Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )
UF00084249_02918 ( sobekcm )

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y STORMS BAHAMAS EDITION



SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007
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CHARGE ON BABY STORE SLAYING

PLP gets court go

Party granted
permission to
Start challenge
over two seats

By NATARIO. McKENZIE

THE PLP’s legal team was
granted permission yesterday
to initiate election court pro-
ceedings in relation to two seats
and are éxpectéd to submit
additional applications over
three more seats on Monday,
attorney Wayne Munroe told



Perry Christie speaks at the
CEO Network conference
that was held at the British

Colonial Hilton.

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune

Staff)



PLP
accepts
election
result

By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE PLP has accepted
the results of the last elec-
tion, but the party maintains
its right to pursue justice for
any irregularities that may
have occurred during the
process, according to Oppo-
sition Leader Perry Christie.

Mr Christie spoke to The
Tribune on the eve of the
historic filing of four or five
election court challenges
that have the potential to
shift the balance of political
power in the Bahamas.

The former prime minis-
ter told The Tribune that he
thinks the process of the

SEE page 10









the Tribune yesterday.

“There were applications
heard for leave to issue peti-
tions in Pinewood and Marco
City and both applications were
granted and there is now leave
to issue those two petitions. The
other three will be dealt with
on Monday,” Mr. Munroe
added.

The applications were heard
yesterday in closed court before
Supreme Court justice Cheryl
Albury, he said. On Monday,
the PLP’s legal team is expected
to return to court to file appli-
cations in relation to the Blue
Hills, Sea Breeze and Golden
Isles seats, Mr Munroe said.

The PLP's Pleasant Bridge-
water, who has been appointed
to the Senate, lost to the FNM's
Zhivargo Laing — now Minis-
ter of State for Finance — by 47
votes, according to results of
the May 2 general election.

The Sea Breeze, Blue Hills
and Golden Isles seats were all
secured by the FNM by fewer
than 70 votes. The FNM won
the Sea Breeze constituency by
64 votes; Biue Hills by 47; Gold-
en Isles by 62 and Marco City
by 47.

The PLP had 21 days after
the opening of parliament on
May 23 to file its applications,
meaning that, excluding Sun-
days and public holidays, the
deadline to do so would fall on
Monday, June 18.

Mr Munroe explained that,
in order to file an election court
petition, one first needed the
permission of a Supreme Court
judge.

“Once the judge gives you

permission you can file it. After
you get permission to file the
petition you have to do certain
things like enter a recognisance
with sureties, serve the petition
and certain other documents.
_ “Then, after that point, the
other party responds and,
depending how they respond,
that will determine how the
matter progresses from there,”
he said.

Mr Munroe said that the
election court process did not
necessarily have to be a lengthy
matter.

“It could take time but we
are all lawyers and we have an
obligation to proceed with the
case as expeditiously as possi-
ble,” he said.

“The only reason for anyone
to try and drag this on is if they
are afraid of the consequences,”
Mr Munroe suggested yester-
day.

In an earlier interview, Mr
Munroe stated that he believes
it is possible that thousands, if
not tens of thousands, of non-
citizens may have voted in the
May 2 general election.

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leaving diplomas

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Ministry of Education will be looking
into re-instituting some form of “leaving school
diploma” after disturbing figures revealed that a
large number of students graduating from gov-
ernment high schools are not receiving a diploma.

C V Bethel High School recently held its grad-
uation exercise and, as Mr Bethel revealed, few-
er than half of the 400 students graduated with a
diploma.

The same could be said for L W Young, it was
claimed, where out of the 400 graduates, fewer
than 100 received their diplomas this year.

Noting that C V Bethel was one of the higher

performing schools in the BGCSE exercises, Mr
Bethel said that there must be a concerted effort
to look at re-evaluating the current curriculum,
citing the recent graduation exercise.

“There are a number of things, and one of
them we will be looking at is re-instituting some
form of school leaving certificate that would indi-
cate that, notwithstanding their failure to get
these diplomas or BGCSEs or the like, that they
have completed the course and achieved certain
standards, so that people will not be leaving
schools with nothing in their hands, no record of
them having passed through the public educa-

tion system.
SEE page 10

FNM: ‘We will do what we have
to do’ on election court challenge

By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FNM has not yet assembled a legal team
to represent its interests in the election court
challenges the PLP has and will continue to file,
The Tribune was told by the party’s vice-chair-
man, Senator Johnley Ferguson.

“If they (the PLP) proceed to file as they said
they will do, we will then do what we need to
do,” Mr Ferguson explained in an interview yes-
terday.

The FNM vice-chairman confidently said that
his party has no fear of the election court chal-
lenges the PLP has instigated.

“There’s no fear. The government organised an
election, went to an election, and turned out the
opposition, and then they’re crying foul. That’s
their right,” he said.

Mr Ferguson added that the filing of these



challenges demonstrated that the PLP is desper-
ate in the wake of the FNM’s victory, and their

decision to challenge the electipn results vali- °

dates his party’s claim that the PLP mishandled
the organisation of the election process — as, for
example, was witnessed by the late report of the
constituency’s commission.

The PLP was so sure that it would win the elec-
tion, that they did not heed the advice of critics
who argued that the then government had, in
some ways, mishandled the process, Mr Ferguson
emphasised.

He also said that, if the PLP had won, there
would not be any complaint about the validity of
the May 2 results.

“So they will continue to find ways to make the
public believe that they should have been the

SEE page 10

SING NEWSPAPER



Former Miss Bahamas Universe, Samantha Carter, demonstrates how a guest at the Royal Victoria Hotel would have
dressed decades ago, as she shares some Bahamian history with tourists and locals yesterday on Bay Street.

Students lacking :

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)



| PNiernre

dispute
over pay
still alive

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter





A pay dispute involving
employees of The Cove,
Atlantis, is still ongoing, said
union president Roy Cole-
brooke yesterday.

While employees are
receiving payment, Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers union official Cole-
brooke said many were not
getting the correct salaries,
as stipulated in their con-
tract.

The president said that he
was expecting to meet with
Cove managerial staff "in
short order" in the hope of
coming to an agreement.

This comes after several
meetings between union
officers and management,
he claimed.

The pay discrepancies
affect housekeeping, food r
and beverage and pool staff,
he said.

In early June the union
president said he felt the
union had been patient
enough with the hotel,
allowing for the "growing
pains" associated with open-
ing a major new facility, but |
said the time had come for

SEE page 10 |




































PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007



ARDASTRA Gardens has
adopted a new green iguana
by the name of Kermit.

The young iguana was found
wandering over the lawns of
Atlantis on Paradise Island.

Since green iguanas are not
native to the Bahamas, it is
assumed that he was brought
into the country and then was
either released or escaped.

He is the fourth green igua-
na to be adopted by Ardastra

If he or the others had
remained in the environment
and flourished, they then
would have become part of a
problem that is even more seri-
ous. They would have become
an “introduced species.”

Introduced species is a term
used for non-native plants or
animals brought in to a partic-
ular region by people. With-
out proper management and
foresight, they can have a dey-
astating effect on the natural
environment into which they
are transferred.

These non-native animals
often turn feral and can prey
on the native animals, compete





Payment Centres:
Monday-Friday 8:30a.m.-4p.m.
#21 Collins Avenue, New Providence
#56 Collins Avenue, New Providence

Rosetta & Bradley Streets, New Providence
‘Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Freeport, Grand Bahama
George Town, Exuma
All Bank of The Bahamas branches.

Call Centre:
Monday-Friday 8:30a.m. -5p.m.
Ph: 356-8471 - 4

_email:cschelpdesk@colinaimperial.com

#21 Collins Avenue

Effective May 26th, 2007
CHIL clients will be able to make payments for
PREMIUM and MORTGAGE accounts
on Saturdays from 9 am to 12:30 pm
at the Clilpuilding at 21 Collins Ave

Tel: 356-8300



under these sad circumstances. ,

with them for food and shel-
ter, aiid bring with them a host

of diseases.

The green iguana is normal-
ly found in the tropical and
subtropical regions from north-
ern Mexico to central South
America.

The word Iguana comes
from the Spanish version of
the Carib word “iwana”.

The iguana family includes
about 30 different species.

Green iguanas have short,
powerful limbs equipped with
strong, sharp claws (for climb-
ing and digging), and a long,
strong tail.

They can reach iGwpins of
6°6” feet.

A large flap of skin hangs
from the throat and helps reg-
ulate body temperature.

Vision, hearing and the
sense of smell are acute. Green
iguanas are somewhat clumsy,
but accomplished tree
climbers. —

They tend to bask by day on
tree branches and are com-
monly found near water and
are excellent swimmers. When
threatened or cornered, igua-
nas can defend themselves with
astonishingly quick, whip-like

lashes of their tails and with

‘their claws and jaws.



ESTRA

THE TRIBUNE

WRIA
region’s turtles

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

The survival of turtles
across the Caribbean region
is being threatened by over-
exploitation of the creatures
in legal fisheries,and through
illegal harvest and trade,
according to a new report.

TRAFFIC, a wildlife trade
monitoring network, say
Caribbean nations need to
improve their co-operation
to manage and conserve the
region's turtles.

The reptiles are under-
siege thanks to the demand
for their shells, meat and
eggs - with the first of these
commonly ending up as per-
sonal items purchased by
tourists in some Caribbean
nations, the report said.

Others indirectly fall prey
to nets put down for other
sealife, often drowning in the
process.

“Protection measures for

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marine turtles are extremely
patchy — turtles may be
adequately protected in
some waters, but then travel
into areas where they are at
risk from unmanaged or ille-
gal take,” said Steven Broad,
TRAFFIC’s executive direc-
tor.

Turtle eggs generally
enjoy greater protection
than the animals themselves.
It is against the law to take
turtle eggs in the Bahamas.
However, in Guatemala, vir-
tually every egg laid is
picked up for human con-
sumption, the report states.

The report recommends
the establishment of scien-
tifically-based limits on the
exploitation of marine tur-
tles, comprehensive surveys
to quantify exploitation,
monitoring and awareness
programmes, more clearly
defined laws and better
national and regional law
enforcement.







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THE TRIBUNE



Carl Bethel

Much work
to be done
on COB’s
university
status bid

Minister of Education
Carl Bethel told MPs dur-
ing the budget debate that
much remains to be done at
the College of the Bahamas
before “any credible transi-
tion” to university status can
be made.

COB will continue to
receive “strong financial
support” from this admin-
istration, he said.

Of the $6.7 million
increase in its government
provided recurrent budget,
about 56 per cent, or $3.8
million, is provided to satis-
fy personal emoluments.

“The remaining $3 mil-
lion will be used to improve
the college’s capital assets,
which will be necessary if
that institution is to make
the complete transition to
the level of a full-fledged
university,” he said.

The government will also
contribute $1 million to the
construction of a new
library for the college.

Mr Bethel maintained
that much remains to be
done before any credible
transition to university sta-
tus can be made.

| “The proposed new
library must be built, and
critical decisions have to be
made as to the location and

building of the new science |

labs,” Mr Bethel said.

While great improve-
ments had been made in
increasing the number of
lecturers who had obtained
doctorate degrees, he said,
greater effort was still
required to encourage and
assist even more Bahami-
ans to achieve doctoral
degrees.

“Additionally, greater
exposure and training of lec-
turers through the facilita-
tion of academic sabbaticals
to other more established
institutions of higher learn-
ing are necessary to broaden
and deepen the academic
experience of lecturers,” he
said.

The minister told parlia-
mentarians that the govern-
ment will work closely with
the COB council to assist in
securing financing for the
new Harry Moore Library,
“and to seek ways to finance
and/or to facilitate the con-
sidered needs for the fur-
ther development of the
several campuses of the col-
lege both in Nassau and in
Freeport over the coming
years.”













LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007, PAGE 3

Man is charged with



20 year-old’s murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Distraught
family and friends of Roselyn
Louis gathered at the Adminis-
trator’s Building in Eight Mile

Rock on Friday for the arraign-
ment of a 32-year-old man
accused of Louis’ murder.

Leon Romeo Rahming, of
Deadman’s Reef, appeared in

Bahamia

the Eight Mile Rock Magis-
trate’s Court before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson.

Rahming is charged with
murdering Louis, a 20-year-old
resident of Hepburn Town,
Eight Mile Rock, on June 11.

According to reports, Louis
was at work when she was dis-
covered lying on the floor in a
pool of blood with a severe
wound to the body on Monday

afternoon.

She was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where she
died the next day in the inten-
sive care unit.

Louis’ death is the seventh
homicide recorded on Grand
Bahama this year.

During the arraignment, the
prosecution alleged that on
June 11, Rahming, while at
Bartlette Hill, Eight Mile Rock,

intentionally caused the death
of Roselyn Louis by means of
unlawful harm.

It is further alleged that, on
the same date, time and place,
while armed with an offensive
instrument, a knife, Rahming
robbed “Keeping Babies Cov-
ered Until Two Store” of
$198.95 in cash, the property of
Alford Smith.

Rahming was not represented ©

by legal counsel. He was not
required to enter a plea to the
charges, which are indictable
offences.

The prosecution has indicated
its intention to proceed in the

“matter by way of a vojuntary

bill of indictment.

Magistrate Ferguson
adjourned the matter lo Sep-
tember 6 and remanded Rah-
ming to Fox Hill Prison.

n mud germs may produce



anti-cancer products, say scientists

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Bahamian mud has been
found to contain bacterium
which could be a producer of
natural antibiotics and anti-can-
cer products, according to US
scientists.

The revelation, which has
received international press
attention, came following the
completion of genome sequenc-
ing on the salinispora tropica
bacterium, first discovered in

shallow ocean sediment off the
Bahamas in 1991.

According to researchers, it
is anticipated that further work
on the bacterium could lead to
the isolation of potent mole-
cules the organism naturally
produces for its own chemical
defence when scavenging and
to communicate.

"By sequencing salinispora
tropica we are now able to look
in greater detail at this organism
and potentially pull out some
of the other compounds from

the gene clusters that may make
highly potent anti-cancer
agents," said Bradley Moore of
the Scripps Institution of
Oceanography.

Scientists from that institu-
tion and the Skaggs School of
Pharmacy at the University of
California-San Diego joined the
US Joint Genome Institute in
working constantly on the bac-
terium.

Compounds produced by
salinispora have already shown
promise in treating cancer.

Man flown to Florida
after speed boat crash

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT —- An Abaco
man was airlifted to a Florida

hospital following a serious

boating accident at Hope Town,
Abaco, on Thursday evening.
_Chad Thompson, 22, a resi-
dent of Hope Town, was dri-
ving his speedboat around 8pm
in the dark from Marsh Har-
bour when he missed the
entrance channel into Hope

Historical
Society set
to meet

’ The Bahamas Historical Soci-
ety will hold its next meeting
on Thursday, June 21.

At the meeting, “Remem- |

bering the Contract”, a 1993
ZNS TV documentary will be
shown.

The documentary gives the
society the opportunity to utilise
its new multi-media equipment
and highlight the importance of
oral history.

The historian behind the pro-
ject, Ms Tracey Tremaine, who
teaches history at the College
of the Bahamas, will answer
questions.

Happy father’s (Day

to the world’s greatest

father and grandtather|

7

Greetings from wife, Althea; children,
Edward Jr & Francine, Valretta & Sean,
Christopher, Christina and especially
granddaughter, Edneka.

GOD BLESS YOU ALWAYS

Town harbour.

The vessel crashed into rocks
at full speed and was badly
damaged.

Thompson sustained serious
injuries to his right leg and was
helped back to Marsh Harbour,
where he was treated at. the
government clinic.

He was later flown to hospital
in West Palm Beach, Florida,
for further medical treatment.

Marsh Harbour police are
investigating the incident.

In brief

The meeting is open to the
public and admission is free.

e For additional information,
contact the society at
info @bahamashistoricalsoci-
ety.com.

Credit
union to
stage 27th
AGM

The Public Workers’ Co-
operative Credit Union Limited
will hold its 27th annual meeting
at 6.30pm on Friday, June 22,
at the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel. Refreshments will be
provided.





FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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CONSTRUCTION WORKERS JOB FAIR

NASSAU FREEPORT
KENDAL G.L. ISAACS FOSTER B. PESTAINA CENTER
GYMNASIUM CHRIST THE KING CHURCH
JUNE 18TH AND 19TH JUNE 21ST
8 A.M. - 4 P.M. 8 A.M. - 4 P.M.
All eligible Bahamian Workers will be Skill Categories Include:
registered and interviewed. - Carpenter
- Dry Waller
Local and international contractors working - Mason
on the project will later select the workers - Roofer

that are needed before construction

begins.

The Application form will be available at
‘om for those islands other |

Www DCNGITCrLC

than New Providence and Grand Bahama.

Professionally Trained
Bahamians are also
encouraged to apply as:
- Project Manager

- Project Engineer

- General Superintendent

- Superintendent

W



VW BAHAM/

- Sheet Metal Worker

- Plumber
- Insulator

- Electrician

- Plasterer / Painter

- Crane / Truck Operator
- Field Foreman

- Heavy Equipment Operator
- Iron Worker

- Welder

- Landscaper
- Tiler / Carpet Layer
- Safety Officer



PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Billy Graham’s soul mate dies

MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) — On a recent vis-
it to Ruth and Billy Graham’s beloved home in
the western North Carolina mountains, her local
pastor recalled, the world’s most renowned evan-
gelist fumbled the words to the 23rd Psalm —
one of his wife’s favourites.

As she had so many times before, Ruth Gra-
ham quickly corrected her husband.

It was yet another little reminder of the role
Ruth Graham played as her husband’s closest
confidant, the Rev. Richard White said. The first
lady of evangelical Protestantism, she undoubt-
edly was an equal partner in a ministry that Bil-
ly Graham carried to presidents and peasants
alike during a spectacular global career that
placed him in the pulpit before more than 210
million people.

“She had the ability to move among presi-
dents and leaders, but then turn right around
and clean thé’ oven of a widow,” White said.

Former President George H'W. Bush remem-
bered her as “a wonderful, kind and wise woman
who brightened all our lives.”

Nancy Reagan described her as a friend to
her and late President Reagan and an extraor-
dinarily caring woman who was devoted to her
family. “I admired the fact that she also found the
time to care about other children and those less
fortunate through her work as an author, poet
and philanthropist,” she said. “I know Billy’s
heart will be broken with this loss.”

A daughter of Presbyterian missionaries who
surrendered dreams of such work in Tibet after
meeting Billy Graham, Ruth Graham died
‘Thursday at her home, surrounded by her hus-
band and their five children. Shé- was 87.

“Ruth was my life partner, and we were called
by God as a team,” Billy Graliam said in a state-
ment. “No one else could have: borne the load
that she carried. She was a vital and integral part
of our ministry, and my work through the years
would have been impossible without her encour-
agement and support.

“I am so grateful to the Lord that he gave me
Ruth, and especially for these last few years

we’ve had in the mouutains together. We’ve .

rekindled the romance of our youth, and my
love for her continued to grow deeper every day.
I will miss her terribly, and look forward even
more to the day I can join her in Heaven.”
Ruth Graham had been bedridden for months
with degenerative osteoarthritis of the back and
neck — the result of a serious fall from a tree in
1974 while fixing a swing for grandchildren. She
underwent treatment for pneumonia two weeks
ago. At her request, and in consultation with

Assistant Manager.
Position Available Immediately |
At ,
Domino’s Pizza

Qualifications:

¢ You should have a High School Diploma

e Past managerial experience
° Certificate in Management is a plus

¢ Must be available for day and night shifts,

including weekends

e You should demonstrate strong communication,
leadership, motivational and people management

skills

e You should have a valid driver’s license
e You must have a GREAT attitude towards

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Basic responsibility to include:

e Maintain product, service and image standard
¢ To assist in supervision of all phases of

production.

° To maintain a hi gh level of efficiency &
productivity in all areas of store operation

Please send résumé on or before

Attention: Human Resource Department

PG. Box.SS-6704- .
Nassau, Bahamas
Or Fax 356-7855



her family, she had stopped receiving nutrients
through a feeding tube for the last few days, said
family spokesman Larry Ross.

The family has planned a public memorial ser-
vice for 2 p.m. today at the Montreat Conference
Centre. A private interment service will be held
the next day in Charlotte.

Ruth Graham grew up in China, where her
father, L. Nelson Bell, headed the Presbyterian
hospital in Qingjiang. She spent three high school
years in what’s now North Korea.

She met Billy Graham at Wheaton College in
Illinois, where he managed to coax her away
from the foreign missions calling and into mar-
riage after they graduated in 1943. In 1945, after
a brief stint pastoring a suburban Chicago con-
gregation, he became a roving speaker for the.
fledgling Youth for Christ organization.

Ruth Graham moved the couple into her par-
ents’ home in Montreat, where they had relo-
cated after fleeing wartime China, and they lat-
er bought their own home across the street
before moving into Little Piney Cove. It was a
comfortably rustic mountainside home she
designed using logs from abandoned cabins, and
became Billy’s retreat between evangelistic for-
ays.

“My father would not have been what he is
today if it wasn’t for my mother,” said her son
Franklin, who now heads the Billy Graham
Evangelist Association.

“She stood strong for what was biblically cor-
rect and accurate. She would help my father pre-
pare his messages, listening with an attentive
ear, and if she saw something that wasn’t right or
heard something that she felt wasn’t as strong as
it could be, she was a voice to strengthen this or
eliminate that. Every person needs that kind of
input in their life, and she was that to my father.”

Though the wife of a famous Baptist minister,
Ruth Graham declined to undergo baptism by
immersion and remained a lifelong Presbyter-
ian. When in Montreat, a town built around a
Presbyterian conference centre, Billy Graham
would attend the Presbyterian church where his
wife often taught the college-age Sunday School
class.-

Due to her husband’s travels, she bore major
responsibility for raising the couple’s five chil-
dren: Franklin (William Franklin III), Nelson,
Virginia, Anne and Ruth. Sne endured her hus-
band’s frequent absences, but once remarked,
“Td rather have a little of Bill than a lot of any
other man.’

(This article was written by Associated Press
writer Mike Baker).



Peed) aD

‘Chest’ get |
these signs :
off island.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I SHALL be grateful if you
would publish this letter in your
paper in order to bring the sub-
ject matter to the attention of
the proper Government author-
ity. The 2007 general elections
are now history and I am
pleased to see that many of the
election posters have come
down. This letter is not directed
at election posters.

