Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
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9994850 ( OCLC )
UF00084249_02916 ( sobekcm )

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WON

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——s Che Miami Herald



BAHAMAS EDITION



Volume: 103 No.168




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[HURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007




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WU

and RELIGION
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE










PM lambasts
PLP leader

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham lambasted former
prime minister Perry Christie
in the House of Assembly yes-
terday, emphasising that Mr
Christie spent only one term in
office before being voted out
by the people of the Bahamas.

Mr Ingraham also touched on
the issue of the leadership of
the Opposition, which it is
reported is actively being sought
by at least three former minis-
ters in the Christie administra-
tion.

Speaking directly to Mr
Christie — who sat facing Mr
Ingraham with his hands
clasped — Mr Ingraham said
that if the economy of the
Bahamas was in such good

shape, and the people of the -

Bahamas still rejected the gov-
ernment, then the leader of the
party must take responsibility
for that loss.

“I would resign!” Mr Ingra-
ham exclaimed. “Take his
georgie bundle and go home.”

“That is how it is done in a
democracy. There is no ques-
tion that is what I would have
done had I lost the election for
the FNM. No one would have
to ask me to go,” he said.

Mr Ingraham also touched on
the legal recourse that the PLP
is taking in contesting four seats
that they lost by a margin of
léss than 100 votes. To this, Mr
Ingraham said, it is obvious that
the PLP have not yet come to
grips with the fact that they

‘have lost the election.
| “The election is over,” Mr
Ingraham said, “but some peo-
ple have a hard time coming to













terms with that. The FNM is the
governing party of the Bahamas
for the next five years. Perry
Gladstone Christie is no longer
the prime minister of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas.
“The people determined that
once was enough for you, my

brother. Hubert Alexander

Ingraham has been brought
back to office by the people of
the Bahamas for a third term.
And that is the way it is. That’s
the way it will continue to be,
God willing, until the people

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Hubert Ingraham
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(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)



Christie makes

ONY Mralitivns
of fear’ claim

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

BAHAMIANS are now wor-
ried that a new culture of
“insensitivity” and “fear”. has
been created by the new FNM
government through the review
of contracts and the transfer of
civil servants, according to
Opposition Leader Perry
Christie, in a passionate contri-
bution to the budget debate yes-
terday in the House.

“People are more and more
feeling angry and feeling that
an angry and insensitive in-
your-face culture has been giv-
en birth,” he said. “It now
appears that it is to be common
practice to suspend contracts
entered into by a previous gov-
ernment within a specified peri-
od prior to a general election. It
now appears that people who
hold positions of authority can
be removed or transferred
regardless of their ability if they
are thought to be supportive of



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Former Asst Commissioner: witness
protection should be ‘Caricom issue’



Former PM says Bahamians are
worried over review of contracts



the other side.”

Mr Christie said that this cul-
ture is in contrast to what he
attempted to usher into the
process of governance in the
Bahamas.

“I firstly as the new prime
minister sought to establish a
culture where there need not
be any fear in supporting the
political party of one’s choice,”
he said.

The leader of the opposition
used the example, without men-
tioning him by name, of Joshua
Sears, who was left in his posi-
tion as the ambassador to the
United States, despite his polit-
ical affiliation - Mr Sears ran
unsuccessfully for the FNM in
the Exuma constituency.

Mr Christie further used the
example of the staffing of the
office of the prime minister to
suggest that he was not a vic-
timiser, though, as some com-
mentators have suggested it
may not have been wise to have
persons who were not support-
ers of the agenda of a govern-
ment, so close to that govern-
ment’s base of power.

“The record will reflect tha’ I
never transferred anyone from
the office of the prime minis-

. ter, notwithstanding the infor-

mation provided me as to who
was loyal and who was not. I
expected all to perform at the
best in the service of their coun-

SEE page 10

Christie blasts Ingraham over Bank
of Bahamas chairman dismissal

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITNESS protection should be a "Caricom issue", potentially
allowing the creation of a programme that would allow those
who see crimes, particularly of a violent or drug-related nature,
to be transported to other Caribbean countries for their own
safety prior to appearing in court, it was claimed yesterday.

Too many cases in the Bahamas have had to be "thrown
away" after key witnesses have "disappeared", former assistant
commissioner in charge of crime, Paul Thompson, said on Love
97's Real Talk Live yesterday.

However, Chief Supt Hulan Hanna said yesterday that wit-.
nesses in high profile cases have indeed been taken out of the
country in the past, and Asst Commissioner Ellison Greenslade

FORMER prime minister Perry Christie yesterday in parlia-
ment blasted current Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham over the dis-
missal of Bank of the Bahamas chairman AI Jarrett, calling Mr
Ingraham’s behaviour “undignified” and indicating that the action
was one of victimisation.

Responding to the criticism during the House of Assembly’s
afternoon session, Mr Ingraham said the request for the resignation
of Mr Jarrett — who was appointed under the PLP government —
was warranted and carried out in a “very decent fashion.”

Mr Ingraham also added that all PLP-appointed boards, except
that of the Broadcasting Corporation and now the Bank of
Bahamas, are still in place, and will continue to remain in place until
June 20.

Giving his contribution to the 2007/08 budget debate, Mr Christie



SEE page 10



SEE page 11

Bethel: 1,200 issues, complaints relating to teachers unresolved under PLP

THERE are more than 1,200
unresolved personnel issues and
complaints relating to teachers
that were left unresolved by the
previous government, Minister
of Education Carl Bethel said
during his contribution to the
budget debate.

Speaking in the House of
Assembly this week, Mr Bethel
said that the outstanding com-
plaints encompass everything

from terms of pay adjustments
to reclassification and promo-
tions.

Mr Bethel said that during a
recent meeting with the
Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) he made it clear that the
welfare and job satisfaction of
teachers is a primary concern
of his government.

“In order to bring focus to
remediation and solving all such

job-related human welfare
issues we will be seconding a
total of three highly experi-
enced human resource officers
frem other ministries to aggres-
sively resolve these issues,” he
said.

Mr Bethel said that the union
has embraced the concept of a
strategic partnership between
the BUT and the ministry.

The minister also said there



could soon be another trade
union with whom the Ministry
of Education will be invited to
bargain should this union be
officially recognised.

“T speak of the recently
constituted Bahamas Educa-
tors’ Managerial Union
(BEMU), which was recognised
by the (PLP) Minister of
Labour in February 2007,” he
said.







PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





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Spiralling murder rate
is cause for concern

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter .

WITH the murder rate climb-
ing —- four have been commit-
ted in the last seven days —
commentators are urging the
public to become more actively
involved in preventing crimes.

“The police is the public and
the public is the police,” says
David Allen, a psychiatrist,

social worker and chairman of

the commission which brought
the Urban Renewal programme
to fruition.

The burgeoning murder and
violent crime rates “cannot be
impacted by the police alone,
but require the development of
an effective social contract
involving the Government, law
enforcement, the church, busi-
ness, charity groups and ordi-
nary citizens,” he said.

A report entitled Crime and
violence in the Bahamas: Caus-
es and Action Plan has been
created and presented by Dr
Allen to the commissioner of
police and the Prime Minister.

Many of his assessments con-
cur with those of Paul Thomp-
son, a former assistant commis-
sioner in charge of crime, police
trainer, and now private securi-
ty firm operator.

“We live in a society now
where we have to be very, very
careful,” said Mr Thompson,
who while appearing on Love
97's Real Talk Live told citizens
that it is in their own interest
to communicate more with
police.

“Report threats of ati or
death to police immediately,”
he said, reminding the public
that threatening a person with
harm or death is in fact illegal.

Mr Thompson urged individ-
uals to be persistent, taking
their information to a senior
officer if necessary, admitting
that he is aware that some peo-
ple do not feel they are taken
seriously at police stations.

It is police protocol that
police should follow up on

AOS te
ROME

Ee

a

Experts call for action to curb crime





threat reports, find the accused
and take their details. “This is in
itself a preventative measure,"
said Mr Thompson, as it will act
as a warning.

Recent police transfers have
been designed to do exactly
what Dr Allen has recom-
mended, increase the visibility
of the force in community polic-
ing.

However, Minister of Nation-
al Security Tommy Turnquest,
also reminded the public that
they too “are a part of polic-
ing”.

Today the murder rate stands
at 37 for 2007. In comparison,
by August 22 last year — almost
two-and-a-half months from
now, the total stood at 35. By
September 2006, it was only
three murders higher than it is
right now, at 40.

A World Bank report
released in May pegged the
Bahamas as having.a murder
rate of 21.2 per 100,000, more
than double the world average,
but less than the Caribbean
average of 30 victims per
100,000.

Both Dr Allen and Assistant
Commissioner in charge of
crime, Ellison Greenslade have
questioned the source of the
report's statistics, but assuming
they are correct have expressed
serious concern.

Dr Allen's report outlines
various causes of crime, includ-
ing the incapacity of many
Bahamians to handle their
anger‘in a reasonable fashion,

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@ DAVID Allen

prompting his suggestion for
“the need for an expansion of
anger management and conflict
resolution training programmes
in every level of our society,
such as the media, schools,
churches, the work place and
community groups”.

Yesterday, Mr Thompson
gave other pointers to the gen-
eral public, based on his expe-
rience, which would help avoid
bloodshed.

These include increased
reporting of domestic violence,
which Dr Allen said accounts
for 50 per cent of murders in
the Bahamas in the past two
years, and in particular encour-
aging the families of battered
women to do their best to help
break the cycle. “Go to court,
take some action to get him (the
batterer) to stay away,” Mr
Thompson said.

He also recommended par-
ents and communities to sup-
port police efforts against
“young reprisals”, retaliatory-
type incidents which he believes
define much recent-crime. :

“We must get kids away from

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: reverse this’.

guns, or people who use guns. If
you have a daughter who goes
out with someone who has a
gun, she is in the line of
fire...discourage her,” Mr
Thompson urged.

Additionally, if a friend has a
gun, report him, said Mr
Thompson. The penalty for pos-
session of an illegal firearm is
significantly less than that for
murder, and if it does reach that
point, the victim could be some-
one you know.

Mr Thompson also had some
warnings for those involved in
drugs.

“If you owe the drug dealer
money, pay him or go into hid-
ing if you can. Leave town...
because he cannot take you to
court, so naturally what's going
to happen... he'll come and kill
you,” said the former senior
officer. °

Worse still, if you “are fooling
around with" a drug dealer's
lady friend, on whom he may
be spending large amounts of
money, “he's going to find out,
his friends are going to tell him
and he's going to be annoyed
— you're playing with fire!”
said Mr Thompson.

Dr Allen believes greater
church involvement in commu-
nities could “revolutionise” the
country in three years, consid-
ering its powers for aiding “soci-
etal renewal”.

The church could establish
crime watch groups for areas
around the church, provide a
hotline for emergency issues,
and be a place for victims of
crime to meet and talk.

Ironically, the psychiatrist
believes the murder rate could
bring unity to the country. "I
really feel that this is something
about which every Bahamian,
black, white, foreign, local, can
say ‘let's buckle down and

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 3







In brief —

Government
to examine
candidates to
become JPs

THE Government will have
“a serious look” at hundreds of
persons who are seeking to be
appointed Justices of the Peace,
some of those applications dat-
ing back to 2002, Minister of
State in the Ministry of Legal
Affairs, Desmond Bannister,
said on Monday.

“Many of these names are
recognisable as persons who
contribute significantly to the
spiritual life of our country,” he
said.

In the build up to the May
general elections, the former
administration bypassed this list,
and appointed 240 Justices of
the Peace presented by its
Members of Parliament.

He apologized to those who
"waited patiently for so many
years in the expectation that
they would have been treated
fairly only to be bypassed in the
name of political expedience.”

“We will be reviewing this list
and making appropriate rec-
ommendations as soon as is
practicable,” Mr Bannister said.

Mr Bannister was addressing
the House of Assembly during
debate on government’s 2007/08
Budget.

Police say
cricket coach
died of

natural causes

m JAMAICA
Kingston

POLICE announced Tuesday
that Pakistan cricket coach Bob
‘Woolmer was not strangled
after all following his team’s sur-
prise World Cup loss.

In an embarrassing end to
one of the highest-profile homi-
cide probes in Jamaican history,
Police Commissioner Lucius
Thomas said the 58-year-old
Woolmer died of natural causes
and that the case is now closed.

Authorities reached their
conclusion after obtaining opin-
ions from three independent
pathologists from Britain, South
Africa and Canada and review-
ing a toxicology report, Thomas
told a packed news conference
in the Jamaican capital.

The announcement ended a
globe-spanning investigation in
which authorities interviewed
nearly 400 people and collected
DNA samples and fingerprints
from dozens of potential wit-
nesses, including members of
the Pakistan cricket squad and
other teams.

Woolmer was found uncon-
scious in his hotel room .in
Kingston on March ‘18, a day after
his heavily favored team was elim-
inated from the World Cup in a
humiliating loss to Ireland.

Authorities first said a pre-
liminary autopsy was inconclu-
sive, but on March 22
announced Woolmer had been
strangled — setting off a media
frenzy across the cricket world.

UN troops kill
suspected |
gang leader
in Haiti
@ HAITI

Port-au-Prince

UN peacekeepers and Hait-
ian police on Tuesday killed a
suspected gang leader wanted
in the kidnap-slaying of a
French businessman, according
to Associated Press.

Charles Junior Acdelhy was
shot to death after he opened
fire on Brazilian peacekeepers
and police as they tried to arrest
him during an early morning
raid in Port-au-Prince’s notori-
ous Cite Soleil slum, U.N.
spokeswoman Sophie Boutaud
de la Combe said. No peace-

keepers or police were injured.

Acdelhy was wanted on inter-
national warrants for homicide,
kidnapping and criminal con-
spiracy, Boutaud said, includ-
ing the January 2004 abduction
and killing of Claude-Bernard
Lauture, a French businessman
of Haitian descent.

Last week, Haitian police
arrested 20 suspected gang
members in an operation aimed
at curbing a recent increase in
violent crime that authorities
have said was a plot to desta-
bilise the troubled former
French colony of 8 million.

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City Markets denies
it puts underage
children to work

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

CITY Markets yesterday
vehemently denied allegations
that children as young as 10
years old are employed at their
stores, in contravention of the
labour laws.

Earlier this week, Bahamas

Democratic Movement
(BDM) member Omar Archer
blasted the food store chain
for allegedly employing chil-
dren below the legal age — 14
— to carry out tasks such as
packing groceries and mopping
floors.

Yesterday, Peter Goudie,
human resources manager at
Bahamas Supermarkets Lim-
ited, parent company of City
Markets, said the claims were
untrue.

"It is not true. We do not

employ children who are 10
years old. No we don't. We do
not use anybody who is under
14, and that is the law. We
comply with all of the labour
laws," said Mr Goudie.

He accused Mr Archer, a
former assistant manager at
City Markets on Rosetta
Street, of "probably [having]
something against us”.

He said City Markets store
managers are very much aware
that the company is against
such practices.

“Our managers know that
they are subject to discipline
if they do anything outside of
the labour laws. Especially
with these young baggers.
They have been told that in
writing,” Mr Goudie said.

On Monday, Mr Archer told
The Tribune of his claims fol-
lowed observations made at

four City Markets stores — in
South Beach, Rosetta Street,
Independence Drive and Sea
Grapes.

He asserted that he had seen
children regularly working
from 4pm until 10pm on week-
days, and doing 10-hour days
on Saturdays.

Mr Archer said Article 51
of the Employment Act per-
tains to children and young
persons, and prohibits children
being employed during school
hours, or at times that will
affect their ability to “obtain
the full benefit of the educa-
tion provided" for them.

Mr Archer claimed the
alleged employment of chil-
dren by the company was an
infraction of the Act, as it
denied them time to do home-
work or generally prepare for
school.

PLP blamed for delays
and additional cost of
new magistrate’s court

THE completion of the new
Magistrate’s Court complex at
Nassau Street is a year behind
schedule and will cost the tax
payer an additional $1.2 mil-
lion because of the PLP admin-
istration’s mismanagement of
the contract, Minister of State
in the Ministry of Legal Affairs
Desmond Bannister told the
House of Assembly.

Speaking during the debate
on the government’s 2007/08
budget, Mr Bannister
addressed accusations by the
former PLP government about
the suspension of a number of
building contracts.

The PLP had accused the
new FNM administration of
being “reckless, of putting
Bahamians out of work and of
committing a number of other
unpardonable sins.”

“The Nassau Street Magis-
trate’s Court complex is a
prime example of the way
these contracts had to be sus-
pended and reviewed,” Mr
Bannister said.

The state minister said that
during last year’s budget
debate, the former Attorney
General Allyson Maynard-
Gibson indicated that she
expected the complex to be
completed in November of last
year.

“As with many other pro-
jections by that former minis-
ter, this completion date was
wrong, and justice has paid the
price of this delay,” Mr Ban-
nister said.

He said reports from the
Ministry of Works indicated

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Bi DESMOND Bannister

that “millions of dollars have
been spent on this complex,
which is still not even close to
being completed.”

Mr Bannister said he was
advised that the work on the
complex is almost a year
behind schedule.

Moreover, he said, the quan-
tity surveyors who have now
been engaged have indicated
that the contract price which
was negotiated by the former
administration was well below
industry standards, and that
the remaining work cannot be
completed at the contract price
without omissions in the scope
of works planned, or seriously
compromising the quality of

the work.

“Asa result, it is estimated



that completion of the Nassau
Street Court complex will cost
an additional $849,199.18 plus
a contingency of $402,787.20
which means that the cost will
exceed the contract price by
$1,252,986.30 — a sum that our
tax dollars will have to pay,” he
added.

Additionally, he said, since
the former administration did
not ensure that “they signed
the contract with a corporate
entity, or take the precaution
of having the contract vetted
by the Attorney General’s
office, the contract appears to
be unenforceable should the
contractor seek to walk away
from it.”

As to putting Bahamians out
of work, he said, “I am told
that this work site has been a
mini-United Nations, with
workers being imported from a.
number of other countries to
do work that Bahamians could

_ easily do.

“In fact, when I visited the
site several Dominican work-
ers hid from me, while the few
Bahamians who were there
asked me how could the Immi-
gration Department permit

‘these foreign workers to be

imported for routine everyday
work while hundreds of
Bahamian masons and car-
penters are looking for work.

“So, we can see why the oth-
er side doesn’t want these con-
tracts to be suspended and
reviewed, but we are acting in
the best interest of Bahamian
workers and taxpayers,” he
said.















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E 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE











The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



PLP trying to ‘turn back’

“NO TURNING BACK” was the theme for
the “new” PLP’s election campaign as it fought
for a second term in government this year. How-
ever, the party was rejected at the polls because

-a majority of Bahamians felt that, despite claim-
ing that there was to be “no turning back”, in
fact in five years the so-called “new” PLP had
never moved forward. They were still wrapped
in the bosom of Sir Lynden’s old PLP. Here
they were 40 years later presenting themselves
as something new when underneath their cam-
ouflage was the philosophy of the same old vic-
timising PLP.

When Philip “Brave” Davis stood on the
tloor of the House of Assembly on June 8 and
urged that some form of punitive action be tak-
en against a “biased” press, memories of the
year 1986 loomed large. That year marked the
lirst serious challenge to our press freedom.
That was the year that The Tribune locked
iorns with a repressive government in its fight
to keep freedom of speech alive and well in
this country.

The PLP was only a year in office when the
press was challenged by an inexperienced gov-
crnment.

In October, 1968 the Council of the Com-
monwealth Press Union in London was watch-
ing “with anxiety” for any further attempts to
attack the fundamental liberty of the Bahamian
press.

In its quarterly bulletin, which is circulated
throughout the Commonwealth, CPU’s Press
Freedom Committee said: “Press freedom in
the Bahamas remains on the defensive against
forays inspired by the vanity of politicians.”

It reported two cases, which it considered
infringements of the freedom of expression.

The first dealt with an instance when Speak-
er Braynen attempted to ban a Guardian
reporter from the House. The second was a
censure motion brought by Senator Simeon
Bowe against Tribune editor-publisher Sir Eti-
enne Dupuch. Two PLP ministers launched a
vitriolic attack in the House against Sir Eti-
enne, accusing him +f lying, distortion and
racism in his editorials.

A panel of leading citizens condemned the
idea of press censorship in a discussion over
radio ZNS. Nassau lawyer Ralph Seligman, QC,
branded the suggestion to “considér some
means of curbing unfair journalism” as the

“most repugnant thing to a democracy | that I
have ever heard.”

Mr Seligman said he believed in the freedom
of the press “unrestricted in any sense, shape or
form.”

He gave the example of London’s Communist
Daily Worker, which “spews out the most
ridiculous nonsense for the Communists... and

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the other papers rebut it. But if at any time the
British people tried to muzzle this section of
the press, I think they would be cutting the
throats of liberty.”

Some PLP politicians, exercising their
tongues for the first time in parliament, would
stand on their feet and make the most ridiculous
statements — statements that horrified them
when read in print. To wriggle out of difficult sit-
uations, they blamed reporters for misquoting
them. As there was no Hansard, there was no
way that a reporter could defend himself. For
years The Tribune fought for the right to tape
record House proceedings to protect our
reporters against unscrupulous politicians. Even-
tually reporters were allowed tape recorders.

However, before recorders were allowed
and before there was a Hansard, the House
tried to press through a Bill to severely punish
reporters accused of “false or misleading”
reports. The question was: Who was to decide
what constituted a “false or misleading” report,
especially among such thin-skinned politicians,
who believed there was more truth in their
word than a reporter’s.

Ralph Renick, vice president in charge of
news at WI'VJ Channel 4, told his TV audi-
ence that the Bahamas government had “intro-
duced a bill into its parliament which would in
essence curb the press in covering activities in
the House of Assembly and the Senate.

“Called the Powers and Privileges Act, the
bill provides that newsmen who publish what it
terms ‘false and misleading’ reports on pro-
ceedings in the House or Senate, may be found
guilty of contempt without any recourse to any
court.” And so his commentary continued.

Sir Etienne notified the Inter American Press
Association (IAPA), which cabled Sir Lynden
and both houses of the legislature advising them
to withdraw the controversial bill. The next day
the IAPA president flew to Nassau to join Sir
Etienne in his fight on behalf of the press of the
Bahamas. IAPA alerted the press of the world,
and telegrams of protests started to flow in.

Under local and world pressure, the Bill was
withdrawn, but the pressure on The Tribune,
which over the years took many forms, never let
up.

However, that year was the turning point
for the PLP. Up to that time the Bahamas’ first
majority government was the darling of the
world press — it could do no wrong. But when
the PLP threatened a free press, they had diffi-
culty getting a “good press” abroad.

We don’t know where Philip Davis was in
those years —possibly too young to be aware.
But today, instead of going forward, his sug-
gestion to punish the press for their views has
taken us back to some very ugly years.






Our police do
not need the
assistance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I LISTENED extensively to
Mr Damian Gomez on the
94.9FM Radio Talk Show on
Tuesday, April 3, 2007. His
statements about the judicial

system reminded me of letters ,

I have written to the press in
recent years criticising the sys-

‘tem and indicating how it was

helping criminals in our
nation. I was also very pleased
to hear his comments about
the exceptional work being
done by the police over the
past years. I have been saying
all along that our Police Force
is the best in the region. One
only has to look at the statis-
tics to find that the detection
rate On major crime is among
the best in the world. The
overcrowded prisons and the
massive backlog of cases are
evidence of the exceptional
work being done by our Police
Force. Yet, there are those
who are calling for recruit-
ment from the UK and other
countries to increase the
strength of our Force. We do
not need the assistance; our
Police personnel are perform-
ing with distinction; the exec-
utives of the Force have
demonstrated their commit-
ment and their ability to take
on the challenge and there is
no shortage of Bahamian
recruits. The only area for
which help may be considered
are in the scenes of crime and
DNA Units, whose personnel
are presently being over-
worked due to the large num-
ber of murders in the coun-
try.

We know that the strength
of the Force was somewhat
depleted with the introduction
of community policing and
urban renewal. Many of its
finest were attached to these
units. A major success of the
community policing unit is the
closing of the gap between
Police and the public. I would
say that community policing
urban renewal have been a
resounding success.

It is about time that our
Police Force, through its pub-
lic relations start providing the
public and, of course, the
politicians with information
about the successes of the two
programmes.

The recent promotions indi-
cate that more room has been
made at the top by providing
additional senior assistant

~ commissioners, assistant com-

missioners, chief superinten-

Des O aes

letters@triounemedia.net






dents, superintendents, and
other additional ranks. Young
Police Officers have a lot of
top positions to look forward
to in the years to come.

I was never in favour of the
“big” promotions and as a
senior officer I tried to get the
system changed to one where
there will be immediate pro-
motions when vacancies
became available.

The reason being that after
the big promotions the Force
loses the standard of perfor-
mance of any of those officers,
who feel neglected, bypassed
or victimised. 'The ineffective
performance lasts for several
months until another big pro-
motion is on the horizon. With
a system of immediate pro-
motion as vacancies occur offi-
cers have to maintain a high
standard of performance at all
times to qualify.

Promotions have always
been criticised and dejected
(personnel alleges political
favours).

I have remained very close
to the Police Force and many
of the senior and junior offi-
cers.

I know of the dedication,
commitment and excellent
standard of performance,
which was consistent. I am
hoping that those senior offi-
cers, who had become spe-
cialised and very successful in
certain areas of policing, in
particular criminal investiga-
tion will continue to perform
with credit in their new areas.
As an old detective I know/of
the great loss experienced
when experienced detectives

Action to

are plucked from the team. In
my twenty-five years in crimi-
nal investigation I had first
hand experience when the in-
put, consultation, dialogue and
directions were missed. It
helped when the replacement
came from within the team.

With the massive promotion
it must be realised by the
recipients that there is more
responsibility and the need for
more commitment. While the
Force has been very effective
in solving major crime there
are other areas in which the
same effect is lacking, namely
— discipline, eg dress code,
court appearances, conduct - ,
and work attitude, etc. A mas-
sive effort must be made to
reduce the number of com-
plaints against Police person-
nel. There is the need for
crime prevention education
through public forums and an
effort to organise neighbour-
hood watch in all areas of the
country. The latter should be a
commitment of the officer in
charge of each division and
every policeman in the area
he/she resides.

The zero tolerance concept
introduced to the Force by Mr
B K Bonamy must be imple-
mented to deal with the hun-
dreds of minor crimes and
traffic violations seen on the
streets daily, eg motorcyclists
must wear helmets, food ven-
dors must have health certifi-
cates, and something must be
done about the clubs with
lewd dancing and prostitution.

Congratulations to all of
those officers promoted.
Please be assured of my con-
tinuing cooperation.

PAUL
THOMPSON
Nassau,

2007.

save the

islands of Bimini

EDITOR, The Tribune.

FIRST, congratulations on your election in the Bahamas.

The Free National Movement put up a plan to establish marine
protected areas throughout the Bahamas.

Five sites were identified as priority for the Bahamian Marine
Reserve Network — Bimini was at the top of this list.

We have learned about Bimini from National Geographic and
hope you will take strong action to save the islands of Bimini.

Thank you for your attention to our letter and for your action in
this very serious matter. May we have a reply as to what action will

be taken?

MR and MRS M
BERNSTEIN
Brooklyn, NY,
May, 2007.

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Payee

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 5



© In brief

Man accused
of stealing
$2,000 of
phone cards

A MAN accused of stealing.
$2,000 worth of GSM cell phone
cards, as well as a sum of cash,
was arraigned in Magistrate's
court yesterday.

It was alleged that Ocassio
Floyd, 28, sometime between
2am and Yam on Friday, March
30, being concerned with anoth-
er stole 100 GSM cards valued
at $2,000, along with $125 cash,
the property of Anthony
Albury. Floyd was also charged
with causing damage.

It was alleged that on Fri-
day, March 30, Floyd caused
damage to a black coin changer
in the amount of $1,800, and a
phone card vending machine in
the sum of $8,000, the property
of Anthony Albury.

On a shopbreaking charge, it
was alleged that Floyd, on Sun-
day, June 10, attempted to
break into Bahamian Paint, sit-
uated on the Tonique Williams
Darling and Milo Butler High-
ways.

The accused, who was
arraigned before Magistrate
Guillimena Archer at Court 10
on Nassau Street, pleaded not
guilty to the charges and was
granted bail in the sum of
$6,000 on the stealing and dam-
age charges with one surety, and
$1,000 bail on the attempted
shopbreaking charge.

30-year-old
faces charge
of firearm
possession

A 30-YEAR-OLD man from
Augusta Street was arraigned
in Magistrate's Court yesterday
on a firearm and ammunition
charge.

According to court dockets,
Carlton Miller, on Saturday,

June 1, was found in possession ,,, ;
of a. 9mm pistol. Court dockets ,
further stated that on Saturday, —:
June 1, the accused was found

in possession of seven live
rounds of ammunition.

Miller was also charged with
threats of harm. It was alleged
that on Saturday, June 9, he
threatened to harm Herbert
Sears.

Miller who was arraigned
before Magistrate Guillimena
Archer at Court 10 on Nassau
Street, yesterday pleaded not
guilty to the charges and was
granted bail in the sum of
$10,900 with one surety on the
gun and ammunition charges,
aiid $800 bail on the threats of
harm charge. The case was
adjourned to September 10.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.

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Foulkes condemns
Christie for having
‘part-time minister’

MINISTER of Education
Carl Bethel hit out at former
Prime Minister Perry Christie
for demonstrably “crippling”
the country’s education sys-
tem by appointing one person
to serve as both Attorney
General and Minister of Edu-
cation under the PLP admin-
istration.

Mr Bethel, giving his con-
tribution to the budget debate,
told parliament on Tuesday
that having served in both
posts he knows first-hand the
necessary attention that each

job demands.

“Something had to suffer. It
was an insult to students, their
parents, the professionals and
administrators to have been
saddled with a part-time min-
ister. Every objective observer
called for a change, whether

it was the Bahamas Union of

Teachers, the general public,
newspaper editorials, the then
opposition — all called for a
full-time minister of education.

“I cry shame upon the for-
mer prime minister for having
crippled education for more
than three years with a half-
time minister,” he said.

Mr Bethel said that even
just a few weeks in office it is
apparent to him that the Min-

istry of Education demands -

and needs the full, detailed,
focused and uninterrupted
attention of a full-time minis-
ter.

He said that the his govern-
ment’s 2007/08 budget is
designed to reflect and main-
tain an inclusive system, and to
facilitate the continued growth
and success of the Bahamian
people.

“Higher levels of account-
ability, productivity and
empowerment will be antici-
pated: by those who have
placed their trust in us and giv-
en us the mandate for a third
time to govern this country,”
he said.

’Mr Bethel said that in the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and

® DION Foulkes

Culture, considerable empha-
sis will continue to be placed
on improving and enhancing
the core educational compo-
nents of human resources and
the curriculum, as well as the
technology and physical plant.

“This government invests in
our children and citizenry
because the rebuilding and
expansion of the public edu-
cation system is the corner-
stone of the nation’s econom-
ic and democratic future,” he
said.

Mr Bethel emphasised that
the focus and mission of his
ministry is that of building
people. |

It is because of this focus,
he said, that his government
has made the conscious deci-
sion to combine the ministries
of Education and Youth,
Sports and Culture so that the
government’s efforts can be
better rationalised and the
financial and human resources
can be appropriately allocated
and carefully managed. !

“In doing so, we realisesthat
we will be able to get greater
value for money, causing our
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AN acute blood shortage
continues to be a year-round
problem in the Bahamas, chief
medical officer at the Ministry
of Health, Dr Merceline Dahl-
Regis said.

While the blood collection in
the Bahamas should be at 16,000
units annually, it is only at
around 5,000 units, or one third
or what should be collected
based on population size, she
said at a press conference to pro-
mote World Blood Donor Day.

“We are appreciative of those
who regularly donate blood
without any special incentive to
do so, but we need more blood
donors,” Dr Dahl-Regis said.

The National Blood Bank
Committee has already begun
a strategy to increase the pool
of these blood donors with the
planned introduction of the club
25 programme, she said.

Dr Dalil-Regis explained that
the programme places the focus
«. voung donors between the
ages of 17 and 25, and the forg-
ing of significant partnerships
with members of civil society.

The health ministry also
intends to create a centralised
blood bank service to ensure
standardisation and quality for
the collection of safe blood, as
well as appoint a national blood
procurement officer, she said.

Dr Dahl-Regis commended
the World Health Organisation’s
regional body — the Pan Ameri-
can Health Organisation

(PAHO) - for providing “great”.

technical support, training and
educational promotion activities
in the Bahamas and the
Caribbean in an effort to improve
the systems and ensure the vision
of safe blood to the public.
While the theme for this
year’s World Blood Donor Day
is ‘Safe Blood for Safe Moth-

. erhood’, PAHO Representative

Lynda Campbell said her organ-
isation decided the Americas
will have a different theme —
‘Children the Gift of Life
through Blood Transfusions’.
Children from across
PAHO’s member states who
have benefited from blood

LOCAL NEWS |



THE TRIBUNE







@ PERMANENT secretary in the Ministry of Health and
Social Development Barbara Burrows (standing) introduces
eight-year-old Deneka Brickell Rolle whose material, which
described her experience as a blood donor recipient won her a
trip to Washington, DC. Also pictured, from left are paediatric
haematologist/oncologist at PMH, Dr Corrine Sinquee and Pan
American Health Organisation representative Linda Campbell.

donations were encouraged to
submit material that described
their experiences, Ms Campbell
explained.

After the entries were
reviewed, five children were
selected from Columbia,

Guatemala, Costa Rica, Suri-

name and the Bahamas to tray-
el' to Washington, DC, to attend
the official PAHO World Blood
Donor celebrations.

The children who entered
into the competition have their
stories recorded in a booklet.

The recipient chosen from
the Bahamas is eight-year-old
Deneka Brickell Rolle.

Paediatric haematologist/
oncologist at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, Dr Corrine Sin-
quee explained that Deneka
had leukaemia and survived to
tell the tale.

Another girl, Ashanti Rolle,
who has sickle cell enema, had
multiple strokes and several
blood transfusions in the
Bahamas before she had the
opportunity to go to California
to have bone marrow trans-
plantation, Dr Sinquee said.

‘caribbeanlandscape.net

(Photo: BIS/Derek Smith)

At one point she had a blood
transfusion every month for
three years straight, it was dis-
closed.

Both girls’ mothers appealed
to the public to give more
blood.

“Tam very. grateful to all of
the volunteer blood donors,
because there were many times
when I did not have anyone to
donate for her to get a blood
transfusion in a particular
month, and | had to rely on vol-
unteer donors,” said Ashanti’s
mother Rhonda Rolle,

“There are many other chil-
dren and adults who may need
transfusions. So I make an
appeal to those who can donate
blood to please do so and help
save a life,” she said. .

Blood Bank supervisor
Everette Miller noted that most
persons giving blood come in on
behalf of other persons, “and you
do not see them again for years.

“We encourage everyone to
give. Become more consistent.
Become volunteer. blood
donors. We would really appre-
ciate that,” he said.

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THE TRIBUNE

IHURSVDAY, JUNE 14, ZUU/, FAUE /







@ PIRATE Anne Bonnie relates her story to tourists at Rawson Square.

Summer junkanoo
revitalises history

DURING this year’s
Junkanoo Summer Festival
famous individuals in Bahamian
history will make an appearance
on Bay Street to create a unique
shopping experience for visitors.

Bahamians and tourists on
Bay Street will encounter
pirates such as Anne Bonnie,
multi-millionaires such as Sir
Harry Oakes, and Royal Gov-
ernors such as Woodes Rogers
during the next two months.

The appearances of actors
who portray the historic char-
acters are part of the Junkanoo
Summer Festival’s “A Walk
Through History” initiative.

Every Tuesday and Friday
between June 8 and July 29,
from 10am to 4am, the charac-
ters will be stationed through-
out Bay Street, relating their
part in Bahamian history to
shoppers.

Janet Johnson, director of
events strategy and special pro-
jects in Ministry of Tourism,
said the effort is part of a move
to make Bay Street competitive
with other shopping districts in

Nassau and also add a special
element to people’s shopping
experiences.

“It is all in good fun. It's edu-
cational and interactive, and
that's what we hope to do,” she
said.

For the twice-weekly event,
Bay Street will be split up into
six blocks.

The history zone runs from
Navy Lion Road to Victoria
Avenue.

The age of discovery zone
will feature Christopher Colum-
bus and the Lucayans.

The age of exploration will
feature William Sayle and the
Eleutheran Adventurers.

There will also be blocks ded-
icated to piracy, Loyalists and
Africans, blockade and rum
runners, and the World Wars.

“We hope that Bahamians will
come back to Bay Street to shop.
We are also encouraging private
car park owners to open up their
car parks on weekends and make

it free of charge:so that Bahami-.

ans can come down here:to'shop.

“That's why they go\to the:

malls, because of the free park-
ing,” Ms Johnson said.
Samantha Carter, former

Miss Bahamas Universe, is .

among the cast of characters
who will appear on Bay Street.

Ms Carter portrays a historic
guest of the Royal Victoria
Hotel, which once stood at the
Victoria Gardens.

She said she and others will
have important bits of informa-
tion to share with shoppers.

“The most important thing is’

the fact that we have history to
tell as a country. A lot of people
are not aware of our history.
So, not only our visitors will
become aware of what hap-
pened in the Bahamas, how we
became the way we are now,
but our locals will also be given
a chance to learn about our his-
tory,” Ms Carter said.

A Walk Through History
characters can be found on Bay
Street between 10am and 4pm.

The entire shopping experi-
ence, which includes historic
themes in some Bay Street stores,

- will be-available 9am to,6pm.
bed ry

‘Smart is Beautiful

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THE TRIBUNE



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_ LOCAL NEWS
~~ | The Ambassador

~~ | Designate of Israel
pays courtesy call

AMBASSADOR Designate of
Israel Yosef Livne yesterday pre-
sented his credentials to Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of
Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette
during a courtesy call in the
Diplomatic Room at the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs.

Both countries pledged to fos-
ter greater ties and create new
partnerships in the areas of trade,
agriculture and reverse osmosis
projects.

The Deputy Prime Minister
commended Israel on its major
successes in the field of reverse
osmosis.

(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)





Bethel: people of Sea Breeze
will not turn their back on FNM

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THE people of Sea Breeze
were not swayed by “PLP lies
and distortions” from voting
for someone who was “known
and trusted” and will not turn
its back on the FNM despite
the PLP’s intentions to take
the seat to election court, MP

for the area and Minister of

Education Carl Bethel said.
Mr Bethel’s constituency
will most likely be one of five
seats that the PLP is expected
contest in election court.
Addressing the House of
Assembly on Tuesday. the
education minister said that

the opposition cannot deny
that although the battle was
long and hard, on.the FNM
side, it was fairly fought.
“We weathered the
onslaught of the entire politi-
cal machinery of the PLP,
whether in terms of the arbi-
trary cutting of two polling
divisions in half, thereby con-
fusing and frustrating voters,
or in terms of Hooding the
area with money, or the
legions of PLP campaign
workers from other con-
stituencies, together with the
other activities of the PLP’s

dirty tricks department,” he
said.

Mr Bethel said although the
PLP is currently “bemoaning”
how the election process was
conducted in Sea Breeze, they
changed the constituency
name, the boundaries, the can-
didate and despite this are
now are going to court to try
to change the results.

“No matter what they do,
the voters of Sea Breeze
decided that the change they
really needed was a change of
government, and they did just
that on May 2, 2007.

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“So as the persons on that
side continue merely to fight
for themselves, we on this side
will continue to fight for the
Bahamian people. As they
fight to hold onto power, we
will fight to empower Bahami-
ans, as they fight to distract
and derail the wishes of the
voters, we will fight to make
the wishes of the voters come
true,” Mr Bethel said.

He said that under the pre-
vious FNM government, Sea
Breeze — then called Holy
Cross — received two new pri-
mary schools where there
were none before and the
Charles Saunders Highway.

The process of new street-
lighting for the main Golf
Course Boulevard, a’s well as
the upgrading of the antiquat-
ed and dysfunctional electric-
ity system were also begun in
the area, he said.

“As for me, I will continue
to the struggle to fight for the
good people of the Sea Breeze
constituency who know that
when IJ was in I looked out for
them. When I was out I still
looked out for them, and now
that I am back, Sea Breeze
need not worry, I will look
after my people,” the MP said.

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LOCAL NEWS:

Farewell gala reception will honour

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 9



former Grand Bahama police chief

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Former
Grand Bahama police chief
Ellison Greenslade, who was
transferred to New Providence

-following his promotion to
senior assistant commissioner,
will be honored at a farewell
gala reception in Freeport.

Senior officials at the Royal
Bahamas Police Force in Grand
Bahama announced that the
event will be held on June 22
in the convention centre at the
Westin at Our Lucaya Resort.

Mr Greenslade served as
assistant commissioner of police
in Grand Bahama for seven
years.

Chief Supt Emerick Seymour,
a member of the planning com-
mittee, said the event will allow
officers of the northern region
to show their appreciation to
Mr Greenslade for his contri-
butions over the years.



@ FORMER Grand Bahama
police chief Ellison Greenslade

Mr Seymour said that many
things have been accomplished
within the region during Mr
Greenslade’s time in office, par-
ticularly in the area of adminis-

tration of the force.

Mr Greenslade, who has a
Master’s Degree in business
administration, is also responsi-
bie for the development of
information technology on the
police force.

The event, which starts at
7pm, will be attended by Com-
missioner Paul Farquharson,
and many senior officials and
officers from the Bimini,
Abaco, and the Berry Islands
districts.

Mr Greenslade has served as
a member of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force since
1979.

He graduated the top in class
at the Bahamas Police Acade-
my, receiving the coveted Baton
of Honor.

He attended the University
of Miami and obtained a Mas-
ter’s Degree. He is also recipi-
ent of a post graduate certifi-
cate in police management
and criminal justice from
University of Leicester in the

Department of Culture to continue
support for National Arts Festival

THE Department of Culture will continue to
invest in the development and promotion of the E
Clement Bethel National Arts Festival and plans
to provide workshops and training in the performing
arts for Family Island participants, Minister of State
for Culture Charles Maynard announced.

“In this way we plan to truly turn national all of
the entities that are now deemed as such,” he said
during his 2007/08 budget communication in the
House of Assembly.

Minister Maynard said the National Arts Festival,
named after the first director of culture, provides a
singular opportunity for all Bahamians to compete
with one another for awards in various areas, includ-
ing music, dance and drama.

“The festival holds a great attraction for school-
age children and serves as a springboard for many of
them to launch a career in the arts,” Minister May-
nard said.

“The festival, however, is more than just a youth
competition. It embraces Bahamians of all ages and
the community sector (of the competition) has been
a resounding success, especially among the Family
Islands,”

“We endeavour to improve the quality of the per-
formances and increase opportunities for aspiring
artists to hone their skills,” he said.

Mr Maynard added that consideration is also
being given to granting national status to a few oth-
er developing entities such as the Bahamas Con-
cert Orchestra.

The minister said the strengthening of some of the
country’s other existing institutions is also neces-
sary.

He said the National Dance School, for exam-
ple, has been in the forefront of training dancers and
choreographers in the Bahamian society for many
years. Many of the owners of private dance schools

have passed through there as students.

“Recently, however, there has been a marked
decline in the quality and output of the National
Dance School.

“My ministry intends to halt this deterioration in

~ one of our premier cultural entities and restore the

school to its former position as a dominant factor in
shaping the cultural identity of the Bahamas,” he
said.

Minister Maynard said there is also an urgent
need for Bahamians to write, document and record
the country’s cultural history and to preserve “our
rich cultural heritage.”

He said the music heritage and research unit is a
new aspect of his ministry, which was established
under the former government.

“Today we are in the process of giving this unit the
mandate to collect, document, preserve and dis-
seminate information about Bahamian music of all
kinds.

“Jt is our goal to use the results of this research to
produce materials for our schools and for the general
population,” he said.

Mr Maynard pointed out that music is a vital part
of the country’s cultural history and that Bahamians
should not only know the history of Bach or
Chopin.

“It is imperative that they know about Blind
Blake, Joseph Spence, Timothy Gibson and Freddie
Munnings, Sr,” he said.

To this end, the minister said, his government
will allocate resources for the required specialists and
musicologists needed to traverse the islands and
compile their findings.

“Resources will also be allocated for transforming
these findings into useful tools for the education of
our people, as well as for their entertainment and
cultural growth,” Minister Maynard said.



the police force medals for mer-
itorious service, as well as good
conduct.

Prime Minister’s Above and
Beyond Award for Heroism,
Boss of the Year 2002/2003, and

United Kingdom.
Mr Greenslade also received
the Queen’s Police Medal, the

Ne NaN eh ales

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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Christie makes
FNM ‘culture
of fear’ claim

FROM page one

try. However I am judged by
history, the one thing that is cer-
tain is that those who would
succeed me will learn from what
is happening now and are most
unlikely to be as trusting as I
was,” he said.

“T fear that my actions of
decency and fair play have now
been undone in just six weeks,”
the leader of the opposition
added.

Mr Christie also told the
House that as prime minister
he left in place people who
could almost be described as
“operatives”, but he made this
decision because they were
Bahamians, who too had the
right to work, free of fear.

@ PLP leader Perry Christie
(BIS Photo Patrick Hanna)



Former Asst Commissioner: witness
protection should be ‘Caricom issue’

FROM page one

stated that police have done a
"good job to date" with pro-
tecting those who are due to
testify.

Officials in the Cayman
Islands, Bermuda and Anguilla
have discussed in past years the
possibility of regional witness
protection programme being set
up which would allow witnesses
from those countries to be
removed to other Caribbean
nations prior to their court
appearance.

Such a possibility might
increase the number of persons
who are willing to testify, where
currently some are fearful of
coming forward for fear of
becoming a target of crime.

However, it has also been
noted that the issue of protect-
ing witnesses would be a less
pressing one if crime fighters
were able to rely less on wit-
ness testimony, and more on
forensic evidence.

‘Former assistant commis-
sioner Thompson suggested yes-
terday that the threat to wit-



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nesses could also be lessened if
sworn affidavits were taken,
removing the incentive for dan-
gerous individuals to try to
silence them, as an affidavit can
be used as evidence in court in
place of the individual's spoken
testimony.

In fact, once such an affidavit
has been taken, it would be in
the accused's interest for the
individual to appear as their
cross-examination may be ben-
eficial to their defence, said Mr
Thompson.

Witness protection is a con-
cern for Dr David Allen, psy-
chiatrist and chairman of the
commission behind the Urban
Renewal programme.

He has spoken out repeated-
ly about intimidation suffered

by Bahamians who have been.

called to testify and, like Mr
Thompson, has called for key

ACCENT FURNITURE

witnesses to be taken out of the
country for their own protec-
tion.

Yesterday Asst Commis-
sioner Greenslade said: "We
have an obligation that people
feel safe and secure, be they
ordinary persons or people who
are called to testify before the
courts.

"We have done a good job to
date. I am satisfied that we have
a good team of detectives deal-
ing on a daily basis with issues
of witness protection, although
we are continually looking
for ways to refine and
improve."

He added that Caricom
affairs are within the "remit of
the government" and he is sat-
isfied government is giving the
suggestion of a regional witness
protection programme the
"attention it deserves."

“DOW TREATMEN

MA





ej, THE TRIBUNE
be

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 11



PM lamhasts

FROM page one

| have a chance (to make a:
' decision),” he said.

the majority of his party.

Christie blasts Ingraham over

After receiving the brunt of O
; this verbal assault almost
| alone in the House, Mr :
Christie was finally joined by : an Q) a amas ¢; 1 an

Mr Ingraham said he asked;
» «Mr Christie earlier that day if :
Rgehe had “missed” being prime : FROM page one
we
‘ yesterday took the opportunt-
ty to speak out on the resigna-
tion of Mr Jarrett from the
board of the Bank Bahamas.
According to Mr Jarrett, the
request for his resignation came
directly from the Prime Minis-
ter’s office.

«minister, to which he claimed
<.Mr Christie replied “Yes, ;
prayes
»¢ “IT wasn’t sure you under- :
tx’ stood me so | asked you two
“’»more times,” Mr Ingraham ;
said to Mr Christie. “And on :
~ each occasion he said, "Yes he :
did’. And I understand. Now :

rin my case | didn’t miss being : we

i hae eee Mr Christie lambasted Mr

;*, prime minister. [didn’t dream : iaeahain toe thewemovalor

»* about becoming prime minis- : Me 7 = CW e :

**.ter again — notwithstanding ; Pe etret ie WOO Wes SEP Oe
‘ : ed to the post of the bank’s

b < 7
\°4°what the leader of the oppo- |
&

** sition was saying about my ; chairman in December 2004

v.jonsing’ for power. I was sat- | under the PLP government.

p's isfied that I did my best each | “You asked. me if I could
ie and every day I was in office. | help you to get Al Jarrett out of
ES “And the transition forme } the position,” Mr Christie

shouted at the prime minister
across the floor of House yes-
terday morning.

The PLP leader said that
when he became prime minis-
ter in 2002 he left Hugh Sands,
who had been appointed in
1996 under the previous FNM
government, in place as chair-
man of the Bank of the
Bahamas for another two
years.

“T left him in place because it
was important, at least for a
season, to create the powerful
imagery that my government
was sufficiently secure to cause
the Bahamians who did not
support us politically, to remain
in posts and show that they can
do as good a job for my gov-
ernment as they did for the
government that put them

-- from being prime minister to :
being a citizen anda member ;

_ of parliament was an easy one ;
for me. I regret that my friend, :

* the leader of the Opposition |
‘can't say the same thing. But I :
, hope that as he wrestles with ;
_, his inner being he will come to :
_- terms about that reality about :
~ which he cannot do anything,”
_or he said. :

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
j making news in their





vehicle outside of the Bank of
the Bahamas and asking him
to step down from his post.

As long as such practices are
taking place, Mr Christie said,
there can be no healing
between the FNM and the
PLP.

Prime Minister Ingraham
responded to Mr Christie by
saying that the request for Mr
Jarrett’s resignation was han-
dled in the correct manner. —

He said that leading up to
the general election, Mr Jarrett
made “all sorts of allegations”
against him and his fellow
FNMs on various radio sta-
tions.

Mr Ingraham explained that
Mr Jarrett failed to respond to
several resignation requests,
even after persons within the
financial services sector talked
to him about the matter.

Finally, the prime minister
said, he saw Mr Jarrett outside
of the bank one day and per-
sonally talked to him about
resigning.

“T said, ‘Al, why are you
making it so difficult, just
resign’,” Mr Ingraham said.

The prime minister said that
he sought advice from the pri-
vate law firm which represents

the Bank of the Bahamas.

The law firm, he said, told
him that he had the “unfettered
right” to terminate Mr Jarrett
as he was not an employee at
the bank, but a member of the
board.

He was also advised, Mr
Ingraham said, that Mr Jarrett
would not have to be remuner-
ated in any way.

“You don’t have to pay him
a nickel or a dime,” Mr Ingra-
ham said citing the bank’s
lawyers.

“Notwithstanding that,” the
prime minister said, “I gave
instructions to give him three
months pay. Now I’m the. vic-
timiser,” Mr Ingraham said.

The Bank of the Bahamas
on Tuesday gave. notice that,
effective from June 8, Mr Jar-
rett is no longer a director or
chairman with the bank.

Mr Jarrett told The Tribune
yesterday that was very pleased
with Mr Christie’s statements in
the House of Assembly, but
that he feels nothing further
needs to be said on the matter.

He said his time at the Bank
of the Bahamas was a very
exciting one, but that he is now
looking forward to moving on
with his life.





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neighbourhoods. Perhaps
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“This government, sadly to
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Mr Christie added that Mr






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Jarrett’s removal was conduct-
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE. ig







THE
with South Africa the Caribbean
und Latin America segment of
the African Diaspora conference
from August 1-3.

Phe South Atrican High Con-
missioner for CARICOM and
Ambassador to Haiti, Fatth
Doreen Radebe, and chief dire:
tor for the Americas in the
Department of Foreign Affairs
Ambassador Mbulelo Rakwena,
were in New Providence to go
over preparations and to renew
the Government’s commitment
to co-hosting the conlerence.

“We chose the Bahamas
because it is part of the CARI-

Bahamas will co-host



COM countries. [t is the part of

the Diaspora that has progressed
so much that, today when we talk
about CARICOM, the Bahamas
becomes one of those important
countries,” High Commissioner
Radebe said.

They paid a courtesy call on
the Minister of Lands and Local
Government, Sidney Collie, on
‘Tuesday.

There have been previous
African Diaspora conferences in
Kingston, Jamaica, in 2005 and
Khartoum, Sudan in 2006,

“We are just taking this move,
because we know this will further
strengthen the African Union
(AU) and the African continent,

ey






is to co-host segment of;
iaspora conference



f@ THEE Bahamas will co-host the African Diaspora Conference.
Pictured from left during a courtesy call on the Minister of Lands
and Local Government, the Hon Sidney Collie are Chief Director,
Americas, in the Department of Foreign Affairs, Ambassador
Mbulelo Rakwena, South African High Commissioner for all
CARICOM States and Ambassador to Haiti Ady Faith Doreen
Radebe, Minister Collie, and Permanent Secretary Harrison

Thompson.

together with CARICOM coun-
tries and the Caribbean,” High
Commissioner, Radebe said
explaining why the conference is

(Photo by: Patrick Hanna)

taking place in the Bahamas.

Mr Collie said he attended the
conference in Kingston and
observed that South Africa was

NUL Ye

1 in-hospital stay ina.
0 hospitals.

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including the USA & The Bahamas.

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taking the lead in the planning of’

the conferences, as well as a lead-,,2 '
ership role in sensitising persons

to the peculiarities of Africans, -7
and the African Diaspora. aa)

Ambassador Rakwena
explained that these conferences .. |,
are trying to achieve a number of 0
things. While the AU is made up ae
of five regions, it is trying to
include the African Diaspora as”
the sixth region.

“The importance of the,
African Diaspora begs the ques-
tion of the recognition of such,” “4
Ambassador Rakwena said. He iu

The conferences also‘seek to'--*-
change the way Africans or per- ‘
sons of African descent are seen‘
throughout the world. aris

These persons are often mar- ginalised and living in poverty,:9q
and the desire is to cast the imagez9i
in a different understanding and.
appreciation, he said. 18

The objective is to deepen dia-. i;
logue and to “engender a sense of,
co-operation” between Africa:
and the Diaspora, poe
Rakwena explained.

This dialogue needs to include. on
discussions on the part Africa and’,
those of African ancestry play in
trade, economic development and
the health systems found through- |
out world, he said. 28

5; and
cg

1

hiswayto .

, asm :
say
ye

CORDERO Minnis of’.
Kingsway Academy walked away’ <*
as the winner of the Texaco 6th '“*
Annual Safety Speech competi- ;
tion, winning over a field of nine 21
speakers. . yn

In addition to winning a
$10,000-scholarship to attend the | rr
college of his choice, Cordero will ;; 3.
serve as the 2007/08 Texacog' 4
national youth safety spokesper- 9:
son and play a key role on the,,,;;
National Road Safety Commit-
tee.

The young aspiring minister of
the Gospel is Kingway's head-"
boy, and expects to enter College ~
in January, 2008.

His personal motto is “I believe
that the steps of a righteous man >j
are ordered by the Lord and if I ;
put Him at the forefront of my 5
endeavours, success and triumph 34
are inevitable. ®

“Seek Him diligently and not*;
complacently.” 3

Capturing second and third a
places respectively were Samuel «;
Brown of Grand Bahama®
Catholic High School, and¢
Rashad Rolle of Doris Johnson %
Senior High School. "*

Samuel and Rashad will”
receive scholarships in ites

32



“amounts of $6,000 and $3, 000 5

respectively.

According to Armando Vegas, «
Chevron's district retail manag- *,
er, this year's competition was a a
great success in more ways than
one.

“We had our largest contingent’
of Family Island students partici-
pating, as well as the largest num-
ber of Family Island participants
advancing to the finals.

“We are very pleased about -
this, as it shows that these stu-
dents as on par with their New
Providence counterparts.

“We are also pleased with the
large number of male participants
this year”, said Mr. Vegas.

Mr Vegas explained that “the
100 per cent increase in scholar- *
ship monies this year is a reflec-*
tion of Chevron's commitment to
developing the youth of the
Bahamas, and more importantly, '
to increasing their awareness
about road safety.”

In previous vears, scholarships
were awarded in the amounts of
$5,000, $3,000 and $1,500 to the
top three finishers.

The other finalists were
Shorneka Thompson of Inagua
All-Age School; Colton Jones of
San Salvador High School,
Cliffrielle Sands of Central -
Eleuthera High School; Brooke
Sherman ef Bishop Michael
Eldon School; Lancelot Darville
Jr of Grand Bahama Catholic
High School, and Marcel
Gibson of Central Andros High |
School.

All nine finalists were present-
ed with laptop computers and the ,
Sharon Wilson Award.

ee

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{



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 13



Think tank founder to give
his explanation for African
poverty at Nassau Institute

"FOR God's sake, please
stop the aid!"

So says James Shikwati
founder of the libertarian think
tank IREN in Nairobi, Kenya.

Speaking about the disas-
trous effects of western devel-
opment policy in Africa, cor-
rupt rulers, and the tendency to
overstate the AIDS problem he
says: “The countries that have
collected the most development
aid are also the ones that are in
the worst shape. Despite the bil-
lions that have poured in to
Africa, the continent remains
poor.”

How could all the money and
other relief and good intentions
have the disastrous effects of
perpetuating poverty instead of
resolving it?

James Shikwati will give his
explanation for African poverty
at a Nassau Institute and Atlas
Foundation Symposium at
Atlantis on Thursday, June
21. Also speaking at the sym-
posium will be Dr Michael
Walker and Michael Fairbanks
of OTF (On the Frontier).

The symposium will be held
in the Orion and Zeus Rooms
at Atlantis from 9.30am to
2.30pm.

Dr Walker of the Fraser
Institute will discuss the lessons
from the global experience for
Bahamian health care reform.

Mr Fairbanks, founder of
OTF, will talk on the subject of
the Bahamas in the era of total
global competition.

Mr Shikwati will also
describe his journey as a young
economist and discovery of lib-
ertarian principles. It began
when he read Frederick Basti-
at’s little book “The Law”. This
remarkable classic with its rig-
orous logic motivated him to a
different understanding of the
causes of poverty.

Since his discovery, he has
maintained a dialogue with
Lawrence W. Reed of the
Mackinac Centre for Public Pol-
icy and with The Atlas Eco-
nomic Research Foundation.

The Nassau Institute spon-
sored Larry Reed’s visit to Nas-
sau in the last week of May. Mr
Reed’s subject was “The Sev-

James Shikwati will
speak at symposium



en Principles of Sound Public
Policy.

“An enthralled sapalence
unfortunately did not include
any members of Parliament,
although they were invited,”
said a spokesman for the Insti-
tute.

At the symposium the audi-
ence will be introduced to a new
way of thinking about the

wii Professionals Trust

Bahamian economy, ideas dif-
ferent from those that have
motivated politicians of both
political parties.

‘The theme for the symposium
is “Changing the direction of a
country lo re-energize its tal-
ents.”

Lor more information about
the speakers and to register go
to www.nassauinstitute.org

Ae Prt ieee Aa

SEATS (te
& rr TS SiC eCe

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS.

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE P52. Boe












THIS MONTH’S TOPIC:
“Beware - Pain and Swelling in the Balls - You Could Lose Them.”

A Lesson on Common Problems of the Testicles in Men and Boys.

sae ~~ [TECTURE DATE

Thursday, June 21, 2007@ 6pm fs | f /
B SHOWN with ‘heir Genanoie are (I to r): Fr Kingsley Knowles, Fr Stephen Grant and Fr *.
Dots Hospi) Coors Boon Rudolph Cooper. a

“o
we

; g Please join us as our guest every third Georgina celebrates 100th i
eicRCER: | Thursday of the month for this | birthday At S pecial mass

scintillating series of the most relevant
week celebrated her 100th

Dr. Robin Roberts, Urologist health issues affecting society today.
“| \ Ei ) AW ES ATHTUR birthday with a special mid-day
mass at St Matthew’s Anglican
OVER YOUR Church.

With clear sight and a sound

OLD ONE i! _ memory, ‘Mama’ — as she is

mai 5 known to scores of grand- and

great-grandchildren — burst out

The Affordable Solution in shouts of praise thanking
to Worn-Out Bathtubs

God for her long and good life.
Having outlived all of her sib-
a a lings, Mrs Forrest,.a native of
* Bathtub Liners are designed to fit over worn-out bathtubs
*Wall Surrounds to cover existing bath walls: In simulated Tile and Marble
" Shower Base Liners to go over existing Shower bases

the Pinder's Point, Grand
Bahama, served as an appren- ;
* Cultured Marble Vanity Tops and Sinks
* Great Shower Door selection

tice cook in her younger days.
* Quality Faucets, All-Wood Vanities

She was employed at the 4
Butlins Hotel in West End, *
www.rebathbahamas.com

which later became the Jack ,
Tar Hotel. é

Open Monday - Friday, 9:00am - 5:00pm
By Appointment Saturday - 11:00am - a opin

Always attending in prayer
Telephone’ : ot

and worship, Mrs Forrest of f
(242) 393-8501 “Authorized Dealer”

began her Christian formation
Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street

Treat Dad like a Kine





x
i

WITH her grandsons at her

=e ee ee











now attends the Church of ,
Epiphany in Nassau. "

Friends and well-wishers {
saluted ‘Mama’ Forrest ina !
grand dinner after the mass ‘
with live music by the Royal ,,
Bahamas Police Force pop
band. 4




* DOCTORS HOSPITAL | ') Abbott

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OSG ane oo 0.4. 4%. a Seo. he Be

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If he ies music hen eoone him
Help him dig deeper into the Word something from our wide selection
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We have many mare great ideas fer fathers, pranapathers or anpene en your gift Mar



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 15







L VRS eS


















Visit our newly
renovated store“
and discover
many gift ideas
including:
Books

Bibles
(US Retail price)

Gifts
Cards
Mugs

Music
And More!

Gueaie 9:30am - 6: Doin
Monday to Saturday





©

_—

OPEN Zam for eye biast 6
Monday - Saturday
Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
Telephone: 394-7040

www.logosbahamas.com 6
Visit our one Boek eres - over | rnillion titles!



Plies Reni hie, yep coda HM
19 fav guna eth Aoenangnae seen

Fen wancing, mutts anbccitin’s
Manin die

“Being informed about local news, sports,
entertainment and world events is importaat to
me. The Tribune is my choice for news and

information. The Tribune is my newspaper.”

JASON RAHMING
CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN

Purchase The Tribune from your
local store or street vendor.

The Tribune

My Vewe. Vly Vlewspapor!



» Th

sere

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FROM
MULTIDISCOUNT FURNITURE &

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

eS

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agmss Ee)

2
be

i$] bec a8,

THE TRIBUNE



Â¥



THE TRIBUNE



A PARTNERSHIP FOR THE
FUTURE OF THE BAHAMAS.



APT A-\UAIS. From the renovations on Cable Beach
Resort to the development of Baha Mar, local culture
and the natural landscape are the inspiration. And
preservation of these resources remains paramount.
It is, after all, this beauty that makes visiting the
islands of the The Bahamas a dream for so many

around the world.

In just four short years, travellers from around the
world will be able to come explore and discover why
Bahamians are so proud to call these islands home.
And they'll be bringing with them a desire
for adventure and the steady source of tax
and tourism revenue which sustains and grows the

island economy.

THURSDAY, JUOE

We've developed a strong partnership with the
people of The Baharhas and have established a track
record of fairness and ethics. We hope to build on

this relationship as we move forward.

To ensure an exciting and bright future, and continue
the process of transforming Cable Beach, let us work
together to make it happen. |

BAHA MAR. GOOD FOR THE BAHAMAS.
EVEN BETTER FOR BAHAMIANS.







PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

INTERNATIONAL NEWS.

THE TRIBUNE



Britain’s highest court rules on case
of six Iraqis killed by British troops

i LONDON

THE House of Lords on
Wednesday rejected claims by



families of people killed in Iraq
that European human rights law
applied to the conduct of British
troops throughout the country,

according to Associated Press.
Such laws only applied to

people held in custody by

British troops, the House of

‘established 1929
HARBOUR BAY SHOPPING PLAZA & THE PLAZA, MACKEY ST





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PRE PAA



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JM CHAGA VA

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Lords affirmed, refusing to
extend that protection to those
injured or killed by British sol-
diers on the streets of Iraq.
The issue arose in the case of

can 1°

six Iraqis who were killed by
British troops in southern Iraq
in separate incidents in 2003.
The case was brought by the
families of the victims.

shave one?







DANN GS



Vay utr aves
RECENT NG «








BIG Directory Publications.

The Lords upheld lower court
rulings that human rights pro-
tections applied in the case of
Baha Mousa, a Basra hotel
clerk who died after being beat-
en while in British custody.

Phil Shiner, a lawyer for
Mousa’s family, said the ruling
was “a massive breakthrough
in my clients’ efforts to secure
accountability for deaths and
torture in detention.”

However, the House of Lords
found no reason to apply
those protections to the other
cases.

“The evidence of senior
British officers indicates that,
on the ground, the available
British troops faced formidable
difficulties due to terrorist activ-
ity, the volatile situation and
the lack of any effective
Iraqi security forces,” Lord
Bingham wrote in the lead opin-
ion.

“In these circumstances ... I
would not consider that the
United Kingdom was in effec-
tive control of Basra and the
surrounding area for purposes
of jurisdiction under article 1 of
the Convention at the relevant
time,” Lord Bingham wrote.

“Leaving the other rights and
freedoms on one side, with all
its troops doing their best, the
United Kingdom did not even
have the kind of control of Bas-
ra and the surrounding area
which would have allowed it to
discharge the obligations” of
the human rights convention,
Lord Bingham wrote.

In 2005, the Court of Appeal
upheld a High Court ruling that
both the European Convention

on Human Rights and the.

Britain’s own Human Rights
Act applied in Mousa’s case,
but not in the others.

