Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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New voter fraud claims

Allegations that
non-citizens may have
used search cards

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

LARGE numbers of non-citi-
zens may have registered and vot-
ed based on search cards, a source
alleges.

Search cards are issued by the
registrar general’s office for peo-
ple whose birth certificates cannot
be found in the official state
records after all checks are
exhausted — and these cards are
not proof of citizenship.

Additionally, the cards are
most likely to be issued to older
people born more than 50 years
ago for example, as modern
claimants can produce affidavits
and witnesses to their births,
whereas older claimants may not
be able to.

The source alleges that large .

Young man to
be arraigned
today after

age confusion
@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A YOUNG man who has :
been charged in connection :
with the murder of 18-year-old :
Mardio Hall is expected to be :
formally arraigned today after :
his arraignment did not go }

ahead as scheduled yesterday.

It was stated that the young
man, who is a resident of :
Pinewood Gardens, is 17 years :

old.

SEE page 12

numbers of non-citizens were
specifically being registered with
these cards, in a particular north-
ern Family Island constituency,
though he further claims that this
practice may have been wide-
spread.

“They stopped issuing them
as a result of the last election,”
he said. “On the 20th of April
they stopped it in the campaign.
Because in the campaign there
was so much abuse.”

All Bahamians who register to

vote for the first time, are sup- _

posed to show proof of citizen-
ship, such as a passport. In sub-
sequent elections, these voters
are allowed to use other forms of
identification that do not prove

SEE page 10

‘Six could bid’
for the PLP
chairmanship

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE race for the chairmanship
for the PLP will be “heavily
stacked” with as many as six peo-
ple possibly making a bid for the
position during the party’s nation-
al convention in November,
according to PLP sources.

A source close to the party told
The Tribune that in addition to
Glenys Hanna-Martin — who has
officially declared her intentions

: — contenders for the post may
However, his age apparently :

had not been confirmed up to :

include former Mount Moriah

SEE page 10

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The Tribune eC ay with USA TODAY

@ SEEN in The Tribune plant before the press started to roll on the first publication of the



Bahamas edition of USA TODAY are (I-r) Robert Carron, Tribune Chief Operating Officer; Den-
ver Adderley, press room assistant; Roger Carron, Tribune managing director, Jamal Brown, senior

press operator; Mrs Eileen Carron, Tribune publisher; Tom Kelly, circulation vice president, USA .

TODAY; Terry Carlson, manager/field operations, USA TODAY, and Jephthah Rahming, press oper-

ator.

THE Tribune and USA
TODAY made history this
morning when the 2.25 million
circulation American publication
printed its Bahamas edition on





The Tribune press for distribu-
tion at Paradise Island and New
Providence hotels.

“Our partnership with The
Tribune is the first printing ven-







? Is \

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ture for USA TODAY in the
Caribbean. We’re excited to be
publishing with The Tribune and

SEE page 12

Man in custody
eye

smashed at

Oa UCIT

A YOUNG man was
taken into police cus-

tody yesterday after a

small stone was thrown :
at the Central Detective :
Unit headquarters, :
smashing the glass front }
door. i

Police say they don’t
know what caused the
incident and that they
are making further
inquiries.

As the door is gov-
ernment property, a
senior officer said,
charges are expected to
be brought in connec-
tion with the matter.



GLASS is cleared
away from the
headquarters of the
Central Detective
Unit last night. :
(Photo: Felipé Major/ :
Tribune staff) :

Bi
Sas

Before you purchase Windows or
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NIB employees
again claiming
victimisation

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

EMPLOYEES at a branch of
the National Insurance Board
are again claiming to be the vic- .
tims of intimidation and victim-
isation at the hands of a few
high-ranking officials at NIB.

Allegations have surfaced
over sexual harassment, undue
dismissals without basis, and
low employee morale as a result
of the reported leadership at
one branch of NIB.

According to one employee,
who spoke to The Tribune on
the condition of anonymity, he
has been working in “hell” for
the past year. “It seems like he
(the NIB official) has a vendet- |
ta against our section,” he told
The Tribune on Thursday. “I
been working for the National
Insurance Board for 30 years,
and I never experienced this
kind of torture.”

“Someone has to expose this
company,” said another fed up
employee. “The union ain’ help-
ing us, it seems like nobody

SEE page 12

PMH set for
four new
dialysis
machines

DIALYSIS patients at the
-Princess Margaret Hospital can
expect four more new dialysis
machines to be installed by the

~weekend of July 20th, according
to Vice-president of Renal
Dynamics LLC, Todd Andersen.

The new machines, which are
expected to arrive in the Bahamas
today, will make eight in total
resulting from the successful
nationwide campaign by The Tile
King, FYP Ltd and The Tribune
that raised $342,915.29 — more
than double the original goal of
$164,000.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mr Andersen, explained
that the original 17 machines at
the Dialysis Unit have or are
arriving at the maximum usage
targets, and these new machines
are needed.

“Our company originally put
these machines in years ago and
the machines have an average life
of seven years and/or 28,000
hours. And so, based upon the

SEE page 10

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

Abaco relics to stay in Bahamas

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ANCIENT artifacts found in
Abaco - touted as holding the
key to perhaps 12,000 years of
Bahamian history — will remain
in this country for the Bahami-
an people to enjoy, according
to an official at the National
Museum.

Yesterday, The Miami Her-
ald reported on findings made
in and around Marsh Harbour,
including shells of a long extinct
land tortoises, a 1,000 year old
human bone, and 40 skeletons
of Cuban crocodiles over 3,000
years old, now disappeared
from Bahamian shores.

Some of the findings have
been taken to Florida for analy-
Sis at their Museum of Natural

History, but. yesterday.one-

Bahamian historical authority
noted that the surprising and
significant artifacts are "the

property of the Bahamian peo-
ple", and once there is a facility
in which they can be housed
adequately, the Bahamian peo-
ple, and tourists, will be able to
view them.

Minister of Culture Charles
Maynard said that building a
facility where historical objects
can be stored and exhibited is
a priority for his government,
however, both he and Nancy
Albury of the Abaco branch of
the Bahamas National Museum,
agree that ensuring the right
kind of building is produced will
take some time and.research.

Such a museum could be a
major draw, particularly con-

sidering that the Abaco artifacts,

have been described as the
“best preserved in the

Caribbean" according to pale-'
“ontologist Gary Morgan, at the,

New Mexico Museum of Nat-
ural History.
"I think the potential is

beyond our comprehension at
this point," said scientist Richard
Franz of the Florida Museum
of Natural History at the Uni-
versity of Florida. "We should
be able to recogstruct the past
10,000 to 12,000 years in the
Bahamas - maybe longer."

Discovery

According to Ms Albury, the
first fossil — the skull of a Cuban
crocodile — was discowered in
1994. The piece was later car-
bon-dated at 2,800 years old.

Since that time, huridreds of
pieces have been uncovered,
primarily from one Blue Hole —
the Sawmill Sink - which has
now been protected.

A flightless shorebird, a large
rodent as well as numerous bats,
tortoises and reptiles were
among dozens of species in evi-
dence between depths of 30 to

110 feet.

Some of the creatures are
now extinct, whereas other are
now known only to exist in oth-
er parts of the Caribbean.

Staff at the National Muse-
um in Abaco have honed their
skills in preserving the fossils,
with help from U S experts
based at the University of Flori-
da, and today, most of the arti-
facts are stored in a repository
in Marsh Harbour.

Numerous Bahamians are
involved in the project to find
and preserve the remains, said
Ms Albury, although the
Bahamas suffers from a short-
age of native paleontologists.

The Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History repository of arti-
facts allows experts to cross
examine the fossils against oth-
er remains, and determine the
species to which it belongs.

"You find a bone, and you
know, what is it? Is it a Ken-

tucky Fried Chicken bone? Lit-
erally, you need someone to
interpret it," explained Ms
Albury.

Experts involved in the
search for the fossils say that
they expect more are to be
found across the Bahamas.
However, Ms Albury noted that
unfortunately, many Blue Holes
have been polluted to the extent
that any artifacts would not
have been preserved as they
have in the Sawmill Sink.

"Unfortunately it's a very
common place for people to put
their trash. Not only does it cov-
er up the fossils, but it changes
the water chemistry, which

‘causes any fossil remains to be

destroyed," she said.

Meanwhile in the sink, the
water has been found to have
properties which: has,allowed
the pieces to be preserved to an
"exceptional" standard over the
millennia.

Chamber of Commerce to host ministerial forum

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce will host its annual
chamber week with a new
forum to allow Bahamians to
discuss important issues with
members of the new FNM cab-
‘inet.

At a press conference to
announce the week of events,
Philip Simon, the chamber’s
executive director, said nine
Cabinet Ministers have con-
firmed their attendance for the
Meet The Ministers Forum,
which will be held at the San-
dals Resort on July 19.

“This is an exciting concept,
and we hope that it will not be
the first of its kind, but that we
will be able to actually put on
this particular type of forum
with our cabinet ministers and
government representatives on
a semi-annual basis. This is par-
ticularly significant in light of
the recent general election and
the change of government,” said
Mr Simon.

It will be a free event. To
date, the confirmed ministers
include:

Zhivargo Laing, minister of

state for finance; Claire Hep- '

burn, attorney general and min-
ister of legal affairs; Carl Bethel,
the minister of education,
youth, sports and culture; Earl
Deveaux, minister of public
works and transport; Brent
Symonette, minister of foreign
affairs; Tommy Turnquest, min-
ister of national security; Neko
Grant, minister of tourism and
aviation; Brent Symonette, min-
ister of foreign affairs; Dion
Foulkes, minister of maritime
affairs; Hubert Minnis, minis-
ter of health and social devel-
opment.

The theme for the week is
Promoting Trade, Expanding
Commerce, Building Better
Communities.

Other events scheduled for
Chamber week include:

* The third annual indepen-
dence golf tournament at the
Radisson Cable Beach Golf
Course on Saturday, July 14

* The president’s meeting,
where the seven presidents of
the seven chambers around the
Bahamas get together and dis-
cuss strategies relating to the
Chamber’s growth and expan-
sion, and the needs of the busi-
ness community, which will be



M ZHIVARGO Laing is one |
of those attending the confer-
ence :

held on Wednesday, July 18
According to Dionisio D’Ag-
uliar, the Chamber president,
the highlight of the week will
be the Gala Award Celebration;
planned for Saturday, July 21.
He said that this year, four
awards will be presented: Busi-
nessperson of the Year; Devel-
oping Entrepreneur of the Year;
the Business of the Year; and a
Lifetime Achievement award.

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The Businessperson of the
Year award.is given to an indi-
vidual who has increased busi-
ness income, has an innovative
spirit and made new market
acquisitions.

The nominees this year are :
Juan Bacardi, Bristol Cellars;
Chester Cooper/John Wilson,
British American Insurance;
and Dr Conville Brown.

The Developing Entrepre-

neur of the Year award is given
to an individual who has started
a business within the past three
years, and been in business at
least a year. ;

The nominees in this catego-
ry are: Burton Wallace, of Movi,
and Al Frances, of the Sleep
Gallery.

The Company of the Year
award is given to the business
which has produced good cor-
porate citizens and improved
business, while adhering to eth-
ical business practices. It must

_also be involved in industry

organisations ,and is a willing
contributor to enhancing the
overall development of the
Bahamas.

The nominees are: Bank of.

the:Bahamas International, the
John Bull Group of Companies

and Kerzner International.

A lifetime Achievement
award will be given to Kelly’s
Home Centre, with the compa-
ny celebrating its 80th anniver-
sary this year, although Mr D’
D’Aguliar said that this was not
why the award was given.to the
company.

The titled sponsorship for the
golf tournament is Diamond

‘International, and the sponsors

for Chamber week include:
Kerzner International, BTC,
Starbucks, Bahamas Ferries,
SuperWash, Cable Bahamas,
Doctors Hospital, Bahamas
Wholesale Agency, Nova
Southeastern, JS Johnson, Pearl
Vison, Bristol Cellars,
Solomon’s Mine, John Bull
Group of Companies, Island
Merchants, Coin of the Realm,
Studio Three, Master Techni-
cians, Custom Computer,
Bahamas Box, GrayCliff, San-
dals, Bahamas Supermarkets,
Continental Airlines, Bally
Total Fitness, Mr Fitz Stubbs,
Abaco Club, Harl Taylor Bags,
Abaco Air, the Event Strate-
gies Unit of the Ministry of
Tourism led by Janet Johnson

‘and Creative Edge Advertising ©

Agency.

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Bahamas Fashion Week
Cinema Trade Show

Saturday, July 14th
9:00am - 9:00pm

Admission is Free!

Ladies sign up and win Pantene's
Woman of Color campaign. Two
young ladies will be selected from
the entries to receive treatment
hair analysis over an 8 week

period.

Pantene Educator will demon-
strate to you the wonders of
Pantene Women of Color hair

care products.

At the Bahamas Fashion Week
Trade Show, on July 14, 2007 at
the New Providence Community

Center.

Call 242-326-3707
for more information!





THE TRIBUNE

Oln brief

Officers
accused of
robbery have
case moved



| ELJONATHAN Hall

: THE case of two police
: officers charged with armed:
: robbery will continue in court

4 five on July 17.

: The case was switched to
? court five, Bank Lane on
: Wednesday after the men,
: Constable Tarquin Kelly and
: District Constable Jonathan
: Hall, were arraigned before
: Chief Magistrate Roger
: Gomez in court one.

: The men were not required
: to plead to the armed robbery
: charges.

: Kelly pleaded not guilty to
: an additional charge of pos- -
: sessing an unlicensed firearm.





: MI TARQUIN Kelly



be

THE TRIBUNE





Haitian is
accused of
sex with
eight-year-old

A HAITIAN man accused
of having sex with a five-year-
old girl was arraigned in Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

It is alleged that Marck-
endy Julmise committed the
offence sometime during
June 2007.

Julmise was adjourned
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meeres at court five in Bank
Lane.

Julmise was not required
to enter a plea to the charge
and was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison having been
denied bail.

The case was adjourned to
October 18.

Police hunt for
robbers after
phone card
booths raided

TWO Quick Cell phone
card booths were robbed at
gunpoint on Wednesday
night, according to a state-

‘ment issued by press liaison

officer Assistant Superinten-
dent Walter Evans.
At.around 5.20pm, two
men in a gold coloured vehi-
cle pulled up to a booth on
Robinson Road near Flori-

~. da Court, Mr Evans said.

He said one unidentified
man got out of the car and
requested a five dollar phone
card from the attendant.

The man then pulled out a
handgun and robbed the
attendant of $400 cash and
about 30 phone cards.

Mr Evans said two men
sped off in the car travelling
in the direction of Key West
Street north.

He added that around half
an hour later, a second Quick
Cell booth was robbed.

A black vehicle with two

_ occupants pulled up neara :
_. phone card booth on East:
| Street south. —

An unidentified man held
the attendant at gunpoint
then left with $500 cash and
several phone cards, Mr
Evans said.

The occupants sped off
travelling north on East
Street.

Investigations into both
incidents continue.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157



Environmental Health
staff threaten action

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

DISGRUNTLED workers in
the grounds and beautification
section of the Department of
Environmental Health are
threatening to take action if
their “frustrating” working con-
ditions are not rectified.

The workers said that they
intend to stage either a walk-
out or a sit-in if their complaints
are not addressed in the next
few weeks.

An employee who spoke to
The Tribune described the
working conditions as “virtual
slavery” and said that eventual-
ly, “someone is either going to
get killed or hurt.”

“We already went through
protocol,” she said yesterday.
“Someone wrote a letter to the
director and the permanent sec-
retary almost two weeks ago
and no one replied. Tempers
are really hot around here and
morale is low.”

She alleged that she and her
co-workers are forced to clean
up potentially hazardous and
unsanitary waste such as used
condoms, discarded sanitary
napkins, and human faeces —
without the benefit of protec-
tive gear and proper equipment.

_ “All they give us is latex gloves

and sometimes [the gloves] tear
when you put your hand in the
garbage,” she explained. “It is
very unsanitary.”

“They Have women out there
cleaning the beach, picking up
trash, things male workers sup-
posed to be doing; and they ain’
even give us our hazardous pay.
The heads in this department
really need to move, or do
more,” she said.

The source alleged that when
employees complain to their
supervisors about working con-
ditions, such as an employee

‘bathroom being out of order for

more than two weeks, threats
about docking wages are made.

The employee has been
working for the grounds and
beautification section for a

Complaints over quality
of working conditions







®@ JOHN Pinder

number of years, but claims that
she is still classified as a “relief
worker” and being paid on a
week to week basis.

“J only is get paid $175 a week,
and after they take out national
insurance I only left with $169.”
She added that on her meagre
salary, it is difficult to take care of
her family as she is the sole bread-
winner. She noted that she put in
the necessary paperwork before
the May general election to.“regu-
larise” her from a weekly worker to
a monthly, salaried worker, how-
ever she is still awaiting approval.

John Pinder, President of the
Bahamas Public Service Union,
said he has not “advised any
industrial action” as yet, but
acknowledged that there are “a
number of concerns” that need-
ed to get addressed by the
Department of Environmental
Health.

“We [the union] are dealing
with the issues,” he told The Tri-
bune yesterday. “We are aware
that a number of employees are
entitled to hazardous pay, are
not receiving risk allowance, and

we know that a number of per-
sons are working outside of their
job description. There is also a
concern about a number of peo-
ple who are not established [per-
manent] workers. We know of
[employees] who have been
there for 12 years and are still
paid on a weekly basis.”

Mr Pinder also noted that
workers are receiving the mini-

“mum risk allowance wage of

$16.67 a month, when they were
entitled to as much as $100 a
month.

When asked if he had
received any complaints regard-
ing maltreatment of employees
at the hands of superWisors, Mr
Pinder replied “not being pro-

vided with regular drinking |

water, not having access to
Junchroom facilities and a [lack
of] protective gear” were just a
few of the complaints.

Mr Pinderz revealed that the
union has contacted the Minister
of Health, Dr Hubert Minnis,
to arrange a meeting about the
work conditions at the depart-
ment, but no date has been set.

Barbara Burrows, permanent
secretary for the Department
of Health, told The Tribune that
she was aware that some
employees need to be regu-
larised. She added that her
department is “actively work-
ing on the matter.”

However, she said that she
was not aware of the other
issues being raised by staff, but
that she would meet with her
director to discuss them.

Attempts were made by The
Tribune to contact Minister of

’ Health Dr Hubert Minnis and

Winston Sweeting, deputy direc-
tor of Environmental Health,
but up to press time. they could
not be reached for comment.

stncecceseeneceeceetencecteneneecenseneeceeeenteeeeseeeeseeeeseeeees eases esse sees eee eseneseene nee eceneeesesensaceaseeessenesaseseleessssesensensesensecsnsensnsensnsenssnsnsensensnsensesensenessseeneenenees

RBDF apprehends 38 Haitians

DEFENCE Force Marines
assigned to the Land and Sea
Park preserve along with the
Park’s warden apprehended 38
undocumented Haitians on Pipe

.Cay in the Exuma chain on

Thursday morning. |

The immigrants are suspect-
ed of attempting to land illegal-
ly in the Bahamas.

While on routine patrol, the
marines received reports that a
Haitian vessel had run aground
on the cay.

A further investigation dis-
covered the immigrants, who all
appeared to be in good health,
the officers reported. :

Defence Force patrol*craft
HMBS P-42 was sent to assist
with the removal of the Haitians.

An ongoing search is current-
ly being carried out on the cay
for any additional immigrants
that may have been missed in
the initial sweep.

This is the second apprehen-
sion of Haitians in the past week.

Last week Friday, 76 migrants
were caught off Halls Point,
Exuma, and brought to Nassau.

This brings the total to more
than 600 Haitian nationals
apprehended in the Bahamas by
Defence Force officials so far
this year.

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PUBLIC NOTICE

In its

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continuing effort to
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service,

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(BTC)

wishes to inform its valued customers and the
general public, that BTC will be performing an

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| July 15th, subscribers in Grand Bahama and

New Providence may experience an interruption
in both Post Paid and Pre Paid GSM services.
BTC apologizes for the inconvenience caused,
and assures the public that every effort will
be made to keep this disruption of service to a

minimum.



f FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007, PAGE 3





















































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EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE iAibUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA\MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No. Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt. y
Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 \
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL. B. ;
Publisher/Editor 7572.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

avulcnbonre (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348 ,

First a purge, then a power play

THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION cally have been expected to oversee fed-



has a record of trying to expand the exec-
utive branch’s power however possible.

So although the Senate and House
judiciary committees have demanded
more information on last year’s firings
of nine US attorneys, the White House
— predictably — is refusing to comply.

President Bush’s assertion of execu-
tive privilege Monday is disturbing
nonetheless.

At the least, it means he will keep
stonewalling inquiries into the firings.

But there’s more to the story.

Executive privilege is often cited to
protect information connected with pres-
idential decision-making.

By invoking it now, Mr Bush is unwit-
tingly implying the purge was instigated
not by Justice Department middle man-
agers, as department officials have testi-
fied, but by the White House itself.

The firings targeted nine US attorneys
appointed by Mr Bush.

Several of them had pursued corrup-
tion allegations against Republicans or
failed to pursue voter-fraud cases that
might have damaged Democrats.

The two committees are seeking

administration documents on the firings
and testimony from two former White
House officials.
- By withholding the documents and urg-
ing the aides not to talk — though at
least one is expected to testify anyway —
the administration has provoked a show-
down over whether Congress has the
right to meaningful oversight of the exec-
utive branch.

The committees should not shy away
from this baitle.

No one disputes the president’s author-
ity to name US attorneys.

But these political appointees histori-

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eral prosecutions in an impartial man-
ner — and to base decisions about whom
to charge solely on the facts and the law.

The question is whether the adminis-
tration abused its authority by pressuring
the prosecutors to carry out Republican
vendettas.

The information demanded by the judi-
ciary committees would shed light on
that issue.

It could also clarify whether Attorney —

General Alberto Gonzales told the
House Judiciary Committee the truth in
May when he claimed to have played.a
minimal role in the firings.

In the past, when the Congress wanted
more information than the White House
wanted to provide, the conflict usually
ended in some kind of deal.

Bush has offered to produce more
information and witnesses, but with unac-
ceptable strings attached.

Bush may be taking a calculated risk.
The clock is ticking away on his admin-
istration.

The Supreme Court has two new jus-

tices with an expansive view of pia
dential power.

The president’s approval rating is so
low that resisting the committees’
demands can hardly drag them down fur-
ther.

The legal limits of executive privilege
are largely unsettled.

What’s clear, though, is that the privi-
lege is not absolute.

It certainly does not give the president
carte blanche to resist a legitimate inquiry
into potential abuses.

(This article is from
The Boston Globe c. 2007)













Let us stand up
and fight crime
wherever we see it

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me space in
your publication to address a
grave concern building in our
beloved Bahamas.

Isat home on Monday, July
Oth, on the eve of the anniver-
sary of the country’s 34th Inde-
pendence, quietly listening to
the lpm newscast, to hear that
the 43rd murder had taken
place in the Commonwealth.
Media reported young 18-year-
old Mardio Hall, a college
bound student and recent high
school graduate, was gunned
down in cold blood before a
crowd of onlookers at an open
air event Sunday evening near
the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre.

I was not shocked to hear
that another life had been
snuffed out by some dumb
argument, of late it has become
the norm. But I was shocked to
know that the murder had tak-
en place just a stones-throw
away from where the National
Ecumenical Service was just
held. At that service were HE
Arthur, Hanna, the Prime Min-
ister and members of the Cab-
inet along with clergy, all
assembled praying for the life
of the nation after 34 years.
Then later just outside the
Kendal G. L. Isaac gym, across
the street if | may say, in the
same vicinity where our leaders
were just assembled, this young
man dies instantly, the victim
of another senseless death.
However this time, an ‘Open-
Air Public Execution’ for wit-
nesses to see.

Where are we going with all

this.murder in The Bahamas?

My God, I said, how far we
haye come and how low we
have reached in this country
when it comes to acts of vio-
lence. There is something seri-
ously wrong deep within the
body of our country, as these
festering sores of murder con-
tinue to break out across the
skin of The Bahamas!

I accepted something went
terribly wrong deep inside the
body of the Bahamas as far
back as 1997, to cause these
festering sores, when the for-
mer Minister of Housing
Charles ‘Chuck’ Virgill, the

husband of a sitting magistrate ©

Linda Virgill, was kidnapped
and brutally murdered. The

killers took the life of a sitting

member of the Cabinet of The
Bahamas and today where are
these criminals one may ask? I



LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net






know for a fact they — at least
to this day— have not received
their just sentence to die.

My great fear is this: People
in The Bahamas across com-
munities, see an independent
country with successive gov-
ernments lacking the political
will to administer the justice
handed down to criminals in
the Bahamas.

They see legal agencies in
their archaic state inadequate.
Criminals see their associates
on bail, free to further create
more “home grown terror”,
whilst communities and vic-
tims’ families find themselves
locked away and barred in
their high walled homes or

the walls of their homes.

Crime has spiraled out of
control in this country, leaving
even hardworking officers of
the police force concerned.
This is a time for all of us, as

. we reflect on 34 years as an

Independent nation, to once
again free ourselves! Let this
freedom from violence and
crime begin in our own homes
where dissenting voices cry
foul. Let it move throughout
each community. So if you are
in Fox Hill or Bain Town or
Farm Road or Blair, let us
come together to, as it was in
the Bahamas before 1973,
“know our neighbours” again,
and tackle this festering sore
that has ruptured into our com-
munities. Let us stand up and
fight crime wherever we see it,
report it and run it out of this
little sovereign nation of ours
we love so dear.

fenced in by. barbed wire,
shockingly paralyzed to do

anything and wondering who CARVEL FRANCIS
would be next in line for the Nassau,
bullet once they walk outside July 11, 2007

Audley D Hanna should
have received more respect

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS ONE of the PLP Stalwart Council members who constantly
criticised Council member Audley.D Hanna due to his resistance
to the party’s selection of the South Beach candidate Wallace
Rolle during the May 2, 2007 election. I have now begun to under-
stand Audley’s objections. Audley, a well known, respected, 30-
years plus resident, a registered voter in South Beach Constituen-
cy and a former senator should have received more respect than we
gave for his contributions concerning who should have got the |
nod as the candidate for South Beach. Due to our inconsideration
we have only ourselves to blame for losing the South Beach seat. ,

Be that as it may, since the election all of the candidates, win, lose
or draw, especially Hope Strachan who showed interest and had
actually ‘started campaigning in the South Beach constituency but
was given little over a month to run in the Sea Breeze constituen-
cy and almost won, runs a daily ad on ’ZNS thanking her support-
ers for their vote. Her headquarters is still open and she is having
a thank you party Saturday, June 9.

Wallace Rolle, on the other hand, closed his headquarters from
May 2 and like the song says “we can’t find Wallace Rolle in
town” or should I say in South Beach, his campaign headquarters
is closed so no one is answering the phone. Wallace Rolle never
looked back to give us the encouragement for the support we gave —
him. As the saying goes there is always a next time but he would not
be getting my vote. My hope is that we would pay more attention
to those who actually live in each constituency instead of those who
have their own agenda. Audley keep on keeping as some of us will
now listen.

Thank you - a PLP Stalwart Councillor, resident and voter of
South Beach.

VOTER
Nassau,
June 7, 2007.

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THE TRIBUNE

FHRIDAY, JULY

15, ZUU/, PAGE 5





In brief

Man facing
marijuana
charge is
granted bail

A 40-YEAR-OLD Bellot
Road man accused of being
found in possession of nearly
$29,000 worth of marijuana
last week was granted $30,000
bail yesterday.

Wade Edward Sands was
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel on Monday,
charged with possession of
marijuana with the intent to
supply to another.

It is alleged that Sands was
found in possession of the
drugs on Saturday July 7.

Sands has pleaded not
guilty to the charge.

Police make
arrest after
discovering
handgun

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama Police detained a
man after allegedly retriev-
ing a loaded firearm from a
parked vehicle at the Gerald
A Bartlett Police Headquar-
ters Building on Monday.

The seizure occurred around
noon, when Drug Enforce-
ment Unit officers conducted a
search of a gold Buick Centu-
ry in the parking lot.

Chief Superintendent of
Police Basil Rahming said
that as a result of informa-
tion received, officers
searched the vehicle.

A black Sig Sauer 9mm
semi-automatic pistol loaded
with 15 live rounds of 9mm
ammunition was discovered
and seized by officers.

Mr Rahming said a 22-
year-old resident of Coral
Reef Estates was taken into
custody. :

Acting on information,
DEU officers proceeded to
Peridot Place, Coral Gardens,
around 1.10pm on Tuesday
and apprehended a 21-year-
old man and collected four
packages of marijuana weigh-

, ing six,ounces, along with 20
, grams | of cocaine. ee



8 By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE police investigation into
allegations of corruption in the
Ministry of Housing has yet to
uncover anything "substantial"
the commissioner of police said.

While stating that the inves-
tigation is still ongoing, with
enquiries "still being made",
Commissioner Paul Farquhar-
son said that not enough evi-
dence has been found to bring
charges against any individual.

"You can't charge people
without evidence, and people
will make a statement to the
press but they may not tell the
police, and even if they tell the
police that may not be evi-
dence," he said.

"I think a number of inquires
that are being made have not
turned out to be enough evi-
dence to charge someone to
date — other wise we would
have someone in court," he
added.

Mr Farquharson's statement
on the matter comes after
numerous inquiries made by
The Tribune as to the status of
the investigation, launched last
November after several reports
appeared in this newspaper of
allegations made against min-
istry officials by contractors, as
well as relating discrepancies
found in ministry documents
and ministry responses to those
findings and allegations.

It also follows speculation by
several commentators this year
that the investigation may have
been held up for political rea-
sons.

Commissioner Farquharson
announced yesterday that assis-
tant commissioner Christopher
McCoy has now taken over

_ from Chief Supt Keith Bell in

LOCAL NEWS

Police yet to find ‘substantial’
evidence in housing probe

It is now eight months. Since a series of Tribune articles
sparked a police investigation into allegations of corruption
at the Ministry of Housing. Yesterday Commissioner Paul
Farquharson gave an update on the state of the inquiry so far.





i COMMISSIONER Paul Farquharson

heading the matter.

The Tribune's investigation
into allegations of corruption in
the Ministry of Housing began

last year when it was claimed |

that certain contractors were
being awarded an unfair num-
ber of contracts based on factors
other than quality of work or
value for public money spent.
It was alleged that certain
contractors got special treat-
ment in the allotment of lucra-
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relationship with particular per-
sons in the government - an
arrangement which may or may
not have included bribes.
Once housing records were

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obtained as part of this news-
paper's investigation, a number
of other peculiarities came to
light. One of these was the
$5,000 discrepancy between the
cost of construction and the sell-
ing price.

Another, seemingly separate,
matter concerns allegations that
certain individuals were extort-
ing money from contractors
throughout the building process
on low-cost homes since at least
2001.

It was claimed by one con-
tractor that this could amount to

as much as $4,000 being paid

out in bribes per house. The

ministry officials allegedly

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involved in extracting this mon-
ey were said to be persons in a
position to make certain con-
tractors who pay up get the
lion's share of future govern-
ment housing contracts.

Another claim was that con-
tractors were asked to carry out
additional work, budgeted for
by the ministry, for which they
were not compensated.

The former housing minister,
Neville Wisdom, who took over
from Shane Gibson last year,
after Mr Gibson had spent four
years at the post, said the rea-
sons some contractors get more
jobs from the ministry than oth-
ers, is that they do better quali-
ty work and can get better
financing.

However, contractors refut-
ed this, pointing out that all the
contractors on the ministry's
approved list have been vetted
for work quality and have
approved lending status.

The ministry's director of
technical services, Gordon
Major, admitted that there is
no bidding process for some
housing models — suggesting

‘that ministry officials are free

to choose whichever contrac-
tors they wish.

This seemed to have been
backed up by Mr Wisdom him-

self in a message unintention- |

ally left on The Tribune's voice-
mail — in which he said of a
reporter, “he thinks you can put
those houses up to bid."

His permanent secretary,
Leila Greene, responded: "Any-
body with any sense would
know that you can't put all
them 80 houses up to bid."

While not connected to any

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another discrepancy came to
light when reporter Mark
Humes visited the ministry in
mid-November.

After asking Mr Major what
happened to the customary
retention fee in cases where'a
second contractor had to be
brought into repair or finish the
work of the first builder on a
project, Mr Humes received two
different responses, from Mr
Major and Mr Wisdom, with Mr
Major claiming it went to the
original contractor, and Mr Wis-
dom denying absolutely that the
money would go to that indi-
vidual.

All these anomalies are
alleged to have resulted in an
unfair and unnecessary finan-
cial burden on small contrac-
tors and less affluent home buy-
ers — some of whom have
entered into 25 year mortgage
contracts.

Contractors claimed corrup-
tion has also had a negative
effect on the quality of housing
which is sold to low income
families who, in many cases,
have been waiting more than a
decade to own their own home.

Yesterday, commissioner Far-
quharson said that he will await
a report from those in charge
of the investigation before
revealing the outcome of the
investigation to the public,
whom he said were "entitled to
know" the findings of the probe.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Natio nal Youth Choir’s







tour which took place recently.

Louise “Mother Nature” Glovena Greene

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Left to mourn are her sons Joba and Garth
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(Photos: Donald Knowles/choir photographer)



@ THE Bahamas National Youth Choir perform on board
the Carnival aes age their 2007 Carribbean tour.

@ PERFORMING at the Frank Collymore Hall in Barbados.

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THE TRIBUNE

’ FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007, PAGE 7



Woman demands action after load
from truck damages her vehicle

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

AN angry woman is calling
for a truck driver to come for-
ward and identify himself after
his vehicle dropped a large rock
on her car — causing expensive
damage and threatening her
safety.

The female motorist was dri-
ving along West Bay Street,
near Arawak Cay early Thurs-
day afternoon, when a “big, red
truck” over filled with rocks
sped past.

According to the woman,
who asked for her name to be
withheld, a rock fell off of the
truck as the driver “flew past”
her. “I’m driving along West
Bay and this truck passes me
and this rock comes flying off
his truck and smashes [the
windshield] and puts a nice, big
thing in my windscreen,” she
told The Tribune.

Luckily the motorist, who
because of her profession as a
realtor spends a lot of time on
the road, was able to maintain
her composure and did not
receive any injury.

Due to the speed at which the
driver of the truck was travel-
ling, she said, she was not able to
record the licence plate number.

She contends that a golf-ball
sized crack is now evident in
her windshield, with “spider
cracks spreading” in the glass.

“Now I’m going to have to
either pay for this [damage],
and it’s probably going to cost
me $800, or use my insurance
— and that costs you to lose your

FIVE member Bahamian
delegation participated in first-

ever Conference of the Ameri-

cas earlier this month.

The conference was held
under the theme, “Advancing
the cause of social justice in the
Americas” on July 9-10 in
Arlington, Virginia.

In attendance were 150
regional-based organisations and
100 US based groups represent-
ing voluntary organisations, non-
governmental organisations, the
private sector and foundations.

The aim was to discuss and
highlight the efforts between
the United States and its neigh-
bors to better the lives of the
region’s citizens.

The conference focused on
sharing lessons learned on how
to promote education, health-
care and economic opportunity
vat the grassroots level and pub-

lic-private partnerships through-











deductible,” she stated.
Following the incident, she
complained to an officer at the
traffic division of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, who



@ THE crack in the windshield of a motorist after a rock flew out
of an overfilled and speeding truck, striking her vehicle.

Phere Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Bahamians go to Virginia for first
Conference of the Americas

out the hemisphere.

The U S Embassy in Nassau
co-sponsored the Bahamian del-
egation that included, Dr San-
dra Dean-Patterson, director of
the Crisis Center; Jeffrey Lloyd,
co-ordinator of the YEAST Pro-
gramme; Rick Lowe, president
of the Nassau Institute; Camille
Barnett, president of the
Bahamas AIDS Foundation, and
Pastor Clint Kemp of the New
Providence Community Centre.

Conference speakers includ-
ed U S President George Bush
and U S Secretary of State,
Condoleezza Rice.

President Bush highlighted
US engagement and discussed
more effective ways to deliver
aid and strengthen civil society
in the Americas. The partici-
pants were also hosted tova lun-
cheon held in their honour by
the president and the First Lady
Laura Bush.

instructed her to file an incident
report at the Cable Beach
Police Station.

She is now asking for the dri- Lat
ver of the truck to come for- i”

CONGRATULATIONS
_& LOVE ON YOUR

ra Wedding Anniversary & ly Lira)
Birthday to Rev Rosileta Davis

ward, and the company respon-
sible to pay for the damage to

her car. “Somebody has to be
accountable,” she said. “I’m

complaining here and hopefully
someone will listen.”



Isaac and Rev Rolsileta Davis

Congotown, South Andros

Psalm 121v5
“The Lord himself watches over you: The Lord stands beside you as your

3?
Rick Lowe, a member of the _protective shade.

Bahamas’ delegation, observed
in the opening remarks by Pres-
ident Bush that the U S is com-
mitted to helping nations in
Western Hemisphere realise
their potential»-to become
healthy, educated and prosper-
ous through trade, open and
transparent governments that
are free of corruption, adding
that his-comments resonated
well throughout the conference.

US Charge d’Affaires, Dr D
Brent Hardt, noted that the
embassy was pleased to assist
with the funding for the confer-
ence participants.

He stated that the Bahamian
participants play a major role in
transformational power as they
are the ones who help to
strengthen their communities,
care for their neighbors and
serve as conduits of a positive
force for change in the Bahamas. : rm

‘

WITH LOVE AND APPRECIATION:
Children: Jacqueline Bain, Clifford, Jerome and James Davis, Leona Davis,
Nettie Major, Yvonne Culmer and Sherlene Davis; 27.grandchildren, 23 great
grandchildren

Numerous nieces and nephews including George Burrows, Cynthia Holmes,
Barbara Maduro, Retha Boone, Dora Mooten and Phyliss Black, Jennie Knowles,
Gwen Bain, Vera Chase, Cynthia Gibson, Dave Bastian, Janice Miller, Larry
and Esta Washington and Magdeline Funderburk, Rosina Bain

Numerous family and special friends including Bishop Sam Greene and Church
family, Rev. Peter Pinder and Church Family-Freeport, Rev. & Mrs. Albert
Campbell, Sis Barbara Smith, Sis. Beth Stewart, His Excellency A.D. & Mrs.
Hanna

Rev. Glendina Knowles and family, Rev. & Mrs. Samuel Duvalier, Bishop James

‘Pratt, Rev. Rosenell Forbes, Rev. Harry Davis and family, Sis Ella Johnson
and family, Sis Alfreda Ferguson-Freeport, Lady Marguerite Pindling, Maxine
Bolden, Clarita Lockhart, Judy Munroe, The Jackson, King, Russell and
Schimpf families, Rev. Geoffrey Wood and Temple Baptist Church, Rev. Morrison
and Zion Baptist Church family and St. Matthew’s Baptist and Rev. Denrick
Rolle and St. Barnabas Anglican Church families and the entire Community
of South Andros.



















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Bank of the
contest feat
architectural n

quarters on West ag Steel

This ambitious tindertakuiy
drew international recogmmlon
and involved top Caribbean
atchitects as judges.

Phe competithon attracted
numerous entries idy the bank s
new corporate olfices, bank
building, rental Gltice space
parking and a banking muscum

on nearly six acres of prime
downtown property next to
Nassau! Street.

Accolding lo Magazine pub-
fisher Gustavo More, who
served as one of the judges in
the competition, it is the fist
time a Bahamian bank has been
included tithe oversized glossy
colfee table Quahiy Archivos de
Arquitectuia Antillana,
AAAQ2Z/.























The new issue of a leading
magazine for architects, desizn-
ers and coyineers teatures a 10-

page spread on Bank of the
Bahamas International’s design
compeution for corporate head-

Rev. Dr. Garth V. Greene, retired Sr.
Deputy Comptroller of Customs and
his family, extend their appreciation
and thanks to the many friends,
supporters and patrons for their
support of his recent thanksgiving
service and appreciation banquet held |.
commemorating his retirement after |
45 years of exemplary public service.

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SmartChoice







Part of the article is in Span-
ish, part English. The winning
design of Michael J Moss of the
Architectural Studio was dis-
played over three pages and
Alexiou & Associates’ second
and third place designs were
also featured.

~The quality of the publica-
tion is truly world-class and we
are honoured to be featured,
especially with such a large
spread,” said bank managing
director Paul McWeeney. “We
had the opportunity to meet
with the publisher when he was
here as a judge. When he said
he would like to include the
competition in his next issue,
we were pleased, but we were
so surprised when we saw the



THE TRIBUNE



SSS

f@ BANK of the Bahamas International managing director Paul
McWeeney holds a copy of a leading magazine for architects
featuring a 10-page spread on the bank’s design competition for
its new headquarters on nearly six acres of prime property on

Bay Street.

particularly in a magazine that is
a standard-bearer for the archi-
tectural industry in the Span-
ish-speaking Caribbean.”

A native of the Dominican
‘Republic, Moré is a prominent
Caribbean architect as well as
publisher. :

“We are very pleased to fea-
ture Mr McWeeney and Bank
ot the Bahamas International,”
said Moré. “This is the first time
we’ve featured a Bahamian

bank but it certainly will not be
the last.”

AAAO027 is a Spanish-Eng-
lish magazine which publishes

three issues annually. It is dis-

tributed in France, Spain,
Argentina, Columbia, Domini-
can Republic, Puerto Rico,
Venezuela, Mexico, and
Trinidad and Tobago and in
major US cities including New
York, Chicago, Los Angeles
and Miami.











space devoted to our project,

THE Ministry of Education,
Youth, Sports and Culture held
its Recognition Ceremony for
the High School Leadership
Programme at Government
House recently.

The programme was designed to
help outstanding young leaders
formulate creative ways to use
their talents and intellect to
maximise their ability to become .
more productive in their schools
and communities.

This developing programme
| caters to the head boys and girls,

deputy head boys and girls, and
student council presidents of all
senior high schools in New
Providence.

The students met bi-weekly to
combine ideas, pool resources, and
network with each other and
professional members of the public.
The students are pictured above
with Governor General Arthur D
Hanna (centre). ;

; (BIS photo: Kris Ingraham).





Hanna & Brown
Wed in New York





















Ralph Hanna was joinéd in Holy Matrimony to Jacqueline
Brown on Saturday, 7th July, 2007 in New York.

Following the Double-Ring Ceremony, a Grand Reception was held at the home of the
newl-weds al 486 Clarendon Road, Uniondale, New York, where guests were catered
to by one of New York's leading Catéring Companies, and wined and dined on a menu
that will not be soon forgotien by those who were present to witness the exchange of
marital vows,













The Groom, who is a Law Enforcement Ollicer with New York Police Department assigned
to the Homicide Division, is the son of Mr Patrick Hanna of Tampa, Florida, but originally
of Nassau, and a nephew of His Excellency The Honourable A. D. Hanna, Governor General
of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.











