Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 103 No.297

Historic Nassau may

i Geli

MOVES TO SAVE CITY SUFFERING FROM NEGLECT

Four murders
in 24 hours
rock nation

By PAUL TURNQUEST
and BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporters

DR THADDEUS McDon-
ald, 59, Dean of the Faculty of
Social and Educational Studies

_at the College of the Bahamas,

became the fourth homicide vic-
tim within a 24-hour period yes-
terday, when he was found
beaten to death at his residence
on Queen Street.

A full press core, senior
police officials, family members
and colleagues from the college,
all converged on the murder
scene just up the road from the
American Embassy.

Just after 6pm, Senior Assis-
tant Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade emerged from the
crime scene with a large group
of senior officers who were
tight-lipped about the circum-
stances surrounding the killing.

Bahamians_

warned on
deadly cold

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A strain of the common cold
that typically causes symptoms
of runny noses and sore throats
has reportedly turned deadly in

the United States killing 10'per- .
_sons over the past 18 months,

according to international
reports.

The US Centres for Disease
Control
(CDCP) has issued a warning
for health care professionals to
be aware of Adenovirus
serotype 14 (Ad14), which is “a
rarely reported but emerging
strain of the cold that can cause
severe and sometimes fatal res-

piratory illness in patients of all

ages, including healthy young
adults.”

In its weekly morbidity and
mortality report, the CDCP
cites the virus for 10 deaths and
at least 140 illmesses across four
American states: Oregon, New
York, Washington, and Texas.

Between March and June
2007, 140 cases of confirmed
Ad14 illnesses were identified
in patients in Oregon, Wash-
ington and Texas. Of these cas-
es, 38 per cent were admitted
to hospitals, 17 per cent were
admitted to Intensive Care
Units, and five per cent of these
patients died.

The youngest fatality of
Ad14 was a 12-day-old infant
who died in New York City in
May 2006.

SEE page 10



and Prevention.

“This evening sometime
around 3.45pm or thereabouts,
we gota call. As a result of that
call, officers from the Central
Division responded to Queen
Street to a residence,” said
Leon Bethel, officer-in-charge
of the homicide division. “While
checking that residence, the
body of a man was found
inside. It was obvious that he
had some injuries to the body,
and as a result we have
launched an investigation into
his death. We are classifying it
as a homicide.”

Police were unwilling to give
an identification of the victim
and were also unwilling to
answer questions as to what
type of injuries Dr McDonald
sustained, when asked by the
media.

SEE page 10

4

Smugegled
Cubans

‘stayed in
Bahamas’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TWO .Miami men
appeared in US federal
court yesterday charged
with smuggling 34 Cubans
to Florida on Thursday.

The Cubans told Border
Patrol authorities that they
travelled from Cuba on
Monday, stayed in the
Bahamas for several days,
and then endured a 10 to 12
hour boat ride to Palm
Beach, according to South
Florida’s NBC6.

One 39-year-old male
Cuban drowned just feet
from shore after the accused
forced the five children and
29 adults into the water to
swim 40 or 50 feet to shore,
said the South Florida Sun-
Sentinel.

If convicted of the
charges made against them,
Duany Jimenez, 24, and
Maikel Soto, 28, could face
sentences of 10 years
imprisonment.

Another man is wanted
for questioning in relation
to the matter, said NBC6.

According to the South-
ern District US Attorney’s
Office, the Palm Beach
Police Department respond-

SEE page 7



EUSA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

An unidentfied Jamaican national is believed to have died in a fire early on Friday morning

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN UNIDENTIFIED Jamaican is believed
to have died in a fire early yesterday morning
when a blaze engulfed a residence on East,
Street south.

Police reports state that around 2.40 am Fri-
day, the Fire Services team responded to #
report of a structural fire on East Street, south
of the New Englerston Seventh-Day Adventist
Church.



(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune Staff)

*

According to a press statement issued by
Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans, fire
services arrived on the scene five minutes later
with two emergency units. Officers found
flames blazing from a single-story concrete
structure threatening to spread to the nearby
church.

As a result, a third emergency vehicle was
called to the scene to prevent the further spread
of the blaze. The fire was soon extinguished

SEE page 9



Police officer charged
over drug possession

A POLICE officer was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday on drug conspiracy and
possession charges.

Constable Wilson Francois Joseph, 35, of High
Vista, and Jacoby Jeol Knowles, 24, of Ida Street
were arraigned before Magistrate Carolita Bethel
at court eight, Bank Lane, yesterday.

According to court dockets the two men are
accused of conspiring to import a quantity of
cocaine between Tuesday, October 9, and Fri-
day, November 2. It is also alleged that between
that period the two conspired to possess the drugs,

imported the drugs and were found in posses-
sion of the drugs which authorities believe they
intended to supply to another. It is alleged that the
men were found in possession of two and a quar-
ter pounds of cocaine.

Both men, who are represented by lawyer Mil-
ton Cox, pleaded not guilty to all of the charges
against them.

Both men were remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison and will return to court on November 23
when Magistrate Bethel will consider whether
they should be granted bail.



PRICE — 75¢



Business
owner

eat av ites
Ce aN

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— In less than
24 hours, Grand Bahama police
were called to the scene of
another murder here on the
island-involving.a well-known
Freeport businessman who was

found shot dead Friday morn:

ing.

Gifford Martin Jr, a 32-year-
old resident of Spinney Road,
was discovered at his business
establishment on Yellow Pine
Street with an apparent gun
shot wound to the head some-
time after-7am. He was found
by a friend, who was not identi-
fied by the police.

Assistant Police Supt Loretta
Mackey, assistant press liaison
officer; said that police received
a call around 7.25am of a homi-
cide'and went to Extreme Auto
and Supplies to investigate.

SO) When Officers arrived at the

scene, she said they discovered
the body of a black man lying
face up on the ground outside at
the rear of the building. She said
the victim had sustained what
appeared to be a gun shot injury
to the head.

Mr Martin’s murder is the
10th homicide for the year on
Grand Bahama. The ‘island’s
ninth homicide was recorded
on Thursday when police dis-
covered a badly decomposed

SEE page 9

Move to
dismiss
election
challenge

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

’ FREEPORT - Lawyer Fred
Smith of Callenders & Co has
filed a legal motion on behalf
of Marco City MP Zhivargo
Laing to dismiss a petition filed
by Senator Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter in the Election Court regard-

ing some 100 votes in the Mar-.

co City Constituency.

The notice of motion filed
on November 14 is seeking to
have Ms Bridgewater’s petition
set aside on the grounds “that

_ there was non-compliance with

Section 83(1) of the Parliamen-
tary Elections Act, and that

SEE page 10



an.



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 2, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

BEC fitter

wins gold

ELECTRICAL fitter for BEC in South Andros
Kevin Seymour beat out millions of hopefuls to
win the 2006 International City & Guilds Gold
Medal from the London-based company.

He was presented the award during the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation Craft Appren-
ticeship Training Programme graduation and
prize-giving ceremony on November 15.

Mr Seymour was a participant in the 2004 Craft

Apprenticeship Programme. -

City & Guilds is one of the leading interna-
tional awards bodies for work-related qualifica-
tions. It has been in existence for more than 130
years and provides more than 60 established inter-
national vocational qualifications.

Annually, more that 1.5 million people enrol in
its programmes and are 1.3 million certificates
are awarded on a yearly basis.



MINISTER of Public works and ‘Transport Earl Deveaux speaks during the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation 2006 Craft Apprenticeship Training Programme graduation and prize-giving ceremony

at the corporation’s Blue Hill Road headquarters.

re



Patrick Hanna/BIS

j



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November 17

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Pictured, from left, are BEC general manager Kevin Basden; City & Guilds’ international relations

officer Martin Newman; Mr Seymour and BEC chairman Frederick Gottlieb. -
Patrick Hanna/BIS

Bahamas’ US Ambassador
welcomed to OAS council .

able benefit of membership,”
Ambassador Smith said. “The

Bahamas is committed to ensur-
whom we share history, culture

and economic, social and polit- SEE page 11
ical challenges was an undeni- &

“We in the Bahamas recog-
nise that increased hemispheric
solidarity with countries with

By Lindsay Thompson

THE Bahamas Ambassador
to the United States and per-
manent representative to the
Organisation of American
States C A Smith has been wel-
comed to the Permanent Coun-
cil of that, prestigious body of
the Americas.

Ambassador Smith present-
ed his credentials to OAS Sec-
retary-General Jose Miguel
Insulza during a ceremony at
the OAS Headquarters in
Washington, DC, this week.

The Bahamas joined the
OAS in 1982, as the 31st mem-
ber, on the premise that collec-
tively, member states could
address issues of common con-
cern. Observes say a seat on the
Permanent Council serves as an
avenue to pursue such matters.

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Historic Nassau faces ‘being

A new move is being made
to restore downtown Nassau,
according to the government.

Nassau 2020 is a series of
public discussions designed to

_bring a focus to the plight of
historic Nassau, and to help
- identify long-term strategies for

opment of Nassau from an his-
toric perspective.

Through April of next year,
the series will feature presen-
tations by the director of Town
Planning, architects, agencies
that provide goods and services
to downtown, and a panel dis-

toric Nassau.

“What we would like to
encourage is a general partici-
pation by the public in dis-
cussing the history, planning,
the problems and the future

development of a city that °

belongs to the Bahamian peo-

its rescue. cussion. ple.”
It is being presented by the Once a premier tourist des- Tens
design firm of Patrick Rahming _ tination, Nassau has seen sig- are SEAR a pec las

and Associates and supported
by the Department of Culture.

The series begins with a dis-
cussion led by historian and for-
mer director of the National
Archives, Dr Gail Saunders, on
Noyember 21 at 6.30pm, at the
Humidor Restaurant in the
Graycliff Hotel.

She will examine the devel-

nificant deterioration said Mr
Rahming, an architect.

“Today, the historic city of
Nassau sits rotting — its best
architecture either already gone
or in danger of being obliterat-
ed, mostly by neglect.”

Mr Rahming said he wanted
to “begin a conversation around
the future development of his-

Fraud warning

issued to US
visa applicants

The US Embassy in Nassau
has warned visa applicants
about new fraudulent websites
posing as official US govern-
ment sites seeking to charge for
visa forms.

These websites and other

ae
companies seek money to

download or complete required
visa forms, suggesting that the
forms are available only
through their site, said US offi-
cials in‘a statement.

“The embassy wishes to
advise visa applicants that there
is no charge to download and
complete the Electronic Visa

It asked that applicants note
the following:

e Immigration related web-
sites

Many other non-governmen-
tal Websites (eg, using the suf-
fixes .com, .org or .net) provide
legitimate and useful immigra-
tion and visa related informa-
tion and services.

Regardless of the content of
other websites, the Department
of State does not endorse, rec-
ommend or sponsor any infor-
mation or material shown at
these other websites.

e Other impostor or fraudu-

Department of Culture’s sup-
port behind the project.

“Being guided by our man-
date — history, heritage and cul-
ture — we thought it was neces-
sary to engage Bahamians in a
conversation on the way for-
ward in terms of how we devel-
Op as a country,” he said.

What to do about Nassau? Pictured from left a are Director of Culture Dr Nicolette Bethel, Minis-

obliterated’ through neglect



ter of State for Culture Charles Maynard, and architect Patrick Rahming.

- Derek Smith/BIS



Magistrate queries
her authority

A 31-year-old man and 32-
year-old woman of East Street
were set to be arraigned in court
yesterday on charges related to
the seizure of hundreds of fake

designer items last year — but the

arraignment did not go as expect-
ed.

Xishan Ma and Yvette Mitchell
Culmer Ma. appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel yes-
terday at court eight in Bank
Lane on 14 counts of possession
of false trademarks.

It is alleged that on Wednes-
day, November 29, 2006 the pair
were found in possession of hun-
dreds of fake designer items,
including knock-off Fendi, Louis
Vouitton, Gucci, Prada and

Application Form at __ lent websites and email :
http://evisaforms.state.gov, nor A few other websites may try hate Aas ee paie
to download any other US gov- _ to mislead customers and mem- repres efit ed by attorney Henry

ernment visa form,” it said.
The statement noted that

only internet sites including the

".gov" indicator are official US
government websites.

The US Embassy said its
website can be found at
http://nassau.usembassy.gov.
“All required forms for visa
applications can be found
through our website at no
charge. For any further inquires
contact the U S Embassy Nas-

_. sau’s consular section at: mail-
to:visanassau@state.gov. :

The embassy advised visa
applicants to be cautious in all

- dealings with companies that

claim to offer any assistance in
obtaining US visas.

bers of the public into thinking
they are official Websites. These
Websites may attempt to
require you to pay for services
such as forms and information

about immigration procedures, -

which are otherwise free on the
Department of State Visa ser-
vices website, or overseas
through the US Embassy Nas-
sau consular section’s website.
These other websites may

' require you to pay for services

you will not receive, and may
contact you by email to lure you
to their offer.

Be wary of sending any per-
sonal information that might be
used for identity fraud/theft'to
these websites.



wi

Xishan Ma outside of court yesterday.

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Olas

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(Photo: Tim Clarke/fribune ee

Bostwick.
Midway through the charge

. sheet Magistrate Bethel, noted

that the offences were alleged to
have been committed since
November last year, far exceeding
the six month period when
charges are usually filed in sum-
mary cases.

Magistrate Bethel stated that
she was not certain whether she
had the jurisdiction to entertain
the matter. ‘

The prosecutor, Sergeant Her-
bert: Duncombe requested more
time to determine the prosecu-
tion’s course of action in relation
to the matter.

The arraignment was
adjourned to Friday, November

23, at 11 am.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914.

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Publisher/Editor 1972-

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Climate change summary expected today

DELEGATES from more than 140
countries meeting in Valencia, Spain,
agreed Friday on a scientific “instant guide”
for policy makers, stating more forcefully
than ever that. climate change has begun
and threatens to irreversibly alter the plan-
et.

The document, summarizing the scien-
tific consensus on human-induced climate
change, will be distributed to delegates at a
crucial meeting in Indonesia next month
that is intended to launch a political process
on international cooperation to control
global warming.

Five days of sometimes tense negotia-

« tions ended before dawn with the approval
. of a 20-page summary of thousands of pages
- of data and computer projections compiled
over the last six years by the Nobel Peace
prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change.

The report does not commit participating
governments to any course of action but it
is important because it is adopted by con-
sensus, meaning those countries accept the
underlying science and cannot disavow its
conclusions. It provides a common scientific
base line for the political talks.

“This is a groundbreaking document that
will pave the way for deep emissions cuts by
developing countries,” said Stephan Singer,
a climate specialist for the World Wide
Fund for Nature. ithe

The report describes how climate sys-
tems are changing and why, the effects it is
having on mankind and ecosystems, and
various scenarios of future impacts, depend-
ing on how quickly action is taken to slow
the trend.

The summary and a longer “synthesis
report” were expected to be formally adopt-
ed after proofreading. They will be released
today at a news conference attended by
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

“Warming of the climate system is
unequivocal,” the summary begins, in a
statement meant to dispel any scepticism
about the reality of climate change, said
participants in the meeting.

In a startling and much-debated conclu-
sion, the document warns that human activ-
ity risks causing “abrupt or irreversible
changes” on Earth, including the wide-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CELICOURT MCKENSON
of MALCOLM ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible. for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not:be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 10th day of November, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

Saturdays 11am to 7 pm
Weekends 3pm - 7pm

LONGER HOURS FROM
DEC 17TH - DEC 24TH

spread extinction of species and a dramat-
ic rise in sea levels before the end of this
century, they said on condition of anonymi-
ty because the details are supposed to
remain confidential until today.

“T think overall it is a good and balanced
document,” said Bert Metz, an eminent
Dutch scientist and one of the 40 authors of

‘the draft. “In the end, a lot of people had to
compromise,” he said.
Though it contains no previously unpub-
’ lished material, the summary pulls togeth-
er the central elements of three lengthy
reports the IPCC released earlier this year.
Boiling down the 3,000. pages into about
20 was “quite a challenge,” said Metz.

The agreement was seen as a personal
triumph for the IPCC chairman, Rajendra
Pachauri of India, who presided with no-
nonsense efficiency and bulldozed through
compromise language. Pachauri, who will
accept the IPCC’s Nobel Peace prize in
Oslo on December 10 along with. former
USS. Vice President Al Gore, is expected to
stand for re-election as head of the IPCC
next year, delegates said.

Delegates said the talks this week were
difficult, and sometimes bogged down for
hours over a brief phrase.

The meeting in the Indonesian resort of
Bali starting December 3 will discuss the
next step in combating climate change after
the measures adopted in the Kyoto Proto-
col expire in five years. Kyoto obliges 36
industrial countries to radically reduce their
carbon emissions by 2012, but has no clear
plan for what happens after that date.

Organizers say the new “road map”
emerging from Bali should draw in the
United States, which rejected the Kyoto
accord and has tried to enlist other coun-
tries in voluntary schemes to reduce emis-
sions of greenhouse gases and invest in
technology research.

Participants in the Valencia meeting said
the U.S. delegation questioned the most
hard-hitting statements in the summary that
implied the urgency of reining in carbon
emissions. But the final text retained key
language, they said.

(This article was written by Arthur Max
of the Associated Press).









NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALEXANDER HECHAVARRIA
MAYET of JOHNSON TERRACE, LOT 6A, P.O. BOX N-
5613, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/ |
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
17th day of November, 2007 to the Minister responsible
ationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

The irony
of today’s
| prejudice

EDITOR, The Tribune.

TODAY on Michael Pin-
tard’s show, “The way forward”
aman called and expressed how
irate he is about the “Haitian
problem.” The caller empha-
sised that the Government must
announce and publicise the
names and number of Haitians
being “naturalised” to the pub-
lic. This caller was passionate
about the “Haitian-problem”
he went on to say that Bahami-

ans should be insulted by what’

is going on in the society today.
“They even have their own talk
shows, they could be planning
to take over...shoots we don’t
even know what they are up
to.”

He further suggested that the
radio stations in addition to the
Government are to blame. “If
they gonna do it (the talk
shows), they should at least
have a Bahamian on the show
to translate.” Michael Pintard,
the host of the show asked the
caller, “but suppose everyone
on the show is legal...they
should be able to host their
show right?” Like Pintard sug-
gested I agreed...if everyone on
the show are legal then what is
the problem? The law, the con-
stitution is not being challenged
therefore, make your point...I
said to myself.

Stupidly, the caller
replied....“that’s the problem
today, we are giving them (the
Haitians) too much leeway and
too much slack...that is why the
country is the way it is today.”
’ Later in the show, Pintard
advised that he must change his
attitude because everyone on

the mentioned Haitian talk.
shows are legal, they contribute °

to the development of the
Bahamas and furthermore, as
legal residents of the Bahamas
they have the right to be on the
radio. to accommodate their

Dawe

letters@trbunemec repay



special audience. Annoyingly,
the uninformed caller closed the
call by taking his ignorance and
stupidity to a higher level not
yet reached before, he stated
that Haitians are inferior and
should not have any rights. In
fact, he closed by saying neither
the legal nor illegal should
reside in the Bahamas “they all
should be sent from where they
came from.” I was baffled by
this caller, I was shocked
beyond understanding I didn’t
know that this level of igno-
rance still existed and more ter-
rifyingly that it was here and
real in my small community. I
am not ignorant to the fact that
ignorance and prejudice still
exists in the Bahamas but I was
traumatised and crippled by the
caller’s expressions, it seems as
if he had seen a Haitian while
on the radio he would have
annihilated them. I am serious
that is how it seemed.

The first thought that came
to mind was the painful memo-
ry of whites dominating the
blacks decades ago...I immedi-
ately found myself in the late
1800’s and early 1900’s where
black slavery was at its peak.
Internally, I was dying ...I want-
ed to call the show so badly to
tell this uninformed jerk a thing
or two about his history.

This is what I wanted to say:

For years your forefathers
were discriminated, hated, prej-
udiced against, persecuted and
even killed simply because of
the colour of their skin.
Remember that our black fore-
fathers pleaded and prayed for
the day when all men would be
considered equal...when
insignificant factors such as

colour would no ionger sepa-
rate and divide man. In their
plea to be considered as equal
our ancestors asked. the white

man many earnest and intense, ©

yet sobering questions. Our
fathers cried, “When you prick
us do we not bleed...do we not

bleed red? When you’re cold «

don’t you shiver? If you stay

out in the sun don’t you get.
dehydrated?” Our forefathers -
prayed and hoped for sympa- »

thy from the whites but today a
black man finds it necessary to
knock and discriminate a fel-
low black man simply because

the fellow black man speaks a .

different language and is froma

_ different location on the world’s

map.
Yesterday’s' discrimination
was caused because of colour
differences. Ironically, today’s
prejudice is inspired by lan-
guage and geographical loca-

tion. Isn’t it incongruous how -

the poison called ignorance can
destroy and contaminate the
very things that we should
appreciate about each other?
We fought for equal rights
between blacks and whites now
we form a division in blacks
because of language. Isn’t it
ironic? How stupid can we be?
What do you think our forefa-
thers would say? Is this what
you think Dr Martin Luther
King had in mind?

Do not allow ignorance and

prejudice to keep you in the’

dark, learn from your history
and take immediate steps to

advance yourself. Prejudice is -

like poison, it is harmful you
and. everyone else who is
involved. , =

LOVY JEAN
UniVision

Nassau,
November, 2007.

A man who makes —

me extremely proud

EDITOR, The Tribune.

POLICE Commissioner Paul
Farquharson will long be
remembered in The Bahamas
as one of her finest sons. He



5 CUBE $318.00
5 CUBE $353.00
7 CUBE $445.00
9 CUBE $522.00

15 CUBE $650.00

gave 41 years of exemplary and
dedicated service to our nation.
His retirement has been
announced and soon he will
become our Ambassador to
Canada, God willing.

Never during his tenure as.a
rank and file officer, or even as
the substantive Commissioner
of Police, were there ever any
credible allegations against him
of corruption or graft.

This man is not only a gen-
tleman, but he is firm, compas-
sionate and uncompromising
when it comes down to the
detection of crime and placing
those who may be charged
before our courts in a timely
manner. His position, profes-
sionally, has always been: “Let
the chips fall where they

may....

Reading about his early back-
ground as a young boy growing
up in Long Island, without the
stabilising and nurturing influ-
ence of his birth parents, liter-
ally brought tears to my eyes,
and I do not cry easily.

- At age 17 years, the future
Commissioner of Police, by
hard work and a sober head,
was able to ascend the domestic
ranks at Chub Cay as Head
Waiter. Later he joined the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
and the rest is history.

Today, so many of the mis-
creants who find themselves
before the courts or within our
criminal justice system, com-

plain that they were. products
of single parent homes and that

they were abused or trauma- ©

tised during their childhood,
resulting in their “bad behay-

iour” and uncontrollable urges ._

to commit crimes.

Commissioner Paul Far-

quharson is a prime living
example that disadvantaged
youth and children need not rel-
egate themselves to a short and

brutal life of crime and may- —

hem. Now, after doing yeoman
services for a grateful nation,
he will move on to become our
Ambassador to Canada. I have
absolutely no doubt that he will
make us all proud.

As the Royal Bahamas Police
Force prepares for new leader-
ship, the force can only go from
strength to strength due to the
splendid groundwork done by
Commissioner Paul Farquhar-
son. In fact, I look forward to
the eventual elevation of my
good friends, Acting Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson and Assistant Commis-
sioner Ellison Greenslade. The
force is in excellent hands and it
will continue to do its job.

Thank you, Mr Farquharson
for a job well done. To God
then, in all of these things, as
sons of the widow, be the glory.

ORTLAND H BODIE JR
Nassau,
November 13, 2007.

marae












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to TAMIKA SONALI ANDREA RAHMING. If there are any
objectinns to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty (80) days
after the date of publication of this notice.

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ae,

jobs.”

THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 5



‘
A .

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.n
et

“IT vex because they voted
Ron Pinder out. Now you
can’t even get your garbage
picked up on time. He was the
only minister willing to go out
and pick up trash, now weeks
and weeks have go by before I
see any
garbage
tar ies Ks
around here
and my
garbage been
piling up. It’s -
ridiculous,
someone
needs to do
something
about this.”

Marathon
resident.

EL vex
because I
leave my car
for 10 min-
utes on
Shirley Street
and one
joneser break
into my car
and. steal my
wallet. Now I got to. go and
cancel all my credit and ATM
cards because people out
there too lazy to get a job.
Crime in this country really

‘| getting out of hand man.”

— vexed robbery victim.



WHY YOU VE







“T am upset by all this traffic
in Nassau. It takes you literal-
ly an hour to get anywhere in
this country and most traffic
lights don’t work.

I was stuck in traffic for 45
minutes on Wulff Road today
and I ended up wasting all my
gas.

Plus to try to get to work
on time I have to get up extra
early and then I end up com-
ing home late. I hardly have

anytime to
spend with
my family.”











angry |

nen iC eat matoret





“Why is it
in this coun-
try that con-
doms have to
» be sold
) behind coun-
ters? I vex
because I go
in the shop
and asa
grown man I
have to ask
somebody’s
grandmother
to pass me a
pack.

They are
necessities,
they will not
hurt you —
they are safe sex products and
young people need access to
them.

Then maybe you wouldn’t
see all these young girls walk-
ing around pregnant.”

— angry Bahamian male.



















Women’s rights
pioneers set to
be honoured —

PIONEERS of the suffrage
movement who fought for equal
voting rights for Bahamian
women will be celebrated dur-
ing National Women’s Week.

<: Minister of State’ for Sotial

Development Loretta Butlér-
Turner made this announce-
ment at a press conference
Thursday.

She added that women Who
continue to contribute to the
development of the country also
will be honoured during the
week beginning Sunday,
November 25.

Mrs Butler-Turner said that
although Bahamian women
have been participating in the
electoral process for more than
45 years, they still suffer from a
great deal of inequality.

“We still have a very long
way to go,” she said. “Just yes-
terday, I had the opportunity
to speak at another place with
regards to sexual harassment in
the workplace.

“It was interesting to note
that even though there are
women in our country who are
constantly sexually harassed on
the job, many of them cannot
even get a case to come before
the'courts, because of the sup-
pression they receive on the job
or the threat of losing their

She also pointed out that
Bahamian women are still earn-
ing lower salaries than their
male counterparts.

“That is very important, con- .

sidering the majority of the
households are headed by
females, and women also have

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



to do a job twice as good as the
male to be recognised for the
same job they are doing.

“The corporate world is dom-
inated by men,” Mrs Butler-

“Turner said. “Although woltén
have made Significant, Strides’6n

so many levels in government,
civics and so many places, we
are still the ones that are kow-
towing to members of the boys
club. So we have a long way: to
go.”

The National Women’s Week
will officially begin with women
uniting in prayer, to give thanks
for the blessings that have been
bestowed upon them, at the
Christ Church Cathedral at
11.15am.

Following the service, a lunch
will be held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton at 1.30pm.

Cora Bain-Colebrooke, Joyce
Moxey-Taylor and Mrs Sylvia
Roberts will be honoured for
their contributions to both
country and community.

On Wednesday, November
28, a “night of poetry” will be
held featuring the talents of
Bahamian women at the
National Art Gallery at 7pm.

A health fair is planned for
Thursday, November 29, from
10am to 3pm in the foyer of the
Main Post Office on East Hill
Street. Representatives from
the Department of Public
Health and other healthcare
professionals will be available

' to conduct screenings. .

Mrs Turner-Butler said, “We
recognise the importance of
good health and we encourage
not only our women, but the
general public to come out and
have their health screenings

- done.”

She explained that on Satur-
day, December 1, there will be a
workshop on the United
Nations Convention on the
Elimination of All Forms of
Discrimination Against
Women. The workshop will be
held from 9.30am to 1.30pm at
the Cancer Society on Third
Terrace in Centreville.

Professor Leith Dunn, from
the University of the West
Indies Centre for Gender and
Development Studies will facil-
itate the workshop, which will
discuss the rights of women
under this Convention.

Also, members of the Nation-
al Women’s Week planning
committee will be visiting select-
ed schools in the capital, to brief
students on the suffrage move-
ment and to encourage them to
strive for excellence. Winners
of the National Women’s Week
Essay Competition also will be
announced during the week.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157










By Lindsay Thompson

THE government of the
Bahamas is seeking assistance
from the German government
in its continued talks with the
Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development
regarding transparency in its
financial services sector.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna made this observation
as he accepted Letters of Cre-
dence from His Excellency Jur-
gen Engel, Ambassador 8f the
Federal Republic of Germany
to the Commonwealth of the

- Bahamas, during a ceremony at

Government House.

About’six years ago, the
Bahamas was blacklisted by the
OECD as a harmful tax haven
and enacted a package of wide-
ranging legislation to enhance
the transparency and account-
ability of the financial services
sector.

‘The governor-general said
the Bahamas appreciated Ger-
many’s and the European

-Union’s sensitivity to the vul-

nerability of a small island
developing state like the
Bahamas and the ensuing,
“indispensable, supportive
national policies and practices
dictated by global interdepen-
dence.”

He added: “The Bahamas
applauds Germany’s global eco-
nomic status as well as her polit-
ical leadership on the European
continent in the context of EU
integration, and intentionally,
at the United Nations, espe-
cially with respect to the impor-
tant, historic debate on Securi-
ty Council reform.”

The governor general also
acknowledged the accreditation
of a German Ambassador to
the Caribbean Community
(Caricom).

“This speaks volumes of the

commitment of the government
of the Federal Republic of Ger-
many to this significant institu-
tion for our sub-region.”

The governor general noted
‘Ambassador Engel’s experienge

cin the region, having served‘in

Latin America and mostly in
Central America.

“With such experience and
awareness on which to draw, I
reiterate my confidence that
your tenure will see the deep-
ening and elevation of
Bahamas-German relations for
mutual benefit,’ the governor
general said.

Ambassador Engel stated
that relations between the two
countries have always been har-
monious with mutual respect,
understanding and friendship
as the hallmark.

“Given the already excellent
rapport between our two goy-
ernments as well as between our
people, I make it my task to
forge even stronger ties
between the Bahamas and Ger-
many, a task to which I assure
your excellency I will give my
best effort,” he said.

Regarding economic co-oper-
ation, Ambassador Engel said
he is confident that it is possible
to further stimulate German
investment in the Bahamas.

In the area of economics he

said his government continues

to value very highly the support
it has received from the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas in
Germany’s initiatives at the
UN.

It is said that for nearly 50
years, Germany, one of the
largest EU member states, has
pursued a course of deepening
and widening European inte-
gration.

“Against the background of
your own experience with the
EU, Germany has always
strongly sympathised with the
efforts of countries in other
regions to join forces, both
politically and economically,”
Ambassador Engel said. “We,
therefore, continue to follow
with keen interest the steps by
the Bahamas in the context of
the Caricom integration
process.”

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

‘

THE TRIBUNE





Page.

LOCAL

ant is not

to be ‘Miss-ed’

JOHNMONEA
SARGEANT

THE Bahamas' Our Little Miss Pageant, for-
merly Little Miss Bahamas, is staging its sixth

annual competition.

The pageant will be held under the theme,
"Career focus youths. The twenty-four little ladies
have already seen some tough days of rehearsals :
and on stage training, as well as lessons in eti-
quette and personal deportment — all in prepara-
tion for the big day on December 16 at the Wyn- -
dham Nassau Resort’s Rain Forest Theatre. ~~

Organisers said that apart from representing the

ALEXCIA FOX

PRESHANNA GIBSON

Bahamas at the world's largest and oldest chil-
dren’s international pageant — World's Our Little

Miss International Scholarship Competition —

petition.

the winner of the local competition walks away
with a $1,000 cash scholarship, other gifts and
awards and serves as one of the nation's youngest
youth ambassadors.
The reigning Little Miss Bahamas — Jennifer
Johnson - represented the country and placed
10th among the 218 girls in the international com-

SHAVONIA CROWL

She is also being featured in a children’s movie,
‘King Red, which is being produced in Los Ange-

les, California.

Pageant director Mrs Gaynell Stubbs said that
it is a pleasure to help mould the nation's youth

through the event.

"L look forward every year to the hosting of the
new contestants, but cried over time my outgoing

queen leaves,” she said.

The ladies participated in a number of work-

shops including:

KYHIESHA TRECO



CYRELL SAUNDERS



CARLIQUE KING

e Fire safety and prevention, sponsored by the
Royal Bahamas Police Department’s fire branch

e Personal hygiene, beauty and etiquette, spon-

noes Pizza

sored by Thompson Trading
e The art of making pizza, pores by Domi-

They will also enjoy fun days at Dolphins

Encounters, Ardastra Gardens, the Atlantis

Resort and Galleria Cinemas, and will be treated .

to a “princess party” sponsored by McDonalds.

Inter-faith effort aims to build bridges

By GRETEL C. KOVACH
(Religion Journal)

c.2007 New York Times News
Service

FRISCO, Texas — The out-
come was uncertain when a
group of mostly strangers sat
down together for dinner:
--Thursday night at a home in this

Dallas suburb. Among the gath-

_ ering were three Jews, two Mor-

mons, three Muslims, two
Bahais, two secular humanists
and a Catholic-Baptist.

But over pasta and lentil
soup, the guests discussed love,
death, forgiveness, compassion
and evil, and found plenty of
common ground.



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THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Sireet.
momma P.O. Box SS-51 03, Nassau, Bahamas
yammmma Phone: 393- 3726/393-2355/Fax:393-81 35

mel CHURCH SERVICES
ly SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2007
a e im SUNDAY, THANKSGIVING

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Rey. Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

Mr. Livingston Parks/Youth Service
Rey. Charles Sweeting )

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

Rey. Gerald Richardson
Rey. Gerald Richardson

& METHODIST
Rev. James Neilly

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
Connections - Rey. Philip Stubbs
Rey. Philip Stubbs

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
Rey. William Higgs
Rey. William Higgs

‘RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Rey. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Rey. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart
JAE EE SC OCICS CORIO RIOR RE RRR RIK
We plough the fields, and scattered
The good seed on the and
But it is fed and watered
By God’s almighty hand
He sends the snow in water
The warmth to well the grain
The breezes and the sunshine
And soft refreshing rain.

“How many times,” said one
guest, Nelson Komaiko, a 59-
year-old self-described “very
Reform” Jew, “do we get ina
situation where people from all

\these different religions can

really talk?”? Not with superfi-
jal workplace chatter, he said,
discussionabout the big
ions of-tife.-““Ustally when..