It has always been my under-
standing that to put up a sign
on government or private prop-
erty (you may correct me if |
am wrong) requires permission
from the relevant department
of the Ministry of Works. Even
putting up a sign in front of your
business establishment requires
such permission (I am not refer-
ring to, for example, a “For
Sale” or “For Rent” sign in
front of the subject property).

New Providence has been
covered with all kinds of signs
advertising the sale of land,
goods and services. Some one in
particular has littered the island
with signs that read “Open

Concerned by




LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



House Exclusive Waterfront
Condos and Marina call----”.
What are these people doing?
Instead of advertising in a dig-
nified way, eg in newspapers,
brochures, TV and radio or
through realtors, they have put
up a great number of these signs
on trees, walls, utility poles, at
roundabouts, at hotel exits, at
the top of the hill, at the bottom
of the hill, and around the bend.
They have even put one-sign up
that covers a traffic sign that
reads “Dual Carriageway” at
the western end of the Sandy-
Port Bridge...wow! Pretty bold!
These people may not realise
it but these signs are having a
negative affect on many people
who have to look at them every
time they drive the main roads.
Then there are signs that read if
you “want you house or Apt
paint call -------- ”, and “Sanco
car rentals call-----”, and ““Time-

less Tools rentals call----- ;
“Generators for sale call --------
-”, and “Justice of the Peace
and Marriage Officer call -------
-”, and on and on. The new sign
going up all over the Island
reads “Supply eee
Direct call --------- USA
number.

These signs plastered all over
the place take away from the
natural beauty of our Island. It
seems to be a free-for-all and
out of control. If one wants to
advertise simply produce a cou-

- ple hundred signs and inundate

the landscape. Perhaps the rel-
evant Government authority
will look into this situation and
if indeed these signs are unau-
thorised and unapproved they
can be taken down and any
offenders fined since a phone
contact has been provided.
Many thanks for the opportu-
nity.

I have now got this off my
chest.

CY NOFF

Nassau,
May, 2007.

‘look’

of planned projects

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Kudos to Larry Smith for
bringing to the fore, the plight
of Nassau’s fast disappearing
historic buildings which help
define what is Bahamian, in
your recent supplement — “An
appeal for the Heart of Nas-
sau”.

Hopefully this will prompt
some positive action from the
owners and perhaps some reac-
tion from the public.

I suggest The Tribune con-
tinue a weekly “featured prop-
erty” as there are many more
eyesores which need tackling.

This supplement prompted
me to write this letter and ask:
“What will the Bahamas look
like in 10, 20 or 30 yes from
now?”

I am very songerned that
there appears to be little con-
cern for the architectural look
of planned projects throughout
our country.

As a realtor J have seen
many of the plans and visited

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KEVENS PIERRE of MARSH"
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any

person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th
day of JUNE, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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CREDIT CARDS

many of the sites of new resorts
which will define our landscape.
In numerous cases there is an
absolute disregard for building
in our traditional island-style.
There are some notable excep-

tions such as the French Leave .

Resort in Governor’s Harbour,
Eleuthera, the Chub Cay devel-
opment in the Berry islands and
February Point in Exuma to
name a few which do reflect our
Bahamian style.

I recently attended a “focus
group” which examined the
plans of the Ritz Carlton devel-
opment on Rose island. I was
shocked as the plans were
unveiled showing a 7-storey rec-
tangular box which was touted
as “contemporary and forward
thinking which answered the
call of today’s buyers.”

I applaud Ritz Carlton for
hosting this focus group and
hope that they re-think their
plans to build a decidedly un-
Bahamian hotel and residential
community on a gem of a very
Bahamian island.

When one travels to Nan-
tucket or Martha’s Vineyard

you expect to see Salt Box
architecture with weathered
cedar shingled buildings, in
Indonesia one expects to see
shaggy-thatched island
dwellings. When one travels to
the Bahamas what does the
traveller expect to find?

What do we want to see as
Bahamians ?

Our traditional architecture
while defining our Bahamian-
ism also just makes sense, as it
provides shade with large over-
hangs, wrap around verandahs
with large openings to take
advantage of cooling breezes.

Why are the communities of
Harbour island and Hope Town
booming? ....because of their
island charm!

Contemporary designs
become dated — our island style
will always be classic.

Town planners, Architects,
Developers, Bahamians — let’s
get it together!

KEN CHAPLIN
Nassau,
June 13, 2007

The reasons for
the PLP’s defeat

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ALLOW me to congratulate
the voters of the Bahamas for a
job well done and on the level
of maturity and intelligence in
the recent elections.

I am so proud of my people.
However there’s some concern
for the voters of Golden Gates,
Fox Hill, Kennedy and North
Andros.

What does this say about
most of the voters in these
areas?

Permit me to give my views
on why the PLP lost.

1) Spitefulness, victimisation,
intimidation,

2) Unfair practices towards
the FNM and their supporters,
eg, ZNS and venues for their
rallies, eg, the circus and R M
Bailey Park.

3) Bold-face, brazen lies,
honestly, these people are unbe-
lievable!

4) Algernon Allen, Ten-
nyson Wells, Cargill, Rolle,

Dupuch ad nauseum, etc.

5) Immature and infantile
mentality.

6) They were too secretive
with the people’s business.

7) Only PLPs benefited
from the “robust economy?” or
anything else.

8) Steve McKinney and
Phillipa Russell of ZNS.

9) Tried to insult the peo-
ple’s intelligence, but it back-
fired.

10) Their arrogance and dis-
honesty.

11) The many scandals they
subjected the country to and
saw nothing wrong with it.
Don’t seem to understand right
from wrong.

12) Christie’s shuffle, kind of
like “while Nero fiddled, Rome
burned.

They shot themselves in foot,
ie, when they weren’t putting it
in their mouth.

D GRAY

Nassau,

2007.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



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2



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007, PAGE 5



A KOREAN War veteran in
his late seventies yesterday
called for an end to speculation
which, he claimed, was casting
suspicion on him as the infa-
mous Alcatraz escapee,
Clarence Anglin.

He urged Nassau artist Fred-
die Pinder Jr to stop his “cam-
paign of persecution”, adding:
“This is causing me a whole
bunch of trouble.”

American Mr Bob Thornton,
77, who lives in eastern Grand
Bahama, said Mr Pinder’s wide-
ly proclaimed theories about
the Alcatraz prison escape of
1962 had led to police knock-
ing on his door several times.

And on every occasion, he
said, they had dismissed Mr Pin-

der’s suspicions that he was —

somehow linked-to the daring
escape plot from the notorious
island-fortress in San Francisco
Bay.

“Believe it or not, I can’t even
swim,” Mr Thornton told The
Tribune yesterday. “I’ve never
even met this guy Pinder. I
don’t know what his gimmickry
is all about, but he is insulting
everybody and making out I’m
a murderer.”

In fact, none of The Tribune’s
stories relating to Mr Pinder’s
theories has named anyone as
the man Mr Pinder believes is
Clarence Anglin. But Mr
Thornton — known affection-
ately as ‘Daddy Bob’ to friends
— says other media outlets.have
been more explicit, and he is
the one who has fallen under
suspicion.

“That guy John Walsh of
America’s Most Wanted even
had the police on to me one
time,” said Mr Thornton. “But
all these stories about me are
untrue.”

In fact, he said, ‘ie first
arrived in the Bahamas in 1957
and bought seven acres of

Meyer. Ve

orean war veteran
urges end to Alcatraz
escape ‘persecution’

Grand Bahama resident
says claims ‘causing me a
whole bunch of trouble’

waterfront land on Grand
Bahama in 1960.

In 1962, when the Alcatraz
prison breakout occurred, he
was employed at AUTEC in
Andros, having quit the US Air
Force two years before.

He said he could prove his
identity through his fingerprints,
which were on file in Washing-
ton, DC, because at one time
he had top secret security clear-
ance through his work for the
American government.

He said Mr Pinder’s claims
were causing him problems
because people were “kind of
edgy” when he referred to
Clarence Anglin having mur-
dered his two co-escapees in
1969.

“People are talking because
they feel I fit. Everyone knows
me up here. But I was here in
1960 (two years before the
Alcatraz escape) and was work-
ing for the US Navy at AUTEC
at the time.

“After I left AUTEC in 1973,
I worked for the Bahamas gov-
ernment as a civil servant until
1992. By making these claims,
Mr Pinder is insulting every-

body — the US embassy, the ©

Bahamas government, the
police who he says have been
taking bribes from me for years,
and everybody else associated
with me.”

Referring to Mr Pinder’s
claims that Anglin had financed
his life in the Bahamas with
spoils from his days as a bank
robber, he said: “I am not a
wealthy man. I have a Bahamas

government pension and a few
investments. I am not a multi-
millionaire.

“I own this property and |
own a house in Nassau which
is at Oakes Field. My wife is a
Bahamian from Long Island. I
ain’t no escapee from Alcatraz.”

“That guy
John Walsh
even had the
police on to
me one time.”



Both Mr Thornton and his
friend, Clarence Billot, a pho-
tolab owner in Grand Bahama,
think Mr Pinder has ulterior
motives for his claims which
centre on former Pinder land.

Mr Thornton said he bought
his Grand Bahama property
from a man called Saul Pinder
nearly half a century ago. His
deeds were recorded in the reg-
istry and handled by a lawyer.
He believes Mr Pinder’s cam-
paign is somehow linked with
his ownership of former Pinder
land.

Mr Bellot agreed. “But now
it’s time to leave him alone.
They have already called in the
police and FBI. He is almost 80
now and hobbles around. To
him, it’s a big joke, and he pre-

oo

aS his Family would like

to say thank you

to oa our family and friends,

‘as well as the general public
who supported us.

tends it doesn’t bother him. But
enough is enough. Bob is defi-
nitely not their man — J would
put my head on the block for
that.”

He also dismissed Mr Pin-
der’s claim that Clarence Anglin
shot his two fellow fugitives, his
brother John Anglin and escape
plot leader Frank Morris, after
they had been living on Grand
Bahama for seven years.

Mr Pinder claimed Anglin
strapped the bodies in a jeep
and tugged it into the centre of
a muddy creek,, where it was
washed up after Hurricane
Floyd 30 years later.

“But those creeks are so shal-
low, it would be impossible to
hide a jeep in there,” he said.

“The story, I agree, has Hol-
lywood written all over it, but
my issue is that the Pinders con-
tinue to call into talk shows and
various other media proclaim-
ing that Clarence Anglin still
lives in the East End. As a
result of their rantings, they
have had the police fingerprint
and harass a man who is very
dear to me.

“I myself have been doing

business here in Grand Bahama

for the last 21 years and I have a
problem with these fairy tales.
They are causing Daddy Bob
and his wife much inconve-
nience in their retirement
years.”

Mr Pinder’s theories about °

the Alcatraz breakout were dis-
cussed in last Monday’s
INSIGHT section in The Tri-
bune.

nae
EXTERMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157





_ dents, a position that saw him representing 400 medical students.




















Mr Taylor is pictured being installed as a member of the student
government by the deputy principal Professor Kochhar at the St
Augustine University of the West Indies.

Ex-COB student
head in UWI first

MACHALE Taylor, former College of the Bahamas Union
of Students (COBUS) president and 2005 ‘youth in parlia-
ment’ speaker, became the first Bahamian student to serve as
an executive for the student government at ae St Augustine
University of the West Indies.

Mr Taylor is currently going into his second year.of medical
school at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad.

He was elected guild secretary, making him the third most
influential student in the university which consists of over
15,000 students.

Elections were held in April and he received 866 votes. He is
also the first, first-year student to win the position.

In September 2007, Mr Taylor transferred to the St Augus-
tine campus from the Cave Hill campus after completing the
pre-medical programme with honours.

Continuing his push to give students a voice, Mr Taylor was
elected as the student representative for first-year medical stu-

Shortly after he was elected deputy hall chair of the Joyce
Gibson Innis Hall, the medical student’s hall of residence.







Used Cars for Sale
Mercedes, Nissan, BMW
also Used restaurant
equipment and other scrap metals

forsale
For more information call
Mr. Peter at: 326-1296 or
322-8833










9



SG Gab tibial

choice... duct tape, plywood or

hurricane shutters.

Shutters are definitely the way to go...
For one day only, Commonwealth Bank is
teaming up with Aluminum Fabricators,
Commonwealth Buiiding Supplies,
Palincia Manufacturing, Storm Guard
Shutter Company and Marlin Marine to
transform our Wulff Road Branch parking
lot into your “Hurricane Central”.
Purchase everything from generators,

shutters to supplies.

veRalaians not

as ]

[2007 Croan

SAT., JUNE 16th

This Saturday, Commonwealth Bank will
get you prepared for what this season has
in store by offering interest rates as low
%, and repayment terms that
won't cause financial damage!

COMMONWEALTH BANK
“Leader in Personal Banking Services”

www.combankitd.com

AURORA eee Oe

@ Uy Road Branch Parking Lot





.GE 6, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007

) Helping the Bahamas

dance to a new tune





\ IBASSADOR designate of Israel Yosef Livne presented his letters of credence to Governor

ELEray envoy presents letters



noral Arthur D Hanna at Government House on Thursday.



BIS photo: ‘Tim Aylen





Defence Force officer
‘inishes training course

LIEU TENANT Clinton D
son returned to Nassau fol-
ins successful completion of

sis month course with the

‘ha company of The Basic

school, USMC, in Quantico,
V iwginia.

‘The demanding course was

oken down into four phases,

uprising intensive academic
struction, immediately fol-
wed by practical instruction

d culminating with a week-

ve field exercise for each

Hlase.

During the field exercises,

licers were evaluated in the

’ CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921

» SUNDAY, JUNE 17TH, 2007

sae 11:30. a.m. $

“Socior David Cartwright of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
No Evening Service

“FTAPPY FATHER’S DAY TO ALL FATHER’S”

Bibie Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread S| 10:45 am.

® Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. « Evening Ser
e Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wed heece. :

4 \_2 Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month) |

ma t BBE see

—

rR enn an seme a

—

i fo

28 rae.



PomAgeA
Te

FATHER’S DAY

11:00AM

Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM

Bernard Road
11:00AM

Zion Boulevard

BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
P.O. Box SS-51 03, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393- 3726/393- 9355/Fax: 393-8135 ©

iugaseg CHURCH SERVICES
ra SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2007

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey

" ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,

Rev. Dr. Laverne. Lockhart

|) COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Ms. Janice Knowles

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

leadership roles as well as abil-
ity to follow directives in fatigu-
ing and distressing conditions.
Every officer was trained to
tan belt status in the USMC
martial arts programme and
received rifle qualifications.

The programme is designed —

to produce infantry officers
who are trained to think and
react practically when presented
with any situation.

Lieutenant Clinton John-
son’s performance distinguished
him from his classmates and
earned a letter of appreciation
from the commanding officer

~aker:

00 pam.
























LIEUTENANT Clinton D Johnson

of The Basic School who con-
gratulated him for a job well
done in “representing your
home country of The Bahamas
very well...and creating a posi-
tive learning environment for
the United States marines
around you.”

MR ALEX Zybine began his
tenure in the Bahamas through
an invitation from Mr Hubert
Farrington, director of the Nas-
sau Civic Ballet.

In 1970, he was offered a
teaching position by the Min-
istry of Education to teach
dance at the C C Sweeting
Senior High School where he
worked for two years.

It was here that Mr Zybine
met and taught many of his stu-
dents. Meanwhile, Lady Nancy
Oakes, Baroness Von Hoynin-
gen Huene, offered the use of
the abandoned residence on
West Hill Street known as the
‘Villa Doyle’ as a centre for
artistic and cultural activities.

Mr Zybine invited the late
Kayla Lockhart Edwards and
Mr Cedrick Scott to use adja-
cent rooms as a base for musical
and drama rehearsal projects.

The ballroom was then reno-
vated by Mrs Violett Zybine for
dance classes. At this time, a
non-profit organisation was
formed and the core group of
dancers brainstormed until the
late Claxton McPhee came up
with the name “The New Breed
Dancers Ltd.” This group
brought credence to the
Bahamas in the dance arena.

Classes were, given by Mr
Zybine daily and free of charge,
the aim being to promote the
art of dance within the Bahami-
an Community.

This group drew all of its
financial support through per-
formances, engagements and
tours. In 1974, the group num-
bered close to 75 participants.

At this time, the Minister of
Education was the late Liv-
ingston Coakley, who made a
major impact in the lives of the
core group of dancers that rep-
resented the Bahamas both
nationally and internationally,
namely:

Lawrence Carrol, Ednol
Wright, Roderick Johnson,
Clarkston McPhee, Alistair But-
ler, Anne Marie Smith Whar-
ton, Victoria McIntosh Josey,
Rosella Darling Armbrister,
Paula Knowles, Christina
Forbes Johnson, Kim Pinder,
Kermit Munnings, Alistair But-
ler (deceased), Oswald Mor-
timer, Sylan Storr,and José
Suarez (Silver Prince), who





Sunday School: 10am
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:

ll Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills e Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622





Grace Fie Peace Wesleyan oT tT Te
PETIA MMM ACM Lr eM meee el

North America

Prayer Time:

Worship Time: fla.m. & 7p.m.
10:15a.m. to 10;45a.m.
Church School during Worship Service







THE TRIBUNE



Alex and Violet Zybine

became the assistant to produc-
tion.

The talented Bahamian Mr
Clement Bethel (deceased) also
played a major role in the lives
of most of the dancers. He
assisted the group with musical
scores and music that he per-
sonally produced and com-
posed. His humour and down-
to-earth personality made it eas-
ier for all to work together.

Other dancers at the Villa
Doyle from time to time includ-
ed Daphne Mortimer, Rosita
Nairn Ali, Eleanor Rolle, Van-
ria Darling Edwards, Yvette
Stuart, Katherine Higgs Cun-
ningham, Julie Hart, Kevin and
Keith Kemp, Debbie Johnson,
Dorothy Lewis, Donna Bowe,
Gertrude Gardiner, Dave
Dixon, Davan, Edward Pe’pe
Johnson, Fredrica Grant Jime-
niez, along with many others.

Violet Zybine was the critic
and seamstress for the group.
Her input was an invaluable
asset to her husband’s success.
Jean Collins was also a valuable
asset as wardrobe mistress.

The group’s first performance
was at the Sheraton British
Colonial Hotel, then the Gov-
ernment High School, where
the famous Folklore Shows
were held.

At the beginning of 1972 the
Ministry of Tourism offered the
New Breed Dancers, the
Lucayan Chorale directed by
Virginia Roach, John Chippie
Chipman’s Junkanoo Group,
Clement Bethel, Billy Nelson
and Bob Brome the opportuni-
ty to pftoduce the Folklore
Shows.

This lasted until 1975. Other
participants included Nathanial
(Natty Small), Shirley Wright,
Pandora Gibson, Pat Rahming,
The Dicey Doh Singers, Sweet
Exorcist Band and others.

In June, 1995, under the
sponsorship of the Ministry Of
Tourism, ‘Misa Caribe” was

produced at “Le Cabaret The-
atre” on Paradise Island. Music
was composed, written and pro-

duced by Cleophas Adderley
Jr, The New Breed Dancers
performed, including the chil-
dren of the Zybines (Nadia and
Olivia), and the Renaissance
Singers.

This major event was held
under the patronage of the
Right Rev Michael Eldon, Lord
Bishop’ of Nassau in the
Bahamas and the Rev Mon- ©
signor Preston Moss.

The New Breed Dancers core
group performed successful
tours throughout Detroit, Pitts-
burgh, Chicago, Cleveland, Ger-
many, Washington, New
Orleans, Jamaica, Canada,
Mexico and participated in Car-
ifesta and Carnival.

These dancers also partici-
pated with many others on Clif-
ford Park when The Bahamas
became independent on July 10,
1973.

When Flora Lojekova from
the Ryerson Polithechnical
Institute of Toronto, Canada,
visited the School of Dance
through the invitation of Mrs
Violet Zybine, she chose
Lawrence Carroll, Oswald Mor-
timer, Roderick Johnson and
Ednol Wright to study in Cana-
da.

Other dancers who studied
abroad were Christina, Victo-
ria, Paula and Chiquita. With
the assistance of family and
friends, or a scholarship from
the Ministry of Education, these
dancers were able to support
themselves when Alex and his
family returned to Mexico.

Rosella went into education,
Kim into the clothing industry
and Anne moved to the USA.

Alex’s last wish was for the
dancers to remain together and
to carry on the legacy. This was
done.

This month, Alex and Violet
Zybine were invited back to the
Bahamas.

Presentations were made and
appreciation showy by the Min-
istry of Education Youth Sports
and Culture along with the
dancers themselves.



Mrs. Minerva Knowles
No Service




















10:00AM
# 7:00PM








Place: Twynam Heights

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, off Prince Charles Drive

East Shirley Street : se

11:00AM Rev. Bill Owens
7:00PM Rev. Bill Owens



Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, :
Queen’s College Campus

| 9:30AM Rev. James Neilly

P.O_Box S8-5631 = eat es
w

ORSHIP AND MINISTRY |











ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue Telephone number: 324-2538
1 8:00AM Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs ate gs a ne
I 9:30AM felefax number: 324-2587

Rev. Philip Stubbs SUNDAY SERVICES

8.30 a.m.












TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street ee ; Morning Worship Service .......
(1 11:00AM Rev. Stephen Yelland COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE Sunday School for allages... 9.45 a.m.
OUT oo SED SOC ie ces leh io audi nner Adutt Education eR Sere eee ee 9.45 am,
RADIO PROGRAMMES : , Worship S@IViC@ vo ccccceees 11.00 a.m.
RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1 ; SPANISH SENVICE Voces 2.00 p.m.
Your Host: Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH Evening Worship Service w...... 6.30 om. :

‘METHODIST MOMENTS!’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart

Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future
Your Host:

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
selective Biole Teaching

Royal Rangers {Boys Club) 4-16 yrs
Missionettes (Girls Cluj 4-16 yis.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY

Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS | -

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE,

Assembly Of God

FNC ALR Um Cue Uc Meelis
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793, P.O. Box: N-1566

eo de aioe dake ee oof ak OS OO GG aC Ck rr fk foi ak aE
The BCMC ts ies ised to announce the publication ofa book containing
short studies highlighting the beliefs and practices of the Methodist
Church. Copies are available through the Confernce Office: 1-9
copies. $8.00 per book. Order of 10 or more copies $6.00 per book.