The Bride is now retired from New York Police Department where she
worked in Drug Enforcement.









Guests from all over the United States, and the Bahamas attended the
ceremony. Flying to New York from Nassau for the joyous occasion were
the Groom's aunt, Yvonne Hanna-Williams; Cousins, Denise Johnson,
Christina Miller and George Lopez Heastie.









The Hanna, ficastic and Tynes clan wishes the young couple a veryg
happy, fruitful, prosperous and long life together.











THE TRIBUNE



-LOCAL NEWS



FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007, PAGE 9



Spend the summer with the pana leading. news and information source.
Read a with us iy:



The Best
in the
World

Written by Marc Talbert
Illustrated by Betsy James

CHAPTER ONE
The Great Idea

¢ ¢ Ge" Nick made a face.
“How many worms did he

eat?”

“Sixty-two,” answered his best friend
Clay. “In thirty seconds. He didn’t chew.
See?” Nick leaned from where he sat on
the porch steps to see better. Clay pulled
the book away, not wanting Nick too
close. Clay hated sharing anything but
trouble.

“Where do they get that stuff!”
said, unable to look any longer.

Clay grinned. “If you thought that was
gross. . .” He flipped carefully through
The Guinness Book of Records.

Nick eyed the book, feeling perturbed.
Clay hadn’t let him touch it yet. Clay

Nick

even showed him the pictures too quick- -

ly, as if a look from Nick’s eyes would
smudge the pages. Nick wanted to look at
it on his own, take his time to see if there
was anything besides the gross stuff Clay
had been showing him. When he’d asked,
Clay had said, “No way! I don’t want
your nose- picking hands on my book!”

“Here!” Clay said. “Get a load of these
fingernails!”

Pretending he didn’t care, Nick stole : a
glance. The man looked as if he were
clutching ribbons he’d ripped off some
presents. “That’s not gross. That’s weird.
How does he sleep?”

Clay shrugged and set the book on his
thigh. “How does he scratch when he
itches? Search me. But neat stuff, huh?”

“J don’t know.” Nick eyed the book. It
wouldn’t be hard to grab. “Ever want to

be in that book?”—as the world’s worst
best friend? he added to himself. Or the
stingiest?

“Sure. Once I did the most humon-
gous burp in the world.”

Nick snorted. “And my belly button
whistles when I cough.” He slid his hand
toward Clay’s leg, pretending to scratch
his own kneecap.

“No, really!’ And yesterday I sneezed
twelve times in a row. I bet that’s a
record.” Clay’s look dared Nick to dis-
agree.

Nick couldn’t stand it: any longer. He
grabbed and ran.

“Hey!” Clay screamed. “Givg that
back!”

“Who's gonna make me?” Nick shout-
ed. “Your grandmother?”

Nick ran around the house, aiming for
some lilac bushes where he could hide
and take his sweet time looking at the
book.



ing

e

Serie



For Kids * 2007



He didn’t count on his little sister’s red
wagon blocking the way.
yelled, jumping.

It all happened very fast.

He shoved the wagon’s cocked handle
away as his right leg shot forward. His
smile seemed to lift him higher. “Yeah!”
he breathed as he started descending.
Then he heard a crash.

“Ow!” Clay yelled.

Nick couldn't help looking behind him.
The book flew from his hand. He lunged
for it and twisted in the air. The grass
reared up like a snapped blanket. Nick
landed flat on his back, knocking the wind
from him. The book lay beyond his hand.
He heard an “O-oof!” on his other side
and turned to see Clay's feet thumping the
ground near his head.

Nick tried to sit but couldn’t. He tried
to breathe, but his throat felt like a straw
collapsed from sucking too hard.

Desperate now, and gasping for breath,
Nick struggled once more to sit. Clay
moaned as he pulled himself onto his
hands and knees and wobbled toward the
book.

“B-e-e-il!” he’

With a tremendous grunt, Nick reared
up and threw himself toward the book,
blocking Clay.

Just as Nick was about to snag the
book, Clay grabbed one of his feet: He
yanked, pulling Nick backwards.

Nick tried kicking, but Clay glommed
on to his other foot. Nick felt as helpless
as a worm on a wet sidewalk.

Ne went limp and groaned. “All
I want to do is look at it.” A

wave of anger washed over him. “ You’ve
been a real creep about this book. And
you know what? It’s not so great. It’s just
about lot of losers doing lame things.
And theyre mostly adults. A-number-
one dolts? Get it?”

“Oh yeah?” Clay said. He tightened his
grip on Nick’s feet.

“Yeah. How about the man who’s tat-
tooed everywhere except between his
toes. Gimme a break! Or the woman
who paid six million dollars for a wed-
ding dress. Come on! We could write a
more interesting book than that!”

The Best in the World

Summer Reading Series
is sponsored by

DISTRIBUTED IN THE PCy EC BY
THOMPSON TRADING - SHIRLEY STREET - 394-1142

“More interesting than the fattest mod-
el in the world?”

Nick winced, picturing her. “Detinite-
ly. Let go and I'll give you back your
stupid book. Cross my heart’. . .”

Clay let go and they both sat up. Nick
reached for the book and, holding it as if
it were disgusting, handed it to Clay.

Clay checked it for damage. Satisfied,
he. said, “You know what? Yow’re right.
We should write our own book.”

Nick nodded. “And make all the
records in our book belong to us.”

Clay grinned. “Hey! That’s a great
idea!” He stood on shaky legs. “What
record should we try for first?”

(To be continued. )

Text copyright © 2001 Marc Talbert
Illustrations copyright © 2001 Betsy
James

Reprinted by Permssion of Breakfast
Serials, Inc.

www.breakfastserials.com





PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007



THE TRIBUNE





$805,000 expected from US to
aid increase in country’s security

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Bahamas is expected to
receive $805,000 this fiscal year
from the US to aid in increasing
the country’s security and for its
fight against drugs and illegal
immigration.

In this year’s cycle the
Bahamas will receive $80,000 to
fund the Bahamas’ maritime
interdiction capability by provid-



FREEPORT
11-A East Coral Road, P.0. Box F-42312
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas -
Tel: (242) 373-1471 Fax: (242) 373-3005
Page 340-8043

Restsiow Memoual
ae

Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

Pagers: 340-8043 / 340-4424 / 340-8034 » Fax: (242) 340-8034

ing spare parts, training, opera-
tional and maintenance support,
and communications equipment;
$225,000 to help in the develop-
ment of a “more professional and
efficient security force” by pro-
viding Bahamian military per-
sonnel courses in basic military

and maritime training and atten-’

dance at the Naval Staff College,
and $500,00 for operational sup-
port, training and equipment for
Bahamian drug enforcement





NASSAU

P.O, Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

TREAZURE
TIFFANY LEWIS, 8











of Jane Street will be
held on Monday, July
16", 2007 at 11:30 a.







































time.

She is survived by her Parents: Gareth and Toni,
Two Brothers: Gareth Jr. and Kallander, Grand
Parents: Ms. Maxine Callender and Mr. and Mrs.
Basil Lewis, Great Grand Parent: Mildred Black,
Aunts: Rosetta Haven, Carolyn Black, Sandra
Bethel, Donna, Michelle, Suzie Lewis and Angela
Blatch, Deborah Pratt, Diana Brooks, Francis Horton,
Stephanie and Marsha Black, Lana Ross, Angela
Blatch, Theresa Coakley, Hilda Etienne, Eulah Toler,
Dorothy Grant, Helen Foulkes, Wally Bullard,
Bernadette Hepburn, Rosebud Knowles, Cassandra,
Shantell and Helena Callander, Uncles: Basil Lewis,
Torrence Blatch, Sonny HaVén, Frederick Black,
Stephen Johnson, Michael Brooks, Basil Lewis,
Julius and David Foulkes, Clifford Barton, Edward
and Bernard Callander, Greg Bethel, and numerous
other Relatives and Friends including: Denise,
Brian, Brinesha and Brian Jr. Foulkes, Father I.
Ranfurly Brown, Nathan Lewis, Darren and D’ Andra.
Bethel, Donavan Gibson, Trevor Saunders, Scarlett
Black, Andrea Moss and Family, Sharlene, Stan and
Sabria Smith, Teddy Woods, Thelma Fernander,
Torren Blatch, Michelle Blackstock, Wendy Foulkes,
Evangeline Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Jackson,
Nancy Waller, Virginia Ettienne and Family, Gertrude
Ford, Avanell Whyms, and Fredricka Munroe.

Viewing will be held in the “Serenity Suite” at
Restview Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Litd.,
Robinson and Soldier Roads, on Saturday from
10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p. m. and then again at the
church on Monday from 12:30 p. m. until service

m. at Calvary Bible
Church,- Collins
Avenue. Officiating
will be Pastor Allen Lee.

Interment will follow
in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

operations and investigations.

According to the US Depart-
ment of State Websilgghere is
also a request for $790.00 to be
given for nonprolif{@#ion, anti-
terrorism, de-mining
in the Bahamas.

The document, wh
the Congressional Bu
cation for Foreign Ops
the Bahamas for this
says that the United States’ inter-
est in maintaining a stable part-
nership with the Bahamas is due
to its proximity to its borders, the
Bahamas being a major destina-
tion for US visitors, and the
prominent role it plays in region-
al organizations such as CARI-
COM.

The US’ priorities in the
Bahamas include ensuring the
safety and security of approxi-
mately 30,000 US permanent res-
idents and more than 4,000,000
annual American visitors block-
ing the movement of illicit drugs
and illegal migrants through the
Bahamas, combat international
financial crime; and encourage
the Bahamas’ constructive lead-
ership role in promoting democ-
racy, stability, free trade, and eco-
nomic. prosperity in the
Caribbean region.

The Bahamas has expressed
willingness to cooperate on sev-
eral programmes promising
greater security to the United
States, including the Container
Security Initiative, Megaports,
and the Proliferation Security Ini-
tiative. ;

The Bahamas, the Turks and
Caicos Islands, and the United
States are partners in “Operation
Bahamas and Turks and Caicos
(OPBAT),” an international,

FROM page one





usage these machines are getting, most of
them are rapidly approaching their. end,” he

said.

Mr Andersen said that with the remaining
nine machines, the best strategy will be to
examine the number of hours used and phase.
in replacements so that it is not again neces-
sary to replace all of the machines at once,
which can be a very costly undertaking.

Renal Dynamics LLC has three full-time
technicians who service dialysis units in the
more than 20 countries with which the com-
pany works in this region. pe

These technicians, Mr Andersen explained,
will be responsible for the quarterly and annu-

multi-agency drug interdiction
effort that has reduced the
amount of cocaine destined for
the US that passes through The
Bahamas from nearly 80 per cent
in the 1980’s to under 10 percent
today.

Programme participants coop-
erate in missions against suspect-
ed drug traffickers and frequent-
ly undertake search and seizure
operations. Although the inter-
diction of illegal migrants is not a
specific mandate of OPBAT,
drugs and illegal migrants often

are linked, and therefore OPBAT

helps disrupt migrant trafficking.

In 2005, the US and The
Bahamas interdicted more than
4,000 illegal migrants. Interna-
tional Narcotics Control and Law
Enforcement (INCLE) funding
provides operational support,
training and equipment for
Bahamian drug enforcement
operations and investigations.

INCLE funding also supports
go-fast interceptor boats provided
to the Bahamian police, con-
tributes to the operation of three
OPBAT facilities in The
Bahamas, and supports legisla-
tive and policy reform to enhance
the effectiveness of the Bahamian
government in combating nar-
cotics trafficking.

These funds will continue to
support training and workshops
to’ assist The Bahamas combat
money-laundering, terrorism
financing, and other financial
crimes.

Foreign Military Financing
(FMF) funds will improve mar-
itime interdiction capability by
providing spare parts, training,
operational and maintenance sup-

port, and communications equip-

Dialysis machines

al maintenance of the machines; while local
.. technicians trained by Renal Dynamics LLC
will handle day-to-day repairs and mainte-

. nance work.

ment and by improving infra-
structure.

The Royal. Bahamas Defence
Force will receive individual and
unit equipment, weapons, ammu-
nition, and training so that it can
fully support enhanced interdic-
tion and better control its bor-
ders. International Military Edu-
cation and Training (IMET) will
help develop a more professional
and efficient security force by

providing Bahamian military per-
sonnel courses in basic military
and maritime training and
attendance at the Naval Staff Col-
lege.

The Bahamas is also eligible
this. year to. receive Excess
Defence Articles (EDA) ona
grant basis to promote counter
drug efforts, maritime support,
inter-operability, and moderniza-
tion of equipment.

Allegations that non-citizens
may have used search cards

FROM page one

citizenship, such as a driver’s licence, to register.
Therefore, if non-citizens are able to register once, they become per-
manent parts of the national register unless their citizenship is officially

challenged.

Jeff Lloyd had on his talk-show Real Talk Live just after the election,

aman only identified as ‘Sharlo’ who by his own admission is not a cit-
izen, and claims to have voted in the 1997 and 2002 elections. He told
Mr Lloyd that the only reason he did not vote in this election was
because he was unhappy with both party’s policies on immigration.
The man further claimed that he initially registered with a school
identification, and when asked if he was Bahamian, he answered
“yes.” : :
With the Parliamentary Registrar Errol Bethel on leave, The Tri-
bune contacted the Deputy Permanent Secretary in the department,
Sherlyn Hall, to discuss these search card claims. However, Mr Hall had

- The machines are the next generation Fre-
senius model that is an upgraded version of
what the hospital currently uses. According to
Mr Andersen, much of the engineering is sim-
ilar, but these new machines are more user
friendly and overall, he said, they are the “best
quality machine out there on the market.”

Mr Andersen also commended the
fundraising effort that secured these new
machines for the many Bahamians in need.

“no comment” on the story.

Although not blaming Mr Bethel for any possible irregularities in the -
election, PLP Senate Leader Allyson Maynard-Gibson, told The Tri- . -

bune in late June:

“The law makes it very clear that the Parliamentary Commissioner

is in charge.”

These latest claims bring'the national voter registry further into
question, and may force officials eventually to scrap the list, mandat-
ing that all Bahamians register with passports at all times.

Calls placed to the registrar general’s department were not returned

-up-to-press time.

said.

“It’s never been done in our territory,” he

“In our tenure in dialysis, which is well
over 15 years in the territory, we have never
seen the success of a fundraising campaign
on this level anywhere, and especially in such
a short period of time,” he said.

Additionally, Mr Andersen told The Tri-
bune that machines can be used for all age
groups, including young children.

Mark Roberts of The Tile King launched
the drive, as machines in the unit were often ~
off-line, with patients’ care being compro- |
mised as a result.

The fund has now been closed, and orga-
nizers have expressed their gratitude for the '
overwhelming support demonstrated by all
those who gave.

FROM page one

MP Keod Smith, former Senator
Paulette Zonicle, senior PLP Ken
Dorsett, former. chairman Ron
Rolle and possibly former
Marathon MP Ron Pinder.

Mrs Hanna-Martin, a former
Cabinet Minister and MP for
Englerston, on Wednesday offi-
cially announced that she will be
seeking the party’s chairmanship.

Some observers noted that this
could be the beginning of the
PLP’s restructuring process, while
others were baffled by the move,
considering it a “step back” for
Mrs Hanna-Martin. :

Speaking yesterday with The
Tribune on the matter, the PLP’s
current chairman Raynard Rig-
by said he has not yet made a
decision whether he will make a
renewed bid for the position, but
noted that the leadership that



APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS

Chairmanship

comes out of the convention has a
“herculean task” to_ perform. _ .
“I’m still in the process of
assessing all of this. I really
haven’t made up my mind what
I’m going to do, but at the right
time I will certainly let the public

- know,” he said.

Mr Rigby said that when it
comes to administrative positions
within the PLP, he hopes that his
party will continue to make a
clear distinction between the
responsibilities and obligations of
PLP parliamentarians and those
who hold party positions..

“The PLP, as of 2002, under-
stood the importance of a sepa-
ration between the work of the
party and the work of the parlia-
mentarians.

“T hope we will not turn back

on that general basic principle,
which in my view makes good
sense for the future survivability
of the PLP,” he said.

Mr Rigby yesterday said that
those seeking positions in the par-
ty first have to understand what is
necessary for the future survival
and success of the. PLP.

“That’s why it’s important for
persons to understand that when
they vie for office, that they vie to
serve unselfishlessly,” he said.

The party chairman said that
he is “one of those PLPs that
believe that democracy must be
alive and well in political organi-
sations.” . :

“Political organisations are
only as good as its members’
(recognition) of their obligations
to the party and the country. It’s
not about being selfish, it’s not
about self-promotion, it’s really
about higher calling. It’s whether
you have the skills, whether you



Village Road . Phone 393-5310. Open 8:30AM. - 5:30PM. Mon - Sat.

have the vision, whether you have

the know-how to cause people to ,

recognise that they ought to be
supporting this political organi-
sation,” he said.
During the PLP’s last national
convention in 2005, Mount Mori-
ah MP Mr Smith declared that
he was running against Mr Rigby
for the chairmanship.
He received a nomination, but
“later withdrew to support Mr Rig-
by..
The PLP in a press release
announcing Mrs Hanna-Martin’s
bid, stated that it is believed that
Mr Rigby will step down after
five years as the chairman “to
pursue other areas of service
within the party.”

Although a number of names

are currently floating around, tra- »

ditionally most contenders will
not officially declare that they are
seeking party positions until con-
vention time.



bBo.

ae —Z

Se eww ewe ee



THE TRIBUNE





Crowds prote



- CARIBBEAN NEWS

st as Panama ratifies



sui, FAWE 11



free trade agreement with US

i PANAMA
Panama City

PANAMA'S legislature rati-
fied a free trade agreement with
the United States on Wednes-
day amid protests by hundreds
of leftists and farmers opposed
to the deal, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The National Assembly’s
approval of the pact by an over-
whelming 58-3 margin, with one
abstention, comes two weeks
after it was signed by both gov-
ernments in Washington. The
agreement must still be ratified
by the Democrat-controlled US
Congress.

“The treaty is a positive step
for Panama to become an impor-
tant exporter,” said lawmaker
Pedro Miguel Gonzales of the rul-
ing Democratic Revolution Party.

In Washington, US Trade
Representative Susan Schwab
applauded the agreement’s
approval.

“This swift action taken by
Panama means that they have

fully accepted the provisions of:

the May 10 Bipartisan Trade
Agreement,” Schwab said in a
news release.

On May 10, US lawmakers
forged new trade policy guide-
lines that require free trade
agreement countries be com-
mitted to adopting and enforc-
‘ing laws that abide by basic
international labour standards.

Opponents of the free trade
treaty, including farmers and

unions, say Panamanian pro-

ducers cannot compete with
their US counterparts.

“This accord is a disaster for
products and it benefits
the oligarchy,” said Enrique
Athanasiadis, leader of the
National Agricultural Organi-
sation.

About 400 protesters gath-
ered outside Panama’s legisla-
ture but left without incident
after a couple of hours.

A majority of US Democrats



a

have opposed most bilateral
free trade agreements in recent
years, contending the deals
negotiated by the Bush admin-
istration are weak in requiring
trading partners to address such
issues as child labor, workplace
discrimination and environ-
mental degradation.
Panamanian President Martin
Torrijos has said the Central
American country will not have
any problems meeting the new

guidelines.

Bilateral trade’ between the
United States and Panama
totaled US82.1 billion in 2003,
including US>** 8 billion in US
exports. Aln n0° half Panama’s
imports com#® om the United
States, and JY foreign invest-
ment in Pan’ {a totals roughly
US$25 billio,

Most of P@hama’s exports to
the United States already enter
the country without duties





HB DEMONSTRATORS protest against the free trade agreement with the United States in front of
the National Congress in Panama City on Wednesday

(AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

WTO to probe EU banana
rules upon US request ©

@ GENEVA

THE World Trade Organiza-
tion will once again investigate
the European Union’s import
rules for bananas, trade officials
said Thursday, according to
Associated Press.

The move reviving one of the
longest-running disputes within
the WTO was requested by the
United States, which claims that
the EU’s banana regime favors
producers from African and
Caribbean countries over
exporters from the US and
Latin America in contravention
of global trade rules.

The WTO has consistently
ruled against how the EU sets
tariffs for the fruit, forcing the
27-nation bloc to overhaul a sys-
tem that grants preferential con-

ditions mainly to former British
and French colonies. °

Latin American producers
and banana companies based in
the United States have long
complained about the prefer-
ences. The US, in 1999, and
Ecuador a year later both won
the right to impose trade sanc-
tions on European goods after
the Geneva-based trade referee
found the EU’s rules to be ille-
gal.
The WTO will now convene
a compliance panel to decide
whether Brussels has imple-
mented this ruling, after the EU
blocked a first request for the
panel’s establishment.

‘The rules are already being
investigated because of a simi-
lar request by Ecuador in
March. Colombia has since ini-

tiated its own complaint against
Brussels’ tariffs. Jamaica,
Cameroon, Panama, Nicaragua,
Japan, Dominican Republic,
Brazil and Dominica have.also
asked to be consulted in the
case.

US trade officials said they
delayed requesting the panel in
the hope of reaching a negoti-
ated settlement with the Euro-
peans.

EU officials said they regret-
ted that the panel had been set
up and questioned whether the
United States had an interest
in the case considering it does
not produce or export bananas
itself.

A deal in 2001 gave the EU
five years to comply with WTO
rulings. Brussels says a new
banana tariff established last

Jamaica detects arrival of invasive insect
that destroys crops, ornamental plants

@ JAMAICA
Kingston

A RAVENOUS, island-hop-
ping pest has been discovered for
the first time in Jamaica, an agri-
culture official said Wednesday,
according to Associated Press.

The pink hibiscus mealybug,
which has destroyed crops and
ornamental plants throughout
the Caribbean, was recently
detected in an five-mile section of
rural Portland parish, according

to Timon Williamson, a senior
research director with the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Lands.

' “It hasn’t spread outside of
this small area. But we need to
get it under control quickly to
prevent a potentially damaging
impact,” Williamson said.

He said Jamaican agriculture
authorities plan to release thou-
sands of tiny parasitic wasps to
eradicate the pests after com-
pleting negotiations with the US
Department of Agriculture,

which raises the parasites in labs.

The tiny wasps, which are
almost invisible to the naked
eye and pose no threat to
humans, lay eggs inside mealy-
bugs. Once hatched, the larvae
feed on the pest internally, caus-
ing it to die.

Mealybugs, which feed on the
sap, roots and leaves of plants,
have destroyed millions of dol-
lars in crops and ornamental
plants across the Caribbean since
they were first reported in 1994.

year — US$234 per ton — has
brought its banana rules into
compliance.

under other programmes such
as the Caribbean Basin Initia-

tive or the Generalized System
of Preferences.

Saint Bede’s Roman
Catholic Church
Raffle Winners 2007

Grand Prize Kia 2007 Mini SUV:
Bob Myers = Ticket # 0516

Plasma TV: Ada - Ticket #11254
Blacberry Phone: Cathryn Evans - Ticket #1264

\)

5 | Ticket to Orlando: Lavelle - Ticket # 5362

Ticket to Eleuthera: Keystalann Burrows
- Ticket # 20463

4 | Ticket to Exuma: Jyde Rolle - Ticket # 11888

7 Bicycle Shanel Burrows - Ticket # 18542

0 | Digital Camera: Kevin Telfort - Ticket # 17148
Watch: Christina Cummings - Ticket # 9679

Pearl Necklace: Peggy Pinder - Ticket # 15851

$100 Gasoline: PG. Ticket # 20076

- Ticket # 6131
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Luncheon at Nett’s: Ason Braynen
- Ticket # 12723
Bed in Bag: Pasha Huene - Ticket # 0452

Microwave: Kayla Rolle - Ticket # 17193
DVD Player: Gary Turnquest - Ticket # 20112

_
_—

Re Rp} Re —
|G SISElSfeles] oleate |

~

e e
OV

oe

The drawing was held on Saturday, July 7, 2007 at
7:00 p.m. on Saint Bede’s Roman Catholic Church’s
grounds. We would like to cngratulate all the winners
and extend our gratitude to all our loyal and generous
raffle participants.





Dr. Emma R. Pastoral, 62 .

of #1 Mt Vernon, N.P. and formerly of Maripipi Leyte,
Philippines, who died at the Intensive Care Unit, Princess
Margaret Hospital on Wednesdayt, July 11, 2007. Funeral
service will be held at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church,
Shirley Street on Saturday, July 14, 2007 at 10:00a.m.

2

Left to cherish her memory are her husband, Dr. Robert Pastoral;

RoyalStar
Assurance

daughter, Ann-Marie Pastoral Boldt; son-in-law, Eric Boldt;
grandson, Robert John Bodlt; father, Sanjos Rabasto Sr.; brothers,
Dr & Mrs. Adolfo Rabasto, Arch & Mrs. Sanjos Rabasto Jr., Mr. & Mrs.
Cecilio Rabasto; sister, Dr. Elizabeth Rabasto Smith; nieces, Rinna;
Anna, Abby, Aireen, Andrea, Pearl and Marieedenze.
Nephews; Archie, Gabriel, Gijon and grandchildren.



Please note
that our offices will |
be closed on Friday 13th July
for our annual |

STAFF FUN DAY.

entreville House, Second Terrace West, Collins Avenue
www.rsabahamas.com

Sincerest thanks to Drs. Christine Chin, John Lunn, Elsa Grant, Theo
Ferguson, Barry McCartney, Robin Roberts, Mark Weech, Reginald
Neymour, Harry Singh, Dwayne Sands and Kevin Moss and to all the
staff at the Intensive Care Unit (PMH) and the Intensive Care Unit
(Doctors Hospital).



Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers Funeral Home, York
and Ernest Street on Friday July 13, 2007 from 4:00p.m until
9:00p.m.





PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Grand Bahama’s

independence

\

celebration;

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A spectac-
ular fireworks displays lit
up the skies at the Inde-
pendence Park in Grand
Bahama, where thousands
turned out on Monday
evening for the 34th
annual independence cele-
brations.

The highlight of the cele-
brations came at 11pm with
a procession of police offi-
cers, immigration and cus-
toms officials, led by the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force Marching Band.

The honour guard
marched onto the playing



field for the official flag-
raising and inspection,
which was carried out by
Minister of Housing and
National Insurance Ken-
neth Russell, the MP for
High Rock.

Residents displayed their
patriotism by wearing inde-
pendence t-shirts in the
colours of the flag, waving
miniature Bahamian flags,
and attaching them to their
vehicles.

The theme for this year’s
celebration was ‘A Tribute
to Our Forbearers.’

A cultural extravaganza

was held at 9pm featuring
various Bahamian artists,
including KB, Lil Joe
Cartwright and the Matrix

Band. There was also a
junkanoo rush-ouat.
Various MPs atiended the
celebrations, including Mar-
co City MP Zhivargo Laing,
Pineridge MP Kwasi
Thompson, Eight Mile
Rock MP Vernae Grant,
and senators Kay Smith and

Frederick McAlpine.

@ SENATOR Kay

Smith, parliamentary sec-
retary in the Prime MInis-
ter’s Office, and Tourism
Minister Neko Grant, and
wife, Barbara, are seen
watching performances at
the Cultural Extravaganza
at Independence Park on
Monday evening.

Pod

ORS Wet: gsc]




@ MINISTER
of Housing and
National Insur-
ance Kenneth
Russell and his
wife, Georgette, :
are seen at the
34th annual
independence
celebrations at
Independence
Park on Monday
evening.

(Photos:
Godfrey
Cooper - Derek
Carroll’s
Photography)


























Courtesy call paid on the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs

SHEILA Carey, deputy permanent secretary in the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, and His Excellency Kailash Lal Agrawal,
High Commissioner of the Republic of India, are pictured on
Wednesday, July 11 at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs during
a courtesy call.

(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)

Teenager dies after stabbing

A TEENAGER, walking on Meadow Street, near Parker Street
about 8 o’clock last night, was attacked by several young men,
who stabbed him several times. The 18 year old died at the scene.

. Last night police were looking for his attackers. Although police
knew his name, they would not release it until his family had been
notified.

This is the forty-fourth murder for the first six months of the year.



The Tribune and
USA TODAY make history

ing their stay in the Bahamas,”
said Tom Kelly, USA
TODAY ’S circulation vice pres-
ident.

“We’re proud to have The Tri-
bune as a part of the USA
TODAY family. Welcome

FROM page one

arraigned as a juvenile.
building.
has been confirmed.

sometime around 7pm.

FROM page one

wants to do anything about it.”

A human resources official at
NIB acknowledged to The Tri-
bune that rumours have been
“circulating” about alleged
intimidation, however as no
“formal written complaint” has
been lodged, an investigation
has not begun. “I have heard
things floating around,” the offi-
cial stated. “However as the
union hasn’t levied these things
(to NIB), we cannot address the
matter.” The official further
noted that employees are usu-



FROM page one aboard!” said Terry Carlson;
look forward to our readers manager/field operations.
enjoying the USA TODAY dur- Robert Carron, Tribune Chief

Operating Officer, welcomed the
USA team to The Tribune’ s
plant.

“This is another journalistic
achievement for The Tribune of
which we are very proud,” said
Mr Carron.

Young man to be arrainged.
today after age confusion -

yesterday afternoon when he was brought before the courts to be

As a result, the press were not allowed in the court room and the
young man’s face was concealed as he was led in and out of the

According to the teen’s lawyer Tamara Taylor, the accused will
return to court today to be formally arraigned, after his actual age

Mardio Hall — the 43rd murder victim for the year — was shot on
Sunday at the racing tracks at the Queen Elizabeth er Centré

‘

NIB staff

ally “reluctant” to make formal
complaints for fear of negative
repercussions.

Jerry Swan, the President of
the Union of Public Officers,
told The Tribune that he “has
absolutely no knowledge” of
the allegations, claiming no such
complaints have been made to
the union.

Messages were left for the
official in question, but as of
press time he could not be
reached for comment.







FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

The Tribune

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



‘Double taxation’ Protect Bahamas firms

hits Bahamas
investment funds
competitiveness

| | By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS-
based investment
fund managers
have lost busi-
ness because
Recognised For-
eign Funds
(RFF) domiciled
in jurisdictions
not prescribed by
this nation’s reg-
ulators are being
subjected to “double taxation”,

DEVEAUX

- The Tribune was told yesterday,

something the Securities Com-
mission hopes to change “in
very short order”.

Hillary Deveaux, the Securi-
ties Commission’s executive
director, said both regulator and
industry were pushing amend-
ments to the Investment Funds
Act 2003 to resolve the situa-
tion, which. currently leaves
RFFs in non-prescribed juris-

dictions with having to pay

licensing fees twice if they. want
to use a Bahamas-based invest-
-ment manager.

Recognised Foreign Funds
are investment funds that are
not domiciled in the Bahamas,
but-have some kind of nexus or
connection to this nation, such
as using a Bahamiaa.investment
manager.

If they are licensed or regis-
tered in jurisdictions prescribed
or registered by the Securities
Commission,Recognised For-
eign. Funds just have to regis-
ter with the Bahamian regulator
and provide proof of their reg-
istration elsewhere.



* Commission seeking
Act amendments ‘in very
short order’, as it mulls
extending audit deadline
from four to six months

* Industry concern on
Segregated Accounts
Companies ‘double fees’

But under the current Invest-
ment Funds Act, Recognised
Foreign Funds that are not
domiciled in a jurisdiction
recognised by the Securities
Commission must also be
licensed in the Bahamas if they
want to use a fund maeaeet in
this nation.

As a result, they are faced
with having to pay licensing fees
twice - in their jurisdiction of
origin, and in the Bahamas -
effectively a form of ‘double
taxation’ that raises the costs of
doing business and deterred
such funds from _ using
Bahamas-based investment
managers. | *

Although the industry had
not igdicated how much busi-

‘ness it might have lost as a
result, Mr Deveaux told The.

Tribune: “One of the difficul-
ties we have is that we’re almost
double taxing a fund if it is not
listed in a prescribed jurisdic-
tion of listed on a prescribed
exchange: °

“Tf a fund is using an invest-

SEE page 6

Port parent demands asset
disposal funds accounting

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

INTERCONTINENTAL
Diversified Corporation
(IDC), parent company for the

-Grand Bahama Port Authori-

ty (GBPA) and Port Group
Ltd, has demanded an account-
ing of all dividends paid to the

_ late Edward St George and his

estate, and his business part-

ner Sir Jack Hayward, alleg-

ing that many of thase pay-

ra were “not authorised”
it

1: its defence and counter- .

claim to the statement of claim

filed by Mr St George’s estate, -

which is disputing Sir Jack’s
assertion that he owns 75 per
cent of IDC, and in turn the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
IDC alleged that it “had a right
to any dividends” declared by
the latter two entities or the
Grand Bahama Development
Company (Devco).

It makes specific reference
to the “special dividends” that
the St George estate alleges
were split equally 50/50
between Sir Jack and Mr St
George upon the sale of vari-
ous Port Group and Devco
assets, as detailed in their state-
ment of claim.

In its counter-claim, IDC
alleged: “IDC has not autho-
rised the payment of many of
those dividends to the first
plaintiff [Lady Henrietta St
George], the first defendant
[Sir Jack Hayward], the [St
George] estate or Mr St
George himself, and any sums
paid to them or either of them
are sums for which they are
liable to account to IDC.

“In light of which, IDC seeks
an accounting of all dividends
paid directly from [the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd] and the
Grand Bahama Development
Company to” Mr St George,

his estate and Sir Jack.”

Given that IDC is a defen-
dant to the action brought by
the St George estate, and is
effectively on the same side
and alleged to be under Sir
Jack’s control, its demand for
an accounting of the dividends
paid to both parties is likely to
baffle many observers.

The dividends in question
were paid to Mr St George and
Sir Jack Hayward over the
period 1993-2001, and collec-
tivly amounted to almost $80
million. According to the St
Géorge estate’s statement of
claim, these payments were
split 50/50.

The dividends resulted from:

* The 1993 sale by Devco of
a 50 per cent stake in Grand
Bahama Power Company to
Southern Electric (now
Mirant), generating $35 mil-
lion.

* The 1999 sale of a 50 per
cent stake in Devco to Hutchi-
son Development Bahamas,
netting a total dividend of $17
million.

* The 2000 sale of a 28.6 per
cent stake in Urban Sanitation
by Port Group Ltd to Onyx,
producing dividends of $9.428
million.

* The 2001 sale of a 50 per
cent stake in the Freeport Con-
tainer Port by Port Group Ltd
to Hutchison Port Bahamas
Holdings, generating special
dividends of $18 million.

In its counter-claim, IDC
denied that all joint ventures
were done on the basis of a
50/50 partnership between Sir
Jack and Mr St George, and
that the proceeds from the
asset disposals were divided
equally between the two.

It demanded that the St
George estate submit “strict
proof” of this to the court.

from ‘shell companies’

* Attorney calls for foreign investor parents to guarantee obligations/
put up performance bond for Bahamian subsidiaries

* Says Bahamian firms ‘have no récourse’ if developers pull-out
leaving unpaid debts and local entities ‘in terrible financial straits’.

wee eee ee eee ee ee eee ee eee ee)

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian busi-

nesses must be

protected from

major investors

who set up “shell
companies” without any assets
to facilitate their projects in this

nation and then pull out without

settling their debts, a prominent
attorney told The Tribune yes-
terday.

Fred Smith, an attomey and
partner with Callender’s & Co,
said this had happened all too
often during his 30 years of
practicing commercial law in
Freeport, leaving Bahamian
companies “in terrible financial
straits” and without any
recourse to recover “hundreds

of thousands of
dollars” owed to
them.

Mr Smith said:
“In my view,
every time a
multinational
compant wants
to develop or do’
business - here,
even if they want
to operate asa
Bahamian company, the parent
company must guaantee the
performance of ,the subsidiary
and all the financial obligations
it enters into in the Bahamas.

“It is my hope that the FNM,
in developing an investment
policy, will legislate that.”

Mr Smith also suggested that
foreign investors be made to
put up a performance bond as a

SMITH



way of guaranteeing their per-
formance, and give Bahamian
creditors, companies and the
Government something finan-
cial to claim against if they

failed to fulfill their obligations :

and departed this nation leaving
unpaid debts.in their wake.

He urged that such guaran-
tees and performance bonds be
legislated, rather than left to.
negotiations over individual ©
Heads of Agreement, and apply
to both Bahamian and foreign
investors, regardless-of how big
or small they are.

“As the Bahamas continues
to attract foreign investment, it
is extremely important that we
protect Bahamian-owned com-
mercial operations from con-
ducting business with shell com-

panies from abroad that have .

no assets here,” Mr Smith said. .
“Companies that do not go.
through with investments some-
times leave millions of dollars in
debt throughout the islands.
“As an attorney operating in
Freeport for the last 30 years, I
can say resoundingly that
Bahamas-based companies,
Grand Bahama Port Authority
licensees, contractors, tour oper-
ators, réal éstate agents, attor-
neys, accountants and engineers
have all, and I have represented
many of them, have had to eat

. their losses, many of them hun-

dreds of thousands of dollars at
atime.”

The Tribune knows of cases
similar to those described by

SEE page 9 |

Abaco Markets eyes June/July
2008 to restart share dividend

* Second quarter to ‘show tremendous improvement’ over prior year
* Firm. to repay Class A preference shares quarterly, with $535,000 payment in September

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

‘ ABACO Markets, the BISX-listed retail



group, is hoping to resume dividend pay-
ments to its long-suffering ordinary share-
holders “by June/July” 2008, The Tribune
was told yesterday, with its second quarter
results likely to “show tremendous improve-
ment” over prior year comparatives.
Gavin Watchorn, Abaco Markets presi-

dent, said: “On the assumption we have a’

profitable year for 2007, we’d like to resume
ordinary dividend [payments] i in 12 months.
I’d like to think by June/July of next year.”

’ The announcement is likely to ignite new
interest in Abaco Markets’ share price, giv-
en that Bahamian investors’ number one
attraction is dividends and receiving instant,
liquid returns on their investment.

A resumption of dividend payments
would also provide some reward for Abaco
Markets shareholders who have stuck with
the stock through some pretty dark times,
including the $25 million loss it incurred in
2003, and complete the retail group’s return

~ to consistent profitability.

. Those investors who bought into Abaco

Markets when it was at its 52-week low of

$0.54 per share have already reaped the
benefits, the stock’s close at $1.60 on
Wednesday this week meaning their invest-
ment has almost tripled in value.

And more share price appreciation may

°

SEE page 8

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Drive them to you by
irecting the traffic

ne of the biggest

misconceptions is

that you simply

put up a website
and people will come flocking
to you. Just like in the real
world, traffic is not going to
come to you on its own. You
are going to have to encour-
age it by various means. Suc-
cessful sites can spend up to
50 per cent of their revenue
with online traffic driving cam-
paigns.

The importance is getting
quality traffic. If your visitors
aren’t relevant and don’t buy,
then you have wasted your
time and money. If you are
selling a parental control e-
mail'solution, you will want to
appeal to mums and dads with
children aged nine to 15. Any
other traffic is a waste of time.
You will need to be clear what
type of traffic you need to
direct to your site. So, what are
the ways you can get traffic to
your website?

The first way is to pursue
Offline Activities. Having a
website doesn’t mean you can’t
use the tried and tested tradi-
tional ways of promotion. Sur-
prisingly, they can still be very
effective. Here are six offline
ways you can drive traffic to
your website:

* First, try advertising in tra-
ditional media such as news-
papers and magazines.

* Second, try public relations
by sending out press releases to
the traditional media.

* Third, try direct market-
ing by using mailing lists to
write sales letters to physical
addresses. ‘

* Fourth, try promotions at
third party venues, running
competitions with magazines
and newspapers, and exhibiting
at fairs and shows.

* Rifth, try joint ventures by

‘signing up partners to help pro-

mote your offering to their
audience. Tying up with news-
papers can be useful, as they
oftgn run promotions to their





Business

readerships.

* Sixth, try adding your web-
site and e-mail address to all
your marketing literature, let-
terheads, stationery, business
vehicles, premises, adverts,
product brochures and your
business cards. This is a great
way of getting virtually free
publicity

The second way is to pursue
Online Activities. This is a bit
of a minefield, where you will
need to spend some time learn-
ing new techniques. There are
many ways in which you can
drive traffic to your site, and
some can be very lucrative.

* First, try advertising online
by buying advertising on sites
such as Google and Yahoo.



i aH Scotiabank Thompson Boulevard branch
wishes to advise its customers that there will
be a disruption in ABM service on

Due to renovations being carried out on the
building, the electrical supply will be
disconnected during these hours.

Scotiabank apologizes for any
inconvenience caused and invites you
to visit one of our other
convenient ABM locations.

You can bid for keywords, or
the search terms that surfers
use. When they arrive on the
search page, they will see your
ad, and when they click on
your ad they will be directed to
your website. You will be
charged for the click.

* Second, if you have creat-
ed your own banners, text ads
or links, try advertising them
on other relevant sites that
have visitors with a similar pro-
file. When visitors click on
your banners, or text ads, they
will again be directed to your
website.

* Third, try public relations
by sending out press releases to
online media and eZines, and
posting in forums.

* Fourth, try direct market-
ing by sending out e-mail to e-
mail address lists, but be wary
of spamming as this will get
you in big trouble with your
Internet Service Provider.

* Fifth, build partnerships by
tying in with partner sites that
appeal to a similar audience
via

(a) Third party promotions,
where they promote your offer
to their customer lists through
a newsletter

(b) Direct mailing, exchang-
ing links or simply obtaining
links from their sites to your
site for free. Check out sites
such as Monster Link Swap
and Zeus Marketing Robot to

help you do it.

* Sixth, try Search Engine
Optimisation techniques to
help rank your website address
higher up the major search
engines. You will need to use
key words in your web page
content and page names,
imbed meta tags in your page
titles, text and headers, and
submit your site to search
engines and directories.

If this looks like Double
Dutch to you, hire an external
SEO company by searching
the top search engines and
select one from the top 20. If
they can’t get. themselves up
the rankings, they won’t be
able to doitfor you. .

* Seventh, try Viral Market-
ing techniques. Simply having
your website link at the bot-
tom of your e-mails is a sure-
fire way of promoting your
website. Also, try inserting
‘Tell A Friend’ links on your
website as a way of getting
your visitors to tell others
about your service. Guerilla
Marketing is a growing form

of marketing that is becoming.

popular. Check out web sites
such as Guerilla Marketing
Bootcamp, which provide a
free newsletter with many
guerilla marketing ideas.

* Finally, try starting an
Affiliate Programme. This is
where you get other sites to

va

eon nita

drive traffic to your site, and
you share the revenue of any
sales as a result of that traffic.
This is dealt with in more detail
in my future column, Becom-
ing An Affiliate.