Mousa was arrested during a
raid at the Haitham Hotel in
Basra then fatally beaten by
British soldiers. In March, a
court martial convicted one sol-
dier of inhumane treatment but
acquitted five others charged in
the case.

The House of Lords is the
highest court of appeal for Eng-
land, Wales and Northern Ire-
land.



NASSAU - 322-9183=7 4 FREEPORT» 3522336 5) |
FAMILY ISLANDS = 1-242=300- gore i

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 19
ERNATIONAL NEWS

AFRICAN elephant babies Kariba, top, and Kando, bottom, play in the outdoor enclosure in Tierpark zoo in Berlin, Wedaes-
day, June 13, 2007. Kando, who was born on May 20, 2007, was united with his family for the first time.
(AP Photo/Franka Bruns)

setoeury tees

Storewide Discounts on
All Men’s Footwear

Huge Selection of Men’s Footwear
from Dress Casual - to Casual, Urban,

The Tribune wants to Boating and of course Athletic!
hear from people who
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~-| Perhaps you are raising |

funds for a good cause,

campaigning for

improvements in the
| area or have won an

award.

If so, call us on 322-

1986 and share your
















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2008 Beijing
Olympic image
could he
tarnished by
charges of
child labour

B BEIJING

THE Olympic image
could be damaged by alle-
gations that children as
young as 12 are being
employed to make official-
ly licensed products for the
2008 Beijing Olympics,
according to ‘Associated —
Press.

That’s the message
Wednesday from Chen
Feng, deputy director of
marketing for the 2008 Bei-
jing Olympics, who has
summoned four manufac-
turers to Beijing to answer
charges of labor-law viola-
tions in the making of
Olympic goods.

A report released Sunday
entitled “No Medal for the
Olympics on Labor Rights”
alleges four factories in
southern China broke
national labor laws on child
labor, overtime pay and
minimum wages to make
souvenirs for the 2008
Olympics.

The four manufactures
acknowledge they have
Olympic contracts, but
deny charges in the report
by Brussels-based PlayFair
2008. The report also says
the Beijing organizers —
and the Lausanne-based
International Olympic
Committee — are doing
too little to guarantee ethi-
cal work conditions in the
making of official products
that carry the five-ring
Olympic logo.

Chen said he planned to
meet Wednesday with rep-
resentatives of the four
companies. Li Zhanjun,
director of the Beijing
Olympic media center, said
it would be several days
before any findings might
be released.

“We don’t want them
(makers of Olympic prod-
ucts) to damage the
Olympic image,” Chen
said. “We want them to
realize that their perfor-
mance in terms of corpo-
rate responsibility, environ-
mental protection and
quality control has a lot to
do with the image of the
Olympics, and the reputa-
tion of the Olympic
games.”

Chen said there was a
“huge gap between the
report and what the busi-
nesses told us. They have
told us they did not employ
child labor at all.”

Chen, repeating threats
made earlier by Jiang
Xiaoyu, executive vice
president of the Beijing
Olympic organizing com-
mittee, said contracts
would be terminated if vio-
lations were found.

“We will continue our
investigation until we find
the truth,” Chen said. “If
we find any problems, we
will severely punish those
violators.”

PlayFair’s report —
along with the actual
charges — has drawn atten-
tion to the vast wealth gap
in China. Beijing is spend-
ing at least $40 billion to
modernize the city for the
Olympics, a sharp contrast
to the legal minimum wage
in southern China of $90 a
month.

Chen also promised a
crackdown on the sale of
counterfeit Olympic mer-
chandise which, like fake
DVDs and knockoffs of
designer goods, is for sale
on many street corners in
Beijing.

“We really have taken
notice of the problem,”
Chen said. “Some cases
constitute criminal offenses
and we will take legal
action to tackle them.

“Those (counterfeit
Olympic) products are all
provided by unauthorized
businesses because we have
strict controls on the
authorized businesses. If
the authorized businesses
sells to an unauthorized
buyer, that would be a seri-
ous violation of the con-
tract and we would severe-
ly penalize them.”





ake INTERNATIONAL NEWS |

PAGE 22, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007


















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THE TRIBUNE



American convicted of running
private Afghan jail freed from
prison, leaves Afghanistan

@ KABUL, Afghanistan

AN AMERICAN inmpris-
oned in Afghanistan for run-
ning a private jail for terror sus-
pects has left the Afghan prison
where he was held for almost
three years and departed the
country, the warden said
Wednesday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Jack Idema, a former Green
Beret, was pardoned by Presi-
dent Hamid Karzai in late
March as part of a general
amnesty. Rahim Ahmadzai,
Idema’s Afghan lawyer, said the
American left the prison out-
side Kabul on June 2 and flew
out of Afghanistan. He did not
know Idema’s destination.

Shamir, the warden of
Policharki prison where Idema
was held, said Idema had want-
ed to stay in Afghanistan but
couldn’t for legal reasons.
Shamir, who like many Afghans

not believe he was immediately
heading to the United States.
“At some point, he’d like to
come back to the United
States,” Tiffany said. “He’s an
American. He loves his: coun-

- try.”

Idema was sentenced to 10
years in prison by a Kabul court
in September 2004 on charges
of entering Afghanistan illegal-
ly, making illegal arrests, estab-
lishing a private jail and tortur-
ing their captives.

Two other Americans were
also convicted. Brent Bennet
was sentenced to 10 years but
was released in September.
Freelance cameraman Edward
Caraballo was sentenced to
eight years; he was released in
April 2006.

Some of the Afghans Idema
imprisoned claimed they were
beaten and their heads held
under water. However, Idema
says he never mistreated pris-

14 WINNI ING ENTRIES WILL APPEAR IN BAHAMAS FIRST’S 25TH ANNIVERSARY 2008 CALENDAR
WINNING ERTMES WILL RECEIVE A GIFT CERTIFICATE VALUED AT $500 EACH



TRY DE/

= RULES::.

Bahamas First's 25th Anniversary Calendar Photo Contest is open to all

h

photographers and has the title “The Bahamas at Play”. Photographs may be of
any subject or scene that illustrates the theme. All photographs must be taken in

The Bahamas.



LINE IS JUNE



9, The winning photographs, along will all publication and
reproduction rights attached thereto become the property of
Bahamas First and the comes reserves the right to use such in

the future.

10. Employees of Bahamas First, its affiliated companies or family,





Kabul airport, said several
Afghan military and two U.S.
personnel accompanied Idema
to the plane.

Jwinda said he and Idema
fought against the Taliban
together in eastern Afghanistan
shortly after the U.S.-led inva-
sion in 2001. Idema had tears
in his eyes while saying good-
bye, Jwinda said.

“IT may be _ leaving
Afghanistan, but my heart will
stay in Afghanistan,” he quoted
Idema as saying.

Tiffany said Idema flew out
of the country from the main
USS. base at Bagram. It wasn’t
clear if the plane flew from
Kabul then to Bagram before
leaving the country.

“If this individual truly was
convicted and truly did all the
things they say he did, how
could he leave from Bagram
Air Force Base, a military air-
port?” Tiffany said. .















2. Deadline for entries is June 22, 2007

3. All entries are to be delivered to Bahamas First General Insurance's office, membescrenoteligible: =
#32 Collins Avenue, Nassau. N.P. between 9 am and 5 pm, weekdays only » f ene
Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest". Yak Business Horie

4. All entries must be accompanied by an official entry form available at Bahamas First PO. Box Street address
offices or when published in newspapers. Signature

5. Only colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images must be providedas = _pgte No. of photos entered (maximum of 5]
digital images on CD. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels orlarger). agree that in the event one or more of my photographs is selected as
Digital images showing any signs of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or ~awinner in the 2008 Bahamas First 25th Anniversary Calendar Photo
compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images Contest it will become the property of Bahamas First General Insurance
should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality JPEG and in the original colour format the = Company and | assign to Bahamas First all rights pertaining to its use in
camera uses (LAB or RGB}. All entries must be supplied with prints which will be used in _ any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos entered in this
the judging process. The photographer's name and photo subject should be writien on Contest were t Jaken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not
the CD and on the reverse of the print. : been previously published.

6. Judging of entries will be based on creativity, imagery, composition, colour, originality
and quality of photograph. The photos selected will appear in Bahamas First's 25th Return with photos to:
Anniversary 2008 calendar. The decision of the judges will be final. 25th Anniversary Calendar Contest

7. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk. It is the company’s intention to return all Baharvics Fist

=a

=

i a a

eeesev a

goes by one name, said he trans- oners and the prosecution Idema, who served three
ported Idema and his dog, Nina, offered scant evidence at his’ years in U.S jail for fraud in the
to the Kabul airport for the | sometimes chaotic Kabul trial. _ 1980s, told the AP by cell phone
flight out. Idema, who has maintained from Policharki last month that
“He wanted to stay in _ that hisactivitiesin Afghanistan he had stayed in prison even
Afghanistan, but there was no _- were sanctioned by the U.S. after being freed because he
way for him to stay,” Shamir government, claims'to have risked arrest by Afghan intelli-
‘said. fought with the Northern’ gence agents. He said that
EXPRESS STORE FEED In an e-mail to The Associat- Alliance forces that toppled the departing would harm his
ViAcups canbe VIA cape are sturdy, VA cups are sale for warming and ed Press, Idema wrote, “Ican’t Taliban regime in late 2001.He chances of recovering docu-
attached to the AVENT stackable and easy feacing. Use the same faat as the and won’t tell anyone where I. was featured in a book about _ ments, tapes and computer files
i ISIS Breast Pump. to wrlta on. AVENT Feeding Botts. am and what I am doing.” the Afghan war called “Task that show his alleged relation-
i , Edward P. Birsner, the consul Force Dagger: The Hunt for bin ship with U.S. officials.
at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Laden.” AUS. federal judge in Aprit
| said in court documents filed in The U.S. military acknowl- said the United States had to
Washington this week that Ide- edges accepting prisoners from respond to a lawsuit by Idema
ma had left for “an unknown Idema in Afghanistan in 2004 alleging that the State Depart-.
a lait 6h etsiais Bisa AV E T destination.” and the separate NATO-led ment and FBI illegally kept him
| i heaghcra 0600 SAGA LIN 1800 edie Seager eae ae Ley tere il The documents were filed in force there helped him with imprisoned, directed his torture
wa a case in which Idema accused __ raids near Kabul. and destroyed evidence. Idema *
the FBI and State Department However, the military soon said he has audio recordings ;
of ordering his torture and denounced him as an imposter and documents to back up his. + |
manipulating the Afghan judi- and he was arrested only afew _ claims. ‘,
cial system. months after entering the coun- The U.S. Embassy in Kabul oe
Idema’s U.S. attorney, John _ try. responded by saying that since’ +
Tiffany, would not say where Abdul Wahab Jwinda, an Idema had been freed by *
Idema flew to but said he does Afghan army commander who Karzai, hisclaimsnolongerhad
said he saw Idema off at the merit. 4
@
f.

hg
Se ee we

entries in their original condition. However, Bahamas First will assume no liability for any
loss, damage or deterioration.

8. Agift certificate valued at $500 will be presented for each of the photographs selected.
More than one entry from a single photographer may be selected. Photographic credits
will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer is limited to a
maximum of five photos.

P.O. Box SS 6238
32 Collins Avenue
Nassau, N.P.

Entry deadline June 22, 2007

SL.

BAHAMAS First

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‘THE TRIBUNE ' THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 2s ;
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—

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THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



US defence secretary to press NATO
for more trainers in Afghanistan

@ STUTTGART, Germany

DEFENCE Secretary
Robert Gates, still frustrat-
ed with NATO’s commit-
ment in Afghanistan, will
press allies in meetings this
week to provide significantly
moré trainers for the Afghan

Senior officials lay out Gates’ expectations

National Army and police,
according to Associated
Press.

Senior U-S. officials en





route to Germany with Gates
on Wednesday laid out the
secretary’s expectations for
the two-day meeting of

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NATO defence ministers
that will begin Thursday in
Brussels. In the nearly six
months since the NATO
leaders met and promised to
fill troop and equipment
needs for the Afghan war,
there have been only incre-
mental increases.

The U.S. officials said
Gates will “make a pitch” for
countries to send more train-
ers in an effort to get the
Afghan government better
able to control its own secu-
rity.

The officials, who request-
ed anonymity so they could
preview the secretary’s plans
for the session, said coalition
forces in Afghanistan still
need up to four battalions —
or as many as 3,000 combat
troops, along with about an
equal amount of trainers.
Gates has said he would like
some NATO and non-
NATO nations to contribute
some of the training forces.

In addition, NATO allies
are also trying to put togeth-
er training teams that can be
embedded with Afghan units.
And those also have been
slow to come together.

In February and again in
April, Gates exhorted
NATO allies to bolster their
troop commitments in
Afghanistan so the alliance
could launch its own offen-
sive against the Taliban, and

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pre-empt what has been an
annual spring increase in
insurgent attacks.

That offensive was
launched, with the aid of
additional U.S. troops. And,
during a visit to Afghanistan
early this month, Gates said
the NATO push was making
progress. But he also warned
that Iranian weapons —
which have been responsible
for widespread violence and
U.S. troop casualties in Iraq
— are now increasingly
showing up in Afghanistan.

For months, Gates has
expressed concern about pos-
sible reversals in
Afghanistan, which still lacks
a self-sustaining military and
suffers from the unmet
expectations of building
an effective central govern-
ment.

In particular, NATO offi-
cials said they have found
armor-piercing roadside
bombs — known as’ explo-
sively formed penetrators, or
EFPs — in Kabul.

The struggle to pressure
NATO countries to live up
to their commitments has
also prompted Gates to ques-
tion whether the alliance
should continue to mount a
25,000-troop response force.

The NATO response force
has been developed as quick
reaction troops who could
respond to emergencies in

the region. But Gates is ques-
tioning whether that is an
appropriate way to use the
hard-to-muster military
resources, considering that
the allies are having so much
trouble coming up with the
forces for an ongoing war.

The U.S. currently has
26,000 troops in Afghanistan,
including some 14,000 in the
NATO-led force.

Another issue likely to
come up during the meeting
is the ongoing controversy
over the U.S. proposal to site
missile defence radars and
interceptors in eastern
Europe.

Russian President Vladimir
Putin, in a recent meeting
with President Bush offered
up an alternative, that would
allow joint use of a radar sta-
tion in Azerbaijan.

Russia has strenuously
opposed U.S. plans to put the
missile defence systems in
Poland and the Czech
Republic.

Gates is expected to meet
with the Russian defence
minister.

And one senior defence
official said that while they
don’t believe the session will
provide a great deal of detail
on the Russian counterpro-
posal, “we would be
very receptive to any clarifi-
cation the Russians would
have.”

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 29



FTMI Welcomes New Pastor

By: Janet Hanna

BISHOP SIS. LORNA WILSON
PHILEMON WILSON, J.P.

Faith Temple Ministries International (FTMI), a Church of God Church in the Bahamas is pleased to a

announce its newly appointed Senior Pastor, Bishop Philemon Rudolph Wilson, and his wife, Sis. Lorna

Wilson. -
Bishop Wilson is no stranger to Faith Temple, having grown up in the church. He joined Faith Temple
Church of God in 1969, and served in several areas of ministries as: Bus Driver, Sunday School Teacher,
Sunday School Superintendent, Member of the Christian Education Board, Member of World Missions
Board, Pastor’s Council, Youth Camp Director, organized the first Pioneer’s for Christ in the Bahamas and
his last and most noted post, Youth Minister. Pastor Wilson is also one of the founding members of Faith
Temple Christian Academy, formerly (Beth-Phil School). :

He and his wife returned home after 20 years as pastor of the Cathedral of Praise Church of God, located
in Mt. Pleasant Village in the western district of New Providence, and he comes back home with a wealth
of experience. |

Having a quest to learn more about God and the most effective ways to minister, he attended The Assembly
of God Bible College, Carmichael Bible College, and Templeton Theogicagical Seminary. As a result he
received several certificates, among them are: Bahamas Ministerial Seminar Certificate; Exhorters Licences
and Lay Evangelism Certificate. In 2003, he received his Doctor of Divinity Degree from Vision International
College and University in Remona, California

Bishop Wilson received his Minister’s licences in 1989 and was ordained as a Bishop in the Church of God
in 1990. He presently serves in the following capacities: District Overseer of Cat Island and San Salvador,
Member of the National Building Committee, Bahamas, Turks and Caicos; Member of the Church of God
National Ministerial Care and Development Board. He is a Marriage Officer and a Justice of the Peace in
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Bishop Wilson can be described as a pastor’s pastor, one who has
a shepherd’s heart, with a burning desire for souls.

He and his wife, both natives of Cat Island, were married in 1969 and they have four sons: Kevin, Darrin,
Michael and Prince. Sis. Wilson gave up a promising career in Nursing and supports her husband faithfully
in the ministry. |

On June 1, 2007, Bishop and Sis. Wilson said goodbye to the Cathedral of Praise congregation in the west
and made the journey back home to the east to pastor Faith Temple Ministries International, and with his
return comes a mission to restore, unite and rebuild.

During his first message back home, Bishop Wilson, told the congregation that his return to Faith Temple
has been nothing short of God’s divine plan. “I am indeed honoured to have been chosen to lead,” added
Bishop Wilson and he assured the members that:he will be there for them.

Faith Temple Ministries International now looks forward with great anticipation to: “A New Beginning, A
Fresh Start,” as it welcomes back home one of its own, a “Son of the Soil,” Bishop Philemon R. Wilson.



PAGE 30, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

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selected
items

THE TRIBUNE



South African public sector

strike intensifies with protests

m@ JOHANNESBURG,
South Africa

TENS of thousands of public
sector workers marched
Wednesday to government
offices across the country, esca-
lating a 12-day-old strike and
bringing South Africa’s largest
cities to a standstill, according
to Associated Press.

The action staged by public
sector unions disrupted school-
ing, health care and transport
services. Municipal workers also
heeded the call to halt work ina
show of solidarity, and a number
of other unions took part in
lunchtime protests.

With a heavy police presence






LA CAS

The Art of Island Living



in all cities, the protests were
peaceful and there were no
reports of violence as workers
rallied for higher wages.

“We are not moving back not
one inch,” the Congress of South
African Trade Unions general
secretary Zwelinzima Vavi told
several thousand people at a ral-
ly outside the gates of parlia-
ment in Cape Town, the South
African Press Association
reported. “So the government
has a choice: Do they see a long
winter or do they want to set-
tle?”

About | million teachers,
nurses and other civil servants
have been on strike since June 1,
leaving hospitals struggling and
































(TA



Bay St., 2 Doors West of Victoria Ave.
el: 242-356-7302
e email: ariana@batalnet.bs

Much More

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prompting the government to
call in soldiers and police to pro-
tect non-striking workers and
other civilians.

The public sector unions
rejected the government’s latest
offer Tuesday to boost salaries
by 7.25 percent, up from an orig-
inal offer of 6 percent. The
unions are demanding a 10 per-
cent increase, down from 12 per-
cent initially.

Medical workers have joined
the public sector strike, even
though as “essential workers,”
they are legally barred from
going on strike. The government
has said striking medical workers
would be fired, and dismissals
have been announced at some
hospitals.

Unions condemned the firings,
and patients have expressed sup-
port for the strikers at some hos-
pitals. But there also have been
reports of strikers intimidating
those who continued to work.

About 30 strikers were arrest-_
ed Monday, accused of intimi-
dating staff at a hospital in the
central city of Bloemfontein.
And on the first day of the
strike, police fired stun grenades
to disperse around 500 protest-
ers who were preventing doctors
from entering one of Cape
Town’s largest hospitals.

’ Police and prison staff unions
also have threatened to join the
strike in a show of solidarity.

Fewer commuter trains were
reported to be running Wednes-
day, while security was increased
at some hospitals. Many schools
were shut for the day.

The ruling African National
Congress called striking work-
ers to ensure there was calm and
“resist those elements that are
bent on acts of violence and
intimidation.”

On Tuesday, President Thabo
Mbeki voiced support for a
revised salary structure for pub-
lic sector workers while con-
demning the intimidation and
violence.

“All of us should ask our-
selves what kind of society we
are building and what moral
lessons we are imparting when
insults, violence against fellow
workers and damage to proper-
ty become the stock-in-trade
during protests of this kind,” he
said.









THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 31

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

olar wing retraction begins as
tronauts prepare for spacewalk

@ IN THIS
photo provided
by NASA,
space shuttle
Atlantis astro-
naut Jim Reilly
participates in
the mission's
first planned
session of
extravehicular
activity (EVA),
as construction
resumes on the
international
space station,
Monday June
11, 2007.

(AP Photo/
NASA)





mm HOUSTON

NASA began retracting an
old solar array on the interna-
tional space station Wednesday
to make way for a new array,
hoping to avoid the problems
that plagued removal of anoth-
er power-generating wing last
year, according to Associated
Press.

The old array’s 31 sections
were being folded up one at a
time. If necessary, spacewalk-
ing astronauts Patrick Forrester
and Steve Swanson would be
assigned to use custom tools to
push the sections into place.

The old array needs to be
folded up so a new set of solar
panels, delivered to the space
station by Atlantis this week,
can follow the sun to generate
enough power for 10 house-
holds. The new array unfolded
automatically on command
Tuesday like an accordion win-
dow blind.

Operated by remote control,
the first panel of the old array
was partially retracted before
Atlantis’ crew was awakened
Wednesday. NASA doesn’t
expect to finish the retraction
until possibly Thursday.

“In a very perfect world,
they’d get the entire solar array
retracted” on Wednesday, said
space station flight director Hol-
ly Ridings.

NASA had to struggle to fold
up a similar 115-foot solar array
during a shuttle mission last
December when guide wires got
stuck on grommets along the
way.

Forrester and Swanson
planned to spend most of their
spacewalk Wednesday — the
second one of Atlantis’ mission
to the space station — removing
locks and restraints on the sta-
tion’s newest section. That new
section, which contains the new
solar array, was installed dur-
ing the first spacewalk Monday.

NASA engineers were still
figuring out how best to repair a
-loose thermal protection blan-
ket on the shuttle.

NASA managers said Tues-
day they were leaning toward
having the astronauts repair the
blanket, which protects part of
the shuttle from the blazing heat
of re-entry, by sewing it using
stainless steel wire and an
instrument that resembles a
small needle.

‘No final decision had been
made on when the repair will
be made, or what repair tech-
nique will be used. Engineers
also have considered using wire
ties or adhesives to secure the 4-
by-6-inch damaged section,
which sits over an engine pod.
Various methods were being
subjected to heat and wind tun-
nel tests.

The shuttle astronauts’ 11-
day mission was extended by
two days to allow time to fix the
thermal blanket, which peeled
back during launch last week.
An investigation was under way
to determine how the blanket
was secured before launch.

Engineers don’t think the re-
entry heat could burn through
the graphite structure under the
blanket and jeopardize the
spacecraft during landing, but
it could cause enough damage
to require schedule-busting
repairs.

NASA has been cautious
about potential re-entry heat
damage since the Columbia dis-

aster in 2003 killed seven astro- , , JONES & co

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PAG= 32, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, euu, THE TRIBUNE

THE TILE KING, FYP LTD & THE TRIBUNE
have partnered to supply critically needed :
DIALYSIS MACHINES

for the Princess Margaret Hosptial :

You can >
nelp
too!

Help us raise $164,000 |
to purchase 8 dialysis |
machines for the PMH





















The number of patients that need dialysis is
pushing the dialysis center to its capacity.

Each dialysis unit costs $20,500 - i.e., complete -
installation, training of staff members and 1 year
of technical support. All donations should be
made payable to The Princess Margaret

Hospital Foundation with a note for The Dialysis
Machine Fund. :

Your contribution will help hundreds of patients
that currently rely on these old machines for life.

Contact Sean D. Moore of The Tribune at
502-2394 or Thelma Rolle of the Princess
Margaret Hospital Foundation at 325-0048
to make a donation.

WHY NOT JOIN US? THEY HAVE! |

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The Tribune



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 33





THURSDAY EVENING JUNE 14, 2007

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
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Let Charlie the
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some smiles on your

kids’s faces.



Bring your children to the
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Palmdale every Thursday

from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of June 9007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

?m lovin’ it

Gift Certificates



AGE 24, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007











SHE HASN'T
TOLD HER

SON? THAT'S Be
STRANGE! fa

B ACTUALLY, BESIDES
GROVES, I'M THE
ONLY ONE SHE TOLD!

I WONDER WHY
RACHEL DIDN'T

TELL US ABOUT
HER CANCER!









AND ALLISON
DON'T EVEN








| BACK AT 3-G, MARGOS HAPPINESS [5

IN ERIC MILLS, I'VE FINALLY
UONAMINISHED v0

FOUND A MAN WHO MAKES
ME FEEL LIKE A WOMAN./






SOMETIMES I WONDER WHAT IT'S

SO THAT'S WHAT
ALL ABOUT...GET UP...GO TO

IT'S ALL ABOUT!












North dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
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PAK 65
WEST EAST
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¥98 ¥QIJ104
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SOUTH
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DISORGANIZATIONAL eA
SKILLS . Pious
The bidding:
North = East South West
1 & Pass 2% 3¢
4% Pass 4NT Pass
59% Pass 5 NT Pass
6% Pass 1%

Opening lead — king of diamonds.

Some plays in bridge seem almost
like feats of magic. Consider this
case where South got to seven
spades. The contract seems impossi-
ble to make when you first look. at
dummy. But doing the impossible is
something a competent player
always tries to do when the going
gets tough.

With only 12 tricks in sight and

Of, CANON. WANT PASSES FoR THE
TRUTH IN WAGHINGTON 16 JUST
AN UNDISCOVERED LIE.
RK FREE SOCIETN DEPENDS oN
AN INDEPENDENT NEINS
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WHAT ARE NOU 0 ARAIO of?
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\ GUESS Yo)

NEED MORE
TIME IN
THERE...



























IF T AM GOO, TG
\NTO MY PANTS WHILE 1!




East Gets Caught in a Vise

an apparently unavoidable heart
loser, declarer found a way to make
all 13 tricks — and, what’s more,
there was nothing the opponents
could do about it.

He saw that his only chance for
the contract was by a squeeze. Essen-
tially, this required East to have most
of the outstanding hearts and clubs.
Accordingly, declarer won the dia-
mond lead and cashed five trump
tricks, producing this position:

North ,
VAKT7
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West
9
QJ
1043

East
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South
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When he next played another
trump, discarding dummy’s low
heart, East was squeezed. He could
not discard a heart because South
would then cash the A-K to establish
the six of hearts as a trick. So East
discarded a club. This didn’t help
either, because declarer cashed the
A-K of clubs and miffed a club to
establish dummy’s six as his 13th
trick.

eel =a



LOOK, MOM, IT PUT ALL MY
CLOTHES FOR TOMORROW
ON THE STAIRS.








THE TRIBUNE



THEN \N THE MORNING,
LLL RUN OUT IN MY
UNDERNEAR AND SLIDE
DOWN AT TOP SPEED!


















a °@ O23 & & TOs



> ae ee bye er ee

v
&





THURSDAY,
JUNE 14

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20 *
It’s time to finally make a decigion
on that proposal, Aries. These stall
tactics are doing nothing but hurting
your reputation. Make a choige,
regardless of the consequences. “x

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21*
Dream big, Taurus, because if. you
put your mind to it, you can certainly
accomplish anything. There will -be
doubters, but you will prove them
wrong in your endeavors. ;

GEMINE- May 22/Jun 21,':
You can’t always be in control,
Gemini, so relinquish the reigns
to. someone dear to you, whom
you trust. Giving up a little power
will teach you humility:

oo & Ga “s
a a Ne ta “0%. ce

*:
.%.

%

.| CANCER — Jun 22/Jul 22 °..

You’re losing touch with someone
who was close to you, Cancer. It hurts
that the friendship is fading. Do your
part to rekindle this relationship — the
extra effort is worth it. ‘
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Hold your temper, Leo, even when
someone purposefully pushes your
buttons. Anger and harsh words will

not remedy the situation, so be “the +- +

digger person in all of this.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22.
You wili feel the need to help ’out

someone at work this week, Virgo. °-
Resist the temptation to do,‘so

because it may put your job in jedp-











| Ff : ardy if you interfere.
@ i The LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
ens Lira Take a moment to plot out your
os words in immediate future, Libra. Considering
the main vo you haven’t been as happy as you’d
Y | pri s F 3 Bae like to be with your career path,,— -
Ped SSS Vi NIA “_e yan oe make a change now. Pt
Ue A <4 US 21st he
1) wa Century s a8 A ae E SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
oe : Dictionary S g BS fi go There will never be the perfect time
MAYBE THE (1999 Fogg” g < to make a drastic career change, so
FISH CAN edition). g g a Roeag stop complaining about your current
HOW many words of four letters Bos La Bae B situation, and do something about it.
nor can ae mate von the ¢ ae % @ § af g Just realize the pluses and minuses.
eon. Heth atten Miy Henise, SeGecckms SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Det.21-
Gres only, Bach eiustcontain ine & age AA? You’ve recently made it through a
centre letter and there must be F § E aa gg 8 rough patch, Sagittarius, and have:
at least one nine-letter word. wsss g rok g come through no worse for the
Sh wear. File this experience away and

www. kingfeatures.com

"CRYPTIC PUZZLE

move on to more positive things.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jamt:20
A person’s good humor can only; be
pushed so far. Think before you speak
when confronted with the individual
you’ve been teasing, Capricom; It

Good 13; very good 19; excellent
25 (or more). Solution tomorrow.







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: pee | pe Risers
ACROSS DU
i ibly pi i a AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb‘18
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about a murder (6) from somewhere in France (6) 5 7 “5 2 | into your own hands, Aquarius ' you
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underground (4,4) foreign place (6) 14 EG 16 ; | condiment | red than in the black. Consult with
8 — City with some vagrancy (4) 3 Read something diagnostic? (4) || ie Seal an expert to tun things around.
ce . less than one’s 4 Optical overture (4,3 : 17 poe 19 20 | | substance used PISCES -— Feb 19/Mar20 i
10 Hold tightly to nothing less ptica’ of e (4,3) ; za f ay Ewan A special-iieoject at work renferce
own idea (6) 5 Abetter judge? (5) 24 ae | complement creativity and imagination —two
11 They can increase people's toxic 6 —_Letalearner have alittle leisure! (5) | food traits that you have in abundaiice.
content (6) 8 — Awanted contribution to the pot (4) 13g ae ae feed Show off and enjoy the rewards.
14 It’s less than the total you 9 Almost torn up as simply rubbish (3) Fi Oe ‘
stent eC ee ,
ad up) io eeeerareney7) | CHESS by Leonard Barden
pee, eee em ae
17 Garden once at No. 10 (4) 15 Allthe same, it’s not sparkling (5) a im
19 Remains in support of a good 18 Ishe not all wicked? (5) : fe || 3 rae 3 D || Magnus Carlsen v Vasily '
figure (5) 19 Inuse, always tastes salty (3) leh ai eles. n=) ; et Ivanchuk, aaah ee er
i i ia 3 Norway's Carlsen, 16 years old, ’
id : '
21 Running through Paris sounds 20 Soldier, perhaps, or robber of food 5 is widely upped aca future i
sane enough (5) from a peasant (3) | = world champion, and the |
22 Gave one’s playmates 21 How Vic Rees rejoined the assessment will become ' '
a hand (5) navy, say (7) stronger after Monaco, a ‘
ittle light i inthe ti i ACROSS DOWN £150,000 event financed by the 9
23 Aliittle light is good, though 22 It flows in the tide, eae (3) 1 Emphasise (6) 1 Angry looks (6) coenniter silicnaite loop v aa i"
not strong (4) 23 Be sorry for an endlessly grim 7 imediol (8) 2 Delighted (6) Gacercuwevnesidestherand if
26 Anoften moving musician (5) woman (6) af a les 3 ut e ac hained the event ater his i
28 Person in favour of 24 They're drawn in substantial wu 11 Shopping street (6) : ae aes 6) daughter. The tournament has a Thea i
remuneration (3) amounts (4) x 14 Allow (3) 6 Charred rather ey ee Hed bal oe ie ce eT i,
eee ns Sacre net rege 5 7 Sleigh () 8 i oy errand dies with half an teenager's best finish. He d
: nnoy : i o pawns, but the d7 ‘
long (6) end (6) a. 19 Man's name (5) 9 Animal doctor (3) hour each for the complete ae hie black-atni :
30 If expecting a tip, will he be 26 Song of the waving palms (5) 21 Claw (5) 12 Dog (3) game. Carlsen’s blindfold vision P : f -
2 22 Warehouse (5) roved lacking and he finished and cuts off Ivanchuk’s queen from :
patient? (6) 27 Inextremes of penury, she has a ” 23 Centre (4) 13 Postpone (5) cae he Satta in this section, king defence. It took just two :
31 Among the cheapest menagerie simple breakfast (5) =< 26 Material (5) 15 Punctuation mark (5) but in the more important rapi d moves for Carlsen to force - !
exhibits? (4) 28 The mushy food dad's soft on? (3) Es Bo i ae (3) 18 Neighbouring (5) Gaines he realiy imprested: resignation. sie a Wits ; r
32 They're left to the survivors (8) 30 White-headed snake that stings te bene i: 19 ss . ai sharing second prize with oe cee and why !
33 One's promise to uncle? (6) rather than bites (4) Sak Mt i 20 Oblaine reigning world champion Vlad , Di
ene) 21 Anxiely (7) Kramnik. Today's puzzle was the LEONARD BARDEN!
1 eee ee i 22. Immerse (3)
: jozen
4 Yesterday's cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions 23 cies of red (6) .
ACROSS:1, AM-bit 6, Suppe(-r) 9, Cushion 10, Div.-an 11, | ACROSS: 1, Crash 6, Stack 9, Coarser 10, Scare 11, 24 Kiln (4) ESE ESE, ’
LI-bya 12, S-no-ot 13, Petunia 15, Sat. 17, Onus 18, Round 12, Habit 13, Dropout 15, Alp 17, Idle 18, Butter 25 Whole (6) ‘
Pop-eye 19, Alain 20, Cr.-I-spy 22, B-ass 24, Has 25, 19, Hairs 20, Cretan 22, Safe 24, Her 25, Devised 26, 26 Oozes (5) fi
Silence 26, Might 27, Tonic 28, Rural 29, Sorties 30, Fired 27, Kebab 28, Speak 29, Dutiful 30, Beret 31, 27 List (5) Chess solution 8384: 1 Rxh5! gxh5 2 Of5 Resigns. ;
Fa-U-st 31, D-E-fer Never 28 Boy (3) The threat is 3 Qx{7 mate. If2...Bxh6 3 Bxh6+ Ke7 (Kg8 :
DOWN: 2, M-aid-en 3, Icarus 4, Tun 5, China 6, Solo-Mon. | DOWN: 2, Record 3, Scrape 4, Hoe 5, Great 6, Serious 7, 30 Terse (4) 4.0g5+ mates) 4 Rel* Kd6 5 Bf4+ wins the queen. :




7, Unit 8, Payday 12, Silly 13, P-or-ch 14, Tun-ls. 15,
Sedan 16, Terse 18, Pi-pi-t 19, A-pric-O-T 21, Ramona 22,
Be-mus-e 23, Scrape 25, S-hot-S 26, Miss. 28, Red



Trot 8, Candle 12, Human 13, Ditch 14, Older 15, Atlas 16, |
Pried 18, Breed 19, Halibut 21, Revere 22, Simple 23,
Female 25, Denim 26, Fade 28, Sun





aan a me SSF,





we



THE TRIBUNE : THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 35



. INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Tiger fights
the heat

ZOO staff spray water on a tiger
to cool him off and beat the heat
caused by the recent heat wave in
Lahore, Pakistan, Wednesday, June
13, 2007. According to local media
dozens of people lost their lives and
hundreds have been hospitalized
with heat stroke and gastroenteri-
tis.

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| Or
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business@tribunemedia.net

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

SECTION



The Tribune

BUSI

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street









Money Safe.
Money Fast.

INTERNATIONAL

Online at
BankBahamasOniine.com



Bahamian retailer Robin Hood
in ‘multi-million’ expansion

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROBIN Hood, the: well-
known Bahamian retailer, has
begun work on a major expan-
sion that will increase its retail
selling space from 16,000 square
feet to “a little less than 90,000
square feet” when completed
by November 2007. The com-
pany is spending “many millions
of dollars” to emulate the shop-
ping experience Bahamians
enjoy in major US stores.

Sandy Schaefer, Robin
Hood’s president, yesterday
said the retailer would trans-
form itself into a one-stop shop-
ping destination experience for
Bahamians, much like Wal-
Mart, Target and other major
retailers have done in the US,
and build on the reputation it
has established for providing

consumers in this nation with.

quality products that are com-
petitively priced.

- Work has already begun on
the first phase of Robin Hood’s
expansion in the Summerwinds

¢ Retailer to expand from 16,000 sq ft to 90,000 sq ft of in-store selling space by

November, emulating Wal- Mart model

¢ Company’s sales up 30% year-to-date, with profits ahead by ' me 20s’, as shrinkage
well below national average
¢ Prices to be kept competitive, as Robin Hood aims to create destination shopene
experience that Bahamians encounter in US and encourage more to shop at home



Plaza, located off the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway,
which will expand the retailer’s
existing retail space from 16,000
square feet to 28,000 square feet
by early August 2007 - in time
for the Back-to-School shop-
ping season.

Mr Schaefer explained that
this would be done by moving
the warehouse from its existing
location in the plaza into where
the retail store currently is, and
reducing the former in size by
50 per cent through having

more inventory and goods on
the shop floor.

When the full expansion is
completed by November, the
Robin Hood president said the
store would have 104,000 square
feet of space that was covered,
due to the presence of genera-
tors and bikes outside. Of that
amount, 90,000 square feet will
be inside in the store.

“It will qualify us as the
largest store, not only in the
Bahamas, but the Caribbean
from studies we’ve done,” Mr

Schaefer told The Tribune.
“The whole idea is to make this
a significant destination where
people satisfy their desires.
We’re going to make an exciting
shopping experience without
increasing prices. This will be a
shopping experience like you
get in the supermarkets in the
US.

“We’ve built up this critical
mass and momentum which has
offered us the opportunity to
build this building.

He added: “We’ve gota

great track record. Our sales
are up 30 per cent for this year
to date, and our profits are up
in the mid-20s [percentage
wise]. Those are great num-
bers: We’ve done extremely
well.

“Our shrinkage rate and
defection rate [inventory that
is accidentally dropped and bro-
ken] is less than 1 per cent. The
national average on shrinkage is
between 4 per cent to 8 per
cent.”

Ms Schaefer added that all

necessary government permits
and approvals for the expan-
sion had been received. Robin
Hood will lease the new prop-
erty from its current Summer-
winds Plaza landlord, ex-Blue
Hills MP and PLP Cabinet min-
ister, Leslie Miller.

The foundations for the new
retail space in the existing ware-
house are currently being
poured, involving 10,000 square
feet of concrete.

SEE page 6B

New $250-$350m
airport design set for
September unveiling

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE proposed design for the
new $250-$350 million terminal
buildings at Lynden Pindling
International Airport will be
presented to the Government
for approval this September, it
was revealed yesterday, with
completion of construction
work on the project to revitalise
the Bahamas main gateway due
in 2012. |

Craig Richmond, president
and chief executive of the Nas-
sau Airport Development Com-
pany (NAD), told the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s annu-
al general meeting (AGM) that
transforming the airport.into a
“world class experience” for
Bahamians and tourists was
likely to take five years.

Presenting the latest design
for the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport, Mr Richmond
indicated that of the current ter-
minals and buildings, only the
existing US departure terminal
is likely to be retained when the

sebeaeeneeesecencenenceeasecseessecenaceaesenaeecessenseasecnanaree

revamped airport is completed.

He added that a new US ter-
minal building, dealing with US
departures, would be con-
structed to the right of the exist-
ing building (when viewed from
the road).

“We expect that three years
from now, in 2010, the US ter-
minal building will be finished,”
Mr Richmond said. He indicat-
ed that the existing US depar-
tures building would be
retained, upgraded and likely
used for international arrivals,
while the current domestic and
international arrivals and depar-
tures terminals would be totally
demolished and replaced with
a new facility.

“We estimate that the new

_terminal is going to cost

between $250-$350 million,” Mr
Richmond told the Chamber’s
AGM. “This design is still in
flux. This is design number 10.
We’re consulting with our
stakeholders in two weeks
again.”

SEE page 12B

Private sector 1s
urged to watch
carbon emissions

ml By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Bahamian business
community must take a closer
look at the effect carbon emis-
sions have on the costs of doing
business in this country, the out-
going Chamber of Commerce
president said yesterday, while
the Government needs to
encourage the use of alternate
fuel sources and conservation
measures.

Tanya Wright, who is also
director of the Caribbean Asso-
ciation of Industry and Com-
merce (CAIC) recently attend-
ed a Caribbean Council on Cli-
mate Change and_ the
Caribbean economy.

She told The Tribune that the
conference was very timely, par-
ticularly given the Bahamas’
recent signing of the Declara-
tion of Panama, which indicates
a commitment to looking at var-
ious sources of energy and the
development of a sustainable
energy policy.

This, Mrs Wright said, came

in the face of recogriisied cli-
mate change threats due to the
level of greenhouse gas emis-
sions.

She said she wanted to see
the Bahamas’ largest green-
house gas emitters - the hospi-
tality and aviation industries,
in particular, join together to
find ways to reduce the
Bahamas’ carbon footprint -
the trail of carbon emissions
left by use and deployment of
various forms of energy - that

can then be applied across

industry.

For instance, Mrs Wright said
that in the area of food and bev-
erage there should be an exam-
ination of the way that foods
are preparedto determine if
there are more energy-efficient
methods.

She added that adaptive mea-
sures in the food and beverage
industry, for energy efficiency
and management, in some cases
had reduced costs by some 30-
40 per cent.

SEE page 9B

!. BL ZHIVARGO Laing



@ By NEIL HARTNELL

any pressure at all” to reform
its taxation system and switch
from customs duties to a sales
or value added tax (VAT),

finance told The Tribune,
despite the likely pressures
this nation and its tax system
will face if it and CARICOM
are forced to negotiate a Free
Trade Agreement (FTA) with
the US.

Zhivargo Laing reiterated
the position stated by his pre-
decessor in the PLP adminis-
tration, James Smith, namely

aaa een I¢
ao the Bank of The Bahamas —
ah

Megs RS et ee

Pr ee cen urge)
oma dence’ f Joncvar hasta se ti

pn



Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas is “not under

the minister of state for

Bahamas ‘under no trade
pressure’ for tax reforms

Government will not do
anything ‘injurious to our
economic and fiscal stability’



that if the Bahamas was forced
to reform its taxation system -
because customs and import
duties were considered a
restrictive tariff barrier to trade
- it would be given a lengthy
time period in which to phase
the changes in.

He queried whether it was
“a fair assumption” to make

and



that ifthe Bahamas was forced
to enter into a trade agreeme ut
with the US, as a replacement
for the Caribbean Basin Ini-
tiative (CBI), it would auto-
matically be required to do
away with its customs duties-
reliant tax structure.

SEE page 4B

you were

going to give
him a tie?!

| givedad
B coolcit



give him a
Bank of The Bahamas
Prepaid Visa® Card
or Visa® Gift Card!
You give the card. He gets stuff
he actually wants. Cool!







PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





on all new
annunhies
during the
month of June!









ee a as ak
rinancial














Bank unveils $8.5m

in net income to
- March 31, 2007

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national yesterday unveiled $8.5
million in net income for the
nine months to March 31, 2007,
but shareholders seemingly
shrugged off the costs of invest-
ing in new operating systems
with the bank’s share price up
25.5 per cent since July 2006.

The bank’s stock is inching
closer towards the $10 mark,
standing at $9.40 yesterday, a
rise over the $7.49 per share the
price stood at in July 2006.

“The unprecedented
growth of Bank of the
Bahamas share price’ of
$9.40, as listed on BISX at the
end of the third fiscal quar-
ter, reaffirms the public’s con-
fidence in the bank’s policies,
business strategy and initia-
tives,” said Paul McWeeney,
Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national’s managing director,
in a statement.

“The growth in share value
is more significant when con-
sidered against the economic
backdrop of the period, as a
tightening of liquidity presented
challenges, limiting all banks
from maximising potential
growth by restricting lending to
ensure sufficient reserves.”

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national’s assets rose by 14.1
per cent to just under $600 mil-
lion at the end of the fiscal 2007
third quarter, with shareholder
equity up 30 per cent over the
same period last year at $94.8
million. This was more than
double the $44.3 million in
shareholder equity in 2005.

“While we can directly mea-
sure the non-recurring realign-
ment costs associated with the
implementation of new systems
in real dollars, assessing the cost
of human capital is much more
challenging,” said Mr
McWeeney, referring to a year-
long re-training exercise.

“The absence of full staff



@ PAUL McWEENEY

presence would be expected to
be reflected in performance.
But we firmly believe that the
investment we are making now
will have long-term, wide-rang-
ing benefits that will propel us



me aii-e

TT FirstCaribbean

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GET THERE, TOGETHER,





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 3B



Fidelity launches

MoneyCentre plan |

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

FIDELITY Bank (Bahamas)
yesterday launched unveiled its
MoneyCentre division, which
will house all its Western Union
outlets in the Bahamas, Cay-
man Islands and the Turks and
Cacios.

MoneyCentre’s aim is to pro-
vide convenience and value to
clients who need swift, safe and
reliable money transfers, pre-
paid Visa cards and phone cards
and other financial products.

Fidelity will remain the oper-
ator of Western Union in the
Bahamas, with the MoneyCen-
tres being an expanded facility
from which to wire funds.

At a press conference to
launch the new service, Peter
Smith, Fidelity’s vice-president
of money transfer services, said
the bank hoped to cater to its
clients by providing more West-
ern Union agent locations,
longer opening hours and the
addition of everyday financial
products and service.



“TI feel that the MoneyCentre
concept is timely and fills a
void in the market place. Peo-
ple want and need these prod-
ucts, and they’ll appreciate
them all being in one place,”

she added.



Victoria Albury, Abaco manager

vices with responsibility for the
Bahamas, said the partnership
with City Markets ensures their
clients can send and receive
funds outside of traditional
banking hours, as the foodstore
locations operate from 7am to
9pm.

MoneyCentre is already open
in Nassau in the Fidelity Finan-
cial Centre in the Madeira
Shopping Centre in Palmdalem
and in downtown Frederick

Street.

On June 18, MoneyCentre
will open in the Marsh Harbour
Shopping Centre, Abaco. Vic-
toria Albury, the new Abaco
manager, said the island was
more than ready.

“I feel that the MoneyCen-
tre concept is timely and fills a
void in the market place. People
want and need these products,
and they’ll appreciate them all
being in one place,” she added.

PONT TE LH

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Mr Smith explained that
Fidelity’s wire transfer cus-
tomers had different needs to
those demanding traditional
retail banking services.

Malvern Bain, Fidelity’s vice-
president of compliance, added
that the facility creates an envi-
ronment for money transfers
while allowing clients to benefit
from the availability of other.
banking services. ,

Mr Smith added that to open
the MoneyCentres, Fidelity will
hire eight persons, and is likely
to increase,that number as
demand grows.

He said the plans to house
additional Western Union facil-
ities in City Markets stores
throughout New Providence are
expected to come on stream in a
matter of days. '

“Coupled with advanced dis-
cussions with other wel- posi-
tioned retail outlets, we intend
to triple the number of Money-

: Centre and Western Union out-

: lets in 12 months,” he said.

, Spencer Dean, Fidelity’s
manager of money transfer ser-

- Small Retail Store specializing in
girls accessories is seeking a dynamic,
energetic, and highly motivated



assistant store manager with prior retail
managerial experience to handle all —
aspects of store operations.
Please send resumes by e-mail to
bahamas.com@gmail.com

Shell Action, Opposite the Old Shirley St. Theatre
Next Door To Sun T

Tel: 393-2000
Fax: 393-6836







Phone: 394-1019





CARIBBEAN CROSSINGS LTD.

NOTICE OF REDEMPTION
SSW NEM ie Va =e

The Company wouid like to inform all holders of Caribbean

_ Crossings Ltd. 8% Series.A Preference Shares that the
scheduled Second Redemption Installment payment will be
made on July 1, 2007 to all shareholders of record June 15,
2007. This payment is being made in accordance with the
terms and conditions attached to the Series A preference
shares which are as follows:

“.the Company will make five (5) annual redemption
installment payments of $2.00 per share commencing
July 1, 2006 and on each July 1 thereafter through and
Including July 1, 2010. The Series A Preferred Shares
will be redeemed for cash through such annual $2.00
July 1 payments, plus any dividends accumulated but
unpaid to the redemption date.” .

Caribbean Crossings is an_ International wholesale
Internet and Data company that operates a fully redundant
submarine fiber optic network linking the four islands of New
Providence, Eleuthera, Abaco and Grand Bahama with
the continental United States on two diverse fiber landing
points in South Florida. Caribbean reported total revenues
of $12.4 million in 2006 and net income of $5.9 million.
_ Caribbean Crossings is a wholly owned subsidiary of Cable
Bahamas Ltd. Cable Bahamas is telecommunications
broadband provider and offers digital television services,
broadband Internet and circuit services throughout the
Bahamas. For the year ended December 31, 2006 Cable Classes End: August 3, 2007
Bahamas reported total revenues of $65.9 million, EBITDA |
of $32.8 million and a net income of $18.1 million. Cable Registration: Bahamian $50.00
Bahamas provides services on 17 islands in the Bahamas International $150.00

with over 360 full time and contracted employees. To a eee
ym) information contact the | BT
ETE ete 902-6300

The Tech Prep Program is a series of courses designed to help
students develop their academic skills in the areas of Math
and English, before proceeding with their regular curricula
courses in the fall.

Classes Begin: June 25, 2007

find out more information about Caribbean Crossings
and Cable Bahamas visit the respective web sites at:
caribbeancrossing.com and cablebahamas.com





PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas ‘under no trade pressure’ for |
says finance minister Laing:

tax reforms,

SWIM CLUB OF NASSAU, BAHAMAS

SUMMER “LEARN TO SWIM" CLASSES
June 25" to July 20" 2007

SPACES ARE STILL AVAILABLE SO
REGISTRATION WILL BE CONTINUING AT
THE QUEEN’S COLLEGE POOL ON
MONDAYS TO THURSDAYS 3:15 P.M. TO 5:15 P.M.
AND SATURDAYS 9:00 A.M. TO 12:00 NOON

Registration forms available on the website:
www. barracudaswimming.org



Vil laggio —

COCKTAIL & WINE BAR



HAS VACANCIES FOR COOKS &
DISHWASHERS ALL LEVELS
MUST BE ABLE TO PROVIDE

REFERENCES, HEALTH CERTS

IMMEDIATE START



WE PROVIDE THE RIGHT PAY FOR THE
RIGHT WORK ETHIC, INTERESTED PARTIES
CONTACT:

PHONE: 327 0965 (10-2 MON-FRI)
FAX: 327 0966,

EMAIL:
INFO@VILLAGGIORESTAURANT.COM.

ATT: GENERAL MANAGER.

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Isiand (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of the Royal
Island Resort and Residential Project, just off North Eleuthera
wish to fill the following position:

Experienced Boat Captain

Successful candidate will be a member of a small team and
will be required to skipper and maintain the company’s fleet of
10 boats (up to +4ft) and will also be required to take part in
the following guest water sports activities:

* Snorkeling

* Diving

* Flats and Deep Sea fishing
¢ Jet ski tours

* Sailing and Windsurfing

The suceessful candidate will be required to reside at Eleuthera.
Qualifications and Experience:

¢A minimum of 10 years experience.

¢ Hold a B class license or better.

* Be familiar with the local waters and the area around Royal
Island,

« Must have strong organizational skills in the areas of boat
maintenance and operations.

¢ Resort/Fishing’ expericnee preferred.

¢ Medical/Lifesaving/Boat and passenger safety training desirable.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover letter
to:

Harcourt Management Services Ltd.
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their
interest. however only those candidates under consideration
will be contacted.



FROM page one

“Even if it sought to do so,
as a general rule these things
tend to have certain implemen-

tation schedules,” Mr Laing
said. “The tendency, in the case
of a developing country like
ours, is to have a five, 10, 15-
year time period” in which





















GIYBYOUR CHILD THE



MAKING ceeafiy AND LEARNING AN EXPERIENCE
OF A LIFE- TIME




SEVEN FULL WEEKS OF: MUSIC, DANCE, pratia, ARTS &
CRAFT, SWIMMING, AND SPORTS.




NEVER HAS SO MUCH BEEN OFFERED FOR SO
; AGES 3 - 16 YEARS OLD
DATE: JUNE 25TH - AUGUST 10T




scoot ALL MUSICAL INSTRUMEN







326.8031/325%

MUSIC GIVES WINGS TO THE MIND.....FLIGHT 16 THE IMAGIINATION



YOUTH DIRECTOR
JOB DESCRIPTION
GRANTS TOWN WESLEY METHODIST
CHURCH

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church is
seeking a part-time Youth Worker to work |
with its Children, Youth and young adults.
This person must:

Be a mature Christian with a personal

Have experienced a Call for working with
Youth; and
Desire to see them develop as Christians.

Duties:

Oversee and co-ordinate exciting Christian
and age appropriate Youth programmes
Recruit and train volunteers for Youth work
Design and implement community outreach
programmes for Youth

’ Coordinate Youth activities and events

This applicant should have at least an
Associate’s Degree in a relevant discipline and
a minimum of two years experience in Youtn
Ministry.

Work hours 15-20 hours per week
Interested persons may send a resumé to fax no

356-0854 or to E-mail: gtwesley@coralwave.com
by 16 June, 2007. , ’



Camperdown Riding aay

Oy PME
LE

Tn~ ey

™“ —
Vas

SUMMER CAMP!!

Weekly camps running June 25th - August 24th
Yam - Spm, Mon - Fri
Cost: $180.00/Wee

Ages: ©4

Please contact Judy Pinder at 224-2065 between
the hours of Bam - tlam & 2pm - mia to resery
your spot. The camp only has 20 spots per week
and it is ona first come, firat serve basis
DD

a deposit of $50.00 non-re
Spot.



There is
fundable to reserve a

Activities:

* Learn to ride English style.
¢ Swim with the horses.

* Grooming & tacking up.

* Basic care of horses.

¢ and lots more

changes and reforms are made,
to ensure countries do not suffer
any adverse economic shocks.

“We cannot rush out there to
make reforms to our tax system
that could be injurious to our
economic and fiscal stability,”
Mr Laing said. “I don’t think
we’re under any pressure at all
to make these reforms.”

The minister said the FNM
government felt the existing
Bahamian tax structure ade-
quately met the Government’s
revenue-raising needs, and
would do so for “the foresee-
able future”.

“There is nothing to suggest
an urgency” for reform, he
added, and “regardless of what
is happening in the internation-
al community” the Bahamas
had to decide what was in its
best interests and act accord-
ingly, rather than under inter-
national pressure.

With regard to the accession
process for the Bahamas’ full
membership in the World
Trade Organisation (WTO), Mr

Laing said that while tariff rates -

globally had been reduced to
20-25 per cent among its mem-
bers, the needs of developing
nations such as this were being
increasingly taken into consid-
eration.

“I think that there is greater
recognition now that developing
countries have particular needs,
and any participation in trade
agreements should have a
development focus,” Mr Laing
said.

Customs duties are project-
ed to account for 41 per cent of
a total $1.49 billion in recurrent

revenues for fiscal 2007-2008,

generating some $605.769 mil-
lion. A further $199.751 million

was projected to be raised from
stamp tax onimports. —

With 90 per cent of imports’
to the Bahamas coming from
the US, based on 2007-2008
projections, the Bahamas could’
lose almost $725 million in rev-,
enue if was forced to sign up to
a reciprocal free trade agree-
ment with the US as a replace-
ment for the Caribbean Basin,
Initiative (CBI).

The CBI is contrary to wT0
rules, because it provides a one-,
way programme of trade bene-
fits and preferences to the
Bahamas and CARICOM
countries that other nations do'
not have access to. The US is,
still trying to get a WTO waiver
for the CBI until 2008, in the
face of opposition from WTO
members such as Paraguay.

Some $100 million of
Bahamian exports, especially
seafoods, benefit from the CBI,
and to maintain duty-free access °
to the US, the Bahamas is like-
ly at some point to have to enter
a reciprocal agreement with the
US that will provide their
exports with similar benefits -
customs duty free access to the ~
Bahamas.

An August 2006 paper on the
full fiscal impact of trade liber-
alisation on the Bahamas, which
was prepared for the CARI-
COM Secretariat but has never
been released publicly by the
Bahamian government, calcu-
lated that a value-Added. tax
(VAT) levied at a rate of
between 13-14 per cent would
be needed for the Government
to recoup all the import duties it
would lose if forced to scrap the
current Bahamian: taxation sys-
tem as a result of agreeing to
full trade liberalisation.

The Public Hospitals Authority
Bahamas National Drug Agency
PUBLIC NOTICE
Tender for the Supply of Drugs
and Related Items

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and

Bahamas.

The

Supplementary Tender,

| the Ministry of Health, The Commonwealth of The

which includes

instruction to the Tenderers along with other relevant

) information, can be collected from the Bahamas
National Drug Agency, Market & McPherson Streets,
Monday through Friday 9am - 5pm

A Tender must be submitted and duplicated in a
sealed envelope or package identified as “Tender
for the Supply of Drug and Related Items’ and

addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
1st Floor, Manx Corporate Centre/Dockendale House
West Bay Street
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, The Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address
on or before 5pm Friday, July 6th, 2007. A
copy of a valid business license. and National

Insurance’ Certificate

proposals.

must

accompany all

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to

reject any or all Tender(s).

SY

pret AS RO ENT EN Dg
o

@nautilus



INV 8
f N
“SED With ba TRACE MINES

GENERAL WORKER NEEDED

With knowledge in electrical
and plumbing

Worker must be able to work a
12 hour shift.

Please contact us at:
1-(242)-377-0444-6 or
Fax resume to 1-(242)-377-0276.

ri











THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

MUST SELL

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 5B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

June 14th, 2007
The Tribune





CROWN ALLOTMENT NO. 77 MURPHY TOWN, ABACO

All that lot of land having an area of 6,790 sq. ft. being Crown allotment
No. 77, of Murphy Town, Abaco Bahamas. Located on the subject property
is a single storey single family concerete building. This house is less than 5
year old and is in good condition with approximately 1,750 sq. ft of living
space and contains 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living room, dining, kitchen,
laundry and utility spaces. There is no significant improvements or deterioration
evident. The property is very well drained and not susceptible to flooding.
Landscaping efforts are still in remedial stages. All major public and private
utilities are situate within 100 ft of the subject site. Property bounderies are
clearly delineated.

Appraisal: $167,580.00



The subject property is situate off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco and is painted light yellow -

trimmed dark yellow.

Exes aw el UW dal len ad oe

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house,
3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room,
kitchen, study, laundry and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $188,406.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to
Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on
the left then 1st right, house is second on your right with
garage. f





INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY - MUST SELL
Lot N0.83, Lower Bogue ELEUTHERA

Alll that piece parcel or lot of land being No. 83 on a plan
on record in the department of Lands and Survey as plan
no. 763 and comprising 21,674 sq. ft. this site encompasses
a 2 year old single storey home consisting of 2-bedrooms;
1 bathroom, living/dining room in one, and kitchen with a
total living area of 1,452 sq. ft. There is also a unit to this
structure to be used as a bakery which could bring in an
average of approximately $600 to $800 per month. There
is also 2 covered porch areas to the front of this building, with an area of 90.4 sq. ft. (one at the front
entrance and one at the entrance to the bakery) this home is in very good condition and appears to
have been built in accordance with the plans and specifications as approved, and at a standard that
was acceptable to the Ministry of Public Works. The land is flat and properly landscaped.

Appraisal: $177,412.00

This property is situated on the Western side of the main Eleuthera Highway and approximately 1,200
ft Northerly from four-for-nothing Road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,





LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no °
194 of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated
in the central district of New Providence this property is’
comprised of a 35 year old single family, single story residence
encompassing approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area and inclusive of separate living and dining rooms, and’ ,
an average size kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and
an entry porch, of approximately 88 sq. ft. ventilation is by 2
wall unit air conditioners. The property is at grade and level
with good drainage, landscaping is minimal, consisting of lawns
and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone
walls mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing and
a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208 sq. ft. cement
driveway leading to a single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also has a concrete block storage
shed measuring of approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $133,570.00
Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right,
(Roland Ave.) the subject property is the 5th property on the left side painted orange with red/white trim.





(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue) .
ELEUTHERA

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements,
in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera,
being No. 62, comprising of about 34,210 sq. ft.,
this site encompasses a 12 year old single storney
home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms,
front room, dining, breakfast room, kitchen and
laundry room, with a total living area of approximately
2,342.06. Property also includes a double car
garage, and front entrance with a total sq. ft. of
approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped
with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.
Appraisal: $235,638.00

This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of Lower
Bogue.





Lot No. 25 Orchard Close Sea Breeze

Nassau
All that lot of land having an aproximate area of 5,000 sq. ft.
more or less being lot 1 of the subdivision Orchard Close,situated
at the southeastern corner of Sea Breeze Lane and the roadway
of Orchard Close about half mile west of Fox Hill Road, in the -
eastern District of New Providence, Bahamas. This property
encompasses a 16 year old single storey house with an attached
1-bedroom apartment is the principal improvement. The quality
of construction is average and maintenance is fair, so the effective
age of the building is 8 years, besides the apartment. The house
is comprised of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, livingroom dining
room, kitchen a utility area and a covered area that is being used

for the preparation of Catered meals, also attached to the house is an open back patio, with concrete block railing

and climate control is provided in the house by ducted central air-conditioning. The lot is completely enclosed,
by chain link fencing in part and by concrete block walls and metal gate in part. The grounds are fairly maintained,
with minimal landscaping in place.

Appraisal: $183,430.00
Travel south on Bay Lily Drive turn right onto Sea Breeze Lane. Go to the 5th corner right, subject property is
1st left painted white trimmed white.



ABACO LOT NO. 120 MURPHY TOWN

All that lot of land and improvements having an area
of 5,040 sq. ft. being portion of lot# 120 of the original
Murphy Town Crown allotments Abaco Bahamas.
This property is comprised of a two storey concrete
‘and wood structure still under construction consisting
of approximately 1,728 sq. ft. of enclosed living space.
| The said building is utilized as a triplex apartment
complex, with a 2 bedroom dwelling on the upper
storey. The lower portion of the building houses two
) units, each with 1-bedroom, 1-bathroom, living/dining
and kitchen spaces. The building is in average
condition and appears to be structurally sound. The
building also demonstrates a need for schelued
maintenance. The property is partially landscape with
boundaries clearly delineated. All major private and public: utilities are situate within one hundred ft

of the property site.
APPRAISAL: $154,476.00
This property is situated off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco









LOT NO. 370 GRENADA CLOSE GOLDEN
GATES #2 (Nassau)

All that lot of land having an area of 5,500 sq. ft., being lot
370 Grenada Close of the subdivision known_and designated
as Golden Gates No. 2, situated in the Southwestern district
of New Providence Bahamas: This property is comprised of
25 years old single family residenCe consisting of approximately
1,234 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with 3 bedrooms,:two
bathrooms, living/dining room, and kitchen. The Land is on a
grade and level and appear to be sufficiently elevated to disallow
the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods.

=! The grounds.are fairly kept, with improvements including
driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing to the sides and rear.

Appraisal: $149,405.60
Traveling south along Blue Hill Road, turn right at the Farmers Market just after passing the Golden Gates Shopping -
Center, take 1st corner left, Windward Isles Way, then take 3rd corner right, St Thomas Road, then first left, grenada
Crest, drive around the bend then 1st left again the subject property is the 2nd property left house #4 painted peach
trimmed black.





LOT NO. 382 WINTON MEADOWS

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area
of 8,300 sq. ft. being lot No. 382 situated in the
subdivision known as Winton Meadows, the said
- subdivision situated in the Eastern District of the
2 mg Island of New Providence, Bahamas. This property

oF ‘gia “is comprised of a 24 year old single family residence
with an attached efficiency (formerly the carport)
consisting of approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of enclosed
living area, front porch-198 sq. ft., back patio-380.
The building is a two storey house. Besides the
efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-
bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, inclusive of a master
bedroom suite upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining
room, family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and kitchen downstairs. Climate control
is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation enhanced by ceiling fans and other
amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance: Average. Effective age: seven
years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow
the possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual heavy rainy periods. The
grounds are well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering trees,
and a concrete garden/storage shed, which is located in the backyard. The yard is enclosed along
the sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with metal railings, and

metal gates at the front and back.

APPRAISAL: $365,000.00 .
Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get to Meadows
Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and take the 4th left, then 1st right. The
subject house is the 2nd house on the left side painted beige trimmed white.

s | ‘| é aul
Bae. Tenner s.. oa

ml ; EL PERUDGv

ci atti rae RE FE eu]

ULE LED EE EE









LOT NO. 1490
GOLDEN GATES
SECTION 2

SS All that lot of land having an
area of 6,000 sq. ft. being
H lot no. 1490 of the
| subdivision known and
designated as Golden
Gates, the said subdivision
situated in the southwestern
district of New Providence,
: bahamas. This property is
comprised of a 25 yer old single family residence consisting of approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space
with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living, dining rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level, however
the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the posibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods
of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is
enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement block wall to the front.

Appraisal: $162,400.00

Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith Ministries
Complex, then first left again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the 6th house left painted
green trimmed white. ‘



LOT NO. #7, BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION
All that piece parcel or lot of land and inprovements situated on the Island of Eleuthera, North of Governor’s Harbour, comprising of Lot No. 7 in
the Boiling Hole Subdivision and comprising of approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site encompasses a 17 years old duplex with each unit consisting
of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, frontroom, diningroom and kitchen with a gross floor area of approximately 1,474.20 sq. ft. and covered porch area
of approximately 164.70 sq. ft. this duplex was built in accordance with the plan and specification as approved, and at a standard that was
acceptable to the Ministry Of Public Works. This structure is in good condition. Each apartment could be rented at $800.00 per month. The land is
landscaped and planted with ficus trees, but needs some manicuring. :

APPRAISAL: $153,521.00



VACANT PROPERTIES

BLACKWOOD, ABACO
All that lot of land having an area of approximately 258,064 sq. ft. This property is yet to reach its highest and best use. It is ideally suited to single or multi-family development as is the nature of surrounding properties
within the community. The site may also serve well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original state. It is covered with low brush and broad leaf coppice vegetation intersperse
with broad strands of mature Yellow Pine indigenous to the area. The property is well drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under normal conditions.
APPRAISAL: $219,354.40
The subject property is vacant and is situated at the Southeastern entrance of the Community of Blackwood, Abaco. The property is undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract of land of approximately

26 acres.



NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)

Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses
a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly
of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $41,275.00

a: Seni 7 ORR ECM EM Umer | |
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 ¢ email harry.collie@scotiabank.com ¢ Fax 356-3851



To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - Click on “Real Estate Mall” - Click on doorway “Enter Online Store”

Teor ean



PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LM a ae ae eee

Bahamian reta

iler Robin Hood

in ‘multi-million’ expansion




POSITIONS AVAILABLE

We are a small, bat rapidly growing group and opportunities
exist for the right persons. All applicants should possess, ata
minimum, good passes in Maths & English, basic computer

cation and orgaaizational skills and an outgoing and pleasant |
personality. The positions available are:

ADMINISTRATIVE/
OFFICE ASSISTANT

Resourceful, with excellent administrative, typing and word
processing skills. Desktop publishing skills and bookkeep ing
experience an asset.

JUNIOR CLERK
Duties include, but not limited to, receptionist, filing, typing,
copying, banking and some accounting functions. Previous
office and print shop experience an asset.

E-mail or fax your résumé and cover letter indicating the
position you are applying for, to jobs@ theservicegroup.com
or 356-6135 by June 25, 2007. Ne calls please! We regret that
only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.

The . Members:
ervice DTP Services, Berencia fsascy & Associates,
roup Image Printing & Berencia Isaacs & Aworiates, Lad,

www. theservicegronp.com



3 UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading international trust
company, is looking for a

New Business Officer

Responsibilities:
Review business established to ensure policies and
procedures are adhered to;
Ability to vet tailor-made deeds;
Undertake the processing of new business ensuring
proper due diligence is in place and adherence to
policy and procedures;
Serve as signatory on assigned companies;
Handle research into and prepare responses to client
enquiries including responding to and preparing a
range of correspondence;
Undertake the processing of New Business ensuring
proper due diligence is in place;
Prepare proper minutes, resolutions, account opening
forms, share certificates and relevant checklists for
new accounts;
Liaise directly with clients, their professional advisers,
trust company agents, bankers, investment advisors,
etc. in respect of routine matters;
Review and maintain accuracy of static and processing
data;

Required Qualifications:

STEP designation;

5 years of trust administration experience;

5 years legal experience;

Good analytical skills;

Good knowledge of finance industry in general and
especially foundation business and fiduciary products;
Good interpersonal skills;
Computer literacy;

Interested persons should submit a full resume, to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

Re: New Business Officer
P.O. Box N-7757

Nassau, Bahamas

or

_ hrbahamas@ubs.com
Re: New Business Officer








professional public accounting experience.



AUDIT = TAX « ADVISORY

Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.



















skills and knowledge of Microsoft Office; excellent communi- |

FROM page one

The planned Robin Hood
expansion is modelled on the
large retail selling spaces
offered by the likes of Wal-
Mart, with the greater volume
of business generated enabling
the Bahamian retailer to keep
price points keen and go lower
than competitors, building on

_its ‘value for money’ and ‘great

deal’ heritage with Bahamian
consumers.

By providing Bahamian shop-
pers with the pleasant shopping
experience they are used to in
major US stores and supermar-
kets right on their doorstep, Mr
Schaefer and Robin Hood are
hoping to make inroads into -
and capture - some of the $1.2-
$1.3 billion he said the Govern-
ment itself estimated was spent
abroad by Bahamians.

Another advantage that
Robin Hood is aiming to offer
to Bahamian consumers is,
through its location in this
nation, end the need for peo-
ple to take time off work and
spend extra money on air fares,
hotel fares and car rentals when
they go to shop in the US.

Just like a Wal-Mart, the
expanded Robin Hood will fea-
ture a designated 45,000 square
feet of retail space for a grocery
store, designated areas for fur-




Head Cooks

Applicants must have a minimum of four (4) years

niture and clothes and shoes,
and a low-cost pharmacy.

The store will also feature a
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) loca-
tion, complete with its Western
Union and MoneyCentre ser-
vices. Mr Schaefer explained
that having the bank there
would also enable it to provide
direct financing for furniture
purchases from Robin Hood, as
the retailer planned to “mas-
sively enlarge its furniture offer-
ing by 10 times because its done
so well for us”. A Robin Hood
customer loyalty card was also a
possibility.

Customer. parking would be

“massively increased”, and,
Robin Hood will also house a »

Caribbean-themed deli to pro-
vide shoppers with food on the
spot.

Robin Hood will hire a
French-trained chef to prepare
meals that consumers take
home, a move that will reduce
product wastage because he can
use these in his meals, while
menu items can also be sold in
the store.

The expanded Robin Hood
will feature a bakery and sushi
bar, and sell free-range meats,
organic vegetables and a full-
line of health foods.

The checkout and scanning
systems in the new Robin Hood

would be similar to those found .

in Wal-Mart SuperCentres, Mr
Schaefer said, the Bahamian
retailer having entered into a
partnership that will see it
source about 15-20 per cent of
its products directly from the
US giant, both from the US and
China.

Robin Hood is also establish-
ing a structure that will allow it
to buy directly from Europe and
offer Bahamians of all incomes
“reasonable prices”. A UK con-
solidator will consolidate goods
from the UK, Ireland, Spain
and Germany before shipping
them directly to Robin Hood.

Mr Schaefer said the retail-
er’s existing 50-55 staff were
likely to be working “around
the clock” as the November
opening drew near, adding that
the number of workers was like-
ly to expand to “in excess of 200
people”. ,

This will be needed if Robin
Hood follows through on plans
to be open 24 hours per day,
seven days per week, as this will
require three shifts if it stays
open late at night to cater to
those such as night-shift hotel
workers.

“Wouldn’t it be great to have
a clean shopping environment
at nice prices?” askéd Mr
Schaefer. “There are issues with
rising prices on the island.

“If we, collectively, the retail-
ers in the Bahamas, work
together to lower prices, we'd
eat into the $1.4 billion spent
overseas and all would benefit
from that. The consumer would
benefit if prices were lower, and
he was dissuaded from going to
the US to get what they want, if

they can get what they want - at
the price they want - here.

“Robin Hood has forced
down the prices of appliances
and electronics. We’ve seen a
deflation in the market. That’s
what I see as one of the best
things that we’ve done for
Bahamian consumers. We did-
n’t just lower our prices; we
forced everyone to lower their
prices.”

By selling higher margin
products such as clothing and
furniture, Robin Hood will not
have to be so concerned about
the margins generated on its
food products.

The company has a sourcing
office already in Yiwu, China,
and Mr Schaefer has a stake in
a Miami-based company that
acts as a distribution wholesale
unit, which chiefly ships elec- °
tronics and appliances to the
Caribbean, South America and
Central America.

Therefore, Robin Hood will
use the size and economies of
scale generated by the volumes
from its larger retail selling
space, improved buying terms
with suppliers, and its sourcing
and buying skills to keep prices
keen in the expanded store.

“It'll be neat to see what hap-
pens,” Mr Schaefer said of the
new store. “When that super-
store opens, it’ll be something
like you’ve never seen here
before.

“It should be really exciting,
because if we do this 80 per cent
of the way we want to do, it’s
going to be tremendous.”






LOOKING TO GIVE YOUR CAREER A BOOST?
Come to KPMG...

We are currently seeking qualified Seniors to join our Audit practice.

Supervising Senior/Seniors

The successful candidates for the Supervising Senior/Senior positions must have at least three to four years
Applicants must hold a CPA, CA, or other professional designation
recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Excellent opportunities exist in our Audit, Corporate Finance, and Risk Advisory departments, to broaden your
professional experience. We offer competitive compensation and benefits packages.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, anda copy of their professional certification to: KPMG, Human Resources
Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or acash@kpma.com.bs. Telephone: (242) 393 2007

© 2007. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a

experience in the field; good presentation is also
requested, Diplomas from the Nassau Hotel
Training College a must....Wead cooks works
seasonally, split shifts weekly.
























Head Chef (Room Service)
Applicants must have experience in pastry, garde
manger, and most important fine dining.
Management skills and people skills a must. This
challenging position will need flexible and well-
experienced persons in classical French cooking
and at the forefront of new Bahamian cuisine.
Minimum of seven (7) years. experience in the
field of cooking is necessary. All standard diplomas
from the Nassau Hotel Training College are
required. This is a seasonal position with possibility
of full time if performance is satisfactory.

| Head Chefs Fine Dining/Casual Bistro:

Applicants must have experience for our fine
dining and casual bistro venues. Knowledge in
fine dining food, pastry and garde manger is a
must. Management skills and people skills a
must. This challenging position will need flexible
and well-experienced persons. Minimum of seven
(7) years experience in the field of cooking. Alll
standard diplomas from the Nassau Hotel Training
College are a must.

All interested persons are asked to fax resumes to:
The Human Resources Director
for the attention of the Director of Cuisine,
Fax #362-6245,
Nassau, Bahamas.





















An established law firm requires the following: ; +

k



Two (2) Legal Secretaries with the following
experience:

1) Three (3) years litigation experience and



2) Three (3) years commercial experience.

Applicants must be able to work on their own
initiative.

Please fax resumes to 393-4558.






Camperdown Riding Club

Proudly presents a

PONY RIDES!

Saturday June 16, 2007

10:00 am - 3:00 pm
Concession Stand available:

Hamburgers / Hotdogs / Snacks / Sweets.

Phone: 324-2065



THE TRIBUNE

Wao Mts RECORDS ASSISTANT

Country Office in Bahamas
Immediate Supervisor: Operations Analyst

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the largest and leading source of
financing for regional development in Latin America and the Caribbean seeks to
contract a consultant to fill the part-time position of Records Assistant.

Objective

To ensure the proper classification, organization, maintenance, protection, access
and control of documents and records in all media and to provide reference services
to authorized Bank personnel.

Basic Functions

¢ Compile, classify, maintain and manage the files and records both paper
and electronic of the File Station pertaining to the Bank operations and
accordance with the Bank’s official records management procedures
Provide reference services and expertise in the retrieval of operational
information of active and inactive files using the appropriate systems: DM
Extension, CRMS (Castle Records Management System), Intranet, Internet,
etc;

Coordinate activities with those of the Bank’s Records Management Section '

through the Operational Analyst, regarding maintenance and preservation
of operation’s archives and adherence to the Bank’s Records
Retention/Destruction Schedule.

e Train staff in the proper classification of the documents and in the use of
electronic filing systems.

e Provide client support to country office staff, as well as to outside clients.

Requirements
Competencies that include the Ability to:

Demonstrated capacity to systematically manage information proficiency
in Microsoft Office package.

Ability to identify, evaluate and propose solutions/alternatives to problems
in this area.

Experience in providing services to multicultural and multidisciplinary
groups.

Services orientation toward clients and harmonious relationship with internal
and external clients.

Education

e A Degree in Archives Administration or Library Science is preferred.

Experience
e Minimum three years of relevant experience.

e Written and spoken command of English. Working knowledge of Spanish
desirable.

Interested Bahamian candidates should forward a copy of their resume by
June 27, 2007 to:
The Admimistentive Officer, IDB Bahamas
P.O. Box N-3743, Nassau, Bahamas
OR Email: cof/cbh @iadb.org

Do elt rent: ron claae
en CL se

Do you ao OTL a Pre

The Lyford Cay Scholars’ Association
in collaboration with
The Bahamas Development Bank
will be hosting a free informational session on

“Viable Business Ventures and
Opportunities for Entrepreneurs”

On Thursday, June 14th, 2007 at 6:300m
at The Michael Eldon Boardroom
in The Michael Eldon Complex
Third Fioor, Thompson Blvd., Nassau
(The building immediately attached to Chapter One Bookstore)

Refreshments will be served + All interested persons are welcome!

For further Information, -
please contact:

Monique Hinsey at
The Lyford Cay Foundation, Inc

Tel: 242.362.4910 Ext #102 or
email: icfmo@bahamas.net.bs



SCHOLARS

|IHUHSDAY, JUNE 14, 2UU/, PAGE / 6

spanks Association
ylic Advisory

The Clearing Banks Association is reminding the public |
not to give personal or confidential banking information
such as savings or checking account numbers, or details
of credit card accounts to persons requesting these details
by telephone, e-mail or online via the internet.

It is not the policy of any member of the Clearing Banks
Association to have staff ask customers to verify or
update personal and confidential bank account
information by any of these methods.

Persons who provide any confidential banking
information to anyone other than an authorized banking
officer, run the risk of compromising their banking
information and exposing themselves to fraud, for which
our members cannot accept responsibility.
If faced with any of the above situations please contact
your bank immediately.

Bank of The Bahamas International |
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Citibank, N.A.
Royal Bank of Canada

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited

eee i (oe
CNET

NSM Elo
COOPER

is asked to contact

Mr Byron Ferguson

of the

Sales & Marketing

Department -
at
_ Bristol Wines & Spirits

| before
Friday June 15th.





(Your Bahamian Siparnarteta » ' RAINBOW

| 7 >UFr pe
|| VALUE —

NOW ACCEPTING 7 > -_
»% SUNCARD o. Redeem Quality Stamps |
QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED sce at Bed, Bath & Home |

SPECIALS GOOD: __
JUNE 14TH — 20TH, 2007

aS (MAHATMA
meen LONG GRAIN/PARBOILED |.|

CORN

ed

KELLOGG’S _ CARNATION

| TRLEUN FY Ta FLOUR oo

2 Se p Ke
| LIBBY’S O/S1 ee eo .
is ri

shy a mq

/BLUEBIRD JUICES SAVE $1.00 eae

bea JUICES SAVE.7
6-0Z. ee
FRUIT $2.99

46-0Z. PINEAPPLE/CRANBERRY -OZ. fe
COCKTAIL $2.69/ \ JUICE $2. 1€
-OZ. APPLE a :

CAMPELL’S
Brey TT A

AIR WICK | | | VALU TIME —

HOUSE Sigal ' , Q BATH |
\ Baek 2 DETERGENT Uv if
2/$300,, Beers $999
| 100- oz § oe. 4-ROLL
PINE SOL HUGGIES | CLOROX | if

D cy canes Cyitesas BLEACH le
CLEANERS (agus iL
, oe

| Oe ee









=O St



BAR-S

)MEAT & CHICKEN
| HOT DOG

42-0Z FROM page one practices are inextricably

linked to good business deci-

“This and other examples — sions,” Mrs Wright said.
show that end-use efficiency She pointed out that the
and environmentally friendly Government needed to be a

ena
MTN)

rr no

BAHAMAS FIRST
HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS
Bahamas First Holdings Limited hereby
notifies all its shareholders that based on
unaudited results for the quarter ending
ES 30th June 2007 the Board of Directors has
CeaHs declared an interim dividend of two cents

RUNSTICKS (a 4iICHOPS

“ PER-LB. PER-LB.








(2¢) per common share to be paid on 29th
June 2007 to all shareholders of record as |
of 15th June, 2007.





U.S. CHOICE U.S CHOICE



| Private sector is urged to
| watch carbon emissions

facilitator and encourage the
implementation of alternative
energy sources, as this simply
made good business sense.
According to Mrs Wricht,
it was a widely accepted Lact
that while the Caribbean may

- make a contribution of less

than | per cent of total global
greenhouse gas emissions, the
region may be more affected
by climate change.

She said that since climate
changes impact nature, indus-
tries such as tourism are vul-
nerable, as climate change
leads to unpredictability of
weather. This may account
for the frequency and severi-
ty of sea level rise and fall,
hurricane intensity, temper-
ature fluctuations and
changes in traditional weath-
er seasons.

“The business community
has a great role to play in the
adaptation process as the pri-
vate sector. To look at what
climate change means in terms
of business, in taking steps to
reduce their carbon footprints
and ultimately the cost of
doing business,” Mrs Wright
said.

TUONO AZT NOD

Teach 2 school aye children (4 1/2 & 7 1/2) in home setting.

| a1 hy
510) F ger crtrests . i AM eB WT a DESC Te Ce CC SC
< e- } iS use creative teaching techniques. Must have a passion for
* Z AST iE te | education. Willing to promote critical thinking and leadership
PElR US “$I 4 ee



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PHEESE. cesssrssvssrsnrsnrsnrssne 1 239 : FROZEN
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SST'D FLAVOR 16-0Z. i
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Sy au MONDAY, JUNE 11TH - SATURDAY, JUNE 16TH,.2007

a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Skills: bachelors degree, 3 years of experience, excellent
PT Cie CUM CSR Me ED pe SY Cd |





FIGURINES
CEILING FANS
PATIO TABLES
PATIO CHAIRS
RICE COOKERS
WALL MIRRORS

HARVEST SWEET TOUCH OF VELVET SHEET SETS PRESSURE COOKERS
ae WATERMELON BETTER HOME SHOWER CURTAINS
Eee :






$489







| [ Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center )
â„¢ : Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 Jf
oe A [ a Ore en coon a —— f
“« ; , d BS ENON) GR! LS. DAES Te OO SARIN CS RB FAS WA de ESS Mint Pat 2h TEA SRA



Doctors Hospital Health System Limited

Interim report
Quarter ended April 30, 2007

TE

Chairman’s Rergort
Doctors Hespital Health System Limited

Dear Shareholders,

I am pleased to report on your company’s financial results for the three months ended April 30, 2007.
The Hospital has completed its fourth consecutive profitable year and your company continues to grow
from strength to strength.

Doctors Hospital Health System eed Qiona esate note, with stellar results from its key centers of
excellence. Earnings per share were thirteen cents for the period. This reflects an increase from ten cents
for the comparable period last year. Net income for the three months was $1.3 million compared to $1.0
million for the comparable period in 2006.

All patient service revenue generating departments contributed positively to. the growth of the Hospital.
The financial results reflect growth in patient service revenues to $10.2 million from $9.6 million in the
prior year period. Our patients increasingly want access to our services, and we are accommodating this
greater demand while maintaining overall higher quality and safety.

The annual increases in the cost of health care are major concern for governments and employers. The
Hospital continues to face challenges from increasing expenses arising in part from an increase in the cost
of supplies, employee benefits and pharmaceuticals. Total expenses increased $0.4 million, or 4.7%, over
the same period last year. Highlights include the following: government taxes and fees increased 10.5%;
other operating—insurances, leases—increased 22.6%; and medical supplies and services increased
12.4%. Payroll costs grew slightly at 8.1%. ;

The Western Medical Plaza continues to be a challenge as we seck a buyer but losses from this
discontinued operation have trended downward as the rental income is generated pending a sale. Losses
for this facility were $0.1 million for the first three months of this year and reflected a slight improvement
over the comparable period last year. Sale of the vacant land at Blake Road was finalized and a gain of
$16,000 was recorded.

The positive operating results that have been achieved have enabled the company to modernize its health
care equipment and improvements have also been made to the nursing units.

We remain optimistic about the future. On behalf of the Board of Directors, I thank you for your
continued loyalty and patronage.

Joseph Krukowski
Chairman
June 4, 2007

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Balance Sheet :

April 30, 2007 with comparative figures at hay 31, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)









130, 2007 January 31, 2007
Assets
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents S$. 2,885 1,988
Accounts receivable—patients, net (note 2) : 1,324 951
Accounts receivable—third party payors, net (note 2) — 6,417 5,521
Inventories 1,330 1,252
Other assets , ; ‘ 241 322
Assets classified as held for sale (note 3) $,469 5,443
; 17,666 15,477
Non-current assets: :
Investments 3 30
Goodwill, net ' . 431 431
Other intangible assets 2,684 : 2,700
Investment property _ . ; ore - 1,022
Eropenty plant and equipment ‘ " : - 9,088 9,359
; : . 12,233 13,542
Total-assets : ‘ Saag REN oS 29,899 29,019
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
Current liabilities: .
Accounts payable and other liabilities . 3,249 3,448
Long-term debt, current portion : 389 389
Liabilities directly associated with assets :
classified,as held for sale (note 3) ~ §,142- 5,279

9,116

Non-current liabilities : ‘
Long-term debt 3,204 . ; 3,302

Total liabilities , Al, 984 12,418
Shareholders’ equity:
Share capital:

Authorized 12,500,000 common shares at par value
of B$0.04 each (January 31, 2007 — 12,500, 000 shares) -
Issued and fully paid 9,971,634 shares

(January 31, 2007 — 9,971,634 shares) 399 ; 399
Contributed surplus : “12,358 12,358
Retained earnings , 5,158 3,844

47,915 16,601



Total liabilities and sharehulders’ equity $ 29,899 29,019

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Revenue and Expenses

Three months ended April 30, 2007 with comparative figures for the ines months ended April 30, 2006
(Expressed i in thousands of Bahamian dollars)



. April 30, 2007 April 30, 2006
CONTINUING OPERATIONS ae . |
Revenues :
Patient service revenue, net ' § 10,249 9,604
Other 153 ; 129
Total revenues ; * 10,402 . 9,733
Expenses
Salaries and benefits : 3,697 3,420
Medical supplies and services 2,628 2,338
Other operating ; 1,144 933
Provision for doubtful accounts : : 230 600
Depreciation and amortization —_- ot Share ' ' 579 ” 507
Utilities 270 ‘ 262
Government taxes and fees 221 200
Repairs and maintenance AMO 219
Total expenses ‘ 8,379 8,479
Income from continuing operations
’ Before interest 1,523 1,254
Interest expense (64 (88)
Income from continuing operations 1,459 1,166
Discontinued operations
Revenue 38 ‘ 24
Expenses (183) (212)

Loss from discontinued operations we (145) (188)

Net income for the period $ 1,314 978
Se a REE BT I AT ES A EE I TEE SEY

Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):
Basic and fully diluted $ 0.13 0.10

(Unaudited)

cee, LOIN LOD

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

Six months ended April 30, 2007 with comparative figures for the three months ended April 30, 2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)







April 30, 2007 April 30, 2006
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in):
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income $ 1,314 979
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash
provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization 579 507
Provision for doubtful accounts 230 599
Gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment (16) :
2,107 2,085
Increase in accounts receivable (1,479) , (1,959)
Decrease (increase) in inventories (78) (67)
Decrease (increase) in prepaid expenses and other assets ‘ 62 183
Decrease in accounts payable and other liabilities 198 (400;
Cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activities 414 (158)
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Purchase of property, plant and equipment (208) (664)
Purchase of intangible assets (84) (568)
Proceeds from disposal of property, plant and equipment 1,038 -
__Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in) investing activities 746 (1,232)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Repayment of long-term debt (236) 602
Cash and cash equivalents used in financing activities (236) (602)
Decrease in cash and cash equivalents 924 (1,992)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 1,988 1,284
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period (note 4) $ 2,912 (708)
ES

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank and in hand, short-term deposits with an original maturity of three
months or less and bank overdrafts.

(Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity

Three months ended April 30, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Number of shares Sharecapital Contributed surplus _ Retained earnings



Balance at January 31, 2007 9,971,634 $ 399 $ 12,358. $ 3,844
Net income for the period - - - 1,314
Balance at April 30, 2007 9,971,634 $ 399 $ 12,358 $ 5,158

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements
Three months ended April 30, 2007

1. Significant accounting policies

These interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard
No. 34, Interim Financial Reporting; using the same accounting policies applied in the January 31, 2006 aes
consolidated financial statements.

2. Accounts receivable
Accounts receivable are stated net of provisions for doubtful accounts of $6.2 million.
3. Assets classified as held for sale

For the period ended April 30, 2007, total assets and liabilities of companies which have been discontinued and
for which there is a commitment for disposition are reported in the balance sheet as “held for sale.” Operating
results for these segments are reported in the statement of income “Discontinued operations.” These include
Western Medical Plaza and Imaging Equipment Limited.

4. Cash and cash equivalents

The cash position of $2.912 million reported in the statement of cash flows reflects $27,000 in cash for WMP
that is recorded as assets held for sale.



"HE COLLEGE OF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs: Moor

REGISTRATION
FOR SUMMER SESSION Il

will take place on
' WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY,
JUNE 13-14, 2007 ONLY.

To accommodate the above mentioned
dates, please be advised that registration
for Fall Semester will be suspended on these
two days and will recommence on Monday,
June 18, 2007.

Publish your Legal Notices and
Balance Sheets

iG

The Tribune

Call: 502-2352





THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 11B

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



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FROM page one

Apart from the existing US
departures terminal, Mr Rich-
mond said the other buildings
were “rather old and getting
them up to speed would not be
worth it”.

He said NAD, which is 100
per cent wholly-owned by the
Bahamian government and is
managing/operating the airport
on a 30-year lease from the Air-
port Authority, would spend a
further $10-$15 million to
upgrade the existing terminals
and facilities at Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

“We're $4 million into it with
just two programmes,” Mr

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| Please contact our customer service
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BUSINESS -



THE TRIBUNE



Richmond said of the initial
upgrades.

He described the $15 per pas-
senger airport user facility fee,
which will be included in the
price of airline tickets from July
1 onwards, as “the cornerstone”
of NAS’s plans for financing the
new terminal construction. The
fee for domestic departures will
be $5 perhead. _

“We have to make sure we

earn enough money to make

this work,” Mr Richmond said.
“Right now, the airport is not

making money.” While aiming

to increase revenues and reduce
operating costs, he added that
electricty costs in the Bahamas
were “five times what” YVRAS
was used to. ts

To raise project financing for
the new terminals’ construction,

banks and other financial insti- |

tutions will want to secure loans
and mezzanine financing on the
airport’s physical assets, and
know their are revenue

streams/cash flow to enable

NAD to repay the debt.

Mr Richmond said NAD was
projecting to earn $19 million
from the passenger airport user

' facility fee in its first financial
’ year, and expected this sum to

increase year-on-year aS more
people used Lynden Pindlin
International Airport. ;

The revenues from this fee
will back and pay off the project
financing, which could be raised
through a securitisation or bond
issue. Under the terms of the
agreement with the Govern-
ment, NAD has to be self-suffi-
cient and cannot look to gov-
ernment subsidies. -

Vancouver Airport Services
(YVRAS), which won the bid-
ding for the 10-year airport
management/operating partner
contract, has seconded Mr Rich-
mond and four other executives
to the NAD.

“Obviously, we hope to be

here a lot longer,” Mr Rich-
mond said, referring to the ini-
tial 10-year contract handed to
YVRAS.

To further bolster Lynden
Pindling International Airport’s
revenue streams and profitabil-
ity, Mr Richmond said he and
officials from the Bahamian
government were seeking to
attract additional carriers and
airlift to use the airport.

He added that at an upcom-
ing conference in Tucson, Ari-
zona, he would be meeting with
airlines such as Lufthansa, Vir-

gin Atlantic, Condor and Fron-
tier to entice them to begin ser-
vice to the Bahamas.

In terms of cosmetic improve-
ments already made by NAD,
Mr Richmond said it had estab-

lished. an operations centre at .

the airport that was manned 18
hours per day, with staff ready
to address all customer queries.
The Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport’s signage and
lighting had also been improved.
“Probably the largest area of
focus for us” was the friendli-
ness and ambience of the air-
port, Mr Richmond said, NAD
having launched the first of its
customer satisfaction surveys in
March. es
‘ NAD was shortly planning to
launch a website so that cus-
tomers could look. up their

flights on-line and see whether

they were on time.
“We will be spending severa
million dollars on needed main-
tenance; hundreds of thousands
of dollars on paint, carpeting
and lighting to improve the
ambience of the airport over
the next three years,” Mr Rich-
mond said.
- He-said the airport was get-
ting close to having a seat avail-
able for all passengers in ‘the
upstairs US deaprture lounge.
The donation of more than 100
seats by the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA) had
brought the total to 738, and
Mr Richmond said that NAD
estimated peak demand in the
lounge would be for 800 seats.
NAD was also spending $2

' million on upgrading Lynden
Pindling International Airport’s ©

washroooms, Mr Richmond
said, adding: “There are parts

of the terminal, especially some .

wash rooms, that are too old to
keep clean, no matter how hard
you try.”

To improve efficiency, and



from people who are
making news in their

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribtine wants to hear

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

If so, call us on 322-1986 |




the speedy movement of pas-
sengers through the various
ticketing, screening and other
stations in Lynden Pindling
International Airport, NAD is
spending $2.2 million on a sys-
tem that will eliminate baggage
screening at the upstairs US
departures lounge - something
that should be gone “early next
year”.

Mr Richmond said conces-
sion and retail opportunities at
Lynden Pindling International

' Airport would come “soon”

and be advertised to Bahami-
ans, breaking the monopoly
held by Bradley Roberts, the
former PLP minister and MP,
and businessman Garet ‘Tiger’

Finlayson.

He added that YVRAS
worked with retail and food ten-
ants to ensure they met perfor-
mance standards.

When asked about the fre+
quent problems encountered by
Bahamians and tourists in

_Teclaiming their baggage upon

arrival.at Lynden Pindling
International Airport, with the

‘carousels frequently out of

order, Mr Richmond said NAD

-was working with both baggage

handlers and the airlines to
address this. .

He added: “The vertical
carousels seem to be broken a
lot, and the maintenance folks
tell me it’s the design - they
burn out constantly.” In addi-
tion, the carousels were only
able to take a certain weight of
baggage, and could break down
if they were overloaded by bag-
gage handlers.

In spending money to
enhance terminals and facilities
that were likely to be torn down
to make way for new buildings,
Mr Richmond said NAD had
“to be careful about throwing
money away” when capital was
needed for new construction.













NOTICE OF VACANCY

A vacancy exists for a Bahamian at The Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Limited in the Building and Development Services Department.

Vacancy:

‘Director of Building and Development Services. The position reports
directly to Management.

Qualifications/Pre-Requisites:

Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering with a minimum of fifteen
(15) years experience with substantial knowledge in the construction
industry w.r.t. building services, substantial familiarity with building
codes, substantial knowledge in urban engineering, and substantial
experience in management of projects. Legal mindedness, computer
literacy, the ability to communicate effectively and speak publicly,
and a character of integrity are essential.

Responsibilities:

Managing the day to day operations of the Building and Development
Services Department with respect to Building and Planning Code
matters, contracts administration of capital projects, implementation
of management’s physical planning of subdivisions and overseeing
the City Management Department.

Résumés with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department

The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited

Grand Bahama
or



P.O. Box F-42666 Freeport,

Email: personnel@gbpa.com
On or before June 29, 2007



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS




Notice of Sitting for New Providence Port Authority Board
To consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration
Act Chapter (277)

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board
for New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration
Building, Prince George Wharf on the 28â„¢ June, 2007at 3:00pm for the purpose
of granting Licences under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277)

Any person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do so at
least six (6) days before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in
writing to the Board and to the applicant.

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written
authorization at the meeting.

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received
written notification from the New Providence Port Authority.

The under mentioned persons have applied for grant of licences as specified below:

NEW JET SKI FOR NEW PROVIDENCE .

REG.NO APPLICANT BOAT CLASS PASS USE
NAME :
NB/05/07 Strachan Tyson NoName 1) 2 Rental
P. O. Box CB- 12549 oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski
NB06/07 _ Romotar Narine NoName =D 2 Rental
Nassau, Bahamas oft
. Jet Ski
NB06/07 Romotar Narine No Name D a) Rental
; ‘ Nassau, Bahamas oft

cater
grutias

Jet Ski i TARY

NEW BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

REGNO APPLICATION BOATNAME CLA PASS USE
SS

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 13B

GN-517

Ministry Of Maritime Affairs & Labour
Port Department



NEW MASTER’S LICENCE FAMILY ISLAND

REG NO APPLICANT CLASS
Hanna Dario M A

NB/42/07 Fresh Creek, Andros

RENEWAL MASTER LICENCE FAMILY ISLAND

LICENCE # NAME CLASS

814] Bain Dereck
Marsh Harbour, Abaco A

1178 Cartwright Kyrle M.W A
: Deadman’s Cay , Long Island

6047 Jones Charles A
Coopers Town, Abaco

6375 Moxey Nelson
Freeport, Grand Bahama ,

7919 Smith Kyle A
P.O. Box F-43216 ;
Freeport, Grand Bahama

7908 Sands Latwone A
Andros, Bahamas

6924 Thomas Perry L A
P.O. Box AB-20237

Marsh Harbour, Abaco

6781 Turnquest Glen A
P.O. Box F 42138
Freeport, Grand Bahama

7366 Murray Daniel A . A
P.O. Box 40906
Freeport, Grand Bahama

i N/B/41/07 _— Bethel Kevin E. Gatta Go B 6 Charter

NB42/07

NB43/07

NB44/07

P.O. Box CR- 54993

“Nassau, Bahamas

Sun Shipping limited
P.O. Box CB-12762
Nassau, Bahamas

Sun Shipping Limited
P.O. Box CB-12762
Nassau, Bahamas

Marine Adventure Co
Ltd
P.O. Box CB-11085

21ft
Fibreglass

Jake Express
77.7ft
Steel Hull

Bahama Pride
249.6ft
Steel Hull

Three Queens
II
46ft

25

Tug Boat

Barge

Charter

REG NO

Nassau, Bahamas Hatteras
TRANSFER OF JET SKI LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

PREVIOUS NEW OWNER CLASS PASS USE

OWNER

NP: 121 ATE Cartwright Jerome SweetingShamane D 2 Rental

REG NO

mardi
NEawO7
NB/45/07
NB/46/07

NB/47/07

NB/48/07

Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas

NEW MASTER LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICANT CLASS

Barnett Robert B
P.O. Box NP- 2141
Nassau, Bahamas

Butler Thomas H B
P.O. Box N-9699
Nassau, Bahamas

Cargill Evan A B
P.O. Box N-9277
Nassau, Bahamas
Lisgaris Antonio
P.O. Box SS-6680 B
Nassau, Bahamas

Mckenzie La’Raoy R B

Nassau, Bahamas

Strachan Charlton W. B
Nassau, Bahamas

» RENEWAL MASTER’S LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

LICENCE #

6877

6557

7040

6084

7814

7186

8095

7114

NAME

Adderley Farron
P.O. Box SB- 50104
Nassau, Bahamas

Horton Jason
Nassau, Bahamas

Horton Christopher
Nassau, Bahamas

Newbold Roy C. Jr
P.O. Box N- 3846
Nassau, Bahamas

Parker Kenyon D3
Nassau, Bahamas

Pratt William
P.O. Box FH- 14633
Nassau, Bahamas

Russell Thomas R
P.O. Box N-3931
Nassau, Bahamas

Lloyd Donne
P.O. Box N-8574
Nassau, Bahamas

CLASS

A



Captain/Anthony J. Allens

Port Controller



PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

ie a
US retail sales rise by 16-month high

@ By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Consumers brushed off rising
gasoline prices and slumping
home sales to storm the malls in
May, pushing retail sales up by
the largest amount in 16
months.

The Commerce Department

reported that retail sales surged
by 1.4 percent last month, com-
pared to April, double the
increase that analysts had been
expecting. Retail sales had fall-
en by 0.1 percent in April.

The May strength was wide-
spread with auto dealers,
department stores, specialty
clothing stores and hardware
stores enjoying an especially

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/No.825
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of
land containing approximately Seven acres and Seventy-seven
hundredths of an acre situate in the Island or Cay known as
Frazer’s Hog Cay one of the Berry Islands group in the said
Bahama Islands being Lot Numbers Fifty-five, Fifty-seven
and Fifty-nine in the plan of a Subdivision of a portion of the
said Frazer’s Hog Cay.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Allan Lightbourn
NOTICE

| THE PETITION OF ALLAN LIGHTBOURNE in respect
of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing
approximately Seven acres and seventy-seven hundredths of
an acre situate in the Island or Cay known as Frazer’s Hog
Cay one of the Berry Islands group in the said Bahama Islands
being Lot Numbers Fifty-five, Fifty-seven and Fifty-nine in
the plan of a Subdivision of a portion of the Frazer’s Hog Cay
bounded Northwestwardly by a road Thirty-five feet wide
and running thereon Six hundred and Nineteen feet and Eight-
six hundredths of a foot Northeastwardly by Lot Number
sixty-one in the said plan and running thereon Five hundred
and ninety-seven feet more or less to the High Water Mark
Southeastwardly by the sea and running thereon Five Hundred
and eighty feet and Seventy hundredths of a foot and
Southwestwardly by Lot Number Fifty-three in the said plan
and running thereon Five Hundred and Thirty-five more or
less to the High Water Mark.

ALLAN LIGHTBOURNE claims to be the owner in fee
| simple in possession of the following land and has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
| The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and
_ the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance
with me adenine a ae sud Act.

it ion ind Plan of the said land may be
mal office hours in the following places:

The chee of the Supreme Court, East Street, North,
in the City of Nassau, Bahamas;

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen
- Retiro Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, The Bahamas;
and

. The Office of the Commissioner/Administrator, Justice
of the Peace or the Local Constable at The Berry
Islands, The Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or
right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 16th day of July, A.D.,

2007 file in the Supreme Court and Serve on the Petitioner |

or the undersigned a Statement of his Claim in the prescribed
for verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.

! Failure of any such person to file and served a Statement of
his Claim on or before the 16th day of July, A.D., 2007 will
operate as a a bar to such claim.

LOCKHART & MUNROE
CHAMBERS

35 BUEN RETIRO ROAD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

Attorneys for the Petitioner



Pricing Information As Of:
Wednesday, 13 June 2007

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark 7
Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

‘Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

z Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

1.342667"
3.2018***
2.681688°*
1.244286**""

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

Previous Close Today's Close

good month.

Sales would have been strong
even without last month’s big
jump in gasoline prices, which
saw prices top $3.20 per gallon.
Excluding sales at gasoline sta-
tions, overall retail sales would
still have been up 1.2 percent.

Meanwhile, the Federal
Reserve reported Wednesday
that the economy headed into
the summer with strong
momentum, bolstered by con-
sumer spending and a rebound
in manufacturing.

The new Fed survey will
serve as the basis for discussion

when the Fed next meets to.

consider interest rates. With the
economy showing signs of
rebounding, most analysts
believe the Fed will leave rates
unchanged at the June 27-28
meeting and possibly for the
rest of the year.

In a separate report, the
Commerce Department said
that businesses increased their
inventories held on shelves and
backlots by 0.4 percent in April,
slightly higher than the 0.3 per-
cent gain that Wall Street had

expected.

Businesses had drawn down
inventories in the first three
months of this year, a factor that
helped slow the economy’s
growth to a barely discernible
0.6 percent rate in the January-
March period. That was the
weakest performance in more’
than four years. However,

inventory rebuilding is expected.

to help contribute to a rebound
in growth in the second quar-
ter.

The strong showing for retail
sales caught. analysts by sur-
prise. They had been forecast-
ing a more moderate rebound
of 0.7 percent.

The increase should ease
fears that consumer spending,
which accounts for two-thirds
of the economy, could falter in
coming months under the
impact of the surge in gasoline
prices, the significant correction
in housing and recent increases
in interest rates.

The government report paint-

ed a more optimistic picture of |

consumer spending than last
week’s report from the nation’s

BLAIRWOOD ACADEMY
SUMMER SCHOOL

July 2 to 27

9:00 to 12:30

READING, WRITING, MATH,
_ STUDY SKILLS, COMPUTER

QUR METHODS HELP STUDENTS
CATCH UP

IMPROVE SKILLS
MOVE FORWARD

393-1303
OR COME IN TO REGISTER
VILLAGE RD SOUTH OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE

JEWELLERY STORE MANAGERS

Discover a rewarding and
challenging career catering to the
country’s visitors in the exciting
retail jewelry business!!!

! Do You Have What it Takes?

ARE YOU...
Confident? ¢ A Leader? ¢ Self Motivated?
° Professional? ¢ Mature (25 yrs or older)? ¢ Dedicated?
If the answer isYES then take the next step .

FAX RESUME TO 326-2824

SALARY OPPORTUNITY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATION



May

Change Daily Vol.

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol.
EPS $ - Acompany'’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

- Trading volume of the prior week



EPS $

Div $

0000.

Yield %

q NAV ney

*- 8 June 2007

** - 30 April 2007
++. 31 May 2007

- 30 April 2007

big chain stores, which reported
moderate gains in their survey
of same-store sales after a dis-
mal April, a month that had

“been hurt by bad weather and

the fact that Easter came early
this year.

The 1.4 percent increase in
May sales was the biggest one-
month advance since a 3.3 per-
cent surge in January 2006. It
left sales at a seasonally adjust-
ed annual rate of $377.9 billion
in May.

For May, sales at general
merchandise stores, the catego-
ry that includes department
stores, were up 1 percent and
sales at department stores rose

THE TRIBUNE

by 1.3 percent, the best showing
in 19 months. Sales at specialty
clothing stores jumped 2.7 per-
cent, rebounding from a dismal
1.5 percent drop in April.
Sales of autos and auto parts
were up 1.8 percent, the best
performance in nearly a year,
while sales were up 2.1 percent
at hardware stores and 1.8 per-
cent at sporting goods stores.
Sales at gasoline stations rose
by 3.8 percent, the biggest
increase in more than a year,
but much of that gain reflected

the big jump in prices. Retail ©

sales are not adjusted for infla-
tion.

Nassau Airport

Development Compary

Nassau Airport Development Company Ltd.

Invites Tenders for providing

JANITORIAL SERVICES
AT

LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT

In keeping with NAD’s objective to develop and
maintain a world- class gateway
to The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
~ proponents:

“ Must be 100% Bahamian owned

& operated

«+ Must be holder’s of a current
business license

“* Must demonstrate the ability to
fulfill the requirements set out in
NAD’s official Request for

Proposal.

“ Must show a track record of
commitment to service with

excellence

RFP’s may be collected from NAD’s
corporate office in Terminal! 1 at
The Lynden Pindling International Airport
between the hours of10:00 am - 4:00 pm
commencing June 15", 2007.

Deadline for submissions of Proposals is
July 27, 2007 at 3:00pm.

Telephone: (242) 377-0209



ESSAY COMPETITION

EIGHT ANNUAL PUBLIC
SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service, will
‘host an Essay Competition as one of the
activities for Eight Annual Public Service
Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior High School Students.

Students interested in participating should
write a 250-300 words (Junior High),
and 450-500 words (Senior High), essay
on the topic: “The Public Service -
Promoting Quality Service in the
Workplace”.

The deadline for entries, which should
be referred to the attention of. Ms.
Antionette Thompson, Deputy Permanent
Secretary, Ministry of the Public Service,
is Friday, 22nd June, 2007.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer with a
scanner, copier and printer will be
awarded to the winner in each category.

The winners will be announced during
The Eight Annual Public Service Week
Awards Ceremony scheduled for 6th

October, 2007.



¢
4s +

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Wwe ‘ <







High: 84° F/29°C
Low: 76°F/24°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

Albuquerque
Anchorage |
Atlanta }
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston

Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas '
Denver !
Detroit i
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
89/31
68/20
86/30
68/20
73/22
64/17
78/25
80/26
86/30
82/27
90/32
81/27
88/31
88/31
92/33

highs and tonights

Today

Low
F/C
62/16
52/11
66/18
52/11
56/13
50/10
55/12
65/18
60/15
58/14
71/21
55/12
61/16
76/24
72/22

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High
F/C
92/33
71/21
81/27
72/22
77/25
72/22
80/26
79/26
89/31
83/28
87/30
90/32
85/29
88/31
89/31

Friday
Low
F/C
64/17
52/11
64/17
57/13
58/14
54/12
57/13
65/18
65/18
59/15
70/21
59/15
63/17
75/23
71/21

s lows.

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Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando



Variable clouds, a

thunderstorm.

High: 88°



High
F/C
90/32
84/28
88/31
107/41
93/33
81/27
92/33
92/33
86/30
82/27
90/32
88/31
68/20
87/30
88/31

Weather

Today

Low

F/C
64/17
64/17
67/9
77/25
68/20
62/16
68/20
73/22
74/23
67/19
66/18
73/22
§5/12
68/20
68/20

RealFeel.

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pc
s
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pe
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High
F/C
87/30
87/30
88/31
106/41
90/32
79/26
90/32
92/33
85/29
86/30
88/31
88/31
74/23
85/29
89/31



Friday
Low
F/C
66/18
68/20
68/20
80/26
68/20
62/16
68/20
72/22
76/24
68/20
65/18
71/21
62/16
67/19
72/22

Mostly cloudy, a
t-storm possible.



Hight 88°F31°C =
Low: 74° F/23°C 3




.

High: 86°

ostly cloudy with a
t-storm or two.

Low: 74° ;



ABACO



High

F/C

Philadelphia 72/22
Phoenix 109/42
Pittsburgh 77/25
Portland, OR 72/22
Raleigh-Durham 76/24
St. Louis 90/32
Salt Lake City 90/32
San Antonio 94/34
San Diego 72/22
San Francisco 76/24
Seattle 70/21
Taliahassee 90/32
Tampa / 88/31
Tucson ; 104/40

Washington, DC 74/23

osc

Today
Low

F/C
56/13
80/26

56/13.

54/12
59/15
71/21
64/17
73/22
64/17
56/13

52/11-

67/19
71/21
72/22
58/14

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combinds the effects of temperature
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Ww

pe
s

pc
pc

{
Ss
S
pc
pe
pc
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Cloudy with a t-storm

_ possible.
High: 86°



High
F/C

15123

110/43
80/26
69/20
77125
91/32
93/33
91/32

ssoelee

72/22
‘67/19
91/32
- 88/31
105/40
78/25

Low: 14°

Low
F/C

60/15

81/27
60/15
54/12
59/15
72/22
67/19
72/22
63/17
55/12

52/11

68/20
13/22
74/23
62/16

Friday

2
oO





Normal high

Normal low . . 74° F/23° C :
Last year's high "90° F/32°C | Sey at |
Last year’s OW ow... teseesesssesctestecneeseess BO? F/27° C
Precipitation Sunrise ......6:20a.m.. Moonrise. .... 5:29 a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0.12” Sunset........8:01 p.m. Moonset... . . 7:58 p.m.
Year to date . 24.03”
Normal year to date . . 14,72” Hew First Fall Last
AccuWeather.com :
All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 =) Jun.14 Jun. 22
}
{
|
|
|
SAN SALVADOR
High: 86° F/30° C
MAYAGUANA |
i High: 87° F/31°C i
i Low: 74° F/23° C i

High:87° F/31
RAGGED ISLAND >
High: 86° F/30°C Low:73" F723"
Low:67°F/19°6

Mostly cloudy, a
{-storm possible. q =;
- High: 88°
rl ie







Mostly cloudy.



| High: 88°
: Low: 78° co



. 87° F/31° C









GREAT INAGUA
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

The higher the AccuWeathef UV Inde
greater the need for eye! and skin protection.



xâ„¢ number, the





, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, precipitation, pressure, and. __ Today 7:44 a.m. 25 1:43.a.m. -0.1
8:10pm. 3.3 1:33 p.m. -0.2
aay 8:35am. 25 2:36am. -0.1
d bide 903 p.m. 3.3 2:27pm. -0.2
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 927am. 25 d27am. 0.1
Temperature 9:54p.m. 3.1 3:20pm. -0.2
HOH: sasttietiacciauceauiaianc 0° P3200 10:18 :
nes Sunda Bam. 25 4:16am. -0.1
COW . 77° F125° Y 1043 p.m. 3.0 4:12pm. -0.1









Li




Loo ere



Today
| High = Low W

ot gS = i FC F/C
Acapulco — = 190/82 77/25 pe
Amsterdam. 70/21 61/16 ©
‘Ankara, Turkey == «4 84/98 5OVIS
Athens i 82/27 . 68/20 pc











Auckland. S95 \51/10 pe
Bangkok 95/35 80/26 c
‘Barbados 88/31. 79/26 pc.
Barcelona 76/24 64/17 pc
‘Beijing. Se 87/30 69/20 pc
_ Beirut. 74/23 74/23 s
Belgrade = t—(ité‘ié O/B GBD pvc
Berlin 79/26 61/16 sh

Bermuda — 78/25 67/19 t.
oo 64/17 46/7 pc
eo 7624 SAO
89/31 66/18
56/12 41/5 +
93/33 67/19 s
95/35 83/28 t
61/16 44/6 c
82/27 70/21 t-
84/28 70/21 t
73/22 63/17



Budapest
Buenos Aires

Cc

ZZ


















63/17 48/8
— 6116 —50/10- S
79/26 58/14
79/26 56/134
63/17. 47/8 pc
- 81/27 70/27
Helsinki 61/16 52/11 sh
‘Hong Kon 87/30 79/26
Islamabad 108/42 88/31 s
Istanbul 3 86/30 7021
Jerusalem — 78/25 56/13 s
Johannesburg 59/15 s
Kingston — 91/32 79/26 pe
Lima_ 64/17 57/13 pe
London 68/20 61/16 ©
Madrid — 77/25. S7/A3
Manila 87/30 78/25 c
‘Mexico City 79/26 54/12 t
Monterrey 95/35 73/22 pc



: 84/28 61/16 pc
8 78/25 57/13 c
78/25 53/11 ¢



‘New Delhi 405/40 80/26 t-
Oslo «59/15 43/6 pc
Paris” | 75/23 59/15. :



84/28 59/15 po
84/28 71/21's
105/40 81/27 's
79/26. 63/17
88/31 81/27 t
ATR =f
86/30 a ti
46/7 —
90/32 ramet ;
77/25. 59/5 s—
83/28 60/15 c
65/18 45/7 pe
58/14 51/10 t_
89/31 76/24 t

69/20 69/20









Tohyo



7 91/32 “7021 pe
68/206 442 pe
86/30 68/20 pc

82/87 61/16 pc
76/24 58/14 t



Winnipeg

- 61/16



90/32 80/26
110/43 81/27
83/28 68/20



63/17 40/4







op 80/26 = 63/17-s.







70/21



86/30. 72/22
103/39 81/27
8127 BI/6





57/13 37/2
78/25. 57/13



Friday
High Low W
F/C F/C
88/31 79/26 ¢

68/20 57/13 ©

84/28. 55/12 pc
86/30 66/18 s

57N3 41/5 sh
94/34 80/26 t

86/30 77/25 pc
78/25 68/20 c

90/32 68/20 pc
75/23 75/23 s

93/33 69/20 pc
81/27 64/17 t

81/27 67/19 pc
65/18 46/7
75/23 50/10
94/34 65/18
52/11. 44/6
94/34 69/20
92/33 85/29
44/6
86/30 71/21
81/27 72/22 pc

oO NH WM es

74/23. 70/21 s

59/15 59/15 sh
61/16 50/10 ©
77/25. 51/10 t
81/27) 55/12 t
61/16. . 47/8 pc

83/28 72/22 t

63/17 48/8

78/25 56/13

87/30 78/25

~ 69/20 57/13 pe

68/20 57/13 c

72/22 SAN2 po

91/32 78/25 pc
75/23, 53/11 t

97/36 74/23 pc
81/27 64/17 pc

78/25 =44/6 c

85/29 59/15 c

76/24 49/9 c

106/41 81/27 pc

68/20 48/8
87/13

86/30 62/16

89/31 80/26
5512 30/-1
81/27 71/21
86/30 74/23

81/27 60/15

66/18 52/11 pc

58/14 49/9 r

82/27 76/24 t

79/26 70/21 pc

80/26 61/16 pc

91/32 66/18 s

66/18 53/11 ¢

89/31 66/18 pc

81/27. 63/17 pe

73/22 54/12 t

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace



| Ce [rae .
WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU = Today: VAR at 5-10 Knots 0-1 Feet 4-7 Miles 80° F
Friday: ESE at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet i 80° F




FREEPORT Today:
Friday:
Today:
Friday:






[SN] Showers
fxs] T-storms

Rain







VAR at 5-10 Knots
SE at 5-10 Knots =
VAR at 5-10 Knots
SSE at 5-10 Knots

1-3 Feet
1-3 Feet
1-3 Feet

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Stationary 2

us!

Bee cholic

Renn





PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS _

From North Eleuthera and Exuma to:

Atlanta $339

Coe Bene ois viel= aay Plelev/ e
a Additional taxes/fees/restrictions apply.
ie ce feet be purchased by June 16, 2007.
Rien as be Cele orate tee cic) roley2

For more inforin ation and Cae ene please contact your
Travel Agent or call delta at 800 221 1212 or visit delta.com.

A portion of travel for some itineraries may be on the Delta Connection® carrier Atlantic Southeast Airlines.

Restrictions: Travel agents may impose an additional service charge for ticketing. Tickets are nontransferable. Seats are limited and fare may not be available on all flights or in all markets. Tickets: Fare shown is
>. Round!trip purr required. Tickets must be purchased within 72 hours after reservations are made, but no later than June 16, 2007. Travel Period: Travel may begin on or after June 16, 2007.
be completed by August 20, 2007. Blackout Dates: None. Fare Validity: Fare is valid in the Economy (Coach) cabin on Delta/Delta Connection carrier flights only. Minimum Stay: 3 nights. Maximum
Stay: Nome, except travel must be completed by August 30, 2007. Cancellations/Refunds/Changes: Fare is nonrefundable. Delta may permit you to apply a portion of the fare value to future travel upon payment
of applicable fees and fare difference; otherwise, the ticket will have no value. Fees may apply for downgrades/reissues and itinerary changes. Delta may allow you to cancel certain electronic tickets until midnight
ci after purchese (or midnight of the departure date of the first flight, whichever comes first) without penalty if purchased at the time of reservation directly from Delta. Contact a Delta agent or visit
T ils, Tames/ Fees: Fare does mot include a $3.40 Federal Excise Tax, Passenger Facility Charge(s) of up to $4.50 for each flight segment, or the September 11th Security Fee of up to $2.50 for each
segment. A flight segment is defined as a takeoff and a landing. international fares do not include U.S. International Air Transportation Tax of up to $30.20 and U.S. and foreign user, inspection, security or
other similarly based charges, fees or taxes of up to $280, depending on itinerary. These taxes and fees are the responsibility of the passenger and must be paid at the time the ticket is purchased. Miscellaneous:
fare and rules are subject to change without notice. it is the responsibility of the passenger to be in possession of all necessary documentation (e.g., valid passport, visa where applicable) at the time of departure

from origin. Delta reserves the might to deny boarding to passengers without the proper documentation. Other restrictions may apply. ©2007 Delta Air Lines, Inc.









PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007










Errington Russell
Sunset; April 28th, 2007



Life is but a stopping place,
A pause in what’s to be,
A resting place along the road,

To sweet eternity.





We all have different journeys,
Different paths along the way,
We are all meant to learn some fhe:
But never meant to stay...







Our destination is a place,
Far greater than we know,
-For some the journey’s quicker,
For some the journey’s slow.






But when the journey finally ends,
We'll claim a great reward,
And find an everlasting peace,
Together with the Lord.





Perhaps you sent a lovely card, or sat
quietly in a chair,

Perhaps you sent beautiful flowers, If so,
we saw them there,

Perhaps you sent or spoke kind words,
as any friend could say;
Perhaps you were not there at all, just

thought of us that day. |
Whatever you did to console the heart,
we thank you so very much,
whatever the part.








@

LO\’

ON




The Russell Family






| grant that We who reniain here to complete our earthly Sojoum,
emulate the life of this man whom. we all loved.so

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



THE BUILDER

Thomas Albert Sands a
OBE. J.P.




d man going the lone highway
vening old and grey






‘The builder lifted
“Good friend-in the pat.




Th



















gooles’



: Buildee Go






Claudia, Thomas, Christel, Chan





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





Card Of ‘thanks
The family of the late

RALPH ALLEN
KNOWLES

would like to thank their many

loving family members and
friends for their love and support
during their time of bereavement.

He will live 0!

| Geana, Dominic, Sarah, Barbara-Ann , Lorenz, Enrique,

Anthony, Marguerite, Anthony Jr., Elaine, Pedro,

Marcia, Mike, Xander, Brent, P lip, Joanne, Mark,
Christian and Angelique

_ Special thanks to Fr. at Pratt Li Bush
Burial Society and Dr. Ameeral..



of the late

ERLE W. T.
POWELL,
ed

Noi more smiles and happy chimes.
No more tatking of old times.
Flashbacks of the wong years we shared,
Knowing that you always cared.

Your smile will always linger

A peaceful moment we will always find.
We thank God for all of the wonderful years,
You comforted us through our joy and tears,

Thank you for contributing to ou Pc Y
We now know that only the strong. Re cx

You were our husband, father, friend and we will ever forget;
In the arms of Jesus, take your sweet rest.
Sleep on until we meet again. .
We will have our joyous reunion then.

We miss and love you always.
Your family forever





THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 3 |

Earl Richard Rahming

The family of Earl Richard Rahming would like to thank

you, for your warm expressions of sympathy, support and

compassion on the recent loss of our husband, father and
grandfather. —

We take comfort from the sympathy you have extended to
our family and in the memories we have of him.

Our family deeply appreciates all those who sent flowers or —

a sympathy card, called with kind words, or thought of us,

stood by us, cooked a meal or helped in any small way to
brighten us in our darkest days.

Thank you for keeping us in your thoughts and prayers.
~The Rahming Family~

Special thanks to: Rev'd Fr. Rodney Burrows, The
Venerable I. Ranfurly Brown, Rev'd. Fr. Bernard Been,
The-Rt .Rev'd Gilbert A. Thompson and St. Agnes Parish
Church family, Rev. Dr. Garnet King, Fr. & Mrs. John Taylor,
Kendal King & family, Edmond Moxey & family, Sylvia
Roberts, Rudolph & Joyce Burgzorg, Ozzie & Christine
Sawyer, Anzlo and Lease Stratchan, Marsha Deveaux,
Maxwell Poitier, Chris Cooper, Ricardo Knowles, Daphne
Taylor, Frank Hanna, Terrance Dorsett, Jermaine Thompson,
Mrs.Carmeta Ramsay, Laurie Ramsay, Andrea Payant, Collin
Chase, Clement Cartwright Mrs.Coriotta Klass, Mrs.
Dorothy Albury, Dr. Kevin Moss, Dr. Robert Gibson, Staff of
Princess Margaret Hospital A&E, doctors, nurses & staff of
Male Medical 1 & 2, Dr. Nicolas Fox and Staff of the Medi
Center, staff of Frank Hanna Cleaning Co., staff of B. T. V.1.,
staff of the Broadcasting Corp. of the Bahamas, management
& staff of Civil Aviation Airway Facility & Air Traffic Dept.,
First Caribbean Customer Service Center, staff of First
Caribbean Premises Dept., Class of St. Anne's School 1980,
management & staff of Bank of the Bahamas, St. Agnes
A.C.W; staff of Water & Sewerage, Armeta Saunders &
Family, the Hinds family, the Imperial Park neighborhood,

management & staff of Bethel Brothers Morticians and to all .
| other family and friends who may have assisted in any way. 4





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

Demeritte’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 e TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR







ESTHER THELMA
BETHEL, 75





Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

Left to cherish her loving memories are her daughters, Tasha |
& Melvina Munroe; stepdaughters, Yvonne Munroe of Syracuse, |
New York & Nurse Carolyn Jolly; sons, Capt. William C. :
Munroe, Sgt. 552 Gregory & Dave Munroe, Theodore Bethell :

‘a resident of Pink Cassia Ave., |
Garden Hills & 2 & formerly of |
the Bluff, Cat Island, will be held |
at St. Barnabas Anglican Church, :
Wulff & Blue Hill Roads, on : |
Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating | |
will be Canon Basil Tynes. |
Interment follows in Lakeview |

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



2 Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
/ Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
: Saturday at thé church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.









FANELISE
CENATUS-THIMO, 61

a resident of Peter Street &
| formerly of St Louis du Nord,
| Haiti, will be held at Our Lady's
| Catholic Church, Deveaux Street,
on Saturday at 3:00 p.m.
Officiating will be Fr. Kaze Eugene
SMM. Interment follows in Old
Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.



& Stanley Hepburn; stepsister, Blossie Meadows; brother, |

Elliot Saunders; daughters-in-law, Joanne Hepburn, Donnalee,

Tamanika & Nadine Munroe of Freeport, Grand Bahama; :
grandchildren, Cpl. 210 Mendel Hepburn, Stanley Jr. Hepburn, :
Krystal, Kara, Christopher, Timitra, Sherice, Dantay, Davantay, |
Devantaly, Greg Jr., Dwight, Davion & Davia Munroe; great |

grand children, Rose, Kelly, CJ, Nikita & Brittaney Munroe;

nieces, Ann, Agatha, Judy, Dretha, Brendlee, Kathy, Marva &
Nikie; nephews, Robert, Perry, Kennie, Branard & Elroy Collie; :

cousins, Francis Ledee, Clarinda Major, Caroline Newbold &
Dorothy Newton of Miami, Florida; a host of other relatives

& friends including: Rev. Luther Thurston, Bishop Albert |
Hepburn, Dean Patrick Adderley, Brenetta Thurston, Helen |

Johnson, Jackie Wilson, Nikie & Joanna McKenzie,Togoods
McKenzie, Lisa Bain, Bishop Innis, Bettymae Poitier & family,

Audrey Bastian & family, Valarie Taylor, Blossie Clear, Tannie |
Michell, Thelma & family, Mable Morgan & family, Fenrick :

Rose, Syble McKenzie & family,Theresa Thurston, Starlin

Dean, Rowena Hepburn, Genive, Elahame, Hently, Willian |
Edgar & Ormand Thurston, Felix, OB, Chris, Pastor Edna |
Williams & family, Mother Rosilda Mackey & family, Eglahmae |
Ferguson & family, RosylIn Ferguson, Rodgers family, Richard

Armbrister & family, Saunders family, Paula Brooks & family,

Jenver Burns, Randy McClains & family, Jan Stuart & family, |

: Left to cherish her memories are her husband, Metilus Cenatus;
children, Mitilien & Ifoxa Cenatus, Therdieu Azard, Angeline
Cenetus, Sohanise Christophin, Rosilia Cenatus, Odiles
Christophin, Merita, Jileat, Jerta & Marie-Dieula Cenatus;
father, Demosthene Moline; mother, Phimerce Estalone;
: brothers, Anelson Innocent, Leximon, Anheon Moline; sisters,
Silvia, Destilia & Julina Moline; grandchildren, Mikens, Wendy,
Wenderson & Peterson Christophin, Loveline Fridomme,
: Bendjina & Rosoland Louis, Danie, Dermord, Janide, Imatha
: & Lovesen Azard, Likennode, Wolph Stanley, Yoldine &
Miliene Cenatus, Veldine & Rams Durosie, Elie, Jackson &
Ronel Azard, Jhonson Cenatus, Michael & Henrique Petit-
: Homme; nieces & nephews, Elliane, Frisnel, Philisnord, Elidieu,
: Rolend, Wilson, Renand, Milent, Wilbert, Willy, Luckson,
Phinansia & Florida; cousins, Agnes & Paul Joseph; Lazamille
Amescar, Beaufils & Belle Jille, Addie Fredrick, Nelta, Guerby,
: Morene, Claudette, Victor, Hendieu, Magdola, Oxy, Anthony
& Adele; other relatives & friends including, Ms. Hanna,
Claudette Rolle, Cathrine Moss, Kennieth Johnson, Patrice
Powell, Eric, Malinda & Maxon Fredrick, Mrs. Deja Alcira,
Bernie, Clermezine, Magarette, Salius Jinante, Antouman,
: Rozalia, Similie, Deja Mizou, Magritte, Malon Guerrien, Queen
of Peace family, Mrs. Fransisce, Julio & Guerrie family.

Major family, Mount Ararat Evangelistic Temple, Fr. Tynes & :

St. Barnabas Parish, Ministry of Works, the Kentucky family,
Maritha Smith, Marjorie Saunders, Nel Smith, Ms. Forbes,

Barrel, Miss Arnette, Kathy, Ms. Davis, Sheril Rocks & :
Enderlyn. Thanks to Dr. Rodgers & the A& E staff & Dr. Chin |
& the Private Medical Staff of the Princess Margaret Hospital. :

| Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
: Home, Market Street, from 10a.m to 6p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday from 9-1p.m. & at the church from 2:00 p.m. until
service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782



THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2007, PAGE 5



FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

JOHN MANDOWSON
"Uncle Johnnie"

GARDINER, 94

a resident of Weir Street, Baillou







Street, on Sunday at | :00 p.m.
UE Officiating will be Pastor Eric D.

Clarke, assisted by Elder Kenny
Deveaux, Elder Roger Forbes, Elder Chris Gayle & Other |
Ministers of Religion. Interment follows in Western Cemetery, |

Nassau Street.