Worship Time: Jam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping
aa Center TEMPLE TIME
i Grant’s Town Weslep Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Ad & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JUNE 17TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Sis. Marilyn Tinker
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Women’s Fellowship
7:00 p.m. Bro. Rev. Carla Culmer/Board of Property

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on

Joy 101.9 at 8:30am

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs



uc ae



' eel en Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007, PAGE 7







Chef Christopher Chea, executive chef for

Tisca Pratt-Armbrister a tasie of what to expect from Shetcat

6 Ss up | for another round of creative and educational fun.
: The Bored Artist Summer Camp program at the Earth & Fire
_ Pottery Studio teaches kids ages 8 - 16 about pottery and |
_ painting. their own masterpieces by using unique pottery

Sheraton Cable Beach Reswit. «

, gles zing concepts and techniques.

* Painting distinctive stoneware valued at over $130

Camp Week Includes:

* Daily encounters and activities — including a





Club Rush Session!

A light snack and a drink each day
* Painting supplies, studio time and kiln firing
Customized sessions on pottery, painting

techniques and glazes.

A special gift for all camp graduates.

June 25 — 29, 2007

Monday — Friday

9:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m.

Registration required.

Balance due first day of class.



Bahamas @ Sunrise host
1s restaurants.







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LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas @ Sunrise, the
country’s only live television
morning show, featured top
executives of Baha Mar and
Sheraton Cable Beach on Mon-
day to highlight the re-flagging
of Radisson Cable Beach and
Golf Resort to Sheraton, a
brand of the Starwood Hotels
and Resorts.

Baha Mar Resorts Ltd.,
together with Starwood Hotels
and Resorts Worldwide Inc.,
marked the official opening of
the new Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort with a flag-raising cere-
mony.

Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation Neko Grant was part of
this ceremony. The resort is
expected to play an instrumen-
tal role in boosting tourism in
Nassau.

Monday’s Bahamas @Sunrise
show was broadcast live from
the newly-refurbished Sheraton
Cable Beach Resort, where
senior executives discussed what
persons should expect from the
resort.

Additionally, there was a culi-
nary demonstration by Christo-
pher Chea, executive chef for
Sheraton.

Don Robinson, president of
Baha Mar Resorts, described
the style of the Sheraton as
being one of “barefoot ele-
gance.”

Half of the hotel has been
refurbished, which includes
about 350 rooms, the restau-
rants, the lobbies, the lounges
and pool and beach areas. He
said the east wing and the con-
vention centre are presently
being refurbished and the entire
hotel will be completed by
December.

“It’s intended to be a place
where guests will come, and

knowing the Sheraton’s stan-.

dards and the level of service
all around the world will expect
it will be repeated here in The
Bahamas,” said Mr Robinson.

Mr Robinson explained that
Sheraton’s staff had undergone
training where they were
instructed on service and stan-



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Don Robinson, president of Baha Mar Resorts, and Robert Sands,
senior vice-president government and external affairs Baha Mar and
Cable Beach Resorts, share a light moment with Bahamas @ Sunrise
host Tisca Pratt-Armbrister during the show.

dards, as well as how they wel-
come and greet guests. He said
the hotel’s restaurants had been
going through test meals and
developing other menus.

Christopher Chea, who pre-
pared Gamberi di Amici (large
shrimp scampi), on Bahamas @
Sunrise, said the resort features
three major restaurants. They
are the Amici, an Italian restau-
rant, The Dolphin Restaurant,
and the Bimini Market, an
international buffet.

Chef Chea explained that, at
the Amici Restaurant, the cook-
ing is “simple, but very tasty.”
At Bimini Market visitors can
choose cuisine from the grill sta-
tion; a flex station, where there
are stews, pasta and pizza; and
an oriental station for stir fry, or
Cantonese-style cooked foods.

“The Bimini Market and the
Dolphin Restaurant will feature
some Bahamian cuisine. At the
Dolphin Restaurant, there is

fresh conch salad made every

day, there are conch fritters,
cracked conch with peas and
rice, and conch chowder,” said
Chef Chea.

Robert Sands, senior vice-
president government and
external affairs, Baha Mar and
Cable Beach Resorts, said that

99 per cent of staff employed
at the Sheraton are Bahami-
ans.

He said that, based on the
multiplier effect, Bahamians
throughout the Bahamas would
benefit from “the prosperity
and the success of this particular
hotel.”

“The fact that we have quali-
ty rooms on line means that the
destination will be in a position
to attract a significant number
of guests with discretionary
income to our destination. Cer-
tainly, that is the fuel that gen-
erates the economic engine in
this country,” said Mr Sands.

Hans Altenhoff, general man-
ager of Sheraton Cable Beach.
Resort, said: “I am looking for-
ward to being a part of the
team, and together we will
make this the best Sheraton
Resort not only in The
Bahamas but also in North
America.”

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PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007

Supermarket
backs students
healthy eating

Julius Bar

Julius Baer, a leading global wealth manager is seeking to employ an experienced
professional to join their team as:

Chief Operations Officer

The main tasks of this position are:

Project Management: leadership and coordination of special projects

Coordinator between the Head Office in Zurich and the Nassau entity particularly
as it relates to implementing any new procedures/guidelines (out also reporting).

Coordinator for the implementation of the local guidelines

IT & Logistics: management, coordination and supervision of all related projects,
including IT supplies, management of the premises, archives .

Security Officer: Implementation of all Group standards related to Business
Continuity Plan and other related plans, and maintenance

Head of Finance: supervision of the Finance Dept and implementation of any
new Group guidelines

Head of Human Resources: supervision of the Human Resources Dept and
implementation of any Group procedures/new guidelines

The successful candidate will have:

Minimum 10 years experience in a Swiss Bank in a Senior position
MBA or equivalent

Strong managerial skills

Project leadership

Fluent in both English, French and German knowledge

Interested persons meeting the above criteria should apply in writing, on or before
June 25th, 2007 enclosing a full resumé with cover letter to:

BY MAIL:

Personal & Confidential
Resident Manager
P.O. Box N.- 4890
Nassau, Bahamas

BY HAND

Personal & Confidential

Resident Manager

Julius Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.
Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore,
East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas







HATS OFF TO HEALTH: From left: Uriah McPhee principal Helen Simmons-Johnson; Dr Merceline Dahl-
Regis, Ministry of Health; Jannelle Curtis, 8 Weeks to Wellness participant; and Dr Idamae Hanna, Health

THE TRIBUNE






Ministries director of the BCSDA, present a plaque of appreciation to Peter Goudie, human resources man-
ager of Bahamas Supermarkets. Photo courtesy of Diane Phillips and Associates.

In a nation where obese

adults make up 60.4 per cent of |

the population and one in every
four children is considered
severely overweight, City Mar-
ket joined 120 students in a cel-

ebration of success following’

eight weeks of health transfor-
mations.

Since March 19, the 120 stu-
dents of Uriah McPhee Primary
School have been a part of the 8
Weeks to Wellness programme.

The children led their families
in practising proper eating
habits, exercising regularly and
building awareness of the
impact of lifestyle on choles-
terol and other health measures.

Students have also been
meeting weekly to get weighed
in, have their cholesterol
checked and participate in a
major exercise routine before
logging in their food and excise
achievements in a diary.

On Thursday, the children
and their families were recog-
nised in a graduation ceremony
at the school.

Bahamas Supermarkets Ltd.,
parent company of City Mar-
ket, partnered with Colinalm-
perial as platinum sponsors of
the programme titled: “Rais-
ing the Standard from Super-
Size Families to Super Healthy
Families.”

“When the 8 Weeks to Well-
ness programme was bought to
our attention we knew we had
to be a part of it,” said Peter
Goudie, human resources man-
ager of Bahamas Supermarkets.
“We used to say that it’s better
in the Bahamas, but if you look
at our population, I’m sure
you'll agree that it is bigger in
the Bahamas.

“In the Forbes health section
earlier this year, I came across a
rather alarming statistic. It was
revealed that the Bahamas is
ranked 39 out of 194 in the most
obese populations worldwide.
That is not something we ought
to be proud of.”

Goudie says he is heartbro-
ken when he sees mothers
handing their toddlers bottles

* except on red tagged and net items

filled with soda or sugar-based
drinks instead of pure fruit
juice, milk or water. He said it’s
even harder to watch families
sit with a heavy portion of
greasy chicken and fries then
wolf it down with a soda.

“JT enjoy peas and rice and

macaroni and fried chicken just

as much as the other guy but
not all on the same plate,”
admitted Goudie.

ave
learned to
choose a
healthier
lifestyle. I eat
more fruits,
drink more
water and
walk around
school .”



“Adults are for the most part
already set in their ways and it’s
hard to teach them to eat right.
It’s often said that the health of
the nation determines the
wealth of the nation. Today, as
I look at these successful grad-
uates, I am truly amazed at how
they not only implemented



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

| If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Too! Boxes
Oye fo [ole lam
Sta IKae XESS
Tool Sets

Share your news

these practices into their own
lifestyles but also convinced
their family members to join
them in a quest for a healthier
life.”

The results of the programme
were more than adequately
summed up by 10-year-old Jan-
nelle Curtis, who\says that her
life has changed since joining
it.

“TI have learned to choose a
healthier lifestyle,” said Curtis.
“TI eat more fruits, drink more
water and walk around the
school four to five times a day
with my friends to make sure
we are ail healthy. It’s not about
us losing a couple of pounds —
it’s about us living longer
healthier lives.

“T have my teachers and Dr
Hanna to thank for that. I also
thank City Market for our shirts
because it’s now like our exer-

cise uniform. Me and my class-

mates are going to continue
being healthy in the summer by
eating right and even exercise
when commercials come on |
during our favourite TV com-
mercials.”

The 8 Weeks to Wellness
programme is spearheaded by
the Adventist Health Profes-
sionals Association, is directed
by Idamae Hanna and involves
some 400 students in the fifth
grades at Uriah McPhee Pri-
mary, E P Roberts Primary and
two Seventh Day Adventist
church schools.









Check out our
other great

Father’s Gifts!

Camping supplies
Fishing & Diving

Gear

Tel: aa 393-4002
Fax: (242) 393-4096



June 11th - 16th, 2007

Kelly’s






Houses
Home

Mall at Marathon
Monday-riday 9:00am8:00pm
Saturday 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday

lose
www.kellysbahamas.com





NEEM
tea

‘ME TRIBUNE | SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007, PAGE 9 ‘an

THE TILE KING, FYP LTD, THE TRIBUNE,
EDWARD E. PATTON & ANNETTE ROLLE
have partnered to supply critically needed






















i



help |

: - Help us raise $164,000 %
- - Barry Bice geen, ee controller Kelly's; eo Dz. Tees. to purch ase & di alysis | Ey ;

marketing manager, The Tribune; Nancy Kelly, executive vice president,

Kelly's; David Kelly, president, Kelly's. . mach 1 nN e S for th eC PMH vc



The. number of patients that need dialysis is .
pushing the dialysis center to its capacity.

PibG



Each dialysis unit costs $20,500 complete
installation, training of staff members and 1 year
of technical support. All donations should be |
made payable to The Princess Margaret
Hospital Foundation with a note for The Dialysis
Machine Fund.

Your contribution will help hundreds of patients
that currently rely on these old machines for life.

(I-r) Mark Roberts, Tile King & FYP Ltd.; Michelle Taylor, Contact Sean D. Moore of The Tribune at
office manager, Palmdale Vision Centre; Sean D. Moore, mar- 502-2394 or Thelma Rolle of the Princess
Rees auRee try vente: | Margaret Hospital Foundation at 325-0048
to make a donation.

re acre

Sa a a rr

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TILE *Â¥ KiNG
<)>) viz FYP LTD

oS






as againndale Vision Cent, @ Antoinette Rolle, Nassau, Bahamas



“We care for your vision as we would our own” L H 0 U S e
d : ; Ebbie Shearer - Jackson, OD, FAAO a S H &
p Optometrist 0 mM @
Tel (242) 393-4002 Fax: (242) 393-4096 + Nesseu, Behames:

H} (1-r) Mark Roberts, Tile King & FYP Ltd.;Garry Julien, manager

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Building Supplies; Robert Carron - chief operating officer, The eC al C
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ERAUAGSS2ESSECRREAE SR DAN CELL HAEER ARES SSREA RES SSP TAR EERE SU RERES RSLS ESRERORAN ED LTRURGMRRSERTERRERREGE SSSGESA2i cs SUBaRcEEsanaceed





PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007



FROM page one

duly-elected government, but
they are not, and they will not
be. Not in this period,” he said.

Mr Ferguson also said that -

the PLP needs to shift focus to
its future, rather that dwelling
on the recent election loss.

“I think the nation has been
calling on them to stop what
they are doing and let’s get on
with the running of the coun-
try. A lot of PLPs are now say-
ing that,” he said.

He said many PLPs were dis-
gusted with the party’s refusal
to accept the election results
and want to rebuild their organ-
isation.

The PLP filed documents to
contest the election results in
Pinewood and Marco City, with
the expected filing of challenges
for Seabreeze, Golden Isles and
Blue Hills expected on Mon-
day, which is the deadline.

The court has the option of
leaving the constituency results
as they are; removing the votes
of ineligible voters who were
allowed to vote, and ordering a
recount — which, potentially, can
change the winner.

If more people than the mar-
gin of victory were illegally
barred from voting, who had
the right to vote in a con-
stituency, the court can order a
by-election.

Dispute impacting
40% of Cove staff

FROM page one

employees to receive their just
desserts. ,

"We have gone three months
now and I think that's long
enough," he said.

Barrie Farrington, Atlantis’
senior vice-president of man-
agement, said at that time that
although "there are still some
challenges to overcome" Kerzn-





position:

* accounts.

accounting functions.

"¢ Provide effective assis
administrators. es







asset

structures

June 20, 2007 to:

S scotiatust
m7. OF. W( Ob 4

Scotiatrust is inviting applications for the following

Client Accounting Officer
Responsibilities include:
e Prompt and accurate preparation of financial

statements for trust, company and agency

¢ To comply with and contribute to the maintenance
of effective internal controls relating to

tatice to a¢count

Qualifications and skills required:

e Bachelor’s degree with a major in Accounting
¢ CPA or other similar qualifications would be an

¢ Knowledge of accounting for trusts and related

¢ Strong PC software skills
¢ Good analytical and communication skills
e Ability to work within given time constraints

Interested persons should submit applications by }

Manager Operations
The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust
Company (Bahamas) Limited
P.O.Box N-3016
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: 326-0991

er International believed they
will "be brought to an amica-
ble conclusion."

Colebrooke estimated that
the pay issue may affect up to
40 per cent of all staff working
in the luxury 600-room tower.

He has suggested that reso-
lution of the matter should be of
utmost priority to the hotel, as
"a happy employee equals hap-

py guests."


















Bisk

Pricing Information As Of:
, 15 June 2007

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark









Bia iaieas denec
band sets the

tone in Rawson
me TKN y DCA

The Royal Bahamas Defence Force Band
performed in Rawson Square yerterday.



(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)

Government to assess

leaving certificate return

FROM page one

“So we are definitely going
to be addressing that issue. That
was a bad decision to remove
what we used to call a school
leaving certificate in my view,”
he said.

Mr Bethel said that he is still
in consultation with officials and
technical officers on the issue.

However, he stressed that
something had to be done so
that students would have some
record of their passage through
school.

This, of course, would only
happen once they met some
minimum level.

“It’s not that just because you
were there, you came and stand

NOTICE

up, and you passed that you’re
going to get something,” Mr
Bethel laughed.

Mr Bethel said the Ministry
of Education would be focus-
ing on raising the national exam
average, which currently stands
ata ‘D’.

“The whole question of cur-
riculum needs to be looked at
very carefully going forward —
even if we try to fit in enhanced
vocational and vocational
aspects to the overall offering
in the public school system.

“So we have to look at how
we create an environment for
those students who may learn
differently and who are perhaps
more gifted with their hands
than academically,” he said. _

NOTICE is hereby given that SIDONIUS WINSTON HENRY
of #27 GLENGARIFF GARDENS, P.O. Box FH-14470,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day
} of June, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
- and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELME JEAN-CLAUDE of
HOMESTEAD AVENUE, P.O. BOX N-10326, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day
of June, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



0.00%
3.48%)
+ 2.77%
2.35%
1.94%



THE TRIBUNE



PLP ‘retains right’
to pursue justice

FROM page one

court challenges will expand the
increased polarisatrion of the
electorate, which is something
he has publicly expressed con-
cern about — as was witnessed
by the taunting and jeering of
parliamentarians and their
spouses, by supporters of both
parties, at the opening of par-
liament.

But the opposition leader said
that his party had attempted to
guide its supporters to accept
their new role in opposition.

“We have tried our best to
get our people to understand
that the results of the election
are the results of the election.
That if there is a case in court,
or two cases in court, and there
is a legitimate basis for moving
forward with those cases, you
move forward with those cases.
But the government is the gov-
ernment — and we accept that,”
he said.

In further response to critics
who suggest the PLP is not
“moving on” from the election,
Mr Christie used the recent
budget debate, in which the
opposition interrogated the gov-
ernment’s proposals, as an
example of his party’s commit-
ment to its constitutional oblig-
ations to constructively oppose
the Government.

“T think we all understand
our obligations to ensure that

the country does not suffer as a
result of either side seeking
their political rights and jus-
tice,” Mr Christie said.

Though not being specific, Mr
Christie added that during the
party’s post-election analysis of
the election results, they
became aware of “major occur-
rences of irregularities.”

Wayne Munroe, one of the
party’s lead attorneys, has said
publicly that thousands of non-
citzens may have voted and that
some Bahamians, who were
constitutionally entitled to vote,
may have been barred.

At the time, Mr Christie said,
the party did not know if these
irregularities were sufficient to
launch court challenges.

Consequently, legal advice
was sought by the party to
determine whether their con-
cerns were substantive enough
to launch official court chal-
lenges, and if so, in which con-
stituencies.

Having been advised by the
party’s legal team that valid.cas-
es existed, Mr Christie said that
he left it up to them to deter-
mine which cases were strong
enough to officially pursue. _,

As of yesterday, the PLP had
filled documents relating to the
Marco City and Pinewood elec-
tion results, with the expecta-
tion that documents will be filed
for three more seats —
Seabreeze, Blue Hills and Gold-
en Isles — on Monday.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KENTON RADEMARI of
APT#6, BLUE HILL ROAD SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should -
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th day of June, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



HELP



WANTED



experience:

initiative.

An established law. firm requires the following:

Two (2) Legal Secretaries with the following

1) Three (3) years litigation experience and
2) Three (3) years commercial experience.

Applicants must be able to work on their own







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Fidelity Bank
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Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank 0.07 1,423
Consolidated Water BDRs : 0.11 281
Doctor's Hospital 0.00 200
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Please fax resumes to 393-4558.

11,000

NOTICE

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC BANK AND
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8.12%
7.85%
0.00%

Last Price | Weekly Vol.
16.00
10.00

unter Securities

41.00

14.00

0.45

S2wk-Low Symbol
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdi

FINAL NOTICE is hereby given that the creditors of the above-named
Company, which is being wound up compulsorily by The Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, are required, if they have not done so
already, on or before the 30th day of June A.D. 2007 to send proofs of their
debts or claims, and the names and addresses of their attorneys (if any) to
the undersigned

0.00%
7.71%
0.00%

28.00 ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdi

1.125
0.000



Ronald Atkinson
Ronald Atkinson & Co.
Chartered Accountants
PO. Box N-8326
Nassau, Bahamas

Fund Name Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

1.342667"
3.2018°**
2.681688"*
1.244286****
11.5519°***
| ANTD OB.20% 1 2006 34.47%
D - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

NAV KEY

the Official Liquidator of the said Company. In default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution by the said Official Liquidator
of the assets of the above-named Company.

Dated the 14th day of June A.D. 2007.

S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks *- 8 June 2007
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

Olv $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

** - 30 April 2007

++ "31 May 2007
Ronald Atkinson
Official Liquidator

* - 30 April 2007

Soe et - 31 May 2007

7764 ( FOR MORE DATA -& INFORMATION CALL (242) 394-2503





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JUDGE PARKER

BESIDES PARIS,
RACHEL OWNS HOMES
IN LONDON, ST-MORITZ

ACTUALLY, MARGO,
I HAVE MET A





8
9
13

31

32

35
36

3

~

39
41
42
43

44



SAUTEED ONIONS,
a= GARLIC, AND
JALAPENOS S











© 2006 by King Festures Syndicate, inc. World Rights reserved

PEOPLE BORN DURING THE
CHINESE “YEAR
OF THE DOG”







Goes off again to get the biaces (7)
Two chaps, one just like you (6,3)
Give one a lift when there's this awful
emptiness inside (5) .
There's little time, dear; move! Step
onit (5)
Give you the impression, when you
propose (7)
How the grim sailor said “Aft!” (7)
At that point, you run through (5)
Slip that top off, little imp! (5)
Great to have a drink, having got
back again (5)
Calls up and the girl's come round, all
tight (6)
The boyfriend gave the fellow a nice
build-up (6)
A page in the haberdashery
catalogue (7)
Having done wrong, the gun-slinger
is in prison (7)
Surprises coming one on top of the
other in the building (6)
Run across in the Wagner
Centre (6)
A mistake for someone working in a
fish restaurant? (5)
He's more jovial with her around (5)
She is French, Northern, with an
English name (5)
Given a number to play might make
you feel better (7)
Home and the tot is playing
in the pen (7)
Sing one note, getting close (5)
Extra for the coach working in (5)
Permission to proceed with the
slashed-price sale (9)
A. migrant will endure without
Jetaliation (7)

CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

WELL, I'D LOVE
TO HEAR ABOUT

WOW! AND SHE'S
LEAVING ALL FOUR
TO THE GIRLSZ

a gol Mm nf

I HAVE To FINESSE A
MILLION BIRTHDAY PARTY
DETAILS. <3



GEEZ LOUISE, WHERE'S





PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007

COMICS

* I MENTIONED THAT

TO RACHEL--- SHE
SAID ROGER IS WELL
TAKEN CARE OF!





IF I KNOW ROGER
CABOT, THIS WILL
NOT 6IT WELL!




(©2007 by Norm America Syndicate, Inc. Werks ngms reserved








THANK GOODNESS, ZA
ALWAYS COOL, CALM AND.
COLLECTED. hee











MY BURGER?!

‘South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.













