is eosiaharl

promotion endp ‘1, 80, 2007

Call ns todey & we will pul you in an with one of our Agente!
meshen { 242.328, 7685 f 242, 325 S151



{

",RoyalStar
» Assu rance

~_wirw rsebehamas,com

4



with the potentially fatal illness
last week, education officials
confirmed yesterday.

While a positive reading of
exposure to the disease does
not mean the person actually
has TB, it is an indicator that a
person had sustained exposure
to an infected individual.

The disease can only be
spread to persons who have had
at least eight hours of sustained
contact with an infected per-
son, health officials said.

According to a press release
issued by the Ministry of Edu-
cation yesterday, on November
16 and 19, teachers, auxiliary
staff, 10th grade students, and
school band members were
screened for exposure to the

illness through the Mantoux

skin test.

Test results revealed 24 staff
members and 12 students had
been exposed to the potential-
ly deadly illness.

Those who tested positive for
TB exposure were referred to
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal for x-rays.

Following the results of the x-
rays, health officials will deter-
mine what further steps are to
be taken.

. A 10th grade student was
reportedly diagnosed with the
illness last week, prompting
Ministry of Education and
Health officials to screen those
who may have come into close,
sustained contact with the stu-
dent. Relatives of the student
have been screened for the dis-
ease as well.

The student is currently in

the hospital undergoing treat-

ment for TB.

Last week,.students were
issued school letters informing
parents and guardians of the

Tuberculosis is a com-
mon, infectious and poten-
tially deadly bacterial
infection caused by the
germ mycobacterium
tuberculosis. It commonly
attacks the infected per-
son’s lungs, but can dam-
age the nervous system

‘and other organs of the
body.

TB spreads by air when
a person infected with TB
of the lungs coughs,
sneezes, or talks. Symp-
toms of the illness include:

° a cough lasting three
weeks or longer

° significant weight loss

e coughing up of
blood/mucus

e weakness/fatigue

® fever/chills

e night sweats

Persons with weak
immune systems are more
susceptible to TB infec-
tion.



situation. While teachers and
parents have expressed mount-
ing concerns over the possibili-

~ ty of a TB outbreak, Ministry of

Health and Education officials
assured the public they are tak-
ing all the necessary measures
to ensure the protection of all
students and staff at C C Sweet-
ing Senior High School.

A special assembly is sched-
uled for Monday, November 27
at the school to educate par-
ents and students about the ill-
ness.

AS

oe

a



eases



>

Cae

sat
Aba

—}-—-

4

THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 3





murder

FROM page one

According to members of the East
Street community, McKenzie was a
“killer for hire” and an individual
feared by many.

Police reported yesterday that
McKenzie and his companion were
standing on the side of the road on

_- Wilson Street when a green Kia

Sportage SUV pulled up and the occu-
pant of the vehicle fired a barrage of
shots at the two men.

Arriving at the scene of the murder
of her son, Veronica McKenzie, who
operates a hot dog stand on Bay
Street, screamed out for justice.

“I want justice, I don’t care who it is,

they better get it right and they better
fix it now before the day is out. I will
not rest until I get this solved today,”
she shouted out in grief.

Mrs McKenzie claimed that the
home of her son’s girlfriend was
recently “shot up” and that police
failed to respond in that case.

_ She claimed that police failed to
come to her son’s rescue when he
needed help.

“But they come now, after they
done (shoot) my son seven times,” she
said.

An hour after the shooting, at
10.07am, police received reports that a
green Kia Sportage SUV had been set
on fire on Malcolm Lane, off South
Street — only a few streets away from
the site of the murder.

Officers noted that they saw the col-
umn of smoke from the blaze while
they were working the crime scene on
Wilson Street.

Speaking with the press at the scene
on Malcolm Lane, Assistant Supt Wal-
ter Evans said that an emergency fire
services crew found the vehicle “fully
engulfed in flames.”

An eye-witness claimed he saw a
man wearing a white shirt throw a
“pipe bomb” at the SUV and then run
away.

The fire completely destroyed the
vehicle, but through specks of paint on

the right fender police were able to
determine that the burnt-out KIA

Sportage was originally green in
colour.

_ Police were also able to determine
that the vehicle had a 87777 license

plate number.

“There may be a connection with
the shooting, we’re not sure, but we’re
_ investigating that. Arson is suspected,”

Mr Evans said.

SHOOTING IN BROAD DAYLIGHT

Drive-by PMH enhances security after
admitting shooting victims







ASSISTANT SUPT acs ee said that an emergency Teco mM hareatent an engulfed in flames.’

PLP expected to conclude
Pinewood case next week

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

THE PLP is expected to con-
clude its case in the Pinewood
election court challenge next
Wednesday, as additional wit-

nesses took the stand yesterday -

acknowledging they were not
ordinary residents of Pinewood,
while a woman was forced to
give details about her relation-
ship with a married man to
determine where she lived.
Philip “Brave” Davis, PLP

- Jead counsel, informed the court

of his plans to wrap up Allyson
Maynard-Gibson’s case at the
beginning of the morning ses-
sion yesterday, before ques-
tioning seven witnesses.

Rodcliffe McPhee, who now
lives off Farrington Road, and is
on the PLP’s list of contested
voters, told the court that he
formerly resided in Pinewood
south of Jacaranda Street, and
east of Thatch Palm Avenue,
when he registered in October
2005. He testified that he then
moved to the Farrington Road
area in June 2006.

Testimony

His admission through testi-
mony that he was not an ordi-
nary resident of Pinewood for at
least six months prior to the
election came as another wit-
ness, Leslie Jones — also on the
PLP’s list — gave a description of
his residence west of Baygera-
nium Avenue that too is out-
side the constituency.

Two witnesses also gave tes-
timony about living in multiple
places, though maintaining that
their actual address was in
Pinewood.

Asa Moss Jr, who has lived
in the area of Foster Street and

ial.
EXTERMINATORS

a PRUE
PHONE: 322-2157



Boyd Road since June 22 this
year, was formerly a resident of
Guinep Street, Pinewood.

Mr Moss told the court that
he did visit his then girlfriend,
now wife, at her Boyd Road
residence, where he did stay at
times.

However, Mr Davis suggest-
ed that he lived there for three
years, rather than Pinewood.
“No,” Mr Moss replied. After
further questioning, Mr Moss
said he did keep clothes in Boyd
Road, but maintained that he
did not live there during that
period.

Berkley Kerr, who has lived
in Cowpen Road for the past
few weeks, testified that before
moving to Cowpen, he lived
between residences. in
Pinewood and Yellow Elder.

When he left his mother’s
Pinewood residence three years
ago, Mr Kerr said, he put some
of his larger items in the storage
area at the back of this house,
while leaving some clothes in a
bedroom that his brother took
over.

When at Pinewood, which
Mr Kerr asserted was his resi-
dence at that time, he said he
stayed in the room with his
brother.

Cheryl Williams, who now
resides in Augusta Street where
she rents, told the court she for-
merly lived on Sapodilla Boule-
vard with her family before
moving into this residence with
Nelson Brennan, who is mar-
ried and currently in divorce
proceeding.

She said that she initially met
Mr Brennan in 2000 at the air-
port. where both’ were
employed.

Ms Williams testified that she
lived with her family in
Pinewood until December 2006,
when she moved in with Mr
Brennan. Mr Davis read from
the BEC records for the Augus-
ta Street residence, which is in
her name along with the lease,
questioning whether Ms
Williams resided there from
October 2002 with Mr Brennan
when the account was activated.

Ms Williams maintained that

she did not, and said the
account was placed in her name
rather than his, as he was going
through legal separation. Under
cross-examination by FNM lead
counsel, Michael Barnett, Ms
Williams also said that due toa
previous problem with an earli-
er pregnancy, she decided to
live with her mother and family
during the period before she

moved in with Mr Brennan,
who is the father of her child.

Under re-examination by Mr
Davis, Ms Williams said that
issues emerged in their rela-
tionship regarding Mr Bren-
nan’s separation and divorce as
early as 2001, though the rela-
tionship was open.

Election court resumes on
Monday at 10am.

FOCOL
HOLDINGS LTD.

DIVIDEND PAYMENT

FOCOL is pleased to announce a

dividend payment of

2 cents per share to all shareholders

of record November 30, 2007

payable December 11, 2007.







@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net



THE Princess Margaret Hospital
initiated “enhanced security mea-
sures” after admitting two persons
who were shot yesterday morning
in what police described as a drive-
by “gangland-style” shooting.

Two men were taken to the
Princess Margaret Hospital with
gunshot wounds.

Samuel McKenzie, 35, who was
in critical condition on arrival at
the hospital, was out on bail on a
murder charge.

McKenzie, an alleged hitman,
who was notorious in the East
Street area, died shortly after
arrival at the hospital. McKenzie is
alleged to have been involved in
the shooting death of Nurse Joan
Lunn in 2001.

Stable

The second patient admitted
with McKenzie was taken to the
operating theatre. His identity was
still being withheld last night, but
he was said to be in stable condi-
tion.

The Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal’s tightened security measures
recalled the ones put in place after
the senseless killing of Nurse
Lunn.

Nurse Lunn was shot dead by a
hit-man in his attempt to
kill one of Nurse Lunn’s patients.

Princess Margaret Hospital man-
agement yesterday promised the
public that it will continue to have
a strong police presence at the hos-
pital.

“(We want to) assure our clients

tinue to work with the Royal
Bahamas Police Force to ensure
the utmost safety and security,”
the hospital said.
Two marked police vehicles and

one armed officer were stationed

at the hospital’s Accident and
Emergency entrance yesterday.

dist may une a

‘The Mall-at-Marathon
BOX: OFFICE OPENS A ATU 10:00 ‘00 AM AM DAILY

rascmsts (00 [380 wu [go [eae [00

cuca 08 [20H [as Jan [0

ae
0 | 00 [WA on [82 |

THE MIST

MR. MAGORIUN’S WONDER TWA | 6:10 | 8:40 [10:40 |
frnepciaust A 1:00 [340 [WA [6:00 [WA | NA
[uonsronuamBs TWA [WA [WA | a | 8:95 [10:50
Se ——— ee ae ma

BEE MOVIE

TYLER PERRY'S WHY DID | GET MARRIED ? eS ae

VEE E999

rises tao | 30s | wa | 600 | 825
pore [suf [or

BEE MOVIE

AMERICAN GANGSTER 7:00 ‘ | 10:00 |

FRED CLAUSE A RB MH

TEL.380-FLIX ¢ 393-9404



and their relatives that we will con- |
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, NOVE ‘MBE ? 23, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

‘THE TRIBUNE



rw " T “ak Li e d
Che Tribune Lumite
NULLIUS ADDICTiS TURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound io Swcaurie The Dogmas of No Master

PKONE FH DULE CTE Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

VE DUPUCTL Kt, O.BLE., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hlon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

SIR ETI

h ditor 1919-1972
editor 1972-199]

Pubushes
Conuibutne
LIL EEN Ge

PUCTI: AKRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-
Published Daily: Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., RO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

[TELEPHONES
Siu rtehboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Vassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
eee fax: (242) 352-9348



cane thing must be done

CHIEF JUSTICE Sir Burton Hall, admit
ting. a “disconnect between the judicial sys-
tem and broad sections of the community”,

gave an excellent talk at the Chamber of

Commerce's annual seminar Monday on the
powers and role of the judiciary,

With criticism mounting against the courts
in the face of escalating crime. Sir Burton, not
only detailed the physical difficulties under
which the courts are expected to function,
but pointed out that judges are appointed

not to “do justice”, but to “do justice accord-
ing to law.” He concluded in fixing the blame
squarely where it belongs. “In sum,” he said,
“while courts might impose punishment upon
conviction achieved after due process, no
court or any other state agency will curtail
objectionable behaviour in which a large
measure of the population insist in chgag
ing.

He reiterated his belief that “the police can .

do precious little to ‘prevent’ crime in the

absence of a broad community consensus of

behaviour which it suuaply will not tolerate.”
In other words we live tna sick society

a society that now reaps what it has sown

over the years. There is no cure for today’s
crime unless each member of society changes
its attitude and fully cooperates with the law

& «and demands. Zero. talevange against those . oo.
in a tool’s “paradise. These persons will never

°

=who don't obey it

“in the nieantine, however, We’ cannot sit
on our hands. complain of our handicaps,
and do nothing.

A caller to a talk show Wednesday morn-
ing likened the police to a greyhound chasing
a rabbit. After catching the rab!
hound turns around only to find

has released the rabbit. The race cits all
over again, a tired grevhound chasing the
same rabbit.

Often the police feel that they are that
greyhound and that the “someone” releasing
the pesky rabbit is the court. Police say that
much of the crimes committed today are by
repeat offenders out on bail Statistics seem to

support their claim
Why are these persons, some accused of

the most heinous crimes, even brutal murdets,
walking the streets? They are there because
the courts do not have the facilities to try
their cases. And so a judge ts duty bound to
administer justice according to the law. Under
the constitution an accused person is not only
presumed innocent. but has aright to a fair

hearing, before a fair and impartial court,

PRE-OWNED

within a reasonable time. However, lan-
guishing in prison for five years is not a “rea-
sonable time”. It is denying an accused, who

-might be innocent, his constitutional rights.

As Sir Burton says the true “victim” might be
an accused who is in fact innocent of the
charge. And so, rather than denying these
persons their rights, the courts are releasing
them into the community. As a result the
community is being held hostage by some of
them, and the exhausted police find that in
many instances they are chasing the same
rabbits.

In the House of Assembly on October. 17
National Security Minister Tommy Turn-
quest told the House that of the 1,359 prison
population some 587 are there on remand. He
said that 189 are now out on bail for armed
robbery, and more than 114 for murder. In
2006. 35 per cent were on bail at the time
they committed their ‘second offence, and
between January and September this year
42 per cent, or 22 murder suspects, were on
bail at the time of a subsequent offence. Up
to September this year 39 persons were out
on bail for rape and more than 189 for armed
robbery.

And so what happens to these accused?
Are they expected to take to the streets, find
a.job and go straight? To believe this is to live

find a job. And so, without family or friends,
and no work how are they to live? You
guessed it, they prey on the community.
While hard working Bahamians are out earn-
ing an honest living these jobless, hungry
people are perched ready to snatch the first
opportunity to plunder your possessions and
even injure you.

So what is to be done?

It is suggested that more judges be hired
and a court be devoted exclusively to criminal
matters. Sir Burton says that this is not prac-
tical. So what is? The matter is urgent, we
cannot wait until the community has been
educated to accept that the only way to
ensure security is to convince all Bahamians
that it’s important to obey the law, even in
small matters.

Nor can we sit back and. tell Bahamians
that they have brought this all on themselves,
while the killing, maiming and robbing con-
tinues. Nothing is impossible. The so-called
impossible now has to be turned into the pos-
sible.

¢ To be continued Monday.



Granddaughter’s
tribute to a
matriarch’s love

EDITOR, The Tribune.

MY GRANDMOTHER may
not have landed on the moon or
may not have become the first
female Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas,
but she has made outstanding
achievements to not only her fam-
ily, but to the community as well.

All her life she has worked
hard to take care of herself and
her family. She gave her five chil-
dren the best school education
that she could afford and instilled
in them crucial values that strong
families and communities are
built on.

Since I was a year and ten
months, my grandmother took
me in and helped my mother to
raise me as if I were her own. I
remember growing up and people
would ask her: “Well Mrs.
Roberts, is this your last child?”
and she would respond jokingly —
“Do you think I am that fool!” -

Nonetheless, it was as if I were
her last because I lived with her
all my life. While growing up, she
made it her duty to raise me the
best way she knew how, by instill-
ing in me strong Christian and
moral values. She made sure that
I learned to respect others, elders
and peers alike. I can still remem-
ber our walks to school together
and her and me picking pennies
up along the way to put in our
piggy bank. She would diligently
assist me with my homework until
the wee hours of the morning and
she would always make herself
known to my teachers and made
surprise visits to school to keep
me in line and spoil me with
treats. My aunts and uncles
always secretly regarded me as
spoiled, but in comparison to my
peers and their parents by dis-
tinction, she appeared strict.

In my developing years, my
perception of my grandmother
transformed from peculiar mis-
conception to love and admira-
tion. As I matured, I realized the
importance of and came to be
grateful for the way that she
raised me and values she lived by
and the standards she fought to
uphold. My grandmother is a
woman of strength and courage
and that could be observed by
anyone. She is statuesque and dig-
nified and her presence alone
demands respect. Initially she
may seem a bit intimidating with
her no-nonsense disposition, but
anyone who has come to know

and appreciate her can rightfully ©

testify that she has a warm heart
and a sincere soul.

She often enjoys expressing
her motherly nature with food.
You can be sure that if you visit
her, she is either preparing a deli-
cious meal or has the food on the
stove waiting to be served. Her
direct family, myself included,

neue hm nelaminl =n ula
“Dont just have thanksgiving

CARS & TRUCKS

For the best deal in town on

pre-owned cars, with warranty!

‘99 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA

have thanksliving”

SUNDAY SERVICES

7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 ¢ 393-5798

Fax: 326-4488/394-4819



HEELS

letters@tribuinemedia.:



knows this and takes delight in
visiting her throughout the day,
almost everyday to partake of her
sumptuous Bahamian cooking.

If I can only become half of
the lady and woman that she is —
I would surely be one of the
greatest women on earth. She is
the manifestation of Christiani-
ty, beauty, grace, elegance and
poise, knowledge, loyalty, kind-
ness and love. She has shown me
the meaning of true and uncon-
ditional love. She bestows untar-
nished grace and generosity to
her loved ones and those around
her in her own special, often mis-
understood way. She loves with-
out thinking and without asking
in return. She is indeed a woman
of truth and sincerity, giving
advice and honest opinions when
asked or not asked at all if the
situation calls for it. Without a
doubt, she is the ideal example
of independence never expectant
of a favour in return and fully
capable of taking care of herself
in every aspect. She is a matri-
arch who perpetually mentors
and cares for her loved ones as
well as everyone else with whom
she may encounter. She is a quin-
tessential woman of wisdom, with
every utterance from her lips wise
thoughts and fundamental values
are verbalized. Most of all, she is
a woman of God, who holds firm
to her faith which is engrained in
every part of her being and
essence.

Apart from God, and a few
other important people, she ranks
at the top of the list of persons
whom I regard as my source of
inspiration. She inspires me to be
the remarkable person and
woman that I know I will one day
become. She is the earthly source
of encouragement that stimulates
me to persevere when I feel like
giving up. Thoughts of her efforts
in my development has caused
me to realize that her (along with
others) investment of time love
and money in me must not and
will not go in vain. Her existence
encourages me to be a better per-
son in all aspects of my personal-
ity and development. She is my
earth angel that God has loaned
to me and others. In these press-
ing times, there is a critical need

‘ for more strong role models in

our society to make their pres-
ence felt. Our country requires
more sound adults like my grand-
mother to raise and supervise our
children with love, good values,
morals and discipline now more
than ever with violence on the
rise in our schools and with the
murder count in our country soar-
ing. It is imperative that we instil
these traits in our children, in
order for us to have a productive
and safe society. Our adolescents
and older folks alike need some-
one to look up to. Don’t let our
values die with those who grew
up generations before us.
Moreover, I want the world to
know what a wonderful woman
Sylvia N. Roberts is, I want to
shout it from the rooftops. I want
this country to know that God
has blessed the world with her
presence and that I am so sin-

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

ty De a CCT TE TCLs
322-2157



cerely grateful to have her in my
life. I want to give her the roses
while she is still alive, I want to
honour this wonder of a woman
whom I love with all my heart!

MONTARA ROBERTS
Nassau,
November 21, 2007

Outside
advertising
adding to
ugliness

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WHAT will certain business
houses try next in outside
advertising?

It seems there is a national
competition between the two
soft beverage companies to
see who can litter the
Bahamas the most and the
quickest.

Everywhere today you see
either banners or bottle
shaped images of the beverage
companies products which
fade very quickly and really
look ugly.

Coming from the Airport
yesterday just passing Go
Slow Bend on West Bay
Street and on the perimeter
wall of the first house on the
waterside there is a large ban-
ner for the Americas Cup Sail-
ing Boat tourist attraction —
surely Physical Planning did
not approve that?

Outside most of the food
stores in recent weeks large
banners advertising the in
store promotion of their bev-
erage products — usually the
sign is tied provisionally, nor-
mally not straight and really
adding to the ugliness which
we seem to enjoy.

Editor, there are provisions
under Town Planning that all «
outside advertising materials
require Physical Planning
Board approval — I believe
Michael Major is the Director,
but obviously these business
houses simply erect the signs
knowing that they will stay up
for weeks before something
“might be done”.