Memories will always be treasured in the hearts of his daughter: |
Ruth Elizabeth Gardiner Asst. Professor, College of The ;
Lester, Gladstone, David and John :
Gardiner Leading Seaman of The Royal Bahamas Defense :
Force; mother to his children: Elomas; two daughters-in-law:

Gladys and Berthamae Gardiner; grandchildren: Kevin, Doug 2 ;
: Left to cherish her memories are her husband, Ernest Mackey;

: children, Bernard, Donna, Anthony, Henry, Nelson, Lonna,
: Angela, Sandra & Tony; daughters-in-law, Rose Hanna, Valarie
| Mackey & Ursula Mackey; sons-in-law, Craig Bethel &

Bahamas; four sons:

of Atlanta, Georgia, Troy of Charlotte, North Carolina,
Currleston, Gino, Garron of Philadelphia, Bernal of Orlando,
Florida, Calderon, Anton, Darmeeko, Raquel, Omar, David,
Chantel, Anishka, Johnelle, John 111, Ashanti, Johnea, Tameko,

Leon Roker Jr, Dion, Ramone, Basil Kelly Jr, Marquinn and

Maleake; twenty great grandchildren, adopted niece: Samantha _ Thurston; brothers, George & Crosby Wilmore; grandchildren,

: Henry, Bernard, Marvin, Dwight, Shavania, Rosetta, Jeremy,

Meadows; other adopted relatives: Carmie, Barbara, Hartman,

Anthony, Ann, Ellie, Astrid, Charlie, Yvette, Val, Dorothy, nia, 1
Kirk and Cora; cousins: Rona, Paul and Garth Major, Francita | Shavargo, Tonyshka, Jared, Kiki, Simeon, Celeste, Tonyque,
Forbes, Carmie Taylor, Gary, Henry and Eric Ingraham, Ruby |
Clarke, Bobette Goodman, Pat and Rudy Gardiner; descendents :
of the Gardiner and Ingraham Family of Governors and :

Tarpum Bay Eleuthera; many other relatives and friends | includu
Willacie, Angle, Denise, Susan, Charlotte, Courtnell, Rev.

including: the Carey, Culmer, Thompson, Bethel, Johnson,

Nottage, Saunders and Antrobus families, the Francis family : va i : :
of the Fort Hill, the Butler, McDonald, Newbold and Skeet | Mr. Philip Stubbs & family, Jackie Pratt & family, Dellamae
families of Weir Street, the Olander, Woodside, Adderley, : ; ‘
| & family, Mrs. Beverley Edwards & family, management &

Archer, Clarke, Wilkerson, Marshall, Montel, Ellis, Nixon,

Miller, Campbell, Neely, Isaacs, Brown, Pratt, Forbes, Stuart,
Stubbs, Walker, Martin and Morgan families; the family of :
Seventh Day Adventists, Batelco, Executive Motors, The |
Royal Bahamas Defense Force, The Culinary and Hospitality |
Management Institute COB, faithful tenants Sue, Ellen and :
Dugay, Archie & Son, political associated, the Bains and |
Grants Town and other over the hill communities, Cupids

: Cay, Governors Harbour, Tarpum Bay and many friends and
: relatives from Eleuthera and throughout the commonwealth
' of The Bahamas.

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on
day fi -11 :00 a.m. & at the church fi 12:00

Hill Road, & formerly of Governors : eo ee etl G rae ecuucn none enn neon
Harbour, Eleuthera, will be held at |
_|Grants Town Seventh Day :

; Adventist Church, Wellington



Va





VERNIE IDELL
MACKEY, 78

| aresident of Dunmore Street, will
be held at Gospel Light Baptist
Church, Cowpen Road & Gerald
Bartlett Way, on Saturday at 11:00
| a.m. Officiating will be Spiritual
| Leader Bro. Perry Cunningham,
assisted by Rev. Kenny Mackey.
Interment follows in. Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.





Jonathan Clebrook; sisters, Edna Miller, Jane Rolle & Norma

Raymond, Clarissa, Leon, Latonia, Lorenza, Sergio, Shavette,

Tony, Santhon, Anea, Tonaz, Nakada, Henry, Henric, Henrenek,
Christopher, Darius & Branequa; a host of great grand nieces,
nephews, grandnieces, grand nephews, relatives & friends
including, Gwendolyn King & family, Mrs. Barbara Cooper,

Kenry Mackey, Pamela, Mrs. Munroe, Dunmore Street family,
Johnson & family, Gretchan Moncur & family, Ena Wissort
staff of K.F.C. Mackey Street, the management & staff of
Solomon Supercentre, management & staff of Seaside Buffet
and management & staff of Mackey's Plumbing.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral

Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.







PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

Demeritte’s Funeral dome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

- | Sturrup, Vanessa King, Violet, Giovanni and Keturah, Dennis (DJ)
: Mathers, Indira Porter, Brenville Saunders; numerous relatives and
: friends of Nassau, Althea Jones and family, Kosygen Forbes and
: family, Dorothy Barr and family, Andrew 'Andy' Forbes and family,
: Charmaine Musgrove and family, Nelson Musgrove and family,
: Shermica McKintosh and family, Marsha Smith and family, Hartley
a resident of Southern Heights, will be :
: family, Cynthia Rolle and family, Rose and Charles Edgecombe and





PEGGIE PEALINE
MUSGROVE-
MCKENZIE, 48

| held at Church of God of Prophecy,



Road.

Peggie, Peggs, Peggie Pearls, Miss Punny Moon, Aunt, Auntie,

Goddie, as she is known, is survived by: five (5) sisters: Mary :
Jethlyn Burrows and Lynda Higgs of :
Freeport, Brenda Lee Simmons of Kissimmee FI., and Bridgette :
Musgrove Flowers of Nassau; five (5) brothers, Cleamine Musgrove :
Jr. of New Jersey, Derek Musgrove of Nassau, Wingo and Monolito :
Musgrove of Freeport and Perry Arthur of Lake Worth FI.; six (6) :
sisters-in-law, Miriam, Daisy, Margaret, Brenda and Donnell :
Musgrove, and Betty Arthur; three (3) brothers-in-Law, Wilfred :
'Gary' Burrows, Ivan Higgs and Dwight 'Tony' Flowers; three (3) :
aunts, Alvissa and Winifred Forbes, and Anne Cox Musgrove; One :
: of God of Prophecy family especially the Elizabeth Estates, Soldier

Berkeley of Miramar FI.,

(1) uncle, James T. Musgrove; twenty (20) nieces, Opal Berkeley,

Shannay Sawyer, Elizabeth Ivanique Higgs, Vivienda Soto, Britoneia :
: Management of The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited,
: the Royal Bahamas Police Force and Reserves, the Royal Bahamas

Musgrove, Alveria Rigby Reid, Brendalee Smith, Donnalee Musgrove,
Lakisha Balfour Watson, Derycka, Deanka, and Deneika Musgrove,

Krystal Ferguson, Latricia and Laranda Musgrove, Rashan Albury, :
Monisha (Precious) and Monica Musgrove, Tanaia Green and Bianca :
Arthur; four (4) nieces-in-law, Lisa Berkeley, Kim and Gwenique :
Musgrove, and Lynette Hamilton; nineteen (19) nephews, Leslie :
Valentino Berkeley, Leading Seaman Themo Berkeley of The Royal :
Bahamas Defence Force, Pedro Berkeley, Wilfred Alexander and :
: Carol, Evan and Jay Williams and family, Kenneth 'Jimbo' Garland
: and family, Stephen Duncombe, Tanisha and Denniqua Johnson,
Patrick Hamilton, Ashley "Don" Arthur, Daniel Cochran, Derek :
Musgrove, Quincy Saunders, and Able Seaman Rondell Knowles :
: Symonette and family of The Turks and Caicos, Sandra Musgrove
Sam Sawyer, Moses Soto, Lloyd Reid, Greg Smith, and Shervaughn :
Watson; fifteen (15) grandnieces: Jaydon Martin, Kaymia, Trincy :
and Sasha Reid, Dominique and Arianna Smith, Neazure and Lakay :
: Charles Forbes and family, Nathaniel Forbes and family, Shannon

James Andrew Burrows, Richendo Simmons, Cleamine Francis,
Rudolph, Tryone, Wingo Jr., Gamal, Akio and Montel Musgrove,

of The Royal Bahamas Defence Force; five (5) nephews-in-law,

Stuart, Tatyana Musgrove, Tinisa and Taysia Berkeley, Tatiana Soto,

Shabethany Sawyer, Patrinique and Latonya Hamilton; three (3) :
grandnephews, Aiden Tyler Musgrove, Davonte Hamilton, Nacassian }
Pinder; special friends, Lavenia King and family, Pauline Porter and :
: are too numerous to list.
Sharon Cunningham and family, Sharon Chase and family, Rose :
Newton and family, Wendy Ferguson, Sheryl Bethel and family, and :
Sheila and Bernard Munroe and family; Several god-children :
including, Tenille Barr, Donovan Flowers, Inderia Henfield, Miquell :

family, Vanna Barry Roach and family, Bernice Bullard and family,

East Street Tabernacle, East Street, on :
Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will :
be Bishop Ghaly Swann, assisted by :
Pastor Dwight Ferguson. Interment :
follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier ;
: Woodside and family, Miriam Curtis and family, Josephine Gibson
: Musgrove and family, Dimple Laroda and family, Puncheeta and
: Almando Taylor and family, Muriel, Alice and Millie Symonette

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





Forbes and family, Sandra Butler and family, Isula Henfield and

family, Virginia and Elvis Carey and family, Eva and Lyle Burrows,
Mae Higgs and family, Gwendolyn Hall and family, Roland Hamilton,
Melda Scavella, Shirley Bonamy and family, Ilene Burrows and
family, George Astwood and family, Patricia and Zieha Rahming,
Vernita Mackey and family, Emaline Curtis and family, Katherine

and family, Rose Newton and family, Edith Saunders and family,
June Collie and family, Ivan Barr and family, Renee.and Joseph
Young and family, Basil and Agnes Charlow and family, Anishka
and Laverne Davis and family, Marva Kelly and family, Virginia
Sawyer and family, Wanda Darville and family, Melanie Goddard
and family, Vernita Mackey and family, Dereo Maycock and family,
Kenton Whylly and family, Andrea Sturrup and family, Annamae
Hepburn and family, Henry "Hank" Bain and family, Louis Major
and family, Henry Roberts and family, The communities of Joan's
Heights West, South Beach and Southern Heights, the entire Church

Road, Baillou Hill Road and East Street Branches, the Staff and

Defence Force and the Graduates of Government High School
especially the Class of 1975 of Freeport, Lydia and Mark Moss and
family, Don and Emma Forbes, Andrea Missick and family, Samantha
McIntosh and family, Diana, Kirk, and Arthur Musgrove and family,
Cleophas Capron and family, Rosemae Saunders-Musgrove and
family, Alexander 'Kalik' Newbold and family, Stanley, Peter, Elsie,

and Willimae Symonette of Bimini and Cat Cay, Rosemary
Edgecombe, and Beatrice Thompson and family of Abaco, Deborah

and family, Eustace Musgrove and family, Cynclair "Pearly" Musgrove
and family, Curlin Musgrove and family, and Stanford Forbes and
family of The United States of America, Keith Forbes and family,

Henfield and family, Carolyn Grey and family, Nettamae Beckles
and family, Glee Musgrove and family, Patsy Williams and family,
and Cheryl Dottin and family. Many other family and friends that

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the
church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Ee

soe eee

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 7

» Bethel Brothers Morticians

- Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

_FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Shane "House"
Anthony Roberts, 32

_ godparents, Jessica Bowe and Frank Guillaume
_ of Miami, Fla.;
including, Peter Roberts-Whitfield, Clifford
_ Storr, Jerome Franks, Gary Wallace, Ruth Sands, .
of East Store Court, |
Yellow Elder Gardens |
will be held Saturday ©
10:45am at St. Francis |

| Xavier Cathedral, West 2 ! :
_ Isaacs and family, Maria McKenzie and family,

and other relatives and friends

Louise Wallace-Thompson, Sidney Wallace,
Paula Williams and Family, Wendal B. Roberts,
Steve, Martin and Brad Albury and the Albury
Clan of Gregory Town, Eleuthera, Mr and Mrs
Neville Albury and family, Mr and Mrs Oswald

_ Maxine Mitchell-Taylor, Sonny Scott. Numerous

Alphonso William Evans; one son, Shane Jr.;

grand mother, Merle Roberts; one grand aunt, |
Ruth Rolle of Syracuse, N.Y.; twenty two aunts, |
Keva Nethersole, Delvera Wallace, Dr. Lynda |
Riddle of Cincinnati, Yolanda Thomas, Francis ©
Roberts, Carolyn Roberts (Freeport), Carolyn |
Roberts (Nassau), Marsha (Abaco), Brenda |
- Tinker, Patrice White, Savannah Georgia, |

Elva Armbrister, Debbie 2
_ family, Roots and One Family Junkanoo Group

Winifred Roberts,
Longley, Wendy Lightbourne, Joy Nicholls,

Nadine Rolle, Tasma Rolle, Hartlyn Roberts, |
Patsy and Sheila Mackey, Margaret and Nora |
Evans; twelve uncles, Anthony Roberts, Hon. |
Bradley B. Roberts, Dr. Robin Roberts, Vaughn |
Roberts, Gladstone, Asa, Paul, Lester, Mackey, |
Craig and Kevin Rolle, Andrew Thomas; |

_ nieces, nephews and cousins to name. Special

_ thanks to the management and staff of the Water

_ and Sewerage Corp., the members and officers

_ of the BUSAWU, Doctors Sands, Weech and
Left to mourn his Chin, Nurses of ICU of the Princess Margaret
passing but to cherish |

happy memories are his loving and devoted |

mother, Donna Pauline Roberts; his father, |
_ Walk In Medical Clinic, Carla Neymour and

Hospital, Dr. Tracey Roberts-Halkitis,
management and staff of The Nassau Hotel
Restaurant Supplies, Doctors and Nurses of the

family (Andros), James Ferguson and sisters,
Roy-Ann Lowe and family, Rosalee Lightfoot
and family, Geraldine Curtis, Barbara, Joyce
and Kimberley Bain, Shirley Cooper, residents
of East Storr Court, Yellow Elder Gardens, Fr.
Glen Nixon, Nuns of St. Martin's Convent,
members of St. Francis Xavier's Cathedral,
Darren Parker and family, Florence Kemp and

and staff of Bethel Brothers Morticians.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel
Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Friday
from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at the church
from 9:45am until service time..





Set eee! UL as Sg

PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.
die oe Director :

Pd eee
See Ree

Tyne com ie ey er ae ta
Kené Kenica Smith, 21

a resident of Silver Gates Estates and
formerly of both Calabash Bay and
Fresh Creek, Andros, will be held on
Saturday, June 16th, 2007 at 10:00 a.
m. at St. Paul's Anglican Church,
Calabash Bay, Andros. Officiating will
be The Very Rev. Father S. Sabastian

Campbell, assisted by other Ministers _

of the Gospel. Interment will follow

in the Public Cemetery. Services have

been entrusted to Gateway Memorial

Funeral Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue
). and Kenwood Street.

Left to cherish the memories of her —

"never ending smile are her mother, Christine Adderley; father, Ken

Smith; brothers, Hassan Bowleg, Ken Jr.; 2 adopted sisters, Tamara . §

Wilson and Darriel Rolle; 1 adopted brother, Darrell Rolle Jr., 1
Godchild, Brianna Bowles; stepmother, Petralee Smith; grandmothers,
Merril Rolle and Reinadell Smith; grandfather, William "Bill"
Adderley; step-grandmother, Valderine Adderley; aunts: Leucretia
and Nickla Rolle, Hope Wilson, Karis Davis, Vernita and Portia
Smith, Gena Young, Dianne Adderley; uncles, Darrell, Ricardo and
Keno Rolle, Ricardo Davis, Dale, Dennis, Dexter and Devon
Adderley, Nelson, Gordon, Errol, Vandyke, Patrick, Philip, Don,
and Tredwell Smith; grandaunts, Coralee Bain, Gloria Johnson,
Rosalie Sweeting, Maxine and Diane Thompson, Cassalina Curry,
Beatrice Tinker, Lilian Rolle, Sally Dill, Inez Mason and Millicent
Miller; granduncles, Hesley and James Roosevelt Thompson, Bernard
Bain, Ivan Johnson and Fredrick Curry; special friends, Jason Neely,
Lynette Hutchinson, Daniel Miller, Branitta Buchanan, Talitha
Strachan, Audra Bain, Miesha and Jordan Prince William's graduating
class of 2004. Other relatives and friends including, Tia, Tarriah,
Tresia, Robyn, Renaldo, Peabo, Altonique, Nickquelle, Carlette,
Aniyah, Racquille, Shaquille, Kaynaj, Keno Jr., Kianna, Kia, Ingrid,
Patricia, Keva, Nicole, Kelly, Pearlamae, Roston, Cleo, Lavern, Joy,
Dominique, Tanya Thompson, Sherry, Patty, Kimberley, ‘Mum’,
Dede, Alliah, D'Mari and Darren Adderley, Felicia, Richanna,
Rexeanna, Chaka, Sanovia, Shatoya, Debrice, Arlene, Alicia, Sophia,

_ Kaitlyn, Shanny, The Dean Family, The Stuart Family, The Western
Air Family, The College Of The Bahamas Family, The Torchbearers
Family, The One Family Family, The Purple Zone Family, The North
‘Andros Family, The Calabash Bay Family, The Silver Gates Family,
The Whitfield Family, The Mills Family, The Turnquest Family and
The Ferguson Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Thursday
from 3 :00 p. m to 7:00 p. m., on Friday from 9:00 a. m. to | :00 p.
m. and at the church in Andros from 4:00 p. m. to service time at
the church.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Mackey Street ° P.O. Box N-4404
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-341-6451 ° Nights 242-322-3242
24 Hour Cell: 242-427-5414

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Dorothy Denise
Clarke, 50

of Wulff Road will be held on
Saturday, June 16, 2007 at Bethel
Baptist Church, Meeting Street at
10am. Officiating will be Pastor
Timothy Stewart, assisted by other
ministers of religion. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish fond memories are
her mother, Ruby Neely; father,
Richard Clarke; five sons, Damon, Treko, Jason Lavardo and
Christopher; one daughter, Tiffany; five grandchildren, Jamal Jr.,
Jasmine, Taleea, Desmond Jr. and Jason Jr.; seven brothers, Christopher

| and Anthony Clarke, Phillip Lightbourne, Stephen, Frank, Calvin

and Jermain Mackey; two sisters, Sandra Cooper and Linda Greer of
Michigan; two sisters-in-law, Judith and Tonette; two aunts, Virginia
Neilly and Edith Sawyer; three grand uncles, Calvin, Twyman and
Clinton Neilly; three grand aunts, Eloise Albury, Sharon Lyles and
Helena Neilly; three aunts-in-law, Mercelita, Evelyn and Diana Neilly;
numerous nieces and nephews, including Valentino Sands, Andre
Cooper, Shaneya, Franjadi, Faith, Brandon, Philon, Rayan, Paris,
Anthony Jr., Donray and Anthonique; numerous other relatives and
friends including Marie Horton, Twees Dean, Lillian Johnson, Shevette
Edwards, Sabrina Roberts, Aletha Cooper, Dwight Lyles, Dwayne
Woodside, Irma, Kendal, and Maxwell Albury, Gregory, Kingsley
Cash, Beverley Sobiech, Ruby Curtis, Florinda Lightbourn, Meryl
Rolle, Helen Hall, Lynette Barry, Valeria Johnson, Anthony, Calvin
Jr., Carlton Neilly, Cheryl, Rhodrille, Dale Neilly, Cynthia Thompson,
Thudgelyn, Theodore, Terrel Neilly, Clinton Jr., Deane, Yelena Neilly,
Rowena, Patrick, Wenzel Neilly, Janet Pratt, Charles Demeritte, Edna
Pennerman and family, Gloria Ward and family, Cynthia Brown and
family, Nellie Cooper and family, the staff of City Markets, the staff
of Bahamas Food Services Limited, the staff of Tropical Shipping,
the staff of Hard Rock Café, the staff of Oyster Bars Seafood, Donna
Wilson and family, the staff of Atlantis, Cheryl Miller and family,
Adrian Smith and family, Bethel Baptist Church and family, Quincey
Bevans and family, Rev. Timothy Stewart and family, Esther Winder
Storr and family, Curly Aranah and family, Judy Roberts and family,

‘the staff of the Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture,

Audrey Dean, Edith Smith and family, Agatha, Jennie, Ronnie, Sarah,
Frith, Richard, Christopher, Pat Horton, Willmae Goodman, Joseph
Horton, Christina, Eldrid, Bridgette Mortimer, Marie Horton and
many others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Evergreen Mortuary,
Mackey Street on Friday from 12noon until 6pm and again at the
church from 9am until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES




Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 e Nassau, N.P., Bahamas 7
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 9



eee





































ALLISON DIANNE
| ELLIS, 37






Road.

' family, staff of Housekeeping Princess Margaret Hospital,
: the Fort Fincastle Community, Christine Gardiner and family,
‘ Kathleen Darville and family, Walter Saunders and family, |

a resident of Fort Fincastle, will :
be held 11am, on Saturday, 16th :
June, 2007, at Lighthouse :
Fellowship Church of God, :
Mahogany Street, Malcolm :
Allotment. Officiating will be :
Bishop Carlton J. Stuart, assisted :
] by Minister Stanley Smith, Rev. :
Shirley Smith, Rev. Theresa :
Burrows. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier :

Cherished memories are held by her son, Maxwell Jenoure;
two daughters, Anastasia Jenoure and Latoya Precious Carey; :
twenty-two grandchildren, Abigail and Allison Jenoure, Kirk :
Stuart, Allison, Antonia, Ariel, Jalisa, Melissa, Jan, Teran, :
Temecia, Joshua, Jermain, LaTorian, Labrea, Lucy, Jatoria, :
Jason Jr., Jerome, Matthew, Kenia and Dario; adopted father, :
Richard Culmer; nine adopted children, Theresa Knowles, :
Brunette Rose, Lashanda Smith, Carmaine Chea, Devonne
Smith, Wendall Bethel, Thomas Lockhart, Brunette :
Edgecombe and Jason Sr.; six brothers, Oswald Carey, Philip
Colebrooke, Clement, Richardo, Carlton Cartwright and :
_ Glenroy Culmer; three sisters, Brenda Larrimore, Arnette !
Collins, Christine and Mitchleen Culmer; fifteen nephews, :
Bryan Morley, Danny Cooper, Chester Darville Jr., Bryan :
Morley Jr., Bryon Morley, William Cartwright, Stephen :
Cartwright, Frank, Tony, Arthur, Dennis, Trevor and Marlon :
Carey, Philip and Justin David; six nieces, Ricarla Rodgers, :
Christer Darville, Brynesha Morley, Patrice Drakes, Elizabeth :
Carey and Kendra Carey; daughter-in-law, Alfreda Fowler :
Jenoure; brother-in-law, James Larrimore; sister-in-law, Annie :
Colebrook; godchildren, Lapond McIntosh, Shawn Taylor, :
Tevin Stevans and Sharlene; and a host of other relatives and :
friends including, Edward, Maxwell Jenoure Sr. and family, :
Kandaisy Roker and family, Jayde, Bersil, Edward Jr., Stanley, :
Osbourne and Bradley Stuart, Daphane Johnson, Rev. Princess :
Smith, Rev. Shirley Smith, Bishop Carlton and Sister Genesta :
Stuart and the Lighthouse Fellowship Church of God, staff :
of Office Plus, Freeport, Gloria Stubbs and family, Margaret :
Saunders and family, Terry and Molesta Winder, the Lockhart :
family, Joseph Ward and family, Rosilee Thompson and :
family, Richardo Rodgers, Mable Jenoure and family, Deborah :
Bethel, Linda Adderley, Sonia Miller, Nelson George and :






Eunice Young, Sammy Culmer and family, David Smith,
Presca Gibbs and family, Francis Knowles and family.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Cedar
Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on
Friday from 12noon to 6pm and at the church on Saturday
from 9:30am until service time.



GASTON
VEDRINE, 39

a resident of Chippingham, formerly
-of Bord-De-Mer, Jean Rabel, Haiti,
will be held 2pm on Saturday, 16th
June, 2007, at Emmaus Baptist
Church, McCollough Corner.
Officiating will be Rev. George
Choute. Interment will follow in the
Southern Cemetery, Spikenard and
Cowpen Road.

Cherished memories are held by his wife, Magelitta Vedrine;
children, Igentha, Wisnaldine and Gerbensly Vedrine; father,
Delpe Vedrine; mother, Ilfancia Toutoute Vedrine; brothers,
Raphael and Rockine Vedrine; sisters, Cilia, Antoinette and
Melila Vedrine, Morrell and Leyanna Noel; nephews and
nieces, John Fritz, Kendy, Pepsi and Lucadet, Ylfancia,
Asonise, Silvany, Dianna, Brigette and Witnika Vedrine;
uncles and aunts, Orest, Dieuseul, Presendiew, Rivelle, Carida,
Elainne and Charitable Vedrine and Fradet Cheri; cousins,
Mela, Benoit, Elie, Odilon and Estme Vedrine, Rosena, Sandy,
Junior, Florentine, Pitelson, Wisley, Rosiana, Dianna, Elita,
Lamercie, Diudonne, Mme Morange, Elda, Gogo, Nicles, St.
Matil, Placida, Johnson, Elza, Merlande, Adline, Zando,
Genise and Johnsy Vedrine and Mme St Amand and family,
and a host of other relatives and friends including the Noel,
Jeanty, Vedrine, Jean-Baptiste, Roche and Toutoute families.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Cedar
Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on
Friday from 12noon to 6pm and on Saturday from 10am to
12noon and at the church from 12:30pm until service time.



PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007



Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

Br et ae

ELDRICA
BURROWS, 74

of East Street South will be
held on Saturday at 2pm at
Fellowship Baptist Church,
Pigeon Plum Street,
Pinewood Gardens.
Officiating will be Rev. Ron
Deleveaux. Interment in The
Southern Cemetery.



She is survived by four daughters, Lenora Douglas,
Kim Lopez, Ruth Burrows and Louise Odelle of
Washington, D.C.; three sons, Philip Burrows of Miami,

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary!

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020e Robinson Rd & 5th Street |



Fla., Ivan Lockhart and Larry Burrows; five sisters, |

Albertha Wilkinson, Hilda Joseph, Edith Cooper, Selma
Joseph and Agnes Joseph; two sons-in-law, Lanny




Lopez and Bill Odelle; three daughters-in-law, Yvonne, |

Debra and Patricia Burrows; brothers-in-law, George
Cox; sister-in-law, twenty one grandchildren, Patrick

and Philip Burrows Jr., Tess Douglas, Terrell Cleare, |

Keisha and Lenny Lopez, Javon and Vernica of
Washington D.C., Qrazy McGree, Opara Lockhart,
Joshua Chipman, Kitty and Devon Lockhart, Derek
Lewis, Taurus Farrington, Larry Burrows Jr., Tallea
Burrows, Tekoa, Melissa, Theo and Tré; three adopted
grandchildren, WR 772 Shacanla Rahming, Latoya
Douglas and Andre Albury; numerous great
grandchildren including, Angel, Rasheed, Rasheea,
Jason, Kiana, Ricardo, Tico, Rachrgah, Lestazia, Makhi,
Randi, Mariska, Taurus Jr., Torique, Lazaria, Oran,
Shantanae, Sierra, Opera Jr.; numerous nephews

including, Wilfred, Terrance, Joe, Tony, Flint, Ned Jr., |
Clyde, Mickie Swann; numerous nieces including, |
Majorie Williams, Ceva Sweeting, Helena Munroe, |
Val, Cyprianna, Audrey, Joey, Margo, Robin, Cherry, |

Sharry, Emma and WCPL 2305 Sweeting; host of

other relatives and friends including Vincent Peet, |
John Darville, Kevin McDonald, Naka, Dr. Megan |
Brooks, Karen Farrington, Alvin Knowles; other |

relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road anc Fifth Street on Friday from 10am
until 6pm, Saturd 1 9am until [2noon and at the

church from ipn “rvice time

4




‘
i
t
'
‘

Remembering

Sean Hilton “Soldier”

THE TRIBUNE: OBITUARIES







You On
Father’s Day ~






the late
Able Seaman Mario







1972 - 2006

oe
“Gone Too Soon”

Nothing could be more precious,



Than the memory we have of you
To Us you were very spectal,
God must have thought SO too!
All our lives we shall miss you,
As the years come and go
Dut mn our hearts you will live forever
/ecause we love you SO.
Missing vou, vour loving wife, Sherry! Hilton; children, Taquin and

‘parents, brothers, sisters and other relatives and friends.

Cc} 44
JMOTNCITE,



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES | = . THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 11








St. George’s Anglican Church
Music Ministry presents

Featuring the choirs of

All Saints Episcopal Church, Princeton, NJ
¢ The Highgrove Singers &

© St. George’s Senior Choir

der the direction of Kathleen Milly & Adrian Archer

saturday, June —— 2007
St. George’s Anglican
Church

21 Montrose Avenue



tis © OC Haig eer ¢ Jack
Heble White *« Roger Ames ¢ Leonard
Bernstein * Benjamin Harlan.







and soloists:
‘Candace Bostwick
Ailan Butler

Zach Coaies

Hope Krick-Osborn
Vakare Peiroliunais
Adrian Archer

ALLELES PILES LN EON ILE TSS No NE IE NIE EEE SSS NSS ASN ARS hd ec tg ub ee eR





ee eee 6





PG 12 ° Thursday, June 14; 2007 RELIGION | | The Tribune

Cardinal: Catholics shouldn't
- fund Amnesty International

sone





@ A TODDLER reacts
as he is held up to Pope
Benedict XVI wearing
ared hat, during the
weekly general audience
in St. Peter’s Square at
the Vatican, Wednesday,
June 13, 2007.

(AP Photo/Pier Paolo
Cito) -

because of abortion stance

VATICAN CITY

A VATICAN cardinal said Monday
that Roman Catholics shouldn’t con-
tribute to Amnesty International
because of the group’s new policy that
calls for access to abortion services for
women under certain circumstances,
according to Associated Press.

The human rights organization
reversed its longtime neutral stance on
abortion in April and adopted a policy
urging governments to ensure access to
abortion services for women in the case
of rape, incest or when pregnancy rep-
resents a risk to the mother’s life or a
grave risk to her health.

Cardinal Renato Martino, who heads
the Vatican’s justice and peace depart-
ment, criticized the policy, saying it rep-
resented a betrayal of Amnesty’s goals

‘of ensuring human rights around the

world.

“The inevitable consequence of this
decision, according to the cardinal, will
be the suspension of any financing to
Amnesty on the part of Catholic organ-
izations and also individual Catholics,”
according to a statement from
Martino’s office.

In a statement, Amnesty said it had
never received any financing from the

Vatican or from official Roman
Catholic organizations.
Spokesman Riccardo Nourey

acknowleged that the group may well
have received financing from “Catholic-
inspired” groups as well as individuals,
but not from organizations that are an
official extension of the Catholic Church.

In fact, Amnesty’s statutes specifical-
ly say that the London-based organiza-

tion is independent of any government,
political party, church, religious confes-
sion or other group.

In the statement, Amnesty explained
that its new abortion policy came about
as part of its global Stop Violence
Against Women campaign.

The group, winner of the 1977 Nobel
Peace Prize, said it recognized that
women and girls were victims of gen-
der-based violence and bear the conse-
quences of “the abuse of their sexual
and reproductive rights.”

Amnesty says it isn’t taking a posi-
tion on whether abortion is right or
wrong, and will not campaign generally
for abortion rights. But it says it decid-
ed to make the policy so it could
address abortion as it relates to its core
work of ensuring the right to health for
women and violence against women.

Martino, who was the Vatican’s U.N.
envoy for 16 years, often makes head-
lines with his pronouncements on issues
of the day: He has expressed support
for genetically modified foods, saying
they could help feed the world’s hungry;
and he has backed scientists who ques-
tion the gravity of climate change.

The statement from Martino’s office
was carried by the official Vatican
Radio. However, the statement on the
Vatican Radio Web site omitted a key
phrase from the original in which
Martino says even individual Catholics
should withhold financing for Amnesty.

A Martino spokesman said he didn’t
know why Vatican Radio had omitted
the section, but insisted that the cardi-
nal fully meant that individual
Catholics should suspend donations to
the group.



The Tribune

a

RELIGION

Thursday, June 14, 2007 °PG 13

Vatican gives award to UN
General Assembly president

who supported contraception

@ UNITED NATIONS

THE Vatican’s U.N. observer pre-
sented an award for promoting peace
and development to the president of
the U.N. General Assembly, a pioneer-
ing Arab lawyer and women’s rights
advocate who publicly supported con-
traception in the fight against AIDS,
according to Associated Press.

Archbishop Celestino Migliore said ©

Sheikha Haya Rashed Al Khalifa, the
legal adviser to Bahrain’s Royal Court,
was also selected for the 15th Path To
Peace Award because of her work to
encourage intercultural and inter-reli-
gious dialogue as president of the 192-
nation world body.

Migliore presented the medal from
the Path to Peace Foundation to the
General Assembly president at a din-
ner Tuesday night attended by over 350
people at U.N. headquarters. The foun-
dation, which Migliore heads, was
established to promote the Catholic
church’s message of peace primarily by
supporting the work of the Holy See’s
U.N. mission.

In a message on World AIDS Day in
December 2006, Al Khalifa said that in
fighting the HIV virus and AIDS,
young people “face barriers to access
services provided by governments or
they cannot afford them and fear being
judged when they go to a clinic.”

_ “This severely limits access to con-
traception and leads to the high rates of

unintended pregnancy and HIV in’

young people,” she said. “Almost 140
million women do not have access to
contraception — so they have no choice
in deciding if and when to have chil-
dren. If world leaders honor their com-
mitments and live up to their promises,
then young people would have the
reproductive health services and infor-
mation to meet their needs.”

According to a statement from the
United States Conference on Catholic
Bishops in 2004, “the Catholic commu-
nity and Catholic institutions should
not honor tl.ose who act in defiance of
our fundamental moral principles.
They should not be given awards, hon-
ors or platforms which would suggest
support for their actions.”

Migliore reiterated the Catholic
church’s opposition to artificial contra-
ception and its strong support for
human lite. He said he did not want “to
give much importance” to concerns



@ UN General Assembly President Sheikha Haya Rashed AI Khalifa speaks during a news conference at the Vienna
International Center on Wednesday, May 30, 2007. Al Khalifa will attend a women’s networking conference aimed at
promoting peace and security in the Middle East on Thursday.

about Al-Khalifa’s award by some anti-
abortion advocates because their con-

cerns are based on the AIDS message. —

“TI consider that what the president
said on that occasion reflected the
national reports on this issue, and she
summarized the national reports ... and
that is something within the duties of
the president of the General Assembly
— to present what the General
Assembly relates,” he said.

Ashraf Kamal, spokesman for the
General Assembly president, said Al
Khalifa was chosen to receive the
award.

“The sheikha has spoken coura-

geously in favor of all women the world
over and her commitment to their
cause has been absolutely strong,” he
said.

Kamal quoted Migliore’s assistant,
Rev. Vittorio Guerrrera, as saying:
“The decision to specifically honor Ms.
Al-Khalifa for her work on inter-reli-
gious dialogue along with her dedicat-
ed effort to promote peace, develop-
ment and the rule of law was made
after diligent review...".

Al Khalifa chose the importance of
intercultural and inter-religious dia-
logue for one of the four thematic
debates she organized in the General

(AP Photo/Hans Punz)

Assembly. It was held last month.

In her speech accepting the award,
AI Khalifa said that “promoting a true
dialogue among civilizations and reli-
gions is perhaps the most important
political instrument that we can use to
reach out across borders and build
bridges of peace and hope.”

She called for greater efforts to over-
come mistrust, saying “all religious
leaders have a duty to motivate their
followers to engage ‘others’ more rea-
sonably and with greater mutual
respect, while remaining true to their
own beliefs."



—_—







B HINDU spiritual
leader and humanitarian
Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, left,
former Indonesian
President Abdurrahman
Wahid, center, and
Director of the Pardes
Institute of Jewish
studies Rabbi Daniel
Landes attend a confer-
ence on religious toler-
ance in Bali, Indonesia,
Tuesday, June, 12, 2007
A Jewish Holocaust
survivor made a plea for
tolerance Tuesday at 2
conference in the world’s
most populous Muslim
nation that also brought
together religious leaders
and victims of attacks by
Islamic extremists.

(AP Photo/Firdia
Lisnawati)

Holocaust survivor appeals for
tolerance in Muslim Indonesia

@ INDONESIA
Bali



RELIGIOUS leaders and victims of
terrorist attacks gathered in the world’s
most populous Muslim nation Tuesday
to protest the Iranian president’s claims
that the Holocaust may have been a
“myth”, according to Associated Press

Among them was a Jewish survivor
of the genocide, who made an impas-
sioned plea for tolerance.

“I hope people will learn from the
past,” said So] Teichman, 79, who was a
teenager living in Czechoslovakia when
his city was occupied first by the
Hungarian army and _ then~ the
Germans. “We should try to improve
life instead of destroying it.”

The daylong gathering on Indonesia’s
resort island of Bali was attended by the
country’s former President
Abdurraham Wahid, Hindu spiritual
head Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, Buddhist

teachers, a Jesuit priest and - rare in a
country that does not recognize Israel
or the Jewish religion — rabbis.

One of the goals was to discuss ways
to end the growing polarization
between faiths since the Sept. 11, 2001,
attacks in the United Sates.

Another was to counter a December
conference hosted by Iranian President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad that tried to
cast doubt on the killing of an estimat-
ed 6 million Jews during World War II.

“Why are the Jews so concerned
about the Holocaust? Well one-third of
our people were killed and only within
six to seven years,” said Rabbi Daniel
Landes, who teaches theology in
Jerusalem.

“That abhors us not only as Jews, it’s
abhorrent to us as members of human-
ity,” he said. “If it can happen once to a
group of people, it can happen to
everyone.”

Wahid, who led Indonesia from 1999

to 2001 and remains a highly respected
moderate Muslim leader, said it was
important that people have the courage
to speak the truth.

“Although I’m a good friend of
Ahmadinejad, I have to say that he is
wrong,” he said. “I visited Auschwitz’s
Museum of Holocaust and I saw many
shoes of dead people. Because of this, I
believe the Holocaust happened.”

Security was tight at the five-star
hotel that hosted the discreetly organ-
ized event.

Indonesia’s government is secular
and most of its 190 million Muslims are
moderate, but a vocal militant fringe
has grown louder in recent years. Al-
Qaida-linked terrorists have twice
attacked Bali -—a mostly Hindu enclave
— killing more than 220 people.

“It has been difficult for me to excuse
in my heart those who committed this
act,” said Tumini, a Balinese woman
who suffered severe burns over her

body during a nightclub blast in 2002.

She said she still has not recovered
emotionally, physically or financially.

The conference was sponsored by
the Libforall Foundation, a U.S. based
organization that seeks to counter
Muslim extremism in the Islamic world
by supporting religious moderates, and
the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s
Museum of Tolerance.

Teichman, speaking publicly for the
first time in a predominantly Muslim
nation, said Ahmadinejad’s questioning
of the Holocaust made him want to
“push a little harder” to talk to Islamic
leaders.

“I ask only one question,” said
Teichman, who was sent to Auschwitz,
Dachau, and three other concentration
camps before allied forces liberated
him 1945.

“If that is a lie, can you tell me what
happened to my mother? To my sister?
To my brothers? To my gran ‘parents?"



The Tribune

RELIGION Thursday, June 14, 2007 °PG 15

Cuba's first female
Episcopal bishop world
welcomes mission

B HAVANA

NEW Episcopal Bishop Nerva Cot Aguilera, the
church’s first female bishop in Cuba and the devel-
oping world, said Monday she welcomed the
opportunity to show what women can do if given
the chance, according to Associated Press.

“I feel very honored by my designation,” Cot
told The Associated Press in a phone interview, a
day after being consecrated at the Holy Trinity
Episcopal Cathedral in Havana. “It’s a historic act
that demonstrates women’s possibilities.”

Cot’s designation as suffragan bishop was first
announced in February.

“Her appointment is a wonderful reminder that
in some nations, leadership is primarily about gifts
for service and not about gender,” U.S. Presiding
Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, who took office
in November as the first woman to lead the church,
said at the time.

Also consecrated on Sunday was Cuban’s other
new suffragan bishop, Ulises Mario Aguiera
Prendes.

Cuba’s Episcopal Church has about 10,000 mem-
bers in a nation of more than 11 million. A majori-
ty of Cubans are nominally Roman Catholic, but
Protestant denominations and the African-influ-
enced faith Santeria have gained in popularity in
recent years.

Cot was a secondary school teacher before
church reforms permitted her ordination as one of
the first three Episcopal women priests in Cuba in
1987.

Cuba was a diocese of the U.S. church until 1967,
when it was forced to break away because hostility
between the U.S. and Cuban governments made
contacts difficult. Cuba’s communist leaders were
embracing official atheism at the time, a stance

abandoned in the early 1990s.

- The Episcopal News Service of the U.S.
Episcopal Church reported earlier this year that
the Cuban church has since operated under a
Metropolitan Council, an extra-provincial region
of the church. Now chaired by the Archbishop
Andrew Hutchison of Canada, the council also
includes Jefferts Schori and the archbishop of the
West Indies.

Cuba’s interim vishop, Miguel Tamayo, is also
bishop of Uruguay.

As suffragan bishops, Cot and Aguiera will serve
under Tamayo. Cot said she will be responsible for
western Cuba with Aguiera heading the church in
the east.

The Episcopal Church of Cuba is part of the 77
million-member Anglican Communion, a global
fellowship of churches that trace their roots to the
Church of England.





@ NEW Episcopal Bishop Nerva Cot Aguilera, the church’s first female bishop in Cuba and the developing
world, works in an office at the Holy Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Havana, Tuesday, June 12, 2007. Cot was
a secondary school teacher before church reforms permitted her ordination as one of the first three
Episcopal women priests in Cuba in 1987.

(AP Photo/Javier Galeano)



PG 16 © Thursday, June 14, 2007 RELIGION The Tribune

St Louis archbishop has record
of publicly scolding dissenters

@ By BETSY TAYLOR
Associated Press Writer

ST. LOUIS (AP) — In_his three
years as St. Louis archbishop, the Most
Rev. Raymond Burke has taken on a
presidential contender, a pop star,
Missouri politicians and even parish-
ioners.

American bishops regularly speak
against public policies that run contrary
to Roman Catholic teaching, but Burke
stands out for his hard line taking on
those who oppose church teachings, no
matter how high-profile or popular
they are.

“I know I have to teach. I know I
have to be clear about the church’s
position,” Burke said in an interview
with The Associated Press. “If that
means that national media takes an
interest in it, then that’s something that
I have to accept. But that’s certainly not
my object in my activity.”

Burke set off a national debate in
2004 when he said he would deny Holy
Communion to presidential hopeful
John Kerry because the Catholic
Democrat supports abortion rights.
Only a few other U.S. bishops went as
far as Burke; most said they opposed
using the sacrament as a sanction.

In April, Burke resigned as board
chairman for the Cardinal Glennon
Children’s Foundation because of a
benefit-concert appearance by singer
Sheryl Crow, who supports abortion
rights and embryonic stem cell
research. Crow declined interview
requests.

And last month, a local Catholic high
school revoked an invitation to U.S.
Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., to speak
at her daughter’s commencement from
the institution. The senator also sup-
ports abortion rights and embryonic
stem-cell research. Burke backed the
school’s decision, though he said he had
no direct hand in it.

A McCaskill spokeswoman has said
the senator understands her positions
differ from those held by the church,

’ but she’s made peace with them.

The archbishop, a genial-looking
man with a soft conversational voice,
said he must serve as a moral guide.

“The most pressing issue is the secu-
larization in society,” Burke said. “The
church finds herself more and more in
a prophetic role of calling into question
trends in society, for instance, practices
like widespread procured abortion, and
now, human cloning and embryonic
stem cell research.”

Burke, 58, came to St. Louis after
years in Rome.

A graduate of the Pontifical

@ REV Marek Bozek stands inside St. Stanislaus Kostka church Wednesday, May 30, 2007, in St. Louis. In 2005, St. Louis



Archbishop Raymond Burke excommunicated the six-member board of directors of the traditionally Polish parish near
downtown and also excommunicated Bozek, brought in by the parish after Burke removed the archdiocesan priests that

had been assigned there.

Gregorian University in Rome and a
student of canon law, Burke spent five
years in service to the highest court in
the church, the Supreme Tribunal of
the Apostolic Signatura. In 1995, he
was installed as bishop of La Crosse,
Wis., then in 2004, was elevated to St.
Louis, home to 550,000 Catholics.

Burke said he has been surprised by
the strong reaction to his declarations.
Kerry has said he shares the church’s
opposition to abortion, but did not feel
it was appropriate to legislate personal
religious beliefs.

“To me, it didn’t seem like anything
very radical to say that a Roman
Catholic who persists in a public way in
fostering legislation that permits pro-
cured abortion should be denied
Communion,” Burke said.

“The church in her whole history has
always understood this, that if you pub-
licly persist in a gravely sinful act, that
you should not present yourself for
Holy Communion, and if you do,
because of the public nature of it, you
should be told not to.”

Prior to a weekday Mass at the
Cathedral Basilica, the ornate crown

jewel of St. Louis’ Catholic churches,

Bryanne Whitney, 22, said there’s much
more to Burke than his statements that
brush up against politics and pop cul-
ture. He calls Catholics to strengthen
their faith, to listen to God and follow
the path God has set out for them, she
said.

“T think he’s on the straight and nar-
row,” she said. “He’s consistent, and he
upholds the church’s teachings.”

Burke also has his critics.

In 2005, the archbishop excommuni-
cated the six-member board of St.
Stanislaus Kostka, a_ traditionally
Polish parish, after they refused to end
an arrangement that dated back to the
late 19th century giving them authority
over parish finances.

Burke also excommunicated the Rev.
Marek Bozek, who was brought in by
the parish.

Bozek said the archbishop is a good
man, but inflexible.

“For him, I think compromise is a
dirty word,” Bozek said.
“Unfortunately, the church is moving
from having a dialogue into a mono-
logue.”

(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Burke has not commented on spe-
cific candidates in the 2008 presiden-
tial race. Four of the Democratic
contenders and three of the
Republicans seeking the nomination
are Catholic.

Last month, Rhode Island Bishop
Thomas J. Tobin called statements on
abortion by former New York Mayor
Rudy Giuliani, a Catholic Republican,
“pathetic” and “hypocritical.” Giuliani
has said he’s personally opposed to
abortion, but believes women should
be able to decide for themselves
whether to terminate a pregnancy.

Burke said he will continue to speak
out about church teaching, even when
it sometimes means that he must “say
difficult things to the culture in which
we live.”

He knows not everyone will accept
the message.

“You cannot be a good Catholic and
be in favor of procured abortion or be
in favor of embryonic stem cell
research. It’s just not possible, and so if
by teaching what the church teaches,
people see that as polarizing, I think
they are mistaken.”



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, June 14, 2007 °PG 17









Anglican Georgina Forrest turns 100

With her Grandsons at her side,
Georgina Forrest celebrated her
100th birthday with a special mid-
day Mass at St. Matthew's Anglican
Church on Wednesday.

Having outlived all of her siblings,
the Pinder's Point, Grand Bahamian
native served as an apprentice cook

in her early days at the Butlins
Hotel in West End Grand Bahama
which later became the Jack Tar
Hotel.

With clear sight and and sound
memory 'Mama' as she is to scores
of grand and great grand children
burst out in shouts of praise thank-

ing God for her long and good life.
Always attending in prayer and
worship, this Anglican mother of
many began her christian formation
at the St. Mary's Magdalene Church
on Grand Bahama and now at
Church of Epiphany in Nassau.
Shown with their grandmother in

the right hand picture are (L to R);
Fr. Kingsley Knowles, Fr. Stephen
Grant and Fr. Rudolph Cooper.

Friends and well wishers saluted
Mama Forrest in a grand dinner
after the mass with live music by
The Royal Bahamas Police Force
Pop Band.



A 7-Day Journey

@ By REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

IN the book, A Seven Day
Journey with Thomas Menton, by
Esther de Waal, the reader is invit-
ed to undertake a personal retreat
for a part of each day or for the
entire week if possible. Just the
thought of such a journey may put
off some people right away, but it is
very rewarding and worth it.

It is like taking a long deep
breath of fresh air or a long leisure-
ly stroll along a heautiful beach.
- The idea.is to change your normal
routine and give yourself some
quality time. Make space in your
cluttered, congested, chaos of con-
siderations to be still. Does this
idea appeal to you?

It is not only what the doctor
orders but it is what your minister
does as well. Prevention is better

than cure. Rest your nerves, slow
your pace, relax your body, settle
your spirit to ponder and pray.

The reading material, we are
told in the beginning of the book,
is to be “read slowly, cradled and
rocked in the heart as one would
cradle and rock a small child.”
Sometimes it is a good thing to
take several months to read a
book, resisting the temptation to
rush to finish it. At other times, we
want to stay up half the night to
solve the mystery, remember all
the characters, or just complete
what has begun without procrasti-
nation. The difference lies in the
purpose behind the reading.

As the season of Pentecost con-
tinues, you may decide to select a
book for quiet reflection. Savour
the flavour of each word or
thought, absorbing as much as you

are able of the hidden meanings.

~ Allow God to speak to your heart

in a very personal way so that the
message takes hold of your mind,
and becomes truth to direct your
life.

In time you will find yourself
praying, asking God to open your
eyes to deeper truths that are con-
tained in the passages. Try a book
with high quality photography.
What it did for me is to train my
eyes to look for ordinary and
uneventful scenes that would be
worth photographing if I had a
camera handy. Just to move
around with a view to take photo-
graphs suggests a rhythm that
invites interruption. It means that I
have to leave with enough time,
stay alert to small details, and ask
God for the grace to see the sacred
everywhere. What about you?



@ ANGELA PALACIOUS



PG 18 ° Thursday, June 14, 2007 RELIGION | , The Tribune

Tribute to deserving fathers

@ By FATHER JAMES
MOULTRIE =

“See what love the Father has
given us, that we should be

called children of God” (1.

John 3: 1-2).

-Acknowledging the impor-
tance of fathers and recognis-
ing the efforts of those
Bahamian men who sought to
follow the biblical example of
what a good father ought to
be, Father James Moultrie,
during a special tribute that
remembered Stephen ‘daddy
o’ Mitchell, extended his con-
gratulations to the fathers of St
Matthew’s, the nation and
especially the fathers that were
being honoured. He said that
the men were all deserving of
the honour being given to
them.

Culturally, Bahamian
fathers have been presented
as tough guys, the disciplinar-
ians of the family. And while
some of our fathers see disci-
pline as their primary role,
that is not what God intend-
ed. God intended that fathers
should model their lives after
Him.

The primary function of
fatherhood is to love: to love
God, their wives and their chil-
dren. Love means being there
for them no matter what. Love
to a child means being present
at their school plays, gradua-
tions, marriages and the other
important celebrations in their
lives. Most importantly, fathers
must be the spiritual leaders of
the home. They must take
their children to church, not
send them, and they must be
the prayer leaders of the fami-
ly.
We all know that each father
has his faults. It is also true
that what we know of human
fathers and what we experi-
ence as children will affect how
we approach fatherhood. If we
have great and loving dads, we
will gladly embrace the biblical
picture of God as the ultimate
Father of all. That is the mes-
sage of the extravagant love
exhibited in the Parable of the
Prodigal Son.

If we did not have that kind
of father, we may be longing to
find the kind of father we
never knew. If our dad was
abusive, physically absent, or

emotionally distant, it may
take a deliberate act and per-
haps a painful effort to sort out
the misconceptions and learn
to cling to the unfailing truths
about the right kind of father-
ing modeled by God.

Fathers who model their
lives after Jesus leave a loving
legacy for their children, espe-
cially their sons.

Fathers are not perfect
human beings. They are just as
flawed and broken as mothers.
Only Jesus had the perfect
Father (Matthew 5:48) and he
alone can a.help us to experi-
ence the close relationship
with our heavenly father that
all our hearts desire.

Included among the hon-
ourees were
Armstrong, William R Darling
II, David Knowles, Kirkward
A Knowles, Anthony V

Roberts and Dexter ‘Sweet
Tee’ Thompson.



B@ ANTHONY ROBERTS

e ANTHONY V ROBERTS

Born July 20, 1940 at New
Providence to Thelma and
Carl Roberts, Mr Roberts is
the fourth of seven children.
He was initially baptized in
Ebenezer Methodist church,
and sometime during his pre-
teens his mother, who was an
Anglican, had him chris-
tened at St Matthew’s. He
attended Sacred Heart
Catholic school
Augustine’s College. He
started his career with the
Amoury Company Ltd and
currently works at Mr. Photo
as the company’s mainte-
nance manager. He is the
proud father four children
and grandfather of one.

Torry T

and St.



a

B KIRKWARD KNOWLES

e KIRKWARD A KNOWLES

Mr Knowles was born on
March 10, 1949 at Mangrove
Bush, Long Island and at the
age of nine left the island. He
attended the Eastern Senior
School and after school
packed groceries at City
Market to help his mother sus-
tain the family. He worked at
various establishments
throughout his career path and
is presently employed with
JCN Radio & TV Station as an
account executive and also co-
hosts the ‘Bahamas

Experience’ show. He is mar-
ried to Lesley Knowles and
they have two children. Mr
Knowles is a member of St
Matthew’s Vestry and attends
the 10:30am service.



EH DEXTER THOMPSON

e DEXTER
THOMPSON

Mr Thompson was born
April 3, 1953 in New
Providence and christened at
St Matthew's parish. A part of
his up-bringing was in Long

‘Sweet Tee’

Island with his grandmother
Melvinia Burrows. Upon his
return, he was re-introduced to
St Matthew’s parish by Cyril
and Wilisie Robinson and
attended church with them.
Mr. Thompson realized at an
early age that he was gifted
and followed in the footsteps
of his father ‘Sweet Richard’.
He is grateful to the Almighty
God for the many blessings
which he has experienced
throughout his life. He contin-
ues to worship with his family
at the 10:30am Eucharist. He is
humbled by this recognition
and he thanks all those who
are responsible.







@ DAVID KNOWLES

e DAVID KNOWLES

Mr Knowles served as a mem-
ber of parliament for the
Progressive Liberal Party in the
Salem Constituency from 1977
to 1992. He served as parliamen-
tary secretary in the Ministry of
Labour and Home Affairs from
1982 to 1983, with special
responsibility for the
Department of Labour. He 1s
married and the father of three
children. He is a regular lector of
the 7pm Evensong on Sundays
at St Matthew’ where he has
been a member all his life.

e WILLIAM R DARLING II

Born June 2, 1937 to William
and Ida Darling of Chesters,
Acklins, Mr Darling was
employed in the hotel industry
and after many years he
achieved his life-long desire to
be a farmer. He was married to
Violet Strachan-Darling
(deceased) and is the proud
father of one daughter and two
granddaughters. A legendary
farmer by the Department of

Agriculture, he is a regular
member of
Eucharist.

the 7:15am



Ss

@ WILLIAM DARLING

e TORRY T ARM-
STRONG.

Mr Armstrong was born
July 18, 1955 at New
Providence. He graduated
from A F Adderley high
school in 1972. His profession-
al education spans from Acme
school of Aeronautics, Fort
Worth Texas to Turs Air Flight
Training, Opa Locka, Florida.
His professional experience
include: OIA/Bahamasair as a
line maintenance mechanic,
MD Air Services as director of
maintenance and . Shell
Bahamas Ltd in various capac-
ities. He is married to Lynn
Martin and they are blessed
with one daughter and two
sons. His hobbies include:
boating, auto mechanics and
fishing. Mr Armstrong and his
family are members of St
Matthew’s parish and regularly
attend the 10:30am Sunday
Eucharist, where he is also a
lector.



@ TORRY ARMSTRONG





The Tribune.

Florida church



RELIGION

visits the Bahamas

Thursday, June 14, 2007 °PG 19







# WELLS of Living Water of Florida recently held a four-day conference at the Wyndham Cable Beach Resort ballroom. The event was part of the Ministry of
Tourism’s Religious Tourism project. At centre, Dr Ann Higgins, craft instructor in the Ministry of Culture, presents a Bahamian Junkanoo doll to conference host
Rebecca Ingraham. Pictured from left are Latoya Davis, Evelyn Rhyant, minister Janice Barrow, Dr Elizibeth Harrison, Katie Alston, Dr Ann Higgins, host
Rebecca Ingraham, Minister Doris Ingram Wright, minister Roselyn Heastie, Prophetess Olease Davidson and Prophetess Dorothy Williams.

(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)

Jesus’ call — be my disciple

@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

The other day I overheard part of a
conversation. There was a question
asked emphatically.

"Do you know what the problem
with religion is today? It's the gospel. It
just doesn't relate to us right now.”

When I left the area, I thought about
these comments and that strange ques-
tion. However, it was obvious that the
person was not really looking for an
answer. This is a question that many of
us today ask ourselves.

It is also clear the person asking the
question stated the ‘problem’ as he saw
it, provided his captive listener with an
answer and then threw in his rationale
for good measure. End of conversation.

I thought of this brief and very frag-
mented conversation when I read an e-
mail a friend sent me this past week. It
touched on last week’s gospel reading
which marks the beginning of Jesus’
ministry and his recruitment of the dis-
ciples.

And so I find myself challenged. ..is
it problematic th.t religion and the
gospel seem distant for us right now?

For a moment, let’s place the events
of recruiting these followers in the con-
text of our time. With a broad swipe at
modern psychological testing and skills
assessment, someone suggested that if
Jesus had sent his apostles to have
these tests this might well be the reply
he would have received:

Thank you for submitting the resumes
of the twelve men that you have picked
for managerial positions in your new
organisation. All of them have taken
our battery of tests. We have tabulated
the results through our database and
have arranged personal interviews for
each of them with a staff psychologist
and vocational aptitude consultant. It is
the staff's opinion that most of your
nominees are lacking in background,
education and vocational aptitude for
your enterprise. In short, they exhibit no
team concept.

e Simon Peter is emotionally unstable
and given to fits of temper

e Andrew demonstrates no qualities
for leadership

e The brothers, James and John, place
personal interest above team loyalty

¢ Thomas shows a skeptical attitude
that could undermine morale

« Matthew, the tax collector, has been
blacklisted by the Jerusalem Better
Business Bureau

e James, the son of Alphaeus, and
Thaddeus, definitely have radical lean-
ings and registered a high score on the
manic-depressive scale

One of the candidates however, shows
real potential. He is a man of ability and
resourcefulness, interacts well with peo-
ple and has contacts in high places. He
is highly motivated, ambitious and
responsible. We recommend Judas
Iscariot as your controller and right-
hand man.

Perhaps we to need revisit the origi-
nal question the person asked dealing
with ‘the problem with religion.’
Instead of trying to label religion as a
problem, we should reexamine our own
relationships and view our faith in the
context of the gospel. In other words,
let’s bring the story into our personal
world.

When asked about our religion,
many of us would describe ourselves
as ‘Catholic’ or as a ‘Christian.’ But
we would tend to back away from
daring to call ourselves a ‘disciple’ or
be counted as a ‘follower.’ After all,
that distinction belongs to the great
heroes of our faith: the saints who
have preceded us or certainly the
very holy people in our world today.
Our lives are just too ordinary, our
professions too worldly to imagine
that we are following in the footsteps
of Jesus...or doing the work of the
Gospel.

However, when we place ourselves
into the story, Jesus encourages us to
change our lives. He tells us, “Repent,
for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”
Then he beckons us to come with him -
to follow him - to be his disciple.

Our initial response is a resounding
YES - just like Peter and his brother
Andrew - and at once we leave our
‘nets’ and follow him. Then we come to
our senses and say ‘Lord, I’m only a
nurse in a hospital’ or ‘I work in a nurs-
ing home, what can I possibly offer’ -

and Jesus responds to us, “Look into
the faces of the people you care for and
see my presence. Know of my Father’s
love for you and for the people you
help.”

Or - ‘Lord, I’m just a student in
school’ - and again Jesus would invite
us to ‘be aware of the needs of our fel-
low students, pay attention to those
who may be struggling so that through
us his presence he will be known.’

Or, ‘I’m a single parent’ - or ‘my wife
and IJ are struggling to raise our chil-
dren’- or, and this is where we include
our own story. In each of our lives Jesus
encourages us to join him, to reach
beyond ourselves, to experience the
kingdom of heaven in our time.

Jesus’ invitation in the gospel to fish-
ermen, tax collectors, farmers, labour-
ers, and peasants to be his followers, is
extended to each of us as well. His call
to discipleship transcends that moment
on the shores of the Sea of Galilee; he
calls to us here and now, in our own
time and place.

We are his disciples. When we were
baptized we accepted an invitation to
take on the work of discipleship in the
homes and classrooms and workplaces
where we live our lives. Jesus continues
to invite us to follow him and to take on
his work, the same work Peter and his
brother and fellow fishermen left their
nets to take on: to bring others to God
through the Gospel of peace, reconcili-
ation, and love.

=e



see ee



A woman’s journey from
Christian to Rastafarian

B By KATINA MARTIN
Tribune Intern

DISMANTLING the myth
of the subjugation of
Rastafarian women, Priscilla
Bowleg, a Rastafarian woman
herself, instead points to the
faith’s emphasis on partnership
and love between its members.

"It's a partnership not a
domination. Men are the head
‘of the family and see to the
spiritual maintenance of the
family. But that doesn't mean
that the women do not offer
equal importance. If there is
dominion there can't be any
love," she said.

A mother of two, Priscilla
says that she is just like any
other woman, whether
Christian, Muslim or Rasta.



Hi PRISCILLA Bowleg

She enjoys being with other
uplifting, spiritual people. She
gets together with other
Rastafarian women socially to
enjoy each other's company.
They watch movies, eat and
socialize and afterward they
pray together, giving thanks
for the blessings that they have
received.

"I love Rastafari," Priscilla
said with a joyful single-mind-
edness that reflected a deeply
rooted understanding and
appreciation of her faith. She
has grown tremendously since
adopting the Rastafarian reli-
gion as her own, and says that
spiritually, she will never stop
growing.

A new path

It was eight years ago that
Priscilla left the Christian faith
and began a_ new spiritual
journey in which she embraced
Jah and the Rastafarian move-
ment.

"It's not a religion, it's a lev-
ity...a way of life," Priscilla, a
legal assistant, told Tribune
Religion when asked what it is
to be Rastafarian. She claims
to be neither Binghi nor Bobo,
but first and foremost a Rasta,
though she incorporates a little
of both into her lifestyle.

A former member of the
Catholic faith, — Priscilla’s
change of heart was the result
of an internal debate. She was
seeking a closer relationship
with God, and recognised that
the worship experience in her
church lacked the spiritual
dimensions and connection to
God that she desired.

When she adopted the
Rastafarian faith her parents,
particularly her mother, did
not agree with her choice, but
they respected her decision.

"My mother asked a lot of
questions, like why I wanted to
change, but my father allowed
that as long as I was satisfied
with the choices I'd made he



@ PRISCILLA and her daughter, Ras Priithan

was okay."

Touching on her relation-
ships within the Rastafarian
movement, Priscilla said that
were some Rastas that were
shy to approach her when they
found out she was working for
the Babylon (referring to her
secular position as a legal assis-
tant).

"I work in the system, not for
the system," was her response
to them. Priscilla says that she
has a lifestyle to maintain,
though that statement wasn't
meant in a pretentious way.

"T have a family to support
and it's difficult. I can't do it
selling peanuts," she said,
though she does not intend it
as a criticism toward those who
can and do make a living that
way. It is simply not a possibil-
ity for her or her. family. She
has two children, an 18-year
old son, anda three-year old
daughter. Her son is a
Christian of his own volition.
She asked him when he was
seven years old what he want-
ed to be and he told her his
preference. Her daughter is
being raised as a Rastafarian.

When asked if it was hard to
raise her daughter as a Rasta,
she said she feels like she is
fighting a losing battle. -

"My baby-sitter often gives
her things to eat that she
shouldn't have. If I'm there she
won't do it, but when I’m away,
and if she can get away with it
she will."

She also says that she finds
Christians to be provoking
whether intentionally or other-
wise, but she says that she has
learned what it is to have love
for everyone and has been able
to overlook a lot of potentially
aggravating situations.

Asked if she had expert-
enced a lot of discrimination,
Priscilla said that she was very
blessed to not have been sub-
jected to much. There were
two experiences however,
where she felt a bit put out by
others and both instances
involved the wrap that she
wears on her head.

While working at Cardinal
Institute and when she visited
RND Cinemas at one point,
both entities wanted her to
remove her wrap. She refused
and stood her ground, and
eventually both parties relent-
ed, allowing her to maintain
her dignity as a Rastafarian
woman.

"If you stand firm in what
you believe in, you will win,"
she said.

Religion
briefs



















@ ST Martin’s
Monastery will hold a
fun day Saturday, June
16 at St Joseph's
Church grounds, Boyd
Road, from noon to
6pm.

Fun and games to
be had by all. There
will be bingo, a
bouncing castle, face
painting, hot dogs,
conch fritters and
much more.

Join us for a day of
fun!

* * KR OK












































@ THE Anglican
Churchwomen of St
Gregory’s Parish,
Golden Gates,
Carmichael Road, are
having a Mini Fair
and Steak Out on
Saturday, June 16
between 12pm and
6pm.

This effort is to
raise funds for the
maintenance of St
Gregory’s Church
and the Church Hall
which, due to such
efforts over recent
years, has undergone
extensive renovations
and extensions. The
Hall (formerly the
little church home) is
Carmichael Road’s
hurricane shelter and
an after school study
hall. The hall can
hold 200 plus
persons for a
wedding or any affair
and is used as a
community meeting
centre for anyone,
non-Anglicans
as well. There will
be fun for all - a

’ bouncing castle,

bingo, whoop-la,

home cookery, steak
and chicken dinners,
conch fritters, sodas,
the works (mini-size).
All are invited to
attend.



Full Text
WON

| HIGH
| LOW



| a
|

‘cal T-STORM



i'm lovin’ it. |

88F |
14 |

——s Che Miami Herald



BAHAMAS EDITION



Volume: 103 No.168




me ata ia

Pee iTeve E

[HURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007




PRICE — 75¢

WU

and RELIGION
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE










PM lambasts
PLP leader

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham lambasted former
prime minister Perry Christie
in the House of Assembly yes-
terday, emphasising that Mr
Christie spent only one term in
office before being voted out
by the people of the Bahamas.

Mr Ingraham also touched on
the issue of the leadership of
the Opposition, which it is
reported is actively being sought
by at least three former minis-
ters in the Christie administra-
tion.

Speaking directly to Mr
Christie — who sat facing Mr
Ingraham with his hands
clasped — Mr Ingraham said
that if the economy of the
Bahamas was in such good

shape, and the people of the -

Bahamas still rejected the gov-
ernment, then the leader of the
party must take responsibility
for that loss.

“I would resign!” Mr Ingra-
ham exclaimed. “Take his
georgie bundle and go home.”

“That is how it is done in a
democracy. There is no ques-
tion that is what I would have
done had I lost the election for
the FNM. No one would have
to ask me to go,” he said.