Driving traffic to your site
can be one of the most tricky
things to get right. You could
spend a lot of money and get
very little in the way of results.
There are many scams on the
Internet. Many Internet mar-
keting techniques look too
good to be true and they often
are. Traffic won’t happen with-
out a lot of hard work. Don’t
be an antipreneur and forget to
implement a mix of the above
online and offline traffic-gen-
erating techniques. Make sure
you avoid the trap of
antipreneurship by spending
sufficient time on this area, as
it will pay large dividends for
your future business success.

NB: This column is available
as an eBook at
www.antipreneurship.com

Mark draws on 20 years of
top level business, marketing
and communications experi-
ence in London and the
Bahamas. He is chief operating
officer of www.ezpzemail.com,
currently lives in Nassau, and
can be contacted at markalex-
palmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer. All rights
reserved













THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 8B
DOW30 _—‘13,861.73 +283.86 Ab
S&P500 —«d4,547.70 +28.94 4%
NASDAQ 2,701.73 +49.94 Ad
10-YR NOTE 5.13 +0.04 2a
CRUDEOIL 7250 -006 W

Stocks
surge
on retail
sales

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press
NEW YORK — Wall Street
soared Thursday, propelling the -
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
and Dow Jones industrials to
record highs as bright spots
among generally sluggish retail
sales allowed investors to toss
aside concerns about the health
of the economy.
The rally, which included the
- Dow’s biggest one-day percent-
age gain in nearly four years,
was perhaps surprising given
- that there was no extraordinary —
announcement or other catalyst
usually seen with such a huge
gain, and that it came before
most .companies. have
announced their second-quarter
S. oe
_. But investors, heartened by
signs of a happy and spending

consumer, clearly decided to

_ put some bets on the table.

Though retail sales generally —

appeared to be crimped last ©
month by higher gasoline prices —
and a tepid housing market, and —

the. outlook for the coming



as dour as-some investors.
expected.

According to " pteltainary) o
: calculations, the S&P 500 rose _

28.94, or L91 percent, to 1,547.70,

_ above its record close of 1, 539. 18, oo

Y set June 4.

‘The Dow shot up: 283. 86, or :

_ 2.09 percent, to 13,861.73; its pre-
- vious record close was 13,676.32, _
also set June 4. The increase

was the biggest percentage gain
- for the blue chip index since
October 2003 and the biggest
_ point gain since October 2002.
- The Dow also reached a new
‘trading high of 13,869.94.
The Nasdaq composite index.
rose 49.94, or 1.88 percent, to
2,701.73; Thursday’s. gain was
the biggest percentage increase:

since March, and the last time ©

. the Nasdaq closed at around
Thurday’s level was Feb. 1, 2001.
Stocks’ ascent Thursday
after mostly unremarkable trad-
ing in recent weeks could also
. reflect so-called short covering.
Investors who sell stocks short
are betting the stock will fall
and can be forced to buy stocks
when markets move higher.

Bonds fell, with the yield on .

the benchmark 10-year Trea-
sury note rising to 5.13 percent
from 5.09 percent late Wednes-

day. The dollar was generally _

lower against other major cur-
rencies, dropping to a new
record low versus the euro and
a 26-year low against the British
pound. Gold prices rose.

Light, sweet crude fell 6
cents to $72.50 per barrel on the
New York = Mercantile
Exchange.

Wall Street, whose advance
this year has been powered in
part by a cascade of buyout
news, received an additional
boost after mining company Rio

_ Tinto offered to buy Canadian
aluminum producer Alcan for |
$38.1 billion.

Advancing issues outnum-
bered decliners by 3 to 1 on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 1.66 bil-
lion shares compared with 1.44
billion traded Wednesday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies ‘rose 15.21, or
181 percent, to 855.18.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average fell 0.36 percent.
Britain’s FTSE 100 rose 1.25 per-

‘cent, Germany’s DAX index
advanced 1.96 percent, and
France’s CAC-40 jumped 1.70
percent.



: difficult, to. ascer- a sak
~ tain, th verall reading wasn’t —

FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

ALUMINUM COMPANY



PETER MCCABE/AP

PARTNERS: Alcan President and CEO Dick Evans, left, and Rio Tinto CEO Tom Albanese address a
news conference in Montreal. Under the buyout deal, anew company named Rio Tinto Alcan
would be based in Montreal, that would be ‘a new global leader in the aluminum industry with |
large, long-life, low-cost assets worldwide,’ the companies said. It would be headed by Evans.

Rio Tinto offers $38B

for Canada’s Alcan

BY ROHAN SULLIVAN

Associated Press
|. SYDNEY, Australia — Mining
| giant Rio Tinto has offered to buy
| Canadian aluminum company
| Alcan for $38.1 billion in cash, the
companies said Thursday, in a
friendly takeover that tops a hostile
| bid by U.S.-based Alcoa.
The bid exceeds a $28 billion
offer of cash and stock from Alcoa
| that Alcan’s board rejected in May,
| and would create the world’s larg-
» est. aluminum. company..,Alcoa
| withdrew its offer on Thursday
| after being outbid.
Alcoa Chairman and CEO Alain
Belda said Rio Tinto’s bid “strongly
| reinforces our view of the underly-
| ing value in the aluminum industry
' and its bright prospects for the
future.”

have more attractive options for
delivering additional value to
shareholders,” he said.

In a joint statement, Rio Tinto
and Alcan said the Anglo-Austra-
lian miner was offering $101 per
| share for Alcan and that Alcan’s
| board was recommending the deal
| to shareholders.

“This transaction combines two
leading and complementary alumi-
num businesses, and is a further
step in Rio Tinto’s strategy of cre-
ating shareholder value through
investing in high quality, large
scale, low cost and long life assets
in attractive sectors,” Rio Tinto
| Chairman Paul Skinner said.

Rio Tinto’s offer is a 65.5 percent
| premium on Alcan’s closing share

MERGER

Huntsman terminates one deal,
agrees to another buyout offer

“However, at this price level, we.

price before Pittsburgh-based
Alcoa’s May 4 takeover bid, and an
almost 33 percent premium on

_Alcoa’s offer, the statement said.

The offer is subject to condi-
tions including gaining the support
of 66.67 percent of Alcan’s share-
holders and a breakup fee of
$1.05 billion payable by Alcan to

‘Rio Tinto if Alcan pulls out.

Alcan’s U.S. shares climbed
$8.85, or. 9. .) percent, to $98.45 in



6.7 pereen enti'to $45.29.

Trading of Rio Tinto’s shares
were halted in Sydney ahead of the
announcement, but. had earlier
soared to a new record price of
105.19 Australian dollars ($90.58) as
rumors swirled that a deal on Alcan
was imminent. On the London
Stock Exchange, where Rio Tinto’s
shares are also traded, the price fell
2.5 percent after the announcement
to 3,892 pence ($78.99).

Under the deal, a new company
named Rio Tinto Alcan would be
based in Montreal, Canada, that
would be “a new global leader in
the aluminum industry with large,
long life, low cost assets world-
wide,” the companies said. It would
be headed by Alcan Chief Execu-
tive Dick Evans.

Alcan Chairman Yves Fortier
said the Rio Tinto offer was “very
attractive” and offered sharehold-
ers “the certainty of a clear path to
completion” — a possible reference
to antitrust concerns about Alcoa’s
bid.

“The agreed transaction with

‘Rio Tinto is the outcome of a rigor-

ous and thorough process con-

ducted by the Alcan board,” he

said.

“It achieves all of our stated
goals, providing clearly superior
value to Alcan shareholders while
remaining true to our core values
and obligations as responsible cor-
porate citizens,” he said.

Rio Tinto CEO Tom Albanese
called aluminum an excellent busi-
ness to be in because of increasing
demand from China:--

“The outlook for sector is very

strong,” Albanese said. “World
demand iis expected to grow at

more six percent per year thru 2011.”
... We’ve seen China’s demand for. -
steel, for copper and for aluminum ,

ramping up in recent years.”

ABN Amro analyst Rob Clifford
told Dow Jones Newswires Alcoa
faced a “big hurdle” because of the
breakup fee Alcan would be liable

for if it had pushed ahead with the:

bidding.

Others noted synergies between
the two companies said Rio Tinto
would likely consolidate operations
after the takeover.

“This is a major deal that’s been

clearly flagged to the market anda ©

very good way for Rio to use its
forecast cash pile,” said Numis
Securities analyst John Meyer, pre-
dicting that Rio Tinto would “be
quick to sell off some of the down-
stream operations.”

Rio Tinto said Alcan has high
quality, low cost assets and excel-
lent access to long life hydro
power.



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

ECONOMY

Trade
deficit
rises as
oil prices
increase

BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — America’s
trade deficit rose to its second-high-
est level of the year as the price of
imported crude oil jumped and
demand for Chinese products
remained strong despite recalls of
tainted products.

The Commerce Department
reported Thursday that the deficit for
May rose to $60.04 billion, 2.3 per-
cent more than in April. Most of the
deterioration in the trade balance
reflected a big increase in the foreign
oil bill, which swamped record sales
of U.S. products abroad.

The Bush administration said the

continued rise in exports validated

President Bush’s campaign for free
trade deals and his opposition to rais-
ing import barrier.

“Our strategy is to focus on grow-
ing our.exports as opposed to intro-
ducing protectionist policies to limit
our imports,” Commerce Secretary
Carlos Gutierrez said in an interview
with The Associated Press.

The administration is working to .

get Congress to approve free trade
deals with South Korea, Peru, Colom-
bia and Panama. The president also
wants lawmakers to extend his power

to seal trade agreements without con- :

gressional intervention. Such author-

ity expired at the end of July.

That effort faces much resistance
because of unhappiness over the
trade deficits and the loss of 3 million

_ U.S. manufacturing jobs since 2000.

. So far this year, the overall trade

deficit is running at an annual rate of

$709 billion. That is down 6.5 percent
from last year’s $758.5 billion, the

er ERLE

fifth consecutive year that the deficit. .

was a record.

Analysts are looking for the deficit |
to improve this year. U.S. exports are —
‘benefiting from strong growth

abroad. Also, the falling value of the

dollar against the euro and other cur-.

rencies lifts exports. |
For May, exports of goods and ser-

vices rose 2.2 percent to an all-time _

high of $132 billion. That figure
reflected big gains in sales of U.S.-
made aircraft, electronic products
and oil drilling equipment.

Imports also set a record, rising 2.2

percent to $192.1 billion. That —

included a 6.2 percent jump in petro- .
leum products to $26.6 billion, the —

highest since last August.

The deficit with China in May rose
to $20.02 billion; it’s the biggest
imbalance since January. While the
overall deficit so far this year is
smaller than last year, the deficit with
China is 17.2 percent ahead of 2006.

BY PAUL FOY
Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — Chemicals maker Hunts-
man agreed to a $6.5 billion buyout offer from an
affiliate of Apollo Management on Thursday, ter-
minating an earlier deal to sell itself at a lower
price to a Dutch company.

Apollo, through its Hexion Specialty Chemicals
unit, had offered $28 a share in cash for Huntsman
which had previously accepted a $25.25 a share
offer from the Dutch manufacturer Basell AF. -

Huntsman gave Basell until Wednesday to raise
its bid but said Basell failed to do so.

“We had a deal and we were very comfortable
with that. We stick with that deal,” said Basell
spokeswoman Patricia Vangheluwe.

Huntsman CEO and president Peter R. Hunts-
man said he couldn’t ignore a bid that was hun-
dreds of millions of dollars higher than a deal he
hatched with another suitor.

Huntsman’s board approved the Apollo deal
and has recommended that shareholders vote in
favor.

Huntsman said his company wired a “mind-bog-
gling” $200 million breakup fee to Basell, which is
controlled by U.S. industrialist Len Blavatnik’s
Access Industries. Hexion agreed to reimburse half
of the amount of the fee.

Blavatnik was “quite disappointed — $25.25 was

a good price at the time, but with Apollo bidding at
$28, that was something to consider,” Huntsman
said in Houston before boarding a plane Thursday

for Salt Lake City, where his company is based. It .

operates from The Woodlands, Texas.
He conceded a Huntsman-Hexion combination

will have a harder and longer time gaining antitrust ,

approvals in the U.S. and Europe because the over-
lap between the two chemical businesses.

“There are areas of overlap in the business, but
we're confident we’ll get through the Federal
Trade Commission,” he said.

To compensate for delays, Hexion agreed to pay
a 8 percent annual premium for Huntsman shares
if the closing takes longer than nine months, he
said.

Huntsman said he didn’t know if Hexion would
keep him or his team of executives on over the
long run — an arrangement he had with Basell.

Craig Morrison, the 5l-year-old chairman and
CEO of Hexion, said it had yet to figure out how
the two companies’ management teams would
mesh or whether any consolidation would result in
plant closings.

To win Huntsman, Apollo raised its bid to $28 a
share when it was already the high bidder at $27.25,
which “really came down to strategy and optimiz-
ing the chance of landing the deal,” he said.

It seemed to work.



-DOUGLAS C. PIZAC/AP
PRODUCTS: Apollo Management will buy out *
chemicals maker Huntsman Corp. Above,
cases display dozens of consumer products
that contain items made by Huntsman ina
museum at the company’s corporate
headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah.





THE MIAMIHERALD | MiamiHerald.com

SHOPPING: A
shopper walks
by bargain
sale signs in
downtown
Seoul, South
Korea. The
Bank of Korea
raised its key
interest rate
Thursday for
the first time
in nearly a
year.

LEE JIN-MAN/AP

e ECONOMY



Bank of Korea raises
key interest rate

From Herald Wire Services

The Bank of Korea on Thursday raised its key interest rate
for the first time in nearly a year amid expected strengthen-
ing economic growth and possible stronger inflation in the

second half of the year.

The central bank said That it raised its overnight call rate
target by 25 basis points to 4.75 percent. It was the first
increase since one of similar scale in August last year.

The decision to raise the rate was expected. Eight of 13
economists surveyed by Dow Jones Newswires expected the
central bank to approve the quarter percentage-point rate

hike.
e CURRENCY

DOLLAR DIPS TO FRESH
LOW AGAINST EURO

The dollar briefly stum-
bled to a fresh low against
the euro on continuing con-
cerns that troubles in the
U.S. housing market could
drag down the overall econ-
omy.

The 13-nationeuro
peaked at $1.3797, topping its
previous record of $1.3784
set early Wednesday. It
retreated to $1.3783 in late —
New York trading, still up .
from $1.3761 late Wednes-
day.

Concerns over the
strength of the U.S. econ-
omy, fueled largely by woes
in the subprime housing sec-

tor, have sted the euro
against tHe dollar.
e SETTLEMENT :

WARNER MUSIC STRIKES
LICENSING DEAL

Warner Music Group
(WMG) said it had settled
its copyright infringement
lawsuit against the social
networking Website imeem
by agreeing to license its
music and video content to
the site for a slice of its ad
revenue.

Financial details of the
settlement were not dis-
closed. :

Under the agreement,
imeem Inc. can carry music
and videos from all of the
record company’s artists,
who include Madonna,
Linkin Park and Red Hot
Chili Peppers.

e ENERGY EFFICIENCY

CHINA FALLS SHORT ON
ENERGY-SAVING GOALS

China is falling short of
its goals in a campaign to
boost energy efficiency in
its fuel-guzzling economy —
the world’s No. 2 oil con-
sumer — but is starting to
make progress, the govern-
ment said.

China launched a five-
year effort in 2006 to cut
energy use per unit of eco-
nomic output by 20 percent
amid mounting worries
about pollution and depen-
dence on imported oil,
which communist leaders
see as a strategic weakness.

But last year’s reduction
was only 1.33 percent, well
below the 4 percent annual
target, Xie Fuzhan, commis-
sioner of the National
Bureau of Statistics, said.

4 6335 p.m. Late
Steck Thr, case
Intel INTC 26.00 25.93.07 275479
Pfizer PFE =. 2598 = 25.65 -33—«106713
Schwab SCHW 22.48 2245 -.04
SPOR SPY 154.39 154.42 +.03 45308
Wachovia WB 5253 5253 *
PwShsQQQ QQQQ 49.56 4956 * 36144
GM 37543754 * 33872
sp MLE 7323 73.41 +18 32262
iro. «= SUNW 5.43) «541-02 29028
TxuCop TXU 6745 6745 * 26916
3464, G4. 24187
IIclBk = IBN 52.425 2.42 20625
sPfncl —XLF 36.54 20266

For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business

e CHINA

FOREIGN INVESTMENT
SOARS 22 PERCENT

The flood of foreign
investment pouring into
China rose by 22 percent in
June to $6.6 billion, the gov-
ernment said, giving further
indication that economic
growth is racing ahead.
despite official efforts to
cool the boom.

The June figure raised
total foreign investment for -
the first half of this year to
$31.9 billion, the Commerce
Ministry said.

The government has
been trying to curb invest-
ment in real estate and other
industries where it believes
supply exceeds demand.
Chinese leaders worry run-
away spending could ignite
inflation or a debt crisis.

e RECORD LABEL

TERRA FIRMA GETS
EU OK FOR EMI BID

EU regulators cleared
private equity group Terra
Firma Capital Partners’
$4.8 billion takeover bid for
EMI Group (EMIPF.PK) on

- Wednesday, though share-

holders of the music com-
pany were still holding out
for a counterbid from

- Warner Music Group

(WMG). The European
Commission approved the
deal after identifying no
antitrust issues and receiv-
ing no complaints from
rivals within a deadline of 25

working days.

e EARNINGS

SONY ERICSSON SEES
PROFITS, VOLUMES RISE

Sony Ericsson, the
world’s fourth-largest
mobile phone maker, saw
growing profits and market
share in the second quarter
but said the average selling
price of its handsets contin-
ued to fall.

The joint venture
between Sweden’s LM
Ericsson (ERIC) and
Japan’s Sony (SNE) said net
profit rose 54 percent to 220
million euros ($303 million)
from 143 million euros in the
same period last year.

Sales grew 37 percent to
3.1 billion euros ($4.3 billion)
from 2.3 billion euros in the
second quarter of 2006.

Sony Ericsson said it -
shipped 24.9 million hand-
sets in the quarter, up 59
percent from the year-ago
period.

4 6:35 Late

Alcoa AA 4529 4637 = +1.08 += 19396
iShR2K nya IWM 84,82 8482 * 19317
WellsFgos WFC 35.44 35.44 17403
SP Mid MDY = 167.51 «16751 * 17158

. PG 62.93 6240 -53 16661
Microsoft MSFT 30.07 29.94 -.13 16010
BredeCm BRCD 8.03 8.06 +03 14644
SemiHTtr SMH 40.22 40.14 -08 13947
CMGI CMG! = 1.86 1.87 +01 13083
OnSmcnd ONNN 1170 11.70 * 12036
Citigrp c 5284 5281 -03 11795
FMCG FCX 9456 9444 -12 11122



CELLPHONE MAKER

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _

FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007 |4B

Motorola’s CEO comes under fire

BY ASHLEY M. HEHER
Associated Press

CHICAGO — After beating
back a proxy fight from bil-
lionaire financier Carl Icahn,
the chief executive and chair-
man of Motorola is under
attack again.

On the heels of this week’s
warning of worse-than-ex-

- pected earnings, Ed Zander

found himself the target of an
activist-backed effort to
reform the once-venerable
cellphone maker.

This time, the campaign to
boot Zander, along with four
other board members, is led by
a group of small investors and
includes an online petition,
blog and five-minute video
manifesto.

“Enough is enough and it’s
time for a change,” said Eric
Jackson, a Naples, Fla., man-
agement consultant who owns
134 Motorola shares and
launched the grass roots initia-
tive called “Plan B” on Mon-
day. “There’s the substance of
what the CEO does, but there’s
also the symbolism. And I
think the problem is that he’s
just not that inspiring.”

So far, about 70 sharehold-
ers who claim to represent
about 400,000 shares have
signed on, though there’s no
way to verify the group’s hold-
ings. A video outlining the
plan has received more than

RETAIL

The campaign to boot Ed Zander, along with
four other board members, is led by a group of
small investors and includes an online petition,
blog and five-minute video manifesto.

1,400 views on YouTube.

Jackson launched a similar
campaign earlier in the year,
attacking former Yahoo CEO
Terry Semel, who stepped
down last month.

The anti-Zander sentiment
may be growing on Wall
Street, too.

“If you don’t see any
improvement over the next
couple of quarters, I think his
days are numbered,” said Mor-
ningstar analyst John Slack. “I
think the catcalls and the cries
for him to step down, or be
fired, are only going to grow
from here out.”

A company spokeswoman
declined to comment specifi-
cally on Jackson’s campaign.

“Ed and the senior manage-
ment team are continuing to
work to restore the profitabil-
ity and performance that we
expect from the mobile
devices business,” spokes-
woman Jennifer Erickson said.

Zander, 60, took the helm of
the Schaumburg-based com-
pany in 2004. Since then, he’s
overseen Motorola’s meteoric
rise on the success of its Razr

Stores post

modest sales

for June

BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Consumers
were eager to buy iPhones and
flat-screen TVs in June, but
their reluctance to purchase
clothing and other non-essen-
tials has retailers worried
about the success of the back-
to-school shopping seasoh.

As merchants reported
their generally modest sales
gains Thursday, it was clear
that consumers’ uneasiness
about higher good and gas
prices and the weakening
housing market was forcing
many of them to think twice
before spending. The disap-
pointments included depart-
ment stores like Macy’s as
well as apparel chains such as
AnnTaylor Stores. Discount-
ers fared well, particularly
Wal-Mart Stores, whose
renewed emphasis on low
prices helped drive sales gains
above analysts’ expectations.

Sales were not as weak as
some analysts feared, but the
fact that June was nonetheless
sluggish did not augur well for
back-to-school shopping that
begins this month. June, the
second most important month
of the year, is a time when
retailers clear out summer
goods to make room for fall
merchandise. Most obvious
for consumers is how much
they’re paying for gasoline —

- prices at the pump that fell

after peaking in late May are
HOTELS

Marriott
BY STEPHEN MANNING
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Hotel
operator Marriott Interna-
tional said Thursday that its
second quarter earnings rose
ll percent on higher demand
for rooms, but its stock dipped
on signs that growth in the
lodging industry may be cool-
ing off.

Marriott shares fell 3 per-
cent in morning trading as it
lowered the upper end of its
growth forecast for North
American revenue per avail-
able room, a key hotel industry
benchmark. It marked the sec-
ond time this year that Marri-
ott has trimmed its 2007
revpar outlook.

The company reported net
income of $207 million, or 51
cents per share, for the three
months ended June 15, up from
the $186 million, or 43 cents
per share, a year earlier.

Revenue rose to $3.21 bil-

again rising, and the national

average price for a gallon of

unleaded regular is above $3.
And although teens were

spending again in June after a .

slower spring, analysts said it
is still too early to tell how the
séas6n will fare. The improve-
ment was reflected in reports
from retailers including
Pacific Sunwear of California
and Abercrombie & Fitch.
Despite the concerns about
back-to-school, J.C. Penney
said it saw a good response to
its early fall merchandise.
“The picture for the con-

sumer hasn’t changed much,” _

said John Morris, managing
director at Wachovia Securi-
ties. “The consumer is facing a
lot of headwinds.”

Morris noted that the
spending outlook is also
becoming more uncertain
because an increasing number
of schools are starting classes
later. Teens usually wait to do
the bulk of their shopping
until after school starts
because they want to see what
their friends are wearing.

The International Council
of Shopping Centers-UBS
sales tally of 50 stores rose 2.4
percent in June, compared to a
3.0 percent gain in the year-
ago period. The tally is based
on same-store sales, which
reflect business at stores open
at least a year and are consid-
ered a key indicator of a retail-
er’s health.

lion from $2.89 billion a year
earlier.

Excluding a charge of $54
million, or 13 cents per share,
due to a tax settlement with
the federal government and
the results of the company’s
synthetic fuel business, second
quarter earnings were $229
million, or 57 cents per share.

FORECAST

Analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial forecast
second-quarter net income of
53 cents per share on revenue
of $3.17 billion.

Revenue per available
room, a _ closely-watched
benchmark known in the
industry as revpar, rose 7.5
percent worldwide and 5.6
percent for managed hotels in
North America, Marriott’s
largest hotel market. The com-
pany saw stronger perfor-
mance in overseas markets
such as China and India, but

phone along with its stunning
decline that began last fall
when aggressive attempts to
increase market share by low-
ering phone prices began to
backfire and hurt profit mar-

gins

On Wednesday, Motorola
acknowledged its struggling
cellphone business — its big-
gest — will be unprofitable at
least until 2008 and warned of
a shortfall in second-quarter
revenue due to weaker-than-
expected handset sales. It also
said it would post an operating
loss because of poor results in
cellphone units in Asia and
Europe.

The announcement that the
company’s cellphone business
won't be back in the black
until at least next year signals

Motorola’s turnaround efforts *

haven't gained traction despite
assurances by Zander that the
company would succeed.
Motorola has announced a
series of reductions and a
restructuring plan, but has
pinned its hopes for a recov-
ery on a new cellphone lineup,
anchored by the Razr 2. That



June’s results extended the
slowing trend retailers have
experienced since February.

For some stores,
results were depressed in part
by a shift in the calender that
moved the Memorial Day
weekend business into May.
But retailers of what are
known as discretionary mer-
chandise such as apparel and
home goods are also coming
under increasing pressure as
consumers are forced to pay
more for food and gas. The
still-weakening housing mar-
ket is also making shoppers
shy about spending.

saw domestic results weighed
down by softer revpar at its
limited service hotels.

Marriott raised its outlook
for the year slightly, predicting
it would earn between $1.88
and $1.96 per share for 2007,
up from the $1.84 to $L94 fore-
cast it made in April. Analysts
expect 2007 earnings of $1.92
per share on $13 billion of rev-
enue.

But the company also low-
ered the upper end of its fore-
cast for revpar, saying it
expects growth of between 6
percent to 7 percent in North
America. In April, Marriott
predicted revpar growth of
between 6 percent to 8 per-
cent, a reduction in earlier
predictions that battered its
stock on fears it indicated
weakness in the hotel sector.

Arne Sorenson, Marriott’s
chief financial officer, told
analysts Thursday that Marri-
ott expects to see stronger

June ~

phone was to be introduced in
Asia this month and elsewhere
later in the summer.

Meanwhile, analysts pre-
dicted Thursday that Samsung
Electronics would eclipse
Motorola for the No. 2 posi-
tion in world handset sales
and market share during the
quarter.

Motorola said it expects to
ship about 35 million to 36 mil-
lion handsets in the second
quarter and analysts forecast
Samsung will ship more than
37 million handsets. Mean-
while, JPMorgan estimates put
Samsung in the No. 2 spot with
13.6 percent of the market,
compared with Motorola’s 12.8
percent. Both trail Nokia Corp.

Standard & Poor’s put
Motorola’s long-term ratings
on watch Thursday — short of
a downgrade but a move signi-
fying negative implications,
the ratings agency said.

“It’s going to take some
time for Motorola to turn
things around considering
competition has_ only
increased in recent months,”
RBC Capital Markets analyst
Mark Sue said. The company,
he said, “sorely needs a hit
product to turn things
around.”

Motorola shares, already
down 13 percent in 2007, rose
13 cents Thursday to $18.08 in
trading. ;

: DARRIN PHEGLEY/THE GLEANER
GADGETS: AT&T retail sales consultant Seth Sutton,
second from left, explains the many features of Apple’s
iPhone to Katie Morton and her parents John and Emiiy
Morton. Hot gadgets like the iPhone are keeping sales of
consumer electronics strong.

Meanwhile, apparel mer-
chants have problems of their
own, including a continuing
absence of must-have fashions
and competition from the lat-
est electronic gadgets.

Craig R. Johnson, president
of Customer Growth Partners,
a retail consultancy in New
Canaan, Conn., said hot gad-
gets like Apple’s iPhone are
keeping sales of consumer
electronics strong.

“The fashion must-haves of
the world are not apparel, but
the iPhones of the world,” said
Johnson. “They are wearing
technology as fashion.”

20 earnings rise 11 percent

revpar growth in the second |
half of 2007. But he added it is
unlikely the lodging industry
will sustain the brisk revpar
growth of the past few years
when it rebounded from a
post-Sept. 11, 2001 travel
slump.

MODEST GROWTH

“We will s¢e more modest
revpar growth, but it ought to
still be a pretty good equation
going forward,” Sorenson said.

Marriott shares dropped
$1.31 to $45.04 Thursday.

Marriott’s net income
included 8 cents per share in
gains from its synthetic fuel
business, a coal production tax
credit program that is tied to
volatile oil prices. The $220
million tax settlement,
reached last month with the
Internal Revenue Service and
Department of Labor, focused
on Marriott’s accounting for a
company retirement plan.

REE ESL PN TS a PS ET TR



THE I RIBUNE

PPtbyrnt, VM by OU, tre Ua





System error
stops trading
over BISX

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

o trading took
place on the
Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities
Exchange (BISX) during nor-
mal hours yesterday after it
incurred a problem with its
electronic trading system,
something its chief executive
said would be rectified by
today. The exchange instituted

a late trading day as The Tri-

bune went to press.

_ Keith Davies said: “We are
dealing with it, and it will be
back up tomorrow [today].”

He explained that an error

‘had occurred, which had

forced the exchange to clear,

-. reset and restart its trading sys-

tem, something that had not

been an uncommon event in

@ KEITH DAVIES

help the migration of govern-



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speed and access times, and :
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ment securities to BISX.

It will also enable. BISX’s
broker/dealer members to
access historical data on listed
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The Bahamas Environment, Science
and Technology (BEST) Commission,
Office of The Prime Minister



is issecing ee ns

BISX’s history.
“Everything is being done to
_Yetire our current system and
move to a new trading plat-

date has yet been set one its
launch.
QuickTrade

has been

designed to replace the BISX
Automated Tradind System,

which has been operating since
the exchange went live in 2000.
It is designed to reduce the
exchange’s overhead and costs,
improve efficiency, boost

'. cedural in nature”

form with different operating
systems,” Mr Davies said. “It’s
never going to be.an issue ©
being down. It won’t happen.”
_He explained that BISX’s
» current system was “very pro-
, Meaning
- that when one error happened
_a set procedure had to be fol-
lowed to get it back up, an all
areas checked.
The launch of BISX’s new
- QuickTrade Windows-based
. trading system was delayed
from June 29, 2007, to sort out
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PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



~ BUSINESS |



- ‘Double taxation’ hits Bahamas
investment funds competitiveness

FROM page 1

ment manager, or proposes to
use an investment
manager/adviser, in the

Abaco

Bahamas, that is deemed a
Bahamas-based fund.

“For investment managers, it
becomes rather onerous. If

Lib

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Resume should be sent to Nick Sims, Development
Department, The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, P.O. Box
AB-20571, Marsh Harbour, Abaco or fax #242-367-2930



these funds are licensed in
another jurisdiction, and it is
not a prescribed jurisdiction,
that fund has to be licensed in
the Bahamas if it wants to use a
Bahamian fund manager.”

Mr Deveaux added: “In addi-
tion to being licensed in the
jurisdiction of origin, the fund
has to be licensed in the
Bahamas. That has prevented
a lot of investment managers in
the Bahamas from generating
business.”

To resolve the problem, he
said the Securities Commission
and the financial services indus-
try were proposing to the Gov-
ernment that the Investment
Funds Act be amended to
“remove the investment man-
ager/adviser as a nexus” to the
Bahamas.

Qualify

To qualify as a prescribed
jurisdiction with the Securities
Commission, other countries
not only had to show they had
adequate anti-money launder-
ing/Know Your Customer sys-
tems that complied with global
standards, but provisions in
their laws equivalent to the
Bahamas.

The Investment Funds Act
regulations were recently
amended to include Bermuda,
the Channel Islands and British
Virgin Islands, but Mr Deveaux

said there were also issues with
the definition of a Recognised
Foreign Fund.

Registered

While such funds were sup-
posed to be licensed or regis-
tered in a presecribed jurisdic-
tion, or listed on a prescribed
foreign exchange, Mr Deveaux
explained that some funds in
the US, especially those incor-
porated in Delaware, were not
required to be licensed or reg-
istered in that country.

This had caused “some diffi-
culties” for the Bahamas given
the requirements of its Invest-
ment Funds Act, and since they
were “the ones we’re trying to
capture as well”, the Securities
Commission and industry were
trying “to create a carve out in
the legislation in the way we
deal with” such US-based funds.

Among the other Investment
Funds Act amendments under
consideration is an extension of
the deadline for filing audited
financials on Bahamas-based
investment funds from four to
six months after year-end, to
give external auditors enough
time to complete their work.

“We’re making representa-
tions to both the [Securities
Commission] Board and the
minister [Zhivargo Laing], and
hopefully they will be done in
very short order,” Mr Deveaux

said of the Act amendments.

“We have to be guided by the
industry, because they're at the
front end. We listen to them,
do analysis, and work out
whether what is good for the
industry is also conducive for
the jurisdiction. On that basis,
we work to make recommen-
dations to the Board and the
minister to make the necessary
amendments.”

Compliant

Mr Deveaux told The Tri-
bune that another compliant
being voiced by the Bahamian
investment funds industry was
over the fact that they were cur-
rently being charged two fees
for incorporating fund struc-
tures as Segregated Accounts
Companies. One fee was being
charged for incorporation by
the Registrar General’s Depart-
ment, and another for registra-
tion.

“The complaint the industry
is bringing is that they are cur-
rently being charged a fee for
funds being incorporated as

Segregated Accounts Compa-

nies, as well as being registered
as Segregated Accounts Com-
panies,” Mr Deveaux said.
“What we’re trying to do is
determine whether this is an
internationally-accepted prac-
tice. This touches on the issues
of competitiveness, whether, we

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are being competitive and
Whether this issue is driving
business away from this juris-
diction.”

Segregated Accounts Com-
panies are vital to the Bahami-
an investment funds industry,
as they enable administrators
to set-up ‘fund of funds’ struc-
tures and prevent liabilities
from one fund impacting the
assets in others.

In a statement, the Securities
Commission said companies
had to be incorporated as either
Bahamian or International
Business Companies (IBCs)
before being registered as Seg-
regated Accounts Companies
with the Registrar General.

The regulator indicated in its
release that delays in authoris-
ing the incorporation of com-
panies by the Registrar Gener-
al’s Department were continu-
ing to create problems for the
Bahamas’ competitiveness in
financial services, including the
Securities Commission’s 72-
hour ‘fast-track’ licensing
process.

Funds

Despite its investment funds
industry having just over $200
billion in assets under manage-
ment, its growth has been rela-
tively slow in recent years.

As at September 30, 2006,
some 760 investment funds
were domiciled in the Bahamas,
an increase of 1.5 per cent or
11 over the previous nine
months. —

Mr Deveaux himself said ear-
lier this year that while the
number of funds registered in
the Bahamas had grown by 4.5
per cent between 2001-2005,

_over the same period the British

Virgin Islands, Bermuda and
Cayman had seen growth rates
of 20 per cent, 23.6 per cent and
123 per cent respectively. The
worldwide industry had seen 4
250 per cent growth rate.

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THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007, PAGE 7B



ahamas still in
20th century on
technology

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

he Bahamas
remains in the 20th
century when it
comes to the way
this country does business, the
Chamber of Commerce’s pres-
ident said yesterday, stressing
the need for commercial bank-

ing system’s Automated Clear- .

ing House (ACH) to come on
line and help Bahamian firms
provide e-commerce services.

“We still do a lot of writing
and we still do a lot of forms
manually. It would be great if
we could interact with the
Government, who have stated
that they would like to improve
this. To apply for a work per-
mit or a business licence,
wouldn’t it be great if you
could apply on line,” Dionisio
D’ Aguilar said during a press
conference to announce the
activities for Chamber Week.

“On the introduction of
technology, there is a long way
to go in this country to get that
to where it needs to be. We
know that it is there and we
know that it is available. And
we know that it will make
doing business a lot more effi-
cient; we just need to get
there.”

Mr D’ Aguilar added that it
can only be a matter of time
before the Bahamas has the
ability to shop online in this
nation.

“Tt is inevitable. I mean, if I
am a bank it’s the way of the
future. It’s like that everywhere
in the world. The process will
take as long’ as long as it will
take, but we will get there,” he
said.

“It’s just a matter of time,
and our job as the Chamber of
Commerce is to move in that
direction, to lobby, to talk and
put pressure on; to do whatev-
er it takes to get us to the point
where it is easier to do busi-
ness in this country.”

Mr D’Aguilar pointed out
that it was difficult to rate the
Bahamas’ technology level
against its regional counter-
parts. “We may be more
advanced in some area as com-
pared to others.”

He added that the ACH will
be one of the key issues he and
other business organisation
leaders will discuss when they
have their annual meeting next
week.

“Since becoming president
of the Chamber, what I have
attempted to do is to focus our
organisation on things that
affect the day-to-day running
of businesses. The issue most
prevalent in my mind, which I
keep talking about all the time,
is to try and get the Automat-
ed Clearing House up and run-
ning,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.

“It’s been talked about a lot
in this country. It’s coming, but



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

hopefully we can spread up the
process and get it to come a
little quicker.

Mr D’Aguilar said the
Chamber can only assist and
tell the Central Bank and the
Clearing Banks their stance as
a business community.

“Hopefully, by the end of
the year it will be up. It will be
wonderful,” Mr D’Aguilar
said. “It would eliminate the
need to accept so much cash. It
would be wonderful if you
could come in with your debit
card. I could swipe it, you put
in your pin and your money
could be transferred electroni-
cally from your account to my
account.

“I don’t have to count the
cash. I don’t have to safeguard
it, I don’t have to transport it,

. and I don’t have to risk my life

every day to deal with it. So
that is a wonderful benefit for
business.

“Take cheques, for example.
You have to write a cheque,
someone has to pick it up, they
have to take it to their accounts
department, they have to
record it, they have to take it to
the bank, do a deposit slip. It’s












Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a
Senior Accountant — Derivatives & Structured Products



a very long, arduous, inefficient
way of doing business. If peo-
ple can do it on-line it’s done.

“It will vastly change the way
we do business in this country,
as it has changed the way they
do business in the first world.”

Mr D’Aguilar said that there
are other issues he would like
to discuss with other Chamber
presidents to see what con-
cerns they may have on their
respective islands. “Obviously
we are in Nassau, so we are
bigger and most of the issues,
here may not apply to them,
so this is an avenue where once
a year we get together to dis-
cuss the issues affecting them.”

SC

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behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

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Provide expertise in defining accounting treatment for derivative products (Options, Swaps, etc.)
Assisting in the preparing of reports for Senior management
Assisting in ensuring that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated
Involvement in various investment banking and Group accounting issues and projects
Recommend new products for implementation after receiving sign-offs of above specialized units,
Ensure that new products are implemented in a controlled manner and execute implementation review
with IT, Operations and Accounting
Identify potential risks and suggest improvements regarding controls, systems in use and business
management : ;
Work with senior business management to prioritize initiatives
Support implementation of standard software supplements

Requirements: .
e Aminimum of five (5) years experience with an offshore bank, trust company or accounting firm
e Technical product knowledge of derivatives / structured products MANDATORY. Must demonstrate
sufficient hands-on work experience in accounting for derivative products.
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Good IT skills; familiar with Accounting and IT infrastructure basics

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Ability to work independently
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Strong analytical and organisational skills and good sense of control

Benefits provided include:
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Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JULY 20, 2007

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Applicants for the position of Private Banking Relationship Officer must.
have Banking or Financial education and experience in the offshore banking
sector, fluency in Italian, German and French, have strong background
in KYC matters, good knowledge of international financial instruments,
ability to partner with team members, project oriented, and have thorough
knowledge of local legislation, regulatory, & statutory matters as well as
international banking practices.

Personal qualities :- :

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook

Project oriented

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Commitment to continuous training and improvement of colleagues
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

Responsibilities :-

Ensure KYC guidelines are applied on a day to day basis within Private
Banking unit

Organize, implement and monitor KYC and Client Relationship
Management related projects within the Private Banking Unit
Training of Private Banking allocated resources

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors or agents
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking
professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their
resume/curriculum vitae to :

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited

Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road
P. O. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 702 1253 or email:

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.





PAGE 6D, PHIVAT, JULT 19, 2UU/

IAeE TRIBUNE



Abaco Markets eyes
June/July 2008 to
restart share dividend

Legal Notice
- Notice

Anatolian Shipping Limited
(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims againts the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned at Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator
on or before the 27th day of July, 2007. In default thereof they
will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by the
Liquidator.’ bie ae

Dated the 11th day of July 2007

‘LYNDEN MAYCOCK
LIQUIDATOR



_ Legal Notice
- NOTICE -
Anatolian Shipping Limited
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a). Anatolian Shipping Limited is in dissolution under

the provisions of the International Business Companies
Act 2000. ae ana

The dissolution of the said cornpany commenced
"som the 11th July, 2007 when its the Aiticles of
Dissolution were submitted to aiid registered by the
Registrar General.

"The Liquidator of the said Cémpany ig Mr. Lynden
._ .Maycock of Ocean Cenitre, Montagu Foreshore,
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as sole Liquidator.
Dated thel 1th day of July 2007.
2S H&J Corporate Services Ltd.
_.. Registered Agent :
'_ for the above-named Company



a onp Unb. |

- (FORMERLY FLETCHER SUNRISE I
_ FUNDLTD):



ee (In Voluntary Liquidation) ©
‘Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, commencing on the 20" .
day of June, 2007.. Articles of Dissolution have
been duly registered by the Registrar. ‘The Joint
Liquidators are Paul A. Gomez and Patrick E. Smith,
P.O. Box N-8285, Nassau, The Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-
named Company aré required on or before the 23"
day of August, 2007 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to
the Joint Liquidators of the Company or, in default
thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Dated this 12" day of July, 2007

‘PAUL A. GOMEZ and PATRICK E. SMITH
ro : Joint Liquidators _.



"Abaco Markets.
Bahamas Property Fund © ~
“", Bank of Bahamas’ ~ :
Benchmark
.. Bahamas Waste |
+ Fidelity’ Bank: e000
Cable Bahamas © =)
Colina Holdings -
- = Commonwealth Bank: | -.
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson
‘Premier Real Estate. -

Bahamas Su
0 Caribbean C
RND Holdings

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund

. Colina Bond Fund

3.2920***
2.739935**
1.244286°"***



Poa

FROM page 1

be in store, with insiders hay-
ing previously told The Tribune
that Abaco Markets was expect-
ed to generate a profitable year
for the 12 months to January
31, 2008, having recorded its
first two consecutive quarters
of profitability for five years
earlier this year.

Mr Watchorn said of Abaco
Markets’ latest three-month

. period, which is due to close at

VEG 11.12% 12006 34.47%

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

the end of this month: “Our sec-
ond quarter is looking to be
somewhat of a similar result [to
the previous quarter]; probably
a little better than quarter one.
We’re showing tremendous
improvement over the prior
year.”

The Abaco Markets presi-
dent added that the company
would also make quarterly

redemption payments to hold-
ers of its Class A preference
shares, rather than release one
lump sum payment at year-end,
a move that will boost cash
flows and bring a quicker end to
an unfavourable interest spread.

