Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )
UF00084249_02862 ( sobekcm )

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Full Text










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Volume: 103 No.113



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@ By BRENT DEAN and
KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporters

A WAVE of excitement
gripped the nation yesterday as
Prime Minister Perry Christie
named May 2 as the date of the
general election.

This announcement ends
months of speculation, and in

_just 27 days, Bahamians will be
asked to cast their ballots to
elect the political party they
wish to govern the country for
the next five years.

In his address to*the nation
yesterday afternoon, Prime
Minister Christie said that the
date he has fixed for the gener-
al election is “in faithful accord
with the promise I made to you
earlier that the general election
this year would be held on, or
before, the fifth anniversary of
the last general election.”

Mr Christie also noted that
all persons who registered to
vote up to and including Tues-
day of this week will be eligi-

PM’s announcement ends
months of speculation

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION |
he Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

MGs

and RELIGION





PRICE — 75¢

IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Life. Money. Balance both:

bay Scotiabank







ble to vote in their respective
constituencies on Election Day.

Up until late Tuesday, some ;

148,055 Bahamians had regis-
tered to vote, according to
Deputy Permanent Secretary at
the Parliamentary Registration
Department, Sherlyn Hall.

Mr Hall said that the num-
bers had picked up consider-
ably in the past few days and
that many, Bahamians came
directly to the Parliamentary
Registration Pepastmen to
register.

The prime minister yesterday

encouraged all registered vot-~

ers to cast their ballots in the
forthcoming general election.

“I have every confidence that
they will do so in record num-
bers this time just as they have
always done so impressively 1 in
the past,” he said.

Mr Christie emphasised that
the Bahamas has one the oldest
and “most vigorous” democra-
cies in the world.

SEE page nine

Prime Minister urges peaceful
campaigns and civilised debate

@ By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter _

IN ANNOUNCING May 2 as the date for the general election,
Prime Minister Perry Christie took the opportunity to urge all
political parties and their candidates to conduct peaceful cam-
paigns and engage in civilised debate with one another.

This request by the prime minister comes on the heels of the hos-
tile and at times violent confrontation between PLP and FNM
supporters at last week’s launch of the PLP’s new web site at the

Sandals resort.

Some persons attending the launch and residents of the area

SEE page nine



















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2 fan FD pp lss
ard ira li

PEST UY




















a COMMISSIONER of Police and Provost Marshall Paul Farquharson yesterday reading two proclamations on behalf of the governor
general. The first declared the formal dissolution of parliament. The second announced that parliament will next be convened on May
23, 2007.

Allegations that
two PLP operatives

gave citizenship cards |

to Haitian migrants
in return for
promises of votes

return for promises of votes.
According to sources in Aba-

Bahamians, and then immedi- :

3.

SEE page nine

_ Application alleging 7

constitutionality of
Coroner's Court in
Daniel Smith inquest

will be heard next week |

: and former PLP senator Dami-
: an Gomez for Attorney Gen-
: eral Allyson Maynard-Gibson
: to remove herself from public
AN APPLICATION chal- : office, the Grand Bahama
: Human Rights Association yes-
: terday lashed out at the Minis-

Bl By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE FNM is expected to |

“vigorously pursue” allegations ; : Ree :
that two high-level PLP.oper ae oer the
tives in South Abaco yesterday | inquest into the death of 20- |
were handing out citizenship : :

SEE page nine

it Was ; nard-Gibson has not lived up
Neil Brathwaite of the Attor- ages proeln.
: ney General’s office told Chief : ting judge. Justi
i : : ting judge, Justice John Lyons,
ately rushing them off to get : a eae nee bac al :
registered to vote — despite the P sowthdg? i
register being closed as of Apttl : into the matter. The application § j ydicial
: is set to be heard before ;

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Human rights
eroup hits
out at AG

ECHOING the call by lawyer

i : : : : ter of Legal Affairs.
a ‘ © ; year-old Daniel Smith will be :
cards to Haitian migrants in | heard by a Supreme Court |
: judge next week,
co, the two operatives were announced yesterday.

observed swearing in Haitian- :

The GBHRA in a statement
yesterday alleged that Mrs May-

In her open criticism of a sit-

Mrs Maynard-Gibson has

: shown that she has “no respect

secured as the date for a hearing : for the sacrosanct nature of the

system of the

SEE page nine

Woman caught in line of fire during shooting

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 45-YEAR-OLD woman is in hospital today
after it she was inadvertently caught in the line of fire
during a retaliatory drive-by shooting in Fox Hill on

Tuesday evening.

The unlucky victim is an employee at the Jungle
Club, where she happened to be standing in the
window of the premises when a burgundy coloured
Honda pulled up at around 9.15pm, said Chief

Superintendent Glen Miller.

One or more of the occupants of the vehicle then
opened fire on the club, hitting the woman in the

shoulder.

"We don't think it was intended for her,"

ee mg

“ee

Chief Supt Miller.

"We're pursuing some information that there
might have been an altercation before the shooting,

added.

this is what we're trying to determine right now," he

The car in which the assailants were travelling

was found shortly after the shooting abandoned off

Rose Street. Bystanders reported seeing two occu-
pants fleeing the area.

"At this point we don't have any named suspects.
Our team is up in that area right now combing the
area to see what information we can get,"
Supt Miller. "Once we locate those persons who
were involved in the argument we'll be well on the

said Chief

way with this and that's the approach we're taking

said

Carb $..1047g
Dietary Fiber...4g
Protedn cesses 24g

right now," he added.

: Valentina,
: Michelle — claim they met
: the owner of the club in Pana-
: ma City in January.

_ Panamanian women

claim they were
forced to have
sex for money by
_ Nassau club owner

; M By ALEXANDRIO

MORLEY .
Tribune Staff Reporter

THREE women from

: Panama claim they were
: forced to have sex for money
: by the owner of a night club
:; in the western end of Nassau,
: The Tribune was told.

The Panamanian women —
Pamela and

The women said they

: entered into an oral agree-
: ment with the owner for them
: to come to the Bahamas to
: dance in his club.

The women claim they

SEE page nine





PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007
Peco VTS

THE TRIBUNE



FNM protests ‘victimisation’ in Freeport

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

Response after religious show is pulled

tion of Rey Frederick McAlpine,
who was informed in writing last
week that his religious show
would be suspended until after



FREEPORT - The FNM
staged a demonstration yester-
day at the Government Com-
plex Building, calling for an end
to political victimisation by the

the 2007 general elections.

A group of about 50 placard-
carrying FNMs, singing ‘We
Shall Overcome’, assembled at

Bahamas Broadcasting Corpo-
ration in Freeport.

The peaceful protest was held
in response to alleged victimisa-

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the Government Complex on
the Mall around 10am.

Neko Grant, MP for Lucaya,
who spoke on behalf of the
group, said it appears that the
Bahamas Broadcasting Corpo-
ration under the PLP govern-
ment has returned to the days
of victimisation on the airwaves.

He said that ZNS’s pulling of
the “Half-hour of Gospel Pow-
er” radio programme of Rev
McAlpine following his speech
at the FNM candidate’s intro-
duction last Thursday was a
“blatant” act of victimisation.

“While it is unacceptable for
any group in our country to be
victimised, one would have
thought that at least the church
would be especially protected,”
Mr Grant said.

Rev McAlpine’s religious
show, which airs on Sundays,
has been on the air for the past
22 years on ZNS. He believes
he was victimised because of his
departure from the PLP party,
and his affiliation now with the
FNM.

Elvis Hepburn, deputy direc-
tor at ZNS in Freeport, has
since withdrawn the suspension
letter, which was dated March
29. In a second letter dated
March 30, Mr Hepburn said
that after review of the show,
the corporation decided to
change its previous decision.

Mr Grant said the fact that it
was rescinded, clearly states that
it was without merit and should
never havé happened in the first





place.

Rev George Cooper, a Bap-
tist minister, said: “It was wrong
for a ‘man of God, a man of the
cloth’ to be treated this way for
the position he took in regard to
his political persuasion.

“This cannot happen in our
country — jt should not happen
unless we are heading to social-
ism, communism, or dictatorship.

“This should not happen
whether you are a PLP, FNM,
BDP, or independent... and it
should stop now.”

Mr Grant said that the cor-
poration has also refused to cov-
er a number of FNM functions
while-it covers similar functions
held by the PLP.

He said that following the
FNM’s victory on August 19,

1992, the first act tabled by the-

FNM administration was an
amendment to the Broadcasting
Act, which freed the airwaves.

“When the FNM comes to
office, it will ensure that such
acts of victimisation do not
occur. We assure religious lead-
ers, the church, and all citizens
of the Bahamas that they will
be able to speak their minds
freely and without fear of
reprisal by the government,”
Mr Grant said.

He said the FNM will take
measures to further guarantee
the freedom of the press and
the media. “We believe that
doing this will be good for
democracy and good for our
nation,” he said.




















HARBOUR BAY EasT ST. NORTH
_ GRadioShack _ East St. North TEL: 393-3882 as
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een co TEL: 394-3803

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 3



© In brief

Jamaican
accused of
practising
obeah

A JAMAICAN man plead-
ed guilty in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday to practicing obeah.

Rupert Williams, 51, of St
Elizabeth Jamaica appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester.

The charge alleged that
Williams practiced obeah on the
assumption that he possessed
the supernatural power to
restore health.

Williams was ordered to pay
a $500 fine. Failure to pay the
fine will result in a two month
prison sentence.

Woman is
charged with
stealing from
workplace

A 32-YEAR-OLD woman
was arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday, charged with
stealing more than $11,000 by
reason of employment.

Anna Marie Butler, 32, of
Canon Pugh Estates appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester at court 11 in Nassau
Street on 13 counts of stealing
by reason of employment.

Butler is accused of stealing
$11,264 from DC Technology
Company Limited on Patton
Street.

The offences are alleged to
have taken place between Mon-

day, November 6 and Tuesday,

December 5, 2006.

Butler pleaded not guilty to
the charge and was granted bail
in the sum of $5,000.

The matter was adjourned
July 23.

Arrest

warrant Is
issued in-
fraud Case"

A WARRANT of arrest was
issued yesterday for a man who
failed to appear for his arraign-
ment on 207 counts of fraud.

It is alleged that between
December. 2006 and March
2007, Lavardo Anton Taylor,
26, of Sherman Avenue
obtained thousands of dollars
from the Royal Bank of Canada
on Madeira Street by uttering
fake cheques.

CARICOM
ambassador

to address
Chamber

BAHAMAS Ambassador to
Caricom Leonard Archer will
address members of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board on the status
of the negotiations for an eco-
nomic partnership agreement
with the European Union.

The event will take place on
Tuesday, April 10 at 6.30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton.

The Bahamas was represent-
ed by the public and private sec-
tor at the most recent Technical
Negotiating Groups held in
Barbados.

The chamber noted in a state-
ment that outcome of these
ongoing discussions on trade
between Caribbean countries
and the European Union can
affect local businesses in the
future.

“We urge you to join this
important discussion on the
potential implication of this
agreement with the European
Union (EU) upon _ the
Bahamas,” said Philip Simon, the
chamber’s executive director.

Share
your
nevws

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us

on 322-1986 and share
your story.

‘FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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AY OOK
Tropical Bed

Berar a) oe ;

PERE





Christie slammed for calling
election before Holy Week

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FNM yesterday con-
demned Prime Minister Perry
Christie and his PLP govern-
ment for their decision to call
an election right before the
observance of Holy Week.

Yesterday, Mr Christie
announced that the next gen-
eral election would be held on
May 2, closing the current reg-
ister as of Tuesday, April 3.
This decision, which comes
only a day before the obser-
vance of the Lenten season,
theoretically would shorten the
campaign season by an entire
week -— leaving only three
weeks for political hopefuls to
campaign.

Hubert Ingraham, former
prime minister and leader of
the FNM, said that although
his party had expected Mr
Christie to do this, he along
with his colleagues were nev-
ertheless saddened and disap-
pointed.

“Back in 1966, the then goy-
erning party called a general
election which placed the
Christmas and New Year holi-
day season right in the middle
of the campaign. The PLP at
that time condemned the UBP

H@ PERRY Christie has
attracted criticism for calling
an election just before Holy
Week

government for this and it
appeared there was a national
consensus that an election cam-
paign at such a time was not a
good thing to do having regard
to the religious beliefs of the
vast majority of our citizens.
Mr Ingraham said that it was
especially unfair to the Parlia-
mentary Registration Depart-
ment and other faithful civil
servants “who have to work
under great pressure” to adjust.



the boundaries; put all the vot-
ers affected in the right con-
stituencies, and also prepare
and issue 150,000 voters’ cards.

“It was clear to us all along
that the government was run-
ning into serious difficulty with
the management of the elec-
toral processes. They have
been late with everything,
either out of incompetence or
deliberate malice.

“The Constituencies Com-
mission was not appointed
within the time frame mandat-
ed by the Bahamas Constitu-
tion, and the government wait-
ed until very late to end the
old voters register and so
encourage Bahamians to reg-
ister,” Mr Ingraham said.

Nevertheless, he said, the
FNM welcomes the announce-
ment, and looks forward to a
vigorous discussion of the
issues facing the Bahamas.

“This campaign is about the
hopes and needs of the
Bahamian people. We believe
Bahamians have a clear choice
in this election — between the
status quo of staying on the
current course versus a change
in the direction of our country.

“And between a current gov-
ernment that has broken faith
and broken promises and a new

Parliament dissolved leaving
three matters still pending

@ By BRENT DEAN

ALL matters pending before
parliament have “fallen away”,
as a result of the dissolution
of parliament, according to
Clerk of the Parliament, Mau-
rice Tynes.’

Prime Minister Christie dis-
solved parliament yesterday
afternoon in a live broadcast
to the nation, declaring May 2

:__as the date for the widely : antic-
“Ypated general election:

“Once the parliament is dis-
solved, that means that the life
of the parliament that started
on the 22nd of May 2002, has
come to an end. All matters
that were before parliament,
will fall away,” said Mr Tynes.

Three matters were still

pending in the last parliament,
Mr Tynes told The Tribune.

These include: a bill to enable
the Bahamas to become a
member of the International
Development Association; a
bill for an act to make it

mandatory for businesses or.

companies to settle their lia-
bilities to government when
they cease operation; and, a
bill for an act to amend the
local government act.

Mr Tynes stated that in
wake of the dissolution, his
staff will still be busy formalis-
ing the records of the last par-

‘liament and preparing for the

official opening of the new
one, which Provost Marshall,
Paul Farquharson announced,
will occur on May 23.

“One thing my staff will be
doing is compiling all the
records for the session that just
ended. We have to compile all

the information that was laid
on the table of the parliament.
We have to get that compiled
in to votes. And then we have
to make preparation for the
opening,” he said.

Mr Tynes also said that the
House is already prepared for
the additional representative
that will be included in the
next parliament.

When Larry Cartwright
joined the official opposition,
an additional seat was placed
in the House. Therefore, a
physical space already exists
for the 41st member in the new
House.

Representatives from the
House also noted that when
the new parliament is con-
vened on May 23, the annual
budget debate will be the main
item on the new governments

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“*

government that will restore
trust and address our citizens
needs to build a better future.
“We invite the Bahamian
people to take account of these
matters along with all the other
reasons they have for voting out
of office this abysmally incom-
petent and grossly insensitive

PLP government,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that the
FNM will suspend all radio
advertising starting today, until
Monday, April 9.

“We will resume our cam-
paign in full force next week
with a rally at Clifford Park on
Wednesday evening,” he said.

Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

“The Mall-at-Marathon
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR .

Violence in the

The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI






Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

PERFECTION is an ideal dreamed about
and pursued but rarely captured. It’s so rare
and out of reach that its elusiveness is used as an
excuse for mistakes. When someone errs, it is
dismissed with the reminder: “Well, nobody’s
perfect.”

Because most claims of perfection, such as
“He’s the perfect husband” or “It’s the perfect
job,” are subjective and exaggerated, the only
things truly perfect are those that can be quan-
tified by objective numbers. In bowling, a per-
fect game is a score of 300. In baseball, a perfect
pitched game is retiring 27 batters without
allowing a base. (Although a truly perfect game
would be getting 27 batters out on 27 pitches).

For more than 60 years, the Tuskegee Air-
men, that fabled group of World War II black
aviators, had a number that made them per-
fect. The number was “0,” as in the number of
U.S. bombers they lost to enemy fighters. When
it was mentioned in public events that they nev-
er lost any of the bombers they escorted, the
feat would elicit loud and appreciative applause.

Such a feat by any squadron would have.been
cheered but this was made more special in that
it was accomplished by men defying a system
and mindset that would deny them opportuni-
ties in the sky just as they were being denied
opportunities on the land of their birth.

It was a perfection that helped lift them to
folkloric status. But last week, a new Air Force
report revealed that enemy aircraft shot down at
least 25 bombers escorted by the all-black 332nd
Fighter Group.

-The report proved just one thing: Nobody’s
perfect, including the Tuskegee Airmen. It does-
n’t diminish their achievements, heroism or



On Monday James Milkey, Massachusetts
assistant attorney general for environmental
protection, celebrated a landmark Supreme
Court ruling that reverberated around the
world.

The court narrowly ruled, 5 to 4, that the
Environmental Protection Agency, despite
cowardly protestations to the contrary, has the

' power to regulate the greenhouse gases that
cause global warming.

Environmentalists believe the ruling will put
pressure on industry and Congress to come up
with comprehensive federal solutions for the
first time.



Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Not perfect, but still American heroes

EPA can regulate greenhouse gases

trailblazing, or remove from the record that
they were so good that their services as escorts
were requested by white bomber pilots who
didn’t know or didn’t care that they were black.

The report corrects numbers but can’t rewrite
the history of what, at the time, was deemed a
controversial programme to train black pilots in
Tuskegee, Ala. Nearly 1,000 pilots were trained
in the programme and while they were not per-
fect, losing 25 planes in more than 15,000 sorties
on 1,500 missions made them close to flawless.

The Air Force’s report was released the day
before President Bush awarded the airmen the
Congressional Gold Medal. The biggest sur-
prise wasn’t that they lost 25 planes but that
it’s taken them this long to receive this hon-
our, one that you’d think they would have
received 40 or 50 years ago.

The youngest of the surviving Tuskegee Air-
men are now in their 80s. In his remarks to
them, President Bush said, “Even the Nazis
asked why African American men would fight
for a country that treated them so unfairly ...
these men in our presence felt a special sense of
urgency. They were fighting two wars: one was
in Europe, and the other took place in the hearts

-and minds of our citizens.”

That war taking place in the hearts and minds
of American citizens proved to be the more
difficult of the two, but they won both wars.

No, the Tuskegee Airmen weren’t perfect,
but in soaring over ignorance and cruelty and
gracing the sky with their dignity, they made
their world and their country a little less imper-
fect.

(This article was written by Cary Clack of the
San Antonio Express-News - c.2007).

This week, the United Nations will release
the latest of reports that predict that in this
century, global warming will cause massive
water shortages and floods, and do things like
bleach the Great Barrier Reef and drive polar
bears into threatened status.

“The Bush administration and the EPA nev-
er disagreed with us on the main point that
global warming is real,” Mr Milkey said. “What
the court is saying to them is that you can’t
say that and not do anything about it.”

(This is an excerpt from an article by Derrick
Z Jackson of the Boston Globe. c.2007).



. 289 Marnot ot South ¢ P.O. Box N-7984 ¢ Nassau, Bahamas
: THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK
“Don't limit your challenges,

challenge your limits.”

SUNDAY SERVICES

7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 © 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

NOTICE

We wish to advise all Abaco customers, that

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June 30, 2007.

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Bahamas must
be stopped

EDITOR, The Tribune.

OVER the past several
years, a Concert Promoter out
of Grand Bahama hosted a
few concerts during the
Bahamian Labour Day week-
end in both Nassau and
Freeport. Under the theme,
“Stop the Violence”, a subtle
effort was made to create
awareness as to the state of
affairs in the nation as it
relates to crime, in particular
violent crimes. Despite the
fact that these concerts were
usually attended by thousands

of young people, little atten-

tion was paid to such a sincere

and desperate message.
Tragically, the rate of vio-

lent crime is escalating at an

alarming rate in the Bahamian

society. Almost on a daily
basis, the Bahamian public is
informed Wvia the various
medias of some senseless and
barbaric act of violence. So
much so, that a Pastor
referred to the Bahamas as a
nation under siege with the
people being held hostage.
Sometimes, one would not
know if a news headline is
coming out of Nassau or out
of Baghdad in Iraq. Drive by
shootings, stabbings, blud-
geoning, mutilated bodies
burned beyond recognition,
kidnapping, etc are now
becoming just too common.
These brutal acts, like in Iraq,
have terrorized the nation
with fear. Nowadays, the
Bahamian public is paralysed
with fear and must modify
their lifestyle to adapt to this
new state of siege.

‘ It’s hard to imagine that in
today’s Bahamas, someone
who is innocently playing a
game of basketball or domi-
noes in the middle of the day
could meet a tragic ending.
Could you ever believe that a
twelve-year-old child simply
watching television would end
up dead with a bullet in his
head? Or could you imagine
the sanctuary of your home

_ being violated by evil invaders

whose mission is to leave a
trail of death and destruction?
In today’s Bahamas, anything
seems to be possible. These
are the times when we now
see brother killing brother like
Cain and Able in the book of
Genesis. But, there are those
“prayer warriors” who despite
their commitment to the faith
would frankly admit that the

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devil has taken over the

Bahamas when we see parents
with the natural responsibility
of safety and well-being of a
child charged with the mur-
der of their child!

Politicians and sociologists
all seem to be at a loss to
explain this continuous surge
in violence in the Bahamian
society. According to the
Police, the cause of murder in
the Bahamas fall under three
main headings. Respectively
they are Domestic Violence,
the Drug War and Random

‘Criminal acts, Recently, Social

Services Minister Melanie
Griffith received much
applause from the Bahamian
public with her promotion and
passage of The Domestic Vio-
lence Act. Despite the good
intentions behind this won-
derful piece of legislation,
there may be doubt as to its
overall success. Domestic vio-
lence has been around since
time immemorial and other

’ Parliamentary Acts have had

little effect. What we see now
is that the epidemic of domes-
tic violence taking a more
extreme form, all too often
ending in death. However,
unlike before, what has
changed for the worse is the
viciousness of domestic vio-
lence. In addition, groups with
the assistance of persons such
as Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson
of the Crisis Centre have left
no stone unturned when it
comes to preventing domes-
tic violence.

Historically, the illegal Drug
Trade has always been a high
risk violent profession. Per-
sons have often expressed the
opinion that as long as inno-
cent persons are not hurt, the
drug dealers can kill off each
other.

The sad fact is that innocent
people get hurt too.

Random criminal violence
regrettably is a reflection of
the attitude of some of the
“don’t care” new generation.
They have no respect for

themselves and certainly do .

not have any for others. Vio-
lence is their way of life and
they are bitter against institu-
tions such as the Police and
the Church that try to contain
them. Nothing seems to deter
them from this disastrous atti-
tude. Not even death by hang-
ing is a deterrent to murder
in the Bahamas. However,
there are strong feelings that
capital punishment may at

least deter a few. One life
saved would certainly be
worth it.

Another possible reason for
the increase in crime in the
Bahamas was suggested by
Fred Mitchell, the current For-
eign Minister of the Bahamas
after the murder of Archdea-
con William Thompson. That
is the “creolisation” of the
Bahamas with the increasing
Haitian population. This gen-
eralisation resulted in much
criticism as it suggested racist
feelings towards the Haitian
community. It is a fact that
many Haitians have resided
peacefully in the Bahamas for
generations. It is just that
some have gotten caught up
in that undesirable lifestyle
and are now a part of the
problem.

Whatever the reason for this
senseless and stupid crime
surge in the Bahamas, it must
be arrested. At its current rate,
by the end of the year, the
Bahamas will have a record
one hundred murders. Such a
count is absolutely unaccept-
able in any decent society.
This is a number far greater
than Tokyo, Japan, with a
population of over twelve mil-
lion people. There are just too
many guns in this town and
many of these gunmen “gone
astray”!

What is also needed is a
Victim’s Bill of Rights as an
act of violence may not just
destroy a victim, but a family
as well. This is especially true
where the victim may. have
been the bread-winner of the
family.

The victim’s family needs to
be placed as much as reason-
ably possible in the same
financial position that they
were in prior to the act of vio-
lence. The offender must sup-
port the family or have his
assets taken away to pay a vic-
tim’s family. Maybe then he
would appreciate the stupidity
of his senseless act! ~

The only good news in this
dreadful situation is the fact
that the tourists have not been
targeted as a group.

Should this undes‘rable sit-
uation develop, the United
States State Department could
issue a warning advising its cit-
izens not to travel to the
Bahamas.

This would be a complete
disaster for the Bahamian
tourism industry that depends
so heavily on the American
tourist.

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-THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 5



On brief

‘Government
accused of
destroying
rule of law

THE government was
accused yesterday of destroy-
ing the rule of Jaw in the
Bahamas, putting commerce
at risk in the process.

The claim came from
Freeport attorney Fred
Smith, who said the PLP had
managed to reverse the sen-
timents of the old colonial

_ motto: Expulsis Piratis, Resti-
, tuta Commercia (Expel Pira-
cy, Restore Commerce).

During their time in power,
‘they had restored piracy and
, put commerce in peril, he

~ said.

He cited the situation in
*‘Freeport, the country’s sec-
‘ond city and a leading com-
‘'mercial and industrial centre.
“:' “Our judicial system just
‘doesn’t exist,” he told The

“Tribune. “The PLP has man- .:

‘aged to reverse the old motto
icby destroying the rule of law.
Whey have restored piracy.”
is Mr Smith said it was
bampossible for commerce to
+function in the Bahamas
» without the rule of law.
Last month, Mr Smith sup-
Z «ported The Tribune’s articles
_, galling the quality of justice
into question, saying the judi-
-cial system was “dysfunc-
tional” and “in a state of col-
“lapse.”
His comments were a pre-
“Jude to a further attack on
‘the legal system this week
“from attorney Damian
** Gomez, who called for the
-Ifesignation of Attorney Gen-
-’éral Allyson Maynard-Gib-
* son.

“Gunman
‘holds up
_car rental
woifice

" VIRGO Car Rentals on
oifl decadence Drive was
= ~ ‘Held up and robbed by a loné
“sunman on Tuesday at
around 2.30pm, -
“ « No one was injured in the
“incident however the culprit
“ifvas able to steal an undeter-
<§nined amount of -cash,
Saccording to chief superin-
-4tendent Glen Miller.
if” Also that day, police recov-
‘“iered-a 9mm handgun.
ou The find was made after
vidfficers from the Eastern
Division executed a search
en ywarrant on a home in Cedar
+; Way, Pinewood Gardens.
There were 20 rounds of
ammunition with the gun,
i ROE said.
, , A man and a woman are
” peing questioned in connec-
tion with the find.

jk

a

1 Share
+ your
|T news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award..

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

» te le ily A EE a S

eb ee PO ee eke TA BOF OL Ae



hristian Council
president tells

‘parties not to use
_ ~prayer events...

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE president of the Christ-
ian Council has called for both
political parties to honestly
observe the Lenten season and
not use prayer breakfasts or
other such services to bolster
their campaign for the upcom-
ing general election.

Rev William Thompson said
that the Christian. community
expects that both the FNM and
the PLP will respect the agree-
ment they reached with the
Christian Council on not hold-
ing any political rallies during

‘Lent.

“Both leaders assured me,
assured the church, that there
would be no rallies held during

[ase ee os
HB REV William | Hhompron

Lent time. We hold them to
that. We will respect that, and
we hope they will respect that.
If they don’t respect it then we
will speak out against it. But
right now we will hold them to
that,” he said.

Rev Thompson said that this
new use of a “prayer breakfast”
as a political event is something
that he hopes both parties will
resist in general.

He said that the Christian
Council will have to review
these and other loopholes when
the next agreement is being
sought with political parties
before a general election.

Yesterday, Prime Minister
Perry Christie, in announcing
the May 2 election date, said
his party would not hold any



..as PLP holds

ee service of prayer

and thanksgiving

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Progressive Liberal Par-
ty hosted a service of prayer
and thanksgiving at its head-
quarters on Farrington Road
last night in honour of the 10th
anniversary of Perry Christie
and Cynthia Pratt being elected
to the leader and deputy lead-
ership post of the party.

This after the prime minister
called for a halt to “public polit-
ical campaign activities” during
Easter week.

In a press release from the
party’s national chairman Ray-
nard Rigby, the PLP saluted
and congratulated its leaders.

“Just a short 10 years ago, the
members of the PLP support-
ed and voted for Perry Christie
and Cynthia Pratt to be the
leader and deputy leader of the
PLP. In fact, it was the first time
in Bahamian history that a
woman was elected to the
deputy leadership of a major
political party.

“The PLP is extremely proud
of its leaders and their perfor-
mance. They have proven to be

the right mix for the issues fac-
ing the nation and have been
able to demonstrate that there
are compassionate democrats.
They have also shown that the
philosophy of the PLP is still
relevant for today’s Bahamas,”
he said.

Mr Rigby said that the date is
a milestone of “immense pride
and humility” for the PLP.

The prayer and thanksgiving
service was scheduled for
7.30pm last night.

The service was planned to
not only honour both Prime
Minister Christie and Deputy
Prime Minister Pratt, but to also
offer thanks to God for them
and to seek His further guid-

‘ance and deliverance over their

lives.
The event was Open to the
public.

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political rallies during the holy
week, and asked other parties to
do the same.

Earlier this year, Rev Thomp-
son also spoke out against the
use of “gutter style” tactics dur-
ing campaigns.

Speaking at the ecumenical
service for parliamentarians in
January, he asked candidates
not to engage in mudslinging in
the run-up to the elections.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Students urged to back Cuban Five

m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

STUDENTS of the Omega
College were urged by Cuban
ambassador Felix Wilson to join
the Bahamian solidarity net-
work in support of the Cuban
Five in Miami.

The students, primarily those
taking Caribbean history class-
es at the college, were told that
the Cuban Five are “national
heroes” who fought against ter-
rorism in the Caribbean.

Ambassador Wilson said that
Cuba has been the fending off
“invasion” attempts by the US
government for many years.
And according to him, the
incarceration of the five Cubans
is “hypocrisy.”

This is particularly so because
the US gevernment is “suppos-
edly” involved in a war 2ainst
terrorism, he said.

The Cuban Five are five men
who are imprisoned in the US,
serving four life sentences and
75 years collectively, after being
convicted in a Federal court in
Miami, on June 8, 2001.

They are Gerardo Hernan-
dez, Ramon Labafiino, Anto-
nio Guerrero, Fernando
Gonzalez and René Gonzalez.

The men were accused by the
US government of committing
espionage and conspiracy
against the United States, and
other related charges.

But the five and those who
defend them point out that they
were involved in monitor ng the

actions of Miami-based terrorist
groups, in order to prevent ter-
rorist attacks on their country.

In October 2006, Irma Gon- -

zalez, the 22-year-old daughter
of one of the imprisoned men,
visited the Bahamas and spoke
to students at the College of the
Bahamas about the case.

Ms Gonzalez was invited to
the Bahamas by a local group
called the Bahamian Friends of
the Cuban Five. She urged
COB students to join the “soli-
darity community” that is agi-
tating for the release of the
men.

Recently, the international
campaign to free the five has
been asking for an investigation
into the US government’s
denial of visitation rights to

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members of the imprisoned
men’s families — especially in
the case of Olga Salanueva and
Adriana Pérez.

“We do not have any ani-
mosity against the US,” Ambas-
sador Wilson said. “It has
always been the position that
the different US administrations
have tried to impose on our
country their will, and that has
been a problem for our peo-
ple.”

Mr Wilson said: “The Cuban
Five could not have received a
fair trial in Miami because the
environment was poisoned by
extreme right-wing groups who
want to aid the US government
in overthrowing Cuba.”

He pledged that Cuba would
continue to do what it believes
is necessary to defend its sover-
eignty.

The five men have been
imprisoned since 1998, In Cuba
they are considered patriots and
heroes who volunteered to



Hi CUBAN ambassador Felix Wilson

defend their country by gather-
ing information about terror-
ism directed at Cuba from with-
in Cuban exile communities.
However the US govern-

ment believes the men are apart
of an espionage network that
threatened US national security
by trying to infiltrate military
installations.

Environmentalist still concerned
at circus despite assurances

ENVIRONMENTALIST
Sam Duncombe said that qual-
ity of treatment is not the prob-
lem with circus acts involving
animals — “but rather over the
ethical and environmental right-
eousness of animals being used
in shows of this nature”.

She was responding to assur-
ances by Circus Maximus,
which is currently operating out
of R M Bailey Park, that it
treats its animals well. This fol-
lowed calls from several animal
rights activists for the govern-
ment to ban licences for shows
that include performances by
captive animals.

“We are not deliberating over
the good treatment or training
of the animals kept by Circus
Maximus, we are concerned
about the message that this con-
veys to our populations, espe-
cially our youth, that it is OK to
see wild animals removed from









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their natural habitats for human
entertainment,” Mrs Duncombe
said in a statement yesterday.

“It's about us condoning the
international removal of species
from their environments to
train, exploit, or breed them in
captive situations — like a cir-
cus environment.”

Mrs Duncombe said this
statement stands, regardless of
whether some of the particular
animals at Circus Maximus
were born in captivity or not.

“The moral ‘right’ here is for
them not to be there at all — and
this is why many governments
internationally are issuing a ban
on animals held in circuses. We
would like to see the Bahamas
follow suit,” she said.

Yesterday, Derrik Rosaire, a
bear trainer at Circus Maximus,
was quoted in The Bahama
Journal as saying: “I have
worked with bears for over 40









years, and never mistreated one
... All of my bears were born in
captivity and the last recorded
instance of a bear captured
from the wild into captivity was
in 1947.”

Minister of Agriculture Leslie
Miller was quoted in the same
article as saying: “The circus
obtained its licence through the
proper channels and as far as
this government is concerned
their practices are humane, pas-
sionate and meet the standards
observed by,circuses world-
wide.”

However, Mrs Duncombe
responded that it is especially
inappropriate for the Ministry
of Agriculture and Marine
Resources to condone the circus
with the issuance of permits to
allow wild animals to be import-
ed — considering the general
ignorance of the Bahamian pop-
ulation with regards to wild, or
even domesticated animals.

She said circuses only per-
petuate the poor treatment of
animals in the Bahamas by
popularising unnatural behav-
iour such as bears walking on
two legs, elephants that march
and dogs that jump through
hoops.

Mrs Duncombe added that
Minister Miller's comments

“reflect the lack of conserva-.

tion and ethical consideration
that-we are attempting to raise
this debate to”.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 7



Ce eo eee LSS a ee ee
Ron Pinder — Nautilus bottled water
never had government approval

NAUTILUS water “does not
and never has had” a licence to
produce or sell water in the
Bahamas, and the quality of its
water has never been verified
by the necessary government
authorities.

Yesterday, Director of Envi-
ronmental Health Services, Ron
Pinder, responded to a retrac-
tion of a statement he released
to The Tribune on Sunday.

Mr Pinder said that the state-
ment was signed and given to
him by the company’s president,
Jason Evans.

It read: “We have been asked
by the Department of Environ-
mental Health to stop all water
products and deliveries and to do
a voluntary recall of all Nautilus
Water products in the market.”

The issue was one of the com-
pany having been “unable to
secure the government certifi-
cate required to operate our
plant due to a licence issue with
our landlords,” read the state-
ment.

It added: “We must stress
that this is not a quality con-
cern.”

However in Wednesday's edi-
tion, at the request of Mr Evans
— who claimed that the state-
ment was “incorrect and unau-

thorised” — The Tribune was .

forced to print a retraction of
this statement.

Mr Evans said at that time
that the licensing issues are cur-
rently being reviewed by the
requisite government agencies
and “as a consequence there
has been no recall of Nautilus
Water products”.

However, Mr Pinder yester-
. day declared that any claim that

Director of Environmental
Health says statement was
true and accurate



the original statement was
unauthorised or untrue is
“nonsense”.

Mr Pinder said he was per-
sonally handed a copy of the
statement on Thursday by Mr
Evans after a follow up meeting
between thé Department of
Environmental Health Services
and Nautilus Water during
which the government agency
“reiterated (to Nautilus Water)
that they were not in possession
of a licence to operate a bot-
tled water company and we...
asked them to halt operations.”

“We indicated to them that
halting operations is not only
stopping the production but that
you can’t sell water that has not
been approved. They then said
they will voluntarily recall the
water, I said ‘Good, you will
have to send this to all the
media houses.’ They said they
did,” explained Mr Pinder.

It was early last month that
Nautilus Water had first been
informed that due to the fact
that the building in which they
were operating did not have a
building permit — certifying its
structural soundness — they
would have to halt production.

This was discovered during
an inspection of the facility by
Mr Pinder. The inspection was
halted upon this discovery, he

said, as the company was told
that this permit was a necessary
prerequisite to the company
obtaining a certificate of sani-
tation.

However, the company con-
tinued to supply to the market
battles of water produced and
stockpiled prior to this call to
halt production.

The Department of Environ-
mental Health Services
(DEHS) told them on Thurs-
day that this was not allowed,
and this was where the state-
ment, which Mr Evans later
claimed to be “unauthorised
and inaccurate” originated.

Mr Pinder explained that all
bottled water companies
licensed by the government
have to submit regular reports
on their quality control proce-
dures, and DEHS carries out
random spot checks on water
quality at these companies, to
ensure that their water is fit for
human consumption.

“Because Nautilus water has
not been approved by us we
have not been able to do that.

So we can't verify the quality -

of their water,” he said.

Mr Pinder stressed that every
aspect of the statement printed
by The Tribune on Monday was
true and accurate, contrary to
Mr Evans’ later claims.

Nautilus president says
government saw facility

THE following statement was
issued by the president of Nau-
tilus: Water Jason Evans:

“The Nautilus Water facility
was inspected by the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
on several occasions and we
were asked to make some
minor changes which we in fact
made.

“We were complemented on
our facility and even asked if
we would allow the Department
to show our plant to other man-
ufacturers.

‘We had what we considered
a final inspection because dur-
ing the last inspection we were
told we had to have all equip-
ment up and running during the
inspection so they could take
samples and see the running of
the equipment.

“After that inspection Olive
Patton, our Chemist, was told
‘our water was excellent and
everything was ok.’

“Olive was then told to come

BAHOM.







pick up the sanitisation certifi-
cate at which time it was dis-
covered there was a problem
with our landlord’s building per-
mit. An official of the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
assured Olive that all of our
requirements are in, the only
problem being that they were
unable to register the company
as certified because all of the
required building permits for
our landlord had not been
approved.

“We were not told that we
could not continue to run our
equipment to produce water so
from that day in October 2006
to March 2007 we were pro-
ducing water until directed to
stop last month. This could have
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007
Follow by example, Prime Minister

Is announcing the date for
the next general election,
Prime Minister Perry Christie
rightly urged that all political
organisations, leaders and
would-be leaders take “higher
ground” in debating the issues
that matter to the Bahamian
people.

It would be wonderful if
PM Christie does what he
says. For the past few days
the PLP has carried a story
on its website about this

writer that is totally untrue.
The story about my inter-
viewing for a job is absolutely
false and has not one shred of
integrity attached to it. Is that
the high road that Mr Christie
wishes to take? Is this the high
level of debate that Mr Christie
urges? It certainly cannot be.
We should have a clean and
decent campaign. We should
debate substantial issues. We
should speak about how we will
reduce the high incidences of
crime in our nation; how we will

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LAING

community where terrorism and
the threat of nuclear war are
realities; how we will minimise
the numbers of illegal immi-
grants in our nation; how we
will deliver public services in an
improved way; how we will edu-
cate our children in a way that
furthers their prospects for pro-
ductive living; how we will
expand tertiary education
opportunities for our young

people; how we will better man- —

age the government’s finances,
reducing our national debt; how
we will develop our Family
Islands in a more meaningful
way; and how we will deepen
our democracy further. These
are substantial issues. These
matter to Bahamians.

\ \ | e will not be able to
debate these issues

properly if we will make lies the
focus of our political efforts.
Lies have no place in decent
politics. Lies cannot advance
our nation’s future. Lies cannot
help find solutions to the many
concerns that we have.

Mr Christie cannot issue a
disclaimer regarding the con-
tent of his party’s material; nor
can the Leader of the Opposi-
tion. Therefore, any lies that

appear on any political website

as guilty as the liar. It is as plain
as that!

YOU MUST BELIEVE

é
H very achievement in
life requires the expen-

diture of energy. If we have no
energy, that is, if we have no
power to make things happen,

THE TRIBUNE

flow from what we are; it should
not define us. If we are defined
by what we do, then our sense
of self-worth will always be tied
to how well we can do what we
do.

Additionally, we will not be
able to define ourselves if we
stop doing what it is we do. Is
this how a life should be mea-
sured? If so, what should we say



Lies have no place in decent
politics. Lies cannot advance our
nation’s future. Lies cannot help
find solutions to the many
concerns that we have.



then we cannot achieve. Per-
sonal energy requires us to
believe in the possibility of a
thing desired.

By accepting with our minds
that a thing can be done, we can
muster up the energy needed
to pursue it. Even if what we
desire to do cannot be done by
us alone, we seek the help
required to make it happen
because we know that it can.

No wonder Jesus said: “All
things are possible to them that
believe.”

WE ARE HUMAN BEINGS

So many of us define our-
selves by what we do. I am a

teacher, lawyer, doctor, busi- -



Daily we should strive to achieve
something worthwhile, something
that brings us personal, divine and
human recognition. It makes life
so much more dynamic and

interesting.



published by the parties must
be owned by their leaders. If
the leaders do not remove those
lies when discovered, then they
must accept responsibility for
them. He that embraces a lie is




















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then about the child who cannot
do anything much or the physi-
cally challenged adult who is
limited in what he or she can
do? The joy of life is in being,
being a living soul endowed
with the image of God. In that
there is full dignity.

WE NEED TO ACHIEVE

We all feel better about our-
selves when we achieve some-
thing worthwhile. See that smile
on a child’s face after winning a
race? It is the joy of achieve-
ment. It is as natural as the sun-
rise.

We often lose that in adult-
hood, not because it goes away
but because we stop achieving.
We settle into the routine of
existing, seldom seeking to
achieve anything.

Yet, we deprive ourselves of
opportunities to maximize our
joy and optimise our sense of
fulfilment. Daily we should
strive to achieve something
worthwhile, something that
brings us personal, divine and

human reéognition. It makes.

life so much more dynamic and
interesting. What can you
achieve today?

THOUGHT FOR THE
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He» Easter to all!

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 9



Peaceful

FROM page one

even called the police when :
the situation threatened to }
spin out of control. :

Addressing the nation yes-
terday afternoon on ZNS, the
prime minister said that he
calls on all parties, “including
my own, and all candidates,
including myself, to conduct a
campaign that is lively and
spirited but at the same time
peaceful, and respectful of the
differences that come
between us at this time in our
national life.”

“Let us leave all the name-
calling and nastiness behind :
us. Let us move resolutely :
instead to higher ground, for
it is only there that we can
engage each other in mature
and civilised debate of the
issues that really matter to the
Bahamian people,” he said.

This echoes the request by
the president of the Bahamas
Christian Council, Rev
William Thompson, who in
January urged all MPs to :
avoid mudslinging :
during their respective cam- :
paigns.

However, observers
claimed that this appeal by
Rev Thompson was to no
avail as just days after he
made his request politicians ;
of all affiliations were already :
back to engaging in name- :
calling and “mudslinging.”

Mr Christie yesterday said:
that politicians do Bahamians
“a grave disservice if we, the :
leaders and would-be leaders :
of our nation, refuse to heed :
this call.” :

“Let each and everyone of :
us, therefore, resolve to con- :
duct a clean campaign, and
free and fair elections, so that
the voice of the people can
be heard in the fullness of all
its wisdom and power, and :
with unmistakable clarity, on :
election day, May 2, 2007,” :
he said.

As the country will be cel- :
ebrating Holy Week, Mr :
Christie confirmed that the :
PLP “will not be holding any :
rallies nor engaging in any :
other public political cam- :
paign activities until after ;
Easter Monday. i

“I believe that the other }
parties will be observing sim- ;
ilar constraints as well,” the
prime minister said.

Panamanian women

FROM page one

were told that they would earn
“mucho money” while dancing,
and that the only thing they
would have to pay for was a visa
extension.

However, they claim that
when they arrived in Nassau on
February 9, the owner com-
pletely changed the terms of the
agreement and they were forced
to work because the owner
had taken their passports
and round-trip tickets to Pana-
ma.

On Tuesday, Valentina told
The Tribune about their alleged
ordeal.

Valentina said that they met
the owner of the club in Pana-
ma city.

She said the night club owner
said they would only have to
pay for their tickets and nothing
else.

All three of the women said
that it cost them $1,850 to come
to the Bahamas.

Valentina said they arrived
in Nassau on February 9 and

FROM page one

“For 276 years now, Bahami-
ans have been going to the polls
to elect representatives to the
House of Assembly.

“Bahamians cherish their
hard won political rights and
freedoms. Amongst these there
is none more precious than the
right of the Bahamian people
to choose their own government
in free, fair and democratic elec-
tions,” he said.

Bahamians, Mr Christie
said, have always exercised their

FROM page one

Supreme Court Justice John Lyons, Mr Brath-

waite said. .

Daniel Smith died September 10 while he was
visiting his mother, three days after she gave birth

to her daughter, Dannielynn.

The inquest into the death of Anna Nicole
Smith’s son came to a standstill last week when
lawyers for Howard K Stern called the constitu-
tionality of the Coroner’s Court into question.

Mr Stern’s legal counsel informed Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez — who is presiding over the
inquest — that a constitutional motion had been
filed with the Supreme Court questioning the
lack of provisions in the Coroner’s Act to provide

for an impartial jury.

they were taken to a two-story
white house located in the Coral
Harbour area.

“He say Bahamas no prob-
lem, mucho money and we only
need to pay for immigration
extension, but when all girls
come to Bahamas we pay for
food and house,” Valentina
said.

The girls said they danced
from 8pm to 4am in the night
club on Wednesdays, Thurs-
days, Fridays and Saturdays.

“Wednesday we pay him $25
and other days we pay $50,” she
said.

“If no pay, he say no working
tonight.”

She told The Tribune that the
night club owner would find
men for the girls to sleep with.

“But he never give money to
we,” Valentina said.

The women said that they
“escaped” from the house last
Wednesday and on Monday the
owner gave them their pass-
ports, but only after they had
threatened to alert Interpol of
his activities when they got back
to Panama.

“T say if you don’t give me
my passport now, I tell police
because its illegal internation-
al,” Valentina said.

The Tribune contacted Assis-
tant Commissioner Greenslade
and he said that an investiga-
tion would be immediately

Election on May 2nd

right in record numbers and
voter turnout at elections has
consistently been on the mag-
nitude of 90 plus per cent.
“This is an astounding statis-
tic by world standards, and one
more reason why our little
nation is the envy of so
many other nations, large and
small, all around the world,” he
said.
In accordance with the con-
stitution, after the prime minis-
ter formally announced the dis-

solution of parliament and the
election date, Provost Marshall,
Paul Farquharson — accompa-
nied by senior police officers
and about fifty new police
recruits — read from the steps
of the House of Assembly, two
proclamations on behalf of the
governor-general. The first
declared the formal dissolution
of Parliament. Whereas, the sec-
ond announced that Parliament
will next be convened on May
23, 2007.

Coroner’s Court

the Coroner’

ceedings.

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During last week’s inquest proceedings Magis-
trate Gomez emphasised that the case of Daniel’s
death has received immense world-wide media
coverage and cautioned the all-female jury not to
heed any news reports, rumours, or gossip they
may hear about the case. However, Mr Stern’s
lawyers are asking the Supreme Court to revise
the provisions of the Coroner’s Act in such a way
that would allow lawyers to question potential
jurors to determine their impartiality. Jurors
selected to the inquest are expected to return to
Court on April 11 the date on
which Magistrate Gomez adjourned court pro-

The 2007

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es ae

@ VALENTINA, Michelle and Pamela

launched into the matter once
they had received all the details.

Attempts to contact the
nightclub owner were unsuc-
cessful.



Allegations
FROM page one

While the FNM maintains
it has nothing against Hait-
ian-Bahamians voting, such
reports show the desperate
level to which the PLP was
willing to stoop to gain extra
votes.

Reportedly at least 18 Hait-
ian migrants were given citi-
zenship and registered yes-
terday.





fa
oe

®

ian
wf



Human
rights group

FROM page one

Bahamas,” the Association
claimed.

Referring to politicians
who assume they hold some
sort of sway over the judicial
system, the Association said
that it is time for the Bahamas
to rid itself of “puerile little
Neros.”

Speaking as a guest on
More94’s Real Talk on Tues-
day, Mr Gomez called on Mrs
Maynard-Gibson to resign as
Attorney General and retire
completely from politics.

Mr Gomez was referring to
Mrs Maynard-Gibson’s con-
duct following two contro-
versial rulings by Justice
Lyons late last year.

Justice Lyons, who handles
90 per cent of all commercial
cases at. the Supreme Court
level, in his rulings found that
the government had failed to
appoint a commission to
review judges’ salaries and
had therefore compromised
the independence of the judi-
clary.

Mr Gomez on Tuesday
heavily criticised what he
termed the “most vicious and
vitriolic attack” by Mrs
Allyson Maynard-Gibson on
Justice Lyons in the House of’
Assembly earlier this year.

The GBHRA claimed that
this attack by Mrs Maynard-
Gibson on a sitting judge
reflects her “callous indiffer-
ence” towards the country’s
legal system.

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ROCK SOUND, Eleuthera
— The infrastructural work cur-
rently going on in south
Eleuthera is vital to residents
and visitors alike said assistant
administrator Francita Neeley.

She said this is especially so
when looked at in terms of job
creation.

“There are a lot of employ-
ment opportunities for those
who wish to work. Once you
like to work, the work is actu-
ally here,” she said. “Other per-
sons from other islands are also
taking advantage of the work
that is offered because there is a
lot of work going on.”

On March 22, contracts were
signed for roadwork in north,
central and south Eleuthera.

Along with these projects,
Mrs Neely said there are
upcoming plans for water works
in Bannnerman Town and John
Millars, construction at Cotton
Bay and Cape Eleuthera, and
there are plans for a new clinic
in Rock Sound.

Mrs Neely said such develop-
ments should encourage former
residents and other Bahamians
interested in making their home
on the island to see what it has
to offer.

“At this point in time, if they
want to really be a part of
what’s going to happen for
Eleuthera in the upcoming
years, they would want to put
themselves in position now to
really take advantage of it,
because it is coming,” she said.

Originally from Andros, Mrs
Neely said she can attest to the



@ THE proposed site for
the new clinic in Rock Sound,
Eleuthera.

(BIS photo: Eric Rose)

friendliness and warmth of the
Eleuthera residents, which is
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“People in Eleuthera are very
friendly and have received me
very warmly,” she said. “They
are very co-operative, especial-
ly as far as working together for
the building of the community,
for implementing changes in the
community. I like being here.”

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{

THE TRIBUNE

outh Eleuthera infrastructural work
to both residents and visitors’

ORD:
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@ ASSISTANT administrator for the south Eleuthera district
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE i



Residents in Eleuthera

LOCAL NEWS

fight for coconut

ENRAGED residents of an
Eleuthera settlement have
raised a petition to prevent
removal of coconut trees from
the local cemetery.

A group calling itself The
Guardians of Savannah Sound
wants the government to step
in and halt what they see as des-
ecration of the area.

The 34-name petition adds:
“Please help us preserve our
pristine environment and phys-
ical landscape for future gener-
ations.”

The row erupted when vil-
lagers discovered that a local
resident, Mr Wainwright Gib-
son, had allegedly negotiated
the sale of 200 coconut trees to
the developers of North Win-
dermere Island, which lies a few
hundred yards off-shore. Mr
Gibson apparently said in a
sworn statement that he and his
son planted the trees in the ear-
ly 1990s, a claim denied by vil-
lagers.

In fact, they say the uprooting
of trees was done without the
knowledge or consent of the
community.

“These coconut trees were
planted by many of the fathers
and forefathers of the commu-
nity in the 1940s and 1950s on
land granted to the community
more than 100 years ago for
burial and public recreation,”
says the petition.

The community has reacted
by contacting the police, the Min-
istry of Works, the island admin-
istrator, the BEST Commission
and several other agencies.

‘Now protesters are stepping
up pressure after the develop-
ment company allegedly sent a
team of men and heavy equip-
ment to remove the trees from
the cemetery and surrounding
area.

This led to a confrontation
between residents and company
officials, who showed them a
statement signed by two locals
saying the community had no
further use of the trees.

The company’s representa-
tive felt he had consent to take
the trees for his own landscap-
ing purposes.

Local JP Claudious Culmer,
the township chairman, said no
permits from any government
agencies were shown to back
up the claims, only a letter
signed by two members of the
commonage committee, Robert
Rahming Sr and Mrs Alice
Campbell.

The coconuts trees, all
between 15 feet and 25 feet tall,
have a special place in Savan-
nah Sound’s heart because they
have been used for food over
manv years.

Mr Culmer said: “The citi-
zens of Savannah Sound use the
coconuts to make the best
coconut tarts, pies, chip-cakes,
creams and water in the coun-
try.”

Mr Culmer alleged that Mr
Gibson was very angry when
workers were not allowed to



remove the trees and threat-
ened political victimisation
against the person who organ-
ised the campaign.

“Mr Gibson insis‘s on selling
the birthright of our communi-
ty,” he added. “But the coconut
trees of Savannah Sound are not
for sale — this is our legacy.”

Now Mr Michael Culmer,
another resident, has written to
Attorney General Allyson May-
nard-Gibson demanding action,
with copies sent to senior police

officers in Nassau.

Yesterday however a compa-
ny representative said the Win-
dermere Island North Devel-
opment had "absolutely no
intention to remove the trees."

Although admitting that the
company was approached by
"someone from the common-
age committee" — Wainwright
Gibson — who "tried to sell us
some trees" administrator
Phillip Jones said that when the
locals protested "we just backed

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"We had no wish to upset the
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Responding to the locals’
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island, and claims made by com-
pany officials to have rights over
the trees, Mr Jones, said: "Ini-
tially we did go over there. We
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Mr Gibson was unavailable
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

a ae
= ee i Urban Renewal families

against murder meeting

THE Department of Urban Renewal held a public forum for Families Against Murder (FAM)
on Thursday, March 29 at the British Colonial Hilton on Bay Street. From left are Carla Stuart,
Juanita Symonette (sister and mother of murder victim Chris Brown) and Jewel Major, director
of Urban Renewal.






(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)

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FROM left are Carla
Stewart, Juanita Symonette,
Marie Scott, Patricia
McGreger, Yasmin Miller,
(all relatives. of murder vic-
tims), and Dr David Allen.
Standing in background is
Pastor Rex Major.

(BIS photo:
Raymond A Bethel)

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

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THE TRIBUNE

Seminar due to”
launch weather
conference

ALTHOUGH the 2006
Atlantic hurricane season was a
quiet one, Bahamian authori-
ties have organised a thorough
hurricane readiness initiative.

They say it is a proactive step
to educate and prepare resi-
dents for hurricanes that will
inevitably impact the Bahamas
in the future.

The Ministry of Tourism will
present, “Climate change — hur-
ricanes and adaptation strate-
gies for the Bahamas” as part of
the 11th annual Bahamas
Weather Conference.

The free seminar and discus-
sion will be held at the British
Colonial Hilton on April 17
from 6pm to 8pm. The presen-
tation is open to the public.

Experts from the Bahamas
and United States will give brief
remarks exploring climate
change and its implications for
hurricane frequency and inten-
sity, as well as strategies for pro-
tecting life and property in the
face of future storms.

Many factors — from building
site selection to adequate set
backs, building material selec-
tion and reinforcement — can
help mitigate the effect of high
wind and storm surge on resi-
dential and commercial prop-
erty.

The evening will be moder-
ated by Mr Earlston McPhee,
director for sustainable tourism
at the ministry. The speakers
will include:

e Arthur Rolle, director of
the Bahamas Meteorological
Services (climate change and
the Bahamas: the Bahamian

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 13



Myla moire



H DR Nicolette Bethel, director of culture, chats with George Lamming, Caribbean novelist and
poet, and Janyne Hodder, president of the College of the Bahamas, at the official launch of the
Bahamas Learning Channel, on Friday, March 30 , ;

(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)



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e Craig Delancy, officer in
charge of the Bahamas Building

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of Works, (mitigating the effects
of wind and water through site
selection and building tech-
niques).

e Dr Bob Sheets, former
director of the National Hurri-
cane Centre

e Max Mayfield, immediate
past director of the National
Hurricane Centre

The panelists will take ques-
tions from the audience follow-
ing the formal presentations and
address issues of specific con-
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2007 hurricane season begins
June 1 making this a perfect
time to encourage every
Bahamian to develop a person-
al prepareduess plan and to dis-
cuss how tie destination as a

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Twelve brides in running
or annual Kelly’s event

BEAUTY Queen Celina
Thompson will pass on her
title as Kelly’s Bride of the
Year 2005-6 as she as
crowns the 15th annual win-
ner during the popular
Bahamas Bridal Show on
April 15.

The willowy and brainy
beauty is a professional
accountant with an off-

* shore bank.

She grew up in Eleuthera
and volunteers with the
Ranfurly Homes for Chil-
dren and Junior Achieve-
ment.

Celina was Kelly’s Octo-
ber Bride of the Year in
2005 and presided over Kel-
ly’s Bridal Events in 2006.

She took home a $1,000
Kelly’s gift certificate and
thousands of dollars in
prizes.

Her successor will also
receive a Kelly’s House and
Home gift certificate and a
number of other prizes
including: a Noritake “Regi-
na Platinum” china service
for eight; a Royal Doulton
“Old Country Roses” cake
plate; a Wedgwood “India”
tea service for six; a Water-
ford crystal water pitcher; a
Villeroy & Boch “Emily”
30-piece flatware set;
Mikasa “Stephanie Plat-
inum” crystal for eight; a
Balta rug; a framed picture
from Portal Publications; a
gift certificate from the
Beauty Spot; Columbian
Home’s eight-piece stock
pot set; a Black and Decker
food processor and a Rub-
bermaid storage organiser.

The 15th annual Kelly’s
Bride of the Year will be

Sunday School: 10am

chosen from the 12 brides
of the month for 2006 and
will reign over Kelly’s bridal
events for 2007. They are:

e January — Seniqua Bren-
nen Curry

e February — Keniqua
Ingraham Whitehouse

e March —- Yolanda
Winder Brennen

e April — Bridget Forbes
Brown

e May - Melissa Miller
Bain

e June — Astacia Stewart

FUNDAMENTAL

Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC

Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills e Phone: 393-0563 ° Box N-3622

















Ei a EASTER SUNDAY

11:00AM

Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM





Bernard Road
11:00AM



Zion Boulevard
10:00AM
7:00AM ~

East Shirley Street
11:00AM
7:00PM

9:30AM



JOUR 8:00am
ay? 9:30AM

11:00AM
6:00PM

RADIO PROGRAMMES














your Host:

Your Host:





THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
ween P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
namensa Phone: 39°-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

ray CHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2007

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey/HC

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Rev.Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC
Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

Pator Martin Loyley
Pator Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus :

Rev. James Neilly/HC
ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill

Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC

yey

: ), TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
Rev. William Higgs

No Service

FOR IR III IIIT III III IIA IK II III IIIS IIIS ISI RII SIRI RIBAK IB III IKI IIIA AA

RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Mrs. Kenris L. Carey
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’ on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Mrs. Kenris L. Carey

RRR KR KKK KERR KEKE KK EEE K EERE REAR KEKE

THE NASSAU REGION of the Women’s Fellowship will be holding
a Hamburger Fry on Friday, April 27, 2007 from 6:00 - 8:30 p.m. at
Epworth Hall, East Shirley Street Donation: $5.00

Wesley Methodist Church

aoe Hil Aid & Chapei Street} P.0.80x CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY APRIL 8TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Sis. Tezel Anderson
11:00 a.m. Rev. Caria Culmer/Bro. Jamicko Forde
6:00 p.m. Sanctuary Choir Cantata

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)








Kk AK KKK EK





‘PY ° SUNDAY, APRIL STH, 2007 _



%



Brice ‘ Bridal Show each year.
° July —Halcyon Saunders “They swarm the huge and
Adderley exciting Kelly’s House and
e August — Valron Grimes Home booth to see the lat-
Tinubu est in fine and casual china,

e September — Cheryl
Thompson Rolle

e October — Sharon Stu-
art Lafluer

e November — Monique
Saunders Sands

e December - Santiala
Cartwright Ferguson

crystal and flatware, styl-

Mrs Judith Adderley, Kel-
ly’s human resources man-
ager. “Kelly’s trained bridal
consultants are there in full
force, too, giving advice and
explaining the delightfully
simple Bridal Registry.at
Kelly’s House and Home,
Mall at Marathon.”

Thousands of prospective
brides visit the Bahamas

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921 ©






11:30 a.m. Speaker: Pastor Rex Major
Topic: The Cross & Its Sacrifice

NO EVENING SERVICE

_Bibfe Class: 9:45 a.m. eakil ir
Community Outreach: Eveni @









OPPORTUNITIES FOR



WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY SERVICES

Morning Worship Service o....
Sunday Schoo! for all ages ...
Adult EGUCCTHION vont
Worship Service ... 14.00 a.m.
Spanish Service 2,00 p.m.
Evening Worship Service ........ 6.30 p.m.

8.30 a.m.
9.45 am.
945a.m

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Selective Bible Teaching

Royal Rangers {Boys Club} 4-16 yrs.
Missionettes (Girs Cluj 4-16 ys.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY

Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 7 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God
Wo OE Var e ume em mca
ICR MER a
a) , A ww



ishly displayed,” explained:



This year will be the 19th
production of the big bridal
event, to be held at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort
on Cable Beach.

An all-day trade show will
offer many thousands of
dollars in prizes and feature
50-plus exhibitors.

@ CONGRATULATING
Celina Thompson at the 18th
Annual Bahamas Bridal
Show last year were: Kelly’s
human recourses manager
Judith Adderley (far left),
Kelly’s bridal manager
Patrice Lloyd-Dames (far
right) and the 2004-5 Bride
of the Year Myriam Paul
Stapleton.

(Photo by
Vincent Vaughan)

“The audience loves it
all,” said Patrice Lloyd-
Dames, manager of Kelly’s
Bridal Department at Kel-
ly’s Home Centre in the
Mall at Marathon. “Of
course everyone loves our
winner. Our Bride of the
Year is always a joy to know
and of great service to our
community.”

Nancy Kelly, vice presi-
dent of Kelly’s, said enter-
ing the Bride of the Year
and Month competition is
“as easy as registering your
bridal choices at Kelly’s.
Just register your wedding
date and make your bridal
choices including china and
crystal at Kelly’s House and
Home, Mall at Marathon.
We even have furniture
now. Your bride groom can
select tools and grills, also,
from our wide selection of
the very best products.”



@ EXCITING new china patterns preview at Kelly’s Bridal
Registry booth at the Bahamas Bridal Show

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co,, Ltd

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

“On Premises
Check Our Price
Before buying

Bahamas Bus & ’



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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 15

Taree ee el
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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 17











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THE TRIBUNE



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ON the surface, Ukraine’s
latest spasm of political turmoil
resembles the Orange Revolu-
tion of 2004, with tent camps
housing thousands and demon-
strators assembling in the capi-
tal’s main square, accordi9ng to
Associated Press.

But this time, the action is in
support of Prime Minister Vik-
tor Yanukovych — the enemy of
the 2004 mass protests.

The demonstrators say they
learned a lesson from the
protests more than two years
ago that helped propel Viktor
Yushchenko into the presiden-
cy over Yanukovych. A day
after Yushchenko ordered par-
liament dissolved, they started
putting up tents and laying out
sleeping bags.

“The Orange people taught
us, and this time we were the
first,” said Dmytro Nykyshyn,
commander of the main camp.

The camp is tucked away ina
park near parliament, not near-
ly as visible as the sprawling
tent camp that lined Kiev’s
main street, Kreshchatyk, dur-
ing the Orange Revolution and
that lasted for more than two
winter months. Nykyshyn said
his camp is home to 2,000 peo-
ple, most of them from the east



@ SUPPORTERS of Ukrainian Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and supporters of President
Viktor Yushchenko shake hands during rallies taking place outside the office of Ukraine’s
President in Kiev, Ukraine yesterday. Yushchenko stood by his order dissolving. Ukraine’s
parliament and calling for early elections, and appealed for support from foreign ambassadors, law
enforcement officials and governors as his standoff with the prime minister escalated.

and south, where support for
Yanukovych runs highest.

Just two days into their
protest, many say they are
already tired and ready to go
home. Some also admitted they
were being paid to be there —
but insisted they’d have come
regardless.

“T hope that soon we’ll win

outside the president’s office.
During the Orange Revolu-
tion, Yushchenko’s tent camp
was the nerve center of his
protest movement, and it
backed right up to the then-
opposition’s stage, giving the
impression of 24-hour activity.
Also, many of the tents were
giant, multi-person contraptions

(Photo: AP/Sergei Chuzavkov)

hours of the day to give encour-
agement to the. tent campers —
and to drop off food and sup-
plies. .

"I don’t sense any life here,”
said Oleksandr Dyadenko, cast-
ing a critical eye over the
Yanukovych camp. He said
he’d lived in the Orange Revo-
lution camp, and was curious to

4
‘

; J

fe

e

, %

and then they’ll let us go -— whereas at Yanukovych’s see what the competition was 4
home,” said 19-year-old student camp the tents tend to be for doing now. Net looks like an imi- .
Serhiy Kutsenko, who has been _ one or two people at the most. _ tation.”

sleeping in a two-person tent in
Mariynsky Park. “Yushchenko
must not ignore our interests.”

Yanukovych’s tent camp is
highly organised, but for much
of the day, it lies largely empty
and quiet while its residents lis-
ten to bands and speakers on
Independence Square and rally

Yanukovych’s supporters are |

also not helped by the fact that
the Ukrainian capital is consid-
ered a so-called “Orange” city.
Its residents were a major force
in the protests that helped ush-
er Yushchenko to power. Dur-
ing the Orange Revolution,
Kiev residents showed up at all

ling of

o the Extreme:

But Yanukovych’s support:
ers said they are determined.
Young people, wearing jackets
and scarves in Yanukovych’s
party’s blue color, lounged
around on a recent night, doing
crossword puzzles, playing cards
and reading.

The camp is tidy — a bag for



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 19



Russian exhibition
at Auschwitz is new
irritant to Poland

m@ POLAND
Warsaw

A DISAGREEMENT over
a Russian exhibit at the former
Nazi death camp of Auschwitz
has emerged as a new irritant
in relations between Russia and
Poland, where resentment of
Cold War domination by
Moscow remains strong, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The camp museum has
delayed the opening of the
Russian-designed exhibition
because it uses the term “Sovi-
et citizens” to refer to people
taken to Auschwitz from for-
mer Polish territory seized by
the Soviet Union at the start of
World War II, said museum
head Piotr Cywinski.

“Why is Russia still inter-
preting Stalinist times this
way?” Cywinski said during an
interview on Radio Tok FM.

The museum said in a state-
ment that residents of the occu-
pied areas “by no means can be
viewed as USSR citizens, as
they did not renounce volun-
tarily their former citizenship
and did not accept, as the result
of an independent decision,
Soviet citizenship.”

Auschwitz-Birkenau, the
German-run death camp oper-
ated in the southern Polish town

of Oswiecim during the Nazi
occupation, houses a number of
national exhibitions in old bar-
racks that document the atroci-
ties committed there.

Russian newspapers have
accused Poland this week of
closing the exhibition for polit-
ical reasons. The Russian daily
“Kommersant,” for one, called
the matter a “new stumbling
block in Russian-Polish rela-
tions.”

Disagreement

Director Cywinski said the
exhibit was closed at Russian
request in 2004 for a planned
update. He did say, however,
that the reopening had been
delayed by the disagreement
over the “Soviet” citizenship
the exhibition ascribes to resi-
dents of eastern Poland, the
Baltic states and part of Roma-
nia — territories taken over the
Soviet Union between 1939-41.

“You cannot say a resident
of Lviv — a Pole or a Jew — was
a Soviet” citizen, Cywinski said.
Lviv, formerly in eastern
Poland, is now in Ukraine.

Wladyslaw Bartoszewski, the
head of the International
Auschwitz Council, an advisory
board that includes camp sur-

vivors, accused Russia of resort-
ing to “dirty tricks” by trying

to count Poles and Jews killed

at the camp as Soviet victims.

“That is inadmissible,” Bar-
toszewski, himself an Auschwitz
survivor and a former Polish
foreign minister, wrote in a col-
umn published Wednesday in
the Dziennik daily.

On Tuesday, the Russian

Foreign Ministry said Poland

was making absurd demands.

“We are convinced that the
memory of victims of the Nazi
concentration camp at Oswiec-
im should not be held hostage
to historic-political profiteer-
ing,” ministry said in a state-
ment.

The dispute comes as ten-
sions simmer between the two
countries over a range of issues,
including a US request to place
part of a missile defense shield
in Poland and the Czech
Republic. Moscow has warned
that bowing to the US request
could spark a new arms race.

Between 1940-45, some 1.5
million people — mostly Jews,

but also others, including Rus--

sians, Poles and Gypsies — per-
ished at Auschwitz in gas cham-
bers or from forced labor,
hunger and disease. The camp
was liberated by Soviet troops
on January 27, 1945.

Kurdish demonstrators clash with
Turkish soldiers on Ocalan birthday

@ TURKEY
Ankara

POLICE and soldiers fired
warning shots into the air and
used tear gas and truncheons
Wednesday to disperse hun-
dreds of stone-throwing Kur-
dish protesters in southeast
Turkey, according to Associated
Press.

(The fprdtesterszwanted to...
travel to the village of Kurdish ~
rebel chief Abdullah Ocalan to :

mark his 58th birthday, reports
said.

The clashes erupted when
police and soldiers blocked a
highway and stopped a convoy
of around 4,000 Kurds near the
town of Halfeti in Sanliurfa
province. Angry Kurds, shout-
ing slogans in support of
Ocalan, began throwing stones
at the soldiers and police,
prompting them to open fire
into the air, the private Dogan
news agency said.

Some of the protesters and .

at least one police officer were
slightly injured, it said. The
group wanted to travel to the
village of Omerli, where Ocalan
was born, near the town of Bire-
cik.

In Birecik, Turkish authori-
ties distributed toys and kebabs
on Wednesday to keep Kurdish
children in school as demon-
strators gathered in downtown.



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manipulation of the children,”
said Tuncay Sonel, governor of
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@ GENERAL view of the closed exhibition honoring Russian victims at the museum of the for-
mer Nazi death camp of Auschwitz in Oswiecim, Poland on Wednesday. The exhibition was closed
in 2004 for a Russia-requested remake and has not been opened over content dispute between its
Russian authors and museum historians. This week, Russian newspapers accused Poland of closing
the exhibition for political reasons.

(Photo: AP/Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, Tomasz Pielesz)



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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE |



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@ LIN Hui a female panda bites bamboo inside her cage in Chiang Mai zoo in Chiang Mai
province, northern Thailand yesterday. After panda porn failed to spark amour, Thai zoo
officials turned early this week to artificial insemination in the hope of impregnating their lone
female giant panda. The officials inseminated Lin Hui, a female panda, with semen from
Chuang Chuang. The artificial insemination is a last ditch effort to get Lin Hui pregnant, after
videos of pandas having sex failed to entice Chuang Chuang into mating with his partner.

(AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Thailand blocks.

YouTube access |

‘
4
q
a

|
‘

amid crackdown

@ THAILAND
Bangkok

THE Thai government
blocked access to the popular
YouTube video Web site
Wednesday, saying a short film
it carries is an insult to the coun-
try’s beloved monarch, accord-
ing ta Associated Press.

It was one of a number of
websites deemed insulting to
the king and blocked by Thai-
land’s military-installed gov-
ernment, said Sitthichai
Pookaiyaudom, the minister of
information and technology.

Sitthichai said YouTube was
blocked Wednesday morning
after its owner Google turned
down his request to remove the
contentious web page, which
features a 44-second clip show-
ing graffitti-like elements paint-
ed over a slideshow of pho-
tographs of 79-year-old King
Bhumibol Adulyadej.

One part of the clip juxta-
poses pictures of feet over the
king’s image — a major cultural
taboo for Thais since feet are
considered extremely dirty and
offensive. The soundtrack is the
Thai National anthem.

“It’s a serious case of lese
majeste,” said Sitthichai, using
the legal term for the crime of
offending the monarchy. “We
asked Google to remove it
some days ago, but they refused
to.”
According to Sitthichai, thou-
sands of people had called the
government to complain about
the YouTube video.

If YouTube removed the clip,
access to the website would be
unblocked, he said.

Sitthichai said Google’s argu-
ment for not removing the
video was that US President
George W Bush had been
attacked more seriously on the

)
Â¥
% 1

Government claims short’
film insulting to monarch:
King Bhumibol Adulyadej



site and those clips were not
removed.

Thai authorities take insults
to the king extremely seriously.
A Swiss man was sentenced to
10 years in jail last week in the
northern Thai city of Chiang
Mai on lese majeste charges,
after he defaced posters of the
king during a drinking binge.

Sitthichai indicated the block-
ing of websites deemed offen-
sive would continue. ,

“People who create these
(websites) are abusing their
rights and clearly don’t mean
well for the country,” Sitthichai
said. “We have closed many and
will continue to.”

He declined to say how many
websites had already been
blocked, or give the number
currently under surveillance.

Critics have accused the cur-
rent government of blocking
Web sites criticising the Sep-
tember coup that overthrew
then-Prime Minister Thaksin
Shinawatra.

However, Sitthichai said the
government is only targeting
sites deemed insulting to the
monarchy, as well as porno-
graphic sites.

The interim government
installed after the coup has
come under increasing criticism,
and groups calling for an early
restoration of democracy have
been organising protests.

One of the sites shut down

was launched by an anti-coup*
group, which calls itself Satur-,
day Voice Against Dictators,’
that has been holding protests’
demanding coup leaders trans-.,
fer power to a democratically:
elected government. 4

Sitthichai said he had ordered.
fewer than 10 sites blocked:
since taking office late last year,’
either because their content,
constituted lese majeste, they.
were pornographic or they’
called for public political’
protests, which are illegal under,
martial law proclaimed after lasts
year’s coup. t

However, at least a dozen
websites with political content’,
have been blocked, some tem-!'
porarily, since the coup. After,’
CNN had an interview earliey*,
this year with ousted Primé:
Minister Thaksin, the link of!
its website with the report was;
apparently blocked, though thé:
action was not officially’
acknowledged. *

In February last year, thé
website of the Thai policg*
department said that 32,612)
“illicit” Web sites had beef»,
reported and subsequently;
blocked since April 2002. More *
recent statistics were not readi-
ly available.

Thailand has no comprehen-
sive law governing the internet,’
and limits governing use and_
censorship are not clearly
defined. ;

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FHE TRIBUNE



M@ REVEREND Jerome Francis, speaks during a memorial service for Pakistan cricket coach
Bob Woolmer in Cape Town, South Africa, Wednesday April 4, 2007. Woolmer coached South
frica's test and one-day team and led the Proteas to the 1999 World Cup semifinals. After a stint as
the high performance manager for the ICC, he took over at Pakistan in 2004. Woolmer was found dead
in his hotel room in Kingston, Jamaica, on March 18 after Pakistan lost to Ireland at the World Cup.
Police said he was strangled. Bob Woolmer's picture is seen at the podium.
t (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

=)

BOUL.



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 21

Friends and family pay
tribute to slain cricket coach

i CAPE TOWN, South Africa

BOB WOOLMER'S family and
friends attended a memorial service
Wednesday near the slain Pakistan
cricket coach's home, according to
Associated Press.

The service in a Cape Town sub-
urb was led by Anglican priest
Jerome Francis, who was one of
hundreds of poor black and mixed-
race boys coached by Woolmer in
the 1980s.

Tears and tributes flowed as
Woolmer's widow Gill and sons,
Dale and Russell, heard how he
defied apartheid to create one of
the country's first mixed-race teams
and nurture talent like South Africa
batsman Herschelle Gibbs.

"Here was a man with so much
worth to humanity," Francis told
300 mourners at Wynberg Boys'
High School where Woolmer spot-

ted a young Jacques Kallis who
went on to play for South Africa.

Woolmer coached South Africa's
test and one-day team and led the
Proteas to the 1999 World Cup
semifinals.

"He was a players' coach. He was
my mentor," former fast bowler
Allan Donald said. "He put South
Africa on the map and we'll remem-
ber him for that. In my book he was
the ultimate legend."

At the height of Woolmer's suc-
cess, the former England test bats-
man trained deprived kids and
became a father to a generation of
cricketers.

At the height of the protests
against racist rule, he would hold
training sessions as bullets and tear
gas flew around the field — and then
drive boys home to make sure they
were safe.

"He's still the most successful

coach South Africa's ever had," spin
bowler Paul Adams said. "We have
lost a great soldier in the game."
During the service, longtime
friend Tim Noakes denied rumors
that Woolmer was about to blow
the whistle on match-fixing in a
coaching manual they were writing.
"Not once in the past five years
did he mention match-fixing to me.
The theory is completely without
substance," said Noakes, whose
book with Woolmer was in its final
stages before the murder.
Woolmer was South Africa's
coach at the height of the match-
fixing scandal involving Hansie
Cronje, but was never implicated.
He was found dead in his hotel
room in Jamaica on March 18, the
day after Pakistan lost in a shock
upset to Ireland and ultimately
crashed out of the World Cup.
Police said he was strangled.

April 1st - April 8th, 2007
Sunday April 1st Sunday of The Passion & Palm Sunday

7:30 a.m.
8:45 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

6:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

The Liturgy of the Palms

Procession & Liturgy for Palm Sunday

Holy Eucharist

Monday April 2nd-1:00 p.m.
Holy Eucharist

Blessing & Distribution of Palms

Evensong, Sermon & Benediction

Tuesday April 3rd - 7:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Wednesday April 4th - 7:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

7:30 p.m.

