Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )
UF00084249_02989 ( sobekcm )

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Full Text
a WAKE UP!

oem (1) The Tribune

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USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION







“ee CLOUDY
Se FSTORMS |

Volume: 103 No.247



aoe SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

inv sion inquig
a Author; ty

Royal Commission
inquiry urged into

at WUT A
SB eg (lame aN La)

soning is ch murder

32-year-old
found dead

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of Pride
Estates were in shock last night
after 32-year-old Shawn Evans
was shot in the neck and found
dead in their neighbourhood
yesterday, making him the 55th
murder victim of the year.

When The Tribune arrived”

on the scene, about 15 residents
were assembled’ around the
taped-off crime area, watching
as officers searched for evi-
dence.

Mr Evans was found lying
barebacked and in short pants
with a fatal gunshot wound to
the neck next to a truck parked
in a neighbour’s yard.

A trail of blood was visible
from where Mr Evans was

parently shot across the
street, with multiple pools of
blood having settled, revealing
the path he took before he
eventually collapsed and died.

Residents reported that they
heard gunshots on Saturday
night at around 10pm. A squad
car reportedly responded to
investigate, but neither the gun-
man, nor the victim, were found
at the time.

Not until 9am yesterday, after
police received a tip, was Mr
Evans’ body found in the new
sub-division off Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway.

Asst Supt Walter Evans said

SEE page 12

Turnquest announces creation
‘ional Crime Council





@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

WITH serious crime up by 29
per cent this year, Minister of
National Security Tommy Turn-
quest announced the creation of
the National Crime Council on
Saturday night, to serve as a per-
manent crime prevention and
control body.

Mr Turnquest discussed this
and other strategies to address
crime at the closing ceremony of
the National Assembly on Crime,
which brought together stake-
holders from the government,
police, medical profession, civil

SEE page 12



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CENT

anh ri SIMU is placed on a stretcher reece mnt

stabbed in
separate
incidents

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedianet___

TWO men became victims of

more violent stabbings over the
weekend, police revealed yester-
day.

The incidents, though separate,
underscore what some are calling a
“shift” towards knives being the
weapon of choice during heated
disputes.

Asst Supt Walter Evans said a
38-year-old man of Okra Hill was
involved in an argument with “a
person known to him” - reported-
ly over a female companion - at
3pm last Friday.

During the exchange, the man

SEE page 12



Bethel denies police are

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Education
Carl Bethel has emphatically
denied that police are returning
to public schools, as reported
in The Nassau Guardian on Sat-
urday.

The Guardian story cited a
Bahamas Union ot Teachers
area vice-president as stating,
based on a meeting with min-
istry officials, that auxiliary
police as well as (wo new secu:
rity guards will return to C I
Gibson school today.

The union source further
declared that “this will be for
all schools.”

But Mr Bethel responded to
this report dn Saturday at the
closing ceremony of the Nation-
al Assembly on Crime and said:



returning to public schools

Or Taisen ey

“No, the police are not being
returned to schools.”

“T have the support of my
ministry and all of the educa-
tion officials. Whenever they

SEE page 12





Mitchell and
Maynard Gibson
respond to
criticism over
‘Ninety’ extradition

THE former Minister of For-
eign Affairs and former Attorney
General have defended their rep-_
utations, and that of the former
government, in response to criti-
cism by the Court of Appeal
regarding the extradition of
Samuel “Ninety” Knowles.

Fred Mitchell held a: press con-
ference yesterday at the Gems
radio networks studio, and
Allyson Maynard-Gibson issued a
press statement, as the Court of
Appeal on Thursday criticised the
government for the extradition of
Mr Knowles before he had
exhausted all legal avenues avail-
able to him.

The court even stated that a
minister could be held in con-
tempt for the actions that
occurred in the case.

To this Mr Mitchell said:

"Reports appeared: in the press
on Friday, 14th September, about
the appeal of the decision of Jus-
tice Lyons not to order the return
of Samuel 'Ninety' Knowles to
The Bahamas.

“The reporting on the case by

SEE page 12

Police officer’s
son robbed
while shopping
with his mother

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE teenage son of a high
ranking police officer was accost-
ed and robbed while shopping
with his mother at the Mall at
Marathon over the weekend, The
Tribune has learned.

The boy, son of Senior Asst
Police Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade, was approached by a
gang of 11 young men who
relieved him of his cellphone on
Saturday at around 7pm.

When The Tribune contacted
Mr Greenslade for comment, he
confirmed that the incident took
place.

“My son and his mom were in
the Mall, and a group of young-
sters, about 11 of them, pounced
on him and forcibly took his cell-
phone away from him in the pres-
ence of his mom.”

Mr Greenslade said security
guards stationed at the shopping
centre responded quickly, as well

SEE page 12

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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Union threatens First

lm By CARA '
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
& TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE National Congress of
Trade Unions has threatened
to call for a boycott of First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), and encourage its
member unions and their
50,000 members to end all
financial relationships with the
bank and withdraw millions of
dollars.

This is because of alleged dis-
crimination and victimisation
tactics being used against
Bahamas Financial Services
Union president, Theresa Mor-
timer.

NCTU executives said they
were prepared to bring pres-
sure on FirstCaribbean after
Ms Mortimer received a letter
from the bank accusing her of
acting inappropriately as union
president.

The letter, dated September
11, came on the heels of last
month’s unanimous strike vote
by bank employees, who were
protesting against working con-
ditions at FirstCaribbean’s Wal-
let Centre.

The letter was signed by
Siobhan Lloyd, First-
Caribbean’s ‘head of human
resources for the Northern
Caribbean stationed in Nassau,
and said in part that the bank
had grave concerns over Ms
Mortimer’s alleged lack of
adherence to labour dispute
processes.

“Please be reminded that
you are not authonised to enter
bank premises to conduct
union business or to meet with
bank employees without autho-
rised permission from the
bank...Any future lack of
adherence to this process will
call for more significant action
on behalf of the company,” Ms
Lloyd said.

NCTU president John Pin-
der said: “It is the view of the



NCTU president John ae)

NCTU that the content, spirit
and tone of the letter amounts
to victimisation and is a direct
attack on Mrs Mortimer as a
Bahamian trade unionist, as a
professional banker employed
by a multi-national company,
on the Bahamian trade union
movement and our rights as cit-
izens of an independent and
sovereign nation.

“We are prepared to declare
war against every member of
the executive management
team of FirstCaribbean and will
take the gloves off,” he said.

Joining Mr Pinder were oth-
er representatives of NCTU
unions, who all pledged their
solidarity with Ms Mortimer.

NCTU general secretary
Robert Farquharson vowed
that if the letter was not
rescinded, they will call on
every union and union mem-
ber to withdraw their funds
from the bank.

The NCTU maintained that
Ms Mortimer was in full com-
pliance with all labour laws and
that FirstCaribbean was acting
in this matter in retaliation for
the massive strike vote.

Mr Pinder also pointed out
that the NCTU has been

Gandia roe

The Bahamas Nation
Real Estate Expo

informed that the directive for
the letter came from First-
Caribbean’s headquarters in
Barbados, and stressed that the
government needs to be cau-
tious that foreign companies
investing in the Bahamas are
aware of the labour culture in
this country.

He further urged corporate
Bahamas to look at how First-
Caribbean operates, as he
claimed that the branches in

the-Rahamas imported all their
supplies from Barbados and did
not use Bahamian suppliers.

In a statement released by
FirstCaribbean yesterday, th
bank “vehemently” denice . *.
accusations mad. vy NCI
regarding alleze: vitimisatibn
of Mrs Mortim«

‘At no tim — did First-
Carivbean Jn-ernational Bank
seek to “victunise” Mrs Mor-
timer. The letter to her was.a
reminder of the rules, regula-
tions and agreements relative
to the conduct of union-related
activities on bank's premises,”
the statement said.

“FirstCaribbean is very dis-
appointed with the deliberate
dissemination of misinforma-
tion to the public. First-
Caribbean stands by its poli-
cies, agreements and the suc-
cessful partnership with the
Bahamas Financial Services
Union and other regional
unions representing our
employees,” the statement con-
tinued.

“First Caribbean Interna-
tional Bank also finds it
extremely disappointing to hear
calls from the NCTU to incite
customers and staff to take
action against the bank with-
out first dialoguing with the
bank on the issue.

“A meeting had been
planned with a NCTU execu-
tive but unfortunately did not
proceed.

“The bank must maintain the
right to manage its affairs and is
responsible for the mainte-
nance of good governance and
stewardship.”

‘dll scaclesle sande

ial.

poe
8 +

.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

RESERVE YOUR EXHIBIT BOOTH BEFORE 11/30/07 AND RECIEVE THE PROMOTIONAL DISCOUNT PACKAGE





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 3



0 In brief

Illegal
firearms
confiscated
by police

THE newly-formed Firearms
Tracing and Investigations Unit
of The Central Detective Unit
confiscated several illegal
firearms over the weekend.

Asst Supt Walter Evans said
that around | pm on Friday offi-
cers acting on a tip patrolled a
“bushy area” off Joe Farring-
ton Road where they discov-
ered a .40 handgun with 33 live
rounds of ammunition. Officers
also found a .45 handgun with
13 live rounds. |

No arrests have been made
in connection with these
firearms, police say.

Officers with a search war-
rant went to a home in Podelo
Street, where they discovered
an unlicensed shotgun with one
live round of ammunition.

Two suspects, aged 49 and 20,
have been arrested and are in
custody, ASP Evans said.

Shortly after 6am on Satur-
day, officers searched a home
in Deveaux Street.

They found an unlicensed 12-
gauge shotgun with 12 live
rounds of ammunition, ten live
rounds for a .45 handgun, 22
live rounds for a .40 handgun,
five cartridges of .40 hollow
point ammunition, and 54 pack-
ets of marijuana, ASP Evans
said.

A 29-year-old man has been
arrested in connection with this
matter.

Sports fishing
vessel is
reported
missing

POLICE are seeking public
help in tracing a red and white
sports fishing vessel stolen from
Green Turtle Cay, Abaco, last
week.

Mr Reuben McIntosh of

Black Sound, Green Turtle Cay,
said his 34-foot Contender was

stolen between 5pm _ on’

Wednesday, September 12, and
8am the following day.

The boat, named “Floorit”,
which has twin 250hp outboard
engines, was taken while left
unattended on the boat-lift at
White Sound, Green durtle
Cay.

Anyone with information is
asked to contact Marsh Har-
bour Police at 1-242-367-2560
or The Central Detective Unit

on Grand Bahama at 1-242-350-’

3089.

Two women
admit using
homes as"
liquor stores

TWO Haitian women living
in Freeport were arraigned at
Freeport Magistrate’s Court on
Friday after being arrested by
Central Division officers last
Wednesday for allegedly using
their homes as liquor and gro-
cery stores without being
licensed.

Michelene Charles, 42, of 17
Oleander Street and Yvrose
McPhee, 46, of 126 Redwood
Lane, both pleaded guilty
before Acting Magistrate
Stephana Saunders to breach-
es of the Shop Licence Act and
the Liquor Licence Act.

They were each fined $100 or
one month imprisonment. The
court ordered that confiscated
alcoholic beverages be turned
over to Police Welfare and oth-
er items to Grand Bahama Chil-
dren’s Home.

Freeport
woman
reports her
car stolen

KIMARA Bellot of Mallory
Lane, Freeport, has reported
the theft of her red Suzuki car,
which vanished between Friday
night and Saturday morning.

The 2001 Suzuki Baleno, reg-
istration number 24530, was left
unattended in the driveway of
her apartment.

She said her Bahamian pass-
port, bank ATM card and a
Credit Union cheque, which
were inside the vehicle, were
also stolen.

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LOCALNEWS _

PM tells radio show Bahamas







will consider ban on smoking

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad
and Tobago - The government
will consider legislating a ban
on smoking in public places,
improve physical education
facilities at public schools and
provide tax incentives for the
creation of on-the-job exercise
facilities, all as part of its ongo-
ing commitment to stemming
the incidences of chronic non-
communicable diseases
(CNCDs) in The Bahamas,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said Saturday.

Mr Ingraham's remarks
came during an interview with
Trinidad and Tobago's C-
News Station at CARICOM's
Summit on Chronic Non-Com-
municable Diseases - diseases
the Caribbean Community has
dubbed one of the greatest

threats to development in the
region.

Back in 2001, CARICOM
heads adopted the Nassau
Declaration that The Health
of the Region is the Wealth of
the Region, which was
designed to accelerate the
response to various health con-
ditions facing the region. The

Hubert Ingraham

2007 summit in ‘Trinidad was
the result of progress from the
declaration adopted in The
Bahamas.

“Specifically, we have a
problem with respect to hyper-
tension,” Mr Ingraham indi-
cated.
diabetes. Apart from the fact
that we are going to put in
place a national programme
for the provision of medicines

for all persons irrespective of

ability to pay for their pre-

. sion,



“We have high levels of

scriptions, we are going have a
major effort in terms of pre-
vention.”

Diseases such as hyperten-
heart disease, diabetes
and cancer, coupled with obe-
sity and a lack of physical
activity, are the leading cause
of death and disability in The
Bahamas, with the summit
revealing that Bahamians are
ten times more likely to die of
hypertension than their Cana-
dian counterparts.

Highlighting the govern-
ment's recent announcement
of a new dietary programme
for all public schools, the prime
minister also foreshadowed
improvements to public school
exercise facilities, adding that
the government is going to
seek to have health promotion
as a major part of initiatives
within the public health sector.

“We are going to seek to
duplicate what we have in a
few government offices, that
is rooms with exercise equip-
ment in Many more govern-
ment facilities and we are
going to seek to encourage
employers to do so by provid-

Specialist stresses importance of
healthy lifestyle to prevention

PORT OF SPAIN,
Trinidad and Tobago - The
greatest weapon in the fight
against chronic non-com-
municable diseases
(CNCDs) in The Bahamas
is to prevent theses diseases
from occurring in the first
place, said Dr Duane Sands,
cardiovascular surgeon and
chief of surgery at Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Dr Sands was one of
three medical specialists in
The Bahamas' delegation to
CARICOM's summit on
chronic non-communicable
diseases, and offered a brief
presentation on The
Bahamas' medical approach
to the prevention and man-
agement of CNCDs.

“Chronic NCDs, violence
and trauma force the peo-
ple of our country to make
real choices of survival,” Dr
Sands told CARICOM
heads and delegates. “These
diseases and the personal
impact require people to
make decisions - do they eat,
do they pay rent or do they
buy medicine.

“This triple threat of
physical, financial and emo-
tional stress has been docu-
mented to predict a dramat-
ic increase in the personal
and national impact of these
diseases in the next decade,”
he added.

Statistics on CNDCs in
The Bahamas are telling.

In the Ministry of
Health's 2005 study on
CNCDs - Identifying Deter-
minants to The Bahamas'
Burden, findings showed
that 70.6 per cent of the pop-
ulation were either over-
weight or obese - risk fac-
tors that either cause or
worsen other diseases such
as heart disease, hyperten-
sion and diabetes.

Another significant risk
factor in the development of
CNCDs is a lack of physical
activity. The study revealed
that 63.8 per cent of the pop-
ulation engaged in activities

“‘Umbrelias :
Loungers ‘
Drinks Trolleys

-Offee Tables

during their leisure time that do
not require physical activity
such as reading and watching
television.

. During his keynote address
to the regional summit, lead
head of government for health
in CARICOM's quasi-cabinet
and prime minister of St Kitts
and Nevis Dr Denzel Douglas
presented figures indicating
that The Bahamas has the
highest incidence of hyperten-
sion in the region, with the
possible cost of treating dia-
betes and hypertension pro-

jected at $76.7 million back in

2001,

Recommended dietary
actions Dr Douglas presented
as ones that lie uniquely at the

heads of government include
the establishment of a manda-
tory standard of meals in public
eating places and the elimina-
tion of trans fats from
Caribbean diets.

Dr Sands indicated that The
Bahamas’ national strategic
plan incorporates the focus on a
healthy lifestyles initiative,
pointing out that the country's
primary care facilities have been
strengthened with more and

better trained healthcare prac-

titioners.

“We are going to take the
battle out of the hospital and
into the community while simul-
taneously increasing the funding
to upgrade and improve our
hospitals.” he said,

MAIN SECTION

Local NeWS......-...--.-----P1,2,3,5,6, 7 8,9,10,11
Local News.......P12,14,15,16, 17; 18,19, 20, 21
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REAL ESTATE GUIDE 20 PAGES

“USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES:

SPORTS SECTION

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ing incentives and tax exemp-
tions for them to acquire equip-
ment to be able to facilitate
people engaging in‘exercise,”
Mr Ingraham said.
Emphasising that most
CNCDs can be prevented
through lifestyle changes in diet
and exercise, the ‘Trinidad sum-
mit also placed emphasis on the

tole of tobacco consumption in

the incidences: of cancer and
heart disease in the region, and
the need to enact tobacco con-
trol measures such as increased
Import taxation and the prohi-
bition of smoking in public
places.

A 2005 Ministry of Health
study on CNCDs revealed that
just over seven per cent of the
Bahamian population. smokes
cigarettes.

Mr Ingraham pointed out
that The Bahamas currently has
a 200 per cent tax on cigarettes
and that during its previous







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terms in office, his government
made the now Lynden Pindling
International Airport a smoke-
free environment.

He indicated that decisions
will now have to be made
regarding the way forward for
tobacco control measures in
The Bahamas.

“We are now going to con-
sider banning [smoking] in pub-
lic places period,” the prime
minister noted. “We have casi-
nos [and] we have conflicting
views as to whether or not a
casino should be exempted
from a policy.

“We are going to make some
decisions about that but I think
at the end of day we will either
have a total ban on smoking in
all public places, or the number
of public: places will be very
minimal and even if that hap-
pens that will have to be for a
minimal period of time, I
think.”



“SEES” withe nedhes GR oR Bk

WHO'S YOUR

















N/A #6







6:05 18:25
615

>









PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited.

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON Ea. DUPUC HL, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
. Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

Was MP unaware of PLP victimisation?

MICAL MP Alfred Grey was.a guest on a
radio talk show on Friday. We were not listen-
ing to the show, but happened to walk through
the room when the radio was on and heard Mr
Grey remark that he had heard something about
whatever they were discussing, but had no per-
sonal knowledge of the matters to which the
caller referred.

We asked those who were listening to the
programme about the matter under discussion.
They said Mr Grey was condemning the FNM’s
recent firing of temporary workers attached to
the civil service, calling the action cruel victim-
isation. Apparently a Bahamian called into the
programme to remind Mr Gray of the PLP’s
own years of cruel victimisation. It was about
this that Mr Grey. denied all personal knowl-
edge.

It reminded us of a 1997 programme in which
Mr Christie was caught on the same embar-
rassing cleft stick, and struggled desperately to
distance his party from its 25-year history of
victimisation.

Guest on a Sunday night show in April,
1997, Mr Christie, then prime minister, declared
that “the PLP as a party does not and did not
believe in victimisation.” He said that “the insti-
tution itself did not believe in anything that
resulted in harm being inflicted on people.”

A voice from the past unsettled the former
prime minister when he called in to the studio to
tell Mr Christie that when he was a very young
boy his mother, with seven other young ladics,
was fired from the then Hatchet Bay Plantation
by the former MP for Governor’s Harbour and
PLP cabinet minister. “And the words that were
used to her by one of his generals who was in
charge of the plant,” said Peter 20 years later,
were: “‘If you don’t support the government,
you cannot live by the government.’” The
women were staunch FNMs.

Here was a little boy, now grown to man-
hood, still carrying the hurt inflicted on his fam-
ily by the PLP, which literally took the only
bread they had off their table.

Ifi in fact the party, as claimed by Mr Christie,
was “a people’s party” that did nothing to inflict
harm on others, why did it tolerate at the cabi-
net table the MP whose decision had denied
so many families of their livelihood?

The truth of the matter is that the PLP was a
people’s party only for those who voted for it;
other Bahamians did not exist. Didn’t one of
their own — also a cabinet minister — declare
that he was checking only for PLPs and anoth-
er announce that in fact God gave this country
to the PLP? This same attitude explains much of
their behaviour today, which in fact prevents
them from accepting that God did not give this
country to them, and in fact they really lost the
2007 election.





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Mr Christie cannot deny the past because,
although many might today say they disagreed
with what took place, they certainly lock-
stepped behind “the Chief” when Bahamians
were being crushed under the party heel.

And so today, it is not good enough for Mr
Grey to dismiss the past as something of which
he was not aware. Presumably, if he wasn’t
aware of it, it didn’t exist. It’s like the question
that philosophers, such as René Descartes,
asked themselves about existence: When the
great.oak came crashing down in the forest was
there independently a loud thud, or did the
noise of the thud only exist-when its crashing
vibrations floated through the air and hit the
human ear?

Born in 1951, Alfred Grey was 16 years old
when the PLP came to power. Surely he was not
so oblivious to his surroundings as not to have
known the cruelty inflicted on one of his “home
boys” from Colonel Hill, Crooked Island —
Mr Grey is from the twin island of Hard Hill,
Acklins. He now represents both islands in the
House of Assembly.

Surely he heard the dismayed stir in the
community when the crippled teacher, beloved
by all, was removed from the settlement. Three
months after Pindling’s party won the govern-
ment in 1967, there was a by-election in the
Acklins, Crooked Island constituency and the
crippled teacher’s good friend, the late Basil
Kelly, won the day. It was felt that the teacher’s
influence helped win the election for Mr Kelly.
From that day until he died the PLP made that
poor teacher’s life a living hell.

Surely, Mr Grey was aware of all the FNM
cries of victimisation in September, 2002, four
months after Mr Christie’s government came to
power. And Mr Grey must remember the bus
and ferry contract disputes that occurred in his
own constituency. As Minister of Local Gov-
ernment at the time he must have had some
part in the decision making.

The 87-year-old Crooked Islander, a retired
school teacher, who lost his school bus contract
accused the PLP of victimisation. He was a long
time FNM. The PLP explained that the con-
tract had expired a month after the Christie
government was sworn in on May 2, 2002, and
rather than the PLP renewing it, despite a job
well done, it had awarded it to another family —
this time PLP. The same thing happened in the
ferry contract.

Remember, Mr Grey? Or are you going to
plead the Fifth, and say you were not aware,
because your ears were not around to hear, nor
your eyes to see what was happening in your
very own constituency?

Today, people are wiser, and they have good
memories. The politicians would be well advised
to adjust to the times.






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LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT IS incredibly shocking,
disconcerting and frightening
to witness the number of
unintentional miscarriages of
justice in our courts in recent
times. These cases have been
mainly related to the result of
shoddy police work and the
brutality on the part of law
enforcement officers. The
courts have had no alterna-
tive but to let free individuals
who were possibly guilty of
serious crimes, including mur-
der. The totally unacceptable
situation cries out for more
modern and enlightened pro-
cedures when individuals,
who are suspects, are inter-
viewed by the police. From
the moment an individual is
brought in to be interrogated
by officers, there should be a
special team present and all
proceedings be video taped.
These recordings should then
be passed on to a legal arm
of the police department to
be scrutinized before being
presented for evidence in cas-
es before the courts.

If the present level of
alleged police brutality con-
tinues, we stand not only to
be the labeled the murder
capital of the world but the
unenviable and most brutal
police state as well. Howev-
er, this cannot be allowed to
become our international rep-
utation, in light of the many
outstanding officers on the
force who carry out their
duties in an honest, effective
and responsible manner.

When a judge or magis-
trate has to unceremoniously
throw out cases which are so
obviously deserving of trial,
then whoever is’ responsible
for such a breach of the
nation’s established laws
should be held responsible.
Whether initiated by a com-
plainant or by the state, where
there is alleged police bru-
tality, then investigations must
be carried out and, if proven,
the appropriate penalties
imposed. It does not condone
well for the state or the indi-
vidual when justice is obvi-
ously aborted. It leaves soci-
ety wide open for vigilantism
and thus additional grief for
the nation.

In this modern society, only
the best. minds should be
allowed to deal with individ-
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gate thoroughly officers who
are accused of brutality. This
body of investigators must be
‘ composed of both civilians
and law enforcement agents,
in order to present an accept-
able image of neutrality for
public confidence.
Finally, I congratulate and
thank those police officers
who Know the laws, abide by

loHers@tribunemedia.net

law, especially when they will
be represented by the best
minds from the legal field. A
judge too, from his level of
wisdom and discretion, should
be empowered to direct alter- them and protect our person
native procedures in circum- —and_property with their very
stances where it is obvious __ lives.

‘mishandling of matters results

in a ‘no case to answer.’

We are all familiar with the
old adage, “City Hall cannot
investigate itself.” Similarly, it
is ludicrous to expect the
police to objectively investi-

JOSEPH DARVILLE
Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
September 7, 2007

We have to
take ourselves
more seriously

as a country

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANK you for your invaluable space. In assessing the progress
of this great nation and attempting to study its growth; I have
come to realise, if nothing else, that we have a very young and pli-
able nation which has manifested a capricious culture; and this
culture has manifested some positives and some not so positive
social elements. As I mentally contend with these elements a sec-
ond phase of realisation confronts me showing that it is indeed ne
best of times and perhaps the not too worst of times.

However, it can only be a not too worst of times if a certain
course of action is collectively taken by this nation: Furthermore
coupled with this, is a concluding revelation that the choice lies with
us as to which direction this country.4akes for the next hundred
years; this is a choice which should begin now.

History shows that there are a number great men and women

who sacrificed plenty during the past 60 years. Some of them con-
tributed publicly and some privately, yet no matter the recognition,
astronomical costs was paid. As it standseit is now up to another
group of Bahamians to step forward and make serious contributions
towards the next stage of this country’s growth.
' One perceives a serious yearning by citizens of this country to
experience for once, in its young existence, a country devoid of
politicised decision making. There are citizens who are yearning to
see a country where education, social services, healthcare or the
judiciary does not suffer for the sake of political convenience.
There are citizens of this country who loathe the political polori-
sation that presently exists but who are being forced to live under
post-colonial oppression and oligarchic manipulation. There are cit-
izens in this country longing to see their country move from a cul-
ture of ad hoc nation building to a culture of sound and struc-
tured policy making.

It is sad to see that after almost 60 years we as a country are clue-
less as to where we will be in the next 10 years. From CSME to

-WTO to EPA, there is just no definitive stance being taken by this

country. Talk shows upon talk shows, forums upon forums and no
political party can present to the public a comprehensive document
that succinctly lays out short-term and long-term solutions for this
country.

The question is why aren’t these plans being presented? The
answer is that it is very difficult to think through and create a plan
for nation building. It takes late nights, studying past and present
statutes and policies. It takes diligence to avoid legal anomalies and
pitfalls. It takes drafting and codifying new laws. In short it takes a
considerable amount of brain power to positively change the course
of a nation. It takes vision and it takes the lack of political rhetoric.

The thing is we have to take ourselves a bit more seriously as a
country. Tourism is a beautiful but old goose therefore she needs
a complement. We must find within ourselves the fortitude to find
this complement. We must move away from the belief that our
tourism product is something that cannot be duplicated. We must
compete internationally; not only as a sun, sand and sea paradise but
also as an attractive and efficient place to do business. We can no
longer look to other countries to create a model for the future of our
nation; we must create our own.

Other nations must be drawn to us because of our advanced
way of doing business. We must reinvent ourselves. We simply
cannot continue to have the College of The Bahamas fend for
itself while we pump monies into Bahamasair. We cannot contin-
ue to relegate national education to a mere nuisance while we
sponsor some form of ‘rush-out’ almost every month of the year.
This nation is at a crossroads; in one breath it has the potential of
becoming a great nation and in another it reeks with the potential
of becoming an objectionable and shoddy little village.

DWAYNE HANNA
Nassau,
August 26, 2007.

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New book
on Anna
Nicole rides
sales high

DESPITE mixed customer
reviews, the latest book about
Anna Nicole Smith has climbed
to number 13 in the Amazon
bestseller charts.

Blonde Ambition by TV
reporter Rita Cosby has already
attracted legal threats from
Howard K Stern and Larry
Birkhead, but the controversy
has merely increased the book’s
popularity.

One reader, giving it a four-
star rating, said the book was
like Anna Nicole herself -
“raunchy, sensational and nev-
er boring.”

Anna Nicole’s final days in
the Bahamas feature largely in
what another reader critic called
“a whodunnit thriller”.

Man found
drowned may
have had
heart attack

A MAN’s body was discov-
ered in the sea off Goodman’s
Bay on Saturday at around
11am, police said.

Reports say the man,
believed to be in his 70s, may
have suffered a heart attack
before drowning. However,
police were unable to confirm
this.

While foul play is not sus-
pected, an autopsy will be held,
Asst Supt Walter Evans said
over the weekend.

The identity of the victim has
- not been released.

Maroons say
Jamaican
PM angered
the spirits

@ JAMAICA
. ‘Kingston ou:

A COMMUNITY of déscen-
dants of freed slaves is blaming
the recent defeat of Jamaica’s
long-ruling People’s National
Party on the prime minister’s
improper use of a sacred horn,
according to Associated Press.

Former Prime Minister Portia
Simpson Miller brought bad
luck upon her party by improp-
erly brandishing the horn, an
abeng, at political rallies, a
leader of the Accompong
Maroons, Melville Currie, told
The Star newspaper in Jamaica.

Currie told the paper the
political use of the abeng “tar-
nished” the talisman and may
have set off a string of bad luck
for Simpson Miller, including
- the arrest of one of her body-
guards fer driving a stolen vehi-
cle in July and the shooting
deaths of another bodyguard
and a party activist after the
election.

“The abeng is our national
symbol. I believe the ancestors
stirred in their graves to see this
happening,” said Currie, an
Accompong leader responsible
for culture.

Simpson Miller received the ©

abeng - traditionally used by
the Maroons to summon the
spirit of their ancestors or to
announce a war — as a gift
before the September 3 elec-
tion, in which she was ousted

- by the victory of the main oppo-
sition Jamaica Labor Party.

. The Accompong Maroons
are the descendants of slaves
freed by the Spanish in the 17th
century to repel invading British
forces. The community has lived
semiautonomously in Jamaica
since 1739, when they signed a
peace treaty with the British
after resisting them for decades.

Coceeocescseeccseecsevess0000000

Are YOU
Vex?

Email us at
wihryyouvex@
tribunemedia.net
and tell us what’s
on your mind

eee neeescoeeseseseseserseece

TROPICAL
Parse vce)

MHL
ae rear a







@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Minister of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources Larry Cartwright
said the government is very
concerned about the potential
threat of the lionfish on the
fishing .industry in the
Bahamas.

“The challenge we face in
the fishing industry is the new
invasive species that we have
inherited from somewhere —
it is a Pacific animal that is now
in the Atlantic Ocean, the
Caribbean Sea, and right
around our shores,” he told
fishermen in Freeport.

Mr Cartwright said the lion-
fish is “creating havoc.” He is
calling on Bahamian fishermen
to spear the predatory fish
when they come in contact
with it.

“It is not deadly, but it does-
n’t have any predators (in the
sea). And we have been saying
to fishermen, spear-fishermen
in particular, that when they
see it to spear it,” he said.

However, he warns that fish-
ermen should be very careful

> ¥

The lionhish is increasingly causing concerns

not to touch the beautiful-
looking fish, which has ven-
omous spines on its fins and
tail.

The lionfish originally comes
from the tropical Indo-Pacific
region of the world. They are
voracious predators and feed
heavily on baby shrimp, lob-
ster, grouper and other fish.

It has been seen throughout

‘the Bahamas, particularly in

shallow waters and near coral
reefs in Grand Bahama; New
Providence, and Exuma.

®



The Bahamas commercial
fishing industry exports nearly

$100 million of fish products’

annually. There is a fear that
the lionfish could cause a sig-
nificant decline in the coun-
try’s fishery resources.

Mr Cartwright said that
some fishermen are now
reporting that lionfish are
invading their habitats.

He also noted that certain
persons have come forward
expressing an interest in har-
vesting the fish, live for export.

Screening held for Bahamian

film is held in Freeport

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand °

Bahama Film Commission
held a special screening at
RND Cinemas in Freeport of
a new movie filmed on Grand
Bahama.

‘Eye of the Dolphin,’ a film
by Michael Sellers of Movie
Bank, and Quantum Enter-
tainment, was shot in Smith’s
Point, Grand Bahama.

Mr Sellers and leading
actress Carly Schroeder were
in Freeport for the screening
along with 100 invited guests
on Grand Bahama. The Min-
istry of Tourism hosted guests
to a cocktail reception.

Tourism officials believe
that Grand Bahama is proving
to be an ideal location for
water-based films by US film-
makers and major movie pro-
duction companies, including
Disney, which filmed its
sequels here for ‘Pirates of the
Caribbean’ II and HI.

Donna Mackey, senior
manager of Filming at the
Ministry of Tourism in
Freeport, said the screening
was very successful and
received positive feedback
from Film Commission mem-
bers.

“We were extremely
pleased that over 100 persons
turned out and we were very
happy to partner with a pro-
duction company like Quan-
tum,” she said.

Ms Mackey said that Grand
Bahama is beginning to devel-
op a niche for water-based
films. She said film produc-
tions in the Bahamas provide
significant economic and
employment opportunities for
Bahamians. :

“When film crews come to
the Bahamas to make a movie
it affects a broad spectrum of

our citizens such as hoteliers,
transportation providers,
caterers, set designers, and
light carriers, and many peo-
ple are employed and our
economy is boosted,” she said.

“We are hoping that
because of our beautiful
waters most water-based films
will continue to come to
Grand Bahama, and our water
tank used in ‘Pirates of the
Caribbean’ can facilitate many
of those water-based films.”

Mr Sellers said Grand
Bahama was the ideal place
for the filming of “Eye of the
Dolphin.” He is planning to
come back again to film the
two more sequels to the
movie.

“It was a blast being here
to shoot the film, and we were
happy to be back again for the
special screening here in
Freeport,” he said.

The film is about a 14-year-
old girl who is a troubled teen
in Los Angeles. Her mother
dies and she goes to live with
her grandmother. She thinks
her father is dead, too, but
when she gets expelled from
school her grandmother tells
her that her father is alive and
is a dolphin research scientist
in the Bahamas.

She sends the girl to the
Bahamas to live with her
father. Through her interac-
tion with the Bahamian cul-
ture and with the dolphins,
she is able to grow and
change, and solves some prob-
lems here on the island.

Mr Sellers said the movie
was originally planned for
filming in the Florida Keys.

“T wasn’t happy with the
dolphin situation there, so |
came over here at UNEXSO
and the wonderful dolphin
experience is the main reason
I came Grand Bahama. Sec-
ondly, when I came here
everyone treated me so well,

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and when I went to the Fish Fry
at Smith’s Point | thought this is
where we are going to shoot the
movie.

“So we rewrote the script so
that it took place here in
Smith’s Point in the year after
Hurricane Jeanne. And so it
was a perfect place to come, and
the perfect place to come again
for the sequels.”

The film is released now in
the United States and is expect-
ed to be available for public
viewing in the Bahamas in the
next two weeks.

Bahamian Cornelius McKin-
ney, of Galaxy Productions, was
the production co-
ordinator/associate producer for
the film.

“We organised everything on
the Bahamas side in terms of
finding source materials, the
crew and the location,” he said.
“We do film, television, music
videos, and commercial pro-
ductions,” he said.

Mr McKinney's company is
finishing a film in Exuma called
‘Matrimonial a la Bahamas,’ an
Italian movie that is expected
to be in theatres in Europe in
November.

He has worked on several
films, including ‘Casino Royale’
and ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’,
as well as on a music video in
Exuma, a Panasonic commer-
cial and a television show called
‘Shop the World’ in Nassau.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 5

Dn eee ee eae

“T wish J could tell them start
tomorrow. But, I would like to
say to fishermen...that while
the sting of the lionfish will not
kill you, it will certainly cause
you enough pain to make you
wish you were dead. So...you
have to be very careful.”

“For the first time in a long
time we have fishermen diving
in August and September in
wetsuits to protect themselves
from the lionfish,” he said.

Dangers

According to information on
BarrierReefAustralia.com, lion-
fish stings can cause nausea,
breathing difficulties, paralysis,
convulsions and collapse.

Even death may occur in
exceptional circumstances. The
venom in the spines remains



© In brief | Minister calls on fishermen

to spear predatory lionfish

active for days, so even dis-
carded spines should be treated
with caution. It may take sever-
al months for a full recovery
and if the sting is left untreated,
gangrene may develop.

US marine scientists and
researchers, who are conduct-
ing study expeditions on the
lionfish in the Bahamas in con-
junction with the College
of the Bahamas Marine
Resources Department, do not
believe the fish migrated on
their own to the Western
Hemisphere.

It is strongly believed that
the fish was either released from
large sea aquariums, or person-
al aquariums owned by individ-
uals in the United States.

The fish have been spotted in
large numbers throughout the
US east coast, the Bahamas,
and as far as Bermuda.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007
Bahamas to receive means to

control mealybug from US

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Depart-
ment of Agriculture is very
close to obtaining the control-

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.
















ling agent to deal with the infes-
tation of the Pink Hibiscus
Mealybug (PHM), which has
now spread to several islands
throughout the Bahamas.

The PHM attacks and
destroys ornamental plants and
crops. It is prevalent on Grand
Bahama, Abaco, and Long
Island, where various plants and
fruit trees have now come under
attack.

Director of Agriculture Sime-
on Pinder said the United States
Department of Agriculture
(USDA) produces a “natural
controlling agent” for the
mealybug, and has placed the
Bahamas on a list among sev-
eral other countries, including
Jamaica, Dominican Republic
and Puerto Rico.

“They are providing this cost

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copies of all degrees and certificates earned to our offices by either facsimile
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Mrs. Dominique Glinton. All applications will be treated as confidential.

free and we have gotten to the
point where they (the USDA)
have now taken The Depart.
ment of Agriculture’s FedEx
number - that means that it is
just a matter of them calling us
to say that the controlling agent
is on its way,” he said.

During a town meeting in
Freeport on Thursday evening,
Minister of Agriculture and
Fisheries Larry Cartwright
assured residents that the gov-
ernment is working as fast as it
can to address the situation here
on Grand Bahama, and other
islands where the mealybug
problem now exists.

“We are aware of the mealy-
bug - we know it is affecting the
hibiscus and other ornamental
plants, and trees such as the
pawpaw and others, and we

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“Doctors Hospital would like to take this opportunity to thank all of our

dedicated Rehabilitation Professionals. The expertise, commitment and passion

that you bring to work everyday is much appreciated. Thank you for all that

you have done for us and the communities around you. Well done, we wish all

of you continued success.”

Charles Sealy,
Chief Executive Officer

me DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life





know...we have to get this thing
addressed.”

Adult mealybugs are small
(about three min long) and
pink in body colour. They are
covered with a waxy secretion.
They feed on the soft issues
of many plant species and
inject a toxic saliva that causes
curling and contortion of
leaves.

The mealybugs are very resis-
tant to pesticides and insecti-
cides. They are not easily erad-
icated and the aim is to control
the population by using a small
wasp-like fly produced by the
USDA.

Mr Pinder said that the same
method was used in New Prov-
idence seven years ago and was
very successful.

“We in New Providence have
had considerable experience
with the mealy bug. It appeared
about seven years ago and did a
great deal of damage before it
was brought under control,” he
said.

“If the Bahamas was one con-
tiguous land mass we would not
be having this problem. But, the

Bernard Nottage
signs copies of new
book of essays



USDA is the only provider of
the natural control agent in this
part of the world, and they have
been very co-operative with us
again.”

Mr Pinder warns that resi-
dents should refrain from using
pesticides and insecticides when
the controlling agents are ini-
tially released.

“There is some discussion
now of setting up a minor pro-
duction facility somewhere in
the country to try and raise the
numbers so we can redistribute
them to other islands when we
need to,” he said.

Mr Pinder said that getting
the mealybug under control is
not an automatic or overnight
fix, and will take some time.

“From what we have seen in
New Providence, the control
will be a lasting one. But the
critical mass of the fly or wasp
would have to be present on
this island in order to contain
the problem.

“The pink hibiscus mealy bug
will never ever leave the
Bahamas, but the aim is to con-
trol its numbers,” he said.

Brent Dean/Tribune staff

DR BERNARD Nottage signing a copy of his new book, “New Directions
in Bahamian Policy: Essays on Endogenous Development”, on
Thursday night at St Mary's Hall, St Augustine’s College. The book is
co-edited by Nikolaos Karagiannis, and contains seven essays, of which

two are contributed by the co-editors.

Available
on the

THE TRIBUNE

_Author who

- wrote book

— on Oakes
murder dies
at age of 83

A WELL-KNOWN author
who wrote one of the most
celebrated accounts of the Sir
Harry Oakes murder case in
Nassau has died in England
aged 83.

James Leasor, who once
worked as personal secretary
to London Daily Express pro-
prietor Lord Beaverbrook,
became a prolific author after
several years in journalism as
a reporter and foreign corre-
spondent.

His book - Who Killed Sir
Harry Oakes? - was one of
several written over the years
offering possible solutions to
the 20th century’s greatest
murder mystery. It is still on
sale through Amazon, where
Leasor’s claims that the mur-
der was somehow linked to
the burning of the liner Nor-
mandie in 1942 and the Allied
landings in Sicily are duly not-
ed.

Leasor, ‘an Oxford gradu-
ate, was once fired four times
in one day by Beaverbrook,
who later took a shine to the
young writer and encouraged
him to sharpen his literary tal-
ents as an Express reporter.

His output was impressive.
He wrote thrillers, historical
novels and biographies,
including a nine-book series

: about the fictional Dr Jason

i Love, a Somerset family
physician who got mixed up
with the secret service.

The Oakes book was one
of his many non-fiction titles,
which ranged from a biogra-
phy of Lord Nuffield, the
motor manufacturer, to
accounts of the Indian Mutiny
and the Dieppe Raid.

He also wrote several
African and Asian sagas
under the pseudonym
Andrew McAllan.

Leasor, the son of a
teacher, was born in. Kent,
England, in 1923. He attend-
ed the City of London School,
where he wrote stories for fel-
low pupils, lending them out
for a fee.

Before war service with the
Lincolnshire Reginient, Lea-
sor got his first taste of jour-
nalism with The Kentish
Times at £1 a week. But it was
his later association with
Beaverbrook that gave him
his all-important break into
the big-time.

After leaving Beaver-
brook’s service, Leasor free-
lanced as a magazine writer
and author, ghosting autobi- |
ographies for the actor Ken- .
neth More and King Zog of
Albania, among others.

Apart from writing, Lea-
sor’s great love was classic
cars, especially a 1937 Cord
that featured in several books
and was once the subject of

? an article in the Daily Tele-
: graph.

He kept his vintage motors
at his Jacobean manor house
in Wiltshire, where he died
on September 10.

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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 7

THE TRIBUNE









Felipé Major/Tribune staff

LEADERS OF the Defense Force, police and prison service were represented at the closing of the National
Assembly on Crime symposium on Saturday at the Wyndham

at crime assembl

MINISTER OF National Security and Immigration Tommy Turnquest closes the National Assemble on Crime
Saturday at the Wyndam Cable Beach Resort

Alarming figures

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

bdean@tribunemedia.net

THE National Assembly on
Crime exposed the crisis the
country now faces, and brought

to light some harsh critiques of

a culture now wrestling to figure
out how to save itself.

For those who do not know,
or think it is an exaggeration to
state that there is a crime crisis
in the country, the police sta-
tistics recently released for this
year, overwhelmingly illustrate
the disaster we face. ;

Violent crime has risen by 29
per cent thus far this year with
rape up 53 per cent; armed rob-
bery up 47 per cent; and unlaw-
ful sexual intercourse up 22 per
cent.

Consultant psychiatrist Dr
Michael Neville set the stage
for the discussions at the open-
ing ceremony on Friday, warn-
ing those in the audience that
the problem is “more complex”
than they think.

Dr Neville said that we
should be cautious about declar-
ing a war on crime, and rather
should be attempting to broker
a“peace”™. -° TF

~ “Many people i in society want
to give police complete freedom
to do as they wish. That would
create collateral damage. The
innocent would be mixed with
the guilty,” he said.

There is already a “phenom-

. enal degree of anger” in our
society, Dr Neville remarked,
with many Bahamians walking
around “like live timebombs
ready to explode.” In this envi-
ronment, further escalation may
only further the anger and
resentment.

Addressing the reasons for
this anger, Dr Neville said:

“J would suggest that
we...have over the years devel-
oped a huge underclass, which is
much harder to get out of than
at any time in Bahamian histo-
ry.”

There was a time, he said,
when civic groups would help
the underclass to rise out of
these circumstances. But now,
the underclass is “often state-
less, nameless and lost. And our
response to them, by and large,
is to kick them down further.”

Dame Joan Sawyer told the
audience that as a society we
individually must take respon-
sibility for the what we have
created, and she indicted
Bahamians for the country that
has been created since inde-
pendence.

“You’ve had 30 years from
Independence and more, and
-you’ve done nothing to build a
nation.

“AJ you do is to whine and
complain, and blame whoever is
in political power and whoever
is in the church and whoever is
there,” she said.

In the Bahamas, officials and
government agencies are
famous for hiding or being
unwilling to release data to the
public regarding the work of the
nation they supervise.

However, Dr Elliston Rah-
ming did so, and the numbers
he released were as haunting as
those released by the police
illustrating the sharp rise of
crime this year.

Some 62 per cent of the 1,400
people in Her Majesty’s Prison

are not guilty of any crime —
they are merely there on
remand. We as a country have
the 11th highest incarceration
rate in the world out of 204
countries surveyed, and from
May to August 69 per cent of
the intake at the prison were
on remand.

These numbers reveal that
after warehousing our children
in schools that chronically have
a failing D grade — with the pub-
lic school average around an E
— we then ship them off in



ARCHBISHOP DREXEL Gomez of the Anglican diocese (left) sits
_ next to Archbishop Patrick Pinder of the Catholic diocese at the

closing of the assembly

increasing numbers to sit in Fox
Hill Prison on remand for up
to five years, some sources have
told The Tribune.

The roundtable sessions com-
prised of stakeholders from the
government, police and civil
society were also extremely can-
did in the discussions.

Assistant Commissioner Mar-
vin Dames emphasised to the
group that the community must
collectively take responsibility
for crime, and that the police
can only be effective when the
community assists in the cre-
ation of strategies to free itself.

Freddy Munnings reminded
those assembled that we must
not expect schools to take the
place of families.

“A high percentage of fami-
lies are dysfunctional. The sin-
gle parent families with children
having children, and mothers
competing with'their daughters
is the thing of the day,” he said.
Parents, he continued, must not
absent themselves from the
rearing of their children.

Regarding schools, Mr
Munnings said that these insti-
tutions “must stop social pro-
motion”.

“No child should graduate

computers

iversary
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i 3 cd

printers

Felipé Major/Tribune Staff

from school without being able
to master the basics, reading,
writing and arithmetic.”

The National Assembly on
Crime ended with a set of poli-
cy suggestions, including the
creation of a National Crime
Council, a group to intervene
in gang culture, and a PR cam-
paign to sensitise Bahamians to
‘behave better’, along with oth-
er initiatives.

However, serious questions
still exist surrounding our legal
system, which seems unable to
free itself from a backlog that
violates the constitutional rights
of hundreds of Bahamians, who
remain in prison for years with-
out being guilty of any crime.

Many of the sociological
problems discussed at the
Assembly will take time to
address, and will require a more
complicated cultural shift. The
court backlog, however, seems
clearly like a problem for the
government and its agencies to
solve.

How can the men being
unjustly denied their freedom
and dignity be expected to act
with dignity and respect when
this society treats them with
such contempt?



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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Halsbury prepares

TWO well-known experts
will offer advice for Bahamians
on becoming wealthy and safe-
guarding the most important
purchase most will make — buy-
ing a home - during the 3rd
annual Halsbury Chambers free
legal clinic on Saturday, Sep-
tember 22 at SuperClubs
Breezes.

This marks the second time
Glenn Ferguson and Troy

. Sampson will be presenters at
the free legal clinic. Now in its
third year, the clinic has grown
into one of the largest commu-
nity outreach projects of its kind
— complete with sessions
throughout the day, childcare
services by the Meridian School
and opportunities to speak for a
limited time to an attorney for
free..

