Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )
UF00084249_02863 ( sobekcm )

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Full Text
» Lhe Tribune

i'm lovin’ it.

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BAHAMAS EDITION



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TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007



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PLP election win ‘predicted

Party will claim 60% of votes
according to data collected
by government’s international
campaign analysts

@ By KARIN HERIG and
PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporters

AS IT stands now, the PLP is
predicted to win around 60 per
cent of votes in the upcoming
general election, according to
data collected by the governing
party’s international campaign
analysts.

However, FNM representa-
tives yesterday stated that they
have been conducting extensive
polls themselves and that, based
on what they are hearing from
the people “on the ground”, the
PLP’s predictions are com-
pletely inaccurate and the oppo-
sition will in fact “win big”
come May 2.

The Tribune has learned that
the PLP has employed political
campaign experts from the US
and Canada to assist them in
gaining an accurate estimate of
how many of the 148,000 regis-
tered voters will choose to re-
elect the governing party to

‘ House of Assembly

office for the next five years.

According to polling exercis-
es conducted by the campaign
specialists, who reportedly con-
cluded their work and left the
country last week, the PLP is
estimated to win some 60-61 per
cent of the electorate’s votes -
barring any unforeseen occur
rences.

This estimate would give the
PLP at least 24 seats in the
three few
er seats than what the FNM
predicts it will be able to secure
in the election.

However, the American and
Canadian campaign specialists
allegedly warned the PLP that
any further scandals — such as
the Anna Nicole Smith debacle
or the controversy over the
independence of the judiciary
— could lose them significant
support and give the FNM a
real chance of winning the gov-
ernment.

SEE page 12

Voters’ cards can



be picked up today

STARTING today from 10am-9pm, Bahamians can pick up
their voters’ cards from schools in their constituency.

For the duration of the Easter holidays (all through this week),
the schools will serve as distribution centres for the parliamentary
registration department.

After that time; new arrangements will be announced.

In the Family Islands voters can get their cards from adminis-
trators’ offices and special centres will be established for distribu-
tion in Grand Bahama.

Voters are urged to pick up their cards as soon as possible as the
general election is only three weeks away.

@ SEE PAGE FIVE for the full list of schools where voters’ cards
can be picked up.

Smell the garite

Look at all that éheese.-
Provolone, Garhe Oregano

ha bil”.

WVU CLs

ONASOAG



Excavation work off Milo Butler Highway

@ MOTORISTS on Milo Butler Highway pass
the scene of excavation work which has cut

into the landscape at the side of the road,
leaving a striking landmark.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Gunman opens | George Smith decides not
to run as an indepenuent |

fire on crowded
basketball court

lm By BRENT DEAN

: M By BRENT DEAN

A GUNMAN opened fire on :
a crowded basketball court in :
the Sunlight Village area over :
the weekend, leaving three peo- :
ple seriously wounded in i

Princess Margaret Hospital.

According to Chief Supt Glen :
Miller, head of CDU, the inci- :
dent occurred around 9.20pm :
on Saturday, when a white “Nis-
san-type” vehicle pulled up to :
the court where a group was :

assembled.

A male emerged from the :
vehicle with a handgun and, :
according to reports, suddenly |
fired into the crowd, hitting and;
seriously wounding three vie- :

tims.

Rolle, 24, of Lifebuoy Street, :
was shot in pelvic area, Ryan;

Bonaby, 25, of Robinson Road, :

was shot in the back, and

Rozsen Moxey, 32, of Gibbs :

Corner, was shot in the right
shoulder.

Police suspect that a 9mm :
semi-automatic pistol was used:
in the shooting, as numerous :
spent cartridges were scattered :

across the scene.

SEE page 12

AFTER months of specula-
tion, George Smith, the former
PLP MP, has decided not to run
as an independent for the Exu-
ma constituency in the upcom-
ing election.

In a press release issued to
The Tribune, Mr Smith reaf-
firmed his commitment to the
PLP and its leader, Perry
Christie.

"In the final analysis, you
would recognise that it would
not be easy for George Smith to

Lawyer: judiciary independence issue still before 3

; spokesperson Erin Greene said:



Gay cights
group hits
out at call for

influence anyone to vote against }
a PLP nominee, even if there ;
might be good reasons to do so. :
Further, it would be very diffi- :
cult for me formally, or in any :
other way, to oppose my chosen }
: Mf By ALEXANDRIO



party.

"Yes, I make it crystal clear
that this time, as in every other :
election, I will campaign for the :
return of the PLP to govern- ;





ment, in the hope that what is
wrong will be put right. I sup-

port the leadership of Perry :

SEE page 12

courts despite govt’s withdrawing of appeal

Reports indicate that Jamal li By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter



THE government "has not dodged the bullet" with regards to the :
: question of the independence of the judiciary by withdrawing its ;
: appeal against the ruling made by Justice John Lyons, a lawyer said yes-

terday.

independent" in light of Justice Lyons’ statements.

SEE page 12

“Fidelity is ty OnE stop
for ALL my financial needs.”

Gary
?

ZERO DOWN LOT LOANS

HOME BQUITY LOANS
MORTGAGE & PERSONAL LOANS
CHECKING & SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
lola)



candidates to
declare their
sexuality

MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

ANY call for political candi-
dates to openly declare their
sexual orientation must be
viewed as an act of “terrorism”
by all forward thinking Bahami-
ans, according to the Rainbow
Alliance of the Bahamas.

In an exclusive interview
with The Tribune, RAB

“To reveal someone's sexual
orientation in this heterosexist
and homophobic social envi-
ronment is a violent act that
could not only lead to the
demise of her/his political
career, extreme psychological
and emotional trauma, but

an ic so result in physical vio-
(hat appeal had asked the court to declare “whether or not the Jus- : could also result in physical vic

tices of the Court of Appeal and the Justices of the Supreme Court are :

lence and death.”
Ms Greene’s statement fol-

Now there are plans afoot in Freeport to use a date with the Court sues a call ied sca
of Appeal to finally determine the veracity of Justice Lyons’ ruling that : C4™ idates to declare their sex-
the judiciary's independence had been rendered compromised "as a } uality.

result of the government's repeated failure to appoint a commission i

On Tuesday, Clever Dun-

SEE page 12



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~—





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



i
Meltdown must stop

descend into state of anarchy

| HE debate over the
independence of
Bahamian high court judges has
exploded: again, and with a
vengeance. .

There can hardly be a more
important issue since it is about
the rule of law and goes to the
very heart of our democratic
governance and the protection
of our rights as citizens.

The administration of Prime
Minister Perry Christie has
shown little regard for the con-
ventions which are so impor-
tant to the proper functioning of
our parliamentary democracy
and to its own proclaimed code
of ethics.

Mr Christie, who knows bet-

' ter, has allowed some of his
ministers to violate the most
fundamental conventions and
rules of cabinet government
without even the mildest of rep-
rimands. These violations have
been pointed out repeatedly in
this column. :

The conventions were not
pulled out of a hat but
evolved over centuries of con-
flict, practice and experience.










































RULES





. -_ oe de S ay tes * fh ie

* 6 Judging of entries will be based on beauty
natural state, rather than in captivity. The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2008 calendar. The decision
7 Allentries are submitted at the owner's risk. It is the company’s intention to return all entries in their original conditio®. However, Family Guardian
will assume no liability for any loss, damage or deterioration.
8 A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. More than one entry from a single photographer may be selected.
Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos. ;
9 The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company
reserves the right to use such in the future.
: 10 Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.

11 Previously published photos are not eligible.
Pee ee ee eee eee eee ee

2008 CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST ENTRY FORM I





0 8638
9,91440¢ e : alent
ae |
9.3128¢



To ignore them is to guaran-
tee that things will fall apart
and that confidence in the sys-
tem will be undermined, per-

'$ Ca

Photo by Tim Higgs

foie

ke
is ES
3

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG

previously published.

Return with photos to:

Calendar Contest, Family Guardian
Corporate Centre, Village & Eastern Road
Roundabout, Nassau, Bahamas

ENTRY DEADLINE: MAY 31, 2007

C0 LEUTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

haps for years to come.

More disturbingly, Mr
Christie and his colleagues have
sailed pretty close to the wind
when it comes to respecting the
rule of law. In some cases they
have ignored the law altogether.

The concept of the rule of law
predates the flowering of par-
liamentary democracy. Its expo-
sition by political philosophers
in the 16th and 17th century
contributed to the development
of various forms of western con-
stitutional democracy and the
separation of powers.

The rule of law means that
the state and all its constituted
authorities, departments and
agents must operate according
to laws that have been estab-
lished in the prescribed manner
and have been made known to
citizens.

It means that the rights of a
citizen must be clearly estab-
lished and cannot be arbitrarily
abridged by the state nor by
other citizens. It means that a
citizen must have access to inde-
pendent courts to protect his
rights from abuse by the state or
anybody else, and for the adju-

é

a celebration of nature

14 winning entries will appear in Family Guardian's 2008 calendar.
Winning entries receive a gift certificate valued at $400 each.
Entry deadline is May 31, 2007

1 Family Guardian's Annual Calendar, Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’s 2008 calendar will be
“A CELEBRATION OF NATURE.” Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene which is a striking example of nature as found in
The Bahama Islands. All photographs must be taken in The Bahamas.

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS MAY 31, 2007.

3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre,
weekdays only. Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest.”

‘4 Allentries must be accompanied by an official entry form, available at any Family Guardian office or when published in the newspapers.

5 Only colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images must be provided as 35mm film or digital images on CD. 35mm film can be positive
(slides) or colour negatives. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing any signs of photo manipulation,
resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high.quality JPEG .,
and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be supplied with prints which will be used in the judging process.
(Note: prints submitted without 35mm slides or negatives or CD's will not be eligible). The photographer's name and photo subject should
be written on the reverse of the print... '

Village and Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, between 9:00am and 5:00pm

: interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Preference will be given to fauna photographed in its

+ Family Guardian's DINE cape kuti ieptaasle emetic es ee acca F
p97 Calendar TEL BUSINESS inc: erscasanucinsmrnceitain HOME
POUBOX camden STREET ADDRESS.......0.-
J SIGNATURE. ssnnnnnnnnnennnnn
5 DATE iciaanayaceons)



Sidhe POSE ONO Wn
ag

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\

}

*:





NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED................... (maximum of 5) i

hi | agree that in the event that one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner in the 2008 Family
f d Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it wil become the property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and
| assign to Family Guardian all rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the
photos entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been

FAMILY

G

SEP OCT NOV

dication of disputes with other
citizens.

A the beginning of his
administration it

appeared that Mr Christie
would not tolerate the vicious

practice of victimisation which °

became a hallmark of the pre-
vious PLP government. But
now he seems to be encourag-
ing this nasty practice.

It would be for the public
good if members of the legal
fraternity would take action in
the courts on behalf of poor
Bahamians who have been vic-
tifised. Government officials
ahd the strangers who come to
do business in our country must
know that the humblest of our
citizens are protected by our
constitution and our laws.

Mr Christie himself, as Prime
Minister, has flouted the law
relating to the very operation
of our parliamentary system by
neglecting to cause the appoint-
ment of the Constituencies
Commission within the time
prescribed by the constitution.

He has made excuses for his

fe judges will be final.

INSURANCE J
COMPAN Y



DE




dereliction, attempted to blame
the citizens for it, and has dis-
missed the clear intent of the
constitution by saying that it is
“directory” and not “mandato-
ry”, and that no consequences
flow from his failure.

Ordinary citizens have been
made to believe that where the
constitution or any other law says



Now that the
appeal has been
withdrawn, the
public has no
alternative but to
conclude that
Justice Lyons was
right all along in
the statements he
has been making.
(ER I
“shall” it means “shall”. One
consequence of Mr Christie’s fail-
ure is that that is now in doubt
and “shall” means that the
authority at whom it is directed
has discretion to do or not to do,
or to do when he feels like it.

Another consequence is that

this election has run danger-
ously close to the wire and only

a back-breaking effort by the -

Parliamentary Commissioner
and his staff can avoid a lot of
confusion.

This is too much of a burden
to place on them. Mr Christie
should have appointed the Con-
stituencies Commission in the
time mandated by the constitu-
tion and he should have closed
the old Register of Voters soon-
er to encourage citizens to reg-
ister earlier.

Aw consequence
is that prospective

candidates have little time to
familiarise themselves with new
constituencies or ones that have
had boundary changes, and
some citizens do not yet know
what constituency they are in.
This is not good for the all-
important process of electing a
government.

Mr Christie knows all this, of
course. He advocated in his par-
ty’s platform that no changes
should be made to constituency
boundaries within the six-month
period preceding a general elec-
tion.

But, either through negli-
gence, incompetence or sheer
disregard for the law or a com-
bination of all these, Mr Christie
has been hard-pressed to fulfil
his promise to call an election
no later than May 2.

So now he has been forced
to make the highly controversial
decision to launch the election
campaign officially in the mid-
dle of the most solemn period in
the Christian calendar.

Perhaps the most serious
assault on the rule of law by Mr
Christie and his colleagues was
their failure to appoint — not
once but twice — a commission
to review the salaries and pen-







before we

sions of judges of the country’s
high courts as mandated by law.

This precipitated an unseem-
ly public row between Attor-
ney General Allyson Maynard-
Gibson and Supreme Court Jus-
tice John Lyons over the inde-
pendence of the judiciary of
The Bahamas.

Pesos the indepen-
dence of the judiciary
- has not been totally destroyed

but no-one can credibly deny
that the failure of the PLP gov-
ernment to appoint the com-
mission was an assault on that
independence. That is a dan-
gerous thing, as Mr Lyons made
clear.

But instead of acknowledg-
ing its dereliction and initiating
consultation to find a way out,
the government engaged in a
running battle with Mr Lyons,
and the Attorney General
lodged an appeal against his rul-
ing.

Now that the appeal has been
withdrawn, the public has no
alternative but to conclude that
Justice Lyons was right all along

in the statements he has been

making. «ia

One of the things the judge
had taken excepticn to was an
apparent attempt by the Attor-



Either through

negligence, incom- -

petence or sheer
disregard for the
law or a combina-
tion of all these,
Mr Christie has
been hard-pressed
to fulfil his
promise to call an
election no later
than May 2.

ney General to grade the per-
formance of judges in pursuit
of her so-called “swift justice”
initiative.

In this, as in other matters,
the opposition FNM. has
accused the PLP government
of a “smoke and mirrors”
approach to governance. The
government has failed to make
sure that there are enough
judges appointed while at the
same time mounting a “swift
justice” public relations exer-
cise.

I: the wake of the Attor-
ney General’s withdraw-
al, Dame Joan Sawyer, Presi-
dent of the Court of Appeal,
has strongly supported Mr
Lyons and expressed disdain for
the idea that anyone but a judge
should presume to grade the
performance of judges.

Commenting on what Mr
Lyons had said about the inde-
pendence of the judiciary being
compromised, Dame Joan said
she had personal reason to
agree with the judge. Then she
made this stunning declaration:
“I have personal experience of
the Executive trying to manip-
ulate the Judiciary.”

But the strongest words of
condemnation for the Attorney
General and the government
came last week from a promi-
nent member of The Bahamas
Bar, Damian Gomez. Mr
Gomez is a former candidate
for the PLP, a former PLP Sen-
ator and recent nominee to the
Supreme Court bench. He has
since declined the appointment.

Mr Gomez excoriated Mrs
Gibson on a radio talk show
and called not only for her res-
ignation from that office but
also her withdrawal from public
life. He said the appeal should
have gone forward so the whole
question could have been
cleared up once and for all.

“But for political reasons,” Mr
Gomez charged, “on the eve of
an election, they have adopted
an approach which is completely
cavalier to the interest of Bahami-
ans in their. civil rights as guar-
anteed by the Bill of Rights.”

Mr Gomez said the country is
in a serious quandary and that
the judiciary is in meltdown.

If that is true, and it looks
very much as if it is, then this
meltdown must be quickly
arrested before rampant law-
lessness overwhelms us and
before we slide into anarchy.

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com

www.bahamapundit.com

ch

_e eee en

nr nw CU ol al ee ot i at dae ch ae aT

, 2-2

-+. ew ee

AY



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 3



Me Ce ee

O ln brief

Stern ‘to
withdraw’ if
DNA tests go
to Birkhead

IF DNA tests reveal that
Larry Birkhead is the father
of Anna Nicole Smith's
daughter Dannielynn,
Howard Stern will withdraw
from the custody battle, it
was claimed yesterday.

Mr Birkhead, who yester-
day bought a “Who’s your
daddy?” T-shirt in Nassau as
he prepared for today’s court
hearing, told Access Holly-
wood that Stern would with-
draw his custody claim.

While no agreement had
been reached on paper, Mr
Birkhead said Stern had indi-
cated he would back out if
the DNA test went against
him. ;

“We both want to do
what’s best for Dannielynn,”
said Mr Birkhead, “Anytime
anyone says they’re not
gonna fight you in this kind of
battle is music to my ears.”

Mr Birkhead also told
Access that no deal was made
with Mr Stern. “There was
no exchange — one thing for
another,” he said. “It was just
two people wanting to co the
right thing.”

Mr Birkhead said he hadn’t
discussed continuing the fight
for J Howard Marshall’s bil-
lion dollar estate on Dan-
nielynn’s behalf.

“T haven’t even thought
about it. I’ve had my plate
full. Other issues are at stake,
like where I'll reside with the
baby.”

Mr Birkhead said he was
excited over the pending test
result, but also felt deep sad-
ness over Anna Nicole’s
death.

“T haven't had time to
grieve and that hit me a little

’ bit,” he said.

Though Anna Nicole fled
to the Bahamas to avoid Mr
Birkhead’s paternity claims,
he believes she would
approve of his legal fight for
Dannielynn.

He said that behind the
public battle was an exchange
of e-mails. “I can hear her
saying ‘good job, dummy’,”
he told Access.

But he admitted raising
Dannielynn without Anna
would be difficult.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your storv.










tate
EXTERMINATORS
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
aU a yay a bY



Fears 0
Nicole nurses

TWO Haitian nurses, one of
whom swore an affidavit
describing life inside Horizons,
where Anna Nicole Smith lived
until her death, claim they fear
far their lives.

“We are Haitian and you
know what that means,” one of
them said on Bahamas televi-
sion over Easter. “People are
going to come after you.”

Both women gave an inter-
view to Controversy TV on
Channel 12 because they said
they trusted show host Lincoln
Bain and wanted to defend
themselves. But they insisted
they should be shown on screen
only from the waist down.

During the show, they
described their feelings for
Anna Nicole and baby Dan-
nielynn — and gave an insight
into life at Horizons after
Daniel Smith’s death last year.

Quethlie Alexis alleged that
attorneys “added” some things
to her original affidavit, includ-
ing information about former
Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson that she didn’t say. But
she said that Mr Gibson, who
admitted being a close friend of
the late reality starlet, visited the
house often “but not every day.”

“I did not say that he sneaked
around to the back entrance.
Shane used to ring the bell.
Shane would come to the front
entrance. He didn’t sneak
around. They said he used to
come in an Explorer, but I can’t
spell Explorer. I said he came in
a black car and sometimes a
Jeep.”

She and Ms Nadine Alexi
said they worked at Horizons
seven days a week without a
break for Anna Nicole when
their papers were “not straight”
and they were both illegal immi-
grants.

Ms Alexis said: “I was scared

Haitians ‘afraid for their lives’







|

: % AMAA
ANNA Nicole Smith

when I saw Shane Gibson
because I had heard something
about Shane before. I told him
everything. I told him I was ille-
gal. He said if I got straight, I
could not work for Anna.”

Nadine said the Gibson fam-
ily were often at the house, but
she:never saw the minister’s
wife, Jackie. However, Quethlie
said she saw Jackie Gibson
three times. Apart from Shane,
his mother and stepmother
were the visitors she remem-
bered.

Both women said they liked
Anna Nicole and she liked
them. To one, she gave a pho-
tograph of herself with the
words: “To Nan Nan - thanks
for loving my child.”

Nadine said: “She wanted the
baby to call us Nan Nan. We
used to read the Bible to Anna.
When she had pain after her
son died, I used to read the
Bible to her. My sister used to
read the Bible at night-time.”

Both said Anna Nicole was
“a lovely person — a very nice
person to be around.” But they
were fired — Quethlie because
of a_row over a washing





SHANE Gibson

machine.

Nadine said: “I was told that
some information was leaking
from inside the house. | think
we were fired because we knew
too much.”

The nurses told Lincoln Bain
that they had agreed to appear
on television because they want-
ed to defend themselves and
felt Controversy TV could “stop
the victimisation.”

Both also claimed that Anna
Nicole wanted son Daniel
buried in Texas, where he was
born. “Howard (Stern) told
Anna that it would be too
expensive to bury him in
Texas,” said Quethlie.

“At that time, Anna did not
have too much money. Then
she got money for the pictures
of the baby. Anna had a money
shortage.”

Asked about allegations that
Anna gave Shane Gibson a
Rolex watch, she said: “I don't
know anything about her giv-
ing him a Rolex watch.”

Asked if Anna gave hima gift
or anything else, she said: “No
comment.”

e SEE page eight for more



Record marijuana find

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE largest field of marijuana
plants ever to be uncovered “in
the history of the Bahamas” was
found in Andros on Wednesday
in a joint operation between
Andros District and Drug
Enforcement Unit officers.

A police estimate put the value
of the drugs growing in the one-
and-a-half mile by 200 foot tract
at several millions of dollars.

In all, 1,060 plants — each at
between three feet and six feet
tall — were uprooted following
the find, which occurred short-
ly after 5pm.

The drug crop, the exact loca-
tion of which police refused to
identify, would likely have been
for both local consumption and
export purposes, police press
liaison officer Assistant Super-
intendent Walter Evans said.

No arrests have been made

in connection with the find,
however police did come across
two make-shift tents in the area.

Six additional bales of mari-
juana were also picked up.

In the 2007 US State Depart-
ment Report, it was noted that
authorities in the Bahamas
seized 10 times more marijuana
last year than in previous years.

This was attributed to a grow-
ing trend of Jamaican nation-
als cultivating drug crops in the
country.

Mr Evans said the possibility
that this field was an example of
such practices could not be
ruled out at this stage.

He said that Out Islands in
particular have been targeted
by would-be criminals for drug
cultivation purposes, often due
to their relative under-develop-
ment.

“We want to look at the
islands as a whole because the
islands are so large in terms of

in Andros

the land mass and then when
you look at some areas there
seems to be underdevelopment
so would be criminals see this as
an opportunity to use those
areas because they believe that
perhaps in terms of the num-
ber of persons who would check
the probability of them getting
catch is very, very small,” he
said.

Mr Evans said that due to the
maturity of the plants, it was
likely that this particular field
had been in place for "quite
some time."

Asked why such a large field
would have gone undetected
until now, Mr Evans said:
“Sometimes persons provide
information for us when they
see any irregularities or any
activities that may be taking
place in any of the islands they
pass it on to us and we will take
action.”

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

Nassau Fax: -

(242) 328-2398

Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Crime is a community fight

IT SEEMS THAT no matter how hard the
police work the streets and government’s
urban renewal projects are promoted, crime
continues to escalate. In the first three months
of this year there have been 23 murders.

Last week police press liaison officer, Assis-
tant Superintendent Walter Evans said that
this figure could increase as police are still
investigating deaths that are yet to be classi-
fied. If they are officially labelled homicides,
the murder count will rise.

Church leaders are now asked to develop
better working relations with police division-
al commanders to help reduce tensions in
their neigbourhoods, particularly among the
young.

Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson,
guest on a radio show last month, said that the
number of murders for the first quarter of
this year have increased by 50 per cent com-
pared to the same period last year. The only
good note in this tragic situation is that police
have already solved 56 per cent of the mur-
ders. However, unless the community makes
up its mind to cooperate with the police, the
murder rate is predicted to exceed last year’s
record of 60 violent deaths — most triggered
by pent up anger by marginalised young men.

Assistant Commissioner of Police Reginald
Ferguson has repeated the frequent complaint
of his officers — as soon as a violent crime
offender is picked up by the police and taken
to court, he is sent back to the streets on bail.
There he continues his crime spree until his
case is called. Police complain that courts and
lawyers are frustrating their work, and leaving
the community at the mercy of people who
should be behind bars.

“There is a greater likelihood that a per-
son who is already facing a serious charge and
is granted bail on another serious matter, will
go out and commit another act once he or
she is given bail,” Mr Ferguson said.

ASP Clayton Fernander agrees. He said
force profiles show that many of the persons
committing murders in the Bahamas are
young, single, unemployed black men with
prior criminal records involving violence.

Although guns, the instrument used in most
of today’s killings, are illegal, they are in easy
reach of the criminal. Many residents of these
various communities know where guns can
be purchased, who has the unlicensed
weapons and often where they are hidden
when not in use — yet they keep this infor-
mation to themselves. They are silent because
they don’t want to be involved. But the day

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the illegal gun is used against them or a mem-
ber of their household, they will be the first to
criticise the police for not doing enough to
curb crime and getting the guns out of the
hands of the criminal.

The ptesident of the Straw Vendors Asso-
ciation has also urged religious leaders to com-
bat crime by taking the fight “to the streets.”
This certainly would be a help, but the only
way to deal with crime is for the entire com-
munity to finger every criminal in their neigh-
bourhood.

In 1835 Alexis de Tocqueville, whose grand-
father and one of his aunts was guillotined
during the French revolution, published two
volumes of his Democracy in America. He
was fascinated by the first democractic gov-
ernment that was truly energised by the peo-
ple. He compared it to Europe, where the
impetus came from central government at the
top and the people in the main were mere
spectators. Wrote de Tocqueville:

“In America the means available to the
authorities for the discovery of crimes and
arrest of criminals are few.

“There is no administrative police force,
and passports are unknown. The criminal
police in the United States cannot be com-
pared to that of France; the officers of the
public prosecutor’s office are few, and the ini-
tiative in prosecutions is not always theirs and
the examination of prisoners is rapid and oral.
Nevertheless, | doubt whether in any other
country crime so seldom escapes punishment.

“The reason is that everyone thinks he has
an interest in furnishing proofs of an offence
and in arresting the guilty man...

“In Europe the criminal is a luckless man
fighting to save his head from the authorities;
in a sense the population are mere spectators
of the struggle. In America he is an enemy
of the human race and every human being is
against him.”

Here in the Bahamas many of us are not
only spectators of the struggle, but also active-
ly conceal evidence by our silence.

The police can fight crime, religious leaders
and civic groups can assist them, but until all
Bahamians join in the struggle, crime will
grow and the criminal will continue to ter-
rorise silent communities.

The fight against crime is a community fight
and every citizen who conceals evidence is
aiding and abetting the criminal.

Every citizen — not just religious leaders —
has to join the fight if we are ever again to be
safe in our homes and in our neigbourhoods.



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EDITOR, The Tribune

I WAS amused by the lor
awaited “exposé” in Thursda_
Nassau Guardian, when the
“Concerned Citizens of the
Bahamas” group — led by FN’
reject Ricardo Smith — atten
ed to besmirch my name in a dis-
play advertisement paid for, pre-
sumably, by his PLP backers.

Is this the same group whose
demonstrations outside The Tri-
bune were followed by furious
claims by many of the protesters
that they had been tricked into
taking part and had not been
paid, as promised? | imagine so.

The ad is so poorly written

‘that it must be from Mr Fred

Mitchell’s website. However,
stylistic deficiencies aside, its
biggest fault lies with its total
disregard for the truth, and its
grossly libellous statements,
which will be dealt with via a
writ to be served on the
Guardian’s management.

Just to clarify a few points for
anyone insane enough to
believe it, I would like to point
out that:

e I was never kicked out of
the Bahamas. I left of my own
accord in October, 1969, with
six months still to run on m
work permit, because I want:
to go to Fleet Street to purs
my career and my wife wanted
to study at the London School
of Economics. Both ambitions
were realised.

A secondary reason was that
I was growing increasingly dis-
illusioned with the Pindling gov-
ernment and its dictatorial ways.
Very shortly after my depar-
ture, all the best brains in the
PLP walked out to form their
own party, apparently having
reached the same conclusion.

e The editorial in the Nassau
Guardian, published in 1969,
and cited in the ad, was written
by an American journalist
called Jim Cobb, who was vili-
fied as a tailwagger in my annu-
al “Silver Grovel” awards for
sycophantic newsmen. He was
trying desperately to get his own
back, but the piece backfired
because no-one believed it. And
incidentally, | was not working
for the Guardian at the time, |
had moved on to The Tribune.
Although his piece said “po
tears were shed” when I left th
Guardian, he had, in fact, ma
more than one attempt to lu.
me back, and was upset when |
declined. His editorial made me
laugh so much at the time tha
had it enlarged and framed.
had pride of place on my study
wall in England for many years.

e The supposedly inflamma-

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tory story about Cuban revolu-
tionaries which appeared under
my by-line in the Mexico City
News was based on a Straight
report of Senate proceedings,

when the late Reginald
Lobosky expressed disquiet
about the possibility of a direct
flight between Nassau and
Havana because he feared the
Bahamas falling into Castro’s
sphere of influence. At the time,
this was a much bigger issue
than it is today because the Bay
of Pigs invasion and Cuban Mis-
sile Crisis had happened only a
few years before, and the US
was concerned about the impact
of communism in the region.

e The allegation of “abuse of
sources” obviously refers to my
interview with Mr Levi Gibson,
who co-operated fully when I
was writing my book, Blood and
Fire, and certainly did not give
the impression that he was any-
thing other than of sound mind.
This accusation obviously comes
straight from Mr Mitchell him-
self, who I believe is Mr Gib-
son’s godson and has once again
got the facts round his neck. My
interview with Mr Gibson was
arranged via his personal assis-
tant and was completely above
board and accurately recorded.

e Lastly, | am not and never
have been a racist, and there is
nothing in my background to
suggest such a thing. In fact, I
was reared in a household
where such attitudes would nev-
er have been tolerated.

Interestingly, when the PLP
came to power in 1967, I was
accused by the old guard of
being a PLP supporter because
my political leanings have
always been on the side of the
downtrodden and victims of
injustice. Those instincts still
drive my work today. As a
result, many Bahamians come
to me in search of justice when
the politicians and lawyers have
let them down.

Mr Mitchell, however, evi-
dently has his own racial
demons to contend with. And
my criticism of his total failure
as a Cabinet minister leads him
into irrational and spiteful acts.
This ad is evidently one of
them, though I’m told the
“Concerned Citizens of the
Bahamas” group doesn’t actu-
ally exist, except in the mind of
Mr Smith, whose irrational rage
against The Tribune could be
seen as a threat to public order.

THE TRIBUNE |



7
°

Correcting ©
the record

on ‘expose’

Consider this: if I hated the
Bahamas and its peopue, as the
ad claims, why would I have
been here for the last eight
years? Why would I have
invested a total of 12 years of
my professional life in a country
I loathed? As a citizen of the
European Union, I have
umpteen alluring countries to
choose from, many of them in
the Mediterranean sunbelt, the |
cradle of civilisation.

These are options I will prob-_
ably exercise in the not-too-dis-
tant future, but I came here
because I like the Bahamas,’
spent part of my youth here,
and feel there is a real job to
be done in the field of journal-
ism. I also like the many;
Bahamians from every section
of society who give me moral
support every week, and who |
believe I am one of the few hon- |
est voices in a morass of sleaze, |
corruption, dishonesty and '
moral cowardice which threats '
ens to engulf what I regard as a
great little country with incred-
ible potential.

For me, the potential of the ,
Bahamas is blighted by the low '
quality of its politicians, the cor- '
rupt state of much of its legal sys- '
tem, and the conseque. :t lack of
accountability which threatens ,
to undermine society here. As :
Judge John Lyons so rightly said, '
he (and I, incidentally) has some- ;
where else to go. We can both
catch jets out of here tomorrow
morning. Most ordinary Bahami-
ans don’t have that option.

However, with the likes of’.
Fred Mitchell and Ricardo.
Smith so hostile towards me, it |
is clear that I am very much on’.
the right track, and the good:
work will continue right through '
the election campaign and,
beyond. Look out for mores
exciting disclosures in the com-'
ing weeks. :

As I told Britain’s Press»
Gazette last week, when they’
were reporting the protest out- °
side The Tribune, earning the.
dislike of politicians like,
Mitchell is not a minus, it’s a»
plus. Any journalist approved :
of by such people is not doing }
his job. All newspaper people ,
should be galvanised and:
encouraged by his abuse. :

Meanwhile, decent Bahamir- ;
ans need to ponder whether ;
crude and grossly mendacious }
attempts at character assassina; *
tion ought really to be part of‘
their democratic process. I think ;

not. ’
JOHN MARQUIS :
Nassau re
April 5, 2007 rs

MARINE NAVIGATION
COURSE

In a nation of islands it is essential to be
able to navigate over the horizon with
confidence. Prepare for safe voyaging by
enrolling in the Terrestrial Navigation
Course offered by The Bahamas School
of Marine Navigation. Plan to attend the
free first class on Monday, April 16, at

7. Pame “at

BASRA Headquarters on

East Bay Street. Details: 364-2861 or
(242) 535-6234

We the family of

Franklin

“Frankie”

Knowles

would like to thank you for the personal and

corporate supports given towar
recent cook-out held on March

expenses an

his medical

10th, 2007. We are truly grateful to you all and
ask that you continue to remember him in your

prayers.

The Family





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 5

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Calvin Lockhart, Bahamian-born
actor, is laid to rest in Nassau

BAHAMIAN-BORN Hol- However, he was best
lywood actor Calvin Lockhart = known for his roles in the
was laid to rest in Nassau on American movies “Cotton
Saturday. Comes to Harlem” and “Let’s

Mr Lockhart, whose birth Do it Again” — in which he
name was Bert Cooper, died — played the character of Big-
on March 29 aged 73 from _— gie Smalls.
complications of a stroke. After becoming a fixture in

One of three Bahamian _ the so-called “blackxploita-
actors to achieve internation- tion” movies of the 1970s, Mr



al acclaim, Mr Lockhart at the
age 18 moved from the
Bahamas to New York City

Lockhart returned to the
Bahamas in the late 1990s,
where he worked as a director

where he spent one year at on productions by the

the Cooper Union School of | Freeport Players Guild up

Engineering before leaving to — until his death.

pursue an acting career. His last film role was in
Mr Lockhart starred in) Rain, a movie shot in the

many British television and — Bahamas that has not yet been

stage productions. released,

B@ CALVIN LOCKHART

TATA [RED BATH & HOME

TUESDAY,
APRIL 10TH

6:00 Community page 1540am

11:00 Real Moms, Real Stories,
Real Savvy

41:30 International Fit Dance

noon ZNS News Update

12:05 Gospel Aficionado

1:00 Legends: Maureen Duvalier ©

2:00 Fast Forward

2:30 Turing Point

3:00 Practical Principles

3:30 Emest Leonard

4:00 Lisa ‘night

4:30 Cybernet

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 Andiamo

5:30 The Envy Life

6:00 Dolphin Encounter

6:15 Seven Seas Informcial

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 The Dahamas Tonight

8:00 The People Behind The
History of B.T.C.

9:00 Battle of The Brains

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Neo Soul Café

12:30 Community Page 1540AM

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share
your
news

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from people who are
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If so, call us on 322-1986
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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





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Antigua WTO victory
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1G SMALL countries
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pared to face the cost of arbi-
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recently, the large developing
countries, small developing
countries have failed to be
aggressive enough in champi-
oning their own rights by forg-
ing alliances with one another.

Small developing countries
also make a mistake in not par-

\ticipating more fully in the work

of the WTO on a daily basis at a
high level. For, it trade in goods
and services is the means by
which they have to live, partici-
pation in making international
trade rules and overseeing how
they are implemented is vitally
important to them.

There is evidence that small
countries can succeed in the
WTO even on their own if they
are determined enough.

Ave and Barbuda,
a small Caribbean

island, created history when, in
March 2003, it won a landmark
case against the United States at
the WTO.

Since then, two more WTO
panels have found for Antigua
and Barbuda at appeals; the last

panel formally reported its find-
ings against the US at the end of
March.

The issue, simply put, was:
Did the government of the
United States violate its com-
mitment under the General
Agreement in Trade in Services
by prohibiting through regula-
tion and legislation the deliv-
ery of gaming services from
Antigua and Barbuda via the



There is
evidence that
small countries
can succeed in
the WTO even
on their own
if they are
determined
enough.



Internet?

Each of the panels found that
the US had violated its com-
mitment and dismissed a US
argument that it prohibited all
internet gaming via the inter-
net — including domestic bet-
ting — and, therefore, was not
discriminating against Antigua
and Barbuda.

I declare a particular interest
and, therefore, a bias in this
matter since I was Antigua and
Barbuda’s Ambassador to the
WTO when this case was first
brought and won.

At stake were not only vital
revenues to the government,
but also the jobs of many peo-
ple employed directly by the
industry or indirectly through
the goods and services pur-
chased locally by the Internet
gaming companies.

| wo successive Antigua
and Barbuda govern-

NOTICE

| WE HAVE MOVED

LIFE CHIROPRACTIC
CENTRE

has moved to the REAR
of our former office

#7B Village Road

Phone: 393-2774
Fax: 394-3067



is

id monthly,
ry credit ca



ments — from opposing politi-
cal parties — held the view that
the case had to be pursued
because of the duty of care to
their citizens.

The decision on whether to
proceed hung more on the cost
of the WTO procedure than it
did on the fact that little
Antigua and Barbuda would be
confronting the mighty US.
While the latter point was a fac-
tor for deep consideration
because of fears of punishment,
it was outweighed by the neces-
sity to stand up for the coun-
try’s rights.

The cost of the case was pro-
hibitive. It was estimated then
that it would cost in excess of
US$1 million. With the appeals
process, the cost has undoubt-
edly been higher.

If the Antigua and Barbuda
government had to pay the legal
costs, it could not do it, and
would not have done it. Priori-
ties would have demanded that
the money be spent on roads,
health, education and wages
and salaries.

In the end, a public-private



The US
government also

‘has to consider

that it is the’
greatest user of
the WTO dispute
procedure; it

is not in its
interest to under-
mine a process
from which it
has benefited and
which maintains
order in interna-
tional trade. |



partnership was forged in which
the government provided the
diplomatic and_ political
resources and many of the com-
panies in the industry paid the
legal firms directly to conduct
the legal research (hundreds of
documents) and prepare the
legal arguments. The industry
recognised that they had as
much to lose or gain as the
country itself.

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@ SIR Ronald Sanders

E has been said that
Antigua and Barbuda’s
victory is ineffective because
the remedies provided by the
WTO are inadequate. For
example, imposition of retalia-
tory tariffs by Antigua and Bar-
buda on exports from the Unit-
ed States will not have sufficient
impact to induce US compli-
ance and will also negatively
impact the cost of US goods
needed by the Antigua and Bar-
buda community.

There is, of course, some

_,,truth in that, and it points to
_ urgency for joint action by all
“small developing countries to

advocate change in the penalties
that an offending country would
be required to pay.

B ut, if the US govern-
ment refuses to start
talking seriously with the
Antigua and Barbuda authori-
ties about how a form of com-
pliance could be achieved in a
manner that is acceptable to
both parties, then the Antigua
and Barbuda may have no
choice but to apply the tariffs
which the WTO Panel sets, and
get their imports elsewhere —
Canada, for instance.

Such a situation may not
harm the US financially, but it
would most certainly hurt its
moral standing as a global
leader and as democratic nation
committed to upholding rights.

The US government also has
to consider that it is the greatest
user of the WTO dispute pro-
cedure; it is not in its interest
to undermine a process from
which it has benefited and
which maintains order in inter-
national trade. The conse-
quence would be to encourage
other countries to ignore WTO
rulings and to unravel the whole
tapestry of international trade
rules,

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

INSURANCE

IN NASSAU CALL

393-5529

IN FREEPORT CALL

350-7827

IN ABACO CALL
ABACO INSURANCE AGENCY

367-5285





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 7



i : ee ee OO ee ae’
Police seize huge marijuana haul

\
NS
SS

H DEU officers offloading drugs from a boat which underwent a





routine check as it entered Nassau harbour last Thursday
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

-Nottage: we will keep
on with NHI scheme

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Despite the
results of a private survey con-
ducted on National Health
Insurance, Health Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage said the gov-
ernment “will not be deterred”
in its effort to implement the
NHI scheme.

The survey, which was car-
ried out by the Segal Company
on behalf of the National Coali-
tion of Healthcare Reform,
reported that only 21 per cent of
Bahamian employers felt that
government’s proposed NHI
scheme is the best option for
improving the quality of health-
care in the Bahamas.

Despite this, Dr Nottage said
the government is moving
ahead with the scheme — which
could be ready for implemen-
tation by the end of the year.

While attending the opening
of World Health Month on
Grand Bahama, Dr Nottage told
The Tribune that despite the
results of the surveys “the truth
of the matter is that a vast major-
ity of the Bahamian people
understand the need for NHI.”

“They are bombarding us
with the question of when it will
begin, and the answer to that
question is when we have every-
thing right, and we feel all of
the various issues have been
adequately dealt with. Not until
then, because we want it to suc-
ceed and we don’t want it to fail
because we were not sufficient-
ly thorough,” he said.

“When we talk about NHI
we are trying to create a system
that will ensure that Bahami-
ans receive the care they need
when they it, whether you have
the money, or not.

The National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform, which
includes among its membership
employer associations, unions
and private sector groups,

claims the government is “rush-.

ing” the plan without proper
consultation.

The group said their survey
“shows that the NHI plan,
based on the information we
have on hand at this time, is not
giving anyone a comfort level.”

Dr Nottage, however, ques-
tioned the instrument used in
the survey.

“IT saw a report of a study
which was done by the Nation-
al Coalition of Healthcare
Reform, which is against the
implementation of NHI. What I
‘didn’t see was the instrument
' that they used, because you can
do studies and research, but the
research has to be authentic,”
he said.

“But, if we haven’t seen the
instrument we don’t know how
the questions were asked, nei-
ther do we know all the ques-
tions that were asked. For
example, I think | am informed
that one Of the questions asked
had to do with whether or not
businesses would downsize if
we introduced NHI. And they
didn’t provide for us in the

newspaper article that I saw the
answers to that question, which
I think would be a very inter-
esting one. | wonder why they
didn’t provide that answer.”

Dr Stanley Lalta, project
manger for NHI, said that
employers would be in a better
position to judge the plan after
certain details had been fine
tuned by consultants hired by
the government to assist in the
plan’s development.

Dr Nottage stated that while
it has always been his objective
to have NHI ready for imple-
mentation by the end of the
year, a number of studies and
consultations are ongoing.

The minister said they are
looking at the micro economic
impact of how businesses will
respond and be affected.

He said they are also looking
at what range of benefits the
government can afford to pay
for, having regard to the con-
tribution they are asking peo-
ple to make.

“These are the nuts and bolts
that have to be tied, and of
course once we have defined all
of these things, making sure reg-
ulations which have to be in
place are in place, there is also
some legislation that pre-dated
the NHI legislation that would
have be amended so that all
various entitlements under the
laws of the Bahamas are dealt
with. We are very busy work-
ing on those issues.”

Dr Nottage said that no matter
who wins the election on May 2,
the mechanisms will be in place
for the scheme to be introduced.

“I believe that the party in
government will continue to be
the government, but even it
doesn’t, the FNM has said it will
support NHI.”



desktops & workstations





@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A SPEED boat containing an
estimated 25 to 30 bales of mar-
ijuana and two men were taken
into police custody last week.

The 30-foot white Intrepid
boat was stopped and searched
by officers from the marine unit
of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force — who said the occupants
were acting suspiciously — at
around 8.45am off the coast of
Western New Providence,
around Clifton Pier.

Bales of marijuana, packaged
in tape, plastic, and foil, and
hidden in sacks, were subse-
quently discovered hidden in all
available cavities in the boat's
hull and console unit.

Assistant Superintendent
Prince Charleton said that the
street value of the haul had not
yet been determined as the
drugs had not been weighed.

One of the two men taken
into custody in connection with
the incident was known to the
authorities, he said.

Asst Supt Charleton said it
was not unusual for authorities
to apprehend suspected drug
runners in the morning, or in
broad daylight.

“It varies. Sometimes we
catch them in the morning,
sometimes in the late evening.
We do a routine patrol, we stag-
ger it — morning, evening or
afternoon,” he said.

It is thought that the vessel
was returning to Nassau from
one of the out islands. Asst Supt
Charleton said it was possible





Speedboat stopped for routine check

it may have been Andros.

Authorities discovered the
largest ever ficld of marijua-
na in the history of the
Bahamas

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on that island on

Wednesday afternoon.

Once taken to the Police Har-
bour Patrol section in Nassau
Harbour at around 10am, the
bales were offloaded and docu-

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

pri’s Graycliff bill



Debra Opri at Nassau’s exclu-
sive Graycliff Restaurant was
“chickenfeed” for owner Enrico
Garzaroli.

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It paled into insignificance
alongside the Graycliff record
- a $185,000 bunfight hosted by
an American businessman who
had just sold out to a major cor-
poration.

“A meal for $2,500 is no big
deal at this restaurant,” Mr
Garzaroli told The Tribune last
week. “If you’re buying wine at
$200 or $300 a bottle, it doesn’t
take long to reach $2,500.”

Ms Opri, the Los Angeles
attorney hired by Anna Nicole
Smith’s ex-boyfriend Larry
Birkhead to help him fight his
paternity action, submitted a
legal bill of more than $620,000
to Mr Birkhead last weekend.

This came two weeks after he
had dispensed with her services
amid reports that there had
been differences of opinion over
her approach to the case.

The bill included a charge of
well over $3,000 for two meals,
one of them running close to
$2,500. Insiders claimed a party
of about nine, mostly lawyers,
were at one Graycliff dinner.

Although Mr Birkhead even-
tually got the bill, via Ms Opri,
for both dinners, he was not
there to enjoy the food. “They
didn’t even take him a doggy-
bag,” said one wit when the
feasts were discussed on Amer-
ican television this week.

For Mr Garzaroli, however,
bills for several thousand dol-
lars are not unusual. With prob-
ably the best wine cellar in the
Caribbean region, he expects to
charge big money to discerning

oesn’t break bank

customers.

The American businessman
celebrating a takeover by a
major group held: several par-
ties at Graycliff in one week,
running up a total bill of half a
million dollars in the process.

The $185,000 binge was the
most expensive of the lot, with
French vintage wines at
between $6,000 and $50,000 per

bottle going down the guests’ -

gullets like Pepsi Cola.

It’s not unusual for Graycliff

customers to leave $500 tips
when they’ve enjoyed a night
carousing at the world-famous
eatery.

Gambler

A few years back, a high-
roller at the Atlantis casino lost
$1.5 million in one night and
was offered a meal with friends
at Graycliff as a consolation gift
from the hotel’s management.

Together, the gambler and
his pals ran up a $96,000 bill,
quaffing liberal amounts of vin-
tage wine as they wolfed down
lobster and other Graycliff spe-
cialities.

Ms Opri is not the only per-
sonality in the Anna Nicole saga
to enjoy the restaurant’s noted
hospitality.

Crews from CNN, CBS, Fox
News and other American TV
channels have been chomping
on Mr Garzaroli’s fine fare in
recent weeks — all on expense
accounts, of course.

@ ENRICO Garzaroli

“So the Anna Nicole story
has been quite good to you
then, Mr Garzaroli,” The Tri-
bune suggested during an inter-
view yesterday.

“Not too bad,” the Italian
proprietor chortled. “I have no
complaints.”

After 33 years as Graycliff’s
owner, he said things just get
better and better, like vintage
wine. But he’s still waiting for a

THE TRIBUNE



customer to come along and
buy the best bottle he has.

That’s a 300-year-old beauty
for sale at a cool $200,000.
“Mmmmm, maybe I wouldn’t
sell it at all,” he said, “Maybe I
would just keep it... unless, of
course, you would like to book
a table.”

“Perhaps not,” I said, “not
unless Larry Birkhead’s pay-

ing.

Birkhead: Who’s Your Daddy?

LARRY Birkhead was in
gung-ho mood yesterday on the
eve of the long-awaited court
hearing which will, it is hoped,
reveal DNA test results on

eee

> Thank You

as
ce

Anna Nicole Smith’s baby Dan-
nielynn.

In fact, he marked the occa-
sion by buying a “Who’s Your
Daddy?” tee-shirt from Island
Shop on Bay Street.

Island Merchants boss Gre-
gory Lee said: “The staff were
amazed when he came in and
bought the tee-shirt. He shout-
ed ‘I’m the daddy’ and then left.
They were quite excited about
it:

Birkhead spent Easter in
Nassau in preparation for the
court hearing which, observers
believe, could end the long
debate over Dannielynn’s pater-
nity.

Birkhead, 32, a Los Angeles
photographer, has been pursu-
ing his claim to the baby for the
last six months, long before
Anna Nicole died in Florida on
February 8.

He claims the child was con- '



WN
head



@ LARRY Birk

ceived in January, 2006, when
he and the former reality show
starlet were setting up home in
Studio City, California.
Howard K Stern, Anna

Nicole’s lawyer-companion, has
also claimed to be the father
and is named on Dannielynn’s
birth certificate.

A DNA test was conducted
in the US last month and results
were kept in a sealed file. Stern
subsequently appealed against
disclosure of the results, but
then withdraw his objection.

Whatever the results show,
the custody and guardianship
issues are expected to continue
before the courts.

Anna Nicole’s mother, Vir-
gie Arthur, is also in Nassau to
pursue custody. But Stern’s sis-
ter Bonnie told American TV:
“She will never get custody -
over our dead bodies.”

Dannielynn could inherit
$475 million from the estate of
Anna Nicole’s late husband, oil
tycoon Howard Marshall. This
matter is still before the US
courts.



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 9

| LOCAL NEWS



@ MEMBERS of the Cable Beach police force learn more about environmental stewardelip
from members of the Coastal Awareness Committee. The outreach programme is part of the com-
mittee’s efforts during April which is Coastal Awareness Month in the Bahamas,

Coastal Awareness Committee
‘meets with police to discuss
environmental stewardship

SEVERAL members of
the Coastal Awareness
Committee of the Bahamas
met with more than 30
police officers stationed at
Cable Beach to discuss the
role of the force in envi-
ronmental stewardship.

The committee is a group
of stakeholders from the
private and public sectors
with an interest in promot-
ing the sustainable devel-
opment of the Bahamas.

Edison Deleveaux of the
Department: of Marine
Resources; Charlene Carey
of BREEF and Eleanor
Phillips of the Nature Con-
servancy, all members of
the committee, discussed
the five main threats to the
coastal environment.

They encouraged the
officers to assist in the
campaign against those
who are abusing the dump-
ing, littering and toxic
waste disposal laws of the
Bahamas.

“Their efforts would
prove to be an important
step in helping to fight the
scourge of the vexing prob-
lem of pollution,” said Mr
Deleveaux, who is the
deputy director of the
Department of Marine
Resources and a reserve
assistant superintendent of
police.

“The officers were very
interested in supporting
Coastal Awareness. The
public may not be aware
that we do have laws about
littering in the Bahamas
because of insufficient pub-
lic education and enforce-
ment efforts by all con-
cerned agencies, including
the police.”

He noted that Bahamians
can familiarise themselves
with local laws governing
dumping by going to
http://laws.bahamas.gov.bs.

“Tt is going to take all of
us — law enforcement, the
public, the business sector
and the government - to
end pollution in our coun-
try.”

April has been officially
proclaimed Coastal Aware-
ness Month in the Bahamas
and the committee has sev-
eral activities planned that
the public are invited to
attend.

D eta

pete i Mea

Officers encouraged
to assist in campaign

There are five main
threats that affect coast-
lines: pollution, invasive
species, climate change,
overfishing and nate
destruction.

The committee will focus
on pollution as a theme for
this year’s campaign, one
of the biggest problems to
threaten Bahamian coasts.

“We all know that trash
is having a negative affect
on our country impacting
our social and economic
well-being,” said Earlston
McPhee director of sus-
tainable development for
the Ministry of Tourism
and chairman of the
Coastal Awareness Com-
mittee. “The exit surveys
handed in by our tourists
indicate that trash is one
of their biggest complaints
when visiting our country.
Our goal is to educate the
public and to offer real
solutions to people that
collectively will help us as
a developing country and
as a tourist destination.”

The events for Coastal
Awareness Month will
include:

¢ National T-Shirt Day -
Friday, April 19

¢ Beach clean-up, South
Beach — April 21 from 8am
to 12pm

e Harbour clean-up —
Saturday, April 28 from
8am to 2pm

e Educational marine
exhibition, Marathon Mall
- Monday, April 23
through Friday, April 27

e National school science
competition — Thursday,
April 26, Marathon Mall

e Field trips to Dolphin
Encounters, Blue Lagoon
Island and Dive Stuart
Cove

¢ National Church Ser-
vice on Sunday, Sacred
Spaces at Clifton Pivr
April 29 at Llam.

As this is a national ini-
tiative beach clean-ups and
other Coastal Awareness

Ron Kenoly i
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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





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senting various denominations
throughout New Providence
were asked to develop better
working relationships with
police divisional commanders
to help stamp out the scourge
of crime in their neighbour-
hoods in particular and the
Bahamas in general.

The challenge came last week
during a one-day symposium on
crime hosted by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force at Police
Headquarters on East Street.

The symposium was designed
to bring the religious leaders

‘up to date on police efforts to

reduce the level of crime ~ par-
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murder, rape and armed rob-
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It was also designed to give
the clergy, especially those who
have churches in the areas
hardest hit by crime, a “first-
hand view” of the role of law
enforcement officials in polic-
ing the streets.

The session was also used to
provide church leaders with
some suggestions on the roles
they can play in their respec-
tive communities to help reduce
the level of crime.

Senior Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson, who served as assistant
commissioner in charge of
crime before his recent promo-
tion, told the religious leaders:

“We must work collectively
to stem the tide of crime in our
country. The Bahamas is one
of the most beautiful places in
the world, but if we don’t work
together to stem the tide of
crime in our country, then it
won't matter how beautiful our
country is. We must seize the
opportunity to keep our coun-
try as tranquil as God will let
us.”

Mr Ferguson said the force
has developed a number of ini-
tiatives designed to deal with
the crime before it gets out of
control. He promised the reli-
gious leaders that the RBPF
has been, and will continue to
be, proactive in that regard.

He said one of the challenges
currently facing the police is
that persons charged with vio-
lent crimes are continually
being granted bail.

“There is a greater likelihood
that a person who is already



LOCAL NEWS

“Church leaders asked
to help stamp

out crime







@ THE Royal Bahamas Police Force hosted religious leaders
from New Providence to a one-day symposium on crime at
Police Headquarters, East Street on Tuesday. From left are John
Rolle, deputy commissioner of Police; Rey Dr William Thomp-
son, president, Bahamas Christian Council; Police Commis-
sioner Paul Farquharson; Bishop John Humes.

facing a serious charge and is
granted bail on another serious
matter, will go out and commit
another act once he or she is
given bail,” Mr Ferguson said.

His view was echoed by
Assistant Superintendent of
Police Clayton Fernander, who
serves as officer-in-charge of
the homicide division of the
Central Detective Unit.

ASP Fernander, whose unit
has had to investigate 23 homi-
cides since the beginning of the
year, said force profiles show
that many of the persons com-
mitting murders in the
Bahamas are young, single,
unemployed black men with
prior criminal records involv-
ing violence.

He said further research
shows that a number of the vic-
tims of these homicides share
a similar profile.

ASP Fernander encouraged
the religious leaders to help the
state through the development
of more comprehensive pro-
grammes that could involve
such young men — who may feel
that they are being margin-
alised.

“The church has been doing
a great job in the past in assist-
ing with the social ills that
impact our country but it has
to step in and help the state
develop the kind of pro-
grammes that will help us guide
our young men in the right

(BIS photo: Patrick Hanna)

direction,” ASP Fernander
said.