“We made the first repay-
ment in June, and when we
made it we gave notice of a sec-
ond payment of $535,000, which
will be made in September,” Mr
Watchorn said.

“Thereafter, we will pay
approximately $270,000 per
quarter going forward.”

Markets

Abaco Markets was currently
paying $80,000 into a “sinking
fund” to help meet the prefer-
ence share obligations, and Mr
Watchorn said the quarterly
payments would help remove

NOTICE

an unfavourable interest spread
faster. The interest earned on
the money in the fund is less
than that on the preference
share debt.

Class A shareholders will see
their principal redeemed in
instalments at the end of 2007,
2008 and 2009, while Class B
shareholders - who account for
63 per cent of the preference
share debt - will only start see-
ing their principal returned in
2009, with payments spread
over four years.

From an operational stand-
point, Mr Watchorn said the
main focus was the conversion
of the group’s Abaco-based
Cost Right store into a full club
store model. Work had been
done on the store’s product mix,
and an order for all the refrig-
eration equipment had been
placed, with Abaco Markets
hoping to have the outlet “up
and running before Christmas”.

“We know we stil have work
to do. There’s always room for

improvement and things to take
advantage of, but we’re pleased
about where we’ve come from
over the last 12 months,” Mr
Watchorn said.

Costs

Electricity costs for Abaco
Markets in the fiscal year that
ended on January 31, 2007,
were 25 per cent higher than
the previous year, and Mr
Watchorn said the company’s

capital expenditure for 2008- 7

2009 would allocate a budget
for bringing in “more energy-
efficient equipment” to combat
the effects of rising global oil
prices.

He added that while electric-
ity costs for the year-to-date
were slightly down on last year,
higher oil prices were “here to
stay”. ;

“Other than that, we’re main-
taining costs and increasing
sales. It’s a good combination,”
Mr Watchorn said.





NOTICE is hereby given that FLORIDA SAINTHILAIRE
CHARITE OF QUAKOO STREET, P.O. BOX N-8889,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should- send~a-written -and-signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of JULY, 2007
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that BALDWIN CELICOURT
OF GARDEN HILLS #2, P.O. BOX EE-15661, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from. the 6TH day of JULY, 2007 to the

Minister. responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N-.7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC



The Public is hereby advised that |, KHAMBREL
CORMON RUSSELL of #17 Golfview Lane, Bahamia
West Replat, Freeport, Grand Bahama, intend to change

my name to KHAMBREL CORMON ROLLE. If there are }

any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL |

The Public is hereby advised that |, MARIE ANGIE
ESTIVEN of NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

intend to
change my name to MARIE ANGIE MESIDOR.
If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box SS-792, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.



Weekly Vol.

Last 12 Months Div S

NAV KEY

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

*- 29 June 2007

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

** - 30 June 2007

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1,.1994 = 100

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

*** 31 May 2007

**** - 30 April 2007








INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

‘and running thereon irregu

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARMAINE LATOYA
GRANT of 117C FARNHAM CLOSE, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day
of July, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, : Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THEBAHAMAS. __2007
IN THE SURPREME COURT CLE/Qui/No. 0142
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION (CLE)

BETWEEN



NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act 1059 Chapter 367.

EOE PETITION OF CARROL ALBURY IN RESPECT

ALL THOSE pieces pe or lots of land comprising °
portions of Lots 9, 23 & 92 and being of admeasurements ©
9,002 aque feet and being portions of the Marsh Harbour
Crown Allotments located on the Southern shoreline of
Marsh Harbour and being bounded clockwise as follows:
NORTHWARDLY by Bay Street and running thereon One
Hundred and Twenty and Eight Hundredths (120.08) feet
more or less WESTWARDLY by land belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon Seventy-five (75) feet
NORTHWESTWARDLY by property of the Petitioner

arly for Seventy and Fifteen
Hundredth (70.15) feet more less WESTWARDLY by
property said to be the estate of the late George Archer.
and running thereon irregularly for One Hundred and
Thirty-five and Fift et
more less SOUT STWARDLY by the property of.

| Cynthia Smith and running thereon Eight-six and Sixty-

two Hundredth (86.62) feet EASTWARDLY by parcel of
rivate property and running thereon Fifty-six and Ten
Haridredths (56.10) feet SOUTHWARDLY by the said
private property and running thereon for
and Twenty-two Hundredths (99.22) feet EASTW.
by land of the Estate of E. I. Lowe and running thereon
One Hundred and Ninety-one and Seventeen Hundredth
(191.17) feet which said piece parcels or lots of lands have
such shape marks boundaries and dimensions. as are
shown on the diagram or plan filed with this Petition. .

(a) The Registry of The Supreme
Court, Freeport, Gran
Bahama Commonwealth of
The Bahamas.

The Chambers of V. Alfred

Gra

& Company, 21A Kiplin

Building Freeport Grand Bahama,
Bahamas.

The Administration’s Office
Marsh Harbour, Abaco,
The Bahamas .

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person
or persons having dower or right of Dower or an
Adverse Claim not recognized in the Petition shall
on or before the 28" day of August, A.D. 2007
file in the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned an Adverse Claim; Non compliance
with the NOTICE will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 20 day of June A.D. 2007,

V. ALFRED GRAY & CO.,
Chambers

Freeport, Grand Bahama
The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner



Hundredths (135.58) feet. ff -:

inety-nine’ |}. .
DLY J:



en

»

‘% THE TRIBUNE

8

FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007; PAGE 9B



Protect Bahamas firms

from ‘shell companies’

FROM page 1

Mr Smith. Bahamas-based engi-
neer, Keith Bishop, who owns
his own company, Islands by
Design, is having to pursue legal
action against a US company,
“Cay Clubs & Resorts, over its

-\Calleged failure to pay him for
‘1S: environmental and engineering

"tay

‘work related to their failed

‘attempt to acquire Walker’s

Â¥

1

vo

. Cay in Abaco.

° Although Cay Clubs &
Resorts is denying the allega-

cc tions against it and previously
2 told The Tribune it was going

to defend the action, Mr Bishop

is leased from the Government,
so no collateral there, and there
are numerous other legal
actions in which the Bahamas
Film Studios are embroiled.

Mr Smith said that Bahamian
businesses were “liable to be
left holding the bag with no
recourse if the shell company
stops doing business, providing
no protection to creditors”.

Many investors establish
Bahamas-based companies,
either International Business
Companies (IBCs) or domestic
ones, to act as holding vehicles
for their projects here, but no
not vest assets in them.

Often, these companies just
act as holding vehicles for a

specicif part of the overall
development, and are treated
as special purpose vehicles
(SPVs) or off-balance-sheet
entities.

“To my mind, any foreign
business that wishes to do oper-
ate or do business in the
Bahamas should operate in its
own name, and not through
some empty shell company that
is created for a special purpose
- for entering into, or doing
business, in the Bahamas,” Mr
Smith said. “Unless these shell
companies do have assets to
back them or put up a perfor-
mance bond, Bahamian busi-
nesses have no recourse in the
event of a breach of contract or

failure to pay. “As we envisage
investment profiles and devel-
opment from abroad and with-
in the Bahamas, I think our leg-
islators should develop protec-
tions for Bahamian suppliers of

goods and services so that com-
panies from abroad operating
here without assets do not put
local companies into bankrupt-
cy.

As the Bahamas was “not



plugged into the US credit rat-
ing system”, any default on debt
repayments or their subsidiary’s
obligations here had no impact
on the credit rating of US par-
ent companies, Mr Smith said.

Ministry of Education, Youth,
Sports and Culture

-2".is being forced to take legal
2's action in the US because the
-t» company has no assets here.
c1 When its deal to purchase
Walker’s Cay fell through, the
-r1,company reclaimed its deposit
© 3.and left no assets for Mr Bishop
“7 to apply the default judgement
he won in the Bahamian courts
against.

In addition, Mr Bishop has
also taken court action that
, secured a lien over any sale of
» .the Grand Bahama-based

Bahamas Film Studios, again
over alleged unpaid environ-
mental and engineering work.

The Bahamas Film Studios,

‘which are for all intents and
purposes closed as its owner
attempts to sell the property,
-has a structure through which
it is controlled by a variety of
holding companies - Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises, Ashby

. =~ (Bahamas) - all the way up to
the Ashby parent, which is

'* domiciled in Bermuda out of
the reach of this nation’s courts.
The Bahamas Film Studios
owe at least $1 million to a vari-
ety of Grand Bahama-based
suppliers and businesses, who
have no hope of claiming them
‘ against the project’s assets,
‘upon which an insurance com:

The following vehicles are offered For Sale:-

AT ||
aU Seer

Prestigious Private Island Resort has immediate positions
available for the following:

Plate: #2172 - 2000 Nissan Wagon
Plate: #2174 - 2000 Nissan Wagon
Plate: #1609 - 1995 Nissan Wagon
Plate: # 1997 - Daewoo Damas
Plate: #1999 ~ Daewoo Damas

These vehicles can be viewed by contacting Mr. Ted Bain at the
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture between the hours of
9:00am and 5:00pm. Monday thru Friday at telephone number 502-0600/1.

1 Housekeeping Supervisor (a minimum of seven
years experience in supervisory position in major
hotel)

Sealed tenders are to be submitted no later than 5:00pm July 20, 2007

2 Housekeepers and addressed:

1 Captain/Maitre’d (Formal/gourmet dining room

experience and table side preparation) Tender For Vehicles
Permanent Secretary
P.O. Box N-4891

Nassau, Bahamas

1 Seasonal Executive Chef (five to ten years
Caribbean experience and knowledge of
European/American Cooking)

rat

The Permanent Secretary reserves the right to reject any and all

2 Cafeteria cooks/attendants (three to five years
tenders.

experience in a major hotel)

Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications. Free housing and other benefits available.
Permanent Secretary

Interested pesons should fax resume to 242-347-5004 or Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture .

email to tstewart@catcayyachtclub.com



: pany has first claim. The Jand. , .

x upon which the project is sited:

PB :

4

Q

id y a a

7 Jol Description

is

{

, ‘ ‘

i Z Job Title: Production Shift Supervisor

‘

t .

, BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED Department: Production

t

, BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established The Production Shift Supervisor shall report to the Production Manager and must be familiar
t intern ational private bank, with its head quarters in Lu gano, Switzerlan d, with, understand and operate according to the relevant elements of the Coca Cola Quality System.
- is presentl ti

' : p 7 accepting applica ions for Main Duties & Responsibilities:

. PRIVATE BANKING - HEAD EUROPEAN ASSET MANAGERS The Production Shift Supervisor shall be responsible for the operations of the Production plant
: % during the respective production shift. Duties shall include but not be limited to the following:
‘ Applicants for the position of Head European External Asset Managers

, within the Private Banking Unit must have Banking or Financial education 1) Ensuring that production targets are met by providing adequate guidance and

\ and at least 10 years experience in the offshore banking sector, well versed supervision to Operations, Maintenance Supervision & Syrup Room Attendants.

. in managing relationships with Professional Asset Managers, fluent in a

y Italian and English, good knowledge of French, ability to manage projects, 2) Assisting with the planning and setting of production targets:

* perform reviews to minimize risks, efficiency oriented, lead small team of oe fee

& Private Banking Relationship Officers, maintain relationships with other 3) Liasing with all departments to ensure that all raw materials and semi finished

«| units and third parties and have knowledge of local legislation, regulatory Pi SeHCL eSUN EN Ente ae Wel ge ually: aaelyeanaeniceney Se ae

é oo dequately met.

: | & statutory matters as well as international banking practices. ei aa

be

if Personal qualities . 4) Liasing with external and internal sanitation crews with respect to production.

5) Ensuring that all Production transactions are completed at the end of each shift.

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Strong in problem solving, investigative.

Customer service oriented

Must be able to work under pressure

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Commitment to continuous training and improvement of allocated
resources

Organisational skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

6) The generation of comprehensive and concise shift reports at the end of each
production shift for management review.

7). Ensuring adherence to Good Manufacturing Practices.
\

Z
8) Identifying staff training requirements and assisting with the training.

9) Performing other reasonable job related duties may be assigned by management.

Responsibilities :

Qualifications & Experience

Manage team

Review relationships with counterparts

Develop allocated client segment

Direct involvement with External Asset Managers’ clients

Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking
professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Tertiary education in a Science discipline

A minimum of three years experience in a supervisory capacity in a manufacturing environment
Core Competencies:

Good working knowledge of production processes.

Good working knowledge of bottling machinery and services.

Good problem solving and communication skills
Good leadership and team building skills.

Raa SFP FWE KCK ae ae CVT Ke R SES BP MMSE. PKs.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their
resume/curriculum vitae to:-

7 PE FI

Human Resources Manager Computer literacy
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited : o
Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road Bee Op ree nee
P. O. Box N-7130
“ Nassau, Bahamas The Human Resources Manager
’ Fax no. (242) 702 1253 or email: P.O. Box N-1123
‘ Nassau, Bahamas
: (ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE) a
. Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted. Or by email to:

jfountain-moss@cbcbahamas.com
On or before Friday, July 27th 2007.





PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007
COMICS PAGE

THE TRIBUNE



JUDGE PARKER

WE'RE NOT GOING| HEY, THERE'S A
INTO THE ALLEY | COP COMING---
WITH YOU---ROB DOWN THE
US AND LEAVE! STREET! f]








( Calvin & Hobbes y









© 1990 Unwversad Press Syndcaie












1T'§ SPRINGTIME IN NEW YORK, AND
FOR SOME, LOVE /S/N THE AIR eee






FOR OTHERS /7 18 THE
SEABON OF MEMORIES... ALAN LANGE!
= L IONT BELIEVE












oie TO READ THE »









NON SEQUITUR

Vieyou

yOU TOOK A
SPEED-READING








MY EYES SE
a







“YOUR CAR LOOKS A LOT BETTER
WITH RACIN’STRIPES, MR.WILSON."!








_By Steve Becker
Famous Hand



Opening lead — three of spades.

A defender has an obligation to
do everything he possibly can to pre-
vent his partner from making a mis-
take. Many defensive errors can be
traced to the failure of one defender
to clarify a situation for his partner,
presenting him instead with an
opportunity to go wrong.

Consider this deal from the match
between Uruguay .and the United
States at the 1984 World Team
Olympiad. Playing against Bob
Hamman and Bobby Wolff, East-
West for the US., the Uruguayan
declarer got to three notrump as
shown.

Wolff led the three of spades, and

MENU, DAGWOOD? ms eee South dealer. it would have been entirely normal
N Both sides vulnerable. for Hamman to win with the king
NORTH and return the jack. In fact, it might
a4 even be called standard operating
Â¥VKI74 procedure. In that case, after South
@KI984 covered the jack with the queen,
&A 82 Wolff most likely would have won
WEST EAST with the ace and returned a spade,
@A9732 #KI8 hoping his partner had started with
¥9862 ¥A103 K-J-10-x. These plays would effec-
72 0653 tively have scuttled the defense,
&7 4 &K965 since declarer’s only losers would
SOUTH then have been two spades, a heart
: #Q 1065 and a club.

7 ¥Q5 But Hamman realized from
T'VE NOTICED DAD AND STAYS I'M BEGINNING ¢ : Q 10 Wolff’s fourth-best lead of the three
LEAVES THE HOUSE AWAY THE TO THINK HE'S $Q5103 . that his partmer had at most five
EARLY EVERY MORNING WHOLE DAY TRYING TO AVOID ME!} The bidding: spades, which meant declarer had to
1) South West North East have four spades — something Wolff
1& Pass 14 Pass couldn’t possibly know (South had
1 NT Pass 3¢ Pass failed to bid one spade over one

3 NT heart).

Hamman also knew that declarer
couid not possibly make three
notrump without first losing a trick to
either the ace of hearts or king of
clubs. Accordingly, at trick one,
Hamman played the jack of spades
instead of the king! He deliberately
played the “wrong” card because,
from his vantage point, it was the
right card to play.

And, as usual, acini. one of
the world’ s best players, was right.
Declarer won the jack with the queen
and immediately tried a club finesse.
Hamman won with the king, played
the king and another spade, and the
defense quickly gathered six tricks to
_ put the contract down two.

i

ue ai

EM
MITE,

WILEY COL SROA TIP, COM

HOW many words of
four letters or more
‘can you make from the
letters shown here? In
making a word, each
letter may be used once
only. Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-lctter word. No





Good 10; very good 15; excellent 20.
Solution tomorrow.

emetic emir emirate emit empire epic erica impact
impart IMPRECATE trate item maitre matric
merit métier metric mica mice mire mite miter
mitre pair paretic pari permit pica piece pier pierce
pieta pirate price prim prima primate prime ramie
receipt recipe récit recite recti remit rice rime ripe
rite tapir tempi tier tierce time timer tire trice trim
trip tripe

aerie amir apiece armpit artic cile crime crimp

plurals or verb forms =
ending in “s”, no words S
with initial no words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. a
The first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in B
inkjet printer). g
TODAY'S TARGET <

o

H

i





4

| CRYPTIC PUZZLE | |

DOWN










ACROSS



ay



11 Togeta likeness i is not exactly The ultimate basis for cobbling (4)

etna Mat tg

1 For the lame, the charge will be 1 Amore able operative? (6)
about a pound (6) 2 They have courses in building (6) word
7 Atempestuous career is only 3 Were stir crazy in jug! (4)
natural (8) 4 Are they fiendishly enthusiastic? (7) | balsa
8 Much the same as “don't mind” (4) 5 Angered by the figures (5)
10 Sort of bullets, you see (6) 6 — Cried upon finding me married (5) a: | bo of wood .
; that is soft and
9



simple (6) Is anameless ass of such

14 Heavenly Tchaikovsky finale (3)



importance? (3)
A low noise down on the farm (3)




16 Cash demanded by a chap, but not in 12
plain English (5) 13

17 Traitors to the arts, possibly (4) 15

19 Gout's treated with relish (5)

21 The shortest can be the 18
straightest (5) 19

22 It's customary to breathe 20
alittle (5) 21




Reveal in a letter to school (3,2)




One's approach to a quarrel with
somebody? (3-2)

One shot by an Amazon? (5)
Little rock! (3)

Group raising some protest (3)
He may be in at No. 11 (4,3)





Kevin Spraggett v Pierre Fogel,
Gibtelecom Masters 2007.
Spraggett is Canada's top player,
but it is nearly 20 years since he
was a world title candidate and
rust showed at Gibraltar. Here











Idol 8, Listen 12, Rents 13, Trash 14, Apart 15, Liken
16, Debar 18, Manor 19, Steepen 21, Porter 22,
Bovine 23, Tenure 25, Cabin 26, Code 28, Met

Ccetmeme ene pr

Lives 16, Telly 18, Re-mus 19, Ja-veli-n. 21, Tartan
22, Strata 23, Legion 25, Clues 26, S-ago 28, Pu-t

CHESS by Leonard Barden



Tribune —
Horoscope



_By LINDA BLACK

FRIDAY,
‘JULY 13

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20 ;
Nosy neighbors try your patience,
Aries. Be civil; you don’t waht. to
cause any battles. Talk over your con-
cerns in a calm but direct way. You
may find the problem disappears,

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Your supervisor has spoken to you
about a disciplinary issue. Rather than
take offense, heed the advice and use
the conversatin as a way to better your
work at the company.

GEMINI — May 22/Jun 21

A confrontation at home catches you
off guard, Gemini. Rather than plan
your defense, listen carefully to what
this person has to say and voice your
opinion rationally.

CANCER — Jun 22/Jul 22
You’ve finally made the decision to
uproot and move, Cancer. With spring
around the comer, this is a good time to
dabble in the real estate market. Spend
time working on home curb appeal.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

A friend in need is weary about con-
fronting you for advice. Give off sig-
nals that you’re open and willing to
be a “shoulder to cry on.” Good for-
tune arrives on Thursday. ;

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

Stop beating yourself up about a pro-
ject you weren’t able to master, Virgo.

You excel in plenty of other things. Set
your sights on a new challenge and
you’ll be pleasantly surprised. ,° ,:

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 |
Fights at home have gotten out of con-
trol, Libra. You have to learn how to
grow up and respect others’ feelings.
By throwing temper tantrums you'll
just make more enemies.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
It’s been difficult balancing work.
and family life lately, Scorpio. You
may have to make the decision that
one will win out over the other. This
is the time for deep thinking.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
You can’t be everyone’s friend all -
of the time, Sagittarius, so stap
trying. Focus on those people,who
genuinely respect you for the: *per-
son you are.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Confrontations with Pisces leave you
frazzled and at your wits’ ‘end.
However, you don’t have the luxury
of making a quick escape. You'll
have to ride this one out.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb\18
Projects at home keep you busy for a
few days, Aquarius. Just think them
through before acting or else! you
might end up with half- finished
work or a big mess.

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20,
Take a more assertive role at work,
Pisces. Establish that you can be
relied upon and get the job done i ina
satisfactory manner.





23 Long to fix a foregone 22 Stephen's bird? (3) ACROSS DOWN 0 :
ee : 1 Plays dishonestly (6 1 Second drink (6) he has just offered a bishop at
0 conclusion (4) 23 Turning white when many : ies ig ly (6) 2 ‘Trinket (6) h5 with multiple threats like Rf
-— 26 Thus the French are not heels! (5) are in pain (6) 8 Fish (4) 3 baa winning Black's queen or Bxg6+
NN 24 Rainstorm country? (4 10 Purloined (6) 4 Dress exposing the king, but his
N 28 Vehicle in which to scarper (3) y? (4) ad 4) Procession (6) 5 Baked unknown opponent's response
FE | 29. Wlooks ike being two nil (6) 25 They happen to be key N 14 Moist (3) food (5) was so strong that the GM had
© J 30 Building speed for about two-thirds of openings (6) S oF See (5) : ee a to resign. What was Black's one-
Seeks -out?
o a lap (6) 26 Carry on with the corporal o. 19 Detested (5) 3 Mesh (3) move knock-out
C 4 31 Deity witha love for noise? (4) punishment (5) > 21 i Lise 6) 12 ed :
. 13 i
: 27 Learnt there was no right to have put “ : :
R 32 Connections made with diplomacy by 9 Pp x a ae (5) 15 Dead language (5) LEONARD BARDEN
< the head of state (8) pressure on (5) uw 7 me ) 18 Epa
19 Border
0 33 You'd never mistake them for 28 Nota nice type in Aracadia (3) 28 Snake (3) 20 ee A
Ss slacks (6) 30 A fencing job? (4) 29 Creature (6) 21. Skin pigment (7)
SS 30 Shameless (6) 22. Male sheep 13)
& | 2a 31 Relax (4) a a cri
e
: : Yesterday? s keyaitie solutions Yesterday's easy solutions oe a 6 25 Cringed (6) x
W ACROSS: 1, Carol 6, Silky 9, Vi-oli-ns 10, C-ured 11, Iliad | ACROSS: 1, Least 6, Rifle 9, Cajoled 10, Scorn 11, Noose xamined (6) 26 Fiasco (5) Chess solution 8357: 1..Ne3! stops Rfl and Qd4+,
i 12, Be-ige 13, Headers 15, Let 17, Oslo 18, Revise 19, 12, Revel 13, Trapped 15, Led 17, Reps 18, Marine 19, | 27 Stiff (5) and threatens Nxdl, Rxc2, or (if 2 Qel) Qxc2+ and
0 - | Joker 20, Streak 22, Se-LL 24, Eat 25, Curt-sey 26, Steal 20, Sprats 22, Beta 24, Hot 25, Coroner ‘ 28 Undergarment (3) Qxb2 mate.
R Seals 27, Steal 28, Patio 29, Give out 30, 26, Cedar 27, Stoop 28, Minus 29, Denizen 30, 30 Fashion Mensa quiz: a) Makeshift b) Modern c) Mislead
: On-l-on 31, Taint Green 31, Tenet EONS One possible word ladder solution is: DIET, died,
D DOWN: 2, Abuses 3, O-verd-O 4, Lid 5, Blues 6, Sni-GG- | DOWN: 2, Encore 3, Scraps 4, Tan 5, Towed 6, Renewal 7, tied. toed, told, fold, FOOD
er 7, Isle 8, Knaves 12, B-R-ook 13, Ho.-use 14, Alert 15,





THE TRIBUNE
FRIDAY EVENING ~ JULY 13, 2007 |

8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

Issues Round- {Washington |McLaughlin {Bill Moyers Journal (N) 1 (CC) May to Decem- |The Vicar of Di- |
WPBT |table discussion. |Week (N) 0, Group N) (CC) ber Zoe tries to |bley “Songs of
(CC) regroup. Praise” ( (CC) |

The Insider (N) |Jericho “Return to Jericho” A recap |Jericho Jake, Johnston, Dale and |NUMB3RS When a missing officer's.
@ WFORIn (cc) of the first 11 episodes. (CC) —_|Heather search for equipment to fix |badge turns up, Don’s team reopens)



the local windmill. O (CC) a tPyearol case. (CC)
Access a 1 vs. 100 One contestant battles |Las vue “Delinda’s Box” Ed and |Law & Order: Criminal IntentA
C3 WT VU |wood (N) (CC) |100 to win $1 milion. © (CC) —_|Danny have 12 hours to save Delin-|judge’s son is found dead after his |
; da from her kidnappers. father sentences a rap star. |
Deco Drive Drive Alex, Corinna, Winston and Drive “Rearview” Corinna and Alex |News (N) (CC) |
WSVN Sean deal with the ramifications of |devise a dangerous plan to gain in-
their jump-start. (N) (CC) formation about the race.
Jeopardy! (N) [George Lopez |George Lopez /Greek ‘Pilot’ College freshman {20/20 Fear of the dark side. (N) 0
WPLG icc) mM Beni depends mais mother {Rusty sets his sights on joininga (CC) |
ontestimony. {passes away. prestigious fraternity. © (CC) |
CABLE CHANNELS :

(:00) CSI: Miami |CSI: Miami “Spring Break’ A girl is |CSI: Miami “Tinder Box’ A fire at a_ Intervention "Sylvia" Sylvia needs
A&E Grave oy found dead on the beach during ‘popular night club claims 16 lives. jan intervention to get her life back
Men’ 1 (C



spring break. (CC) A (CC) together. (CC

) (CC)
Hardtalk Extra |BBC News World Business |BBC News Our World New |BBC News World Business
BBCI (Latenight). |Report . — |(Latenight). feature of the |(Latenight). |Report
~ |Arctic map.
B (CC)





ET Hell Date (CC) |THE SEAT FILLER (2004) Kelly Rowland, Duane Martin. A man pretends /Baldwin Hills {Baldwin Hills
to work in show business while dating a singer. (CC) (CC)
CBC sneet NCC nove cea Fest ee ose “Pressure Drop” (CC) |CBC News: The National (N) (CC)
ee! ir Farce es| ;
CNBC che the — |Fast Money 2007 Heads-Up Poker Tournament] The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNN ea Situa- |Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
ion Room
Scrubs “My Life |Reno 911! Visits |Reno 911! (CC) |Chappelle’s {Comedy Central |Comedy Central |Comedy Central
COM in Four Cameras’ Jex. (CC) Show a Presents Jon Presents Jeff + |Presents Doug
(CC) Woman.” (CC) | Reep. (CC) Cesario. Benson. : l
COURT. |C283.F2t,.. [Most Shocking “Under Siege 2° [Forensic Files Forensic Files (Forensic Files North Mission some smiles on your
Worth” 1 (CC) | “Stand In’ “Over a Barrel” Road (N) le : A /
The Suite Life of|Cory inthe [Hannah Mon- _ |The Suite Life of| The Suite Life of| The Suite Life of|The Suite Life of D lass fa ces.
DISN Zack & Cody ( |House Cory is jtana(N) © (CC)|Zack & Cody [Zack & Cody Zack & Cody 1 |Zack & Cody ey
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DIY This Old House |Home Again |New Yankee Sweat Equity Sweat Equity [Classic Rides Classic Car : :
Front yard plan. |(CC) Workshop (CC) Restoration
Johannes B. Kerner Ich Trage einen |Journal: Tages- |Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx } }
DW eee Grossen Nam |thema Depth B "I Ng yo ur chi Id ren to the



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E! The Daily 10 (N) |20 Most Horrifying Hollywood Murders Murders of celebrities. The Soup (N) —_|Half Year Best : 2 M cH a p p y +] oura 4 McDo na | d Ss in
NFL Live (Live) Softball 2007 World Cup -- China vs. United States. From Oklahoma Baseball Tonight (Live) oe
ESPN [eg te [eae co | Marlborough Street every Thursday
ESPNI World Strong: Boxing Fy Night Fights. Allan Green vs. Darryl Woods. Fromn Tulsa, o ‘e
man Cup (N) __ lite event from Las Vegas. Okla. (Live) (CC) a from 3 30pm to 4:30pm during the

Daily Mass: Our |The World Over Lifels Worth |The Holy Rosary|Defending Life Voices on Virtue
EWTN Lady : Living - h = |
month of July 2007.



:00) Cardio —‘|Fitness Fantasy Fitness Fantasy |Body Challenge Health Cops: Sentenced to Health
FITTV fbeacie [oqe cq ea es :
Fox Report- |The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) jHannity & Colmes (Live) (CC On the Record With Greta Van
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FSNFL {tte ? Hed Track Score (Live)

| GOLF PGA Golf: Nationwide Tour -- Chil- |PGA Golf John Deere Classic -- Second Round. From the Tournament Players Club at
dren’s Hospital Invitational Deere Run in Silvis, Ill.

GSN a Lingo (CC) Lingo (CC) Dog Eat Dog 1 (CC) ca Reaction fea)" Reaction
6:00) E3’07 — |Code Monkeys |Code Monkeys |E3’07 Live “Day 3” Interviews, game demos.
caTech iE) :
:00) Walker, — |Walker, Texas Ranger “Eyes ofa |AVENGING ANGEL (2007, Western) Kevin Sorbo, Wings Hauser, Cyn- 2 forget
HALL Neue Ranger |Ranger” Walker encourages a tal-_|thia Watros. A bounty hunter seeks revenge against a murderous Pm lovin’ it
“Paradise Trail’ jented 16-year-old to sing. (CC) landowner. (CC) S :
Buy Me “Rob & Selling Houses Specials ‘Notting- [House Hunters |World’s Most Relocation, Relocation “PJ and a rr
HGTV | {Mato (CC) |ham” A family decides to move to International |Extreme Homes |Hereward” PJ and Hereward are
: Norfolk. lec) Paris. (CC) | fleeing Fulham. (CC)
Morris Cerullo |Breakthrough jJay Sekulow Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Day|The Gospel :.
NS oe ee ee Cee ta
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KTLA Therapy’ Reba Kids ‘illegal dim (Part 1 of|Jim Dana falls forjand Chandler Loves Raymond |Loves Ravina
gets the blame. |Smile” (CC) 2) (CC) therapist. % — |baby-sitBen. — |"Favors’(CC) | (CC)
Still Standing |Reba Reba pur- |Reba Cheyenne |THE OBSESSION (2006, Suspense) cane Zuniga. A man dates a
LIFE Judy's Mother’s |sues a career in lis deprived of — |woman to get closer to her daughter. (CC)
; Day tradition. real estate. (CC) |Van’s attention. .
:00) Hardball |Countdown With Keith Olber- . /MSNBC Investigates Prison in New|MSNBC Investigates “Lockup:
MSNBC [@]"" fm NO Nee Mer
NICK Jimmy Neutron: |Nicktoons TV |Nicktoons TV Nicktoons TV ‘Nicktoons TV Funniest Home |Roseanne 1
Boy Genius a an a a Videos (CC)
- |(00) NUMB3RS |Very Bad Men ‘The Faux Rocke- Global Currents: Breaking Ranks |News (N) — |News
NTV IES [eg Cates ce ea
:00) Trackside )ARCA RE/MAX Series Kentucky. From Sparta, Ky. (Live) Rolex Sports Car Series lowa --
SPEED fee NS [isso
Rediscover the Behind the The Hal Lindsey |Joel Osteen —_|Dr. Frederick K. |Praise the Lord (Live) (CC)
TBN Kingdom Scenes (CC) |Report (CC) . |(CC) Price (CC)
MLB Baseball Pittsburgh Pirates at Atlanta Braves. From Turner Field in Atlanta, (Subject to Blackout) (Live) Everybody
TBS (CC) Loves Raymond
“Ray's Journal’
(:00) What Not |What Not to Wear Sarah’s What Not to Wear “Desiree” Fash- |A Model Life “Model Beginnings”
TLC to Wear “Laurie wardrobe of hooded sweatshirts and|ion issues. (N) (CC) (Series Premiere) Six aspiring mod-
T” (CC) yoga pants scares away clients. els. (N)

00) Charmed | % %% MINORITY REPORT (2002, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise, Colin Farrell, Samantha Morton. Premiere.
TNT Mette Aban- |A cop tries to establish his innocence in a future crime. (CC)
lon”

TOON Home for Image Camp Lazlo Class of 3000 an Adven- me Boy |My eee Camp Lazlo
nary Friends ures obby. ner’s a Monkey |
TV5 (0) Toute une |Festival franco-ontarien 2006 pees ed ie gour-
istoire mands

Storm Stories |Abrams & Bettes It Could Happen |Full Force Na- |Weather: Evening Edition (CC
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(00) Yo Amoa {Duelo de Pasiones Un hacendado |Destilando Amor Conteo Final a Premios Juventud
UNIV uan Querendénlrico rechaza a-su esposa y su hija.
; (:00) Law & Or- {Law & Order: Special Victims Unit/Monk “Biggest Fan” (Geason Pre- |Psych “American Duos’ A talent-
USA der: Special Vic-|“Contagious” (CC) miere) Adrian's fan is accused of a_|show judge hires Shawn for protec-

tims Unit 0 crime, (N) (CC) tion. (N) icc}
VH1 * * & FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF (1986, Come- /Best Week Ever /Shockingly Thin |20 Skinniest Celebs 0

dy) Matthew Broderick, Alan Ruck, Mia Sara. 0 (N) 0 Hollywood 1
vs ue Huntley {Cycling Tour de France -- Stage 6. From Semur-en-Auxois to Bourg-en-Bresse, France.

. ay

(*) America’s | % DEEP RISING (1998, Slee) Treat Williams, Famke Janssen, {WGN News at Nine (N) © (CC)

WGN Funniest he Ann og Jewel thieves face a deadly monster in the South China
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PREMIUM CHANNELS
Assume the Po- | x x THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA ee Comedy) Meryl Streep, Anne|Entourage Billy |Entourage Dra-

HBO-E sition 201 With |Hathaway, Adrian Grenier. A recent college graduate lands ajob ata ——_jand Eric clash on |ma plans a party
Mr. Wuhl (CC) the set. (CC) for Vince.

:45) * x DOMINO (2005, Action) Keira Knightley,

fashion magazine. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)
ickey Rourke, Edgar Ramirez. Thrill-seeker Domino
Harvey becomes a bounty hunter. © 'R’ (CC)





: Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun
















6:00) * * EX- | & & SLITHER (2006, Horror) Nathan Fillion, Eliza-
HBO-P TENE MEA- — beth Banks, Michael Rooker. ‘en organisms infest a
SURES (1996) [small town. ‘R’ (CC)











ee) % %& HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE (2005, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Assume the Po-
HBO-W Emma Watson. Voldemort lays a trap for Harry at the Triwizard Tournament. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) a a coy
r. Wuhl (
(:15) & %% FORCES OF NATURE (1999) Sandra Bul-|Big Love “Vision Thing’ Bill is * & & SYRIANA (2005, Drama)
HBOSES __|lock, Ben Affleck. A groom hurries to his wedding, with ive waitress,

drawn to an attractive waitress. 1 /George Clooney, Matt ia Jef- |




a fellow traveler. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) (CC) frey Wright. O'R’ (CC







re *% THE re % % THE LAKE HOUSE (2006, Romance) Keanu Reeves, San: | & & *% SUPERMAN RETURNS re
MAX-E ICKER MAN dra Bullock, Shohreh Aghdashloo. A doctor and a frustrated architect fall ie) Brandon Routh. The Man of a
(2006) ‘PG-13' [in love across time. M ‘PG’ (CC) teel faces an old enemy. (CC)



* &% THE OH IN OHIO (2006, Comedy) Parker * &% MIAMI VICE (2006, Crime Drama) Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx, Gong
MOMA |Posey, Paul Rudd, Danny DeVito. An unsatisfied Li. Detectives Crockett and Tubbs take on drug lords in South Florida. (1 |
woman seeks sexual fulfillment. / ‘R’ (CC) 'R’ (CC) |





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(:00) * x &% CAPOTE (2005, Bio Meadowlands (iTV) Evelyn learns a} *% IN THE MIX (2005, Comedy-











raphy) Philip Sey-
SHOW _ Imour Hoffman. iTV. Writer Truman Canale researches |shocking truth. M (CC) Drama) Usher Raymond. iTV Pre-
a family’s murder. 1 ‘R’ (CC) miere. ( ‘PG-13' (CC)
re % *% BEAUTY SHOP * & + MIMIC 3; SENTINEL (2003, Horror) Karl Geary, | * * SAW Il a Horror) Donnie
TMC . 2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah. {Alexis Dziena. An invalid witnesses giant bug attacks |Wahlberg, Tobin Bell, Shawnee
‘PG-13' (CC) from his window. (0 ‘R’ (CC) Smith. 0 'R’ (CC)
t 4






PAGE 12B

THE WEATHER REPORT

7 ULSTER

)) INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS |







i









































































5-Day FORECAST yy SVE say AY ayy tanks oy eet Eis re : | Marine Forecast .
52 ZS : s Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: E at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 85° F
FIC ne A GE Saturday: _E at-6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 4-7 Miles 65°F
| 32 79/26 FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-1 Feet 6-7 Miles 85° F
MODERATE Saturday: _ ESE at 6-12 Knots ~ 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
: ; : = ABACO Today: ESE at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles _ 84° F
Partly sunny and hot. Partly cloudy and Periods of sun with a Partly sunny, a Periods of sun, a Clouds and sun, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the C lel s Saturday: _ ESE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 84°F
warm. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. 44/6 pi
High: 90° High: 90° = : Tt lb
Low: on ~ vt :76 R i ee 276 Sm Tipes FoR NASSAU “63/17 s 1 Topay’s U.S. Forecast .
High Ht.(ft.) Low —_HIL(ft —
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ae is an index that combines = effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, tee precipitation, ai and ~ Today 7:28am. 2.4 .1:30am. 0.0 Ree 281/27 B05 pen
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 7:58 p.m. 3.2> 1:20p.m. -0.1 ewig’ Seu 55/12 ¢ =
: ft 8:20am. 2.5 2:20am. 0.0 ‘Bermuda = i i(iti‘é;SC 4/28 «76/24 pe Billings
pd : Es eee 8:48p.m. 3.1 2:14pm. -0.1 Bogota 64/17 48/8 e CICK
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday o10am. 26 S07am. 0.0 day o10am. 26 307am. 00 "Brussels 72/22” S16
ABACO petal —____________ 9:35 p.m. 3.0 3:05 p.m. -0.1 Busnes! la e227 a7 pe
aaeemae iN sate ee 93° F/34°C) |= ————pees ss oe a C~C=‘CS@BuuentgS Aires pe
igh 91" F/83°C LOW wenn “34° Frage ¢ = Monday Tete assem og Cairo 97/36 75/23 s
Low:61 F/27°C ae high 4 bs 88° Fat ¢ : ote i im. 0. Calcuty —— 9g 87 BOT: se
ormal low ........ ald? ° Calgary 88/31 57/13 s
WEST PALM BEACH | Last year's high 8a FTC ESTED ya Te Cancun 908275728 pe
High: 91° F/33°C Last year’s low von TAP F/23° CO Caracas 82/27 68/20 pc
Low: 79° F/26°C Precipitation = .~——___—_—_—_—sCMSunrise...... 6:28 a.m. Moonrise..... 5:17a.m. Casablanca == == 90/32 -79/26's
. SE AS Of 2 p.m. yesterday ...seccccssccssssssseeseseeeee 0.00” Sunset....... 8:03 p.m. Moonset..... 7:43pm. Copenhagen _ - 70/21 54/12 ¢
REEPORT : Year to date ww. 34.48” New First Full Last ‘Dublin ANT SAND
High: 91°F/33° C Normal year to date oo... .ceesseeeceseseeeeees 20.97” - ia Frankfurt 73/22 60/15 ¢c
Low: 79° F/26° C ack ‘Geneva = 82/27 55/12 pe
AccuWeather.com Halifax 78/25 60/15 pe
All forecasts and maps provided by - i P Havatia 2 90/82 75/23 1 Showers 4 Se
_ AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Jul. 14 Jul. 22 Jul. 29 Aug. 5 Helsinki, 70/21 82/11 ¢ [& &j T-storms . \ 90/79 !
ELEUTHERA ‘Hong Kong’ 92/33 82/27 pe Rain ee
Hoc 81 cee : pues scope ape ae A ez Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and oe i
Low: 80° F/27°C ; Istanbul 77/25 65/18 S Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm i |
. Jerusalem : 85/29 59/15 s - Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary egenf@
‘Johannesburg == HB BZ SO
. Kingston 90/32 79/26 t
oe. CAT ISLAND : Lima GANT 86/13 S”
~ Low:82°F/28°C High: 89° F/32°C London . 73/22 5713 t
. a \w: 74° F/23° C ‘Madrid = 93/83 B47 Re
& ; Manila . 84/28 78/25 t = . ie A ie
‘Mexico City 1128 S42 ok sh
Monterrey 99/37 75/23 s
: ‘Montreal = 527423 ASH =
SAN SALVADOR , Moscow 87/30 63/17 pc
High: 90° F/32°C “Munich 7eeR saeco
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ANDROS Ele BPE G 46/7 pc =,
: . ° o é = SSR
highs and tonights's lows. High: 92° F/33°C Tt =
Low: 81° F/27°G 59/12 r
‘ egg 20 pee
58/14 ¢
‘Rio de Janeiro 79/26" 70/21 pe
z i 89/31 s
OE LSE A RG sO err ec ae Rome aT BIBS -
Today Saturday Today Saturday - Today Saturday MAYAGUANA ye BO/2 26 3
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 92° F/33°C ~ 28/-2's
Fic FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC F/C FIC F/C [24°C vst 7021 te
Albuquerque 91/32 69/20 pc 93/33 68/20 t Indianapolis 84/28 60/15 pc 85/29 64/17 s Philadelphia 87/30 66/18 t — 83/28 69/20 pc CROOKE W202 IISESS :
Anchorage «65/18 53/11 c 67/19 53/11 c Jacksonville 94/34 73/22 t 89/31 73/22 t Phoenix 107/41 87/30 pc 110/43 87/30 75123 po Lelie DO
Attanta 90/32 69/20 t 84/28 69/20 t ‘Kansas City 86/30 66/18 po 90/32 69/20 pe Pittsburgh «76/24 a - BAGGEDISLAND : eri oe —
Atlantic City 84/28 61/16 t 84/28 69/20. pc LasVegas 107/41 81/27 s 108/42 86/30 pc Portland, OR 86/30 ~ High: 90° F/32° C merAsse aR UAREHE
Baltimore 84/28 64/17 t 86/30 63/17 pc Little Rock 89/31 71/21 t 88/31 69/20 c Raleigh-Durham 90/32 ¢ Low: 70°F/21°C : re ae
Boston 85/29 64/17 pe 78/25 64/17 pc Los Angeles 82/27 64/17 pc 84/28 64/17 pc St. Louis 84/28 ‘ p 479126 6
Buffalo 74/23 55/12 t 79/26 63/17 pc Louisville 84/28 64/17 pe 89/31 71/21 pe = Salt Lake City 95/35. 70/21. 9! IC GREAT INAGUA 72/22
Charleston, SC 92/33 72/22 t 88/31 74/23 t Memphis 86/30 74/23 t 89/31 72/22 pc San Antonio 95/35 75/23 s 91/32 - 75/23 pce High: 92° F/33°C B73 t
Chicago 76/24 62/16 pc 84/28 62/16 po Miami =» 90/32. 79/26 +t 90/82 77/25 t =“ San Diego 74/23 “66/18 pe 76/24 ia 75° F/2A° 63/17. pc
Cleveland 74/23 58/14 t 83/28 63/17 pc Minneapolis 80/26 65/18 pc 82/27 62/16 pc San Francisco 73/22 ms Fie : 3° S216
Dallas . 92/33 74/23 t ~ 86/30 71/21 t Nashville 86/30 65/18 t 88/31 69/20 pe Seattle = = 82/27 GO/I5 t 8B 4 Vienna. a 70/21 pe
Denver 87/30 60/15 t 93/33 61/16 s New Orleans 92/33 75/23 t 91/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 96/35 74/23 t 39/31 “72/22 t “Warsaw 5/23 57/3 t
Detroit 78/25 59/15 pc 82/27 62/16 t NewYork 85/29 68/20 t —--83/28-73/22 pe += Tampa” 182° 77/25 te 182-7725 t= Winnipeg 56/13 pc
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 77/25 s Oklahoma City 84/28 70/21 t 84/28 67/19 pc Tucson 98/36 80/26 pc 101/38 78/25° pc : . a -
Houston —»«95/35 75/23 pe 90/32 75/23 t Orlando -94/34°75/23-t 93/33 75/23 Washington, DC. 88/31 65/18 t 87/30 71/21 pc oe a eae Mie are el tes eeaion ee



Full Text


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New voter fraud claims

Allegations that
non-citizens may have
used search cards

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

LARGE numbers of non-citi-
zens may have registered and vot-
ed based on search cards, a source
alleges.