Mr Sampson's discussion,
“Buying A Home: Basic Steps
to Safeguarding Your Pur-
chase” is slated to begin at 10am
and will undoubtedly provide
tips in what can seem a tedious
process. He is also the president

day Sept. 22, 2) 07



IMMEDIATE PAST president of the Bahamas Mortgage Brokers Associ-
ation Troy Sampson discusses various issues he will address on “Buy-
ing A Home: Basic Steps to Safeguarding Your Purchase”

of Approved Lending Services,
a fully internet-driven mortgage
brokerage company.

“I am ecstatic to be a part of -

the team of presenters at this
year's legal clinic,” said Samp-
son. “I feel that the firm has
taken an unprecedented initia-
tive to get involved with the

community and bring to them
the answers they felt were out
of reach. What I enjoy most
about being a part of the clinic
is the fact that while I'm not
presenting, I'm absorbing so
much valuable information
from the other presenters.”
Mr Ferguson is an interna-

Former justice joins law firm

RETIRED Supreme Court
' Justice Jeanne Thompson, a
leading legal figure who served
in one of the highest judicial
posts in the nation, has joined
the firm of Halsbury Chambers
Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law
as consultant, the firm
announced.

“We are honoured that Jus-
tice Jeanne Thompson, who has
been highly sought after by the
legal community since she
retired from the Supreme Court
in March, 2007, has selected
Halsbury Chambers as the
appropriate firm in which to
lend her expertise,” said Donald
Saunders, senior associate.

“Justice Thompson brings a
wealth of unmatched wisdom
to our practice, better enabling
us to serve clients and her con-
tributions both to the legal fra-
ternity and cultural history of
The Bahamas are legendary.”

The former justice’s legal
career spans five decades. A
member of the Honorable Soci-
ety of the Middle Temple, she
was called to the degree of the
Utter Bar in 1964 and to the















ATTN aL ThOnneche



Bahamas Bar the following
year. She practiced law under
the tutelage of the Sir Orville
Turnquest and the late Eugene
Dupuch, QC after whom the
Bahamas’ law school is named,
in the chambers of Dupuch &
Turnquest, later joining the law
firm of the late Sir Kendal
Isaacs, and subsequently, Isaacs,
Johnson and Thompson.

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From 1981 until she was
named to the Supreme Court
bench in 2002, she practiced on
her own, specialising in Matri-
monial Law. In her earlier years
she practised both criminal and
civil law.

Outside the legal communi-
ty, Justice Thompson is well-
known as a cultural icon whose
writing, columns, and plays
form a significant part of
Bahamian folklore. She co-
authored the first Bahamian
soap opera, “The Fergusons of
Farm Road,” and was the
author of the radio soap opera,
‘Sam Finley’s Sandcastle.”

At Halsbury Chambers, she
joins a complement of attorneys
whose practice includes civil lit-
igation, company formation,
family law, maritime and avia-
tion law, immigration law, wills
and estates, intellectual prop-
erty and real estate.

Justice Thompson will be on
hand to provide expert advice
during the 3rd Annual Halsbury
Chambers free legal clinic
“Information You Need for the
Life You Want”.

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directions on the road to wealth when he discusses “So You Want To
Be A Millionaire”

tionally recognised financial and
retirement consultant,
researcher, syndicated writer
and talk show host on Gems
FM. He is also the principal of
Comprehensive Consulting Ser-
vices and Comprehensive Insur-
ance Agents and Brokers.
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been invited to present again,”
says Ferguson. “I am amazed
at the hundreds of people who
file in and out of the informa-
tion halls throughout the day.
What people can discover here
in one day would often take
months and thousands of dol-
lars to find out.”



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for third free clinic

This year's exciting discus-
sions include “Marital Rights:
Sweethearting, Divorce & Out-
side Children”, “Whose Beach
is It Anyway? Access Rights:
Developer versus Residents”,
“A National Crisis: The Skin-
ny on Obesity”, “So You Want
To Be A Millionaire”, “What's
Your EQ: Measuring Emotion-
al Intelligence”, “Buying a
Home: Basic Steps to Safe-
guarding a Home” and “Get-
ting Your Hands Dirty: The
Value of a Good Education”.

Parents can also take advan-
tage of free childcare services
provided by the Meridian
School at Unicorn Village and
register them to be placed in a
national database, similar to the
US's Amber Alert, courtesy of
BOSS. For more information
and registration call 393-4551/5,
Co-sponsors include BOSS,
BTC, Andeaus Insurance,
Cable Bahamas, Common-
wealth Bank, Pepsi, Troy Samp-
son and the Zonta Club of New
Providence.

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nical staff of Imaging at
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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS |



Eric Rose/BIS photos



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Nurses honoured at awards ceremony

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healthcare workers for the role they play in the care of children in hospital. The honourees are
shown in a group photograph.





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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007



Robert Mugabe

i By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat).

Aricas heads of
government are

idamant that Zimbabwe's auto-

cratic leader, Robert Mugabe,
nust be invited to a summit
meeting of African and Euro-
pean leaders in Portugal in
December.

For their part, European
heads of government are debat-
ing Whether to bar Mugabe
from attending or not.

This issue was part of a wider
debate on Zimbabwe earlier
ihis year at a symposium at the
Royal Commonwealth Society
in London in which I partici-
pated. Other participants
included British parliamentari-
ans and businessmen, black and
white Zimbabweans, and diplo-
matic and academic represen-
‘atives from neighbouring
southern African countries.

Amid great disagreement, |
nad suggested at the London
symposium that Mugabe should
»e allowed to attend because |
saw it as an opportunity for oth-
er heads of government to seri-
ously negotiate his departure
from the presidency of Zim-
hbabwe directly with him in the

margins of the mecting. Others
disagreed, saying that his atten-
dance at the Atrica-Europe
summit would give Mugabe's
government “legitimacy.”

It is a similar debate that is
currently on-going in Europe.
But, it is a sterile debate. Like it
or not, Mugabe is in charge of
Zimbabwe and the army, which
he has favoured and nurtured,
still stands behind him.

The best efforts of the oppo-
sition party and its supporters
have failed to unseat him, and
the leaders of many of Zim-
babwe’s neighbouring states,





his role as a freedom fighter.
But, they, like everyone else,
recognise that Mugabe has
destroyed the Zimbabwean
economy and is ruthlessly per-
secuting his own people.
Inflation was estimated at a



Like it or not, Mugabe is in
charge of Zimbabwe and the
army, which he has favoured
and nurtured, still stands

behind him.



who could best apply pressure
on him, are ambivalent in their
attitude toward him.

As Don McKinnon, the Com-
monwealth Secretary-General,
publicly said recently many
African countries still regard
Mugabe as a hero because of

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staggering 7,600 per cent in July
and unemployment at a fright-
ening 80 per cent. Families are
surviving only because many of
their breadwinners — both men
and women — have sneaked
across the border into neigh-
bouring states and are sending
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Sir- Ronald Sanders



reports indicate that “price con-
trols that the government
enforced in June have emptied
shelves and depleted stocks,
bringing many shops and facto-
ries to a standstill.”

The official exchange rate
between the Zimbabwe and US
dollars was devalued in the first
week of September from 250 to

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Dissent, however mild, is met
with vicious beatings by police
and Mugabe support groups.

It is difficult to imagine that
the situation could get any
worse.

So why should European .

nations tolerate this villain at
their summit with African lead-
ers in Portugal in December?

There are two good reasons.
One is the argument put for-
ward by McKinnon that the
Africa-European summit is too
important to be put off because
of Mugabe. And, the African
Union has stated quite clearly
that its leaders will not attend if
Mugabe is not invited.

The second reason is that the
leaders of the Southern African
nations that are in the best posi-
tion to persuade Mugabe to end
his rule of tyranny are reluctant
to take action against him.
South Africa’s President, Thabo
Mbeki, is the chief among them.

There are various reasons for
the reluctance to move against

THE TRIBUNE



with Zimbabwe knows that the
only way to end the destruction
of the country and the decima-
tion of its people is for a deal to
be negotiated directly with
Mugabe in which he leaves
office with impunity.

He will not accept that such a
deal is possible unless he has
iron-clad guarantees from Euro-
pean nations and the United
States, and he will want it from
the highest possible levels.

The corridors of the Euro-
pean-Africa summit in Decem-
ber would be a good place to
start to talk to him.

Hero to some and villain to
others, the reality is that
Mugabe has presided over the
destruction of his country and
the decimation of his people.
Every day that he remains his
country is driven further into
an economic abyss, and threat-
ens the stability of neighbouring
states as Zimbabwean stream
across the borders.

Mr Mckinnon, as Common-
wealth Secretary-General, has
urged that Mugabe be invited



The only way to end the
destruction of the country and
the decimation of its people is
for a deal to be negotiated
directly with Mugabe in which
he leaves office with impunity.



Mugabe. One of them is what
Don McKinnon has said:
Mugabe is still a revolutionary
hero to many in Africa because
he stood up against the racist
minority government of lan
Smith.

A second reason — and I sus-
pect this is particularly true in
South Africa — leaders fear a
backlash from militant groups
within their own countries who
would use any anti-Mugabe
action to suggest that they were
selling out to “imperialist” (or
“white”) powers in Europe and
North America who want to
oust Mugabe.

Aves everyone con-
nected in anyway

to the European-African sum-
mit in December as a practi-
cal matter and as good sense.
The same argument is relevant
to placing the subject of Zim-
babwe on the agenda of the
Commonwealth heads of gov-
ernment in Uganda in Novem-
ber.

It would not be the first time
that the Commonwealth dis-
cussed a country that had with-
drawn from membership, nor
would it be the first time that
Commonwealth resolution led
to European and American
action to end tyranny —
ApartheidsSouth Africa is the
prime example.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS



‘Handcraft artisans are
‘Bahamas ambassadors’

@ By Bahamas Information
‘Services

FREEPORT — Those who
‘produce souvenir items, includ-
ing jewellery and straw work,
have been reminded to utilise
‘their skills fully when presenting
items for sale to visitors,
because they are also ambas-
sadors for The Bahamas.

So said Minister of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources Lar-
ry Cartwright.

His comments came as he
addressed graduates of the
Coconut Shell, Jewellery and
Straw Training Programmes
Sponsored by the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration in conjunction with
‘Grand Bahama Craft Associa-
‘tion.

The graduation ceremony
‘was held at the Canon Eric Sam
,\Centre at the Church of the
‘Ascension in Lucaya on Thurs-
day evening. Sixty-two people

graduated after completing
courses in coconut craft, jew-
ellery, introduction to platting
and straw work.

Mr Key and Mr Cartwright
are on a two-day official visit
to Grand Bahama.

A former educator, Mr
Cartwright’s ministerial respon
sibility also includes the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation.

The minister noted that not
many males have offered them
selves for courses offered by
the handicraft department of
BAIC, which has a mandate to
assist the handicraft entreprc
neur who rely on arts, cratt and
souvenir gifts production as a
primary source of income.

“When we held a similar exe1
cise in Abaco a few weeks ago,
there was only one male gradu-
ate present, so it seems the trend
continues. | am not sure who
wants to take responsibility for
this trend but BAIC takes full

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responsibility for the develop-
ment, delivery and certification
through this training programme
across the country,” he said,
adding that the programme is
available to all who’ are inter-
ested, both male and female.

The minister acknowledged
that the programme is building
on the success of entrepreneur-
ial craft persons who have done
very well in the past.

“By developing such a pro-
gramme nationwide and
encouraging persons who may
have the interest but need con-
fidence in the skills, a broader
range of craft products will
eventually be produced to sup
plement the souvenir industry
in the country,” he said.

He reminded graduates that,
in the marketplace, they would
be competing with the best in
the world but their training will
help them to produce items that
will bear testament to their lev-
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Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate and

proof of Bahamian citizenship should be sent to

THE DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES
GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY, LIMITED
PO. Box F-40888
Freeport, Grand Bahama Island, Bahamas

Email: hrdept@gb-power.com
DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:

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you produce will say something
about The Bahamas to the cus-
tomer or the person.who
receives the souvenir as a gilt. It
is important to put your very
all into each piece,” he said.





PARTICIPANTS IN the Coconut Craft Training Programme are pictured
with BAIC chairman Edison Key and Minister for Agriculture and
Marine Resources Larry Cartwright during their graduation exercise at
the Canon Eric Sam Centre at the Church of The Ascension

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Shooting Carl Bethel

FROM page one

police believe that Mr Evans :
was killed on Saturday night at;
the time when residents report- :

ed hearing gunshots.

ASP Evans also said that, at
this stage of the investigation,
police suspect the victim was
shot as a result of an argument
across the street from where

his body was eventually found.

One resident, who did not
wish to be named, told The
Tribune that the rise in vio-
lence this year has her ina
state of fear.

“1 don’t know what is hap-
pening to this country. All you
keep hearing about are mur-
ders and stabbings. This
Bahamas is getting out of con-
trol,” she said.

The fears of this resident,
and other Bahamians, regard-
ing the increase of violent
crime have been validated by
police statistics revealing a 29
per cent increase in serious
crime this year in the
Bahamas.

The murder total for 2007,
at 55, has already surpassed

the total number for 2005 (52),

with the rate still on pace to
reach or surpass 80 murders
for the year. mi

With reported rapes up 53
per cent and armed robberies
up 47 per cent, the country
appears in the grip of a violent
cultural shift, some commen-
tators declared at last week’s
National Assembly on Crime.

Police currently have no
suspects in relation to Mr
Evans’ death.

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FROM page one

speak to me (they) say that that is not the
answer to the problem,” he said. “Police are not

returning Co schools.”

Of the existing group of auxiliary police the ;
PLP government placed on public school cam-
puses, Mr Bethel said that some of these indi- :
as he indicated in his budget }
communication — be integrated into the more ;
troubled schools as “regular school security

viduals will

officers.”

“The police are not being permanently sta-
tioned in our school campuses. No trained :
police officers will have a station in our school :

campuses,” Mr Bethel stressed.

The school security initiative, Mr Bethel told :
The Tribune, which provides heightened patrols :
at specific times along with staggered patrols ;
throughout the day in and around the schools, }

will continue.

“It would be a silly minister of education }
who did not see that there were some problems }
having our children settle down in the first few :
weeks of school and do nothing about it,” Mr :

Bethel said.

“Obviously, as we have a live and ongoing }
: school security initiative that is going on in co- :
: -operation with the police, where weaknesses
occasionally are shown, where they arise, they }

will be addressed,” Mr Bethel added.

The government has had to endure a wave of:
criticism surrounding its decision to withdraw :

police officers from schools, as a result of sev-
eral acts of serious violence in the first few
weeks of the new semester.

Stabbings have occurred at A F Adderley

and CI Gibson schools, along with a teacher i

being assaulted at the Mable Walker school.

The opposition has strongly criticised the ;
government’s decision to remove police from :
schools. with former Prime Minister Perry :

Christie last week calling for their reinstate-
ment.

on the issue, said that the FNM government

appeared poised to act contrary to policies :

introduced by the former government.
Mr Mitchell went further and also ques-

tioned if the government is now poised, with :
officers out of the schools, to distribute security :

contracts to supporters.

Secretary general of the Bahamas Union of :

Teachers Belinda Wilson has also called for
reinstatement of police officers. Ms Wilson is

also asking that the government instal metal :
detectors in schools as an additional security :

measure.



LOCAL NEWS
FROM page one

the press was not very clear and so I have
asked for the entire printed transcript of
what was said in the course of the trial.
"Whatever was said, however, the press
felt sufficiently secure to say the following:
"The press reported that Court of
Appeal's justices, or the President of the
Court of Appeal in particular, allegedly
asserted that my actions as the minister
responsible for extraditions in the mat-
ter were illegal and that I should be held
in contempt, that there had been a con-
stitutional infringement by me and my

colleague Allyson Maynard-Gibson and.

that the government of the PLP had
infringed the rights of one of its citizens
and had broken the law.
"Notwithstanding the absence of the
full transcript and to the extent that these

allegations are made in the press, this is,

enough to warrant an immediate response

Fred Mitchell

from me.

"The public should know that the jus-
tices dismissed the appeal so the decision
of Justice Lyons stands.

"It should be pointed out that all
actions by me were taken as Minister of
Foreign Affairs, and as such, it is the Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs today who is
bound to defend the actions of the gov-
ernment in accordance with the statute
and on the advice of the Attorney Gen-
eral. The actions as a minister are lawful
unless or until otherwise pronounced in
appropriate legal proceedings, properly
adjudicated after hearing both sides.

"I would urge the press in the future to
deal with these matters with some cau-
tion having regard to the fact that the

‘personal safety of the individuals involved

may be at risk as.a result of their report-



"Until the transcript is obtained, I will
make no further comment on the matter.
I reserve any right of further action upon
review of that transcript. Any further
questions on the matter should go to the
Attorney General. As a lawyer of 21 years
at the Bar, I have always upheld the rule
of law and the betterment of the judicia-
ry and will continue to do so.”

Former Attorney General Allison May-
nard-Gibson said in her defence:

“The public should know that the judg-
ment of the Honourable Justice John
Lyons stands. It is therefore the law of
the land,” she said.

“As a member in good standing of The
Bahamas Bar for almost 27 years, as a
former Attorney General, as a former
Minister of the Government and as a Sen-
ator of The Bahamas, I have scrupulous-
ly adhered to the laws and the conventions
of our Constitution and I reject whole-
heartedly and unreservedly any suggestion
to the contrary.”







At a press conference yesterday, Fox Hill :
MP Fred Mitchell, responding to a question :







ing.

FROM page one

was allegedly stabbed in his abdomen and taken to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital (PMH), where his condition is listed as serious. His
identity has not been released.

On Saturday at 8pm, two men from Quarry Mission engaged
ina heated “row” and, as a result, an 18-year-old man was stabbed
in the abdomen. He is listed in serious condition at PMH.

Police revealed that a 40-year-old suspect turned himself into
authorities later that day.

At a press conference held at police headquarters last week,
ASP Evans remarked on the recent cluster of stabbing incidents.

“We are particularly concerned with the number of stabbings we
have seen in recent times, especially those matters which have tak-
en place in our schools. Much more can be done, but we need the
full support of the community to help reform, in this case, our
young men.”

As reported previously, two students were reportedly stabbed
while on school premises in unrelated incidents last week, while
three men were allegedly stabbed by a co-worker on a construc-
tion site at Cable Beach last week.

Police believe the latter was a culmination of a “history of bad
blood” between the co-workers.

“We have to be concerned as a people, concerned (about)
how we deal with issues at hand...we have to be able to resolve (dif-
ferences) in a more peaceful way,” ASP Evans cautioned in a tele-
phone interview with The Tribune yesterday.

“These (knives) are instruments that we totally discourage
people from using at all costs.”

ASP Evans said that, as knives are readily accessible household
items, little could be done to regulate who bought them. He
warned anyone in conflict with others against arming themselves
with a knife and to enlist police help or seek counsel from a trust-
ed person.

He also advised Bahamians to weigh the consequences of their
actions before resorting to violence to solve their problems.

According to preliminary crime statistics released by police

Two men stabbed

last week, there has been a 29 per cent increase in “serious
crimes”, otherwise known as “crimes against the person”, from
2006.

For September, there were eight non-fatal stabbing incidents
reported up to press time.

Police officer’s son robbed
FROM page one

as police officers on patrol.

However, the assailants fled the scene and were not caught.

Fortunately, his son and wife escaped without injury, he
added.

“We were able to get tremendous community support in the
entire matter, in that members of the public who were standing
by got involved and I believe, thanks to that, no further harm
came to my wife or my son.”

Ironically, Mr Greenslade said he got news of the incident
while on his way to the closing ceremony of the National Assem-
bly on Crime.

He commented on the rising tide of violence in the nation and
the urgent need to address mounting concern.

“These young men (are) running around like little rebels,
just pouncing on people, and you know that’s happening all
over the country every day.

“We do have some issues with these young people who roam
about in gangs and we’re going to have to do our best to try and
interdict this kind of activity.” ;

A formal complaint has been lodged and this will be investi-
gated like any other, said the officer.

He extended gratitude to security officers at the Mall for
their quick response.

services.

FROM page one

society and the media, to offer
policy solutions to the crime prob-
lem in the country.

Recent statistics released by
police indicate that murder is up
by 50 per cent for the year; armed
robbery is up by 47 per cent; rape
is up by 53 per cent; and unlawful
sexual intercourse is up by 22 per
cent... a

Based on a document released

Turnquest

major components of the man-
date of the National Crime Coun-
cil would include: the expansion
of the Andros programme for
young delinquent boys and girls;
advocacy for the creation of a
National Sex Offenders Registry;
advocacy for legal reform that
denies bail to those accused of
murder and the increased speed
of violent crime trials; the use of

closed circuit television as a
crime-fighting tool, and the
strengthening of witness protec-
tion programmes in the country.

In an effort to demonstrate that
the two-day assembly provided
practical solutions, Mr Turnquest
also pledged to assist with the
hosting of a National Youth
Forum, that would engage those
most likely to be victims and per-
petrators of crimesman osty f)

Mr Turnquest also announced
that his ministry will sogntaunch

a major anti-crime public rela-
tions campaign through the print,
broadcast and electronic media,
to spread the message that
“Crime doesn’t pay”.

A Youth Gang Intervention
Unit was also proposed by the
Assembly.

However, Mr Turnquest did
not elaborate further on whether
or not such a group would be cre-

yyy sated:as'a partofithe police force,

or another government agency,

The minister endorsed sugges-
tions that came from the Assem-
bly such as the adoption of pris-
oners by churches in order to
assist in their rehabilitation, along
with the suggestion that proper
“Community Boundaries” be
established, possibly along the
lines of the police Neighbourhood
Community Policing Programme,
where stakeholders ‘can more
directly focus their crime prevea-

,.Such asthe department of social. ...tion efforts.

by Dr David Allen, some of the

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THE TRIBUNE , MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2007, PAGE 13

THE JUNKANOO CORPORATION NEW PROVIDENCE LIMITED
IN PARTNERSHIP WITH :

THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE

Application
for

Prospective Judges

Applicant must be 21lyrs or over

OFFICAL USE ONLY

|__|

_ JUDGE NUMBER |
THE 2007 / 2008 JUNKANOO SEASON

Please PRINT LEGIBLY all information in the spaces provided below and answer all questions and provide documentation including a
passport photo as requested or application may be subject to outright rejection

All information given by applicants will be subject to follow up background investigations and checks.

A. PERSONAL INFORMATION
Full Name (Ms./Mr./Mrs.)



SURNAME FIRST MIDDLE Alias





Maiden name aliases nick names

Address



(STREET, CITY, ISLAND)

Date of Birth 3. Country of Birth Age
DD/ MMI YY *
P.O. Box wo ei SOR Nationality
| AW) HY) eC)

Employer ; Profession

Telephone





Employer's Address



Email:



B. GENERAL & BACKGROUND INFORMATION .
Have you resided in the Bahamas for more than five years? (I£.NO please state previous residence)
Have you ever judged a Junkanoo Parade? (If YES please give year(s) of parade)

a. Do you currently participate/rush with any Junkanoo group? If yes, name Group







b. Have yowparticipated/rushed with any Junkanoo Group before If yes, name group



TO}

c. Are you an avid supporter of any Junkanoo Group? If yes, name group
d. Do you have any relatives and/or close friends who participate with any Junkanoo Group?





If yes name persons and group(s)



e. Do you presently have any personal affiliation wi th ANY Junkanoo Group? (If YES please name the Group



f. Do you have any religious reason that may prevent you from judging a parade? (If YES please explain) :

g. Do you work on Boxing Day and/or New Years? (If YES please state which)



h. Why do you wish to be a judge?





Have you ever participated in any Junkanoo parade(s) before? (If YES please give the year and name of the group)
Explain how “integrity” relates to a judge and the parade a ee E

C: Given the above, are you confident tha t you are able to Judge a parade fainly and in an unbiased manner, based solely on your training and the presentation and performance of the groups during

the parades? _Yes__or___No i
Do you see Judging of Junkanoo Parades as a National contribution and civic duty? Yes or No

Do you know of any reason that would disqualify you for being aflowed to Judge any parade? Yes or No





D. MEDICAL INFORMATION
Please note this section is for insurance and medical emergency purpose ONLY

Do you have any medical condition(s) that might’ préverit You from judging? (EG: asthma, heart condition, diabetes, hypertension, optical, hearing, etc.) If YES please explain and list any medication

that you take for that condition.





Are you allergic to any specific medicine? (If yes please list)



T understand that | may be liable to take a medical examination to determine my abilities in areas related to my ability to judge the parade and agree to the same.

Emergency Contact (LIST 2 PERSONS TO CONTACT IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY)



1. Name Relationship _ __
Telephone (W) (H) ee (©)
"2, Name Relationship
Telephone (W) (H) ee (©)
os
Declaration

I, declare that the information I have provided in this application is true and correct. I further agree that | am of sound mind and body and pledge to be sober during the parade and to abide by all of

the rules, regulations and assignments set forth by JCNP or.jits.assigns. I further understand and accept the full responsibility for the completeness and accuracy of the information that | have herein

provided, and accept full and complete responsibility for the same. If any of the information is found to be false and or misleading, either prior during or after a parade that I have Judged, ]
render my self incapable of judging again in the future, and agree to stand liable for any such act, and that any and all scores tendered by me will be discarded.

APPLICANT SIGANTURE —s DATE
PASTE
PHOTO HERE

Completed applications should be submitted to the

Ministry of Culture, Morro Castle, Attention Mrs. Joan Henderson on
or before Friday, September 28, 2007



PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

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LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



“to school at
Englerson Urban
Renewal Centre

@ By Bahamas Information
Services



HUNDREDS of students
returning to school this year
attended the Englerston Urban
Renewal Centre back*to-school
extravaganza.

Mr Brensil Rolle, parliamen-
tary secretary in the Ministry of
Housing and National Insur-
ance, addressed the students
and their parents.

The students were treated to
free uniforms, school bags,
books, pencils, pens, folders,
geometry sets, crayons and
colouring books.

Patrice Miller, project man-
ager of the centre, said the
school supplies were donated
by the community and sur-
rounding businesses.

“We could have gotten a
small donation from the min-
istry,” she said, “but the whole
idea is to teach the people how
to become a sustainable com-
munity or how to sustain them-
selves. If we pool our efforts
and resources, we can get it
done.”

Ms Miller said letters were
sent to about 365 businesses in
Englerston seeking donations.

Two or three days later they
visited the businesses and did a
follow-up and got very good
response.

Ms Miller said those who did
not get back in touch with the
centre still showed up Friday
and Saturday with supplies for
the back-to-school event.

Foodstores provided the
food, restaurants in the area
cooked the food and other busi-
nesses, including the lquor
stores and other places like
Purity Bakery, Bahamas Bak-
ery, Bahamas Food Services,
provided the bread.

Churches also. provided

bouncing. castles aid tents for

the,event.





PARENTS AND children attend the opening ceremony for the Engler-
ston Urban Renewal Centre back-to-school extravaganza, before school

supplies were given out



STUDENTS WAIT patiently for school fem sippled by businesses

from Englerston

The yowner of the A Shoe
Creation not only made a dona-
tion. Ms Miller said, but will
also give free school shoes to
students in: ‘Englerston who
acedthemy a

The centre will: act as facilita-

tor between the store and stu-
dents in need of shoes.

She said the centre is still has
some uniforms for schools in
the area. Those, needing :uni-
forms can also contact the cen-

‘treilyt | routy lt



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THE TRIBUNE

CARIBBEAN NEWS

VIONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 15



Jamaican officials launch campaign
to reverse the decline i: tourism

| SAN JUAN, “uerto Rico



JAMAICAN officials said Sunday they plan
to open a .ourism training school as part of a
campaign to reverse a downturn in visitors to the
Caribbean island, including from the key U.S.
market, according to Associated Press.

“The (tourism) industry has been on a dan-
gerous, downwards spiral over the last six
months,” newly appointed Tourism Minister Ed
Bartlett said in a statement.

He said details on the school, such as when

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THE TRIBUNE

mma irom TST sme OED |
Old Bahama Bay employee hits top gear with award

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama’s Jamal Darville, an
employee at Ginn’s Old
Bahama Bay resort property
at West End, was named
‘Employee of the Quarter’
and was awarded a Fantasy
NASCAR trip to United
States.

Mr Darville, a marina
deckhand at Old Bahama
Bay at Ginn sur Mer, was
chosen from among 2,500
employees at Ginn proper-
ties for its coveted ‘Employ-
ee of the Quarter’.

Deidre Rahming, public





‘WELL DONE’: Bob Van Bergen (centre) Vice President and General Man-
ager of Ginn sur Mer, congratulates Samuel Ferguson (left) and Jamal
Darville (right) on receiving Old Bahama Bay at Ginn sur Mer ‘Manager’ &
‘Employee of the Quarter’ awards, respectively.

from across the United
States on a_ Fantasy
NASCAR trip in which

relations director, said Mr
Darville joined 11 other
Ginn Resorts employees.

employees are treated as
celebrities for a weekend.

“After being whisked
away on a Ginn Resorts
company jet, Darville settled
into a luxury villa at Ginn
Hammock Beach Resort, a
golf and spa resort located
on two miles of pristine
oceanfront in Palm Coast,
Florida,” she said.

Mr Darville took his moth-
er, Gloria Darville, with him.
The two traveled with oth-

.er winners by private jet to .

the Chevy Rock & Roll 400
at Richmond International
Speedway in Richmond, Vir-
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suite tickets, pit tours, food
and beverage, and
NASCAR merchandise.

“This has been an once-in-
a-lifetime experience,” said
Mr Darville, who reflected
on his stay at the 1,100-acre
Ginn Hammock Beach
Resort and a visit to the
marina at Ginn Resorts’
Yacht Harbor Village, also
in Palm Coast, Florida.

He was particularly
impressed with the profes-
sional staff and outstanding
service.

Bob Van Bergen, Vice
President and General Man-
ager of Ginn sur Mer, pre-
sented Mr Darville with a
plaque, certificate, and
cheque. Sous chef, Samuel

PTT



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ae
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Ferguson was also honoured
at the event with similar gifts
for being named ‘Manager
of the Quarter’.

“We continue our com-
mitment to the future of the
Bahamian tourism industry,”
said Van Bergen.

“We realise that visitors
take lasting memories home
from our resort and it is not
simply because of the beau-
tiful views and accommoda-
tions.

“Tt is the employees who
strive daily to create the
highest level of hospitality
for our guests that bring the
Old Bahama Bay at Ginn
sur Mer experience to life.”

Veteran

Samuel Ferguson, a veter-
an in the tourism industry,
has served more than 24
years in the industry, includ-
ing working at the former
Jack Tar Village in West
End. Ferguson said he
enjoys helping young
Bahamians reach their
career goals in the culinary
field.

Jamal Darville, who
recently joined the hospital-
ity industry about two years
ago, looks forward to a long
career.

“What I enjoy most about
my job is the privilege of
meeting new and interesting
people from all over the
world,” he said. ,

Ginn Resorts is currently
developing Ginn sur Mer, a
2,000 acre resort community
adjacent to Old Bahama Bay
that will contain more than
4,400 condominium and
hotel units, nearly 2,000 sin-
gle family residential home
sites, signature golf courses
designed by Jack Nicklaus
and Arnold Palmer, club-
houses, two large marinas, a
private airport, a Monte
Carlo style casino, water and
swim pavilions, a beach club
and a spa.

The $4.9 billion Ginn sur
Mer development will serve
as Ginn Resorts’ flagship
Caribbean development.

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THE TRIBUNE



Conservatives

ahead in Greek |
general election

@ GREECE
Athens

GREECE’S governing con-
servatives appeared headed for
election victory Sunday, exit
polls showed, despite wide-
spread anger over devastating
forest fires that killed more than
65 people last month, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

An exit poll for Greece’s state
TV projected the governing
New Democracy party ahead
with 42.2 percent of the vote,
and the opposition socialist
PASOK party in second place
with 38.5 percent.

The poll, conducted by the
RASS-MARC polling agency
for the state television channel
NET, said its margin of error
was plus or minus 1 percentage
point.

If confirmed, the projections
will indicate a slip in support
for both parties from the previ-
ous election in 2004, when New
Democracy had won with 45.4
percent, ahead of PASOK with
40.5 percent.

“The government won under
very difficult circumstances. Of
course there is a message for
New Democracy which we must
listen to,” said Athens Mayor
Nikitas Kaklamanis, a senior
official in New Democracy.

Some government officials

played down the figures.

“The reduction in our sup-
port is not significant. The argu-
ments made by the (Socialists)
were ineffective,” said, outgo-
ing Culture Minister Giorgos
Voulgarakis.

Outgoing Interior Minister
Prokopis Pavlopoulos said it
appeared that PASOK had lost

more support than New

Democracy had.
The early results indicated

that New Democracy might win
>



GREEK PRIME Minister Costas Karamanlis talks to the media after
voting outside a polling station in the northern Greek city of
Thessaloniki during general elections on Sunday

enough seats in the 300-member
unicameral parliament to form
a governing majority. Before
the election, Prime Minister
Costas Karamanlis had ruled
out the possibility of forming
coalition with any other party
if he did not win enough votes
to form a majority government
and the election resulted in a
hung parliament.

“It appears New Democracy
will form a governing majori-
ty,” said outgoing Health Min-
ister Dimitris Avramopoulos.
“The size of the majority will
not affect how effective our gov-

ernment is. Even with 151

deputies in parliament, we will
proceed with our reform pro-
gram.”

Others were much more cau-
tious.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 17

Dimitri Messinis/AP

“It will be a long night... the
question of a hung parliament
remains open,” said PASOK
party veteran Kimon Koulouris.

Several other polling agen-
cies conducting exit polls for
private TV stations all showed
similar results, projecting that
New Democracy was ahead
with between 40.2 percent and
43.7 percent, and PASOK was
in second place with between
36.5 percent and 39.8 percent.
They also said surveys indicated
the right-wing nationalist LAOS
party had won enough votes to.
enter parliament.

RASS-MARC _ showed
LAOS winning a projected 3.5
percent _ half a percentage
point more than the minimum
required for a seat in the legis-
lature.

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PAGE 18, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





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Kenyan president

announces plans
for re-election bid

®@ KENYA
Nairobi

PRESIDENT Mwai Kibaki
formally announced Sunday he
would run for re-election as the
candidate for a newly formed
party alliance, according to
Associated Press.

The announcement — made
at a ceremony introducing his
new Party of National Unity —
ended months of speculation

and confusion among those.

backing his bid to become
Kenya’s first incumbent to face
a credible challenge at the polls.

“Things have become better,
but we are far from where we
want to be,” Kibaki said at the
ceremony in. Nairobi. “That is
why Lam requesting you to give

me and our alliance an oppor-

tunity to continue building our
nation.”

The new five-party alliance
includes the Kenya National
African Union, the country’s
oldest party and the largest in
parliament. It was unclear how
strong the party would be, how-
ever, as Kenyan lawmakers fre-
quently change their affiliations,
observers said.

The elections, expected in
December, represent the first
in which an incumbent presi-
dent will face a credible elec-
tion challenge.

Opposition parties named
their candidates weeks ago,
while 75-year-old Kibaki left
Kenyans guessing as to which
party he would run with. Estab-
lishing the new affiliation was
key, however, as Kibaki’s pre-
vious party — with which he had
won in 2002 — had split.

On Sunday, Kibaki did not
elaborate on his campaign plat-
form, but noted his achieve-
ments in the past five years in
office, including improved gov-
ernment services and a free pri-
mary school education program.



KENYA'S PRESIDENT Mwai Kibaki celebrates at the Kenyatta

= Senosi/AP

International Conference Centre during the inter parties co-operation

on Sunday a

He said the country had ‘seen
strong economic growth as well
as the largest influx of foreign

‘ Investment in decades. ‘|

The president said he would
unveil his re-election campaign
at the new party’s official launch
later this month.

His challengers are hoping to
turn voters their way by focus-

. ing on Kenya’s ongoing prob-

lem with high-level graft and
calls for a new constitution,
which already has been draft-
ed by a government-appointed
commission.

Some of Kibaki’s opponents,
however, have endorsed his re-
election bid, including his pre-
decessor, Daniel arap Moi.
Kibaki previously characterized
Moi’s 24-year rule as steeped
in corruption.

Kibaki won a resounding vic-
tory in 2002, campaigning with
the National Rainbow Coali-
tion party on a wide-ranging
reform platform that included
fighting graft. Moi had been
barred constitutionally from
running.

Kibaki’s victory and that of
his party in parliamentary polls

YOUR ALE atyS TO THE WORLD

er

ended the Kenya African
National Union’s 39-year rule,
since its 1963 independence
from Britain.

’ Within months of Kibaki’s
taking office, there were dis-
agreements in his National
Rainbow Coalition, which split
before a November 2005 refer-
endum on a proposed new con-
stitution.

Kibaki had pledged to reduce
the president’s powers under
the current constitution, but
seven Cabinet ministers cam-
paigned against the proposed
charter, saying it did not reduce
presidential powers enough.
The draft constitution was
rejected in the referendum, and
the seven ministers were sacked
by Kibaki.

The seven formed an opposi-
tion party, which later split into
two camps — each now offering
serious challenges to Kibaki’s
re-election, former Cabinet
ministers Raila Odinga, 62, and
Kalonzo Musyoka, 53.

Before the next elections,
Kibaki must dissolve parlia-
ment, and then electoral offi-
cials will sent a poll date.

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THE TRIBUNE



ctivists urge leaders
not to look away

from Darfur crisis

m@ LONDON

PROTESTERS held demon-
strations in several countries on
Sunday to urge world leaders
and the U.N. General Assembly
to work harder to end the crisis
in Darfur, according to Associ-
ated Press.

In London, scores of activists
donned black blindfolds — sym-
bolizing the international com-
munity’s failure to act since
vowing to stop atrocities in Dar-
fur two years ago.

Demonstrators in Rome wore
white T-shirts with a blood-
stained hand on the front and
marched to the Italian city’s
central Piazza Farnese. They
carried a peace torch, which
they said was lit in Chad where
hundreds of thousands from
Darfur now live in refugee
camps.

In Belgium, a few dozen peo-
ple demonstrated outside the
Palace of Justice in Brussels.

Organizers — who planned
protests in more than 30 coun-
tries, including Australia, Egypt,
Germany, Japan, Mongolia,
Nigeria, South Africa and the
United States — said some in the
international community had
become complacent since the
UN. Security Council approved
plans on July 31 for a 26,000-
strong peacekeeping force for
the vast, war-battered region in
western Sudan.

The deployment of the joint
African Union-United Nations
peacekeeping force faces delays,
however, due to a lack of avia-
tion, transport and logistics
units, U.N. Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon has said.

The U.N. General Assembly
and world leaders planned to
discuss the Darfur crisis at their
meeting this week in New York.

More than 200,000 people
have died and 2.5 million have
been uprooted since ethnic
African rebels took up arms
against the Arab-dominated
Sudanese government in 2003,
accusing it of decades of neglect.
Sudan’s government is accused
of retaliating by unleashing a

militia of Arab nomads known
as the janjaweed ~ a charge it
denies.

Activists say Darfur’s vio-
lence is increasing, and they are
demanding the peacekeeping
force be deployed swiftly, and
that the international commu-
nity put pressure all sides in the
conflict to end the violence.

“The world has acknowl-
edged the atrocities in Darfur.
And its leaders have promised
to end them. Now they must
fulfill that promise,” said
Colleen Connors from Globe
for Darfur, a coalition of aid
groups working in Dartur.

“The meeting of world leaders
in the next two weeks is a critical
juncture for the people of Dar-
fur,” she said. “We simply can-
not afford to look away now.”

In London, demonstrators
carried signs reading “Stop
genocide in Darfur” and “Rape,
torture, murder. How much
longer for Darfur?”

Celebrities

Actors Matt Damon, Don
Cheedle, supermodel Elle
MacPherson and South African
Archbishop Desmond Tutu are
among the celebrities who
appear in a video filmed for the
day in which they hold up slo-
gans demanding action.

“The people of Darfur need
peace and they need it now. To
make peace a possibility gov-
ernments should push for an
immediate cease-fire and sup-
ply the peacekeepers they have
talked about for months,”
Damon said.

Tutu called Darfur “the
world’s largest concentration of
human suffering,” adding “it’s
also entirely avoidable if peo-
ple speak out.”

Britain and China pledged
new support Sunday for the
hybrid peacekeeping force.

Britain would likely provide
technical support for peace-
keepers, as well as additional
support for the African coun-
tries contributing to the force,

Russian suspect in
Litvinenko’s murder
nominated to run
for parliament

gm MOSCOW

THE sole suspect in the radi-
ation poisoning death of Krem-
lin foe Alexander Litvinenko
said Sunday he would run for
parliament on the ticket of a
pro-Kremlin ultranationalist
party, according to Associated
Press. :

Former KGB officer Andrei
Lugovoi, who met with Litvi-
nenko at a London hotel bar
on Nov. 1 hours before he fell
ill, told state-run Russia Today
television that he had had no
desire to go into politics but
changed his mind because of
the British accusations against
him.

Lugovoi, a Moscow business-
man who runs a private securi-
ty agency, said Sunday that he
would be No. 2 on the list of
Vladimir Zhirinovsky’s Liber-
al Democratic Party in Decem-
ber’s parliamentary elections.

Britain has identified Lugov-
oi as the main suspect in the
murder of Litvinenko and
demanded his extradition. Rus-
sia has rejected the demand, say-
ing its constitution forbids it.

Lugovoi has dismissed the
British accusations and accused
British authorities of hurting his
business interests.

"T have been involved in pol-
itics over the past three months
against my wishes,” Lugovoi
told Russia Today. “I was a
businessman, but no longer,
thanks to the disgusting policy
of British prosecutors which led
to this political hysteria. With
the situation being highly politi-
cized by British opponents, I
find myself in the midst of a

political wave of interest in me.”

Zhirinovsky, a flamboyant
politician who heeds the Krem-
lin’s orders, said his party con-
gress would confirm Lugovoi’s
position on the party list on
Monday. He dismissed British
charges against Lugovoi as “an
attempt to organize provoca-
tions against our citizens,” the
Interfax news agency reported.

Litvinenko, a former KGB
officer with asylum in Britain,
died Nov. 23 in a London hos-
pital after ingesting radioactive
polonium-210. In a deathbed
statement, he accused President
Vladimir Putin of being behind
his killing - charges the Kremlin
has fiercely denied.

Tensions over the Litvinenko
case have badly hurt the bilat-
eral ties, and the two nations
recently have announced tit-for
tat diplomat expulsions.

Putin has dismissed British
demands for Lugovoi’s extradi-
tion as a vestige of British “colo-
nial thinking.”

Lugovoi’s lawyer, Tatiana
Stukalova, said Sunday that he
had filed a lawsuit against the
business daily Kommersant
over a report in the paper this
summer that referred to Litvi-
nenko as Lugovoi’s “victim.”
Lugovoi said the report cast him
as a criminal, and he is seeking
20 million rubles (about
US$800,000) in damages, news
reports said.

Kommersant editor Andrei
Vasilyev said on Ekho Moskvy
radio that the newspaper was
ready to retract the line Lugov-
oi was referring to, but called
the amount of damages Lugov-
oi was seeking excessive.

said Prime Minister Gordon
Brown, who helped push the
British-French resolution on
Darfur through the U.N. Secu-
rity Council.

“T want to see the hybrid
force in place before the end of
the year,” Brown told the
British Broadcasting Corp. “I
want to see it there, if at all pos-
sible, earlier than that.”

China

Beijing, which is trying to
counter criticism that it is reluc-
tant to support international
intervention in Darfur, said it
would send 315 people.

The Chinese group _ com-
prised of Chinese engineer pla-
toons, a well-digging platoon,
and a field hospital team _ will
build roads, bridges and dig

wells before the larger U.N.-
AU force arrives, China’s
Defense Ministry said, accord-
ing to state media.

Critics have attempted to

shame China, one of Sudan’s

major trading partners, into
action by linking China’s fail
ure to act in the Darfur crisis
to calls for a boycott next year’s
Summer Olympics in the Chi
nese capital.

Sunday’s events were being
organized by a coalition of more
than 50 organizations including
Amnesty International, Human
Rights Watch, and the Save
Darfur Coalition.

Hopes.of a cease-fire were
boosted Saturday, when
Sudanese President Omar al
Bashir said Khartoum was
ready to call a cease-fire when
peace talks get under way in
Libya’s capital on Oct. 27.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 19




Pierre-Yves Brunaud, Amnesty international/AP

IN THIS picture released by Amnesty International, blindfolded
activists calling for peace in Darfur hold a banner reading: “Darfur,
let’s not look away”, as they demonstrate near the Eiffel tower in
Paris on Sunday

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PAGE 20, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



World Rally
champion =
believed dead
in Scotland
helicopter
crash

gm LONDON

FORMER World Ral-
ly champion Colin
McRae was believed to
be among four people
killed in a helicopter
crashed in Scotland,

' police said Sunday,
according to Associated
Press.

McRae, Britain’s best-
known rally driver, was
thought to on board the
- helicopter, which was
owned by him and
crashed Saturday ina
wooded area near his
home in Lanark, police
said.

McRae’s agent, Jean-
Eric Freudiger, said in
reports in The Sunday
Times and the Sunday
Telegraph that the 39-
year-old driver had been
piloting the helicopter.
The reports also said his
5-year-old son, Johnny,
was on board.

Calls to Freudiger’s
Geneva office were not
immediately answered.
Official confirmation
was expected later Sun-
day. i
Police said that four {
people were on board :
the helicopter, all of
whom were feared dead.
The aircraft was badly
burned, making it
impossible for police to
immediately identify the
occupants.

McRae is a licensed
pilot who often flies in
the area, police said. It
wasn’t immediately
known from where the
helicopter had taken off
or where it was headed.

McRae was the World
Rally champion in 1995
and runner-up in 1996,
1997 and 2001.

He won 25 races in a
World Rally Champi-
onship career that ran
from 1987 to 2004. He
made intermittent
appearances on the
WRC circuit until 2006.

McRae, the son of
five-time British rally
champion Jimmy
McRae, also competed
in the Paris-to-Dakar
rally race in 2004 and
2005 and in the Le Mans
24-hour race in 2005.

“He and his wife, Ali-
son, have two children,
Hollie and Johnny.

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS

“Medieval records help scientists

understand climate history

‘

@ EINSIEDELN,
Switzerland
A LIBRARIAN at this

10th century monastery leads

a visitor beneath the vault-

ed ceilings of the archive past

the skulls of two former
abbots.

He pushes aside medieval
ledgers of indulgences and
absolutions, pulls out one of
13 bound diaries inscribed
from 1671 to 1704 and starts
to read about the weather.

“Jan. 11 was so frightfully
cold that all. of the commu-
nion wine froze,” says an
entry from 1684 by Brother
Josef Dietrich, governor and
“weatherman” of the once-
powerful Einsiedeln
Monastery. “Since I’ve been
an ordained priest, the sacra-
ment has never frozen in the
chalice.”

“But on Jan. 13 it got even
worse and one could say it
has never been so cold in
human memory,” he adds.

Ancient diaries of day-to-
day weather details from the
age before 19th-century stan-
dardized thermometers are
proving of great value to sci-
entists who study today’s cli-
mate, according to Associat-
ed Press.

Inaccuracy

Historical accounts were
once largely ignored, as they
were thought to be fraught
with inaccuracy or were sim-
ply inaccessible or illegible.

‘But the booming interest in

climate change has trans-
formed the study of ancient
weather records from what
was oncé a “wallflower sci-
ence,” says Christian Pfister,
a climate historian at the
University of Bern.

The accounts dispel any
lingering doubts that the
Earth is heating up more
dramatically than ever
before, he says. Last winter
— when spring blossoms
popped up all over the Aus-
trian Alps, Geneva’s official
chestnut tree sprouted leaves
and flowers, and Swedes
were still picking mushrooms
well into December — was
Europe’s warmest in 500
years, Pfister says. It came
after the hottest autumn in
a millennium and was fol-
lowed by one of the balmiest
Aprils on record.

“Tn the last year there was
a series of extr¢mely excep-
tional weather,” he says.
“The probability of this is
very low.”

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Bradley S. Klapper/AP



A PAGE in one of 13 diaries by Brother Josef, inscribed from 1671 to 1704 is shown Aug. 15, 2007 in the
Monastery in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. Frozen communion wine, soft rains that caressed the earth and
winds that wrought an all-consuming yellow fog are described meticulously by the 17th century Swiss
monk in accounts once consigned to dark ecclesiastical archives.