~Questi
people of different faiths have a

‘dialogue,’ it’s with guns blaz-
ing.” .

The occasion was an Amaz-
ing Faiths Project Dinner Dia-
logue, one of a series of small
gatherings in private homes
intended to foster tolerance and
understanding of religious dif-
ferences.














Pastor Charles Moss......... 0.













CHURCH,




















“The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427 ©
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Bro. Ricardo Mcqueen
11:00 a.m. Bro. Henry Knowles/Youth
7:00 p.m. Harvest Pageant/ Hat Parade

"Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

‘tor of the Boniuk Center.

The series was organized by
Mayor Bill White of Houston,
the Boniuk Center for the Study
and Advancement of Religious
Tolerance at Rice University
and Interfaith Ministries for

_Greater Houston. What began .
with 20 dinners and about 200...
participants in January has
quadrupled in size this round "

and spread to three other Texas
cities, largely by word of mouth.

“People are hungry for this,”
said Jill Carroll, executive direc-
“This
project is a way to leverage all

. of the individuals and the little

groups out there into a move-
ment that actually has the pos-
sibility to shift the culture away
from hatred and religious big-

_otry to one of tolerance.”

The dinners start with each
participant selecting a card and
then answering a question
broad enough that followers of
any faith, or no faith, can draw
on their personal experiences.
After everyone takes a turn,
there is a break, and then each

person has a few minutes to’

speak freely.

Although the event is called a
“dialogue,” participants are not
allowed to challenge one anoth-
er’s remarks. “The idea is not to
be pontificating or giving little
sermons, but listening and shar-

ing from-their heart,” Carroll

said.
The Amazing Faiths dinners

Sunday School: 10am
Freaching

‘}tam & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday.6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

are limited to about 10 partici-
pants, to keep the gatherings
intimate. “People are on better
behavior when they are guests
in someone’s home,” Carroll
said. “It plumbs the richness of
our traditions about hospitali-
ty, hosting the stranger. Toler-

‘ance begins at home.”

Kim Kamen, interim execu-

tive director of the American--

Jewish Committee’s Dallas
chapter, was moderator of the
dinner here, held at the home of
Deanna DeYoung, a Bahai.
The two women formed a mul-
tifaith group after the 9/11
attacks but found that free-
ranging discussions among peo-
ple of different faiths sometimes
drifted into edgy territory.

At the outset Thursday night,
Kamen warned the group that
the talk would be very struc-
tured. “No one is saying we
have to agree or disagree,” she
said, adding that the goal was
to learn about different faiths
in a safe and neutral environ-
ment.

Heather Woodward laughéd
when she drew a card asking
about miracles.

“T find it very humorous that
I’m the secular one and I draw
this card,” she said. “The most
miraculous thing to me is that as
humans we relate to one anoth-

er.” She shared the story of hav- _

ing been married to an Ortho-
dox Jew for 14 years, though

FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H, Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 © Box N-3622



LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future

Worship Time: Jlam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping

Center

~ Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on

Joy 101.9 at 8:30a.m

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs

they are “very different on

paper.”
DeYoung’s card asked if she

saw compassion around her.

every day. “I don’t think so,”
she said. “America seems to be
searching outside ourselves for
méaning: think it’s very unfor-
{hmate that it takes something

ery tragic — things like 9/11

have to happen —.to bring us

together.”

Lucille Nowaski, like her hus-
band a Roman Catholic, told
the group of having convinced
him that they should start
attending a Baptist church that
their young daughter had cho-
sen to attend. “We need to go
with her,” she told him, “to
keep her safe.” Of God, Nowas-
ki added, “I think he wants us
all to be together.”

Some in the group nodded -

knowingly. “Amen,” Halima
Sonday said.

Komaiko’s card asked what
happened when one’s prayers
were not answered.

He described becoming
embittered with religion when
he was a young man watching
his mother die of cancer. “She
followed the kosher rules her
entire life,” he said, “and was
basically a very good person. I

asked myself, ‘Does God really.



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care?”

Roy Dahle, a Mormon, had
almost the opposite experience.
“When the doctors were say-
ing, ‘Roy, there’s nothing more
we can do for you,’ and I came

through, I attributed that to a,

higher. power,” Dahle said.

The dinner guests had many

questions. What is confirma-
tion? What does secular mean?

Or Bahai? Before the night was

through, all were answered. But
they planned to continue the
conversation, by meeting again
or joining the Boniuk Center’s
online social networking site.

“T learned from every one of
you,” Rabia Sonday said.
“That’s one of the miracles. He
created so many billions of peo-
ple.

Every one of us is different,
yet we are all the same.”

Her sister Halima agreed. Set
aside the politics, and “it really
comes down to how we treat
other people,” she said.

But Renato Sperandeo, a 65-
year-old Bahai, reminded them
that here in the soft candlelight,
content in the knowledge that
no one would challenge their
beliefs, it was not hard to be
accepting.

“It’s too easy now to be lov-
he said.

%

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL ete ° Tel: Arel i
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2007

10:00 a.m... Communion Service *

11:00 am. 129th Anniversary Service

Speaker Dr. David Allen ;
No os Service i

Brea SOF RIOR

re



Grace and eter Wesleyan Church
‘A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE TS AR FIRMED

Worship Time: lla.m. & 7p.m.

" Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45a.m.~

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Price Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE





THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 7






By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT -—
Bahama resident Jennifer Rus-
sell is the first person in the
Caribbean region to qualify as
a money laundering specialist
in the gaming industry.

Ms Russell, an audit inspec-
tor at the Gaming Board in
Freeport, completed require-
ments for Anti-Money Laun-
dering and Compliance Diplo-
ma programme offered by the















Grand.

International Compliance .



Jennifer Russell

Detention Centre
escapees are not
among Cuban

migrant

FROM page one

ed to a call about a migrant
landing at 2.40am on Thursday.

When the police arrived
they found the 34 Cubans
“huddled on the beach” with
the body of the drowned
man.

The group were taken toa
local health facility for evalu-
ation and determined to be
in generally good health,
apart from some sunburn.»

Yesterday, as’a result of the"

US's “wet foot dry foot” pol-
icy, which dictates that once
Cuban refugees have reached
land they are legally allowed
to remain in the country to
obtain permanent residency,
some of the smuggled Cubans
were reunited with their fam-
ilies already resident in Mia-
mi.

Some of the Cubans had
called ahead to alert their

eh whee



family members in Florida
that they would be making
the treacherous ‘journey,
according to NBC6.

They now will be able to
begin applying for legal resi-
dence after a year and one

. day if they have not been con-

victed of a crime.

Yesterday Royal Bahamas
Defence Force petty officer
Ralph McKinney said that
US Coast Guard liaison offi-
_cer Lieutenant Commander
; Michael, Fredie had, checked

with authorities.in the US ‘and.

determined that the three
Cuban escapees from the
Carmichael Road Detention

‘centre on November 6 were

not among the group.

“We have put our feelers
out internationally and sent
their names to US agencies,
but none of those have come
back as matching,” said offi-
cer McKinney.

Positions available at Bimini Sands Resort & Marina:

Sushi Chef
Diesel/Gasoline Mechanic

A competitive salary and benefit package will be offered to the
successful candidates. If you are interested in being part of a
dynamic, growing company, please email, mail or fax

Resume to:

Human Resources Manager
Bimini Sands Resort & Marina
PO Box 24020
South Bimini
Bahamas
Tel: 242-347-3500
Fax: 242-347-3501
fcooney@biminisands.com —

Sele!

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COCKE S SESE SELES ESEEESEEEEEEOEEESESESEEEESS

Association (ICA) in associa-

- tion with the University of

Manchester in the United
Kingdom.

The 18-month course is con-
ducted in conjunction with the
Bahamas Institute of Financial
Services (BIFS) and the
Bahamas Association of Com-
pliance Officers (BACO),.

Ms Russell will be awarded
her diplomas at a ceremony to
be hosted by BACO in early
December.

The new international award
indicates a high level of practi-
cal competence inthe field of

international compliance and
anti-money laundering prac-
tice.

Mrs Russell was not only
very excited to learn that she
passed the course, but that she
is first to do so in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean.

“The fact that my struggle
of relocating with my children
(to New Providence), working
a second job, burning the mid-
night oil to study and being the
only individual in my class from
the gaming industry was quite a
challenge, but I was deter-
mined to succeed,” she said.

Mrs Russell has been
employed in the gaming indus-
try for 21 years. She joined the
Gaming Board in Freeport in
1986 as an audit assistant. She
was later promoted to inspec-
tor in the Audit Department.

She was again promoted to
Inspector Grade II in 1988, and
further promoted in 2005 to
Inspector Grade I.

She also received training in
Atlantic City, Las Vegas and
Orlando.

Mrs Russell said she made a
great sacrifice by relocating to
New Providence in order to



Gaming inspector
in Caribbean first

take the course. Her goal is to
become a compliance officer
for the Gaming Board.

Mrs Russell said she felt
compelled to improve her
knowledge.in anti-money laun-
dering and compliance.

“With the Bahamas being
blacklisted, there was a need
to be qualified or knowledge-
able in these areas,” she said.

Mrs Russell has. since
returned to Grand Bahama,
where she was appointed to the
position Acting Senior Inspec-
tor assigned to enforcement in
the casinos.



Minister appoints Copyright Tribunal members

MINISTER of of State for Legal Affairs Desmond Bannister
signed the Instruments of Appointment for members of the
Copyright Royalty Tribunal, on November 15. The tribunal will

govern copyright and works directly under the Registrar Gener-
al’s Office. Pictured posing with the document are, from left,

Permanent Secretary at the Office of the Attorney General and
Ministry of Legal Affairs Lelia Greene; current chairman Copy-
right Royalty Tribunal Lowell Mortimer; Minister Bannister;
new chairman Copyright Royalty Tribunal Kirk Seymour

Derek Smith/BIS

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
e:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

Pho





Ee

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
Melia em eek

Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace Centreville
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793, P.O, Box: N+1566
Email aus bs Aida die RXCUSUG CUI li





| PAGE.8, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





When Nassau



ave
Â¥

Se

This week, In Days Gone By looks back at a
' two-week period in May 1979 when Nassau was
; set a-buzz with rumours of spooky poltergeist-like
' » phenoniena 1 inthe home of an elderly couple in
1 pipet,
‘According to reports from those living in the
" Bouse, rocks would appear and fly around the
t ‘rooms, trees outside the building would “dance”
“and demons were said to/Have attacked one of the
‘ homeowners, ; Sarah dane Campbell, sending her
“to: hospital, . fuk
Such rumours ‘prdthptba BB Verdi ifront page
‘news stories — as well asjlatge:crowds of onlook-
ers, followed shortly after-by police, and even a
visiting African “mystic and seer”, while the
frightened residents ah refuge elsewhere.



PICT URED RIGHT: ‘Sarah Jane Canipbell
76- -year-old. resident of the. cHanated house”,



> ee ee ee Se



oS re ew ee ee ee

s ‘spooked’

clutches her bible. According to a report at the
time, Mrs Campbell’s reading ability was impaired
by her poor eyesight, but despite that, she said
that two weeks of ghostly activity in her home had
brought her “nearer to (her) bible.”

SHOWN BELOW: Dr Francis Ngombe (seen
middle, in white robe), a visiting African “medi-
cine man” exits the building followed by police
Superintendent Addington Darville. Dr Ngombe,
head of the All Traditional Medicine Men, asked

to tour the alleged site of the supernatural phe-

nomena after seeing a television news report on
TV-13 news. “This is part of my work”, the doc-
tor told The Tribune, shortly before he emerged
and declared that he had found no evidence of a
ghostly presence in the house, nor was “anyone’s’
life in danger there.”

e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your
income.

e You are limited only to
your potential
¢ Flexible hours available
e Excellent commissions

and benefits

Must have a proven track record in sales
Professional appearance a must

Must have reliable transportation :

Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
Excellent written and communication skills.

Apply in writing to
Sales Representatives
Box PM-1
C/O The Nassau Guardian
P.O. Box N-3011
Nassau

Bahamas






















ABOVE: Word of a haunting at the Camp-
bell’s bungalow spread across Nassau like wildfire.
Hundreds of locals flocked to the yard of the
house in the hope of ascertaining whether there
was any truth to the stories of inanimate objects
flying around the room and rocks materialising
from nowhere to break furniture. Police at one
point dispersed the crowds with a firehouse after
they felt the situation was “getting out of control’’
and radio broadcasts were issued urging people to



stay away from the area.

BELOW: This sorry-looking china cabinet
inside the house was said to have been smashed
by mysterious rocks that “fell through the roof but
left-no holes in the ceiling.”” Mrs Campbell was
quoted as saying: “The spirit must be in my china
cabinet and all about.” She stopped sleeping at
the house and stayed with neighbours and rela-
tives.



Ley

Uy

N
N





THE TRIBUNE

\By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Two Grand
Bahama students were select-
ed as finalists for the Bahamas
in this year’s Florida Caribbean
Cruise Association Foundation
Children’s Essay Competition.

Ministry of Tourism officials
Debbie Huyler and Jeritzan
Outten congratulated students
‘Angenike Curtis and Narendra
Lindsay of the Bishop Michael
Eldon High School. The stu-
dents were each presented with
a $200 cheque. Of the 12 par-
ticipants on Grand Bahama,
Angenike and Narendra were
selected as the junior and senior
division finalists, respectively.

Mrs Huyler, manager of visi-
tor relations at ports of entry,
said the FCCA has been hold-
ing the children’s essay compe-
tition for the past 10 years.

“The Bahamas has always

been participating in the com-
petition, I think it is a good
thing because it gives students
an opportunity to think of their
country, especially since we are
a tourism destination,” she said.

“They will have an idea what
is expected, what tourists would
like to do and see when they
come to the country, and it gets
them thinking at a very early
age.”

‘This year’s competition was
held in August and students
submitted essays on the topic:
“Tf I was a cruise passenger
what would I like to see or do in
my country.”

Ms Huyler said that students
from schools throughout the
island participated in the com-
petition. The two finalists from
the Bahamas will compete with
finalists selected from through-
out the Caribbean.

She stated that all essays are
usually sent to the Ministry of
Tourism Office in Nassau,

LOCAL NEWS

The Ministry of Education
then goes through all of the
essays and selects the best
through a process of elimina-

tion and enters two persons —

one in each division.

“Unfortunately, I did not
send ours:to Nassau, I sent it
directly to FCCA and the
response was very good and
both students at BME (in
Freeport) were entered as final-
ists in the competition,” she
said.

Mrs Huyler said that another
competition is also on the draw-
ing board for the Ministry of
Tourism, which will include a
poster competition and is sched-
uled for January.

She noted that FCCA is also
partnering with the ministry in

.an annual Christmas gift drive

on December 3. The event will
be held at the Grand Bahama
Taxi Union Hall, where gifts
will be distributed to under-
privileged children.

Decomposed body
yet to be identified

FROM page one

body around 3.45pm in bushes in Lucaya.

It is not known whether the body is that of 45-
year-old Kenneth Lightbourne of South Bahamia,
who disappeared late Saturday evening.

-As investigators gathered evidence on Friday
morning at Extreme Auto, a portion of Yellow
Pine Street — a prominent causeway in the com-
mercial industrial/business district of Freeport
— was cordoned off by police for several hours.

A large crowd of curious onlookers had gath-
ered in the area, including several close relatives
who cried as the body was taken away in a hearse.

Martin, a husband and father of two children,
was described as a bright young man who had
obtained a law degree from a law school in Lon-

don. His family is well known in Eight Mile Rock '

and in Grand Bahama.

Police are not certain whether robbery was a
motive at this time and are continuing to follow
several leads into the matter.

According to Ms Mackey, a motorist passing in
the area around 7am on Friday noticed the side
gate partly opened at Extreme Auto, located in
the former Bahamas Electronic Lab (BEL) Build-

ing.

She said the man, who is also a close friend of
the deceased, went to check the premises and
discovered Mr Martin dead. He called the police.

A gold-coloured Infiniti coup G-35, which was
parked at the premises and owned by Mr Martin,
was taken to the Central Detective Unit for fur-
ther police investigation.

Asst Supt Mackey is appealing to anyone with
information into these homicides to contact police
at 350-3109 or 911. :

“We are hoping that we can bring some closure
to both these matters in another day or two, but
are urging members of the public who may have
seen anything to call the police,” she said.

In the case of Mr Lightbourne, who was
employed as a waiter and electrician at Zorba’s
Restaurant, he. has not been seen since leaving
work at 8round 11.45pm on Saturday.

Police recovered his Mitsubishi Eclipse on
Monday in the parking lot at RND cinema.

Nick Vickatos, manager at Zorba’s, said that
colleagues are very concerned about Kenny. “He
was a fun person — always smiling and cracking
jokes and everybody is in a state of disbelief and
sad about the entire situation,” he said.

Man’s body discovered
in burned-out house

FROM page one

and officers forcibly entered the burned struc-
ture through a locked metal door to find out if
there were any survivors.

Fire fighters discovered the body of a dark
male in a southern bedroom dressed in sleeping

” Bank
Financing
Available

ae The deceased was found lying on a bed,
police said.

His body was not positively identified up to
press time. Investigations are continuing into the
matter while the official cause of death is to be
determined by an autopsy, ASP Evans said.