NORTH
4Q16
Â¥K5
@KI853
&AQT
WEST EAST
@K932 #10874
V743 V6
102 $Q974
&10862 RKI53
SOUTH
AS
ARE SAID TO THEY LIKE TO H
WAVE DOG -LIKE 1S ANG AROUND votes?
PERSONALITY HYDRANTS 2! &O4
TRAITS The bidding:
South West North East
1y¥ Pass 2¢ Pass -
394 Pass 6%



THERE'S No TIME To
WASTE! [VE GOT

JULIAN LIKES SCHOOL,
4. WE NEVER GETS IN
FIGHTS, HE READS

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS

Down [| a |_|
1 One's always bearing up to 15

change (6) se aoans “or nme |
2 Holding the gun, fear there's PPT

3

wi >

34
38

40



ACROSS: 4, A-waits 7, Learners 8, Pan-a-ma 10, Bob-by 13, West 14, Spar 15,
Pa-NT 16, Ate 17, Otis 19, Euro 21, Carthorse 23, Mode 24, Ed-na 26, Job 27,
Bar-d 29, Glib 32, Alps 33, C-E-ase 34, Bo Peep 35, Left over 36, Remove

DOWN: 1, B-L-abs 2, Sam-ba 3, Only 4, Aspen 5, Aunt 6, Tomato 9, Astern 11,
Op.-t 12, Broad 13, Washers 15, Pit 16, Are 18, Treble 20, Usage 21, Cob 22,
O-dd 23, Mo-r-ose 25, His 23, Apple (-pie) 30, Larva 31, Beard 32, Aero 33, Cats






Opening lead — two of clubs.

Assume you’re in six hearts and
West leads a club. There are many
factors to consider before playing a
card from dummy.

You have 11 sure winners and
numerous chances for a 12th trick,
all depending on how the adverse
cards are divided. You could try a
club or spade finesse, or even a dia-
mond finesse, or you could try to
establish dummy’s diamonds.

You can’t safely test all these pos-
sibilities, so you must decide at trick
one which line of play to adopt.

The best way to start is by play-
ing a low club from dummy. This

























Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)

Yo YOU THINK
HE'S A GROWN-UP
IN DISGUISE 7



HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 17; very good 25;
excellent 34 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.

i
,
mre
(QS007 dy King Feshees Byraftante, ine. World tigfen reserved. “j'











a a a
Pe
| a



something wrong with the catch (8)
That's a lot of money,

lovely lady! (6,5)

Even at the Pearly Gates? (4,5)
Ran away, has somehow got caught
and shot (7)

Breaking a raw egg into, call out,
acting cockily (10)

eRe (a

i

ne a esate
i

Be pclbeil:

=
roy

n



x
Are ear and afler a time, have == ee ee aula |
caught up ;
Parts of bodies found in a furniture 2
shop (6) ee es Mee a Me ele sb Le)
Comment on people who have gol | || | | gE | || | |
notable Pe mee
Bash in — right in - fast (6) ee | | | | | | | a
Smuggled the dope from a foreign
por (7 a — pt ool el



Leave in a hurry if you
serve tea to? (4,3)

ACROSS
Finding someone who's been 8 Right (7) Be gs (6)
slandering you? (7,4) ; 9 —Twin-hulled vessel (9) 2 — Jewellery item (8)
Couldn't face being refused 13 Dance to this (5) 3 Gathers speed (11)
admittance? (6,4) i Se eet o 4 Enter uninvited (4-5)

, ; issful state 5 Discolour (7

A girl having a drink in the garden (9) 16 Determination (7) - aaah di
The prisoner's wi 17 Noblemen (5) fetid
‘identification? (3,4) I 18 Time when dark (5) : ine ( i )
Noisy crane operating 20 Happening (5) 10 Come into view (6)
in the country (6) N a po) 11 Controls (7)
Be as excited over the dance as the a 5 sea i (7) 12 Squanders (6)
game (8) > 27 Hot condiment (7) u snl ()
Not conscientious, no 30 Marionette (6) cs Be a )
again fail to see (6) The nonspecific “officer” (7) Lu 32 fae ‘5) 28 Hospital (9)
Continues to jog as : Clinical 29 Letgo(7) _
one talks (4,2) 35 cerusloh (5) 30 Financial gain (6)
Most uniikely to get 36 Unity (5) 32 ae
high (4) 37 Afternoon show (7) 33 Stinks (6)

39 Gatches fire (7) 34 Creche (7)

41 Worker in stone (5) 38 Almost (6)

42 Speak slowly (5) 40 Short letter (4)

43 Plan of travel (9)
44 Of the sense of
touch (7)

EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Suffer 7, Chestnut 8, Oregon 10, Erase 13, Crew 14, Sent 15, Seem
Said 32, Tier 33, Sever 34, Arcane 35, Champion 36, Stitch

DOWN: 1, Aches 2, Sedan 3, Stye 4, Store 5, Flew 6, Eloped 9, Remake 11, Red

12, Stove 13, Cantaur 15, Sir 16, Sin 18, Detain 20, Cease 21, Ore 22, Art 23,
Ferret 25, Tie 28, Beech 30, Avoid 31, Drunk 32, Tact 33, Same







“No WONDER WE CAN'T FIND OUR CAR
DAP DROPPED US OFF, SeneER Pe




16, Sex 17, Odin 19, Acid 21, Overtaken 23, Fret 24, Area 26, Fee 27, Abut 29,






TO KNOW -
ANYTHING
NEW.

EDUCATED
AGAINST MF
ILL! MY
RIGHTS ARE #2
BEING
TRAMPLED!














relinquishes the possibility of imme-
diately winning the trick with the
queen, but there are excellent reasons
for rejecting the finesse.

First, West may have led from J-8-
6-2, in which case East might play
the king instead of the ten, handing
you your 12th trick immediately.
Then, too, West might have led low
from the J-10-x-x of clubs, which
will again establish dummy’s queen
as a trick after East takes the king.

But the most compelling reason
for playing low is that you retain an
extra entry to dummy that might
come in handy later on. If you were
to finesse the queen, you would lose
this advantage after East won and
returned a club, dislodging dummy’s
ace.

East wins the first trick with the
jack and returns a spade. Again you
decline the finesse, which offers only
a 50 percent chance. Instead, thanks
to your duck at trick one, you can
now play for a 3-3.or 4-2 diamond
division (an 84 percent chance).

After taking the spade, you cash
the queen of hearts and A-K of dia-
monds. You then muff a diamond
high, lead a trump to the king and
ruff another diamond, establishing
the jack as a trick. After you draw
West’s last trump, your carefully pre-
served ace-of-clubs entry permits
you to discard your spade loser on
the jack of diamonds, and the slam is
home.



a bison boast
oating bong
snob stab

bowing obtain snib

baton bias
swab SWINGBOAT

basing

’S SOLUTION

ait bang basin
basting bastion

b

YESTERDAY
igot bingo biot
boasting boat b

b






new
Ls,
cow

-part of tooth
Piatt ab -taey
beyond the

gumline

Jon Blackburn (South Wales) v
Bernd Rechel (Wood Green), UK
4NCL league 2007. Wood
Green's club rooms are close to
White Hart Lane, but its team
used to be the Chelsea of British
chess, hiring world class
grandmasters to demolish rival
squads. The zenith came at the
end of the 2005-6 season when
the all-time number one
woman, Judith Polgar, was
flown from Budapest for the
decisive match against
championship rivals Guildford-
ADC. Then WG's major sponsor
cut back support, so that in the
season just ended Guildford
triumphed easily while the north
Londoners struggled against
relegation. There were still one
or two hired hands, though
Germany's Rechel is a modest

T DONT WANT To GO To
ScHOOL. I DONT WANT

THE FACT \S, I'M BEING

cia ee,
=

THE TRIBUNE






T ALREADY KNOW MORE
THAN TL WANT To! I
LIKED THINGS BETTER
WHEN I DIDNT

UNDERSTAND THEM /











SITDDUAS Steig TENUN AQ PENQUECUOLEUEA C651








SATURDAY,
JUNE 16

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

You have R&R on the brain, but you
have to buckle down and get through
another grueling week at work,
Aries. There will be reward enough
for a job well done.

TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21

It may feel like everyone is out to get
you this week, Taurus. But it is all just
your imagination. Just focus on the
task at hand and these next few days .
are géing to sail by.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Wishing for a change in your
finances will get you nowhere,
Gemini. You have to put a plan in
action to make the changes you
desire. Leo can help with the task.

| CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Focus on family for the next few
days, Cancer. Afterward, you’ll have
some time to devote to yourself.
There are big changes on the horizon,
so enjoy the downtime now.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23
Hold your head high when you pre-
sent a proposal to: your supervisor,
Leo. Your ideas have merit and they
should be taken seriously. Surprises
are in store on Thursday.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22














‘] Make the most:of the time spent with

your spouse or romantic partner,
Virgo. The hours will become fleeting
when a work project springs up unex-
pectedly midweek.

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ll have trouble focusing on any-
thing this week, Libra. No matter
how hard you try to devote your
attention to one task, you’ll end up
working on multiple projects.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
Rather than going on the defensive
with a coworker, Scorpio, sit down
and talk to the person about what’s
bothering you. It may or may not
work, but at least you’ll have tried.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Now is not the time to make a major |
life decision because your head is
just not into it, Sagittarius. Put off
heavy thinking for another few days
and skate through this week.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
No matter how hard you try,
Capricorn, you can’t get everyone to
like you — just accept it. Instead of
trying to win everyone over, spend
your energy on the friends you have.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 -
There is trouble brewing at home, ~
but you won’t be able to figure out -
what’s up unless you confront those
you live with. Don’t clam up and -
avoid confrontation. :

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20

It’ll take a lot of effort to get through -
the week, Pisces, because things will
be a struggle for you. Relief comes
when Virgo enters the picture.

eye 113) by Leonard Barden



master rather than an elite GM.
Here as Black (to move) Rechel is
two pawns down but has White's
e3 knight caught in an awkward
pin. How did Black force victory?

LEONARD BARDEN

*
Chess solution 8386: 1..Bg4! 2 Qxg4 Qxe3 3Kg2

Qf2+ 4 Kh3 OfL 5 Kh4 BIG+ wins.

»

LAS TT Se NN MY DAD



: : ASCBLKESE CHV PM ATARAUTE SA CAS HBH SHE eT TKN OS PEAR EM REET ART OUT EAUFAHTAD EO ASEH KOU CETUS ABET MCE A Hs 5
ee * 7 ‘sat o FRAT HS SRARHESSRWEKSHGTITS MASH HT CAAT SSFSEPSHVPSOHKESANHE rOSBeRwscanseereryeseretorrru = vane sete t erste 5
:
*





«
Â¥

“4 4 i
me “ z . ~s ean List Ce iwe os a> 7% a tee ee Ow Bee BX ee #2 ¢ a Te -e ye 5








NSURANCE MANAGEMENT

‘ima



tify 8






eee

a ”" agi: Arg 2 Today Sunday WINDS WAVES _ VISIBILITY
Lee. ape Z ee High = Low W High = Low W NASSAU Today: SSE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet .



WATER TEMPS.
4-7 Miles 82° F























































































: F/C F/C F/C F/C ‘ ESE at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 82°F
90/32 79/26 pe =: 89/31 77/25 pc S at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet |
A ; 84/17 55/12 t 70/21 55/12 pe :___ VAR at 5-10 Knots 1-3 Feet
oe (a a es af | 88/81 S73 s 88/81 57/13 's S at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet
Mostly cloudy with a Mostly cloudy. : | Mostlycloudy. | ~| Clouds andbreaksof | Intervalsofclouds | Intervals of clouds The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the 88/31 73/22 s 88/31 70/21 s ; VAR at 5-10 Knots 2-4 Feet
thunderstorm. 5 sun. | and sunshine. : and sunshine. greater-the need for eye and skin protection. ‘Auckland . 63/11 46/7 s 684 48/8 5 rs
3 : High: 88° 4 High: 88° High: 88° =| - High: 88° : a a aes poe aoe
+ RRO ; » 74° + 7RO on + 7RO 3 avy: 74° 1 « 7RO los. 00/00 fico PO U pe
High: 88 Low: 74 Low: 76 Low: 76 Low: 74 _| Low: 16 | 75/23 66/18 t 75/23 66/18 pc
eT Ta Tet _ Accu eT rae poe ut | a LS ea Li ae 89/31 69/20 po 89/31 71/21 s
00 Le ed, é = 7 ae —— 76/24 73/22 s . 74/23 73/22 s
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:27am. 2.5 3:27 a.m. = -98/31- 66/18-t 90/32 65/18 pc
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:54p.m. 3.1 3:20pm. -0.2 7 05 55/12 t = 75 193 57/13. ¢
+ Sunday 10:18am. 25 4:16am. -0.1 80/26 66/18 po =—=—=S77/25-—«G6/18 t
CoG a eae nee as Y 40:43 pm. 3.0 4:12pm. -04 63/17 46/7 pc 64/17 46/7 +
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 11:08am. 25 5:03am. 0.0 “Brussels: eS 86/18 49/9 t= 74/23 S3/11 pc
ABACO Temperature 11:31p.m. 2.8 5:05p.m. 0.1 sees ae ae pe =. Son pc
HUG: “scuset dscsccseettenscvduaceattoivesesuiciseass OO 1S2— 0 : : ‘Buenos Aires = 8 393s 55/12 Ss
High: 85° F/29°C a “ree rac Uuisday TSP AM 25 BAe Cairo 96/35 69/20 s 95/35 71/21 s
Normal high . 87° a = Berns 93/33 85/29 t 96/35 86/30 t
Normal low .. 14° F/23° : 64/17 43/6 t 57/13 41/5 sh
EST PALM BEACH Last year’s high .. 91° F/33° C at aa tat 94/28 -72/22t © 88/31. 76/24 t
High: 84° F/29° C Last year's low . sessereee 80° F/27° C nse neta eis a 88/31 68/20 pc 81/27 72/22 c
Low:73°F/23°C Precipitation Sunrise......6:20a.m. Moonrise..... 736 a.m. 5 sablan <2 77/25. 65/18 pe —* 75/23 - 65/18 s
As of 2 p.m. yesterday . 0.21" ‘Sunset.......8:01 p.m. Moonset.....9:56).m. Copenhagen 6216 56/136 64/17 53/11 t
Year to date .. 24,24" First Full Last New Dublin : So10c = BAT «48/8 pc
: High: 83° F/28°C Normal year to date 15.15" ii mm Frankfurt 50/10 t 77/25 59/15 pc
Low: 69° F/21°C Genev. 73/22 52/11 ¢ ——-—- 73/22 §9/15 t
AccuWeather.com Halifax 66/18 52/11 ¢ 68/20 52/11c | Showers
All forecasts and maps provided by: cil ‘Havana. 84/28 -72/22t = B5/29._ 73/22 t T-storms
2 o ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc.©2007 Jun. 30 Jul. 7 Jul. 14 Helsinki 61/16 48/8 s 64/17 50/10 r “o_{ Rain
NASSAU High: 88° F/31°C : a mE ‘Hone Kon . ae , 73/22 pc ae aes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
: ‘ 2 , : ; i recipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
~ High: 88° F/31°C: Low: 74° F/23 C . : Astanbul - ~ == 83/28 69/200's 86/30. 70/21 s Fouad Seiten ichipseahiiee are for sacs oes
- Low:74°F/23°C 22 ow Jerusalem 79/26: S713 s_ 80/26 57/13 s
sees 12 9 Johannesburg 6317. 393s 6/16 39/8 's
ea : Kingston 1/32! 81/27 pc 88/31 79/26 pc
sgh: 86° F/90"C = CAT ISLAND 61/16) 55/12 po 68/20. 54/12 pe
Low:75°F/24°C High: 89° F/32°C : ¢ 70/21,, 54/12 sh 72/22 55/12 pe
: ; 2 eh 72/22 HONS te 822 SONS ts
z ” 88/31, 78/25 pc 92/33 78/25 pc
79/28. S52 te 78/25 = S2/1tt
2 : 100/37 75/23 s 101/38 75/23 s
Montreal — : 85/29 64/17 t === 80/26 60/15 pe
: P ‘atlanied Moscow 62/16 51/10 -sh 84/28 58/14 c
Low: 75° F/24° C Munich Ss SS 70/2 48/8 t <= == 78/25, 56/13 pe



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's 75/23 52/11 ¢ 77/25 53/11 ¢










highs and tonights's lows. High:87°F/31°C "402/38 79/26 pe —=—«:102/38.- 78/25 pe
Low:77°F/25°C | 5512 46/7 6
70/21 55/1 68/20 S95 po
- ! : 75/23 «5 79/26











































81/27 69/20 Bays ; : eS eed
105/40 81/27 s 2 ae = ts
ee et iin OT a u_can rest easy knowin
— - = S . — — — —— = — = = = = . SS cos ate ANA : “ANnNINO \/ Pp anse ‘ OE p = . . ¥ > * an
High bee Ww High cy Ww High ae Ww High — W High ir Ww High To W eile C : San Juan oun a ; z : - ave excellent INSULT ce
g ow id ow 0 ow Q ow \Hig ow ig ow \ : = 3 ane so MURS SneS as Te e (
ee ee ce. Ee eee Se. el Fe FIC Fe FIC | ‘San Salvador tener. 72e2 | rage no matter. which
Albuquerque | 92/33 66/18 t 99/33 66/18 t Indianapolis 90/32 67/19 s 89/31 68/20 pc Philadelphia 84/28 64/17 pc 90/32 68/20 ' CROOKEDIS NS es Hee , wa the wind blows.
Anchorage 70/21 52/11 s «69/20 52/11 s Jacksonville 88/31 67/19 pc 90/32 70/21 pc Phoenix 110/43 82/27 s 107/41 80/26 th ji ee se i = 28 ae
Atlanta 90/32 69/20 pc 88/31 68/20 pc KansasCity 90/32 68/20 pc 87/30 69/20 pc Pittsburgh 82/27 56/13 s ~~ 87/30 63/17 pc RAGGED ISLAND ENG ESE ASES | |
Atlantic City 79/26 63/17 pc 90/32 66/18 pc Las Vegas 105/40 77/25 s 103/39 79/26 s Portland,OR 70/21 52/11 pc 70/21 52/11 paged iri ciel = oes aa Sele A
Baltimore 82/27 62/16 pc 92/33 66/18 .pc LittleRock 92/33 67/19 pc 92/33 69/20 pc _—Raleigh-Durham 85/29 64/17 t ~ 94/34 68/20 pc Low: 73° F/23°C . crams Se ee ae Sao oe
Boston 75/23 60/15 pe 86/30 66/18 t Los Angeles 78/25 62/16 pce 78/25 61/16 pc St. Louis 92/33 72/22 s 93/33 73/22 pc " aan 85/29. 75/23 t ~ 87/30. 78/25 ae ' ane gi a= “
Buffalo 77/25 62/16 pe 78/25 61/16 pc Louisville 90/32 68/20 s 93/33 67/19 pc Salt Lake City 94/34 68/20 pe 88/29 51/10 's GREATINAGUA Tokyo 78/25 64/17 pc “81/27 64/17 po om oe
Charleston, SC 88/31 67/19 t 91/32 70/21 s$ Memphis 92/33 74/23 s 92/33 72/22 pc San Antonio 92/33 73/22 c¢ 86/30 74/23 t High: 91°F/33°C i “Toronto” 82/27 85/18 pe «82/27 66/18 pc
Chicago 90/32 64/17 s 90/32 71/21 po Miami 86/30 76/24 t 87/30 77/25 t SanDiego © 72/22 64/17 pe 70/21 62/16 pc Low 79°F/26°C ore 90/92 64/17 s -—«90/32.-:«6B/20 s
Cleveland 86/30 61/16 s 83/28 65/18 pc Minneapolis 84/28 68/20 t 87/30 69/20 c San Francisco 68/20 53/11 pc 70/21 53/11 pc e Bae -B/20 “S31 eo B47 BBV
Dallas 84/28 70/21 t 83/28 70/21 t Nashville 90/32 64/17 s 95/35 66/18 pc Seattle 68/20 50/10 c 65/18 50/10 c “a 78/25 61/16 pc —=»-8 2/27 6/18 pc
Denver 91/32 59/15 pce 93/33 53/11 pc. ‘New Orleans 90/32 72/22 s 90/32 74/23 pc Tallahassee 92/33 69/20 t 93/33 70/21 peo , i /25 S915 ¢ 81/27 “57/13 pc
‘Detroit 88/31 64/17 pc 88/31 68/20 pc. New York 80/26 66/18 pce — 90/32 72/22 pc Tampa 88/31. 73/22 t 89/31 74/23 t | 73/22 58/14 pc 76/24 58/14 t
' Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 s OklahomaCity 84/28 67/19 t 82/27 65/18 t Tucson 102/38 74/23 s 104/40 72/22 s : oe : “i :
Houston 89/31 71/21 t 89/31 71/21 t Orlando 88/31 73/22 t 89/31 74/23 pce Washington,DC 82/27 65/18 pc 92/33 70/21 pe’ ran i Lbaeag ll Help sal Mant eA! Drghalitat ak RoR



storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace



PAGE 14, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007 . THE TRIBUNE









TURED ON CAMERA

’s graduates
r and wide









Former Attorney General Sean McWeeney with his son Sean
MicWeeney Jr, who will be pursuing studies at the University of MEAGHAN MILLER
Fampa in Florida, and wife, former senator and co-owner of 105.9 _ receiving her award for achieve-
Gems IM radio station, Cyprianna McWeeney. ment in art.





a

ST ANDREW'S School held its 2007 graduation ceremony in the Crystal Ballroom at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort on Wednesday.

In 1969, former Minister of Finance Carlton Francis agreed with the board of St Andrew’s that the
school would draw from inner city children who were unable to attend St Andrew’s due to limited

Charles Hamilton, president of the student funds.



TEAM receives her diploma — council, received the highest award during the Pictured above, from left, are three inner-city students, Glenda Roker (prefect), Tracyann Perpall
boi) Robin Jrownrigg, chairman of the board of — ‘school’s graduation ceremony from the principal, and Charles Hamilton (president of the Student Council), who graduated this year. All thanked St
St Andrew’s School. Bob Wade. Andrew’s for what they called the best education in the country.

GABRIELLE
DAWKINS
receives her
achievement award
frou the prinicipal
of St Andrew's,
Bob Wade.



Chairman of the St Andrew’s Board, Robin Brownrigg, presenting James Virgill, son of Magistrate
Linda Virgill and former Cabinet Minister, the late Charles Virgill, who was murdered in 1997. James
will be attending Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida in the fall.









~
—_—



Full Text


m Lhe Tribune

. | up all night!
| | | ere | McDonald’s downtown
| .