The records also provide a
context for judging shifts in
the weather. Brother Kon-
rad Hinder, the current
weatherman at Einsiedeln
and an avid reader of Diet-
rich’s diaries, says his prede-
cessor’s precise accounts of
everything from yellow fog
to avalanches provide his-

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torical context.

“We know from Josef
Dietrich that the extremes
were very big during his
time. There were very cold
winters and very mild win-
ters, very wet summers and
very dry summers,” he says,
adding that the range of
weather extremes has been

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smaller in the 40 years he has
recorded data for the Swiss
national weather service.

“That’s why I’m always
cautious when people say the
weather extremes now are at
their greatest. Without his-
torical context you lose con-
trol and you rush to proclaim
every latest weather phe-
nomenon as extreme or
unprecedented,” Hinder
says.

Most historians and scien-
tists delving deep into
archives seek accounts of dis-
asters and extreme weather
events. But the records can
also be used to obtain a more
precise temperature range
for most months and years
that goes beyond such gen-
eral indicators as tree rings,
corals, ice cores or glaciers.

Such weather sources
include the thrice-daily tem-
perature and pressure mea-
surements by 17th-century
Paris physician Louis Morin,
a short-lived international
meteorological network cre-
ated by the Grand Duke of
Tuscany in 1653, and 33
“weather diaries” surviving
from the 16th century. In
Japan, court officers kept
records of the dates of cher-
ry blossom festivals, which
allow modern scientists to
track the weather of the
time.

Early records often are
only discovered by chance in
documents that have sur-
vived in centuries-old Euro-



The Tribune wants to hear
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making news in their
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you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
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award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
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Share your news

pean monasteries like Ein-
siedeln, or in the annals of
rulers, military campaigns,
famines, natural hazards and
meteorological anomalies. In
Klosterneuberg near Vienna
an unidentified writer notes a
lack of ice on the Danube in
1343-1344 and calls the win-
ter “mild,” while the abbot
of Switzerland’s Fischingen
Monastery laments the late
harvest of hay and corn in
the summer of 1639 when
“there was hardly ever a
really warm day.”

Scores of similar clues are
pieced together year by year
to determine temperature
ranges, says Pfister, whose
team of four uses old
“weather reports” to work
back as far as the 10th cen-
tury.

Pfister has found that from
1900 to 1990, there was an
average of five months of
extreme warmth per decade.
In the 1990s, that number
jumped to an unprecedent-
ed 22 months. The same
decade also had no months
of extreme cold, in contrast
to the half-millennium
before.

Even in the last major
global warming period from
900 to 1300, severe winters
were only “somewhat less
frequent and less extreme,”
Pfister says. Over the past
century, temperatures have
gone up an average of 1.3
degrees Fahrenheit, which is
often attributed to the accu-
mulation of greenhouse gas-
es, primarily carbon dioxide,
in the atmosphere.

Issues

Global warming is one of
the world’s top issues today,
because of fears of massive

‘hurricanes and flooding. For

most of history, though, it
was the fate of farms and the
fear of’ famine that encour-
aged careful weather obser-
vation.

The Einsiedeln abbots —
princes within the Holy
Roman Empire until 1798 —
were powerful leaders who
ruled over large swaths of
central Switzerland’s moun-
tainous terrain. Agriculture
was the primary source of
income for the region and
natural disasters such as
floods and avalanches posed
an omnipresent threat.

Debts accrued and hon-
ored, accidents, local con-
flicts and business transac-
tions also fill Dietrich’s
accounts, “but most days
start with the weather,” says
Andreas Meyerhans, who
cares for the monastery’s
precious documents.

The diaries — written in
German sprinkled with old
Swiss dialect and margin
notes in Latin — are
“unique” because of the
exceptional everyday detail
they provide, Pfister says.

He adds that centuries of
weather records make it
clear that people need to
adapt when extremely hot or
cold weather becomes more
frequent.

While the lives of earlier
generations were ruled by
the weather, “in the second
half of the 20th century peo-
ple slept and became com-
pletely unprepared for nat-
ural disasters, because they
happened so rarely.”

In Einsiedeln, Hinder
reads from a barometer
flanked by the Virgin Mary,
and worries that humanity is
in trouble.

“God still controls the
weather,” he says. But, he
adds, people must do their
part by taking better care of
the planet.















THE TRIBUNE



Pope presses his new

environment campaign,
urging greater cooperation

to fight

@ CASTEL GANDOLFO,
ital



POPE BENEDICT XVI
pressed his new environment
campaign Sunday, urging
greater international coopera-
tion to fight ozone depletion,
according to Associated Press.

Benedict noted that Sunday
marked the 20th anniversary of
the adoption of the Montreal
Protocol, which calls for reduc-
ing the production and con-
sumption of ozone-thinning
chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs.

"In the last two decades,
thanks to an exemplary collab-
oration in the international
community among politics, sci-
ence and economics, important
results have been obtained with
positive results for current and
future generations," Benedict
said.

"On behalf of all, 1 hope that
this cooperation is intensified
so that the common good,
development and the safe-
guarding of creation is promot-
ed, strengthening the alliance
between man and the environ-
ment," he said.

Benedict was speaking to the
faithful gathered for his weekly
Sunday blessing in the court-
‘yard of the papal summer resi-
dence in Castel Gandolfo, in
the hills south of Rome.

In other comments, Benedict
also noted the passing of the
Sept. 11 anniversary, saying the
"tragic" attacks on New York
and Washington had "darkened
the dawn of the Third Millen-
nium."

He quoted Pope John Paul
II, who in response to the
attacks urged Christians and
others to believe that God's
mercy was "stronger than every

bad, and that only 6n the cross, _

of Christ is the world's salva-
tion found."
Benedict has been on an eco-
friendly campaign of late, pre-
siding most recently over a pro-
environment youth rally in the
central Italian shrine town of
Loreto. In addition, the Vati-
can has installed photovoltaic
cells on the roof of its main
‘auditorium to convert sunlight
into electricity and has joined

a reforestation project.aimed at .

offsetting its CO2 emissions.

The Montreal Protocol was
adopted in 1987 following the
1985 discovery of the growing
hole in the ozone layer over the
Antarctic. Thinning in the
ozone layer — largely due to the
CFC chemical compounds
leaked from refrigerators, air
conditioners and other devices —
exposes Earth to harmful solar
rays.

‘The protocol calls for the
reduction of the production and
consumption of CFCs. It also
calls on signatories to bar the





POPE BENEDICT XVI greets faithful during

ozone-depletion



Alessandra Tarantino/AP -





the Angelus prayer from

his window at his summer palace in Caste! Gandolfo

export or import of CFC pro-
ducing items to countries that
have not signed or ratified the
deal.

The ozone layer keeps out
ultraviolet radiation, which is

Just spend

dangerous’to humans and ani-
mals.

Less protection could
increase risks of skin cancer and
cataracts and atfect biodiversity,
scientists say

ERNATIONAL NEWS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 21



Castel Gandolfo, on the outskirts of Rome, Sunday, Sept. 16, 2007.



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POPE BENEDICT XVI greets faithful during the Angelus prayer from his window at his summer palace in

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PAGE 22, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

COMICS: PAGE





Tribune Comics
JUDGE PARKER . 3

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Dennis. )
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THE TRIBUNE



MOM, CAN I Get A

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Contract Bridge
_ By Steve Becker

Famous Hand

Opening lead — king of hearts.

This deal occurred in a playoff

South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
@A1073
v
4 53
t #KQII0842
F WEST EAST
385 4
Â¥KQ743 VA 1062
#AQ92 38764
MARVIN Ne $753
{ ‘ SOUTH
K
TILL GO PLAY o
WITH THE #K 10
TOYS INMY Pay £96
BEDROOM 1k: The bidding:
re South West North East
3 Pass 1yv 26 24%
1) 2¢ 3¢ 4¢@ 5¢@
{ Pass Pass 54 Pass
i Pass Dble
if
BI.
<1 il
ay





ier
CNBLE NEING eal NSN
KBLE NEW ap hl

QNNERSITY




HST. BY OPIVGETL FEED MWh is
Colomic$.coM / powsSsQuituRr

| ton a WILAI VEC EAGTHLIUE. HET

TIGER here?In making a
word. cach letter may
be used once only:

L ’
WERE “TI \ZOUGH Each must contain the

LISTENING!



). CRYPTIC PUZZLE .



between the B. Jay Becker and Cur-
tis Smith teams to determine which
would represent the United States in
the 1973 world championship. The
Becker team won the match handily,
but not before it was badly clawed on
this hand.

Becker, West, doubled five spades
and Jed the king of hearts, ruffed in

dummy. Declarer then conceded a
club to the ace, after which Becker
could do no better than cash the ace
of diamonds to hold South to 11
tricks

Losing 850 points was no doubt a
bitter pill for Becker to swallow, but
what happened at the other table was
no doubt even worse than he might
have expected. With his teammates
now holding the North-South cards,
the bidding went:

South West North East
Pass lv 2 & 2 @(!)
Pass 3 & 4& 49
Pass 44 Pass 59”
Dble

Here Smith, East, decided to
muddy the waters by throwing in a
psychic two-spade bid, and it worked
like a charm. Becker’s befuddled
teammates never got themselves
straightened out, and they wound up
doubling five hearts. West then pro-
ceeded to wrap up that contract for
another 850 points, losing only a
spade and a trump.

Thus the Smith team made five
spades doubled at one table and five
hearts doubled at the other table for a
combined gain of 1,700 points. For-
tunately for Becker’s squad, it was
able to recover from this disastrous
loss, proving that one hand does not
a bridge match make.



‘HOW many words of
four letters or more

‘can you make from
the letters shown

centre letter and there
must be at least one
nine-letter word. No
plurals or verb forms

ending in “s”, no words with inital capitals and no
words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted.
The first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkiet

in inkjet printer).

TODAY’S TARGET

Good 17: very good 26; excellent 34 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.





hate heat heath hoot oath teach tech that thatch

theta tooth TOOTHACHE

ache chat cheat each echo etch hatch hatchet

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION

) grammar

Study of
words and
ra aX-1 [om Rew 4)

language





MONDAY,
SEPT 17

ARIES — March 21/April 20

You’re not concerned with other
people’s opinions this week, Aries.
You are feeling quite confident and:

| loving every minute of it. Consult

with friends for weekend plans.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21 |
It seems that romance is key for this
week, Taurus. You are well
equipped to handle any situation
that comes your way — so make the)
most of chances for passion. Libra’
could be a love match. 44
GEMINI - May 22/June 21 |
Stop your excessive worrying,
Gemini, things will turn out just fine.|
Capricom is a key player in surpris-|
ing events on Thursday. Expect-an,
outcome you never expected. }
CANCER - June 22/July 22 |
Now is the time to take chances and)
step out into the public spotlight,;
Cancer. Make the most of your confi-'
dence to pursue a new love interest.)
Don’t look too far for thatsomeone. |
LEO - July 23/August 23 ~ |

This week’s struggles won’t go away!

‘with a quick fix. You must pull out the!

big guns and spend some time and con-,
sideration on this difficulty. Look to,
Pisces to lend.a hand. __ cede
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22.
The more you learn, the more you;
are anxious to use your knowl-!
edge, Virgo. All matters concern- |
ing technology are child’s play |
this week. Others need your help. |
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
You-provide the missing link in an}
important work project, Libra.
Tuesday will prove to be your most |
productive day of the week. Use it-as |
your power day and all others will!
look toward you as a leader. |
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22 |
You’re the master of your domain, |
Scorpio and you feel great. An easy
work week leaves you plenty of time}
to sit back and enjoy the scenery. A.
natural loner, enjoy it alone. =
SAGITTARIUS —Nov 23/Dec 21 |
You are not in the mood for commo- ;
tion this week, Sagittarius, so stay |
away from those who are loud and
overbearing. Spend some serene}
moments with your mate. a
CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20 |
Let work associates get a peak at what
makes you tick, Capricorn, and you'll’
seem less mysterious to them. A testy:
boss confronts your work ethic. Be!
_patient and the situation will blow over. |

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
You've bitten off more than you can |
chew this week, Aquarius, but there’s |
no backing out now. Best to call in |
the reserves, namely a few trusty
friends who can lend a hand.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20.
When a close friend pushes your lim-
its, it’s best to stand by your princi- |
ples and not go along with this per- |
son’s plan. Trouble is not what you |
need right now. !

Torture 20, Aunts 22, Spectre 23, Eye-catching 25, Terminates
26, Nightmares 28, Evaluate 31, Overcoat 32, Spatter 34,
Entire 35, Raise 39, Nail.

ACROSS DOWN
3 Many bulldings or part of one (5) 1 Deputy guilty of some garbled
8 The firm figures it's funny (5) circumiocution (5) :
10 The right hand one is long and 2 Anintoxicating colourful mixture (4,3)
wet (5) 4 — The young fellow has nothing but
11 See one in a metal box (3) a burden (4)
12 italian city residence, a bit 5 Charlie's out of practice and
quaint (5) somewhat surly (6)
13 The male took the lead, then gave 6 — Inwhich old soldiers became less
way (7) conspicuous In their bravery (5)
15 Fora runner lo get £50, 7 Nell, sadly, was heard to take
abllity’s needed (5) , her tow (5)
18 Obtained when you leave on time (3) | 9 Awomplece of machinery (3)
‘19 Possibly Is left to suffocate (6) 12 Becoming wild, the pet deer
21 Is taken to mean freedom (7) ran out (7) ; Be
22 Double container of whiskey (4) 14 Highball (3)
23 Abitdespondent, yet is full of life! (4) 16 Otherwise possibly of tin (2,3) ey TT
24 Minced beef tin, always 17 Guides around the dales (5)
worth having (7) 19 Flows freely from masters (7) co Peed
26 = Truly athome with a legal 20 Take off something comic, ,
document (6) perhaps? (5) : DOWN
29 Broadcasters give thelr views on it(3) | 21 Girl from Colindalo (5) ae ar 1 os ‘
ag 31. She's soft on a nobleman (5) 23 Judged to be awtully good, albeit 8 Deadly (5) 4 Cog (4)
i 32 Possibly reads about me being plagiarised (7) 7 a (5) 5 desig (6)
- maligned (7) 24 Loud ory from below, about a bit ww 12 Custom (5) : an ais
rE 34 Another name for central of help (6) ~ 13 Narrator (7) 9 Twitch (3)
Ey Dakar? (5) 25. Iftuming up when due to finish, N 15 Accepted (5) 12. Coarse fabric (7)
: 35. Maybe not a welght? (3) shame on you! (3) | ie eee 6 14 Weight (3)
(C | % Speckttusto make an authortaive | 27 Land the plane awkwardly (5) Bel Ope) sf 46- Flying toys (5)
decision (3-2) 28 Rub away (5) rp 22 Animal fat (4) 17 Atno time (5)
BR 1 37 Atsome stage, put back that 30 One planet in seven, usually (5) 0 dressy outfit (3-2) 32 Around the sand bar, thare flows Ly 26 Source (6) 21 Deserve (5)
€ | 38 The jugs were broken at the leisure a river (4) ' 29 Term of respect (3) 23 Blasphemer (7)
S centre (5) 33 What carrots do in cars? (3) 31 Giant (5) : 24 Tiny (6)
Ma 32 Myths (7) 25 Equipment (3)
S ——— 34 Sensational (5) 27 Opponent (5)
|” | CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS EASY SOLUTIONS 35 Aleo oe = one (5)
WY] Sieearareese Ae ues, (AamSSsimma uu Amen Mad | SF Ura nnn 32 Conacon
Y 0 y oe eae ie Hee ae af oe 3 | 19, Lard 21 , Absorb 24, Country and western 27, Meteor Be Pewee) 33 Negative (3)
( A , v) 30, Rap-iers 33, y
4 Fairness 35, Letting fly 36, Bled 37, Tuck-s in 38, Negate 29, Cost 30, Postage 33, Face-lift 35, Represents 36, Punt
y R. 4 40, Knocks 41, No 42, In the w-a' 37, Atheist 38, Cancan 40, Starve 41, Neo 42, Examines.
a ae eon 2, on i. penal a DOWN: 1, Antibiotic 2, Sick 3, Handsome 4, Central 5, Knuckle
AQ) Uinsetie 10° Site Lomead 30 ae Bb See ee ae en eel eee eat 10; Needy 16,

23, Every second 25, Screen test 26, For all that 28,
Ena-bling 31, A-li-enat-e 32, St-and-in 34, Reduc-E 35,
L-oser 39, Goes





| CHESS by Leonard Barden |

Georg Siegel v Maurice Asniey,
Bad Wiessee 1997. Ashley is
America’s first black
grandmaster, a charismatic
personality who is a regular
commentator at televised speed
tournaments. In today’s puzzle
his queen and rook menace the
white king, but White’s army is
compact and many players
would settle for a queen swap.
How did Black (to move) force
decisive material gain?

This weekend sees the final
rounds of the Staunton
Memorial, London's
grandmaster tournament. Play
at Simpsons in the Strand starts
at 2pm today and noon
tomorrow. Spectator entry is
free, with comfortable viewing



in the upstairs bar. Competitors
include Holland's top three GMs,
England number one Michael
Adams, and London's best woman
player Jovanka Houska.

LEONARD BARDEN

Chess solution 8451: 1...h4+ 2 Kf4 (2 Kxh4? Qxf3) ‘
Rd4+ 3 Red g5+! 4 Ke3 Rd3+ 5 Kxd3 Qxf3+ and wins.



THE TRIBUNE omar i/, 2007, PAGE 23







| MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 17, 2007.

8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

Florida Roadtrip |Antiques Roadshow “Honolulu, HI" Most Honorable Son (N) (\ (CC) |Justice for My People: The Dr.
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ior million. (N) (CC) peril. 4 (CC)

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prison’s sewer system. (N) (CC) —_|the city. (N) (CC)
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(6:15) * x MA- /Real Time With Bill Maher Carl Curb YourEn- |The Kingdom: Tell Me You Love Me Jamie's
OR PAYNE —‘|Bernstein. 4 (CC) thusiasm (. —_|HBO First Look |doubts persist; Palek seems to be
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x &% THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS: TOKYO (:15) & & MAJOR PAYNE (1995, Comedy) Damon Wayans, Karyn Par-
DRIFT (2006) Lucas Black. An American street racer sons, Bill Hickey. A gung-ho Marine commands young recruits. 1 ‘PG-
takes on a Japanese champion. ‘PG-13' (CC) 13' (CC)

(39) % & THE THING ABOUT MY FOLKS (2005, | *» HOPE FLOATS (1998, Romance) Sandra Bullock, Harry Connick Jr.,
medy-Drama) Peter Falk. A man and his father bond|Gena Rowlands. A newly divorced single mother finds love in her home-
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ra *% BIG | % TENACIOUS DIN: THE PICK OF DESTINY —_|(:45) The King- | x & FANTASTIC FOUR (2005, Ac-
ADDY (1999) jaune, Comedy) Jack Black, Kyle Gass. JB and KG on Max Final |tion) loan Gruffudd, Jessica Alba.
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es % % IN THE MIX (2005, Com-|(:25) * * AEON FLUX (2005, Science Fiction) Charl- | Weeds Californication
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(6:00) 4% | NATIONAL LAMPOON'S DORM DAZE (2003, —_|(:40) DORM DAZE 2: COLLEGE AT SEA (2006, Com-
NIN THE |Comedy) Tatyana Ali, Boti Bliss. Two women turn edy) Gable Carr, Patrick Casey. Collegians board a
VALLEY (2005) {heads at a coed dormitory. © ‘R’ (CC) i








Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
etn decveny eee
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of September 2007.

HBO-

UV



- Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun



i'm lovin’ it



TMC



cruise ship containing a stolen jewel. 'R’





P3

=
_



PAGE 24, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



Attention All,

GSM —

POSTPAID he neene



| Please bring your GSM postpaid sccelll
Bm up fo date before September 17th to avoid —
disconnection on Sapien 19th.

~ GSM mobile



L



| To find more information on GSM Credit Limits, contact the
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or visit any BTC location in our Family of Islands
send us an email at gsmcreditlimits@btcbahamas.com

Visit the website at www.bicbahamas.com click GSM Credit Limits









MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

The Tribune



Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life






Royal Cor
urged i

Licensees call for forensic audit and injunction to prevent any GBPA share

oO





on inquiry
uthori



sales, warning that Freeport's foundations ‘being built on sand’

wee eee wee ce wee wee eee eee ewe eee meme ewne geen aneataaeenenanae eps See ee been vale tage. arb eater added rec abiaah daar mie ia ries Ar oars oh... Te) © ee CETTE oe SPEED.

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

reeport business leaders
have called for a Royal
Commission to review
the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, and urged

Former MP in

that an n injunction be imposed to pre-
vent the Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity’s (GBPA) shareholders from sell-

ing their investment-while a forensic |

audit of the company — focusing par-
ticularly on its disposal of productive
assets — is carried out. . >

In a hard-hitting statement respond-

ing to the Fleming Gro

acquiring the GBPA a
opments, Chris Lowe, the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Commertce’s

ee "Ss interest in

president, and attorney Rawle May- |
nard, on behalf of the Freeport .

Licensees and Property Owners Asso-

ciation, urged Sal baat ota Blue ..

other devel-

' devo

Ribbon Commission be established
to assess whether the GBPA’s regu-
iptory responsibilities should be

ved to.a local government

GBPA to devolves its quasi-govern-

mental, development and regulatory

powers ‘to a ‘Local Authority’, pro-
vided this is approved by some 80 per

authority. cent of GBPA licensees.
’ Clause 4 (2) of the 1960 supple- 9
mental agreement to the Hawksbill SEE Page 10

‘Creek apreeiient provides for the

Licence, permit fees hit ‘DHHS
_ medical costs by $700,000 |

Jegal battle with ex-
business partner

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FURIOUS legal battle has erupted between.a former .

FNM MP and his ex-business partner, the former seeking |

a Supreme Court order preventing ‘interference and .inter-—
vention’ in his business and the latter looking to apply for
a rival injunction to freeze all the former politician’s wealth
in a dispute embroiling up to $80 million in client assets. |

Lester Turnquest, former FNM MP for Malcolm Creek, : |
and his company, the Bonnycord Group, have filed a
Supreme Court summons seeking an order that his for-
mer business partner, Hywel Jones, president of Bahamas-
based financial services firm, the Britannia Consulting
Group, “be restrained from interfering with or intervening”
in his company’s business affairs.

He is also claiming damages “for conspiracy to defraud
and/or injure” himself and Bonnycord, and for alleged’
“fraudulent misrepresentations” made against them.

And Mr Turnquest has filed two more separate writs, one
claiming $2.348 million from Mr Jones’s Britannia Group,

@ By NEIL HARTNELL -

» DOCTORS Hospital Health

Systems (DHHS) sees some ©

$700,000 stripped from its bot-
tom line profits per annum
through business licence and
work permit fees, its chief
financial-officer telling The Tri-

|’ bune that appeals for the pre-

TetummpOuances Editor .. BISXlisted firm sees profits up 25 per cent, despite pleas

for change ‘falling on pasta ears’ with former government

vious government to alleviate

this situation “fell on deaf.

ears” despite its increasing

medical services costs. .
DHHS ‘saw its ‘net income

for the six months to July 31,

2007, increase by 25 per cent to
. $2.5 million from $2 million,
despite incurring these costs,
while finding a solution for its
loss-making discontinued oper-
ation, Western Medical Plaza,

by leasing it to saniher party
(see story Pagé 3B).
Yet Darron Cash, DHHS

alleging that this was a sum
that Bonnycord had lent to
it. The other writ, naming

SEE page 4



Forty five days for the
EPA decision, as $35m_
lobster sales in danger

i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas must decide
_ within the next 45 days whether
to participate in the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
talks with the European Union
(EU), with failure to do so like-
ly to cost its crawfish/lobster
industry more than $35 million
in lost revenues per annum.

A paper on the EPA’s impli-
cations for the Bahamian fish-
eries industry, and the conse-
quences of not signing on to the
treaty by December 31, 2007,
said the sector’s exports to the
EU would attract the Most
Favoured Nation (MFN) import
duty rate from 2008 onwards.

The paper, produced by
Hank Ferguson, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce's trade
agreements task force chairman,
said the MFN rate on lobster
imported to the EU was around

12.5 per cent, and its ‘inpioaiticn ;

— coupled with the loss of duty-

free access for Bahamian.

seafood wholesalers — would
raise the price of their products
by $2-$2.50 per pound, making
them uncompetitive against
rivals.

seafood products, Mr Ferguson
said, some $35.003 million of
these lobster alone.

The paper added: “The
Bahamas decision not to sign
the EPA agreement would
mean the end of duty-free
access, and all goods exported
would attract.an MFN tariff
rate. :

erential status would immedi-
ately raise the ae of lobster

SEE EPA, page 5

More than 50 per cent of the —
Bahamas’$66.315 - million:
exports to the EU in 2004 were |

“The MEN tariff on lobster — }
is 12.5 per cent. The loss of pref-

THE DAVIS FAMILY

: a



Confidence For Life

Colinalmperial.

One family with many needs. For
a solid financial foundation and

customized advice, their choice Is
Colinalmperial.

Gy



242.356.8300

Info@Colinalmperial.com



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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

Ota tay WRAP }

New I. nvestment
Opportunities!

REAL ESTATE

Indigo - Investment Opportunity

A unique opportunity to own 5 adjacent | lots in he quaint weied :
community. Each lot measures 60 ff'x 130 ft:zoned for 15 units.
Amentiies include double tennis court and ‘swimming pool. Was -

$650,000, now reduced 16 $900: 000 for ane sale.

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P.0.Box W.10414, Nossou, The Bahamas



@ By Fidelity Capital
Markets

; rading activity was

brisk this past week in

the Bahamiau market,

as over 103,000 shares changed

hands. The market saw 12 out

of its 19 listed stocks trade, of

which nine advanced and three
remained unchanged.

Volume leader for a second

straight week was Common-

. wealth Bank (CBL), with

36,150 shares changing hands

and accounting for 35 per cent

of the total shares traded..

CBL was also the big
advancer for the week, increas-
ing by $0.36 or 2.36 per cent to
close at a new 52-week high of
$15.64. CBL’s share price has
continued its upward soar since
the announcement of a
planned three-for-one stock
split in November 2007.

Also advancing was Cable
Bahamas (CAB), up $0.22 or
2.04 per cent to end the week
at.a new 52-week high of
$11.02.. The FINDEX
increased by 6.09 points or

- 0.72%, week over week to

close at 853.81.

COMPANY NEWS
Cable Bahamas (CAB) —
_FOR the 2007 second quar-

ter, CAB posted a net profit
of $5. 3 million ($0.27 per share)
compared to a profit of $4.4
million ($0.22 per share) for
the same period last year.
Total revenues were $18.9
million for the quarter, com-
pared to $16.1 million, for the
2006 second quarter, an
increase of $2.8 million.
CAB's management indicat-
ed that:its cable television seg-
ment continued to perform
well during the quarter. Total
revenues from the cable tele-
vision segment were $10.8 mil-
lion during the quarter, with

‘total revenues from the com-

pany's Internet and data seg-

ments being $5.5 million and:

$2.5 million respectively.
Compared to the 2006 sec-
ond quarter, operating expens-
es of $9. 5 million and operating
income of $6.6 million for 2007
increased by $1.5 million and
$1million, respectively.

CAB’s total assets as at June
30, 2007, were $173 million, an
increase of $7 million when
compared to year-end 2006,
due to additional capital expen-
ditures during the period. |

Total liabilities remained
pretty consistent with the year-

SEE page 11

RBC is pleased to announce the opening of our new branch on Carmichael

Road. This new temporary’ location will house both RBC Royal Bank of

Canada and RBC FINCO under one roof, pending the construction of Cee
RBC’s new flagship. location ¢ one block west of the temporary location 0 on. md

Carmichael Road.

Royal Bank will offer a full range of banking products and services, while aks
- RBC FINCO will offer a uh suite of mor ieaee products and services.

Services include:

Business and Consumer Loans

Personal and Business Deposit Account Services

Single and Multi-family Residential Mortgages

24-Hour ATM
Foreign Exchange Services
Night Deposits

Card Services

_» Royal Online™ Internet Banking —

» and more!

Come see us at the corner of Carmichael Road and Turtle Drive. We look
forward to welcoming you to our new location soon!

GD Ears asin

be @l0 Rh

ere aaa)






















The | Bahamian | Stock |

FINDEX 853.81 YTD 15.05%

CLOSING CHANGE VOLU

BISX
SYMBOL PRICE
AML $1.60 $- 0
BAB $1.62 $-. 0
BBL $0.85. $- 0
BOB $9.54 $0.04 “1240
BPF $11.70 $- 5420
BSL $14.60 $- 0
BWL $3.74 $- 0
CAB $11.02 $0.22 9500
CBL $15.64 $0.36 36150
CHL $3.10 $- 0
CIB - $14.70 * $0.05 17000
CWCB $5.92 $0.01 1761
DHS $2.32 $0.01 9500
FAM $6.18 $0.13 1000
FCC $0.70 $- 0
FCL $6.10 $0.08 14000
FIN $12.77 $- 5992
ICD $7.25 $- 200
JSJ. $10.05 $0.04 1500 16. 86%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
¢ CBL has declared dividends of $0.12 per share, payable on
September 28, 2007, to all shareholders of record date Sep-
tember 14, 2007.



© Consolidated Water Company has declared dividends of
$0.013 per BDR, payable on November 7, 2007, to all share-
holders of record date September 30, 2007.

¢ CBL will hold an Extraordinary General Meeting on
October 17, 2007, at 5pm at SuperClubs Breezes, West Bay
Street, Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.

| ¢ Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on September 26, 2007, at 6pm at the British Colonial
Hilton, Number One, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. .

bastomencen oepepentneenee



Share your news

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from people who are
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neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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award.

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and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

octors Hospital
(DHHS) remains
“committed” to sell-

ing its Blake Road-based
Western Medical Plaza facility
despite reaching an agreement
to lease the facility to a third
party and reduce its drag on
the company’s profitability,
with its chief financial officer
telling The Tribune that a div-
idend payment to sharehold-
ers was “under active consid-
eration”.

e Darron Cash’said the five-
year lease arrangement for
Western Medical Plaza took
effect from July 11, 2007, with
the move set to eliminate the
regular losses DHHS incurred
from the facility which was a
discontinued operation held
for sale.

Its disposal would have been
the final step in DHHS’ turn-
around programme, with
Western Medical Plaza having
generated a $0.29 million loss
for the first ix months of the
year to July 31, 2007, com-
pared to $0.36 million last year,
a reduction of 19.4 per cent.

The lease agreement will
eliminate the losses and oper-
ating expenses that DHHS was
incurring in keeping the facili-
ty operational, this becoming
the as-yet unnamed lessee’s
responsibility, with the BISX-
listed company now receiving
positive cash flows from the
monthly rental payments.

Mr Cash did not go into too
much detail, saying more finan-



cial details about the Western

Medical Plaza arrangement
would be revealed when the
company published its third
quarter financials. .

He told The Tribune: “It’s
certainly going to notably
reduce the outlay Doctors
Hospital would have to pay for
operating expenses, and goes
further by adding some posi-
tive cash flow from the rent.
That is a net plus for the hos-
pital. .

“At the same time, it helps
us add value into the facility.

_ But again; we draw reference
to the-fact that the hospital
maintains its commifment to
selling the facility. If there is

the possibility of a sale at the
right value, that is going to get
the appropriate consideration.

“The lease does provide
increased cash flow benetits,
but long-term there’s still a
commitment to sell.”

Mr Cash said DHHD had
made “strides in reducing the
losses from discontinuing oper-
ations year-over-year”, adding
that among the difficulties the
company had experienced in
attempting to sell Western
Medical Plaza were problems
encountered in obtaining goy-
ernment approval for buyers
who had some element of for-
eign ownership. That is likely
to have been a reference to the
MedLink/Bahamas Public Ser-
vices union deal, which ulti-
mately fell through.

Market

“T think the fact it’s been on
the market so long indicates
the extent to which it’s been a
challenge. It’s been extremely
difficult to sell, not only
because it’s a purpose built
building, but because a number
of companies who did find val-
ue in the facility had some for-
eign element that found it
impossible to get approval

from the Government,” Mr
Cash said.

For the first half of its cur-
rent financial year, DELHS saw
net income increase 25 per
cent to $2.5 million from $2
million, with earnings per share
(EPS) up to $0.25 per share
from $0.20 per share a year
ago.

Patient days, based on the
average daily census, were up 5
per cent across all nursing
departments compared to the
previous year, particularly in
medical/surgical patient days,
while patient service revenues
rose 5.08 per cent to,$20.7 mil-
lion from $19.7 million.

As a result, Mr Cash said:
“We just want to signal to the
market that the subject of div-
idends has been getting con-
siderable attention from the
Board of Directors. They
understand the need to pro-
vide a return to shareholders,
and the matter is under active
consideration.”

Mr Cash added that DHHS
was targeting “low-hanging
fruit”, especially accounts
receivables and minimizing
provisions four doubtful
accounts. In the six months to
July 31, 2007, net accounts
receivables. owed by patients

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 131 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Businéss Companies Act, 2000,
notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Jumper Island Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution is
the 3rd day of September, A.D., 2007 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308 East

Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
Liquidator



The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

- JAMIE SMITH

‘OWEN BURROWS

» MICHAEL HANNA

DALE ANDREWS

* MARK BETHEL

* ROCHELLE KNOWLES

* WAYNE SMITH

¢ ROBERT THOMPSON
* JACQUELINE GLINTON
* GEORGETTE THOMPSON

¢ RALF MADILL

¢ CRAIG SIMMONS
¢ MAT ENTERPRISES

¢ SONIA ADDERLEY
¢ DEMETRI WELLS

All rentals must be paid and items removed
no later than September 26th, 2007

stor-it-all



Soldier Ce
(by Lowe s Wholesale)
Telephone: 393-4622 or 393-0964

-all



had risen from $951,000 to
$1.147 million, while sums
owed by third party-payers,
such as insurance companies,
grew from $5.521 million to
$6.007 million.

Payments

While the pace of payments
from insurance companies “has
not been what we want it to
be”, Mr Cash said DHHS’
largest exposure was not from
third-party-payers, although
the National Insurance Board

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 3B

PP ee
Doctors still ‘committed’ to Western Medical sale

(NIB) was back up over $1
million in accounts receivables.

He added that receivables
owned by company accounts
to DHHS had “crept up above
satisfactory levels”, and as a
result DHHS had “limited pre-
viously unfettered access to our
facilities” that was enjoyed by

the Public Hospitals Authority .

(PHA); agents for cruise ships
and private companies.

Mr Cash said DHHS had a
difficult balance to strike when
it came to providing health-
care and chasing up patients



who owed money, saying the
company would continue to
take appropriate action with-
out doing anything that might
harm its reputation “by being
unreasonably harsh”.

“There are a number of
major accounts that are before ~
the courts, both companies and
individuals,” Mr Cash said.
“We've taken the position that
for those persons who have the
means to pay, they will be
brought to account, and those
persons are presently before
the courts.”

PUBLIC AUCTION

FRIDAY - SEPTEMBER 21st, 2007

By Order of

The Commissioner of Police

Commonwealth of The Bahamas

(B) 2 - “His and Her” Rolex Watches - (Certified)
To be Sold Individually or as a Pair

I. G. STUBBS WILL SELL

(A) Brand new Blue Dodge Durango - Year: 2007
4 Door SLT Wagon
ecm are Me eee ere Umer Ur LiL)

LOCATION: Police Training College Grounds
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

alii

12:00 Noon - Friday - September 21st, 2007

Preview and Inspection from 11:00 a.m.
OTe PAU Co CR Tea UCR

All items subject to a reserve price, and the right of the Auctioneer

or any person on his behalf to bid up to that price.
*All items Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’s Check

Terms

or current Bank Guarantee Letter. No purchase(s) will

be released until

paid for in full. Where a deposit is

required, the same is non refundable.

Any and all Notices or amendments by Auctioneer on said: Auction
Day whether written or verbal shall supercede this or any subsequent

advertisement.

For further information contact I.G. Stubbs at 322-2028 or
Fax: 328-8086 or Email: igstubbs@coralwave.com

SET HHNNGNPHHAPNHHNE NNN I a 5 gg EEE

EDO LOL ONTO LLL LONNIE LEED DDD LODO,

LEO MELLEL ID ELOL LLL

LASALLE OEE ILI

LOE OLEDOOD RIL

COLL ELE LEE ELC ABET LEI LE COOL TORT NTSC TESCO L Uh

1.G. Stubbs —

Public Auctioneer









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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Fe EUS ee
Former MP in legal battle with ex-business partner

FROM page 1

Bonnycord as the plaintiff, is
claiming $133,000 from Bri-
tannia Group. It is claiming
that this is due to Bonnycord
as principal and interest on a
promissory note, which was
signed on December 20, 2006.
The writ alleges that the
promissory note contract was
originally signed between Bri-
tannia and a company called
Horse Whisper, but was then
assigned to Bonnycord by the
latter on July 3, 2007.

Yet in an affidavit filed in
response by Mr Jones, he
describes Mr Turnquest’s inter-
ference allegations against
himself and his companies-as
“demonstrably false” and
“wholly without foundation”.

He adds that the affidavit
is to support his application

“for a proprietary freezing
injunction and worldwide
Mareva injunction” to freeze
Mr Turnquest’s assets and
those of companies he controls.

Mr Jones is counter-alleg
ing fraud against Mr ‘Turn-
quest, claiming he “removed”
$20 million from Britannia and
the company’s client accounts
before the two parted ways,
and that the former MP is now
falsely claiming ownership of
companies he wholly owns on
the basis of “fraudulent share

* transfers”.

The companies at the centre
of the dispute were said to hold
assets worth more than $80
million.

Mr Jones alleged: “The total!
assets in the Hampton sub
sidiaries are approximately $80
million. The vast majority of
this sum are client assets.
These are sums in respect ol

which Hampton remaims con-
tractually Table to its chents.
When there ts a draw on the
life insurance policy the clients
are legally entitled io look to
Hampton tor satisfaction
thereof, whether or not those
assets have been transterred.”

Mr Purnquest is understood
to be vehemently denying such
allegations. wiih Myr Jones
threatening to launch “a sub-
stantial counterclaimâ„¢ in
response to Mr Lurnquest’s
summonses

the bitter legal battle
between two lormer close
friends and business partners is
likely to stun some in the
Bahamian financial services
community, especially as the
rift between them has taken
less than a year to emerge, as
Mr Turnquest onty left Bri-
tannia to set ap Bonnyeord in
October 2006

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‘Their main business was the
devising and setting up of tax
and investment structures that
were compliant for clients’
home country tax purposes,
with a heavy focus on life
insurance,

Many are likely to be sur-
prised that the whole matter
has ended up in litigation, giv-
en that the affair could do
damage to the reputation of
both parties and their busi-
nesses, regardless of who is
found to be in the right.
Observers are likely to teel a
settlement is in the interests of
both parties.

At its core, the dispute
appears to be over who con-
trols certain companies and
client assets.

Mr Turnquest is understood
to be alleging that Mr Jones
and Britannia were upset that
the bulk of the business —
assets and clients — left to go
with him when he set up Bon-
nycord Ltd, eventually spark-
ing the deep divisions between
them.

‘The dispute is understood
to have attracted the attention
of financial services regulators
thrqughout the Caribbean,
especially in territories where
the parties operate and where
they have related entities
domiciled.

Among the agencies being
kept abreast of developments
is understood to be the
Bahamian Registrar of Insur
ance, and its equivalent in the
British Virgin Islands

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



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Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs i

The filing and serving of the
actions, according to Mr Jones
in his defence, appears to have
been sparked by a new dispute
between the two former
friends and business partners
as to who owns and controls a
company called West Coast
Holdings.

Mr Turnquest’s summons
seeks a court order preventing
Mr Jones, Britannia, Hampton
Insurance Company and one
of Mr Jones’s colleagues,
Stephen Dickson, from repre-
senting themselves as the reg-
istered agent, directors or con-
trollers of West Coast Hold-
ings.

He also wants the’ court to
order that they deliver to him
documents relating to West

Coast Holdings that were
incorrectly sent to Britannia’s
olfices.

Mr Turnquest is alleging
that on July 27, 2007, he was a
director of West Coast Hold-
ings and Bonnycord Ltd was
its registered agent. He is also
alleging that he was a signato-
ry on West Coast’s bank
accounts, and that since July
13, 2006, the company’s sole
shareholder was Experta Trust
Company (Bahamas).

As a result, he is alleging
that Mr Jones and Britannia
“wrongfully detained” a pack-
age relating to West Coast that
was sent to their offices.

Yet Mr Jones is alleging that
his signature on a West Coast
share certificate, purporting to
change the company’s owner-
ship from his Hampton firm to
Experta Trust Company, was a
forgery, producing evidence
from a forensic handwriting
expert, William Mader, to back
up this assertion.

He is claiming that West
Coast Holdings is really owned
by Hampton, and on June 6-7,
2007, Mr Turnquest was



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removed as a director, with the
registered agent for the com-
pany changed back to Britan-
nia.

Therefore, Mr Jones alleged
that the disputed West Coast
documents were “not wrong-
fully detained, as alleged in the
Turnquest affidavit, but law-
fully received”.

Mr Jones alleged that the
documents had been passed to
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force’s Central Detective Unit
(CDU). In response to this, Mr
Turnquest is known to be
denying Mr Jones’s allegations
that his signature on the West
Coast share certificates was

forged.
Meanwhile, Mr Jones
alleged that Ansbacher

(Bahamas) had said it could
not release information on any
accounts it held for a number
of Hampton subsidiaries
because this could only be
authorised by Mr Turnquest.

Ansbacher wrote on August
22: “We have received con-
flicting information regarding
the signing authorities relating
to the companies, and until the
dispute between you and Mr
Turnquest is resolved, I am
sure that you will understand
that we cannot release any
information to either disput-
ing party until we have
received either a court order
or an agreement signed by
both parties determining the
authorised owner of the
accounts.”

Other Nassau-based banks
alleged to have mairitained
bank and securities accounts
for Britannia and its clients
include Caledonia, Bank of
Butterfield and Experta.

Mr Turnquest’s legal actions
came up for hearing before
Justice John Lyons on July 12,
2007, and were adjourned until
July 21, 2007.


















































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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 5B



EPA, from page 1

by approximately $2-$2.50 per
pound, and would probably
make Bahamian lobster uncom-
petitive.

“Under current negotiations,
the MEN on processed fish is
expected to be 24 per cent.
Those qualifying for the Gen-
eral System of Preferences, 23.9
per cent, and for those signato-
ty to the EPA, the duty and
quota-free access will be main-
tained.”

The paper added: “The loss
to the Bahamas would be the
value of the lobster exported,
and the potential income loss
of the Bahamian fishermen who
catch the lobster, as well as
$649,259 in royalties.

“It is possible that alternative
markets for the lobster would
be found, but there would be
no guarantee that the price
obtained and rules of entry
would be as good as what is
available in the European mar-
kets.”

Data seen by The Tribune for
Bahamian fisheries exports in
2006 illustrates the extent to
which the crawfish industry is
heavily dependent on sales to
France. For the four months
from January to April 2006, the
Bahamas exported 85,120
pounds, 87,360 pounds, 131,040
pounds, and 104,120 pounds
respectively.

In turn, the respective month-
ly values for these exports, for
the January-April 2006 period,
were $1.45 million, $1.485 mil-
lion, $2.211 million and $1.812
million. The high point for
Bahamian lobster exports to
France is the August to Novem-
ber period. For the three
months covered by this period
in 2006, the value of Bahamian
exports to France was $3.282
million, $11.804 million, $12.608
million and $4.92 million respec-
tively.

Such figures illustrate the
scale of the potential sales, rev-
enues and job losses facing the
Bahamian lobster and fisheries
industry, with those losing out
ranging from wholesalers such
as Paradise Fisheries and Trop-
ic Seafood right down to the *
grass roots’ of Bahamian soci-
ety. This would include not only
fishermen, but those who supply
them with gas and compressors.

Mr Ferguson said those who
were hoping the EPA deadline
would not be met, or that the
EU would seek a further waiv-

‘er for the existing Cotonou
MA ge

Agreement from the World
Trade Organisation (WTO),
were likely to be mistaken.

Peter Mandelson, the EU
Trade Commissioner, last week
warned the 76-nation African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group currently negotiating the
EPA that failure to conclude
an agreement by December 31,
2007, would see them placed on
the General System of Preter-
ences (GSP) system. ‘This would
provide them with less
favourable trade benefits and
preferences than they enjoy
now, of would do under the
EPA.

However, Mr Ferguson point-
ed out that Bahamian exporters
would not even be able to
access the GSP preferences
because of its status as a ‘devel-
oped country’, leaving them at
the mercy of MFN import tariff
rates.

His paper said the EPA was
in its final and fourth phase of
negotiations, “and barring our
participation the Bahamas will
lose its duty-free access to the
EU market, and at best would
attract the MFN rate of duty”.

It added: “Recent indications
suggest that the EU is not pre-
pared to seek a waiver, and it

‘has stated that failing the com-

pletion of the agreement by
January 1, 2008, all exports from
the ACP will be subject to MFN
rates.

“For some countries in the
ACP, this reality is mitigated
by their access to other trade
regimes including the GSP,
which is not as favourable, and
there are others which benefit
from bilateral trade agreements
with Europe.

“The Bahamas does not have
access to the GSP, and no bilat-
eral agreements. It is also high-
ly unlikely that the EU will be
interested in a bilateral agree-
ment with the Bahamas, and
even if considered, this process
would not solve our market
access in the short term.”

Mr Ferguson’s paper point-
ed out that under the previous
PLP administratiop, the
Bahamas did submit a draft
market access offer for the EPA
in March 2007, at the seventh
Technical Working Group
meeting.

The offer, “thought at the
time to be in the best interest of
the Bahamas”, maintained
duty-free market access for this
nation’s seafood, rum and poly-
mers exports, while minimizing
revenue losses from the phased

reduction or elimination of tar-
iffs on European-produced
goods imported into this nation,

Yet since taking office on
May 2, the FNM government
has said its priorities are acced-
ing to full membership in the
W'TO and developing an all-
encompassing policy to deal
with all trade matters facing the
Bahamas, not just the EPA,

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, said the
Bahamas would not rush to sign
the EPA at the expense of the
wider interests of this nation
and its major economic indus-
tries. Instead, the Government
wants more time to assess all
the EPA’s implications, but Mr
Ferguson pointed out that its
WTO-centred focus did not
address the immediate issue of
duty-free market access to the
EU.

“A determination as to
whether or not the Bahamas
will participate will have to be
made within the next 45 days.
Failing to do so will result in
exports from the Bahamas
attracting the MEN rate of duty,
perhaps as soon as January |,
2008,” Mr Ferguson’s paper
concluded.

“Industry leaders must deter-
mine whether.they can remain
competitive at the MEN rates,
or alternatively seek new mat-
kets for the export of seafood
products. A determination will
have to be made, and a case
presented to the Government
to sign the agreement. We
remain uncertain if the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas ts ful-
ly aware of the direct and pos-
sibly latent effects the loss of
preferential access may have on
this market.”

COLON
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THE BAHAMAS INSTITUTE OF
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS SEMINAR

“Upholding Integrity, Striving for Excellence”

EXAMINING THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC
ENVIRONMENT & ITS IMPACT ON THE BAHAMAS

Date: September 27th, 2007 Time: 8:45 am — 4:00 pm

Place: British Colonial Hilton Hotel, The Governor’s Ballroom

Pre-register: Fax: 326-6618

Cost per day: Members $100

. Tel. 326-6619 Email: secbica@batelnet.bs

Non-members $125 Lunch & Parking Included

CPE hours: 7 (BICA licensed members - 50 hours required over a 2 year period)

NO BILLINGS

Topics & Speakers Include:

Preparing Our Accountants for The Changing Global Economic

Environment

Mr. Daniel Ferguson — President, The pidharnag Institute of Chartered

Accountants

Partnering With Other Countries in The Region to Pool Resources
Signing Onto Economic Treaties — What Do We Gain or Lose?