Search cards are issued by the
registrar general’s office for peo-
ple whose birth certificates cannot
be found in the official state
records after all checks are
exhausted — and these cards are
not proof of citizenship.

Additionally, the cards are
most likely to be issued to older
people born more than 50 years
ago for example, as modern
claimants can produce affidavits
and witnesses to their births,
whereas older claimants may not
be able to.

The source alleges that large .

Young man to
be arraigned
today after

age confusion
@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A YOUNG man who has :
been charged in connection :
with the murder of 18-year-old :
Mardio Hall is expected to be :
formally arraigned today after :
his arraignment did not go }

ahead as scheduled yesterday.

It was stated that the young
man, who is a resident of :
Pinewood Gardens, is 17 years :

old.

SEE page 12

numbers of non-citizens were
specifically being registered with
these cards, in a particular north-
ern Family Island constituency,
though he further claims that this
practice may have been wide-
spread.

“They stopped issuing them
as a result of the last election,”
he said. “On the 20th of April
they stopped it in the campaign.
Because in the campaign there
was so much abuse.”

All Bahamians who register to

vote for the first time, are sup- _

posed to show proof of citizen-
ship, such as a passport. In sub-
sequent elections, these voters
are allowed to use other forms of
identification that do not prove

SEE page 10

‘Six could bid’
for the PLP
chairmanship

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE race for the chairmanship
for the PLP will be “heavily
stacked” with as many as six peo-
ple possibly making a bid for the
position during the party’s nation-
al convention in November,
according to PLP sources.

A source close to the party told
The Tribune that in addition to
Glenys Hanna-Martin — who has
officially declared her intentions

: — contenders for the post may
However, his age apparently :

had not been confirmed up to :

include former Mount Moriah

SEE page 10

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The Tribune eC ay with USA TODAY

@ SEEN in The Tribune plant before the press started to roll on the first publication of the



Bahamas edition of USA TODAY are (I-r) Robert Carron, Tribune Chief Operating Officer; Den-
ver Adderley, press room assistant; Roger Carron, Tribune managing director, Jamal Brown, senior

press operator; Mrs Eileen Carron, Tribune publisher; Tom Kelly, circulation vice president, USA .

TODAY; Terry Carlson, manager/field operations, USA TODAY, and Jephthah Rahming, press oper-

ator.

THE Tribune and USA
TODAY made history this
morning when the 2.25 million
circulation American publication
printed its Bahamas edition on





The Tribune press for distribu-
tion at Paradise Island and New
Providence hotels.

“Our partnership with The
Tribune is the first printing ven-







? Is \

2528



aoe





ture for USA TODAY in the
Caribbean. We’re excited to be
publishing with The Tribune and

SEE page 12

Man in custody
eye

smashed at

Oa UCIT

A YOUNG man was
taken into police cus-

tody yesterday after a

small stone was thrown :
at the Central Detective :
Unit headquarters, :
smashing the glass front }
door. i

Police say they don’t
know what caused the
incident and that they
are making further
inquiries.

As the door is gov-
ernment property, a
senior officer said,
charges are expected to
be brought in connec-
tion with the matter.



GLASS is cleared
away from the
headquarters of the
Central Detective
Unit last night. :
(Photo: Felipé Major/ :
Tribune staff) :

Bi
Sas

Before you purchase Windows or
Doors that claim to be Hurricane

Proof or Impact



NIB employees
again claiming
victimisation

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

EMPLOYEES at a branch of
the National Insurance Board
are again claiming to be the vic- .
tims of intimidation and victim-
isation at the hands of a few
high-ranking officials at NIB.

Allegations have surfaced
over sexual harassment, undue
dismissals without basis, and
low employee morale as a result
of the reported leadership at
one branch of NIB.

According to one employee,
who spoke to The Tribune on
the condition of anonymity, he
has been working in “hell” for
the past year. “It seems like he
(the NIB official) has a vendet- |
ta against our section,” he told
The Tribune on Thursday. “I
been working for the National
Insurance Board for 30 years,
and I never experienced this
kind of torture.”

“Someone has to expose this
company,” said another fed up
employee. “The union ain’ help-
ing us, it seems like nobody

SEE page 12

PMH set for
four new
dialysis
machines

DIALYSIS patients at the
-Princess Margaret Hospital can
expect four more new dialysis
machines to be installed by the

~weekend of July 20th, according
to Vice-president of Renal
Dynamics LLC, Todd Andersen.

The new machines, which are
expected to arrive in the Bahamas
today, will make eight in total
resulting from the successful
nationwide campaign by The Tile
King, FYP Ltd and The Tribune
that raised $342,915.29 — more
than double the original goal of
$164,000.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mr Andersen, explained
that the original 17 machines at
the Dialysis Unit have or are
arriving at the maximum usage
targets, and these new machines
are needed.

“Our company originally put
these machines in years ago and
the machines have an average life
of seven years and/or 28,000
hours. And so, based upon the

SEE page 10

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Pot ta \chidnah sbedlehsbabhsobbhabatcaauil

WinGuard
f L Sb hiah he Bn Lee F cata


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

Abaco relics to stay in Bahamas

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ANCIENT artifacts found in
Abaco - touted as holding the
key to perhaps 12,000 years of
Bahamian history — will remain
in this country for the Bahami-
an people to enjoy, according
to an official at the National
Museum.

Yesterday, The Miami Her-
ald reported on findings made
in and around Marsh Harbour,
including shells of a long extinct
land tortoises, a 1,000 year old
human bone, and 40 skeletons
of Cuban crocodiles over 3,000
years old, now disappeared
from Bahamian shores.

Some of the findings have
been taken to Florida for analy-
Sis at their Museum of Natural

History, but. yesterday.one-

Bahamian historical authority
noted that the surprising and
significant artifacts are "the

property of the Bahamian peo-
ple", and once there is a facility
in which they can be housed
adequately, the Bahamian peo-
ple, and tourists, will be able to
view them.

Minister of Culture Charles
Maynard said that building a
facility where historical objects
can be stored and exhibited is
a priority for his government,
however, both he and Nancy
Albury of the Abaco branch of
the Bahamas National Museum,
agree that ensuring the right
kind of building is produced will
take some time and.research.

Such a museum could be a
major draw, particularly con-

sidering that the Abaco artifacts,

have been described as the
“best preserved in the

Caribbean" according to pale-'
“ontologist Gary Morgan, at the,

New Mexico Museum of Nat-
ural History.
"I think the potential is

beyond our comprehension at
this point," said scientist Richard
Franz of the Florida Museum
of Natural History at the Uni-
versity of Florida. "We should
be able to recogstruct the past
10,000 to 12,000 years in the
Bahamas - maybe longer."

Discovery

According to Ms Albury, the
first fossil — the skull of a Cuban
crocodile — was discowered in
1994. The piece was later car-
bon-dated at 2,800 years old.

Since that time, huridreds of
pieces have been uncovered,
primarily from one Blue Hole —
the Sawmill Sink - which has
now been protected.

A flightless shorebird, a large
rodent as well as numerous bats,
tortoises and reptiles were
among dozens of species in evi-
dence between depths of 30 to

110 feet.

Some of the creatures are
now extinct, whereas other are
now known only to exist in oth-
er parts of the Caribbean.

Staff at the National Muse-
um in Abaco have honed their
skills in preserving the fossils,
with help from U S experts
based at the University of Flori-
da, and today, most of the arti-
facts are stored in a repository
in Marsh Harbour.

Numerous Bahamians are
involved in the project to find
and preserve the remains, said
Ms Albury, although the
Bahamas suffers from a short-
age of native paleontologists.

The Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History repository of arti-
facts allows experts to cross
examine the fossils against oth-
er remains, and determine the
species to which it belongs.

"You find a bone, and you
know, what is it? Is it a Ken-

tucky Fried Chicken bone? Lit-
erally, you need someone to
interpret it," explained Ms
Albury.

Experts involved in the
search for the fossils say that
they expect more are to be
found across the Bahamas.
However, Ms Albury noted that
unfortunately, many Blue Holes
have been polluted to the extent
that any artifacts would not
have been preserved as they
have in the Sawmill Sink.

"Unfortunately it's a very
common place for people to put
their trash. Not only does it cov-
er up the fossils, but it changes
the water chemistry, which

‘causes any fossil remains to be

destroyed," she said.

Meanwhile in the sink, the
water has been found to have
properties which: has,allowed
the pieces to be preserved to an
"exceptional" standard over the
millennia.

Chamber of Commerce to host ministerial forum

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce will host its annual
chamber week with a new
forum to allow Bahamians to
discuss important issues with
members of the new FNM cab-
‘inet.

At a press conference to
announce the week of events,
Philip Simon, the chamber’s
executive director, said nine
Cabinet Ministers have con-
firmed their attendance for the
Meet The Ministers Forum,
which will be held at the San-
dals Resort on July 19.

“This is an exciting concept,
and we hope that it will not be
the first of its kind, but that we
will be able to actually put on
this particular type of forum
with our cabinet ministers and
government representatives on
a semi-annual basis. This is par-
ticularly significant in light of
the recent general election and
the change of government,” said
Mr Simon.

It will be a free event. To
date, the confirmed ministers
include:

Zhivargo Laing, minister of

state for finance; Claire Hep- '

burn, attorney general and min-
ister of legal affairs; Carl Bethel,
the minister of education,
youth, sports and culture; Earl
Deveaux, minister of public
works and transport; Brent
Symonette, minister of foreign
affairs; Tommy Turnquest, min-
ister of national security; Neko
Grant, minister of tourism and
aviation; Brent Symonette, min-
ister of foreign affairs; Dion
Foulkes, minister of maritime
affairs; Hubert Minnis, minis-
ter of health and social devel-
opment.

The theme for the week is
Promoting Trade, Expanding
Commerce, Building Better
Communities.

Other events scheduled for
Chamber week include:

* The third annual indepen-
dence golf tournament at the
Radisson Cable Beach Golf
Course on Saturday, July 14

* The president’s meeting,
where the seven presidents of
the seven chambers around the
Bahamas get together and dis-
cuss strategies relating to the
Chamber’s growth and expan-
sion, and the needs of the busi-
ness community, which will be



M ZHIVARGO Laing is one |
of those attending the confer-
ence :

held on Wednesday, July 18
According to Dionisio D’Ag-
uliar, the Chamber president,
the highlight of the week will
be the Gala Award Celebration;
planned for Saturday, July 21.
He said that this year, four
awards will be presented: Busi-
nessperson of the Year; Devel-
oping Entrepreneur of the Year;
the Business of the Year; and a
Lifetime Achievement award.

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The Businessperson of the
Year award.is given to an indi-
vidual who has increased busi-
ness income, has an innovative
spirit and made new market
acquisitions.

The nominees this year are :
Juan Bacardi, Bristol Cellars;
Chester Cooper/John Wilson,
British American Insurance;
and Dr Conville Brown.

The Developing Entrepre-

neur of the Year award is given
to an individual who has started
a business within the past three
years, and been in business at
least a year. ;

The nominees in this catego-
ry are: Burton Wallace, of Movi,
and Al Frances, of the Sleep
Gallery.

The Company of the Year
award is given to the business
which has produced good cor-
porate citizens and improved
business, while adhering to eth-
ical business practices. It must

_also be involved in industry

organisations ,and is a willing
contributor to enhancing the
overall development of the
Bahamas.

The nominees are: Bank of.

the:Bahamas International, the
John Bull Group of Companies

and Kerzner International.

A lifetime Achievement
award will be given to Kelly’s
Home Centre, with the compa-
ny celebrating its 80th anniver-
sary this year, although Mr D’
D’Aguliar said that this was not
why the award was given.to the
company.

The titled sponsorship for the
golf tournament is Diamond

‘International, and the sponsors

for Chamber week include:
Kerzner International, BTC,
Starbucks, Bahamas Ferries,
SuperWash, Cable Bahamas,
Doctors Hospital, Bahamas
Wholesale Agency, Nova
Southeastern, JS Johnson, Pearl
Vison, Bristol Cellars,
Solomon’s Mine, John Bull
Group of Companies, Island
Merchants, Coin of the Realm,
Studio Three, Master Techni-
cians, Custom Computer,
Bahamas Box, GrayCliff, San-
dals, Bahamas Supermarkets,
Continental Airlines, Bally
Total Fitness, Mr Fitz Stubbs,
Abaco Club, Harl Taylor Bags,
Abaco Air, the Event Strate-
gies Unit of the Ministry of
Tourism led by Janet Johnson

‘and Creative Edge Advertising ©

Agency.

PANTENE

Bahamas Fashion Week
Cinema Trade Show

Saturday, July 14th
9:00am - 9:00pm

Admission is Free!

Ladies sign up and win Pantene's
Woman of Color campaign. Two
young ladies will be selected from
the entries to receive treatment
hair analysis over an 8 week

period.

Pantene Educator will demon-
strate to you the wonders of
Pantene Women of Color hair

care products.

At the Bahamas Fashion Week
Trade Show, on July 14, 2007 at
the New Providence Community

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Call 242-326-3707
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THE TRIBUNE

Oln brief

Officers
accused of
robbery have
case moved



| ELJONATHAN Hall

: THE case of two police
: officers charged with armed:
: robbery will continue in court

4 five on July 17.

: The case was switched to
? court five, Bank Lane on
: Wednesday after the men,
: Constable Tarquin Kelly and
: District Constable Jonathan
: Hall, were arraigned before
: Chief Magistrate Roger
: Gomez in court one.

: The men were not required
: to plead to the armed robbery
: charges.

: Kelly pleaded not guilty to
: an additional charge of pos- -
: sessing an unlicensed firearm.





: MI TARQUIN Kelly
be

THE TRIBUNE





Haitian is
accused of
sex with
eight-year-old

A HAITIAN man accused
of having sex with a five-year-
old girl was arraigned in Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

It is alleged that Marck-
endy Julmise committed the
offence sometime during
June 2007.

Julmise was adjourned
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meeres at court five in Bank
Lane.

Julmise was not required
to enter a plea to the charge
and was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison having been
denied bail.

The case was adjourned to
October 18.

Police hunt for
robbers after
phone card
booths raided

TWO Quick Cell phone
card booths were robbed at
gunpoint on Wednesday
night, according to a state-

‘ment issued by press liaison

officer Assistant Superinten-
dent Walter Evans.
At.around 5.20pm, two
men in a gold coloured vehi-
cle pulled up to a booth on
Robinson Road near Flori-

~. da Court, Mr Evans said.

He said one unidentified
man got out of the car and
requested a five dollar phone
card from the attendant.

The man then pulled out a
handgun and robbed the
attendant of $400 cash and
about 30 phone cards.

Mr Evans said two men
sped off in the car travelling
in the direction of Key West
Street north.

He added that around half
an hour later, a second Quick
Cell booth was robbed.

A black vehicle with two

_ occupants pulled up neara :
_. phone card booth on East:
| Street south. —

An unidentified man held
the attendant at gunpoint
then left with $500 cash and
several phone cards, Mr
Evans said.

The occupants sped off
travelling north on East
Street.

Investigations into both
incidents continue.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157



Environmental Health
staff threaten action

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

DISGRUNTLED workers in
the grounds and beautification
section of the Department of
Environmental Health are
threatening to take action if
their “frustrating” working con-
ditions are not rectified.

The workers said that they
intend to stage either a walk-
out or a sit-in if their complaints
are not addressed in the next
few weeks.

An employee who spoke to
The Tribune described the
working conditions as “virtual
slavery” and said that eventual-
ly, “someone is either going to
get killed or hurt.”

“We already went through
protocol,” she said yesterday.
“Someone wrote a letter to the
director and the permanent sec-
retary almost two weeks ago
and no one replied. Tempers
are really hot around here and
morale is low.”

She alleged that she and her
co-workers are forced to clean
up potentially hazardous and
unsanitary waste such as used
condoms, discarded sanitary
napkins, and human faeces —
without the benefit of protec-
tive gear and proper equipment.

_ “All they give us is latex gloves

and sometimes [the gloves] tear
when you put your hand in the
garbage,” she explained. “It is
very unsanitary.”

“They Have women out there
cleaning the beach, picking up
trash, things male workers sup-
posed to be doing; and they ain’
even give us our hazardous pay.
The heads in this department
really need to move, or do
more,” she said.

The source alleged that when
employees complain to their
supervisors about working con-
ditions, such as an employee

‘bathroom being out of order for

more than two weeks, threats
about docking wages are made.

The employee has been
working for the grounds and
beautification section for a

Complaints over quality
of working conditions







®@ JOHN Pinder

number of years, but claims that
she is still classified as a “relief
worker” and being paid on a
week to week basis.

“J only is get paid $175 a week,
and after they take out national
insurance I only left with $169.”
She added that on her meagre
salary, it is difficult to take care of
her family as she is the sole bread-
winner. She noted that she put in
the necessary paperwork before
the May general election to.“regu-
larise” her from a weekly worker to
a monthly, salaried worker, how-
ever she is still awaiting approval.

John Pinder, President of the
Bahamas Public Service Union,
said he has not “advised any
industrial action” as yet, but
acknowledged that there are “a
number of concerns” that need-
ed to get addressed by the
Department of Environmental
Health.

“We [the union] are dealing
with the issues,” he told The Tri-
bune yesterday. “We are aware
that a number of employees are
entitled to hazardous pay, are
not receiving risk allowance, and

we know that a number of per-
sons are working outside of their
job description. There is also a
concern about a number of peo-
ple who are not established [per-
manent] workers. We know of
[employees] who have been
there for 12 years and are still
paid on a weekly basis.”

Mr Pinder also noted that
workers are receiving the mini-

“mum risk allowance wage of

$16.67 a month, when they were
entitled to as much as $100 a
month.

When asked if he had
received any complaints regard-
ing maltreatment of employees
at the hands of superWisors, Mr
Pinder replied “not being pro-

vided with regular drinking |

water, not having access to
Junchroom facilities and a [lack
of] protective gear” were just a
few of the complaints.

Mr Pinderz revealed that the
union has contacted the Minister
of Health, Dr Hubert Minnis,
to arrange a meeting about the
work conditions at the depart-
ment, but no date has been set.

Barbara Burrows, permanent
secretary for the Department
of Health, told The Tribune that
she was aware that some
employees need to be regu-
larised. She added that her
department is “actively work-
ing on the matter.”

However, she said that she
was not aware of the other
issues being raised by staff, but
that she would meet with her
director to discuss them.

Attempts were made by The
Tribune to contact Minister of

’ Health Dr Hubert Minnis and

Winston Sweeting, deputy direc-
tor of Environmental Health,
but up to press time. they could
not be reached for comment.

stncecceseeneceeceetencecteneneecenseneeceeeenteeeeseeeeseeeeseeeees eases esse sees eee eseneseene nee eceneeesesensaceaseeessenesaseseleessssesensensesensecsnsensnsensnsenssnsnsensensnsensesensenessseeneenenees

RBDF apprehends 38 Haitians

DEFENCE Force Marines
assigned to the Land and Sea
Park preserve along with the
Park’s warden apprehended 38
undocumented Haitians on Pipe

.Cay in the Exuma chain on

Thursday morning. |

The immigrants are suspect-
ed of attempting to land illegal-
ly in the Bahamas.

While on routine patrol, the
marines received reports that a
Haitian vessel had run aground
on the cay.

A further investigation dis-
covered the immigrants, who all
appeared to be in good health,
the officers reported. :

Defence Force patrol*craft
HMBS P-42 was sent to assist
with the removal of the Haitians.

An ongoing search is current-
ly being carried out on the cay
for any additional immigrants
that may have been missed in
the initial sweep.

This is the second apprehen-
sion of Haitians in the past week.

Last week Friday, 76 migrants
were caught off Halls Point,
Exuma, and brought to Nassau.

This brings the total to more
than 600 Haitian nationals
apprehended in the Bahamas by
Defence Force officials so far
this year.

YOUR CONNECTION®*TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

In its

GSM UPGRADE

continuing effort to
telecommunications
Telecommunication Company Ltd.

service,

The

improve its
Bahamas
(BTC)

wishes to inform its valued customers and the
general public, that BTC will be performing an

equipment

upgrade to

the

GSM_ cellular

platform. Beginning Friday June 29th Sunday

| July 15th, subscribers in Grand Bahama and

New Providence may experience an interruption
in both Post Paid and Pre Paid GSM services.
BTC apologizes for the inconvenience caused,
and assures the public that every effort will
be made to keep this disruption of service to a

minimum.



f FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007, PAGE 3





















































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EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE iAibUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA\MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No. Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt. y
Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 \
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL. B. ;
Publisher/Editor 7572.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

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Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
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First a purge, then a power play

THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION cally have been expected to oversee fed-



has a record of trying to expand the exec-
utive branch’s power however possible.

So although the Senate and House
judiciary committees have demanded
more information on last year’s firings
of nine US attorneys, the White House
— predictably — is refusing to comply.

President Bush’s assertion of execu-
tive privilege Monday is disturbing
nonetheless.

At the least, it means he will keep
stonewalling inquiries into the firings.

But there’s more to the story.

Executive privilege is often cited to
protect information connected with pres-
idential decision-making.

By invoking it now, Mr Bush is unwit-
tingly implying the purge was instigated
not by Justice Department middle man-
agers, as department officials have testi-
fied, but by the White House itself.

The firings targeted nine US attorneys
appointed by Mr Bush.

Several of them had pursued corrup-
tion allegations against Republicans or
failed to pursue voter-fraud cases that
might have damaged Democrats.

The two committees are seeking

administration documents on the firings
and testimony from two former White
House officials.
- By withholding the documents and urg-
ing the aides not to talk — though at
least one is expected to testify anyway —
the administration has provoked a show-
down over whether Congress has the
right to meaningful oversight of the exec-
utive branch.

The committees should not shy away
from this baitle.

No one disputes the president’s author-
ity to name US attorneys.

But these political appointees histori-

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eral prosecutions in an impartial man-
ner — and to base decisions about whom
to charge solely on the facts and the law.

The question is whether the adminis-
tration abused its authority by pressuring
the prosecutors to carry out Republican
vendettas.

The information demanded by the judi-
ciary committees would shed light on
that issue.

It could also clarify whether Attorney —

General Alberto Gonzales told the
House Judiciary Committee the truth in
May when he claimed to have played.a
minimal role in the firings.

In the past, when the Congress wanted
more information than the White House
wanted to provide, the conflict usually
ended in some kind of deal.

Bush has offered to produce more
information and witnesses, but with unac-
ceptable strings attached.

Bush may be taking a calculated risk.
The clock is ticking away on his admin-
istration.

The Supreme Court has two new jus-

tices with an expansive view of pia
dential power.

The president’s approval rating is so
low that resisting the committees’
demands can hardly drag them down fur-
ther.

The legal limits of executive privilege
are largely unsettled.

What’s clear, though, is that the privi-
lege is not absolute.

It certainly does not give the president
carte blanche to resist a legitimate inquiry
into potential abuses.

(This article is from
The Boston Globe c. 2007)













Let us stand up
and fight crime
wherever we see it

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me space in
your publication to address a
grave concern building in our
beloved Bahamas.

Isat home on Monday, July
Oth, on the eve of the anniver-
sary of the country’s 34th Inde-
pendence, quietly listening to
the lpm newscast, to hear that
the 43rd murder had taken
place in the Commonwealth.
Media reported young 18-year-
old Mardio Hall, a college
bound student and recent high
school graduate, was gunned
down in cold blood before a
crowd of onlookers at an open
air event Sunday evening near
the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre.

I was not shocked to hear
that another life had been
snuffed out by some dumb
argument, of late it has become
the norm. But I was shocked to
know that the murder had tak-
en place just a stones-throw
away from where the National
Ecumenical Service was just
held. At that service were HE
Arthur, Hanna, the Prime Min-
ister and members of the Cab-
inet along with clergy, all
assembled praying for the life
of the nation after 34 years.
Then later just outside the
Kendal G. L. Isaac gym, across
the street if | may say, in the
same vicinity where our leaders
were just assembled, this young
man dies instantly, the victim
of another senseless death.
However this time, an ‘Open-
Air Public Execution’ for wit-
nesses to see.

Where are we going with all

this.murder in The Bahamas?

My God, I said, how far we
haye come and how low we
have reached in this country
when it comes to acts of vio-
lence. There is something seri-
ously wrong deep within the
body of our country, as these
festering sores of murder con-
tinue to break out across the
skin of The Bahamas!

I accepted something went
terribly wrong deep inside the
body of the Bahamas as far
back as 1997, to cause these
festering sores, when the for-
mer Minister of Housing
Charles ‘Chuck’ Virgill, the

husband of a sitting magistrate ©

Linda Virgill, was kidnapped
and brutally murdered. The

killers took the life of a sitting

member of the Cabinet of The
Bahamas and today where are
these criminals one may ask? I



LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net






know for a fact they — at least
to this day— have not received
their just sentence to die.

My great fear is this: People
in The Bahamas across com-
munities, see an independent
country with successive gov-
ernments lacking the political
will to administer the justice
handed down to criminals in
the Bahamas.

They see legal agencies in
their archaic state inadequate.
Criminals see their associates
on bail, free to further create
more “home grown terror”,
whilst communities and vic-
tims’ families find themselves
locked away and barred in
their high walled homes or

the walls of their homes.

Crime has spiraled out of
control in this country, leaving
even hardworking officers of
the police force concerned.
This is a time for all of us, as

. we reflect on 34 years as an

Independent nation, to once
again free ourselves! Let this
freedom from violence and
crime begin in our own homes
where dissenting voices cry
foul. Let it move throughout
each community. So if you are
in Fox Hill or Bain Town or
Farm Road or Blair, let us
come together to, as it was in
the Bahamas before 1973,
“know our neighbours” again,
and tackle this festering sore
that has ruptured into our com-
munities. Let us stand up and
fight crime wherever we see it,
report it and run it out of this
little sovereign nation of ours
we love so dear.

fenced in by. barbed wire,
shockingly paralyzed to do

anything and wondering who CARVEL FRANCIS
would be next in line for the Nassau,
bullet once they walk outside July 11, 2007

Audley D Hanna should
have received more respect

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS ONE of the PLP Stalwart Council members who constantly
criticised Council member Audley.D Hanna due to his resistance
to the party’s selection of the South Beach candidate Wallace
Rolle during the May 2, 2007 election. I have now begun to under-
stand Audley’s objections. Audley, a well known, respected, 30-
years plus resident, a registered voter in South Beach Constituen-
cy and a former senator should have received more respect than we
gave for his contributions concerning who should have got the |
nod as the candidate for South Beach. Due to our inconsideration
we have only ourselves to blame for losing the South Beach seat. ,

Be that as it may, since the election all of the candidates, win, lose
or draw, especially Hope Strachan who showed interest and had
actually ‘started campaigning in the South Beach constituency but
was given little over a month to run in the Sea Breeze constituen-
cy and almost won, runs a daily ad on ’ZNS thanking her support-
ers for their vote. Her headquarters is still open and she is having
a thank you party Saturday, June 9.

Wallace Rolle, on the other hand, closed his headquarters from
May 2 and like the song says “we can’t find Wallace Rolle in
town” or should I say in South Beach, his campaign headquarters
is closed so no one is answering the phone. Wallace Rolle never
looked back to give us the encouragement for the support we gave —
him. As the saying goes there is always a next time but he would not
be getting my vote. My hope is that we would pay more attention
to those who actually live in each constituency instead of those who
have their own agenda. Audley keep on keeping as some of us will
now listen.

Thank you - a PLP Stalwart Councillor, resident and voter of
South Beach.

VOTER
Nassau,
June 7, 2007.

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FHRIDAY, JULY

15, ZUU/, PAGE 5





In brief

Man facing
marijuana
charge is
granted bail

A 40-YEAR-OLD Bellot
Road man accused of being
found in possession of nearly
$29,000 worth of marijuana
last week was granted $30,000
bail yesterday.

Wade Edward Sands was
arraigned before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel on Monday,
charged with possession of
marijuana with the intent to
supply to another.

It is alleged that Sands was
found in possession of the
drugs on Saturday July 7.

Sands has pleaded not
guilty to the charge.

Police make
arrest after
discovering
handgun

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama Police detained a
man after allegedly retriev-
ing a loaded firearm from a
parked vehicle at the Gerald
A Bartlett Police Headquar-
ters Building on Monday.

The seizure occurred around
noon, when Drug Enforce-
ment Unit officers conducted a
search of a gold Buick Centu-
ry in the parking lot.

Chief Superintendent of
Police Basil Rahming said
that as a result of informa-
tion received, officers
searched the vehicle.

A black Sig Sauer 9mm
semi-automatic pistol loaded
with 15 live rounds of 9mm
ammunition was discovered
and seized by officers.

Mr Rahming said a 22-
year-old resident of Coral
Reef Estates was taken into
custody. :

Acting on information,
DEU officers proceeded to
Peridot Place, Coral Gardens,
around 1.10pm on Tuesday
and apprehended a 21-year-
old man and collected four
packages of marijuana weigh-

, ing six,ounces, along with 20
, grams | of cocaine. ee



8 By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE police investigation into
allegations of corruption in the
Ministry of Housing has yet to
uncover anything "substantial"
the commissioner of police said.

While stating that the inves-
tigation is still ongoing, with
enquiries "still being made",
Commissioner Paul Farquhar-
son said that not enough evi-
dence has been found to bring
charges against any individual.

"You can't charge people
without evidence, and people
will make a statement to the
press but they may not tell the
police, and even if they tell the
police that may not be evi-
dence," he said.

"I think a number of inquires
that are being made have not
turned out to be enough evi-
dence to charge someone to
date — other wise we would
have someone in court," he
added.

Mr Farquharson's statement
on the matter comes after
numerous inquiries made by
The Tribune as to the status of
the investigation, launched last
November after several reports
appeared in this newspaper of
allegations made against min-
istry officials by contractors, as
well as relating discrepancies
found in ministry documents
and ministry responses to those
findings and allegations.

It also follows speculation by
several commentators this year
that the investigation may have
been held up for political rea-
sons.

Commissioner Farquharson
announced yesterday that assis-
tant commissioner Christopher
McCoy has now taken over

_ from Chief Supt Keith Bell in

LOCAL NEWS

Police yet to find ‘substantial’
evidence in housing probe

It is now eight months. Since a series of Tribune articles
sparked a police investigation into allegations of corruption
at the Ministry of Housing. Yesterday Commissioner Paul
Farquharson gave an update on the state of the inquiry so far.





i COMMISSIONER Paul Farquharson

heading the matter.

The Tribune's investigation
into allegations of corruption in
the Ministry of Housing began

last year when it was claimed |

that certain contractors were
being awarded an unfair num-
ber of contracts based on factors
other than quality of work or
value for public money spent.
It was alleged that certain
contractors got special treat-
ment in the allotment of lucra-
tive contracts because of their
relationship with particular per-
sons in the government - an
arrangement which may or may
not have included bribes.
Once housing records were

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obtained as part of this news-
paper's investigation, a number
of other peculiarities came to
light. One of these was the
$5,000 discrepancy between the
cost of construction and the sell-
ing price.

Another, seemingly separate,
matter concerns allegations that
certain individuals were extort-
ing money from contractors
throughout the building process
on low-cost homes since at least
2001.

It was claimed by one con-
tractor that this could amount to

as much as $4,000 being paid

out in bribes per house. The

ministry officials allegedly

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involved in extracting this mon-
ey were said to be persons in a
position to make certain con-
tractors who pay up get the
lion's share of future govern-
ment housing contracts.

Another claim was that con-
tractors were asked to carry out
additional work, budgeted for
by the ministry, for which they
were not compensated.

The former housing minister,
Neville Wisdom, who took over
from Shane Gibson last year,
after Mr Gibson had spent four
years at the post, said the rea-
sons some contractors get more
jobs from the ministry than oth-
ers, is that they do better quali-
ty work and can get better
financing.

However, contractors refut-
ed this, pointing out that all the
contractors on the ministry's
approved list have been vetted
for work quality and have
approved lending status.

The ministry's director of
technical services, Gordon
Major, admitted that there is
no bidding process for some
housing models — suggesting

‘that ministry officials are free

to choose whichever contrac-
tors they wish.

This seemed to have been
backed up by Mr Wisdom him-

self in a message unintention- |

ally left on The Tribune's voice-
mail — in which he said of a
reporter, “he thinks you can put
those houses up to bid."

His permanent secretary,
Leila Greene, responded: "Any-
body with any sense would
know that you can't put all
them 80 houses up to bid."

While not connected to any

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another discrepancy came to
light when reporter Mark
Humes visited the ministry in
mid-November.

After asking Mr Major what
happened to the customary
retention fee in cases where'a
second contractor had to be
brought into repair or finish the
work of the first builder on a
project, Mr Humes received two
different responses, from Mr
Major and Mr Wisdom, with Mr
Major claiming it went to the
original contractor, and Mr Wis-
dom denying absolutely that the
money would go to that indi-
vidual.

All these anomalies are
alleged to have resulted in an
unfair and unnecessary finan-
cial burden on small contrac-
tors and less affluent home buy-
ers — some of whom have
entered into 25 year mortgage
contracts.

Contractors claimed corrup-
tion has also had a negative
effect on the quality of housing
which is sold to low income
families who, in many cases,
have been waiting more than a
decade to own their own home.

Yesterday, commissioner Far-
quharson said that he will await
a report from those in charge
of the investigation before
revealing the outcome of the
investigation to the public,
whom he said were "entitled to
know" the findings of the probe.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Natio nal Youth Choir’s







tour which took place recently.

Louise “Mother Nature” Glovena Greene

Who went home to rest 4th July, 2004

Left to mourn are her sons Joba and Garth
Greene and a host of family and friends.

God Bless and Have Mercy on Your Soul.

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@ THE members of the Bahamas National Youth Choir perform at the harbour in Dominica during the choir’s 2007 Caribbean



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business hours on

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We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.



(Photos: Donald Knowles/choir photographer)



@ THE Bahamas National Youth Choir perform on board
the Carnival aes age their 2007 Carribbean tour.

@ PERFORMING at the Frank Collymore Hall in Barbados.

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THE TRIBUNE

’ FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007, PAGE 7



Woman demands action after load
from truck damages her vehicle

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON

AN angry woman is calling
for a truck driver to come for-
ward and identify himself after
his vehicle dropped a large rock
on her car — causing expensive
damage and threatening her
safety.

The female motorist was dri-
ving along West Bay Street,
near Arawak Cay early Thurs-
day afternoon, when a “big, red
truck” over filled with rocks
sped past.

According to the woman,
who asked for her name to be
withheld, a rock fell off of the
truck as the driver “flew past”
her. “I’m driving along West
Bay and this truck passes me
and this rock comes flying off
his truck and smashes [the
windshield] and puts a nice, big
thing in my windscreen,” she
told The Tribune.

Luckily the motorist, who
because of her profession as a
realtor spends a lot of time on
the road, was able to maintain
her composure and did not
receive any injury.

Due to the speed at which the
driver of the truck was travel-
ling, she said, she was not able to
record the licence plate number.

She contends that a golf-ball
sized crack is now evident in
her windshield, with “spider
cracks spreading” in the glass.

“Now I’m going to have to
either pay for this [damage],
and it’s probably going to cost
me $800, or use my insurance
— and that costs you to lose your

FIVE member Bahamian
delegation participated in first-

ever Conference of the Ameri-

cas earlier this month.

The conference was held
under the theme, “Advancing
the cause of social justice in the
Americas” on July 9-10 in
Arlington, Virginia.

In attendance were 150
regional-based organisations and
100 US based groups represent-
ing voluntary organisations, non-
governmental organisations, the
private sector and foundations.

The aim was to discuss and
highlight the efforts between
the United States and its neigh-
bors to better the lives of the
region’s citizens.

The conference focused on
sharing lessons learned on how
to promote education, health-
care and economic opportunity
vat the grassroots level and pub-

lic-private partnerships through-











deductible,” she stated.
Following the incident, she
complained to an officer at the
traffic division of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, who



@ THE crack in the windshield of a motorist after a rock flew out
of an overfilled and speeding truck, striking her vehicle.

Phere Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Bahamians go to Virginia for first
Conference of the Americas

out the hemisphere.

The U S Embassy in Nassau
co-sponsored the Bahamian del-
egation that included, Dr San-
dra Dean-Patterson, director of
the Crisis Center; Jeffrey Lloyd,
co-ordinator of the YEAST Pro-
gramme; Rick Lowe, president
of the Nassau Institute; Camille
Barnett, president of the
Bahamas AIDS Foundation, and
Pastor Clint Kemp of the New
Providence Community Centre.

Conference speakers includ-
ed U S President George Bush
and U S Secretary of State,
Condoleezza Rice.

President Bush highlighted
US engagement and discussed
more effective ways to deliver
aid and strengthen civil society
in the Americas. The partici-
pants were also hosted tova lun-
cheon held in their honour by
the president and the First Lady
Laura Bush.

instructed her to file an incident
report at the Cable Beach
Police Station.

She is now asking for the dri- Lat
ver of the truck to come for- i”

CONGRATULATIONS
_& LOVE ON YOUR

ra Wedding Anniversary & ly Lira)
Birthday to Rev Rosileta Davis

ward, and the company respon-
sible to pay for the damage to

her car. “Somebody has to be
accountable,” she said. “I’m

complaining here and hopefully
someone will listen.”



Isaac and Rev Rolsileta Davis

Congotown, South Andros

Psalm 121v5
“The Lord himself watches over you: The Lord stands beside you as your

3?
Rick Lowe, a member of the _protective shade.

Bahamas’ delegation, observed
in the opening remarks by Pres-
ident Bush that the U S is com-
mitted to helping nations in
Western Hemisphere realise
their potential»-to become
healthy, educated and prosper-
ous through trade, open and
transparent governments that
are free of corruption, adding
that his-comments resonated
well throughout the conference.

US Charge d’Affaires, Dr D
Brent Hardt, noted that the
embassy was pleased to assist
with the funding for the confer-
ence participants.

He stated that the Bahamian
participants play a major role in
transformational power as they
are the ones who help to
strengthen their communities,
care for their neighbors and
serve as conduits of a positive
force for change in the Bahamas. : rm

‘

WITH LOVE AND APPRECIATION:
Children: Jacqueline Bain, Clifford, Jerome and James Davis, Leona Davis,
Nettie Major, Yvonne Culmer and Sherlene Davis; 27.grandchildren, 23 great
grandchildren

Numerous nieces and nephews including George Burrows, Cynthia Holmes,
Barbara Maduro, Retha Boone, Dora Mooten and Phyliss Black, Jennie Knowles,
Gwen Bain, Vera Chase, Cynthia Gibson, Dave Bastian, Janice Miller, Larry
and Esta Washington and Magdeline Funderburk, Rosina Bain

Numerous family and special friends including Bishop Sam Greene and Church
family, Rev. Peter Pinder and Church Family-Freeport, Rev. & Mrs. Albert
Campbell, Sis Barbara Smith, Sis. Beth Stewart, His Excellency A.D. & Mrs.
Hanna

Rev. Glendina Knowles and family, Rev. & Mrs. Samuel Duvalier, Bishop James

‘Pratt, Rev. Rosenell Forbes, Rev. Harry Davis and family, Sis Ella Johnson
and family, Sis Alfreda Ferguson-Freeport, Lady Marguerite Pindling, Maxine
Bolden, Clarita Lockhart, Judy Munroe, The Jackson, King, Russell and
Schimpf families, Rev. Geoffrey Wood and Temple Baptist Church, Rev. Morrison
and Zion Baptist Church family and St. Matthew’s Baptist and Rev. Denrick
Rolle and St. Barnabas Anglican Church families and the entire Community
of South Andros.



















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architectural n

quarters on West ag Steel

This ambitious tindertakuiy
drew international recogmmlon
and involved top Caribbean
atchitects as judges.

Phe competithon attracted
numerous entries idy the bank s
new corporate olfices, bank
building, rental Gltice space
parking and a banking muscum

on nearly six acres of prime
downtown property next to
Nassau! Street.

Accolding lo Magazine pub-
fisher Gustavo More, who
served as one of the judges in
the competition, it is the fist
time a Bahamian bank has been
included tithe oversized glossy
colfee table Quahiy Archivos de
Arquitectuia Antillana,
AAAQ2Z/.