SSF | drive-thru is now open

74F | 24 hours

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y STORMS BAHAMAS EDITION



SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007
da
Kermit’s

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Volume: 103 No.170



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CHARGE ON BABY STORE SLAYING

PLP gets court go

Party granted
permission to
Start challenge
over two seats

By NATARIO. McKENZIE

THE PLP’s legal team was
granted permission yesterday
to initiate election court pro-
ceedings in relation to two seats
and are éxpectéd to submit
additional applications over
three more seats on Monday,
attorney Wayne Munroe told



Perry Christie speaks at the
CEO Network conference
that was held at the British

Colonial Hilton.

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune

Staff)



PLP
accepts
election
result

By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE PLP has accepted
the results of the last elec-
tion, but the party maintains
its right to pursue justice for
any irregularities that may
have occurred during the
process, according to Oppo-
sition Leader Perry Christie.

Mr Christie spoke to The
Tribune on the eve of the
historic filing of four or five
election court challenges
that have the potential to
shift the balance of political
power in the Bahamas.

The former prime minis-
ter told The Tribune that he
thinks the process of the

SEE page 10









the Tribune yesterday.

“There were applications
heard for leave to issue peti-
tions in Pinewood and Marco
City and both applications were
granted and there is now leave
to issue those two petitions. The
other three will be dealt with
on Monday,” Mr. Munroe
added.

The applications were heard
yesterday in closed court before
Supreme Court justice Cheryl
Albury, he said. On Monday,
the PLP’s legal team is expected
to return to court to file appli-
cations in relation to the Blue
Hills, Sea Breeze and Golden
Isles seats, Mr Munroe said.

The PLP's Pleasant Bridge-
water, who has been appointed
to the Senate, lost to the FNM's
Zhivargo Laing — now Minis-
ter of State for Finance — by 47
votes, according to results of
the May 2 general election.

The Sea Breeze, Blue Hills
and Golden Isles seats were all
secured by the FNM by fewer
than 70 votes. The FNM won
the Sea Breeze constituency by
64 votes; Biue Hills by 47; Gold-
en Isles by 62 and Marco City
by 47.

The PLP had 21 days after
the opening of parliament on
May 23 to file its applications,
meaning that, excluding Sun-
days and public holidays, the
deadline to do so would fall on
Monday, June 18.

Mr Munroe explained that,
in order to file an election court
petition, one first needed the
permission of a Supreme Court
judge.

“Once the judge gives you

permission you can file it. After
you get permission to file the
petition you have to do certain
things like enter a recognisance
with sureties, serve the petition
and certain other documents.
_ “Then, after that point, the
other party responds and,
depending how they respond,
that will determine how the
matter progresses from there,”
he said.

Mr Munroe said that the
election court process did not
necessarily have to be a lengthy
matter.

“It could take time but we
are all lawyers and we have an
obligation to proceed with the
case as expeditiously as possi-
ble,” he said.

“The only reason for anyone
to try and drag this on is if they
are afraid of the consequences,”
Mr Munroe suggested yester-
day.

In an earlier interview, Mr
Munroe stated that he believes
it is possible that thousands, if
not tens of thousands, of non-
citizens may have voted in the
May 2 general election.

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leaving diplomas

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Ministry of Education will be looking
into re-instituting some form of “leaving school
diploma” after disturbing figures revealed that a
large number of students graduating from gov-
ernment high schools are not receiving a diploma.

C V Bethel High School recently held its grad-
uation exercise and, as Mr Bethel revealed, few-
er than half of the 400 students graduated with a
diploma.

The same could be said for L W Young, it was
claimed, where out of the 400 graduates, fewer
than 100 received their diplomas this year.

Noting that C V Bethel was one of the higher

performing schools in the BGCSE exercises, Mr
Bethel said that there must be a concerted effort
to look at re-evaluating the current curriculum,
citing the recent graduation exercise.

“There are a number of things, and one of
them we will be looking at is re-instituting some
form of school leaving certificate that would indi-
cate that, notwithstanding their failure to get
these diplomas or BGCSEs or the like, that they
have completed the course and achieved certain
standards, so that people will not be leaving
schools with nothing in their hands, no record of
them having passed through the public educa-

tion system.
SEE page 10

FNM: ‘We will do what we have
to do’ on election court challenge

By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FNM has not yet assembled a legal team
to represent its interests in the election court
challenges the PLP has and will continue to file,
The Tribune was told by the party’s vice-chair-
man, Senator Johnley Ferguson.

“If they (the PLP) proceed to file as they said
they will do, we will then do what we need to
do,” Mr Ferguson explained in an interview yes-
terday.

The FNM vice-chairman confidently said that
his party has no fear of the election court chal-
lenges the PLP has instigated.

“There’s no fear. The government organised an
election, went to an election, and turned out the
opposition, and then they’re crying foul. That’s
their right,” he said.

Mr Ferguson added that the filing of these



challenges demonstrated that the PLP is desper-
ate in the wake of the FNM’s victory, and their

decision to challenge the electipn results vali- °

dates his party’s claim that the PLP mishandled
the organisation of the election process — as, for
example, was witnessed by the late report of the
constituency’s commission.

The PLP was so sure that it would win the elec-
tion, that they did not heed the advice of critics
who argued that the then government had, in
some ways, mishandled the process, Mr Ferguson
emphasised.

He also said that, if the PLP had won, there
would not be any complaint about the validity of
the May 2 results.

“So they will continue to find ways to make the
public believe that they should have been the

SEE page 10

SING NEWSPAPER



Former Miss Bahamas Universe, Samantha Carter, demonstrates how a guest at the Royal Victoria Hotel would have
dressed decades ago, as she shares some Bahamian history with tourists and locals yesterday on Bay Street.

Students lacking :

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)



| PNiernre

dispute
over pay
still alive

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter





A pay dispute involving
employees of The Cove,
Atlantis, is still ongoing, said
union president Roy Cole-
brooke yesterday.

While employees are
receiving payment, Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers union official Cole-
brooke said many were not
getting the correct salaries,
as stipulated in their con-
tract.

The president said that he
was expecting to meet with
Cove managerial staff "in
short order" in the hope of
coming to an agreement.

This comes after several
meetings between union
officers and management,
he claimed.

The pay discrepancies
affect housekeeping, food r
and beverage and pool staff,
he said.

In early June the union
president said he felt the
union had been patient
enough with the hotel,
allowing for the "growing
pains" associated with open-
ing a major new facility, but |
said the time had come for

SEE page 10 |

































PAGE 2, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007



ARDASTRA Gardens has
adopted a new green iguana
by the name of Kermit.

The young iguana was found
wandering over the lawns of
Atlantis on Paradise Island.

Since green iguanas are not
native to the Bahamas, it is
assumed that he was brought
into the country and then was
either released or escaped.

He is the fourth green igua-
na to be adopted by Ardastra

If he or the others had
remained in the environment
and flourished, they then
would have become part of a
problem that is even more seri-
ous. They would have become
an “introduced species.”

Introduced species is a term
used for non-native plants or
animals brought in to a partic-
ular region by people. With-
out proper management and
foresight, they can have a dey-
astating effect on the natural
environment into which they
are transferred.

These non-native animals
often turn feral and can prey
on the native animals, compete





Payment Centres:
Monday-Friday 8:30a.m.-4p.m.
#21 Collins Avenue, New Providence
#56 Collins Avenue, New Providence

Rosetta & Bradley Streets, New Providence
‘Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Freeport, Grand Bahama
George Town, Exuma
All Bank of The Bahamas branches.

Call Centre:
Monday-Friday 8:30a.m. -5p.m.
Ph: 356-8471 - 4

_email:cschelpdesk@colinaimperial.com

#21 Collins Avenue

Effective May 26th, 2007
CHIL clients will be able to make payments for
PREMIUM and MORTGAGE accounts
on Saturdays from 9 am to 12:30 pm
at the Clilpuilding at 21 Collins Ave

Tel: 356-8300



under these sad circumstances. ,

with them for food and shel-
ter, aiid bring with them a host

of diseases.

The green iguana is normal-
ly found in the tropical and
subtropical regions from north-
ern Mexico to central South
America.

The word Iguana comes
from the Spanish version of
the Carib word “iwana”.

The iguana family includes
about 30 different species.

Green iguanas have short,
powerful limbs equipped with
strong, sharp claws (for climb-
ing and digging), and a long,
strong tail.

They can reach iGwpins of
6°6” feet.

A large flap of skin hangs
from the throat and helps reg-
ulate body temperature.

Vision, hearing and the
sense of smell are acute. Green
iguanas are somewhat clumsy,
but accomplished tree
climbers. —

They tend to bask by day on
tree branches and are com-
monly found near water and
are excellent swimmers. When
threatened or cornered, igua-
nas can defend themselves with
astonishingly quick, whip-like

lashes of their tails and with

‘their claws and jaws.



ESTRA

THE TRIBUNE

WRIA
region’s turtles

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

The survival of turtles
across the Caribbean region
is being threatened by over-
exploitation of the creatures
in legal fisheries,and through
illegal harvest and trade,
according to a new report.

TRAFFIC, a wildlife trade
monitoring network, say
Caribbean nations need to
improve their co-operation
to manage and conserve the
region's turtles.

The reptiles are under-
siege thanks to the demand
for their shells, meat and
eggs - with the first of these
commonly ending up as per-
sonal items purchased by
tourists in some Caribbean
nations, the report said.

Others indirectly fall prey
to nets put down for other
sealife, often drowning in the
process.

“Protection measures for

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marine turtles are extremely
patchy — turtles may be
adequately protected in
some waters, but then travel
into areas where they are at
risk from unmanaged or ille-
gal take,” said Steven Broad,
TRAFFIC’s executive direc-
tor.

Turtle eggs generally
enjoy greater protection
than the animals themselves.
It is against the law to take
turtle eggs in the Bahamas.
However, in Guatemala, vir-
tually every egg laid is
picked up for human con-
sumption, the report states.

The report recommends
the establishment of scien-
tifically-based limits on the
exploitation of marine tur-
tles, comprehensive surveys
to quantify exploitation,
monitoring and awareness
programmes, more clearly
defined laws and better
national and regional law
enforcement.







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THE TRIBUNE



Carl Bethel

Much work
to be done
on COB’s
university
status bid

Minister of Education
Carl Bethel told MPs dur-
ing the budget debate that
much remains to be done at
the College of the Bahamas
before “any credible transi-
tion” to university status can
be made.

COB will continue to
receive “strong financial
support” from this admin-
istration, he said.

Of the $6.7 million
increase in its government
provided recurrent budget,
about 56 per cent, or $3.8
million, is provided to satis-
fy personal emoluments.

“The remaining $3 mil-
lion will be used to improve
the college’s capital assets,
which will be necessary if
that institution is to make
the complete transition to
the level of a full-fledged
university,” he said.

The government will also
contribute $1 million to the
construction of a new
library for the college.

Mr Bethel maintained
that much remains to be
done before any credible
transition to university sta-
tus can be made.

| “The proposed new
library must be built, and
critical decisions have to be
made as to the location and

building of the new science |

labs,” Mr Bethel said.

While great improve-
ments had been made in
increasing the number of
lecturers who had obtained
doctorate degrees, he said,
greater effort was still
required to encourage and
assist even more Bahami-
ans to achieve doctoral
degrees.

“Additionally, greater
exposure and training of lec-
turers through the facilita-
tion of academic sabbaticals
to other more established
institutions of higher learn-
ing are necessary to broaden
and deepen the academic
experience of lecturers,” he
said.

The minister told parlia-
mentarians that the govern-
ment will work closely with
the COB council to assist in
securing financing for the
new Harry Moore Library,
“and to seek ways to finance
and/or to facilitate the con-
sidered needs for the fur-
ther development of the
several campuses of the col-
lege both in Nassau and in
Freeport over the coming
years.”













LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007, PAGE 3

Man is charged with



20 year-old’s murder

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Distraught
family and friends of Roselyn
Louis gathered at the Adminis-
trator’s Building in Eight Mile

Rock on Friday for the arraign-
ment of a 32-year-old man
accused of Louis’ murder.

Leon Romeo Rahming, of
Deadman’s Reef, appeared in

Bahamia

the Eight Mile Rock Magis-
trate’s Court before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson.

Rahming is charged with
murdering Louis, a 20-year-old
resident of Hepburn Town,
Eight Mile Rock, on June 11.

According to reports, Louis
was at work when she was dis-
covered lying on the floor in a
pool of blood with a severe
wound to the body on Monday

afternoon.

She was taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where she
died the next day in the inten-
sive care unit.

Louis’ death is the seventh
homicide recorded on Grand
Bahama this year.

During the arraignment, the
prosecution alleged that on
June 11, Rahming, while at
Bartlette Hill, Eight Mile Rock,

intentionally caused the death
of Roselyn Louis by means of
unlawful harm.

It is further alleged that, on
the same date, time and place,
while armed with an offensive
instrument, a knife, Rahming
robbed “Keeping Babies Cov-
ered Until Two Store” of
$198.95 in cash, the property of
Alford Smith.

Rahming was not represented ©

by legal counsel. He was not
required to enter a plea to the
charges, which are indictable
offences.

The prosecution has indicated
its intention to proceed in the

“matter by way of a vojuntary

bill of indictment.

Magistrate Ferguson
adjourned the matter lo Sep-
tember 6 and remanded Rah-
ming to Fox Hill Prison.

n mud germs may produce



anti-cancer products, say scientists

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Bahamian mud has been
found to contain bacterium
which could be a producer of
natural antibiotics and anti-can-
cer products, according to US
scientists.

The revelation, which has
received international press
attention, came following the
completion of genome sequenc-
ing on the salinispora tropica
bacterium, first discovered in

shallow ocean sediment off the
Bahamas in 1991.

According to researchers, it
is anticipated that further work
on the bacterium could lead to
the isolation of potent mole-
cules the organism naturally
produces for its own chemical
defence when scavenging and
to communicate.

"By sequencing salinispora
tropica we are now able to look
in greater detail at this organism
and potentially pull out some
of the other compounds from

the gene clusters that may make
highly potent anti-cancer
agents," said Bradley Moore of
the Scripps Institution of
Oceanography.

Scientists from that institu-
tion and the Skaggs School of
Pharmacy at the University of
California-San Diego joined the
US Joint Genome Institute in
working constantly on the bac-
terium.

Compounds produced by
salinispora have already shown
promise in treating cancer.

Man flown to Florida
after speed boat crash

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT —- An Abaco
man was airlifted to a Florida

hospital following a serious

boating accident at Hope Town,
Abaco, on Thursday evening.
_Chad Thompson, 22, a resi-
dent of Hope Town, was dri-
ving his speedboat around 8pm
in the dark from Marsh Har-
bour when he missed the
entrance channel into Hope

Historical
Society set
to meet

’ The Bahamas Historical Soci-
ety will hold its next meeting
on Thursday, June 21.

At the meeting, “Remem- |

bering the Contract”, a 1993
ZNS TV documentary will be
shown.

The documentary gives the
society the opportunity to utilise
its new multi-media equipment
and highlight the importance of
oral history.

The historian behind the pro-
ject, Ms Tracey Tremaine, who
teaches history at the College
of the Bahamas, will answer
questions.

Happy father’s (Day

to the world’s greatest

father and grandtather|

7

Greetings from wife, Althea; children,
Edward Jr & Francine, Valretta & Sean,
Christopher, Christina and especially
granddaughter, Edneka.

GOD BLESS YOU ALWAYS

Town harbour.

The vessel crashed into rocks
at full speed and was badly
damaged.

Thompson sustained serious
injuries to his right leg and was
helped back to Marsh Harbour,
where he was treated at. the
government clinic.

He was later flown to hospital
in West Palm Beach, Florida,
for further medical treatment.

Marsh Harbour police are
investigating the incident.

In brief

The meeting is open to the
public and admission is free.

e For additional information,
contact the society at
info @bahamashistoricalsoci-
ety.com.

Credit
union to
stage 27th
AGM

The Public Workers’ Co-
operative Credit Union Limited
will hold its 27th annual meeting
at 6.30pm on Friday, June 22,
at the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel. Refreshments will be
provided.





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CONSTRUCTION WORKERS JOB FAIR

NASSAU FREEPORT
KENDAL G.L. ISAACS FOSTER B. PESTAINA CENTER
GYMNASIUM CHRIST THE KING CHURCH
JUNE 18TH AND 19TH JUNE 21ST
8 A.M. - 4 P.M. 8 A.M. - 4 P.M.
All eligible Bahamian Workers will be Skill Categories Include:
registered and interviewed. - Carpenter
- Dry Waller
Local and international contractors working - Mason
on the project will later select the workers - Roofer

that are needed before construction

begins.

The Application form will be available at
‘om for those islands other |

Www DCNGITCrLC

than New Providence and Grand Bahama.

Professionally Trained
Bahamians are also
encouraged to apply as:
- Project Manager

- Project Engineer

- General Superintendent

- Superintendent

W



VW BAHAM/

- Sheet Metal Worker

- Plumber
- Insulator

- Electrician

- Plasterer / Painter

- Crane / Truck Operator
- Field Foreman

- Heavy Equipment Operator
- Iron Worker

- Welder

- Landscaper
- Tiler / Carpet Layer
- Safety Officer
PAGE 4, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Billy Graham’s soul mate dies

MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) — On a recent vis-
it to Ruth and Billy Graham’s beloved home in
the western North Carolina mountains, her local
pastor recalled, the world’s most renowned evan-
gelist fumbled the words to the 23rd Psalm —
one of his wife’s favourites.

As she had so many times before, Ruth Gra-
ham quickly corrected her husband.

It was yet another little reminder of the role
Ruth Graham played as her husband’s closest
confidant, the Rev. Richard White said. The first
lady of evangelical Protestantism, she undoubt-
edly was an equal partner in a ministry that Bil-
ly Graham carried to presidents and peasants
alike during a spectacular global career that
placed him in the pulpit before more than 210
million people.

“She had the ability to move among presi-
dents and leaders, but then turn right around
and clean thé’ oven of a widow,” White said.

Former President George H'W. Bush remem-
bered her as “a wonderful, kind and wise woman
who brightened all our lives.”

Nancy Reagan described her as a friend to
her and late President Reagan and an extraor-
dinarily caring woman who was devoted to her
family. “I admired the fact that she also found the
time to care about other children and those less
fortunate through her work as an author, poet
and philanthropist,” she said. “I know Billy’s
heart will be broken with this loss.”

A daughter of Presbyterian missionaries who
surrendered dreams of such work in Tibet after
meeting Billy Graham, Ruth Graham died
‘Thursday at her home, surrounded by her hus-
band and their five children. Shé- was 87.

“Ruth was my life partner, and we were called
by God as a team,” Billy Graliam said in a state-
ment. “No one else could have: borne the load
that she carried. She was a vital and integral part
of our ministry, and my work through the years
would have been impossible without her encour-
agement and support.

“I am so grateful to the Lord that he gave me
Ruth, and especially for these last few years

we’ve had in the mouutains together. We’ve .

rekindled the romance of our youth, and my
love for her continued to grow deeper every day.
I will miss her terribly, and look forward even
more to the day I can join her in Heaven.”
Ruth Graham had been bedridden for months
with degenerative osteoarthritis of the back and
neck — the result of a serious fall from a tree in
1974 while fixing a swing for grandchildren. She
underwent treatment for pneumonia two weeks
ago. At her request, and in consultation with

Assistant Manager.
Position Available Immediately |
At ,
Domino’s Pizza

Qualifications:

¢ You should have a High School Diploma

e Past managerial experience
° Certificate in Management is a plus

¢ Must be available for day and night shifts,

including weekends

e You should demonstrate strong communication,
leadership, motivational and people management

skills

e You should have a valid driver’s license
e You must have a GREAT attitude towards

customer service!

Basic responsibility to include:

e Maintain product, service and image standard
¢ To assist in supervision of all phases of

production.

° To maintain a hi gh level of efficiency &
productivity in all areas of store operation

Please send résumé on or before

Attention: Human Resource Department

PG. Box.SS-6704- .
Nassau, Bahamas
Or Fax 356-7855



her family, she had stopped receiving nutrients
through a feeding tube for the last few days, said
family spokesman Larry Ross.

The family has planned a public memorial ser-
vice for 2 p.m. today at the Montreat Conference
Centre. A private interment service will be held
the next day in Charlotte.

Ruth Graham grew up in China, where her
father, L. Nelson Bell, headed the Presbyterian
hospital in Qingjiang. She spent three high school
years in what’s now North Korea.

She met Billy Graham at Wheaton College in
Illinois, where he managed to coax her away
from the foreign missions calling and into mar-
riage after they graduated in 1943. In 1945, after
a brief stint pastoring a suburban Chicago con-
gregation, he became a roving speaker for the.
fledgling Youth for Christ organization.

Ruth Graham moved the couple into her par-
ents’ home in Montreat, where they had relo-
cated after fleeing wartime China, and they lat-
er bought their own home across the street
before moving into Little Piney Cove. It was a
comfortably rustic mountainside home she
designed using logs from abandoned cabins, and
became Billy’s retreat between evangelistic for-
ays.

“My father would not have been what he is
today if it wasn’t for my mother,” said her son
Franklin, who now heads the Billy Graham
Evangelist Association.

“She stood strong for what was biblically cor-
rect and accurate. She would help my father pre-
pare his messages, listening with an attentive
ear, and if she saw something that wasn’t right or
heard something that she felt wasn’t as strong as
it could be, she was a voice to strengthen this or
eliminate that. Every person needs that kind of
input in their life, and she was that to my father.”

Though the wife of a famous Baptist minister,
Ruth Graham declined to undergo baptism by
immersion and remained a lifelong Presbyter-
ian. When in Montreat, a town built around a
Presbyterian conference centre, Billy Graham
would attend the Presbyterian church where his
wife often taught the college-age Sunday School
class.-

Due to her husband’s travels, she bore major
responsibility for raising the couple’s five chil-
dren: Franklin (William Franklin III), Nelson,
Virginia, Anne and Ruth. Sne endured her hus-
band’s frequent absences, but once remarked,
“Td rather have a little of Bill than a lot of any
other man.’

(This article was written by Associated Press
writer Mike Baker).



Peed) aD

‘Chest’ get |
these signs :
off island.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I SHALL be grateful if you
would publish this letter in your
paper in order to bring the sub-
ject matter to the attention of
the proper Government author-
ity. The 2007 general elections
are now history and I am
pleased to see that many of the
election posters have come
down. This letter is not directed
at election posters.

It has always been my under-
standing that to put up a sign
on government or private prop-
erty (you may correct me if |
am wrong) requires permission
from the relevant department
of the Ministry of Works. Even
putting up a sign in front of your
business establishment requires
such permission (I am not refer-
ring to, for example, a “For
Sale” or “For Rent” sign in
front of the subject property).