Dr. Thaddeus McDonald — Dean of Social Education Studies, The
College of The Bahamas

The Impact of Mixed Use Tourism Developments — Pros & Cons
Albany & Baha Mar Projects
Mr. William Wong — Vice President, Bahamas Real Estate Association

New Money Laundering Initiatives for The Bahamas
Are We Meeting International Standards?
Mr. Anthony Johnson — Director, The Financial Intelligence Unit

The U.S.A. Credit Market Squeeze — An Overview
The Impact on our Local Money & Capital Markets
Mr. Michael Halkitis — Consultant, Financial Services Investments,

British American











Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



OP UNDER THE STARS
FESTIVAL 2007

GALA CONCERT

Saturday - September 29 - 2007
Dinner 7:00 P.M. (Gala Ticket Holders) : Concert Begins 8:00 P.M.
Wyndham Nassau Resort
Cable Beach - Nassau - Bahamas
law



~ \< \\ .
Ta Richardson yep Pirie ny Temika Moore

FABULOUS MUSIC
GOURMET DINING

TICKETS ON SALE AT
CHAPTER ONE BOOKSTORE and
in THE OFFICE OF COMMUNICATION
Block A - Oakes Field Campus

For reservations,

sponsorship opportunities and
further infarmation, please call
Office of Communication

at telephones
302-43046/6353/4354/4366

ROYAL SPONSORS
pee es Airlines/American Eagle
Chintarle Airline of Jazz Under the Stars
Wyndham Nassau Resort |
The Oita sctenne of Jazz Under the Stars

| = lolly Press Ltd

| eC ee

‘Bank Cy Bahamas International
RBC Royal Bank of Canada

SU eo ety
_ Bahamas Electricity Corporation

GOLD SPONSOR
~ Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd

SILVER SPONSORS
Atlantic Medical
BTC
Aa: Counsellors Ltd

Executive Producer ~ Patricia Glinton- Meicholas
Show Producer ~ Roscoe Dames “Mr Jazz”





Gala Concert and Dinner - $175
Includes Gala Concert and Dinner

General Admission - $50



’



PAGE 6B, MONRO SenleNeen 17, 2007



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHA

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

ADMISSIONS DEADLINES

‘Regular Admissions Deadline
Spring (January) 2008
_ September 28, 2007 - 4:00pm
Application fee - $40.00

THE TRIBUNE










Late Admissions Deadline
Spring (January) 2008
October 5, 2007 -— 4:00pm
Application fee - $50.00

For further information contact the Office of Admissions at
1-242-302-4499 or 1-242-302-4394

International Conference

Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave
Trade: Telling the Story

The College of The Bahamas
February 21-23, 2008
Nassau, The Bahamas

The College of The Bahamas will host the Conference: “Abolition of The Trans-
| Atlantic Slave Trade: Telling t the Story, February 21-23, eons at the Oakes Field
: Campus, Nassau: 0 Reith
Abstracts of approximately 200 words are invited on the following topics:
Language and Oppression
Religion in Slavery: Agent Provocateur or Opiate?
Slavery and Human Sensibility
Power and Enslavement
Kinship across the Diaspora
Identity: Culture, the Arts, Race and Gender
The African Diaspora’s Gifts to the World
Enslavement and Liberation: Telling the Story through Teaching, Song,
Story and Preservation
Liberation: Ideologies, Contexts and Dynamics
Liberation: Simple Past or Present Continuous?

Please send abstracts as an attached Word file to Jessica Minnis, Chair of the
Conference Committee at abolitionconference@cob.edu.bs Deadline extended to
Monday, October 1, 2007.

Conference Structure

The conference will feature 20-minute papers from all disciplines, followed by 10-
minute discussions, presented in concurrent and plenary sessions. Panel and
poster proposals will also be considered. Such proposals should be as complete
as possible.

Submissions (an electronic copy) should be directed to:
Jessica Minnis

Associate Professor, School of Social Sciences

The College of The Bahamas

P O Box N4912

Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail: abolitionconf@cob.edu.bs

Deadline for Submission: Monday, December 31, 2007.

Registration

Three Days:

Day Rate:

Late Registration Fee:
Student Rate:
Student Day Rate:

$450:00
$150:00
$125.00
$150.00
$75.00

For information on the availability of student subsidies, please contact:

Vice President Research, Graduate Programmes and Intemational Relations
Tel: (242) 302 4455

Registration is open and online at http:/Awww.cob.edu.bs/abolitionconf.php.

The Alumni Association of The College of The Bahamas

2007 Hall of Fame Induction and Luncheon
Friday, November 23, 2007 at 12:30 p.m. :
British Colonial Hilton, No. 1 Bay Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tickets available for a donation of $50

peotact the Alumni Relations & Davelonin ant

= corre

Tel tee 302-4359

ean oe Le

ie FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION &

& EXTENSION SERVICES

dO

_Massage Therapy Essentials |

This introductory course gives you

the opportunily to learn basic tech-
niques of massage therapy. Major
topic areas will include Massage
Theory, Manipulations — and
Techniques, Wellness Education
(Psychological and Physiological
Benefits), Indications and
Contraindications, Serving Special
Populations and Complementary
Bodywork Systems to include
Aromatherapy Essentials.

Begins: Thursday, 27 September, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: Munnings Building",
The College of The Bahamas

TOE
Massage Therapy Essentials Il

This is an advanced course for
learning techniques of massage
therapy and its many benefits
Major topics include introduction
to hydrotherapy, spa and body
treatments, the basic facial,
aromatherapy-fundamentals or
essential oils, relaxation and med-
itative methods, and hot stone
therapy.

Begins: Monday, 24 September, 2007
Time: 6:00-9 00pm

Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $620.00

Venue: Munnings Building",
The College of The Bahamas

This is an introductory course
for learning how to teach group
fitness and exercise classes.
Major topics of discussion will
include: Basic anatomy and
physiology, choreography and
cueing, the five components of
fitness, nutrition, basic exer-
cise testing and how to teach
group exercise.

Begins: Wednesday, 26 September, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm

Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $400.00

Venue: Munnings Building*,

The College of the Bahamas

*NOTE: The Munnings Building is situated next to KFC

www.cob.edu.bs





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 7B







Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING &



THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE (ILCL) - THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
EVENTS CALENDER 2007-2008






School of Social Sciences
Programmes in —
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION



~ LECTURERS / PARTICIPANTS ______VENUE_

“| Slide show by Dr. Irene Moss, Director, LCL Munnings Room 2
6:30 PM.

V1]






GERMAN FILM














Fray mee
September 23°

F riday _

Presented by Professor Xian Xianwen Munnings: Room 2



































































SPANISH FILM Presentation: Foreign Lang. Dept.: Assistant Munnings Rom 2 A Contemporary Approach to Administration for Productivity and
ey Professor, ‘Guadatupe de) Micme Miphetas = Effective Management in Public and Private Entities
October 6 OKTOBERFEST Organized by I. Moss with all relevant COB Band Shell :
Saturda Departments: Communications, Security, ete. | 6- U1 ; . : . : .
November 8 FRENCH FOLK SONG EVENING Slide show by I. Moss, F. Leger on guitar, J. Munnings Room 2 ae School . Social 5 Sohn ee oti tebe cbr of The
Thursda Mereus on vocals and other musical friends 7PM anamas invite members e public and private sectors to
November 14 THE HOLOCAUST ~— a movie presentation | Mr. Absil — holocaust survivor UWI Dining Room enroll in one of our progressive Public Administration Programmes:
Wednesday and lecture : 7PM Become 21° century ‘change agents’ and partners in national
December 4 JUNKANOO ART — designing and pasting | Presentation and demonstration by Henry Moss Jr. | Munnings Room 2 development.
Tuesday costumes - WORKSHOP slide show by 1. Moss | 6-8 1
December 13 MERRY MULTI-CULTURAL Organization & musical direction: I. Moss Munnings Room 2 Prospective students and participants have the following
Thursday Cc Sere _ ILCL Foreign Lang. Dept. members and COB |. 7. PM _._ | options:
January 9 - Wed Presentation by Professor Xu Xianwen Munnings. Room 2, 7PM

















Video of Montreal TAM TAM JAM by I. I. Moss Band shell
Director: TBA 2PM

DRUMEEST - A dvunt summit regrouping
members from all the Junkanoo teams

January 19
Saturday



¢ Pursue the BA Degree in Public Administration
Participate in seminars/workshops and short courses [with








February Di PANEL DISCUSSION: Tourism and “Panel member: “Munnings Room 2 or BTC if; f
Thursday ange OS eee ean hae Seat and private tourism busine Lecture Hall?7PM certificate o attendance]
















































February 19 Presentation on Roman history b background by. ~~ T “Munnings Room 2 : ; a .
Tuesday : | Professor Stephen BL Aranha Pm _ Programmes are conducted in a progressive environment which
March 1-15 IRISH PUB NITE ~ to be announced “With Montreal Band SWIFT ~ [UWI Dining Room takes into consideration:
March 21 - Fri VICTOR HUGO — Beyond LES MIZ iL Lecture and s slide show by | - Moss Soke iad Munnings Room 2 ;
April 10 HAITIAN FILM “Slide presentation: Assistant Professor Frenand Munnings Room 2 v¥ Needs of the individuals through small group interaction

Poe esai ene | Leger, Foreign Languages Department, 0 fw ‘Bottom line’ of organizations through exposure to planning-
April Md aN Ee re Een Musicians and (BA - strategic and long range and total quality management

ae 2 nnn na een cewnfecennnnznnniennnnzennnmennnd | W Major contemporary issues of organizations; e.g. training

y MAIFEST Slide Show by I.Moss; participation of German- | Munnings Room 2 cae
T speakers in Nassau & [LCI students needs occasioned by the challenges of globalization
May 23 CLASSICAL MUSICEVENING Piano solos by | Moss: Cello / piano ducts by Il. | Munnings Room2SSC*Y*&: %~—«sESSues relating to sustainable development
Friday ¥ Public/Private Sector Partnerships [PPPs]

Peloguin & L.Moss; guests TBA




Dates are subject to change.

Individuals: This is your chance to ready your thinking and skills
to seize 21% century opportunities and be someone who is proactive
and makes great things happen.

Employers: Here’s your opportunity to create real resources to
increase your organization’s ability to compete! in rapidly changing
global economy.













— Far 2007 Comeurer COURSE OFFERINGS









COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |” INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY | PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR

Course. : This course is for the beginner who Ba ra, ; . ‘
knows very about computers and does not understand Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Course Deore: Ths curses ohana eon ;
how ork This course covers the major computer puter con- Technology. The course provides training in the following areas: O8Y Sysiems Tor use i information environments, The course ‘
extensive hands-on practice of various software Basic Hardware Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, Ver the lollowing topics: Basic: Hardware, Operating Systems,
: {) Microsoft Office - Word Processing {ii} Microsoft Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Excel + Spreadsheet {iiil) Microsoft Access - Database
Management.






For details contact: Chair, School of Social Sciences or Dr.
Silvius Wilson, Assistant Professor @ COB Tel. 397 2607-8
E-mail: swilson@cob.edu.bs





Operating Systam Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency.




























Prsrequsite: None
pas * Pre-requisite: None Begins: Monday & Wednesday, 17 September, 2007 MAR K TH E DATE
Data Wacnectan 12 September, 200 Begins: Wednesday, 12 September, 2007 Time: 6:009m - 7:30pm Duration: 12 weeks
Time: 11:00am -2:00pm Section 01 (CEES) Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm Duration: 12 weeks Venue: BHTC Computer Lab Fees: $500.00
Dele: Mond, 10 September, 2007 Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $480.00 QUICKBOOKS
Time: 8:00pm - 9: “Section 02 (CEES) Thursday, November 8, 2007
MICROSOFT EXCEL Course Description: This course is designed to train naw and existing :
Date: Saturday, 15 September, 2007 ; small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) how to
Time: 10:00am - 1:00pm. Section 03 (CEE: Course Descriation: This course covers the fundamentals of the organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks The Colle e of The Bahamas
Duration: 12 weeks Venue: CEES Coe Lab Microsoft Exce! spreadsheet. Tools that are neaded for basic entry Pro software. Students wit team how to set-up their company fites g
Tuion: $450.00 and manipuition of cells and worksheets are presenisd char of accounts, hig, cisions, vrs and employneg. Counselling and Health Services

















ONS Il Pre-requisite: None,
: Pre-requisite: None z
Course Description: course cavers the major advanosd . * Begins: Tuesday, 25 Saptember, 2007
cepts wi Sean Se Begins: Saturday, 29 September, 2007 Tene: 6:prt aon Onaten: 6.weeks CAREERS/ JOB FAIF t
og ing () =a Office reat {iy Manso F Excai- Time: os ~ 8:00pm as 8 weeks Venue: CEES Carares tab a 73 FRR $330.00 . WA sR 3 "
asc ees base Manage Venue: Computer Lab : $250.00 , Je S 2 YO® :
: << . ; WESPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP is coming your Waly caevi



MICROSOFT



‘ \ < Course Desenption Ths course, which targets persons who would

. . : like to create their personal web pages, will dover Web Page Creation,
Course Description: This course assumes no particular background ~— Web Site Management, and HTML Specific topics will include
and takes the student from the: level of novice fo an advanced level. Formatting. Graphics, Multmedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of
A thorough grounding in aif of the fundamentals of document handing — 8D pages.
















Employers, bright young students and other
interested persons have the opportunity to meet for
















in Microsoft Word is presented Prerequisite: Participants must be computer tterate and have a

Prerequisite: None ei nal ihn * mutual benefit.

Begins: Tuesday, 25 September, 2007 Begins: Thursday & Friday, 18th October, 2007

, 5 94 , Time: 9:30am - 4:30 Duration: 2 ae ‘ . .

Time: 1:00am - 2:00pm Drretor: 8 Woe ed CoagerLab Poe Seat Individual Booths Available for Organization Displays

Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $250.00

* f: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email perdev@cob.edu.bs fees are includ- -
fies of $40.00 (one ane When submitting pppication. kindly provide oe of the first four pages











Benefits to employers/organizations:

> Exposure to hundreds of the best-trained college students in The
Bahamas/Access to prospective employees

>» A direct opportunity in becoming a stakeholder in preparing COB
students for their future endeavours

> Exposure to high school students seeking career information

> Acomplete 8’ x 10’ booth for display purposes

> Signage on all print advertisements













Contact:
Ms. Norma Turnquest, Advisory Committee Executive Secretary
Career & Placement Counsellor, COB at Tel: 242-302-4445

Fax: 242-302-4448, nturnquest@cob.edu.bs

INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES

AND CULTURES INSTITUTE
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Communication: The Key to Global Understanding

COURSE OFFERING: FALL 2007 — Beginning September 24th
CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I: Mon/Wed: 6 — 7:30 PM








CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE II: Tues/Thurs: 7:30 — 9 PM
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I: Mon/Wed: 5 - 6:30 PM





CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30 PM
ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION GROUP: Tuesdays: 1 - 2 PM







ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP:
Thursdays: 1 -2 PM






EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
Date: Thursday, 4 October, 2007

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an — Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. | Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship ‘Tuition: $160.00

building and employee motivation. Wes Pace Desicn







These are directed conversation and practice “brown bag”
sessions - bring your own lunch!
10 consecutive sessions: $100 ($50 for COB Students)

CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I: Mon/Wed: 6:30 - 8 PM


























Date: Thursday, 11 October, 2007 This course will cover Web Page Creation, Website

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN I: Mon/Wed: 7:30 — 9 PM
Venue: Grovenor Close Nursing School computers and would like to create their own web pages are CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN II: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30
Tuition: $170.00 encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting,






Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web

Errective PoweRPOINT PRESENTATIONS i
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an Date: Thursday & Friday , 18th & 19th October, 2007
overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. {t . Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
presentations. Tuition: $550.00

CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I: Mon/Wed: 6 — 7:30 PM



CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30 PM














DELE SPANISH PROFICIENCY TESTING:
Registration: Sept 3 — Oct. 12



LOCATION: Munnings Building (next to KFC at COB Roundabout):
Room 16

DURATION: 3 hours per week for 10 weeks, total course hours: 30 hours
PRICE: $ 250.00 per course (except for Advanced French and Spanish
Conversation Group)

‘TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587 E-MAIL: ilci@cob.edu.bs

TIMES MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE














ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email
perdev@cob.edu.bs. All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time) . When
submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.









PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

Licence, permit fees hit DHHS medical costs by $700,00

LOSS Sto

NOTICE OF VACANCY

Excellent opportunities for career advancement exist in the Legal
Department of Port Group Limited. The Company invites qualified
applicants to apply for the position of Legal Assistant.

The successful candidate must have at least five (5) years experience
as a Legal Assistant in the fields of conveyancing, commercial
transactions and probate matters, and: must be proficient in all

Microsoft Word an

d Excel programmes.

The successful candidate must also have:

I. Completed a recognized paralegal/legal executive course,

or

2. A minimum of five (5) B.G.C.S.E “O” levels or equivalent,
two (2) of which should be Math and English with grade

“C” or abo

ve.

Résumés with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department

The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited

P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
BAHAMAS
or

Email: personnel@gbpa.com

On

or before September 30, 2007



To meet the challenge of operating our growing business, we wish to recruit a:

FROM page I

chief financial officer, indicat-
ed DHHS results would be
even better if it were not for
the high work permit and busi-
ness licence fees that the
BISX-listed healthcare
provider incurred on an annu-
al basis.

He explained that although
the Business Licence Act pro-
vided for hospitals to be
exempted from the payment
of annual business licence fees,
unlike the publicly-funded and
owned Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, DHHS was still being
treated as an ordinary business
by the Ministry of Finance’s
Business Licensing Depart-
ment.

As a result, it still had to pay
business licence fees that last

ear were “just shy” of
$400,000. Mr Cash contrasted
discrepancies between the
Medical Facilities Licensing
Board’s licensing of DHHS as
a hospital with the Business
Licensing Department’s treat-
ment of the company.

“The Business Licensing Act
provides for hospitals io be
exempt from business licences.
We've continually asked the
Ministry of Finance to recog-
nise us as a hospital to no
avail,” Mr Cash said.

“It is one area where Doc-
tors Hospital would be able to
directly impact the cost of care
by not having to make these
payments.”

In addition, DHHS had to
spend “just under $300,000”
annually on work permit fees
for essential medical services
personnel, further adding to
the burden imposed by what
Mr Cash described as a global
shortage of qualified nurses.
To attract nurses and medical
technicians with the skills to
deliver high quality care and
service standards, DHHS
needed to offer top-level
salaries, and Mr Cash
explained that work permit
fees just added to the cost bur-
den.

“The same issues continue
to persist,” Mr Cash told The
Tribune. “There is a global
nursing shortage, and DHHS
has to provide higher salaries
to attract qualified nurses.

“It is unconscionable, we

. think, to have to pay the cost

of work permits on top of that.
So the Government is being
asked to eliminate or substan-
tially reduce to a nominal lev-
el the cost of work permits for
nurses and medical techni-
cians.”

Mr Cash added: “DHHS is
not asking the Government for
any special favours. The reali-
ty is that we provide special
discounts to indigent patients,
not to mention those patients
who are underinsured and do
not fall into the indigent cate-

gory.
Costs

“There are always opportu-
nities. for government, to
reduce the cost of customs
duties on medical equipment”
such as MRI and CT scan-
ners.”

“There are a lot of opportu-
nities for the Government to
meet DHHS half way and
reduce the cost of care for
Bahamians,” Mr Cash added.
“If it becomes cost prohibitive
or expensive, and you have
Bahamians looking elsewhere,
it is a loss to the country on a
net basis.

“Money goes out of the
country for health care when it
could have stayed here, partic-
ularly when we have shown
that we have the quality,
sophistication and scope of ser-
vices to compete with south
Florida.”

These issues have remained
unresolved for some time, and
Mr Cash said DHHS’ requests
“fell on deaf ears” with the for-
mer Christie government. He
added that the BISX-listed
company would continue to
make its case with the new
FNM administration.

In his letter to DHHS share-
holders on the company’s sec-



WANTE

r
The TRIBUNE

|

enema



ond quarter and half-year
results, Joseph Krukowski, the
company’s chairman, said toffl
expenses for the six months fp
July 31, 2007, had increased

almost $0.8 million or 4.35 pr
cent over the previous ye@r
comparative. They rose {fp
$18.174 million from SA rs

million.

Other operating expense
such as insurances and leas¢ dh,
rose by 19 per cent over 2096
levels, while medical supplifs
and services costs rose by 9.92
per cent. Payroll costs grew ths
9.16 per cent. I

Charles Sealy, DHHS chit f
executive, said that despite tie
company’s ever-improvi
financial performance — larg Ht -
ly driven by growth in patient
volumes and revenues — it was
still challenged by rising mel-
ical supplies costs and oper -

_ ing expenses. There were al

difficulties in attracting qual. -
fied Bahamians into the meq-
ical profession. 1.
Mr Cash told The Tribu
that the increase in operating

. costs and expenses were havisg

“a notable ripple effect”
DHHS’s business, both tral
a service provider and employ-
er standpoint. |

Increases in medical supp h
costs, he explained, weie
passed on to patients and a
insurance companies in t
form of rising healthcare cosas
and insurance premiums.

“The business insurance we
pay, whether we talk about lif-
bility insurance or generpl
insurance, this has not stopped
going up, so this has ultimatt-
ly had a negative impact on the
bottom line,” Mr Cash addeli.

Meanwhile, rising electridj-
ty bills were having a “com-

pletely negative effect”, forci he

DHHS to look at new medic!
equipment and ways to Uk
more efficient.

“It has a very negatil e
impact in terms of cost,” Mar
Cash said, “and has forcdt
leadership teams to go back fp p
the drawing board to find wa
top do things better in the Wa
we operate.”








i
i
}
i

Compliance Officer

Hold a compliance certification.

Have several years of experience as compliance officer in private banking.
Have knowledge of Bahamian and international compliance requirements.
Be computer literate with communication skills.

MEDICAL SECRETARY

Busy Doctor’s Office requires secretary
with excellent writing, verbal and computer |
skills. Experience in basic accounting and |
office management, plus ability to work |
with sophisticated clientele is required. :
Salary commensurate with experience and |
qualifications.

The successful applicant must:






Planning, organizing the compliance function for a bank.
Developing and maintaining adequate policies and procedures.
Reviewing and managing the documentation of client files.
Liaising with regulators and compliance officer of the Group.

- Motivated team player with pleasant personality.
Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision.
Ability to conduct the monitoring of clients credit risk
and/or law degree is an asset.

We require knowledge and experience with:

Fax resumé to 327-6140

We offer — Asalary which is commensurate with the job,

a pension plan and medical insurance.

We will only reply to candidates that fully match our requirements listed above, if so we will be pleased to receive your resume
and one (1) letter of reference to: SYZ & CO Bank & Trust LTD. | Attention Betsy Morris (betsy.morris@syzbank.com)
P.O. Box N —1089 | Bayside Executive Park | West Bay Street & Blake Road | Nassau, Bahamas | Fax: (+1 242) 327 66 29

SYZ & CO

Created to perform

SYSTEMS ANALYST



Information Technology

-




Headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The Bahamas, Barbados, th
Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, Butterfield
Bank offers a wide range of services to local and internationai clients.

Ap
yf

Private Banking
OYSTER Funds

Alternative Investments

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results arented self starter wi itt!
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Informatio
Technology team.

SYZ & CO || Bank & Trust

Core Responsibiliti ies

* Provide tier-1 end user support in suppor of business operations via the
internal Help Desk function,

= )FIDELITY

= Assist with the preparation and maintenance of technical specifications

Pricing Information As Of: and related documentation

Proactively ensure all identified applications, hardware and general

SECURITIES - VISIT WWW.BISXBAH? Dy . KK ;
: AX KK equipment are monitored via aperational tasks lists, |

KRE INDEX: CLOSE 1,887.48 / CHG -00.
Securit Previous Close Today's Close
Abaco Markets 1.60 1.60
Bahamas Property Fund 11.70 11.70
Bank of Bahamas 9.54 9.54
Benchmark 0.85
Bahamas Waste 3.74
Fidelity Bank 1.62
Cable Bahamas 11.02
Colina Holdings 3.10
Commonwealth Bank 15.64
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
mier Real Estate



Yield
0.00%
1.627 3.42%
0.733 i < 2.73%
0.048 : 2.35%
0.279 0. ‘060 . 1.60%
0.064 0.040 2.47%
0.996 0.240 2.18%
0.208 0.080 4s 2.58%
1.190 0.680 4.35% s
0.112 0.050 0.84%
0.281 0.000 0.00%
0.804 0.240 3.88%) "
0.768 0.570 4.46%
0.977 * 0.470 3.20%
0.364 0.133 2.17% "
-0.415 0.000 0.00%
0.411 0.200 2.76%
0.580 6 5.77%
0.600 6.00%

EPS $
0.094

52wk-Hi Change
1.78
11.74
9.54
0.85
3.74
1.62
11.00
3.10
15.64

47.22
2.76
6.40
12.77
14.70
6.10
1.00

52wk-Low
0.54
11.00
7.50
0.70
1.52
1.20.
9.40
1.80
11.35
4.70.
2.20
5.54
11.51
13.76
5.18
0.54
7.10

= Assist with technology projects and initiatives with use of analytical and
problem-solving skills to help identify, communicate and re cote issues t
maximize the benefit of IT systems investments,

3.74



Desired Qualifications
A degree in Computer Science on related discipline from a well
recognized university

A minimum of two years professional tT PRs ience; preferably in the
Financial Services Industry.



IY based training or qualifications (A*,

MCP, or CCNA) from accredited
institutions will be advantageous

â„¢ Proficient in computer systems and network management, Web-based
applications, clent-server applications, and PC-based software
applications

|
Div $ Yield
1.485
0.480
0.000

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND sepa

® Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows Servers, Microsoft Windows
XP, Microsoft SQL Server, and Microsoft Office



} j y Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
41.00 43.00 41.00
14.60 . 15.50 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.45
BIS Listed Mutual Funds

YTD% Last 12 Months

2.750 ‘ 3.70% ba
1.485
0.000

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, and customer

service skills

0 ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Closing Date: September 20, 2007

NA V Div $ Yield %
1.355424*
3.3402***
2.886936***
1.269803***
11.6581**** 7 : 7
FINDEX: CLOSE 863.81 / YTD 16.05% / 2006 34.47%
MARKET TERMS YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *. 7 September 2007
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price *. 30 June 2007
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week 31 August 2007
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths 31 July 2007
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful *
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 100

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund




Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail recruitment@butterfieldbank bs

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

NAV KEY
- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

www.butterfieldbank.bs

6

Butterfield Bank





THE ne







Sn

Doctors Hospital Health System Limited
Interim report
Quarter ended July 31, 2007

Chairman’s Report
Doctors Hospital Health System Limited

Dear Shareholders,

Tam pleased to report on your company’s financial results for the three months caded July 31, 2007.
Earnings per share were twelve cents for the period which refleets an ‘increase from ten cents for the
comparable period last year, Net income for the six months was $2.5 million, or twenty-five cents per
share, compared to $2.0 million, or twenty cents per share, for the comparable period in 2006.

The financial results reflect growth in patient service revenues to $20.7 million from $19.7 million in the
prior year period, an increase of 5.08%,

Total expenses increased $0.8 million, or 4.35%, over the same period last year. Highlights include the
following: other operating—insurances, leases—-increased 19.0%; and medical supplies and services
increased 9.22%. Payroll costs grew by 9.16%.

The Western Medical Plaza is the remaining principal discontinuing operation. Losses trom this facility
are $0.29 million for the first six months. of this year, compared to $0.36 million for the comparable
period last year, an improvement of 19.4%, Sale of the vacant land at Blake Road was finalized and a
gain of $16,000 was recorded. We are pleased to report that the Company has finalized an agreement to
lease the full WMP complex for a five-year period.-‘The new arrangement will result in the immediate
reduction in operating ‘expenses incurred by. DH, as these costs become ‘the responsibility of the new
lessee. The new lease agreement will produce free cash flows that will facilitate additional repayments on
the related WMP debt.

Strategic plan objectives to increase cash reserves, reduce accounts receivables and minimize debt are
falling into place as anticipated. We have stabilized our financial status, employee morale and medical
staff loyalty. We have regained viability and a positive bottom line as we continue to record profits,
moving the hospital in the right direction to make other needed changes.

Doctors Hospital is also realizing the return on investments made on its Healthcare Information System,
Meditech, with timely reporting and improved efficiency. Meditech has provided useful tools to help our
department leaders enhance efficiency, service and quality. Meditech also positively affects physicians
and clinicians by providing accurate information and real time data which translates into better patient
care as physicians are able to diagnose and treat more effectively and efficiently. ; .

The Hospital’s noteworthy, success is the continued focus on our goals to provide high quality care, and
‘patient — and physician ~ friendly service, so there-is no need to go elsewhere for healthcare. Another
important goal for the hospital is strong community support. Taking best practices from the hospitality
industry, the hospital has established'a culture of service, to improve the entire patient experience and
improve satisfaction rates and, continue profitability.

On behalf of the Board of Directors, I thank you for your continued loyalty to Doctors Hospital.

Joseph Krukowski
Chairman
September 14, 2007

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Balance Sheet

July 31, 2007 with comparative figures at January 31, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

we daly 3 2007 danuary 31,2007

Assets
Current assets;
Cash and cash equivalents , $ 4,599 1,988
Accounts receivable—patients, net (note 2) 1,147 951
Accounts receivable—third party payors, net (note 2) 6,007 5,521
Inventories 1,290 1,252
Other assets , : 687 322
Assets classified as held for sale (note 3) ee 5,513 . S443
19,243 18,477
; Non-current assets: |
* Rivestments j ; 30 30
“Goodwill, net pve 431 , 431
Other intangible assets 7 2,594 2,700
Investment property (note 4) ; . 1,022
Property, plant and equipment . _ 8,900 9359
ae a : 1195 13,542
Total assets , : $ 31,198 29,019
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable and other liabilities 3,621 3.448

Long-term debt, current portion : 389 389
Liabilities directly associated with assets classified as













held for sale(note3) — _ 5,001 . 5,279
a ee) L916
~ Non-current liabilities
Long-term debt 3,108 3,302
* - Total liabilities 12,119 12,418
Shareholders’ equity:
Share capital:
Authorized 12,500, 000 common shares at par value
of B$0.04 each (July 31, 2007 — 12,500, 000 shares)
Issued and fully paid 9,97 1,634 shares .

(July 31, 2007 — 9,971,634 shares) = 399 399
Contributed surplus : 12,358 12.358
Retained earnings 6,322 3.844

: 19,079 16,601
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $ 31,198 29,019
(Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Income

Three months ended July 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the three months ended July 31, 2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

















es duty 31,2007 Sully 312000
CONTINUING OPERATIONS
Revenues .

. Patient service revenue, net ; $ 10,483 10,065
Other . - os 182 130
Total revenues a, 665 10,195

Expenses

Salaries and benefits 4,010 3.041
Medical supplies and services 2,655 2,499
Other operating 1,108 959
Provision for doubtful accounts oan ’ 394 O88
Depreciation and amortization 473 S44
Utilities ; 294 277
Government taxes and fees 202 219
Repairs and maintenance ee 159 103
Totalexpenses. _: a ee 9,295 8.940
Income from continuing operations ° /

before interest 1,370 1,255
Interest expense _ tO) 9)
Income from continuing operations 1,309 1,162
Discontinued operations
Revenue 25 21
Expenses a (170) (188)
Loss from discontinued operations (IAS) (167)



Net income for the period $ NOS

Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):
Basic and fully diluted $





(Unaudited)

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2007,

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Income

Six months ended July 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the six months ended July 31, 2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

July 30,2007 0 Sttly 31, 2006

CONTINUING OPERATIONS

Revenues
Patient service revenue, net $
Other

Total revenues

20,732

19,669















Expenses
Salaries and benefits 7,707 7,061
Medical supplies and services 5,283 4,837
Other operating 2,252 1,892
Provision for doubtful accounts 624 1,287
Depreciation and amortization (note 5) : $,052 1,060
Utilities 564 539
Government taxes and fees ‘ 423 419
Repairs and maintenance a 269 323
Total expenses - _ 18,174 17,418
Income from continuing operations ;
before interest 2,893 2,509
Interest expense _ (125) (180) _
Income from continuing operations 2,768 2,329
Discontinued operations
Revenue 63 45
Expenses = OS) ____(400)
Loss from discontinued operations (290) te (355)
i
Netincomefortheperiod 2,478 1,974
Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):
__ Basic and fully diluted $25 0.20



(Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

Six months ended July 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the six months ended July 31, 2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)













ee ee __ July 31, 2007 July 31, 2006
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in):
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income $ 2,478 1,974
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash
provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization 1,052 1,060
Provision for doubtful accounts 624 1,287
_ Gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment (16) . -
4,138 4,321
Increase in accounts receivable (1,310) (2,885)
(Increase) decrease in inventories (38) 18
Increase in prepaid expenses and other assets (380) (137)
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable and other liabilities 173 _ (491)
Cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activitics 2,583 826
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Purchase of property, plant and equipment (393) (1,107)
Purchase of intangible assets (94) (838)
___ Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment. _____ 1,038 :
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in) investing activities 551 : (1,945)



FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
__ Repayment of long-term debt ‘ (471) (1,215)





Cash and cash equivalents used in financing activities (471) (1.215)
‘Increase (decrease) i in cash and ¢ cash equivalents a 2663 _ (2,334)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 1,988 1,284
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period (note 6) $4 OSE (1,050)

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank and in hand, short-term deposits with an original maturity of six
months or less and bank overdratts,

(Unaudited)
DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity

Six months ended July 31, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)



_ Number of shares Share capital Contributed surplus —_ Retained earnings —__
Balance at January 31, 2007 9,971,634 $ 399 $ 12,358 $ 3,844
Net income for the period - : - - 2.478



Balance at July tly 31, 2007



9.971 034 $ 12,358 6.322





DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements
Six months ended July 31,2007

1. Significant accounting policies

These interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard
No. 34, Interim Financial Reporting, using the same accounting policies applied in the January 31, 2007 audited

consolidated financial statements.
2. Accounts receivable

Accounts reecivable are stated net of provisions tor doubtful accounts of $7.1 million,

3. Assets classified as held for sale

For the period ended July 31, 2007, total assets and liabilities of companies which have been discontinued and
for which there is a commitment for disposition are reported in the balance sheet as “held for sale.” Operating
results for these segments are reported in the statement of income “Discontinued operations.” These include

Western Medical Plaza Limited and Doctors Hospital (Wesd) Limited.
.
4. Investment Property

During the period The Company sold 5 acres of undeveloped land in western New Providence. A gain of

$16,000 was recorded.
5. Change in accounting estimate

During the period The Company changed the period of amortization for its buildings. The original amortization
period for the principal buildings located at Doctors Hospital East were dwenty and twenty-five years. In
accordance with the provisions of TAS [6, the amortization periods were extended to forty years. The effect of
the change for this period was a decrease in amortization charges of $ 107,000,

6. Cash and cash equivalents

The cash position of $4.051 million reported in the statement of cash flows reflects $52,000 in cash for WMP

that is recorded as assets held tor sale.

PAGE 96













PAGE 10B, MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 17, 2007 |
POR a
Royal Commission inquiry urged into Port Authority

FROM page 1

In the joint statement, Mr
Lowe and Mr Maynard criti-
cised both PLP and FNM gov-



ernments for failing to
“address and redress the now-

disclosed blatant breaches of

the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment”, which they alleged had
taken place when Sir Jack

Tan Opportunities

Hayward and the late Edward
St George had sold off stakes
in Freeport’s utility companies
and other GBPA assets to out-
side private sector partners.
The pair charged: “The time

The Clifton Heritage Authority is seeking the services of persons to fill the
following positions at the Clifton National Park:

Position: WARDEN:

Park wardens have significant responsibilities in visitor services, Resource
management and the provision of the interpretative services.

_ Duties/Responsibilities:

° Assists with monitoring the activities at the park to ensure the proper use of

the facilities.

Assists with the facilitation of tours at the site, school programs and special

events.

Implements resource management techniques required to manage and restore
natural and cultural resources including exotic plant and animal removal,
native plant restoration, erosion control and prevention of historic structure
remains and archaeological sites.
Property uses herbicides and other chemicals in conjunction with the

maintenance team.

Provides emergency assistance.
Assist with any other duties assigned.

Post Qualifications:

° Minimum of 3 BGCSE’s or 5 BJC’s

° Have sound knowledge of security techniques.
Police vetting is a requirement —
Trainable and preparedness to be trained.
Graduate of the Bahamas Host Program is a plus

Position: Maintenance Worker

Responsible for the daily maintenance and upkeep of the grounds and facilities

of the Clifton Heritage Park. -

Duties/Responsibilities



Ensures the daily maintenance and upkeep of the grounds of the Clifton
Heritage Park, facility cleaning, facility repairs and maintenance, and natural

“and cultural:‘resource management as directed..." 2°
© Removat'of debris and other identified plane,” ~" .

ae

ery
S sa
oe

tae >

° Cleans and properly stores all tools, vehicles and equipment.
° Constructs, maintains and repairs building and structures, including
plumbing, wiring and painting.

Post Qualifications:

° Minimum of 3 BJC’s

° Ability to operate general landscaping equipment
° Trainable and preparedness to be trained
Applications are available at the Authority’s Office Colin’s Avenue.

Join Cititrust
(Bahamas) Limited,

Telephone caontact 325-1505.

— one of the most

established trust
organizations in the

We invite outstanding
individuals, wanting to build.a
career in technology, to be part
of our dynamic global team. You

world.



ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
Reporting to our Deputy Technology Head, the position is
responsible for all phases of the technology project management
lifecycle. Key responsibilities include documenting business

has come for a forensic audit of
the affairs of the Port Author-
ity, and an injunction imposed
to prohibit the sale of any
shares in the Grand Bahama
Port Authority and affiliated
companies until community
assets have been accounted for
and the covenants on the part
of the Port Authority to be
performed guaranteed.

“Our organisations would be
pleased to meet with govern-
ment representatives to discuss
the concerns of our members,
to explain why we believe a
Royal or Blue Ribbon Com-
mission should be appointed
to review the agreement and
to consider whether it is not

* time to turn over the provision
of services to a local govern-
ment.”

The sale by the GBPA
shareholders ofa 55.4 per cent
stake in Grand Bahama Power
Company to Mirant (since sold
on to Japanese firm Marubeni)
and a minor stake in Sanita-
tion Services to Onyx, as well
as the sale of 50 per cent stakes
in the Grand Bahama Devel-
opment Company (Devco),
Freeport Harbour Company
and Freeport Container Port
to Hutchison Whampoa, have
frequently aroused controver-
sy since the GBPA ownership
dispute burst out into the open.

Sir Jack and Mr St George
earned at least $80 million col-

. lectively in ‘special dividends’

from those asset disposals, but
clauses 1(6), 1 (7), 1 (8), and 2
(21) in the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, in the eyes of
some observers, make the pro-
vision of utility services “the
exclusive responsibility” of the
GBPA.

This raises questions about
whether such assets could have
been divested, especially as the
sales were given Government
(National Economic Council
and the Cabinet) and Central
Bank approval, and whether
such assets were supposed to
be held in trust for the benefit
of the Freeport and Bahamian
people, not sold for private
profit.

In an interview with The Tn-
bune, Mr Lowe said a Royal

sCommission was needed “to

get to the bottom of the situa-'

tion” and “how the assets came
to be moved from the Port
Authority ownership proper
and thrown aside into the own-
ership of Intercontinental
Diversified Corporation, and
the creation of Port Group
Ltd. It’s a basic core question”.

Mr Lowe added that such an
inquiry could not be left to the
Government, citing “apparent
collusion between the Gov-
ernment and Port Authority
principals over the years with
respect to the abrogation of

citi

Technology Project Leader

requirements, preparing project plans, writing technical design |
documents, coordinating production support, overseeing user

will interact with colleagues from
around the world and across the

organization, providing
technology project management
leadership. In addition to a great
career, we offer a competitive
salary and benefits package.

Interested candidates should

acceptance testing and managing all related project estimates and
financial budgets. Additional responsibilities include ensuring
adherence to all internal technology standards and controls,
information security requirements and any related policies.

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS REQUIRED

Candidates must possess a Bachelors degree in Information
Technology, Engineering, or a related field and a minimum of five
to seven years of related experience. Additionally, Microsoft
Certification (MCP or higher), solid knowledge or Oracle and SQL
databases, and experience with vendor

management are assets. Excellent project management skills,
strong oral and written communication skills, and proved

forward a copy of their resume

by August 31, 2007 to: Gieselle
Campbell, Cititrust (Bahamas)
Limited, P.O. Box N-1576,

apply.

Nassau, Bahamas OR Fax:
(242) 302-8552 OR Email:

gieselle.campbell@citi.com

Challenge

leadership skills will round out the ideal candidate.

Interested Bahamians are encouraged to

yourself to a career like no other

the agreement itself, and the
disposal of the assets that the
Port Authority and its share-
holders were entrusted with
the development of thereof”.

The Grand Bahama Cham-
ber president said of the need
for an inquiry into the GBPA
and how Freeport reached its
current state: “I think it’s crit-
ical, otherwise we’re going to
go through a litany of potential
suitors and investors, and shift
further and further away from
the root cause and purpose of
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment. We’re building castles
on sand.

“If they’re selling assets
which, in point of fact, are pri-
vately held for private profit,
they will take the profits and
leave, and Freeport will be left
holding an empty bag.

“The assets were to be capi-
talised on for the development
of Freeport, and whilst rea-
sonable profits are to be
expected, special dividends to
be derived from the revenue
generated from the sale of
these assets is unreasonable.
This habit of profiteering and
liquidation has been incredi-
bly detrimental.”

To rectify Freeport’s prob-
lems, Mr Lowe said one key
was for all stakeholders — the
Government, GBPA share-
holders and management, and
licensees — to show more
accountability now and in the
future.

Agreeing with those who
have argued that the Govern-
ment, licensees and Bahamian
people had not held the GBPA
and its shareholders to account
for their governance and devel-
opmental obligations, Mr
Lowe said: “The quasi-regula-
tory, governance position of
the Port Authority has been
ignored with respect to the
proper administration of
Freeport, but has been well-
utilised by the shareholders for
private profit.

“In my opinion, they’ve
ignored the mandate for prop-
er administration, except when
it suited their purposes, which
was to remove the assets from
the Port Authority and strip it
of profits.”

Mr Lowe questioned
whether some of the produc-
tive assets, in which stakes
were now held by Port Group
Ltd and ICD, would be

THE TRIBUNE

returned to the GBPA’s own-
ership and used to further
develop Freeport.

Other areas of concern, he
added, were to discover the
fate of the 7.5 per cent stake
that the Government purport-
edly holds in the GBPA, at
least according to company
records filed at the Registrar
General’s Office’s Companies
Registry. The Government
says it can find no record that it
still owns such a stake, which
Mr Lowe said needed answer-
ing, since he had seen nothing
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly to show the Public Trea-
sury was receiving dividends
or had obtained revenues from
the stake’s sale.

Mr Lowe also said the Gov-
ernment had yet to recognise
the Freeport Property Owners
and Licensees Association. “It

has yet to be done,” he said.
“It’s just sitting there, waiting |
to be recognised. There’s no »
status. It’s just like everything ©
else; it seems to have gong into /

a void.”

As for the Fleming Group’s ©

interest, the Grand Bahama
Chamber president added:
“While I can appreciate the
Fleming Group's grandiose
plans and possible contribu-

A

tion to the development of |

Freeport, I am concerned by

the ‘disposal of the past bag- :

gage’ aspect of their approach.

“The past baggage of
Freeport and the Grand
Bahama Port Authority are
precisely what concern the

licensees, and should greatly .

concern the Government. The
licensees have before the
courts an originating summons
and affidavits intended to open
the ‘baggage’ so at the very
least we know what we have
and are ‘throwing away’.

“It is an application before
the courts which has yet to be
heard, and should cause any
potential purchaser of the one-
time assets of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and
the Port itself to await the dis-
covery thereof.

“It is high time we stop
building castles and empires
on sand, and seek to discover
the extenté® which the foun-
ase Freeport have been
undérmined, so that the struc-
ture can be repaired to the
extent possible and regain a
solid foundation.”

NOTICE

BAHAMAS BUSINESS SOLUTIONS LTD.

wishes to inform the general public that

TEKITO STEVENSON

is no longer employed with the company,

and is not authorized to

transact any business on behalf of

the company.

B_~ Bahamas
(Bsp Business Solutions Ltd.



ise
-o HEATH

BANK & TRUST LIMITED

COMPLIANCE OFFICER

We are looking for a Compliance Officer who will be

responsible for ensuring that the Compliance function at

our bank is in accordance with regulatory guidelines.

The succesful applicant will:

e Have several years of relevant experience as a

compliance officer and a good understanding of

Bahamain and international compliance requirements.

¢ Be the principal contact for our bank with all

regulators.

* Be able to develop and maintain compliance policies

and procedures.

¢ Be computer literate

¢ Be able to work effectively with other staff members

We offer an attractive work enviroment and a

competitive compensation package.

Submit resume and salary requirements in confidence

.o. Muviorris@ HeathBank.com



3
5

é
:
j
{

MILNE AL ADDU Me ONS LRA ATE LRN OT ARLEN RDA BBM | 1



THE TRIBUNE Pe cS UNDA, SEP TEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 11B
REO A RR Ee es
WRAP, from page 2 turned its operati ; ‘ |
° edits operating results Revenues from real estate of $25k.
International Markets around, generating a small holdings were $609,000 (2006- Management has cited that it
end balance of $94m, standing unaudited profit of $25,000 for — $542,000), while revenues from - expects income, from its real

at $93 million at quarter-end.

' the first half of its fiscal year,

the TicketXpress acer

“estate business to be stable,

eeaeeee Weekly % Change Cable’s cash .pasition — compared to a loss of $103,000, were. $280,000 (2006,- . .While.expecting continued
, remained positive at the quar- for the same period last year. _ $238,000). ; hee wth: apr the TicketXpress
93 -1.49 ter end, despite investing and Total operating revenues ~~. business, ito: ‘economies of
i sara Be financing outflows, with net | were. $889,000 for the period, Income - a scale and continued expansion
EUR 1.3875 0.78 cash flows of $691,000 com- an increase of $109,000 over . in this area.’
, pared to $1.2 million for the | the $780,000 reported. at the Income from cohticalag ie Additionally, imanagement
2006 second quarter. end of the 2006 second quarter. operations of $194,000 was . is optimistic‘aboput opcrations
Commodities Operating revenues were more than double the $73,000 _ over the last half of the year
: Weekly % Change RND Holdings (RND).- generated by the company's _ reported in the prior period,’ ‘and expects the company to
At its recent Annual Gen- real estate and TicketXpress with finance costs of $168,000. - _ breakeven or even generate a
Crude Oil $79.10 219 eral Meeting, RND manage- segments, both of which saw (2006 - $177,000) resulting in. small profit for the fiscal year
Gold $717.80 2.08 ment reported that it has — growth over the period. ‘the ‘Teported unaudited profit” ended ee 2008.
International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly % Change
} Em ‘oloee
DJIA 13,551.00 3.34 R Bbpcive
S & P 500 1,484.25 2.11
NASDAQ 2,602.18 1.42
Nikkei 16,127.42 0.03

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Roots Landscape &
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invites applications for the following position:

FOREMAN, LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE DIVISION

_ Applicants must possess the following:

¢ Minimum of 3 years experience in landscaping in
a supervisory capacity

¢ Ability to organize and supervise a crew of labourers

¢ Ability to work with minimum supervision

¢ Ability to operate landscaping equipment

¢ A valid driver’s licence

A mechanical background wouid be an asset

Interested persons may apply by
telephone to 361-7589
Between the hours of 9:00am and 4:30pm
Or by fax to 361-0118

References and police record should
be available upon request

A leading law firm with offices. located in
Nassau and Feeport is presently considering
applications for the following position.

SYSTEMS
ADMINISTRATOR

The successful applicant should possess the following
minimum requirements:

In.any relationship, it’s important to have the right partner. Be
FirstCaribbean offers you the singular advantage of an experienced team, ‘innovative
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¢ Previous knowledge of law firm operations an asset.

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For farthecinfofrnation; contact.our Corporate Office:
Nassau (242) 322-8455 and (242) 356-1764
Freeport (242) 352-6651

Abaco (242) 367-2166/7 or 8

General responsibilities will include but not limited to:

¢ Maintaining, troubleshooting and repairing hardware and
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¢ Maintaining Network trustees and security

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¢ Recommendation and implementation of new technologies

¢ Liase and coordinate with various vendor-based
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Interested persons should apply in writing to:

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P.O. Box N-7117

Nassau, Panamias "SMALL. BUSINESS | CORPORATE BANKING | convoeare FINANCE |



¢ APITAL MARKETS



PAGE 12B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17,2007 THE TRIBUNE



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Full Text
a WAKE UP!

oem (1) The Tribune

E rm lovin’ it. |
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USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION







“ee CLOUDY
Se FSTORMS |

Volume: 103 No.247



aoe SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

inv sion inquig
a Author; ty

Royal Commission
inquiry urged into

at WUT A
SB eg (lame aN La)

soning is ch murder

32-year-old
found dead

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of Pride
Estates were in shock last night
after 32-year-old Shawn Evans
was shot in the neck and found
dead in their neighbourhood
yesterday, making him the 55th
murder victim of the year.