The new issue of a leading
magazine for architects, desizn-
ers and coyineers teatures a 10-

page spread on Bank of the
Bahamas International’s design
compeution for corporate head-

Rev. Dr. Garth V. Greene, retired Sr.
Deputy Comptroller of Customs and
his family, extend their appreciation
and thanks to the many friends,
supporters and patrons for their
support of his recent thanksgiving
service and appreciation banquet held |.
commemorating his retirement after |
45 years of exemplary public service.

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SmartChoice







Part of the article is in Span-
ish, part English. The winning
design of Michael J Moss of the
Architectural Studio was dis-
played over three pages and
Alexiou & Associates’ second
and third place designs were
also featured.

~The quality of the publica-
tion is truly world-class and we
are honoured to be featured,
especially with such a large
spread,” said bank managing
director Paul McWeeney. “We
had the opportunity to meet
with the publisher when he was
here as a judge. When he said
he would like to include the
competition in his next issue,
we were pleased, but we were
so surprised when we saw the



THE TRIBUNE



SSS

f@ BANK of the Bahamas International managing director Paul
McWeeney holds a copy of a leading magazine for architects
featuring a 10-page spread on the bank’s design competition for
its new headquarters on nearly six acres of prime property on

Bay Street.

particularly in a magazine that is
a standard-bearer for the archi-
tectural industry in the Span-
ish-speaking Caribbean.”

A native of the Dominican
‘Republic, Moré is a prominent
Caribbean architect as well as
publisher. :

“We are very pleased to fea-
ture Mr McWeeney and Bank
ot the Bahamas International,”
said Moré. “This is the first time
we’ve featured a Bahamian

bank but it certainly will not be
the last.”

AAAO027 is a Spanish-Eng-
lish magazine which publishes

three issues annually. It is dis-

tributed in France, Spain,
Argentina, Columbia, Domini-
can Republic, Puerto Rico,
Venezuela, Mexico, and
Trinidad and Tobago and in
major US cities including New
York, Chicago, Los Angeles
and Miami.











space devoted to our project,

THE Ministry of Education,
Youth, Sports and Culture held
its Recognition Ceremony for
the High School Leadership
Programme at Government
House recently.

The programme was designed to
help outstanding young leaders
formulate creative ways to use
their talents and intellect to
maximise their ability to become .
more productive in their schools
and communities.

This developing programme
| caters to the head boys and girls,

deputy head boys and girls, and
student council presidents of all
senior high schools in New
Providence.

The students met bi-weekly to
combine ideas, pool resources, and
network with each other and
professional members of the public.
The students are pictured above
with Governor General Arthur D
Hanna (centre). ;

; (BIS photo: Kris Ingraham).





Hanna & Brown
Wed in New York





















Ralph Hanna was joinéd in Holy Matrimony to Jacqueline
Brown on Saturday, 7th July, 2007 in New York.

Following the Double-Ring Ceremony, a Grand Reception was held at the home of the
newl-weds al 486 Clarendon Road, Uniondale, New York, where guests were catered
to by one of New York's leading Catéring Companies, and wined and dined on a menu
that will not be soon forgotien by those who were present to witness the exchange of
marital vows,













The Groom, who is a Law Enforcement Ollicer with New York Police Department assigned
to the Homicide Division, is the son of Mr Patrick Hanna of Tampa, Florida, but originally
of Nassau, and a nephew of His Excellency The Honourable A. D. Hanna, Governor General
of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.











The Bride is now retired from New York Police Department where she
worked in Drug Enforcement.









Guests from all over the United States, and the Bahamas attended the
ceremony. Flying to New York from Nassau for the joyous occasion were
the Groom's aunt, Yvonne Hanna-Williams; Cousins, Denise Johnson,
Christina Miller and George Lopez Heastie.









The Hanna, ficastic and Tynes clan wishes the young couple a veryg
happy, fruitful, prosperous and long life together.








THE TRIBUNE



-LOCAL NEWS



FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007, PAGE 9



Spend the summer with the pana leading. news and information source.
Read a with us iy:



The Best
in the
World

Written by Marc Talbert
Illustrated by Betsy James

CHAPTER ONE
The Great Idea

¢ ¢ Ge" Nick made a face.
“How many worms did he

eat?”

“Sixty-two,” answered his best friend
Clay. “In thirty seconds. He didn’t chew.
See?” Nick leaned from where he sat on
the porch steps to see better. Clay pulled
the book away, not wanting Nick too
close. Clay hated sharing anything but
trouble.

“Where do they get that stuff!”
said, unable to look any longer.

Clay grinned. “If you thought that was
gross. . .” He flipped carefully through
The Guinness Book of Records.

Nick eyed the book, feeling perturbed.
Clay hadn’t let him touch it yet. Clay

Nick

even showed him the pictures too quick- -

ly, as if a look from Nick’s eyes would
smudge the pages. Nick wanted to look at
it on his own, take his time to see if there
was anything besides the gross stuff Clay
had been showing him. When he’d asked,
Clay had said, “No way! I don’t want
your nose- picking hands on my book!”

“Here!” Clay said. “Get a load of these
fingernails!”

Pretending he didn’t care, Nick stole : a
glance. The man looked as if he were
clutching ribbons he’d ripped off some
presents. “That’s not gross. That’s weird.
How does he sleep?”

Clay shrugged and set the book on his
thigh. “How does he scratch when he
itches? Search me. But neat stuff, huh?”

“J don’t know.” Nick eyed the book. It
wouldn’t be hard to grab. “Ever want to

be in that book?”—as the world’s worst
best friend? he added to himself. Or the
stingiest?

“Sure. Once I did the most humon-
gous burp in the world.”

Nick snorted. “And my belly button
whistles when I cough.” He slid his hand
toward Clay’s leg, pretending to scratch
his own kneecap.

“No, really!’ And yesterday I sneezed
twelve times in a row. I bet that’s a
record.” Clay’s look dared Nick to dis-
agree.

Nick couldn’t stand it: any longer. He
grabbed and ran.

“Hey!” Clay screamed. “Givg that
back!”

“Who's gonna make me?” Nick shout-
ed. “Your grandmother?”

Nick ran around the house, aiming for
some lilac bushes where he could hide
and take his sweet time looking at the
book.



ing

e

Serie



For Kids * 2007



He didn’t count on his little sister’s red
wagon blocking the way.
yelled, jumping.

It all happened very fast.

He shoved the wagon’s cocked handle
away as his right leg shot forward. His
smile seemed to lift him higher. “Yeah!”
he breathed as he started descending.
Then he heard a crash.

“Ow!” Clay yelled.

Nick couldn't help looking behind him.
The book flew from his hand. He lunged
for it and twisted in the air. The grass
reared up like a snapped blanket. Nick
landed flat on his back, knocking the wind
from him. The book lay beyond his hand.
He heard an “O-oof!” on his other side
and turned to see Clay's feet thumping the
ground near his head.

Nick tried to sit but couldn’t. He tried
to breathe, but his throat felt like a straw
collapsed from sucking too hard.

Desperate now, and gasping for breath,
Nick struggled once more to sit. Clay
moaned as he pulled himself onto his
hands and knees and wobbled toward the
book.

“B-e-e-il!” he’

With a tremendous grunt, Nick reared
up and threw himself toward the book,
blocking Clay.

Just as Nick was about to snag the
book, Clay grabbed one of his feet: He
yanked, pulling Nick backwards.

Nick tried kicking, but Clay glommed
on to his other foot. Nick felt as helpless
as a worm on a wet sidewalk.

Ne went limp and groaned. “All
I want to do is look at it.” A

wave of anger washed over him. “ You’ve
been a real creep about this book. And
you know what? It’s not so great. It’s just
about lot of losers doing lame things.
And theyre mostly adults. A-number-
one dolts? Get it?”

“Oh yeah?” Clay said. He tightened his
grip on Nick’s feet.

“Yeah. How about the man who’s tat-
tooed everywhere except between his
toes. Gimme a break! Or the woman
who paid six million dollars for a wed-
ding dress. Come on! We could write a
more interesting book than that!”

The Best in the World

Summer Reading Series
is sponsored by

DISTRIBUTED IN THE PCy EC BY
THOMPSON TRADING - SHIRLEY STREET - 394-1142

“More interesting than the fattest mod-
el in the world?”

Nick winced, picturing her. “Detinite-
ly. Let go and I'll give you back your
stupid book. Cross my heart’. . .”

Clay let go and they both sat up. Nick
reached for the book and, holding it as if
it were disgusting, handed it to Clay.

Clay checked it for damage. Satisfied,
he. said, “You know what? Yow’re right.
We should write our own book.”

Nick nodded. “And make all the
records in our book belong to us.”

Clay grinned. “Hey! That’s a great
idea!” He stood on shaky legs. “What
record should we try for first?”

(To be continued. )

Text copyright © 2001 Marc Talbert
Illustrations copyright © 2001 Betsy
James

Reprinted by Permssion of Breakfast
Serials, Inc.

www.breakfastserials.com


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007



THE TRIBUNE





$805,000 expected from US to
aid increase in country’s security

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Bahamas is expected to
receive $805,000 this fiscal year
from the US to aid in increasing
the country’s security and for its
fight against drugs and illegal
immigration.

In this year’s cycle the
Bahamas will receive $80,000 to
fund the Bahamas’ maritime
interdiction capability by provid-



FREEPORT
11-A East Coral Road, P.0. Box F-42312
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas -
Tel: (242) 373-1471 Fax: (242) 373-3005
Page 340-8043

Restsiow Memoual
ae

Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas

Pagers: 340-8043 / 340-4424 / 340-8034 » Fax: (242) 340-8034

ing spare parts, training, opera-
tional and maintenance support,
and communications equipment;
$225,000 to help in the develop-
ment of a “more professional and
efficient security force” by pro-
viding Bahamian military per-
sonnel courses in basic military

and maritime training and atten-’

dance at the Naval Staff College,
and $500,00 for operational sup-
port, training and equipment for
Bahamian drug enforcement





NASSAU

P.O, Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

TREAZURE
TIFFANY LEWIS, 8











of Jane Street will be
held on Monday, July
16", 2007 at 11:30 a.







































time.

She is survived by her Parents: Gareth and Toni,
Two Brothers: Gareth Jr. and Kallander, Grand
Parents: Ms. Maxine Callender and Mr. and Mrs.
Basil Lewis, Great Grand Parent: Mildred Black,
Aunts: Rosetta Haven, Carolyn Black, Sandra
Bethel, Donna, Michelle, Suzie Lewis and Angela
Blatch, Deborah Pratt, Diana Brooks, Francis Horton,
Stephanie and Marsha Black, Lana Ross, Angela
Blatch, Theresa Coakley, Hilda Etienne, Eulah Toler,
Dorothy Grant, Helen Foulkes, Wally Bullard,
Bernadette Hepburn, Rosebud Knowles, Cassandra,
Shantell and Helena Callander, Uncles: Basil Lewis,
Torrence Blatch, Sonny HaVén, Frederick Black,
Stephen Johnson, Michael Brooks, Basil Lewis,
Julius and David Foulkes, Clifford Barton, Edward
and Bernard Callander, Greg Bethel, and numerous
other Relatives and Friends including: Denise,
Brian, Brinesha and Brian Jr. Foulkes, Father I.
Ranfurly Brown, Nathan Lewis, Darren and D’ Andra.
Bethel, Donavan Gibson, Trevor Saunders, Scarlett
Black, Andrea Moss and Family, Sharlene, Stan and
Sabria Smith, Teddy Woods, Thelma Fernander,
Torren Blatch, Michelle Blackstock, Wendy Foulkes,
Evangeline Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Jackson,
Nancy Waller, Virginia Ettienne and Family, Gertrude
Ford, Avanell Whyms, and Fredricka Munroe.

Viewing will be held in the “Serenity Suite” at
Restview Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Litd.,
Robinson and Soldier Roads, on Saturday from
10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p. m. and then again at the
church on Monday from 12:30 p. m. until service

m. at Calvary Bible
Church,- Collins
Avenue. Officiating
will be Pastor Allen Lee.

Interment will follow
in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

operations and investigations.

According to the US Depart-
ment of State Websilgghere is
also a request for $790.00 to be
given for nonprolif{@#ion, anti-
terrorism, de-mining
in the Bahamas.

The document, wh
the Congressional Bu
cation for Foreign Ops
the Bahamas for this
says that the United States’ inter-
est in maintaining a stable part-
nership with the Bahamas is due
to its proximity to its borders, the
Bahamas being a major destina-
tion for US visitors, and the
prominent role it plays in region-
al organizations such as CARI-
COM.

The US’ priorities in the
Bahamas include ensuring the
safety and security of approxi-
mately 30,000 US permanent res-
idents and more than 4,000,000
annual American visitors block-
ing the movement of illicit drugs
and illegal migrants through the
Bahamas, combat international
financial crime; and encourage
the Bahamas’ constructive lead-
ership role in promoting democ-
racy, stability, free trade, and eco-
nomic. prosperity in the
Caribbean region.

The Bahamas has expressed
willingness to cooperate on sev-
eral programmes promising
greater security to the United
States, including the Container
Security Initiative, Megaports,
and the Proliferation Security Ini-
tiative. ;

The Bahamas, the Turks and
Caicos Islands, and the United
States are partners in “Operation
Bahamas and Turks and Caicos
(OPBAT),” an international,

FROM page one





usage these machines are getting, most of
them are rapidly approaching their. end,” he

said.

Mr Andersen said that with the remaining
nine machines, the best strategy will be to
examine the number of hours used and phase.
in replacements so that it is not again neces-
sary to replace all of the machines at once,
which can be a very costly undertaking.

Renal Dynamics LLC has three full-time
technicians who service dialysis units in the
more than 20 countries with which the com-
pany works in this region. pe

These technicians, Mr Andersen explained,
will be responsible for the quarterly and annu-

multi-agency drug interdiction
effort that has reduced the
amount of cocaine destined for
the US that passes through The
Bahamas from nearly 80 per cent
in the 1980’s to under 10 percent
today.

Programme participants coop-
erate in missions against suspect-
ed drug traffickers and frequent-
ly undertake search and seizure
operations. Although the inter-
diction of illegal migrants is not a
specific mandate of OPBAT,
drugs and illegal migrants often

are linked, and therefore OPBAT

helps disrupt migrant trafficking.

In 2005, the US and The
Bahamas interdicted more than
4,000 illegal migrants. Interna-
tional Narcotics Control and Law
Enforcement (INCLE) funding
provides operational support,
training and equipment for
Bahamian drug enforcement
operations and investigations.

INCLE funding also supports
go-fast interceptor boats provided
to the Bahamian police, con-
tributes to the operation of three
OPBAT facilities in The
Bahamas, and supports legisla-
tive and policy reform to enhance
the effectiveness of the Bahamian
government in combating nar-
cotics trafficking.

These funds will continue to
support training and workshops
to’ assist The Bahamas combat
money-laundering, terrorism
financing, and other financial
crimes.

Foreign Military Financing
(FMF) funds will improve mar-
itime interdiction capability by
providing spare parts, training,
operational and maintenance sup-

port, and communications equip-

Dialysis machines

al maintenance of the machines; while local
.. technicians trained by Renal Dynamics LLC
will handle day-to-day repairs and mainte-

. nance work.

ment and by improving infra-
structure.

The Royal. Bahamas Defence
Force will receive individual and
unit equipment, weapons, ammu-
nition, and training so that it can
fully support enhanced interdic-
tion and better control its bor-
ders. International Military Edu-
cation and Training (IMET) will
help develop a more professional
and efficient security force by

providing Bahamian military per-
sonnel courses in basic military
and maritime training and
attendance at the Naval Staff Col-
lege.

The Bahamas is also eligible
this. year to. receive Excess
Defence Articles (EDA) ona
grant basis to promote counter
drug efforts, maritime support,
inter-operability, and moderniza-
tion of equipment.

Allegations that non-citizens
may have used search cards

FROM page one

citizenship, such as a driver’s licence, to register.
Therefore, if non-citizens are able to register once, they become per-
manent parts of the national register unless their citizenship is officially

challenged.

Jeff Lloyd had on his talk-show Real Talk Live just after the election,

aman only identified as ‘Sharlo’ who by his own admission is not a cit-
izen, and claims to have voted in the 1997 and 2002 elections. He told
Mr Lloyd that the only reason he did not vote in this election was
because he was unhappy with both party’s policies on immigration.
The man further claimed that he initially registered with a school
identification, and when asked if he was Bahamian, he answered
“yes.” : :
With the Parliamentary Registrar Errol Bethel on leave, The Tri-
bune contacted the Deputy Permanent Secretary in the department,
Sherlyn Hall, to discuss these search card claims. However, Mr Hall had

- The machines are the next generation Fre-
senius model that is an upgraded version of
what the hospital currently uses. According to
Mr Andersen, much of the engineering is sim-
ilar, but these new machines are more user
friendly and overall, he said, they are the “best
quality machine out there on the market.”

Mr Andersen also commended the
fundraising effort that secured these new
machines for the many Bahamians in need.

“no comment” on the story.

Although not blaming Mr Bethel for any possible irregularities in the -
election, PLP Senate Leader Allyson Maynard-Gibson, told The Tri- . -

bune in late June:

“The law makes it very clear that the Parliamentary Commissioner

is in charge.”

These latest claims bring'the national voter registry further into
question, and may force officials eventually to scrap the list, mandat-
ing that all Bahamians register with passports at all times.

Calls placed to the registrar general’s department were not returned

-up-to-press time.

said.

“It’s never been done in our territory,” he

“In our tenure in dialysis, which is well
over 15 years in the territory, we have never
seen the success of a fundraising campaign
on this level anywhere, and especially in such
a short period of time,” he said.

Additionally, Mr Andersen told The Tri-
bune that machines can be used for all age
groups, including young children.

Mark Roberts of The Tile King launched
the drive, as machines in the unit were often ~
off-line, with patients’ care being compro- |
mised as a result.

The fund has now been closed, and orga-
nizers have expressed their gratitude for the '
overwhelming support demonstrated by all
those who gave.

FROM page one

MP Keod Smith, former Senator
Paulette Zonicle, senior PLP Ken
Dorsett, former. chairman Ron
Rolle and possibly former
Marathon MP Ron Pinder.

Mrs Hanna-Martin, a former
Cabinet Minister and MP for
Englerston, on Wednesday offi-
cially announced that she will be
seeking the party’s chairmanship.

Some observers noted that this
could be the beginning of the
PLP’s restructuring process, while
others were baffled by the move,
considering it a “step back” for
Mrs Hanna-Martin. :

Speaking yesterday with The
Tribune on the matter, the PLP’s
current chairman Raynard Rig-
by said he has not yet made a
decision whether he will make a
renewed bid for the position, but
noted that the leadership that



APPLIANCES & ELECTRONICS

Chairmanship

comes out of the convention has a
“herculean task” to_ perform. _ .
“I’m still in the process of
assessing all of this. I really
haven’t made up my mind what
I’m going to do, but at the right
time I will certainly let the public

- know,” he said.

Mr Rigby said that when it
comes to administrative positions
within the PLP, he hopes that his
party will continue to make a
clear distinction between the
responsibilities and obligations of
PLP parliamentarians and those
who hold party positions..

“The PLP, as of 2002, under-
stood the importance of a sepa-
ration between the work of the
party and the work of the parlia-
mentarians.

“T hope we will not turn back

on that general basic principle,
which in my view makes good
sense for the future survivability
of the PLP,” he said.

Mr Rigby yesterday said that
those seeking positions in the par-
ty first have to understand what is
necessary for the future survival
and success of the. PLP.

“That’s why it’s important for
persons to understand that when
they vie for office, that they vie to
serve unselfishlessly,” he said.

The party chairman said that
he is “one of those PLPs that
believe that democracy must be
alive and well in political organi-
sations.” . :

“Political organisations are
only as good as its members’
(recognition) of their obligations
to the party and the country. It’s
not about being selfish, it’s not
about self-promotion, it’s really
about higher calling. It’s whether
you have the skills, whether you



Village Road . Phone 393-5310. Open 8:30AM. - 5:30PM. Mon - Sat.

have the vision, whether you have

the know-how to cause people to ,

recognise that they ought to be
supporting this political organi-
sation,” he said.
During the PLP’s last national
convention in 2005, Mount Mori-
ah MP Mr Smith declared that
he was running against Mr Rigby
for the chairmanship.
He received a nomination, but
“later withdrew to support Mr Rig-
by..
The PLP in a press release
announcing Mrs Hanna-Martin’s
bid, stated that it is believed that
Mr Rigby will step down after
five years as the chairman “to
pursue other areas of service
within the party.”

Although a number of names

are currently floating around, tra- »

ditionally most contenders will
not officially declare that they are
seeking party positions until con-
vention time.



bBo.

ae —Z

Se eww ewe ee
THE TRIBUNE





Crowds prote



- CARIBBEAN NEWS

st as Panama ratifies



sui, FAWE 11



free trade agreement with US

i PANAMA
Panama City

PANAMA'S legislature rati-
fied a free trade agreement with
the United States on Wednes-
day amid protests by hundreds
of leftists and farmers opposed
to the deal, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The National Assembly’s
approval of the pact by an over-
whelming 58-3 margin, with one
abstention, comes two weeks
after it was signed by both gov-
ernments in Washington. The
agreement must still be ratified
by the Democrat-controlled US
Congress.

“The treaty is a positive step
for Panama to become an impor-
tant exporter,” said lawmaker
Pedro Miguel Gonzales of the rul-
ing Democratic Revolution Party.

In Washington, US Trade
Representative Susan Schwab
applauded the agreement’s
approval.

“This swift action taken by
Panama means that they have

fully accepted the provisions of:

the May 10 Bipartisan Trade
Agreement,” Schwab said in a
news release.

On May 10, US lawmakers
forged new trade policy guide-
lines that require free trade
agreement countries be com-
mitted to adopting and enforc-
‘ing laws that abide by basic
international labour standards.

Opponents of the free trade
treaty, including farmers and

unions, say Panamanian pro-

ducers cannot compete with
their US counterparts.

“This accord is a disaster for
products and it benefits
the oligarchy,” said Enrique
Athanasiadis, leader of the
National Agricultural Organi-
sation.

About 400 protesters gath-
ered outside Panama’s legisla-
ture but left without incident
after a couple of hours.

A majority of US Democrats



a

have opposed most bilateral
free trade agreements in recent
years, contending the deals
negotiated by the Bush admin-
istration are weak in requiring
trading partners to address such
issues as child labor, workplace
discrimination and environ-
mental degradation.
Panamanian President Martin
Torrijos has said the Central
American country will not have
any problems meeting the new

guidelines.

Bilateral trade’ between the
United States and Panama
totaled US82.1 billion in 2003,
including US>** 8 billion in US
exports. Aln n0° half Panama’s
imports com#® om the United
States, and JY foreign invest-
ment in Pan’ {a totals roughly
US$25 billio,

Most of P@hama’s exports to
the United States already enter
the country without duties





HB DEMONSTRATORS protest against the free trade agreement with the United States in front of
the National Congress in Panama City on Wednesday

(AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

WTO to probe EU banana
rules upon US request ©

@ GENEVA

THE World Trade Organiza-
tion will once again investigate
the European Union’s import
rules for bananas, trade officials
said Thursday, according to
Associated Press.

The move reviving one of the
longest-running disputes within
the WTO was requested by the
United States, which claims that
the EU’s banana regime favors
producers from African and
Caribbean countries over
exporters from the US and
Latin America in contravention
of global trade rules.

The WTO has consistently
ruled against how the EU sets
tariffs for the fruit, forcing the
27-nation bloc to overhaul a sys-
tem that grants preferential con-

ditions mainly to former British
and French colonies. °

Latin American producers
and banana companies based in
the United States have long
complained about the prefer-
ences. The US, in 1999, and
Ecuador a year later both won
the right to impose trade sanc-
tions on European goods after
the Geneva-based trade referee
found the EU’s rules to be ille-
gal.
The WTO will now convene
a compliance panel to decide
whether Brussels has imple-
mented this ruling, after the EU
blocked a first request for the
panel’s establishment.

‘The rules are already being
investigated because of a simi-
lar request by Ecuador in
March. Colombia has since ini-

tiated its own complaint against
Brussels’ tariffs. Jamaica,
Cameroon, Panama, Nicaragua,
Japan, Dominican Republic,
Brazil and Dominica have.also
asked to be consulted in the
case.

US trade officials said they
delayed requesting the panel in
the hope of reaching a negoti-
ated settlement with the Euro-
peans.

EU officials said they regret-
ted that the panel had been set
up and questioned whether the
United States had an interest
in the case considering it does
not produce or export bananas
itself.

A deal in 2001 gave the EU
five years to comply with WTO
rulings. Brussels says a new
banana tariff established last

Jamaica detects arrival of invasive insect
that destroys crops, ornamental plants

@ JAMAICA
Kingston

A RAVENOUS, island-hop-
ping pest has been discovered for
the first time in Jamaica, an agri-
culture official said Wednesday,
according to Associated Press.

The pink hibiscus mealybug,
which has destroyed crops and
ornamental plants throughout
the Caribbean, was recently
detected in an five-mile section of
rural Portland parish, according

to Timon Williamson, a senior
research director with the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Lands.

' “It hasn’t spread outside of
this small area. But we need to
get it under control quickly to
prevent a potentially damaging
impact,” Williamson said.

He said Jamaican agriculture
authorities plan to release thou-
sands of tiny parasitic wasps to
eradicate the pests after com-
pleting negotiations with the US
Department of Agriculture,

which raises the parasites in labs.

The tiny wasps, which are
almost invisible to the naked
eye and pose no threat to
humans, lay eggs inside mealy-
bugs. Once hatched, the larvae
feed on the pest internally, caus-
ing it to die.

Mealybugs, which feed on the
sap, roots and leaves of plants,
have destroyed millions of dol-
lars in crops and ornamental
plants across the Caribbean since
they were first reported in 1994.

year — US$234 per ton — has
brought its banana rules into
compliance.

under other programmes such
as the Caribbean Basin Initia-

tive or the Generalized System
of Preferences.

Saint Bede’s Roman
Catholic Church
Raffle Winners 2007

Grand Prize Kia 2007 Mini SUV:
Bob Myers = Ticket # 0516

Plasma TV: Ada - Ticket #11254
Blacberry Phone: Cathryn Evans - Ticket #1264

\)

5 | Ticket to Orlando: Lavelle - Ticket # 5362

Ticket to Eleuthera: Keystalann Burrows
- Ticket # 20463

4 | Ticket to Exuma: Jyde Rolle - Ticket # 11888

7 Bicycle Shanel Burrows - Ticket # 18542

0 | Digital Camera: Kevin Telfort - Ticket # 17148
Watch: Christina Cummings - Ticket # 9679

Pearl Necklace: Peggy Pinder - Ticket # 15851

$100 Gasoline: PG. Ticket # 20076

- Ticket # 6131
- Ticket # 21534

Luncheon at Nett’s: Ason Braynen
- Ticket # 12723
Bed in Bag: Pasha Huene - Ticket # 0452

Microwave: Kayla Rolle - Ticket # 17193
DVD Player: Gary Turnquest - Ticket # 20112

_
_—

Re Rp} Re —
|G SISElSfeles] oleate |

~

e e
OV

oe

The drawing was held on Saturday, July 7, 2007 at
7:00 p.m. on Saint Bede’s Roman Catholic Church’s
grounds. We would like to cngratulate all the winners
and extend our gratitude to all our loyal and generous
raffle participants.





Dr. Emma R. Pastoral, 62 .

of #1 Mt Vernon, N.P. and formerly of Maripipi Leyte,
Philippines, who died at the Intensive Care Unit, Princess
Margaret Hospital on Wednesdayt, July 11, 2007. Funeral
service will be held at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church,
Shirley Street on Saturday, July 14, 2007 at 10:00a.m.

2

Left to cherish her memory are her husband, Dr. Robert Pastoral;

RoyalStar
Assurance

daughter, Ann-Marie Pastoral Boldt; son-in-law, Eric Boldt;
grandson, Robert John Bodlt; father, Sanjos Rabasto Sr.; brothers,
Dr & Mrs. Adolfo Rabasto, Arch & Mrs. Sanjos Rabasto Jr., Mr. & Mrs.
Cecilio Rabasto; sister, Dr. Elizabeth Rabasto Smith; nieces, Rinna;
Anna, Abby, Aireen, Andrea, Pearl and Marieedenze.
Nephews; Archie, Gabriel, Gijon and grandchildren.



Please note
that our offices will |
be closed on Friday 13th July
for our annual |

STAFF FUN DAY.

entreville House, Second Terrace West, Collins Avenue
www.rsabahamas.com

Sincerest thanks to Drs. Christine Chin, John Lunn, Elsa Grant, Theo
Ferguson, Barry McCartney, Robin Roberts, Mark Weech, Reginald
Neymour, Harry Singh, Dwayne Sands and Kevin Moss and to all the
staff at the Intensive Care Unit (PMH) and the Intensive Care Unit
(Doctors Hospital).



Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers Funeral Home, York
and Ernest Street on Friday July 13, 2007 from 4:00p.m until
9:00p.m.


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Grand Bahama’s

independence

\

celebration;

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A spectac-
ular fireworks displays lit
up the skies at the Inde-
pendence Park in Grand
Bahama, where thousands
turned out on Monday
evening for the 34th
annual independence cele-
brations.

The highlight of the cele-
brations came at 11pm with
a procession of police offi-
cers, immigration and cus-
toms officials, led by the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force Marching Band.

The honour guard
marched onto the playing



field for the official flag-
raising and inspection,
which was carried out by
Minister of Housing and
National Insurance Ken-
neth Russell, the MP for
High Rock.

Residents displayed their
patriotism by wearing inde-
pendence t-shirts in the
colours of the flag, waving
miniature Bahamian flags,
and attaching them to their
vehicles.

The theme for this year’s
celebration was ‘A Tribute
to Our Forbearers.’

A cultural extravaganza

was held at 9pm featuring
various Bahamian artists,
including KB, Lil Joe
Cartwright and the Matrix

Band. There was also a
junkanoo rush-ouat.
Various MPs atiended the
celebrations, including Mar-
co City MP Zhivargo Laing,
Pineridge MP Kwasi
Thompson, Eight Mile
Rock MP Vernae Grant,
and senators Kay Smith and

Frederick McAlpine.

@ SENATOR Kay

Smith, parliamentary sec-
retary in the Prime MInis-
ter’s Office, and Tourism
Minister Neko Grant, and
wife, Barbara, are seen
watching performances at
the Cultural Extravaganza
at Independence Park on
Monday evening.

Pod

ORS Wet: gsc]




@ MINISTER
of Housing and
National Insur-
ance Kenneth
Russell and his
wife, Georgette, :
are seen at the
34th annual
independence
celebrations at
Independence
Park on Monday
evening.

(Photos:
Godfrey
Cooper - Derek
Carroll’s
Photography)


























Courtesy call paid on the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs

SHEILA Carey, deputy permanent secretary in the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, and His Excellency Kailash Lal Agrawal,
High Commissioner of the Republic of India, are pictured on
Wednesday, July 11 at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs during
a courtesy call.

(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)

Teenager dies after stabbing

A TEENAGER, walking on Meadow Street, near Parker Street
about 8 o’clock last night, was attacked by several young men,
who stabbed him several times. The 18 year old died at the scene.

. Last night police were looking for his attackers. Although police
knew his name, they would not release it until his family had been
notified.

This is the forty-fourth murder for the first six months of the year.



The Tribune and
USA TODAY make history

ing their stay in the Bahamas,”
said Tom Kelly, USA
TODAY ’S circulation vice pres-
ident.

“We’re proud to have The Tri-
bune as a part of the USA
TODAY family. Welcome

FROM page one

arraigned as a juvenile.
building.
has been confirmed.

sometime around 7pm.

FROM page one

wants to do anything about it.”

A human resources official at
NIB acknowledged to The Tri-
bune that rumours have been
“circulating” about alleged
intimidation, however as no
“formal written complaint” has
been lodged, an investigation
has not begun. “I have heard
things floating around,” the offi-
cial stated. “However as the
union hasn’t levied these things
(to NIB), we cannot address the
matter.” The official further
noted that employees are usu-



FROM page one aboard!” said Terry Carlson;
look forward to our readers manager/field operations.
enjoying the USA TODAY dur- Robert Carron, Tribune Chief

Operating Officer, welcomed the
USA team to The Tribune’ s
plant.

“This is another journalistic
achievement for The Tribune of
which we are very proud,” said
Mr Carron.

Young man to be arrainged.
today after age confusion -

yesterday afternoon when he was brought before the courts to be

As a result, the press were not allowed in the court room and the
young man’s face was concealed as he was led in and out of the

According to the teen’s lawyer Tamara Taylor, the accused will
return to court today to be formally arraigned, after his actual age

Mardio Hall — the 43rd murder victim for the year — was shot on
Sunday at the racing tracks at the Queen Elizabeth er Centré

‘

NIB staff

ally “reluctant” to make formal
complaints for fear of negative
repercussions.

Jerry Swan, the President of
the Union of Public Officers,
told The Tribune that he “has
absolutely no knowledge” of
the allegations, claiming no such
complaints have been made to
the union.

Messages were left for the
official in question, but as of
press time he could not be
reached for comment.




FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

The Tribune

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



‘Double taxation’ Protect Bahamas firms

hits Bahamas
investment funds
competitiveness

| | By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS-
based investment
fund managers
have lost busi-
ness because
Recognised For-
eign Funds
(RFF) domiciled
in jurisdictions
not prescribed by
this nation’s reg-
ulators are being
subjected to “double taxation”,

DEVEAUX

- The Tribune was told yesterday,

something the Securities Com-
mission hopes to change “in
very short order”.

Hillary Deveaux, the Securi-
ties Commission’s executive
director, said both regulator and
industry were pushing amend-
ments to the Investment Funds
Act 2003 to resolve the situa-
tion, which. currently leaves
RFFs in non-prescribed juris-

dictions with having to pay

licensing fees twice if they. want
to use a Bahamas-based invest-
-ment manager.

Recognised Foreign Funds
are investment funds that are
not domiciled in the Bahamas,
but-have some kind of nexus or
connection to this nation, such
as using a Bahamiaa.investment
manager.

If they are licensed or regis-
tered in jurisdictions prescribed
or registered by the Securities
Commission,Recognised For-
eign. Funds just have to regis-
ter with the Bahamian regulator
and provide proof of their reg-
istration elsewhere.



* Commission seeking
Act amendments ‘in very
short order’, as it mulls
extending audit deadline
from four to six months

* Industry concern on
Segregated Accounts
Companies ‘double fees’

But under the current Invest-
ment Funds Act, Recognised
Foreign Funds that are not
domiciled in a jurisdiction
recognised by the Securities
Commission must also be
licensed in the Bahamas if they
want to use a fund maeaeet in
this nation.

As a result, they are faced
with having to pay licensing fees
twice - in their jurisdiction of
origin, and in the Bahamas -
effectively a form of ‘double
taxation’ that raises the costs of
doing business and deterred
such funds from _ using
Bahamas-based investment
managers. | *

Although the industry had
not igdicated how much busi-

‘ness it might have lost as a
result, Mr Deveaux told The.

Tribune: “One of the difficul-
ties we have is that we’re almost
double taxing a fund if it is not
listed in a prescribed jurisdic-
tion of listed on a prescribed
exchange: °

“Tf a fund is using an invest-

SEE page 6

Port parent demands asset
disposal funds accounting

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

INTERCONTINENTAL
Diversified Corporation
(IDC), parent company for the

-Grand Bahama Port Authori-

ty (GBPA) and Port Group
Ltd, has demanded an account-
ing of all dividends paid to the

_ late Edward St George and his

estate, and his business part-

ner Sir Jack Hayward, alleg-

ing that many of thase pay-

ra were “not authorised”
it

1: its defence and counter- .

claim to the statement of claim

filed by Mr St George’s estate, -

which is disputing Sir Jack’s
assertion that he owns 75 per
cent of IDC, and in turn the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
IDC alleged that it “had a right
to any dividends” declared by
the latter two entities or the
Grand Bahama Development
Company (Devco).

It makes specific reference
to the “special dividends” that
the St George estate alleges
were split equally 50/50
between Sir Jack and Mr St
George upon the sale of vari-
ous Port Group and Devco
assets, as detailed in their state-
ment of claim.

In its counter-claim, IDC
alleged: “IDC has not autho-
rised the payment of many of
those dividends to the first
plaintiff [Lady Henrietta St
George], the first defendant
[Sir Jack Hayward], the [St
George] estate or Mr St
George himself, and any sums
paid to them or either of them
are sums for which they are
liable to account to IDC.

“In light of which, IDC seeks
an accounting of all dividends
paid directly from [the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd] and the
Grand Bahama Development
Company to” Mr St George,

his estate and Sir Jack.”

Given that IDC is a defen-
dant to the action brought by
the St George estate, and is
effectively on the same side
and alleged to be under Sir
Jack’s control, its demand for
an accounting of the dividends
paid to both parties is likely to
baffle many observers.

The dividends in question
were paid to Mr St George and
Sir Jack Hayward over the
period 1993-2001, and collec-
tivly amounted to almost $80
million. According to the St
Géorge estate’s statement of
claim, these payments were
split 50/50.

The dividends resulted from:

* The 1993 sale by Devco of
a 50 per cent stake in Grand
Bahama Power Company to
Southern Electric (now
Mirant), generating $35 mil-
lion.

* The 1999 sale of a 50 per
cent stake in Devco to Hutchi-
son Development Bahamas,
netting a total dividend of $17
million.

* The 2000 sale of a 28.6 per
cent stake in Urban Sanitation
by Port Group Ltd to Onyx,
producing dividends of $9.428
million.

* The 2001 sale of a 50 per
cent stake in the Freeport Con-
tainer Port by Port Group Ltd
to Hutchison Port Bahamas
Holdings, generating special
dividends of $18 million.

In its counter-claim, IDC
denied that all joint ventures
were done on the basis of a
50/50 partnership between Sir
Jack and Mr St George, and
that the proceeds from the
asset disposals were divided
equally between the two.

It demanded that the St
George estate submit “strict
proof” of this to the court.

from ‘shell companies’

* Attorney calls for foreign investor parents to guarantee obligations/
put up performance bond for Bahamian subsidiaries

* Says Bahamian firms ‘have no récourse’ if developers pull-out
leaving unpaid debts and local entities ‘in terrible financial straits’.

wee eee ee eee ee ee eee ee eee ee)

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian busi-

nesses must be

protected from

major investors

who set up “shell
companies” without any assets
to facilitate their projects in this

nation and then pull out without

settling their debts, a prominent
attorney told The Tribune yes-
terday.

Fred Smith, an attomey and
partner with Callender’s & Co,
said this had happened all too
often during his 30 years of
practicing commercial law in
Freeport, leaving Bahamian
companies “in terrible financial
straits” and without any
recourse to recover “hundreds

of thousands of
dollars” owed to
them.

Mr Smith said:
“In my view,
every time a
multinational
compant wants
to develop or do’
business - here,
even if they want
to operate asa
Bahamian company, the parent
company must guaantee the
performance of ,the subsidiary
and all the financial obligations
it enters into in the Bahamas.

“It is my hope that the FNM,
in developing an investment
policy, will legislate that.”

Mr Smith also suggested that
foreign investors be made to
put up a performance bond as a

SMITH



way of guaranteeing their per-
formance, and give Bahamian
creditors, companies and the
Government something finan-
cial to claim against if they

failed to fulfill their obligations :

and departed this nation leaving
unpaid debts.in their wake.

He urged that such guaran-
tees and performance bonds be
legislated, rather than left to.
negotiations over individual ©
Heads of Agreement, and apply
to both Bahamian and foreign
investors, regardless-of how big
or small they are.

“As the Bahamas continues
to attract foreign investment, it
is extremely important that we
protect Bahamian-owned com-
mercial operations from con-
ducting business with shell com-

panies from abroad that have .

no assets here,” Mr Smith said. .
“Companies that do not go.
through with investments some-
times leave millions of dollars in
debt throughout the islands.
“As an attorney operating in
Freeport for the last 30 years, I
can say resoundingly that
Bahamas-based companies,
Grand Bahama Port Authority
licensees, contractors, tour oper-
ators, réal éstate agents, attor-
neys, accountants and engineers
have all, and I have represented
many of them, have had to eat

. their losses, many of them hun-

dreds of thousands of dollars at
atime.”

The Tribune knows of cases
similar to those described by

SEE page 9 |

Abaco Markets eyes June/July
2008 to restart share dividend

* Second quarter to ‘show tremendous improvement’ over prior year
* Firm. to repay Class A preference shares quarterly, with $535,000 payment in September

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

‘ ABACO Markets, the BISX-listed retail



group, is hoping to resume dividend pay-
ments to its long-suffering ordinary share-
holders “by June/July” 2008, The Tribune
was told yesterday, with its second quarter
results likely to “show tremendous improve-
ment” over prior year comparatives.
Gavin Watchorn, Abaco Markets presi-

dent, said: “On the assumption we have a’

profitable year for 2007, we’d like to resume
ordinary dividend [payments] i in 12 months.
I’d like to think by June/July of next year.”

’ The announcement is likely to ignite new
interest in Abaco Markets’ share price, giv-
en that Bahamian investors’ number one
attraction is dividends and receiving instant,
liquid returns on their investment.

A resumption of dividend payments
would also provide some reward for Abaco
Markets shareholders who have stuck with
the stock through some pretty dark times,
including the $25 million loss it incurred in
2003, and complete the retail group’s return

~ to consistent profitability.

. Those investors who bought into Abaco

Markets when it was at its 52-week low of

$0.54 per share have already reaped the
benefits, the stock’s close at $1.60 on
Wednesday this week meaning their invest-
ment has almost tripled in value.

And more share price appreciation may

°

SEE page 8

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Drive them to you by
irecting the traffic

ne of the biggest

misconceptions is

that you simply

put up a website
and people will come flocking
to you. Just like in the real
world, traffic is not going to
come to you on its own. You
are going to have to encour-
age it by various means. Suc-
cessful sites can spend up to
50 per cent of their revenue
with online traffic driving cam-
paigns.

The importance is getting
quality traffic. If your visitors
aren’t relevant and don’t buy,
then you have wasted your
time and money. If you are
selling a parental control e-
mail'solution, you will want to
appeal to mums and dads with
children aged nine to 15. Any
other traffic is a waste of time.
You will need to be clear what
type of traffic you need to
direct to your site. So, what are
the ways you can get traffic to
your website?

The first way is to pursue
Offline Activities. Having a
website doesn’t mean you can’t
use the tried and tested tradi-
tional ways of promotion. Sur-
prisingly, they can still be very
effective. Here are six offline
ways you can drive traffic to
your website:

* First, try advertising in tra-
ditional media such as news-
papers and magazines.

* Second, try public relations
by sending out press releases to
the traditional media.

* Third, try direct market-
ing by using mailing lists to
write sales letters to physical
addresses. ‘

* Fourth, try promotions at
third party venues, running
competitions with magazines
and newspapers, and exhibiting
at fairs and shows.