New Providence has been
covered with all kinds of signs
advertising the sale of land,
goods and services. Some one in
particular has littered the island
with signs that read “Open

Concerned by




LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



House Exclusive Waterfront
Condos and Marina call----”.
What are these people doing?
Instead of advertising in a dig-
nified way, eg in newspapers,
brochures, TV and radio or
through realtors, they have put
up a great number of these signs
on trees, walls, utility poles, at
roundabouts, at hotel exits, at
the top of the hill, at the bottom
of the hill, and around the bend.
They have even put one-sign up
that covers a traffic sign that
reads “Dual Carriageway” at
the western end of the Sandy-
Port Bridge...wow! Pretty bold!
These people may not realise
it but these signs are having a
negative affect on many people
who have to look at them every
time they drive the main roads.
Then there are signs that read if
you “want you house or Apt
paint call -------- ”, and “Sanco
car rentals call-----”, and ““Time-

less Tools rentals call----- ;
“Generators for sale call --------
-”, and “Justice of the Peace
and Marriage Officer call -------
-”, and on and on. The new sign
going up all over the Island
reads “Supply eee
Direct call --------- USA
number.

These signs plastered all over
the place take away from the
natural beauty of our Island. It
seems to be a free-for-all and
out of control. If one wants to
advertise simply produce a cou-

- ple hundred signs and inundate

the landscape. Perhaps the rel-
evant Government authority
will look into this situation and
if indeed these signs are unau-
thorised and unapproved they
can be taken down and any
offenders fined since a phone
contact has been provided.
Many thanks for the opportu-
nity.

I have now got this off my
chest.

CY NOFF

Nassau,
May, 2007.

‘look’

of planned projects

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Kudos to Larry Smith for
bringing to the fore, the plight
of Nassau’s fast disappearing
historic buildings which help
define what is Bahamian, in
your recent supplement — “An
appeal for the Heart of Nas-
sau”.

Hopefully this will prompt
some positive action from the
owners and perhaps some reac-
tion from the public.

I suggest The Tribune con-
tinue a weekly “featured prop-
erty” as there are many more
eyesores which need tackling.

This supplement prompted
me to write this letter and ask:
“What will the Bahamas look
like in 10, 20 or 30 yes from
now?”

I am very songerned that
there appears to be little con-
cern for the architectural look
of planned projects throughout
our country.

As a realtor J have seen
many of the plans and visited

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KEVENS PIERRE of MARSH"
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any

person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th
day of JUNE, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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CREDIT CARDS

many of the sites of new resorts
which will define our landscape.
In numerous cases there is an
absolute disregard for building
in our traditional island-style.
There are some notable excep-

tions such as the French Leave .

Resort in Governor’s Harbour,
Eleuthera, the Chub Cay devel-
opment in the Berry islands and
February Point in Exuma to
name a few which do reflect our
Bahamian style.

I recently attended a “focus
group” which examined the
plans of the Ritz Carlton devel-
opment on Rose island. I was
shocked as the plans were
unveiled showing a 7-storey rec-
tangular box which was touted
as “contemporary and forward
thinking which answered the
call of today’s buyers.”

I applaud Ritz Carlton for
hosting this focus group and
hope that they re-think their
plans to build a decidedly un-
Bahamian hotel and residential
community on a gem of a very
Bahamian island.

When one travels to Nan-
tucket or Martha’s Vineyard

you expect to see Salt Box
architecture with weathered
cedar shingled buildings, in
Indonesia one expects to see
shaggy-thatched island
dwellings. When one travels to
the Bahamas what does the
traveller expect to find?

What do we want to see as
Bahamians ?

Our traditional architecture
while defining our Bahamian-
ism also just makes sense, as it
provides shade with large over-
hangs, wrap around verandahs
with large openings to take
advantage of cooling breezes.

Why are the communities of
Harbour island and Hope Town
booming? ....because of their
island charm!

Contemporary designs
become dated — our island style
will always be classic.

Town planners, Architects,
Developers, Bahamians — let’s
get it together!

KEN CHAPLIN
Nassau,
June 13, 2007

The reasons for
the PLP’s defeat

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ALLOW me to congratulate
the voters of the Bahamas for a
job well done and on the level
of maturity and intelligence in
the recent elections.

I am so proud of my people.
However there’s some concern
for the voters of Golden Gates,
Fox Hill, Kennedy and North
Andros.

What does this say about
most of the voters in these
areas?

Permit me to give my views
on why the PLP lost.

1) Spitefulness, victimisation,
intimidation,

2) Unfair practices towards
the FNM and their supporters,
eg, ZNS and venues for their
rallies, eg, the circus and R M
Bailey Park.

3) Bold-face, brazen lies,
honestly, these people are unbe-
lievable!

4) Algernon Allen, Ten-
nyson Wells, Cargill, Rolle,

Dupuch ad nauseum, etc.

5) Immature and infantile
mentality.

6) They were too secretive
with the people’s business.

7) Only PLPs benefited
from the “robust economy?” or
anything else.

8) Steve McKinney and
Phillipa Russell of ZNS.

9) Tried to insult the peo-
ple’s intelligence, but it back-
fired.

10) Their arrogance and dis-
honesty.

11) The many scandals they
subjected the country to and
saw nothing wrong with it.
Don’t seem to understand right
from wrong.

12) Christie’s shuffle, kind of
like “while Nero fiddled, Rome
burned.

They shot themselves in foot,
ie, when they weren’t putting it
in their mouth.

D GRAY

Nassau,

2007.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007, PAGE 5



A KOREAN War veteran in
his late seventies yesterday
called for an end to speculation
which, he claimed, was casting
suspicion on him as the infa-
mous Alcatraz escapee,
Clarence Anglin.

He urged Nassau artist Fred-
die Pinder Jr to stop his “cam-
paign of persecution”, adding:
“This is causing me a whole
bunch of trouble.”

American Mr Bob Thornton,
77, who lives in eastern Grand
Bahama, said Mr Pinder’s wide-
ly proclaimed theories about
the Alcatraz prison escape of
1962 had led to police knock-
ing on his door several times.

And on every occasion, he
said, they had dismissed Mr Pin-

der’s suspicions that he was —

somehow linked-to the daring
escape plot from the notorious
island-fortress in San Francisco
Bay.

“Believe it or not, I can’t even
swim,” Mr Thornton told The
Tribune yesterday. “I’ve never
even met this guy Pinder. I
don’t know what his gimmickry
is all about, but he is insulting
everybody and making out I’m
a murderer.”

In fact, none of The Tribune’s
stories relating to Mr Pinder’s
theories has named anyone as
the man Mr Pinder believes is
Clarence Anglin. But Mr
Thornton — known affection-
ately as ‘Daddy Bob’ to friends
— says other media outlets.have
been more explicit, and he is
the one who has fallen under
suspicion.

“That guy John Walsh of
America’s Most Wanted even
had the police on to me one
time,” said Mr Thornton. “But
all these stories about me are
untrue.”

In fact, he said, ‘ie first
arrived in the Bahamas in 1957
and bought seven acres of

Meyer. Ve

orean war veteran
urges end to Alcatraz
escape ‘persecution’

Grand Bahama resident
says claims ‘causing me a
whole bunch of trouble’

waterfront land on Grand
Bahama in 1960.

In 1962, when the Alcatraz
prison breakout occurred, he
was employed at AUTEC in
Andros, having quit the US Air
Force two years before.

He said he could prove his
identity through his fingerprints,
which were on file in Washing-
ton, DC, because at one time
he had top secret security clear-
ance through his work for the
American government.

He said Mr Pinder’s claims
were causing him problems
because people were “kind of
edgy” when he referred to
Clarence Anglin having mur-
dered his two co-escapees in
1969.

“People are talking because
they feel I fit. Everyone knows
me up here. But I was here in
1960 (two years before the
Alcatraz escape) and was work-
ing for the US Navy at AUTEC
at the time.

“After I left AUTEC in 1973,
I worked for the Bahamas gov-
ernment as a civil servant until
1992. By making these claims,
Mr Pinder is insulting every-

body — the US embassy, the ©

Bahamas government, the
police who he says have been
taking bribes from me for years,
and everybody else associated
with me.”

Referring to Mr Pinder’s
claims that Anglin had financed
his life in the Bahamas with
spoils from his days as a bank
robber, he said: “I am not a
wealthy man. I have a Bahamas

government pension and a few
investments. I am not a multi-
millionaire.

“I own this property and |
own a house in Nassau which
is at Oakes Field. My wife is a
Bahamian from Long Island. I
ain’t no escapee from Alcatraz.”

“That guy
John Walsh
even had the
police on to
me one time.”



Both Mr Thornton and his
friend, Clarence Billot, a pho-
tolab owner in Grand Bahama,
think Mr Pinder has ulterior
motives for his claims which
centre on former Pinder land.

Mr Thornton said he bought
his Grand Bahama property
from a man called Saul Pinder
nearly half a century ago. His
deeds were recorded in the reg-
istry and handled by a lawyer.
He believes Mr Pinder’s cam-
paign is somehow linked with
his ownership of former Pinder
land.

Mr Bellot agreed. “But now
it’s time to leave him alone.
They have already called in the
police and FBI. He is almost 80
now and hobbles around. To
him, it’s a big joke, and he pre-

oo

aS his Family would like

to say thank you

to oa our family and friends,

‘as well as the general public
who supported us.

tends it doesn’t bother him. But
enough is enough. Bob is defi-
nitely not their man — J would
put my head on the block for
that.”

He also dismissed Mr Pin-
der’s claim that Clarence Anglin
shot his two fellow fugitives, his
brother John Anglin and escape
plot leader Frank Morris, after
they had been living on Grand
Bahama for seven years.

Mr Pinder claimed Anglin
strapped the bodies in a jeep
and tugged it into the centre of
a muddy creek,, where it was
washed up after Hurricane
Floyd 30 years later.

“But those creeks are so shal-
low, it would be impossible to
hide a jeep in there,” he said.

“The story, I agree, has Hol-
lywood written all over it, but
my issue is that the Pinders con-
tinue to call into talk shows and
various other media proclaim-
ing that Clarence Anglin still
lives in the East End. As a
result of their rantings, they
have had the police fingerprint
and harass a man who is very
dear to me.

“I myself have been doing

business here in Grand Bahama

for the last 21 years and I have a
problem with these fairy tales.
They are causing Daddy Bob
and his wife much inconve-
nience in their retirement
years.”

Mr Pinder’s theories about °

the Alcatraz breakout were dis-
cussed in last Monday’s
INSIGHT section in The Tri-
bune.

nae
EXTERMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157





_ dents, a position that saw him representing 400 medical students.




















Mr Taylor is pictured being installed as a member of the student
government by the deputy principal Professor Kochhar at the St
Augustine University of the West Indies.

Ex-COB student
head in UWI first

MACHALE Taylor, former College of the Bahamas Union
of Students (COBUS) president and 2005 ‘youth in parlia-
ment’ speaker, became the first Bahamian student to serve as
an executive for the student government at ae St Augustine
University of the West Indies.

Mr Taylor is currently going into his second year.of medical
school at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad.

He was elected guild secretary, making him the third most
influential student in the university which consists of over
15,000 students.

Elections were held in April and he received 866 votes. He is
also the first, first-year student to win the position.

In September 2007, Mr Taylor transferred to the St Augus-
tine campus from the Cave Hill campus after completing the
pre-medical programme with honours.

Continuing his push to give students a voice, Mr Taylor was
elected as the student representative for first-year medical stu-

Shortly after he was elected deputy hall chair of the Joyce
Gibson Innis Hall, the medical student’s hall of residence.







Used Cars for Sale
Mercedes, Nissan, BMW
also Used restaurant
equipment and other scrap metals

forsale
For more information call
Mr. Peter at: 326-1296 or
322-8833










9



SG Gab tibial

choice... duct tape, plywood or

hurricane shutters.

Shutters are definitely the way to go...
For one day only, Commonwealth Bank is
teaming up with Aluminum Fabricators,
Commonwealth Buiiding Supplies,
Palincia Manufacturing, Storm Guard
Shutter Company and Marlin Marine to
transform our Wulff Road Branch parking
lot into your “Hurricane Central”.
Purchase everything from generators,

shutters to supplies.

veRalaians not

as ]

[2007 Croan

SAT., JUNE 16th

This Saturday, Commonwealth Bank will
get you prepared for what this season has
in store by offering interest rates as low
%, and repayment terms that
won't cause financial damage!

COMMONWEALTH BANK
“Leader in Personal Banking Services”

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AURORA eee Oe

@ Uy Road Branch Parking Lot


.GE 6, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007

) Helping the Bahamas

dance to a new tune





\ IBASSADOR designate of Israel Yosef Livne presented his letters of credence to Governor

ELEray envoy presents letters



noral Arthur D Hanna at Government House on Thursday.



BIS photo: ‘Tim Aylen





Defence Force officer
‘inishes training course

LIEU TENANT Clinton D
son returned to Nassau fol-
ins successful completion of

sis month course with the

‘ha company of The Basic

school, USMC, in Quantico,
V iwginia.

‘The demanding course was

oken down into four phases,

uprising intensive academic
struction, immediately fol-
wed by practical instruction

d culminating with a week-

ve field exercise for each

Hlase.

During the field exercises,

licers were evaluated in the

’ CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921

» SUNDAY, JUNE 17TH, 2007

sae 11:30. a.m. $

“Socior David Cartwright of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
No Evening Service

“FTAPPY FATHER’S DAY TO ALL FATHER’S”

Bibie Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread S| 10:45 am.

® Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. « Evening Ser
e Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wed heece. :

4 \_2 Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month) |

ma t BBE see

—

rR enn an seme a

—

i fo

28 rae.



PomAgeA
Te

FATHER’S DAY

11:00AM

Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM

Bernard Road
11:00AM

Zion Boulevard

BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
P.O. Box SS-51 03, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393- 3726/393- 9355/Fax: 393-8135 ©

iugaseg CHURCH SERVICES
ra SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2007

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey

" ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,

Rev. Dr. Laverne. Lockhart

|) COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Ms. Janice Knowles

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

leadership roles as well as abil-
ity to follow directives in fatigu-
ing and distressing conditions.
Every officer was trained to
tan belt status in the USMC
martial arts programme and
received rifle qualifications.

The programme is designed —

to produce infantry officers
who are trained to think and
react practically when presented
with any situation.

Lieutenant Clinton John-
son’s performance distinguished
him from his classmates and
earned a letter of appreciation
from the commanding officer

~aker:

00 pam.
























LIEUTENANT Clinton D Johnson

of The Basic School who con-
gratulated him for a job well
done in “representing your
home country of The Bahamas
very well...and creating a posi-
tive learning environment for
the United States marines
around you.”

MR ALEX Zybine began his
tenure in the Bahamas through
an invitation from Mr Hubert
Farrington, director of the Nas-
sau Civic Ballet.

In 1970, he was offered a
teaching position by the Min-
istry of Education to teach
dance at the C C Sweeting
Senior High School where he
worked for two years.

It was here that Mr Zybine
met and taught many of his stu-
dents. Meanwhile, Lady Nancy
Oakes, Baroness Von Hoynin-
gen Huene, offered the use of
the abandoned residence on
West Hill Street known as the
‘Villa Doyle’ as a centre for
artistic and cultural activities.

Mr Zybine invited the late
Kayla Lockhart Edwards and
Mr Cedrick Scott to use adja-
cent rooms as a base for musical
and drama rehearsal projects.

The ballroom was then reno-
vated by Mrs Violett Zybine for
dance classes. At this time, a
non-profit organisation was
formed and the core group of
dancers brainstormed until the
late Claxton McPhee came up
with the name “The New Breed
Dancers Ltd.” This group
brought credence to the
Bahamas in the dance arena.

Classes were, given by Mr
Zybine daily and free of charge,
the aim being to promote the
art of dance within the Bahami-
an Community.

This group drew all of its
financial support through per-
formances, engagements and
tours. In 1974, the group num-
bered close to 75 participants.

At this time, the Minister of
Education was the late Liv-
ingston Coakley, who made a
major impact in the lives of the
core group of dancers that rep-
resented the Bahamas both
nationally and internationally,
namely:

Lawrence Carrol, Ednol
Wright, Roderick Johnson,
Clarkston McPhee, Alistair But-
ler, Anne Marie Smith Whar-
ton, Victoria McIntosh Josey,
Rosella Darling Armbrister,
Paula Knowles, Christina
Forbes Johnson, Kim Pinder,
Kermit Munnings, Alistair But-
ler (deceased), Oswald Mor-
timer, Sylan Storr,and José
Suarez (Silver Prince), who





Sunday School: 10am
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:

ll Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills e Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622





Grace Fie Peace Wesleyan oT tT Te
PETIA MMM ACM Lr eM meee el

North America

Prayer Time:

Worship Time: fla.m. & 7p.m.
10:15a.m. to 10;45a.m.
Church School during Worship Service







THE TRIBUNE



Alex and Violet Zybine

became the assistant to produc-
tion.

The talented Bahamian Mr
Clement Bethel (deceased) also
played a major role in the lives
of most of the dancers. He
assisted the group with musical
scores and music that he per-
sonally produced and com-
posed. His humour and down-
to-earth personality made it eas-
ier for all to work together.

Other dancers at the Villa
Doyle from time to time includ-
ed Daphne Mortimer, Rosita
Nairn Ali, Eleanor Rolle, Van-
ria Darling Edwards, Yvette
Stuart, Katherine Higgs Cun-
ningham, Julie Hart, Kevin and
Keith Kemp, Debbie Johnson,
Dorothy Lewis, Donna Bowe,
Gertrude Gardiner, Dave
Dixon, Davan, Edward Pe’pe
Johnson, Fredrica Grant Jime-
niez, along with many others.

Violet Zybine was the critic
and seamstress for the group.
Her input was an invaluable
asset to her husband’s success.
Jean Collins was also a valuable
asset as wardrobe mistress.

The group’s first performance
was at the Sheraton British
Colonial Hotel, then the Gov-
ernment High School, where
the famous Folklore Shows
were held.

At the beginning of 1972 the
Ministry of Tourism offered the
New Breed Dancers, the
Lucayan Chorale directed by
Virginia Roach, John Chippie
Chipman’s Junkanoo Group,
Clement Bethel, Billy Nelson
and Bob Brome the opportuni-
ty to pftoduce the Folklore
Shows.

This lasted until 1975. Other
participants included Nathanial
(Natty Small), Shirley Wright,
Pandora Gibson, Pat Rahming,
The Dicey Doh Singers, Sweet
Exorcist Band and others.

In June, 1995, under the
sponsorship of the Ministry Of
Tourism, ‘Misa Caribe” was

produced at “Le Cabaret The-
atre” on Paradise Island. Music
was composed, written and pro-

duced by Cleophas Adderley
Jr, The New Breed Dancers
performed, including the chil-
dren of the Zybines (Nadia and
Olivia), and the Renaissance
Singers.

This major event was held
under the patronage of the
Right Rev Michael Eldon, Lord
Bishop’ of Nassau in the
Bahamas and the Rev Mon- ©
signor Preston Moss.

The New Breed Dancers core
group performed successful
tours throughout Detroit, Pitts-
burgh, Chicago, Cleveland, Ger-
many, Washington, New
Orleans, Jamaica, Canada,
Mexico and participated in Car-
ifesta and Carnival.

These dancers also partici-
pated with many others on Clif-
ford Park when The Bahamas
became independent on July 10,
1973.

When Flora Lojekova from
the Ryerson Polithechnical
Institute of Toronto, Canada,
visited the School of Dance
through the invitation of Mrs
Violet Zybine, she chose
Lawrence Carroll, Oswald Mor-
timer, Roderick Johnson and
Ednol Wright to study in Cana-
da.

Other dancers who studied
abroad were Christina, Victo-
ria, Paula and Chiquita. With
the assistance of family and
friends, or a scholarship from
the Ministry of Education, these
dancers were able to support
themselves when Alex and his
family returned to Mexico.

Rosella went into education,
Kim into the clothing industry
and Anne moved to the USA.

Alex’s last wish was for the
dancers to remain together and
to carry on the legacy. This was
done.

This month, Alex and Violet
Zybine were invited back to the
Bahamas.

Presentations were made and
appreciation showy by the Min-
istry of Education Youth Sports
and Culture along with the
dancers themselves.



Mrs. Minerva Knowles
No Service




















10:00AM
# 7:00PM








Place: Twynam Heights

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH, off Prince Charles Drive

East Shirley Street : se

11:00AM Rev. Bill Owens
7:00PM Rev. Bill Owens



Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH, :
Queen’s College Campus

| 9:30AM Rev. James Neilly

P.O_Box S8-5631 = eat es
w

ORSHIP AND MINISTRY |











ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue Telephone number: 324-2538
1 8:00AM Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs ate gs a ne
I 9:30AM felefax number: 324-2587

Rev. Philip Stubbs SUNDAY SERVICES

8.30 a.m.












TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street ee ; Morning Worship Service .......
(1 11:00AM Rev. Stephen Yelland COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE Sunday School for allages... 9.45 a.m.
OUT oo SED SOC ie ces leh io audi nner Adutt Education eR Sere eee ee 9.45 am,
RADIO PROGRAMMES : , Worship S@IViC@ vo ccccceees 11.00 a.m.
RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1 ; SPANISH SENVICE Voces 2.00 p.m.
Your Host: Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH Evening Worship Service w...... 6.30 om. :

‘METHODIST MOMENTS!’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart

Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future
Your Host:

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
selective Biole Teaching

Royal Rangers {Boys Club) 4-16 yrs
Missionettes (Girls Cluj 4-16 yis.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY

Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS | -

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE,

Assembly Of God

FNC ALR Um Cue Uc Meelis
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793, P.O. Box: N-1566

eo de aioe dake ee oof ak OS OO GG aC Ck rr fk foi ak aE
The BCMC ts ies ised to announce the publication ofa book containing
short studies highlighting the beliefs and practices of the Methodist
Church. Copies are available through the Confernce Office: 1-9
copies. $8.00 per book. Order of 10 or more copies $6.00 per book.