Bishop Delton Fernander,
senior pastor of New Destiny
Baptist Church and a member
of the Police Reserves, said the
symposium gave religious lead-
ers an opportunity to “see how
our responsibilities are more
than just sitting in our pulpits.”

“As a reservist, I serve this
country at a different level than
most pastors and so what was
talked about here, I have a dif-
ferent perspective because I am
the person on the front-line,
who is wearing the bullet proof
vest and who has to go into
these places,” Bishop Fernan-
der said.

“T think today’s session pro-
vided more of the pastors with
a front-line view of what mem-
bers of this force have to go
through on a daily basis in the
fight against crime,” he added.

Bishop Fernander said the
information provided at the
symposium will be crucial to
the development of the future
plans and programmes of
churches throughout the island.

“Tt is my belief that if we can
continue this type of partner-
ship whereby the Police Force
can inform us of the problems
that exist in our districts, then
we as a church can develop the
programmes necessary to help
solve some of those problems,”
Bishop Fernander said.

NASSAU REPAIR SHOP

WRECK-A-MEN

So
BF 393 - 3710

The Bahamas Environment, Science
and Technology Commission

The Montreal Protocol Act, 2006, requires all Refrigeration and
Air-conditioning technicians to possess
A NATIONAL CERTIFICATION CARD.

To facilitate this process,

THE MINISTRY OF UTILITIES & THE ENVIRONMENT

advises that

The Representatives Of The National Ozone Unit
will be on the islands of Abaco, Eleuthera, Exuma and Grand Bahama on the

George Town, Exuma
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Govenor’s Harbour, Eleuthera
Freeport, Grand Bahama

following dates and times:

April 11th, 2007
April 25th, 2007
April 26th, 2007
April 27th, 2007

9:00-5:00p.m.
9:00-5:00p.m.
9:00-5:00p.m.
9:00-5:00p.m.

at the Department of Environmental Health Services Office, to register
ALL REFRIGERATION AND AIR-CONDITIONING TECHNICIANS.
Technicians are required to bring along the following:

. Drivers license;

I
2. National Insurance card:
3

. Passport ot valid voter’s card and

4. Certification documents.

For more information, please contact the National Ozone Unit, Best Commission
in Nassau at 322-4546; 356-3067 and 322-2576.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 11



Grand Isle Resort and
Spa takes top honours

GRAND Isle Resort and
Spa has been rated number
one among nine hotels and
resorts in Exuma by visitors
who reported their experi-
ence in glowing terms on the
popular website TripAdvi-
sor.com.

“We were notified by a
guest that they had posted a
glowing review, and we went
to TripAdvisor.com and
were thrilled,” said Pamela
McCullough, senior vice-
president of Grand
Caribbean Resorts Inc.,
which manages the upscale
condotel resort in Emerald

Bay, Great Exuma.

“There was one report
after another praising the
property, the service and the
beauty of our beach. The
overall ranking at the top of
the page said first of nine
hotels in Exuma. We are so
pleased with the placement
and so proud of our staff.”

Reports posted as recently
as March 24 painted a pic-
ture of the hilltop luxury
resort as “unforgettable,”
“friendly,” “outstanding,”

and even “our favourite
vacation destination.”
Three out of four reviews

gave ita perfect 5.0 rating
in all categories, the highest
a property can achieve. The
single lowest rating was a
4.5,

Grand Isle Resort and
Spa, formerly known as
Grand Isle Villas, is a pri-
vate community of 78 luxu-
riously-appointed villas at
the highest point of Emer-
ald Bay, a short walk from
the Four Seasons and the 18-

- hole Greg Norman-designed

championship golf course.

B POOLSIDE at Grand
Isle Resort and Spa

afternoon. managers at Old Bahama Bay by
Ginn sur Mer in Grand Bahama put aside e-
mails and cell phones and head to the small
public school in the nearby West End commu-
nity.

Bright-eyed students from kindergarten to
grade six eagerly await their arrival, with the
younger ones gathering on floor mats. Since
early March, Old Bahama Bay instituted a
reading programme at the school with resort
staff members participating as readers on a
rotational basis.

Commenting on the success of the pro-
gramme thus far, Donald Glass, vice president
of human resources at Old Bahama Bay, said:





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“The response was both encouraging and moti-
vating. In some cases, the students wanted the
reading to continue past the designated pert-
od.”

School principal Cardinal Woods and his
teaching staff expressed gratitude for the
involvement of Old Bahama Bay in yet anoth-
er aspect of the school’s affairs.

Most recently, Old Bahama Bay assisted
with the school’s spelling bee and donated an
$80,000 air-conditioning system to the school
last December.

In the photo, resort vice president and gen-
eral manager Bob Van Bergen reads to a cap-
tive audience of grade one students during a
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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, APRIL+10, 2007

FNM supporter is arrested

Woman due to be witness
in murder trial found dead

POLICE are probing the mysterious death of
a woman who was due to be a witness in a mur-
der trial.

Sharon Pratt, 48, was found dead at her home
in Village Alley, off Blue Hill Road, last Thurs-
day.

Neighbours who had. not seen her for two
days found her decomposing body when they
entered her home to investigate.

‘Sources claim there were injuries to her legs.
It is not known whether there were other
wounds.

Ms Pratt, a single childless woman who
worked as a domestic help, was due to give
evidence in the Hosea Lightbourn murder
trial.

He was shot dead in Rupert Dean Lane, Bain

Town, last September in what was described
at the time as a “reprisal” killing.

Mr Lightbourn is alleged to have taken out a
contract on another man.

A resident of Big Pond is apparently being
sought for questioning in connection with Ms
Pratt’s death.

Yesterday, neighbours in Black Village
expressed sorrow over her death.

“She was a nice girl,” said one, “She lived
alone and was usually out and about i in Black
Village. Persons are very tight-lipped and it is
being whispered that she was murdered.”

The source added: “There is a sombre, quiet
mood here.”

Police were unavailable for comment last
night.

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PROPERTY SIZE: Multi Family (4,800 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Curtis Road, Gambier Village
APPRAISED VALUE: $58,000

BELAIR ESTATES

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PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family (6,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Turtle Drive

APPRAISED VALUE: $180,000

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PROPERTY SIZE: Multi Family (6,500 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Curtis Road, Gambier Village
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INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE
CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET,

OR CALL 242-502-6221
REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.

* WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO

FNM campaigners were furious last night after
a supporter was arrested by police at Fort Fin-
castle.

Francis Milfort, said to be in his thirties, was in
his car - which was flying FNM flags - when he
was grabbed by officers and taken away, party
workers claimed.

“We are not aware that he did anything
wrong,” said one source, “He was dragged off

THE TRIBUNE.’

Â¥

See

and taken to Central Police Station. came
“We had a party for our people on the hill and.*.
as he drove up, the officers took him out of nes
car.” *
Lawyer Michael Barnett, the party’s candidgbet’e!
for Fort Charlotte, was last night trying to neggeys e
tiate Mr Milfort’s release. @ oy
Police said he was arrested for allegedly usin i
obscene language. J

ste

Judiciary independence issue;

FROM page one

under the judge's remuneration
and pension's act."

Freeport based lawyer, human
rights activist and founder of the
Save the Guana Cay foundation
Fred Smith told The Tribune yes-
terday that he plans to use a April
25 date at the court — ostensibly
seeking an injunction application
to restrain the development on
Guana Cay while the group's
appeal is being conducted — to
ask the court to consider whether
the foundation had a fair trial to
begin with, given Justice Lyons'
judgment.

"Although the Attorney Gen- ~

eral (Allyson Maynard-Gibson)
for her own expedient political
purposes may have withdrawn
that appeal, it doesn't avoid the
fact that the issue is still alive
before the courts, and indeed in
the Save Guana Cay matter we
have obtained leave to appeal
from Justice (Norris) Carroll, to
ask the courts to determine that
very point," said Mr Smith.

If it is determined by that court
that the judiciary was not inde-
pendent at the time that Justice
Carroll first heard their case, the
group, and many others, would
be entitled to a retrial, having had

their constitutional right to a trial
before an impartial judge
breached.
Hundreds of judgments may

be called into question, he said.

Mr Smith said that in the case
of Justice Carroll, in particular,
the group will further be making
the case that the "the opportuni-
ty for political interference,
although it may not have
occurred, remained a live one"
as he is an acting judge.

For this reason, he did not have

.the "security of tenure" neces-

sary for assured independence
"because he could be removed at
the will of the executive at any
time."

Mr Smith likened appointing
acting judges to "putting the
judge on probation."

"As long as you behave, as
long as you don't disrupt the sys-
tem too much, we might eventu-
ally confirm you in the appoint-
ment," he said, adding that the
PLP are "particularly fond" of
appointing judges in this way.

He said that although other
countries appoint acting judges, it
is usually only for very short peri-
ods of time and not at the "high-
est" levels.

Mr Smith added that Freeport
in particular was plagued with a
"dysfunctional" judicial system,

tate!

overseen by only two judges, both

of whom are merely "acting" =. _

Justices Peter Maynard and Nor-
ris Carroll.

"That is an unacceptable situ-
ation for the northern region,
which is supposed to have, by the
amendment to the Supreme
Court Act...the senior Justice sit-
ting in Freeport at all times," he
said.

Mr Smith said he and the Save
the Guana Cay Foundation are
ready to take their case to the
Privy Council if necessary.

In November, Justice Lyons —

said that the government had

shown a "manifest disregard for.
the rule of law" by failing».
tri-annual”.,

to appoint a
commission to review judges’
salaries.

The review schedule, mandated .*
by law, is designed specifically to. -

protect against the undermining. ° ;
of the independence of the judi-:’ »

ciary.

Lyons claimed that the govern-
ment had "deliberately" ignored
a law designed to protect the con-
stitutional independence of
judges. :

The Attorney General
appealed his ruling, but subse-
quently withdrew that appeal at
the end of March.

In his landmark ruling, Justice .

FROM page one

combe, who is contesting the Golden Gates seat
as an independent, said gay election candidates
should declare their sexuality before seeking the
votes of the public.

Mr Duncombe said voters had a right to know
where candidates stood on family issues.

And sexuality, he said, often affected an MP’s
stance on such matters.

The child rights advocate said since gay sex was
legalised in the Bahamas 16 years ago, there had
been a “proliferation” of homosexuals and les-
bians.

He said voters had a right to know a candi-

“Sdate’s proclivities because they so often influ-

a: the way they viewed important Borla and

estic issues. s

“If they are bold enough and believe it, then
why hide it?” Mr Duncombe asked.

He criticised both Prime Minister Perry

“Christie and Opposition leader Hubert Ingra-

ham for not taking a position on this important
question publicly.

“T have no problems with people who are gay,
but I have a great problem with those who hide it

FROM page one

eR a SO et

Gay rights
eroup hits out

and pretend they are something else,” he said.
However, Ms Greene told The Tribune: “If Mr
Duncombe's statements are born out of a desire
to promote a culture of honesty, integrity and
accountability and/or to promote a culture that
views the family and the right to create family as
sacred, then the Rainbow Alliance of the
Bahamas supports him and all those that believe
that honesty, integrity and accountability are the

‘cornerstone ‘of nation-building. Otherwise we

would, advise:‘Mr: Duncombe not to play poli-
tricks with people's lives.”

Ms Greene said that no credible institutions
or individuals in the Bahamas are in the prac-
tice of “outing” homosexuals.

“Not the Christian church, not the Bahamian
government nor any political parties, and cer-
tainly not the Rainbow Alliance of the Bahamas,”
Ms Greene said.

~.@
sree

resulted from his possible revoli-3<*
from the party, and to display*» f

LUMBER ~

on Wilton Street is

NOW

Christie and will work to see
him return as Prime Minister,"
he said.

Mr Smith's possible opposi-
tion to the PLP, as an indepen-
dent, frightened many senior
members of the party, as he had
been a representative from
Exuma for nearly 30 years.

A three-way race with Mr
Smith, the FNM candidate
Joshua Sears and the PLP
incumbent, Anthony Moss,
could have split the PLP vote,
allowing Mr Sears a clearer path
to victory, in a seat that is
expected to be competitive.

Mr Smith initially lobbied
the government for the Exuma
seat to be divided in two so that
he could run along with Mr
Moss under the PLP banner.

George Smith

Seasons Resort, was given by
Mr Smith as a justification for
the extra seat. Mr Smith argued
that one representative would
have difficulty maintaining the
“quality contact" Exumians
expected and deserved.

The government did not
accept this argument and Exu-
ma was left as a single seat,
resulting in Mr Smith publicly
threatening to still run.

The announcement that Mr
Smith will not oppose the PLP
in Exuma comes on the heels
of reports in The Punch that Mr
Smith was at odds with Prime
Minister Christie, suggesting
that his job as chairman of the
Hotel Corporation was under
threat if he did run against the

his full support of Mr Christies *f

Mr Smith said: se

-

“I know personally that theses

Rt Hon Perry G Christie is
caring man with the qualities

a good prime minister. His best, $
years are ahead of him, and thos: ‘

nation should give him supreS
port.’

The former MP, in his

tes

remarks, also made suggestions; +;
to the government for improve".

ments that are urgently need-
ed within The Exumas.

Some of these include:
upgrades to Exuma Interna-
tional Airport; refurbishment
of existing school buildings and
the provision of highly-trained
teachers; and, a docking facility
and transshipment centre at

Pudding Point to facilitate the...

economic growth of this>.-
area and the southern Exuma ,«!.
cays.

PLP.
In an apparent attempt to
heal the rift that may have

PLP prediction Gunman
FROM page one FROM page one

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, FNM chair- Chief Supt Miller said police are unaware, ’
man Desmond Bannister said that his party’s polls of a motive in the incident. ney
are painting an entirely different picture than that of The three victims are in serious condition, ,2
the PLP’s campaign analysts. and several police teams are seeking thes

“Anybody whose polling is that inaccurate is going suspect, or suspects, involved in the shooting, , :,
to be really surprised on May 2. We know what our according to Chief Supt Miller. At
polls told us and we know what their (the PLP’s) In other crime news over the weekend,
polls told them, so we are quite aware what is hap- two men were taken into custody by the
pening on the ground of this country and on May 2 police and charged with six counts of armed
we're going to have a new government.” robbery.

While Mr Bannister said that he could not reveal Acting on information of an illega! firearnj
the percentage by which his party is estimated to in the Churchill Avenue area, police moved’
win, he added that, according to the polls, the FNM in ona suspect and found a .38 revolver and’
is expected to win by an overwhelming number of four rounds of ammunition.
votes. Upon questioning the suspect, Chief Supt

“We’re going to win big, that’s what the people are Miller said they were led to another indi-
telling us,” he said. vidual in the same area they suspect acted in

Mr Bannister could not comment on whether the concert with the first, in six armed robberies.
FNM had hired political campaign specialists similar The firearm recovered was allegedly shared
to those of the PLP, but explained that his party by the two in committing these offences. .*
had been prepared for this election for a long time A security officer, Alfred Luther, from =.
and had done everything to ensure it wins. the Corner Hotel, is also in serious condition.

The FNM chairman further said that his party will after being stabbed early on Friday morning. - “eg
hold Prime Minister Perry Christie to his word to run According to police reports, around 5.15am, ;
an election on issues. “We hope the press also three to four men entered the hotel creating
ensures he is held to that word,” he said. a loud disturbance when Mr Luther came to”— .

Mr Bannister said that the FNM is especially dis- investigate. :
gusted with the recent advertisement campaign the The officer allegedly spoke to the men,
PLP has been staging. asking them to leave, when an apeumient

“The commercials have been a disgrace, demean- ensued, and one of the men stabbed him
ing the name of a former leader of this country, and repeatedly on various parts of his body. Mr
really a government that runs that type of ad cam- Luther remains in serious condition at
paign loses the respect of the people,” he said. Princess Margaret Hospital.

The population expansion in
Exuma, as a result of the Four

selling
Building Materials and
Pressure Treated Lumber
just west of its old location

on Wilton Street
(right next door to DW Davis School)

Our NEW Hours will be
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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 13 -
LOCAL NEWS









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THE PLP officially
opened its new Bain and
Grants Town office on Fri-
day ‘night.

Pictured (top left) is Minis-
ter of Health and Bain and
Grants Town MP Dr
Bernard Nottage addressing
the crowd.

Top right is Prime Minister
Perry.Christie speaking from
the stage. And, above, is Dr
Bernard Nottage with Dr
Philip McPhee, who was the
FNM candidate for the con-
stituency at the last general
election.

© 2007 ADWORKS

(Photos: Franklyn G
Ferguson)

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

award. ena
If so, call us on 322-1986 New location Bilney Lane



and share your story.







THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 14, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

APRIL 10, 2007







Travel with your ‘Blacktery aa |
° In Canada with Rogers Wireless. 7
and ereenation Campsie that will sae % In the United States with Cingular.
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ae Cae Bhs Peas esT ASA YOUR CONNECTION 6 THE WORLD
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The Bahamas Telecomm-unications Centre and BTC JFK.

Company Limited, (BTC) is pleased to

inform our valued customers and the BTC encourages the public to use any of
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TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007



The Tribune

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







25 FIDELITY

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





Hilton marina developer
looks at alternative sites

IGY still committed to doing a Yacht Haven Grande in Bahamas, but-wants
downtown hotel’s majority owner to stick to deal’s ‘original terms’





B AN outside view of the British Colonial Hilton, Nassau

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he developer
behind the pro-
posed multi-mil-
lion dollar mari-
na/resort develop-
ment just to the west of down-
town Nassau’s British Colonial
Hilton has indicated to The Tri-
bune that it is looking at alter-
native sites for the project, in
case the Hilton’s new majority
owner does not return to the
“original terms” of their joint

venture agreement.

Andrew Farkas, chairman
and chief executive of New
York-based Island Global
Yachting (IGY), reiterated that
his company would not wait
“much longer” to achieve an
agreement with the hotel’s hold-
ing company, the British Colo-
nial Development Company,
which is now majority-owned
by Adurion Investment Man-
agement, a boutique Swiss/UK
investment house.

“The bottom line here for us
is that we remain committed to

the Bahamas, and will find one
way or another to develop a
Yacht Haven Grande here; not
dissimilar to the Yacht Haven
Grande we have just opened in
St Thomas,” Mr Farkas told
The Tribune.

“However, to the extent we
are unable to convince Adurion
to stay with the original terms,
then we’ll seek an alternative
venue.”

He indicated that a search for
possible alternative sites to the
Hilton joint venture, which
would be situated on land

immediately to, the west of the
downtown Nassau hotel, had
already begun.

When asked whether the
Hilton project was poised on a
“knife’s edge”, Mr Farkas con-
firmed this was an accurate
description. He acknowledged
that the project was still ‘in lim-
bo’, explaining that this was
because Adurion had decided
to change the terms of the joint

venture agreement after acquir-

SEE page 12B



Interest rates
under pressure

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian commercial
banking industry is waiting to
see whether. the-Central Bank
of the Bahamas will increase
the Bahamian Prime rate, the
interest rate that most bank
loans are linked to, as the com-
petition to attract deposits
squeezes interest rate margins.

The Tribune has been told
that the liquidity crunch expe-
rienced by the Bahamian com-
mercial banking industry
towards the end of 2006 is at
the root cause of the pressure
that Bahamian prime, currently
at 5.5 per cent, is coming under.

Although this newspaper was
unable to contact commercial
bank managing directors and
chief executives before the
Easter weekend, many having
left New Providence for a
break, it understands that many
banks have been forced to

increase deposit rates in a bid to
attract new deposits that can be
used for onward lending pur-
poses.

The interest rates that com-
mercial banks charge on most
loans are linked to Bahamian
Prime, which has remained
unchanged as a deposit rates
have gone up. Interest earned
from loans represents a com-
mercial bank’s core income,
while deposits are their chief
liabilities. While revenues
earned from loans are effec-
tively unchanged, interest pay-
ments that commercial banks
have to make on customer
deposits have increased.

As a result, the interest mar-
gins of commercial banks have
been squeezed, impacting their
profitability as they fight for
new deposits.

Sources suggested to The Tri-

SEE page 6B

Bahamas eco-friendly advantage in danger

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

IF the Bahamas does not begin to take
more environmentally-friendly measures it = * S;
could lose its competitive advantage as an

eco- friendly destination.

Christian Henry, chief financial officer
at the Cape Eleuthera Foundation, told

The Tribune that if the Bahamas did not
dégin t6 market itselfmore ager

essiVely as

an environmentally sensitive destination, :
other’countries will take the lead and the

bic By ae) ar Na See

Cape Eleuthera executive calls for right incentives
on renewable energy and conservation

ays support for alternatives will build from having

just two per cent of electricity supplied by them

SEE page 14B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Now that the bell has rung

ast week Wednesday,
Parliament was finally

dissolved and general
elections were set for May 2,
2007. A mere 23 days from
today, elections will be all over
and the country will return to
some semblance of normality,
complete with the complex
challenges of governing.

Rent-a-crowd

However, for the next 23
days, there is nothing the aver-
age Bahamian voter likes more
than the run-up period to elec-
tions, with all its hype, rallies
and give-aways.
. In Bahamian politics, great
iss emphasis is placed on the size
7 of the crowd attending a polit-

’ ical rally. Everyone wants to
be associated with a winner,

and there is absolutely no












doubt that the party generating
the biggest crowd gets a
‘knock-on’ benefit of winning
over previously undecided vot-
ers.

Recognising this, political
strategists do all they can to
ensure massive attendance by
finding creative ways to draw
people out to political rallies.
Large sums of money are rou-
tinely spent on professional
stages, lighting, sound systems,
party paraphernalia, live musi-
cians and, to top it all off, won-
derful fireworks displays.

For the ‘rent-a-crowd’
(RAC) crew, life simply could
not get any better. Where else
can you get a brand new t-shirt.
safe passage by chartered bus,
free food and drinks, first-class
Bahamian entertainment, juicy
political speeches and, alleged-

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ly in some cases, a stipend for
attending a political rally?

Within the next 23 days, the
RAC crew may have as many
as LO opportunities (some of
which will include Family
Island events) to ply their
trade. It should be noted that
seasoned RAC participants are
colour-blind and are just as
comfortable wearing one
coloured t-shirt as they are
wearing the next.

Therefore, candidates should
not become intoxicated just by
large turnouts at rallies but
should continue to work their
constituencies, because the
crowds could well be there
courtesy of your colleagues
and not necessarily for you.

Disturbing Trend

One disturbing trend that |
have noted in recent weeks ts
the insertion of voice-clips tak-
en from radio shows that are
being inserted into political
advertisements. 1 personally



@ By Fidelity Capital Markets

IT was another slow trading week in
the Bahamian market, with only 20.373
shares changing hands. The market saw [1
out of its 19 sted stocks trade, of which
four advanced, one declined and six

remained unchanged.

Volume leader for the week was FINCO

find this trend most unsettling,
especially if these voice-clips
are being used without the per-
son’s express permission.
There should be boundaries
and rules of common decency
adhered to in using some-
body’s voice and comments in
political advertisements.

If unchecked, a person who
participates in a radio, televi-
sion or other public pro-
gramme could find comments
made (in whole or in part) in
such a forum used by some
other organisation (to whom
you would not normally or
wish to be associated with), to
lend support or give the
impression of support to some
objective of that organisation
without your permission. This
is very dangerous indeed.

Electoral

Broadcasting Council

Outside of what voters read
in the newspapers or witness
at rallies, all that you see on
television or hear on radio will
be overseen by the Election
Broadcasting Council (EBC).
The Parliamentary Act 1992
calls for the establishment of a
three-member EBC, consist-
ing of a chairman and another
member both nominated by

$0.06 or 6.52 per cent to close at $0.98.
Bank of the Bahamas (BOB) also
advanced by $0.35 or 4.05 per cent to end
the week at $11.59.

On the down side, Consolidated Water
Company's BDR declined by $0.08 or 1.65
per cent to close the week at $4.77.

The FINDEX increased by 1.99 points
tor the week, to close at 793.36.

(FIN) with 5,000 shares changing hands
and accounting for 24.54 per cent of the

total shares traded.

US ECONOMIC NEWS

The big advancer for a second consecu-

tive week was Abaco Markets (AML), up





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EVERY MONTH
ETS YOU
CLOSER TO







*Tradernarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.
t Conditions apply. Subject to credit approval

Oil Price remains steady —

the Prime Minister, and a
deputy chairman nominated
by the Leader of the Opposi-
tion.

1. The Parliamentary Act
cites the functions of the EBC
as:

a) To monitor the coverage
of the election campaign being
done by the Broadcasting Cor-
poration of the Bahamas
(BCOTB) for the purpose of
ensuring that there is accuracy
and fairness in the reporting
of the campaign.

b) To act as a board of
review to hear any complaints
made by a political party or
candidate at an election in
respect of a breach by the
BCOTB - or its general man-
ager - of the rules relating to
political broadcasts or adver-
tisements.

2. The Council, in exercising
its functions as a Board of
Review, may obtain oral or
written complaints and shall
deal with them expeditiously.

3. In the exercise of its func-
tions, under this section the
Council shall not be subject to
the direction or control of any
person or authority.

It must be remembered that

eA

Crude oil was little changed amid con-
cern that US gasoline stockpiles will be
insufficient to meet demand during the

the Act was passed prior to the
licensing of private radio and
television stations, so anything
that references the BCOTB
also applies to all licensed
radio and television stations.
By the time you read this
article, the members of the
EBC should be announced. I
would not at all be surprised
if one of the first complaints
lodged would be about the
unauthorised use of voice-clips.
Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International Ltd, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
Ltd and is a major shareholder
of Security & General Insur-
ance Company in_ the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs



summer months when consumption peaks.

Gasoline inventories plunged 9.7 per
cent to 205.2 million barrels in the past
eight weeks, an Energy Department report
showed.

Crude oil for May delivery fell 10 cents

to settle at $64.28 a barrel. Futures
touched $68.09 a barrel on March 27, the

highest since September 6. Prices are down

2.4 per cent this week, and are 4.2 per-

cent lower than a year ago.

6 Scotiabank

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of:

SENIOR MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES

With over 55,000 employees in over 50 countries, Scotiabank places great importance on
recognizing and rewarding strong performance. We offer room for advancement, a stimulating
work environment and the resources to help you make the most of your career. Together,
we continue to make Scotiabank a great place to work.

POSITION SUMMARY:

As the Senior Manager, Human Resources, you are a member of the senior management
team of Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd., with a focus on dealing with the strategic and tactical
Human Resources needs of a growing and profitable organization. This will include but
not be limited to: developing the HR strategy for the organization: working with the Bank’s
support groups in the head office on the development of the annual total rewards program;
maintaining and developing a dynamic employee relations strategy; ensuring the effective
recruitment and orientation of new employees: managing the relationship between the
Bank and third-party service suppliers; and the identification of training needs and the
evolution of the training and development curriculum. You will need to be capable of
working in a highly cross-functional environment and be capable of managing tight time
lines and conflicting priorities. You are an exemplar of communication and relationship-
building skills, an excellent coach, and can effectively establish and maintain an open, co-

operative work environment.

Key accountabilities for this role:

Contribute to the achievement of the overall business objectives of Scotiabank

(Bahamas) Ltd.

Ensure the recruitment, development and maintenance of an engaged workforce.
Support people through and act as an agent of change in the environment.

Be prepared to liaise with a wide variety of Departments, balancing the needs of all
against the objectives and strategies of the Optimization program

QUALIFICATIONS:

‘Ten years of experience as a Human Resources professional.

A minimum of an undergraduate university degree, while a graduate degree or a.
major in Human Resources is an asset.
Experience in the financial industry is an asset.
Proven experience managing people.

Excellent and proven negotiation and conflict resolution skills are essential.
Ability to learn quickly, adapt to an ever changing environment and adapt to ever
changing priorities are essential.

OTHER INFORMATION:

* Frequent travel to the Family [slands
* Occasional travel internationally.
¢ Spanish Language is a bonus in an organization that is expanding rapidly in Spanish-

speaking countries.

The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from
all interested parties. We thank you for your interest, however, only those candidates
selected for an interview will be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit applications in writing marked Private and
Confidential by Monday, April 30, 2007 to:

Manager, Manpower & Succession Planning,

P. O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas or email scotiabank.bs



oe

ER ee ett,

at

\
S



Che Miami Herald \



THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 8B

bow 30 12,569.14 +8.94 A

‘sep500 1,444.61 +0.85 AL

NASDAQ 2,469.18 -216 W

“10-YR NOTE 475 N/C =
as) | -277 W

CRUDE OIL



F a t e
E BEL BRUNO
Asscciated Press
NEW YORK — Wall Street
-d an erratic session essen-
t ‘Monday as investors
anxious about upcoming
uarter earnings and the
; ibility that interest rates
vt be declining anytime
soon. A $2 drop in oil prices lent
support to the major indexes.
‘With the market closed for
- Good Friday, traders had their
_ first opportunity to react to
- Labor Department data that
- showed stronger-than-expected
— job growth in March. The num-
_ bers indicated the economy
might be in better shape than
: ly thought, and helped
~ offset concerns about a contin-
ued slowdown in the housing
_ market.
Takeover activity also pro-
vided some lift to.the markets,
-- with reports Dow Chemical has
_ been targeted by Middle East-
ern investors and U.S. buyout
_ firms in a deal that could be
~ worth $50 billion.
~- But upbeat news about the
-_U.S. economy and corporate
--activity was interpreted by
_ some on Wall Street as reasons
~ for the Federal Reserve to hold
ff on cutting rates. And, with
orporate earnings season to
__ begin when Alcoa posts results
-‘Fuésday — and profit growth
_ levels expected to fall from pre-
' “vious quarters — investors had
reason to be cautious. —
oo “AN things point to the Fed,
and now it looks like they are
' going to put rates on the back
burner for a while after Friday’s
- numbers,” said Jay Suskind,
head trader at Ryan Beck & Co.
‘And, now the markets are
looking toward earnings reports
where expectations have
: already been tempered.”
= According to preliminary
“calculations, the Dow Jones
_ industrials rose 8.94, or 0.07
- percent, to 12,569.14.
_. Broader stock indicators
_ ‘were mixed. The Standard &
' Poor’s 500 index edged up 0.85,
or 0.06 percent, to 1,444.61, and
the Nasdaq composite index fell
216, or 0.09 percent, to 2,469.18.
The Russell 2000 index of
- smaller companies fell 1.71, or
0.21 percent, to 811.64.
. Monday’s modest moves left
- intact last week’s advance; the
-— tnajor indexes rose each day last
- week and returned to positive
territory for the year. Most
_ major European markets were
~ closed Friday and Monday for
"an extended Easter holiday.
_ The Labor Department
report showed nonfarm pay-
- rolls rose by 180,000 in March,
~ above forecasts of 135,000. The
unemployment rate fell to
_ 4.4 percent, a five-month low.
-- Should the economy be stron-
er than some analysts esti-
ted, it could dissuade the
central bankers from lowering
interest rates in the near term. |
Oil prices continued their
steep decline, with a barrel of
light sweet crude settling down
$2.77 to $61.51 per barrel on the
New York Mercantile
» Exchange.
» Tensions in the Middle East
pushed crude higher in recent
’ ‘weeks, and eased after Iran
released 15 British soldiers and
- marines. There is also specula-
‘tion among traders that an
' Energy Department report will
_ show higher-than-expected U.S.
inventories.





















































' TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

INESS |



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Concerns push Vonage shares down

@ Investors’ fears affected
Vonage stocks as the Internet
phone firm saw its stock prices
fall.

BY CRAYTON HARRISON
Bloomberg News

Shares of Vonage Holdings, the
Internet phone company that lost a
patent-infringement suit last month,
dropped 10 percent on concern the
company may be prohibited from
signing up new customers.

The stock declined 34 cents to
$3.03 at 4:02 p.m. in New York Stock
Exchange composite trading. Vonage
said today in a statement that a tem-
porary stay on a judge’s ban on new

@ The Bush administration will

| file two complaints against

| China at the World Trade

| Organization aimed at stopping
what it said is piracy of
copyrighted U.S. products.

| BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Bush
administration announced Monday
it is filing two new trade cases
against China over copyright piracy
and restrictions on the sale of
American movies, music and books
there.

The action, announced by U.S.
Trade Representative Susan
Schwab, represented the latest
move by the administration to
respond to growing political pres-
sure at home to do something about
soaring U.S. trade deficits.

Schwab said the United States
was filing with the World Trade
Organization a case that will chal-
lenge Beijing’s lax enforcement of
violations of copyrights and trade-
marks on a wide range of products.
American companies contend they
are losing billions of dollars in sales
because of rampant copyright
piracy.

The second case will challenge
China’s barriers to the sale of U.S.-
produced movies, music and books.

“Piracy and counterfeiting levels
in China remain unacceptably
high,” Schwab said in announcing
the new cases. “Inadequate protec-
tion of intellectual property rights
in China costs U.S. firms and work-
ers billions of dollars each year.”

The two new cases represent the
latest effort by the administration
to increase pressure on China now
that Democrats, many highly criti-
cal of China’s trade practices, have
won control of the House and the
Senate.

The U.S. trade deficit set a



customers is the “first step” toward a
legal resolution in its favor.

A jury found in March that Von-
age infringed Verizon Communica-
tions’ patents and should pay $58 mil-
lion and a 5.5 percent royalty.
Verizon claimed Vonage lured away
600,000 customers by copying tech-
nology such as voice-mail features, as
well as the method for allowing Inter-
net calls to reach traditional phone
lines.

“Shares will remain very volatile
until there’s visibility around the
legal challenges,” said Richard
Greenfield, an analyst at Pali Capital
in New York. He has a “sell” rating
on Vonage shares.

TRADE

| Se Said



ILLEGAL DVD: ‘Piracy and counterfeiting levels in China remain unacceptably high,’ said U.S. Trade
Representative Susan Schwab, shown holding a pirated DVD copy of Night at the Museum, during
a news conference Monday in Washington. The pirated material, made in China, was brought into
the country last week. The movie is to be released in the United States on April 24th.

U.S. to file two new trade
complaints against China

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the
Federal Circuit in Washington issued
the stay on April 6. U.S. District
Judge Claude Hilton in Alexandria,
Virginia, ordered the company ear-
lier that day to stop adding subscrib-
ers.

Vonage will post a bond of $66
million and will pay the 5.5 percent
royalty rate into escrow during the
appeals process. The company said it
believe it will win the case on appeal
and is developing technology to work
around Verizon’s patents.

“We cannot envision how Vonage

continues operations unimpeded” if:

it’s unable to convince the appeals
court and can’t produce an alterna-





PHOTOS BY MANUEL BALCE CENETA/AP

ww
a
a
x
wi
Pa
i
if





PIRATED PRODUCTS: Pirated materials from China are displayed
during a news conference in Washington.

record for a fifth consecutive year
in 2006 — at $765.3 billion — with
the imbalance with China climbing
to $232.5 billion, the highest ever
recorded with a single country.

In late March, the Bush adminis-
tration announced it was imposing
penalty tariffs on Chinese glossy
paper imports in a case that broke a
23-year precedent that had barred
U.S. companies from seeking pro-
tection from unfair subsidies pro-
vided by the Chinese government.

In February, Schwab announced
the administration was bringing a
WTO case against China on the
government subsidy issue.

The decision to go to the WTO
with the two new trade cases will
trigger a 60-day consultation
period during which trade negotia-
tors from both countries will try to
resolve the two disputes.

If that fails, WTO hearing panels

PEN TARTAR ETC eT OREO AE

would be convened. If the U.S. wins
the cases, it would be allowed to
impose penalty economic sanctions
on Chinese products.

In a statement, the Motion Pic-
ture Association of America said
that American industries lost an
estimated $2.3 billion in revenue to
copyright pirates in China in 2005
with only one out of every 10 DVDs
sold in China a legal copy.

“China is, by virtually any and
every measure, the world’s largest
marketplace for pirated goods,”
said MPA chairman Dan Glickman.

Mitch Bainwol, chairman of the
Recording Industry Association of
America, said that his industry wel-
comed the administration’s deci-
sion to file the WTO cases. “The
theft of music is pervasive in China
and takes place virtually without
meaningful consequence.” he said.



tive technology, Greg Miller, an ana-
lyst with Deutsche Bank in Green-
wich, Connecticut, said today in a
research note.

A work-around would require
changes to software from several
other companies and may involve
replacing customers’ equipment, said
Clayton Moran, an analyst at Stan-
ford Group, in a research note.

“This could be a complicated,
time-consuming process,” said
Moran, who is based in Boca Raton,
Florida, and has a “hold” rating on
the stock.

Vonage shares have lost more than
80 percent of their value since they
were first sold in May at $17.

Foreign
demand
may bail
out U.S.

i Breaking tradition, the United
States may need help from the
rest of the world as its economy
flounders and there is little sign
of weakness in major economies
outside the U.S.

BY SIMON KENNEDY
Bloomberg News

The flagging U.S. economy may
get by with a little help from its
ioe.



ing a eline to an America weighed
down by the housing slump and weak
business investment. With exports
accelerating and imports shrinking,
trade this year may add to growth
instead of subtracting from it for the
first time in more than a decade.

“Had it not been for the rest of the
world, the U.S. economy might be
seriously floundering,” says Stephen
King, chief economist at HSBC Hold-
ings in London.

That’s a change from the past 40
years, when the U.S. powered the
world economy through financial cri-
ses elsewhere but gained little thrust
from abroad when demand turned
weak at home. Back then, when the
U.S. sneezed, the rest of the world
caught a cold; “nowadays, when the
U.S. sneezes, the rest of the world
goes shopping,” King says.

The shift gives central bankers
and finance ministers of the Group of
Seven, the world’s biggest industrial-
ized economies, reason for optimism
as they meet in Washington this
week.

The big differences now: The
housing slump that’s dragging down
demand in the U.S. is having little
impact beyond the country’s borders,
while other economies are generat-
ing enough demand on their own to
prop up growth elsewhere.

“The U.S. slowdown has had little
discernible effect on growth in most
other countries,” the International
Monetary Fund said in a report last
week.

That could change if the housing
recession does more damage than
most economists now expect to the
rest of the U.S. economy. The U.S.
still accounts for a fifth of the global
economy and is its biggest importer.

Even though the importance of the
U.S. market has diminished, there’s
still danger of “spillover” from a
slowdown in the world’s largest
economy because so many compa-
nies and investors in the rest of the
world have ties to American busi-
nesses and markets, the IMF report
says.

Stephen Roach, chief global econ-
omist at Morgan Stanley in New
York, also doubts that consumers
elsewhere wield big enough spending
power to compensate for softness in
the U.S.

“The global economy is likely to
be a good deal weaker than the
decoupling crowd would lead you to
believe,” says Roach.

So far, though, there’s little sign of
weakness in major economies out-
side the U.S. The 13 nations that share
the euro are being buoyed by record
low unemployment and the highest
confidence in six years. Japan’s econ-
omy, after wobbling at the end of last
year, is also extending its longest
expansion since World War II.

2 Lh ETE PANT ATS MO CUNT



4B | TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007



S&P 500 NASDAQ Dow
1,444.61 fi +35 2,469.18 2.16 19569.14
W550 6 6 pe rennetrtteenrnn nen eetrnnnpnnentenc centiny 2,700
1,500 - 2,600

INTERNATIONAL EDITION .










te» +8.94

6-MO T-BILLS
4.89%

30-YR T-BONDS @& +.05

fe +11

6 4.91%

Money&Markets

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TSO: Cossscccehennncscsnion Quitsntsoea ele asian Taeie S&P 500 2,300 Moog sooohoune Nasdaq composite
: Close: 1,444.61 : Close: 2,469.18
: ‘ Change: +0.85 (+0.1%) ! Change: -2.16 (-0.1%)
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0 N D J F MA 0 N D J F MOA
StocksRecap HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR YTD
DOW 12593.60 1255532 12569.14 +8.94 +0.07% A A A +0.85%
NYSE NASD DOW Trans. 5069.62. 4917.53 5010.10 +9304 +1.89% A A & +9.87%
DOW Util. 514.15 510.27 «513.60 $3.26 +0.64% «=A A 12.44%
Vol. (in mil.) 2,320 1,687 = NYSEComp. 9450.27 9422.45 = 9429.21 $2.64 +0.03% A A A +3.18%
Pvs. Volume 2,312 1,517 NASDAQ 2478.68 2464.57 2469.18 2.16 -0.09% A A A +#2.23%
Advanced 1624 1339 S&P 500 1448.10 1443.28 = :1444.61 +0.85 +0.06% A A A +1.86%
Declined 1673 1705 S&P 400 864.39 860.27 = 862.53 +0.74 «+0.09% A A A 47.23%
New Highs 304 146 Russell2000 814.31 += 809.92 811.64. «1.71 -0.21% = A $3.04
New Lows 17 56 Wilshire 5000 1468099 14629.27 14648.08 + +7.70«-+0.05% A A A +2,74%
WidelyHeldStocks
Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg
ABBLtd 17.86 -.04 =~ BostonSci_ 14.94 -.03 Natlcity 36.14 -.47
ABN Amro 45.35 +81 BrMySq 27.66 -16 Ecolab 43.81 +.08 ImpTob 89.08 -.13 NatGrid 80.10 -.27
ACE Ltd 57.53 +.24 BritAir 101.12 +.13 Edisonint 51.62 +.49 IndoTel 45.36 +.24 NOilVarco 79.63 -.19
AESCpIf 22.28 -+.59 BritATob 62.86 -.33 ElPasoCp 14.68 = +.02 Infineon 15.59 — -.05 NatSemi 24.59 -.13
AFLAC 48.13 +21 BritSky 44,43 -.28 Elan 14.48 +53 Infosys s 52.56 +73 NetwkAp 36.07 -,44
AMR 33.12 +.77 Broadcom 32.41 —--.57 ElectArts 51.50 -.44 IngerRd 43.75 +14 NewellRub 31.06 -.26
ASMLHId 25.58 = -.10 = BrkfldAsgs 55.54 +78 EDS 27.70 -O1 Intel 20.10 +52 NewmtM = — 43.57 -.06
AT&Tinc 39.33 +.06 =~ BrkfldPrp = 40.25 = -.20 Embarqn 56.01 = -.49 IntentlEx 128.50 38 NewsCpA «23.47 #11
AUOptron 15.49 +11 BungeLt 76.81 -.28 EmersnEls 42.72 -.09 IntCtlHtlrs 25.28.09 NewsCpB 25.02 +13
AXA 43.55 -.09 — BurINSF 88.08 +5.36 EEIChile 42.68 +121 IBM 96.62 +10 — Nexeng 61.81 -.72
AbtLab 57.21 +19 CAInc 26.24 ==. Enbridge 32.45 -.04 IntlGame 40.38 -.23, Ss Nisource . 25.04 +.19
AberFitc 7649 74 CBRElliss 3409 -39 EnCana 51.91 16 IntPap 37.06 +27 Nidec 16.53 +.34
Accenture 3833 -31 CBOT 189.92 -1.66 Endesa 53.51 -.22 IntIPower 82.20 -.22, Ss NikeBwi '53.90—s+.42
Adecco 16.20 -.15 CBSB 31.20 +18 — Enel 55.68 15 ANAT Bed NippnTT = 26.09 -.38
AdobeSy 42.70 +09 CHRobins 48.75 -.09 EngyTEq 36.82 +20 jncscog 132.42 -17—SsNissan 21.82 +.04
AMD 1335 +49 CIGNA = 147.66 +.04—EngyTsfr = 58.22, 18 JpMorgch 49.00 +23. «= NobleCorp, 81.17 -.29
Advantstrs 4847 +181 CITGp 53.94 -16 Enersis 17.02, +33 Johnun 61.63 +08 NobleEn 61.30 -.01
Aegon 20.54 05 CNAFn = 4469 +.28 «= ENSCO 54.72 -.63Johnsnctl 97.30 +.33~=—-NokiaCp =——23.54
Aetna 4531 +31 CNHGbI = 37.07 -.24 Entergy = 110.35 #1.05 Inprntwk = .20.79««+.22, «Nomura =—s‘19.95—-.20
Agilent 35.06 +35 = CNOOC = 88.30 +.10 = EntPrPt’ §= 32.09 +.02, tA Tne §=— 55.53 ~.32-Nordstrm = 54.59 +.46
Ahold 12.24 CPFLEn 45.68 41.94 = EqtyRsd 49.37 +.04 py 16.33 -.07 ~—NorflkSo. = 52.89 #1.91
AFrance 49.00 +30 «= CRH 4483 +17 — EricsnTl = 37-49-03 KT Corp = 22.37.05 Norsks = 32.95 -.33
AirProd 75.25 +.79 «= CSXS 4186 +90 Esteeldr = 49.2504 Kellogg = 51.78 = +.01_~—sNortelifrs 24.15 -.32
AkamaiT 51.66 +69 CVSCare 3490 +17 — Exelon 72.08 +38 Keycorp «37.54 -.07-—NorTrst. = 60.83 -.22
Akzo 76.82 -29 CablvNYs 30.70 -26 Expedia = 23.81.21 Keyspan = 41.42_—«+.06 = NorthropG- 75.73 —-+.68
Alcan 5351 +31 CadbyS 52.30.14 = Expdintls © 42.44 +01 Kimbcik 70.11. «+.45——sNovartis 55.30 -.46
Alcatelluc 12.35 -.04 Camecogs 4688 +.73 ExpScripts 85.88 +.05 — Kimco 48.77 +07 NovoNdk 92.27 _—s-.47
Alcoa 3487 +28 Cameron 6357 +24 — ExxonMbl = 76.80 42 KindME = 55.26 +.35=SNucors ~—67.50_—+.99
Alcon 138.27° +26 CampSp 3855 +12 FPLGrp = 61.75 +35 KindMorg 106.80 +.01 ~—Nvidia 30.34 -.56
AllgEngy 50.69 +33 CIBCg. «= 8811 +41 FannieMIf 54.43 +10 Kohls 7847 +09 OcciPets 49.68 -.27
AllegTch 113.34 +2.48 «© CdnNRyg = 46.47 -+2.18 = FedExCp 109.26 +44 — Kookmin 93.46 -+1.62—OffcDpt_ «= 35.14 +.28
Allergan 11361 +.09 CdnNRsg 56.49 -,33,- FedrDSs |= 46.31 +31 Koreagle §=— 20.82 -.18 += Omnicom = 102.40 -.86
AlliBern = 91.04 «+74 = CPRwyg 57.39 +163 Fiat 25.93 +02 Kraft 3131 -27 Oracle 1857 — -.10
Allianz 2136 +05 Canons 55.00 +58 FidNinfo = 47.71.17 Kroger 29.22. +11 Orix 132.84 +.20
Aldirish 57.39 +06 © CapOne = 73.43, +07 ~—FifthThird = 38.2753 Kubota. «= 441 +.17 Ss PGRECp = 49.38 +.03
Allstate 60.36 +.04 CardnlHIth 73.28 -1.25 = FirstDatas 32.38) +09 kyocera = 98.35 $1.94 = PNC 72.61 -.16
Alltel 62.61 +02 Carnival 4649 -.26 FFirstEngy 68.25 +20, 1-3,Com 89.15 -1.00 POSCO 105.86 -.50
AltanaAG 67.23.12, CamUK = 48.02, -.21_—‘Fiserv 54.27 576 LGPhilips 17.77 -.54 PPG 7L81 0 +.75
AlteraCplf 20.21 +24 CarolinaGp 77.30 -131 —‘Flextrn 11.05 +03 Labcp 7368 +48 PPLCorp 4310 +27
Altria s 69.90 -.85 Caterpillar 67.34 -.29 Fluor 91.72 LafargeSA 40.11 -.11 Paccars 74.64 = -.07
Alumina 2452, +.25 = Celgene «= 58.90 +87 «= FEMSA = 116.40 +131 © LamRsch = 49.33«S ~07-=S ParkHan = 87.64 —-+.02
AmBevC = 54.84 +65 Cemexs 33,33. +34 FordM 8.08 +07 vsands 88.58 + -.32.~— Paychex «= 37.66 = -.23
AmBev 57.10 +89 Cemig 50.31 +39 Forestlab 5446 +16 — Leggnason 96.32 -.64 — PeabdyE | 4387 #RA3e
Amazon 41.66 «= -.02,_—ChesEng)» 32.59 +08 FortuneBr 78.64 = 05. LehmanBr = 72.29-«+.85 “Pearson id “lL
AmbacF 86.05 +17 = Chevron.“ (75.49 -.12'—FranceTel == 27.39.07 LeucNatls 29.66 -.01 = PennWst gn 2945 ».27
Amdocs 36.75 «+11 © ChiMerc 550.50 -3.00 —FrankRes 125.72 07 Level3 6.26 +13 Penney.) 8269 -1.37
““Ameren 50.16 -32Chinalfes” “44.23 +.73 = FredMac_— 59.63.25 ibGlobA = -34.91««+.08 += PeopBCT ~= 44.41_—s+.15
AMovill 50.55 +.81 ChinaMble 46.33 +.94 FMCG 68.98 +1.41 LibGlobB 34,89 PepsiBott 32.00 -.35
AMovilA 50.45 +67 = ChinaNet «51.63 +.23 = FresenM == 49.85.16 LibGlobc «32.95 +.18 = PepsiCo ~=— 62.99 _—-.69
AmCapStr 45.65 +04 ChinaPet 88.62 +55 Fujifilm = 42.40 +78 LibMintAn 24.02 -.78 =~ PetroCg. «39.7515
A€agleOs 29.63.27 ChinaTel «50.54 +.55 Gallaher 88.73.33 LibMCapAn 112.70 +124 — PetChina 117.91 ~.20
AEP 4957 +73 ChinaUni 1483 +18 = Gannett, = 57.42, +145 | illyeli 55.58 +10 PetrbrsA 91.12.01
AmExp 56.36 «+40 = Chubbs 52.00 +01 = Gap 1839 +75 Limited 26.86. «+09 = Petrobrs =—(102.62-+.47
AmintGp If 67.23 ChungTel 19.94 +14 Garmins = 53.76 31 LincNat = 68.09-«+.01-—SPfizer 26.00 +.16
AREst 11650 -.09 CinnFin 42.63.34. Genentch = 82.64 «76 LinearTch 31.82.18 ~——PIILD 53.45 +.10
AmStand 53.29 +40 — Cisco 26.20 +14 GenDynam 78.52 +41 LIoydTSB_ 45.23. -.12—PhillipsE!_ «38.92 ~.23
AmTower 39.33 +03 Citigrp, «= 51.58 +.01 © GenElec = 34.78 = =.24LockhdM = 98.03. #132 PitnyBW 46.12
Ameriprise 59.92 +38 ClearChan 35.55 -.13 © GnGrthPrp. 64.87 +70 igewss = 46.63 -.18 = PlainsAA 57.43.15
AmeriBrg 53.75 -.26 = ClearCh_ «26.86 -.20 © GenMills._ 58.55.20 tgwess 31.50 +11 = PlumCrk = -39.50—++.01
Amgen = 57.19 -1.14 Clorox 64.28 +55 GnMotr = 32.00 #10 Luxottica, © 32.3119 PoloRL «92.97 4.37
Amvescp 22.93 +.18 Coach 5130-10 GenuPrt = 49.81 +19 yondell «= «31.43. #.23—PortglTel «13.65 +.03
Anadarks 44.47 +17 CocaCE + = 20.46 «= -.08 «= Genworth = 35.06 = 09 atBk © 105.27 -.72,~=Ss~Potash~=—«169.33-+.80
AnalogDev 36.16 +03 CCFemsa 38.04 +.66 «© Genzyme = 60.82, 71 pia 65.84 -.07 Praxair = 63.72 +.24
AngloAm 27.10 +.08 CCHellen 40.79 -.21.-= Gerdaus 19.63 #.76 MEM 60.41 -1.03 PrecCastpt 106.29 -.62
AnglogidA 45.76 +24 — CocaCl 49.63 +11 GileadSci._ 77.70.62 MGMMir =—«-72.57 +50 ~—PriceTRs = 48.70 +.24
Anheusr 51.71 +61 CogTech 86.04. -.72,-—GlaxoSKIn 56.12 -12 Macerich 94,07 +11 ~—PrinFnel «= 60.31. -.32
AonCorp 3848 -.13 © ColgPal. «= 66.71 +.08 © GlobalSFe_ 63.22. +51 = Magnalg ~=-78.63.««+.92~—-ProctGam = 63.26 +.26
Apache 72.19 +10 Comcasts 2646 -15 GoldFltd 19.16 -.02 Manpwi 74.59 +145 ~~ ProgrssEn 50.89 -—«+.09
ApolloG if 43.25 -1.14 © Comesps 25.98 = -.04.- Golderpg_ 25.5116 = Manulifgs 35.40 +13 Progcps 2169 27
Appleinc 93.65 -1.03 Comerica 59.42 -.19 © GoldmanS 208.94 +1.01 Marathon 101.93 -.86 ProLogis. ©«66.08—s +41
ApldMatl 18.65 -.03 = CmcBN) «= 33.00. «-+.08 «= Goodrich © 52.0374 Marintds © 49.85 «= -.17~=Ss Prudent! ©=«91.68-—«+.02
ArcelorMit 5457 -.25 CVRDs 40.06 +31 Google 468.21 -3.30) © MarshM = -29.23. Ss -s11.=SséPrud UK =—s29.31—S-.10
ArchDan 37.74 «+72, CVRD pfs) 33.45. «+12 ~—sGraingr 7742-09 Marshils 48.25 »-.38.~=Ss: PSEG 86.80 +1.65
ArchstnSm 54.56 08 CompsBc 69.41 -.05 GrantPrde 49.73 -.11 = MartMM = 138.68 «+45 += PubStrg. «(96.17 -.46
Assurant 55.75 -1.25 © CompSci 53.55 -.25« GpTelevisa 31.04 +.21 — MarvellTsif 17.00 -18 Publicis 46.55.17
AstraZen 54.33 -.26 ConAgra 24.93. +.20 «= HDFCBK = 67.62 +.54 Masco 26.89 -29 Pulte 26.90 -.05
AustNZ 121.21 = 20.» ConocPhil 68.42 +46 «© HSBC 89.78 +10 MasterCdn 108.34 +33 Qualcom 42.68 —-.62
Autodesk If 3884 -.71 ConsolEs 42.48 +24 = Hallibtns 32.60 -.34—atsush =. 20.84. Ss -.02Ss«stDiag «51.25.05
AutoData 44.56 -92 ConEd 52.14 +09 Hanson 80.54 -.07 Mattel 29.28 -37 Questar 93.47 +.65
AutoZone 130.18 +.55 ConstellEn 89.00 +1.00 HarleyD 62.16 +60 Maximif 29.15 -55 Qwesttm 895 -16
AvalonBay 130.20 -.30 Coopers 45.94 +14 Harman = 99.43, -.18 = Micpnids 46.49 «+71 = Raytheon = 54.42, +.38
AveryD 64,27 «+10 = Corning «= 23.52, 07, HarmonyG = 15.49 03 MicGrwH 61.97 +29 Realogyn = 29.96 +.07
Avon 3856 10 Costco = 54.82, 06 = HarrahE = 85.03 +13 McKesson 58.56 -.36 ~—-ReedEIsNV 36.03 -.05
BASF 116.26 -.23. = CntwdFn «34.20 +54 = HarrisCorp 50.75 36 = Medimun =: 36.76 ~=«+.38~—sReedElsplc 48.63 = -.17
BB&TCp 40.41. -.39-~— Coventry © 58.40 © -.05 = HartfdFn = 97.33 +16 =~ MedcoHith 73.99 +.04 ~—-Regionsfn 34,74 -.54
BCEgn 28.23 Ad HithcrPr 36.52 +27 Medtrnic ~=— 48.95 --18~—sReliantEn «21.76 4.74
BG Grp 71.80 -4l CredSuiss 71.84 = -.46 HealthNet 56.80 = -.27 Mellonfne 43.48 = +.11 Repsol 34.07 -.24
BHPBilLt 49.63 +15 CrwnCstle 32.82 +.56 = HSCardDvn 25.05 03 Merck 45.65 +11 RschMotn 146.26 +.49
BHPBiI ple 46.04 +27 «= Cummins 147.48 = -.22, HSDiagn = 25.6910 rkserono 22.34 = -15—sReutrGrp = 58.12.38
BJ Svcs 28.06 -.20 DJIADiam 125.65 = +.19 HSECancn 28.89 +1.89 Mertilllyn 86.78 +70 ReynAms — 63.47 +87
BMC Sft 31.18 +.10 DRHorton 22.04 = +.03 HsETechn 26.56 +02 MetLife 63.87 +.04 Rinker 75.30 -.20
BP PLC 64.84 -41 TE 48.57 4.16 -HSPatCren 27.42 Metso 5371 11 — RioTinto §— 240.56 #1.35
BTGrp = 6112-34 DaimirC = 84.47 = -.33 Heinz 47.49 +01 Microchp 36.15 -.16 = RockwlAut 58.16 +.09
BakrHu 67.17 -57 Danaher 70.98 -.29 HellnTel 14.06 +.04 MicronT 11.18 +33 RockColl 66.99 «08
BcBilVArg 24.73 07 © Danone = 36.48 +15 = Hershey = 55.34.88 Microsoft 28.57 -+.02 »=« RogCmgs = 34.17_—-+.07
BcBradess 20.71 +.24 Dassault 54.89 = -.18 Hertz n 24.17 +19 Millea s 37.64 +18
Bncoltau 37.05 +.45 Deere 108.62 +1.05 Hess s 55.08 -1.21 — Millicomint 83.57. +.27 RoHaas 52.75 +.25
BcoSnCH 18.43 -.02 Delhaize 95.62 = -.24 HewlettP 41.34 —-.46 Mirant 44,08 +3.44 Rostele 52.43 +.42
BcSanChile 51.52 +.59 Dell Inc If 23.71 +.20 Hilton 36.91 ~17 MitsuUFJ 11.56 RoyalBk g 51.10 +.01
BkofAm 50.86 +.01 DeutschBk 137.49 26 Hitachi 18.77 “13 Mitsui 358.00 -6.36 RylCarb 42.49 -05
Bkirelnd 86.43 -.27-~—S« Deut Tel 17.27 = -.05 = HomeDp = 38.08 +06 izuhoFn §=.13.16 = -.06 += RoyDShIIB- 66,91 —-.38
BkMontg 61.28 +28 DevDv 64.21 +32 Honda 35.30 -.19 — MobileTel 60.72 +2.02 + RoyDShIIA 66.60 = -.44
BkNY 40.96 +.15 DevonE 72.95 +1.07 Honwllintl 47.11 -15 — MolscoorsB 94.80 -.09 Ryanairs 45.81 -.07
BkNovag 46.57 +.02 Diageo 81.94 -.01 Hospira = 40.72, 21 Monsantos 58.29 +74 SAPAG 46.36 -.36
Barclay 57.90 -.28 DiaOffs 81.69 -.61 HostHotls 26.77 12 Moodys 61.78 +.67 SEI Inv 62.22 —--.08
Bard 81.73 -.24 DirecTV 23.58 +.07 HuanPwr 40.11 -.51 MorgStan 80.30 SK Tlem 23.47
BarrickG 29.18 -.15 Disney 34.91 HudsCity 13.66 +01 wosaiclf 29.10 +28 SLGreen 139.23 +2.39
Baxter 54.37 +.33 DollarG 21.22 +18 Humana 63.07 +46 wotorola 17.65 +06 SLMCp 41.57 +.13
BayerAG 65.91 -.06 DomRes 90.20 +.06 = HutchTel = 30.59 +10 Murpho) 53.16 = -.71. = ST MSTech 56,70 -.12
Bearst 149.00 -1.40 —-OonlleyRR_- 37.36 «+51 =‘ 1ACInter. § 38.20 +38 =~ NcRCp = 48.05«+.13.~«=STMicro. = 19.87.08
BectDck 77.90 -.52 Dover 48.74 41 ICICI Bk 38.64 = +.28 NEC 5.61 +05 Safeco 64.76 = -.70
BedBath 41.39 +18 DowChm 46.63 +2.16 — ING 43.21 +11 NII Hldg 78.73 +1.04 Safeway 37.18 +.86
Berkley 32.61 -.34 DuPont 49.68 +.36 iShJapan 14.66 -.02 NIS Grp s 5.69 BerkHaA 109000 +151 DukeEgys 2081 +14 iShDIDv 72.26 =~04 = RGegy = 76.63 -+2.65 «= SanDisk = 4403-47
BerkKHB -3635.—=i(si«é#Q”—=Ct*«éE Trade 2144-16 = iShSP500 144.72 +.18 = NTTDoCo ~— «18.08 «54s Satniofi 43.55 43
BestBuy 48.23 -.22 E.ON AG 48.84 +.07 iShHEmMMkKt 120.77 +.47 NYMEXn 129.08 —--2.43 SaraLee 16.99
Biogenidc 44.39 —-.63 eBay 33.74 = +.03 iSh EAFE 71.68 ~~ -.06 NYSEEur 96.05 -.69 Sasol 33.20 +.10
Biomet If 42.73 -.05 EMC Cp 14,38 -.06 iSRIKV nya 84.40 +.15 Nabors 30.15 +26 Satyam s 23.63 +.28
BlackRock 155.37 -1.14 ENI 64.87 -40 iShR2K nya 80.57 —-+.13 Nasdl00Tr 44.45 “ll SchergPl 26.29 = +.43
BlockHR 21.03 -.15 = EOG Res 74.39 -.36 ITT Corp 62.03 +.26 = Naspers = -25.80 +17, Schimbrg. 757-27
Boeing 90.03 -.47 EKodak 2322-22 TW 52.49 +17 NtAust «168.43. +08 «= Schwab 19.19 +.06
BostProp 118.74 +.65 Eaton 85.51 = +.07 IC] 43.02 +.02 NBkGreece 11.26 +.02 ScotPwrn 64.49 +12
EchoStar 45.14 +.43 ImpOilgs 38.26 = +.52 SeagateT 2346 +.19
. TorontoStockExchange
Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg
MegaUranmo 8.16 +1.75 VictoryNklo 86 +.09 PinetreeCapo 14.65 +1.87 FarallonReso 64-01 DenisonMines 15.36 +.13
CdnZinco 92 +.06 AlgonquinUn 8.28 -.05 Timmincoltd 2.85 — -.09 CentaminOrd 1.00 +.07 YellowPgsUn 13.79 -.07
QuadraMng 11.90 _+.55 YamanaGldo 17.09 +.03 CdnNatRail 53.58 +2.68 QuestCapital 3.15 ne GatewayUn = 25.00 -.05
Inflazyme 07-01 BluePearlMng 13.75 +.39 BombdrBSV = 4.66 +.02 EldoradoGld 7.04 -.06 LundinMng 15.25 +.08
Crystallexo 4.90 +.20 CoalcorpMino .65 +.02 PaladinOrdo 9.90 +.21 CaledoniaMng 16 +.01 ChromosMolo — .04 ae
CamecoCorp 54.06 +.95 LionoreMng 19.22 -.28 EqnoxMnrlso 2.44 is BreakwaterRes 2.04 +.07 FirstNickelo = 1.31 +.04
CandaxEngy 60 +.08 Bk NS 53.73 +.20 ConjuChemBio .63 +.04 KinrossGold 16.42 ie EasternPlat 2.13 -.02
UEXCorpo = 7.42:«+.26+=—s«UraMinIncJ = 7.00 +.20 _SilverWheaton 12.35 +.50 -UTSEngyCorp 4.17 -.09 — GoldcorpInc 29.43 -.04
TalismanEgy 21.14 +.16 NorOriono 5.39 +.36 MolyMnsOrdo 4.48 +.68 KhanReso 487 +.18 Carpathian) — 1.24