Mr Ingraham also touched on
the legal recourse that the PLP
is taking in contesting four seats
that they lost by a margin of
léss than 100 votes. To this, Mr
Ingraham said, it is obvious that
the PLP have not yet come to
grips with the fact that they

‘have lost the election.
| “The election is over,” Mr
Ingraham said, “but some peo-
ple have a hard time coming to













terms with that. The FNM is the
governing party of the Bahamas
for the next five years. Perry
Gladstone Christie is no longer
the prime minister of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas.
“The people determined that
once was enough for you, my

brother. Hubert Alexander

Ingraham has been brought
back to office by the people of
the Bahamas for a third term.
And that is the way it is. That’s
the way it will continue to be,
God willing, until the people

SEE page 11

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ati t om iniog
Hubert Ingraham
speaks. in the
House yesterday

(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)



Christie makes

ONY Mralitivns
of fear’ claim

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

BAHAMIANS are now wor-
ried that a new culture of
“insensitivity” and “fear”. has
been created by the new FNM
government through the review
of contracts and the transfer of
civil servants, according to
Opposition Leader Perry
Christie, in a passionate contri-
bution to the budget debate yes-
terday in the House.

“People are more and more
feeling angry and feeling that
an angry and insensitive in-
your-face culture has been giv-
en birth,” he said. “It now
appears that it is to be common
practice to suspend contracts
entered into by a previous gov-
ernment within a specified peri-
od prior to a general election. It
now appears that people who
hold positions of authority can
be removed or transferred
regardless of their ability if they
are thought to be supportive of



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Former Asst Commissioner: witness
protection should be ‘Caricom issue’



Former PM says Bahamians are
worried over review of contracts



the other side.”

Mr Christie said that this cul-
ture is in contrast to what he
attempted to usher into the
process of governance in the
Bahamas.

“I firstly as the new prime
minister sought to establish a
culture where there need not
be any fear in supporting the
political party of one’s choice,”
he said.

The leader of the opposition
used the example, without men-
tioning him by name, of Joshua
Sears, who was left in his posi-
tion as the ambassador to the
United States, despite his polit-
ical affiliation - Mr Sears ran
unsuccessfully for the FNM in
the Exuma constituency.

Mr Christie further used the
example of the staffing of the
office of the prime minister to
suggest that he was not a vic-
timiser, though, as some com-
mentators have suggested it
may not have been wise to have
persons who were not support-
ers of the agenda of a govern-
ment, so close to that govern-
ment’s base of power.

“The record will reflect tha’ I
never transferred anyone from
the office of the prime minis-

. ter, notwithstanding the infor-

mation provided me as to who
was loyal and who was not. I
expected all to perform at the
best in the service of their coun-

SEE page 10

Christie blasts Ingraham over Bank
of Bahamas chairman dismissal

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITNESS protection should be a "Caricom issue", potentially
allowing the creation of a programme that would allow those
who see crimes, particularly of a violent or drug-related nature,
to be transported to other Caribbean countries for their own
safety prior to appearing in court, it was claimed yesterday.

Too many cases in the Bahamas have had to be "thrown
away" after key witnesses have "disappeared", former assistant
commissioner in charge of crime, Paul Thompson, said on Love
97's Real Talk Live yesterday.

However, Chief Supt Hulan Hanna said yesterday that wit-.
nesses in high profile cases have indeed been taken out of the
country in the past, and Asst Commissioner Ellison Greenslade

FORMER prime minister Perry Christie yesterday in parlia-
ment blasted current Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham over the dis-
missal of Bank of the Bahamas chairman AI Jarrett, calling Mr
Ingraham’s behaviour “undignified” and indicating that the action
was one of victimisation.

Responding to the criticism during the House of Assembly’s
afternoon session, Mr Ingraham said the request for the resignation
of Mr Jarrett — who was appointed under the PLP government —
was warranted and carried out in a “very decent fashion.”

Mr Ingraham also added that all PLP-appointed boards, except
that of the Broadcasting Corporation and now the Bank of
Bahamas, are still in place, and will continue to remain in place until
June 20.

Giving his contribution to the 2007/08 budget debate, Mr Christie



SEE page 10



SEE page 11

Bethel: 1,200 issues, complaints relating to teachers unresolved under PLP

THERE are more than 1,200
unresolved personnel issues and
complaints relating to teachers
that were left unresolved by the
previous government, Minister
of Education Carl Bethel said
during his contribution to the
budget debate.

Speaking in the House of
Assembly this week, Mr Bethel
said that the outstanding com-
plaints encompass everything

from terms of pay adjustments
to reclassification and promo-
tions.

Mr Bethel said that during a
recent meeting with the
Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT) he made it clear that the
welfare and job satisfaction of
teachers is a primary concern
of his government.

“In order to bring focus to
remediation and solving all such

job-related human welfare
issues we will be seconding a
total of three highly experi-
enced human resource officers
frem other ministries to aggres-
sively resolve these issues,” he
said.

Mr Bethel said that the union
has embraced the concept of a
strategic partnership between
the BUT and the ministry.

The minister also said there



could soon be another trade
union with whom the Ministry
of Education will be invited to
bargain should this union be
officially recognised.

“T speak of the recently
constituted Bahamas Educa-
tors’ Managerial Union
(BEMU), which was recognised
by the (PLP) Minister of
Labour in February 2007,” he
said.




PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





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Spiralling murder rate
is cause for concern

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter .

WITH the murder rate climb-
ing —- four have been commit-
ted in the last seven days —
commentators are urging the
public to become more actively
involved in preventing crimes.

“The police is the public and
the public is the police,” says
David Allen, a psychiatrist,

social worker and chairman of

the commission which brought
the Urban Renewal programme
to fruition.

The burgeoning murder and
violent crime rates “cannot be
impacted by the police alone,
but require the development of
an effective social contract
involving the Government, law
enforcement, the church, busi-
ness, charity groups and ordi-
nary citizens,” he said.

A report entitled Crime and
violence in the Bahamas: Caus-
es and Action Plan has been
created and presented by Dr
Allen to the commissioner of
police and the Prime Minister.

Many of his assessments con-
cur with those of Paul Thomp-
son, a former assistant commis-
sioner in charge of crime, police
trainer, and now private securi-
ty firm operator.

“We live in a society now
where we have to be very, very
careful,” said Mr Thompson,
who while appearing on Love
97's Real Talk Live told citizens
that it is in their own interest
to communicate more with
police.

“Report threats of ati or
death to police immediately,”
he said, reminding the public
that threatening a person with
harm or death is in fact illegal.

Mr Thompson urged individ-
uals to be persistent, taking
their information to a senior
officer if necessary, admitting
that he is aware that some peo-
ple do not feel they are taken
seriously at police stations.

It is police protocol that
police should follow up on

AOS te
ROME

Ee

a

Experts call for action to curb crime





threat reports, find the accused
and take their details. “This is in
itself a preventative measure,"
said Mr Thompson, as it will act
as a warning.

Recent police transfers have
been designed to do exactly
what Dr Allen has recom-
mended, increase the visibility
of the force in community polic-
ing.

However, Minister of Nation-
al Security Tommy Turnquest,
also reminded the public that
they too “are a part of polic-
ing”.

Today the murder rate stands
at 37 for 2007. In comparison,
by August 22 last year — almost
two-and-a-half months from
now, the total stood at 35. By
September 2006, it was only
three murders higher than it is
right now, at 40.

A World Bank report
released in May pegged the
Bahamas as having.a murder
rate of 21.2 per 100,000, more
than double the world average,
but less than the Caribbean
average of 30 victims per
100,000.

Both Dr Allen and Assistant
Commissioner in charge of
crime, Ellison Greenslade have
questioned the source of the
report's statistics, but assuming
they are correct have expressed
serious concern.

Dr Allen's report outlines
various causes of crime, includ-
ing the incapacity of many
Bahamians to handle their
anger‘in a reasonable fashion,

(monitor not inctuded)
Computer Monitors
$ 1 Oo Qs up

tw the

@ DAVID Allen

prompting his suggestion for
“the need for an expansion of
anger management and conflict
resolution training programmes
in every level of our society,
such as the media, schools,
churches, the work place and
community groups”.

Yesterday, Mr Thompson
gave other pointers to the gen-
eral public, based on his expe-
rience, which would help avoid
bloodshed.

These include increased
reporting of domestic violence,
which Dr Allen said accounts
for 50 per cent of murders in
the Bahamas in the past two
years, and in particular encour-
aging the families of battered
women to do their best to help
break the cycle. “Go to court,
take some action to get him (the
batterer) to stay away,” Mr
Thompson said.

He also recommended par-
ents and communities to sup-
port police efforts against
“young reprisals”, retaliatory-
type incidents which he believes
define much recent-crime. :

“We must get kids away from

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: reverse this’.

guns, or people who use guns. If
you have a daughter who goes
out with someone who has a
gun, she is in the line of
fire...discourage her,” Mr
Thompson urged.

Additionally, if a friend has a
gun, report him, said Mr
Thompson. The penalty for pos-
session of an illegal firearm is
significantly less than that for
murder, and if it does reach that
point, the victim could be some-
one you know.

Mr Thompson also had some
warnings for those involved in
drugs.

“If you owe the drug dealer
money, pay him or go into hid-
ing if you can. Leave town...
because he cannot take you to
court, so naturally what's going
to happen... he'll come and kill
you,” said the former senior
officer. °

Worse still, if you “are fooling
around with" a drug dealer's
lady friend, on whom he may
be spending large amounts of
money, “he's going to find out,
his friends are going to tell him
and he's going to be annoyed
— you're playing with fire!”
said Mr Thompson.

Dr Allen believes greater
church involvement in commu-
nities could “revolutionise” the
country in three years, consid-
ering its powers for aiding “soci-
etal renewal”.

The church could establish
crime watch groups for areas
around the church, provide a
hotline for emergency issues,
and be a place for victims of
crime to meet and talk.

Ironically, the psychiatrist
believes the murder rate could
bring unity to the country. "I
really feel that this is something
about which every Bahamian,
black, white, foreign, local, can
say ‘let's buckle down and

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 3







In brief —

Government
to examine
candidates to
become JPs

THE Government will have
“a serious look” at hundreds of
persons who are seeking to be
appointed Justices of the Peace,
some of those applications dat-
ing back to 2002, Minister of
State in the Ministry of Legal
Affairs, Desmond Bannister,
said on Monday.

“Many of these names are
recognisable as persons who
contribute significantly to the
spiritual life of our country,” he
said.

In the build up to the May
general elections, the former
administration bypassed this list,
and appointed 240 Justices of
the Peace presented by its
Members of Parliament.

He apologized to those who
"waited patiently for so many
years in the expectation that
they would have been treated
fairly only to be bypassed in the
name of political expedience.”

“We will be reviewing this list
and making appropriate rec-
ommendations as soon as is
practicable,” Mr Bannister said.

Mr Bannister was addressing
the House of Assembly during
debate on government’s 2007/08
Budget.

Police say
cricket coach
died of

natural causes

m JAMAICA
Kingston

POLICE announced Tuesday
that Pakistan cricket coach Bob
‘Woolmer was not strangled
after all following his team’s sur-
prise World Cup loss.

In an embarrassing end to
one of the highest-profile homi-
cide probes in Jamaican history,
Police Commissioner Lucius
Thomas said the 58-year-old
Woolmer died of natural causes
and that the case is now closed.

Authorities reached their
conclusion after obtaining opin-
ions from three independent
pathologists from Britain, South
Africa and Canada and review-
ing a toxicology report, Thomas
told a packed news conference
in the Jamaican capital.

The announcement ended a
globe-spanning investigation in
which authorities interviewed
nearly 400 people and collected
DNA samples and fingerprints
from dozens of potential wit-
nesses, including members of
the Pakistan cricket squad and
other teams.

Woolmer was found uncon-
scious in his hotel room .in
Kingston on March ‘18, a day after
his heavily favored team was elim-
inated from the World Cup in a
humiliating loss to Ireland.

Authorities first said a pre-
liminary autopsy was inconclu-
sive, but on March 22
announced Woolmer had been
strangled — setting off a media
frenzy across the cricket world.

UN troops kill
suspected |
gang leader
in Haiti
@ HAITI

Port-au-Prince

UN peacekeepers and Hait-
ian police on Tuesday killed a
suspected gang leader wanted
in the kidnap-slaying of a
French businessman, according
to Associated Press.

Charles Junior Acdelhy was
shot to death after he opened
fire on Brazilian peacekeepers
and police as they tried to arrest
him during an early morning
raid in Port-au-Prince’s notori-
ous Cite Soleil slum, U.N.
spokeswoman Sophie Boutaud
de la Combe said. No peace-

keepers or police were injured.

Acdelhy was wanted on inter-
national warrants for homicide,
kidnapping and criminal con-
spiracy, Boutaud said, includ-
ing the January 2004 abduction
and killing of Claude-Bernard
Lauture, a French businessman
of Haitian descent.

Last week, Haitian police
arrested 20 suspected gang
members in an operation aimed
at curbing a recent increase in
violent crime that authorities
have said was a plot to desta-
bilise the troubled former
French colony of 8 million.

ae
ty

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
_ PHONE: 822-2157

es eee









City Markets denies
it puts underage
children to work

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

CITY Markets yesterday
vehemently denied allegations
that children as young as 10
years old are employed at their
stores, in contravention of the
labour laws.

Earlier this week, Bahamas

Democratic Movement
(BDM) member Omar Archer
blasted the food store chain
for allegedly employing chil-
dren below the legal age — 14
— to carry out tasks such as
packing groceries and mopping
floors.

Yesterday, Peter Goudie,
human resources manager at
Bahamas Supermarkets Lim-
ited, parent company of City
Markets, said the claims were
untrue.

"It is not true. We do not

employ children who are 10
years old. No we don't. We do
not use anybody who is under
14, and that is the law. We
comply with all of the labour
laws," said Mr Goudie.

He accused Mr Archer, a
former assistant manager at
City Markets on Rosetta
Street, of "probably [having]
something against us”.

He said City Markets store
managers are very much aware
that the company is against
such practices.

“Our managers know that
they are subject to discipline
if they do anything outside of
the labour laws. Especially
with these young baggers.
They have been told that in
writing,” Mr Goudie said.

On Monday, Mr Archer told
The Tribune of his claims fol-
lowed observations made at

four City Markets stores — in
South Beach, Rosetta Street,
Independence Drive and Sea
Grapes.

He asserted that he had seen
children regularly working
from 4pm until 10pm on week-
days, and doing 10-hour days
on Saturdays.

Mr Archer said Article 51
of the Employment Act per-
tains to children and young
persons, and prohibits children
being employed during school
hours, or at times that will
affect their ability to “obtain
the full benefit of the educa-
tion provided" for them.

Mr Archer claimed the
alleged employment of chil-
dren by the company was an
infraction of the Act, as it
denied them time to do home-
work or generally prepare for
school.

PLP blamed for delays
and additional cost of
new magistrate’s court

THE completion of the new
Magistrate’s Court complex at
Nassau Street is a year behind
schedule and will cost the tax
payer an additional $1.2 mil-
lion because of the PLP admin-
istration’s mismanagement of
the contract, Minister of State
in the Ministry of Legal Affairs
Desmond Bannister told the
House of Assembly.

Speaking during the debate
on the government’s 2007/08
budget, Mr Bannister
addressed accusations by the
former PLP government about
the suspension of a number of
building contracts.

The PLP had accused the
new FNM administration of
being “reckless, of putting
Bahamians out of work and of
committing a number of other
unpardonable sins.”

“The Nassau Street Magis-
trate’s Court complex is a
prime example of the way
these contracts had to be sus-
pended and reviewed,” Mr
Bannister said.

The state minister said that
during last year’s budget
debate, the former Attorney
General Allyson Maynard-
Gibson indicated that she
expected the complex to be
completed in November of last
year.

“As with many other pro-
jections by that former minis-
ter, this completion date was
wrong, and justice has paid the
price of this delay,” Mr Ban-
nister said.

He said reports from the
Ministry of Works indicated

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that “millions of dollars have
been spent on this complex,
which is still not even close to
being completed.”

Mr Bannister said he was
advised that the work on the
complex is almost a year
behind schedule.

Moreover, he said, the quan-
tity surveyors who have now
been engaged have indicated
that the contract price which
was negotiated by the former
administration was well below
industry standards, and that
the remaining work cannot be
completed at the contract price
without omissions in the scope
of works planned, or seriously
compromising the quality of

the work.

“Asa result, it is estimated



that completion of the Nassau
Street Court complex will cost
an additional $849,199.18 plus
a contingency of $402,787.20
which means that the cost will
exceed the contract price by
$1,252,986.30 — a sum that our
tax dollars will have to pay,” he
added.

Additionally, he said, since
the former administration did
not ensure that “they signed
the contract with a corporate
entity, or take the precaution
of having the contract vetted
by the Attorney General’s
office, the contract appears to
be unenforceable should the
contractor seek to walk away
from it.”

As to putting Bahamians out
of work, he said, “I am told
that this work site has been a
mini-United Nations, with
workers being imported from a.
number of other countries to
do work that Bahamians could

_ easily do.

“In fact, when I visited the
site several Dominican work-
ers hid from me, while the few
Bahamians who were there
asked me how could the Immi-
gration Department permit

‘these foreign workers to be

imported for routine everyday
work while hundreds of
Bahamian masons and car-
penters are looking for work.

“So, we can see why the oth-
er side doesn’t want these con-
tracts to be suspended and
reviewed, but we are acting in
the best interest of Bahamian
workers and taxpayers,” he
said.















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E 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE











The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



PLP trying to ‘turn back’

“NO TURNING BACK” was the theme for
the “new” PLP’s election campaign as it fought
for a second term in government this year. How-
ever, the party was rejected at the polls because

-a majority of Bahamians felt that, despite claim-
ing that there was to be “no turning back”, in
fact in five years the so-called “new” PLP had
never moved forward. They were still wrapped
in the bosom of Sir Lynden’s old PLP. Here
they were 40 years later presenting themselves
as something new when underneath their cam-
ouflage was the philosophy of the same old vic-
timising PLP.

When Philip “Brave” Davis stood on the
tloor of the House of Assembly on June 8 and
urged that some form of punitive action be tak-
en against a “biased” press, memories of the
year 1986 loomed large. That year marked the
lirst serious challenge to our press freedom.
That was the year that The Tribune locked
iorns with a repressive government in its fight
to keep freedom of speech alive and well in
this country.

The PLP was only a year in office when the
press was challenged by an inexperienced gov-
crnment.

In October, 1968 the Council of the Com-
monwealth Press Union in London was watch-
ing “with anxiety” for any further attempts to
attack the fundamental liberty of the Bahamian
press.

In its quarterly bulletin, which is circulated
throughout the Commonwealth, CPU’s Press
Freedom Committee said: “Press freedom in
the Bahamas remains on the defensive against
forays inspired by the vanity of politicians.”

It reported two cases, which it considered
infringements of the freedom of expression.

The first dealt with an instance when Speak-
er Braynen attempted to ban a Guardian
reporter from the House. The second was a
censure motion brought by Senator Simeon
Bowe against Tribune editor-publisher Sir Eti-
enne Dupuch. Two PLP ministers launched a
vitriolic attack in the House against Sir Eti-
enne, accusing him +f lying, distortion and
racism in his editorials.

A panel of leading citizens condemned the
idea of press censorship in a discussion over
radio ZNS. Nassau lawyer Ralph Seligman, QC,
branded the suggestion to “considér some
means of curbing unfair journalism” as the

“most repugnant thing to a democracy | that I
have ever heard.”

Mr Seligman said he believed in the freedom
of the press “unrestricted in any sense, shape or
form.”

He gave the example of London’s Communist
Daily Worker, which “spews out the most
ridiculous nonsense for the Communists... and

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the other papers rebut it. But if at any time the
British people tried to muzzle this section of
the press, I think they would be cutting the
throats of liberty.”

Some PLP politicians, exercising their
tongues for the first time in parliament, would
stand on their feet and make the most ridiculous
statements — statements that horrified them
when read in print. To wriggle out of difficult sit-
uations, they blamed reporters for misquoting
them. As there was no Hansard, there was no
way that a reporter could defend himself. For
years The Tribune fought for the right to tape
record House proceedings to protect our
reporters against unscrupulous politicians. Even-
tually reporters were allowed tape recorders.

However, before recorders were allowed
and before there was a Hansard, the House
tried to press through a Bill to severely punish
reporters accused of “false or misleading”
reports. The question was: Who was to decide
what constituted a “false or misleading” report,
especially among such thin-skinned politicians,
who believed there was more truth in their
word than a reporter’s.

Ralph Renick, vice president in charge of
news at WI'VJ Channel 4, told his TV audi-
ence that the Bahamas government had “intro-
duced a bill into its parliament which would in
essence curb the press in covering activities in
the House of Assembly and the Senate.

“Called the Powers and Privileges Act, the
bill provides that newsmen who publish what it
terms ‘false and misleading’ reports on pro-
ceedings in the House or Senate, may be found
guilty of contempt without any recourse to any
court.” And so his commentary continued.

Sir Etienne notified the Inter American Press
Association (IAPA), which cabled Sir Lynden
and both houses of the legislature advising them
to withdraw the controversial bill. The next day
the IAPA president flew to Nassau to join Sir
Etienne in his fight on behalf of the press of the
Bahamas. IAPA alerted the press of the world,
and telegrams of protests started to flow in.

Under local and world pressure, the Bill was
withdrawn, but the pressure on The Tribune,
which over the years took many forms, never let
up.

However, that year was the turning point
for the PLP. Up to that time the Bahamas’ first
majority government was the darling of the
world press — it could do no wrong. But when
the PLP threatened a free press, they had diffi-
culty getting a “good press” abroad.

We don’t know where Philip Davis was in
those years —possibly too young to be aware.
But today, instead of going forward, his sug-
gestion to punish the press for their views has
taken us back to some very ugly years.






Our police do
not need the
assistance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I LISTENED extensively to
Mr Damian Gomez on the
94.9FM Radio Talk Show on
Tuesday, April 3, 2007. His
statements about the judicial

system reminded me of letters ,

I have written to the press in
recent years criticising the sys-

‘tem and indicating how it was

helping criminals in our
nation. I was also very pleased
to hear his comments about
the exceptional work being
done by the police over the
past years. I have been saying
all along that our Police Force
is the best in the region. One
only has to look at the statis-
tics to find that the detection
rate On major crime is among
the best in the world. The
overcrowded prisons and the
massive backlog of cases are
evidence of the exceptional
work being done by our Police
Force. Yet, there are those
who are calling for recruit-
ment from the UK and other
countries to increase the
strength of our Force. We do
not need the assistance; our
Police personnel are perform-
ing with distinction; the exec-
utives of the Force have
demonstrated their commit-
ment and their ability to take
on the challenge and there is
no shortage of Bahamian
recruits. The only area for
which help may be considered
are in the scenes of crime and
DNA Units, whose personnel
are presently being over-
worked due to the large num-
ber of murders in the coun-
try.

We know that the strength
of the Force was somewhat
depleted with the introduction
of community policing and
urban renewal. Many of its
finest were attached to these
units. A major success of the
community policing unit is the
closing of the gap between
Police and the public. I would
say that community policing
urban renewal have been a
resounding success.

It is about time that our
Police Force, through its pub-
lic relations start providing the
public and, of course, the
politicians with information
about the successes of the two
programmes.

The recent promotions indi-
cate that more room has been
made at the top by providing
additional senior assistant

~ commissioners, assistant com-

missioners, chief superinten-

Des O aes

letters@triounemedia.net






dents, superintendents, and
other additional ranks. Young
Police Officers have a lot of
top positions to look forward
to in the years to come.

I was never in favour of the
“big” promotions and as a
senior officer I tried to get the
system changed to one where
there will be immediate pro-
motions when vacancies
became available.

The reason being that after
the big promotions the Force
loses the standard of perfor-
mance of any of those officers,
who feel neglected, bypassed
or victimised. 'The ineffective
performance lasts for several
months until another big pro-
motion is on the horizon. With
a system of immediate pro-
motion as vacancies occur offi-
cers have to maintain a high
standard of performance at all
times to qualify.

Promotions have always
been criticised and dejected
(personnel alleges political
favours).

I have remained very close
to the Police Force and many
of the senior and junior offi-
cers.

I know of the dedication,
commitment and excellent
standard of performance,
which was consistent. I am
hoping that those senior offi-
cers, who had become spe-
cialised and very successful in
certain areas of policing, in
particular criminal investiga-
tion will continue to perform
with credit in their new areas.
As an old detective I know/of
the great loss experienced
when experienced detectives

Action to

are plucked from the team. In
my twenty-five years in crimi-
nal investigation I had first
hand experience when the in-
put, consultation, dialogue and
directions were missed. It
helped when the replacement
came from within the team.

With the massive promotion
it must be realised by the
recipients that there is more
responsibility and the need for
more commitment. While the
Force has been very effective
in solving major crime there
are other areas in which the
same effect is lacking, namely
— discipline, eg dress code,
court appearances, conduct - ,
and work attitude, etc. A mas-
sive effort must be made to
reduce the number of com-
plaints against Police person-
nel. There is the need for
crime prevention education
through public forums and an
effort to organise neighbour-
hood watch in all areas of the
country. The latter should be a
commitment of the officer in
charge of each division and
every policeman in the area
he/she resides.

The zero tolerance concept
introduced to the Force by Mr
B K Bonamy must be imple-
mented to deal with the hun-
dreds of minor crimes and
traffic violations seen on the
streets daily, eg motorcyclists
must wear helmets, food ven-
dors must have health certifi-
cates, and something must be
done about the clubs with
lewd dancing and prostitution.

Congratulations to all of
those officers promoted.
Please be assured of my con-
tinuing cooperation.

PAUL
THOMPSON
Nassau,

2007.

save the

islands of Bimini

EDITOR, The Tribune.

FIRST, congratulations on your election in the Bahamas.

The Free National Movement put up a plan to establish marine
protected areas throughout the Bahamas.

Five sites were identified as priority for the Bahamian Marine
Reserve Network — Bimini was at the top of this list.

We have learned about Bimini from National Geographic and
hope you will take strong action to save the islands of Bimini.

Thank you for your attention to our letter and for your action in
this very serious matter. May we have a reply as to what action will

be taken?

MR and MRS M
BERNSTEIN
Brooklyn, NY,
May, 2007.

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Payee

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 5



© In brief

Man accused
of stealing
$2,000 of
phone cards

A MAN accused of stealing.
$2,000 worth of GSM cell phone
cards, as well as a sum of cash,
was arraigned in Magistrate's
court yesterday.

It was alleged that Ocassio
Floyd, 28, sometime between
2am and Yam on Friday, March
30, being concerned with anoth-
er stole 100 GSM cards valued
at $2,000, along with $125 cash,
the property of Anthony
Albury. Floyd was also charged
with causing damage.

It was alleged that on Fri-
day, March 30, Floyd caused
damage to a black coin changer
in the amount of $1,800, and a
phone card vending machine in
the sum of $8,000, the property
of Anthony Albury.

On a shopbreaking charge, it
was alleged that Floyd, on Sun-
day, June 10, attempted to
break into Bahamian Paint, sit-
uated on the Tonique Williams
Darling and Milo Butler High-
ways.

The accused, who was
arraigned before Magistrate
Guillimena Archer at Court 10
on Nassau Street, pleaded not
guilty to the charges and was
granted bail in the sum of
$6,000 on the stealing and dam-
age charges with one surety, and
$1,000 bail on the attempted
shopbreaking charge.

30-year-old
faces charge
of firearm
possession

A 30-YEAR-OLD man from
Augusta Street was arraigned
in Magistrate's Court yesterday
on a firearm and ammunition
charge.

According to court dockets,
Carlton Miller, on Saturday,

June 1, was found in possession ,,, ;
of a. 9mm pistol. Court dockets ,
further stated that on Saturday, —:
June 1, the accused was found

in possession of seven live
rounds of ammunition.

Miller was also charged with
threats of harm. It was alleged
that on Saturday, June 9, he
threatened to harm Herbert
Sears.

Miller who was arraigned
before Magistrate Guillimena
Archer at Court 10 on Nassau
Street, yesterday pleaded not
guilty to the charges and was
granted bail in the sum of
$10,900 with one surety on the
gun and ammunition charges,
aiid $800 bail on the threats of
harm charge. The case was
adjourned to September 10.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.

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Foulkes condemns
Christie for having
‘part-time minister’

MINISTER of Education
Carl Bethel hit out at former
Prime Minister Perry Christie
for demonstrably “crippling”
the country’s education sys-
tem by appointing one person
to serve as both Attorney
General and Minister of Edu-
cation under the PLP admin-
istration.

Mr Bethel, giving his con-
tribution to the budget debate,
told parliament on Tuesday
that having served in both
posts he knows first-hand the
necessary attention that each

job demands.

“Something had to suffer. It
was an insult to students, their
parents, the professionals and
administrators to have been
saddled with a part-time min-
ister. Every objective observer
called for a change, whether

it was the Bahamas Union of

Teachers, the general public,
newspaper editorials, the then
opposition — all called for a
full-time minister of education.

“I cry shame upon the for-
mer prime minister for having
crippled education for more
than three years with a half-
time minister,” he said.

Mr Bethel said that even
just a few weeks in office it is
apparent to him that the Min-

istry of Education demands -

and needs the full, detailed,
focused and uninterrupted
attention of a full-time minis-
ter.

He said that the his govern-
ment’s 2007/08 budget is
designed to reflect and main-
tain an inclusive system, and to
facilitate the continued growth
and success of the Bahamian
people.

“Higher levels of account-
ability, productivity and
empowerment will be antici-
pated: by those who have
placed their trust in us and giv-
en us the mandate for a third
time to govern this country,”
he said.

’Mr Bethel said that in the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and

® DION Foulkes

Culture, considerable empha-
sis will continue to be placed
on improving and enhancing
the core educational compo-
nents of human resources and
the curriculum, as well as the
technology and physical plant.

“This government invests in
our children and citizenry
because the rebuilding and
expansion of the public edu-
cation system is the corner-
stone of the nation’s econom-
ic and democratic future,” he
said.

Mr Bethel emphasised that
the focus and mission of his
ministry is that of building
people. |

It is because of this focus,
he said, that his government
has made the conscious deci-
sion to combine the ministries
of Education and Youth,
Sports and Culture so that the
government’s efforts can be
better rationalised and the
financial and human resources
can be appropriately allocated
and carefully managed. !

“In doing so, we realisesthat
we will be able to get greater
value for money, causing our
interventions to have much
greater significance.




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AN acute blood shortage
continues to be a year-round
problem in the Bahamas, chief
medical officer at the Ministry
of Health, Dr Merceline Dahl-
Regis said.

While the blood collection in
the Bahamas should be at 16,000
units annually, it is only at
around 5,000 units, or one third
or what should be collected
based on population size, she
said at a press conference to pro-
mote World Blood Donor Day.

“We are appreciative of those
who regularly donate blood
without any special incentive to
do so, but we need more blood
donors,” Dr Dahl-Regis said.

The National Blood Bank
Committee has already begun
a strategy to increase the pool
of these blood donors with the
planned introduction of the club
25 programme, she said.

Dr Dalil-Regis explained that
the programme places the focus
«. voung donors between the
ages of 17 and 25, and the forg-
ing of significant partnerships
with members of civil society.

The health ministry also
intends to create a centralised
blood bank service to ensure
standardisation and quality for
the collection of safe blood, as
well as appoint a national blood
procurement officer, she said.

Dr Dahl-Regis commended
the World Health Organisation’s
regional body — the Pan Ameri-
can Health Organisation

(PAHO) - for providing “great”.

technical support, training and
educational promotion activities
in the Bahamas and the
Caribbean in an effort to improve
the systems and ensure the vision
of safe blood to the public.
While the theme for this
year’s World Blood Donor Day
is ‘Safe Blood for Safe Moth-

. erhood’, PAHO Representative

Lynda Campbell said her organ-
isation decided the Americas
will have a different theme —
‘Children the Gift of Life
through Blood Transfusions’.
Children from across
PAHO’s member states who
have benefited from blood

LOCAL NEWS |



THE TRIBUNE







@ PERMANENT secretary in the Ministry of Health and
Social Development Barbara Burrows (standing) introduces
eight-year-old Deneka Brickell Rolle whose material, which
described her experience as a blood donor recipient won her a
trip to Washington, DC. Also pictured, from left are paediatric
haematologist/oncologist at PMH, Dr Corrine Sinquee and Pan
American Health Organisation representative Linda Campbell.

donations were encouraged to
submit material that described
their experiences, Ms Campbell
explained.

After the entries were
reviewed, five children were
selected from Columbia,

Guatemala, Costa Rica, Suri-

name and the Bahamas to tray-
el' to Washington, DC, to attend
the official PAHO World Blood
Donor celebrations.

The children who entered
into the competition have their
stories recorded in a booklet.

The recipient chosen from
the Bahamas is eight-year-old
Deneka Brickell Rolle.

Paediatric haematologist/
oncologist at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, Dr Corrine Sin-
quee explained that Deneka
had leukaemia and survived to
tell the tale.

Another girl, Ashanti Rolle,
who has sickle cell enema, had
multiple strokes and several
blood transfusions in the
Bahamas before she had the
opportunity to go to California
to have bone marrow trans-
plantation, Dr Sinquee said.

‘caribbeanlandscape.net

(Photo: BIS/Derek Smith)

At one point she had a blood
transfusion every month for
three years straight, it was dis-
closed.

Both girls’ mothers appealed
to the public to give more
blood.

“Tam very. grateful to all of
the volunteer blood donors,
because there were many times
when I did not have anyone to
donate for her to get a blood
transfusion in a particular
month, and | had to rely on vol-
unteer donors,” said Ashanti’s
mother Rhonda Rolle,

“There are many other chil-
dren and adults who may need
transfusions. So I make an
appeal to those who can donate
blood to please do so and help
save a life,” she said. .

Blood Bank supervisor
Everette Miller noted that most
persons giving blood come in on
behalf of other persons, “and you
do not see them again for years.

“We encourage everyone to
give. Become more consistent.
Become volunteer. blood
donors. We would really appre-
ciate that,” he said.

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IHURSVDAY, JUNE 14, ZUU/, FAUE /







@ PIRATE Anne Bonnie relates her story to tourists at Rawson Square.

Summer junkanoo
revitalises history

DURING this year’s
Junkanoo Summer Festival
famous individuals in Bahamian
history will make an appearance
on Bay Street to create a unique
shopping experience for visitors.

Bahamians and tourists on
Bay Street will encounter
pirates such as Anne Bonnie,
multi-millionaires such as Sir
Harry Oakes, and Royal Gov-
ernors such as Woodes Rogers
during the next two months.

The appearances of actors
who portray the historic char-
acters are part of the Junkanoo
Summer Festival’s “A Walk
Through History” initiative.

Every Tuesday and Friday
between June 8 and July 29,
from 10am to 4am, the charac-
ters will be stationed through-
out Bay Street, relating their
part in Bahamian history to
shoppers.

Janet Johnson, director of
events strategy and special pro-
jects in Ministry of Tourism,
said the effort is part of a move
to make Bay Street competitive
with other shopping districts in

Nassau and also add a special
element to people’s shopping
experiences.

“It is all in good fun. It's edu-
cational and interactive, and
that's what we hope to do,” she
said.

For the twice-weekly event,
Bay Street will be split up into
six blocks.

The history zone runs from
Navy Lion Road to Victoria
Avenue.

The age of discovery zone
will feature Christopher Colum-
bus and the Lucayans.

The age of exploration will
feature William Sayle and the
Eleutheran Adventurers.

There will also be blocks ded-
icated to piracy, Loyalists and
Africans, blockade and rum
runners, and the World Wars.

“We hope that Bahamians will
come back to Bay Street to shop.
We are also encouraging private
car park owners to open up their
car parks on weekends and make

it free of charge:so that Bahami-.

ans can come down here:to'shop.

“That's why they go\to the:

malls, because of the free park-
ing,” Ms Johnson said.
Samantha Carter, former

Miss Bahamas Universe, is .

among the cast of characters
who will appear on Bay Street.

Ms Carter portrays a historic
guest of the Royal Victoria
Hotel, which once stood at the
Victoria Gardens.

She said she and others will
have important bits of informa-
tion to share with shoppers.

“The most important thing is’

the fact that we have history to
tell as a country. A lot of people
are not aware of our history.
So, not only our visitors will
become aware of what hap-
pened in the Bahamas, how we
became the way we are now,
but our locals will also be given
a chance to learn about our his-
tory,” Ms Carter said.

A Walk Through History
characters can be found on Bay
Street between 10am and 4pm.

The entire shopping experi-
ence, which includes historic
themes in some Bay Street stores,

- will be-available 9am to,6pm.
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THE TRIBUNE



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_ LOCAL NEWS
~~ | The Ambassador

~~ | Designate of Israel
pays courtesy call

AMBASSADOR Designate of
Israel Yosef Livne yesterday pre-
sented his credentials to Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of
Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette
during a courtesy call in the
Diplomatic Room at the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs.

Both countries pledged to fos-
ter greater ties and create new
partnerships in the areas of trade,
agriculture and reverse osmosis
projects.

The Deputy Prime Minister
commended Israel on its major
successes in the field of reverse
osmosis.

(BIS photo: Tim Aylen)





Bethel: people of Sea Breeze
will not turn their back on FNM

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THE people of Sea Breeze
were not swayed by “PLP lies
and distortions” from voting
for someone who was “known
and trusted” and will not turn
its back on the FNM despite
the PLP’s intentions to take
the seat to election court, MP

for the area and Minister of

Education Carl Bethel said.
Mr Bethel’s constituency
will most likely be one of five
seats that the PLP is expected
contest in election court.
Addressing the House of
Assembly on Tuesday. the
education minister said that

the opposition cannot deny
that although the battle was
long and hard, on.the FNM
side, it was fairly fought.
“We weathered the
onslaught of the entire politi-
cal machinery of the PLP,
whether in terms of the arbi-
trary cutting of two polling
divisions in half, thereby con-
fusing and frustrating voters,
or in terms of Hooding the
area with money, or the
legions of PLP campaign
workers from other con-
stituencies, together with the
other activities of the PLP’s

dirty tricks department,” he
said.

Mr Bethel said although the
PLP is currently “bemoaning”
how the election process was
conducted in Sea Breeze, they
changed the constituency
name, the boundaries, the can-
didate and despite this are
now are going to court to try
to change the results.

“No matter what they do,
the voters of Sea Breeze
decided that the change they
really needed was a change of
government, and they did just
that on May 2, 2007.

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“So as the persons on that
side continue merely to fight
for themselves, we on this side
will continue to fight for the
Bahamian people. As they
fight to hold onto power, we
will fight to empower Bahami-
ans, as they fight to distract
and derail the wishes of the
voters, we will fight to make
the wishes of the voters come
true,” Mr Bethel said.

He said that under the pre-
vious FNM government, Sea
Breeze — then called Holy
Cross — received two new pri-
mary schools where there
were none before and the
Charles Saunders Highway.

The process of new street-
lighting for the main Golf
Course Boulevard, a’s well as
the upgrading of the antiquat-
ed and dysfunctional electric-
ity system were also begun in
the area, he said.

“As for me, I will continue
to the struggle to fight for the
good people of the Sea Breeze
constituency who know that
when IJ was in I looked out for
them. When I was out I still
looked out for them, and now
that I am back, Sea Breeze
need not worry, I will look
after my people,” the MP said.

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LOCAL NEWS:

Farewell gala reception will honour

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 9



former Grand Bahama police chief

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Former
Grand Bahama police chief
Ellison Greenslade, who was
transferred to New Providence

-following his promotion to
senior assistant commissioner,
will be honored at a farewell
gala reception in Freeport.

Senior officials at the Royal
Bahamas Police Force in Grand
Bahama announced that the
event will be held on June 22
in the convention centre at the
Westin at Our Lucaya Resort.

Mr Greenslade served as
assistant commissioner of police
in Grand Bahama for seven
years.

Chief Supt Emerick Seymour,
a member of the planning com-
mittee, said the event will allow
officers of the northern region
to show their appreciation to
Mr Greenslade for his contri-
butions over the years.



@ FORMER Grand Bahama
police chief Ellison Greenslade

Mr Seymour said that many
things have been accomplished
within the region during Mr
Greenslade’s time in office, par-
ticularly in the area of adminis-

tration of the force.

Mr Greenslade, who has a
Master’s Degree in business
administration, is also responsi-
bie for the development of
information technology on the
police force.

The event, which starts at
7pm, will be attended by Com-
missioner Paul Farquharson,
and many senior officials and
officers from the Bimini,
Abaco, and the Berry Islands
districts.

Mr Greenslade has served as
a member of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force since
1979.

He graduated the top in class
at the Bahamas Police Acade-
my, receiving the coveted Baton
of Honor.

He attended the University
of Miami and obtained a Mas-
ter’s Degree. He is also recipi-
ent of a post graduate certifi-
cate in police management
and criminal justice from
University of Leicester in the

Department of Culture to continue
support for National Arts Festival

THE Department of Culture will continue to
invest in the development and promotion of the E
Clement Bethel National Arts Festival and plans
to provide workshops and training in the performing
arts for Family Island participants, Minister of State
for Culture Charles Maynard announced.

“In this way we plan to truly turn national all of
the entities that are now deemed as such,” he said
during his 2007/08 budget communication in the
House of Assembly.

Minister Maynard said the National Arts Festival,
named after the first director of culture, provides a
singular opportunity for all Bahamians to compete
with one another for awards in various areas, includ-
ing music, dance and drama.

“The festival holds a great attraction for school-
age children and serves as a springboard for many of
them to launch a career in the arts,” Minister May-
nard said.

“The festival, however, is more than just a youth
competition. It embraces Bahamians of all ages and
the community sector (of the competition) has been
a resounding success, especially among the Family
Islands,”

“We endeavour to improve the quality of the per-
formances and increase opportunities for aspiring
artists to hone their skills,” he said.

Mr Maynard added that consideration is also
being given to granting national status to a few oth-
er developing entities such as the Bahamas Con-
cert Orchestra.

The minister said the strengthening of some of the
country’s other existing institutions is also neces-
sary.

He said the National Dance School, for exam-
ple, has been in the forefront of training dancers and
choreographers in the Bahamian society for many
years. Many of the owners of private dance schools

have passed through there as students.

“Recently, however, there has been a marked
decline in the quality and output of the National
Dance School.

“My ministry intends to halt this deterioration in

~ one of our premier cultural entities and restore the

school to its former position as a dominant factor in
shaping the cultural identity of the Bahamas,” he
said.

Minister Maynard said there is also an urgent
need for Bahamians to write, document and record
the country’s cultural history and to preserve “our
rich cultural heritage.”

He said the music heritage and research unit is a
new aspect of his ministry, which was established
under the former government.

“Today we are in the process of giving this unit the
mandate to collect, document, preserve and dis-
seminate information about Bahamian music of all
kinds.

“Jt is our goal to use the results of this research to
produce materials for our schools and for the general
population,” he said.

Mr Maynard pointed out that music is a vital part
of the country’s cultural history and that Bahamians
should not only know the history of Bach or
Chopin.

“It is imperative that they know about Blind
Blake, Joseph Spence, Timothy Gibson and Freddie
Munnings, Sr,” he said.

To this end, the minister said, his government
will allocate resources for the required specialists and
musicologists needed to traverse the islands and
compile their findings.

“Resources will also be allocated for transforming
these findings into useful tools for the education of
our people, as well as for their entertainment and
cultural growth,” Minister Maynard said.



the police force medals for mer-
itorious service, as well as good
conduct.

Prime Minister’s Above and
Beyond Award for Heroism,
Boss of the Year 2002/2003, and

United Kingdom.
Mr Greenslade also received
the Queen’s Police Medal, the

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THE TRIBUNE



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Christie makes
FNM ‘culture
of fear’ claim

FROM page one

try. However I am judged by
history, the one thing that is cer-
tain is that those who would
succeed me will learn from what
is happening now and are most
unlikely to be as trusting as I
was,” he said.

“T fear that my actions of
decency and fair play have now
been undone in just six weeks,”
the leader of the opposition
added.

Mr Christie also told the
House that as prime minister
he left in place people who
could almost be described as
“operatives”, but he made this
decision because they were
Bahamians, who too had the
right to work, free of fear.

@ PLP leader Perry Christie
(BIS Photo Patrick Hanna)



Former Asst Commissioner: witness
protection should be ‘Caricom issue’

FROM page one

stated that police have done a
"good job to date" with pro-
tecting those who are due to
testify.

Officials in the Cayman
Islands, Bermuda and Anguilla
have discussed in past years the
possibility of regional witness
protection programme being set
up which would allow witnesses
from those countries to be
removed to other Caribbean
nations prior to their court
appearance.

Such a possibility might
increase the number of persons
who are willing to testify, where
currently some are fearful of
coming forward for fear of
becoming a target of crime.

However, it has also been
noted that the issue of protect-
ing witnesses would be a less
pressing one if crime fighters
were able to rely less on wit-
ness testimony, and more on
forensic evidence.

‘Former assistant commis-
sioner Thompson suggested yes-
terday that the threat to wit-



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nesses could also be lessened if
sworn affidavits were taken,
removing the incentive for dan-
gerous individuals to try to
silence them, as an affidavit can
be used as evidence in court in
place of the individual's spoken
testimony.

In fact, once such an affidavit
has been taken, it would be in
the accused's interest for the
individual to appear as their
cross-examination may be ben-
eficial to their defence, said Mr
Thompson.

Witness protection is a con-
cern for Dr David Allen, psy-
chiatrist and chairman of the
commission behind the Urban
Renewal programme.

He has spoken out repeated-
ly about intimidation suffered

by Bahamians who have been.

called to testify and, like Mr
Thompson, has called for key

ACCENT FURNITURE

witnesses to be taken out of the
country for their own protec-
tion.

Yesterday Asst Commis-
sioner Greenslade said: "We
have an obligation that people
feel safe and secure, be they
ordinary persons or people who
are called to testify before the
courts.

"We have done a good job to
date. I am satisfied that we have
a good team of detectives deal-
ing on a daily basis with issues
of witness protection, although
we are continually looking
for ways to refine and
improve."

He added that Caricom
affairs are within the "remit of
the government" and he is sat-
isfied government is giving the
suggestion of a regional witness
protection programme the
"attention it deserves."

“DOW TREATMEN

MA


ej, THE TRIBUNE
be

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 11



PM lamhasts

FROM page one

| have a chance (to make a:
' decision),” he said.

the majority of his party.

Christie blasts Ingraham over

After receiving the brunt of O
; this verbal assault almost
| alone in the House, Mr :
Christie was finally joined by : an Q) a amas ¢; 1 an

Mr Ingraham said he asked;
» «Mr Christie earlier that day if :
Rgehe had “missed” being prime : FROM page one
we
‘ yesterday took the opportunt-
ty to speak out on the resigna-
tion of Mr Jarrett from the
board of the Bank Bahamas.
According to Mr Jarrett, the
request for his resignation came
directly from the Prime Minis-
ter’s office.

«minister, to which he claimed
<.Mr Christie replied “Yes, ;
prayes
»¢ “IT wasn’t sure you under- :
tx’ stood me so | asked you two
“’»more times,” Mr Ingraham ;
said to Mr Christie. “And on :
~ each occasion he said, "Yes he :
did’. And I understand. Now :

rin my case | didn’t miss being : we

i hae eee Mr Christie lambasted Mr

;*, prime minister. [didn’t dream : iaeahain toe thewemovalor

»* about becoming prime minis- : Me 7 = CW e :

**.ter again — notwithstanding ; Pe etret ie WOO Wes SEP Oe
‘ : ed to the post of the bank’s

b < 7
\°4°what the leader of the oppo- |
&

** sition was saying about my ; chairman in December 2004

v.jonsing’ for power. I was sat- | under the PLP government.

p's isfied that I did my best each | “You asked. me if I could
ie and every day I was in office. | help you to get Al Jarrett out of
ES “And the transition forme } the position,” Mr Christie

shouted at the prime minister
across the floor of House yes-
terday morning.

The PLP leader said that
when he became prime minis-
ter in 2002 he left Hugh Sands,
who had been appointed in
1996 under the previous FNM
government, in place as chair-
man of the Bank of the
Bahamas for another two
years.

“T left him in place because it
was important, at least for a
season, to create the powerful
imagery that my government
was sufficiently secure to cause
the Bahamians who did not
support us politically, to remain
in posts and show that they can
do as good a job for my gov-
ernment as they did for the
government that put them

-- from being prime minister to :
being a citizen anda member ;

_ of parliament was an easy one ;
for me. I regret that my friend, :

* the leader of the Opposition |
‘can't say the same thing. But I :
, hope that as he wrestles with ;
_, his inner being he will come to :
_- terms about that reality about :
~ which he cannot do anything,”
_or he said. :

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
j making news in their





vehicle outside of the Bank of
the Bahamas and asking him
to step down from his post.

As long as such practices are
taking place, Mr Christie said,
there can be no healing
between the FNM and the
PLP.

Prime Minister Ingraham
responded to Mr Christie by
saying that the request for Mr
Jarrett’s resignation was han-
dled in the correct manner. —

He said that leading up to
the general election, Mr Jarrett
made “all sorts of allegations”
against him and his fellow
FNMs on various radio sta-
tions.

Mr Ingraham explained that
Mr Jarrett failed to respond to
several resignation requests,
even after persons within the
financial services sector talked
to him about the matter.

Finally, the prime minister
said, he saw Mr Jarrett outside
of the bank one day and per-
sonally talked to him about
resigning.

“T said, ‘Al, why are you
making it so difficult, just
resign’,” Mr Ingraham said.

The prime minister said that
he sought advice from the pri-
vate law firm which represents

the Bank of the Bahamas.

The law firm, he said, told
him that he had the “unfettered
right” to terminate Mr Jarrett
as he was not an employee at
the bank, but a member of the
board.

He was also advised, Mr
Ingraham said, that Mr Jarrett
would not have to be remuner-
ated in any way.

“You don’t have to pay him
a nickel or a dime,” Mr Ingra-
ham said citing the bank’s
lawyers.

“Notwithstanding that,” the
prime minister said, “I gave
instructions to give him three
months pay. Now I’m the. vic-
timiser,” Mr Ingraham said.

The Bank of the Bahamas
on Tuesday gave. notice that,
effective from June 8, Mr Jar-
rett is no longer a director or
chairman with the bank.

Mr Jarrett told The Tribune
yesterday that was very pleased
with Mr Christie’s statements in
the House of Assembly, but
that he feels nothing further
needs to be said on the matter.

He said his time at the Bank
of the Bahamas was a very
exciting one, but that he is now
looking forward to moving on
with his life.





Caribbean Health & Fitness Limited will hold
a sale of gym equipment at the old Gold’s
Gym location on the second floor of the
Bridge Commons Plaza, East Bay & Mackey -
Streets, on the following days:-

GYM EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

Monday to Friday June 11to15 12noon to 8p.m.

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neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning

for improvements in the



there.

“This government, sadly to
say, has a totally different
view,” he said.

Mr Christie added that Mr






area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Jarrett’s removal was conduct-
ed in an undignified manner,
with Mr Ingraham pulling up
along side Mr Jarrett in his





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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE. ig







THE
with South Africa the Caribbean
und Latin America segment of
the African Diaspora conference
from August 1-3.

Phe South Atrican High Con-
missioner for CARICOM and
Ambassador to Haiti, Fatth
Doreen Radebe, and chief dire:
tor for the Americas in the
Department of Foreign Affairs
Ambassador Mbulelo Rakwena,
were in New Providence to go
over preparations and to renew
the Government’s commitment
to co-hosting the conlerence.

“We chose the Bahamas
because it is part of the CARI-

Bahamas will co-host



COM countries. [t is the part of

the Diaspora that has progressed
so much that, today when we talk
about CARICOM, the Bahamas
becomes one of those important
countries,” High Commissioner
Radebe said.

They paid a courtesy call on
the Minister of Lands and Local
Government, Sidney Collie, on
‘Tuesday.

There have been previous
African Diaspora conferences in
Kingston, Jamaica, in 2005 and
Khartoum, Sudan in 2006,

“We are just taking this move,
because we know this will further
strengthen the African Union
(AU) and the African continent,

ey






is to co-host segment of;
iaspora conference



f@ THEE Bahamas will co-host the African Diaspora Conference.
Pictured from left during a courtesy call on the Minister of Lands
and Local Government, the Hon Sidney Collie are Chief Director,
Americas, in the Department of Foreign Affairs, Ambassador
Mbulelo Rakwena, South African High Commissioner for all
CARICOM States and Ambassador to Haiti Ady Faith Doreen
Radebe, Minister Collie, and Permanent Secretary Harrison

Thompson.

together with CARICOM coun-
tries and the Caribbean,” High
Commissioner, Radebe said
explaining why the conference is

(Photo by: Patrick Hanna)

taking place in the Bahamas.

Mr Collie said he attended the
conference in Kingston and
observed that South Africa was

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taking the lead in the planning of’

the conferences, as well as a lead-,,2 '
ership role in sensitising persons

to the peculiarities of Africans, -7
and the African Diaspora. aa)

Ambassador Rakwena
explained that these conferences .. |,
are trying to achieve a number of 0
things. While the AU is made up ae
of five regions, it is trying to
include the African Diaspora as”
the sixth region.

“The importance of the,
African Diaspora begs the ques-
tion of the recognition of such,” “4
Ambassador Rakwena said. He iu

The conferences also‘seek to'--*-
change the way Africans or per- ‘
sons of African descent are seen‘
throughout the world. aris

These persons are often mar- ginalised and living in poverty,:9q
and the desire is to cast the imagez9i
in a different understanding and.
appreciation, he said. 18

The objective is to deepen dia-. i;
logue and to “engender a sense of,
co-operation” between Africa:
and the Diaspora, poe
Rakwena explained.

This dialogue needs to include. on
discussions on the part Africa and’,
those of African ancestry play in
trade, economic development and
the health systems found through- |
out world, he said. 28

5; and
cg

1

hiswayto .

, asm :
say
ye

CORDERO Minnis of’.
Kingsway Academy walked away’ <*
as the winner of the Texaco 6th '“*
Annual Safety Speech competi- ;
tion, winning over a field of nine 21
speakers. . yn

In addition to winning a
$10,000-scholarship to attend the | rr
college of his choice, Cordero will ;; 3.
serve as the 2007/08 Texacog' 4
national youth safety spokesper- 9:
son and play a key role on the,,,;;
National Road Safety Commit-
tee.

The young aspiring minister of
the Gospel is Kingway's head-"
boy, and expects to enter College ~
in January, 2008.

His personal motto is “I believe
that the steps of a righteous man >j
are ordered by the Lord and if I ;
put Him at the forefront of my 5
endeavours, success and triumph 34
are inevitable. ®

“Seek Him diligently and not*;
complacently.” 3

Capturing second and third a
places respectively were Samuel «;
Brown of Grand Bahama®
Catholic High School, and¢
Rashad Rolle of Doris Johnson %
Senior High School. "*

Samuel and Rashad will”
receive scholarships in ites

32



“amounts of $6,000 and $3, 000 5

respectively.

According to Armando Vegas, «
Chevron's district retail manag- *,
er, this year's competition was a a
great success in more ways than
one.

“We had our largest contingent’
of Family Island students partici-
pating, as well as the largest num-
ber of Family Island participants
advancing to the finals.

“We are very pleased about -
this, as it shows that these stu-
dents as on par with their New
Providence counterparts.

“We are also pleased with the
large number of male participants
this year”, said Mr. Vegas.

Mr Vegas explained that “the
100 per cent increase in scholar- *
ship monies this year is a reflec-*
tion of Chevron's commitment to
developing the youth of the
Bahamas, and more importantly, '
to increasing their awareness
about road safety.”

In previous vears, scholarships
were awarded in the amounts of
$5,000, $3,000 and $1,500 to the
top three finishers.

The other finalists were
Shorneka Thompson of Inagua
All-Age School; Colton Jones of
San Salvador High School,
Cliffrielle Sands of Central -
Eleuthera High School; Brooke
Sherman ef Bishop Michael
Eldon School; Lancelot Darville
Jr of Grand Bahama Catholic
High School, and Marcel
Gibson of Central Andros High |
School.

All nine finalists were present-
ed with laptop computers and the ,
Sharon Wilson Award.

ee

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ST tee

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{
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 13



Think tank founder to give
his explanation for African
poverty at Nassau Institute

"FOR God's sake, please
stop the aid!"

So says James Shikwati
founder of the libertarian think
tank IREN in Nairobi, Kenya.

Speaking about the disas-
trous effects of western devel-
opment policy in Africa, cor-
rupt rulers, and the tendency to
overstate the AIDS problem he
says: “The countries that have
collected the most development
aid are also the ones that are in
the worst shape. Despite the bil-
lions that have poured in to
Africa, the continent remains
poor.”

How could all the money and
other relief and good intentions
have the disastrous effects of
perpetuating poverty instead of
resolving it?

James Shikwati will give his
explanation for African poverty
at a Nassau Institute and Atlas
Foundation Symposium at
Atlantis on Thursday, June
21. Also speaking at the sym-
posium will be Dr Michael
Walker and Michael Fairbanks
of OTF (On the Frontier).

The symposium will be held
in the Orion and Zeus Rooms
at Atlantis from 9.30am to
2.30pm.

Dr Walker of the Fraser
Institute will discuss the lessons
from the global experience for
Bahamian health care reform.

Mr Fairbanks, founder of
OTF, will talk on the subject of
the Bahamas in the era of total
global competition.

Mr Shikwati will also
describe his journey as a young
economist and discovery of lib-
ertarian principles. It began
when he read Frederick Basti-
at’s little book “The Law”. This
remarkable classic with its rig-
orous logic motivated him to a
different understanding of the
causes of poverty.

Since his discovery, he has
maintained a dialogue with
Lawrence W. Reed of the
Mackinac Centre for Public Pol-
icy and with The Atlas Eco-
nomic Research Foundation.

The Nassau Institute spon-
sored Larry Reed’s visit to Nas-
sau in the last week of May. Mr
Reed’s subject was “The Sev-

James Shikwati will
speak at symposium



en Principles of Sound Public
Policy.

“An enthralled sapalence
unfortunately did not include
any members of Parliament,
although they were invited,”
said a spokesman for the Insti-
tute.

At the symposium the audi-
ence will be introduced to a new
way of thinking about the

wii Professionals Trust

Bahamian economy, ideas dif-
ferent from those that have
motivated politicians of both
political parties.

‘The theme for the symposium
is “Changing the direction of a
country lo re-energize its tal-
ents.”

Lor more information about
the speakers and to register go
to www.nassauinstitute.org

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS.

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE P52. Boe












THIS MONTH’S TOPIC:
“Beware - Pain and Swelling in the Balls - You Could Lose Them.”

A Lesson on Common Problems of the Testicles in Men and Boys.

sae ~~ [TECTURE DATE

Thursday, June 21, 2007@ 6pm fs | f /
B SHOWN with ‘heir Genanoie are (I to r): Fr Kingsley Knowles, Fr Stephen Grant and Fr *.
Dots Hospi) Coors Boon Rudolph Cooper. a

“o
we

; g Please join us as our guest every third Georgina celebrates 100th i
eicRCER: | Thursday of the month for this | birthday At S pecial mass

scintillating series of the most relevant
week celebrated her 100th

Dr. Robin Roberts, Urologist health issues affecting society today.
“| \ Ei ) AW ES ATHTUR birthday with a special mid-day
mass at St Matthew’s Anglican
OVER YOUR Church.

With clear sight and a sound

OLD ONE i! _ memory, ‘Mama’ — as she is

mai 5 known to scores of grand- and

great-grandchildren — burst out

The Affordable Solution in shouts of praise thanking
to Worn-Out Bathtubs

God for her long and good life.
Having outlived all of her sib-
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the Pinder's Point, Grand
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tice cook in her younger days.
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She was employed at the 4
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which later became the Jack ,
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Open Monday - Friday, 9:00am - 5:00pm
By Appointment Saturday - 11:00am - a opin

Always attending in prayer
Telephone’ : ot

and worship, Mrs Forrest of f
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began her Christian formation
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now attends the Church of ,
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Friends and well-wishers {
saluted ‘Mama’ Forrest ina !
grand dinner after the mass ‘
with live music by the Royal ,,
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 15







L VRS eS


















Visit our newly
renovated store“
and discover
many gift ideas
including:
Books

Bibles
(US Retail price)

Gifts
Cards
Mugs

Music
And More!

Gueaie 9:30am - 6: Doin
Monday to Saturday





©

_—

OPEN Zam for eye biast 6
Monday - Saturday
Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
Telephone: 394-7040

www.logosbahamas.com 6
Visit our one Boek eres - over | rnillion titles!



Plies Reni hie, yep coda HM
19 fav guna eth Aoenangnae seen

Fen wancing, mutts anbccitin’s
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“Being informed about local news, sports,
entertainment and world events is importaat to
me. The Tribune is my choice for news and

information. The Tribune is my newspaper.”

JASON RAHMING
CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN

Purchase The Tribune from your
local store or street vendor.

The Tribune

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

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THE TRIBUNE



Â¥
THE TRIBUNE



A PARTNERSHIP FOR THE
FUTURE OF THE BAHAMAS.



APT A-\UAIS. From the renovations on Cable Beach
Resort to the development of Baha Mar, local culture
and the natural landscape are the inspiration. And
preservation of these resources remains paramount.
It is, after all, this beauty that makes visiting the
islands of the The Bahamas a dream for so many

around the world.

In just four short years, travellers from around the
world will be able to come explore and discover why
Bahamians are so proud to call these islands home.
And they'll be bringing with them a desire
for adventure and the steady source of tax
and tourism revenue which sustains and grows the

island economy.

THURSDAY, JUOE

We've developed a strong partnership with the
people of The Baharhas and have established a track
record of fairness and ethics. We hope to build on

this relationship as we move forward.

To ensure an exciting and bright future, and continue
the process of transforming Cable Beach, let us work
together to make it happen. |

BAHA MAR. GOOD FOR THE BAHAMAS.
EVEN BETTER FOR BAHAMIANS.




PAGE 18, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

INTERNATIONAL NEWS.

THE TRIBUNE



Britain’s highest court rules on case
of six Iraqis killed by British troops

i LONDON

THE House of Lords on
Wednesday rejected claims by



families of people killed in Iraq
that European human rights law
applied to the conduct of British
troops throughout the country,

according to Associated Press.
Such laws only applied to

people held in custody by

British troops, the House of

‘established 1929
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Lords affirmed, refusing to
extend that protection to those
injured or killed by British sol-
diers on the streets of Iraq.
The issue arose in the case of

can 1°

six Iraqis who were killed by
British troops in southern Iraq
in separate incidents in 2003.
The case was brought by the
families of the victims.

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The Lords upheld lower court
rulings that human rights pro-
tections applied in the case of
Baha Mousa, a Basra hotel
clerk who died after being beat-
en while in British custody.

Phil Shiner, a lawyer for
Mousa’s family, said the ruling
was “a massive breakthrough
in my clients’ efforts to secure
accountability for deaths and
torture in detention.”

However, the House of Lords
found no reason to apply
those protections to the other
cases.

“The evidence of senior
British officers indicates that,
on the ground, the available
British troops faced formidable
difficulties due to terrorist activ-
ity, the volatile situation and
the lack of any effective
Iraqi security forces,” Lord
Bingham wrote in the lead opin-
ion.

“In these circumstances ... I
would not consider that the
United Kingdom was in effec-
tive control of Basra and the
surrounding area for purposes
of jurisdiction under article 1 of
the Convention at the relevant
time,” Lord Bingham wrote.

“Leaving the other rights and
freedoms on one side, with all
its troops doing their best, the
United Kingdom did not even
have the kind of control of Bas-
ra and the surrounding area
which would have allowed it to
discharge the obligations” of
the human rights convention,
Lord Bingham wrote.

In 2005, the Court of Appeal
upheld a High Court ruling that
both the European Convention

on Human Rights and the.

Britain’s own Human Rights
Act applied in Mousa’s case,
but not in the others.

Mousa was arrested during a
raid at the Haitham Hotel in
Basra then fatally beaten by
British soldiers. In March, a
court martial convicted one sol-
dier of inhumane treatment but
acquitted five others charged in
the case.

The House of Lords is the
highest court of appeal for Eng-
land, Wales and Northern Ire-
land.



NASSAU - 322-9183=7 4 FREEPORT» 3522336 5) |
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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 19
ERNATIONAL NEWS

AFRICAN elephant babies Kariba, top, and Kando, bottom, play in the outdoor enclosure in Tierpark zoo in Berlin, Wedaes-
day, June 13, 2007. Kando, who was born on May 20, 2007, was united with his family for the first time.
(AP Photo/Franka Bruns)

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2008 Beijing
Olympic image
could he
tarnished by
charges of
child labour

B BEIJING

THE Olympic image
could be damaged by alle-
gations that children as
young as 12 are being
employed to make official-
ly licensed products for the
2008 Beijing Olympics,
according to ‘Associated —
Press.

That’s the message
Wednesday from Chen
Feng, deputy director of
marketing for the 2008 Bei-
jing Olympics, who has
summoned four manufac-
turers to Beijing to answer
charges of labor-law viola-
tions in the making of
Olympic goods.

A report released Sunday
entitled “No Medal for the
Olympics on Labor Rights”
alleges four factories in
southern China broke
national labor laws on child
labor, overtime pay and
minimum wages to make
souvenirs for the 2008
Olympics.

The four manufactures
acknowledge they have
Olympic contracts, but
deny charges in the report
by Brussels-based PlayFair
2008. The report also says
the Beijing organizers —
and the Lausanne-based
International Olympic
Committee — are doing
too little to guarantee ethi-
cal work conditions in the
making of official products
that carry the five-ring
Olympic logo.

Chen said he planned to
meet Wednesday with rep-
resentatives of the four
companies. Li Zhanjun,
director of the Beijing
Olympic media center, said
it would be several days
before any findings might
be released.

“We don’t want them
(makers of Olympic prod-
ucts) to damage the
Olympic image,” Chen
said. “We want them to
realize that their perfor-
mance in terms of corpo-
rate responsibility, environ-
mental protection and
quality control has a lot to
do with the image of the
Olympics, and the reputa-
tion of the Olympic
games.”