Worship Time: Jam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping
aa Center TEMPLE TIME
i Grant’s Town Weslep Methodist Church

(Baillou Hill Ad & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, JUNE 17TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Sis. Marilyn Tinker
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Women’s Fellowship
7:00 p.m. Bro. Rev. Carla Culmer/Board of Property

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on

Joy 101.9 at 8:30am

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs



uc ae



' eel en Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007, PAGE 7







Chef Christopher Chea, executive chef for

Tisca Pratt-Armbrister a tasie of what to expect from Shetcat

6 Ss up | for another round of creative and educational fun.
: The Bored Artist Summer Camp program at the Earth & Fire
_ Pottery Studio teaches kids ages 8 - 16 about pottery and |
_ painting. their own masterpieces by using unique pottery

Sheraton Cable Beach Reswit. «

, gles zing concepts and techniques.

* Painting distinctive stoneware valued at over $130

Camp Week Includes:

* Daily encounters and activities — including a





Club Rush Session!

A light snack and a drink each day
* Painting supplies, studio time and kiln firing
Customized sessions on pottery, painting

techniques and glazes.

A special gift for all camp graduates.

June 25 — 29, 2007

Monday — Friday

9:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m.

Registration required.

Balance due first day of class.



Bahamas @ Sunrise host
1s restaurants.







_ Located in the Beach Tower next to Seagrapes
Call: 363-2000 ext. 63122 for more information

ATLAN TISs



LOCAL NEWS

Bahamas @ Sunrise, the
country’s only live television
morning show, featured top
executives of Baha Mar and
Sheraton Cable Beach on Mon-
day to highlight the re-flagging
of Radisson Cable Beach and
Golf Resort to Sheraton, a
brand of the Starwood Hotels
and Resorts.

Baha Mar Resorts Ltd.,
together with Starwood Hotels
and Resorts Worldwide Inc.,
marked the official opening of
the new Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort with a flag-raising cere-
mony.

Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation Neko Grant was part of
this ceremony. The resort is
expected to play an instrumen-
tal role in boosting tourism in
Nassau.

Monday’s Bahamas @Sunrise
show was broadcast live from
the newly-refurbished Sheraton
Cable Beach Resort, where
senior executives discussed what
persons should expect from the
resort.

Additionally, there was a culi-
nary demonstration by Christo-
pher Chea, executive chef for
Sheraton.

Don Robinson, president of
Baha Mar Resorts, described
the style of the Sheraton as
being one of “barefoot ele-
gance.”

Half of the hotel has been
refurbished, which includes
about 350 rooms, the restau-
rants, the lobbies, the lounges
and pool and beach areas. He
said the east wing and the con-
vention centre are presently
being refurbished and the entire
hotel will be completed by
December.

“It’s intended to be a place
where guests will come, and

knowing the Sheraton’s stan-.

dards and the level of service
all around the world will expect
it will be repeated here in The
Bahamas,” said Mr Robinson.

Mr Robinson explained that
Sheraton’s staff had undergone
training where they were
instructed on service and stan-



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Price includes licensing and inspection to birthday,
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Don Robinson, president of Baha Mar Resorts, and Robert Sands,
senior vice-president government and external affairs Baha Mar and
Cable Beach Resorts, share a light moment with Bahamas @ Sunrise
host Tisca Pratt-Armbrister during the show.

dards, as well as how they wel-
come and greet guests. He said
the hotel’s restaurants had been
going through test meals and
developing other menus.

Christopher Chea, who pre-
pared Gamberi di Amici (large
shrimp scampi), on Bahamas @
Sunrise, said the resort features
three major restaurants. They
are the Amici, an Italian restau-
rant, The Dolphin Restaurant,
and the Bimini Market, an
international buffet.

Chef Chea explained that, at
the Amici Restaurant, the cook-
ing is “simple, but very tasty.”
At Bimini Market visitors can
choose cuisine from the grill sta-
tion; a flex station, where there
are stews, pasta and pizza; and
an oriental station for stir fry, or
Cantonese-style cooked foods.

“The Bimini Market and the
Dolphin Restaurant will feature
some Bahamian cuisine. At the
Dolphin Restaurant, there is

fresh conch salad made every

day, there are conch fritters,
cracked conch with peas and
rice, and conch chowder,” said
Chef Chea.

Robert Sands, senior vice-
president government and
external affairs, Baha Mar and
Cable Beach Resorts, said that

99 per cent of staff employed
at the Sheraton are Bahami-
ans.

He said that, based on the
multiplier effect, Bahamians
throughout the Bahamas would
benefit from “the prosperity
and the success of this particular
hotel.”

“The fact that we have quali-
ty rooms on line means that the
destination will be in a position
to attract a significant number
of guests with discretionary
income to our destination. Cer-
tainly, that is the fuel that gen-
erates the economic engine in
this country,” said Mr Sands.

Hans Altenhoff, general man-
ager of Sheraton Cable Beach.
Resort, said: “I am looking for-
ward to being a part of the
team, and together we will
make this the best Sheraton
Resort not only in The
Bahamas but also in North
America.”

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5:30pm



Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) * Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 267-2916
PAGE 8, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007

Supermarket
backs students
healthy eating

Julius Bar

Julius Baer, a leading global wealth manager is seeking to employ an experienced
professional to join their team as:

Chief Operations Officer

The main tasks of this position are:

Project Management: leadership and coordination of special projects

Coordinator between the Head Office in Zurich and the Nassau entity particularly
as it relates to implementing any new procedures/guidelines (out also reporting).

Coordinator for the implementation of the local guidelines

IT & Logistics: management, coordination and supervision of all related projects,
including IT supplies, management of the premises, archives .

Security Officer: Implementation of all Group standards related to Business
Continuity Plan and other related plans, and maintenance

Head of Finance: supervision of the Finance Dept and implementation of any
new Group guidelines

Head of Human Resources: supervision of the Human Resources Dept and
implementation of any Group procedures/new guidelines

The successful candidate will have:

Minimum 10 years experience in a Swiss Bank in a Senior position
MBA or equivalent

Strong managerial skills

Project leadership

Fluent in both English, French and German knowledge

Interested persons meeting the above criteria should apply in writing, on or before
June 25th, 2007 enclosing a full resumé with cover letter to:

BY MAIL:

Personal & Confidential
Resident Manager
P.O. Box N.- 4890
Nassau, Bahamas

BY HAND

Personal & Confidential

Resident Manager

Julius Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.
Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore,
East Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas







HATS OFF TO HEALTH: From left: Uriah McPhee principal Helen Simmons-Johnson; Dr Merceline Dahl-
Regis, Ministry of Health; Jannelle Curtis, 8 Weeks to Wellness participant; and Dr Idamae Hanna, Health

THE TRIBUNE






Ministries director of the BCSDA, present a plaque of appreciation to Peter Goudie, human resources man-
ager of Bahamas Supermarkets. Photo courtesy of Diane Phillips and Associates.

In a nation where obese

adults make up 60.4 per cent of |

the population and one in every
four children is considered
severely overweight, City Mar-
ket joined 120 students in a cel-

ebration of success following’

eight weeks of health transfor-
mations.

Since March 19, the 120 stu-
dents of Uriah McPhee Primary
School have been a part of the 8
Weeks to Wellness programme.

The children led their families
in practising proper eating
habits, exercising regularly and
building awareness of the
impact of lifestyle on choles-
terol and other health measures.

Students have also been
meeting weekly to get weighed
in, have their cholesterol
checked and participate in a
major exercise routine before
logging in their food and excise
achievements in a diary.

On Thursday, the children
and their families were recog-
nised in a graduation ceremony
at the school.

Bahamas Supermarkets Ltd.,
parent company of City Mar-
ket, partnered with Colinalm-
perial as platinum sponsors of
the programme titled: “Rais-
ing the Standard from Super-
Size Families to Super Healthy
Families.”

“When the 8 Weeks to Well-
ness programme was bought to
our attention we knew we had
to be a part of it,” said Peter
Goudie, human resources man-
ager of Bahamas Supermarkets.
“We used to say that it’s better
in the Bahamas, but if you look
at our population, I’m sure
you'll agree that it is bigger in
the Bahamas.

“In the Forbes health section
earlier this year, I came across a
rather alarming statistic. It was
revealed that the Bahamas is
ranked 39 out of 194 in the most
obese populations worldwide.
That is not something we ought
to be proud of.”

Goudie says he is heartbro-
ken when he sees mothers
handing their toddlers bottles

* except on red tagged and net items

filled with soda or sugar-based
drinks instead of pure fruit
juice, milk or water. He said it’s
even harder to watch families
sit with a heavy portion of
greasy chicken and fries then
wolf it down with a soda.

“JT enjoy peas and rice and

macaroni and fried chicken just

as much as the other guy but
not all on the same plate,”
admitted Goudie.

ave
learned to
choose a
healthier
lifestyle. I eat
more fruits,
drink more
water and
walk around
school .”



“Adults are for the most part
already set in their ways and it’s
hard to teach them to eat right.
It’s often said that the health of
the nation determines the
wealth of the nation. Today, as
I look at these successful grad-
uates, I am truly amazed at how
they not only implemented



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

| If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Too! Boxes
Oye fo [ole lam
Sta IKae XESS
Tool Sets

Share your news

these practices into their own
lifestyles but also convinced
their family members to join
them in a quest for a healthier
life.”

The results of the programme
were more than adequately
summed up by 10-year-old Jan-
nelle Curtis, who\says that her
life has changed since joining
it.

“TI have learned to choose a
healthier lifestyle,” said Curtis.
“TI eat more fruits, drink more
water and walk around the
school four to five times a day
with my friends to make sure
we are ail healthy. It’s not about
us losing a couple of pounds —
it’s about us living longer
healthier lives.

“T have my teachers and Dr
Hanna to thank for that. I also
thank City Market for our shirts
because it’s now like our exer-

cise uniform. Me and my class-

mates are going to continue
being healthy in the summer by
eating right and even exercise
when commercials come on |
during our favourite TV com-
mercials.”

The 8 Weeks to Wellness
programme is spearheaded by
the Adventist Health Profes-
sionals Association, is directed
by Idamae Hanna and involves
some 400 students in the fifth
grades at Uriah McPhee Pri-
mary, E P Roberts Primary and
two Seventh Day Adventist
church schools.









Check out our
other great

Father’s Gifts!

Camping supplies
Fishing & Diving

Gear

Tel: aa 393-4002
Fax: (242) 393-4096



June 11th - 16th, 2007

Kelly’s






Houses
Home

Mall at Marathon
Monday-riday 9:00am8:00pm
Saturday 9:00am-9:00pm
Sunday

lose
www.kellysbahamas.com


NEEM
tea

‘ME TRIBUNE | SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007, PAGE 9 ‘an

THE TILE KING, FYP LTD, THE TRIBUNE,
EDWARD E. PATTON & ANNETTE ROLLE
have partnered to supply critically needed






















i



help |

: - Help us raise $164,000 %
- - Barry Bice geen, ee controller Kelly's; eo Dz. Tees. to purch ase & di alysis | Ey ;

marketing manager, The Tribune; Nancy Kelly, executive vice president,

Kelly's; David Kelly, president, Kelly's. . mach 1 nN e S for th eC PMH vc



The. number of patients that need dialysis is .
pushing the dialysis center to its capacity.

PibG



Each dialysis unit costs $20,500 complete
installation, training of staff members and 1 year
of technical support. All donations should be |
made payable to The Princess Margaret
Hospital Foundation with a note for The Dialysis
Machine Fund.

Your contribution will help hundreds of patients
that currently rely on these old machines for life.

(I-r) Mark Roberts, Tile King & FYP Ltd.; Michelle Taylor, Contact Sean D. Moore of The Tribune at
office manager, Palmdale Vision Centre; Sean D. Moore, mar- 502-2394 or Thelma Rolle of the Princess
Rees auRee try vente: | Margaret Hospital Foundation at 325-0048
to make a donation.

re acre

Sa a a rr

HAVE!
& @

TILE *Â¥ KiNG
<)>) viz FYP LTD

oS






as againndale Vision Cent, @ Antoinette Rolle, Nassau, Bahamas



“We care for your vision as we would our own” L H 0 U S e
d : ; Ebbie Shearer - Jackson, OD, FAAO a S H &
p Optometrist 0 mM @
Tel (242) 393-4002 Fax: (242) 393-4096 + Nesseu, Behames:

H} (1-r) Mark Roberts, Tile King & FYP Ltd.;Garry Julien, manager

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Building Supplies; Robert Carron - chief operating officer, The eC al C
@ ‘Tribune.

ERAUAGSS2ESSECRREAE SR DAN CELL HAEER ARES SSREA RES SSP TAR EERE SU RERES RSLS ESRERORAN ED LTRURGMRRSERTERRERREGE SSSGESA2i cs SUBaRcEEsanaceed


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007



FROM page one

duly-elected government, but
they are not, and they will not
be. Not in this period,” he said.

Mr Ferguson also said that -

the PLP needs to shift focus to
its future, rather that dwelling
on the recent election loss.

“I think the nation has been
calling on them to stop what
they are doing and let’s get on
with the running of the coun-
try. A lot of PLPs are now say-
ing that,” he said.

He said many PLPs were dis-
gusted with the party’s refusal
to accept the election results
and want to rebuild their organ-
isation.

The PLP filed documents to
contest the election results in
Pinewood and Marco City, with
the expected filing of challenges
for Seabreeze, Golden Isles and
Blue Hills expected on Mon-
day, which is the deadline.

The court has the option of
leaving the constituency results
as they are; removing the votes
of ineligible voters who were
allowed to vote, and ordering a
recount — which, potentially, can
change the winner.

If more people than the mar-
gin of victory were illegally
barred from voting, who had
the right to vote in a con-
stituency, the court can order a
by-election.

Dispute impacting
40% of Cove staff

FROM page one

employees to receive their just
desserts. ,

"We have gone three months
now and I think that's long
enough," he said.

Barrie Farrington, Atlantis’
senior vice-president of man-
agement, said at that time that
although "there are still some
challenges to overcome" Kerzn-





position:

* accounts.

accounting functions.

"¢ Provide effective assis
administrators. es







asset

structures

June 20, 2007 to:

S scotiatust
m7. OF. W( Ob 4

Scotiatrust is inviting applications for the following

Client Accounting Officer
Responsibilities include:
e Prompt and accurate preparation of financial

statements for trust, company and agency

¢ To comply with and contribute to the maintenance
of effective internal controls relating to

tatice to a¢count

Qualifications and skills required:

e Bachelor’s degree with a major in Accounting
¢ CPA or other similar qualifications would be an

¢ Knowledge of accounting for trusts and related

¢ Strong PC software skills
¢ Good analytical and communication skills
e Ability to work within given time constraints

Interested persons should submit applications by }

Manager Operations
The Bank of Nova Scotia Trust
Company (Bahamas) Limited
P.O.Box N-3016
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: 326-0991

er International believed they
will "be brought to an amica-
ble conclusion."

Colebrooke estimated that
the pay issue may affect up to
40 per cent of all staff working
in the luxury 600-room tower.

He has suggested that reso-
lution of the matter should be of
utmost priority to the hotel, as
"a happy employee equals hap-

py guests."


















Bisk

Pricing Information As Of:
, 15 June 2007

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark









Bia iaieas denec
band sets the

tone in Rawson
me TKN y DCA

The Royal Bahamas Defence Force Band
performed in Rawson Square yerterday.



(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)

Government to assess

leaving certificate return

FROM page one

“So we are definitely going
to be addressing that issue. That
was a bad decision to remove
what we used to call a school
leaving certificate in my view,”
he said.

Mr Bethel said that he is still
in consultation with officials and
technical officers on the issue.

However, he stressed that
something had to be done so
that students would have some
record of their passage through
school.

This, of course, would only
happen once they met some
minimum level.

“It’s not that just because you
were there, you came and stand

NOTICE

up, and you passed that you’re
going to get something,” Mr
Bethel laughed.

Mr Bethel said the Ministry
of Education would be focus-
ing on raising the national exam
average, which currently stands
ata ‘D’.

“The whole question of cur-
riculum needs to be looked at
very carefully going forward —
even if we try to fit in enhanced
vocational and vocational
aspects to the overall offering
in the public school system.

“So we have to look at how
we create an environment for
those students who may learn
differently and who are perhaps
more gifted with their hands
than academically,” he said. _

NOTICE is hereby given that SIDONIUS WINSTON HENRY
of #27 GLENGARIFF GARDENS, P.O. Box FH-14470,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day
} of June, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
- and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ELME JEAN-CLAUDE of
HOMESTEAD AVENUE, P.O. BOX N-10326, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day
of June, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



0.00%
3.48%)
+ 2.77%
2.35%
1.94%



THE TRIBUNE



PLP ‘retains right’
to pursue justice

FROM page one

court challenges will expand the
increased polarisatrion of the
electorate, which is something
he has publicly expressed con-
cern about — as was witnessed
by the taunting and jeering of
parliamentarians and their
spouses, by supporters of both
parties, at the opening of par-
liament.

But the opposition leader said
that his party had attempted to
guide its supporters to accept
their new role in opposition.

“We have tried our best to
get our people to understand
that the results of the election
are the results of the election.
That if there is a case in court,
or two cases in court, and there
is a legitimate basis for moving
forward with those cases, you
move forward with those cases.
But the government is the gov-
ernment — and we accept that,”
he said.

In further response to critics
who suggest the PLP is not
“moving on” from the election,
Mr Christie used the recent
budget debate, in which the
opposition interrogated the gov-
ernment’s proposals, as an
example of his party’s commit-
ment to its constitutional oblig-
ations to constructively oppose
the Government.

“T think we all understand
our obligations to ensure that

the country does not suffer as a
result of either side seeking
their political rights and jus-
tice,” Mr Christie said.

Though not being specific, Mr
Christie added that during the
party’s post-election analysis of
the election results, they
became aware of “major occur-
rences of irregularities.”

Wayne Munroe, one of the
party’s lead attorneys, has said
publicly that thousands of non-
citzens may have voted and that
some Bahamians, who were
constitutionally entitled to vote,
may have been barred.

At the time, Mr Christie said,
the party did not know if these
irregularities were sufficient to
launch court challenges.

Consequently, legal advice
was sought by the party to
determine whether their con-
cerns were substantive enough
to launch official court chal-
lenges, and if so, in which con-
stituencies.

Having been advised by the
party’s legal team that valid.cas-
es existed, Mr Christie said that
he left it up to them to deter-
mine which cases were strong
enough to officially pursue. _,

As of yesterday, the PLP had
filled documents relating to the
Marco City and Pinewood elec-
tion results, with the expecta-
tion that documents will be filed
for three more seats —
Seabreeze, Blue Hills and Gold-
en Isles — on Monday.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KENTON RADEMARI of
APT#6, BLUE HILL ROAD SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should -
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9th day of June, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



HELP



WANTED



experience:

initiative.

An established law. firm requires the following:

Two (2) Legal Secretaries with the following

1) Three (3) years litigation experience and
2) Three (3) years commercial experience.

Applicants must be able to work on their own







Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank 0.07 1,423
Consolidated Water BDRs : 0.11 281
Doctor's Hospital 0.00 200
Famguard 0.00

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FirstCaribbean 0.00

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1.54%
2.24%
3.62%
4.65%}
0.96%
0.00%
3.83%
4.52%
3.45%
3.01%
0.00%
1.38%
6.00%
6.00%



Please fax resumes to 393-4558.

11,000

NOTICE

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC BANK AND
TRUST COMPANY LIMITED



g (in Compulsory Liquidation)
Yield
8.12%
7.85%
0.00%

Last Price | Weekly Vol.
16.00
10.00

unter Securities

41.00

14.00

0.45

S2wk-Low Symbol
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdi

FINAL NOTICE is hereby given that the creditors of the above-named
Company, which is being wound up compulsorily by The Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, are required, if they have not done so
already, on or before the 30th day of June A.D. 2007 to send proofs of their
debts or claims, and the names and addresses of their attorneys (if any) to
the undersigned

0.00%
7.71%
0.00%

28.00 ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdi

1.125
0.000



Ronald Atkinson
Ronald Atkinson & Co.
Chartered Accountants
PO. Box N-8326
Nassau, Bahamas

Fund Name Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

1.342667"
3.2018°**
2.681688"*
1.244286****
11.5519°***
| ANTD OB.20% 1 2006 34.47%
D - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

NAV KEY

the Official Liquidator of the said Company. In default thereof they will be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution by the said Official Liquidator
of the assets of the above-named Company.

Dated the 14th day of June A.D. 2007.

S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks *- 8 June 2007
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

Olv $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

** - 30 April 2007

++ "31 May 2007
Ronald Atkinson
Official Liquidator

* - 30 April 2007

Soe et - 31 May 2007

7764 ( FOR MORE DATA -& INFORMATION CALL (242) 394-2503


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JUDGE PARKER

BESIDES PARIS,
RACHEL OWNS HOMES
IN LONDON, ST-MORITZ

ACTUALLY, MARGO,
I HAVE MET A





8
9
13

31

32

35
36

3

~

39
41
42
43

44



SAUTEED ONIONS,
a= GARLIC, AND
JALAPENOS S











© 2006 by King Festures Syndicate, inc. World Rights reserved

PEOPLE BORN DURING THE
CHINESE “YEAR
OF THE DOG”







Goes off again to get the biaces (7)
Two chaps, one just like you (6,3)
Give one a lift when there's this awful
emptiness inside (5) .
There's little time, dear; move! Step
onit (5)
Give you the impression, when you
propose (7)
How the grim sailor said “Aft!” (7)
At that point, you run through (5)
Slip that top off, little imp! (5)
Great to have a drink, having got
back again (5)
Calls up and the girl's come round, all
tight (6)
The boyfriend gave the fellow a nice
build-up (6)
A page in the haberdashery
catalogue (7)
Having done wrong, the gun-slinger
is in prison (7)
Surprises coming one on top of the
other in the building (6)
Run across in the Wagner
Centre (6)
A mistake for someone working in a
fish restaurant? (5)
He's more jovial with her around (5)
She is French, Northern, with an
English name (5)
Given a number to play might make
you feel better (7)
Home and the tot is playing
in the pen (7)
Sing one note, getting close (5)
Extra for the coach working in (5)
Permission to proceed with the
slashed-price sale (9)
A. migrant will endure without
Jetaliation (7)

CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

WELL, I'D LOVE
TO HEAR ABOUT

WOW! AND SHE'S
LEAVING ALL FOUR
TO THE GIRLSZ

a gol Mm nf

I HAVE To FINESSE A
MILLION BIRTHDAY PARTY
DETAILS. <3



GEEZ LOUISE, WHERE'S





PAGE 12, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007

COMICS

* I MENTIONED THAT

TO RACHEL--- SHE
SAID ROGER IS WELL
TAKEN CARE OF!





IF I KNOW ROGER
CABOT, THIS WILL
NOT 6IT WELL!