SXRUranium) 18.30
12
16

21.94

3.86
14

TiominReso

Queenstake

MDS Inc
Dynatec

CampbellRes
HudBayMnrls 21.62

Name Last
SearsHldgs 186.90
SempraEn 62.25
ShawC g 38.37
Sherwin 66.36
Shinhan 119.24
Shire 63.26
SiderNac 44.05
Siemens 111.23
SimonProp 114.03
Smith&N 62.81
Smithintl 49.29
Sodexho 74.00
SonyCp 53.25
SouthnCo —_ 37,31
SthnCopps 76.03
SwstAirl 15.13
SwstnEngy 42.13
SovrgnBcp 24.63
Spectran 26,03
SprintNex 19.27
SPDR 144.44
SP Mid 156.95
Staples 26.55
Starbucks 31.14
StarwdHtl — 68.70
StateStr 66.99
Statoil 27.10
StoraEnso 17.47
Stryker 68.49
Suez 54.15
SunLffng 45.95
SunMicro 5.93
Suncor g 76.58
Sunoco 74,09 °
SunTrst 79,88
Supvalu 39.68 «
Swisscom 35.85
Symantec 16,95
Syngenta 40.10
Synovus 32.56
Sysco 33.44
TOAmeritr 15.31
TD Bknorth 32.25
TDK 89.90
TJX 28.07
TNT NV 46.20
TXUCorp = 64.30
TaiwSemi _—10.87
TalismE gs 18.30
Target 61.38
TataMotors 16.59
Technip 74.02
TeckCmgn 73.75
TelcNZ 27.73
Telltalia 32.46
TelltaliaA 25.96
TelBrasH 32.10
TelSPaulo 25.92
TelefEsp 67.99
TelMexL 36.26
TAustria 51.76
Telenor 55.70
TelData 59.74
Telkom 98.00
Telstra 19.09
Telus g 50.24
Templein 60.92
Tenaris s 46.40
Terex $s 72.78
Tesoro 107.56
TevaPhrm 37.81
Texinst 30.82
Textron 92.56
ThermoFis 48.45
Thomson 41.40
»3M.CO, ..... 76.83
Tiffany 48.77
TWCablen 36.95
TimeWarn 21.01
Trchmrk 65.26
TorDBkg —-60.34
TotalSAs 70.03
TotalSys 32.44
Toyota 126.29
TrCda g 33.21
Transocn 82.36
Travelers 52.84
Tribune 32.75
Turkcell 14.25
Tycolntl 31.99
Tyson 19.63
UBS AGs 60.27
UPM Ky 25.48
UST Inc 60.00
UltraPt g 54.44
UUniao 92.94
UnilevNVs 29.29
Unilevers 30.09
UnionPac 107.15
UnBnCal 62.28
UtdMicro 3.31
UPS B 70.09
US Bancrp 34.68
US Cellular 73.40
USSteel 103.24
UtdTech 65.06
UtdUtils 30.00
UtdhIthGp 54.88
UnumGrp 23.98
VF Cp 85.25
ValeroE 67.15
VarianMed 48.55
VeoliaEnv 76.02
Verisign 26.02
VerizonCm 38.00
ViacomB 41.00
VimpelCm — 99.59
VirgnMdah = 25.11
Vodafone 27.00
Volvo 84.50
Vornado —-:120.75
VulcanM 118.12
WPP Gp 76.30
Wachovia 54.06
WalMart 48.47
Walgrn 46.60
WA Mull 39.25
WsteMinc 34.43
Weathfdint 47.27
WellPoint 82.25
WellsFgos 34.37
WstnUnn — 23.02
Westpac —106.80
Weyerh 76.21
Whrlpl 87.26
WholeFd 44.81
WmsCos 28.32
Windstrm — 14.85
Wipro 16.27
Wolseley s 25.00
WooriFn 74.29
Wrigley 51.27
Wyeth 52.94
Wyndham n 34.70
Wynn 101.08
XL Cap 69.78
XTOEngy 56.00
XcelEngy 24.69
Xerox 17.30
Xilinx 25.96
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Yahoo 31.64
YumBrds 59.03
Zimmer 88.31
ZionBcp 82.90
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MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD —



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 5B



BISX Rules reform ‘step

in the right direction’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

T= proposed amend-
ments to the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange’s (BISX) listings and
issuers’ continuing obligations
rules have been praised as “a
step in the right direction” by
one market participant,
although they have to be tied
to a reformed Securities Indus-
tries Act that has enforcement
teeth.

Larry Gibson, vice-president-
pensions for Colonial Pensions
Services (Bahamas), said of the
redrafted BISX rules: “It’s a
step in the right direction.

“We need to really go one
step further to make the
required changes to the Secu-
rities Industries Act, to cover
minority shareholders, mergers
and acquisitions, corporate
reporting and timly disclosure
of corporate events, especially
material events - the whole nine
yards.”

The Tribune reported last
Thursday how the redrafted
BISX Rules propose requiring
listed companies to publish
their quarterly and annual
financial figures some 60 and
90 days respectively after the
periods end, with the
exchange’s listings committee
having “the ability to disquali-
fy a director from serving in
that capacity” for a listed firm.

The redrafted Rules are due
to be published by tomorrow
to obtain feedback from listed
- companies, investors and cap-
- ital markets participants, and
other interested parties. Once
the amendments are for-
malised, they then have to be
approved by capital markets
regulator, the Securities Com-
mission of the Bahamas.

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told The Tribune
that one set of rules the
exchange had hoped to pub-
lish but had not completed
were those governing mergers
and acquisitions. 2 OW

4 \ 4 &

“We just haven’t been able
to finalise the mergers and
acquisitions rules, but people
should rest assured they will
be published in a similar fash-
ion to the listings rules and the

continuing obligations rules.”

Among the proposed
amendments to the latter two
sets of rules are a requirement
for all BISX issuers “to make
all material disclosures to a
new department in BISX,
called the BISX Companies
Announcements Office”.

The proposal will require all
issuers, under BISX rules, to
file all results and material dis-
closures with this office first in
an electronic format, using the
secure filing process that the
exchange has adopted.

Once received = and
processed, the new BISX
department would “make avi-
lable on a website these dis-
closures for and on behalf of
the companies”.

Another section deals with
disclosures by company offi-
cers, directors and other insid-
ers of their trading activities in
the firm’s stock. These details
will have to be disclosed in a
timely fashion to BISX, and
made available to other
investors via the exchange’s
website.

“The Securities Industry Act
requires it, but this formalises it
and takes it a step further in

requiring disclosure to the «

exchange,” Mr Davies said.
Most capital markets partic-

ipants wanted to see the full
BISX rules amendments
before providing detailed com-
ments, although some felt the
proposed stipulation that listed
companies provide their full-
year financials 90 days after
year-end was too strict, espe-
cially for life insurance com-
panies such as Colina Hold-
ings (Bahamas) and Fam-
Guard Corporation that relied
on actuaries as well as external
auditors.

Some sources felt the
requirements set out in the
BISX rules should also be
extended to other public com-
panies not listed on the
exchange, such as Bahamas
Supermarkets and RND Hold-
ings that are on the over-the-
counter market.

In the Bahamas, a public
company is defined as one with
50 or more shareholders, so
another argument may be that
the proposed BISX rules
should also be adopted by the
likes of Bahamas First, which
although not listed has a broad
shareholder base.

Another issue likely to be
discussed is whether there
should be a mandatory bar on
trading in a company’s stock
by its officers, directors and
other shareholders in the
weeks leading up to the end of
the full-year or quarter, as
those individuals are likely to

SEE page 15B

- BUSINESS FOR SALE

Well established Fashion Retail
Business. Well known and

respected worldwide Franchise.
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

| VACANCY NOTICE

NETWORK SUPPORT ASSISTANT

FINANCE DIVISION

‘A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the post of Network Support Assistant in
the Information Technology Services Department - Finance Division.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not limited to:

Assisting with the continuous operation and maintenance of
the Corporation’s Local and Wide Area Networks (New
Providence & Family Islands)

Troubleshooting and resolving network hardware/software conflicts

Ensuring that all network devices are properly configured and
functioning

Providing end-user support for hardware, software and network
access issues

Network performance monitoring and the maintenance of
corresponding statistical data

Maintaining network architecture documentation

Repairing Personal Computers and peripheral equipment

Monitoring and maintaining computer equipment inventory/supplies

Identifying and recommending Information Technology solutions

The incumbent should also have:

A minimum of an Associate Degree with concentration in Computer

Science

A minimum of 1-2 years experience in LAN/WAN environment
Network + and/or A+ Certification (Cisco CCNA a plus)

Sound technical knowledge of network and computer operating

systems

Demonstrates knowledge of the operation and function of standard
networking equipment

Excellent written and verbal communication skills

Knowledge of effective user support services

Interested persons may apply by completing and returning an Application

Form to: The Manager - Human Resources & Training,
Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau Bahamas,

on or before: April 20, 2007.

British Colonial Hilton

Nassau

The British Colonial Hilton invites applications for dynamic, confident and
assertive individuals to fill the following positions:

es Manager: This position is responsible for supervising, managing,
and overseeing all aspects of catering sales in addition to leading and motivating
the catering accounts and maintaining relationships with existing accounts to meet
and/or exceed food beverage revenue goals.

é, ididate should meet th
3-5 years hotel industry and management experience with at least 2 years sale experience
demonstrating strong sales, negotiating and closing skills
Advanced knowledge of sales/hospitality principles and practices
Excellent people and leadership skills
Effective communication i.e oral, written and presentation skills
A professional demeanor and appearance
Goal-oriented, focused, energetic and self-motivated with the ability to work with little
supervision
Computer literate and proficient in the use of Microsoft Excel and Word
Open to a flexible work schedule as evenings and weekends are essential at times. Hotel
catering experience would be an asset

chook ak sols ots os as ok as ok

Senior Sous Chef[Kitchen Artiste: Under the direction of the executive chef, this position

ensures cost effective production of the highest quality food appropriate to the market. The selected
individual will primarily be responsible for all artistic creativity within the kitchen including
specialty carvings, show picces and sculptures. Will train and develop department’s team
members.

The successful candidate should meet the following minimum requirements:

Extensive practical knowledge of cooking styles and various cuisine including Continental,
American, Mediterranean/Italian and Caribbean/Bahamian.

10 years experience as a senior chef within operation of at least 4-star designation including
Professional certification/training from a recognized culinary institution

Demonstrated artistic ability to produce high level culinary show pieces, carvings and
sculptures i.e. ice carvings, fruit and vegetables carvings, chocolate carvings and buffet show
pieces. Industry/professional awards are desirable proof of excellence.

Proven experience with a successful track record of achievements in leading a culinary team.
Strong administration and organizational skills with the ability to contain operational costs.
Computer-literate with a working knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.

Proven ability to train and develop members of the culinary and stewarding teams.

Individuals who meet the above requirements are invited to forward their resumes to:

Director of Human resources
BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON, NASSAU
| bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-302-9040
E-mail:recruitment.nassau @hilton.com

Deadline: April 20, 2007



CFA Society of The Bahamas

MONTHLY LUNCHEON SPEAKER EVENT
2006/2007 Officers & Directors

President

David Slatter, CFA

Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust

PO Box N-4853, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 356 7764

Email: david.slatter@fidelitybahamas.com

Topic: “How Much is Your Investment

Management Firm Worth?”
Thursday April 12, 2007
12:00 pm Cocktail Reception

12:30 pm Speaker’s Address
Please arrive promptly!

Vice-President

Kristina M. Fox, CFA
Templeton Global Advisors Ltd.
PO Box N 7759, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 362 4600

Fax: (242) 362 4308

Email: kfox@templeton.com

Location: SuperClubs Breezes

Cable Beach

Steven M. Levitt

Principal

Cambridge International Partners
New York, NY

Treasurer Speaker:
David Ramirez, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.

PO Box N-4873

Nassau Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 2217

Fax: (242) 327 6610

Email:dramirez@pictet.com

Members $25.00

Non-Members $35.00

(If paying by cheque, please make cheque payable to:
CFA Society of The Bahamas)

Secretary

Christopher Dorsett, CFA

Citigroup Corporate & Investment Bank
PO Box N 8158, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 8668

Fax: (242) 302 8569

Email: Christopher.a.dorsett(@citigroup.com

PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED —by Apr. 10, 2007
Chris Dorsett, CFA
Christopher.a.Dorsett@Citigroup.com

*Prepayment required through one of the Board
Members

Reservations:

Mr, Levitt, who joined Cambridge as a partner in 2005, is actively involved
in business development and client advisory work. He rejoined Cambridge
from MilleniumAssociates AG, a Swiss investment banking boutique, where
he focused on strategic advisory work in the asset management and
brokerage industries for North American and European financial
institutions. Prior to that, he spent three years with Putnam Lovell
Securities, also focused on strategic advisory and transactional work with
asset managers and broker-dealers, From 1997 to 1999, Mr. Levitt was an
associate at Cambridge.

Mr. Levitt holds a BA in economics from Stanford University and an MBA
in finance from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He is
a General Securities Representative.



"How Much is Your Investment Management Firm Worth?"
This presentation addresses historical transactional activity im the
investment management space. It covers how investment management firms
have historically been priced and the approach an acquirer would take to
valuing a particular asset manager. The presentation addresses deal
structures and trends, It is intended to be practical, with reaLtife examples.



INSTITUTE

PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
QUALIFIED ACTIVITY





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007






Under the distinguished patronage of the
Hon. Fredrick A. Mitchell

The Ministry of The Public Service
Presents

Singing Competition showcasing over twenty par-
ticipants from the various Government Ministries/ /
Corporations (choirs and soloists) }

Preliminary Round—I Ith April,2007 at 7pm
(Soloists Only)
Place: Holy Trinity Activity Centre
(Stapledon Gardens)





Finals—Sunday 22nd April, 2007 at 6.30pm
(Choirs and Soloists)

Place: Golden Gates Worldwide Ministries

(Carmichael Road)
Included are a few of our shinning stars...





Tickets for Finals are Available at The Ministry of the Public
Service, Poincians Hill, Meeting Street @ $5.00
( Celephone Contact: 502-7200

. Toe SEPT ANAT _SRWATRRE DERG Mi ty sae

Bahamas Electricity Corporation

VACANCY NOTICE

STAFF ACCOUNTANT
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Staff Accountant in the Finance
Division.

The Staff Accountant is responsible for ensuring, the proper accounting for
all projects related activities, which includes proper billing, and monitoring
of receipts of miscellaneous receivables and managing the fixed asset register.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not limited
to:

Assist in the management of the Finance Department which primarily
include: the preparation of disbursements; management of vendor
accounts; and management of payroll

Analyzes monthly financial information and reports

Evaluate and summarize the Corporation’s current and projected financial
, position ;
Ensure timely reporting on specific and general departmental
responsibilities; and any other duties as assigned

Monitors compliance with generally accepted accounting principles
The incumbent should also have:

¢ A Bachelors degree with certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA or
equivalent qualifications
Excellent written and verbal communication skills
Strong analytical abilities and skills
Effective leadership skills
Good time management, and
Strong interpersonal and human relation skills

Interested persons may apply by completing an returning an Application
Form to: The Manager — Human Resources & Training, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before April 20, 2007.



THE TRIBUNE‘.

Interest rates
under pressure.

FROM page 1B

bune that the fact that some
institutions were seeking — and
offering — deposit rates close to
the existing Bahamian Prime
rate indicated that Prime was
“lower than it should be”, and
was almost becoming discon-
nected from the current envi-
ronment.

The Central Bank’s latest
monthly economic report said
that commercial banks were
now offering rates of 6.5 per
cent on short-term deposits for
terms under one year, a full 1
per cent over the current
Bahamian Prime rate.

Although just pure specula-
tion at this point, observers
questioned whether political
factors were behind the main-
tenance of a 5.5 per cent
Bahamian Prime rate given the
imminent general election on
May 2.

Any increase in Bahamian
Prime prior to the general elec-
tion - with most believing any
increase would be around 0.5
per cent, taking it to 6 per cent
- would not play well with most
of the electorate, as this increase
would be passed on by the com-
mercial banks in the form of 0.5
per cent rises on all their loans,
usually after a 90-day notice
period. |

Majori
jority

Given that the majority of
Bahamians are borrowers and
spenders, not savers and
investors, any increases in inter-
est and loan repayment rates
could hit many especially hard,
reducing their disposable
income and making people feel
less wealthy.

Many Bahamians have less
than $1,000 in their bank

acggunts, and any increases in
debt servicing costs could have

alarming consequences for
some, given their minimal sav-
ings, forcing radical reassess-
ments of household spending
policies.

Central

Although the Central Bank
of the Bahamas in theory enjoys
statutory independence on
monetary policy conduct, and
is able to set the interest rate
structure of its choosing through
the Central Bank Discount
Rate — Prime is linked to this —
in practice any interest rate
changes have to be implement-
ed with the Ministry of
Finance’s knowledge and agree-
ment.

As a result, observers are
increasingly predicting that
Bahamian Prime could rise at
some point after the May 2 gen-
eral election.

Total liquidity in the Bahami-
an commercial banking sector,
which means the surplus assets
in the system that the banks
have available for lending pur-
poses, shrunk to just over $9
million in late December — an
extraordinarily low number.

The liquidity crunch was

. caused by a number of factors,

including the traditional credit
demand from both Bahamian
consumers and companies in
the run-up to Christmas, in
anticipation of seasonal spend-
ing and sticking up inventories
respectively.

In addition, the growing
Bahamian economy generated
strong credit demand from con-
sumers for both mortgage and

’ consumer loans throughout

2005 and 2006, while millions
of Bahamian-denominated dol-
lars were also sucked out of the
commercial banking system to
fund business transactions such
as Freeport Oil Company’s
$32.75 million purchase of Shell
(Bahamas); the $54 million BSL

Holdings buyout of Winn-Dix,;
ie’s 78 per cent stake in;
Bahamas Supermarkets; and,
BAB Holdings purchase of
British American eu
Company.

Excess liquid assets in the,
Bahamian commercial banking:
system have recovered since
2006 year-end, standing at
$84.17 million in February 2007,
arise of $74.74 million since the.
turn of the year. However, the:
total number is about half the
$168.24 million in excess liq-,
uidity that the commercial
banking system possessed in,
February 2006.

The commercial banking sys~
tem’s excess reserves stood at
$212.08 million in February
2007, slightly ahead of the pra,*
vious year. i

Bank
agi

The Central Bank of thg;
Bahamas’ report on monthly,
economic developments for
February 2007 said the,
“favourable interest rate envi;
ronment” saw fixed deposits
during the first two months of,
2007 increase by “more thap-
double” the amount seen if
2006, rising by $86 million. ay

Savings deposit growth,
strengthened to $17.1 million:
from $2.5 million the year,
before, with accretions to total,
deposits up by $66 million the
$78.3 million.

For February 2007, the Cena ,
tral Bank said average interest
rates firmed during the month,,
the weighted average deposit!
rate offered by commercial.
banks up by 0.1 per cent to 3.7,
per cent, the highest rate of 6.5:
per cent being offered for fixed
deposits with maturities of over.
one month. and six.to 12,
months. ° po tye

The weighted average loan
rate, though,.only rose. by..0.04,
per cent to 10.13 per cent. o

FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE
UNIT (THE “FIU”)

P

Pursuant to Section 15(2) of The Financial Intelligence Unit
the public is hereby notified that, the revised
Transactions
of Money Laundering and the Financing of
Terrorism (The ‘2007 Guidelines’’) for financial institutions
within The Commonwealth of the Bahamas have been issued

Act, 2000,
Suspicious
Prevention

BLI

Tl

Guidelines

and are effective as of 19th March 2007.

The 2007 Guidelines replace those Guidelines issued in

December 2001.

Copies of the 2007 Guidelines can be obtained between the
9a.m. to 5p.m. Monday through Friday, from the
Administrative Offices, The Financial Intelligence Unit, 3rd
Floor, Norfolk House, Frederick Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

hours of

Anthony M. Johnson

Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O. Box SB 50086
Nassau, The Bahamas

Relating to

E

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a A ad aE EE I DP BO MSL AL

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LEE! tag EE LILLIE TL OEE AE OE LOLI LE LET EO SE eS





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 7B



DT Ce ee
Film Studios buyer

‘disappointed’ talks
on sale not resumed

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Nassau-based finan-
| cial services executive
who put together an
investor group that attempted
td acquire the Bahamas Film
Studios for $14 million told The
Tribune they were “disappoint-
ed” the development’s owner
had not resumed talks with
them after breaking off the orig-
inal transaction.

Ross Fuller, head of Ashby
Corporation, the Bahamas Film
Studios’ parent company, reject-
ed the deal proposed by Owen
Bethel and his Bahamas Film
Invest International group after
the two parties failed to negoti-
ate a further extension to the
closing deadline, which had
already been pushed back from
February 28, 2007, to March 15,
2007.

.Mr Bethel, president of the
Montaque Group, told The Tri-
bune: “We're disappointed that
it has still not been concluded
and, certainly, that Mr Fuller
has decided not to discuss fur-
ther with uis concluding the
deal.

“As we’ve always said, we
stand ready, able and willing to
move forward and conclude.”

Mr Fuller is thought likely to
be seeking a better offer than
the $14 million that Bahamas
FilmInvest International was
prepared to give him, multiple
sources having told The Tribune
that he is now talking to an as-
yet unnamed Sri Lankan
investor, whose representatives
have already visited the now-
closed Bahamas Film Studios
location in Grand Bahama.

‘The offer from Mr Bethel’s
group will likely be used as
leverage to obtain a better deal,
especially as the circumstances
and potential liabilities facing
Mr Fuller have changed.

It is understood that a major
portion of the $14 million sales
price from Bahamas FilmInvest
International would have been

1 OD, Se a BG

used to settle the Bahamas Film
Studios liabilities by Mr Fuller,
chiefly the $9.95 million First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) loan to construct the
water tank plus a further $1 mil-
lion owed to Grand Bahama-
based suppliers. The former has
akready been settled by its guar-
antor, an insurance company,
which now itself wants paying.

Mr Fuller would have walked
away with a net $3-$4.5 million,
but the original projections
hhave been complicated by the
lawsuit since filed against the
Bahamas Film Studios and him-
self by the project’s sole surviv-
ing founding partner, Paul
Quigley, who is seeking $1.6
million for breach of his
employment contract.

Mr Quigley last month
obtained a Supreme Court
order preventing up to $1.6 mil-
lion in proceeds from the
Bahamas Film Studios’ sales
being taken out of the
Bahamas, and The Tribune
understands that order - which
expired on April 4 last week -
has been extended.

As a result, Mr Fuller may
want a higher price than that
offered by Bahamas FilmInvest
International if he decides to
settle with Mr Quigley but still
obtain the target net proceeds.

The Bahamas Film Studios is
currently facing a number of
lawsuits, including one by
Islands By Design, run by
Bahamian Keith Bishop, who
had sued the Bahamas Film
Studios for $80,000 over an
alleged unpaid Bill relating to
an environmental impact assess-
ment (EIA) he had performed
for the company.

Mr Fuller said that action
would be settled “prudently”,
although he denies the allega-
tions by both Islands By Design
and Mr Quigley.

The Bahamas Film Studios,
which is where the Pirates of
the Caribbean II and III films
were shot, is not short of poten-
tial suitors.



Andrew Law, the former
Association of International
Banks and Trusts (AIBT) chair-
man and head of Credit Suisse
Trust (Bahamas), who has since
set up his own Bahamas-based
financial services provider, the
International Protector Group
(IPG), previously confirmed to
The Tribune he was represent-
ing a group interested in acquir-
ing the rights to the project,
which this newspaper under-
stands is based in the UK.

Another potential player is
Bahamian filmmaker Cedric
Scott, who is based in Los
Angeles and had formed a
group that looked at the
Bahamas Film Studios prior to
Mr Bethel’s consortium being
selected initially as the pre-
ferred bidder.

Many observers, though,
believe that the situation at the
Bahamas Film Studios is unlike-
ly to be resolved until after the
general election on May 2, the
project’s potential sale effec-
tively going into cold storage
until end of May-early June.

This is because with ministers
focusing on getting re-elected,
there will no attention on pro-
viding any buyer of the
Bahamas Film Studios with the
requiured government
approvals. This was a key factor
in undermining Bahamas
FilmInvest International’s deal,
the group not wanting to com-
mit to anything until the
required approvals were in
place, something that ultimate-
ly caused Mr Fuller to lose
patience and refuse to provide
them with the extension they
were seeking after they did not
agree to his terms.

Thus any potential deal is
likely to be held up by the gen-
eral election, and there is little
prospect of the Government -
which is the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios’ landlord by virtue of own-

ing the 3,500-acre site - putting -

pressure on Mr Fuller to strike
a deal with all the current dis-
tractions.

THE CENTRAL BANK
OF THE BAHAMAS

B$ COUNTERFEIT BANKNOTE AND

“4 ee oer

PLACE:

cae & & I

" WHEN:

*
Ld
*

‘CONTACT NOS.:

‘iis
?
a

* APPLY BY:

< .88, 8, 7

INTRODUCTION TO CRISP SERIES SEMINAR

THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS TRAINING ROOM,
MARKET STREET AND TRINITY

PLACE
ENTRANCE

SESSION 1

APRIL 18, 2007 FROM
11:30 A.M. TO 1:00 PM.

SESSION 2

APRIL 18, 2007 FROM 6:00 P.M.

TO 7:30 P.M.

302-2620, 302-2622 &

302-2734

APRIL 13, 2007

THE SEMINAR IS OPEN TO BANKS AND BANKING
INSTITUTIONS, GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND

CORPORATIONS, PRIVATE COMPANIES AND THE
: GENERAL PUBLIC. APPLICATIONS WILL BE TAKEN
ON A FIRST-COME /FIRST-SERVED BASIS, AS SPACE IS

LIMITED.

KINDLY INDICATE WHICH SESSION YOU WILL BE

ATTENDING

Pace Po ec Ne a
fo rw OEY Urol MM NL Sa Oe Uo ea vez)

Our client, a bank & trust company, is seeking applications for the following managerial
positions:

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR:

Responsible for the profitability and efficiency of the office and providing leadership
and direction in human resources, budgeting, compliance, billing & collections, expense
management, marketing, filing, technology and office services. The Office Manager will
also be responsible for the preparation of financial statements, bank reconciliations and
management accounts.

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES FOR OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR:
Candidates must meet the following criteria:
¢ Minimum of three years relevant administrative management experience.
Bachelor’s Degree or higher in related field. Masters degree preferred
Proven ability to enhance operational efficiencies
Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications
Knowledge of Quick Books

CiienT RELATIONSHIP MANAGER:

Responsible for the maintenance and control of client records, payments and
disbursements, the preparation and analysis of monthly client financials and invoices, and
posting and reconciliation of client cash and security trading transactions. The Client
Relationship Manager will also be responsible for preparation, maintenance and analysis of
loan/trust documentation and related fiduciary records.

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES FOR CLIENT RELATIONSHIP MANAGER:
Candidates must meet the following criteria:
Minimum of three years relevant IBC/corporate administration
experience.
Bachelor’s Degree or higher in Business, Law, Finance, Economics or Accounting

required. Masters degree preferred

Excellent data entry skills

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft Word & Excel

Ability to read and interpret governing instruments and legal documentation
including trust agreements, wills, investment management agreements, custodian
agreements, etc.

Both Candidates should also meet the following criteria:
* Proven ability to enhance operational efficiencies
Experience with compliance and KYC processes and procedures
Strong technical and managerial skills
Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills
Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the company
Honest, hardworking and possess ability to meet deadlines

Both positions offer attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the
successful applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a pension plan
and medical coverage.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including references before April
10", 2007 to:
Mark E. Munnings
Partner
Deloitte & Touche
P. O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
or

Email:mmunnings@deloitte.com.bs
Deloitte.



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Database Administrator in the
Finance Division.

The Database Administrator is responsible for planning, designing,
implementing and maintaining efficient operations of corporate databases and
preparation of logical data base design for in-house application development.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not limited
to:

¢ To participate in Information Systems development and implementation
teams.

e Defines and implements data level security for all corporate databases.

e Manages data migration/conversion issues during system installations.

¢ Defining, establishing and operating databases for executive information
needs.

¢ Develops procedures for the integration of corporate systems.

° Defines, establishes and operates a database to serve Document Management
System requirements.

¢ Leading and participating on committees assessing business information
technology needs.

¢ Manages installation of release upgrades to installed RDBMD products.

¢ Facilitates smooth transition of all business systems vendor upgrades.

The successful candidate should also possess:

e A Bachelors degree in Computer Science or equivalent qualifications

e Sound working knowledge of relevant database management systems

* Sound knowledge of computer programming

¢ Strong analytical skills and time management skills

¢ Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing

e Five years computer experience in a technology/data processing
environment

Interested persons may apply by completing an
returning Application Form to:

The Manager-Human Resources & Training,
Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau, Bahamas
on or before April 20, 2007.





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS












Bujo Kevin Jones
WORKSHOPS
Friday, June 15, 2007
Two Sessions
10:00am to 12:00 noon
and
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Roscoe Dames




Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs FDUCATING & TRAINING B. {T ANS

The College of The Bahamas
Office of Communication
presents

under the st “rs
Ah SPT ve

GALA CONCERT AND DINNER
Saturday - June 16 - 2007 - 7:00 P.M.
COB Band Shell

i. «



Nicki Gonzalez







The Music Business m FRIDAY JAMZ @
7.00 -9- CONCERT TICKETS For reservations,
Pith she iclande to The word Friday, June 15, 2007 SOUS POUR = = = = ee 0 — lols '
with sponsorship opportunities and
Bujo Kevin Jones Bahamas Jazz Project Friday Jamz-$50 | further information, please call
Drummers Clinic (2 hours] featuring Nicki Gonzalez ee ee Office of Communication at
Nicki Génales a GALA CONCERT AND DINNER o@ Gala - $175 | telephones
Saturday, J 16, 2007 :: 7:00 p.m. j ;
The Tricks & Traps of a Solo Career Beep aie aah ae Caen echt an DINED re 4304/4353/4354/4366
(1 hour} Buhanisedcessicieck Gold - $80 We're Taking It up Several Notches
f na Tino Rich Gala Concert and Cheese and Fruit | in Entertainment and Dining
Phillip Martin eatur ing ino Richardson ooo -
Paleuiie you; area yates ohare gerer Show Producer - Roscoe Dames “Mr Jazz”
professional career (1 hour) e
Tenth World

Workshop: $30.00
Students: $15.00

American Airlines/American Eagle

featuring Bujo Kevin Jones Official Airline of Jazz Under the Stars

(African Jazz] |
i | Wyndham Nassau Resort.w ise

Phillip Martin | | The Official Resort of Jazz;\Under the Stars
featuring Alyson Williams

Sen ooth dase with REE Vacalet Catering by Alexandra (Alexandra Maillis Lynch)

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS














| Register early for these rare development
opportunities in pastry making for professionals,
| students, entrepreneurs and pastry enthusiasts!

| NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE
_ Thursday, May 17

Plated Desserts

-CHMI Main Kitchen

_ Professionals

» Max. 24

Fees: $100.00 (Student)
$175.00 (BHA)

$200.00 (General Public)

| Friday, May 18

| Specialty Cakes
_CHMI Main Kitchen
_ Professionals



_ Max. 24

Fees: $100.00 [Student]
$200.00 (BHA]

$225.00 (General)

| Monday, May 21

| Basic Cake Decoration
_CHMI Main Kitchen

_ General Public

Max. 24

| Fees: $100.00 (Student)
_ $185.00 (BHA)

$210.00 [General Public)

| Thursday, May 24
| Marzipan

Advanced Petit Fours

|
|
|

CHMI Main Kitchen
Students

Max. 60

Fees: $100.00 (Student)
$250.00 (BHA)

$275.00 (General Public)

Friday, May 25



CHMI Main Kitchen
Students

Max. 60

Fees: $100.00 (Student)
$225.00 (BHA)

$250.00 (General Public}





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
THE CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE
Industry Training Department is pleased to announce

SEE SY

Professional Pastry Workshop Series

GEORGETOWN, EXUMA
Tuesday, May 22

Advanced Petit Fours

Four Seasons Sugar Kitchen
Professionals & General Public
Max. 24

Fees: $100.00 (Student)
$225.00 (BHA)

$250.00 (General Public}

May 16-25, 2007 —




FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
Wednesday, May 23

Plated Desserts

Best Westin Hotel

Students, Professionals & General
Public

Max. 24

Fees: $100.00 (Student)

$175.00 (BHA)

$200.00 (General Public]

ee
ay Bh,

10% discount will be granted to on

persons who register for three or : oo
more sessions. pe 2 on ma. Fy ? we
CHEF BO FRIBERG is a certified and Europe, and was Pastry Chet
Master Pastry Chef with over 40 for Swedish American Lines
years of professional experience Cruise Ships. In addition, he has
in the industry and has taught demonstrated his pastry artistry
baking and pastry courses to all on television shows including
levels of students - from beginners | the two highly acclaimed public

to seasoned professionals - since television series Cooking Secrets
1978. Chef Bo las his students call of the CIA, and Cooking at The
him) currently holds the position Academy, as well as NBC's Today
of Department Chair of the Baking Show and the locally produced
and Pastry Programme at the Bay Cafe. Chef Bo’s celebrated
Professional Culinary Institute in cookbook The Professional Pastry
Chef, has now been revised to its
Fourth Edition, with the expanded
material divided into a two-volume
set, Fundamentals of Baking

and Pastry and The Advanced
Professional Pastry Chef.

cs

Session Details

* Materials will be provided

¢ Participants are to bring small
pastry tools

e Cantinuing Education Units will
be granted for all sessions.

¢ CEU's accepted by the American
Culinary Federation

Campbell, California. He graduated . ,
Sey mt a ale alol marche cela

and to reserve your space
contact
Monique Butler, CHMI
Telephone 323-5804/6804

from the Confectionery Association



School of Sweden and holds a

| degree as a Master Confectioner.

‘| He has worked in both small shops
and large retail and wholesale
‘operations in the United States







Featuring Certified Master Pastry Chef Bo Friberg of California



47

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TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 9B



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

\ THE COLLECE OF TH

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING &' r








a



CENTRE FOR CONTEVUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES international Conference
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER | Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: Telling the Story















COURSE __| SEC | COURSE i pee aoe The College of The Bahamas
NO. |.NO. | DESCRIPTION a ee DAY START oR EE | February 1 -23, 2008
su hee aaa ta Nassau, The Bahamas
ACCA900 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS! ___ 6:00pm-8:00pm | Mon/Wed E

ACCA901 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I! 7-May | 10 wks | $275 |

ACCAFOR BEGINNERS It

eel

et

[ot |

[or |

[or |

pal eee a ee
BUSINESS |_| pee a eee cee ol
clerin [| SUERON STORRS wo |
CUSTS00 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. W/S 9:30am-4:30pm | Thurs

[or |

[|

ACCA902

Call for Papers

=
~~ 29-Mar The College of The Bahamas will host the Conference: “Abolition of The Trans-Atlantic
1 da $170

Slave Trade: Telling the Story, February 21-23, 2008 at the Oakes Field Campus, Nassau.

BUSI900
Abstracts of approximately 200 words are invited on the following topics:

BUSI901 CREDIT AND COLLECTIONS I! 6:00-9:00PM































SOMEDIERS . ° Language and Oppression

-COMPEO" O1_| COMPUTER APPLICATIONS... ° Religion in Slavery: Agent Provocateur or Opiate?

COMP901 ie COMPUTER APPLICATIONS! e Slavery and Human Sensibility

COMP902 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1! ° Power and Enslavement

COMP941 QUICKBOOKS ° Kinship across the Diaspora

COMP953 01__| PC UPGRADE & REPAIR ° Identity: Culture, Race and Gender

Comiees ot Ee ES SOR ° Enslavement and Liberation: Pedagogy

COMP930 AGE DES ° Liberation: Ideologies, Contexts and Dynamics

'DECORATING |__| ° Liberation: Simple Past or Present Continuous?

[FLORs00 | 01 6:00pm-9:00pm . : se

FLOR601 FLORALDESIGNI, -00pm-9:00pm Please send abstracts as an attached Word file to Jessica Minnis, Chair of the Conference
FLOR802 101 | FLORAL DESIGN IN | 6:00pm-9:00pm | Mon roa Committee at abolitionconference@cob.edu.bs no later than Friday, August 31, 2007.
| DECO800 Wed

ae et

BH Sa aa Conference Structure

el eae S:00pen-8:00pm | Tues — Lowe _| $225 The conference will feature 20-minute papers from all disciplines, followed by 10-minute
HEALTH AND discussions, presented in concurrent and plenary sessions. Panel and poster proposals
FITNESS | | : etd will also be considered. Such proposals should be as complete as possible.
MASG900 [01 | MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | | 6:00pm-9:00p | $465 |

nas MESSAGE THERAE ERENT awiie:.| aaa Submissions (an electronic copy) should be directed to:

ae Jessica Minnis

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR |! D | 10 wks | $400 | :

ee eee eae Seo) | cent ee

ounemeNe ee eee |_| School of Social Sciences
| MGMT900 Lo1_| HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT | 60pm 9:20pm. Thurs 10May |9wks | $250 | The College of The Bahamas

MGMT901___.| 01__| HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT II Mon 7-May | 9wks | $300 | Oakes Field Campus

ee at eee a eet oe eee ee ee ae see ee te eee P O Box N4912

SEWING 2-22) ee ee es ee ee ee

-SEW 600_——[ 01 [BASIC FREEHAND GOTT Nes ———7aiay [owe [=25] | E-mail abolitioncont@cob.edu.bs

[SEW 802___—«| 01 _| BASIC FREEHAND CUTTING 1! Thurs 10May | 10 wks | $250 | . i ;

| SEws0s |. 01_| DRAPERY MAKING | oa Tues 8-Ma | $225 |

Deadline for Submission: Monday, December 31, 2007.

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 (242) 328-0093/328-1936/302-4300 ext Accommodation for Non-Resident Delegates

5202 or email: persdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). Information will be forthcoming.
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course materials.

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Registration

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND | three days: seas
EXTENSION SERVICES Day Rate: $150.00

Late Registration Fee:

° Student Rate: $150.00
Comp uter Offe erings — Summer 2007 Student Day Rate: $ 75.00
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I ; For information on the availability of student subsidies, please contact:
Course Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers re 43) 302, lee Graduate Programmes and International Relations

and does not understand how it works. This course covers the major

computer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: : sae : be
() Microsoft ince — Word Processing (ii) Ricoh Excel — Spreadsheet (ia) Registration is open and online at http://www.cob.edu.bs/abolitionconf.php.

Microsoft Access — Database Management.
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Pre-requisite: None -

Begins: Monday, 7" May 2007 6:00pm - 9:30pm Section 01 (CEES) Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
aes Penning 5" May 2007 10:00am _- 1:30pmSection 02 (CEES) In conjunction with the Offices of Academic Affairs and Outreach
Venue: CEES Computer Lab e
Tuition: $450.00 - Summer Research Workshop Series 2007
30th April- 11th May 2007
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS Il Gerace Research Centre, San Salvador
Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office — Word Processing (ii) Microsoft ipa : dy ot .
Excel — Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access — Database Management. An Exc €p tional Opp ortunity f or Building Research _ nd Writing. Skills
Participants Completing Earn Continuing Education Units (CEUs)
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I
Begins: . Thursday, 10 May 2007 Summer Research Workshop Series 2007 is designed to build research capacity through the
Time: 6:00pm - 9:30pm honing of critical research and writing skills as well as grant writing. In addition, the inclusion
Duration: 9 weeks of the module on marine pollutants provides a forum in which College/University faculty can
oo cae Lab work in concert with governmental and non-governmental agencies on national issues.
Participants will select two of the following three modules:
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS Module I--Essentials of Technical Writing—(36 hours = 3.5 CEUs)
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft Facilitator: Dr. Padma T. Venkatraman, Coordinator of Graduate Diversity, University of
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations. Rhode Island
Oe This modules in scientific writing has three main goals: (1) to show participants how to write a
F peor eduisite: None . technical manuscript (including, but not limited to a scientific research paper, a proposal to a
csi ty May 2007 funding agency, or a thesis or dissertation) and to make informed choices about its content,
pain: 1s ee care structure, and style; (2) to show how to use the English language to communicate the desired
Pees cee Cinipaeies message att Pee re aS seen ett to show how to use the language to
Fees: $160.00 communicate the message to the widest possible audience.
Module II—Principles of Grant Writing (36 hours = 3.5 CEUs
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR Facilitator: Nancy B. Pe: Roe Image (a worldwide oats infrastructure service),
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information Marble Falls, TX
environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, The goal of Principles of Grant Writing is to enhance the faculty-initiated grant application. The
Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs. objectives are to: 1). Determine the grant application requirements, review criteria and organization
: wa required by the RFP; 2). Write integrated goals, hypotheses, objects, and outcome measures for
Ao Sd Jth May 2007 a scholarly project; 3). Match budget requirements and limitations to the project scope; 4). Prepare
Tie: 6:00 ae 8:00pm Aiciileysae Wakes a project summary and project plan draft; 5). Evaluate project design for innovation, importance,
Duration: Daecks : y y feasibility, and significance; 6). Use tools to streamline and organize the application preparation
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab process; and 7). Evaluate studies involving human and animal subjects for appropriateness.
Fees: $500.00 Participants will work in groups on interactive assignments to explore academic and scholarly
multidisciplinary strengths for possible future collaborations.
QUICKBOOKS Module UW1—Introduction to Marine Pollution (3.5 hours = 3.5 CEUs)
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs Facilitator: Dr. Rainer Lohmann, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Oceanography,
(fewer than 20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting University of Rhode Island :
fone cael Tapeh Pro ubhate Students will 2 Ny ae This module is an introduction to marine pollution emphasizing geochemical aspects of the *
eir company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees. sources, transport, fate and effects of pollutants in the coastal marine environment. The pollutants
Pre-requisite: None include oxygen—demanding waste, petroleum, metals, synthetic organics and radioactive/solid
Begins: Tuesday, 8 May 2007 wastes. Risk assessment and specific case histories will also be used to evaluate the environmental
Time: 6:00pm — 9:00pm impact of the pollutants.
Duration: 6 weeks > :
Venue: CEES Computer Lab pathaauee OF EUs {continuing Education Units)
Fees: $330.00 Group Contact/Session Collaboration = 5 per Module
Preparation/Individual Work = 10 hours per Module
TOTAL per Module = 36 (3.5 CEUs per Module) .
WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web Targeted Audience: The College of The Bahamas faculty, staff and representatives of government and non-
pages will cover Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific ]. | government organizations
topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and Estimated number of participants: 10-15 persons per module
hosting of web pages. Cost:
, ° $820.00 per internal participant (Includes workshop fees--$300--plus room and board at GRC)
Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word- ° $1,015.00 per external participant (Includes workshop fees--$300--plus and room and board at GRC)
processing Participants will be accommodated at GRC ona first come first served basis (all rooms are double occupancy.
Begins: Thursday, 14” & 15" June 2007 Overflow will be referred to Riding Rock at $145 per night, double occupancy.
Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days For further information and registration, please contact:
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Dr Linda Davis, Vice President, Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
Fees: $550.00 Tel: (242) 302 4315 :
: : el:
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 302-4300 ext $201 5202 5205 or email a
ees are included with the exception of the oe fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting Tek: Tel: BBS; 445
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to ek: Tel: (242) 302 5

change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course E-mail: shiggs@cob.edu.bs



get i
: Part-time Instructor in Information Technology L&ll (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able :
®t® teach Information technology at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least :








PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007



CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
EXTENSION SERVICES (CEES)

ACADEMIC UPGRADING DEPARTMENT

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Geoarapry New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
keteach Geography at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

Bachelor's Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

Sievel of BGCSE in the subject area.

§ Part-time Instructor in College Prep Mathematics (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able
to teach Mathematics at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned :
Bachelor’s pee in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the :

- el of BGCSE in the subject area.

$ePsrt-time Instructor in College Pep piotoay rer Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach ;
eaology at the College Preparatory, “level. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor's;

Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the level of

ERSCSE in the subject area,

New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
evel. candidates must have at least an earned

fakeart-tiine Instructor in College Prep Chemist
Paaach Chemistry at the College Preparatary/b

E=aichelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

level of BGCSE in the subject area.

2art-time Instructor in College Prep Agriculture (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
(aa Agriculture at the College Preparatory/BG evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

“fével of BGCSE in the subject area.
Aart-time Instructor in College Frrep Histony/Socier Studies (New Providence Campus) Candidates must
~ He able to teach History/Social Studies at the College Preparatory) evel. Candidates must have

experience at the level of BGCSE in the subject area.

“I
Y

.

“Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the level of
BGCSE in the subject area. :

tin

‘Tevel of BGCSE in the subject area.

= To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete ;
application packet consists of an application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form :
a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment) :
-and the names and contact information of three references addressed to: :

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

ade

ve

RY
TAN

| PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

DIC.
farlrine Instructor in Accounting for Beginners 4 IL & Ill (New Providence Campus}
andidates must be able to teach Accounting at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must

is desirable.

“must have at least an earned Master's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable. ts seeped RT? is . diced



Part-time Instructor in Busitless Etiquétte (New Providence Campus
Candidates must be able to teach Business Etiquette at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates
must have at least an earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is

; desirable.



. a .
: Part-time Instructor in Human Resource Management |, Il (New Providence Campus)
E Candidates must be able to teach Human Resource Management at the introductory to advanced level.

- Candidates must have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate

Pp is desirable.

| ‘
Part-time Instructor in Computer lications |, ll (New Providence Campus
= Gandidates must be able to teach computer courses at the Introductory to advanced level. Candidates
ft must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable.
i”

!

« Part-time Instructor in Credit & Collections Procedures and Control | & Il New Providence Campus}
andidates must be able to teach Creal ollections Procedures and Control at the introductory to

* Advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent in the subject.

A teaching certificate is desirable.

xo

j; Rart-time Instructor in Superior Customer Service Workshop (New Providence Camputs) :
4° Gandidates must be able fo teach Superior Customer Service /Course Workshop. Gan idates must have :

«at least an earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

san earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

carne Instructor in QuickBooks (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach QuickBooks
sat the introductory level. Candidates must have at Teast an earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the :

“subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in PC Upgrade and Repair (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
stgach PC Upgrade and Repair at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an
earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

p :Part-time Instructor in Effective PowerPoint W/S (New Providence campus} Candidates must be able to
i Staach Microsoft PowerPoint at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an :

| earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

| Part-time Instructor in Interior Decorating | & Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be ableto
féach Interior Decorating at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned :

‘Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.
ao

‘Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

rt-time Instructor in Floral Design |, II & Ill (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
oral Désign at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least a minimum of five years :

working experience in the area.



Effective ng a r ry
degree or equivalent in the subject or related area. A teaching certificate is desirable.
at

art-time Instructor in Basic of Freehand Cutting | & Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be
Sosa Basic of Freehand Cu ting at the introdiictory to advanced level. Candidates must have at
least five years working experience in the area.
as

Part-time Instructor in Drapery Making | & II (New Providence campus) Candidates must be able to teach
fapery Making at the introductory level to advanced level. Candidates must have at least a minimum —;

of'five years working experience in the area.

oi
Part-time Instructor in Bath and Kitchen Accessories (New Providence Campus)
andidates must be able to teach Bath an chen Accessories at the introductory level to advanced

level. Candidates must have at least a minimum of five years working experience in the area.
oF *
Part-time Instructor in Basic Car Maintenance (New Providence Campus)

Candidates must]

mast have at least an earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject.

wt .