Although Physical Planning
Board advised all the political
candidates that their election
signs must be taken down
there are still not just one or
two in very visible locations —
someone has to be blind to
those of B J Nottage and Rev
CB Moss at the light on Blue
Hill and Dillet Street....It is
time these were removed.

It seems in our eyes ugliness
is close to godliness when it is
the total opposite.

Iam so annoyed with the
beverage companies that I and
my family will not purchase
their products as they in my
opinion they not law abiding
and are sending such a nega-
tive message to our young
people.

MARCIA FARRINGTON
Nassau,
November 13, 2007.

SAUNT

O3-c SUZUK | BALENO
‘04 SUZUKI IGNIS
‘95 TC >vOTA A AVALON
‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer
00 HYUNDAI ACCENT
‘O00 HYUNDAI GALILOPER
‘O01 HYUNDAI COUPE -

04 HYUNDAI SANTA FESS

Very on mileage, very clean

‘O06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Very clean
‘06 HYUNDAI TUSCON GLS

VAUtO <=,
ITY ae
LIMITED

HE BAHAMAS
322. a775) ’ a5 3079

Quoans Huy, 352-6422

14.8 Cube
$650.00

@

The toterwattened Scout of The Babarees
FORNDED tee

@® world school

18 Cube
$720.00

se? Ure, %

The Annual General Meeting of

St. Andrew’s School Limited will
take place in the school’s library
on

21 Cube
$962.00

ESTIMATE PREPARED FOR FINANGING AT THE BANK OF YOUR CHOICE
When it comes to quality We Don’t Compare!

betel DISCOUNT FURNITURE AND is

APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE
L MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
t A Lie Lorena}



#1 AUTO DEALER ft
EAST SHIRLEY STREET -
sit our thowroor af Quality huto Salos (Free

or Abaco Motor Mail, Ger

Financial statements and proxy forms may be
obtained the Business Office at St. Andrew’s School


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 5



Ce Ea a Se a
” Father appeals for his

missing wife to return



In brief

Sandals resorts
scoop hat-trick
at British Travel
Awards 2007

THE British Travel
Awards held this month
saw Sandals Resorts hon-
oured as the favourite all
inclusive resort of con-
sumers.

Sandals was also named
best all inclusive resort as
voted by the travel indus-
try, and the company with
the favourite travel adver-
tising campaign among
consumers.

“These awards are the
result of hard work, non-
stop training, our commit-
ment to continuously mod-
ernising and improving our
product and our determi-
nation to settle for nothing
less than number one,”
said Gordon “Butch”
Stewart, chairman of San-
dals Resorts. “These
acknowledgments arrive at
a special time in Sandals’
history as we enter our
new ‘luxury-included’
epoch. We look forward to
remaining at the top of the
travel world tor many
years to come.”

Known for leadership in
Caribbean travel, Sandals
has once again raised the
bar among distinctive
resort destinations with
the introduction of the
Luxury Included Holiday
and a collection of luxury
suites in Jamaica, Antigua,
St Lucia and the Bahamas.

The new luxury experi-
ence at Sandals reportedly
features unprecedented
services and amenities
including private plunge
pools and jacuzzis, exclu-
sive dining options, and
celebrated partnerships
with celebrity designers.

The British Travel
Awards recognises more
than 100 of the best com-
panies in travel as voted
for by industry profession-

als andconsumers. 4% esd











Evamae Kemp-Rolle



A FATHER-OF-THREE last night
appealed for his missing wife to return
home, claiming his children were cry-
ing themselves to sleep over her dis-
appearance.

Beach attendant Paul Rolle, 49, said
his 38-year-old wife Evamae Kemp-
Rolle left home for work two months
ago and had not been seen or heard

from since then.

wife.

Rum Cay Resort developers
announce the winner of
million dollar treasure hunt

RUM CAY — Montana
Holdings Limited, developers
of the Rum Cay Resort and
Marina and platinum spon-
sors for the fifth Oil Baron’s
Ball in’ Dubai, have
announced the winner of their
million dollar treasure hunt.

Karen Sinclair, a resident
of Dubai, was randomly
picked as the winner of the
grand prize — an oceanfront
home site valued at $1.25 mil-
lion.

The luxurious Bahamian
beach front home site is easi-
ly accessible via air and land,
the company said.

“Tam still in a complete
state of shock, this is really a
dream come true,” said an
exhilarated Karen Sinclair.
“My husband has been in the
oil industry for 30 years, and
this time we feel we've truly
struck gold.”

Each guest at the ball was
given a brochure containing
a number and web address.
The web address was activat-
ed immediately after the ball
ended and participants
entered this number on the
website within the seven day
time period.

The Oil Baron’s Ball Dubai
took place on Friday, Novem-
ber 9 on the lawns of the Emi-

rates Golf Club, Dubai.
Considered Dubai’s pre-
mier corporate social event
for executives of the oil and
gas industry, the Oil Baron’s
Ball features the crowning of
the Middle East Oil Baron
2007 and raises money for the
ball’s official charity, the
Make A Wish Foundation.
“We are pleased to
announce that Ms Sinclair is
the winner of our million dol-
lar treasure hunt. The Oil
Baron’s Ball stimulated great
interest in our magnificent
island of Rum Cay and we
look forward to the day that
Ms Sinclair can relay its
exquisite beauty and
ambiance to others,” said
MHL CEO John Mittens.
Rum Cay Resort Marina is
an 897-acre luxury residential
resort marina, which accord-
ing to the company is being
developed “as the premier
destination for the free-spirit-
ed, adventure traveller seek-
ing an authentic Bahamian
‘out island® experience with
unparalleled natural elegance
and superb amenities”.
There are plans for a new,
modern airport with on-site
Customs services as well as a
full-service mega-yacht mari-
na.

The Women’s Ministry Of

HOLY DOVE BAPTIST CHURCH

Fifth Street, The Grove

will host their

wee “Women With Integrity
‘Walking In Authority”

WITH TWO SPECIAL SERVICES
Scriptures text: Esther 4:5-16

| Prophetess

ANN
COAKLEY

Sunday,
November 25,
2007, @ 11am

Minister
FLORENCE
DELEVEAUX

| Monday,
November 26,
2007, @ 7:30pm

Holy Dove Baptist Church honors

SIS. NADEEN EUGENE

Kingdom Woman of the Year
2007-2008

Woman's Ministry President:
Prophetess Koralee
Brathwaite
Pastor Bishop
lan K. Brathwaite



He told The Tribune: “I love my

“Y want her back. The children are

Bank

Available

missing her. They cry themselves to
sleep at night.”

Mrs Rolle, who worked as a room
attendant at Atlantis, was last seen in
September when she left home for
Paradise Island.

“From that day forth we have not
seen her,” said Mr Rolle from his
home in The Grove. “The children are
missing her desperately.”

Asked if she might have left with
another man, Mr Rolle said: “It’s
always a possibility. But ’'m convinced

“Financing

she is still right here on New Provi-
dence.”

He said she had never left home like
this before.

“My kids are between four and eight
years old and they are upset.

“We want her to contact us to say
where she is.”

Mr Rolle said police had been
informed.

He has also placed an advertisement
seeking the public’s help in finding
her.

Insurance
Available
on the

BRING YOUR OLD VEHICLE TO TRADE SO YOU CAN UPGRADE!!!

Located: Thompson Blvd
Tel: 325-0881/2 Open:Mon.-Fri. 8a.m.-5:00p.m.

nosetta Street - Ph: 325-3336


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Holiday issue: Pictured
(from left) are Jim LaRo-
da Sr, Post Office super-
intendent general; Rowe-
na Rolle, general manag-
er of Authentically
Bahamian Department:
Miralee Rose, artisan; Mr
Grant, Leslie Cartwright,
deputy postmaster and
Cathy Laing, artisan



e Srnail and easy to carry

* Easy to test In low light

* 4 daily alarms

¢ Extra small blood dran
for genta testing



Prreestyle

Ask FOr details





S

Derek Smithy!



Is simplicity
your priority?

« Easy to apply blood
* Simple to review
us results



* Designed ta make
tasting simple

¢ Extra reassurance of
blood ketone testing



’



Precision Xtra

Upgrade’ your meter now. It’s FREE!

- Abbott

~ Diahetes Care

: ~ ‘ t
“Oller excludes currant Preelsion Xia" and FreaStvie “mater Users.

DISTRIBUTED BY
_ LOWE'S WHOLESALE
SOLDIER ROAD ® 393-7171

> Rae



Vote for your favourite Barista.

CT URL MUL Leak eM Lm YLT Ce aa Ce Laer cae oleae
who provides legendary service. (Yost men eal AG TEM as eRe

of espresso~ based coffee drink.

Does your Barista. +» Offer a sense of belonging « Greet you as you walk
through the door + Know you by drink or name « Provide quality beverages + Share their coffee
knowledge , Express passion and excitement of the Starbucks brand?

If so, we invite you to es into any Starbucks location and vote for your

favourite Barista!
' Barista Name:
: Store: _
; Your Name:
; Email:

Tel.:

1 Additional entry forms & drop boxes available at all Starbucks Bahamas locations.

ALL ENTRIES MUST BE SUBMITTED BY MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26th, 200%,

8-8087 + Wyndham Casino, CL ta)
thon, 394-5733 + Oakes Field, 302-2892

Post Office marks Christmas with special issue

Bahamian products win
the stamp of approval

JUST days before the
nation’s largest handicraft
and souvenir show, the Post
Office Department issued
special Christmas postage
stamps featuring authentical-
ly Bahamian products.

Post Office officials pre-
sented the series to Minister
of Tourism and Neko Grant
and the creators of the prod-
ucts featured on the stamps.

The presentation launched
a chain of highly-anticipated
events in the handicraft and
souvenir industry.

The industry’s next signifi-
cant event will be the 13th
annual Authentically
Bahamian Christmas Craft
Show, which is organised by
Ministry of Tourism in con-
junction with Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA).

Mr Grant pointed out the
importance of constantly sup-
porting Bahamian creations.

“The Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation through its var-
ious departments always
seizes the opportunity to
assist in the promotion of
things Bahamian,” he said.

“Tam told that this year
represents the 13th annual
Authentically Bahamian
Christmas Craft show, and
that division is headed by Ms
Rowena Rolle.”

Mr Grant commended Ms
Rolle and artisans Miralee
Rose and Cathy Laing,
whose shell and straw orna-
ments have been pho-
itographed for the special
issue of Christmas stamps.

The work of Ms Rose, the
2005 winner of the Cacique
Award for Handicraft, was
selected for the 1S cent, 25
cent, 50 cent, 65 cent and 80
cent stamps.

Ms Laing’s work will be on
the 70 cents stamp.

Mr Grant also commend-
ed the Post Office Depart-

ment on the selection of

authentically Bahamian craft
items for this year’s Christ-
mas issue.

$39,200°



“The stamp by itself is a beau-
tiful thing to view, and Iam
quite sure the sale will go well
with this issue. It is something
that is completely original and
something authentically

Bahamian.”



Assistant Postmaster Leslie Cartwright

CHANCE OF AWARD

The focus on
Bahamian handi-
crafts will culminate
in the crowning of a
new Cacique Award

winner for Handi-
craft on February 1
when the Cacique -
-Awards honour the
_ best performers in
tourism-related
~ fields. eo

He pointed out that high-
quality Bahamian products
will now be seen around the
world when the stamps are
put into use.

“We sincerely hope that as
we move forward, more
opportunity will be presented
to the promotion of things
Bahamian, not only locally
but certainly international-
ly.” he said.

Ms Rolle, general manager
of the Authentically Bahami-
an Department in the Min-
istry of Tourism, said the
stamps are a testament to the



significant advancement that
has been made for Bahamian
products and the annual
show that displays them.

“When we first started, we
didn’t even have ornaments,”
she said.

“Now, after 13 years, look
what we have today.”

Ms Rolle said that Ms
Rose and Ms Laing take part
in the show every Christmas.

They will display the items
on the postage stamps from
November 30 to December
2, when the Authentically
Bahamian Christmas Craft
Show is held at Wyndham
Nassau Resort.

Leslie Cartwright, assistant
postmaster, said individuals
such as Ms Rose and Ms
Laing help to make the
Christmas stamp programme
a success every year.

“The stamp by itself is a
beautiful thing to view, and I
am quite sure the sale will go
well with this issue,” he said.
“It is something that is com-
pletely original and some-
thing authentically Bahami-
an. So we are really excited
about this issue and we are
looking forward to the pub-
lic’s participation in purchas-
ing these souvenir items this
year.”

muta aS THE
SMART ui: TO a

q ‘6L V8 Automatic
Super Cab XLT

ue

The worlds
best selling
full size
truck
(other
models
available)

During the Ford Model Year Clearance you can experience the
best deals of the year. Don’t miss the truly amazing opportunity
to get behind the wheel of the most stylish vehicles on the road.

Available at

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094



EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas. com SmartChoice


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 7





‘Sun and ?’ hosts
Burgundian Dinner
to celebrate the
release of new wine

MORE than 70 patrons enjoyed the special Burgundian
Dinner at Sun and? Restaurant, held to celebrate the world-
wide release of the 2007 Georges Duboeut Beaujolais Nou-
veau.

The wine is distributed in the Bahamas by Bristol Wines
and Spirits.

Sun and ? chef and owner Ronnie Dykere joined Bristol
wine director Rusty Scates, in organising and creating the
evenings special menu and wine tasting.

Chef Ronnie, as he is generally known, said, "We were very
pleased with the turnout. | enjoyed preparing the special
beaujolais menu and getting people together for the tradi-
tional annual launch of the Beaujolais Nouveau. It's some-
thing different to the usual dining out experience.”

Wine expert Rusty Scates commented, "This year's Beau-
jolais Nouveau from Georges Duboeuf, is a very drinkable
‘fun’ wine, a step up from the 2005 and 2006 Nouveau wines,
which were both a little disappointing.

“The food and the wine were an excellent combination and
all of the patrons 1 spoke with, thoroughly enjoyed the
evening,” he said.

Guests had a delightful choice of dishes to try:

APPETIZERS
¢ Cassolette D’Escargots au Fleurie
Escargots simmered in red beaujolais wine.

° La Caille Rotie Au Beaujolais et Champignons en nid de
Salade Trevise Rouge, Roquette, Arugula

Roasted quail with mushrooms nestled in ficld greens
glazed with a beaujolais sauce.

MAIN COURSE
e Magret De Canard Rotis Au Vinaigre De Miel
Roast duck breast with a honey vinegar sauce.

e Saumon ou Dorade Local Grille a la cream D’Estragon

et Asperges
Grilled salmon or local snapper complemented with a tar-
ragon cream sauce.

DESSERT

¢ Feuillete D’ Anglaise aux Pommes Glace au Caramel

Sliced apples with pastry cream served on puff pastry with
a caramel ice cream

MISSING











EVAMAL KEMP
ROLLE
has been missing
since September
this year, Any one
who knows of her
whereabouts
Please Contact

325-6306

She is missed by
her kids




Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

LOCAL NEWS

Mitchell: PLP concerned

that government has no
plan to deal with crime





the Urban Renewal Project by
the FNM government has con-
tributed to the rise in crime.
Mr Mitchell said the PLP is
concerned that the govern-
ment has no clear direction or
plan to deal with the crime sit-
uation in the Bahamas.
“From our perspective, the
government needs to address
what it is they are doing
about crime — what is their
legislative agenda and
what is their social agen-
da, and it is simply not
clear that they have
any agenda to address
the issue,” he said.
Mr Mitchell, who
was speaking in Grand
Bahama on Tuesday,
said that the PLP stands
ready to support any
programme that will
reduce crime. ”
“Our party met in a par-
liamentary caucus (Mon-
day) night and I can tell you

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport —
Reporter

FREEPORT — Fox Hill MP
Fred Mitchell is claiming that
the “destabilisation” of the
Royal Bahamas
Police
Force
and








































about this issue. We think
that it is necessary
for there to be
a public
state-



4!

all MPs expressed concerns -



“From our perspective, the
government needs to address
what it is they are doing about
crime — what is their legislative
agenda and what is their social

agenda.”



ment at the highest level in the
country, especially when the
country is panicked about the
situation related to crime,” he
said.

“We have heard from the

police, but the people of the
country want to hear from
their political leaders about
the state of crime in this coun-
try.”
MP Mitchell said the FNM
has not revealed any short
term or long term plans to deal
with the issue.

“We were told when the
House adjourned at summer
time that when it came back
from recess in September, the
plan would be revealed. No
plan was revealed then and
there is no legislative agenda

.

US.

Bae Ca Cee EC EEN YAR art
Marina Village, Paradise Island.- Crystal Court at Atlantis

‘Mall at Marathon .- Harbour Bay -.Palmdale

Marsh Harbour, Abaco - Harbour Island - Emerald Bay Exuma
“Our Lucaya, Freeport, Grand Bahama ‘

WWW.TECHNOMARINE.COM

and we are now dealing with
old history in the House. So
there is nothing really to
advance the whole issue of
what is happening in the area
of crime,” he said.

When the PLP was in office,
Mr Mitchell said it put in place
specific proposals to deal with
crime, and re-organised the
Royal Bahamas Police Force.

The re-organisation which
took place just before the gen-
eral election, aimed to bring a
new perspective and fresh
expertise and training to help
reduce the crime, he claimed.

Mr Mitchell claims that the
force was destabilised by the
reversal of many of these
changes when the FNM came
to office.


PAGE 8, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Be GN a oh LOCAL NEWS





>) TOYOTA moving forward
4Runner ©

im RIGIhE
LOvmment:






|







The Toyota 4Runner has supreme power and style ina
tough, sophisticated form.

Features include: V6 4.0 litre engine, automatic transmission, 2WD system, A/C,
dual airbags, power windows, locks and mirrors, Keyless entry, automatic
power back door window and jam protection system and CD player.

: TOYOTA

vi Backed by a 3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty.

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS.LID

safe



Auto Mall, Shir ley Street (opp. St. Matthew's Church)

Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm San
Sat-8am - |2noon

THE 397-1700

E-GaR ex ecmotor@batelnet.bs

Parts and service guaranteed







AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER












PLP govt abuse ©
of BAIC left a
legacy of debt

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

HE publicly owned

Bahamas Agriculture -

Industrial Corporation is mil-
lions of dollars in debt after
being abused by the “new”
PLP during its single term in
government.

According to a recent
report to parliament by Agri-
culture and Marine Resources
Minister Larry Cartwright,
audited accounts of BAIC’s
financial position show that
the corporation was in debt
by $1.6 million (2003) and
$812,586 (2004).

While farmers, fishermen
and industrialists on the Fam-
ily Islands were in dire need
of financial relief to sustain
their livelihoods, it appears
that some of the principals at
BAIC were gallivanting, fer-
yently spending public funds
on extravagant dinners and

- opulent trips. Prior to the then

minister stepping in to correct
a seemingly piggish state of
affairs, BAIC appeared to
have become the personal
piggy-bank of certain govern-
ment officials. Public funds,
in my estimation, appeared to
have been frivolously spent
on gratuitous professional
fees that also included speech
writing and so-called “special
project services.”

“Travel and entertainment
expenses included costs relat-
ed to airfares, accommoda-
tions, transportation and
meals from travel within and
outside of the Bahamas,” Mr
Cartwright said.

Mr Cartwright stated that
approximately $52,000 was
spent on trade and investment
missions to ‘China, yet there
is no evidence of any remark-
able boost in Bahamas-China



A DR AN



The audited
reports of the
activities at BAIC
in 2003/2004
gives the
impression that
Bahamian tax-
payers were
grossly abused



trade or Chinese investment
in the Bahamas. Or, is it that
these trips were joyrides that
resulted in little to nothing
and counted for naught?

Additionally, there were
large payments to the Royal
Bank of Canada Visa and
Restaurants that were includ-
ed in the Business and Enter-
tainment figure of which
$35,000 was attributed to the
BAIC chairman at the time,
the then Member of Parlia-
ment for Holy Cross. Well
blow me down!

How much food could pos-
sibly be eaten that would have
resulted in a $35,000 bill -in
that time span? And, if all of
this money was spent on
“business lunches”, who were
the businessmen and what
investments or returns did

~ these meétings lead to?

What plausible explanation
can clarify how travel and
entertainment costs signifi-
cantly ballooned from $61,285

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW



GiBpsoOoN

in 2002 to $232,000 in 2003?