(©2007 by Norm America Syndicate, Inc. Werks ngms reserved








THANK GOODNESS, ZA
ALWAYS COOL, CALM AND.
COLLECTED. hee











MY BURGER?!

‘South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.













NORTH
4Q16
Â¥K5
@KI853
&AQT
WEST EAST
@K932 #10874
V743 V6
102 $Q974
&10862 RKI53
SOUTH
AS
ARE SAID TO THEY LIKE TO H
WAVE DOG -LIKE 1S ANG AROUND votes?
PERSONALITY HYDRANTS 2! &O4
TRAITS The bidding:
South West North East
1y¥ Pass 2¢ Pass -
394 Pass 6%



THERE'S No TIME To
WASTE! [VE GOT

JULIAN LIKES SCHOOL,
4. WE NEVER GETS IN
FIGHTS, HE READS

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS

Down [| a |_|
1 One's always bearing up to 15

change (6) se aoans “or nme |
2 Holding the gun, fear there's PPT

3

wi >

34
38

40



ACROSS: 4, A-waits 7, Learners 8, Pan-a-ma 10, Bob-by 13, West 14, Spar 15,
Pa-NT 16, Ate 17, Otis 19, Euro 21, Carthorse 23, Mode 24, Ed-na 26, Job 27,
Bar-d 29, Glib 32, Alps 33, C-E-ase 34, Bo Peep 35, Left over 36, Remove

DOWN: 1, B-L-abs 2, Sam-ba 3, Only 4, Aspen 5, Aunt 6, Tomato 9, Astern 11,
Op.-t 12, Broad 13, Washers 15, Pit 16, Are 18, Treble 20, Usage 21, Cob 22,
O-dd 23, Mo-r-ose 25, His 23, Apple (-pie) 30, Larva 31, Beard 32, Aero 33, Cats






Opening lead — two of clubs.

Assume you’re in six hearts and
West leads a club. There are many
factors to consider before playing a
card from dummy.

You have 11 sure winners and
numerous chances for a 12th trick,
all depending on how the adverse
cards are divided. You could try a
club or spade finesse, or even a dia-
mond finesse, or you could try to
establish dummy’s diamonds.

You can’t safely test all these pos-
sibilities, so you must decide at trick
one which line of play to adopt.

The best way to start is by play-
ing a low club from dummy. This

























Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)

Yo YOU THINK
HE'S A GROWN-UP
IN DISGUISE 7



HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 17; very good 25;
excellent 34 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.

i
,
mre
(QS007 dy King Feshees Byraftante, ine. World tigfen reserved. “j'











a a a
Pe
| a



something wrong with the catch (8)
That's a lot of money,

lovely lady! (6,5)

Even at the Pearly Gates? (4,5)
Ran away, has somehow got caught
and shot (7)

Breaking a raw egg into, call out,
acting cockily (10)

eRe (a

i

ne a esate
i

Be pclbeil:

=
roy

n



x
Are ear and afler a time, have == ee ee aula |
caught up ;
Parts of bodies found in a furniture 2
shop (6) ee es Mee a Me ele sb Le)
Comment on people who have gol | || | | gE | || | |
notable Pe mee
Bash in — right in - fast (6) ee | | | | | | | a
Smuggled the dope from a foreign
por (7 a — pt ool el



Leave in a hurry if you
serve tea to? (4,3)

ACROSS
Finding someone who's been 8 Right (7) Be gs (6)
slandering you? (7,4) ; 9 —Twin-hulled vessel (9) 2 — Jewellery item (8)
Couldn't face being refused 13 Dance to this (5) 3 Gathers speed (11)
admittance? (6,4) i Se eet o 4 Enter uninvited (4-5)

, ; issful state 5 Discolour (7

A girl having a drink in the garden (9) 16 Determination (7) - aaah di
The prisoner's wi 17 Noblemen (5) fetid
‘identification? (3,4) I 18 Time when dark (5) : ine ( i )
Noisy crane operating 20 Happening (5) 10 Come into view (6)
in the country (6) N a po) 11 Controls (7)
Be as excited over the dance as the a 5 sea i (7) 12 Squanders (6)
game (8) > 27 Hot condiment (7) u snl ()
Not conscientious, no 30 Marionette (6) cs Be a )
again fail to see (6) The nonspecific “officer” (7) Lu 32 fae ‘5) 28 Hospital (9)
Continues to jog as : Clinical 29 Letgo(7) _
one talks (4,2) 35 cerusloh (5) 30 Financial gain (6)
Most uniikely to get 36 Unity (5) 32 ae
high (4) 37 Afternoon show (7) 33 Stinks (6)

39 Gatches fire (7) 34 Creche (7)

41 Worker in stone (5) 38 Almost (6)

42 Speak slowly (5) 40 Short letter (4)

43 Plan of travel (9)
44 Of the sense of
touch (7)

EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Suffer 7, Chestnut 8, Oregon 10, Erase 13, Crew 14, Sent 15, Seem
Said 32, Tier 33, Sever 34, Arcane 35, Champion 36, Stitch

DOWN: 1, Aches 2, Sedan 3, Stye 4, Store 5, Flew 6, Eloped 9, Remake 11, Red

12, Stove 13, Cantaur 15, Sir 16, Sin 18, Detain 20, Cease 21, Ore 22, Art 23,
Ferret 25, Tie 28, Beech 30, Avoid 31, Drunk 32, Tact 33, Same







“No WONDER WE CAN'T FIND OUR CAR
DAP DROPPED US OFF, SeneER Pe




16, Sex 17, Odin 19, Acid 21, Overtaken 23, Fret 24, Area 26, Fee 27, Abut 29,






TO KNOW -
ANYTHING
NEW.

EDUCATED
AGAINST MF
ILL! MY
RIGHTS ARE #2
BEING
TRAMPLED!














relinquishes the possibility of imme-
diately winning the trick with the
queen, but there are excellent reasons
for rejecting the finesse.

First, West may have led from J-8-
6-2, in which case East might play
the king instead of the ten, handing
you your 12th trick immediately.
Then, too, West might have led low
from the J-10-x-x of clubs, which
will again establish dummy’s queen
as a trick after East takes the king.

But the most compelling reason
for playing low is that you retain an
extra entry to dummy that might
come in handy later on. If you were
to finesse the queen, you would lose
this advantage after East won and
returned a club, dislodging dummy’s
ace.

East wins the first trick with the
jack and returns a spade. Again you
decline the finesse, which offers only
a 50 percent chance. Instead, thanks
to your duck at trick one, you can
now play for a 3-3.or 4-2 diamond
division (an 84 percent chance).

After taking the spade, you cash
the queen of hearts and A-K of dia-
monds. You then muff a diamond
high, lead a trump to the king and
ruff another diamond, establishing
the jack as a trick. After you draw
West’s last trump, your carefully pre-
served ace-of-clubs entry permits
you to discard your spade loser on
the jack of diamonds, and the slam is
home.



a bison boast
oating bong
snob stab

bowing obtain snib

baton bias
swab SWINGBOAT

basing

’S SOLUTION

ait bang basin
basting bastion

b

YESTERDAY
igot bingo biot
boasting boat b

b






new
Ls,
cow

-part of tooth
Piatt ab -taey
beyond the

gumline

Jon Blackburn (South Wales) v
Bernd Rechel (Wood Green), UK
4NCL league 2007. Wood
Green's club rooms are close to
White Hart Lane, but its team
used to be the Chelsea of British
chess, hiring world class
grandmasters to demolish rival
squads. The zenith came at the
end of the 2005-6 season when
the all-time number one
woman, Judith Polgar, was
flown from Budapest for the
decisive match against
championship rivals Guildford-
ADC. Then WG's major sponsor
cut back support, so that in the
season just ended Guildford
triumphed easily while the north
Londoners struggled against
relegation. There were still one
or two hired hands, though
Germany's Rechel is a modest

T DONT WANT To GO To
ScHOOL. I DONT WANT

THE FACT \S, I'M BEING

cia ee,
=

THE TRIBUNE






T ALREADY KNOW MORE
THAN TL WANT To! I
LIKED THINGS BETTER
WHEN I DIDNT

UNDERSTAND THEM /











SITDDUAS Steig TENUN AQ PENQUECUOLEUEA C651








SATURDAY,
JUNE 16

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

You have R&R on the brain, but you
have to buckle down and get through
another grueling week at work,
Aries. There will be reward enough
for a job well done.

TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21

It may feel like everyone is out to get
you this week, Taurus. But it is all just
your imagination. Just focus on the
task at hand and these next few days .
are géing to sail by.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Wishing for a change in your
finances will get you nowhere,
Gemini. You have to put a plan in
action to make the changes you
desire. Leo can help with the task.

| CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Focus on family for the next few
days, Cancer. Afterward, you’ll have
some time to devote to yourself.
There are big changes on the horizon,
so enjoy the downtime now.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23
Hold your head high when you pre-
sent a proposal to: your supervisor,
Leo. Your ideas have merit and they
should be taken seriously. Surprises
are in store on Thursday.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22














‘] Make the most:of the time spent with

your spouse or romantic partner,
Virgo. The hours will become fleeting
when a work project springs up unex-
pectedly midweek.

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ll have trouble focusing on any-
thing this week, Libra. No matter
how hard you try to devote your
attention to one task, you’ll end up
working on multiple projects.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
Rather than going on the defensive
with a coworker, Scorpio, sit down
and talk to the person about what’s
bothering you. It may or may not
work, but at least you’ll have tried.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Now is not the time to make a major |
life decision because your head is
just not into it, Sagittarius. Put off
heavy thinking for another few days
and skate through this week.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
No matter how hard you try,
Capricorn, you can’t get everyone to
like you — just accept it. Instead of
trying to win everyone over, spend
your energy on the friends you have.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 -
There is trouble brewing at home, ~
but you won’t be able to figure out -
what’s up unless you confront those
you live with. Don’t clam up and -
avoid confrontation. :

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20

It’ll take a lot of effort to get through -
the week, Pisces, because things will
be a struggle for you. Relief comes
when Virgo enters the picture.

eye 113) by Leonard Barden



master rather than an elite GM.
Here as Black (to move) Rechel is
two pawns down but has White's
e3 knight caught in an awkward
pin. How did Black force victory?

LEONARD BARDEN

*
Chess solution 8386: 1..Bg4! 2 Qxg4 Qxe3 3Kg2

Qf2+ 4 Kh3 OfL 5 Kh4 BIG+ wins.

»

LAS TT Se NN MY DAD
: : ASCBLKESE CHV PM ATARAUTE SA CAS HBH SHE eT TKN OS PEAR EM REET ART OUT EAUFAHTAD EO ASEH KOU CETUS ABET MCE A Hs 5
ee * 7 ‘sat o FRAT HS SRARHESSRWEKSHGTITS MASH HT CAAT SSFSEPSHVPSOHKESANHE rOSBeRwscanseereryeseretorrru = vane sete t erste 5
:
*





«
Â¥

“4 4 i
me “ z . ~s ean List Ce iwe os a> 7% a tee ee Ow Bee BX ee #2 ¢ a Te -e ye 5








NSURANCE MANAGEMENT

‘ima



tify 8






eee

a ”" agi: Arg 2 Today Sunday WINDS WAVES _ VISIBILITY
Lee. ape Z ee High = Low W High = Low W NASSAU Today: SSE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet .



WATER TEMPS.
4-7 Miles 82° F























































































: F/C F/C F/C F/C ‘ ESE at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 82°F
90/32 79/26 pe =: 89/31 77/25 pc S at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet |
A ; 84/17 55/12 t 70/21 55/12 pe :___ VAR at 5-10 Knots 1-3 Feet
oe (a a es af | 88/81 S73 s 88/81 57/13 's S at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet
Mostly cloudy with a Mostly cloudy. : | Mostlycloudy. | ~| Clouds andbreaksof | Intervalsofclouds | Intervals of clouds The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the 88/31 73/22 s 88/31 70/21 s ; VAR at 5-10 Knots 2-4 Feet
thunderstorm. 5 sun. | and sunshine. : and sunshine. greater-the need for eye and skin protection. ‘Auckland . 63/11 46/7 s 684 48/8 5 rs
3 : High: 88° 4 High: 88° High: 88° =| - High: 88° : a a aes poe aoe
+ RRO ; » 74° + 7RO on + 7RO 3 avy: 74° 1 « 7RO los. 00/00 fico PO U pe
High: 88 Low: 74 Low: 76 Low: 76 Low: 74 _| Low: 16 | 75/23 66/18 t 75/23 66/18 pc
eT Ta Tet _ Accu eT rae poe ut | a LS ea Li ae 89/31 69/20 po 89/31 71/21 s
00 Le ed, é = 7 ae —— 76/24 73/22 s . 74/23 73/22 s
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 9:27am. 2.5 3:27 a.m. = -98/31- 66/18-t 90/32 65/18 pc
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 9:54p.m. 3.1 3:20pm. -0.2 7 05 55/12 t = 75 193 57/13. ¢
+ Sunday 10:18am. 25 4:16am. -0.1 80/26 66/18 po =—=—=S77/25-—«G6/18 t
CoG a eae nee as Y 40:43 pm. 3.0 4:12pm. -04 63/17 46/7 pc 64/17 46/7 +
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 11:08am. 25 5:03am. 0.0 “Brussels: eS 86/18 49/9 t= 74/23 S3/11 pc
ABACO Temperature 11:31p.m. 2.8 5:05p.m. 0.1 sees ae ae pe =. Son pc
HUG: “scuset dscsccseettenscvduaceattoivesesuiciseass OO 1S2— 0 : : ‘Buenos Aires = 8 393s 55/12 Ss
High: 85° F/29°C a “ree rac Uuisday TSP AM 25 BAe Cairo 96/35 69/20 s 95/35 71/21 s
Normal high . 87° a = Berns 93/33 85/29 t 96/35 86/30 t
Normal low .. 14° F/23° : 64/17 43/6 t 57/13 41/5 sh
EST PALM BEACH Last year’s high .. 91° F/33° C at aa tat 94/28 -72/22t © 88/31. 76/24 t
High: 84° F/29° C Last year's low . sessereee 80° F/27° C nse neta eis a 88/31 68/20 pc 81/27 72/22 c
Low:73°F/23°C Precipitation Sunrise......6:20a.m. Moonrise..... 736 a.m. 5 sablan <2 77/25. 65/18 pe —* 75/23 - 65/18 s
As of 2 p.m. yesterday . 0.21" ‘Sunset.......8:01 p.m. Moonset.....9:56).m. Copenhagen 6216 56/136 64/17 53/11 t
Year to date .. 24,24" First Full Last New Dublin : So10c = BAT «48/8 pc
: High: 83° F/28°C Normal year to date 15.15" ii mm Frankfurt 50/10 t 77/25 59/15 pc
Low: 69° F/21°C Genev. 73/22 52/11 ¢ ——-—- 73/22 §9/15 t
AccuWeather.com Halifax 66/18 52/11 ¢ 68/20 52/11c | Showers
All forecasts and maps provided by: cil ‘Havana. 84/28 -72/22t = B5/29._ 73/22 t T-storms
2 o ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc.©2007 Jun. 30 Jul. 7 Jul. 14 Helsinki 61/16 48/8 s 64/17 50/10 r “o_{ Rain
NASSAU High: 88° F/31°C : a mE ‘Hone Kon . ae , 73/22 pc ae aes Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
: ‘ 2 , : ; i recipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
~ High: 88° F/31°C: Low: 74° F/23 C . : Astanbul - ~ == 83/28 69/200's 86/30. 70/21 s Fouad Seiten ichipseahiiee are for sacs oes
- Low:74°F/23°C 22 ow Jerusalem 79/26: S713 s_ 80/26 57/13 s
sees 12 9 Johannesburg 6317. 393s 6/16 39/8 's
ea : Kingston 1/32! 81/27 pc 88/31 79/26 pc
sgh: 86° F/90"C = CAT ISLAND 61/16) 55/12 po 68/20. 54/12 pe
Low:75°F/24°C High: 89° F/32°C : ¢ 70/21,, 54/12 sh 72/22 55/12 pe
: ; 2 eh 72/22 HONS te 822 SONS ts
z ” 88/31, 78/25 pc 92/33 78/25 pc
79/28. S52 te 78/25 = S2/1tt
2 : 100/37 75/23 s 101/38 75/23 s
Montreal — : 85/29 64/17 t === 80/26 60/15 pe
: P ‘atlanied Moscow 62/16 51/10 -sh 84/28 58/14 c
Low: 75° F/24° C Munich Ss SS 70/2 48/8 t <= == 78/25, 56/13 pe



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's 75/23 52/11 ¢ 77/25 53/11 ¢










highs and tonights's lows. High:87°F/31°C "402/38 79/26 pe —=—«:102/38.- 78/25 pe
Low:77°F/25°C | 5512 46/7 6
70/21 55/1 68/20 S95 po
- ! : 75/23 «5 79/26











































81/27 69/20 Bays ; : eS eed
105/40 81/27 s 2 ae = ts
ee et iin OT a u_can rest easy knowin
— - = S . — — — —— = — = = = = . SS cos ate ANA : “ANnNINO \/ Pp anse ‘ OE p = . . ¥ > * an
High bee Ww High cy Ww High ae Ww High — W High ir Ww High To W eile C : San Juan oun a ; z : - ave excellent INSULT ce
g ow id ow 0 ow Q ow \Hig ow ig ow \ : = 3 ane so MURS SneS as Te e (
ee ee ce. Ee eee Se. el Fe FIC Fe FIC | ‘San Salvador tener. 72e2 | rage no matter. which
Albuquerque | 92/33 66/18 t 99/33 66/18 t Indianapolis 90/32 67/19 s 89/31 68/20 pc Philadelphia 84/28 64/17 pc 90/32 68/20 ' CROOKEDIS NS es Hee , wa the wind blows.
Anchorage 70/21 52/11 s «69/20 52/11 s Jacksonville 88/31 67/19 pc 90/32 70/21 pc Phoenix 110/43 82/27 s 107/41 80/26 th ji ee se i = 28 ae
Atlanta 90/32 69/20 pc 88/31 68/20 pc KansasCity 90/32 68/20 pc 87/30 69/20 pc Pittsburgh 82/27 56/13 s ~~ 87/30 63/17 pc RAGGED ISLAND ENG ESE ASES | |
Atlantic City 79/26 63/17 pc 90/32 66/18 pc Las Vegas 105/40 77/25 s 103/39 79/26 s Portland,OR 70/21 52/11 pc 70/21 52/11 paged iri ciel = oes aa Sele A
Baltimore 82/27 62/16 pc 92/33 66/18 .pc LittleRock 92/33 67/19 pc 92/33 69/20 pc _—Raleigh-Durham 85/29 64/17 t ~ 94/34 68/20 pc Low: 73° F/23°C . crams Se ee ae Sao oe
Boston 75/23 60/15 pe 86/30 66/18 t Los Angeles 78/25 62/16 pce 78/25 61/16 pc St. Louis 92/33 72/22 s 93/33 73/22 pc " aan 85/29. 75/23 t ~ 87/30. 78/25 ae ' ane gi a= “
Buffalo 77/25 62/16 pe 78/25 61/16 pc Louisville 90/32 68/20 s 93/33 67/19 pc Salt Lake City 94/34 68/20 pe 88/29 51/10 's GREATINAGUA Tokyo 78/25 64/17 pc “81/27 64/17 po om oe
Charleston, SC 88/31 67/19 t 91/32 70/21 s$ Memphis 92/33 74/23 s 92/33 72/22 pc San Antonio 92/33 73/22 c¢ 86/30 74/23 t High: 91°F/33°C i “Toronto” 82/27 85/18 pe «82/27 66/18 pc
Chicago 90/32 64/17 s 90/32 71/21 po Miami 86/30 76/24 t 87/30 77/25 t SanDiego © 72/22 64/17 pe 70/21 62/16 pc Low 79°F/26°C ore 90/92 64/17 s -—«90/32.-:«6B/20 s
Cleveland 86/30 61/16 s 83/28 65/18 pc Minneapolis 84/28 68/20 t 87/30 69/20 c San Francisco 68/20 53/11 pc 70/21 53/11 pc e Bae -B/20 “S31 eo B47 BBV
Dallas 84/28 70/21 t 83/28 70/21 t Nashville 90/32 64/17 s 95/35 66/18 pc Seattle 68/20 50/10 c 65/18 50/10 c “a 78/25 61/16 pc —=»-8 2/27 6/18 pc
Denver 91/32 59/15 pce 93/33 53/11 pc. ‘New Orleans 90/32 72/22 s 90/32 74/23 pc Tallahassee 92/33 69/20 t 93/33 70/21 peo , i /25 S915 ¢ 81/27 “57/13 pc
‘Detroit 88/31 64/17 pc 88/31 68/20 pc. New York 80/26 66/18 pce — 90/32 72/22 pc Tampa 88/31. 73/22 t 89/31 74/23 t | 73/22 58/14 pc 76/24 58/14 t
' Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 s OklahomaCity 84/28 67/19 t 82/27 65/18 t Tucson 102/38 74/23 s 104/40 72/22 s : oe : “i :
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storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace
PAGE 14, SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2007 . THE TRIBUNE









TURED ON CAMERA

’s graduates
r and wide









Former Attorney General Sean McWeeney with his son Sean
MicWeeney Jr, who will be pursuing studies at the University of MEAGHAN MILLER
Fampa in Florida, and wife, former senator and co-owner of 105.9 _ receiving her award for achieve-
Gems IM radio station, Cyprianna McWeeney. ment in art.





a

ST ANDREW'S School held its 2007 graduation ceremony in the Crystal Ballroom at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort on Wednesday.

In 1969, former Minister of Finance Carlton Francis agreed with the board of St Andrew’s that the
school would draw from inner city children who were unable to attend St Andrew’s due to limited

Charles Hamilton, president of the student funds.



TEAM receives her diploma — council, received the highest award during the Pictured above, from left, are three inner-city students, Glenda Roker (prefect), Tracyann Perpall
boi) Robin Jrownrigg, chairman of the board of — ‘school’s graduation ceremony from the principal, and Charles Hamilton (president of the Student Council), who graduated this year. All thanked St
St Andrew’s School. Bob Wade. Andrew’s for what they called the best education in the country.

GABRIELLE
DAWKINS
receives her
achievement award
frou the prinicipal
of St Andrew's,
Bob Wade.



Chairman of the St Andrew’s Board, Robin Brownrigg, presenting James Virgill, son of Magistrate
Linda Virgill and former Cabinet Minister, the late Charles Virgill, who was murdered in 1997. James
will be attending Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida in the fall.









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