Yo: ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete



application packet consists of an Application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form :

4 detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment)

| 4nd the names and contact information of three references addressed to:

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

BSesmrneenesever

jess

HE COLLEGE OF THE «

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING & TRAININ 6

Fart-time Instructor in College Prep Civics (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
Civics at the Callege Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor’s ;
uRart-time Instructor in College Prep English pangage (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be
cable to teach English at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the i

“ve at least an earned Master's degree or equivalent (e.g. CPA CA) in the subject. A teaching certificate ;

_ Part-time Instructor in Introduction to Business | & Il (New Providence Campus)
r ata must be able ta teach Introduction to Business.at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates :

Part-time Instructor in Web Page Design Workshop (New Providence Campus) Candidate must be able:
tq teach Web Page Design at ths iReckiclory to aavanead level. Candidates must have at least an earned :

J able to teach Basic Car Maintenance at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates:

1M TAN TPSTRT ROTTEN LSU TROBE TET AENEAN HR BTTTTE PATH OPER WENN MRT ROTM REPU HPT STON SOUR Y RUE TRTPN PNY TOWN MT ER IAT NTOBN NE HRN UNION TET NTP TAT TNR ON

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS





| PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
(New Providence, Bahamas)

Lean Mastery

Human Resource Management
Business Administration
Administrative Skills
Supervisory Skills

Public Accounting

Project Management
Professional Management
Executive Leadership Skills
Writing & Research Skills

The Legal Environment

General Legal Principles
Employment Law

Company Law

Banking & Trust Law

Real Estate Law

Real Estate Management
Insurance Management & Sales
Insurance Law

E-business Practice & Management
Hotel Front Office Management
Accounting For Non-Financial Managers

All candidates must have earned Masters’ Degrees from a recognized accredited institution in the
“Bachelor's Degree in the subject-area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the : relevant area or its equivalent. ;

: To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. ‘Acomplete

: application packet consists of an Application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form
: a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment)

cat least an earned Bachelor's Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching and the names and contact information of three references addressed to:

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES
SUMMER SEMESTER 022007









COCRSE cope BEGINS DUR. DAYS TCITION & RESOURCE
FEE MATERIALS
{ADDITIONAL
$40 APP FEE
FOR NEW
STUDENTS)

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Kitchen

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Kitchen

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Kitchen

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5. Cake & Pastry Making II

Tues
ee
Kitchen
Kitchen
Kitchen
| ° 4 Kitchen

‘or further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the
ulinary & Hospitality Management Institute at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY

Library and Media Services
Librarian — Technical Services

1. Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 May 17 6 weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm_ } $225.00 $10-$12 per week | CHMI Main
Kitchen
. c is ;



































5 weeks





The position falls in the area of Technical Services. The incumbent should be dynamic,
innovative individual with a strong commitment to service within a diverse community. The
Librarian will demonstrate successful administrative experience in a library, sound understanding
of emerging technologies and the ability to use them within the library setting and commitment
to developing a strong integrated library service within the academic environment.

The duties of the Librarian will include management of the Unit, leadership in short and long
range planning to enhance and expand library services, development and promotion of library
resources and services, personnel supervision, initiation and management of appropriate
emerging technologies, and liaison with relevant internal and external groups.

The Librarian should possess a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from an
accredited institution, and a minimum of two years, post Masters professional library
experience. The incumbent will demonstrate strong communication and interpersonal skills
that engender an excellent customer friendly environment. Evening and weekend work on
rotation, library research, service to the community and library instruction will also be required.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A
complete application packet consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas’
Application Form, a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of all transcripts (original transcripts
required upon employment) and the names and contact information for three references
addressed to:

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Please visit the College’s website at for more information about the institution and
to access the College’s Employment Application Form.

INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

COURSE SCHEDULE
SUMMER 2007 — Beginning April 16th
CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I: | Mon/Wed: 6 — 8:00 PM
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I: Tues/Thurs: 4 — 6:00 PM
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 8:00 PM
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I: Mon/Wed: 6:00 — 8:00 PM
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: Mon/Wed: 4 — 6:00 PM
GERMAN I: TBA
MANDARIN CHINESE I: TBA








LOCATION: Munnings Building (next to KFC at the COB Roundabout, gnd Floor, Room 15)



PRICE: $ 250.00 per course



DURATION: 4 hours per week for 7 1/2 weeks, total course hours: 30 hours



TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587



Communication: The Key to Global Understanding

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 118







THE

Visit our website at www.cob.edubs



EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS |

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

IMPORTANT NOTICE

FINANCIAL COMMUNITY ADVANCED TECHNICAL
EDUCATION TRUST FOR BAHAMIANS (1973)

EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE FOR TECHNICAL STUDIES

Applications are invited from suitable candidates for consideration for financial
Awards offered by the above Trust at The College of The Bahamas or any accredited
Technical or Community College or University overseas, commencing September,
2007.

The Awards are intended to provide financial assistance for training at advanced
level in areas of technology where there is vital need for such skills in The Bahamas.
Areas of study include the following:

(a) Automobile, Mechanical and Architectural Engineering
(b) Aviation/ Maintenance
(c) Automobile or Marine Maintenance (gas or diesel engines)
(d) Air-conditioning and refrigeration
(e) Elevator Engineering
(f) Computer Engineering
(g) Marine Engineering (Coastal Management)
Food Processing and Production techniques
Manufacture of Clothing, Furniture, etc.
Craft Production and Boat Building
Radio and Television Technology/Mass Communication
Medical Technology
Crop Science
Livestock Science
Any other area of technology acceptable to the Selection Committee

Successful candidates will be required to pursue a course of study from (1) to not
more than three (3) years leading to a Certificate or Diploma (Not a Degree).

It is expected that candidates will seek admission to a recognized technical institution
of their choice.

Candidates should have successfully completed high school education in The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and should preferably have attained G.E.C. ‘O”’
level/B.G.C.S.E. certificates in appropriate subjects or completed courses of study
in a technical field. The value of each award will depend upon the cost and length
of course.

The successful candidates will be expected to return to The Bahamas on the
satisfactory completion of the course to give the country the benefit of their training.

Application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Education Loan
Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology, Thompson Boulevard.
Completed application forms should be returned in an envelope marked “Financial
Community Advanced Education Scholarship”, Scholarship & Education Loan
Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology, P.O. Box N-3913,
Nassau, Bahamas to arrive no later than the deadline date.

APPLICATION DEADLINE : Thursday May 31°" | 2007

INCOMPLETE OR LATE APPLICATION FORMS
WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED



COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

- Residential
project for Grand
Bahama unveile

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

US developer and
Bahamian architect
have teamed up to

develop a boutique, luxury 29-
unit residential complex on
Grand Bahama, which is
scheduled for completion in
summer 2008 with properties
selling for between $764,000 to
$1.065 million.

Port Terra Nova, which will
be located one mile east of
Freeport’s Port Lucaya desti-
nation, is being developed by
Bahamian Donald Dean and
US developer Paul Kalomaris,
according to a release issues
by the US real estate agent
appointed as sales and mar-
keting agent.

The 29-unit property will
include penthouse, garden res-
idences and town houses, with
35-80 boat docks, and be devel-
oped by Port Terra Nova
Development Company and a
location called Smith’s Point.

The phase one ‘founders’
programme will offer units
ranging in price from $764,000
to $1,065 million. That pro-
gramme is to be launched this
week, with the developers
intending that it allow prospec-
tive buyers an early opportu-
nity to become involved at
“pre-construction prices, 50 per
cent below the current
Bahamian market compara-
bles”.

The development aims to
exploit Freeport’s and Grand
Bahama’s proximity to Florida,
especially areas such. as West
Palm Beach, where a large
number of wealthy, high-net
worth US residents live - the







Main tasks:

basis

projects

other offices

Requirements:







P ! Qualities:









¢ Good IT skills







CREDIT SUISSE

CPA or equivalent qualification
A minimum of 7 years’ post qualification experience in the banking industry ah
with at least 3 years experience in investment banking essential 7
° Knowledge of US GAAP especially for derivatives and structured products

¢ Experience with working with multicurrency trial balances and a full understanding
of foreign exchange risk management

A commitment to service excellence
¢ Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
° Good organizational and interpersonal skills
e Ability to work independently

Benefi dell chide:

¢ Competitive salary and benefits

Bahamian

SMaeH Fe RSeEse

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i

*
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ry ie

Ch



architect involved;

partners planning projects
in Nassau and Eleuthera



ideal target market for second :

home residences in the
Bahamas.

In common with the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and Grand Bahama
Development Company (Dev-
co), Port Terra Nova Devel-
opment Company views Grand
Bahama as an ideal second
home location, given that most
coastal areas in Florida are
now fully-developed and there
is no to little room left for con-
struction.

Partner

Mr Kalomeris, partner and ©

developer of Terra Nova
Development Company, said:
“The addition of this luxury
gated community truly com-
pletes our vision of providing
unique waterfront enclaves for
the up-scale market within
close proximity to US shores.”

Each Port Terra Nova resi-
dence overlooks its own pri-
vate fixed dock. They range in

size from 2,281- 2,500 square’

feet, and are available in three
configurations; two-bedroom,
2.5 bath garden residences and
townhouses, and the pent-
house with three-bedrooms
and 3.5 baths, including a semi-
private elevator.

The project, will be built on a

Credit Suisse Nassau

Branch

is presently considering applications for a

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Ensuring that the Branch’s books and records are accurately recorded on a timely

¢ Reconciling profit and loss for various product types covering loans, derivatives,
structured notes and subordinated debt

¢ Preparing all Branch, Group and Regulatory reporting to specific reporting
deadlines under US GAAP and Swiss GAAP

¢ Preparing of reports for Senior management in London and New York

e Ensuring that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated

¢ Involvement in various investment banking and Group accounting issues and

¢ Advising front office on structuring trades for the Branch
¢ Managing the assistant controller and influencing peers both in. Bahamas and

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.
Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.
NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS APRIL 18, 2007.

natural elevation of 15 feet
above sea level, and will con-

* tain a back-up generator and

underground power.

The private marina will:be
constructed first, the develop-
ers said, with fixed docks con-
taining 100 amp power stations
and dock boxes. Owners take
full deeded fee-simple title for
both the residence and the
amenity of the private dock. «

Terra Nova Development

_ Said that apart from its Grand

Bahama venture, it was also
planning projects in Eleuthéra
and Nassau, although it did fiot
release any details. ae

’Mr Dean was described?as
the principal and lead desigtief
of The Architects Incorporat®
ed, a Grand Bahama-based
architectural, planning and
interior design firm. -

Among the projects the
company is said to have been
involved with are Freeport’s
new police headquarters; the
Imperial Life and Family
Guardian buildings; the Star
General Insurance building;
and FOCOL’ service stations.

Aquamarine Realty, the US
real estate sales agent for Port
Terra Nova, has been involved
with real estate sales at Old:
Bahama Bay on Grdiid
Bahama and Emerald Bay in
Exuma.















ST ST OS LES RL BORAT ET (eg EPR AEE 0 CAPA IOS I EIA EEBS LL TLS Bh IW TT A nobly ATR ENE a i a ML LE nk BP I ln oy

PAGE

PR PEL OLD ORLA UREN STEERED



“ny
7 4
oo
ohh Po Rane

FROM page 1B

i

‘ny majority ownership of the
ilton from the Canadian Com-
mercial Workers Industry Pen-
sion Plan (CCWIPP). .

Phey want to renegotiate
rice of the land,” Mr
is satd. “Price is a fairly
mental term.”

Phe Gevernment understood
to bé keen for the IGY project
to go ahead as originally
planned, , Mr Farkas telling The
Tribune Particularly in the last
SIX months or so, government
has been extremely supportive.”







SOREN ceban cone rueMNEEA:

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Side





yOLUORS








we
Ri

ae



JR aE RoR BOK ak ok







Cent
Providence

The Baha

— ee
TiC ish






PNR






wegen

f+
OT any





Pa ORCI 02 TESS TOE

| \ 4th Floor Suite 400
i #1 Bay Street
; Nassau, Bahamas

Pricing Miorin ition As OF:
\ a . as eee 209 _
Lomechnesere oe
















COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

if MATTER OF ALL THOSE pieces parcels and lots of land
‘ f the original Crown Grant to W.W, Narita and situate
¢ easter aid western side of the Main Queen’s
eth Victoria Hill in the vicinity of an area Known as Palaris on the
of Sau Salvador one of the Istands of the Commonwealth of The

AND

eee’ MATTER OF the Quicting Titles Act, 1959 (Chapter 393)
Statute Law of ‘The Bahamas revised edition 2001

oral AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of BRUCE NIRO

SARA COR GOR SOR ROR RR RRR SRE RRR E

NOTICE

FORO ROR OR ROR ROR RRR ERE RARER RR

BRUCE NERO, The Petitioner claim to be the owner in fee simple in
posseSsion of the ne ces parcels or lots of land hereinbefore described
and huve made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act to have the
title to the said pieces parcels or lots of land investigated and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title.to.
be beatae by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the Act.

Copies of a diagram or plan showing the position boundaries shape:
marks and dimensions of the said pieces parcels or lots of land may be
t sted during normal working hours at the following places:

, New Providence,

rs of Messrs. Davis & Co.,
ree, 4th Floor Suite 400, #1 Bay Street, Nassau, New
mas, Attorneys for the Petitioner

ereby given that any person or persons having a right of
e claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
(30) days after the appearance of the Notice herein
he Regisiry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau

i ve on the Petitioners or the undersigned a statement
e prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed

such person to file and serve a statement of claim within
430) day hercin will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 2nd day of April, A.D. 2007

DAVIS & CO.
Chambers
British Colonial Hilton
Centre of Commerce



3K CAL Ag ‘SHARE INDE :



12B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007






The Government’s chief
investment negotiator, Sir Bel-
ton Bethel, who is also the
Hotel Corporation’s deputy
chairman and managing direc-
tor, is understood to have met
with Adurion executives over
their Hilton investment and the
{GY project while in London
last month for his knighthood.

It is understood that while Sir
Belton communicated the Gov-
ernment’s eagerness to see the
IGY project move forward, it
was reluctant to intervene in
negotiations between two pri-
vate sector parties on a com-
mercial transaction,

2007

No.00028

Highway North

The Bahamas.

British Colonial Hilton,






















BUSINESS

The imminent general elec-
tion will also distract the Gov-
ernment’s focus, its ministers
concentrating on becoming re-
elected, so any government
intervention is likely to be wish-
ful thinking on Ivy’s part.

Mr Farkas said IGY had
already invested several million
dollars in the project over the
two years it has been working
on it, having finally received an
agreement in principle from the
Government just before Aduri-
on sought to alter the joint ven-
ture’s terms.

Both CCWIPP and sources
close to Adurion had indicated
that they were drafting a new
offer they would present to
IGY, but Mr Farkas said: “We
have not received any revised
term sheet.”

project to happen, and all three
parties were agreed on the end
objective. The only difference
currently was over how to get
there, with Adurion wanting to
redraft the joint venture IGY
agreement to ensure the deal
made sense to all sides and was
the most efficient, effective way
of working things.

The Tribune was told that
Adurion did not believe there
was a “deal breaker” issue to
be overcome, but it was
acknowledged that no signed
agreement with IGY existed
yet.

Failure to conclude a deal
with IGY would be a blow to
both the British Colonial Hilton
and the downtown Nassau rede-
velopment initiative, as the pro-
posed project would both

FIDELITY




enhance the hotel and make it a
‘magnet attraction’ for visitors

Contacts familiar with the sit-
uation said that both CCWIPP
and Adurion wanted the IGY

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIO MOISE OF MACKEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10th
day of April, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau. Bahamas.



NASSAU PLASTICS COMPANY
_ THE SIGNPOST
AND THE TROPHY CASE

Wishing all our valued customers a
HAPPY EASTER!

We will be closed on
Tuesday, 10th April
in order to give our hardworking staff a
well deserved rest.
Reopening on Wednesday
ready to serve you even better!



PARKGATE ROAD, 393-1332





















se Securit_y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. PS $ Div $
i Abaco Markets 0.95 0.96 0.01 1,000 -0.282 0.000 N/M
{ Baharnas Property Fund 11.59 11.59 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.9
} Bank of Bahamas 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.737 0.260 12.2
Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.2
Bahamas Waste 2.30 2.30 0.00 0.199 0.060 11.6
Fidelity Bank 1.30 1.30 0.00 0.170 0.050 7.6
Cable Bahamas 10.35 10.35 0.00 300 0.915 0.240 11.3
Colina Holdings 2.10 2.10 0.00 0.078 0.040 26.9
cammonwealih Bank 14.19 14.19 0.00 146 1.084 0.680 13.1
Consoiidated Water BDRs 4.80 4.76 -0.04 211 0.118 0.045 40.7
Dector's Hospital 2.46 2.46 0.00 0.295 0.000 8.3
Famguard 5.94 5.94 0.00 0.552 0.240 10.8
Finco 12.49 12.49 0.00 0.779 0.570 15.7
FirstCaribbean 14.61 14.61 0.00 0.977 0.500 15.0
) 7 Focol 17.06 17.06 0.00 1.644 0.510 10.4
15 1 Freeport Concrete 0.50 0.50 0.00 -0.434 0.000 N/M
20 7. ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.532 0.100 13.6
° Oye. lg 8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.560 15.4
40 ro 0 Premier Real 0.00 1.269 0.795 79 |. A
| omy : SRE eate % AWS LOS ; .
wheal ih es Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
y Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.766 1.125 8.8 :
19.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM :
q0.54 ' 0 ?0 ND Holdings : 0.55 0.20 0.021 0.000 26.2 7
ee po ae BLE SEEMS ‘Securities “
i $00, 23.00 ABDAB 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
i) 1100 Zaharnas Supermarkets 14.00 1.770 1.320 8.3 9.04%
0.60 . 0.25 RIND Holding 5 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Pe : : i aed ial Funds AN
{ xy ! ro Bund Name Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
i . Joliet Money Market Fund 1.333665"
Fidelity Baharnas G & | Fund 3.0988***
oftta MS! Preferred Fund 2.625419**
Cotina Bond Fund 41.233813°*"*
5¢ Videlity Prime Inc 3
# 5 ‘ 2 oe i § MAAN
‘ 34 ALLISHAISE INLD! Ha Dyer ae) = 1,000,00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by clos sing, price NAV KEY. :
WPA hesteloring 4 Ou hast 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
wk 4 . fownu pice in dast 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity * - 23 March 2007
| neoovieon love Frey day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Jnyts Glove taunont day wotghtad price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week * - 8 February 2007
Hany Chatnge tn big price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths:
Yoanty Yo Momber fal heros traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *- 34 January 2007
{ts tends per chore paid-in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
by piloe divided ty the fast 14% month earings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 * - 28 February 2007
i Sd ee Re os - 8 February 2007
Lit tag A EL ROR MORE DATA ® INFORMATION CALI (282) 04260





and Bahamians, and provide:





another ‘anchor’ to revitalize
that part of Bay Street.

IGY specializes in reinte-
grating waterfronts back into
their communities and tourist
industries, having done this with
its newly-opened flagship devel-
opment, the $150 million Yacht
Haven Grande on St Thomas
in the US Virgin Islands. This
features a 70-room hotel and 12
luxury condos, and the compa-
ny’s target market is five-star
marina developments.

An economic impact study
predicted that the IGY-project
would generate “very substan-
tial employment”, creating 700
direct full-time jobs and anoth-
er 400 indirect permanent jobs
for Bahamians. The indirect
jobs will be created at suppli-
ers of goods and services to the
development, and through ser-
vices provided to yachts.

The study also forecast that
the IGY development would
create 200-250 full-time jobs
during construction, and has a
total economic impact of $222.8
million over a 20-year period.

Ivy’s proposed marina on
West Bay Street would have 72
slips, catering chiefly to the larg-
er yachts and vessels, those of
between 100-150 feet to 200 feet
and longer.

The development will feature

THE TRIBUNE



marina developer
t alternative sites

a boutique hotel of about 150-
200 rooms, several restaurants,
retail and a parking structure
for over 300 cars.

Adurion itself has made a
more-than $30 million invest-
ment commitment to revitalize
the Hilton, including a $15 mil-
lion refurbishment pro-
grammed, after taking control
of the British Colonial Devel-
opment Company from its
Canadian pension fund partner.

The West Bay Street marina
is the first one that IGY will be
developing, owning and build-
ing from scratch in the
Bahamas, and it is also involved
in a potential deal with Kerzner
International to redevelop Hur-
ricane Hole marina on Paradise
Island.

IGY and its subsidiary,
Applied Technology and Man-
agement, have provided design,
development, operational,
financing and engineering assis-
tance to the Atlantis marina on
Paradise Island, the Bimini Bay
Resort and Casino; Emerald
Bay and Crab Cay in the Exu-
mas; Old Bahama Bay;
Freeport Harbour; Great Gua-
na Cay; Hatchet Bay Marinas
in Eleuthera; Whale Cay in the
Berry Islands; the Windermere
Club in Eleuthera; and Disney’s
Gorda Cay.

JEWELLERY SALES ASSOCIATES

Must be...
Honest, Reliable, Dedicated,
Professional, Energetic &
SELF MOTIVATED

DO YOU HAWE WHAT IT TAKES?

If the answer is YES then take the next step.
FAX RESUME TO 326-2824

1 Excellent $$$ Bonus Potential 1
; |
I
I

NA MN

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NAVONNE N. ANDRE (a.k.a)
NAVONNE ADAIR ANDRE late of Ramsey, North
Oaks in the State of Minnesota one of the United
States of America, deceased

NOTICE is hereby

given that all persons having

any claims or demand against or interest in the
above Estate should send same duly certified in-
writing to the undersigned on or before 27th April,
2007 after which date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets of the Estate having regard only
to the claims, demands or interests of which he shall
then have had notice AND all persons indebted to
the above Estate are asked to settle such debts on or

before 27th April, 2007.

FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor

P.O. Box AB-20405

Bay Street, Marsh Harbour

Abaco, The Bahamas



“KA-CHING!”,

MONEY IN YA’ POCKET!

BUY GOOD QUALITY, SLIGHTLY USED
GOODS FOR

50% - 80% OFF

THE ORIGINAL
RETAIL PRICE.

PLUS, GET CASH FOR ANY NEW OR

USED ITEMS YOU HAVE LYING
AROUND YOUR HOUSE THAT YOU
DON’T NEED OR WANT?

Located inside Pricebusters store,
#361 Soldier Road.

Tel:

393-0535





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 13B





Abaco Markets
sells BSL stake
for $2.65m

the buyout group that last sum-

ABACO Markets may have
mer acquired Winn-Dixie’s 78

made a $150,000 profit from

the sale of its BSL Holdings
stake to other shareholders in

Tourism/Hospitality Scholarship Opportunities

The Patrick S.G.Bain, BHEA, BHA and BHC&AWU
Hotel Industry Partners Scholarship Fund



$25,000.00 available to industry professionals and students interested in a career in
Hospitality/Tourism





¢ 6 Scholarships valued at & $4,000.00 each, tenable at The College of The Bahamas







Train For Careers In:-




per cent majority stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets for
$54 million.

The BISX-listed retail group
confirmed that it had complet-
ed the divestment of its stake
in BSL Holdings to the other
investors in proportion to their
holdings for a price of $2.65
million.

The $2.65 million, which is
the proceeds from an all-cash
transaction, is higher than the
$2.5 million that Gavin
Watchorn, Abaco Markets’
president, said the company
was paying for its initial 10 per
cent stake in BSL Holdings.

In a statement on the sale,
he added: “This is a tremen-
dous step forward for Abaco
Markets as the transaction,
along with the recently

RBC FINCO is considering applications for

Mortgage Specialist
RBC FINCO, Freeport
and Main Branch

The successful candidate should possess the following ‘

qualifications:

e ACIB OR ABIFS Diploma or degree in in Banking (or |
a related field). :

e Previous experience in portfolio and liability
administration would be an asset.

e Exhibit good selling & negotiating skills.

© Self-motivated and able to work with minimal
supervison.

© Ability to make sound credit analysis

© Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)

Responsibilities include:

° Contributing to meeting team sales plans by acquiring
and growing profitable client relationships.

e Providing customized solutions and financial advice
designed to satisfy the client’s long-term goals on
obtaining a mortgage.

¢ Seeking out new clients by developing relationships
within the community and local centres of influence.

e Enhancing the experience of existing clients by
providing accessibility and one-on-one advice and
valuable information on the intricacies of having a
mortgage.

© Successfully anchoring clients with the appropriate
delivery channel within RBC Financial Group.

A competitive compensation package (base salary &
bonus) will commensurate with relevant experience
and qualifications.

Please apply before April 16th, 2007 to:
Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Banking
Royal Bank of Canada














| COOOL

Applications Available At:

Hotel Centre House
S.G. Hambros Building

West Bay Street, Southern Entrance
P.O.Box N-7799

Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Applicants must:
Be Bahamian
Have a minimum G.P.A of 2.85

Pledge to pursue a career in hospitality/tourism
Meet other requirements

¢ Hospitality Management e Marketing
e Equipment Maintenance ¢ Culinary Arts
¢ Information Technology e Accounting and Finance
e Marine and Environmental Sciences e Laundry
e Engineering ¢ Horticulture Sciences
e

and other industry-related career areas



Workers
Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O.Box GT-2514

Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Telephone: 322-838 1/502-4245) 502-4222/323-5933
or Visit us at www. bhahotels.com or www.bhcawu@ yahoo.com

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO APRIL 15, 2007

INTERNAL AUDITOR
INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for Internal Auditor in the Internal Audit
Department.

The job executes various audit and investigation assignments as stipulated in the
Schedule of Activities formulated by the AGM — Chief Internal Auditor; supervises
and directs the activities of the Audit Clerks, and offers technical assistance to the
Assistant Internal Auditors. The internal auditor trains subordinate staff; assists the
Extcrnal Auditors with joint audit efforts for the year-end audit; produces audit
programs; produces audit and investigation reports as well as monthly and quarterly
reports; assists the AGM-Chief Internal Auditor with annual plans and corporate
research.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not limited to:

Produce audit programs and submit for approval of the Chief Internal Auditor
Conducts complete risk assessment for areas being audited

Conducts financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in accordance with
established audit programs

Produces complete file of audit working papers

Produces audit reports on audit concerns and recommendations in accordance
with the ITA Standards

Conducts some confidential audit investigations, evaluate finding & produce
reports; exercising the IIA’s ethical standards

Conducts reviews of budgetary systems (including variances analysis), policies,
manpower efficiency and new computer applications

Discusses audit concerns with the relevant Department/Section head and seek
agreement to implement recommendations

Supervises work of Audit Clerks and conduct review of work done

The incumbent should also have:

A Bachelors degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline and a
professional accounting qualification e.g. CPA, CA or ACCA

Obtaining the CIA would be highly desirable

Five years post certification experience in auditing and general accounting
with experience in interviewing, producing reports and making verbal
presentations

eerie persons may apply by completing and returning an Application
orm to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training,
Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau, Bahamas
on or before: April 20, 2007.














Bahamas Regional Office

P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145

Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

announced agreement for sale
of our Turks property, elimi-
nates the company’s debt and
the related debt service costs
our group has been challenged
with in recent years.

“This allows us to reallocate
critical resources to move for-
ward completely focused on
our daily operations in our
core markets,” said Mr
Watchorn.



GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIPS
(FORMALLY) BAHAMAS FIELD STATION AWARDS

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Ot) PAV a SU us 0.0 9

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for nine (9) full scholarships
and two (2) partial scholarships tenable at accredited institutions in the United States
of America under the Bahamas Field Station/Ministry of Education Agreement (1971),
commencing September 2007.

Under the Agreement, participating Colleges and Universities will offer full tuition
scholarships and the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology will pay board and
lodging charges.

Applicants should have gained admission into one of the following institutions where
the number and type of awards available is indicated:

ALBRIGHT COLLEGE, Reading, Pennsylvania 1
WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY, Springfield, Ohio 1 PARTIAL
DICKINSON COLLEGE, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

HARTWICK COLLEGE, Oneonta, New York

MIAMI.UNIVERSITY OF OHIO, Oxford, Ohio 1 PARTIAL
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN, New Haven, Connecticut 1
ELMIRA COLLEGE, Elmira, New York

EMPORIA STATE UNIVERSITY, Emporia, Kansas 1
YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITY, Ohio 1

Application Forms will be accepted only for the Colleges/Universities specified
above.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens, should have successfully completed high school
education in The Bahamas, and be in possession of at least 5 G.C.E./B.G.C.S.E. subjects,
including English language and Mathematics at grade A, B, or C.

Bahamian citizens currently pursuing studies at one of the named institutions may apply
for this award and should submit an up-to-date transcript along with the completed
application form.

Applicants should note that the area of study must be one deemed acceptable for the
further development of the country.

Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Education
Loan Division of The Ministry of Education or from the Ministry of Education website
al

Completed application forms should be returned to The Scholarship and Education
Loan Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology,
P. O. Box N-3913, No later than Monday, April 30th, 2007.

Application forms received after this date will not be considered.

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION





PAGE 14B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

a »

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BESHY LAVAUD OF

WILSON ST., P.O. BOX GT-2043, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of April, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



A Sales Man Needed Urgently

We are a growing retail company, we are offering:
Base Salary, Bonuses, Pension Plan, ‘Training and lots of
Fun. We are looking for: A young man between the age of
17 and 25, he must be Energetic, Out

Going, Stable, Hard Working, Well Groomed, Honest and
Reliable.







Interested then call for an interview
356-4512 or 356-4514

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCELLINE YIMMY OF
NASSAU STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 10th day of April, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ONC ne

























ABACO ESTATE SERVICES

Reap Esrarn Saves e Vacarion Renracs

RESTAURANT/BAR
FOR SALE

Treasure Cay, Abaco, Bahamas
* Located on Hwy at Treasure Cay Entrance
* 26,136 sq. ft. Prime Commercial Property
* 2,818 sq. ft. Fully Equipped Restaurant Bldg.
* 20 Dining Tables with Seating Capacity of 70
* Great Potential Catering to Affluent Treasure
Cay Community BS517,000.

HOUSE FOR SALE
OWN YOUR PIECE OF PARADISE!
* 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Fully Furnished Home
* 2,244 sq. ft. Under Roof, Recently Renovated
* Just One Block From Treasure Cay Beach
* 11,280 s/f Fully Enclosed, Well Maintained Property
* Exceptional Value! $345,000.



HOUSE FOR SALE
* 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Furnished House, plus Patio
* 1,240 sq. ft. Living Space plus Storage Shed
* Approx 13,500 sq. ft. Parcel within Treasure Cay
* Enjoy Privacy, Near Beach & Golf Course
* Option to Purchase Adjoining Lot



$268,000.





Contact us Today for Further Details

info@abacoestateservices.com ‘Tel: (242) 36 hax: (242) 365.8753







THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas eco-friendly
advantage in danger

FROM page 1B

Bahamas will find itself at a
competitive disadvantage.

According to Mr Henry,
important. steps have already
been taken in this regard, such
as the import and stamp duty
exemptions for solar panels to
facilitate less reliance on
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) generated electrici-
ty, but he said more can be
done.

“More businesses are realis-
ing the cost efficiency of this to
their electricity bills for things
like water heaters. Right now,
solar hot water heaters and the
actual solar panels for making
electricity from the sun are both
duty free, but also we must
include in that the components
that would be used for those
kinds of systems. Right now, as
far as I know, they are not duty
free, but we are making steps
towards that,” Mr Henry said.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



During a presentation on
energy conservation at the
Bahamas National Trust
Retreat, Mr Henry outlined the
unique and effective ways
through which the Cape
Eleuthera Institute and the
Island School are preserving the
environment and conserving
energy.

A hallmark of the new Insti-
tute facility is the solar-powered
Wege Centre for Sustainable
Fisheries. This building houses
hatchery facilities and wet labs
for the development of sustain-
able aquaculture, including off-
shore cage culture, bonefish
energetic studies and sponge,
conch and lobster grow-out.
The Wege Centre will generate
electricity for the entire facility,
and represents the first-ever
BEC grid inter-tie in the
Bahamas.

Mr Henry explained that
although the law prohibits indi-
viduals from generating their
own electricity, the Institute has
been granted special leave as a
research facility.

The Cape Eleuthera Institute
(CEI) was launched in February
2003 by the Cape Eleuthera
Foundation to provide authen-
tic research opportunities for
students, and to model sustain-
able systems for developing
nations. The CEI is half-way
through a capital campaign to
build a campus that will be one
of the most ecologically respon-
sible facilities in the Caribbean,
and possibly the world.

Mr Henry explained that the
compound has a solar-panelled
roof, which gives it the ability to
heat all water without having
to use electric water heaters that

NOTICE

consume more energy.

This system has been expand-
ed to a number of other prop-
erties on Eleuthera, such as the
multi-million dollar Cotton Bay
Resort project, which has
ordered 55 units.

Further, Cape Eleuthera gets
about 250 gallons of used cook-
ing oil from Princess Cruise
Lines each week, which it
refines in an on-site plant and
then uses to power diesel cars.

Mr Henry said the result is
that the cars all smell like
French fries, but they have elim-
inated the need for gasoline.

When one considers the
amount of hotels and restau-
rants which have oil to dispose,
the results can be staggering, he
added.

During the refining process,
glycerin is released as a by-
product. Mr Henry said glyc-
erin is a component of soap, and
although Cape Eleuthera does
not manufacture soap as yet, it
does use glycerin for burning
purposes and for compost.

Mr Henry said that what is
being done in Eleuthera is
transferable to Nassau or any
of the more populated Bahami-
an islands.

“It’s very transferable. With a
change in government policy to
allow a very small percentage -
maybe 2 per cent - of the total
gird connected supply to comes
from renewable energy, I
believe there would be a
groundswell of support from
both local people who feel good
about polluting the environ-
ment less to use electricity, but
also from people who are clients
of the Bahamas and who come
here for touristic reason; to be
able to visit a place where the
environment is preserved,” Mr
Henry said.

He added: “Small successes
will breed larger successes,
which will breed large-scale suc-

cess. I don’t think that anyone

should be asked to do some- = '

thing that he does not want to
try, but I do believe that seeing

a?

‘sy
\

¢
¢
°
6

»

»
*

what has already been proven ~

to work will result in a new
mindset.”

*

a0 8
>

«
»
°

+

-

Mr Henry said initially it may ,-

be difficult to persuade some-

»
@

4
“

4

>

»
°
’

one that spending $7 for a fluo- .- 2
rescent lightbulb would be more '

efficient than buying a standard

$2 bulb, but if people try it, then .

they would see the benefits.

“If you look carefully,.those .

big establishments such as
hotels have started doing that,”
he added.

However, Mr Henry said that
for this to happen, the invest-
ments incentives and tax breaks
provided by the Government
would have to be right.

Other ways of conserving

energy, he said included simple ~.

steps such as turning off lights

when not in use, turning up >.~
thermostats, and in hotels ask- ..--

ing guests to reuse their linens, .:

which would result in having to
run less washes. In addition,
persons can convert to more
energy-efficient appliances.

Mr Henry added that in the -

US, there is a push to use

ethanol - a by-product of corn - ,.

for fuel burning. This push is
bécause the US government

subsidises corn production, but.
Mr Henry said that one of the °

down sides of this is that corn

fertilizer uses petroleum. A ©

more efficient product is sugar.

Brazil has captured the mar- -

ket in ethanol use because it

can grow massive amounts of .

sugar cane cheaper.

But the US government, "
again to help the corn industry, -°

has high tariffs on the import
of sugar, which is why US soft
drinks contain corn fructose

syrup because it is cheaper to »

use that rather than imported
sugar.





NOTICE is hereby given that ANNETTE JOSEPH OF
DRY HILL ROAD, NORTH PALMETTO POINT, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



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able to work on own initiative -Must be able to
correspond with clients, must be conversant with
all aspect of company administraton-preparation of
minutes, liquidation of companies, preparation and
filling ofannual returns, redomiciliation of companies,

have a sound knowledge of International Business
Companies, Foundations, Protected Cell Companies,
Private Trust. Companies, Companies incorporated
under the Companies Act 1992-must have Good
accounting background. Must be computer literate.

Qualified Applicants please e-mail:
jsmil143 @hotmail.com



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MOISE LUGENS OF
MINNIE ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 3rd day of April, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTOPHER FINGER OF
BRISTOL PARK DRIVE, APOLLO BEACH, FLORIDA,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10th day of April, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality-and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JACQUELINE DORVIL OF
NEWTON CREST #39, P.O.BOX F-44619, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH
day of APRIL, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas. -



_ cao

vy mm

= 2a

ee a ae



THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 15B -

sia
rami





A

Coalition ‘left in dark’
on NHI benefits study

Mm By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he National Coalition
Le Healthcare Reform
told The Tribune that
despite having many discussions
with the National Health Insur-
ance (NHI) project implemen-
tation team, it only learnt that
the Government had hired a
second set of consultants to
develop the scheme’s benefits
package through reading this
newspaper.

Stanley Lalta, the NHI pro-
ject team’s manager, said last
week that the Government had
hired a Costa Rican firm,
Sanigest International, to work
with it on developing the
scheme’s benefits package and
payments system.

In response, Winston Rolle, a
former Chamber of Commerce
president and Coalition repre-
sentative, told The Tribune:
“The first time we heard of it

was in the article with Stanley.
We've had numerous discus-
sions with Stanley, but this is
the first time I’m hearing that
this second consultation is going
on.”

Mr Rolle said Sanigest Inter-
national had worked on imple-
menting similar social health
insurance programmes in Chile,
and questioned what the Gov-
ernment’s failure to disclose this
hiring meant with regard to con-
sultation over the NHI plan.

Explained

He explained that the Coali-
tion knew all about the Wash-
ington-based company, DAH
Consulting, that had been hired
to do an economic assessment
of NHI’s impact, adding: “To
date, the Coalition has not had
ant discussions, dialogue and
requests for information with
respect to benefits. Nothing has
come to the Coalition saying

what has been proposed and
can you give your comments,
feedback.”

The Government and its NHI
team are seeking to complete
all further work on the plan,
including is regulations and
devising its benefits, before
year-end, so that the scheme
will be ready for implementa-
tion from January 1, 2008, if the
current administration is voted
back into office.

Mr Rolle said the Coalition
had recognised this was always
the likely intention, adding of
the current consultant hirings:
“It shows for the most part
there’s a lot of pieces they don’t
have together and are strill try-
ing to figure out.

“It’s obvious that a lot of the
legwork they should have done
before putting together and
passing the legislation, and hav-
ing any discussions, they’re just
putting together now. It’s a very
backwards way of doing it.”

Â¥

In an article in today’s Tri-
bune, Dr Bernard Nottage, min-
ister of health and national
insurance, said the Government
would not be “deterred” from
its NHI plans, adding in a ref-
erence to the Coalition: “There
are all sorts of groups around
here doing all sorts of surveys to
find reasons why sick people
should not be able to get the
care they need when they need
it in the Bahamas, but... we
will not be deterred.”

Mr Rolle described this as
“ridiculous”, explaining that the
Coalition was for healthcare for
all Bahamians, but wanted “to
ensure” this was done in a “tru-
ly sustainable, equitable and
viable fashion”.

Dr Nottage also questioned
the methodology used by the
Segal Group to obtain the sur-
vey results for the Coalition,
which found that just 21 per
cent of employers supported
NHL in its present form.

BISX Rules reform ‘step in the right direction’

FROM page 5B

know how well the firm has
performed and whether it will
meet or exceed expectations.

The areas targeted for
reform by Mr Davies and
BISX are among those that
have long been identified by
observers as being among the
weakest in the Bahamian cap-
ital markets regulatory set-up.
They have also been addressed
by regulators globally.

These are the timeliness and
transparency of financial
reporting and material disclo-
sures by BISX-listed entities;
corporate governance and
Board composition issues,
relating mainly to independent
directors; and giving teeth to

the penalties and sanctions that
BISX and Bahamian regula-
tors can enforce against com-
panies and market participants
who breach the rules.

The moves to amend the

BISX rules also coincide with
moves by the Securities Com-
mission of the Bahamas. and
the Government to reform the
Securities Industry Act 1999,
the chief governing law for the
Bahamian capital markets.

The reforms to the Act are
likely to include some form of
mergers and acquisitions
takeover code; the protection
of minority shareholder inter-
ests; and minor deficiencies in
the existing legislation.

The Act also proposes mak-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LAN GDALE ADVISORY LIMITED

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 LANGDALE
ADVISORY LIMITED is in dissolution.

ing the Securities Commission
accountable to a Parliamen-
tary sub-committee, rather
than a minister, making it inde-
pendent and bringing it into
line with the principles set out
by IOSCO, the international
securities regulator.

A key issue with both the
BISX rules reforms and Secu-
rities Industries Act, as ever in
the Bahamas, is whether they
will have real teeth and be
enforced. This nation has many
laws on the books that are not
properly implemented.

®),

Temple Christian High Fehoot

“Teach MeO Lord, hy Ray”. Psalm 119:33
ShirkeniStreet

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers
for the following positions for the 2007-2008 School

Year.

- Journalism / Literature (Gr. 10-12)
- Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr. 7-12)

- Math (Gr. 7-12)
- Physics (Gr. 10-12)
- Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)

- Technical Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
- Accounts/Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
- Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)

- Spanish (Gr. 7-12)

- Georgraphy/History (Gr. 10-12)

- Chemistry

- Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)

Mr Rolle said he found this
interesting, as the “shoe was on
the other foot” now. The Coali-
tion and others had repeatedly
asked the Government to reveal
the full report, and all its
methodologies, that backed the
eight-age summary of what NHI

<

t
.
i

“a

would cost, but it had not doné*

. So. This meant the public was,

unable to substantiate any of,
the calculations underpinning
the NHI scheme.

Now, the Government was,
using exactly the same angle to
attack the Coalition’s work. ”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common ia Divkon
BETWEEN
HENRY & ELIZABETH MOXEY
Plaintiffs

AND
THE OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER



and ;
THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST =
2nd Defendant
and
THE ATTORNEY GENERAL =
3rd Defendant #0
ees
aaa:
caine
ORINGINATING SUMMONS Pd is
“ te:
TO: HENRY MOXEY & ELIZABETH MOXEY ot oe
Joe Farrington Road (Roberts Gas Station / World of Tyres) ne ie
Nassau, New Providence (the Plaintiffs herein). rl
LET THE PLAINTIFFS within fourteen (14) days after service
of this Summons on them inclusive of the day of service, cause“

an appearance to be entered to this Summons which is issued on
the application of THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST (the

Second Defendant herein) Village Road Nassau, The Bahamas

2003...

GEN/CLE No.02153 “~~

Way

awh

Dis
wv
alt
net

We

1st Defendant \’"!

yee.
vase,

‘panes

for an Order of Vacant Possession of ALL THAT certain lot piece

or parcel of Crown Land being Ponds and Marshland at Harold
and Wilson Ponds and shown on a plan or diagram on record in
MP File 5148 in the Department of Lands and Surveys situate

ae
-

Northwardly or Fire Trail Road and Eastwardly of Sir Milo Butler;

Highway in the Western District of the island of New Providence ...
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas on the ground that they are.
entitled to Vacant Possession and that the Plaintiffs in occupation

are in occupation without licence or consent.

By this Summons the Second Defendant herein claims against the

Plaintiffs:
1. Vacant Possession of ALL THAT certain lot piece
of parcel of Crown Land being Ponds and Marshland
consisting of Harold Pond and Wilson Pond and shown
on a plan or diagram on record in MP File 5148 in the
Department of Lands and Surveys situate Northwardly
or Fire Trail Road and Eastwardly of Sir Milo Butler
Highway in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas

Abutting and Bounding towards the West. partly on Lands â„¢

Granted to Island Gases as Grant Numbered A8-60 partly

on Crown Land and Sir Milo Butler Highway towards the

North partly on lands now or formerly Alexander Harold
Grant partly on Lands Granted to W. Skees being Grants




ne EM
ad aggre
Sat TR
ase"
SS
25 NT



numbered A4-21 and A4-20 partly on Lands Granted to

C. Harris being Grant numbered A446 partly on lands :

Granted to H. McKinney being Grant numbered A4-45 * coattt

Partly on Lands claimed by various owners and partly on

Lands Alphonso Smith towards the east partly on Lands

Granted to Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas

being Grant A7-57 partly on Lands vested in the Treasurer

of the Bahamas and towards the South partly on Bahamas

Electricity Corporation Leeway 100 feet wide partly on

Lands C. Godet being Grant A8-58 and partly on an old

Crown Reservation running in a Northwesterly direction

through Harold Road and partly on Lands Granted to

Diamond farms and partly on the shore of Wilson Pond

or however else the same may Abut and Bound which

said piece or parcel of Crown Land being Ponds and

Marshland (hereinafter called “the demised premises’) is

more particularly delineated and shown pink on the plan

attached to Lease No. 1038, MP No. 5148 dated 17th day

of April A.D., 2002 between The Minister Responsible ~

for Department of Lands and Surveys and The Bahamas x

National Trust For Places of Historic Interest or National ’

Beauty. aS
\

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 4th April 2007.
David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2
Caves Village, RO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of LANGDALE
ADVISORY LIMITED. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their address and particulars of
their debts to the Liquidator before the 4th May 2007.

- Health Science (Gr. 7-9)

- General Science (Gr. 7-9)

- Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)

- Music (Gr. 7-12)

- Biology (Gr. 10-12)

- Language Arts/Literature (Gr. 7-12)
- Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12)

- Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)

- Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
- Social Studies (Gr. 7-9) Q

- Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

Yee ae age cae?
ae: eh eae: 462

£
u

Applicants must:

HUMAN
RESOURCES &

A. * Bea practicing born-aghin Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith
of Temple Christian School.

e Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or
University in the area of specialization.

OFFICE MANAGER

Seeking EXPERIENCED
Human Resources & Office Manager.
Salary will be commensurate with experience.
Only persons meeting the requirements
below should apply.

e Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma. 2. Further or other relief,

2

¢ Have at least two years teaching experience
in the relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills.

3. The said premises are situated in the vicinity
of Harold Pond and Wilson Pond; and

If the Plaintiffs do not enter an appearance; such Judgment may
be given or order made against or in relation to them as the Court
may think just and expedient. .

e Applicants must have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the
¢ A Bachelor’s Degree in HumanResources Pca ea =
TAKE NOTICE that the Second Defendant intends at the hearing ~~
of the Summons served hereto to apply for an order for the
Plaintiffs to deliver up to the Second Defendant possession of the +‘
subject property.

F. ¢ Be willing to participate in the high school’s
* At least Five (5) years experience in Human extra curricular programmes.

Resources

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph and
three references to:

° Working Knowledge of the Employment PY veren Oran

Act, 2001 REGISTRAR :
Mr Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
. P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application ig April 30th, 2007

This Summons ts taken out by:

FERREIRA & COMPANY,
Chambers,
Kemp Building
#39 East Street North
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Second Defendant

Please submit your application via email to:

bahamasexecutivesearch @ gmail.com





ee
a if Bro \C esr rs oA
7 <1" RIF IPL] | |p 1° 7 “yt |

5-Day Fon SS aS yaa








Intervals of clouds





Mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy with a Mostly cloudy, a Mainly cloudy. Partly sunny.
; passing shower. shower possible. and sunshine. i
High: 82° High: 82° High: 82° High: 84°
High: 82° Low: 71° Low: 71° Low: 71° Low: 71° Low: 71°
AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel }
[| 89°-76°F [ 89°-74°F




The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ‘Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday





Temperature,

eee High 82° F/28° C

. Low 61° F/16° C

Normal high . .. 81° F/27° C

Normal low .............. setsrssnmeenesssearas OO" F/20° CE.

EST PALM BEACH Last year’s RIQH ....secsceeeseeseeen a. 84° F/29° C
High: 84° F/29° C MASE YCArSNOW sc dasissessacesinvacess w. 13° F/23° C

Low: 68° F/20°C Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... ececeseseseeene «x 0,00"

, Year tO: date .......reecsseoseorerse sscdeacasestvrdsreets ine 965"

High: 81° F/27°C Normal year to date ....... rehapessvis eeaadagasteiidse 5.93”

Low: 66° F/19°C

AccuWeather.con:

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007



a i l
h: 85° F/29°C

w: 71° F/22°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



es

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Pew Lt
High Ht.(ft.) Low — Ht.(ft.







Tod 1:32am. 2.6 8:02am. 0.5
” 1:54p.m. 2.1 8:00pm. 0.4
Wednesday23/a.m. 2.5 9:03am. 0.5
Â¥93:01 pm. 22 9:11pm. 04

Thursday 3:43am. 2.6 10:03am. 0.4
Y 4:08 p.m. 2.4 10:21p.m. 0.3

Friday 4:47am. 2.7 10:59am. 0.2
: 5:10 p.m. 2.7 11:26 p.m. 0.1



LC

6:53 a.m. Moonrise..... 1:57 a.m.
7:30 p.m. Moonset... . 12:30 p.m.

New First Full





» SAN SALVADOR
_ High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 71° F/22°C





Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday ;
High Low W High =Low Ww High Low W High Low Ww High Low W High = Low Ww *
F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 72/22 46/7 s 72/22, 45/7 pe Indianapolis 47/8 38/3 ¢ 53/11 38/3 sor Philadelphia 52/11. 35/1 s 50/10 40/4 pc
Anchorage 44/6 32/0 ¢ 44/6 28/-2 pc Jacksonville 66/18 57/13 t 82/27 65/18 t Phoenix 88/31 63/17 s 87/30 62/16 s
Atlanta ~60/15 45/7 pe 65/18 57/13 +t Kansas City ~-§3/11 39/3 6015 44/6 c Pittsburgh 47/8 30/-1- pc 47/8 38/3 or RAGGED ISLAND
Atlantic City . 51/10 27/-2 s 51/10 39/3 pc Las Vegas 81/27 56/13 s 79/26 56/13 pc Portland, OR 55/12 36/2 pe 56/13 40/4 + High: 83° F/28° C
Baltimore 5412 37/2 s 50/10 40/4 Fr Little Rock 62/16 53/11. t 71/21 50/10 t Raleigh-Durham 63/17 42/5 s. 57/13 52/11 + Low: 70° F/21°C
Boston 47/8 33/0 pc 43/6 33/0 s Los Angeles 70/21 55/12 pe 68/20 52/11. pc St. Louis 57/13 45/7 t 5713 45/7 t :
Buffalo 43/6 22/-5 pe 44/6 33/0 + Louisville 56/13 46/7. ¢ §7A3 43/6 t Salt Lake City 51/10 35/1 pe 50/10 35/1 GREAT INAGUA
Charleston,SC 66/18 51/10 c 71/21 57/13 t Memphis 63/17 59/15 t 68/20 54/12 ¢t San Antonio 80/26 63/17 pc 87/30 65/18 s - High: 84° F/29°C
Chicago 44/6 36/2 pc 40/4 32/0 sn Miami 85/29 69/20 pe 86/30 74/23 pc San Diego 6417 56/13. pe 64/17 54/12 pe gh:
Cleveland 42/5 29/-1 pc 44/6 36/2 41 Minneapolis 38/3 31/0 sn 40/4 30/-1_ sf San Francisco 67/19 52/11 pce 56/13 46/7 sh
Dallas 72/22 59/15 t 75/23 61/16 s Nashville 60/15 46/77 c 62/16 43/6 t Seattle 52/11 36/2 c 54/12 38/3 ¢
Denver 56/13 30/-1 c 5412 34/1 pe New Orleans 71/21 65/18 t 83/28 67/19 t- Tallahassee 65/18 58/14 t 84/28 65/18 t :
Detroit 46/7 28/-2 pc 41/5 31/0 ¢ New York 50/10 36/2 s 48/8 39/3 pe Tampa 78/25: 69/20 t 82/27 70/21 pe
Honolulu 84/28 72/22 s 83/28 71/21 s Oklahoma City 64/17 50/10 c 71/21 51/10 s Tucson 84/28 57/13 s 85/29 57/13 s
Houston 81/27 64/17. pe 84/28 66/18 s Orlando » 80/26 64/17" t 84/28" 68/20 pe’ Washington;DC 55/12 35/1 5 49/9 42/5 +

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados





Beirut
Belgrade ee
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo

Calcutta
Calgary

_ Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin”
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki

Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi

New Delhi
‘Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago ©
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm —
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg



Dieters

64/17

72/22



Today
High Low W

F/C F/C

90/32 72/22 s

59/15 43/6 c
6116 37/2 s
68/20 50/10 s

68/20 58/14 pc

95/35 79/26 pc
86/30 75/23 sh
57/13 50/10 r

45/7 pe
66/18 59/15 sh

68/20 50/10 s

55/12 45/7 pe

68/20 62/16 5

64/17
64/17
64/17

46/7 pc
45/7 pe
45/7 pc

- 70/21 55/12 pe

75/23 55/12 pe
98/36 77/25 s
31/0 28/-2 sn
86/30 72/22 pc
84/28 66/18 pc
68/20 54/12 s

52/11 43/6 pe
59/15 45/7 pc
64/17 41/5 pe
6417 45/7 s
40/4 22/-5 ¢
88/31 68/20 pc
41/5 32/0 pc
77/25 67/9 5
100/37 72/22 s
68/20 «= 48/8 s
57/13 48/8 pc
67/19 48/8 pc
88/31 75/23 t
76/24 66/18 c
66/18 43/6 pc
55/12 415 t
88/31 75/23 pc
THOS ASHES
88/31 64/17 pc
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48/8 37/2 ¢
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59/15 43/6 pc
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90/32 70/21 t
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78/25 «54/12 pe

90/32 70/21 pc
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54/12 40/4 r

AGE BESS

75/23 59/15 s

-74/23--68/20 t

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8 te
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

88/31

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ASN IN. IN ANICE MAAN AGERACAIT |

Wednesday
High Low W
F/C F/C

88/31 74/23 s
63/17 43/6 s
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70/21 54/12 pc
66/18 = 53/11-¢
95/35 80/26 pc
86/30 75/23 pe
59/15 51/10 r
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6116 44/6 s
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Full Text
» Lhe Tribune

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Volume: 103 No.114

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TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007



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PLP election win ‘predicted

Party will claim 60% of votes
according to data collected
by government’s international
campaign analysts

@ By KARIN HERIG and
PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporters

AS IT stands now, the PLP is
predicted to win around 60 per
cent of votes in the upcoming
general election, according to
data collected by the governing
party’s international campaign
analysts.

However, FNM representa-
tives yesterday stated that they
have been conducting extensive
polls themselves and that, based
on what they are hearing from
the people “on the ground”, the
PLP’s predictions are com-
pletely inaccurate and the oppo-
sition will in fact “win big”
come May 2.

The Tribune has learned that
the PLP has employed political
campaign experts from the US
and Canada to assist them in
gaining an accurate estimate of
how many of the 148,000 regis-
tered voters will choose to re-
elect the governing party to

‘ House of Assembly

office for the next five years.

According to polling exercis-
es conducted by the campaign
specialists, who reportedly con-
cluded their work and left the
country last week, the PLP is
estimated to win some 60-61 per
cent of the electorate’s votes -
barring any unforeseen occur
rences.

This estimate would give the
PLP at least 24 seats in the
three few
er seats than what the FNM
predicts it will be able to secure
in the election.

However, the American and
Canadian campaign specialists
allegedly warned the PLP that
any further scandals — such as
the Anna Nicole Smith debacle
or the controversy over the
independence of the judiciary
— could lose them significant
support and give the FNM a
real chance of winning the gov-
ernment.

SEE page 12

Voters’ cards can



be picked up today

STARTING today from 10am-9pm, Bahamians can pick up
their voters’ cards from schools in their constituency.

For the duration of the Easter holidays (all through this week),
the schools will serve as distribution centres for the parliamentary
registration department.

After that time; new arrangements will be announced.

In the Family Islands voters can get their cards from adminis-
trators’ offices and special centres will be established for distribu-
tion in Grand Bahama.

Voters are urged to pick up their cards as soon as possible as the
general election is only three weeks away.

@ SEE PAGE FIVE for the full list of schools where voters’ cards
can be picked up.

Smell the garite

Look at all that éheese.-
Provolone, Garhe Oregano

ha bil”.