The matter has been classified as a death by
fire.

Insurance
Available
on the

asst

Sore

BRING YOUR OLD VEHICLE TO TRADE SO YOU CAN UPGRADE!!!

Located: Thompson Blvd
Tel: 325-0881/2 Open:Mon.-Fri. 8a.m.-5:00p.m.






JERITZAN Outten of the Ministry of Tourism:
$200 cheque and Debbie Huyler of the Ministry of
tis with her cheque for $200 on Wednesday at pene
ers at the school.

YOUR CONNECTION

SENIOR )

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR
Regulatory Department.

REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:

This position will report directly to the.
Interconnection and will be responsible for all regulatory.
to the Public Utilities Commission. is

OB SUMMARY:

11.

12.

13.

. Liaise with the PUC on all legal and regulaibry

. Assist and advise on the reporting of matters

. Ensure the Company’s somnpliihea ge Ww: the legal and

licenses issued by the PUC, the stipulations

. of the Bahamas, the Telecommunications =

legislation related thereto.



with regulations under the PUC license. issued to BTC



. Liaise with other licensed telecommunicatons p

interconnection.

. Provide legal opinions on matters of a re

analyze all relevant documentation of a regulatory



activity on BTC’s network by both licensed atid

. Attend at and assist with any Fepulatony: matter ret



competent jurisdiction

. Represent the Company on any matters of ey



Company

. Assist in the preparation of epans on the « Cotipan they fe



of regulatory as required by the PUC

Liaise and coordinate with relevant depart
regulatory matters

Inform, educate, and update all relevant Co ip
matters
environment to the staff

Perform any other duties relevidar to the sup)
time to time by the Vice President of Legal, ‘Regal

. EDUCATION AND/OR EXPERIENCE

Master’s Degree preferred.

Exposure to the principles of relecommhicseaaks i8.a plus,
skills are essential, organization, self-motivational ‘andl ¢ commi

Ay

- All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, wa John R hen Drive,
no later than Wednesday November 28, 2007, ‘and. Auldtgssed: a as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT

HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMIN
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICAT
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MANAGERILEGAL & sto sa







PAGE 10, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007




moment

for COB’

FROM page one

However, according to Madi-
son McDonald, brother of the
deceased, Dr McDonald had his
face beaten “beyond recogni-
tion” with a clothing iron.

Mr McDonald told The Tri-
bune that there was no sign of
forced entry, and nothing of
note was missing from the Al-
Rebulan African Boutique and
Guest House, where the pro-
fessor lived. In fact, he said, Dr
McDonald’s computer was still
on when his body was discov-
ered.

With these facts in mind, rel-
atives who:had gathered at the
scene speculated that Dr
McDonald must have know the
assailant.

Concems were initially raised '

about Dr McDonald’s where-
abouts when he failed to appear
at the college over the past few
days, relatives told The Tribune.

“T don’t know what to do,”
said Mr McDonald. “You gat
to leave this place and go live

somewhere else.”

When asked about the state
of the country noting the num-
ber of homicides this year, the
brother of the deceased said
that in his opinion, the current
condition is “beyond ridicu-
lous.”

Mrs Janyne Hodder, presi-
dent of COB, also addressed

the media after emerging from.

the crime scene with relatives
and police.

“This is indeed a very tragic

moment for the College of the
Bahamas. Dean McDonald was

* an academic, a faculty member,

a professor of psychology. He
has been with the college for
over 20 years, responsible for
teaching countless numbers of
young Bahamians,” Mrs Hod-
der said.

The COB president, who
looked distraught when she
arrived at the scene, said that
the college is in “deep mourn-
ing” over the death of a profes-
sor who was working to intro-
duce a law programme to the
country before his death.

Position Available:

HEAVY EQUIPMENT
MAINTENANCE MANAGER




A wrecker tows a damaged car after an accident on the Tonique Williams Darling Highway yesterday. .

THE TRIBUNE



(Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)

Warnings over deadly cold hitting US

FROM page one

US health officials believe.a new strain of
the virus has emerged and have advised
state and local public health departments to
be on alert for the possibility of outbreaks
caused by Ad14.

The CDCP listed possible Ad 14 pre-
vention measures that were implemented in
Texas during the outbreak:

e Increasing the number of hand-sani-

tizing stations.

e Widespread sanitizing of surfaces and
equipment with appropriate disinfectants.

e Increasing awareness of Ad14 among
trainees and staff members.

e Taking contact and droplet precau-
tions for hospitalized patients with Ad14.

So far there have been no reported cas-
es of Ad14 in The Bahamas, however
Bahamians are advised to take extra. pre-
cautions by performing frequent hand wash-

ings and to report to a physician if com-
mon cold symptoms worsen.

Adenovirus outbreaks are said to be par-
ticularly difficult to control because they
can be spread in respiratory secretions, fae-
cal waste and can fester for weeks on envi-
ronmental surfaces, the Centre for Disease
Control says.

There are reportedly 51 strains of aden-
ovirus, however Ad 14 is believed to a vir-
ulent, aggressive strain.

|| Job Description:

| Responsible for the management of all
maintenance activities in Nassau ensuring
all preventative maintenance and heavy
equipment repairs are conducted as per com-
pany standards. Conducts on-site audits and
evaluations of port equipment, coordinates
repair activities and preventative procedures.

Education:

High school diploma or equivalent. Trade
or Technical certificate in Heavy Equipment
Maintenance. :

Experience:

Five years experience in heavy equip-
ment maintenance with at least two years
| in management of equipment maintenance.

Container Terminals offers a highly competi-
tive package of benefits. Salary is commen-
surate with qualifications and experience.



Pricing Information As Of:
, 16 November 200 7

Previous Close Today's Close

0.54

11.00 Bahamas Property Fund
7.88 Bank of Bahamas

0.70 Benchmark

1.65 Bahamas Waste

1.21 Fidelity Bank

9.81 Cable Bahamas

1.85 Colina Holdings

4.03 Commonwealth Bank (31)
4.70 Consolidated Water BDRs
2.20 . Doctor's Hospital

5.54 . Famguard

12.00 Finco

14.60 FirstCaribbean

5.18 Focol (S) ©

0.54 Freeport Concrete

7.10 ICD Utilities

8.52 J. S. Johnson

10.00 Premier Real Estate

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

41.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.40 RND Holding

Fund Name

1.364118"
3.5388**"
2.938214°""
1.279370°**

joney
Fidelity Batuthes G &1 Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Laing’s attorneys file to
dismiss Bridgéwater case

FROM page one

affidavits filed in support of
the application for leave on
June 14, 2007, were irregular
and did not contain the neces-
sary facts to grant leave and/or
otherwise failed to comply with
rules, and that the petitioner
failed to make full disclosure to
the Court.”

Mr Laing, who is also the
Minister of State for Finance,
defeated former PLP MP Pleas-
ant Bridgewater in the May 2
general election by 47 votes.

However, in June 2007, Ms
Bridgewater, filed a petition to
be heard in the Election Court
claiming that 100 people voted
illegally in the Marco City

Constituency which affected
the results of the election, and
that such votes ought to be dis-
counted.

Zhivargo Laing is named as
the First Respondent and Cecil
Thompson, the Returning Offi-
cer, is named as the Second
Respondent.

Change

16,675
1,250

Daily Vol. EPS $

In her petition she claims
that there was non-compliance
with the Parliamentary Act,
1992, and that 19 people who
voted in Marco City were not
citizens of the Bahamas and not
entitled to vote.

She further claimed that an
additional 81 persons who did
not live in Marco City voted ia
the Marco City Constituency.

Mr Laing is seeking an order
that Ms Bridgewater’s petition
be dismissed under Order 18
Rule 19 and under the inherent
jurisdiction of the Election
Court on the ground “that the

petition discloses no reasonable’

cause of action, is scandalous,
frivolous and vexatious, preju-
dices and embarrasses the fair
trial of this action and is other-
wise an abuse of the process of
the Court.” — ;

The grounds of the acP te
tion are:

1) The Petitioner does not
plead that she challenged the
100 voters listed in the Petition

Div $

6.70%
7.71%

under Section 58(1) of the Act.

2) The Petitioner does not
plead that provisions of Section
69(2) were complied with by the
Petitioner.

3) It is an abuse of process
for the Petitioner to seek to
challenge the qualifications of
the 100 persons listed in the
Petition to vote after the votes
have been cast having (accord-
ing to the Affidavits filed in sup-
port of the application for leave
on June 15, 2007) known of
their alleged legal incapacities
prior to the election.

4) This Election Court is not
properly constituted and has no
jurisdiction under Section 58 of
the Act.

5) The Petitioner has failed
to plead in the Petition or lead
evidence in her supporting affi-
davits for leave, the necessary
facts in support of the allega-
tions of legal incapacity.

6) This Petition is an abuse of
process because the Petitioner
failed to avail herself of the dif-
ferent opportunities under the
Act to challenge the legal capac-

ity of persons registered to vote ©

and doing so after the election
and dehors the provisions of
Section 58(1) is not permissi-
ble.

7) There are no pleaded alle-
gations against the conduct of
the election officials and there-
fore the only ground pleaded,
section 79(b) discloses no cause
of action; and/or alternatively:

For an order that the Petition
be dismissed on the ground that
this Election Court does not
have jurisdiction to engage in
the adjudication of the matters
raised by the Petitioner because:

1) The Petitioner has not fol-
lowed the procedures set out in
the Act.

2) None of the 100 persons is
a party to this action.

3) The constitutional rights
of each of the 100 persons to a
fair hearing in respect of their
criminal and civil rights will be
breached.

Ms Bridgewater is repre-
sented by Philip “Brave” Davis
of Davis and Co.

The PLP, which has 18 seats,
is contesting the results of three
seats — Pinewood, Marco City,
and Baillou Hills.

The Election Court is now
hearing the petition of Senator
Allyson Maynard-Gibson, for-
mer MP for Pinewood, who is
contesting 266 votes in that con-
stituency. It is the first of three
cases to be heard.

PROVOST
MARSHALL SALE

An auction will be held on 28th Noveme-
ber, 2007 at 10:00 0’ clock at the Supreme
Court Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, The
Bahamas. On auction will be a number of
Locman Watches in a variety of styles and

colours.

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

* 9 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 62 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
'S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
'81) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

11.8192°**

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

NAV KEY

* «9 November 2007
** 30 June 2007

*** . 31 October 2007
eee. 31 July 2007



For more information please contact Miss
Cordell Frazier at Gibson & Company at
323-1234 or Mr. Jack Davis a the Supreme
Court at 356-9101.



“aapeentir



we

cage

THE TRIBUNE



Students
‘electrified’
by power
plant tour

STUDENTS from the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Insti-
tute’s electrical installation programme had the opportunity to
visit one of BEC’s main power plants at Clifton Pier.

- Thirty-three students participated in the field trip on Wednesday, -

November 14, to observe the day-to-day operations of the plant.
The students were taken on a two-hour tour by Mario Smith,

assistant engineer and Melvin Babbs, mechanical technician, who ~

spoke about electricity generation and exposed the students to

other aspects of the plant.

BTVI students commented on the benefits of the visit, which they
said gave them the opportunity to reinforce their theoretical knowl-

edge with first-hand observations.

The students thanked the power station officials for the valuable

information.

0000000 o oOo oOo OOOO HOOD EE CESOO DSO SEO SESOE HODES OD ESOSOO EEO O OEE O ETOCS OO EES EH OED E SEES OSEOHED EOE OO DEEEOS

Ambassador welcomed to
OAS permanent council ©

FROM page two

ing that the fundamental prin-
ciples and democratic values of
this organisation remain
strong.”

At the Bahamas’ 25th

anniversary in the OAS, in.

March of this year, Secretary
General Insulza recognised the
country for “standing shoulder-

to-shoulder as a committed
partner in the pursuit of demo-'

cratic and development ideals.”

Ambassador Smith said that
the Bahamas appreciates that
its participation in the OAS cre-
ates opportunities to advance
national and international inter-
ests and to strengthen their
engagement with the Americ-
as.
“Just as important, we believe

‘ that the OAS is the foremost

organisation for addressing the
concerns of the hemisphere,”
he said.

The ambassador then con-
gratulated the OAS for its lead-
ership on a myriad of impor-
tant issues such as the promo-

tion of democracy and human —

rights, hemispheric security, sus-
tainable development, health
and gender issues.

Since 2002, the Inter-Ameri-
can Committee Against Ter-
rorism has provided invaluable
technical assistance and capaci-
ty building programmes to assist
OAS member states in pre-
venting, fighting and eliminating
terrorism.

“The establishment of civil
registries, unknown in some
countries, has become a reality
in our hemisphere, giving our
peoples a sense of belonging
and self-worth,” Ambassador
Smith said.

He noted that the pledges of
support to the Bahamas, Haiti
and the Dominican Republic in
the wake of Tropical Storm

Noel is another testimony to the

solidarity which exists among

the members of the OAS.
Ambassador Smith said that

the Bahamas has decided to ©

continue its contributions to
various peace initiatives, includ-
ing those in Colombia and
Haiti, and encouraged other
countries to consider pledging
to those noteworthy activities

aimed at securing peace in the

region.

He further noted that the
Bahamas, like it CARICOM
members, attaches “great
importance” to the OAS schol-
arship programme, as hundreds
of Bahamian students and gov-
ernment officials have benefit-
ted from it.

“The Bahamas is committed
to partnership with this hemi-
spheric group of nations to meet
the challenges which beset us
in this area,” Ambassador
Smith said.

Rules:
. White a essay answering the

. The body of the essay must not exceed 1,000 words,

From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were
concemed with promoting high
ethical standards in their

- professional lives. One of the
world's most widely printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This
24-word Test has been
translated into more than a —
hundred languages and
published in thousands of ways.
tt asks the following four
questions:



dren ages 10-16 may enter. dging will be in two
age categories: 10 - 13 years and 14-16 years for a first
and second place winner in each ‘

following subject:
“What does the Four-Way Test mean to me.”
your understanding of the 4-Way Test as it relates to.
your life, experiences, and/or society in general.”
Your essay must include the four principles.

Adults may assist the child in Alling out the entry form,
but not in writing the letter,

4, Limit one essay per child. All entries must be received by

The Four-Way Test .
“Of the things we think,

say or do

1. Is it the truth?
2. Is it fair to all

eoncerned?:

3. Will it build goodwill.
“and better friendships?
4, Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?”

_ 2007, PAGE 11






















accepted.
. Que winner will be chosen from cach age category. 'The
decision of the judges ts final,

essay and completed
The Four-Way Test Kesay Compotition,
Attn; Michelo Rassin, The Rotary Club of Bast Nassau,
P.O. Box $S-6320, Nassau, Bahamas

The Tribune

tly Vows, Hy Fdewseqnenl



and reprodizced for any purpose without compensation,

Rotary Club of

EAST




e NASSAU 2

3 WES

«=
a

C3

ee ee eM EMER AER CANE

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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 12, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007
ii (Li



NASSAU, EVENTS, CAPT URED ON ClawE RA



- Luncheon for new US

ati



bees ‘LODR DELONG BONNER (left), US Navy Liaison Officer and Lynn Fichter, personal assistant for the Siegel
. Group in Boca Raton, Florida. as



PERMANENT SECRETARY in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Sheila Carey (former first secretary at the
t Bahamian Embassy in Washington, DC) and Jacquelyn ! ‘ray, Permanent Secretary and Secretary to
hot Governor General.





eae SHOWN (ler in front row) are Lieutenant Commander Michael Fredie, US Coast Guard Liaison Officer Mrs Saskia Hardt and her husband Dr D Brent Hardt, Deputy Chief of Mission, United States Ambassador Ned Siegel,

Ms Cynthia Loyet, Office Management Specialist, Ronnie Fontenot, Information Management Officer; and Lieutenant Commander Delong Bon
al Security Officer, Mr Dave Foran, Narcotics Affairs Officer, Mr Jerome Hutchinson, DEA Supervisor, Enrique Tamayo, Port Director, and

ner, Navy Liaison Office. Shown (I-r in back row) are Mr Albert DeJong, Region-
Dan O'Connor, chief of the Political/Economic, Protocol/Public Affairs Section.



GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Dion Hanna (left) and United States Ambassador Ned Siegel pose fora pho- ie

tograph following the presentation of the ambassador's credentials and:lunch at Government House. In his

remarks during the ceremony earlier this week, Ambassador Siegel said he is committed to deepening the
“extraordinary partnership of shared purpose and common values” between the United States and the -
Bahamas. He also pledged to continue the US Embassy’s literacy programme and emphasized that, under his’
watch, the Embassy will remain an active civic partner, working to protect the environment, supporting the
less fortunate and inspiring youth:

eh a
a MaMa tact







Full Text


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up all night!

NMcDonald’s downtown



The Tribune

CTT AWUahl é :
LOD hie © wa, drive-thru is now open

he 24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays





) |
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Volume: 103 No.297

Historic Nassau may

i Geli

MOVES TO SAVE CITY SUFFERING FROM NEGLECT

Four murders
in 24 hours
rock nation

By PAUL TURNQUEST
and BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporters

DR THADDEUS McDon-
ald, 59, Dean of the Faculty of
Social and Educational Studies

_at the College of the Bahamas,

became the fourth homicide vic-
tim within a 24-hour period yes-
terday, when he was found
beaten to death at his residence
on Queen Street.

A full press core, senior
police officials, family members
and colleagues from the college,
all converged on the murder
scene just up the road from the
American Embassy.

Just after 6pm, Senior Assis-
tant Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade emerged from the
crime scene with a large group
of senior officers who were
tight-lipped about the circum-
stances surrounding the killing.

Bahamians_

warned on
deadly cold

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A strain of the common cold
that typically causes symptoms
of runny noses and sore throats
has reportedly turned deadly in

the United States killing 10'per- .
_sons over the past 18 months,

according to international
reports.

The US Centres for Disease
Control
(CDCP) has issued a warning
for health care professionals to
be aware of Adenovirus
serotype 14 (Ad14), which is “a
rarely reported but emerging
strain of the cold that can cause
severe and sometimes fatal res-

piratory illness in patients of all

ages, including healthy young
adults.”

In its weekly morbidity and
mortality report, the CDCP
cites the virus for 10 deaths and
at least 140 illmesses across four
American states: Oregon, New
York, Washington, and Texas.

Between March and June
2007, 140 cases of confirmed
Ad14 illnesses were identified
in patients in Oregon, Wash-
ington and Texas. Of these cas-
es, 38 per cent were admitted
to hospitals, 17 per cent were
admitted to Intensive Care
Units, and five per cent of these
patients died.

The youngest fatality of
Ad14 was a 12-day-old infant
who died in New York City in
May 2006.

SEE page 10



and Prevention.

“This evening sometime
around 3.45pm or thereabouts,
we gota call. As a result of that
call, officers from the Central
Division responded to Queen
Street to a residence,” said
Leon Bethel, officer-in-charge
of the homicide division. “While
checking that residence, the
body of a man was found
inside. It was obvious that he
had some injuries to the body,
and as a result we have
launched an investigation into
his death. We are classifying it
as a homicide.”

Police were unwilling to give
an identification of the victim
and were also unwilling to
answer questions as to what
type of injuries Dr McDonald
sustained, when asked by the
media.

SEE page 10

4

Smugegled
Cubans

‘stayed in
Bahamas’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

TWO .Miami men
appeared in US federal
court yesterday charged
with smuggling 34 Cubans
to Florida on Thursday.

The Cubans told Border
Patrol authorities that they
travelled from Cuba on
Monday, stayed in the
Bahamas for several days,
and then endured a 10 to 12
hour boat ride to Palm
Beach, according to South
Florida’s NBC6.

One 39-year-old male
Cuban drowned just feet
from shore after the accused
forced the five children and
29 adults into the water to
swim 40 or 50 feet to shore,
said the South Florida Sun-
Sentinel.

If convicted of the
charges made against them,
Duany Jimenez, 24, and
Maikel Soto, 28, could face
sentences of 10 years
imprisonment.

Another man is wanted
for questioning in relation
to the matter, said NBC6.

According to the South-
ern District US Attorney’s
Office, the Palm Beach
Police Department respond-

SEE page 7



EUSA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

An unidentfied Jamaican national is believed to have died in a fire early on Friday morning

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN UNIDENTIFIED Jamaican is believed
to have died in a fire early yesterday morning
when a blaze engulfed a residence on East,
Street south.

Police reports state that around 2.40 am Fri-
day, the Fire Services team responded to #
report of a structural fire on East Street, south
of the New Englerston Seventh-Day Adventist
Church.



(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune Staff)

*

According to a press statement issued by
Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans, fire
services arrived on the scene five minutes later
with two emergency units. Officers found
flames blazing from a single-story concrete
structure threatening to spread to the nearby
church.

As a result, a third emergency vehicle was
called to the scene to prevent the further spread
of the blaze. The fire was soon extinguished

SEE page 9



Police officer charged
over drug possession

A POLICE officer was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday on drug conspiracy and
possession charges.

Constable Wilson Francois Joseph, 35, of High
Vista, and Jacoby Jeol Knowles, 24, of Ida Street
were arraigned before Magistrate Carolita Bethel
at court eight, Bank Lane, yesterday.

According to court dockets the two men are
accused of conspiring to import a quantity of
cocaine between Tuesday, October 9, and Fri-
day, November 2. It is also alleged that between
that period the two conspired to possess the drugs,

imported the drugs and were found in posses-
sion of the drugs which authorities believe they
intended to supply to another. It is alleged that the
men were found in possession of two and a quar-
ter pounds of cocaine.

Both men, who are represented by lawyer Mil-
ton Cox, pleaded not guilty to all of the charges
against them.

Both men were remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison and will return to court on November 23
when Magistrate Bethel will consider whether
they should be granted bail.



PRICE — 75¢



Business
owner

eat av ites
Ce aN

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— In less than
24 hours, Grand Bahama police
were called to the scene of
another murder here on the
island-involving.a well-known
Freeport businessman who was

found shot dead Friday morn:

ing.

Gifford Martin Jr, a 32-year-
old resident of Spinney Road,
was discovered at his business
establishment on Yellow Pine
Street with an apparent gun
shot wound to the head some-
time after-7am. He was found
by a friend, who was not identi-
fied by the police.

Assistant Police Supt Loretta
Mackey, assistant press liaison
officer; said that police received
a call around 7.25am of a homi-
cide'and went to Extreme Auto
and Supplies to investigate.

SO) When Officers arrived at the

scene, she said they discovered
the body of a black man lying
face up on the ground outside at
the rear of the building. She said
the victim had sustained what
appeared to be a gun shot injury
to the head.

Mr Martin’s murder is the
10th homicide for the year on
Grand Bahama. The ‘island’s
ninth homicide was recorded
on Thursday when police dis-
covered a badly decomposed

SEE page 9

Move to
dismiss
election
challenge

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

’ FREEPORT - Lawyer Fred
Smith of Callenders & Co has
filed a legal motion on behalf
of Marco City MP Zhivargo
Laing to dismiss a petition filed
by Senator Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter in the Election Court regard-

ing some 100 votes in the Mar-.

co City Constituency.

The notice of motion filed
on November 14 is seeking to
have Ms Bridgewater’s petition
set aside on the grounds “that

_ there was non-compliance with

Section 83(1) of the Parliamen-
tary Elections Act, and that

SEE page 10



an.
THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 2, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

BEC fitter

wins gold

ELECTRICAL fitter for BEC in South Andros
Kevin Seymour beat out millions of hopefuls to
win the 2006 International City & Guilds Gold
Medal from the London-based company.

He was presented the award during the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation Craft Appren-
ticeship Training Programme graduation and
prize-giving ceremony on November 15.

Mr Seymour was a participant in the 2004 Craft

Apprenticeship Programme. -

City & Guilds is one of the leading interna-
tional awards bodies for work-related qualifica-
tions. It has been in existence for more than 130
years and provides more than 60 established inter-
national vocational qualifications.

Annually, more that 1.5 million people enrol in
its programmes and are 1.3 million certificates
are awarded on a yearly basis.



MINISTER of Public works and ‘Transport Earl Deveaux speaks during the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation 2006 Craft Apprenticeship Training Programme graduation and prize-giving ceremony

at the corporation’s Blue Hill Road headquarters.

re



Patrick Hanna/BIS

j



Saturday —
November 17

John S. George

*Christmas

Located in these
shopping centers

Palmdale, tel: 322-8421

Harbour Bay, tel: 393-8761/2
Cable Beach, tel: 327-7740/1
Lyford Cay, tel: 362-5289
independence, tel: 341-8527
Visit our website at: WWW. isgco.com





stockings



COP MOO COCO OEE EO OOOO OEE ESOS SHES EE ESEES OSES EOS EO OOOO ESOS EOS OES SSE SOO ESO O EEE E SEES EEE EEO ESE EEE E OEE EEEEES







Pictured, from left, are BEC general manager Kevin Basden; City & Guilds’ international relations

officer Martin Newman; Mr Seymour and BEC chairman Frederick Gottlieb. -
Patrick Hanna/BIS

Bahamas’ US Ambassador
welcomed to OAS council .

able benefit of membership,”
Ambassador Smith said. “The

Bahamas is committed to ensur-
whom we share history, culture

and economic, social and polit- SEE page 11
ical challenges was an undeni- &

“We in the Bahamas recog-
nise that increased hemispheric
solidarity with countries with

By Lindsay Thompson

THE Bahamas Ambassador
to the United States and per-
manent representative to the
Organisation of American
States C A Smith has been wel-
comed to the Permanent Coun-
cil of that, prestigious body of
the Americas.

Ambassador Smith present-
ed his credentials to OAS Sec-
retary-General Jose Miguel
Insulza during a ceremony at
the OAS Headquarters in
Washington, DC, this week.

The Bahamas joined the
OAS in 1982, as the 31st mem-
ber, on the premise that collec-
tively, member states could
address issues of common con-
cern. Observes say a seat on the
Permanent Council serves as an
avenue to pursue such matters.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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Tropical Exterminators
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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Historic Nassau faces ‘being

A new move is being made
to restore downtown Nassau,
according to the government.

Nassau 2020 is a series of
public discussions designed to

_bring a focus to the plight of
historic Nassau, and to help
- identify long-term strategies for

opment of Nassau from an his-
toric perspective.

Through April of next year,
the series will feature presen-
tations by the director of Town
Planning, architects, agencies
that provide goods and services
to downtown, and a panel dis-

toric Nassau.

“What we would like to
encourage is a general partici-
pation by the public in dis-
cussing the history, planning,
the problems and the future

development of a city that °

belongs to the Bahamian peo-

its rescue. cussion. ple.”
It is being presented by the Once a premier tourist des- Tens
design firm of Patrick Rahming _ tination, Nassau has seen sig- are SEAR a pec las

and Associates and supported
by the Department of Culture.

The series begins with a dis-
cussion led by historian and for-
mer director of the National
Archives, Dr Gail Saunders, on
Noyember 21 at 6.30pm, at the
Humidor Restaurant in the
Graycliff Hotel.

She will examine the devel-

nificant deterioration said Mr
Rahming, an architect.

“Today, the historic city of
Nassau sits rotting — its best
architecture either already gone
or in danger of being obliterat-
ed, mostly by neglect.”

Mr Rahming said he wanted
to “begin a conversation around
the future development of his-

Fraud warning

issued to US
visa applicants

The US Embassy in Nassau
has warned visa applicants
about new fraudulent websites
posing as official US govern-
ment sites seeking to charge for
visa forms.

These websites and other

ae
companies seek money to

download or complete required
visa forms, suggesting that the
forms are available only
through their site, said US offi-
cials in‘a statement.

“The embassy wishes to
advise visa applicants that there
is no charge to download and
complete the Electronic Visa

It asked that applicants note
the following:

e Immigration related web-
sites

Many other non-governmen-
tal Websites (eg, using the suf-
fixes .com, .org or .net) provide
legitimate and useful immigra-
tion and visa related informa-
tion and services.

Regardless of the content of
other websites, the Department
of State does not endorse, rec-
ommend or sponsor any infor-
mation or material shown at
these other websites.

e Other impostor or fraudu-

Department of Culture’s sup-
port behind the project.

“Being guided by our man-
date — history, heritage and cul-
ture — we thought it was neces-
sary to engage Bahamians in a
conversation on the way for-
ward in terms of how we devel-
Op as a country,” he said.

What to do about Nassau? Pictured from left a are Director of Culture Dr Nicolette Bethel, Minis-

obliterated’ through neglect



ter of State for Culture Charles Maynard, and architect Patrick Rahming.

- Derek Smith/BIS



Magistrate queries
her authority

A 31-year-old man and 32-
year-old woman of East Street
were set to be arraigned in court
yesterday on charges related to
the seizure of hundreds of fake

designer items last year — but the

arraignment did not go as expect-
ed.

Xishan Ma and Yvette Mitchell
Culmer Ma. appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel yes-
terday at court eight in Bank
Lane on 14 counts of possession
of false trademarks.

It is alleged that on Wednes-
day, November 29, 2006 the pair
were found in possession of hun-
dreds of fake designer items,
including knock-off Fendi, Louis
Vouitton, Gucci, Prada and

Application Form at __ lent websites and email :
http://evisaforms.state.gov, nor A few other websites may try hate Aas ee paie
to download any other US gov- _ to mislead customers and mem- repres efit ed by attorney Henry

ernment visa form,” it said.
The statement noted that

only internet sites including the

".gov" indicator are official US
government websites.

The US Embassy said its
website can be found at
http://nassau.usembassy.gov.
“All required forms for visa
applications can be found
through our website at no
charge. For any further inquires
contact the U S Embassy Nas-

_. sau’s consular section at: mail-
to:visanassau@state.gov. :

The embassy advised visa
applicants to be cautious in all

- dealings with companies that

claim to offer any assistance in
obtaining US visas.

bers of the public into thinking
they are official Websites. These
Websites may attempt to
require you to pay for services
such as forms and information

about immigration procedures, -

which are otherwise free on the
Department of State Visa ser-
vices website, or overseas
through the US Embassy Nas-
sau consular section’s website.
These other websites may

' require you to pay for services

you will not receive, and may
contact you by email to lure you
to their offer.

Be wary of sending any per-
sonal information that might be
used for identity fraud/theft'to
these websites.



wi

Xishan Ma outside of court yesterday.

Thin set, Grout and
BOL Cwatelietapies

Olas

SARTO aN ARLES EA

PU MSSM atta aed LA Uinta trot covet

Veo Li



Flat Wall Paint 1 gaion.......... $14.95





(Photo: Tim Clarke/fribune ee

Bostwick.
Midway through the charge

. sheet Magistrate Bethel, noted

that the offences were alleged to
have been committed since
November last year, far exceeding
the six month period when
charges are usually filed in sum-
mary cases.

Magistrate Bethel stated that
she was not certain whether she
had the jurisdiction to entertain
the matter. ‘

The prosecutor, Sergeant Her-
bert: Duncombe requested more
time to determine the prosecu-
tion’s course of action in relation
to the matter.

The arraignment was
adjourned to Friday, November

23, at 11 am.

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914.

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Publisher/Editor 1972-

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Climate change summary expected today

DELEGATES from more than 140
countries meeting in Valencia, Spain,
agreed Friday on a scientific “instant guide”
for policy makers, stating more forcefully
than ever that. climate change has begun
and threatens to irreversibly alter the plan-
et.

The document, summarizing the scien-
tific consensus on human-induced climate
change, will be distributed to delegates at a
crucial meeting in Indonesia next month
that is intended to launch a political process
on international cooperation to control
global warming.

Five days of sometimes tense negotia-

« tions ended before dawn with the approval
. of a 20-page summary of thousands of pages
- of data and computer projections compiled
over the last six years by the Nobel Peace
prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change.

The report does not commit participating
governments to any course of action but it
is important because it is adopted by con-
sensus, meaning those countries accept the
underlying science and cannot disavow its
conclusions. It provides a common scientific
base line for the political talks.

“This is a groundbreaking document that
will pave the way for deep emissions cuts by
developing countries,” said Stephan Singer,
a climate specialist for the World Wide
Fund for Nature. ithe

The report describes how climate sys-
tems are changing and why, the effects it is
having on mankind and ecosystems, and
various scenarios of future impacts, depend-
ing on how quickly action is taken to slow
the trend.

The summary and a longer “synthesis
report” were expected to be formally adopt-
ed after proofreading. They will be released
today at a news conference attended by
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

“Warming of the climate system is
unequivocal,” the summary begins, in a
statement meant to dispel any scepticism
about the reality of climate change, said
participants in the meeting.

In a startling and much-debated conclu-
sion, the document warns that human activ-
ity risks causing “abrupt or irreversible
changes” on Earth, including the wide-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CELICOURT MCKENSON
of MALCOLM ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible. for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not:be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 10th day of November, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

Saturdays 11am to 7 pm
Weekends 3pm - 7pm

LONGER HOURS FROM
DEC 17TH - DEC 24TH

spread extinction of species and a dramat-
ic rise in sea levels before the end of this
century, they said on condition of anonymi-
ty because the details are supposed to
remain confidential until today.

“T think overall it is a good and balanced
document,” said Bert Metz, an eminent
Dutch scientist and one of the 40 authors of

‘the draft. “In the end, a lot of people had to
compromise,” he said.
Though it contains no previously unpub-
’ lished material, the summary pulls togeth-
er the central elements of three lengthy
reports the IPCC released earlier this year.
Boiling down the 3,000. pages into about
20 was “quite a challenge,” said Metz.

The agreement was seen as a personal
triumph for the IPCC chairman, Rajendra
Pachauri of India, who presided with no-
nonsense efficiency and bulldozed through
compromise language. Pachauri, who will
accept the IPCC’s Nobel Peace prize in
Oslo on December 10 along with. former
USS. Vice President Al Gore, is expected to
stand for re-election as head of the IPCC
next year, delegates said.

Delegates said the talks this week were
difficult, and sometimes bogged down for
hours over a brief phrase.

The meeting in the Indonesian resort of
Bali starting December 3 will discuss the
next step in combating climate change after
the measures adopted in the Kyoto Proto-
col expire in five years. Kyoto obliges 36
industrial countries to radically reduce their
carbon emissions by 2012, but has no clear
plan for what happens after that date.

Organizers say the new “road map”
emerging from Bali should draw in the
United States, which rejected the Kyoto
accord and has tried to enlist other coun-
tries in voluntary schemes to reduce emis-
sions of greenhouse gases and invest in
technology research.