Although there was a mora-
torium on public sector hir-
ing during much of the PLP’s
governance, cronyism seems
to have reigned supreme at
BAIC, as 22 new employ-
ees/contractual staff were
employed in 2003, thereby
causing the corporation to be
overstaffed. This subsequent-
ly led to an increasing month-
ly payroll which spiked at an
astounding $140,000!

Mr Cartwright also
expressed concerns that there
was very little movement in
the collection of micro-loans.
Further illustrating the topsy-

._ turvy, do-nothing atmosphere

at the micro-loan facility, the
minister said that it was out
of control!

“There were significant
breaches as far as documen-
tation and overall administra-
tion of the programme were
concerned,” Mr Cartwright
said.

The audited reports of the
activities at BAIC in
2003/2004 gives the impres-
sion that Bahamian taxpayers
were grossly abused. Instead
of encouraging sustainable
development, the public’s
purse was apparently used to
pay for swanky trips, gourmet
dishes and questionable hir-
ing practices! Between 2003
and 2004, the fishermen-and

‘farmers, for whom the corpo-

ration was established, seem
to have been woefully
neglected instead of being giv-

en much desired assistance.

-— Crime — a national crisis

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

EMInSU
elt haa

t appears that more than a handful of Bahamians have
seemingly lost their moral compass and gone insane!

The murderous, sadistic state of affairs presently afflicting the
Bahamas is nothing short of nightmarish. If the current crime
wave continues unabatedly, our nation is on the brink of out-
right anarchy!

The vicious spate of brutal crimes plaguing our society is a
manifestation of more complex social ills—for e.g., absentee
fathers/parents, poor socialization, low academic achievement,
too much exposure to violence and poor conflict resolution skills.
When children spend hour after hour killing each other in violent
video games and listening to music that encourages violence, it
seems that they assume that they can take the same approach in
reality. In our schools, I have heard daily conversations by students
that centre around who among them can fight, which of them can
beat the other and who won a recent brawl. It is high time that par-
ents are also held responsible for the actions of their children.

Staggeringly, one in every 232 Bahamians, primarily young
men, are in prison. For the most part, it appears that Bahamians
have lost all value for life. Further, under no conditions should dan-
gerous offenders be granted bail.

Crime is out of control, but yet our MPs spent a week blowing
hot air and wasting time fighting over semantics. Even more, as the
crime rate soars, the Christian Council is conveniently quiet or
barely talking, with no action. It appears that many churches are ~
doing nothing, but collecting funds! Last night’s prayer vigil,
which was orchestrated by Dr David Allen, was an indication
that crime has finally grabbed the attention of civic leaders.

Two and a half weeks ago, I spoke to a friend who expressed his
grievances about a recent concert held at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports centre. Much commotion had been made about the arrival
of Jamaican singer Jah Cure (Siccature Alcock) who was recent-
ly released from statesville (July 28) after serving an eight-year sen-
tence for rape, robbery and gun possession.

My friend—a popular motivational speaker and gospel artist—
said that what was worse was secing that in the midst of the crime
crisis our nation now faces, national corporations such as BTC and
the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas saw fit to proudly
sponsor a concert headlined by a convicted criminal. According to
him, a gospel concert (FamFest), that featured Bahamian
gospel/motivational artists and encouraged family unity, was
repeatedly snubbed by BTC and several other corporations when
the promoter sought their sponsorship. In the end, the promoters
of FamFest footed an exorbitant bill, particularly since the concert
was free of charge. It was quite disappointing to hear that our
national companies would choose to support a venue headlined by
a convicted rapist instead of positive-minded, young Bahamians.

Undoubtedly, the US embassy is extremely apprehensive about
the level of violent crimes and could soon issue a travel advisory
on the Bahamas. Once an advisory is issued, our already waning
tourist numbers would diminish even more.

1 ama proponent of capital punishment, | am certain that the
death penalty and the cat-o-nine tails, if utilized, would serve as an
ever-present deterrent inthe minds of offenders. Capital punish-
: ment is cited in law, and therefore, after aconvieted murderer has
RUE ani BS SOUT tt . lost all appeals and been sentenced to death, his execution should

hae ans be forthwith.
As a 23-year-old young man, Lam personally appealing to my
peers to stop the violence with the hope that they would read
today’s paper or be told of my petition, The future of our country
and our economy is vt stake, as more than ever before, crime has
weakened the social fabric of our nation and many Bahamians are
again living in fear,

OP RUS



At Master Technicians & Best Buy Furniture, where we've 90
AMAL MUR cl MEMEO MMR ria old Mme) ome HEL AL i: 1 ATo
PMO ee icl eral eM aC NANT l=) Oem coli mae AU 9-10 3

EE OR CAC CEE UrCeMe TCM ltl iet a CU: Siac ne
Pek RMR OK on NO) (A MIRON NACHE AOC TNC HCB ON (LT

{

BUR UCL ng

MC COMORSCMCR ORM EC CmCcnr msc den mata

CUR Ce ees MRO RRL omc LUM dale alec polo) ty a
- WIN 1 of 5 Brand New Vehicles! so COME'IN, SPIN and WIN!

At Master Technicians & Best Buy Furniture, Rules and restrictiong may apply. See in'store for details.

i LULL SM CerLs
393.5310 / 394.2378

www.mastertechbahamas:com
MASA l ther Lr Wut Oat






wonagg iW Rud Merinu:.

THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 9



Foul play suspected in security

officer's disappearance

FROM page one

rooms in the school’s Adminis-
tration Building.

A team of detectives and
scenes of crime officials were
at the school conducting inves-
tigations when students and
ieachers arrived for class at
sam.

School Principal Sheryl
Campbell said school was dis-

‘missed around 8.30am due to

the circumstances.

Assistant Superintendent of
Police Loretta Mackey, report-
ed that police located Mr Pedi-
can’s van licensed number 431
sometime Thursday morniiig in
the Hawksbill area.

Mr Pedican, a resident of No
3 Samoa Drive, Royal Bahamia
Estates, had been employed as
a school security guard for 15
years in the public school sys-
tem. He was also employed full
time with Wide World For-
warding for many years.

Supt Mackey said he was last
seen by a family member at
midnight on Wednesday,
November, 21, when he left his
residence for work at Eight
Mile Rock High School.

Ms Mackey said he was dis-
covered missing around 6.50am
when a security officer arrived
for duty at the school to relieve
him, but could not locate him.

According to Stephen
Plakaris, deputy director of
school security with the Min-
istry of Education, Mr Pedican
was stationed at Eight Mile
Rock High on the midnight to
8am shift.

He reported that security
records indicate that he had
reported for duty at 11.53pm
on Wednesday. Mr Plakaris said
due to manpower shortages
only one ofticer is stationed at
the schools in the evening
hours.

Principal Campbell said she
received a call at home around
7am on Thursday from a secu-
rity officer who reported that
there had been a break-in in the
guidance counsellor’s office sit-
uated in the Administration
Building.

The officer, she ‘said,
informed her that it appeared
that the culprit/culprits had
gained access through the back
door and then gained access to
the office.

“Fle also said that blood was
on the floor in the guidance
counsellor’s room, and that Mr
Pedican’s shoes were on the
floor, and that his walky-talky
radio was in the senior head-
master’s room,” said’ Mrs
Campbell.

Mrs Campbell said that Mr
Pedican was a very dedicated
and professional officer.

“He doesn’t leave the school
until an administrator arrives at
8am. And, when [I arrived this
morning I was unable to gain
access to the staff room, but I
saw his bedding still there and

his shoes were still there, so we
are just trusting and praying
that he is alive.

“I know he is not well
because some blood on the
floor has given us some indica-
tion that something has hap-
pened,” she said.

Mrs Campbell said school
should resume as normal on Fri-
day.

Investigators left with several
bags of evidence and wrapped
up their investigations at the
school around 11.50am.

School security officers and
Mr Pedican’s colleagues at the
Wide World Forwarding were
not taking the news well. “We
are ina state of shock over this
unfortunate news and are pray-

. ing for him,” said a colleague

at Wide World Forwarding.

Supt Mackey said Mr Pedi-
can is described as 6°?” tall, of
slim built and mediunr brown
complexion. He is b:ild and has
a black and grey beard.

Persons are asked call 350-
3107/8, 352-9774/5 or 911 with
any information in relation to
the maiter.

Police are also continuing
investigations iio the murders
of Kenneth Lightbourne 45, and
businessman Gifford Martin Jr

2, who were Grand Bahama’s

ninth and 10th homicides for

the year.

Former minister speaks out over botched housing development

FROM page one

the start as the developer failed to comply with
the Private Roads and Subdivision Acct, failed to
apply for Building Permits by the submission of
plans by approved qualified architects/assistants
in compliance with the Ministry oi Works build-
ing control regulations,” he said.

Mr Roberts acknowledged, as Mr Foulkes pre-
viously asserted, that a letter from the Town
Planning Committee of the Ministry of Works
did grant approval in principle for a subdivision
which was to be known as Stephen's Close in
September 2005.

Mr Foulkes told The Tribune earlier this month
that it was on the basis of this letter that the
developers were able to proceed

However, Mr Roberts claimed: “As is the
norm, the approval in principle was made subject
to certain conditions, including the installation
of infrastructure or posting of a bond to.ensure



Monday November 26th,





C

COMMORNWEALT BANC



the actual instailation of such infrastructure. Nei-
ther of these steps was ever taken and final
approval was never granted.

“Yet the sale of lots did take place and the
construction of houses began, even though no
requests for permits were submitted for such
buildings and therefore no permits were ever
granted by the ministry.

“Upon the discovery of the illegal construc-
tion by the building control division of the Min-
istry of Works, a stop order was issued by the
Ministry of Works on November 21, 2005,” he
said.

Mr Roberts said that to date, the families that
invested in the housing scheme have yet to receive
their home or a refund of their money.

“It is clear that the land is useless to the parties
concerned and immediate action is required to
bring long overdue relief and full reimbursement
and damages to ali the families caught up in this
disgraceful saga,” he said.

m In addition to regular
discounts all 2007 models now
receive $1,000.00 cash
fem Zot tme Aas!

rebate



customer

ey Cis

mecey? Nees ee 200

_ Friday, November 23rd 2007) © eo
Centre at) uC AUG
Ss Nassau

For more information and =
ticket information contact:
SELLS CYC CMe y eS eC shi) lls



‘AUTO EXTRAVAGANZA

8:00 am - 5:30 pm



yg J

we
Mh
Wy
Yili

Commonwealth Bank along with J.S. Johnson on site will be there on the spot.

Refreshments, Test Drives, Special Prices & More

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co. Ltd. :

Montrose Ave.
Phone: 322-1722/Fax: 326-7452




PAGE 10, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
Where’s Solomon?

July 2-9, 1828. Along the south bank of the
Ohio River, Kentucky. ;

THE-STORY.SO FAR:..When Jesse over-
hears the Smiths talk about keeping Louisa and
Solomon, she decides to trick them with a copy of
Papa’s letter.

After a long time, Mr. Smith clears his throat
and frowns. “Don’t look like a man’s hand,” he
says.

“Papa dictated it to me. He couldn’t read or
write.” I point to the wax. “That’s his seal.”

Mr. Smith shoves the diary toward his wife.
“You puzzle it out.” Mrs. Smith reads the way
Louisa does, mouthing the words. “Read so I
can hear,” Mr. Smith says.

Mrs. Smith reads out loud. When she’s fin-
ished, tears roll down her cheeks. “My daddy was
a Mason,” she says. “He took a vow to help wid-
ows and orphans.” She looks at Mr. Smith.
“Their papa asks the Masons to give his children
safe passage. We have to let them go.”

J want to dance a jig, but instead I keep a sugary
smile pasted on my face. “Thank you for your
kindness, ma’am.” I point to the gun, propped
beside their pallet. “Do you like our grandpa’s
Kentucky rifle? The government gave it to him
for bravery.”

- Mr. Smith’s cheeks turn as red as his hair. “I
was fixing to clean it for you,” he says. “It’s a
beauty. Your grandpa must have been a good
man.”

Even though my heart is beating like partridge
wings, I thank him sweetly.

Later that morning we leave with our bellies full
of porridge, the rifle clean and polished, and.a
new wheel spoke. Moses is too lame to ride Pearl,
so he sits beside me in the wagon while his mare
trots behind. The minute we turn onto the trail,
Moses and I howl with laughter. Louisa and
Solomon scramble forward.

“What’s so funny?” Louisa asks.

“Your sister really fooled those people,” Moses
says, nearly choking. He explains how I faked a
copy of Papa’s letter.

Louisa squeezes between us on the seat. “Did
they want ta steal us?”

» “Yes. But Jesse was too smart for them.”

My cheeks feel warm. I’m not used to hearing
praise from Moses.

“But they seemed nice. Mrs. Smith sang to me,
like Mama.” Louisa buries her head on my shoul-
der, “J didn’t mean to tell that we’re orphans,”

er)

Sin

she says.

I pat her knee. “I know. Just be careful next
time.”

A week later we’re creeping along a ridge road
to escape the valley mud. It’s been raining for two
days. We’re all cranky, especially Moses. We've
pulled quilts around our heads to keep off the
rain and mosquitoes. Our cornmeal is wet, and
our salt pork is nearly gone.

Suddenly Sadie’s ears go flat against her head.
Pearl shies, and we hear a noise like a tornado-
but there’s no wind. As the wagon inches forward
the sound becomes a roar. My stomach clenches.
“What is it?” Louisa cries.

We pull up on the edge of a bluff. The noise
comes from a foaming chute in the muddy Ohio
River. Solomon screeches as if he’s been stung,
jumps from the wagon, and runs to the edge of the
bluff. “Look! A boat on fire!” We hurry after
him. A huge boat, with two smoking chimneys,
steams down the river toward a landing above
the rapids. “What is it?” Solomon asks.

“A steamboat.” Moses’s eyes are as big as
Solomon’s. “Papa told me about them. he fire
runs the boat.”

“Can we ride it?” Solomon asks.

Moses shakes his head. “We need our money to
buy food in Louisville.”

Solomon starts to cry, and the rain falls harder,
as if the sky is crying, too. [ take'a deep breath. “If
we sold Pearl, we’d have enough money to travel
by boat awhile—and to buy more food.” I know





it’s mean, but I keep talking. “Traveling in the rain
is miserable—and you can’t even ride Pearl now.”

Moses’s mouth is set straight, like he’s caught
Sadie’s stubbornness. “Pearl’s my mare, my jew-
el. I raised her. And I won’t be lame forever.”

I wonder. His ankle is still swollen, as if he
stepped into a hornet’s nest. “Pearl eats more than
the mule,” I say. “And there’s no grass in the
woods. What if we never get home?”

“Don’t say that,” Louisa pleads.

Just then, smoke puffs from the two chimneys
and the boat eases into the landing. Solomon
pats Moses on the shoulder. “The boat’s turning
upstream. Please can we ride it?”

To my surprise, Moses pulls himself up tall.
“Allright,” he says. “A boat is faster than a poky
mule. Maybe someone getting off that steamer
needs a good horse.” I touch his arm and try to
thank him, but Moses brushes me off. I guess he
doesn’t want my sympathy.

In a few hours we've sold Pearl to a man head-
ed west. Moses kisses the white patch on Pearl’s
nose and turns his back as the man leads her
away. Her sharp whinnies make my eyes sting,
and Moses’s chin trembles as he tucks some mon-
ey into my hand. “Buy four tickets to Cincin-
nati,” he says.

Moses studies our rough map while the crew
loads barrels and crates. “We’re leaving Papa’s
route,” he says. “How will we find the Licking
River?”

“Don't worry,” | say. “Someone on the boat



- This Breakfast Serials story is
- sponsored by

THE TRIBUNE



Aad peta

will tell us.” The crowd pushes us toward the
gangway. Sparks rain from the steamer’s chim-
neys. Solomon bounces with excitement.

Moses ties his bandana over Sadie’s eyes, but
she balks and prances as we pull her through the
crowd onto the ship. A whistle sounds so loud I
clap my hands over my ears. When I uncover
them, Louisa is tugging on my skirt. “Jesse,” she
yells, “the puppy’s gone!” .

“He’s not with you?” .

She shakes her head, biting her lip. The whistle
shrieks again and Louisa wails, “Where’s
Solomon?”

I rush to the railing and shove through the
crowd as the steamer chugs away from the shore.

_ “Solomon!” I scream.

The only answer is the boat’s piercing whistle.
(Continued on Tuesday)

Text copyright © 2007 Liza Ketchum
Illustrations copyright © 2007 C. B. Mordan
Reprinted by permission of

Breakfast Serials, Inc.

www. breakfastserials.com

se UBS




rein
~ THE TRIBUNE

PRIDAR So wethie

v, 2007, PAGE 11

Two students are in |

hospital, one is in
custody after reported |
stabbing incident

FROM page one

clusive up to press time, Ms
Williams told The Tribune
during a telephone interview
yesterday that three male stu-
dents between the ages of 14
to 16 were involved. v

Reportedly a male student
accosted two other students,
stabbing one in his “side” and
the other in his upper arm
before security staff on cam-
pus were able to catch the
juvenile, Ms Williams said.
Quick thinking security staff
apprehended the assailant and
the weapon used during the
stabbing as he tried to flee the
scene.

“Well there was a stabbing

(at the school). It appears to

» be gang related but we’re not

sure. This gang thing seems to
be gaining new strength, but
we are encouraging (students)
not to mimic what is evident in
the wider society.”

Ms Williams indicated that
possible gang rivalry started
outside of the school’s cam-
pus may have been the impe-
tus for the incident. In spite
of this recent spurt of violence
at the Marathon Estates cam-
pus, she contended that a vio-
lence “preventative pro-
gramme” introduced to the
school last year is having pos-
itive and evident effects.

“(The incident) did not
escalate to the level that it
could have in the past. I feel

very proud of my students and
teachers who worked hard to
control the situation — it was-
n’t a chaotic situation.”

The programme is geared
to teach students about being
responsible for their own
actions, however the principal
noted that no matter how
effective it was it could
not reach every at risk stu-
dent.

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans, press liaison
officer, in a telephone inter-
view confirmed with The Tri-
bune that “a stabbing inci-
dent” occurred on the school’s
campus but the medical con-
dition of the two students who
were injured was not known
up to press time.

PLP chairman won't offer
himself for re-election

FROM page one

was pondering the possibility of offering himself

in the last general election. Whether he will do
so in next general election is yet to be seen.
Yesterday marked the fifth year of his elec-
tion to the post of National Chairman of the
PLP, and as Mr Rigby said, his decision not to

offer again for the post only came after “care-

ful” thought and consideration. ° ’

In a short statement from his ‘office, Mr Rig-

by said it was “a great privilege” to have served
as the National Chairman for the past five years,
allowing him the opportunity to work tireless-
ly to build a stronger PLP:

Bristol Wine & Spirits Stores Locations:

GLADSTONE ROAD
BLAKE ROAD
EAST BAY

PRINGE CHARLES

“I have formed many lasting friendships with
sO many party supporters and Bahamians across
our country.

“It was truly a wonderful experience, and I
am ever grateful to have been afforded the
opportunity to play a role in the building of

my party and our country.
“TI look forward to continuing to serve my

_ country so as to ensure that we build a Bahamas

based on the principles of fairness, peace and
equal opportunity for all,” his statement read.

- Currently, PLP MP for Englerston Glenys
Hanna-Martin, Paulette Zonicle, and PLP new-
comer Omar Archer‘are the only three per-
sons to officially announce’ their intention to
vie for the post of chairman.

eS a

Independent Locations:
MILO BUTLER (Blue Hill)

BEST DEALS (Augusta Street)
LIGHTBOURNE & SON (Dunmore Ave)
BASE ROAD (Nassau Street)

WULFF ROAD L/S (Wulff Road)

Prayers for “wounded
souls’ at candlelight vigil

FROM page one

of hope and freedom to shine through,” he said.

Dr Allen said that the gathering was an affir-
mation that love is stronger than death and
“many waters cannot quench it.”

“But like Dostoyevsky we realize that, ‘love in
action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared
with love in dreams’. We come to reclaim the
freedom to love openly and enjoy the privileges
of our chosen relationships.

“We come to reclaim the safety of our homes:

where our children can grow up in an atmos-



SUPERIOR/GOLD
400z for 1 a & RECEIVE



phere of love and follow their dreams. We come
to take back the night and reclaim the beauty
and splendour of the Bahamaland left to us by
our ancestors.

“Ladies and gentlemen, with heavy hearts
and burdened spirits, we gather here tonight to
mourn the loss of so many of our brothers and
sisters who have succumbed to the cruel rav-
ages of murder and violent crimes.