WVU CLs

ONASOAG



Excavation work off Milo Butler Highway

@ MOTORISTS on Milo Butler Highway pass
the scene of excavation work which has cut

into the landscape at the side of the road,
leaving a striking landmark.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Gunman opens | George Smith decides not
to run as an indepenuent |

fire on crowded
basketball court

lm By BRENT DEAN

: M By BRENT DEAN

A GUNMAN opened fire on :
a crowded basketball court in :
the Sunlight Village area over :
the weekend, leaving three peo- :
ple seriously wounded in i

Princess Margaret Hospital.

According to Chief Supt Glen :
Miller, head of CDU, the inci- :
dent occurred around 9.20pm :
on Saturday, when a white “Nis-
san-type” vehicle pulled up to :
the court where a group was :

assembled.

A male emerged from the :
vehicle with a handgun and, :
according to reports, suddenly |
fired into the crowd, hitting and;
seriously wounding three vie- :

tims.

Rolle, 24, of Lifebuoy Street, :
was shot in pelvic area, Ryan;

Bonaby, 25, of Robinson Road, :

was shot in the back, and

Rozsen Moxey, 32, of Gibbs :

Corner, was shot in the right
shoulder.

Police suspect that a 9mm :
semi-automatic pistol was used:
in the shooting, as numerous :
spent cartridges were scattered :

across the scene.

SEE page 12

AFTER months of specula-
tion, George Smith, the former
PLP MP, has decided not to run
as an independent for the Exu-
ma constituency in the upcom-
ing election.

In a press release issued to
The Tribune, Mr Smith reaf-
firmed his commitment to the
PLP and its leader, Perry
Christie.

"In the final analysis, you
would recognise that it would
not be easy for George Smith to

Lawyer: judiciary independence issue still before 3

; spokesperson Erin Greene said:



Gay cights
group hits
out at call for

influence anyone to vote against }
a PLP nominee, even if there ;
might be good reasons to do so. :
Further, it would be very diffi- :
cult for me formally, or in any :
other way, to oppose my chosen }
: Mf By ALEXANDRIO



party.

"Yes, I make it crystal clear
that this time, as in every other :
election, I will campaign for the :
return of the PLP to govern- ;





ment, in the hope that what is
wrong will be put right. I sup-

port the leadership of Perry :

SEE page 12

courts despite govt’s withdrawing of appeal

Reports indicate that Jamal li By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter



THE government "has not dodged the bullet" with regards to the :
: question of the independence of the judiciary by withdrawing its ;
: appeal against the ruling made by Justice John Lyons, a lawyer said yes-

terday.

independent" in light of Justice Lyons’ statements.

SEE page 12

“Fidelity is ty OnE stop
for ALL my financial needs.”

Gary
?

ZERO DOWN LOT LOANS

HOME BQUITY LOANS
MORTGAGE & PERSONAL LOANS
CHECKING & SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
lola)



candidates to
declare their
sexuality

MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

ANY call for political candi-
dates to openly declare their
sexual orientation must be
viewed as an act of “terrorism”
by all forward thinking Bahami-
ans, according to the Rainbow
Alliance of the Bahamas.

In an exclusive interview
with The Tribune, RAB

“To reveal someone's sexual
orientation in this heterosexist
and homophobic social envi-
ronment is a violent act that
could not only lead to the
demise of her/his political
career, extreme psychological
and emotional trauma, but

an ic so result in physical vio-
(hat appeal had asked the court to declare “whether or not the Jus- : could also result in physical vic

tices of the Court of Appeal and the Justices of the Supreme Court are :

lence and death.”
Ms Greene’s statement fol-

Now there are plans afoot in Freeport to use a date with the Court sues a call ied sca
of Appeal to finally determine the veracity of Justice Lyons’ ruling that : C4™ idates to declare their sex-
the judiciary's independence had been rendered compromised "as a } uality.

result of the government's repeated failure to appoint a commission i

On Tuesday, Clever Dun-

SEE page 12



tials

INTERNET BANKING
SION PB ih

AES DNL Te)
NAGE MENT
PLANNING

INVEST MEN

HUN i ek to wy

: Pea gam ele R RCM Stat

=) FIDELITY

www. frdehtvbahamas.com



~—


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



i
Meltdown must stop

descend into state of anarchy

| HE debate over the
independence of
Bahamian high court judges has
exploded: again, and with a
vengeance. .

There can hardly be a more
important issue since it is about
the rule of law and goes to the
very heart of our democratic
governance and the protection
of our rights as citizens.

The administration of Prime
Minister Perry Christie has
shown little regard for the con-
ventions which are so impor-
tant to the proper functioning of
our parliamentary democracy
and to its own proclaimed code
of ethics.

Mr Christie, who knows bet-

' ter, has allowed some of his
ministers to violate the most
fundamental conventions and
rules of cabinet government
without even the mildest of rep-
rimands. These violations have
been pointed out repeatedly in
this column. :

The conventions were not
pulled out of a hat but
evolved over centuries of con-
flict, practice and experience.










































RULES





. -_ oe de S ay tes * fh ie

* 6 Judging of entries will be based on beauty
natural state, rather than in captivity. The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2008 calendar. The decision
7 Allentries are submitted at the owner's risk. It is the company’s intention to return all entries in their original conditio®. However, Family Guardian
will assume no liability for any loss, damage or deterioration.
8 A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. More than one entry from a single photographer may be selected.
Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos. ;
9 The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company
reserves the right to use such in the future.
: 10 Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.

11 Previously published photos are not eligible.
Pee ee ee eee eee eee ee

2008 CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST ENTRY FORM I





0 8638
9,91440¢ e : alent
ae |
9.3128¢



To ignore them is to guaran-
tee that things will fall apart
and that confidence in the sys-
tem will be undermined, per-

'$ Ca

Photo by Tim Higgs

foie

ke
is ES
3

JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG

previously published.

Return with photos to:

Calendar Contest, Family Guardian
Corporate Centre, Village & Eastern Road
Roundabout, Nassau, Bahamas

ENTRY DEADLINE: MAY 31, 2007

C0 LEUTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

haps for years to come.

More disturbingly, Mr
Christie and his colleagues have
sailed pretty close to the wind
when it comes to respecting the
rule of law. In some cases they
have ignored the law altogether.

The concept of the rule of law
predates the flowering of par-
liamentary democracy. Its expo-
sition by political philosophers
in the 16th and 17th century
contributed to the development
of various forms of western con-
stitutional democracy and the
separation of powers.

The rule of law means that
the state and all its constituted
authorities, departments and
agents must operate according
to laws that have been estab-
lished in the prescribed manner
and have been made known to
citizens.

It means that the rights of a
citizen must be clearly estab-
lished and cannot be arbitrarily
abridged by the state nor by
other citizens. It means that a
citizen must have access to inde-
pendent courts to protect his
rights from abuse by the state or
anybody else, and for the adju-

é

a celebration of nature

14 winning entries will appear in Family Guardian's 2008 calendar.
Winning entries receive a gift certificate valued at $400 each.
Entry deadline is May 31, 2007

1 Family Guardian's Annual Calendar, Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company’s 2008 calendar will be
“A CELEBRATION OF NATURE.” Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene which is a striking example of nature as found in
The Bahama Islands. All photographs must be taken in The Bahamas.

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS MAY 31, 2007.

3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre,
weekdays only. Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest.”

‘4 Allentries must be accompanied by an official entry form, available at any Family Guardian office or when published in the newspapers.

5 Only colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images must be provided as 35mm film or digital images on CD. 35mm film can be positive
(slides) or colour negatives. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing any signs of photo manipulation,
resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFF or high.quality JPEG .,
and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be supplied with prints which will be used in the judging process.
(Note: prints submitted without 35mm slides or negatives or CD's will not be eligible). The photographer's name and photo subject should
be written on the reverse of the print... '

Village and Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, between 9:00am and 5:00pm

: interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Preference will be given to fauna photographed in its

+ Family Guardian's DINE cape kuti ieptaasle emetic es ee acca F
p97 Calendar TEL BUSINESS inc: erscasanucinsmrnceitain HOME
POUBOX camden STREET ADDRESS.......0.-
J SIGNATURE. ssnnnnnnnnnennnnn
5 DATE iciaanayaceons)



Sidhe POSE ONO Wn
ag

i

\

}

*:





NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED................... (maximum of 5) i

hi | agree that in the event that one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner in the 2008 Family
f d Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it wil become the property of Family Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and
| assign to Family Guardian all rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the
photos entered in this contest were taken in The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been

FAMILY

G

SEP OCT NOV

dication of disputes with other
citizens.

A the beginning of his
administration it

appeared that Mr Christie
would not tolerate the vicious

practice of victimisation which °

became a hallmark of the pre-
vious PLP government. But
now he seems to be encourag-
ing this nasty practice.

It would be for the public
good if members of the legal
fraternity would take action in
the courts on behalf of poor
Bahamians who have been vic-
tifised. Government officials
ahd the strangers who come to
do business in our country must
know that the humblest of our
citizens are protected by our
constitution and our laws.

Mr Christie himself, as Prime
Minister, has flouted the law
relating to the very operation
of our parliamentary system by
neglecting to cause the appoint-
ment of the Constituencies
Commission within the time
prescribed by the constitution.

He has made excuses for his

fe judges will be final.

INSURANCE J
COMPAN Y



DE




dereliction, attempted to blame
the citizens for it, and has dis-
missed the clear intent of the
constitution by saying that it is
“directory” and not “mandato-
ry”, and that no consequences
flow from his failure.

Ordinary citizens have been
made to believe that where the
constitution or any other law says



Now that the
appeal has been
withdrawn, the
public has no
alternative but to
conclude that
Justice Lyons was
right all along in
the statements he
has been making.
(ER I
“shall” it means “shall”. One
consequence of Mr Christie’s fail-
ure is that that is now in doubt
and “shall” means that the
authority at whom it is directed
has discretion to do or not to do,
or to do when he feels like it.

Another consequence is that

this election has run danger-
ously close to the wire and only

a back-breaking effort by the -

Parliamentary Commissioner
and his staff can avoid a lot of
confusion.

This is too much of a burden
to place on them. Mr Christie
should have appointed the Con-
stituencies Commission in the
time mandated by the constitu-
tion and he should have closed
the old Register of Voters soon-
er to encourage citizens to reg-
ister earlier.

Aw consequence
is that prospective

candidates have little time to
familiarise themselves with new
constituencies or ones that have
had boundary changes, and
some citizens do not yet know
what constituency they are in.
This is not good for the all-
important process of electing a
government.

Mr Christie knows all this, of
course. He advocated in his par-
ty’s platform that no changes
should be made to constituency
boundaries within the six-month
period preceding a general elec-
tion.

But, either through negli-
gence, incompetence or sheer
disregard for the law or a com-
bination of all these, Mr Christie
has been hard-pressed to fulfil
his promise to call an election
no later than May 2.

So now he has been forced
to make the highly controversial
decision to launch the election
campaign officially in the mid-
dle of the most solemn period in
the Christian calendar.

Perhaps the most serious
assault on the rule of law by Mr
Christie and his colleagues was
their failure to appoint — not
once but twice — a commission
to review the salaries and pen-







before we

sions of judges of the country’s
high courts as mandated by law.

This precipitated an unseem-
ly public row between Attor-
ney General Allyson Maynard-
Gibson and Supreme Court Jus-
tice John Lyons over the inde-
pendence of the judiciary of
The Bahamas.

Pesos the indepen-
dence of the judiciary
- has not been totally destroyed

but no-one can credibly deny
that the failure of the PLP gov-
ernment to appoint the com-
mission was an assault on that
independence. That is a dan-
gerous thing, as Mr Lyons made
clear.

But instead of acknowledg-
ing its dereliction and initiating
consultation to find a way out,
the government engaged in a
running battle with Mr Lyons,
and the Attorney General
lodged an appeal against his rul-
ing.

Now that the appeal has been
withdrawn, the public has no
alternative but to conclude that
Justice Lyons was right all along

in the statements he has been

making. «ia

One of the things the judge
had taken excepticn to was an
apparent attempt by the Attor-



Either through

negligence, incom- -

petence or sheer
disregard for the
law or a combina-
tion of all these,
Mr Christie has
been hard-pressed
to fulfil his
promise to call an
election no later
than May 2.

ney General to grade the per-
formance of judges in pursuit
of her so-called “swift justice”
initiative.

In this, as in other matters,
the opposition FNM. has
accused the PLP government
of a “smoke and mirrors”
approach to governance. The
government has failed to make
sure that there are enough
judges appointed while at the
same time mounting a “swift
justice” public relations exer-
cise.

I: the wake of the Attor-
ney General’s withdraw-
al, Dame Joan Sawyer, Presi-
dent of the Court of Appeal,
has strongly supported Mr
Lyons and expressed disdain for
the idea that anyone but a judge
should presume to grade the
performance of judges.

Commenting on what Mr
Lyons had said about the inde-
pendence of the judiciary being
compromised, Dame Joan said
she had personal reason to
agree with the judge. Then she
made this stunning declaration:
“I have personal experience of
the Executive trying to manip-
ulate the Judiciary.”

But the strongest words of
condemnation for the Attorney
General and the government
came last week from a promi-
nent member of The Bahamas
Bar, Damian Gomez. Mr
Gomez is a former candidate
for the PLP, a former PLP Sen-
ator and recent nominee to the
Supreme Court bench. He has
since declined the appointment.

Mr Gomez excoriated Mrs
Gibson on a radio talk show
and called not only for her res-
ignation from that office but
also her withdrawal from public
life. He said the appeal should
have gone forward so the whole
question could have been
cleared up once and for all.

“But for political reasons,” Mr
Gomez charged, “on the eve of
an election, they have adopted
an approach which is completely
cavalier to the interest of Bahami-
ans in their. civil rights as guar-
anteed by the Bill of Rights.”

Mr Gomez said the country is
in a serious quandary and that
the judiciary is in meltdown.

If that is true, and it looks
very much as if it is, then this
meltdown must be quickly
arrested before rampant law-
lessness overwhelms us and
before we slide into anarchy.

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com

www.bahamapundit.com

ch

_e eee en

nr nw CU ol al ee ot i at dae ch ae aT

, 2-2

-+. ew ee

AY
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 3



Me Ce ee

O ln brief

Stern ‘to
withdraw’ if
DNA tests go
to Birkhead

IF DNA tests reveal that
Larry Birkhead is the father
of Anna Nicole Smith's
daughter Dannielynn,
Howard Stern will withdraw
from the custody battle, it
was claimed yesterday.

Mr Birkhead, who yester-
day bought a “Who’s your
daddy?” T-shirt in Nassau as
he prepared for today’s court
hearing, told Access Holly-
wood that Stern would with-
draw his custody claim.

While no agreement had
been reached on paper, Mr
Birkhead said Stern had indi-
cated he would back out if
the DNA test went against
him. ;

“We both want to do
what’s best for Dannielynn,”
said Mr Birkhead, “Anytime
anyone says they’re not
gonna fight you in this kind of
battle is music to my ears.”

Mr Birkhead also told
Access that no deal was made
with Mr Stern. “There was
no exchange — one thing for
another,” he said. “It was just
two people wanting to co the
right thing.”

Mr Birkhead said he hadn’t
discussed continuing the fight
for J Howard Marshall’s bil-
lion dollar estate on Dan-
nielynn’s behalf.

“T haven’t even thought
about it. I’ve had my plate
full. Other issues are at stake,
like where I'll reside with the
baby.”

Mr Birkhead said he was
excited over the pending test
result, but also felt deep sad-
ness over Anna Nicole’s
death.

“T haven't had time to
grieve and that hit me a little

’ bit,” he said.

Though Anna Nicole fled
to the Bahamas to avoid Mr
Birkhead’s paternity claims,
he believes she would
approve of his legal fight for
Dannielynn.

He said that behind the
public battle was an exchange
of e-mails. “I can hear her
saying ‘good job, dummy’,”
he told Access.

But he admitted raising
Dannielynn without Anna
would be difficult.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
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your storv.










tate
EXTERMINATORS
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
aU a yay a bY



Fears 0
Nicole nurses

TWO Haitian nurses, one of
whom swore an affidavit
describing life inside Horizons,
where Anna Nicole Smith lived
until her death, claim they fear
far their lives.

“We are Haitian and you
know what that means,” one of
them said on Bahamas televi-
sion over Easter. “People are
going to come after you.”

Both women gave an inter-
view to Controversy TV on
Channel 12 because they said
they trusted show host Lincoln
Bain and wanted to defend
themselves. But they insisted
they should be shown on screen
only from the waist down.

During the show, they
described their feelings for
Anna Nicole and baby Dan-
nielynn — and gave an insight
into life at Horizons after
Daniel Smith’s death last year.

Quethlie Alexis alleged that
attorneys “added” some things
to her original affidavit, includ-
ing information about former
Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson that she didn’t say. But
she said that Mr Gibson, who
admitted being a close friend of
the late reality starlet, visited the
house often “but not every day.”

“I did not say that he sneaked
around to the back entrance.
Shane used to ring the bell.
Shane would come to the front
entrance. He didn’t sneak
around. They said he used to
come in an Explorer, but I can’t
spell Explorer. I said he came in
a black car and sometimes a
Jeep.”

She and Ms Nadine Alexi
said they worked at Horizons
seven days a week without a
break for Anna Nicole when
their papers were “not straight”
and they were both illegal immi-
grants.

Ms Alexis said: “I was scared

Haitians ‘afraid for their lives’







|

: % AMAA
ANNA Nicole Smith

when I saw Shane Gibson
because I had heard something
about Shane before. I told him
everything. I told him I was ille-
gal. He said if I got straight, I
could not work for Anna.”

Nadine said the Gibson fam-
ily were often at the house, but
she:never saw the minister’s
wife, Jackie. However, Quethlie
said she saw Jackie Gibson
three times. Apart from Shane,
his mother and stepmother
were the visitors she remem-
bered.

Both women said they liked
Anna Nicole and she liked
them. To one, she gave a pho-
tograph of herself with the
words: “To Nan Nan - thanks
for loving my child.”

Nadine said: “She wanted the
baby to call us Nan Nan. We
used to read the Bible to Anna.
When she had pain after her
son died, I used to read the
Bible to her. My sister used to
read the Bible at night-time.”

Both said Anna Nicole was
“a lovely person — a very nice
person to be around.” But they
were fired — Quethlie because
of a_row over a washing





SHANE Gibson

machine.

Nadine said: “I was told that
some information was leaking
from inside the house. | think
we were fired because we knew
too much.”

The nurses told Lincoln Bain
that they had agreed to appear
on television because they want-
ed to defend themselves and
felt Controversy TV could “stop
the victimisation.”

Both also claimed that Anna
Nicole wanted son Daniel
buried in Texas, where he was
born. “Howard (Stern) told
Anna that it would be too
expensive to bury him in
Texas,” said Quethlie.

“At that time, Anna did not
have too much money. Then
she got money for the pictures
of the baby. Anna had a money
shortage.”

Asked about allegations that
Anna gave Shane Gibson a
Rolex watch, she said: “I don't
know anything about her giv-
ing him a Rolex watch.”

Asked if Anna gave hima gift
or anything else, she said: “No
comment.”

e SEE page eight for more



Record marijuana find

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE largest field of marijuana
plants ever to be uncovered “in
the history of the Bahamas” was
found in Andros on Wednesday
in a joint operation between
Andros District and Drug
Enforcement Unit officers.

A police estimate put the value
of the drugs growing in the one-
and-a-half mile by 200 foot tract
at several millions of dollars.

In all, 1,060 plants — each at
between three feet and six feet
tall — were uprooted following
the find, which occurred short-
ly after 5pm.

The drug crop, the exact loca-
tion of which police refused to
identify, would likely have been
for both local consumption and
export purposes, police press
liaison officer Assistant Super-
intendent Walter Evans said.

No arrests have been made

in connection with the find,
however police did come across
two make-shift tents in the area.

Six additional bales of mari-
juana were also picked up.

In the 2007 US State Depart-
ment Report, it was noted that
authorities in the Bahamas
seized 10 times more marijuana
last year than in previous years.

This was attributed to a grow-
ing trend of Jamaican nation-
als cultivating drug crops in the
country.

Mr Evans said the possibility
that this field was an example of
such practices could not be
ruled out at this stage.

He said that Out Islands in
particular have been targeted
by would-be criminals for drug
cultivation purposes, often due
to their relative under-develop-
ment.

“We want to look at the
islands as a whole because the
islands are so large in terms of

in Andros

the land mass and then when
you look at some areas there
seems to be underdevelopment
so would be criminals see this as
an opportunity to use those
areas because they believe that
perhaps in terms of the num-
ber of persons who would check
the probability of them getting
catch is very, very small,” he
said.

Mr Evans said that due to the
maturity of the plants, it was
likely that this particular field
had been in place for "quite
some time."

Asked why such a large field
would have gone undetected
until now, Mr Evans said:
“Sometimes persons provide
information for us when they
see any irregularities or any
activities that may be taking
place in any of the islands they
pass it on to us and we will take
action.”

e SEE page seven for more

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

Nassau Fax: -

(242) 328-2398

Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Crime is a community fight

IT SEEMS THAT no matter how hard the
police work the streets and government’s
urban renewal projects are promoted, crime
continues to escalate. In the first three months
of this year there have been 23 murders.

Last week police press liaison officer, Assis-
tant Superintendent Walter Evans said that
this figure could increase as police are still
investigating deaths that are yet to be classi-
fied. If they are officially labelled homicides,
the murder count will rise.

Church leaders are now asked to develop
better working relations with police division-
al commanders to help reduce tensions in
their neigbourhoods, particularly among the
young.

Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson,
guest on a radio show last month, said that the
number of murders for the first quarter of
this year have increased by 50 per cent com-
pared to the same period last year. The only
good note in this tragic situation is that police
have already solved 56 per cent of the mur-
ders. However, unless the community makes
up its mind to cooperate with the police, the
murder rate is predicted to exceed last year’s
record of 60 violent deaths — most triggered
by pent up anger by marginalised young men.

Assistant Commissioner of Police Reginald
Ferguson has repeated the frequent complaint
of his officers — as soon as a violent crime
offender is picked up by the police and taken
to court, he is sent back to the streets on bail.
There he continues his crime spree until his
case is called. Police complain that courts and
lawyers are frustrating their work, and leaving
the community at the mercy of people who
should be behind bars.

“There is a greater likelihood that a per-
son who is already facing a serious charge and
is granted bail on another serious matter, will
go out and commit another act once he or
she is given bail,” Mr Ferguson said.

ASP Clayton Fernander agrees. He said
force profiles show that many of the persons
committing murders in the Bahamas are
young, single, unemployed black men with
prior criminal records involving violence.

Although guns, the instrument used in most
of today’s killings, are illegal, they are in easy
reach of the criminal. Many residents of these
various communities know where guns can
be purchased, who has the unlicensed
weapons and often where they are hidden
when not in use — yet they keep this infor-
mation to themselves. They are silent because
they don’t want to be involved. But the day

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the illegal gun is used against them or a mem-
ber of their household, they will be the first to
criticise the police for not doing enough to
curb crime and getting the guns out of the
hands of the criminal.

The ptesident of the Straw Vendors Asso-
ciation has also urged religious leaders to com-
bat crime by taking the fight “to the streets.”
This certainly would be a help, but the only
way to deal with crime is for the entire com-
munity to finger every criminal in their neigh-
bourhood.

In 1835 Alexis de Tocqueville, whose grand-
father and one of his aunts was guillotined
during the French revolution, published two
volumes of his Democracy in America. He
was fascinated by the first democractic gov-
ernment that was truly energised by the peo-
ple. He compared it to Europe, where the
impetus came from central government at the
top and the people in the main were mere
spectators. Wrote de Tocqueville:

“In America the means available to the
authorities for the discovery of crimes and
arrest of criminals are few.

“There is no administrative police force,
and passports are unknown. The criminal
police in the United States cannot be com-
pared to that of France; the officers of the
public prosecutor’s office are few, and the ini-
tiative in prosecutions is not always theirs and
the examination of prisoners is rapid and oral.
Nevertheless, | doubt whether in any other
country crime so seldom escapes punishment.

“The reason is that everyone thinks he has
an interest in furnishing proofs of an offence
and in arresting the guilty man...

“In Europe the criminal is a luckless man
fighting to save his head from the authorities;
in a sense the population are mere spectators
of the struggle. In America he is an enemy
of the human race and every human being is
against him.”

Here in the Bahamas many of us are not
only spectators of the struggle, but also active-
ly conceal evidence by our silence.

The police can fight crime, religious leaders
and civic groups can assist them, but until all
Bahamians join in the struggle, crime will
grow and the criminal will continue to ter-
rorise silent communities.

The fight against crime is a community fight
and every citizen who conceals evidence is
aiding and abetting the criminal.

Every citizen — not just religious leaders —
has to join the fight if we are ever again to be
safe in our homes and in our neigbourhoods.



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EDITOR, The Tribune

I WAS amused by the lor
awaited “exposé” in Thursda_
Nassau Guardian, when the
“Concerned Citizens of the
Bahamas” group — led by FN’
reject Ricardo Smith — atten
ed to besmirch my name in a dis-
play advertisement paid for, pre-
sumably, by his PLP backers.

Is this the same group whose
demonstrations outside The Tri-
bune were followed by furious
claims by many of the protesters
that they had been tricked into
taking part and had not been
paid, as promised? | imagine so.

The ad is so poorly written

‘that it must be from Mr Fred

Mitchell’s website. However,
stylistic deficiencies aside, its
biggest fault lies with its total
disregard for the truth, and its
grossly libellous statements,
which will be dealt with via a
writ to be served on the
Guardian’s management.

Just to clarify a few points for
anyone insane enough to
believe it, I would like to point
out that:

e I was never kicked out of
the Bahamas. I left of my own
accord in October, 1969, with
six months still to run on m
work permit, because I want:
to go to Fleet Street to purs
my career and my wife wanted
to study at the London School
of Economics. Both ambitions
were realised.

A secondary reason was that
I was growing increasingly dis-
illusioned with the Pindling gov-
ernment and its dictatorial ways.
Very shortly after my depar-
ture, all the best brains in the
PLP walked out to form their
own party, apparently having
reached the same conclusion.

e The editorial in the Nassau
Guardian, published in 1969,
and cited in the ad, was written
by an American journalist
called Jim Cobb, who was vili-
fied as a tailwagger in my annu-
al “Silver Grovel” awards for
sycophantic newsmen. He was
trying desperately to get his own
back, but the piece backfired
because no-one believed it. And
incidentally, | was not working
for the Guardian at the time, |
had moved on to The Tribune.
Although his piece said “po
tears were shed” when I left th
Guardian, he had, in fact, ma
more than one attempt to lu.
me back, and was upset when |
declined. His editorial made me
laugh so much at the time tha
had it enlarged and framed.
had pride of place on my study
wall in England for many years.

e The supposedly inflamma-

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tory story about Cuban revolu-
tionaries which appeared under
my by-line in the Mexico City
News was based on a Straight
report of Senate proceedings,

when the late Reginald
Lobosky expressed disquiet
about the possibility of a direct
flight between Nassau and
Havana because he feared the
Bahamas falling into Castro’s
sphere of influence. At the time,
this was a much bigger issue
than it is today because the Bay
of Pigs invasion and Cuban Mis-
sile Crisis had happened only a
few years before, and the US
was concerned about the impact
of communism in the region.

e The allegation of “abuse of
sources” obviously refers to my
interview with Mr Levi Gibson,
who co-operated fully when I
was writing my book, Blood and
Fire, and certainly did not give
the impression that he was any-
thing other than of sound mind.
This accusation obviously comes
straight from Mr Mitchell him-
self, who I believe is Mr Gib-
son’s godson and has once again
got the facts round his neck. My
interview with Mr Gibson was
arranged via his personal assis-
tant and was completely above
board and accurately recorded.

e Lastly, | am not and never
have been a racist, and there is
nothing in my background to
suggest such a thing. In fact, I
was reared in a household
where such attitudes would nev-
er have been tolerated.

Interestingly, when the PLP
came to power in 1967, I was
accused by the old guard of
being a PLP supporter because
my political leanings have
always been on the side of the
downtrodden and victims of
injustice. Those instincts still
drive my work today. As a
result, many Bahamians come
to me in search of justice when
the politicians and lawyers have
let them down.

Mr Mitchell, however, evi-
dently has his own racial
demons to contend with. And
my criticism of his total failure
as a Cabinet minister leads him
into irrational and spiteful acts.
This ad is evidently one of
them, though I’m told the
“Concerned Citizens of the
Bahamas” group doesn’t actu-
ally exist, except in the mind of
Mr Smith, whose irrational rage
against The Tribune could be
seen as a threat to public order.

THE TRIBUNE |



7
°

Correcting ©
the record

on ‘expose’

Consider this: if I hated the
Bahamas and its peopue, as the
ad claims, why would I have
been here for the last eight
years? Why would I have
invested a total of 12 years of
my professional life in a country
I loathed? As a citizen of the
European Union, I have
umpteen alluring countries to
choose from, many of them in
the Mediterranean sunbelt, the |
cradle of civilisation.

These are options I will prob-_
ably exercise in the not-too-dis-
tant future, but I came here
because I like the Bahamas,’
spent part of my youth here,
and feel there is a real job to
be done in the field of journal-
ism. I also like the many;
Bahamians from every section
of society who give me moral
support every week, and who |
believe I am one of the few hon- |
est voices in a morass of sleaze, |
corruption, dishonesty and '
moral cowardice which threats '
ens to engulf what I regard as a
great little country with incred-
ible potential.

For me, the potential of the ,
Bahamas is blighted by the low '
quality of its politicians, the cor- '
rupt state of much of its legal sys- '
tem, and the conseque. :t lack of
accountability which threatens ,
to undermine society here. As :
Judge John Lyons so rightly said, '
he (and I, incidentally) has some- ;
where else to go. We can both
catch jets out of here tomorrow
morning. Most ordinary Bahami-
ans don’t have that option.

However, with the likes of’.
Fred Mitchell and Ricardo.
Smith so hostile towards me, it |
is clear that I am very much on’.
the right track, and the good:
work will continue right through '
the election campaign and,
beyond. Look out for mores
exciting disclosures in the com-'
ing weeks. :

As I told Britain’s Press»
Gazette last week, when they’
were reporting the protest out- °
side The Tribune, earning the.
dislike of politicians like,
Mitchell is not a minus, it’s a»
plus. Any journalist approved :
of by such people is not doing }
his job. All newspaper people ,
should be galvanised and:
encouraged by his abuse. :

Meanwhile, decent Bahamir- ;
ans need to ponder whether ;
crude and grossly mendacious }
attempts at character assassina; *
tion ought really to be part of‘
their democratic process. I think ;

not. ’
JOHN MARQUIS :
Nassau re
April 5, 2007 rs

MARINE NAVIGATION
COURSE

In a nation of islands it is essential to be
able to navigate over the horizon with
confidence. Prepare for safe voyaging by
enrolling in the Terrestrial Navigation
Course offered by The Bahamas School
of Marine Navigation. Plan to attend the
free first class on Monday, April 16, at

7. Pame “at

BASRA Headquarters on

East Bay Street. Details: 364-2861 or
(242) 535-6234

We the family of

Franklin

“Frankie”

Knowles

would like to thank you for the personal and

corporate supports given towar
recent cook-out held on March

expenses an

his medical

10th, 2007. We are truly grateful to you all and
ask that you continue to remember him in your

prayers.

The Family


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 5

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Calvin Lockhart, Bahamian-born
actor, is laid to rest in Nassau

BAHAMIAN-BORN Hol- However, he was best
lywood actor Calvin Lockhart = known for his roles in the
was laid to rest in Nassau on American movies “Cotton
Saturday. Comes to Harlem” and “Let’s

Mr Lockhart, whose birth Do it Again” — in which he
name was Bert Cooper, died — played the character of Big-
on March 29 aged 73 from _— gie Smalls.
complications of a stroke. After becoming a fixture in

One of three Bahamian _ the so-called “blackxploita-
actors to achieve internation- tion” movies of the 1970s, Mr



al acclaim, Mr Lockhart at the
age 18 moved from the
Bahamas to New York City

Lockhart returned to the
Bahamas in the late 1990s,
where he worked as a director

where he spent one year at on productions by the

the Cooper Union School of | Freeport Players Guild up

Engineering before leaving to — until his death.

pursue an acting career. His last film role was in
Mr Lockhart starred in) Rain, a movie shot in the

many British television and — Bahamas that has not yet been

stage productions. released,

B@ CALVIN LOCKHART

TATA [RED BATH & HOME

TUESDAY,
APRIL 10TH

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1:00 Legends: Maureen Duvalier ©

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2:30 Turing Point

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3:30 Emest Leonard

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5:05 Andiamo

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6:15 Seven Seas Informcial

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7:00 The Dahamas Tonight

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





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Antigua WTO victory
over US points way
for small nations |

1G SMALL countries
intend to participate
meaningfully in the global trad-
ing system, they have to be pre-
pared to face the cost of arbi-
trating disputes at the World
Trade Organisation (WTO) and
to be creative in the ways in
which these costs are met,
including through public-private
partnerships.

There has been a tendency to
characterise the WTO dispute
settlement machinery as weight-
ed against small countries.
Indeed, the WTO has been
equated with the World Bank
and IMF as the three pillars of
globalisation that disadvantage
small countries.

Yet, the WTO, unlike the
IMF and World Bank, is a truly
universal organisation in which
each member state has a single
and equal vote. And, while its
negotiating procedures have
been dominated by the indus-
trialised nations and, more
recently, the large developing
countries, small developing
countries have failed to be
aggressive enough in champi-
oning their own rights by forg-
ing alliances with one another.

Small developing countries
also make a mistake in not par-

\ticipating more fully in the work

of the WTO on a daily basis at a
high level. For, it trade in goods
and services is the means by
which they have to live, partici-
pation in making international
trade rules and overseeing how
they are implemented is vitally
important to them.

There is evidence that small
countries can succeed in the
WTO even on their own if they
are determined enough.

Ave and Barbuda,
a small Caribbean

island, created history when, in
March 2003, it won a landmark
case against the United States at
the WTO.

Since then, two more WTO
panels have found for Antigua
and Barbuda at appeals; the last

panel formally reported its find-
ings against the US at the end of
March.

The issue, simply put, was:
Did the government of the
United States violate its com-
mitment under the General
Agreement in Trade in Services
by prohibiting through regula-
tion and legislation the deliv-
ery of gaming services from
Antigua and Barbuda via the



There is
evidence that
small countries
can succeed in
the WTO even
on their own
if they are
determined
enough.



Internet?

Each of the panels found that
the US had violated its com-
mitment and dismissed a US
argument that it prohibited all
internet gaming via the inter-
net — including domestic bet-
ting — and, therefore, was not
discriminating against Antigua
and Barbuda.

I declare a particular interest
and, therefore, a bias in this
matter since I was Antigua and
Barbuda’s Ambassador to the
WTO when this case was first
brought and won.

At stake were not only vital
revenues to the government,
but also the jobs of many peo-
ple employed directly by the
industry or indirectly through
the goods and services pur-
chased locally by the Internet
gaming companies.

| wo successive Antigua
and Barbuda govern-

NOTICE

| WE HAVE MOVED

LIFE CHIROPRACTIC
CENTRE

has moved to the REAR
of our former office

#7B Village Road

Phone: 393-2774
Fax: 394-3067



is

id monthly,
ry credit ca



ments — from opposing politi-
cal parties — held the view that
the case had to be pursued
because of the duty of care to
their citizens.

The decision on whether to
proceed hung more on the cost
of the WTO procedure than it
did on the fact that little
Antigua and Barbuda would be
confronting the mighty US.
While the latter point was a fac-
tor for deep consideration
because of fears of punishment,
it was outweighed by the neces-
sity to stand up for the coun-
try’s rights.

The cost of the case was pro-
hibitive. It was estimated then
that it would cost in excess of
US$1 million. With the appeals
process, the cost has undoubt-
edly been higher.

If the Antigua and Barbuda
government had to pay the legal
costs, it could not do it, and
would not have done it. Priori-
ties would have demanded that
the money be spent on roads,
health, education and wages
and salaries.

In the end, a public-private



The US
government also

‘has to consider

that it is the’
greatest user of
the WTO dispute
procedure; it

is not in its
interest to under-
mine a process
from which it
has benefited and
which maintains
order in interna-
tional trade. |



partnership was forged in which
the government provided the
diplomatic and_ political
resources and many of the com-
panies in the industry paid the
legal firms directly to conduct
the legal research (hundreds of
documents) and prepare the
legal arguments. The industry
recognised that they had as
much to lose or gain as the
country itself.

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@ SIR Ronald Sanders

E has been said that
Antigua and Barbuda’s
victory is ineffective because
the remedies provided by the
WTO are inadequate. For
example, imposition of retalia-
tory tariffs by Antigua and Bar-
buda on exports from the Unit-
ed States will not have sufficient
impact to induce US compli-
ance and will also negatively
impact the cost of US goods
needed by the Antigua and Bar-
buda community.

There is, of course, some

_,,truth in that, and it points to
_ urgency for joint action by all
“small developing countries to

advocate change in the penalties
that an offending country would
be required to pay.

B ut, if the US govern-
ment refuses to start
talking seriously with the
Antigua and Barbuda authori-
ties about how a form of com-
pliance could be achieved in a
manner that is acceptable to
both parties, then the Antigua
and Barbuda may have no
choice but to apply the tariffs
which the WTO Panel sets, and
get their imports elsewhere —
Canada, for instance.

Such a situation may not
harm the US financially, but it
would most certainly hurt its
moral standing as a global
leader and as democratic nation
committed to upholding rights.

The US government also has
to consider that it is the greatest
user of the WTO dispute pro-
cedure; it is not in its interest
to undermine a process from
which it has benefited and
which maintains order in inter-
national trade. The conse-
quence would be to encourage
other countries to ignore WTO
rulings and to unravel the whole
tapestry of international trade
rules,

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

INSURANCE

IN NASSAU CALL

393-5529

IN FREEPORT CALL

350-7827

IN ABACO CALL
ABACO INSURANCE AGENCY

367-5285





AA
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e

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i ry

%
%
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yo
en

men | ia
Ugst
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sve
One

.
AY tt
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 7



i : ee ee OO ee ae’
Police seize huge marijuana haul

\
NS
SS

H DEU officers offloading drugs from a boat which underwent a





routine check as it entered Nassau harbour last Thursday
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

-Nottage: we will keep
on with NHI scheme

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Despite the
results of a private survey con-
ducted on National Health
Insurance, Health Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage said the gov-
ernment “will not be deterred”
in its effort to implement the
NHI scheme.

The survey, which was car-
ried out by the Segal Company
on behalf of the National Coali-
tion of Healthcare Reform,
reported that only 21 per cent of
Bahamian employers felt that
government’s proposed NHI
scheme is the best option for
improving the quality of health-
care in the Bahamas.

Despite this, Dr Nottage said
the government is moving
ahead with the scheme — which
could be ready for implemen-
tation by the end of the year.

While attending the opening
of World Health Month on
Grand Bahama, Dr Nottage told
The Tribune that despite the
results of the surveys “the truth
of the matter is that a vast major-
ity of the Bahamian people
understand the need for NHI.”

“They are bombarding us
with the question of when it will
begin, and the answer to that
question is when we have every-
thing right, and we feel all of
the various issues have been
adequately dealt with. Not until
then, because we want it to suc-
ceed and we don’t want it to fail
because we were not sufficient-
ly thorough,” he said.

“When we talk about NHI
we are trying to create a system
that will ensure that Bahami-
ans receive the care they need
when they it, whether you have
the money, or not.

The National Coalition for
Healthcare Reform, which
includes among its membership
employer associations, unions
and private sector groups,

claims the government is “rush-.

ing” the plan without proper
consultation.

The group said their survey
“shows that the NHI plan,
based on the information we
have on hand at this time, is not
giving anyone a comfort level.”

Dr Nottage, however, ques-
tioned the instrument used in
the survey.

“IT saw a report of a study
which was done by the Nation-
al Coalition of Healthcare
Reform, which is against the
implementation of NHI. What I
‘didn’t see was the instrument
' that they used, because you can
do studies and research, but the
research has to be authentic,”
he said.

“But, if we haven’t seen the
instrument we don’t know how
the questions were asked, nei-
ther do we know all the ques-
tions that were asked. For
example, I think | am informed
that one Of the questions asked
had to do with whether or not
businesses would downsize if
we introduced NHI. And they
didn’t provide for us in the

newspaper article that I saw the
answers to that question, which
I think would be a very inter-
esting one. | wonder why they
didn’t provide that answer.”

Dr Stanley Lalta, project
manger for NHI, said that
employers would be in a better
position to judge the plan after
certain details had been fine
tuned by consultants hired by
the government to assist in the
plan’s development.

Dr Nottage stated that while
it has always been his objective
to have NHI ready for imple-
mentation by the end of the
year, a number of studies and
consultations are ongoing.

The minister said they are
looking at the micro economic
impact of how businesses will
respond and be affected.

He said they are also looking
at what range of benefits the
government can afford to pay
for, having regard to the con-
tribution they are asking peo-
ple to make.

“These are the nuts and bolts
that have to be tied, and of
course once we have defined all
of these things, making sure reg-
ulations which have to be in
place are in place, there is also
some legislation that pre-dated
the NHI legislation that would
have be amended so that all
various entitlements under the
laws of the Bahamas are dealt
with. We are very busy work-
ing on those issues.”

Dr Nottage said that no matter
who wins the election on May 2,
the mechanisms will be in place
for the scheme to be introduced.

“I believe that the party in
government will continue to be
the government, but even it
doesn’t, the FNM has said it will
support NHI.”



desktops & workstations





@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A SPEED boat containing an
estimated 25 to 30 bales of mar-
ijuana and two men were taken
into police custody last week.

The 30-foot white Intrepid
boat was stopped and searched
by officers from the marine unit
of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force — who said the occupants
were acting suspiciously — at
around 8.45am off the coast of
Western New Providence,
around Clifton Pier.

Bales of marijuana, packaged
in tape, plastic, and foil, and
hidden in sacks, were subse-
quently discovered hidden in all
available cavities in the boat's
hull and console unit.

Assistant Superintendent
Prince Charleton said that the
street value of the haul had not
yet been determined as the
drugs had not been weighed.

One of the two men taken
into custody in connection with
the incident was known to the
authorities, he said.

Asst Supt Charleton said it
was not unusual for authorities
to apprehend suspected drug
runners in the morning, or in
broad daylight.

“It varies. Sometimes we
catch them in the morning,
sometimes in the late evening.
We do a routine patrol, we stag-
ger it — morning, evening or
afternoon,” he said.

It is thought that the vessel
was returning to Nassau from
one of the out islands. Asst Supt
Charleton said it was possible





Speedboat stopped for routine check

it may have been Andros.

Authorities discovered the
largest ever ficld of marijua-
na in the history of the
Bahamas

”

on that island on

Wednesday afternoon.

Once taken to the Police Har-
bour Patrol section in Nassau
Harbour at around 10am, the
bales were offloaded and docu-

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

pri’s Graycliff bill



Debra Opri at Nassau’s exclu-
sive Graycliff Restaurant was
“chickenfeed” for owner Enrico
Garzaroli.

® By TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

THE controversial $2,500
dinner bill run up by lawyer

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From The Management Of

LOPS4

It paled into insignificance
alongside the Graycliff record
- a $185,000 bunfight hosted by
an American businessman who
had just sold out to a major cor-
poration.

“A meal for $2,500 is no big
deal at this restaurant,” Mr
Garzaroli told The Tribune last
week. “If you’re buying wine at
$200 or $300 a bottle, it doesn’t
take long to reach $2,500.”

Ms Opri, the Los Angeles
attorney hired by Anna Nicole
Smith’s ex-boyfriend Larry
Birkhead to help him fight his
paternity action, submitted a
legal bill of more than $620,000
to Mr Birkhead last weekend.

This came two weeks after he
had dispensed with her services
amid reports that there had
been differences of opinion over
her approach to the case.

The bill included a charge of
well over $3,000 for two meals,
one of them running close to
$2,500. Insiders claimed a party
of about nine, mostly lawyers,
were at one Graycliff dinner.

Although Mr Birkhead even-
tually got the bill, via Ms Opri,
for both dinners, he was not
there to enjoy the food. “They
didn’t even take him a doggy-
bag,” said one wit when the
feasts were discussed on Amer-
ican television this week.

For Mr Garzaroli, however,
bills for several thousand dol-
lars are not unusual. With prob-
ably the best wine cellar in the
Caribbean region, he expects to
charge big money to discerning

oesn’t break bank

customers.

The American businessman
celebrating a takeover by a
major group held: several par-
ties at Graycliff in one week,
running up a total bill of half a
million dollars in the process.

The $185,000 binge was the
most expensive of the lot, with
French vintage wines at
between $6,000 and $50,000 per

bottle going down the guests’ -

gullets like Pepsi Cola.

It’s not unusual for Graycliff

customers to leave $500 tips
when they’ve enjoyed a night
carousing at the world-famous
eatery.

Gambler

A few years back, a high-
roller at the Atlantis casino lost
$1.5 million in one night and
was offered a meal with friends
at Graycliff as a consolation gift
from the hotel’s management.

Together, the gambler and
his pals ran up a $96,000 bill,
quaffing liberal amounts of vin-
tage wine as they wolfed down
lobster and other Graycliff spe-
cialities.

Ms Opri is not the only per-
sonality in the Anna Nicole saga
to enjoy the restaurant’s noted
hospitality.

Crews from CNN, CBS, Fox
News and other American TV
channels have been chomping
on Mr Garzaroli’s fine fare in
recent weeks — all on expense
accounts, of course.

@ ENRICO Garzaroli

“So the Anna Nicole story
has been quite good to you
then, Mr Garzaroli,” The Tri-
bune suggested during an inter-
view yesterday.

“Not too bad,” the Italian
proprietor chortled. “I have no
complaints.”

After 33 years as Graycliff’s
owner, he said things just get
better and better, like vintage
wine. But he’s still waiting for a

THE TRIBUNE



customer to come along and
buy the best bottle he has.

That’s a 300-year-old beauty
for sale at a cool $200,000.
“Mmmmm, maybe I wouldn’t
sell it at all,” he said, “Maybe I
would just keep it... unless, of
course, you would like to book
a table.”

“Perhaps not,” I said, “not
unless Larry Birkhead’s pay-

ing.

Birkhead: Who’s Your Daddy?

LARRY Birkhead was in
gung-ho mood yesterday on the
eve of the long-awaited court
hearing which will, it is hoped,
reveal DNA test results on

eee

> Thank You

as
ce

Anna Nicole Smith’s baby Dan-
nielynn.

In fact, he marked the occa-
sion by buying a “Who’s Your
Daddy?” tee-shirt from Island
Shop on Bay Street.

Island Merchants boss Gre-
gory Lee said: “The staff were
amazed when he came in and
bought the tee-shirt. He shout-
ed ‘I’m the daddy’ and then left.
They were quite excited about
it:

Birkhead spent Easter in
Nassau in preparation for the
court hearing which, observers
believe, could end the long
debate over Dannielynn’s pater-
nity.

Birkhead, 32, a Los Angeles
photographer, has been pursu-
ing his claim to the baby for the
last six months, long before
Anna Nicole died in Florida on
February 8.

He claims the child was con- '



WN
head



@ LARRY Birk

ceived in January, 2006, when
he and the former reality show
starlet were setting up home in
Studio City, California.
Howard K Stern, Anna

Nicole’s lawyer-companion, has
also claimed to be the father
and is named on Dannielynn’s
birth certificate.

A DNA test was conducted
in the US last month and results
were kept in a sealed file. Stern
subsequently appealed against
disclosure of the results, but
then withdraw his objection.

Whatever the results show,
the custody and guardianship
issues are expected to continue
before the courts.

Anna Nicole’s mother, Vir-
gie Arthur, is also in Nassau to
pursue custody. But Stern’s sis-
ter Bonnie told American TV:
“She will never get custody -
over our dead bodies.”

Dannielynn could inherit
$475 million from the estate of
Anna Nicole’s late husband, oil
tycoon Howard Marshall. This
matter is still before the US
courts.



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 9

| LOCAL NEWS



@ MEMBERS of the Cable Beach police force learn more about environmental stewardelip
from members of the Coastal Awareness Committee. The outreach programme is part of the com-
mittee’s efforts during April which is Coastal Awareness Month in the Bahamas,

Coastal Awareness Committee
‘meets with police to discuss
environmental stewardship

SEVERAL members of
the Coastal Awareness
Committee of the Bahamas
met with more than 30
police officers stationed at
Cable Beach to discuss the
role of the force in envi-
ronmental stewardship.

The committee is a group
of stakeholders from the
private and public sectors
with an interest in promot-
ing the sustainable devel-
opment of the Bahamas.

Edison Deleveaux of the
Department: of Marine
Resources; Charlene Carey
of BREEF and Eleanor
Phillips of the Nature Con-
servancy, all members of
the committee, discussed
the five main threats to the
coastal environment.

They encouraged the
officers to assist in the
campaign against those
who are abusing the dump-
ing, littering and toxic
waste disposal laws of the
Bahamas.

“Their efforts would
prove to be an important
step in helping to fight the
scourge of the vexing prob-
lem of pollution,” said Mr
Deleveaux, who is the
deputy director of the
Department of Marine
Resources and a reserve
assistant superintendent of
police.

“The officers were very
interested in supporting
Coastal Awareness. The
public may not be aware
that we do have laws about
littering in the Bahamas
because of insufficient pub-
lic education and enforce-
ment efforts by all con-
cerned agencies, including
the police.”

He noted that Bahamians
can familiarise themselves
with local laws governing
dumping by going to
http://laws.bahamas.gov.bs.

“Tt is going to take all of
us — law enforcement, the
public, the business sector
and the government - to
end pollution in our coun-
try.”

April has been officially
proclaimed Coastal Aware-
ness Month in the Bahamas
and the committee has sev-
eral activities planned that
the public are invited to
attend.

D eta

pete i Mea

Officers encouraged
to assist in campaign

There are five main
threats that affect coast-
lines: pollution, invasive
species, climate change,
overfishing and nate
destruction.

The committee will focus
on pollution as a theme for
this year’s campaign, one
of the biggest problems to
threaten Bahamian coasts.

“We all know that trash
is having a negative affect
on our country impacting
our social and economic
well-being,” said Earlston
McPhee director of sus-
tainable development for
the Ministry of Tourism
and chairman of the
Coastal Awareness Com-
mittee. “The exit surveys
handed in by our tourists
indicate that trash is one
of their biggest complaints
when visiting our country.
Our goal is to educate the
public and to offer real
solutions to people that
collectively will help us as
a developing country and
as a tourist destination.”

The events for Coastal
Awareness Month will
include:

¢ National T-Shirt Day -
Friday, April 19

¢ Beach clean-up, South
Beach — April 21 from 8am
to 12pm

e Harbour clean-up —
Saturday, April 28 from
8am to 2pm

e Educational marine
exhibition, Marathon Mall
- Monday, April 23
through Friday, April 27

e National school science
competition — Thursday,
April 26, Marathon Mall

e Field trips to Dolphin
Encounters, Blue Lagoon
Island and Dive Stuart
Cove

¢ National Church Ser-
vice on Sunday, Sacred
Spaces at Clifton Pivr
April 29 at Llam.

As this is a national ini-
tiative beach clean-ups and
other Coastal Awareness

Ron Kenoly i
Featured Artist
&Speaker

yh



activities are planned
for the islands of
Abaco, Andros, Bimini,

Eleuthera, Exuma and San
Salvador.

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THE TRIBUNE





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INFORMATION
SERVICES

CHURCH leaders repre-
senting various denominations
throughout New Providence
were asked to develop better
working relationships with
police divisional commanders
to help stamp out the scourge
of crime in their neighbour-
hoods in particular and the
Bahamas in general.

The challenge came last week
during a one-day symposium on
crime hosted by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force at Police
Headquarters on East Street.

The symposium was designed
to bring the religious leaders

‘up to date on police efforts to

reduce the level of crime ~ par-
ticularly violent crime, such as
murder, rape and armed rob-
bery. |

It was also designed to give
the clergy, especially those who
have churches in the areas
hardest hit by crime, a “first-
hand view” of the role of law
enforcement officials in polic-
ing the streets.

The session was also used to
provide church leaders with
some suggestions on the roles
they can play in their respec-
tive communities to help reduce
the level of crime.

Senior Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson, who served as assistant
commissioner in charge of
crime before his recent promo-
tion, told the religious leaders:

“We must work collectively
to stem the tide of crime in our
country. The Bahamas is one
of the most beautiful places in
the world, but if we don’t work
together to stem the tide of
crime in our country, then it
won't matter how beautiful our
country is. We must seize the
opportunity to keep our coun-
try as tranquil as God will let
us.”

Mr Ferguson said the force
has developed a number of ini-
tiatives designed to deal with
the crime before it gets out of
control. He promised the reli-
gious leaders that the RBPF
has been, and will continue to
be, proactive in that regard.

He said one of the challenges
currently facing the police is
that persons charged with vio-
lent crimes are continually
being granted bail.

“There is a greater likelihood
that a person who is already



LOCAL NEWS

“Church leaders asked
to help stamp

out crime







@ THE Royal Bahamas Police Force hosted religious leaders
from New Providence to a one-day symposium on crime at
Police Headquarters, East Street on Tuesday. From left are John
Rolle, deputy commissioner of Police; Rey Dr William Thomp-
son, president, Bahamas Christian Council; Police Commis-
sioner Paul Farquharson; Bishop John Humes.

facing a serious charge and is
granted bail on another serious
matter, will go out and commit
another act once he or she is
given bail,” Mr Ferguson said.

His view was echoed by
Assistant Superintendent of
Police Clayton Fernander, who
serves as officer-in-charge of
the homicide division of the
Central Detective Unit.

ASP Fernander, whose unit
has had to investigate 23 homi-
cides since the beginning of the
year, said force profiles show
that many of the persons com-
mitting murders in the
Bahamas are young, single,
unemployed black men with
prior criminal records involv-
ing violence.

He said further research
shows that a number of the vic-
tims of these homicides share
a similar profile.

ASP Fernander encouraged
the religious leaders to help the
state through the development
of more comprehensive pro-
grammes that could involve
such young men — who may feel
that they are being margin-
alised.

“The church has been doing
a great job in the past in assist-
ing with the social ills that
impact our country but it has
to step in and help the state
develop the kind of pro-
grammes that will help us guide
our young men in the right

(BIS photo: Patrick Hanna)

direction,” ASP Fernander
said.

Bishop Delton Fernander,
senior pastor of New Destiny
Baptist Church and a member
of the Police Reserves, said the
symposium gave religious lead-
ers an opportunity to “see how
our responsibilities are more
than just sitting in our pulpits.”

“As a reservist, I serve this
country at a different level than
most pastors and so what was
talked about here, I have a dif-
ferent perspective because I am
the person on the front-line,
who is wearing the bullet proof
vest and who has to go into
these places,” Bishop Fernan-
der said.

“T think today’s session pro-
vided more of the pastors with
a front-line view of what mem-
bers of this force have to go
through on a daily basis in the
fight against crime,” he added.

Bishop Fernander said the
information provided at the
symposium will be crucial to
the development of the future
plans and programmes of
churches throughout the island.

“Tt is my belief that if we can
continue this type of partner-
ship whereby the Police Force
can inform us of the problems
that exist in our districts, then
we as a church can develop the
programmes necessary to help
solve some of those problems,”
Bishop Fernander said.

NASSAU REPAIR SHOP

WRECK-A-MEN

So
BF 393 - 3710

The Bahamas Environment, Science
and Technology Commission

The Montreal Protocol Act, 2006, requires all Refrigeration and
Air-conditioning technicians to possess
A NATIONAL CERTIFICATION CARD.