Participants in the Valencia meeting said
the U.S. delegation questioned the most
hard-hitting statements in the summary that
implied the urgency of reining in carbon
emissions. But the final text retained key
language, they said.

(This article was written by Arthur Max
of the Associated Press).









NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALEXANDER HECHAVARRIA
MAYET of JOHNSON TERRACE, LOT 6A, P.O. BOX N-
5613, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/ |
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
17th day of November, 2007 to the Minister responsible
ationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

The irony
of today’s
| prejudice

EDITOR, The Tribune.

TODAY on Michael Pin-
tard’s show, “The way forward”
aman called and expressed how
irate he is about the “Haitian
problem.” The caller empha-
sised that the Government must
announce and publicise the
names and number of Haitians
being “naturalised” to the pub-
lic. This caller was passionate
about the “Haitian-problem”
he went on to say that Bahami-

ans should be insulted by what’

is going on in the society today.
“They even have their own talk
shows, they could be planning
to take over...shoots we don’t
even know what they are up
to.”

He further suggested that the
radio stations in addition to the
Government are to blame. “If
they gonna do it (the talk
shows), they should at least
have a Bahamian on the show
to translate.” Michael Pintard,
the host of the show asked the
caller, “but suppose everyone
on the show is legal...they
should be able to host their
show right?” Like Pintard sug-
gested I agreed...if everyone on
the show are legal then what is
the problem? The law, the con-
stitution is not being challenged
therefore, make your point...I
said to myself.

Stupidly, the caller
replied....“that’s the problem
today, we are giving them (the
Haitians) too much leeway and
too much slack...that is why the
country is the way it is today.”
’ Later in the show, Pintard
advised that he must change his
attitude because everyone on

the mentioned Haitian talk.
shows are legal, they contribute °

to the development of the
Bahamas and furthermore, as
legal residents of the Bahamas
they have the right to be on the
radio. to accommodate their

Dawe

letters@trbunemec repay



special audience. Annoyingly,
the uninformed caller closed the
call by taking his ignorance and
stupidity to a higher level not
yet reached before, he stated
that Haitians are inferior and
should not have any rights. In
fact, he closed by saying neither
the legal nor illegal should
reside in the Bahamas “they all
should be sent from where they
came from.” I was baffled by
this caller, I was shocked
beyond understanding I didn’t
know that this level of igno-
rance still existed and more ter-
rifyingly that it was here and
real in my small community. I
am not ignorant to the fact that
ignorance and prejudice still
exists in the Bahamas but I was
traumatised and crippled by the
caller’s expressions, it seems as
if he had seen a Haitian while
on the radio he would have
annihilated them. I am serious
that is how it seemed.

The first thought that came
to mind was the painful memo-
ry of whites dominating the
blacks decades ago...I immedi-
ately found myself in the late
1800’s and early 1900’s where
black slavery was at its peak.
Internally, I was dying ...I want-
ed to call the show so badly to
tell this uninformed jerk a thing
or two about his history.

This is what I wanted to say:

For years your forefathers
were discriminated, hated, prej-
udiced against, persecuted and
even killed simply because of
the colour of their skin.
Remember that our black fore-
fathers pleaded and prayed for
the day when all men would be
considered equal...when
insignificant factors such as

colour would no ionger sepa-
rate and divide man. In their
plea to be considered as equal
our ancestors asked. the white

man many earnest and intense, ©

yet sobering questions. Our
fathers cried, “When you prick
us do we not bleed...do we not

bleed red? When you’re cold «

don’t you shiver? If you stay

out in the sun don’t you get.
dehydrated?” Our forefathers -
prayed and hoped for sympa- »

thy from the whites but today a
black man finds it necessary to
knock and discriminate a fel-
low black man simply because

the fellow black man speaks a .

different language and is froma

_ different location on the world’s

map.
Yesterday’s' discrimination
was caused because of colour
differences. Ironically, today’s
prejudice is inspired by lan-
guage and geographical loca-

tion. Isn’t it incongruous how -

the poison called ignorance can
destroy and contaminate the
very things that we should
appreciate about each other?
We fought for equal rights
between blacks and whites now
we form a division in blacks
because of language. Isn’t it
ironic? How stupid can we be?
What do you think our forefa-
thers would say? Is this what
you think Dr Martin Luther
King had in mind?

Do not allow ignorance and

prejudice to keep you in the’

dark, learn from your history
and take immediate steps to

advance yourself. Prejudice is -

like poison, it is harmful you
and. everyone else who is
involved. , =

LOVY JEAN
UniVision

Nassau,
November, 2007.

A man who makes —

me extremely proud

EDITOR, The Tribune.

POLICE Commissioner Paul
Farquharson will long be
remembered in The Bahamas
as one of her finest sons. He



5 CUBE $318.00
5 CUBE $353.00
7 CUBE $445.00
9 CUBE $522.00

15 CUBE $650.00

gave 41 years of exemplary and
dedicated service to our nation.
His retirement has been
announced and soon he will
become our Ambassador to
Canada, God willing.

Never during his tenure as.a
rank and file officer, or even as
the substantive Commissioner
of Police, were there ever any
credible allegations against him
of corruption or graft.

This man is not only a gen-
tleman, but he is firm, compas-
sionate and uncompromising
when it comes down to the
detection of crime and placing
those who may be charged
before our courts in a timely
manner. His position, profes-
sionally, has always been: “Let
the chips fall where they

may....

Reading about his early back-
ground as a young boy growing
up in Long Island, without the
stabilising and nurturing influ-
ence of his birth parents, liter-
ally brought tears to my eyes,
and I do not cry easily.

- At age 17 years, the future
Commissioner of Police, by
hard work and a sober head,
was able to ascend the domestic
ranks at Chub Cay as Head
Waiter. Later he joined the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
and the rest is history.

Today, so many of the mis-
creants who find themselves
before the courts or within our
criminal justice system, com-

plain that they were. products
of single parent homes and that

they were abused or trauma- ©

tised during their childhood,
resulting in their “bad behay-

iour” and uncontrollable urges ._

to commit crimes.

Commissioner Paul Far-

quharson is a prime living
example that disadvantaged
youth and children need not rel-
egate themselves to a short and

brutal life of crime and may- —

hem. Now, after doing yeoman
services for a grateful nation,
he will move on to become our
Ambassador to Canada. I have
absolutely no doubt that he will
make us all proud.

As the Royal Bahamas Police
Force prepares for new leader-
ship, the force can only go from
strength to strength due to the
splendid groundwork done by
Commissioner Paul Farquhar-
son. In fact, I look forward to
the eventual elevation of my
good friends, Acting Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson and Assistant Commis-
sioner Ellison Greenslade. The
force is in excellent hands and it
will continue to do its job.

Thank you, Mr Farquharson
for a job well done. To God
then, in all of these things, as
sons of the widow, be the glory.

ORTLAND H BODIE JR
Nassau,
November 13, 2007.

marae












DO YOU LOVE CHILDREN? ARE YOU
MATURE AND RELIABLE?

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, SONAL! ANDREA
SYMONETTE a.k.a. SONALI ANDREA PRATT of Rock
Sound, Eleuthera, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to TAMIKA SONALI ANDREA RAHMING. If there are any
objectinns to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas, no later than thirty (80) days
after the date of publication of this notice.

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ae,

jobs.”

THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 5



‘
A .

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.n
et

“IT vex because they voted
Ron Pinder out. Now you
can’t even get your garbage
picked up on time. He was the
only minister willing to go out
and pick up trash, now weeks
and weeks have go by before I
see any
garbage
tar ies Ks
around here
and my
garbage been
piling up. It’s -
ridiculous,
someone
needs to do
something
about this.”

Marathon
resident.

EL vex
because I
leave my car
for 10 min-
utes on
Shirley Street
and one
joneser break
into my car
and. steal my
wallet. Now I got to. go and
cancel all my credit and ATM
cards because people out
there too lazy to get a job.
Crime in this country really

‘| getting out of hand man.”

— vexed robbery victim.



WHY YOU VE







“T am upset by all this traffic
in Nassau. It takes you literal-
ly an hour to get anywhere in
this country and most traffic
lights don’t work.

I was stuck in traffic for 45
minutes on Wulff Road today
and I ended up wasting all my
gas.

Plus to try to get to work
on time I have to get up extra
early and then I end up com-
ing home late. I hardly have

anytime to
spend with
my family.”











angry |

nen iC eat matoret





“Why is it
in this coun-
try that con-
doms have to
» be sold
) behind coun-
ters? I vex
because I go
in the shop
and asa
grown man I
have to ask
somebody’s
grandmother
to pass me a
pack.

They are
necessities,
they will not
hurt you —
they are safe sex products and
young people need access to
them.

Then maybe you wouldn’t
see all these young girls walk-
ing around pregnant.”

— angry Bahamian male.



















Women’s rights
pioneers set to
be honoured —

PIONEERS of the suffrage
movement who fought for equal
voting rights for Bahamian
women will be celebrated dur-
ing National Women’s Week.

<: Minister of State’ for Sotial

Development Loretta Butlér-
Turner made this announce-
ment at a press conference
Thursday.

She added that women Who
continue to contribute to the
development of the country also
will be honoured during the
week beginning Sunday,
November 25.

Mrs Butler-Turner said that
although Bahamian women
have been participating in the
electoral process for more than
45 years, they still suffer from a
great deal of inequality.

“We still have a very long
way to go,” she said. “Just yes-
terday, I had the opportunity
to speak at another place with
regards to sexual harassment in
the workplace.

“It was interesting to note
that even though there are
women in our country who are
constantly sexually harassed on
the job, many of them cannot
even get a case to come before
the'courts, because of the sup-
pression they receive on the job
or the threat of losing their

She also pointed out that
Bahamian women are still earn-
ing lower salaries than their
male counterparts.

“That is very important, con- .

sidering the majority of the
households are headed by
females, and women also have

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



to do a job twice as good as the
male to be recognised for the
same job they are doing.

“The corporate world is dom-
inated by men,” Mrs Butler-

“Turner said. “Although woltén
have made Significant, Strides’6n

so many levels in government,
civics and so many places, we
are still the ones that are kow-
towing to members of the boys
club. So we have a long way: to
go.”

The National Women’s Week
will officially begin with women
uniting in prayer, to give thanks
for the blessings that have been
bestowed upon them, at the
Christ Church Cathedral at
11.15am.

Following the service, a lunch
will be held at the British Colo-
nial Hilton at 1.30pm.

Cora Bain-Colebrooke, Joyce
Moxey-Taylor and Mrs Sylvia
Roberts will be honoured for
their contributions to both
country and community.

On Wednesday, November
28, a “night of poetry” will be
held featuring the talents of
Bahamian women at the
National Art Gallery at 7pm.

A health fair is planned for
Thursday, November 29, from
10am to 3pm in the foyer of the
Main Post Office on East Hill
Street. Representatives from
the Department of Public
Health and other healthcare
professionals will be available

' to conduct screenings. .

Mrs Turner-Butler said, “We
recognise the importance of
good health and we encourage
not only our women, but the
general public to come out and
have their health screenings

- done.”

She explained that on Satur-
day, December 1, there will be a
workshop on the United
Nations Convention on the
Elimination of All Forms of
Discrimination Against
Women. The workshop will be
held from 9.30am to 1.30pm at
the Cancer Society on Third
Terrace in Centreville.

Professor Leith Dunn, from
the University of the West
Indies Centre for Gender and
Development Studies will facil-
itate the workshop, which will
discuss the rights of women
under this Convention.

Also, members of the Nation-
al Women’s Week planning
committee will be visiting select-
ed schools in the capital, to brief
students on the suffrage move-
ment and to encourage them to
strive for excellence. Winners
of the National Women’s Week
Essay Competition also will be
announced during the week.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157










By Lindsay Thompson

THE government of the
Bahamas is seeking assistance
from the German government
in its continued talks with the
Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development
regarding transparency in its
financial services sector.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna made this observation
as he accepted Letters of Cre-
dence from His Excellency Jur-
gen Engel, Ambassador 8f the
Federal Republic of Germany
to the Commonwealth of the

- Bahamas, during a ceremony at

Government House.

About’six years ago, the
Bahamas was blacklisted by the
OECD as a harmful tax haven
and enacted a package of wide-
ranging legislation to enhance
the transparency and account-
ability of the financial services
sector.

‘The governor-general said
the Bahamas appreciated Ger-
many’s and the European

-Union’s sensitivity to the vul-

nerability of a small island
developing state like the
Bahamas and the ensuing,
“indispensable, supportive
national policies and practices
dictated by global interdepen-
dence.”

He added: “The Bahamas
applauds Germany’s global eco-
nomic status as well as her polit-
ical leadership on the European
continent in the context of EU
integration, and intentionally,
at the United Nations, espe-
cially with respect to the impor-
tant, historic debate on Securi-
ty Council reform.”

The governor general also
acknowledged the accreditation
of a German Ambassador to
the Caribbean Community
(Caricom).

“This speaks volumes of the

commitment of the government
of the Federal Republic of Ger-
many to this significant institu-
tion for our sub-region.”

The governor general noted
‘Ambassador Engel’s experienge

cin the region, having served‘in

Latin America and mostly in
Central America.

“With such experience and
awareness on which to draw, I
reiterate my confidence that
your tenure will see the deep-
ening and elevation of
Bahamas-German relations for
mutual benefit,’ the governor
general said.

Ambassador Engel stated
that relations between the two
countries have always been har-
monious with mutual respect,
understanding and friendship
as the hallmark.

“Given the already excellent
rapport between our two goy-
ernments as well as between our
people, I make it my task to
forge even stronger ties
between the Bahamas and Ger-
many, a task to which I assure
your excellency I will give my
best effort,” he said.

Regarding economic co-oper-
ation, Ambassador Engel said
he is confident that it is possible
to further stimulate German
investment in the Bahamas.

In the area of economics he

said his government continues

to value very highly the support
it has received from the gov-
ernment of the Bahamas in
Germany’s initiatives at the
UN.

It is said that for nearly 50
years, Germany, one of the
largest EU member states, has
pursued a course of deepening
and widening European inte-
gration.

“Against the background of
your own experience with the
EU, Germany has always
strongly sympathised with the
efforts of countries in other
regions to join forces, both
politically and economically,”
Ambassador Engel said. “We,
therefore, continue to follow
with keen interest the steps by
the Bahamas in the context of
the Caricom integration
process.”

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

‘

THE TRIBUNE





Page.

LOCAL

ant is not

to be ‘Miss-ed’

JOHNMONEA
SARGEANT

THE Bahamas' Our Little Miss Pageant, for-
merly Little Miss Bahamas, is staging its sixth

annual competition.

The pageant will be held under the theme,
"Career focus youths. The twenty-four little ladies
have already seen some tough days of rehearsals :
and on stage training, as well as lessons in eti-
quette and personal deportment — all in prepara-
tion for the big day on December 16 at the Wyn- -
dham Nassau Resort’s Rain Forest Theatre. ~~

Organisers said that apart from representing the

ALEXCIA FOX

PRESHANNA GIBSON

Bahamas at the world's largest and oldest chil-
dren’s international pageant — World's Our Little

Miss International Scholarship Competition —

petition.

the winner of the local competition walks away
with a $1,000 cash scholarship, other gifts and
awards and serves as one of the nation's youngest
youth ambassadors.
The reigning Little Miss Bahamas — Jennifer
Johnson - represented the country and placed
10th among the 218 girls in the international com-

SHAVONIA CROWL

She is also being featured in a children’s movie,
‘King Red, which is being produced in Los Ange-

les, California.

Pageant director Mrs Gaynell Stubbs said that
it is a pleasure to help mould the nation's youth

through the event.

"L look forward every year to the hosting of the
new contestants, but cried over time my outgoing

queen leaves,” she said.

The ladies participated in a number of work-

shops including:

KYHIESHA TRECO



CYRELL SAUNDERS



CARLIQUE KING

e Fire safety and prevention, sponsored by the
Royal Bahamas Police Department’s fire branch

e Personal hygiene, beauty and etiquette, spon-

noes Pizza

sored by Thompson Trading
e The art of making pizza, pores by Domi-

They will also enjoy fun days at Dolphins

Encounters, Ardastra Gardens, the Atlantis

Resort and Galleria Cinemas, and will be treated .

to a “princess party” sponsored by McDonalds.

Inter-faith effort aims to build bridges

By GRETEL C. KOVACH
(Religion Journal)

c.2007 New York Times News
Service

FRISCO, Texas — The out-
come was uncertain when a
group of mostly strangers sat
down together for dinner:
--Thursday night at a home in this

Dallas suburb. Among the gath-

_ ering were three Jews, two Mor-

mons, three Muslims, two
Bahais, two secular humanists
and a Catholic-Baptist.

But over pasta and lentil
soup, the guests discussed love,
death, forgiveness, compassion
and evil, and found plenty of
common ground.