Liturgy of the Renewal of Priestly Vows & Blessing of Holy Oils

Thursday April 5th - Maundy Thursday 7:30 p.m.
Commemoration of the Last Supper &

Watch before the Altar of Repose

Friday April 6th - Good Friday 9:00 a.m.

Good Friday Liturgy

Service Times For Sunday April 8th, 2007

Easter Sunday

6:00 a.m. The Easter Vigil
7:30 a.m. Holy Communion

9:00 a.m. Procession, Family Eucharist
11:15 a.m. Holy Eucharist

6:00 p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon & ‘Benediction

THE ASSEMBLIES OF GOD
BIBLE COLLEGE
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Evening Classes: 7p.m. - 9:45 p.m.
Weekend Classes: Fri 7 p.m. - 9:45 p.m.
and Sat 9 a.m. - 3:45 p.m.

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7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

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Basic English
Church History II

Intro to Missions

Bible Origins

WEEKEND CLASS: Marriage Counseling I

Instructors:

U.S. Instructors:
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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE. ::
INTERNATIONAL NEWS
9 e :
Â¥
:
® ® :
a
\ “
§
4
\
mâ„¢@ MUNDA, Solomon Islands H RESIDENTS in the vil-
lage of Noro in the Solomon ;
MEN perched on rocks Islands, Monday, April 2. a
peered out to sea through 2007, wade through the main +
Sieinae a od . foe ee street after water subsided =~
da on Wednesday, watching for ers Se a byan ,
another deadly wave, accord- ae ae ce Cae t :
ing to Associated Press. south TF aciic in the earty ,
have sprung up in hills behind of the Solomon Island s
towns hit by Monday’s tsunami including Munda and :
and earthquake. With strong Gizo,were hit by anearth-
aftershocks still jolting the quake on Monday that mea- ¢
region, the 40 families huddled sured 8.1 causing atsunami =}
there were afraid to come to hit the coast line and forc- *
down, though some had run out ing residence to flee to the ;
of water. hills for cover. ¢
“There’s no water to wash, 4
no water to drink,” said Esther (AP Photo/ ‘
Zekele, who fled with her hus- Gladys Houla)
band and five children to the ‘
camp on Monday as the sea ‘
surged into Munda, on the west- :
ern island of Gizo. :
On Wednesday, they ven- i
tured back for a sack of rice to were sunk or washed away by :
replace the one they brought the tsunami and fuel was cont- !
with them, now half gone. But aminated with sea water, adding '
when they heard a rumor that to the aid delivery woes.
another wave was coming, they Fakarii said officials had |
took to the hills again. asked for two mobile hospitals |-
The fears of another tsunami from Australia and New 4
have made it difficult for offi- Zealand. Hospitals at Gizo and :
cials to determine the number Munda had been wrecked by }
of victims and get aid to the the disaster, he said. ®
homeless. And aftershocks were The quake, which struck 6 :
pushing some survivors even miles under the sea about 25
deeper into the hills. miles from Gizo, set off alarms #
“People are in a panic from Tokyo to Hawaii, testing +
because of the continuous procedures put in place after 4
tremors,” said Rex Tara, a dis- | the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami ‘
iali that left 230,000 dead or missing <
SAL HAGCKbeeed ain one aerial surveillance flights inthe _ radio. “What we are experienc- _ tsunami. Honiara only has very small jn a dozen countries. e ;
Oxfam Beney past two days had revealed “was ing right now in some of the One police patrol boat — shops,” he told The Associated Gizo’s proximity to the epi- *
At least 28 people were filled no.evidence of mass deaths.” campsites is children starting to arrived in Gizo on Tuesday Press. center meant the destructive ®
by tsunami ee nitwde:k Red Cross official Nancy Jolo experience diarrhea.” after traveling 10 hours from .A New Zealand military waves — up to 16 feet high — :
cuttitauake aH a acitiee said her agency had handed out Six doctors and 15 nurses _ the capital, Honiara, with tents, transport plane unloaded a ship- — it before an alarm could be «

were checking unconfirmed
reports of further deaths,
including six people buried in
a landslide on Simbo, another
island in this South Pacific
nation.

Authorities have no firm fig-
ure for the missing, but
Solomon’s deputy police com-
missioner Peter Marshall said



all the emergency supplies it
had stored in Gizo, the main
town in the disaster zone, and
was waiting for new supplies
from a New Zealand military
transport plane that landed late
Tuesday in Munda.

“The priority need right now, .

is for water,” Jolo told Aus-
tralian Broadcasting»C€orp.*

from Honiara were among aid
workers who arrived Wednes-
day at Gizo, where the airport
remained closed and the wharf
was badly damaged.

Many of the 5,600 left home-
less were left scrounging for

-basic supplies. under buildings .

knocked down by the quake -
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tarps, food and water. A sec-
ond supply boat left Honiara
on Wednesday evening, but two
others were delayed because
provisions could not be found to
fill them, chief government
spokesman Alfred Maesulia
said.

“It’s very difficult to get the
materials needed because








rn of | ,
cL

Loa

ment of tarps, water and rations
at Munda.

“We have not reached peo-
ple as soon as we could ...
because of the widespread
nature of this particular disas-
ter,” said Fred Fakarii, chair-
man of the Natignal;Disaster
Management Council.

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sounded, rekindling debate
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worth the cost.

No significant tsunami was
‘reported outside the Solomons,
which are comprised of more
than 200 islands with a popula-
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Tere a bie i 7 a B 5 ere



THE TRIBUNE
= @ Phone: (242) 502-6000
El] ERNST & YOUNG = “tartered Accountants Eheoets42421 502-6008
Third Floor www.ey.com
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3231

Nassau, Bahamas

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF ANSBACHER
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited and its subsidiaries (the Bank) as at
31 December, 2006, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

Management’s Responsibility for the Balance Sheet

accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical
requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the balance sheet ts free from

material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet.
The procedures selected depend on the auditors’ judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material
misstatement of the balance sheet, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor
considers internal control relevant to the entity's preparation and fair presentation of the balance sheet in order to

design audit procedures that are appropriate for the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on
the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. ‘An audit also inctudes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting
poticies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as wetl as evaluating the overall

presentation of the balance sheet.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained ts sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit

opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, the consolidated balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the

Bank as of 31 December, 2006 in accordance with Intemational Financial Reporting Standards,

Grmet ¥

January 11, 2007

Consolidated balance sheet

31 December 31 December
2006 2005
Notes $000 $000
As restated
Assets
Cash * $ 43 225
Placements with, and loans and advances to, other banks 3 259,084 218,932
Loans and advances to customers 4 74,361 53,275
Investment securities 5 2,004 12,903
Property and equipment 6 916 1,149 |
Intangible assets 7 14 7”
Accrued income and other assets 1,596 1,977
Other receivables 8 760 “7
Total assets $ 338,778 $ 289,007
Liabilities
Customer deposits 9 $ 319,192 $ 272,878
Accruals and deferred income 2,984 2,280
Trade and other payables 10 1,080 1,097
Subordinated liabilities Z 11 3,632 3,632
Total liabilfties 326,888 279,887
Capital and reserves
Called up share capital 12 3,000 3,000
Share premium account 13 1,000 1,000
Statutory loan loss reserve 2 723 533
Retained eamings 7,167 4,587
Total equity 11 890 9,120
Total equity and liabilities $ 338,778 $ 289,007



The consolidated balance sheet was approved by the board on 11 January 2007

asi Bnfo- ' Qt © AN a
Director“ : Director
The attached notes form an integral part of this consolidated balance sheet

Notes to the consolidated balance sheet

1. Corporate information

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited and its subsidiaries (the Bank) are incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas. The Bank ts licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Regulation Act, Chapter 287, 2000 to carry on
banking and trust business. The Bank’s principal activities comprise: private and specialist banking; wealth
protection and management; and fiduciary services. The registered office of the Bank ts located at Ansbacher House,
Bank Lane, P. O. Box N-7768, Nassau, Bahamas.

The consolidated balance sheet of the Bank for the year ended 31 December 2006 were authorised for issue by the
board of the directors on 11 January 2007.

The Bank's ultimate holding company fs Qatar National Bank SAQ, which ts incorporated in Qatar. The immediate
holding company is Ansbacher Overseas Group Limited (the Parent), a company incorporated in Guernsey. The
smallest higher group in which the consolidated balance sheet of the Bank ts consolidated is headed by QNB
international Holdings Limited sarl, a company incorporated in Luxembourg.

The Bank’s consolidated balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards (IFRSs). The principal accounting policies adopted by the Bank are set out in note 2.

2. Accounting policies

Basis of preparation

The Bank has applied IFRS in its financial reporting with effect from 1 Juty 2004 in accordance with the transitional
provisions set out in IFRS 1, ‘First-time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards’. Previously, the Bank
followed UK accounting standards issued by the UK Accounting Standards Board and the pronouncements of its Urgent
Issues Task Force and Statements of Recommended Practice tssued by the British Bankers Association and the
accounting requirements of the Companies Act 1985 (collectively, ‘UK GAAP’).

The consolidated balance sheet has been prepared under the historical cost convention as modified by the inclusion
of certain financial instruments at fair valuation. The preparation of the consolidated balance sheet requires
management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts and disclosures in the consolidated
balance sheet. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

The consolidated balance sheet 1s presented in United States Dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest
thousand dollars ($000) except when otherwise indicated.

> 2, Accounting policies (continued)

Basis of consolidation !
The consolidated balance sheet comprises the balance sheet of the Bank and {ts subsidiaries, Ark Limited, Baird

Limited, Bitmore Limited, Boyne Limited, Chester Asset Holdings Limited, and Dunmore Properties Limited as at
December 31, 2006. %

Subsidiaries are consolidated from the date of their acquisition, being the date on which the Bank obtains control,
and continue to be consolidated until the date that such control ceases. Control comprises the power to govern the
financial and operating policies of the investee so as to obtain benefit from its activities and ts achieved through
. direct or indirect ownership of voting rights; currently exercisable or convertible potential voting rights; or by way of
contractual agreement. The balance sheet of the Bank's subsidiaries are prepared for the same reporting year as the
parent company, using consistent accounting policies. All inter-company balances and transactions are eliminated

Foreign currencies

Transactions denominated in foreign currencies are translated into the functional currency at the rates ruling at the
dates of the transactions. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the batance sheet date
are re-translated at the rates ruling at that date.

Intangible assets

Intangible assets consist of software and are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation. lintangibles assets are
amortised on a straight-line basis over three years. The carrying amounts of intangible assets are reviewed at each
balance sheet date to assess whether they are recorded in excess of their recoverable amounts, and where carrying
values exceed this estimated recoverable amount, assets are written down to their recoverable amount. No such
write-downs have been recorded by the Bank during the year (2005 - nil).

Property and equipment
and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation ts calculated on a straight-

Property
line basis as follows:

Leasehold Improvements 5 years
Fixture, Office Equipment and Computers 3- 10 years

The carrying amounts of property and equipment are reviewed at each balance sheet date to assess whether they are
recorded in excess of their recoverable amounts, and where carrying values exceed this estimated recoverable
amount, assets are written down to their recoverable amount. No such write-downs have been recorded by the Bank

during the year (2005 - nil).

Impairment of assets

The Bank assesses at each reporting da’e whether there ts an indication that an asset may be impaired. Hf any such
indication exists, or when annual impairment testing for an asset it required, the group makes an estimate of the
asset’s recoverable amount. Where the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount, the asset &
considered impaired and is written down to its recoverable amount.

probabitity of recovery ts assessed as being remote. pee os

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007,

2, .

Financial Assets

Financial assets in the scope of LAS 39 are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss; loans and
recetvables; heid-to-maturity investments; or es available-for-sale financial assets, as appropriate. The Bank
determines the classification of fts financial assets at initial recognition and re-evaluates this designation at each
financial year-end. When financial assets are recognised initially, they are measured at fair value, being the
transaction price pius, in the case of financial assets not at fair value through profit or loss, directly attributable
transaction costs.

All regular way purchases and sales of financial assets are recognised on the trade date, being the date that the Bank
commits to purchase or sell the asset. Regular way transactions require delivery of assets within the timeframe
generally established by regulation or convention in the market place. The subsequent measurement of financial
assets depends on their classification, as follows:

Financial essets at fair value through profit or toss :

Financial assets classified as held for trading and other assets designated as such on inception are included in
this category. Financial assets are classified as held for trading if they are acquired for sale in the short term.
Derivatives are also classified as held for trading unless they are designated as hedging instruments. Assets
are carried in the balance sheet at fair value.

Loans and edvances

Loans and advances are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not
quoted in an active market, do not qualify as trading assets and have not been designated as either fair value
through profit and loss or available for sale. Such assets are carried at amortised cost using the effective
interest method if the time value of money ts significant. The Bank holds collateral in the form of cash,
securities or real property on each of the outstanding amounts in accordance with its internal policies.

Available- for-sale financial assets

Available-for-sale financial assets are those non-dertvative financial assets that are designated as such or are
not classified in any of the above. After initial recognition avatlable-for sale financial assets are measured at
fair value with gains or losses being recognised as a separate component of equity until the investment is
Gerecognised or until the investment is determined to be impaired at which time the cumulative gain or loss
previously reported in equity is included in the consotidated statement of income.

Fair value of financial instruments

The fair value of quoted investments ts determined by reference to bid prices at the close of business on the
balance sheet date. Where there ts no active market, fair value ts determined using valuation techniques.
These include using recent arm's length market transactions; reference to the current market value of
another instrument which ts substantially the same; discounted cash flow analysis and pricing models.
Otherwise financial assets and liabilities will be carried at cost.

2. Accounting policies (continued)

impairment of financiol assets
‘The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired.

Assets carried at omortised cost ,
Hf there ts objecttve evidence that an impairment toss on loans and receivables carried at amorttsed cost has
been incurred, the amount of the loss ts measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and
the present value of estimated future cash flows (exciuding future credit losses that have not been incurred)
discounted at the financial asset's original effective interest rate (i.e. the effective interest rate computed at
initial recognition). The carrying amount of the asset fs reduced, with the amount of the loss recognised in
administration costs. ff, in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the
decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognised, the previously
recognised impairment loss ts reversed. Any subsequent reversal of an impairment loss is recognised in the
consolidated statement of income, to the extent that the carrying value of the asset does not exceed its
amortised cost at.the reversal date.

Assets corrted at cost

If there {s objective evidence that an impairment loss on an unquoted equity instrument that fs not carried at
fair value because its fair value cannot be reliably messured, or on a derivative asset that is linked to and
mast be settled by delivery of such an unquoted equity instrument, has been incurred, the amount of the loss
{s measured as the difference between the asset's carrying amount and the present value of estimated future
cash flows discounted at the current market rate of return for a similar financial asset.

Available-for-sale financial assets

If an available-for-sate asset 1s impaired, an amount comprising the difference between its cost (net of any
principal payment and amortisation) and fts fair vatue ts transferred from equity to the consolidated
statement of income. Reversats of impairment tosses on debt instruments are reversed through the
consolidated statement of income, if the increase in fair value of the instrument can be objectively related to
an event occurring after the impairment toss was recognised in profit or loss. Reversals in respect of equity
instruments classified as available-for-sale are not recognised in the statement of income. _

Derivative financial instruments and hedging

The Bank may use derivative financial instruments such as forward currency contracts to hedge {ts risks associated
with foreign currency. Such derivative financial instruments are initially recognised at fair value on the date on
which a derivative contract is entered into and are subsequently remeasured at fair value. Derivatives are carried as
assets when the fair vatue fs positive and as liabilities when the fair value ts negative.

‘The fair value of forward currency contracts is calculated by reference to current forward exchange rates for
Contracts with similar maturity profiles. The fair vatue of interest rate swap contracts ts determined by reference to
market values for similar instruments.

Trade and other receivables ;
‘Trade receivables are recognised and carried at the tower of their original invoiced value and recoverable amount,
Provision 1s made for any amount outstanding for more than six months. ' Balances are written off when the

2. Accounting policies (continued)

Cash and cash equivotents
Cash and short-term deposits comprise cash at banks and in hand and short-term deposits with an original maturity of
three months or less.

Texation
There are no income taxes imposed on the Bank in the Cemmonwealth of The Bahamas.

Provisions

A provision ts recognised when the Bank has a legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event and it is
probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. If the effect is material,
expected further cash flows are discounted using a rate that reflects, where appropriate, the risks specific to the

liability.

Where the Bank expects some of all of a provision to be reimbursed, for example under an insurance policy, the
reimbursement fs recognised as a separate asset but only when recovery is virtually certain.

A generat provision for loan losses ts required to meet the Bank's statutory requirements. The general provision ts
shown as an appropriation of retained earnings and reflected as part of shareholders’ equity. At 31 December, 2006
the statutory loan loss reserve was $723 (2005: $533).

Pensions

The Bank operates one post-retirement benefit scheme for its employees which is a defined contribution pension
plan. 4 defined contribution plan {s a pension plan into which the Bank pays fixed contributions: there fs no legal or
constructive obtigation to pay further contributtons.

Assets under administration

No account 1s taken in this consolidated balance sheet of assets and liabilities of clients administered by the Bank as
castodian, trustee, or nominee, or its subsidiaries as custodian, trustee, or nominee, other than those assets and
Uabitities which relate to banking services provided by the Bank or its subsidiaries for their clients. During the period
ended 31 December, 2005, the portfolio of the Bank's affitiate in the Cayman Islands was transferred to the Bank’s
local portfolto. The Bank has a fiduciary obligation to its customers for the administration of these accounts.

3. Placements with, and loans and advances to other banks

PAGE 23



31 December 31 December
2006 2005
$000 $000
Repayable on demand $ 46,597 $ 85,711

Other deposits with remaining maturity:
Three months or less but not repayable on demand 203,554 101,186
One year or tess but over three months 8,933 31,575
Five years or less but over one year - 460
$ 259,084 $ 218,932

The above amounts inctude:

Oue from parent and fellow subsidiary undertakings $ 183,452 $

4. Loans and edvences to customers

31 December 31 December

2006 2005

$000 $000

Repayable on demand $ 1,287 5 2,044
Other loans and advances with remaining maturity:

Three months or less 2,983 1,594

One year or less but over three months 11,110 1,525

12,181

Five years or less but over one year
46,870

Over five years
Less: allowance for impairment /provisions free note 9)

9,283
39,178

(70) (349)
74,361 $ 53,275

31 December 31 December
2006 2005
$000 $000

Concentration of credit risk
Property and real estate $ 49,969 $ 39,457
Other 24,462 14,167

74,431

Less: allowance for impairment / provisions (see note 9)

31 December 31 December
2006 2005
$000 $000

Geographical concentration of risk
North America $ 27,009 $ 18,940
Bahamas 26,202 20,098
Europe 16,627 6,633
Other Countries 4,523 7,604
$ 74,361 $ 53,275

53,624

(70) (749)
74,361 53,275



PAGE 24, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

5. Investment securities

THE TRIBUNE

Market risk

3 earn’ hei Market risk including foreign exchange, interest rate and liquidity risk, is encountered in both the investment and
‘$000 $000 trading books. The Bank's Asset and Liability Committee ts responsible for setting market risk limits and for managing
and monitoring these limits. The Bank’s treasury department also operates a central treasury for the Ansbacher
Debt securities $ 1,999 $ 12,778 Group and is responsible for the active management of the market risk of the Bank on a day-to-day basis.
Equity security .
Available for sale financial investments 2004S The treasury department manages the daily liquidity structure of the balance sheet. This is to ensure that funding
31 December 31 December obligations are met and that the regulatory liquidity requirements are complied with. General market liquidity risk ts
2006 2005 considered within the context of scenario testing.
‘$000 $000
Movement in available for sale financial investments Foreign exchange risk is controlled via net short open and forward foreign exchange gap limits. Foreign exchange
1 January 2006/1 July 2004 $ 12,903 $ 29,422 trading has not been a core activity of the Bank during the period under review and, in the opinion of the directors,
(10,780) (16,519) the risk inherent in these limits ts considered to be minimal.

Disposals (sale and redemption)

Impairment of equity security 119) :
m * $2,004 $12,903

At 31 December

The Bank investment in a non-tradable equity security has been assessed for impairment and based on that
assessment has recorded an impairment charge of $119 on the investment.

In 2006 and 2005, the Bank’s investments were held at amorttsed cost, less any impairment charges, which
approximates fair value.

The principal interest rate risk fs that of interest rate mismatching (re-pricing risk) which ts monitored through the
regular analysis of the book into various time buckets (gap analysis), with limits being set for each individual gap.

Operational risk
Operational risk is the risk that deficiencies in information systems or internal controls result in unexpected business,
financial and operating losses. The identification and control of these risks are managed by the Board of Directors.

Bf ot i SH

ek i a ee

oe ee me

The Bank's Risk Management Department and Internal Auditors carries out a regular review of all operational areas to
ensure operational risks are being properly controlled and reported to the Risk Committee. Contingency plans are in
place to achieve business continuity in the event of serious disruptions to business operations.

A maturity analysis of the available for sale debt securities ts as follows:

December 31, 2006











2,000,000 Investkredit Bank AG 2/1/2007 S$ 1,999 .
16, Interest rate risk
December 31, 2005 The Bank holds interest rate exposure. Instruments are allocated to time bands by reference to the earlier of their
next contractual interest rate repricing date and their maturity date. Short-term debtors and creditors are included
Finance 750
5 an bata ede IUlinots Float eines $ 5,025 in the following interest rate repricing and non-trading currency risk tables.
2,000,000 _Investkredit Bank AG 2/1/2007 1.999
1,500,000 Northern Rock PLC 2/28/2006 1,501 31 December 2006
3,500,000 San Paolo IMI Bk Intl SA 212712006 3,503 Within 3-12 1-5 >5 Non-interest
——S_12,778 3 Months Months Years Years bearing Total
— 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec Average
6. Property and equipment 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 _— Interest
Freehold Fixtures, 2000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 rate (%)
and office .
leasehold Equipment & oan banks and : .
iPro OD ey e000 oo loans and advances
to banks $ 244,998 $ 14,129 § - $ - $ - § 259,127 3.37- 6.45
cost Loans and advances to :
st: ; .
“At 1 July 2004 $1,251 $3,391 $4,642 pee ic 2,000 ; 74,361 3.38-9.35
Additions during the period 66 1 177 Other assets oe : : : 3 on 2,004 5.52
Disposals during the period : (81 (81 A 3,286 :
At 31 December 2005 1,317 3,421 4,738 — 8212.58 Ss 16,129 $n SS 32918 338,78
Additions during the year "1 163 ed Customer accounts $ 302,497 $ 16
: 671 § 4 S$ : : 4 15-5,
Disposals during the year : 49 19) Other liabilities aaa a } ° $ aes $3 yr 2.15-5 2
Subordinated liabil : . : . ;
At 31 December 2006 1,328 3,565 4,893 Serreers 4 ties : : : 3,632 3,632 6.27
11,890 11,890
Depreciation: Total Wabiteles $302 AST SVG S7 S24 S 3,632 515,954 $338,778
At 1 July 2004 767 2,425 — Interest rate
Provided during the period 197 560
he period : : 60 (60 sensitivity gap $ 16,861 $ (542) $ (24) $ = (3,632) $ (12,663;
Disposals during the pe $$) Cumulative gap 3 46851 § wea § tos §taees §
At 31 December 2005, 964 : 2,625 3,589 aa
132 267 399 me
Dispesals guring the year : 41 11 16, Interest rate risk (Continued)
At 31 December 2006 1096 BA 8977 31 December 2005
Within 3-12 ' 1-5 >5 Non-interest 7
Net book value at 31 December 2006 $ 232 $684 $ 916 , 3 Months Months Years Years bearing Fotal
. : . 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec Average
Net book value at 31 December 2005 $353 $ 796 $ 1,149 2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 interest
\ $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 rate (%)
7. Intangible assets ts Cash and balances at
Computer central banks and
software loans and advances to
$000 banks $ 215,901 $ 3,256 §$ 7 $ - $ - §$ 219,157 2.05-5.98
As restated Loans and advances to
Cost: customers 51,275 2,000 : : : 53,275 . 2.89 - 9.86
At 1 July 2004 $ 1,275 Investment securities 5,754 5,025 1,999 : 125 12,903 4.66 - 4.69
Additions during the period : 2 Other assets : _ -_ : 3,672 3,672 :
: Total assets $ 272,930 3 10,281 S 1,999 $ : $3,797 ~§ 289,007
At 31 December 2005 1,277 ,
. Customer accounts -$ 269,352 $ 3,526 $ : . $ . $ - $ 272,878 0.98- 4.73
Additions during the year 9 - Other liabilities : : : : 3,377 3,37 -
Subordinated liabilities : : - 3,632 : 3,632 - 5.21
At 31 December 2006 —_ 1,286 __ Shareholder's equity : : : : 9,120 9,120 :
Amortization: . Total liabilities $ 269,352 $ 3,526 $ : $ 3,632 $ 12,497 $289,007
At 1 July 2004 562 eo er a a
Provided during the period _____ 636 __ Interest rate .
sensitivity gap $ 3,578 $ 6755 § 1,999 $ (3,632) $ (8,700)
At 31 December 2005 1,198 Cumulative gap $3,578 $ 10,333 § 12,332 § 8,700 § :
74
Provided during the year TTT The average interest rate ranges noted include all currengies, which are not equally weighted across each category of
At 31 December 2006 1,272 assets or liabilities.
Net book value at 31 December 2006 ee ee
. 17. Currency denomination of assets and liabilities
1 December 2005 $ 79
Net book value e+ em . 31 December 31 December
, 2006 2005
8. Other receivables Pe . oo $000
Assets:
31 December 31 December ; Denominated in US dollars $ 272,831 $ 230,347
2006 2005 , Denominated in sterling / 25,392 31,281
$000 $000 as Denominatéd in.euro...""s). eis Beg ak 15,415, 5,952
. . 5 i 5 oe j Denominated in-urrérictes other than'sterling, US dollars and euro’. ‘ 38 140 a a2
Interest recetvi We assets 38,778 ,
Sundry receivables : 303 ; 181 Total 338-778 S28
—_s_ 70S SSG ,
oO Liabilities and shareholder's funds
Denominated in US dollars : $ 277,372 $ 226,463
9. Customer deposits . ' Denominated in sterling 25,627 29,721
Denominated in euro 15,144 5,700
31 December 31 December : Denominated in currencies other than sterling, US dollars and euro 20,635 27,123
2006 2005 Total liabilities and shareholder’s funds $ 338,778 $289,007
$000 $000 p A
Repayable on demand . $ 64,778 $ 207,977 The above can be considered to demonstrate the exposure of the Bank to foreign exchange rate risk.
Other deposits by remaining maturity:
’ Three months or less but not repayable on demand 237,720 61,375
One year or less but over three months 16,670 3,526 18, Operating lease commitments
24 .

Five years or less but over one year

319,192 $272,878

8 92272, B78 Future minimum lease rentals receivable under operating leases are as foltow. as at December 31, 2006:

10. Trade and other payables

31 December 31 December Within one year $597
2006 2005 Between one to five years 1,070
$000 $000
Interest payable : $ 825 5 613 Future minimum lease payments due under the operating lease are as follows as at December 31, 2006:
Sundry payables 35 264 -
Other provision (see below) 220 220 Within one year 5 500
080 7 Between one to five years 1,250
Due to parent and fellow subsidiary undertakings $ 33 $ 27

19. Related balances
11. Subordinated liabliities =

Parties are considered to be related ff one party has the ability to control the other party or exercise significant

a a

+ ewe se oe ee

A EE ee ee BM

oan Pat ae ; ie SY sas Poin

Te a cE

it Ra ak ae a ED Be eo ae

On 10 November 2004, the Bank entered into a subordinated loan agreement with its Parent. The Loan is denominated
in US dollars, due in 2013 and accrues interest at a rate of LIBOR plus 0.9%. The loan ts unsecured and claims in
respect of it are subordinated to the claims of all other creditors. The balance of the loan at December 31, 2006 was

influence over the other party in making financial or operation decisions, or one other party controls both.

(a) Subsidiaries

$3,632 (2005: $3,632).

12. Called up share capital Details of the principal subsfdiaries are shown in Note 2.

(b) Entities with significant influence over the Bank.

31 December 31 December
2006 2005
$000 $000 The Bank also provides a number of normal current and interest bearing cash accounts to entities throughout the
Authorised, issued and fully paid: Group. These transactions are conducted on normal market terms.
1,000 Class A ordinary shares of $50 each (2005: 1,000 shares) $ 50 $ 50
59,000 Class B ordinary shares of $50 each (2005: 59,000 shares) 2,950 2,950 The following is a summary of group balances in the consolidated balances sheet as at 31 December 2006 and 2005.

$ 3,000 $ 3,000

The Class A shares carry all of the voting rights in the Bank. Both classes of shares carry equal rights to participate in

In aggregate, amounts included in the accounts are as follows:

dividends declared by the Bank. 2006 2005
$000 $000
13. Share premium
Balances:

31 December 31 December Placements with, and loans and advances, to other banks $ 183,452 $ 154,688
2006 2005 Accruals and deferred income $ 1,882 $ 1,557
$000 : $000 Subordinated loan $3,632 $3,632

Share premium account: 7

40,000 Class B shares at $25 each $ 1,000 $ 1,000

20. First-time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards

Share premium may be converted to ordinary shares of the class for which the premium was paid by means of a
special resolution of the Board of Directors. Upon conversion, share premium shall have the same rights and
privileges of the relevant class of ordinary shares.

The pages that follow contain detailed reconciliations of UK GAAP in accordance with IFRS I. It should be noted that
all adjustments from UK GAAP tc IFRS relate to the effects of the recognition and measurement changes required by
the transition to IFRS.
14, Memorandum items

31 December 2005
Transfer General





At the balance sheet date, the contract amounts of contingent liabilities and commitments were: .
UK Mortgage to statutory loan Intangible
GAAP arrangement reserve provision assets IFRS
31 December 2006 31 December 2005 $000
Contract Contract $000 $000 $000 $000 $000
amount amount Assets
$000 $000 Cash $ 225 $ $ $
. - - . 225
Placements with, and 5 $
Contingent liabilities: loans and advances to, . .
Guarantees and irrevocable letters of other banks 218,932 - : : - 218,9
credit $ 80 $ : Loans and advances to ° uae
$ 80 $ : customers 53,275 - . : : 53,275
Commitments: Investment securities 12,903 : . . . 12,903
Undrawn formal standby facilities, credit Property, plant and
lines and cther commitments to lend equipments 1,228 : : : (79) 1,149
- one year and over $ 2,003 S$ 437 Intangible assets : : : : 79 79
- less than one year 15,828 1,645 Accrued income and
17,831 2,082 other assets 1,97 : : : - 1,977
Trade and other
. receivables 467 : : . . 467
The Bank is a party to certain financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk, in the normal course of business, to
meet the financial needs of customers. These financial instruments include acceptances and guarantees, Total assets 5289,007 SSS 289,007
commitments to extend lines of credit, and commitments to originate loans and mortgages. Exposure to loss is Llabtlities
represented by the contractual amount of each of the instruments. Where guarantees are issued on behalf of Customer deposits $ 272,878 5 - 5 - S - $ : S$ 272,878
customers, the Bank either holds collateral against the exposure or has the right of recourse to the customer. . Accruals and deferred ,
income 2,222 264 - (296) - 2,190
15. Risk management Trade and other payables 1,187 : : : - 1,187
Subordinated liabilities 3,632 : : : - 3,632
The major risks associated with the Bank’s business are: . Total liabilities 279,919 264 : (296) - 279,887
Credit risk Capital and reserves
Credit risk arises principally from lending and, to a lesser degree, on all investments and trading activity involving on Called up share capital 3,000 3,000
and off balance sheet instruments. The Credit Committee is responsible for setting book, portfolio and individual Share premfum account 1,000 : : : 1,000
credit limits and these are monitored on an ongoing intra-day basis. Exceptions are reported to the Committee who is eoeldperdbanarhe : : 533 - 7 533
responsible for overseeing any remedial action. Retained earnings 3,088 al 333 ci - 4,587
Total equity 9,088 (264 : 296 : 9,120
The size of the balance sheet is such that it ts possible to examine each individual exposure to evaluate ff specific
Provisions are necessary or adequate. In addition, the uacy of | Total equity and
eq! adequacy of general provisioning ts also considered on a liabilities 5 289,007 5 . 5 . 5 . 5 . $ 289,007

regular basis.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 25



20. First-time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (continued)

1 July 2004

Transfer to
Statutory Intangible
UK GAAP reserve assets IFRS

$000 $000 $000 $000

Assets
Cash 475 : : re)
Placements with, and loans and advances to,

other banks 121,069
Loans and advances to customers 25,450
Investment securities 29,422
Property, plant and equipments 2,463
Intangible assets :
Accrued income and other assets 1,111
Trade and other receivables 435
Total assets 180,425 - S .
Liabilities
Deposits from banks
Customer deposits
Trading portfolio liabilities
Derivative financial instruments -
Accruals and deferred income 2,089
Trade and other payables 158
Subordinated liabilities 3,632

169,337

Total liabilities 175,216

Capital and reserves

Called up share capital 1,000

Share premium account - .

Loan Loss reserve : = 255
Retained earings z 3,954

5,209 : : 5,209

Total equity and Habilities , 180,425 _ 5 .

Total equity

20. First-time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (continued)

Fees and commissions that are an integral part of the effective yield on a financial instrument, and direct
incremental costs associated with its origination, are included in the calculation of the effective interest rate and
recognised over the expected life of the instrument, or a shorter period if appropriate. As a result the recognition of
up-front fees and costs that were recognised when received, or incurred, under UK GAAP, for example those related
to loan origination, are now deferred.

IAS 39 permits financial assets to be designated at the time of initial recognition as being held at fair value, with
unrecognised gains or losses reported in income.

Under UK GAAP debt securities held for continuing use in the business were classified as investment securities and
carried in the consolidated balance sheet at cost less any provisions for permanent diminution in value. IAS 39
introduces strict requirements to be met before debt securities can be carried at amortised cost and the Bank has
determined that it does not meet these. Accordingly debt securities previously classified as investment securities
have been reclassified as available-for-sale and valued at their fair values at 1 January 2005. Equity investments may
not be carried at cost under IAS 39 and these have also been reclassified as available-for-sale.

Under UK GAAP the Bank’s accounting policy was to capitalise, within tangible fixed assets, only software costs
relating to separable new systems. Under IFRS, both extemal and directly related internal costs relating to
enhancements that lead to additional system functionality are also now capitalised and included in intangible assets.

21. Litigation

The Bank is involved in legai actions arising from its normal course of business. No material adverse impact on the
financial position of the Bank is expected to arise from these proceedings.

22. Issued International Financial Reporting Standards which are not effective

During the year, the IASB has issued the following standards with an effective date after the date of this consolidated
balance sheet:

Effective Date

1 January 2007

1 January 2007

1 May 2006

1 June 2006

1 November 2006
1 March 2007

1 January 2008

IFRS 7 ~ Financial Instruments: Disclosures

IAS 1 Amendment - Capital Disclosures

IFRIC 8 Related to IFRS 2 Share-based Payment

IFRIC 9 Related to embedded derivatives

IFRIC 10 Related to the reversal of impairment losses recognized in an interim period

IFRIC 11 Related to group and treasury share transactions related to share-based payments

IFRIC 12 Related to accounting by operators for public-to-private service concession arrangements

The Directors do not anticipate that the adoption of these standards will have a material impact on the Bank’s
balance sheet in the period of initial application. :

Upon adoption of IFRS 7, the Bank will have to disclose additional information about its financial instruments, their
significance and the nature and extent of risks that they give rise to. More specifically the Bank will need to disclose
the fair value of its financial instruments and its risk exposure in greater detail. There will be no effect on reported
income or net assets.

Les LI
towards car purchase

@ Jackie Johnson of The Tribune and Ingrid Farrington

ngrid Farrington was the lucky winner of $1,000 towards

the purchase of a new car in a joint promotion between
The Tribune, The Bahamas Motor Dealers Association, COOL 96,
JOY FM, and 100 JAMZ.

Readers of The Tribune and listeners of the respective radio sta-
tions were invited to complete entry forms published in The Tri-
bune from March 19 - 23, 2007.

Only respondents who delivered their entry forms to the
BMDA New Car Show on March 23 were eligible to win the
prize.

Ms. Farrington said, "When I received the call from The Tri-
bune, I was very happy and grateful for the blessing. Actually,
I was in the bank at the time, making final
arrangements for the car loan. The call came in right in time!"

Ms. Farrington decided to purchase a 2007 Chevy Captiva from
Nassau Motor Company.

The Tribune



Parents take care of offspring





i BROWN bear Goca plays with one of her two two-month old cubs in Belgrade Zoo, enjoying the
- (AP Photo/Srdjan Ilic)

warm spring weather, Wednesday, April 4, 2007.









@ A TEN-DAY-OLD zebra is seen behind its mother at Attica Zoo in Spata, near Athens on

Wednesday, April 4, 2007.
(AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)



PAGE 26, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
i Sa

Congratulations to the winners
of The Tribune’s & Kelly’s Easter

Colouring Contest 2007!
Winners Age Category 4 - 5















Anastacia
Moree,
Tribune
Features
Writer;
Taylor M. i
Higgs, 1st . i
place winner;
Marcquel
Bethel, |
Tribune Sales . ;

ee

ws

Executive



~‘es=¢








Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's; : Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's;
in Philip Pullicino, 2nd place winner; Mrs. Pullicino Sarai Bain, 3rd place winnner; Mrs. Bain

a



=

1

v

Winners Age Category 6 - 8







4

Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's; Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's; Glenwitte Russell, | Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's; ‘

Paige Butler, Ist place winner; Mrs. Butler 2nd place winner; Mr. Russell Laura Eldon, 3rd place winnner; Mr. Eldon ‘

; a |
;

Winners Age Category 9 3

4

d

‘oe,



i) Pitre





Cherese Moxey, Kelly's: Ericka Wilchcombe, Kelly's; Astrid Tanaz Pikramenos, Cherese Moxey, Kelly's; Shannon Lightbourne,
Ashli Pratt, Ist place winner; Mr. Pratt 2nd place winner; Mr. & Mrs. Pikramenos 3rd place winnner; Mrs. Lighbourne

SS PPE EE PT TT - er er - oe mane ape ee ee



THE TRIBUNE





COMICS PAGE



Tribune Comics



JUDGE PARKER

3AM, DID YOU LEAK
CELESTE'S DRINKING
PROBLEM TO THE MEDIAZ



















/___AND REGGIE |
JUST GOT A
ROCK TOSSED
THROUGH HIS
FRONT WINDOW!

PEOPLE WHO
CLAIM MORAL
SUPERIORITY
LIVE IN GLASS
HOUSES. -- “

NO, I DIDN'T! AND
CELESTE'S DRINKING
WASN'T THE ISSUE!























ABOUT MY LCHOSTS |

\
SS

YOUR MINP.

1. You are declarer with the West
hand at Six Hearts, and North leads

ALEXANDER the five of spades. How would you



ALREADY lay the hand?

TOOK HER! Bee East
: @AI7 —
| {i} VAKQI94 ¥8752
a| #10874 A953
ETS + — $A9843

2. You are declarer with the West
hand at Three Notrump, and North
leads the five of hearts. South covers
the eight with the ten, and you win
with the queen. How would you play
the hand?






TL THOUGHT INCREASED
PRODUCTIVITY WAS A
GOOD THING





THIS 1S THE FIFTH
DIRTY DIAPER IVE








CHANGED IN THE we aH
¥AQ4 ¥598
oA #QJ10984
#KQI108 HA53
kkk

1. There is very little chance of
making the slam unless the missing
clubs are divided 4-4, so you should
plan from the startto establish the
club nine as your 12th trick.

Trump the spade lead in dummy,
ruff a club, cash the ace of hearts,
trump the jack of spades, ruff another
club, trump the ace of spades and ruff
a third round of clubs. .

Draw trumps, lead a diamond to
the ace and cash the ace of clubs, dis-
carding a diamond. If both opponents
follow to the ace of clubs, cash the



GCOLOTNCS. COM (OW SBUITIR

HOW many words of four

letter word. No plurals
TODAY'S TARGET



©2007 by King Features Synctoste, Inc. World nghta seserved

42 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.



| CRYPTIC PUZZLE |

ACROSS






ij DOWN
1 Alittle store of timber on the 2. Butisit important enough to be
street (5) questionable? (6)
6 - Woman worth winning? (5) 3 Does such an egg contain
9 Pirate said to have a coarse alcohol? (6)
manner (7)



4 — Steamy bit of photography? (3)



10 Look in a mine to find an aviator! (5)
11 Tiny error about a foxtrot
being stylish (5)
12 Praises lads going out of turn! (5)
13 By concealing a desire to be a
baseballer (7)
15 Little boy's room (3)
17 Whip the Spanish
hothead! (4)
18 Check out the dog is safe (6)
19 Like fruit that’s not juicy (5)
20 Hide or show (6) 14
22 Drifting gas, note, can smell 15



5 Admired by players, but he can never




quite make a score (5)

6 Related to a philanthropic
communist (7)

7 Anoptical circle (4)

8 Taking a drink with one’s better half,
seem unsteady (6)

12 Find there's money io make (5)

13 Shove off round the corner? That's

rich! (5)

Had they the making of stars? (5)

Money nearly due, pet (5)






























appetising! (4) 16 Notvery emphatic? (5)
24 Isobligedtobe abit hasty (3). 18 Do the job on court? (5)
25 Show competitor never upset about 19 Made clear in a style | defend (7) ACROSS DOWN
finishing late (7) 21 See tales woven about a fairytale : ene) (5) 2 Steps (6)
26 Enough petrol to have lit a bit edifice! (6) 9 Found (7) ; oleae
of a fire (5) 22 Slow movers the school head 10 Unit of gem a eee 65)
ae 27 The mug one possibly sent catches (6) bd 11 eee 6 — Cold-blooded
E round (5) 23 - Became like a jelly when some angel x 12 Glue (5) crealure (7)
28 Nominally something to pay at the gave encouragement (6) PB : i. ay ; SNE mnt
29 eee the official (7) ; ae on ee a. Mi Empijed (4) ee
\ ) > 18 Refer (6) / 13 Exterior (5)
30 Honoured with a nosh-up round the 26 Asentence that may not mean what it Yn) 19 Type of brick (5) 14 Denounce (5)
Turk’s Head (5) says (4) 31 One team that's never 28 What aman may mimic, uu 24 Beam (3) 16 At no time (5)
in front (5) sheepishly (3) 25 More conceited (7) eterna ta)




19 Performer (7)



26 Metal fastener (5)











27 Penalties (5) 21 Running (6)
Yesterday's cryptic solutions | Yesterday's easy solutions ae pena - ee @)
ACROSS: 3, Hunch 8, Lucan 10, H-ovel 11, Man 12, ; ACROSS: 3, Staid 8, Fatal 10, Reply 11, Log 12, Broom 13, 30 Gemstone (5) ie
Fo-C-al 13, Bar-gain 18, Pesos 18, Kid 19, M-E-DICI21, | Compere 15, Noted 19, Ire 19, Minute 21, Heretic 22, 31 Principle (5) 25: Peat Onn (9)
Cordial 22, H-ark 23, Junk 24, Pea soup 26, Chaser 29, _| Peas 23, Feal 24, Batters 26, Crepes 29, Awe 31, Hones p 26 Relax (4)
ll-L 31, Hiker 32, Codicil 34, Put on (Upton) 35, Aid 36, 32, Sketchy 34, Title 35, Tar 36, Salad 37, Beret 28 Obtain (3)
Ideas 37, End-Ed 38, Leaks 38, Ledge



S52 cS
ENCOURAGE GABRIELLA. mas PERI NN SSSR ANA
YOU KNOW SHE'S VERY:/ HER ADVICE] THING AS AND YOU FO BREEAM
MIGHT CHANGE ee PAR ORLoo x

Test Your Play



letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one nine-

cpp

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 27







nine and discard another diamond.
Then congratulate yourself on a fine
performance in making a poor slam
contract, as you were a 2-1 underdog
when play began. f

2. You start with eight tricks, and
the problem is to find a ninth. Oddly
enough, you are sure to make the
contract — regardless of how the
adverse cards are divided — if you
invoke a very unusual play.

Let’s first suppose you tried to
establish your ninth trick by leading
a low spade to dummy’s ten at trick
two. You would go down if South
won the spade and retumed a heart,
and it turned out that North started
with five hearts to the king and the
remaining spade honor.

This outcorne can be avoided if
you play the ace of diamonds at trick
two, cash three club tricks ending in
dummy, then lead the queen of. dia-
monds and discard the ace of hearts!

Once you do this, the contract is
ice-cold. The defense cannot avoid
either putting you in dummy with a
heart or a diamond to cash nine
tricks, or putting you in your hand to
achieve the same result with your
clubs and spades. You give away a
trick by discarding the ace of hearts,
but it comes back with interest. The
only tricks you can lose on this line
of play are two spades, a diamond
and a heart. :



aeonad
sagas @
Agen &
g.ge8 «
2wengdeyv a
Saseae §
Beee2 585
Szeee
SSragr
Rages
yvedsan a
geese oe
Q ook
a LORY
He nee ob
Begabes
HEEEEEES

Good 21; very good 32; excellent






ae

carbohydrates






BU rete leas
Plea e ears
Pec lg ee UM g 4g
Gee) ro -e






Paul Keres v Giuseppe Stalda,
postal game 1934. Estonia's
Keres was one of the finest
players never to become world
champion. His career was
blighted when he competedin 6
wartime German tournaments.
On his return home Soviet

authorities, who favoured 4 | [ IBI T T fafal
ed ect bel ot

Ase

Keres's Russian rival Mikhail
Botvinnik, coerced him with
threats to his family. Though no 2
smoking gun has emerged, 1
suspicions linger that Keres
chose to play below form when
he lost four straight games to
Botvinnik in the 1948 world title
event. As a youthful talent,

Keres honed his game by postal
chess, taking on 150 opponents
at once. When he died,
thousands attended his funeral
and he was honoured with his

a

HEY, DAD, WILL Yu BUY |
ME A FLAME THROWER?

‘CHESS by Leonard Barden ~

























THURSDAY,
APRIL 5

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20

Be careful of what you are doing,
Aries. You could send an e-mail to the
wrong person or leave a sensitive doc-
ument in the copier. Stay on your toes
most of this week.

TAURUS -— Apr 21/May 21

Keep track of your finances, Taurus.
It’s easy to let a bill slide by other-
wise. You don’t want to mar your
financial record with a foolish mis-
take, like sending out a payment late.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

It will be difficult to schedule meet-
ings these days, Gemini. Everyone
keeps switching the date, and find-
ing an acceptable time is turning into
a fiasco. Keep your patience.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Some of your best plans will go
awry, Cancer. Just about everything
will require more time and, most
likely, more money. You may want
to jump ship.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

The next week is not ideal for ven-
turing into new territory, but you can
shore up projects you have already
started. These projects may be rela-
tionships as well.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

This isn’t the time for domestic deci-
sions. You could end up with home
renovations that border on weird. Wait
some time before heading to the-home
center or choosing paint swatéhés.

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23:
This week, you will be delighted to
bump into old friends. Take the time
to catch up on past history, and
resolve to keep in touch more, Libra.
You prefer piay to work anyway.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

If you’ve been scatterbrained, things
will all come into focus this week,
Scorpio. You could find that lost
watch or set of keys. Others will
notice your regained concentration.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Things are not working according
to your timetable, Sagittarius, and
you are frustrated. It’s best if you
adapt to the new schedule rather
than forging ahead.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You can finally catch up on all those
chores you promised to get to,
Capricorn. Even though the thought
isn’t appealing, you know that it can’t
be all fun and no work.

AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb 18
Your schedule this week seems
ridiculous. You feel there will be no
way to get it all done, Aquarius.
Somehow you’ll summon the power
of an army and push through.

PISCES -— Feb 19/Mar 20
Beware of making promises you
can’t keep, since this week you are
overly optimistic, Pisces. Don’t com-
mit until April arrives.









~€ doe! z h

£

image on a stamp. Here Keres
looks set for victory with his Qg6
mate threat, while the queen also
stops Qxe2 +. It looks resignable
for Stalda, but the Italian produced
a surprise resource. What
happened?

LEONARD BARDEN



Chess solution 8340; 1...Ral+ 2 Kh2 Rhi+! when if 3
Kxhl? Qbl+ and Qgl mate, so White must play 3 Kg2
Rgl+ with a draw by perpetual check.



DOWN: 1, Dumas 2, Ban-G-KO-k 4, Upon 5 CH-apel 6,
Holed 7, M-edoc 9, Car 12, Fiddler 14, Air 16, Sit-up 17,
S-ink-S 19, Mansion (House) 20, Which 21, Croak 23, ~
Juliana 24, Per-U-se 25, Old 27, Hinds 28, Sepai 30,
Wides 32, Cork 33, CID

| DOWN: 1, Talon 2, Magpies 4, Tire 5, tronic 6, Demon 7,
Fleet 9, Tom 12, Breezes 14, Err 16, Tunes 17, Delta 19,

| Mistake 20, Epoch 21, Haven 23, Fretted 24,

Beside 25, Ewe 27, Roman 28, Petal 30, Shred 32, Slog

33, Car















PAGE 28, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



COMICS PAGE









AND WHAT \E T DON'T
WANT TO BE NOUR
FRIEND TODAN ?





WHICH MEANS...r'cc Yl |
DEFINITELY BE NEEDING

THINK REGGIE \ HIMSELF AND
WILL DROP OUT | CELESTE ON THE

~.-I WOULDN'T BE E
SURPRISED IF HE :
COMPLETELY RETIRES!







[ms

i

WHATA HORRIB
NIGHT THAT WAS

dl

—




LOOKS SEEDIER THAN} YOU WERE HERE
EMBE FOR ALANS PARTY.




a
YDo YOU THINK IM

“UMMM. THAT
PRETTY, DENNIS?” c

TRICK QUESTION?”



BLONDIE

YOUR NEIGHBOR LAMAR WONDERED
IF COULD UPGRADE YOUR








WHY THE HECK DOES LAMAR CARE
WHAT I WATCH IN MY HOUSE?!



HE SUST GOT HIS
TELESCOPE FIXED







The Vanishing Trick












CABLE. HE SAYS THE STLFF YOU'RE] Bes
WATCHING IS £2 E my
i South dealer. losers, one in trumps and the other in
Both sides vulnerable. hearts.
NORTH Undaunted, South proceeded to FRIDAY,
@K9543 demonstrate that things are not
i ¥K92 always as they seem. At bie ines APRIL 6
“U5 A104 he led a spade to the king, then =
i &Q7 cashed the ace of clubs and K-A of Sa er ay Apr a di
j WEST EAST Gequnds andsntedss Gamond: | ee
a * | your way, you may be planning a
: ae 6 oe 076 eu per a ace of hearts and a | inaior bash. Don’t be so extravagant
eart to the king. ith dies h :
#3972 $Q853 The stage was now set for what Po
#10984 &I6532 declarer hoped would be a success e
o v SOUTH denouement. Having stripped the eS. oer ae
4f SIGHP¢... IT NEVER. we L ALWAYS @A10872 diamonds and clubs from his com- } 1 1' Soce-friends and f amily ae
FAILS. WHENEVER EXPERIENCE AN VÂ¥A843 bined hands, and with two small Gag-t0 fel the bront of your tonsae
FINISH ONE OF MY EMOTIONAL LETDOWN K6 hearts remaining in a hand oppose inchee Cala Gow and’ stare menling
BLOW-OUT TANTRUMS | = wees Sore Hee ay e now exited | eo. before it’s too late.
e bidding: i
South West . North East West won with the queen, but CEMINE May 22 dn a a
1¢ Pass 34 Pass found himself in a most unhappy sit- important Cecision Cu

of the week has you pulled in two
directions. You must make a decision
soon, or else the opportunity might
pass you by. |

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
You’ve been waiting to hear big
news, Cancer, and it’s finally headed
your way. Expect a complete tum-
around with a situation that has been
plaguing you lately.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

A business trip, a vacation or some-
thing that involves your going out of
town is on the ‘horizon, Leo.’ Pack
your bags now because you'll be in
_Store for an adventure. .

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
Someone from your past has made
an appearance lately, Virgo. You’re
not happy to run into this individual.
:Graciously smile and be on your
. way — in the opposite direction.

4 LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23

A large responsibility has been put
into your hands, Libra. Don’t worry,
you have the means to get it done.
You can always enlist the help of a
friend if you feel overwhelmed.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Your life is in an upheaval, Scorpio,
but it is a happy change to your
normal orderly schedule. Friends and
family love to be near you in the days
to come. Enjoy the company.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
If you’ve been feeling down in the
dumps, Sagittarius, all of that is
going to change. A stranger brings
good news, and you’re the first in
line to accept his offering.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You’ve been juggling too many
responsibilities, Capricorn. Pretty
soon one of the balls is going to drop.
Realize that’ you need to scale back
your projects.

6% uation. Since he had no hearts, he
Opening lead — ten of clubs. had to return a club or a diamond.
This allowed declarer to discard
dummy’s heart loser while he
trumped in his hand, and the slam
was made.

It is true that this line of play
required West to have no more than
two hearts, but once the trumps
divided 3-0, that was South’s only
legitimate chance. He therefore
methodically went about the neces-
sary preliminary preparations for the
endplay on the assumption that his
efforts would be rewarded.

And then, poof, the heart. loser
simply disappeared.

The skillful magician who can
make things disappear right in front
of your eyes has his bridge counter- _
part in the skillful declarer who can
make a seemingly sure loser vanish
into thin air.

Consider this deal where South
arrived at six spades, a contract that
required only a 2-1 trump division —
a 78 percent probability — to be lay-
down. However, after he won the
opening club lead and cashed the ace
of spades, he suddenly found himself
faced with two apparently certain

TARGET

Bot BI YeReM. fRses synroeTS



HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb forms
ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals and no
words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. The
first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in
inkjet printer).

TODAY’S TARGET :
Good 20; very good 30; excellent 39 (or more).
Solution Monday.

are
tay

ilove quey.s. (we.






YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION

dare dart darter date dater deaf dear deft draft

drafter drat duet dust duster fade fader fared

fasted fated feud fraud FRAUDSTER furred

fused rased rated read retard rude rudest rued
es rusted sated stared starred stead stud sued

“ano! surd' tarred trade trader tread trued used

| CRYPTIC PUZZLE

(©2007 by King Featsce Syrcicate, Ine. World tigfta reserved.
















»
.AGROSS DOWN -
ee i estas: Sonesue oy oe ee
* Quite proper, but a fathead could successtid blow (6) heavily in the days to come,

2 Tofine leg? (6) Aquarius. You don’t mind because












































































make it terrible! (8 sets
Mt hs : 3 Essay about starting out in you love to feel needed and a central
be Sno poets in the past, just for one the city (4) part of the action.
ve kind of puccing (4) 4 — Avoid a fellow getting side-tracked (7) 7 PISCES — Feb 19/Mar20 °
Where varsity men regularly start a 5 Later, open talks in irrational fear (5) ee Advice is offered to you, but you’re
- row (6) 6 . Another explosion, curse it! (5) not inclined to take it. Reconsider,
Divine spirits of the East, in new 8 — Ashot at heartening constables (4) ee aes oe fo really speaks
: words of wisdom.
__ slang? (6) 9 Ina ae via ||
maybe win :
f t the
nc ,
13 All upset about some boy - it’s true! :
s grecotmtraaie |” PCC me | | Maal ated
has to return? (5) 15 Neighbour needing money for coal, a Eo nm - Reese pit
vw ee wriggling out of the Birkenhead perhaps(5) Peter Svidler v Zoltan Almasi,
(2) fiver (4) Teorey Mine Sut ana mLcOves (>) Petco || German Bundesliga 2003-4. It
9 Cordage well known to old hands (5) 19. Somewhat outrageous practical takes a special tactic to catch
24 Walked at the front ofthe field? (5) eA oe ere Ed Pit zz oe cue ee Senders wren
i : y getting one note right on e game is hardly out of the
ne Sweet American, maybe, to chew the piano! (3) opening. In today’s puzzle
wag with (5) 21 Move to the right as you leave (4,3) ACROSS DOWN Almasi has just captured the e4
123 Become friendly with me and an 22 Could such an urchin be a 1 — es @) 1 Pursued (6) pawn with his black knight. The
iL officer (4) cabin boy? (3) 7 eo 2 Salty (6) Hungarian number three
" ; ; ; 8 — Dash (4) 6 3. Hollow (4) calculated 1 Bxe7 Nxc3 2 bxc3
\'26 Possibly be ill dus to an offence (5) 23 Phone the gang a wicked lie! (6) i: aun (6) 4 — Suggested Rxe7 or 1 Nxe4 Bxe4 2 Rxed (if 2
"28 In favour of reversing to the right (3) 24 Greek god of generosity (4) uu. 14 Writing fluid (3) (7) Bxe7 Rxe7) Bxg5 when Black
'29) Is out of business due to perfectionist 25 _Abird you can talk to, practically? (6) a 16 Type of 5 Blemish (5) remains a pawn up and has also
i= notions (6) 26 Though not heavy, it's a good thing to N saw (5) ; st vy exchanged several pieces.
, shed (5) 5 17 Appointment (4) 9 Haier he Svidler ranks in the world top
30 Workin our lab (6) 27 Prohibits including even a scrap of a. 19 Servant (5) my six, but Almasi reckoned that checkmate or decisive material
31 Aline some cabs may form (4) meat in a vegetable product (5) = 21.) Was concatiied (6) Tee ere) the Russian had made a simple ain. How did White (to play)
i ‘ pn n 22 Disgusting (5) 13 Benefactor (5) ight and would have to oe sa play
32 Acclaimed for having sharpened up 28 Communicate sound facts, if only < 23 Saucy (4) 15 European capital (5) Ranie | aeaatonial score a rapid victory?
around the Central Court (8) approximately (3) 26 Type of chair (5) 18 Awry (5) Bo De aaitelh re nla:
1.33, Non-vintage wine ftom Spain, 30 Anumber of advertisements for aR eat (3) : ey his analysis had missed a
iginall young men (4) 29 Score ui ‘ hidden crusher which forced
originally (6) 30 Drool (6) 21 Mythical creature (7) o FEOWARD BARDEN
31 Radiate (4) 22 Adherent (3)
32 Angelic (8) 23 Courteous (6) CE a TT,
: 33 Dozen (6) 24 Way out (4)
Yesterday’‘s cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions 25 Hypnotic state (6) 7
ACROSS: 1, St.-ash 6, Kitty 9, Corsair 10, Pi-lo-t 11, Ni-F-ty | ACROSS: 1, Ashen 6, Right 9, Located 10, Carat 11, Plead 26 Orderly pile (5) Chess solution 8322: ] Nxe4 Bxe4 2 Rxe4 Bxg5 3
12, La-U-ds 13, P-itch-er 15, Den 17, Las-h 18, Se-cur-e 12, Paste 13, Ordeals 15, Den 17, Used 18, Allude 19, 27 Postpone (5) : Qg4! and Black resigned. If Qxa4 4 Rxe8 mate. If Re7 4
19, Dried 20, Screen 22, Sag-E 24, Has 25, Even-te-r 26, | Adobe 20, Errors 22, Cede 24, Ray 25, Prouder 26, Rivet 28 Woman's name (3) Qxd7 Rxd7 5 Re8 mate. If Ne6 (best) 4 Nxe6 wins the





A-side






sommr23, Gel-led 25, Erred 26, Life 28, Baa




Lit-re 27, Ste-I-n 28, Bill-y 29, Federal 30, Fe-T-ed 31,

DOWN: 2, Trivia 3, Scotch 4, Hot 5, Oscar 6, Kind-red 7,
Iris 8, Tot-ter 12, L-earn 13, P-L-ush 14, Tsars 15, Du-cat
16, Never 18, Serve 19, Defined 21, C-astle 22, S-nails

27, Fines 28, Gamut 29, Starlet 30, Agate 31,

Tenet

DOWN: 2, Stairs 3, Elated 4, Not 5, Galas 6, Reptile 7, Idle
8, Heated 12, Plods 13, Outer 14, Decry 15, Duped 16,
Never 18, Abort 19, Artiste 21, Racing 22, Curate 23,
Deluge 25, Perry 26, Rest 28, Get

Religious group (4)

e6 knight or the g5 bishop.

Mensa quiz: Ipswich, Swansea, Aberdeen and
Lincoln.

One possible word ladder solution is: DOCK, deck,
peck, peak, leak, lead, LEAF.





THE TRIBUNE









vs Tribune Comics
JUDGE PARKER

THE COURTHOUSE!
WHAT HAPPENEDZ,

CELESTE BLACK

7 HAD A HANGOVER
AND ATTACKED
A TV REPORTER!

WHY DIDN'T
REGGIE LEAVE

I'LL BET HE'S
PONDERING THAT
DECISION AS WE SPEAK!

UT I GUESS IT WAS

WELL HAVE TO TAKE THE STAIRS. UST YOU LADIES. 444

MR. GIBBS SAYS THE ELEVATOR

H} THERE, LUANN. I WAS JUST
ABOUT TO GO UPSTAIRS AND SEE
WHAT ALL THE RUCKUS WAS ABOUT.



HOW AM [ SUPPOSED TO ~
GET TO SLEEP WITH ALL THAT
GLOWING GOING ON?

THAT YOU'RE
WEARING?

THURSDAY, ARIL 5, 2007, PAGE 29

ww/. PENNISTHEMENACE. com

LYING AROUND.

/

“HEY, MoM, ME AN’ JOEY WERE WONDERIN’
HOW LONG IT TAKES FOR HAIR TO GROW BACK.”

_ A Play Fit for a Queen

South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

South wins with the king, and,
with the cards divided as they are, he

YOUR MOM'S GOING TO
GO INTO CQNNIPTIONS
WHEN SHE SEES THIS

MARVIN



I'LL HAVE
THE “BEFORE
SUNRISE ”
BREAKFAST
SPECIAL

Yeb, TART Wi
Lh GLORIOUS

L
ae



NORTH must eventually go down at least two

#Q32 against best defense. East is bound to

Â¥Q 103 score four heart tricks as soon as

#KJ1095 West gains the lead with the king of

96 clubs and returns a heart through

WEST EAST dummy’s Q-3. The same result

#10974 #365 accrues if declarer plays low from

Â¥62 VÂ¥AI9N84 dummy on the first trick, in which
#8632 #AQ7 case East’s eight forces the king.

HK 84 52 But South has a much better way

SOUTH to play the hand that will stop East-

AK8 West stone cold dead. All he has to

Â¥K75 do to stymie the defense is to play the

4 queen of hearts from dummy on

&AQI1073 West’s opening lead.

The bidding: What can East then do? If he

South West North East takes the ace, he can’t return a heart

1 & Pass 1¢ 1¥ without establishing dummy’s ten.

3 & Pass 3¢ Pass Whether East continues or discontin-

3NT ues the suit, South has all the time he

Opening lead — six of hearts.

One play can make all the differ-
ence between making a contract and
going down. Declarer should there-
fore be careful not to play too hastily
when success or failure may hang in
the balance.

Take this simple case where
declarer gets to three notrump as
shown and West lead the six of
hearts. Let’s say declarer plays the

needs to wrap up-tiine tricks. And if
East does not take the ace, he winds
up in the same helpless position after
declarer next leads the nine of clubs
from dummy and loses the finesse to
West’s king.
The contract thus stands or falls
on which card declarer plays from
dummy at trick one. After giving due
weight to East’s one-heart overcall,
South must recognize the importance
of putting up dummy’s queen. Other-

VICTORY, SIR.
BUT, No, THE
VANQUISKED
GENERAL'S
HEAD ON A
PIKE DOGSN'T
COUNT

COCOINES. CoM / HOPSEQUITUR




IST. BY UMVERQLAL PRESS SYMACAT ES

Bete WILEY 1h, IHC. WILA WEE EMRTALIVE. HET

TIGER

CHILDREN
ARE SO
EXPENSINE |

~~ CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS DOWN
4 Restrictively 1 The impertinence to start curtseying
authoritarian? (6) i wrong (5)
7 Not much of a waterfall! (8) 2 Around mid-air, the fluttering dove is
8 Whence there may be a line to worth watching (5)
Gateshead? (6) 3. When to be wary in March? (4)
10 Arrests the flow of 4 With which to have a stab at cutting
supporters (5) up pears? (5)
13 Decline to surrender? (4) 5 The bread list, nominally? (4)
14 You won't get far with this one! (4) 6 Weapon perhaps useful at snooker (6)
15 She gets Joe with a right 9 — Claim a drink all round for the cricket
and a left! (4) side (6)
16 Fight a big-headed beefy type (3) 11 Quite a well-known article in the
17 Outstanding Netherlands (3)
encouragement (4) 12 Tosumup, | see what's worthy of a
19 Once prime minister's hearing (5)
garden (4) 13 Inservice, he has his own personal
21 Marginally sure to pay off? (4-5) lift (7)
23 | see mum's gone out to get 15 Like an inner feeling turning up in
a mineral (4) Portugal (3)
24 Manner in which one interrupts 16 Comfortable place to live at the end
people (4) of the road (3)
26 Showa huge amount of 18 Horse used with authority for halt the ACROSS ;
affection? (3) winter (6) : eo (6)
27 Catchina rapt 20 Compact in many ways (5) 8 Lust (6)
condition (4) 21 Engagement playing a soldier with a 10 Musty (5)
29 Set foot in haste, light heart (3) : 13 Slippery fish (4)
perhaps (4) 22 Personal immersion in something ve Feed et (4)
32 He's said to have been tasteful (3) Ww 2 ae See)
cut short (4) 23 Like our common friend in Dickens (6) | ad 17 Shade (4)
33 It's poetic in a clever sense (5) 25 Agreement in every essential (3) N 19 Contended (4)
34 The potatoes Buster 28 Possibly pass to the right in files (5) 5 21 Feeling (9)
mashed? (6) 30 Drag the guns into position? (5) a ee. TOU OL calle (A)
35 Regularly make apt cries at prices 31 Sellers possibly look carefully around > . a
being changed? (8) central Acton (5) pel 27 Paradise (4)
36 Using many branches, gets to the top 32 Seamen's union (4) uJ 29 Unusual (4)
of the tree (6) 33 Deputy’s fault? (4) 32 Water plant (4)
33 Book of maps (5)
34 Scorn (6)
35 Adorn (8)
36 Tension (6)

Yesterday's cryptic solutions :

ACROSS: 1, Caught 7, Rightful 8, S-ago 10, Putney 11,
Ang-E-Is 14, AC-t 16, Tar-ot 17, El-B-e 19, Ropes 21,
Paced 22, SU-gar 23, Me-Lt. 26, Libel 28, Fo-R 29,
|-deal-s 30, Labour 31, (t-)Axis 32, Hon-our-ed 33,

Sherry

DOWN: 1, Coup-le 2, Glance 3, Tr-o-y 4, Shun-Ted 5, Af-t-
er 6, Blast 8, Stab 9, Get 12, Gas 13, L-oy-al 15, L-ocal 18,
Li-Vi-d 19, Rag 20, P-E-R 21, Pull out 22, Sea 23, Mob-ile
24, Eros 25, Turkey 26, Light 27, B-e-ans 28, Fax 30,
L-ads.

Yesterday's easy solutions

ACROSS: 1, Caused 7, Exporter 8, Elan 10, Sadist 11,
Divide 14, Ink 16, Tenon 17, Date 19, Valet 21, Cared 22,
Fetid 23, Pert 26, Sedan 28, Pox 29, Twenty 30, Saliva 31,
Emit 32, Cherubic 33, Twelve

DOWN: 1, Chased 2, Saline 3, Dent 4, Posited 5,

Stain 6, Green 8, Edit 9, Ask 12, Vet 13, Donor 15,

Paris 18, Askew 19, Vat 20, Led 21, Centaur

22, Fan 23, Polite 24, Exit 25, Trance 26, Stack 27,

Defer 28, Pam 30, Sect





ten of hearts from dummy and East wise, the contract goes down the





covers the ten with the jack. drain,

The

Target

uses

words in

the main

body of

Chambers £2

21st § e g B35

Century Boao Ses

Dictionary o> 3 g io

(1999 SB Aso eR

edition). zgoebsehs
HOW many words of four letters E°SoVsases
or more can you make from the 52 P2es°oss
letters shown here? In making 82 3 588°
a word, each letter may be used So obo Heo
once only. Each must contain the of Ss592
centre letter and there must be Bog By 3 BES
at least one nine-letter word. Br OO SF ah
No plurals. esetas sy
TODAY'S TARGET BER RESS aE
Good 16; very good 23; excellent BOVUVODHS

31 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

new

word

reo el eel Sn
soak



Julio Kaplan v David Bronstein,
Hastings 1975-6. The late world
title challenger Bronstein always
liked to play in England, though

his clashes with Soviet 2
authorities restricted his visits.

CHESS by Leonard Barden





© 2088 Universe! Press Byndicete



SATURDAY, -
APRIL 7

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20
Overindulging in all areas of your life
is not a healthy way to live, Aries.
Rethink your personal goals and
streamline so you’re not’being pulled
‘into too many directions.

TAURUS -— Apr 21/May 21
You want to support’ a friend,
Taurus, but you just, ‘don’t agree
with this person’s motives. Don’t
get involved in the situgtion; you'll
regret it later. Fake
GEMINI —- May 22/Jun 21
Someone in the family: has stepped
on your toes, Gemini.’ Rather than
lash out, keep your ‘feelings to
yourself and be the bigger person
in this situation. “

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
You’ve put all your eggs.in one bas-
ket, Caricer, and now--that things
haven’t worked out, you’re left won-
dering what to do. Family: members
won’t let you down. i+ «:

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23 “

Watch how much you speng this -
week, Leo. You could go overboard
if you’re not paying: attention.
Better leave the credit at, home and
use cash instead. . at
VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

If you don’t make a move soon in your
love life, you’re going to miss the
opportunity, Virgo. Stop looking for
the perfect Mr. or Ms. Right. Rather,
look outside your comfort zone.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

Now is not the time to’ make rash
career decisions, Libra. You have too
many responsibilities and ‘bills com-
ing in. Even though your jpb may not
appeal to you anymore, stick with it.
SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
Normally a go-getter, Scorpio, you’re
ready to throw in the tow—l in regards
to a project that isn’t working out.
Don’t give up, however; ‘you'll find
relief soon. a.
SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Stop being so generous to-others, and
start concentrating on your immedi-
ate family, Sagittarius: They’re in
need of your love and “attention.
Quality family time is key.
CAPRICORN -— Dec-22/Jan 20
Your love life is a mess, Capricom.
You can’t seem to get along with your
partner no matter what you do. Instead
of butting heads, sit down: and talk
camly and rationally. ;

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Stop being argumentative, Aquarius.
Those around you will grow tired of
hearing how you’re always right.
Accept that someone elses opinion
might be valid. .
PISCES -— Feb 19/Mar 20
Recuperation from an injury or illness
will take time, Pisces. Don’t try to do
it all now. You’ll have plenty of time
to catch up in the weeks to come.

LEONARD BARDEN

DOWN Here as Black (to move) 7
1 Trunk (5) Bronstein can win a pawn by é
2 Continental (5) Rxg2, but after Kd1 and Nf3
3 Inthis place (4) White could keep drawing 5
4 Loaded (5) chances. Bronstein’s actual 5
5 Untidy state (4) choice was much stronger. Three
6 — Deserved (6) precise turns aeateda position 3
9 Cricket tear (6) where his opponent, though — ;
11 Pull (3) ahead on material, had to resign
12. Afterwards (5) with no reasonable defence. The
13. Lured (7) winning technique is known as
zugzwang, a German term
See meaning “compulsion to make a
ip eae losing move”. It's well worth
eee learning as all experts are aware
20 Stuggish (5) of it while it can easily catch
2) pamn}4) opponents at club and social
22 Male (3) level. How did Black force
23 Open (6) victory?
25 Age (3)
28 Actions (5) aS ENT EO a
30 Church table (5)
31 County (5) Chess solution 8323: 1. Rxd2! 2 Rxd2 Rd8 3 Rhdl cA!
32 Ready to eat (4) and White resigned. Black's last turn c4 prevented
33 Promise (4) White unravelling his pieces by c4, c3 and Ke2.
Instead, once White has run out of moves with his a, g
and h pawns he must move his cl king or dl rook,
allowing Black to capture the d2 rook and win with his
extra bishop.





wa
a



5a)

ae

OD, Bl WAVERSPL ABESS onc PTE

PAGE 30, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



COMICS PAGE





ce o _ Tribune Comics
JUDGE PARKER





I'M RUINED-.-- r HEY, YOU KNOW \ ~=—

THE MEDIA---
STOCK WHEN THEY HAVE A
THAT TAPE AIRS! NOSE FOR DIRT!

HOW DO YOU SUPPOSE
THEY FOUND OUT ABOUT
THE REHAG VISITS, ROYF

WELL, I WOULDN'T OR THAT PESKY GHOST ]
WORRY. MAYBE IT WAS] $k. AGAIN, ° g

JUST THE HEAT PIPES
BANGING.

a
EA

L— 1 BET YOUR NOTHING'S TOO
HOUSE IS THE ONLY GOOD FOR OUR FINE
PLACE THAT _=8¢@7FEATHERED FRIENDS,
SERVES 'EM vy ELMO!
"MINI-SANOWICHES," )
HUH?

A SPECIAL
SURPRISE!

©2007 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Wortd Rights reserved

I DON'T
UNDERSTAND
WHAT YOU'RE

SAYING, MARVIN

NON SEQUITUR




Kl, BONEN ,
NAO ME.
SORRY
INN LATE,
BUT...





it OO WILEM WK. IHC.

TIGER






i CLEANED THE
PART OF MY Room
NEAK THE PO0R

WHAT ABOOT
THE BEST



ACRUSS
Take steps in time (5) 4, DOWN
Rude remark about a bit of luck Away with you, Kenneth, and stir
(5) things up! (6)
Comprehensive accommodation Links the church with a bad sin (6)
ae rach vested () A burden to shoulder (3)
Kian ad ‘oda (6) Excellent line to trade (5)
Files for the ringleader to pass Pep sold wrongly, having been
around (5 spilt! (7) :
Creator of ten line drawings? (7) Several astronauts have it, more’s
Chap from Harlesden (3) the pity (4)
The responsibility of a union, Effects! (6) :
a any rubbish (6) . Pay a redhead, but not for a good

: l time! (5)

noe or mentioned as sighted For just a little loan? (6)

Belief in direct negotiation (6) Lacking cover, they need a bit of
A place to stay, being at a loose shade in the rising sun (5)

end (4) Was it superior in forming a link
gees to hurry when ten short! with the moon? (5)

; ‘ Young woman embraced by a
vm we 7 many a fresh pink couple of Poles (5)

Allots a soldier five points (5) oe

A noise that may come from the nonnider get ae ae ae
pipes (5) July, but in a nice way (7)

re to get an antique by the end Big noise in the criminal world? (6)
of the day (5) Water jump? (6)

bili Kansas is state Can a broken leg cause a

ey being broke (5) apathy at leisure (5)
(5) ng good in a gnarled tree Not quite a grand old lady? (4)

A name for the master key (3)

8B NBR RP RB SS Mas: Ses: es orc f

#3 38



CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Strict 7, Rain-drop 8, Ealin-G 10, Stems 13, Fall 14, Thou 15, GI-R-L
16, B-ox 17, Spur 19, Eden 21, Gilt-edged 23, M-ic-a 24, M-l-en 26, Hug 27, Trap
29, Step 32, Sean (shorn) 33, Verse 34, Tubers 35, Practise 36, C-limbs

DOWN: 1, Crust 2, V-i-deo 3, Ides 4, Spear 5, Roll 6, Cannon 9, Al-leg-e 11, The
12, Mus-ic 13, Fireman 15, Gut 16, Be-d 18, PLA-ter 20, D-ENSE 21, Gl-g 22, Dip
23,'Mutual 25, Yes 28, R-asps 30, Train 31, Pe-t-er 32, Seam 33, Vice

EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Limpet 7, Hysteria 8, Desire 10, Stale 13, Eels 14, Tuna 15, Anne 16,
Bed 17, Tint 19, Vied 21, Sentiment 23, Herd 24, Cane 26, Sow 27, Eden 29, Rare
32, Reed 33, Atlas 34, Deride 35, Decorate 36, Stress

DOWN: 1, Chest 2, Asian 3, Here 4, Laden 5, Mess 6, Earned 9, Eleven 11, Tug 12,
Later 13, Enticed 15, Ant 16, Bet 18, Indeed 20, Inert 21, Sew 22, Man 23,
Honest 25, Era 28, Deeds 30, Altar 31, Essex 32, Ripe 33, Avow

IF YOU STAND HERE, |
» TAR REST POESNIT -
NEEP CLEANING

EASY PUZZLE











PUTTING MY
THOUGHTS











y

2
TWe CNBEE NENS 3h

8



Tropical bird (5)
Currency units
(5)

Arthurian
knight (7)
Reject (5)
Allude (5)
Derision (5)
Musical ending
(”)

Tier (3)
Minerals (4)
Dress (6)
Practises
boxing (5)
Disprove (6)
African country
(4)

Insect (3)
Stimulus (7)
Play (5)
Moroccan
capital (5)
Without (5)
Esteems (7)
Celebrated (5)
Fraction (5)





“57S YOUR TURN, JOEY, TO
FOR OUR BALL BACK.”

West dealer.
East-West vulnerable.

NORTH
@KQI93
VA63
$Q9
#AKQ
WEST EAST
$85 #A 102
¥310974 ¥85
*AI84 #K52
#76 #98532
SOUTH
#764
Â¥KQ2
10763
$3104

The bidding:

West North East South
Pass 1¢ Pass 1 NT
Pass 3 NT

Opening lead — jack of hearts.

To be a good player, you must
acquire’ the habit of making assump-
tions. Often these assumptions will
turn out to be wrong, but that doesn’t
mean it was wrong to make them;
only by making assumptions can you
put yourself in a position to win
when it is possible to win.

Here is a typical case. Let’s say
you’re East and partner leads the jack
of hearts’ against: three notrump.
South wins with the queen and leads

' ety

Vuageat





HOW many words of four letters

or more can you make from the

letters shown here? In making a

word, each letter may be used

once only. Each must contain

the centre letter and there must
’ be at least one nine-letter word.

No plurals.

TODAY’S TARGET :

Good 14; very good 21; excellent
’ 28 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

Seem (6)
Tallies (6)
Pale (3)
Jousting
weapon (5)
Root
vegetables (7)
Biblical garden
(4)

Quake (6)
Range (5)
Snake (5)
Dutch
earthenware (5)
Correct (5)
Unwanted
plants (5)
Scent (5)
Began (7)
Hire (6)
Shade of red
(6)

Month (6)
Force (5)
Challenge (4)
Encountered
(3)

SRSS

NNONNH
Ooouw

It Only Hurts for a Minute

tee

Ge

Ca



MOM, WILL YOU DRIVE
ME INTO TOWN ?



WEN SHOULD T DRIVE
YOU, CALVIN ?









a spade to dummy’s jack. It doesn’t
rnigtier when you take yo ace; what M O N DAY,
does matter is what you play next.

It’s easy to see — if you look at all APRIL 9

four hands — that if you retumalow | ARTRS — Mar 21/Apr 20
diamond, your side can snatch four | Don worry when a conflict arises

diamond tricks and put the contract : : “Wo
down one; Butié you don tient at work, Aries. Things will simmer
low diamond at trick three — per-
haps because you were taught not to finding a resolution.

lead away from a king, or always to TAURUS — Apr 21/M ay 21

return your partner’s suit — declarer he nas :
finishes with 10 tricks. ; There’s no time like the present to

: embark on that home improvement
Regardless of what you might ‘you’ve been considering, Taurus.
have been taught, however, the fact | Encourage others to give you some
is that in this case you must assume friendly assistance.
West has the ace of diamonds to give . GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
yourself any chance of beating the if you've ee ra ing Shoat taking
contract. : ‘ :
a trip, now. is the time to do so,
. To assume that South has the ace Gemini. Grab a friend or family mem.
of diamonds ;— or to ignore entirely | ber 10 take the ride with you and it will
the question bf who has the ace — be much more fan e
and blindly return a heart would be CANCER - J ; 22/Jul 2
giving up. It is obvious dec]arer will. ~ Jun 22/Jul 22

score at least nine tricks, — four “J YOU’ve been feeling under the
spades, two hearts (you can’t be sure Weather, Cancer, and you can’t seem
who has the king) and three clubs — || bounce back quickly. Rest is key

if you play “safe” and return a heart. this week. There’s no point getting
It is true that West must have | CY? more run down.

somewhat more strength in dia- | LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

monds than just four to the ace — he | Lions may be the kings of the jungle,

must have at least the jack’ with it — . | Leo, but this week you can’t even

but this is merely an extension of the [| Muster a meow. No one is taking you

original assumption. Seriously, and that has: you angry.
Seka 7 Rethink your strategy.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

A move you made a few weeks back
is not panning out as you had hoped,
Virgo. You just can’t seem to get
along with your new housemate. It
may be time to pack up once more.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ve been taking advantage of
loved ones, Libra, and it has to stop.
There’s only so much they will take
before getting angry. Start reciprocat-
ing instead of just being greedy.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
You'll want to run the show this
week, Scorpio, and others will be
anxious to let you. Don’t let the
power go to your head, or else you’ll
make enemies very quickly.

SAGITTARIUS = Nov 23/Dec 21
A friend in need has you running,
Sagittarius. But don’t be so quick
to jump everytime this person
beckons or.else the situation could
get out of control.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You’ve been doing too much at work
again, Capricorn. If you don’t slow
yourself down, you’re going to find

new : yourself physically and mentally
worn out.
AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18
word Stop being so controlling of the

finances, Aquarius. Putting the

spending blame on others is not
| consume | accurate — you’re involved in that
Situation as well.
PISCES — Feb 19/Mar20
MTT aT) If plans don’t work out the way you
expected this week, Pisces, don’t

get discouraged. Bounce back and
set a new agenda.





et cart

CELEBRATE cereal claret

clear cleat crab crat
ect erect

e@
ec tercel

ber cable care car

acre brace bracelet bract
carte cartel cater

create creel eclat el
lace race react tal
trace treacle

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

ca



CHESS by Leonard Barden _

Bragi Thorfinsson v Arnar
Gunnarson, Reykjavik 2006. It
was a full two hours straight TV
chess, a remarkable sight
anywhere but maybe not in
Iceland which has the highest
number of grandmasters
relative to population of any
major country. The two experts
were in the final stages of their
speed game when Thorfinsson,
with a lost position, sacrificed a
rook for a crude trap. He hoped
that Black would fall for exf5?? A
Qxc6. Gunnarson planned Qd7, _ Fischer, now an Icelandic citizen,
but the clock made him panic watching the programme, and ;
and he went Kg8?? allowing giving a rare indication that he still
Qxg7 mate. Then came the most follows real chess. Of course,
unexpected twist. The TV station Bobby was right. What should
gota call from a viewer pointing Black play?

out a spectacular black win in

the diagram. It was Bobby LEONARD BARDEN



TE TT,

*
Chess solution 8324: 1...Rxg2+! 2 Khl (if 2 Kxg2
Rg4++ 3 Kh2 Qg2 mate) Rh4! when if 3 Nxh4 RI2+
wins the {6 queen or 3 Qxh4 Rg4+ or 3 QI7+ Rg/+! 4 £3
Rxh3 mate.
Mensa quiz: Content, sweep, duet, own, out and tee.
One possible word ladder solution is: MILK, mill,
mall, pail, paid MAID.



. vy,
Mp

down rather quickly, so don’t 4
spend much time thinking about *

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TF LARRABEE OD DDD aa"a"0'S WW ss RBS F898. TLL Tea e aaa a a et

ADS PW

>» 7.7.2

4@a 0%



THE TRIBUNE

hy
aed h

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 31 = =



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Russian cosmonauts, US space
tourist prepare for launch -

B@ BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan

IN ONE of their last days
before leaving the planet
aboard a closet-sized space
capsule, two Russian cosmo-
nauts and a U.S. billionaire
computer programmer
enjoyed an array of earthly
pleasures Wednesday — a
springtime stroll, a game of
pingpong and a freshly cooked
lunch, according to Associat-
ed Press.

Engineers, meanwhile, were
finishing the assembly of the
Russian-made Soyuz rocket
that will blast off into the
nighttime skies over Central
Asian steppes Saturday carry-
ing Fyodor Yurchikhin, Oleg
Kotov and Charles Simonyi to
the international space station.

As the trio took a stroll
down the so-called Cosmo-
nauts' Alley at the training
center in Baikonur, Kaza-
khstan, Yurchikhin, 48,
quipped to reporters that he
was more worried about say-
ing goodbye to his wife than
about the spaceflight.

"Yes, I am very nervous: my
wife is coming soon, I have to





@ WORKER maintain the Russian Soyuz TMA-10 ay that will
carry the crew to the international space station during final prepa-
rations ina hangar at Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, April 4,
2007. The rocket is scheduled to blast off on Saturday, April 7, 2007.
(AP Photo Sergey Ponomarev)

look nice and shaved."
Yurchikhin said. "What
launch? Is there going to be a

lll Atlantic Medical

launch?"
Simonyi, 58, the soft-spoken
Hungarian-born computer

sce tsata hei AG nile she Cancel

programmer who paid US$25
million to become the world’ s
fifth paying "space tourist,"
said he was getting lots of
training and assistance.

"Everyone is helping me so
much that it's easy," he told
reporters.

Simonyi's 13-day journey
includes roughly 11 days on
the orbiting station and travel
time to and from it. He returns
to Earth on April 20 along
with the two of the station's
current crew, Russian cosmo-
naut Mikhail Tyurin and U.S.
astronaut Miguel. Lopez-Ale-
gria.

The third member of the
current crew, U.S. astronaut
Sunita Williams, will remain.
on board until June, when she”
will be replaced by Clayton
Anderson.

Yurchikhin and Kotov will
be aboard the station for more
than six months .

Simonyi had earlier said that
the hardest parts of training
were spinning in a high-speed
rotating chair to help train
against dizziness in space and
learning Russian. Now, he
said, he has begun to actually

Gityof THe Bahamas:

‘inp Haharnas Disbele Astecation ad clans ed Wire a good ee

enjoy the chair and his Russ-
ian —-some of which he studied
as a child in Hungary - is
improving.

Before sitting down to a
three-course lunch, Simonyi
began a pingpong game with
Yurchikhin with an energetic
"poyekhali," or “let's go" in
Russian — an echo of the last
words uttered by cosmonaut
Yuri Gagarin in 1961 as he
blasted off to become the first
man in space.

"I think the space station
will be more surprising than
the Earth," Simonyi said. "The
Earth will be there at the start,
it's going to be there during
the flight, it-will be always
there, ‘but the space station
will somehow come out of
nowhere."

Born in Communist Hun-
gary, Simonyi first learned
computer programming on a
bulky. Soviet computer called
Ural-2. Later, after emigrat-
ing to the United States, he
worked for software giant
Microsoft Corp.

He said his former colleague
— Microsoft CEO Bill Gates
—was paying close attention to

by

sir
the adventure and has asked
several questions on Simonyi's
Web site. Yurchikhin joked;
that Gates is probably busy...
training himself to be a":
"spaceflight participant" — as'~*
Simonyi and his four paying
predecessors have been known

Simonyi said he found itr=-
ironic that four decades after vi
he learned to program on ay:
Soviet machine, it is the suc-!~
cessor of Soviet technology~
that was sending him into.
space. He said he was also’:
happy that the Russian space
program was nothing like the
highly secretive project the
Soviet efforts were. jews

"Technology and engineer- -
ing, it has very little to do with,
politics, so 1 am very proud of. :
my background with my — at. °
that time — Soviet computers,"
he said.

Simonyi said an Ural-1 com- ,
puter that he saw at the
Baikonur museum reminded «
him of the Ural-2, on which -
he learned his craft. ~

"And I kind of thought, ‘thee
circle has closed. We are back“
to the future, I think it's
great," he said. tat

Atlantic Medical is hosting its ninth Annual Fun Walk on Saturday 21st April 2007 at 6.00 am at the Montagu Beach | ta
Foreshore. Funds for the Walk will once again be donated to The Cancer Society of The Bahamas and The Bahamas
Diabetic Association. Your efforts in 2006 helped raise $40,000. Thank you.

THE EVENT BEGINS AT 6.00 A.M.

THE ROUTE commences from MONTAGU BEACH then WEST on Shirley Street, NORTH on Church Street, OUTWARD across “New Paradise
island Bridge” to the round-about at Paradise Island Golf Course, BACK to New Providence via the “Old Paradise Bridge”, EAST on East Bay Street and
back to Montagu Beach.

TROPHIES ARE AWARDED ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES:

(Male and Female awards)

A.15 and Under

B.16-25 C.26-35 D36-45 E. 46-59 F 60 and Over

Official registration TOPM tunwatkastianichouse.combs

Atlantic Medical is not liable for injuries incurred by participants at this event.

$15.00 Adults / $12.00 Children: includes “T-shirt& gift pack”
Deliver to Atlantic Medical Insurance, Atlantic House 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue PO BOX SS



q 0,
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ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas Tel.326-819|
www.cgigroup.bm_ e: atlanticmedical@atlantichouse.com.bs

A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.
Personal & Business Insurance:Group Pensions:Group Medical:Life Assurance & Investments

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Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.



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PAGE 32, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

maha ater te ve

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Platinum
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Bahamas Ministry of Tourism

Tropical Shipping Co. Ltd. = Seaside Real Estate
| HG Christie Ltd.

Gold Sam Gray Enterprises
Bank of The Bahamas
BTC Gibson, Rigby and Co.
Kalik Eddie’s Edge Water
Ron Ricardo ‘oat Club Peace & Plenty
Fireworks Unlimited ae G&G Shipping Co. Ltd.
Coral Springs Water Company

Silver
Donors
Four Seasons Resort
Scotiabank Bahamas Ltd. February Point
Palm Bay Beach Club Crab Cay Development
Sky Bahamas Lid. JS Johnson Insurance Co. Ltd.
British American Insurance , Exuma Waste Management
Chat ‘n Chill 4 Sky Limo.
Airport Car Rental Exuma Chamber of Commerce



nk the entire Exuma community for their unfailing support and generous contributions of time,
AT rola e Uta arol sh aro) dal=] an c=sc1e 10 i aor







THE TRIBUNE eee APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 33

evens

FOR EASTER





Butler & Sands 4m
Company Limited fe Shin Fe I Fd

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PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY.





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THE TRIBUNE





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE





Space tourist gets

_ ready for launch









Available at your
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| Libby?
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\ he ir min
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No City Market or Vendor Employee May Enter

Ends April Tht





@ KAZAKHSTAN
Baikonur

IN one of their last days

’ before leaving the planet

aboard a closet-sized space
capsule, two Russian cosmo-
nauts and a US billionaire

computer programmer
enjoyed an array of earthly
pleasures Wednesday - a

springtime stroll, a game of
ping-pong and a freshly
cooked lunch, according to
Associated Press.

Engineers, meanwhile, were
finishing the assembly of the
Russian-made Soyuz rocket
that will blast off into the night
time skies over Central Asian
steppes Saturday carrying
Fyodor Yurchikhin, Oleg
Kotov and Charles Simonyi to
the international space station.

As the trio took a stroll
down the so-called
Cosmonauts’ Alley at the
training centre in Baikonur,
Kazakhstan, Yurchikhin, 48,
quipped to reporters that he
was more worried about say-
ing goodbye to his wife than
about the spaceflight.

“Yes, I am very nervous: my
wife is coming soon, I have to
look nice and_ shaved.”
Yurchikhin said. “What
launch? Is there going to be a
launch?”

Simonyi, 58, the soft-spoken
Hungarian-born computer
programmer who paid US$25
million to become the world’s
fifth paying “space tourist,”
said he was getting lots of
training and assistance.

“Everyone is helping me so
much that it’s easy,” he told
reporters.

Simonyi’s 13-day journey
includes roughly 11 days on
the orbiting station and travel
time to and from it. He returns
to Earth on April 20 along
with the two of the station’s
current crew, Russian cosmo-
naut Mikhail Tyurin and US

‘astronaut Miguel Lopez-

Alegria... .

The third member of the
current crew, US astronaut
Sunita Williams, will remain
on board until June, when she
will be replaced by Clayton
Anderson. :

Yurchikhin and Kotov will —

be aboard the station for more
than six months

Simonyi had earlier said that
the hardest parts of training
were spinning in a high-speed
rotating chair to help train
against dizziness in space and
learning Russian. Now, he said,
he has begun to actually enjoy
the chair and his Russian —
some of which he studied as a
child in Hungary — is improv-
ing.

Before sitting down to a
three-course lunch, Simonyi
began a ping-pong game with
Yurchikhin with an energetic
“poyekhali,” or “let’s go” in
Russian —_ an echo of the last
words uttered by cosmonaut
Yuri Gagarin in 1961 as he
blasted off to become the first
man in space.

“I think the space station
will be more surprising than
the Earth,” Simonyi said. “The
Earth will be there at the start,
it’s going to be there during the
flight, it will be always there,
but the space station will
somehow come out. of
nowhere.”

Born in Communist
Hungary, Simonyi first learned
computer programming on a
bulky Soviet computer called
Ural-2. Later, after emigrating
to the United States, he
worked for software giant
Microsoft Corp.

He said his former colleague
— Microsoft CEO Bill Gates —
was paying close attention to
the adventure and has asked
several questions on Simonyi’s
Web site. Yurchikhin joked that
Gates is probably busy training
himself to be a “spaceflight par-
ticipant” — as Simonyi and his
four paying predecessors have
been known.

Simonyi said he found it
ironic that four decades after
he learned to program on a
Soviet machine, it is the succes-
sor of Soviet technology that
was sending him into space. He
said he was also happy that the
Russian space programme was
nothing like the highly secre-
tive project the Soviet efforts
were.

“Technology and engineer-
ing, it has very little to do with
politics, so 1 am very proud of
my background with my — at
that time — Soviet computers,”
he said.
















PAGE 36, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE:
} : rep

TO











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in the mornings. I get a wealth of
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SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net

BU

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street









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@ ABOVE: An
artist’s impression of
The Two Turtles

Inn in Georgetown,
Exuma

@ BURTON
RODGERS

(Photo: Tim Clarke/ |
Tribune staff) |



Bahamian planning
$16m resort facelift

Planned renovation of Exuma’s Two Turtles property could create up to 120 permanent jobs

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

he Two Turtles

Inn in George-

town, Exuma, is

set to receive a

$16 million
facelift, thanks to its new own-
er, Bahamian Burton Rodgers,
who hopes to transform the
property into a small, luxuri-
ous yet still affordable bou-
tique hotel.

In an exclusive interview
with Tribune Business, Mr
Rodgers, himself a native of
Exuma, explained that his

vision is to create a resort that
provides unparalleled service
at-prices the average guest can
easily afford.

“We want to provide high-
end, quality service at an
affordable price, which is
unheard of in the boutique
industry, because when people
think of boutique they think
of expensive $700-800 room
nights,” Mr Rodgers said.

“We won’t be at that price,
but we’re gonna be at an
affordable price for the aver-
age Bahamian vacationer,
because we want people to
come not only from the United
States and Europe ,but also
folks from Nassau and the oth-

er islands.”

Mr Rodgers noted that once
reopened, Two Turtles should
have a tremendous impact on
the island’s economy.

“In addition to the 120 per-
manent employees we expect
to hire, we have the construc-
tion workers and spin-off
employment,” he added.

He said he hopes to employ
as many native Exumians as
possible, because they are very
knowledgeable about the his-
tory of the property and the
island itself.

Mr Rodgers said the prop-
erty will undergo a_ through
renovation, with some of the
buildings being completely lev-

- elled and rebuilt. However, he

said he is determined not to
let the property lose the charm
that has made it such an insti-
tution on the island.

“When we are finished, we
will have among other things a
first class spa, two restaurants -
one a higher priced and the
other moderately priced - and
a deli,” he said.

Construction is expected to
start in the next few months, as
soon as all of the relevant per-
mits are obtained.

Mr Rodgers said that so far,
all his initial government meet-

SEE page 14B



BISX rules changes Stuart Cove’s visitor base ‘could double’

to speed

up issuer

financial reporting

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
~-Tribune-Business Editor

THE redrafted Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) listings and
issuers’ continuing obligations

rules will require listed com- ~

panies to publish their quar-
terly and annual financial fig-
ures some 60 and 90 days
respectively after the periods
end, with the exchange’s list-
ings committee having “the
aibility to disqualify a director
from serving in that capacity”
for a listed firm.

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told The Tribune
yesterday that the redrafted
listings and issuers’ continuing
obligations rules would be pub-
lished by next Tuesday to
obtain feedback from listed
companies, investors and cap-
ital markets participants, and
other interested parties.

Outlining the major changes
to both sets of rules, in regard
to the continuing obligations
of BISX-listed companies, Mr
Davies said: “We are requir-
ing companies to publish their
quarterlies 60 days after the
quarter ends; it used to be [and
is currently] 90 days.

“We are requiring compa-
nies to publish 90 days after
the year-end, rather than 120

Quarterly and
annual financial
filings proposed
at 60 and 90 days
after period end,
with BISX listings
committee able to
disqualify directors

days....... We’re increasing the
speed and timeliness of disclo-
sure.”

Mr Davies added: “We’ve
got to improve the standard,
and at this point unless some-
thing contrary comes about, it
is not enough for inssuers to
say that their external, inde-
pendent auditors cannot meet
these deadlines.

“We’ve approached BICA
[the Bahamian accountants
institute], and in discussions
with them they’ve just said
they’ll have to approach the
companies earlier. We’ve put
out there, and will have to see
what the companies come back
with and BICA’s comments.”

Mr Davies said another pro-

SEE page 13B



SKYLINE HEIGHTS, CABLE BEACH
9,600 SQ FT NEWLY REFURBISHED
~ 60,000 SQ FT GATED COMPOUND
9 BEDROOMS INC COTTAGE & APARTMENT
PRIVATE WALLED POOL, LUSCIOUS GARDENS

$1,699,000
GREATLY REDUCED!

TEL: 327-8866







Bahamian business to form vital component of $867m South Ocean revitalisation
* Developer in ‘deeper talks’ on four-star hotel brand and bigger role for Greg Norman
* Big role envisaged for Bahamian entrpreneurs, with beach and coral reef restoration also playing a part

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
~ Tribune Business Editor

STUART Cove’s Dive Bahamas, the
internationally-renowned undersea explo-
ration and adventure excursions provider,

- will be relocated to the marina of the rede-
‘veloped South Ocean Golf & Beach

Resort, the property’s developer telling
The Tribune yesterday that the move
would likely “double” the Bahamian firm’s
visitor base. ,

Roger Stein, of RHS Ventures and the
multi-million dollar investment project’s
managing director, said he had been work-
ing with Stuart Cove’s on the relocation,
the firm being a key part of South Ocean’s

plans going forward. i

He added that Stuart Cove’s currently
attracted about 55,000 visitors to its tours,
excursions and facilities per year, but
South Ocean’s closure since 2004 had
impacted the company by depriving .its
clients of a nearby hotel where they could
stay.

Incorporating Stuart Cove’s into the
redeveloped South Ocean’s marina, Mr
Stein said, would not only provide a bid
draw for the development’s guests, but it
would give the Bahamian company access
to a much larger client base.

There would also be more mooring
space for boats and yachts in the marina,
and more shopping, eating and other activ-

ities for Stuart Cove’s customers to par-

ticipate in.

Mr Stein said that although Stuart Cov-
e’s attracted 55,000 visitors every year, he
and the company “expect that to double
once they’ve moved into the location
we’ve designed for them.

“It’s a good draw and brings lots of peo-
ple to the site. Once they have an open
hotel nearby, people will have more time
to spend more money, spending it with .
retail, entertainment and boats,” he added.

“We’ve been designing the relocation
of Stuart Cove’s with Stuart and Michelle.

SEE page 10B



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- bankbahamasonline.com
_-and get on with your business.

Tet mip Es





PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007



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THE TRIBUNE

Due diligence
required on
shareholder

nominees

nominee sharehold-
er is an individual or
a corporate entity

who holds the shares of a com-.

pany, either directly or indi-
rectly, on behalf of the ulti-
mate beneficial owner(s) of the
shares. It is.in the nominee’s
name that the shares are regis-
tered in the share register of
the company. Nominee share-
holders are normally used for
reasons of anonymity and con-
venience, particularly by off-
shore clients.

However, the provision of
such services must be offered
to clients whose identities,
business dealings and character
have met (and often surpassed)
strict Know Your Client
(KYC) requirements under
Bahamian law and interna-
tional standards of best prac-
tices. They must also pass a
financial and corporate service
provider’s internal due dili-
gence policies and procedures,
in order to ensure it neither
attracts nor assists in the com-
mission of money laundering
offences or any other criminal
activity.

The nominee shareholder
arrangement is a type of
agency relationship, where the
nominee, by holding a compa-
ny's share in his/its name for
the ultimate beneficial owner,
acts as an agent on behalf of
the ultimate beneficial owner
(who is also the principal in
this particular case).

"Asiait-agenty the” ‘néminee
Sa as owes the: same

nox
rate

,
,

e7Adrian
The Baham

e DJ cou

“Maes



duties and responsibilities to
the ultimate beneficial owner
as any agent would owe to
his/its principal. These are, pri-
marily, to perform the duties
imposed on him/it by the
express or implied terms of the
agency agreement, which in
this case is the nominee agree-
ment between the ultimate
beneficia! owner and the nom-
inee shareholder. The agent
must act strictly within the lim-
its of the terms of the
agency/nominee agreement
and his actual authority.

In consideration of the
agency arrangement and the
duties and obligations inher-
ent in such a relationship, the
potential liability that a nomi-
nee shareholder would incur
would be, primarily, one
towards the ultimate benefi-
cial owner (principal) of the
shares for breach of warranty
of authority, if the nominee
shareholder exceeds his/its
actual and apparent authority
to act on the principal's behalf
in any way.

However, the principal may
ratify the act(s) of the agent if
desired. It is important that the
provisions of the nominee
agreement between the ulti-

‘mate-beneficial ownér and the:'

nominee shareholder state



i tracy’
° c
eres y ecombe 8

Chure ch choir

e Mr. Lynx
@ Ta Da

_ “legal fiction"

nee

clearly and comprehensively
the nature and ambit of the
nominee shareholder, relation-
ship, the duties and responsi-
bilities of the nominee share-
holder, and the extent of the

nominee shareholder’s author- .

ity to act on behalf of the ulti-
mate beneficial owner in that
capacity.

With regard to third parties,
the nominee shareholder has
the same liability as an ordi-

_ nary shareholder, which is lia- »

bility for any amount that
remains unpaid on shares
issued to him in a company
limited by shares.

A strict interpretation of the
nominee shareholder arrange-
ment may cause some legal
academics to surmise that the

potential liability of a nominee

shareholder is, in reality, a
, since a nomi-
nee shareholder has no real or
practical liability. Any legal
obligation or liability with
regard to the shareholding
remains the obligation of the
ultimate beneficial owner of

the shares, not that of his agent -

or representative.
It is important to note that '

the potential liabilities of a .
nominee shareholder are not .
to be confused with the poten- |

tial dangers of providing such a
service to offshore clients, par-
ticularly in a financial envi-
ronment where sophisticated
‘white-collar’ criminals seek to

’ SEE page 12B ~

Reena

April 7th 2007

as s Harvest ~

eS



‘ wart oy:

ww ee wwe ew = eo

Toe ee ew BA OE ww Oe em we ee i et

FERRI I OSA



lets LI 6 Te? OD SR ae ete FL OOO aaa ala al TF ODO Da AoE we TLS O10 Oe 3 0 8 a eA AA ee aa LF LT OP PRT POS aL ae J 2 a2



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS





Regsuy
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS MAR 2.2 2007 2p05/CLE/gen/00794

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side
BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintift
AND
BERNARD SAUNDERS
First Defendant
AND

BERNARD’S CARPENTRY & CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LIMITED
: Second Defendant

SUMMONS



LET ALL PARTIES concerned attend before the Registrar in Chambers, Supreme

Court Registry, in the Ansbacher Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, Bahamas on
“Thurs dary the VO day of Roni
noon on the hearing of an application on the part of the Plaintiff for leave to enter
Judgment in Default of Appearance against the Defendants in the sum of $40,409.49
principal and interest in the amount of $23,001.09 as at 16” February. 2007 and continuing
to accrue at the rate of $9.34 per diem until payment in full and costs to be taxed if not

agreed.

Dated 22 day of March A. D., 2007.

‘REGISTRAR:

This Summons was taken out by Graham, Thompson & Co., Sassoon House. Shirley Street
& Victoria Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas, the Attorneys for the Plaintiff.




“ SUBRERE COURT

Rags:
COMMONWEALTH OF THEBAHAMAS. FEB 2 = 217 2005/CLE/gen/00794
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side
BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS} LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
. BERNARD SAUNDERS
First Defendant
AND

BERNARD’S CARPENTRY & CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LIMITED
Second Defendant

AFFIDAVIT

Il, HENDERSON BULLEN, of the Western District of the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands: of-‘The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Banker, make oath and say as
follows:- . le

1. Tam the Assistant Manager of the Plaintiff's Commercial Credit Workout Unit.and I am
duly authorized to make this Affidavit on its behalf.

2. Insofar as the matters deposed to herein are within my own knowledge they are true and
insofar as they are in accordance with the information furnished to me or derived from
statements or documents I have read as hereinafter appears, they are true to the best of

my knowledge, information and belief. ;
3. The Second Vetendant is indebted to the Plaintiff under a loan granted on the 20" March,

4, The said loan is evidence by a Guarantee dated 20" March, 2000 and executed by the
First Defendant on behalf of the Second Defendant. There is now produced and shown to
me and exhibited hereto marked "HB1" a copy of the said Guarantee.

5. The amount actually lent to the Second Defendant by the Plaintiff under the said loan was
$65,000.00.

6. The actual rate of interest charged on the said loan is $9.34 per diem.

7. In the Writ of Summons filed herein on the 18" July, 2005 the Plaintiff claimed the
principal sum of $35,876.24 together with accrued interest thereon in the amount of
$20,163.45 calculated to the 9" May, 2005 and continuing to accrue at the rate of $9.34
per diem unti] payment in full.

8. By letters dated the 12" April, 2002 the Plaintiff demanded that the Defendants pay of all
sums due and owing. The Defendants did not respond to the demand and no sums were
paid to satisfy the debt. The Plaintiff by letters dated the 19 March, 2004 informed the
Defendants that the Plaintiff had realized part of the debt owing by selling Lot No. 37
Area 10E Flamingo Bay Estates and demanded sums due. Notwithstanding numerous
requests by the Plaintiff the Defendants have failed and/or refused to pay sums due and
owing. There is now produced and shown to me and exhibited hereto marked "HB 2"
copies of the said letters.

9. As at the 19" February, 2007 the principal sum of $40,409.49 remained due and owing
together with accrued interest thereon of $23,001.09

10. By reason of the Defendants’ default the Plaintiff is entitled to recover from the
Defendants the monies duc under the said loan. .

1}. 1am advised by Messrs. Graham, Thompson & Co. Attomeys for the Plaintiff that the
Defendant has not entered an Appearance to this action.

12. I verily belicve there is no Defence to this action.

13. 1 make this Affidavit in support of the Plaintiffs application for leave to enter judgment

against the Defendants.

SWORN TO at Nassau, New Providence)
B This so*i,, of Forum )

A. D., 2007

LVAD .

7
f
Before me,
fa
- 4 Lhe
Y PUBLIC

A.D., 2007 at 20 o'clock in the Oe. v

‘the objects,




COMMONWEAL TIT OF THE BAHAMAS 2005/CLE/pen794
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law side
BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
ANI)

BERNARD SAUNDERS
First Defendant
AND
BERNARD'S CARPENTRY & CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LIMITED

Second Defendant

CERTIFICATE

I, hereby certify that these are the Exhibits marked “HB” and “HB2" mentioned and

is
referred to in the Affidavit of Henderson Bullen swom hereto before me this do’ day of

(Lt

NOTAR#E PUBLIC

A.D., 2007.

GUARANTER
TU Ncotinbank Qsahamay) Lid,

IN CONSIDERA’ ? i “
‘selils-eu Aes oenidinie to “ON praia TION or Scotiubank (Bulhamas) Lid. (herein called the ‘iank") anrecing to deal

BERNARD'S CARPENTRY AND CONSTRUCTION Company LIMITED
percin called te “Custome:”) the underalgned and each of than i morc thun o "
giiaranlecs payinent to the Rank of all delis and Dabilittes, present or future, direct ‘or ‘indirect, Abrohue on conlloneny
matured or not, al any time owing by the Customer to the Bank or remoining unpaid by the Customer to the Tonk.
whether arising Bom denlings between the Bank and the Customer or from other dcalings 01 proceedings by which
the Dank may be of ein Any Inanner Whatever a crcdilor of the Customer, and wherever (weurred, and whether
incurred by the Custome: alonc or with snother or others and whether es incipal or surety, inch ¥
tegal and other cosis, charges and oxpenses (such debts and labllities fei ‘

_ a juding all interest
Vabiiitiesâ„¢), the liability of the undersigned he: cinder being limited to the sum of

ng herein called the “guarantesd

+ Sixty-five Thousand Doliars (65,000.00)
rom tho datc of and for payment at fie rate set oul in Paragroph 3 heseof. annonce

Ls PERS
sith the Bunk as Anoâ„¢ UN) IGNED and each of them, ifmore than ones, hereby jointly and severally agrees

A. In thi: “ undersigned and 7
guarantor, it shalt inenn, wee ee erantoce siell enean. ane if there Js more thas one

2. This guerantes shall be a continuing puarantce of all the teed Ji
pete bt ee erates due or remaining unpaid to the Bank; and this Bieraniea silatt pot ee een erty 0 sng
Pod int ally at ished by he payment or liquidation at any time of any sum of money for the time being due or remaining

3. The. Bank shall not be bourid to exhaust its recourse againet the C
oa ictal Hotes a je Customer or others or any securities
ne af nei rent cine hold before being entitled to payment from the Quarantos, and the antor

4. The Guarantor’s linbility to make t under ual: demand
for has been made in writing on indersighed oe anyone of then, “iTrare thane egies Somos chall
such one of thom at the address of the onderattaned cade en demand addressed to che pasted westnes
) i ned or such une of them last known to the Bank ja ied,
repal post office; ‘ ‘auch domi e
pre in eataaere 4 affice, and the Guarantow's Jiabllity shal! bear intorest from the date of jand at the rate set

Ss. The rate of interest ayable by the Guarantor fri the date of di
itsined shall boc te eaten e. ‘om the date of demand for payment under this
air be reper ae Renta applicable to t Ander the Gen to time until indebtedness of the Custonier fo the Bank

6. Sefuutt in {cf any sum Custom Benk
test ' iti div'ana payabie tnd Coe by asia " er ae Bank at any time, the may
y eum 99 on! th:
aceount. A written shatechent ofa Monager or Acting Manager of in Oasneh arin? Beene at which wor eee retdhe
the Customer shalt, Ir wereed to by the Cusiornen Nea orelicnes cen ana holt in Ss vance ce prin 4
+ .
evhienoe aguinst the Guarantor as to the amount remaining unpaid to the Bank at nach Tne oe abun ee

7 This gusrantee shall bi In eddition to and not in substitution for any other gusraniess or other
rerdigngn fares Ta acs ihe Gate copa tena ple athe Sank has caer
ersets which the Bank msy be entitled to recej upon; ror ey fo reanect bss
uncnforceabllity of any otlrer guarantess i Other necurities whlch ie eae may awe erent ba ate esheet or

the guaranteed liabilities, whether oconsi ecw en
the Qoorantocts jteedite nether sioned by the fault of the Bank or oth jee, ahal! in any way limit or lessen

‘ustomer,

8. Without prejudice to or in any way limiting or lessenin; the Guarantor's liab , without
ottaining the consent of or giving notioa to the jscontinue, hoc, inary and
vary the credit of the Customer may grant tim senowety enters tad 7 7 bed

u
antor es the Bank may sec fit, and the Bank may take, abstain from teklr vary,
Sischaree, ive up, realize un or otherwise deal with sectirilies und Buarantess insuch mover as the B re
it, sane cre Pte Acree atl moneys Meek ses from the Customer or others or from securities or guarantees upon
Ss a a ¥
such farts of the © Bank may see fit and change any such appticetion in wijole er in part

9. Until cepayment.tn full of all the guaranteed liabilities, all dividends, com, tions, ‘oceeds
eecurities valued or prymenis reced the Bank from the Custoiner or ty ivide from aoe In Pespect otto
guaranteed Nabilitics shall be regarded for all purposes as payments in grose’ without any tight on the part of the

juarantar to claiin the benefit thereof in reduction of the Hlebity under thie yuarantes, and the Guarantor shall not
elainy any sel-off or counterclaim ugainst the Customer In respect of any liu lity of the Customer to the Guarantor,

claim or prove in the bankrupt Bi 1 com| i
subrogated to te so tuptey or insolvancy on coer, in petition with the Bank or heve any right to be

10, This guaruntes shall hot be discharged or otherwise affocted by the death of loss o|
Customer, by any change.in the name of the Customers, or In the memberahip ofthe Customer, Taepeeriont in
capital structure or tution of the.Customer, if a corporation, or by the gale of the Customer's business
or any part thereof or by the tase being amalgamated with 9 corporation, but shall, notwithstanding any such
event, Continue to npply to all guaranteed fiabilitics whether theretofore or thereafet incurred, and in the case of »
change in oration, thir gran aes oe is , yarinership or In the case of the Customer being amalgamated
rompora 5 niece shall apply to the liabilities of the reaullin |
“Custumer" shall include cach such resulting partnership and corporations ESrerieeete Seperation, sive Wis tere

uy. All advances, renewals and ercdits made car granted by the Bunk purportedly to or for the Customer
ufter the death, loss of capacity, bankrupicy o1 insolvency of the Customer, but before the Dank has receivsd notice
theroof shall be deemed to form part af the puarnotecd Uabililics; wid all advances, ronewals und credits oblained from
the Bunk purportedly by or of behalf o!
nutwihstanding any lack or limitation of power, incapacity of disability ofthe Cuslunes or of the direciors, partners
of agents thereof, or (hat the Customer may not be a Icyel of aunble entity, ov any irregularity, defect or in! ew enulity
tua the obtaining of such advances, renewals or credits, whether or not the Bunk had knowledge Ihercof, and any such
advance, renewal of credit which may nor be recoveruble from te undersigned as guarantor(s) shall be sevoverable

from the padersigned and each of (hem, if more thus one, jointly and severally as principal dcblor(s) in respect thercof |.

und shell be paid to the Bank on demand wilh interest at (lo mile cet out in paragraph 5 hercof,

2, All debis and liabilities, present and future, of the Customer lo the Guarantor arc hereby assigned

| to the Dank and postponed to the guaranteed liabililics, and all moneys recaived by the Quarantor in respect thereof

shall be received in trust for the Bank and forthwith upon receipt shall be paid over to the Bank, the wholo without i
any way lessening of limiting, the liability of the Guaranior under this guarantee; and this assignment’ and
Bonen is independent of the gubrantco and sholl remain in full fores and eflect until repayment in full te the

of al) the guaranteed Siabilities, ndtwithslanding that tho liability of tho undersigned of any of them under this
Quorantes may Inve been discharged or terminated.

13. 4 The imdersiyned of ‘any of them, if more than one, or his of their executors or adininisirators, by
giving thirty doys* notice In wrill 0 to the branch of the unk at which the main account of the Customer te kept, may
terminate his or thelr further tiabillty under this quarantec In respect of Habilitics of the Customer incurred of arising
aftes the ication of sach thirty Unys, but not in respect of nny guaranteed Jiabillties incurred or arising before the
expiration of such thirty days even though nut then matured; provided that notwithstanding receipt of any auch notice
the Bank may fulfil sequirements uf the Customor bused on ogrecments oxpreas or implied made privr to the
expiration of such thirty und any resulting liabilities shnll be covered by this guarantee; and provided further that
tn the eveat of the termination of this guarantee as to one or mors of the undersigned, if more than ono, it shall remuin
@ continuing gusranice as to the olher or others of the undersigned. 7

v4. This guarantes embodies all the agrecinents between tho parties hereto relative to the guaranties,
assignment end pestponcment and none of the parties sinll be bound iv any ropresentetion or promise made by any
person relative theretu which is not cinbodied herein, and It Ix specifically red |
any representations or promises made by the Customer to Ue Guarantor. Possession of this instrument by the Ban!
shall be conclusive evidence against the Guarantor that the Inutcument was not delivered in escrow of pursiunt ly wi
agreement thal Ii sliould not bs effective until any condition precedent of sul ent has beon complied wills and this
varantec shall be opcrative und binding notwithstanding the non-execulion theroof by any proposed siguatory.

“* “This guarantee shall bo governed In all respecte by the Jaws of tie Province ur Jurladtcttun in which :

* Ss.
the Customer's main account with the Tank Is kept.

oo
“Vhis yuerantes shall nol be discharged or affected by the death or wry dikabllity of the undersigned
fi oud

16.
or any of them, if more then one, nnd xhall cuure to the benefit of and be binding upon the Dan
exsigns, and the Guarantor, his heirs, exocutors, adminisirators, successors and assigns.

AS WITNESS the hand and soal of tho Guarantor nt_ Nassau, Bahamas
this 20th | | ,

» Ms muccessurs a

: day of March : > tt 192000
SIGNED SEALED AND DELIVER3D ns :
" ‘inthe presence of. ~ SIGNATURB AND SEAL



DATE RECUVEO

aeRROvaS



12" April 2002.

Bernard A. Saunders,
P. O. Box N-3875,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Dear Sir,
ec: rd’s Carpentry and Construction Compan fi
Please be advised that we represent Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited.

Our instructions are that on or about the 22% March 2000 our clients
granted a Joan to the captioned company, Bernard’s Carpentry and
Construction Company, Limited ("the company").

We are instructed that by a written Guarantee dated the 20" March 2000,
you guaranteed payment to our clients on demand of up to $65,000.00 of
the debts and liabilities that the company shall be indebted or liable to pay
to our clients and interest from the date of demand until all monies owed by
the company are repaid.

We are further instructed that the company has defauhed in it's repayment
obligations to our clients under the loan and that as at the 26" March 2002
the company was indebted to our clients under the Joan in the principal sum
of $63,890.00 and $4,463.00 interest. Interest continues to accrue at the
rate of $17.50 per diem.

We have therefore been instructed to demand from you as Guarantor
payment of the sum of $65,000.00 and interest thereon from the date
hereof until payment within thirty (30) days of the date hereof.






















the Customer shall be dcamed to form par} of the guaruntesd Jiabililies, |*

that the Mank shall not be bound by .

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 3B

In the event payment in full is not received within the time specified, our
clients shall take all steps necessary against both yourself and the company
to recover the outstanding balance including but not limited to exercising
it’s power of sale over Lot 10-037, Flaming Bay Exuma held as security
for this loan.

Please give this matter your immediate attention.

Yours sincerely,
GRAHAM,

laut Kea, ,
Tami C. Kassim.

MPSON & CO.

12â„¢ April 2002.
Bernard's Carpentry and Construction Company Limited,

Clo Registered Office,
P. O. Box N-3875,

Please be advised that w= represent Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited.

Our instructions are that Bernard’s Carpentry and Construction Company
Limited (“the company”) is indebted to our clicnts under a loan dated the.





" We are instructed that as at the 9” April 2000 the company was indebted

to our clients in the principal sum of $63,890.00 together with accrued
interest thereon the sum of $4,463.00 and continuing to accrue at the rate
of $17.50 per diem. :

We have therefore been instructed to demand, end we do hereby demand,
peyment of the said outstanding principal sum together with accrued
interest thereon to the date of payment which interest is to be calculated at

' the rate of $17.50 per diem within thirty (30) days of the date hereof.

In the event payment in full is not received within the time specified, our
clients shall pursue all remedies available to them to recover the said sums

“inchuding but not limited to exercising their power of sale over Lot No.10-

037, Flamingo Bay, Exuma held as security for this loan.

Please give this matter your immediate attention.

: Yours sincerely,

~ GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,

: eee

Vow Ke’

. Tani C. Kassim.

19” March 2004.

Bemard A. Saunders,
P. 0. Box N-3875,
Nassau, Bahamas.

’ Dear Sir,

Re: Bemard’s Carpentry and Construction Company Limited Lot
No. 37 in Area 10E Marina Section North “Flamingo Bay Estates”,
Exuma, Bahamas.

We refer to our demand letter dated the 12" April 2002, a copy of which
we enclose herewith.

Our instructions are that the captioned property held by Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Limited as security for a Joan to the captioned company dated
the 22" March 2000 was sold by our clients for the sum of $30,000.00.

We are instructed that the sale proceeds were disbursed as follows: -

i) Amount applied to-principal balance due under Demand Loan-
"$28,014.46;
ii) Legal Fees in sale of the property-$824.50;
iii) | One-half of Stamp Duty on Conveyance-$600.00;
iv) — Other legal fees -§561.04.
Total $30,000.00.

Our instructions are that the sale proceeds were not sufficient to liquidate

: ‘the debt owed to our clients and that as at the 19" March 2004 the
’ principal sum of $35,876.24 and accrued interest thereon of $16,116.80

remained due and owing. Interest will continue to accrue at the rate of
$9.83 per diem until payment in full.

We have therefore been instructed to demand, and we-do hereby demand,
from you as guarantor of the loan payment of the said outstanding

_ principal and interest within thirty (30) days of the date hereof.

_ Inthe event payment in full is not received within the time specified, our
_ Clients shall take all steps necessary against both yourself and the

company to recover the outstanding balance without further notice.

Yours sincerely,
GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,

Tait’ Kas——————

In the event payment in full 1s not received within the time specified, our
clients shall take all steps necessary against the company to recover the
outstanding balance without further notice.

Yours sincerely,
GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,

. nit

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law Side

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff

AND

BERNARD SAUNDERS
First Defendant

AND
BERNARD'S CARPENTRY & CONSTRUCTION

COMPANY LIMITED
Second Defendam



AFFIDAVIT

a ee

2005/CLE/gen’00794

Gebers sthersee & als:

Chambers

Sassoon House

Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
Nassau. Bahamas

Atiomeys for the Plaintiff

DDG

»

carntiontpa nde



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 5B



Winn-Dixie transition
drops City Markets
profits by almost 60%

ahamas Supermarkets
B yesterday indicated
that the costs associ-
ated with the ownership tran-
sition from Winn-Dixie had
acted as a major drag on its
results, with net income down
almost 60 per cent for the 16
weeks to January 10, 2007, at
$1.25 million compared to $3.1
million the year before.
The company, which oper-

in Nassau and Freeport, said
in a statement that net sales
for the 28-week period (or first
half) to January 10, 2007, were
down by 0.5 per cent at $75
million, something it attributed
to “specific and temporary
causes”.

For the period November
11, 2006, to January 10, 2007,
Bahamas Supermarkets’ gross
profits were down by 8.2 per
cent or $1 million at $11.2 mil-

lion, compared to $12.2 mil-
lion last year,

The crocery retail chain,
which was acquired . by
Bahamian buyout group BSL
Holdings for $54 million last
summer, said year-to-date
operating income had more-
than-halved from $4.56 million
to $2.13 million this year,
although shareholder equity
remained strong at $22.7 mil-
lion.

“During this period
Bahamas Supermarkets
underwent a significant tran-
sition, shedding not only Winn-
Dixie ownership, directorships
and products, but also its oper-
ating support systems,” said
Basil Sands, its chairman.

“Transition-related expens-
es, escalating insurance premi-

SEE page 9B

ates the 12 City Markets stores

BIC spends $114m on GSM’s roll-out

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



THE BAHAMAS Telecommunications
Company (BTC) yesterday launched GSM
cellular service to Rum Cay and Ragged
Island, linking both remote locations to the
world.

BTC president Leon Williams said the
company has spent more than $114 million
in creating GSM technology for various
Bahamian islands, as it moved to ensure
every Bahamian has access to a cell phone
or blackberry.

. He added that BTC has had to continu-
ally upgrade its services, as demand grew
and capacity was filled. Mr Williams said
the company remains committed to pro-
viding quality service, and addressing prob-
lem quickly, but he could not guarantee
there would not be service disruption.

To facilitate the service on the two
islands, BTC has constructed a 100-foot
tall GSM tower on each island.

Mr Williams said that initially they plan
to accommodate 250 customers, but indi-
cated that as new developments come on
stream, such as the Montana Holdings’

Pictured from left: Mrs. Fanchon Braynen, Senior Manager, Customer Service & Operations,

Rum Cay Resort Marina project, they will
upgrade the system to accommodate
demand.

The next islands BTC hopes’ to reach
with GSM are Long Island, the Berry
Islands and Inagua.

BTC, he said, hopes to phase out TDMA
by mid June 2008.

“Soon, BTC will cover the Bahamas with
GSM technology. Already, more than two-
thirds of the population subscribes to either
pre- paid or post-paid cellular. More than
200,000 phones since BTC introduced cell
service,” Mr Williams said.

Minister of Utilities and Energy, Senator

’ Dr Marcus Bethel, said: “By the end of

this year, no longer will the farmer on
Mayaguana or the fisherman in Long Island
or the teacher in a small Cay in the Berry
Islands or Andros be isolated.

“We will be one nation able to commu-
nicate freely... Over the past decade, the
dramatic surge in wireless communications

‘has been a key component driving busi-

ness.

“BTC, then, is in a critical position in its
relations with the national economic devel-
opment. Should the company not provide

RBC FINCO and Mr. Giorgio Baldacci, President, Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association.

RBC FINCO Supports 2007 Easter
Classic Tennis Championships

“The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association

the products and services demanded by
today’s business climate, it is not merely

the company that would suffer, but the —

economy of the Bahamas. Fortunately for
us, BTC has recognised the pivotal role it
plays.”

BTC’s vice-president of marketing and |

sales, Marlon Johnson, agreed, saying: “No
longer is a sophisticated communications
system a luxury. Without modern commu-
nications, an economy falters and stalls. At
worst, it dwindles and dies.”

During the press launch, BTC held video
conferencing with residents in Rum Cay
and a teleconference with Ragged Island.

MP for Ragged Island, Larry Cartwright,
said he was ecstatic about the new service.
He said that for far too long ,the smaller
Family Islands were ignored and got “the
left overs.”

The service was something he has long

_ been agitating for, and said he couldn’t be

more pleased.

Representatives from Montana Holdings
and residents of Rum Cay also expressed
their pleasure, saying that workers on the
multi-million dollar resort would now be
able to communicate directly with Nassau.

PLACE:

RBC FINCO is again pleased to support
The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s
(BLTA) Junior Clay Court Easter Classic
Championships.

“Our support of The Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association gives us the
opportunity to invest in our community
and in particular young Bahamians ina
tangible way,” said Fanchon Braynen,
Senior Manager, Customer Service &
Operations, RBC FINCO.

About RBC FINCO:

wishes to thank RBC FINCO for its
continued support of tennis in our country
and especially our junior players,” said
Paula Whitfield, Vice President, BLTA.
“RBC has sponsored this initiative for a
number of years and we have seen the
positive impact on our younger players.”

The Championships will be held April 6-9,
2007 at the Gym Tennis Club Winton
Meadows.

For over 50 years RBC FINCO and its employees have been an integral part of The Bahamas
helping causes, supporting needs, and giving back to the communities we serve.

RBC FINCO, established in 1953, is a leading provider of single- and multi-family home
mortgages to Bahamians and attractive interest rates for its depositors. It has 5 branches and
4 automated banking machines located in New Providence and Freeport. RBC FINCO is owned
25 percent by the general Bahamian public, representing approximately 4,000 shareholders,
and 75 percent by its majority shareholder RBC Royal Bank of Canada.

RBC FINCO — the most experienced in mortgage services and
PEG @L Cue Ae UCC Meu urs ee

RBC
SB) FINCO
Rute)



CONTACT NOS.:

APPLY BY:

For The Attention of All

PLANET FITNESS
OAT BL I0 8)

em envi (isre

27th March, 2007
Dear Members,

I would like to take this opportunity to express my sincere regret of
the closure of the Planet Fitness Gym and the manner in which it
occurred,

Planet Fitness originally opened its doors in December 2005 as a result
of a partnership and business relationship between Valdez Campbell
and I with a vision to provide, over time, .a modern, state-of-the-art
fitness facility.

Unfortunately, due to my work commitments, training and competition
schedules, I have been unable to remain in Nassau on a consistent
basis to oversee the operations of Planet Fitness as I felt was necessary
to ensure its success.

As aresult,, in early November 2006 Mr Campbell in a meeting realized
me not being able to fulfill my portfolio with the gym, decided to take
full control of operations. I could not devote the necessary time and
energy to Planet Fitness as required and was transferring all shares,
rights and interests over to him as the sole owner.

Sometime in late February early March, I began to receive numerous
telephone calls from a number of Planet Fitness members querying
why the doors of the gym had been locked and why they had been
unable to gain access to the gym. I have also been told that no form
of notification has been provided to the members to explain the
current situation.

In an attempt to clarify my relationship with Planet Fitness, I am
writing this letter to advise the gym members of the events that
occurred and that to date I have not received any correspondence,
verbal or written, from Mr. Campbell advising of the closure of the
gym nor any explanation of same. I was just told that some things
were being worked on.

I trust that Mr Campbell will make an effort to contact all Planet
Fitness members with a much needed explanation and an offer of
compensation for any and all outstanding gym memberships. As we
all know these situations take time to resolve and resolute.

In the meantime, thank you for your patience, considerations and
above all your business and support during time in existence.

Sincerely,
Joel Stubb



ms pont .

THE CENTRAL BANK |
OF THE BAHAMAS

B$ COUNTERFEIT BANKNOTE AND
INTRODUCTION TO CRISP SERIES SEMINAR

THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS TRAINING ROOM,
MARKET STREET AND TRINITY
PLACE

ENTRANCE

SESSION 1
APRIL 18, 2007 FROM
11:30 A.M. TO 1:00 P.M.

SESSION 2
APRIL 18, 2007 FROM 6:00 P.M.
TO 7:30 P.M.

302-2620, 302-2622 &
302-2734

APRIL 13, 2007

THE SEMINAR IS OPEN TO BANKS AND BANKING
INSTITUTIONS, GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND
CORPORATIONS, PRIVATE COMPANIES AND THE
GENERAL PUBLIC. APPLICATIONS WILL BE TAKEN
ON A FIRST-COME /FIRST-SERVED BASIS, AS SPACE IS

LIMITED.

KINDLY INDICATE WHICH SESSION YOU WILL BE

ATTENDING





PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, A RIL 5, 2007

Dhan



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expenses and recent co
10th, 2007. We are truly
ask that you continue to
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member him in your

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE originating summons
filed by the Freeport Property
Owners and Licencees Associa-
tion, seeking answers from the
Supreme Court on whether cer-
tain actions by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA)
and its principals may have

ily



Y EASTER

Customers And Friends
From





SED on Saturday April 7", 2007

in observ nce of the Easter Holidays

ST. ALBAN’S DRIVE
TEL: 242-322-8396
FAX: 242-323-7745
P.O. BOX N-1085

x

TH
BANK

The Cleari
advise that
hours will

Th
9:

M

9:



EEE LLLP LILLE LLL LELAND

RR RR RRR Re Ree

Fr day, April 6th

Regular Ba king hours will resume
on Tues ay, April 10th from

EAST BAY & MACKEY STREETS
BRIDGE PLAZA COMMONS
TEL/FAX: 242-393-4210

TOLL FREE: 242-300-7035

eR ee ee Bae aA

SAGE FROM:

CLEARING
ASSOCIATION

Banks of the Bahamas
aster Holidays Banking
as follows:

sday, April Sth
0am - 4:30pm

LOSED

day, April 9th
LOSED

am - 3:00pm

COP LLLP PLL LLG

RRR RRR RR RRR RRR OAT POINT AA AAT BEARER,

breached parts of the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, are not
designed to deter “first rate
investors” such as Morgan Stan-
ley and the Raven Group from
coming to Freeport.

Christopher Lowe, the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce’s president, and one of the
Association members that swore
a supporting affidavit for the
summons, told The Tribune yes-
terday that the group wanted to
send a reassuring message to
potential investors that their pro-
jects were still wanted in
Freeport.

“In so far as the pending deals,
we want first rate investors in
Grand Bahama,” Mr Lowe said.
“Unfortunatley, we have some
house cleaning to do, and want
to ensure a more stable platform
for Grand Bahama for the next
48 years, a platform these
investors will appreciate.

“Hopefully, there will be a

- decent dialogue between the

licencees and the Port Authority
and we can move forward. We
wish to solve this for everybody’s
benefit.”

Mr Lowe said the summons
sought declarations on what had
happened with the GBPA and
its assets to date, and was “seek-
ing the truth, the whole truth”.

He added: “Further, any and
all present and potential
investors that are being enter-
tained or facilitated by the exec-
utives of the Port Authority
should be heartened and encour-
aged by the efforts of their pre-
sent or soon to be co-licensees,
as perhaps they will benefit from
these efforts towards full disclo-
sure on the status of our regula-
tory body, the Port Authority.

“In point of fact, it may and
should make their presence in
Freeport a more pleasant and
permanent experience than that
experienced by some of our pre-
sent and former investors and
licensees.”

The Tribune understands that
the summons’ filing has caused
some disquiet at all of the
GBPA, the Grand Bahama
Development Company (Dev-
co) and investors such as Morgan
Stanley and the Raven Group,
who have multi-million
dollar investment projects
before the GBPA and the Gov-
ernment.

The Raven Group project had
been proposed for a 1500-acre
site, and would take place in four
phases. The Tribune had
revealed that talks on the pro-
ject wwere being held earlier this
year, with the high-end, boutique

Kingsway Academy

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

FOR SEPTEMBER 2007.

The Entrance Examination will be held at the
school on Bernard Road on Thursday, April

i2 2007 a 8:00 a.m. for students wishing to
enter grades seven through ten. Deadline for

applications

will be Wednesday,

April

11. Aplications can be collected at the
Business Office from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

For more information please call telephone
numbers 324-8811: 324-3409: or 324-6269



THE TRIBUNE

Licencee action not
intended to deter
‘first rate investors’

resort chain, Aman Resorts,
being lined up as the hotel oper-
ating partner.

The Raven Group project was
expected to create more than 700
jobs during construction, and
about 750 permanent jobs, with
the developers investing $250
million in “the early stages”.

Morgan Stanley was ;ooking
at a joint venture with Port
Group Ltd, the GBPA’s affili-
ate, for the east of the Grand
Bahama waterway.

The development is slated for
2,000 acres at Barbary Beach,
and is understood to be the most
advanced of all the projects
being negotiated by the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd.

Marriott is understood to be
among the major brands inter-
ested in participating in the Mor-
gan Stanley project, the first
stage of which involves a $50 mil-
lion land purchase.

This will see Devco (the
Grand Bahama Development
Company) sell its 50 per cent
stake in the Barbary Beach land
to Morgan Stanley, which would
then by 50/50 partners in a
joint venture with Port Group
Ltd.

Mr Lowe, meanwhile, said the
licencees had arisen from their
“slumber” with the summons fil-
ing, which sought to determine
what had happened to the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement’s
objectives and aims.

“It is also particularly unfor-
tunate that it has taken blows
being traded by the sparring
shareholding partners of the Port
to illuminate the situation, a sit-
uation the licensees have by and
large been kept ignorant of,” Mr
Lowe said in a statement.

“Tt could be said that, no mat-
ter the number of licensees, a
number cloaked in secrecy by
the Port Authority to date, there
are as many opinions of events
transpiring to date as there are
licensees.

“Therefore this group of |

licensees is seeking the facts,
truth and details, information
that should not have to be fought
for, but should always have been
available, especially when we
should have been privy to and
approving of any changes to the
practice of the terms of the
agreement.

“Perhaps, if viewed in a

greater context, our potential in .

Freeport can finally be realised if
an environment of transparency
is created, facilitating that long-
awaited and promised boom that
has, at times, held our hopes so
high, only to be dashed on the
rocks of apparent personal and
political manipulation.”

NOTICE

The Board of directors of
Omega College Ltd.,

St. Mary’s Hall, S.A.C Campus,
off Bernard Road, Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas

wish to inform the Genaral Public of the
RESIGNATION OF

Mr. Andrew R. Curr

I, The former Vice President, Managing Director, and
Treasurer, of Omega College, effective March Ist, 2007.

Mr. Curry was a founding member of Omega College
in January, 2001 and he was among a short list of persons
who played a major role in the College’s initial progress.

UTR eT MD Tca ym UIT AE LEON CUDA
Staff and Students, would like to thank Mr. Curry for his
contribution and assistance towards the development of
Oise Oo TMC WANNIN NLU Rta Nad

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Stee ee ee ee ee ee ea aw

Pe ee

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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 7B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MUST SELL xx
The Tribune

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

CROWN ALLOTMENT NO. 77 om KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
MURPHY TOWN, ABACO : (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,790 sq. ft. being Crown allotment Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story












No. 77, of Murphy Town, Abaco Bahamas. Located on the subject H house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area,
property is a single storey single family concerete building. This house family room, kitchen, study, laundry and an entry porch.

is less than 5 year old and is in gaod condition with approximately 1,750 ry:

sq. ft of living space and contains 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living room, 3 :

dining, kitchen, laundry and utility spaces. There is no significant Appraisal: $188,406.00

4 improvements or deterioration evident. The property is very well drained ’ : : :

and not susceptible to flooding. Landscaping efforts are still in remedial Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance
stages. All major public and private utilities are situate within 100 ft of the subject site. Property bounderies are clearly ___ to Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st
delineated. corner on the left then 1st right, house is second on your right with garage.

Appraisal: $167,580.00

The subject property is situate off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco and is painted light yellow
trimmed dark yellow. 7





INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY -
MUST SELL
Lot NO.83, Lower Bogue
ELEUTHERA

; : Alll that piece parcel or lot of land being No. 83 on a plan
All that parcel of land having an area of 14,400 sq. ft. on record in the department of Lands and Survey as plan
being a portion of the Dundas Town Crown allotment 4 no. 763 and comprising 21,674 sq. ft. this site encompasses
this land is rectangular in shape with dimensions of 80 a 2 year old single storey home consisting of 2-bedrooms;
ft by 180. Located on the above mentioned lot is a 4 bathroom, living/dining room in one, and kitchen with a total living area of 1,452 sq. ft. There is
concrete block structure with dimensions of 27 x40. also a unit to this structure to be used as a bakery which could bring in an average of approximately
This house is an approximate 30 year old single family, — $600 to $800 per month. There is also 2 covered porch areas to the front of this building, with an
=| residence comprising of 3-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, area of 90.4 sq. ft. (one at the front entrance and one at the entrance to the bakery) this home is
living/dining area and kitchen. This house is in fairly _ jn very good condition and appears to have been built in accordance with the plans and specifications
good condition for its age with a projected future life as approved, and at a standard that was acceptable to the Ministry of Public Works. The land is
of about 25 to 30 more years. The land rises above road level, to a height in excess of approximately —#jat and properly landscaped.
45ft above sea level, with no likelihood of flooding in an hurricane. The grounds are sparsely landscaped.

Appraisal: $90,000.00

DUNDAS TOWN CROWN
ALLOTMENT,
DUNDAS TOWN ABACO



Appraisal: $177,412.00

This property is situated on the Western side of the main Eleuthera Highway and approximately
: : . ae : ; : pai : 1,200 ft Northerly from four-for-nothing Road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue.
This house is located in Dundas Town Abaco which is adjacent to Marsh Harbour and is painted white

trimmed teal green.



LOT NO. 24, FRELIA SUBDIVISION

All that lot of land having an area of 6,724 sq. ft. being lot
No. 24 of the subdivision known and designated as Frelia
Subdivision, the said subdivision situated in the Southwestern
District of New Providence Bahamas. This property is
comprised of a 4 year old single storey residence consisting
| of approximately 1,223 sq. ft of enclosed living space, with
3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living/dining rooms, kitchen and
utility room. The land is flat and slightly below the level of
the roadway, but was brought up to road level by land fill
to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy

LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot
no 194 of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated
in the central district of New Providence this property is
comprised of a 35 year old single family, single story residence
encompassing approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area and inclusive of separate living and dining rooms, and
an average size kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms
and an entry porch, of approximately 88 sq. ft. ventilation is
, : : : by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property is at grade and
oi ee rainy periods of the year..The grounds are fairly kept, with level with good drainage, landscaping is minimal, consisting
minimal landscaping in place. The yard is open at the front and enclosed on its sides and back of lawns and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with
with 7ft chain linked fencing. Remedial work required to the house includes repair of cracks in the stone walls mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing
partitions belts and columns. . and a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208 sq. ft. cement driveway leading to a single covered
Appraisal: $161,000.00 carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also has a concrete block storage shed measuring of approximately
Travel south on Sir Milo Butler Highway until you get to Fire Trail Road. Turn left onto Fire Trail 143 sq. ft.
Road, go all the way to the last bend right, take first left then first right the subject house isthe » Appraisal: $1 33,570.00
5th house right painted white trimmed yellow. Of" Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner
; i &. right, (Roland Ave.) the subject property is the 5th property on the left side painted orange with red/white
trim. : ae





(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue)

ELEUTHERA LOT NO. 370 GRENADA CLOSE

GOLDEN GATES #2 (Nassau)

{ All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements,
in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera,
being No. 62, comprising of about 34,210 sq. ft., this -
site encompasses a 12 year old single storney home
comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room,
dining, breakfast room, kitchen and laundry room,
with a total living area of approximately 2,342.06.

All that lot of land having an area of 5,500 sq. ft., being lot
370 Grenada Close of the subdivision known and designated
as Golden Gates No. 2, situated in the Southwestern district
of New Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised
of 25 years old single family residence consisting of
approximately 1,234 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with
3 bedrooms, two bathrooms, living/dining room, and kitchen.
Property also includes a double car garage, and front The Land is on a grade and level and appear to be sufficiently

entrance with a tatal sq. ft. of approximately 655.75. 4 elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual
This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped with crab grass, heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with improvements including driveway, walkway and low





fiascos and some fruit trees. : shrubs. Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing to the sides and rear.

i Appraisal: $235,638.00 Appraisal: $149,405.60
This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of Lower Traveling south along Blue Hill Road, turn right at the Farmers Market just after passing the Golden Gates
Bogue. : Shopping Center, take 1st corner left, Windward Isles Way, then take 3rd corner right, St Thomas Road, then

first left, grenada Crest, drive around the bend then 1st left again the subject property is the 2nd property left
house #4 painted peach trimmed black.



ABACO LOT NO. 120 MURPHY TOWN

All that lot of land and improvements having an area
of 5,040 sq. ft. being portion of lot# 120 of the original
Murphy Town Crown allotments Abaco Bahamas.
This property is comprised of a two storey concrete
and wood structure still under construction consisting
of approximately 1,728 sq. ft. of enclosed living space.
The said building is utilized as a triplex apartment
4 complex, with a 2 bedroom dwelling on the upper
storey. The lower portion of the building houses two
units, each with 1-bedroom, 1-bathroom, living/dining
and kitchen spaces. The building is in average
condition and appears to be structurally sound. The
building also demonstrates a need for schelued
maintenance. The property is partially landscape with
boundaries clearly delineated. All major private and public utilities are situate within one hundred
ft of the property site.

Pars

| | LOT NO. 382 WINTON MEADOWS

Ce ae All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of
oe : : 8,300 sq. ft. being lot No. 382 situated in the
i Island of New Providence, Bahamas. This property

subdivision known as Winton Meadows, the said
E | i | Ma ul cane is comprised of a 24 year old single family residence
Se uiieed ‘ots ue AMPTOMMEETL PRE a Fe with an attached efficiency (formerly the carport)
TU GE SEE) «= ESL] «consisting of approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of enclosed

a ae living area, front porch-198 sq. ft., back patio-380.
The building is a two storey house. Besides the
efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-
bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, inclusive of a master bedroom suite upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining
room, family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and kitchen downstairs. Climate ©
‘control is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation enhanced by ceiling fans
and other amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance: Average. Effective
age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated
to disallow the possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual heavy rainy
periods. The grounds are well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with
flowering trees, and a concrete garden/storage shed, which is located in the backyard. The yard
is enclosed along the sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with
metal railings, and metal gates at the front and back.

APPRAISAL: $365,000.00
Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get to Meadows
Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and take the 4th right, then 1st right. The
subject house is the 2nd house on the right side painted beige trimmed white.

VACANT PROPERTIES

BLACKWOOD, ABACO
* All that lot of land having an area of approximately 258,064 sq. ft. This property is yet to reach its highest and best use. It is ideally suited to single or multi-family development as is the nature of surrounding properties
within the community. The site may also serve well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original state. It is covered with low brush and broad leaf coppice vegetation intersperse
with broad strands of mature Yellow Pine indigenous to the area. The property is well drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under normal conditions.
APPRAISAL: $219,354.40.
The subject property is vacant and is situated at the Southeastern entrance of the Community of Blackwood, Abaco. The property is undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract of land of approximately
26 acres.



subdivision. situated in the Eastern District of the



APPRAISAL: $154,476.00
This property is situated off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco





RAINBOW SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 3 BLOCK 27 (ELEUTHERA)
All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 14,052.59 sq. ft. being lot no. 3, block 27, of Rainbow Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded
about 103.44 ft north by Queens Highway, and 137.02 ft. east and about 99.94 ft south of Rainbow Hill Circul 139.91 ft west, all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $37,440.00

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)
Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level.
This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511
sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $41,275.00





For conditions of sale and other information contact

mariii® White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 © email harry.collie@scotiabank.com ¢ Fax 356-3851
To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - fe fel ol Mane adc M El Maem eae eee eh Aa Lm OL



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‘hss SBR S Tod rain teed te 5 hod eeln Petts Lak ek en es WE SSS a ea ee





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

Re See ee eee a
Stocks close moderately higher
following economic reports |

@ By TIM PARADIS
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall
Street caught its breath Wednes-
day after the previous session’s
big advance, advancing only
slightly amid a mix of economic
data and a slight drop in oil
prices. Bond prices rose as
investors brushed off the eco-
nomic reports and went on a buy-
ing spree.

Economic data offered little
incentive to push stocks higher.
The Institute for Supply Man-
agement, an organization of cor-
porate purchasing executives,
reported that the nation’s service
economy expanded at a slower
pace in March than in February.

But the market held on to
gains earned Tuesday when the
Dow Jones industrials and Stan-
dard & Poor’s 500, riding some
optimism about the housing mar-





qualifications:

a related field).

supervison.

Responsibilities include:

obtaining a mortgage.

mortgage.

and qualifications.

Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Banking

Royal Bank of Canada

RBC FINCO is considering applications for

Mortgage Specialist
RBC FINCO, Freeport
and Main Branch

The successful candidate should possess the following
¢ ACIB OR ABIFS Diploma or degree in in Banking (or

e Previous experience in portfolio and liability
administration would be an asset.

e Exhibit good selling & negotiating skills.

¢ Self-motivated and able to work with minimal

¢ Ability to make sound credit analysis
¢ Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)

¢ Contributing to meeting team sales plans by acquiring
and growing profitable client relationships.

¢ Providing customized solutions and financial advice
designed to satisfy the client’s long-term goals on,

¢ Seeking out new clients by.developing relationships ;:

‘within the community and local centres of influence.

e Enhancing the experience of existing clients by
providing accessibility and one-on-one advice and
valuable information on the intricacies of having a

e Successfully anchoring clients with the appropriate
delivery channel within RBC Financial Group.

A competitive compensation package (base salary &
bonus) will commensurate with relevant experience

Please apply before April 16th, 2007 to:

Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145

Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

ket, rose to their highest levels
since a global pullback February
27.

“The data has been somewhat
mixed, People are still trying to
get a grasp on — as the Fed inter-
prets this data — what is it going
to do next,” said Nick Raich
director of research at National
City Private Client Group, refer-
ring to the Federal Reserve’s next
move on short-term interest
rates.

He said Wall Street’s widely
held belief earlier in the year that
the economy was headed toward
a soft landing had been eroded
by concerns about the housing
market and the well-documented
woes of subprime mortgage

“lenders. Better-than-expected
housing news Tuesday fed the
advance that lifted the Dow 128
points.

According to preliminary cal-
culations Wednesday, the Dow

























{Ni Ou (10 4 uM}

RBC

FINCO |

kd e1e

POR er Re un eCEL Lae Ue CL)



BiskK

Pricing Information As Of:

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

rose 19.75, or 0.16 per cent, to
12,530.05.

Broader stock indicators made
modest gains. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index rose 1.60, or 0.11
per cent, to 1,439.37, and the Nas-
daq composite index rose 8.36,
or 0.34 per cent, to 2,458.69.

Bonds rose as investors looked
past mixed economic data for the
security of Treasuries. The yield
on the benchmark 10-year Trea-
sury note fell to 4.65 percent from
4.67 per cent late Tuesday. The
dollar was mixed against other
major currencies, while gold
prices rose.

Light, sweet crude settled
down 26 cents to $64.38 on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
Oil prices, which had risen since
the dispute over Iran’s capture
of 15 British sailors and marines
unfolded March 23, moved lower
but pared some of their losses

after release of inventory data.
Weekly Energy Department fig-
ures showed a greater-than-
expected draw last week of gaso-
line supplies.

Economic news, which has
kept Wall Street’s attention in
recent months, gave mixed sig-
nals Wednesday. Investors have
been trying to determine whether
the economy can still slow grad-
ually — a so-called soft landing
— or whether fissures in the
housing sector will place too
great a strain on economic
growth. Recent attention to
strains among so-called subprime
lenders, which make loans to
people with somewhat dubious
credit quality, has unnerved some
investors.

The Fed, which has left interest
rates unchanged at its last six
meetings after a string of 17
straight increases, has said infla-

NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that all entrances to and
exits from the Shirley House and the 52 Shirley Street
Car Parking properties and which are situate on the
southeast corner of the intersection of Shirley Street and
Charlotte Street on the Island of New Providence shall

be closed to the public from 7:00am on Sunday April
8th, 2007 to 7:00am on Monday April 9th, 2007 in
order to preserve the Private Properties Rights and to
prevent the Acquisition by the Public of any Right of

Ways.

Nassau Enterprises Limited, Bahamian Properties

Limited.



HUMAN
RESOURCES &
OFFICE MANAGER

moo {i

Seeking EXPERIENCED
Human Resources & Office Manager.
Salary will be commensurate with experience.
Only persons meeting the requirements
below should apply.

¢ A Bachelor’s Degree in HumanResources

° At least Five (5) years experience in Human

Resources

¢ Working Knowledge of the Employment

Act, 2001

Please submit your application via email to:

bahamasexecutivesearch @ gmail.com

=) FIDELITY

~ Change "Daily Vol.

EPS $



Div $

tion remains a concern even as
the economy slows.

“As long as growth continues
to run along below the speed lim-
it, that should ease some infla-
tion concern,” said Craig Wright,
chief economist at RBC Financial
Group, referring to growth below
levels that might make the Fed
nervous. “The economic data is a
good proxy for what we're seeing
overall — that growth is moder-
ating. Growth is shifting to a
slower speed and it’s taking place
as inflation is drifting slightly
higher,” Wright said.

The ISM report showed the
group’s index of business activity
in the non-manufacturing sector
came in at 52.4 in March, down
from 54.3 in February. Wall
Street had been expecting a read-
ing of 54.7. Figures above SO indi-
cate expansion. March was the
48th straight month of growth in
the non-manufacturing industries.

Also, new orders placed with
US factories for manufactured
goods rose by one per cent in
February; economists had been
expecting an increase of 1.9 per
cent.

Investors appeared unim-
pressed with a report from pay-
roll services company Automatic
Data Processing Inc. and consul-
tancy Macroeconomic Advisers
reported that predicts an increase
of 106,000 private jobs in March.
That came in below economists’
expectations for an increase of
150,000 jobs.

In corporate news, Best Buy
Co. fell $1.24, or 2.5 per cent, to
$47.89 after reporting its fiscal
fourth-quarter profit rose nearly
19 per cent.

Rival Circuit City Stores Inc.

THE TRIBUNE

posted an unexpected loss
because of sluggish sales growth
— especially in its flat-panel tele-
visions. Circuit City, the No. 2
electronics chain behind Best
Buy, fell seven cents to $18.21.

In other corporate news, Psivi-
da Ltd., an Australian developer
of bio-nanotech technology,
jumped 21 cents, or 10.3 per cent,
to $2.25 after signing an exclu-
sive research and license agree-
ment for its drug delivery tech-
nology with Pfizer Inc. Pfizer rose
14 cents to $25.81.

Greenbrier Cos., which makes
freight cars and provides services .
to railroads, fell $4.52, or 16.9 per
cent, to $22.20 after it swung to a
loss in its fiscal second quarter
amid lackluster demand.

Monsanto Co. rose $1.79, or
3.2 per cent, to $57.79 after the
world’s largest seed company said
demand for corn-based ethanol
led to strong corn seed sales and
boosted fiscal second-quarter
profits by 23 per cent.

Advancing issues outpaced
decliners by about six to five on
the New York Stock Exchange,
where volume came to 1.4 billion
shares compared with 1.56 bil-
lion shares traded Tuesday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies slipped 0.98,
or 0.12 per cent, to 810.79.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei stock
average closed up 1.74 per cent.
Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index
advanced 1.03 per cent, while the
sometimes-volatile Shanghai
Composite Index added 0.01 per
cent. Britain’s FTSE 100 closed
down 0.02 per cent, Germany’s
DAX< index rose 0.40 per cent,
and France’s CAC~40 finished up
0.47 per cent.

ENTREPRENEURS
"Turn your Dreams into Reality"

* Business Plans (Government/Banks)....$750.00
* Entrepreneurship Training k
* Quickbooks Training.........-..004

a eeceereere

* Marketing Plans/Feasibility Studies.......6500.00

* Business Consulting (per hour)

hog on: Www.markturnquestconsulting.com

$50.00

Mark A. Turnquest |

SMALL BUSINESS RESOURCE CENTRE
(242) 326-6748 / (242) 427-3640 .

















Company
Administrator

able to work on own initiative -Must be able to
correspond with clients, must be conversant with
all aspect of company administraton-preparation of
minutes, liquidation of companies, preparation and
fillingof annual returns, redomiciliationof companies,
have a sound knowledge of International Business
Companies, Foundations, Protected Cell Companies,
Private Trust Companies, Companies incorporated
under the Companies Act 1992-must have Good
accounting background. Must be computer literate.

Qualified Applicants please e-mail:
smil 143 @hotmail.com





Palmdale Veterinary Clinic

Needs

Telephonist/Office Assistant
° Must be an Animal Lover
° Excellent Communications Skills Required
° Willing to Learn Veterinary Care
° Must be Client Oriented

J. S. Johnson
__ Premier Real Estate —

Symbol
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

14.60

8.00

0.45
Cote pexsps

41.00

14.60

0.45

14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
__0.35 RND Holdings

NA V
1.333665"
3.0988°**
2.625419°*
1.233813°°***

S2wk-Low
1.2806
2.7451
2.3312
1.1592

10.0000

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today’s Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

MARKET TERMS

© FO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7016 / FIDELITY 242-3

0.000
1.320

2.220.
1.770

BISX Listed Mi Aus Ries
YTD%

Last 12 Mont!

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price E NAV

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Voi
EPS $ - Acampany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

* - 23 March 2007
- Trading volume of the prior week ** - 8 February 2007

*** - 31 January 2007

**** - 28 February 2007



Maou Mme Kelis
° Must Be Animal Lover
° Respectful
° Reliable
° Hardworking
° Willing to Learn

Duties:

° Kennel Hand/Cleaner
° Animal Handling, Restraint and Caregiving

Fax Resume to 326-2173 or hand
deliver to Palmdale Veterinary Clinic.



THE TRIBUNE



as OO ee Se
Winn-Dixie transition

drops City Markets
profits by almost 60%

FROM page 5B

ums and dramatically higher
utility costs negatively impact-
ed profitability.”

Withdrawal of Winn-Dixie’s
systems after 40 years led
Bahamas Supermarkets to
make a major investment in
information technology.

As new products such as
IGA Foods were being
secured, the company said the
transition between Winn-Dix-
ie’s own-brand products and
new labels left gaps in promo-
tional support, particularly dur-
ing the holidays.

The company also blames
construction work on the new
Cable Beach store for ham-

‘pering sales at the old site,
adding to the cramped park-

ing conditions, while road-
works affected the Indepen-
dence Drive store.

Bahamas Supermarkets was
also faced with extraordinary

costs, including substantial fees,

paid to Winn-Dixie under the
Transition Service Agreement.
Early termination of the agree-
ment, which came after the
end of the reporting period,
saved BSL $500,000, a sum
that will be reflected in future
net earnings results.

Leasehold improvements
and preparing Cable Beach
City Market reflected nega-
tively in the half-year report,
but sales since the store’s open-
ing two weeks after period-end
have been brisk, the firm
added.

“While many factors created
temporary setbacks in results,
we have the utmost confidence

in the direction and future of
Bahamas Supermarkets, one
of the country’s oldest and
most respected businesses,”
said Mr Sands.

While our net sales were
down slightly for the 28-week
period ending January 10, the
decline is attributable to spe-
cific and temporary causes.

“We are confident that we
have, and are continuing to,
put into place measures and
technology that will increase
operations efficiency and pro-
vide greater customer satisfac-
tion. In short, we believe that
with continued dedication and
hard work of our 700 staff,
management and executives
and with the improvements we
have approved for our stores,
operations, recruitment and
training, the future looks
bright.”

Tourism/Hospitality Scholarship Opportunities

The Patrick S.G.Bain, BHEA, BHA and BHC& AWU
Hotel Industry Partners Scholarship Fund

$25,000.00 available to industry professionals and students interested in a career in

Hospitality Tourism

° 6 Scholarships valued at & $4,000.00 each, tenable at The College of The Bahamas

Train For Careers In:-

¢ Hospitality Management

e Equipment Maintenance
Information Technology

e
e Marine and Environmental Sciences
e

Engineering

Applications Available At:

Hotel Centre House
S.G. Hambros Building

West Bay Street, Southern Entrance

P.O.Box N-7799
: Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas

Telephone: 322-838 1/502-4245/502- 4222/323- 5033”

Marketing

Culinary Arts

Laundry

Accounting and Finance

Horticulture Sciences

and other industry-related career areas

Workers

Tonique Williams-Darling Highway

P.O.Box GT-2514

Nassau, NP, The Bahamas

og

1s

or Visit us at www. bhahotels.com or www.bhcawu@ yahoo.com

Applicants must:
Be Bahamian

Have a minimum G.P.A of 2.85
Pledge to pursue a career in hospitality/tourism

Meet other requirements

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO APRIL 15, 2007

“Motions Salon Herbals Deal:

. ‘Receive 1 Motions Salon Herbals Neutralizing Conditioner
: 3202 and a Motions Golf Umbrella FREE oe order!



RBC

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 9B



Royal Bank
Kg. of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED

FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown
Allotments, Love Hill Settle-
ment, Andros. Containing a
two-storey residence. Appraised
Value $100,000.

(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3 with
a parcel situated between Lot
#1, Block 3, containing a 4 bed-
room condominium - Sunset
View Villas, West Bay Street.
Appraised Value $750,000.

(806) Lot #13, Block 4 of Coral
Waterways, Section One, Coral
Harbour, N.P. with two houses
and a swimming pool, #312
N.P. bounded Northwardly by
a canal or waterway of the said
Subdivision known as Flamingo
waterway and running 102.004
ft. Eastwardly by lot #14 and
146.145ft Southwardly by a
reservation for a private road.
Appraised Value $530,000

(433) Lot #27 of Village Allot-
ment #14 in the Eastern District,
containing residence situated
on Denver Street off Parkgate
Road in the Ann’s Town Con-
stituency, N.P. Property size
2,500 sq ft Building size 990 sq
ft Appraised value $50,000.

(304) Lot #213 containing resi-
dence in Elizabeth Estates East
Subdivision, N.P. Appraised
value: TBO

(304) Lot #2 in block #8, Steward
Road, Coral Heights East Subdi-
vision situated in Western Dis-
trict of N.P., approx. size 8,800
sq ft with a split level contain-
ing two bed, two bath, living,
dining & family rooms, kitchen
and utility room-approx. size of
building 2,658 sq ft. Appraised
value: $322, 752

(702) Lot #20 with residen-
tial _ property located Sky-
line Heights. Appraised value
$280,000.

(902) Lot #14, Block #23 (125

x 80) situated Rainbow Bay,

Eleuthera containing a one. sto-
rey house with 2 bed/1 bath,
kitchen, living room and 2
linen closets. Appraised value
$89,998.

(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150
x 150 on Queens Highway just
south of Palmetto Point with a
two storey stone building con-
taining two apartments. Each

(304) Lot D-2,415 west of Fox
Hill Road and 659 ft. south of
Joe Farrington Road, N.P. Ap-
praised value: TBO

(565) Vacant lot #5 located
Eleuthera Island Shores, Sea-
side Drive Section B, Block
#15, Eleuthera. 9,691 sq. ft. Ap-
praised value $21,805.

(902) Lot #46, Block #32, Ba-
hamia. Section 1X Freeport,
Grand Bahama 90 ft wide along
Stratford Way and 150 ft along
Stratford Court. Appraised val-
ue $26,000.

COMMERCIAL

BANKING CENTRE

Tel: 242-356-8567

(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
(802) Mr. Brian Knowles
(805) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(806) Mrs Lois Hollis

(807) Mr. Wayne Kendall
(808) Mrs. Hope Sealey
PALMDALE SHOPPING
CENTRE BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-4426/9

or 242-302-3800

(201) Mr. David Barr

(202) Mr. Frank Dean

(203) Mrs. Cedricka Clarke
NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT
Tel: 242-377-7179

(433) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR,
ELEUTHERA

Tel: 242-332-2856/8

(902) Mr. Brian Hanna
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel: 242-333-2230

(901) Ms. Velderine Laroda
(903} Mrs. Rose Bethel

unit has 3 bed/2 1/2 bath,
kitchen, living room and 3
linen closets. Appraised value
$287,209.

(105) Lot with three bed, two
and a half bath residence, situ-
ated Bailey Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value TBO

(903) Lot #15 located Johnson
Harbour View Estate, Harbour
Island, size 6,750 sq ft with a
3 bed, 2 bath residence. Esti-
mated value $95,000.

(902) Lot (8,000 sq ft) situated
Sand’s Alley, North Palmetto
Point with incomplete triplex
(concrete structure — belt course
2,529.6 sq ft). Appraised value
$49,414.

(100) Developed property
Pinder’s, Long Island contain-
ing a split level Mediterranean
style home with kitchen, liv-
ing room, dining room, master
bed & bath, two guest rooms,
full and half guest bathroom
on lower level. Also garage and
breezeway - a gross area 4,212
sq ft. Kitchenette, master bed-
room and bath and front entry
porch features the upper level,
gross area of 780 sq ft. Porches
all around the concrete struc-
ture which is 90% complete.
Appraised value $650,000.

(400) Property situated in Cal-
abash Bay on the Island of
Andros. 75’x150’ and contain-
ing thereon a small grocery
store 480 sq ft and an incom-
plete 3 bed 2 bath house 900 sq
ft. Appraised value $65,000.

(565) Lot #12 in Block #2 con-
taining 4 houses (3 wooden, :
one partly concrete block,
partly stucco building), 4,763
sq ft situated on Farrington
Road in the Western District
of New Providence. Appraised
value $68,000.

(505) A concrete single-family
residence located on Lot #212
Roland St, Ridgeland Park West
Subdivision. Appraised value
$72,035.

(902) Lot containing 3 bed , 2
bath residence situated in the
settlement of Governor’s Har-
bour bounded northwardly by
a 19ft road and running thereon
50ft eastwardly and running
thereon 100ft southwardly and

VACANT PROPERTIES

(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65
sq. ft.) situated in Mango Lane
Section “B” Block #15, Eleu-
thera Island Shores on the is-
land of Eleuthera. Appraised
value $25,665.

(902) .281 acre of vacant land
off Queen’s Highway in the set-
tlement of Governor’s Harbour,
Eleuthera. Appraised value
$31,320.

(800) Vacant property located
Bahamia South. Block 16 lot
9A, Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Appraised value $15,000.00

OFFICERS

ANDROS TOWN
Tel:242-368-2071

(400) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-8700

(701) Mrs. Stephanie-Saunders
(702) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles
(703) Mrs. Renae Walkine
JFK DRIVE BRANCH

Tel: 242-325-4711

(401) Mr. James Strachan
PRINCE CHARLES
SHOPPING CENTRE

Tel: 242-393-7505/8

(501) Mr. Keith Lloyd

(505) Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH

Tel: 242-327-6077

(466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420

(908) Mr. Antonio Eyma
(909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
(910) Mr. Travis Spicer
BIMINI BRANCH

Telephone: 242-347-3031
(105) Mr. Kermit Curry

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

re ys

SOft westwardly.
value $90,000.

(902) Lot #17, Block# 7 of Sec-
tion “A” of the Eleuthera Island
Shores Subdivision situated 3
miles Northeastward of Hatchet
Bay, Eleuthera containing resi-
dence. Appraised value TBO.

(400) Lot #14 situated in the
settlement of Love Hill on
the Island of Andros totaling
20,000 sq. ft. Property con-
tains a two storey 5 bedroom, 3
bathroom residence. Appraised
value $185,000.

Appraised

(203) Lot B situated on the
north side of Shell Fish Road,
being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster
Road with a one half duplex
residential premises. Appraised
value TBO

(433) | Lot#71 located Yamac-
raw Shores, New Providence
containing 2 storey building
with 2 apartments above and
shops below. Appraised value
$317,000

(723) Residence in Ridgeland
Park, valued at $72,000.

(433) Lot Number A, located
Rocky Pine Road, Pineview
Heights Subdivision, Western
District, New Providence con-
taining triplex 7,000 sq ft gross.
Appraised value $200,000.

(701) Lot of land having the
number 16 in Block number 16
in Section Three of tHe Subdivi-
sion called and known as Sea
Breeze Estates situated in the
Eastern District of New Prov-
idence. Property contains a
three bed, two bath residence.
Appraised value TBO.

(701) Lot of land being lot
number 11 in Block number 10
on a plan of allotments laid out
by Village Estates Limited and
filed in the dept of Land & Sur-
veys as number 142 N..P. and
situated in the Eastern District
of New Providence. Property
contains three bed, two bath
residence.

(800) «Lot of land being lots
number 10 and 11 in block 29
of Coconut Grove Subdivi-
sion - Robinson Road with two
storey building. Lot is trape-
zium in shape. Approximately
8,383 square feet. Appraised
value$490,000.00



(717) Vacant residential lot #25
(6,513 sq. ft) in James Cistern
North Subdivision, Eleuthera.
Appraised value $12,375

(401) Lot No. 17456 Bahama
Sound off Exuma No. 18,
located approximately 2.5 miles
northwestwardly of George
Town, Exuma. Appraised value
$18,000.

(800) Vacant property
located Dumping Ground Road,
Nassau Bahamas. Rectangu-
lar shape lot at 1,850 sq ft.
Appraised value $11,000.00

GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND

Telephone: 242-337-0101

(100) Mrs Lucy Wells

LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE

Tel: 242-394-3560

(716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon

(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

(723) Mrs. Deidre King

(724) Mrs. Faye Higgs

(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson

(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis

MACKEY STREET

Tel: 242-393-3097

(601) Ms. Nicola Walker

BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-2451 /3

(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson

(303) Mr. Desmond McIntosh

(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson

FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-352-6631/2

(101) Ms. Garnell Frith

(103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
Cartwright

(104) Ms. Jackie Knowles

(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey

Sa Royal Bank

RBC. of Canada





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows

() ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANGOLA
(BLOCK V) LIMITED 1s dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
3rd day of April, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(cy The Liquidator of the said Company is Karen Floyd of 16945
“Northchase Drive, Texas 77002, U SA.

Dated the 3rd day of April, 2007
HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY

MANAGEMENT CO, LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

The Tribune



Stuart Cove’s visitor base ‘could double

FROM page 1B

It’s going to be beautiful.
We’ve been working on that
with some world-renowned
architects.”

Mr Stein is due to be in Nas-
sau today for further talks with
the Bahamian government in
his quest to seal a Heads of
Agreement with the adminis-
tration for the $867 million
project.

“I’m certainly very hopeful
that we can get our Heads of
Agreement imminently and
within the current administra-
tion,” Mr Stein told The Tri-
bune, although accomplishing
that is uncertain given that Par-
liament was yesterday dis-
solved ahead of the May 2 gen-

rl The 7 Are!

British



iN ANC

Ms. Karen Isaacs Ms. Shantell Butler-Lockhart

are no longer employed at British American
Financial and are not authorized to conduct any
business on behalf of the Company

For further information pleas
cali our Rosetta Street office
at 322-1801-2

a" sAmerican

a&a t

i

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-382-7208 Exema 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-5661
















eral election.

He added that the plans to
revitalise the South Ocean
resort included a Straw Market
in the development’s marina
village, with the project
designed “to provide a lot of
wonderful opportunities for
Bahamian entrepreneurs”.

Mr Stein said he was “in
deeper negotiations and pretty
close on the four-star hotel”
to concluding a brand/operat-
ing partner agreement for the
facility. The Tribune under-
stands that this is likely to be
Hard Rock, although Mr Stein
again declined to comment on
this.

He added that the South
Ocean golf course’s restora-
tion, carries out by Greg Nor-

‘man Golf Course Design, was

“almost done” and would be
re-opened in the last quarter
of 2007. The course would be
open on a pay-to-play basis,
and discount rates would be
offered for Bahamians.

“We’re in discussions with
Greg Norman in taking a much
larger role in the overall devel-
opment, with estate homes, vil-
las and condos,” Mr Stein said.
“I’ve been having conversa-
tions with them.”

In common with most major,
multi-use resort developments,
Mr Stein said that once
approved, South Ocean’s rede-
velopment would take place in
two phases, the first involving
utilities and infrastructure such
as the installation of roads,
sewerage, telephone, electrici-
ty, reverse osmosis and water
storage facilities.

That, he added, was likely
to cost “a little over $200 mil-
lion”, with the second phase,
involving the construction of
the 400-room four-star hotel;
140-room foive-star hotel; frac-
tional villas; 180 timeshare
units; second homes; 40,000
square foot casino; convention
centre; marina; tennis facilities;
spa and other facilities set to
cost around $500 million.

To clean up and preserve the
water and beachfront environ-
ment, Mr Stein said: “We’re
spending a lot of money on
beach restoration and coral
reefs, which is a way of sus-
taining and beautifying them
for a long period of time.”

The five-star resort is slated
to occupy the land where the
current South Ocean structures
currently lie, and the redevel-
opment aims to restore 1500-

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
ANGOLA (BLOCK V) LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the
above-named Company are required to send -
particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P. O. Box
N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 26th April,
A.D., 2007. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the
Liquidator.

Dated the 3rd day of April, A.D., 2007.

Karen Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE
UNIT (THE “‘FIU’’)



1800 “linear feet of beach
space” directly in front of
them. Then, a new second
beach will be created to the
west towards Clifton Park, for

pale 8

the four-star hotel and marina »

“where one didn’t exist before. ~
The whole beachfront will be
restored”.

Mr Stein added that he

planned to provide scholar- ~

ships for Bahamians to attend

South Ocean’s planned tennis .

training facilities, and said:

“I’m in conversations with two ,

major superstars to be running
the facility.”

The project to revitalise the -

South Ocean Golf & Beach
Resort is projected to generate

o

1,358 full-time jobs when fully -
open, in addition to 1,200%

direct construction jobs during ?.

peak build-out.

A draft economic impact

a
Bo%
é
,

study performed for the South -
Ocean project by Oxford Eco- !
nomics had projected that the —
development, scheduled to ;
open in 2010 with construction °
hopefully beginning this year, ’
would inject $172 million in }
visitor spending into the |

Bahamian economy during its
first full operational year.

Hard construction spending, .
which would involve the con- ,
struction of new buildings and ,

renovations to others, would

total $541 million by 2015, with ,

the total investment by Mr

\

Stein, RHS and their partners ;

via the New South Ocean
Development Company reach-
ing $867 million by that year.

Construction employment,
Mr Stein said, would average
877 persons over the 2007-2010
period, peaking in 2009.

The $541 million construc-
tion spending had been fore-
cast to inject $217 million into
the Bahamas’ GDP over nine

sre

years, and generate $105 mil- .

lion in wages. On the opera-

tional side, South Ocean was »°

forecast to produce a $3.7 bil-

lion GDP impact over its first '

20 years, generating $1.5 bil-

lion in direct wages and

. salaries for its employees.

In addition, the project was |

forecast to generate $1.8 bil-
lion in revenues for the Gov-

ernment in the 23 years to '

2030.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 15(2) of The Financial Intelligence Unit
Act, 2000, the public is hereby notified that, the revised

Suspicious

Transactions

Guidelines

Relating to the

Prevention of Money Laundering and the Financing of
| Terrorism (The ‘‘2007 Guidelines’’) for financial institutions
within The Commonwealth of the Bahamas have been issued
and are effective as of 19th March 2007.

The 2007 Guidelines replace those Guidelines issued in
December 2001.

Copies of the 2007 Guidelines can be obtained between the
hours of 9a.m. to 5p.m. Monday through Friday, from the
Administrative Offices, The Financial Intelligence Unit, 3rd
Floor, Norfolk House, Frederick Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

Anthony M. Johnson

Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O. Box SB 50086
Nassau, The Bahamas



ee ee ee ee er ee |



THE TRIBUNE

British tobacco company
expands business in
United States market

@ By BRUCE SCHREINER
Associated Press Writer

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) —
British company Imperial
Tobacco Group PLC success-
fully plugged a giant gap in its
global business, entering the
United States cigarette market
with its acquisition of Ken-
tucky-based Commonwealth
Brands in a $1.9 billion deal
completed this week.

The deal allows Imperial, one
of the world’s biggest tobacco
companies, to inherit the
fourth-largest cigarette produc-
er in the United States. Com-
monwealth Brands, maker of
discount brands USA Gold and
Sonoma, has an estimated 3.7
per cent of the $376 billion US
market.

Imperial Chief Executive
Gareth Davis said this week
that his company plans to boost
profit from its new acquisition
by launching additional brands.

“We will absolutely be invest-
ing to grow and develop the
business there,” Imperial
spokesman Alex Parsons said
in a phone interview Wednes-
day.

Imperial bought Common-
wealth Brands from Bowling
Green, Ky.,-based Houchens
Industries Inc., whose other
businesses include Food Giant,
IGA, Piggly Wiggly and Mad
Butcher food stores. Houchens
acquired Commonwealth
Brands, the trading name of
CBHC Inc., in 2001.

Jimmie Gipson, chairman of
privately owned Houchens, said
the deal with Imperial pairs
Commonwealth Brands with a
company that “has a tradition
of success in the tobacco indus-
try and the resources to contin-
ue its growth.”

“The sale generates signifi-
cant value for Houchens’ share-
holders and will provide capital
to expand our existing busi-
nesses and to seek new busi-
ness opportunities,” Gipson
said.

Commonwealth Brands is

based in Bowling Green in.

south-central Kentucky, and
Parsons said Imperial has no
plans to move those operations.
The senior management team
at Commonwealth Brands will
stay on to help chart Imperial’s
course in the United States,
Parsons said.

Commonwealth Brands has
a work force of about 720 anda
factory in Reidsville, N.C., that
makes about 14 billion ciga-
rettes a year. Its other brands
are Montclair, Malibu and Riv-
iera.

Parsons said Imperial had
resisted the US market because
of the “litigation climate” — in
which a number of multimillion
dollar lawsuits were filed
against the tobacco industry.

“That has eased considerably
in recent years,” Parsons said.

As a result, Imperial decid-
ed “the timing was right” to
enter the American cigarette
market, he said. The British
company already had a US
presence through its New Jer-
sey-based Robert Burton Asso-
ciates subsidiary that sells ciga-
rette papers and tubes.

Imperial’s expansion to the
United States got the attention
of its competitors.

At the time the Common-
wealth Brands sale was
announced in February,
Reynolds American Inc. chair-
man Susan M Ivey called it a
“good strategic buy” by Imper-
ial. “Commonwealth has always
been a strong competitor in that
low-value market,” Ivey said at
the time.

North ‘Carolina-based
Reynolds American is the
nation’s second-largest tobac-
co company behind industry
leader Philip Morris USA.
Reynolds’ cigarette brands
include Camel, Kool and Pall
Mall. Philip Morris USA’s
brands include Marlboro, Vir-
ginia Slims, Parliament and
Basic.

The Bristol, England-based
Imperial, whose brands include
Regal, Lambert & Butler and
Davidoff, sold 187 billion ciga-

rettes in more than 130 coun+"

sor

we A AUN DEY EW RR ATE OTRO PUSTHOMETE I

tries in the fiscal year ending
last September — a seven per
cent sales increase from the pre-
vious year. Davis previously
said Imperial expects the US to
become its third-largest market
behind Britain and Germany.

“We want to grow and devel-
op the business, and there are
some significant blank spots on
our global footprint,” Parsons
said. “And the US was obvi-
ously a key one to look at.”

He said Imperial views the
United States as “an extremely
profitable market.”

Parsons, citing competitive
reasons, declined to offer hints
on whether Imperial’s US strat-
egy will focus on discount
brands or introduction of its
premium cigarettes.

“We don’t want to show our
hand,” he said.

When the deal was
announced in February, Imper-
ial said the net cost of the acqui-
sition was $1.5 billion when
including some tax benefits.

Deutsche Bank Securities
Inc. analyst Mare Greenberg
said Commonwealth Brands
becomes a “different animal”
with Imperial’s backing. Still,
he was skeptical that “this great
big, strong competitor is going
to come in and make a big
splash in the US market.”

Greenberg said Common-
wealth Brands has enjoyed
growth in the discount segment.
Introducing premium brands in
the US, however, would be a
challenge for Imperial, he said.

“If you were going to pick on
a brand competitor in a cate-
gory, I don’t think you would
choose Marlboro in cigarettes,
or Camel for that matter,”
Greenberg said.

Greenberg said Imperial’s
entry into the American mar-
ket will have little or no imme-
diate impact on the industry
leaders, but said they’ll keep an
eye on the new US player.

“It’s a scale player in their
marketplace with significant
capital,” he said. “So they’re

smart and they won’t ignore |

that.”

Neabeue

TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.

THE NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

wishes to

announce

that

applications

are how

being invited from all qualified members who wish to
be considered for recommendation as candidates for the
seats to become available on either the Board of Direc-
tors or The Supervisory Committee at the 30th Annual
General Meeting to be held on Saturday May 19, 2007.

All members

interested in

serving

in either

capacity should collect an application form from any
office of the Teachers and Salaried Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited offices in Nassau, Freeport or Abaco.

The qualification for each post is available upon request.

Completed applications, along with the other information
requested should be returned to any of the offices on or
before the close of business on Friday April 27, 2007.

All Resolutions must also be submitted by Friday April
27, 2007.

Any application, not fully: completed or without the
requested supporting information, or received after the
aforementioned date will not be eligible for consideration.

“TEACHERS AND SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LTD.
SERVING THE WHOLE BAHAMAS”



~—

to be a part of o

Cashiers Departi

Qualifications

High School Di
Associate degr
Excellent comp
Previous cashin
Good Administ
Strong commui
skills essential.
Strong Custom

Excellent benefits |

rao DOCTOR

Please submit resume to: Human
P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahama







ADDERLEY, GWEN (PHR)

ADDERLEY RICHARD

ARMSTRONG, CECILE

BAIN CHERYL (PHR)




BAIN, INGRID




BARROW, RENEE




BASTIAN, GLORIA













BENEBY, JACQUELYN (PHR)



BETHEL, ANNETTE



BETHEL, CYPRIANNA



BLACK, VILLIEMAE

BOOTH ROSETTA

BOSTWICK HILDA

BURROWS DEBORAH

BURROWS V. THERESA



CAREY, SYLVIA

CARGILL DENISE
CARTWRIGHT BARBARA

BOWE, SIMMONE

CASH, ANNETTE

Bahamas Human











































AS

"Growing to

We thank you, our members, for your suppoi thus far as we look forward to your continued support.



DEAL, SHERRY (PHR)
DEMERITE, EMILY
DEVEAUX WENDY
DENNIS TERI
DIAH JOAN

ELLIS, PATRICIA

EVANS, ALMA




EVANS, HOWARD



FERNANDER, RUTH
FERGUSON, CAROLY)
FERGUSON CANDIDA
Garland, Debbie
LARODA-DEAL JULIE
LIGHTBOURNE, ROCH

LIGHTBOURNE-ALBU

LIGHTFOOT, CATHY

|_MCLEOD, DALE -SHR
MCPHEE-RUSSELL, K(

MCSWEENEY, ANNET

LIGHTBOURA RUSSEL \

HURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 11B _






r WOW service team.

nt

oma
a plus

er literacy
experience

tive Skills

ation and interpersonal



Service Skills essential

lary commensurate with experience

OSPITAL

Health For Life

UNCC ACE MPO RRCER MEO REEORCCONEERRECONCOLEDOROCODBTORDDEASCSIIBHODODSPEEMIESPIEDINOINIOENISMELEDIED IDEN ERMCLEDIERIODSEEDOOEDSCE SEE ESET!



sources Department | Doctors Hospital “sabe

oa.

or call 302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.combie i .









sources Development
clation

ter serve you” in 2007.





NGUYEN, BONNIE

NIXON, LEOTHA
O' BRIEN, ESTHER (PHR,
PLETCHER, BRUNO



niin hh aby a | MAVIS
RAMSEY, MARJORIE

RAMSEY, RITA



RIGBY, KAREN,

RICHARDSON, DELLARESE

ROBERTS, ANDREW (PHR)

ROKER. GENEVIEVE

ROLLE KATHYN










spad

ROLLE, CLAUDIA

£.






SAWYER, PAMELA
SEYMOUR, DIANNE

SMITH, MARISA

RUSSELL KOLLEEN
UDITH ,

Pass-President)









SUTHERLAND, SANDRA -

THOMPSON, STEPHANIE (PHR






















CHARLTON, ALBURY NADENE (PHR) MAJOR, GLENN
| COX. ANTHEA DELANEY ti MURRAY RHONDA
| DEAN ANDRELL iy, |_MILLS KADERIN
DEAN VALRIE MORTIMER CORNEL
DARVILLE, DEBORAH MILLER, MAB








BHRDA extends to its members a safe and ha
our first meeting on Wednesday, Ar

Topic: Building Human Relatir

Our workshop under the banner of “Ef

We look for

THOMPSON, RICARDO
WALLACE VALARIE
WILLIAMS, MATTHEW

y Easter holidays and we look forward to seeing you at

18th, 2007 @ Luciano Restaurant at 12:30pm
, Breaking Barriers in Labour Relations




tive Talent Management” will be held in May.
rd to your support.



pliewk

i ‘

j j he

i

{ basis

H°

{ structured notes and subordinated debt

t! Preparing all Branch, Group and Regulatory reporting to specific reporting
naan ines under US GAAP and Swiss GAAP

i -reparing of reports for Senior management in London and New York
i Unsur ing ) that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated

i

} projects

{ Ad ivising front office on structuring trades for the Branch

|

L | other offices

(| Requirements:

i | CPA or equivalent qualification

4

: -—_——

with at least 3 years experience in investment banking essential
| pratense,

i fee of foreign exchange risk management

:
5
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Sanasee

Sa PITT

, | boty K Agencies (USA) LLC

t om
ae

Ren: moringigpgen te $ Sere cree eR

(:nsuring that the Branch’s books and records are accurately recorded on a timely

cconciling profit and loss for various product types covering loans, derivatives,

Involvement in various investment banking and Group accounting issues and

Managing the assistant controller and influencing peers both in Bahamas and

‘\ minimum of 7 years’ post qualification experience in the banking industry

‘\ commitment to service excellence
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Good organizational and interpersonal skills

= 12B, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

Credit Suisse Nassau
Branch

is presently considering applications for a

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:
I pe

Knowledge of US GAAP especially for derivatives and ‘structured products
ixperience with working with multicurrency trial balances and a full understanding

} Ao aie
f= Personal Qualities: Si
“Ub

Ability to work independently

R





‘

Good IT skills
Benefits provided in
* Competitive salary and benefits
APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.

Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.
NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS APRIL 18, 2007,

EDIT SU oS

_ Betty K Agencies





Coming Soon!!!!!

‘TO ABACO BAHAMAS
Weekly Freight Services Between

MEAMEFL- NASSAU AND MARSH HARBOUR ABACO

Please contact our customer service
Representative for further Information

Nassau (Office)

| Betty K Agencies Ltd.
| C.Trevor Kelly Bldg.
| East Street North

2. Box N-351, Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-2142
Fax: (242) 322-6089

Miami (Office)

Telephone: (305) 635-4650
Fax: (305) 635-4651

’ SW. South River Drive

i. Florida 33 142




“TA enenm acverrens.

THE TRIBUNE



Due diligence
on shareholder

nominees

FROM page 2B

use offshore companies to hide
or launder money from their
illegal activities, and keep
themselves and the source of
their funds inconspicuous.

It is highly recommended
that stricter KYC requirements
be established by financial and
corporate services providers,
or financial institutions, when it
comes to verifying client iden-
tification and distinguishing
conclusively the nature and
ambit of a client's business
dealings, before the provision
of such services are offered to
a client.

Alternatively, « financial and
corporate services provider or
financial institution may wish
only to offer nominee services
to well-known or existing
clients on a case-by-case basis,
and still require full KYC and
customer due diligence infor-
mation, where this information
has not already been obtained
and verified. This is notwith-
standing the referral of clients
requesting nominee share-
holder services by the repre-
sentative offices, branches, sub-
sidiaries or affiliates of finan-
cial institutions or financial and
corporate service providers.

In either case, as is a require-
ment in any risk-based
approach to the implementa-
tion and enforcement of cus-

tomer due diligence policies.

and procedures, systematic
monitoring and reporting of
companies with nominee ser-
vices should be established and
maintained within an organi-

sation’s compliance culture and
legal framework.

In order to provide nominee
shareholder services, financial
institutions in the Bahamas
must apply to the Central
Bank of the Bahamas (the
Central Bank) for a restricted
nominee trust licence, under
the provisions of the Banks
and Trust Companies Regula-
tion Act 2000, in accordance
with the procedure outlined in
The Bank and Trust Compa-
nies (Licence Application)
Regulations.

Licensee

A nominee trust licensee is a
nominee company that has
obtained a restricted license
from the Central Bank, and
holds securities and other
assets in its own name on
behalf of clients of its parent

bank or trust company, but’

carries on no other trust busi-
ness.

The minimum capital
requirement for a nominee
trust licensee is B$10,000, and
the annual fees payable under
the Bank and Trust Compa-
nies Regulation Act is B$2,500.
The nominee company must
be a company incorporated
under the Companies Act
1992, since International Busi-
ness Companies (IBCs) are
prohibited, under the Interna-
tional Business Companies Act
2000, from engaging in banking
or trust business in the
Bahamas.

Notwithstanding the nuances
of a nominee shareholder
arrangement, one should note
that under company law and
in consideration of the legal
underpinnings of an agency

arrangement, the shares of a
deceased member of a compa-
ny (in this case the ultimate
beneficial owner) normally
devolve on the personal rep-
resentative of the deceased
member’s estate, by operation
of law, and the deceased mem-
ber’s assets are distributed in
accordance with the provisions
of his will or the rules of intes-
tacy, if he dies intestate.
Therefore, on the death of
an ultimate beneficial owner
and subject to the provisions
of the Articles of Association
of the company, shares held by
a nominee shareholder, on
‘behalf of an ultimate benefi-
cial owner, cannot be disposed
of in any way that the company
chooses, since the legal own-
ership of such shares is that of
the personal representative of
the ultimate beneficial owner,
not the nominee shareholder.

NB: The information con-
tained in this article does not
constitute, nor is it a substi-
tute, for legal advice. Persons
reading this article and/or col-
umn, generally, are encour-
aged to seek the relevant legal
advice and assistance regarding
issues that may affect them and
may relate to the information
presented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is
a practising attorney in the
Chambers of Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have
any comments regarding this
article, you may contact Mr
Fitzgerald at Suite 212,
Lagoon Court Building, Olde
Towne Mall at Sandyport,

. West Bay St., P. O. Box CB-

11173, Nassau, Bahamas or
at 327-3347 (telephone).

THE LYFORD CAY FOUNDATION

(IN CONJUNCTION WITH)

THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

NOTICE

ALL BAHAMAS MERIT SCHOLARSHIP 2007

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the All Bahamas Merit Scholarship.
_ The scholarship will be given for 4 (four) years tenable at accredited universities or colleges in the
Caribbean, United States of America, United Kingdom or Canada, commencing August 2007.

Applicants must:

‘Be a citizen of The Bahamas who has been educated in The Bahamian
Secondary School system;
Be between the ages of 16 and 19 years and should have completed
secondary school in the year of application or not later than one year after

graduation;

Be unmarried and childless;
Possess at least a 3.0 GPA or equivalent;
Have at least seven (7) BGCSE’s with a minimum of four (4) A’s and two (2)

B's;

Have a minimum SAT score of 1150;
Show integrity of character and respect for others;
Prove participation in beneficial community activities

VALUE OF AWARD

The award will include tuition fees, room and board, one round trip ticket, clothing
and a personal and book allowance. The total award is not to exceed $35,000.00

per annum.

Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and
Education Loan Division of The Ministry of Education, Science & Technology or
from the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology's website at
www.bahamaseducation.com

Completed application forms should be returned to reach The Scholarship
and Education Loan Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology
P. O. Box N-3913, No later than Monday, April 30, 2007.

Application forms received after this date will not be considered.





THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 13B



BISX rules changes to speed
up issuer financial reporting

FROM page 1B

posed amendment to the
issuers’ continuing obligations
rules was that directors, chief
executives and chief financial
officers, “particularly with
quarterly financials”, had to
make a public declaration that
these financial reports were in
compliance - and had been
published in compliance - with
International Financial Report-
ing Standards (IFRS) for inter-
im accounts.

“Right now, we’re not satis-
fied that all companies are
meeting their requirements in
that regard,” Mr Davies said.
“So we’re going to require
them to make declarations. It’s
going to raise the bar.”

The key, he added, was that
the quarterly results required
by BISX-listed companies
were in compliance with the
format required by the IFRS.

Another proposed rules
change, Mr Davies explained,
was a requirement for all BISX
issuers “to make all material
disclosures to a new depart-
ment in BISX, called the BISX
Companies Announcements
Office”.

The proposal will require all
issuers, under BISX rules, to
file all results and material dis-
closures with this office first in
an electronic format, using the

secure filing process that the |

exchange has adopted.

Once received and
processed, the new BISX
department would “make avi-
lable on a website these dis-
closures for and on behalf of
the companies”.

Investors, shareholders, the
media and members of the
general public would be able to
sign up to receive an electron-
ic password enabling them to
‘access the site, Mr Davies say-
ing: “We’re going to have elec-
tronic filing and electronic dis-
closure.

“From our perspective, this
is much more accurate, much
more timely, disclosure’ abili-
ty. We have so much difficulty

[me eee ee cee ee es Go ee ee ee Ooms em wee mee yO = Se ee ee ee

Present

Pe a a

SAVE***SAVE***SAVE**#

right now with intermittent dis-
closure.”

He indicated that the pro-
posal was intended to elimi-
nate asymmetrical information
in the Bahamian securities
markets, where some investors
heard of material events earli-
er than others and exploited
this to their advantage, due to
issues such as anomalies with
the post.

In addition, the electronic
filing of annual reports, quar-
terly results and other infor-
mation with the new BISX
department would reduce costs
for listed companies that they
incurred with the existing
shareholder mailouts.

Mr Davies said other
changes to the continuing
obligations rules placed the
onus on listed companies to be
proactive when making timely
disclosures of material infor-
mation, and show they were
making the effort to do so.

As public companies, they
had continuing obligations to
disclose material information
to the investing public, such as




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capital structure changes, share
buybacks and rights offerings,
and there were a number of
“certain steps” to take.

On the proposed listings
rules changes, Mr Davies said:
“For the first time, the listings
committee has the ability to
disqualify a director from serv-
ing in that capacity on a BISX-
listed issuer.

“If a director remains, he can
impair the suitability of an
issuer to remain on the
exchange for the long-term.”

The BISX chief executive
added that the redrafted rules
also included requirements
that there be independent
directors on the Board, “and
that they play a specific role

_ with regard to decision mak-

ing; that they be identified and
if there are changes that they
be identified”.

The listings rules changes,
Mr Davies said, defined and
explained the listings commit-
tee’s obligations, suties,

SEE page 15B




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Lot of land with a combined area of 11,500 sq.ft. being Lots #22 & 23 Kim Crescent in Baillou Dale Sub-
division off Baillou Hill Road. The property is comprised of an 18yr old single family residence consisting
of 2,000 sq.ft. with 3 bedrooms 2 bathrooms, living, family, dining, kitchen and laundry rooms. The
building is enclosed and landscaped with a grass lawn, flowering plants and fruit trees.
Utilities: Electricity, Water and Telephone. ‘

For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact:
‘redit Risk Management — Managing Director’s Office

at: 356-1685 or 356-1608

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management - Managing Director’s Office,
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas «..’
tlatmaning sons iuttein tannnise ok OFEACH ES before-April.27, DOO Trisuesst eccaets

wae

Our client, a bank & trust company, is seeking applications for the following managerial
positions:

Orrice ADMINISTRATOR:

Responsible for the profitability and efficiency of the office and providing leadership
and direction in human resources, budgeting, compliance, billing & collections, expense
management, marketing, filing, technology and office services. The Office Manager will
also be responsible for the preparation of financial statements, bank reconciliations and
management accounts.

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES FOR OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR:
Candidates must meet the following criteria:
¢ Minimum of three years relevant administrative management experience.
Bachelor’s Degree or higher in related field. Masters degree preferred
Proven ability to enhance operational efficiencies
Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications
Knowledge of Quick Books

CLIENT RELATIONSHIP MANAGER:

Responsible for the maintenance and control of client records, payments and
disbursements, the preparation and analysis of monthly client financials and invoices, and
posting and reconciliation of client cash and security trading transactions. The Client
Relationship Manager will also be responsible for preparation, maintenance and analysis of
loan/trust documentation and related fiduciary records.

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES FoR CLIENT RELATIONSHIP MANAGER:
Candidates must meet the following criteria:
Minimum of three years relevant IBC/corporate administration
experience.
Bachelor’s Degree or higher in Business, Law, Finance, Economics or Accounting
required. Masters degree preferred
Excellent data entry skills
Proficient in the use of the Microsoft Word & Excel
Ability to read and interpret governing instruments and legal documentation
including trust agreements, wills, investment management agreements, custodian
agreements, etc.

Both Candidates should also meet the following criteria:
* Proven ability to enhance operational efficiencies
Experience with compliance and KYC processes and procedures
Strong technical and managerial skills
Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills
Excellent organizational and time management skills
Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the company
Honest, hardworking and possess ability to meet deadlines

Both positions offer attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the
successful applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a pension plan
and medical coverage.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including references before April
10", 2007 to:

Mark E. Munnings

Partner

Deloitte & Touche

P. O. Box N-7120

Nassau, Bahamas

or

Email:mmunnings@deloitte.com.bs
Deloitte.







PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a ae ee eee ee eee
Bahamian planning $16m resort facelift

FROM page 1B

ings have been going well. He

said he met with the Finan-
cial Services and Investments
Minister, Vincent Peet, whom
he described “as very accom-
modating.”

Right now, Mr Rodgers said







PUBLIC NOTICE

Palmdale Shopping parking and access roads

WILL BE CLOSED

~ to the public from 6:30am,
Sunday, April 8th to 6:30am Monday, April 9th

Legal Notice

NOTICE

WOO ITE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

*(a) CHINEWOOD LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

; (b) The dissolution of the said company commence on the 03rd
April, 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General. .

:(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Paul Evans of
Helvetia Court, South Esplanade, St Peter Port,
Guernsey GY1 4EE.

‘Dated this 05th day of April, A.D. 2007

Paul Evans
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

STANTIN LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GREAT KONSTANTIN LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section: 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies. Act 2.000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commence on the 03rd
April, 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mark Edward Jackman
of c/o 1 Raffles Link #05-02, Singapore 039393.
Dated this OSth day of April, A.D. 2007

Mark Edward Jackman
Liquidator



Legal Notice
NOTICE

RISSOL LIMITED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) RISSOL LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the

provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commence on the 4th
April, 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust
Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, Geneva.

Dated this 05th day of April, A.D. 2007

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LOUBURG REAL ESTATE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with
| Section 138 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act. 2000, LOUBURG REAL ESTATE
INC, is in dissolution as of December 22, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A

Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

he is in the process of finalising
the expansion plans before
they go into deeper conversa-
tions and make a full-fledged
presentation.

Mr Rodgers added that with
all the anticipated investment
projects in the Bahamas, it was
a very good time to be
Bahamian, but he also
acknowledged that Bahamians
often have trouble in starting
such large-scale ventures.

However, he pointed out
that before potential business
persons go to government for
assistance, “they should be
sure to have all their ducks in a
row, you can’t go in half step-
ping, so to speak.

“Opportunities can present
themselves, but the biggest
problem is funding. There are
Bahamians who are capable of
owning anywhere from a five-
room bonefish lodge to a mega
resort the size of Atlantis. The
problem is being in a position
where you can get the financ-
ing to do it. Unfortunately,
when Bahamians are getting
into projects and they can’t get
local financing, they have to
go abroad and that is a hard

sell, because you are going into
a foreign country to ask for
money to build in a foreign
country.

“I think the opportunities
are there and the Government,
whoever it may be, has to take
a chance on these people and
their ideas, because an idea is
just an idea, but an idea with
money behind it - anything is
possible.”

The young hotelier has been
in the service industry for more
than 20 years, and said his
dream of owning a resort was
nurtured by Atlantis owner Sol
Kerzner, who served as his
mentor.

He said that working with
Mr Kerzner was an incredible
experience, which provided
him with invaluable insight
into how to cater to guests and
run a successful property. Two
Turtles is the realisation of a
dream and a testament to Mr
Kerzner’s confidence in him.

“I always wanted to do
something in Exuma, and I
hope to create something that
not only the people of Exuma
can be proud of, but something
that Bahamians can be proud

of,” Mr Rodgers said.

He added that although the
infrastructure on Exuma can
be improved upon, there is
enough of a foundation in
place.

“The docking facility needs
to be improved. Fortunately
for us, the water system Is
improving, it is actually pretty
good now,” Mr Rodgers said.

“There are some challenges
from a communication stand-
point because the population
growth on Exuma has sort of
taken everybody off guard.

The population has tripled in
the last two years to keep up
with the level and the amount
of people that are now on the
island.”

He pointed out that the basic
infrastructure, such as lights
and running water and tele-
phones are all there.

“We have an international
airport that has direct flights
from the United States, so the
basic stuff is there to sustain
growth, it just needs a little
improvement,” Mr Rodgers
said.

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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NELCIA JOSEPH OF
COLLETON ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30th day of March, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HERMAN LEONCE OF JOHNSON
ROAD , P.O. BOX FH-14089, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts.within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of APRIL, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.





A Sales Man Needed Urgently

We are a growing retail company, we are offering:
Base Salary, Bonuses, Pension Plan, Training and lots of
Fun. We are looking for: A young man between the age of
17 and 25, he must be Energetic, Out

Going, Stable, Hard Working, Well Groomed, Honest and
Reliable.

Interested then call for an interview

356-4512 or 356-4514

TAYLOR INDUSTRIES LTD.
WILL BE CLOSED
FOR THE EASTER HOLIDAY ON

FRIDAY, APRIL 6TH
SATURDAY, APRIL 7TH
MONDAY, APRIL 9TH

WE REGRET ANY
INCONVENIENCE THIS WILL
CAUSE TO OUR CUSTOMERS.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
ECO B LIMITED

VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000 the Dissolution of
ECO B LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 14th March 2007.




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2001 BMW 740I1L

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Tan Leather Interior Fully Loaded

Bluetooth Hands free phone system Satellite Radio
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Engine Description: 4.4L V8
Headlights: Xenon High Intensity
$41000.00 TEL 356-0372 Days Cell 424-2173

Baker’s Bay

GOLF & OCEAN CLUB

As part of our commitment to employ 200 Bahamians on
our project we are seeking qualified Bahamians to apply

for the position of:

Yacht Fleet Manager

Responsibilities will include:

* Must have 5-10 years experience managing five
or more yachts

Must have diesel and gas engine experience
Must be Computer Literate

Must be willing to live on an out island

Ability to work on own initiative is important
Ability to work with existing team

o, 2, >,
~~ ad “

o
Sa

>,
~~ °,

Salary and benefits will be based on experience and will
include health benefits. Only qualified applicants need

apply.

Applications can be directed to:
Indira Edwards
P.O. Box AB20766
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Or iedwards@bakersbayclub.com

Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club is a $500 million
project under development on Great Guana Cay.
It includes 381 residential homes, a 79-acre
environmental preserve, a 180-slip marina, a
championship golf course and a 70-room luxury
hotel.



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THE TRIBUNE



BISX rules changes to speed
up issuer financial reporting

FROM page 13B

responsibilities and composi-
tion, its powers and relation-
ship to BISX staff members.

“A major new section on
sanctions” that can be levied
by the BISX listings committee
has also been proposed, with
the list of sanctions available
expanded and details of how
they can be applied included.

Mr Davies said there were
two different types of sanction
proposed - public and non-
public, the latter involving
warnings and censures along
the lines of ‘please don’t’.

A guidance note detailing
three levels of sanctions that
could be applied were also
included, moves intended to
reassuring the investing pub-
lic that BISX was taking the
necessary steps to protect their
interests.

The disciplinary process for
listed issuers was also set out,
Mr Davies explained, detail-

ing how issuers were first
informed, the listings commit-
tee’s ability to negotiate a set-
tlement with them, how the
process was conducted and
final rulings.

“It’s an all-encompassing set
of rules to be able to be listed,”
Mr Davies said.

Another section deals with
disclosures by company offi-
cers, directors and other insid-
ers of their trading activities in
the firm’s stock.

“The Securities Industry Act
requires it, but this formalises it
and takes it a step further in
requiring disclosure to the
exchange,” Mr Davies said.

The areas targeted for
reform by Mr Davies and
BISX are among those that
have long been identified by
observers as being among the
weakest in the Bahamian cap-
ital markets regulatory set-up.
They have also been addressed
by regulators globally.

transparency of financial
reporting and material disclo-
sures by BISX-listed entities;
corporate governance and
Board composition issues,
relating mainly to independent
directors; and giving teeth to
the penalties and sanctions that
BISX and Bahamian regula-
tors can enforce against com-

panies and market participants
who breach the rules.

The moves to amend the
BISX rules also coincide with
moves by the Securities Com-
mission of the Bahamas and
the Government to reform the
Securities Industry Act 1999,
the chief governing law for the
Bahamian capital markets.

These are the timeliness and

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 131 of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
WIVENHOE HOLDINGS LIMITED is in dissolution.
Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
May 3, 2007.

~ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR ,

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MARAQUECHE LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(8) of

the International Business Companies Act 2000, the disolution
of MARAQUECHE LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



MILO B. BUTLER
& SONS CO. LTD.
Located on :

PEACH STREET OFF
MONTROSE AVENUE

will have its

- PROPERTY CLOSED OFF
TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC.

on

Saturday evening, April 7th
thru Tuesday morning,



April 10th, 2007

to retain their rights to
the Private Roads

We apologize for any
inconvenience caused

RAMA TRRD SI RAR ARADO TRON DOOR R ERROR RAR K ERO NORA ARORA DORAN ROAD KARA DEORE AEA A RRMA REPU RRA PERRO ARORA ORR OTRAS OE
VACUO TCU HT NETH E ERTL ANA HNOTER OTE R ARRON H RETNA AERTS TROPPO HUET ACETATE CATE Ree eee












PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

| The Public is hereby advised that |, GUERDA JEAN-
BAPTISTE of No.3 South Beach Estates, c/o P.O.Box N-
9598, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
GUERDA DOLCE. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARJORIE JEUNE OF
EAST STREET, #29 SUNLIGHT VILLAGE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person. who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
af the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29th day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TARASSACO LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in disolution, which commenced on the
3rd day of April 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
In., P.O.Box N-7757 Naggau, Bahamas. .

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


















MUST SELL
VACANT PROPERTY

Lot #14721 comprising 10,000 sq.ft. in area with 83
frontage on Zinnia Road and 120 feet on Eastward Drive
in Bahama Sound of Exuma Ocean Addition West;
Exuma Bahamas







The property is undeveloped and is located
1 mile south of Emerald Bay and The Four
Seasons Resort.

For conditions of the sale and any other information,
please contact:
Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit at:
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas



Interested persons should submit offers in writing
addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management - Collection
Unit, RO. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before April 16, 2007.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 15B ..

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUFORT CELOUIS *..
OF MARSH HARBOUR, P.O. Box AB 21020, ABACO,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization ,
as a citizen of The Bahamas, ‘and that. any person who ‘f*
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement

of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day

of April, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. °

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EMMANUEL LOUISUIS OF 3s.
ROCK SOUND, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying to ‘f%*::
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, 2%
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The pe
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason -pes
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,

should send a written and signed statement of the psu
facts within twenty-eight days from the 30th day of Amr
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality fro»
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. {dros



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GINETTE LOUIS PIERRE-
CELOUIS OF MARSH HARBOUR, P.O. Box AB 21020,
ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization -
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should .
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day
of April, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that FEDNA PETIP BEAU, P.O. BOX
SB-41300, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of APRIL, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, -}-—-
Bahamas.


















Temple Christian High Fchoot
"Teach Me, © Lord, Thy Way”..Psalmn 119:33
Shirley Street .

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers
for the following positions for the 2007-2008 School
Year.

- Journalism / Literature (Gr. 10-12)
- Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr: 7-12)
- Math (Gr. 7-12)
~~ Physics (Gr. 10-12):
- Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)
- Technical Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
~ - Accounts/Commerce/Economics (Gr. 10-12)
- Physical Education (Gr. 7-12)
- Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
- Georgraphy/History (Gr. 10-12)
- Chemistry
- Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
- Health Science (Gr. 7-9)
- General Science (Gr. 7-9)
- Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)
- Music (Gr. 7-12)
- Biology (Gr. 10-12)
- Language Arts/Literature (Gr. 7-12)
- Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12)
- Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)
- Clothing Construction (Gr. 10-12)
- Social Studies (Gr. 7-9)
- Home Economics (Gr. 7-9)

Applicants must:

A. * Bea practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith
of Temple Christian School.

¢ Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or
University in the area of specialization.

¢ Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

. * Have at least two years teaching experience
in the relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills.

e Applicants must have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the
BJC/BGCSE levels.

F. ¢ Be willing to participate in the high school’s
extra curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum vitae, recent coloured photograph and
three references to:

Mr Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is April 30th, 2007





PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

INSIGHT







For the sto

ies behind
mee ele fe]
on Mondays

i

DOUBLE

| a Oe AY



THE TRIBUNE



Androsia signs

distribution deal

with Nassau {irm

ndrosia, the Andros-based Batik

manufacturer, yesterday said

Commonwealth Fabrics in
Palmdale was the only Over-the-Hill Nas-
sau store to now be carrying authentic
Androsia fabric, the two having signed a
distribution agreement.

Executive

Jeff Birch, Androsia’s chief executive,
said in a statement that the company had
launched Androsia Your Way, a cus-
tomised approach to ordering garments
and accessories, while its website was
being revamped with a shopping cart to
aid customers’ online orders.

“We are delighted to be working with
Commonwealth Fabrics. The past year

has been challenging for Androsia, as we
have had to combat a foreign-produced
copycat batik that's taken some of our
market share. But we are still here, and
we're surviving because we have the sup-
port and commitment of the Bahamian
people," said Mr Birch.

Androsia last year warned about an imi-
tation batik product that was being mar-

keted as if it was authentic, alleging that it

was not made in the Bahamas and nor
was it authentic Androsia.

’ Positive

“We're still here, with a positive atti-
tude, making progress and developing our
line. We recently launched Androsia Your
Way, a new customised approach to order-

ing our ¢arments and accessories. The
Androsia website, www.Androsia.com, is
in the pri cess of being revamped with a
shoppin. cart to facilitate customer
orders," . aid Mr Birch.

Products

Andrc ‘ia products are sold at the
Androsi: factory outlet store in Fresh
Creek, / ndros, and at retail outlets in
Nassau a d the Family Islands. Androsia
was start d by the Birch family in 1973 as
a cottag industry to provide jobs for
Bahamia s. Today, the company employs
more tha 20 people and manufactures a
variety oj batik fabric designs, along with
an array f clothing for men, women and
children, 1s well as textiles for the home.



Ex-CFAL executive
joins FirstCaribbean
capital markets team

FIRSTCaribbean Interna-

Mr Stubbs holds a Bachelor

tional Bank (Bahamas) has
appointed a former CFAL
(Colina Financial Advisors)
executive as a business analyst
with its newly-established cap-
ital markets team. —

Prior to joining First-
Caribbean, Jamaal Stubbs
worked in the areas of investor
education and financial media

-relations at CFAL.

During his career, he has
held filled a number of roles,
including research analyst,
licensed securities trader and

of Business Administration
from Acadia University
Wolfville in Canada, and is a
Level II candidate in the Char-
tered Financial Analyst pro-
gramme.

As Business Analyst, he will
be responsible for performing
competitive analyses and pro-
viding key research in the
development of deal struc-
tures. Mr Stubbs will be based
in the Bahamas office, which
serves clients in the Bahamas,
British Virgin Islands and the

cash manager.

The 10th Annual Easter Egg Hunt is a major fundraiser
for the Kiwanis Club of Fort Montagu

Pian to join us for these exciting activities

Saturday, April 7th
Annual Easter Egg Hunt

* Centre Court » Mini Circus Performance
* Grassed atea outside New Wing Bus Stop Entrance

Easter Egg Hunt

) 41:30am - Redemption of Prizes
12:30pm - Presentation to Golden Egg Winners

ea

YOUR $2.00 OFF-CIRCUS ADMISSION COUPON

» 6 ‘AT PARTICIPATING MALL STORES
ROM MARCH 15TH WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

Get $2,0ff;

GRUIBLECTIRGOD

Turks and Caicos Islands.



JAMA LSTUBBS















SCV Act. “Sn a tors VAGECI ta : ea Ne Ete 8 hab epg QL
s tPA voos ats Fy fA 5. HT . So SaaS Ta SESS? 31

PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



july 27, 1933 - April 8, 2006 Sn
7 Lady Iris O. Arnett

One year has passed since you quietly : : :
_ slipped away and, still we morn our loss. : 1936 - 2006
Even though we can no longer De your To the world’s greatest mother, sister,
smile or hear yourvoice or feel your hugs, grand-mother, aunt and teacher...

you will forever be in our thoughts
because you have left us with precious Your life on earth it seemed too

memories of your love and kindness. You short, for those who loved you so,
were free in giving and shared whatever. ;
abel You were the one that we ran to,

little you had in love.
now where are we to go?

ance were my Knipe | It seems like only yesterday we had
As a father you were augne and caring you by our side, but now it’s

As a grandfather you were fun loving and : God’s side that you re on and in His
dependable Pel

As a brother you were trustworthy and a i love you abide.

friend { One full year has passed and gone

As a friend you were a confidant ) f. pei
We love you but Jesus loves you best. since we ve seen your face, but it
: gives us such great joy within
We miss you dearly; gone but delay knowing you're in Cons grace.
not forgotten. OY
Lovingly remembered by wife, childrer
grandchildren, great-grandchildren, a

rs,.brothers, nieces, nephews, ‘other. ee
es sand: friends mee =







AO YeyeA soy)



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

‘Lmerald Ridge Mortuary Cony ae

& Monument Company Lid..
Mr. Wendell G. Dean UH, cs. tonne:

Managing Funeral Director

BEouour

Turquoise
Funeral Notices for

Mrs. Christiana Augusta
“Mama Ceva’”’
Jones- Williams, 90

of North Victoria Hill, San Salvador will be held
on Saturday, April 07, 2007 at 10am at Golden
Gates Native Baptist Church, Lobster Avenue
Golden Gates No.1. Rev. Dr. Michael C.
Symonette CBE., JP, assisted by Rev. Dr. Alonzo
A. Hinsey, Rev. Leonard Miller and Rev. Albert
Brown will officiate and burial will be in St.
James Native Baptist Church Cemetery, St. James
Road.

The Radiance of this “Turquoise of A Gem” Will always glow in the hearts of her:
Four Sons: Harry, Reginald Sr., Ronald and Eric Williams Sr.;

Three Daughters: Melinda Fernander, Lurie Gibson and Alma Storr;

Step Daughter: Edna Williams;

Forty Four Grand Children: Jackie, Franklyn, Kevin, Perry, Andrea, Karen, Sharon,
Enita, Monique, Reginald Jr., Sonia, Cleveland, Nicole, Gina, Deidre, Wendy, Diena,
Shelly, Emilyann, Erica, Sharon, Sonia, Raquel, Eric Jr., Dedorah, Wayne, Andrea,
Alva, Floyd, Jackie, Cindy, Valderine, Dorsette, Mavis, Alrena, Bernadette, Jeffrey,
Pamela, Keva, Troy, Emmerson, Clement, Cleveland and Nicola;

Seventy Six Great Grand Children Including: Deno, Shenieka, Natasha, Delvin,
Lestia and Janice;

Seventeen Great, Great Grand Children: Deontae, Quetell, D'Asia, Jason Jr.,
Tarron, Jeffrey Jr., Jade and Hillary;

Son-in-law: Wellington Fernander;

Three Daughters-in-law: Margaret, Linda and Curlean Williams;

1 Eleven Nephews: Mervin, Peter, Roy, Basil, Bernard, Elic, Sidney, Rev. Osbourne
Rolle, Michael, Herbert and Samuel;

Nineteen Nieces: Beryl, Manerva, Nora, Dorothy, Maudline: Ella, Gloria, Eloise,
Sandra, Andrea, Renee, Daisy, Mertlyn, Audrey, Maud, Tesser, Olive, Vangy and
Rose;

Sister-in-law: Alanare Jones;

Twenty Nine: Great Grand Nephews;

Twenty: Great Grand Nieces;

Other relatives and friends including: Pastor Arlington and Ivy Butler, Orion
Walker, Ruth Nairn, Bernard and Isadora Storr, Bert Deveaux, Rev. Ada Forbes,
Rev. Heinex and Anna Reckley, Thomas Hanna, Lorraine Role, Joyce Hamilton,
Rev. Dr. Michael C. and Rev. Hilda Symonette, Rev. Dr. Alonzo and Rev. Jessie
Hinsey, Deaconess Adline Thurston, Luther and Bernice Major, Millie and Estelle
many other loving family and friends and the entire Island of San Salvador.

The Body will be viewed in the “Emerald Suite” Emerald Ridge Mortuary &
Monument Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road, on Friday, April 06, 2007 from 1pm
to 5pm and at Golden Gates Native Baptist Church, on Saturday, April 07, 2007
from 9am to service time.

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE.3

: Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary @coralwave.com view video
: tributes, sign guest book to share your condolence, sympathy, love and memories.

eee | Mr. Charles Wilfred
a “‘Charlie Boy”
Tinker, 62

1 of #04 Rowena Road, Claridge Dale Gardens and
= formerly of High Rock South, Andros will be held
on Saturday, April 07, 2007 at 11am at Community
Holiness Church, Bahama Avenue and Amos
Ferguson Street. Rev. Gladstone Patton Jr., assisted
by other Ministers will officiate and burial will
be in Lakeview Memorial Gardens & Mausoleum,
John F. Kennedy Drive and Gladstone Road.

: The Radiance of this “Turquoise of A Gem” will always glow in the hearts of his:
: Wife: Arabella Tinker;
: Five Sons: Dwight, Robert, Adrian, Kevin and Troy Tinker;

: Three Daughters: Charis and Doris Tinker and Pauline Thomas;

: Four Grand Sons: Sir Donne Lloyd, Mario Tinker, Cameron Thomas and Tavaris
: Dames;

: Five Grand Daughters: Shavanah and Shenicka Tinker, Stephanique and Sheniece
: Thomas and Troya Rolle;

: Mother: Mildred Andrews-Tinker,

: Two Sisters: Muddle Tinker and Judy Strachan;

Father-in-law: Mr. Amos Ferguson;

Uncle: Emmanuel Rolle of Fort Lauderdale, Florida;

Five Aunts: Viola Sands, Marri Brown, Frances Forbes, Ethel Rolle and Lily
Duncombe;

Two Daughters-in-law: Latonya and Anya Tinker;

Three Nephews: William Burrows; Kevin Huyler and Philip Armbrister;

Five Nieces: Nicola Burrows, Daphne Simmons, Tia Swann, Raquel Huyler and
Lakeshia Armbrister;

Two Brothers-in-law: Levi Wilson and Sterling Strachan;

Two Sisters-in-law: Eulamae Patton and Erlene Wilson;

Cousins: Alice Edwards, Betty Hanna, Gladys Saunders, Lucille, Myrtle and Frank
Andrews, Keith Poitier, George Pintard, Tina Munroe, Carl Sands, Livingston and
Mae Rolle, Vera Bethel, Glendina and The Knowles Family, Walton Rolle, Wenzel
and Pearl McKinney, Edwin Johnson, Bertha and Garth Curry, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth
Andrews, Albertha Rahming, Idell McIntosh, Estelle and Pearline King, Eulamae
Butterfield, Jeffrey, Theodora, Anthony, George, Michael, Deborah, Angela, Stephanie,
Barbie, Dan, John, Terry and Angela;

Other relatives and friends including: Laura Wilson, Maria Symonette, Ethel
McPhee, Maxine, Rev. and Mrs. Gladstone Patton Jr., Rev. and Mrs. Rufus Hanna,
Rev. and Mrs. Michael Hensey, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Stubbs, Mr. and Mrs. Rosvelt
Cleare, Mr. and Mrs. Wellington King, Mr. and Mrs. Oswald Pinder, Mr. and Mrs.
Eric Bain, Mae Moss, Jeannie Cartwright, Dora C. Dean, Mrs. Butler and their
families, Sister Emerald Patton, Sister Rosalee Gibson, Cynthia Taylor, Evelyn
Forbes, Mavis Dean, Mrs. Munroe, Rev. Elva Russell, The entire Community
Holiness Church Family, Neil Cameron, Peter Kemp, Lavern Richie, Bruce Bowe,
Patricia Knowles, Stanley Braynen, Hugo Strachan, Anthony Eulan, the entire Lyford }
Cay Club Staff, Hon. Ron Pinder M.P., Melvern Bain ad the entire Claridge Dale
Gardens Community, Sidney Cooper, Julian Cartwright, Tony and Natasha, McGregor,
Sammy and Anastacia Farrington, C & T Club Family and The Mount Ararat Baptist
Family. Special thanks to the Doctors and Nurses of the Intensive Care Unit and
Male Surgical Ward of The Princess Margaret Hospital and The Management and
Staff of Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument Company Ltd.

The Body will be viewed in the “Sapphire Suite” Emerald Ridge Mortuary
& Monument Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road, on Friday, April 06, 2007
from 1pm to 5pm and at Community Holiness Church Bahama Avenue and
Amos Ferguson Street, on Saturday, April 07, 2007 from 10am to service
time.

Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary @coralwave.com view
video tributes, sign guest book to share your condolence, sympathy, love
and memories.





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

ements. sma specal

onny Pinder of Pin



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

DESMOND LAMONT BUTLER, 31
better known as "JOHN-BOY"

a resident of 325 Market Street, will be held at 11:00 a.m. on
Saturday, April 7, 2007, at Final Hour Apostolic Cathedral, Fox .
Hill Road. Officiating will be Bishop G.O. Fowler, assisted by
other ministers. Interment will be made in The Fox Hill Public
Cemetery.
















‘Cherished memory are held by his mother, Missionary Suzanne
Butler; one son, Devonte*> Butler; four brothers, Leading Seaman
Dkeruma Alexander Carey, Devon Butler, Pastor Robert Butler and
Rev. Don Butler; sister-in-law, Woman Marine Claudine Carey;
one niece, Rhodrica LaFleur; adoped grandmother, Mae Louise
Adderley; grandfather, Alfred Bullard; five uncles, Winston and
Leroy Bullard, Dereck and Inspector Julian Butler and Elder John
Reckley; 11 aunts, Evangelist Michelle Reckley, Deaconess Sherry,
Mae Mary and Linda Bullard, Nina Thompson, Aubrianna, Zsa-
Zsa, Sherry, Wilma, WPC 2027 Dornell Butler and Charity Carey;
godparents, Verna Stubbs and Kenneth Dawkins; five granduncles,
Winston Starlin Duncombe, Charles and Tellis Butler, Clement
Johnson, Elder Leonard Dames Sr.; 13 grandaunts, Ella Richardson
of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Phyllis Dorsett of Miami Florida,
Barbara Duncombe, Sylvia Demeritte, Dorothy Dames, Kathleen
Demeritte, Marjorie Johnson, Eleanore, Joan, Thelma and Virginia
Butler, Rosetta Johnson and Andrea Dawkins, 52 cousins and a
host of other relatives and friends including Bishop George and
Rev. Saveletta Fowler and Final Hour Church family, Elder Benjamin
and Pastor Marjorieann LaFleur and The Final Hour #4 Church
family of Freeport, G.B., Issamae Rahming, Serethea, Mark and
Dr. Nelson Clarke, Sidney and Charles Dames, Andrea Moss, Cyril,
Emerson and Carnet Pinder; the families of Essie Laing, Elizabeth
Clarke, the Duncombes, Butlers, Bullards, Leroy Richards, Belinda
Pratt and Vanessa Hepburn; also Lavano Sands, Kevin Moss, Corry
Stubbs, Curry and Kera Lewis, Kwame Adderley, Ricardo and
Madine Bullard, Lynden Rolle, Da'Sheando Douglas, Cyril King,
Jamal Williams, Lubin Baptiste, Denice Riley and family, Nekita
Lightbourne, Linda LaFleur and family, Jacqueline Johnson and
family, George Delancy and family, Tiffany Flowers, Arthur, Samuel
and John Strachan and families, the Morley family, Rev. and Sister
Armbrister, Adline Mitchell and family, Bishop Samuel Johnson,
Helen McPhee, Maria Simmons, Jackie Richardson, Olga Deveaux
and family, Debra Adderley and family, and other friends of Freeport,
G.B., the families of the Careys, Ellen Young, Polly Bodie, Helena
Poitier, Althea Farrington, Ruth Mae Reckley, The Hon. Cynthia
Pratt, Bishop Albert H. Hepburn and the United Christian Church,
Rev. Luther Thurston and Seed Outreach Ministry, Rev. R.E. Cooper,
Jr.; and Mission Baptist Church, The Deliverance Revival Centre
Church, The Grove Community, the management and staff of Four
Seasons Resort, the management and staff of Fortune Beach Resort,
Mrs. Mortimer and the Head Start Preschool; the Operating Theatres
of P.M.H. and others too numerous to mention.












































THE BODY CANNOT BE VIEWED. ARRANGEMENTS ARE
BEING HANDLED BY CEDAR CREST FUNERAL HOME,
ROBINSON ROAD AND FIRST STREET.







The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, April 5, 2007 °PG5



Good news for
Good Friday

@ By PASTOR DEANZA
A CUNNINGHAM
Senior Pastor
Christ Communi

n this Maundy Thursday, I share a brief

O and succinct exposition from II

Corinthians 5:18-21, which powerfully
reminds us that amidst all the amplified negatives
occurring in our society, there is still good news
this solemn season. That good news is that through
the cross-work of Jesus Christ, humans and God
have been brought together again. Sinners can
now become saints. The enemies of God can
become the friends of God. The bound can now
become free.

But how is it possible for sinners to poco;
saints? How is it possible for the enemies of God
to become the friends of God? How is it possible
for the bound to become free?

Firstly, verse 18 says, Now all things are of God,
who has reconciled us to Himself through Jesus
Christ... This verse demonstrates that our possibili-
ties are by the will of God. God chose to do it. He
reconciled us to Himself by declaring peace with
us.

Secondly, verse 19 says, that is, that God was in
Christ reconciling the world to Himself, not imput-
ing their trespasses to them. This verse shouts out
to us that it is possible for sinners to become saints
by the means of forgiveness. God did not put our
sin to-our account. He canceled the debt that we
owed. Our mortgage was paid on the cross.

Thirdly, verse 20 says, Now then, we are ambas-
sadors for Christ, as though God were pleading
through us: we implore you on Christ’s behalf, be

Church





St Matthew’s Anglican Church
Church and Shirley Streets

Maundy Thursday, April 5
¢ 7:30pm - Holy Eucharist, Washing
of feet and Watch before Altar of
Repose, until midnight



Good Friday, April 6
¢ 9am - Liturgy for Good Friday

Schedule of ey (ees for Holy nen

reconciled to God.
Paul is saying that

it is possible for
sinners to-become
saints by the obedi- |
ence of faith. You
have to believe and
receive.

Finally, verse 21
shows us that it is
possible for sinners
to become saints by
the work of substi-
tution. Paul writes,
For He made Him
who knew no sin to
be sin for us, that
we might become
the righteousness of
God in Him. This
verse calls us to a
“Pentecostal shout”.

On the cross, God
treated Jesus as if He had personally committed
every sin ever committed by every person who
would ever believe, even though He committed
none of them. God then unleashed the full fury of
His wrath on Jesus as He should have on every
sinner who would ever believe. Only then was His
wrath satisfied — that’s the cross.

On that cross God treated Jesus Christ as if He
had lived your life so that He could treat you as if
you had lived His. God took your sin and gave you
His righteousness. That is the doctrine of substitu-
tion, of imputation. He substituted for us on the
cross and we are substitutes for Him in the





:

ml PASTOR DEANZA
CUNNINGHAM



¢ 12noon to 3pm - Devotions on the
Seven Last Words








Easter Day, April 8
¢ 6am - Easter Vigil & Holy
Eucharist

© 10:30am — Solemn High Mass,
Procession and Baptism

e 7pm - Solemn Evensong, Sermon
and Benediction











Father’s eyes — that’s grace. So when God looks at
a believer, He sees His,only Son. Hallelujah!

But why did Jesus have to go through all the
stuff that humans have to go through? Why did
He have to go through 33 years of stuff instead of
just the one weekend when He was crucified?

Here’s why? Jesus needed to live a whole life
perfectly under every issue of life, under every
temptation, so that perfect life could be credited to
your account. And it took Him 33 years to live
that perfect life. That’s why I know He cares.

Without Jesus substituting for us we could not
become anything. So then, what should be our
response to the love of God this and everyday?

II Corinthians 5:5 says, And he died for all, that
those who live should no longer live for themselves
but for him who died for them and was raised
again.

In light of what Jesus has. done, we should live
for Him by receiving His forgiveness and turning
from our sins, worshipping Him, loving each other,
being socially responsible, and sharing the gospel.

The story is told of a woman who went to
Europe for a vacation, and while shopping she saw
a beautiful fur coat in a shop. The price was
$50,000, so she sent a e-mail to her husband asking
if she could buy it. Her husband sent back an e-
mail saying, “No, price too high.” A week later,
the woman returned home and when she stepped
off the plane she was dressed in the coat. Her hus-
band went ‘ballistic’. “I thought I told you no.”
His wife replied, “No you didn’t, and J have the e-
mail to prove it”.

You see, the husband, in his haste to answer the
e-mail, forgot to put a full stop after the no, so the
e-mail read, “No price too high”.

The price for our salvation was priceless for it
took the death of Jesus Christ. By His death, Jesus
declared no price too high for your sins. The only
correct response to Jesus is to thank Him by living
for Him for the rest of our lives. Make that deci-
sion today. You will not regret it.

Christ Community Church is a community of
people cultivating the spirit of the Acts. Located on
Bellot Road, off Faith Avenue, Christ Community
Church seeks to bring glory to God and to continue
the redemptive-evangelistic and discipleship min-
istry of Jesus Christ through the utilization of a
multiplicity of methodologies. We are a community
of Christ followers that value true worship, family
centeredness, moral purity, biblical measurement,
evangelistic boldness, social responsibility, passion-
ate commitment to Jesus Christ and the pursuit of
excellence.

e For further information regarding this article or
for times of corporate worship, please call our
church's office at 361.8782/ 361.2848 or e-mail us at
cccbahamas@coralwave.com.



PG 6 @ Thursday, April 5, 2007



The Tribune

‘Who killed Jesus?’

@ By DR MYLES E MUNROE
Senior Pastor
Bahamas Faith Ministries International

producer Mel Gibson stirred the fires of a

global discussion in response to his block-
buster icon movie, “The passion of the Christ”. For
over four months after its release the world-wide
media including CNN, Fox Network, ABC, CBS,
BBC and even our local stations, throughout the
Caribbean joined in the debate.

One of the major points of contention was the
implication derived by many from the movie that
the Jews were presented as the principle cause and
instigators of the death of Jesus Christ. It was felt
that this group of people was magnified as the cul-
prits and the Roman government authorities were
simply the mechanism used to execute their
desires.

This argument has been perpetrated for hun-
dreds of years and in some cases, at different times
in history, has been used by the Christian church to
justify an antagonistic attitude toward the Jewish
people.

However, as I sat for days listening to the media
with their numerous guests, some claiming to be
experts in the subjects, and others with no clue to
the gravity of the issue, trying to answer and
explain a divine activity from intellectual finite con-
cepts, I was amazed at even some of the religious
leaders who were drawn into the argument with lit-
’ tle more to add than commentary on the words of
those who were already confused.

I have learned over the years in my own search
for truth that when it comes to biblical questions
the answers are always contained within the bible
itself. It is no different with this question of who
really killed Jesus.

As the world once again enters this special week
celebrating the Passion of Jesus Christ and we cel-
ebrate this holy season of Easter, the thoughts of
the global community of millions of Christians and
others focus on this critical story and records of the

Le: controversial movie by famed actor and

-events of this week 2,000 years ago. There is no

event in history that is the topic of more mystery,
confusion, discussion, and argument than the
death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ.
However, in order to answer the question, “Who
killed Jesus?” it is more important to question the
question.

It is my contention that the question itself is not
the correct question, because the issue is, “was he
killed?”. According to the scriptures and all the
prophecies and declaration of Jesus Christ himself,
it is my conclusion and also the biblical declaration
that Jesus was not killed by man or anyone human
entity. In fact “Good Friday”, occurred long before
the creation of man and thus mankind could not be
responsible for the death of Jesus. Let’s take a brief
look at a few scriptures that speak for themselves:

¢ Revelations 13:8-9

And all that dwell upon the earth shall worship
him, whose names are not written in the book of life
of the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.
KJV



@ DR MYLES E MUNROE

e Isaiah 53:4-5

Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our
sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of
God, and afflicted. KJV

e Isaiah 53:10-54:1

10 But the LORD was pleased to crush Him, put-
ting Him to grief; If He would render Himself as a
guilt offering, He will see His offspring, He will pro-
long His days, And the good pleasure of the LORD
will prosper in His hand.

11 As a result of the anguish of His soul, He will
see it and be satisfied; By His knowledge the
Righteous One, My Servant, will justify the many, as
He will bear their iniquities. 12 Therefore, I will allot
Him a portion with the great, And He will divide the
booty with the strong; Because He poured out
Himself to death, And was numbered with the trans-
gressors; Yet He Himself bore the sin of many, And
interceded for the transgressors. NAS

A careful review of these scriptural texts will
show clearly that the death of Jesus Christ, indicat-
ed here as the Servant of God, was not the result of
a carefully devised human scheme or concoction,
but was a deliberate pre-destined, pre-determined
divine decision by the creator in his redemptive
programme to restore all mankind to his perfect
will. Note particularly these statements;

“Smitten of God” or, “The Lord was pleased to
crush Him, putting him to grief”, and “Yet He him-

self bore our sin...”

Thus we see that God takes responsibility for the
death and suffering of Jesus Christ for the benefit
of the Jews, the Romans and all mankind including
every Bahamian in the nation today.

The words of Jesus himself sum it all up when he
states, in John 10:17-19,

17 The reason my Father loves me is that I lay
down my life, only to take it up again.

18 No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of
my own accord. I have authority to lay it down and
authority to take it up again. This command I
received from my Father. NIV

What a wonderful truth and divine relief that no
man killed Jesus, but rather the incalculable love of
the heavenly Father that created us in his image,
took the proactive choice and divine prerogative to
kill himself in order to save our lives from the
destructive impact of our rebellion against him.

This word rebellion is the Hebrew word we
translate as sin. Good Friday is about this very issue
of sin. The Old Testament scriptures of Leviticus,
which is also included in the Jewish scriptures and
the Islamic Koran, declare that the atonement for
Sin is only possible by the shedding of blood.

Leviticus 17:11

11 For the life of a creature is in the blood, and I
have given it to you to make atonement for your-
selves on the altar; it is the blood that makes atone-
ment for one’s life. NIV

Hebrew 9:22

22 In fact, the law requires that nearly everything
be cleansed with blood, and without the shedding of
blood there is no forgiveness. NIV

Good Friday was the greatest act of a loving
Heavenly Father expressing his love for this image
in each man and paying the ultimate price to
redeem us from our own folly.

Finally, it is essential to note that the death of
Jesus was not and must not be considered and act
of “suicide”, because the notion of suicide is always
motivated by an individual’s response to personal
distress, frustration, hopelessness and depression.

The death of Jesus was completely opposite in
nature in that is was not caused by distress, stress or
hopelessness, but rather was initiated to relieve
others from stress, distress and give us all hope for
life and beyond the grave. His resurrection from
the dead guaranteed our hope that we to will win
over the greatest enemy of mankind, death itself.

Easter is also a reminder that of all the religions
of the world, the Christian faith is the only faith in
which the founder personally and willfully died and
shed his blood on the cross for His followers and
assures them of a bodily resurrection by his own.

Good Friday is not a day for Christians, but for
the whole world and all humanity. This is the joy of
the Easter message and cause for all men every-
where in every nation and race to have hope. He
was not killed, he decided to die in our place in
order to keep the integrity of his word to himself
and destroy the stain and power of sin in every
man’s life. Happy Easter!





E TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Nd
GareWaurdier

Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.
President/Managing Director

aT ace a Ct THE LATE

PATRICK LEROY
PRATT
affectionately called "Kaya",
45

a resident of Johnson Road, Fox Hill will be
held on Saturday April 7th, 2007, at 11:00 a.
m., at New Born Church of God, Bernard Road
in the Fox ‘Hill Public Cemetery, Fox Hill Road:
.Services have been entrusted to Gateway

and Kenwood Street



of his Living other: Mrs. Elvy Pratt; sisters, Ms. Sytvia Pratt, Ms: Ethel Pratt, Ms.
Ruth Pratt, Ms. Theresa Pratt, Mrs. Jacqueline Horton, Mrs. Estella Johnson, the late
Christina Pratt; adopted sister, Ms. Athena Mackey; brothers, Messrs; John, Tyrone,
Lawrence, William; Alexander, Richard, Philip Sr., Mark, Whitmore and Prince Pratt;
. adopted brothers, Arnold and Alvin Mackey; nephews and nieces include, Anvil
Davis, Ricardo Edgecombe, Alex, Melvin, Philip Jr., Steven, Carlos, Cameron,

Whitmore Jr., and Pedro Pratt, Joyanna Strachan, Rubyanna Mackey, Shellece and -

Megan Pratt, Phierse, Ashleigh and Sunday Pratt, Markell Pratt, Whitnae and D'Nette
Pratt, Edrica and Erica Horton, Angela and Tara, and Harmony Jo Pratt; grandnephews
and grandnieces include, Ivory Edgecombe and Comad Scott, aunts and uncles,

Rev. Wilfred and Mrs. Betty Moss and family, Albion, New York, the late Mr. Herbert |

and Mrs. Mary Moss and family, True Blue, Crooked Island, Rev. Eliakim and Mrs.
Dorcas Ferguson and family, Mrs. Eula Moss and the late Hubert "Bullah" Moss and
family, Mrs. Gertrude Moss and the late Felix Moss and family. Mr. Clayton and
Mrs. Dorothy Moss, Mr. Arthur and Mrs. Pandora Hall and family, Ms. Ida Johnson
and family, the late Rev. Pinder and Mrs. Mille Pinder and family, Ms. Deloris Moss
and family, the late Mr. Bursel and Mrs. Emerald Pratt and family, the late Mr. and
Mrs. Errol Pratt and family, the late Joe Pratt and family, the late Mrs. Jestina Taylor
and family; grand uncle and grand aunts, Rev. Curtis and Mrs. Moss and family.
Fairfield, Crooked Island and Mrs. Olive Moss and family: godbrother, Tony
Demeritte and family other relatives and friends include, Mrs. Iva Jolly and family,
Mrs. Fannie Cox and family, Sheila and Rose Munnings and family, Mrs. Eugenia
Thurston and family, Mr. Hansel Pratt and family, Mr. George Pratt and family, Mrs.
Alicia Brown and family, Mrs. Thelma Grimes and family, Oswald Poitier, Reuben
Mackey, Melvern Cockburn, Clarice Chea, Sophia, Sarah, Monet and Erin Pratt,
Michelle Green, Hidla Cartwright, Mario Minnis, Mrs. Zerlena Sawyer, Shirley and
Thomas Sampson, Marsha Thompson and family, Keva Johnson, Mr. Solomon
Johnson and family, Alfred "Sarge" Williams, Dwayne White and White's HideOut,
Basil Cleare, Betty Humes, Florence White, Michael Minns and family, Doreen
Bethel and family, Rupert Smith, Marissa Smith, Roland "Tiger" Clark, Bourbon
Smith, Bertram Rahming, Ray, Tony, Ivan, Anthony Brown and Talmadge Curry.
Mrs. Evelyn Johnson and family, Mrs. Bernice Harris and family, Mrs. Jewelann
Bethel and family, Mrs. Barbara Fernander, Mrs. Ann Curry and family, Ruth Burrows,
Smithy, Mr. Saunders, Mrs. Major and the Staff and Students of Doris Johnson Senior
High School, Rev. and Mrs. Leonard Roberts and family, Rev. Reginald Saunders
and family, Rev. and Mrs. David Johnson and family, Church families of Coke
Memorial Methodist and Newborn Church of God, the communities of Step Street,
The Village, Fox Hill and Johnson Road, Special Thanks to Dr. Duane Sands and
Staff of the Bahamas Chest Center, Dr. Clinton Campbell and Nurses of Male Surgical
I, Princess Margaret Hospital. and many others too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Thursday from 11:00 a.
m. to 6:30 p. m. and on Friday from 3:00 p. m.
2:30 a. m. to service time at the church.

to 6:00 p.m ind on Saturday from

and Garden View Estates. Interment will follow '
Officiating will-be Rev. Reginald. Saunders.
- Memorial Funeral chapel, Mount Royal Avenue-.-

Precious memory will.forever linger in the hearts



B

| Cemetery, Soldier Road.

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 7

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
P.O. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

Tass lad

PAUL LEONARD
RENALDO (P.J.)
WOODSIDE JR, 21










will be held on Saturday,
April 07, 2007, at 10:00
a.m., at Seven Hills,
Church of God of

Prophecy, Seven Hills. a
Officiating will be Rev. Julian A. Johnson, Bishop
Anthony T: Roker and Pastor Gersham Pratt.
Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens

















Left to cherish his memory are his father,
Constable 84, Paul Woodside Sr.; stepmother,
Jackie Woodside; brothers, Sorrento Woodside,
Lattario and De' Angelo; grandmothers, Minister
Janet O. Brown and Betty Woodside; grandfather,
Sidney Brown; aunts: Judith Gray and Jasmine
Clarke; uncles, Arlington, Dwayne, Dale, Glen
and Kerry Brown; adopted uncle, Perry Clarke
Sr.; cousins, Alisa Richardson, Andrea, Garcia,
Garcelle, Perry Jr., Tova, Arlington Jr., Orville,
Aleah, Doniko and Dontia, Bishop Anthony T.
Roker and family, Bishop Clarence N. Williams
and Seven Hills Church of God of Prophecy,
family of Carmichael Baptist Holiness Church,
the Golden Gates No.2 Community and many
other relatives too numerous to mention.



















Relatives and friends may pay their last respects
at Newbold Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue
| and cane ae off Market and East Streets
| on Friday from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday
at the church form 9:00 a.m. until service time.




t



PAGE 8, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



FUNERAL SERVICES FOR



PATRICIA YVONNE
FERGUSON, 76

of Winton Highway, and formerly of Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, will be held on
Saturday, April 7, 2007 at 10:00 a.m. at The

Tabernacle. Officiating will be Bishop

ministers. Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.



"Nickie" Ferguson Johnson; two grandsons,
Elwood "Elly" Donaldson and Javaughn "Boo" Cooper; one brother, Rudolph
Hanna; one aunt, Reva Grant; two great grandchildren, Sierra and Shannon
Donaldson; adopted sons, Tracy Cooper and Darrell Ferguson; son-in-law,

other relatives including, Bishop and Mrs Brice Thompson and family, Mr.
and Mrs. Fritz Grant Sr. and family, Donna Delancy, Ethel Bartlette and
family, Dressler Dean and family, Wilfred and Dorothy Horton and family,
Jane Knowles and family, Mr. and Mrs. Neko Grant and family, Kingsley
Grant and family, Marie Whitfield and family, Gloria Bethel and family, Mr.
and Mrs. James Pinder and family, Mr. and Mrs. Doweswell Bevans, Judy
Rolle, Inez Russell and family, Mr. and Mrs. Rudy Cooper, Redwin Grant
and family, Sir Arlington Butler and family, Arnette, Audrey, Gary, Dwight
and Bridgette Cooper, Winston and Lorna Thompson, Wayne and Linda
Thompson, Woodley and Vernique Thompson, Wes and Windy Williams,
Zelma Worrel, Clarice Cooper, Elva and Ethlyn‘Rolle; numerous godchildren
including, Stephanie Moss Hanna, Detra Walkine and Wayne Thompson;
close friends including, Nurse Pat Bethel, Mary Sweetnam, Kendrick L.
Williams, Ruthel and Petula McDiarmed, Veronica Gray, Ruth Sands, Ann
Craig and family, Marsha Stewart and family, Romeo Ferguson and family,
Sharon Deveaux, Herbert Forbes and family, Reuben Clarke and family, Pat
Jervis, Dame Marguerite Pindling, Rt. Hon. Perry G. Christie and family,
Stella Knowles, Charles and Doritt Grant, Kirk Williams and family, Elva
Manning, Mother Victoria Beneby and family, Rev. Delegal and Mayrona
Seymour, Rev. Steve and Carmen Hepburn, Bishop and Mrs. Franklin M.
Ferguson, Bishop Hulan A. Hanna and family, Bishop Hartman L. Rolle and
family, Bishop Joseph M. Swann and family, Bishop and Mrs. Arthur Ferguson
and family, Bishop Cephas Ferguson and family, Doreen Campbell and family,
Mr. and Mrs. Hurai Ferguson, Mayna Hepburn and family, Hon Janet Bostwick
and family, Laura Hart, Roberta Hepburn and family, Edna Cunningham and
family, Winifred Williamson and family, Dr. Barbara Williams and family,
Dorcas Burrows and family, Lionella Cooper and family, Roselda Ford, Emily
Gibson, Dr. Kevin Moss, Dr. Eugene Gray, Hon. Dr. Bernard Nottage and
Ricky Davis; numerous friends fromj Sassoon Banking Company, McKinney
Bancroft and Hughes, Ministry of Works, Ministry of External Affairs, Ministry
of Health, Water and Sewerage Corporation, ZNS, The Valley and Winton
Highway, The East Street Tabernacle Church of God of Prophecy family and
so many others too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau

{

¢hurch from 9:00 a.m. until servicé time

SS ET CRE I A ARREARS I



Church of God of Prophecy, East Street |

Franklin M. Ferguson, assisted by other 7



She is survived by one daughter, Vernica |

KETURAH
BAIN-WRIGHT, 57

of Mt. Pleasant Village, will be held on
Saturday at 10:00 a.m. at Church of God
Auditorium, Joe Farrington Road, Rev. Dr.
1 Philemon R. Wilson, assisted by Bishop
| Reby Francis and Dr: John N. Humes will

officiate. Interment will be made in Lakeview
1 Gardens, J.F.K. Drive.

Left to cherish her memory are her husband,
. Frederick; children, Charice Grace and Koji
Wright; stepchildren, Theresa Miller and

: Bernadette Sweeting; grandchildren, Chenyr, Chara, Cyrion, Kamul, Ptah
: and "Rhoda"; sisters, Suenetta Rhonda, Emily, Gaylene and Patricia; brothers,
: Arnold and John; son-in-law, Herman Grace; daughter-in-law, Rhonda Wright;
Bishop William Johnson; grand daughter-in-law, Shenelle Donaldson and _: sisters-in-law, Anne, Anita, Florence Williams, Merlene Nesbit, Rosemary
: Ferguson and Inell Stubbs; brothers-in-law, Rev. Alexander Williams, Kendal
: Demeritte, Reginald Pinder and Thomas Wright; aunts, Irene Ellis, Mary
' Saunders, Laverne Williams, Maedon Roberts, Bonita Smith, Sybil Blyden,
: Inez Gray, Patcina Gray and Nurse Patricia Bain; uncles, Percy Blyden and
: Ansil Saunders; nieces, Dr. Teja, Ebony, Kemia, Shenique, Gejonte, Jade,
: Anae, Ebonette, Summer, Evonese and Arnese; nephews, Sheldon, Daryl,
: Timothy, Rhinnon, Kemuel, Kai and Rhyan Rhandi; cousins, Betsy Moore,
: Autrey Russell, Lonney Ellis, Ilene Johnson, Demetrius Allen, Lathon Ellis,
: Phyllis Dickerson, Letty Rolle, Dr. Pamula Mills, Bercu Pierre, Chalice,
: Develon, Tammy and Rumalo Ellis; Patricia Rolle, Paul and Vincent Ellis;
: Mavis Saunders, Charlene Gibson, Nanette Bain, Tyrone Saunders, Carlesa,
: Tabitha and Carlise Williams; Cottrice Robinson, Alexandria Bowe, Pedrito
: Roberts, Veta Brown, Calliope Williams, Persis Hepburn, Dr. Gerswhin,
: Louise and John Blyden; Barbara Copeland, Kendra Ivory, Tangy Smith,
: Anne Bain, Deidre Richardson, Ernestine Moss, Charlene, Tanya, Marie,
: Dazelle, Demecca Gray, Valderine Daxon, Theresa Wright, Oletta, Shandine,
i Rhoda Gray, Glen, Don, Kevin, Ashley, Henry, Alexander, Patrick, Citrol,
: Dino, Joshua Gray, Ida, Minna and John Bain; other brothers and sisters,
: Vangie, Florinda, Eloise, Cheyenne, Frances, Gordon, Roderick, Craig,
: Lorenzo, Anthony, Collin, Granville, Roger, Philip, Deanne, Lamar, Carla,
: Stephen and Curlene Bain; special friends, Gurlena Jones, Adalee Wisseh,
: Jacqueline Deveaux, Sister Lorna Wilson, Lynn Blake, Rosemary Newry,
i Nellie Cooper, Carriemae Simms, Eula Gaitor, Jackie Jenoure, Katherine
: Beneby, Kim Bodie, Linda Major, Cleomi Woods, Carnetta Ferguson, Pat
! Collins, Leanora Archer, Avis Lightbourne, Lillymae McDonald, Beryl Barnett,
: Valdez Sweeting, Evadne Bascom, Shirley Clarke, Annette Chambers, family
: of Cathedral of Praise Church of God, Mount Pleasant Village family, The
: Bimini Community; The L.W. Young and the Claridge Road families, and
: a host of other relatives and friends too numerous to name.

| Special thanks to Dr. John Lunn and Nurse Karen Walcott.

: Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau
: Street on Thursday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church
: from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

Street, on Thursday from 10:00 a.m, to 6:00 p.m. and. on Saturday at the .|

wea se ee ee

yt Sobvise 1505
So an aia ae

2



RIBUNE OBITUARIES

*, Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

ST a
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

RETIRED POLICE
SERGEANT #446
LEANDER FERGUSON,
74

of #69 Woodlawn Way, Winton
Heights, will be held on Sunday
at 2:30 p.m. at First Baptist
Church, Market Street. Rev. Dr.
Earle Francis, assisted by
Minister Diana Francis will
officiate. Interment will be
made in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

He is survived by his loving wife, Helen Ferguson; daughters,
Emma Ferguson, Grace Bostwick, Portia and Charmaine
Ferguson; sons, Stephen, Leander Jr., Kendal Ferguson;
stepson, Allan Adderley of New Jersey; brother-in-law,
Stafford Rolle; son-in-law, Durward Bostwick;
grandchildren, Terrance and Tomeko Gibson, Jamal
Ferguson, Daniel and Durnique Bostwick; sisters, Rowena
Ferguson Rolle, Mable Rolle and Merlean Ferguson;
brothers, Wesley and Perry Ferguson; numerous nieces and
nephews including, Iris Clarke, Leona Bodie, Patricia
Johnson, Alderine Rolle, Martha McKenzie, Patricia White,
Eleazor, Charles and Clyde Ferguson, Arthur Bodie, Ernest
Clarke, Tency Ferguson and Irma Clarke Ferguson;
numerous relatives and friends including, Thomas Gibson,
Stafford Rolle and family, Rev. Dr. Earle Francis and
family; the members of First Baptist Church, Rev. T.G.
Morrison and family, Pastor Victor Cooper and family,
Pastor Dr. Leonard Johnson and family, Pastor Valentino
Campbell and family, Centreville S.D.A. Church family,
Pastor Danny Clarke and family, Royal Bahamas Police
Force, Retired Police Stass Association, Paradise Island

Casino staff, Penn's Building Square staff, Post Office |

Department, Office of the Judiciary, Nursing staff of the
Princess Margaret Hospital and the entire family of the
Forest, Exuma.

Sleep on and take your rest. May the sun shine on you, and |

the God of Peace hold you in His everlasting hands where
there is safety and contentment.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Saturday from 10:00 a.m.
to 6:00 p.m. and on Sunday at the church from 1:30 p.m.
until service time.



THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 9



Commontuealth Funeral Home

Independence Drive ° Phone: 341-4055

| FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ISANORA DAVIS
ADDERLEY, 50
- affectionately called "Issie"







of Tucker Lane off Polehmus Street, will be E23
held on Saturday 1:00 p.m. at Mount Calvary
Baptist Cathedral Baillou Hill Road ‘and Laird
Street. Rev. Dr. Phillip B. McPhee assisted
by Rev. Glendale Miller, Rev. Jeffery Bannister
and other associate ministers will officiate and
interment will follow in Lakeview Memorial
Gardens John F. Kennedy Drive.

&












She will always be loved and remembered,
as she has etched with idelible ink an
everlasting impression on the lives and hearts of those who came to know her.






Left to cherish her memory are, husband, Samuel Vandyke Adderley; sons,Kermit
Ferguson, Police Constable #1268 Hason Ferguson of The Royal Bahamas
Police Force, Jermaine Matthews, Sandocan Hayden, Marine Seaman Vandyke
Adderley of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force and Aaron Berry; daughters,
Felicianna Hayden and Raphaletha Vandell Adderley; mother, Rosemary Moxey
Marsh; adopted-children, Reve McIntosh, Dino O'Brien, Karen Rolle, Lidvene
Smith, John Descally, Brandon Fisher , and Shaneice Adderley; grand-children,
Kermit Jr., Kerlandra, Omar and Omara Ferguson, Nurisha, Decovian, Jermaine
and Jamel Matthews; sisters, Wanda Dean, Portia McFord, Jacinta Deveaux,
Kenva and Shirleymae Davis, Dorothy McPhee, Harriett Rolle, Shenia Pratt,
. Leonora Shepherd, Shareia Saunders, Carla Bastian and Toinette Munnings;
brothers, Anthony "Happy" Marsh Leonard "Lenny", Dale, Erskine "Champ"
Dereck, Ryan and Lionel Davis, Andre, Peter and Paul Davis; adopted brother,
Paul Petite; aunts, Rodleigh Sweeting of New York, Doris Kerr of Miami
Florida, and Rosemary Moxey, uncles,Edwin "Bulla" Moxey and Audley
"Smokey" Moxey; nieces, Karen and Lamanda Dean, Aneika Marsh, Lakezia
Pratt, Shaleathéia Burrows, Ashley Deveaux, Kimberly Bethell Leonardra,
Larondra, Jacinta, Ashley, Erskilla, Euphemia, Donesheia, Kadesha, Marissa,
Natasha, Shaneil, Adrianna, Deidre, Wanda, Crystal, Keisha, Anshaneque,
Candice, Felisha and Shanique Davis, Lynette Rolle, Colleen Darling, Carmaine
McPhee; nephews, Jarrett and Vincent Dean, Antonio Cooper, Jeffery, Jethro,
Anthony, Neil and Anwar Marsh, Norman,Claudzeus, Tunde, Dante, Dale II,
John, Randy, Paul Jr., and Peter Davis Jr., Danny Zonicle, Jamerson Pratt,
William McFord Jr., Shaquille McFord, Melvin Jr., Brian, Mario and Keino
Deveaux, Davon and Daveron Fowler, Rolly Hanna, Allen McPhee, Raymond
Rolle, Police Constale #1009 Rudolph Pratt Jr. and Police Constable Angelo
Pratt of The Royal Bahamas Police Force, Rashad and Berlin Pratt, Leslie
Edgecombe, Jonathan and McNeil Saunders, Angelo Saunders, Phileshia
Bastian, Taneil, Tieanna, Teasha, Berkley Munnings Jr., Jason Dean, Shavonne,
Tavonne, Maurice, Ericson, Omar, Tamar, Lamar, Kendrick, Quenton and
Denrick Davis; daughters-in-law, Yolanda Ferguson and Cassandra Matthews;
sisters-in-law, Karen Marsh, Flora, Janet and Stephanie Davis, Cynthia Adderley-
Wallace, and Patricia Petite; brothers-in-law, William McFord, Melvin Deveaux,
David Shepherd, Sargent #344 Rudy Pratt of The Royal Bahamas Police Force,
Rex McPhee, Joseph, William, Donald and Paul Adderley; other relatives and
friends include, Wilfred Ferguson and family William Berry and family, Naiona
Flowers and family, Viola Morris and family, Leon Moss and family, Honorable
Glenys Hanna-Martin and Staff of the Ministry Of Transport and Aviation,
Melvina Martin and family, Janet Mackey and family, Luellen Strachan and
family, Ricardo Johnson and family, Ramona Newton and family, the Bain and
Grant's Town Community and many others too numerous to mention. All
persons attending the funeral service are requested to wear pastel colors.













































Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL OF MEMORIES
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE ON Thursday from 11:00-6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
at the church from 11:30 a.m. to service time.






mr orn 4

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007






FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 340-8034






FUNERAL SERVICE FOR |

GEORGE “JEFFREY”
SMITH JR.,66

of #4 Ellemon Street, Yellow Elder,
and formerly of Port How, Cat
Island, will be held on Saturday,
April 7", 2007 at 10:00 a. m. at
Southside Christian Ministries
International, Carmichael Road
West. Officiating will be Apostle
C. Clifford Smith II. Interment
will follow in Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.














He will be treasured by his Daughters: Ellamae Collie and
Sandra Carey, Son: Philip Hepburn, Grand Children: Pedro
Jr. and Tameka Collie, Raymond Carey, Glen Higgs, Tori Forbes,
Shantell and Erica, Aunt: [lean Bain, Relatives and Friends:
Tom Pratt, Sharon Nottage, Mr. Bodie, Gregg, Lee Saunders,
and Corrine Pinder and their Families, Daniel and Maria Stubbs,
Gloria Stubbs, Adrian and Sherryann Griffin, Rowena Riley,
Hester Brennen, Michelle Higgs, Lule, Smitty and their Families,
and the entire Yellow Elder Community.










Viewing will be held in the “Serenity” Suite at Restview Memorial

Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd. on Thursday from 10:00 a. m.
until 6:00 p. m. and then again at the church on Saturday from
8:30 a. m. until service time.

DEATH NOTICE






HUGH CAMPBELL
CLEARE JR., 77

of Tropical Gardens, died at h
residence on Tuesday, April 2", |
2007)















He is survived by his Wife: Eloise |
Louise Cleare, Son: Hugh
Campbell Cleare III, Daughters:
Denise Hafidh and Hedda Smith,
Sisters: Hyacinth Nicholls, Mary
Cleare, Carolyn Roker, and Joan |
Treco, Daughter-in-law: Sharon Cleare, Sons-in-law: Fuad
Hafidh and Phillip Smith, Grand Children: Justine and Gia
Cleare, Phillip and Paige Smith, Ifta, Ifrat, and Fatiya Hafidh,
and a host of other Relatives and Friends.







Funeral arrangements will be announced later.







' formerly of Salt Pond, Long Island will

| Daughter-in-law; Jenny Fox, Aunts; Rosie

f Wilson, Vasilia Mauros and Alecia Acosta,

J relatives and friends.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Funeral Service for



Bice

Wade Fox





be on Monday April 9th 10:00 a.m. at
St. Joseph’s Church, Thompson Bay.
Officating will be the Rev'd Fr. Mark
Lindsay Fox, Rector of St. Peter’s Parish. —
Interment Church Cemetery. He is survived
by his wife Rosalie, 2 sons; Chuck and
Dwight, His Mother Verna Fox, 2 sisters; _
Deborah Wilson and Mary Acosta, Mother-
in-law; Ida Fox, Sister-in-law; Chloe Wells,
Kathy Fox and Cindy Mauros, Brother-in-
- laws: Shewelyn Fox, Collins Fox, Joy
Acosta, Augustus Wells and Theo Mauros,


























Winters, Violet Olson, Dorothy Fox, Frieda
Fox, Miriah Harding, Olive Knowles,
Evelyn Knowles, Uncles: Ernest Fox,
Harry. Harding, Freeman Fox, Arnold
Harding Willard, Mattlan, Daniel Knowles,
Nieces; Shicara Wells, Amelia Burrows,
Rhonda Knowles, Brittany and Malina








Irene Mauros Knowles. Nephews; Trevor
Fox, Gino and Marco Fox, Christopher and
Sean Wells and and Vasili Mauros, Grand-
nieces; Jenna Fox, Kathlyn Fox, Evin Fox,
Victoria Archer, Savannah Knowles and
Mercedes and Marco Jr. and a host of other











ae Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, April 5, 2007 ° PG 11



He died
for us

B® By CLEMENT JOHNSON

omorrow the Christian
community will gather
for “Good Friday”. In
the Bahamas, for many of us,
that is the day when we go to
church and afterward you would
go home and eat fish and hot
cross buns. For many of us we do
not realize the importance of
“Good Friday” maybe the story
of little Johnny might help us.
Little Johnny was failing all his
exams in the public school until
his parents decided to send him
to a Catholic school. At the end
of the year Johnny came out on
top of the class. When his parents
asked him what made him
change so dramatically, Johnny
replied, “The moment I walked
into that new school and saw that
guy hanging on the cross, I knew
that the people here were dead
serious, so I decided not to take
any chances.”
The crucifix might have helped
Johnny to improve his scores but

“What God expects from us today is
eratitude — gratitude strong enough
to make us hate sin of every shade
and colour; strong enough to make
us translate our love of God into
love of all of God’s people...”

might help.

Two brothers lived together in
the same apartment. The elder
brother was an honest, hard-
working and God-fearing man
and the younger a dishonest,
gun-totting, substance-abusing
rogue. Many a night the younger
man would come back into the

_ apartment late, drunk and with a

it is easy to see that Johnny had@lot of cash and the elder brother

misread the crucifix. The man on
the cross is not there to scare lit-
tle boys, but to show them how
much he loves them. He does not
need us to dress in dark clothing
and go and sing dirges in church,
nor does he compel us to eat that
all-expensive fish nor those fat-
tening buns.

He is not there to show them
what will happen to them if they
misbehave; he is there to show
them that he has already paid the
penalty for their sins. He is not
dying on the cross for what he
has done, but for what you and I
have done; because he loves us.
He died for us.

“He died for us” - Many of us
have heard this phrase so many
times that it now carries with it
neither the shock of someone
dying on account of what we
have done nor the good news of
our being delivered from death.
For us to hear this message again

today as for the first time, the.

story of a man who literally died
for the misdeeds of his brother

would spend hours pleading with
him to mend his ways and live a
decent life. But the young man
would have none of it.

One night the junior brother
runs into the house with a smok-
ing gun and_ blood-stained
clothes. “I killed a man,” he
announced. In a few minutes the
house is surrounded by police
and the two brothers know there
is no escape. “I did not mean to
kill him,” stammered the young
brother, “I don’t want to die.” By
now the police are knocking at
the door. The senior brother has
an idea. He exchanges his clothes
for the blood-stained clothes of
his killer brother. The police
arrest him, try him and condemn
him to death for murder. He is
killed and his junior brother
lives. He dies for his brother.

Can we see that this story of
crime and death is basically a
story of love? Similarly, the story
of the suffering and death of
Jesus, which we heard in the
Passion, is basically a story of

— Clement Jobnson

love — God’s love for us. How
should we respond to it? Well,
how would you expect the junior
brother to respond to the death
of the senior brother?

We would expect him to
respond with gratitude.
Gratitude to his generous broth-
er should make him turn over a
new leaf and never go back to a
life of crime. He would be a most
ungrateful idiot if he should con-
tinue living the sort of life that
made his brother die. Gratitude
should make him keep the mem-
ory of his brother alive.

Not day should pass that he
should not remember his brother
who died for him.

Finally, if the -dead brother has
a wife and children we should
expect the saved brother, out of
gratitude, to love and care for
them.

What God expects from us
today is gratitude — gratitude
strong enough to make us hate
sin of every shade and colour;
strong enough to make us trans-
late our love of God into love of
all of God’s people.

So as we celebrate Good
Friday, and ultimately Easter, let
us remember what it is about,
especially as we go through this
election season. Let’s us be mind-
ful that we are all one people,
God’s people, and that Jesus died
for us all - shed his blood for us
all...

Let’s

si]

@ By LAUREL HAMILTON
Universal Truth Ministries



TODAY is Holy
Thursday, three days to
Easter Sunday. We have
gone through the Lenten
experience and (hope-
fully) have given up a lot
of “baggage”. We have
prepared ourselves for
the glorious resurrection
of our spiritual selves on
Easter morning.
However, some of us
may still be in the gar-
den, feeling alone. We
may still be struggling with releasing some of
the things we have held so near and dear to
us, but that we know no longer serve us well. -

We all experience the “Garden of
Gethsemane” frequently, but know that you
will get through it. By prayer and contempla-
tion of all the good that God is, we leave the
garden, go through the crucifixion and rise
again better than ever before.

Gethsemane is a garden outside of
Jerusalem, at the foot of the Mount of Olives.
Metaphysically, Gethsemane is “the struggle
that takes place within the consciousness
when Truth is realized as the one reality.”
Feelings of agony are often experienced in
giving up our cherished idols (money, cars,
designer clothes, important positions in socie-
ty, etc).

Jesu wing thatehe was about to be cru-
cified, went to Gethsemane, knelt down and
prayed. “Father, if you are willing, remove
this cup from me; yet, not my will but yours
be done.” In his anguish, he prayed more
earnestly, and his sweat became like great
drops of blood falling down on the ground.”
(Luke 22:42, 44)

The word “Gethsemane” comes to mind
when going through what.appear as rock bot-
tom experiences. During those times, we
might find ourselves filled with feelings of
anguish. Like Jesus, we experience the
impulse to pray.

Dear God, not my human will, but your will
be done, knowing that your will can only be
what will serve the highest good of all.



# HAMILTON -

From the Daily Inspiration for Better
Living, April 2007, page 10

e The Universal Truth Ministries is a
Bible-based ministry for thinkers. We are a
teaching ministry and we invite you to join us
in our classes. Our spring semester begins on
April 16. Please call 393-9460 for information
on how to register for classes.

Mondays: The Game of Life at 7pm

Sundays: Let’s Talk at 4pm





The Tribux





@ REVEREND Fathers James Moultrie and Don Haynes at the entrance of St Matthew’s Church during the Palm Sunday procession.
(Photos: Anthony Long y)

Marching on Palm Sunda:

@ THE march at P m
Sunday at Historic St
Matthew’s Angli n
Church on Sunday. S en
here, Governor Gen al
Arthur Hanna and _— rs
Hanna join the process n.







The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, April 5, 2007 ° PG 13



‘The gates of hell ©
shall not prevail’

he churches comprising the
Assemblies of Brethren are
meeting in its 63rd Annual
United Missions Conference this
week. The meetings, started Sunday,
April 1, will end on Good Friday.

Under the theme, “The Gates of
Hell shall not Prevail,” the confer-
ence will host keynote speakers
Pastors Lyall Bethel, Allan Lee and
Cedric Moss, who will address topics
such as Youth, Violence and Crime,
Divorce and Remarriage, Same Sex
Marriage, and Homosexuality.

Pastor Perry Wallace, chairman of
the Assemblies’ United Missions
Department, said that this is the first
time the Conference will deal with
social issues. “In order to educate and
equip the general public and
Brethren Assemblies on effectively
‘ministering to those ensnared and
entrapped by these social ills, these
competently informed men of God
(were selected), to address these
(matters) that are challenging the
church and nation.”

The annual conference commenced
on Sunday morning with Dr Rex
Major, who in the words of Pastor
Tom Roberts, “preached a message
that emphasized Christians moving
forward and advancing through the
gates of hell, so the gates shall not
prevail as they enter the territory of
Satan.”

Pastor Roberts, a member of the
United Missions Department Board,
said the Association is using this
year’s conference platform to address
these particular issues because they
are very much in the media today.

“These are the things we are read-
ing about and seeing practiced more
than ever before,” said Pastor
Roberts. He further explained that
although they are dealing with these
issues on a conference level for the
first time, the issues have been
addressed in the individual churches
of the Assemblies of Brethren.

“We always speak out against sin
period,” said he. “You can’t really
preach the gospel without denoting
these issues, because the gospel
brings hope,” Pastor Roberts said,
adding that he looks forward to some

Assemblies of Brethren in 63rd Annual United Missions Conference



@ FRONT ROW (1-r): Elder Elliott Neilly, Pastor Perry Wallace, chairman United Missions Department, Pastor and.
Dr William Al McCartney, president, Assemblies of Brethren. Back row (I-r): Elder Joshua Sands Sr, Pastor ‘iom
Roberts, Elder Barton Duncanson and Elder Stanley Pinder.

real challenging times during this
week of conference, but he knows
that the church is on the “winning
side.”

Pastor Lyall Bethel, senior pastor
of Grace Community Church, com-
mented about his presentation on
homosexuality. Pastor Bethel said
that there should be no question
among average Bahamians on
whether such lifestyles can fit in the
context of Christianity. He alluded to
the ordination of openly gay Anglican

‘Bishop Gene Robinson of the US, as

a situation causing intentional confu-
sion in the church. This approval of
the Anglican priest, he said,
“behooves Christian leaders to give
some straight answers on this matter.”

President of the association of the

Assemblies of Brethren in the
Bahamas, Pastor William McCartney,
explained that the conference’s theme
“was inspired from the very life and
lips of Jesus concerning His church as

recorded in the gospel of Matthew

16:18.

Night and morning sessions will be
held at Emmanuel Gospel Chapel,
located Emmanuel Drive, Malcolm
Allotment, off Soldier Road West.
Each meeting is open to the public.

Topics to be covered during the con-
ference are as follows:

e Thursday, April 5 @ 12:30am -

2:30pm: Special day session with
Pastor Allan Lee on “Remarriage
and Divorce” at East Street Gospel
Chapel’s Fellowship Hall.

(Photo courtesy)

e Thursday, April 5 @ 7:30pm -
Pastor Cedric Moss on “The Biblical
Response to Same Sex Marriage”.

¢ Good Friday, April 6 @ 10am,
Pastor Joshua Sands Jr, on “The
Enemies, Blood and Message of the
Cross”.

e Good Friday, April 6 @ 7:30pm,
Pastor David Cartwright on “United
in the Battle for Moral Purity”

The Good Friday morning service
that will commence at 10 am is prom-

‘ised to be a celebration that will

reflect on the crucifixion of Jesus
Christ. Established in the Bahamas
for over 130 years, the Brethren is
comprised of 28-affiliated member
churches, in New Providence and the
Family Islands.

NA TSS PEE ELE. TS NE DL EL SS



PG 14 e Thursday, April 5, 2007

RELI

The Tribune



Sister Ena Albury

This week, the Monastery continues a series of articles on each of
its members. Today's feature is on Sister Ena Albury, who has been
in the religious life for over 50 years, and is still enjoying it.

itting atop a hill not far from

the city of Nassau, Saint

Martin Monastery is home to
an independent Benedictine commu-
nity of religious women serving the
Roman Catholic Archdiocese of
Nassau in the Bahamas.

Their foundation in 1937 was to
pursue sanctification of community
members and engage in apostolic
work for the spiritual and temporal
welfare of the underprivileged. Today,
their ministries involve: education,
administration, pastoral ministry,
healthcare services, care of the elderly,
mentoring and spiritual guidance. For
many years the Benedictine Sisters
have impacted the lives of many gen-
erations through their involvement in
the Church and the wider community.

This week, the Monastery continues
a series of articles on each of its mem-
bers. Today’s feature is on Sister Ena
Albury, who has been in the religious

life for over 50 years, and isggill enioy-

ing it.
Sister Ena Albury

On January 24, 1937, a baby daugh-
ter was born to Ralph and Eunice
Albury of Governor’s Harbour,
Eleuthera. They named her Ena. Ena
had ten brothers and one sister. The
family was a loving caring family who
believed that each individual could
make a difference to society. At a
young age Ena decided God was call-
ing her to be a nun and dedicate her
life to the service of his people.

© On March 17, 1953, Ena left her
parents and siblings and two days
later entered St Martin’s Convent on
Nassau Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

¢ On March 21, 1953, she was
accepted as a postulant and thus
began her journey as a religious sis-
ter.

e On August 6, 1953, having com-
pleted her initial preparation, she
entered the novitiate of the
Bahamian Order of the Sisters of
Blessed Martin de Porres and
received the habit as a sister on



@ SISTER ENA ALBURY

October 15 of that same year.

° On August 6, 1960, she took her
final (perpetual) vows and the name
of Sister Maria Joseph.

© On September 2, the Order trans-
ferred allegiance to the Benedictine
Sisters, St Joseph, Minnesota and she
reverted back to her given name,
Sister Ena.

Sister Ena’s main contribution to
the Bahamas was as an educator. As
part of her training to become a
teacher, Sister Ena attended Aquinas
College from January through to
December in 1958, where she learnt
how to use phonetics as an aid in

teaching children how to read.

Her first teaching assignment was
to cover maternity leave at St
Joseph’s Primary School, where she
taught grade three. From 1959 to
1960, Sister Ena taught grades one
and two at St Joseph’s Primary
School. She was then transferred to
Hunters, Grand Bahama and taught
grades two, three and four at St
Vincent de Paul’s School. She
returned to Nassau and between 1967
and 1969, taught at St Joseph’s
Primary School and St Bede’s
Primary School. Her special interests
were arts and craft, English, physical
education, dancing, needle work and

’ evening/weekend

straw weaving crafts.

While she was teaching, Sister Ena
was also furthering her education.
She attended the Bahamas Teacher’s
College from 1972 to 1974 and
received an endorsed teaching certifi-
cate. She also attended
courses and
received a Bachelor’s Degree from St
Benedict’s College, St Joseph,
Minnesota in 1975.

From 1975 to 1985, Sister Ena
taught in St Vincent de Paul’s School
in Hunters, Grand Bahama, rising to
assistant principal in 1981, a post that
she held until she was transferred
back to Nassau in 1985. She immedi-
ately rejoined the staff of St
Francis/St Joseph School and taught
there until she was sent to Bimini in
1990 as principal of Holy Name
School, a post she held until 1999.

In 1999, Sister Ena took a two year
study leave and attended Duquesne
University in Pittsburgh where she
obtaiiied » a: Master’s Degree in
Counseling, specializing in group
counselling, career, family and mar-
riage counseling, drug use and abuse,
and the theory and practice of coun-
seling. Upon returning to Nassau, she
completed an internship and used
these skills at the Crisis Centre and
the Community Counselling Centre.
She then returned to education and
taught at Aquinas College and then
St Francis/St Joseph School until her.
retirement in 2005.

Since her retirement, Sister Ena
has been running the gift shop at the
convent, which contains many beauti-
ful items that she herself has made
including angels, hats, shell necklaces
and many other items that much be
seen to be appreciated. She also helps
with the cooking (St Martin’s
Convent cookies are well known
through Nassau) and with other
chores.

She has declared that her life as a
Sister has been a blessing and a joy
and she is happy that she has had the
privilege to dedicate her life to the
service of God and his people.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 15

“MULTIPLICATION” Temple of the Word Hinistries |

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PG 16 © Thursday, April 5, 2007

Way, Stapledon Gardens *
x N-8696 * Nassau, Bahamas



The Tribune

Time for.
_ prayer

@ By REVEREND ANGELA
C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS

aundy Thursday is the day

that we find Our Lord and

Saviour, Jesus Christ in
the Garden of Gethsemane, praying
for inner peace to fulfill God’s pur-
pose for his life. There we are also.

We are invited to enter the prayer
closet of the Son of God, to see Him
in most intimate communion as He
wrestles with the forces of doubt and
fear and dread. —

Three hours we are told He
laboured so that He could endure
what was perhaps a fifteen hour
ordeal, from the arrest in the garden
to His final breath on the cross. That
is a ratio of about an hour in prayer
for every five hours in agony. Is this
what we do?

Prayer is so necessary to spiritual
survival that it is no wonder that we
are tempted by the enemy to neglect
it. It is prayer that focuses our atten-
tion on who it is that is on our side. In
fact, it reminds us that we are on
God’s side if we want to do what is
true and loving.

We become strengthened with the
power of prayer as we allow God to
be God in us. Just sit quietly and be
open to the quiet strength that comes
from being still, and acknowledging
the presence of God in your life.

As you remember that God is with
you and within you, your thoughts
begin to clear, and-you have access to
the wisdom of the ages. This creates
a gentle awareness that you will be
more than equal to the task if you
allow the inner voice of conscience,
and the Holy Spirit to lead your
thoughts.

The sense of direction is offered
you one step at a time, as one atti-
tude changes to contemplate. It is
gradual, sometimes slow, hardly
measurable, but a change is occur-
ring. Prayer changes you first of all
before it teaches you how to accept
or change your circumstances.

The new you, now confident and
poised, ready for action as you stand
firm on the solid rock of Jesus Christ,
this new you can do the impossible.
Your heartbeat now regulated by
inner serenity, your gaze fixed on the
heavenly target, your spirit humbled
to rely totally on God, you leave your
prayer closet able to bear any cross.
Christ is carrying it for you long

meditation



@ By REVEREND ANGELA
C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS

“Prayer is so necessary
to spiritual survival that
it is no wonder that we
are tempted by the
enemy to neglect it. It is
prayer that focuses our
attention on who it is
that is on our side...”

— Rev Palacious

before you see it face to face.

Comforted by God’s grace, and
strengthened by faith in the One who
is fighting for you, your tongue of
prayer speaks words of praise and
thanks to God, and messages of
peace and encouragement to others.
Now you are a prayer warrior able to
survive Good Friday until the Easter
experience blesses you.

It's here! Your new message!



The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, April 5, 2007 * PG 17

Calvary Deliverance
say~ | members to ‘remember
cman | how Christ died so that
we may have eternal life’

nce again Christians around

the world prepare to com-

memorate their most highly
revered holiday. Easter encompasses
the death, burial and resurrection of
Jesus Christ. Churches around the
world will be filled with people gath-
ering in memorial of Christ’s sacrifice
on Calvary. |

The members and followers of
Calvary Deliverance, East Street
South, will also gather on Friday,
April 6, to remember how Christ
died so that we may have eternal life.

Speakers for this event include:
Elder Mark Barrett, Ministers

Adrian Newton, Jason McPhee,
me ASON MCPHEE mS CLARKE Meredith Munroe, and Eartha
Charlow, as well as. Sisters Serena
Gardiner and A’Yanna Cartwright-
Clarke.

Ministering in music will be the
anointed Brother Ryan and Sister
Shanique Richardson, and Jeffrey
Beckles. Also scheduled to minister
is the CDC Praise Team and
Junkanoo Combo.







# LORNA SIMMONS

Women of Integrity
Conference 2007
draws near



THE air is thick with holy antici-
pation as women from the length
and breadth of the Bahamas prepare
to converge on the grounds of
Calvary Deliverance Church for
what promises to be its most vibrant
women’s conference yet.

Women of Integrity Conference
2007, April 9-15, has all the ingredi-
ents for a life changing gathering.
Host of the conference, Elder
Beverly M Clarke, assures us that we
will never be the same as we experi-
ence phenomenal teaching and
preaching of the Word from
Ministers Lorna Joy Simmons,
peas Ter ieens. Plgee ees ™ EARTHA CHARLOW ll A’YANNA CARTWRIGHT-
Pratt, and Pastor Sheryl Brady. CLARKE

Joining us for the first time is Co-
pastor Penny Francis of Ruach
Ministries in London, England.

Coupled with evening lectures
from leading ladies within our com-
munity, and excellent music ministry,
this year’s Women of Integrity
Conference will certainly constrain
women and indeed the body of
Christ to move into higher levels of
worship, compelling us to reach
forth and grasp all that God has
ordained for this season.

e Services include two afternoon
sessions, Easter Monday and
Tuesday at 12:30pm and evening ; ; : Me
services from Tuesday through |.. 0 «2 0s ao. ace @ MEREDITH B@ ADRIAN
Friday at 7hmsdghtlyacc 108 Vanni 2 ti qgicl BUWARE BARRETT i ari!) bg B SERENA GARDINER “95 MBUNROE UPPRYPAN EL

492Gb D AK a SB Re REET ER aS ER Ase Gaavevruna ds









PG 18 @ Thursday, April 5, 2007

RELIGION

The Tribune |

‘The law of
deterioration’ ©

m@ By PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN

ow can this once beautiful country, the
Bahamas, where our people are said to
be so loving, courteous and hospitable,

have become such a crime time bomb? What’s
even more amazing, is the fact that as I listen to the .

radio talk shows and hear the country’s educated
and the many modern day Caiaphas’, Nicodemus’
and Annas’ (religious leaders) try their very best to

dissect and explain the deteriorating state of this

religious Christian nation.

The question is often asked about carrying out
the laws that are on the books of the Bahamas.
Those laws that-are on the books have been super-
seded by another law, and this other law is called

_“The law of Deterioration.” Maybe one day the
country’s educated and: the. powerless, spooky. reli-

-gious leaders can take to the air waves and dissect

this law.
_ As termites are toan untreated wooden house so

-is the law of deterioration to anything that’s not

- adhered too and.given its due diligence. There is a
standard that’s called excellence which is rarely
seen-in most sectors of this country. As a people
we’ve learned how to accept, tolerate and make
excuses for mediocrity. Therefore to demand and
receive excellence from a people that don’t know
or have experienced excellence themselves is near
to the impossible.

The law of deterioration and mediocrity seem to
be of no great concern to those in authority of this
beautiful Bahamas. No one person or group can
point a finger at another for the deteriorating state
of affairs in this country, both political parties
(PLP and FNM) have failed as it relates to restor-
ing stability, excellence and integrity into the varies
systems that are in place as they’ve governed one
iime or another.

The political system

The quality, loyalty and commitment of younger
men and women that are involved in this system
today appear to be at an all time low. Lynden
Pindling, Cecil Wallace Whitfield and the other
fathers of the political system were committed too
and would have died for their parties’ beliefs and
standards. Sad but true - this is not the case today
with these chameleon politicians that want to be in
governmental leadership of this country. I don’t
need to expound on this any further, you under-
stand what I’m saying; God help us.

The judicial system

This system presents itself as a big strong bull
dog wearing a spike collar around its neck; it can
yark real loud, but its greatest fear is the criminal.
This kind of svstem/bull dog has no problem in bit-
ng and executing swift iustice on the netty offend-

Sa See tee ‘i ae
ES SE aaa a TAD ADE NE BG SIR LR ER a EP RP



@ PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN

er as to say that the system is at work. This is one
of the reasons why our courts ate so backlogged
with cases while the criminals wreak havoc upon
society.

Here’s a system that’s filled with educated. well
paid, qualified professionals that are being made
to look stupid (in most cases) by persons whe are
not as educated or qualified as the legal minds of
this judicial system.

I am the ieast educated in this country, but this
one thing I do know, “a fool with a Master’s degree
is nothing more than a Master fool. [ll talk to you
more about this some other time.

The educational system

As a result of the years of due care and proper
attention, the education system as it is today (for
lack of a better word), is what? Even the unedu-
cated and unschooled of this country would not
hesitate in calling the supposedly qualified educat-
ed persons who sit in the seats of authority of this

_ system incompetent.

There are many, many and then a whoie lot more
reasons why and how persons outside of this sys-
tem can fee! and speak in such a disgusted manner
4bout a system which is supposed to build and pre-
pare the future leaders of our country. is

Sl a ab he a Fa eat TE RAN > Se a a ee

One may ask what and who qualified Pastor
Allen to speak on the education system? (He’s not
one of the leading religious leaders of this coun-
try). My response would be, “you’re right, but just
keep on doing what you’ve been doing and you'll
keep getting the same results.” Remember the law
of deterioration.

The religious system

This system has been methodically orhestraled
by the enemy (Satan) himself, and the leaders of
this system because of their own religion and tra-

- dition have made the word of God of no-effect. In

Matthew 15:1-9, Yeshuwa Messiah (Jesus Christ) .

speaks to the religious leaders; “Thus have ye - Lb
made the commandment of God of none effect. by. ©

your tradition,” Matthew 15:6b.
As it was then:so is it today, the command-

ment/word of God is of no effect to the aimless
young men-and women that are wreaking havoc |
‘throughout this Bahama land. Whose fault is it?

I’m glad-you’ve asked; it’s the “compromising, hyp- st
ocritical religious leaders” fault. Watch this.

For such a small country, we’ve got more church-
es, bishops, apostles, prophets and other so called
gifts than when Yeshuwa and His disciples walked
the earth. All of them put together they could not
bind, rebuke or run even a used demon. Why?
Because of the same law of deterioration that’s at
work even within the church, which brings about a
spirit of strife, division, confusion, competition,
envy and every evil work.

There is strength in numbers, but this strength is
made available only in the unification of the num-
bers. The thousands of churches that are through-
out the Bahamas will forever be powerless against
the spirit of death and destruction that is eating
away at the moral fabric of this country. How many
more of our voung men and women have to die,
while the religious leaders of this country strut
their stuff and promote their agenda rather than
truly doing the work of the Kingdom.

To you bishops, apostles and other church lead-
ers who are good at talking the talk, but not walk-
ing and living what you’re talking; you can fool
some of the people, some times. But you can’t fool
God at anytime, Isaiah 56:10-11 calls you
wicked shepherds “dumb dogs, greedy dogs”.
Watch out. For one day you’re going to feel and
experience the pain and heart ache that is being
felt by those who’ve been bitten by the crime and
violence that you’ve caused to rule and reign in
this land through your religion and tradition.

° For questions or comments contact via e-mail:
pastormallen@yahoo.com or tel 242-351-7368, 242-
44] -2 202 >] or r Pastor Matthew K Allen c/o Kingdom
Vii 1 eL pwship Center Inte Freeport,

Df

THAUONGL



rar Baie ama. f



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Cruneral Chapel

_SWhere the river lies still.
24 HOURS A DAY
“Serving The Babamas With Pride”
Frank M. Cooprr - Funeral Director
"Professional People Who Care”

Market Street & Bimini Avenue
- P.O. Box GT 2305
Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 356-3721

Cellular: (242) 395-8931

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

SUSAN BEVELLIE
KNOWLES, 64

resident of Second Street, Grove, will
be held on Saturday April 7,2007, at II
am, at First Baptist Church, Market
Street, Coconut Grove Ave. Officiating
will be Rev Earle Francis Senior, assisted
by Ministries of the Gospel. Interment
will follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Old
Trail Road.

Cockburn Town
San Salvador, Bahamas
Telephone:
(242) 331-2642

Left to cherish her memory are her sisters,

Roselyn Knowles, Mrs Joyclyn Bain and
Mrs Shevamae Morley; brothers, Wilbert Rolle, Joseph Rolle, Newman
Horton and Walter Gray; daughters, Mrs Viola Richardson, Mrs. Marilyn
Thompson, Sharan Coakley and Theresa Knowles; sons, Mr Andrew
Knowles, Deon Burrows, Wendall Knowles and Gregory Knowles;
daughter-in-laws, Barbara Knowles, Karen Burrows and Ruthmae
Burrows; son-in-Iaws, Mr. Wade Thompson and Mr Kevin Richardson;
sister-in-laws, Marion Rolle, Elizabeth Gray and Anita Rolle; brother-
in-laws, Benjamin Bain and Berkley Morley; nieces, Kimberley, Vivian,
Verginia, Betty, Beverley, Loretta, Bernadette, Renee, Carla, Crystal,
Renee Rolle, Tynes, Kelly, Shandra, Trina, Eze, Yvandell, Shantell,
Zeke, Elswhile and Cynthia; nephews, Noel, Vincent, Garnet, Cleveland,
Douglas, Ken, Bradley, Randy, Stephen, Jerome, Walter Jr, Jamal,
Kevano, Wilbert Jr, Tameko, Newman Jr Keno, Deon Jr, grandson,
Trevor, Maurice, Reno Thompson, Alexzander Coakley, Vincent,
Ezekel, Prez Knowles; granddaughters, Pressions Tamara, Shanicka,
Elanqua, Vanessa, Victoria; great grand, Travan Thompson, Shantell
Griffin, Jemero Griffin, Sharlene Knowles and Malissa; godchildren,
Lutha Dames and Wendriko Kerr; other relatives ands friends including,
Mrs Josephine Darling, Mr Franklyn Richie, Mr. Tryme Cooper of
Riverside Funeral Home, Francis Adderley, Ralph Rolle, Althea
Knowles, (cousin), Yubert Beneby, Jessie, Stephen, Renaldo, Leviti,
Shandrika, sister Geneva Ferguson, Senator Paulette Zonicle, Miriam,
Commonwealth Masons, Rev Dr Earle Francis and Marjorie Francis,
and The First Baptist Church family, Minister Dorris Burrows and
family, Althea Clarke and family, Ernestine Johnson, Sylvia Saunders
and family, Minister Williamson Francis and family, Ron Williams,
Jean Clarke and the staff at Jiffy's Cleaners, Eulease Johnson and
family, Mr Harry Gardiner and family, Florence Richardson and family,
Ester Cartwright and family, Solomon Rolle and family, Pennimen
Evans and family, Mrs Williamae and Johnson and family, Delroy
Wright and family, The Staff of The Intensive Care Unit, and the doctors
and nurses of the Female Surgical Ward, The Housekeeping Staff of
Sandilands Rehabilitation Center, The Staff of Island Wholesale, The
grove Community, Ernestine Poitier and family and those who are too
numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay there last respects at Riverside Funeral
Chapel, Market Street and Bimini Aveune on Friday from 2pm to 7pm
and at the church on Saturday from 10 am until service time.



THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 19

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020 Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 * 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

WOT seals

PAUL McDONALD
SMITH, 65

of Providenciales, Turks and
Caicos Island, will be held on
Saturday at 2:00 p.m. at Seven
Hills, Church of God Of
Prophecy,. Seven--Hills.
Officiating will be Bishop
Joseph M. Swann, assisted by
* Bishop David Henfield and
Pastor Julian Johnson. Interment
will be in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
















He is survived by his wife, Harrette Louise Smith; three
sons, Baron, Michael and Sean; four daughters, Muriel
Black, Melanie Taylor, Yvette Marcelin and Cassandra
Lightbourne-Johnson; one brother, Joseph Stubbs; three |
sisters, Melsida Williams, Martha Rolle and Nellie Francis;
12 grandchildren, Nicholas, M'Kaila, Cheyenne, Sharnica,
Baronell, Baronette, Baronique, Baron, Baronhill, Pyfrom
Jr., Santanna and Samantha; one aunt, Gertrude Wood;
nine nephews, Hubert, James, Richard, Nathaniel, Wendell,
Calvin, Johnny, Mario and Albert; 14 nieces, Mary, Annie,
Myrtis, Anishka, lane, Claudette, Yvonne, Patricia,
Wretha, Shirlene, Harrieth, Conswayla, Janieth and
Evelyn; son-in-law, Neil Black; two daughters-in-law,
Janice and Jaimee; 18 sisters-in-law, Jane, Marjorie, Janet,
Kay, RubyAnn, Collette, Shawnette, Colleen, Cislyn,
Lorraine, Renae, Rhoda, Melvena, Yvonne, Kenva, Juana,
Freda and Yvonne Pratt; 18 brothers-in-law, Hubert, Barr,
James, Elkanah, Keith, Leroy, Joseph Pratt, Larry, Frank,
Telford, Joseph, Wellington, Isaac, Robert, Harvey, Bert,
Lincoln and Carlington; host of other relatives and friends
including, Bishop David and Gloria Henfield and family,
James J. Lightbourne, Ionaa Glinton and Iris Marclin;
also the following and their families, the Jennings family,
the Hall, the Campbells, Bishop Swann, Don Grant, the
Pratts, the Stubbs, James and Mary, the Delancy and the
Ramseys; The Church of God of Prophecy family in
Philadelphia and Turks and Caicos, co-workers, doctors
and nurses from Myrtle Rigby Clinic and Doctors Hospital
and other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.





























The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Friday from 1:00 p.m.
until 5:00 p.m., Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00
noon and at the church from1:00 p.m. until service time.






PAGE 20, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007




EVANGELIST
MARY ELLEN RAMSEY
ROLLE, 64



JFK Drive.

at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

EMILY
CURRY, 47

Demeritie’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR -

Stewart, assisted by Rev. Dr. Alfred Stewart. Interment follows in
: Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

: Left to cherish her memory are her daughter, Joy Goodman; 3

E aresident of Cool Acres and formerly of
The Cove, Cat Island, will be held at : : ;
Se, neta i Sh : : Wallace,

| Kemp Road Ministries, Kemp Road, on _ Sharan Burrows; 3 sisters, Evangelist Gloria Wallace, Aretha
| Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will :
be Rev. Dr. Ivan F. Butler, Jr. Interment :

follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, law, Sandra Curry and Joy Mortimer; nieces, Lakeisha Davis,

' Felicia Clarke, Daronique, Donell Williams, Tramaine Gray,

| Left to cherish her memory are her 2 daughters, Theresa and Kendrea Ferg sugmand Shandre ka Rolle mepne ey uu) sun
Samantha Rolle; 5 sons, Kevin, Tredwill, Paddison, Carlton and :
Andrew Rolle; 14 grandchildren, Krischon, Kardashian, Kevin, :
Kaesha, Tredlisa, Tredeka, Latario, Lesha, Patesia, Toya, Carlton : . .
Ge leyton Wieaiee anid Fohiciy erect erandenikAimbernique: | Sweeting, Evelyn and Denise Rolle, Betty Johnson, Josey Brown,
2 daughters-in-law, Stephanie and Clausette Rolle; 2 brothers, Ellis ‘ wt Ge
Ratisey Gi tarps Fla and Arnold Ramsey; 12 mieces, Cansce! | uncles, Simeon Rolle, Audrick Smith, Kenneth Sweeting, George
Sheril, Carolyn, Ruth, Mary, Una, Claudina, Carolyn, Monique, } : : : : a Wi
Shantell: Scholasticia, Clannad: Tara, Resemiary and Marion: 12 Curry; other relatives and friends including, James Williams,
nephews, Arnold and Donnie of West Palm Beach, Fla., Herburt :
Jr., Donald, Fred, Jarard, Glenroy, Anton, Treco, Lemond, Lemuel :
and Hyote Ramsey; 5 sisters-in-law, Mary Ramsey of West Palm :
Beach, FI., Irene Ramsey of Orange Creek, Cat Island, Athea ;
Symms, Betty Ramsey and Lucy Rolle; grand nieces and nephews | pamela Williams, Patrice Clarke, Portia Rolle, Marvin Knowles,
including, Joanne, Jorenda and Gidget; other relatives and friends ;
including, Elice Mackey, Natilee Ramsey, Sylvia Ramsey, the :
Ramsey and Rolle families and other relatives and friends too :
numerous to mention, Special thanks to Pastor Ivan Ford Butler, ;
Jr. and officers and members of Kemp Road Union Baptist Church, :
Rev. Dr. Lavina Stewart and New Mt. Zion Church family, Uriah :

McPhee School family and Kingsway Academy School family. Rolle, Mispah Stephanie, Andra Curry, Edith, Joneal and Sybil

; ets oe | Sweeting, Katherine and James Wells, Maxine Hanna, The Edwards
Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, :

Market Street, from 3:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday Margaret Hospital, Sharon McCardy and Daisy Ingraham. Special

i thanks to the P.M.H. staff, Dorothy Farrington, Kim Clarke, Bradley
| McDonald, John Wallace and Hattie Moxey.

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
: Market Street, from 3:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday
: from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. and at the church from 1:00 p.m. until
a resident of Elizabeth Estates, will be :
held at The New Mt. Zion Missionary :
Baptist Church, Blue Hill Road South, :
on Saturday April 7th, 2007 at 2:00 p.m. :
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Lavenia :

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES




grandchildren, Rashan and Hartman Ramsey and Pedrinque
Curtis; 1 adopted daughter: Phillippa Gray; 1 adopted grandson,





Johnson and Gaylene Rolle; 5 brothers, Andrew Curry, David
Rolle, Christopher and Jackson Mortimer and Vernon Sweeting;
brothers-in-law, John Wallace and Philip Johnson; sisters-in-







Curry, Kevin Davis, Dugal, Darcio Collie, Rashad Swain, Jamaal,
Kendrick Rolle, Aaron, Anron Williams, Jackson Mortimer; aunts,
Francis Smith, Florence Fernander, Gloria Demeritte, Ruthmae |





Lillamae Mortimer, Nellie, Icelyn Curry and Merle Durham;




Femander, Harvey Demeritte; grand aunts, Loretta and Virginia




Philip, Charles, Glen, Ted and Rosie Rolle, Deborah and Patrick
Flowers, Kim Clarke, Audrey Porras, Anna Knowles, Elsie Gray,
Esther and Alex Mayett, Ruth Salvator, Wilfred Smith, Sophia,
Kevin, Bradley, Prisca McDonaid, Yvonne Bonaby, Dereck, Rickey,
Sherva, Ron, Herby Femander, Christine Neily, Lisa Fernander,








Dorothy Farrington, Maxine Fox, Rea Johnson, Sharon, Shirley
James and Willimae Rolle, Catherine Sweeting, Christine and
Stanford Hanna, Jane Curry, Theresa Glinton Thompson, Butler,
Gwendolyn Butler, Hattie Moxey, Ednamae Clarice, Claudette,
Claudine, Claudia, Dario, Simeon Rolle, Anna Kemp, Gwendolyn
Rolle, Jocelyn Smith, Sheila Sweeting, Gloria Neely, Ednamae







Family, Gladys Miller, Shirley and Nat Russell, Staff of Princess







service time.










SAI ALT

My VAL eae eee
EO aN 543} ST HS

"THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





DELBEAU
GABRIEL 41

and Celirard of Miami, Fla.; 3 sisters, Leauretha, Meritha,

Eleuthera; 5 sisters-in-law, Saintelia Beaubrum, Lavirar,

Eleuthera, Julian and Destilien of Exuma, Sabien,

Ciliane of Nassau; special friends: Elusnord, Piterson,

Sonia, Joseline, Filiston, Fred Tador, Fedeline Lucien,

community of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera.

Demeritte’s Funeral Home —

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

aS)

2 Home, Rock Sound, Eleuthera, from 3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
: on Friday and at the church in Tarpum Bay from 7:00
| p.m. until service time on Saturday.

a resident of Tarpum Bay, |
Eleuthera and formerly of Saint :
Louis Dunord, Haiti, will be held :
at Church of God of Prophecy, :
a Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, on :
Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating |
will be Pastor Samuel Johnson. :
Interment follows in Tarpum Bay Public Cemetery. :

Left to cherish his memory are his wife, Louisna Gabriel; :
2 daughters, Quelande and Guitha Gabriel; 1 son, Jason :
Gabriel; 5 brothers, Deus, Mirabeau, Meaulijaine, Heurcul :
: will be Rev. jeffiey Delevean assisted by other ministers
Elizia of Haiti; 4 uncles, Julian, Kelly, Ceraman of :
Eleuthera and Capre of Haiti; 2 aunts, Marilia Saintil and :
‘| Julianie Ordenard of Haiti; father and mother-in-law, |
Dorleus and Celia Ordeus; 5 brother-in-law, Feleres Philip :
of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, Celeson and Alix Ordeus of |
Haiti, Dorleant Ordeus, Marcel Ordeus of Tarpum Bay, :
: Vernese Bain and Mary Knowles; uncles,
Lavictume, Paliantha, Louisdeze of Haiti; godchild, Lexilia :
Ordeus of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera; cousins, Celondieu of :
: T’Shura, Mark and Shannon Ambrose, Rochelle, Stephanie,
Salonmon, Sanefe, Merelus, Jackson of Haiti, IIfrid and :
Lucien of Marsh Harbour, Mrilaine, Saintil, Luciene :
Sainful of Marsh Harbour, Heurmanna, Merdelia, Meprize :
of Haiti, Eddie Beaubrum of Marsh Harbour, Roselie :
: Alexander Moree and other relatives and friends.
Elandieus, Kenson, Jean-Rene, Clebert, Cameus, Paul, :

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Boss Man Mr. Terry and Mrs. Ingraham, Mr. David Carey, :
Mr. James Nottage, Mr. Henry McCartney, Mr. James |
Smith and family, Florence Mingo and family, Debra and :
Mary of Tarpum Bay, Experance Saintilair, Elveus, Marat, :
Joseph, Monlecoeur, Saintilus, Sainverty of Nassau, Orlbry, :
Hevery and Lucane Saintil of Rock Sound and the :

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral :

Che LS A PRIYA VERMONT AO Roa

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 21












LEVANO LEKIO
LEVI BROWN,
ONE YEAR
















| a resident of East Street South,
will be held at Glad Tidings
| Mission Baptist Church, Balfour
| Avenue and Podoleo Street, on
’ Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating








of the gospel. Interment follows in Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street.





He is survived by his mother, Makeisha Brown, father,
Levi Knowles; grandmother, Deborah Bain-Vanhala;
grandfather, Kevin Knowles; great grandmothers, Rev.
D'Angelo, Caleb,
Hakeem, Ramiish and Rudolph; his caring aunt, Guen
and Kianna Knowles; numerous cousins including Lavar,







Daphne, Lashanda and Brightmon Bain, Kevin and Corey
Bain, Arianna and Omega Bain and other relatives
including Matthew and Victoria Ambrose, James and
Brenda Bain, Levi Bain Jr., Enrico Knowles, Inderia Cash,







Home, Market Street from 3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on
Friday and on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m.
until service time.









PAGE 22, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007



FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005




THERESA CEDRIC
LeBLANC, 78

OF GARNET LANE, FREEPORT, :
GRAND BAHAMA AND:

FUNERAL BANC WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A
LATER DATE.

FORMERLY OF NASSAU,

WILL BE REV. MSGR. J.

Granddaughters: Nicole and Lian; Brother: Anthony Farrington;

Stevenson; Nephews: Billy, Rae, Freddy, Greg, Christopher, Mark,
Michael and Clark; Nieces: Camille, Grace, Gail, Tina, Paula, Debra
and Annette. The family wishes to thank her caregivers Jesse and

9S SATA RI NSS AP TORT SA SUA EN ee
BES = PE Ta ce)

| assistance and support over the last few months.
| VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “CELESTIAL SUITE” OF

LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON WEDNESDAY FROM 10:00 A.M TO 2:00 P.M

DEATH NOTICES

MR. RAYMOND ERIC
GIBSON, 82

OF #406 NANSAN AVENUE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,

PLACE, OFF SOLIDER ROAD,



) He is predeceased by his Wife: Floretta
Gibson. He is survived by his Sons:
Sidney, Eugene, Levi and John ; cs be Edith and Queenie Gibson,

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

BAHAMAS WAS HELD ON :
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4th, 2007 AT :
3:45 P.M. AT MARY STAR OF THE :
SEA CATHOLIC CHURCH, EAST | @&
| SUNRISE HIGHWAY, FREEPORT, : [

GRAND BAHAMA. OFFICIATING

AMBROSE MacKINNON, S.E.M. CREMATION WILL FOLLOW. :
Mrs. LeBlanc is survived by her Son: Leo; Daughter-in-law: Ina; |

Sisters-in-law: Madeline, Rosie and Carol Farrington and June



Maria and her friends June, Brenda and Norma for their unending :

AND FORMERLY OF WINSOR :

NASSAU, BAHAMAS AND TURN
BULL, LONG ISLAND DIED ON :
SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2007. :



: of Other Relatives & Friends

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Sor Pe ae

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
.0. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 340-8034

: Rose and Florence Gibson, Melva Mackey, Viola Ferguson of Long
: Island Dorine Ambrister of Clear Water, Florida and Lillian Butler;
: Brothers: David Gibson of Clear Water, Florida and Edward Gibson
: of Burnt Ground, Long Island; Numerous Nieces; Nephews and a

Host of Other Relatives and Friends.

MR. ELGIN KELLY
“UNCLE” SMITH, 67
= OF SEYMOUR’S, LONG ISLAND,
DIED AT HIS RESIDENCE ON
| SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007.

He is survived by his Wife: Jennifer
= Smith of New York; Mother: Louise
| Smith of Seymour’s, Long Island;
; Daughters: Kim Vilmenay of West
Palm Beach and Lounice Smith of
New York; Sisters: Orian Adderley
of Long Island and Elva Smith of
Freeport, Grand Bahama; Uncles:

: Kyser Wilson; Aunts: Orian Rahming and Blance Gilton; Numerous
: Nieces; Nephews and A Host of Other Relatives and Friends.
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM : ?

: FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A
: LATER DATE.

MR. ELIE JEAN JR., 24

OF LEWIS YARD, GRAND
BAHAMA AND FORMERLY OF
NASSAU, BAHAMAS DIED AT
THE RAND MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL ON FRIDAY, MARCH
30, 2007.

' | He is survived by his Father: Elie
~ 1 Jean Sr.; Mother: Beatrice Cela-Jean;

1 Sister: Neida Jean; Brothers: Willmer,
j/ Anthony and Wilnie Jean and
Dieujuste Marc Fresnel and a Host

| FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A

Enid Francis and Patricia Hepburn of Freeport; Sisters: Flossie Taylor, | i LATER DATE.



Onl ott AY rm i oy uit alt rj aah

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



_ FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005

MR. CALVIN
LOCKHART, 73

1 OF GORDON: AVENUE,
| FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
1 AND

|} PALMETTO POINT,



; Mother: Minerva Cooper; 2 Sisters: Delores Bain and Melva

Nieces; Nephews and A Host Of Other Relatives & Friends.

ANNOUNCED AT A LATER DATE. ALL PERSONS

CON TACL- MR.
gyoungbahamas@aim.com

GODFREY YOUNG

MRS. SHIRLEY LOUISE
SEYMOUR, 70

Ist, 2007.



Arthur Seymour;

Friends

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A ?

LATER DATE.

DEATH NOTICES FOR

FORMERLY OF.

| ELEUTHERA DIED ON >
| THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 2007 |

|) He is survived by his Wife: Jennifer |
Myles-Lockhart; 2 Sons: Julian :
Myles Lockhart and Michael Cooper :
: in-law: Kenneth Steven Demeritte; 5 Granddaughters: Mrs. Kendith
Styles; 3 Brothers: Eric, Carney and Philip Cooper; Numerous :

=») OF HSA SEA GULE.CLOSE,::

| FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, :
AND FORMERLY OF NASSAU, :
BAHAMAS DIED AT HER: @
RESIDENCE ON SENDAL APRIL :

_| She is survived by her 5 Sons: Keith, |
*/ Franklyn, Andrew, Anthony and :
1 Daughter: :
Celestina Seymour; 7 Grandchildren, 3 Brothers: Dennis, Harvey :
and Phillip Tynes; 2 Sisters: Edna Ijeoma and Sylvia Tynes; :
Numerous Nieces & Nephews and a Host of Other Relatives and :



Vos ae

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 23

} ee

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, ngpeet: N. P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: (242) 340-8034



MOTHER GERALDINE
DELLY GIBSON, 75

OF #7 EAST. BEACH ROAD,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA {|

AND FORMERLY OF TURN :
BOLT, LONG ISLAND DIED AT 2
THE RAND MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL ON FRIDAY, MARCH

30th, 2007.

She is survived by | Daughter:
- Shirley Pauline Demeritte; 1 Son-

Higgs, Donnalee Henfield, Eunice Wildgoose, Deborah and

: Christine Demeritte; 5 Sisters: Daisy Gibson-J ohnson, Olga Taylor,
: Geneva Ward, Joyce and Oralee Gibson; 3 Brothers: Rev. Harcourt
A NATIONAL MEMORIAL SERVICE IS CURRENTLY IN :
PREPARATION, TIME AND LOCATION WILL BE :

Gibson of Turn Bolt, Long Island and James and Charles Gibson;
11 Great Grandchildren; 1 Great Great Grandchild; Numerous

: Nieces; Nephews and A Host Of Other Relatives & Friends.
INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING IN THE SERVICE SHOULD |:
AT ;
LATER DATE.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED ATA :

Cae



PG 24° Thursday, April 5, 2007

religionnews
Church leaders, members must
‘walk in a spirit of submission’

@ By ANASTACIA MOREE
Tribune Feature Writer

f the Church in the Bahamas

..is to make-a-radical contribu-. | =

tion to this society, those who

call themselves the body of

Christ - both leaders and

members - must develop and walk in

a spirit of submission, a well known
church leader said recently.

Bishop Simeon Hall, senior pastor
of New Covenant Baptist Church,
told Tribune Religion that with all the
4,000-plus churches scattered across
this nation, most of them are church-
es that have been created by former
members and even former leaders
who have been enveloped by some
sort of conflict or misunderstanding.

"When a leader or minister or even
a member decides to break away
from a church it’s either because of a
conflict or misunderstanding within
the church’s body, and this is obvious-
ly a problem that exists within many

of our local churches,” Bishop Hall:

said.

The minister noted that like other
segments in society, the business
arena, the family circle and civic
organisations, the church also faces

its share of conflicts and misunder-

standings. The difference between
these segments however, he said, is
that the church community, following
the example set by Christ and his dis-
ciples, must be able to submit to
those in authority. :

“Should a problem arise there must
always. be some form of solution.
Every one is not going to agree, but
ducking out or moving is not going to
solve the problem,” he said.

Ed Watson, senior pastor at Trinity
Assemblies, said that while conflicts
and disagreements exist, finding a
solution to the problem is what
everyone should focus on. And when
this does not happen, it means that
the people in the church do not want
to submit to the leadership. They are
not willing to hear someone else’s
opinion, he noted.

Identifying it as one of the biggest
challenges faced by the Church in the
21st century, Pastor Watson said that
there is a segment within the church

@ BISHOP SIMEON HALL

body that does not want to submit to
the leadership, but “every one can
not be a leader, someone must fol-
low,” he said.

Pastor Watson also noted that
while he does not know how many
new churches have been formed fol-
lowing a split, he admitted that the
number was likely to be high. He
noted also that many of these new
bodies continue in the same denomi-
nation.

When asked by Tribune Religion
about why the decision to break away
is made, rather the seeking to reason
together and come to some form of
compromise, Pastor Watson said,
“One of the reasons some churches
experience this situation is because of
the lack of maturity within the
church. To many church leaders are
not mature enough to deal with issues
that come before them, so when a sit-
uation arises instead of confronting
the members and coming to a mutual
agreement, they tend to just split.”

While a leader may decide to break
away from a ministry for his own per-
sonal reasons, Pastor Watson said
that there are times when a minister
may be led by the spirit of God to

ea ae a ee



The Tribune



2

e

within the church, said that it is the
structure of a church that will deter-
mine how that body deals with con-
flicts or misunderstandings that may

7 ee ATSC, meceved



& ARCHBISHOP GOMEZ

start his own ministry, after being
involved with his home church for
some time.

“There are times when a pastor or
leader of the church may want to
expand his church leadership or start
a new ministry because they are
being led by the Holy Spirit to do so,
and that is all good and you cannot
stop that. However, you must do it
the proper way,” he said.

Pastor Watson also noted that
there are just to many churches in
Nassau, and because of this many
persons are being exposed to the
wrong teachings, particularly when
the person who is doing the teaching
hasn’t been properly trained them-
selves.

“There are some churches that are
the result of splits some three or four
times over because there are many
who do not leave with the right atti-
tude,” he said

Archbishop of the West Indies and
the Bahamas Drexel Gomez, faced
with a worldwide Anglican body that
is itself faced with question of a split
over the issue of church sanctioned
homosexual marriages and the
appointment of homosexual priests

In.- the Anglican Church,
Archbishop Gomez said, the ministry
is set up as_a ‘collegial’ - the body
comes together collectively as a
church and tries to find a solution to
the problem that is at hand.

“There are some churches that are
solely owned by the pastor, therefore
he has the last say about the decision
making. In the Anglican Church we
refer to the Bible as a reference when
making decisions in the Church.”

Referencing the Biblical story
found in Acts 15, Archbishop Gomez
said that resolving conflict also
depends on how the church inter-
prets the Bible.

“There are many factors that one
must take into consideration when
resolving conflicts, including the way
one interprets the word of God,”
Archbishop Gomez said.

’ And what happens when members
are not abie to come to a reasonable
conclusion? Archbishop Gomez said
that either the person or persons
involved will remain in the church
and become inactive or they will sim-
ply go somewhere else.

This last option, he said, should not
be accepted.

In the Anglican Church,
Archbishop Gomez said, there is a
level of mutual understanding.

“We here in the Anglican Church
try to come together the way God
would want us to. We pray about a
situation and allow the Holy Spirit to
lead us, thus resulting in a form of
agreement. And no matter what hap-
pens in the church, the body has an
obligation to love and reach out
wherever it’s necessary.

“The spirit of discernment is our
reference, we allow the Holy Spirit to
help us with whatever situation aris-
es.
“We must accept that there will
always be conflicts however, we must
learn to accept it and then be led into
a prayer session and allow the Holy
Spirit to be our guide in the decisions
that we make.”



Full Text


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Volume: 103 No.113



Ee

CARS

Peels



@ By BRENT DEAN and
KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporters

A WAVE of excitement
gripped the nation yesterday as
Prime Minister Perry Christie
named May 2 as the date of the
general election.

This announcement ends
months of speculation, and in

_just 27 days, Bahamians will be
asked to cast their ballots to
elect the political party they
wish to govern the country for
the next five years.

In his address to*the nation
yesterday afternoon, Prime
Minister Christie said that the
date he has fixed for the gener-
al election is “in faithful accord
with the promise I made to you
earlier that the general election
this year would be held on, or
before, the fifth anniversary of
the last general election.”

Mr Christie also noted that
all persons who registered to
vote up to and including Tues-
day of this week will be eligi-

PM’s announcement ends
months of speculation

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION |
he Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

MGs

and RELIGION





PRICE — 75¢

IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

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ble to vote in their respective
constituencies on Election Day.

Up until late Tuesday, some ;

148,055 Bahamians had regis-
tered to vote, according to
Deputy Permanent Secretary at
the Parliamentary Registration
Department, Sherlyn Hall.

Mr Hall said that the num-
bers had picked up consider-
ably in the past few days and
that many, Bahamians came
directly to the Parliamentary
Registration Pepastmen to
register.

The prime minister yesterday

encouraged all registered vot-~

ers to cast their ballots in the
forthcoming general election.

“I have every confidence that
they will do so in record num-
bers this time just as they have
always done so impressively 1 in
the past,” he said.

Mr Christie emphasised that
the Bahamas has one the oldest
and “most vigorous” democra-
cies in the world.

SEE page nine

Prime Minister urges peaceful
campaigns and civilised debate

@ By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter _

IN ANNOUNCING May 2 as the date for the general election,
Prime Minister Perry Christie took the opportunity to urge all
political parties and their candidates to conduct peaceful cam-
paigns and engage in civilised debate with one another.

This request by the prime minister comes on the heels of the hos-
tile and at times violent confrontation between PLP and FNM
supporters at last week’s launch of the PLP’s new web site at the

Sandals resort.

Some persons attending the launch and residents of the area

SEE page nine



















Wiel asie
2 fan FD pp lss
ard ira li

PEST UY




















a COMMISSIONER of Police and Provost Marshall Paul Farquharson yesterday reading two proclamations on behalf of the governor
general. The first declared the formal dissolution of parliament. The second announced that parliament will next be convened on May
23, 2007.

Allegations that
two PLP operatives

gave citizenship cards |

to Haitian migrants
in return for
promises of votes

return for promises of votes.
According to sources in Aba-

Bahamians, and then immedi- :

3.

SEE page nine

_ Application alleging 7

constitutionality of
Coroner's Court in
Daniel Smith inquest

will be heard next week |

: and former PLP senator Dami-
: an Gomez for Attorney Gen-
: eral Allyson Maynard-Gibson
: to remove herself from public
AN APPLICATION chal- : office, the Grand Bahama
: Human Rights Association yes-
: terday lashed out at the Minis-

Bl By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE FNM is expected to |

“vigorously pursue” allegations ; : Ree :
that two high-level PLP.oper ae oer the
tives in South Abaco yesterday | inquest into the death of 20- |
were handing out citizenship : :

SEE page nine

it Was ; nard-Gibson has not lived up
Neil Brathwaite of the Attor- ages proeln.
: ney General’s office told Chief : ting judge. Justi
i : : ting judge, Justice John Lyons,
ately rushing them off to get : a eae nee bac al :
registered to vote — despite the P sowthdg? i
register being closed as of Apttl : into the matter. The application § j ydicial
: is set to be heard before ;

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Human rights
eroup hits
out at AG

ECHOING the call by lawyer

i : : : : ter of Legal Affairs.
a ‘ © ; year-old Daniel Smith will be :
cards to Haitian migrants in | heard by a Supreme Court |
: judge next week,
co, the two operatives were announced yesterday.

observed swearing in Haitian- :

The GBHRA in a statement
yesterday alleged that Mrs May-

In her open criticism of a sit-

Mrs Maynard-Gibson has

: shown that she has “no respect

secured as the date for a hearing : for the sacrosanct nature of the

system of the

SEE page nine

Woman caught in line of fire during shooting

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 45-YEAR-OLD woman is in hospital today
after it she was inadvertently caught in the line of fire
during a retaliatory drive-by shooting in Fox Hill on

Tuesday evening.

The unlucky victim is an employee at the Jungle
Club, where she happened to be standing in the
window of the premises when a burgundy coloured
Honda pulled up at around 9.15pm, said Chief

Superintendent Glen Miller.

One or more of the occupants of the vehicle then
opened fire on the club, hitting the woman in the

shoulder.

"We don't think it was intended for her,"

ee mg

“ee

Chief Supt Miller.

"We're pursuing some information that there
might have been an altercation before the shooting,

added.

this is what we're trying to determine right now," he

The car in which the assailants were travelling

was found shortly after the shooting abandoned off

Rose Street. Bystanders reported seeing two occu-
pants fleeing the area.

"At this point we don't have any named suspects.
Our team is up in that area right now combing the
area to see what information we can get,"
Supt Miller. "Once we locate those persons who
were involved in the argument we'll be well on the

said Chief

way with this and that's the approach we're taking

said

Carb $..1047g
Dietary Fiber...4g
Protedn cesses 24g

right now," he added.

: Valentina,
: Michelle — claim they met
: the owner of the club in Pana-
: ma City in January.

_ Panamanian women

claim they were
forced to have
sex for money by
_ Nassau club owner

; M By ALEXANDRIO

MORLEY .
Tribune Staff Reporter

THREE women from

: Panama claim they were
: forced to have sex for money
: by the owner of a night club
:; in the western end of Nassau,
: The Tribune was told.

The Panamanian women —
Pamela and

The women said they

: entered into an oral agree-
: ment with the owner for them
: to come to the Bahamas to
: dance in his club.

The women claim they

SEE page nine


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007
Peco VTS

THE TRIBUNE



FNM protests ‘victimisation’ in Freeport

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

Response after religious show is pulled

tion of Rey Frederick McAlpine,
who was informed in writing last
week that his religious show
would be suspended until after



FREEPORT - The FNM
staged a demonstration yester-
day at the Government Com-
plex Building, calling for an end
to political victimisation by the

the 2007 general elections.

A group of about 50 placard-
carrying FNMs, singing ‘We
Shall Overcome’, assembled at

Bahamas Broadcasting Corpo-
ration in Freeport.

The peaceful protest was held
in response to alleged victimisa-

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the Government Complex on
the Mall around 10am.

Neko Grant, MP for Lucaya,
who spoke on behalf of the
group, said it appears that the
Bahamas Broadcasting Corpo-
ration under the PLP govern-
ment has returned to the days
of victimisation on the airwaves.

He said that ZNS’s pulling of
the “Half-hour of Gospel Pow-
er” radio programme of Rev
McAlpine following his speech
at the FNM candidate’s intro-
duction last Thursday was a
“blatant” act of victimisation.

“While it is unacceptable for
any group in our country to be
victimised, one would have
thought that at least the church
would be especially protected,”
Mr Grant said.

Rev McAlpine’s religious
show, which airs on Sundays,
has been on the air for the past
22 years on ZNS. He believes
he was victimised because of his
departure from the PLP party,
and his affiliation now with the
FNM.

Elvis Hepburn, deputy direc-
tor at ZNS in Freeport, has
since withdrawn the suspension
letter, which was dated March
29. In a second letter dated
March 30, Mr Hepburn said
that after review of the show,
the corporation decided to
change its previous decision.

Mr Grant said the fact that it
was rescinded, clearly states that
it was without merit and should
never havé happened in the first





place.

Rev George Cooper, a Bap-
tist minister, said: “It was wrong
for a ‘man of God, a man of the
cloth’ to be treated this way for
the position he took in regard to
his political persuasion.

“This cannot happen in our
country — jt should not happen
unless we are heading to social-
ism, communism, or dictatorship.

“This should not happen
whether you are a PLP, FNM,
BDP, or independent... and it
should stop now.”

Mr Grant said that the cor-
poration has also refused to cov-
er a number of FNM functions
while-it covers similar functions
held by the PLP.

He said that following the
FNM’s victory on August 19,

1992, the first act tabled by the-

FNM administration was an
amendment to the Broadcasting
Act, which freed the airwaves.

“When the FNM comes to
office, it will ensure that such
acts of victimisation do not
occur. We assure religious lead-
ers, the church, and all citizens
of the Bahamas that they will
be able to speak their minds
freely and without fear of
reprisal by the government,”
Mr Grant said.

He said the FNM will take
measures to further guarantee
the freedom of the press and
the media. “We believe that
doing this will be good for
democracy and good for our
nation,” he said.




















HARBOUR BAY EasT ST. NORTH
_ GRadioShack _ East St. North TEL: 393-3882 as
Harbour Bay Shopping i ea ge igre 394-5180
een co TEL: 394-3803

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 3



© In brief

Jamaican
accused of
practising
obeah

A JAMAICAN man plead-
ed guilty in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday to practicing obeah.

Rupert Williams, 51, of St
Elizabeth Jamaica appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester.

The charge alleged that
Williams practiced obeah on the
assumption that he possessed
the supernatural power to
restore health.

Williams was ordered to pay
a $500 fine. Failure to pay the
fine will result in a two month
prison sentence.

Woman is
charged with
stealing from
workplace

A 32-YEAR-OLD woman
was arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday, charged with
stealing more than $11,000 by
reason of employment.

Anna Marie Butler, 32, of
Canon Pugh Estates appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester at court 11 in Nassau
Street on 13 counts of stealing
by reason of employment.

Butler is accused of stealing
$11,264 from DC Technology
Company Limited on Patton
Street.

The offences are alleged to
have taken place between Mon-

day, November 6 and Tuesday,

December 5, 2006.

Butler pleaded not guilty to
the charge and was granted bail
in the sum of $5,000.

The matter was adjourned
July 23.

Arrest

warrant Is
issued in-
fraud Case"

A WARRANT of arrest was
issued yesterday for a man who
failed to appear for his arraign-
ment on 207 counts of fraud.

It is alleged that between
December. 2006 and March
2007, Lavardo Anton Taylor,
26, of Sherman Avenue
obtained thousands of dollars
from the Royal Bank of Canada
on Madeira Street by uttering
fake cheques.

CARICOM
ambassador

to address
Chamber

BAHAMAS Ambassador to
Caricom Leonard Archer will
address members of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and the Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board on the status
of the negotiations for an eco-
nomic partnership agreement
with the European Union.

The event will take place on
Tuesday, April 10 at 6.30pm at
the British Colonial Hilton.

The Bahamas was represent-
ed by the public and private sec-
tor at the most recent Technical
Negotiating Groups held in
Barbados.

The chamber noted in a state-
ment that outcome of these
ongoing discussions on trade
between Caribbean countries
and the European Union can
affect local businesses in the
future.

“We urge you to join this
important discussion on the
potential implication of this
agreement with the European
Union (EU) upon _ the
Bahamas,” said Philip Simon, the
chamber’s executive director.

Share
your
nevws

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us

on 322-1986 and share
your story.

‘FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
AY OOK
Tropical Bed

Berar a) oe ;

PERE





Christie slammed for calling
election before Holy Week

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FNM yesterday con-
demned Prime Minister Perry
Christie and his PLP govern-
ment for their decision to call
an election right before the
observance of Holy Week.

Yesterday, Mr Christie
announced that the next gen-
eral election would be held on
May 2, closing the current reg-
ister as of Tuesday, April 3.
This decision, which comes
only a day before the obser-
vance of the Lenten season,
theoretically would shorten the
campaign season by an entire
week -— leaving only three
weeks for political hopefuls to
campaign.

Hubert Ingraham, former
prime minister and leader of
the FNM, said that although
his party had expected Mr
Christie to do this, he along
with his colleagues were nev-
ertheless saddened and disap-
pointed.

“Back in 1966, the then goy-
erning party called a general
election which placed the
Christmas and New Year holi-
day season right in the middle
of the campaign. The PLP at
that time condemned the UBP

H@ PERRY Christie has
attracted criticism for calling
an election just before Holy
Week

government for this and it
appeared there was a national
consensus that an election cam-
paign at such a time was not a
good thing to do having regard
to the religious beliefs of the
vast majority of our citizens.
Mr Ingraham said that it was
especially unfair to the Parlia-
mentary Registration Depart-
ment and other faithful civil
servants “who have to work
under great pressure” to adjust.



the boundaries; put all the vot-
ers affected in the right con-
stituencies, and also prepare
and issue 150,000 voters’ cards.

“It was clear to us all along
that the government was run-
ning into serious difficulty with
the management of the elec-
toral processes. They have
been late with everything,
either out of incompetence or
deliberate malice.

“The Constituencies Com-
mission was not appointed
within the time frame mandat-
ed by the Bahamas Constitu-
tion, and the government wait-
ed until very late to end the
old voters register and so
encourage Bahamians to reg-
ister,” Mr Ingraham said.

Nevertheless, he said, the
FNM welcomes the announce-
ment, and looks forward to a
vigorous discussion of the
issues facing the Bahamas.

“This campaign is about the
hopes and needs of the
Bahamian people. We believe
Bahamians have a clear choice
in this election — between the
status quo of staying on the
current course versus a change
in the direction of our country.

“And between a current gov-
ernment that has broken faith
and broken promises and a new

Parliament dissolved leaving
three matters still pending

@ By BRENT DEAN

ALL matters pending before
parliament have “fallen away”,
as a result of the dissolution
of parliament, according to
Clerk of the Parliament, Mau-
rice Tynes.’

Prime Minister Christie dis-
solved parliament yesterday
afternoon in a live broadcast
to the nation, declaring May 2

:__as the date for the widely : antic-
“Ypated general election:

“Once the parliament is dis-
solved, that means that the life
of the parliament that started
on the 22nd of May 2002, has
come to an end. All matters
that were before parliament,
will fall away,” said Mr Tynes.

Three matters were still

pending in the last parliament,
Mr Tynes told The Tribune.

These include: a bill to enable
the Bahamas to become a
member of the International
Development Association; a
bill for an act to make it

mandatory for businesses or.

companies to settle their lia-
bilities to government when
they cease operation; and, a
bill for an act to amend the
local government act.

Mr Tynes stated that in
wake of the dissolution, his
staff will still be busy formalis-
ing the records of the last par-

‘liament and preparing for the

official opening of the new
one, which Provost Marshall,
Paul Farquharson announced,
will occur on May 23.

“One thing my staff will be
doing is compiling all the
records for the session that just
ended. We have to compile all

the information that was laid
on the table of the parliament.
We have to get that compiled
in to votes. And then we have
to make preparation for the
opening,” he said.

Mr Tynes also said that the
House is already prepared for
the additional representative
that will be included in the
next parliament.

When Larry Cartwright
joined the official opposition,
an additional seat was placed
in the House. Therefore, a
physical space already exists
for the 41st member in the new
House.

Representatives from the
House also noted that when
the new parliament is con-
vened on May 23, the annual
budget debate will be the main
item on the new governments

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“*

government that will restore
trust and address our citizens
needs to build a better future.
“We invite the Bahamian
people to take account of these
matters along with all the other
reasons they have for voting out
of office this abysmally incom-
petent and grossly insensitive

PLP government,” he said.

Mr Ingraham added that the
FNM will suspend all radio
advertising starting today, until
Monday, April 9.

“We will resume our cam-
paign in full force next week
with a rally at Clifford Park on
Wednesday evening,” he said.

Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
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e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR .

Violence in the

The Tribune Limited



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI






Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

PERFECTION is an ideal dreamed about
and pursued but rarely captured. It’s so rare
and out of reach that its elusiveness is used as an
excuse for mistakes. When someone errs, it is
dismissed with the reminder: “Well, nobody’s
perfect.”

Because most claims of perfection, such as
“He’s the perfect husband” or “It’s the perfect
job,” are subjective and exaggerated, the only
things truly perfect are those that can be quan-
tified by objective numbers. In bowling, a per-
fect game is a score of 300. In baseball, a perfect
pitched game is retiring 27 batters without
allowing a base. (Although a truly perfect game
would be getting 27 batters out on 27 pitches).

For more than 60 years, the Tuskegee Air-
men, that fabled group of World War II black
aviators, had a number that made them per-
fect. The number was “0,” as in the number of
U.S. bombers they lost to enemy fighters. When
it was mentioned in public events that they nev-
er lost any of the bombers they escorted, the
feat would elicit loud and appreciative applause.

Such a feat by any squadron would have.been
cheered but this was made more special in that
it was accomplished by men defying a system
and mindset that would deny them opportuni-
ties in the sky just as they were being denied
opportunities on the land of their birth.

It was a perfection that helped lift them to
folkloric status. But last week, a new Air Force
report revealed that enemy aircraft shot down at
least 25 bombers escorted by the all-black 332nd
Fighter Group.

-The report proved just one thing: Nobody’s
perfect, including the Tuskegee Airmen. It does-
n’t diminish their achievements, heroism or



On Monday James Milkey, Massachusetts
assistant attorney general for environmental
protection, celebrated a landmark Supreme
Court ruling that reverberated around the
world.

The court narrowly ruled, 5 to 4, that the
Environmental Protection Agency, despite
cowardly protestations to the contrary, has the

' power to regulate the greenhouse gases that
cause global warming.

Environmentalists believe the ruling will put
pressure on industry and Congress to come up
with comprehensive federal solutions for the
first time.



Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Not perfect, but still American heroes

EPA can regulate greenhouse gases

trailblazing, or remove from the record that
they were so good that their services as escorts
were requested by white bomber pilots who
didn’t know or didn’t care that they were black.

The report corrects numbers but can’t rewrite
the history of what, at the time, was deemed a
controversial programme to train black pilots in
Tuskegee, Ala. Nearly 1,000 pilots were trained
in the programme and while they were not per-
fect, losing 25 planes in more than 15,000 sorties
on 1,500 missions made them close to flawless.

The Air Force’s report was released the day
before President Bush awarded the airmen the
Congressional Gold Medal. The biggest sur-
prise wasn’t that they lost 25 planes but that
it’s taken them this long to receive this hon-
our, one that you’d think they would have
received 40 or 50 years ago.

The youngest of the surviving Tuskegee Air-
men are now in their 80s. In his remarks to
them, President Bush said, “Even the Nazis
asked why African American men would fight
for a country that treated them so unfairly ...
these men in our presence felt a special sense of
urgency. They were fighting two wars: one was
in Europe, and the other took place in the hearts

-and minds of our citizens.”

That war taking place in the hearts and minds
of American citizens proved to be the more
difficult of the two, but they won both wars.

No, the Tuskegee Airmen weren’t perfect,
but in soaring over ignorance and cruelty and
gracing the sky with their dignity, they made
their world and their country a little less imper-
fect.

(This article was written by Cary Clack of the
San Antonio Express-News - c.2007).

This week, the United Nations will release
the latest of reports that predict that in this
century, global warming will cause massive
water shortages and floods, and do things like
bleach the Great Barrier Reef and drive polar
bears into threatened status.

“The Bush administration and the EPA nev-
er disagreed with us on the main point that
global warming is real,” Mr Milkey said. “What
the court is saying to them is that you can’t
say that and not do anything about it.”

(This is an excerpt from an article by Derrick
Z Jackson of the Boston Globe. c.2007).



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Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

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Bahamas must
be stopped

EDITOR, The Tribune.

OVER the past several
years, a Concert Promoter out
of Grand Bahama hosted a
few concerts during the
Bahamian Labour Day week-
end in both Nassau and
Freeport. Under the theme,
“Stop the Violence”, a subtle
effort was made to create
awareness as to the state of
affairs in the nation as it
relates to crime, in particular
violent crimes. Despite the
fact that these concerts were
usually attended by thousands

of young people, little atten-

tion was paid to such a sincere

and desperate message.
Tragically, the rate of vio-

lent crime is escalating at an

alarming rate in the Bahamian

society. Almost on a daily
basis, the Bahamian public is
informed Wvia the various
medias of some senseless and
barbaric act of violence. So
much so, that a Pastor
referred to the Bahamas as a
nation under siege with the
people being held hostage.
Sometimes, one would not
know if a news headline is
coming out of Nassau or out
of Baghdad in Iraq. Drive by
shootings, stabbings, blud-
geoning, mutilated bodies
burned beyond recognition,
kidnapping, etc are now
becoming just too common.
These brutal acts, like in Iraq,
have terrorized the nation
with fear. Nowadays, the
Bahamian public is paralysed
with fear and must modify
their lifestyle to adapt to this
new state of siege.

‘ It’s hard to imagine that in
today’s Bahamas, someone
who is innocently playing a
game of basketball or domi-
noes in the middle of the day
could meet a tragic ending.
Could you ever believe that a
twelve-year-old child simply
watching television would end
up dead with a bullet in his
head? Or could you imagine
the sanctuary of your home

_ being violated by evil invaders

whose mission is to leave a
trail of death and destruction?
In today’s Bahamas, anything
seems to be possible. These
are the times when we now
see brother killing brother like
Cain and Able in the book of
Genesis. But, there are those
“prayer warriors” who despite
their commitment to the faith
would frankly admit that the

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devil has taken over the

Bahamas when we see parents
with the natural responsibility
of safety and well-being of a
child charged with the mur-
der of their child!

Politicians and sociologists
all seem to be at a loss to
explain this continuous surge
in violence in the Bahamian
society. According to the
Police, the cause of murder in
the Bahamas fall under three
main headings. Respectively
they are Domestic Violence,
the Drug War and Random

‘Criminal acts, Recently, Social

Services Minister Melanie
Griffith received much
applause from the Bahamian
public with her promotion and
passage of The Domestic Vio-
lence Act. Despite the good
intentions behind this won-
derful piece of legislation,
there may be doubt as to its
overall success. Domestic vio-
lence has been around since
time immemorial and other

’ Parliamentary Acts have had

little effect. What we see now
is that the epidemic of domes-
tic violence taking a more
extreme form, all too often
ending in death. However,
unlike before, what has
changed for the worse is the
viciousness of domestic vio-
lence. In addition, groups with
the assistance of persons such
as Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson
of the Crisis Centre have left
no stone unturned when it
comes to preventing domes-
tic violence.

Historically, the illegal Drug
Trade has always been a high
risk violent profession. Per-
sons have often expressed the
opinion that as long as inno-
cent persons are not hurt, the
drug dealers can kill off each
other.

The sad fact is that innocent
people get hurt too.

Random criminal violence
regrettably is a reflection of
the attitude of some of the
“don’t care” new generation.
They have no respect for

themselves and certainly do .

not have any for others. Vio-
lence is their way of life and
they are bitter against institu-
tions such as the Police and
the Church that try to contain
them. Nothing seems to deter
them from this disastrous atti-
tude. Not even death by hang-
ing is a deterrent to murder
in the Bahamas. However,
there are strong feelings that
capital punishment may at

least deter a few. One life
saved would certainly be
worth it.

Another possible reason for
the increase in crime in the
Bahamas was suggested by
Fred Mitchell, the current For-
eign Minister of the Bahamas
after the murder of Archdea-
con William Thompson. That
is the “creolisation” of the
Bahamas with the increasing
Haitian population. This gen-
eralisation resulted in much
criticism as it suggested racist
feelings towards the Haitian
community. It is a fact that
many Haitians have resided
peacefully in the Bahamas for
generations. It is just that
some have gotten caught up
in that undesirable lifestyle
and are now a part of the
problem.

Whatever the reason for this
senseless and stupid crime
surge in the Bahamas, it must
be arrested. At its current rate,
by the end of the year, the
Bahamas will have a record
one hundred murders. Such a
count is absolutely unaccept-
able in any decent society.
This is a number far greater
than Tokyo, Japan, with a
population of over twelve mil-
lion people. There are just too
many guns in this town and
many of these gunmen “gone
astray”!

What is also needed is a
Victim’s Bill of Rights as an
act of violence may not just
destroy a victim, but a family
as well. This is especially true
where the victim may. have
been the bread-winner of the
family.

The victim’s family needs to
be placed as much as reason-
ably possible in the same
financial position that they
were in prior to the act of vio-
lence. The offender must sup-
port the family or have his
assets taken away to pay a vic-
tim’s family. Maybe then he
would appreciate the stupidity
of his senseless act! ~

The only good news in this
dreadful situation is the fact
that the tourists have not been
targeted as a group.

Should this undes‘rable sit-
uation develop, the United
States State Department could
issue a warning advising its cit-
izens not to travel to the
Bahamas.

This would be a complete
disaster for the Bahamian
tourism industry that depends
so heavily on the American
tourist.

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE
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April 1, 2007.

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iy.
-THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 5



On brief

‘Government
accused of
destroying
rule of law

THE government was
accused yesterday of destroy-
ing the rule of Jaw in the
Bahamas, putting commerce
at risk in the process.

The claim came from
Freeport attorney Fred
Smith, who said the PLP had
managed to reverse the sen-
timents of the old colonial

_ motto: Expulsis Piratis, Resti-
, tuta Commercia (Expel Pira-
cy, Restore Commerce).

During their time in power,
‘they had restored piracy and
, put commerce in peril, he

~ said.

He cited the situation in
*‘Freeport, the country’s sec-
‘ond city and a leading com-
‘'mercial and industrial centre.
“:' “Our judicial system just
‘doesn’t exist,” he told The

“Tribune. “The PLP has man- .:

‘aged to reverse the old motto
icby destroying the rule of law.
Whey have restored piracy.”
is Mr Smith said it was
bampossible for commerce to
+function in the Bahamas
» without the rule of law.
Last month, Mr Smith sup-
Z «ported The Tribune’s articles
_, galling the quality of justice
into question, saying the judi-
-cial system was “dysfunc-
tional” and “in a state of col-
“lapse.”
His comments were a pre-
“Jude to a further attack on
‘the legal system this week
“from attorney Damian
** Gomez, who called for the
-Ifesignation of Attorney Gen-
-’éral Allyson Maynard-Gib-
* son.

“Gunman
‘holds up
_car rental
woifice

" VIRGO Car Rentals on
oifl decadence Drive was
= ~ ‘Held up and robbed by a loné
“sunman on Tuesday at
around 2.30pm, -
“ « No one was injured in the
“incident however the culprit
“ifvas able to steal an undeter-
<§nined amount of -cash,
Saccording to chief superin-
-4tendent Glen Miller.
if” Also that day, police recov-
‘“iered-a 9mm handgun.
ou The find was made after
vidfficers from the Eastern
Division executed a search
en ywarrant on a home in Cedar
+; Way, Pinewood Gardens.
There were 20 rounds of
ammunition with the gun,
i ROE said.
, , A man and a woman are
” peing questioned in connec-
tion with the find.

jk

a

1 Share
+ your
|T news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award..

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

» te le ily A EE a S

eb ee PO ee eke TA BOF OL Ae



hristian Council
president tells

‘parties not to use
_ ~prayer events...

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE president of the Christ-
ian Council has called for both
political parties to honestly
observe the Lenten season and
not use prayer breakfasts or
other such services to bolster
their campaign for the upcom-
ing general election.

Rev William Thompson said
that the Christian. community
expects that both the FNM and
the PLP will respect the agree-
ment they reached with the
Christian Council on not hold-
ing any political rallies during

‘Lent.

“Both leaders assured me,
assured the church, that there
would be no rallies held during

[ase ee os
HB REV William | Hhompron

Lent time. We hold them to
that. We will respect that, and
we hope they will respect that.
If they don’t respect it then we
will speak out against it. But
right now we will hold them to
that,” he said.

Rev Thompson said that this
new use of a “prayer breakfast”
as a political event is something
that he hopes both parties will
resist in general.

He said that the Christian
Council will have to review
these and other loopholes when
the next agreement is being
sought with political parties
before a general election.

Yesterday, Prime Minister
Perry Christie, in announcing
the May 2 election date, said
his party would not hold any



..as PLP holds

ee service of prayer

and thanksgiving

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Progressive Liberal Par-
ty hosted a service of prayer
and thanksgiving at its head-
quarters on Farrington Road
last night in honour of the 10th
anniversary of Perry Christie
and Cynthia Pratt being elected
to the leader and deputy lead-
ership post of the party.

This after the prime minister
called for a halt to “public polit-
ical campaign activities” during
Easter week.

In a press release from the
party’s national chairman Ray-
nard Rigby, the PLP saluted
and congratulated its leaders.

“Just a short 10 years ago, the
members of the PLP support-
ed and voted for Perry Christie
and Cynthia Pratt to be the
leader and deputy leader of the
PLP. In fact, it was the first time
in Bahamian history that a
woman was elected to the
deputy leadership of a major
political party.

“The PLP is extremely proud
of its leaders and their perfor-
mance. They have proven to be

the right mix for the issues fac-
ing the nation and have been
able to demonstrate that there
are compassionate democrats.
They have also shown that the
philosophy of the PLP is still
relevant for today’s Bahamas,”
he said.

Mr Rigby said that the date is
a milestone of “immense pride
and humility” for the PLP.

The prayer and thanksgiving
service was scheduled for
7.30pm last night.

The service was planned to
not only honour both Prime
Minister Christie and Deputy
Prime Minister Pratt, but to also
offer thanks to God for them
and to seek His further guid-

‘ance and deliverance over their

lives.
The event was Open to the
public.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
May gah)
PHONE: 322-2157

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political rallies during the holy
week, and asked other parties to
do the same.

Earlier this year, Rev Thomp-
son also spoke out against the
use of “gutter style” tactics dur-
ing campaigns.

Speaking at the ecumenical
service for parliamentarians in
January, he asked candidates
not to engage in mudslinging in
the run-up to the elections.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Students urged to back Cuban Five

m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

STUDENTS of the Omega
College were urged by Cuban
ambassador Felix Wilson to join
the Bahamian solidarity net-
work in support of the Cuban
Five in Miami.

The students, primarily those
taking Caribbean history class-
es at the college, were told that
the Cuban Five are “national
heroes” who fought against ter-
rorism in the Caribbean.

Ambassador Wilson said that
Cuba has been the fending off
“invasion” attempts by the US
government for many years.
And according to him, the
incarceration of the five Cubans
is “hypocrisy.”

This is particularly so because
the US gevernment is “suppos-
edly” involved in a war 2ainst
terrorism, he said.

The Cuban Five are five men
who are imprisoned in the US,
serving four life sentences and
75 years collectively, after being
convicted in a Federal court in
Miami, on June 8, 2001.

They are Gerardo Hernan-
dez, Ramon Labafiino, Anto-
nio Guerrero, Fernando
Gonzalez and René Gonzalez.

The men were accused by the
US government of committing
espionage and conspiracy
against the United States, and
other related charges.

But the five and those who
defend them point out that they
were involved in monitor ng the

actions of Miami-based terrorist
groups, in order to prevent ter-
rorist attacks on their country.

In October 2006, Irma Gon- -

zalez, the 22-year-old daughter
of one of the imprisoned men,
visited the Bahamas and spoke
to students at the College of the
Bahamas about the case.

Ms Gonzalez was invited to
the Bahamas by a local group
called the Bahamian Friends of
the Cuban Five. She urged
COB students to join the “soli-
darity community” that is agi-
tating for the release of the
men.

Recently, the international
campaign to free the five has
been asking for an investigation
into the US government’s
denial of visitation rights to

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PART OF YOUR LIFE




members of the imprisoned
men’s families — especially in
the case of Olga Salanueva and
Adriana Pérez.

“We do not have any ani-
mosity against the US,” Ambas-
sador Wilson said. “It has
always been the position that
the different US administrations
have tried to impose on our
country their will, and that has
been a problem for our peo-
ple.”

Mr Wilson said: “The Cuban
Five could not have received a
fair trial in Miami because the
environment was poisoned by
extreme right-wing groups who
want to aid the US government
in overthrowing Cuba.”

He pledged that Cuba would
continue to do what it believes
is necessary to defend its sover-
eignty.

The five men have been
imprisoned since 1998, In Cuba
they are considered patriots and
heroes who volunteered to



Hi CUBAN ambassador Felix Wilson

defend their country by gather-
ing information about terror-
ism directed at Cuba from with-
in Cuban exile communities.
However the US govern-

ment believes the men are apart
of an espionage network that
threatened US national security
by trying to infiltrate military
installations.

Environmentalist still concerned
at circus despite assurances

ENVIRONMENTALIST
Sam Duncombe said that qual-
ity of treatment is not the prob-
lem with circus acts involving
animals — “but rather over the
ethical and environmental right-
eousness of animals being used
in shows of this nature”.

She was responding to assur-
ances by Circus Maximus,
which is currently operating out
of R M Bailey Park, that it
treats its animals well. This fol-
lowed calls from several animal
rights activists for the govern-
ment to ban licences for shows
that include performances by
captive animals.

“We are not deliberating over
the good treatment or training
of the animals kept by Circus
Maximus, we are concerned
about the message that this con-
veys to our populations, espe-
cially our youth, that it is OK to
see wild animals removed from









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their natural habitats for human
entertainment,” Mrs Duncombe
said in a statement yesterday.

“It's about us condoning the
international removal of species
from their environments to
train, exploit, or breed them in
captive situations — like a cir-
cus environment.”

Mrs Duncombe said this
statement stands, regardless of
whether some of the particular
animals at Circus Maximus
were born in captivity or not.

“The moral ‘right’ here is for
them not to be there at all — and
this is why many governments
internationally are issuing a ban
on animals held in circuses. We
would like to see the Bahamas
follow suit,” she said.

Yesterday, Derrik Rosaire, a
bear trainer at Circus Maximus,
was quoted in The Bahama
Journal as saying: “I have
worked with bears for over 40









years, and never mistreated one
... All of my bears were born in
captivity and the last recorded
instance of a bear captured
from the wild into captivity was
in 1947.”

Minister of Agriculture Leslie
Miller was quoted in the same
article as saying: “The circus
obtained its licence through the
proper channels and as far as
this government is concerned
their practices are humane, pas-
sionate and meet the standards
observed by,circuses world-
wide.”

However, Mrs Duncombe
responded that it is especially
inappropriate for the Ministry
of Agriculture and Marine
Resources to condone the circus
with the issuance of permits to
allow wild animals to be import-
ed — considering the general
ignorance of the Bahamian pop-
ulation with regards to wild, or
even domesticated animals.

She said circuses only per-
petuate the poor treatment of
animals in the Bahamas by
popularising unnatural behav-
iour such as bears walking on
two legs, elephants that march
and dogs that jump through
hoops.

Mrs Duncombe added that
Minister Miller's comments

“reflect the lack of conserva-.

tion and ethical consideration
that-we are attempting to raise
this debate to”.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 7



Ce eo eee LSS a ee ee
Ron Pinder — Nautilus bottled water
never had government approval

NAUTILUS water “does not
and never has had” a licence to
produce or sell water in the
Bahamas, and the quality of its
water has never been verified
by the necessary government
authorities.

Yesterday, Director of Envi-
ronmental Health Services, Ron
Pinder, responded to a retrac-
tion of a statement he released
to The Tribune on Sunday.

Mr Pinder said that the state-
ment was signed and given to
him by the company’s president,
Jason Evans.

It read: “We have been asked
by the Department of Environ-
mental Health to stop all water
products and deliveries and to do
a voluntary recall of all Nautilus
Water products in the market.”

The issue was one of the com-
pany having been “unable to
secure the government certifi-
cate required to operate our
plant due to a licence issue with
our landlords,” read the state-
ment.

It added: “We must stress
that this is not a quality con-
cern.”

However in Wednesday's edi-
tion, at the request of Mr Evans
— who claimed that the state-
ment was “incorrect and unau-

thorised” — The Tribune was .

forced to print a retraction of
this statement.

Mr Evans said at that time
that the licensing issues are cur-
rently being reviewed by the
requisite government agencies
and “as a consequence there
has been no recall of Nautilus
Water products”.

However, Mr Pinder yester-
. day declared that any claim that

Director of Environmental
Health says statement was
true and accurate



the original statement was
unauthorised or untrue is
“nonsense”.

Mr Pinder said he was per-
sonally handed a copy of the
statement on Thursday by Mr
Evans after a follow up meeting
between thé Department of
Environmental Health Services
and Nautilus Water during
which the government agency
“reiterated (to Nautilus Water)
that they were not in possession
of a licence to operate a bot-
tled water company and we...
asked them to halt operations.”

“We indicated to them that
halting operations is not only
stopping the production but that
you can’t sell water that has not
been approved. They then said
they will voluntarily recall the
water, I said ‘Good, you will
have to send this to all the
media houses.’ They said they
did,” explained Mr Pinder.

It was early last month that
Nautilus Water had first been
informed that due to the fact
that the building in which they
were operating did not have a
building permit — certifying its
structural soundness — they
would have to halt production.

This was discovered during
an inspection of the facility by
Mr Pinder. The inspection was
halted upon this discovery, he

said, as the company was told
that this permit was a necessary
prerequisite to the company
obtaining a certificate of sani-
tation.

However, the company con-
tinued to supply to the market
battles of water produced and
stockpiled prior to this call to
halt production.

The Department of Environ-
mental Health Services
(DEHS) told them on Thurs-
day that this was not allowed,
and this was where the state-
ment, which Mr Evans later
claimed to be “unauthorised
and inaccurate” originated.

Mr Pinder explained that all
bottled water companies
licensed by the government
have to submit regular reports
on their quality control proce-
dures, and DEHS carries out
random spot checks on water
quality at these companies, to
ensure that their water is fit for
human consumption.

“Because Nautilus water has
not been approved by us we
have not been able to do that.

So we can't verify the quality -

of their water,” he said.

Mr Pinder stressed that every
aspect of the statement printed
by The Tribune on Monday was
true and accurate, contrary to
Mr Evans’ later claims.

Nautilus president says
government saw facility

THE following statement was
issued by the president of Nau-
tilus: Water Jason Evans:

“The Nautilus Water facility
was inspected by the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
on several occasions and we
were asked to make some
minor changes which we in fact
made.

“We were complemented on
our facility and even asked if
we would allow the Department
to show our plant to other man-
ufacturers.

‘We had what we considered
a final inspection because dur-
ing the last inspection we were
told we had to have all equip-
ment up and running during the
inspection so they could take
samples and see the running of
the equipment.

“After that inspection Olive
Patton, our Chemist, was told
‘our water was excellent and
everything was ok.’

“Olive was then told to come

BAHOM.







pick up the sanitisation certifi-
cate at which time it was dis-
covered there was a problem
with our landlord’s building per-
mit. An official of the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
assured Olive that all of our
requirements are in, the only
problem being that they were
unable to register the company
as certified because all of the
required building permits for
our landlord had not been
approved.

“We were not told that we
could not continue to run our
equipment to produce water so
from that day in October 2006
to March 2007 we were pro-
ducing water until directed to
stop last month. This could have
been a communication problem
and we apologize to the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
if there was a misunderstand-
ing.

“As for the quality of the
water being verified, last Friday

/
/

For All Your

Doors!

Specializing in

the Department of Envir

mental Health took samples *
from our plant and on Monday;:

April 2, we were notified that
the samples tested were fine. —

“The reason I requested The
Tribune to print the retraction
statement was because last Fri-
day, we were advised that a
recall has specific procedures
that must be followed and that
those procedures were not in
place so we asked The Tribune
to print a retraction because we
did not authorize the statement
as earlier noted.

“Ron Pinder made the fol-
lowing statement on Cable 12
‘The issue that the department
has is beyond the Nautilus
Company, but is in fact with the
owners of the building that the
Nautilus facility is in.’

“Today we received a copy cf
our landlord’s building permit
stamped with today’s date. We,
therefore, hope these issues will

soon be behind us all very soon.”

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007
Follow by example, Prime Minister

Is announcing the date for
the next general election,
Prime Minister Perry Christie
rightly urged that all political
organisations, leaders and
would-be leaders take “higher
ground” in debating the issues
that matter to the Bahamian
people.

It would be wonderful if
PM Christie does what he
says. For the past few days
the PLP has carried a story
on its website about this

writer that is totally untrue.
The story about my inter-
viewing for a job is absolutely
false and has not one shred of
integrity attached to it. Is that
the high road that Mr Christie
wishes to take? Is this the high
level of debate that Mr Christie
urges? It certainly cannot be.
We should have a clean and
decent campaign. We should
debate substantial issues. We
should speak about how we will
reduce the high incidences of
crime in our nation; how we will

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fix our judicial system; how we
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LAING

community where terrorism and
the threat of nuclear war are
realities; how we will minimise
the numbers of illegal immi-
grants in our nation; how we
will deliver public services in an
improved way; how we will edu-
cate our children in a way that
furthers their prospects for pro-
ductive living; how we will
expand tertiary education
opportunities for our young

people; how we will better man- —

age the government’s finances,
reducing our national debt; how
we will develop our Family
Islands in a more meaningful
way; and how we will deepen
our democracy further. These
are substantial issues. These
matter to Bahamians.

\ \ | e will not be able to
debate these issues

properly if we will make lies the
focus of our political efforts.
Lies have no place in decent
politics. Lies cannot advance
our nation’s future. Lies cannot
help find solutions to the many
concerns that we have.

Mr Christie cannot issue a
disclaimer regarding the con-
tent of his party’s material; nor
can the Leader of the Opposi-
tion. Therefore, any lies that

appear on any political website

as guilty as the liar. It is as plain
as that!

YOU MUST BELIEVE

é
H very achievement in
life requires the expen-

diture of energy. If we have no
energy, that is, if we have no
power to make things happen,

THE TRIBUNE

flow from what we are; it should
not define us. If we are defined
by what we do, then our sense
of self-worth will always be tied
to how well we can do what we
do.

Additionally, we will not be
able to define ourselves if we
stop doing what it is we do. Is
this how a life should be mea-
sured? If so, what should we say



Lies have no place in decent
politics. Lies cannot advance our
nation’s future. Lies cannot help
find solutions to the many
concerns that we have.



then we cannot achieve. Per-
sonal energy requires us to
believe in the possibility of a
thing desired.

By accepting with our minds
that a thing can be done, we can
muster up the energy needed
to pursue it. Even if what we
desire to do cannot be done by
us alone, we seek the help
required to make it happen
because we know that it can.

No wonder Jesus said: “All
things are possible to them that
believe.”

WE ARE HUMAN BEINGS

So many of us define our-
selves by what we do. I am a

teacher, lawyer, doctor, busi- -



Daily we should strive to achieve
something worthwhile, something
that brings us personal, divine and
human recognition. It makes life
so much more dynamic and

interesting.



published by the parties must
be owned by their leaders. If
the leaders do not remove those
lies when discovered, then they
must accept responsibility for
them. He that embraces a lie is




















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then about the child who cannot
do anything much or the physi-
cally challenged adult who is
limited in what he or she can
do? The joy of life is in being,
being a living soul endowed
with the image of God. In that
there is full dignity.

WE NEED TO ACHIEVE

We all feel better about our-
selves when we achieve some-
thing worthwhile. See that smile
on a child’s face after winning a
race? It is the joy of achieve-
ment. It is as natural as the sun-
rise.

We often lose that in adult-
hood, not because it goes away
but because we stop achieving.
We settle into the routine of
existing, seldom seeking to
achieve anything.

Yet, we deprive ourselves of
opportunities to maximize our
joy and optimise our sense of
fulfilment. Daily we should
strive to achieve something
worthwhile, something that
brings us personal, divine and

human reéognition. It makes.

life so much more dynamic and
interesting. What can you
achieve today?

THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK

He» Easter to all!

lh),





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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 9



Peaceful

FROM page one

even called the police when :
the situation threatened to }
spin out of control. :

Addressing the nation yes-
terday afternoon on ZNS, the
prime minister said that he
calls on all parties, “including
my own, and all candidates,
including myself, to conduct a
campaign that is lively and
spirited but at the same time
peaceful, and respectful of the
differences that come
between us at this time in our
national life.”

“Let us leave all the name-
calling and nastiness behind :
us. Let us move resolutely :
instead to higher ground, for
it is only there that we can
engage each other in mature
and civilised debate of the
issues that really matter to the
Bahamian people,” he said.

This echoes the request by
the president of the Bahamas
Christian Council, Rev
William Thompson, who in
January urged all MPs to :
avoid mudslinging :
during their respective cam- :
paigns.

However, observers
claimed that this appeal by
Rev Thompson was to no
avail as just days after he
made his request politicians ;
of all affiliations were already :
back to engaging in name- :
calling and “mudslinging.”

Mr Christie yesterday said:
that politicians do Bahamians
“a grave disservice if we, the :
leaders and would-be leaders :
of our nation, refuse to heed :
this call.” :

“Let each and everyone of :
us, therefore, resolve to con- :
duct a clean campaign, and
free and fair elections, so that
the voice of the people can
be heard in the fullness of all
its wisdom and power, and :
with unmistakable clarity, on :
election day, May 2, 2007,” :
he said.

As the country will be cel- :
ebrating Holy Week, Mr :
Christie confirmed that the :
PLP “will not be holding any :
rallies nor engaging in any :
other public political cam- :
paign activities until after ;
Easter Monday. i

“I believe that the other }
parties will be observing sim- ;
ilar constraints as well,” the
prime minister said.

Panamanian women

FROM page one

were told that they would earn
“mucho money” while dancing,
and that the only thing they
would have to pay for was a visa
extension.

However, they claim that
when they arrived in Nassau on
February 9, the owner com-
pletely changed the terms of the
agreement and they were forced
to work because the owner
had taken their passports
and round-trip tickets to Pana-
ma.

On Tuesday, Valentina told
The Tribune about their alleged
ordeal.

Valentina said that they met
the owner of the club in Pana-
ma city.

She said the night club owner
said they would only have to
pay for their tickets and nothing
else.

All three of the women said
that it cost them $1,850 to come
to the Bahamas.

Valentina said they arrived
in Nassau on February 9 and

FROM page one

“For 276 years now, Bahami-
ans have been going to the polls
to elect representatives to the
House of Assembly.

“Bahamians cherish their
hard won political rights and
freedoms. Amongst these there
is none more precious than the
right of the Bahamian people
to choose their own government
in free, fair and democratic elec-
tions,” he said.

Bahamians, Mr Christie
said, have always exercised their

FROM page one

Supreme Court Justice John Lyons, Mr Brath-

waite said. .

Daniel Smith died September 10 while he was
visiting his mother, three days after she gave birth

to her daughter, Dannielynn.

The inquest into the death of Anna Nicole
Smith’s son came to a standstill last week when
lawyers for Howard K Stern called the constitu-
tionality of the Coroner’s Court into question.

Mr Stern’s legal counsel informed Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez — who is presiding over the
inquest — that a constitutional motion had been
filed with the Supreme Court questioning the
lack of provisions in the Coroner’s Act to provide

for an impartial jury.

they were taken to a two-story
white house located in the Coral
Harbour area.

“He say Bahamas no prob-
lem, mucho money and we only
need to pay for immigration
extension, but when all girls
come to Bahamas we pay for
food and house,” Valentina
said.

The girls said they danced
from 8pm to 4am in the night
club on Wednesdays, Thurs-
days, Fridays and Saturdays.

“Wednesday we pay him $25
and other days we pay $50,” she
said.

“If no pay, he say no working
tonight.”

She told The Tribune that the
night club owner would find
men for the girls to sleep with.

“But he never give money to
we,” Valentina said.

The women said that they
“escaped” from the house last
Wednesday and on Monday the
owner gave them their pass-
ports, but only after they had
threatened to alert Interpol of
his activities when they got back
to Panama.

“T say if you don’t give me
my passport now, I tell police
because its illegal internation-
al,” Valentina said.

The Tribune contacted Assis-
tant Commissioner Greenslade
and he said that an investiga-
tion would be immediately

Election on May 2nd

right in record numbers and
voter turnout at elections has
consistently been on the mag-
nitude of 90 plus per cent.
“This is an astounding statis-
tic by world standards, and one
more reason why our little
nation is the envy of so
many other nations, large and
small, all around the world,” he
said.
In accordance with the con-
stitution, after the prime minis-
ter formally announced the dis-

solution of parliament and the
election date, Provost Marshall,
Paul Farquharson — accompa-
nied by senior police officers
and about fifty new police
recruits — read from the steps
of the House of Assembly, two
proclamations on behalf of the
governor-general. The first
declared the formal dissolution
of Parliament. Whereas, the sec-
ond announced that Parliament
will next be convened on May
23, 2007.

Coroner’s Court

the Coroner’

ceedings.

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During last week’s inquest proceedings Magis-
trate Gomez emphasised that the case of Daniel’s
death has received immense world-wide media
coverage and cautioned the all-female jury not to
heed any news reports, rumours, or gossip they
may hear about the case. However, Mr Stern’s
lawyers are asking the Supreme Court to revise
the provisions of the Coroner’s Act in such a way
that would allow lawyers to question potential
jurors to determine their impartiality. Jurors
selected to the inquest are expected to return to
Court on April 11 the date on
which Magistrate Gomez adjourned court pro-

The 2007

‘Mercedes-Benz



es ae

@ VALENTINA, Michelle and Pamela

launched into the matter once
they had received all the details.

Attempts to contact the
nightclub owner were unsuc-
cessful.



Allegations
FROM page one

While the FNM maintains
it has nothing against Hait-
ian-Bahamians voting, such
reports show the desperate
level to which the PLP was
willing to stoop to gain extra
votes.

Reportedly at least 18 Hait-
ian migrants were given citi-
zenship and registered yes-
terday.





fa
oe

®

ian
wf



Human
rights group

FROM page one

Bahamas,” the Association
claimed.

Referring to politicians
who assume they hold some
sort of sway over the judicial
system, the Association said
that it is time for the Bahamas
to rid itself of “puerile little
Neros.”

Speaking as a guest on
More94’s Real Talk on Tues-
day, Mr Gomez called on Mrs
Maynard-Gibson to resign as
Attorney General and retire
completely from politics.

Mr Gomez was referring to
Mrs Maynard-Gibson’s con-
duct following two contro-
versial rulings by Justice
Lyons late last year.

Justice Lyons, who handles
90 per cent of all commercial
cases at. the Supreme Court
level, in his rulings found that
the government had failed to
appoint a commission to
review judges’ salaries and
had therefore compromised
the independence of the judi-
clary.

Mr Gomez on Tuesday
heavily criticised what he
termed the “most vicious and
vitriolic attack” by Mrs
Allyson Maynard-Gibson on
Justice Lyons in the House of’
Assembly earlier this year.

The GBHRA claimed that
this attack by Mrs Maynard-
Gibson on a sitting judge
reflects her “callous indiffer-
ence” towards the country’s
legal system.

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creation.

“There are a lot of employ-
ment opportunities for those
who wish to work. Once you
like to work, the work is actu-
ally here,” she said. “Other per-
sons from other islands are also
taking advantage of the work
that is offered because there is a
lot of work going on.”

On March 22, contracts were
signed for roadwork in north,
central and south Eleuthera.

Along with these projects,
Mrs Neely said there are
upcoming plans for water works
in Bannnerman Town and John
Millars, construction at Cotton
Bay and Cape Eleuthera, and
there are plans for a new clinic
in Rock Sound.

Mrs Neely said such develop-
ments should encourage former
residents and other Bahamians
interested in making their home
on the island to see what it has
to offer.

“At this point in time, if they
want to really be a part of
what’s going to happen for
Eleuthera in the upcoming
years, they would want to put
themselves in position now to
really take advantage of it,
because it is coming,” she said.

Originally from Andros, Mrs
Neely said she can attest to the



@ THE proposed site for
the new clinic in Rock Sound,
Eleuthera.

(BIS photo: Eric Rose)

friendliness and warmth of the
Eleuthera residents, which is
one of the best aspects of liv-
ing on the island.

“People in Eleuthera are very
friendly and have received me
very warmly,” she said. “They
are very co-operative, especial-
ly as far as working together for
the building of the community,
for implementing changes in the
community. I like being here.”

TV 13 SCHEDULE

THURSDAY
APRIL 5°

2:00am Community Pg 1540AM
11:00 Gospel Video Countdown
12noon ZNS News Headlines - Live
12:03 Gospel Aficionado
1:00pm Legends: Sir. Arlington
Butler

Fast Forward

Turning Point

Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
John Francis

Lisa Knight

Cybernet

ZNS News Headline
Andiamo

You & Your Money

This Week In The Bahamas
News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight

Native Stew -

Movie: A Man Called Peter
News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight

Late Night Movie: A Man
For All Seasons

1:30am Community Pg. 1540AM

2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
5:05
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
8:00
8:30
10:30
11:00
11:30

FRIDAY
APRIL 6

5:30am Community Page 1540am
6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise - Live
7:30 Living Stations Of The
Cross
8:00
8:30
9:00

Man Alive: Courage
The Great & Holy Week
The Passion According
To John

Lutheran Special: Three
Days

The Bahamas Christian
Choral

Grants Town Wesley
Methodist Church
Matinee: The Story of
Moses

9:30

10:00

11:00

1:00

3:30 — Matinee: The Day Christ
Died

ZNS News Update
Matinee: The Day Christ
Died

The Great & Holy Week
News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight

Movie: The Storey of Moses
News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight

Late Night Movie:
Monsignor

1:30am Community Page 1540am

5:00
5:05

6:00
6:30
7:00
8:00
10:30
11:00
11:30

SATURDAY
APRIL 7

6:30am Community Pg 1540AM .
9:00am Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 International Fit Dance
10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego

11:30 Little Robots

12noon Underdog

12:30 Bullwinkle & Friends

1:00 The Fun Farm

2:00 The Easter Promise

3:00 Matinee: The Story of Ruth
5:30 One Cubed

6:00 Gospel Aficionado

7:00 | Bahamas Tonight

7:30 Native Stew

8:00 Movie: Ben Hur

11:30 Bahamas Tonight

12m/n Gospel Video Countdown:
25 years of Tradition Taste
of Gospel

1:30am Community Pg. 1540AM

Have A
St

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the right to make
last minute programme changes!



{

THE TRIBUNE

outh Eleuthera infrastructural work
to both residents and visitors’

ORD:
Y MANAGEMENT





@ ASSISTANT administrator for the south Eleuthera district
Francita Neely speaking in Rock Sound at the contract signing
for the repairs to South Eleuthera settlement roads, on March 22.

- (BIS photo: Eric Rose)

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Charlotte Street Off Bay Street - Tel: 322-3806
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65 OL


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE i



Residents in Eleuthera

LOCAL NEWS

fight for coconut

ENRAGED residents of an
Eleuthera settlement have
raised a petition to prevent
removal of coconut trees from
the local cemetery.

A group calling itself The
Guardians of Savannah Sound
wants the government to step
in and halt what they see as des-
ecration of the area.

The 34-name petition adds:
“Please help us preserve our
pristine environment and phys-
ical landscape for future gener-
ations.”

The row erupted when vil-
lagers discovered that a local
resident, Mr Wainwright Gib-
son, had allegedly negotiated
the sale of 200 coconut trees to
the developers of North Win-
dermere Island, which lies a few
hundred yards off-shore. Mr
Gibson apparently said in a
sworn statement that he and his
son planted the trees in the ear-
ly 1990s, a claim denied by vil-
lagers.

In fact, they say the uprooting
of trees was done without the
knowledge or consent of the
community.

“These coconut trees were
planted by many of the fathers
and forefathers of the commu-
nity in the 1940s and 1950s on
land granted to the community
more than 100 years ago for
burial and public recreation,”
says the petition.

The community has reacted
by contacting the police, the Min-
istry of Works, the island admin-
istrator, the BEST Commission
and several other agencies.

‘Now protesters are stepping
up pressure after the develop-
ment company allegedly sent a
team of men and heavy equip-
ment to remove the trees from
the cemetery and surrounding
area.

This led to a confrontation
between residents and company
officials, who showed them a
statement signed by two locals
saying the community had no
further use of the trees.

The company’s representa-
tive felt he had consent to take
the trees for his own landscap-
ing purposes.

Local JP Claudious Culmer,
the township chairman, said no
permits from any government
agencies were shown to back
up the claims, only a letter
signed by two members of the
commonage committee, Robert
Rahming Sr and Mrs Alice
Campbell.

The coconuts trees, all
between 15 feet and 25 feet tall,
have a special place in Savan-
nah Sound’s heart because they
have been used for food over
manv years.

Mr Culmer said: “The citi-
zens of Savannah Sound use the
coconuts to make the best
coconut tarts, pies, chip-cakes,
creams and water in the coun-
try.”

Mr Culmer alleged that Mr
Gibson was very angry when
workers were not allowed to



remove the trees and threat-
ened political victimisation
against the person who organ-
ised the campaign.

“Mr Gibson insis‘s on selling
the birthright of our communi-
ty,” he added. “But the coconut
trees of Savannah Sound are not
for sale — this is our legacy.”

Now Mr Michael Culmer,
another resident, has written to
Attorney General Allyson May-
nard-Gibson demanding action,
with copies sent to senior police

officers in Nassau.

Yesterday however a compa-
ny representative said the Win-
dermere Island North Devel-
opment had "absolutely no
intention to remove the trees."

Although admitting that the
company was approached by
"someone from the common-
age committee" — Wainwright
Gibson — who "tried to sell us
some trees" administrator
Phillip Jones said that when the
locals protested "we just backed

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"We had no wish to upset the
locals or cause any political
problems," he said.

Responding to the locals’
statement describing the arrival
of heavy machinery on the
island, and claims made by com-
pany officials to have rights over
the trees, Mr Jones, said: "Ini-
tially we did go over there. We
didn't realise there was a prob-
lem, but as soon as we did we
pulled out straight away, and
said we won't touch it."

Mr Gibson was unavailable
for comment.

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

a ae
= ee i Urban Renewal families

against murder meeting

THE Department of Urban Renewal held a public forum for Families Against Murder (FAM)
on Thursday, March 29 at the British Colonial Hilton on Bay Street. From left are Carla Stuart,
Juanita Symonette (sister and mother of murder victim Chris Brown) and Jewel Major, director
of Urban Renewal.






(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)

Create X-citement

The new X-TRAIL is one off-roader that’s just as exhilarating on the asphalt. Its 2:5 litter
DOHC engine provides more than.enough power to accelerate with conviction. And ns rigid
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FROM left are Carla
Stewart, Juanita Symonette,
Marie Scott, Patricia
McGreger, Yasmin Miller,
(all relatives. of murder vic-
tims), and Dr David Allen.
Standing in background is
Pastor Rex Major.

(BIS photo:
Raymond A Bethel)

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

SIF T_the future



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7

THE TRIBUNE

Seminar due to”
launch weather
conference

ALTHOUGH the 2006
Atlantic hurricane season was a
quiet one, Bahamian authori-
ties have organised a thorough
hurricane readiness initiative.

They say it is a proactive step
to educate and prepare resi-
dents for hurricanes that will
inevitably impact the Bahamas
in the future.

The Ministry of Tourism will
present, “Climate change — hur-
ricanes and adaptation strate-
gies for the Bahamas” as part of
the 11th annual Bahamas
Weather Conference.

The free seminar and discus-
sion will be held at the British
Colonial Hilton on April 17
from 6pm to 8pm. The presen-
tation is open to the public.

Experts from the Bahamas
and United States will give brief
remarks exploring climate
change and its implications for
hurricane frequency and inten-
sity, as well as strategies for pro-
tecting life and property in the
face of future storms.

Many factors — from building
site selection to adequate set
backs, building material selec-
tion and reinforcement — can
help mitigate the effect of high
wind and storm surge on resi-
dential and commercial prop-
erty.

The evening will be moder-
ated by Mr Earlston McPhee,
director for sustainable tourism
at the ministry. The speakers
will include:

e Arthur Rolle, director of
the Bahamas Meteorological
Services (climate change and
the Bahamas: the Bahamian

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 13



Myla moire



H DR Nicolette Bethel, director of culture, chats with George Lamming, Caribbean novelist and
poet, and Janyne Hodder, president of the College of the Bahamas, at the official launch of the
Bahamas Learning Channel, on Friday, March 30 , ;

(Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)



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@® Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

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Bahamas and Bahamian fami-
lies)

e Craig Delancy, officer in
charge of the Bahamas Building

HURRICANE SHUTTERS

Control Division at the Ministry
of Works, (mitigating the effects
of wind and water through site
selection and building tech-
niques).

e Dr Bob Sheets, former
director of the National Hurri-
cane Centre

e Max Mayfield, immediate
past director of the National
Hurricane Centre

The panelists will take ques-
tions from the audience follow-
ing the formal presentations and
address issues of specific con-
cern to Bahamian families. The
2007 hurricane season begins
June 1 making this a perfect
time to encourage every
Bahamian to develop a person-
al prepareduess plan and to dis-
cuss how tie destination as a

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Twelve brides in running
or annual Kelly’s event

BEAUTY Queen Celina
Thompson will pass on her
title as Kelly’s Bride of the
Year 2005-6 as she as
crowns the 15th annual win-
ner during the popular
Bahamas Bridal Show on
April 15.

The willowy and brainy
beauty is a professional
accountant with an off-

* shore bank.

She grew up in Eleuthera
and volunteers with the
Ranfurly Homes for Chil-
dren and Junior Achieve-
ment.

Celina was Kelly’s Octo-
ber Bride of the Year in
2005 and presided over Kel-
ly’s Bridal Events in 2006.

She took home a $1,000
Kelly’s gift certificate and
thousands of dollars in
prizes.

Her successor will also
receive a Kelly’s House and
Home gift certificate and a
number of other prizes
including: a Noritake “Regi-
na Platinum” china service
for eight; a Royal Doulton
“Old Country Roses” cake
plate; a Wedgwood “India”
tea service for six; a Water-
ford crystal water pitcher; a
Villeroy & Boch “Emily”
30-piece flatware set;
Mikasa “Stephanie Plat-
inum” crystal for eight; a
Balta rug; a framed picture
from Portal Publications; a
gift certificate from the
Beauty Spot; Columbian
Home’s eight-piece stock
pot set; a Black and Decker
food processor and a Rub-
bermaid storage organiser.

The 15th annual Kelly’s
Bride of the Year will be

Sunday School: 10am

chosen from the 12 brides
of the month for 2006 and
will reign over Kelly’s bridal
events for 2007. They are:

e January — Seniqua Bren-
nen Curry

e February — Keniqua
Ingraham Whitehouse

e March —- Yolanda
Winder Brennen

e April — Bridget Forbes
Brown

e May - Melissa Miller
Bain

e June — Astacia Stewart

FUNDAMENTAL

Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC

Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills e Phone: 393-0563 ° Box N-3622

















Ei a EASTER SUNDAY

11:00AM

Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM





Bernard Road
11:00AM



Zion Boulevard
10:00AM
7:00AM ~

East Shirley Street
11:00AM
7:00PM

9:30AM



JOUR 8:00am
ay? 9:30AM

11:00AM
6:00PM

RADIO PROGRAMMES














your Host:

Your Host:





THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
ween P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
namensa Phone: 39°-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

ray CHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 2007

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey/HC

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Rev.Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC
Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

Pator Martin Loyley
Pator Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus :

Rev. James Neilly/HC
ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill

Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC

yey

: ), TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
Rev. William Higgs

No Service

FOR IR III IIIT III III IIA IK II III IIIS IIIS ISI RII SIRI RIBAK IB III IKI IIIA AA

RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Mrs. Kenris L. Carey
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’ on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Mrs. Kenris L. Carey

RRR KR KKK KERR KEKE KK EEE K EERE REAR KEKE

THE NASSAU REGION of the Women’s Fellowship will be holding
a Hamburger Fry on Friday, April 27, 2007 from 6:00 - 8:30 p.m. at
Epworth Hall, East Shirley Street Donation: $5.00

Wesley Methodist Church

aoe Hil Aid & Chapei Street} P.0.80x CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY APRIL 8TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Sis. Tezel Anderson
11:00 a.m. Rev. Caria Culmer/Bro. Jamicko Forde
6:00 p.m. Sanctuary Choir Cantata

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)








Kk AK KKK EK





‘PY ° SUNDAY, APRIL STH, 2007 _



%



Brice ‘ Bridal Show each year.
° July —Halcyon Saunders “They swarm the huge and
Adderley exciting Kelly’s House and
e August — Valron Grimes Home booth to see the lat-
Tinubu est in fine and casual china,

e September — Cheryl
Thompson Rolle

e October — Sharon Stu-
art Lafluer

e November — Monique
Saunders Sands

e December - Santiala
Cartwright Ferguson

crystal and flatware, styl-

Mrs Judith Adderley, Kel-
ly’s human resources man-
ager. “Kelly’s trained bridal
consultants are there in full
force, too, giving advice and
explaining the delightfully
simple Bridal Registry.at
Kelly’s House and Home,
Mall at Marathon.”

Thousands of prospective
brides visit the Bahamas

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921 ©






11:30 a.m. Speaker: Pastor Rex Major
Topic: The Cross & Its Sacrifice

NO EVENING SERVICE

_Bibfe Class: 9:45 a.m. eakil ir
Community Outreach: Eveni @









OPPORTUNITIES FOR



WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY SERVICES

Morning Worship Service o....
Sunday Schoo! for all ages ...
Adult EGUCCTHION vont
Worship Service ... 14.00 a.m.
Spanish Service 2,00 p.m.
Evening Worship Service ........ 6.30 p.m.

8.30 a.m.
9.45 am.
945a.m

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Selective Bible Teaching

Royal Rangers {Boys Club} 4-16 yrs.
Missionettes (Girs Cluj 4-16 ys.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY

Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 7 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God
Wo OE Var e ume em mca
ICR MER a
a) , A ww



ishly displayed,” explained:



This year will be the 19th
production of the big bridal
event, to be held at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort
on Cable Beach.

An all-day trade show will
offer many thousands of
dollars in prizes and feature
50-plus exhibitors.

@ CONGRATULATING
Celina Thompson at the 18th
Annual Bahamas Bridal
Show last year were: Kelly’s
human recourses manager
Judith Adderley (far left),
Kelly’s bridal manager
Patrice Lloyd-Dames (far
right) and the 2004-5 Bride
of the Year Myriam Paul
Stapleton.

(Photo by
Vincent Vaughan)

“The audience loves it
all,” said Patrice Lloyd-
Dames, manager of Kelly’s
Bridal Department at Kel-
ly’s Home Centre in the
Mall at Marathon. “Of
course everyone loves our
winner. Our Bride of the
Year is always a joy to know
and of great service to our
community.”

Nancy Kelly, vice presi-
dent of Kelly’s, said enter-
ing the Bride of the Year
and Month competition is
“as easy as registering your
bridal choices at Kelly’s.
Just register your wedding
date and make your bridal
choices including china and
crystal at Kelly’s House and
Home, Mall at Marathon.
We even have furniture
now. Your bride groom can
select tools and grills, also,
from our wide selection of
the very best products.”



@ EXCITING new china patterns preview at Kelly’s Bridal
Registry booth at the Bahamas Bridal Show

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co,, Ltd

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

“On Premises
Check Our Price
Before buying

Bahamas Bus & ’



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THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Tent camps again sprout in Ukraine —

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Kiev



ON the surface, Ukraine’s
latest spasm of political turmoil
resembles the Orange Revolu-
tion of 2004, with tent camps
housing thousands and demon-
strators assembling in the capi-
tal’s main square, accordi9ng to
Associated Press.

But this time, the action is in
support of Prime Minister Vik-
tor Yanukovych — the enemy of
the 2004 mass protests.

The demonstrators say they
learned a lesson from the
protests more than two years
ago that helped propel Viktor
Yushchenko into the presiden-
cy over Yanukovych. A day
after Yushchenko ordered par-
liament dissolved, they started
putting up tents and laying out
sleeping bags.

“The Orange people taught
us, and this time we were the
first,” said Dmytro Nykyshyn,
commander of the main camp.

The camp is tucked away ina
park near parliament, not near-
ly as visible as the sprawling
tent camp that lined Kiev’s
main street, Kreshchatyk, dur-
ing the Orange Revolution and
that lasted for more than two
winter months. Nykyshyn said
his camp is home to 2,000 peo-
ple, most of them from the east



@ SUPPORTERS of Ukrainian Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and supporters of President
Viktor Yushchenko shake hands during rallies taking place outside the office of Ukraine’s
President in Kiev, Ukraine yesterday. Yushchenko stood by his order dissolving. Ukraine’s
parliament and calling for early elections, and appealed for support from foreign ambassadors, law
enforcement officials and governors as his standoff with the prime minister escalated.

and south, where support for
Yanukovych runs highest.

Just two days into their
protest, many say they are
already tired and ready to go
home. Some also admitted they
were being paid to be there —
but insisted they’d have come
regardless.

“T hope that soon we’ll win

outside the president’s office.
During the Orange Revolu-
tion, Yushchenko’s tent camp
was the nerve center of his
protest movement, and it
backed right up to the then-
opposition’s stage, giving the
impression of 24-hour activity.
Also, many of the tents were
giant, multi-person contraptions

(Photo: AP/Sergei Chuzavkov)

hours of the day to give encour-
agement to the. tent campers —
and to drop off food and sup-
plies. .

"I don’t sense any life here,”
said Oleksandr Dyadenko, cast-
ing a critical eye over the
Yanukovych camp. He said
he’d lived in the Orange Revo-
lution camp, and was curious to

4
‘

; J

fe

e

, %

and then they’ll let us go -— whereas at Yanukovych’s see what the competition was 4
home,” said 19-year-old student camp the tents tend to be for doing now. Net looks like an imi- .
Serhiy Kutsenko, who has been _ one or two people at the most. _ tation.”

sleeping in a two-person tent in
Mariynsky Park. “Yushchenko
must not ignore our interests.”

Yanukovych’s tent camp is
highly organised, but for much
of the day, it lies largely empty
and quiet while its residents lis-
ten to bands and speakers on
Independence Square and rally

Yanukovych’s supporters are |

also not helped by the fact that
the Ukrainian capital is consid-
ered a so-called “Orange” city.
Its residents were a major force
in the protests that helped ush-
er Yushchenko to power. Dur-
ing the Orange Revolution,
Kiev residents showed up at all

ling of

o the Extreme:

But Yanukovych’s support:
ers said they are determined.
Young people, wearing jackets
and scarves in Yanukovych’s
party’s blue color, lounged
around on a recent night, doing
crossword puzzles, playing cards
and reading.

The camp is tidy — a bag for



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 19



Russian exhibition
at Auschwitz is new
irritant to Poland

m@ POLAND
Warsaw

A DISAGREEMENT over
a Russian exhibit at the former
Nazi death camp of Auschwitz
has emerged as a new irritant
in relations between Russia and
Poland, where resentment of
Cold War domination by
Moscow remains strong, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The camp museum has
delayed the opening of the
Russian-designed exhibition
because it uses the term “Sovi-
et citizens” to refer to people
taken to Auschwitz from for-
mer Polish territory seized by
the Soviet Union at the start of
World War II, said museum
head Piotr Cywinski.

“Why is Russia still inter-
preting Stalinist times this
way?” Cywinski said during an
interview on Radio Tok FM.

The museum said in a state-
ment that residents of the occu-
pied areas “by no means can be
viewed as USSR citizens, as
they did not renounce volun-
tarily their former citizenship
and did not accept, as the result
of an independent decision,
Soviet citizenship.”

Auschwitz-Birkenau, the
German-run death camp oper-
ated in the southern Polish town

of Oswiecim during the Nazi
occupation, houses a number of
national exhibitions in old bar-
racks that document the atroci-
ties committed there.

Russian newspapers have
accused Poland this week of
closing the exhibition for polit-
ical reasons. The Russian daily
“Kommersant,” for one, called
the matter a “new stumbling
block in Russian-Polish rela-
tions.”

Disagreement

Director Cywinski said the
exhibit was closed at Russian
request in 2004 for a planned
update. He did say, however,
that the reopening had been
delayed by the disagreement
over the “Soviet” citizenship
the exhibition ascribes to resi-
dents of eastern Poland, the
Baltic states and part of Roma-
nia — territories taken over the
Soviet Union between 1939-41.

“You cannot say a resident
of Lviv — a Pole or a Jew — was
a Soviet” citizen, Cywinski said.
Lviv, formerly in eastern
Poland, is now in Ukraine.

Wladyslaw Bartoszewski, the
head of the International
Auschwitz Council, an advisory
board that includes camp sur-

vivors, accused Russia of resort-
ing to “dirty tricks” by trying

to count Poles and Jews killed

at the camp as Soviet victims.

“That is inadmissible,” Bar-
toszewski, himself an Auschwitz
survivor and a former Polish
foreign minister, wrote in a col-
umn published Wednesday in
the Dziennik daily.

On Tuesday, the Russian

Foreign Ministry said Poland

was making absurd demands.

“We are convinced that the
memory of victims of the Nazi
concentration camp at Oswiec-
im should not be held hostage
to historic-political profiteer-
ing,” ministry said in a state-
ment.

The dispute comes as ten-
sions simmer between the two
countries over a range of issues,
including a US request to place
part of a missile defense shield
in Poland and the Czech
Republic. Moscow has warned
that bowing to the US request
could spark a new arms race.

Between 1940-45, some 1.5
million people — mostly Jews,

but also others, including Rus--

sians, Poles and Gypsies — per-
ished at Auschwitz in gas cham-
bers or from forced labor,
hunger and disease. The camp
was liberated by Soviet troops
on January 27, 1945.

Kurdish demonstrators clash with
Turkish soldiers on Ocalan birthday

@ TURKEY
Ankara

POLICE and soldiers fired
warning shots into the air and
used tear gas and truncheons
Wednesday to disperse hun-
dreds of stone-throwing Kur-
dish protesters in southeast
Turkey, according to Associated
Press.

(The fprdtesterszwanted to...
travel to the village of Kurdish ~
rebel chief Abdullah Ocalan to :

mark his 58th birthday, reports
said.

The clashes erupted when
police and soldiers blocked a
highway and stopped a convoy
of around 4,000 Kurds near the
town of Halfeti in Sanliurfa
province. Angry Kurds, shout-
ing slogans in support of
Ocalan, began throwing stones
at the soldiers and police,
prompting them to open fire
into the air, the private Dogan
news agency said.

Some of the protesters and .

at least one police officer were
slightly injured, it said. The
group wanted to travel to the
village of Omerli, where Ocalan
was born, near the town of Bire-
cik.

In Birecik, Turkish authori-
ties distributed toys and kebabs
on Wednesday to keep Kurdish
children in school as demon-
strators gathered in downtown.



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“We distributed kebabs at
high-schools and toys at the pri-
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manipulation of the children,”
said Tuncay Sonel, governor of
the southeastern town of Bire-

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@ GENERAL view of the closed exhibition honoring Russian victims at the museum of the for-
mer Nazi death camp of Auschwitz in Oswiecim, Poland on Wednesday. The exhibition was closed
in 2004 for a Russia-requested remake and has not been opened over content dispute between its
Russian authors and museum historians. This week, Russian newspapers accused Poland of closing
the exhibition for political reasons.

(Photo: AP/Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, Tomasz Pielesz)



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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE |



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@ LIN Hui a female panda bites bamboo inside her cage in Chiang Mai zoo in Chiang Mai
province, northern Thailand yesterday. After panda porn failed to spark amour, Thai zoo
officials turned early this week to artificial insemination in the hope of impregnating their lone
female giant panda. The officials inseminated Lin Hui, a female panda, with semen from
Chuang Chuang. The artificial insemination is a last ditch effort to get Lin Hui pregnant, after
videos of pandas having sex failed to entice Chuang Chuang into mating with his partner.

(AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong)

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Thailand blocks.

YouTube access |

‘
4
q
a

|
‘

amid crackdown

@ THAILAND
Bangkok

THE Thai government
blocked access to the popular
YouTube video Web site
Wednesday, saying a short film
it carries is an insult to the coun-
try’s beloved monarch, accord-
ing ta Associated Press.

It was one of a number of
websites deemed insulting to
the king and blocked by Thai-
land’s military-installed gov-
ernment, said Sitthichai
Pookaiyaudom, the minister of
information and technology.

Sitthichai said YouTube was
blocked Wednesday morning
after its owner Google turned
down his request to remove the
contentious web page, which
features a 44-second clip show-
ing graffitti-like elements paint-
ed over a slideshow of pho-
tographs of 79-year-old King
Bhumibol Adulyadej.

One part of the clip juxta-
poses pictures of feet over the
king’s image — a major cultural
taboo for Thais since feet are
considered extremely dirty and
offensive. The soundtrack is the
Thai National anthem.

“It’s a serious case of lese
majeste,” said Sitthichai, using
the legal term for the crime of
offending the monarchy. “We
asked Google to remove it
some days ago, but they refused
to.”
According to Sitthichai, thou-
sands of people had called the
government to complain about
the YouTube video.

If YouTube removed the clip,
access to the website would be
unblocked, he said.

Sitthichai said Google’s argu-
ment for not removing the
video was that US President
George W Bush had been
attacked more seriously on the

)
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% 1

Government claims short’
film insulting to monarch:
King Bhumibol Adulyadej



site and those clips were not
removed.

Thai authorities take insults
to the king extremely seriously.
A Swiss man was sentenced to
10 years in jail last week in the
northern Thai city of Chiang
Mai on lese majeste charges,
after he defaced posters of the
king during a drinking binge.

Sitthichai indicated the block-
ing of websites deemed offen-
sive would continue. ,

“People who create these
(websites) are abusing their
rights and clearly don’t mean
well for the country,” Sitthichai
said. “We have closed many and
will continue to.”

He declined to say how many
websites had already been
blocked, or give the number
currently under surveillance.

Critics have accused the cur-
rent government of blocking
Web sites criticising the Sep-
tember coup that overthrew
then-Prime Minister Thaksin
Shinawatra.

However, Sitthichai said the
government is only targeting
sites deemed insulting to the
monarchy, as well as porno-
graphic sites.

The interim government
installed after the coup has
come under increasing criticism,
and groups calling for an early
restoration of democracy have
been organising protests.

One of the sites shut down

was launched by an anti-coup*
group, which calls itself Satur-,
day Voice Against Dictators,’
that has been holding protests’
demanding coup leaders trans-.,
fer power to a democratically:
elected government. 4

Sitthichai said he had ordered.
fewer than 10 sites blocked:
since taking office late last year,’
either because their content,
constituted lese majeste, they.
were pornographic or they’
called for public political’
protests, which are illegal under,
martial law proclaimed after lasts
year’s coup. t

However, at least a dozen
websites with political content’,
have been blocked, some tem-!'
porarily, since the coup. After,’
CNN had an interview earliey*,
this year with ousted Primé:
Minister Thaksin, the link of!
its website with the report was;
apparently blocked, though thé:
action was not officially’
acknowledged. *

In February last year, thé
website of the Thai policg*
department said that 32,612)
“illicit” Web sites had beef»,
reported and subsequently;
blocked since April 2002. More *
recent statistics were not readi-
ly available.

Thailand has no comprehen-
sive law governing the internet,’
and limits governing use and_
censorship are not clearly
defined. ;

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FHE TRIBUNE



M@ REVEREND Jerome Francis, speaks during a memorial service for Pakistan cricket coach
Bob Woolmer in Cape Town, South Africa, Wednesday April 4, 2007. Woolmer coached South
frica's test and one-day team and led the Proteas to the 1999 World Cup semifinals. After a stint as
the high performance manager for the ICC, he took over at Pakistan in 2004. Woolmer was found dead
in his hotel room in Kingston, Jamaica, on March 18 after Pakistan lost to Ireland at the World Cup.
Police said he was strangled. Bob Woolmer's picture is seen at the podium.
t (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

=)

BOUL.



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 21

Friends and family pay
tribute to slain cricket coach

i CAPE TOWN, South Africa

BOB WOOLMER'S family and
friends attended a memorial service
Wednesday near the slain Pakistan
cricket coach's home, according to
Associated Press.

The service in a Cape Town sub-
urb was led by Anglican priest
Jerome Francis, who was one of
hundreds of poor black and mixed-
race boys coached by Woolmer in
the 1980s.

Tears and tributes flowed as
Woolmer's widow Gill and sons,
Dale and Russell, heard how he
defied apartheid to create one of
the country's first mixed-race teams
and nurture talent like South Africa
batsman Herschelle Gibbs.

"Here was a man with so much
worth to humanity," Francis told
300 mourners at Wynberg Boys'
High School where Woolmer spot-

ted a young Jacques Kallis who
went on to play for South Africa.

Woolmer coached South Africa's
test and one-day team and led the
Proteas to the 1999 World Cup
semifinals.

"He was a players' coach. He was
my mentor," former fast bowler
Allan Donald said. "He put South
Africa on the map and we'll remem-
ber him for that. In my book he was
the ultimate legend."

At the height of Woolmer's suc-
cess, the former England test bats-
man trained deprived kids and
became a father to a generation of
cricketers.

At the height of the protests
against racist rule, he would hold
training sessions as bullets and tear
gas flew around the field — and then
drive boys home to make sure they
were safe.

"He's still the most successful

coach South Africa's ever had," spin
bowler Paul Adams said. "We have
lost a great soldier in the game."
During the service, longtime
friend Tim Noakes denied rumors
that Woolmer was about to blow
the whistle on match-fixing in a
coaching manual they were writing.
"Not once in the past five years
did he mention match-fixing to me.
The theory is completely without
substance," said Noakes, whose
book with Woolmer was in its final
stages before the murder.
Woolmer was South Africa's
coach at the height of the match-
fixing scandal involving Hansie
Cronje, but was never implicated.
He was found dead in his hotel
room in Jamaica on March 18, the
day after Pakistan lost in a shock
upset to Ireland and ultimately
crashed out of the World Cup.
Police said he was strangled.

April 1st - April 8th, 2007
Sunday April 1st Sunday of The Passion & Palm Sunday

7:30 a.m.
8:45 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

6:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

The Liturgy of the Palms

Procession & Liturgy for Palm Sunday

Holy Eucharist

Monday April 2nd-1:00 p.m.
Holy Eucharist

Blessing & Distribution of Palms

Evensong, Sermon & Benediction

Tuesday April 3rd - 7:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

Wednesday April 4th - 7:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.

Holy Eucharist

7:30 p.m.

Liturgy of the Renewal of Priestly Vows & Blessing of Holy Oils

Thursday April 5th - Maundy Thursday 7:30 p.m.
Commemoration of the Last Supper &

Watch before the Altar of Repose

Friday April 6th - Good Friday 9:00 a.m.

Good Friday Liturgy

Service Times For Sunday April 8th, 2007

Easter Sunday

6:00 a.m. The Easter Vigil
7:30 a.m. Holy Communion

9:00 a.m. Procession, Family Eucharist
11:15 a.m. Holy Eucharist

6:00 p.m. Solemn Evensong, Sermon & ‘Benediction

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BIBLE COLLEGE
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Evening Classes: 7p.m. - 9:45 p.m.
Weekend Classes: Fri 7 p.m. - 9:45 p.m.
and Sat 9 a.m. - 3:45 p.m.

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7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

Epistles I (I & II Cor)

Basic English
Church History II

Intro to Missions

Bible Origins

WEEKEND CLASS: Marriage Counseling I

Instructors:

U.S. Instructors:
April 20 - 21, May 11 -12, June 8-9

MA & CST Class:
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Global University, USA Instructors






PAGE 22, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE. ::
INTERNATIONAL NEWS
9 e :
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a
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§
4
\
mâ„¢@ MUNDA, Solomon Islands H RESIDENTS in the vil-
lage of Noro in the Solomon ;
MEN perched on rocks Islands, Monday, April 2. a
peered out to sea through 2007, wade through the main +
Sieinae a od . foe ee street after water subsided =~
da on Wednesday, watching for ers Se a byan ,
another deadly wave, accord- ae ae ce Cae t :
ing to Associated Press. south TF aciic in the earty ,
have sprung up in hills behind of the Solomon Island s
towns hit by Monday’s tsunami including Munda and :
and earthquake. With strong Gizo,were hit by anearth-
aftershocks still jolting the quake on Monday that mea- ¢
region, the 40 families huddled sured 8.1 causing atsunami =}
there were afraid to come to hit the coast line and forc- *
down, though some had run out ing residence to flee to the ;
of water. hills for cover. ¢
“There’s no water to wash, 4
no water to drink,” said Esther (AP Photo/ ‘
Zekele, who fled with her hus- Gladys Houla)
band and five children to the ‘
camp on Monday as the sea ‘
surged into Munda, on the west- :
ern island of Gizo. :
On Wednesday, they ven- i
tured back for a sack of rice to were sunk or washed away by :
replace the one they brought the tsunami and fuel was cont- !
with them, now half gone. But aminated with sea water, adding '
when they heard a rumor that to the aid delivery woes.
another wave was coming, they Fakarii said officials had |
took to the hills again. asked for two mobile hospitals |-
The fears of another tsunami from Australia and New 4
have made it difficult for offi- Zealand. Hospitals at Gizo and :
cials to determine the number Munda had been wrecked by }
of victims and get aid to the the disaster, he said. ®
homeless. And aftershocks were The quake, which struck 6 :
pushing some survivors even miles under the sea about 25
deeper into the hills. miles from Gizo, set off alarms #
“People are in a panic from Tokyo to Hawaii, testing +
because of the continuous procedures put in place after 4
tremors,” said Rex Tara, a dis- | the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami ‘
iali that left 230,000 dead or missing <
SAL HAGCKbeeed ain one aerial surveillance flights inthe _ radio. “What we are experienc- _ tsunami. Honiara only has very small jn a dozen countries. e ;
Oxfam Beney past two days had revealed “was ing right now in some of the One police patrol boat — shops,” he told The Associated Gizo’s proximity to the epi- *
At least 28 people were filled no.evidence of mass deaths.” campsites is children starting to arrived in Gizo on Tuesday Press. center meant the destructive ®
by tsunami ee nitwde:k Red Cross official Nancy Jolo experience diarrhea.” after traveling 10 hours from .A New Zealand military waves — up to 16 feet high — :
cuttitauake aH a acitiee said her agency had handed out Six doctors and 15 nurses _ the capital, Honiara, with tents, transport plane unloaded a ship- — it before an alarm could be «

were checking unconfirmed
reports of further deaths,
including six people buried in
a landslide on Simbo, another
island in this South Pacific
nation.

Authorities have no firm fig-
ure for the missing, but
Solomon’s deputy police com-
missioner Peter Marshall said



all the emergency supplies it
had stored in Gizo, the main
town in the disaster zone, and
was waiting for new supplies
from a New Zealand military
transport plane that landed late
Tuesday in Munda.

“The priority need right now, .

is for water,” Jolo told Aus-
tralian Broadcasting»C€orp.*

from Honiara were among aid
workers who arrived Wednes-
day at Gizo, where the airport
remained closed and the wharf
was badly damaged.

Many of the 5,600 left home-
less were left scrounging for

-basic supplies. under buildings .

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others were delayed because
provisions could not be found to
fill them, chief government
spokesman Alfred Maesulia
said.

“It’s very difficult to get the
materials needed because








rn of | ,
cL

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ment of tarps, water and rations
at Munda.

“We have not reached peo-
ple as soon as we could ...
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Tere a bie i 7 a B 5 ere
THE TRIBUNE
= @ Phone: (242) 502-6000
El] ERNST & YOUNG = “tartered Accountants Eheoets42421 502-6008
Third Floor www.ey.com
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3231

Nassau, Bahamas

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF ANSBACHER
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited and its subsidiaries (the Bank) as at
31 December, 2006, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

Management’s Responsibility for the Balance Sheet

accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical
requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the balance sheet ts free from

material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet.
The procedures selected depend on the auditors’ judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material
misstatement of the balance sheet, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor
considers internal control relevant to the entity's preparation and fair presentation of the balance sheet in order to

design audit procedures that are appropriate for the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on
the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. ‘An audit also inctudes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting
poticies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as wetl as evaluating the overall

presentation of the balance sheet.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained ts sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit

opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, the consolidated balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the

Bank as of 31 December, 2006 in accordance with Intemational Financial Reporting Standards,

Grmet ¥

January 11, 2007

Consolidated balance sheet

31 December 31 December
2006 2005
Notes $000 $000
As restated
Assets
Cash * $ 43 225
Placements with, and loans and advances to, other banks 3 259,084 218,932
Loans and advances to customers 4 74,361 53,275
Investment securities 5 2,004 12,903
Property and equipment 6 916 1,149 |
Intangible assets 7 14 7”
Accrued income and other assets 1,596 1,977
Other receivables 8 760 “7
Total assets $ 338,778 $ 289,007
Liabilities
Customer deposits 9 $ 319,192 $ 272,878
Accruals and deferred income 2,984 2,280
Trade and other payables 10 1,080 1,097
Subordinated liabilities Z 11 3,632 3,632
Total liabilfties 326,888 279,887
Capital and reserves
Called up share capital 12 3,000 3,000
Share premium account 13 1,000 1,000
Statutory loan loss reserve 2 723 533
Retained eamings 7,167 4,587
Total equity 11 890 9,120
Total equity and liabilities $ 338,778 $ 289,007



The consolidated balance sheet was approved by the board on 11 January 2007

asi Bnfo- ' Qt © AN a
Director“ : Director
The attached notes form an integral part of this consolidated balance sheet

Notes to the consolidated balance sheet

1. Corporate information

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited and its subsidiaries (the Bank) are incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas. The Bank ts licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Regulation Act, Chapter 287, 2000 to carry on
banking and trust business. The Bank’s principal activities comprise: private and specialist banking; wealth
protection and management; and fiduciary services. The registered office of the Bank ts located at Ansbacher House,
Bank Lane, P. O. Box N-7768, Nassau, Bahamas.

The consolidated balance sheet of the Bank for the year ended 31 December 2006 were authorised for issue by the
board of the directors on 11 January 2007.

The Bank's ultimate holding company fs Qatar National Bank SAQ, which ts incorporated in Qatar. The immediate
holding company is Ansbacher Overseas Group Limited (the Parent), a company incorporated in Guernsey. The
smallest higher group in which the consolidated balance sheet of the Bank ts consolidated is headed by QNB
international Holdings Limited sarl, a company incorporated in Luxembourg.

The Bank’s consolidated balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards (IFRSs). The principal accounting policies adopted by the Bank are set out in note 2.

2. Accounting policies

Basis of preparation

The Bank has applied IFRS in its financial reporting with effect from 1 Juty 2004 in accordance with the transitional
provisions set out in IFRS 1, ‘First-time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards’. Previously, the Bank
followed UK accounting standards issued by the UK Accounting Standards Board and the pronouncements of its Urgent
Issues Task Force and Statements of Recommended Practice tssued by the British Bankers Association and the
accounting requirements of the Companies Act 1985 (collectively, ‘UK GAAP’).

The consolidated balance sheet has been prepared under the historical cost convention as modified by the inclusion
of certain financial instruments at fair valuation. The preparation of the consolidated balance sheet requires
management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts and disclosures in the consolidated
balance sheet. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

The consolidated balance sheet 1s presented in United States Dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest
thousand dollars ($000) except when otherwise indicated.

> 2, Accounting policies (continued)

Basis of consolidation !
The consolidated balance sheet comprises the balance sheet of the Bank and {ts subsidiaries, Ark Limited, Baird

Limited, Bitmore Limited, Boyne Limited, Chester Asset Holdings Limited, and Dunmore Properties Limited as at
December 31, 2006. %

Subsidiaries are consolidated from the date of their acquisition, being the date on which the Bank obtains control,
and continue to be consolidated until the date that such control ceases. Control comprises the power to govern the
financial and operating policies of the investee so as to obtain benefit from its activities and ts achieved through
. direct or indirect ownership of voting rights; currently exercisable or convertible potential voting rights; or by way of
contractual agreement. The balance sheet of the Bank's subsidiaries are prepared for the same reporting year as the
parent company, using consistent accounting policies. All inter-company balances and transactions are eliminated

Foreign currencies

Transactions denominated in foreign currencies are translated into the functional currency at the rates ruling at the
dates of the transactions. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the batance sheet date
are re-translated at the rates ruling at that date.

Intangible assets

Intangible assets consist of software and are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation. lintangibles assets are
amortised on a straight-line basis over three years. The carrying amounts of intangible assets are reviewed at each
balance sheet date to assess whether they are recorded in excess of their recoverable amounts, and where carrying
values exceed this estimated recoverable amount, assets are written down to their recoverable amount. No such
write-downs have been recorded by the Bank during the year (2005 - nil).

Property and equipment
and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation ts calculated on a straight-

Property
line basis as follows:

Leasehold Improvements 5 years
Fixture, Office Equipment and Computers 3- 10 years

The carrying amounts of property and equipment are reviewed at each balance sheet date to assess whether they are
recorded in excess of their recoverable amounts, and where carrying values exceed this estimated recoverable
amount, assets are written down to their recoverable amount. No such write-downs have been recorded by the Bank

during the year (2005 - nil).

Impairment of assets

The Bank assesses at each reporting da’e whether there ts an indication that an asset may be impaired. Hf any such
indication exists, or when annual impairment testing for an asset it required, the group makes an estimate of the
asset’s recoverable amount. Where the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount, the asset &
considered impaired and is written down to its recoverable amount.

probabitity of recovery ts assessed as being remote. pee os

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007,

2, .

Financial Assets

Financial assets in the scope of LAS 39 are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss; loans and
recetvables; heid-to-maturity investments; or es available-for-sale financial assets, as appropriate. The Bank
determines the classification of fts financial assets at initial recognition and re-evaluates this designation at each
financial year-end. When financial assets are recognised initially, they are measured at fair value, being the
transaction price pius, in the case of financial assets not at fair value through profit or loss, directly attributable
transaction costs.

All regular way purchases and sales of financial assets are recognised on the trade date, being the date that the Bank
commits to purchase or sell the asset. Regular way transactions require delivery of assets within the timeframe
generally established by regulation or convention in the market place. The subsequent measurement of financial
assets depends on their classification, as follows:

Financial essets at fair value through profit or toss :

Financial assets classified as held for trading and other assets designated as such on inception are included in
this category. Financial assets are classified as held for trading if they are acquired for sale in the short term.
Derivatives are also classified as held for trading unless they are designated as hedging instruments. Assets
are carried in the balance sheet at fair value.

Loans and edvances

Loans and advances are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not
quoted in an active market, do not qualify as trading assets and have not been designated as either fair value
through profit and loss or available for sale. Such assets are carried at amortised cost using the effective
interest method if the time value of money ts significant. The Bank holds collateral in the form of cash,
securities or real property on each of the outstanding amounts in accordance with its internal policies.

Available- for-sale financial assets

Available-for-sale financial assets are those non-dertvative financial assets that are designated as such or are
not classified in any of the above. After initial recognition avatlable-for sale financial assets are measured at
fair value with gains or losses being recognised as a separate component of equity until the investment is
Gerecognised or until the investment is determined to be impaired at which time the cumulative gain or loss
previously reported in equity is included in the consotidated statement of income.

Fair value of financial instruments

The fair value of quoted investments ts determined by reference to bid prices at the close of business on the
balance sheet date. Where there ts no active market, fair value ts determined using valuation techniques.
These include using recent arm's length market transactions; reference to the current market value of
another instrument which ts substantially the same; discounted cash flow analysis and pricing models.
Otherwise financial assets and liabilities will be carried at cost.

2. Accounting policies (continued)

impairment of financiol assets
‘The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired.

Assets carried at omortised cost ,
Hf there ts objecttve evidence that an impairment toss on loans and receivables carried at amorttsed cost has
been incurred, the amount of the loss ts measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and
the present value of estimated future cash flows (exciuding future credit losses that have not been incurred)
discounted at the financial asset's original effective interest rate (i.e. the effective interest rate computed at
initial recognition). The carrying amount of the asset fs reduced, with the amount of the loss recognised in
administration costs. ff, in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the
decrease can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognised, the previously
recognised impairment loss ts reversed. Any subsequent reversal of an impairment loss is recognised in the
consolidated statement of income, to the extent that the carrying value of the asset does not exceed its
amortised cost at.the reversal date.

Assets corrted at cost

If there {s objective evidence that an impairment loss on an unquoted equity instrument that fs not carried at
fair value because its fair value cannot be reliably messured, or on a derivative asset that is linked to and
mast be settled by delivery of such an unquoted equity instrument, has been incurred, the amount of the loss
{s measured as the difference between the asset's carrying amount and the present value of estimated future
cash flows discounted at the current market rate of return for a similar financial asset.

Available-for-sale financial assets

If an available-for-sate asset 1s impaired, an amount comprising the difference between its cost (net of any
principal payment and amortisation) and fts fair vatue ts transferred from equity to the consolidated
statement of income. Reversats of impairment tosses on debt instruments are reversed through the
consolidated statement of income, if the increase in fair value of the instrument can be objectively related to
an event occurring after the impairment toss was recognised in profit or loss. Reversals in respect of equity
instruments classified as available-for-sale are not recognised in the statement of income. _

Derivative financial instruments and hedging

The Bank may use derivative financial instruments such as forward currency contracts to hedge {ts risks associated
with foreign currency. Such derivative financial instruments are initially recognised at fair value on the date on
which a derivative contract is entered into and are subsequently remeasured at fair value. Derivatives are carried as
assets when the fair vatue fs positive and as liabilities when the fair value ts negative.

‘The fair value of forward currency contracts is calculated by reference to current forward exchange rates for
Contracts with similar maturity profiles. The fair vatue of interest rate swap contracts ts determined by reference to
market values for similar instruments.

Trade and other receivables ;
‘Trade receivables are recognised and carried at the tower of their original invoiced value and recoverable amount,
Provision 1s made for any amount outstanding for more than six months. ' Balances are written off when the

2. Accounting policies (continued)

Cash and cash equivotents
Cash and short-term deposits comprise cash at banks and in hand and short-term deposits with an original maturity of
three months or less.

Texation
There are no income taxes imposed on the Bank in the Cemmonwealth of The Bahamas.

Provisions

A provision ts recognised when the Bank has a legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event and it is
probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. If the effect is material,
expected further cash flows are discounted using a rate that reflects, where appropriate, the risks specific to the

liability.

Where the Bank expects some of all of a provision to be reimbursed, for example under an insurance policy, the
reimbursement fs recognised as a separate asset but only when recovery is virtually certain.

A generat provision for loan losses ts required to meet the Bank's statutory requirements. The general provision ts
shown as an appropriation of retained earnings and reflected as part of shareholders’ equity. At 31 December, 2006
the statutory loan loss reserve was $723 (2005: $533).

Pensions

The Bank operates one post-retirement benefit scheme for its employees which is a defined contribution pension
plan. 4 defined contribution plan {s a pension plan into which the Bank pays fixed contributions: there fs no legal or
constructive obtigation to pay further contributtons.

Assets under administration

No account 1s taken in this consolidated balance sheet of assets and liabilities of clients administered by the Bank as
castodian, trustee, or nominee, or its subsidiaries as custodian, trustee, or nominee, other than those assets and
Uabitities which relate to banking services provided by the Bank or its subsidiaries for their clients. During the period
ended 31 December, 2005, the portfolio of the Bank's affitiate in the Cayman Islands was transferred to the Bank’s
local portfolto. The Bank has a fiduciary obligation to its customers for the administration of these accounts.

3. Placements with, and loans and advances to other banks

PAGE 23



31 December 31 December
2006 2005
$000 $000
Repayable on demand $ 46,597 $ 85,711

Other deposits with remaining maturity:
Three months or less but not repayable on demand 203,554 101,186
One year or tess but over three months 8,933 31,575
Five years or less but over one year - 460
$ 259,084 $ 218,932

The above amounts inctude:

Oue from parent and fellow subsidiary undertakings $ 183,452 $

4. Loans and edvences to customers

31 December 31 December

2006 2005

$000 $000

Repayable on demand $ 1,287 5 2,044
Other loans and advances with remaining maturity:

Three months or less 2,983 1,594

One year or less but over three months 11,110 1,525

12,181

Five years or less but over one year
46,870

Over five years
Less: allowance for impairment /provisions free note 9)

9,283
39,178

(70) (349)
74,361 $ 53,275

31 December 31 December
2006 2005
$000 $000

Concentration of credit risk
Property and real estate $ 49,969 $ 39,457
Other 24,462 14,167

74,431

Less: allowance for impairment / provisions (see note 9)

31 December 31 December
2006 2005
$000 $000

Geographical concentration of risk
North America $ 27,009 $ 18,940
Bahamas 26,202 20,098
Europe 16,627 6,633
Other Countries 4,523 7,604
$ 74,361 $ 53,275

53,624

(70) (749)
74,361 53,275
PAGE 24, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

5. Investment securities

THE TRIBUNE

Market risk

3 earn’ hei Market risk including foreign exchange, interest rate and liquidity risk, is encountered in both the investment and
‘$000 $000 trading books. The Bank's Asset and Liability Committee ts responsible for setting market risk limits and for managing
and monitoring these limits. The Bank’s treasury department also operates a central treasury for the Ansbacher
Debt securities $ 1,999 $ 12,778 Group and is responsible for the active management of the market risk of the Bank on a day-to-day basis.
Equity security .
Available for sale financial investments 2004S The treasury department manages the daily liquidity structure of the balance sheet. This is to ensure that funding
31 December 31 December obligations are met and that the regulatory liquidity requirements are complied with. General market liquidity risk ts
2006 2005 considered within the context of scenario testing.
‘$000 $000
Movement in available for sale financial investments Foreign exchange risk is controlled via net short open and forward foreign exchange gap limits. Foreign exchange
1 January 2006/1 July 2004 $ 12,903 $ 29,422 trading has not been a core activity of the Bank during the period under review and, in the opinion of the directors,
(10,780) (16,519) the risk inherent in these limits ts considered to be minimal.

Disposals (sale and redemption)

Impairment of equity security 119) :
m * $2,004 $12,903

At 31 December

The Bank investment in a non-tradable equity security has been assessed for impairment and based on that
assessment has recorded an impairment charge of $119 on the investment.

In 2006 and 2005, the Bank’s investments were held at amorttsed cost, less any impairment charges, which
approximates fair value.

The principal interest rate risk fs that of interest rate mismatching (re-pricing risk) which ts monitored through the
regular analysis of the book into various time buckets (gap analysis), with limits being set for each individual gap.

Operational risk
Operational risk is the risk that deficiencies in information systems or internal controls result in unexpected business,
financial and operating losses. The identification and control of these risks are managed by the Board of Directors.

Bf ot i SH

ek i a ee

oe ee me

The Bank's Risk Management Department and Internal Auditors carries out a regular review of all operational areas to
ensure operational risks are being properly controlled and reported to the Risk Committee. Contingency plans are in
place to achieve business continuity in the event of serious disruptions to business operations.

A maturity analysis of the available for sale debt securities ts as follows:

December 31, 2006











2,000,000 Investkredit Bank AG 2/1/2007 S$ 1,999 .
16, Interest rate risk
December 31, 2005 The Bank holds interest rate exposure. Instruments are allocated to time bands by reference to the earlier of their
next contractual interest rate repricing date and their maturity date. Short-term debtors and creditors are included
Finance 750
5 an bata ede IUlinots Float eines $ 5,025 in the following interest rate repricing and non-trading currency risk tables.
2,000,000 _Investkredit Bank AG 2/1/2007 1.999
1,500,000 Northern Rock PLC 2/28/2006 1,501 31 December 2006
3,500,000 San Paolo IMI Bk Intl SA 212712006 3,503 Within 3-12 1-5 >5 Non-interest
——S_12,778 3 Months Months Years Years bearing Total
— 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec Average
6. Property and equipment 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 _— Interest
Freehold Fixtures, 2000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 rate (%)
and office .
leasehold Equipment & oan banks and : .
iPro OD ey e000 oo loans and advances
to banks $ 244,998 $ 14,129 § - $ - $ - § 259,127 3.37- 6.45
cost Loans and advances to :
st: ; .
“At 1 July 2004 $1,251 $3,391 $4,642 pee ic 2,000 ; 74,361 3.38-9.35
Additions during the period 66 1 177 Other assets oe : : : 3 on 2,004 5.52
Disposals during the period : (81 (81 A 3,286 :
At 31 December 2005 1,317 3,421 4,738 — 8212.58 Ss 16,129 $n SS 32918 338,78
Additions during the year "1 163 ed Customer accounts $ 302,497 $ 16
: 671 § 4 S$ : : 4 15-5,
Disposals during the year : 49 19) Other liabilities aaa a } ° $ aes $3 yr 2.15-5 2
Subordinated liabil : . : . ;
At 31 December 2006 1,328 3,565 4,893 Serreers 4 ties : : : 3,632 3,632 6.27
11,890 11,890
Depreciation: Total Wabiteles $302 AST SVG S7 S24 S 3,632 515,954 $338,778
At 1 July 2004 767 2,425 — Interest rate
Provided during the period 197 560
he period : : 60 (60 sensitivity gap $ 16,861 $ (542) $ (24) $ = (3,632) $ (12,663;
Disposals during the pe $$) Cumulative gap 3 46851 § wea § tos §taees §
At 31 December 2005, 964 : 2,625 3,589 aa
132 267 399 me
Dispesals guring the year : 41 11 16, Interest rate risk (Continued)
At 31 December 2006 1096 BA 8977 31 December 2005
Within 3-12 ' 1-5 >5 Non-interest 7
Net book value at 31 December 2006 $ 232 $684 $ 916 , 3 Months Months Years Years bearing Fotal
. : . 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec 31 Dec Average
Net book value at 31 December 2005 $353 $ 796 $ 1,149 2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 2005 interest
\ $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 rate (%)
7. Intangible assets ts Cash and balances at
Computer central banks and
software loans and advances to
$000 banks $ 215,901 $ 3,256 §$ 7 $ - $ - §$ 219,157 2.05-5.98
As restated Loans and advances to
Cost: customers 51,275 2,000 : : : 53,275 . 2.89 - 9.86
At 1 July 2004 $ 1,275 Investment securities 5,754 5,025 1,999 : 125 12,903 4.66 - 4.69
Additions during the period : 2 Other assets : _ -_ : 3,672 3,672 :
: Total assets $ 272,930 3 10,281 S 1,999 $ : $3,797 ~§ 289,007
At 31 December 2005 1,277 ,
. Customer accounts -$ 269,352 $ 3,526 $ : . $ . $ - $ 272,878 0.98- 4.73
Additions during the year 9 - Other liabilities : : : : 3,377 3,37 -
Subordinated liabilities : : - 3,632 : 3,632 - 5.21
At 31 December 2006 —_ 1,286 __ Shareholder's equity : : : : 9,120 9,120 :
Amortization: . Total liabilities $ 269,352 $ 3,526 $ : $ 3,632 $ 12,497 $289,007
At 1 July 2004 562 eo er a a
Provided during the period _____ 636 __ Interest rate .
sensitivity gap $ 3,578 $ 6755 § 1,999 $ (3,632) $ (8,700)
At 31 December 2005 1,198 Cumulative gap $3,578 $ 10,333 § 12,332 § 8,700 § :
74
Provided during the year TTT The average interest rate ranges noted include all currengies, which are not equally weighted across each category of
At 31 December 2006 1,272 assets or liabilities.
Net book value at 31 December 2006 ee ee
. 17. Currency denomination of assets and liabilities
1 December 2005 $ 79
Net book value e+ em . 31 December 31 December
, 2006 2005
8. Other receivables Pe . oo $000
Assets:
31 December 31 December ; Denominated in US dollars $ 272,831 $ 230,347
2006 2005 , Denominated in sterling / 25,392 31,281
$000 $000 as Denominatéd in.euro...""s). eis Beg ak 15,415, 5,952
. . 5 i 5 oe j Denominated in-urrérictes other than'sterling, US dollars and euro’. ‘ 38 140 a a2
Interest recetvi We assets 38,778 ,
Sundry receivables : 303 ; 181 Total 338-778 S28
—_s_ 70S SSG ,
oO Liabilities and shareholder's funds
Denominated in US dollars : $ 277,372 $ 226,463
9. Customer deposits . ' Denominated in sterling 25,627 29,721
Denominated in euro 15,144 5,700
31 December 31 December : Denominated in currencies other than sterling, US dollars and euro 20,635 27,123
2006 2005 Total liabilities and shareholder’s funds $ 338,778 $289,007
$000 $000 p A
Repayable on demand . $ 64,778 $ 207,977 The above can be considered to demonstrate the exposure of the Bank to foreign exchange rate risk.
Other deposits by remaining maturity:
’ Three months or less but not repayable on demand 237,720 61,375
One year or less but over three months 16,670 3,526 18, Operating lease commitments
24 .

Five years or less but over one year

319,192 $272,878

8 92272, B78 Future minimum lease rentals receivable under operating leases are as foltow. as at December 31, 2006:

10. Trade and other payables

31 December 31 December Within one year $597
2006 2005 Between one to five years 1,070
$000 $000
Interest payable : $ 825 5 613 Future minimum lease payments due under the operating lease are as follows as at December 31, 2006:
Sundry payables 35 264 -
Other provision (see below) 220 220 Within one year 5 500
080 7 Between one to five years 1,250
Due to parent and fellow subsidiary undertakings $ 33 $ 27

19. Related balances
11. Subordinated liabliities =

Parties are considered to be related ff one party has the ability to control the other party or exercise significant

a a

+ ewe se oe ee

A EE ee ee BM

oan Pat ae ; ie SY sas Poin

Te a cE

it Ra ak ae a ED Be eo ae

On 10 November 2004, the Bank entered into a subordinated loan agreement with its Parent. The Loan is denominated
in US dollars, due in 2013 and accrues interest at a rate of LIBOR plus 0.9%. The loan ts unsecured and claims in
respect of it are subordinated to the claims of all other creditors. The balance of the loan at December 31, 2006 was

influence over the other party in making financial or operation decisions, or one other party controls both.

(a) Subsidiaries

$3,632 (2005: $3,632).

12. Called up share capital Details of the principal subsfdiaries are shown in Note 2.

(b) Entities with significant influence over the Bank.

31 December 31 December
2006 2005
$000 $000 The Bank also provides a number of normal current and interest bearing cash accounts to entities throughout the
Authorised, issued and fully paid: Group. These transactions are conducted on normal market terms.
1,000 Class A ordinary shares of $50 each (2005: 1,000 shares) $ 50 $ 50
59,000 Class B ordinary shares of $50 each (2005: 59,000 shares) 2,950 2,950 The following is a summary of group balances in the consolidated balances sheet as at 31 December 2006 and 2005.

$ 3,000 $ 3,000

The Class A shares carry all of the voting rights in the Bank. Both classes of shares carry equal rights to participate in

In aggregate, amounts included in the accounts are as follows:

dividends declared by the Bank. 2006 2005
$000 $000
13. Share premium
Balances:

31 December 31 December Placements with, and loans and advances, to other banks $ 183,452 $ 154,688
2006 2005 Accruals and deferred income $ 1,882 $ 1,557
$000 : $000 Subordinated loan $3,632 $3,632

Share premium account: 7

40,000 Class B shares at $25 each $ 1,000 $ 1,000

20. First-time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards

Share premium may be converted to ordinary shares of the class for which the premium was paid by means of a
special resolution of the Board of Directors. Upon conversion, share premium shall have the same rights and
privileges of the relevant class of ordinary shares.

The pages that follow contain detailed reconciliations of UK GAAP in accordance with IFRS I. It should be noted that
all adjustments from UK GAAP tc IFRS relate to the effects of the recognition and measurement changes required by
the transition to IFRS.
14, Memorandum items

31 December 2005
Transfer General





At the balance sheet date, the contract amounts of contingent liabilities and commitments were: .
UK Mortgage to statutory loan Intangible
GAAP arrangement reserve provision assets IFRS
31 December 2006 31 December 2005 $000
Contract Contract $000 $000 $000 $000 $000
amount amount Assets
$000 $000 Cash $ 225 $ $ $
. - - . 225
Placements with, and 5 $
Contingent liabilities: loans and advances to, . .
Guarantees and irrevocable letters of other banks 218,932 - : : - 218,9
credit $ 80 $ : Loans and advances to ° uae
$ 80 $ : customers 53,275 - . : : 53,275
Commitments: Investment securities 12,903 : . . . 12,903
Undrawn formal standby facilities, credit Property, plant and
lines and cther commitments to lend equipments 1,228 : : : (79) 1,149
- one year and over $ 2,003 S$ 437 Intangible assets : : : : 79 79
- less than one year 15,828 1,645 Accrued income and
17,831 2,082 other assets 1,97 : : : - 1,977
Trade and other
. receivables 467 : : . . 467
The Bank is a party to certain financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk, in the normal course of business, to
meet the financial needs of customers. These financial instruments include acceptances and guarantees, Total assets 5289,007 SSS 289,007
commitments to extend lines of credit, and commitments to originate loans and mortgages. Exposure to loss is Llabtlities
represented by the contractual amount of each of the instruments. Where guarantees are issued on behalf of Customer deposits $ 272,878 5 - 5 - S - $ : S$ 272,878
customers, the Bank either holds collateral against the exposure or has the right of recourse to the customer. . Accruals and deferred ,
income 2,222 264 - (296) - 2,190
15. Risk management Trade and other payables 1,187 : : : - 1,187
Subordinated liabilities 3,632 : : : - 3,632
The major risks associated with the Bank’s business are: . Total liabilities 279,919 264 : (296) - 279,887
Credit risk Capital and reserves
Credit risk arises principally from lending and, to a lesser degree, on all investments and trading activity involving on Called up share capital 3,000 3,000
and off balance sheet instruments. The Credit Committee is responsible for setting book, portfolio and individual Share premfum account 1,000 : : : 1,000
credit limits and these are monitored on an ongoing intra-day basis. Exceptions are reported to the Committee who is eoeldperdbanarhe : : 533 - 7 533
responsible for overseeing any remedial action. Retained earnings 3,088 al 333 ci - 4,587
Total equity 9,088 (264 : 296 : 9,120
The size of the balance sheet is such that it ts possible to examine each individual exposure to evaluate ff specific
Provisions are necessary or adequate. In addition, the uacy of | Total equity and
eq! adequacy of general provisioning ts also considered on a liabilities 5 289,007 5 . 5 . 5 . 5 . $ 289,007

regular basis.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 25



20. First-time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (continued)

1 July 2004

Transfer to
Statutory Intangible
UK GAAP reserve assets IFRS

$000 $000 $000 $000

Assets
Cash 475 : : re)
Placements with, and loans and advances to,

other banks 121,069
Loans and advances to customers 25,450
Investment securities 29,422
Property, plant and equipments 2,463
Intangible assets :
Accrued income and other assets 1,111
Trade and other receivables 435
Total assets 180,425 - S .
Liabilities
Deposits from banks
Customer deposits
Trading portfolio liabilities
Derivative financial instruments -
Accruals and deferred income 2,089
Trade and other payables 158
Subordinated liabilities 3,632

169,337

Total liabilities 175,216

Capital and reserves

Called up share capital 1,000

Share premium account - .

Loan Loss reserve : = 255
Retained earings z 3,954

5,209 : : 5,209

Total equity and Habilities , 180,425 _ 5 .

Total equity

20. First-time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (continued)

Fees and commissions that are an integral part of the effective yield on a financial instrument, and direct
incremental costs associated with its origination, are included in the calculation of the effective interest rate and
recognised over the expected life of the instrument, or a shorter period if appropriate. As a result the recognition of
up-front fees and costs that were recognised when received, or incurred, under UK GAAP, for example those related
to loan origination, are now deferred.

IAS 39 permits financial assets to be designated at the time of initial recognition as being held at fair value, with
unrecognised gains or losses reported in income.

Under UK GAAP debt securities held for continuing use in the business were classified as investment securities and
carried in the consolidated balance sheet at cost less any provisions for permanent diminution in value. IAS 39
introduces strict requirements to be met before debt securities can be carried at amortised cost and the Bank has
determined that it does not meet these. Accordingly debt securities previously classified as investment securities
have been reclassified as available-for-sale and valued at their fair values at 1 January 2005. Equity investments may
not be carried at cost under IAS 39 and these have also been reclassified as available-for-sale.

Under UK GAAP the Bank’s accounting policy was to capitalise, within tangible fixed assets, only software costs
relating to separable new systems. Under IFRS, both extemal and directly related internal costs relating to
enhancements that lead to additional system functionality are also now capitalised and included in intangible assets.

21. Litigation

The Bank is involved in legai actions arising from its normal course of business. No material adverse impact on the
financial position of the Bank is expected to arise from these proceedings.

22. Issued International Financial Reporting Standards which are not effective

During the year, the IASB has issued the following standards with an effective date after the date of this consolidated
balance sheet:

Effective Date

1 January 2007

1 January 2007

1 May 2006

1 June 2006

1 November 2006
1 March 2007

1 January 2008

IFRS 7 ~ Financial Instruments: Disclosures

IAS 1 Amendment - Capital Disclosures

IFRIC 8 Related to IFRS 2 Share-based Payment

IFRIC 9 Related to embedded derivatives

IFRIC 10 Related to the reversal of impairment losses recognized in an interim period

IFRIC 11 Related to group and treasury share transactions related to share-based payments

IFRIC 12 Related to accounting by operators for public-to-private service concession arrangements

The Directors do not anticipate that the adoption of these standards will have a material impact on the Bank’s
balance sheet in the period of initial application. :

Upon adoption of IFRS 7, the Bank will have to disclose additional information about its financial instruments, their
significance and the nature and extent of risks that they give rise to. More specifically the Bank will need to disclose
the fair value of its financial instruments and its risk exposure in greater detail. There will be no effect on reported
income or net assets.

Les LI
towards car purchase

@ Jackie Johnson of The Tribune and Ingrid Farrington

ngrid Farrington was the lucky winner of $1,000 towards

the purchase of a new car in a joint promotion between
The Tribune, The Bahamas Motor Dealers Association, COOL 96,
JOY FM, and 100 JAMZ.

Readers of The Tribune and listeners of the respective radio sta-
tions were invited to complete entry forms published in The Tri-
bune from March 19 - 23, 2007.

Only respondents who delivered their entry forms to the
BMDA New Car Show on March 23 were eligible to win the
prize.

Ms. Farrington said, "When I received the call from The Tri-
bune, I was very happy and grateful for the blessing. Actually,
I was in the bank at the time, making final
arrangements for the car loan. The call came in right in time!"

Ms. Farrington decided to purchase a 2007 Chevy Captiva from
Nassau Motor Company.

The Tribune



Parents take care of offspring





i BROWN bear Goca plays with one of her two two-month old cubs in Belgrade Zoo, enjoying the
- (AP Photo/Srdjan Ilic)

warm spring weather, Wednesday, April 4, 2007.









@ A TEN-DAY-OLD zebra is seen behind its mother at Attica Zoo in Spata, near Athens on

Wednesday, April 4, 2007.
(AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)
PAGE 26, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
i Sa

Congratulations to the winners
of The Tribune’s & Kelly’s Easter

Colouring Contest 2007!
Winners Age Category 4 - 5















Anastacia
Moree,
Tribune
Features
Writer;
Taylor M. i
Higgs, 1st . i
place winner;
Marcquel
Bethel, |
Tribune Sales . ;

ee

ws

Executive



~‘es=¢








Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's; : Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's;
in Philip Pullicino, 2nd place winner; Mrs. Pullicino Sarai Bain, 3rd place winnner; Mrs. Bain

a



=

1

v

Winners Age Category 6 - 8







4

Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's; Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's; Glenwitte Russell, | Lashanta Dugay, Kelly's; ‘

Paige Butler, Ist place winner; Mrs. Butler 2nd place winner; Mr. Russell Laura Eldon, 3rd place winnner; Mr. Eldon ‘

; a |
;

Winners Age Category 9 3

4

d

‘oe,



i) Pitre





Cherese Moxey, Kelly's: Ericka Wilchcombe, Kelly's; Astrid Tanaz Pikramenos, Cherese Moxey, Kelly's; Shannon Lightbourne,
Ashli Pratt, Ist place winner; Mr. Pratt 2nd place winner; Mr. & Mrs. Pikramenos 3rd place winnner; Mrs. Lighbourne

SS PPE EE PT TT - er er - oe mane ape ee ee
THE TRIBUNE





COMICS PAGE



Tribune Comics



JUDGE PARKER

3AM, DID YOU LEAK
CELESTE'S DRINKING
PROBLEM TO THE MEDIAZ



















/___AND REGGIE |
JUST GOT A
ROCK TOSSED
THROUGH HIS
FRONT WINDOW!

PEOPLE WHO
CLAIM MORAL
SUPERIORITY
LIVE IN GLASS
HOUSES. -- “

NO, I DIDN'T! AND
CELESTE'S DRINKING
WASN'T THE ISSUE!























ABOUT MY LCHOSTS |

\
SS

YOUR MINP.

1. You are declarer with the West
hand at Six Hearts, and North leads

ALEXANDER the five of spades. How would you



ALREADY lay the hand?

TOOK HER! Bee East
: @AI7 —
| {i} VAKQI94 ¥8752
a| #10874 A953
ETS + — $A9843

2. You are declarer with the West
hand at Three Notrump, and North
leads the five of hearts. South covers
the eight with the ten, and you win
with the queen. How would you play
the hand?






TL THOUGHT INCREASED
PRODUCTIVITY WAS A
GOOD THING





THIS 1S THE FIFTH
DIRTY DIAPER IVE








CHANGED IN THE we aH
¥AQ4 ¥598
oA #QJ10984
#KQI108 HA53
kkk

1. There is very little chance of
making the slam unless the missing
clubs are divided 4-4, so you should
plan from the startto establish the
club nine as your 12th trick.

Trump the spade lead in dummy,
ruff a club, cash the ace of hearts,
trump the jack of spades, ruff another
club, trump the ace of spades and ruff
a third round of clubs. .

Draw trumps, lead a diamond to
the ace and cash the ace of clubs, dis-
carding a diamond. If both opponents
follow to the ace of clubs, cash the



GCOLOTNCS. COM (OW SBUITIR

HOW many words of four

letter word. No plurals
TODAY'S TARGET



©2007 by King Features Synctoste, Inc. World nghta seserved

42 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.



| CRYPTIC PUZZLE |

ACROSS






ij DOWN
1 Alittle store of timber on the 2. Butisit important enough to be
street (5) questionable? (6)
6 - Woman worth winning? (5) 3 Does such an egg contain
9 Pirate said to have a coarse alcohol? (6)
manner (7)



4 — Steamy bit of photography? (3)



10 Look in a mine to find an aviator! (5)
11 Tiny error about a foxtrot
being stylish (5)
12 Praises lads going out of turn! (5)
13 By concealing a desire to be a
baseballer (7)
15 Little boy's room (3)
17 Whip the Spanish
hothead! (4)
18 Check out the dog is safe (6)
19 Like fruit that’s not juicy (5)
20 Hide or show (6) 14
22 Drifting gas, note, can smell 15



5 Admired by players, but he can never




quite make a score (5)

6 Related to a philanthropic
communist (7)

7 Anoptical circle (4)

8 Taking a drink with one’s better half,
seem unsteady (6)

12 Find there's money io make (5)

13 Shove off round the corner? That's

rich! (5)

Had they the making of stars? (5)

Money nearly due, pet (5)






























appetising! (4) 16 Notvery emphatic? (5)
24 Isobligedtobe abit hasty (3). 18 Do the job on court? (5)
25 Show competitor never upset about 19 Made clear in a style | defend (7) ACROSS DOWN
finishing late (7) 21 See tales woven about a fairytale : ene) (5) 2 Steps (6)
26 Enough petrol to have lit a bit edifice! (6) 9 Found (7) ; oleae
of a fire (5) 22 Slow movers the school head 10 Unit of gem a eee 65)
ae 27 The mug one possibly sent catches (6) bd 11 eee 6 — Cold-blooded
E round (5) 23 - Became like a jelly when some angel x 12 Glue (5) crealure (7)
28 Nominally something to pay at the gave encouragement (6) PB : i. ay ; SNE mnt
29 eee the official (7) ; ae on ee a. Mi Empijed (4) ee
\ ) > 18 Refer (6) / 13 Exterior (5)
30 Honoured with a nosh-up round the 26 Asentence that may not mean what it Yn) 19 Type of brick (5) 14 Denounce (5)
Turk’s Head (5) says (4) 31 One team that's never 28 What aman may mimic, uu 24 Beam (3) 16 At no time (5)
in front (5) sheepishly (3) 25 More conceited (7) eterna ta)




19 Performer (7)



26 Metal fastener (5)











27 Penalties (5) 21 Running (6)
Yesterday's cryptic solutions | Yesterday's easy solutions ae pena - ee @)
ACROSS: 3, Hunch 8, Lucan 10, H-ovel 11, Man 12, ; ACROSS: 3, Staid 8, Fatal 10, Reply 11, Log 12, Broom 13, 30 Gemstone (5) ie
Fo-C-al 13, Bar-gain 18, Pesos 18, Kid 19, M-E-DICI21, | Compere 15, Noted 19, Ire 19, Minute 21, Heretic 22, 31 Principle (5) 25: Peat Onn (9)
Cordial 22, H-ark 23, Junk 24, Pea soup 26, Chaser 29, _| Peas 23, Feal 24, Batters 26, Crepes 29, Awe 31, Hones p 26 Relax (4)
ll-L 31, Hiker 32, Codicil 34, Put on (Upton) 35, Aid 36, 32, Sketchy 34, Title 35, Tar 36, Salad 37, Beret 28 Obtain (3)
Ideas 37, End-Ed 38, Leaks 38, Ledge



S52 cS
ENCOURAGE GABRIELLA. mas PERI NN SSSR ANA
YOU KNOW SHE'S VERY:/ HER ADVICE] THING AS AND YOU FO BREEAM
MIGHT CHANGE ee PAR ORLoo x

Test Your Play



letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one nine-

cpp

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 27







nine and discard another diamond.
Then congratulate yourself on a fine
performance in making a poor slam
contract, as you were a 2-1 underdog
when play began. f

2. You start with eight tricks, and
the problem is to find a ninth. Oddly
enough, you are sure to make the
contract — regardless of how the
adverse cards are divided — if you
invoke a very unusual play.

Let’s first suppose you tried to
establish your ninth trick by leading
a low spade to dummy’s ten at trick
two. You would go down if South
won the spade and retumed a heart,
and it turned out that North started
with five hearts to the king and the
remaining spade honor.

This outcorne can be avoided if
you play the ace of diamonds at trick
two, cash three club tricks ending in
dummy, then lead the queen of. dia-
monds and discard the ace of hearts!

Once you do this, the contract is
ice-cold. The defense cannot avoid
either putting you in dummy with a
heart or a diamond to cash nine
tricks, or putting you in your hand to
achieve the same result with your
clubs and spades. You give away a
trick by discarding the ace of hearts,
but it comes back with interest. The
only tricks you can lose on this line
of play are two spades, a diamond
and a heart. :



aeonad
sagas @
Agen &
g.ge8 «
2wengdeyv a
Saseae §
Beee2 585
Szeee
SSragr
Rages
yvedsan a
geese oe
Q ook
a LORY
He nee ob
Begabes
HEEEEEES

Good 21; very good 32; excellent






ae

carbohydrates






BU rete leas
Plea e ears
Pec lg ee UM g 4g
Gee) ro -e






Paul Keres v Giuseppe Stalda,
postal game 1934. Estonia's
Keres was one of the finest
players never to become world
champion. His career was
blighted when he competedin 6
wartime German tournaments.
On his return home Soviet

authorities, who favoured 4 | [ IBI T T fafal
ed ect bel ot

Ase

Keres's Russian rival Mikhail
Botvinnik, coerced him with
threats to his family. Though no 2
smoking gun has emerged, 1
suspicions linger that Keres
chose to play below form when
he lost four straight games to
Botvinnik in the 1948 world title
event. As a youthful talent,

Keres honed his game by postal
chess, taking on 150 opponents
at once. When he died,
thousands attended his funeral
and he was honoured with his

a

HEY, DAD, WILL Yu BUY |
ME A FLAME THROWER?

‘CHESS by Leonard Barden ~

























THURSDAY,
APRIL 5

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20

Be careful of what you are doing,
Aries. You could send an e-mail to the
wrong person or leave a sensitive doc-
ument in the copier. Stay on your toes
most of this week.

TAURUS -— Apr 21/May 21

Keep track of your finances, Taurus.
It’s easy to let a bill slide by other-
wise. You don’t want to mar your
financial record with a foolish mis-
take, like sending out a payment late.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

It will be difficult to schedule meet-
ings these days, Gemini. Everyone
keeps switching the date, and find-
ing an acceptable time is turning into
a fiasco. Keep your patience.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Some of your best plans will go
awry, Cancer. Just about everything
will require more time and, most
likely, more money. You may want
to jump ship.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

The next week is not ideal for ven-
turing into new territory, but you can
shore up projects you have already
started. These projects may be rela-
tionships as well.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

This isn’t the time for domestic deci-
sions. You could end up with home
renovations that border on weird. Wait
some time before heading to the-home
center or choosing paint swatéhés.

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23:
This week, you will be delighted to
bump into old friends. Take the time
to catch up on past history, and
resolve to keep in touch more, Libra.
You prefer piay to work anyway.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

If you’ve been scatterbrained, things
will all come into focus this week,
Scorpio. You could find that lost
watch or set of keys. Others will
notice your regained concentration.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Things are not working according
to your timetable, Sagittarius, and
you are frustrated. It’s best if you
adapt to the new schedule rather
than forging ahead.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You can finally catch up on all those
chores you promised to get to,
Capricorn. Even though the thought
isn’t appealing, you know that it can’t
be all fun and no work.

AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb 18
Your schedule this week seems
ridiculous. You feel there will be no
way to get it all done, Aquarius.
Somehow you’ll summon the power
of an army and push through.

PISCES -— Feb 19/Mar 20
Beware of making promises you
can’t keep, since this week you are
overly optimistic, Pisces. Don’t com-
mit until April arrives.









~€ doe! z h

£

image on a stamp. Here Keres
looks set for victory with his Qg6
mate threat, while the queen also
stops Qxe2 +. It looks resignable
for Stalda, but the Italian produced
a surprise resource. What
happened?

LEONARD BARDEN



Chess solution 8340; 1...Ral+ 2 Kh2 Rhi+! when if 3
Kxhl? Qbl+ and Qgl mate, so White must play 3 Kg2
Rgl+ with a draw by perpetual check.



DOWN: 1, Dumas 2, Ban-G-KO-k 4, Upon 5 CH-apel 6,
Holed 7, M-edoc 9, Car 12, Fiddler 14, Air 16, Sit-up 17,
S-ink-S 19, Mansion (House) 20, Which 21, Croak 23, ~
Juliana 24, Per-U-se 25, Old 27, Hinds 28, Sepai 30,
Wides 32, Cork 33, CID

| DOWN: 1, Talon 2, Magpies 4, Tire 5, tronic 6, Demon 7,
Fleet 9, Tom 12, Breezes 14, Err 16, Tunes 17, Delta 19,

| Mistake 20, Epoch 21, Haven 23, Fretted 24,

Beside 25, Ewe 27, Roman 28, Petal 30, Shred 32, Slog

33, Car












PAGE 28, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



COMICS PAGE









AND WHAT \E T DON'T
WANT TO BE NOUR
FRIEND TODAN ?





WHICH MEANS...r'cc Yl |
DEFINITELY BE NEEDING

THINK REGGIE \ HIMSELF AND
WILL DROP OUT | CELESTE ON THE

~.-I WOULDN'T BE E
SURPRISED IF HE :
COMPLETELY RETIRES!







[ms

i

WHATA HORRIB
NIGHT THAT WAS

dl

—




LOOKS SEEDIER THAN} YOU WERE HERE
EMBE FOR ALANS PARTY.




a
YDo YOU THINK IM

“UMMM. THAT
PRETTY, DENNIS?” c

TRICK QUESTION?”



BLONDIE

YOUR NEIGHBOR LAMAR WONDERED
IF COULD UPGRADE YOUR








WHY THE HECK DOES LAMAR CARE
WHAT I WATCH IN MY HOUSE?!



HE SUST GOT HIS
TELESCOPE FIXED







The Vanishing Trick












CABLE. HE SAYS THE STLFF YOU'RE] Bes
WATCHING IS £2 E my
i South dealer. losers, one in trumps and the other in
Both sides vulnerable. hearts.
NORTH Undaunted, South proceeded to FRIDAY,
@K9543 demonstrate that things are not
i ¥K92 always as they seem. At bie ines APRIL 6
“U5 A104 he led a spade to the king, then =
i &Q7 cashed the ace of clubs and K-A of Sa er ay Apr a di
j WEST EAST Gequnds andsntedss Gamond: | ee
a * | your way, you may be planning a
: ae 6 oe 076 eu per a ace of hearts and a | inaior bash. Don’t be so extravagant
eart to the king. ith dies h :
#3972 $Q853 The stage was now set for what Po
#10984 &I6532 declarer hoped would be a success e
o v SOUTH denouement. Having stripped the eS. oer ae
4f SIGHP¢... IT NEVER. we L ALWAYS @A10872 diamonds and clubs from his com- } 1 1' Soce-friends and f amily ae
FAILS. WHENEVER EXPERIENCE AN VÂ¥A843 bined hands, and with two small Gag-t0 fel the bront of your tonsae
FINISH ONE OF MY EMOTIONAL LETDOWN K6 hearts remaining in a hand oppose inchee Cala Gow and’ stare menling
BLOW-OUT TANTRUMS | = wees Sore Hee ay e now exited | eo. before it’s too late.
e bidding: i
South West . North East West won with the queen, but CEMINE May 22 dn a a
1¢ Pass 34 Pass found himself in a most unhappy sit- important Cecision Cu

of the week has you pulled in two
directions. You must make a decision
soon, or else the opportunity might
pass you by. |

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
You’ve been waiting to hear big
news, Cancer, and it’s finally headed
your way. Expect a complete tum-
around with a situation that has been
plaguing you lately.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

A business trip, a vacation or some-
thing that involves your going out of
town is on the ‘horizon, Leo.’ Pack
your bags now because you'll be in
_Store for an adventure. .

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
Someone from your past has made
an appearance lately, Virgo. You’re
not happy to run into this individual.
:Graciously smile and be on your
. way — in the opposite direction.

4 LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23

A large responsibility has been put
into your hands, Libra. Don’t worry,
you have the means to get it done.
You can always enlist the help of a
friend if you feel overwhelmed.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Your life is in an upheaval, Scorpio,
but it is a happy change to your
normal orderly schedule. Friends and
family love to be near you in the days
to come. Enjoy the company.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
If you’ve been feeling down in the
dumps, Sagittarius, all of that is
going to change. A stranger brings
good news, and you’re the first in
line to accept his offering.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You’ve been juggling too many
responsibilities, Capricorn. Pretty
soon one of the balls is going to drop.
Realize that’ you need to scale back
your projects.

6% uation. Since he had no hearts, he
Opening lead — ten of clubs. had to return a club or a diamond.
This allowed declarer to discard
dummy’s heart loser while he
trumped in his hand, and the slam
was made.

It is true that this line of play
required West to have no more than
two hearts, but once the trumps
divided 3-0, that was South’s only
legitimate chance. He therefore
methodically went about the neces-
sary preliminary preparations for the
endplay on the assumption that his
efforts would be rewarded.

And then, poof, the heart. loser
simply disappeared.

The skillful magician who can
make things disappear right in front
of your eyes has his bridge counter- _
part in the skillful declarer who can
make a seemingly sure loser vanish
into thin air.

Consider this deal where South
arrived at six spades, a contract that
required only a 2-1 trump division —
a 78 percent probability — to be lay-
down. However, after he won the
opening club lead and cashed the ace
of spades, he suddenly found himself
faced with two apparently certain

TARGET

Bot BI YeReM. fRses synroeTS



HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb forms
ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals and no
words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. The
first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in
inkjet printer).

TODAY’S TARGET :
Good 20; very good 30; excellent 39 (or more).
Solution Monday.

are
tay

ilove quey.s. (we.






YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION

dare dart darter date dater deaf dear deft draft

drafter drat duet dust duster fade fader fared

fasted fated feud fraud FRAUDSTER furred

fused rased rated read retard rude rudest rued
es rusted sated stared starred stead stud sued

“ano! surd' tarred trade trader tread trued used

| CRYPTIC PUZZLE

(©2007 by King Featsce Syrcicate, Ine. World tigfta reserved.
















»
.AGROSS DOWN -
ee i estas: Sonesue oy oe ee
* Quite proper, but a fathead could successtid blow (6) heavily in the days to come,

2 Tofine leg? (6) Aquarius. You don’t mind because












































































make it terrible! (8 sets
Mt hs : 3 Essay about starting out in you love to feel needed and a central
be Sno poets in the past, just for one the city (4) part of the action.
ve kind of puccing (4) 4 — Avoid a fellow getting side-tracked (7) 7 PISCES — Feb 19/Mar20 °
Where varsity men regularly start a 5 Later, open talks in irrational fear (5) ee Advice is offered to you, but you’re
- row (6) 6 . Another explosion, curse it! (5) not inclined to take it. Reconsider,
Divine spirits of the East, in new 8 — Ashot at heartening constables (4) ee aes oe fo really speaks
: words of wisdom.
__ slang? (6) 9 Ina ae via ||
maybe win :
f t the
nc ,
13 All upset about some boy - it’s true! :
s grecotmtraaie |” PCC me | | Maal ated
has to return? (5) 15 Neighbour needing money for coal, a Eo nm - Reese pit
vw ee wriggling out of the Birkenhead perhaps(5) Peter Svidler v Zoltan Almasi,
(2) fiver (4) Teorey Mine Sut ana mLcOves (>) Petco || German Bundesliga 2003-4. It
9 Cordage well known to old hands (5) 19. Somewhat outrageous practical takes a special tactic to catch
24 Walked at the front ofthe field? (5) eA oe ere Ed Pit zz oe cue ee Senders wren
i : y getting one note right on e game is hardly out of the
ne Sweet American, maybe, to chew the piano! (3) opening. In today’s puzzle
wag with (5) 21 Move to the right as you leave (4,3) ACROSS DOWN Almasi has just captured the e4
123 Become friendly with me and an 22 Could such an urchin be a 1 — es @) 1 Pursued (6) pawn with his black knight. The
iL officer (4) cabin boy? (3) 7 eo 2 Salty (6) Hungarian number three
" ; ; ; 8 — Dash (4) 6 3. Hollow (4) calculated 1 Bxe7 Nxc3 2 bxc3
\'26 Possibly be ill dus to an offence (5) 23 Phone the gang a wicked lie! (6) i: aun (6) 4 — Suggested Rxe7 or 1 Nxe4 Bxe4 2 Rxed (if 2
"28 In favour of reversing to the right (3) 24 Greek god of generosity (4) uu. 14 Writing fluid (3) (7) Bxe7 Rxe7) Bxg5 when Black
'29) Is out of business due to perfectionist 25 _Abird you can talk to, practically? (6) a 16 Type of 5 Blemish (5) remains a pawn up and has also
i= notions (6) 26 Though not heavy, it's a good thing to N saw (5) ; st vy exchanged several pieces.
, shed (5) 5 17 Appointment (4) 9 Haier he Svidler ranks in the world top
30 Workin our lab (6) 27 Prohibits including even a scrap of a. 19 Servant (5) my six, but Almasi reckoned that checkmate or decisive material
31 Aline some cabs may form (4) meat in a vegetable product (5) = 21.) Was concatiied (6) Tee ere) the Russian had made a simple ain. How did White (to play)
i ‘ pn n 22 Disgusting (5) 13 Benefactor (5) ight and would have to oe sa play
32 Acclaimed for having sharpened up 28 Communicate sound facts, if only < 23 Saucy (4) 15 European capital (5) Ranie | aeaatonial score a rapid victory?
around the Central Court (8) approximately (3) 26 Type of chair (5) 18 Awry (5) Bo De aaitelh re nla:
1.33, Non-vintage wine ftom Spain, 30 Anumber of advertisements for aR eat (3) : ey his analysis had missed a
iginall young men (4) 29 Score ui ‘ hidden crusher which forced
originally (6) 30 Drool (6) 21 Mythical creature (7) o FEOWARD BARDEN
31 Radiate (4) 22 Adherent (3)
32 Angelic (8) 23 Courteous (6) CE a TT,
: 33 Dozen (6) 24 Way out (4)
Yesterday’‘s cryptic solutions Yesterday's easy solutions 25 Hypnotic state (6) 7
ACROSS: 1, St.-ash 6, Kitty 9, Corsair 10, Pi-lo-t 11, Ni-F-ty | ACROSS: 1, Ashen 6, Right 9, Located 10, Carat 11, Plead 26 Orderly pile (5) Chess solution 8322: ] Nxe4 Bxe4 2 Rxe4 Bxg5 3
12, La-U-ds 13, P-itch-er 15, Den 17, Las-h 18, Se-cur-e 12, Paste 13, Ordeals 15, Den 17, Used 18, Allude 19, 27 Postpone (5) : Qg4! and Black resigned. If Qxa4 4 Rxe8 mate. If Re7 4
19, Dried 20, Screen 22, Sag-E 24, Has 25, Even-te-r 26, | Adobe 20, Errors 22, Cede 24, Ray 25, Prouder 26, Rivet 28 Woman's name (3) Qxd7 Rxd7 5 Re8 mate. If Ne6 (best) 4 Nxe6 wins the





A-side






sommr23, Gel-led 25, Erred 26, Life 28, Baa




Lit-re 27, Ste-I-n 28, Bill-y 29, Federal 30, Fe-T-ed 31,

DOWN: 2, Trivia 3, Scotch 4, Hot 5, Oscar 6, Kind-red 7,
Iris 8, Tot-ter 12, L-earn 13, P-L-ush 14, Tsars 15, Du-cat
16, Never 18, Serve 19, Defined 21, C-astle 22, S-nails

27, Fines 28, Gamut 29, Starlet 30, Agate 31,

Tenet

DOWN: 2, Stairs 3, Elated 4, Not 5, Galas 6, Reptile 7, Idle
8, Heated 12, Plods 13, Outer 14, Decry 15, Duped 16,
Never 18, Abort 19, Artiste 21, Racing 22, Curate 23,
Deluge 25, Perry 26, Rest 28, Get

Religious group (4)

e6 knight or the g5 bishop.

Mensa quiz: Ipswich, Swansea, Aberdeen and
Lincoln.

One possible word ladder solution is: DOCK, deck,
peck, peak, leak, lead, LEAF.


THE TRIBUNE









vs Tribune Comics
JUDGE PARKER

THE COURTHOUSE!
WHAT HAPPENEDZ,

CELESTE BLACK

7 HAD A HANGOVER
AND ATTACKED
A TV REPORTER!

WHY DIDN'T
REGGIE LEAVE

I'LL BET HE'S
PONDERING THAT
DECISION AS WE SPEAK!

UT I GUESS IT WAS

WELL HAVE TO TAKE THE STAIRS. UST YOU LADIES. 444

MR. GIBBS SAYS THE ELEVATOR

H} THERE, LUANN. I WAS JUST
ABOUT TO GO UPSTAIRS AND SEE
WHAT ALL THE RUCKUS WAS ABOUT.



HOW AM [ SUPPOSED TO ~
GET TO SLEEP WITH ALL THAT
GLOWING GOING ON?

THAT YOU'RE
WEARING?

THURSDAY, ARIL 5, 2007, PAGE 29

ww/. PENNISTHEMENACE. com

LYING AROUND.

/

“HEY, MoM, ME AN’ JOEY WERE WONDERIN’
HOW LONG IT TAKES FOR HAIR TO GROW BACK.”

_ A Play Fit for a Queen

South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

South wins with the king, and,
with the cards divided as they are, he

YOUR MOM'S GOING TO
GO INTO CQNNIPTIONS
WHEN SHE SEES THIS

MARVIN



I'LL HAVE
THE “BEFORE
SUNRISE ”
BREAKFAST
SPECIAL

Yeb, TART Wi
Lh GLORIOUS

L
ae



NORTH must eventually go down at least two

#Q32 against best defense. East is bound to

Â¥Q 103 score four heart tricks as soon as

#KJ1095 West gains the lead with the king of

96 clubs and returns a heart through

WEST EAST dummy’s Q-3. The same result

#10974 #365 accrues if declarer plays low from

Â¥62 VÂ¥AI9N84 dummy on the first trick, in which
#8632 #AQ7 case East’s eight forces the king.

HK 84 52 But South has a much better way

SOUTH to play the hand that will stop East-

AK8 West stone cold dead. All he has to

Â¥K75 do to stymie the defense is to play the

4 queen of hearts from dummy on

&AQI1073 West’s opening lead.

The bidding: What can East then do? If he

South West North East takes the ace, he can’t return a heart

1 & Pass 1¢ 1¥ without establishing dummy’s ten.

3 & Pass 3¢ Pass Whether East continues or discontin-

3NT ues the suit, South has all the time he

Opening lead — six of hearts.

One play can make all the differ-
ence between making a contract and
going down. Declarer should there-
fore be careful not to play too hastily
when success or failure may hang in
the balance.

Take this simple case where
declarer gets to three notrump as
shown and West lead the six of
hearts. Let’s say declarer plays the

needs to wrap up-tiine tricks. And if
East does not take the ace, he winds
up in the same helpless position after
declarer next leads the nine of clubs
from dummy and loses the finesse to
West’s king.
The contract thus stands or falls
on which card declarer plays from
dummy at trick one. After giving due
weight to East’s one-heart overcall,
South must recognize the importance
of putting up dummy’s queen. Other-

VICTORY, SIR.
BUT, No, THE
VANQUISKED
GENERAL'S
HEAD ON A
PIKE DOGSN'T
COUNT

COCOINES. CoM / HOPSEQUITUR




IST. BY UMVERQLAL PRESS SYMACAT ES

Bete WILEY 1h, IHC. WILA WEE EMRTALIVE. HET

TIGER

CHILDREN
ARE SO
EXPENSINE |

~~ CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS DOWN
4 Restrictively 1 The impertinence to start curtseying
authoritarian? (6) i wrong (5)
7 Not much of a waterfall! (8) 2 Around mid-air, the fluttering dove is
8 Whence there may be a line to worth watching (5)
Gateshead? (6) 3. When to be wary in March? (4)
10 Arrests the flow of 4 With which to have a stab at cutting
supporters (5) up pears? (5)
13 Decline to surrender? (4) 5 The bread list, nominally? (4)
14 You won't get far with this one! (4) 6 Weapon perhaps useful at snooker (6)
15 She gets Joe with a right 9 — Claim a drink all round for the cricket
and a left! (4) side (6)
16 Fight a big-headed beefy type (3) 11 Quite a well-known article in the
17 Outstanding Netherlands (3)
encouragement (4) 12 Tosumup, | see what's worthy of a
19 Once prime minister's hearing (5)
garden (4) 13 Inservice, he has his own personal
21 Marginally sure to pay off? (4-5) lift (7)
23 | see mum's gone out to get 15 Like an inner feeling turning up in
a mineral (4) Portugal (3)
24 Manner in which one interrupts 16 Comfortable place to live at the end
people (4) of the road (3)
26 Showa huge amount of 18 Horse used with authority for halt the ACROSS ;
affection? (3) winter (6) : eo (6)
27 Catchina rapt 20 Compact in many ways (5) 8 Lust (6)
condition (4) 21 Engagement playing a soldier with a 10 Musty (5)
29 Set foot in haste, light heart (3) : 13 Slippery fish (4)
perhaps (4) 22 Personal immersion in something ve Feed et (4)
32 He's said to have been tasteful (3) Ww 2 ae See)
cut short (4) 23 Like our common friend in Dickens (6) | ad 17 Shade (4)
33 It's poetic in a clever sense (5) 25 Agreement in every essential (3) N 19 Contended (4)
34 The potatoes Buster 28 Possibly pass to the right in files (5) 5 21 Feeling (9)
mashed? (6) 30 Drag the guns into position? (5) a ee. TOU OL calle (A)
35 Regularly make apt cries at prices 31 Sellers possibly look carefully around > . a
being changed? (8) central Acton (5) pel 27 Paradise (4)
36 Using many branches, gets to the top 32 Seamen's union (4) uJ 29 Unusual (4)
of the tree (6) 33 Deputy’s fault? (4) 32 Water plant (4)
33 Book of maps (5)
34 Scorn (6)
35 Adorn (8)
36 Tension (6)

Yesterday's cryptic solutions :

ACROSS: 1, Caught 7, Rightful 8, S-ago 10, Putney 11,
Ang-E-Is 14, AC-t 16, Tar-ot 17, El-B-e 19, Ropes 21,
Paced 22, SU-gar 23, Me-Lt. 26, Libel 28, Fo-R 29,
|-deal-s 30, Labour 31, (t-)Axis 32, Hon-our-ed 33,

Sherry

DOWN: 1, Coup-le 2, Glance 3, Tr-o-y 4, Shun-Ted 5, Af-t-
er 6, Blast 8, Stab 9, Get 12, Gas 13, L-oy-al 15, L-ocal 18,
Li-Vi-d 19, Rag 20, P-E-R 21, Pull out 22, Sea 23, Mob-ile
24, Eros 25, Turkey 26, Light 27, B-e-ans 28, Fax 30,
L-ads.

Yesterday's easy solutions

ACROSS: 1, Caused 7, Exporter 8, Elan 10, Sadist 11,
Divide 14, Ink 16, Tenon 17, Date 19, Valet 21, Cared 22,
Fetid 23, Pert 26, Sedan 28, Pox 29, Twenty 30, Saliva 31,
Emit 32, Cherubic 33, Twelve

DOWN: 1, Chased 2, Saline 3, Dent 4, Posited 5,

Stain 6, Green 8, Edit 9, Ask 12, Vet 13, Donor 15,

Paris 18, Askew 19, Vat 20, Led 21, Centaur

22, Fan 23, Polite 24, Exit 25, Trance 26, Stack 27,

Defer 28, Pam 30, Sect





ten of hearts from dummy and East wise, the contract goes down the





covers the ten with the jack. drain,

The

Target

uses

words in

the main

body of

Chambers £2

21st § e g B35

Century Boao Ses

Dictionary o> 3 g io

(1999 SB Aso eR

edition). zgoebsehs
HOW many words of four letters E°SoVsases
or more can you make from the 52 P2es°oss
letters shown here? In making 82 3 588°
a word, each letter may be used So obo Heo
once only. Each must contain the of Ss592
centre letter and there must be Bog By 3 BES
at least one nine-letter word. Br OO SF ah
No plurals. esetas sy
TODAY'S TARGET BER RESS aE
Good 16; very good 23; excellent BOVUVODHS

31 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

new

word

reo el eel Sn
soak



Julio Kaplan v David Bronstein,
Hastings 1975-6. The late world
title challenger Bronstein always
liked to play in England, though

his clashes with Soviet 2
authorities restricted his visits.

CHESS by Leonard Barden





© 2088 Universe! Press Byndicete



SATURDAY, -
APRIL 7

ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20
Overindulging in all areas of your life
is not a healthy way to live, Aries.
Rethink your personal goals and
streamline so you’re not’being pulled
‘into too many directions.

TAURUS -— Apr 21/May 21
You want to support’ a friend,
Taurus, but you just, ‘don’t agree
with this person’s motives. Don’t
get involved in the situgtion; you'll
regret it later. Fake
GEMINI —- May 22/Jun 21
Someone in the family: has stepped
on your toes, Gemini.’ Rather than
lash out, keep your ‘feelings to
yourself and be the bigger person
in this situation. “

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
You’ve put all your eggs.in one bas-
ket, Caricer, and now--that things
haven’t worked out, you’re left won-
dering what to do. Family: members
won’t let you down. i+ «:

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23 “

Watch how much you speng this -
week, Leo. You could go overboard
if you’re not paying: attention.
Better leave the credit at, home and
use cash instead. . at
VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

If you don’t make a move soon in your
love life, you’re going to miss the
opportunity, Virgo. Stop looking for
the perfect Mr. or Ms. Right. Rather,
look outside your comfort zone.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

Now is not the time to’ make rash
career decisions, Libra. You have too
many responsibilities and ‘bills com-
ing in. Even though your jpb may not
appeal to you anymore, stick with it.
SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
Normally a go-getter, Scorpio, you’re
ready to throw in the tow—l in regards
to a project that isn’t working out.
Don’t give up, however; ‘you'll find
relief soon. a.
SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Stop being so generous to-others, and
start concentrating on your immedi-
ate family, Sagittarius: They’re in
need of your love and “attention.
Quality family time is key.
CAPRICORN -— Dec-22/Jan 20
Your love life is a mess, Capricom.
You can’t seem to get along with your
partner no matter what you do. Instead
of butting heads, sit down: and talk
camly and rationally. ;

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Stop being argumentative, Aquarius.
Those around you will grow tired of
hearing how you’re always right.
Accept that someone elses opinion
might be valid. .
PISCES -— Feb 19/Mar 20
Recuperation from an injury or illness
will take time, Pisces. Don’t try to do
it all now. You’ll have plenty of time
to catch up in the weeks to come.

LEONARD BARDEN

DOWN Here as Black (to move) 7
1 Trunk (5) Bronstein can win a pawn by é
2 Continental (5) Rxg2, but after Kd1 and Nf3
3 Inthis place (4) White could keep drawing 5
4 Loaded (5) chances. Bronstein’s actual 5
5 Untidy state (4) choice was much stronger. Three
6 — Deserved (6) precise turns aeateda position 3
9 Cricket tear (6) where his opponent, though — ;
11 Pull (3) ahead on material, had to resign
12. Afterwards (5) with no reasonable defence. The
13. Lured (7) winning technique is known as
zugzwang, a German term
See meaning “compulsion to make a
ip eae losing move”. It's well worth
eee learning as all experts are aware
20 Stuggish (5) of it while it can easily catch
2) pamn}4) opponents at club and social
22 Male (3) level. How did Black force
23 Open (6) victory?
25 Age (3)
28 Actions (5) aS ENT EO a
30 Church table (5)
31 County (5) Chess solution 8323: 1. Rxd2! 2 Rxd2 Rd8 3 Rhdl cA!
32 Ready to eat (4) and White resigned. Black's last turn c4 prevented
33 Promise (4) White unravelling his pieces by c4, c3 and Ke2.
Instead, once White has run out of moves with his a, g
and h pawns he must move his cl king or dl rook,
allowing Black to capture the d2 rook and win with his
extra bishop.





wa
a
5a)

ae

OD, Bl WAVERSPL ABESS onc PTE

PAGE 30, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



COMICS PAGE





ce o _ Tribune Comics
JUDGE PARKER





I'M RUINED-.-- r HEY, YOU KNOW \ ~=—

THE MEDIA---
STOCK WHEN THEY HAVE A
THAT TAPE AIRS! NOSE FOR DIRT!

HOW DO YOU SUPPOSE
THEY FOUND OUT ABOUT
THE REHAG VISITS, ROYF

WELL, I WOULDN'T OR THAT PESKY GHOST ]
WORRY. MAYBE IT WAS] $k. AGAIN, ° g

JUST THE HEAT PIPES
BANGING.

a
EA

L— 1 BET YOUR NOTHING'S TOO
HOUSE IS THE ONLY GOOD FOR OUR FINE
PLACE THAT _=8¢@7FEATHERED FRIENDS,
SERVES 'EM vy ELMO!
"MINI-SANOWICHES," )
HUH?

A SPECIAL
SURPRISE!

©2007 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Wortd Rights reserved

I DON'T
UNDERSTAND
WHAT YOU'RE

SAYING, MARVIN

NON SEQUITUR




Kl, BONEN ,
NAO ME.
SORRY
INN LATE,
BUT...





it OO WILEM WK. IHC.

TIGER






i CLEANED THE
PART OF MY Room
NEAK THE PO0R

WHAT ABOOT
THE BEST



ACRUSS
Take steps in time (5) 4, DOWN
Rude remark about a bit of luck Away with you, Kenneth, and stir
(5) things up! (6)
Comprehensive accommodation Links the church with a bad sin (6)
ae rach vested () A burden to shoulder (3)
Kian ad ‘oda (6) Excellent line to trade (5)
Files for the ringleader to pass Pep sold wrongly, having been
around (5 spilt! (7) :
Creator of ten line drawings? (7) Several astronauts have it, more’s
Chap from Harlesden (3) the pity (4)
The responsibility of a union, Effects! (6) :
a any rubbish (6) . Pay a redhead, but not for a good

: l time! (5)

noe or mentioned as sighted For just a little loan? (6)

Belief in direct negotiation (6) Lacking cover, they need a bit of
A place to stay, being at a loose shade in the rising sun (5)

end (4) Was it superior in forming a link
gees to hurry when ten short! with the moon? (5)

; ‘ Young woman embraced by a
vm we 7 many a fresh pink couple of Poles (5)

Allots a soldier five points (5) oe

A noise that may come from the nonnider get ae ae ae
pipes (5) July, but in a nice way (7)

re to get an antique by the end Big noise in the criminal world? (6)
of the day (5) Water jump? (6)

bili Kansas is state Can a broken leg cause a

ey being broke (5) apathy at leisure (5)
(5) ng good in a gnarled tree Not quite a grand old lady? (4)

A name for the master key (3)

8B NBR RP RB SS Mas: Ses: es orc f

#3 38



CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Strict 7, Rain-drop 8, Ealin-G 10, Stems 13, Fall 14, Thou 15, GI-R-L
16, B-ox 17, Spur 19, Eden 21, Gilt-edged 23, M-ic-a 24, M-l-en 26, Hug 27, Trap
29, Step 32, Sean (shorn) 33, Verse 34, Tubers 35, Practise 36, C-limbs

DOWN: 1, Crust 2, V-i-deo 3, Ides 4, Spear 5, Roll 6, Cannon 9, Al-leg-e 11, The
12, Mus-ic 13, Fireman 15, Gut 16, Be-d 18, PLA-ter 20, D-ENSE 21, Gl-g 22, Dip
23,'Mutual 25, Yes 28, R-asps 30, Train 31, Pe-t-er 32, Seam 33, Vice

EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Limpet 7, Hysteria 8, Desire 10, Stale 13, Eels 14, Tuna 15, Anne 16,
Bed 17, Tint 19, Vied 21, Sentiment 23, Herd 24, Cane 26, Sow 27, Eden 29, Rare
32, Reed 33, Atlas 34, Deride 35, Decorate 36, Stress

DOWN: 1, Chest 2, Asian 3, Here 4, Laden 5, Mess 6, Earned 9, Eleven 11, Tug 12,
Later 13, Enticed 15, Ant 16, Bet 18, Indeed 20, Inert 21, Sew 22, Man 23,
Honest 25, Era 28, Deeds 30, Altar 31, Essex 32, Ripe 33, Avow

IF YOU STAND HERE, |
» TAR REST POESNIT -
NEEP CLEANING

EASY PUZZLE











PUTTING MY
THOUGHTS











y

2
TWe CNBEE NENS 3h

8



Tropical bird (5)
Currency units
(5)

Arthurian
knight (7)
Reject (5)
Allude (5)
Derision (5)
Musical ending
(”)

Tier (3)
Minerals (4)
Dress (6)
Practises
boxing (5)
Disprove (6)
African country
(4)

Insect (3)
Stimulus (7)
Play (5)
Moroccan
capital (5)
Without (5)
Esteems (7)
Celebrated (5)
Fraction (5)





“57S YOUR TURN, JOEY, TO
FOR OUR BALL BACK.”

West dealer.
East-West vulnerable.

NORTH
@KQI93
VA63
$Q9
#AKQ
WEST EAST
$85 #A 102
¥310974 ¥85
*AI84 #K52
#76 #98532
SOUTH
#764
Â¥KQ2
10763
$3104

The bidding:

West North East South
Pass 1¢ Pass 1 NT
Pass 3 NT

Opening lead — jack of hearts.

To be a good player, you must
acquire’ the habit of making assump-
tions. Often these assumptions will
turn out to be wrong, but that doesn’t
mean it was wrong to make them;
only by making assumptions can you
put yourself in a position to win
when it is possible to win.

Here is a typical case. Let’s say
you’re East and partner leads the jack
of hearts’ against: three notrump.
South wins with the queen and leads

' ety

Vuageat





HOW many words of four letters

or more can you make from the

letters shown here? In making a

word, each letter may be used

once only. Each must contain

the centre letter and there must
’ be at least one nine-letter word.

No plurals.

TODAY’S TARGET :

Good 14; very good 21; excellent
’ 28 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

Seem (6)
Tallies (6)
Pale (3)
Jousting
weapon (5)
Root
vegetables (7)
Biblical garden
(4)

Quake (6)
Range (5)
Snake (5)
Dutch
earthenware (5)
Correct (5)
Unwanted
plants (5)
Scent (5)
Began (7)
Hire (6)
Shade of red
(6)

Month (6)
Force (5)
Challenge (4)
Encountered
(3)

SRSS

NNONNH
Ooouw

It Only Hurts for a Minute

tee

Ge

Ca



MOM, WILL YOU DRIVE
ME INTO TOWN ?



WEN SHOULD T DRIVE
YOU, CALVIN ?









a spade to dummy’s jack. It doesn’t
rnigtier when you take yo ace; what M O N DAY,
does matter is what you play next.

It’s easy to see — if you look at all APRIL 9

four hands — that if you retumalow | ARTRS — Mar 21/Apr 20
diamond, your side can snatch four | Don worry when a conflict arises

diamond tricks and put the contract : : “Wo
down one; Butié you don tient at work, Aries. Things will simmer
low diamond at trick three — per-
haps because you were taught not to finding a resolution.

lead away from a king, or always to TAURUS — Apr 21/M ay 21

return your partner’s suit — declarer he nas :
finishes with 10 tricks. ; There’s no time like the present to

: embark on that home improvement
Regardless of what you might ‘you’ve been considering, Taurus.
have been taught, however, the fact | Encourage others to give you some
is that in this case you must assume friendly assistance.
West has the ace of diamonds to give . GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
yourself any chance of beating the if you've ee ra ing Shoat taking
contract. : ‘ :
a trip, now. is the time to do so,
. To assume that South has the ace Gemini. Grab a friend or family mem.
of diamonds ;— or to ignore entirely | ber 10 take the ride with you and it will
the question bf who has the ace — be much more fan e
and blindly return a heart would be CANCER - J ; 22/Jul 2
giving up. It is obvious dec]arer will. ~ Jun 22/Jul 22

score at least nine tricks, — four “J YOU’ve been feeling under the
spades, two hearts (you can’t be sure Weather, Cancer, and you can’t seem
who has the king) and three clubs — || bounce back quickly. Rest is key

if you play “safe” and return a heart. this week. There’s no point getting
It is true that West must have | CY? more run down.

somewhat more strength in dia- | LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

monds than just four to the ace — he | Lions may be the kings of the jungle,

must have at least the jack’ with it — . | Leo, but this week you can’t even

but this is merely an extension of the [| Muster a meow. No one is taking you

original assumption. Seriously, and that has: you angry.
Seka 7 Rethink your strategy.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

A move you made a few weeks back
is not panning out as you had hoped,
Virgo. You just can’t seem to get
along with your new housemate. It
may be time to pack up once more.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ve been taking advantage of
loved ones, Libra, and it has to stop.
There’s only so much they will take
before getting angry. Start reciprocat-
ing instead of just being greedy.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
You'll want to run the show this
week, Scorpio, and others will be
anxious to let you. Don’t let the
power go to your head, or else you’ll
make enemies very quickly.

SAGITTARIUS = Nov 23/Dec 21
A friend in need has you running,
Sagittarius. But don’t be so quick
to jump everytime this person
beckons or.else the situation could
get out of control.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You’ve been doing too much at work
again, Capricorn. If you don’t slow
yourself down, you’re going to find

new : yourself physically and mentally
worn out.
AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18
word Stop being so controlling of the

finances, Aquarius. Putting the

spending blame on others is not
| consume | accurate — you’re involved in that
Situation as well.
PISCES — Feb 19/Mar20
MTT aT) If plans don’t work out the way you
expected this week, Pisces, don’t

get discouraged. Bounce back and
set a new agenda.





et cart

CELEBRATE cereal claret

clear cleat crab crat
ect erect

e@
ec tercel

ber cable care car

acre brace bracelet bract
carte cartel cater

create creel eclat el
lace race react tal
trace treacle

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

ca



CHESS by Leonard Barden _

Bragi Thorfinsson v Arnar
Gunnarson, Reykjavik 2006. It
was a full two hours straight TV
chess, a remarkable sight
anywhere but maybe not in
Iceland which has the highest
number of grandmasters
relative to population of any
major country. The two experts
were in the final stages of their
speed game when Thorfinsson,
with a lost position, sacrificed a
rook for a crude trap. He hoped
that Black would fall for exf5?? A
Qxc6. Gunnarson planned Qd7, _ Fischer, now an Icelandic citizen,
but the clock made him panic watching the programme, and ;
and he went Kg8?? allowing giving a rare indication that he still
Qxg7 mate. Then came the most follows real chess. Of course,
unexpected twist. The TV station Bobby was right. What should
gota call from a viewer pointing Black play?

out a spectacular black win in

the diagram. It was Bobby LEONARD BARDEN



TE TT,

*
Chess solution 8324: 1...Rxg2+! 2 Khl (if 2 Kxg2
Rg4++ 3 Kh2 Qg2 mate) Rh4! when if 3 Nxh4 RI2+
wins the {6 queen or 3 Qxh4 Rg4+ or 3 QI7+ Rg/+! 4 £3
Rxh3 mate.
Mensa quiz: Content, sweep, duet, own, out and tee.
One possible word ladder solution is: MILK, mill,
mall, pail, paid MAID.



. vy,
Mp

down rather quickly, so don’t 4
spend much time thinking about *

eee “4,

®

Dut

QOSEF

oti“

ar

2S a SOF SF FAA EAA OS

FE

A

ati. A Oe

8.0 C.F. 8. FEN @ 2 24.6.7. FF 22. SE SP BULA "4S 4 OF

TF LARRABEE OD DDD aa"a"0'S WW ss RBS F898. TLL Tea e aaa a a et

ADS PW

>» 7.7.2

4@a 0%
THE TRIBUNE

hy
aed h

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 31 = =



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Russian cosmonauts, US space
tourist prepare for launch -

B@ BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan

IN ONE of their last days
before leaving the planet
aboard a closet-sized space
capsule, two Russian cosmo-
nauts and a U.S. billionaire
computer programmer
enjoyed an array of earthly
pleasures Wednesday — a
springtime stroll, a game of
pingpong and a freshly cooked
lunch, according to Associat-
ed Press.

Engineers, meanwhile, were
finishing the assembly of the
Russian-made Soyuz rocket
that will blast off into the
nighttime skies over Central
Asian steppes Saturday carry-
ing Fyodor Yurchikhin, Oleg
Kotov and Charles Simonyi to
the international space station.

As the trio took a stroll
down the so-called Cosmo-
nauts' Alley at the training
center in Baikonur, Kaza-
khstan, Yurchikhin, 48,
quipped to reporters that he
was more worried about say-
ing goodbye to his wife than
about the spaceflight.

"Yes, I am very nervous: my
wife is coming soon, I have to





@ WORKER maintain the Russian Soyuz TMA-10 ay that will
carry the crew to the international space station during final prepa-
rations ina hangar at Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, April 4,
2007. The rocket is scheduled to blast off on Saturday, April 7, 2007.
(AP Photo Sergey Ponomarev)

look nice and shaved."
Yurchikhin said. "What
launch? Is there going to be a

lll Atlantic Medical

launch?"
Simonyi, 58, the soft-spoken
Hungarian-born computer

sce tsata hei AG nile she Cancel

programmer who paid US$25
million to become the world’ s
fifth paying "space tourist,"
said he was getting lots of
training and assistance.

"Everyone is helping me so
much that it's easy," he told
reporters.

Simonyi's 13-day journey
includes roughly 11 days on
the orbiting station and travel
time to and from it. He returns
to Earth on April 20 along
with the two of the station's
current crew, Russian cosmo-
naut Mikhail Tyurin and U.S.
astronaut Miguel. Lopez-Ale-
gria.

The third member of the
current crew, U.S. astronaut
Sunita Williams, will remain.
on board until June, when she”
will be replaced by Clayton
Anderson.

Yurchikhin and Kotov will
be aboard the station for more
than six months .

Simonyi had earlier said that
the hardest parts of training
were spinning in a high-speed
rotating chair to help train
against dizziness in space and
learning Russian. Now, he
said, he has begun to actually

Gityof THe Bahamas:

‘inp Haharnas Disbele Astecation ad clans ed Wire a good ee

enjoy the chair and his Russ-
ian —-some of which he studied
as a child in Hungary - is
improving.

Before sitting down to a
three-course lunch, Simonyi
began a pingpong game with
Yurchikhin with an energetic
"poyekhali," or “let's go" in
Russian — an echo of the last
words uttered by cosmonaut
Yuri Gagarin in 1961 as he
blasted off to become the first
man in space.

"I think the space station
will be more surprising than
the Earth," Simonyi said. "The
Earth will be there at the start,
it's going to be there during
the flight, it-will be always
there, ‘but the space station
will somehow come out of
nowhere."

Born in Communist Hun-
gary, Simonyi first learned
computer programming on a
bulky. Soviet computer called
Ural-2. Later, after emigrat-
ing to the United States, he
worked for software giant
Microsoft Corp.

He said his former colleague
— Microsoft CEO Bill Gates
—was paying close attention to

by

sir
the adventure and has asked
several questions on Simonyi's
Web site. Yurchikhin joked;
that Gates is probably busy...
training himself to be a":
"spaceflight participant" — as'~*
Simonyi and his four paying
predecessors have been known

Simonyi said he found itr=-
ironic that four decades after vi
he learned to program on ay:
Soviet machine, it is the suc-!~
cessor of Soviet technology~
that was sending him into.
space. He said he was also’:
happy that the Russian space
program was nothing like the
highly secretive project the
Soviet efforts were. jews

"Technology and engineer- -
ing, it has very little to do with,
politics, so 1 am very proud of. :
my background with my — at. °
that time — Soviet computers,"
he said.

Simonyi said an Ural-1 com- ,
puter that he saw at the
Baikonur museum reminded «
him of the Ural-2, on which -
he learned his craft. ~

"And I kind of thought, ‘thee
circle has closed. We are back“
to the future, I think it's
great," he said. tat

Atlantic Medical is hosting its ninth Annual Fun Walk on Saturday 21st April 2007 at 6.00 am at the Montagu Beach | ta
Foreshore. Funds for the Walk will once again be donated to The Cancer Society of The Bahamas and The Bahamas
Diabetic Association. Your efforts in 2006 helped raise $40,000. Thank you.

THE EVENT BEGINS AT 6.00 A.M.

THE ROUTE commences from MONTAGU BEACH then WEST on Shirley Street, NORTH on Church Street, OUTWARD across “New Paradise
island Bridge” to the round-about at Paradise Island Golf Course, BACK to New Providence via the “Old Paradise Bridge”, EAST on East Bay Street and
back to Montagu Beach.

TROPHIES ARE AWARDED ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES:

(Male and Female awards)

A.15 and Under

B.16-25 C.26-35 D36-45 E. 46-59 F 60 and Over

Official registration TOPM tunwatkastianichouse.combs

Atlantic Medical is not liable for injuries incurred by participants at this event.

$15.00 Adults / $12.00 Children: includes “T-shirt& gift pack”
Deliver to Atlantic Medical Insurance, Atlantic House 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue PO BOX SS



q 0,
2@4Wellness
74 1 yr’! together better!



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INTERNATIONAL

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RACE CATEGORY: (circle choice) A B

MN Atlantic Medical

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas Tel.326-819|
www.cgigroup.bm_ e: atlanticmedical@atlantichouse.com.bs

A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.
Personal & Business Insurance:Group Pensions:Group Medical:Life Assurance & Investments

L XL
Cc D E F

5 Jasmine Corporate Center, East Sunrise Highway, Freeport, Bahamas Tel. 351-3960

XXL XXXL



4 BEST
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Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.



a 7. 7ewmwanavw
PAGE 32, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

maha ater te ve

Nitmay sound ‘cliche, but happiness to me is seeing my dreams come s true and chartin a course ee .
new Ones, not just for me but for my family < and eves sand my Felatienship) with f _stCatibbean

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| GET THERE. TOGETHER, |

Platinum
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Tropical Shipping Co. Ltd. = Seaside Real Estate
| HG Christie Ltd.

Gold Sam Gray Enterprises
Bank of The Bahamas
BTC Gibson, Rigby and Co.
Kalik Eddie’s Edge Water
Ron Ricardo ‘oat Club Peace & Plenty
Fireworks Unlimited ae G&G Shipping Co. Ltd.
Coral Springs Water Company

Silver
Donors
Four Seasons Resort
Scotiabank Bahamas Ltd. February Point
Palm Bay Beach Club Crab Cay Development
Sky Bahamas Lid. JS Johnson Insurance Co. Ltd.
British American Insurance , Exuma Waste Management
Chat ‘n Chill 4 Sky Limo.
Airport Car Rental Exuma Chamber of Commerce



nk the entire Exuma community for their unfailing support and generous contributions of time,
AT rola e Uta arol sh aro) dal=] an c=sc1e 10 i aor




THE TRIBUNE eee APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 33

evens

FOR EASTER





Butler & Sands 4m
Company Limited fe Shin Fe I Fd

Ce ee ee * AAs,

PTE ae y :.
$11.25 “Ww. was sio.05 @
ma

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Now
$47.95 —™







Absolut Vodka Gordon’s Gin Hennessy VSOP | Smirnoff Vodka
Litre | 40 oz. Litre | Litre _

WAS $16.50





Ne) ae igen aii
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“ NOW
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Sale Date: March 29th-April 7th, 2007
Best Choices, Best Deais!

NASSAU-Caves Village, Shirley Street, Independence Highway, JFK Drive, Cable Beach
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ec. GRAND BAHAMA-RND Plaza, Queen’s Highway, Seahorse Plaza

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ELEUTHERA & HARBOUR !SLAND-Butler & Sands Governor’s Harbour, Bayside Liquor
Store—Harbour Isiand, Jeans Bay-Harbour Island

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WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. NO FURTHER DISCOUNT APPLICABLE ON THESE ITEMS.
PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY.


PAGE 34, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007










McCAIN
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Always Maxi’s 14 - 20 ct, Pringles 6.5 oz
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Advertised products may differ from the photos shown. Some product availabilty may differ for Grand Bahama stores.


“TOTAL” ";
COUNTS

biel il me ilale
GREAT VALUE
your “OVERALL”
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- purchase ».,)
nae

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LSBURY Asst’d 16 - 18 oz
iKE MIX or
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NT’S CANNED
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FELLER’S READY CUT 16 oz
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INTS Squeeze 36 0z

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‘AFT Asst’d 8 oz
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‘BY’S 12 oz
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IR FRESHENER

st’d Scents 9 02
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THE TRIBUNE





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE





Space tourist gets

_ ready for launch









Available at your
City Market Stores

| Libby?
Libbyy
| Libby
er ail ‘
Select Quality Comed Beef
& Whole Kernel Com

Mahatma

Extra Long Grain
Enriched Rice



Robin Hood.

Enriched Quick Grits. -

BUY and FLY
Win 1 of 4 Trips

Ci ty an onesie

See coe
( aN fl)

es
$500.00 spending money
eed

2 TRAVEL BONANZA

Buy any 2 of the 6 advertised |
items and have a cashier|
verify the products by
signing the front of your|
City Market Receipt}

Print your name,
phone numbers
and email address
on the top of your
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Receipt

and drop into |

the Entry Box |
at the Store

\ he ir min
Bath fissue

Oe cetacean aces

No City Market or Vendor Employee May Enter

Ends April Tht





@ KAZAKHSTAN
Baikonur

IN one of their last days

’ before leaving the planet

aboard a closet-sized space
capsule, two Russian cosmo-
nauts and a US billionaire

computer programmer
enjoyed an array of earthly
pleasures Wednesday - a

springtime stroll, a game of
ping-pong and a freshly
cooked lunch, according to
Associated Press.

Engineers, meanwhile, were
finishing the assembly of the
Russian-made Soyuz rocket
that will blast off into the night
time skies over Central Asian
steppes Saturday carrying
Fyodor Yurchikhin, Oleg
Kotov and Charles Simonyi to
the international space station.

As the trio took a stroll
down the so-called
Cosmonauts’ Alley at the
training centre in Baikonur,
Kazakhstan, Yurchikhin, 48,
quipped to reporters that he
was more worried about say-
ing goodbye to his wife than
about the spaceflight.

“Yes, I am very nervous: my
wife is coming soon, I have to
look nice and_ shaved.”
Yurchikhin said. “What
launch? Is there going to be a
launch?”

Simonyi, 58, the soft-spoken
Hungarian-born computer
programmer who paid US$25
million to become the world’s
fifth paying “space tourist,”
said he was getting lots of
training and assistance.

“Everyone is helping me so
much that it’s easy,” he told
reporters.

Simonyi’s 13-day journey
includes roughly 11 days on
the orbiting station and travel
time to and from it. He returns
to Earth on April 20 along
with the two of the station’s
current crew, Russian cosmo-
naut Mikhail Tyurin and US

‘astronaut Miguel Lopez-

Alegria... .

The third member of the
current crew, US astronaut
Sunita Williams, will remain
on board until June, when she
will be replaced by Clayton
Anderson. :

Yurchikhin and Kotov will —

be aboard the station for more
than six months

Simonyi had earlier said that
the hardest parts of training
were spinning in a high-speed
rotating chair to help train
against dizziness in space and
learning Russian. Now, he said,
he has begun to actually enjoy
the chair and his Russian —
some of which he studied as a
child in Hungary — is improv-
ing.

Before sitting down to a
three-course lunch, Simonyi
began a ping-pong game with
Yurchikhin with an energetic
“poyekhali,” or “let’s go” in
Russian —_ an echo of the last
words uttered by cosmonaut
Yuri Gagarin in 1961 as he
blasted off to become the first
man in space.

“I think the space station
will be more surprising than
the Earth,” Simonyi said. “The
Earth will be there at the start,
it’s going to be there during the
flight, it will be always there,
but the space station will
somehow come out. of
nowhere.”

Born in Communist
Hungary, Simonyi first learned
computer programming on a
bulky Soviet computer called
Ural-2. Later, after emigrating
to the United States, he
worked for software giant
Microsoft Corp.

He said his former colleague
— Microsoft CEO Bill Gates —
was paying close attention to
the adventure and has asked
several questions on Simonyi’s
Web site. Yurchikhin joked that
Gates is probably busy training
himself to be a “spaceflight par-
ticipant” — as Simonyi and his
four paying predecessors have
been known.

Simonyi said he found it
ironic that four decades after
he learned to program on a
Soviet machine, it is the succes-
sor of Soviet technology that
was sending him into space. He
said he was also happy that the
Russian space programme was
nothing like the highly secre-
tive project the Soviet efforts
were.

“Technology and engineer-
ing, it has very little to do with
politics, so 1 am very proud of
my background with my — at
that time — Soviet computers,”
he said.













PAGE 36, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE:
} : rep

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@ ABOVE: An
artist’s impression of
The Two Turtles

Inn in Georgetown,
Exuma

@ BURTON
RODGERS

(Photo: Tim Clarke/ |
Tribune staff) |



Bahamian planning
$16m resort facelift

Planned renovation of Exuma’s Two Turtles property could create up to 120 permanent jobs

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

he Two Turtles

Inn in George-

town, Exuma, is

set to receive a

$16 million
facelift, thanks to its new own-
er, Bahamian Burton Rodgers,
who hopes to transform the
property into a small, luxuri-
ous yet still affordable bou-
tique hotel.

In an exclusive interview
with Tribune Business, Mr
Rodgers, himself a native of
Exuma, explained that his

vision is to create a resort that
provides unparalleled service
at-prices the average guest can
easily afford.

“We want to provide high-
end, quality service at an
affordable price, which is
unheard of in the boutique
industry, because when people
think of boutique they think
of expensive $700-800 room
nights,” Mr Rodgers said.

“We won’t be at that price,
but we’re gonna be at an
affordable price for the aver-
age Bahamian vacationer,
because we want people to
come not only from the United
States and Europe ,but also
folks from Nassau and the oth-

er islands.”

Mr Rodgers noted that once
reopened, Two Turtles should
have a tremendous impact on
the island’s economy.

“In addition to the 120 per-
manent employees we expect
to hire, we have the construc-
tion workers and spin-off
employment,” he added.

He said he hopes to employ
as many native Exumians as
possible, because they are very
knowledgeable about the his-
tory of the property and the
island itself.

Mr Rodgers said the prop-
erty will undergo a_ through
renovation, with some of the
buildings being completely lev-

- elled and rebuilt. However, he

said he is determined not to
let the property lose the charm
that has made it such an insti-
tution on the island.

“When we are finished, we
will have among other things a
first class spa, two restaurants -
one a higher priced and the
other moderately priced - and
a deli,” he said.

Construction is expected to
start in the next few months, as
soon as all of the relevant per-
mits are obtained.

Mr Rodgers said that so far,
all his initial government meet-

SEE page 14B



BISX rules changes Stuart Cove’s visitor base ‘could double’

to speed

up issuer

financial reporting

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
~-Tribune-Business Editor

THE redrafted Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX) listings and
issuers’ continuing obligations

rules will require listed com- ~

panies to publish their quar-
terly and annual financial fig-
ures some 60 and 90 days
respectively after the periods
end, with the exchange’s list-
ings committee having “the
aibility to disqualify a director
from serving in that capacity”
for a listed firm.

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, told The Tribune
yesterday that the redrafted
listings and issuers’ continuing
obligations rules would be pub-
lished by next Tuesday to
obtain feedback from listed
companies, investors and cap-
ital markets participants, and
other interested parties.

Outlining the major changes
to both sets of rules, in regard
to the continuing obligations
of BISX-listed companies, Mr
Davies said: “We are requir-
ing companies to publish their
quarterlies 60 days after the
quarter ends; it used to be [and
is currently] 90 days.

“We are requiring compa-
nies to publish 90 days after
the year-end, rather than 120

Quarterly and
annual financial
filings proposed
at 60 and 90 days
after period end,
with BISX listings
committee able to
disqualify directors

days....... We’re increasing the
speed and timeliness of disclo-
sure.”

Mr Davies added: “We’ve
got to improve the standard,
and at this point unless some-
thing contrary comes about, it
is not enough for inssuers to
say that their external, inde-
pendent auditors cannot meet
these deadlines.

“We’ve approached BICA
[the Bahamian accountants
institute], and in discussions
with them they’ve just said
they’ll have to approach the
companies earlier. We’ve put
out there, and will have to see
what the companies come back
with and BICA’s comments.”

Mr Davies said another pro-

SEE page 13B



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TEL: 327-8866







Bahamian business to form vital component of $867m South Ocean revitalisation
* Developer in ‘deeper talks’ on four-star hotel brand and bigger role for Greg Norman
* Big role envisaged for Bahamian entrpreneurs, with beach and coral reef restoration also playing a part

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
~ Tribune Business Editor

STUART Cove’s Dive Bahamas, the
internationally-renowned undersea explo-
ration and adventure excursions provider,

- will be relocated to the marina of the rede-
‘veloped South Ocean Golf & Beach

Resort, the property’s developer telling
The Tribune yesterday that the move
would likely “double” the Bahamian firm’s
visitor base. ,

Roger Stein, of RHS Ventures and the
multi-million dollar investment project’s
managing director, said he had been work-
ing with Stuart Cove’s on the relocation,
the firm being a key part of South Ocean’s

plans going forward. i

He added that Stuart Cove’s currently
attracted about 55,000 visitors to its tours,
excursions and facilities per year, but
South Ocean’s closure since 2004 had
impacted the company by depriving .its
clients of a nearby hotel where they could
stay.

Incorporating Stuart Cove’s into the
redeveloped South Ocean’s marina, Mr
Stein said, would not only provide a bid
draw for the development’s guests, but it
would give the Bahamian company access
to a much larger client base.

There would also be more mooring
space for boats and yachts in the marina,
and more shopping, eating and other activ-

ities for Stuart Cove’s customers to par-

ticipate in.

Mr Stein said that although Stuart Cov-
e’s attracted 55,000 visitors every year, he
and the company “expect that to double
once they’ve moved into the location
we’ve designed for them.

“It’s a good draw and brings lots of peo-
ple to the site. Once they have an open
hotel nearby, people will have more time
to spend more money, spending it with .
retail, entertainment and boats,” he added.

“We’ve been designing the relocation
of Stuart Cove’s with Stuart and Michelle.

SEE page 10B



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THE TRIBUNE

Due diligence
required on
shareholder

nominees

nominee sharehold-
er is an individual or
a corporate entity

who holds the shares of a com-.

pany, either directly or indi-
rectly, on behalf of the ulti-
mate beneficial owner(s) of the
shares. It is.in the nominee’s
name that the shares are regis-
tered in the share register of
the company. Nominee share-
holders are normally used for
reasons of anonymity and con-
venience, particularly by off-
shore clients.

However, the provision of
such services must be offered
to clients whose identities,
business dealings and character
have met (and often surpassed)
strict Know Your Client
(KYC) requirements under
Bahamian law and interna-
tional standards of best prac-
tices. They must also pass a
financial and corporate service
provider’s internal due dili-
gence policies and procedures,
in order to ensure it neither
attracts nor assists in the com-
mission of money laundering
offences or any other criminal
activity.

The nominee shareholder
arrangement is a type of
agency relationship, where the
nominee, by holding a compa-
ny's share in his/its name for
the ultimate beneficial owner,
acts as an agent on behalf of
the ultimate beneficial owner
(who is also the principal in
this particular case).

"Asiait-agenty the” ‘néminee
Sa as owes the: same

nox
rate

,
,

e7Adrian
The Baham

e DJ cou

“Maes



duties and responsibilities to
the ultimate beneficial owner
as any agent would owe to
his/its principal. These are, pri-
marily, to perform the duties
imposed on him/it by the
express or implied terms of the
agency agreement, which in
this case is the nominee agree-
ment between the ultimate
beneficia! owner and the nom-
inee shareholder. The agent
must act strictly within the lim-
its of the terms of the
agency/nominee agreement
and his actual authority.

In consideration of the
agency arrangement and the
duties and obligations inher-
ent in such a relationship, the
potential liability that a nomi-
nee shareholder would incur
would be, primarily, one
towards the ultimate benefi-
cial owner (principal) of the
shares for breach of warranty
of authority, if the nominee
shareholder exceeds his/its
actual and apparent authority
to act on the principal's behalf
in any way.

However, the principal may
ratify the act(s) of the agent if
desired. It is important that the
provisions of the nominee
agreement between the ulti-

‘mate-beneficial ownér and the:'

nominee shareholder state



i tracy’
° c
eres y ecombe 8

Chure ch choir

e Mr. Lynx
@ Ta Da

_ “legal fiction"

nee

clearly and comprehensively
the nature and ambit of the
nominee shareholder, relation-
ship, the duties and responsi-
bilities of the nominee share-
holder, and the extent of the

nominee shareholder’s author- .

ity to act on behalf of the ulti-
mate beneficial owner in that
capacity.

With regard to third parties,
the nominee shareholder has
the same liability as an ordi-

_ nary shareholder, which is lia- »

bility for any amount that
remains unpaid on shares
issued to him in a company
limited by shares.

A strict interpretation of the
nominee shareholder arrange-
ment may cause some legal
academics to surmise that the

potential liability of a nominee

shareholder is, in reality, a
, since a nomi-
nee shareholder has no real or
practical liability. Any legal
obligation or liability with
regard to the shareholding
remains the obligation of the
ultimate beneficial owner of

the shares, not that of his agent -

or representative.
It is important to note that '

the potential liabilities of a .
nominee shareholder are not .
to be confused with the poten- |

tial dangers of providing such a
service to offshore clients, par-
ticularly in a financial envi-
ronment where sophisticated
‘white-collar’ criminals seek to

’ SEE page 12B ~

Reena

April 7th 2007

as s Harvest ~

eS



‘ wart oy:

ww ee wwe ew = eo

Toe ee ew BA OE ww Oe em we ee i et

FERRI I OSA



lets LI 6 Te? OD SR ae ete FL OOO aaa ala al TF ODO Da AoE we TLS O10 Oe 3 0 8 a eA AA ee aa LF LT OP PRT POS aL ae J 2 a2
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS





Regsuy
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS MAR 2.2 2007 2p05/CLE/gen/00794

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side
BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintift
AND
BERNARD SAUNDERS
First Defendant
AND

BERNARD’S CARPENTRY & CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LIMITED
: Second Defendant

SUMMONS



LET ALL PARTIES concerned attend before the Registrar in Chambers, Supreme

Court Registry, in the Ansbacher Building, Bank Lane, Nassau, Bahamas on
“Thurs dary the VO day of Roni
noon on the hearing of an application on the part of the Plaintiff for leave to enter
Judgment in Default of Appearance against the Defendants in the sum of $40,409.49
principal and interest in the amount of $23,001.09 as at 16” February. 2007 and continuing
to accrue at the rate of $9.34 per diem until payment in full and costs to be taxed if not

agreed.

Dated 22 day of March A. D., 2007.

‘REGISTRAR:

This Summons was taken out by Graham, Thompson & Co., Sassoon House. Shirley Street
& Victoria Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas, the Attorneys for the Plaintiff.




“ SUBRERE COURT

Rags:
COMMONWEALTH OF THEBAHAMAS. FEB 2 = 217 2005/CLE/gen/00794
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side
BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS} LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
. BERNARD SAUNDERS
First Defendant
AND

BERNARD’S CARPENTRY & CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LIMITED
Second Defendant

AFFIDAVIT

Il, HENDERSON BULLEN, of the Western District of the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands: of-‘The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Banker, make oath and say as
follows:- . le

1. Tam the Assistant Manager of the Plaintiff's Commercial Credit Workout Unit.and I am
duly authorized to make this Affidavit on its behalf.

2. Insofar as the matters deposed to herein are within my own knowledge they are true and
insofar as they are in accordance with the information furnished to me or derived from
statements or documents I have read as hereinafter appears, they are true to the best of

my knowledge, information and belief. ;
3. The Second Vetendant is indebted to the Plaintiff under a loan granted on the 20" March,

4, The said loan is evidence by a Guarantee dated 20" March, 2000 and executed by the
First Defendant on behalf of the Second Defendant. There is now produced and shown to
me and exhibited hereto marked "HB1" a copy of the said Guarantee.

5. The amount actually lent to the Second Defendant by the Plaintiff under the said loan was
$65,000.00.

6. The actual rate of interest charged on the said loan is $9.34 per diem.

7. In the Writ of Summons filed herein on the 18" July, 2005 the Plaintiff claimed the
principal sum of $35,876.24 together with accrued interest thereon in the amount of
$20,163.45 calculated to the 9" May, 2005 and continuing to accrue at the rate of $9.34
per diem unti] payment in full.

8. By letters dated the 12" April, 2002 the Plaintiff demanded that the Defendants pay of all
sums due and owing. The Defendants did not respond to the demand and no sums were
paid to satisfy the debt. The Plaintiff by letters dated the 19 March, 2004 informed the
Defendants that the Plaintiff had realized part of the debt owing by selling Lot No. 37
Area 10E Flamingo Bay Estates and demanded sums due. Notwithstanding numerous
requests by the Plaintiff the Defendants have failed and/or refused to pay sums due and
owing. There is now produced and shown to me and exhibited hereto marked "HB 2"
copies of the said letters.

9. As at the 19" February, 2007 the principal sum of $40,409.49 remained due and owing
together with accrued interest thereon of $23,001.09

10. By reason of the Defendants’ default the Plaintiff is entitled to recover from the
Defendants the monies duc under the said loan. .

1}. 1am advised by Messrs. Graham, Thompson & Co. Attomeys for the Plaintiff that the
Defendant has not entered an Appearance to this action.

12. I verily belicve there is no Defence to this action.

13. 1 make this Affidavit in support of the Plaintiffs application for leave to enter judgment

against the Defendants.

SWORN TO at Nassau, New Providence)
B This so*i,, of Forum )

A. D., 2007

LVAD .

7
f
Before me,
fa
- 4 Lhe
Y PUBLIC

A.D., 2007 at 20 o'clock in the Oe. v

‘the objects,




COMMONWEAL TIT OF THE BAHAMAS 2005/CLE/pen794
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law side
BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
ANI)

BERNARD SAUNDERS
First Defendant
AND
BERNARD'S CARPENTRY & CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LIMITED

Second Defendant

CERTIFICATE

I, hereby certify that these are the Exhibits marked “HB” and “HB2" mentioned and

is
referred to in the Affidavit of Henderson Bullen swom hereto before me this do’ day of

(Lt

NOTAR#E PUBLIC

A.D., 2007.

GUARANTER
TU Ncotinbank Qsahamay) Lid,

IN CONSIDERA’ ? i “
‘selils-eu Aes oenidinie to “ON praia TION or Scotiubank (Bulhamas) Lid. (herein called the ‘iank") anrecing to deal

BERNARD'S CARPENTRY AND CONSTRUCTION Company LIMITED
percin called te “Custome:”) the underalgned and each of than i morc thun o "
giiaranlecs payinent to the Rank of all delis and Dabilittes, present or future, direct ‘or ‘indirect, Abrohue on conlloneny
matured or not, al any time owing by the Customer to the Bank or remoining unpaid by the Customer to the Tonk.
whether arising Bom denlings between the Bank and the Customer or from other dcalings 01 proceedings by which
the Dank may be of ein Any Inanner Whatever a crcdilor of the Customer, and wherever (weurred, and whether
incurred by the Custome: alonc or with snother or others and whether es incipal or surety, inch ¥
tegal and other cosis, charges and oxpenses (such debts and labllities fei ‘

_ a juding all interest
Vabiiitiesâ„¢), the liability of the undersigned he: cinder being limited to the sum of

ng herein called the “guarantesd

+ Sixty-five Thousand Doliars (65,000.00)
rom tho datc of and for payment at fie rate set oul in Paragroph 3 heseof. annonce

Ls PERS
sith the Bunk as Anoâ„¢ UN) IGNED and each of them, ifmore than ones, hereby jointly and severally agrees

A. In thi: “ undersigned and 7
guarantor, it shalt inenn, wee ee erantoce siell enean. ane if there Js more thas one

2. This guerantes shall be a continuing puarantce of all the teed Ji
pete bt ee erates due or remaining unpaid to the Bank; and this Bieraniea silatt pot ee een erty 0 sng
Pod int ally at ished by he payment or liquidation at any time of any sum of money for the time being due or remaining

3. The. Bank shall not be bourid to exhaust its recourse againet the C
oa ictal Hotes a je Customer or others or any securities
ne af nei rent cine hold before being entitled to payment from the Quarantos, and the antor

4. The Guarantor’s linbility to make t under ual: demand
for has been made in writing on indersighed oe anyone of then, “iTrare thane egies Somos chall
such one of thom at the address of the onderattaned cade en demand addressed to che pasted westnes
) i ned or such une of them last known to the Bank ja ied,
repal post office; ‘ ‘auch domi e
pre in eataaere 4 affice, and the Guarantow's Jiabllity shal! bear intorest from the date of jand at the rate set

Ss. The rate of interest ayable by the Guarantor fri the date of di
itsined shall boc te eaten e. ‘om the date of demand for payment under this
air be reper ae Renta applicable to t Ander the Gen to time until indebtedness of the Custonier fo the Bank

6. Sefuutt in {cf any sum Custom Benk
test ' iti div'ana payabie tnd Coe by asia " er ae Bank at any time, the may
y eum 99 on! th:
aceount. A written shatechent ofa Monager or Acting Manager of in Oasneh arin? Beene at which wor eee retdhe
the Customer shalt, Ir wereed to by the Cusiornen Nea orelicnes cen ana holt in Ss vance ce prin 4
+ .
evhienoe aguinst the Guarantor as to the amount remaining unpaid to the Bank at nach Tne oe abun ee

7 This gusrantee shall bi In eddition to and not in substitution for any other gusraniess or other
rerdigngn fares Ta acs ihe Gate copa tena ple athe Sank has caer
ersets which the Bank msy be entitled to recej upon; ror ey fo reanect bss
uncnforceabllity of any otlrer guarantess i Other necurities whlch ie eae may awe erent ba ate esheet or

the guaranteed liabilities, whether oconsi ecw en
the Qoorantocts jteedite nether sioned by the fault of the Bank or oth jee, ahal! in any way limit or lessen

‘ustomer,

8. Without prejudice to or in any way limiting or lessenin; the Guarantor's liab , without
ottaining the consent of or giving notioa to the jscontinue, hoc, inary and
vary the credit of the Customer may grant tim senowety enters tad 7 7 bed

u
antor es the Bank may sec fit, and the Bank may take, abstain from teklr vary,
Sischaree, ive up, realize un or otherwise deal with sectirilies und Buarantess insuch mover as the B re
it, sane cre Pte Acree atl moneys Meek ses from the Customer or others or from securities or guarantees upon
Ss a a ¥
such farts of the © Bank may see fit and change any such appticetion in wijole er in part

9. Until cepayment.tn full of all the guaranteed liabilities, all dividends, com, tions, ‘oceeds
eecurities valued or prymenis reced the Bank from the Custoiner or ty ivide from aoe In Pespect otto
guaranteed Nabilitics shall be regarded for all purposes as payments in grose’ without any tight on the part of the

juarantar to claiin the benefit thereof in reduction of the Hlebity under thie yuarantes, and the Guarantor shall not
elainy any sel-off or counterclaim ugainst the Customer In respect of any liu lity of the Customer to the Guarantor,

claim or prove in the bankrupt Bi 1 com| i
subrogated to te so tuptey or insolvancy on coer, in petition with the Bank or heve any right to be

10, This guaruntes shall hot be discharged or otherwise affocted by the death of loss o|
Customer, by any change.in the name of the Customers, or In the memberahip ofthe Customer, Taepeeriont in
capital structure or tution of the.Customer, if a corporation, or by the gale of the Customer's business
or any part thereof or by the tase being amalgamated with 9 corporation, but shall, notwithstanding any such
event, Continue to npply to all guaranteed fiabilitics whether theretofore or thereafet incurred, and in the case of »
change in oration, thir gran aes oe is , yarinership or In the case of the Customer being amalgamated
rompora 5 niece shall apply to the liabilities of the reaullin |
“Custumer" shall include cach such resulting partnership and corporations ESrerieeete Seperation, sive Wis tere

uy. All advances, renewals and ercdits made car granted by the Bunk purportedly to or for the Customer
ufter the death, loss of capacity, bankrupicy o1 insolvency of the Customer, but before the Dank has receivsd notice
theroof shall be deemed to form part af the puarnotecd Uabililics; wid all advances, ronewals und credits oblained from
the Bunk purportedly by or of behalf o!
nutwihstanding any lack or limitation of power, incapacity of disability ofthe Cuslunes or of the direciors, partners
of agents thereof, or (hat the Customer may not be a Icyel of aunble entity, ov any irregularity, defect or in! ew enulity
tua the obtaining of such advances, renewals or credits, whether or not the Bunk had knowledge Ihercof, and any such
advance, renewal of credit which may nor be recoveruble from te undersigned as guarantor(s) shall be sevoverable

from the padersigned and each of (hem, if more thus one, jointly and severally as principal dcblor(s) in respect thercof |.

und shell be paid to the Bank on demand wilh interest at (lo mile cet out in paragraph 5 hercof,

2, All debis and liabilities, present and future, of the Customer lo the Guarantor arc hereby assigned

| to the Dank and postponed to the guaranteed liabililics, and all moneys recaived by the Quarantor in respect thereof

shall be received in trust for the Bank and forthwith upon receipt shall be paid over to the Bank, the wholo without i
any way lessening of limiting, the liability of the Guaranior under this guarantee; and this assignment’ and
Bonen is independent of the gubrantco and sholl remain in full fores and eflect until repayment in full te the

of al) the guaranteed Siabilities, ndtwithslanding that tho liability of tho undersigned of any of them under this
Quorantes may Inve been discharged or terminated.

13. 4 The imdersiyned of ‘any of them, if more than one, or his of their executors or adininisirators, by
giving thirty doys* notice In wrill 0 to the branch of the unk at which the main account of the Customer te kept, may
terminate his or thelr further tiabillty under this quarantec In respect of Habilitics of the Customer incurred of arising
aftes the ication of sach thirty Unys, but not in respect of nny guaranteed Jiabillties incurred or arising before the
expiration of such thirty days even though nut then matured; provided that notwithstanding receipt of any auch notice
the Bank may fulfil sequirements uf the Customor bused on ogrecments oxpreas or implied made privr to the
expiration of such thirty und any resulting liabilities shnll be covered by this guarantee; and provided further that
tn the eveat of the termination of this guarantee as to one or mors of the undersigned, if more than ono, it shall remuin
@ continuing gusranice as to the olher or others of the undersigned. 7

v4. This guarantes embodies all the agrecinents between tho parties hereto relative to the guaranties,
assignment end pestponcment and none of the parties sinll be bound iv any ropresentetion or promise made by any
person relative theretu which is not cinbodied herein, and It Ix specifically red |
any representations or promises made by the Customer to Ue Guarantor. Possession of this instrument by the Ban!
shall be conclusive evidence against the Guarantor that the Inutcument was not delivered in escrow of pursiunt ly wi
agreement thal Ii sliould not bs effective until any condition precedent of sul ent has beon complied wills and this
varantec shall be opcrative und binding notwithstanding the non-execulion theroof by any proposed siguatory.

“* “This guarantee shall bo governed In all respecte by the Jaws of tie Province ur Jurladtcttun in which :

* Ss.
the Customer's main account with the Tank Is kept.

oo
“Vhis yuerantes shall nol be discharged or affected by the death or wry dikabllity of the undersigned
fi oud

16.
or any of them, if more then one, nnd xhall cuure to the benefit of and be binding upon the Dan
exsigns, and the Guarantor, his heirs, exocutors, adminisirators, successors and assigns.

AS WITNESS the hand and soal of tho Guarantor nt_ Nassau, Bahamas
this 20th | | ,

» Ms muccessurs a

: day of March : > tt 192000
SIGNED SEALED AND DELIVER3D ns :
" ‘inthe presence of. ~ SIGNATURB AND SEAL



DATE RECUVEO

aeRROvaS



12" April 2002.

Bernard A. Saunders,
P. O. Box N-3875,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Dear Sir,
ec: rd’s Carpentry and Construction Compan fi
Please be advised that we represent Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited.

Our instructions are that on or about the 22% March 2000 our clients
granted a Joan to the captioned company, Bernard’s Carpentry and
Construction Company, Limited ("the company").

We are instructed that by a written Guarantee dated the 20" March 2000,
you guaranteed payment to our clients on demand of up to $65,000.00 of
the debts and liabilities that the company shall be indebted or liable to pay
to our clients and interest from the date of demand until all monies owed by
the company are repaid.

We are further instructed that the company has defauhed in it's repayment
obligations to our clients under the loan and that as at the 26" March 2002
the company was indebted to our clients under the Joan in the principal sum
of $63,890.00 and $4,463.00 interest. Interest continues to accrue at the
rate of $17.50 per diem.

We have therefore been instructed to demand from you as Guarantor
payment of the sum of $65,000.00 and interest thereon from the date
hereof until payment within thirty (30) days of the date hereof.






















the Customer shall be dcamed to form par} of the guaruntesd Jiabililies, |*

that the Mank shall not be bound by .

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 3B

In the event payment in full is not received within the time specified, our
clients shall take all steps necessary against both yourself and the company
to recover the outstanding balance including but not limited to exercising
it’s power of sale over Lot 10-037, Flaming Bay Exuma held as security
for this loan.

Please give this matter your immediate attention.

Yours sincerely,
GRAHAM,

laut Kea, ,
Tami C. Kassim.

MPSON & CO.

12â„¢ April 2002.
Bernard's Carpentry and Construction Company Limited,

Clo Registered Office,
P. O. Box N-3875,

Please be advised that w= represent Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited.

Our instructions are that Bernard’s Carpentry and Construction Company
Limited (“the company”) is indebted to our clicnts under a loan dated the.





" We are instructed that as at the 9” April 2000 the company was indebted

to our clients in the principal sum of $63,890.00 together with accrued
interest thereon the sum of $4,463.00 and continuing to accrue at the rate
of $17.50 per diem. :

We have therefore been instructed to demand, end we do hereby demand,
peyment of the said outstanding principal sum together with accrued
interest thereon to the date of payment which interest is to be calculated at

' the rate of $17.50 per diem within thirty (30) days of the date hereof.

In the event payment in full is not received within the time specified, our
clients shall pursue all remedies available to them to recover the said sums

“inchuding but not limited to exercising their power of sale over Lot No.10-

037, Flamingo Bay, Exuma held as security for this loan.

Please give this matter your immediate attention.

: Yours sincerely,

~ GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,

: eee

Vow Ke’

. Tani C. Kassim.

19” March 2004.

Bemard A. Saunders,
P. 0. Box N-3875,
Nassau, Bahamas.

’ Dear Sir,

Re: Bemard’s Carpentry and Construction Company Limited Lot
No. 37 in Area 10E Marina Section North “Flamingo Bay Estates”,
Exuma, Bahamas.

We refer to our demand letter dated the 12" April 2002, a copy of which
we enclose herewith.

Our instructions are that the captioned property held by Scotiabank
(Bahamas) Limited as security for a Joan to the captioned company dated
the 22" March 2000 was sold by our clients for the sum of $30,000.00.

We are instructed that the sale proceeds were disbursed as follows: -

i) Amount applied to-principal balance due under Demand Loan-
"$28,014.46;
ii) Legal Fees in sale of the property-$824.50;
iii) | One-half of Stamp Duty on Conveyance-$600.00;
iv) — Other legal fees -§561.04.
Total $30,000.00.

Our instructions are that the sale proceeds were not sufficient to liquidate

: ‘the debt owed to our clients and that as at the 19" March 2004 the
’ principal sum of $35,876.24 and accrued interest thereon of $16,116.80

remained due and owing. Interest will continue to accrue at the rate of
$9.83 per diem until payment in full.

We have therefore been instructed to demand, and we-do hereby demand,
from you as guarantor of the loan payment of the said outstanding

_ principal and interest within thirty (30) days of the date hereof.

_ Inthe event payment in full is not received within the time specified, our
_ Clients shall take all steps necessary against both yourself and the

company to recover the outstanding balance without further notice.

Yours sincerely,
GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,

Tait’ Kas——————

In the event payment in full 1s not received within the time specified, our
clients shall take all steps necessary against the company to recover the
outstanding balance without further notice.

Yours sincerely,
GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,

. nit

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law Side

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff

AND

BERNARD SAUNDERS
First Defendant

AND
BERNARD'S CARPENTRY & CONSTRUCTION

COMPANY LIMITED
Second Defendam



AFFIDAVIT

a ee

2005/CLE/gen’00794

Gebers sthersee & als:

Chambers

Sassoon House

Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
Nassau. Bahamas

Atiomeys for the Plaintiff

DDG

»

carntiontpa nde
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

i
1
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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 5B



Winn-Dixie transition
drops City Markets
profits by almost 60%

ahamas Supermarkets
B yesterday indicated
that the costs associ-
ated with the ownership tran-
sition from Winn-Dixie had
acted as a major drag on its
results, with net income down
almost 60 per cent for the 16
weeks to January 10, 2007, at
$1.25 million compared to $3.1
million the year before.
The company, which oper-

in Nassau and Freeport, said
in a statement that net sales
for the 28-week period (or first
half) to January 10, 2007, were
down by 0.5 per cent at $75
million, something it attributed
to “specific and temporary
causes”.

For the period November
11, 2006, to January 10, 2007,
Bahamas Supermarkets’ gross
profits were down by 8.2 per
cent or $1 million at $11.2 mil-

lion, compared to $12.2 mil-
lion last year,

The crocery retail chain,
which was acquired . by
Bahamian buyout group BSL
Holdings for $54 million last
summer, said year-to-date
operating income had more-
than-halved from $4.56 million
to $2.13 million this year,
although shareholder equity
remained strong at $22.7 mil-
lion.

“During this period
Bahamas Supermarkets
underwent a significant tran-
sition, shedding not only Winn-
Dixie ownership, directorships
and products, but also its oper-
ating support systems,” said
Basil Sands, its chairman.

“Transition-related expens-
es, escalating insurance premi-

SEE page 9B

ates the 12 City Markets stores

BIC spends $114m on GSM’s roll-out

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



THE BAHAMAS Telecommunications
Company (BTC) yesterday launched GSM
cellular service to Rum Cay and Ragged
Island, linking both remote locations to the
world.

BTC president Leon Williams said the
company has spent more than $114 million
in creating GSM technology for various
Bahamian islands, as it moved to ensure
every Bahamian has access to a cell phone
or blackberry.

. He added that BTC has had to continu-
ally upgrade its services, as demand grew
and capacity was filled. Mr Williams said
the company remains committed to pro-
viding quality service, and addressing prob-
lem quickly, but he could not guarantee
there would not be service disruption.

To facilitate the service on the two
islands, BTC has constructed a 100-foot
tall GSM tower on each island.

Mr Williams said that initially they plan
to accommodate 250 customers, but indi-
cated that as new developments come on
stream, such as the Montana Holdings’

Pictured from left: Mrs. Fanchon Braynen, Senior Manager, Customer Service & Operations,

Rum Cay Resort Marina project, they will
upgrade the system to accommodate
demand.

The next islands BTC hopes’ to reach
with GSM are Long Island, the Berry
Islands and Inagua.

BTC, he said, hopes to phase out TDMA
by mid June 2008.

“Soon, BTC will cover the Bahamas with
GSM technology. Already, more than two-
thirds of the population subscribes to either
pre- paid or post-paid cellular. More than
200,000 phones since BTC introduced cell
service,” Mr Williams said.

Minister of Utilities and Energy, Senator

’ Dr Marcus Bethel, said: “By the end of

this year, no longer will the farmer on
Mayaguana or the fisherman in Long Island
or the teacher in a small Cay in the Berry
Islands or Andros be isolated.

“We will be one nation able to commu-
nicate freely... Over the past decade, the
dramatic surge in wireless communications

‘has been a key component driving busi-

ness.

“BTC, then, is in a critical position in its
relations with the national economic devel-
opment. Should the company not provide

RBC FINCO and Mr. Giorgio Baldacci, President, Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association.

RBC FINCO Supports 2007 Easter
Classic Tennis Championships

“The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association

the products and services demanded by
today’s business climate, it is not merely

the company that would suffer, but the —

economy of the Bahamas. Fortunately for
us, BTC has recognised the pivotal role it
plays.”

BTC’s vice-president of marketing and |

sales, Marlon Johnson, agreed, saying: “No
longer is a sophisticated communications
system a luxury. Without modern commu-
nications, an economy falters and stalls. At
worst, it dwindles and dies.”

During the press launch, BTC held video
conferencing with residents in Rum Cay
and a teleconference with Ragged Island.

MP for Ragged Island, Larry Cartwright,
said he was ecstatic about the new service.
He said that for far too long ,the smaller
Family Islands were ignored and got “the
left overs.”

The service was something he has long

_ been agitating for, and said he couldn’t be

more pleased.

Representatives from Montana Holdings
and residents of Rum Cay also expressed
their pleasure, saying that workers on the
multi-million dollar resort would now be
able to communicate directly with Nassau.

PLACE:

RBC FINCO is again pleased to support
The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association’s
(BLTA) Junior Clay Court Easter Classic
Championships.

“Our support of The Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association gives us the
opportunity to invest in our community
and in particular young Bahamians ina
tangible way,” said Fanchon Braynen,
Senior Manager, Customer Service &
Operations, RBC FINCO.

About RBC FINCO:

wishes to thank RBC FINCO for its
continued support of tennis in our country
and especially our junior players,” said
Paula Whitfield, Vice President, BLTA.
“RBC has sponsored this initiative for a
number of years and we have seen the
positive impact on our younger players.”

The Championships will be held April 6-9,
2007 at the Gym Tennis Club Winton
Meadows.

For over 50 years RBC FINCO and its employees have been an integral part of The Bahamas
helping causes, supporting needs, and giving back to the communities we serve.

RBC FINCO, established in 1953, is a leading provider of single- and multi-family home
mortgages to Bahamians and attractive interest rates for its depositors. It has 5 branches and
4 automated banking machines located in New Providence and Freeport. RBC FINCO is owned
25 percent by the general Bahamian public, representing approximately 4,000 shareholders,
and 75 percent by its majority shareholder RBC Royal Bank of Canada.

RBC FINCO — the most experienced in mortgage services and
PEG @L Cue Ae UCC Meu urs ee

RBC
SB) FINCO
Rute)



CONTACT NOS.:

APPLY BY:

For The Attention of All

PLANET FITNESS
OAT BL I0 8)

em envi (isre

27th March, 2007
Dear Members,

I would like to take this opportunity to express my sincere regret of
the closure of the Planet Fitness Gym and the manner in which it
occurred,

Planet Fitness originally opened its doors in December 2005 as a result
of a partnership and business relationship between Valdez Campbell
and I with a vision to provide, over time, .a modern, state-of-the-art
fitness facility.

Unfortunately, due to my work commitments, training and competition
schedules, I have been unable to remain in Nassau on a consistent
basis to oversee the operations of Planet Fitness as I felt was necessary
to ensure its success.

As aresult,, in early November 2006 Mr Campbell in a meeting realized
me not being able to fulfill my portfolio with the gym, decided to take
full control of operations. I could not devote the necessary time and
energy to Planet Fitness as required and was transferring all shares,
rights and interests over to him as the sole owner.

Sometime in late February early March, I began to receive numerous
telephone calls from a number of Planet Fitness members querying
why the doors of the gym had been locked and why they had been
unable to gain access to the gym. I have also been told that no form
of notification has been provided to the members to explain the
current situation.

In an attempt to clarify my relationship with Planet Fitness, I am
writing this letter to advise the gym members of the events that
occurred and that to date I have not received any correspondence,
verbal or written, from Mr. Campbell advising of the closure of the
gym nor any explanation of same. I was just told that some things
were being worked on.

I trust that Mr Campbell will make an effort to contact all Planet
Fitness members with a much needed explanation and an offer of
compensation for any and all outstanding gym memberships. As we
all know these situations take time to resolve and resolute.

In the meantime, thank you for your patience, considerations and
above all your business and support during time in existence.

Sincerely,
Joel Stubb



ms pont .

THE CENTRAL BANK |
OF THE BAHAMAS

B$ COUNTERFEIT BANKNOTE AND
INTRODUCTION TO CRISP SERIES SEMINAR

THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS TRAINING ROOM,
MARKET STREET AND TRINITY
PLACE

ENTRANCE

SESSION 1
APRIL 18, 2007 FROM
11:30 A.M. TO 1:00 P.M.

SESSION 2
APRIL 18, 2007 FROM 6:00 P.M.
TO 7:30 P.M.

302-2620, 302-2622 &
302-2734

APRIL 13, 2007

THE SEMINAR IS OPEN TO BANKS AND BANKING
INSTITUTIONS, GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND
CORPORATIONS, PRIVATE COMPANIES AND THE
GENERAL PUBLIC. APPLICATIONS WILL BE TAKEN
ON A FIRST-COME /FIRST-SERVED BASIS, AS SPACE IS

LIMITED.

KINDLY INDICATE WHICH SESSION YOU WILL BE

ATTENDING


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, A RIL 5, 2007

Dhan



would like to thank yo
corporate s ue giv
expenses and recent co
10th, 2007. We are truly
ask that you continue to
prayers.

The F

HA

To All Ou

We will be CL

’e the family of

Bou

ranklin
rankie”
nowles

for the personal and
toward his medical
--out held on March
rateful to you all and
member him in your

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE originating summons
filed by the Freeport Property
Owners and Licencees Associa-
tion, seeking answers from the
Supreme Court on whether cer-
tain actions by the Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA)
and its principals may have

ily



Y EASTER

Customers And Friends
From





SED on Saturday April 7", 2007

in observ nce of the Easter Holidays

ST. ALBAN’S DRIVE
TEL: 242-322-8396
FAX: 242-323-7745
P.O. BOX N-1085

x

TH
BANK

The Cleari
advise that
hours will

Th
9:

M

9:



EEE LLLP LILLE LLL LELAND

RR RR RRR Re Ree

Fr day, April 6th

Regular Ba king hours will resume
on Tues ay, April 10th from

EAST BAY & MACKEY STREETS
BRIDGE PLAZA COMMONS
TEL/FAX: 242-393-4210

TOLL FREE: 242-300-7035

eR ee ee Bae aA

SAGE FROM:

CLEARING
ASSOCIATION

Banks of the Bahamas
aster Holidays Banking
as follows:

sday, April Sth
0am - 4:30pm

LOSED

day, April 9th
LOSED

am - 3:00pm

COP LLLP PLL LLG

RRR RRR RR RRR RRR OAT POINT AA AAT BEARER,

breached parts of the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement, are not
designed to deter “first rate
investors” such as Morgan Stan-
ley and the Raven Group from
coming to Freeport.

Christopher Lowe, the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Com-
merce’s president, and one of the
Association members that swore
a supporting affidavit for the
summons, told The Tribune yes-
terday that the group wanted to
send a reassuring message to
potential investors that their pro-
jects were still wanted in
Freeport.

“In so far as the pending deals,
we want first rate investors in
Grand Bahama,” Mr Lowe said.
“Unfortunatley, we have some
house cleaning to do, and want
to ensure a more stable platform
for Grand Bahama for the next
48 years, a platform these
investors will appreciate.

“Hopefully, there will be a

- decent dialogue between the

licencees and the Port Authority
and we can move forward. We
wish to solve this for everybody’s
benefit.”

Mr Lowe said the summons
sought declarations on what had
happened with the GBPA and
its assets to date, and was “seek-
ing the truth, the whole truth”.

He added: “Further, any and
all present and potential
investors that are being enter-
tained or facilitated by the exec-
utives of the Port Authority
should be heartened and encour-
aged by the efforts of their pre-
sent or soon to be co-licensees,
as perhaps they will benefit from
these efforts towards full disclo-
sure on the status of our regula-
tory body, the Port Authority.

“In point of fact, it may and
should make their presence in
Freeport a more pleasant and
permanent experience than that
experienced by some of our pre-
sent and former investors and
licensees.”

The Tribune understands that
the summons’ filing has caused
some disquiet at all of the
GBPA, the Grand Bahama
Development Company (Dev-
co) and investors such as Morgan
Stanley and the Raven Group,
who have multi-million
dollar investment projects
before the GBPA and the Gov-
ernment.

The Raven Group project had
been proposed for a 1500-acre
site, and would take place in four
phases. The Tribune had
revealed that talks on the pro-
ject wwere being held earlier this
year, with the high-end, boutique

Kingsway Academy

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

FOR SEPTEMBER 2007.

The Entrance Examination will be held at the
school on Bernard Road on Thursday, April

i2 2007 a 8:00 a.m. for students wishing to
enter grades seven through ten. Deadline for

applications

will be Wednesday,

April

11. Aplications can be collected at the
Business Office from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

For more information please call telephone
numbers 324-8811: 324-3409: or 324-6269



THE TRIBUNE

Licencee action not
intended to deter
‘first rate investors’

resort chain, Aman Resorts,
being lined up as the hotel oper-
ating partner.

The Raven Group project was
expected to create more than 700
jobs during construction, and
about 750 permanent jobs, with
the developers investing $250
million in “the early stages”.

Morgan Stanley was ;ooking
at a joint venture with Port
Group Ltd, the GBPA’s affili-
ate, for the east of the Grand
Bahama waterway.

The development is slated for
2,000 acres at Barbary Beach,
and is understood to be the most
advanced of all the projects
being negotiated by the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd.

Marriott is understood to be
among the major brands inter-
ested in participating in the Mor-
gan Stanley project, the first
stage of which involves a $50 mil-
lion land purchase.

This will see Devco (the
Grand Bahama Development
Company) sell its 50 per cent
stake in the Barbary Beach land
to Morgan Stanley, which would
then by 50/50 partners in a
joint venture with Port Group
Ltd.

Mr Lowe, meanwhile, said the
licencees had arisen from their
“slumber” with the summons fil-
ing, which sought to determine
what had happened to the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement’s
objectives and aims.

“It is also particularly unfor-
tunate that it has taken blows
being traded by the sparring
shareholding partners of the Port
to illuminate the situation, a sit-
uation the licensees have by and
large been kept ignorant of,” Mr
Lowe said in a statement.

“Tt could be said that, no mat-
ter the number of licensees, a
number cloaked in secrecy by
the Port Authority to date, there
are as many opinions of events
transpiring to date as there are
licensees.

“Therefore this group of |

licensees is seeking the facts,
truth and details, information
that should not have to be fought
for, but should always have been
available, especially when we
should have been privy to and
approving of any changes to the
practice of the terms of the
agreement.

“Perhaps, if viewed in a

greater context, our potential in .

Freeport can finally be realised if
an environment of transparency
is created, facilitating that long-
awaited and promised boom that
has, at times, held our hopes so
high, only to be dashed on the
rocks of apparent personal and
political manipulation.”

NOTICE

The Board of directors of
Omega College Ltd.,

St. Mary’s Hall, S.A.C Campus,
off Bernard Road, Fox Hill, Nassau, Bahamas

wish to inform the Genaral Public of the
RESIGNATION OF

Mr. Andrew R. Curr

I, The former Vice President, Managing Director, and
Treasurer, of Omega College, effective March Ist, 2007.

Mr. Curry was a founding member of Omega College
in January, 2001 and he was among a short list of persons
who played a major role in the College’s initial progress.

UTR eT MD Tca ym UIT AE LEON CUDA
Staff and Students, would like to thank Mr. Curry for his
contribution and assistance towards the development of
Oise Oo TMC WANNIN NLU Rta Nad

ee LL LLL LLL



Stee ee ee ee ee ee ea aw

Pe ee

-
ae A BS
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007, PAGE 7B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MUST SELL xx
The Tribune

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

CROWN ALLOTMENT NO. 77 om KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
MURPHY TOWN, ABACO : (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,790 sq. ft. being Crown allotment Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story












No. 77, of Murphy Town, Abaco Bahamas. Located on the subject H house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area,
property is a single storey single family concerete building. This house family room, kitchen, study, laundry and an entry porch.

is less than 5 year old and is in gaod condition with approximately 1,750 ry:

sq. ft of living space and contains 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living room, 3 :

dining, kitchen, laundry and utility spaces. There is no significant Appraisal: $188,406.00

4 improvements or deterioration evident. The property is very well drained ’ : : :

and not susceptible to flooding. Landscaping efforts are still in remedial Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance
stages. All major public and private utilities are situate within 100 ft of the subject site. Property bounderies are clearly ___ to Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st
delineated. corner on the left then 1st right, house is second on your right with garage.

Appraisal: $167,580.00

The subject property is situate off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco and is painted light yellow
trimmed dark yellow. 7





INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY -
MUST SELL
Lot NO.83, Lower Bogue
ELEUTHERA

; : Alll that piece parcel or lot of land being No. 83 on a plan
All that parcel of land having an area of 14,400 sq. ft. on record in the department of Lands and Survey as plan
being a portion of the Dundas Town Crown allotment 4 no. 763 and comprising 21,674 sq. ft. this site encompasses
this land is rectangular in shape with dimensions of 80 a 2 year old single storey home consisting of 2-bedrooms;
ft by 180. Located on the above mentioned lot is a 4 bathroom, living/dining room in one, and kitchen with a total living area of 1,452 sq. ft. There is
concrete block structure with dimensions of 27 x40. also a unit to this structure to be used as a bakery which could bring in an average of approximately
This house is an approximate 30 year old single family, — $600 to $800 per month. There is also 2 covered porch areas to the front of this building, with an
=| residence comprising of 3-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, area of 90.4 sq. ft. (one at the front entrance and one at the entrance to the bakery) this home is
living/dining area and kitchen. This house is in fairly _ jn very good condition and appears to have been built in accordance with the plans and specifications
good condition for its age with a projected future life as approved, and at a standard that was acceptable to the Ministry of Public Works. The land is
of about 25 to 30 more years. The land rises above road level, to a height in excess of approximately —#jat and properly landscaped.
45ft above sea level, with no likelihood of flooding in an hurricane. The grounds are sparsely landscaped.

Appraisal: $90,000.00

DUNDAS TOWN CROWN
ALLOTMENT,
DUNDAS TOWN ABACO



Appraisal: $177,412.00

This property is situated on the Western side of the main Eleuthera Highway and approximately
: : . ae : ; : pai : 1,200 ft Northerly from four-for-nothing Road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue.
This house is located in Dundas Town Abaco which is adjacent to Marsh Harbour and is painted white

trimmed teal green.



LOT NO. 24, FRELIA SUBDIVISION

All that lot of land having an area of 6,724 sq. ft. being lot
No. 24 of the subdivision known and designated as Frelia
Subdivision, the said subdivision situated in the Southwestern
District of New Providence Bahamas. This property is
comprised of a 4 year old single storey residence consisting
| of approximately 1,223 sq. ft of enclosed living space, with
3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living/dining rooms, kitchen and
utility room. The land is flat and slightly below the level of
the roadway, but was brought up to road level by land fill
to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy

LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot
no 194 of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated
in the central district of New Providence this property is
comprised of a 35 year old single family, single story residence
encompassing approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area and inclusive of separate living and dining rooms, and
an average size kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms
and an entry porch, of approximately 88 sq. ft. ventilation is
, : : : by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property is at grade and
oi ee rainy periods of the year..The grounds are fairly kept, with level with good drainage, landscaping is minimal, consisting
minimal landscaping in place. The yard is open at the front and enclosed on its sides and back of lawns and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with
with 7ft chain linked fencing. Remedial work required to the house includes repair of cracks in the stone walls mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing
partitions belts and columns. . and a wrought iron gate in front there is a 208 sq. ft. cement driveway leading to a single covered
Appraisal: $161,000.00 carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also has a concrete block storage shed measuring of approximately
Travel south on Sir Milo Butler Highway until you get to Fire Trail Road. Turn left onto Fire Trail 143 sq. ft.
Road, go all the way to the last bend right, take first left then first right the subject house isthe » Appraisal: $1 33,570.00
5th house right painted white trimmed yellow. Of" Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner
; i &. right, (Roland Ave.) the subject property is the 5th property on the left side painted orange with red/white
trim. : ae





(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue)

ELEUTHERA LOT NO. 370 GRENADA CLOSE

GOLDEN GATES #2 (Nassau)

{ All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements,
in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera,
being No. 62, comprising of about 34,210 sq. ft., this -
site encompasses a 12 year old single storney home
comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room,
dining, breakfast room, kitchen and laundry room,
with a total living area of approximately 2,342.06.

All that lot of land having an area of 5,500 sq. ft., being lot
370 Grenada Close of the subdivision known and designated
as Golden Gates No. 2, situated in the Southwestern district
of New Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised
of 25 years old single family residence consisting of
approximately 1,234 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with
3 bedrooms, two bathrooms, living/dining room, and kitchen.
Property also includes a double car garage, and front The Land is on a grade and level and appear to be sufficiently

entrance with a tatal sq. ft. of approximately 655.75. 4 elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual
This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped with crab grass, heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with improvements including driveway, walkway and low





fiascos and some fruit trees. : shrubs. Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing to the sides and rear.

i Appraisal: $235,638.00 Appraisal: $149,405.60
This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of Lower Traveling south along Blue Hill Road, turn right at the Farmers Market just after passing the Golden Gates
Bogue. : Shopping Center, take 1st corner left, Windward Isles Way, then take 3rd corner right, St Thomas Road, then

first left, grenada Crest, drive around the bend then 1st left again the subject property is the 2nd property left
house #4 painted peach trimmed black.



ABACO LOT NO. 120 MURPHY TOWN

All that lot of land and improvements having an area
of 5,040 sq. ft. being portion of lot# 120 of the original
Murphy Town Crown allotments Abaco Bahamas.
This property is comprised of a two storey concrete
and wood structure still under construction consisting
of approximately 1,728 sq. ft. of enclosed living space.
The said building is utilized as a triplex apartment
4 complex, with a 2 bedroom dwelling on the upper
storey. The lower portion of the building houses two
units, each with 1-bedroom, 1-bathroom, living/dining
and kitchen spaces. The building is in average
condition and appears to be structurally sound. The
building also demonstrates a need for schelued
maintenance. The property is partially landscape with
boundaries clearly delineated. All major private and public utilities are situate within one hundred
ft of the property site.

Pars

| | LOT NO. 382 WINTON MEADOWS

Ce ae All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of
oe : : 8,300 sq. ft. being lot No. 382 situated in the
i Island of New Providence, Bahamas. This property

subdivision known as Winton Meadows, the said
E | i | Ma ul cane is comprised of a 24 year old single family residence
Se uiieed ‘ots ue AMPTOMMEETL PRE a Fe with an attached efficiency (formerly the carport)
TU GE SEE) «= ESL] «consisting of approximately 2,675 sq. ft. of enclosed

a ae living area, front porch-198 sq. ft., back patio-380.
The building is a two storey house. Besides the
efficiency apartment, the house is comprised of 3-
bedrooms, 3-bathrooms, inclusive of a master bedroom suite upstairs. Foyer, front room, dining
room, family room, powder room, utility room, breakfast nook and kitchen downstairs. Climate ©
‘control is provided by ducted central air conditioning, with air circulation enhanced by ceiling fans
and other amenities. Quality of construction: Average. Standard of maintenance: Average. Effective
age: seven years (7) the land is on flat terrain; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated
to disallow the possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual heavy rainy
periods. The grounds are well kept, with improvements including neatly maintained lawns with
flowering trees, and a concrete garden/storage shed, which is located in the backyard. The yard
is enclosed along the sides with chain-link fencing, and concrete block walls that are topped with
metal railings, and metal gates at the front and back.

APPRAISAL: $365,000.00
Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive, pass the streetlight at Fox Hill Road until you get to Meadows
Boulevard, turn right onto Meadows Boulevard, go south and take the 4th right, then 1st right. The
subject house is the 2nd house on the right side painted beige trimmed white.

VACANT PROPERTIES

BLACKWOOD, ABACO
* All that lot of land having an area of approximately 258,064 sq. ft. This property is yet to reach its highest and best use. It is ideally suited to single or multi-family development as is the nature of surrounding properties
within the community. The site may also serve well as a commercial site as the area remains un-zoned the property remains largely in its original state. It is covered with low brush and broad leaf coppice vegetation intersperse
with broad strands of mature Yellow Pine indigenous to the area. The property is well drained and represents no immediate flooding danger under normal conditions.
APPRAISAL: $219,354.40.
The subject property is vacant and is situated at the Southeastern entrance of the Community of Blackwood, Abaco. The property is undivided and comprises approximately 6 acres of a larger tract of land of approximately
26 acres.



subdivision. situated in the Eastern District of the



APPRAISAL: $154,476.00
This property is situated off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco





RAINBOW SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 3 BLOCK 27 (ELEUTHERA)
All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 14,052.59 sq. ft. being lot no. 3, block 27, of Rainbow Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded
about 103.44 ft north by Queens Highway, and 137.02 ft. east and about 99.94 ft south of Rainbow Hill Circul 139.91 ft west, all utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $37,440.00

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)
Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level.
This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511
sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $41,275.00





For conditions of sale and other information contact

mariii® White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 © email harry.collie@scotiabank.com ¢ Fax 356-3851
To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - fe fel ol Mane adc M El Maem eae eee eh Aa Lm OL



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‘hss SBR S Tod rain teed te 5 hod eeln Petts Lak ek en es WE SSS a ea ee


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2007

Re See ee eee a
Stocks close moderately higher
following economic reports |

@ By TIM PARADIS
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall
Street caught its breath Wednes-
day after the previous session’s
big advance, advancing only
slightly amid a mix of economic
data and a slight drop in oil
prices. Bond prices rose as
investors brushed off the eco-
nomic reports and went on a buy-
ing spree.

Economic data offered little
incentive to push stocks higher.
The Institute for Supply Man-
agement, an organization of cor-
porate purchasing executives,
reported that the nation’s service
economy expanded at a slower
pace in March than in February.

But the market held on to
gains earned Tuesday when the
Dow Jones industrials and Stan-
dard & Poor’s 500, riding some
optimism about the housing mar-





qualifications:

a related field).

supervison.

Responsibilities include:

obtaining a mortgage.

mortgage.

and qualifications.

Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Banking

Royal Bank of Canada

RBC FINCO is considering applications for

Mortgage Specialist
RBC FINCO, Freeport
and Main Branch

The successful candidate should possess the following
¢ ACIB OR ABIFS Diploma or degree in in Banking (or

e Previous experience in portfolio and liability
administration would be an asset.

e Exhibit good selling & negotiating skills.

¢ Self-motivated and able to work with minimal

¢ Ability to make sound credit analysis
¢ Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)

¢ Contributing to meeting team sales plans by acquiring
and growing profitable client relationships.

¢ Providing customized solutions and financial advice
designed to satisfy the client’s long-term goals on,

¢ Seeking out new clients by.developing relationships ;:

‘within the community and local centres of influence.

e Enhancing the experience of existing clients by
providing accessibility and one-on-one advice and
valuable information on the intricacies of having a

e Successfully anchoring clients with the appropriate
delivery channel within RBC Financial Group.

A competitive compensation package (base salary &
bonus) will commensurate with relevant experience

Please apply before April 16th, 2007 to:

Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas
Via fax: (242)328-7145

Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

ket, rose to their highest levels
since a global pullback February
27.

“The data has been somewhat
mixed, People are still trying to
get a grasp on — as the Fed inter-
prets this data — what is it going
to do next,” said Nick Raich
director of research at National
City Private Client Group, refer-
ring to the Federal Reserve’s next
move on short-term interest
rates.

He said Wall Street’s widely
held belief earlier in the year that
the economy was headed toward
a soft landing had been eroded
by concerns about the housing
market and the well-documented
woes of subprime mortgage

“lenders. Better-than-expected
housing news Tuesday fed the
advance that lifted the Dow 128
points.

According to preliminary cal-
culations Wednesday, the Dow

























{Ni Ou (10 4 uM}

RBC

FINCO |

kd e1e

POR er Re un eCEL Lae Ue CL)



BiskK

Pricing Information As Of:

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

rose 19.75, or 0.16 per cent, to
12,530.05.

Broader stock indicators made
modest gains. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index rose 1.60, or 0.11
per cent, to 1,439.37, and the Nas-
daq composite index rose 8.36,
or 0.34 per cent, to 2,458.69.

Bonds rose as investors looked
past mixed economic data for the
security of Treasuries. The yield
on the benchmark 10-year Trea-
sury note fell to 4.65 percent from
4.67 per cent late Tuesday. The
dollar was mixed against other
major currencies, while gold
prices rose.

Light, sweet crude settled
down 26 cents to $64.38 on the
New York Mercantile Exchange.
Oil prices, which had risen since
the dispute over Iran’s capture
of 15 British sailors and marines
unfolded March 23, moved lower
but pared some of their losses

after release of inventory data.
Weekly Energy Department fig-
ures showed a greater-than-
expected draw last week of gaso-
line supplies.

Economic news, which has
kept Wall Street’s attention in
recent months, gave mixed sig-
nals Wednesday. Investors have
been trying to determine whether
the economy can still slow grad-
ually — a so-called soft landing
— or whether fissures in the
housing sector will place too
great a strain on economic
growth. Recent attention to
strains among so-called subprime
lenders, which make loans to
people with somewhat dubious
credit quality, has unnerved some
investors.

The Fed, which has left interest
rates unchanged at its last six
meetings after a string of 17
straight increases, has said infla-

NOTICE

The public is hereby notified that all entrances to and
exits from the Shirley House and the 52 Shirley Street
Car Parking properties and which are situate on the
southeast corner of the intersection of Shirley Street and
Charlotte Street on the Island of New Providence shall

be closed to the public from 7:00am on Sunday April
8th, 2007 to 7:00am on Monday April 9th, 2007 in
order to preserve the Private Properties Rights and to
prevent the Acquisition by the Public of any Right of

Ways.

Nassau Enterprises Limited, Bahamian Properties

Limited.



HUMAN
RESOURCES &
OFFICE MANAGER

moo {i

Seeking EXPERIENCED
Human Resources & Office Manager.
Salary will be commensurate with experience.
Only persons meeting the requirements
below should apply.

¢ A Bachelor’s Degree in HumanResources

° At least Five (5) years experience in Human

Resources

¢ Working Knowledge of the Employment

Act, 2001

Please submit your application via email to:

bahamasexecutivesear