To facilitate this process,

THE MINISTRY OF UTILITIES & THE ENVIRONMENT

advises that

The Representatives Of The National Ozone Unit
will be on the islands of Abaco, Eleuthera, Exuma and Grand Bahama on the

George Town, Exuma
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Govenor’s Harbour, Eleuthera
Freeport, Grand Bahama

following dates and times:

April 11th, 2007
April 25th, 2007
April 26th, 2007
April 27th, 2007

9:00-5:00p.m.
9:00-5:00p.m.
9:00-5:00p.m.
9:00-5:00p.m.

at the Department of Environmental Health Services Office, to register
ALL REFRIGERATION AND AIR-CONDITIONING TECHNICIANS.
Technicians are required to bring along the following:

. Drivers license;

I
2. National Insurance card:
3

. Passport ot valid voter’s card and

4. Certification documents.

For more information, please contact the National Ozone Unit, Best Commission
in Nassau at 322-4546; 356-3067 and 322-2576.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 11



Grand Isle Resort and
Spa takes top honours

GRAND Isle Resort and
Spa has been rated number
one among nine hotels and
resorts in Exuma by visitors
who reported their experi-
ence in glowing terms on the
popular website TripAdvi-
sor.com.

“We were notified by a
guest that they had posted a
glowing review, and we went
to TripAdvisor.com and
were thrilled,” said Pamela
McCullough, senior vice-
president of Grand
Caribbean Resorts Inc.,
which manages the upscale
condotel resort in Emerald

Bay, Great Exuma.

“There was one report
after another praising the
property, the service and the
beauty of our beach. The
overall ranking at the top of
the page said first of nine
hotels in Exuma. We are so
pleased with the placement
and so proud of our staff.”

Reports posted as recently
as March 24 painted a pic-
ture of the hilltop luxury
resort as “unforgettable,”
“friendly,” “outstanding,”

and even “our favourite
vacation destination.”
Three out of four reviews

gave ita perfect 5.0 rating
in all categories, the highest
a property can achieve. The
single lowest rating was a
4.5,

Grand Isle Resort and
Spa, formerly known as
Grand Isle Villas, is a pri-
vate community of 78 luxu-
riously-appointed villas at
the highest point of Emer-
ald Bay, a short walk from
the Four Seasons and the 18-

- hole Greg Norman-designed

championship golf course.

B POOLSIDE at Grand
Isle Resort and Spa

afternoon. managers at Old Bahama Bay by
Ginn sur Mer in Grand Bahama put aside e-
mails and cell phones and head to the small
public school in the nearby West End commu-
nity.

Bright-eyed students from kindergarten to
grade six eagerly await their arrival, with the
younger ones gathering on floor mats. Since
early March, Old Bahama Bay instituted a
reading programme at the school with resort
staff members participating as readers on a
rotational basis.

Commenting on the success of the pro-
gramme thus far, Donald Glass, vice president
of human resources at Old Bahama Bay, said:





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“The response was both encouraging and moti-
vating. In some cases, the students wanted the
reading to continue past the designated pert-
od.”

School principal Cardinal Woods and his
teaching staff expressed gratitude for the
involvement of Old Bahama Bay in yet anoth-
er aspect of the school’s affairs.

Most recently, Old Bahama Bay assisted
with the school’s spelling bee and donated an
$80,000 air-conditioning system to the school
last December.

In the photo, resort vice president and gen-
eral manager Bob Van Bergen reads to a cap-
tive audience of grade one students during a
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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, APRIL+10, 2007

FNM supporter is arrested

Woman due to be witness
in murder trial found dead

POLICE are probing the mysterious death of
a woman who was due to be a witness in a mur-
der trial.

Sharon Pratt, 48, was found dead at her home
in Village Alley, off Blue Hill Road, last Thurs-
day.

Neighbours who had. not seen her for two
days found her decomposing body when they
entered her home to investigate.

‘Sources claim there were injuries to her legs.
It is not known whether there were other
wounds.

Ms Pratt, a single childless woman who
worked as a domestic help, was due to give
evidence in the Hosea Lightbourn murder
trial.

He was shot dead in Rupert Dean Lane, Bain

Town, last September in what was described
at the time as a “reprisal” killing.

Mr Lightbourn is alleged to have taken out a
contract on another man.

A resident of Big Pond is apparently being
sought for questioning in connection with Ms
Pratt’s death.

Yesterday, neighbours in Black Village
expressed sorrow over her death.

“She was a nice girl,” said one, “She lived
alone and was usually out and about i in Black
Village. Persons are very tight-lipped and it is
being whispered that she was murdered.”

The source added: “There is a sombre, quiet
mood here.”

Police were unavailable for comment last
night.

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INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE
CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET,

OR CALL 242-502-6221
REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.

* WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO

FNM campaigners were furious last night after
a supporter was arrested by police at Fort Fin-
castle.

Francis Milfort, said to be in his thirties, was in
his car - which was flying FNM flags - when he
was grabbed by officers and taken away, party
workers claimed.

“We are not aware that he did anything
wrong,” said one source, “He was dragged off

THE TRIBUNE.’

Â¥

See

and taken to Central Police Station. came
“We had a party for our people on the hill and.*.
as he drove up, the officers took him out of nes
car.” *
Lawyer Michael Barnett, the party’s candidgbet’e!
for Fort Charlotte, was last night trying to neggeys e
tiate Mr Milfort’s release. @ oy
Police said he was arrested for allegedly usin i
obscene language. J

ste

Judiciary independence issue;

FROM page one

under the judge's remuneration
and pension's act."

Freeport based lawyer, human
rights activist and founder of the
Save the Guana Cay foundation
Fred Smith told The Tribune yes-
terday that he plans to use a April
25 date at the court — ostensibly
seeking an injunction application
to restrain the development on
Guana Cay while the group's
appeal is being conducted — to
ask the court to consider whether
the foundation had a fair trial to
begin with, given Justice Lyons'
judgment.

"Although the Attorney Gen- ~

eral (Allyson Maynard-Gibson)
for her own expedient political
purposes may have withdrawn
that appeal, it doesn't avoid the
fact that the issue is still alive
before the courts, and indeed in
the Save Guana Cay matter we
have obtained leave to appeal
from Justice (Norris) Carroll, to
ask the courts to determine that
very point," said Mr Smith.

If it is determined by that court
that the judiciary was not inde-
pendent at the time that Justice
Carroll first heard their case, the
group, and many others, would
be entitled to a retrial, having had

their constitutional right to a trial
before an impartial judge
breached.
Hundreds of judgments may

be called into question, he said.

Mr Smith said that in the case
of Justice Carroll, in particular,
the group will further be making
the case that the "the opportuni-
ty for political interference,
although it may not have
occurred, remained a live one"
as he is an acting judge.

For this reason, he did not have

.the "security of tenure" neces-

sary for assured independence
"because he could be removed at
the will of the executive at any
time."

Mr Smith likened appointing
acting judges to "putting the
judge on probation."

"As long as you behave, as
long as you don't disrupt the sys-
tem too much, we might eventu-
ally confirm you in the appoint-
ment," he said, adding that the
PLP are "particularly fond" of
appointing judges in this way.

He said that although other
countries appoint acting judges, it
is usually only for very short peri-
ods of time and not at the "high-
est" levels.

Mr Smith added that Freeport
in particular was plagued with a
"dysfunctional" judicial system,

tate!

overseen by only two judges, both

of whom are merely "acting" =. _

Justices Peter Maynard and Nor-
ris Carroll.

"That is an unacceptable situ-
ation for the northern region,
which is supposed to have, by the
amendment to the Supreme
Court Act...the senior Justice sit-
ting in Freeport at all times," he
said.

Mr Smith said he and the Save
the Guana Cay Foundation are
ready to take their case to the
Privy Council if necessary.

In November, Justice Lyons —

said that the government had

shown a "manifest disregard for.
the rule of law" by failing».
tri-annual”.,

to appoint a
commission to review judges’
salaries.

The review schedule, mandated .*
by law, is designed specifically to. -

protect against the undermining. ° ;
of the independence of the judi-:’ »

ciary.

Lyons claimed that the govern-
ment had "deliberately" ignored
a law designed to protect the con-
stitutional independence of
judges. :

The Attorney General
appealed his ruling, but subse-
quently withdrew that appeal at
the end of March.

In his landmark ruling, Justice .

FROM page one

combe, who is contesting the Golden Gates seat
as an independent, said gay election candidates
should declare their sexuality before seeking the
votes of the public.

Mr Duncombe said voters had a right to know
where candidates stood on family issues.

And sexuality, he said, often affected an MP’s
stance on such matters.

The child rights advocate said since gay sex was
legalised in the Bahamas 16 years ago, there had
been a “proliferation” of homosexuals and les-
bians.

He said voters had a right to know a candi-

“Sdate’s proclivities because they so often influ-

a: the way they viewed important Borla and

estic issues. s

“If they are bold enough and believe it, then
why hide it?” Mr Duncombe asked.

He criticised both Prime Minister Perry

“Christie and Opposition leader Hubert Ingra-

ham for not taking a position on this important
question publicly.

“T have no problems with people who are gay,
but I have a great problem with those who hide it

FROM page one

eR a SO et

Gay rights
eroup hits out

and pretend they are something else,” he said.
However, Ms Greene told The Tribune: “If Mr
Duncombe's statements are born out of a desire
to promote a culture of honesty, integrity and
accountability and/or to promote a culture that
views the family and the right to create family as
sacred, then the Rainbow Alliance of the
Bahamas supports him and all those that believe
that honesty, integrity and accountability are the

‘cornerstone ‘of nation-building. Otherwise we

would, advise:‘Mr: Duncombe not to play poli-
tricks with people's lives.”

Ms Greene said that no credible institutions
or individuals in the Bahamas are in the prac-
tice of “outing” homosexuals.

“Not the Christian church, not the Bahamian
government nor any political parties, and cer-
tainly not the Rainbow Alliance of the Bahamas,”
Ms Greene said.

~.@
sree

resulted from his possible revoli-3<*
from the party, and to display*» f

LUMBER ~

on Wilton Street is

NOW

Christie and will work to see
him return as Prime Minister,"
he said.

Mr Smith's possible opposi-
tion to the PLP, as an indepen-
dent, frightened many senior
members of the party, as he had
been a representative from
Exuma for nearly 30 years.

A three-way race with Mr
Smith, the FNM candidate
Joshua Sears and the PLP
incumbent, Anthony Moss,
could have split the PLP vote,
allowing Mr Sears a clearer path
to victory, in a seat that is
expected to be competitive.

Mr Smith initially lobbied
the government for the Exuma
seat to be divided in two so that
he could run along with Mr
Moss under the PLP banner.

George Smith

Seasons Resort, was given by
Mr Smith as a justification for
the extra seat. Mr Smith argued
that one representative would
have difficulty maintaining the
“quality contact" Exumians
expected and deserved.

The government did not
accept this argument and Exu-
ma was left as a single seat,
resulting in Mr Smith publicly
threatening to still run.

The announcement that Mr
Smith will not oppose the PLP
in Exuma comes on the heels
of reports in The Punch that Mr
Smith was at odds with Prime
Minister Christie, suggesting
that his job as chairman of the
Hotel Corporation was under
threat if he did run against the

his full support of Mr Christies *f

Mr Smith said: se

-

“I know personally that theses

Rt Hon Perry G Christie is
caring man with the qualities

a good prime minister. His best, $
years are ahead of him, and thos: ‘

nation should give him supreS
port.’

The former MP, in his

tes

remarks, also made suggestions; +;
to the government for improve".

ments that are urgently need-
ed within The Exumas.

Some of these include:
upgrades to Exuma Interna-
tional Airport; refurbishment
of existing school buildings and
the provision of highly-trained
teachers; and, a docking facility
and transshipment centre at

Pudding Point to facilitate the...

economic growth of this>.-
area and the southern Exuma ,«!.
cays.

PLP.
In an apparent attempt to
heal the rift that may have

PLP prediction Gunman
FROM page one FROM page one

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, FNM chair- Chief Supt Miller said police are unaware, ’
man Desmond Bannister said that his party’s polls of a motive in the incident. ney
are painting an entirely different picture than that of The three victims are in serious condition, ,2
the PLP’s campaign analysts. and several police teams are seeking thes

“Anybody whose polling is that inaccurate is going suspect, or suspects, involved in the shooting, , :,
to be really surprised on May 2. We know what our according to Chief Supt Miller. At
polls told us and we know what their (the PLP’s) In other crime news over the weekend,
polls told them, so we are quite aware what is hap- two men were taken into custody by the
pening on the ground of this country and on May 2 police and charged with six counts of armed
we're going to have a new government.” robbery.

While Mr Bannister said that he could not reveal Acting on information of an illega! firearnj
the percentage by which his party is estimated to in the Churchill Avenue area, police moved’
win, he added that, according to the polls, the FNM in ona suspect and found a .38 revolver and’
is expected to win by an overwhelming number of four rounds of ammunition.
votes. Upon questioning the suspect, Chief Supt

“We’re going to win big, that’s what the people are Miller said they were led to another indi-
telling us,” he said. vidual in the same area they suspect acted in

Mr Bannister could not comment on whether the concert with the first, in six armed robberies.
FNM had hired political campaign specialists similar The firearm recovered was allegedly shared
to those of the PLP, but explained that his party by the two in committing these offences. .*
had been prepared for this election for a long time A security officer, Alfred Luther, from =.
and had done everything to ensure it wins. the Corner Hotel, is also in serious condition.

The FNM chairman further said that his party will after being stabbed early on Friday morning. - “eg
hold Prime Minister Perry Christie to his word to run According to police reports, around 5.15am, ;
an election on issues. “We hope the press also three to four men entered the hotel creating
ensures he is held to that word,” he said. a loud disturbance when Mr Luther came to”— .

Mr Bannister said that the FNM is especially dis- investigate. :
gusted with the recent advertisement campaign the The officer allegedly spoke to the men,
PLP has been staging. asking them to leave, when an apeumient

“The commercials have been a disgrace, demean- ensued, and one of the men stabbed him
ing the name of a former leader of this country, and repeatedly on various parts of his body. Mr
really a government that runs that type of ad cam- Luther remains in serious condition at
paign loses the respect of the people,” he said. Princess Margaret Hospital.

The population expansion in
Exuma, as a result of the Four

selling
Building Materials and
Pressure Treated Lumber
just west of its old location

on Wilton Street
(right next door to DW Davis School)

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 13 -
LOCAL NEWS









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THE PLP officially
opened its new Bain and
Grants Town office on Fri-
day ‘night.

Pictured (top left) is Minis-
ter of Health and Bain and
Grants Town MP Dr
Bernard Nottage addressing
the crowd.

Top right is Prime Minister
Perry.Christie speaking from
the stage. And, above, is Dr
Bernard Nottage with Dr
Philip McPhee, who was the
FNM candidate for the con-
stituency at the last general
election.

© 2007 ADWORKS

(Photos: Franklyn G
Ferguson)

Share
your
news

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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

award. ena
If so, call us on 322-1986 New location Bilney Lane



and share your story.




THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 14, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

APRIL 10, 2007







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The Bahamas Telecomm-unications Centre and BTC JFK.

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TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007



The Tribune

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







25 FIDELITY

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
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Hilton marina developer
looks at alternative sites

IGY still committed to doing a Yacht Haven Grande in Bahamas, but-wants
downtown hotel’s majority owner to stick to deal’s ‘original terms’





B AN outside view of the British Colonial Hilton, Nassau

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he developer
behind the pro-
posed multi-mil-
lion dollar mari-
na/resort develop-
ment just to the west of down-
town Nassau’s British Colonial
Hilton has indicated to The Tri-
bune that it is looking at alter-
native sites for the project, in
case the Hilton’s new majority
owner does not return to the
“original terms” of their joint

venture agreement.

Andrew Farkas, chairman
and chief executive of New
York-based Island Global
Yachting (IGY), reiterated that
his company would not wait
“much longer” to achieve an
agreement with the hotel’s hold-
ing company, the British Colo-
nial Development Company,
which is now majority-owned
by Adurion Investment Man-
agement, a boutique Swiss/UK
investment house.

“The bottom line here for us
is that we remain committed to

the Bahamas, and will find one
way or another to develop a
Yacht Haven Grande here; not
dissimilar to the Yacht Haven
Grande we have just opened in
St Thomas,” Mr Farkas told
The Tribune.

“However, to the extent we
are unable to convince Adurion
to stay with the original terms,
then we’ll seek an alternative
venue.”

He indicated that a search for
possible alternative sites to the
Hilton joint venture, which
would be situated on land

immediately to, the west of the
downtown Nassau hotel, had
already begun.

When asked whether the
Hilton project was poised on a
“knife’s edge”, Mr Farkas con-
firmed this was an accurate
description. He acknowledged
that the project was still ‘in lim-
bo’, explaining that this was
because Adurion had decided
to change the terms of the joint

venture agreement after acquir-

SEE page 12B



Interest rates
under pressure

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian commercial
banking industry is waiting to
see whether. the-Central Bank
of the Bahamas will increase
the Bahamian Prime rate, the
interest rate that most bank
loans are linked to, as the com-
petition to attract deposits
squeezes interest rate margins.

The Tribune has been told
that the liquidity crunch expe-
rienced by the Bahamian com-
mercial banking industry
towards the end of 2006 is at
the root cause of the pressure
that Bahamian prime, currently
at 5.5 per cent, is coming under.

Although this newspaper was
unable to contact commercial
bank managing directors and
chief executives before the
Easter weekend, many having
left New Providence for a
break, it understands that many
banks have been forced to

increase deposit rates in a bid to
attract new deposits that can be
used for onward lending pur-
poses.

The interest rates that com-
mercial banks charge on most
loans are linked to Bahamian
Prime, which has remained
unchanged as a deposit rates
have gone up. Interest earned
from loans represents a com-
mercial bank’s core income,
while deposits are their chief
liabilities. While revenues
earned from loans are effec-
tively unchanged, interest pay-
ments that commercial banks
have to make on customer
deposits have increased.

As a result, the interest mar-
gins of commercial banks have
been squeezed, impacting their
profitability as they fight for
new deposits.

Sources suggested to The Tri-

SEE page 6B

Bahamas eco-friendly advantage in danger

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

IF the Bahamas does not begin to take
more environmentally-friendly measures it = * S;
could lose its competitive advantage as an

eco- friendly destination.

Christian Henry, chief financial officer
at the Cape Eleuthera Foundation, told

The Tribune that if the Bahamas did not
dégin t6 market itselfmore ager

essiVely as

an environmentally sensitive destination, :
other’countries will take the lead and the

bic By ae) ar Na See

Cape Eleuthera executive calls for right incentives
on renewable energy and conservation

ays support for alternatives will build from having

just two per cent of electricity supplied by them

SEE page 14B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Now that the bell has rung

ast week Wednesday,
Parliament was finally

dissolved and general
elections were set for May 2,
2007. A mere 23 days from
today, elections will be all over
and the country will return to
some semblance of normality,
complete with the complex
challenges of governing.

Rent-a-crowd

However, for the next 23
days, there is nothing the aver-
age Bahamian voter likes more
than the run-up period to elec-
tions, with all its hype, rallies
and give-aways.
. In Bahamian politics, great
iss emphasis is placed on the size
7 of the crowd attending a polit-

’ ical rally. Everyone wants to
be associated with a winner,

and there is absolutely no












doubt that the party generating
the biggest crowd gets a
‘knock-on’ benefit of winning
over previously undecided vot-
ers.

Recognising this, political
strategists do all they can to
ensure massive attendance by
finding creative ways to draw
people out to political rallies.
Large sums of money are rou-
tinely spent on professional
stages, lighting, sound systems,
party paraphernalia, live musi-
cians and, to top it all off, won-
derful fireworks displays.

For the ‘rent-a-crowd’
(RAC) crew, life simply could
not get any better. Where else
can you get a brand new t-shirt.
safe passage by chartered bus,
free food and drinks, first-class
Bahamian entertainment, juicy
political speeches and, alleged-

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Sales Agents:
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Financial
Focus

LN Me Tw le le ese




ly in some cases, a stipend for
attending a political rally?

Within the next 23 days, the
RAC crew may have as many
as LO opportunities (some of
which will include Family
Island events) to ply their
trade. It should be noted that
seasoned RAC participants are
colour-blind and are just as
comfortable wearing one
coloured t-shirt as they are
wearing the next.

Therefore, candidates should
not become intoxicated just by
large turnouts at rallies but
should continue to work their
constituencies, because the
crowds could well be there
courtesy of your colleagues
and not necessarily for you.

Disturbing Trend

One disturbing trend that |
have noted in recent weeks ts
the insertion of voice-clips tak-
en from radio shows that are
being inserted into political
advertisements. 1 personally



@ By Fidelity Capital Markets

IT was another slow trading week in
the Bahamian market, with only 20.373
shares changing hands. The market saw [1
out of its 19 sted stocks trade, of which
four advanced, one declined and six

remained unchanged.

Volume leader for the week was FINCO

find this trend most unsettling,
especially if these voice-clips
are being used without the per-
son’s express permission.
There should be boundaries
and rules of common decency
adhered to in using some-
body’s voice and comments in
political advertisements.

If unchecked, a person who
participates in a radio, televi-
sion or other public pro-
gramme could find comments
made (in whole or in part) in
such a forum used by some
other organisation (to whom
you would not normally or
wish to be associated with), to
lend support or give the
impression of support to some
objective of that organisation
without your permission. This
is very dangerous indeed.

Electoral

Broadcasting Council

Outside of what voters read
in the newspapers or witness
at rallies, all that you see on
television or hear on radio will
be overseen by the Election
Broadcasting Council (EBC).
The Parliamentary Act 1992
calls for the establishment of a
three-member EBC, consist-
ing of a chairman and another
member both nominated by

$0.06 or 6.52 per cent to close at $0.98.
Bank of the Bahamas (BOB) also
advanced by $0.35 or 4.05 per cent to end
the week at $11.59.

On the down side, Consolidated Water
Company's BDR declined by $0.08 or 1.65
per cent to close the week at $4.77.

The FINDEX increased by 1.99 points
tor the week, to close at 793.36.

(FIN) with 5,000 shares changing hands
and accounting for 24.54 per cent of the

total shares traded.

US ECONOMIC NEWS

The big advancer for a second consecu-

tive week was Abaco Markets (AML), up





aap Open a Scotiabank Home Savings Plan today.
You save a little every month for your home purchase
and we'll top it up with as much as $2,000.



EVERY MONTH
ETS YOU
CLOSER TO







*Tradernarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.
t Conditions apply. Subject to credit approval

Oil Price remains steady —

the Prime Minister, and a
deputy chairman nominated
by the Leader of the Opposi-
tion.

1. The Parliamentary Act
cites the functions of the EBC
as:

a) To monitor the coverage
of the election campaign being
done by the Broadcasting Cor-
poration of the Bahamas
(BCOTB) for the purpose of
ensuring that there is accuracy
and fairness in the reporting
of the campaign.

b) To act as a board of
review to hear any complaints
made by a political party or
candidate at an election in
respect of a breach by the
BCOTB - or its general man-
ager - of the rules relating to
political broadcasts or adver-
tisements.

2. The Council, in exercising
its functions as a Board of
Review, may obtain oral or
written complaints and shall
deal with them expeditiously.

3. In the exercise of its func-
tions, under this section the
Council shall not be subject to
the direction or control of any
person or authority.

It must be remembered that

eA

Crude oil was little changed amid con-
cern that US gasoline stockpiles will be
insufficient to meet demand during the

the Act was passed prior to the
licensing of private radio and
television stations, so anything
that references the BCOTB
also applies to all licensed
radio and television stations.
By the time you read this
article, the members of the
EBC should be announced. I
would not at all be surprised
if one of the first complaints
lodged would be about the
unauthorised use of voice-clips.
Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International Ltd, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
Ltd and is a major shareholder
of Security & General Insur-
ance Company in_ the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs



summer months when consumption peaks.

Gasoline inventories plunged 9.7 per
cent to 205.2 million barrels in the past
eight weeks, an Energy Department report
showed.

Crude oil for May delivery fell 10 cents

to settle at $64.28 a barrel. Futures
touched $68.09 a barrel on March 27, the

highest since September 6. Prices are down

2.4 per cent this week, and are 4.2 per-

cent lower than a year ago.

6 Scotiabank

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of:

SENIOR MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES

With over 55,000 employees in over 50 countries, Scotiabank places great importance on
recognizing and rewarding strong performance. We offer room for advancement, a stimulating
work environment and the resources to help you make the most of your career. Together,
we continue to make Scotiabank a great place to work.

POSITION SUMMARY:

As the Senior Manager, Human Resources, you are a member of the senior management
team of Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd., with a focus on dealing with the strategic and tactical
Human Resources needs of a growing and profitable organization. This will include but
not be limited to: developing the HR strategy for the organization: working with the Bank’s
support groups in the head office on the development of the annual total rewards program;
maintaining and developing a dynamic employee relations strategy; ensuring the effective
recruitment and orientation of new employees: managing the relationship between the
Bank and third-party service suppliers; and the identification of training needs and the
evolution of the training and development curriculum. You will need to be capable of
working in a highly cross-functional environment and be capable of managing tight time
lines and conflicting priorities. You are an exemplar of communication and relationship-
building skills, an excellent coach, and can effectively establish and maintain an open, co-

operative work environment.

Key accountabilities for this role:

Contribute to the achievement of the overall business objectives of Scotiabank

(Bahamas) Ltd.

Ensure the recruitment, development and maintenance of an engaged workforce.
Support people through and act as an agent of change in the environment.

Be prepared to liaise with a wide variety of Departments, balancing the needs of all
against the objectives and strategies of the Optimization program

QUALIFICATIONS:

‘Ten years of experience as a Human Resources professional.

A minimum of an undergraduate university degree, while a graduate degree or a.
major in Human Resources is an asset.
Experience in the financial industry is an asset.
Proven experience managing people.

Excellent and proven negotiation and conflict resolution skills are essential.
Ability to learn quickly, adapt to an ever changing environment and adapt to ever
changing priorities are essential.

OTHER INFORMATION:

* Frequent travel to the Family [slands
* Occasional travel internationally.
¢ Spanish Language is a bonus in an organization that is expanding rapidly in Spanish-

speaking countries.

The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications from
all interested parties. We thank you for your interest, however, only those candidates
selected for an interview will be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit applications in writing marked Private and
Confidential by Monday, April 30, 2007 to:

Manager, Manpower & Succession Planning,

P. O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas or email scotiabank.bs



oe

ER ee ett,

at

\
S
Che Miami Herald \



THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 8B

bow 30 12,569.14 +8.94 A

‘sep500 1,444.61 +0.85 AL

NASDAQ 2,469.18 -216 W

“10-YR NOTE 475 N/C =
as) | -277 W

CRUDE OIL



F a t e
E BEL BRUNO
Asscciated Press
NEW YORK — Wall Street
-d an erratic session essen-
t ‘Monday as investors
anxious about upcoming
uarter earnings and the
; ibility that interest rates
vt be declining anytime
soon. A $2 drop in oil prices lent
support to the major indexes.
‘With the market closed for
- Good Friday, traders had their
_ first opportunity to react to
- Labor Department data that
- showed stronger-than-expected
— job growth in March. The num-
_ bers indicated the economy
might be in better shape than
: ly thought, and helped
~ offset concerns about a contin-
ued slowdown in the housing
_ market.
Takeover activity also pro-
vided some lift to.the markets,
-- with reports Dow Chemical has
_ been targeted by Middle East-
ern investors and U.S. buyout
_ firms in a deal that could be
~ worth $50 billion.
~- But upbeat news about the
-_U.S. economy and corporate
--activity was interpreted by
_ some on Wall Street as reasons
~ for the Federal Reserve to hold
ff on cutting rates. And, with
orporate earnings season to
__ begin when Alcoa posts results
-‘Fuésday — and profit growth
_ levels expected to fall from pre-
' “vious quarters — investors had
reason to be cautious. —
oo “AN things point to the Fed,
and now it looks like they are
' going to put rates on the back
burner for a while after Friday’s
- numbers,” said Jay Suskind,
head trader at Ryan Beck & Co.
‘And, now the markets are
looking toward earnings reports
where expectations have
: already been tempered.”
= According to preliminary
“calculations, the Dow Jones
_ industrials rose 8.94, or 0.07
- percent, to 12,569.14.
_. Broader stock indicators
_ ‘were mixed. The Standard &
' Poor’s 500 index edged up 0.85,
or 0.06 percent, to 1,444.61, and
the Nasdaq composite index fell
216, or 0.09 percent, to 2,469.18.
The Russell 2000 index of
- smaller companies fell 1.71, or
0.21 percent, to 811.64.
. Monday’s modest moves left
- intact last week’s advance; the
-— tnajor indexes rose each day last
- week and returned to positive
territory for the year. Most
_ major European markets were
~ closed Friday and Monday for
"an extended Easter holiday.
_ The Labor Department
report showed nonfarm pay-
- rolls rose by 180,000 in March,
~ above forecasts of 135,000. The
unemployment rate fell to
_ 4.4 percent, a five-month low.
-- Should the economy be stron-
er than some analysts esti-
ted, it could dissuade the
central bankers from lowering
interest rates in the near term. |
Oil prices continued their
steep decline, with a barrel of
light sweet crude settling down
$2.77 to $61.51 per barrel on the
New York Mercantile
» Exchange.
» Tensions in the Middle East
pushed crude higher in recent
’ ‘weeks, and eased after Iran
released 15 British soldiers and
- marines. There is also specula-
‘tion among traders that an
' Energy Department report will
_ show higher-than-expected U.S.
inventories.





















































' TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

INESS |



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Concerns push Vonage shares down

@ Investors’ fears affected
Vonage stocks as the Internet
phone firm saw its stock prices
fall.

BY CRAYTON HARRISON
Bloomberg News

Shares of Vonage Holdings, the
Internet phone company that lost a
patent-infringement suit last month,
dropped 10 percent on concern the
company may be prohibited from
signing up new customers.

The stock declined 34 cents to
$3.03 at 4:02 p.m. in New York Stock
Exchange composite trading. Vonage
said today in a statement that a tem-
porary stay on a judge’s ban on new

@ The Bush administration will

| file two complaints against

| China at the World Trade

| Organization aimed at stopping
what it said is piracy of
copyrighted U.S. products.

| BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Bush
administration announced Monday
it is filing two new trade cases
against China over copyright piracy
and restrictions on the sale of
American movies, music and books
there.

The action, announced by U.S.
Trade Representative Susan
Schwab, represented the latest
move by the administration to
respond to growing political pres-
sure at home to do something about
soaring U.S. trade deficits.

Schwab said the United States
was filing with the World Trade
Organization a case that will chal-
lenge Beijing’s lax enforcement of
violations of copyrights and trade-
marks on a wide range of products.
American companies contend they
are losing billions of dollars in sales
because of rampant copyright
piracy.

The second case will challenge
China’s barriers to the sale of U.S.-
produced movies, music and books.

“Piracy and counterfeiting levels
in China remain unacceptably
high,” Schwab said in announcing
the new cases. “Inadequate protec-
tion of intellectual property rights
in China costs U.S. firms and work-
ers billions of dollars each year.”

The two new cases represent the
latest effort by the administration
to increase pressure on China now
that Democrats, many highly criti-
cal of China’s trade practices, have
won control of the House and the
Senate.

The U.S. trade deficit set a



customers is the “first step” toward a
legal resolution in its favor.

A jury found in March that Von-
age infringed Verizon Communica-
tions’ patents and should pay $58 mil-
lion and a 5.5 percent royalty.
Verizon claimed Vonage lured away
600,000 customers by copying tech-
nology such as voice-mail features, as
well as the method for allowing Inter-
net calls to reach traditional phone
lines.

“Shares will remain very volatile
until there’s visibility around the
legal challenges,” said Richard
Greenfield, an analyst at Pali Capital
in New York. He has a “sell” rating
on Vonage shares.

TRADE

| Se Said



ILLEGAL DVD: ‘Piracy and counterfeiting levels in China remain unacceptably high,’ said U.S. Trade
Representative Susan Schwab, shown holding a pirated DVD copy of Night at the Museum, during
a news conference Monday in Washington. The pirated material, made in China, was brought into
the country last week. The movie is to be released in the United States on April 24th.

U.S. to file two new trade
complaints against China

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the
Federal Circuit in Washington issued
the stay on April 6. U.S. District
Judge Claude Hilton in Alexandria,
Virginia, ordered the company ear-
lier that day to stop adding subscrib-
ers.

Vonage will post a bond of $66
million and will pay the 5.5 percent
royalty rate into escrow during the
appeals process. The company said it
believe it will win the case on appeal
and is developing technology to work
around Verizon’s patents.

“We cannot envision how Vonage

continues operations unimpeded” if:

it’s unable to convince the appeals
court and can’t produce an alterna-





PHOTOS BY MANUEL BALCE CENETA/AP

ww
a
a
x
wi
Pa
i
if





PIRATED PRODUCTS: Pirated materials from China are displayed
during a news conference in Washington.

record for a fifth consecutive year
in 2006 — at $765.3 billion — with
the imbalance with China climbing
to $232.5 billion, the highest ever
recorded with a single country.

In late March, the Bush adminis-
tration announced it was imposing
penalty tariffs on Chinese glossy
paper imports in a case that broke a
23-year precedent that had barred
U.S. companies from seeking pro-
tection from unfair subsidies pro-
vided by the Chinese government.

In February, Schwab announced
the administration was bringing a
WTO case against China on the
government subsidy issue.

The decision to go to the WTO
with the two new trade cases will
trigger a 60-day consultation
period during which trade negotia-
tors from both countries will try to
resolve the two disputes.

If that fails, WTO hearing panels

PEN TARTAR ETC eT OREO AE

would be convened. If the U.S. wins
the cases, it would be allowed to
impose penalty economic sanctions
on Chinese products.

In a statement, the Motion Pic-
ture Association of America said
that American industries lost an
estimated $2.3 billion in revenue to
copyright pirates in China in 2005
with only one out of every 10 DVDs
sold in China a legal copy.

“China is, by virtually any and
every measure, the world’s largest
marketplace for pirated goods,”
said MPA chairman Dan Glickman.

Mitch Bainwol, chairman of the
Recording Industry Association of
America, said that his industry wel-
comed the administration’s deci-
sion to file the WTO cases. “The
theft of music is pervasive in China
and takes place virtually without
meaningful consequence.” he said.



tive technology, Greg Miller, an ana-
lyst with Deutsche Bank in Green-
wich, Connecticut, said today in a
research note.

A work-around would require
changes to software from several
other companies and may involve
replacing customers’ equipment, said
Clayton Moran, an analyst at Stan-
ford Group, in a research note.

“This could be a complicated,
time-consuming process,” said
Moran, who is based in Boca Raton,
Florida, and has a “hold” rating on
the stock.

Vonage shares have lost more than
80 percent of their value since they
were first sold in May at $17.

Foreign
demand
may bail
out U.S.

i Breaking tradition, the United
States may need help from the
rest of the world as its economy
flounders and there is little sign
of weakness in major economies
outside the U.S.

BY SIMON KENNEDY
Bloomberg News

The flagging U.S. economy may
get by with a little help from its
ioe.



ing a eline to an America weighed
down by the housing slump and weak
business investment. With exports
accelerating and imports shrinking,
trade this year may add to growth
instead of subtracting from it for the
first time in more than a decade.

“Had it not been for the rest of the
world, the U.S. economy might be
seriously floundering,” says Stephen
King, chief economist at HSBC Hold-
ings in London.

That’s a change from the past 40
years, when the U.S. powered the
world economy through financial cri-
ses elsewhere but gained little thrust
from abroad when demand turned
weak at home. Back then, when the
U.S. sneezed, the rest of the world
caught a cold; “nowadays, when the
U.S. sneezes, the rest of the world
goes shopping,” King says.

The shift gives central bankers
and finance ministers of the Group of
Seven, the world’s biggest industrial-
ized economies, reason for optimism
as they meet in Washington this
week.

The big differences now: The
housing slump that’s dragging down
demand in the U.S. is having little
impact beyond the country’s borders,
while other economies are generat-
ing enough demand on their own to
prop up growth elsewhere.

“The U.S. slowdown has had little
discernible effect on growth in most
other countries,” the International
Monetary Fund said in a report last
week.

That could change if the housing
recession does more damage than
most economists now expect to the
rest of the U.S. economy. The U.S.
still accounts for a fifth of the global
economy and is its biggest importer.

Even though the importance of the
U.S. market has diminished, there’s
still danger of “spillover” from a
slowdown in the world’s largest
economy because so many compa-
nies and investors in the rest of the
world have ties to American busi-
nesses and markets, the IMF report
says.

Stephen Roach, chief global econ-
omist at Morgan Stanley in New
York, also doubts that consumers
elsewhere wield big enough spending
power to compensate for softness in
the U.S.

“The global economy is likely to
be a good deal weaker than the
decoupling crowd would lead you to
believe,” says Roach.

So far, though, there’s little sign of
weakness in major economies out-
side the U.S. The 13 nations that share
the euro are being buoyed by record
low unemployment and the highest
confidence in six years. Japan’s econ-
omy, after wobbling at the end of last
year, is also extending its longest
expansion since World War II.

2 Lh ETE PANT ATS MO CUNT
4B | TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007



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: Close: 1,444.61 : Close: 2,469.18
: ‘ Change: +0.85 (+0.1%) ! Change: -2.16 (-0.1%)
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StocksRecap HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR YTD
DOW 12593.60 1255532 12569.14 +8.94 +0.07% A A A +0.85%
NYSE NASD DOW Trans. 5069.62. 4917.53 5010.10 +9304 +1.89% A A & +9.87%
DOW Util. 514.15 510.27 «513.60 $3.26 +0.64% «=A A 12.44%
Vol. (in mil.) 2,320 1,687 = NYSEComp. 9450.27 9422.45 = 9429.21 $2.64 +0.03% A A A +3.18%
Pvs. Volume 2,312 1,517 NASDAQ 2478.68 2464.57 2469.18 2.16 -0.09% A A A +#2.23%
Advanced 1624 1339 S&P 500 1448.10 1443.28 = :1444.61 +0.85 +0.06% A A A +1.86%
Declined 1673 1705 S&P 400 864.39 860.27 = 862.53 +0.74 «+0.09% A A A 47.23%
New Highs 304 146 Russell2000 814.31 += 809.92 811.64. «1.71 -0.21% = A $3.04
New Lows 17 56 Wilshire 5000 1468099 14629.27 14648.08 + +7.70«-+0.05% A A A +2,74%
WidelyHeldStocks
Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg
ABBLtd 17.86 -.04 =~ BostonSci_ 14.94 -.03 Natlcity 36.14 -.47
ABN Amro 45.35 +81 BrMySq 27.66 -16 Ecolab 43.81 +.08 ImpTob 89.08 -.13 NatGrid 80.10 -.27
ACE Ltd 57.53 +.24 BritAir 101.12 +.13 Edisonint 51.62 +.49 IndoTel 45.36 +.24 NOilVarco 79.63 -.19
AESCpIf 22.28 -+.59 BritATob 62.86 -.33 ElPasoCp 14.68 = +.02 Infineon 15.59 — -.05 NatSemi 24.59 -.13
AFLAC 48.13 +21 BritSky 44,43 -.28 Elan 14.48 +53 Infosys s 52.56 +73 NetwkAp 36.07 -,44
AMR 33.12 +.77 Broadcom 32.41 —--.57 ElectArts 51.50 -.44 IngerRd 43.75 +14 NewellRub 31.06 -.26
ASMLHId 25.58 = -.10 = BrkfldAsgs 55.54 +78 EDS 27.70 -O1 Intel 20.10 +52 NewmtM = — 43.57 -.06
AT&Tinc 39.33 +.06 =~ BrkfldPrp = 40.25 = -.20 Embarqn 56.01 = -.49 IntentlEx 128.50 38 NewsCpA «23.47 #11
AUOptron 15.49 +11 BungeLt 76.81 -.28 EmersnEls 42.72 -.09 IntCtlHtlrs 25.28.09 NewsCpB 25.02 +13
AXA 43.55 -.09 — BurINSF 88.08 +5.36 EEIChile 42.68 +121 IBM 96.62 +10 — Nexeng 61.81 -.72
AbtLab 57.21 +19 CAInc 26.24 ==. Enbridge 32.45 -.04 IntlGame 40.38 -.23, Ss Nisource . 25.04 +.19
AberFitc 7649 74 CBRElliss 3409 -39 EnCana 51.91 16 IntPap 37.06 +27 Nidec 16.53 +.34
Accenture 3833 -31 CBOT 189.92 -1.66 Endesa 53.51 -.22 IntIPower 82.20 -.22, Ss NikeBwi '53.90—s+.42
Adecco 16.20 -.15 CBSB 31.20 +18 — Enel 55.68 15 ANAT Bed NippnTT = 26.09 -.38
AdobeSy 42.70 +09 CHRobins 48.75 -.09 EngyTEq 36.82 +20 jncscog 132.42 -17—SsNissan 21.82 +.04
AMD 1335 +49 CIGNA = 147.66 +.04—EngyTsfr = 58.22, 18 JpMorgch 49.00 +23. «= NobleCorp, 81.17 -.29
Advantstrs 4847 +181 CITGp 53.94 -16 Enersis 17.02, +33 Johnun 61.63 +08 NobleEn 61.30 -.01
Aegon 20.54 05 CNAFn = 4469 +.28 «= ENSCO 54.72 -.63Johnsnctl 97.30 +.33~=—-NokiaCp =——23.54
Aetna 4531 +31 CNHGbI = 37.07 -.24 Entergy = 110.35 #1.05 Inprntwk = .20.79««+.22, «Nomura =—s‘19.95—-.20
Agilent 35.06 +35 = CNOOC = 88.30 +.10 = EntPrPt’ §= 32.09 +.02, tA Tne §=— 55.53 ~.32-Nordstrm = 54.59 +.46
Ahold 12.24 CPFLEn 45.68 41.94 = EqtyRsd 49.37 +.04 py 16.33 -.07 ~—NorflkSo. = 52.89 #1.91
AFrance 49.00 +30 «= CRH 4483 +17 — EricsnTl = 37-49-03 KT Corp = 22.37.05 Norsks = 32.95 -.33
AirProd 75.25 +.79 «= CSXS 4186 +90 Esteeldr = 49.2504 Kellogg = 51.78 = +.01_~—sNortelifrs 24.15 -.32
AkamaiT 51.66 +69 CVSCare 3490 +17 — Exelon 72.08 +38 Keycorp «37.54 -.07-—NorTrst. = 60.83 -.22
Akzo 76.82 -29 CablvNYs 30.70 -26 Expedia = 23.81.21 Keyspan = 41.42_—«+.06 = NorthropG- 75.73 —-+.68
Alcan 5351 +31 CadbyS 52.30.14 = Expdintls © 42.44 +01 Kimbcik 70.11. «+.45——sNovartis 55.30 -.46
Alcatelluc 12.35 -.04 Camecogs 4688 +.73 ExpScripts 85.88 +.05 — Kimco 48.77 +07 NovoNdk 92.27 _—s-.47
Alcoa 3487 +28 Cameron 6357 +24 — ExxonMbl = 76.80 42 KindME = 55.26 +.35=SNucors ~—67.50_—+.99
Alcon 138.27° +26 CampSp 3855 +12 FPLGrp = 61.75 +35 KindMorg 106.80 +.01 ~—Nvidia 30.34 -.56
AllgEngy 50.69 +33 CIBCg. «= 8811 +41 FannieMIf 54.43 +10 Kohls 7847 +09 OcciPets 49.68 -.27
AllegTch 113.34 +2.48 «© CdnNRyg = 46.47 -+2.18 = FedExCp 109.26 +44 — Kookmin 93.46 -+1.62—OffcDpt_ «= 35.14 +.28
Allergan 11361 +.09 CdnNRsg 56.49 -,33,- FedrDSs |= 46.31 +31 Koreagle §=— 20.82 -.18 += Omnicom = 102.40 -.86
AlliBern = 91.04 «+74 = CPRwyg 57.39 +163 Fiat 25.93 +02 Kraft 3131 -27 Oracle 1857 — -.10
Allianz 2136 +05 Canons 55.00 +58 FidNinfo = 47.71.17 Kroger 29.22. +11 Orix 132.84 +.20
Aldirish 57.39 +06 © CapOne = 73.43, +07 ~—FifthThird = 38.2753 Kubota. «= 441 +.17 Ss PGRECp = 49.38 +.03
Allstate 60.36 +.04 CardnlHIth 73.28 -1.25 = FirstDatas 32.38) +09 kyocera = 98.35 $1.94 = PNC 72.61 -.16
Alltel 62.61 +02 Carnival 4649 -.26 FFirstEngy 68.25 +20, 1-3,Com 89.15 -1.00 POSCO 105.86 -.50
AltanaAG 67.23.12, CamUK = 48.02, -.21_—‘Fiserv 54.27 576 LGPhilips 17.77 -.54 PPG 7L81 0 +.75
AlteraCplf 20.21 +24 CarolinaGp 77.30 -131 —‘Flextrn 11.05 +03 Labcp 7368 +48 PPLCorp 4310 +27
Altria s 69.90 -.85 Caterpillar 67.34 -.29 Fluor 91.72 LafargeSA 40.11 -.11 Paccars 74.64 = -.07
Alumina 2452, +.25 = Celgene «= 58.90 +87 «= FEMSA = 116.40 +131 © LamRsch = 49.33«S ~07-=S ParkHan = 87.64 —-+.02
AmBevC = 54.84 +65 Cemexs 33,33. +34 FordM 8.08 +07 vsands 88.58 + -.32.~— Paychex «= 37.66 = -.23
AmBev 57.10 +89 Cemig 50.31 +39 Forestlab 5446 +16 — Leggnason 96.32 -.64 — PeabdyE | 4387 #RA3e
Amazon 41.66 «= -.02,_—ChesEng)» 32.59 +08 FortuneBr 78.64 = 05. LehmanBr = 72.29-«+.85 “Pearson id “lL
AmbacF 86.05 +17 = Chevron.“ (75.49 -.12'—FranceTel == 27.39.07 LeucNatls 29.66 -.01 = PennWst gn 2945 ».27
Amdocs 36.75 «+11 © ChiMerc 550.50 -3.00 —FrankRes 125.72 07 Level3 6.26 +13 Penney.) 8269 -1.37
““Ameren 50.16 -32Chinalfes” “44.23 +.73 = FredMac_— 59.63.25 ibGlobA = -34.91««+.08 += PeopBCT ~= 44.41_—s+.15
AMovill 50.55 +.81 ChinaMble 46.33 +.94 FMCG 68.98 +1.41 LibGlobB 34,89 PepsiBott 32.00 -.35
AMovilA 50.45 +67 = ChinaNet «51.63 +.23 = FresenM == 49.85.16 LibGlobc «32.95 +.18 = PepsiCo ~=— 62.99 _—-.69
AmCapStr 45.65 +04 ChinaPet 88.62 +55 Fujifilm = 42.40 +78 LibMintAn 24.02 -.78 =~ PetroCg. «39.7515
A€agleOs 29.63.27 ChinaTel «50.54 +.55 Gallaher 88.73.33 LibMCapAn 112.70 +124 — PetChina 117.91 ~.20
AEP 4957 +73 ChinaUni 1483 +18 = Gannett, = 57.42, +145 | illyeli 55.58 +10 PetrbrsA 91.12.01
AmExp 56.36 «+40 = Chubbs 52.00 +01 = Gap 1839 +75 Limited 26.86. «+09 = Petrobrs =—(102.62-+.47
AmintGp If 67.23 ChungTel 19.94 +14 Garmins = 53.76 31 LincNat = 68.09-«+.01-—SPfizer 26.00 +.16
AREst 11650 -.09 CinnFin 42.63.34. Genentch = 82.64 «76 LinearTch 31.82.18 ~——PIILD 53.45 +.10
AmStand 53.29 +40 — Cisco 26.20 +14 GenDynam 78.52 +41 LIoydTSB_ 45.23. -.12—PhillipsE!_ «38.92 ~.23
AmTower 39.33 +03 Citigrp, «= 51.58 +.01 © GenElec = 34.78 = =.24LockhdM = 98.03. #132 PitnyBW 46.12
Ameriprise 59.92 +38 ClearChan 35.55 -.13 © GnGrthPrp. 64.87 +70 igewss = 46.63 -.18 = PlainsAA 57.43.15
AmeriBrg 53.75 -.26 = ClearCh_ «26.86 -.20 © GenMills._ 58.55.20 tgwess 31.50 +11 = PlumCrk = -39.50—++.01
Amgen = 57.19 -1.14 Clorox 64.28 +55 GnMotr = 32.00 #10 Luxottica, © 32.3119 PoloRL «92.97 4.37
Amvescp 22.93 +.18 Coach 5130-10 GenuPrt = 49.81 +19 yondell «= «31.43. #.23—PortglTel «13.65 +.03
Anadarks 44.47 +17 CocaCE + = 20.46 «= -.08 «= Genworth = 35.06 = 09 atBk © 105.27 -.72,~=Ss~Potash~=—«169.33-+.80
AnalogDev 36.16 +03 CCFemsa 38.04 +.66 «© Genzyme = 60.82, 71 pia 65.84 -.07 Praxair = 63.72 +.24
AngloAm 27.10 +.08 CCHellen 40.79 -.21.-= Gerdaus 19.63 #.76 MEM 60.41 -1.03 PrecCastpt 106.29 -.62
AnglogidA 45.76 +24 — CocaCl 49.63 +11 GileadSci._ 77.70.62 MGMMir =—«-72.57 +50 ~—PriceTRs = 48.70 +.24
Anheusr 51.71 +61 CogTech 86.04. -.72,-—GlaxoSKIn 56.12 -12 Macerich 94,07 +11 ~—PrinFnel «= 60.31. -.32
AonCorp 3848 -.13 © ColgPal. «= 66.71 +.08 © GlobalSFe_ 63.22. +51 = Magnalg ~=-78.63.««+.92~—-ProctGam = 63.26 +.26
Apache 72.19 +10 Comcasts 2646 -15 GoldFltd 19.16 -.02 Manpwi 74.59 +145 ~~ ProgrssEn 50.89 -—«+.09
ApolloG if 43.25 -1.14 © Comesps 25.98 = -.04.- Golderpg_ 25.5116 = Manulifgs 35.40 +13 Progcps 2169 27
Appleinc 93.65 -1.03 Comerica 59.42 -.19 © GoldmanS 208.94 +1.01 Marathon 101.93 -.86 ProLogis. ©«66.08—s +41
ApldMatl 18.65 -.03 = CmcBN) «= 33.00. «-+.08 «= Goodrich © 52.0374 Marintds © 49.85 «= -.17~=Ss Prudent! ©=«91.68-—«+.02
ArcelorMit 5457 -.25 CVRDs 40.06 +31 Google 468.21 -3.30) © MarshM = -29.23. Ss -s11.=SséPrud UK =—s29.31—S-.10
ArchDan 37.74 «+72, CVRD pfs) 33.45. «+12 ~—sGraingr 7742-09 Marshils 48.25 »-.38.~=Ss: PSEG 86.80 +1.65
ArchstnSm 54.56 08 CompsBc 69.41 -.05 GrantPrde 49.73 -.11 = MartMM = 138.68 «+45 += PubStrg. «(96.17 -.46
Assurant 55.75 -1.25 © CompSci 53.55 -.25« GpTelevisa 31.04 +.21 — MarvellTsif 17.00 -18 Publicis 46.55.17
AstraZen 54.33 -.26 ConAgra 24.93. +.20 «= HDFCBK = 67.62 +.54 Masco 26.89 -29 Pulte 26.90 -.05
AustNZ 121.21 = 20.» ConocPhil 68.42 +46 «© HSBC 89.78 +10 MasterCdn 108.34 +33 Qualcom 42.68 —-.62
Autodesk If 3884 -.71 ConsolEs 42.48 +24 = Hallibtns 32.60 -.34—atsush =. 20.84. Ss -.02Ss«stDiag «51.25.05
AutoData 44.56 -92 ConEd 52.14 +09 Hanson 80.54 -.07 Mattel 29.28 -37 Questar 93.47 +.65
AutoZone 130.18 +.55 ConstellEn 89.00 +1.00 HarleyD 62.16 +60 Maximif 29.15 -55 Qwesttm 895 -16
AvalonBay 130.20 -.30 Coopers 45.94 +14 Harman = 99.43, -.18 = Micpnids 46.49 «+71 = Raytheon = 54.42, +.38
AveryD 64,27 «+10 = Corning «= 23.52, 07, HarmonyG = 15.49 03 MicGrwH 61.97 +29 Realogyn = 29.96 +.07
Avon 3856 10 Costco = 54.82, 06 = HarrahE = 85.03 +13 McKesson 58.56 -.36 ~—-ReedEIsNV 36.03 -.05
BASF 116.26 -.23. = CntwdFn «34.20 +54 = HarrisCorp 50.75 36 = Medimun =: 36.76 ~=«+.38~—sReedElsplc 48.63 = -.17
BB&TCp 40.41. -.39-~— Coventry © 58.40 © -.05 = HartfdFn = 97.33 +16 =~ MedcoHith 73.99 +.04 ~—-Regionsfn 34,74 -.54
BCEgn 28.23 Ad HithcrPr 36.52 +27 Medtrnic ~=— 48.95 --18~—sReliantEn «21.76 4.74
BG Grp 71.80 -4l CredSuiss 71.84 = -.46 HealthNet 56.80 = -.27 Mellonfne 43.48 = +.11 Repsol 34.07 -.24
BHPBilLt 49.63 +15 CrwnCstle 32.82 +.56 = HSCardDvn 25.05 03 Merck 45.65 +11 RschMotn 146.26 +.49
BHPBiI ple 46.04 +27 «= Cummins 147.48 = -.22, HSDiagn = 25.6910 rkserono 22.34 = -15—sReutrGrp = 58.12.38
BJ Svcs 28.06 -.20 DJIADiam 125.65 = +.19 HSECancn 28.89 +1.89 Mertilllyn 86.78 +70 ReynAms — 63.47 +87
BMC Sft 31.18 +.10 DRHorton 22.04 = +.03 HsETechn 26.56 +02 MetLife 63.87 +.04 Rinker 75.30 -.20
BP PLC 64.84 -41 TE 48.57 4.16 -HSPatCren 27.42 Metso 5371 11 — RioTinto §— 240.56 #1.35
BTGrp = 6112-34 DaimirC = 84.47 = -.33 Heinz 47.49 +01 Microchp 36.15 -.16 = RockwlAut 58.16 +.09
BakrHu 67.17 -57 Danaher 70.98 -.29 HellnTel 14.06 +.04 MicronT 11.18 +33 RockColl 66.99 «08
BcBilVArg 24.73 07 © Danone = 36.48 +15 = Hershey = 55.34.88 Microsoft 28.57 -+.02 »=« RogCmgs = 34.17_—-+.07
BcBradess 20.71 +.24 Dassault 54.89 = -.18 Hertz n 24.17 +19 Millea s 37.64 +18
Bncoltau 37.05 +.45 Deere 108.62 +1.05 Hess s 55.08 -1.21 — Millicomint 83.57. +.27 RoHaas 52.75 +.25
BcoSnCH 18.43 -.02 Delhaize 95.62 = -.24 HewlettP 41.34 —-.46 Mirant 44,08 +3.44 Rostele 52.43 +.42
BcSanChile 51.52 +.59 Dell Inc If 23.71 +.20 Hilton 36.91 ~17 MitsuUFJ 11.56 RoyalBk g 51.10 +.01
BkofAm 50.86 +.01 DeutschBk 137.49 26 Hitachi 18.77 “13 Mitsui 358.00 -6.36 RylCarb 42.49 -05
Bkirelnd 86.43 -.27-~—S« Deut Tel 17.27 = -.05 = HomeDp = 38.08 +06 izuhoFn §=.13.16 = -.06 += RoyDShIIB- 66,91 —-.38
BkMontg 61.28 +28 DevDv 64.21 +32 Honda 35.30 -.19 — MobileTel 60.72 +2.02 + RoyDShIIA 66.60 = -.44
BkNY 40.96 +.15 DevonE 72.95 +1.07 Honwllintl 47.11 -15 — MolscoorsB 94.80 -.09 Ryanairs 45.81 -.07
BkNovag 46.57 +.02 Diageo 81.94 -.01 Hospira = 40.72, 21 Monsantos 58.29 +74 SAPAG 46.36 -.36
Barclay 57.90 -.28 DiaOffs 81.69 -.61 HostHotls 26.77 12 Moodys 61.78 +.67 SEI Inv 62.22 —--.08
Bard 81.73 -.24 DirecTV 23.58 +.07 HuanPwr 40.11 -.51 MorgStan 80.30 SK Tlem 23.47
BarrickG 29.18 -.15 Disney 34.91 HudsCity 13.66 +01 wosaiclf 29.10 +28 SLGreen 139.23 +2.39
Baxter 54.37 +.33 DollarG 21.22 +18 Humana 63.07 +46 wotorola 17.65 +06 SLMCp 41.57 +.13
BayerAG 65.91 -.06 DomRes 90.20 +.06 = HutchTel = 30.59 +10 Murpho) 53.16 = -.71. = ST MSTech 56,70 -.12
Bearst 149.00 -1.40 —-OonlleyRR_- 37.36 «+51 =‘ 1ACInter. § 38.20 +38 =~ NcRCp = 48.05«+.13.~«=STMicro. = 19.87.08
BectDck 77.90 -.52 Dover 48.74 41 ICICI Bk 38.64 = +.28 NEC 5.61 +05 Safeco 64.76 = -.70
BedBath 41.39 +18 DowChm 46.63 +2.16 — ING 43.21 +11 NII Hldg 78.73 +1.04 Safeway 37.18 +.86
Berkley 32.61 -.34 DuPont 49.68 +.36 iShJapan 14.66 -.02 NIS Grp s 5.69 BerkHaA 109000 +151 DukeEgys 2081 +14 iShDIDv 72.26 =~04 = RGegy = 76.63 -+2.65 «= SanDisk = 4403-47
BerkKHB -3635.—=i(si«é#Q”—=Ct*«éE Trade 2144-16 = iShSP500 144.72 +.18 = NTTDoCo ~— «18.08 «54s Satniofi 43.55 43
BestBuy 48.23 -.22 E.ON AG 48.84 +.07 iShHEmMMkKt 120.77 +.47 NYMEXn 129.08 —--2.43 SaraLee 16.99
Biogenidc 44.39 —-.63 eBay 33.74 = +.03 iSh EAFE 71.68 ~~ -.06 NYSEEur 96.05 -.69 Sasol 33.20 +.10
Biomet If 42.73 -.05 EMC Cp 14,38 -.06 iSRIKV nya 84.40 +.15 Nabors 30.15 +26 Satyam s 23.63 +.28
BlackRock 155.37 -1.14 ENI 64.87 -40 iShR2K nya 80.57 —-+.13 Nasdl00Tr 44.45 “ll SchergPl 26.29 = +.43
BlockHR 21.03 -.15 = EOG Res 74.39 -.36 ITT Corp 62.03 +.26 = Naspers = -25.80 +17, Schimbrg. 757-27
Boeing 90.03 -.47 EKodak 2322-22 TW 52.49 +17 NtAust «168.43. +08 «= Schwab 19.19 +.06
BostProp 118.74 +.65 Eaton 85.51 = +.07 IC] 43.02 +.02 NBkGreece 11.26 +.02 ScotPwrn 64.49 +12
EchoStar 45.14 +.43 ImpOilgs 38.26 = +.52 SeagateT 2346 +.19
. TorontoStockExchange
Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg Name Last Chg
MegaUranmo 8.16 +1.75 VictoryNklo 86 +.09 PinetreeCapo 14.65 +1.87 FarallonReso 64-01 DenisonMines 15.36 +.13
CdnZinco 92 +.06 AlgonquinUn 8.28 -.05 Timmincoltd 2.85 — -.09 CentaminOrd 1.00 +.07 YellowPgsUn 13.79 -.07
QuadraMng 11.90 _+.55 YamanaGldo 17.09 +.03 CdnNatRail 53.58 +2.68 QuestCapital 3.15 ne GatewayUn = 25.00 -.05
Inflazyme 07-01 BluePearlMng 13.75 +.39 BombdrBSV = 4.66 +.02 EldoradoGld 7.04 -.06 LundinMng 15.25 +.08
Crystallexo 4.90 +.20 CoalcorpMino .65 +.02 PaladinOrdo 9.90 +.21 CaledoniaMng 16 +.01 ChromosMolo — .04 ae
CamecoCorp 54.06 +.95 LionoreMng 19.22 -.28 EqnoxMnrlso 2.44 is BreakwaterRes 2.04 +.07 FirstNickelo = 1.31 +.04
CandaxEngy 60 +.08 Bk NS 53.73 +.20 ConjuChemBio .63 +.04 KinrossGold 16.42 ie EasternPlat 2.13 -.02
UEXCorpo = 7.42:«+.26+=—s«UraMinIncJ = 7.00 +.20 _SilverWheaton 12.35 +.50 -UTSEngyCorp 4.17 -.09 — GoldcorpInc 29.43 -.04
TalismanEgy 21.14 +.16 NorOriono 5.39 +.36 MolyMnsOrdo 4.48 +.68 KhanReso 487 +.18 Carpathian) — 1.24

SXRUranium) 18.30
12
16

21.94

3.86
14

TiominReso

Queenstake

MDS Inc
Dynatec

CampbellRes
HudBayMnrls 21.62

Name Last
SearsHldgs 186.90
SempraEn 62.25
ShawC g 38.37
Sherwin 66.36
Shinhan 119.24
Shire 63.26
SiderNac 44.05
Siemens 111.23
SimonProp 114.03
Smith&N 62.81
Smithintl 49.29
Sodexho 74.00
SonyCp 53.25
SouthnCo —_ 37,31
SthnCopps 76.03
SwstAirl 15.13
SwstnEngy 42.13
SovrgnBcp 24.63
Spectran 26,03
SprintNex 19.27
SPDR 144.44
SP Mid 156.95
Staples 26.55
Starbucks 31.14
StarwdHtl — 68.70
StateStr 66.99
Statoil 27.10
StoraEnso 17.47
Stryker 68.49
Suez 54.15
SunLffng 45.95
SunMicro 5.93
Suncor g 76.58
Sunoco 74,09 °
SunTrst 79,88
Supvalu 39.68 «
Swisscom 35.85
Symantec 16,95
Syngenta 40.10
Synovus 32.56
Sysco 33.44
TOAmeritr 15.31
TD Bknorth 32.25
TDK 89.90
TJX 28.07
TNT NV 46.20
TXUCorp = 64.30
TaiwSemi _—10.87
TalismE gs 18.30
Target 61.38
TataMotors 16.59
Technip 74.02
TeckCmgn 73.75
TelcNZ 27.73
Telltalia 32.46
TelltaliaA 25.96
TelBrasH 32.10
TelSPaulo 25.92
TelefEsp 67.99
TelMexL 36.26
TAustria 51.76
Telenor 55.70
TelData 59.74
Telkom 98.00
Telstra 19.09
Telus g 50.24
Templein 60.92
Tenaris s 46.40
Terex $s 72.78
Tesoro 107.56
TevaPhrm 37.81
Texinst 30.82
Textron 92.56
ThermoFis 48.45
Thomson 41.40
»3M.CO, ..... 76.83
Tiffany 48.77
TWCablen 36.95
TimeWarn 21.01
Trchmrk 65.26
TorDBkg —-60.34
TotalSAs 70.03
TotalSys 32.44
Toyota 126.29
TrCda g 33.21
Transocn 82.36
Travelers 52.84
Tribune 32.75
Turkcell 14.25
Tycolntl 31.99
Tyson 19.63
UBS AGs 60.27
UPM Ky 25.48
UST Inc 60.00
UltraPt g 54.44
UUniao 92.94
UnilevNVs 29.29
Unilevers 30.09
UnionPac 107.15
UnBnCal 62.28
UtdMicro 3.31
UPS B 70.09
US Bancrp 34.68
US Cellular 73.40
USSteel 103.24
UtdTech 65.06
UtdUtils 30.00
UtdhIthGp 54.88
UnumGrp 23.98
VF Cp 85.25
ValeroE 67.15
VarianMed 48.55
VeoliaEnv 76.02
Verisign 26.02
VerizonCm 38.00
ViacomB 41.00
VimpelCm — 99.59
VirgnMdah = 25.11
Vodafone 27.00
Volvo 84.50
Vornado —-:120.75
VulcanM 118.12
WPP Gp 76.30
Wachovia 54.06
WalMart 48.47
Walgrn 46.60
WA Mull 39.25
WsteMinc 34.43
Weathfdint 47.27
WellPoint 82.25
WellsFgos 34.37
WstnUnn — 23.02
Westpac —106.80
Weyerh 76.21
Whrlpl 87.26
WholeFd 44.81
WmsCos 28.32
Windstrm — 14.85
Wipro 16.27
Wolseley s 25.00
WooriFn 74.29
Wrigley 51.27
Wyeth 52.94
Wyndham n 34.70
Wynn 101.08
XL Cap 69.78
XTOEngy 56.00
XcelEngy 24.69
Xerox 17.30
Xilinx 25.96
YPF Soc 44.01
Yahoo 31.64
YumBrds 59.03
Zimmer 88.31
ZionBcp 82.90
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+21 Crude Oil (bbl) 61.51 64.28 -4.31 +08
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+18 Canada (Dollar) 8674 0013-15 8904-0047.
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+27 London FTSE 100 6397.30 +32.60 +051% A A A +2.84% 0!
+.30 Hong Kong Hang Seng 20209.71 +207.01 +1.038% A A A 41.23% 9..f°
+11 paris CAC-40 5741.38 +237 +0.04% A&A A A 43.60% 397)
oi Tokyo Nikkei 225 1743.76 +258.98 +148% A A A $3,01% 1:7
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+177 Mexico City Bolsa ~- me 11.05% _ +,
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18 Sawer ne aes OverseasA m 26.45. -.06 +16.8 eee 03-4140 4"
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MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD —



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 5B



BISX Rules reform ‘step

in the right direction’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

T= proposed amend-
ments to the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange’s (BISX) listings and
issuers’ continuing obligations
rules have been praised as “a
step in the right direction” by
one market participant,
although they have to be tied
to a reformed Securities Indus-
tries Act that has enforcement
teeth.

Larry Gibson, vice-president-
pensions for Colonial Pensions
Services (Bahamas), said of the
redrafted BISX rules: “It’s a
step in the right direction.

“We need to really go one
step further to make the
required changes to the Secu-
rities Industries Act, to cover
minority shareholders, mergers
and acquisitions, corporate
reporting and timly disclosure
of corporate events, especially
material events - the whole nine
yards.”

The Tribune reported last
Thursday how the redrafted
BISX Rules propose requiring
listed companies to publish
their quarterly and annual
financial figures some 60 and
90 days respectively after the
periods end, with the
exchange’s listings committee
having “the ability to disquali-
fy a director from serving in
that capacity” for a listed firm.

The redrafted Rules are due
to be published by tomorrow
to obtain feedback from listed
- companies, investors and cap-
- ital markets participants, and
other interested parties. Once
the amendments are for-
malised, they then have to be
approved by capital markets
regulator, the Securities Com-
mission of the Bahamas.

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told The Tribune
that one set of rules the
exchange had hoped to pub-
lish but had not completed
were those governing mergers
and acquisitions. 2 OW

4 \ 4 &

“We just haven’t been able
to finalise the mergers and
acquisitions rules, but people
should rest assured they will
be published in a similar fash-
ion to the listings rules and the

continuing obligations rules.”

Among the proposed
amendments to the latter two
sets of rules are a requirement
for all BISX issuers “to make
all material disclosures to a
new department in BISX,
called the BISX Companies
Announcements Office”.

The proposal will require all
issuers, under BISX rules, to
file all results and material dis-
closures with this office first in
an electronic format, using the
secure filing process that the
exchange has adopted.

Once received = and
processed, the new BISX
department would “make avi-
lable on a website these dis-
closures for and on behalf of
the companies”.

Another section deals with
disclosures by company offi-
cers, directors and other insid-
ers of their trading activities in
the firm’s stock. These details
will have to be disclosed in a
timely fashion to BISX, and
made available to other
investors via the exchange’s
website.

“The Securities Industry Act
requires it, but this formalises it
and takes it a step further in

requiring disclosure to the «

exchange,” Mr Davies said.
Most capital markets partic-

ipants wanted to see the full
BISX rules amendments
before providing detailed com-
ments, although some felt the
proposed stipulation that listed
companies provide their full-
year financials 90 days after
year-end was too strict, espe-
cially for life insurance com-
panies such as Colina Hold-
ings (Bahamas) and Fam-
Guard Corporation that relied
on actuaries as well as external
auditors.

Some sources felt the
requirements set out in the
BISX rules should also be
extended to other public com-
panies not listed on the
exchange, such as Bahamas
Supermarkets and RND Hold-
ings that are on the over-the-
counter market.

In the Bahamas, a public
company is defined as one with
50 or more shareholders, so
another argument may be that
the proposed BISX rules
should also be adopted by the
likes of Bahamas First, which
although not listed has a broad
shareholder base.

Another issue likely to be
discussed is whether there
should be a mandatory bar on
trading in a company’s stock
by its officers, directors and
other shareholders in the
weeks leading up to the end of
the full-year or quarter, as
those individuals are likely to

SEE page 15B

- BUSINESS FOR SALE

Well established Fashion Retail
Business. Well known and

respected worldwide Franchise.
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

| VACANCY NOTICE

NETWORK SUPPORT ASSISTANT

FINANCE DIVISION

‘A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the post of Network Support Assistant in
the Information Technology Services Department - Finance Division.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not limited to:

Assisting with the continuous operation and maintenance of
the Corporation’s Local and Wide Area Networks (New
Providence & Family Islands)

Troubleshooting and resolving network hardware/software conflicts

Ensuring that all network devices are properly configured and
functioning

Providing end-user support for hardware, software and network
access issues

Network performance monitoring and the maintenance of
corresponding statistical data

Maintaining network architecture documentation

Repairing Personal Computers and peripheral equipment

Monitoring and maintaining computer equipment inventory/supplies

Identifying and recommending Information Technology solutions

The incumbent should also have:

A minimum of an Associate Degree with concentration in Computer

Science

A minimum of 1-2 years experience in LAN/WAN environment
Network + and/or A+ Certification (Cisco CCNA a plus)

Sound technical knowledge of network and computer operating

systems

Demonstrates knowledge of the operation and function of standard
networking equipment

Excellent written and verbal communication skills

Knowledge of effective user support services

Interested persons may apply by completing and returning an Application

Form to: The Manager - Human Resources & Training,
Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau Bahamas,

on or before: April 20, 2007.

British Colonial Hilton

Nassau

The British Colonial Hilton invites applications for dynamic, confident and
assertive individuals to fill the following positions:

es Manager: This position is responsible for supervising, managing,
and overseeing all aspects of catering sales in addition to leading and motivating
the catering accounts and maintaining relationships with existing accounts to meet
and/or exceed food beverage revenue goals.

é, ididate should meet th
3-5 years hotel industry and management experience with at least 2 years sale experience
demonstrating strong sales, negotiating and closing skills
Advanced knowledge of sales/hospitality principles and practices
Excellent people and leadership skills
Effective communication i.e oral, written and presentation skills
A professional demeanor and appearance
Goal-oriented, focused, energetic and self-motivated with the ability to work with little
supervision
Computer literate and proficient in the use of Microsoft Excel and Word
Open to a flexible work schedule as evenings and weekends are essential at times. Hotel
catering experience would be an asset

chook ak sols ots os as ok as ok

Senior Sous Chef[Kitchen Artiste: Under the direction of the executive chef, this position

ensures cost effective production of the highest quality food appropriate to the market. The selected
individual will primarily be responsible for all artistic creativity within the kitchen including
specialty carvings, show picces and sculptures. Will train and develop department’s team
members.

The successful candidate should meet the following minimum requirements:

Extensive practical knowledge of cooking styles and various cuisine including Continental,
American, Mediterranean/Italian and Caribbean/Bahamian.

10 years experience as a senior chef within operation of at least 4-star designation including
Professional certification/training from a recognized culinary institution

Demonstrated artistic ability to produce high level culinary show pieces, carvings and
sculptures i.e. ice carvings, fruit and vegetables carvings, chocolate carvings and buffet show
pieces. Industry/professional awards are desirable proof of excellence.

Proven experience with a successful track record of achievements in leading a culinary team.
Strong administration and organizational skills with the ability to contain operational costs.
Computer-literate with a working knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.

Proven ability to train and develop members of the culinary and stewarding teams.

Individuals who meet the above requirements are invited to forward their resumes to:

Director of Human resources
BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON, NASSAU
| bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-302-9040
E-mail:recruitment.nassau @hilton.com

Deadline: April 20, 2007



CFA Society of The Bahamas

MONTHLY LUNCHEON SPEAKER EVENT
2006/2007 Officers & Directors

President

David Slatter, CFA

Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust

PO Box N-4853, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 356 7764

Email: david.slatter@fidelitybahamas.com

Topic: “How Much is Your Investment

Management Firm Worth?”
Thursday April 12, 2007
12:00 pm Cocktail Reception

12:30 pm Speaker’s Address
Please arrive promptly!

Vice-President

Kristina M. Fox, CFA
Templeton Global Advisors Ltd.
PO Box N 7759, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 362 4600

Fax: (242) 362 4308

Email: kfox@templeton.com

Location: SuperClubs Breezes

Cable Beach

Steven M. Levitt

Principal

Cambridge International Partners
New York, NY

Treasurer Speaker:
David Ramirez, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.

PO Box N-4873

Nassau Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 2217

Fax: (242) 327 6610

Email:dramirez@pictet.com

Members $25.00

Non-Members $35.00

(If paying by cheque, please make cheque payable to:
CFA Society of The Bahamas)

Secretary

Christopher Dorsett, CFA

Citigroup Corporate & Investment Bank
PO Box N 8158, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 8668

Fax: (242) 302 8569

Email: Christopher.a.dorsett(@citigroup.com

PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED —by Apr. 10, 2007
Chris Dorsett, CFA
Christopher.a.Dorsett@Citigroup.com

*Prepayment required through one of the Board
Members

Reservations:

Mr, Levitt, who joined Cambridge as a partner in 2005, is actively involved
in business development and client advisory work. He rejoined Cambridge
from MilleniumAssociates AG, a Swiss investment banking boutique, where
he focused on strategic advisory work in the asset management and
brokerage industries for North American and European financial
institutions. Prior to that, he spent three years with Putnam Lovell
Securities, also focused on strategic advisory and transactional work with
asset managers and broker-dealers, From 1997 to 1999, Mr. Levitt was an
associate at Cambridge.

Mr. Levitt holds a BA in economics from Stanford University and an MBA
in finance from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He is
a General Securities Representative.



"How Much is Your Investment Management Firm Worth?"
This presentation addresses historical transactional activity im the
investment management space. It covers how investment management firms
have historically been priced and the approach an acquirer would take to
valuing a particular asset manager. The presentation addresses deal
structures and trends, It is intended to be practical, with reaLtife examples.



INSTITUTE

PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
QUALIFIED ACTIVITY


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007






Under the distinguished patronage of the
Hon. Fredrick A. Mitchell

The Ministry of The Public Service
Presents

Singing Competition showcasing over twenty par-
ticipants from the various Government Ministries/ /
Corporations (choirs and soloists) }

Preliminary Round—I Ith April,2007 at 7pm
(Soloists Only)
Place: Holy Trinity Activity Centre
(Stapledon Gardens)





Finals—Sunday 22nd April, 2007 at 6.30pm
(Choirs and Soloists)

Place: Golden Gates Worldwide Ministries

(Carmichael Road)
Included are a few of our shinning stars...





Tickets for Finals are Available at The Ministry of the Public
Service, Poincians Hill, Meeting Street @ $5.00
( Celephone Contact: 502-7200

. Toe SEPT ANAT _SRWATRRE DERG Mi ty sae

Bahamas Electricity Corporation

VACANCY NOTICE

STAFF ACCOUNTANT
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Staff Accountant in the Finance
Division.

The Staff Accountant is responsible for ensuring, the proper accounting for
all projects related activities, which includes proper billing, and monitoring
of receipts of miscellaneous receivables and managing the fixed asset register.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not limited
to:

Assist in the management of the Finance Department which primarily
include: the preparation of disbursements; management of vendor
accounts; and management of payroll

Analyzes monthly financial information and reports

Evaluate and summarize the Corporation’s current and projected financial
, position ;
Ensure timely reporting on specific and general departmental
responsibilities; and any other duties as assigned

Monitors compliance with generally accepted accounting principles
The incumbent should also have:

¢ A Bachelors degree with certification in Accounting ACCA/CPA or
equivalent qualifications
Excellent written and verbal communication skills
Strong analytical abilities and skills
Effective leadership skills
Good time management, and
Strong interpersonal and human relation skills

Interested persons may apply by completing an returning an Application
Form to: The Manager — Human Resources & Training, Bahamas
Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau
Bahamas on or before April 20, 2007.



THE TRIBUNE‘.

Interest rates
under pressure.

FROM page 1B

bune that the fact that some
institutions were seeking — and
offering — deposit rates close to
the existing Bahamian Prime
rate indicated that Prime was
“lower than it should be”, and
was almost becoming discon-
nected from the current envi-
ronment.

The Central Bank’s latest
monthly economic report said
that commercial banks were
now offering rates of 6.5 per
cent on short-term deposits for
terms under one year, a full 1
per cent over the current
Bahamian Prime rate.

Although just pure specula-
tion at this point, observers
questioned whether political
factors were behind the main-
tenance of a 5.5 per cent
Bahamian Prime rate given the
imminent general election on
May 2.

Any increase in Bahamian
Prime prior to the general elec-
tion - with most believing any
increase would be around 0.5
per cent, taking it to 6 per cent
- would not play well with most
of the electorate, as this increase
would be passed on by the com-
mercial banks in the form of 0.5
per cent rises on all their loans,
usually after a 90-day notice
period. |

Majori
jority

Given that the majority of
Bahamians are borrowers and
spenders, not savers and
investors, any increases in inter-
est and loan repayment rates
could hit many especially hard,
reducing their disposable
income and making people feel
less wealthy.

Many Bahamians have less
than $1,000 in their bank

acggunts, and any increases in
debt servicing costs could have

alarming consequences for
some, given their minimal sav-
ings, forcing radical reassess-
ments of household spending
policies.

Central

Although the Central Bank
of the Bahamas in theory enjoys
statutory independence on
monetary policy conduct, and
is able to set the interest rate
structure of its choosing through
the Central Bank Discount
Rate — Prime is linked to this —
in practice any interest rate
changes have to be implement-
ed with the Ministry of
Finance’s knowledge and agree-
ment.

As a result, observers are
increasingly predicting that
Bahamian Prime could rise at
some point after the May 2 gen-
eral election.

Total liquidity in the Bahami-
an commercial banking sector,
which means the surplus assets
in the system that the banks
have available for lending pur-
poses, shrunk to just over $9
million in late December — an
extraordinarily low number.

The liquidity crunch was

. caused by a number of factors,

including the traditional credit
demand from both Bahamian
consumers and companies in
the run-up to Christmas, in
anticipation of seasonal spend-
ing and sticking up inventories
respectively.

In addition, the growing
Bahamian economy generated
strong credit demand from con-
sumers for both mortgage and

’ consumer loans throughout

2005 and 2006, while millions
of Bahamian-denominated dol-
lars were also sucked out of the
commercial banking system to
fund business transactions such
as Freeport Oil Company’s
$32.75 million purchase of Shell
(Bahamas); the $54 million BSL

Holdings buyout of Winn-Dix,;
ie’s 78 per cent stake in;
Bahamas Supermarkets; and,
BAB Holdings purchase of
British American eu
Company.

Excess liquid assets in the,
Bahamian commercial banking:
system have recovered since
2006 year-end, standing at
$84.17 million in February 2007,
arise of $74.74 million since the.
turn of the year. However, the:
total number is about half the
$168.24 million in excess liq-,
uidity that the commercial
banking system possessed in,
February 2006.

The commercial banking sys~
tem’s excess reserves stood at
$212.08 million in February
2007, slightly ahead of the pra,*
vious year. i

Bank
agi

The Central Bank of thg;
Bahamas’ report on monthly,
economic developments for
February 2007 said the,
“favourable interest rate envi;
ronment” saw fixed deposits
during the first two months of,
2007 increase by “more thap-
double” the amount seen if
2006, rising by $86 million. ay

Savings deposit growth,
strengthened to $17.1 million:
from $2.5 million the year,
before, with accretions to total,
deposits up by $66 million the
$78.3 million.

For February 2007, the Cena ,
tral Bank said average interest
rates firmed during the month,,
the weighted average deposit!
rate offered by commercial.
banks up by 0.1 per cent to 3.7,
per cent, the highest rate of 6.5:
per cent being offered for fixed
deposits with maturities of over.
one month. and six.to 12,
months. ° po tye

The weighted average loan
rate, though,.only rose. by..0.04,
per cent to 10.13 per cent. o

FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE
UNIT (THE “FIU”)

P

Pursuant to Section 15(2) of The Financial Intelligence Unit
the public is hereby notified that, the revised
Transactions
of Money Laundering and the Financing of
Terrorism (The ‘2007 Guidelines’’) for financial institutions
within The Commonwealth of the Bahamas have been issued

Act, 2000,
Suspicious
Prevention

BLI

Tl

Guidelines

and are effective as of 19th March 2007.

The 2007 Guidelines replace those Guidelines issued in

December 2001.

Copies of the 2007 Guidelines can be obtained between the
9a.m. to 5p.m. Monday through Friday, from the
Administrative Offices, The Financial Intelligence Unit, 3rd
Floor, Norfolk House, Frederick Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

hours of

Anthony M. Johnson

Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O. Box SB 50086
Nassau, The Bahamas

Relating to

E

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a A ad aE EE I DP BO MSL AL

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LEE! tag EE LILLIE TL OEE AE OE LOLI LE LET EO SE eS


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 7B



DT Ce ee
Film Studios buyer

‘disappointed’ talks
on sale not resumed

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Nassau-based finan-
| cial services executive
who put together an
investor group that attempted
td acquire the Bahamas Film
Studios for $14 million told The
Tribune they were “disappoint-
ed” the development’s owner
had not resumed talks with
them after breaking off the orig-
inal transaction.

Ross Fuller, head of Ashby
Corporation, the Bahamas Film
Studios’ parent company, reject-
ed the deal proposed by Owen
Bethel and his Bahamas Film
Invest International group after
the two parties failed to negoti-
ate a further extension to the
closing deadline, which had
already been pushed back from
February 28, 2007, to March 15,
2007.

.Mr Bethel, president of the
Montaque Group, told The Tri-
bune: “We're disappointed that
it has still not been concluded
and, certainly, that Mr Fuller
has decided not to discuss fur-
ther with uis concluding the
deal.

“As we’ve always said, we
stand ready, able and willing to
move forward and conclude.”

Mr Fuller is thought likely to
be seeking a better offer than
the $14 million that Bahamas
FilmInvest International was
prepared to give him, multiple
sources having told The Tribune
that he is now talking to an as-
yet unnamed Sri Lankan
investor, whose representatives
have already visited the now-
closed Bahamas Film Studios
location in Grand Bahama.

‘The offer from Mr Bethel’s
group will likely be used as
leverage to obtain a better deal,
especially as the circumstances
and potential liabilities facing
Mr Fuller have changed.

It is understood that a major
portion of the $14 million sales
price from Bahamas FilmInvest
International would have been

1 OD, Se a BG

used to settle the Bahamas Film
Studios liabilities by Mr Fuller,
chiefly the $9.95 million First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) loan to construct the
water tank plus a further $1 mil-
lion owed to Grand Bahama-
based suppliers. The former has
akready been settled by its guar-
antor, an insurance company,
which now itself wants paying.

Mr Fuller would have walked
away with a net $3-$4.5 million,
but the original projections
hhave been complicated by the
lawsuit since filed against the
Bahamas Film Studios and him-
self by the project’s sole surviv-
ing founding partner, Paul
Quigley, who is seeking $1.6
million for breach of his
employment contract.

Mr Quigley last month
obtained a Supreme Court
order preventing up to $1.6 mil-
lion in proceeds from the
Bahamas Film Studios’ sales
being taken out of the
Bahamas, and The Tribune
understands that order - which
expired on April 4 last week -
has been extended.

As a result, Mr Fuller may
want a higher price than that
offered by Bahamas FilmInvest
International if he decides to
settle with Mr Quigley but still
obtain the target net proceeds.

The Bahamas Film Studios is
currently facing a number of
lawsuits, including one by
Islands By Design, run by
Bahamian Keith Bishop, who
had sued the Bahamas Film
Studios for $80,000 over an
alleged unpaid Bill relating to
an environmental impact assess-
ment (EIA) he had performed
for the company.

Mr Fuller said that action
would be settled “prudently”,
although he denies the allega-
tions by both Islands By Design
and Mr Quigley.

The Bahamas Film Studios,
which is where the Pirates of
the Caribbean II and III films
were shot, is not short of poten-
tial suitors.



Andrew Law, the former
Association of International
Banks and Trusts (AIBT) chair-
man and head of Credit Suisse
Trust (Bahamas), who has since
set up his own Bahamas-based
financial services provider, the
International Protector Group
(IPG), previously confirmed to
The Tribune he was represent-
ing a group interested in acquir-
ing the rights to the project,
which this newspaper under-
stands is based in the UK.

Another potential player is
Bahamian filmmaker Cedric
Scott, who is based in Los
Angeles and had formed a
group that looked at the
Bahamas Film Studios prior to
Mr Bethel’s consortium being
selected initially as the pre-
ferred bidder.

Many observers, though,
believe that the situation at the
Bahamas Film Studios is unlike-
ly to be resolved until after the
general election on May 2, the
project’s potential sale effec-
tively going into cold storage
until end of May-early June.

This is because with ministers
focusing on getting re-elected,
there will no attention on pro-
viding any buyer of the
Bahamas Film Studios with the
requiured government
approvals. This was a key factor
in undermining Bahamas
FilmInvest International’s deal,
the group not wanting to com-
mit to anything until the
required approvals were in
place, something that ultimate-
ly caused Mr Fuller to lose
patience and refuse to provide
them with the extension they
were seeking after they did not
agree to his terms.

Thus any potential deal is
likely to be held up by the gen-
eral election, and there is little
prospect of the Government -
which is the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios’ landlord by virtue of own-

ing the 3,500-acre site - putting -

pressure on Mr Fuller to strike
a deal with all the current dis-
tractions.

THE CENTRAL BANK
OF THE BAHAMAS

B$ COUNTERFEIT BANKNOTE AND

“4 ee oer

PLACE:

cae & & I

" WHEN:

*
Ld
*

‘CONTACT NOS.:

‘iis
?
a

* APPLY BY:

< .88, 8, 7

INTRODUCTION TO CRISP SERIES SEMINAR

THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS TRAINING ROOM,
MARKET STREET AND TRINITY

PLACE
ENTRANCE

SESSION 1

APRIL 18, 2007 FROM
11:30 A.M. TO 1:00 PM.

SESSION 2

APRIL 18, 2007 FROM 6:00 P.M.

TO 7:30 P.M.

302-2620, 302-2622 &

302-2734

APRIL 13, 2007

THE SEMINAR IS OPEN TO BANKS AND BANKING
INSTITUTIONS, GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND

CORPORATIONS, PRIVATE COMPANIES AND THE
: GENERAL PUBLIC. APPLICATIONS WILL BE TAKEN
ON A FIRST-COME /FIRST-SERVED BASIS, AS SPACE IS

LIMITED.

KINDLY INDICATE WHICH SESSION YOU WILL BE

ATTENDING

Pace Po ec Ne a
fo rw OEY Urol MM NL Sa Oe Uo ea vez)

Our client, a bank & trust company, is seeking applications for the following managerial
positions:

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR:

Responsible for the profitability and efficiency of the office and providing leadership
and direction in human resources, budgeting, compliance, billing & collections, expense
management, marketing, filing, technology and office services. The Office Manager will
also be responsible for the preparation of financial statements, bank reconciliations and
management accounts.

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES FOR OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR:
Candidates must meet the following criteria:
¢ Minimum of three years relevant administrative management experience.
Bachelor’s Degree or higher in related field. Masters degree preferred
Proven ability to enhance operational efficiencies
Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications
Knowledge of Quick Books

CiienT RELATIONSHIP MANAGER:

Responsible for the maintenance and control of client records, payments and
disbursements, the preparation and analysis of monthly client financials and invoices, and
posting and reconciliation of client cash and security trading transactions. The Client
Relationship Manager will also be responsible for preparation, maintenance and analysis of
loan/trust documentation and related fiduciary records.

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES FOR CLIENT RELATIONSHIP MANAGER:
Candidates must meet the following criteria:
Minimum of three years relevant IBC/corporate administration
experience.
Bachelor’s Degree or higher in Business, Law, Finance, Economics or Accounting

required. Masters degree preferred

Excellent data entry skills

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft Word & Excel

Ability to read and interpret governing instruments and legal documentation
including trust agreements, wills, investment management agreements, custodian
agreements, etc.

Both Candidates should also meet the following criteria:
* Proven ability to enhance operational efficiencies
Experience with compliance and KYC processes and procedures
Strong technical and managerial skills
Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills
Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the company
Honest, hardworking and possess ability to meet deadlines

Both positions offer attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the
successful applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a pension plan
and medical coverage.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including references before April
10", 2007 to:
Mark E. Munnings
Partner
Deloitte & Touche
P. O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
or

Email:mmunnings@deloitte.com.bs
Deloitte.



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES DEPARTMENT
FINANCE DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for a Database Administrator in the
Finance Division.

The Database Administrator is responsible for planning, designing,
implementing and maintaining efficient operations of corporate databases and
preparation of logical data base design for in-house application development.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not limited
to:

¢ To participate in Information Systems development and implementation
teams.

e Defines and implements data level security for all corporate databases.

e Manages data migration/conversion issues during system installations.

¢ Defining, establishing and operating databases for executive information
needs.

¢ Develops procedures for the integration of corporate systems.

° Defines, establishes and operates a database to serve Document Management
System requirements.

¢ Leading and participating on committees assessing business information
technology needs.

¢ Manages installation of release upgrades to installed RDBMD products.

¢ Facilitates smooth transition of all business systems vendor upgrades.

The successful candidate should also possess:

e A Bachelors degree in Computer Science or equivalent qualifications

e Sound working knowledge of relevant database management systems

* Sound knowledge of computer programming

¢ Strong analytical skills and time management skills

¢ Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing

e Five years computer experience in a technology/data processing
environment

Interested persons may apply by completing an
returning Application Form to:

The Manager-Human Resources & Training,
Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau, Bahamas
on or before April 20, 2007.


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS












Bujo Kevin Jones
WORKSHOPS
Friday, June 15, 2007
Two Sessions
10:00am to 12:00 noon
and
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Roscoe Dames




Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs FDUCATING & TRAINING B. {T ANS

The College of The Bahamas
Office of Communication
presents

under the st “rs
Ah SPT ve

GALA CONCERT AND DINNER
Saturday - June 16 - 2007 - 7:00 P.M.
COB Band Shell

i. «



Nicki Gonzalez







The Music Business m FRIDAY JAMZ @
7.00 -9- CONCERT TICKETS For reservations,
Pith she iclande to The word Friday, June 15, 2007 SOUS POUR = = = = ee 0 — lols '
with sponsorship opportunities and
Bujo Kevin Jones Bahamas Jazz Project Friday Jamz-$50 | further information, please call
Drummers Clinic (2 hours] featuring Nicki Gonzalez ee ee Office of Communication at
Nicki Génales a GALA CONCERT AND DINNER o@ Gala - $175 | telephones
Saturday, J 16, 2007 :: 7:00 p.m. j ;
The Tricks & Traps of a Solo Career Beep aie aah ae Caen echt an DINED re 4304/4353/4354/4366
(1 hour} Buhanisedcessicieck Gold - $80 We're Taking It up Several Notches
f na Tino Rich Gala Concert and Cheese and Fruit | in Entertainment and Dining
Phillip Martin eatur ing ino Richardson ooo -
Paleuiie you; area yates ohare gerer Show Producer - Roscoe Dames “Mr Jazz”
professional career (1 hour) e
Tenth World

Workshop: $30.00
Students: $15.00

American Airlines/American Eagle

featuring Bujo Kevin Jones Official Airline of Jazz Under the Stars

(African Jazz] |
i | Wyndham Nassau Resort.w ise

Phillip Martin | | The Official Resort of Jazz;\Under the Stars
featuring Alyson Williams

Sen ooth dase with REE Vacalet Catering by Alexandra (Alexandra Maillis Lynch)

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS














| Register early for these rare development
opportunities in pastry making for professionals,
| students, entrepreneurs and pastry enthusiasts!

| NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE
_ Thursday, May 17

Plated Desserts

-CHMI Main Kitchen

_ Professionals

» Max. 24

Fees: $100.00 (Student)
$175.00 (BHA)

$200.00 (General Public)

| Friday, May 18

| Specialty Cakes
_CHMI Main Kitchen
_ Professionals



_ Max. 24

Fees: $100.00 [Student]
$200.00 (BHA]

$225.00 (General)

| Monday, May 21

| Basic Cake Decoration
_CHMI Main Kitchen

_ General Public

Max. 24

| Fees: $100.00 (Student)
_ $185.00 (BHA)

$210.00 [General Public)

| Thursday, May 24
| Marzipan

Advanced Petit Fours

|
|
|

CHMI Main Kitchen
Students

Max. 60

Fees: $100.00 (Student)
$250.00 (BHA)

$275.00 (General Public)

Friday, May 25



CHMI Main Kitchen
Students

Max. 60

Fees: $100.00 (Student)
$225.00 (BHA)

$250.00 (General Public}





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
THE CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE
Industry Training Department is pleased to announce

SEE SY

Professional Pastry Workshop Series

GEORGETOWN, EXUMA
Tuesday, May 22

Advanced Petit Fours

Four Seasons Sugar Kitchen
Professionals & General Public
Max. 24

Fees: $100.00 (Student)
$225.00 (BHA)

$250.00 (General Public}

May 16-25, 2007 —




FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
Wednesday, May 23

Plated Desserts

Best Westin Hotel

Students, Professionals & General
Public

Max. 24

Fees: $100.00 (Student)

$175.00 (BHA)

$200.00 (General Public]

ee
ay Bh,

10% discount will be granted to on

persons who register for three or : oo
more sessions. pe 2 on ma. Fy ? we
CHEF BO FRIBERG is a certified and Europe, and was Pastry Chet
Master Pastry Chef with over 40 for Swedish American Lines
years of professional experience Cruise Ships. In addition, he has
in the industry and has taught demonstrated his pastry artistry
baking and pastry courses to all on television shows including
levels of students - from beginners | the two highly acclaimed public

to seasoned professionals - since television series Cooking Secrets
1978. Chef Bo las his students call of the CIA, and Cooking at The
him) currently holds the position Academy, as well as NBC's Today
of Department Chair of the Baking Show and the locally produced
and Pastry Programme at the Bay Cafe. Chef Bo’s celebrated
Professional Culinary Institute in cookbook The Professional Pastry
Chef, has now been revised to its
Fourth Edition, with the expanded
material divided into a two-volume
set, Fundamentals of Baking

and Pastry and The Advanced
Professional Pastry Chef.

cs

Session Details

* Materials will be provided

¢ Participants are to bring small
pastry tools

e Cantinuing Education Units will
be granted for all sessions.

¢ CEU's accepted by the American
Culinary Federation

Campbell, California. He graduated . ,
Sey mt a ale alol marche cela

and to reserve your space
contact
Monique Butler, CHMI
Telephone 323-5804/6804

from the Confectionery Association



School of Sweden and holds a

| degree as a Master Confectioner.

‘| He has worked in both small shops
and large retail and wholesale
‘operations in the United States







Featuring Certified Master Pastry Chef Bo Friberg of California



47

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TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 9B



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

\ THE COLLECE OF TH

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING &' r








a



CENTRE FOR CONTEVUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES international Conference
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER | Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: Telling the Story















COURSE __| SEC | COURSE i pee aoe The College of The Bahamas
NO. |.NO. | DESCRIPTION a ee DAY START oR EE | February 1 -23, 2008
su hee aaa ta Nassau, The Bahamas
ACCA900 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS! ___ 6:00pm-8:00pm | Mon/Wed E

ACCA901 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS I! 7-May | 10 wks | $275 |

ACCAFOR BEGINNERS It

eel

et

[ot |

[or |

[or |

pal eee a ee
BUSINESS |_| pee a eee cee ol
clerin [| SUERON STORRS wo |
CUSTS00 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. W/S 9:30am-4:30pm | Thurs

[or |

[|

ACCA902

Call for Papers

=
~~ 29-Mar The College of The Bahamas will host the Conference: “Abolition of The Trans-Atlantic
1 da $170

Slave Trade: Telling the Story, February 21-23, 2008 at the Oakes Field Campus, Nassau.

BUSI900
Abstracts of approximately 200 words are invited on the following topics:

BUSI901 CREDIT AND COLLECTIONS I! 6:00-9:00PM































SOMEDIERS . ° Language and Oppression

-COMPEO" O1_| COMPUTER APPLICATIONS... ° Religion in Slavery: Agent Provocateur or Opiate?

COMP901 ie COMPUTER APPLICATIONS! e Slavery and Human Sensibility

COMP902 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1! ° Power and Enslavement

COMP941 QUICKBOOKS ° Kinship across the Diaspora

COMP953 01__| PC UPGRADE & REPAIR ° Identity: Culture, Race and Gender

Comiees ot Ee ES SOR ° Enslavement and Liberation: Pedagogy

COMP930 AGE DES ° Liberation: Ideologies, Contexts and Dynamics

'DECORATING |__| ° Liberation: Simple Past or Present Continuous?

[FLORs00 | 01 6:00pm-9:00pm . : se

FLOR601 FLORALDESIGNI, -00pm-9:00pm Please send abstracts as an attached Word file to Jessica Minnis, Chair of the Conference
FLOR802 101 | FLORAL DESIGN IN | 6:00pm-9:00pm | Mon roa Committee at abolitionconference@cob.edu.bs no later than Friday, August 31, 2007.
| DECO800 Wed

ae et

BH Sa aa Conference Structure

el eae S:00pen-8:00pm | Tues — Lowe _| $225 The conference will feature 20-minute papers from all disciplines, followed by 10-minute
HEALTH AND discussions, presented in concurrent and plenary sessions. Panel and poster proposals
FITNESS | | : etd will also be considered. Such proposals should be as complete as possible.
MASG900 [01 | MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | | 6:00pm-9:00p | $465 |

nas MESSAGE THERAE ERENT awiie:.| aaa Submissions (an electronic copy) should be directed to:

ae Jessica Minnis

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR |! D | 10 wks | $400 | :

ee eee eae Seo) | cent ee

ounemeNe ee eee |_| School of Social Sciences
| MGMT900 Lo1_| HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT | 60pm 9:20pm. Thurs 10May |9wks | $250 | The College of The Bahamas

MGMT901___.| 01__| HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT II Mon 7-May | 9wks | $300 | Oakes Field Campus

ee at eee a eet oe eee ee ee ae see ee te eee P O Box N4912

SEWING 2-22) ee ee es ee ee ee

-SEW 600_——[ 01 [BASIC FREEHAND GOTT Nes ———7aiay [owe [=25] | E-mail abolitioncont@cob.edu.bs

[SEW 802___—«| 01 _| BASIC FREEHAND CUTTING 1! Thurs 10May | 10 wks | $250 | . i ;

| SEws0s |. 01_| DRAPERY MAKING | oa Tues 8-Ma | $225 |

Deadline for Submission: Monday, December 31, 2007.

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 (242) 328-0093/328-1936/302-4300 ext Accommodation for Non-Resident Delegates

5202 or email: persdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). Information will be forthcoming.
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course materials.

atncecccceccncessccccasceccccscserecceceecesecseseceeeseeseaeeeee esses anes eeeeeeeeeseeesarennes saeeeeeeeeeerereeeaeeseeeseeareeceseuesenecenesanansesansseceaesseasesasansnaneneaseneaeeeeaseeeeeseneee

Registration

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND | three days: seas
EXTENSION SERVICES Day Rate: $150.00

Late Registration Fee:

° Student Rate: $150.00
Comp uter Offe erings — Summer 2007 Student Day Rate: $ 75.00
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I ; For information on the availability of student subsidies, please contact:
Course Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers re 43) 302, lee Graduate Programmes and International Relations

and does not understand how it works. This course covers the major

computer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software using: : sae : be
() Microsoft ince — Word Processing (ii) Ricoh Excel — Spreadsheet (ia) Registration is open and online at http://www.cob.edu.bs/abolitionconf.php.

Microsoft Access — Database Management.
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Pre-requisite: None -

Begins: Monday, 7" May 2007 6:00pm - 9:30pm Section 01 (CEES) Office of Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
aes Penning 5" May 2007 10:00am _- 1:30pmSection 02 (CEES) In conjunction with the Offices of Academic Affairs and Outreach
Venue: CEES Computer Lab e
Tuition: $450.00 - Summer Research Workshop Series 2007
30th April- 11th May 2007
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS Il Gerace Research Centre, San Salvador
Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office — Word Processing (ii) Microsoft ipa : dy ot .
Excel — Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access — Database Management. An Exc €p tional Opp ortunity f or Building Research _ nd Writing. Skills
Participants Completing Earn Continuing Education Units (CEUs)
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I
Begins: . Thursday, 10 May 2007 Summer Research Workshop Series 2007 is designed to build research capacity through the
Time: 6:00pm - 9:30pm honing of critical research and writing skills as well as grant writing. In addition, the inclusion
Duration: 9 weeks of the module on marine pollutants provides a forum in which College/University faculty can
oo cae Lab work in concert with governmental and non-governmental agencies on national issues.
Participants will select two of the following three modules:
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS Module I--Essentials of Technical Writing—(36 hours = 3.5 CEUs)
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft Facilitator: Dr. Padma T. Venkatraman, Coordinator of Graduate Diversity, University of
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations. Rhode Island
Oe This modules in scientific writing has three main goals: (1) to show participants how to write a
F peor eduisite: None . technical manuscript (including, but not limited to a scientific research paper, a proposal to a
csi ty May 2007 funding agency, or a thesis or dissertation) and to make informed choices about its content,
pain: 1s ee care structure, and style; (2) to show how to use the English language to communicate the desired
Pees cee Cinipaeies message att Pee re aS seen ett to show how to use the language to
Fees: $160.00 communicate the message to the widest possible audience.
Module II—Principles of Grant Writing (36 hours = 3.5 CEUs
PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR Facilitator: Nancy B. Pe: Roe Image (a worldwide oats infrastructure service),
Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information Marble Falls, TX
environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, The goal of Principles of Grant Writing is to enhance the faculty-initiated grant application. The
Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs. objectives are to: 1). Determine the grant application requirements, review criteria and organization
: wa required by the RFP; 2). Write integrated goals, hypotheses, objects, and outcome measures for
Ao Sd Jth May 2007 a scholarly project; 3). Match budget requirements and limitations to the project scope; 4). Prepare
Tie: 6:00 ae 8:00pm Aiciileysae Wakes a project summary and project plan draft; 5). Evaluate project design for innovation, importance,
Duration: Daecks : y y feasibility, and significance; 6). Use tools to streamline and organize the application preparation
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab process; and 7). Evaluate studies involving human and animal subjects for appropriateness.
Fees: $500.00 Participants will work in groups on interactive assignments to explore academic and scholarly
multidisciplinary strengths for possible future collaborations.
QUICKBOOKS Module UW1—Introduction to Marine Pollution (3.5 hours = 3.5 CEUs)
Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs Facilitator: Dr. Rainer Lohmann, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Oceanography,
(fewer than 20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting University of Rhode Island :
fone cael Tapeh Pro ubhate Students will 2 Ny ae This module is an introduction to marine pollution emphasizing geochemical aspects of the *
eir company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees. sources, transport, fate and effects of pollutants in the coastal marine environment. The pollutants
Pre-requisite: None include oxygen—demanding waste, petroleum, metals, synthetic organics and radioactive/solid
Begins: Tuesday, 8 May 2007 wastes. Risk assessment and specific case histories will also be used to evaluate the environmental
Time: 6:00pm — 9:00pm impact of the pollutants.
Duration: 6 weeks > :
Venue: CEES Computer Lab pathaauee OF EUs {continuing Education Units)
Fees: $330.00 Group Contact/Session Collaboration = 5 per Module
Preparation/Individual Work = 10 hours per Module
TOTAL per Module = 36 (3.5 CEUs per Module) .
WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web Targeted Audience: The College of The Bahamas faculty, staff and representatives of government and non-
pages will cover Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific ]. | government organizations
topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and Estimated number of participants: 10-15 persons per module
hosting of web pages. Cost:
, ° $820.00 per internal participant (Includes workshop fees--$300--plus room and board at GRC)
Pre-requisite: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word- ° $1,015.00 per external participant (Includes workshop fees--$300--plus and room and board at GRC)
processing Participants will be accommodated at GRC ona first come first served basis (all rooms are double occupancy.
Begins: Thursday, 14” & 15" June 2007 Overflow will be referred to Riding Rock at $145 per night, double occupancy.
Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days For further information and registration, please contact:
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Dr Linda Davis, Vice President, Research, Graduate Programmes & International Relations
Fees: $550.00 Tel: (242) 302 4315 :
: : el:
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 302-4300 ext $201 5202 5205 or email a
ees are included with the exception of the oe fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting Tek: Tel: BBS; 445
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to ek: Tel: (242) 302 5

change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course E-mail: shiggs@cob.edu.bs
get i
: Part-time Instructor in Information Technology L&ll (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able :
®t® teach Information technology at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least :








PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007



CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
EXTENSION SERVICES (CEES)

ACADEMIC UPGRADING DEPARTMENT

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Geoarapry New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
keteach Geography at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

Bachelor's Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

Sievel of BGCSE in the subject area.

§ Part-time Instructor in College Prep Mathematics (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able
to teach Mathematics at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned :
Bachelor’s pee in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the :

- el of BGCSE in the subject area.

$ePsrt-time Instructor in College Pep piotoay rer Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach ;
eaology at the College Preparatory, “level. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor's;

Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the level of

ERSCSE in the subject area,

New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
evel. candidates must have at least an earned

fakeart-tiine Instructor in College Prep Chemist
Paaach Chemistry at the College Preparatary/b

E=aichelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

level of BGCSE in the subject area.

2art-time Instructor in College Prep Agriculture (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
(aa Agriculture at the College Preparatory/BG evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

“fével of BGCSE in the subject area.
Aart-time Instructor in College Frrep Histony/Socier Studies (New Providence Campus) Candidates must
~ He able to teach History/Social Studies at the College Preparatory) evel. Candidates must have

experience at the level of BGCSE in the subject area.

“I
Y

.

“Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the level of
BGCSE in the subject area. :

tin

‘Tevel of BGCSE in the subject area.

= To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete ;
application packet consists of an application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form :
a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment) :
-and the names and contact information of three references addressed to: :

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

ade

ve

RY
TAN

| PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

DIC.
farlrine Instructor in Accounting for Beginners 4 IL & Ill (New Providence Campus}
andidates must be able to teach Accounting at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must

is desirable.

“must have at least an earned Master's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable. ts seeped RT? is . diced



Part-time Instructor in Busitless Etiquétte (New Providence Campus
Candidates must be able to teach Business Etiquette at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates
must have at least an earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is

; desirable.



. a .
: Part-time Instructor in Human Resource Management |, Il (New Providence Campus)
E Candidates must be able to teach Human Resource Management at the introductory to advanced level.

- Candidates must have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate

Pp is desirable.

| ‘
Part-time Instructor in Computer lications |, ll (New Providence Campus
= Gandidates must be able to teach computer courses at the Introductory to advanced level. Candidates
ft must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable.
i”

!

« Part-time Instructor in Credit & Collections Procedures and Control | & Il New Providence Campus}
andidates must be able to teach Creal ollections Procedures and Control at the introductory to

* Advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent in the subject.

A teaching certificate is desirable.

xo

j; Rart-time Instructor in Superior Customer Service Workshop (New Providence Camputs) :
4° Gandidates must be able fo teach Superior Customer Service /Course Workshop. Gan idates must have :

«at least an earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

san earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

carne Instructor in QuickBooks (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach QuickBooks
sat the introductory level. Candidates must have at Teast an earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the :

“subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in PC Upgrade and Repair (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
stgach PC Upgrade and Repair at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an
earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

p :Part-time Instructor in Effective PowerPoint W/S (New Providence campus} Candidates must be able to
i Staach Microsoft PowerPoint at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an :

| earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

| Part-time Instructor in Interior Decorating | & Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be ableto
féach Interior Decorating at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned :

‘Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.
ao

‘Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

rt-time Instructor in Floral Design |, II & Ill (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
oral Désign at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least a minimum of five years :

working experience in the area.



Effective ng a r ry
degree or equivalent in the subject or related area. A teaching certificate is desirable.
at

art-time Instructor in Basic of Freehand Cutting | & Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be
Sosa Basic of Freehand Cu ting at the introdiictory to advanced level. Candidates must have at
least five years working experience in the area.
as

Part-time Instructor in Drapery Making | & II (New Providence campus) Candidates must be able to teach
fapery Making at the introductory level to advanced level. Candidates must have at least a minimum —;

of'five years working experience in the area.

oi
Part-time Instructor in Bath and Kitchen Accessories (New Providence Campus)
andidates must be able to teach Bath an chen Accessories at the introductory level to advanced

level. Candidates must have at least a minimum of five years working experience in the area.
oF *
Part-time Instructor in Basic Car Maintenance (New Providence Campus)

Candidates must]

mast have at least an earned Bachelor's degree or equivalent in the subject.

wt .

Yo: ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete



application packet consists of an Application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form :

4 detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment)

| 4nd the names and contact information of three references addressed to:

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

BSesmrneenesever

jess

HE COLLEGE OF THE «

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING & TRAININ 6

Fart-time Instructor in College Prep Civics (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
Civics at the Callege Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor’s ;
uRart-time Instructor in College Prep English pangage (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be
cable to teach English at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the i

“ve at least an earned Master's degree or equivalent (e.g. CPA CA) in the subject. A teaching certificate ;

_ Part-time Instructor in Introduction to Business | & Il (New Providence Campus)
r ata must be able ta teach Introduction to Business.at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates :

Part-time Instructor in Web Page Design Workshop (New Providence Campus) Candidate must be able:
tq teach Web Page Design at ths iReckiclory to aavanead level. Candidates must have at least an earned :

J able to teach Basic Car Maintenance at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates:

1M TAN TPSTRT ROTTEN LSU TROBE TET AENEAN HR BTTTTE PATH OPER WENN MRT ROTM REPU HPT STON SOUR Y RUE TRTPN PNY TOWN MT ER IAT NTOBN NE HRN UNION TET NTP TAT TNR ON

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS





| PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
(New Providence, Bahamas)

Lean Mastery

Human Resource Management
Business Administration
Administrative Skills
Supervisory Skills

Public Accounting

Project Management
Professional Management
Executive Leadership Skills
Writing & Research Skills

The Legal Environment

General Legal Principles
Employment Law

Company Law

Banking & Trust Law

Real Estate Law

Real Estate Management
Insurance Management & Sales
Insurance Law

E-business Practice & Management
Hotel Front Office Management
Accounting For Non-Financial Managers

All candidates must have earned Masters’ Degrees from a recognized accredited institution in the
“Bachelor's Degree in the subject-area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the : relevant area or its equivalent. ;

: To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. ‘Acomplete

: application packet consists of an Application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form
: a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment)

cat least an earned Bachelor's Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching and the names and contact information of three references addressed to:

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES
SUMMER SEMESTER 022007









COCRSE cope BEGINS DUR. DAYS TCITION & RESOURCE
FEE MATERIALS
{ADDITIONAL
$40 APP FEE
FOR NEW
STUDENTS)

seem t ee a eee eee ee
Kitchen

cee a ee eae sleet
Kitchen

eee ee ee
Kitchen

- . :00-9: zy b fee



5. Cake & Pastry Making II

Tues
ee
Kitchen
Kitchen
Kitchen
| ° 4 Kitchen

‘or further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the
ulinary & Hospitality Management Institute at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY

Library and Media Services
Librarian — Technical Services

1. Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 May 17 6 weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pm_ } $225.00 $10-$12 per week | CHMI Main
Kitchen
. c is ;



































5 weeks





The position falls in the area of Technical Services. The incumbent should be dynamic,
innovative individual with a strong commitment to service within a diverse community. The
Librarian will demonstrate successful administrative experience in a library, sound understanding
of emerging technologies and the ability to use them within the library setting and commitment
to developing a strong integrated library service within the academic environment.

The duties of the Librarian will include management of the Unit, leadership in short and long
range planning to enhance and expand library services, development and promotion of library
resources and services, personnel supervision, initiation and management of appropriate
emerging technologies, and liaison with relevant internal and external groups.

The Librarian should possess a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from an
accredited institution, and a minimum of two years, post Masters professional library
experience. The incumbent will demonstrate strong communication and interpersonal skills
that engender an excellent customer friendly environment. Evening and weekend work on
rotation, library research, service to the community and library instruction will also be required.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A
complete application packet consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas’
Application Form, a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of all transcripts (original transcripts
required upon employment) and the names and contact information for three references
addressed to:

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Please visit the College’s website at for more information about the institution and
to access the College’s Employment Application Form.

INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

COURSE SCHEDULE
SUMMER 2007 — Beginning April 16th
CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I: | Mon/Wed: 6 — 8:00 PM
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I: Tues/Thurs: 4 — 6:00 PM
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 8:00 PM
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I: Mon/Wed: 6:00 — 8:00 PM
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: Mon/Wed: 4 — 6:00 PM
GERMAN I: TBA
MANDARIN CHINESE I: TBA








LOCATION: Munnings Building (next to KFC at the COB Roundabout, gnd Floor, Room 15)



PRICE: $ 250.00 per course



DURATION: 4 hours per week for 7 1/2 weeks, total course hours: 30 hours



TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587



Communication: The Key to Global Understanding

ETAT TTY OTHE HTH TER EMH PETE THY RIN ITH INH PTET WOONONA HUT ETP NT RT



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 118







THE

Visit our website at www.cob.edubs



EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS |

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

IMPORTANT NOTICE

FINANCIAL COMMUNITY ADVANCED TECHNICAL
EDUCATION TRUST FOR BAHAMIANS (1973)

EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE FOR TECHNICAL STUDIES

Applications are invited from suitable candidates for consideration for financial
Awards offered by the above Trust at The College of The Bahamas or any accredited
Technical or Community College or University overseas, commencing September,
2007.

The Awards are intended to provide financial assistance for training at advanced
level in areas of technology where there is vital need for such skills in The Bahamas.
Areas of study include the following:

(a) Automobile, Mechanical and Architectural Engineering
(b) Aviation/ Maintenance
(c) Automobile or Marine Maintenance (gas or diesel engines)
(d) Air-conditioning and refrigeration
(e) Elevator Engineering
(f) Computer Engineering
(g) Marine Engineering (Coastal Management)
Food Processing and Production techniques
Manufacture of Clothing, Furniture, etc.
Craft Production and Boat Building
Radio and Television Technology/Mass Communication
Medical Technology
Crop Science
Livestock Science
Any other area of technology acceptable to the Selection Committee

Successful candidates will be required to pursue a course of study from (1) to not
more than three (3) years leading to a Certificate or Diploma (Not a Degree).

It is expected that candidates will seek admission to a recognized technical institution
of their choice.

Candidates should have successfully completed high school education in The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and should preferably have attained G.E.C. ‘O”’
level/B.G.C.S.E. certificates in appropriate subjects or completed courses of study
in a technical field. The value of each award will depend upon the cost and length
of course.

The successful candidates will be expected to return to The Bahamas on the
satisfactory completion of the course to give the country the benefit of their training.

Application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Education Loan
Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology, Thompson Boulevard.
Completed application forms should be returned in an envelope marked “Financial
Community Advanced Education Scholarship”, Scholarship & Education Loan
Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology, P.O. Box N-3913,
Nassau, Bahamas to arrive no later than the deadline date.

APPLICATION DEADLINE : Thursday May 31°" | 2007

INCOMPLETE OR LATE APPLICATION FORMS
WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED



COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

- Residential
project for Grand
Bahama unveile

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

US developer and
Bahamian architect
have teamed up to

develop a boutique, luxury 29-
unit residential complex on
Grand Bahama, which is
scheduled for completion in
summer 2008 with properties
selling for between $764,000 to
$1.065 million.

Port Terra Nova, which will
be located one mile east of
Freeport’s Port Lucaya desti-
nation, is being developed by
Bahamian Donald Dean and
US developer Paul Kalomaris,
according to a release issues
by the US real estate agent
appointed as sales and mar-
keting agent.

The 29-unit property will
include penthouse, garden res-
idences and town houses, with
35-80 boat docks, and be devel-
oped by Port Terra Nova
Development Company and a
location called Smith’s Point.

The phase one ‘founders’
programme will offer units
ranging in price from $764,000
to $1,065 million. That pro-
gramme is to be launched this
week, with the developers
intending that it allow prospec-
tive buyers an early opportu-
nity to become involved at
“pre-construction prices, 50 per
cent below the current
Bahamian market compara-
bles”.

The development aims to
exploit Freeport’s and Grand
Bahama’s proximity to Florida,
especially areas such. as West
Palm Beach, where a large
number of wealthy, high-net
worth US residents live - the







Main tasks:

basis

projects

other offices

Requirements:







P ! Qualities:









¢ Good IT skills







CREDIT SUISSE

CPA or equivalent qualification
A minimum of 7 years’ post qualification experience in the banking industry ah
with at least 3 years experience in investment banking essential 7
° Knowledge of US GAAP especially for derivatives and structured products

¢ Experience with working with multicurrency trial balances and a full understanding
of foreign exchange risk management

A commitment to service excellence
¢ Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
° Good organizational and interpersonal skills
e Ability to work independently

Benefi dell chide:

¢ Competitive salary and benefits

Bahamian

SMaeH Fe RSeEse

Â¥

i

*
nw
ry ie

Ch



architect involved;

partners planning projects
in Nassau and Eleuthera



ideal target market for second :

home residences in the
Bahamas.

In common with the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and Grand Bahama
Development Company (Dev-
co), Port Terra Nova Devel-
opment Company views Grand
Bahama as an ideal second
home location, given that most
coastal areas in Florida are
now fully-developed and there
is no to little room left for con-
struction.

Partner

Mr Kalomeris, partner and ©

developer of Terra Nova
Development Company, said:
“The addition of this luxury
gated community truly com-
pletes our vision of providing
unique waterfront enclaves for
the up-scale market within
close proximity to US shores.”

Each Port Terra Nova resi-
dence overlooks its own pri-
vate fixed dock. They range in

size from 2,281- 2,500 square’

feet, and are available in three
configurations; two-bedroom,
2.5 bath garden residences and
townhouses, and the pent-
house with three-bedrooms
and 3.5 baths, including a semi-
private elevator.

The project, will be built on a

Credit Suisse Nassau

Branch

is presently considering applications for a

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Ensuring that the Branch’s books and records are accurately recorded on a timely

¢ Reconciling profit and loss for various product types covering loans, derivatives,
structured notes and subordinated debt

¢ Preparing all Branch, Group and Regulatory reporting to specific reporting
deadlines under US GAAP and Swiss GAAP

¢ Preparing of reports for Senior management in London and New York

e Ensuring that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated

¢ Involvement in various investment banking and Group accounting issues and

¢ Advising front office on structuring trades for the Branch
¢ Managing the assistant controller and influencing peers both in. Bahamas and

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.
Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.
NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS APRIL 18, 2007.

natural elevation of 15 feet
above sea level, and will con-

* tain a back-up generator and

underground power.

The private marina will:be
constructed first, the develop-
ers said, with fixed docks con-
taining 100 amp power stations
and dock boxes. Owners take
full deeded fee-simple title for
both the residence and the
amenity of the private dock. «

Terra Nova Development

_ Said that apart from its Grand

Bahama venture, it was also
planning projects in Eleuthéra
and Nassau, although it did fiot
release any details. ae

’Mr Dean was described?as
the principal and lead desigtief
of The Architects Incorporat®
ed, a Grand Bahama-based
architectural, planning and
interior design firm. -

Among the projects the
company is said to have been
involved with are Freeport’s
new police headquarters; the
Imperial Life and Family
Guardian buildings; the Star
General Insurance building;
and FOCOL’ service stations.

Aquamarine Realty, the US
real estate sales agent for Port
Terra Nova, has been involved
with real estate sales at Old:
Bahama Bay on Grdiid
Bahama and Emerald Bay in
Exuma.












ST ST OS LES RL BORAT ET (eg EPR AEE 0 CAPA IOS I EIA EEBS LL TLS Bh IW TT A nobly ATR ENE a i a ML LE nk BP I ln oy

PAGE

PR PEL OLD ORLA UREN STEERED



“ny
7 4
oo
ohh Po Rane

FROM page 1B

i

‘ny majority ownership of the
ilton from the Canadian Com-
mercial Workers Industry Pen-
sion Plan (CCWIPP). .

Phey want to renegotiate
rice of the land,” Mr
is satd. “Price is a fairly
mental term.”

Phe Gevernment understood
to bé keen for the IGY project
to go ahead as originally
planned, , Mr Farkas telling The
Tribune Particularly in the last
SIX months or so, government
has been extremely supportive.”







SOREN ceban cone rueMNEEA:

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Side





yOLUORS








we
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ae



JR aE RoR BOK ak ok







Cent
Providence

The Baha

— ee
TiC ish






PNR






wegen

f+
OT any





Pa ORCI 02 TESS TOE

| \ 4th Floor Suite 400
i #1 Bay Street
; Nassau, Bahamas

Pricing Miorin ition As OF:
\ a . as eee 209 _
Lomechnesere oe
















COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

if MATTER OF ALL THOSE pieces parcels and lots of land
‘ f the original Crown Grant to W.W, Narita and situate
¢ easter aid western side of the Main Queen’s
eth Victoria Hill in the vicinity of an area Known as Palaris on the
of Sau Salvador one of the Istands of the Commonwealth of The

AND

eee’ MATTER OF the Quicting Titles Act, 1959 (Chapter 393)
Statute Law of ‘The Bahamas revised edition 2001

oral AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of BRUCE NIRO

SARA COR GOR SOR ROR RR RRR SRE RRR E

NOTICE

FORO ROR OR ROR ROR RRR ERE RARER RR

BRUCE NERO, The Petitioner claim to be the owner in fee simple in
posseSsion of the ne ces parcels or lots of land hereinbefore described
and huve made application to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act to have the
title to the said pieces parcels or lots of land investigated and the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title.to.
be beatae by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the Act.

Copies of a diagram or plan showing the position boundaries shape:
marks and dimensions of the said pieces parcels or lots of land may be
t sted during normal working hours at the following places:

, New Providence,

rs of Messrs. Davis & Co.,
ree, 4th Floor Suite 400, #1 Bay Street, Nassau, New
mas, Attorneys for the Petitioner

ereby given that any person or persons having a right of
e claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
(30) days after the appearance of the Notice herein
he Regisiry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau

i ve on the Petitioners or the undersigned a statement
e prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed

such person to file and serve a statement of claim within
430) day hercin will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 2nd day of April, A.D. 2007

DAVIS & CO.
Chambers
British Colonial Hilton
Centre of Commerce



3K CAL Ag ‘SHARE INDE :



12B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007






The Government’s chief
investment negotiator, Sir Bel-
ton Bethel, who is also the
Hotel Corporation’s deputy
chairman and managing direc-
tor, is understood to have met
with Adurion executives over
their Hilton investment and the
{GY project while in London
last month for his knighthood.

It is understood that while Sir
Belton communicated the Gov-
ernment’s eagerness to see the
IGY project move forward, it
was reluctant to intervene in
negotiations between two pri-
vate sector parties on a com-
mercial transaction,

2007

No.00028

Highway North

The Bahamas.

British Colonial Hilton,






















BUSINESS

The imminent general elec-
tion will also distract the Gov-
ernment’s focus, its ministers
concentrating on becoming re-
elected, so any government
intervention is likely to be wish-
ful thinking on Ivy’s part.

Mr Farkas said IGY had
already invested several million
dollars in the project over the
two years it has been working
on it, having finally received an
agreement in principle from the
Government just before Aduri-
on sought to alter the joint ven-
ture’s terms.

Both CCWIPP and sources
close to Adurion had indicated
that they were drafting a new
offer they would present to
IGY, but Mr Farkas said: “We
have not received any revised
term sheet.”

project to happen, and all three
parties were agreed on the end
objective. The only difference
currently was over how to get
there, with Adurion wanting to
redraft the joint venture IGY
agreement to ensure the deal
made sense to all sides and was
the most efficient, effective way
of working things.

The Tribune was told that
Adurion did not believe there
was a “deal breaker” issue to
be overcome, but it was
acknowledged that no signed
agreement with IGY existed
yet.

Failure to conclude a deal
with IGY would be a blow to
both the British Colonial Hilton
and the downtown Nassau rede-
velopment initiative, as the pro-
posed project would both

FIDELITY




enhance the hotel and make it a
‘magnet attraction’ for visitors

Contacts familiar with the sit-
uation said that both CCWIPP
and Adurion wanted the IGY

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIO MOISE OF MACKEY
STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10th
day of April, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau. Bahamas.



NASSAU PLASTICS COMPANY
_ THE SIGNPOST
AND THE TROPHY CASE

Wishing all our valued customers a
HAPPY EASTER!

We will be closed on
Tuesday, 10th April
in order to give our hardworking staff a
well deserved rest.
Reopening on Wednesday
ready to serve you even better!



PARKGATE ROAD, 393-1332





















se Securit_y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. PS $ Div $
i Abaco Markets 0.95 0.96 0.01 1,000 -0.282 0.000 N/M
{ Baharnas Property Fund 11.59 11.59 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.9
} Bank of Bahamas 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.737 0.260 12.2
Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.2
Bahamas Waste 2.30 2.30 0.00 0.199 0.060 11.6
Fidelity Bank 1.30 1.30 0.00 0.170 0.050 7.6
Cable Bahamas 10.35 10.35 0.00 300 0.915 0.240 11.3
Colina Holdings 2.10 2.10 0.00 0.078 0.040 26.9
cammonwealih Bank 14.19 14.19 0.00 146 1.084 0.680 13.1
Consoiidated Water BDRs 4.80 4.76 -0.04 211 0.118 0.045 40.7
Dector's Hospital 2.46 2.46 0.00 0.295 0.000 8.3
Famguard 5.94 5.94 0.00 0.552 0.240 10.8
Finco 12.49 12.49 0.00 0.779 0.570 15.7
FirstCaribbean 14.61 14.61 0.00 0.977 0.500 15.0
) 7 Focol 17.06 17.06 0.00 1.644 0.510 10.4
15 1 Freeport Concrete 0.50 0.50 0.00 -0.434 0.000 N/M
20 7. ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.532 0.100 13.6
° Oye. lg 8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.560 15.4
40 ro 0 Premier Real 0.00 1.269 0.795 79 |. A
| omy : SRE eate % AWS LOS ; .
wheal ih es Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
y Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.766 1.125 8.8 :
19.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM :
q0.54 ' 0 ?0 ND Holdings : 0.55 0.20 0.021 0.000 26.2 7
ee po ae BLE SEEMS ‘Securities “
i $00, 23.00 ABDAB 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
i) 1100 Zaharnas Supermarkets 14.00 1.770 1.320 8.3 9.04%
0.60 . 0.25 RIND Holding 5 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
Pe : : i aed ial Funds AN
{ xy ! ro Bund Name Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
i . Joliet Money Market Fund 1.333665"
Fidelity Baharnas G & | Fund 3.0988***
oftta MS! Preferred Fund 2.625419**
Cotina Bond Fund 41.233813°*"*
5¢ Videlity Prime Inc 3
# 5 ‘ 2 oe i § MAAN
‘ 34 ALLISHAISE INLD! Ha Dyer ae) = 1,000,00 YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by clos sing, price NAV KEY. :
WPA hesteloring 4 Ou hast 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
wk 4 . fownu pice in dast 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity * - 23 March 2007
| neoovieon love Frey day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Jnyts Glove taunont day wotghtad price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week * - 8 February 2007
Hany Chatnge tn big price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths:
Yoanty Yo Momber fal heros traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *- 34 January 2007
{ts tends per chore paid-in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
by piloe divided ty the fast 14% month earings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 * - 28 February 2007
i Sd ee Re os - 8 February 2007
Lit tag A EL ROR MORE DATA ® INFORMATION CALI (282) 04260





and Bahamians, and provide:





another ‘anchor’ to revitalize
that part of Bay Street.

IGY specializes in reinte-
grating waterfronts back into
their communities and tourist
industries, having done this with
its newly-opened flagship devel-
opment, the $150 million Yacht
Haven Grande on St Thomas
in the US Virgin Islands. This
features a 70-room hotel and 12
luxury condos, and the compa-
ny’s target market is five-star
marina developments.

An economic impact study
predicted that the IGY-project
would generate “very substan-
tial employment”, creating 700
direct full-time jobs and anoth-
er 400 indirect permanent jobs
for Bahamians. The indirect
jobs will be created at suppli-
ers of goods and services to the
development, and through ser-
vices provided to yachts.

The study also forecast that
the IGY development would
create 200-250 full-time jobs
during construction, and has a
total economic impact of $222.8
million over a 20-year period.

Ivy’s proposed marina on
West Bay Street would have 72
slips, catering chiefly to the larg-
er yachts and vessels, those of
between 100-150 feet to 200 feet
and longer.

The development will feature

THE TRIBUNE



marina developer
t alternative sites

a boutique hotel of about 150-
200 rooms, several restaurants,
retail and a parking structure
for over 300 cars.

Adurion itself has made a
more-than $30 million invest-
ment commitment to revitalize
the Hilton, including a $15 mil-
lion refurbishment pro-
grammed, after taking control
of the British Colonial Devel-
opment Company from its
Canadian pension fund partner.

The West Bay Street marina
is the first one that IGY will be
developing, owning and build-
ing from scratch in the
Bahamas, and it is also involved
in a potential deal with Kerzner
International to redevelop Hur-
ricane Hole marina on Paradise
Island.

IGY and its subsidiary,
Applied Technology and Man-
agement, have provided design,
development, operational,
financing and engineering assis-
tance to the Atlantis marina on
Paradise Island, the Bimini Bay
Resort and Casino; Emerald
Bay and Crab Cay in the Exu-
mas; Old Bahama Bay;
Freeport Harbour; Great Gua-
na Cay; Hatchet Bay Marinas
in Eleuthera; Whale Cay in the
Berry Islands; the Windermere
Club in Eleuthera; and Disney’s
Gorda Cay.

JEWELLERY SALES ASSOCIATES

Must be...
Honest, Reliable, Dedicated,
Professional, Energetic &
SELF MOTIVATED

DO YOU HAWE WHAT IT TAKES?

If the answer is YES then take the next step.
FAX RESUME TO 326-2824

1 Excellent $$$ Bonus Potential 1
; |
I
I

NA MN

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF NAVONNE N. ANDRE (a.k.a)
NAVONNE ADAIR ANDRE late of Ramsey, North
Oaks in the State of Minnesota one of the United
States of America, deceased

NOTICE is hereby

given that all persons having

any claims or demand against or interest in the
above Estate should send same duly certified in-
writing to the undersigned on or before 27th April,
2007 after which date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets of the Estate having regard only
to the claims, demands or interests of which he shall
then have had notice AND all persons indebted to
the above Estate are asked to settle such debts on or

before 27th April, 2007.

FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor

P.O. Box AB-20405

Bay Street, Marsh Harbour

Abaco, The Bahamas



“KA-CHING!”,

MONEY IN YA’ POCKET!

BUY GOOD QUALITY, SLIGHTLY USED
GOODS FOR

50% - 80% OFF

THE ORIGINAL
RETAIL PRICE.

PLUS, GET CASH FOR ANY NEW OR

USED ITEMS YOU HAVE LYING
AROUND YOUR HOUSE THAT YOU
DON’T NEED OR WANT?

Located inside Pricebusters store,
#361 Soldier Road.

Tel:

393-0535


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 13B





Abaco Markets
sells BSL stake
for $2.65m

the buyout group that last sum-

ABACO Markets may have
mer acquired Winn-Dixie’s 78

made a $150,000 profit from

the sale of its BSL Holdings
stake to other shareholders in

Tourism/Hospitality Scholarship Opportunities

The Patrick S.G.Bain, BHEA, BHA and BHC&AWU
Hotel Industry Partners Scholarship Fund



$25,000.00 available to industry professionals and students interested in a career in
Hospitality/Tourism





¢ 6 Scholarships valued at & $4,000.00 each, tenable at The College of The Bahamas







Train For Careers In:-




per cent majority stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets for
$54 million.

The BISX-listed retail group
confirmed that it had complet-
ed the divestment of its stake
in BSL Holdings to the other
investors in proportion to their
holdings for a price of $2.65
million.

The $2.65 million, which is
the proceeds from an all-cash
transaction, is higher than the
$2.5 million that Gavin
Watchorn, Abaco Markets’
president, said the company
was paying for its initial 10 per
cent stake in BSL Holdings.

In a statement on the sale,
he added: “This is a tremen-
dous step forward for Abaco
Markets as the transaction,
along with the recently

RBC FINCO is considering applications for

Mortgage Specialist
RBC FINCO, Freeport
and Main Branch

The successful candidate should possess the following ‘

qualifications:

e ACIB OR ABIFS Diploma or degree in in Banking (or |
a related field). :

e Previous experience in portfolio and liability
administration would be an asset.

e Exhibit good selling & negotiating skills.

© Self-motivated and able to work with minimal
supervison.

© Ability to make sound credit analysis

© Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)

Responsibilities include:

° Contributing to meeting team sales plans by acquiring
and growing profitable client relationships.

e Providing customized solutions and financial advice
designed to satisfy the client’s long-term goals on
obtaining a mortgage.

¢ Seeking out new clients by developing relationships
within the community and local centres of influence.

e Enhancing the experience of existing clients by
providing accessibility and one-on-one advice and
valuable information on the intricacies of having a
mortgage.

© Successfully anchoring clients with the appropriate
delivery channel within RBC Financial Group.

A competitive compensation package (base salary &
bonus) will commensurate with relevant experience
and qualifications.

Please apply before April 16th, 2007 to:
Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Banking
Royal Bank of Canada














| COOOL

Applications Available At:

Hotel Centre House
S.G. Hambros Building

West Bay Street, Southern Entrance
P.O.Box N-7799

Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Applicants must:
Be Bahamian
Have a minimum G.P.A of 2.85

Pledge to pursue a career in hospitality/tourism
Meet other requirements

¢ Hospitality Management e Marketing
e Equipment Maintenance ¢ Culinary Arts
¢ Information Technology e Accounting and Finance
e Marine and Environmental Sciences e Laundry
e Engineering ¢ Horticulture Sciences
e

and other industry-related career areas



Workers
Tonique Williams-Darling Highway
P.O.Box GT-2514

Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

Telephone: 322-838 1/502-4245) 502-4222/323-5933
or Visit us at www. bhahotels.com or www.bhcawu@ yahoo.com

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO APRIL 15, 2007

INTERNAL AUDITOR
INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for Internal Auditor in the Internal Audit
Department.

The job executes various audit and investigation assignments as stipulated in the
Schedule of Activities formulated by the AGM — Chief Internal Auditor; supervises
and directs the activities of the Audit Clerks, and offers technical assistance to the
Assistant Internal Auditors. The internal auditor trains subordinate staff; assists the
Extcrnal Auditors with joint audit efforts for the year-end audit; produces audit
programs; produces audit and investigation reports as well as monthly and quarterly
reports; assists the AGM-Chief Internal Auditor with annual plans and corporate
research.

The duties and responsibilities for this job is as follows, but not limited to:

Produce audit programs and submit for approval of the Chief Internal Auditor
Conducts complete risk assessment for areas being audited

Conducts financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in accordance with
established audit programs

Produces complete file of audit working papers

Produces audit reports on audit concerns and recommendations in accordance
with the ITA Standards

Conducts some confidential audit investigations, evaluate finding & produce
reports; exercising the IIA’s ethical standards

Conducts reviews of budgetary systems (including variances analysis), policies,
manpower efficiency and new computer applications

Discusses audit concerns with the relevant Department/Section head and seek
agreement to implement recommendations

Supervises work of Audit Clerks and conduct review of work done

The incumbent should also have:

A Bachelors degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline and a
professional accounting qualification e.g. CPA, CA or ACCA

Obtaining the CIA would be highly desirable

Five years post certification experience in auditing and general accounting
with experience in interviewing, producing reports and making verbal
presentations

eerie persons may apply by completing and returning an Application
orm to:
The Manager-Human Resources & Training,
Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,
P.O. Box N-7509 Nassau, Bahamas
on or before: April 20, 2007.














Bahamas Regional Office

P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145

Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

announced agreement for sale
of our Turks property, elimi-
nates the company’s debt and
the related debt service costs
our group has been challenged
with in recent years.

“This allows us to reallocate
critical resources to move for-
ward completely focused on
our daily operations in our
core markets,” said Mr
Watchorn.



GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIPS
(FORMALLY) BAHAMAS FIELD STATION AWARDS

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Ot) PAV a SU us 0.0 9

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for nine (9) full scholarships
and two (2) partial scholarships tenable at accredited institutions in the United States
of America under the Bahamas Field Station/Ministry of Education Agreement (1971),
commencing September 2007.

Under the Agreement, participating Colleges and Universities will offer full tuition
scholarships and the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology will pay board and
lodging charges.

Applicants should have gained admission into one of the following institutions where
the number and type of awards available is indicated:

ALBRIGHT COLLEGE, Reading, Pennsylvania 1
WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY, Springfield, Ohio 1 PARTIAL
DICKINSON COLLEGE, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

HARTWICK COLLEGE, Oneonta, New York

MIAMI.UNIVERSITY OF OHIO, Oxford, Ohio 1 PARTIAL
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN, New Haven, Connecticut 1
ELMIRA COLLEGE, Elmira, New York

EMPORIA STATE UNIVERSITY, Emporia, Kansas 1
YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITY, Ohio 1

Application Forms will be accepted only for the Colleges/Universities specified
above.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens, should have successfully completed high school
education in The Bahamas, and be in possession of at least 5 G.C.E./B.G.C.S.E. subjects,
including English language and Mathematics at grade A, B, or C.

Bahamian citizens currently pursuing studies at one of the named institutions may apply
for this award and should submit an up-to-date transcript along with the completed
application form.

Applicants should note that the area of study must be one deemed acceptable for the
further development of the country.

Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Education
Loan Division of The Ministry of Education or from the Ministry of Education website
al

Completed application forms should be returned to The Scholarship and Education
Loan Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology,
P. O. Box N-3913, No later than Monday, April 30th, 2007.

Application forms received after this date will not be considered.

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION


PAGE 14B, TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007

a »

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BESHY LAVAUD OF

WILSON ST., P.O. BOX GT-2043, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of April, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



A Sales Man Needed Urgently

We are a growing retail company, we are offering:
Base Salary, Bonuses, Pension Plan, ‘Training and lots of
Fun. We are looking for: A young man between the age of
17 and 25, he must be Energetic, Out

Going, Stable, Hard Working, Well Groomed, Honest and
Reliable.







Interested then call for an interview
356-4512 or 356-4514

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCELLINE YIMMY OF
NASSAU STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 10th day of April, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ONC ne

























ABACO ESTATE SERVICES

Reap Esrarn Saves e Vacarion Renracs

RESTAURANT/BAR
FOR SALE

Treasure Cay, Abaco, Bahamas
* Located on Hwy at Treasure Cay Entrance
* 26,136 sq. ft. Prime Commercial Property
* 2,818 sq. ft. Fully Equipped Restaurant Bldg.
* 20 Dining Tables with Seating Capacity of 70
* Great Potential Catering to Affluent Treasure
Cay Community BS517,000.

HOUSE FOR SALE
OWN YOUR PIECE OF PARADISE!
* 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Fully Furnished Home
* 2,244 sq. ft. Under Roof, Recently Renovated
* Just One Block From Treasure Cay Beach
* 11,280 s/f Fully Enclosed, Well Maintained Property
* Exceptional Value! $345,000.



HOUSE FOR SALE
* 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Furnished House, plus Patio
* 1,240 sq. ft. Living Space plus Storage Shed
* Approx 13,500 sq. ft. Parcel within Treasure Cay
* Enjoy Privacy, Near Beach & Golf Course
* Option to Purchase Adjoining Lot



$268,000.





Contact us Today for Further Details

info@abacoestateservices.com ‘Tel: (242) 36 hax: (242) 365.8753







THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas eco-friendly
advantage in danger

FROM page 1B

Bahamas will find itself at a
competitive disadvantage.

According to Mr Henry,
important. steps have already
been taken in this regard, such
as the import and stamp duty
exemptions for solar panels to
facilitate less reliance on
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) generated electrici-
ty, but he said more can be
done.

“More businesses are realis-
ing the cost efficiency of this to
their electricity bills for things
like water heaters. Right now,
solar hot water heaters and the
actual solar panels for making
electricity from the sun are both
duty free, but also we must
include in that the components
that would be used for those
kinds of systems. Right now, as
far as I know, they are not duty
free, but we are making steps
towards that,” Mr Henry said.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



During a presentation on
energy conservation at the
Bahamas National Trust
Retreat, Mr Henry outlined the
unique and effective ways
through which the Cape
Eleuthera Institute and the
Island School are preserving the
environment and conserving
energy.

A hallmark of the new Insti-
tute facility is the solar-powered
Wege Centre for Sustainable
Fisheries. This building houses
hatchery facilities and wet labs
for the development of sustain-
able aquaculture, including off-
shore cage culture, bonefish
energetic studies and sponge,
conch and lobster grow-out.
The Wege Centre will generate
electricity for the entire facility,
and represents the first-ever
BEC grid inter-tie in the
Bahamas.

Mr Henry explained that
although the law prohibits indi-
viduals from generating their
own electricity, the Institute has
been granted special leave as a
research facility.

The Cape Eleuthera Institute
(CEI) was launched in February
2003 by the Cape Eleuthera
Foundation to provide authen-
tic research opportunities for
students, and to model sustain-
able systems for developing
nations. The CEI is half-way
through a capital campaign to
build a campus that will be one
of the most ecologically respon-
sible facilities in the Caribbean,
and possibly the world.

Mr Henry explained that the
compound has a solar-panelled
roof, which gives it the ability to
heat all water without having
to use electric water heaters that

NOTICE

consume more energy.

This system has been expand-
ed to a number of other prop-
erties on Eleuthera, such as the
multi-million dollar Cotton Bay
Resort project, which has
ordered 55 units.

Further, Cape Eleuthera gets
about 250 gallons of used cook-
ing oil from Princess Cruise
Lines each week, which it
refines in an on-site plant and
then uses to power diesel cars.

Mr Henry said the result is
that the cars all smell like
French fries, but they have elim-
inated the need for gasoline.

When one considers the
amount of hotels and restau-
rants which have oil to dispose,
the results can be staggering, he
added.

During the refining process,
glycerin is released as a by-
product. Mr Henry said glyc-
erin is a component of soap, and
although Cape Eleuthera does
not manufacture soap as yet, it
does use glycerin for burning
purposes and for compost.

Mr Henry said that what is
being done in Eleuthera is
transferable to Nassau or any
of the more populated Bahami-
an islands.

“It’s very transferable. With a
change in government policy to
allow a very small percentage -
maybe 2 per cent - of the total
gird connected supply to comes
from renewable energy, I
believe there would be a
groundswell of support from
both local people who feel good
about polluting the environ-
ment less to use electricity, but
also from people who are clients
of the Bahamas and who come
here for touristic reason; to be
able to visit a place where the
environment is preserved,” Mr
Henry said.

He added: “Small successes
will breed larger successes,
which will breed large-scale suc-

cess. I don’t think that anyone

should be asked to do some- = '

thing that he does not want to
try, but I do believe that seeing

a?

‘sy
\

¢
¢
°
6

»

»
*

what has already been proven ~

to work will result in a new
mindset.”

*

a0 8
>

«
»
°

+

-

Mr Henry said initially it may ,-

be difficult to persuade some-

»
@

4
“

4

>

»
°
’

one that spending $7 for a fluo- .- 2
rescent lightbulb would be more '

efficient than buying a standard

$2 bulb, but if people try it, then .

they would see the benefits.

“If you look carefully,.those .

big establishments such as
hotels have started doing that,”
he added.

However, Mr Henry said that
for this to happen, the invest-
ments incentives and tax breaks
provided by the Government
would have to be right.

Other ways of conserving

energy, he said included simple ~.

steps such as turning off lights

when not in use, turning up >.~
thermostats, and in hotels ask- ..--

ing guests to reuse their linens, .:

which would result in having to
run less washes. In addition,
persons can convert to more
energy-efficient appliances.

Mr Henry added that in the -

US, there is a push to use

ethanol - a by-product of corn - ,.

for fuel burning. This push is
bécause the US government

subsidises corn production, but.
Mr Henry said that one of the °

down sides of this is that corn

fertilizer uses petroleum. A ©

more efficient product is sugar.

Brazil has captured the mar- -

ket in ethanol use because it

can grow massive amounts of .

sugar cane cheaper.

But the US government, "
again to help the corn industry, -°

has high tariffs on the import
of sugar, which is why US soft
drinks contain corn fructose

syrup because it is cheaper to »

use that rather than imported
sugar.





NOTICE is hereby given that ANNETTE JOSEPH OF
DRY HILL ROAD, NORTH PALMETTO POINT, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



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have a sound knowledge of International Business
Companies, Foundations, Protected Cell Companies,
Private Trust. Companies, Companies incorporated
under the Companies Act 1992-must have Good
accounting background. Must be computer literate.

Qualified Applicants please e-mail:
jsmil143 @hotmail.com



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MOISE LUGENS OF
MINNIE ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 3rd day of April, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTOPHER FINGER OF
BRISTOL PARK DRIVE, APOLLO BEACH, FLORIDA,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10th day of April, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality-and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JACQUELINE DORVIL OF
NEWTON CREST #39, P.O.BOX F-44619, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH
day of APRIL, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas. -



_ cao

vy mm

= 2a

ee a ae
THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2007, PAGE 15B -

sia
rami





A

Coalition ‘left in dark’
on NHI benefits study

Mm By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he National Coalition
Le Healthcare Reform
told The Tribune that
despite having many discussions
with the National Health Insur-
ance (NHI) project implemen-
tation team, it only learnt that
the Government had hired a
second set of consultants to
develop the scheme’s benefits
package through reading this
newspaper.

Stanley Lalta, the NHI pro-
ject team’s manager, said last
week that the Government had
hired a Costa Rican firm,
Sanigest International, to work
with it on developing the
scheme’s benefits package and
payments system.

In response, Winston Rolle, a
former Chamber of Commerce
president and Coalition repre-
sentative, told The Tribune:
“The first time we heard of it

was in the article with Stanley.
We've had numerous discus-
sions with Stanley, but this is
the first time I’m hearing that
this second consultation is going
on.”

Mr Rolle said Sanigest Inter-
national had worked on imple-
menting similar social health
insurance programmes in Chile,
and questioned what the Gov-
ernment’s failure to disclose this
hiring meant with regard to con-
sultation over the NHI plan.

Explained

He explained that the Coali-
tion knew all about the Wash-
ington-based company, DAH
Consulting, that had been hired
to do an economic assessment
of NHI’s impact, adding: “To
date, the Coalition has not had
ant discussions, dialogue and
requests for information with
respect to benefits. Nothing has
come to the Coalition saying

what has been proposed and
can you give your comments,
feedback.”

The Government and its NHI
team are seeking to complete
all further work on the plan,
including is regulations and
devising its benefits, before
year-end, so that the scheme
will be ready for implementa-
tion from January 1, 2008, if the
current administration is voted
back into office.

Mr Rolle said the Coalition
had recognised this was always
the likely intention, adding of
the current consultant hirings:
“It shows for the most part
there’s a lot of pieces they don’t
have together and are strill try-
ing to figure out.

“It’s obvious that a lot of the
legwork they should have done
before putting together and
passing the legislation, and hav-
ing any discussions, they’re just
putting together now. It’s a very
backwards way of doing it.”

Â¥

In an article in today’s Tri-
bune, Dr Bernard Nottage, min-
ister of health and national
insurance, said the Government
would not be “deterred” from
its NHI plans, adding in a ref-
erence to the Coalition: “There
are all sorts of groups around
here doing all sorts of surveys to
find reasons why sick people
should not be able to get the
care they need when they need
it in the Bahamas, but... we
will not be deterred.”

Mr Rolle described this as
“ridiculous”, explaining that the
Coalition was for healthcare for
all Bahamians, but wanted “to
ensure” this was done in a “tru-
ly sustainable, equitable and
viable fashion”.

Dr Nottage also questioned
the methodology used by the
Segal Group to obtain the sur-
vey results for the Coalition,
which found that just 21 per
cent of employers supported
NHL in its present form.

BISX Rules reform ‘step in the right direction’

FROM page 5B

know how well the firm has
performed and whether it will
meet or exceed expectations.

The areas targeted for
reform by Mr Davies and
BISX are among those that
have long been identified by
observers as being among the
weakest in the Bahamian cap-
ital markets regulatory set-up.
They have also been addressed
by regulators globally.

These are the timeliness and
transparency of financial
reporting and material disclo-
sures by BISX-listed entities;
corporate governance and
Board composition issues,
relating mainly to independent
directors; and giving teeth to

the penalties and sanctions that
BISX and Bahamian regula-
tors can enforce against com-
panies and market participants
who breach the rules.

The moves to amend the

BISX rules also coincide with
moves by the Securities Com-
mission of the Bahamas. and
the Government to reform the
Securities Industry Act 1999,
the chief governing law for the
Bahamian capital markets.

The reforms to the Act are
likely to include some form of
mergers and acquisitions
takeover code; the protection
of minority shareholder inter-
ests; and minor deficiencies in
the existing legislation.

The Act also proposes mak-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LAN GDALE ADVISORY LIMITED

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 LANGDALE
ADVISORY LIMITED is in dissolution.

ing the Securities Commission
accountable to a Parliamen-
tary sub-committee, rather
than a minister, making it inde-
pendent and bringing it into
line with the principles set out
by IOSCO, the international
securities regulator.

A key issue with both the
BISX rules reforms and Secu-
rities Industries Act, as ever in
the Bahamas, is whether they
will have real teeth and be
enforced. This nation has many
laws on the books that are not
properly implemented.

®),

Temple Christian High Fehoot

“Teach MeO Lord, hy Ray”. Psalm 119:33
ShirkeniStreet

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers
for the following positions for the 2007-2008 School

Year.

- Journalism / Literature (Gr. 10-12)
- Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr. 7-12)

- Math (Gr. 7-12)
- Physics (Gr. 10-12)
- Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)

- Technical Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
- Accounts/Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
- Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)

- Spanish (Gr. 7-12)

- Georgraphy/History (Gr. 10-12)

- Chemistry

- Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)

Mr Rolle said he found this
interesting, as the “shoe was on
the other foot” now. The Coali-
tion and others had repeatedly
asked the Government to reveal
the full report, and all its
methodologies, that backed the
eight-age summary of what NHI

<

t
.
i

“a

would cost, but it had not doné*

. So. This meant the public was,

unable to substantiate any of,
the calculations underpinning
the NHI scheme.

Now, the Government was,
using exactly the same angle to
attack the Coalition’s work. ”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common ia Divkon
BETWEEN
HENRY & ELIZABETH MOXEY
Plaintiffs

AND
THE OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER



and ;
THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST =
2nd Defendant
and
THE ATTORNEY GENERAL =
3rd Defendant #0
ees
aaa:
caine
ORINGINATING SUMMONS Pd is
“ te:
TO: HENRY MOXEY & ELIZABETH MOXEY ot oe
Joe Farrington Road (Roberts Gas Station / World of Tyres) ne ie
Nassau, New Providence (the Plaintiffs herein). rl
LET THE PLAINTIFFS within fourteen (14) days after service
of this Summons on them inclusive of the day of service, cause“

an appearance to be entered to this Summons which is issued on
the application of THE BAHAMAS NATIONAL TRUST (the

Second Defendant herein) Village Road Nassau, The Bahamas

2003...

GEN/CLE No.02153 “~~

Way

awh

Dis
wv
alt
net

We

1st Defendant \’"!

yee.
vase,

‘panes

for an Order of Vacant Possession of ALL THAT certain lot piece

or parcel of Crown Land being Ponds and Marshland at Harold
and Wilson Ponds and shown on a plan or diagram on record in
MP File 5148 in the Department of Lands and Surveys situate

ae
-

Northwardly or Fire Trail Road and Eastwardly of Sir Milo Butler;

Highway in the Western District of the island of New Providence ...
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas on the ground that they are.
entitled to Vacant Possession and that the Plaintiffs in occupation

are in occupation without licence or consent.

By this Summons the Second Defendant herein claims against the

Plaintiffs:
1. Vacant Possession of ALL THAT certain lot piece
of parcel of Crown Land being Ponds and Marshland
consisting of Harold Pond and Wilson Pond and shown
on a plan or diagram on record in MP File 5148 in the
Department of Lands and Surveys situate Northwardly
or Fire Trail Road and Eastwardly of Sir Milo Butler
Highway in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas

Abutting and Bounding towards the West. partly on Lands â„¢

Granted to Island Gases as Grant Numbered A8-60 partly

on Crown Land and Sir Milo Butler Highway towards the

North partly on lands now or formerly Alexander Harold
Grant partly on Lands Granted to W. Skees being Grants




ne EM
ad aggre
Sat TR
ase"
SS
25 NT



numbered A4-21 and A4-20 partly on Lands Granted to

C. Harris being Grant numbered A446 partly on lands :

Granted to H. McKinney being Grant numbered A4-45 * coattt

Partly on Lands claimed by various owners and partly on

Lands Alphonso Smith towards the east partly on Lands

Granted to Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas

being Grant A7-57 partly on Lands vested in the Treasurer

of the Bahamas and towards the South partly on Bahamas

Electricity Corporation Leeway 100 feet wide partly on

Lands C. Godet being Grant A8-58 and partly on an old

Crown Reservation running in a Northwesterly direction

through Harold Road and partly on Lands Granted to

Diamond farms and partly on the shore of Wilson Pond

or however else the same may Abut and Bound which

said piece or parcel of Crown Land being Ponds and

Marshland (hereinafter called “the demised premises’) is

more particularly delineated and shown pink on the plan

attached to Lease No. 1038, MP No. 5148 dated 17th day

of April A.D., 2002 between The Minister Responsible ~

for Department of Lands and Surveys and The Bahamas x

National Trust For Places of Historic Interest or National ’

Beauty. aS
\

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 4th April 2007.
David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2
Caves Village, RO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of LANGDALE
ADVISORY LIMITED. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their address and particulars of
their debts to the Liquidator before the 4th May 2007.

- Health Science (Gr. 7-9)

- General Science (Gr. 7-9)

- Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)

- Music (Gr. 7-12)

- Biology (Gr. 10-12)

- Language Arts/Literature (Gr. 7-12)
- Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12)

- Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)

- Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
- Social Studies (Gr. 7-9) Q

- Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

Yee ae age cae?
ae: eh eae: 462

£
u

Applicants must:

HUMAN
RESOURCES &

A. * Bea practicing born-aghin Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith
of Temple Christian School.

e Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or
University in the area of specialization.

OFFICE MANAGER

Seeking EXPERIENCED
Human Resources & Office Manager.
Salary will be commensurate with experience.
Only persons meeting the requirements
below should apply.

e Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma. 2. Further or other relief,

2

¢ Have at least two years teaching experience
in the relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills.

3. The said premises are situated in the vicinity
of Harold Pond and Wilson Pond; and

If the Plaintiffs do not enter an appearance; such Judgment may
be given or order made against or in relation to them as the Court
may think just and expedient. .

e Applicants must have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the
¢ A Bachelor’s Degree in HumanResources Pca ea =
TAKE NOTICE that the Second Defendant intends at the hearing ~~
of the Summons served hereto to apply for an order for the
Plaintiffs to deliver up to the Second Defendant possession of the +‘
subject property.

F. ¢ Be willing to participate in the high school’s
* At least Five (5) years experience in Human extra curricular programmes.

Resources

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph and
three references to:

° Working Knowledge of the Employment PY veren Oran

Act, 2001 REGISTRAR :
Mr Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
. P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application ig April 30th, 2007

This Summons ts taken out by:

FERREIRA & COMPANY,
Chambers,
Kemp Building
#39 East Street North
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Second Defendant

Please submit your application via email to:

bahamasexecutivesearch @ gmail.com


ee
a if Bro \C esr rs oA
7 <1" RIF IPL] | |p 1° 7 “yt |

5-Day Fon SS aS yaa








Intervals of clouds





Mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy with a Mostly cloudy, a Mainly cloudy. Partly sunny.
; passing shower. shower possible. and sunshine. i
High: 82° High: 82° High: 82° High: 84°
High: 82° Low: 71° Low: 71° Low: 71° Low: 71° Low: 71°
AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel }
[| 89°-76°F [ 89°-74°F




The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ‘Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday





Temperature,

eee High 82° F/28° C

. Low 61° F/16° C

Normal high . .. 81° F/27° C

Normal low .............. setsrssnmeenesssearas OO" F/20° CE.

EST PALM BEACH Last year’s RIQH ....secsceeeseeseeen a. 84° F/29° C
High: 84° F/29° C MASE YCArSNOW sc dasissessacesinvacess w. 13° F/23° C

Low: 68° F/20°C Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... ececeseseseeene «x 0,00"

, Year tO: date .......reecsseoseorerse sscdeacasestvrdsreets ine 965"

High: 81° F/27°C Normal year to date ....... rehapessvis eeaadagasteiidse 5.93”

Low: 66° F/19°C

AccuWeather.con:

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007



a i l
h: 85° F/29°C

w: 71° F/22°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



es

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Pew Lt
High Ht.(ft.) Low — Ht.(ft.







Tod 1:32am. 2.6 8:02am. 0.5
” 1:54p.m. 2.1 8:00pm. 0.4
Wednesday23/a.m. 2.5 9:03am. 0.5
Â¥93:01 pm. 22 9:11pm. 04

Thursday 3:43am. 2.6 10:03am. 0.4
Y 4:08 p.m. 2.4 10:21p.m. 0.3

Friday 4:47am. 2.7 10:59am. 0.2
: 5:10 p.m. 2.7 11:26 p.m. 0.1



LC

6:53 a.m. Moonrise..... 1:57 a.m.
7:30 p.m. Moonset... . 12:30 p.m.

New First Full





» SAN SALVADOR
_ High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 71° F/22°C





Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday ;
High Low W High =Low Ww High Low W High Low Ww High Low W High = Low Ww *
F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C F/C
Albuquerque 72/22 46/7 s 72/22, 45/7 pe Indianapolis 47/8 38/3 ¢ 53/11 38/3 sor Philadelphia 52/11. 35/1 s 50/10 40/4 pc
Anchorage 44/6 32/0 ¢ 44/6 28/-2 pc Jacksonville 66/18 57/13 t 82/27 65/18 t Phoenix 88/31 63/17 s 87/30 62/16 s
Atlanta ~60/15 45/7 pe 65/18 57/13 +t Kansas City ~-§3/11 39/3 6015 44/6 c Pittsburgh 47/8 30/-1- pc 47/8 38/3 or RAGGED ISLAND
Atlantic City . 51/10 27/-2 s 51/10 39/3 pc Las Vegas 81/27 56/13 s 79/26 56/13 pc Portland, OR 55/12 36/2 pe 56/13 40/4 + High: 83° F/28° C
Baltimore 5412 37/2 s 50/10 40/4 Fr Little Rock 62/16 53/11. t 71/21 50/10 t Raleigh-Durham 63/17 42/5 s. 57/13 52/11 + Low: 70° F/21°C
Boston 47/8 33/0 pc 43/6 33/0 s Los Angeles 70/21 55/12 pe 68/20 52/11. pc St. Louis 57/13 45/7 t 5713 45/7 t :
Buffalo 43/6 22/-5 pe 44/6 33/0 + Louisville 56/13 46/7. ¢ §7A3 43/6 t Salt Lake City 51/10 35/1 pe 50/10 35/1 GREAT INAGUA
Charleston,SC 66/18 51/10 c 71/21 57/13 t Memphis 63/17 59/15 t 68/20 54/12 ¢t San Antonio 80/26 63/17 pc 87/30 65/18 s - High: 84° F/29°C
Chicago 44/6 36/2 pc 40/4 32/0 sn Miami 85/29 69/20 pe 86/30 74/23 pc San Diego 6417 56/13. pe 64/17 54/12 pe gh:
Cleveland 42/5 29/-1 pc 44/6 36/2 41 Minneapolis 38/3 31/0 sn 40/4 30/-1_ sf San Francisco 67/19 52/11 pce 56/13 46/7 sh
Dallas 72/22 59/15 t 75/23 61/16 s Nashville 60/15 46/77 c 62/16 43/6 t Seattle 52/11 36/2 c 54/12 38/3 ¢
Denver 56/13 30/-1 c 5412 34/1 pe New Orleans 71/21 65/18 t 83/28 67/19 t- Tallahassee 65/18 58/14 t 84/28 65/18 t :
Detroit 46/7 28/-2 pc 41/5 31/0 ¢ New York 50/10 36/2 s 48/8 39/3 pe Tampa 78/25: 69/20 t 82/27 70/21 pe
Honolulu 84/28 72/22 s 83/28 71/21 s Oklahoma City 64/17 50/10 c 71/21 51/10 s Tucson 84/28 57/13 s 85/29 57/13 s
Houston 81/27 64/17. pe 84/28 66/18 s Orlando » 80/26 64/17" t 84/28" 68/20 pe’ Washington;DC 55/12 35/1 5 49/9 42/5 +

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados





Beirut
Belgrade ee
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo

Calcutta
Calgary

_ Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin”
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki

Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi

New Delhi
‘Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago ©
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm —
Sydney
Taipei
Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg



Dieters

64/17

72/22



Today
High Low W

F/C F/C

90/32 72/22 s

59/15 43/6 c
6116 37/2 s
68/20 50/10 s

68/20 58/14 pc

95/35 79/26 pc
86/30 75/23 sh
57/13 50/10 r

45/7 pe
66/18 59/15 sh

68/20 50/10 s

55/12 45/7 pe

68/20 62/16 5

64/17
64/17
64/17

46/7 pc
45/7 pe
45/7 pc

- 70/21 55/12 pe

75/23 55/12 pe
98/36 77/25 s
31/0 28/-2 sn
86/30 72/22 pc
84/28 66/18 pc
68/20 54/12 s

52/11 43/6 pe
59/15 45/7 pc
64/17 41/5 pe
6417 45/7 s
40/4 22/-5 ¢
88/31 68/20 pc
41/5 32/0 pc
77/25 67/9 5
100/37 72/22 s
68/20 «= 48/8 s
57/13 48/8 pc
67/19 48/8 pc
88/31 75/23 t
76/24 66/18 c
66/18 43/6 pc
55/12 415 t
88/31 75/23 pc
THOS ASHES
88/31 64/17 pc
44/6 28/-2 c
39/3 25/-3 s
63/17 36/2 s
83/28 60/15 pc
101/38 74/23 s
48/8 37/2 ¢
66/18 43/6 s~
59/15 43/6 pc
79/26 72/22 pc

90/32 70/21 t
70/21 46/7 s
86/30 76/24 s

78/25 «54/12 pe

90/32 70/21 pc
/22 46/7 pe

88/31 72/22 pc

73/22 64/17 pc

54/12 40/4 r

AGE BESS

75/23 59/15 s

-74/23--68/20 t

63/17 50/10 pc
43/6 27/-2 pc
86/30 72/22 c
53/11 40/4 c
64/17 45/7 pc
48/8 36/2 r
39/3 23/-5 pc

8 te
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

88/31

102/38 78/25 s

ASN IN. IN ANICE MAAN AGERACAIT |

Wednesday
High Low W
F/C F/C

88/31 74/23 s
63/17 43/6 s
66/18 37/2 s
70/21 54/12 pc
66/18 = 53/11-¢
95/35 80/26 pc
86/30 75/23 pe
59/15 51/10 r
62/16 51/10 c
63/17 59/15 c
6116 44/6 s
61/16 45/7 pc
68/20 62/16 +r

66/18 49/9 r
68/20 53/11 pc
65/18 ~ 43/6 s
70/21 50/10 r
77/25 58/14 pe

102/38 =78/25 s ~

35/1 22/-5 ¢
75/23 pe
82/27 72/22 pc
66/18 57/13 pc
55/12 42/5 pe
5713 - 45/7 pe
67/19 50/10 pc

70/21 «45/7 s

38/3 27/-2 pc

87/30 «71/21 pe

43/6 32/0 sn
74/23 69/20 +

102/38 77/25 s

60/15 52/11 ¢
58/14 46/7 pc
71/21 51/10 pe
88/31 78/25 pc
79/26 67/19 c
68/20 46/7 c

6317 39/3 t

88/31 77/25 t
98/36 71/21 s

42/5 30/-1

44/6 37/2 pc

6417) «414 pe

84/28 57/13 pc

§412 39/3 s

70/21 46/7 s_—
62/16 42/5 pc
80/26 73/22 pc
90/32 69/20 pc
70/21 48/8 s
85/29 77/25 pc

78/25 54/12 pe
82/27 71/21 pe

75/23 46/7 Ss

85/29 71/21 pc
74/23 63/17 pe.
61/16 46/7 c -
52/11 30/-1 pe
77/25 58/14 pc

74/23 68/20 po

57/13 50/10 pc
41/5 33/0 r
86/30 72/22 t
§3N1 39/3 c
64/17 50/10 pc
$412 43/6 c
35/1 27/-2 sf

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

swf



webs IV WU Of Vedi V iced YU I



WINDS

SE at 6-12 Knots
: SW at 6-12 Knots
SE at 6-12 Knots
SSW at 7-14 Knots
SSE at 5-10 Knots
SW at 10-20 Knots

WAVES
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
1-2 Feet
2-3 Feet

VISIBILITY
5-7 Miles
4-7 Miles
4-7 Miles
4-7 Miles
5-7 Miles
4-7 Miles

WATER TEMPS.
rae
tik
76° F
76° F
76° F
76°F



NASSAU = Today: ©







NN] Showers

[<= 4 T-storms

(6°31 Rain

[x x | * ji

a) debit Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

t your
-U

out us!

FAHAMAS) TN CE BROKERS & AGENTS

YL
(DMD) 332-2062 Te (42) 2304



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