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THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Sireet.
momma P.O. Box SS-51 03, Nassau, Bahamas
yammmma Phone: 393- 3726/393-2355/Fax:393-81 35

mel CHURCH SERVICES
ly SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2007
a e im SUNDAY, THANKSGIVING

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Rey. Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

Mr. Livingston Parks/Youth Service
Rey. Charles Sweeting )

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

Rey. Gerald Richardson
Rey. Gerald Richardson

& METHODIST
Rev. James Neilly

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
Connections - Rey. Philip Stubbs
Rey. Philip Stubbs

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
Rey. William Higgs
Rey. William Higgs

‘RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Rey. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Rey. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart
JAE EE SC OCICS CORIO RIOR RE RRR RIK
We plough the fields, and scattered
The good seed on the and
But it is fed and watered
By God’s almighty hand
He sends the snow in water
The warmth to well the grain
The breezes and the sunshine
And soft refreshing rain.

“How many times,” said one
guest, Nelson Komaiko, a 59-
year-old self-described “very
Reform” Jew, “do we get ina
situation where people from all

\these different religions can

really talk?”? Not with superfi-
jal workplace chatter, he said,
discussionabout the big
ions of-tife.-““Ustally when..

~Questi
people of different faiths have a

‘dialogue,’ it’s with guns blaz-
ing.” .

The occasion was an Amaz-
ing Faiths Project Dinner Dia-
logue, one of a series of small
gatherings in private homes
intended to foster tolerance and
understanding of religious dif-
ferences.














Pastor Charles Moss......... 0.













CHURCH,




















“The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427 ©
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Bro. Ricardo Mcqueen
11:00 a.m. Bro. Henry Knowles/Youth
7:00 p.m. Harvest Pageant/ Hat Parade

"Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

‘tor of the Boniuk Center.

The series was organized by
Mayor Bill White of Houston,
the Boniuk Center for the Study
and Advancement of Religious
Tolerance at Rice University
and Interfaith Ministries for

_Greater Houston. What began .
with 20 dinners and about 200...
participants in January has
quadrupled in size this round "

and spread to three other Texas
cities, largely by word of mouth.

“People are hungry for this,”
said Jill Carroll, executive direc-
“This
project is a way to leverage all

. of the individuals and the little

groups out there into a move-
ment that actually has the pos-
sibility to shift the culture away
from hatred and religious big-

_otry to one of tolerance.”

The dinners start with each
participant selecting a card and
then answering a question
broad enough that followers of
any faith, or no faith, can draw
on their personal experiences.
After everyone takes a turn,
there is a break, and then each

person has a few minutes to’

speak freely.

Although the event is called a
“dialogue,” participants are not
allowed to challenge one anoth-
er’s remarks. “The idea is not to
be pontificating or giving little
sermons, but listening and shar-

ing from-their heart,” Carroll

said.
The Amazing Faiths dinners

Sunday School: 10am
Freaching

‘}tam & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday.6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

are limited to about 10 partici-
pants, to keep the gatherings
intimate. “People are on better
behavior when they are guests
in someone’s home,” Carroll
said. “It plumbs the richness of
our traditions about hospitali-
ty, hosting the stranger. Toler-

‘ance begins at home.”

Kim Kamen, interim execu-

tive director of the American--

Jewish Committee’s Dallas
chapter, was moderator of the
dinner here, held at the home of
Deanna DeYoung, a Bahai.
The two women formed a mul-
tifaith group after the 9/11
attacks but found that free-
ranging discussions among peo-
ple of different faiths sometimes
drifted into edgy territory.

At the outset Thursday night,
Kamen warned the group that
the talk would be very struc-
tured. “No one is saying we
have to agree or disagree,” she
said, adding that the goal was
to learn about different faiths
in a safe and neutral environ-
ment.

Heather Woodward laughéd
when she drew a card asking
about miracles.

“T find it very humorous that
I’m the secular one and I draw
this card,” she said. “The most
miraculous thing to me is that as
humans we relate to one anoth-

er.” She shared the story of hav- _

ing been married to an Ortho-
dox Jew for 14 years, though

FUNDAMENTAL
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“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 © Box N-3622



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Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future

Worship Time: Jlam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping

Center

~ Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on

Joy 101.9 at 8:30a.m

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs

they are “very different on

paper.”
DeYoung’s card asked if she

saw compassion around her.

every day. “I don’t think so,”
she said. “America seems to be
searching outside ourselves for
méaning: think it’s very unfor-
{hmate that it takes something

ery tragic — things like 9/11

have to happen —.to bring us

together.”

Lucille Nowaski, like her hus-
band a Roman Catholic, told
the group of having convinced
him that they should start
attending a Baptist church that
their young daughter had cho-
sen to attend. “We need to go
with her,” she told him, “to
keep her safe.” Of God, Nowas-
ki added, “I think he wants us
all to be together.”

Some in the group nodded -

knowingly. “Amen,” Halima
Sonday said.

Komaiko’s card asked what
happened when one’s prayers
were not answered.

He described becoming
embittered with religion when
he was a young man watching
his mother die of cancer. “She
followed the kosher rules her
entire life,” he said, “and was
basically a very good person. I

asked myself, ‘Does God really.



PR yO

Wh,
Vy

E ty yy,

Hy

ty
U6

ie Yh Gs pay,
i

uw
“npull

“tiyyy,

‘ing to each other,”



care?”

Roy Dahle, a Mormon, had
almost the opposite experience.
“When the doctors were say-
ing, ‘Roy, there’s nothing more
we can do for you,’ and I came

through, I attributed that to a,

higher. power,” Dahle said.

The dinner guests had many

questions. What is confirma-
tion? What does secular mean?

Or Bahai? Before the night was

through, all were answered. But
they planned to continue the
conversation, by meeting again
or joining the Boniuk Center’s
online social networking site.

“T learned from every one of
you,” Rabia Sonday said.
“That’s one of the miracles. He
created so many billions of peo-
ple.

Every one of us is different,
yet we are all the same.”

Her sister Halima agreed. Set
aside the politics, and “it really
comes down to how we treat
other people,” she said.

But Renato Sperandeo, a 65-
year-old Bahai, reminded them
that here in the soft candlelight,
content in the knowledge that
no one would challenge their
beliefs, it was not hard to be
accepting.

“It’s too easy now to be lov-
he said.

%

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL ete ° Tel: Arel i
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2007

10:00 a.m... Communion Service *

11:00 am. 129th Anniversary Service

Speaker Dr. David Allen ;
No os Service i

Brea SOF RIOR

re



Grace and eter Wesleyan Church
‘A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE TS AR FIRMED

Worship Time: lla.m. & 7p.m.

" Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45a.m.~

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Price Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE


THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 7






By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT -—
Bahama resident Jennifer Rus-
sell is the first person in the
Caribbean region to qualify as
a money laundering specialist
in the gaming industry.

Ms Russell, an audit inspec-
tor at the Gaming Board in
Freeport, completed require-
ments for Anti-Money Laun-
dering and Compliance Diplo-
ma programme offered by the















Grand.

International Compliance .



Jennifer Russell

Detention Centre
escapees are not
among Cuban

migrant

FROM page one

ed to a call about a migrant
landing at 2.40am on Thursday.

When the police arrived
they found the 34 Cubans
“huddled on the beach” with
the body of the drowned
man.

The group were taken toa
local health facility for evalu-
ation and determined to be
in generally good health,
apart from some sunburn.»

Yesterday, as’a result of the"

US's “wet foot dry foot” pol-
icy, which dictates that once
Cuban refugees have reached
land they are legally allowed
to remain in the country to
obtain permanent residency,
some of the smuggled Cubans
were reunited with their fam-
ilies already resident in Mia-
mi.

Some of the Cubans had
called ahead to alert their

eh whee



family members in Florida
that they would be making
the treacherous ‘journey,
according to NBC6.

They now will be able to
begin applying for legal resi-
dence after a year and one

. day if they have not been con-

victed of a crime.

Yesterday Royal Bahamas
Defence Force petty officer
Ralph McKinney said that
US Coast Guard liaison offi-
_cer Lieutenant Commander
; Michael, Fredie had, checked

with authorities.in the US ‘and.

determined that the three
Cuban escapees from the
Carmichael Road Detention

‘centre on November 6 were

not among the group.

“We have put our feelers
out internationally and sent
their names to US agencies,
but none of those have come
back as matching,” said offi-
cer McKinney.

Positions available at Bimini Sands Resort & Marina:

Sushi Chef
Diesel/Gasoline Mechanic

A competitive salary and benefit package will be offered to the
successful candidates. If you are interested in being part of a
dynamic, growing company, please email, mail or fax

Resume to:

Human Resources Manager
Bimini Sands Resort & Marina
PO Box 24020
South Bimini
Bahamas
Tel: 242-347-3500
Fax: 242-347-3501
fcooney@biminisands.com —

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Association (ICA) in associa-

- tion with the University of

Manchester in the United
Kingdom.

The 18-month course is con-
ducted in conjunction with the
Bahamas Institute of Financial
Services (BIFS) and the
Bahamas Association of Com-
pliance Officers (BACO),.

Ms Russell will be awarded
her diplomas at a ceremony to
be hosted by BACO in early
December.

The new international award
indicates a high level of practi-
cal competence inthe field of

international compliance and
anti-money laundering prac-
tice.

Mrs Russell was not only
very excited to learn that she
passed the course, but that she
is first to do so in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean.

“The fact that my struggle
of relocating with my children
(to New Providence), working
a second job, burning the mid-
night oil to study and being the
only individual in my class from
the gaming industry was quite a
challenge, but I was deter-
mined to succeed,” she said.

Mrs Russell has been
employed in the gaming indus-
try for 21 years. She joined the
Gaming Board in Freeport in
1986 as an audit assistant. She
was later promoted to inspec-
tor in the Audit Department.

She was again promoted to
Inspector Grade II in 1988, and
further promoted in 2005 to
Inspector Grade I.

She also received training in
Atlantic City, Las Vegas and
Orlando.

Mrs Russell said she made a
great sacrifice by relocating to
New Providence in order to



Gaming inspector
in Caribbean first

take the course. Her goal is to
become a compliance officer
for the Gaming Board.

Mrs Russell said she felt
compelled to improve her
knowledge.in anti-money laun-
dering and compliance.

“With the Bahamas being
blacklisted, there was a need
to be qualified or knowledge-
able in these areas,” she said.

Mrs Russell has. since
returned to Grand Bahama,
where she was appointed to the
position Acting Senior Inspec-
tor assigned to enforcement in
the casinos.



Minister appoints Copyright Tribunal members

MINISTER of of State for Legal Affairs Desmond Bannister
signed the Instruments of Appointment for members of the
Copyright Royalty Tribunal, on November 15. The tribunal will

govern copyright and works directly under the Registrar Gener-
al’s Office. Pictured posing with the document are, from left,

Permanent Secretary at the Office of the Attorney General and
Ministry of Legal Affairs Lelia Greene; current chairman Copy-
right Royalty Tribunal Lowell Mortimer; Minister Bannister;
new chairman Copyright Royalty Tribunal Kirk Seymour

Derek Smith/BIS

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.

Montrose Avenue
e:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

Pho





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| PAGE.8, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





When Nassau



ave
Â¥

Se

This week, In Days Gone By looks back at a
' two-week period in May 1979 when Nassau was
; set a-buzz with rumours of spooky poltergeist-like
' » phenoniena 1 inthe home of an elderly couple in
1 pipet,
‘According to reports from those living in the
" Bouse, rocks would appear and fly around the
t ‘rooms, trees outside the building would “dance”
“and demons were said to/Have attacked one of the
‘ homeowners, ; Sarah dane Campbell, sending her
“to: hospital, . fuk
Such rumours ‘prdthptba BB Verdi ifront page
‘news stories — as well asjlatge:crowds of onlook-
ers, followed shortly after-by police, and even a
visiting African “mystic and seer”, while the
frightened residents ah refuge elsewhere.



PICT URED RIGHT: ‘Sarah Jane Canipbell
76- -year-old. resident of the. cHanated house”,



> ee ee ee Se



oS re ew ee ee ee

s ‘spooked’

clutches her bible. According to a report at the
time, Mrs Campbell’s reading ability was impaired
by her poor eyesight, but despite that, she said
that two weeks of ghostly activity in her home had
brought her “nearer to (her) bible.”

SHOWN BELOW: Dr Francis Ngombe (seen
middle, in white robe), a visiting African “medi-
cine man” exits the building followed by police
Superintendent Addington Darville. Dr Ngombe,
head of the All Traditional Medicine Men, asked

to tour the alleged site of the supernatural phe-

nomena after seeing a television news report on
TV-13 news. “This is part of my work”, the doc-
tor told The Tribune, shortly before he emerged
and declared that he had found no evidence of a
ghostly presence in the house, nor was “anyone’s’
life in danger there.”

e Excellent opportunity
for you to control your
income.

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¢ Flexible hours available
e Excellent commissions

and benefits

Must have a proven track record in sales
Professional appearance a must

Must have reliable transportation :

Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
Excellent written and communication skills.

Apply in writing to
Sales Representatives
Box PM-1
C/O The Nassau Guardian
P.O. Box N-3011
Nassau

Bahamas






















ABOVE: Word of a haunting at the Camp-
bell’s bungalow spread across Nassau like wildfire.
Hundreds of locals flocked to the yard of the
house in the hope of ascertaining whether there
was any truth to the stories of inanimate objects
flying around the room and rocks materialising
from nowhere to break furniture. Police at one
point dispersed the crowds with a firehouse after
they felt the situation was “getting out of control’’
and radio broadcasts were issued urging people to



stay away from the area.

BELOW: This sorry-looking china cabinet
inside the house was said to have been smashed
by mysterious rocks that “fell through the roof but
left-no holes in the ceiling.”” Mrs Campbell was
quoted as saying: “The spirit must be in my china
cabinet and all about.” She stopped sleeping at
the house and stayed with neighbours and rela-
tives.



Ley

Uy

N
N


THE TRIBUNE

\By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Two Grand
Bahama students were select-
ed as finalists for the Bahamas
in this year’s Florida Caribbean
Cruise Association Foundation
Children’s Essay Competition.

Ministry of Tourism officials
Debbie Huyler and Jeritzan
Outten congratulated students
‘Angenike Curtis and Narendra
Lindsay of the Bishop Michael
Eldon High School. The stu-
dents were each presented with
a $200 cheque. Of the 12 par-
ticipants on Grand Bahama,
Angenike and Narendra were
selected as the junior and senior
division finalists, respectively.

Mrs Huyler, manager of visi-
tor relations at ports of entry,
said the FCCA has been hold-
ing the children’s essay compe-
tition for the past 10 years.

“The Bahamas has always

been participating in the com-
petition, I think it is a good
thing because it gives students
an opportunity to think of their
country, especially since we are
a tourism destination,” she said.

“They will have an idea what
is expected, what tourists would
like to do and see when they
come to the country, and it gets
them thinking at a very early
age.”

‘This year’s competition was
held in August and students
submitted essays on the topic:
“Tf I was a cruise passenger
what would I like to see or do in
my country.”

Ms Huyler said that students
from schools throughout the
island participated in the com-
petition. The two finalists from
the Bahamas will compete with
finalists selected from through-
out the Caribbean.

She stated that all essays are
usually sent to the Ministry of
Tourism Office in Nassau,

LOCAL NEWS

The Ministry of Education
then goes through all of the
essays and selects the best
through a process of elimina-

tion and enters two persons —

one in each division.

“Unfortunately, I did not
send ours:to Nassau, I sent it
directly to FCCA and the
response was very good and
both students at BME (in
Freeport) were entered as final-
ists in the competition,” she
said.

Mrs Huyler said that another
competition is also on the draw-
ing board for the Ministry of
Tourism, which will include a
poster competition and is sched-
uled for January.

She noted that FCCA is also
partnering with the ministry in

.an annual Christmas gift drive

on December 3. The event will
be held at the Grand Bahama
Taxi Union Hall, where gifts
will be distributed to under-
privileged children.

Decomposed body
yet to be identified

FROM page one

body around 3.45pm in bushes in Lucaya.

It is not known whether the body is that of 45-
year-old Kenneth Lightbourne of South Bahamia,
who disappeared late Saturday evening.

-As investigators gathered evidence on Friday
morning at Extreme Auto, a portion of Yellow
Pine Street — a prominent causeway in the com-
mercial industrial/business district of Freeport
— was cordoned off by police for several hours.

A large crowd of curious onlookers had gath-
ered in the area, including several close relatives
who cried as the body was taken away in a hearse.

Martin, a husband and father of two children,
was described as a bright young man who had
obtained a law degree from a law school in Lon-

don. His family is well known in Eight Mile Rock '

and in Grand Bahama.

Police are not certain whether robbery was a
motive at this time and are continuing to follow
several leads into the matter.

According to Ms Mackey, a motorist passing in
the area around 7am on Friday noticed the side
gate partly opened at Extreme Auto, located in
the former Bahamas Electronic Lab (BEL) Build-

ing.

She said the man, who is also a close friend of
the deceased, went to check the premises and
discovered Mr Martin dead. He called the police.

A gold-coloured Infiniti coup G-35, which was
parked at the premises and owned by Mr Martin,
was taken to the Central Detective Unit for fur-
ther police investigation.

Asst Supt Mackey is appealing to anyone with
information into these homicides to contact police
at 350-3109 or 911. :

“We are hoping that we can bring some closure
to both these matters in another day or two, but
are urging members of the public who may have
seen anything to call the police,” she said.

In the case of Mr Lightbourne, who was
employed as a waiter and electrician at Zorba’s
Restaurant, he. has not been seen since leaving
work at 8round 11.45pm on Saturday.