“Overwhelmed by the ongoing human atroc-
ities, we lament in the words of William Butler
Yeats: ‘Things fall apart, the centre cannot
hold’,” Dr Allen said.



BACARDI ard te Gat Devtce are registered tadernarks of Bacents & Company Lid.




PAGE 12, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE -



LOCAL NEWS



HEALTH MINISTER TOURS FACILITIES IN MANGROVE CAY AND DEEP SOUTH

Andros clinics

@ By Gladstone Thurston

Residents of the South
Andros community can look
forward to improved health care
facilities, Minister of Health and
the Environment Dr Hubert
Minnis, said.

Following a tour of public
clinics in Mangrove Cay and the
Deep South on Wednesday, Dr
Minnis promised to address
“serious” concerns “in a very
rapid manner.”

“It is my job to ensure that
there is absolutely no discrimi-
nation in the delivery of med-
ical care throughout the
Bahamas,” said Dr Minnis.

He was accompanied by
South Andros MP Picewell
Forbes, consultant Dr Baldwin
Carey, health undersecretary
Michael Turner, community
physician Dr Swamy Atluri,
administrator Neil Campbell,
chief councillors Zebedee Rolle
and Brian Moxey, deputy direc-
tor of Environmental Health
Services Thomasina Wilson,
project engineer Henry Moxey
and medical staff.

Dr Minnis also met with
Health and Environmental Ser-
vices’ South Andros staff and
local government officials.

“From what I heard from the
minister, I am very optimistic,”
said Mr Forbes. “There has
been much concern over the
past years about repairs to our
clinics. 1 am very hopeful that
we can look forward to some
results in South Andros very
shortly.”

The modern and spacious
Miriam Greene Clinic was con-
structed several years ago in the
Johnson Bay area in the Deep
South.

However, it had to be aban-
doned because the roof leaks.
The ceiling has now collapsed,
and the floor is being eroded
due to flooding.

The clinic has since been
moved to comfortable rental
facilities in The Bluff where
many other government offices

_ are located.

Nursing officer Andrea Lin-
den of the Department of Public
Health reported that there has
been an almost 100 per cent
increase in the number of

patients seen since then.
“What that shows is accessi-
bility and once more patients





Gladstone Thurston/BIS

UNUSED: Dr Hubert Minnis (right) and consultant Dr Baldwin Carey
found a great deal of unused material during their tour of South Andros
clinics on Wednesday.

UNDER Secretary in the Ministry
of Health and the Environment
Michael Turner has his say during
a meeting in South Andros.

are coming out,” said Dr Minnis.
“That in itself is prevention.”

Dr Minnis said relocating the
Miriam Greene Clinic to The
Bluff “is worth looking at.”

“One has to look at making
the clinic more accessible,” he
said, “and once it is more acces-
sible to the community, what
you would find is that just like
how your volume had increased
by 100 per cent, your hospitali-
sation would decrease by 100
per cent. And that’s basically
what you want to do.

“It is our job to keep you
away from hospitals, and clin-
ics and prevention does that.”

Dr Minnis said he was “more
than shocked” at the amount of
medical equipment left unused
in the closed clinic.

CIVIL engineer Henry Moxey (right) explains to Dr Hubert Minnis (left) the layout of the new public dump in Man-



Deep South Chief Councillor
Zebedee Rolle said he was
“very impressed with the con-
cern that Dr Minnis has shown
about to healthcare throughout
South Andros.”

Constant flooding and a fire
three years ago closed Man-
grove Cay’s main clinic at
Dorsett’s.

For a while the clinic was relo-
cated to a church centre while a
nurses’ residence was being ren-
ovated to accommodate it.

However, the nurses’ resi-
dence is situated on a steep
incline which makes it difficult
for patients to access. It has no
wheelchair ramp.

“Whatever the problems with
the clinic, the people would like
to see them resolved,” said
Councillor Moxey. “We need
our clinic repaired.

“I feel comfortable, though,
that Minister Minnis is going to
deliver. I see him a man of
action.”

Mangrove Cay is also getting
a new and modern public
garbage disposal system.

“IT can say with confidence
that you have an excellent dump
site that is being developed with
modern technology,” said Dr
Minnis.

“Once everything goes as
planned then you would not
have any problems in the future
as we have had in the past in
Nassau with dump fires.”

bald

grove Cay, Andros. Also pictured are consultant Dr Baldwin Carey and Chief Councillor Brian Moxey.

oe

nF
oH Hi









na

co
_|a
i ec
f oO
iv | =
Aisle Y
ni? | =
=

—

@

‘=

So

—

n”

uc
ae | =
|

SHOCKED: Dr Hubert Minnis (right) said he was “shocked” by the large amount of medical equipment left unused
in South Andros clinics which had to be abandoned, like this new incubator. Pictured from left are community
physician Dr Swamy Atluri, nursing officer Andrea Linden, and South Andros MP Picewell Forbes.























































Ssatived Wires

Ghawigaane/Sparkling Winte Special



USAT ES




MOL LMI.

GE



TRIBUNE



LDL ELLE

“ERIDAY,



NOVEMBER 23,
























































ver'y close’ to
TORE UCT

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor



BAHA MAR’S $2.4
billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment is “very, very
close” to getting all the
Government approvals
and permits it needs to
finally proxceed with the
full go-ahead of the pro-
ject.

Highly-placed sources
told The Tribune yester-
day that Baha Mar was
hoping to obtain all the
necessary documents and
permits before Christ-
mas, a schedule that the
Albany developers are
also understood to be
working to, the latter
seeking to re-start con-
struction in the New
Year.

In Baha Mar’s case,
initial bids on the con-
tract for the re-routing of
West Bay Street are due
in on December 1, 2007, °
with the developers
anticipating that they will
“imminently” receive the
final approvals necessary
from the Government
and the Office of the
Prime Minister.

Baha Mar has been
seeking to negotiate a
supplemental Heads of
Agreement with the
Government to account
for the fact that the cost
of its proposed project



billion to $2.4 billion.
The April 6, 2005, Heads
of Agreement signed
between Baha Mar and
the Christie government
was for a $1 billion pro-
ject.
According to that
Heads of Agreement,
before the West Bay
Street road re-routing
was to take place, Baha
Mar had to show the
Government it had con-

SEE page 7B



Council told: Still
approve Baker’s Bay

permits on ‘merit’ only

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has urged
the Hope Town District Coun-
cil to keep reviewing permit
applications submitted by the
Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean
Club and approve them only on
“merit”, despite the threat of
legal action hanging over the
council.

A letter from the Ministry of
Lands and Local Government,
which was sent to Cephas
Cooper, administrator of the
central Abaco district, and
Hope Town District Council’s
chief councillor, Jeremy Sweet-
ing, urged the council to con-
tinue reviewing and assessing
all planning and approval appli-
cations submitted by the Guana
Cay-based Baker’s Bay project.

Mr Sweeting yesterday told
The Tribune that the Govern-
ment’s letter backed the posi-
tion he had been advocating
from the start, and could “clear
a lot of things up”.

In particular, he indicated
that it might address the con-
cerns held by three of the Hope
Town District’s seven council-
lors, who had wanted written
central government confirma-
tion that they can still deal with
the developers’ submissions
amid the threat of litigation -
and possible liability - by the
Save Guana Cay Reef Associ-
ation and its attorney, Callen-
ders & Co partner Fred Smith.

This had split the council
right down the middle, and

“slowed down” the processing
of permit and approval appli-
cations for the 175 million

Chamber ‘very concerned’
about 6.5% goods cost rise

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Chamber of Commerce
will seek the newly-appointed
US Ambassador’s help in try-
ing to persuade Florida not to
repeal its 6.5 per cent sales tax
exemption on goods exported
to the Bahamas, its president

‘ yesterday telling The Tribune

he was “very concerned” about
the negative inflationary and
cost of living implications.
Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is
also Superwash’s president, said
the likelihood that Florida’s Tax
and Budget Reform Commis-
sion would place eliminating the
export sales tax exemption on
the ballot presented to Florida
voters in November 2008 would
be “one of the items” raised by
the Chamber when it met with
US Ambassador, Ned Siegel.

* ‘Momentum’ builds in Florida for repeal
of 6.5% sales tax exemption on goods

exported to Bahamas

* Chamber president to raise issue with US
Ambassador, as threatens to spark inflation,
price rises and increased cost of living

Mr D’Aguilar said he hoped
that Mr Siegel, himself a Florida
businessman, would be able to
use his contacts and influence
to assist the Bahamas in efforts
to protect the sales tax exemp-
tion.

If Florida removes the 6.5 per
cent sales tax exemption on
products shipped directly to this
nation, Mr D’ Aguilar said: “It’s
definitely going to add to the
cost of living. It’s a no-brainer.

The cost of shipping goods to
the Bahamas is going to
increase because of that, as a
lot of items and staples are
shipped to the Bahamas
through Florida.”

“[’m very concerned. 6.5 per
cent is a significant amount.”

According to the Department
of Statistics, in 2005, the last
year for which complete trade
data is available, the Bahamas
imported some $2.155 billion

has*increaséd from “$1F«

‘Very close’ on Albany
incentives, road diversion

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



NONE OF the offers for the acquisition of private
land to accommodate the road diversion for the
$1.3 billion Albany Golf & Beach Resort have been
accepted, The Tribune was told yesterday, although
the final details are still being completed, with the
project close to getting a final ‘go-ahead’.

David Davis, director of investments in the Office
of the Prime Minister, told Tribune Business yes-

~terday that while offers had been made to the

landowners whose property is being compulsorily
acuired for the road diversion, to date none had
been fully accepted.

“We are very close to dotting all the ‘i’s’ and
crossing all the ‘t’s’ in a sale,” he said yesterday.

Mr Davis explained that the way the process usu-
ally works is that the Government may request any-
where from one. to four appraisals, ‘and then the
offer is made to the homeowners based on those pro-
posals.

“However, I cannot say how many were done in
this case,” he said. The Tribune understands that out
of the three appraisals requested, two have been
completed and submitted to the Government, which
has acknowledged to the Albany developers it owns
the land.

Mr Davis pointed out that along with the issue of

property acquisitions for the road re-routing, the
other issue the Prime Minister’sOffice is working on

is the completion of the Hotels Encouragement Act
agreement for Albany.

“Despite what you may have heard regarding the
Government stalling, I can tell you that they [the
developers] would have had to negotiate an agree-
ment with whatever government was in office,” he
said.

“I do not know if they have all the permits and
everything. But we are confident that we are
very close to completing those two aspects of the
deal.”

The $1.3 billion Albany project, which was nego-
tiated and signed by the previous PLP administra-
tion, encompasses some 560 acres and includes a
rerouting of the South West Bay Street road, creat-
ing a private and exclusive community. Partners in

the deal are the Tavistock Group and golfers Tiger.

Woods and Ernie Els.

The property is to include 450-600 residences; a
small hotel; an 18 hole championship golf course; a
marina, berthing yachts up to 240 feet; an equestri-
an centre; and a beach club.

The realignment of the road and its junction is by
far the most controversial aspect of the develop-
ment, which the developers say is one of the most
crucial parts of the design.

At a recent government-sponsored town meeting
on both the Albany and South Ocean developments,
the most contentious issue was the road diversion,
with many people questioning why the project could
not proceed without it.



Dionisio eR

worth of goods from Florida,
some 84 per cent of its total
$2.567 billion import bill.

The total amount of goods

imported directly from Florida
was not detailed, but Mr
D’ Aguilar said that even it was
as low as $1 billion, a 6.5 per
cent sales tax imposed on that
figure would raise the cost of
goods imported into the
Bahamas by some $65 million
per annum - a major increase
that is likely to be a severe
underestimate.

Dividing that figure by
300,000, the estimated size of
the Bahamian population, and
this nation’s import bill will rise
by more than $200 per person -
every man, woman and child - if
Florida does away with the sales
tax. exemption.

Ryan Pinder, a Bahamian,
who is a tax specialist and attor-
ney and partner in the Florida-
based law firm, Becker & Poli-

SEE page 6B

Economy likely
to grow ‘lot less’
than 4% forecast

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy is likely to grow in 2008 by a “lot
less” than the 4 per cent forecast by the International Monetary
Fund (IMF) and the Government, a leading banking executive
told The Tribune yesterday, due to the impact the US ‘sub-
prime’ mortgage crisis and ‘global credit crunch would have on
tourism and foreign direct-investment projects. ssi

Anwer Sunderji, chairman and chief executive of Fidelity Bank
& Trust International, said Bahamians were “not connecting
the dots” linking the implications of a US economic downturn to
the Bahamian economy’s performance, with consumer and bank-
ing confidence having taken a big knock from events outside

this nation.

Mr Sunderji explained that the Bahamian economy was depen-
dent on two major factors: US tourists, who accounted for
between 85-90 per cent of visitors to this nation, and US-based
financial institutions, which lent to and financed Bahamas-based
mixed-use resort developments that were heavily dependent on

real estate sales/land speculation.

Some 70 per cent of US economic growth had been driven by
the consumer and his/her willingness to spend, Mr Sunderji
pointed out. In turn, this spending was dependent on the con-
sumer’s ability to borrow, something which in recent years had

SEE page 5B





Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean
Club.

With those three councillors
not wanting to deal with appli-
cations by the developer, Ati-
zona-based Discovery Land |
Company, until they received
government assurances, the
Hope Town District Council
had been split three:three, with
Mr Sweeting using his casting
vote to move the permits for-
ward.

Yet this ‘casting vote’ power
is only available when therc is
a tie, and when one councillor
was absent in August, the
three:two majority held by
those councillors seeking the
assurances meant a slew of
Baker’s Bay approvals were
delayed for one month.

Yet the ministry’s letter,
received on November 20, 2007,
from its permanent secretary,
Harrison Thompson, said that
under Section 14 (1) of the
Local Government Act 1996,
each district council apart from
those specified possessed the
same functions as those
assigned to the Town Planning
Committee under the Town
Planning Act’s provisions.

In addition, it said Subsection
1(b) of the Local Government
Act 1996 gave district councils
the power of the Building Con-
trol Officer to issue and grant
permits under the Building
Regulations Act.

’ Mr Thompson wrote: “he
above authority gives the coun-
cil the right to issue building
permits for all projects in their
district.

SEE page eight





think you can’t afford.

a mortgage?

; cell

Reality Check.

We have affordable loans with

low down payments,

and terms up to 30 years!

Call us in Nassau at 242 396 4040

or in Freeport at 242 352 3670.

Or log on to www.familyguardian.com today! °

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





Bs
"
PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a ee
Pay attention to your ‘deficit’

D O YOU suffer from
Attention Deficit

Disorder? This might be a
rather frivolous question to
ask someone in business. Yet
more and more research indi-
cates that our attention span
has lessened due to the con-
stant interruptions that are
now part of business life.

Attention deficit could kill
your business. And with over
500,000 small businesses clos-
ing every year in the US, the
chances of this happening are
increasing.

Internet marketer Rich
Schefren talks about the
demise of the information age,
and that it is now the atten-
tion age that is upon us. Get-
ting our attention is now the
most prized activity for mar-
keters today. It is also the
most prized activity for our
family, friends and co-work-
ers. Since the advent of e-
mail, instant messaging and
text messaging, we are
plugged into our communica-



tion networks from the time
we wake to the time we go to
bed.

The chief symptom of our
attention deficit is interrup-
tions. Every day we face a bar-
rage of interruptions from our
cell phones, pdas, pagers,
landlines, instant messaging,
work computers, home com-
puters, laptops, blogs, rss, e-
mails, the Internet and tex-
ting. The frequency of inter-
ruptions has increased through
our lifetime. The average
office worker is now inter-

Business

Sense

rupted for nearly two hours
every day. This is a stagger-
ing statistic. With-29 per cent
of our day broken up, it is no
wonder that our productivity
has suffered, and our life
reduced to a series of inter-
rupted interruptions!

How often have you been
interrupted by friends, fami-
ly, co-workers and partners
when you were trying to con-
centrate on something? With
an interruption occurring on
average every 11 minutes, we
have less and less time to

focus on and finish a specific
activity.

Peter Drucker, in The Effec-
tive Executive, wrote that to
do your job you need large
chunks of uninterrupted times,
as dribs and drabs of time -
even if they add up to the
same time - are not the same.
There are several reasons for
this.

Research shows that once
you get interrupted, it
becomes harder for you to get
back on track, as it can take
up to 25 minutes to refocus.
This is because our brains
work a bit like an old-fash-
ioned printing machine.
Every time you focus on a dif-
ferent task, you have to set up
the machine all over again,
which takes time.

Research also shows that
interruptions can wreak havoc
with our short-term memory.
After an interruption, 40 per
cent of the time we go off in
another direction. How often
do you stop and think: “What
was I just doing?" Getting dis-

WHEN NIGHT FALLS

LE Sd Od ol ca a

i oe ee ee ee

CRICKET

BACK FOR MORE =

In THE WEST

a)

JANUARY 2008

STANMFORD2020.C0OmM

tracted can be detrimental to
your efficiency and produc-
tivity.

According to Glenn Wilson,
a psychiatrist at Kings Col-
lege, London, constant inter-
ruptions also make you dumb-
er. He showed that a person’s
IQ dropped up to 10 per cent
during interruptions. It is
amazing to think that any
device which allows you to be
contacted at any time could
make you dumber, and could
limit your earning potential.
The trouble is that we are
addicted to these devices:

Constant interruptions lead
to multi-tasking, where we try
to juggle many different balls
at one time. Multi-tasking, in
itself ,is not a bad thing, but
the habit of not concentrating
and flitting from one thing to
another leads to disconnec-
tion, not connection. Think of
this type of activity as junk
food.

So how can we help our-
selves overcome our attention
deficit? Here are some tips to



hf

Bera baat



help you cope:

* Stop interrupting yourself
by reading e-mails, surfing,
instant messaging and chat-
ting on the phone. Fifty-five
per cent of office workers
open e-mails as soon as they
arrive. Turn your e-mail off
while you are working and
deal with it no more than
three times a day. Set your
Instant Messaging on Do Not
Disturb when you are work-
ing.

* Do one thing at a time,
and do it well without inter-
ruptions, Set 30-minute
chunks of uninterruptible

- time. When you have finished

each 30 minutes, take a break
and put that work aside for
the next chunk or later.

* Prepare a list of key things
you need to achieve today,
and block out time for each
of them.

* Have a countdown timer
when you do online research,
so that you limit your time to
these activities. Make a chart
and keep track of the time you
spend each day doing non-
productive tasks, such as e-
mailing, tinkering with new
technology, surfing, and
watching TV.

* Only review information
that you need now and don’t
waste your time assessing
things that you might need for
later, as it will probably be out
of date when you need it. Step
back and ask yourself whether
the information in front of you
is useful. Just stop researching
for one week and see if that
helps.

* When you are travelling,
turn off your pagers, cell
phones and laptops so that
you can spend more time
thinking. Someone once said
that no problem can withstand
the onslaught of continuous
thinking.

.* Resist buying technology
with too many features. You

“ will probably néver use them

all and you will have to spend
precious time reading the
manual. The more technology
we introduce in our lives, the
more training we need to do.

* Remember, more infor-
mation is not necessarily
advantageous. Knowing too
much can hurt. The mass of
information in the hands of
the US security services did
not prevent Pearl Harbour or
the September 11 attacks.
Malcolm Gladwell, in his book
Blink, shows that more infor-
mation does not necessarily
improve your decision-mak-
ing capabilities.

Attention deficit is a grow-
ing concern in our ‘junk food’
information-addicted society.
While businesses fail for many
reasons, poor management
decisions contribute to most
business failures. Avoid mak-
ing poor decisions by getting
control over your time and
productivity. Take some steps
today before your ADD
becomes incurable. You will
only have yourself to blame.

NB: This column is avail-
able as an eBook at
www.antipreneurship.com

Mark draws on 20 years of
top level business, marketing
and communications experi-
ence in London and the
Bahamas. He is chief operat-
ing officer of www.ezpze-
mail.com, currently lives in
Nassau, and can be contacted
at

markalexpalmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer.
All rights reserved
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 3B



ae
Customs ‘seriously

hindered’ lawful
bonded practices

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Customs Depart-
ment has “seriously hin-
dered” Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA)
licensees who have imple-
mented new, ‘lawful’ meth-
ods of selling ‘over-the-
counter bonded goods’ in
Freeport, a paper submitted
by the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce has
revealed.

The document, containing
recommendations for
resolving concerns on the
‘over-the-counter bonded
goods sales’ that are held by
both Customs and GBPA
licensees, said retailers and
wholesalers who had partic-
ipated in the Chamber’s sur-
vey of the practice did not
want to be identified for
fear that it would draw
undue attention from Cus-
toms.