When The Tribune arrived”

on the scene, about 15 residents
were assembled’ around the
taped-off crime area, watching
as officers searched for evi-
dence.

Mr Evans was found lying
barebacked and in short pants
with a fatal gunshot wound to
the neck next to a truck parked
in a neighbour’s yard.

A trail of blood was visible
from where Mr Evans was

parently shot across the
street, with multiple pools of
blood having settled, revealing
the path he took before he
eventually collapsed and died.

Residents reported that they
heard gunshots on Saturday
night at around 10pm. A squad
car reportedly responded to
investigate, but neither the gun-
man, nor the victim, were found
at the time.

Not until 9am yesterday, after
police received a tip, was Mr
Evans’ body found in the new
sub-division off Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway.

Asst Supt Walter Evans said

SEE page 12

Turnquest announces creation
‘ional Crime Council





@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

WITH serious crime up by 29
per cent this year, Minister of
National Security Tommy Turn-
quest announced the creation of
the National Crime Council on
Saturday night, to serve as a per-
manent crime prevention and
control body.

Mr Turnquest discussed this
and other strategies to address
crime at the closing ceremony of
the National Assembly on Crime,
which brought together stake-
holders from the government,
police, medical profession, civil

SEE page 12



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CENT

anh ri SIMU is placed on a stretcher reece mnt

stabbed in
separate
incidents

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedianet___

TWO men became victims of

more violent stabbings over the
weekend, police revealed yester-
day.

The incidents, though separate,
underscore what some are calling a
“shift” towards knives being the
weapon of choice during heated
disputes.

Asst Supt Walter Evans said a
38-year-old man of Okra Hill was
involved in an argument with “a
person known to him” - reported-
ly over a female companion - at
3pm last Friday.

During the exchange, the man

SEE page 12



Bethel denies police are

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Education
Carl Bethel has emphatically
denied that police are returning
to public schools, as reported
in The Nassau Guardian on Sat-
urday.

The Guardian story cited a
Bahamas Union ot Teachers
area vice-president as stating,
based on a meeting with min-
istry officials, that auxiliary
police as well as (wo new secu:
rity guards will return to C I
Gibson school today.

The union source further
declared that “this will be for
all schools.”

But Mr Bethel responded to
this report dn Saturday at the
closing ceremony of the Nation-
al Assembly on Crime and said:



returning to public schools

Or Taisen ey

“No, the police are not being
returned to schools.”

“T have the support of my
ministry and all of the educa-
tion officials. Whenever they

SEE page 12





Mitchell and
Maynard Gibson
respond to
criticism over
‘Ninety’ extradition

THE former Minister of For-
eign Affairs and former Attorney
General have defended their rep-_
utations, and that of the former
government, in response to criti-
cism by the Court of Appeal
regarding the extradition of
Samuel “Ninety” Knowles.

Fred Mitchell held a: press con-
ference yesterday at the Gems
radio networks studio, and
Allyson Maynard-Gibson issued a
press statement, as the Court of
Appeal on Thursday criticised the
government for the extradition of
Mr Knowles before he had
exhausted all legal avenues avail-
able to him.

The court even stated that a
minister could be held in con-
tempt for the actions that
occurred in the case.

To this Mr Mitchell said:

"Reports appeared: in the press
on Friday, 14th September, about
the appeal of the decision of Jus-
tice Lyons not to order the return
of Samuel 'Ninety' Knowles to
The Bahamas.

“The reporting on the case by

SEE page 12

Police officer’s
son robbed
while shopping
with his mother

m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE teenage son of a high
ranking police officer was accost-
ed and robbed while shopping
with his mother at the Mall at
Marathon over the weekend, The
Tribune has learned.

The boy, son of Senior Asst
Police Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade, was approached by a
gang of 11 young men who
relieved him of his cellphone on
Saturday at around 7pm.

When The Tribune contacted
Mr Greenslade for comment, he
confirmed that the incident took
place.

“My son and his mom were in
the Mall, and a group of young-
sters, about 11 of them, pounced
on him and forcibly took his cell-
phone away from him in the pres-
ence of his mom.”

Mr Greenslade said security
guards stationed at the shopping
centre responded quickly, as well

SEE page 12

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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oi

ee Lz,





Union threatens First

lm By CARA '
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
& TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE National Congress of
Trade Unions has threatened
to call for a boycott of First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), and encourage its
member unions and their
50,000 members to end all
financial relationships with the
bank and withdraw millions of
dollars.

This is because of alleged dis-
crimination and victimisation
tactics being used against
Bahamas Financial Services
Union president, Theresa Mor-
timer.

NCTU executives said they
were prepared to bring pres-
sure on FirstCaribbean after
Ms Mortimer received a letter
from the bank accusing her of
acting inappropriately as union
president.

The letter, dated September
11, came on the heels of last
month’s unanimous strike vote
by bank employees, who were
protesting against working con-
ditions at FirstCaribbean’s Wal-
let Centre.

The letter was signed by
Siobhan Lloyd, First-
Caribbean’s ‘head of human
resources for the Northern
Caribbean stationed in Nassau,
and said in part that the bank
had grave concerns over Ms
Mortimer’s alleged lack of
adherence to labour dispute
processes.

“Please be reminded that
you are not authonised to enter
bank premises to conduct
union business or to meet with
bank employees without autho-
rised permission from the
bank...Any future lack of
adherence to this process will
call for more significant action
on behalf of the company,” Ms
Lloyd said.

NCTU president John Pin-
der said: “It is the view of the



NCTU president John ae)

NCTU that the content, spirit
and tone of the letter amounts
to victimisation and is a direct
attack on Mrs Mortimer as a
Bahamian trade unionist, as a
professional banker employed
by a multi-national company,
on the Bahamian trade union
movement and our rights as cit-
izens of an independent and
sovereign nation.

“We are prepared to declare
war against every member of
the executive management
team of FirstCaribbean and will
take the gloves off,” he said.

Joining Mr Pinder were oth-
er representatives of NCTU
unions, who all pledged their
solidarity with Ms Mortimer.

NCTU general secretary
Robert Farquharson vowed
that if the letter was not
rescinded, they will call on
every union and union mem-
ber to withdraw their funds
from the bank.

The NCTU maintained that
Ms Mortimer was in full com-
pliance with all labour laws and
that FirstCaribbean was acting
in this matter in retaliation for
the massive strike vote.

Mr Pinder also pointed out
that the NCTU has been

Gandia roe

The Bahamas Nation
Real Estate Expo

informed that the directive for
the letter came from First-
Caribbean’s headquarters in
Barbados, and stressed that the
government needs to be cau-
tious that foreign companies
investing in the Bahamas are
aware of the labour culture in
this country.

He further urged corporate
Bahamas to look at how First-
Caribbean operates, as he
claimed that the branches in

the-Rahamas imported all their
supplies from Barbados and did
not use Bahamian suppliers.

In a statement released by
FirstCaribbean yesterday, th
bank “vehemently” denice . *.
accusations mad. vy NCI
regarding alleze: vitimisatibn
of Mrs Mortim«

‘At no tim — did First-
Carivbean Jn-ernational Bank
seek to “victunise” Mrs Mor-
timer. The letter to her was.a
reminder of the rules, regula-
tions and agreements relative
to the conduct of union-related
activities on bank's premises,”
the statement said.

“FirstCaribbean is very dis-
appointed with the deliberate
dissemination of misinforma-
tion to the public. First-
Caribbean stands by its poli-
cies, agreements and the suc-
cessful partnership with the
Bahamas Financial Services
Union and other regional
unions representing our
employees,” the statement con-
tinued.

“First Caribbean Interna-
tional Bank also finds it
extremely disappointing to hear
calls from the NCTU to incite
customers and staff to take
action against the bank with-
out first dialoguing with the
bank on the issue.

“A meeting had been
planned with a NCTU execu-
tive but unfortunately did not
proceed.

“The bank must maintain the
right to manage its affairs and is
responsible for the mainte-
nance of good governance and
stewardship.”

‘dll scaclesle sande

ial.

poe
8 +

.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

RESERVE YOUR EXHIBIT BOOTH BEFORE 11/30/07 AND RECIEVE THE PROMOTIONAL DISCOUNT PACKAGE


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 3



0 In brief

Illegal
firearms
confiscated
by police

THE newly-formed Firearms
Tracing and Investigations Unit
of The Central Detective Unit
confiscated several illegal
firearms over the weekend.

Asst Supt Walter Evans said
that around | pm on Friday offi-
cers acting on a tip patrolled a
“bushy area” off Joe Farring-
ton Road where they discov-
ered a .40 handgun with 33 live
rounds of ammunition. Officers
also found a .45 handgun with
13 live rounds. |

No arrests have been made
in connection with these
firearms, police say.

Officers with a search war-
rant went to a home in Podelo
Street, where they discovered
an unlicensed shotgun with one
live round of ammunition.

Two suspects, aged 49 and 20,
have been arrested and are in
custody, ASP Evans said.

Shortly after 6am on Satur-
day, officers searched a home
in Deveaux Street.

They found an unlicensed 12-
gauge shotgun with 12 live
rounds of ammunition, ten live
rounds for a .45 handgun, 22
live rounds for a .40 handgun,
five cartridges of .40 hollow
point ammunition, and 54 pack-
ets of marijuana, ASP Evans
said.

A 29-year-old man has been
arrested in connection with this
matter.

Sports fishing
vessel is
reported
missing

POLICE are seeking public
help in tracing a red and white
sports fishing vessel stolen from
Green Turtle Cay, Abaco, last
week.

Mr Reuben McIntosh of

Black Sound, Green Turtle Cay,
said his 34-foot Contender was

stolen between 5pm _ on’

Wednesday, September 12, and
8am the following day.

The boat, named “Floorit”,
which has twin 250hp outboard
engines, was taken while left
unattended on the boat-lift at
White Sound, Green durtle
Cay.

Anyone with information is
asked to contact Marsh Har-
bour Police at 1-242-367-2560
or The Central Detective Unit

on Grand Bahama at 1-242-350-’

3089.

Two women
admit using
homes as"
liquor stores

TWO Haitian women living
in Freeport were arraigned at
Freeport Magistrate’s Court on
Friday after being arrested by
Central Division officers last
Wednesday for allegedly using
their homes as liquor and gro-
cery stores without being
licensed.

Michelene Charles, 42, of 17
Oleander Street and Yvrose
McPhee, 46, of 126 Redwood
Lane, both pleaded guilty
before Acting Magistrate
Stephana Saunders to breach-
es of the Shop Licence Act and
the Liquor Licence Act.

They were each fined $100 or
one month imprisonment. The
court ordered that confiscated
alcoholic beverages be turned
over to Police Welfare and oth-
er items to Grand Bahama Chil-
dren’s Home.

Freeport
woman
reports her
car stolen

KIMARA Bellot of Mallory
Lane, Freeport, has reported
the theft of her red Suzuki car,
which vanished between Friday
night and Saturday morning.

The 2001 Suzuki Baleno, reg-
istration number 24530, was left
unattended in the driveway of
her apartment.

She said her Bahamian pass-
port, bank ATM card and a
Credit Union cheque, which
were inside the vehicle, were
also stolen.

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LOCALNEWS _

PM tells radio show Bahamas







will consider ban on smoking

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad
and Tobago - The government
will consider legislating a ban
on smoking in public places,
improve physical education
facilities at public schools and
provide tax incentives for the
creation of on-the-job exercise
facilities, all as part of its ongo-
ing commitment to stemming
the incidences of chronic non-
communicable diseases
(CNCDs) in The Bahamas,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said Saturday.

Mr Ingraham's remarks
came during an interview with
Trinidad and Tobago's C-
News Station at CARICOM's
Summit on Chronic Non-Com-
municable Diseases - diseases
the Caribbean Community has
dubbed one of the greatest

threats to development in the
region.

Back in 2001, CARICOM
heads adopted the Nassau
Declaration that The Health
of the Region is the Wealth of
the Region, which was
designed to accelerate the
response to various health con-
ditions facing the region. The

Hubert Ingraham

2007 summit in ‘Trinidad was
the result of progress from the
declaration adopted in The
Bahamas.

“Specifically, we have a
problem with respect to hyper-
tension,” Mr Ingraham indi-
cated.
diabetes. Apart from the fact
that we are going to put in
place a national programme
for the provision of medicines

for all persons irrespective of

ability to pay for their pre-

. sion,



“We have high levels of

scriptions, we are going have a
major effort in terms of pre-
vention.”

Diseases such as hyperten-
heart disease, diabetes
and cancer, coupled with obe-
sity and a lack of physical
activity, are the leading cause
of death and disability in The
Bahamas, with the summit
revealing that Bahamians are
ten times more likely to die of
hypertension than their Cana-
dian counterparts.

Highlighting the govern-
ment's recent announcement
of a new dietary programme
for all public schools, the prime
minister also foreshadowed
improvements to public school
exercise facilities, adding that
the government is going to
seek to have health promotion
as a major part of initiatives
within the public health sector.

“We are going to seek to
duplicate what we have in a
few government offices, that
is rooms with exercise equip-
ment in Many more govern-
ment facilities and we are
going to seek to encourage
employers to do so by provid-

Specialist stresses importance of
healthy lifestyle to prevention

PORT OF SPAIN,
Trinidad and Tobago - The
greatest weapon in the fight
against chronic non-com-
municable diseases
(CNCDs) in The Bahamas
is to prevent theses diseases
from occurring in the first
place, said Dr Duane Sands,
cardiovascular surgeon and
chief of surgery at Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Dr Sands was one of
three medical specialists in
The Bahamas' delegation to
CARICOM's summit on
chronic non-communicable
diseases, and offered a brief
presentation on The
Bahamas' medical approach
to the prevention and man-
agement of CNCDs.

“Chronic NCDs, violence
and trauma force the peo-
ple of our country to make
real choices of survival,” Dr
Sands told CARICOM
heads and delegates. “These
diseases and the personal
impact require people to
make decisions - do they eat,
do they pay rent or do they
buy medicine.

“This triple threat of
physical, financial and emo-
tional stress has been docu-
mented to predict a dramat-
ic increase in the personal
and national impact of these
diseases in the next decade,”
he added.

Statistics on CNDCs in
The Bahamas are telling.

In the Ministry of
Health's 2005 study on
CNCDs - Identifying Deter-
minants to The Bahamas'
Burden, findings showed
that 70.6 per cent of the pop-
ulation were either over-
weight or obese - risk fac-
tors that either cause or
worsen other diseases such
as heart disease, hyperten-
sion and diabetes.

Another significant risk
factor in the development of
CNCDs is a lack of physical
activity. The study revealed
that 63.8 per cent of the pop-
ulation engaged in activities

“‘Umbrelias :
Loungers ‘
Drinks Trolleys

-Offee Tables

during their leisure time that do
not require physical activity
such as reading and watching
television.

. During his keynote address
to the regional summit, lead
head of government for health
in CARICOM's quasi-cabinet
and prime minister of St Kitts
and Nevis Dr Denzel Douglas
presented figures indicating
that The Bahamas has the
highest incidence of hyperten-
sion in the region, with the
possible cost of treating dia-
betes and hypertension pro-

jected at $76.7 million back in

2001,

Recommended dietary
actions Dr Douglas presented
as ones that lie uniquely at the

heads of government include
the establishment of a manda-
tory standard of meals in public
eating places and the elimina-
tion of trans fats from
Caribbean diets.

Dr Sands indicated that The
Bahamas’ national strategic
plan incorporates the focus on a
healthy lifestyles initiative,
pointing out that the country's
primary care facilities have been
strengthened with more and

better trained healthcare prac-

titioners.

“We are going to take the
battle out of the hospital and
into the community while simul-
taneously increasing the funding
to upgrade and improve our
hospitals.” he said,

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ing incentives and tax exemp-
tions for them to acquire equip-
ment to be able to facilitate
people engaging in‘exercise,”
Mr Ingraham said.
Emphasising that most
CNCDs can be prevented
through lifestyle changes in diet
and exercise, the ‘Trinidad sum-
mit also placed emphasis on the

tole of tobacco consumption in

the incidences: of cancer and
heart disease in the region, and
the need to enact tobacco con-
trol measures such as increased
Import taxation and the prohi-
bition of smoking in public
places.

A 2005 Ministry of Health
study on CNCDs revealed that
just over seven per cent of the
Bahamian population. smokes
cigarettes.

Mr Ingraham pointed out
that The Bahamas currently has
a 200 per cent tax on cigarettes
and that during its previous







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terms in office, his government
made the now Lynden Pindling
International Airport a smoke-
free environment.

He indicated that decisions
will now have to be made
regarding the way forward for
tobacco control measures in
The Bahamas.

“We are now going to con-
sider banning [smoking] in pub-
lic places period,” the prime
minister noted. “We have casi-
nos [and] we have conflicting
views as to whether or not a
casino should be exempted
from a policy.

“We are going to make some
decisions about that but I think
at the end of day we will either
have a total ban on smoking in
all public places, or the number
of public: places will be very
minimal and even if that hap-
pens that will have to be for a
minimal period of time, I
think.”



“SEES” withe nedhes GR oR Bk

WHO'S YOUR

















N/A #6







6:05 18:25
615

>






PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited.

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON Ea. DUPUC HL, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
. Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

Was MP unaware of PLP victimisation?

MICAL MP Alfred Grey was.a guest on a
radio talk show on Friday. We were not listen-
ing to the show, but happened to walk through
the room when the radio was on and heard Mr
Grey remark that he had heard something about
whatever they were discussing, but had no per-
sonal knowledge of the matters to which the
caller referred.

We asked those who were listening to the
programme about the matter under discussion.
They said Mr Grey was condemning the FNM’s
recent firing of temporary workers attached to
the civil service, calling the action cruel victim-
isation. Apparently a Bahamian called into the
programme to remind Mr Gray of the PLP’s
own years of cruel victimisation. It was about
this that Mr Grey. denied all personal knowl-
edge.

It reminded us of a 1997 programme in which
Mr Christie was caught on the same embar-
rassing cleft stick, and struggled desperately to
distance his party from its 25-year history of
victimisation.

Guest on a Sunday night show in April,
1997, Mr Christie, then prime minister, declared
that “the PLP as a party does not and did not
believe in victimisation.” He said that “the insti-
tution itself did not believe in anything that
resulted in harm being inflicted on people.”

A voice from the past unsettled the former
prime minister when he called in to the studio to
tell Mr Christie that when he was a very young
boy his mother, with seven other young ladics,
was fired from the then Hatchet Bay Plantation
by the former MP for Governor’s Harbour and
PLP cabinet minister. “And the words that were
used to her by one of his generals who was in
charge of the plant,” said Peter 20 years later,
were: “‘If you don’t support the government,
you cannot live by the government.’” The
women were staunch FNMs.

Here was a little boy, now grown to man-
hood, still carrying the hurt inflicted on his fam-
ily by the PLP, which literally took the only
bread they had off their table.

Ifi in fact the party, as claimed by Mr Christie,
was “a people’s party” that did nothing to inflict
harm on others, why did it tolerate at the cabi-
net table the MP whose decision had denied
so many families of their livelihood?

The truth of the matter is that the PLP was a
people’s party only for those who voted for it;
other Bahamians did not exist. Didn’t one of
their own — also a cabinet minister — declare
that he was checking only for PLPs and anoth-
er announce that in fact God gave this country
to the PLP? This same attitude explains much of
their behaviour today, which in fact prevents
them from accepting that God did not give this
country to them, and in fact they really lost the
2007 election.





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Mr Christie cannot deny the past because,
although many might today say they disagreed
with what took place, they certainly lock-
stepped behind “the Chief” when Bahamians
were being crushed under the party heel.

And so today, it is not good enough for Mr
Grey to dismiss the past as something of which
he was not aware. Presumably, if he wasn’t
aware of it, it didn’t exist. It’s like the question
that philosophers, such as René Descartes,
asked themselves about existence: When the
great.oak came crashing down in the forest was
there independently a loud thud, or did the
noise of the thud only exist-when its crashing
vibrations floated through the air and hit the
human ear?

Born in 1951, Alfred Grey was 16 years old
when the PLP came to power. Surely he was not
so oblivious to his surroundings as not to have
known the cruelty inflicted on one of his “home
boys” from Colonel Hill, Crooked Island —
Mr Grey is from the twin island of Hard Hill,
Acklins. He now represents both islands in the
House of Assembly.

Surely he heard the dismayed stir in the
community when the crippled teacher, beloved
by all, was removed from the settlement. Three
months after Pindling’s party won the govern-
ment in 1967, there was a by-election in the
Acklins, Crooked Island constituency and the
crippled teacher’s good friend, the late Basil
Kelly, won the day. It was felt that the teacher’s
influence helped win the election for Mr Kelly.
From that day until he died the PLP made that
poor teacher’s life a living hell.

Surely, Mr Grey was aware of all the FNM
cries of victimisation in September, 2002, four
months after Mr Christie’s government came to
power. And Mr Grey must remember the bus
and ferry contract disputes that occurred in his
own constituency. As Minister of Local Gov-
ernment at the time he must have had some
part in the decision making.

The 87-year-old Crooked Islander, a retired
school teacher, who lost his school bus contract
accused the PLP of victimisation. He was a long
time FNM. The PLP explained that the con-
tract had expired a month after the Christie
government was sworn in on May 2, 2002, and
rather than the PLP renewing it, despite a job
well done, it had awarded it to another family —
this time PLP. The same thing happened in the
ferry contract.

Remember, Mr Grey? Or are you going to
plead the Fifth, and say you were not aware,
because your ears were not around to hear, nor
your eyes to see what was happening in your
very own constituency?

Today, people are wiser, and they have good
memories. The politicians would be well advised
to adjust to the times.






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Totally unacceptable
Situation cries out
for more modern

procedures

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT IS incredibly shocking,
disconcerting and frightening
to witness the number of
unintentional miscarriages of
justice in our courts in recent
times. These cases have been
mainly related to the result of
shoddy police work and the
brutality on the part of law
enforcement officers. The
courts have had no alterna-
tive but to let free individuals
who were possibly guilty of
serious crimes, including mur-
der. The totally unacceptable
situation cries out for more
modern and enlightened pro-
cedures when individuals,
who are suspects, are inter-
viewed by the police. From
the moment an individual is
brought in to be interrogated
by officers, there should be a
special team present and all
proceedings be video taped.
These recordings should then
be passed on to a legal arm
of the police department to
be scrutinized before being
presented for evidence in cas-
es before the courts.

If the present level of
alleged police brutality con-
tinues, we stand not only to
be the labeled the murder
capital of the world but the
unenviable and most brutal
police state as well. Howev-
er, this cannot be allowed to
become our international rep-
utation, in light of the many
outstanding officers on the
force who carry out their
duties in an honest, effective
and responsible manner.

When a judge or magis-
trate has to unceremoniously
throw out cases which are so
obviously deserving of trial,
then whoever is’ responsible
for such a breach of the
nation’s established laws
should be held responsible.
Whether initiated by a com-
plainant or by the state, where
there is alleged police bru-
tality, then investigations must
be carried out and, if proven,
the appropriate penalties
imposed. It does not condone
well for the state or the indi-
vidual when justice is obvi-
ously aborted. It leaves soci-
ety wide open for vigilantism
and thus additional grief for
the nation.

In this modern society, only
the best. minds should be
allowed to deal with individ-
uals who run amuck of the



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gate thoroughly officers who
are accused of brutality. This
body of investigators must be
‘ composed of both civilians
and law enforcement agents,
in order to present an accept-
able image of neutrality for
public confidence.
Finally, I congratulate and
thank those police officers
who Know the laws, abide by

loHers@tribunemedia.net

law, especially when they will
be represented by the best
minds from the legal field. A
judge too, from his level of
wisdom and discretion, should
be empowered to direct alter- them and protect our person
native procedures in circum- —and_property with their very
stances where it is obvious __ lives.

‘mishandling of matters results

in a ‘no case to answer.’

We are all familiar with the
old adage, “City Hall cannot
investigate itself.” Similarly, it
is ludicrous to expect the
police to objectively investi-

JOSEPH DARVILLE
Grand Bahama Human
Rights Association
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
September 7, 2007

We have to
take ourselves
more seriously

as a country

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANK you for your invaluable space. In assessing the progress
of this great nation and attempting to study its growth; I have
come to realise, if nothing else, that we have a very young and pli-
able nation which has manifested a capricious culture; and this
culture has manifested some positives and some not so positive
social elements. As I mentally contend with these elements a sec-
ond phase of realisation confronts me showing that it is indeed ne
best of times and perhaps the not too worst of times.

However, it can only be a not too worst of times if a certain
course of action is collectively taken by this nation: Furthermore
coupled with this, is a concluding revelation that the choice lies with
us as to which direction this country.4akes for the next hundred
years; this is a choice which should begin now.

History shows that there are a number great men and women

who sacrificed plenty during the past 60 years. Some of them con-
tributed publicly and some privately, yet no matter the recognition,
astronomical costs was paid. As it standseit is now up to another
group of Bahamians to step forward and make serious contributions
towards the next stage of this country’s growth.
' One perceives a serious yearning by citizens of this country to
experience for once, in its young existence, a country devoid of
politicised decision making. There are citizens who are yearning to
see a country where education, social services, healthcare or the
judiciary does not suffer for the sake of political convenience.
There are citizens of this country who loathe the political polori-
sation that presently exists but who are being forced to live under
post-colonial oppression and oligarchic manipulation. There are cit-
izens in this country longing to see their country move from a cul-
ture of ad hoc nation building to a culture of sound and struc-
tured policy making.

It is sad to see that after almost 60 years we as a country are clue-
less as to where we will be in the next 10 years. From CSME to

-WTO to EPA, there is just no definitive stance being taken by this

country. Talk shows upon talk shows, forums upon forums and no
political party can present to the public a comprehensive document
that succinctly lays out short-term and long-term solutions for this
country.

The question is why aren’t these plans being presented? The
answer is that it is very difficult to think through and create a plan
for nation building. It takes late nights, studying past and present
statutes and policies. It takes diligence to avoid legal anomalies and
pitfalls. It takes drafting and codifying new laws. In short it takes a
considerable amount of brain power to positively change the course
of a nation. It takes vision and it takes the lack of political rhetoric.

The thing is we have to take ourselves a bit more seriously as a
country. Tourism is a beautiful but old goose therefore she needs
a complement. We must find within ourselves the fortitude to find
this complement. We must move away from the belief that our
tourism product is something that cannot be duplicated. We must
compete internationally; not only as a sun, sand and sea paradise but
also as an attractive and efficient place to do business. We can no
longer look to other countries to create a model for the future of our
nation; we must create our own.

Other nations must be drawn to us because of our advanced
way of doing business. We must reinvent ourselves. We simply
cannot continue to have the College of The Bahamas fend for
itself while we pump monies into Bahamasair. We cannot contin-
ue to relegate national education to a mere nuisance while we
sponsor some form of ‘rush-out’ almost every month of the year.
This nation is at a crossroads; in one breath it has the potential of
becoming a great nation and in another it reeks with the potential
of becoming an objectionable and shoddy little village.

DWAYNE HANNA
Nassau,
August 26, 2007.

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THE TRIBUNE



New book
on Anna
Nicole rides
sales high

DESPITE mixed customer
reviews, the latest book about
Anna Nicole Smith has climbed
to number 13 in the Amazon
bestseller charts.

Blonde Ambition by TV
reporter Rita Cosby has already
attracted legal threats from
Howard K Stern and Larry
Birkhead, but the controversy
has merely increased the book’s
popularity.

One reader, giving it a four-
star rating, said the book was
like Anna Nicole herself -
“raunchy, sensational and nev-
er boring.”

Anna Nicole’s final days in
the Bahamas feature largely in
what another reader critic called
“a whodunnit thriller”.

Man found
drowned may
have had
heart attack

A MAN’s body was discov-
ered in the sea off Goodman’s
Bay on Saturday at around
11am, police said.

Reports say the man,
believed to be in his 70s, may
have suffered a heart attack
before drowning. However,
police were unable to confirm
this.

While foul play is not sus-
pected, an autopsy will be held,
Asst Supt Walter Evans said
over the weekend.

The identity of the victim has
- not been released.

Maroons say
Jamaican
PM angered
the spirits

@ JAMAICA
. ‘Kingston ou:

A COMMUNITY of déscen-
dants of freed slaves is blaming
the recent defeat of Jamaica’s
long-ruling People’s National
Party on the prime minister’s
improper use of a sacred horn,
according to Associated Press.

Former Prime Minister Portia
Simpson Miller brought bad
luck upon her party by improp-
erly brandishing the horn, an
abeng, at political rallies, a
leader of the Accompong
Maroons, Melville Currie, told
The Star newspaper in Jamaica.

Currie told the paper the
political use of the abeng “tar-
nished” the talisman and may
have set off a string of bad luck
for Simpson Miller, including
- the arrest of one of her body-
guards fer driving a stolen vehi-
cle in July and the shooting
deaths of another bodyguard
and a party activist after the
election.

“The abeng is our national
symbol. I believe the ancestors
stirred in their graves to see this
happening,” said Currie, an
Accompong leader responsible
for culture.

Simpson Miller received the ©

abeng - traditionally used by
the Maroons to summon the
spirit of their ancestors or to
announce a war — as a gift
before the September 3 elec-
tion, in which she was ousted

- by the victory of the main oppo-
sition Jamaica Labor Party.

. The Accompong Maroons
are the descendants of slaves
freed by the Spanish in the 17th
century to repel invading British
forces. The community has lived
semiautonomously in Jamaica
since 1739, when they signed a
peace treaty with the British
after resisting them for decades.

Coceeocescseeccseecsevess0000000

Are YOU
Vex?

Email us at
wihryyouvex@
tribunemedia.net
and tell us what’s
on your mind

eee neeescoeeseseseseserseece

TROPICAL
Parse vce)

MHL
ae rear a







@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Minister of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources Larry Cartwright
said the government is very
concerned about the potential
threat of the lionfish on the
fishing .industry in the
Bahamas.

“The challenge we face in
the fishing industry is the new
invasive species that we have
inherited from somewhere —
it is a Pacific animal that is now
in the Atlantic Ocean, the
Caribbean Sea, and right
around our shores,” he told
fishermen in Freeport.

Mr Cartwright said the lion-
fish is “creating havoc.” He is
calling on Bahamian fishermen
to spear the predatory fish
when they come in contact
with it.

“It is not deadly, but it does-
n’t have any predators (in the
sea). And we have been saying
to fishermen, spear-fishermen
in particular, that when they
see it to spear it,” he said.

However, he warns that fish-
ermen should be very careful

> ¥

The lionhish is increasingly causing concerns

not to touch the beautiful-
looking fish, which has ven-
omous spines on its fins and
tail.

The lionfish originally comes
from the tropical Indo-Pacific
region of the world. They are
voracious predators and feed
heavily on baby shrimp, lob-
ster, grouper and other fish.

It has been seen throughout

‘the Bahamas, particularly in

shallow waters and near coral
reefs in Grand Bahama; New
Providence, and Exuma.

®



The Bahamas commercial
fishing industry exports nearly

$100 million of fish products’

annually. There is a fear that
the lionfish could cause a sig-
nificant decline in the coun-
try’s fishery resources.

Mr Cartwright said that
some fishermen are now
reporting that lionfish are
invading their habitats.

He also noted that certain
persons have come forward
expressing an interest in har-
vesting the fish, live for export.

Screening held for Bahamian

film is held in Freeport

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand °

Bahama Film Commission
held a special screening at
RND Cinemas in Freeport of
a new movie filmed on Grand
Bahama.

‘Eye of the Dolphin,’ a film
by Michael Sellers of Movie
Bank, and Quantum Enter-
tainment, was shot in Smith’s
Point, Grand Bahama.

Mr Sellers and leading
actress Carly Schroeder were
in Freeport for the screening
along with 100 invited guests
on Grand Bahama. The Min-
istry of Tourism hosted guests
to a cocktail reception.

Tourism officials believe
that Grand Bahama is proving
to be an ideal location for
water-based films by US film-
makers and major movie pro-
duction companies, including
Disney, which filmed its
sequels here for ‘Pirates of the
Caribbean’ II and HI.

Donna Mackey, senior
manager of Filming at the
Ministry of Tourism in
Freeport, said the screening
was very successful and
received positive feedback
from Film Commission mem-
bers.

“We were extremely
pleased that over 100 persons
turned out and we were very
happy to partner with a pro-
duction company like Quan-
tum,” she said.

Ms Mackey said that Grand
Bahama is beginning to devel-
op a niche for water-based
films. She said film produc-
tions in the Bahamas provide
significant economic and
employment opportunities for
Bahamians. :

“When film crews come to
the Bahamas to make a movie
it affects a broad spectrum of

our citizens such as hoteliers,
transportation providers,
caterers, set designers, and
light carriers, and many peo-
ple are employed and our
economy is boosted,” she said.

“We are hoping that
because of our beautiful
waters most water-based films
will continue to come to
Grand Bahama, and our water
tank used in ‘Pirates of the
Caribbean’ can facilitate many
of those water-based films.”

Mr Sellers said Grand
Bahama was the ideal place
for the filming of “Eye of the
Dolphin.” He is planning to
come back again to film the
two more sequels to the
movie.

“It was a blast being here
to shoot the film, and we were
happy to be back again for the
special screening here in
Freeport,” he said.

The film is about a 14-year-
old girl who is a troubled teen
in Los Angeles. Her mother
dies and she goes to live with
her grandmother. She thinks
her father is dead, too, but
when she gets expelled from
school her grandmother tells
her that her father is alive and
is a dolphin research scientist
in the Bahamas.

She sends the girl to the
Bahamas to live with her
father. Through her interac-
tion with the Bahamian cul-
ture and with the dolphins,
she is able to grow and
change, and solves some prob-
lems here on the island.

Mr Sellers said the movie
was originally planned for
filming in the Florida Keys.

“T wasn’t happy with the
dolphin situation there, so |
came over here at UNEXSO
and the wonderful dolphin
experience is the main reason
I came Grand Bahama. Sec-
ondly, when I came here
everyone treated me so well,

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and when I went to the Fish Fry
at Smith’s Point | thought this is
where we are going to shoot the
movie.

“So we rewrote the script so
that it took place here in
Smith’s Point in the year after
Hurricane Jeanne. And so it
was a perfect place to come, and
the perfect place to come again
for the sequels.”

The film is released now in
the United States and is expect-
ed to be available for public
viewing in the Bahamas in the
next two weeks.

Bahamian Cornelius McKin-
ney, of Galaxy Productions, was
the production co-
ordinator/associate producer for
the film.

“We organised everything on
the Bahamas side in terms of
finding source materials, the
crew and the location,” he said.
“We do film, television, music
videos, and commercial pro-
ductions,” he said.

Mr McKinney's company is
finishing a film in Exuma called
‘Matrimonial a la Bahamas,’ an
Italian movie that is expected
to be in theatres in Europe in
November.

He has worked on several
films, including ‘Casino Royale’
and ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’,
as well as on a music video in
Exuma, a Panasonic commer-
cial and a television show called
‘Shop the World’ in Nassau.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 5

Dn eee ee eae

“T wish J could tell them start
tomorrow. But, I would like to
say to fishermen...that while
the sting of the lionfish will not
kill you, it will certainly cause
you enough pain to make you
wish you were dead. So...you
have to be very careful.”

“For the first time in a long
time we have fishermen diving
in August and September in
wetsuits to protect themselves
from the lionfish,” he said.

Dangers

According to information on
BarrierReefAustralia.com, lion-
fish stings can cause nausea,
breathing difficulties, paralysis,
convulsions and collapse.

Even death may occur in
exceptional circumstances. The
venom in the spines remains



© In brief | Minister calls on fishermen

to spear predatory lionfish

active for days, so even dis-
carded spines should be treated
with caution. It may take sever-
al months for a full recovery
and if the sting is left untreated,
gangrene may develop.

US marine scientists and
researchers, who are conduct-
ing study expeditions on the
lionfish in the Bahamas in con-
junction with the College
of the Bahamas Marine
Resources Department, do not
believe the fish migrated on
their own to the Western
Hemisphere.

It is strongly believed that
the fish was either released from
large sea aquariums, or person-
al aquariums owned by individ-
uals in the United States.

The fish have been spotted in
large numbers throughout the
US east coast, the Bahamas,
and as far as Bermuda.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007
Bahamas to receive means to

control mealybug from US

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Depart-
ment of Agriculture is very
close to obtaining the control-

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.
















ling agent to deal with the infes-
tation of the Pink Hibiscus
Mealybug (PHM), which has
now spread to several islands
throughout the Bahamas.

The PHM attacks and
destroys ornamental plants and
crops. It is prevalent on Grand
Bahama, Abaco, and Long
Island, where various plants and
fruit trees have now come under
attack.

Director of Agriculture Sime-
on Pinder said the United States
Department of Agriculture
(USDA) produces a “natural
controlling agent” for the
mealybug, and has placed the
Bahamas on a list among sev-
eral other countries, including
Jamaica, Dominican Republic
and Puerto Rico.

“They are providing this cost

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The successful candidate will receive a competitive salary based on his or
her qualifications and on the job training. The engagement is expected to
last four to five months only, but may materialize into a permanent position.

Interested applicants may forward their curriculum vitas together with
copies of all degrees and certificates earned to our offices by either facsimile
at 328-8008 or e-mail at dglinton@gsolegal.com addressed to the attention of
Mrs. Dominique Glinton. All applications will be treated as confidential.

free and we have gotten to the
point where they (the USDA)
have now taken The Depart.
ment of Agriculture’s FedEx
number - that means that it is
just a matter of them calling us
to say that the controlling agent
is on its way,” he said.

During a town meeting in
Freeport on Thursday evening,
Minister of Agriculture and
Fisheries Larry Cartwright
assured residents that the gov-
ernment is working as fast as it
can to address the situation here
on Grand Bahama, and other
islands where the mealybug
problem now exists.

“We are aware of the mealy-
bug - we know it is affecting the
hibiscus and other ornamental
plants, and trees such as the
pawpaw and others, and we

REHABILITATION AWARENESS WEEK

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dedicated Rehabilitation Professionals. The expertise, commitment and passion

that you bring to work everyday is much appreciated. Thank you for all that

you have done for us and the communities around you. Well done, we wish all

of you continued success.”

Charles Sealy,
Chief Executive Officer

me DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life





know...we have to get this thing
addressed.”

Adult mealybugs are small
(about three min long) and
pink in body colour. They are
covered with a waxy secretion.
They feed on the soft issues
of many plant species and
inject a toxic saliva that causes
curling and contortion of
leaves.

The mealybugs are very resis-
tant to pesticides and insecti-
cides. They are not easily erad-
icated and the aim is to control
the population by using a small
wasp-like fly produced by the
USDA.

Mr Pinder said that the same
method was used in New Prov-
idence seven years ago and was
very successful.

“We in New Providence have
had considerable experience
with the mealy bug. It appeared
about seven years ago and did a
great deal of damage before it
was brought under control,” he
said.

“If the Bahamas was one con-
tiguous land mass we would not
be having this problem. But, the

Bernard Nottage
signs copies of new
book of essays



USDA is the only provider of
the natural control agent in this
part of the world, and they have
been very co-operative with us
again.”

Mr Pinder warns that resi-
dents should refrain from using
pesticides and insecticides when
the controlling agents are ini-
tially released.

“There is some discussion
now of setting up a minor pro-
duction facility somewhere in
the country to try and raise the
numbers so we can redistribute
them to other islands when we
need to,” he said.

Mr Pinder said that getting
the mealybug under control is
not an automatic or overnight
fix, and will take some time.

“From what we have seen in
New Providence, the control
will be a lasting one. But the
critical mass of the fly or wasp
would have to be present on
this island in order to contain
the problem.

“The pink hibiscus mealy bug
will never ever leave the
Bahamas, but the aim is to con-
trol its numbers,” he said.

Brent Dean/Tribune staff

DR BERNARD Nottage signing a copy of his new book, “New Directions
in Bahamian Policy: Essays on Endogenous Development”, on
Thursday night at St Mary's Hall, St Augustine’s College. The book is
co-edited by Nikolaos Karagiannis, and contains seven essays, of which

two are contributed by the co-editors.

Available
on the

THE TRIBUNE

_Author who

- wrote book

— on Oakes
murder dies
at age of 83

A WELL-KNOWN author
who wrote one of the most
celebrated accounts of the Sir
Harry Oakes murder case in
Nassau has died in England
aged 83.

James Leasor, who once
worked as personal secretary
to London Daily Express pro-
prietor Lord Beaverbrook,
became a prolific author after
several years in journalism as
a reporter and foreign corre-
spondent.

His book - Who Killed Sir
Harry Oakes? - was one of
several written over the years
offering possible solutions to
the 20th century’s greatest
murder mystery. It is still on
sale through Amazon, where
Leasor’s claims that the mur-
der was somehow linked to
the burning of the liner Nor-
mandie in 1942 and the Allied
landings in Sicily are duly not-
ed.

Leasor, ‘an Oxford gradu-
ate, was once fired four times
in one day by Beaverbrook,
who later took a shine to the
young writer and encouraged
him to sharpen his literary tal-
ents as an Express reporter.

His output was impressive.
He wrote thrillers, historical
novels and biographies,
including a nine-book series

: about the fictional Dr Jason

i Love, a Somerset family
physician who got mixed up
with the secret service.

The Oakes book was one
of his many non-fiction titles,
which ranged from a biogra-
phy of Lord Nuffield, the
motor manufacturer, to
accounts of the Indian Mutiny
and the Dieppe Raid.

He also wrote several
African and Asian sagas
under the pseudonym
Andrew McAllan.

Leasor, the son of a
teacher, was born in. Kent,
England, in 1923. He attend-
ed the City of London School,
where he wrote stories for fel-
low pupils, lending them out
for a fee.

Before war service with the
Lincolnshire Reginient, Lea-
sor got his first taste of jour-
nalism with The Kentish
Times at £1 a week. But it was
his later association with
Beaverbrook that gave him
his all-important break into
the big-time.

After leaving Beaver-
brook’s service, Leasor free-
lanced as a magazine writer
and author, ghosting autobi- |
ographies for the actor Ken- .
neth More and King Zog of
Albania, among others.

Apart from writing, Lea-
sor’s great love was classic
cars, especially a 1937 Cord
that featured in several books
and was once the subject of

? an article in the Daily Tele-
: graph.

He kept his vintage motors
at his Jacobean manor house
in Wiltshire, where he died
on September 10.

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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 7

THE TRIBUNE









Felipé Major/Tribune staff

LEADERS OF the Defense Force, police and prison service were represented at the closing of the National
Assembly on Crime symposium on Saturday at the Wyndham

at crime assembl

MINISTER OF National Security and Immigration Tommy Turnquest closes the National Assemble on Crime
Saturday at the Wyndam Cable Beach Resort

Alarming figures

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

bdean@tribunemedia.net

THE National Assembly on
Crime exposed the crisis the
country now faces, and brought

to light some harsh critiques of

a culture now wrestling to figure
out how to save itself.

For those who do not know,
or think it is an exaggeration to
state that there is a crime crisis
in the country, the police sta-
tistics recently released for this
year, overwhelmingly illustrate
the disaster we face. ;

Violent crime has risen by 29
per cent thus far this year with
rape up 53 per cent; armed rob-
bery up 47 per cent; and unlaw-
ful sexual intercourse up 22 per
cent.

Consultant psychiatrist Dr
Michael Neville set the stage
for the discussions at the open-
ing ceremony on Friday, warn-
ing those in the audience that
the problem is “more complex”
than they think.

Dr Neville said that we
should be cautious about declar-
ing a war on crime, and rather
should be attempting to broker
a“peace”™. -° TF

~ “Many people i in society want
to give police complete freedom
to do as they wish. That would
create collateral damage. The
innocent would be mixed with
the guilty,” he said.

There is already a “phenom-

. enal degree of anger” in our
society, Dr Neville remarked,
with many Bahamians walking
around “like live timebombs
ready to explode.” In this envi-
ronment, further escalation may
only further the anger and
resentment.

Addressing the reasons for
this anger, Dr Neville said:

“J would suggest that
we...have over the years devel-
oped a huge underclass, which is
much harder to get out of than
at any time in Bahamian histo-
ry.”

There was a time, he said,
when civic groups would help
the underclass to rise out of
these circumstances. But now,
the underclass is “often state-
less, nameless and lost. And our
response to them, by and large,
is to kick them down further.”

Dame Joan Sawyer told the
audience that as a society we
individually must take respon-
sibility for the what we have
created, and she indicted
Bahamians for the country that
has been created since inde-
pendence.

“You’ve had 30 years from
Independence and more, and
-you’ve done nothing to build a
nation.

“AJ you do is to whine and
complain, and blame whoever is
in political power and whoever
is in the church and whoever is
there,” she said.

In the Bahamas, officials and
government agencies are
famous for hiding or being
unwilling to release data to the
public regarding the work of the
nation they supervise.

However, Dr Elliston Rah-
ming did so, and the numbers
he released were as haunting as
those released by the police
illustrating the sharp rise of
crime this year.

Some 62 per cent of the 1,400
people in Her Majesty’s Prison

are not guilty of any crime —
they are merely there on
remand. We as a country have
the 11th highest incarceration
rate in the world out of 204
countries surveyed, and from
May to August 69 per cent of
the intake at the prison were
on remand.

These numbers reveal that
after warehousing our children
in schools that chronically have
a failing D grade — with the pub-
lic school average around an E
— we then ship them off in



ARCHBISHOP DREXEL Gomez of the Anglican diocese (left) sits
_ next to Archbishop Patrick Pinder of the Catholic diocese at the

closing of the assembly

increasing numbers to sit in Fox
Hill Prison on remand for up
to five years, some sources have
told The Tribune.

The roundtable sessions com-
prised of stakeholders from the
government, police and civil
society were also extremely can-
did in the discussions.

Assistant Commissioner Mar-
vin Dames emphasised to the
group that the community must
collectively take responsibility
for crime, and that the police
can only be effective when the
community assists in the cre-
ation of strategies to free itself.

Freddy Munnings reminded
those assembled that we must
not expect schools to take the
place of families.

“A high percentage of fami-
lies are dysfunctional. The sin-
gle parent families with children
having children, and mothers
competing with'their daughters
is the thing of the day,” he said.
Parents, he continued, must not
absent themselves from the
rearing of their children.

Regarding schools, Mr
Munnings said that these insti-
tutions “must stop social pro-
motion”.

“No child should graduate

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iversary
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Felipé Major/Tribune Staff

from school without being able
to master the basics, reading,
writing and arithmetic.”

The National Assembly on
Crime ended with a set of poli-
cy suggestions, including the
creation of a National Crime
Council, a group to intervene
in gang culture, and a PR cam-
paign to sensitise Bahamians to
‘behave better’, along with oth-
er initiatives.

However, serious questions
still exist surrounding our legal
system, which seems unable to
free itself from a backlog that
violates the constitutional rights
of hundreds of Bahamians, who
remain in prison for years with-
out being guilty of any crime.

Many of the sociological
problems discussed at the
Assembly will take time to
address, and will require a more
complicated cultural shift. The
court backlog, however, seems
clearly like a problem for the
government and its agencies to
solve.

How can the men being
unjustly denied their freedom
and dignity be expected to act
with dignity and respect when
this society treats them with
such contempt?



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Invitation for Proposals

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is soliciting proposals from qualified suppliers for the provision
of a Direct Top-Up Pre-paid Mobile Solution.

Interested parties may obtain further information, including
eligibility to participate as of Wednesday, September 12, 2007
from the BTC Public Relations Department, John F Kennedy
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Halsbury prepares

TWO well-known experts
will offer advice for Bahamians
on becoming wealthy and safe-
guarding the most important
purchase most will make — buy-
ing a home - during the 3rd
annual Halsbury Chambers free
legal clinic on Saturday, Sep-
tember 22 at SuperClubs
Breezes.

This marks the second time
Glenn Ferguson and Troy

. Sampson will be presenters at
the free legal clinic. Now in its
third year, the clinic has grown
into one of the largest commu-
nity outreach projects of its kind
— complete with sessions
throughout the day, childcare
services by the Meridian School
and opportunities to speak for a
limited time to an attorney for
free..

Mr Sampson's discussion,
“Buying A Home: Basic Steps
to Safeguarding Your Pur-
chase” is slated to begin at 10am
and will undoubtedly provide
tips in what can seem a tedious
process. He is also the president

day Sept. 22, 2) 07



IMMEDIATE PAST president of the Bahamas Mortgage Brokers Associ-
ation Troy Sampson discusses various issues he will address on “Buy-
ing A Home: Basic Steps to Safeguarding Your Purchase”

of Approved Lending Services,
a fully internet-driven mortgage
brokerage company.

“I am ecstatic to be a part of -

the team of presenters at this
year's legal clinic,” said Samp-
son. “I feel that the firm has
taken an unprecedented initia-
tive to get involved with the

community and bring to them
the answers they felt were out
of reach. What I enjoy most
about being a part of the clinic
is the fact that while I'm not
presenting, I'm absorbing so
much valuable information
from the other presenters.”
Mr Ferguson is an interna-

Former justice joins law firm

RETIRED Supreme Court
' Justice Jeanne Thompson, a
leading legal figure who served
in one of the highest judicial
posts in the nation, has joined
the firm of Halsbury Chambers
Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law
as consultant, the firm
announced.

“We are honoured that Jus-
tice Jeanne Thompson, who has
been highly sought after by the
legal community since she
retired from the Supreme Court
in March, 2007, has selected
Halsbury Chambers as the
appropriate firm in which to
lend her expertise,” said Donald
Saunders, senior associate.

“Justice Thompson brings a
wealth of unmatched wisdom
to our practice, better enabling
us to serve clients and her con-
tributions both to the legal fra-
ternity and cultural history of
The Bahamas are legendary.”

The former justice’s legal
career spans five decades. A
member of the Honorable Soci-
ety of the Middle Temple, she
was called to the degree of the
Utter Bar in 1964 and to the















ATTN aL ThOnneche



Bahamas Bar the following
year. She practiced law under
the tutelage of the Sir Orville
Turnquest and the late Eugene
Dupuch, QC after whom the
Bahamas’ law school is named,
in the chambers of Dupuch &
Turnquest, later joining the law
firm of the late Sir Kendal
Isaacs, and subsequently, Isaacs,
Johnson and Thompson.

2007 models
starting at

$11,995,

From 1981 until she was
named to the Supreme Court
bench in 2002, she practiced on
her own, specialising in Matri-
monial Law. In her earlier years
she practised both criminal and
civil law.

Outside the legal communi-
ty, Justice Thompson is well-
known as a cultural icon whose
writing, columns, and plays
form a significant part of
Bahamian folklore. She co-
authored the first Bahamian
soap opera, “The Fergusons of
Farm Road,” and was the
author of the radio soap opera,
‘Sam Finley’s Sandcastle.”

At Halsbury Chambers, she
joins a complement of attorneys
whose practice includes civil lit-
igation, company formation,
family law, maritime and avia-
tion law, immigration law, wills
and estates, intellectual prop-
erty and real estate.

Justice Thompson will be on
hand to provide expert advice
during the 3rd Annual Halsbury
Chambers free legal clinic
“Information You Need for the
Life You Want”.

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RETIREMENT AND financial consultant Glenn Ferguson will provide
directions on the road to wealth when he discusses “So You Want To
Be A Millionaire”

tionally recognised financial and
retirement consultant,
researcher, syndicated writer
and talk show host on Gems
FM. He is also the principal of
Comprehensive Consulting Ser-
vices and Comprehensive Insur-
ance Agents and Brokers.
“Tam very happy to have

Firm wins insulation bid at new service

company has been chosen to
provide insulation for Imaging
at Grosvenor, a 24-hour 3D
CAT scan and Ultrasound
service located in Grosvenor
Close and owned by Eliza-



FREE LEGAL T

mVeed for the Life} You ak
Sept, 22, 2987
Breezes

m alll:

A BAHAMIAN-OWNED>






“deans }



Tim Aylen

been invited to present again,”
says Ferguson. “I am amazed
at the hundreds of people who
file in and out of the informa-
tion halls throughout the day.
What people can discover here
in one day would often take
months and thousands of dol-
lars to find out.”



beth Darville and Stanley
Darville.

Bahamas Foam Insulation
will be taking on the job at
the building, constructed
during July ‘and August at ,
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This year's exciting discus-
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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS |



Eric Rose/BIS photos



a7

Nurses honoured at awards ceremony

NURSES AND healthcare professionals were honoured during the Neonatal Nurses Day awards
ceremony at the Grosvenor Close Campus of the College of The Bahamas on Friday. The event,
held under the theme, “Neonatal Nurses: We Dare to Care,” recognised more than 50 nurses and
healthcare workers for the role they play in the care of children in hospital. The honourees are
shown in a group photograph.





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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007



Robert Mugabe

i By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat).

Aricas heads of
government are

idamant that Zimbabwe's auto-

cratic leader, Robert Mugabe,
nust be invited to a summit
meeting of African and Euro-
pean leaders in Portugal in
December.

For their part, European
heads of government are debat-
ing Whether to bar Mugabe
from attending or not.

This issue was part of a wider
debate on Zimbabwe earlier
ihis year at a symposium at the
Royal Commonwealth Society
in London in which I partici-
pated. Other participants
included British parliamentari-
ans and businessmen, black and
white Zimbabweans, and diplo-
matic and academic represen-
‘atives from neighbouring
southern African countries.

Amid great disagreement, |
nad suggested at the London
symposium that Mugabe should
»e allowed to attend because |
saw it as an opportunity for oth-
er heads of government to seri-
ously negotiate his departure
from the presidency of Zim-
hbabwe directly with him in the

margins of the mecting. Others
disagreed, saying that his atten-
dance at the Atrica-Europe
summit would give Mugabe's
government “legitimacy.”

It is a similar debate that is
currently on-going in Europe.
But, it is a sterile debate. Like it
or not, Mugabe is in charge of
Zimbabwe and the army, which
he has favoured and nurtured,
still stands behind him.

The best efforts of the oppo-
sition party and its supporters
have failed to unseat him, and
the leaders of many of Zim-
babwe’s neighbouring states,





his role as a freedom fighter.
But, they, like everyone else,
recognise that Mugabe has
destroyed the Zimbabwean
economy and is ruthlessly per-
secuting his own people.
Inflation was estimated at a



Like it or not, Mugabe is in
charge of Zimbabwe and the
army, which he has favoured
and nurtured, still stands

behind him.



who could best apply pressure
on him, are ambivalent in their
attitude toward him.

As Don McKinnon, the Com-
monwealth Secretary-General,
publicly said recently many
African countries still regard
Mugabe as a hero because of

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staggering 7,600 per cent in July
and unemployment at a fright-
ening 80 per cent. Families are
surviving only because many of
their breadwinners — both men
and women — have sneaked
across the border into neigh-
bouring states and are sending
money back home.

() n top of this hardship,
there are massive

power and fuel shortages, and

Sir- Ronald Sanders



reports indicate that “price con-
trols that the government
enforced in June have emptied
shelves and depleted stocks,
bringing many shops and facto-
ries to a standstill.”

The official exchange rate
between the Zimbabwe and US
dollars was devalued in the first
week of September from 250 to

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hero and villain

30,000 Zimbabwean dollars to
one US dollar.

Dissent, however mild, is met
with vicious beatings by police
and Mugabe support groups.

It is difficult to imagine that
the situation could get any
worse.

So why should European .

nations tolerate this villain at
their summit with African lead-
ers in Portugal in December?

There are two good reasons.
One is the argument put for-
ward by McKinnon that the
Africa-European summit is too
important to be put off because
of Mugabe. And, the African
Union has stated quite clearly
that its leaders will not attend if
Mugabe is not invited.

The second reason is that the
leaders of the Southern African
nations that are in the best posi-
tion to persuade Mugabe to end
his rule of tyranny are reluctant
to take action against him.
South Africa’s President, Thabo
Mbeki, is the chief among them.

There are various reasons for
the reluctance to move against

THE TRIBUNE



with Zimbabwe knows that the
only way to end the destruction
of the country and the decima-
tion of its people is for a deal to
be negotiated directly with
Mugabe in which he leaves
office with impunity.

He will not accept that such a
deal is possible unless he has
iron-clad guarantees from Euro-
pean nations and the United
States, and he will want it from
the highest possible levels.

The corridors of the Euro-
pean-Africa summit in Decem-
ber would be a good place to
start to talk to him.

Hero to some and villain to
others, the reality is that
Mugabe has presided over the
destruction of his country and
the decimation of his people.
Every day that he remains his
country is driven further into
an economic abyss, and threat-
ens the stability of neighbouring
states as Zimbabwean stream
across the borders.

Mr Mckinnon, as Common-
wealth Secretary-General, has
urged that Mugabe be invited



The only way to end the
destruction of the country and
the decimation of its people is
for a deal to be negotiated
directly with Mugabe in which
he leaves office with impunity.



Mugabe. One of them is what
Don McKinnon has said:
Mugabe is still a revolutionary
hero to many in Africa because
he stood up against the racist
minority government of lan
Smith.

A second reason — and I sus-
pect this is particularly true in
South Africa — leaders fear a
backlash from militant groups
within their own countries who
would use any anti-Mugabe
action to suggest that they were
selling out to “imperialist” (or
“white”) powers in Europe and
North America who want to
oust Mugabe.

Aves everyone con-
nected in anyway

to the European-African sum-
mit in December as a practi-
cal matter and as good sense.
The same argument is relevant
to placing the subject of Zim-
babwe on the agenda of the
Commonwealth heads of gov-
ernment in Uganda in Novem-
ber.

It would not be the first time
that the Commonwealth dis-
cussed a country that had with-
drawn from membership, nor
would it be the first time that
Commonwealth resolution led
to European and American
action to end tyranny —
ApartheidsSouth Africa is the
prime example.

Responses to: ronald-
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEWS



‘Handcraft artisans are
‘Bahamas ambassadors’

@ By Bahamas Information
‘Services

FREEPORT — Those who
‘produce souvenir items, includ-
ing jewellery and straw work,
have been reminded to utilise
‘their skills fully when presenting
items for sale to visitors,
because they are also ambas-
sadors for The Bahamas.

So said Minister of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources Lar-
ry Cartwright.

His comments came as he
addressed graduates of the
Coconut Shell, Jewellery and
Straw Training Programmes
Sponsored by the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration in conjunction with
‘Grand Bahama Craft Associa-
‘tion.

The graduation ceremony
‘was held at the Canon Eric Sam
,\Centre at the Church of the
‘Ascension in Lucaya on Thurs-
day evening. Sixty-two people

graduated after completing
courses in coconut craft, jew-
ellery, introduction to platting
and straw work.

Mr Key and Mr Cartwright
are on a two-day official visit
to Grand Bahama.

A former educator, Mr
Cartwright’s ministerial respon
sibility also includes the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation.

The minister noted that not
many males have offered them
selves for courses offered by
the handicraft department of
BAIC, which has a mandate to
assist the handicraft entreprc
neur who rely on arts, cratt and
souvenir gifts production as a
primary source of income.

“When we held a similar exe1
cise in Abaco a few weeks ago,
there was only one male gradu-
ate present, so it seems the trend
continues. | am not sure who
wants to take responsibility for
this trend but BAIC takes full

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responsibility for the develop-
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through this training programme
across the country,” he said,
adding that the programme is
available to all who’ are inter-
ested, both male and female.

The minister acknowledged
that the programme is building
on the success of entrepreneur-
ial craft persons who have done
very well in the past.

“By developing such a pro-
gramme nationwide and
encouraging persons who may
have the interest but need con-
fidence in the skills, a broader
range of craft products will
eventually be produced to sup
plement the souvenir industry
in the country,” he said.

He reminded graduates that,
in the marketplace, they would
be competing with the best in
the world but their training will
help them to produce items that
will bear testament to their lev-
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about The Bahamas to the cus-
tomer or the person.who
receives the souvenir as a gilt. It
is important to put your very
all into each piece,” he said.





PARTICIPANTS IN the Coconut Craft Training Programme are pictured
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the Canon Eric Sam Centre at the Church of The Ascension

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Shooting Carl Bethel

FROM page one

police believe that Mr Evans :
was killed on Saturday night at;
the time when residents report- :

ed hearing gunshots.

ASP Evans also said that, at
this stage of the investigation,
police suspect the victim was
shot as a result of an argument
across the street from where

his body was eventually found.

One resident, who did not
wish to be named, told The
Tribune that the rise in vio-
lence this year has her ina
state of fear.

“1 don’t know what is hap-
pening to this country. All you
keep hearing about are mur-
ders and stabbings. This
Bahamas is getting out of con-
trol,” she said.

The fears of this resident,
and other Bahamians, regard-
ing the increase of violent
crime have been validated by
police statistics revealing a 29
per cent increase in serious
crime this year in the
Bahamas.

The murder total for 2007,
at 55, has already surpassed

the total number for 2005 (52),

with the rate still on pace to
reach or surpass 80 murders
for the year. mi

With reported rapes up 53
per cent and armed robberies
up 47 per cent, the country
appears in the grip of a violent
cultural shift, some commen-
tators declared at last week’s
National Assembly on Crime.

Police currently have no
suspects in relation to Mr
Evans’ death.

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FROM page one

speak to me (they) say that that is not the
answer to the problem,” he said. “Police are not

returning Co schools.”

Of the existing group of auxiliary police the ;
PLP government placed on public school cam-
puses, Mr Bethel said that some of these indi- :
as he indicated in his budget }
communication — be integrated into the more ;
troubled schools as “regular school security

viduals will

officers.”

“The police are not being permanently sta-
tioned in our school campuses. No trained :
police officers will have a station in our school :

campuses,” Mr Bethel stressed.

The school security initiative, Mr Bethel told :
The Tribune, which provides heightened patrols :
at specific times along with staggered patrols ;
throughout the day in and around the schools, }

will continue.

“It would be a silly minister of education }
who did not see that there were some problems }
having our children settle down in the first few :
weeks of school and do nothing about it,” Mr :

Bethel said.

“Obviously, as we have a live and ongoing }
: school security initiative that is going on in co- :
: -operation with the police, where weaknesses
occasionally are shown, where they arise, they }

will be addressed,” Mr Bethel added.

The government has had to endure a wave of:
criticism surrounding its decision to withdraw :

police officers from schools, as a result of sev-
eral acts of serious violence in the first few
weeks of the new semester.

Stabbings have occurred at A F Adderley

and CI Gibson schools, along with a teacher i

being assaulted at the Mable Walker school.

The opposition has strongly criticised the ;
government’s decision to remove police from :
schools. with former Prime Minister Perry :

Christie last week calling for their reinstate-
ment.

on the issue, said that the FNM government

appeared poised to act contrary to policies :

introduced by the former government.
Mr Mitchell went further and also ques-

tioned if the government is now poised, with :
officers out of the schools, to distribute security :

contracts to supporters.

Secretary general of the Bahamas Union of :

Teachers Belinda Wilson has also called for
reinstatement of police officers. Ms Wilson is

also asking that the government instal metal :
detectors in schools as an additional security :

measure.



LOCAL NEWS
FROM page one

the press was not very clear and so I have
asked for the entire printed transcript of
what was said in the course of the trial.
"Whatever was said, however, the press
felt sufficiently secure to say the following:
"The press reported that Court of
Appeal's justices, or the President of the
Court of Appeal in particular, allegedly
asserted that my actions as the minister
responsible for extraditions in the mat-
ter were illegal and that I should be held
in contempt, that there had been a con-
stitutional infringement by me and my

colleague Allyson Maynard-Gibson and.

that the government of the PLP had
infringed the rights of one of its citizens
and had broken the law.
"Notwithstanding the absence of the
full transcript and to the extent that these

allegations are made in the press, this is,

enough to warrant an immediate response

Fred Mitchell

from me.

"The public should know that the jus-
tices dismissed the appeal so the decision
of Justice Lyons stands.

"It should be pointed out that all
actions by me were taken as Minister of
Foreign Affairs, and as such, it is the Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs today who is
bound to defend the actions of the gov-
ernment in accordance with the statute
and on the advice of the Attorney Gen-
eral. The actions as a minister are lawful
unless or until otherwise pronounced in
appropriate legal proceedings, properly
adjudicated after hearing both sides.

"I would urge the press in the future to
deal with these matters with some cau-
tion having regard to the fact that the

‘personal safety of the individuals involved

may be at risk as.a result of their report-



"Until the transcript is obtained, I will
make no further comment on the matter.
I reserve any right of further action upon
review of that transcript. Any further
questions on the matter should go to the
Attorney General. As a lawyer of 21 years
at the Bar, I have always upheld the rule
of law and the betterment of the judicia-
ry and will continue to do so.”

Former Attorney General Allison May-
nard-Gibson said in her defence:

“The public should know that the judg-
ment of the Honourable Justice John
Lyons stands. It is therefore the law of
the land,” she said.

“As a member in good standing of The
Bahamas Bar for almost 27 years, as a
former Attorney General, as a former
Minister of the Government and as a Sen-
ator of The Bahamas, I have scrupulous-
ly adhered to the laws and the conventions
of our Constitution and I reject whole-
heartedly and unreservedly any suggestion
to the contrary.”







At a press conference yesterday, Fox Hill :
MP Fred Mitchell, responding to a question :







ing.

FROM page one

was allegedly stabbed in his abdomen and taken to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital (PMH), where his condition is listed as serious. His
identity has not been released.

On Saturday at 8pm, two men from Quarry Mission engaged
ina heated “row” and, as a result, an 18-year-old man was stabbed
in the abdomen. He is listed in serious condition at PMH.

Police revealed that a 40-year-old suspect turned himself into
authorities later that day.

At a press conference held at police headquarters last week,
ASP Evans remarked on the recent cluster of stabbing incidents.

“We are particularly concerned with the number of stabbings we
have seen in recent times, especially those matters which have tak-
en place in our schools. Much more can be done, but we need the
full support of the community to help reform, in this case, our
young men.”

As reported previously, two students were reportedly stabbed
while on school premises in unrelated incidents last week, while
three men were allegedly stabbed by a co-worker on a construc-
tion site at Cable Beach last week.

Police believe the latter was a culmination of a “history of bad
blood” between the co-workers.

“We have to be concerned as a people, concerned (about)
how we deal with issues at hand...we have to be able to resolve (dif-
ferences) in a more peaceful way,” ASP Evans cautioned in a tele-
phone interview with The Tribune yesterday.

“These (knives) are instruments that we totally discourage
people from using at all costs.”

ASP Evans said that, as knives are readily accessible household
items, little could be done to regulate who bought them. He
warned anyone in conflict with others against arming themselves
with a knife and to enlist police help or seek counsel from a trust-
ed person.

He also advised Bahamians to weigh the consequences of their
actions before resorting to violence to solve their problems.

According to preliminary crime statistics released by police

Two men stabbed

last week, there has been a 29 per cent increase in “serious
crimes”, otherwise known as “crimes against the person”, from
2006.

For September, there were eight non-fatal stabbing incidents
reported up to press time.

Police officer’s son robbed
FROM page one

as police officers on patrol.

However, the assailants fled the scene and were not caught.

Fortunately, his son and wife escaped without injury, he
added.

“We were able to get tremendous community support in the
entire matter, in that members of the public who were standing
by got involved and I believe, thanks to that, no further harm
came to my wife or my son.”

Ironically, Mr Greenslade said he got news of the incident
while on his way to the closing ceremony of the National Assem-
bly on Crime.

He commented on the rising tide of violence in the nation and
the urgent need to address mounting concern.

“These young men (are) running around like little rebels,
just pouncing on people, and you know that’s happening all
over the country every day.

“We do have some issues with these young people who roam
about in gangs and we’re going to have to do our best to try and
interdict this kind of activity.” ;

A formal complaint has been lodged and this will be investi-
gated like any other, said the officer.

He extended gratitude to security officers at the Mall for
their quick response.

services.

FROM page one

society and the media, to offer
policy solutions to the crime prob-
lem in the country.

Recent statistics released by
police indicate that murder is up
by 50 per cent for the year; armed
robbery is up by 47 per cent; rape
is up by 53 per cent; and unlawful
sexual intercourse is up by 22 per
cent... a

Based on a document released

Turnquest

major components of the man-
date of the National Crime Coun-
cil would include: the expansion
of the Andros programme for
young delinquent boys and girls;
advocacy for the creation of a
National Sex Offenders Registry;
advocacy for legal reform that
denies bail to those accused of
murder and the increased speed
of violent crime trials; the use of

closed circuit television as a
crime-fighting tool, and the
strengthening of witness protec-
tion programmes in the country.

In an effort to demonstrate that
the two-day assembly provided
practical solutions, Mr Turnquest
also pledged to assist with the
hosting of a National Youth
Forum, that would engage those
most likely to be victims and per-
petrators of crimesman osty f)

Mr Turnquest also announced
that his ministry will sogntaunch

a major anti-crime public rela-
tions campaign through the print,
broadcast and electronic media,
to spread the message that
“Crime doesn’t pay”.

A Youth Gang Intervention
Unit was also proposed by the
Assembly.

However, Mr Turnquest did
not elaborate further on whether
or not such a group would be cre-

yyy sated:as'a partofithe police force,

or another government agency,

The minister endorsed sugges-
tions that came from the Assem-
bly such as the adoption of pris-
oners by churches in order to
assist in their rehabilitation, along
with the suggestion that proper
“Community Boundaries” be
established, possibly along the
lines of the police Neighbourhood
Community Policing Programme,
where stakeholders ‘can more
directly focus their crime prevea-

,.Such asthe department of social. ...tion efforts.

by Dr David Allen, some of the

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THE TRIBUNE , MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2007, PAGE 13

THE JUNKANOO CORPORATION NEW PROVIDENCE LIMITED
IN PARTNERSHIP WITH :

THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE

Application
for

Prospective Judges

Applicant must be 21lyrs or over

OFFICAL USE ONLY

|__|

_ JUDGE NUMBER |
THE 2007 / 2008 JUNKANOO SEASON

Please PRINT LEGIBLY all information in the spaces provided below and answer all questions and provide documentation including a
passport photo as requested or application may be subject to outright rejection

All information given by applicants will be subject to follow up background investigations and checks.

A. PERSONAL INFORMATION
Full Name (Ms./Mr./Mrs.)



SURNAME FIRST MIDDLE Alias





Maiden name aliases nick names

Address



(STREET, CITY, ISLAND)

Date of Birth 3. Country of Birth Age
DD/ MMI YY *
P.O. Box wo ei SOR Nationality
| AW) HY) eC)

Employer ; Profession

Telephone





Employer's Address



Email:



B. GENERAL & BACKGROUND INFORMATION .
Have you resided in the Bahamas for more than five years? (I£.NO please state previous residence)
Have you ever judged a Junkanoo Parade? (If YES please give year(s) of parade)

a. Do you currently participate/rush with any Junkanoo group? If yes, name Group







b. Have yowparticipated/rushed with any Junkanoo Group before If yes, name group



TO}

c. Are you an avid supporter of any Junkanoo Group? If yes, name group
d. Do you have any relatives and/or close friends who participate with any Junkanoo Group?





If yes name persons and group(s)



e. Do you presently have any personal affiliation wi th ANY Junkanoo Group? (If YES please name the Group



f. Do you have any religious reason that may prevent you from judging a parade? (If YES please explain) :

g. Do you work on Boxing Day and/or New Years? (If YES please state which)



h. Why do you wish to be a judge?





Have you ever participated in any Junkanoo parade(s) before? (If YES please give the year and name of the group)
Explain how “integrity” relates to a judge and the parade a ee E

C: Given the above, are you confident tha t you are able to Judge a parade fainly and in an unbiased manner, based solely on your training and the presentation and performance of the groups during

the parades? _Yes__or___No i
Do you see Judging of Junkanoo Parades as a National contribution and civic duty? Yes or No

Do you know of any reason that would disqualify you for being aflowed to Judge any parade? Yes or No





D. MEDICAL INFORMATION
Please note this section is for insurance and medical emergency purpose ONLY

Do you have any medical condition(s) that might’ préverit You from judging? (EG: asthma, heart condition, diabetes, hypertension, optical, hearing, etc.) If YES please explain and list any medication

that you take for that condition.





Are you allergic to any specific medicine? (If yes please list)



T understand that | may be liable to take a medical examination to determine my abilities in areas related to my ability to judge the parade and agree to the same.

Emergency Contact (LIST 2 PERSONS TO CONTACT IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY)



1. Name Relationship _ __
Telephone (W) (H) ee (©)
"2, Name Relationship
Telephone (W) (H) ee (©)
os
Declaration

I, declare that the information I have provided in this application is true and correct. I further agree that | am of sound mind and body and pledge to be sober during the parade and to abide by all of

the rules, regulations and assignments set forth by JCNP or.jits.assigns. I further understand and accept the full responsibility for the completeness and accuracy of the information that | have herein

provided, and accept full and complete responsibility for the same. If any of the information is found to be false and or misleading, either prior during or after a parade that I have Judged, ]
render my self incapable of judging again in the future, and agree to stand liable for any such act, and that any and all scores tendered by me will be discarded.

APPLICANT SIGANTURE —s DATE
PASTE
PHOTO HERE

Completed applications should be submitted to the

Ministry of Culture, Morro Castle, Attention Mrs. Joan Henderson on
or before Friday, September 28, 2007
PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

Major Marketing Corporation

is looking for a

ouniry a

with responsibility for Bahamas, Bermuda
and Turks & Caicos.

Successful Applicant must have a Bachelors
or Above in Marketing Management or
Communications

Responsibility: :

To grow consumer F volume i in all
Markets

Fullfill the reporting eq
International Finan eS

Depts.

Develop People in Markets
Implement internal programs

Cost control on marketing, sales and
indirect budgets to deliver the above.

Manage cash flow via days receivable,
inventory levels and Cape



rani for all



Develop Marketing P Pi Ot
Markets

Please send resume to
DA 13572 |
C/O P.O. Box N3207
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“phy speeeye rs BAS qyttees

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



“to school at
Englerson Urban
Renewal Centre

@ By Bahamas Information
Services



HUNDREDS of students
returning to school this year
attended the Englerston Urban
Renewal Centre back*to-school
extravaganza.

Mr Brensil Rolle, parliamen-
tary secretary in the Ministry of
Housing and National Insur-
ance, addressed the students
and their parents.

The students were treated to
free uniforms, school bags,
books, pencils, pens, folders,
geometry sets, crayons and
colouring books.

Patrice Miller, project man-
ager of the centre, said the
school supplies were donated
by the community and sur-
rounding businesses.

“We could have gotten a
small donation from the min-
istry,” she said, “but the whole
idea is to teach the people how
to become a sustainable com-
munity or how to sustain them-
selves. If we pool our efforts
and resources, we can get it
done.”

Ms Miller said letters were
sent to about 365 businesses in
Englerston seeking donations.

Two or three days later they
visited the businesses and did a
follow-up and got very good
response.

Ms Miller said those who did
not get back in touch with the
centre still showed up Friday
and Saturday with supplies for
the back-to-school event.

Foodstores provided the
food, restaurants in the area
cooked the food and other busi-
nesses, including the lquor
stores and other places like
Purity Bakery, Bahamas Bak-
ery, Bahamas Food Services,
provided the bread.

Churches also. provided

bouncing. castles aid tents for

the,event.





PARENTS AND children attend the opening ceremony for the Engler-
ston Urban Renewal Centre back-to-school extravaganza, before school

supplies were given out



STUDENTS WAIT patiently for school fem sippled by businesses

from Englerston

The yowner of the A Shoe
Creation not only made a dona-
tion. Ms Miller said, but will
also give free school shoes to
students in: ‘Englerston who
acedthemy a

The centre will: act as facilita-

tor between the store and stu-
dents in need of shoes.

She said the centre is still has
some uniforms for schools in
the area. Those, needing :uni-
forms can also contact the cen-

‘treilyt | routy lt



Learn to Reac

Career
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7. leading home appliances and electronics retail
distributor invites suitably qualified applicants to
apply for the following posts:

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September 25, 26, 27 (7:00-9:00pm)

Venue
New Providence Community Centre on Blake Road.

2. APPLIANCE REPAIR TECHNICIANS
Must be competent, experienced and able
to work without direct supervision,

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a police character certificate, and copies of
certification(s) achieved from reputable institution(s) to:

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(1) Email to: biblereadingseminar@yahoo.ca
(2) Or call Penny: 325-3177
(3) Or mail information to: P.O, Box N-993, Nasa, B Bahamas
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Nassau, Bahamas.

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| Deadline for receipt of applications is October 8th, 2007.


THE TRIBUNE

CARIBBEAN NEWS

VIONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 15



Jamaican officials launch campaign
to reverse the decline i: tourism

| SAN JUAN, “uerto Rico



JAMAICAN officials said Sunday they plan
to open a .ourism training school as part of a
campaign to reverse a downturn in visitors to the
Caribbean island, including from the key U.S.
market, according to Associated Press.

“The (tourism) industry has been on a dan-
gerous, downwards spiral over the last six
months,” newly appointed Tourism Minister Ed
Bartlett said in a statement.

He said details on the school, such as when

Monday, Sept 24,: 2007

Session 1: 9 am to 1 pm
Session 2: 6 pm to 8 pm

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haircutting techniques and salon management.
As if that weren't enough professional ey |
James is a pre Master Artist yo Clairol
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Textures&Tones color line, along with other
Team Synergy team members.

James often educates in the national show
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and techniques at Bronner Brothers, Prot
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He has been in the beauty biz since 1982,
earning his cosmetology degree from Dahl's
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Jamaica has seo: . 12 percent drop this year in
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the bulk of the island’s tourism.

Other Caribbean islands are reporting similar
slumps, according to the Caribbean ‘Tourism
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Experts have cited new passport rules and a
ae U.S. economy as possthie explanations,

Bartlett said he would s\n announce other
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tourism season, which starts Dec. 15.

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 20C7

THE TRIBUNE

mma irom TST sme OED |
Old Bahama Bay employee hits top gear with award

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama’s Jamal Darville, an
employee at Ginn’s Old
Bahama Bay resort property
at West End, was named
‘Employee of the Quarter’
and was awarded a Fantasy
NASCAR trip to United
States.

Mr Darville, a marina
deckhand at Old Bahama
Bay at Ginn sur Mer, was
chosen from among 2,500
employees at Ginn proper-
ties for its coveted ‘Employ-
ee of the Quarter’.

Deidre Rahming, public





‘WELL DONE’: Bob Van Bergen (centre) Vice President and General Man-
ager of Ginn sur Mer, congratulates Samuel Ferguson (left) and Jamal
Darville (right) on receiving Old Bahama Bay at Ginn sur Mer ‘Manager’ &
‘Employee of the Quarter’ awards, respectively.

from across the United
States on a_ Fantasy
NASCAR trip in which

relations director, said Mr
Darville joined 11 other
Ginn Resorts employees.

employees are treated as
celebrities for a weekend.

“After being whisked
away on a Ginn Resorts
company jet, Darville settled
into a luxury villa at Ginn
Hammock Beach Resort, a
golf and spa resort located
on two miles of pristine
oceanfront in Palm Coast,
Florida,” she said.

Mr Darville took his moth-
er, Gloria Darville, with him.
The two traveled with oth-

.er winners by private jet to .

the Chevy Rock & Roll 400
at Richmond International
Speedway in Richmond, Vir-
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suite tickets, pit tours, food
and beverage, and
NASCAR merchandise.

“This has been an once-in-
a-lifetime experience,” said
Mr Darville, who reflected
on his stay at the 1,100-acre
Ginn Hammock Beach
Resort and a visit to the
marina at Ginn Resorts’
Yacht Harbor Village, also
in Palm Coast, Florida.

He was particularly
impressed with the profes-
sional staff and outstanding
service.

Bob Van Bergen, Vice
President and General Man-
ager of Ginn sur Mer, pre-
sented Mr Darville with a
plaque, certificate, and
cheque. Sous chef, Samuel

PTT



—
ee

ae
ae



Ferguson was also honoured
at the event with similar gifts
for being named ‘Manager
of the Quarter’.

“We continue our com-
mitment to the future of the
Bahamian tourism industry,”
said Van Bergen.

“We realise that visitors
take lasting memories home
from our resort and it is not
simply because of the beau-
tiful views and accommoda-
tions.

“Tt is the employees who
strive daily to create the
highest level of hospitality
for our guests that bring the
Old Bahama Bay at Ginn
sur Mer experience to life.”

Veteran

Samuel Ferguson, a veter-
an in the tourism industry,
has served more than 24
years in the industry, includ-
ing working at the former
Jack Tar Village in West
End. Ferguson said he
enjoys helping young
Bahamians reach their
career goals in the culinary
field.

Jamal Darville, who
recently joined the hospital-
ity industry about two years
ago, looks forward to a long
career.

“What I enjoy most about
my job is the privilege of
meeting new and interesting
people from all over the
world,” he said. ,

Ginn Resorts is currently
developing Ginn sur Mer, a
2,000 acre resort community
adjacent to Old Bahama Bay
that will contain more than
4,400 condominium and
hotel units, nearly 2,000 sin-
gle family residential home
sites, signature golf courses
designed by Jack Nicklaus
and Arnold Palmer, club-
houses, two large marinas, a
private airport, a Monte
Carlo style casino, water and
swim pavilions, a beach club
and a spa.

The $4.9 billion Ginn sur
Mer development will serve
as Ginn Resorts’ flagship
Caribbean development.

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Conservatives

ahead in Greek |
general election

@ GREECE
Athens

GREECE’S governing con-
servatives appeared headed for
election victory Sunday, exit
polls showed, despite wide-
spread anger over devastating
forest fires that killed more than
65 people last month, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

An exit poll for Greece’s state
TV projected the governing
New Democracy party ahead
with 42.2 percent of the vote,
and the opposition socialist
PASOK party in second place
with 38.5 percent.

The poll, conducted by the
RASS-MARC polling agency
for the state television channel
NET, said its margin of error
was plus or minus 1 percentage
point.

If confirmed, the projections
will indicate a slip in support
for both parties from the previ-
ous election in 2004, when New
Democracy had won with 45.4
percent, ahead of PASOK with
40.5 percent.

“The government won under
very difficult circumstances. Of
course there is a message for
New Democracy which we must
listen to,” said Athens Mayor
Nikitas Kaklamanis, a senior
official in New Democracy.

Some government officials

played down the figures.

“The reduction in our sup-
port is not significant. The argu-
ments made by the (Socialists)
were ineffective,” said, outgo-
ing Culture Minister Giorgos
Voulgarakis.

Outgoing Interior Minister
Prokopis Pavlopoulos said it
appeared that PASOK had lost

more support than New

Democracy had.
The early results indicated

that New Democracy might win
>



GREEK PRIME Minister Costas Karamanlis talks to the media after
voting outside a polling station in the northern Greek city of
Thessaloniki during general elections on Sunday

enough seats in the 300-member
unicameral parliament to form
a governing majority. Before
the election, Prime Minister
Costas Karamanlis had ruled
out the possibility of forming
coalition with any other party
if he did not win enough votes
to form a majority government
and the election resulted in a
hung parliament.

“It appears New Democracy
will form a governing majori-
ty,” said outgoing Health Min-
ister Dimitris Avramopoulos.
“The size of the majority will
not affect how effective our gov-

ernment is. Even with 151

deputies in parliament, we will
proceed with our reform pro-
gram.”

Others were much more cau-
tious.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 17

Dimitri Messinis/AP

“It will be a long night... the
question of a hung parliament
remains open,” said PASOK
party veteran Kimon Koulouris.

Several other polling agen-
cies conducting exit polls for
private TV stations all showed
similar results, projecting that
New Democracy was ahead
with between 40.2 percent and
43.7 percent, and PASOK was
in second place with between
36.5 percent and 39.8 percent.
They also said surveys indicated
the right-wing nationalist LAOS
party had won enough votes to.
enter parliament.

RASS-MARC _ showed
LAOS winning a projected 3.5
percent _ half a percentage
point more than the minimum
required for a seat in the legis-
lature.

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PAGE 18, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





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i fa pter gr

Kenyan president

announces plans
for re-election bid

®@ KENYA
Nairobi

PRESIDENT Mwai Kibaki
formally announced Sunday he
would run for re-election as the
candidate for a newly formed
party alliance, according to
Associated Press.

The announcement — made
at a ceremony introducing his
new Party of National Unity —
ended months of speculation

and confusion among those.

backing his bid to become
Kenya’s first incumbent to face
a credible challenge at the polls.

“Things have become better,
but we are far from where we
want to be,” Kibaki said at the
ceremony in. Nairobi. “That is
why Lam requesting you to give

me and our alliance an oppor-

tunity to continue building our
nation.”

The new five-party alliance
includes the Kenya National
African Union, the country’s
oldest party and the largest in
parliament. It was unclear how
strong the party would be, how-
ever, as Kenyan lawmakers fre-
quently change their affiliations,
observers said.

The elections, expected in
December, represent the first
in which an incumbent presi-
dent will face a credible elec-
tion challenge.

Opposition parties named
their candidates weeks ago,
while 75-year-old Kibaki left
Kenyans guessing as to which
party he would run with. Estab-
lishing the new affiliation was
key, however, as Kibaki’s pre-
vious party — with which he had
won in 2002 — had split.

On Sunday, Kibaki did not
elaborate on his campaign plat-
form, but noted his achieve-
ments in the past five years in
office, including improved gov-
ernment services and a free pri-
mary school education program.



KENYA'S PRESIDENT Mwai Kibaki celebrates at the Kenyatta

= Senosi/AP

International Conference Centre during the inter parties co-operation

on Sunday a

He said the country had ‘seen
strong economic growth as well
as the largest influx of foreign

‘ Investment in decades. ‘|

The president said he would
unveil his re-election campaign
at the new party’s official launch
later this month.

His challengers are hoping to
turn voters their way by focus-

. ing on Kenya’s ongoing prob-

lem with high-level graft and
calls for a new constitution,
which already has been draft-
ed by a government-appointed
commission.

Some of Kibaki’s opponents,
however, have endorsed his re-
election bid, including his pre-
decessor, Daniel arap Moi.
Kibaki previously characterized
Moi’s 24-year rule as steeped
in corruption.

Kibaki won a resounding vic-
tory in 2002, campaigning with
the National Rainbow Coali-
tion party on a wide-ranging
reform platform that included
fighting graft. Moi had been
barred constitutionally from
running.

Kibaki’s victory and that of
his party in parliamentary polls

YOUR ALE atyS TO THE WORLD

er

ended the Kenya African
National Union’s 39-year rule,
since its 1963 independence
from Britain.

’ Within months of Kibaki’s
taking office, there were dis-
agreements in his National
Rainbow Coalition, which split
before a November 2005 refer-
endum on a proposed new con-
stitution.

Kibaki had pledged to reduce
the president’s powers under
the current constitution, but
seven Cabinet ministers cam-
paigned against the proposed
charter, saying it did not reduce
presidential powers enough.
The draft constitution was
rejected in the referendum, and
the seven ministers were sacked
by Kibaki.

The seven formed an opposi-
tion party, which later split into
two camps — each now offering
serious challenges to Kibaki’s
re-election, former Cabinet
ministers Raila Odinga, 62, and
Kalonzo Musyoka, 53.

Before the next elections,
Kibaki must dissolve parlia-
ment, and then electoral offi-
cials will sent a poll date.

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THE TRIBUNE



ctivists urge leaders
not to look away

from Darfur crisis

m@ LONDON

PROTESTERS held demon-
strations in several countries on
Sunday to urge world leaders
and the U.N. General Assembly
to work harder to end the crisis
in Darfur, according to Associ-
ated Press.

In London, scores of activists
donned black blindfolds — sym-
bolizing the international com-
munity’s failure to act since
vowing to stop atrocities in Dar-
fur two years ago.

Demonstrators in Rome wore
white T-shirts with a blood-
stained hand on the front and
marched to the Italian city’s
central Piazza Farnese. They
carried a peace torch, which
they said was lit in Chad where
hundreds of thousands from
Darfur now live in refugee
camps.

In Belgium, a few dozen peo-
ple demonstrated outside the
Palace of Justice in Brussels.

Organizers — who planned
protests in more than 30 coun-
tries, including Australia, Egypt,
Germany, Japan, Mongolia,
Nigeria, South Africa and the
United States — said some in the
international community had
become complacent since the
UN. Security Council approved
plans on July 31 for a 26,000-
strong peacekeeping force for
the vast, war-battered region in
western Sudan.

The deployment of the joint
African Union-United Nations
peacekeeping force faces delays,
however, due to a lack of avia-
tion, transport and logistics
units, U.N. Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon has said.

The U.N. General Assembly
and world leaders planned to
discuss the Darfur crisis at their
meeting this week in New York.

More than 200,000 people
have died and 2.5 million have
been uprooted since ethnic
African rebels took up arms
against the Arab-dominated
Sudanese government in 2003,
accusing it of decades of neglect.
Sudan’s government is accused
of retaliating by unleashing a

militia of Arab nomads known
as the janjaweed ~ a charge it
denies.

Activists say Darfur’s vio-
lence is increasing, and they are
demanding the peacekeeping
force be deployed swiftly, and
that the international commu-
nity put pressure all sides in the
conflict to end the violence.

“The world has acknowl-
edged the atrocities in Darfur.
And its leaders have promised
to end them. Now they must
fulfill that promise,” said
Colleen Connors from Globe
for Darfur, a coalition of aid
groups working in Dartur.

“The meeting of world leaders
in the next two weeks is a critical
juncture for the people of Dar-
fur,” she said. “We simply can-
not afford to look away now.”

In London, demonstrators
carried signs reading “Stop
genocide in Darfur” and “Rape,
torture, murder. How much
longer for Darfur?”

Celebrities

Actors Matt Damon, Don
Cheedle, supermodel Elle
MacPherson and South African
Archbishop Desmond Tutu are
among the celebrities who
appear in a video filmed for the
day in which they hold up slo-
gans demanding action.

“The people of Darfur need
peace and they need it now. To
make peace a possibility gov-
ernments should push for an
immediate cease-fire and sup-
ply the peacekeepers they have
talked about for months,”
Damon said.

Tutu called Darfur “the
world’s largest concentration of
human suffering,” adding “it’s
also entirely avoidable if peo-
ple speak out.”

Britain and China pledged
new support Sunday for the
hybrid peacekeeping force.

Britain would likely provide
technical support for peace-
keepers, as well as additional
support for the African coun-
tries contributing to the force,

Russian suspect in
Litvinenko’s murder
nominated to run
for parliament

gm MOSCOW

THE sole suspect in the radi-
ation poisoning death of Krem-
lin foe Alexander Litvinenko
said Sunday he would run for
parliament on the ticket of a
pro-Kremlin ultranationalist
party, according to Associated
Press. :

Former KGB officer Andrei
Lugovoi, who met with Litvi-
nenko at a London hotel bar
on Nov. 1 hours before he fell
ill, told state-run Russia Today
television that he had had no
desire to go into politics but
changed his mind because of
the British accusations against
him.

Lugovoi, a Moscow business-
man who runs a private securi-
ty agency, said Sunday that he
would be No. 2 on the list of
Vladimir Zhirinovsky’s Liber-
al Democratic Party in Decem-
ber’s parliamentary elections.

Britain has identified Lugov-
oi as the main suspect in the
murder of Litvinenko and
demanded his extradition. Rus-
sia has rejected the demand, say-
ing its constitution forbids it.

Lugovoi has dismissed the
British accusations and accused
British authorities of hurting his
business interests.

"T have been involved in pol-
itics over the past three months
against my wishes,” Lugovoi
told Russia Today. “I was a
businessman, but no longer,
thanks to the disgusting policy
of British prosecutors which led
to this political hysteria. With
the situation being highly politi-
cized by British opponents, I
find myself in the midst of a

political wave of interest in me.”

Zhirinovsky, a flamboyant
politician who heeds the Krem-
lin’s orders, said his party con-
gress would confirm Lugovoi’s
position on the party list on
Monday. He dismissed British
charges against Lugovoi as “an
attempt to organize provoca-
tions against our citizens,” the
Interfax news agency reported.

Litvinenko, a former KGB
officer with asylum in Britain,
died Nov. 23 in a London hos-
pital after ingesting radioactive
polonium-210. In a deathbed
statement, he accused President
Vladimir Putin of being behind
his killing - charges the Kremlin
has fiercely denied.

Tensions over the Litvinenko
case have badly hurt the bilat-
eral ties, and the two nations
recently have announced tit-for
tat diplomat expulsions.

Putin has dismissed British
demands for Lugovoi’s extradi-
tion as a vestige of British “colo-
nial thinking.”

Lugovoi’s lawyer, Tatiana
Stukalova, said Sunday that he
had filed a lawsuit against the
business daily Kommersant
over a report in the paper this
summer that referred to Litvi-
nenko as Lugovoi’s “victim.”
Lugovoi said the report cast him
as a criminal, and he is seeking
20 million rubles (about
US$800,000) in damages, news
reports said.

Kommersant editor Andrei
Vasilyev said on Ekho Moskvy
radio that the newspaper was
ready to retract the line Lugov-
oi was referring to, but called
the amount of damages Lugov-
oi was seeking excessive.

said Prime Minister Gordon
Brown, who helped push the
British-French resolution on
Darfur through the U.N. Secu-
rity Council.

“T want to see the hybrid
force in place before the end of
the year,” Brown told the
British Broadcasting Corp. “I
want to see it there, if at all pos-
sible, earlier than that.”

China

Beijing, which is trying to
counter criticism that it is reluc-
tant to support international
intervention in Darfur, said it
would send 315 people.

The Chinese group _ com-
prised of Chinese engineer pla-
toons, a well-digging platoon,
and a field hospital team _ will
build roads, bridges and dig

wells before the larger U.N.-
AU force arrives, China’s
Defense Ministry said, accord-
ing to state media.

Critics have attempted to

shame China, one of Sudan’s

major trading partners, into
action by linking China’s fail
ure to act in the Darfur crisis
to calls for a boycott next year’s
Summer Olympics in the Chi
nese capital.

Sunday’s events were being
organized by a coalition of more
than 50 organizations including
Amnesty International, Human
Rights Watch, and the Save
Darfur Coalition.

Hopes.of a cease-fire were
boosted Saturday, when
Sudanese President Omar al
Bashir said Khartoum was
ready to call a cease-fire when
peace talks get under way in
Libya’s capital on Oct. 27.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 19




Pierre-Yves Brunaud, Amnesty international/AP

IN THIS picture released by Amnesty International, blindfolded
activists calling for peace in Darfur hold a banner reading: “Darfur,
let’s not look away”, as they demonstrate near the Eiffel tower in
Paris on Sunday

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PAGE 20, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



World Rally
champion =
believed dead
in Scotland
helicopter
crash

gm LONDON

FORMER World Ral-
ly champion Colin
McRae was believed to
be among four people
killed in a helicopter
crashed in Scotland,

' police said Sunday,
according to Associated
Press.

McRae, Britain’s best-
known rally driver, was
thought to on board the
- helicopter, which was
owned by him and
crashed Saturday ina
wooded area near his
home in Lanark, police
said.

McRae’s agent, Jean-
Eric Freudiger, said in
reports in The Sunday
Times and the Sunday
Telegraph that the 39-
year-old driver had been
piloting the helicopter.
The reports also said his
5-year-old son, Johnny,
was on board.

Calls to Freudiger’s
Geneva office were not
immediately answered.
Official confirmation
was expected later Sun-
day. i
Police said that four {
people were on board :
the helicopter, all of
whom were feared dead.
The aircraft was badly
burned, making it
impossible for police to
immediately identify the
occupants.

McRae is a licensed
pilot who often flies in
the area, police said. It
wasn’t immediately
known from where the
helicopter had taken off
or where it was headed.

McRae was the World
Rally champion in 1995
and runner-up in 1996,
1997 and 2001.

He won 25 races in a
World Rally Champi-
onship career that ran
from 1987 to 2004. He
made intermittent
appearances on the
WRC circuit until 2006.

McRae, the son of
five-time British rally
champion Jimmy
McRae, also competed
in the Paris-to-Dakar
rally race in 2004 and
2005 and in the Le Mans
24-hour race in 2005.

“He and his wife, Ali-
son, have two children,
Hollie and Johnny.

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS

“Medieval records help scientists

understand climate history

‘

@ EINSIEDELN,
Switzerland
A LIBRARIAN at this

10th century monastery leads

a visitor beneath the vault-

ed ceilings of the archive past

the skulls of two former
abbots.

He pushes aside medieval
ledgers of indulgences and
absolutions, pulls out one of
13 bound diaries inscribed
from 1671 to 1704 and starts
to read about the weather.

“Jan. 11 was so frightfully
cold that all. of the commu-
nion wine froze,” says an
entry from 1684 by Brother
Josef Dietrich, governor and
“weatherman” of the once-
powerful Einsiedeln
Monastery. “Since I’ve been
an ordained priest, the sacra-
ment has never frozen in the
chalice.”

“But on Jan. 13 it got even
worse and one could say it
has never been so cold in
human memory,” he adds.

Ancient diaries of day-to-
day weather details from the
age before 19th-century stan-
dardized thermometers are
proving of great value to sci-
entists who study today’s cli-
mate, according to Associat-
ed Press.

Inaccuracy

Historical accounts were
once largely ignored, as they
were thought to be fraught
with inaccuracy or were sim-
ply inaccessible or illegible.

‘But the booming interest in

climate change has trans-
formed the study of ancient
weather records from what
was oncé a “wallflower sci-
ence,” says Christian Pfister,
a climate historian at the
University of Bern.

The accounts dispel any
lingering doubts that the
Earth is heating up more
dramatically than ever
before, he says. Last winter
— when spring blossoms
popped up all over the Aus-
trian Alps, Geneva’s official
chestnut tree sprouted leaves
and flowers, and Swedes
were still picking mushrooms
well into December — was
Europe’s warmest in 500
years, Pfister says. It came
after the hottest autumn in
a millennium and was fol-
lowed by one of the balmiest
Aprils on record.

“Tn the last year there was
a series of extr¢mely excep-
tional weather,” he says.
“The probability of this is
very low.”

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Bradley S. Klapper/AP



A PAGE in one of 13 diaries by Brother Josef, inscribed from 1671 to 1704 is shown Aug. 15, 2007 in the
Monastery in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. Frozen communion wine, soft rains that caressed the earth and
winds that wrought an all-consuming yellow fog are described meticulously by the 17th century Swiss
monk in accounts once consigned to dark ecclesiastical archives.

The records also provide a
context for judging shifts in
the weather. Brother Kon-
rad Hinder, the current
weatherman at Einsiedeln
and an avid reader of Diet-
rich’s diaries, says his prede-
cessor’s precise accounts of
everything from yellow fog
to avalanches provide his-

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torical context.

“We know from Josef
Dietrich that the extremes
were very big during his
time. There were very cold
winters and very mild win-
ters, very wet summers and
very dry summers,” he says,
adding that the range of
weather extremes has been

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smaller in the 40 years he has
recorded data for the Swiss
national weather service.

“That’s why I’m always
cautious when people say the
weather extremes now are at
their greatest. Without his-
torical context you lose con-
trol and you rush to proclaim
every latest weather phe-
nomenon as extreme or
unprecedented,” Hinder
says.

Most historians and scien-
tists delving deep into
archives seek accounts of dis-
asters and extreme weather
events. But the records can
also be used to obtain a more
precise temperature range
for most months and years
that goes beyond such gen-
eral indicators as tree rings,
corals, ice cores or glaciers.

Such weather sources
include the thrice-daily tem-
perature and pressure mea-
surements by 17th-century
Paris physician Louis Morin,
a short-lived international
meteorological network cre-
ated by the Grand Duke of
Tuscany in 1653, and 33
“weather diaries” surviving
from the 16th century. In
Japan, court officers kept
records of the dates of cher-
ry blossom festivals, which
allow modern scientists to
track the weather of the
time.

Early records often are
only discovered by chance in
documents that have sur-
vived in centuries-old Euro-



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pean monasteries like Ein-
siedeln, or in the annals of
rulers, military campaigns,
famines, natural hazards and
meteorological anomalies. In
Klosterneuberg near Vienna
an unidentified writer notes a
lack of ice on the Danube in
1343-1344 and calls the win-
ter “mild,” while the abbot
of Switzerland’s Fischingen
Monastery laments the late
harvest of hay and corn in
the summer of 1639 when
“there was hardly ever a
really warm day.”

Scores of similar clues are
pieced together year by year
to determine temperature
ranges, says Pfister, whose
team of four uses old
“weather reports” to work
back as far as the 10th cen-
tury.

Pfister has found that from
1900 to 1990, there was an
average of five months of
extreme warmth per decade.
In the 1990s, that number
jumped to an unprecedent-
ed 22 months. The same
decade also had no months
of extreme cold, in contrast
to the half-millennium
before.

Even in the last major
global warming period from
900 to 1300, severe winters
were only “somewhat less
frequent and less extreme,”
Pfister says. Over the past
century, temperatures have
gone up an average of 1.3
degrees Fahrenheit, which is
often attributed to the accu-
mulation of greenhouse gas-
es, primarily carbon dioxide,
in the atmosphere.

Issues

Global warming is one of
the world’s top issues today,
because of fears of massive

‘hurricanes and flooding. For

most of history, though, it
was the fate of farms and the
fear of’ famine that encour-
aged careful weather obser-
vation.

The Einsiedeln abbots —
princes within the Holy
Roman Empire until 1798 —
were powerful leaders who
ruled over large swaths of
central Switzerland’s moun-
tainous terrain. Agriculture
was the primary source of
income for the region and
natural disasters such as
floods and avalanches posed
an omnipresent threat.

Debts accrued and hon-
ored, accidents, local con-
flicts and business transac-
tions also fill Dietrich’s
accounts, “but most days
start with the weather,” says
Andreas Meyerhans, who
cares for the monastery’s
precious documents.

The diaries — written in
German sprinkled with old
Swiss dialect and margin
notes in Latin — are
“unique” because of the
exceptional everyday detail
they provide, Pfister says.

He adds that centuries of
weather records make it
clear that people need to
adapt when extremely hot or
cold weather becomes more
frequent.

While the lives of earlier
generations were ruled by
the weather, “in the second
half of the 20th century peo-
ple slept and became com-
pletely unprepared for nat-
ural disasters, because they
happened so rarely.”

In Einsiedeln, Hinder
reads from a barometer
flanked by the Virgin Mary,
and worries that humanity is
in trouble.

“God still controls the
weather,” he says. But, he
adds, people must do their
part by taking better care of
the planet.












THE TRIBUNE



Pope presses his new

environment campaign,
urging greater cooperation

to fight

@ CASTEL GANDOLFO,
ital



POPE BENEDICT XVI
pressed his new environment
campaign Sunday, urging
greater international coopera-
tion to fight ozone depletion,
according to Associated Press.

Benedict noted that Sunday
marked the 20th anniversary of
the adoption of the Montreal
Protocol, which calls for reduc-
ing the production and con-
sumption of ozone-thinning
chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs.

"In the last two decades,
thanks to an exemplary collab-
oration in the international
community among politics, sci-
ence and economics, important
results have been obtained with
positive results for current and
future generations," Benedict
said.

"On behalf of all, 1 hope that
this cooperation is intensified
so that the common good,
development and the safe-
guarding of creation is promot-
ed, strengthening the alliance
between man and the environ-
ment," he said.

Benedict was speaking to the
faithful gathered for his weekly
Sunday blessing in the court-
‘yard of the papal summer resi-
dence in Castel Gandolfo, in
the hills south of Rome.

In other comments, Benedict
also noted the passing of the
Sept. 11 anniversary, saying the
"tragic" attacks on New York
and Washington had "darkened
the dawn of the Third Millen-
nium."

He quoted Pope John Paul
II, who in response to the
attacks urged Christians and
others to believe that God's
mercy was "stronger than every

bad, and that only 6n the cross, _

of Christ is the world's salva-
tion found."
Benedict has been on an eco-
friendly campaign of late, pre-
siding most recently over a pro-
environment youth rally in the
central Italian shrine town of
Loreto. In addition, the Vati-
can has installed photovoltaic
cells on the roof of its main
‘auditorium to convert sunlight
into electricity and has joined

a reforestation project.aimed at .

offsetting its CO2 emissions.

The Montreal Protocol was
adopted in 1987 following the
1985 discovery of the growing
hole in the ozone layer over the
Antarctic. Thinning in the
ozone layer — largely due to the
CFC chemical compounds
leaked from refrigerators, air
conditioners and other devices —
exposes Earth to harmful solar
rays.

‘The protocol calls for the
reduction of the production and
consumption of CFCs. It also
calls on signatories to bar the





POPE BENEDICT XVI greets faithful during

ozone-depletion



Alessandra Tarantino/AP -





the Angelus prayer from

his window at his summer palace in Caste! Gandolfo

export or import of CFC pro-
ducing items to countries that
have not signed or ratified the
deal.

The ozone layer keeps out
ultraviolet radiation, which is

Just spend

dangerous’to humans and ani-
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Less protection could
increase risks of skin cancer and
cataracts and atfect biodiversity,
scientists say

ERNATIONAL NEWS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 21



Castel Gandolfo, on the outskirts of Rome, Sunday, Sept. 16, 2007.



ANSWER CORRECTLY AND BECOME ELIGIBLE TO WIN TWO (2) FREE TICKETS TO MAKE EM LISTEN | LIVE IN CONCERT YF

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COMICS: PAGE





Tribune Comics
JUDGE PARKER . 3

} WELL, I THINK
| ANGELA'S JEALOUSY
MAY HAVE SAVED OUR
LIVES, CEDRIC!






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TOO EMBARRADGOEDP

Dennis. )
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THE TRIBUNE



MOM, CAN I Get A

BIG TATIOOP T WANT!

A WINGED SERPENT COILING
ARQUND ONE ARM, CLUTCHING
A SHIP ON MY CHEST, WITH...

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DID YOU KNOW MOM CAN
COMMUNICATE. TELEPATHICALLY ?





Contract Bridge
_ By Steve Becker

Famous Hand

Opening lead — king of hearts.

This deal occurred in a playoff

South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
@A1073
v
4 53
t #KQII0842
F WEST EAST
385 4
Â¥KQ743 VA 1062
#AQ92 38764
MARVIN Ne $753
{ ‘ SOUTH
K
TILL GO PLAY o
WITH THE #K 10
TOYS INMY Pay £96
BEDROOM 1k: The bidding:
re South West North East
3 Pass 1yv 26 24%
1) 2¢ 3¢ 4¢@ 5¢@
{ Pass Pass 54 Pass
i Pass Dble
if
BI.
<1 il
ay





ier
CNBLE NEING eal NSN
KBLE NEW ap hl

QNNERSITY




HST. BY OPIVGETL FEED MWh is
Colomic$.coM / powsSsQuituRr

| ton a WILAI VEC EAGTHLIUE. HET

TIGER here?In making a
word. cach letter may
be used once only:

L ’
WERE “TI \ZOUGH Each must contain the

LISTENING!



). CRYPTIC PUZZLE .



between the B. Jay Becker and Cur-
tis Smith teams to determine which
would represent the United States in
the 1973 world championship. The
Becker team won the match handily,
but not before it was badly clawed on
this hand.

Becker, West, doubled five spades
and Jed the king of hearts, ruffed in

dummy. Declarer then conceded a
club to the ace, after which Becker
could do no better than cash the ace
of diamonds to hold South to 11
tricks

Losing 850 points was no doubt a
bitter pill for Becker to swallow, but
what happened at the other table was
no doubt even worse than he might
have expected. With his teammates
now holding the North-South cards,
the bidding went:

South West North East
Pass lv 2 & 2 @(!)
Pass 3 & 4& 49
Pass 44 Pass 59”
Dble

Here Smith, East, decided to
muddy the waters by throwing in a
psychic two-spade bid, and it worked
like a charm. Becker’s befuddled
teammates never got themselves
straightened out, and they wound up
doubling five hearts. West then pro-
ceeded to wrap up that contract for
another 850 points, losing only a
spade and a trump.

Thus the Smith team made five
spades doubled at one table and five
hearts doubled at the other table for a
combined gain of 1,700 points. For-
tunately for Becker’s squad, it was
able to recover from this disastrous
loss, proving that one hand does not
a bridge match make.



‘HOW many words of
four letters or more

‘can you make from
the letters shown

centre letter and there
must be at least one
nine-letter word. No
plurals or verb forms

ending in “s”, no words with inital capitals and no
words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted.
The first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkiet

in inkjet printer).

TODAY’S TARGET

Good 17: very good 26; excellent 34 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.





hate heat heath hoot oath teach tech that thatch

theta tooth TOOTHACHE

ache chat cheat each echo etch hatch hatchet

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION

) grammar

Study of
words and
ra aX-1 [om Rew 4)

language





MONDAY,
SEPT 17

ARIES — March 21/April 20

You’re not concerned with other
people’s opinions this week, Aries.
You are feeling quite confident and:

| loving every minute of it. Consult

with friends for weekend plans.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21 |
It seems that romance is key for this
week, Taurus. You are well
equipped to handle any situation
that comes your way — so make the)
most of chances for passion. Libra’
could be a love match. 44
GEMINI - May 22/June 21 |
Stop your excessive worrying,
Gemini, things will turn out just fine.|
Capricom is a key player in surpris-|
ing events on Thursday. Expect-an,
outcome you never expected. }
CANCER - June 22/July 22 |
Now is the time to take chances and)
step out into the public spotlight,;
Cancer. Make the most of your confi-'
dence to pursue a new love interest.)
Don’t look too far for thatsomeone. |
LEO - July 23/August 23 ~ |

This week’s struggles won’t go away!

‘with a quick fix. You must pull out the!

big guns and spend some time and con-,
sideration on this difficulty. Look to,
Pisces to lend.a hand. __ cede
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22.
The more you learn, the more you;
are anxious to use your knowl-!
edge, Virgo. All matters concern- |
ing technology are child’s play |
this week. Others need your help. |
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
You-provide the missing link in an}
important work project, Libra.
Tuesday will prove to be your most |
productive day of the week. Use it-as |
your power day and all others will!
look toward you as a leader. |
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22 |
You’re the master of your domain, |
Scorpio and you feel great. An easy
work week leaves you plenty of time}
to sit back and enjoy the scenery. A.
natural loner, enjoy it alone. =
SAGITTARIUS —Nov 23/Dec 21 |
You are not in the mood for commo- ;
tion this week, Sagittarius, so stay |
away from those who are loud and
overbearing. Spend some serene}
moments with your mate. a
CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20 |
Let work associates get a peak at what
makes you tick, Capricorn, and you'll’
seem less mysterious to them. A testy:
boss confronts your work ethic. Be!
_patient and the situation will blow over. |

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
You've bitten off more than you can |
chew this week, Aquarius, but there’s |
no backing out now. Best to call in |
the reserves, namely a few trusty
friends who can lend a hand.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20.
When a close friend pushes your lim-
its, it’s best to stand by your princi- |
ples and not go along with this per- |
son’s plan. Trouble is not what you |
need right now. !

Torture 20, Aunts 22, Spectre 23, Eye-catching 25, Terminates
26, Nightmares 28, Evaluate 31, Overcoat 32, Spatter 34,
Entire 35, Raise 39, Nail.

ACROSS DOWN
3 Many bulldings or part of one (5) 1 Deputy guilty of some garbled
8 The firm figures it's funny (5) circumiocution (5) :
10 The right hand one is long and 2 Anintoxicating colourful mixture (4,3)
wet (5) 4 — The young fellow has nothing but
11 See one in a metal box (3) a burden (4)
12 italian city residence, a bit 5 Charlie's out of practice and
quaint (5) somewhat surly (6)
13 The male took the lead, then gave 6 — Inwhich old soldiers became less
way (7) conspicuous In their bravery (5)
15 Fora runner lo get £50, 7 Nell, sadly, was heard to take
abllity’s needed (5) , her tow (5)
18 Obtained when you leave on time (3) | 9 Awomplece of machinery (3)
‘19 Possibly Is left to suffocate (6) 12 Becoming wild, the pet deer
21 Is taken to mean freedom (7) ran out (7) ; Be
22 Double container of whiskey (4) 14 Highball (3)
23 Abitdespondent, yet is full of life! (4) 16 Otherwise possibly of tin (2,3) ey TT
24 Minced beef tin, always 17 Guides around the dales (5)
worth having (7) 19 Flows freely from masters (7) co Peed
26 = Truly athome with a legal 20 Take off something comic, ,
document (6) perhaps? (5) : DOWN
29 Broadcasters give thelr views on it(3) | 21 Girl from Colindalo (5) ae ar 1 os ‘
ag 31. She's soft on a nobleman (5) 23 Judged to be awtully good, albeit 8 Deadly (5) 4 Cog (4)
i 32 Possibly reads about me being plagiarised (7) 7 a (5) 5 desig (6)
- maligned (7) 24 Loud ory from below, about a bit ww 12 Custom (5) : an ais
rE 34 Another name for central of help (6) ~ 13 Narrator (7) 9 Twitch (3)
Ey Dakar? (5) 25. Iftuming up when due to finish, N 15 Accepted (5) 12. Coarse fabric (7)
: 35. Maybe not a welght? (3) shame on you! (3) | ie eee 6 14 Weight (3)
(C | % Speckttusto make an authortaive | 27 Land the plane awkwardly (5) Bel Ope) sf 46- Flying toys (5)
decision (3-2) 28 Rub away (5) rp 22 Animal fat (4) 17 Atno time (5)
BR 1 37 Atsome stage, put back that 30 One planet in seven, usually (5) 0 dressy outfit (3-2) 32 Around the sand bar, thare flows Ly 26 Source (6) 21 Deserve (5)
€ | 38 The jugs were broken at the leisure a river (4) ' 29 Term of respect (3) 23 Blasphemer (7)
S centre (5) 33 What carrots do in cars? (3) 31 Giant (5) : 24 Tiny (6)
Ma 32 Myths (7) 25 Equipment (3)
S ——— 34 Sensational (5) 27 Opponent (5)
|” | CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS EASY SOLUTIONS 35 Aleo oe = one (5)
WY] Sieearareese Ae ues, (AamSSsimma uu Amen Mad | SF Ura nnn 32 Conacon
Y 0 y oe eae ie Hee ae af oe 3 | 19, Lard 21 , Absorb 24, Country and western 27, Meteor Be Pewee) 33 Negative (3)
( A , v) 30, Rap-iers 33, y
4 Fairness 35, Letting fly 36, Bled 37, Tuck-s in 38, Negate 29, Cost 30, Postage 33, Face-lift 35, Represents 36, Punt
y R. 4 40, Knocks 41, No 42, In the w-a' 37, Atheist 38, Cancan 40, Starve 41, Neo 42, Examines.
a ae eon 2, on i. penal a DOWN: 1, Antibiotic 2, Sick 3, Handsome 4, Central 5, Knuckle
AQ) Uinsetie 10° Site Lomead 30 ae Bb See ee ae en eel eee eat 10; Needy 16,

23, Every second 25, Screen test 26, For all that 28,
Ena-bling 31, A-li-enat-e 32, St-and-in 34, Reduc-E 35,
L-oser 39, Goes





| CHESS by Leonard Barden |

Georg Siegel v Maurice Asniey,
Bad Wiessee 1997. Ashley is
America’s first black
grandmaster, a charismatic
personality who is a regular
commentator at televised speed
tournaments. In today’s puzzle
his queen and rook menace the
white king, but White’s army is
compact and many players
would settle for a queen swap.
How did Black (to move) force
decisive material gain?

This weekend sees the final
rounds of the Staunton
Memorial, London's
grandmaster tournament. Play
at Simpsons in the Strand starts
at 2pm today and noon
tomorrow. Spectator entry is
free, with comfortable viewing



in the upstairs bar. Competitors
include Holland's top three GMs,
England number one Michael
Adams, and London's best woman
player Jovanka Houska.

LEONARD BARDEN

Chess solution 8451: 1...h4+ 2 Kf4 (2 Kxh4? Qxf3) ‘
Rd4+ 3 Red g5+! 4 Ke3 Rd3+ 5 Kxd3 Qxf3+ and wins.
THE TRIBUNE omar i/, 2007, PAGE 23







| MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 17, 2007.

8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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Florida Roadtrip |Antiques Roadshow “Honolulu, HI" Most Honorable Son (N) (\ (CC) |Justice for My People: The Dr.
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The Insider (N) |How! Met Your |The New Adven-|Two anda Half |(:31) Rules of —|CSI: Miami “Born to Kill” When a
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Robin's secret. Christine (CC) |new boyfriend. |'Jetf’s Wooby” thinks that it has closed the case.
Access nek Deal or No Deal A guest banker —_|The Singing Bee (Season Finale) |Heroes People with extraordinary
GB WT VJ |wood (N) (CC) surprises a contestant as she plays |Missing lyrics. (N) (CC) abilities face moments of pain and
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oa CSI: Miami CSI: Miami When a truck full of = |The ~~ “Two Tonys; Rat Pack” Organized crime parolees change
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month of September 2007.

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PAGE 24, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



Attention All,

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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

The Tribune



Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life






Royal Cor
urged i

Licensees call for forensic audit and injunction to prevent any GBPA share

oO





on inquiry
uthori



sales, warning that Freeport's foundations ‘being built on sand’

wee eee wee ce wee wee eee eee ewe eee meme ewne geen aneataaeenenanae eps See ee been vale tage. arb eater added rec abiaah daar mie ia ries Ar oars oh... Te) © ee CETTE oe SPEED.

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

reeport business leaders
have called for a Royal
Commission to review
the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, and urged

Former MP in

that an n injunction be imposed to pre-
vent the Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity’s (GBPA) shareholders from sell-

ing their investment-while a forensic |

audit of the company — focusing par-
ticularly on its disposal of productive
assets — is carried out. . >

In a hard-hitting statement respond-

ing to the Fleming Gro

acquiring the GBPA a
opments, Chris Lowe, the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Commertce’s

ee "Ss interest in

president, and attorney Rawle May- |
nard, on behalf of the Freeport .

Licensees and Property Owners Asso-

ciation, urged Sal baat ota Blue ..

other devel-

' devo

Ribbon Commission be established
to assess whether the GBPA’s regu-
iptory responsibilities should be

ved to.a local government

GBPA to devolves its quasi-govern-

mental, development and regulatory

powers ‘to a ‘Local Authority’, pro-
vided this is approved by some 80 per

authority. cent of GBPA licensees.
’ Clause 4 (2) of the 1960 supple- 9
mental agreement to the Hawksbill SEE Page 10

‘Creek apreeiient provides for the

Licence, permit fees hit ‘DHHS
_ medical costs by $700,000 |

Jegal battle with ex-
business partner

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FURIOUS legal battle has erupted between.a former .

FNM MP and his ex-business partner, the former seeking |

a Supreme Court order preventing ‘interference and .inter-—
vention’ in his business and the latter looking to apply for
a rival injunction to freeze all the former politician’s wealth
in a dispute embroiling up to $80 million in client assets. |

Lester Turnquest, former FNM MP for Malcolm Creek, : |
and his company, the Bonnycord Group, have filed a
Supreme Court summons seeking an order that his for-
mer business partner, Hywel Jones, president of Bahamas-
based financial services firm, the Britannia Consulting
Group, “be restrained from interfering with or intervening”
in his company’s business affairs.

He is also claiming damages “for conspiracy to defraud
and/or injure” himself and Bonnycord, and for alleged’
“fraudulent misrepresentations” made against them.

And Mr Turnquest has filed two more separate writs, one
claiming $2.348 million from Mr Jones’s Britannia Group,

@ By NEIL HARTNELL -

» DOCTORS Hospital Health

Systems (DHHS) sees some ©

$700,000 stripped from its bot-
tom line profits per annum
through business licence and
work permit fees, its chief
financial-officer telling The Tri-

|’ bune that appeals for the pre-

TetummpOuances Editor .. BISXlisted firm sees profits up 25 per cent, despite pleas

for change ‘falling on pasta ears’ with former government

vious government to alleviate

this situation “fell on deaf.

ears” despite its increasing

medical services costs. .
DHHS ‘saw its ‘net income

for the six months to July 31,

2007, increase by 25 per cent to
. $2.5 million from $2 million,
despite incurring these costs,
while finding a solution for its
loss-making discontinued oper-
ation, Western Medical Plaza,

by leasing it to saniher party
(see story Pagé 3B).
Yet Darron Cash, DHHS

alleging that this was a sum
that Bonnycord had lent to
it. The other writ, naming

SEE page 4



Forty five days for the
EPA decision, as $35m_
lobster sales in danger

i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas must decide
_ within the next 45 days whether
to participate in the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA)
talks with the European Union
(EU), with failure to do so like-
ly to cost its crawfish/lobster
industry more than $35 million
in lost revenues per annum.

A paper on the EPA’s impli-
cations for the Bahamian fish-
eries industry, and the conse-
quences of not signing on to the
treaty by December 31, 2007,
said the sector’s exports to the
EU would attract the Most
Favoured Nation (MFN) import
duty rate from 2008 onwards.

The paper, produced by
Hank Ferguson, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce's trade
agreements task force chairman,
said the MFN rate on lobster
imported to the EU was around

12.5 per cent, and its ‘inpioaiticn ;

— coupled with the loss of duty-

free access for Bahamian.

seafood wholesalers — would
raise the price of their products
by $2-$2.50 per pound, making
them uncompetitive against
rivals.

seafood products, Mr Ferguson
said, some $35.003 million of
these lobster alone.

The paper added: “The
Bahamas decision not to sign
the EPA agreement would
mean the end of duty-free
access, and all goods exported
would attract.an MFN tariff
rate. :

erential status would immedi-
ately raise the ae of lobster

SEE EPA, page 5

More than 50 per cent of the —
Bahamas’$66.315 - million:
exports to the EU in 2004 were |

“The MEN tariff on lobster — }
is 12.5 per cent. The loss of pref-

THE DAVIS FAMILY

: a



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Colinalmperial.

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Colinalmperial.

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

Ota tay WRAP }

New I. nvestment
Opportunities!

REAL ESTATE

Indigo - Investment Opportunity

A unique opportunity to own 5 adjacent | lots in he quaint weied :
community. Each lot measures 60 ff'x 130 ft:zoned for 15 units.
Amentiies include double tennis court and ‘swimming pool. Was -

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P.0.Box W.10414, Nossou, The Bahamas



@ By Fidelity Capital
Markets

; rading activity was

brisk this past week in

the Bahamiau market,

as over 103,000 shares changed

hands. The market saw 12 out

of its 19 listed stocks trade, of

which nine advanced and three
remained unchanged.

Volume leader for a second

straight week was Common-

. wealth Bank (CBL), with

36,150 shares changing hands

and accounting for 35 per cent

of the total shares traded..

CBL was also the big
advancer for the week, increas-
ing by $0.36 or 2.36 per cent to
close at a new 52-week high of
$15.64. CBL’s share price has
continued its upward soar since
the announcement of a
planned three-for-one stock
split in November 2007.

Also advancing was Cable
Bahamas (CAB), up $0.22 or
2.04 per cent to end the week
at.a new 52-week high of
$11.02.. The FINDEX
increased by 6.09 points or

- 0.72%, week over week to

close at 853.81.

COMPANY NEWS
Cable Bahamas (CAB) —
_FOR the 2007 second quar-

ter, CAB posted a net profit
of $5. 3 million ($0.27 per share)
compared to a profit of $4.4
million ($0.22 per share) for
the same period last year.
Total revenues were $18.9
million for the quarter, com-
pared to $16.1 million, for the
2006 second quarter, an
increase of $2.8 million.
CAB's management indicat-
ed that:its cable television seg-
ment continued to perform
well during the quarter. Total
revenues from the cable tele-
vision segment were $10.8 mil-
lion during the quarter, with

‘total revenues from the com-

pany's Internet and data seg-

ments being $5.5 million and:

$2.5 million respectively.
Compared to the 2006 sec-
ond quarter, operating expens-
es of $9. 5 million and operating
income of $6.6 million for 2007
increased by $1.5 million and
$1million, respectively.

CAB’s total assets as at June
30, 2007, were $173 million, an
increase of $7 million when
compared to year-end 2006,
due to additional capital expen-
ditures during the period. |

Total liabilities remained
pretty consistent with the year-

SEE page 11

RBC is pleased to announce the opening of our new branch on Carmichael

Road. This new temporary’ location will house both RBC Royal Bank of

Canada and RBC FINCO under one roof, pending the construction of Cee
RBC’s new flagship. location ¢ one block west of the temporary location 0 on. md

Carmichael Road.

Royal Bank will offer a full range of banking products and services, while aks
- RBC FINCO will offer a uh suite of mor ieaee products and services.

Services include:

Business and Consumer Loans

Personal and Business Deposit Account Services

Single and Multi-family Residential Mortgages

24-Hour ATM
Foreign Exchange Services
Night Deposits

Card Services

_» Royal Online™ Internet Banking —

» and more!

Come see us at the corner of Carmichael Road and Turtle Drive. We look
forward to welcoming you to our new location soon!

GD Ears asin

be @l0 Rh

ere aaa)






















The | Bahamian | Stock |

FINDEX 853.81 YTD 15.05%

CLOSING CHANGE VOLU

BISX
SYMBOL PRICE
AML $1.60 $- 0
BAB $1.62 $-. 0
BBL $0.85. $- 0
BOB $9.54 $0.04 “1240
BPF $11.70 $- 5420
BSL $14.60 $- 0
BWL $3.74 $- 0
CAB $11.02 $0.22 9500
CBL $15.64 $0.36 36150
CHL $3.10 $- 0
CIB - $14.70 * $0.05 17000
CWCB $5.92 $0.01 1761
DHS $2.32 $0.01 9500
FAM $6.18 $0.13 1000
FCC $0.70 $- 0
FCL $6.10 $0.08 14000
FIN $12.77 $- 5992
ICD $7.25 $- 200
JSJ. $10.05 $0.04 1500 16. 86%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
¢ CBL has declared dividends of $0.12 per share, payable on
September 28, 2007, to all shareholders of record date Sep-
tember 14, 2007.



© Consolidated Water Company has declared dividends of
$0.013 per BDR, payable on November 7, 2007, to all share-
holders of record date September 30, 2007.

¢ CBL will hold an Extraordinary General Meeting on
October 17, 2007, at 5pm at SuperClubs Breezes, West Bay
Street, Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.

| ¢ Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on September 26, 2007, at 6pm at the British Colonial
Hilton, Number One, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. .

bastomencen oepepentneenee



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us.‘on 322-1986
and share your story.

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THE TRIBUNE



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

octors Hospital
(DHHS) remains
“committed” to sell-

ing its Blake Road-based
Western Medical Plaza facility
despite reaching an agreement
to lease the facility to a third
party and reduce its drag on
the company’s profitability,
with its chief financial officer
telling The Tribune that a div-
idend payment to sharehold-
ers was “under active consid-
eration”.

e Darron Cash’said the five-
year lease arrangement for
Western Medical Plaza took
effect from July 11, 2007, with
the move set to eliminate the
regular losses DHHS incurred
from the facility which was a
discontinued operation held
for sale.

Its disposal would have been
the final step in DHHS’ turn-
around programme, with
Western Medical Plaza having
generated a $0.29 million loss
for the first ix months of the
year to July 31, 2007, com-
pared to $0.36 million last year,
a reduction of 19.4 per cent.

The lease agreement will
eliminate the losses and oper-
ating expenses that DHHS was
incurring in keeping the facili-
ty operational, this becoming
the as-yet unnamed lessee’s
responsibility, with the BISX-
listed company now receiving
positive cash flows from the
monthly rental payments.

Mr Cash did not go into too
much detail, saying more finan-



cial details about the Western

Medical Plaza arrangement
would be revealed when the
company published its third
quarter financials. .

He told The Tribune: “It’s
certainly going to notably
reduce the outlay Doctors
Hospital would have to pay for
operating expenses, and goes
further by adding some posi-
tive cash flow from the rent.
That is a net plus for the hos-
pital. .

“At the same time, it helps
us add value into the facility.

_ But again; we draw reference
to the-fact that the hospital
maintains its commifment to
selling the facility. If there is

the possibility of a sale at the
right value, that is going to get
the appropriate consideration.

“The lease does provide
increased cash flow benetits,
but long-term there’s still a
commitment to sell.”

Mr Cash said DHHD had
made “strides in reducing the
losses from discontinuing oper-
ations year-over-year”, adding
that among the difficulties the
company had experienced in
attempting to sell Western
Medical Plaza were problems
encountered in obtaining goy-
ernment approval for buyers
who had some element of for-
eign ownership. That is likely
to have been a reference to the
MedLink/Bahamas Public Ser-
vices union deal, which ulti-
mately fell through.

Market

“T think the fact it’s been on
the market so long indicates
the extent to which it’s been a
challenge. It’s been extremely
difficult to sell, not only
because it’s a purpose built
building, but because a number
of companies who did find val-
ue in the facility had some for-
eign element that found it
impossible to get approval

from the Government,” Mr
Cash said.

For the first half of its cur-
rent financial year, DELHS saw
net income increase 25 per
cent to $2.5 million from $2
million, with earnings per share
(EPS) up to $0.25 per share
from $0.20 per share a year
ago.

Patient days, based on the
average daily census, were up 5
per cent across all nursing
departments compared to the
previous year, particularly in
medical/surgical patient days,
while patient service revenues
rose 5.08 per cent to,$20.7 mil-
lion from $19.7 million.

As a result, Mr Cash said:
“We just want to signal to the
market that the subject of div-
idends has been getting con-
siderable attention from the
Board of Directors. They
understand the need to pro-
vide a return to shareholders,
and the matter is under active
consideration.”

Mr Cash added that DHHS
was targeting “low-hanging
fruit”, especially accounts
receivables and minimizing
provisions four doubtful
accounts. In the six months to
July 31, 2007, net accounts
receivables. owed by patients

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 131 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Businéss Companies Act, 2000,
notice is hereby given that:-

(a) Jumper Island Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution is
the 3rd day of September, A.D., 2007 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308 East

Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
Liquidator



The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

- JAMIE SMITH

‘OWEN BURROWS

» MICHAEL HANNA

DALE ANDREWS

* MARK BETHEL

* ROCHELLE KNOWLES

* WAYNE SMITH

¢ ROBERT THOMPSON
* JACQUELINE GLINTON
* GEORGETTE THOMPSON

¢ RALF MADILL

¢ CRAIG SIMMONS
¢ MAT ENTERPRISES

¢ SONIA ADDERLEY
¢ DEMETRI WELLS

All rentals must be paid and items removed
no later than September 26th, 2007

stor-it-all



Soldier Ce
(by Lowe s Wholesale)
Telephone: 393-4622 or 393-0964

-all



had risen from $951,000 to
$1.147 million, while sums
owed by third party-payers,
such as insurance companies,
grew from $5.521 million to
$6.007 million.

Payments

While the pace of payments
from insurance companies “has
not been what we want it to
be”, Mr Cash said DHHS’
largest exposure was not from
third-party-payers, although
the National Insurance Board

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 3B

PP ee
Doctors still ‘committed’ to Western Medical sale

(NIB) was back up over $1
million in accounts receivables.

He added that receivables
owned by company accounts
to DHHS had “crept up above
satisfactory levels”, and as a
result DHHS had “limited pre-
viously unfettered access to our
facilities” that was enjoyed by

the Public Hospitals Authority .

(PHA); agents for cruise ships
and private companies.

Mr Cash said DHHS had a
difficult balance to strike when
it came to providing health-
care and chasing up patients



who owed money, saying the
company would continue to
take appropriate action with-
out doing anything that might
harm its reputation “by being
unreasonably harsh”.

“There are a number of
major accounts that are before ~
the courts, both companies and
individuals,” Mr Cash said.
“We've taken the position that
for those persons who have the
means to pay, they will be
brought to account, and those
persons are presently before
the courts.”

PUBLIC AUCTION

FRIDAY - SEPTEMBER 21st, 2007

By Order of

The Commissioner of Police

Commonwealth of The Bahamas

(B) 2 - “His and Her” Rolex Watches - (Certified)
To be Sold Individually or as a Pair

I. G. STUBBS WILL SELL

(A) Brand new Blue Dodge Durango - Year: 2007
4 Door SLT Wagon
ecm are Me eee ere Umer Ur LiL)

LOCATION: Police Training College Grounds
Oakes Field
Nassau, Bahamas

alii

12:00 Noon - Friday - September 21st, 2007

Preview and Inspection from 11:00 a.m.
OTe PAU Co CR Tea UCR

All items subject to a reserve price, and the right of the Auctioneer

or any person on his behalf to bid up to that price.
*All items Sold Where Is As Is for Cash, Cashier’s Check

Terms

or current Bank Guarantee Letter. No purchase(s) will

be released until

paid for in full. Where a deposit is

required, the same is non refundable.

Any and all Notices or amendments by Auctioneer on said: Auction
Day whether written or verbal shall supercede this or any subsequent

advertisement.

For further information contact I.G. Stubbs at 322-2028 or
Fax: 328-8086 or Email: igstubbs@coralwave.com

SET HHNNGNPHHAPNHHNE NNN I a 5 gg EEE

EDO LOL ONTO LLL LONNIE LEED DDD LODO,

LEO MELLEL ID ELOL LLL

LASALLE OEE ILI

LOE OLEDOOD RIL

COLL ELE LEE ELC ABET LEI LE COOL TORT NTSC TESCO L Uh

1.G. Stubbs —

Public Auctioneer









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BAHAMAS

{| Paradise Island Drive
Paradise Island, Bahamas


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Fe EUS ee
Former MP in legal battle with ex-business partner

FROM page 1

Bonnycord as the plaintiff, is
claiming $133,000 from Bri-
tannia Group. It is claiming
that this is due to Bonnycord
as principal and interest on a
promissory note, which was
signed on December 20, 2006.
The writ alleges that the
promissory note contract was
originally signed between Bri-
tannia and a company called
Horse Whisper, but was then
assigned to Bonnycord by the
latter on July 3, 2007.

Yet in an affidavit filed in
response by Mr Jones, he
describes Mr Turnquest’s inter-
ference allegations against
himself and his companies-as
“demonstrably false” and
“wholly without foundation”.

He adds that the affidavit
is to support his application

“for a proprietary freezing
injunction and worldwide
Mareva injunction” to freeze
Mr Turnquest’s assets and
those of companies he controls.

Mr Jones is counter-alleg
ing fraud against Mr ‘Turn-
quest, claiming he “removed”
$20 million from Britannia and
the company’s client accounts
before the two parted ways,
and that the former MP is now
falsely claiming ownership of
companies he wholly owns on
the basis of “fraudulent share

* transfers”.

The companies at the centre
of the dispute were said to hold
assets worth more than $80
million.

Mr Jones alleged: “The total!
assets in the Hampton sub
sidiaries are approximately $80
million. The vast majority of
this sum are client assets.
These are sums in respect ol

which Hampton remaims con-
tractually Table to its chents.
When there ts a draw on the
life insurance policy the clients
are legally entitled io look to
Hampton tor satisfaction
thereof, whether or not those
assets have been transterred.”

Mr Purnquest is understood
to be vehemently denying such
allegations. wiih Myr Jones
threatening to launch “a sub-
stantial counterclaimâ„¢ in
response to Mr Lurnquest’s
summonses

the bitter legal battle
between two lormer close
friends and business partners is
likely to stun some in the
Bahamian financial services
community, especially as the
rift between them has taken
less than a year to emerge, as
Mr Turnquest onty left Bri-
tannia to set ap Bonnyeord in
October 2006

(Jae merase Cee hy

A position has arisen for a chartered accountant with 20-25 years
experience in the profession, or private sector, to assist in the
further development of a branch office in Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

The applicant must have good inter-personal skills and be able to
relate to a wide variety of clients in diverse business environments,
have a history of large scale development projects and experience
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Applicants should apply in writing to:

















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‘Their main business was the
devising and setting up of tax
and investment structures that
were compliant for clients’
home country tax purposes,
with a heavy focus on life
insurance,

Many are likely to be sur-
prised that the whole matter
has ended up in litigation, giv-
en that the affair could do
damage to the reputation of
both parties and their busi-
nesses, regardless of who is
found to be in the right.
Observers are likely to teel a
settlement is in the interests of
both parties.

At its core, the dispute
appears to be over who con-
trols certain companies and
client assets.

Mr Turnquest is understood
to be alleging that Mr Jones
and Britannia were upset that
the bulk of the business —
assets and clients — left to go
with him when he set up Bon-
nycord Ltd, eventually spark-
ing the deep divisions between
them.

‘The dispute is understood
to have attracted the attention
of financial services regulators
thrqughout the Caribbean,
especially in territories where
the parties operate and where
they have related entities
domiciled.

Among the agencies being
kept abreast of developments
is understood to be the
Bahamian Registrar of Insur
ance, and its equivalent in the
British Virgin Islands

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



CY BCG CFG 47
Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs i

The filing and serving of the
actions, according to Mr Jones
in his defence, appears to have
been sparked by a new dispute
between the two former
friends and business partners
as to who owns and controls a
company called West Coast
Holdings.

Mr Turnquest’s summons
seeks a court order preventing
Mr Jones, Britannia, Hampton
Insurance Company and one
of Mr Jones’s colleagues,
Stephen Dickson, from repre-
senting themselves as the reg-
istered agent, directors or con-
trollers of West Coast Hold-
ings.

He also wants the’ court to
order that they deliver to him
documents relating to West

Coast Holdings that were
incorrectly sent to Britannia’s
olfices.

Mr Turnquest is alleging
that on July 27, 2007, he was a
director of West Coast Hold-
ings and Bonnycord Ltd was
its registered agent. He is also
alleging that he was a signato-
ry on West Coast’s bank
accounts, and that since July
13, 2006, the company’s sole
shareholder was Experta Trust
Company (Bahamas).

As a result, he is alleging
that Mr Jones and Britannia
“wrongfully detained” a pack-
age relating to West Coast that
was sent to their offices.

Yet Mr Jones is alleging that
his signature on a West Coast
share certificate, purporting to
change the company’s owner-
ship from his Hampton firm to
Experta Trust Company, was a
forgery, producing evidence
from a forensic handwriting
expert, William Mader, to back
up this assertion.

He is claiming that West
Coast Holdings is really owned
by Hampton, and on June 6-7,
2007, Mr Turnquest was



ave you done anything special i
for yourself lately?

Personal Development - Fall Schedule of Courses

© BAHAMIANS

removed as a director, with the
registered agent for the com-
pany changed back to Britan-
nia.

Therefore, Mr Jones alleged
that the disputed West Coast
documents were “not wrong-
fully detained, as alleged in the
Turnquest affidavit, but law-
fully received”.

Mr Jones alleged that the
documents had been passed to
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force’s Central Detective Unit
(CDU). In response to this, Mr
Turnquest is known to be
denying Mr Jones’s allegations
that his signature on the West
Coast share certificates was

forged.
Meanwhile, Mr Jones
alleged that Ansbacher

(Bahamas) had said it could
not release information on any
accounts it held for a number
of Hampton subsidiaries
because this could only be
authorised by Mr Turnquest.

Ansbacher wrote on August
22: “We have received con-
flicting information regarding
the signing authorities relating
to the companies, and until the
dispute between you and Mr
Turnquest is resolved, I am
sure that you will understand
that we cannot release any
information to either disput-
ing party until we have
received either a court order
or an agreement signed by
both parties determining the
authorised owner of the
accounts.”

Other Nassau-based banks
alleged to have mairitained
bank and securities accounts
for Britannia and its clients
include Caledonia, Bank of
Butterfield and Experta.

Mr Turnquest’s legal actions
came up for hearing before
Justice John Lyons on July 12,
2007, and were adjourned until
July 21, 2007.


















































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ENQUIRIES _ DECORATING
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 5B



EPA, from page 1

by approximately $2-$2.50 per
pound, and would probably
make Bahamian lobster uncom-
petitive.

“Under current negotiations,
the MEN on processed fish is
expected to be 24 per cent.
Those qualifying for the Gen-
eral System of Preferences, 23.9
per cent, and for those signato-
ty to the EPA, the duty and
quota-free access will be main-
tained.”

The paper added: “The loss
to the Bahamas would be the
value of the lobster exported,
and the potential income loss
of the Bahamian fishermen who
catch the lobster, as well as
$649,259 in royalties.

“It is possible that alternative
markets for the lobster would
be found, but there would be
no guarantee that the price
obtained and rules of entry
would be as good as what is
available in the European mar-
kets.”

Data seen by The Tribune for
Bahamian fisheries exports in
2006 illustrates the extent to
which the crawfish industry is
heavily dependent on sales to
France. For the four months
from January to April 2006, the
Bahamas exported 85,120
pounds, 87,360 pounds, 131,040
pounds, and 104,120 pounds
respectively.

In turn, the respective month-
ly values for these exports, for
the January-April 2006 period,
were $1.45 million, $1.485 mil-
lion, $2.211 million and $1.812
million. The high point for
Bahamian lobster exports to
France is the August to Novem-
ber period. For the three
months covered by this period
in 2006, the value of Bahamian
exports to France was $3.282
million, $11.804 million, $12.608
million and $4.92 million respec-
tively.

Such figures illustrate the
scale of the potential sales, rev-
enues and job losses facing the
Bahamian lobster and fisheries
industry, with those losing out
ranging from wholesalers such
as Paradise Fisheries and Trop-
ic Seafood right down to the *
grass roots’ of Bahamian soci-
ety. This would include not only
fishermen, but those who supply
them with gas and compressors.

Mr Ferguson said those who
were hoping the EPA deadline
would not be met, or that the
EU would seek a further waiv-

‘er for the existing Cotonou
MA ge

Agreement from the World
Trade Organisation (WTO),
were likely to be mistaken.

Peter Mandelson, the EU
Trade Commissioner, last week
warned the 76-nation African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group currently negotiating the
EPA that failure to conclude
an agreement by December 31,
2007, would see them placed on
the General System of Preter-
ences (GSP) system. ‘This would
provide them with less
favourable trade benefits and
preferences than they enjoy
now, of would do under the
EPA.

However, Mr Ferguson point-
ed out that Bahamian exporters
would not even be able to
access the GSP preferences
because of its status as a ‘devel-
oped country’, leaving them at
the mercy of MFN import tariff
rates.

His paper said the EPA was
in its final and fourth phase of
negotiations, “and barring our
participation the Bahamas will
lose its duty-free access to the
EU market, and at best would
attract the MFN rate of duty”.

It added: “Recent indications
suggest that the EU is not pre-
pared to seek a waiver, and it

‘has stated that failing the com-

pletion of the agreement by
January 1, 2008, all exports from
the ACP will be subject to MFN
rates.

“For some countries in the
ACP, this reality is mitigated
by their access to other trade
regimes including the GSP,
which is not as favourable, and
there are others which benefit
from bilateral trade agreements
with Europe.

“The Bahamas does not have
access to the GSP, and no bilat-
eral agreements. It is also high-
ly unlikely that the EU will be
interested in a bilateral agree-
ment with the Bahamas, and
even if considered, this process
would not solve our market
access in the short term.”

Mr Ferguson’s paper point-
ed out that under the previous
PLP administratiop, the
Bahamas did submit a draft
market access offer for the EPA
in March 2007, at the seventh
Technical Working Group
meeting.

The offer, “thought at the
time to be in the best interest of
the Bahamas”, maintained
duty-free market access for this
nation’s seafood, rum and poly-
mers exports, while minimizing
revenue losses from the phased

reduction or elimination of tar-
iffs on European-produced
goods imported into this nation,

Yet since taking office on
May 2, the FNM government
has said its priorities are acced-
ing to full membership in the
W'TO and developing an all-
encompassing policy to deal
with all trade matters facing the
Bahamas, not just the EPA,

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, said the
Bahamas would not rush to sign
the EPA at the expense of the
wider interests of this nation
and its major economic indus-
tries. Instead, the Government
wants more time to assess all
the EPA’s implications, but Mr
Ferguson pointed out that its
WTO-centred focus did not
address the immediate issue of
duty-free market access to the
EU.

“A determination as to
whether or not the Bahamas
will participate will have to be
made within the next 45 days.
Failing to do so will result in
exports from the Bahamas
attracting the MEN rate of duty,
perhaps as soon as January |,
2008,” Mr Ferguson’s paper
concluded.

“Industry leaders must deter-
mine whether.they can remain
competitive at the MEN rates,
or alternatively seek new mat-
kets for the export of seafood
products. A determination will
have to be made, and a case
presented to the Government
to sign the agreement. We
remain uncertain if the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas ts ful-
ly aware of the direct and pos-
sibly latent effects the loss of
preferential access may have on
this market.”