* Rifth, try joint ventures by

‘signing up partners to help pro-

mote your offering to their
audience. Tying up with news-
papers can be useful, as they
oftgn run promotions to their





Business

readerships.

* Sixth, try adding your web-
site and e-mail address to all
your marketing literature, let-
terheads, stationery, business
vehicles, premises, adverts,
product brochures and your
business cards. This is a great
way of getting virtually free
publicity

The second way is to pursue
Online Activities. This is a bit
of a minefield, where you will
need to spend some time learn-
ing new techniques. There are
many ways in which you can
drive traffic to your site, and
some can be very lucrative.

* First, try advertising online
by buying advertising on sites
such as Google and Yahoo.



i aH Scotiabank Thompson Boulevard branch
wishes to advise its customers that there will
be a disruption in ABM service on

Due to renovations being carried out on the
building, the electrical supply will be
disconnected during these hours.

Scotiabank apologizes for any
inconvenience caused and invites you
to visit one of our other
convenient ABM locations.

You can bid for keywords, or
the search terms that surfers
use. When they arrive on the
search page, they will see your
ad, and when they click on
your ad they will be directed to
your website. You will be
charged for the click.

* Second, if you have creat-
ed your own banners, text ads
or links, try advertising them
on other relevant sites that
have visitors with a similar pro-
file. When visitors click on
your banners, or text ads, they
will again be directed to your
website.

* Third, try public relations
by sending out press releases to
online media and eZines, and
posting in forums.

* Fourth, try direct market-
ing by sending out e-mail to e-
mail address lists, but be wary
of spamming as this will get
you in big trouble with your
Internet Service Provider.

* Fifth, build partnerships by
tying in with partner sites that
appeal to a similar audience
via

(a) Third party promotions,
where they promote your offer
to their customer lists through
a newsletter

(b) Direct mailing, exchang-
ing links or simply obtaining
links from their sites to your
site for free. Check out sites
such as Monster Link Swap
and Zeus Marketing Robot to

help you do it.

* Sixth, try Search Engine
Optimisation techniques to
help rank your website address
higher up the major search
engines. You will need to use
key words in your web page
content and page names,
imbed meta tags in your page
titles, text and headers, and
submit your site to search
engines and directories.

If this looks like Double
Dutch to you, hire an external
SEO company by searching
the top search engines and
select one from the top 20. If
they can’t get. themselves up
the rankings, they won’t be
able to doitfor you. .

* Seventh, try Viral Market-
ing techniques. Simply having
your website link at the bot-
tom of your e-mails is a sure-
fire way of promoting your
website. Also, try inserting
‘Tell A Friend’ links on your
website as a way of getting
your visitors to tell others
about your service. Guerilla
Marketing is a growing form

of marketing that is becoming.

popular. Check out web sites
such as Guerilla Marketing
Bootcamp, which provide a
free newsletter with many
guerilla marketing ideas.

* Finally, try starting an
Affiliate Programme. This is
where you get other sites to

va

eon nita

drive traffic to your site, and
you share the revenue of any
sales as a result of that traffic.
This is dealt with in more detail
in my future column, Becom-
ing An Affiliate.

Driving traffic to your site
can be one of the most tricky
things to get right. You could
spend a lot of money and get
very little in the way of results.
There are many scams on the
Internet. Many Internet mar-
keting techniques look too
good to be true and they often
are. Traffic won’t happen with-
out a lot of hard work. Don’t
be an antipreneur and forget to
implement a mix of the above
online and offline traffic-gen-
erating techniques. Make sure
you avoid the trap of
antipreneurship by spending
sufficient time on this area, as
it will pay large dividends for
your future business success.

NB: This column is available
as an eBook at
www.antipreneurship.com

Mark draws on 20 years of
top level business, marketing
and communications experi-
ence in London and the
Bahamas. He is chief operating
officer of www.ezpzemail.com,
currently lives in Nassau, and
can be contacted at markalex-
palmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer. All rights
reserved










THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 8B
DOW30 _—‘13,861.73 +283.86 Ab
S&P500 —«d4,547.70 +28.94 4%
NASDAQ 2,701.73 +49.94 Ad
10-YR NOTE 5.13 +0.04 2a
CRUDEOIL 7250 -006 W

Stocks
surge
on retail
sales

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press
NEW YORK — Wall Street
soared Thursday, propelling the -
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
and Dow Jones industrials to
record highs as bright spots
among generally sluggish retail
sales allowed investors to toss
aside concerns about the health
of the economy.
The rally, which included the
- Dow’s biggest one-day percent-
age gain in nearly four years,
was perhaps surprising given
- that there was no extraordinary —
announcement or other catalyst
usually seen with such a huge
gain, and that it came before
most .companies. have
announced their second-quarter
S. oe
_. But investors, heartened by
signs of a happy and spending

consumer, clearly decided to

_ put some bets on the table.

Though retail sales generally —

appeared to be crimped last ©
month by higher gasoline prices —
and a tepid housing market, and —

the. outlook for the coming



as dour as-some investors.
expected.

According to " pteltainary) o
: calculations, the S&P 500 rose _

28.94, or L91 percent, to 1,547.70,

_ above its record close of 1, 539. 18, oo

Y set June 4.

‘The Dow shot up: 283. 86, or :

_ 2.09 percent, to 13,861.73; its pre-
- vious record close was 13,676.32, _
also set June 4. The increase

was the biggest percentage gain
- for the blue chip index since
October 2003 and the biggest
_ point gain since October 2002.
- The Dow also reached a new
‘trading high of 13,869.94.
The Nasdaq composite index.
rose 49.94, or 1.88 percent, to
2,701.73; Thursday’s. gain was
the biggest percentage increase:

since March, and the last time ©

. the Nasdaq closed at around
Thurday’s level was Feb. 1, 2001.
Stocks’ ascent Thursday
after mostly unremarkable trad-
ing in recent weeks could also
. reflect so-called short covering.
Investors who sell stocks short
are betting the stock will fall
and can be forced to buy stocks
when markets move higher.

Bonds fell, with the yield on .

the benchmark 10-year Trea-
sury note rising to 5.13 percent
from 5.09 percent late Wednes-

day. The dollar was generally _

lower against other major cur-
rencies, dropping to a new
record low versus the euro and
a 26-year low against the British
pound. Gold prices rose.

Light, sweet crude fell 6
cents to $72.50 per barrel on the
New York = Mercantile
Exchange.

Wall Street, whose advance
this year has been powered in
part by a cascade of buyout
news, received an additional
boost after mining company Rio

_ Tinto offered to buy Canadian
aluminum producer Alcan for |
$38.1 billion.

Advancing issues outnum-
bered decliners by 3 to 1 on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 1.66 bil-
lion shares compared with 1.44
billion traded Wednesday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies ‘rose 15.21, or
181 percent, to 855.18.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average fell 0.36 percent.
Britain’s FTSE 100 rose 1.25 per-

‘cent, Germany’s DAX index
advanced 1.96 percent, and
France’s CAC-40 jumped 1.70
percent.



: difficult, to. ascer- a sak
~ tain, th verall reading wasn’t —

FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

ALUMINUM COMPANY



PETER MCCABE/AP

PARTNERS: Alcan President and CEO Dick Evans, left, and Rio Tinto CEO Tom Albanese address a
news conference in Montreal. Under the buyout deal, anew company named Rio Tinto Alcan
would be based in Montreal, that would be ‘a new global leader in the aluminum industry with |
large, long-life, low-cost assets worldwide,’ the companies said. It would be headed by Evans.

Rio Tinto offers $38B

for Canada’s Alcan

BY ROHAN SULLIVAN

Associated Press
|. SYDNEY, Australia — Mining
| giant Rio Tinto has offered to buy
| Canadian aluminum company
| Alcan for $38.1 billion in cash, the
companies said Thursday, in a
friendly takeover that tops a hostile
| bid by U.S.-based Alcoa.
The bid exceeds a $28 billion
offer of cash and stock from Alcoa
| that Alcan’s board rejected in May,
| and would create the world’s larg-
» est. aluminum. company..,Alcoa
| withdrew its offer on Thursday
| after being outbid.
Alcoa Chairman and CEO Alain
Belda said Rio Tinto’s bid “strongly
| reinforces our view of the underly-
| ing value in the aluminum industry
' and its bright prospects for the
future.”

have more attractive options for
delivering additional value to
shareholders,” he said.

In a joint statement, Rio Tinto
and Alcan said the Anglo-Austra-
lian miner was offering $101 per
| share for Alcan and that Alcan’s
| board was recommending the deal
| to shareholders.

“This transaction combines two
leading and complementary alumi-
num businesses, and is a further
step in Rio Tinto’s strategy of cre-
ating shareholder value through
investing in high quality, large
scale, low cost and long life assets
in attractive sectors,” Rio Tinto
| Chairman Paul Skinner said.

Rio Tinto’s offer is a 65.5 percent
| premium on Alcan’s closing share

MERGER

Huntsman terminates one deal,
agrees to another buyout offer

“However, at this price level, we.

price before Pittsburgh-based
Alcoa’s May 4 takeover bid, and an
almost 33 percent premium on

_Alcoa’s offer, the statement said.

The offer is subject to condi-
tions including gaining the support
of 66.67 percent of Alcan’s share-
holders and a breakup fee of
$1.05 billion payable by Alcan to

‘Rio Tinto if Alcan pulls out.

Alcan’s U.S. shares climbed
$8.85, or. 9. .) percent, to $98.45 in



6.7 pereen enti'to $45.29.

Trading of Rio Tinto’s shares
were halted in Sydney ahead of the
announcement, but. had earlier
soared to a new record price of
105.19 Australian dollars ($90.58) as
rumors swirled that a deal on Alcan
was imminent. On the London
Stock Exchange, where Rio Tinto’s
shares are also traded, the price fell
2.5 percent after the announcement
to 3,892 pence ($78.99).

Under the deal, a new company
named Rio Tinto Alcan would be
based in Montreal, Canada, that
would be “a new global leader in
the aluminum industry with large,
long life, low cost assets world-
wide,” the companies said. It would
be headed by Alcan Chief Execu-
tive Dick Evans.

Alcan Chairman Yves Fortier
said the Rio Tinto offer was “very
attractive” and offered sharehold-
ers “the certainty of a clear path to
completion” — a possible reference
to antitrust concerns about Alcoa’s
bid.

“The agreed transaction with

‘Rio Tinto is the outcome of a rigor-

ous and thorough process con-

ducted by the Alcan board,” he

said.

“It achieves all of our stated
goals, providing clearly superior
value to Alcan shareholders while
remaining true to our core values
and obligations as responsible cor-
porate citizens,” he said.

Rio Tinto CEO Tom Albanese
called aluminum an excellent busi-
ness to be in because of increasing
demand from China:--

“The outlook for sector is very

strong,” Albanese said. “World
demand iis expected to grow at

more six percent per year thru 2011.”
... We’ve seen China’s demand for. -
steel, for copper and for aluminum ,

ramping up in recent years.”

ABN Amro analyst Rob Clifford
told Dow Jones Newswires Alcoa
faced a “big hurdle” because of the
breakup fee Alcan would be liable

for if it had pushed ahead with the:

bidding.

Others noted synergies between
the two companies said Rio Tinto
would likely consolidate operations
after the takeover.

“This is a major deal that’s been

clearly flagged to the market anda ©

very good way for Rio to use its
forecast cash pile,” said Numis
Securities analyst John Meyer, pre-
dicting that Rio Tinto would “be
quick to sell off some of the down-
stream operations.”

Rio Tinto said Alcan has high
quality, low cost assets and excel-
lent access to long life hydro
power.



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

ECONOMY

Trade
deficit
rises as
oil prices
increase

BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — America’s
trade deficit rose to its second-high-
est level of the year as the price of
imported crude oil jumped and
demand for Chinese products
remained strong despite recalls of
tainted products.

The Commerce Department
reported Thursday that the deficit for
May rose to $60.04 billion, 2.3 per-
cent more than in April. Most of the
deterioration in the trade balance
reflected a big increase in the foreign
oil bill, which swamped record sales
of U.S. products abroad.

The Bush administration said the

continued rise in exports validated

President Bush’s campaign for free
trade deals and his opposition to rais-
ing import barrier.

“Our strategy is to focus on grow-
ing our.exports as opposed to intro-
ducing protectionist policies to limit
our imports,” Commerce Secretary
Carlos Gutierrez said in an interview
with The Associated Press.

The administration is working to .

get Congress to approve free trade
deals with South Korea, Peru, Colom-
bia and Panama. The president also
wants lawmakers to extend his power

to seal trade agreements without con- :

gressional intervention. Such author-

ity expired at the end of July.

That effort faces much resistance
because of unhappiness over the
trade deficits and the loss of 3 million

_ U.S. manufacturing jobs since 2000.

. So far this year, the overall trade

deficit is running at an annual rate of

$709 billion. That is down 6.5 percent
from last year’s $758.5 billion, the

er ERLE

fifth consecutive year that the deficit. .

was a record.

Analysts are looking for the deficit |
to improve this year. U.S. exports are —
‘benefiting from strong growth

abroad. Also, the falling value of the

dollar against the euro and other cur-.

rencies lifts exports. |
For May, exports of goods and ser-

vices rose 2.2 percent to an all-time _

high of $132 billion. That figure
reflected big gains in sales of U.S.-
made aircraft, electronic products
and oil drilling equipment.

Imports also set a record, rising 2.2

percent to $192.1 billion. That —

included a 6.2 percent jump in petro- .
leum products to $26.6 billion, the —

highest since last August.

The deficit with China in May rose
to $20.02 billion; it’s the biggest
imbalance since January. While the
overall deficit so far this year is
smaller than last year, the deficit with
China is 17.2 percent ahead of 2006.

BY PAUL FOY
Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — Chemicals maker Hunts-
man agreed to a $6.5 billion buyout offer from an
affiliate of Apollo Management on Thursday, ter-
minating an earlier deal to sell itself at a lower
price to a Dutch company.

Apollo, through its Hexion Specialty Chemicals
unit, had offered $28 a share in cash for Huntsman
which had previously accepted a $25.25 a share
offer from the Dutch manufacturer Basell AF. -

Huntsman gave Basell until Wednesday to raise
its bid but said Basell failed to do so.

“We had a deal and we were very comfortable
with that. We stick with that deal,” said Basell
spokeswoman Patricia Vangheluwe.

Huntsman CEO and president Peter R. Hunts-
man said he couldn’t ignore a bid that was hun-
dreds of millions of dollars higher than a deal he
hatched with another suitor.

Huntsman’s board approved the Apollo deal
and has recommended that shareholders vote in
favor.

Huntsman said his company wired a “mind-bog-
gling” $200 million breakup fee to Basell, which is
controlled by U.S. industrialist Len Blavatnik’s
Access Industries. Hexion agreed to reimburse half
of the amount of the fee.

Blavatnik was “quite disappointed — $25.25 was

a good price at the time, but with Apollo bidding at
$28, that was something to consider,” Huntsman
said in Houston before boarding a plane Thursday

for Salt Lake City, where his company is based. It .

operates from The Woodlands, Texas.
He conceded a Huntsman-Hexion combination

will have a harder and longer time gaining antitrust ,

approvals in the U.S. and Europe because the over-
lap between the two chemical businesses.

“There are areas of overlap in the business, but
we're confident we’ll get through the Federal
Trade Commission,” he said.

To compensate for delays, Hexion agreed to pay
a 8 percent annual premium for Huntsman shares
if the closing takes longer than nine months, he
said.

Huntsman said he didn’t know if Hexion would
keep him or his team of executives on over the
long run — an arrangement he had with Basell.

Craig Morrison, the 5l-year-old chairman and
CEO of Hexion, said it had yet to figure out how
the two companies’ management teams would
mesh or whether any consolidation would result in
plant closings.

To win Huntsman, Apollo raised its bid to $28 a
share when it was already the high bidder at $27.25,
which “really came down to strategy and optimiz-
ing the chance of landing the deal,” he said.

It seemed to work.



-DOUGLAS C. PIZAC/AP
PRODUCTS: Apollo Management will buy out *
chemicals maker Huntsman Corp. Above,
cases display dozens of consumer products
that contain items made by Huntsman ina
museum at the company’s corporate
headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah.


THE MIAMIHERALD | MiamiHerald.com

SHOPPING: A
shopper walks
by bargain
sale signs in
downtown
Seoul, South
Korea. The
Bank of Korea
raised its key
interest rate
Thursday for
the first time
in nearly a
year.

LEE JIN-MAN/AP

e ECONOMY



Bank of Korea raises
key interest rate

From Herald Wire Services

The Bank of Korea on Thursday raised its key interest rate
for the first time in nearly a year amid expected strengthen-
ing economic growth and possible stronger inflation in the

second half of the year.

The central bank said That it raised its overnight call rate
target by 25 basis points to 4.75 percent. It was the first
increase since one of similar scale in August last year.

The decision to raise the rate was expected. Eight of 13
economists surveyed by Dow Jones Newswires expected the
central bank to approve the quarter percentage-point rate

hike.
e CURRENCY

DOLLAR DIPS TO FRESH
LOW AGAINST EURO

The dollar briefly stum-
bled to a fresh low against
the euro on continuing con-
cerns that troubles in the
U.S. housing market could
drag down the overall econ-
omy.

The 13-nationeuro
peaked at $1.3797, topping its
previous record of $1.3784
set early Wednesday. It
retreated to $1.3783 in late —
New York trading, still up .
from $1.3761 late Wednes-
day.

Concerns over the
strength of the U.S. econ-
omy, fueled largely by woes
in the subprime housing sec-

tor, have sted the euro
against tHe dollar.
e SETTLEMENT :

WARNER MUSIC STRIKES
LICENSING DEAL

Warner Music Group
(WMG) said it had settled
its copyright infringement
lawsuit against the social
networking Website imeem
by agreeing to license its
music and video content to
the site for a slice of its ad
revenue.

Financial details of the
settlement were not dis-
closed. :

Under the agreement,
imeem Inc. can carry music
and videos from all of the
record company’s artists,
who include Madonna,
Linkin Park and Red Hot
Chili Peppers.

e ENERGY EFFICIENCY

CHINA FALLS SHORT ON
ENERGY-SAVING GOALS

China is falling short of
its goals in a campaign to
boost energy efficiency in
its fuel-guzzling economy —
the world’s No. 2 oil con-
sumer — but is starting to
make progress, the govern-
ment said.

China launched a five-
year effort in 2006 to cut
energy use per unit of eco-
nomic output by 20 percent
amid mounting worries
about pollution and depen-
dence on imported oil,
which communist leaders
see as a strategic weakness.

But last year’s reduction
was only 1.33 percent, well
below the 4 percent annual
target, Xie Fuzhan, commis-
sioner of the National
Bureau of Statistics, said.

4 6335 p.m. Late
Steck Thr, case
Intel INTC 26.00 25.93.07 275479
Pfizer PFE =. 2598 = 25.65 -33—«106713
Schwab SCHW 22.48 2245 -.04
SPOR SPY 154.39 154.42 +.03 45308
Wachovia WB 5253 5253 *
PwShsQQQ QQQQ 49.56 4956 * 36144
GM 37543754 * 33872
sp MLE 7323 73.41 +18 32262
iro. «= SUNW 5.43) «541-02 29028
TxuCop TXU 6745 6745 * 26916
3464, G4. 24187
IIclBk = IBN 52.425 2.42 20625
sPfncl —XLF 36.54 20266

For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business

e CHINA

FOREIGN INVESTMENT
SOARS 22 PERCENT

The flood of foreign
investment pouring into
China rose by 22 percent in
June to $6.6 billion, the gov-
ernment said, giving further
indication that economic
growth is racing ahead.
despite official efforts to
cool the boom.

The June figure raised
total foreign investment for -
the first half of this year to
$31.9 billion, the Commerce
Ministry said.

The government has
been trying to curb invest-
ment in real estate and other
industries where it believes
supply exceeds demand.
Chinese leaders worry run-
away spending could ignite
inflation or a debt crisis.

e RECORD LABEL

TERRA FIRMA GETS
EU OK FOR EMI BID

EU regulators cleared
private equity group Terra
Firma Capital Partners’
$4.8 billion takeover bid for
EMI Group (EMIPF.PK) on

- Wednesday, though share-

holders of the music com-
pany were still holding out
for a counterbid from

- Warner Music Group

(WMG). The European
Commission approved the
deal after identifying no
antitrust issues and receiv-
ing no complaints from
rivals within a deadline of 25

working days.

e EARNINGS

SONY ERICSSON SEES
PROFITS, VOLUMES RISE

Sony Ericsson, the
world’s fourth-largest
mobile phone maker, saw
growing profits and market
share in the second quarter
but said the average selling
price of its handsets contin-
ued to fall.

The joint venture
between Sweden’s LM
Ericsson (ERIC) and
Japan’s Sony (SNE) said net
profit rose 54 percent to 220
million euros ($303 million)
from 143 million euros in the
same period last year.

Sales grew 37 percent to
3.1 billion euros ($4.3 billion)
from 2.3 billion euros in the
second quarter of 2006.

Sony Ericsson said it -
shipped 24.9 million hand-
sets in the quarter, up 59
percent from the year-ago
period.

4 6:35 Late

Alcoa AA 4529 4637 = +1.08 += 19396
iShR2K nya IWM 84,82 8482 * 19317
WellsFgos WFC 35.44 35.44 17403
SP Mid MDY = 167.51 «16751 * 17158

. PG 62.93 6240 -53 16661
Microsoft MSFT 30.07 29.94 -.13 16010
BredeCm BRCD 8.03 8.06 +03 14644
SemiHTtr SMH 40.22 40.14 -08 13947
CMGI CMG! = 1.86 1.87 +01 13083
OnSmcnd ONNN 1170 11.70 * 12036
Citigrp c 5284 5281 -03 11795
FMCG FCX 9456 9444 -12 11122



CELLPHONE MAKER

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _

FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007 |4B

Motorola’s CEO comes under fire

BY ASHLEY M. HEHER
Associated Press

CHICAGO — After beating
back a proxy fight from bil-
lionaire financier Carl Icahn,
the chief executive and chair-
man of Motorola is under
attack again.

On the heels of this week’s
warning of worse-than-ex-

- pected earnings, Ed Zander

found himself the target of an
activist-backed effort to
reform the once-venerable
cellphone maker.

This time, the campaign to
boot Zander, along with four
other board members, is led by
a group of small investors and
includes an online petition,
blog and five-minute video
manifesto.

“Enough is enough and it’s
time for a change,” said Eric
Jackson, a Naples, Fla., man-
agement consultant who owns
134 Motorola shares and
launched the grass roots initia-
tive called “Plan B” on Mon-
day. “There’s the substance of
what the CEO does, but there’s
also the symbolism. And I
think the problem is that he’s
just not that inspiring.”

So far, about 70 sharehold-
ers who claim to represent
about 400,000 shares have
signed on, though there’s no
way to verify the group’s hold-
ings. A video outlining the
plan has received more than

RETAIL

The campaign to boot Ed Zander, along with
four other board members, is led by a group of
small investors and includes an online petition,
blog and five-minute video manifesto.

1,400 views on YouTube.

Jackson launched a similar
campaign earlier in the year,
attacking former Yahoo CEO
Terry Semel, who stepped
down last month.

The anti-Zander sentiment
may be growing on Wall
Street, too.

“If you don’t see any
improvement over the next
couple of quarters, I think his
days are numbered,” said Mor-
ningstar analyst John Slack. “I
think the catcalls and the cries
for him to step down, or be
fired, are only going to grow
from here out.”

A company spokeswoman
declined to comment specifi-
cally on Jackson’s campaign.

“Ed and the senior manage-
ment team are continuing to
work to restore the profitabil-
ity and performance that we
expect from the mobile
devices business,” spokes-
woman Jennifer Erickson said.

Zander, 60, took the helm of
the Schaumburg-based com-
pany in 2004. Since then, he’s
overseen Motorola’s meteoric
rise on the success of its Razr

Stores post

modest sales

for June

BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Consumers
were eager to buy iPhones and
flat-screen TVs in June, but
their reluctance to purchase
clothing and other non-essen-
tials has retailers worried
about the success of the back-
to-school shopping seasoh.

As merchants reported
their generally modest sales
gains Thursday, it was clear
that consumers’ uneasiness
about higher good and gas
prices and the weakening
housing market was forcing
many of them to think twice
before spending. The disap-
pointments included depart-
ment stores like Macy’s as
well as apparel chains such as
AnnTaylor Stores. Discount-
ers fared well, particularly
Wal-Mart Stores, whose
renewed emphasis on low
prices helped drive sales gains
above analysts’ expectations.

Sales were not as weak as
some analysts feared, but the
fact that June was nonetheless
sluggish did not augur well for
back-to-school shopping that
begins this month. June, the
second most important month
of the year, is a time when
retailers clear out summer
goods to make room for fall
merchandise. Most obvious
for consumers is how much
they’re paying for gasoline —

- prices at the pump that fell

after peaking in late May are
HOTELS

Marriott
BY STEPHEN MANNING
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Hotel
operator Marriott Interna-
tional said Thursday that its
second quarter earnings rose
ll percent on higher demand
for rooms, but its stock dipped
on signs that growth in the
lodging industry may be cool-
ing off.

Marriott shares fell 3 per-
cent in morning trading as it
lowered the upper end of its
growth forecast for North
American revenue per avail-
able room, a key hotel industry
benchmark. It marked the sec-
ond time this year that Marri-
ott has trimmed its 2007
revpar outlook.

The company reported net
income of $207 million, or 51
cents per share, for the three
months ended June 15, up from
the $186 million, or 43 cents
per share, a year earlier.

Revenue rose to $3.21 bil-

again rising, and the national

average price for a gallon of

unleaded regular is above $3.
And although teens were

spending again in June after a .

slower spring, analysts said it
is still too early to tell how the
séas6n will fare. The improve-
ment was reflected in reports
from retailers including
Pacific Sunwear of California
and Abercrombie & Fitch.
Despite the concerns about
back-to-school, J.C. Penney
said it saw a good response to
its early fall merchandise.
“The picture for the con-

sumer hasn’t changed much,” _

said John Morris, managing
director at Wachovia Securi-
ties. “The consumer is facing a
lot of headwinds.”

Morris noted that the
spending outlook is also
becoming more uncertain
because an increasing number
of schools are starting classes
later. Teens usually wait to do
the bulk of their shopping
until after school starts
because they want to see what
their friends are wearing.

The International Council
of Shopping Centers-UBS
sales tally of 50 stores rose 2.4
percent in June, compared to a
3.0 percent gain in the year-
ago period. The tally is based
on same-store sales, which
reflect business at stores open
at least a year and are consid-
ered a key indicator of a retail-
er’s health.

lion from $2.89 billion a year
earlier.

Excluding a charge of $54
million, or 13 cents per share,
due to a tax settlement with
the federal government and
the results of the company’s
synthetic fuel business, second
quarter earnings were $229
million, or 57 cents per share.

FORECAST

Analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial forecast
second-quarter net income of
53 cents per share on revenue
of $3.17 billion.

Revenue per available
room, a _ closely-watched
benchmark known in the
industry as revpar, rose 7.5
percent worldwide and 5.6
percent for managed hotels in
North America, Marriott’s
largest hotel market. The com-
pany saw stronger perfor-
mance in overseas markets
such as China and India, but

phone along with its stunning
decline that began last fall
when aggressive attempts to
increase market share by low-
ering phone prices began to
backfire and hurt profit mar-

gins

On Wednesday, Motorola
acknowledged its struggling
cellphone business — its big-
gest — will be unprofitable at
least until 2008 and warned of
a shortfall in second-quarter
revenue due to weaker-than-
expected handset sales. It also
said it would post an operating
loss because of poor results in
cellphone units in Asia and
Europe.

The announcement that the
company’s cellphone business
won't be back in the black
until at least next year signals

Motorola’s turnaround efforts *

haven't gained traction despite
assurances by Zander that the
company would succeed.
Motorola has announced a
series of reductions and a
restructuring plan, but has
pinned its hopes for a recov-
ery on a new cellphone lineup,
anchored by the Razr 2. That



June’s results extended the
slowing trend retailers have
experienced since February.

For some stores,
results were depressed in part
by a shift in the calender that
moved the Memorial Day
weekend business into May.
But retailers of what are
known as discretionary mer-
chandise such as apparel and
home goods are also coming
under increasing pressure as
consumers are forced to pay
more for food and gas. The
still-weakening housing mar-
ket is also making shoppers
shy about spending.

saw domestic results weighed
down by softer revpar at its
limited service hotels.

Marriott raised its outlook
for the year slightly, predicting
it would earn between $1.88
and $1.96 per share for 2007,
up from the $1.84 to $L94 fore-
cast it made in April. Analysts
expect 2007 earnings of $1.92
per share on $13 billion of rev-
enue.

But the company also low-
ered the upper end of its fore-
cast for revpar, saying it
expects growth of between 6
percent to 7 percent in North
America. In April, Marriott
predicted revpar growth of
between 6 percent to 8 per-
cent, a reduction in earlier
predictions that battered its
stock on fears it indicated
weakness in the hotel sector.

Arne Sorenson, Marriott’s
chief financial officer, told
analysts Thursday that Marri-
ott expects to see stronger

June ~

phone was to be introduced in
Asia this month and elsewhere
later in the summer.

Meanwhile, analysts pre-
dicted Thursday that Samsung
Electronics would eclipse
Motorola for the No. 2 posi-
tion in world handset sales
and market share during the
quarter.

Motorola said it expects to
ship about 35 million to 36 mil-
lion handsets in the second
quarter and analysts forecast
Samsung will ship more than
37 million handsets. Mean-
while, JPMorgan estimates put
Samsung in the No. 2 spot with
13.6 percent of the market,
compared with Motorola’s 12.8
percent. Both trail Nokia Corp.

Standard & Poor’s put
Motorola’s long-term ratings
on watch Thursday — short of
a downgrade but a move signi-
fying negative implications,
the ratings agency said.

“It’s going to take some
time for Motorola to turn
things around considering
competition has_ only
increased in recent months,”
RBC Capital Markets analyst
Mark Sue said. The company,
he said, “sorely needs a hit
product to turn things
around.”

Motorola shares, already
down 13 percent in 2007, rose
13 cents Thursday to $18.08 in
trading. ;

: DARRIN PHEGLEY/THE GLEANER
GADGETS: AT&T retail sales consultant Seth Sutton,
second from left, explains the many features of Apple’s
iPhone to Katie Morton and her parents John and Emiiy
Morton. Hot gadgets like the iPhone are keeping sales of
consumer electronics strong.

Meanwhile, apparel mer-
chants have problems of their
own, including a continuing
absence of must-have fashions
and competition from the lat-
est electronic gadgets.

Craig R. Johnson, president
of Customer Growth Partners,
a retail consultancy in New
Canaan, Conn., said hot gad-
gets like Apple’s iPhone are
keeping sales of consumer
electronics strong.

“The fashion must-haves of
the world are not apparel, but
the iPhones of the world,” said
Johnson. “They are wearing
technology as fashion.”

20 earnings rise 11 percent

revpar growth in the second |
half of 2007. But he added it is
unlikely the lodging industry
will sustain the brisk revpar
growth of the past few years
when it rebounded from a
post-Sept. 11, 2001 travel
slump.

MODEST GROWTH

“We will s¢e more modest
revpar growth, but it ought to
still be a pretty good equation
going forward,” Sorenson said.

Marriott shares dropped
$1.31 to $45.04 Thursday.

Marriott’s net income
included 8 cents per share in
gains from its synthetic fuel
business, a coal production tax
credit program that is tied to
volatile oil prices. The $220
million tax settlement,
reached last month with the
Internal Revenue Service and
Department of Labor, focused
on Marriott’s accounting for a
company retirement plan.

REE ESL PN TS a PS ET TR
THE I RIBUNE

PPtbyrnt, VM by OU, tre Ua





System error
stops trading
over BISX

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

o trading took
place on the
Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities
Exchange (BISX) during nor-
mal hours yesterday after it
incurred a problem with its
electronic trading system,
something its chief executive
said would be rectified by
today. The exchange instituted

a late trading day as The Tri-

bune went to press.

_ Keith Davies said: “We are
dealing with it, and it will be
back up tomorrow [today].”

He explained that an error

‘had occurred, which had

forced the exchange to clear,

-. reset and restart its trading sys-

tem, something that had not

been an uncommon event in

@ KEITH DAVIES

help the migration of govern-



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is issecing ee ns

BISX’s history.
“Everything is being done to
_Yetire our current system and
move to a new trading plat-

date has yet been set one its
launch.
QuickTrade

has been

designed to replace the BISX
Automated Tradind System,

which has been operating since
the exchange went live in 2000.
It is designed to reduce the
exchange’s overhead and costs,
improve efficiency, boost

'. cedural in nature”

form with different operating
systems,” Mr Davies said. “It’s
never going to be.an issue ©
being down. It won’t happen.”
_He explained that BISX’s
» current system was “very pro-
, Meaning
- that when one error happened
_a set procedure had to be fol-
lowed to get it back up, an all
areas checked.
The launch of BISX’s new
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. trading system was delayed
from June 29, 2007, to sort out
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PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



~ BUSINESS |



- ‘Double taxation’ hits Bahamas
investment funds competitiveness

FROM page 1

ment manager, or proposes to
use an investment
manager/adviser, in the

Abaco

Bahamas, that is deemed a
Bahamas-based fund.

“For investment managers, it
becomes rather onerous. If

Lib

WItnoine Bay
ABACO, GAKAMAS

Construction Project Manager

e Minimum 5 years experience in construction

management

e Working knowledge of timber and masonry

construction methods

e Proficient in reading and understanding construction

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e Proficient in performing material take-offs and placing

material orders

e Working knowledge of construction materials
e Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel
¢ Good communication skills

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Resume should be sent to Nick Sims, Development
Department, The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, P.O. Box
AB-20571, Marsh Harbour, Abaco or fax #242-367-2930



these funds are licensed in
another jurisdiction, and it is
not a prescribed jurisdiction,
that fund has to be licensed in
the Bahamas if it wants to use a
Bahamian fund manager.”

Mr Deveaux added: “In addi-
tion to being licensed in the
jurisdiction of origin, the fund
has to be licensed in the
Bahamas. That has prevented
a lot of investment managers in
the Bahamas from generating
business.”

To resolve the problem, he
said the Securities Commission
and the financial services indus-
try were proposing to the Gov-
ernment that the Investment
Funds Act be amended to
“remove the investment man-
ager/adviser as a nexus” to the
Bahamas.

Qualify

To qualify as a prescribed
jurisdiction with the Securities
Commission, other countries
not only had to show they had
adequate anti-money launder-
ing/Know Your Customer sys-
tems that complied with global
standards, but provisions in
their laws equivalent to the
Bahamas.

The Investment Funds Act
regulations were recently
amended to include Bermuda,
the Channel Islands and British
Virgin Islands, but Mr Deveaux

said there were also issues with
the definition of a Recognised
Foreign Fund.

Registered

While such funds were sup-
posed to be licensed or regis-
tered in a presecribed jurisdic-
tion, or listed on a prescribed
foreign exchange, Mr Deveaux
explained that some funds in
the US, especially those incor-
porated in Delaware, were not
required to be licensed or reg-
istered in that country.

This had caused “some diffi-
culties” for the Bahamas given
the requirements of its Invest-
ment Funds Act, and since they
were “the ones we’re trying to
capture as well”, the Securities
Commission and industry were
trying “to create a carve out in
the legislation in the way we
deal with” such US-based funds.

Among the other Investment
Funds Act amendments under
consideration is an extension of
the deadline for filing audited
financials on Bahamas-based
investment funds from four to
six months after year-end, to
give external auditors enough
time to complete their work.

“We’re making representa-
tions to both the [Securities
Commission] Board and the
minister [Zhivargo Laing], and
hopefully they will be done in
very short order,” Mr Deveaux

said of the Act amendments.

“We have to be guided by the
industry, because they're at the
front end. We listen to them,
do analysis, and work out
whether what is good for the
industry is also conducive for
the jurisdiction. On that basis,
we work to make recommen-
dations to the Board and the
minister to make the necessary
amendments.”

Compliant

Mr Deveaux told The Tri-
bune that another compliant
being voiced by the Bahamian
investment funds industry was
over the fact that they were cur-
rently being charged two fees
for incorporating fund struc-
tures as Segregated Accounts
Companies. One fee was being
charged for incorporation by
the Registrar General’s Depart-
ment, and another for registra-
tion.

“The complaint the industry
is bringing is that they are cur-
rently being charged a fee for
funds being incorporated as

Segregated Accounts Compa-

nies, as well as being registered
as Segregated Accounts Com-
panies,” Mr Deveaux said.
“What we’re trying to do is
determine whether this is an
internationally-accepted prac-
tice. This touches on the issues
of competitiveness, whether, we

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are being competitive and
Whether this issue is driving
business away from this juris-
diction.”

Segregated Accounts Com-
panies are vital to the Bahami-
an investment funds industry,
as they enable administrators
to set-up ‘fund of funds’ struc-
tures and prevent liabilities
from one fund impacting the
assets in others.

In a statement, the Securities
Commission said companies
had to be incorporated as either
Bahamian or International
Business Companies (IBCs)
before being registered as Seg-
regated Accounts Companies
with the Registrar General.

The regulator indicated in its
release that delays in authoris-
ing the incorporation of com-
panies by the Registrar Gener-
al’s Department were continu-
ing to create problems for the
Bahamas’ competitiveness in
financial services, including the
Securities Commission’s 72-
hour ‘fast-track’ licensing
process.

Funds

Despite its investment funds
industry having just over $200
billion in assets under manage-
ment, its growth has been rela-
tively slow in recent years.

As at September 30, 2006,
some 760 investment funds
were domiciled in the Bahamas,
an increase of 1.5 per cent or
11 over the previous nine
months. —

Mr Deveaux himself said ear-
lier this year that while the
number of funds registered in
the Bahamas had grown by 4.5
per cent between 2001-2005,

_over the same period the British

Virgin Islands, Bermuda and
Cayman had seen growth rates
of 20 per cent, 23.6 per cent and
123 per cent respectively. The
worldwide industry had seen 4
250 per cent growth rate.

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THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007, PAGE 7B



ahamas still in
20th century on
technology

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

he Bahamas
remains in the 20th
century when it
comes to the way
this country does business, the
Chamber of Commerce’s pres-
ident said yesterday, stressing
the need for commercial bank-

ing system’s Automated Clear- .

ing House (ACH) to come on
line and help Bahamian firms
provide e-commerce services.

“We still do a lot of writing
and we still do a lot of forms
manually. It would be great if
we could interact with the
Government, who have stated
that they would like to improve
this. To apply for a work per-
mit or a business licence,
wouldn’t it be great if you
could apply on line,” Dionisio
D’ Aguilar said during a press
conference to announce the
activities for Chamber Week.

“On the introduction of
technology, there is a long way
to go in this country to get that
to where it needs to be. We
know that it is there and we
know that it is available. And
we know that it will make
doing business a lot more effi-
cient; we just need to get
there.”

Mr D’ Aguilar added that it
can only be a matter of time
before the Bahamas has the
ability to shop online in this
nation.

“Tt is inevitable. I mean, if I
am a bank it’s the way of the
future. It’s like that everywhere
in the world. The process will
take as long’ as long as it will
take, but we will get there,” he
said.

“It’s just a matter of time,
and our job as the Chamber of
Commerce is to move in that
direction, to lobby, to talk and
put pressure on; to do whatev-
er it takes to get us to the point
where it is easier to do busi-
ness in this country.”

Mr D’Aguilar pointed out
that it was difficult to rate the
Bahamas’ technology level
against its regional counter-
parts. “We may be more
advanced in some area as com-
pared to others.”

He added that the ACH will
be one of the key issues he and
other business organisation
leaders will discuss when they
have their annual meeting next
week.

“Since becoming president
of the Chamber, what I have
attempted to do is to focus our
organisation on things that
affect the day-to-day running
of businesses. The issue most
prevalent in my mind, which I
keep talking about all the time,
is to try and get the Automat-
ed Clearing House up and run-
ning,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.

“It’s been talked about a lot
in this country. It’s coming, but



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

hopefully we can spread up the
process and get it to come a
little quicker.

Mr D’Aguilar said the
Chamber can only assist and
tell the Central Bank and the
Clearing Banks their stance as
a business community.

“Hopefully, by the end of
the year it will be up. It will be
wonderful,” Mr D’Aguilar
said. “It would eliminate the
need to accept so much cash. It
would be wonderful if you
could come in with your debit
card. I could swipe it, you put
in your pin and your money
could be transferred electroni-
cally from your account to my
account.

“I don’t have to count the
cash. I don’t have to safeguard
it, I don’t have to transport it,

. and I don’t have to risk my life

every day to deal with it. So
that is a wonderful benefit for
business.

“Take cheques, for example.
You have to write a cheque,
someone has to pick it up, they
have to take it to their accounts
department, they have to
record it, they have to take it to
the bank, do a deposit slip. It’s












Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a
Senior Accountant — Derivatives & Structured Products



a very long, arduous, inefficient
way of doing business. If peo-
ple can do it on-line it’s done.

“It will vastly change the way
we do business in this country,
as it has changed the way they
do business in the first world.”

Mr D’Aguilar said that there
are other issues he would like
to discuss with other Chamber
presidents to see what con-
cerns they may have on their
respective islands. “Obviously
we are in Nassau, so we are
bigger and most of the issues,
here may not apply to them,
so this is an avenue where once
a year we get together to dis-
cuss the issues affecting them.”

SC

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on Mondays

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e Technical product knowledge of derivatives / structured products MANDATORY. Must demonstrate
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Applicants for the position of Private Banking Relationship Officer must.
have Banking or Financial education and experience in the offshore banking
sector, fluency in Italian, German and French, have strong background
in KYC matters, good knowledge of international financial instruments,
ability to partner with team members, project oriented, and have thorough
knowledge of local legislation, regulatory, & statutory matters as well as
international banking practices.

Personal qualities :- :

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook

Project oriented

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Commitment to continuous training and improvement of colleagues
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

Responsibilities :-

Ensure KYC guidelines are applied on a day to day basis within Private
Banking unit

Organize, implement and monitor KYC and Client Relationship
Management related projects within the Private Banking Unit
Training of Private Banking allocated resources

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors or agents
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking
professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their
resume/curriculum vitae to :

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited

Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road
P. O. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 702 1253 or email:

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.


PAGE 6D, PHIVAT, JULT 19, 2UU/

IAeE TRIBUNE



Abaco Markets eyes
June/July 2008 to
restart share dividend

Legal Notice
- Notice

Anatolian Shipping Limited
(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Creditors having debts or claims againts the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned at Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator
on or before the 27th day of July, 2007. In default thereof they
will be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made by the
Liquidator.’ bie ae

Dated the 11th day of July 2007

‘LYNDEN MAYCOCK
LIQUIDATOR



_ Legal Notice
- NOTICE -
Anatolian Shipping Limited
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a). Anatolian Shipping Limited is in dissolution under

the provisions of the International Business Companies
Act 2000. ae ana

The dissolution of the said cornpany commenced
"som the 11th July, 2007 when its the Aiticles of
Dissolution were submitted to aiid registered by the
Registrar General.