Report

The report said: “It was a
recurring theme, among
many, but not all, that the
vendors did not want to be
identified in this report as
they feared that being iden-
tified would precipitate
them being investigated,
their imports delayed, or
their business interfered
with by Customs.

“They were also unwilling
to be the ‘first’ to imple-
ment a new, lawful, method
of dealing with ‘over-the-
counter-bonded sales, as
they were concerned that
Customs would, as they
_ have done in the past and

BSi

continue to do so, apply a
policy upon them that was
not based on any lawful
authority, but would be a
serious hindrance to their
business.”

The Chamber report,
though, acknowledged that
“Customs must be provid-
ed with the necessary tools
to protect the revenue of
the country”, and had a
duty to investigate fraud,
although they were pre-
vented by Justice Stanley
Moore’s 2002 Supreme
Court judgment from con-
ducting audits of GBPA
licensees.

The report acknowledged
that fraud could be commit-
ted in respect to over-the-
counter bonded goods sales,
particularly with GBPA
licensees purchasing goods
under their bond and then
using them for personal use
or re-selling them outside
Freeport - uses not permit-
ted under the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, and

under which they become *

regarded as ‘consumables’
where import/customs duty
must be paid.

Fraud might also occur,
the Chamber found, when a
customer who was not a
valid signing authority pro-
duced a purchase order
from a GBPA licensee.

Over-the-counter bonded
goods sales involve the sale
of bonded items, which are
imported into Freeport free
from import and customs
duties, by a GBPA licensee
and then sold duty-free to
another licensee, provided
the goods are for use in

their business and do not go ©

outside Freeport.

Customs has seen over-
the-counter bonded goods
sales as depriving the Gov-
ernment of. much-needed
revenue, while the GBPA
licensees have viewed the
Department’s “arbitrary”
attempts to interfere with
the practice and impose
conditions on them as an
unreasonable intrusion into
and interference with their
business.

The Chamber report said:
“Customs has voiced some
concern with respect to the
practice of ‘over-the-
counter sale of bonded
goods’, as they view it as a
possible source of revenue
loss.

Decisions

“Both the licensees and
Customs are frustrated that
there is no set standard with
which the practice is being
managed, and Customs has
made some arbitrary deci-
sions with respect to those
goods.

“A standardised, accept-
able mechanism must be
established for the manage-
ment and reporting of ‘over-
the-counter sale of bonded
goods’ that does not subju-
gate the rights of the
licensees of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority,
while still protecting the
legitimate revenue collec-
tion of the Government of
the Bahamas.

“This mechanism must be
the same for all vendors and
must be derived from with-
in the laws of the Bahamas
and the terms of the
Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment.”

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

' BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently accepting

applications for

HEAD RISK MANAGEMENT

Applicants for the position of Head Risk Management must have banking or
financial degree and at least 10 years of experience in the offshore banking sector,
fluency in Italian, French and knowledge of German, proven leadership and
management experience, ability to partner with team members, and have thorough
knowledge of local legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international

banking practices.

PERSONAL QUALITIES :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Positive attitude and outlook .

Problem-solving skills

Financial and analytical background
Ability to coach and have mentoring skills
Commitment to quality and service excellence

RESPONSIBILITIES :-

Ability to partner with other managers for the development and implementation
of Risk Management strategies and practices

Supervision and monitoring of the credit exposure
Supervision of credit department: review loan proposals/reports for risk, quality
and credit policy compliance
Liaise and network at group level and with external professionals on matters

related to the position

Responsibility for Central Filing, Credits, Compliance & Internal Controls

units

Supervision of the outgoing reports to regulatory bodies and to group internal

entities

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum

vitae to :-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road

P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 702 1253 or email: julie.benjamin@bsiob.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.





POSITION AVAILABLE
INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS SUPERVISOR

| A brokers & agency company [an affiliate of a large established company] is looking for an Administrative

| Supervisor. The ideal candidate must be detail-oriented and self-motivated with excellent organizational,

} interpersonal and communication skills. The ability to work with limited supervision in a fast-paced progressive
i environment is a must. ;

|

| Responsibilities:
| Receive and submit for processing applications for Home Insurance [property] and other insurance plahs
Liaise with sub-agents on all application issues
Maintenance of database .
Liaise with Underwriters and Customer Service departments to ensure accurate application processing
Generate monthly reports on issued contracts
Reconciliation of premiums
Prepare and issue completed quotes and Certificates of Insurance
Handing Internal.and External client queries
Supervise Administrative support for all general issues

| Core Competencies:
| Ability to work with limited supervision andleam new skils quickly
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Ability to resolve problems with a sense of urgency
Demonstrate a keen eye for details
Abllity to work under pressure
Strong interpersonal skills and ability to maintain a harmonious relationship with co-workers
Ability to maintain confidentiality
Reliable, dependable and flexible team-player

| Required Qualifications:
Bachelors Degree in Business Administration or related field or equivalent work experience.
3+ years experience in a similar position
Excellent computer skills and proficiency in Excel required
Relevant General insurance designations for pats thereof] a plus

Benefits:
Salary commensurate with current salary scales, skills and experience. Attractive benefit package including Life, Health and
Pension.

Submit Resume to Human Resources Administrator, P.O. Box N-4815, Nassau
Bahamas, fax (242) 361-2525 or via email to dlparker@live.com

US ED

Metropolitan Bank
(Bahamas) Limited

Senior Accountant

An Asian based banking group (“Metrobank”) is currently recruiting for a Senior
Accountant. This person will be one of a small team working for the Metrobank
subsidiary in Nassau. The Bank has a full banking license in the Bahamas and is
expanding it Nassau based operations.

The qualified applicant should have the following Qualifications:

¢ Acollege degree (or equivalent) from a recognized four year program in
accounting or business related topics or qualification as a Chartered Accountant
/ Certified Public Accountant or other similar qualification.

¢ Have 3- 5 years of prior work experience in the areas of banking and or
accounting

¢ An advanced understanding of accounting and accounting applications (CPA
preferred but not required)

e Strong analytical skills

° Possess a good understanding of investments and securities

¢ Exceptional written and verbal communication skills

¢ An advanced understanding of Excel & Word applications

¢ Fluency in Tagalog (written and verbal) is not a requirement but is a “plus”
for this post.

This position will encompass the Duties:

¢ Handle all aspects of the accounting matters of the Bank as they pertain to
the record keeping of the Nassau based operations.
Prepare the monthly financial statements of the Bank and report on these to
Senior Management
Assist with the day to day operations of the Bank
Be the Bank’s contact person for Head Office Treasury and other Head Office
points of contact as it relates to accounting matters
Assist with ensuring that the Bank is in compliance with the requirements of
the Central Bank of The Bahamas
Assist with coordinating monthly management meetings with officers of the
Bank
Draft procedural documents as considered necessary
Prepare an annual budget forecast for the Bank and monitor actual versus
budget results ,
Coordinate the external audit of the Bank
Assist with coordinating inspections of the Bank by the Central Bank of The
Bahamas and other regulators as required

This Company offers a competitive compensation package and salary will be
consummate to experience of the applicant.

Qualified and interested candidates should submit their resume with salary history to Metropolitan
Bank (Bahamas) Limited attention Ms. Jacqueline Bain, P.O. Box CR-56766, Suite 700, New
Providence Financial Center, East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, fax 242-394-2142, e-mail
jacquie @ metrobankbahamas.com
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE







2007/2008 Officers & Directors

President

Kristina M. Fox, CFA

CIT Holdings Ltd

PO Box SS-19140, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 363 1501 Bay. (242) 363 1802

Email kteitco.uk



Vice-President

David Ramirez, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.

PO Box N-4873, Nassau Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 2217 Fay: (242) 327 6610)

Emaildramiftzic pictet.com




Treasurer
Christopher Dorsett, CFA

Citigroup Corporate & Investment Bank

PO Box N 8158, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 8668 Fax: (242) 302 8569
Email: Christopher.a.dorsett( citigroup.com



Sceretary

Sonia Beneby, CFA

ScotiaTrust

PO Box N 3016, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 502 $700 Fax: (242) 326 099]
Email: sonia.benebywscotiatrust.com

Programming

Karen Pinder, CFA

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.

PO Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 502 5400 Fax: (242) 502 5428
Email: karen.pinder@efgbank.com

Education

Pamela Musgrove, CFA

Colina Financial Advisors, Ltd.

PO Box CB 12407, . Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 7008 Fax: (242) 356 3677
Email: pmusgrovewctal.com

Warren Pustam, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.

PO Box N-4873, Nassau Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 2222 Fax: (242) 327 6614
Email: w_pustam@hotmail.com







Membership

Geneen Riviere

Pearl Investment Management Limited
PO Box N 4930, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 502 8022 Fax: (242) 502 8008
Email: geneen.tiviere@ pearl-investment-
management.com





Past President

David Slatter, CFA

KPMG

PO Box N-123, Nassau. Bahamas
Ph: (242) 393 2007

Email: dslatter(a@kpmg.com.bs

INSTITUTE

PROFESS|ONAL
DEVELOPMENT
QUALIFIED ACTIVITY



CFA Society of The Bahamas

Topic: “The Link Between Pensions and Long Term Financial
Stability"

Date Thursday, November 29"" 2007

Time: 12:00 pm General Meeting
12:30 pm Speaker

Location:

Presentation:

Cost: Members

Reservations:








MONTHLY SPEAKER / WEBCAST EVENT










Please arrive promptly!





Luciano’s of Chicago
Cagliari Room
East Bay Street





Larry R. Gibson, CFA
Vice President-Pensions
Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas) Limited





$25.00

Non-Members $35.00

(If paying by cheque, please make cheque payable to: CFA
Society of The Bahamas)








PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED - by Tuesday
November 27, 2007
Karen Pinder, CFA

~ karen.pinder@efgbank.com

*Prepayment required through one of the Board Members

Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Financial Analyst charter holder, is Vice President -
Pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas) Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary
of Colonial Group International Ltd, which owns Atlantic Medical Insurance Ltd and
is a major shareholder of Security & General Insurance Company in The Bahamas.

















He ty a Veteran executive within The Bahamas’ financial services sector, having held
senor executive positions in both international and domestic organizations.





Mr. Gibson has served on numerous public and private sector boards throughout his
career and currently serves as a Director of Commonwealth Bank Limited; Chairman
of the Finance Committee of St. Andrew’s School; and a member of the Anglican
Church Diocesan Finance Committee. ,







He is a regular speaker on financial and economic matters and authors the weekly
column Financial Insight’ tn a local newspaper.




Mr. Larry R. Gibson, CFA, ts a founding member of the CFA Society of The
Bahamas, formerly named Bahamas Society of Financial Analysts.






BAHAMAS FIRST

FIRST IN INSURANCE. TODAY. TOMORROW.

Career opportunity for an ambitious

career oriented individual

Claims Advisor
Role & Responsibilities:

Provide Customer service, advice and assistance to walk-
in customers and over the telephone

Deal with agencies and other insurance companies
Complete reports and input data

Assist with subrogation

Maintain Claims Bordereaux

Assist with on-scene accident investigations

Assistance with special projects

Qualifications:

BUSINESS

Regulations
proposed to aid
foreign banks

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Central Bank of the Bahamas is
seeking comments on a draft regulation
that would allow foreign financial institu-
tions to use this country as a base of oper-
ations in the event of a disaster in their
home country.

This provision would fall under a new set
of proposed regulations, the Banks and
Trust Companies (Temporary Business
Continuity Operations) Regulations
2007.

Agreement

To avail itself of the exemption, the for-
eign bank or trust company would have to
enter into an agreement with a Bahamas
licensed bank or trust company, where the
equipment is to be used during the period
of exemption and the company must be reg-
istered with the Central Bank.

Further the institution would have to
provide a list of the names, addresses and
occupations of the person(s) who will be
working on behalf of the foreign institu-
tion.

The proposed regulations would also
mandate that the duration of the exemp-
tion does not exceed a period of 30 days,
where the person’s home regulator is unable
to continue to exercise regulatory control,



Is the price of gas _
SUZUKILIANA yw

is what you need.

hit by disasters

or 60 days after the occurrence of the dis-
ruptive event.

A major component of the regulations
would be allowing foreign nationals to
arrive in the Bahamas to work on behalf
of the foreign financial institution without
first possessing a valid work permit.

This will, of course, have serious impli-
cations relating to immigration laws and,
in particular, the requirement for obtaining
work permits.

Laws

The Central Bank added that all immi-
gration laws would apply to persons arriving
here under exempted status, including a
letter of request from the employer, a police
certificate covering five years, a valid pass-
port and two recent passport size photos.

In the case of an unplanned event the
results in the operation of banking or trust
business from the Bahamas, the require-
ment for a person who will be conducting
exempt activities on behalf of an exempt
person to obtain a work permit prior to
their arrival in the Bahamas may be waived.

However such persons will besrequired
to apply for a work permit within the time
prescribed by Immigration officials.

Comments on the draft regulations should
be forwarded to the Policy Unit, Bank
Supervision Department by January 11,
2008.





ns

5-door Hatchback



A.A. Degree tn business or related subject

Experience useful but not essential

On the job training will be provided

Computer proficiency required

Strong customer service, communication and interpersonal
skills required

Save in two ways — low price & low gas!

The Liana 4-door sedan & 5-door hatchback feature:
1,6-litre, 4-cylinder engine; automatic transmission;
power steering, windows, door locks & mirrors;
AM/FMICD player; spacious interior with plenty
of leg room.





The Bahamas First Group is the largest property and casualty
insurance company in The Bahamas and has an A-.(Excellent)
Rating from A. M. Best reflecting the company’s financial
stability and sound risk management practices. Compensation
commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications.







$ SUZUKI

Way of Life!

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING
with COMMONWEALTH BANK



Please apply before November 28th, 2007 to:




Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.



Group HR & Training Manager
Bahamas First Corporate Services
32 Collins Avenue
P.O. Box SS-6268
Nassau, Bahamas





#1 AUTO DEALER IN TE

EAST SHIRLEY STREET 32 2-3 | }25-3079
Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122

or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916









or email to: careers@bahamasfirst.com





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 5B





Economy likely to grow
‘lot less’ than 4% forecast

FROM page one

started to increasingly hinge on
real estate values.

In the US, house prices had
increased for the best part of a
decade since 1997, raising the
value of what for most con-
sumers is their number one
asset. Many had become aggres-
sive in borrowing against the
increasing equity value of their
homes, over and above mort-
gage costs and what they had
paid for their properties.

“US consumers have in effect
been able to use it [their homes]
as an ATM with collateral, and
banks have been happy to lend
because prices have been going
up,” Mr Sunderji said.

“Now, the ability of the US
consumer to borrow has been

impacted by the sub-prime prob-
lems, which have resulted in
homes being foreclosed and
house prices decreasing sub-
stantially. Banks have been
tightening up on lending as they
recalibrate risk.

“The ability of consumers to
borrow has been impacted, so
their ability to spend has been
impacted, too.”

With US consumers feeling
less wealthy, Mr Sunderji said
many were likely to cut back on
disposable income, and among
items impacted were likely to be
vacation and travel plans.

As a result, the Bahamian
tourism industry was likely to
feel the effects “some time in
the coming year” through
reduced visitor arrivals and low-
er per capita spending, as visi-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHEFILISE JEAN of APPLE
STREET WEST OFF WULFF ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-54802,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister resposible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PROVOST
MARSHALL SALE

An auction will be held on 28th Noveme-
ber, 2007 at 10:00 o’ clock at the Supreme
Court Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, The
Bahamas. On auction will be a number of
ts ‘Locman Watches. ip a variety of styles and
colours.

For more information please contact Miss
Cordell Frazier at Gibson & Company at
323-1234 or Mr. Jack Davis a the Supreme
"Court at 356-9101.

g Bank of The Bahamas

M I T BE D

B05 0 (6

Notice is hereby given in
accordance with Section 64
of the Securities Industry Act,
1999 that Mr. Azeal McFall
resigned from bank of The
Bahamas Limited effective

September 21, 2007

Legal Notice

NOTICE



MAYA COM. INC.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MAYA COM. INC. is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137(4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 21st November, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,
BVI

Dated this 23rd day of November, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

tor: traffic was set to “drop off”.

This, Mr Sunderji said, would
affect occupancies, revenue per
available room (RevPAR) and
profits for a major private sector
employer, the Bahamian hotel
industry, leading to lower wages
for employees in the sector.
This, in turn, was likely to man-
ifest itself in a reduced velocity
of circulation for income circu-
lating within the Bahamian
economy.

Mr Sunderji contrasted the
Bahamas’ reliance on US
tourists with the Dominican
Republic’s visitor base, which
was split 55/45 in favour of Euro-
pean tourists compared to
Americans.

“We need a balance along
those lines,” he suggested, as
the increased purchasing power
enjoyed by Canadians and Euro-
peans as a result of the US dol-
lar’s decline, making vacations
in the Bahamas relatively cheap-
er for them. To do so, though,
the Bahamas needed to enhance
airlift from Europe and Cana-
da.

“We live in a global economy,
and need to be aware that the
US$ has devalued very sharply
against the Canadian$, the UK£
and the euro. It means the
Bahamian$ has devalued against
those currencies,” Mr Sunderji
said.

He added that further infla-
tionary pressures were likely to
result from the fact that the oil
producing countries were look-
ing at increasing the price of oil,
and moving away from using the
US$ as a common denominat-
ing currency.

“We will see inflation creeping
in, simply because we will be
able to buy less for our dollar, “*
Mr Sunderji said. “We need to
be far more aware of what is
going on in the global market-
place than we actually are. We
think we are insulated far more
than we are. We are not.”

On the foreign direct invest-
ment side, Mr Sunderji said pro-
posed Bahamas-based develop-
ments might be impacted
“because banks are recalibrat-
ing risk, and might not lend in

Legal Notice

NOTICE

C. ING. CORPO

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) AMERIC. ING. CORPORATION in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 21st November, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,

BVI

Dated this 23rd day of November, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
- Liquidator

ICD UTILITIES LIMITED
Notice To Shareholders

The Board of Directors of

ICD Utilities Limited is pleased

to advise that a dividend of

10 cent per share

has been declared to all Shareholders

of record as at 3rd December, 2007

and payable on 14th December, 2007



areas where it is difficult to get a
return. The sub-prime problems
will impact the US consumer
and the US banks, and the lat-
ter’s ability to fund projects in
this nation”.

He cautioned that the
Caribbean was “littered with
failures” when it came to resort
developments, pointing as an
example to the Four Seasons
Emerald Bay resort, which was
in receivership.

With global financial institu-
tions cautious on lending full
stop, and’ increasing interest
rates and the cost of capital on
projects they were backing, Mr
Sunderji indicated Bahamas-
based foreign direct investment
projects might find it difficult to
attract capital amid the current
credit crunch.

And apart from the develop-
ers themselves, the credit crunch
is also likely to impact financ-
ing for potential buyers of real
estate at these projects. With
such developments heavily
reliant on cash flow from such
sales to drive project build-out,

that is another major headache
for Bahamas-based developers.

“TI see the domestic economy
following [the US], and I think
the 4 per cent GDP growth fore-
cast [for 2008] is a tad opti-
mistic,” Mr Sunderji said.

“I’m hopeful that we will not
have a very bad year, but cer-
tainly it will not be as robust as it
has been in the past couple of
years.

“IT don’t think growth will be
in the 4 per cent range; it will
be a lot less, and depend on
whether one or two of the major
investment projects out there go
through. There is some uncer-
tainty associated with that.”

He added: “I’m sure the Goy-
ernment is working vigorously
to ensure one or two of the large
projects come through, and buoy
the economy.

“Albany and Baha Mar are
said to be imminent. Both of
these will cushion the economy,
clearly, because they will
create jobs and foreign
direct investment will come
through.”

NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE IN-
VESTMENT CORPORATION LIMITED hereby
gives notice to the public of the resignation of Mr.
Cornelius A. Smith as President and Director of
the Company effective 30th October, 2007.

Dated this 21st day of November A.D., 2007.



MT SC
eS

Experienced Quantity , Su
in Building required. D:
pricing, contract nego
estimating and prep












Interested applicants are asked to send their :
resume to




Quantity Sar EY0
c/o The Tribune _
P.O. Box N-3027 |

Nassau, Bah .







eSidewalk Salee

Friday 23rd November and Saturday 24th November 2007

10:00a.m. - 5:00p.m.