Chen said there was a
“huge gap between the
report and what the busi-
nesses told us. They have
told us they did not employ
child labor at all.”

Chen, repeating threats
made earlier by Jiang
Xiaoyu, executive vice
president of the Beijing
Olympic organizing com-
mittee, said contracts
would be terminated if vio-
lations were found.

“We will continue our
investigation until we find
the truth,” Chen said. “If
we find any problems, we
will severely punish those
violators.”

PlayFair’s report —
along with the actual
charges — has drawn atten-
tion to the vast wealth gap
in China. Beijing is spend-
ing at least $40 billion to
modernize the city for the
Olympics, a sharp contrast
to the legal minimum wage
in southern China of $90 a
month.

Chen also promised a
crackdown on the sale of
counterfeit Olympic mer-
chandise which, like fake
DVDs and knockoffs of
designer goods, is for sale
on many street corners in
Beijing.

“We really have taken
notice of the problem,”
Chen said. “Some cases
constitute criminal offenses
and we will take legal
action to tackle them.

“Those (counterfeit
Olympic) products are all
provided by unauthorized
businesses because we have
strict controls on the
authorized businesses. If
the authorized businesses
sells to an unauthorized
buyer, that would be a seri-
ous violation of the con-
tract and we would severe-
ly penalize them.”


ake INTERNATIONAL NEWS |

PAGE 22, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007


















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THE TRIBUNE



American convicted of running
private Afghan jail freed from
prison, leaves Afghanistan

@ KABUL, Afghanistan

AN AMERICAN inmpris-
oned in Afghanistan for run-
ning a private jail for terror sus-
pects has left the Afghan prison
where he was held for almost
three years and departed the
country, the warden said
Wednesday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Jack Idema, a former Green
Beret, was pardoned by Presi-
dent Hamid Karzai in late
March as part of a general
amnesty. Rahim Ahmadzai,
Idema’s Afghan lawyer, said the
American left the prison out-
side Kabul on June 2 and flew
out of Afghanistan. He did not
know Idema’s destination.

Shamir, the warden of
Policharki prison where Idema
was held, said Idema had want-
ed to stay in Afghanistan but
couldn’t for legal reasons.
Shamir, who like many Afghans

not believe he was immediately
heading to the United States.
“At some point, he’d like to
come back to the United
States,” Tiffany said. “He’s an
American. He loves his: coun-

- try.”

Idema was sentenced to 10
years in prison by a Kabul court
in September 2004 on charges
of entering Afghanistan illegal-
ly, making illegal arrests, estab-
lishing a private jail and tortur-
ing their captives.

Two other Americans were
also convicted. Brent Bennet
was sentenced to 10 years but
was released in September.
Freelance cameraman Edward
Caraballo was sentenced to
eight years; he was released in
April 2006.

Some of the Afghans Idema
imprisoned claimed they were
beaten and their heads held
under water. However, Idema
says he never mistreated pris-

14 WINNI ING ENTRIES WILL APPEAR IN BAHAMAS FIRST’S 25TH ANNIVERSARY 2008 CALENDAR
WINNING ERTMES WILL RECEIVE A GIFT CERTIFICATE VALUED AT $500 EACH



TRY DE/

= RULES::.

Bahamas First's 25th Anniversary Calendar Photo Contest is open to all

h

photographers and has the title “The Bahamas at Play”. Photographs may be of
any subject or scene that illustrates the theme. All photographs must be taken in

The Bahamas.



LINE IS JUNE



9, The winning photographs, along will all publication and
reproduction rights attached thereto become the property of
Bahamas First and the comes reserves the right to use such in

the future.

10. Employees of Bahamas First, its affiliated companies or family,





Kabul airport, said several
Afghan military and two U.S.
personnel accompanied Idema
to the plane.

Jwinda said he and Idema
fought against the Taliban
together in eastern Afghanistan
shortly after the U.S.-led inva-
sion in 2001. Idema had tears
in his eyes while saying good-
bye, Jwinda said.

“IT may be _ leaving
Afghanistan, but my heart will
stay in Afghanistan,” he quoted
Idema as saying.

Tiffany said Idema flew out
of the country from the main
USS. base at Bagram. It wasn’t
clear if the plane flew from
Kabul then to Bagram before
leaving the country.

“If this individual truly was
convicted and truly did all the
things they say he did, how
could he leave from Bagram
Air Force Base, a military air-
port?” Tiffany said. .















2. Deadline for entries is June 22, 2007

3. All entries are to be delivered to Bahamas First General Insurance's office, membescrenoteligible: =
#32 Collins Avenue, Nassau. N.P. between 9 am and 5 pm, weekdays only » f ene
Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest". Yak Business Horie

4. All entries must be accompanied by an official entry form available at Bahamas First PO. Box Street address
offices or when published in newspapers. Signature

5. Only colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images must be providedas = _pgte No. of photos entered (maximum of 5]
digital images on CD. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels orlarger). agree that in the event one or more of my photographs is selected as
Digital images showing any signs of photo manipulation, resolution enhancement or ~awinner in the 2008 Bahamas First 25th Anniversary Calendar Photo
compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images Contest it will become the property of Bahamas First General Insurance
should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high quality JPEG and in the original colour format the = Company and | assign to Bahamas First all rights pertaining to its use in
camera uses (LAB or RGB}. All entries must be supplied with prints which will be used in _ any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos entered in this
the judging process. The photographer's name and photo subject should be writien on Contest were t Jaken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not
the CD and on the reverse of the print. : been previously published.

6. Judging of entries will be based on creativity, imagery, composition, colour, originality
and quality of photograph. The photos selected will appear in Bahamas First's 25th Return with photos to:
Anniversary 2008 calendar. The decision of the judges will be final. 25th Anniversary Calendar Contest

7. All entries are submitted at the owner's risk. It is the company’s intention to return all Baharvics Fist

=a

=

i a a

eeesev a

goes by one name, said he trans- oners and the prosecution Idema, who served three
ported Idema and his dog, Nina, offered scant evidence at his’ years in U.S jail for fraud in the
to the Kabul airport for the | sometimes chaotic Kabul trial. _ 1980s, told the AP by cell phone
flight out. Idema, who has maintained from Policharki last month that
“He wanted to stay in _ that hisactivitiesin Afghanistan he had stayed in prison even
Afghanistan, but there was no _- were sanctioned by the U.S. after being freed because he
way for him to stay,” Shamir government, claims'to have risked arrest by Afghan intelli-
‘said. fought with the Northern’ gence agents. He said that
EXPRESS STORE FEED In an e-mail to The Associat- Alliance forces that toppled the departing would harm his
ViAcups canbe VIA cape are sturdy, VA cups are sale for warming and ed Press, Idema wrote, “Ican’t Taliban regime in late 2001.He chances of recovering docu-
attached to the AVENT stackable and easy feacing. Use the same faat as the and won’t tell anyone where I. was featured in a book about _ ments, tapes and computer files
i ISIS Breast Pump. to wrlta on. AVENT Feeding Botts. am and what I am doing.” the Afghan war called “Task that show his alleged relation-
i , Edward P. Birsner, the consul Force Dagger: The Hunt for bin ship with U.S. officials.
at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Laden.” AUS. federal judge in Aprit
| said in court documents filed in The U.S. military acknowl- said the United States had to
Washington this week that Ide- edges accepting prisoners from respond to a lawsuit by Idema
ma had left for “an unknown Idema in Afghanistan in 2004 alleging that the State Depart-.
a lait 6h etsiais Bisa AV E T destination.” and the separate NATO-led ment and FBI illegally kept him
| i heaghcra 0600 SAGA LIN 1800 edie Seager eae ae Ley tere il The documents were filed in force there helped him with imprisoned, directed his torture
wa a case in which Idema accused __ raids near Kabul. and destroyed evidence. Idema *
the FBI and State Department However, the military soon said he has audio recordings ;
of ordering his torture and denounced him as an imposter and documents to back up his. + |
manipulating the Afghan judi- and he was arrested only afew _ claims. ‘,
cial system. months after entering the coun- The U.S. Embassy in Kabul oe
Idema’s U.S. attorney, John _ try. responded by saying that since’ +
Tiffany, would not say where Abdul Wahab Jwinda, an Idema had been freed by *
Idema flew to but said he does Afghan army commander who Karzai, hisclaimsnolongerhad
said he saw Idema off at the merit. 4
@
f.

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Se ee we

entries in their original condition. However, Bahamas First will assume no liability for any
loss, damage or deterioration.

8. Agift certificate valued at $500 will be presented for each of the photographs selected.
More than one entry from a single photographer may be selected. Photographic credits
will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer is limited to a
maximum of five photos.

P.O. Box SS 6238
32 Collins Avenue
Nassau, N.P.

Entry deadline June 22, 2007

SL.

BAHAMAS First

FIRST IN INSURANCE, TODAY. TOMORROW,


‘THE TRIBUNE ' THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 2s ;
ae SSS SSS SSS tia es

Knut takes time es
out from being
main attraction

POLAR bear Knut and his
keeper Ronny Henkel play in
the water at the Zoo in Berlin
on Monday, June 11, 2007.
Knut who was bottle-fed after
his mother ignored him has
been the most viewed animal
at the Zoo of Berlin since his
first public appearance in
March.



—

(AP Photo/
Michael Sohn)



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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 25

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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



ee ; INTERNATIONAL NEWS










| Meel goes
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MOTHER Russian sea
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PAGE 28, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



US defence secretary to press NATO
for more trainers in Afghanistan

@ STUTTGART, Germany

DEFENCE Secretary
Robert Gates, still frustrat-
ed with NATO’s commit-
ment in Afghanistan, will
press allies in meetings this
week to provide significantly
moré trainers for the Afghan

Senior officials lay out Gates’ expectations

National Army and police,
according to Associated
Press.

Senior U-S. officials en





route to Germany with Gates
on Wednesday laid out the
secretary’s expectations for
the two-day meeting of

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NATO defence ministers
that will begin Thursday in
Brussels. In the nearly six
months since the NATO
leaders met and promised to
fill troop and equipment
needs for the Afghan war,
there have been only incre-
mental increases.

The U.S. officials said
Gates will “make a pitch” for
countries to send more train-
ers in an effort to get the
Afghan government better
able to control its own secu-
rity.

The officials, who request-
ed anonymity so they could
preview the secretary’s plans
for the session, said coalition
forces in Afghanistan still
need up to four battalions —
or as many as 3,000 combat
troops, along with about an
equal amount of trainers.
Gates has said he would like
some NATO and non-
NATO nations to contribute
some of the training forces.

In addition, NATO allies
are also trying to put togeth-
er training teams that can be
embedded with Afghan units.
And those also have been
slow to come together.

In February and again in
April, Gates exhorted
NATO allies to bolster their
troop commitments in
Afghanistan so the alliance
could launch its own offen-
sive against the Taliban, and

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pre-empt what has been an
annual spring increase in
insurgent attacks.

That offensive was
launched, with the aid of
additional U.S. troops. And,
during a visit to Afghanistan
early this month, Gates said
the NATO push was making
progress. But he also warned
that Iranian weapons —
which have been responsible
for widespread violence and
U.S. troop casualties in Iraq
— are now increasingly
showing up in Afghanistan.

For months, Gates has
expressed concern about pos-
sible reversals in
Afghanistan, which still lacks
a self-sustaining military and
suffers from the unmet
expectations of building
an effective central govern-
ment.

In particular, NATO offi-
cials said they have found
armor-piercing roadside
bombs — known as’ explo-
sively formed penetrators, or
EFPs — in Kabul.

The struggle to pressure
NATO countries to live up
to their commitments has
also prompted Gates to ques-
tion whether the alliance
should continue to mount a
25,000-troop response force.

The NATO response force
has been developed as quick
reaction troops who could
respond to emergencies in

the region. But Gates is ques-
tioning whether that is an
appropriate way to use the
hard-to-muster military
resources, considering that
the allies are having so much
trouble coming up with the
forces for an ongoing war.

The U.S. currently has
26,000 troops in Afghanistan,
including some 14,000 in the
NATO-led force.

Another issue likely to
come up during the meeting
is the ongoing controversy
over the U.S. proposal to site
missile defence radars and
interceptors in eastern
Europe.

Russian President Vladimir
Putin, in a recent meeting
with President Bush offered
up an alternative, that would
allow joint use of a radar sta-
tion in Azerbaijan.

Russia has strenuously
opposed U.S. plans to put the
missile defence systems in
Poland and the Czech
Republic.

Gates is expected to meet
with the Russian defence
minister.

And one senior defence
official said that while they
don’t believe the session will
provide a great deal of detail
on the Russian counterpro-
posal, “we would be
very receptive to any clarifi-
cation the Russians would
have.”

SALE ENDS

JUNE 16TH

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 29



FTMI Welcomes New Pastor

By: Janet Hanna

BISHOP SIS. LORNA WILSON
PHILEMON WILSON, J.P.

Faith Temple Ministries International (FTMI), a Church of God Church in the Bahamas is pleased to a

announce its newly appointed Senior Pastor, Bishop Philemon Rudolph Wilson, and his wife, Sis. Lorna

Wilson. -
Bishop Wilson is no stranger to Faith Temple, having grown up in the church. He joined Faith Temple
Church of God in 1969, and served in several areas of ministries as: Bus Driver, Sunday School Teacher,
Sunday School Superintendent, Member of the Christian Education Board, Member of World Missions
Board, Pastor’s Council, Youth Camp Director, organized the first Pioneer’s for Christ in the Bahamas and
his last and most noted post, Youth Minister. Pastor Wilson is also one of the founding members of Faith
Temple Christian Academy, formerly (Beth-Phil School). :

He and his wife returned home after 20 years as pastor of the Cathedral of Praise Church of God, located
in Mt. Pleasant Village in the western district of New Providence, and he comes back home with a wealth
of experience. |

Having a quest to learn more about God and the most effective ways to minister, he attended The Assembly
of God Bible College, Carmichael Bible College, and Templeton Theogicagical Seminary. As a result he
received several certificates, among them are: Bahamas Ministerial Seminar Certificate; Exhorters Licences
and Lay Evangelism Certificate. In 2003, he received his Doctor of Divinity Degree from Vision International
College and University in Remona, California

Bishop Wilson received his Minister’s licences in 1989 and was ordained as a Bishop in the Church of God
in 1990. He presently serves in the following capacities: District Overseer of Cat Island and San Salvador,
Member of the National Building Committee, Bahamas, Turks and Caicos; Member of the Church of God
National Ministerial Care and Development Board. He is a Marriage Officer and a Justice of the Peace in
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Bishop Wilson can be described as a pastor’s pastor, one who has
a shepherd’s heart, with a burning desire for souls.

He and his wife, both natives of Cat Island, were married in 1969 and they have four sons: Kevin, Darrin,
Michael and Prince. Sis. Wilson gave up a promising career in Nursing and supports her husband faithfully
in the ministry. |

On June 1, 2007, Bishop and Sis. Wilson said goodbye to the Cathedral of Praise congregation in the west
and made the journey back home to the east to pastor Faith Temple Ministries International, and with his
return comes a mission to restore, unite and rebuild.

During his first message back home, Bishop Wilson, told the congregation that his return to Faith Temple
has been nothing short of God’s divine plan. “I am indeed honoured to have been chosen to lead,” added
Bishop Wilson and he assured the members that:he will be there for them.

Faith Temple Ministries International now looks forward with great anticipation to: “A New Beginning, A
Fresh Start,” as it welcomes back home one of its own, a “Son of the Soil,” Bishop Philemon R. Wilson.
PAGE 30, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

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THE TRIBUNE



South African public sector

strike intensifies with protests

m@ JOHANNESBURG,
South Africa

TENS of thousands of public
sector workers marched
Wednesday to government
offices across the country, esca-
lating a 12-day-old strike and
bringing South Africa’s largest
cities to a standstill, according
to Associated Press.

The action staged by public
sector unions disrupted school-
ing, health care and transport
services. Municipal workers also
heeded the call to halt work ina
show of solidarity, and a number
of other unions took part in
lunchtime protests.

With a heavy police presence






LA CAS

The Art of Island Living



in all cities, the protests were
peaceful and there were no
reports of violence as workers
rallied for higher wages.

“We are not moving back not
one inch,” the Congress of South
African Trade Unions general
secretary Zwelinzima Vavi told
several thousand people at a ral-
ly outside the gates of parlia-
ment in Cape Town, the South
African Press Association
reported. “So the government
has a choice: Do they see a long
winter or do they want to set-
tle?”

About | million teachers,
nurses and other civil servants
have been on strike since June 1,
leaving hospitals struggling and
































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prompting the government to
call in soldiers and police to pro-
tect non-striking workers and
other civilians.

The public sector unions
rejected the government’s latest
offer Tuesday to boost salaries
by 7.25 percent, up from an orig-
inal offer of 6 percent. The
unions are demanding a 10 per-
cent increase, down from 12 per-
cent initially.

Medical workers have joined
the public sector strike, even
though as “essential workers,”
they are legally barred from
going on strike. The government
has said striking medical workers
would be fired, and dismissals
have been announced at some
hospitals.

Unions condemned the firings,
and patients have expressed sup-
port for the strikers at some hos-
pitals. But there also have been
reports of strikers intimidating
those who continued to work.

About 30 strikers were arrest-_
ed Monday, accused of intimi-
dating staff at a hospital in the
central city of Bloemfontein.
And on the first day of the
strike, police fired stun grenades
to disperse around 500 protest-
ers who were preventing doctors
from entering one of Cape
Town’s largest hospitals.

’ Police and prison staff unions
also have threatened to join the
strike in a show of solidarity.

Fewer commuter trains were
reported to be running Wednes-
day, while security was increased
at some hospitals. Many schools
were shut for the day.

The ruling African National
Congress called striking work-
ers to ensure there was calm and
“resist those elements that are
bent on acts of violence and
intimidation.”

On Tuesday, President Thabo
Mbeki voiced support for a
revised salary structure for pub-
lic sector workers while con-
demning the intimidation and
violence.

“All of us should ask our-
selves what kind of society we
are building and what moral
lessons we are imparting when
insults, violence against fellow
workers and damage to proper-
ty become the stock-in-trade
during protests of this kind,” he
said.






THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 31

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

olar wing retraction begins as
tronauts prepare for spacewalk

@ IN THIS
photo provided
by NASA,
space shuttle
Atlantis astro-
naut Jim Reilly
participates in
the mission's
first planned
session of
extravehicular
activity (EVA),
as construction
resumes on the
international
space station,
Monday June
11, 2007.

(AP Photo/
NASA)





mm HOUSTON

NASA began retracting an
old solar array on the interna-
tional space station Wednesday
to make way for a new array,
hoping to avoid the problems
that plagued removal of anoth-
er power-generating wing last
year, according to Associated
Press.

The old array’s 31 sections
were being folded up one at a
time. If necessary, spacewalk-
ing astronauts Patrick Forrester
and Steve Swanson would be
assigned to use custom tools to
push the sections into place.

The old array needs to be
folded up so a new set of solar
panels, delivered to the space
station by Atlantis this week,
can follow the sun to generate
enough power for 10 house-
holds. The new array unfolded
automatically on command
Tuesday like an accordion win-
dow blind.

Operated by remote control,
the first panel of the old array
was partially retracted before
Atlantis’ crew was awakened
Wednesday. NASA doesn’t
expect to finish the retraction
until possibly Thursday.

“In a very perfect world,
they’d get the entire solar array
retracted” on Wednesday, said
space station flight director Hol-
ly Ridings.

NASA had to struggle to fold
up a similar 115-foot solar array
during a shuttle mission last
December when guide wires got
stuck on grommets along the
way.

Forrester and Swanson
planned to spend most of their
spacewalk Wednesday — the
second one of Atlantis’ mission
to the space station — removing
locks and restraints on the sta-
tion’s newest section. That new
section, which contains the new
solar array, was installed dur-
ing the first spacewalk Monday.

NASA engineers were still
figuring out how best to repair a
-loose thermal protection blan-
ket on the shuttle.

NASA managers said Tues-
day they were leaning toward
having the astronauts repair the
blanket, which protects part of
the shuttle from the blazing heat
of re-entry, by sewing it using
stainless steel wire and an
instrument that resembles a
small needle.

‘No final decision had been
made on when the repair will
be made, or what repair tech-
nique will be used. Engineers
also have considered using wire
ties or adhesives to secure the 4-
by-6-inch damaged section,
which sits over an engine pod.
Various methods were being
subjected to heat and wind tun-
nel tests.

The shuttle astronauts’ 11-
day mission was extended by
two days to allow time to fix the
thermal blanket, which peeled
back during launch last week.
An investigation was under way
to determine how the blanket
was secured before launch.

Engineers don’t think the re-
entry heat could burn through
the graphite structure under the
blanket and jeopardize the
spacecraft during landing, but
it could cause enough damage
to require schedule-busting
repairs.

NASA has been cautious
about potential re-entry heat
damage since the Columbia dis-

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 33





THURSDAY EVENING JUNE 14, 2007

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probes the authenticity of a snufffilm. © 'R’(CC) —jvaders. 0 ‘R’ (Cc)
Se % %% LORD OF WAR (2005, Drama) Nicolas | * % THE KING (2005, Drama) Gael Garcia Bernal, William Hurt, Paul
SHOW age, Jared Leto. iTV. A relentless Interpol agent Dano. iTV. A young man tells a preacher that he is the man’s illegitimate
tracks an arms dealer. 1 'R’ (CC) son. 'R’

ee &% THE) %% 10TH AND WOLF (2006, Drama) James Marsden, Giovanni Ribisi, | * % EDMOND (2005, Drama)






sic) Dillon. A jobless buddy moves in with two newlyweds. 1 ‘PG-



HBO-W











TMC

Reba “A Moment |My Wife and — | According to arta to [Friends Phoebe |Everybody Everybody
KTLA _ [in Time’ 1 (CC) |Kids Michael is [Jim Jim shows {Jim Cheryl's se- |has a fear of fly- [Loves Raymond |Loves Raymond
dejected. (CC) off risque gift. jcret tape. (CC) ing. (CC) 1 (CC) 1M (CC) i





ONGEST YARD Brad Renfro. Premiere. A former Marine tangles with the mob. O'R’ — {William H. Ma oh Jeffrey Combs,
(2005) 0 (CC) Dulé Hill. 0 ‘R’ (CC)





Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put ay

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.



Bring your children to the
MctHappy tour at McDonald's in
Palmdale every Thursday

from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of June 9007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

?m lovin’ it

Gift Certificates
AGE 24, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007











SHE HASN'T
TOLD HER

SON? THAT'S Be
STRANGE! fa

B ACTUALLY, BESIDES
GROVES, I'M THE
ONLY ONE SHE TOLD!

I WONDER WHY
RACHEL DIDN'T

TELL US ABOUT
HER CANCER!









AND ALLISON
DON'T EVEN








| BACK AT 3-G, MARGOS HAPPINESS [5

IN ERIC MILLS, I'VE FINALLY
UONAMINISHED v0

FOUND A MAN WHO MAKES
ME FEEL LIKE A WOMAN./






SOMETIMES I WONDER WHAT IT'S

SO THAT'S WHAT
ALL ABOUT...GET UP...GO TO

IT'S ALL ABOUT!












North dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
©7642
VAK73
5
PAK 65
WEST EAST
a3 a5
¥98 ¥QIJ104
KQI10762 9843
1043 &QI92
SOUTH
AK QI1098
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SKILLS . Pious
The bidding:
North = East South West
1 & Pass 2% 3¢
4% Pass 4NT Pass
59% Pass 5 NT Pass
6% Pass 1%

Opening lead — king of diamonds.

Some plays in bridge seem almost
like feats of magic. Consider this
case where South got to seven
spades. The contract seems impossi-
ble to make when you first look. at
dummy. But doing the impossible is
something a competent player
always tries to do when the going
gets tough.

With only 12 tricks in sight and

Of, CANON. WANT PASSES FoR THE
TRUTH IN WAGHINGTON 16 JUST
AN UNDISCOVERED LIE.
RK FREE SOCIETN DEPENDS oN
AN INDEPENDENT NEINS
WEDIA BS AWATCH Doe /
WHAT ARE NOU 0 ARAIO of?
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East Gets Caught in a Vise

an apparently unavoidable heart
loser, declarer found a way to make
all 13 tricks — and, what’s more,
there was nothing the opponents
could do about it.

He saw that his only chance for
the contract was by a squeeze. Essen-
tially, this required East to have most
of the outstanding hearts and clubs.
Accordingly, declarer won the dia-
mond lead and cashed five trump
tricks, producing this position:

North ,
VAKT7
PAK 65
West
9
QJ
1043

East
8 ¥QI10
&QI92

beo<

South
298
Â¥652
87
When he next played another
trump, discarding dummy’s low
heart, East was squeezed. He could
not discard a heart because South
would then cash the A-K to establish
the six of hearts as a trick. So East
discarded a club. This didn’t help
either, because declarer cashed the
A-K of clubs and miffed a club to
establish dummy’s six as his 13th
trick.

eel =a



LOOK, MOM, IT PUT ALL MY
CLOTHES FOR TOMORROW
ON THE STAIRS.








THE TRIBUNE



THEN \N THE MORNING,
LLL RUN OUT IN MY
UNDERNEAR AND SLIDE
DOWN AT TOP SPEED!


















a °@ O23 & & TOs



> ae ee bye er ee

v
&





THURSDAY,
JUNE 14

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20 *
It’s time to finally make a decigion
on that proposal, Aries. These stall
tactics are doing nothing but hurting
your reputation. Make a choige,
regardless of the consequences. “x

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21*
Dream big, Taurus, because if. you
put your mind to it, you can certainly
accomplish anything. There will -be
doubters, but you will prove them
wrong in your endeavors. ;

GEMINE- May 22/Jun 21,':
You can’t always be in control,
Gemini, so relinquish the reigns
to. someone dear to you, whom
you trust. Giving up a little power
will teach you humility:

oo & Ga “s
a a Ne ta “0%. ce

*:
.%.

%

.| CANCER — Jun 22/Jul 22 °..

You’re losing touch with someone
who was close to you, Cancer. It hurts
that the friendship is fading. Do your
part to rekindle this relationship — the
extra effort is worth it. ‘
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Hold your temper, Leo, even when
someone purposefully pushes your
buttons. Anger and harsh words will

not remedy the situation, so be “the +- +

digger person in all of this.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22.
You wili feel the need to help ’out

someone at work this week, Virgo. °-
Resist the temptation to do,‘so

because it may put your job in jedp-











| Ff : ardy if you interfere.
@ i The LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
ens Lira Take a moment to plot out your
os words in immediate future, Libra. Considering
the main vo you haven’t been as happy as you’d
Y | pri s F 3 Bae like to be with your career path,,— -
Ped SSS Vi NIA “_e yan oe make a change now. Pt
Ue A <4 US 21st he
1) wa Century s a8 A ae E SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
oe : Dictionary S g BS fi go There will never be the perfect time
MAYBE THE (1999 Fogg” g < to make a drastic career change, so
FISH CAN edition). g g a Roeag stop complaining about your current
HOW many words of four letters Bos La Bae B situation, and do something about it.
nor can ae mate von the ¢ ae % @ § af g Just realize the pluses and minuses.
eon. Heth atten Miy Henise, SeGecckms SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Det.21-
Gres only, Bach eiustcontain ine & age AA? You’ve recently made it through a
centre letter and there must be F § E aa gg 8 rough patch, Sagittarius, and have:
at least one nine-letter word. wsss g rok g come through no worse for the
Sh wear. File this experience away and

www. kingfeatures.com

"CRYPTIC PUZZLE

move on to more positive things.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jamt:20
A person’s good humor can only; be
pushed so far. Think before you speak
when confronted with the individual
you’ve been teasing, Capricom; It

Good 13; very good 19; excellent
25 (or more). Solution tomorrow.







nm

i









































: pee | pe Risers
ACROSS DU
i ibly pi i a AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb‘18
1 Where everybody was terribly sad 1 Possibly piped to the end of the line P| ee eaioe | ic | VV ra re Havnie been parca eeu
about a murder (6) from somewhere in France (6) 5 7 “5 2 | into your own hands, Aquarius ' you
) Smaaarapenmay | 2 Omerammecene | PEEL TT PM) Te] ie ul Sosa
underground (4,4) foreign place (6) 14 EG 16 ; | condiment | red than in the black. Consult with
8 — City with some vagrancy (4) 3 Read something diagnostic? (4) || ie Seal an expert to tun things around.
ce . less than one’s 4 Optical overture (4,3 : 17 poe 19 20 | | substance used PISCES -— Feb 19/Mar20 i
10 Hold tightly to nothing less ptica’ of e (4,3) ; za f ay Ewan A special-iieoject at work renferce
own idea (6) 5 Abetter judge? (5) 24 ae | complement creativity and imagination —two
11 They can increase people's toxic 6 —_Letalearner have alittle leisure! (5) | food traits that you have in abundaiice.
content (6) 8 — Awanted contribution to the pot (4) 13g ae ae feed Show off and enjoy the rewards.
14 It’s less than the total you 9 Almost torn up as simply rubbish (3) Fi Oe ‘
stent eC ee ,
ad up) io eeeerareney7) | CHESS by Leonard Barden
pee, eee em ae
17 Garden once at No. 10 (4) 15 Allthe same, it’s not sparkling (5) a im
19 Remains in support of a good 18 Ishe not all wicked? (5) : fe || 3 rae 3 D || Magnus Carlsen v Vasily '
figure (5) 19 Inuse, always tastes salty (3) leh ai eles. n=) ; et Ivanchuk, aaah ee er
i i ia 3 Norway's Carlsen, 16 years old, ’
id : '
21 Running through Paris sounds 20 Soldier, perhaps, or robber of food 5 is widely upped aca future i
sane enough (5) from a peasant (3) | = world champion, and the |
22 Gave one’s playmates 21 How Vic Rees rejoined the assessment will become ' '
a hand (5) navy, say (7) stronger after Monaco, a ‘
ittle light i inthe ti i ACROSS DOWN £150,000 event financed by the 9
23 Aliittle light is good, though 22 It flows in the tide, eae (3) 1 Emphasise (6) 1 Angry looks (6) coenniter silicnaite loop v aa i"
not strong (4) 23 Be sorry for an endlessly grim 7 imediol (8) 2 Delighted (6) Gacercuwevnesidestherand if
26 Anoften moving musician (5) woman (6) af a les 3 ut e ac hained the event ater his i
28 Person in favour of 24 They're drawn in substantial wu 11 Shopping street (6) : ae aes 6) daughter. The tournament has a Thea i
remuneration (3) amounts (4) x 14 Allow (3) 6 Charred rather ey ee Hed bal oe ie ce eT i,
eee ns Sacre net rege 5 7 Sleigh () 8 i oy errand dies with half an teenager's best finish. He d
: nnoy : i o pawns, but the d7 ‘
long (6) end (6) a. 19 Man's name (5) 9 Animal doctor (3) hour each for the complete ae hie black-atni :
30 If expecting a tip, will he be 26 Song of the waving palms (5) 21 Claw (5) 12 Dog (3) game. Carlsen’s blindfold vision P : f -
2 22 Warehouse (5) roved lacking and he finished and cuts off Ivanchuk’s queen from :
patient? (6) 27 Inextremes of penury, she has a ” 23 Centre (4) 13 Postpone (5) cae he Satta in this section, king defence. It took just two :
31 Among the cheapest menagerie simple breakfast (5) =< 26 Material (5) 15 Punctuation mark (5) but in the more important rapi d moves for Carlsen to force - !
exhibits? (4) 28 The mushy food dad's soft on? (3) Es Bo i ae (3) 18 Neighbouring (5) Gaines he realiy imprested: resignation. sie a Wits ; r
32 They're left to the survivors (8) 30 White-headed snake that stings te bene i: 19 ss . ai sharing second prize with oe cee and why !
33 One's promise to uncle? (6) rather than bites (4) Sak Mt i 20 Oblaine reigning world champion Vlad , Di
ene) 21 Anxiely (7) Kramnik. Today's puzzle was the LEONARD BARDEN!
1 eee ee i 22. Immerse (3)
: jozen
4 Yesterday's cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions 23 cies of red (6) .
ACROSS:1, AM-bit 6, Suppe(-r) 9, Cushion 10, Div.-an 11, | ACROSS: 1, Crash 6, Stack 9, Coarser 10, Scare 11, 24 Kiln (4) ESE ESE, ’
LI-bya 12, S-no-ot 13, Petunia 15, Sat. 17, Onus 18, Round 12, Habit 13, Dropout 15, Alp 17, Idle 18, Butter 25 Whole (6) ‘
Pop-eye 19, Alain 20, Cr.-I-spy 22, B-ass 24, Has 25, 19, Hairs 20, Cretan 22, Safe 24, Her 25, Devised 26, 26 Oozes (5) fi
Silence 26, Might 27, Tonic 28, Rural 29, Sorties 30, Fired 27, Kebab 28, Speak 29, Dutiful 30, Beret 31, 27 List (5) Chess solution 8384: 1 Rxh5! gxh5 2 Of5 Resigns. ;
Fa-U-st 31, D-E-fer Never 28 Boy (3) The threat is 3 Qx{7 mate. If2...Bxh6 3 Bxh6+ Ke7 (Kg8 :
DOWN: 2, M-aid-en 3, Icarus 4, Tun 5, China 6, Solo-Mon. | DOWN: 2, Record 3, Scrape 4, Hoe 5, Great 6, Serious 7, 30 Terse (4) 4.0g5+ mates) 4 Rel* Kd6 5 Bf4+ wins the queen. :




7, Unit 8, Payday 12, Silly 13, P-or-ch 14, Tun-ls. 15,
Sedan 16, Terse 18, Pi-pi-t 19, A-pric-O-T 21, Ramona 22,
Be-mus-e 23, Scrape 25, S-hot-S 26, Miss. 28, Red



Trot 8, Candle 12, Human 13, Ditch 14, Older 15, Atlas 16, |
Pried 18, Breed 19, Halibut 21, Revere 22, Simple 23,
Female 25, Denim 26, Fade 28, Sun





aan a me SSF,





we
THE TRIBUNE : THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 35



. INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Tiger fights
the heat

ZOO staff spray water on a tiger
to cool him off and beat the heat
caused by the recent heat wave in
Lahore, Pakistan, Wednesday, June
13, 2007. According to local media
dozens of people lost their lives and
hundreds have been hospitalized
with heat stroke and gastroenteri-
tis.

Tel: 242.352.3616
| Or
Email — www.hntpointe.com

eee











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business@tribunemedia.net

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

SECTION



The Tribune

BUSI

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street









Money Safe.
Money Fast.

INTERNATIONAL

Online at
BankBahamasOniine.com



Bahamian retailer Robin Hood
in ‘multi-million’ expansion

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ROBIN Hood, the: well-
known Bahamian retailer, has
begun work on a major expan-
sion that will increase its retail
selling space from 16,000 square
feet to “a little less than 90,000
square feet” when completed
by November 2007. The com-
pany is spending “many millions
of dollars” to emulate the shop-
ping experience Bahamians
enjoy in major US stores.

Sandy Schaefer, Robin
Hood’s president, yesterday
said the retailer would trans-
form itself into a one-stop shop-
ping destination experience for
Bahamians, much like Wal-
Mart, Target and other major
retailers have done in the US,
and build on the reputation it
has established for providing

consumers in this nation with.

quality products that are com-
petitively priced.

- Work has already begun on
the first phase of Robin Hood’s
expansion in the Summerwinds

¢ Retailer to expand from 16,000 sq ft to 90,000 sq ft of in-store selling space by

November, emulating Wal- Mart model

¢ Company’s sales up 30% year-to-date, with profits ahead by ' me 20s’, as shrinkage
well below national average
¢ Prices to be kept competitive, as Robin Hood aims to create destination shopene
experience that Bahamians encounter in US and encourage more to shop at home



Plaza, located off the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway,
which will expand the retailer’s
existing retail space from 16,000
square feet to 28,000 square feet
by early August 2007 - in time
for the Back-to-School shop-
ping season.

Mr Schaefer explained that
this would be done by moving
the warehouse from its existing
location in the plaza into where
the retail store currently is, and
reducing the former in size by
50 per cent through having

more inventory and goods on
the shop floor.

When the full expansion is
completed by November, the
Robin Hood president said the
store would have 104,000 square
feet of space that was covered,
due to the presence of genera-
tors and bikes outside. Of that
amount, 90,000 square feet will
be inside in the store.

“It will qualify us as the
largest store, not only in the
Bahamas, but the Caribbean
from studies we’ve done,” Mr

Schaefer told The Tribune.
“The whole idea is to make this
a significant destination where
people satisfy their desires.
We’re going to make an exciting
shopping experience without
increasing prices. This will be a
shopping experience like you
get in the supermarkets in the
US.

“We’ve built up this critical
mass and momentum which has
offered us the opportunity to
build this building.

He added: “We’ve gota

great track record. Our sales
are up 30 per cent for this year
to date, and our profits are up
in the mid-20s [percentage
wise]. Those are great num-
bers: We’ve done extremely
well.

“Our shrinkage rate and
defection rate [inventory that
is accidentally dropped and bro-
ken] is less than 1 per cent. The
national average on shrinkage is
between 4 per cent to 8 per
cent.”

Ms Schaefer added that all

necessary government permits
and approvals for the expan-
sion had been received. Robin
Hood will lease the new prop-
erty from its current Summer-
winds Plaza landlord, ex-Blue
Hills MP and PLP Cabinet min-
ister, Leslie Miller.

The foundations for the new
retail space in the existing ware-
house are currently being
poured, involving 10,000 square
feet of concrete.

SEE page 6B

New $250-$350m
airport design set for
September unveiling

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE proposed design for the
new $250-$350 million terminal
buildings at Lynden Pindling
International Airport will be
presented to the Government
for approval this September, it
was revealed yesterday, with
completion of construction
work on the project to revitalise
the Bahamas main gateway due
in 2012. |

Craig Richmond, president
and chief executive of the Nas-
sau Airport Development Com-
pany (NAD), told the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce’s annu-
al general meeting (AGM) that
transforming the airport.into a
“world class experience” for
Bahamians and tourists was
likely to take five years.

Presenting the latest design
for the Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport, Mr Richmond
indicated that of the current ter-
minals and buildings, only the
existing US departure terminal
is likely to be retained when the

sebeaeeneeesecencenenceeasecseessecenaceaesenaeecessenseasecnanaree

revamped airport is completed.

He added that a new US ter-
minal building, dealing with US
departures, would be con-
structed to the right of the exist-
ing building (when viewed from
the road).

“We expect that three years
from now, in 2010, the US ter-
minal building will be finished,”
Mr Richmond said. He indicat-
ed that the existing US depar-
tures building would be
retained, upgraded and likely
used for international arrivals,
while the current domestic and
international arrivals and depar-
tures terminals would be totally
demolished and replaced with
a new facility.

“We estimate that the new

_terminal is going to cost

between $250-$350 million,” Mr
Richmond told the Chamber’s
AGM. “This design is still in
flux. This is design number 10.
We’re consulting with our
stakeholders in two weeks
again.”

SEE page 12B

Private sector 1s
urged to watch
carbon emissions

ml By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Bahamian business
community must take a closer
look at the effect carbon emis-
sions have on the costs of doing
business in this country, the out-
going Chamber of Commerce
president said yesterday, while
the Government needs to
encourage the use of alternate
fuel sources and conservation
measures.

Tanya Wright, who is also
director of the Caribbean Asso-
ciation of Industry and Com-
merce (CAIC) recently attend-
ed a Caribbean Council on Cli-
mate Change and_ the
Caribbean economy.

She told The Tribune that the
conference was very timely, par-
ticularly given the Bahamas’
recent signing of the Declara-
tion of Panama, which indicates
a commitment to looking at var-
ious sources of energy and the
development of a sustainable
energy policy.

This, Mrs Wright said, came

in the face of recogriisied cli-
mate change threats due to the
level of greenhouse gas emis-
sions.

She said she wanted to see
the Bahamas’ largest green-
house gas emitters - the hospi-
tality and aviation industries,
in particular, join together to
find ways to reduce the
Bahamas’ carbon footprint -
the trail of carbon emissions
left by use and deployment of
various forms of energy - that

can then be applied across

industry.

For instance, Mrs Wright said
that in the area of food and bev-
erage there should be an exam-
ination of the way that foods
are preparedto determine if
there are more energy-efficient
methods.

She added that adaptive mea-
sures in the food and beverage
industry, for energy efficiency
and management, in some cases
had reduced costs by some 30-
40 per cent.

SEE page 9B

!. BL ZHIVARGO Laing



@ By NEIL HARTNELL

any pressure at all” to reform
its taxation system and switch
from customs duties to a sales
or value added tax (VAT),

finance told The Tribune,
despite the likely pressures
this nation and its tax system
will face if it and CARICOM
are forced to negotiate a Free
Trade Agreement (FTA) with
the US.

Zhivargo Laing reiterated
the position stated by his pre-
decessor in the PLP adminis-
tration, James Smith, namely

aaa een I¢
ao the Bank of The Bahamas —
ah

Megs RS et ee

Pr ee cen urge)
oma dence’ f Joncvar hasta se ti

pn



Tribune Business Editor

The Bahamas is “not under

the minister of state for

Bahamas ‘under no trade
pressure’ for tax reforms

Government will not do
anything ‘injurious to our
economic and fiscal stability’



that if the Bahamas was forced
to reform its taxation system -
because customs and import
duties were considered a
restrictive tariff barrier to trade
- it would be given a lengthy
time period in which to phase
the changes in.

He queried whether it was
“a fair assumption” to make

and



that ifthe Bahamas was forced
to enter into a trade agreeme ut
with the US, as a replacement
for the Caribbean Basin Ini-
tiative (CBI), it would auto-
matically be required to do
away with its customs duties-
reliant tax structure.

SEE page 4B

you were

going to give
him a tie?!

| givedad
B coolcit



give him a
Bank of The Bahamas
Prepaid Visa® Card
or Visa® Gift Card!
You give the card. He gets stuff
he actually wants. Cool!




PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





on all new
annunhies
during the
month of June!









ee a as ak
rinancial














Bank unveils $8.5m

in net income to
- March 31, 2007

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national yesterday unveiled $8.5
million in net income for the
nine months to March 31, 2007,
but shareholders seemingly
shrugged off the costs of invest-
ing in new operating systems
with the bank’s share price up
25.5 per cent since July 2006.

The bank’s stock is inching
closer towards the $10 mark,
standing at $9.40 yesterday, a
rise over the $7.49 per share the
price stood at in July 2006.

“The unprecedented
growth of Bank of the
Bahamas share price’ of
$9.40, as listed on BISX at the
end of the third fiscal quar-
ter, reaffirms the public’s con-
fidence in the bank’s policies,
business strategy and initia-
tives,” said Paul McWeeney,
Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national’s managing director,
in a statement.

“The growth in share value
is more significant when con-
sidered against the economic
backdrop of the period, as a
tightening of liquidity presented
challenges, limiting all banks
from maximising potential
growth by restricting lending to
ensure sufficient reserves.”

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national’s assets rose by 14.1
per cent to just under $600 mil-
lion at the end of the fiscal 2007
third quarter, with shareholder
equity up 30 per cent over the
same period last year at $94.8
million. This was more than
double the $44.3 million in
shareholder equity in 2005.

“While we can directly mea-
sure the non-recurring realign-
ment costs associated with the
implementation of new systems
in real dollars, assessing the cost
of human capital is much more
challenging,” said Mr
McWeeney, referring to a year-
long re-training exercise.

“The absence of full staff



@ PAUL McWEENEY

presence would be expected to
be reflected in performance.
But we firmly believe that the
investment we are making now
will have long-term, wide-rang-
ing benefits that will propel us



me aii-e

TT FirstCaribbean

“My. definition of success is simply not having to worry about the future wand with FirstCaribbean,
I can say that | have been very successful.”

Speak to our experts about our Chequing & Savings Accounts, Fixed Deposits, SureStart and our

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Success... Solved.

INTERNET & TELEPHONE BANKING e INSURANCE © ABMs © DEBIT CARDS ¢ CREDIT CARDS

as we reach broader and broad-
er markets and meet increas-
ingly sophisticated financial
management demands.”

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE, TOGETHER,


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 3B



Fidelity launches

MoneyCentre plan |

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

FIDELITY Bank (Bahamas)
yesterday launched unveiled its
MoneyCentre division, which
will house all its Western Union
outlets in the Bahamas, Cay-
man Islands and the Turks and
Cacios.

MoneyCentre’s aim is to pro-
vide convenience and value to
clients who need swift, safe and
reliable money transfers, pre-
paid Visa cards and phone cards
and other financial products.

Fidelity will remain the oper-
ator of Western Union in the
Bahamas, with the MoneyCen-
tres being an expanded facility
from which to wire funds.

At a press conference to
launch the new service, Peter
Smith, Fidelity’s vice-president
of money transfer services, said
the bank hoped to cater to its
clients by providing more West-
ern Union agent locations,
longer opening hours and the
addition of everyday financial
products and service.



“TI feel that the MoneyCentre
concept is timely and fills a
void in the market place. Peo-
ple want and need these prod-
ucts, and they’ll appreciate
them all being in one place,”

she added.



Victoria Albury, Abaco manager

vices with responsibility for the
Bahamas, said the partnership
with City Markets ensures their
clients can send and receive
funds outside of traditional
banking hours, as the foodstore
locations operate from 7am to
9pm.

MoneyCentre is already open
in Nassau in the Fidelity Finan-
cial Centre in the Madeira
Shopping Centre in Palmdalem
and in downtown Frederick

Street.

On June 18, MoneyCentre
will open in the Marsh Harbour
Shopping Centre, Abaco. Vic-
toria Albury, the new Abaco
manager, said the island was
more than ready.

“I feel that the MoneyCen-
tre concept is timely and fills a
void in the market place. People
want and need these products,
and they’ll appreciate them all
being in one place,” she added.

PONT TE LH

| VEHICLES MUST SEL?

SALE SATURDAY 16TH JUNE
1 DAY SALE

8 AM- 4PM
CARS, VANS AND TRUCKS

PRICES A:

&
Ca Re ee ceceecc ccc





Mr Smith explained that
Fidelity’s wire transfer cus-
tomers had different needs to
those demanding traditional
retail banking services.

Malvern Bain, Fidelity’s vice-
president of compliance, added
that the facility creates an envi-
ronment for money transfers
while allowing clients to benefit
from the availability of other.
banking services. ,

Mr Smith added that to open
the MoneyCentres, Fidelity will
hire eight persons, and is likely
to increase,that number as
demand grows.

He said the plans to house
additional Western Union facil-
ities in City Markets stores
throughout New Providence are
expected to come on stream in a
matter of days. '

“Coupled with advanced dis-
cussions with other wel- posi-
tioned retail outlets, we intend
to triple the number of Money-

: Centre and Western Union out-

: lets in 12 months,” he said.

, Spencer Dean, Fidelity’s
manager of money transfer ser-

- Small Retail Store specializing in
girls accessories is seeking a dynamic,
energetic, and highly motivated



assistant store manager with prior retail
managerial experience to handle all —
aspects of store operations.
Please send resumes by e-mail to
bahamas.com@gmail.com

Shell Action, Opposite the Old Shirley St. Theatre
Next Door To Sun T

Tel: 393-2000
Fax: 393-6836







Phone: 394-1019





CARIBBEAN CROSSINGS LTD.

NOTICE OF REDEMPTION
SSW NEM ie Va =e

The Company wouid like to inform all holders of Caribbean

_ Crossings Ltd. 8% Series.A Preference Shares that the
scheduled Second Redemption Installment payment will be
made on July 1, 2007 to all shareholders of record June 15,
2007. This payment is being made in accordance with the
terms and conditions attached to the Series A preference
shares which are as follows:

“.the Company will make five (5) annual redemption
installment payments of $2.00 per share commencing
July 1, 2006 and on each July 1 thereafter through and
Including July 1, 2010. The Series A Preferred Shares
will be redeemed for cash through such annual $2.00
July 1 payments, plus any dividends accumulated but
unpaid to the redemption date.” .

Caribbean Crossings is an_ International wholesale
Internet and Data company that operates a fully redundant
submarine fiber optic network linking the four islands of New
Providence, Eleuthera, Abaco and Grand Bahama with
the continental United States on two diverse fiber landing
points in South Florida. Caribbean reported total revenues
of $12.4 million in 2006 and net income of $5.9 million.
_ Caribbean Crossings is a wholly owned subsidiary of Cable
Bahamas Ltd. Cable Bahamas is telecommunications
broadband provider and offers digital television services,
broadband Internet and circuit services throughout the
Bahamas. For the year ended December 31, 2006 Cable Classes End: August 3, 2007
Bahamas reported total revenues of $65.9 million, EBITDA |
of $32.8 million and a net income of $18.1 million. Cable Registration: Bahamian $50.00
Bahamas provides services on 17 islands in the Bahamas International $150.00

with over 360 full time and contracted employees. To a eee
ym) information contact the | BT
ETE ete 902-6300

The Tech Prep Program is a series of courses designed to help
students develop their academic skills in the areas of Math
and English, before proceeding with their regular curricula
courses in the fall.

Classes Begin: June 25, 2007

find out more information about Caribbean Crossings
and Cable Bahamas visit the respective web sites at:
caribbeancrossing.com and cablebahamas.com


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas ‘under no trade pressure’ for |
says finance minister Laing:

tax reforms,

SWIM CLUB OF NASSAU, BAHAMAS

SUMMER “LEARN TO SWIM" CLASSES
June 25" to July 20" 2007

SPACES ARE STILL AVAILABLE SO
REGISTRATION WILL BE CONTINUING AT
THE QUEEN’S COLLEGE POOL ON
MONDAYS TO THURSDAYS 3:15 P.M. TO 5:15 P.M.
AND SATURDAYS 9:00 A.M. TO 12:00 NOON

Registration forms available on the website:
www. barracudaswimming.org



Vil laggio —

COCKTAIL & WINE BAR



HAS VACANCIES FOR COOKS &
DISHWASHERS ALL LEVELS
MUST BE ABLE TO PROVIDE

REFERENCES, HEALTH CERTS

IMMEDIATE START



WE PROVIDE THE RIGHT PAY FOR THE
RIGHT WORK ETHIC, INTERESTED PARTIES
CONTACT:

PHONE: 327 0965 (10-2 MON-FRI)
FAX: 327 0966,

EMAIL:
INFO@VILLAGGIORESTAURANT.COM.

ATT: GENERAL MANAGER.

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Isiand (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of the Royal
Island Resort and Residential Project, just off North Eleuthera
wish to fill the following position:

Experienced Boat Captain

Successful candidate will be a member of a small team and
will be required to skipper and maintain the company’s fleet of
10 boats (up to +4ft) and will also be required to take part in
the following guest water sports activities:

* Snorkeling

* Diving

* Flats and Deep Sea fishing
¢ Jet ski tours

* Sailing and Windsurfing

The suceessful candidate will be required to reside at Eleuthera.
Qualifications and Experience:

¢A minimum of 10 years experience.

¢ Hold a B class license or better.

* Be familiar with the local waters and the area around Royal
Island,

« Must have strong organizational skills in the areas of boat
maintenance and operations.

¢ Resort/Fishing’ expericnee preferred.

¢ Medical/Lifesaving/Boat and passenger safety training desirable.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover letter
to:

Harcourt Management Services Ltd.
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their
interest. however only those candidates under consideration
will be contacted.



FROM page one

“Even if it sought to do so,
as a general rule these things
tend to have certain implemen-

tation schedules,” Mr Laing
said. “The tendency, in the case
of a developing country like
ours, is to have a five, 10, 15-
year time period” in which





















GIYBYOUR CHILD THE



MAKING ceeafiy AND LEARNING AN EXPERIENCE
OF A LIFE- TIME




SEVEN FULL WEEKS OF: MUSIC, DANCE, pratia, ARTS &
CRAFT, SWIMMING, AND SPORTS.




NEVER HAS SO MUCH BEEN OFFERED FOR SO
; AGES 3 - 16 YEARS OLD
DATE: JUNE 25TH - AUGUST 10T




scoot ALL MUSICAL INSTRUMEN







326.8031/325%

MUSIC GIVES WINGS TO THE MIND.....FLIGHT 16 THE IMAGIINATION



YOUTH DIRECTOR
JOB DESCRIPTION
GRANTS TOWN WESLEY METHODIST
CHURCH

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church is
seeking a part-time Youth Worker to work |
with its Children, Youth and young adults.
This person must:

Be a mature Christian with a personal

Have experienced a Call for working with
Youth; and
Desire to see them develop as Christians.

Duties:

Oversee and co-ordinate exciting Christian
and age appropriate Youth programmes
Recruit and train volunteers for Youth work
Design and implement community outreach
programmes for Youth

’ Coordinate Youth activities and events

This applicant should have at least an
Associate’s Degree in a relevant discipline and
a minimum of two years experience in Youtn
Ministry.

Work hours 15-20 hours per week
Interested persons may send a resumé to fax no

356-0854 or to E-mail: gtwesley@coralwave.com
by 16 June, 2007. , ’



Camperdown Riding aay

Oy PME
LE

Tn~ ey

™“ —
Vas

SUMMER CAMP!!

Weekly camps running June 25th - August 24th
Yam - Spm, Mon - Fri
Cost: $180.00/Wee

Ages: ©4

Please contact Judy Pinder at 224-2065 between
the hours of Bam - tlam & 2pm - mia to resery
your spot. The camp only has 20 spots per week
and it is ona first come, firat serve basis
DD

a deposit of $50.00 non-re
Spot.



There is
fundable to reserve a

Activities:

* Learn to ride English style.
¢ Swim with the horses.

* Grooming & tacking up.

* Basic care of horses.

¢ and lots more

changes and reforms are made,
to ensure countries do not suffer
any adverse economic shocks.

“We cannot rush out there to
make reforms to our tax system
that could be injurious to our
economic and fiscal stability,”
Mr Laing said. “I don’t think
we’re under any pressure at all
to make these reforms.”

The minister said the FNM
government felt the existing
Bahamian tax structure ade-
quately met the Government’s
revenue-raising needs, and
would do so for “the foresee-
able future”.

“There is nothing to suggest
an urgency” for reform, he
added, and “regardless of what
is happening in the internation-
al community” the Bahamas
had to decide what was in its
best interests and act accord-
ingly, rather than under inter-
national pressure.

With regard to the accession
process for the Bahamas’ full
membership in the World
Trade Organisation (WTO), Mr

Laing said that while tariff rates -

globally had been reduced to
20-25 per cent among its mem-
bers, the needs of developing
nations such as this were being
increasingly taken into consid-
eration.

“I think that there is greater
recognition now that developing
countries have particular needs,
and any participation in trade
agreements should have a
development focus,” Mr Laing
said.

Customs duties are project-
ed to account for 41 per cent of
a total $1.49 billion in recurrent

revenues for fiscal 2007-2008,

generating some $605.769 mil-
lion. A further $199.751 million

was projected to be raised from
stamp tax onimports. —

With 90 per cent of imports’
to the Bahamas coming from
the US, based on 2007-2008
projections, the Bahamas could’
lose almost $725 million in rev-,
enue if was forced to sign up to
a reciprocal free trade agree-
ment with the US as a replace-
ment for the Caribbean Basin,
Initiative (CBI).

The CBI is contrary to wT0
rules, because it provides a one-,
way programme of trade bene-
fits and preferences to the
Bahamas and CARICOM
countries that other nations do'
not have access to. The US is,
still trying to get a WTO waiver
for the CBI until 2008, in the
face of opposition from WTO
members such as Paraguay.

Some $100 million of
Bahamian exports, especially
seafoods, benefit from the CBI,
and to maintain duty-free access °
to the US, the Bahamas is like-
ly at some point to have to enter
a reciprocal agreement with the
US that will provide their
exports with similar benefits -
customs duty free access to the ~
Bahamas.

An August 2006 paper on the
full fiscal impact of trade liber-
alisation on the Bahamas, which
was prepared for the CARI-
COM Secretariat but has never
been released publicly by the
Bahamian government, calcu-
lated that a value-Added. tax
(VAT) levied at a rate of
between 13-14 per cent would
be needed for the Government
to recoup all the import duties it
would lose if forced to scrap the
current Bahamian: taxation sys-
tem as a result of agreeing to
full trade liberalisation.

The Public Hospitals Authority
Bahamas National Drug Agency
PUBLIC NOTICE
Tender for the Supply of Drugs
and Related Items

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and
Related Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and

Bahamas.

The

Supplementary Tender,

| the Ministry of Health, The Commonwealth of The

which includes

instruction to the Tenderers along with other relevant

) information, can be collected from the Bahamas
National Drug Agency, Market & McPherson Streets,
Monday through Friday 9am - 5pm

A Tender must be submitted and duplicated in a
sealed envelope or package identified as “Tender
for the Supply of Drug and Related Items’ and

addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
1st Floor, Manx Corporate Centre/Dockendale House
West Bay Street
P.O. Box N-8200
Nassau, The Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address
on or before 5pm Friday, July 6th, 2007. A
copy of a valid business license. and National

Insurance’ Certificate

proposals.

must

accompany all

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to

reject any or all Tender(s).

SY

pret AS RO ENT EN Dg
o

@nautilus



INV 8
f N
“SED With ba TRACE MINES

GENERAL WORKER NEEDED

With knowledge in electrical
and plumbing

Worker must be able to work a
12 hour shift.

Please contact us at:
1-(242)-377-0444-6 or
Fax resume to 1-(242)-377-0276.

ri








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

MUST SELL

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 5B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

June 14th, 2007
The Tribune





CROWN ALLOTMENT NO. 77 MURPHY TOWN, ABACO

All that lot of land having an area of 6,790 sq. ft. being Crown allotment
No. 77, of Murphy Town, Abaco Bahamas. Located on the subject property
is a single storey single family concerete building. This house is less than 5
year old and is in good condition with approximately 1,750 sq. ft of living
space and contains 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living room, dining, kitchen,
laundry and utility spaces. There is no significant improvements or deterioration
evident. The property is very well drained and not susceptible to flooding.
Landscaping efforts are still in remedial stages. All major public and private
utilities are situate within 100 ft of the subject site. Property bounderies are
clearly delineated.

Appraisal: $167,580.00



The subject property is situate off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco and is painted light yellow -

trimmed dark yellow.

Exes aw el UW dal len ad oe

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house,
3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room,
kitchen, study, laundry and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $188,406.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to
Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on
the left then 1st right, house is second on your right with
garage. f





INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY - MUST SELL
Lot N0.83, Lower Bogue ELEUTHERA

Alll that piece parcel or lot of land being No. 83 on a plan
on record in the department of Lands and Survey as plan
no. 763 and comprising 21,674 sq. ft. this site encompasses
a 2 year old single storey home consisting of 2-bedrooms;
1 bathroom, living/dining room in one, and kitchen with a
total living area of 1,452 sq. ft. There is also a unit to this
structure to be used as a bakery which could bring in an
average of approximately $600 to $800 per month. There
is also 2 covered porch areas to the front of this building, with an area of 90.4 sq. ft. (one at the front
entrance and one at the entrance to the bakery) this home is in very good condition and appears to
have been built in accordance with the plans and specifications as approved, and at a standard that
was acceptable to the Ministry of Public Works. The land is flat and properly landscaped.

Appraisal: $177,412.00

This property is situated on the Western side of the main Eleuthera Highway and approximately 1,200
ft Northerly from four-for-nothing Road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue,





LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no °
194 of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated
in the central district of New Providence this property is’
comprised of a 35 year old single family, single story residence
encompassing approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area and inclusive of separate living and dining rooms, and’ ,
an average size kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and
an entry porch, of approximately 88 sq. ft. ventilation is by 2
wall unit air conditioners. The property is at grade and level
with good drainage, landscaping is minimal, consisting of lawns
and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone
walls mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing and
a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208 sq. ft. cement
driveway leading to a single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also has a concrete block storage
shed measuring of approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $133,570.00
Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right,
(Roland Ave.) the subject property is the 5th property on the left side painted orange with red/white trim.





(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue) .
ELEUTHERA

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements,
in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera,
being No. 62, comprising of about 34,210 sq. ft.,
this site encompasses a 12 year old single storney
home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms,
front room, dining, breakfast room, kitchen and
laundry room, with a total living area of approximately
2,342.06. Property also includes a double car
garage, and front entrance with a total sq. ft. of
approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped
with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.
Appraisal: $235,638.00

This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of Lower
Bogue.





Lot No. 25 Orchard Close Sea Breeze

Nassau
All that lot of land having an aproximate area of 5,000 sq. ft.
more or less being lot 1 of the subdivision Orchard Close,situated
at the southeastern corner of Sea Breeze Lane and the roadway
of Orchard Close about half mile west of Fox Hill Road, in the -
eastern District of New Providence, Bahamas. This property
encompasses a 16 year old single storey house with an attached
1-bedroom apartment is the principal improvement. The quality
of construction is average and maintenance is fair, so the effective
age of the building is 8 years, besides the apartment. The house
is comprised of 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, livingroom dining
room, kitchen a utility area and a covered area that is being used

for the preparation of Catered meals, also attached to the house is an open back patio, with concrete block railing

and climate control is provided in the house by ducted central air-conditioning. The lot is completely enclosed,
by chain link fencing in part and by concrete block walls and metal gate in part. The grounds are fairly maintained,
with minimal landscaping in place.

Appraisal: $183,430.00
Travel south on Bay Lily Drive turn right onto Sea Breeze Lane. Go to the 5th corner right, subject property is
1st left painted white trimmed white.



ABACO LOT NO. 120 MURPHY TOWN

All that lot of land and improvements having an area
of 5,040 sq. ft. being portion of lot# 120 of the original
Murphy Town Crown allotments Abaco Bahamas.
This property is comprised of a two storey concrete
‘and wood structure still under construction consisting
of approximately 1,728 sq. ft. of enclosed living space.
| The said building is utilized as a triplex apartment
complex, with a 2 bedroom dwelling on the upper
storey. The lower portion of the building houses two
) units, each with 1-bedroom, 1-bathroom, living/dining
and kitchen spaces. The building is in average
condition and appears to be structurally sound. The
building also demonstrates a need for schelued
maintenance. The property is partially landscape with
boundaries clearly delineated. All major private and public: utilities are situate within one hundred ft

of the property site.
APPRAISAL: $154,476.00
This property is situated off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco









LOT NO. 370 GRENADA CLOSE GOLDEN
GATES #2 (Nassau)

All that lot of land having an area of 5,500 sq. ft., being lot
370 Grenada Close of the subdivision known_and designated
as Golden Gates No. 2, situated in the Southwestern district
of New Providence Bahamas: This property is comprised of
25 years old single family residenCe consisting of approximately
1,234 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with 3 bedrooms,:two
bathrooms, living/dining room, and kitchen. The Land is on a
grade and level and appear to be sufficiently elevated to disallow
the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods.

=! The grounds.are fairly kept, with improvements including
driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing to the sides and rear.

Appraisal: $149,405.60
Traveling south along Blue Hill Road, turn right at the Farmers Market just after passing the Golden Gates Shopping -
Center, take 1st corner left, Windward Isles Way, then take 3rd corner right, St Thomas Road, then first left, grenada
Crest, drive around the bend then 1st left again the subject property is the 2nd property left house #4 painted peach
trimmed black.





LOT NO. 382 WINTON MEADOWS

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area
of 8,300 sq. ft. being lot No. 382 situated in the
subdivision known as Winton Meadows, the said
- subdivision situated in the Eastern District of the
2 mg Island of New Providence, Bahamas. This property

oF ‘gia “is comprised of a 24 year old single family residence
with an attached efficiency (formerly the carport)
consisting of approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of enclosed
living area, front porch-198 sq. ft., back patio-380.
The building is a two storey house. Besides the
efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-
bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, inclusive of a master
bedroom suite upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining
room, family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and kitchen downstairs. Climate control
is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation enhanced by ceiling fans and other
amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance: Average. Effective age: seven
years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow
the possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual heavy rainy periods. The
grounds are well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with flowering trees,
and a concrete garden/storage shed, which is located in the backyard. The yard is enclosed along
the sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with metal railings, and

metal gates at the front and back.

APPRAISAL: $365,000.00 .
Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get to Meadows
Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and take the 4th left, then 1st right. The
subject house is the 2nd house on the left side painted beige trimmed white.

s | ‘| é aul
Bae. Tenner s.. oa

ml ; EL PERUDGv

ci atti rae RE FE eu]

ULE LED EE EE









LOT NO. 1490
GOLDEN GATES
SECTION 2

SS All that lot of land having an
area of 6,000 sq. ft. being
H lot no. 1490 of the
| subdivision known and
designated as Golden
Gates, the said subdivision
situated in the southwestern
district of New Providence,
: bahamas. This property is
comprised of a 25 yer old single family residence consisting of approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space
with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living, dining rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level, however
the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the posibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods
of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is
enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement block wall to the front.

Appraisal: $162,400.00

Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith Ministries
Complex, then first left again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the 6th house left painted
green trimmed white. ‘



LOT NO. #7, BOILING HOLE SUBDIVISION
All that piece parcel or lot of land and inprovements situated on the Island of Eleuthera, North of Governor’s Harbour, comprising of Lot No. 7 in
the Boiling Hole Subdivision and comprising of approximately 10,000 sq. ft., this site encompasses a 17 years old duplex with each unit consisting
of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, frontroom, diningroom and kitchen with a gross floor area of approximately 1,474.20 sq. ft. and covered porch area
of approximately 164.70 sq. ft. this duplex was built in accordance with the plan and specification as approved, and at a standard that was
acceptable to the Ministry Of Public Works. This structure is in good condition. Each apartment could be rented at $800.00 per month. The land is
landscaped and planted with ficus trees, but needs some manicuring. :

APPRAISAL: $153,521.00



VACANT PROPERTIES

BLACKWOOD, ABACO
All that lot of land having an area of approximately 258,064 sq. ft. This property is yet to reach its highest and best use. It is ideally suited to single or multi-family development as is the nature of surrounding properties
within the community. The site may also serve well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original state. It is covered with low brush and broad leaf coppice vegetation intersperse
with broad strands of mature Yellow Pine indigenous to the area. The property is well drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under normal conditions.
APPRAISAL: $219,354.40
The subject property is vacant and is situated at the Southeastern entrance of the Community of Blackwood, Abaco. The property is undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract of land of approximately

26 acres.



NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)

Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses
a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly
of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $41,275.00

a: Seni 7 ORR ECM EM Umer | |
Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 ¢ email harry.collie@scotiabank.com ¢ Fax 356-3851



To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - Click on “Real Estate Mall” - Click on doorway “Enter Online Store”

Teor ean
PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LM a ae ae eee

Bahamian reta

iler Robin Hood

in ‘multi-million’ expansion




POSITIONS AVAILABLE

We are a small, bat rapidly growing group and opportunities
exist for the right persons. All applicants should possess, ata
minimum, good passes in Maths & English, basic computer

cation and orgaaizational skills and an outgoing and pleasant |
personality. The positions available are:

ADMINISTRATIVE/
OFFICE ASSISTANT

Resourceful, with excellent administrative, typing and word
processing skills. Desktop publishing skills and bookkeep ing
experience an asset.

JUNIOR CLERK
Duties include, but not limited to, receptionist, filing, typing,
copying, banking and some accounting functions. Previous
office and print shop experience an asset.

E-mail or fax your résumé and cover letter indicating the
position you are applying for, to jobs@ theservicegroup.com
or 356-6135 by June 25, 2007. Ne calls please! We regret that
only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.

The . Members:
ervice DTP Services, Berencia fsascy & Associates,
roup Image Printing & Berencia Isaacs & Aworiates, Lad,

www. theservicegronp.com



3 UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading international trust
company, is looking for a

New Business Officer

Responsibilities:
Review business established to ensure policies and
procedures are adhered to;
Ability to vet tailor-made deeds;
Undertake the processing of new business ensuring
proper due diligence is in place and adherence to
policy and procedures;
Serve as signatory on assigned companies;
Handle research into and prepare responses to client
enquiries including responding to and preparing a
range of correspondence;
Undertake the processing of New Business ensuring
proper due diligence is in place;
Prepare proper minutes, resolutions, account opening
forms, share certificates and relevant checklists for
new accounts;
Liaise directly with clients, their professional advisers,
trust company agents, bankers, investment advisors,
etc. in respect of routine matters;
Review and maintain accuracy of static and processing
data;

Required Qualifications:

STEP designation;

5 years of trust administration experience;

5 years legal experience;

Good analytical skills;

Good knowledge of finance industry in general and
especially foundation business and fiduciary products;
Good interpersonal skills;
Computer literacy;

Interested persons should submit a full resume, to:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

Re: New Business Officer
P.O. Box N-7757

Nassau, Bahamas

or

_ hrbahamas@ubs.com
Re: New Business Officer








professional public accounting experience.



AUDIT = TAX « ADVISORY

Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.



















skills and knowledge of Microsoft Office; excellent communi- |

FROM page one

The planned Robin Hood
expansion is modelled on the
large retail selling spaces
offered by the likes of Wal-
Mart, with the greater volume
of business generated enabling
the Bahamian retailer to keep
price points keen and go lower
than competitors, building on

_its ‘value for money’ and ‘great

deal’ heritage with Bahamian
consumers.

By providing Bahamian shop-
pers with the pleasant shopping
experience they are used to in
major US stores and supermar-
kets right on their doorstep, Mr
Schaefer and Robin Hood are
hoping to make inroads into -
and capture - some of the $1.2-
$1.3 billion he said the Govern-
ment itself estimated was spent
abroad by Bahamians.

Another advantage that
Robin Hood is aiming to offer
to Bahamian consumers is,
through its location in this
nation, end the need for peo-
ple to take time off work and
spend extra money on air fares,
hotel fares and car rentals when
they go to shop in the US.

Just like a Wal-Mart, the
expanded Robin Hood will fea-
ture a designated 45,000 square
feet of retail space for a grocery
store, designated areas for fur-




Head Cooks

Applicants must have a minimum of four (4) years

niture and clothes and shoes,
and a low-cost pharmacy.

The store will also feature a
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) loca-
tion, complete with its Western
Union and MoneyCentre ser-
vices. Mr Schaefer explained
that having the bank there
would also enable it to provide
direct financing for furniture
purchases from Robin Hood, as
the retailer planned to “mas-
sively enlarge its furniture offer-
ing by 10 times because its done
so well for us”. A Robin Hood
customer loyalty card was also a
possibility.

Customer. parking would be

“massively increased”, and,
Robin Hood will also house a »

Caribbean-themed deli to pro-
vide shoppers with food on the
spot.

Robin Hood will hire a
French-trained chef to prepare
meals that consumers take
home, a move that will reduce
product wastage because he can
use these in his meals, while
menu items can also be sold in
the store.

The expanded Robin Hood
will feature a bakery and sushi
bar, and sell free-range meats,
organic vegetables and a full-
line of health foods.

The checkout and scanning
systems in the new Robin Hood

would be similar to those found .

in Wal-Mart SuperCentres, Mr
Schaefer said, the Bahamian
retailer having entered into a
partnership that will see it
source about 15-20 per cent of
its products directly from the
US giant, both from the US and
China.

Robin Hood is also establish-
ing a structure that will allow it
to buy directly from Europe and
offer Bahamians of all incomes
“reasonable prices”. A UK con-
solidator will consolidate goods
from the UK, Ireland, Spain
and Germany before shipping
them directly to Robin Hood.

Mr Schaefer said the retail-
er’s existing 50-55 staff were
likely to be working “around
the clock” as the November
opening drew near, adding that
the number of workers was like-
ly to expand to “in excess of 200
people”. ,

This will be needed if Robin
Hood follows through on plans
to be open 24 hours per day,
seven days per week, as this will
require three shifts if it stays
open late at night to cater to
those such as night-shift hotel
workers.

“Wouldn’t it be great to have
a clean shopping environment
at nice prices?” askéd Mr
Schaefer. “There are issues with
rising prices on the island.

“If we, collectively, the retail-
ers in the Bahamas, work
together to lower prices, we'd
eat into the $1.4 billion spent
overseas and all would benefit
from that. The consumer would
benefit if prices were lower, and
he was dissuaded from going to
the US to get what they want, if

they can get what they want - at
the price they want - here.

“Robin Hood has forced
down the prices of appliances
and electronics. We’ve seen a
deflation in the market. That’s
what I see as one of the best
things that we’ve done for
Bahamian consumers. We did-
n’t just lower our prices; we
forced everyone to lower their
prices.”

By selling higher margin
products such as clothing and
furniture, Robin Hood will not
have to be so concerned about
the margins generated on its
food products.

The company has a sourcing
office already in Yiwu, China,
and Mr Schaefer has a stake in
a Miami-based company that
acts as a distribution wholesale
unit, which chiefly ships elec- °
tronics and appliances to the
Caribbean, South America and
Central America.

Therefore, Robin Hood will
use the size and economies of
scale generated by the volumes
from its larger retail selling
space, improved buying terms
with suppliers, and its sourcing
and buying skills to keep prices
keen in the expanded store.

“It'll be neat to see what hap-
pens,” Mr Schaefer said of the
new store. “When that super-
store opens, it’ll be something
like you’ve never seen here
before.

“It should be really exciting,
because if we do this 80 per cent
of the way we want to do, it’s
going to be tremendous.”






LOOKING TO GIVE YOUR CAREER A BOOST?
Come to KPMG...

We are currently seeking qualified Seniors to join our Audit practice.

Supervising Senior/Seniors

The successful candidates for the Supervising Senior/Senior positions must have at least three to four years
Applicants must hold a CPA, CA, or other professional designation
recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants.

Excellent opportunities exist in our Audit, Corporate Finance, and Risk Advisory departments, to broaden your
professional experience. We offer competitive compensation and benefits packages.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, anda copy of their professional certification to: KPMG, Human Resources
Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or acash@kpma.com.bs. Telephone: (242) 393 2007

© 2007. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a

experience in the field; good presentation is also
requested, Diplomas from the Nassau Hotel
Training College a must....Wead cooks works
seasonally, split shifts weekly.
























Head Chef (Room Service)
Applicants must have experience in pastry, garde
manger, and most important fine dining.
Management skills and people skills a must. This
challenging position will need flexible and well-
experienced persons in classical French cooking
and at the forefront of new Bahamian cuisine.
Minimum of seven (7) years. experience in the
field of cooking is necessary. All standard diplomas
from the Nassau Hotel Training College are
required. This is a seasonal position with possibility
of full time if performance is satisfactory.

| Head Chefs Fine Dining/Casual Bistro:

Applicants must have experience for our fine
dining and casual bistro venues. Knowledge in
fine dining food, pastry and garde manger is a
must. Management skills and people skills a
must. This challenging position will need flexible
and well-experienced persons. Minimum of seven
(7) years experience in the field of cooking. Alll
standard diplomas from the Nassau Hotel Training
College are a must.

All interested persons are asked to fax resumes to:
The Human Resources Director
for the attention of the Director of Cuisine,
Fax #362-6245,
Nassau, Bahamas.





















An established law firm requires the following: ; +

k



Two (2) Legal Secretaries with the following
experience:

1) Three (3) years litigation experience and



2) Three (3) years commercial experience.

Applicants must be able to work on their own
initiative.

Please fax resumes to 393-4558.






Camperdown Riding Club

Proudly presents a

PONY RIDES!

Saturday June 16, 2007

10:00 am - 3:00 pm
Concession Stand available:

Hamburgers / Hotdogs / Snacks / Sweets.

Phone: 324-2065
THE TRIBUNE

Wao Mts RECORDS ASSISTANT

Country Office in Bahamas
Immediate Supervisor: Operations Analyst

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the largest and leading source of
financing for regional development in Latin America and the Caribbean seeks to
contract a consultant to fill the part-time position of Records Assistant.

Objective

To ensure the proper classification, organization, maintenance, protection, access
and control of documents and records in all media and to provide reference services
to authorized Bank personnel.

Basic Functions

¢ Compile, classify, maintain and manage the files and records both paper
and electronic of the File Station pertaining to the Bank operations and
accordance with the Bank’s official records management procedures
Provide reference services and expertise in the retrieval of operational
information of active and inactive files using the appropriate systems: DM
Extension, CRMS (Castle Records Management System), Intranet, Internet,
etc;

Coordinate activities with those of the Bank’s Records Management Section '

through the Operational Analyst, regarding maintenance and preservation
of operation’s archives and adherence to the Bank’s Records
Retention/Destruction Schedule.

e Train staff in the proper classification of the documents and in the use of
electronic filing systems.

e Provide client support to country office staff, as well as to outside clients.

Requirements
Competencies that include the Ability to:

Demonstrated capacity to systematically manage information proficiency
in Microsoft Office package.

Ability to identify, evaluate and propose solutions/alternatives to problems
in this area.

Experience in providing services to multicultural and multidisciplinary
groups.

Services orientation toward clients and harmonious relationship with internal
and external clients.

Education

e A Degree in Archives Administration or Library Science is preferred.

Experience
e Minimum three years of relevant experience.

e Written and spoken command of English. Working knowledge of Spanish
desirable.

Interested Bahamian candidates should forward a copy of their resume by
June 27, 2007 to:
The Admimistentive Officer, IDB Bahamas
P.O. Box N-3743, Nassau, Bahamas
OR Email: cof/cbh @iadb.org

Do elt rent: ron claae
en CL se

Do you ao OTL a Pre

The Lyford Cay Scholars’ Association
in collaboration with
The Bahamas Development Bank
will be hosting a free informational session on

“Viable Business Ventures and
Opportunities for Entrepreneurs”

On Thursday, June 14th, 2007 at 6:300m
at The Michael Eldon Boardroom
in The Michael Eldon Complex
Third Fioor, Thompson Blvd., Nassau
(The building immediately attached to Chapter One Bookstore)

Refreshments will be served + All interested persons are welcome!

For further Information, -
please contact:

Monique Hinsey at
The Lyford Cay Foundation, Inc

Tel: 242.362.4910 Ext #102 or
email: icfmo@bahamas.net.bs



SCHOLARS

|IHUHSDAY, JUNE 14, 2UU/, PAGE / 6

spanks Association
ylic Advisory

The Clearing Banks Association is reminding the public |
not to give personal or confidential banking information
such as savings or checking account numbers, or details
of credit card accounts to persons requesting these details
by telephone, e-mail or online via the internet.

It is not the policy of any member of the Clearing Banks
Association to have staff ask customers to verify or
update personal and confidential bank account
information by any of these methods.

Persons who provide any confidential banking
information to anyone other than an authorized banking
officer, run the risk of compromising their banking
information and exposing themselves to fraud, for which
our members cannot accept responsibility.
If faced with any of the above situations please contact
your bank immediately.

Bank of The Bahamas International |
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Citibank, N.A.
Royal Bank of Canada

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited

eee i (oe
CNET

NSM Elo
COOPER

is asked to contact

Mr Byron Ferguson

of the

Sales & Marketing

Department -
at
_ Bristol Wines & Spirits

| before
Friday June 15th.


(Your Bahamian Siparnarteta » ' RAINBOW

| 7 >UFr pe
|| VALUE —

NOW ACCEPTING 7 > -_
»% SUNCARD o. Redeem Quality Stamps |
QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED sce at Bed, Bath & Home |

SPECIALS GOOD: __
JUNE 14TH — 20TH, 2007

aS (MAHATMA
meen LONG GRAIN/PARBOILED |.|

CORN

ed

KELLOGG’S _ CARNATION

| TRLEUN FY Ta FLOUR oo

2 Se p Ke
| LIBBY’S O/S1 ee eo .
is ri

shy a mq

/BLUEBIRD JUICES SAVE $1.00 eae

bea JUICES SAVE.7
6-0Z. ee
FRUIT $2.99

46-0Z. PINEAPPLE/CRANBERRY -OZ. fe
COCKTAIL $2.69/ \ JUICE $2. 1€
-OZ. APPLE a :

CAMPELL’S
Brey TT A

AIR WICK | | | VALU TIME —

HOUSE Sigal ' , Q BATH |
\ Baek 2 DETERGENT Uv if
2/$300,, Beers $999
| 100- oz § oe. 4-ROLL
PINE SOL HUGGIES | CLOROX | if

D cy canes Cyitesas BLEACH le
CLEANERS (agus iL
, oe

| Oe ee






=O St



BAR-S

)MEAT & CHICKEN
| HOT DOG

42-0Z FROM page one practices are inextricably

linked to good business deci-

“This and other examples — sions,” Mrs Wright said.
show that end-use efficiency She pointed out that the
and environmentally friendly Government needed to be a

ena
MTN)

rr no

BAHAMAS FIRST
HOLDINGS LIMITED

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS
Bahamas First Holdings Limited hereby
notifies all its shareholders that based on
unaudited results for the quarter ending
ES 30th June 2007 the Board of Directors has
CeaHs declared an interim dividend of two cents

RUNSTICKS (a 4iICHOPS

“ PER-LB. PER-LB.








(2¢) per common share to be paid on 29th
June 2007 to all shareholders of record as |
of 15th June, 2007.





U.S. CHOICE U.S CHOICE



| Private sector is urged to
| watch carbon emissions

facilitator and encourage the
implementation of alternative
energy sources, as this simply
made good business sense.
According to Mrs Wricht,
it was a widely accepted Lact
that while the Caribbean may

- make a contribution of less

than | per cent of total global
greenhouse gas emissions, the
region may be more affected
by climate change.

She said that since climate
changes impact nature, indus-
tries such as tourism are vul-
nerable, as climate change
leads to unpredictability of
weather. This may account
for the frequency and severi-
ty of sea level rise and fall,
hurricane intensity, temper-
ature fluctuations and
changes in traditional weath-
er seasons.

“The business community
has a great role to play in the
adaptation process as the pri-
vate sector. To look at what
climate change means in terms
of business, in taking steps to
reduce their carbon footprints
and ultimately the cost of
doing business,” Mrs Wright
said.

TUONO AZT NOD

Teach 2 school aye children (4 1/2 & 7 1/2) in home setting.

| a1 hy
510) F ger crtrests . i AM eB WT a DESC Te Ce CC SC
< e- } iS use creative teaching techniques. Must have a passion for
* Z AST iE te | education. Willing to promote critical thinking and leadership
PElR US “$I 4 ee



CYA MRTG Cael DUC DTT i SU)









: vs 9 99 a
DAIRY & FROZEN yey ae

;ORDENS SANDWICH | GREEN GIANT
NATE: SLICED 8-OZ. | ASST’D 10-OZ.

PHEESE. cesssrssvssrsnrsnrsnrssne 1 239 : FROZEN
IKOTA | | VEGETABLES. :.cssssssss1$ 2019

SST'D FLAVOR 16-0Z. i
BAGELS. sesssssnssnssnzas2s 20 1 9 i ISLAND QUEEN FROZEN 2-LB.

a |

l

August 27, 2007.





cere cen

oi | PLAINTAINS vecsssss-.$3.49 | |
AMPICO ASST’D 12PK,
WS OZ. j GREEN GIANT - 12’s

RUIT PUNCH.......$4.99 ! | CORN ON COB.evssssssssss11$4,89

LUNCH MEATS@

“BAR-S SLICED Prey WN a aa)










‘FRESH BAKED

pre CAKE

$999

“7 = rir @).

SWEET eG \U-cye

D YELLOW - FRESH BED SPREADS
25 | QGORN Pali J If scare ees
» * ' 3929 BT RL



: KITCHEN CURTAINS
PERLE. BAMBOO AREA RUGS
ee FOOT REST/OTTOMANS





we












$48

Sy au MONDAY, JUNE 11TH - SATURDAY, JUNE 16TH,.2007

a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Skills: bachelors degree, 3 years of experience, excellent
PT Cie CUM CSR Me ED pe SY Cd |





FIGURINES
CEILING FANS
PATIO TABLES
PATIO CHAIRS
RICE COOKERS
WALL MIRRORS

HARVEST SWEET TOUCH OF VELVET SHEET SETS PRESSURE COOKERS
ae WATERMELON BETTER HOME SHOWER CURTAINS
Eee :






$489







| [ Located: Harbour Bay Shopping Center )
â„¢ : Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 Jf
oe A [ a Ore en coon a —— f
“« ; , d BS ENON) GR! LS. DAES Te OO SARIN CS RB FAS WA de ESS Mint Pat 2h TEA SRA
Doctors Hospital Health System Limited

Interim report
Quarter ended April 30, 2007

TE

Chairman’s Rergort
Doctors Hespital Health System Limited

Dear Shareholders,

I am pleased to report on your company’s financial results for the three months ended April 30, 2007.
The Hospital has completed its fourth consecutive profitable year and your company continues to grow
from strength to strength.

Doctors Hospital Health System eed Qiona esate note, with stellar results from its key centers of
excellence. Earnings per share were thirteen cents for the period. This reflects an increase from ten cents
for the comparable period last year. Net income for the three months was $1.3 million compared to $1.0
million for the comparable period in 2006.

All patient service revenue generating departments contributed positively to. the growth of the Hospital.
The financial results reflect growth in patient service revenues to $10.2 million from $9.6 million in the
prior year period. Our patients increasingly want access to our services, and we are accommodating this
greater demand while maintaining overall higher quality and safety.

The annual increases in the cost of health care are major concern for governments and employers. The
Hospital continues to face challenges from increasing expenses arising in part from an increase in the cost
of supplies, employee benefits and pharmaceuticals. Total expenses increased $0.4 million, or 4.7%, over
the same period last year. Highlights include the following: government taxes and fees increased 10.5%;
other operating—insurances, leases—increased 22.6%; and medical supplies and services increased
12.4%. Payroll costs grew slightly at 8.1%. ;

The Western Medical Plaza continues to be a challenge as we seck a buyer but losses from this
discontinued operation have trended downward as the rental income is generated pending a sale. Losses
for this facility were $0.1 million for the first three months of this year and reflected a slight improvement
over the comparable period last year. Sale of the vacant land at Blake Road was finalized and a gain of
$16,000 was recorded.

The positive operating results that have been achieved have enabled the company to modernize its health
care equipment and improvements have also been made to the nursing units.

We remain optimistic about the future. On behalf of the Board of Directors, I thank you for your
continued loyalty and patronage.

Joseph Krukowski
Chairman
June 4, 2007

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Balance Sheet :

April 30, 2007 with comparative figures at hay 31, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)









130, 2007 January 31, 2007
Assets
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents S$. 2,885 1,988
Accounts receivable—patients, net (note 2) : 1,324 951
Accounts receivable—third party payors, net (note 2) — 6,417 5,521
Inventories 1,330 1,252
Other assets , ; ‘ 241 322
Assets classified as held for sale (note 3) $,469 5,443
; 17,666 15,477
Non-current assets: :
Investments 3 30
Goodwill, net ' . 431 431
Other intangible assets 2,684 : 2,700
Investment property _ . ; ore - 1,022
Eropenty plant and equipment ‘ " : - 9,088 9,359
; : . 12,233 13,542
Total-assets : ‘ Saag REN oS 29,899 29,019
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
Current liabilities: .
Accounts payable and other liabilities . 3,249 3,448
Long-term debt, current portion : 389 389
Liabilities directly associated with assets :
classified,as held for sale (note 3) ~ §,142- 5,279

9,116

Non-current liabilities : ‘
Long-term debt 3,204 . ; 3,302

Total liabilities , Al, 984 12,418
Shareholders’ equity:
Share capital:

Authorized 12,500,000 common shares at par value
of B$0.04 each (January 31, 2007 — 12,500, 000 shares) -
Issued and fully paid 9,971,634 shares

(January 31, 2007 — 9,971,634 shares) 399 ; 399
Contributed surplus : “12,358 12,358
Retained earnings , 5,158 3,844

47,915 16,601



Total liabilities and sharehulders’ equity $ 29,899 29,019

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Revenue and Expenses

Three months ended April 30, 2007 with comparative figures for the ines months ended April 30, 2006
(Expressed i in thousands of Bahamian dollars)



. April 30, 2007 April 30, 2006
CONTINUING OPERATIONS ae . |
Revenues :
Patient service revenue, net ' § 10,249 9,604
Other 153 ; 129
Total revenues ; * 10,402 . 9,733
Expenses
Salaries and benefits : 3,697 3,420
Medical supplies and services 2,628 2,338
Other operating ; 1,144 933
Provision for doubtful accounts : : 230 600
Depreciation and amortization —_- ot Share ' ' 579 ” 507
Utilities 270 ‘ 262
Government taxes and fees 221 200
Repairs and maintenance AMO 219
Total expenses ‘ 8,379 8,479
Income from continuing operations
’ Before interest 1,523 1,254
Interest expense (64 (88)
Income from continuing operations 1,459 1,166
Discontinued operations
Revenue 38 ‘ 24
Expenses (183) (212)

Loss from discontinued operations we (145) (188)

Net income for the period $ 1,314 978
Se a REE BT I AT ES A EE I TEE SEY

Earnings per common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars):
Basic and fully diluted $ 0.13 0.10

(Unaudited)

cee, LOIN LOD

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

Six months ended April 30, 2007 with comparative figures for the three months ended April 30, 2006
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)







April 30, 2007 April 30, 2006
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in):
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income $ 1,314 979
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash
provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization 579 507
Provision for doubtful accounts 230 599
Gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment (16) :
2,107 2,085
Increase in accounts receivable (1,479) , (1,959)
Decrease (increase) in inventories (78) (67)
Decrease (increase) in prepaid expenses and other assets ‘ 62 183
Decrease in accounts payable and other liabilities 198 (400;
Cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activities 414 (158)
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Purchase of property, plant and equipment (208) (664)
Purchase of intangible assets (84) (568)
Proceeds from disposal of property, plant and equipment 1,038 -
__Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in) investing activities 746 (1,232)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Repayment of long-term debt (236) 602
Cash and cash equivalents used in financing activities (236) (602)
Decrease in cash and cash equivalents 924 (1,992)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 1,988 1,284
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period (note 4) $ 2,912 (708)
ES

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank and in hand, short-term deposits with an original maturity of three
months or less and bank overdrafts.

(Unaudited)

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity

Three months ended April 30, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Number of shares Sharecapital Contributed surplus _ Retained earnings



Balance at January 31, 2007 9,971,634 $ 399 $ 12,358. $ 3,844
Net income for the period - - - 1,314
Balance at April 30, 2007 9,971,634 $ 399 $ 12,358 $ 5,158

DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements
Three months ended April 30, 2007

1. Significant accounting policies

These interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard
No. 34, Interim Financial Reporting; using the same accounting policies applied in the January 31, 2006 aes
consolidated financial statements.

2. Accounts receivable
Accounts receivable are stated net of provisions for doubtful accounts of $6.2 million.
3. Assets classified as held for sale

For the period ended April 30, 2007, total assets and liabilities of companies which have been discontinued and
for which there is a commitment for disposition are reported in the balance sheet as “held for sale.” Operating
results for these segments are reported in the statement of income “Discontinued operations.” These include
Western Medical Plaza and Imaging Equipment Limited.

4. Cash and cash equivalents

The cash position of $2.912 million reported in the statement of cash flows reflects $27,000 in cash for WMP
that is recorded as assets held for sale.



"HE COLLEGE OF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs: Moor

REGISTRATION
FOR SUMMER SESSION Il

will take place on
' WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY,
JUNE 13-14, 2007 ONLY.

To accommodate the above mentioned
dates, please be advised that registration
for Fall Semester will be suspended on these
two days and will recommence on Monday,
June 18, 2007.

Publish your Legal Notices and
Balance Sheets

iG

The Tribune

Call: 502-2352


THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 11B

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



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FROM page one

Apart from the existing US
departures terminal, Mr Rich-
mond said the other buildings
were “rather old and getting
them up to speed would not be
worth it”.

He said NAD, which is 100
per cent wholly-owned by the
Bahamian government and is
managing/operating the airport
on a 30-year lease from the Air-
port Authority, would spend a
further $10-$15 million to
upgrade the existing terminals
and facilities at Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

“We're $4 million into it with
just two programmes,” Mr

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BUSINESS -



THE TRIBUNE



Richmond said of the initial
upgrades.

He described the $15 per pas-
senger airport user facility fee,
which will be included in the
price of airline tickets from July
1 onwards, as “the cornerstone”
of NAS’s plans for financing the
new terminal construction. The
fee for domestic departures will
be $5 perhead. _

“We have to make sure we

earn enough money to make

this work,” Mr Richmond said.
“Right now, the airport is not

making money.” While aiming

to increase revenues and reduce
operating costs, he added that
electricty costs in the Bahamas
were “five times what” YVRAS
was used to. ts

To raise project financing for
the new terminals’ construction,

banks and other financial insti- |

tutions will want to secure loans
and mezzanine financing on the
airport’s physical assets, and
know their are revenue

streams/cash flow to enable

NAD to repay the debt.

Mr Richmond said NAD was
projecting to earn $19 million
from the passenger airport user

' facility fee in its first financial
’ year, and expected this sum to

increase year-on-year aS more
people used Lynden Pindlin
International Airport. ;

The revenues from this fee
will back and pay off the project
financing, which could be raised
through a securitisation or bond
issue. Under the terms of the
agreement with the Govern-
ment, NAD has to be self-suffi-
cient and cannot look to gov-
ernment subsidies. -

Vancouver Airport Services
(YVRAS), which won the bid-
ding for the 10-year airport
management/operating partner
contract, has seconded Mr Rich-
mond and four other executives
to the NAD.

“Obviously, we hope to be

here a lot longer,” Mr Rich-
mond said, referring to the ini-
tial 10-year contract handed to
YVRAS.

To further bolster Lynden
Pindling International Airport’s
revenue streams and profitabil-
ity, Mr Richmond said he and
officials from the Bahamian
government were seeking to
attract additional carriers and
airlift to use the airport.

He added that at an upcom-
ing conference in Tucson, Ari-
zona, he would be meeting with
airlines such as Lufthansa, Vir-

gin Atlantic, Condor and Fron-
tier to entice them to begin ser-
vice to the Bahamas.

In terms of cosmetic improve-
ments already made by NAD,
Mr Richmond said it had estab-

lished. an operations centre at .

the airport that was manned 18
hours per day, with staff ready
to address all customer queries.
The Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport’s signage and
lighting had also been improved.
“Probably the largest area of
focus for us” was the friendli-
ness and ambience of the air-
port, Mr Richmond said, NAD
having launched the first of its
customer satisfaction surveys in
March. es
‘ NAD was shortly planning to
launch a website so that cus-
tomers could look. up their

flights on-line and see whether

they were on time.
“We will be spending severa
million dollars on needed main-
tenance; hundreds of thousands
of dollars on paint, carpeting
and lighting to improve the
ambience of the airport over
the next three years,” Mr Rich-
mond said.
- He-said the airport was get-
ting close to having a seat avail-
able for all passengers in ‘the
upstairs US deaprture lounge.
The donation of more than 100
seats by the Bahamas Hotel
Association (BHA) had
brought the total to 738, and
Mr Richmond said that NAD
estimated peak demand in the
lounge would be for 800 seats.
NAD was also spending $2

' million on upgrading Lynden
Pindling International Airport’s ©

washroooms, Mr Richmond
said, adding: “There are parts

of the terminal, especially some .

wash rooms, that are too old to
keep clean, no matter how hard
you try.”

To improve efficiency, and



from people who are
making news in their

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribtine wants to hear

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

If so, call us on 322-1986 |




the speedy movement of pas-
sengers through the various
ticketing, screening and other
stations in Lynden Pindling
International Airport, NAD is
spending $2.2 million on a sys-
tem that will eliminate baggage
screening at the upstairs US
departures lounge - something
that should be gone “early next
year”.

Mr Richmond said conces-
sion and retail opportunities at
Lynden Pindling International

' Airport would come “soon”

and be advertised to Bahami-
ans, breaking the monopoly
held by Bradley Roberts, the
former PLP minister and MP,
and businessman Garet ‘Tiger’

Finlayson.

He added that YVRAS
worked with retail and food ten-
ants to ensure they met perfor-
mance standards.

When asked about the fre+
quent problems encountered by
Bahamians and tourists in

_Teclaiming their baggage upon

arrival.at Lynden Pindling
International Airport, with the

‘carousels frequently out of

order, Mr Richmond said NAD

-was working with both baggage

handlers and the airlines to
address this. .

He added: “The vertical
carousels seem to be broken a
lot, and the maintenance folks
tell me it’s the design - they
burn out constantly.” In addi-
tion, the carousels were only
able to take a certain weight of
baggage, and could break down
if they were overloaded by bag-
gage handlers.

In spending money to
enhance terminals and facilities
that were likely to be torn down
to make way for new buildings,
Mr Richmond said NAD had
“to be careful about throwing
money away” when capital was
needed for new construction.













NOTICE OF VACANCY

A vacancy exists for a Bahamian at The Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Limited in the Building and Development Services Department.

Vacancy:

‘Director of Building and Development Services. The position reports
directly to Management.

Qualifications/Pre-Requisites:

Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering with a minimum of fifteen
(15) years experience with substantial knowledge in the construction
industry w.r.t. building services, substantial familiarity with building
codes, substantial knowledge in urban engineering, and substantial
experience in management of projects. Legal mindedness, computer
literacy, the ability to communicate effectively and speak publicly,
and a character of integrity are essential.

Responsibilities:

Managing the day to day operations of the Building and Development
Services Department with respect to Building and Planning Code
matters, contracts administration of capital projects, implementation
of management’s physical planning of subdivisions and overseeing
the City Management Department.

Résumés with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department

The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited

Grand Bahama
or



P.O. Box F-42666 Freeport,

Email: personnel@gbpa.com
On or before June 29, 2007
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS




Notice of Sitting for New Providence Port Authority Board
To consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration
Act Chapter (277)

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board
for New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration
Building, Prince George Wharf on the 28â„¢ June, 2007at 3:00pm for the purpose
of granting Licences under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277)

Any person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do so at
least six (6) days before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in
writing to the Board and to the applicant.

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written
authorization at the meeting.

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received
written notification from the New Providence Port Authority.

The under mentioned persons have applied for grant of licences as specified below:

NEW JET SKI FOR NEW PROVIDENCE .

REG.NO APPLICANT BOAT CLASS PASS USE
NAME :
NB/05/07 Strachan Tyson NoName 1) 2 Rental
P. O. Box CB- 12549 oft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski
NB06/07 _ Romotar Narine NoName =D 2 Rental
Nassau, Bahamas oft
. Jet Ski
NB06/07 Romotar Narine No Name D a) Rental
; ‘ Nassau, Bahamas oft

cater
grutias

Jet Ski i TARY

NEW BOAT LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

REGNO APPLICATION BOATNAME CLA PASS USE
SS

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 13B

GN-517

Ministry Of Maritime Affairs & Labour
Port Department



NEW MASTER’S LICENCE FAMILY ISLAND

REG NO APPLICANT CLASS
Hanna Dario M A

NB/42/07 Fresh Creek, Andros

RENEWAL MASTER LICENCE FAMILY ISLAND

LICENCE # NAME CLASS

814] Bain Dereck
Marsh Harbour, Abaco A

1178 Cartwright Kyrle M.W A
: Deadman’s Cay , Long Island

6047 Jones Charles A
Coopers Town, Abaco

6375 Moxey Nelson
Freeport, Grand Bahama ,

7919 Smith Kyle A
P.O. Box F-43216 ;
Freeport, Grand Bahama

7908 Sands Latwone A
Andros, Bahamas

6924 Thomas Perry L A
P.O. Box AB-20237

Marsh Harbour, Abaco

6781 Turnquest Glen A
P.O. Box F 42138
Freeport, Grand Bahama

7366 Murray Daniel A . A
P.O. Box 40906
Freeport, Grand Bahama

i N/B/41/07 _— Bethel Kevin E. Gatta Go B 6 Charter

NB42/07

NB43/07

NB44/07

P.O. Box CR- 54993

“Nassau, Bahamas

Sun Shipping limited
P.O. Box CB-12762
Nassau, Bahamas

Sun Shipping Limited
P.O. Box CB-12762
Nassau, Bahamas

Marine Adventure Co
Ltd
P.O. Box CB-11085

21ft
Fibreglass

Jake Express
77.7ft
Steel Hull

Bahama Pride
249.6ft
Steel Hull

Three Queens
II
46ft

25

Tug Boat

Barge

Charter

REG NO

Nassau, Bahamas Hatteras
TRANSFER OF JET SKI LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

PREVIOUS NEW OWNER CLASS PASS USE

OWNER

NP: 121 ATE Cartwright Jerome SweetingShamane D 2 Rental

REG NO

mardi
NEawO7
NB/45/07
NB/46/07

NB/47/07

NB/48/07

Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas

NEW MASTER LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICANT CLASS

Barnett Robert B
P.O. Box NP- 2141
Nassau, Bahamas

Butler Thomas H B
P.O. Box N-9699
Nassau, Bahamas

Cargill Evan A B
P.O. Box N-9277
Nassau, Bahamas
Lisgaris Antonio
P.O. Box SS-6680 B
Nassau, Bahamas

Mckenzie La’Raoy R B

Nassau, Bahamas

Strachan Charlton W. B
Nassau, Bahamas

» RENEWAL MASTER’S LICENCE NEW PROVIDENCE

LICENCE #

6877

6557

7040

6084

7814

7186

8095

7114

NAME

Adderley Farron
P.O. Box SB- 50104
Nassau, Bahamas

Horton Jason
Nassau, Bahamas

Horton Christopher
Nassau, Bahamas

Newbold Roy C. Jr
P.O. Box N- 3846
Nassau, Bahamas

Parker Kenyon D3
Nassau, Bahamas

Pratt William
P.O. Box FH- 14633
Nassau, Bahamas

Russell Thomas R
P.O. Box N-3931
Nassau, Bahamas

Lloyd Donne
P.O. Box N-8574
Nassau, Bahamas

CLASS

A



Captain/Anthony J. Allens

Port Controller
PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

ie a
US retail sales rise by 16-month high

@ By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Consumers brushed off rising
gasoline prices and slumping
home sales to storm the malls in
May, pushing retail sales up by
the largest amount in 16
months.

The Commerce Department

reported that retail sales surged
by 1.4 percent last month, com-
pared to April, double the
increase that analysts had been
expecting. Retail sales had fall-
en by 0.1 percent in April.

The May strength was wide-
spread with auto dealers,
department stores, specialty
clothing stores and hardware
stores enjoying an especially

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006
IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/No.825
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of
land containing approximately Seven acres and Seventy-seven
hundredths of an acre situate in the Island or Cay known as
Frazer’s Hog Cay one of the Berry Islands group in the said
Bahama Islands being Lot Numbers Fifty-five, Fifty-seven
and Fifty-nine in the plan of a Subdivision of a portion of the
said Frazer’s Hog Cay.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Allan Lightbourn
NOTICE

| THE PETITION OF ALLAN LIGHTBOURNE in respect
of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing
approximately Seven acres and seventy-seven hundredths of
an acre situate in the Island or Cay known as Frazer’s Hog
Cay one of the Berry Islands group in the said Bahama Islands
being Lot Numbers Fifty-five, Fifty-seven and Fifty-nine in
the plan of a Subdivision of a portion of the Frazer’s Hog Cay
bounded Northwestwardly by a road Thirty-five feet wide
and running thereon Six hundred and Nineteen feet and Eight-
six hundredths of a foot Northeastwardly by Lot Number
sixty-one in the said plan and running thereon Five hundred
and ninety-seven feet more or less to the High Water Mark
Southeastwardly by the sea and running thereon Five Hundred
and eighty feet and Seventy hundredths of a foot and
Southwestwardly by Lot Number Fifty-three in the said plan
and running thereon Five Hundred and Thirty-five more or
less to the High Water Mark.

ALLAN LIGHTBOURNE claims to be the owner in fee
| simple in possession of the following land and has made
application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
| The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of the Quieting Titles
Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and
_ the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance
with me adenine a ae sud Act.

it ion ind Plan of the said land may be
mal office hours in the following places:

The chee of the Supreme Court, East Street, North,
in the City of Nassau, Bahamas;

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen
- Retiro Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, The Bahamas;
and

. The Office of the Commissioner/Administrator, Justice
of the Peace or the Local Constable at The Berry
Islands, The Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or
right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before the 16th day of July, A.D.,

2007 file in the Supreme Court and Serve on the Petitioner |

or the undersigned a Statement of his Claim in the prescribed
for verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.

! Failure of any such person to file and served a Statement of
his Claim on or before the 16th day of July, A.D., 2007 will
operate as a a bar to such claim.

LOCKHART & MUNROE
CHAMBERS

35 BUEN RETIRO ROAD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

Attorneys for the Petitioner



Pricing Information As Of:
Wednesday, 13 June 2007

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark 7
Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

‘Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

z Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

1.342667"
3.2018***
2.681688°*
1.244286**""

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

Previous Close Today's Close

good month.

Sales would have been strong
even without last month’s big
jump in gasoline prices, which
saw prices top $3.20 per gallon.
Excluding sales at gasoline sta-
tions, overall retail sales would
still have been up 1.2 percent.

Meanwhile, the Federal
Reserve reported Wednesday
that the economy headed into
the summer with strong
momentum, bolstered by con-
sumer spending and a rebound
in manufacturing.

The new Fed survey will
serve as the basis for discussion

when the Fed next meets to.

consider interest rates. With the
economy showing signs of
rebounding, most analysts
believe the Fed will leave rates
unchanged at the June 27-28
meeting and possibly for the
rest of the year.

In a separate report, the
Commerce Department said
that businesses increased their
inventories held on shelves and
backlots by 0.4 percent in April,
slightly higher than the 0.3 per-
cent gain that Wall Street had

expected.

Businesses had drawn down
inventories in the first three
months of this year, a factor that
helped slow the economy’s
growth to a barely discernible
0.6 percent rate in the January-
March period. That was the
weakest performance in more’
than four years. However,

inventory rebuilding is expected.

to help contribute to a rebound
in growth in the second quar-
ter.

The strong showing for retail
sales caught. analysts by sur-
prise. They had been forecast-
ing a more moderate rebound
of 0.7 percent.

The increase should ease
fears that consumer spending,
which accounts for two-thirds
of the economy, could falter in
coming months under the
impact of the surge in gasoline
prices, the significant correction
in housing and recent increases
in interest rates.

The government report paint-

ed a more optimistic picture of |

consumer spending than last
week’s report from the nation’s

BLAIRWOOD ACADEMY
SUMMER SCHOOL

July 2 to 27

9:00 to 12:30

READING, WRITING, MATH,
_ STUDY SKILLS, COMPUTER

QUR METHODS HELP STUDENTS
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IMPROVE SKILLS
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OR COME IN TO REGISTER
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JEWELLERY STORE MANAGERS

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challenging career catering to the
country’s visitors in the exciting
retail jewelry business!!!

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ARE YOU...
Confident? ¢ A Leader? ¢ Self Motivated?
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If the answer isYES then take the next step .

FAX RESUME TO 326-2824

SALARY OPPORTUNITY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATION



May

Change Daily Vol.

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol.
EPS $ - Acompany'’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

- Trading volume of the prior week



EPS $

Div $

0000.

Yield %

q NAV ney

*- 8 June 2007

** - 30 April 2007
++. 31 May 2007

- 30 April 2007

big chain stores, which reported
moderate gains in their survey
of same-store sales after a dis-
mal April, a month that had

“been hurt by bad weather and

the fact that Easter came early
this year.

The 1.4 percent increase in
May sales was the biggest one-
month advance since a 3.3 per-
cent surge in January 2006. It
left sales at a seasonally adjust-
ed annual rate of $377.9 billion
in May.

For May, sales at general
merchandise stores, the catego-
ry that includes department
stores, were up 1 percent and
sales at department stores rose

THE TRIBUNE

by 1.3 percent, the best showing
in 19 months. Sales at specialty
clothing stores jumped 2.7 per-
cent, rebounding from a dismal
1.5 percent drop in April.
Sales of autos and auto parts
were up 1.8 percent, the best
performance in nearly a year,
while sales were up 2.1 percent
at hardware stores and 1.8 per-
cent at sporting goods stores.
Sales at gasoline stations rose
by 3.8 percent, the biggest
increase in more than a year,
but much of that gain reflected

the big jump in prices. Retail ©

sales are not adjusted for infla-
tion.

Nassau Airport

Development Compary

Nassau Airport Development Company Ltd.

Invites Tenders for providing

JANITORIAL SERVICES
AT

LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT

In keeping with NAD’s objective to develop and
maintain a world- class gateway
to The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
~ proponents:

“ Must be 100% Bahamian owned

& operated

«+ Must be holder’s of a current
business license

“* Must demonstrate the ability to
fulfill the requirements set out in
NAD’s official Request for

Proposal.

“ Must show a track record of
commitment to service with

excellence

RFP’s may be collected from NAD’s
corporate office in Terminal! 1 at
The Lynden Pindling International Airport
between the hours of10:00 am - 4:00 pm
commencing June 15", 2007.

Deadline for submissions of Proposals is
July 27, 2007 at 3:00pm.

Telephone: (242) 377-0209



ESSAY COMPETITION

EIGHT ANNUAL PUBLIC
SERVICE WEEK

The Department of Public Service, will
‘host an Essay Competition as one of the
activities for Eight Annual Public Service
Week. The Competition is open to Junior
and Senior High School Students.

Students interested in participating should
write a 250-300 words (Junior High),
and 450-500 words (Senior High), essay
on the topic: “The Public Service -
Promoting Quality Service in the
Workplace”.

The deadline for entries, which should
be referred to the attention of. Ms.
Antionette Thompson, Deputy Permanent
Secretary, Ministry of the Public Service,
is Friday, 22nd June, 2007.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer with a
scanner, copier and printer will be
awarded to the winner in each category.

The winners will be announced during
The Eight Annual Public Service Week
Awards Ceremony scheduled for 6th

October, 2007.



¢
4s +

an”

eg ae ye
Wwe ‘ <




High: 84° F/29°C
Low: 76°F/24°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

Albuquerque
Anchorage |
Atlanta }
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston

Buffalo
Charleston, SC
Chicago
Cleveland
Dallas '
Denver !
Detroit i
Honolulu
Houston

High
F/C
89/31
68/20
86/30
68/20
73/22
64/17
78/25
80/26
86/30
82/27
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81/27
88/31
88/31
92/33

highs and tonights

Today

Low
F/C
62/16
52/11
66/18
52/11
56/13
50/10
55/12
65/18
60/15
58/14
71/21
55/12
61/16
76/24
72/22

Ww

Ss
Ss
c

rT RHRnmrrHnH HY TD

i]

High
F/C
92/33
71/21
81/27
72/22
77/25
72/22
80/26
79/26
89/31
83/28
87/30
90/32
85/29
88/31
89/31

Friday
Low
F/C
64/17
52/11
64/17
57/13
58/14
54/12
57/13
65/18
65/18
59/15
70/21
59/15
63/17
75/23
71/21

s lows.

Ww

pe
S
t
pc
pe
pc
pe
t
pc
pe
t
pc

sit

Ss
t

Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City
Orlando



Variable clouds, a

thunderstorm.

High: 88°



High
F/C
90/32
84/28
88/31
107/41
93/33
81/27
92/33
92/33
86/30
82/27
90/32
88/31
68/20
87/30
88/31

Weather

Today

Low

F/C
64/17
64/17
67/9
77/25
68/20
62/16
68/20
73/22
74/23
67/19
66/18
73/22
§5/12
68/20
68/20

RealFeel.

W

s
t
pc
s
pe
pe
s
pe
t
pe
pe
pe

pc.

if
t





High
F/C
87/30
87/30
88/31
106/41
90/32
79/26
90/32
92/33
85/29
86/30
88/31
88/31
74/23
85/29
89/31



Friday
Low
F/C
66/18
68/20
68/20
80/26
68/20
62/16
68/20
72/22
76/24
68/20
65/18
71/21
62/16
67/19
72/22

Mostly cloudy, a
t-storm possible.



Hight 88°F31°C =
Low: 74° F/23°C 3




.

High: 86°

ostly cloudy with a
t-storm or two.

Low: 74° ;



ABACO



High

F/C

Philadelphia 72/22
Phoenix 109/42
Pittsburgh 77/25
Portland, OR 72/22
Raleigh-Durham 76/24
St. Louis 90/32
Salt Lake City 90/32
San Antonio 94/34
San Diego 72/22
San Francisco 76/24
Seattle 70/21
Taliahassee 90/32
Tampa / 88/31
Tucson ; 104/40

Washington, DC 74/23

osc

Today
Low

F/C
56/13
80/26

56/13.

54/12
59/15
71/21
64/17
73/22
64/17
56/13

52/11-

67/19
71/21
72/22
58/14

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combinds the effects of temperature
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Ww

pe
s

pc
pc

{
Ss
S
pc
pe
pc
pe

Cloudy with a t-storm

_ possible.
High: 86°



High
F/C

15123

110/43
80/26
69/20
77125
91/32
93/33
91/32

ssoelee

72/22
‘67/19
91/32
- 88/31
105/40
78/25

Low: 14°

Low
F/C

60/15

81/27
60/15
54/12
59/15
72/22
67/19
72/22
63/17
55/12

52/11

68/20
13/22
74/23
62/16

Friday

2
oO





Normal high

Normal low . . 74° F/23° C :
Last year's high "90° F/32°C | Sey at |
Last year’s OW ow... teseesesssesctestecneeseess BO? F/27° C
Precipitation Sunrise ......6:20a.m.. Moonrise. .... 5:29 a.m.
As of 2 p.m. yesterday 0.12” Sunset........8:01 p.m. Moonset... . . 7:58 p.m.
Year to date . 24.03”
Normal year to date . . 14,72” Hew First Fall Last
AccuWeather.com :
All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 =) Jun.14 Jun. 22
}
{
|
|
|
SAN SALVADOR
High: 86° F/30° C
MAYAGUANA |
i High: 87° F/31°C i
i Low: 74° F/23° C i

High:87° F/31
RAGGED ISLAND >
High: 86° F/30°C Low:73" F723"
Low:67°F/19°6

Mostly cloudy, a
{-storm possible. q =;
- High: 88°
rl ie







Mostly cloudy.



| High: 88°
: Low: 78° co



. 87° F/31° C









GREAT INAGUA
High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 74° F/23°C

The higher the AccuWeathef UV Inde
greater the need for eye! and skin protection.



xâ„¢ number, the





, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, precipitation, pressure, and. __ Today 7:44 a.m. 25 1:43.a.m. -0.1
8:10pm. 3.3 1:33 p.m. -0.2
aay 8:35am. 25 2:36am. -0.1
d bide 903 p.m. 3.3 2:27pm. -0.2
Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 927am. 25 d27am. 0.1
Temperature 9:54p.m. 3.1 3:20pm. -0.2
HOH: sasttietiacciauceauiaianc 0° P3200 10:18 :
nes Sunda Bam. 25 4:16am. -0.1
COW . 77° F125° Y 1043 p.m. 3.0 4:12pm. -0.1









Li




Loo ere



Today
| High = Low W

ot gS = i FC F/C
Acapulco — = 190/82 77/25 pe
Amsterdam. 70/21 61/16 ©
‘Ankara, Turkey == «4 84/98 5OVIS
Athens i 82/27 . 68/20 pc











Auckland. S95 \51/10 pe
Bangkok 95/35 80/26 c
‘Barbados 88/31. 79/26 pc.
Barcelona 76/24 64/17 pc
‘Beijing. Se 87/30 69/20 pc
_ Beirut. 74/23 74/23 s
Belgrade = t—(ité‘ié O/B GBD pvc
Berlin 79/26 61/16 sh

Bermuda — 78/25 67/19 t.
oo 64/17 46/7 pc
eo 7624 SAO
89/31 66/18
56/12 41/5 +
93/33 67/19 s
95/35 83/28 t
61/16 44/6 c
82/27 70/21 t-
84/28 70/21 t
73/22 63/17



Budapest
Buenos Aires

Cc

ZZ


















63/17 48/8
— 6116 —50/10- S
79/26 58/14
79/26 56/134
63/17. 47/8 pc
- 81/27 70/27
Helsinki 61/16 52/11 sh
‘Hong Kon 87/30 79/26
Islamabad 108/42 88/31 s
Istanbul 3 86/30 7021
Jerusalem — 78/25 56/13 s
Johannesburg 59/15 s
Kingston — 91/32 79/26 pe
Lima_ 64/17 57/13 pe
London 68/20 61/16 ©
Madrid — 77/25. S7/A3
Manila 87/30 78/25 c
‘Mexico City 79/26 54/12 t
Monterrey 95/35 73/22 pc



: 84/28 61/16 pc
8 78/25 57/13 c
78/25 53/11 ¢



‘New Delhi 405/40 80/26 t-
Oslo «59/15 43/6 pc
Paris” | 75/23 59/15. :



84/28 59/15 po
84/28 71/21's
105/40 81/27 's
79/26. 63/17
88/31 81/27 t
ATR =f
86/30 a ti
46/7 —
90/32 ramet ;
77/25. 59/5 s—
83/28 60/15 c
65/18 45/7 pe
58/14 51/10 t_
89/31 76/24 t

69/20 69/20









Tohyo



7 91/32 “7021 pe
68/206 442 pe
86/30 68/20 pc

82/87 61/16 pc
76/24 58/14 t



Winnipeg

- 61/16



90/32 80/26
110/43 81/27
83/28 68/20



63/17 40/4







op 80/26 = 63/17-s.







70/21



86/30. 72/22
103/39 81/27
8127 BI/6





57/13 37/2
78/25. 57/13



Friday
High Low W
F/C F/C
88/31 79/26 ¢

68/20 57/13 ©

84/28. 55/12 pc
86/30 66/18 s

57N3 41/5 sh
94/34 80/26 t

86/30 77/25 pc
78/25 68/20 c

90/32 68/20 pc
75/23 75/23 s

93/33 69/20 pc
81/27 64/17 t

81/27 67/19 pc
65/18 46/7
75/23 50/10
94/34 65/18
52/11. 44/6
94/34 69/20
92/33 85/29
44/6
86/30 71/21
81/27 72/22 pc

oO NH WM es

74/23. 70/21 s

59/15 59/15 sh
61/16 50/10 ©
77/25. 51/10 t
81/27) 55/12 t
61/16. . 47/8 pc

83/28 72/22 t

63/17 48/8

78/25 56/13

87/30 78/25

~ 69/20 57/13 pe

68/20 57/13 c

72/22 SAN2 po

91/32 78/25 pc
75/23, 53/11 t

97/36 74/23 pc
81/27 64/17 pc

78/25 =44/6 c

85/29 59/15 c

76/24 49/9 c

106/41 81/27 pc

68/20 48/8
87/13

86/30 62/16

89/31 80/26
5512 30/-1
81/27 71/21
86/30 74/23

81/27 60/15

66/18 52/11 pc

58/14 49/9 r

82/27 76/24 t

79/26 70/21 pc

80/26 61/16 pc

91/32 66/18 s

66/18 53/11 ¢

89/31 66/18 pc

81/27. 63/17 pe

73/22 54/12 t

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace



| Ce [rae .
WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU = Today: VAR at 5-10 Knots 0-1 Feet 4-7 Miles 80° F
Friday: ESE at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet i 80° F




FREEPORT Today:
Friday:
Today:
Friday:






[SN] Showers
fxs] T-storms

Rain







VAR at 5-10 Knots
SE at 5-10 Knots =
VAR at 5-10 Knots
SSE at 5-10 Knots

1-3 Feet
1-3 Feet
1-3 Feet

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Stationary 2

us!

Bee cholic

Renn


PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS _

From North Eleuthera and Exuma to:

Atlanta $339

Coe Bene ois viel= aay Plelev/ e
a Additional taxes/fees/restrictions apply.
ie ce feet be purchased by June 16, 2007.
Rien as be Cele orate tee cic) roley2

For more inforin ation and Cae ene please contact your
Travel Agent or call delta at 800 221 1212 or visit delta.com.

A portion of travel for some itineraries may be on the Delta Connection® carrier Atlantic Southeast Airlines.

Restrictions: Travel agents may impose an additional service charge for ticketing. Tickets are nontransferable. Seats are limited and fare may not be available on all flights or in all markets. Tickets: Fare shown is
>. Round!trip purr required. Tickets must be purchased within 72 hours after reservations are made, but no later than June 16, 2007. Travel Period: Travel may begin on or after June 16, 2007.
be completed by August 20, 2007. Blackout Dates: None. Fare Validity: Fare is valid in the Economy (Coach) cabin on Delta/Delta Connection carrier flights only. Minimum Stay: 3 nights. Maximum
Stay: Nome, except travel must be completed by August 30, 2007. Cancellations/Refunds/Changes: Fare is nonrefundable. Delta may permit you to apply a portion of the fare value to future travel upon payment
of applicable fees and fare difference; otherwise, the ticket will have no value. Fees may apply for downgrades/reissues and itinerary changes. Delta may allow you to cancel certain electronic tickets until midnight
ci after purchese (or midnight of the departure date of the first flight, whichever comes first) without penalty if purchased at the time of reservation directly from Delta. Contact a Delta agent or visit
T ils, Tames/ Fees: Fare does mot include a $3.40 Federal Excise Tax, Passenger Facility Charge(s) of up to $4.50 for each flight segment, or the September 11th Security Fee of up to $2.50 for each
segment. A flight segment is defined as a takeoff and a landing. international fares do not include U.S. International Air Transportation Tax of up to $30.20 and U.S. and foreign user, inspection, security or
other similarly based charges, fees or taxes of up to $280, depending on itinerary. These taxes and fees are the responsibility of the passenger and must be paid at the time the ticket is purchased. Miscellaneous:
fare and rules are subject to change without notice. it is the responsibility of the passenger to be in possession of all necessary documentation (e.g., valid passport, visa where applicable) at the time of departure

from origin. Delta reserves the might to deny boarding to passengers without the proper documentation. Other restrictions may apply. ©2007 Delta Air Lines, Inc.



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007










Errington Russell
Sunset; April 28th, 2007



Life is but a stopping place,
A pause in what’s to be,
A resting place along the road,

To sweet eternity.





We all have different journeys,
Different paths along the way,
We are all meant to learn some fhe:
But never meant to stay...







Our destination is a place,
Far greater than we know,
-For some the journey’s quicker,
For some the journey’s slow.






But when the journey finally ends,
We'll claim a great reward,
And find an everlasting peace,
Together with the Lord.





Perhaps you sent a lovely card, or sat
quietly in a chair,

Perhaps you sent beautiful flowers, If so,
we saw them there,

Perhaps you sent or spoke kind words,
as any friend could say;
Perhaps you were not there at all, just

thought of us that day. |
Whatever you did to console the heart,
we thank you so very much,
whatever the part.








@

LO\’

ON




The Russell Family






| grant that We who reniain here to complete our earthly Sojoum,
emulate the life of this man whom. we all loved.so

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



THE BUILDER

Thomas Albert Sands a
OBE. J.P.




d man going the lone highway
vening old and grey






‘The builder lifted
“Good friend-in the pat.




Th



















gooles’



: Buildee Go






Claudia, Thomas, Christel, Chan


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





Card Of ‘thanks
The family of the late

RALPH ALLEN
KNOWLES

would like to thank their many

loving family members and
friends for their love and support
during their time of bereavement.

He will live 0!

| Geana, Dominic, Sarah, Barbara-Ann , Lorenz, Enrique,

Anthony, Marguerite, Anthony Jr., Elaine, Pedro,

Marcia, Mike, Xander, Brent, P lip, Joanne, Mark,
Christian and Angelique

_ Special thanks to Fr. at Pratt Li Bush
Burial Society and Dr. Ameeral..



of the late

ERLE W. T.
POWELL,
ed

Noi more smiles and happy chimes.
No more tatking of old times.
Flashbacks of the wong years we shared,
Knowing that you always cared.

Your smile will always linger

A peaceful moment we will always find.
We thank God for all of the wonderful years,
You comforted us through our joy and tears,

Thank you for contributing to ou Pc Y
We now know that only the strong. Re cx

You were our husband, father, friend and we will ever forget;
In the arms of Jesus, take your sweet rest.
Sleep on until we meet again. .
We will have our joyous reunion then.

We miss and love you always.
Your family forever





THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 3 |

Earl Richard Rahming

The family of Earl Richard Rahming would like to thank

you, for your warm expressions of sympathy, support and

compassion on the recent loss of our husband, father and
grandfather. —

We take comfort from the sympathy you have extended to
our family and in the memories we have of him.

Our family deeply appreciates all those who sent flowers or —

a sympathy card, called with kind words, or thought of us,

stood by us, cooked a meal or helped in any small way to
brighten us in our darkest days.

Thank you for keeping us in your thoughts and prayers.
~The Rahming Family~

Special thanks to: Rev'd Fr. Rodney Burrows, The
Venerable I. Ranfurly Brown, Rev'd. Fr. Bernard Been,
The-Rt .Rev'd Gilbert A. Thompson and St. Agnes Parish
Church family, Rev. Dr. Garnet King, Fr. & Mrs. John Taylor,
Kendal King & family, Edmond Moxey & family, Sylvia
Roberts, Rudolph & Joyce Burgzorg, Ozzie & Christine
Sawyer, Anzlo and Lease Stratchan, Marsha Deveaux,
Maxwell Poitier, Chris Cooper, Ricardo Knowles, Daphne
Taylor, Frank Hanna, Terrance Dorsett, Jermaine Thompson,
Mrs.Carmeta Ramsay, Laurie Ramsay, Andrea Payant, Collin
Chase, Clement Cartwright Mrs.Coriotta Klass, Mrs.
Dorothy Albury, Dr. Kevin Moss, Dr. Robert Gibson, Staff of
Princess Margaret Hospital A&E, doctors, nurses & staff of
Male Medical 1 & 2, Dr. Nicolas Fox and Staff of the Medi
Center, staff of Frank Hanna Cleaning Co., staff of B. T. V.1.,
staff of the Broadcasting Corp. of the Bahamas, management
& staff of Civil Aviation Airway Facility & Air Traffic Dept.,
First Caribbean Customer Service Center, staff of First
Caribbean Premises Dept., Class of St. Anne's School 1980,
management & staff of Bank of the Bahamas, St. Agnes
A.C.W; staff of Water & Sewerage, Armeta Saunders &
Family, the Hinds family, the Imperial Park neighborhood,

management & staff of Bethel Brothers Morticians and to all .
| other family and friends who may have assisted in any way. 4


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

Demeritte’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 e TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR







ESTHER THELMA
BETHEL, 75





Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

Left to cherish her loving memories are her daughters, Tasha |
& Melvina Munroe; stepdaughters, Yvonne Munroe of Syracuse, |
New York & Nurse Carolyn Jolly; sons, Capt. William C. :
Munroe, Sgt. 552 Gregory & Dave Munroe, Theodore Bethell :

‘a resident of Pink Cassia Ave., |
Garden Hills & 2 & formerly of |
the Bluff, Cat Island, will be held |
at St. Barnabas Anglican Church, :
Wulff & Blue Hill Roads, on : |
Saturday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating | |
will be Canon Basil Tynes. |
Interment follows in Lakeview |

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



2 Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
/ Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
: Saturday at thé church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.









FANELISE
CENATUS-THIMO, 61

a resident of Peter Street &
| formerly of St Louis du Nord,
| Haiti, will be held at Our Lady's
| Catholic Church, Deveaux Street,
on Saturday at 3:00 p.m.
Officiating will be Fr. Kaze Eugene
SMM. Interment follows in Old
Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.



& Stanley Hepburn; stepsister, Blossie Meadows; brother, |

Elliot Saunders; daughters-in-law, Joanne Hepburn, Donnalee,

Tamanika & Nadine Munroe of Freeport, Grand Bahama; :
grandchildren, Cpl. 210 Mendel Hepburn, Stanley Jr. Hepburn, :
Krystal, Kara, Christopher, Timitra, Sherice, Dantay, Davantay, |
Devantaly, Greg Jr., Dwight, Davion & Davia Munroe; great |

grand children, Rose, Kelly, CJ, Nikita & Brittaney Munroe;

nieces, Ann, Agatha, Judy, Dretha, Brendlee, Kathy, Marva &
Nikie; nephews, Robert, Perry, Kennie, Branard & Elroy Collie; :

cousins, Francis Ledee, Clarinda Major, Caroline Newbold &
Dorothy Newton of Miami, Florida; a host of other relatives

& friends including: Rev. Luther Thurston, Bishop Albert |
Hepburn, Dean Patrick Adderley, Brenetta Thurston, Helen |

Johnson, Jackie Wilson, Nikie & Joanna McKenzie,Togoods
McKenzie, Lisa Bain, Bishop Innis, Bettymae Poitier & family,

Audrey Bastian & family, Valarie Taylor, Blossie Clear, Tannie |
Michell, Thelma & family, Mable Morgan & family, Fenrick :

Rose, Syble McKenzie & family,Theresa Thurston, Starlin

Dean, Rowena Hepburn, Genive, Elahame, Hently, Willian |
Edgar & Ormand Thurston, Felix, OB, Chris, Pastor Edna |
Williams & family, Mother Rosilda Mackey & family, Eglahmae |
Ferguson & family, RosylIn Ferguson, Rodgers family, Richard

Armbrister & family, Saunders family, Paula Brooks & family,

Jenver Burns, Randy McClains & family, Jan Stuart & family, |

: Left to cherish her memories are her husband, Metilus Cenatus;
children, Mitilien & Ifoxa Cenatus, Therdieu Azard, Angeline
Cenetus, Sohanise Christophin, Rosilia Cenatus, Odiles
Christophin, Merita, Jileat, Jerta & Marie-Dieula Cenatus;
father, Demosthene Moline; mother, Phimerce Estalone;
: brothers, Anelson Innocent, Leximon, Anheon Moline; sisters,
Silvia, Destilia & Julina Moline; grandchildren, Mikens, Wendy,
Wenderson & Peterson Christophin, Loveline Fridomme,
: Bendjina & Rosoland Louis, Danie, Dermord, Janide, Imatha
: & Lovesen Azard, Likennode, Wolph Stanley, Yoldine &
Miliene Cenatus, Veldine & Rams Durosie, Elie, Jackson &
Ronel Azard, Jhonson Cenatus, Michael & Henrique Petit-
: Homme; nieces & nephews, Elliane, Frisnel, Philisnord, Elidieu,
: Rolend, Wilson, Renand, Milent, Wilbert, Willy, Luckson,
Phinansia & Florida; cousins, Agnes & Paul Joseph; Lazamille
Amescar, Beaufils & Belle Jille, Addie Fredrick, Nelta, Guerby,
: Morene, Claudette, Victor, Hendieu, Magdola, Oxy, Anthony
& Adele; other relatives & friends including, Ms. Hanna,
Claudette Rolle, Cathrine Moss, Kennieth Johnson, Patrice
Powell, Eric, Malinda & Maxon Fredrick, Mrs. Deja Alcira,
Bernie, Clermezine, Magarette, Salius Jinante, Antouman,
: Rozalia, Similie, Deja Mizou, Magritte, Malon Guerrien, Queen
of Peace family, Mrs. Fransisce, Julio & Guerrie family.

Major family, Mount Ararat Evangelistic Temple, Fr. Tynes & :

St. Barnabas Parish, Ministry of Works, the Kentucky family,
Maritha Smith, Marjorie Saunders, Nel Smith, Ms. Forbes,

Barrel, Miss Arnette, Kathy, Ms. Davis, Sheril Rocks & :
Enderlyn. Thanks to Dr. Rodgers & the A& E staff & Dr. Chin |
& the Private Medical Staff of the Princess Margaret Hospital. :

| Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
: Home, Market Street, from 10a.m to 6p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday from 9-1p.m. & at the church from 2:00 p.m. until
service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782



THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2007, PAGE 5



FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

JOHN MANDOWSON
"Uncle Johnnie"

GARDINER, 94

a resident of Weir Street, Baillou







Street, on Sunday at | :00 p.m.
UE Officiating will be Pastor Eric D.

Clarke, assisted by Elder Kenny
Deveaux, Elder Roger Forbes, Elder Chris Gayle & Other |
Ministers of Religion. Interment follows in Western Cemetery, |

Nassau Street.