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THE BAHAMAS INSTITUTE OF
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS SEMINAR

“Upholding Integrity, Striving for Excellence”

EXAMINING THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC
ENVIRONMENT & ITS IMPACT ON THE BAHAMAS

Date: September 27th, 2007 Time: 8:45 am — 4:00 pm

Place: British Colonial Hilton Hotel, The Governor’s Ballroom

Pre-register: Fax: 326-6618

Cost per day: Members $100

. Tel. 326-6619 Email: secbica@batelnet.bs

Non-members $125 Lunch & Parking Included

CPE hours: 7 (BICA licensed members - 50 hours required over a 2 year period)

NO BILLINGS

Topics & Speakers Include:

Preparing Our Accountants for The Changing Global Economic

Environment

Mr. Daniel Ferguson — President, The pidharnag Institute of Chartered

Accountants

Partnering With Other Countries in The Region to Pool Resources
Signing Onto Economic Treaties — What Do We Gain or Lose?

Dr. Thaddeus McDonald — Dean of Social Education Studies, The
College of The Bahamas

The Impact of Mixed Use Tourism Developments — Pros & Cons
Albany & Baha Mar Projects
Mr. William Wong — Vice President, Bahamas Real Estate Association

New Money Laundering Initiatives for The Bahamas
Are We Meeting International Standards?
Mr. Anthony Johnson — Director, The Financial Intelligence Unit

The U.S.A. Credit Market Squeeze — An Overview
The Impact on our Local Money & Capital Markets
Mr. Michael Halkitis — Consultant, Financial Services Investments,

British American











Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



OP UNDER THE STARS
FESTIVAL 2007

GALA CONCERT

Saturday - September 29 - 2007
Dinner 7:00 P.M. (Gala Ticket Holders) : Concert Begins 8:00 P.M.
Wyndham Nassau Resort
Cable Beach - Nassau - Bahamas
law



~ \< \\ .
Ta Richardson yep Pirie ny Temika Moore

FABULOUS MUSIC
GOURMET DINING

TICKETS ON SALE AT
CHAPTER ONE BOOKSTORE and
in THE OFFICE OF COMMUNICATION
Block A - Oakes Field Campus

For reservations,

sponsorship opportunities and
further infarmation, please call
Office of Communication

at telephones
302-43046/6353/4354/4366

ROYAL SPONSORS
pee es Airlines/American Eagle
Chintarle Airline of Jazz Under the Stars
Wyndham Nassau Resort |
The Oita sctenne of Jazz Under the Stars

| = lolly Press Ltd

| eC ee

‘Bank Cy Bahamas International
RBC Royal Bank of Canada

SU eo ety
_ Bahamas Electricity Corporation

GOLD SPONSOR
~ Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd

SILVER SPONSORS
Atlantic Medical
BTC
Aa: Counsellors Ltd

Executive Producer ~ Patricia Glinton- Meicholas
Show Producer ~ Roscoe Dames “Mr Jazz”





Gala Concert and Dinner - $175
Includes Gala Concert and Dinner

General Admission - $50



’
PAGE 6B, MONRO SenleNeen 17, 2007



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHA

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

ADMISSIONS DEADLINES

‘Regular Admissions Deadline
Spring (January) 2008
_ September 28, 2007 - 4:00pm
Application fee - $40.00

THE TRIBUNE










Late Admissions Deadline
Spring (January) 2008
October 5, 2007 -— 4:00pm
Application fee - $50.00

For further information contact the Office of Admissions at
1-242-302-4499 or 1-242-302-4394

International Conference

Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave
Trade: Telling the Story

The College of The Bahamas
February 21-23, 2008
Nassau, The Bahamas

The College of The Bahamas will host the Conference: “Abolition of The Trans-
| Atlantic Slave Trade: Telling t the Story, February 21-23, eons at the Oakes Field
: Campus, Nassau: 0 Reith
Abstracts of approximately 200 words are invited on the following topics:
Language and Oppression
Religion in Slavery: Agent Provocateur or Opiate?
Slavery and Human Sensibility
Power and Enslavement
Kinship across the Diaspora
Identity: Culture, the Arts, Race and Gender
The African Diaspora’s Gifts to the World
Enslavement and Liberation: Telling the Story through Teaching, Song,
Story and Preservation
Liberation: Ideologies, Contexts and Dynamics
Liberation: Simple Past or Present Continuous?

Please send abstracts as an attached Word file to Jessica Minnis, Chair of the
Conference Committee at abolitionconference@cob.edu.bs Deadline extended to
Monday, October 1, 2007.

Conference Structure

The conference will feature 20-minute papers from all disciplines, followed by 10-
minute discussions, presented in concurrent and plenary sessions. Panel and
poster proposals will also be considered. Such proposals should be as complete
as possible.

Submissions (an electronic copy) should be directed to:
Jessica Minnis

Associate Professor, School of Social Sciences

The College of The Bahamas

P O Box N4912

Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail: abolitionconf@cob.edu.bs

Deadline for Submission: Monday, December 31, 2007.

Registration

Three Days:

Day Rate:

Late Registration Fee:
Student Rate:
Student Day Rate:

$450:00
$150:00
$125.00
$150.00
$75.00

For information on the availability of student subsidies, please contact:

Vice President Research, Graduate Programmes and Intemational Relations
Tel: (242) 302 4455

Registration is open and online at http:/Awww.cob.edu.bs/abolitionconf.php.

The Alumni Association of The College of The Bahamas

2007 Hall of Fame Induction and Luncheon
Friday, November 23, 2007 at 12:30 p.m. :
British Colonial Hilton, No. 1 Bay Street

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tickets available for a donation of $50

peotact the Alumni Relations & Davelonin ant

= corre

Tel tee 302-4359

ean oe Le

ie FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION &

& EXTENSION SERVICES

dO

_Massage Therapy Essentials |

This introductory course gives you

the opportunily to learn basic tech-
niques of massage therapy. Major
topic areas will include Massage
Theory, Manipulations — and
Techniques, Wellness Education
(Psychological and Physiological
Benefits), Indications and
Contraindications, Serving Special
Populations and Complementary
Bodywork Systems to include
Aromatherapy Essentials.

Begins: Thursday, 27 September, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: Munnings Building",
The College of The Bahamas

TOE
Massage Therapy Essentials Il

This is an advanced course for
learning techniques of massage
therapy and its many benefits
Major topics include introduction
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treatments, the basic facial,
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Begins: Monday, 24 September, 2007
Time: 6:00-9 00pm

Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $620.00

Venue: Munnings Building",
The College of The Bahamas

This is an introductory course
for learning how to teach group
fitness and exercise classes.
Major topics of discussion will
include: Basic anatomy and
physiology, choreography and
cueing, the five components of
fitness, nutrition, basic exer-
cise testing and how to teach
group exercise.

Begins: Wednesday, 26 September, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm

Duration: 10 Weeks

Tuition Fee: $400.00

Venue: Munnings Building*,

The College of the Bahamas

*NOTE: The Munnings Building is situated next to KFC

www.cob.edu.bs


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 7B







Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING &



THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE (ILCL) - THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
EVENTS CALENDER 2007-2008






School of Social Sciences
Programmes in —
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION



~ LECTURERS / PARTICIPANTS ______VENUE_

“| Slide show by Dr. Irene Moss, Director, LCL Munnings Room 2
6:30 PM.

V1]






GERMAN FILM














Fray mee
September 23°

F riday _

Presented by Professor Xian Xianwen Munnings: Room 2



































































SPANISH FILM Presentation: Foreign Lang. Dept.: Assistant Munnings Rom 2 A Contemporary Approach to Administration for Productivity and
ey Professor, ‘Guadatupe de) Micme Miphetas = Effective Management in Public and Private Entities
October 6 OKTOBERFEST Organized by I. Moss with all relevant COB Band Shell :
Saturda Departments: Communications, Security, ete. | 6- U1 ; . : . : .
November 8 FRENCH FOLK SONG EVENING Slide show by I. Moss, F. Leger on guitar, J. Munnings Room 2 ae School . Social 5 Sohn ee oti tebe cbr of The
Thursda Mereus on vocals and other musical friends 7PM anamas invite members e public and private sectors to
November 14 THE HOLOCAUST ~— a movie presentation | Mr. Absil — holocaust survivor UWI Dining Room enroll in one of our progressive Public Administration Programmes:
Wednesday and lecture : 7PM Become 21° century ‘change agents’ and partners in national
December 4 JUNKANOO ART — designing and pasting | Presentation and demonstration by Henry Moss Jr. | Munnings Room 2 development.
Tuesday costumes - WORKSHOP slide show by 1. Moss | 6-8 1
December 13 MERRY MULTI-CULTURAL Organization & musical direction: I. Moss Munnings Room 2 Prospective students and participants have the following
Thursday Cc Sere _ ILCL Foreign Lang. Dept. members and COB |. 7. PM _._ | options:
January 9 - Wed Presentation by Professor Xu Xianwen Munnings. Room 2, 7PM

















Video of Montreal TAM TAM JAM by I. I. Moss Band shell
Director: TBA 2PM

DRUMEEST - A dvunt summit regrouping
members from all the Junkanoo teams

January 19
Saturday



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Thursday ange OS eee ean hae Seat and private tourism busine Lecture Hall?7PM certificate o attendance]
















































February 19 Presentation on Roman history b background by. ~~ T “Munnings Room 2 : ; a .
Tuesday : | Professor Stephen BL Aranha Pm _ Programmes are conducted in a progressive environment which
March 1-15 IRISH PUB NITE ~ to be announced “With Montreal Band SWIFT ~ [UWI Dining Room takes into consideration:
March 21 - Fri VICTOR HUGO — Beyond LES MIZ iL Lecture and s slide show by | - Moss Soke iad Munnings Room 2 ;
April 10 HAITIAN FILM “Slide presentation: Assistant Professor Frenand Munnings Room 2 v¥ Needs of the individuals through small group interaction

Poe esai ene | Leger, Foreign Languages Department, 0 fw ‘Bottom line’ of organizations through exposure to planning-
April Md aN Ee re Een Musicians and (BA - strategic and long range and total quality management

ae 2 nnn na een cewnfecennnnznnniennnnzennnmennnd | W Major contemporary issues of organizations; e.g. training

y MAIFEST Slide Show by I.Moss; participation of German- | Munnings Room 2 cae
T speakers in Nassau & [LCI students needs occasioned by the challenges of globalization
May 23 CLASSICAL MUSICEVENING Piano solos by | Moss: Cello / piano ducts by Il. | Munnings Room2SSC*Y*&: %~—«sESSues relating to sustainable development
Friday ¥ Public/Private Sector Partnerships [PPPs]

Peloguin & L.Moss; guests TBA




Dates are subject to change.

Individuals: This is your chance to ready your thinking and skills
to seize 21% century opportunities and be someone who is proactive
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Employers: Here’s your opportunity to create real resources to
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: {) Microsoft Office - Word Processing {ii} Microsoft Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Excel + Spreadsheet {iiil) Microsoft Access - Database
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For details contact: Chair, School of Social Sciences or Dr.
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E-mail: swilson@cob.edu.bs





Operating Systam Proficiency, Internet and Email Proficiency.




























Prsrequsite: None
pas * Pre-requisite: None Begins: Monday & Wednesday, 17 September, 2007 MAR K TH E DATE
Data Wacnectan 12 September, 200 Begins: Wednesday, 12 September, 2007 Time: 6:009m - 7:30pm Duration: 12 weeks
Time: 11:00am -2:00pm Section 01 (CEES) Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm Duration: 12 weeks Venue: BHTC Computer Lab Fees: $500.00
Dele: Mond, 10 September, 2007 Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $480.00 QUICKBOOKS
Time: 8:00pm - 9: “Section 02 (CEES) Thursday, November 8, 2007
MICROSOFT EXCEL Course Description: This course is designed to train naw and existing :
Date: Saturday, 15 September, 2007 ; small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) how to
Time: 10:00am - 1:00pm. Section 03 (CEE: Course Descriation: This course covers the fundamentals of the organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks The Colle e of The Bahamas
Duration: 12 weeks Venue: CEES Coe Lab Microsoft Exce! spreadsheet. Tools that are neaded for basic entry Pro software. Students wit team how to set-up their company fites g
Tuion: $450.00 and manipuition of cells and worksheets are presenisd char of accounts, hig, cisions, vrs and employneg. Counselling and Health Services

















ONS Il Pre-requisite: None,
: Pre-requisite: None z
Course Description: course cavers the major advanosd . * Begins: Tuesday, 25 Saptember, 2007
cepts wi Sean Se Begins: Saturday, 29 September, 2007 Tene: 6:prt aon Onaten: 6.weeks CAREERS/ JOB FAIF t
og ing () =a Office reat {iy Manso F Excai- Time: os ~ 8:00pm as 8 weeks Venue: CEES Carares tab a 73 FRR $330.00 . WA sR 3 "
asc ees base Manage Venue: Computer Lab : $250.00 , Je S 2 YO® :
: << . ; WESPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP is coming your Waly caevi



MICROSOFT



‘ \ < Course Desenption Ths course, which targets persons who would

. . : like to create their personal web pages, will dover Web Page Creation,
Course Description: This course assumes no particular background ~— Web Site Management, and HTML Specific topics will include
and takes the student from the: level of novice fo an advanced level. Formatting. Graphics, Multmedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of
A thorough grounding in aif of the fundamentals of document handing — 8D pages.
















Employers, bright young students and other
interested persons have the opportunity to meet for
















in Microsoft Word is presented Prerequisite: Participants must be computer tterate and have a

Prerequisite: None ei nal ihn * mutual benefit.

Begins: Tuesday, 25 September, 2007 Begins: Thursday & Friday, 18th October, 2007

, 5 94 , Time: 9:30am - 4:30 Duration: 2 ae ‘ . .

Time: 1:00am - 2:00pm Drretor: 8 Woe ed CoagerLab Poe Seat Individual Booths Available for Organization Displays

Venue: CEES Computer Lab Fees: $250.00

* f: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email perdev@cob.edu.bs fees are includ- -
fies of $40.00 (one ane When submitting pppication. kindly provide oe of the first four pages











Benefits to employers/organizations:

> Exposure to hundreds of the best-trained college students in The
Bahamas/Access to prospective employees

>» A direct opportunity in becoming a stakeholder in preparing COB
students for their future endeavours

> Exposure to high school students seeking career information

> Acomplete 8’ x 10’ booth for display purposes

> Signage on all print advertisements













Contact:
Ms. Norma Turnquest, Advisory Committee Executive Secretary
Career & Placement Counsellor, COB at Tel: 242-302-4445

Fax: 242-302-4448, nturnquest@cob.edu.bs

INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES

AND CULTURES INSTITUTE
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Communication: The Key to Global Understanding

COURSE OFFERING: FALL 2007 — Beginning September 24th
CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I: Mon/Wed: 6 — 7:30 PM








CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE II: Tues/Thurs: 7:30 — 9 PM
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I: Mon/Wed: 5 - 6:30 PM





CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30 PM
ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION GROUP: Tuesdays: 1 - 2 PM







ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP:
Thursdays: 1 -2 PM






EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
Date: Thursday, 4 October, 2007

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an — Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service. | Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship ‘Tuition: $160.00

building and employee motivation. Wes Pace Desicn







These are directed conversation and practice “brown bag”
sessions - bring your own lunch!
10 consecutive sessions: $100 ($50 for COB Students)

CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I: Mon/Wed: 6:30 - 8 PM


























Date: Thursday, 11 October, 2007 This course will cover Web Page Creation, Website

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN I: Mon/Wed: 7:30 — 9 PM
Venue: Grovenor Close Nursing School computers and would like to create their own web pages are CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN II: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30
Tuition: $170.00 encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting,






Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web

Errective PoweRPOINT PRESENTATIONS i
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an Date: Thursday & Friday , 18th & 19th October, 2007
overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. {t . Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
presentations. Tuition: $550.00

CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I: Mon/Wed: 6 — 7:30 PM



CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30 PM














DELE SPANISH PROFICIENCY TESTING:
Registration: Sept 3 — Oct. 12



LOCATION: Munnings Building (next to KFC at COB Roundabout):
Room 16

DURATION: 3 hours per week for 10 weeks, total course hours: 30 hours
PRICE: $ 250.00 per course (except for Advanced French and Spanish
Conversation Group)

‘TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587 E-MAIL: ilci@cob.edu.bs

TIMES MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE














ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ 328-1936 or email
perdev@cob.edu.bs. All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time) . When
submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.






PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2007

Licence, permit fees hit DHHS medical costs by $700,00

LOSS Sto

NOTICE OF VACANCY

Excellent opportunities for career advancement exist in the Legal
Department of Port Group Limited. The Company invites qualified
applicants to apply for the position of Legal Assistant.

The successful candidate must have at least five (5) years experience
as a Legal Assistant in the fields of conveyancing, commercial
transactions and probate matters, and: must be proficient in all

Microsoft Word an

d Excel programmes.

The successful candidate must also have:

I. Completed a recognized paralegal/legal executive course,

or

2. A minimum of five (5) B.G.C.S.E “O” levels or equivalent,
two (2) of which should be Math and English with grade

“C” or abo

ve.

Résumés with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department

The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited

P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
BAHAMAS
or

Email: personnel@gbpa.com

On

or before September 30, 2007



To meet the challenge of operating our growing business, we wish to recruit a:

FROM page I

chief financial officer, indicat-
ed DHHS results would be
even better if it were not for
the high work permit and busi-
ness licence fees that the
BISX-listed healthcare
provider incurred on an annu-
al basis.

He explained that although
the Business Licence Act pro-
vided for hospitals to be
exempted from the payment
of annual business licence fees,
unlike the publicly-funded and
owned Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, DHHS was still being
treated as an ordinary business
by the Ministry of Finance’s
Business Licensing Depart-
ment.

As a result, it still had to pay
business licence fees that last

ear were “just shy” of
$400,000. Mr Cash contrasted
discrepancies between the
Medical Facilities Licensing
Board’s licensing of DHHS as
a hospital with the Business
Licensing Department’s treat-
ment of the company.

“The Business Licensing Act
provides for hospitals io be
exempt from business licences.
We've continually asked the
Ministry of Finance to recog-
nise us as a hospital to no
avail,” Mr Cash said.

“It is one area where Doc-
tors Hospital would be able to
directly impact the cost of care
by not having to make these
payments.”

In addition, DHHS had to
spend “just under $300,000”
annually on work permit fees
for essential medical services
personnel, further adding to
the burden imposed by what
Mr Cash described as a global
shortage of qualified nurses.
To attract nurses and medical
technicians with the skills to
deliver high quality care and
service standards, DHHS
needed to offer top-level
salaries, and Mr Cash
explained that work permit
fees just added to the cost bur-
den.

“The same issues continue
to persist,” Mr Cash told The
Tribune. “There is a global
nursing shortage, and DHHS
has to provide higher salaries
to attract qualified nurses.

“It is unconscionable, we

. think, to have to pay the cost

of work permits on top of that.
So the Government is being
asked to eliminate or substan-
tially reduce to a nominal lev-
el the cost of work permits for
nurses and medical techni-
cians.”

Mr Cash added: “DHHS is
not asking the Government for
any special favours. The reali-
ty is that we provide special
discounts to indigent patients,
not to mention those patients
who are underinsured and do
not fall into the indigent cate-

gory.
Costs

“There are always opportu-
nities. for government, to
reduce the cost of customs
duties on medical equipment”
such as MRI and CT scan-
ners.”

“There are a lot of opportu-
nities for the Government to
meet DHHS half way and
reduce the cost of care for
Bahamians,” Mr Cash added.
“If it becomes cost prohibitive
or expensive, and you have
Bahamians looking elsewhere,
it is a loss to the country on a
net basis.

“Money goes out of the
country for health care when it
could have stayed here, partic-
ularly when we have shown
that we have the quality,
sophistication and scope of ser-
vices to compete with south
Florida.”

These issues have remained
unresolved for some time, and
Mr Cash said DHHS’ requests
“fell on deaf ears” with the for-
mer Christie government. He
added that the BISX-listed
company would continue to
make its case with the new
FNM administration.

In his letter to DHHS share-
holders on the company’s sec-



WANTE

r
The TRIBUNE

|

enema



ond quarter and half-year
results, Joseph Krukowski, the
company’s chairman, said toffl
expenses for the six months fp
July 31, 2007, had increased

almost $0.8 million or 4.35 pr
cent over the previous ye@r
comparative. They rose {fp
$18.174 million from SA rs

million.

Other operating expense
such as insurances and leas¢ dh,
rose by 19 per cent over 2096
levels, while medical supplifs
and services costs rose by 9.92
per cent. Payroll costs grew ths
9.16 per cent. I

Charles Sealy, DHHS chit f
executive, said that despite tie
company’s ever-improvi
financial performance — larg Ht -
ly driven by growth in patient
volumes and revenues — it was
still challenged by rising mel-
ical supplies costs and oper -

_ ing expenses. There were al

difficulties in attracting qual. -
fied Bahamians into the meq-
ical profession. 1.
Mr Cash told The Tribu
that the increase in operating

. costs and expenses were havisg

“a notable ripple effect”
DHHS’s business, both tral
a service provider and employ-
er standpoint. |

Increases in medical supp h
costs, he explained, weie
passed on to patients and a
insurance companies in t
form of rising healthcare cosas
and insurance premiums.

“The business insurance we
pay, whether we talk about lif-
bility insurance or generpl
insurance, this has not stopped
going up, so this has ultimatt-
ly had a negative impact on the
bottom line,” Mr Cash addeli.

Meanwhile, rising electridj-
ty bills were having a “com-

pletely negative effect”, forci he

DHHS to look at new medic!
equipment and ways to Uk
more efficient.

“It has a very negatil e
impact in terms of cost,” Mar
Cash said, “and has forcdt
leadership teams to go back fp p
the drawing board to find wa
top do things better in the Wa
we operate.”








i
i
}
i

Compliance Officer

Hold a compliance certification.

Have several years of experience as compliance officer in private banking.
Have knowledge of Bahamian and international compliance requirements.
Be computer literate with communication skills.

MEDICAL SECRETARY

Busy Doctor’s Office requires secretary
with excellent writing, verbal and computer |
skills. Experience in basic accounting and |
office management, plus ability to work |
with sophisticated clientele is required. :
Salary commensurate with experience and |
qualifications.

The successful applicant must:






Planning, organizing the compliance function for a bank.
Developing and maintaining adequate policies and procedures.
Reviewing and managing the documentation of client files.
Liaising with regulators and compliance officer of the Group.

- Motivated team player with pleasant personality.
Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision.
Ability to conduct the monitoring of clients credit risk
and/or law degree is an asset.

We require knowledge and experience with:

Fax resumé to 327-6140

We offer — Asalary which is commensurate with the job,

a pension plan and medical insurance.

We will only reply to candidates that fully match our requirements listed above, if so we will be pleased to receive your resume
and one (1) letter of reference to: SYZ & CO Bank & Trust LTD. | Attention Betsy Morris (betsy.morris@syzbank.com)
P.O. Box N —1089 | Bayside Executive Park | West Bay Street & Blake Road | Nassau, Bahamas | Fax: (+1 242) 327 66 29

SYZ & CO

Created to perform

SYSTEMS ANALYST



Information Technology

-




Headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The Bahamas, Barbados, th
Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, Butterfield
Bank offers a wide range of services to local and internationai clients.

Ap
yf

Private Banking
OYSTER Funds

Alternative Investments

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results arented self starter wi itt!
a record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Informatio
Technology team.

SYZ & CO || Bank & Trust

Core Responsibiliti ies

* Provide tier-1 end user support in suppor of business operations via the
internal Help Desk function,

= )FIDELITY

= Assist with the preparation and maintenance of technical specifications

Pricing Information As Of: and related documentation

Proactively ensure all identified applications, hardware and general

SECURITIES - VISIT WWW.BISXBAH? Dy . KK ;
: AX KK equipment are monitored via aperational tasks lists, |

KRE INDEX: CLOSE 1,887.48 / CHG -00.
Securit Previous Close Today's Close
Abaco Markets 1.60 1.60
Bahamas Property Fund 11.70 11.70
Bank of Bahamas 9.54 9.54
Benchmark 0.85
Bahamas Waste 3.74
Fidelity Bank 1.62
Cable Bahamas 11.02
Colina Holdings 3.10
Commonwealth Bank 15.64
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
mier Real Estate



Yield
0.00%
1.627 3.42%
0.733 i < 2.73%
0.048 : 2.35%
0.279 0. ‘060 . 1.60%
0.064 0.040 2.47%
0.996 0.240 2.18%
0.208 0.080 4s 2.58%
1.190 0.680 4.35% s
0.112 0.050 0.84%
0.281 0.000 0.00%
0.804 0.240 3.88%) "
0.768 0.570 4.46%
0.977 * 0.470 3.20%
0.364 0.133 2.17% "
-0.415 0.000 0.00%
0.411 0.200 2.76%
0.580 6 5.77%
0.600 6.00%

EPS $
0.094

52wk-Hi Change
1.78
11.74
9.54
0.85
3.74
1.62
11.00
3.10
15.64

47.22
2.76
6.40
12.77
14.70
6.10
1.00

52wk-Low
0.54
11.00
7.50
0.70
1.52
1.20.
9.40
1.80
11.35
4.70.
2.20
5.54
11.51
13.76
5.18
0.54
7.10

= Assist with technology projects and initiatives with use of analytical and
problem-solving skills to help identify, communicate and re cote issues t
maximize the benefit of IT systems investments,

3.74



Desired Qualifications
A degree in Computer Science on related discipline from a well
recognized university

A minimum of two years professional tT PRs ience; preferably in the
Financial Services Industry.



IY based training or qualifications (A*,

MCP, or CCNA) from accredited
institutions will be advantageous

â„¢ Proficient in computer systems and network management, Web-based
applications, clent-server applications, and PC-based software
applications

|
Div $ Yield
1.485
0.480
0.000

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND sepa

® Working knowledge of Microsoft Windows Servers, Microsoft Windows
XP, Microsoft SQL Server, and Microsoft Office



} j y Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
41.00 43.00 41.00
14.60 . 15.50 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.45
BIS Listed Mutual Funds

YTD% Last 12 Months

2.750 ‘ 3.70% ba
1.485
0.000

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, and customer

service skills

0 ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Closing Date: September 20, 2007

NA V Div $ Yield %
1.355424*
3.3402***
2.886936***
1.269803***
11.6581**** 7 : 7
FINDEX: CLOSE 863.81 / YTD 16.05% / 2006 34.47%
MARKET TERMS YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *. 7 September 2007
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price *. 30 June 2007
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week 31 August 2007
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths 31 July 2007
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful *
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 100

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund




Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail recruitment@butterfieldbank bs

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

NAV KEY
- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

www.butterfieldbank.bs

6

Butterfield Bank


THE ne







Sn

Doctors Hospital Health System Limited
Interim report
Quarter ended July 31, 2007

Chairman’s Report
Doctors Hospital Health System Limited

Dear Shareholders,

Tam pleased to report on your company’s financial results for the three months caded July 31, 2007.
Earnings per share were twelve cents for the period which refleets an ‘increase from ten cents for the
comparable period last year, Net income for the six months was $2.5 million, or twenty-five cents per
share, compared to $2.0 million, or twenty cents per share, for the comparable period in 2006.

The financial results reflect growth in patient service revenues to $20.7 million from $19.7 million in the
prior year period, an increase of 5.08%,

Total expenses increased $0.8 million, or 4.35%, over the same period last year. Highlights include the
following: other operating—insurances, leases—-increased 19.0%; and medical supplies and services
increased 9.22%. Payroll costs grew by 9.16%.

The Western Medical Plaza is the remaining principal discontinuing operation. Losses trom this facility
are $0.29 million for the first six months. of this year, compared to $0.36 million for the comparable
period last year, an improvement of 19.4%, Sale of the vacant land at Blake Road was finalized and a
gain of $16,000 was recorded. We are pleased to report that the Company has finalized an agreement to
lease the full WMP complex for a five-year period.-‘The new arrangement will result in the immediate
reduction in operating ‘expenses incurred by. DH, as these costs become ‘the responsibility of the new
lessee. The new lease agreement will produce free cash flows that will facilitate additional repayments on
the related WMP debt.

Strategic plan objectives to increase cash reserves, reduce accounts receivables and minimize debt are
falling into place as anticipated. We have stabilized our financial status, employee morale and medical
staff loyalty. We have regained viability and a positive bottom line as we continue to record profits,
moving the hospital in the right direction to make other needed changes.

Doctors Hospital is also realizing the return on investments made on its Healthcare Information System,
Meditech, with timely reporting and improved efficiency. Meditech has provided useful tools to help our
department leaders enhance efficiency, service and quality. Meditech also positively affects physicians
and clinicians by providing accurate information and real time data which translates into better patient
care as physicians are able to diagnose and treat more effectively and efficiently. ; .

The Hospital’s noteworthy, success is the continued focus on our goals to provide high quality care, and
‘patient — and physician ~ friendly service, so there-is no need to go elsewhere for healthcare. Another
important goal for the hospital is strong community support. Taking best practices from the hospitality
industry, the hospital has established'a culture of service, to improve the entire patient experience and
improve satisfaction rates and, continue profitability.

On behalf of the Board of Directors, I thank you for your continued loyalty to Doctors Hospital.

Joseph Krukowski
Chairman
September 14, 2007

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Balance Sheet

July 31, 2007 with comparative figures at January 31, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

we daly 3 2007 danuary 31,2007

Assets
Current assets;
Cash and cash equivalents , $ 4,599 1,988
Accounts receivable—patients, net (note 2) 1,147 951
Accounts receivable—third party payors, net (note 2) 6,007 5,521
Inventories 1,290 1,252
Other assets , : 687 322
Assets classified as held for sale (note 3) ee 5,513 . S443
19,243 18,477
; Non-current assets: |
* Rivestments j ; 30 30
“Goodwill, net pve 431 , 431
Other intangible assets 7 2,594 2,700
Investment property (note 4) ; . 1,022
Property, plant and equipment . _ 8,900 9359
ae a : 1195 13,542
Total assets , : $ 31,198 29,019
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable and other liabilities 3,621 3.448

Long-term debt, current portion : 389 389
Liabilities directly associated with assets classified as













held for sale(note3) — _ 5,001 . 5,279
a ee) L916
~ Non-current liabilities
Long-term debt 3,108 3,302
* - Total liabilities 12,119 12,418
Shareholders’ equity:
Share capital:
Authorized 12,500, 000 common shares at par value
of B$0.04 each (July 31, 2007 — 12,500, 000 shares)
Issued and fully paid 9,97 1,634 shares .

(July 31, 2007 — 9,971,634 shares) = 399 399
Contributed surplus : 12,358 12.358
Retained earnings 6,322 3.844

: 19,079 16,601
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $ 31,198 29,019
(Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Income

Three months ended July 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the three months ended July 31, 2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

















es duty 31,2007 Sully 312000
CONTINUING OPERATIONS
Revenues .

. Patient service revenue, net ; $ 10,483 10,065
Other . - os 182 130
Total revenues a, 665 10,195

Expenses

Salaries and benefits 4,010 3.041
Medical supplies and services 2,655 2,499
Other operating 1,108 959
Provision for doubtful accounts oan ’ 394 O88
Depreciation and amortization 473 S44
Utilities ; 294 277
Government taxes and fees 202 219
Repairs and maintenance ee 159 103
Totalexpenses. _: a ee 9,295 8.940
Income from continuing operations ° /

before interest 1,370 1,255
Interest expense _ tO) 9)
Income from continuing operations 1,309 1,162
Discontinued operations
Revenue 25 21
Expenses a (170) (188)
Loss from discontinued operations (IAS) (167)



Net income for the period $ NOS

Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):
Basic and fully diluted $





(Unaudited)

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2007,

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Income

Six months ended July 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the six months ended July 31, 2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

July 30,2007 0 Sttly 31, 2006

CONTINUING OPERATIONS

Revenues
Patient service revenue, net $
Other

Total revenues

20,732

19,669















Expenses
Salaries and benefits 7,707 7,061
Medical supplies and services 5,283 4,837
Other operating 2,252 1,892
Provision for doubtful accounts 624 1,287
Depreciation and amortization (note 5) : $,052 1,060
Utilities 564 539
Government taxes and fees ‘ 423 419
Repairs and maintenance a 269 323
Total expenses - _ 18,174 17,418
Income from continuing operations ;
before interest 2,893 2,509
Interest expense _ (125) (180) _
Income from continuing operations 2,768 2,329
Discontinued operations
Revenue 63 45
Expenses = OS) ____(400)
Loss from discontinued operations (290) te (355)
i
Netincomefortheperiod 2,478 1,974
Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):
__ Basic and fully diluted $25 0.20



(Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

Six months ended July 31, 2007 with comparative figures for the six months ended July 31, 2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)













ee ee __ July 31, 2007 July 31, 2006
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in):
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income $ 2,478 1,974
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash
provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization 1,052 1,060
Provision for doubtful accounts 624 1,287
_ Gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment (16) . -
4,138 4,321
Increase in accounts receivable (1,310) (2,885)
(Increase) decrease in inventories (38) 18
Increase in prepaid expenses and other assets (380) (137)
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable and other liabilities 173 _ (491)
Cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activitics 2,583 826
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Purchase of property, plant and equipment (393) (1,107)
Purchase of intangible assets (94) (838)
___ Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment. _____ 1,038 :
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in) investing activities 551 : (1,945)



FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
__ Repayment of long-term debt ‘ (471) (1,215)





Cash and cash equivalents used in financing activities (471) (1.215)
‘Increase (decrease) i in cash and ¢ cash equivalents a 2663 _ (2,334)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 1,988 1,284
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period (note 6) $4 OSE (1,050)

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank and in hand, short-term deposits with an original maturity of six
months or less and bank overdratts,

(Unaudited)
DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity

Six months ended July 31, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)



_ Number of shares Share capital Contributed surplus —_ Retained earnings —__
Balance at January 31, 2007 9,971,634 $ 399 $ 12,358 $ 3,844
Net income for the period - : - - 2.478



Balance at July tly 31, 2007



9.971 034 $ 12,358 6.322





DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements
Six months ended July 31,2007

1. Significant accounting policies

These interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard
No. 34, Interim Financial Reporting, using the same accounting policies applied in the January 31, 2007 audited

consolidated financial statements.
2. Accounts receivable

Accounts reecivable are stated net of provisions tor doubtful accounts of $7.1 million,

3. Assets classified as held for sale

For the period ended July 31, 2007, total assets and liabilities of companies which have been discontinued and
for which there is a commitment for disposition are reported in the balance sheet as “held for sale.” Operating
results for these segments are reported in the statement of income “Discontinued operations.” These include

Western Medical Plaza Limited and Doctors Hospital (Wesd) Limited.
.
4. Investment Property

During the period The Company sold 5 acres of undeveloped land in western New Providence. A gain of

$16,000 was recorded.
5. Change in accounting estimate

During the period The Company changed the period of amortization for its buildings. The original amortization
period for the principal buildings located at Doctors Hospital East were dwenty and twenty-five years. In
accordance with the provisions of TAS [6, the amortization periods were extended to forty years. The effect of
the change for this period was a decrease in amortization charges of $ 107,000,

6. Cash and cash equivalents

The cash position of $4.051 million reported in the statement of cash flows reflects $52,000 in cash for WMP

that is recorded as assets held tor sale.

PAGE 96










PAGE 10B, MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 17, 2007 |
POR a
Royal Commission inquiry urged into Port Authority

FROM page 1

In the joint statement, Mr
Lowe and Mr Maynard criti-
cised both PLP and FNM gov-



ernments for failing to
“address and redress the now-

disclosed blatant breaches of

the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment”, which they alleged had
taken place when Sir Jack

Tan Opportunities

Hayward and the late Edward
St George had sold off stakes
in Freeport’s utility companies
and other GBPA assets to out-
side private sector partners.
The pair charged: “The time

The Clifton Heritage Authority is seeking the services of persons to fill the
following positions at the Clifton National Park:

Position: WARDEN:

Park wardens have significant responsibilities in visitor services, Resource
management and the provision of the interpretative services.

_ Duties/Responsibilities:

° Assists with monitoring the activities at the park to ensure the proper use of

the facilities.

Assists with the facilitation of tours at the site, school programs and special

events.

Implements resource management techniques required to manage and restore
natural and cultural resources including exotic plant and animal removal,
native plant restoration, erosion control and prevention of historic structure
remains and archaeological sites.
Property uses herbicides and other chemicals in conjunction with the

maintenance team.

Provides emergency assistance.
Assist with any other duties assigned.

Post Qualifications:

° Minimum of 3 BGCSE’s or 5 BJC’s

° Have sound knowledge of security techniques.
Police vetting is a requirement —
Trainable and preparedness to be trained.
Graduate of the Bahamas Host Program is a plus

Position: Maintenance Worker

Responsible for the daily maintenance and upkeep of the grounds and facilities

of the Clifton Heritage Park. -

Duties/Responsibilities



Ensures the daily maintenance and upkeep of the grounds of the Clifton
Heritage Park, facility cleaning, facility repairs and maintenance, and natural

“and cultural:‘resource management as directed..." 2°
© Removat'of debris and other identified plane,” ~" .

ae

ery
S sa
oe

tae >

° Cleans and properly stores all tools, vehicles and equipment.
° Constructs, maintains and repairs building and structures, including
plumbing, wiring and painting.

Post Qualifications:

° Minimum of 3 BJC’s

° Ability to operate general landscaping equipment
° Trainable and preparedness to be trained
Applications are available at the Authority’s Office Colin’s Avenue.

Join Cititrust
(Bahamas) Limited,

Telephone caontact 325-1505.

— one of the most

established trust
organizations in the

We invite outstanding
individuals, wanting to build.a
career in technology, to be part
of our dynamic global team. You

world.



ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
Reporting to our Deputy Technology Head, the position is
responsible for all phases of the technology project management
lifecycle. Key responsibilities include documenting business

has come for a forensic audit of
the affairs of the Port Author-
ity, and an injunction imposed
to prohibit the sale of any
shares in the Grand Bahama
Port Authority and affiliated
companies until community
assets have been accounted for
and the covenants on the part
of the Port Authority to be
performed guaranteed.

“Our organisations would be
pleased to meet with govern-
ment representatives to discuss
the concerns of our members,
to explain why we believe a
Royal or Blue Ribbon Com-
mission should be appointed
to review the agreement and
to consider whether it is not

* time to turn over the provision
of services to a local govern-
ment.”

The sale by the GBPA
shareholders ofa 55.4 per cent
stake in Grand Bahama Power
Company to Mirant (since sold
on to Japanese firm Marubeni)
and a minor stake in Sanita-
tion Services to Onyx, as well
as the sale of 50 per cent stakes
in the Grand Bahama Devel-
opment Company (Devco),
Freeport Harbour Company
and Freeport Container Port
to Hutchison Whampoa, have
frequently aroused controver-
sy since the GBPA ownership
dispute burst out into the open.

Sir Jack and Mr St George
earned at least $80 million col-

. lectively in ‘special dividends’

from those asset disposals, but
clauses 1(6), 1 (7), 1 (8), and 2
(21) in the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, in the eyes of
some observers, make the pro-
vision of utility services “the
exclusive responsibility” of the
GBPA.

This raises questions about
whether such assets could have
been divested, especially as the
sales were given Government
(National Economic Council
and the Cabinet) and Central
Bank approval, and whether
such assets were supposed to
be held in trust for the benefit
of the Freeport and Bahamian
people, not sold for private
profit.

In an interview with The Tn-
bune, Mr Lowe said a Royal

sCommission was needed “to

get to the bottom of the situa-'

tion” and “how the assets came
to be moved from the Port
Authority ownership proper
and thrown aside into the own-
ership of Intercontinental
Diversified Corporation, and
the creation of Port Group
Ltd. It’s a basic core question”.

Mr Lowe added that such an
inquiry could not be left to the
Government, citing “apparent
collusion between the Gov-
ernment and Port Authority
principals over the years with
respect to the abrogation of

citi

Technology Project Leader

requirements, preparing project plans, writing technical design |
documents, coordinating production support, overseeing user

will interact with colleagues from
around the world and across the

organization, providing
technology project management
leadership. In addition to a great
career, we offer a competitive
salary and benefits package.

Interested candidates should

acceptance testing and managing all related project estimates and
financial budgets. Additional responsibilities include ensuring
adherence to all internal technology standards and controls,
information security requirements and any related policies.

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS REQUIRED

Candidates must possess a Bachelors degree in Information
Technology, Engineering, or a related field and a minimum of five
to seven years of related experience. Additionally, Microsoft
Certification (MCP or higher), solid knowledge or Oracle and SQL
databases, and experience with vendor

management are assets. Excellent project management skills,
strong oral and written communication skills, and proved

forward a copy of their resume

by August 31, 2007 to: Gieselle
Campbell, Cititrust (Bahamas)
Limited, P.O. Box N-1576,

apply.

Nassau, Bahamas OR Fax:
(242) 302-8552 OR Email:

gieselle.campbell@citi.com

Challenge

leadership skills will round out the ideal candidate.

Interested Bahamians are encouraged to

yourself to a career like no other

the agreement itself, and the
disposal of the assets that the
Port Authority and its share-
holders were entrusted with
the development of thereof”.

The Grand Bahama Cham-
ber president said of the need
for an inquiry into the GBPA
and how Freeport reached its
current state: “I think it’s crit-
ical, otherwise we’re going to
go through a litany of potential
suitors and investors, and shift
further and further away from
the root cause and purpose of
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment. We’re building castles
on sand.

“If they’re selling assets
which, in point of fact, are pri-
vately held for private profit,
they will take the profits and
leave, and Freeport will be left
holding an empty bag.

“The assets were to be capi-
talised on for the development
of Freeport, and whilst rea-
sonable profits are to be
expected, special dividends to
be derived from the revenue
generated from the sale of
these assets is unreasonable.
This habit of profiteering and
liquidation has been incredi-
bly detrimental.”

To rectify Freeport’s prob-
lems, Mr Lowe said one key
was for all stakeholders — the
Government, GBPA share-
holders and management, and
licensees — to show more
accountability now and in the
future.

Agreeing with those who
have argued that the Govern-
ment, licensees and Bahamian
people had not held the GBPA
and its shareholders to account
for their governance and devel-
opmental obligations, Mr
Lowe said: “The quasi-regula-
tory, governance position of
the Port Authority has been
ignored with respect to the
proper administration of
Freeport, but has been well-
utilised by the shareholders for
private profit.

“In my opinion, they’ve
ignored the mandate for prop-
er administration, except when
it suited their purposes, which
was to remove the assets from
the Port Authority and strip it
of profits.”

Mr Lowe questioned
whether some of the produc-
tive assets, in which stakes
were now held by Port Group
Ltd and ICD, would be

THE TRIBUNE

returned to the GBPA’s own-
ership and used to further
develop Freeport.

Other areas of concern, he
added, were to discover the
fate of the 7.5 per cent stake
that the Government purport-
edly holds in the GBPA, at
least according to company
records filed at the Registrar
General’s Office’s Companies
Registry. The Government
says it can find no record that it
still owns such a stake, which
Mr Lowe said needed answer-
ing, since he had seen nothing
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly to show the Public Trea-
sury was receiving dividends
or had obtained revenues from
the stake’s sale.

Mr Lowe also said the Gov-
ernment had yet to recognise
the Freeport Property Owners
and Licensees Association. “It

has yet to be done,” he said.
“It’s just sitting there, waiting |
to be recognised. There’s no »
status. It’s just like everything ©
else; it seems to have gong into /

a void.”

As for the Fleming Group’s ©

interest, the Grand Bahama
Chamber president added:
“While I can appreciate the
Fleming Group's grandiose
plans and possible contribu-

A

tion to the development of |

Freeport, I am concerned by

the ‘disposal of the past bag- :

gage’ aspect of their approach.

“The past baggage of
Freeport and the Grand
Bahama Port Authority are
precisely what concern the

licensees, and should greatly .

concern the Government. The
licensees have before the
courts an originating summons
and affidavits intended to open
the ‘baggage’ so at the very
least we know what we have
and are ‘throwing away’.

“It is an application before
the courts which has yet to be
heard, and should cause any
potential purchaser of the one-
time assets of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and
the Port itself to await the dis-
covery thereof.

“It is high time we stop
building castles and empires
on sand, and seek to discover
the extenté® which the foun-
ase Freeport have been
undérmined, so that the struc-
ture can be repaired to the
extent possible and regain a
solid foundation.”

NOTICE

BAHAMAS BUSINESS SOLUTIONS LTD.

wishes to inform the general public that

TEKITO STEVENSON

is no longer employed with the company,

and is not authorized to

transact any business on behalf of

the company.

B_~ Bahamas
(Bsp Business Solutions Ltd.



ise
-o HEATH

BANK & TRUST LIMITED

COMPLIANCE OFFICER

We are looking for a Compliance Officer who will be

responsible for ensuring that the Compliance function at

our bank is in accordance with regulatory guidelines.

The succesful applicant will:

e Have several years of relevant experience as a

compliance officer and a good understanding of

Bahamain and international compliance requirements.

¢ Be the principal contact for our bank with all

regulators.

* Be able to develop and maintain compliance policies

and procedures.

¢ Be computer literate

¢ Be able to work effectively with other staff members

We offer an attractive work enviroment and a

competitive compensation package.

Submit resume and salary requirements in confidence

.o. Muviorris@ HeathBank.com



3
5

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:
j
{

MILNE AL ADDU Me ONS LRA ATE LRN OT ARLEN RDA BBM | 1
THE TRIBUNE Pe cS UNDA, SEP TEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 11B
REO A RR Ee es
WRAP, from page 2 turned its operati ; ‘ |
° edits operating results Revenues from real estate of $25k.
International Markets around, generating a small holdings were $609,000 (2006- Management has cited that it
end balance of $94m, standing unaudited profit of $25,000 for — $542,000), while revenues from - expects income, from its real

at $93 million at quarter-end.

' the first half of its fiscal year,

the TicketXpress acer

“estate business to be stable,

eeaeeee Weekly % Change Cable’s cash .pasition — compared to a loss of $103,000, were. $280,000 (2006,- . .While.expecting continued
, remained positive at the quar- for the same period last year. _ $238,000). ; hee wth: apr the TicketXpress
93 -1.49 ter end, despite investing and Total operating revenues ~~. business, ito: ‘economies of
i sara Be financing outflows, with net | were. $889,000 for the period, Income - a scale and continued expansion
EUR 1.3875 0.78 cash flows of $691,000 com- an increase of $109,000 over . in this area.’
, pared to $1.2 million for the | the $780,000 reported. at the Income from cohticalag ie Additionally, imanagement
2006 second quarter. end of the 2006 second quarter. operations of $194,000 was . is optimistic‘aboput opcrations
Commodities Operating revenues were more than double the $73,000 _ over the last half of the year
: Weekly % Change RND Holdings (RND).- generated by the company's _ reported in the prior period,’ ‘and expects the company to
At its recent Annual Gen- real estate and TicketXpress with finance costs of $168,000. - _ breakeven or even generate a
Crude Oil $79.10 219 eral Meeting, RND manage- segments, both of which saw (2006 - $177,000) resulting in. small profit for the fiscal year
Gold $717.80 2.08 ment reported that it has — growth over the period. ‘the ‘Teported unaudited profit” ended ee 2008.
International Stock Market Indexes:
Weekly % Change
} Em ‘oloee
DJIA 13,551.00 3.34 R Bbpcive
S & P 500 1,484.25 2.11
NASDAQ 2,602.18 1.42
Nikkei 16,127.42 0.03

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invites applications for the following position:

FOREMAN, LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE DIVISION

_ Applicants must possess the following:

¢ Minimum of 3 years experience in landscaping in
a supervisory capacity

¢ Ability to organize and supervise a crew of labourers

¢ Ability to work with minimum supervision

¢ Ability to operate landscaping equipment

¢ A valid driver’s licence

A mechanical background wouid be an asset

Interested persons may apply by
telephone to 361-7589
Between the hours of 9:00am and 4:30pm
Or by fax to 361-0118

References and police record should
be available upon request

A leading law firm with offices. located in
Nassau and Feeport is presently considering
applications for the following position.

SYSTEMS
ADMINISTRATOR

The successful applicant should possess the following
minimum requirements:

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¢ APITAL MARKETS
PAGE 12B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17,2007 THE TRIBUNE



| sin i‘ vada range ot








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