50-75% off

Household Gifts » Accessories °

Handbags :Watches
And much more!
Fab! Finds Gift Shop

Lyford Cay Shopping Center

Tel: 362-6123


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a a re ee



Chamber ‘very concerned’

about 6.5% goods cost rise




FROM page one

akoff, told The Tribune that
“momentum” was increasing
to repeal all sales tax exemp-
tions in Florida, the proposal
having gone before the Tax
and Budget Reform Commis-
sion’s Finance and Tax
Reform Committee on
Friday.

The committee’s role is to
funnel proposals it considers
worthy up to the Commission
for consideration. With Flori-
da estimating that the sales
tax exemptions cost it $12 bil-
lion in tax revenues per year,
Mr Pinder said the draft
amendments discussed before
the committee were likely to
feature - in some form or oth-
er - in the Commission’s final
proposals for the voter’s bal-

si UBS

lot, due to be decided by
Spring 2008.

Mr Pinder said: “The com-
mittee voted unanimously to
put it [removing all sales tax
exemptions] in.

“It definitely has. a lot.of
momentum behind it, and
with $12 million in sales tax
exemptions, they see a lot of
money in increasing the tax
base.”

The proposed amendment
to the Florida constitution, as
it stands now, would “repeal
sales tax exemptions deter-
mined not to advance or serve
a public purpose”, although
areas where the imposition of
such a tax would be seen as
politically unpopular - such as
food and electricity - have
been spared.

However, the text allows for

individual sales tax exemp-
tions to be reinstated if they
are approved by 60 per cent of
both houses in the Florida
state legislature. ;

Mr Pinder said it would be
“worthwhile” for the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce or the
major retailers/wholesalers in
this nation to hire a US-based
attorney or representative to
give them a voice in the
sales tax exemption delibera-
tions.

He pointed out that there
was a clear opportunity to
influence the discussions, as
the Florida Commission and
its committee were worried
about the economic impact
the sales tax exemption’s
removal would have on the
state’s export industries.

The key, he said, would be

for the Chamber and Bahami-
an companies to provide data
showing the negative eco-
nomic impact for Florida com-
panies if, given the consider-

-able trade and links with this

nation, they switched to pur-
chasing from other US
sources.

Mr Pinder said imposition
of the 6.5 per cent sales tax
exemption would result in an
“increase in the cost of goods,
and because margins are so
slim on retail, some compa-
nies will go out of business.
It will act as inflationary pres-
sures, if companies pass the

‘cost of goods on to the con-

sumer”.
He added that while
Bahamian companies could

Legal Notice
NOTICE
JUBILEE SHIPS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

seek out new suppliers and
trading partners in other US

_ states and countries, this

would cost them “time and
money”.

“Whatever happens, it will
definitely result in higher costs
to the business entities in the
Bahamas, and to the general
public and the consumer.
There would be inflationary
pressures. Fuel and food are
going up, and this develop-
ment would result in another
one,” Mr Pinder said.

“As the Bahamas tries to
move from a tourism and
financial services economy to
more of a trading economy,
and its large retail establish-
ments develop and grow, any-
thing with an international tax
aspect coming out of the US is
worth keeping an eye on, both
at a federal and state level.”

Mr Pinder said collecting
due tax revenues and protect-
ing the tax base, amid the
pressure of international trade



treaties, was “ hot button
item” in the US currently.
Tightening the tax collection
system thus had implications
for nations such as the
Bahamas.

“It’s a hugely significant
item that the Bahamas,
Bahamian professionals, and

. the Government should be

keeping an eye on or have
someone keeping an eye on
for them,” Mr Pinder said.
Meanwhile, Mr D’ Aguilar
said companies likely to be
most affected if the sales tax
exemption was repealed were
those “who don’t have the
know how or sophistication to
buy from another state”, such
as Bahamian small business-
es and ‘mom and pop’ stores.
His counterparft in Grand
Bahama, Christopher Lowe,
the Chamber president there,
said building materials costs
in the Bahamas would be
especially impacted if the sales
tax exemption was repealed.

UBS (Bahamas) Limited is seeking a suitably
qualified individual to join their growing and
dynamic team as a:

Facility Specialist

This position is open to candidates with a
minimum of 3 years experience and
certification in electrical, plumbing & air-
condition repair & maintenance.

Main responsibilities to include:

* Traditional tasks of building management;

* Oversee all preventative maintenance
programs;

* Carry out technical interventions;

* Oversee maintenance service providers;
Oversee churn projects, documentation and

__ accounting;. haa aes ee
Support bank operations with a wide variety

of logistics services.- ~~~ =

In addition, candidates must have expérience
in report writing with basic working knowledge
of Microsoft Word and Excel. The ideal candidate
must be able to utilize knowledge & experience
to solve routine problems and reply to client

‘ (a) JUBILEE SHIPS LIMITED is in dissolution
under the provisions of the International Business
Companies Act 2000

The dissolution of the said company commenced
on the 20th November, 2007 when its the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.
The Liquidator of the said Company is Mr. Lynden
of Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas, as sole Liquidator.
Dated the 21st day of November 2007

H & J Corporate Services Ltd.

Registered Agent
for the above-named Company



Legal Notite
Notice.

JUBILEE SHIPS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)














NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that AIME LUGENS, MINNIE STREET,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and-that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of
NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, -P.O0.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with | _

“Section 138 (4) of the International Business Companies, |=
Act, (No. 45 of 2000), CENS CORPORATION LTD. is in
dissolution. ADAN ARTURO ILLUECA HERRANDO
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at 52St. N°17,
Bella Vista, Panama City, Republic of Panama. All
persons having claims against the above-named com-
pany are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
29th day of November, 2007.

requests. Creditors having debts or claims againts the above-named Com-

Interested persons meeting ine shove Rilera pany are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
should apply in writing, enclosing a full resume
with cover letter, on or before November 30,
2007 to:

at Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box
N-3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 6th
day of December, 2007. In default thereof they will be excluded

ADAN ARTURO a

ts

hrbahamas@ubs.com

:
UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N 7757,
Nassau, Bahamas



Baker's Bay

GOLF @ OCEAN CLUB

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Baharnas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

Key Responsibilities

Establish culinary standard

Create menus and recipes for high-end and casual dining to include
international and Bahamian cuisine

Maintain food safety standard

Recruit and train culinary team

Manage and develop culinary team

Control food cost

Determine market list and vendors

Design special events

Qualifications -

Y Bachelor's degree in Culinary Arts or related subject; professional
certifications

Y Minimum ten (10) years experience at a five-star club, resort or restaurant
with at least three (3) years international or off-shore experience.

Y Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and culinary skills,
must be able to train others and execute ideas and standards.

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit your resume

to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, sbowe@bekersbayclub.comn or
by fax at 242-367-0804.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 21st day of November 2007

LYNDEN MAYCOCK
LIQUIDATOR

ENOL,
~ AS

\
Sorngott

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE STTPPLY OF DRUGS
RELATED ITEMS
Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public
Authority and the Ministry of
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Health,

The Tender Document, which includes instruction to

| the Tenderers along with other relevant information,

can be collected from the Bahamas National Drug
Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, Monday
through Friday 9a.m. - 5p.m.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a
sealed envelope or package idenified as “Tender
for the Supply of Drug and Related Items” and
addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
1st Floor, Manx Corporate Centre/Dockendale House
West Bay Street
P.O.Box N-8200
Nassau, The Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address
on a before 5p.m. Friday, December 21st, 2007. A
copy of a valid business license and Nation-
allnsurance Certificate must accompany all
proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all Tender(s).



Hospitals |’

FML Group of Companies Ltd.
is seeking to employ a

Marketing

Manager

Must be young, aggressive and energentic
with experience in marketing and public
relations.

Interested persons may fax their resumes
to 394-2193.

NOTICE

The following practices located at #36 Collins
Avenue, Nassau, will be closed permanently on 22
February, 2008, at the latest:

















e KENNETH W. KNOWLES, M.D.
-¢ BAHAMAS OPTICAL CENTRE, LTD.






Patients who wish to obtain records are asked to
mail a written request, containing clear patient ID
information etc., to Box N-8322, Nassau. Following
that, specific arrangements may then be made by
telephone at 325-4754, 322-4940. Regretfully, no
further letters can be written.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 7B



BUSINESS



Baha Mar ‘very, very —
close’ to full go-ahead

FROM page one

tributed $400 million in
equity to the development,
largely from its principal
investors, Dikran and Sarkis
Izmirlian.

It also had to prove it had
$1 billion in financing in
place, and that could have
been made more difficult -
not only by the increase to
$2.4 billion - but by the
global debt and credit mar-
ket squeeze, which has
increased the cost of capi-
tal and made accessing it
more difficult.

The original Heads of
Agreement said that once
these conditions were satis-
fied, the Government and
Baha Mar would engage a
project manager, and
“mutually agreed” master
planning and civil engineer-
ing firms, to handle the
West Bay re-routing, plus
construction of a corridor
connecting the resort with
JFK Drive.






SPECIFIC DUTIES:

DIHAARWN

12. Issues library passes.

available.

in the area.

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

1. LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II, LAW LIBRARY

The Law Library of The College requires a highly motivated, tactful, people-friendly,
innovative, detail-oriented person to provide paraprofessional, administrative and basic
reference assistance. Clientele will include students and faculty of the LL.B Programme,
as well as members of the legal profession and the general public.

The construction work
would be staged in phases,
with the project manager
selecting the lowest quali-
fied bidder provided they
were able to obtain perfor-
mance bonds and the bids
were reasonable.

The total estimated cost
of the West Bay Street re-
routing and JFK connection
was estimated, at the time
the Heads of Agreement
was signed, to be $90 mil-
lion. This did not include
the $16 million reverse
osmosis plant and sewerage
treatment plant that Baha
Mar would finance itself.

The Government was to
pay $45.3 million towards
the road works costs, almost
exactly what it received for
selling the then-Radisson
and associated lands to
Baha Mar. If the total cost
came to less than $70 mil-
lion, the Government and
Baha Mar would pay 50 per
cent each.

_ Baha Mar first sought a
supplemental Heads of

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

STAFF VACANCY

LIBRARIES & INSTRUCTIONAL
MEDIA SERVICES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:

The successful candidate will perform all duties with minimal supervision, assisting with
the overseeing of the day-today activities and programmes of the Branch in the absence
of the Branch head, so good judgment and professionalism is essential. In addition,
he/she will direct the activities of library assistants and part-timers and will assist with
their training and appraisal. Regular written reports are required.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:
Under the direction of the Unit Supervisor, the position performs a variety of paraprofessional
duties with minimal supervision. These include supervision of library assistant(s),
preparation of written and oral reports/correspondence, planning and organizing job
activities, which demonstrates skills such as decision-making, good judgment and’
knowledge of library and college policies and procedures. Further, overseeing the
maintenance of collections, participation in the development of policies, services and
programmes, and overseeing the day-to-day activities and programmes of the Unit in the
absence of the Unit Head are to be undertaken. The position works closely with all Units
to ensure the delivery of a high standard of service to patrons.

Provides evening and Saturday reference services.
Directs the activities of Library Assistants, and assists in their appraisal.
Assists in the Unit’s budget preparation.
Assists with the updating of policies and procedures manuals.

Responds to reference questions received from patrons by telephone and in person.
Supervises part-time, evening and weekend staff.
Ensures the enforcement of library policies and procedures.

Assists with storage and access to all library resources, e.g. books, microfilm,
CD-ROM databases, microfiche and related equipment.

9. Conducts research in support of the Unit’s work.
10. Assists with the conduct of research and the compilation of bibliographies.
11. Assumes responsibility for deposit of funds collected in the unit.

13. Organizes work schedules for library clearance.
14. Handles Inter-Library loan requests.

15. Assists with the delivery of Bibliographic Instructional programmes.

16. Provides group and individual tours of the unit/library.

18. Assists patrons with the use of computers and other related electronic services

19. Assists in the development of projects for the making of the library and its resources.
20. Conducts training for Library Assistants on o
21. Attends library meetings.

22. Serves on College wide committees
23. Participates in library projects.

24. Drafts letters, reports, proposals as requested.
25. Recommends resources for acquisitions

26. Any other duties which may be assigned.

LIBRARY ASSOCIATE II

QUALIFICATIONS: Normally a Bachelor’s Degree or the equivalent in relevant area,
OR for a technical/vocational or craft area, satisfactory completion of a recognized or
acceptable programme of training at the craft level, AND have at least ten (10) years of
experience working in the craft area, OR have a trained Teacher’s Certificate with
specialization in the relevant craft area, PLUS at least six (6) years of teaching experience

SALARY SCALE: SPS-5 $24,580 x $700 - $35,780

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest along with a completed application
form and an up-to-date resume to the address below by December 6, 2007:

The Director

.Human Resources Department

The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Or to hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please note that applications are available on The-College’s website: www.cob.edu.bs

perational procedures.

Agreement with the
Christie administration, as
it was crucial to cementing
its relationship with Har-
rah’s, the Caesar’s Enter-
tainment parent, which
would take a 43 per cent
equity stake in the project,
and Starwood. ,

Yet no agreement was
concluded before the May
2 general election, and the
Ingraham government’s
position has been that Baha
Mar must start fulfilling its
obligations under the first
Heads of Agreement before
any new deal and extra
investment incentives are
considered.

Yet talks between the
Government and Baha Mar
have continued, as they
have also with Albany’s
developer, Park Ridge
Securities Corporation,
whose investors include
golfers Ernie Els and Tiger
Woods, plus the Tavistock
Group - the worldwide
holding vehicle for invest-
ments by Lyford Cay bil-
























































FML Group of Companies Ltd.
is seeking to employ an

Administrative Assistant

for it human resources department.

lionaire Joe Lewis.

It is understood that
progress has been made in
the Albany negotiations,
with the developers agree-
ing to give up a multi-mil-
lion dollar package of
Hotels Encouragement Act
investment incentives - cus-
toms duties, stamp duties
and real property tax
exemptions - on some 200
condominium units that
would have formed a con-
dotel.

Must be matured, energentic and possess
knowledge of word and excel. Must have
excellent written and communication skills.
Human resources experience a plus.

Interested persons may fax their resumes
to 394-2193.





Employment Opportunities

New retail business seeks male and female sales per-
sons for immediate employment. An attractive base
plus a weekly commission and uniform are provided.
Interested persons should contact Mr. Mcintosh by
telephoning 454-6380 to make an appointment for an
interview. Applicants should bring the following docu-
ments to the interview: |











a) Valid Passport
b) Police Certificate (Record)

)
c) National Insurance Card
d) Health Certificate











SALES
PERSONS




e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your
income.

e You are limited only to
your potential
e Flexible hours available
e Excellent commissions
and benefits








Must have a proven track record in sales
Professional appearance a must
Must have reliable transportation
Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
Excellent written and communication skills.













Apply in writing to
Sales Representatives
Box PM-1
C/O The Nassau Guardian
P.O. Box N-3011
Nassau

Bahamas






*PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
néighbourhoods. Perhaps
‘you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













Legal Notice

NOTICE

OAKCREST VENTURES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)



‘Notice is hereby given that the above-named
‘Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the

‘1 ;25th day of October 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa

Gor. Inc., P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

fe

SVR,

tLe ARGOSA CORP. INC.
aCe (Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BACLIFF VIEW LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, the dissolution of BACLIFF VIEW LIMITED.

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

~ ZOLE MANAGEMENT
HOLDINGS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of ZOLE MANAGEMENT HOLD-
INGS LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Pricing Information As Of:

S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson





Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

1.364794"
3.5388***

Colina Money Market Fund



Previous Close Today's Close

Counc

il told: Still

approve Baker’s Bay
permits on ‘merit’ only

FROM page one

“T believe the concerns of
the council might be that Bak-
er’s Bay includes non-
Bahamian entities, but once
a Heads of Agreement is



invites you to our

~ (Lay-aways get 15% discount)

Your friendly little jewelry store thru the International Bazaar, downtown, i
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS SALE

<< Noy. 16 thru Nov. 23 you get 25% discount
Nov. 24 thru Nov. 30 you get 20% discount

Then 15% discount will continue thru the month of December

Mens’ gold rings from $80 ...... Ladies’ gold rings from $32
Babies’ gold rings from $20...... Gold Handchains from $35
Gold anklets from $37 ..... Gold earrings from $13

Gold charms from $10 ..... Gold chains from $35

Let Angie, Eleanor and Ricky help you make your selection Free Giftwraping

LAS TIENDAS
International Bazaar, Bay St. Tel. 325-3333

SAH VA AAT NA WD RANT RAP AT LARA ARRAN

signed it is the duty of the
local council to review all
applications that are present-
ed and make a détermination
based on merit. .
“I would therefore direct
you to invite the council to
consider the plans submitted





|
.

i



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BYLAND INVESTMENTS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of BY LAND INVESTMENTS

LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution

has been issued and the Company has therefore been

struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. ING. 0
(Liquidator) ae

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DARGILE RIVER LTD.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of DARGILE RIVER LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register. |

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
, (Liquidator)

= )FIDELITY

Change Daily Vol.

EPS $

Div $ es

8.12%
7.80%
0.00%












for their consideration and
make a decision one way or
the other. Please advise this
office as soon as a decision is
made.”

Mr Sweeting told The Tri-
bune: “I’ve said this from day
one. It’s basically echoing my
advice to the council, in that
until we get a court order or
such notice from the Govern-
ment telling us to stop, we
should continue to review
these plans [from Baker’s
Bay] as if they were from any-
one else.”

In relation to the concerns
held by the three councillors,
Fred Sweeting and Rory
Russell from Man-O-War
Cay, and Fred Laing from
Great Guana Cay, Mr Sweet-
ing said: “I think this will
clear a lot of things up. I feel
they may still try to find ways

to oppose the project, but
we'll see.”

He had previously accused
the trio of playing politics
over the Baker’s Bay project,
an accusation that Mr Russell
had denied to The Tribune.

“We want to keep this mov-
ing forward for the benefit of
the economy of Abaco,
because it’s a major player
in the economy,” Mr Sweet-
ing said of Baker’s Bay.

“There’s still a very thin
margin [on the council]. It’s
almost an even split, but
we’ve got just enough to keep
things going in the right direc-
tion.”

Another 14 Baker’s Bay
permit applications are up for
consideration at the Hope
Town District Council’s next
meeting on Thursday,
November 29, 2007.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEFFREY TOUSSAINT

of MARSH HARBOUR,

ABACO, BAHAMAS is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization as a citizen

of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16TH day of
NOVEMBER 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARVIN GARY DARVILLE OF
GEORGE TOWN, EXUMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23RD day of NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

is hereby given that LATOYA PLUMMER-
CHEDDESINGH of ST. ALBANS DRIVE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day of
November, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



MARINE STORE
LOOKING FOR

Experience Counter
Sales Person;

must be computer literate and have good
customer relations

PLEASE FAX RESUME TO 394-3885

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RASHAN SEVERE OF SCOTT
STREET, BAIN TOWN, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23RD day of NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.









PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ASJA SHAKARA
GREEN of Soldier Road, Bahamas, intend to change
my name to ASJA SHAKAR TILERAIN. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.
















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DANCINSAN BERCHANT OF
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 23RD day of NOVEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

idelity Prime Income Fund

2.938214***
1.279370"**
ioc



YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 NAVKEY
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

'S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S:

* © 16 November 2007
** 30 Jurie 2007
*** 31 October 2007
see" 31 July 2007

INFORMATION CALL (242) 9


THE TRIBUNE

Baker’s Bay provides ‘major

if es

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007, PAGE 98



Ya

opportunities’ for Bahamian firms

AT A time when the US
economy is slowing down, and
revised IMF and Central Bank
estimates for the Bahamas GDP
growth in 2007 are lower than
previously forecasted, the island
of Abaco has one of the
strongest. economies in this
nation.

Some of the island’s small
and large companies are expe-
riencing this.economic prosper-
ity due, in part, to the presence
of one of the island’s major
developer,Baker’s Bay Golf and
Ocean Club on Great Guana
Cay.

The developers of the $175
million resort have already
invested more than $200 mil-
lion in the Bahamas and pro-
vided employment for 140 per-
manent staff. An additional 150
persons are also employed in
construction work wiih Baker’s
Bay’s coniractors and subcon-
tractors.

Bahamas Hot Mix Company,
the contractor for earthworks
and road paving at Baker’s Bay,
has been involved with the pro-
ject for one year. Ebrahim Sai-
di, general manager of Bahamas
Hot Mix. said the project has
provided continuous employ-
ment for 25 staff, the majority of
whom are Abaconians, work-
ing directly on-site.