Memories will always be treasured in the hearts of his daughter: |
Ruth Elizabeth Gardiner Asst. Professor, College of The ;
Lester, Gladstone, David and John :
Gardiner Leading Seaman of The Royal Bahamas Defense :
Force; mother to his children: Elomas; two daughters-in-law:

Gladys and Berthamae Gardiner; grandchildren: Kevin, Doug 2 ;
: Left to cherish her memories are her husband, Ernest Mackey;

: children, Bernard, Donna, Anthony, Henry, Nelson, Lonna,
: Angela, Sandra & Tony; daughters-in-law, Rose Hanna, Valarie
| Mackey & Ursula Mackey; sons-in-law, Craig Bethel &

Bahamas; four sons:

of Atlanta, Georgia, Troy of Charlotte, North Carolina,
Currleston, Gino, Garron of Philadelphia, Bernal of Orlando,
Florida, Calderon, Anton, Darmeeko, Raquel, Omar, David,
Chantel, Anishka, Johnelle, John 111, Ashanti, Johnea, Tameko,

Leon Roker Jr, Dion, Ramone, Basil Kelly Jr, Marquinn and

Maleake; twenty great grandchildren, adopted niece: Samantha _ Thurston; brothers, George & Crosby Wilmore; grandchildren,

: Henry, Bernard, Marvin, Dwight, Shavania, Rosetta, Jeremy,

Meadows; other adopted relatives: Carmie, Barbara, Hartman,

Anthony, Ann, Ellie, Astrid, Charlie, Yvette, Val, Dorothy, nia, 1
Kirk and Cora; cousins: Rona, Paul and Garth Major, Francita | Shavargo, Tonyshka, Jared, Kiki, Simeon, Celeste, Tonyque,
Forbes, Carmie Taylor, Gary, Henry and Eric Ingraham, Ruby |
Clarke, Bobette Goodman, Pat and Rudy Gardiner; descendents :
of the Gardiner and Ingraham Family of Governors and :

Tarpum Bay Eleuthera; many other relatives and friends | includu
Willacie, Angle, Denise, Susan, Charlotte, Courtnell, Rev.

including: the Carey, Culmer, Thompson, Bethel, Johnson,

Nottage, Saunders and Antrobus families, the Francis family : va i : :
of the Fort Hill, the Butler, McDonald, Newbold and Skeet | Mr. Philip Stubbs & family, Jackie Pratt & family, Dellamae
families of Weir Street, the Olander, Woodside, Adderley, : ; ‘
| & family, Mrs. Beverley Edwards & family, management &

Archer, Clarke, Wilkerson, Marshall, Montel, Ellis, Nixon,

Miller, Campbell, Neely, Isaacs, Brown, Pratt, Forbes, Stuart,
Stubbs, Walker, Martin and Morgan families; the family of :
Seventh Day Adventists, Batelco, Executive Motors, The |
Royal Bahamas Defense Force, The Culinary and Hospitality |
Management Institute COB, faithful tenants Sue, Ellen and :
Dugay, Archie & Son, political associated, the Bains and |
Grants Town and other over the hill communities, Cupids

: Cay, Governors Harbour, Tarpum Bay and many friends and
: relatives from Eleuthera and throughout the commonwealth
' of The Bahamas.

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
: Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Saturday & on
day fi -11 :00 a.m. & at the church fi 12:00

Hill Road, & formerly of Governors : eo ee etl G rae ecuucn none enn neon
Harbour, Eleuthera, will be held at |
_|Grants Town Seventh Day :

; Adventist Church, Wellington



Va





VERNIE IDELL
MACKEY, 78

| aresident of Dunmore Street, will
be held at Gospel Light Baptist
Church, Cowpen Road & Gerald
Bartlett Way, on Saturday at 11:00
| a.m. Officiating will be Spiritual
| Leader Bro. Perry Cunningham,
assisted by Rev. Kenny Mackey.
Interment follows in. Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.





Jonathan Clebrook; sisters, Edna Miller, Jane Rolle & Norma

Raymond, Clarissa, Leon, Latonia, Lorenza, Sergio, Shavette,

Tony, Santhon, Anea, Tonaz, Nakada, Henry, Henric, Henrenek,
Christopher, Darius & Branequa; a host of great grand nieces,
nephews, grandnieces, grand nephews, relatives & friends
including, Gwendolyn King & family, Mrs. Barbara Cooper,

Kenry Mackey, Pamela, Mrs. Munroe, Dunmore Street family,
Johnson & family, Gretchan Moncur & family, Ena Wissort
staff of K.F.C. Mackey Street, the management & staff of
Solomon Supercentre, management & staff of Seaside Buffet
and management & staff of Mackey's Plumbing.
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral

Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.




PAGE 6, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

Demeritte’s Funeral dome

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

- | Sturrup, Vanessa King, Violet, Giovanni and Keturah, Dennis (DJ)
: Mathers, Indira Porter, Brenville Saunders; numerous relatives and
: friends of Nassau, Althea Jones and family, Kosygen Forbes and
: family, Dorothy Barr and family, Andrew 'Andy' Forbes and family,
: Charmaine Musgrove and family, Nelson Musgrove and family,
: Shermica McKintosh and family, Marsha Smith and family, Hartley
a resident of Southern Heights, will be :
: family, Cynthia Rolle and family, Rose and Charles Edgecombe and





PEGGIE PEALINE
MUSGROVE-
MCKENZIE, 48

| held at Church of God of Prophecy,



Road.

Peggie, Peggs, Peggie Pearls, Miss Punny Moon, Aunt, Auntie,

Goddie, as she is known, is survived by: five (5) sisters: Mary :
Jethlyn Burrows and Lynda Higgs of :
Freeport, Brenda Lee Simmons of Kissimmee FI., and Bridgette :
Musgrove Flowers of Nassau; five (5) brothers, Cleamine Musgrove :
Jr. of New Jersey, Derek Musgrove of Nassau, Wingo and Monolito :
Musgrove of Freeport and Perry Arthur of Lake Worth FI.; six (6) :
sisters-in-law, Miriam, Daisy, Margaret, Brenda and Donnell :
Musgrove, and Betty Arthur; three (3) brothers-in-Law, Wilfred :
'Gary' Burrows, Ivan Higgs and Dwight 'Tony' Flowers; three (3) :
aunts, Alvissa and Winifred Forbes, and Anne Cox Musgrove; One :
: of God of Prophecy family especially the Elizabeth Estates, Soldier

Berkeley of Miramar FI.,

(1) uncle, James T. Musgrove; twenty (20) nieces, Opal Berkeley,

Shannay Sawyer, Elizabeth Ivanique Higgs, Vivienda Soto, Britoneia :
: Management of The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited,
: the Royal Bahamas Police Force and Reserves, the Royal Bahamas

Musgrove, Alveria Rigby Reid, Brendalee Smith, Donnalee Musgrove,
Lakisha Balfour Watson, Derycka, Deanka, and Deneika Musgrove,

Krystal Ferguson, Latricia and Laranda Musgrove, Rashan Albury, :
Monisha (Precious) and Monica Musgrove, Tanaia Green and Bianca :
Arthur; four (4) nieces-in-law, Lisa Berkeley, Kim and Gwenique :
Musgrove, and Lynette Hamilton; nineteen (19) nephews, Leslie :
Valentino Berkeley, Leading Seaman Themo Berkeley of The Royal :
Bahamas Defence Force, Pedro Berkeley, Wilfred Alexander and :
: Carol, Evan and Jay Williams and family, Kenneth 'Jimbo' Garland
: and family, Stephen Duncombe, Tanisha and Denniqua Johnson,
Patrick Hamilton, Ashley "Don" Arthur, Daniel Cochran, Derek :
Musgrove, Quincy Saunders, and Able Seaman Rondell Knowles :
: Symonette and family of The Turks and Caicos, Sandra Musgrove
Sam Sawyer, Moses Soto, Lloyd Reid, Greg Smith, and Shervaughn :
Watson; fifteen (15) grandnieces: Jaydon Martin, Kaymia, Trincy :
and Sasha Reid, Dominique and Arianna Smith, Neazure and Lakay :
: Charles Forbes and family, Nathaniel Forbes and family, Shannon

James Andrew Burrows, Richendo Simmons, Cleamine Francis,
Rudolph, Tryone, Wingo Jr., Gamal, Akio and Montel Musgrove,

of The Royal Bahamas Defence Force; five (5) nephews-in-law,

Stuart, Tatyana Musgrove, Tinisa and Taysia Berkeley, Tatiana Soto,

Shabethany Sawyer, Patrinique and Latonya Hamilton; three (3) :
grandnephews, Aiden Tyler Musgrove, Davonte Hamilton, Nacassian }
Pinder; special friends, Lavenia King and family, Pauline Porter and :
: are too numerous to list.
Sharon Cunningham and family, Sharon Chase and family, Rose :
Newton and family, Wendy Ferguson, Sheryl Bethel and family, and :
Sheila and Bernard Munroe and family; Several god-children :
including, Tenille Barr, Donovan Flowers, Inderia Henfield, Miquell :

family, Vanna Barry Roach and family, Bernice Bullard and family,

East Street Tabernacle, East Street, on :
Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will :
be Bishop Ghaly Swann, assisted by :
Pastor Dwight Ferguson. Interment :
follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier ;
: Woodside and family, Miriam Curtis and family, Josephine Gibson
: Musgrove and family, Dimple Laroda and family, Puncheeta and
: Almando Taylor and family, Muriel, Alice and Millie Symonette

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





Forbes and family, Sandra Butler and family, Isula Henfield and

family, Virginia and Elvis Carey and family, Eva and Lyle Burrows,
Mae Higgs and family, Gwendolyn Hall and family, Roland Hamilton,
Melda Scavella, Shirley Bonamy and family, Ilene Burrows and
family, George Astwood and family, Patricia and Zieha Rahming,
Vernita Mackey and family, Emaline Curtis and family, Katherine

and family, Rose Newton and family, Edith Saunders and family,
June Collie and family, Ivan Barr and family, Renee.and Joseph
Young and family, Basil and Agnes Charlow and family, Anishka
and Laverne Davis and family, Marva Kelly and family, Virginia
Sawyer and family, Wanda Darville and family, Melanie Goddard
and family, Vernita Mackey and family, Dereo Maycock and family,
Kenton Whylly and family, Andrea Sturrup and family, Annamae
Hepburn and family, Henry "Hank" Bain and family, Louis Major
and family, Henry Roberts and family, The communities of Joan's
Heights West, South Beach and Southern Heights, the entire Church

Road, Baillou Hill Road and East Street Branches, the Staff and

Defence Force and the Graduates of Government High School
especially the Class of 1975 of Freeport, Lydia and Mark Moss and
family, Don and Emma Forbes, Andrea Missick and family, Samantha
McIntosh and family, Diana, Kirk, and Arthur Musgrove and family,
Cleophas Capron and family, Rosemae Saunders-Musgrove and
family, Alexander 'Kalik' Newbold and family, Stanley, Peter, Elsie,

and Willimae Symonette of Bimini and Cat Cay, Rosemary
Edgecombe, and Beatrice Thompson and family of Abaco, Deborah

and family, Eustace Musgrove and family, Cynclair "Pearly" Musgrove
and family, Curlin Musgrove and family, and Stanford Forbes and
family of The United States of America, Keith Forbes and family,

Henfield and family, Carolyn Grey and family, Nettamae Beckles
and family, Glee Musgrove and family, Patsy Williams and family,
and Cheryl Dottin and family. Many other family and friends that

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the
church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Ee

soe eee

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 7

» Bethel Brothers Morticians

- Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

_FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Shane "House"
Anthony Roberts, 32

_ godparents, Jessica Bowe and Frank Guillaume
_ of Miami, Fla.;
including, Peter Roberts-Whitfield, Clifford
_ Storr, Jerome Franks, Gary Wallace, Ruth Sands, .
of East Store Court, |
Yellow Elder Gardens |
will be held Saturday ©
10:45am at St. Francis |

| Xavier Cathedral, West 2 ! :
_ Isaacs and family, Maria McKenzie and family,

and other relatives and friends

Louise Wallace-Thompson, Sidney Wallace,
Paula Williams and Family, Wendal B. Roberts,
Steve, Martin and Brad Albury and the Albury
Clan of Gregory Town, Eleuthera, Mr and Mrs
Neville Albury and family, Mr and Mrs Oswald

_ Maxine Mitchell-Taylor, Sonny Scott. Numerous

Alphonso William Evans; one son, Shane Jr.;

grand mother, Merle Roberts; one grand aunt, |
Ruth Rolle of Syracuse, N.Y.; twenty two aunts, |
Keva Nethersole, Delvera Wallace, Dr. Lynda |
Riddle of Cincinnati, Yolanda Thomas, Francis ©
Roberts, Carolyn Roberts (Freeport), Carolyn |
Roberts (Nassau), Marsha (Abaco), Brenda |
- Tinker, Patrice White, Savannah Georgia, |

Elva Armbrister, Debbie 2
_ family, Roots and One Family Junkanoo Group

Winifred Roberts,
Longley, Wendy Lightbourne, Joy Nicholls,

Nadine Rolle, Tasma Rolle, Hartlyn Roberts, |
Patsy and Sheila Mackey, Margaret and Nora |
Evans; twelve uncles, Anthony Roberts, Hon. |
Bradley B. Roberts, Dr. Robin Roberts, Vaughn |
Roberts, Gladstone, Asa, Paul, Lester, Mackey, |
Craig and Kevin Rolle, Andrew Thomas; |

_ nieces, nephews and cousins to name. Special

_ thanks to the management and staff of the Water

_ and Sewerage Corp., the members and officers

_ of the BUSAWU, Doctors Sands, Weech and
Left to mourn his Chin, Nurses of ICU of the Princess Margaret
passing but to cherish |

happy memories are his loving and devoted |

mother, Donna Pauline Roberts; his father, |
_ Walk In Medical Clinic, Carla Neymour and

Hospital, Dr. Tracey Roberts-Halkitis,
management and staff of The Nassau Hotel
Restaurant Supplies, Doctors and Nurses of the

family (Andros), James Ferguson and sisters,
Roy-Ann Lowe and family, Rosalee Lightfoot
and family, Geraldine Curtis, Barbara, Joyce
and Kimberley Bain, Shirley Cooper, residents
of East Storr Court, Yellow Elder Gardens, Fr.
Glen Nixon, Nuns of St. Martin's Convent,
members of St. Francis Xavier's Cathedral,
Darren Parker and family, Florence Kemp and

and staff of Bethel Brothers Morticians.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel
Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Friday
from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at the church
from 9:45am until service time..


Set eee! UL as Sg

PAGE 8, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007

Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.
die oe Director :

Pd eee
See Ree

Tyne com ie ey er ae ta
Kené Kenica Smith, 21

a resident of Silver Gates Estates and
formerly of both Calabash Bay and
Fresh Creek, Andros, will be held on
Saturday, June 16th, 2007 at 10:00 a.
m. at St. Paul's Anglican Church,
Calabash Bay, Andros. Officiating will
be The Very Rev. Father S. Sabastian

Campbell, assisted by other Ministers _

of the Gospel. Interment will follow

in the Public Cemetery. Services have

been entrusted to Gateway Memorial

Funeral Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue
). and Kenwood Street.

Left to cherish the memories of her —

"never ending smile are her mother, Christine Adderley; father, Ken

Smith; brothers, Hassan Bowleg, Ken Jr.; 2 adopted sisters, Tamara . §

Wilson and Darriel Rolle; 1 adopted brother, Darrell Rolle Jr., 1
Godchild, Brianna Bowles; stepmother, Petralee Smith; grandmothers,
Merril Rolle and Reinadell Smith; grandfather, William "Bill"
Adderley; step-grandmother, Valderine Adderley; aunts: Leucretia
and Nickla Rolle, Hope Wilson, Karis Davis, Vernita and Portia
Smith, Gena Young, Dianne Adderley; uncles, Darrell, Ricardo and
Keno Rolle, Ricardo Davis, Dale, Dennis, Dexter and Devon
Adderley, Nelson, Gordon, Errol, Vandyke, Patrick, Philip, Don,
and Tredwell Smith; grandaunts, Coralee Bain, Gloria Johnson,
Rosalie Sweeting, Maxine and Diane Thompson, Cassalina Curry,
Beatrice Tinker, Lilian Rolle, Sally Dill, Inez Mason and Millicent
Miller; granduncles, Hesley and James Roosevelt Thompson, Bernard
Bain, Ivan Johnson and Fredrick Curry; special friends, Jason Neely,
Lynette Hutchinson, Daniel Miller, Branitta Buchanan, Talitha
Strachan, Audra Bain, Miesha and Jordan Prince William's graduating
class of 2004. Other relatives and friends including, Tia, Tarriah,
Tresia, Robyn, Renaldo, Peabo, Altonique, Nickquelle, Carlette,
Aniyah, Racquille, Shaquille, Kaynaj, Keno Jr., Kianna, Kia, Ingrid,
Patricia, Keva, Nicole, Kelly, Pearlamae, Roston, Cleo, Lavern, Joy,
Dominique, Tanya Thompson, Sherry, Patty, Kimberley, ‘Mum’,
Dede, Alliah, D'Mari and Darren Adderley, Felicia, Richanna,
Rexeanna, Chaka, Sanovia, Shatoya, Debrice, Arlene, Alicia, Sophia,

_ Kaitlyn, Shanny, The Dean Family, The Stuart Family, The Western
Air Family, The College Of The Bahamas Family, The Torchbearers
Family, The One Family Family, The Purple Zone Family, The North
‘Andros Family, The Calabash Bay Family, The Silver Gates Family,
The Whitfield Family, The Mills Family, The Turnquest Family and
The Ferguson Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Thursday
from 3 :00 p. m to 7:00 p. m., on Friday from 9:00 a. m. to | :00 p.
m. and at the church in Andros from 4:00 p. m. to service time at
the church.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Mackey Street ° P.O. Box N-4404
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-341-6451 ° Nights 242-322-3242
24 Hour Cell: 242-427-5414

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Dorothy Denise
Clarke, 50

of Wulff Road will be held on
Saturday, June 16, 2007 at Bethel
Baptist Church, Meeting Street at
10am. Officiating will be Pastor
Timothy Stewart, assisted by other
ministers of religion. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish fond memories are
her mother, Ruby Neely; father,
Richard Clarke; five sons, Damon, Treko, Jason Lavardo and
Christopher; one daughter, Tiffany; five grandchildren, Jamal Jr.,
Jasmine, Taleea, Desmond Jr. and Jason Jr.; seven brothers, Christopher

| and Anthony Clarke, Phillip Lightbourne, Stephen, Frank, Calvin

and Jermain Mackey; two sisters, Sandra Cooper and Linda Greer of
Michigan; two sisters-in-law, Judith and Tonette; two aunts, Virginia
Neilly and Edith Sawyer; three grand uncles, Calvin, Twyman and
Clinton Neilly; three grand aunts, Eloise Albury, Sharon Lyles and
Helena Neilly; three aunts-in-law, Mercelita, Evelyn and Diana Neilly;
numerous nieces and nephews, including Valentino Sands, Andre
Cooper, Shaneya, Franjadi, Faith, Brandon, Philon, Rayan, Paris,
Anthony Jr., Donray and Anthonique; numerous other relatives and
friends including Marie Horton, Twees Dean, Lillian Johnson, Shevette
Edwards, Sabrina Roberts, Aletha Cooper, Dwight Lyles, Dwayne
Woodside, Irma, Kendal, and Maxwell Albury, Gregory, Kingsley
Cash, Beverley Sobiech, Ruby Curtis, Florinda Lightbourn, Meryl
Rolle, Helen Hall, Lynette Barry, Valeria Johnson, Anthony, Calvin
Jr., Carlton Neilly, Cheryl, Rhodrille, Dale Neilly, Cynthia Thompson,
Thudgelyn, Theodore, Terrel Neilly, Clinton Jr., Deane, Yelena Neilly,
Rowena, Patrick, Wenzel Neilly, Janet Pratt, Charles Demeritte, Edna
Pennerman and family, Gloria Ward and family, Cynthia Brown and
family, Nellie Cooper and family, the staff of City Markets, the staff
of Bahamas Food Services Limited, the staff of Tropical Shipping,
the staff of Hard Rock Café, the staff of Oyster Bars Seafood, Donna
Wilson and family, the staff of Atlantis, Cheryl Miller and family,
Adrian Smith and family, Bethel Baptist Church and family, Quincey
Bevans and family, Rev. Timothy Stewart and family, Esther Winder
Storr and family, Curly Aranah and family, Judy Roberts and family,

‘the staff of the Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture,

Audrey Dean, Edith Smith and family, Agatha, Jennie, Ronnie, Sarah,
Frith, Richard, Christopher, Pat Horton, Willmae Goodman, Joseph
Horton, Christina, Eldrid, Bridgette Mortimer, Marie Horton and
many others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Evergreen Mortuary,
Mackey Street on Friday from 12noon until 6pm and again at the
church from 9am until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES




Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 e Nassau, N.P., Bahamas 7
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 9



eee





































ALLISON DIANNE
| ELLIS, 37






Road.

' family, staff of Housekeeping Princess Margaret Hospital,
: the Fort Fincastle Community, Christine Gardiner and family,
‘ Kathleen Darville and family, Walter Saunders and family, |

a resident of Fort Fincastle, will :
be held 11am, on Saturday, 16th :
June, 2007, at Lighthouse :
Fellowship Church of God, :
Mahogany Street, Malcolm :
Allotment. Officiating will be :
Bishop Carlton J. Stuart, assisted :
] by Minister Stanley Smith, Rev. :
Shirley Smith, Rev. Theresa :
Burrows. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier :

Cherished memories are held by her son, Maxwell Jenoure;
two daughters, Anastasia Jenoure and Latoya Precious Carey; :
twenty-two grandchildren, Abigail and Allison Jenoure, Kirk :
Stuart, Allison, Antonia, Ariel, Jalisa, Melissa, Jan, Teran, :
Temecia, Joshua, Jermain, LaTorian, Labrea, Lucy, Jatoria, :
Jason Jr., Jerome, Matthew, Kenia and Dario; adopted father, :
Richard Culmer; nine adopted children, Theresa Knowles, :
Brunette Rose, Lashanda Smith, Carmaine Chea, Devonne
Smith, Wendall Bethel, Thomas Lockhart, Brunette :
Edgecombe and Jason Sr.; six brothers, Oswald Carey, Philip
Colebrooke, Clement, Richardo, Carlton Cartwright and :
_ Glenroy Culmer; three sisters, Brenda Larrimore, Arnette !
Collins, Christine and Mitchleen Culmer; fifteen nephews, :
Bryan Morley, Danny Cooper, Chester Darville Jr., Bryan :
Morley Jr., Bryon Morley, William Cartwright, Stephen :
Cartwright, Frank, Tony, Arthur, Dennis, Trevor and Marlon :
Carey, Philip and Justin David; six nieces, Ricarla Rodgers, :
Christer Darville, Brynesha Morley, Patrice Drakes, Elizabeth :
Carey and Kendra Carey; daughter-in-law, Alfreda Fowler :
Jenoure; brother-in-law, James Larrimore; sister-in-law, Annie :
Colebrook; godchildren, Lapond McIntosh, Shawn Taylor, :
Tevin Stevans and Sharlene; and a host of other relatives and :
friends including, Edward, Maxwell Jenoure Sr. and family, :
Kandaisy Roker and family, Jayde, Bersil, Edward Jr., Stanley, :
Osbourne and Bradley Stuart, Daphane Johnson, Rev. Princess :
Smith, Rev. Shirley Smith, Bishop Carlton and Sister Genesta :
Stuart and the Lighthouse Fellowship Church of God, staff :
of Office Plus, Freeport, Gloria Stubbs and family, Margaret :
Saunders and family, Terry and Molesta Winder, the Lockhart :
family, Joseph Ward and family, Rosilee Thompson and :
family, Richardo Rodgers, Mable Jenoure and family, Deborah :
Bethel, Linda Adderley, Sonia Miller, Nelson George and :






Eunice Young, Sammy Culmer and family, David Smith,
Presca Gibbs and family, Francis Knowles and family.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Cedar
Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on
Friday from 12noon to 6pm and at the church on Saturday
from 9:30am until service time.



GASTON
VEDRINE, 39

a resident of Chippingham, formerly
-of Bord-De-Mer, Jean Rabel, Haiti,
will be held 2pm on Saturday, 16th
June, 2007, at Emmaus Baptist
Church, McCollough Corner.
Officiating will be Rev. George
Choute. Interment will follow in the
Southern Cemetery, Spikenard and
Cowpen Road.

Cherished memories are held by his wife, Magelitta Vedrine;
children, Igentha, Wisnaldine and Gerbensly Vedrine; father,
Delpe Vedrine; mother, Ilfancia Toutoute Vedrine; brothers,
Raphael and Rockine Vedrine; sisters, Cilia, Antoinette and
Melila Vedrine, Morrell and Leyanna Noel; nephews and
nieces, John Fritz, Kendy, Pepsi and Lucadet, Ylfancia,
Asonise, Silvany, Dianna, Brigette and Witnika Vedrine;
uncles and aunts, Orest, Dieuseul, Presendiew, Rivelle, Carida,
Elainne and Charitable Vedrine and Fradet Cheri; cousins,
Mela, Benoit, Elie, Odilon and Estme Vedrine, Rosena, Sandy,
Junior, Florentine, Pitelson, Wisley, Rosiana, Dianna, Elita,
Lamercie, Diudonne, Mme Morange, Elda, Gogo, Nicles, St.
Matil, Placida, Johnson, Elza, Merlande, Adline, Zando,
Genise and Johnsy Vedrine and Mme St Amand and family,
and a host of other relatives and friends including the Noel,
Jeanty, Vedrine, Jean-Baptiste, Roche and Toutoute families.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Cedar
Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street on
Friday from 12noon to 6pm and on Saturday from 10am to
12noon and at the church from 12:30pm until service time.
PAGE 10, THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007



Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

Br et ae

ELDRICA
BURROWS, 74

of East Street South will be
held on Saturday at 2pm at
Fellowship Baptist Church,
Pigeon Plum Street,
Pinewood Gardens.
Officiating will be Rev. Ron
Deleveaux. Interment in The
Southern Cemetery.



She is survived by four daughters, Lenora Douglas,
Kim Lopez, Ruth Burrows and Louise Odelle of
Washington, D.C.; three sons, Philip Burrows of Miami,

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary!

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020e Robinson Rd & 5th Street |



Fla., Ivan Lockhart and Larry Burrows; five sisters, |

Albertha Wilkinson, Hilda Joseph, Edith Cooper, Selma
Joseph and Agnes Joseph; two sons-in-law, Lanny




Lopez and Bill Odelle; three daughters-in-law, Yvonne, |

Debra and Patricia Burrows; brothers-in-law, George
Cox; sister-in-law, twenty one grandchildren, Patrick

and Philip Burrows Jr., Tess Douglas, Terrell Cleare, |

Keisha and Lenny Lopez, Javon and Vernica of
Washington D.C., Qrazy McGree, Opara Lockhart,
Joshua Chipman, Kitty and Devon Lockhart, Derek
Lewis, Taurus Farrington, Larry Burrows Jr., Tallea
Burrows, Tekoa, Melissa, Theo and Tré; three adopted
grandchildren, WR 772 Shacanla Rahming, Latoya
Douglas and Andre Albury; numerous great
grandchildren including, Angel, Rasheed, Rasheea,
Jason, Kiana, Ricardo, Tico, Rachrgah, Lestazia, Makhi,
Randi, Mariska, Taurus Jr., Torique, Lazaria, Oran,
Shantanae, Sierra, Opera Jr.; numerous nephews

including, Wilfred, Terrance, Joe, Tony, Flint, Ned Jr., |
Clyde, Mickie Swann; numerous nieces including, |
Majorie Williams, Ceva Sweeting, Helena Munroe, |
Val, Cyprianna, Audrey, Joey, Margo, Robin, Cherry, |

Sharry, Emma and WCPL 2305 Sweeting; host of

other relatives and friends including Vincent Peet, |
John Darville, Kevin McDonald, Naka, Dr. Megan |
Brooks, Karen Farrington, Alvin Knowles; other |

relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road anc Fifth Street on Friday from 10am
until 6pm, Saturd 1 9am until [2noon and at the

church from ipn “rvice time

4




‘
i
t
'
‘

Remembering

Sean Hilton “Soldier”

THE TRIBUNE: OBITUARIES







You On
Father’s Day ~






the late
Able Seaman Mario







1972 - 2006

oe
“Gone Too Soon”

Nothing could be more precious,



Than the memory we have of you
To Us you were very spectal,
God must have thought SO too!
All our lives we shall miss you,
As the years come and go
Dut mn our hearts you will live forever
/ecause we love you SO.
Missing vou, vour loving wife, Sherry! Hilton; children, Taquin and

‘parents, brothers, sisters and other relatives and friends.

Cc} 44
JMOTNCITE,
THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES | = . THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2007, PAGE 11








St. George’s Anglican Church
Music Ministry presents

Featuring the choirs of

All Saints Episcopal Church, Princeton, NJ
¢ The Highgrove Singers &

© St. George’s Senior Choir

der the direction of Kathleen Milly & Adrian Archer

saturday, June —— 2007
St. George’s Anglican
Church

21 Montrose Avenue



tis © OC Haig eer ¢ Jack
Heble White *« Roger Ames ¢ Leonard
Bernstein * Benjamin Harlan.







and soloists:
‘Candace Bostwick
Ailan Butler

Zach Coaies

Hope Krick-Osborn
Vakare Peiroliunais
Adrian Archer

ALLELES PILES LN EON ILE TSS No NE IE NIE EEE SSS NSS ASN ARS hd ec tg ub ee eR





ee eee 6


PG 12 ° Thursday, June 14; 2007 RELIGION | | The Tribune

Cardinal: Catholics shouldn't
- fund Amnesty International

sone





@ A TODDLER reacts
as he is held up to Pope
Benedict XVI wearing
ared hat, during the
weekly general audience
in St. Peter’s Square at
the Vatican, Wednesday,
June 13, 2007.

(AP Photo/Pier Paolo
Cito) -

because of abortion stance

VATICAN CITY

A VATICAN cardinal said Monday
that Roman Catholics shouldn’t con-
tribute to Amnesty International
because of the group’s new policy that
calls for access to abortion services for
women under certain circumstances,
according to Associated Press.

The human rights organization
reversed its longtime neutral stance on
abortion in April and adopted a policy
urging governments to ensure access to
abortion services for women in the case
of rape, incest or when pregnancy rep-
resents a risk to the mother’s life or a
grave risk to her health.

Cardinal Renato Martino, who heads
the Vatican’s justice and peace depart-
ment, criticized the policy, saying it rep-
resented a betrayal of Amnesty’s goals

‘of ensuring human rights around the

world.

“The inevitable consequence of this
decision, according to the cardinal, will
be the suspension of any financing to
Amnesty on the part of Catholic organ-
izations and also individual Catholics,”
according to a statement from
Martino’s office.

In a statement, Amnesty said it had
never received any financing from the

Vatican or from official Roman
Catholic organizations.
Spokesman Riccardo Nourey

acknowleged that the group may well
have received financing from “Catholic-
inspired” groups as well as individuals,
but not from organizations that are an
official extension of the Catholic Church.

In fact, Amnesty’s statutes specifical-
ly say that the London-based organiza-

tion is independent of any government,
political party, church, religious confes-
sion or other group.

In the statement, Amnesty explained
that its new abortion policy came about
as part of its global Stop Violence
Against Women campaign.

The group, winner of the 1977 Nobel
Peace Prize, said it recognized that
women and girls were victims of gen-
der-based violence and bear the conse-
quences of “the abuse of their sexual
and reproductive rights.”

Amnesty says it isn’t taking a posi-
tion on whether abortion is right or
wrong, and will not campaign generally
for abortion rights. But it says it decid-
ed to make the policy so it could
address abortion as it relates to its core
work of ensuring the right to health for
women and violence against women.

Martino, who was the Vatican’s U.N.
envoy for 16 years, often makes head-
lines with his pronouncements on issues
of the day: He has expressed support
for genetically modified foods, saying
they could help feed the world’s hungry;
and he has backed scientists who ques-
tion the gravity of climate change.

The statement from Martino’s office
was carried by the official Vatican
Radio. However, the statement on the
Vatican Radio Web site omitted a key
phrase from the original in which
Martino says even individual Catholics
should withhold financing for Amnesty.

A Martino spokesman said he didn’t
know why Vatican Radio had omitted
the section, but insisted that the cardi-
nal fully meant that individual
Catholics should suspend donations to
the group.
The Tribune

a

RELIGION

Thursday, June 14, 2007 °PG 13

Vatican gives award to UN
General Assembly president

who supported contraception

@ UNITED NATIONS

THE Vatican’s U.N. observer pre-
sented an award for promoting peace
and development to the president of
the U.N. General Assembly, a pioneer-
ing Arab lawyer and women’s rights
advocate who publicly supported con-
traception in the fight against AIDS,
according to Associated Press.

Archbishop Celestino Migliore said ©

Sheikha Haya Rashed Al Khalifa, the
legal adviser to Bahrain’s Royal Court,
was also selected for the 15th Path To
Peace Award because of her work to
encourage intercultural and inter-reli-
gious dialogue as president of the 192-
nation world body.

Migliore presented the medal from
the Path to Peace Foundation to the
General Assembly president at a din-
ner Tuesday night attended by over 350
people at U.N. headquarters. The foun-
dation, which Migliore heads, was
established to promote the Catholic
church’s message of peace primarily by
supporting the work of the Holy See’s
U.N. mission.

In a message on World AIDS Day in
December 2006, Al Khalifa said that in
fighting the HIV virus and AIDS,
young people “face barriers to access
services provided by governments or
they cannot afford them and fear being
judged when they go to a clinic.”

_ “This severely limits access to con-
traception and leads to the high rates of

unintended pregnancy and HIV in’

young people,” she said. “Almost 140
million women do not have access to
contraception — so they have no choice
in deciding if and when to have chil-
dren. If world leaders honor their com-
mitments and live up to their promises,
then young people would have the
reproductive health services and infor-
mation to meet their needs.”

According to a statement from the
United States Conference on Catholic
Bishops in 2004, “the Catholic commu-
nity and Catholic institutions should
not honor tl.ose who act in defiance of
our fundamental moral principles.
They should not be given awards, hon-
ors or platforms which would suggest
support for their actions.”

Migliore reiterated the Catholic
church’s opposition to artificial contra-
ception and its strong support for
human lite. He said he did not want “to
give much importance” to concerns



@ UN General Assembly President Sheikha Haya Rashed AI Khalifa speaks during a news conference at the Vienna
International Center on Wednesday, May 30, 2007. Al Khalifa will attend a women’s networking conference aimed at
promoting peace and security in the Middle East on Thursday.

about Al-Khalifa’s award by some anti-
abortion advocates because their con-

cerns are based on the AIDS message. —

“TI consider that what the president
said on that occasion reflected the
national reports on this issue, and she
summarized the national reports ... and
that is something within the duties of
the president of the General Assembly
— to present what the General
Assembly relates,” he said.

Ashraf Kamal, spokesman for the
General Assembly president, said Al
Khalifa was chosen to receive the
award.

“The sheikha has spoken coura-

geously in favor of all women the world
over and her commitment to their
cause has been absolutely strong,” he
said.

Kamal quoted Migliore’s assistant,
Rev. Vittorio Guerrrera, as saying:
“The decision to specifically honor Ms.
Al-Khalifa for her work on inter-reli-
gious dialogue along with her dedicat-
ed effort to promote peace, develop-
ment and the rule of law was made
after diligent review...".

Al Khalifa chose the importance of
intercultural and inter-religious dia-
logue for one of the four thematic
debates she organized in the General

(AP Photo/Hans Punz)

Assembly. It was held last month.

In her speech accepting the award,
AI Khalifa said that “promoting a true
dialogue among civilizations and reli-
gions is perhaps the most important
political instrument that we can use to
reach out across borders and build
bridges of peace and hope.”

She called for greater efforts to over-
come mistrust, saying “all religious
leaders have a duty to motivate their
followers to engage ‘others’ more rea-
sonably and with greater mutual
respect, while remaining true to their
own beliefs."



—_—




B HINDU spiritual
leader and humanitarian
Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, left,
former Indonesian
President Abdurrahman
Wahid, center, and
Director of the Pardes
Institute of Jewish
studies Rabbi Daniel
Landes attend a confer-
ence on religious toler-
ance in Bali, Indonesia,
Tuesday, June, 12, 2007
A Jewish Holocaust
survivor made a plea for
tolerance Tuesday at 2
conference in the world’s
most populous Muslim
nation that also brought
together religious leaders
and victims of attacks by
Islamic extremists.

(AP Photo/Firdia
Lisnawati)

Holocaust survivor appeals for
tolerance in Muslim Indonesia

@ INDONESIA
Bali



RELIGIOUS leaders and victims of
terrorist attacks gathered in the world’s
most populous Muslim nation Tuesday
to protest the Iranian president’s claims
that the Holocaust may have been a
“myth”, according to Associated Press

Among them was a Jewish survivor
of the genocide, who made an impas-
sioned plea for tolerance.

“I hope people will learn from the
past,” said So] Teichman, 79, who was a
teenager living in Czechoslovakia when
his city was occupied first by the
Hungarian army and _ then~ the
Germans. “We should try to improve
life instead of destroying it.”

The daylong gathering on Indonesia’s
resort island of Bali was attended by the
country’s former President
Abdurraham Wahid, Hindu spiritual
head Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, Buddhist

teachers, a Jesuit priest and - rare in a
country that does not recognize Israel
or the Jewish religion — rabbis.

One of the goals was to discuss ways
to end the growing polarization
between faiths since the Sept. 11, 2001,
attacks in the United Sates.

Another was to counter a December
conference hosted by Iranian President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad that tried to
cast doubt on the killing of an estimat-
ed 6 million Jews during World War II.

“Why are the Jews so concerned
about the Holocaust? Well one-third of
our people were killed and only within
six to seven years,” said Rabbi Daniel
Landes, who teaches theology in
Jerusalem.

“That abhors us not only as Jews, it’s
abhorrent to us as members of human-
ity,” he said. “If it can happen once to a
group of people, it can happen to
everyone.”

Wahid, who led Indonesia from 1999

to 2001 and remains a highly respected
moderate Muslim leader, said it was
important that people have the courage
to speak the truth.

“Although I’m a good friend of
Ahmadinejad, I have to say that he is
wrong,” he said. “I visited Auschwitz’s
Museum of Holocaust and I saw many
shoes of dead people. Because of this, I
believe the Holocaust happened.”

Security was tight at the five-star
hotel that hosted the discreetly organ-
ized event.

Indonesia’s government is secular
and most of its 190 million Muslims are
moderate, but a vocal militant fringe
has grown louder in recent years. Al-
Qaida-linked terrorists have twice
attacked Bali -—a mostly Hindu enclave
— killing more than 220 people.

“It has been difficult for me to excuse
in my heart those who committed this
act,” said Tumini, a Balinese woman
who suffered severe burns over her

body during a nightclub blast in 2002.

She said she still has not recovered
emotionally, physically or financially.

The conference was sponsored by
the Libforall Foundation, a U.S. based
organization that seeks to counter
Muslim extremism in the Islamic world
by supporting religious moderates, and
the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s
Museum of Tolerance.

Teichman, speaking publicly for the
first time in a predominantly Muslim
nation, said Ahmadinejad’s questioning
of the Holocaust made him want to
“push a little harder” to talk to Islamic
leaders.

“I ask only one question,” said
Teichman, who was sent to Auschwitz,
Dachau, and three other concentration
camps before allied forces liberated
him 1945.

“If that is a lie, can you tell me what
happened to my mother? To my sister?
To my brothers? To my gran ‘parents?"
The Tribune

RELIGION Thursday, June 14, 2007 °PG 15

Cuba's first female
Episcopal bishop world
welcomes mission

B HAVANA

NEW Episcopal Bishop Nerva Cot Aguilera, the
church’s first female bishop in Cuba and the devel-
oping world, said Monday she welcomed the
opportunity to show what women can do if given
the chance, according to Associated Press.

“I feel very honored by my designation,” Cot
told The Associated Press in a phone interview, a
day after being consecrated at the Holy Trinity
Episcopal Cathedral in Havana. “It’s a historic act
that demonstrates women’s possibilities.”

Cot’s designation as suffragan bishop was first
announced in February.

“Her appointment is a wonderful reminder that
in some nations, leadership is primarily about gifts
for service and not about gender,” U.S. Presiding
Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, who took office
in November as the first woman to lead the church,
said at the time.

Also consecrated on Sunday was Cuban’s other
new suffragan bishop, Ulises Mario Aguiera
Prendes.

Cuba’s Episcopal Church has about 10,000 mem-
bers in a nation of more than 11 million. A majori-
ty of Cubans are nominally Roman Catholic, but
Protestant denominations and the African-influ-
enced faith Santeria have gained in popularity in
recent years.

Cot was a secondary school teacher before
church reforms permitted her ordination as one of
the first three Episcopal women priests in Cuba in
1987.

Cuba was a diocese of the U.S. church until 1967,
when it was forced to break away because hostility
between the U.S. and Cuban governments made
contacts difficult. Cuba’s communist leaders were
embracing official atheism at the time, a stance

abandoned in the early 1990s.

- The Episcopal News Service of the U.S.
Episcopal Church reported earlier this year that
the Cuban church has since operated under a
Metropolitan Council, an extra-provincial region
of the church. Now chaired by the Archbishop
Andrew Hutchison of Canada, the council also
includes Jefferts Schori and the archbishop of the
West Indies.

Cuba’s interim vishop, Miguel Tamayo, is also
bishop of Uruguay.

As suffragan bishops, Cot and Aguiera will serve
under Tamayo. Cot said she will be responsible for
western Cuba with Aguiera heading the church in
the east.

The Episcopal Church of Cuba is part of the 77
million-member Anglican Communion, a global
fellowship of churches that trace their roots to the
Church of England.





@ NEW Episcopal Bishop Nerva Cot Aguilera, the church’s first female bishop in Cuba and the developing
world, works in an office at the Holy Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Havana, Tuesday, June 12, 2007. Cot was
a secondary school teacher before church reforms permitted her ordination as one of the first three
Episcopal women priests in Cuba in 1987.

(AP Photo/Javier Galeano)
PG 16 © Thursday, June 14, 2007 RELIGION The Tribune

St Louis archbishop has record
of publicly scolding dissenters

@ By BETSY TAYLOR
Associated Press Writer

ST. LOUIS (AP) — In_his three
years as St. Louis archbishop, the Most
Rev. Raymond Burke has taken on a
presidential contender, a pop star,
Missouri politicians and even parish-
ioners.

American bishops regularly speak
against public policies that run contrary
to Roman Catholic teaching, but Burke
stands out for his hard line taking on
those who oppose church teachings, no
matter how high-profile or popular
they are.

“I know I have to teach. I know I
have to be clear about the church’s
position,” Burke said in an interview
with The Associated Press. “If that
means that national media takes an
interest in it, then that’s something that
I have to accept. But that’s certainly not
my object in my activity.”

Burke set off a national debate in
2004 when he said he would deny Holy
Communion to presidential hopeful
John Kerry because the Catholic
Democrat supports abortion rights.
Only a few other U.S. bishops went as
far as Burke; most said they opposed
using the sacrament as a sanction.

In April, Burke resigned as board
chairman for the Cardinal Glennon
Children’s Foundation because of a
benefit-concert appearance by singer
Sheryl Crow, who supports abortion
rights and embryonic stem cell
research. Crow declined interview
requests.

And last month, a local Catholic high
school revoked an invitation to U.S.
Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., to speak
at her daughter’s commencement from
the institution. The senator also sup-
ports abortion rights and embryonic
stem-cell research. Burke backed the
school’s decision, though he said he had
no direct hand in it.

A McCaskill spokeswoman has said
the senator understands her positions
differ from those held by the church,

’ but she’s made peace with them.

The archbishop, a genial-looking
man with a soft conversational voice,
said he must serve as a moral guide.

“The most pressing issue is the secu-
larization in society,” Burke said. “The
church finds herself more and more in
a prophetic role of calling into question
trends in society, for instance, practices
like widespread procured abortion, and
now, human cloning and embryonic
stem cell research.”

Burke, 58, came to St. Louis after
years in Rome.

A graduate of the Pontifical

@ REV Marek Bozek stands inside St. Stanislaus Kostka church Wednesday, May 30, 2007, in St. Louis. In 2005, St. Louis



Archbishop Raymond Burke excommunicated the six-member board of directors of the traditionally Polish parish near
downtown and also excommunicated Bozek, brought in by the parish after Burke removed the archdiocesan priests that

had been assigned there.

Gregorian University in Rome and a
student of canon law, Burke spent five
years in service to the highest court in
the church, the Supreme Tribunal of
the Apostolic Signatura. In 1995, he
was installed as bishop of La Crosse,
Wis., then in 2004, was elevated to St.
Louis, home to 550,000 Catholics.

Burke said he has been surprised by
the strong reaction to his declarations.
Kerry has said he shares the church’s
opposition to abortion, but did not feel
it was appropriate to legislate personal
religious beliefs.

“To me, it didn’t seem like anything
very radical to say that a Roman
Catholic who persists in a public way in
fostering legislation that permits pro-
cured abortion should be denied
Communion,” Burke said.

“The church in her whole history has
always understood this, that if you pub-
licly persist in a gravely sinful act, that
you should not present yourself for
Holy Communion, and if you do,
because of the public nature of it, you
should be told not to.”

Prior to a weekday Mass at the
Cathedral Basilica, the ornate crown

jewel of St. Louis’ Catholic churches,

Bryanne Whitney, 22, said there’s much
more to Burke than his statements that
brush up against politics and pop cul-
ture. He calls Catholics to strengthen
their faith, to listen to God and follow
the path God has set out for them, she
said.

“T think he’s on the straight and nar-
row,” she said. “He’s consistent, and he
upholds the church’s teachings.”

Burke also has his critics.

In 2005, the archbishop excommuni-
cated the six-member board of St.
Stanislaus Kostka, a_ traditionally
Polish parish, after they refused to end
an arrangement that dated back to the
late 19th century giving them authority
over parish finances.

Burke also excommunicated the Rev.
Marek Bozek, who was brought in by
the parish.

Bozek said the archbishop is a good
man, but inflexible.

“For him, I think compromise is a
dirty word,” Bozek said.
“Unfortunately, the church is moving
from having a dialogue into a mono-
logue.”

(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Burke has not commented on spe-
cific candidates in the 2008 presiden-
tial race. Four of the Democratic
contenders and three of the
Republicans seeking the nomination
are Catholic.

Last month, Rhode Island Bishop
Thomas J. Tobin called statements on
abortion by former New York Mayor
Rudy Giuliani, a Catholic Republican,
“pathetic” and “hypocritical.” Giuliani
has said he’s personally opposed to
abortion, but believes women should
be able to decide for themselves
whether to terminate a pregnancy.

Burke said he will continue to speak
out about church teaching, even when
it sometimes means that he must “say
difficult things to the culture in which
we live.”

He knows not everyone will accept
the message.

“You cannot be a good Catholic and
be in favor of procured abortion or be
in favor of embryonic stem cell
research. It’s just not possible, and so if
by teaching what the church teaches,
people see that as polarizing, I think
they are mistaken.”
The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, June 14, 2007 °PG 17









Anglican Georgina Forrest turns 100

With her Grandsons at her side,
Georgina Forrest celebrated her
100th birthday with a special mid-
day Mass at St. Matthew's Anglican
Church on Wednesday.

Having outlived all of her siblings,
the Pinder's Point, Grand Bahamian
native served as an apprentice cook

in her early days at the Butlins
Hotel in West End Grand Bahama
which later became the Jack Tar
Hotel.

With clear sight and and sound
memory 'Mama' as she is to scores
of grand and great grand children
burst out in shouts of praise thank-

ing God for her long and good life.
Always attending in prayer and
worship, this Anglican mother of
many began her christian formation
at the St. Mary's Magdalene Church
on Grand Bahama and now at
Church of Epiphany in Nassau.
Shown with their grandmother in

the right hand picture are (L to R);
Fr. Kingsley Knowles, Fr. Stephen
Grant and Fr. Rudolph Cooper.

Friends and well wishers saluted
Mama Forrest in a grand dinner
after the mass with live music by
The Royal Bahamas Police Force
Pop Band.



A 7-Day Journey

@ By REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

IN the book, A Seven Day
Journey with Thomas Menton, by
Esther de Waal, the reader is invit-
ed to undertake a personal retreat
for a part of each day or for the
entire week if possible. Just the
thought of such a journey may put
off some people right away, but it is
very rewarding and worth it.

It is like taking a long deep
breath of fresh air or a long leisure-
ly stroll along a heautiful beach.
- The idea.is to change your normal
routine and give yourself some
quality time. Make space in your
cluttered, congested, chaos of con-
siderations to be still. Does this
idea appeal to you?

It is not only what the doctor
orders but it is what your minister
does as well. Prevention is better

than cure. Rest your nerves, slow
your pace, relax your body, settle
your spirit to ponder and pray.

The reading material, we are
told in the beginning of the book,
is to be “read slowly, cradled and
rocked in the heart as one would
cradle and rock a small child.”
Sometimes it is a good thing to
take several months to read a
book, resisting the temptation to
rush to finish it. At other times, we
want to stay up half the night to
solve the mystery, remember all
the characters, or just complete
what has begun without procrasti-
nation. The difference lies in the
purpose behind the reading.

As the season of Pentecost con-
tinues, you may decide to select a
book for quiet reflection. Savour
the flavour of each word or
thought, absorbing as much as you

are able of the hidden meanings.

~ Allow God to speak to your heart

in a very personal way so that the
message takes hold of your mind,
and becomes truth to direct your
life.

In time you will find yourself
praying, asking God to open your
eyes to deeper truths that are con-
tained in the passages. Try a book
with high quality photography.
What it did for me is to train my
eyes to look for ordinary and
uneventful scenes that would be
worth photographing if I had a
camera handy. Just to move
around with a view to take photo-
graphs suggests a rhythm that
invites interruption. It means that I
have to leave with enough time,
stay alert to small details, and ask
God for the grace to see the sacred
everywhere. What about you?



@ ANGELA PALACIOUS
PG 18 ° Thursday, June 14, 2007 RELIGION | , The Tribune

Tribute to deserving fathers

@ By FATHER JAMES
MOULTRIE =

“See what love the Father has
given us, that we should be

called children of God” (1.

John 3: 1-2).

-Acknowledging the impor-
tance of fathers and recognis-
ing the efforts of those
Bahamian men who sought to
follow the biblical example of
what a good father ought to
be, Father James Moultrie,
during a special tribute that
remembered Stephen ‘daddy
o’ Mitchell, extended his con-
gratulations to the fathers of St
Matthew’s, the nation and
especially the fathers that were
being honoured. He said that
the men were all deserving of
the honour being given to
them.

Culturally, Bahamian
fathers have been presented
as tough guys, the disciplinar-
ians of the family. And while
some of our fathers see disci-
pline as their primary role,
that is not what God intend-
ed. God intended that fathers
should model their lives after
Him.

The primary function of
fatherhood is to love: to love
God, their wives and their chil-
dren. Love means being there
for them no matter what. Love
to a child means being present
at their school plays, gradua-
tions, marriages and the other
important celebrations in their
lives. Most importantly, fathers
must be the spiritual leaders of
the home. They must take
their children to church, not
send them, and they must be
the prayer leaders of the fami-
ly.
We all know that each father
has his faults. It is also true
that what we know of human
fathers and what we experi-
ence as children will affect how
we approach fatherhood. If we
have great and loving dads, we
will gladly embrace the biblical
picture of God as the ultimate
Father of all. That is the mes-
sage of the extravagant love
exhibited in the Parable of the
Prodigal Son.

If we did not have that kind
of father, we may be longing to
find the kind of father we
never knew. If our dad was
abusive, physically absent, or

emotionally distant, it may
take a deliberate act and per-
haps a painful effort to sort out
the misconceptions and learn
to cling to the unfailing truths
about the right kind of father-
ing modeled by God.

Fathers who model their
lives after Jesus leave a loving
legacy for their children, espe-
cially their sons.

Fathers are not perfect
human beings. They are just as
flawed and broken as mothers.
Only Jesus had the perfect
Father (Matthew 5:48) and he
alone can a.help us to experi-
ence the close relationship
with our heavenly father that
all our hearts desire.

Included among the hon-
ourees were
Armstrong, William R Darling
II, David Knowles, Kirkward
A Knowles, Anthony V

Roberts and Dexter ‘Sweet
Tee’ Thompson.



B@ ANTHONY ROBERTS

e ANTHONY V ROBERTS

Born July 20, 1940 at New
Providence to Thelma and
Carl Roberts, Mr Roberts is
the fourth of seven children.
He was initially baptized in
Ebenezer Methodist church,
and sometime during his pre-
teens his mother, who was an
Anglican, had him chris-
tened at St Matthew’s. He
attended Sacred Heart
Catholic school
Augustine’s College. He
started his career with the
Amoury Company Ltd and
currently works at Mr. Photo
as the company’s mainte-
nance manager. He is the
proud father four children
and grandfather of one.

Torry T

and St.



a

B KIRKWARD KNOWLES

e KIRKWARD A KNOWLES

Mr Knowles was born on
March 10, 1949 at Mangrove
Bush, Long Island and at the
age of nine left the island. He
attended the Eastern Senior
School and after school
packed groceries at City
Market to help his mother sus-
tain the family. He worked at
various establishments
throughout his career path and
is presently employed with
JCN Radio & TV Station as an
account executive and also co-
hosts the ‘Bahamas

Experience’ show. He is mar-
ried to Lesley Knowles and
they have two children. Mr
Knowles is a member of St
Matthew’s Vestry and attends
the 10:30am service.



EH DEXTER THOMPSON

e DEXTER
THOMPSON

Mr Thompson was born
April 3, 1953 in New
Providence and christened at
St Matthew's parish. A part of
his up-bringing was in Long

‘Sweet Tee’

Island with his grandmother
Melvinia Burrows. Upon his
return, he was re-introduced to
St Matthew’s parish by Cyril
and Wilisie Robinson and
attended church with them.
Mr. Thompson realized at an
early age that he was gifted
and followed in the footsteps
of his father ‘Sweet Richard’.
He is grateful to the Almighty
God for the many blessings
which he has experienced
throughout his life. He contin-
ues to worship with his family
at the 10:30am Eucharist. He is
humbled by this recognition
and he thanks all those who
are responsible.







@ DAVID KNOWLES

e DAVID KNOWLES

Mr Knowles served as a mem-
ber of parliament for the
Progressive Liberal Party in the
Salem Constituency from 1977
to 1992. He served as parliamen-
tary secretary in the Ministry of
Labour and Home Affairs from
1982 to 1983, with special
responsibility for the
Department of Labour. He 1s
married and the father of three
children. He is a regular lector of
the 7pm Evensong on Sundays
at St Matthew’ where he has
been a member all his life.

e WILLIAM R DARLING II

Born June 2, 1937 to William
and Ida Darling of Chesters,
Acklins, Mr Darling was
employed in the hotel industry
and after many years he
achieved his life-long desire to
be a farmer. He was married to
Violet Strachan-Darling
(deceased) and is the proud
father of one daughter and two
granddaughters. A legendary
farmer by the Department of

Agriculture, he is a regular
member of
Eucharist.

the 7:15am



Ss

@ WILLIAM DARLING

e TORRY T ARM-
STRONG.

Mr Armstrong was born
July 18, 1955 at New
Providence. He graduated
from A F Adderley high
school in 1972. His profession-
al education spans from Acme
school of Aeronautics, Fort
Worth Texas to Turs Air Flight
Training, Opa Locka, Florida.
His professional experience
include: OIA/Bahamasair as a
line maintenance mechanic,
MD Air Services as director of
maintenance and . Shell
Bahamas Ltd in various capac-
ities. He is married to Lynn
Martin and they are blessed
with one daughter and two
sons. His hobbies include:
boating, auto mechanics and
fishing. Mr Armstrong and his
family are members of St
Matthew’s parish and regularly
attend the 10:30am Sunday
Eucharist, where he is also a
lector.



@ TORRY ARMSTRONG


The Tribune.

Florida church



RELIGION

visits the Bahamas

Thursday, June 14, 2007 °PG 19







# WELLS of Living Water of Florida recently held a four-day conference at the Wyndham Cable Beach Resort ballroom. The event was part of the Ministry of
Tourism’s Religious Tourism project. At centre, Dr Ann Higgins, craft instructor in the Ministry of Culture, presents a Bahamian Junkanoo doll to conference host
Rebecca Ingraham. Pictured from left are Latoya Davis, Evelyn Rhyant, minister Janice Barrow, Dr Elizibeth Harrison, Katie Alston, Dr Ann Higgins, host
Rebecca Ingraham, Minister Doris Ingram Wright, minister Roselyn Heastie, Prophetess Olease Davidson and Prophetess Dorothy Williams.

(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)

Jesus’ call — be my disciple

@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

The other day I overheard part of a
conversation. There was a question
asked emphatically.

"Do you know what the problem
with religion is today? It's the gospel. It
just doesn't relate to us right now.”

When I left the area, I thought about
these comments and that strange ques-
tion. However, it was obvious that the
person was not really looking for an
answer. This is a question that many of
us today ask ourselves.

It is also clear the person asking the
question stated the ‘problem’ as he saw
it, provided his captive listener with an
answer and then threw in his rationale
for good measure. End of conversation.

I thought of this brief and very frag-
mented conversation when I read an e-
mail a friend sent me this past week. It
touched on last week’s gospel reading
which marks the beginning of Jesus’
ministry and his recruitment of the dis-
ciples.

And so I find myself challenged. ..is
it problematic th.t religion and the
gospel seem distant for us right now?

For a moment, let’s place the events
of recruiting these followers in the con-
text of our time. With a broad swipe at
modern psychological testing and skills
assessment, someone suggested that if
Jesus had sent his apostles to have
these tests this might well be the reply
he would have received:

Thank you for submitting the resumes
of the twelve men that you have picked
for managerial positions in your new
organisation. All of them have taken
our battery of tests. We have tabulated
the results through our database and
have arranged personal interviews for
each of them with a staff psychologist
and vocational aptitude consultant. It is
the staff's opinion that most of your
nominees are lacking in background,
education and vocational aptitude for
your enterprise. In short, they exhibit no
team concept.

e Simon Peter is emotionally unstable
and given to fits of temper

e Andrew demonstrates no qualities
for leadership

e The brothers, James and John, place
personal interest above team loyalty

¢ Thomas shows a skeptical attitude
that could undermine morale

« Matthew, the tax collector, has been
blacklisted by the Jerusalem Better
Business Bureau

e James, the son of Alphaeus, and
Thaddeus, definitely have radical lean-
ings and registered a high score on the
manic-depressive scale

One of the candidates however, shows
real potential. He is a man of ability and
resourcefulness, interacts well with peo-
ple and has contacts in high places. He
is highly motivated, ambitious and
responsible. We recommend Judas
Iscariot as your controller and right-
hand man.

Perhaps we to need revisit the origi-
nal question the person asked dealing
with ‘the problem with religion.’
Instead of trying to label religion as a
problem, we should reexamine our own
relationships and view our faith in the
context of the gospel. In other words,
let’s bring the story into our personal
world.

When asked about our religion,
many of us would describe ourselves
as ‘Catholic’ or as a ‘Christian.’ But
we would tend to back away from
daring to call ourselves a ‘disciple’ or
be counted as a ‘follower.’ After all,
that distinction belongs to the great
heroes of our faith: the saints who
have preceded us or certainly the
very holy people in our world today.
Our lives are just too ordinary, our
professions too worldly to imagine
that we are following in the footsteps
of Jesus...or doing the work of the
Gospel.

However, when we place ourselves
into the story, Jesus encourages us to
change our lives. He tells us, “Repent,
for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”
Then he beckons us to come with him -
to follow him - to be his disciple.

Our initial response is a resounding
YES - just like Peter and his brother
Andrew - and at once we leave our
‘nets’ and follow him. Then we come to
our senses and say ‘Lord, I’m only a
nurse in a hospital’ or ‘I work in a nurs-
ing home, what can I possibly offer’ -

and Jesus responds to us, “Look into
the faces of the people you care for and
see my presence. Know of my Father’s
love for you and for the people you
help.”

Or - ‘Lord, I’m just a student in
school’ - and again Jesus would invite
us to ‘be aware of the needs of our fel-
low students, pay attention to those
who may be struggling so that through
us his presence he will be known.’

Or, ‘I’m a single parent’ - or ‘my wife
and IJ are struggling to raise our chil-
dren’- or, and this is where we include
our own story. In each of our lives Jesus
encourages us to join him, to reach
beyond ourselves, to experience the
kingdom of heaven in our time.

Jesus’ invitation in the gospel to fish-
ermen, tax collectors, farmers, labour-
ers, and peasants to be his followers, is
extended to each of us as well. His call
to discipleship transcends that moment
on the shores of the Sea of Galilee; he
calls to us here and now, in our own
time and place.

We are his disciples. When we were
baptized we accepted an invitation to
take on the work of discipleship in the
homes and classrooms and workplaces
where we live our lives. Jesus continues
to invite us to follow him and to take on
his work, the same work Peter and his
brother and fellow fishermen left their
nets to take on: to bring others to God
through the Gospel of peace, reconcili-
ation, and love.

=e
see ee



A woman’s journey from
Christian to Rastafarian

B By KATINA MARTIN
Tribune Intern

DISMANTLING the myth
of the subjugation of
Rastafarian women, Priscilla
Bowleg, a Rastafarian woman
herself, instead points to the
faith’s emphasis on partnership
and love between its members.

"It's a partnership not a
domination. Men are the head
‘of the family and see to the
spiritual maintenance of the
family. But that doesn't mean
that the women do not offer
equal importance. If there is
dominion there can't be any
love," she said.

A mother of two, Priscilla
says that she is just like any
other woman, whether
Christian, Muslim or Rasta.



Hi PRISCILLA Bowleg

She enjoys being with other
uplifting, spiritual people. She
gets together with other
Rastafarian women socially to
enjoy each other's company.
They watch movies, eat and
socialize and afterward they
pray together, giving thanks
for the blessings that they have
received.

"I love Rastafari," Priscilla
said with a joyful single-mind-
edness that reflected a deeply
rooted understanding and
appreciation of her faith. She
has grown tremendously since
adopting the Rastafarian reli-
gion as her own, and says that
spiritually, she will never stop
growing.

A new path

It was eight years ago that
Priscilla left the Christian faith
and began a_ new spiritual
journey in which she embraced
Jah and the Rastafarian move-
ment.

"It's not a religion, it's a lev-
ity...a way of life," Priscilla, a
legal assistant, told Tribune
Religion when asked what it is
to be Rastafarian. She claims
to be neither Binghi nor Bobo,
but first and foremost a Rasta,
though she incorporates a little
of both into her lifestyle.

A former member of the
Catholic faith, — Priscilla’s
change of heart was the result
of an internal debate. She was
seeking a closer relationship
with God, and recognised that
the worship experience in her
church lacked the spiritual
dimensions and connection to
God that she desired.

When she adopted the
Rastafarian faith her parents,
particularly her mother, did
not agree with her choice, but
they respected her decision.

"My mother asked a lot of
questions, like why I wanted to
change, but my father allowed
that as long as I was satisfied
with the choices I'd made he



@ PRISCILLA and her daughter, Ras Priithan

was okay."

Touching on her relation-
ships within the Rastafarian
movement, Priscilla said that
were some Rastas that were
shy to approach her when they
found out she was working for
the Babylon (referring to her
secular position as a legal assis-
tant).

"I work in the system, not for
the system," was her response
to them. Priscilla says that she
has a lifestyle to maintain,
though that statement wasn't
meant in a pretentious way.

"T have a family to support
and it's difficult. I can't do it
selling peanuts," she said,
though she does not intend it
as a criticism toward those who
can and do make a living that
way. It is simply not a possibil-
ity for her or her. family. She
has two children, an 18-year
old son, anda three-year old
daughter. Her son is a
Christian of his own volition.
She asked him when he was
seven years old what he want-
ed to be and he told her his
preference. Her daughter is
being raised as a Rastafarian.

When asked if it was hard to
raise her daughter as a Rasta,
she said she feels like she is
fighting a losing battle. -

"My baby-sitter often gives
her things to eat that she
shouldn't have. If I'm there she
won't do it, but when I’m away,
and if she can get away with it
she will."

She also says that she finds
Christians to be provoking
whether intentionally or other-
wise, but she says that she has
learned what it is to have love
for everyone and has been able
to overlook a lot of potentially
aggravating situations.

Asked if she had expert-
enced a lot of discrimination,
Priscilla said that she was very
blessed to not have been sub-
jected to much. There were
two experiences however,
where she felt a bit put out by
others and both instances
involved the wrap that she
wears on her head.

While working at Cardinal
Institute and when she visited
RND Cinemas at one point,
both entities wanted her to
remove her wrap. She refused
and stood her ground, and
eventually both parties relent-
ed, allowing her to maintain
her dignity as a Rastafarian
woman.

"If you stand firm in what
you believe in, you will win,"
she said.

Religion
briefs



















@ ST Martin’s
Monastery will hold a
fun day Saturday, June
16 at St Joseph's
Church grounds, Boyd
Road, from noon to
6pm.

Fun and games to
be had by all. There
will be bingo, a
bouncing castle, face
painting, hot dogs,
conch fritters and
much more.

Join us for a day of
fun!

* * KR OK












































@ THE Anglican
Churchwomen of St
Gregory’s Parish,
Golden Gates,
Carmichael Road, are
having a Mini Fair
and Steak Out on
Saturday, June 16
between 12pm and
6pm.

This effort is to
raise funds for the
maintenance of St
Gregory’s Church
and the Church Hall
which, due to such
efforts over recent
years, has undergone
extensive renovations
and extensions. The
Hall (formerly the
little church home) is
Carmichael Road’s
hurricane shelter and
an after school study
hall. The hall can
hold 200 plus
persons for a
wedding or any affair
and is used as a
community meeting
centre for anyone,
non-Anglicans
as well. There will
be fun for all - a

’ bouncing castle,

bingo, whoop-la,

home cookery, steak
and chicken dinners,
conch fritters, sodas,
the works (mini-size).
All are invited to
attend.