"The Liquidator of the said Cémpany ig Mr. Lynden
._ .Maycock of Ocean Cenitre, Montagu Foreshore,
East Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, as sole Liquidator.
Dated thel 1th day of July 2007.
2S H&J Corporate Services Ltd.
_.. Registered Agent :
'_ for the above-named Company



a onp Unb. |

- (FORMERLY FLETCHER SUNRISE I
_ FUNDLTD):



ee (In Voluntary Liquidation) ©
‘Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, commencing on the 20" .
day of June, 2007.. Articles of Dissolution have
been duly registered by the Registrar. ‘The Joint
Liquidators are Paul A. Gomez and Patrick E. Smith,
P.O. Box N-8285, Nassau, The Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-
named Company aré required on or before the 23"
day of August, 2007 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to
the Joint Liquidators of the Company or, in default
thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Dated this 12" day of July, 2007

‘PAUL A. GOMEZ and PATRICK E. SMITH
ro : Joint Liquidators _.



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FROM page 1

be in store, with insiders hay-
ing previously told The Tribune
that Abaco Markets was expect-
ed to generate a profitable year
for the 12 months to January
31, 2008, having recorded its
first two consecutive quarters
of profitability for five years
earlier this year.

Mr Watchorn said of Abaco
Markets’ latest three-month

. period, which is due to close at

VEG 11.12% 12006 34.47%

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

the end of this month: “Our sec-
ond quarter is looking to be
somewhat of a similar result [to
the previous quarter]; probably
a little better than quarter one.
We’re showing tremendous
improvement over the prior
year.”

The Abaco Markets presi-
dent added that the company
would also make quarterly

redemption payments to hold-
ers of its Class A preference
shares, rather than release one
lump sum payment at year-end,
a move that will boost cash
flows and bring a quicker end to
an unfavourable interest spread.

“We made the first repay-
ment in June, and when we
made it we gave notice of a sec-
ond payment of $535,000, which
will be made in September,” Mr
Watchorn said.

“Thereafter, we will pay
approximately $270,000 per
quarter going forward.”

Markets

Abaco Markets was currently
paying $80,000 into a “sinking
fund” to help meet the prefer-
ence share obligations, and Mr
Watchorn said the quarterly
payments would help remove

NOTICE

an unfavourable interest spread
faster. The interest earned on
the money in the fund is less
than that on the preference
share debt.

Class A shareholders will see
their principal redeemed in
instalments at the end of 2007,
2008 and 2009, while Class B
shareholders - who account for
63 per cent of the preference
share debt - will only start see-
ing their principal returned in
2009, with payments spread
over four years.

From an operational stand-
point, Mr Watchorn said the
main focus was the conversion
of the group’s Abaco-based
Cost Right store into a full club
store model. Work had been
done on the store’s product mix,
and an order for all the refrig-
eration equipment had been
placed, with Abaco Markets
hoping to have the outlet “up
and running before Christmas”.

“We know we stil have work
to do. There’s always room for

improvement and things to take
advantage of, but we’re pleased
about where we’ve come from
over the last 12 months,” Mr
Watchorn said.

Costs

Electricity costs for Abaco
Markets in the fiscal year that
ended on January 31, 2007,
were 25 per cent higher than
the previous year, and Mr
Watchorn said the company’s

capital expenditure for 2008- 7

2009 would allocate a budget
for bringing in “more energy-
efficient equipment” to combat
the effects of rising global oil
prices.

He added that while electric-
ity costs for the year-to-date
were slightly down on last year,
higher oil prices were “here to
stay”. ;

“Other than that, we’re main-
taining costs and increasing
sales. It’s a good combination,”
Mr Watchorn said.





NOTICE is hereby given that FLORIDA SAINTHILAIRE
CHARITE OF QUAKOO STREET, P.O. BOX N-8889,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should- send~a-written -and-signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of JULY, 2007
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that BALDWIN CELICOURT
OF GARDEN HILLS #2, P.O. BOX EE-15661, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from. the 6TH day of JULY, 2007 to the

Minister. responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N-.7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC



The Public is hereby advised that |, KHAMBREL
CORMON RUSSELL of #17 Golfview Lane, Bahamia
West Replat, Freeport, Grand Bahama, intend to change

my name to KHAMBREL CORMON ROLLE. If there are }

any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of publication of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL |

The Public is hereby advised that |, MARIE ANGIE
ESTIVEN of NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

intend to
change my name to MARIE ANGIE MESIDOR.
If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box SS-792, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this notice.



Weekly Vol.

Last 12 Months Div S

NAV KEY

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

*- 29 June 2007

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

** - 30 June 2007

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1,.1994 = 100

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

*** 31 May 2007

**** - 30 April 2007








INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

‘and running thereon irregu

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARMAINE LATOYA
GRANT of 117C FARNHAM CLOSE, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 13th day
of July, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, : Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THEBAHAMAS. __2007
IN THE SURPREME COURT CLE/Qui/No. 0142
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION (CLE)

BETWEEN



NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act 1059 Chapter 367.

EOE PETITION OF CARROL ALBURY IN RESPECT

ALL THOSE pieces pe or lots of land comprising °
portions of Lots 9, 23 & 92 and being of admeasurements ©
9,002 aque feet and being portions of the Marsh Harbour
Crown Allotments located on the Southern shoreline of
Marsh Harbour and being bounded clockwise as follows:
NORTHWARDLY by Bay Street and running thereon One
Hundred and Twenty and Eight Hundredths (120.08) feet
more or less WESTWARDLY by land belonging to the
Petitioner and running thereon Seventy-five (75) feet
NORTHWESTWARDLY by property of the Petitioner

arly for Seventy and Fifteen
Hundredth (70.15) feet more less WESTWARDLY by
property said to be the estate of the late George Archer.
and running thereon irregularly for One Hundred and
Thirty-five and Fift et
more less SOUT STWARDLY by the property of.

| Cynthia Smith and running thereon Eight-six and Sixty-

two Hundredth (86.62) feet EASTWARDLY by parcel of
rivate property and running thereon Fifty-six and Ten
Haridredths (56.10) feet SOUTHWARDLY by the said
private property and running thereon for
and Twenty-two Hundredths (99.22) feet EASTW.
by land of the Estate of E. I. Lowe and running thereon
One Hundred and Ninety-one and Seventeen Hundredth
(191.17) feet which said piece parcels or lots of lands have
such shape marks boundaries and dimensions. as are
shown on the diagram or plan filed with this Petition. .

(a) The Registry of The Supreme
Court, Freeport, Gran
Bahama Commonwealth of
The Bahamas.

The Chambers of V. Alfred

Gra

& Company, 21A Kiplin

Building Freeport Grand Bahama,
Bahamas.

The Administration’s Office
Marsh Harbour, Abaco,
The Bahamas .

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person
or persons having dower or right of Dower or an
Adverse Claim not recognized in the Petition shall
on or before the 28" day of August, A.D. 2007
file in the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned an Adverse Claim; Non compliance
with the NOTICE will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 20 day of June A.D. 2007,

V. ALFRED GRAY & CO.,
Chambers

Freeport, Grand Bahama
The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner



Hundredths (135.58) feet. ff -:

inety-nine’ |}. .
DLY J:
en

»

‘% THE TRIBUNE

8

FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007; PAGE 9B



Protect Bahamas firms

from ‘shell companies’

FROM page 1

Mr Smith. Bahamas-based engi-
neer, Keith Bishop, who owns
his own company, Islands by
Design, is having to pursue legal
action against a US company,
“Cay Clubs & Resorts, over its

-\Calleged failure to pay him for
‘1S: environmental and engineering

"tay

‘work related to their failed

‘attempt to acquire Walker’s

Â¥

1

vo

. Cay in Abaco.

° Although Cay Clubs &
Resorts is denying the allega-

cc tions against it and previously
2 told The Tribune it was going

to defend the action, Mr Bishop

is leased from the Government,
so no collateral there, and there
are numerous other legal
actions in which the Bahamas
Film Studios are embroiled.

Mr Smith said that Bahamian
businesses were “liable to be
left holding the bag with no
recourse if the shell company
stops doing business, providing
no protection to creditors”.

Many investors establish
Bahamas-based companies,
either International Business
Companies (IBCs) or domestic
ones, to act as holding vehicles
for their projects here, but no
not vest assets in them.

Often, these companies just
act as holding vehicles for a

specicif part of the overall
development, and are treated
as special purpose vehicles
(SPVs) or off-balance-sheet
entities.

“To my mind, any foreign
business that wishes to do oper-
ate or do business in the
Bahamas should operate in its
own name, and not through
some empty shell company that
is created for a special purpose
- for entering into, or doing
business, in the Bahamas,” Mr
Smith said. “Unless these shell
companies do have assets to
back them or put up a perfor-
mance bond, Bahamian busi-
nesses have no recourse in the
event of a breach of contract or

failure to pay. “As we envisage
investment profiles and devel-
opment from abroad and with-
in the Bahamas, I think our leg-
islators should develop protec-
tions for Bahamian suppliers of

goods and services so that com-
panies from abroad operating
here without assets do not put
local companies into bankrupt-
cy.

As the Bahamas was “not



plugged into the US credit rat-
ing system”, any default on debt
repayments or their subsidiary’s
obligations here had no impact
on the credit rating of US par-
ent companies, Mr Smith said.

Ministry of Education, Youth,
Sports and Culture

-2".is being forced to take legal
2's action in the US because the
-t» company has no assets here.
c1 When its deal to purchase
Walker’s Cay fell through, the
-r1,company reclaimed its deposit
© 3.and left no assets for Mr Bishop
“7 to apply the default judgement
he won in the Bahamian courts
against.

In addition, Mr Bishop has
also taken court action that
, secured a lien over any sale of
» .the Grand Bahama-based

Bahamas Film Studios, again
over alleged unpaid environ-
mental and engineering work.

The Bahamas Film Studios,

‘which are for all intents and
purposes closed as its owner
attempts to sell the property,
-has a structure through which
it is controlled by a variety of
holding companies - Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises, Ashby

. =~ (Bahamas) - all the way up to
the Ashby parent, which is

'* domiciled in Bermuda out of
the reach of this nation’s courts.
The Bahamas Film Studios
owe at least $1 million to a vari-
ety of Grand Bahama-based
suppliers and businesses, who
have no hope of claiming them
‘ against the project’s assets,
‘upon which an insurance com:

The following vehicles are offered For Sale:-

AT ||
aU Seer

Prestigious Private Island Resort has immediate positions
available for the following:

Plate: #2172 - 2000 Nissan Wagon
Plate: #2174 - 2000 Nissan Wagon
Plate: #1609 - 1995 Nissan Wagon
Plate: # 1997 - Daewoo Damas
Plate: #1999 ~ Daewoo Damas

These vehicles can be viewed by contacting Mr. Ted Bain at the
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture between the hours of
9:00am and 5:00pm. Monday thru Friday at telephone number 502-0600/1.

1 Housekeeping Supervisor (a minimum of seven
years experience in supervisory position in major
hotel)

Sealed tenders are to be submitted no later than 5:00pm July 20, 2007

2 Housekeepers and addressed:

1 Captain/Maitre’d (Formal/gourmet dining room

experience and table side preparation) Tender For Vehicles
Permanent Secretary
P.O. Box N-4891

Nassau, Bahamas

1 Seasonal Executive Chef (five to ten years
Caribbean experience and knowledge of
European/American Cooking)

rat

The Permanent Secretary reserves the right to reject any and all

2 Cafeteria cooks/attendants (three to five years
tenders.

experience in a major hotel)

Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications. Free housing and other benefits available.
Permanent Secretary

Interested pesons should fax resume to 242-347-5004 or Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture .

email to tstewart@catcayyachtclub.com



: pany has first claim. The Jand. , .

x upon which the project is sited:

PB :

4

Q

id y a a

7 Jol Description

is

{

, ‘ ‘

i Z Job Title: Production Shift Supervisor

‘

t .

, BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED Department: Production

t

, BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established The Production Shift Supervisor shall report to the Production Manager and must be familiar
t intern ational private bank, with its head quarters in Lu gano, Switzerlan d, with, understand and operate according to the relevant elements of the Coca Cola Quality System.
- is presentl ti

' : p 7 accepting applica ions for Main Duties & Responsibilities:

. PRIVATE BANKING - HEAD EUROPEAN ASSET MANAGERS The Production Shift Supervisor shall be responsible for the operations of the Production plant
: % during the respective production shift. Duties shall include but not be limited to the following:
‘ Applicants for the position of Head European External Asset Managers

, within the Private Banking Unit must have Banking or Financial education 1) Ensuring that production targets are met by providing adequate guidance and

\ and at least 10 years experience in the offshore banking sector, well versed supervision to Operations, Maintenance Supervision & Syrup Room Attendants.

. in managing relationships with Professional Asset Managers, fluent in a

y Italian and English, good knowledge of French, ability to manage projects, 2) Assisting with the planning and setting of production targets:

* perform reviews to minimize risks, efficiency oriented, lead small team of oe fee

& Private Banking Relationship Officers, maintain relationships with other 3) Liasing with all departments to ensure that all raw materials and semi finished

«| units and third parties and have knowledge of local legislation, regulatory Pi SeHCL eSUN EN Ente ae Wel ge ually: aaelyeanaeniceney Se ae

é oo dequately met.

: | & statutory matters as well as international banking practices. ei aa

be

if Personal qualities . 4) Liasing with external and internal sanitation crews with respect to production.

5) Ensuring that all Production transactions are completed at the end of each shift.

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Strong in problem solving, investigative.

Customer service oriented

Must be able to work under pressure

Commitment to quality and service excellence

Commitment to continuous training and improvement of allocated
resources

Organisational skills

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

6) The generation of comprehensive and concise shift reports at the end of each
production shift for management review.

7). Ensuring adherence to Good Manufacturing Practices.
\

Z
8) Identifying staff training requirements and assisting with the training.

9) Performing other reasonable job related duties may be assigned by management.

Responsibilities :

Qualifications & Experience

Manage team

Review relationships with counterparts

Develop allocated client segment

Direct involvement with External Asset Managers’ clients

Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking
professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Tertiary education in a Science discipline

A minimum of three years experience in a supervisory capacity in a manufacturing environment
Core Competencies:

Good working knowledge of production processes.

Good working knowledge of bottling machinery and services.

Good problem solving and communication skills
Good leadership and team building skills.

Raa SFP FWE KCK ae ae CVT Ke R SES BP MMSE. PKs.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their
resume/curriculum vitae to:-

7 PE FI

Human Resources Manager Computer literacy
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited : o
Bayside Executive Park, W. Bay St. & Blake Road Bee Op ree nee
P. O. Box N-7130
“ Nassau, Bahamas The Human Resources Manager
’ Fax no. (242) 702 1253 or email: P.O. Box N-1123
‘ Nassau, Bahamas
: (ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE) a
. Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted. Or by email to:

jfountain-moss@cbcbahamas.com
On or before Friday, July 27th 2007.


PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2007
COMICS PAGE

THE TRIBUNE



JUDGE PARKER

WE'RE NOT GOING| HEY, THERE'S A
INTO THE ALLEY | COP COMING---
WITH YOU---ROB DOWN THE
US AND LEAVE! STREET! f]








( Calvin & Hobbes y









© 1990 Unwversad Press Syndcaie












1T'§ SPRINGTIME IN NEW YORK, AND
FOR SOME, LOVE /S/N THE AIR eee






FOR OTHERS /7 18 THE
SEABON OF MEMORIES... ALAN LANGE!
= L IONT BELIEVE












oie TO READ THE »









NON SEQUITUR

Vieyou

yOU TOOK A
SPEED-READING








MY EYES SE
a







“YOUR CAR LOOKS A LOT BETTER
WITH RACIN’STRIPES, MR.WILSON."!








_By Steve Becker
Famous Hand



Opening lead — three of spades.

A defender has an obligation to
do everything he possibly can to pre-
vent his partner from making a mis-
take. Many defensive errors can be
traced to the failure of one defender
to clarify a situation for his partner,
presenting him instead with an
opportunity to go wrong.

Consider this deal from the match
between Uruguay .and the United
States at the 1984 World Team
Olympiad. Playing against Bob
Hamman and Bobby Wolff, East-
West for the US., the Uruguayan
declarer got to three notrump as
shown.

Wolff led the three of spades, and

MENU, DAGWOOD? ms eee South dealer. it would have been entirely normal
N Both sides vulnerable. for Hamman to win with the king
NORTH and return the jack. In fact, it might
a4 even be called standard operating
Â¥VKI74 procedure. In that case, after South
@KI984 covered the jack with the queen,
&A 82 Wolff most likely would have won
WEST EAST with the ace and returned a spade,
@A9732 #KI8 hoping his partner had started with
¥9862 ¥A103 K-J-10-x. These plays would effec-
72 0653 tively have scuttled the defense,
&7 4 &K965 since declarer’s only losers would
SOUTH then have been two spades, a heart
: #Q 1065 and a club.

7 ¥Q5 But Hamman realized from
T'VE NOTICED DAD AND STAYS I'M BEGINNING ¢ : Q 10 Wolff’s fourth-best lead of the three
LEAVES THE HOUSE AWAY THE TO THINK HE'S $Q5103 . that his partmer had at most five
EARLY EVERY MORNING WHOLE DAY TRYING TO AVOID ME!} The bidding: spades, which meant declarer had to
1) South West North East have four spades — something Wolff
1& Pass 14 Pass couldn’t possibly know (South had
1 NT Pass 3¢ Pass failed to bid one spade over one

3 NT heart).

Hamman also knew that declarer
couid not possibly make three
notrump without first losing a trick to
either the ace of hearts or king of
clubs. Accordingly, at trick one,
Hamman played the jack of spades
instead of the king! He deliberately
played the “wrong” card because,
from his vantage point, it was the
right card to play.

And, as usual, acini. one of
the world’ s best players, was right.
Declarer won the jack with the queen
and immediately tried a club finesse.
Hamman won with the king, played
the king and another spade, and the
defense quickly gathered six tricks to
_ put the contract down two.

i

ue ai

EM
MITE,

WILEY COL SROA TIP, COM

HOW many words of
four letters or more
‘can you make from the
letters shown here? In
making a word, each
letter may be used once
only. Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-lctter word. No





Good 10; very good 15; excellent 20.
Solution tomorrow.

emetic emir emirate emit empire epic erica impact
impart IMPRECATE trate item maitre matric
merit métier metric mica mice mire mite miter
mitre pair paretic pari permit pica piece pier pierce
pieta pirate price prim prima primate prime ramie
receipt recipe récit recite recti remit rice rime ripe
rite tapir tempi tier tierce time timer tire trice trim
trip tripe

aerie amir apiece armpit artic cile crime crimp

plurals or verb forms =
ending in “s”, no words S
with initial no words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. a
The first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in B
inkjet printer). g
TODAY'S TARGET <

o

H

i





4

| CRYPTIC PUZZLE | |

DOWN










ACROSS



ay



11 Togeta likeness i is not exactly The ultimate basis for cobbling (4)

etna Mat tg

1 For the lame, the charge will be 1 Amore able operative? (6)
about a pound (6) 2 They have courses in building (6) word
7 Atempestuous career is only 3 Were stir crazy in jug! (4)
natural (8) 4 Are they fiendishly enthusiastic? (7) | balsa
8 Much the same as “don't mind” (4) 5 Angered by the figures (5)
10 Sort of bullets, you see (6) 6 — Cried upon finding me married (5) a: | bo of wood .
; that is soft and
9



simple (6) Is anameless ass of such

14 Heavenly Tchaikovsky finale (3)



importance? (3)
A low noise down on the farm (3)




16 Cash demanded by a chap, but not in 12
plain English (5) 13

17 Traitors to the arts, possibly (4) 15

19 Gout's treated with relish (5)

21 The shortest can be the 18
straightest (5) 19

22 It's customary to breathe 20
alittle (5) 21




Reveal in a letter to school (3,2)




One's approach to a quarrel with
somebody? (3-2)

One shot by an Amazon? (5)
Little rock! (3)

Group raising some protest (3)
He may be in at No. 11 (4,3)





Kevin Spraggett v Pierre Fogel,
Gibtelecom Masters 2007.
Spraggett is Canada's top player,
but it is nearly 20 years since he
was a world title candidate and
rust showed at Gibraltar. Here











Idol 8, Listen 12, Rents 13, Trash 14, Apart 15, Liken
16, Debar 18, Manor 19, Steepen 21, Porter 22,
Bovine 23, Tenure 25, Cabin 26, Code 28, Met

Ccetmeme ene pr

Lives 16, Telly 18, Re-mus 19, Ja-veli-n. 21, Tartan
22, Strata 23, Legion 25, Clues 26, S-ago 28, Pu-t

CHESS by Leonard Barden



Tribune —
Horoscope



_By LINDA BLACK

FRIDAY,
‘JULY 13

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20 ;
Nosy neighbors try your patience,
Aries. Be civil; you don’t waht. to
cause any battles. Talk over your con-
cerns in a calm but direct way. You
may find the problem disappears,

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Your supervisor has spoken to you
about a disciplinary issue. Rather than
take offense, heed the advice and use
the conversatin as a way to better your
work at the company.

GEMINI — May 22/Jun 21

A confrontation at home catches you
off guard, Gemini. Rather than plan
your defense, listen carefully to what
this person has to say and voice your
opinion rationally.

CANCER — Jun 22/Jul 22
You’ve finally made the decision to
uproot and move, Cancer. With spring
around the comer, this is a good time to
dabble in the real estate market. Spend
time working on home curb appeal.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

A friend in need is weary about con-
fronting you for advice. Give off sig-
nals that you’re open and willing to
be a “shoulder to cry on.” Good for-
tune arrives on Thursday. ;

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

Stop beating yourself up about a pro-
ject you weren’t able to master, Virgo.

You excel in plenty of other things. Set
your sights on a new challenge and
you’ll be pleasantly surprised. ,° ,:

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 |
Fights at home have gotten out of con-
trol, Libra. You have to learn how to
grow up and respect others’ feelings.
By throwing temper tantrums you'll
just make more enemies.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
It’s been difficult balancing work.
and family life lately, Scorpio. You
may have to make the decision that
one will win out over the other. This
is the time for deep thinking.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
You can’t be everyone’s friend all -
of the time, Sagittarius, so stap
trying. Focus on those people,who
genuinely respect you for the: *per-
son you are.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Confrontations with Pisces leave you
frazzled and at your wits’ ‘end.
However, you don’t have the luxury
of making a quick escape. You'll
have to ride this one out.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb\18
Projects at home keep you busy for a
few days, Aquarius. Just think them
through before acting or else! you
might end up with half- finished
work or a big mess.

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20,
Take a more assertive role at work,
Pisces. Establish that you can be
relied upon and get the job done i ina
satisfactory manner.





23 Long to fix a foregone 22 Stephen's bird? (3) ACROSS DOWN 0 :
ee : 1 Plays dishonestly (6 1 Second drink (6) he has just offered a bishop at
0 conclusion (4) 23 Turning white when many : ies ig ly (6) 2 ‘Trinket (6) h5 with multiple threats like Rf
-— 26 Thus the French are not heels! (5) are in pain (6) 8 Fish (4) 3 baa winning Black's queen or Bxg6+
NN 24 Rainstorm country? (4 10 Purloined (6) 4 Dress exposing the king, but his
N 28 Vehicle in which to scarper (3) y? (4) ad 4) Procession (6) 5 Baked unknown opponent's response
FE | 29. Wlooks ike being two nil (6) 25 They happen to be key N 14 Moist (3) food (5) was so strong that the GM had
© J 30 Building speed for about two-thirds of openings (6) S oF See (5) : ee a to resign. What was Black's one-
Seeks -out?
o a lap (6) 26 Carry on with the corporal o. 19 Detested (5) 3 Mesh (3) move knock-out
C 4 31 Deity witha love for noise? (4) punishment (5) > 21 i Lise 6) 12 ed :
. 13 i
: 27 Learnt there was no right to have put “ : :
R 32 Connections made with diplomacy by 9 Pp x a ae (5) 15 Dead language (5) LEONARD BARDEN
< the head of state (8) pressure on (5) uw 7 me ) 18 Epa
19 Border
0 33 You'd never mistake them for 28 Nota nice type in Aracadia (3) 28 Snake (3) 20 ee A
Ss slacks (6) 30 A fencing job? (4) 29 Creature (6) 21. Skin pigment (7)
SS 30 Shameless (6) 22. Male sheep 13)
& | 2a 31 Relax (4) a a cri
e
: : Yesterday? s keyaitie solutions Yesterday's easy solutions oe a 6 25 Cringed (6) x
W ACROSS: 1, Carol 6, Silky 9, Vi-oli-ns 10, C-ured 11, Iliad | ACROSS: 1, Least 6, Rifle 9, Cajoled 10, Scorn 11, Noose xamined (6) 26 Fiasco (5) Chess solution 8357: 1..Ne3! stops Rfl and Qd4+,
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0 - | Joker 20, Streak 22, Se-LL 24, Eat 25, Curt-sey 26, Steal 20, Sprats 22, Beta 24, Hot 25, Coroner ‘ 28 Undergarment (3) Qxb2 mate.
R Seals 27, Steal 28, Patio 29, Give out 30, 26, Cedar 27, Stoop 28, Minus 29, Denizen 30, 30 Fashion Mensa quiz: a) Makeshift b) Modern c) Mislead
: On-l-on 31, Taint Green 31, Tenet EONS One possible word ladder solution is: DIET, died,
D DOWN: 2, Abuses 3, O-verd-O 4, Lid 5, Blues 6, Sni-GG- | DOWN: 2, Encore 3, Scraps 4, Tan 5, Towed 6, Renewal 7, tied. toed, told, fold, FOOD
er 7, Isle 8, Knaves 12, B-R-ook 13, Ho.-use 14, Alert 15,


THE TRIBUNE
FRIDAY EVENING ~ JULY 13, 2007 |

8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

Issues Round- {Washington |McLaughlin {Bill Moyers Journal (N) 1 (CC) May to Decem- |The Vicar of Di- |
WPBT |table discussion. |Week (N) 0, Group N) (CC) ber Zoe tries to |bley “Songs of
(CC) regroup. Praise” ( (CC) |

The Insider (N) |Jericho “Return to Jericho” A recap |Jericho Jake, Johnston, Dale and |NUMB3RS When a missing officer's.
@ WFORIn (cc) of the first 11 episodes. (CC) —_|Heather search for equipment to fix |badge turns up, Don’s team reopens)



the local windmill. O (CC) a tPyearol case. (CC)
Access a 1 vs. 100 One contestant battles |Las vue “Delinda’s Box” Ed and |Law & Order: Criminal IntentA
C3 WT VU |wood (N) (CC) |100 to win $1 milion. © (CC) —_|Danny have 12 hours to save Delin-|judge’s son is found dead after his |
; da from her kidnappers. father sentences a rap star. |
Deco Drive Drive Alex, Corinna, Winston and Drive “Rearview” Corinna and Alex |News (N) (CC) |
WSVN Sean deal with the ramifications of |devise a dangerous plan to gain in-
their jump-start. (N) (CC) formation about the race.
Jeopardy! (N) [George Lopez |George Lopez /Greek ‘Pilot’ College freshman {20/20 Fear of the dark side. (N) 0
WPLG icc) mM Beni depends mais mother {Rusty sets his sights on joininga (CC) |
ontestimony. {passes away. prestigious fraternity. © (CC) |
CABLE CHANNELS :

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Men’ 1 (C



spring break. (CC) A (CC) together. (CC

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Hardtalk Extra |BBC News World Business |BBC News Our World New |BBC News World Business
BBCI (Latenight). |Report . — |(Latenight). feature of the |(Latenight). |Report
~ |Arctic map.
B (CC)





ET Hell Date (CC) |THE SEAT FILLER (2004) Kelly Rowland, Duane Martin. A man pretends /Baldwin Hills {Baldwin Hills
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ee! ir Farce es| ;
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ion Room
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COM in Four Cameras’ Jex. (CC) Show a Presents Jon Presents Jeff + |Presents Doug
(CC) Woman.” (CC) | Reep. (CC) Cesario. Benson. : l
COURT. |C283.F2t,.. [Most Shocking “Under Siege 2° [Forensic Files Forensic Files (Forensic Files North Mission some smiles on your
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DIY This Old House |Home Again |New Yankee Sweat Equity Sweat Equity [Classic Rides Classic Car : :
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ESPN [eg te [eae co | Marlborough Street every Thursday
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man Cup (N) __ lite event from Las Vegas. Okla. (Live) (CC) a from 3 30pm to 4:30pm during the

Daily Mass: Our |The World Over Lifels Worth |The Holy Rosary|Defending Life Voices on Virtue
EWTN Lady : Living - h = |
month of July 2007.



:00) Cardio —‘|Fitness Fantasy Fitness Fantasy |Body Challenge Health Cops: Sentenced to Health
FITTV fbeacie [oqe cq ea es :
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FSNFL {tte ? Hed Track Score (Live)

| GOLF PGA Golf: Nationwide Tour -- Chil- |PGA Golf John Deere Classic -- Second Round. From the Tournament Players Club at
dren’s Hospital Invitational Deere Run in Silvis, Ill.

GSN a Lingo (CC) Lingo (CC) Dog Eat Dog 1 (CC) ca Reaction fea)" Reaction
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caTech iE) :
:00) Walker, — |Walker, Texas Ranger “Eyes ofa |AVENGING ANGEL (2007, Western) Kevin Sorbo, Wings Hauser, Cyn- 2 forget
HALL Neue Ranger |Ranger” Walker encourages a tal-_|thia Watros. A bounty hunter seeks revenge against a murderous Pm lovin’ it
“Paradise Trail’ jented 16-year-old to sing. (CC) landowner. (CC) S :
Buy Me “Rob & Selling Houses Specials ‘Notting- [House Hunters |World’s Most Relocation, Relocation “PJ and a rr
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: Norfolk. lec) Paris. (CC) | fleeing Fulham. (CC)
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Still Standing |Reba Reba pur- |Reba Cheyenne |THE OBSESSION (2006, Suspense) cane Zuniga. A man dates a
LIFE Judy's Mother’s |sues a career in lis deprived of — |woman to get closer to her daughter. (CC)
; Day tradition. real estate. (CC) |Van’s attention. .
:00) Hardball |Countdown With Keith Olber- . /MSNBC Investigates Prison in New|MSNBC Investigates “Lockup:
MSNBC [@]"" fm NO Nee Mer
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Boy Genius a an a a Videos (CC)
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NTV IES [eg Cates ce ea
:00) Trackside )ARCA RE/MAX Series Kentucky. From Sparta, Ky. (Live) Rolex Sports Car Series lowa --
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TBN Kingdom Scenes (CC) |Report (CC) . |(CC) Price (CC)
MLB Baseball Pittsburgh Pirates at Atlanta Braves. From Turner Field in Atlanta, (Subject to Blackout) (Live) Everybody
TBS (CC) Loves Raymond
“Ray's Journal’
(:00) What Not |What Not to Wear Sarah’s What Not to Wear “Desiree” Fash- |A Model Life “Model Beginnings”
TLC to Wear “Laurie wardrobe of hooded sweatshirts and|ion issues. (N) (CC) (Series Premiere) Six aspiring mod-
T” (CC) yoga pants scares away clients. els. (N)

00) Charmed | % %% MINORITY REPORT (2002, Science Fiction) Tom Cruise, Colin Farrell, Samantha Morton. Premiere.
TNT Mette Aban- |A cop tries to establish his innocence in a future crime. (CC)
lon”

TOON Home for Image Camp Lazlo Class of 3000 an Adven- me Boy |My eee Camp Lazlo
nary Friends ures obby. ner’s a Monkey |
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(00) Yo Amoa {Duelo de Pasiones Un hacendado |Destilando Amor Conteo Final a Premios Juventud
UNIV uan Querendénlrico rechaza a-su esposa y su hija.
; (:00) Law & Or- {Law & Order: Special Victims Unit/Monk “Biggest Fan” (Geason Pre- |Psych “American Duos’ A talent-
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tims Unit 0 crime, (N) (CC) tion. (N) icc}
VH1 * * & FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF (1986, Come- /Best Week Ever /Shockingly Thin |20 Skinniest Celebs 0

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vs ue Huntley {Cycling Tour de France -- Stage 6. From Semur-en-Auxois to Bourg-en-Bresse, France.

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(*) America’s | % DEEP RISING (1998, Slee) Treat Williams, Famke Janssen, {WGN News at Nine (N) © (CC)

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PREMIUM CHANNELS
Assume the Po- | x x THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA ee Comedy) Meryl Streep, Anne|Entourage Billy |Entourage Dra-

HBO-E sition 201 With |Hathaway, Adrian Grenier. A recent college graduate lands ajob ata ——_jand Eric clash on |ma plans a party
Mr. Wuhl (CC) the set. (CC) for Vince.

:45) * x DOMINO (2005, Action) Keira Knightley,

fashion magazine. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)
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: Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun
















6:00) * * EX- | & & SLITHER (2006, Horror) Nathan Fillion, Eliza-
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SURES (1996) [small town. ‘R’ (CC)











ee) % %& HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE (2005, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Assume the Po-
HBO-W Emma Watson. Voldemort lays a trap for Harry at the Triwizard Tournament. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) a a coy
r. Wuhl (
(:15) & %% FORCES OF NATURE (1999) Sandra Bul-|Big Love “Vision Thing’ Bill is * & & SYRIANA (2005, Drama)
HBOSES __|lock, Ben Affleck. A groom hurries to his wedding, with ive waitress,

drawn to an attractive waitress. 1 /George Clooney, Matt ia Jef- |




a fellow traveler. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) (CC) frey Wright. O'R’ (CC







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(2006) ‘PG-13' [in love across time. M ‘PG’ (CC) teel faces an old enemy. (CC)



* &% THE OH IN OHIO (2006, Comedy) Parker * &% MIAMI VICE (2006, Crime Drama) Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx, Gong
MOMA |Posey, Paul Rudd, Danny DeVito. An unsatisfied Li. Detectives Crockett and Tubbs take on drug lords in South Florida. (1 |
woman seeks sexual fulfillment. / ‘R’ (CC) 'R’ (CC) |





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Mimake great gifts!

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raphy) Philip Sey-
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re % *% BEAUTY SHOP * & + MIMIC 3; SENTINEL (2003, Horror) Karl Geary, | * * SAW Il a Horror) Donnie
TMC . 2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah. {Alexis Dziena. An invalid witnesses giant bug attacks |Wahlberg, Tobin Bell, Shawnee
‘PG-13' (CC) from his window. (0 ‘R’ (CC) Smith. 0 'R’ (CC)
t 4



PAGE 12B

THE WEATHER REPORT

7 ULSTER

)) INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS |







i









































































5-Day FORECAST yy SVE say AY ayy tanks oy eet Eis re : | Marine Forecast .
52 ZS : s Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: E at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 85° F
FIC ne A GE Saturday: _E at-6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 4-7 Miles 65°F
| 32 79/26 FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-1 Feet 6-7 Miles 85° F
MODERATE Saturday: _ ESE at 6-12 Knots ~ 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 85° F
: ; : = ABACO Today: ESE at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles _ 84° F
Partly sunny and hot. Partly cloudy and Periods of sun with a Partly sunny, a Periods of sun, a Clouds and sun, a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the C lel s Saturday: _ ESE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 84°F
warm. thunderstorm. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. 44/6 pi
High: 90° High: 90° = : Tt lb
Low: on ~ vt :76 R i ee 276 Sm Tipes FoR NASSAU “63/17 s 1 Topay’s U.S. Forecast .
High Ht.(ft.) Low —_HIL(ft —
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ae is an index that combines = effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, tee precipitation, ai and ~ Today 7:28am. 2.4 .1:30am. 0.0 Ree 281/27 B05 pen
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 7:58 p.m. 3.2> 1:20p.m. -0.1 ewig’ Seu 55/12 ¢ =
: ft 8:20am. 2.5 2:20am. 0.0 ‘Bermuda = i i(iti‘é;SC 4/28 «76/24 pe Billings
pd : Es eee 8:48p.m. 3.1 2:14pm. -0.1 Bogota 64/17 48/8 e CICK
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday o10am. 26 S07am. 0.0 day o10am. 26 307am. 00 "Brussels 72/22” S16
ABACO petal —____________ 9:35 p.m. 3.0 3:05 p.m. -0.1 Busnes! la e227 a7 pe
aaeemae iN sate ee 93° F/34°C) |= ————pees ss oe a C~C=‘CS@BuuentgS Aires pe
igh 91" F/83°C LOW wenn “34° Frage ¢ = Monday Tete assem og Cairo 97/36 75/23 s
Low:61 F/27°C ae high 4 bs 88° Fat ¢ : ote i im. 0. Calcuty —— 9g 87 BOT: se
ormal low ........ ald? ° Calgary 88/31 57/13 s
WEST PALM BEACH | Last year's high 8a FTC ESTED ya Te Cancun 908275728 pe
High: 91° F/33°C Last year’s low von TAP F/23° CO Caracas 82/27 68/20 pc
Low: 79° F/26°C Precipitation = .~——___—_—_—_—sCMSunrise...... 6:28 a.m. Moonrise..... 5:17a.m. Casablanca == == 90/32 -79/26's
. SE AS Of 2 p.m. yesterday ...seccccssccssssssseeseseeeee 0.00” Sunset....... 8:03 p.m. Moonset..... 7:43pm. Copenhagen _ - 70/21 54/12 ¢
REEPORT : Year to date ww. 34.48” New First Full Last ‘Dublin ANT SAND
High: 91°F/33° C Normal year to date oo... .ceesseeeceseseeeeees 20.97” - ia Frankfurt 73/22 60/15 ¢c
Low: 79° F/26° C ack ‘Geneva = 82/27 55/12 pe
AccuWeather.com Halifax 78/25 60/15 pe
All forecasts and maps provided by - i P Havatia 2 90/82 75/23 1 Showers 4 Se
_ AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Jul. 14 Jul. 22 Jul. 29 Aug. 5 Helsinki, 70/21 82/11 ¢ [& &j T-storms . \ 90/79 !
ELEUTHERA ‘Hong Kong’ 92/33 82/27 pe Rain ee
Hoc 81 cee : pues scope ape ae A ez Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and oe i
Low: 80° F/27°C ; Istanbul 77/25 65/18 S Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm i |
. Jerusalem : 85/29 59/15 s - Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary egenf@
‘Johannesburg == HB BZ SO
. Kingston 90/32 79/26 t
oe. CAT ISLAND : Lima GANT 86/13 S”
~ Low:82°F/28°C High: 89° F/32°C London . 73/22 5713 t
. a \w: 74° F/23° C ‘Madrid = 93/83 B47 Re
& ; Manila . 84/28 78/25 t = . ie A ie
‘Mexico City 1128 S42 ok sh
Monterrey 99/37 75/23 s
: ‘Montreal = 527423 ASH =
SAN SALVADOR , Moscow 87/30 63/17 pc
High: 90° F/32°C “Munich 7eeR saeco
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ANDROS Ele BPE G 46/7 pc =,
: . ° o é = SSR
highs and tonights's lows. High: 92° F/33°C Tt =
Low: 81° F/27°G 59/12 r
‘ egg 20 pee
58/14 ¢
‘Rio de Janeiro 79/26" 70/21 pe
z i 89/31 s
OE LSE A RG sO err ec ae Rome aT BIBS -
Today Saturday Today Saturday - Today Saturday MAYAGUANA ye BO/2 26 3
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 92° F/33°C ~ 28/-2's
Fic FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC F/C FIC F/C [24°C vst 7021 te
Albuquerque 91/32 69/20 pc 93/33 68/20 t Indianapolis 84/28 60/15 pc 85/29 64/17 s Philadelphia 87/30 66/18 t — 83/28 69/20 pc CROOKE W202 IISESS :
Anchorage «65/18 53/11 c 67/19 53/11 c Jacksonville 94/34 73/22 t 89/31 73/22 t Phoenix 107/41 87/30 pc 110/43 87/30 75123 po Lelie DO
Attanta 90/32 69/20 t 84/28 69/20 t ‘Kansas City 86/30 66/18 po 90/32 69/20 pe Pittsburgh «76/24 a - BAGGEDISLAND : eri oe —
Atlantic City 84/28 61/16 t 84/28 69/20. pc LasVegas 107/41 81/27 s 108/42 86/30 pc Portland, OR 86/30 ~ High: 90° F/32° C merAsse aR UAREHE
Baltimore 84/28 64/17 t 86/30 63/17 pc Little Rock 89/31 71/21 t 88/31 69/20 c Raleigh-Durham 90/32 ¢ Low: 70°F/21°C : re ae
Boston 85/29 64/17 pe 78/25 64/17 pc Los Angeles 82/27 64/17 pc 84/28 64/17 pc St. Louis 84/28 ‘ p 479126 6
Buffalo 74/23 55/12 t 79/26 63/17 pc Louisville 84/28 64/17 pe 89/31 71/21 pe = Salt Lake City 95/35. 70/21. 9! IC GREAT INAGUA 72/22
Charleston, SC 92/33 72/22 t 88/31 74/23 t Memphis 86/30 74/23 t 89/31 72/22 pc San Antonio 95/35 75/23 s 91/32 - 75/23 pce High: 92° F/33°C B73 t
Chicago 76/24 62/16 pc 84/28 62/16 po Miami =» 90/32. 79/26 +t 90/82 77/25 t =“ San Diego 74/23 “66/18 pe 76/24 ia 75° F/2A° 63/17. pc
Cleveland 74/23 58/14 t 83/28 63/17 pc Minneapolis 80/26 65/18 pc 82/27 62/16 pc San Francisco 73/22 ms Fie : 3° S216
Dallas . 92/33 74/23 t ~ 86/30 71/21 t Nashville 86/30 65/18 t 88/31 69/20 pe Seattle = = 82/27 GO/I5 t 8B 4 Vienna. a 70/21 pe
Denver 87/30 60/15 t 93/33 61/16 s New Orleans 92/33 75/23 t 91/32 76/24 t Tallahassee 96/35 74/23 t 39/31 “72/22 t “Warsaw 5/23 57/3 t
Detroit 78/25 59/15 pc 82/27 62/16 t NewYork 85/29 68/20 t —--83/28-73/22 pe += Tampa” 182° 77/25 te 182-7725 t= Winnipeg 56/13 pc
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 77/25 s Oklahoma City 84/28 70/21 t 84/28 67/19 pc Tucson 98/36 80/26 pc 101/38 78/25° pc : . a -
Houston —»«95/35 75/23 pe 90/32 75/23 t Orlando -94/34°75/23-t 93/33 75/23 Washington, DC. 88/31 65/18 t 87/30 71/21 pc oe a eae Mie are el tes eeaion ee