Professional

“It’s kept us busy for the past
year and hopefully into next
year as well. The developers are
very professional. They have all
their permits in place. Every-
thing we’re doing is permitted
by the Ministry of Works, and
it’s all been in compliance with
the rules and regulations. We
execute in accordance with
them. Baker’s Bay has already
generated a large income for
the people of Abaco and as it
builds out it will provide con-
tinuous benefits and increased
income revenue to the Abacos,”
Mr Saidi said. :

Also working on the project
is Bahamas Marine Construc-
tion, a’ subcontractor to Ameri-



can Bridge, which is responsible
for a number of aspects of the
project, including building
revetments and breakwaters,
internal dredging and construc-
tion of the docks.

James Mosko, president of
Bahamas Marine Construction,
said his company has been
growing since working with
Kerzner, and is now able to do
jobs that would have previously
been done by companies out of
the US. He said it feels good to
step into another large project.

“They’re high-end: They're
doing everything right. They’re
not skimping anywhere. We
have about 15 to 18 people up
there, and we'll be there for the
better part of a ycar-and-a-halft.
We've still got three to four
months to finish the first phase,
and then. we start the docks,
which will take us another eight
months,” Mr Mosko said.

He added that maintaining .a
presence in Abaco means
spending money localiy, and
expressed confidence that the
developers would see the pro-
ject through.

“In Marsh Harbour we’ve got
I don’t know how many homes
and rooms rented. All our tood
comes from the food store, wo
travel on Abaco Air and
Bahamasair, any way we
can...we’ve seen a lot of pro-

* jects that are half-baked and get

off and they’re under-funded
and they go to hell in a hand
basket, but this isn’t going to
happen with this project,” Mr
Mosko said. :!

In August, construction
began on Baker's Bay’s 33-acre
Marina Village, which consists
of high-end residential units,
town homes and some retail
stores. This work is being car-
ried out by Woslee Dominion,
another all Bahamian compa-
ny. -
Prior to, Baker’s Bay, Woslee
Dominon completed the $7 mil-
lion dollar Mandara Spa Expan-
sion for Kerzner International's
Phase III expansion, the $38
million Harbourside Ailantis,
and a number of luxury high-

end homes at Ocean Club ''

Estates. Ashley Glinton, presi-
dent and owner of Woslee
Dominion, says he expects the
work will last for about two-
and-a-half to three years, and
at its peak he will employ at
least 200 construction workers
from Abaco, Nassau and other
Bahamian islands.

“] think it’s a wonderful pro-
ject. It’s a very exciting project.
I’ve been involved in other
developments and from what |
can tell and who I’ve communi-
cated with these guys are gen-
uine. They’re sincere in what
they’re going to do. They say
what they’re going to do so far,
and as far as theit commitment
to Abaco and the people and
the environment i have seen
nothing less than what they say
they’re going to do. I think it’s a
model for other developments
in terms of the environment and
the way developments really
should be carried out,” Mr Glin-
ton said.

Benefitted

While the company relied on
Bahamian contractors for the
creation of the resort, a num-
ber of smaller companies have
also benefited from Baker’s Bay
related business.

On Guana Cay, Donna’s
Golf Cart and Cottage Rentals
rents golf carts to Baker’s Bay
on a monthly basis, and cottages
to the developers and their con-

tractors as needed. Guana Cay’s -

Orchard Bay Marina also ben-
efits from cottage rentals by
Baker’s Bay.

Jimmy Albury, of Orchard
Bay Marina, says he believes
the development will be good
for Guana Cay and Abaco as
long as it is “controlled and
doesn’t grow too fast”.

“Discovery Land Company
has deep pockets and overall
they’re a good company,” Mr
Albury said.

Donna Sands, also noted that
the company has assisted the
community. “They formed the
Fig Tree Foundation and it’s

helped a guy with cancer, paid
some of his medical expenses
and we’ve got a young guy in
Florida in rehab and the Foun-
dation’s paying for that

“Vaen they just donated tive
computers to the school, brand
new desks, everything.

“So they are willing to help
the community,” Mrs Sands
said.

In Marsh Harbour, a number
of Bahamian businesses also








on-site in the Bahamas,
Nova Southeastern University

> Are you ready to caus







c/o Bahamas Baptist Community College
8 Jaan Street Gleniston Gardens

2 an effect?

supply products and services to
the Baker’s Bay development.
One such business is the Har-
bour View Marina in Marsh
Harbour that supplies Baker’s
Bay with tuet products.

“We provide them with fuel,
gasoline and diesel on a weekly
or daily basis depending on
their activity,” says Troy
Cornea, manager of the marina.

“It certainly moves product
for us, which is very beneficial

At Nova Southeastern University’s Fischler School, we inspire educators to inspire their students to
change the world. Become inspired by the school that has been svattering the barriers of traditional

learning for more than 35 years. Earn your bachelor s, master © or doctoral degree in education

ATTEND AN INFORMATION MEETING TO LEARN MORE:
Thursday, November 29, 2007 at 6:00 p.m.

242-364-6766

Albany Developer Ltd.

in conjuction with

The Department of Labour , BTVi and the Contractors Association

will host a

Job fair

Tuesday November 27" 2007

and

‘Wednesday November 28" 2007

8 a.m.-4 p.m.

Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium

We need to see

ALL CONTRACTORS (Big and small
ALL YENDORS -ALL SUPPLIERS

NOVAGENtVERSITY

a Fis chlerSchool.nova.edu/Bahamas

and this has been going om for
five or six months now since
we’ve hdd their account.”

“As far as what they’re doing
the scope seems to be in very
good taste. J understand the
company is an extremely rep-'
utable company, so if we’re
going to have development on
Guana Cay or in that area it
seems like these guys are the
ideal candidates to develop it,”
Mr. Cornea said.

ERE,

ich-V.\0) 4-0 (0) ots
OR CANCER.







FISCHLER SCHOOL

OF EDUCATION & HUMAN SERVICES



by the Comanssion
hte ward associate's,




PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

rt a
; Mo) eS cls |

20, WHAT DO ©
CALL YOU..-RED,

OR RUSTY?

ALL MY OLD
FRIC

- €ROM

ALAN TELL6 ERIC ALL ABOUT
[LUANVS LINES See

| SHE’S HOME NOW,
BUT HER HEALTH





LOOK, IT'S OFFICIAL! THERE'S THE
MOST DANGEROUS JOB IN THE

MARVIN

WHOA. MOM

WAS REALLY
MAD ABOUT

WHAT YOU







4

OST, BY UV ERSEA PRIS SYWOIL

7

ATa\ © OT WILEY WK, Wee,



mzo




NeseS
RUNS IT PAST

“OGBOSHHOBOQ



L WONVER HOW
HIGH JULIAN'S

ACROSS
A chap possibly noted in 1
N. America (6)

Being desperate is no good (8)
Pictures a saint with woes (6)

In the dark until explained (5)
Fat lad embracing a redhead (4)
Busy person's mid-afternoon
drink? (4)

Fruit worth £1 to me? (4)

He's plumb suspended! (3)
Fictional captain's exclamation to
a seaman (4)

Calamity due to the wind? (4)
Put on a show just for fun? (5,4)
Interviewed the head of

State, even (4)

It grows in less than

three days (4)

Pretend, partly in play (3)

An animal shot at? (4)

Utter in a semitone (4)

Source of electricity for a small
room? (4)

Cul a key for a flier (5)

This expedition is possibly including
some seafaring (6)

Gone like the truck one got rid of (8)
Boil these in a brew before

closing time (6)

Yesterday’s cryptic solutions

ACROSS: 1, D-rink-S 7, Pen-elope 8, Flea 10, Mai-so-n 11,

Strive 14, Ron 16, Ho.-Ned 17, Lie-n 19, M-one-t. 21,

ViP-er 22, Dixie 23, Rest 26, Sugar 28, Y-EW 29, Team up

30, Dec.-ent 31, Use-R 32, B-utter-ed 33, Swed-E-n
DOWN: 1, Disma-L 2, Nelson 3, Span 4, Heat-fier 5,
Rob-|-n 6, SE-wed 8, Fire 9, Eon 12, Rot 13, Venus 15,

Hop it 18, Is-Sue 19, MIX 20, Nee 21, Vi-ruses 22, Dam. .
23, Recede 24, Ewer 25, Tit-l-an 26, Stubs 27, Gar-th 28,

Yes 30, Duds

", STL

THAT POOR
SAP WHO HAS TO
CHANGE THE GAS
PRICE IN BROAD

DOWN

Has she nothing to exist for? (5)
Questionable strength? (5)

What Theodore or Edward could
bear to be called? (5)

Vehicle useful in back-tracking (4)
The mistake of a girl? (4)

WAS A JUDGE.--HID
NAME WAS DUNCAN!



Plant you can make a brush

out of (5)

The sort of pie to order? (5)
Unexciting place to live? (4)

Where one could amass a

lot of tea (5)

A police department's chemical? (4)
Lacking heart, there could be such
a victory (6)

High-pitched song belter

perhaps? (6)

Catch less than nine trout (3)
Being angry, one has to scold (5)
Would such politicians be a long
time in preparing a bill? (7)

The village recidivist? (3)

Does his body lack a figure? (3)

A supporter apt to be wiry (6)

Left port with cargo (5)

A determined group of people? (3)
Favourite piano quartet finale (3)
Trouble due to foolish capers (6)

A depressed area in the country (3)

Yesterday's easy solutions

ACROSS: 1, Cuspid 7, Athletic 8, Pear 10, Solace 11, Altire

14, Use 16, Taped 17, Sage 19, Ripen 21, Raven

22, Sepia 23, Pint 26, Talon 28, Bad 29, United 30,
Parole 31, Oral 32, Overacts 33, Treble

DOWN: 1, Crisis 2, Please 3, Dare 4, Flatten 5, Strip 6,
Ached 8, Plug 9, Ace 12, Tan 13, Resin 15, Civil

18, Asian 19, Rap 20, Pea 21, Renewal 22, Sot

WELL.,.VESPITE
THE IMPOSING
TITLE, ONWY
TIWo & THESE



| EASY PUZZLE |











COULD BE
ACTLONABLE




GOLOMICS, CoM / RoPSE QU (TURE

r-
| WIL PEC CAPTRLIDE. HET

VID YOU TRY
LOOKING ON THE
TOP SHELF OF HIS

i,

|
‘
‘
i
j
i
i

ACROSS
Royal seat (6)
Journalist (8)
Perceptive (6)
Mud (5)
Quote (4)
Grain store (4)
Greek letter (4)
Favourite (3)
Feline (4)
Close (4)
Overzealous (9)
Injury (4)
Playing cards (4)
Possessive
pronoun (3)
Fever (4)
Paradise (4)
Celebrity (4)

Wind instrument (5)
Floor covering (6)

Revered (8)
Loves (6)

23, Parade 24, Idol 25, Twelve 26, Tudor 27, Liver 28, Bar

30, Post



“WHEN I SA

South dealer.
East-West vulnerable.
NORTH
#93
Â¥KQ6
#KQ742
&QI3
WEST EAST
@K72 #Q10865
¥742 ¥83
095 #31083
AK865 107
SOUTH
bAT4
Â¥AJ1095
A6
&942
The bidding:
South West North East
i Pass 2¢ Pass
2% Pass 4%

Opening lead — king of clubs.

Most errors at the bridge table are
of a simple sort. It is not the difficult
hands that cause the loss of myriads
of points, b’. ~ther the far more fre-
quent run-o.-. s-mill hands that are
responsible for such losses.

Take this hand, for example.
West led the king of clubs, East play-
ing the ten to begin a high-low. West
continued with the ace and another
club, and East miffed to bring his side
to three tricks. East then shifted to a
spade, taken by South with the ace.

Declarer drew three rounds of
trumps and tested the diamond suit
by cashing the A-K-Q. On the third

EN I SAID, RUSTLE UP SOME GRUB,
MA'AM,’ TDIDN’T MEAN VEG-TABLES!”

eo
The Better Way



diamond, South disposed of one of
his spade losers, but when the dia-
monds failed to break 3-3, he had to
go down one.

However, declarer should have
made the contract. In effect, he
banked all his hopes on a 3-3 divi-
sion of the opposing diamonds and
made no provision for the possibility
that the diamonds might be divided
4-2.

After winning the ace of spades,
South should have drawn only two
rounds of trumps, retaining the king
in dummy as a subsequent entry. He
could then cash the A-K of diamonds
and ruff a low diamond with a high

trump.

This would establish the Q-7 as
tricks. 4 heart to the king would then
put him in dummy to cash the two
d:.monds and discard both his spade
losers.

It is important to observe the
effect this line of play has on the
chances of making the contract. In
normal circumstances, a 3-3 break
occurs about 36 percent of the time,
while a 4-2 break is a 48 percent
probability. If declarer can develop
an approach that will succeed against
either a 3-3 or 4-2 division, he can
raise his chances to 84 percent.

In the given case, where East is
known to have started with only two
clubs and West with five, the chance
of a 3-3 break is even less likely, so
declarer has all the more reason to
seek a more viable approach.

TARGET



HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY’S TARGET

Good 16; very good 24;
excellent 32 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.



Angry (5)

Month (5)
Encourage (4)
Characteristic (5)
Ceremony (4)
Gossip (6)
Position (6)

Cover (3)

Tooth (5)
Mythical creature (7)
Snake (3)

Friend (3)
Prisoner (6)
Artist's stand (5)
Distant (3)
Frozen water (3)
Announcer (6)
Moist (3)

Portals (5)

Fool (5)

Poor (5)
Incitement (4)
Run away (4)

~~

fort forte
hereto hetero
retro rort rote
THEREFORE
hhree throe tore

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION
ether ferret fete
. forth fret froth

thereof t!
torr tree

_ Other rete
thee there

Me
word
| plot

the main story




of a play, novel
or poem

Magnus Carlsen v Lauren
Fressinet, Cap d'Agde 2006.
Norway's 16-year-old Carisen Is
the darling of chess fans and
organisers. Many reckon him a
future world champion, while
his zestful attacks and
imaginative tactics make his
games a pleasure to watch and
replay. Carlsen came unstuck in
the Cap d'Agde semi-final when
he was outwitted by his
Ukrainian rival Sergey Karjakin,
also 16, but his finish in today's
diagram was widely considered
the move of the toummament. As
White (to play) he is only a pawn
up while Black threatens Rxb5,
cxb5 and Nxd3. Carisen’s next
tum proved so devastating that
France's Fressinet resigned on
the spot. What was White's
winner?

MOM, CAN T HAVE SOME
MONEY SO HOBRES AND
T CAN COTO A MONE?

T REAL THINK THERE
ARE MORE CONSIRICTINE

THE TRIBUNE















FRIDAY,
NOV 23

ARIES — March 21/April 20
It’s time to curb the paranoia, Aries.
No one is plotting against you. Quit
worrying about what others. think.
Follow your own path to happiness.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21
You are able to make sense of situa-
tions that seem to make no sense at
all. More important, you can deal
with people who have allowed their
emotions to get the better of them.

GEMINI - May 22/June 21

A setback at work is not as serious
as it might first appear, so don’t let it
get you down. Cheer yourself up by
going out on Wednesday instead of
going straight home after work —
the festive lights will lift your spirits.

CANCER - June 22/July 22
Keep telling yourself you are the
best — and believe it, Cancer. Your
confidence may have started to slip,
but the truth is, there is a great
opportunity coming your way.
LEO - July 23/August 23

The good times keep getting better,
and this week is no exception.
However, where joint money mat-
ters are concerned, you must not
take anything for granted.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

Be as kind and forgiving as you can,
this week, even to those who have
been giving you a hard time lately.
It’s not as difficult as it seems.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

As independent as you may be, you
must make the effort to work with
others this week. Luck will come
your way through oe — net-
working is the name of the game.

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
You'll be under the microscope for
most of this week, Scorpio, so you’ll
want to make sure that everything
you do is “‘on the level.” Sparks fly
when you run into a sexy stranger
late in the week. Have fun!

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
The everyday things don’t interest
you at all this week — excitement
and adventure are what you crave.
Carpe diem! Don’t tie yourself down
with the trivia of life.

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
A new business opportunity will
come your way early in the week,
but think long and hard before you
‘sign anything. Will you be able to
commit the time and effort required?

AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb 18
There’s potential for a new love to
blossom — but make sure you’re
ready to be serious. Don’t play
games with anyone else’s heart.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
You’re not feeling as energetic as
usual this week, Pisces. This: could
be a blessing in disguise — you've
been busy as of late and could cer-
tainly use the time off.

‘CHESS by Leonard Barden





Chess solution ¢ 1 (Qf5! Resigns. If Qxf5 2 RxbS+
forces mate. I cxbS or RxdhS 2 Qxf4. If Qc7 2 RxbS+
QxbS 3 Qne6 wins a rook. I RIG 2 Qxt4 Rixf4 3 RbS+

mates.




THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, NOvuwiotrit


FRIDAY EVENING | NOVEMBER 23, 2007 |

[7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

. Issues Round- |Washington |McLaughlin [Bill Moyers Journal (N) (CC) |The Vicar of Di- Bae a the
WPBT [table discussion. |Week (N) 0 Group fy (CC) bley Geraldine [Dead (Part 2 of
» — |(CC) plays Cupid. 2) _|
The Insider (N) [Ghost Whisperer Melinda tries to [Moonlight Beth is jealous when [NUMBSRS A deadly robbery leads
WFOR |n (CC) help a girl understand the git ste Mick starts working closely with a {to the disappearance of an extreme-
has been given. (N) “ (CC) mysterious photographer. (N) “% — ly rare comic book. (N)
)

Access a % & & THE FAMILY MAN (2000, Romance-Comedy) Nicolas Cage, Tea Leoni, Don Cheadle. A Wall Street
WTVJ {wood (N) (CC)

Deco Drive The Next Great American Band Don’t Forget the Lyrics! Singers |News (N) (CC)
@ WSVN Another band leaves; six bands per-|compete. {N) (CC)
form. (N) A (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) /Men in Trees “Sea Change” Marin |Women’s Murder Club Illegal-alien |(:02) 20/20 (N) (CC)
@ WPLG Cc) questions the terms of her relation- |witnesses embroil the Bani an
ship with Jack. (N) (CC) immigration fight. (N) (CC)
CABLE CHANNELS
(:00) CSI: Miami CSI: Miami “Free Fall” A couple, re- |CSI: Miami “Dead Air’ A kidnapped |CSI; Miami The team searches for
A&E Recoil” (CC) |cently released from jail, is targeted |woman misdials a cell-phone num: the killer of two people on a cruise
for death. (CC) ber and begs for help. ship docked in Miami. (CC)
Peschardt’s |BBC World News America BBC News ~ |World Business |BBC News Our World ‘The
BBCI Peo le “Amitabh (Latenight). |Report (Latenight). Prying Game”
achchan”

Access Granted |BET Hip-Hop Awards 2007 (CC Keyshia Cole: |College Hill: In-
BET ; por me The Way ItIs {terns (CC)
A
L

playboy wakes to an alternate suburban existence. \ (CC

intiques Road- {Air Farce Live Rick Mercer Re- |Torchwood ‘They Keep Killin CBC News: The National (N) (CC)
CBC (Cc) port (CC) |Suzie"(N) (CC) :
:00) Kudlow & Fast Mone’ The Suze Orman Show Lowering |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch x :
CNBC [botany (cc Liles eclal ie federal funda, (CC) 3 | et Charlie the
C)

oz;

a
CNN a tice) Out in the Open Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC) B rN lh Amian 5 1p 1p etan d

%* %% LEGALLY BLONDE (2001, ]%* %% BLUE COLLAR COMEDY TOUR RIDES AGAIN (2004, Documentary) Comics Bill Mente ed :
COM dda rer Luke |Engvall, Jeff Foxworthy and others perform. | | WS Sl d ek | ele Dere Ik P ut wit
ilson, Selma Blair

COURT Cops ‘Las Ve- [Most Shocking Forensic Files |Forensic Files [Forensic Files North Mission some SMI les on your
(cc) ‘Order Up” Road cons.)
; le | d ss fa ces.

(:45) Phineas = HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 2 itt Musical Comedy) Zac Efron, Vanes- |The Suite Life of|The Suite Life of
(CC)
it

———

i

DISN and Ferb “Roller-|sa pe Ashley Tisdale, A teen befriends members of a wealthy fami-/Zack & Cody 1 |Zack & Cody
tt ly. 0 ‘NR’ (CC) Stacey's party.