Police recovered his Mitsubishi Eclipse on
Monday in the parking lot at RND cinema.

Nick Vickatos, manager at Zorba’s, said that
colleagues are very concerned about Kenny. “He
was a fun person — always smiling and cracking
jokes and everybody is in a state of disbelief and
sad about the entire situation,” he said.

Man’s body discovered
in burned-out house

FROM page one

and officers forcibly entered the burned struc-
ture through a locked metal door to find out if
there were any survivors.

Fire fighters discovered the body of a dark
male in a southern bedroom dressed in sleeping

” Bank
Financing
Available

ae The deceased was found lying on a bed,
police said.

His body was not positively identified up to
press time. Investigations are continuing into the
matter while the official cause of death is to be
determined by an autopsy, ASP Evans said.

The matter has been classified as a death by
fire.

Insurance
Available
on the

asst

Sore

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JERITZAN Outten of the Ministry of Tourism:
$200 cheque and Debbie Huyler of the Ministry of
tis with her cheque for $200 on Wednesday at pene
ers at the school.

YOUR CONNECTION

SENIOR )

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR
Regulatory Department.

REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:

This position will report directly to the.
Interconnection and will be responsible for all regulatory.
to the Public Utilities Commission. is

OB SUMMARY:

11.

12.

13.

. Liaise with the PUC on all legal and regulaibry

. Assist and advise on the reporting of matters

. Ensure the Company’s somnpliihea ge Ww: the legal and

licenses issued by the PUC, the stipulations

. of the Bahamas, the Telecommunications =

legislation related thereto.



with regulations under the PUC license. issued to BTC



. Liaise with other licensed telecommunicatons p

interconnection.

. Provide legal opinions on matters of a re

analyze all relevant documentation of a regulatory



activity on BTC’s network by both licensed atid

. Attend at and assist with any Fepulatony: matter ret



competent jurisdiction

. Represent the Company on any matters of ey



Company

. Assist in the preparation of epans on the « Cotipan they fe



of regulatory as required by the PUC

Liaise and coordinate with relevant depart
regulatory matters

Inform, educate, and update all relevant Co ip
matters
environment to the staff

Perform any other duties relevidar to the sup)
time to time by the Vice President of Legal, ‘Regal

. EDUCATION AND/OR EXPERIENCE

Master’s Degree preferred.

Exposure to the principles of relecommhicseaaks i8.a plus,
skills are essential, organization, self-motivational ‘andl ¢ commi

Ay

- All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, wa John R hen Drive,
no later than Wednesday November 28, 2007, ‘and. Auldtgssed: a as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT

HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMIN
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICAT
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR MANAGERILEGAL & sto sa




PAGE 10, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007




moment

for COB’

FROM page one

However, according to Madi-
son McDonald, brother of the
deceased, Dr McDonald had his
face beaten “beyond recogni-
tion” with a clothing iron.

Mr McDonald told The Tri-
bune that there was no sign of
forced entry, and nothing of
note was missing from the Al-
Rebulan African Boutique and
Guest House, where the pro-
fessor lived. In fact, he said, Dr
McDonald’s computer was still
on when his body was discov-
ered.

With these facts in mind, rel-
atives who:had gathered at the
scene speculated that Dr
McDonald must have know the
assailant.

Concems were initially raised '

about Dr McDonald’s where-
abouts when he failed to appear
at the college over the past few
days, relatives told The Tribune.

“T don’t know what to do,”
said Mr McDonald. “You gat
to leave this place and go live

somewhere else.”

When asked about the state
of the country noting the num-
ber of homicides this year, the
brother of the deceased said
that in his opinion, the current
condition is “beyond ridicu-
lous.”

Mrs Janyne Hodder, presi-
dent of COB, also addressed

the media after emerging from.

the crime scene with relatives
and police.

“This is indeed a very tragic

moment for the College of the
Bahamas. Dean McDonald was

* an academic, a faculty member,

a professor of psychology. He
has been with the college for
over 20 years, responsible for
teaching countless numbers of
young Bahamians,” Mrs Hod-
der said.

The COB president, who
looked distraught when she
arrived at the scene, said that
the college is in “deep mourn-
ing” over the death of a profes-
sor who was working to intro-
duce a law programme to the
country before his death.

Position Available:

HEAVY EQUIPMENT
MAINTENANCE MANAGER




A wrecker tows a damaged car after an accident on the Tonique Williams Darling Highway yesterday. .

THE TRIBUNE



(Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)

Warnings over deadly cold hitting US

FROM page one

US health officials believe.a new strain of
the virus has emerged and have advised
state and local public health departments to
be on alert for the possibility of outbreaks
caused by Ad14.

The CDCP listed possible Ad 14 pre-
vention measures that were implemented in
Texas during the outbreak:

e Increasing the number of hand-sani-

tizing stations.

e Widespread sanitizing of surfaces and
equipment with appropriate disinfectants.

e Increasing awareness of Ad14 among
trainees and staff members.

e Taking contact and droplet precau-
tions for hospitalized patients with Ad14.

So far there have been no reported cas-
es of Ad14 in The Bahamas, however
Bahamians are advised to take extra. pre-
cautions by performing frequent hand wash-

ings and to report to a physician if com-
mon cold symptoms worsen.

Adenovirus outbreaks are said to be par-
ticularly difficult to control because they
can be spread in respiratory secretions, fae-
cal waste and can fester for weeks on envi-
ronmental surfaces, the Centre for Disease
Control says.

There are reportedly 51 strains of aden-
ovirus, however Ad 14 is believed to a vir-
ulent, aggressive strain.

|| Job Description:

| Responsible for the management of all
maintenance activities in Nassau ensuring
all preventative maintenance and heavy
equipment repairs are conducted as per com-
pany standards. Conducts on-site audits and
evaluations of port equipment, coordinates
repair activities and preventative procedures.

Education:

High school diploma or equivalent. Trade
or Technical certificate in Heavy Equipment
Maintenance. :

Experience:

Five years experience in heavy equip-
ment maintenance with at least two years
| in management of equipment maintenance.

Container Terminals offers a highly competi-
tive package of benefits. Salary is commen-
surate with qualifications and experience.



Pricing Information As Of:
, 16 November 200 7

Previous Close Today's Close

0.54

11.00 Bahamas Property Fund
7.88 Bank of Bahamas

0.70 Benchmark

1.65 Bahamas Waste

1.21 Fidelity Bank

9.81 Cable Bahamas

1.85 Colina Holdings

4.03 Commonwealth Bank (31)
4.70 Consolidated Water BDRs
2.20 . Doctor's Hospital

5.54 . Famguard

12.00 Finco

14.60 FirstCaribbean

5.18 Focol (S) ©

0.54 Freeport Concrete

7.10 ICD Utilities

8.52 J. S. Johnson

10.00 Premier Real Estate

52wk-Low Symbol
14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

41.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.40 RND Holding

Fund Name

1.364118"
3.5388**"
2.938214°""
1.279370°**

joney
Fidelity Batuthes G &1 Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Laing’s attorneys file to
dismiss Bridgéwater case

FROM page one

affidavits filed in support of
the application for leave on
June 14, 2007, were irregular
and did not contain the neces-
sary facts to grant leave and/or
otherwise failed to comply with
rules, and that the petitioner
failed to make full disclosure to
the Court.”

Mr Laing, who is also the
Minister of State for Finance,
defeated former PLP MP Pleas-
ant Bridgewater in the May 2
general election by 47 votes.

However, in June 2007, Ms
Bridgewater, filed a petition to
be heard in the Election Court
claiming that 100 people voted
illegally in the Marco City

Constituency which affected
the results of the election, and
that such votes ought to be dis-
counted.

Zhivargo Laing is named as
the First Respondent and Cecil
Thompson, the Returning Offi-
cer, is named as the Second
Respondent.

Change

16,675
1,250

Daily Vol. EPS $

In her petition she claims
that there was non-compliance
with the Parliamentary Act,
1992, and that 19 people who
voted in Marco City were not
citizens of the Bahamas and not
entitled to vote.

She further claimed that an
additional 81 persons who did
not live in Marco City voted ia
the Marco City Constituency.

Mr Laing is seeking an order
that Ms Bridgewater’s petition
be dismissed under Order 18
Rule 19 and under the inherent
jurisdiction of the Election
Court on the ground “that the

petition discloses no reasonable’

cause of action, is scandalous,
frivolous and vexatious, preju-
dices and embarrasses the fair
trial of this action and is other-
wise an abuse of the process of
the Court.” — ;

The grounds of the acP te
tion are:

1) The Petitioner does not
plead that she challenged the
100 voters listed in the Petition

Div $

6.70%
7.71%

under Section 58(1) of the Act.

2) The Petitioner does not
plead that provisions of Section
69(2) were complied with by the
Petitioner.

3) It is an abuse of process
for the Petitioner to seek to
challenge the qualifications of
the 100 persons listed in the
Petition to vote after the votes
have been cast having (accord-
ing to the Affidavits filed in sup-
port of the application for leave
on June 15, 2007) known of
their alleged legal incapacities
prior to the election.

4) This Election Court is not
properly constituted and has no
jurisdiction under Section 58 of
the Act.

5) The Petitioner has failed
to plead in the Petition or lead
evidence in her supporting affi-
davits for leave, the necessary
facts in support of the allega-
tions of legal incapacity.

6) This Petition is an abuse of
process because the Petitioner
failed to avail herself of the dif-
ferent opportunities under the
Act to challenge the legal capac-

ity of persons registered to vote ©

and doing so after the election
and dehors the provisions of
Section 58(1) is not permissi-
ble.

7) There are no pleaded alle-
gations against the conduct of
the election officials and there-
fore the only ground pleaded,
section 79(b) discloses no cause
of action; and/or alternatively:

For an order that the Petition
be dismissed on the ground that
this Election Court does not
have jurisdiction to engage in
the adjudication of the matters
raised by the Petitioner because:

1) The Petitioner has not fol-
lowed the procedures set out in
the Act.

2) None of the 100 persons is
a party to this action.

3) The constitutional rights
of each of the 100 persons to a
fair hearing in respect of their
criminal and civil rights will be
breached.

Ms Bridgewater is repre-
sented by Philip “Brave” Davis
of Davis and Co.

The PLP, which has 18 seats,
is contesting the results of three
seats — Pinewood, Marco City,
and Baillou Hills.

The Election Court is now
hearing the petition of Senator
Allyson Maynard-Gibson, for-
mer MP for Pinewood, who is
contesting 266 votes in that con-
stituency. It is the first of three
cases to be heard.

PROVOST
MARSHALL SALE

An auction will be held on 28th Noveme-
ber, 2007 at 10:00 0’ clock at the Supreme
Court Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, The
Bahamas. On auction will be a number of
Locman Watches in a variety of styles and

colours.

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

* 9 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 62 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
'S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
'81) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

11.8192°**

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

NAV KEY

* «9 November 2007
** 30 June 2007

*** . 31 October 2007
eee. 31 July 2007



For more information please contact Miss
Cordell Frazier at Gibson & Company at
323-1234 or Mr. Jack Davis a the Supreme
Court at 356-9101.



“aapeentir
we

cage

THE TRIBUNE



Students
‘electrified’
by power
plant tour

STUDENTS from the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Insti-
tute’s electrical installation programme had the opportunity to
visit one of BEC’s main power plants at Clifton Pier.

- Thirty-three students participated in the field trip on Wednesday, -

November 14, to observe the day-to-day operations of the plant.
The students were taken on a two-hour tour by Mario Smith,

assistant engineer and Melvin Babbs, mechanical technician, who ~

spoke about electricity generation and exposed the students to

other aspects of the plant.

BTVI students commented on the benefits of the visit, which they
said gave them the opportunity to reinforce their theoretical knowl-

edge with first-hand observations.

The students thanked the power station officials for the valuable

information.

0000000 o oOo oOo OOOO HOOD EE CESOO DSO SEO SESOE HODES OD ESOSOO EEO O OEE O ETOCS OO EES EH OED E SEES OSEOHED EOE OO DEEEOS

Ambassador welcomed to
OAS permanent council ©

FROM page two

ing that the fundamental prin-
ciples and democratic values of
this organisation remain
strong.”

At the Bahamas’ 25th

anniversary in the OAS, in.

March of this year, Secretary
General Insulza recognised the
country for “standing shoulder-

to-shoulder as a committed
partner in the pursuit of demo-'

cratic and development ideals.”

Ambassador Smith said that
the Bahamas appreciates that
its participation in the OAS cre-
ates opportunities to advance
national and international inter-
ests and to strengthen their
engagement with the Americ-
as.
“Just as important, we believe

‘ that the OAS is the foremost

organisation for addressing the
concerns of the hemisphere,”
he said.

The ambassador then con-
gratulated the OAS for its lead-
ership on a myriad of impor-
tant issues such as the promo-

tion of democracy and human —

rights, hemispheric security, sus-
tainable development, health
and gender issues.

Since 2002, the Inter-Ameri-
can Committee Against Ter-
rorism has provided invaluable
technical assistance and capaci-
ty building programmes to assist
OAS member states in pre-
venting, fighting and eliminating
terrorism.

“The establishment of civil
registries, unknown in some
countries, has become a reality
in our hemisphere, giving our
peoples a sense of belonging
and self-worth,” Ambassador
Smith said.

He noted that the pledges of
support to the Bahamas, Haiti
and the Dominican Republic in
the wake of Tropical Storm

Noel is another testimony to the

solidarity which exists among

the members of the OAS.
Ambassador Smith said that

the Bahamas has decided to ©

continue its contributions to
various peace initiatives, includ-
ing those in Colombia and
Haiti, and encouraged other
countries to consider pledging
to those noteworthy activities

aimed at securing peace in the

region.

He further noted that the
Bahamas, like it CARICOM
members, attaches “great
importance” to the OAS schol-
arship programme, as hundreds
of Bahamian students and gov-
ernment officials have benefit-
ted from it.

“The Bahamas is committed
to partnership with this hemi-
spheric group of nations to meet
the challenges which beset us
in this area,” Ambassador
Smith said.

Rules:
. White a essay answering the

. The body of the essay must not exceed 1,000 words,

From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were
concemed with promoting high
ethical standards in their

- professional lives. One of the
world's most widely printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This
24-word Test has been
translated into more than a —
hundred languages and
published in thousands of ways.
tt asks the following four
questions:



dren ages 10-16 may enter. dging will be in two
age categories: 10 - 13 years and 14-16 years for a first
and second place winner in each ‘

following subject:
“What does the Four-Way Test mean to me.”
your understanding of the 4-Way Test as it relates to.
your life, experiences, and/or society in general.”
Your essay must include the four principles.

Adults may assist the child in Alling out the entry form,
but not in writing the letter,

4, Limit one essay per child. All entries must be received by

The Four-Way Test .
“Of the things we think,

say or do

1. Is it the truth?
2. Is it fair to all

eoncerned?:

3. Will it build goodwill.
“and better friendships?
4, Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?”

_ 2007, PAGE 11






















accepted.
. Que winner will be chosen from cach age category. 'The
decision of the judges ts final,

essay and completed
The Four-Way Test Kesay Compotition,
Attn; Michelo Rassin, The Rotary Club of Bast Nassau,
P.O. Box $S-6320, Nassau, Bahamas

The Tribune

tly Vows, Hy Fdewseqnenl



and reprodizced for any purpose without compensation,

Rotary Club of

EAST




e NASSAU 2

3 WES

«=
a

C3

ee ee eM EMER AER CANE

Og ee

Aeneas te

oS aeee ee SERRE BES ETA EEE
THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 12, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2007
ii (Li



NASSAU, EVENTS, CAPT URED ON ClawE RA



- Luncheon for new US

ati



bees ‘LODR DELONG BONNER (left), US Navy Liaison Officer and Lynn Fichter, personal assistant for the Siegel
. Group in Boca Raton, Florida. as



PERMANENT SECRETARY in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Sheila Carey (former first secretary at the
t Bahamian Embassy in Washington, DC) and Jacquelyn ! ‘ray, Permanent Secretary and Secretary to
hot Governor General.





eae SHOWN (ler in front row) are Lieutenant Commander Michael Fredie, US Coast Guard Liaison Officer Mrs Saskia Hardt and her husband Dr D Brent Hardt, Deputy Chief of Mission, United States Ambassador Ned Siegel,

Ms Cynthia Loyet, Office Management Specialist, Ronnie Fontenot, Information Management Officer; and Lieutenant Commander Delong Bon
al Security Officer, Mr Dave Foran, Narcotics Affairs Officer, Mr Jerome Hutchinson, DEA Supervisor, Enrique Tamayo, Port Director, and

ner, Navy Liaison Office. Shown (I-r in back row) are Mr Albert DeJong, Region-
Dan O'Connor, chief of the Political/Economic, Protocol/Public Affairs Section.



GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Dion Hanna (left) and United States Ambassador Ned Siegel pose fora pho- ie

tograph following the presentation of the ambassador's credentials and:lunch at Government House. In his

remarks during the ceremony earlier this week, Ambassador Siegel said he is committed to deepening the
“extraordinary partnership of shared purpose and common values” between the United States and the -
Bahamas. He also pledged to continue the US Embassy’s literacy programme and emphasized that, under his’
watch, the Embassy will remain an active civic partner, working to protect the environment, supporting the
less fortunate and inspiring youth:

eh a
a MaMa tact







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