DIY This Old House This Old House |New Yankee |New Yankee [Wood WorksA Burt Buildsa |The Inside Job
n (cc fn (CC) Workshop (CC) |Workshop (CC) |hall table. Band ;
Ich Trage einen |Journal: Tages- [Europa Aktuell jJournal: In Journal: Tages- |Quadriga Ay )
DW esr tome ie | Bring your children to the
The Daily 10 (N) [Patrick Dempsey: The E! True Keeping Up-Kar-|Kimora: Life in |The Soup (N) Wildest Cop . yy
mee Hollywood story A (CC) das ion Pi the Fab Lane , Show Moments ; McH a ) py +] our at McDo nald sin
ot- | NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Miami Heat. From the Americandirlines Arena in Mia-_ [NBA Basketball O \ |
around ve) _ [ie (C) | akes Field every Thursday
Salat ' wine eG Houston Rockets at Miami Heat, From the Americandirlines Arena in Mia- eee = | . 3 0 ' 4 3 0 A \ th
wera de Juego |mi. (Live ntl, Edition tron o 4: rin e
tay Mass: Our |The World Over ° He IsWorth |The Holy Rosary|Defending Life a for Our F 3 F mo Ep i J
iving lope |
ye Max: [Ballroom Bootcamp (CC) —_—*|Get Fresh With Sara Snow “Green |Ice Diaries ‘Let the Games Begin’ MO nth of N ovem be vr 20 0 7 :
tiedrich Wedding” Wedding. (CC)
x Report: |The O'Reilly Factor (CC) Hannity & Colmes (CC) On the Record With Greta Van |
ith Susteren (CC)
FSNFL ~~ NHL Hockey New York Rangers at Florida Panthers. From the BankAtlantic Center in Sun- |Inside the Pan- |The FSN Final |
rise, Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) thers Score (Live) E G E . a f E
:00) Big Break: ]Vijay & Rocco |GolfCentral — |Golf Omega Mission Hills World Cup -- Day 2. From Shenzhen, China. Y
GOLF (me p= Day njoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun
:00) Weakest Who Wants to Be a Millionaire ( |That’s the Ques-/Family Feud |Family Feud Chain Reaction
ink 1 (CC) |(CC) tion (CC) (CC) (CC) rrp
: Ninja Warrior {X-Play “Rock —_ {X-Play “Mass Ef- |Cops “Coast to |Cops Prostitution |Ninja Warrior | Ninja Warrior i
G4éTech |" Bande fc ion. (Coast (0 (CC) sing (C) i & \
A CHRISTMAS VISITOR (2002, Drama) William De- | x A SEASON FOR MIRACLES (1999, Drama) Carla Gugino, David :; va

HALL _\vane, Meredith Baxter. A stranger brings joy to mem- |Conrad, Laura Dern. A woman gives her jailed sister's children a real
bers of a grief-stricken family. ioc) Christmas. (CC)

Buy MeThe ]APlace in Italy [Uncharted Terri-|House Hunters |World’s Most —|Relocation, Relocation Paul and

HGTV {golden rules of Paul and Rima |tory Turkey. (N) International Extreme Homes |Andrew look to buy homes in Lon-
ea —___ freal estate, (CC) |make an.offer, ., (CC)... [Buenos Aires. |. don and Paris. (N) “ (CC)

vl 1... [Morris Cerullo.. |Breakthrough: -|Jay Sekulow .. |Inspiration To- _ /Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Day|The Gospel...

NSE. ne eines lap re (en tan

~|Reba “Proud ane ‘According to — |Family Guy The |Family Gy Pe- |Two and a Half |Two anda Half |

KTLA _|Reba’ 0 (CC) |Kids The Kyles |Jim Jim’s birth- [Griffins inherit ater buys a fishing {Men © (CC) Men Alan offends

attend a funeral. jday gifts. (CC) |mansion.(CC) — |boat. Iec) Charlie, |

Still Standing |Reba‘ItAin't — |Reba Reba’s kids|Lisa Williams: Life Among the |America’s Psychic Challenge
LIFE Judy must apolo- |Over Til the Red-|carouse at dad's Dead Lisa does an office reading for ‘Semifinals’ Four psychics compet. |
gize to Kyle. {head Sings place. 1 Rosemary. (N) (CC) (N) (CC) |
‘MSNBC [tr MSNBC Re- mie Reports Hidden camera |MSNBC Reports Long Beach, Calif. MSNBC Reports Long Beach, Cali.
po operation. . ;
SpongeBob SpongeBob — [SpongeBob |SpongeBob {SpongeBob [George Lopez |George Lopez
NICK SquarePants © {SquarePants © |SquarePants 1 |SquarePants 1 SquarePants an (Cc) e 0 (C0) .
NTV (00) NAcc) Friday Night Lights M (CC) Las Vegas 1 (CC) tc (N) A |News |
abu
SPEED Fe) Unique — |Unique Whips Unique Whips Unique Whips
ips

Rediscover the |Behind the The Hal Lindsey |Joel Osteen Dr. Frederick K. |Praise the Lord (CC)

TBN Kingdom Scenes (CC) |Report(CC) —_|(CC) Price (CC)

Everybody Friends Phoebe |Friends Phoebe | * NATIONAL LAMPOON’S CHRISTMAS VACATION (1989, Comedy),
TBS Loves Raymond |has a fear of fly- has a fear of fly- |Chevy Chase, Beverly D'Angelo, ne Quaid. A traditional Griswold
“Alone Time” ing. (CC) (CC)

ing. (CC) yuletide backfires in comic fashion.
a What Not [What Not to Wear “Erin” Film What Not to Wear “Carrie” Mix-and-|Fashionably Late With Stacy Lon-
TLC 0 Wear “Renee archivist. (CC) match style. (N) (CC) don (Series Premiere) Rebecca
0.” Weight loss. Romijn. (N)
(0) Cold Case |Cold Case El equipo investiga en {Cold Case ‘Forever Blue”A 1968 Cold Case “Knuckle Up" Lilly re-
TNT ishing’ (jun club de corazones solos cuando |case involves a cop suspected of opens the 2006 case of a cle
: (CC) un hombre se suicida. 0 being gay. 1 (cc) bound man’s disappearance, (CC)
TOON Chowder (N) [BEN 10: RACE AGAINST TIME (2007, Action) Gra- |Codename: Kids|Out of Jimmy's |Chowder
ham Phillips, Haley Ramm, Lee Majors. Next Door Head “Mascot”
TV5 (0) pe une |Thalassa “Tour du monde: Shangai-Xiamen” (SC) Le 3950
stoire =
TWC rae Ven- Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
ures
ed Yo Amo a |Amar sin Limites Un hombre lucha |Destilando Amor (N) Alejandro Fernandez: un Regalo
UNIV ry Querendén|para salvar a la mujer que ama. (N) Navidefio
(:00) Law & Or- |Law & Order: Special Victims Unit] x * * ELF ane Camedy) Will Ferrell, James Caan, Bob Newhart. A
der: Criminal In-|A mother who reported statutory man leaves Santa's workshop to search for his family. (CC)
tent © (CC) —_|rape is found murdered.
VH1 One Hit Won- {100 Greatest One Hit Wonders America’s Most Smartest Model || Love New York Blood oath. 1
ders One-hit wonders No. 20 to No.1. {Drunken networking.
vs (:00) College Basketball Legends Classic Tournament/College Basketball Legends Classic Tournament -- Tennessee vs. West
* -- New Mexico State vs. Texas. (Live) Virginia. From Prudential Center in Newark, N.J. (Live)
(00) America’s | x x % MICHAEL (1996, Drama) John Travdlta, Andie MacDowell, WGN News at Nine (N) 4 (CC)
WGN unniest Home |Willam Hurt. Tabloid journalists see the light with an angel's help.
Videos 1 (CC) |(CC)
Family Guy The |WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) © (CC) CW11 News at Ten With Kaity

WPIX [Griffins inherit a Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)
mansion. (CC)

Jeopardy! (N) Dr Phil © (CC) News (N) Jeopardy! (CC) |Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
WSBK (cc) asks a caller's ex |pursues a myste-
yo. on a date, rious caller.

PREMIUM CHANNELS

(0) Inside the | x x» MIAMI VICE (2006, Crime Drama) Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx, Gong i 5) Michigan vs. Ohio State: The
HBO-E [NFL n (cc) L, ae Crockett and Tubbs take on drug lords in South Florida. © |Rivalry © (CC)

a x % THE!Curb Your En- Curb Your En- {Curb YourEn- [Curb YourEn- |Curb Your En- {Curb Your En-
HBO-P PRODUCERS thusiasm ‘Meet |thusiasm © —|thusiasm Sam- |thusiasm Dog- |thusiasm ‘The _|thusiasm Exter-

(2005) (CC) the Blacks” 1 |(CC) ple-abusers. ( |gie-bag dispute. |Freak Book” ( |minator friend.

:45) The Making] % % x HAPPY FEET (2006, Adventure) Voices of Elijah Wood, Robin Inside the NFL © (CC
HBO-W tek e

g Kong |Williams, Brittany Murphy. Animated. An emperor penguin expresses him-
(CC self through tap-dancing, © ‘PG’ (CC)
% THE RETURN (2006, Suspense) Sarah Michelle | x» BECAUSE | SAID SO (2007) Diane Keaton, eo Making
HBO-S _|Gollar.A young woman has visions of the murder of a |Mandy Moore. A meddlesome woman tries to find the JOf: The Depart-
woman she has never met. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) perfect man for her daughter. ‘PG-13' (CC) ed 1 (CC)
5:20) ke %e% | ee NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM (2006, Fantasy) Ben Stiller, Carla Gugi- | & % % & THE UNTOUCHABLES
MAX-E SPeRMAN RE- |no, Dick Van Dyke. Museum exhibits spring to ie when the sun goes : (907 Crime Dre Kevin Costner,



a
3
a
so
LY â„¢%

=
wo
>
wm
ss
3



@
=
m
na
wu
=

nNOS

5/5
of -
z\iz
=a\e2lee
ral
=
g

E




?m lovin’ it










TURNS (CC) —|down. A ‘PG’ (CC) ean Connery. 1 'R’ (CC) cae ; @ wn. ae
6:40) * & x» FIGHT CLUB (1999, Suspense) Brad |x» CODE NAME: THE CLEANER (2007) Cedric the |BUSTY COPS 2: om G ( ki ( rt f { MOMAX fi A ard Norton, Men vent their ra aby beating —|Entertainer. Premiere. An amnesiac (iva betes he |MORE COPS, c K e | \ Ca ad |
: e i

_ Jeach other in a secret arena. 1 'R’ (CC) is a secret agent. ( ‘PG-13' (CC) BIGGER BUSTS st

6:00) x kx |(7:55) ku IN THE MIX (2005) Usher Raymond. iTV. A |Weeds "Go" (TV)[Brotherhood “Shelter From the oa mM k £ £ ft If
SHOW BAD NEWS —_/disc jockey becomes a bodyguard for a mobsters. =| 1 (CC) a Storm 1:1-2” Ae ee clears his ; : > ad e€ reat d S oa
BEARS (2005) |daughter. 1 'PG-13' (CC) conscience. £1 (CC) a < ‘

6:05) Neil % & & STRANGE BEDFELLOWS (2004, Comedy) —|(:45) * x THE BAXTER (2005, Romance-Comedy)
TMC oung;: Heart of |Paul Hogan. Two men pretend to be a same-sex cou- |Michael Showalter. A bridegroom has an anxious two
Gold 1 (CC) _ ple to receive a tax break. 1 'R’ (CC) ; weeks before his wedding. © 'PG-13' (CC)








PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



oF

New partnership focuses on next

generation of automobile power

@ GREENVILLE, S.C.
Associated Press

.WITH A growing stake in
automobiles and the research to
make them run cleaner and
cheaper, the South isn’t taking
sides in the ethanol vs. hydrogen
fuel cells debate.

The future of fuel dominated
the agenda at a meeting this
week that signaled a new auto-
motive power partnership

Future of fuel dominates agenda at meeting



between South Carolina and the
Tennessee Valley Corridor, an
economic development initia-
tive for Tennessee, north Alaba-
ma, southern Kentucky, and
southwest Virginia.

Speaking alongside promot-
ers of hydrogen and fuel cell
research and a top BMW engi-

neer who described models .

already using some hydrogen
power, University of Tennessee
President John Petersen made
a pitch for plans to grow switch-
grass as a replacement for gaso-
line.

No one booed. Although the
approaches to alternative fuels

differ, the theme of the Mon-
day meeting was working
together instead of competing.

The Tennessee Valley Corri-
dor automotive sessions were
hosted by the Clemson Univer-
sity International Center for
Automotive Research. The still
unfinished campus, in the same

Boeing beats its own sales record

@ By JAMES WALLACE
c.2007 Seattle Post-Intelligencer

SEATTLE - For the third consecutive
year, The Boeing Co. has won orders for
more than 1,000 jetliners and has already
eclipsed its own sales record set last year,
when it beat rival Airbus for the first time
since 2000.

Boeing announced Wednesday that is has
won 1,057 gross orders, or 1,047 net, so far in
2007.

That makes 2007 the best order year ever
for Boeing. Its previous high came last year
when it won 1,050 gross orders, or 1,044 net.
The net figure includes cancellations. The
gross total is the actual number of firm orders
won in a given year.

In the past week, Boeing added 72 new
orders, all but one from unidentified cus-
tomers. They were for 15 777s and 57 737s.

For the year, Boeing has won 584 gross
orders for its 737, and its order count for the
more profitable widebody jets is nearing 500.

But keeping the title of order king is likely
to be short-lived. The crown appears almost
certain to go back to Airbus at the end of
2007 because Airbus is having a record year,
too -- an industry record.

Over the past three years, Boeing and Air-
bus have combined for well over 6,000 orders.
Backlogs are at record levels.

And the jetliner buying frenzy could con-
tinue into 2008, although both airplane mak-
ers are predicting a fall-off next year.

In 2004, with the airline industry still in a

tailspin from the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Air-
bus and Boeing combined for only 638 orders.
It was even worse the previous year.

Then airlines, starting with those in Asia
and later Europe, went on a spending spree
the likes of which the industry has never seen

before.

Boeing won more than, 1,000 orders in 2005,
as did Airbus.

But it was not until last year that Boeing
finally topped Airbus for the first time in six
years. And Airbus still had an excellent year,
winning 824 gross orders, its second-best year
ever. But the year was marked by serious
delays with its A380 jumbo jet and senior
management changes.

This year, Airbus has come back strong.
The A380 has entered service with Singapore
Airlines, and Airbus is winning orders and
praise for its A350, which will challenge Boe-
ing’s 787.

Through October, Airbus had won orders

for 1,021 planes, but that figure will go up ©

substantially when orders are added from
this month’s big-Dubai air show.

With five weeks remaining in 2007, Boe-
ing’s order total will grow, too, especially
when deals announced in Dubai are final-
ized. But Airbus won far more orders and
commitments at the show than Boeing.

Boeing and Airbus do not count commit-
ments in their order totals. They must first be
turned into firm orders. _

At the air show, Dubai Aerospace Enter-
prise, a newcomer to the aircraft leasing busi-
ness, said it will order 70 A320s and 30 A350s
from Airbus, as well as 70 737s, five 747-9
freighters, 10 777-300ERs and 15 787s from
Boeing. Those orders are not yet firm.

And Qantas recently announced that it will
order about 100 more jets from Boeing and
Airbus. Those orders, of which about 60 per-
cent are for Airbus planes, could become
firm before the end of the year

Until 2007, the best order year for Airbus
was 2005, when it sold 1,111 planes. Its net
total for that year was 1,055.

That broke what was believed to be the

Open a new account today
PC MiGm@e dite emmy eh

$20,000

f (ery \ a fou deposit get
Aviti in the |

ronthly

industry order record set by Boeing and
McDonnell Douglas in 1989.

After merging with McDonnell Douglas
in 1997, Boeing changed its historical order
charts to include planes sold by McDonnell
Douglas. By that measure, the companies
combined for 1,107 gross orders in 1989,
according to Boeing’s historical order num-
bers. But Boeing has said it was not really
sure how many planes it and McDonnell Dou-
glas sold in 1989, and the number 1,107 might
have been based on bad information.

Regardless, Airbus will easily beat its 2005 .

order total this year. It won 163 firm orders at
the Dubai air show, along with another 132
commitments, many of which could be turned
into firm orders before the end of the year.
And the orders keep coming.
OceanAir, a Brazilian carrier that plans to

add domestic and international flights in Latin.

America, said Wednesday it has agreed to
buy seven A330-200 widebody planes from
Airbus, as well as 14 A319s and seven A320s.

Heading into 2007, neither Boeing nor Air-
bus expected to have the kind of year both
have enjoyed. But the current industry boom
-- the industry’s best ever -- has not slowed. It
followed the industry’s worst-ever downturn,
which tarted even before the Sept. 11 attacks
sent airlines, especially those in the United
States, into a financial tumble.

In recent interviews, top executives at Boe-
ing and Airbus have said they believe orders
could peak this year and drop sharply in 2008.

But they have said that before.

Still to be heard from in the’current heated
order cycle are the legacy U'S. carriers that
held off buying large numbers of new jets to
replace old ones because they needed to first
recover financially. Delta, Continental, Amer-
ican and United all could place sizeable os
in 2008 or 2009.

4

cqravws

For more information visit any branch of FirstCaribbean International Bank,

Ov call:

New Providence - 502-6800/01
Family islands - 1-242-300-2255



region as a BMW Manufactur-
ing Co. plant at Greer, already
offers master’s and doctorate
programs in automotive engi-
neering.

U.S. Rep. Bob Inglis, R-S.C.,
said he wants to see “plenty of
collaboration between the
Savannah River National Lab
and the Oak Ridge National
Lab.”

Other members of Congress
from Tennessee and South Car-
olina detailed efforts to get fed-
eral dollars for the region’s vary-
ing research interests in the hunt
for alternatives to fossil fuels.

Petersen described the uni-
versity’s role in developing a $40
million pilot plant for making
cellulosic ethanol — grassoline
— from switchgrass by the sum-
mer of 2009.

Proponents maintain the ven-
ture could eventually create
4,000 jobs in rural communities,
generate $100 million in new
farm revenue and help switch-
grass supplant corn as the best
and cheapest source for the
ethanol industry.

“Tennessee happens to be an
ideal climate for switchgrass,”
Petersen said.

A Joint Institute for Biologi-
cal Sciences at the Oak Ridge
National Laboratory that will
research new processes for pro-
cessing switchgrass is also
planned.

Tom Baloga, BMW of North
America’s vice president of
engineering in the United
States, predicted that some bal-
ance between hydrogen and bat-
teries will replace gasoline.

“We think the answer is
hydrogen,” Baloga said.

The technology combines
hydrogen with oxygen in the
vehicle’s fuel-cell stack, and
energy from the reaction is con-
verted into electricity that pow-
ers the vehicle. The vehicle’s
only emission is water.

South Carolina lawmakers

this year pledged $15 million to
lure companies involved in
hydrogen fuel research to the
state.

Shannon Baxter-Clemmons,
director of the South Carolina
Hydrogen and Fuel Cell
Alliance, said the Center for
Hydrogen Research in Aiken
County, affiliated with the
Savannah River National Labo-
ratory, was financed partly by
the community.

“They are excited about
hydrogen and fuel cells,” Bax-
ter-Clemmons said. “There are
second and third graders telling
me what a fuel cell is.”

In recent decades, Japanese,
German and Korean automak-
ers have built assembly plants
across the South and in stark
contrast to Detroit, employees
at those plants have not union-
ized. Nissan North America Inc.
last year moved its corporate
headquarters from California to
Tennessee, where it is finishing
construction on a building in
the Nashville suburb of
Franklin.

Clemson University President
James F. Barker said statistics
from the South Carolina
Department of Commerce show
that nearly one in six of the
state’s manufacturing workers
is employed by an automotive
company.

Peter Brown, associate pub-
lisher and editorial director of
Automotive News, told the
meeting that “the American
South is a place on the way up
in the automotive world,” and
fuel economy is the industry's
overriding issue.

Brown warned that the
South’s appeal to automakers
could be temporary.

He said the region’s ascent “is
in large part due to the absence
of the UAW (United Auto
Workers)” and lower costs
could eventually take the jobs
to Mexico, China and India.

The prizes get bigger
and bigger every month!

November - $1,500
December - $2,500

January -

$3,500

February - $5,000

Grand Prize $20,000
paid over a 12 month
period in $1,666 installments,

Wee ae AEs be Het R ean tah, come

FIRSTCARIBREAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK
HET THERE, TOGETHER:









xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EM7W7O61U_DX2HEW INGEST_TIME 2012-01-04T19:29:03Z PACKAGE UF00084249_03045
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES