Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )
UF00084249_02847 ( sobekcm )

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Full Text



FILET O° FISH







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Volume: 103 No.98

WEATHER

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' The Tribune



Grand Bahama
developer: No Crown
Land involved



Naa Tea (Cat ae SRN HLL B

Statement claims company
seeking to have concessions
‘vastly increased’

BAHA MAR is seeking to
have the “already generous con-
cessions granted” under the
2005 Heads of Agreement it
signed “vastly increased”, the
Government said in breaking
its silence on why it has failed to
conclude talks with the Cable
Beach developer on a supple-
mental Heads of Agreement for
its $2.4 billion project by the
March 1 deadline.

In addition, the Government
said other requests by Baha
Mar could also impact property
owners in the Cable Beach area
and the flow of vehicular traffic.

In a statement issued yester-
day, the Government said it
recognised the importance of
the project to the Bahamas, but
its duty to act in the best inter-
ests of Bahamians and to ensure
the rights of neighbouring land
owners and relevant environ-
mental issues were properly
addressed, could not be over-
looked.

“The Government has the
obligation to balance the bene-
fits of the project with the best
interests of the people of the
Bahamas. In addition, the Gov-
ernment must have due regard
to the level of concessions which
could be justified in relation to
other major developments,” the
statement said.

Baha Mar was not slow in
responding to the Governmen-
t’s statement, pointing out that
the project would contribute
$400 million or 6.5 per cent of
Bahamian gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP) during its first full
year in operation.

It added that the $2.4 billion
Cable Beach development
would generate over $15.5 bil-
lion in GDP over the first 20







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years, attracting 600,000 guests
in its first year and creating
6,000 direct jobs at the resort
in full operation, plus 2,000 indi-
rect and induced jobs.

In yesterday’s statement,
Baha Mar said Government
should not try to distract atten-
tion from the fact that its failure
to conclude the supplemental
Heads of Agreement had pre-
vented the developers from
sealing their deal with Harrah’s
by March 15, a deadline that
has now passed.

Last week, Baha Mar warned
that its $2.4 billion Cable Beach
redevelopment project had
been placed in jeopardy by the
failure to yet conclude a sup-
plemental Heads of Agreement
with the Government, some-
thing that could allow Harrah’s,
its joint venture partner, to
“walk away” from the deal.

Thursday was the deadline
for Baha Mar to complete its

joint venture agreement with

Harrah’s, the world-renowned
casino and entertainment oper-
ator, that would see it take a 43
per cent equity stake in the pro-
ject, but that deadline has been
missed as a result of not con-
cluding talks with Government.

Starwood, the other operating
partner that does not hold an
equity stake, has a “me too”
clause in its agreement with
Baha Mar allowing it to walk
away if Harrah’s chooses to
exercise that right.

Baha Mar said at the week-
end, in response to the Gov-
ernment, “that no matter what
the reasons the Government
might try to cite, the facts
remain that the March 15 dead-

SEE page 14

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PLP confirms slate of candidates

THE PLP has finally con-
firmed its slate of candidates
for the. 2007 general elec-
tions.

As reported earlier by The
Tribune, the only PLP
incumbent not to receive a
nomination was Sidney
Stubbs.

Observers say that he
spent most of the night out-
side the party’s headquarters
“in a funk”.

As predicted Mr Stubbs
will be replaced by lawyer
Hope Strachan.

In South Beach, where the
incumbent Agatha Marcell
had decided not to offer for
this general election, Wallace

Rolle will be the candidate.

Jackson Ritchie, the Long
Islander who it was
rumoured earlier would run
for a seat in his hometown,
will be offering in the newly-
formed Clifton area.

Fellow Long Islander
Ricardo Treco also will be
running in the newly resur-
rected constituency of St
Annes.

Although no official
announcement has been
made, a new seat will be cre-
ated when the Boundaries
Commission report is pre-
sented before the House of
Assembly today.

Five constituencies will be

eliminated — Holy Cross,
Delaporte, Adelaide, St Mar-
garet’s and Golden Gates.
Replacing them will be the
new seats of Sea Breeze, Kil-
larney, Clifton , St Anne’s,
and Golden Isles, informed
sources have said.

The Family Island con-
stituencies will effectively
remain unchanged.

Delaporte will be divided
into two constituencies — Kil-
larney and Clifton — in order
to “save” the seat of incum-
bent MP Neville Wisdom
and win the PLP an addi-
tional seat, it was claimed

SEE page 14

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Weekend sees
two murders,
brutal death
of a baby

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH two murders and the
brutal death of a baby in the
past two days, the country once
again had a weekend of vio-
lence.

The Bahamas recorded its
17th and 18th murder this week-
end with the shooting deaths of
two young men and police are
investigating two further deaths
that may be classified as homi-
cides at a later date.

Following the suspicious
death of a young man in Fox
Hill on Thursday, police are
now investigating the circum-
stances surrounding the sudden
death of a one-year-old boy.

According to reports, the
child was admitted to hospital
on Friday shortly after 5pm.

The baby had “serious
injuries about the body” and
died at 7am on Saturday, press
liaison officer Inspector Walter
Evans told The Tribune yester-
day.

Police have taken the child’s
22-year-old mother and her 17-

SEE page 14

Sir Arthur Foulkes:
race ought not
to be an issue
in this election

THE issue of race is not a
legitimate issue and ought not
to be an issue in this election
nor has it been “for many elec-
tions gone”, Sir Arthur Foulkes
said yesterday when he
appeared on Gems 105.9’s talk
show, “Tell It Like It is”, hosted

-by Sean McWeeny.

A member of the “dissident
eight” who founded the FNM,
Sir Arthur said it is just an insult
to think that the FNM would
take this country back to the
days before Majority Rule.

Election time, he said, is the
wrong time to speak about the
race issue, Sir Arthur said.

“After the election we should
sit down and have sensible dis-
passionate discussions about our
past, our racist legacy so we can
move forward. We can’t con-
tinue like this. | don’t want my
children to live in a Bahamas
where you look at one Bahami-
an as different from another,”

SEE page 14





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PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



IR i

ele

pene

ooh
LOCAL NEWS err
one
PLP Fox Hill official accuses Dr Higgs of tr yin to rewrite history
35 g sate
ACCUSING Dr Jacinta Hig- The constituency coordinator, He said that the Fox Hill Com- = 2002. At the community meet-, and a permanent office for the That event raised some $8,000 *"*”
gs, the FNM candidate for Fox said that anew plan for the cen- | munity centre was the dream of __ ings, a comprehensive report was _ Fox Hill Festival Committee and _at the time and other contribu- ity
Hill, of trying to rewrite history, tre had to be drawn up because all previous PLP representatives given as to what the legal posi- a Computer Room and Reading __ tions from friends of the Fox Hill ‘~~
PLP Fox Hill Constituency the committee was advised that for the Fox Hill Constituency, tion was and the community was | Room upstairs. Member of Parliament. 03:
Coordinator Philip Mortimer the foundation on the property — starting with Carlton Francis, asked what was its wish. It was The facility will allow for Nat- ‘“Woslee Dominion, headed by ~~ ~
said that for Dr Higgs to suggest —_ was not useable. Lionel Davis, Frank Edgecombe decided that there should be a __ural Ventilation and will be fully Ashley Glinton, is the contractor . ,
that the foundation for the com- Trees, he said, were growing and then George Mackey. community cenrw. air conditioned and also feature and he has done a yeoman's |" __
munity centre under construc- through the foundation and it According to Mr Mortimer, _day care facilities for children _ work in bringing the structure to. (7
tion in that area was dug up — could not be salvaged. Mr Mackey had a community Facility and senior citizens. The facility where itis. Mr Mitchell, northe «© *3"!
“willy-nilly” by current MP Fred “Mr Mitchell has sought to development association that will also have a generator and Committee, has a relationship *” +?
Mitchell, is simply false. complete Mr Mackey’s and oth- came closest to realizing the ” fe serve as hurricane shelter. with any other contractor. All 3-04
Mr Mortimer made the state- er Fox Hill representatives’ dream of this centre when under The need for the new facility The estimated cost of the the work has been done through “+'ts
ment in a letter issued to The vision of a Community Centre __ his leadership land was acquired Was also influenced by the fact building is .two million dollars | Woslee Dominion and his asso- .vi70
Tribune over the weekend. in Fox Hill,’ Mr Mortimer said. | by the Ministry of Housing for that the Sandilands Primary and the value of the construc- _ ciates. roils
the public purpose of providing School does not have a facility tion so far approaches one mil- “When the work iscompleted 4‘
housing for the people of Fox 1! which to hold its assemblies. —_ jign dollars. the Honorary Treasurer will ,“.9
Hill. It was then assigned by the The architect was asked to The building, Mr Mortimer have a full report from the pub- |»
Ministry of Housing for the com- design a structure that could hold said, is almost finished and the __ lic as to the fundraising. Various |, ,
munity centre. the entire Sandilands School and: cornerstone will be laid during churches in Fox Hill have elote
Mr Mackey’s committee was _ he has done that with a 800- eat April by Prime Minister Christie. pledged donations. Of note isa _|,,,,,
well on the way with the project @uditorium,” Mr Mortimer said. He said that the donations to contribution of $1,500 from the , :,,,,
and a foundation was built, the There are also in addition to this matter were started by adin- __ staff and students of Sandilands ° aT
plumbing roughing was installed. bathroom facilitics, banquet per sponsored by friends of Mr _— Primary School in Fox Hill,” Mr hap
The PLP lost office in 1992 and facilities, a kitchen for catering fitchell on his 50th birthday. Mortimer said. sro
the project stopped there. No ap
further work was able to be come i tititintitsncstsnssransstanetentumantmeneenmnenmanenennanennanenianeaianaiemasenainannieuninnenianeaninieii olz
tinued due, it is believed, to a wet
VE North Tel: 356-2217 ing 4
EEE a etiam Worker’ s Party leader denies :.
=~ fadloshack., 393-3882 1997. The foundation was uit
Marathon Mail Tel: 394-3803 untouched from the time the ade
Hewonemencrr ASS€LTtONS ON a PLP website «:
Mr Mitchell’s election in 2002. ods
Mr Mitchell campaigned dur- : vA
ing the 2002 campaign that he 4M By TAMARA FERGUSON Mr Moncur said government
would seek to complete Mr has failed to curb the murder is |r
Mackey’s dream of a community WORKER’s Party leader Rod- ‘ rate. He also criticised govern- —_ .,..,
centre for Fox Hill. ney Moncur has denied assertions ment's Urban Renewal pro- .,,.4
Mr Mortimer said that it was on a PLP website that his public gramme. +



discovered during the first year
of Mr Mitchell’s tenure that the
land was not owned by the

According to Mr Moncur,
many criminal activities occurless —
than a quarter of a mile from ,- «

demonstrations are being fund-
ed by Hubert Ingraham and the
FNM.

Development Association According to an article pub- Urban Renewal centres. "The dai
formed by Mr Mackey but wasin Jished on Bahamas Uncen- country is in crisis," he said. aiaat.
“oe owned Hed the rokyaekeds of sored.com on February 28, under He also criticised immigration —.,.3
ieee the public purpose the heading, “Who is paying Rod- policies, stating that these poli- ij.y
“The new minister then Shane ney?” Mr Moncur was accused of cies are a failure. : wh
Gibson determined that he want- _TUNNINE political interference by In January oF tite yet ANE om

ed to revert to the earlier pur- C@USing mischief during election Worker's Party protested for the -;s
season. five “baggage handlers” who -j4.

pose and build government
affordable housing on the land.
Mr Mitchell asked Minister
Shane Gibson not to proceed
until he had checked with the
community on the matter,” the
Constituency Co-ordinator said.

Several community meetings
were held on the matter at the St
Mark’s Baptist Church through

were arrested and charged with .,-;
drug trafficking to be returned to
the Bahamas. wy
Mr Moncur alleged that gov- .-
ernment had conspired with US)... 4
authorities to entrap the men. “ad
During this demonstration, the party also « «.,;
called for Foreign Affairs Minister Fred |.
Mitchell to be stripped of his political portfolio. .+,~
In another protest, the party called for the (5,
excommunication of Prime Minister Perry ,°
Christie and Foreign Affairs Minister Fred -.:,. .
Mitchell from the Anglican church. 4 ayy

The website also claimed that
he is representing the FNM and
that demonstrations are being
funded by the FNM.

Bahamasuncensored said Mr
Moncur needs to come clean and tell the pub-
lic who he is really representing in these
demonstrations.

Mr Moncur hit back at the allegations yes-
terday, insisting that the Worker's party has
always been independent.

“Over the years, the party has either run as a
candidate, or supported the PLP or the FNM,”



a WORKER'S Pad
leader Rodney Moncur



Mr Moncur said. Just two days following photographs pub- }+ 4,:
Asked if he were being funded by the FNM, _ lished by The Tribune showing Immigration ; 4/»;
Mr Moncur said the worker's party receives Minister Shane Gibson and late celebrity Anna ~ »,,«

Nicole Smith in close embrace, the Worker’s
Party staged another protest to call for the res-
ignation of Mr Gibson as Minister of Labour .,,3..,,
and Immigration. 5 urBe

its funding from supporters as well as from
members who are required to pay dues.

He said there are many other issues Bahama-
suncensored should focus on — such as crime.

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RBC FINCO is pleased to annourfce the appointment of Mr. Ross A. McDonald, Head
of Caribbean Banking, as chairman of the RBC FINCO board of directors. Mr.
McDonald takes over from Mr. Gordon J. Feeney, who has retired as chairman after
serving on the Board for the past 16 years.

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“lam very pleased to announce that Ross has replaced me in this key role for RBC
FINCO. He will provide visionary leadership as RBC FINCO continues in its important
role as the leading provider of home financing for Bahamians,” said Mr. Feeney.
“| am proud to have witnessed the outstanding financial performance of RBC FINCO
over the years and | look forward to hearing about the company’s continued
success,” he continued. °



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“| eagerly accept this new challenge and look forward to working closely with
the board as we chart RBC FINCO’s success moving forward,” said Mr. McDonald.

As Chairman, Mr. McDonald will lead the RBC FINCO Board of Directors in Corporate
Governance oversight and in setting and implementing the bank's business
strategy, as it strengthens its presence and performance in The Bahamas. He is a
30-year veteran with RBC Royal Bank of Canada and is head of RBC’s domestic
operations throughout the Caribbean Region.



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Prior to accepting the position of chairman, McDonald senile on RBC FINCO’s Board
of Directors since 2001. He is currently a director of RBC Royal Bank of Canada
(Bahamas) Limited and RBC Royal Bank of Canada (Cayman) Limited, which
deliver trust and private banking services to offshore clients through Global
Private Banking.

About RBC FINCO

RBC FNC, established in 1953, is a leading provider of single- and multi-family
ges to Bahamians and attractive interest rates for its depositors. It has
anciee and 4 automated banking machines located in New Providence and
BC FINCO is owned 25 percent by the general Bahamian public,
pproximately 4,000 shareholders, and 75 percent by its majority —
hareholder Royal Bank of Canada.

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= TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 3



insurance
companies
give verdict on
car ownership

WHILE police and the Attor-
ney General’s office are inves-
tigating the “true ownership”
of vehicles stolen as part of a
lucrative car theft ring, insur-
ance companies say that the
original owners have unequivo-
cal rights to the cars.

In a letter to the editor, the
Bahamas General Insurance
Association (BGIA) stated that
a thief does not have title to
stolen property and cannot give
ownership to the person to
whom he sells the property.
Therefore, the BGIA said, all
original owners of the cars in
question have the right to the
stolen vehicles and should have
their property returned to them.

Two months after police
broke a large car theft ring in
Andros, victims who were
robbed of their vehicles are still
waiting to regain ownership of
their cars.

According to initial reports,
the Attorney General’s office
is currently investigating who
can claim ownership of a vehicle
once it has been stolen, sold and
resold several times over to oth-
er unsuspecting parties.

Cassandra Davenport, of the
Bahamian Forum expressed her
disbelief that her daughter
Janine was told by officials from
Road Traffic that the vehicle,
which was stolen from her now
belonged to the new buyers of
the stolen property.

Road Traffic officers report-
edly told Ms Davenport’s
daughter that she needs to get
reimbursed for her stolen car
by her insurance company.

However, co-ordinator of the
Bahamas General Insurance

Company Robin Hardy is refut-’

ing this, stating that “no matter
how many hands the stolen
property passes through, title
remains with the original owner.
“In the cases in question,
even if the purchasers bought
the vehicles genuinely beliey-
ing that the seller had a clear
title to the vehicles, in law they
have no title and the vehicles
should be returned to the orig-
inal owners from whom the
vehicles were stolen,” Mr Hardy
said in his letter to the editor.
The BGIA also pointed out
that if the original owner was
compensated for their loss by
an insurance company, then the

rights to the vehicle pass to the .

insurance company that can
then dispose of the vehicle or
return it to the original owner.

Man faces
firearm and
ammunition
charges —

FREEPORT - A Freeport
man was charged with numer-
ous serious offences in Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on Friday.

George Alexander, 25, of
No. 40 Clarke Avenue, was
arraigned on firearm and
ammunition charges in Court
Two before Magistrate Subu
LaSalle.

He was also charged with
resisting arrest and assaulting
police officers with a deadly
weapon.

It is alleged that on March 15
the accused, who was suspected
of possessing a firearm, was
involved in a violent struggle
with police officers as they
attempted to disarm him. Dur-
ing the struggle, the weapon dis-
charged, but no one was
injured.

Alexander was represented
by Brian Hanna. He pleaded
not guilty to the charges and
was granted $5,000 bail with one
surety. The case was adjourned
to October 23.

Share
your
news

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neighbourhoods. Call us
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years have been
‘disappointing’

THE past five years of the
Christie administration have
been disappointing Sir
Arthur Foulkes said yester-
day when he appeared on
Gems 105.9’s talk show,
“Tell It Like It Is”, hosted
by Sean McWeeny.

One of the major issues in
this election, he said, is going
to be Prime Minister
Christie.

“AMl of us I think in the
country generally felt that
Perry Christie is a decent
human being, very likable,
not a victimizer, not a person
who would indulge in the
politics of personal destruc-
tion and all the rest of it.

“But | think after a while
that wears off in the face of
so many other things. I
believe the Bahamian public
now regard Mr Christie as
indecisive; that’s the word we
hear mostly in criticism of Mr
Christie,” Sir Arthur said.

The political pioneer said
he believes Mr Christie’s
intentions are good and he
has a capacity to articulate
the vision, but history will
show that his indecision was
his Achilles heel.

“You could be a good guy
and you could tolerate fool-
ishness up to a point, beyond
that point, even if you don’t
indulge in it as a leader, the
foolishness becomes yours
and I think that has been Mr
Christie’s big problem,” Sir
Arthur. said.

However, he admitted
that Mr Christie’s greatest
strength is his personality
and the perception that he
is a decent person.

But, if the FNM were to

Easte
& Craft.

Jabucs,-





ARTHUR Foulkes

be elected the government in
the next election, Sir Arthur

_said that they would have to lis-

ten more, not to be in as much
of a hurry as before and be
careful about process.

“I hear people say we have
good public relations, but I told
Mr Ingraham that when I was
away I was amazed at some of
the things you did that I wasn’t
aware of. Be careful about cul-



ture, cultural changes, cultural
legislation. The referendum was
about culture. Make no mistake
about that. You have to be very
careful with that.

“We ran into that in the ear-
ly days of the PLP when some
of us progressives got up there
talking about women ... we were
blown out of the water. The
women were saying ‘so why she
going up there with the men?’ It
is a cultural thing and it is unfor-
tunate and we have to take our
people step by step,” he said.

‘Sir Arthur said that he did
not think the FNM or any other
government would make that
mistake.

“The referendum, although
process was made the rallying
cry, it really wasn’t about
process issues, it was about the
issue itself about whether
women should be 100 per cent
equal to men in all respects that
was the issue and a lot of
women did not buy it,” he said.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE,



~ AROS LE Sa T_T.

oa Sa AR ER ER OTM AEE A PREC BN

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., RGSG

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUC. i CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

*

Riblishew Eder 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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An elec

{HS MORNING Prime Minister Christie
to the House to present the Boundaries
ynmission report.

ihe only certainty — until the report is

ially laid on the table of the House — is
that Montagu MP Brent Symonette,
Whose opinion was treated with complete con-
iempt by the commission, did not sign the
report. '

What we have been told so far is that
instead of 40 constituencies, there are now
41, despite the fact that up to March 12 when
the old register closed, there were fewer vot-
ers on the new register than on the old. We
have also been told that five constituencies
have been eliminated and four new ones cre-
ated,

‘This is what was in the report submitted to
the governor-general, who, on signing it,
returned it to Mr Christie for his further con-
sideration and presentation to the House. It

; sllin Mr Christie’s power to change the
report if he did not agree with any of the
boundary changes. That is why we say that

» one will know for certain what those
boundaries are until Mr Christie has spoken in

House today.

However, what everyone — who is aware
of what goes into making an election func-

Vie —- already knows is that within
time constraints from here until the elec-

is calied there is going to be complete
ision

ir Christie has already announced that

lection will be called on or before May 2.
ve don’t know if he has consulted a calendar

sly, but we do know that the calendar is

| going to accommodate him, and time is
quickly running out. Mr Christie has until May
i 2 when, according to the Constitution, if he
es nothing, parliament will dissolve itself.
Vith the time now left to him and the enor-
vious amount of work yet to be done before
the election, it would indeed be a miracle if
Bahamians go to be polls on or before May 2.

\pparently, when the PLP commission
members presented the report — representing
it as their completed plan — to FNM Deputy
Leader Brent Symonette for his considera-
ion, be, after consultation with his leader,
igzrecd 16'of the proposed boundary changes
w. Providence’s 24 constituencies. There



to N

were no changes in the Family Islands. The

PLP took the FNM recommendations away
ior further consideration.

What they eventually came back with was

so radically different from what they had pro-

osed and to what had been agreed with the




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tion of chaos expected

Opposition that Mr Symonette refused to sign
their new report.

When the FNM became the government
in 1992, there were 49 seats in the House. The
new government did not think that the voter
register justified that number of seats, nor
could the country afford 49 MPs, and so in
1997 the constituencies were shaved to 40.
Today with even fewer registered voters, Mr
Christie’s government, instead of reducing the
constituencies even further, has increased
House seats by one — from 40 to 41.

It is unlikely that the House will be pro-
rogued this week. The report will be present-
ed on Monday and debate will start on
Wednesday. The last time that there was a
boundaries debate, members spent five days
debating. With the electoral register down, it
is obvious that Mr Christie is trying to keep the
House in session as long as possible because as
soon as it is prorogued, the register closes —
and, unless there is a tremendous last minute
rush, Mr Christie will not get the numbers he
had hoped for. However, it is highly unlikely
that the House can continue to sit past next
week.

By Mr Christie’s failure to close the old
register sooner, he has thrust an almost impos-
sible job on the parliamentary registrar’s staff.

Within the next eight weeks, that staff will
have to write out by hand new voters cards
with their counterfoils for the dramatic
changes in the newly created constituencies, in
addition to the boundary changes in the
remaining constituencies. It has been esti-
mated that by the time that the two cards and
counterfoils for each voter have been written
out, the department will have had to make
360,000 changes by hand before the cards can
be put in the computer and distributed to vot-
ers. The parliamentary registrar has two weeks
in which to certify the register; the ballots
then have to be printed and the voters register
has to be published. The election will then
have to be called within four weeks with the
police having to vote a week before the public
goes to the polls.

As Mr Christie has planned this election,
there will be voters still running around on
election day when the polls are closing trying
to find their polling division.

One has to wonder whether this chaos has
been created by design, or by sheer incom-
petence.

Whatever it is, this election promises to go
down in history as an election of colossal mis-
management — almost fit for the Guinness
Book of Records.






Report o



tourism

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THERE is an old saying
that “it isn’t bragging if it is
true!” One of the things that
all Bahamians like to brag
about is that “it is better in
the Bahamas!” However, the
billion dollar question is
whether this assertion is
indeed factual? Or it is just
something Bahamians say to
identify as a Bahamian? A
recent statement in The Tri-
bune dated February 27, 2007
entitled “Nassau, Freeport
face low recommendations”
provides some interesting
answers for the nation’s num-
ber one industry, that of

‘tourism, based on an exit sur-

vey conducted by visitors to
the Bahamas. Some of these
responses gave failing grades
to some of the destinations
in the Bahamas, indicating
that the “Better in the
Bahamas” slogan may be just
a myth.

The destinations were eval-
uated using various criteria
such as activities available,
value for money, taxi/tour
operators, cleanliness, service,
attitude of the people, etc.
Grand Bahama was at the
bottom with an unacceptable
score of 46.4 per cent of per-
sons saying that they would
recommend Grand Bahama
to others. Nassau was slightly
ahead with a score of 56.1
with the main complaint
being a pricey destination.
When one considers the
trémendous amount of mon-
ey the government of the
Bahamas spends on adver-
tisements and other pro-
grammes promoting Grand
Bahama, the Bahamian tax-
payer is not getting a good
bang for their buck.

There seems to have been a
failure for Grand Bahama
despite all of its resources to
find a niche in the tourism
market. Its proximity to the
United States, just 51 miles
from West Palm Beach, has
not been a trump card. Its
only attraction appears to be
the cheapness of the tourism
product on Grand Bahama.
The hotel rooms are offered
at bargain basement prices
and many of the tourists com-
ing to Grand Bahama are
referred to as the “Burger
King” or “Kentucky Fried
Chicken” tourist, a reflection
of the fact that they are ona
tight budget.

Over the past two decades,
the quality and the number
of hotel rooms on Grand
Bahama had been on the
decline. Efforts by both the

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letters@tribuneme:



Ministry of Tourism and the
Grand Bahama Promotion
Board have not produced an
anticipated improvement in
tourism for Grand Bahama.
With no significant increase
in the number of hotel rooms
during that time, the tourism
industry on Grand Bahama
can only be described as
“stagnant.” Along with a
decline in the number of
hotel rooms is a limit in the
number of airlift seats coming
to Grand Bahama. This is a
chicken and egg syndrome as
the airlines say that they need
more hotel rooms to expand
and the hotels are saying that
they need more airline seats
to expand. Tourism projects,
such as the one by Ginn at
West, are really long term
and the public should not
expect any short term relief.

To make matters worse, the
Royal Oasis, one of the
largest hotels in Freeport, has
been closed since hurricane
Frances in 2004. There is
widespread speculation that
the re-opening of this resort
will usher in a new era for
Grand Bahama tourism. The
sad reality, however, is that
there is no quick fix for the
Grand Bahama tourism
industry. The sale of the Roy-
al Oasis is not the quick fix
that everyone is hoping for.
In the dilapidated state that it
is in and being over forty
years old, a reasonable sug-
gestion would be to implode
it and start fresh as they do so
often in Las Vegas (by coin-
cidence the implosion of the
Stardust Hotel in Las Vegas
is now on the CNN Headline
News). Even the Internation-
al Bazaar should have an
appointment with the bull-
dozer. What will improve the
Grand Bahama tourism prod-
uct is the elimination of the
stink attitudes and poor ser-
vice that we accept as the

standard for Grand Bahama. °

I have often jokingly com-
pared the Grand Bahama
tourism industry to the
“Pirates of the Caribbean” in
the scene where Johnny
Depp is being chased by the
natives with spears and sticks
off the island. Ironically, this
very scene I believe was
filmed on Grand Bahama. On
Grand Bahama, judging by
the poor performance in the
exit survey, this is exactly how
tourists are treated.

On the other hand, Har-
bour Island or ’Briland con-
tinues to be the shiny dia-

_mond in the crown of the

Bahamian tourism industry.
Not only has ’Briland out per-

formed all of the islands of

the Bahamas, but it has the
unique distinction of being
the best tourist destination in
the entire Caribbean region.
This region includes 26 coun-
tries with 44 different desti-
nations. In the exit survey,

’Briland received the fantastic.
score of 82.6 per cent and is
the Bahamian destination’
most likely to be recom-
mended by visitors. Even
more impressive is the fact
that in most categories of.
repeat visitors, ’Briland.
maintains a 90 per cent plus
chance of returning, not just.
once, but many times over.

Unlike the “chicken in the-
bag” tourist who comes to
Grand Bahama, ’Briland
attracts the world’s best. It is:
a common occurrence te
meet a family who spends.
$10,000 or more per week’
during their ’Briland visit."
Many come on their privat&
jets or mega yachts and so
can travel to almost any oth-,
er destination in the world.
Instead, they choose to come
to "Briland.

What is it that attracts cc
rich and famous to this,
Bahamian paradise? Yes,.
*Briland is blessed with nat-:
ural resources, such as the
Pink Sands Beach. However,'
within minutes of arriving at:
*Briland, one would quickly.
discover what makes ’Briland
so special. The greatest:
resource and treasure of ’Bri-
land is the people. The friend¢,
liness and hospitality of thesé:
people are known the world‘
over. Like Colonel Saunders
of KFC, whose claim to fame.
was that they do chicken.
right, ’Brilanders treat the
tourist right. From the ferry-
men to the taxi drivers, and;
from the waiters to the enters!
tainers, it is a natural effort té.
make any stranger feel wel-‘
come as they enjoy the “’Bri-,
land Sweet, Eh” experience.’
A warm smile and a sense of,
appreciation of them coming:
to ’Briland goes a long way:

The goodwill of such an,
elite tourism product was‘
developed over the years by,
our forefathers who had the»
vision and dedication to nur-?
ture what we enjoy today...
Until 1995, ’Briland didn’t;
even have a Ministry of;
Tourism office and so it is the;
people who deserve the cred;
it for this success story. 3}

One regret I have in all this’
was conveyed to tourism!
Minister Obie Wilchcombe in,
2005 when ’Briland was?
awarded the best destination
in the region title. It is dis-‘
turbing that this award was a‘
*Briland award and not bf
Bahamian award. Does it,
mean that the qualities inher-*
ent to ’Briland life are absent!
in other Bahamian islands?
If this is the case then hopeg®
fully the other islands would
learn from ’Briland.

The Ministry of Tourism
has now implemented a poli-
cy of marketing each Bahami=.
an Island destination sepa;»
rately. Those that fail to reach”
the mark will simply be left.
behind! 2

<

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE, DDS
*Briland,

March 14, 2007.

In Loving Memory
of the late

Sunrise: October 16th, 1939 * Sunset: March 9th, 2001

Dear Mom,

Much time has passed since you bid this world
farewell. Mom, not a day goes by that I don't think.
about you. I miss you dearly. You worked hard and
made sacrifices for your family; yet you're the Kind
of person who would say it wasn’t work or
sacrifice...but love. No matter where I go in life, or
how grown-up I get - I will never outgrow your
love ex times we shared. Because you stay so close
to me, in mind and heart. The Lord saw your
suffering and took you home to rest. Sleep sweetly

dear mom until we meet again.

Love Always, Kyla Ralston





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 5



MEG hh aa eames
© In brief] PM Christie allowing supporters to

launch personal attacks, says FNM

Woman is
seriously
injured in
accident

A YOUNG woman is in
hospital in serious condition
after suffering multiple
injuries in a traffic accident
in West End on Saturday.

- According to reports, Pip-
pa Smith, 25, of Deadman’s
Reef, was driving her 2006
Toyota Corolla around
7.30pm on Saturday when it
skidded off the road and
crashed into two utility poles
on Queen’s Highway.

Supt Basil Rahming
reported that both poles
were snapped in half by the
vehicle on impact. He said it
is believed that Ms Smith
was speeding when she lost
-control of the vehicle just
before reaching the Ginn sur
Mer administration com-
pound.

_ He said passing motorists
stopped at the scene and
helped Ms Smith from the
wreckage. She was rushed
by ambulance to the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where
she is detained with a bro-
ken arm, fractured pelvis,
ruptured bladder and other
bodily injuries.

“ Police are urging motorists
to slow down and to resist
the temptation to speed in
isolated areas.

+ Investigations are contin-
uing into the incident.

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EXTERMINATORS

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5:30 The Envy Life
6:00 Gospel Grooves
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PRIME Minister Perry
Christie has given his supporters
free reign to launch mean-spir-
ited and personal attacks on
anyone who would disagree
with the PLP, the FNM claimed
yesterday.

In its weekly commentary,
the FNM yesterday sought to
debunk claims Prime Minister
Perry Christie made in an April
4, 2002, speech at Clifford Park.

Among the quotes by Mr
Christie that the FNM sought
to draw attention to was the fol-
lowing: “You see, 1 want to help
build a great country. And this I
know: we can never achieve
greatness unless we first learn to
get along with each other. We
must celebrate our diversity,
whether it be ethnic, religious,
political or social.

“We must celebrate that
diversity, not condemn it; we

must nurture it, not suffocate
it. We must never persecute
someone just because he thinks
differently or votes differently
than we do.”

In light of that statement by
Mr Christie, the FNM said it is
strange that the prime minister
has allowed the PLP chairman
Raynard Rigby to claim on the
party’s website that the PLP has
“systematically and routinely
attacked those who are opposed
to our philosophy.”

The FNM asked yesterday:
“Which is it Mr Christie? Does
the PLP celebrate diversity or
does it systematically and rou-
tinely attack those who disagree
with its philosophy?”

“Bahamians now realise that
Mr Christie hides behind and
gives free rein to scores of
mean-spirited and personal
attacks on many who are bold



@ PERRY Christie: under fire
for comments at rally

‘enough to disagree with the

PLP,” the FNM said.
After his “malicious attacks
at the last PLP rally”, the oppo-



Rigby hits out at ‘senseless criticism’

PLP chairman Raynard Rigby
yesterday in a press release hit
out at the FNM’s “senseless crit-
icism” of the benefits that have
ensued to the Bahamian econo-
my under the PLP’s anchor pro-
ject economic strategy.

He said that the opposition has
shown that they do not under-
stand the opportunities that have
been created for the Bahamian
people by the expanding of the
national economy to centres oth-
er than Nassau, Freeport and
Marsh Harbour.

“It is a fact that there has
been no significant sale of land
from Bahamians to non-
Bahamians under this PLP gov-
ernment as compared to any
other period in our national
development. In fact it is the
public record that it was the
decision of the FNM to repeal
the Immovable Properties Act
and replace it with the Interna-
tional Persons Landholding Act

ROWerer sob tts wee
Banquets

runt er

Hewat:

(IPLA) which allowed the
floodgates to open wide,” the
PLP chairman said.

Under the International Per-
sons Landholding Act (IPLA),
non-Bahamians are able to pur-
chase up to five acres of land
for residential purposes, with-
out seeking the prior approval
of Government.

Mr Rigby argues that as a
result of the passage of the
IPLA, many non-Bahamians
were able to speculate in
Bahamian real estate, which
was contrary to the national
investment policy under the
previous PLP administration.

He pointed out that the FNM
reduced the stamp tax on the
purchase of land by non-
Bahamians. Under the previous

PLP administration a foreign- |

er who acquired property in the

Bahamas paid double the stamp °

duty that a Bahamian would
have paid.

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“It is also obvious that the
FNM does not remember that it
was their policy that led to the
increase of the eligibility
requirement for economic per-
manent residence from $250,000

. to $500,000. They increased the

stamp duty on real estate trans-
actions with a value of $250,000
or more to 10 per cent.

“They wanted to maximize
Government revenue due to the
Canadian demand for perma-
nent residence in offshore juris-
dictions for tax purposes... it
significantly crippled the
Bahamian middle-class as prices
of affordable middle-class
homes increased overnight due
to the foreign demand for
inventory priced in the $500,000
range” Mr Rigby said.

Bahamian households, he
said, have enjoyed a 14 per
cent increase in personal
income during this same period
or 3.5 per cent per annum. The
incremental increase in per-
sonal income is outpacing the
rate of inflation which is con-
tained at 1.74 per cent per

annum.



>

Ae

Rosetta St. ~

sition party said, Mr Christie
can “no longer pretend to be
Mr Nice.”

The FNM also said that the
prime minister should “stop
pretending about another pas-
sionately delivered statement
he made at Clifford Park almost
five years ago”.

At that time Mr Christie said
that the PLP members must
conduct themselves in govern-
ment according to an “uncom-
promising code of complete
integrity and transparency.”

“If we set the right example
at the top, it will filter all the
way down to the bottom, both
in the public sector and in the
wider society,” Mr Christie said.

However, the FNM claimed
yesterday that the “new” PLP
seemed to have started where
the last PLP left off “in terms of
corruption”.

“Even after the most obvi-
ously unethical and irresponsi-
ble behaviour by Ministers and
backbenchers, Mr Christie only
acts after intense public pres-
sure and disastrous political
consequences, and then quite
inadequately. He has failed
utterly to fulfil his promise of
accountability and transparency
in his government,” the FNM
said.

The FNM stated that Mr
Christie is good at promising
investigations into the multiple
scandals drowning the PLP, but
that the people of the Bahamas
never seem to be able to get
the results of those investiga-
tions.

“Remember the Korean
boat scandal early in his admin-
istration? We have yet to hear
about the results of that inves-
tigation,” the FNM said.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

aa aaa eee
Medical tourism: a chance to address many ills

@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat).

ANY of the state
owned and operated
hospitals in’ the

Caribbean are in poor condi-
tion. Notwithstanding compe-
tent doctors and nurses, the

physical condition of many of

the hospitals is bad and their
equipment and technology are
inadequate.

Against this background, it
may seem odd that I am sug-
gesting in this commentary that
Caribbean governments, finan-
cial institutions and tourist
resorts should invest in health
tourism.

Nonetheless, I do suggest it

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as a chance not only to add a
lucrative string to the bow of
Caribbean tourism, but also as
an opportunity to provide local
people with better hospitals and
improved health care for a wide
range of illnesses.

\ huge market is rapidly
developing in the United States,
Canada and Europe of people
who are going abroad to seek
urgent medical attention, cos-
metic surgery and rehabilitation
in salubrious climes.

And, there is a massive drive
by several developing countries
to corner a significant portion of
this growing industry.

During this month alone
there are two events at which
alliances will be built to take
advantage of the opportunities
that health tourism is opening.

The Department of Tourism

in Kerala, a state in the South of
India, in partnership with the
Confederation of Indian Indus-
try (CII) is organising a show
and an international conference
on health tourism which will be
attended by prominent medical
tourism hospitals, medical insur-
ance companies and the travel
trade.

The state minister for tourism
Kodiveri Balakrishnan said:
"As a state, Kerala is leading
in the area of medical tourism.
We are planning to announce
a Medical Tourism Policy dur-
ing the inaugural session” of the
show.

Then, the Cyprus Tourism
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gress, targeting Corporate Buy-
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here is yood reason for
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Some countries, such as the
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hip replacements. In some cas-
es, even surgery for heart con-
ditions can take months to
schedule. Consequently, people



A huge market is
rapidly developing
in the United
States, Canada and
Europe of people
who are going
abroad to seek
urgent medical
attention, cosmetic
surgery and
rehabilitation in
salubrious climes.

are opting to go abroad to
places like India and Singapore
to be treated immediately in pri-
vate hospitals.

The cost of treatment in pri-
vate hospitals in North America
and Europe is much higher than
it is in developing countries that
have dedicated resources to
medical tourism.

A study conducted by the
Confederation of Indian Indus-
try and McKinsey consultants
estimated "medical tourism"
could be worth over US$2 bil-
lion by 2012. The study
revealed that last year over
150,000 foreigners visited India
alone for treatment, with the
number rising by 15 per cent a
year.

A similar number of Ameri-
cans, dissatisfied with the esca-
lating costs of health care,
sought surgery abroad in 2006

ANDRE},
SscHoor °

The International School of The Bahamas ,
TOUNDED 1948,



and the number is growing.
This is a reality recognised by

US health insurance companies

who see a benefit to their prof-

its by offering their subscribers ©

treatment at, for instance, Bum-
rungrad hospital in Thailand, if
their policies do not cover the
costs of US hospitals for proce-
dures they need.

Increasingly, more private
insurance providers will be
doing the same.

The middle-east is also a
growing market for medical
tourism.

Many wealthy Arabs, who
used to travel to Britain and the
United States for medical treat-
ment, have discovered that they
can receive as good medical
attention in better climates and
at better prices in India, Singa-
pore, the Philippines and
Malaysia —— all of whom are
hustling to develop the market
still further.

And, the private hospitals in
these developing countries have
extremely healthy bank
accounts. For instance, Mr.
Chai Sophonpanich, the Chair-



The middle-east
is also a growing
market for
medical tourism.



man of the Thai hospital, Bum-
rungrad, which is a publicly
traded company, reported at the
end of 2005 that the hospital
served more than a million
patients from over 190 coun-
tries paying an impressive divi-
dend to its shareholders.

B oth at home and in the
Diaspora, the

Caribbean has highly trained
and skilled doctors ranging from

THE TRIBUNE:

\
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AT.

@ SIR Ronald Sanders

general practitioners to sur-
geons and specialists. Caribbean
nurses are also poached every
day for work in the UK, the US
and Canada.

Undoubtedly, they can pro-
vide as good a service and per-
haps better to the growing mar-
ket for medical tourism. It’
would keep their talent at
home, and bring home many of .
them. And, while they serve a
lucrative foreign market at
home, they could also give their
skills to the local population
whose costs could be subsidised
by the foreign clientele.

But, such a development will
require precisely what the state
of Kerala is about to announce:
a medical tourism policy by gov-
ernments that includes incen-
tives for private companies to
invest in modern, well-
equipped, well-paying hospitals
and a strong marketing effort
to promote the Caribbean as a
health tourism destination.

It will also need visionary
companies and financial backers
who recognise the opportunity
that medical tourism presents
and seize the moment to invest
in it. r j

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com



(].8) world school

ENROL IN THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA
PROGRAMME AT ST. ANDREW’S SCHOOL

The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) is an exciting and
challenging academic programme that prepares high school students exceedingly
well for their tertiary education. The two-year programme is offered in Years 12
‘and 13 at St Andrew’s School and is highly favoured by universities and recognized
by the ministries of education in over a hundred countries worldwide as an
outstanding introductory curriculum to university education. As a result, it opens
the doors to students to study at renowned universities anywhere in the world and
many students receive additional scholarships upon successful completion of the
diploma. North American universities highly value the IB Diploma students in the
admissions process. Many students receive advanced standing and, in some cases,
complete credit for their Freshman year in universities.

The following will be reviewed by the school when considering students applying to

the programme:

¢ BGCSE results
¢ SAT scores

¢ School reports and recommendations

Information pamphlets on the IBDP and the various courses offered at St. Andrew’s
School are available from the Admissions Office.

For further information, please contact:

Sharon Wilson
Admissions Officer
St Andrew’s School
Phone: 242.324.2621

e-mail: swilson@st-andrews.com

Additionally, general information may be obtained on the International
Baccalaureate website at: www.ibo.org





,

\

THE TRIBUNE



‘AM
Cable Beach

* PLP has
a ‘Prayer
‘and Praise’
event at
Radisson

B WALLACE Rolle,
candidate for South
Beach, Gary Sawyer,
South Abaco, Hope
Strachan, Sea Breeze, and
Jackson Ritchie, Clifton

(Photos: Franklyn G
Ferguson)





ERICAN artist Vickie Winans singing at the PLP’s ‘Prayer and Praise’ at the Radisson



Former MP: think
hard about who

POLITICAL parties must be
extremely careful about whom
they propose to represent their
interests in the House of
Assembly, former PLP MP and

‘current chairman of the Hotel

Corporation George Smith said.
Speaking at a meeting of the
Rotary Club of West Nassau,
Mr Smith said that the same
yardstick must also be applied
to those appointed to the
Bahamas Senate.
; “In the Bahamas today,
although both major political
organisations have more or less
completed their proposed slate
of candidates for nominations
in the upcoming general elec-
tions, it is important that every-
one understands that such a
nomination process is not a fait
accompli until nomination day,”
he said.
' Mr Smith pointed out that
there is always time to amend,
to re-think, to decide anew,
repent and ask the forgiveness
of some constituencies if the
parties feel they are offering
constituents an unfair deal.
* “TI say to the leaders of both
major political organisations
that what your party has done
thus far, and will continue to do
and to promote, will not be
Written in stone until that fateful
nomination day, when will
come the people’s time to
decide,” Mr Smith said.,
' It has been rumoured among
political pundits that Mr Smith
may offer as an independent for
the Exuma constituency.

The former MP said that the
people deserve and have every
right to expect decent and com-
petent choices in every con-
stituency. ‘

“People must be convinced
that their candidate’s voice
would be heard in parliament,
he could have a seat at the table
and that he knows how to deal
with those who control things.
In this way people would renew
their faith in the principle of
government for the people,” Mr
Smith said.

' Bahamians, he said, want to
believe that their representa-
tive would be there for them
when “the lightning strikes.”

* It has always been a point of
comfort for him, Mr Smith said,
to believe that a good repre-
sentative does not have to pos-
sess the “wisdom of Solomon”,
but that “some measure of the
humility and understanding of
Solomon would help.”

“I went on the daunting front
line of politics in the Bahamas
when I was first elected to par-
liament for the Rolleville con-
stituency of Exuma at the ten-
der age of 25, serving for almost
three decades.

': “Some are saying that I am
not yet off that formidable front



GEORGE Smith

line, and indeed people keep
asking me that question. The

answer I give most of the time is.

one which wise old Bahamians
have been giving for many
years: ‘You talk some and you

keep some’,” the hotel corpo-
ration chairman said.



In these times of great social
challenges, when this whole
nation is struggling to get and
keep impressionable young peo-
ple on the right track, politi-
cians, Mr Smith said, need to
be careful.





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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



The problems of generation land

| HERE has been much
talk over the years of a

comprehensive Land Use Poli-
cy. In recent years the issue has
been given increased rhetorical
urgency by politicians, although
it remains to be seen whether
anything substantive will come
of it anytime soon.

For the moment at least, all
eyes are on those aspects of
land policy that affect non-local
acquisition of Bahamian real
estate and its presumed effect
on local purchasing power. In
some areas of The Bahamas,
such concerns are justified, since



WrictkT JER >

In Association with.

hohe athe Soe



a lack of planning and sudden
development has literally left
many locals feeling left out in
the cold as a result of a precipi-
tous climb in land prices.

But what risks being over-
looked yet again is the retarding
effect that certain “traditional”
Bahamian forms of land own-
ership are having on the devel-
opment of the local side of the
economy in the Family Islands,
even while the foreign domi-
nated real estate and investment
industry booms.

Exuma is a case in point. As
an island that is booming from
end to end, Great Exuma offers

Present

PERSPECTIVES



ANDREW ALLEN

locals with private landholdings
many opportunities to share in
the wealth that is being pro-
duced in the island’s economy.

Juxtapose a photo of George
Town ten years ago with one
taken today and the contrast is
pretty stark. Locals have clear-
ly made quite a lot of money
on sales of land in the last
decade. But they have also used



RoyalStar
eeeeeray nce

the opportunity afforded by ris-
ing real estate values to invest in
new shopping centres and com-
mercial buildings everywhere.

B ut, as in other islands,
Exuma suffers from a
dual system of land ownership,
in which the hearts of tradi-
tional settlements are either col-
lectively owned “generation
land”, or less commonly, com-
monage, as in parts of North
Eleuthera adjacent to Harbour
Island.

Parts of such settlements as
Rolletown, Steventon and
Moss Town, and virtually all
of Barraterre are presently
dominated by generation land,
under which any verifiable
descendant of the township is
entitled to build and occupy a
part of the property.

The problem with generation
land is that its occupiers never
become private owners of their
parcels and are thus incapable
of producing the kind of title
required for bank financing.
They are also not able to sell
the land, rendering it essential-
ly alienated from the rest of the

island’s booming economy.

A friend who is a winter res-
ident in Exuma recently
remarked how guests of his
often question the abundance
of half built structures sitting
on land that is clearly valuable.
Of course, what they do not
know is that, no matter how
pretty it is, “generation” land
simply cannot attract the financ-
ing normally required for build-
ings for improvements. Locals
simply build as they get the

as islands like Exuma urbanise,
the centres of these settlements
will form ghettos of under
investment. The only Exumians
excluded from bankable titles
to real estate (a crucial key to
upward mobility in The
Bahamas) will be those unfor-
tunate enough to inherit only
rights to generation land.
Presumably, the way around
all this would be for an enlight-
ened government (ah for one
of those!) to at least study the



What risks being overlooked yet
again is the retarding effect that
certain “traditional” Bahamian
forms of land ownership are
having on the development of the
local side of the economy in the

Family Islands.



money, creating uncoordinated
and somewhat sloppy looking
settlements.

W orse still, since gen-
eration land tends

to comprise the central areas of
traditionally settled townships,
there is a real probability that,

prospect of a comprehensive
reacquisition of generation land
by the crown with a view to reg-
ularising titles. In the meantime,
there would appear no more
just and reasonable use for pre-
sent crown land holdings than
to offer grants of crown land by
way of exchange for rights to
generation land.

PROPERTIES FOR SALE

LISTED PROPERTIES - RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

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Friday, March 30th, 2007 Ue aturday: March 31st, 2007 LOT NO. 75 soe
St. Paul's Church Hall : St Andrew' Ss Kirk PROPERTY SIZE: Multi Family Sixplex Apartment argh

Complex (19,055 sq. ft.) eee

8:00 P.M. | 8:00 P.M. LOCATION: Bonita Lane & Bluefish Street Mate
Members: $25.00 ts: $10.00 APPRAISED VALUE: $420,000 an
. Non-members: $35.00 Sradente vie

saan

The Albek Trio Will Perform Works By: mae

Mozart * Shostakovich + Faila * Smeina baa

‘es

Reservations and Tickets Available at:
A.D. HANNA & CO., Deveaux Street - 322-8306

Ba
ONS

ee







a
STAR GENERAL, Marathon Road - 393-5529 HAWKSBILL SUBDIVISION ARDENT FOREST SUBDIVISION roth
MOIR & CO., Lyford Cay Shopping Centre - 362-4895 LOT NO. 124 LOT NO. 25 Block 2 Unit 4 a
and View the Programme at www.nassaumusicsociety.org PROPERTY SIZE: Single Storey Residence PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Incomplete ries
SG (5,400 sq. ft.) Residence (0.34 acres) “ste
Private Banking LOCATION: Abaco Drive LOCATION: 250 Yards West of Midshipman Road eee
- APPRAISED VALUE: $70,000 APPRAISED VALUE: $62,842 wee
5!

EIGHT. MILE ROCK ROYAL BAHAMIAN ESTATES eh,
PROPERTY SIZE: Incomplete Single Family LOT NO. 225 Section 28 oe
* Duplex (5,000 sq. ft.) PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence — ofeca
LOCATION: Main Settlement of Eight Mile Rock 3 Beds / 2 Baths (21,250 sq. ft.) "ata

APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000 LOCATION: Inagua Avenue Boe

APPRAISED VALUE: $204,000

YEOMAN WOOD SUBDIVISION sO
LOT NO. 7 Block 1 Unit 1 ‘oy: *
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Storey Residence one
(13,660 sq. ft.) Oe
LOCATION: On a Cul-de-sac off Albatross Circle eal

APPRAISED VALUE: $96,000 sey
oe
MALIBOO REEF ESTATES SUBDIVISION shat
LOT NO. 104 = W

PROPERTY SIZE: Duplex Building (11,866 sq. ft.) . , .
LOCATION: Galleon Avenue & Outrigger CT ote
APPRAISED VALUE: $360,000 eee
eee

GRAND BAHAMA EAST SUBDIVISION





LOT NO. 27 Section 21 Block “D” oO
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Storey Residence oes
(10,446 sq. ft.) 3
LOCATION: Linday Drive oe
APPRAISED VALUE: $59,000 > ot
LISTED PROPERTIES - VACANT-LOTS a
LINCOLN GREEN SUBDIVISION ROYAL BAHAMIAN ESTATES SUBDIVISION te '
LOT NO. 52 Block 5 Unit 1 LOT NO. 16 block 23 ,
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi Family (0.28 acres) PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family (0.44 acres) :
LOCATION: Western Side of Ludford Road LOCATION: South Side of Dominica Avenue ‘
APPRAISED VALUE: $30,000 APPRAISED VALUE: $25,000 ’
ARDENT FOREST SUBDIVISION BAHAMIA SOUTH SUBDIVISION 4
LOT NO. 11 Block 22 Unit 2 LOT NO. 10 Block 32 Section 2 ‘
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family (0.35 acres) PROPERTY SIZE: Multi/Single Family a
LOCATION: South Side of Orlando Drive & Arden (0.33 acres) ;
Forest Road LOCATION: Eastern Side of Forest Lane ;
APPRAISED VALUE: $30,000 (Less Than 150 Yards West of Santa Maria Avenue) es ‘
APPRAISED VALUE: $30,000 v9)
SEA HORSE VILLAGE SUBDIVISION on
LOT NO. 31 Block 11 oats
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi/Single Family .
(0.27 acres) ’
LOCATION: Eastern Side of Bonito Street ¢
APPRAISED VALUE: $30,000 ote
Be In New York City on Playtex! “ri
Name: Telephone: INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE Peel
Address: CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET, wa) oye
Entries without receipts cannot be counted. OR CALL 242-502-6221 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO ‘s:
: : REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. ont
NYC isthe BigA__ ibs a







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 9



Ce SG aaa
Performers let their



| POET Shamija Moncur Pehiis one of her pieces Sduring the latest session of ‘Express Vourscle:
The event, held at Da Island Club in the Nassau Beach Hotel, is an open forum for poets,
musicians and performers to share their work. The next session will be held on Wednesday, March

21, at 8pm.



‘i PUBLISHED poet Sean Munnings reading his poetry



& POET Indy Seymour recites one of her pieces












B CULTURAL
veteran and
poet Odediah
Smith sharing
one of his
poems during
the latest last
week’s session
of “Express
Yourself.”



ym
Prone .
Lad
aint

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Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a aaa a nea el ee
International Women’s Day collection

is given to Shepherd’s Nook home

SOCIAL Services Minister
Melanie Griffin presented a
cheque to ‘A Shepherd’s
Nook’, a home for girls.

The cheque, given to the
home’s president and admin-
istrator, Rev Betty Cleare,

..came from an offering collect-

g

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ed at the International Wom-
en’s Day church service held at
Bethel Baptist Church.

During the presentation at
her Ministry on March 14, Mrs
Griffin thanked Rev Cleare
for the work the home is doing
in the community.



dosed for inventory

Saturday, March 24, 2007











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$322.2115 €322.2355
RUNCORN IC Lea

“Il commend you, your
house mother and the other
Board of Directors at A Shep-
herd’s Nook for the work you
do,” she said. “It is a work that
can only be done from the
heart.”

Rev Cleare thanked the
donors for “the generous gift.
It is going to go a long way in
helping with our groceries, and
helping with the programme
we have at the Shepherd’s
Nook,” she said.

‘When I came into Shep-
herd’s Nook I was totally
green to the whole concept of
social work, but I also knew
that I had a heart for excel-
lence and enhancing people’s
lives.

“T had to find someone who
would assist me in that work
and | found a friend in the per-
son of Minister Alisha Adder-
ley.”

Mrs Griffin also thanked
Bethel’s pastor, Rev Dr Tim-
othy Stewart, for allowing the
service to be held at his
church.

Rev Stewart said his church
can be called on at all times
to assist the Ministry of Social
Services and Community
Development.

THE BAHAMAS INSTITUTE
OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

“Accuracy, Integrity and Fairness”

Website: www.bica.bs

4 CONTIN UING EDUCATION SEMINAR:

LEADERSHIP & REGULATORY TRAINING FOR MANAGERS

Place:
Time:

March 224 2007
British Colonial Hilton Hotel, The Governor’s Ballroom
9:00 am - 4:00 pm

Pre-register: Telephone 326-6619

CPE hours:

Cost per day: Members $100
Lunch & Parking Included. No Billings.

Topics & Speakers Include:

Non-members $125

7 (BICA members - 40 hours required over a 2 year period)

. Effective Leadership Skills & Managing People
Work/Life Balance Issues

Gems Radio Station

‘ The Blueprint for a

Ms. Debbie Bartlett — President, CEO Network & Partner,

Successful Woman Executive

The importance of maintaining strong corporate ethical standards
Ms. Minna Israel —- Managing Director, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.
& Chairman, Clearing Banks Association

: Steps to Plan and Manage a Successful Audit Engagement
A technical perspective

Ms. Tiffany Norris Pilcher,

CPA — Senior Manager, Ernst & Young

. Detecting & Reporting Suspicious Transactions
e A case study approach for financial institutions
ee Financial Intelligence Unit

: Risk Based Supervision
este Anti- as Laundering Procedures

aa Mr. Ste

hen Thompson

Complhance Commission

Induction Ceremony for New Members & Licensees of BICA

he EE Te a eee ae eee

avn







@ MINISTER of Social Services and Community Development Melanie Griffin presented a
cheque, made up of contributions collected during the International Women’s Day church service,
to “A Shepherd’s Nook.” Pictured from left are business manager and president of the Women’s
Department of Bethel Baptist Church, Rev Patricia Bethel; first assistant secretary and officer

in charge of Bureau of Women’s Affairs, Phedra Rahming; pastor of Bethel Baptist, Rev Timothy
Stewart; president and administrator at A Shepherd’s Nook, Rev Betty Cleare; Melanie Griffin;
senior assistant secretary at the ministry, Florinda Johnson and A Shepherd’s Nook house no

Rev Florence Elisha Adderley.

(BIS photo: Tim Aylen).

Teenager accused of smuggling drugs

FREEPORT — A 19-year-
old American visitor was arrest-
ed on Saturday accused of
attempting to smuggle $30,000
worth of illegal drugs at
Lucayan Harbour.

According to Supt Basil Rah-
ming, press liaison officer, a
female resident of Bradenton,
Florida, was at the Discovery
Cruise passenger terminal around
4pm when she was found in pos-
session of one kilo of cocaine.

_Mr Rahming said the woman
was walking through the secu-
rity X-ray screening equipment
when an alarm was activated.
A female security officer took
the woman to a private room,

wthad

where a search was conducted.

During the search, the offi-
cer discovered one taped plastic
package, containing one kilo of
cocaine, tied to the woman’s
back with a black pantyhose.



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in
their neighbourhoods.
Call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The teen was arrested and tak-
en into custody by Drug
Enforcement Unit officers.

The woman is expected to be
charged on Monday in ba Mag-
istrate’s Court.







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THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LIMITED

Ean

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NASSAU, BAHAMAS

MANAGER — ACCOUNTS PAYABLE DEPARTMENT

TS TART ca



“ THE TRIBUNE
®

BRED Pare



s

ve we

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



Cee 8 mk eT

FREEPORT — The Grand
Bahama business community
» commended US Ambassador
* John Rood on his accomplish-
s ments during his tenure in the
~, Bahamas.
. The Grand Bahama Cham-
*ber of Commerce hosted a
farewell luncheon on Friday for
Mr Rood at the Ruby Swiss
Restaurant, where business per-
sons, politicians and civic lead-
ers bid him farewell after sery-
ing three years as the ambas-
sador to the Bahamas.

Albert Gray, president of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
MP Kenneth Russell, and Rotary

~Club president Derek Handticld,
and other community teaders
- wished the ambassador well in



his future endeavours

“You are the epitome of a
true ambassador ... that came
along at the right time,” said
Freeport News Editor Oswald
Brown, who was also called on
to give brief farewell remarks.

Mr Rood said that the com-
mercial relationship between
the countries are very strong,
adding that the US does about
$2 billion of merchandise trade
with the Bahamas each year
He also noted that 85 per cent
of all Bahamian trade is with
the US.

But, more importantly, Mr
Rood noted that both countries
have co-operated closely in
areas such as drug trafficking,
migrant smuggling, and security.

Mr Rood said when he was
offered the job to serve he could
not turn it down because “1

it was




















an opportunity fo serve his
coupiy and a chance fo really
make a difference.”

Since his appointment, Mr
Rood has been at the forefront
in hurricane relict and restora-
tion efforts in the Bahamas, and
promoting literacy, and educa-
tional projects in the Bahamas.

Mr Rood and his family have
contributed personal funds to
help build a new home for
Bahamian israel Bonefish Fol-
ley’ Rolle, whose home was
destroyed by Hurricane Frances.
The US has also contributed
millions to the rebuilding of
some 19 homes at West End.

“T look back on my tenure as
Ambassador and think of the
millions of dollars in training
and equipment provided to sup-
port the outsianding collabora-
tion we enjoy through OPBAT

with Bahamian law enforcement
and the Defence Force,” he said.
Mr Rood was also instru-
mental in ensuring the continu-
ation of the US Customs Pre-
clearance facility in Grand
Bahama, despite the low
tourism arrivals to the island.
He said the US has also deep-
ened its commitment to Grand
Bahama through its decision to
establish both megaports screen-
ing, and the container security
initiative at the Freeport port.
“Through these initiatives
and others, I hope that I have
left the US-Bahamas relation-
ship even closer than it was
when I came. And I also hope
that I have strengthened the
special ties between Grand
Bahama, whose past and future
is so closely linked with the
United States,” he said.



Ambassador visits Hugh Campbell Primary

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT ~ US Ambas

.sador John Rood is getting clos-
ser to achieving his goal of visit-
sing 50 schools throughout the
, Bahamas. On Friday he visited
*the Hugh Campbell Primary
‘School in Freeport.

Mr Rood received an impres
sive welcome from the students,
who paid special tribute through
SC

‘
4
\
4
songs, poems, and a lively rake
é’n scrape performance for the
‘Ambassador, and his small
entourage at the US Embassy.
: “JT will be leaving soon ... but
tbefore T leave I plan to visit 50

‘schools.” he said. “tT have been

'
#
t



to every major island, but I still

have a few more schools to go.”

Ambassador Rood told stu-
dents that as the ambassador to
the Bahamas his duty is to assist
the Bahamas in times of need,
to establish bilateral relation-
ships, and to promote public
diplomacy.

“It has really been a wonder-
ful time for mein the Bahamas
to meet so many people and to
visit the schools here and to see
talents in your schools,” he said.

Ambassador Rood, who read
a book to the students, said that
public diplomacy and reaching
out to people about things, such
as literacy. are very important

“L have chosen reading

because Laura Bush, the wife
of President (George) Bush,
was a teacher and a librarian,
who promotes literacy.”

Mr Rood makes it a point to
read to students during his
school visits. The Embassy has
also donated books to the vari-
ous school libraries.

Mr Rood stated that the
Bahamian people are resilient,
optimistic, and a very giving
people.

“When I first presented my
credentials, Hurricane Frances
hit and we took a bus tour of
Freeport, and it was unbeliey-
able, and I will always
remember how optimistic the
people of the Bahamas are.” he

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recalled.

Ambassador Rood said the
United States assisted in build-
ing 19 homes in West End for
those very needy persons in that
settlement.

He said the gesture was
returned when the Bahamas
raised more than $1 million for
the people in New Orleans who
were affected by Hurricane
Katrina. “Bahamians prayed
and held a tele-a-thon for
pledges and musicians per-
formed, and students raised
money.” he said.

Mr Rood, who is from Jack-
sonville, has served three years
as ambassador to the Bahamas.

more powerful engines. The ML”
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MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 11





Rood pays visit to Ginn

US Ambassador John Rood made a brief stopover at the
West End property of Ginn sur Mer.

Ambassador Rood and his team — Dan O’Connor, the US
Embassy’s political officer, and Anne Marie Bain, commercial _
specialist — were given a brief tour of the property.
Refreshments were served at Ginn’s sales trailer where the
ambassador took in the master plan.

Ambassador Rood and his friend, Israel “Bonefish” Foley
were reunited once more before his departure from the
Bahamas. Mr Rood also said good-bye to his reading
programme counterpart, Cardinal Woods, principal at West
End Primary School. Mr Woods served as principal of
Woodcock Primary School in Nassau, where the ambassador
launched his reading programme.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

Contract signed to repair causeway

oy SPENT CEA Sa.

GOVERNMENT has signed
a contract of nearly $500,000 to
repair a dilapidated causeway
on Great Harbour Cay, the




















































Berry Islands.

Works Minister Bradley
Roberts signed the contract on
Thursday with Mr Terry
Winder of Winder Construction
— a local construction compa-

ny.

The project will include the
erection of 165 yards of guard
rails along the causeway; the
placement of 1,500 tonnes of
aggregate and boulders as a

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support base; the construction
of 200 yards of swales, parallel
to the causeway; the installa-
tion of 25 catch basins in the
swales; and, the placement of
60 cubic yards of top soil and
grass to protect the embank-
ment.

Mr Roberts told The Tribune
that the awarding of govern-
ment contracts to Bahamian
contractors is a firm policy and
philosophy of the government.

“It’s only when we are,
through circumstances beyond
our control, based on the impo-
sition of donor or lender organ-
isations, that you must go to
international tender. We believe
that our people (contractors)
have been able to demonstrate
that they are just as good as the
international contractors,” he
said.

The infrastructure upgrade to
the causeway in.Great Harbour
Cay, is another example of gov-
ernment’s desire to improve the
lives of Bahamians, according
to Vincent Peet, MP for North

THE TRIBUNE





@ THE government of the Bahamas signed a contract with

Winder Construction on Thursday to repair the causeway in
Great Harbour Cay, The Berry Islands. From left are David
Dean, chief councillor for the Berry Islands; Vincent Peet,
Minister of Labour and Financial Services and Member of
Parliament for North Andros; Malester Winder and Terry
Winder of Winder Construction. and Bradley Roberts, Minister

of Works and Immigration.

Andros and the Berry Islands.

“Today is such a special, spe-
cial day to have both areas of
my constituency benefit from
the vision and commitment of
this government to uplift the

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Class “A” Preference Shares
Dividend Payment

The Board of Directors of Colina
Holdings Bahamas Limited (CHBL) ts
pleased to announce that a Preference
Share Dividend for the period January
1, 2007 to March 31, 2007 at the
annual rate of B$ Prime +2.25% will
be paid to the Class “A” Preference

= Shareholders of record of CHBL on

& the 31° day of March 2007.

Payment will be made through the
Company’s Registrar and Transfer
Agent, CFAL Ltd. within 10 business
days of the record date.

Colina.

Holdings Bahamas

(BIS photo: Raymond Bethel)

lives of our people, to improve
the infrastructure and to pro-
vide safety in the case of a hur-
ricane or some disaster. So that,
should we be faced with those
challenges in the future, we will
be prepared both here in the
Berry Islands and Andros,” he
said.

Government also signed a
contract of nearly $2 million
earlier in the day in Lowe
Sound, Andros, which is a part
of Mr Peet’s constituency.

More announcements for
infrastructure upgrades are
expected as the election nears.
Some commentators suggest
that these announcements func-
tion as attempts by govern-
ments to sway voters. However,
others suggest that governments
rush these projects through,
near election time to satisfy the
vast number of promises made
at the beginning of their man-.
date.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share

i your story.











a

a



see ew



THE TRIBUNE






COUNTRY music fans
across the Bahamas are in for
an amazing treat, as Cable
Beach Resorts and Crystal
Palace Casino host one of the
brightest stars in the industry,
LeAnn Rimes, in a two show
performance, March 24 and 25.

Following a line-up of inter-
nationally acclaimed artists,
from the soul sister herself, Pat-
ti LaBelle, to the ever-youthful
Beach Boys, LeAnn is the latest
in a string of top artists to hit
the shores of Nassau as part of
the Cable Beach Resorts enter-
tainment revue.

With two performances
scheduled, Saturday, March 24
at 9pm in the Rainforest The-
atre and Sunday, March 25, at
3pm on the Crystal Beach,
Bahamians are already buzzing
about the upcoming concert,
said Sharon Saunders-Smith,
events and entertainment man-
ager, Crystal Palace Casino. She
added also that tickets for Sat-
urday’s performance are almost
sold out, as are the VIP tickets
for Sunday’s show on the Crys-
tal Beach.

Adding a bit of a twist to the
upcoming show, organisers have
planned something extra spe-
cial for the audience — an
opening act. Mrs Saunders-
Smith declined, however, to
identify the group, saying only
that it was an international
group and that they were very
good.

“It’s the first time we have an
opening act and it’s going to be
a surprise who they are. This is
a first for us — we’re trying a
new concept,” she said.

According to Ms Saunders-
Smith, Cable Beach Resorts will
again be offering an exclusive
drawing for Bahamians who
purchase tickets to the events.
Some 12 prizes will be present-
ed — from VIP tickets to the
concert, a weekend stay in one
of the resort’s suits, round-trip
limo rides to the concert to din-
ner at the Black Angus restau-
rant. The drawing will be held
Thursday, March 22.

In other entertainment news,
Cable Beach Resorts premiered
its nightclub, the Rum Jungle,
during a soft opening last Thurs-
day. The Hot Spot will be open
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
evenings after the Jambalaya
show at 11pm in the Rainfor-
est Theatre. The nightclub fea-
tures the “Dice Girls” — go-go
dancers who perform through-
out the evening on the shadow
box and a local DJ talent.

“Even though we do have
this nightclub in the Rainforest
Theatre — Jambalaya is still
doing well. Bahamians might
not know that we’ve added to
Jambalaya a local fire act fea-
turing ‘Pepper’, a Bahamian fire
dancer. We also have a new
lead singer for the show and
have added more _ local
dancers,” she said.

Following the LeAnn Rimes
Concert, Cable Beach Resorts

Bahamas



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ff MARIE Taylor

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 13

BENITH Fatal



@ BRENDALEE Silver

Our Lucaya selects year end winners

AFTER months of waiting
and hundreds of nominations,
the management of the Westin
and Sheraton Grand Bahama
Island Our Lucaya Resort
revealed the names of their
2006 associates, supervisor and
manager of the year winners
at a special lunch at the resort.

Victorious were: Brendalee
Silver, front of house associate
of the year and Marie Taylor,
heart of house associate of the
year, Benitha Fatal, supervisor

of the year and Jeremiah Saun-
ders, manager of the year.

Brendalee Silver, a front
desk agent at the Sheraton
Grand Bahama, has dedicated
more than 20 years to the hos-
pitality industry.

Marie Taylor, a seamstress
in the resort’s auto valet
department, has been with the
resort since December 1999
and was its September 2006
associate of the month heart
of the house award .

ONE COMPANY ONE GOAL

Accounts payable supervisor
-Benitha Fatal was awarded the
supervisor of the month award
for the period ending March
2006 and won the overall title
of supervisor of the year.

Employed with the resort
since July 1999, Jeremiah Saun-
ders, assistant chief of engi-
neering, was selected manag-
er of the quarter for the period
ending September 2006 before
winning the overall manager
of the year award.

ONE CHOICE

Colinalmperial bisurauce invites interested persons to. submit applications for the
position of Systens Developer it the information Technology depar bent.

Systems Developer

Position Summary
The successful candidate will: develop tools and applications to ensure the
overall efficiency of the business processes; maintain and enhance the core
line of business applications as necessary; and work with Senior

Developers to implement new technologies.

Job Requirements

Must have a Bachelor's

degree in IS or equivalent technical certifications

Minium 3 years programming experience with ASIN0 CL, REG IV / ILE

or ASS 400 Cobol

Minimum 2 vears programming exporivnce in sOl

Knowledge of industry standards re: Svsterm Change

Contre! procedures

Practical experience in insurams or banking fields preferred
Excellent attention te detail

Excellent analytical and problem solving skills
Strong verbal and written communication skills
Strong leadership and organizational skills

_ Knowledge of the following would be an asset:

NBase

CICS tor AS400
lava / Perl /XML
Tomeat

Crystal Reports

Microsoft Development (NET)

Responsibilities Include
Development of new applications to improve ihe business process
Supporting maintenance & enhancement of sisting applications

Implementation of changes using established testing procedures and change control

Bus & Truck

Troubleshooting of problems related to RPG and Cobol AS-100 progranis

Creation of technical specications and design documents

Work with team of developers and analysts to complete corporate objectives

Compensation will be commensurate with experience and qualifications.
Please submit your resume to our Corporate Headquar ters, 308 East Bay Strees,

attention: Vice President. Human Resources or submit via email to Careers@Colinalmperial.com

will bring the Motown group
using the subject line: Systerns Developer: Deadline for all submissions: Thursday, Apri Sth, 2007

Earth, Wind and Fire, Novem-
ber 3 and 4. The resort is also
’ said to be in negotiations for
other Motown acts expected to
touch down on the country’s
shores in the months ahead.

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

Statement claims company seeking to
have concessions ‘vastly increased’

FROM page one

line has unfortunately passed
and, after March 15, Baha
Mar’s partners’ ‘walk away’
rights are in effect, and could
be exercised at any time if the
partners so chocse

“As thc Government should
know, the failure to finalise
uegotiations by March 15 has
increased the risk in the pro-
ject’s future, a project which,
if fulfilled, holds enormous eco-
nomic benefits for the

Bahamas. Baha Mar reiterates,
as it repeatedly did to the Gov-
ernment in the days leading up


































COME GROW WITH US!

We're expanding to our new premises,
on Chesapeake Rd. & we're seeking a:

Sales & Marketing
Meals

PRIMARY DUTIES:

*Spearhead the growth of current brands
& introduce new products to business.
houses & the general public in Nassau
& the Family islands.

eSupervise & train a small team of
salespersons/merchandisers on the trade.

*Monitor & track monthly sales by category;
plan product forecasts.

*Plan & organize seasonal promotions
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SUCCESSFUL APPLICANT MUST:
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*Be able to meet high standards &
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*Be self motivated & able to wor! independently. .
‘Possess good leadership & interpersonal skills,
*Have good computer skills.

Competitive Salary w/ Sales Incehtive plus
Health Insurance & Vehicle Allowance!

to the March 15 deadline, that
it stands ready to meet with the
Government to achieve suc-
cessful negotiations so that the
project may go forward.”

However, the Government
said that after months of good
faith negotiations with a view
to facilitating the development,
on March 7 it communicated
its position on the investment
incentives, approvals and other
requests sought by Baha Mar,
together with government’s
response relating to Baha
Mar’s Conditions Precedent
obligations.

“Baha Mar has rejected sig-

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1ea7a351

PRIMARY DUTIES:

Maintain in good order all inventory in medium
sized warehouse w/ frozen & dry goods.

*Dispatch & receive fleet of 4 to 5 trucks
before & after their daily routes.

*Receive all Incoming inventory.
«Supervise & verify orders being picked up,

* Assist w/ tracking & ordering inventory
items via computer.

SUCCESSFUL APPLICANT MUST:

*Have at least 2 years experience in
warehouse environment.

*Be able & willing to follow strict inventory
guidelines; as set out by management.

«Be self motivated & able to work independently.
Possess good leadership & organizational skills.
*Be capable of driving & operating fork lift.
*Have basic computer skills.
Competitive Salary w/ Annual Bonus
plus Health Insurance!

Suitable persons should send their
resume w/ references & a photo to

FUN FOODS WHOLESALE
Royal Bank Building, Mackey St.

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nificant parts of the Govern-
ment’s position and is now ask-
ing that Government reconsid-
er its position as communicated
to Baha Mar. In light of the
same, the Government’s rep-
resentatives indicated to Baha
Mar some three weeks ago the
necessity of securing an exten-
sion from its partners beyond
the March 15 deadline in order
to complete the transaction.
Such extensions are not unusu-
al in major agreements of this
nature,” the Government
release said.

Baha Mar previously said
Harrah’s now had the right to
withdraw from the $2.4 billion
project, something The Tribune
was told would send the devel-
opment “back to the drawing
board”.

The Cable Beach developer
said that while Harrah’s had so
far given no indication it would
use its right to “walk away”,

‘the failure to meet the dead-

line had exposed the project to

“increased risk”.

Baha Mar Development
Company entered into a Heads
of Agreement with the gov-
ernment on April 6, 2005 for a
$1 billion resort development.
on Cable Beach.

Baha Mar has subsequently
announced that the project was
being expanded to a $2 billion
development.

©

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Nassau Street.

time.

P.O.BOX N -984

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MVE Reenter lle

Friends may pay their last respects at St. Martin
Monastery Chapel, # 96 Nassau Street on
Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. and at St.
Anslem 's Catholic Church, Bernard Road from
5:30 p.m. until service time.

In Lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to St.
Martin Monastery Development Fund c/o

Meanwhile, however, the
Government and its team of
technical experts are vigorous-
ly pursuing negotiations with
Baha Mar, together with
national and international
expert advisers.

Particular attention has been
given to the fulfilment of Baha
Mar’s conditions precedents
obligations under the existing
Heads of Agreement relating
to equity requirements, financ-
ing and the procurement of
world-class casino and hotel
joint venture partners.

Recently, the definitive
agreement relating to these
obligations was received by the
Government.

This document, the Govern-
ment said, required very close
scrutiny and analysis.

Both parties have continued
to dialogue with a view to
resolving all outstanding issues.
The Government said it
remained fully committed to
ensuring that the best possible
arrangements were made in
order to facilitate the Joint
Venture between Harrah’s,
Baha Mar and Starwood as its
other operating partner.

“The Government remains
optimistic that outstanding
issues could be resolved with

continued good faith negotia- i

tions within a timely manner,”
the release said.








Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

Sister Maria





of St. Martin
Monastery, #96
Nassau Street will be
held on Thursday
March 22nd, 2007 at
11:00 a.m. at St.
Jo h Catholic
, , Boyd Road.



. She is survived by her religious community of |

seventy years, The Benedictine Sisters "of Saint
Martin Monastery, The Benedictine Oblates; two
sisters, Mrs. Margaret Demetrius and Mrs. Alice
Wondside; cousin, Miss Miriam Roker; nieces,
Effie-Jane Sherman Wallis, Jaunianne Dorsette,
Christina Nwosa, Doris Rahming, Regina Talley,
Louise Russell, Druscilla, Annie and Christina
Moss, Lucy and Anne Woodside, Barbara
Rahming, Mrs. Alfred Huie and Mrs. Carolyn
Kinglock; nephews,
Benjamin Rahming, Anthony, Samuel, Donald
and Alexander Woodside, Hosea and Calvin
Moss, John, Ricardo, Frederick, Barry and Larry
Rahming and a host of other relatives and friends.

Ferdinand Sherman,



A Vigil will be held at St. Anslem 's Church,
Bernard Road, Fox Hill on Wednesday March
21st, 2007 at 7:30 p.m.








And again on Thursday at St. Joseph Catholic
Church, Boyd Roadfrom 10:00 a.m. until service






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Rahming, 87°

~ His Grace Archbishop...
Patrick C. Pinder assisted by the Clergy of the
Archdiocese of Nassau will officiate. Interment
will be made in St. Martin dePorres Cemetery,





THE TRIBUNE

Sir Arthur Foulkes:
race ought not to be an

issue in this election »

FROM page one

he said.

Despite the pronouncements
of some, Sir Arthur said he did
believe the race card is being
played in this election.

“If you make a reference to
the UBP, if one politician
makes a reference to the UBP
and accuses the FNM of wanti-
ng to go back to the old days
and to sell out‘and then anoth-
er politician at a meeting, say
in Fox Hill, brings up the race
thing it connects pretty neatly (
to the race issue) | think,” Sir
Arthur said.

However, he said, it is never
wrong to talk about history and
the country should do more
talking about history.

“We should teach our chil-
dren our young people about
our history, including the his-
tory of slavery and racism. | am
all for that. But I do not believe

that race is a legitimate issue in
this election nor for many elec-
tions gone. It is not an issue,”
Sir Arthur said.

Early in the life of the FNM,
he said, the participation of
“some of the old guard” did the
FNM a lot of harm even though
there was no danger of them
ever taking over.

“Remember when the FNM
was formed, our motto was All
Together. That was not a slo-
gan for that election. That was a
concept.

“We had this concept from
the very beginning the eight of
us and the others who joined,
of a Bahamas where the race
question would be put to bed
forever and that whites and
blacks together as equals would
participate in every thing in
their country including the gov-
ernance of their country. And it
is regrettable that it has not hap-
pened,” Sir Arthur said.

PLP confirms its
slate of candidates

FROM page one

yesterday.

According to other sources, the Sports, Youth and Housing
Minister will run for the constituency of Clifton — an area further.
west which includes several subdivisions.

St Margaret’s will be divided into two, with a portion going 6
Montagu, and some to the new constituency of St Anne’s.

Weekend sees two murders

FROM page one

year-old male companion, both
of East Street South, into cus-
tody and are now awaiting the
results of the autopsy on the
baby’s body.

Just hours after the baby’s
death, at [lam on Saturday,
police were called to the scene
of a shooting in the area of
Ethel Street and Montell
Heights.

’ When police arrived on the
scene they found a man with a
gunshot wound in his abdomen.

The man, believed to be in
his early twenties of central
New Providence, was rushed to
hospital, but died of his injuries
a short time later.

Just two hours later police
arrested a 25-year-old man ot
Milton Street in the Montell
Heights area after he anda
companion fled from police
when they had been observed
sitting in a green coloured
Oldsmobile, “acting suspicious-
ly”,

Police officers found a :357

. revolver and nine live rounds

of ammunition on the suspect.
It could not be confirmed if

the man taken into custody was

involved in the murder, but



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

| area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

police are following leads in the
matter, Mr Evans said.

The weekend’s second mur-
der occurred at 11pm on Satur-
day night in the Englerston
area.

According to police reports, a

’ group of men were playing

cards in the backyard of a home
in the area when an unidenti-
fied armed man approached
them and opened fire.

One of the men, who was

playing cards, was shot in the -

head and died at the scene.
The victim, a resident of the
Engierston community, is
believed to be in his early twen-
ties. é
This year’s high number of
murders, Mr Evans said yester-
day, has led Police Commis-
sioner Paul Farquharson to
introduce additional initiatives
to eradicate crime, which will
be launched sometime this
week.
Mr Evans said it is important
that Bahamians now partner

- with the police to remove illegal

weapons and social ills from the
country’s communities.

“Police remain committed to
eliminating crime so that the
majority of people can feel safe
again,” he said.













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THE TRIBUNE



i ieee



@ TIFFANY Blue ithapsedly - Delano aoannd (right) prepares
to sample the signature drink of the evening provided by Bristol

Cellars.

John Bull invites
customers for
evening viewing



Hi WINNER Nordin Siam (centre) receives his Tiffany & Co gift
from Andrew Roberts (left), director of operations of the John
Bull group of companies, and Tarek Vanderpool (right), jewelry

buyer at John Bull.

JOHN Bull, home to the local
jewelry boutique Tiffany & Co,
recently invited preferred cus-
tomers to celebrate an evening
of glamour during an exclusive
viewing of a spectacular travel-
ling gemstone jewelry collec-
tion at their 284 Bay Street loca-
tion.

Upon entering, guests
stepped into the world of
Tiffany — the world’s premier
house of jewelry design.

Greeted by beautiful live
models and a jazz trio, the
evening was spent viewing fab-
ulous pieces while feasting on
savory and sweet selections,
including signature Tiffany Blue
Box Petits Fours and Blue
Rhapsody Tiffany cocktails.

Select Tiffany & Co gifts,
including a suite of Tiffany jew-
elry, offered a surprising addi-
tion to the event, as happy win-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so; call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ners took home an unexpected
delight.

As one on a short list of trade
accounts to host this collection,
John Bull was honoured to have
been given the opportunity to
present the collection to their
market.





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SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net



MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

The Tribune



Colinalmperial





Insurance Ltd,



Grand Bahama developer:
No Crown Land involved

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he developer
behind a major
investment pro-
posal for eastern
Grand Bahama
has denied to The Tribune that
it is proposing to develop all
Crown Land in that area, saying
its planned resort will be built
on privately-owned land

Gross margins from Bolue Hills hurt until company can prove water loss target hit

acquired from Bahamians.

In a statement sent to The
Tribune, Ken Farino, who is
acting as a Bahamas-based con-
sultant/adviser for developers
Beka Development, said “at no
time” had it discussed with the
Government either becoming
the developer of all Crown
Land in the East End, or
becoming the ‘master develop-
er’ for a 100 square-mile area.

Mr Farino confirmed to The

* Dismisses lawsuit as ‘without merit’

* Penalties fall to $368,000, as firm lauds record income

Tribune what Obie Wilch-
combe, the minister of tourism,
had told this newspaper two
weeks ago, namely that Beka
Development had submitted an
investment proposal to the
Government.

He said: “The resort pro-

posed in the East End is to be
built on land purchased from
private Bahamian citizens at a
price which is at or above fair
market value. It never has been

Consolidated hit by free water to Corporation

on Crown Land.

“At no time have there been
any proposals or discussions
with government to develop a
10 by 10 mile area (100 square
miles). At no time have there
been any proposals or discus-
sions with government to
become the developer for all
the Crown Land in the East
End.”

Mr Farino also denied that

Beka had “ever discussed” pur-



chasing Crown Land in the East
End for a $2,800 per acre price,
as a document published on the
project by a North Carolina-
based real estate firm, Infinity
Partners, had claimed.

The Infinity Partners docu-
ment, which was published on
the Internet and exposed by
The Tribune, created a storm
of controversy when its contents
were disclosed, especially the
claims that Beka Development

| Ex-AIBT chair advising

was in talks to become the ‘mas-
ter developer’ for East End
Grand Bahama. The document
also alleged that the Govern-
ment was “willing to sell sub-
stantially all of its east Crown
Land” to the project.

This prompted a flurry of
concern from residents of East
End Grand Bahama, plus FNM

SEE page 11B



group eyeing Film Studios

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE former chairman of the Association of International Banks
& Trusts (AIBT) is advising an investor group that is interested in
acquiring the Bahamas Film Studios, The Tribune has learnt, with
renewed interest expected to follow the collapse of Bahamas
FilmInvest International’s $14 million attempt to acquire the pro-
ject where Pirates of the Caribbean II and III were filmed.

Andrew Law, the former head of Credit Suisse Trust (Bahamas),
who has since sent up his own Bahamas-based financial services
company, International Protector Group (IPG), confirmed to The
Tribune that a group he was representing were now “assessing
their options”, having sat on the sidelines and waited to see whether
the Bahamas FilmInvest offer would succeed.

Although not identifying
investors in the group, Mr Law
said: “We are trying to put togeth- _

profits on company-wide bulk (wholesale)
water sales fell as a percentage of sales from
23 per cent for the nine months to Septem-
ber 30, 2006, to 19 per cent for the full-
year.

This was attributed to the fact that $1.7
million in sales made by the Blue Hills plant
to the Water & Sewerage Corporation dur-
ing the three months to ‘December 31, 2006,
were “made at essentially a break even
gross margin”.

In its form 10-K filed with the Securities

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CONSOLIDATED Water said the over-
all gross margin on water sales from its
‘Blue Hills reverse osmosis plant was “great-
‘ly reduced” during the 2006 fourth quarter
because, until it proves it has reduced water
losses from New Providence’s water distri-
‘bution system by 438 million gallons per
‘year, it has to supply 1.2 million free gallons
‘per day to the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration (WSC). _

Unveiling its 2006 fourth quarter and full-
_ year results, Consolidated Water said gross



@ JEFFREY PARKER, chairman

of Consolidated Water . s EE page 11B- sandany

SEE page 10B





Scotia launches private client
initiative first in Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL i
Tribune Business Editor Bank targets prowl
————__— __ wealthy Bahamian

THE Bahamas has become
the first country in the
Caribbean and Latin American
region to see Scotiabank launch
its Private Client Group, aiming
to provide a seamless, one-stop
service for the wealth manage-
ment needs and growing
demand from what the bank
perceives as an expanding mar-
ket of high net-worth Bahami-
ans.

Dianne Bingham, the centre
director for Scotia’s Bahamas-
based Private Client Group,
said the bank had seen “a grow-
ing interest in the domestic mar-

market with integrated
‘four pillar’ solution

ket with regard to these types of
service, and I feel personally it’s
something we will see continue
to grow, as we see the number
of mass affluent people grow in
the Bahamas”.

She added that the question
of why Scotiabank and others

SEE page 13B

Baha Mar to soon turn down
requests for retirement

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE developer behind the
$2.4 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment has told staff that
the high number of applicants

Jooking to take advantage of its

Voluntary Retirement and Sep-
aration Programme (VSP)
means that. it is “rapidly
approaching a point where we

- will be turning down requests

in selected areas”.

Writing to staff in the wake of
the failure to conclude the Joint
Venture Agreement with Har-
rah’s Entertainment by the
March 15 deadline, something
that could allow the casino and

ay PR

‘ho be uTERS, cl ar

entertainment operator to ‘walk
away’ from the deal to take a 43
per cent equity stake in Baha
Mar’s project, Don Robinson,
president of Baha Mar Resorts,
said: “Cable Beach Resorts will
become a world-class resort
area with or without Baha Mar,
and the future is very bright for
those of you who remain with
Cable Beach Resorts.

The Cable Beach Resorts are
the existing resorts — the Radis-
son, which is being transformed
into a Sheraton, the Wyndham
& Crystal Palace Casino, and
the Nassau Beach Hotel. It is

SEE page 12B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE























FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

“CAREER OPPORTUNITY
for

Treasurer — Bahamas and Cayman Operating Companies
Treasury Sales & Trading (TST)

Key Activities and Deliverables:

The Treasurer is a senior member of the TST leadership team that provide
best-in-class Balance sheet management, TST control and TST dealing support for
the FirstCaribbean Group. A key focus for TST is to enhance Group interest income
and develop / market TST products to the countries’ largest and most discerning

- clients. Countries include: Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, Cayman, British Virgin
Islands, St. Maarten, and Curacao,

Successfully manage and extract maximum value from business projects and process
improvement initiatives designed to strengthen the operational infrastructure of
FirstCaribbean TST

Build and improve the organizational structures and delivery platforms that support
the FirstCaribbean TST model and product lines

Manage to successful completion, business projects and process improvement
initiatives, designed to strengthen the operational infrastructure of FirstCaribbean
TST.

Develop effective partnerships with all functional groups including Marketing,
Finance, Human Resources and Operations & Technology that directly benefit TST
activities, customers and day-to day operations.

Key result areas include: balance sheet & liquidity management, product
sales/marketing function, product structured support, governance and market
risk

Qualifications/Experience:

¢ Graduate status with minimum of 7 years experience in the business/financial
world

° 3 years of specific. management experience in a TST environment

¢ Association of Corporate Treasurers (ACT) or equivalent qualification
preferred

¢ Understanding of the local Bahamas markets, competition, geographic, macro
economic and global factors impacting TST activities

¢ Seasoned director with a solid track record of success managing and growing
TST / Treasury Products business in international financial institutions

¢ Solid operational experience in both a sales and a trading environment

’ Remuneration:

¢ Salary commensurate with.the position’s seniority (FC Level 9 - the Bank
has 11 pay levels)

e Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred
loan rates

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
March 23, 2007 to:

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.





-bottom line.











































. :
International Markets \ ARK 4 AP 3s
FOREX Rates ree.
Weekly % Change | ae
tent
CAD$ 1.1754 0.28 @ By Fidelity Capital Markets Markets (AML), up $0.03 or 7 am
GBP 1.9420 0.54 ~~ 4 per cent to close at $0.78. On
EUR 1.3316 1.54 | IT was an active trading — the down side, Consolidated The Bahamian Stock Market ate
' week in the Bahamian market Water Company Ltd - BDR ; "E
| as over 85,000 shares changed = (CWCB), lost $0.02 or 0.39 per FINDEX 791.63 YTD 6.67% =
Commodities hands. The market saw 12 out a to close at $5.08. .
Weekly % Change of its 19 listed stocks trade, of The FINDEX gained 7.89 BISX | CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
§ which eight advanced and four —_ points for the week, to close SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE |...
Crude Oil 57.10 -4.85 remained unchanged. at 791.63. oie
Gold $653.50 0.60 Volume leader for the week , oe eee ea oo ee a
was Commonwealth Bank COMPANY NEWS BBL $0.85 $ ’ 3000 11'34% ad
(EBT) svn fou) shetes BOB $8.60 $0.10 5260 710% | --4
International Stock Market Indexes: changing hands and account- Cable Bahamas (CAB) — - BPF $11 95 $ : 0 0.44% -*
ing for 15.6 per cent of the total Fiscal 2006 was a stellar one BSL $14.60 $- 0 , 0.00%
Weekly % Change shares traded. The big for the technology giant, BWL $2 19 $0 19 3000 25.14% er
advancer for the week was’ marked by strong revenue CAB $10 33 $0.30 13300 330% ale
12,110.41 | -1.35 Bahamas Waste (BWL), up growth and cost containment. CBL $14.00 $ y 10881 11191% ny
1,386.95 -1.13 |. $0.19 or 9.50 per cent toend Net income attributable to CHL $2 i0 $- 5000 1053% te
2,372.66 _ 0.62 the week at $2.19. ordinary shareholders stood at CIB $14 70) $0 10 10040 389% ag
16,744.15 -2.45 Also advancing was Abaco — $18.1 million, which represents CWCB $5 08 $ 0.02 0 0.30% oh
' an increase of $6.8 million or S 2 46 $. ‘ 0 1.60% “4
60 per cemt over the $11.3 mil- at ane ; 0 "9'59% He
lion in net income recorded in FCC oo : 0 9.09% “
fiscal 2005. : : cae a LO .
Total revenues grew by $8.9 FCL $17.06 $0.35 5980 35.94% tyr:
million or 15.6 per cent to total a oe ‘ee oane Gah te
$65.9 million, while operating IS] $9.05 $- 0 : 5.93% . :
expenses increased by $2.5 mil- PRE $10 00 $- 0 0.00% oaks
lion or 9.03 per cent to total , 7 Deira a
$30.4 million. Operating prof-
it was $32.8 million, up from DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
$26.7 million year-over-year, : ‘
while ee oe ae ¢ ICD has declared dividends of $0.10 per share, payable on | ~ ¥
497 per cent a eae March 30, 2007, to all shareholders of record date March 12, |. »
Earnings per share for fiscal a -*.
ot by $0.35 to total ¢ CBL has declared dividends of $0.12 per share, payable on
In ralate Anew te Bond March 30, 2007, to all shareholders of record date March 15, ;
of Directors for CAB has 7%
oe oiee et © CAB has declared dividends of $0.06 per share, payable on Bc
007 ae a So menGlieiat March 30, 2007, to all shareholders of record date March 16, | _
; 2007. ‘ s
record date March 16, 2007. a
¢ CBL has declared an extraordinary dividend of $0.12 per
pein said Vo ae share, payable on April 30, 2007 to all shareholders of record 5
thatit had sold is Turks ee eee 4
Nv

Caicos Cost Right store to
Entervant Holdings (TCI) Ltd
for $2.5 million.





- AML management has said ‘
the proceeds from the sale of
this operation, along with the

$2.5 million to be received
from the sale of its shares in 3 e
BSL Holdings Ltd, will be used

to pay-off its bank debt. This mols Hl stories behind
presently stands at about $3.5

million. The elimination of the ld news, read Insight
bank debt will add about

$250,000 per monthto AML's [i sed Mondays






















FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE Ae
UNIT (THE “‘FIU”’) ue
PUBLI TICE —
Pursuant to Section 15(2) of The Financial Intelligence Unit “
Act, 2000, the public is hereby notified that, the revised ae
Suspicious Transactions Guidelines Relating to the me
Prevention of Money Laundering and the Financing of et
Terrorism (The ‘2007 Guidelines’’) for financial institutions aie
within The Commonwealth of the Bahamas have been issued on
and are effective as of 19th March 2007. —
The 2007 Guidelines replace those Guidelines issued in | J *“*
December 2001. ;
Copies of the 2007 Guidelines can be obtained between the s
hours of 9a.m. to 5p.m. Monday through Friday, from the
Administrative Offices, The Financial Intelligence Unit, 3rd san
Floor, Norfolk House, Frederick Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. a
Anthony M. Johnson sf
Director ”
Financial Intelligence Unit wee
P.O. Box SB 50086 —
Nassau, The Bahamas a



BUSINESS



WALL STREET

Che : Miami Herald |



sie avieeaasoernnuar sane unr cas rwnDoLmns

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

3B

Subprime woes an exit point for investors

M Investors started to pare their
stock portfolios when faced with
the news of lenders admitting
that borrowers with shaky credit
were defaulting on their
mortgages.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Some people
might wonder if the angst over prob-
lems in the subprime mortgage mar-
ket is overblown, but that hasn’t
stopped some investors from using it
as a reason to pare their stock portfo-
lios.

Résume
goes way |
ofeight |
tracks

Online job-screening software
has made the printed résumé
irrelevant.

BY DIANE STAFFORD
McClatchy News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Remember
eight-track tapes? Polyester leisure
suits? Beer-can openers?

The printed résumé — long the
standard way to apply for a white-
collar job — may soon join those
once-ubiquitous products in history’s
dustbin.

If you haven’t applied for a job
lately, you may be surprised. If you
have applied for just about any posi-
tion in a midsized or large company,
you know what’s happening.

Instead of reading your résumé, an
employer may ask you to fill out an
online form or take an online test that
measures how well you “fit” the job,
based on responses from successful
workers.

Google, for example, uses a
screening program to measure appli-
cants’ attitudes, behaviors, personal-
ity and biographical details. Answers
are scrunched in a formula that cre-
ates a score, indicating how well the
candidate is likely to fare on the job.

“It’s getting harder to sell yourself
for a job you think you’re qualified
for,” said Steve Murphy, a 48-year-
old job hunter from Lenexa, Kan,
who’s been surprised at all the elec-
tronic hoops he’s had to jump
through before nabbing interviews.
In most cases, he said, “You're just
able to post online.”

Murphy and applicants like him
discovered that résumés have gone

digital. Forget worrying about what -

kind of paper stock to use. You prob-
ably won’t need it.

In some cases, résumés have dis-
appeared from the hiring process
completely. Some employers don’t
even want them in digitized format.
They prefer customized online
forms, tailor-made to cull the appli-
cant field.

Some human-resource gurus sug-
gest the personal interview could be
next on the endangered-species list.

John Sullivan, a management pro-
fessor at San Francisco State Univer-

*TURN TO RESUME
SUMMER DRIVING

Wall Street shuddered as mort-
gage lenders admitted that borrowers
with shaky credit were delinquent —
put another way, defaulting — at an
alarming rate. The fears were that
subprime mortgage loans, those
made to people with poor credit rat-
ings, were just the start, and that bor-
rowers with stronger credit ratings
would also have problems making
their payments.

Major U.S. investment banks this
past week were quick to assuage mar-
ket fears by declaring troubled loans
were contained to just the subprime
market. But, that wasn’t enough for

some investors faced with an already
slowing U.S. economy and a
depressed housing market.

“Tt’s a major exit point,” said Mat-
thew Smith, president and chief
investment officer with New York-
based money management firm
Smith Affiliated Capital.

Not helping the situation was Alan
Greenspan.

‘The former Federal Reserve chair-
man, who last month fed the global
stock selloff with comments about a
possible recession in the United

States, predicted the subprime shake-:

out will worsen. He said subprime

mortgage defaults would spread to
other parts of the economy, espe-
cially if home prices decline.

“Tf prices go down, we will have
problems — problems in the sense of
spillover to other areas,” Greenspan
said at a Futures Industry Association
meeting in Boca Raton, Fla. on Thurs-
day.

The immediate impact of a shake-
out among subprime mortgages obvi-
ously will be on the lenders them-
selves. News that lenders are being
denied financing from creditors, and
might be forced to sell loan portfolios
at deep discounts, has ravaged their



;





VILLAGE: Real estate developer Frank McKinney funds self-sustaining villages for the poor in Haiti.
Above, he tours the newly completed Ange Village in Cap-Haitien, Haiti.

SHELTERING: -.
HAIT’?S POOR

FRANK MCKINNEY USES HIS VAST FORTUNE TO

He doesn’t grimace at the

stench, but seems pained when he
learns the children fish through the
water scavenging for crabs to eat or
sell. There is no electricity or run-
ning water in this makeshift village
built on a garbage dump.
A day later, the developer enter-
| tained billionaires interested in his
| $135 million home near Palm Beach,
| renting a red carpet, a Bentley with
diamond encrusted wheels and
models wearing fruit.

The multimillionaire who is
building one of the most expensive
homes in the United States is also
one of Haiti’s benefactors — he’s
already commissioned four villages



BUILD FREE HOMES IN HAITI,
THE HEMISPHERE’S POOREST NATION

BY KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

i CAP-HAITIEN, HAITI — Trudging through muddy sewer water,
Frank McKinney sidesteps a pig wandering aimlessly through this
destitute village, passing two dozen children with bloated bellies. He
pauses to give a stuffed toy to a young girl in a yellow dress.

for the poor, including one for
those living in the garbage dump,
and is planning two more this year.
The homes are given free.

“It’s taken a lot of work to be
able to understand I can live in
both words,” said McKinney, 43. “I
train myself to understand that this
is part of the stewardship. I’m not
in this to feel good. It’s oe part of
the calling.”

The mansion — Somnlete with a
combination shark tank-swimming
pool, bowling alley and ceiling
aquarium that snakes into a wet bar
— is the 32nd multimillion dollar
project for the Delray Beach devel-
oper. It is worlds away from the

Analysts: $3 gasoline unlikely

@ Barring a hurricane or
unexpected international strife,
analysts say that U.S. gas
supplies should be ample enough
this summer to keep prices
relatively stable.

BY ALAN ZIBEL
Associated Press

Elementary school principal
Randy Busscher of Holland, Mich. is
braced for gasoline prices of $3 a gal-
lon or more by summer break.

Analysts say Busscher and other
U.S. motorists may be more worried
than necessary, however. Absent a
major Gulf Coast hurricane, unex-
pected international strife or a wave
of refinery woes, average U.S. gaso-
line prices are not expected to rise to

the $3-a-gallon psychological thresh-
old this summer — a good sign as
well for the broader economy, which
is under pressure from a weakening
housing market.

When energy prices rise, the risk
is that consumer spending will fall,
particularly at discount stores and
low-priced restaurants, whose cus-
tomers tend to be more sensitive to
extra costs in their monthly budgets.

The stock prices of some restau-
rant chains, including Applebee’s
International, Darden Restaurants
and Wendy’s International dipped in
recent weeks as gasoline prices rose.
The Dow Jones Index for restaurants
and bars is down more than 5 percent
for the month, compared with a 4.7
percent decline for the benchmark

RECO RACDDABIG? DA RAEI. GOO

Standard & Poor’s 500 index.

Energy analysts say U.S. gasoline
supplies should be ample enough this
summer to keep prices relatively sta-
ble. “We don’t think that oil prices
are going to be a drag on the econ-
omy this summer,” said Global
Insight energy analyst Kevin Linde-
mer.

Economist Douglas Porter of BMO
Capital Markets in Toronto said con-
sumer spending seems more likely to
be hurt this summer by the slow-
down in the housing market than any
nominal increase in energy prices.

Still, the average price for regular
unleaded has shot up nearly 40 cents
per gallon since late January and

* TURN TO GAS PRICES

MIKE MAGUI/AP

simple $5,000 homes he builds in
Haiti.

His life is full of dichotomies,
though he seems to move with
grace between them.

Costumed in a black cape and |
mask for the unveiling of his $20
million house in 2005, he rode
down a zip line and successfully
dueled an evil invader before adra- |
matic fireworks show. The home
sold a few weeks later.

“Never losing the little boy
inside really keeps one in touch
with creativity,” said McKinney,
whose office is an elaborate two-
story tree house with an oceanfront
view.

He is eccentric, but not ostenta-
tious. He’ll compete in the 135-mile
Badwater marathon in Death Val-
ley for the third time later this year.
Though he garners about 17 per-
cent from the home sales, he drives
a 2002 Honda hybrid, walks his
8-year-old daughter to school daily
and attends church every Sunday.

He practices “exercising my risk
threshold like a muscle,” building
the multimillion dollar homes on



* TURN TO HAITI



stock prices — with some plunging
90 percent or more.

The next wave of investor discon-
tent pounded financial services firms,
especially ones with exposure to the
subprime market. Investment banks

. like Bear Stearns and Lehman Broth-

ers Holdings not only are creditors to
many mortgage lenders, but buy their
loans and repackage them as mort-
gage-backed securities.

And, although subprime exposure
for both of those investment houses
is minuscule when compared to their

° TURN TO INVESTORS

INTERNET VS. TV

Tech firms
urge use of
unused TV
airwaves

@ Unused and unlicensed TV
airwaves are at the center of a
developing battle between TV
broadcasters and tech

‘ companies that want to deliver

high-speed Internet service over
the airwaves.

By DIBYA SARKAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Microsoft,
Google and other technology compa-
nies are bumping into resistance
from U.S. television broadcasters as
they seek regulatory approval to
deliver high-speed Internet service
over unused television airwaves.

The technology companies, which
have submitted a prototype device to
the Federal Communications Com-
mission for testing, say their aim is to
make broadband Internet connec-
tions accessible and affordable to
millions more Americans.

Broadcasters, though, fear the
unproven device could interfere with
TV service, and even some technol-
ogy experts have reservations about
how well the device will actually per-
form. Matters could get even more
complicated, broadcasters say, when
the industry switches from analog to
digital signals in 2009.

At the center of this dispute are
unused and unlicensed TV airwaves,
part of the spectrum known as “white
spaces.” These white spaces are
located between channels 2 and 51 on
televisions that aren’t hooked up to
satellite or cable, though use of these
services would not preclude anyone
from accessing the Internet over
unused spectrum in their region.

“This is some prime spectrum real
estate,” said Ben Scott, policy direc-
tor for Free Press, a national nonpar-
tisan public interest research group,
which supports using the public air-
waves for Internet service.

In a nutshell, the technology com-
panies want to beam Internet access
through the white space and into
computers and mobile devices. And
they argue rural Americans would
benefit greatly because the technol-
ogy enables Internet service to
remote areas at a fraction of the cost
of cable- and telephone-based sub-
scription services.

“This is Wi-Fi on steroids,” Scott
said..i5 .

* TURN TO TELEVISION

FILLING UP:
When energy
prices rise,
consumer
spending falls.
Left, Sandra
Fairbank fills
up her
automobile at
a Mobil gas
station in
Cambridge,
Mass.

CHITOSE SUZUKI/AP

Tekh GES POY NT



4B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

WALL STREET

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Investors us subprime woes

Certainly, the U.S. mortgage crisis was partly

* INVESTORS

overall business, it still has
made investors nervous. The
Amex Securities Bro-

’ ker/Dealer index, which
tracks 12 of the most widely
known firms in the sector, has
fallen ll percent since compa-
nies began to disclose prob-
lems in subprime loans on
Feb. 8. ‘

That was the day HSBC
Holdings, Europe’s largest
bank, admitted delinquencies
on risky U.S. mortgages rose
to a four-year high. It was also
the day New Century Finan-
cial announced it had lost

PHILANTHROPY

Developer
uses his
fortune to

build free
homes

HAITI

spec, despite Florida’s often
fickle real estate market.
Sporting a teased blond
mane reminiscent of a 1980s
rocker, McKinney is some-
what of a rock star in the real
estate world. He brokers that
celebrity status to raise
money for his Haiti projects.
When McKinney went on a
nationwide book tour for his
second book, investors could
join him for eight-hour legs of
the journey if they donated
money to “The Caring House
Project Foundation.” ,
“He’s really a modern day
Robin Hood,” said St. Louis

real-estate investor Marlene.

Trice, who also accompanied
McKinney on a recent visit to
Haiti to see the village she
helped fund. “He creates a
huge amount of wealth in
everything that he does and
then turns it and gives it back
to the communities that don’t
have any.”

McKinney, who would not
disclose his net worth, ini-
tially tried building for the
local homeless, but was
stalled by government red
tape and quickly realized he
could build homes cheaper
and faster in one of the poor-
est and most violent countries
in the Western Hemisphere.
The villages cost between
$400,000 and $500,000 to
build.

To the Haitian children, he
is seen as the Beanie Baby
man and on a recent trip has
jammed 750 into backpacks

SUMMER DRIVING

Analysts: $3 per

°GAS PRICES

Busscher, who drives a fuel-
efficient Toyota Camry, is
prepared for the worst.

Seeing gasoline rise to last
summer’s levels, when prices
averaged more than $3 a gal-
lon for much of July and
August, “would bother me
and I’m sure it would bother
others.”

The national average price
for regular unleaded on Fri-
day was $2.55 a gallon, up
more than 30 cents from a
month ago, according to
AAA’s daily survey of more
than 85,000 self-serve sta-
tions.

JOB HUNT

track of how rapidly its loan
portfolio deteriorated.

Certainly, the U.S. mort-
gage crisis was partly respon-
sible for the Feb. 27 global
market swoon that included a
416-point drop in the Dow.
Problems with subprime lend-
ers — along with a sell off in
Chinese stocks and worries
about the economy — have
made Wall Street increasingly
more cautious about compa-
nies in general.

“T think the issue with the
subprime space is really a
huge issue and is about what
effect it will have on the con-
sumer,” said Jeffrey Morti-



responsible for the I’eb.

27 global market

swoon that included a -416-poin! drop in the

Dow.

mer, chief investment officer
for equities at Charles
Schwab Investment Manage-
ment. “I worry about con-
sumer spending, which is
two-thirds of the economy.
He contends consumers
unnerved by a buckling of
some subprime mortgage
lenders and a pullback or lev-
eling off in home values could

ratchet back their spending.
This kind of logic puts a num-
ber of sectors on Wall Street
at risk.

Beyond the obvious fallout
on home builders, retailers
are the next biggest target.
Americans worried about
making their mortgage pay-
ments could be that much less
willing to spend.



J. PAT CARTER/AP

BEST OF BOTH WORLDS: Real estate developer Frank McKinney lives in an $8-million
ocean-front home he built in Delray Beach, Fla.

that he passed out after the .

village’s dedication cere-
mony.

Normally talkative, McKin-
ney was silent for much of the
trip as he toured the Ange Vil-
lage, which includes homes
for 30 families, a community
center, medical clinic, school,
orphanage and acres of farm
land with goats and chickens
so the village can be self-
sufficient. More homes, a soc-
cer field and tilapia pond are
slated for Phase 2.

“This is the best thing that
ever happened to me,” said
Jean Louis, 47, who lives in
another village McKinney
built in Cap-Haitien with his
wife and five children. “This
home makes me feel safe. No
one will ever kick me out
again.”

Surrounded by lush green
mountains and not far from
the coast, McKinney noted
the landscape would be prime
real estate anywhere else than
this violent country with its

The Energy Information
Administration, the Energy
Department’s_ statistical
agency, projects the average
pump price of regular
unleaded will hit a peak of
around $2.70 a gallon in June,
then drop off as the summer
driving season wanes.

The average price of crude
oil is projected to remain
around $64 per barrel through
summer, down from last
year’s record levels of more
than $78 a barrel.

Gasoline prices have risen
in recent weeks due to
planned and unplanned refin-
ery outages, as well as falling
imports from Europe, accord-

HAITI AT A GLANCE

A bLEbE A byod

Ho

e Description: Poorest country in the Western Hemisphere;

economy is ina shambles
e Population: 8.4 million
Capital: Port-au-Prince

Median age: 18.2 years
Life expectancy: 53 years

GDP per capita: $1,800

mangoes

FIND OUT MORE

Area: 10,714 square miles
Major languages: Creole, French

Percent living below poverty line: 80%

Main exports: Light manufactures, coffee, oils, cocoa,

The Caring House Project Foundation: http://www. frank-
mckinney.com/caringHouseProject.php

pock marked, garbage strewn
roads.

With him were 12 other
real estate investors who have
contributed to his projects.
He’s hoping the abject pov-
erty will inspire them to
larger donations.

On the way back to the air-

port, McKinney said he is
eager to begin work on the
next village — slated for the
Haiti-Dominican Republic
border.

For now, he boarded a
plane home, to walk a red car-
pet and smile for the billion-
aires.

___MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

as exit point

Home improvement stores
like Home Depot and Lowes,
which already have been
affected by the slowing hous-
ing market, could be further
hurt as people do less home
renovating. Appliance makers
like Whirlpool might also see
sales dwindle as homeowners
put off buy a new refrigerator
or washing machine.

It could also trickle down
into national chains like
Wal-Mart Stores and Target if
consumers just don’t have as
much free cash to spend.
Wal-Mart already saw an
impact on its sales last year
from rising gasoline prices.

INTERNET VS. TV

Smith, whose firm manages
about $1.7 billion in customer
assets, said turmoil in the
mortgage sector will only
make consumers more con-
cerned about how they spend.

But, while retailers are hurt,

there are other more defen-

sive sectors that will still

thrive. “The non-discretion-
ary companies are where
most will look toward,” he
said. “No matter what hap-

pens to homeowners, there is,
still a need for energy, and,

there is still a need for health-

care. That’s not going to,

change no matter where the,

economy is.”

Tech firms urge
use of unused
TV airwaves

* TELEVISION

Scott Blake Harris, an
attorney representing a loose
coalition of technology com-
panies that typically compete
with one another, said he
believes the FCC should
authorize this technology so
long as its proponents can
prove it will not disrupt TV
programming.

But broadcasters want the
FCC to proceed cautiously.

The National Association
of Broadcasters, which repre-
sents more than a thousand
local TV stations as well as
major broadcasters including
Walt Disney’s ABC division
and Univision Communica-
tions, insists the industry is
not against the new technol-
ogy — only worried about
unintended consequences.

“If they (the technology
companies) are wrong, once
those devices get introduced
that means that people won’t
be able to get clear television
pictures,” said NAB spokes-
man Dennis Wharton.

Shure, a manufacturer of
wireless microphones, has
also expressed concerns, say-
ing use of white space for
Internet services could cause
interference with audio sys-
tems at concerts and sporting
events. Potential pitfalls
aside, proponents of the new
technology — including Dell,
Hewlett-Packard, Intel and
Philips Electronics North
America, a division of Nether-
lands-based Royal Philips
Electronics NV — say it could
also spur innovation.

Paul Brownell, a govern-
ment relations manager at
Dell, said white-space spec-
trum also could be used to
stream video and audio
throughout a house without

running wires all over the

place. The company is inter-

ested in building computers

that would come prepro-.

grammed to recognize Inter-
net service delivered via
white space.

Advocates said the white-
space spectrum is too valu-
able to be left idle because the

television airwaves can trans- |
mit better signal quality .

through obstacles and to a
wider geographic area. In

rural areas, the new technol- -

ogy is an attractive alternative
to phone-, cable- or satellite-
based Internet service

because it would not require ~

expensive new infrastructure
to be built, they said.

The lack of infrastructure
is a key reason why many

ene

rural areas lack high-speed '

Internet service. A recent

Pew Internet & American Life '

Project found that only 30
percent of rural residents
have high-speed Internet as
compared with 49 percent for

suburban residents and 52.
percent for urban Americans. -
Amid all this enthusiasm, .

however, there are skeptics.
Dorothy Robyn, a principal
with the Brattle Group, a
Cambridge, Mass.-based eco-
nomic consulting firm, said

the technology benefits could |

be overstated. Specitically,

she questioned whether the ,
device could deliver good- —
quality Internet service over ,

long distances.
For this reason, she said

licensing the white-space *
spectrum is critical to ensure ©

that it gets used in the best
and most efficient way. And
there’s an added benefit,

Robyn said: if signal interfer-_

ence ever became an issue,
broadcasters could point to
the source of the problem.

gallon gasoline price unlikely

Energy analysts say U.S. gasoline supplies
should be ample enough this summer to keep

prices relatively stable.

ing to the forecasting agency.

Those conditions are
expected to ease later this
spring.

And unlike the start of last
summer, when much of the
country made a transition to
ethanol as a gasoline-blending
component, there should be
ample supplies of the corn-
based fuel this year, said Tom
Kloza, chief oil analyst for Oil
Price Information Service.

Other economists disagree.

Wachovia economists pre-
dict gasoline prices this sum-
mer will average $2.75 to $3
per gallon — lower than last
year, but not by much.

“This year consumers have
not only to contend with high
gas prices, they've got to con-
tend with worries about slow-
ing economic growth,” said
Wachovia economist Gina
Martin.

“The job market is still
steady but not running as

quickly as it was last year.”

The Organization of Petro-
leum Exporting Countries
said in Vienna on Thursday
that it plans to keep crude-oil
production at existing levels,
satisfied that two recent
rounds of output cutbacks
helped balance global markets
and stabilize prices around
$60 a barrel.

OPEC warned, though, that
oil price volatility is likely to
continue in 2007.

Prices have zigzagged
recently, sometimes sharply
during the same day, buoyed
by political tensions with Iran
and pulled down by mild win-
ter temperatures in the

Northeast.
For many consumers,
though, explanations of inter-

national turmoil that sends oil: |

markets up and down are
hardly reassuring.

Warehouse worker Luis
Ortega, 35, who commutes 80
miles a day to his job in south-
ern California, has felt the
impact of higher pump prices
in recent weeks.

“T can’t go to the movies as
often, dinner as often. I drive
less and stay home more,
watch more TV,” he said, fill-
ing up his red 1998 Toyota
SUV with regular unleaded
priced at $3.09 a gallon near
downtown Los Angeles.

Online software makes printed résumés dinosaurs

° RESUME

sity, says most interviews are
as valuable as Ouija boards in
measuring whether a person
will be good on the job.
Interviewers ask the wrong
questions and job candidates
can lie or simply not shine,
when on the job they’d do
quite well, he says. Compa-
nies — especially those that

hire thousands of workers and
have high turnover — are
turning to a range of comput-
er-based filters to pare down
candidates to a manageable
number. At AMC Entertain-
ment, for example, the com-
pany is introducing questions
about availability, work eligi-
bility, desired pay, qualifica-
tions and pertinent awards in
the online application pro-

cess, said Keith Wiedenkeller,
senior vice president-human
resources.

The new screening soft-
ware allows an interview,
when it’s offered, “to be more
streamlined and efficient,”
with just five or six basic
questions needed, mostly of
the “tell me about a time
when you resolved a difficult
customer service situation”

variety, he said.

Even smaller companies,
where résumés still are
accepted, have purchased
screening software.

An increasingly popular
screening tool uses a kind of
standardized test. Applicants’
answers to questions — about
such characteristics as their
preferred noise level at work
or the time of day they feel

most energized — are com-
pared with answers from
workers who already are suc-
cessful in the jobs.

Many job hunters are frus-
trated at the digitized “deper-
sonalization” of the hiring
process. But many in the
human-resource industry are
glad online screening tools
exist.

“There’s no way anymore

to filter qualified applicants
by just looking for buzzwords
on résumés,” said Darren
Dupriest, president of Valid-
ity Screening Solutions, a
security and background
checking company in Over-
land Park.

“We've sacrificed face-to-
face for efficiency,” Dupriest
said. “The cost of a bad hire is
too great.”





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 5B



Film Studios buyer:
e will not be bullied

Hits out at Fuller over claims on paying Islands by Design

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he investment group
| who saw their $14 mil-
lion bid to acquire the
Bahamas Film Studios rejected
after failing to negotiate an
extension to the deal’s close,
said at the weekend that they
would not be “bullied” by the
vendor, telling The Tribune
they were “making it sound as
if we were the culprit”.

Owen Bethel, president of
Nassau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque
Group, said he was disap-
pointed that his investor con-
sortium had been unable to
negotiate an extension to the
March 15 closing deadline with
Ross Fuller, head of Ashby
Corporation, adding that the
deal’s collapse - at least for the
moment - would further delay
the Bahamas Film Studios’ re-
opening and attempts to
resume operations.

Mr Bethel also responded to
a release by Mr Fuller, in
which the latter said the dead-
line was not extended because
Mr Bethel and his group,
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional, had failed to “make
payments to an environmen-
tal firm as they had warrant-
ed to do”.

That firm is understood to
be Bahamas-based Islands By
Design, run by Keith Bishop,
who had sued the Bahamas
Film Studios for $80,000 over
an alleged unpaid Bill relating
to an environmental impact
assessment (EIA) he had per-
formed for the company.

Mr Fuller, in an e-mailed
reply to The Tribune’s ques-
tions, said the lawsuit from

Islands By Design was “pend-.
ing and will be dealt with pru-’

dently”, although he did not
explain what he meant by that.

Mr . Bethel, though,
explained that under the orig-
inal Memorandum of Agree-
ment signed with Mr Fuller for
the initial February 28, 2007,
closing, everything “was con-
ditional on government
approval” for the purchase by
Bahamas FilmInvest.

Mr Bethel said his group
eventually agreed to undertake
to pay Islands By Design the
money it was owed by the Stu-
dios, which he alleged was Mr
Fuller’s obligation, provided
they received government
approval.

This was not forthcoming, as
the Government had not had

the chance to complete its due
diligence and assessments by
then, which resulted in one
extension being negotiated
until March 15.

The two sides could not
agree terms for a further exten-
sion, and Mr Bethel told The
Tribune that Bahamas FilmIn-
vest “decided not to make any
further payments until the
agreement was extended”.

As a result, in the absence
of any extension agreement,
he said Bahamas FilmInvest
would not pay Mr Bishop and
“provide Mr Fuller with cash
funds to meet the Film Stu-
dios’ daily expenses”.

Referring to Mr Bishop, Mr
Bethel said: “We have been in
communications with his
lawyer to indicate that, ‘yes,
we would cover that’, subject
to negotiations and approval
being given by the Govern-
ment. There was nothing pre-
sented to him that we were
going to undertake that imme-
diately.”

“It’s making it sound as if
we were the culprits,” Mr
Bethel added.

“I am surprised that in our
attempts to negotiate in good
faith for an extension, and with
regard to the amount of time it
would take to obtain govern-
ment approval, that Mr Fuller
has decided not to proceed
with resolving and working out
an extension and new terms of
negotiation.

“The interest of ensuring the
project moves and gets opera-
tional as quickly as possible
will be further delayed through
this process, whether he is con-
tacting other investors or has
to come and negotiate with us
again.” .

Mr.Bethel told The Tribune:
“We’re still certainly very
much interested in the project
if Mr Fuller is prepared to sit at
the table and come to the table
in good faith. We are certainly
ready to close the deal in terms








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@ OWEN Bethel, president of Montaque Group

of financing.

“The only issue is that we
are making it all subject to gov-
ernment approval. It seems
time is of the essence on Mr
Fuller’siside.......

“IT would also think it is dis-
appointing to the Bahamas
Film Commission and Ministry
of Tourism, who certainly have
plans to promote the whole
industry, including the facility
itself.”

Bahamas
deposit has been returned to
it by Mr Fuller, and Mr Bethel
said his team had run up con-
siderable expenses on their
acquisition attempt - well over
$300,000.

In a later release, Bahamas
FilmInvest said it stood ready
to “infuse millions” of dollars
into the 3,500 acres Bahamas
Film Studios project, some-
thing Mr Fuller had been
unable to do.

It accused Mr Fuller of



EN a

MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR

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and maintenance of equipment and machinery, with a keen focus on detail
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NASSAU, BAHAMAS



FilmInvest’s

(FILE photo)

appearing to put himself
before the interests of the pro-
ject and the Bahamas, adding
that it was Bahamas FilmIn-
vest that resolved a $10 mil-
lion debt owed by the Studios
to FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (Bahamas) through
talks with the loan’s guaran-
tor, United Insurance.

Mr Bethel added: “Mr
Fuller’s remarks appear to be a
negotiating ploy, either to pres-
sure Bahamas FilmInvest to
provide more favourable terms
or to use Bahamas FilmInvest’s
terms to attempt to negotiate a
more favourable deal from a
third party.

“In either case, Mr Fuller
has misjudged Bahamas
FilmInvest.

“We will not be bullied by
Mr Fuller, and we will assert
our rights against Mr Fuller,
his companies and any inter-
fering parties to the fullest
extent possible under the law.”

Presenter. Mr. Dudrick Edwards

Assistant Professor
School of Business, The College of The Bahamas

The Armoury
ey eT Mae

rr} experiencing difficulties
with telephone lines.

We can be contacted on the
following numbers:

(242) 322-2733
(242) 397-1600
(242) 323-1104

We apologise for any
inconvenience caused.

Signed: Management

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BAIC

In Conjunction With

The College of The Bahamas

_ Will Host

the business opportunities
available to them now, and
to encourage them to

- exploit such opportunities,
thereby empowering them
to become self employed.

Doing Business via the Internet

Possibilities of Pitfalls

Thursday March 15, 2007
at 7:00 p.m.

The College Of The Bahamas

(Bahamas Tourism Training Center)
(Lecture Theatre)

¢ Thursday Febmary 1, 2007
“Empowering Baharmians *
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter ~ Mr. Glenn Ferguson

« Thursday February 8, 2007

Business Planning, Forecasting & Marketing

B.TLY.L. - Old Trail Road
Presenter - Mr. Daniel Thompson

» Thursday February 15, 2007
‘Business Finance and Venture Capital

COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Jerome Gomez,

Tebruary 1-April §, 2007
(See Schedule Below)
1-00 p.m, Lecture/Presentation i

Interactive Panel Discussion
followed by Entrepreneur
Testimonials and Q&A session,

+ The College of The Bahamas ©
(Bahaaas Youriva Trainisg Center)
{Lecture Theatre}

Change your buying habits, “BUY to SELL’,
become self employed and create wealth.

Schedule of Weekly Seminars

« Thursday February 22, 2007
Book:Kgeping - Accounting for the Busmess
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Christopher Stuart

+ Thursday March 1, 2007
Busmess Opportumties in The Bahamas
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Benjamin Bailey

« Thursday March 8, 2007
Forging a New Vinon for the Bahamian Investor
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenters ~ Mr. Donald Demeritte
Mr. Paul Major

+ Thursday March 15, 2007
Doing Busmess via the Intemet - Possibilities of
Pitfalls COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Mr Dudrick Edwards

Thursday March 22, 2007

Import & Export, Customs, Concesnons

COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Bahamas Customs Representative

Thursday March 29, 2007

Book Keeping - Accounting for the Business
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Mr, Christopher Stuart

Thursday April 5, 2007
Govemment Regulations and Business License

COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Registrar Representative *

CONTACT; Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) at 322-3740 or 325-1912

Mr. Lester Stuart / Mr. Le-Var Miller





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007



CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
EXTENSION SERVICES (CEES)

ACADEMIC UPGRADING DEPARTMENT

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Geography (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teach Geography at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned



Bachelor's Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

level of BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Mathematics (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able
to teach Mathematics at the College Preparatory, evel.



level of BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College rep prota (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
iology at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor’s

Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the level of
BGCSE.in the subject area.
/

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Chernisty Nee Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teac emistry at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

level of BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Agriculture (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teach Agriculture at the College Preparatory evel. Candidates must have at least an earned
Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the
level of BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College Fae History/Socias Studies (New Providence Campus) Candidates must
e able to teach History/Social Studies at the College Preparatory evel. Candidates must have

at least an earned Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching :

experience at the level of BGCSE in the subject area. -

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Civics (New Providence Campus} Candidates must be able to teach
ivics at the College Preparatory evel. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor's i

Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the level of
BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College Prep English Language New Providence Campus) Candidates must be
able to teach English at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

Bachelor's Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

level of BGCSE in the subject area.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete :
application packet consists of an application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form :
a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment) :
information of three references addressed to: :

and the names and contact

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

Part-time Instructor in Accounting for Beginners |, Il & Ill (New Providence Campus}
andidates must be able to teach Accounting at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must

have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent (e.g. CPA CA) in the subject. A teaching certificate

is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Introduction to Business | & Il (New Providence Campus)
andidate must be able to teach Introduction to Business at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates :

must have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable.




Part-time Instructor in’ Business’ Etiquette (NeW Providerice Carnpus

andidates must be able to teac iquette at the’introductory to advanced level. Candidates
must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Human Resource Management |, Il (New Providence Campus)
andidates must be able to teach Human Resource Management at the introductory to advanced level.



Candidates must have at least an earned Master's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate

i is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Computer Applications I, Il (New Providence Campus) .

andidates must be able to teach computer courses at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates
must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Credit & Collections Procedures and Control | & Il (New Providence Campus)
andidates must be able to teach Credit ollections Procedures and Control at the introductory to
advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent in the subject.

A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Superior Customer Service Workshop (New Providence Campus) ;
andidates must be able to teach Superior Customer Service /Course Workshop. Candidates must have :

at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Information Technology | & Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able
to teach Information Technology at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least

an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in QuickBooks (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach QuickBooks
at the introductory level. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the :

subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in PC Upgrade and Repair (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teac pgrade and Repair at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an

earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Effective PowerPoint W/S (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teach Microsoft PowerPoint at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an ;

earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Web Page Design Workshop (New Providence Campus) Candidate must be able
to teach Web Page Design at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned i

Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Interior Decorating 1.& Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teach Interior Decorating at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned :

Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Floral Design F I & Ill (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
oral Design at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least a minimum of five years }

working experience in the area.

Part-time Instructor in Effective Writing Skills (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
ective Writing at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor’s ;

degree or equivalent in the subject or related area. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Basic of Freehand Cutting | & Il (New Providence campus) Candidates must be
able to teach Basic of Freehand Cutting at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at

least five years working experience in the area.

Part-time Instructor in Drapery Making | & Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
rapery Making at the introductory level to advanced level. Candidates must have at least a minimum i

of five years working experience in the area.

Part-time Instructor in Bath and Kitchen Accessories (New Providence Campus)
andidates must be able to teach Bath and Kitchen Accessories at the introductory level to advanced

level. Candidates must have at least a minimum of five years working experience in the area.

j Part-time Instructor in Basic Car Maintenance (New Providence Campus) :
andidates must be able to teach Basic Car Maintenance at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates i

must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete
application packet consists of an Application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form
a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment)
and the names and contact information of three references addressed to:

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

andidates must have at least an earned
Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the i

All candidates must have earned Masters’ Degrees from a recognized accredited institution in the
:_ relevant area or its equivalent.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete
: application packet consists of an Application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS '





EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS _

: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
‘New Providence, Bahamas



Lean Mastery

Human Resource Management
Business Administration
Administrative Skills
Supervisory Skills

Public Accounting

Project Management
Professional Management
Executive Leadership Skills
Writing & Research Skills

The Legal Environment

General Legal Principles
Employment Law

Company Law

Banking & Trust Law

Real Estate Law

Real Estate Management
Insurance Management & Sales
Insurance Law

E-business Practice & Management
Hotel Front Office Management
Accounting For Non-Financial Managers

ee ee ee ee ee ee ea

>






































? a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment) "
; and the names and contact information of three references addressed to: ‘ ¢
The Director ‘
Human Resources ‘
The College of The Bahamas '
. Oakes Field Campus *
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive :
P. O. Box N-4912 :
Nassau, Bahamas : "
( "

'
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS 3
STAFF VACANCY is
is
The College of the Bahamas invites applications for the following post: Q
Assistant, Alumni Relations & Development * {6
DIVISION: Office of the President a
UNIT: Alumni Relations and Development 4
START DATE: May 1, 2007 if
1
JOB DESCRIPTION iy
SUMMARY: id
Working out of The Office of the President, in a team under the joint direct supervision of the i
Development Officer and Alumni Relations Director, the Alumni Relations & Development Assistant iy
is responsible for the day-to-day administration of alumni and development activities. The Alumni 1%
Relations & Development Assistant participates in all fundraising activities including donor and alumni jh
events, database maintenance, information/record management, alumni and donor research, mailings, .
and special events. The successful candidate will be someone with strong organisational skills who : i"
is a good communicator both verbally and in writing and who enjoys team work. This is an excellent a
opportunity for someone who is also creative and who will enjoy working with others to build a new -e

Aluh{ni Relations and Development Department at The College/University of The Bahamas.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Process donations and prepare acknowledgement letters and other correspondence

Maintain foundation, corporation, individual donor and alumni record files

Create fundraising reports and other database reports as needed

Continually create, update and correct database records

Conduct preliminary research on prospective corporate foundation and individual donors

Coordinate productions and mailing of appeal letters

Send appropriate documentation to process credits to donors

Maintain guest lists, gather and prepare registration materials and other duties as

assigned for fund-raising and alumni events

e Handle all administrative details associated with committee meetings (i.e. prepare
and distribute notices, agendas, minutes, etc.).

e Prepare media materials for distribution. (i.e. copying, filing, mailing, e-mailing)

e Assemble media and donor kits for events and meetings.

e Other duties as assigned

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:
° Associate's or bachelor's degree

° Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint

° Capacity to manage substantial volumes of email correspondence and to organize
meetings using calendaring technology

Database maintenance and data entry experience

Excellent written and verbal communication skills ;

Ability to present information concisely and effectively, both verbally and in writing
Ability to organize work and to manage competing priorities

Proven accuracy and attention to detail

Proactive work ethic and ability to take initiative towards agreed upon goals
Excellent interpersonal skills

A team player and overall pleasant disposition

ta eb eee

While the normal candidate will have administrative experience, consideration will be given to any
entry level candidate who has demonstrated the capacity to excel, who is an excellent organizer, who
has strong communication and interpersonal skills and who demonstrates an excellent attitude and
willingness to learn and work effectively in a team setting.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed.
They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities, duties and skills
required of the Alumni Relations & Development Assistant

Compensation is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should submit a College of The Bahamas Application
Form, a comprehensive resume and a cover letter of interest. To expedite the appointment procedure,
applicants should request that three referees send references under confidential cover directly to the
address listed below on or before April 5, 2007:

J
at

Oe FT A I IS CO OTe Tl PT IAI OEP DN MEET Ee RS

Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas












Ground Floor, Administration Building ‘A

Thompson Blvd and Poinciana Drive \,

P O Box N 4912 ie

Nassau, Bahamas 4

Email:hrapply@cob.edu.bs :

Please visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs for more information about the College and to access oa
the College’s Employment Application Form. !
‘’

THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE >
AT
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS ma

ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING COURSE: BEGINNING MARCH 27, 2007 ;
CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN CHINESE, Beginners’ Level f

— Tuesdays/Thursdays 7:00 — 8:30 7

LOCATION: The Munnings Building, next to KFC, by the COB roundabout |}
PRICE: $250 per course :

a

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL: 302-4584 or 302-4587

tag
<



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS






THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY

Library and Media Services























Librarian - Technical Services



The position falls in the area of Technical Services. The incumbent should be dynamic,
innovative individual with a strong commitment to service within a diverse community. The
Librarian will demonstrate successful administrative experience in a library, sound understanding
of emerging technologies and the ability to use them within the library setting and commitment
to developing a strong integrated library service within the academic environment.

The duties of the Librarian will include management of the Unit, leadership in short and long
range planning to enhance and expand library services, development and promotion of library
resources and services, personnel supervision, initiation and management of appropriate
emerging technologies, and liaison with relevant internal and external groups.

The Librarian should possess a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from an
accredited institution, and a minimum of two years, post Masters professional library experience.
The incumbent will demonstrate strong communication and interpersonal skills that engender

research, service to the community and library instruction will also be required.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A
complete application packet consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas’
Application Form, a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of all transcripts (original transcripts
required upon employment) and the names and contact information for three references
addressed to:



The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Please visit the College’s website at for more information about the institution and to
access the College’s Employment Application Form.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY |

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:

Purchasing Manager, Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
SUMMARY STATEMENT

This position will require the successful individual to hold responsibilities for the following:
° Purchasing of merchandise
° To ensure adequate inventory in the Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute and
the storeroom
° Institute competitive pricing and obtainment of high quality products.












e









It is expected that this person will possess strong critical thinking skills, business acumen and
excellent interpersonal skills. The ability to provide superior customer service is also vitahi

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

e A Bachelors Degree is preferred with three years relevant post qualification experience
OR an Associate Degree with five years post qualification experience in a relevant area.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIREMENTS

Considerable knowledge of food & beverage
Knowledge of office procedures and paper trails
Computer proficient with basic knowledge of Microsoft Applications
Excellent written and oral communication skills

Ability to properly use a calculator

Express a positive attitude.

Excellent telephone skills.

Ability to establish priorities.

Ability to work independently.

Skill to use a personal computer and various software.
Ability to resolve problems.

Ability to analyze statistics



Physical Requirements
e Ability to lift up to 50 pounds.
° Ability to work on a personal computer for long periods of time

Salary Scale: $22,110 X $600 - $29,110

Interested candidates should submit a detailed curriculum vitae and a cover letter of interest,
giving full particulars of qualifications and experience to the Human Resources Department no

later than Friday, March 23, 2007

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES
(UWD
LL.B. PROGRAMME (FULL-TIME)
AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The normal entry requirements for the UWI LL.B. DEGREE are based on the following basic UWI
Matriculation standards:

(a) Five subjects, at least two of which must be at Advanced (A) Level and the remainder at CXC
(Caribbean Examinations Council) general or BGCSE (Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary
Education) or the equivalent; OR

(b) ASSOCIATE OR BACHELOR degree with a CUMULATIVE GPA OF 2.5 OR HIGHER.
Note: Space in the programme is limited and competition is high. Therefore, above average 'A'
Level grades and high averages (AT LEAST 3.0) in undergraduate degrees are required for an
applicant to stand a reasonable chance of gaining admission.

The College of The Bahamas will consider a limited number of applications from persons who
do not satisfy Matriculation standards as identified above but who have equivalent academic
qualifications. In particular, MATURE APPLICANTS OVER 30 WHO PROVIDE EVIDENCE
OF ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT CAN BE CONSIDERED. This is
an opportunity for persons who have already been associated with the practice of law in some way
j to read for a law degree. A resume must be submitted with the COB and UWI applications.

All applicants are required to sit a Proficiency Exam, at a date to announced, by end of June
# 2007. ‘

Interested persons must complete a College of The Bahamas and University of the West Indies
Application for Admission Form available from the Office of Admissions, 2nd Floor, Portia Smith
Building, Poinciana Drive, The College of The Bahamas.

Kindly submit by March 30, 2007 completed applications, original certificates (which will be
returned to the applicant), copies of original certificates, transcripts (sent directly from universities
or colleges previously attended) to the Director of Admissions at COB, and proof of payment of the
$40.00 application fee (paid at the BUSINESS OFFICE AT COB).

THE COLLEGE OF THE I

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

an excellent customer friendly environment. Evening and weekend work on rotation, library |-

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 7B

er















EDUCATING & TRAINING B



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PRESENTS

A One Day Workshop
in
Superior Customer Service

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the
fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on customer value,

retention and relationship building and employee motivation.

Topics to be covered:

The Customer Service Environment
Understanding the Customer
Communication and Customer Service
Handling Complaints and the Difficult Customer
Creating Your Customer Service Strategy for Loyal Customers

The Face of the Future
Date: Thursday, 29 March 2007
Time: 9:30am — 4:00pm

TBA

$170.00 Full payment is required at time of registration.
CASH, CREDIT CARD OR BANK CERTIFIED CHEQUE ACCEPTED

Application Fee:$40.00 (one time payment)
Certification: | A Continuing Education Certificate on successful completion.

Enquiries: Contact the co-ordinator at Tel. (242) 302-5201 / 302-5205 or 302-5202 or
email: nlacroix@cob.edu.bs

All fees included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time payment)
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Venue:

Tuition:

PRESIDENT’S SCHOLARS



PROGRAMME

The College of The Bahamas is now accepting applications for its prestigious and.
valuable President’s Scholars Programme (PSP), a scholarship and leadership programme
for high-achieving, highly-motivated, service-oriented students who will be pursuing
a FIRST-TIME bachelor degree at COB, beginning in Fall 2007.

Applications are welcome from all High School Seniors who possess:

° Cumulative GPA of 3.5 _
_ SAT scores of 1200 on the two-part (math and critical reading) 1800 three-

part (math, reading and writing) OR:

° Seven (7) BGCSE’s Gani of 5 A’s in core subjects)

° Proven leadership skills

Benefits

° Scholarship Award of $24,000.00 ($6,000.00 per year for 4 years)

° poe ne Leadership Training with opportunities for international
ravel.

Applications and brochures can be downloaded from

Hand deliver applications to The College of The Bahamas, Office of Student Leadership,
Room A 85, Administration Block, Oakes Field Campus, Nassau, The Bahamas OR
mail to P. O. Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas.

Deadline Friday, March 31, 2007
For further information, telephone the Director at (242) 302-4559

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

Presents a Panel Discussion










Perspectives on the Impact of Haitian Migration to The Bahamas

Wednesday, 218 March, 2007 at 7:00pm

The Foyer, Ground Floor
Portia Smith Building
Poinciana Drive
The College of The Bahamas

Panelists:

Former Minister and Marketing Director
Lucayan Tropical

Mr. Earl Deveaux






Dr. Evelyn McCollin Associate Professor History

The College of The Bahamas



Dr. Thaddeus McDonald Dean, Faculty of Social and
Educational Studies, The College
of The Bahamas

Mr. Eliezer Regnier Counsel and Attorney, Notary Public




Director of National Museum of
The Bahamas






Dr. Keith Tinker




Free Admission
Donations to the COB fund gladly accepted

For further information,
contact Dr. Evelyn McCollin or Jessica Minnis at 397-2606/7

\



er

-=PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

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“N

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER























[ COURSE SEC [COURSE ee ey feaute Pe 8] 2 2

NO. NO. | DESCRIPTION _ TIME DAY START | DUR | FEE |

ACCA900 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00pm-8:00pm | Mon/Wed __7-Mai

ACCAQ01 01__| ACCAFOR BEGINNERS II 6:00pm-8:00pm | MonWed __7-May | 10 wks_| $275

ACCA902 __ ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Il 6:00pm-8:00pm | Tues/Thurs _8-May | 10 wks _|
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. W/S 9:30am-4:30pm | Thurs 29-Mar | 1 day



SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. W/S

CREDIT AND COLLECTIONS |
CREDIT AND COLLECTIONS We"

9:30am-4:30pm | Thurs 31Ma 1
Thurs 10 May | 8 wks

Tue 8-May | 8 wks _|















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[01 | COMPUTER APPLICATIONS Ii ___| 6:00pm-9:30pm | Thurs 10May | 9wks | $550 |

Tues 8-May | 6wks | $330 |

OMP953_ MoniWed _7-May | 9 wks | $500,

| 9:30am-4:30pm | Thurs = 3iMay | 1day _| $170 |

COMP930 [930am-4:30pm | Thurs __—14-Jun | 2days__| $560 |

a a ARM ilar an so JoP Crore | Pec |

DECORATING spam poe hae ome Hoes te

FLOR800 pot FLORAL DESIGN | Thurs 10Ma

FLOR8014 “FLORAL DESIGN Il Tues 8-May | 10 wks _| $250

FLORAL DESIGN III 10 wks | $300 |

[01 __| INTERIOR DECORATING | [6:00pm-9:00pm | Wed __———9-May | 10. wks_| $225 |

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EFFECTIVE WRITING’ SKILLS Tues 8-May | 8wks _| $225 |

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MASG900___| 01_| MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | Thurs 10Ma | $465 |

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS ie ectton Marwan ligeank

icles neta f r Mon 7-Ma\

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR! | 6:00pm-9:00pm | Wed _—=——«9-May | 10 wks_| $400

Bette ee ae ai Pea te BN Le Sdn cael |e ae

EMENT PSE RA RES src tres [Fa]

MGMT900_ | HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT | | 6:00pm-9:30pm | Thurs __—=—‘10May | 9wks _| $250 |

_MGMT901_ HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT Il | 6:00pm-9:30pm | Mon 7-May | 9wks | $300 |

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SEW 800 [01 _| BASIC FREEHAND CUTTING | [6:00pm-9:00pm | Mon __—_—7-May | 10 wks_| $225 |

SEW 802 BASIC FREEHAND CUTTING II [6:00pm-9:00pm | Thurs __—*10May | 10 wks _| $260 |

Ssews05 ——s«([01_| DRAPERY MAKING I Tues 8-May | 10 wks _| $225 |

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 (242) 328-0093/328-1936/302-4300 ext
5202 or email: persdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).

CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course materials.

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
EXTENSION SERVICES

Computer Offerings — Summer 2007

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

This courses for. thetheginner who knows very little about computers
and does not understand how it works. This course covers the major
Vg wae eo ake EA ngompmepcencerts win rxteasive hands on.practice of various software using:
ee Tees aa (1) Microsoft Office — Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel — Spreadsheet (iii)
Microsoft Access — Database Management.

Course Description:

Pre-requisite: ' None

Begins: Monday, 7"" May 2007 6:00pm - 9:30pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 5" May 2007 10:00am _ - 1:30pmSection 02 (CEES)

Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Tuition: $450.00

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II

Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office — Word Processing (ii) Microsoft
Excel — Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access — Database Management.

Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I

Begins: Thursday, 10 May 2007
Time: 6:00pm - 9:30pm
Duration: 9 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Pre-requisite: None
Thursday, 31° May 2007

Begins:

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $160.00

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR

Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware,

Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Monday 7th May 2007

Time: 6:00pm — 8:00pm Monday & Wednesday

Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: BHTC Computer Lab

Fees: $500.00 .

¢

QUICKBOOKS

Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs
(fewer than 20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting
activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will learn how to set-up
their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Tuesday, 8 May 2007

Time: 6:00pm — 9:00pm

Duration: 6 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Fees: $330.00

WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web
pages will cover Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific
topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and

hosting of web pages.

Pre-requistte: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-
processing, :

Begins: Thursday, 14" & 15" June 2007

Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm

Duration: 2 days

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Fees: $550.00

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 302-4300 ext 5201 5202 5205 or email

ees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



EDUCATING & TRAINING

An International Conference
In Commemoration of the 200" Anniversary of the Abolition
of the Transatlantic Slave Trade of

“Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: Telling the Story”
The College of The Bahamas
February 2008
Nassau, The Bahamas

Cali for. Papers

The College of The Bahamas will host the Conference: “Abolition of The Trans-Atlantic Slave
Trade: Telling the Story, February 2008 at the Oakes Field Campus, Nassau.

Abstracts of approximately 200 words are invited on the following topics:

Language and Oppression

Religion in Slavery: Agent Provocateur or Opiate?
Slavery and Human Sensibilities

Power and Enslavement

Kinship across the Diaspora

Identity: Culture, Race and Gender

Enslavement and Liberation: Pedagogy
Liberation: Ideologies, Contexts and Dynamics
Liberation: Simple Past.or Present Continuous?

Conference Structure

The conference will feature 20-minute papers from all disciplines, followed by 10-minute
discussions, presented in concurrent and plenary sessions. Panel and poster proposals will
also be considered. Such proposals should be as complete as possible. Artwork and poetry
reflecting the noted topics will be considered for exhibition and expression over the period
of the conference. ;

Submissions (4 paper copies and 1 electronic copy) should be directed to:
Jessica Minnis

Associate Professor

School of Social Sciences

The College of The Bahamas

Oakes Field Campus

P O Box N4912

Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail: abolitionconf@cob.edu.bs

Accommodation for Non-Resident Delegates

Only private sector accommodation is available. As the island of New Providence is a major
tourist destination and business centre, it offers a variety of accommodations, ranging from

well-kept bed and breakfasts to large luxury properties. Several of the smaller hotels and bed
and breakfasts, moderately priced, are located downtown or in nearby surburban areas, 15-
20 minute walk from the conference venue. A taxi ride takes about five to seven minutes and
costs about $8.00 each way. :
As a matter of course, we will assist delegates with hotel reservations and recommend early
booking to get the best rates. Names of recommended properties will be posted on the College
of The Bahamas website in short order.

Registration : n 7

# v APRS ATR ROTI Ag s é rat SRT A Sein Fog sae ‘
Fe days: $150:00 -e- Day'rate $100:00° * “Late’Registration: $200.00 © Student rate:

0
Dates for receipt of abstract, papers, and registration will be announced shortly.

Registration will be online at http://www.cob.edu.bs/abolitionconf.php

Calling all
COB alumni

Get in on the excitement of building
the University of The Bahamas!



Whether you graduated from The

College with the Class of ‘77 or just last

year, we want to hear from you to

e Keep you up to date on news of the
University of The Bahamas

e Network you with other alumni in
your field

e Invite you to a reception to meet the
President

e Brag about your achievements

e Ask your advice.

So COB Alumni, let’s reconnect.

Call Alumni and Development today
. 302-4355 or 6

or email

alumni(dcob.edu.bs

head{dcob.edu.bs







. ONT RT TYEE WEL EAS HUE MSEY BIT PP PN TPR ALE BPS STEERS LT TET EPO OPTED TG TENE LUT UPON FPN PRL STE EET IN BPI LOL FF PE LN TPL IEE TT PTE PTT AT ENTITLE REET HT TET TRET TET TH FONT TPT TTT TN TN Le HN TEN TEAL A TVET Te CNEL Tt

a

.



- "SF O42 OS Oo EF F.BLILK OK RK SC AOA KKH GFCRR YTS F248 err VRC eewrewperecre
*

Pmeer




eli tas hoy 4 the Graduate Programmes Office

in collaboration

THE TRIBUNE

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING & TRAINING. BAHAMIANS

Prospective Applicants
OT aa ee

Master's Degree
Ea? rogramme

_ Master of Science in Early
“Childhood and Elementary



3 Applications for the two programmes _
Offered by arenowavallablein
mits od (5-4 _ the Graduate Programmes Office

: ee ere _ Michael Hartley Eldon Complex

- Thompson Blvd :: Room 306 —

ays ye =
for submitting applications

to the Graduate Programmes Office is
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2007



in collaboration

=~ Bern
397.2602

WHEELOCK
COL «L
swisdom@cob.edu.bs

EGE

For more information



ospective Applicants

murs

rogramme

. _ Applications for the two programmes.
are now available in

Ae oe Michael Hartley Eldon Complex
f The Bahamas — - Thompson Bivd :: Room 306

THE DEADLINE
for submitting applications
to the Graduate Programmes Office is
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2007

Reale
397.2602

swisdom@cob.edu.bs





with





For more information

(CBA) will meet this week with the Cen-







er’s Degree





MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 9B
BUSINESS

Governor’s backing
for ACH software
vendor is sought

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor





THE Clearing Banks Association

tral Bank of the Bahamas governor,
Wendy Craigg, and one item on the agen-
da will be to obtain her approval for their
choice of software provider for the Auto-
mated Clearing House (ACH).

Paul McWeeney, Bank of the Bahamas
International’s managing director and
head of the ACH working group, said the
CBA had “come to an agreement on the
recommendation” for the ACH software
provider in principle.

“However, it was felt that we should
have that confirmed at the next meeting
with the Governor, which is scheduled for
next week,” Mr McWeeney told The Tri-
bune. “I don’t expect any major hiccups.”

Once the Governor’s confirmation is
obtained, the CBA will move into “final i,
negotiations” with the chosen software
vendor. ®@ PAUL McWEENEY



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS | | 2006

IN THE SUPREME COURT ee ~ CLEQUI000325
Equity Side :

IN THE MATTER of all those pieces parcels or lots of land
comprising Lots 73, 74 and 75 of the Gregory Town Crown Allotments _
situate in the Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas. ‘

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act 1959

“AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Bernard A. Kuttner

The Petition of BERNARD A; KUTTNER of Millburn, New Jersey one of
the Untied States of America and Gregory Town, Eleuthera one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of;-

ALL THOSE pieces parcels or lots of land comprising lots 73,
74 and 75 of the Gregory Town Crown Allotments and which said pieces, -
parcels or lots of land are bounded as follows on the North West by Crown *
Land and by the property of the Petitioner and running thereon One hundred and =‘
Ninety-eight and seventy-nine hundreths (198.79) feet on the West North West ©
by the property of the Petitioner and running thereon One hundred and Eleven
and Thirty-two hundreths (111.32) feet on the North East by vacant land, by
Cave Street and Lot Number No.6 of the Gregory Town Crown Allotments
and running thereon One hundred and Seventy-eight and Sixty-two hundreths
(178.62) feet on the South East by the property of the Petitioner and running
thereon Three hundred (300) feet and on the South West by Crown Land and
running thereon One Hundred and Six and Seven hundreths (106.07) feet and
which said pieces parcels or lots of land are more particularly delineated and
shown on the plan filed in this matter and thereon coloured Pink.

Bernard A.Kuttner claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession of the
said land free from encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of Bahamas under. Section 3 The Quieting Titles
Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and the nature and extent _
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the -
Court in accordance with provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected duing normal office hours in
the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said City of Nassau

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, Mareva
House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau, Attorneys for the
Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Island Administrator at Govenor’s Harbour
Eleuthera,

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a right of dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
14th day of May, 2007 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to be file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the said 14th day of May, 2007 will operate
as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 7th day of March, A.D. 2007.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Chambers
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

EES RT NAcc TESTES |

Consolidated hit by free water to Corporation

FROM page 1B

& Exchange Commission
(SEC), BISX-listed Consoli-
dated Water said: “Our agree-
ment with the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation for the Blue
Hills plant contains a non-rev-
enue water (NRW) component
that requires us to reduce the
amount of water lost by the
public water distribution system
on New Providence Island over
a one-year period by 438 mil-
lion US gallons.

“Until such time as we can
demonstrate to the WSC that

1.2 million US gallons of water
per day to the WSC from the
Blue Hills plant at no cost to
the WSC.

“The costs associated with
providing this free water to
WSC are significant to overall
plant operating costs, and great-
ly reduced the overall gross
margin on total water sales from
the Blue Hills plant during the
fourth quarter of 2006. The lack
of gross margin on thése sales
made by the Blue Hills facility is
attributable to higher opera-
tional costs related to plant
start-up and our current obliga-
tions with respect to the NRW



we have achieved this reduc-
tion, we are required to provide

reduction component of the
Blue Hills contract. ~

“We are taking aggressive
actions to address these start-
up issues and to complete the
NRW project in order to reduce
operating costs and improve the
profitability of the Blue Hills

Tela LE

For the stories

profit of our bulk water seg-
ment in future periods may con-
tinue to be adversely affected
by the results for our Blue Hills
plant.” :

The company added that it
expected to meet the NRW
requirement and prove this to
the WSC in the 2007 third quar-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANNASTACIA FENELON OF
MARSH HARBOUR, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 19TH day of MARCH, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays














SEATS REAPS PS LTC SPSS CEPTS eee ae Se Sree
iy

OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE.

-
a
7

Pe

4,468 of office space 4

ie

downtown for lease.

re

Adequate parking and

infrastructure in place. 3

ry

‘

STSCI Reece ale

Ce



: pee ey ope its
ee eee eee ee eee eee!

operation. However, the gross



a
ry

‘e:

ter.

The Blue Hills plant has not
been without its problems. Con-
solidated Water also noted that
a Statement of Claim had been
filed against it in the Supreme
Court by Gruppozecca
Bahamas Ltd, seeking damages
of more than $950,000 for
alleged “breaches of obligation”
to it over the Blue Hills plant’s
construction.

Consolidated Water said the

claims made against its Bahami- -

an subsidiary were “without
merit”, and would be “vigor-
ously defended”.

Consolidated Water said its

full-year bulk water sales rose
by $6:579 million or 56 per cent
to $18.303 million, largely as a
result of the 7.2 million gallons
per day Blue Hills plant coming
on line and expanded produc-
tion capacity at its other New
Providence-based plant, Wind-
sor. Sales at the latter plant
increased by $610,119 over 2005
figures, and it also benefited
from reduced production penal-
ties.
. Those penalties at the Wind-
sor plant, whose production
capacity is 3.1 million gallons
per day, had fallen to $367,357
in 2006, having hit a high of
$571,349 in 2005.

Consolidated Water said in
its form 10-K; “Over the past

NOTICE

three years, we have experi-
enced various equipment fail-
ures and operational problems

which caused us to incur penal-

ties for not supplying minimum
water volumes to the WSC. We

also incurred penalties for not’

meeting diesel fuel and elec-
tricity efficiencies specified in
our water sale agreement with
the WSC. ;

“These penalties totalled
$367,257, $571,349, and
$313,408 in 2006, 2005, and
2004, respectively. We have
undertaken a programme to
replace certain equipment
prone to repetitive failure and
to reduce the fouling tendency
of the feed water to the plant.”

The contract for the Windsor
plant with the WSC tasts until
March 2013 or when it has sup-
plied 13.1 billion gallons of
water, whichever happens ear-
lier. ’

Consolidated Water said:
“From time to time since Octo-
ber 2004, we have been unable
to deliver the minimum water
volumes required under the
contract because of mechanical
equipment problems and mem-
brane fouling. As a result, we
have been subject to water rate
decreases that decreased rev-
enue by approximately
$400,000, $600,000 and $300,000
in 2006, 2005 and 2004, respec-

NOTICE is hereby given that TRACY ANN BLAIR COAKLEY
OF NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for. registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturatization ~
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
Statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19th’
day of March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality .
and. Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

3 VIVID ie POSTITTONS

“Showroom Sales Associtate”’

° Highly self-motivated person with sharp,

dynamic personality

* Strong interpersonal skills

’ Fulltime and able to work weekends

* Computer literate

The ideal candidates possessing knowledge in

cither furniture sales, fabric sales, plumbing

hardware or tle Is preferable.

tively.

“We have implemented an
extensive programme to test
and understand the cause of the
membrane fouling, and have
expanded the production capac-
ity of the Windsor plant in order
to replace the production capac-
ity that was lost because of
membrane fouling.

“At present, we believe we
have resolved, the. membrane

fouling problem at the Wind-'

sor plant. However, membrane
fouling may.reoccur at the

RR eoveeee’e

ed a rival bid by a consortium
featuring Veolia Enerserve and
Bahamas-based BK Water and

. Sable (Bahamas). The last that
was known was the contract |

award still had to be debated
and voted on by Cabinet.
As a result of the Blue Hills ”

plant’s construction, Consoli- °
dated Water’s sales to the WSC *;
doubled, increasing from $4.595’

million in 2005 to $9.912 mil- ‘
lion in 2006, and accounting for

26 per cent of the company’s ~

total revenues, up from 18 per

cent the previous year. It sup- ~
plied the WSC with 2.3 billion °,
gallons of water in 2006, com- ,-

Windsor plant, and if we are
unable to meet the production
minimums due to this or other




operating issues, we could be in
technical default of the Windsor
supply contract and ‘subject to

~-various- adverse consequences,

including further water rate
decreases or cancellation of the
contract by the WSC.”
Announcing the company’s
results, Rick MacTaggart, its
president and: chief executive,
said that “additional capacity
and operational efficiencies” at
the Windsor plant during 2006
helped drive sales and revenues
in a year when the company
made a record profit of $7.521
million or $0.59 per share, a 36
per cent increase over 2005.
He indicated that Consoli-
dated Water was also prepar-
ing to.bid’on the request for

_ proposal (RFP) tender put out

by the Government for the

. Winton reversé osmosis: plant,

which will be capable of pro-

_ducing two million gallons per

day once constructed. There
was no mention, though, of
what has happened to the.con-
tract for the Perpall Tract
reverse osmosis plant, which

~appears:to. have disappeared

into a black hole since going out
to bid some two to three years

ago.

Consolidated Water had bid
on this, but The Tribune had
been told that the WSC and its
technical advisers, Camp, Dress-
er & McKee, had recommend-






. facility had been paid at March -

: Representatives from the
Canadian High Commission,

- Visa and Public Affairs Sections

| will be at the

a Canadian Consulate in Nassau,

pared to'853 million gallons the

year before.

Consolidated Water, which }
operates in the Bahamas _
through Consolidated Water *
(Bahamas), its almost 91 per ~

cent owned subsidiary, also sup- ,
plied six million gallons of water ,
to the Bimini Sands Resort and *
Bimini Beach Hotel through its ©

Bimini-based operating plant, '

a 20 per cent increase on the
previous year’s five million. The
plant is capable of providing
115,000 gallons of potable water ,
per day. “
Consolidated Water said
interest expense rose to $1.887
million in 2006, compared to
the $885,628 incurred the pre-
vious year, as a result of bor-
rowings to complete the Blue
Hills plant. Some $21.8 million

was used during 2006 to finance *-
the Blue Hills plant’s construc- *

tion.

Consolidated Water said it
expected to arrange the'
issuance of a $4 million perfor-
mance bond for the Blue Hills -

operation “some time in 2007”, ©

but its Bahamian subsidiary“
“was not in compliance with the

liabilities to tangible net worth ~

covenant” of its new $5.6 mil-

lion credit facility with the Roy-

al Bank of Canada at year-end '
2006. The term loans under this

2007.




r
rad

9am to lam, Thursday, March 22, 2007
To promote study in Canada.






Legal Notice

NOTICE

Salary commensurate with experience.
Showroom Sales
327-1691




Please fax resume to:





Appointments only - Please call 393-2123
KEAN COURT LTD. |

Legal Notice

NOTICE :

Legal Notice

NOTICE

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 15th day of

OPAH LIMITED COLVILLE LIMITED r

March 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) (In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced’ on the 15th day of
March 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 15th day of
March 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

PARTS TTS SIE
Pela) 52

For an expanding Freeport Auto Dealership.



Successful applicant must have a thorough
understanding of computerized inventory .
systems and must be willing to supervise
and train others. Knowledge of Japanese
and Korean parts is a must along with

proven dealership experience.





Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ACQUA WELLINGTON
OPPORTUNITY I LIMITED

Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Attractive and competitive remuneration
package available to successful applicant.

Please apply in writing to:
PARTS

P.O. Box F-41060
Freeport, Grand Bahama



Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000 notice is hereby given that the
above-named Company has been dissolved and struck off the
Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 20th day of February, 2007.

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
ACQUA WELLINGTON OPPORTUNITY I LIMITED



Owner asking $220,000 (ONO) for both Aircrafts as is.
The Aircrafts can be viewed at
Executive Flight Support, Nassau Bahamas

For further information or inspection call (242) 377-1256. ‘





fHE TRIBUNE

Ee ass

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 11B -

nt

invo



FROM page 1B

opposition politicians, with
some referring to it as a “Crown
Land fire sale” and fearing that
another large chunk of Bahami-
an land was being ‘given away’
to foreign resort developers,
and that this nation’s citizens
would receive no benefits and
be squeezed out.

Mr Farino’s comments indi-
cate these claims are incorrect,
and back up what The Tribune
first reported — that Infinity
Partners had ‘jumped the gun’
in spectacular style, causing
problems for the Government
and all involved with the Beka
project, not to mention consid-

potential resort and other part-

deal with them has been com-
pleted. It is understood that
while preliminary talks and dis-
cussions may have been held
with a number of them, no deal
has been done with a single
company named in the Infinity
Partners document, as every-
thing would hinge on Beka
Development first signing a
Heads of Agreement with the
Bahamian government.

For instance, the Infinity
Partners document said there
was a potential tie-up with Mar-
garitaville for a Margaritaville
Hotel and Casino. While
exploratory talks have taken
place with Beka, no agreement
has been reached, and Margar-
itaville is understood to have
been talking to a number of

tial casino operator. Foxwoods
executives, together with Mr
Farino, Harcourt representa-
tives and Driftwood
(Freeport’s) head, Donald
Archer, all recently toured the
casino at the still-closed Royal
Oasis resort, the Government
having asked Foxwoods to look
at becoming involved in
attempts to purchase and re-
open the resort that has been
closed since September 2004.

There have been talks
between Harcourt and Beka on
the Royal Oasis and how the
two could work together on fur-
ther developments in Grand
Bahama.

In addition, Beka is also
understood to be keen on dis-
cussing with the Government

land.

not interested in the harbour
currently used by South Riding
Point Holdings, for which the
latter holds a lease from the
Government for another almost
13 years, until December 31.
2019.

Jaime Vargas, South Riding
Point Holdings vice-president
of operations, previously told
The Tribune that the Infinity
Partners document had caused
the company considerable dis-
quiet, wondering whether it
would still have use of the har-
bour for the long-term.

South Riding Point Holdings
is understood to be mulling a
$16 million expansion of its
facility, adding two storage
tanks, but these plans are being
held up because the Govern-

EDAW and East Bay Group as

ronmental impact assessment
(EIA) groups for the develop-
ment respectively.

“The Government has
requested an environmental
impact assessment, and in order
to do so we have decided to
photograph from the air a 10
by 10 mile area,” Mr Farino told
‘The Tribune.

“This includes photograph-
ing from the north to the south
side of the island, so our pro-
ject will not have a negative
impact on the surrounding envi-
ronment, and so everything can
be properly planned.”

Mr Farino, who at one point
was the point man in seeking
to bring Marriolt to do a time-



share resort project at Discov-
ery Bay, and is also involved
with the Taino Beach Resort,”
said Beka had discussed “build-’ |
ing community facilities” such:
as schools, community build-:
ings, fire and police stations,:
low cost housing and other.
amenities that would “benefit
the East End of Grand;

Bahama”. »
‘We would hope to use pur-.;

chased or leased Government:
land for this purpose, but no :

agreement has been reached at:

this time because there seems

to be opposition to the use of..
any government land, even for,.
community purposes,” Mr Fari-.;

no said.

erable embarrassment. other developers eyeing the opening the air strip at the — ment has so far been reluctant as
From the developers’ point Bahamas, including the pro- — Bahamas Film Studios (the for- to enter into talks with the com- — om ae
of view, the statements in that — posed 2,000-acre Morgan Stan- — mer US Air Force Missile Base) pany over a lease extension. : ae
document are either incorrect, ley project in Freeport. for use by its proposed project. One area where Infinity Part- Vi & FE Limited HAY bcs
exaggerated, or involve naming In some areas, though, the ‘Phe Government owns the — ners got it right was in naming Hoe
tay tah

iq.

ners in terms that indicate a

Infinity document was right,
naming Foxwoods as the poten-

However, the developer is

the master planners and envi-

Ex-AIBT chair advising group eyeing Film Studios

FROM page 1B

er a group of investors to buy
the Film Studios from Ross
Fuller [chairman of selling com-
pany, Ashby Corporation].

“We thought that that oppor-
tunity had gone, and it now
seems there might be an oppor-
tunity back. We hope Ross will
actively consider any offer we
make.”

Mr Fuller and Ashby Corpo-
ration confirmed that they were
seeking new offers for the
Bahamas Film Studios after
they were unable to agree terms
for an extension to the March
15 deadline for Bahamas
FilmInvest, a group put togeth-
er by Owen Bethel, head of the
Nassau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque Group,

were “multiple groups with a
continued interest in investing”.

He added: “We are not
searching for a buyer, we are
simply entertaining additional
offers at this juncture. We hope
to see the entire matter settled
in a matter of weeks, and move
ahead with the project as
planned.”

Mr Fuller said FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
and United Insurance, the guar-
antor for the $9.95 million con-
struction loan that the former
had made to the Bahamas Film
Studios, had reached an agree-
ment where the latter would
pay the Studios’ debt to the
bank.

Out of the $14 million pur-
chase price that Ashby Corpo-
ration was due to receive, some
$9.95 million will now have to

source said.

Vhere is virtually no activity
taking place at the Bahamas
Film Studios site in eastern
Grand Bahama, which is the
former US Air Force Missile
Base. It is understood that the
location is just being manned
by security personnel, a far cry
from the Pirates of the
Caribbean filming days.

Disney and its Bahamas-
based production company,
Second Mate Productions, shot
the films at the Studios. How-
ever, Mr Fuller is blaming Dis-
ney for allegedly leaving $1 mil-
lion in unpaid bills behind it, an
allegation the company is
known to be disputing.

In his e-mailed replies to The
Tribune, he hinted this was a
key factor behind the Bahamas
Film Studios running up such





number of lawsuits filed against
it, and the need to settle a vari-
ety of debts.

Mr Fuller took control after
two of the project’s three
founders, Hans Schutte and
Michael Collyer, passed away.
The surviving partner, Paul
Quigley, is no longer with the
Bahamas Film Studios, as is
understood to be mounting a
$1.7 million legal action over
the way in which his involve-
ment was ended.

When asked about this, Mr
Fuller said in a cutting reply
that he had no knowledge of
the lawsuit “and cannot imagine
how an ex-employee with no
investment in the company
would......... file such a frivo-
lous lawsuit.

“We also believe that Mr
Quigley is an intelligent indi-

| As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
7 Company and the authorized Caterpillar dealer }«
j in the Bahamas, we are seeking a Financial |=

Rental Coordinator. The candidate should

os

| have a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting.. |
He/She should be knowledgeable in the field
of Marine Engineering and Inventory Control.
The candidate should be able to develop |
inventory systems for rental equipment, be

able to implement a system for service #

inventory for rental machines, create a i
maintenance program for company’s rental §

fleet, and monitor inventory system levels §
among technicians. The candidate should also |

have some knowledge about purchasing parts, {
inventory, and motors, and be able to ¢
coordinate the delivery of these parts, motors |

and equipment.

service excellence.






This person should be a |
professional who thrives on the challenge of jf -
developing outstanding customer relations and





to close its purchase. That dead- go back to United Insurance — massive debts — without explain- — vidual who has moved on with 1
line had already been extend- Company, rather than the bank, — ing how — and saying that Ash- his life.... One that will not Having both academic and practical a
ed once from the original Feb- While a further $1 million willbe — by was “working with ourcred- — include the Bahamas Film Stu- Ke
ruary 28, 2007, closing date. used to,pay off the Bahamas _ itors and. dealing with: ee ~ dios.” ; background AN the hale a eb Accounting’ pnerene!> a.
Apart from Mr Law’s group, Film Studios’ debts to other. as.we: CAML os »....The original business. Blea for. - é eee ‘ig : i
there are other parties interest- ~Grand Bahama-based and Another surcedémiliartl the Film Studios called for the oa y Rhee wees wa
ed in the Bahamas Film Stu- Bahamian suppliers. the situation told The Tribune: construction of sound stages iP : Aree a
dios. It is understood that while One Grand Bahama-based “I sure hope the Bahamas Film — and other TV and film produc- eee complete resume ait adnssion and aie ae
waiti el’s t business source told The Tri- Studios finds a buyer. It would tion facilities, followed by a ae
ape Mr Eller ses talks bune that the collapse of the be a huge shot in the arm for movie theme park, hotel and experience toM&E Limited, P.O. Box N-3238, oe
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Human Resources #

with a group headed by a Mia-
mi-based construction magnate,
although The Tribune has been



















deal involving Bahamas FilrmIn-
vest would further delay the
repayment of debts owed to





















us, and diversify us away from
the golf course and hotel mod-
el”.

He suggested that the Gov-

other real estate components.
Mr Bethel’s group estimated

that an $80-$90 million invest-

ment would be needed to

Department,



or email me@me-ltd.com. |.




unable to learn his name. Bahamian businesses, some- 1
In ‘addition, another poten- thing they were not too pleased ernment should have taken a realise this vision, and that the fj Only persons being interviewed for this position :
tial player is the Bahamian film- about. more proactive role in dealing Film Studios could employ lb tacted ,
maker Cedric Scott, who is “There are quite a few local — with the Bahamas Film Studios — between 700-1200 fixed staff will pe contacted. H
based in Los Angeles. Like Mr Suppliers who are owed money situation, especially as it was when in use. Ho:
Law and his investors, Mr Scott by the Studios outfit. We're all the landlord and owned the real ‘
is understood to have been _ Sitting around waiting, and this estate on which the project was mS
watching and waiting on the _ Will delay further the honour- _ sitting. a
sidelines to see if Mr Bethel’s ing of debts incurred with local However, the Studios’ sale q
group was successful. He and a suppliers and businesses,” the has been complicated by the :
group also previously looked at - ;
the Bahamas Film Studios, but a
were understood to have ee ZZ
backed off after doing some due B US HY 2 oe
diligence work. we pit ak 5
In an e-mailed reply to The H a
Tribune’s questions, Mr Fuller | =
did not rule out the possibility q _
of accepting another bid from ; POSITION VAC CANCY 3
Bahamas FilmInvest, sayin / Ne
thatit Mr Bethel’ $oroup ane MANUFACTURING PLANT OPERA’ PIONS MANAGER § :
aC 5 a . uw
back “with another, viable offer, al :
anything is possible”. !
Although declining to name | Pepsi Cola Bahamas, an affiliate of Pepsi Americas, Inc., is searching for a :
or discuss any other potential alified individu: APACE The Ti! Mati oti <4 i
bayers, Mi Pullec-said there qualified individual to manage its manufacturing operations. This includes ¥
- Production, Quality Control, Maintenance, Warehouse, Fleet, and Logistics. (5 ;
direct reports, 30+ indirect reports). ft
Qualified candidates must posses the following:
Education: a
tor : : . Minimum Bachelor’s degree in business, operations or related field “
This ideal candidate will report to the General Manager. Provides accurate project cost plate
forecast by assessing actual cost incurred and physical progress achieved for all phases § Experience: fe
. of a project (Engineering, Procurement, Fabrication, Construction, and Commissioning). ap pork ; . : . ; : greet
. Prior leadership, supervisor and coaching experience required. Operations ff:
Duties and Responsibilities: and distribution experience preferred
e Provide efficiency control by comparing actual and planned man-hours
e Set-up and maintain jobs (i.e. structure and budget in ERP system) Personal:
° Support Project Managers by collecting all relevant progress and cost data from ° Results oriented _
Ce Fee ey and Accounting ° Strong leadership ,
onsolidate ata in Project Cost Report for Project Manager’s review and approva z Team builder / Team player
© Prepare project cash flow ° Ability to coach and develop people
¢ Support Project Manager in change order manager 7 ere aa z - : ae C oe pel :
e Support Project Manager in contingency management ; Excellent interpersonal skills :
4h Process oriented :
Qualifications: . Problem solver t
Bachelors Degree in Accounting or similar field or equivalent combination of education ° Ability to multi task
and experience. Minimum Five (5) years experience in cost accounting and/or project :
Seana He AAG OF ee ee : nee eee ees h A competitive salary and benefits package will be offered to the successful
anc i east Five (5) years of SAGE/Timberline experience is a must. I sdidat sa ae faa sss tela ;
Sine ; } candidate. If you are a strong leader/manager capable of multi tasking and are
Intermediate level skills with Microsoft Office Software, accounting, cost control H a ai an . ae aan i F3 . . soa co ~ as i: ational c ‘ : , ‘ A i
procedures, analytical and problemsolving skills. effective communication shills both t _ oe ee cing Pare) TaD SOs EE SAORI Ee beens Y
verbally and in writing, and the ability to plan and manage multiple tasks/projects. mail or cmail resume to: 1
: ‘ % : : i 4
Physical Demands and Work Environment to be reviewed. Zz
Human Resources Manager H
{



Please respond by email to:
Fax:

: ; Pepsi Cola Bahamas Bottling Co., Ltd.
\ P.O. Box N-3004
i Prince Charles Drive
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 364-2123
e-mail: rhonda.rolle@pensibahamas. com

jobs@marmatglobal.com
242-363-1279










Mail: MARMAT
Attn: Office Manager
P.O. Box CR-56766

Nassau, Bahamas





02 NETS ii
SSS et | rca cana RCRD a SNARE ARID AAT HL eb de aa We OU RTS GS AA DSA





PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Baha | r to soon turn down requests for retirement

FROM page 1B

only the latter which will be
demolished to make way for the
$2.4 billion revamp, along with
several towers at the Wyndham.

Separate and distinct from
this is the Baha Mar project,
which involves the construction
of a 1,000-room hotel and casi-
no branded by Harrah’s Cae-
sar’s Entertainment, plus hotels
branded by Starwood’s St Reg:
is, W and Westin brands. A con-
vention centre is also planned.



2 1/2 Bathrooms.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot Bomar Condominium
Westward Villas, situated in the Western District on the [sland of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of 3 Bedrooms.








Yet the Government’s failure
to conclude a supplemental
Heads of Agreement with Baha
Mar by March 1 has meant that
the developer has been unable
to seal the joint venture deal
with Harrah’s and, secondly,

Starwood, which has a “me:

too” clause in its contract.
This would enable Starwood
to walk away from the project if

Harrah’s does, and the failure to |

hit that March 15 deadline
means that there is increased
risk the latter will do so.

Although Harrah's has given
no indication yet that it will

exercise this option, every day

. that goes by without its deator
the supplemental Heads of ©
Agreement with the Govern- -
‘this project, which provides such

ment being finalised increases

this risk. This has effectively.
placed the Baha Mar project on ._-
hold, forcing the developer to -
hold back on issuing $50 mil- -
lion in construction contracts |

for the new Commercial Vil-
lage, plus the West Bay Street
re-routing and other plans.

If Harrah’s were to withdraw,
it would effectively send the
Baha Mar project “back to the
drawing board”

In his letter to staff, Mr
Robinson said Baha Mar, which
has as its principal investors
Lyford Cay-based billionaires,
father-and-son Dikran and
Sarkis Izmirlian, remained
“committed to finalizing the
project and quickly beginning
construction once the REree:

ment is concluded. :
“It is*Baha Mar’s hope that

the Government will move to

successfully ‘complete its nego-

tiations with Baha Mar so that

significant benefits to the
Bahamgs, can commence.

“I want to reassure all of you
that.we are continuing to. rein-

- vest a tremendous amount of °

capital and energy into trans-
forming the existing Cable
Beach Resorts properties into
world class resorts.”

Mr Robinson said the “new-
ly-renovated portions” of the
Sheraton Cable Beach Resort,
the former Radisson, would
open soon, while the renova-
tions of two Wyndham towers
and suites would start in May.

Programme

The VSP programme, he
added, was in its fourth week,
and a “large number of appli-
cations had been submitted”.
This would cause Baha Mar to
turn down.a number of appli-
cations in certain areas.

The reasons for why the Goy-
ernment has been unable to

-conclude an agreement with

Baha Mar are unclear, with the
developers themselves just as
baffled and mystified as the gen-
eral public, it seems. After all, it
is a project that has been touted
on nimerous occasions by

Prime Minister Perry Christie, .

and is seen as his lasting legacy

to the Bahamian scaoles

The collapse of the Harrah’s
deal could deal the Prime Min-
ister a damaging blow, espe-
cially as it would come just
before a general election, and
having gone so far, many
observers feel it would be
almost impossible for the PLP
government not to reach a sup-
plemental Heads of Agreement
and get Baha Mar going.

One school of thought,
though, suggests that the Gov-
ernment’s reluctance may be
due to the fact that Baha Mar is
seeking an increase in the
investment incentives in pro-
portion to the size of its invest-
ment, which has risen from the
$1 billion contemplated in the
original Heads of Agreement
to $2.4 billion.

‘It is believed that the Gov-

‘ernment fears if it agrees to the

enhanced incentive package, it
could leave itself open to FNM
accusations that it has given too
much away and ‘sold out
Bahamian land to foreign devel-
opers’, something that could
also hurt its electoral prospects.

Unit Size 450 sq ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FENANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 1549”, All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March 2007.



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Apt No.23, Wild Tamarind
Condo situated in the Western District on the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Situated
thereon is Condo consisting of (3) three Bedrooms, (2) two Bathrooms.

Unit Size 1,400 sq ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
io FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

rem eeeee Aan aan eenncermnin memnemenenrinaenn ie ete tat Are enemy RE AE RENAE RON OY NTne Ney naseantn epee Rete ne a ey

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a scaled envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 2076”. All offers must be
| received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March 2007.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot: Lot #143
Yellow Elder Gardens Subdivision, situated in the Western
District on the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated theron is a Single Family
Residence, consisting of 3 Bedrooms | Bathroom.

Property Size: 3,200 Sq Ft
Building Size: 873 Sq Ft

This property ts being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMUTED.

All offers should be forwarded ia writting in a sealed
enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender
0878”. All offers must be received by the close of business
4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March, 2007.



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot: 500ft
west of Marigold Farm Road, and south of Hanna Road,
situated in the Southern District on the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
theron is vacant land.

Property Size: 16,102 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writting in a scaled

enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, PO. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked ~
3147”.
4:00 p.m.,

Tender
All offers must be received by the close of business
Uriday 30th March, 2007








NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TONEY CLAUDIUS GRIFFIN OF
EAST STREET OPPOSITE ODLE CORNER, P.O. BOX N1309,

NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any who knows

any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be |

eg should send a written and signed statement of the
ts within twenty-eight days from the 19TH day of MARCH,

2007 to the Minister for Nationality

P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



ay FINCO

BS ce
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #5, Lexington
. Estates Subdivision situated in the Southern District on the Island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of 3 Bedrooms. 2 Bathrooms.
_ Property Size 7,410 sq ft
. Building Size: 1,350 sqft

3

Lek ‘
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and. marked “Tender 1911”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4: 00 p-m., Friday 30th March 2007.

NOTICE | oa ee
RBC FINCO IN VITES’ TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #80,
Kennedy Subdivision situated in the Southern District on the
island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
residence, consisting of 3 Bedrooms ! Bathroom.
®
Property Size: 3,600 Sq Ft
Building Size: 928 Sq Ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED. te

All offers should be forwarded in writting in a sealed
enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender
0726”. All offers must be received by the close of business
4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March, 2007.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #400,
Yellow Elder Gardens situated in the Western District on the
island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth. of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Multi
Family unit consisting of 1 - 3 Bedrooms i Bathroom, and 3
Bedrooms 1 Bathroom. -

Property Size: 3,200 Sq im

Building Size: 1,490 Sq Ft —

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writting in a sealed
enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender
1626”. All offers must be received by the close of business
4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March, 2007.



and Citizenship,



Legal Notice
NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF SERGIO DANGUILLECOURT
Late of Miami - Dade Country, Florida, USA

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the 5th
day of June 2007 after which date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of which
he shall then have notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
P.O. Box N-4805
St. Andrew’s Court, Frederick St. Steps
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor - Barry Brant

ITUATION VACANT

TRAINED AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN

experienced in American, Japanese
and Korean vehicles needed

Applicants must be familiar with automotive
computer analysis systems and preference will
be given to applicant with proven dealership
experience. References as proof of good work
relationships must be supplied.

Apply in person or in writing to:
Manager
QUALITY AUTO SALES
(FREEPORT) LTD.
Queens Highway
P.O. Box F-42405
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Small Nassau based financial services company requires
self motivated and dynamic individual to lead its initiative
to promote tax and risk management structures for
successful small to medium sized businesses engaged in
ecommerce and international commerce with the specific
objective of exploiting synergies with captive insurance.

The successful applicant will have skills and experience
in the following areas:

1) payment platforms for businesses engaged in
ecommerce and international trading

2) risk management for the ownership of intellectual
property and for internet based operations

3) tax planning for ecommerce business and international 1
trading companies

4) knowledge of taxation and organization of captive
insurance companies

A relevant tertiary degree and professional qualification
is required along with a minimum of 10 years experience
in this area.

Applications to the Chief Operating Officer, P.O. Box
SS-5382, Nassau, Bahamas.



AALS

Ma ae esse arias ates al Se lewits e ms ee y

ee 2.9.9.

ES ea an Oe

a 6 & tO e

22 2) ewer

=~ ee eee



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 13B



Scotia launches private client

ek

Peal

\
al
ff
&

FROM page 1B

were not offering the same ser-
vices to high-net worth Bahami-
ans and residents that they
offeradefo international wealth
management clients had been
raised many times.

As a result, Scotiabank felt it
could develop “a niche in that
market, and have the first foot
in as well. We have quite a few
wealthy domestic clients, and
there’s no reason why they
should not expect the same lev-
el of service”

The, Bahamas-based Scotia
Private Client Group will lever-
age their Canadian parent’s
wealth management expertise,
plus that of Scotiatrust

(Bahamas), which has been
operating in this country since
1956, to offer services in the
areas of investment manage-

ment and advice, trusts and
estate planning, private bank-
ing services, and insurance.

The aim, Ms Bingham said,
of the focus on these four “pil-
lars” was to provide clients with
a seamless, comprehensive one-
stop solution to their wealth
management needs, drawing up
plans in conjunction with their
wishes.

Private

Previously, Scotiabank’s pri-
vate banking centre had served
the private banking needs of
wealthy Bahamians and resi-
dents for the past three-and-a-
half years, but her group now
aimed to provide a full wealth
management menu.

She explained that the
Bahamas had been chosen for
the Private Client Group’s
regional launch because apart
from its proximity to the US
and stability, it has “a more



Sih

ge

Major firm in the financial and
* legal services industry

Invites applicants for its Abaco office for the function of:




comprehensive legislative plat-
form” when it comes to private
wealth management than oth-
er countries in the Caribbean
and Latin America as a result of
having specialised in such ser-
vices for decades.

Ms Bingham said Scotiabank
also hoped the unit’s launch in
the Bahamas could help the
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange (BISX), leading
to the development of new
investment products and an
expansion of the capital mar-
kets.

“We hope that in conjunction
with us, we will see an increase
in BISX activities to assist in
providing products for our
clients,” Ms Bingham said. “We
hope to see common ground for
growth for both of us in that
area.

“We can provide some invest-
ment opportunities there, and
hopefully the Government will
see this as an opportunity for
an expansion of BISX’s role,
and the type of investment
products and opportunities they
can offer.”

The Scotia Private Client
Group, which currently has an
eight-strong staff that the bank
soon hopes to expand to nine

members, including an invest-
ment broker, is also seeking to
leverage further exchange con-
trol liberalization as it is exe-
cuted by the Government and
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas.

Focusing

Ms Bingham said the private
client group was also focusing
on the domestic trust market,
having “seen an increase in
regards to inquiries” for that
product and other estate plan-
ning and asset protection tools.

She pointed out that Bahami-
ans were now far more educat-
ed and aware on global stock
market and investment oppor-
tunities, and wealth was also
changing hands through being
passed from one generation to
the next.

The Bahamas group is look-
ing to serve the affluent and
mass affluent, including all of
Bahamians, residents and inter-
national clients.

The Scotia Private Client
Group model will next be rolled
out to the Cayman Islands and
the Dominican Republic, then
Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad &
Tobago, the British Virgin

» Legal Secretary

e imum 4 years experience
* Kgpiwledge of and ability to prepare legal documentation
¢ Working knowledge of Microsoft Office

° Good organizational skills

e Ability to work independently

¢ Salary commensurate with experience
* Attractive benefits








Reply in confidence to: .
,, Fax (242) 394-8430) |
Or email: glosbastian@hotmail.com



NOTICE

The. partners of SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES,
Constance A. Delancy and Angenette C. Pyfrom,
announce that effective 1** March, 2007 their Chambers
will re-locate from 245 Baillou Hill Road to:-

Naomi House
‘ No.19, 9" Terrace and West Court
Rb off Collins Avenue, Centreville

“y
New Providence, The Bahamas.

ae Telephone: (242) 323 4824
* (242) 325 104718

Fax: (242) 323 4827

Website: www.sydbri-legal.org

DRIVERS

Are you retired or work night Shift only?
Do you want to make some extra Cash?
$200 - $300 per week

Come Deliver for Domino’s Pizza

If you are:-
18yrs. or older
Have a Drivers License & good Driving record
Have your own Vehicle
Great Customer Service Attitude

pero wants YOU!!
ak:
Benefits

*: Good Health Insurance Plan
@Pension

at

Come into Abaco Markets Limited
dams Lown Center Mall Office
Pill out an application Today.
Ph. 325-2122 Fax 356-7855





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DUNBERRO OPNUNIE MC
NORTHERN DUNCOMBE OF #43 BURIAL GROUND
CORNER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
19TH day of MARCH, 2007 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











: AUTO
SERVICE VACANCY

Freeport automobile dealership is looking for
an energetic person to fill the position of

SERVICE WRITER/
| ADVISOR |

in our Service Department. Prospective
applicants should possess similar work
experience with some training in customer
management relations. Intermediate
computer skills are a must.

Please apply in writing to:
Service Advisor

P.O. Box F-41060
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Bl!

Pricing Information As Of:

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor ~ Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets
45

Fund Name Vv
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
) _ Fidelity Prime Income Fund

52wk-Low

initiative first in Bahamas

To atlvertise in The Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call 822-1986 today!

MAINTENANCE/HANDYMAN
WANTED

A leading retail company has an immediate opening
for a Maintenance/Handyman -

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

1. Should have a basic working knowledge electrical,
plumbing and general carpentry repairs.

2. Must have a clean current Police Record

3. Must be a self-starter with drive and determination

4, Must be able to work with minimum supervision.

5. Previous experience not required but would be an
asset.

Persons meeting the above requirements should submit
their Resumes via fax to the address below.

The positions offer career opportunities with excellent

salary and benefits package.

THE OPERATIONS MANAGER
Fax: 328-5902



Assistant Manager
Position Available Immediately
At
Domino’s Pizza

Qualifications:
You should have a High School Diploma
Past managerial experience
Certificate in Management is a plus
Must be available for day and night shifts,
including weekends
You should demonstrate strong communication,
leadership, motivational and people management
skills
You should have a valid driver’s license
You must have a GREAT attitude towards
customer service!

Basic responsibility to include:
e Maintain product, service and image standard
¢ To assist in supervision of all phases of
production.
To maintain a high level of efficiency &
productivity in all areas of store operation

Please send résumé on or before
October 2, 2006
Attention: Human Resource Department
P.O. Box SS-6704
Nassau, Bahamas
Or Fax 356-7855



0.55
2 BISx Lieted MutuaAne in
YTD%

‘o

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 , MARI SRMS. YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price fram day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

*-9 March 2007

** - 8 February 2007
*** - 31 January 2007
*** . 28 February 2007

seers. 8 February 200







PAGE 14B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



GE asi ESE See aed ne
Investment Board pushes

for two Budget initiatives

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Domestic Investment
Board has requested that the
Government approve two ini-
tiatives in its budget for 2007-
2008 that would assist Bahami-
ans in creating their own busi-
nesses.

Paul Major, the Board’s con-
sultant, told a weekend busi-
ness seminar they would like to
see the Government make pro-
visions for training and the cre-
ation. of business plans for
future entrepreneurs.

“We realise that a lot of peo-
ple going into business have
not had any introduction into
business, so we're putting in
the Budget - if it can be
approved - what you might call
introductory and intermediate
training for business, and prac-
tical training,” he said.

“How to form and operate
your company, how to market
your company, how to do
proper accounting in your
company, very important

things. If you don’t understand
them, you are like a black man
stumbling in the dark.

“So we are going to insist
that we put these things in
place where you get free of
charge training to give you an
introductory or intermediary
orientation in business.” .

The second thing, Mr Major
said, was helping persons in
the creation of business plans.

“IT have seen business plans

that have cost as much as

$60,000-$70,0000. I have also
seen business plans that cost
as little as $500,” he said.
“Truth be told, a lot of peo-
ple with good ideas don’t have
$100 to invest in a business
plan, so you get a whole lot of
hand written notes that really
are not presentable to banks.
Even the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank has processes, pro-
cedures and analysis before
they can release either gov-

~ ernment, multi-lateral agency

or ‘public funds.

“We have recommended
that we.put aside at least $500
per project for persons to be

able to develop their business





@ PAUL MAJOR

plans. The IDB has also set
aside grant funding to help in
this area.”

Mr Major said that if these
items are passed, hopefully
Bahamians can begin to see
the funds become available to

them as soon as possible.

His comments came ata
small business seminar hosted
by Mark A Turnquest and
Associates, in collaboration
with the Small Business
Resource Centre.

Entrepreneurs told to specialise in sectors they know



@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

PERSONS interested in establishing their
own business need to enter a field they
have some knowledge, interest or ability
in, the chairman of the Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial Venture Fund, Jerome Gomez, said.
' Speaking to attendees at a small busi-
ness seminar hosted by Mark A Turnquest
and Associates, and the Small Business
Resource Centre, at the weekend, Mr
Gomez said a lot of persons chose fields

they have no experience or knowledge in,:

when there may be other areas they are
better suited for.
He explained that owning a business,

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though extremely rewarding, was a huge
risk and challenge, something that is not
suited for every single individual. ‘

“You have to look within yourself, to
determine if you are an entrepreneur or an
investor, because some people are not cut
out to become business owners,” Mr

Gomez said,

He also highlighted the advantages of
partnering in business ventures.

“Most people want to go it alone, but it
may be a good idea to enter into a venture
with a partner.” Already, he said $2.5 of
the first $3 million allocated to the fund
has been granted, and the fund is hopeful
that the budgeted annual $1 million will
continue with the new government in the







2007-2008 budget.

Mr Gomez said it was hoped that the
fund will eventually be entirely sustained by
the private sector, and reminded the public
that monies were not only available for
start-up companies, but for companies wish-
ing to expand as well.

He cautioned applicants to remember
that the process does take at least three
months, and warned them not to get dis-
couraged by that timeframe.

In addition, Mr Gomez pointed out the
Fund’s Board liked applicants who were
willing “to bring something to the table to
show you believe in the venture”. He said
that in addition to personal funds, this could
be another successful business.



Qualifications:



from its



website:

Food industries
account for just eight
per cent of Domestic
Investment proposals

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

MORE resources need to be
allocated to ensure that
Bahamians embrace entrepre-
neurial opportunities in agri-
culture, livestock and fisheries,
areas that remain virtually
untouched by persons request-
ing assistance from the Domes-
tic Investment Board (DIB), a
senior government official said.

According to Michael Halki-
tis, chairman of the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC), these indus-
tries combined to only account
for 8 per cent of the proposal
submitted to the DIB.

“Some of the proposals under
active consideration include
proposals for Andros, Crooked
Island, Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Inagua, Long Island,
Mayaguana and New Provi-
dence,” he said.

These proposals could be cat-
egortisied into several sections,
including Agro Business, live-

- stock, fisheries, food textiles,

minerals, hotels and restaurants,
real estate and the ‘other’ cate-

gory.

Mr Halkitis pointed out that
the ‘other’ category accounted
for 43 per cent of the proposals
being viewed by the Domestic
Investment Board, while the
hotel and restaurants category

accounted for 26 per cent

Mr Halkitis noted that this
indicated a concentration in the
services and tourism-directed
industries of the economy.

“It is with interest that we
note and report that applica-
tions for agro business, livestock
and fisheries sadly only account
for a combined 8 per cent of the
proposals being studied by the
Domestic Investment Board,”
Mr Halkitis said. He added that
this was an indication that more
resources, investment incentives
and capital were needed to

encourage Bahamians to pay-
ticipate in those areas.

Mr Halkitis said BAIC would
fully support this, particularly
as agriculture only accounted
for a 3 per cent share of the pro-
posals submitted to the Domes-
tic Investment Board.

The projects which were
approved in this area will be
highlighted throughout the
domestic investment month, he
added.

His comments came at the
opening of a small business
seminar hosted by Mark A
Turnquest and Associate Cont-
panies, in collaooration with the
Small Business Resource Cen-
tre, held at the weekend.

Mr Halkitis explained that
the DIB was created out of:a
need to help facilitate Bahami-
ans in starting and expanding
their businesses by providing a
one-stop shop and eliminating
as much red tape as possible. «

“The Bahamian entrepreneur
has to see and believe that they
can have an opportunity to ben-
efit from the massive amount
of investment pouring into the
country,” he added. “So that is
what the domestic board is
about.”

Mr Halkitis said there needed
to be a proactive approach in
identifying opportunities that
will become available two to
three years down the road, and
to begin to prepare Bahamians
now for those opportunities that
will be available when anchor
project are up andrunning. .

Mr Halkitis also used the
opportunity to launch the
Domestic Investment Board’s
new brochure, which ‘he
described as a roadmap for
investors.

In addition to valuable con-
tact information for government
support offices, the brochure
also includes a timeline for get-
ting a project up and running,
plus relevant legislation and
concessions for Bahamian
investors.

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regulate the telecommunications sector is seeking to strengthen
its capacity in regulatory economic analysis.
seeking a suitably qualified economist with drive and ambition
to fill the position of SENIOR ECONOMIST. The successful
candidate will provide specialist advice on the economic and
financial performance on regulated utilities. The candidate will
also work as an integral part of a multidisciplinary team of
professionals to ensure effective oversight of the numerous
licensees in The Bahamas. The candidate will perform market
research and other economic studies relevant to the current and
future development of the telecommunications, electricity, and
water and sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

The PUC is

-Bachelor’s Degree in Economics or
Economics and Accounting;

-Master’s Degree in Economics or Finance; and
-Minimum of five (5) years relevant experience

The PUC offers a very attractive benefits package and excellent
opportunities for further development including specialist
training via short courses and seminars in The Bahamas and
overseas. Starting salary will be commensurate with relevant
experience. Further information about the PUC can be obtained

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Applications should be received by March 30, 2007.

Interested applicants may deliver or fax resumes to:
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4h Terrace East, Collins Avenue

Fax No. (242) 323-7288

E-mail: PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs _





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' The Tribune



Grand Bahama
developer: No Crown
Land involved



Naa Tea (Cat ae SRN HLL B

Statement claims company
seeking to have concessions
‘vastly increased’

BAHA MAR is seeking to
have the “already generous con-
cessions granted” under the
2005 Heads of Agreement it
signed “vastly increased”, the
Government said in breaking
its silence on why it has failed to
conclude talks with the Cable
Beach developer on a supple-
mental Heads of Agreement for
its $2.4 billion project by the
March 1 deadline.

In addition, the Government
said other requests by Baha
Mar could also impact property
owners in the Cable Beach area
and the flow of vehicular traffic.

In a statement issued yester-
day, the Government said it
recognised the importance of
the project to the Bahamas, but
its duty to act in the best inter-
ests of Bahamians and to ensure
the rights of neighbouring land
owners and relevant environ-
mental issues were properly
addressed, could not be over-
looked.

“The Government has the
obligation to balance the bene-
fits of the project with the best
interests of the people of the
Bahamas. In addition, the Gov-
ernment must have due regard
to the level of concessions which
could be justified in relation to
other major developments,” the
statement said.

Baha Mar was not slow in
responding to the Governmen-
t’s statement, pointing out that
the project would contribute
$400 million or 6.5 per cent of
Bahamian gross domestic prod-
uct (GDP) during its first full
year in operation.

It added that the $2.4 billion
Cable Beach development
would generate over $15.5 bil-
lion in GDP over the first 20







PO ‘
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years, attracting 600,000 guests
in its first year and creating
6,000 direct jobs at the resort
in full operation, plus 2,000 indi-
rect and induced jobs.

In yesterday’s statement,
Baha Mar said Government
should not try to distract atten-
tion from the fact that its failure
to conclude the supplemental
Heads of Agreement had pre-
vented the developers from
sealing their deal with Harrah’s
by March 15, a deadline that
has now passed.

Last week, Baha Mar warned
that its $2.4 billion Cable Beach
redevelopment project had
been placed in jeopardy by the
failure to yet conclude a sup-
plemental Heads of Agreement
with the Government, some-
thing that could allow Harrah’s,
its joint venture partner, to
“walk away” from the deal.

Thursday was the deadline
for Baha Mar to complete its

joint venture agreement with

Harrah’s, the world-renowned
casino and entertainment oper-
ator, that would see it take a 43
per cent equity stake in the pro-
ject, but that deadline has been
missed as a result of not con-
cluding talks with Government.

Starwood, the other operating
partner that does not hold an
equity stake, has a “me too”
clause in its agreement with
Baha Mar allowing it to walk
away if Harrah’s chooses to
exercise that right.

Baha Mar said at the week-
end, in response to the Gov-
ernment, “that no matter what
the reasons the Government
might try to cite, the facts
remain that the March 15 dead-

SEE page 14

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PLP confirms slate of candidates

THE PLP has finally con-
firmed its slate of candidates
for the. 2007 general elec-
tions.

As reported earlier by The
Tribune, the only PLP
incumbent not to receive a
nomination was Sidney
Stubbs.

Observers say that he
spent most of the night out-
side the party’s headquarters
“in a funk”.

As predicted Mr Stubbs
will be replaced by lawyer
Hope Strachan.

In South Beach, where the
incumbent Agatha Marcell
had decided not to offer for
this general election, Wallace

Rolle will be the candidate.

Jackson Ritchie, the Long
Islander who it was
rumoured earlier would run
for a seat in his hometown,
will be offering in the newly-
formed Clifton area.

Fellow Long Islander
Ricardo Treco also will be
running in the newly resur-
rected constituency of St
Annes.

Although no official
announcement has been
made, a new seat will be cre-
ated when the Boundaries
Commission report is pre-
sented before the House of
Assembly today.

Five constituencies will be

eliminated — Holy Cross,
Delaporte, Adelaide, St Mar-
garet’s and Golden Gates.
Replacing them will be the
new seats of Sea Breeze, Kil-
larney, Clifton , St Anne’s,
and Golden Isles, informed
sources have said.

The Family Island con-
stituencies will effectively
remain unchanged.

Delaporte will be divided
into two constituencies — Kil-
larney and Clifton — in order
to “save” the seat of incum-
bent MP Neville Wisdom
and win the PLP an addi-
tional seat, it was claimed

SEE page 14

F NOT, START SAVING TODAY!





Weekend sees
two murders,
brutal death
of a baby

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH two murders and the
brutal death of a baby in the
past two days, the country once
again had a weekend of vio-
lence.

The Bahamas recorded its
17th and 18th murder this week-
end with the shooting deaths of
two young men and police are
investigating two further deaths
that may be classified as homi-
cides at a later date.

Following the suspicious
death of a young man in Fox
Hill on Thursday, police are
now investigating the circum-
stances surrounding the sudden
death of a one-year-old boy.

According to reports, the
child was admitted to hospital
on Friday shortly after 5pm.

The baby had “serious
injuries about the body” and
died at 7am on Saturday, press
liaison officer Inspector Walter
Evans told The Tribune yester-
day.

Police have taken the child’s
22-year-old mother and her 17-

SEE page 14

Sir Arthur Foulkes:
race ought not
to be an issue
in this election

THE issue of race is not a
legitimate issue and ought not
to be an issue in this election
nor has it been “for many elec-
tions gone”, Sir Arthur Foulkes
said yesterday when he
appeared on Gems 105.9’s talk
show, “Tell It Like It is”, hosted

-by Sean McWeeny.

A member of the “dissident
eight” who founded the FNM,
Sir Arthur said it is just an insult
to think that the FNM would
take this country back to the
days before Majority Rule.

Election time, he said, is the
wrong time to speak about the
race issue, Sir Arthur said.

“After the election we should
sit down and have sensible dis-
passionate discussions about our
past, our racist legacy so we can
move forward. We can’t con-
tinue like this. | don’t want my
children to live in a Bahamas
where you look at one Bahami-
an as different from another,”

SEE page 14





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fe vo ae
PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



IR i

ele

pene

ooh
LOCAL NEWS err
one
PLP Fox Hill official accuses Dr Higgs of tr yin to rewrite history
35 g sate
ACCUSING Dr Jacinta Hig- The constituency coordinator, He said that the Fox Hill Com- = 2002. At the community meet-, and a permanent office for the That event raised some $8,000 *"*”
gs, the FNM candidate for Fox said that anew plan for the cen- | munity centre was the dream of __ ings, a comprehensive report was _ Fox Hill Festival Committee and _at the time and other contribu- ity
Hill, of trying to rewrite history, tre had to be drawn up because all previous PLP representatives given as to what the legal posi- a Computer Room and Reading __ tions from friends of the Fox Hill ‘~~
PLP Fox Hill Constituency the committee was advised that for the Fox Hill Constituency, tion was and the community was | Room upstairs. Member of Parliament. 03:
Coordinator Philip Mortimer the foundation on the property — starting with Carlton Francis, asked what was its wish. It was The facility will allow for Nat- ‘“Woslee Dominion, headed by ~~ ~
said that for Dr Higgs to suggest —_ was not useable. Lionel Davis, Frank Edgecombe decided that there should be a __ural Ventilation and will be fully Ashley Glinton, is the contractor . ,
that the foundation for the com- Trees, he said, were growing and then George Mackey. community cenrw. air conditioned and also feature and he has done a yeoman's |" __
munity centre under construc- through the foundation and it According to Mr Mortimer, _day care facilities for children _ work in bringing the structure to. (7
tion in that area was dug up — could not be salvaged. Mr Mackey had a community Facility and senior citizens. The facility where itis. Mr Mitchell, northe «© *3"!
“willy-nilly” by current MP Fred “Mr Mitchell has sought to development association that will also have a generator and Committee, has a relationship *” +?
Mitchell, is simply false. complete Mr Mackey’s and oth- came closest to realizing the ” fe serve as hurricane shelter. with any other contractor. All 3-04
Mr Mortimer made the state- er Fox Hill representatives’ dream of this centre when under The need for the new facility The estimated cost of the the work has been done through “+'ts
ment in a letter issued to The vision of a Community Centre __ his leadership land was acquired Was also influenced by the fact building is .two million dollars | Woslee Dominion and his asso- .vi70
Tribune over the weekend. in Fox Hill,’ Mr Mortimer said. | by the Ministry of Housing for that the Sandilands Primary and the value of the construc- _ ciates. roils
the public purpose of providing School does not have a facility tion so far approaches one mil- “When the work iscompleted 4‘
housing for the people of Fox 1! which to hold its assemblies. —_ jign dollars. the Honorary Treasurer will ,“.9
Hill. It was then assigned by the The architect was asked to The building, Mr Mortimer have a full report from the pub- |»
Ministry of Housing for the com- design a structure that could hold said, is almost finished and the __ lic as to the fundraising. Various |, ,
munity centre. the entire Sandilands School and: cornerstone will be laid during churches in Fox Hill have elote
Mr Mackey’s committee was _ he has done that with a 800- eat April by Prime Minister Christie. pledged donations. Of note isa _|,,,,,
well on the way with the project @uditorium,” Mr Mortimer said. He said that the donations to contribution of $1,500 from the , :,,,,
and a foundation was built, the There are also in addition to this matter were started by adin- __ staff and students of Sandilands ° aT
plumbing roughing was installed. bathroom facilitics, banquet per sponsored by friends of Mr _— Primary School in Fox Hill,” Mr hap
The PLP lost office in 1992 and facilities, a kitchen for catering fitchell on his 50th birthday. Mortimer said. sro
the project stopped there. No ap
further work was able to be come i tititintitsncstsnssransstanetentumantmeneenmnenmanenennanennanenianeaianaiemasenainannieuninnenianeaninieii olz
tinued due, it is believed, to a wet
VE North Tel: 356-2217 ing 4
EEE a etiam Worker’ s Party leader denies :.
=~ fadloshack., 393-3882 1997. The foundation was uit
Marathon Mail Tel: 394-3803 untouched from the time the ade
Hewonemencrr ASS€LTtONS ON a PLP website «:
Mr Mitchell’s election in 2002. ods
Mr Mitchell campaigned dur- : vA
ing the 2002 campaign that he 4M By TAMARA FERGUSON Mr Moncur said government
would seek to complete Mr has failed to curb the murder is |r
Mackey’s dream of a community WORKER’s Party leader Rod- ‘ rate. He also criticised govern- —_ .,..,
centre for Fox Hill. ney Moncur has denied assertions ment's Urban Renewal pro- .,,.4
Mr Mortimer said that it was on a PLP website that his public gramme. +



discovered during the first year
of Mr Mitchell’s tenure that the
land was not owned by the

According to Mr Moncur,
many criminal activities occurless —
than a quarter of a mile from ,- «

demonstrations are being fund-
ed by Hubert Ingraham and the
FNM.

Development Association According to an article pub- Urban Renewal centres. "The dai
formed by Mr Mackey but wasin Jished on Bahamas Uncen- country is in crisis," he said. aiaat.
“oe owned Hed the rokyaekeds of sored.com on February 28, under He also criticised immigration —.,.3
ieee the public purpose the heading, “Who is paying Rod- policies, stating that these poli- ij.y
“The new minister then Shane ney?” Mr Moncur was accused of cies are a failure. : wh
Gibson determined that he want- _TUNNINE political interference by In January oF tite yet ANE om

ed to revert to the earlier pur- C@USing mischief during election Worker's Party protested for the -;s
season. five “baggage handlers” who -j4.

pose and build government
affordable housing on the land.
Mr Mitchell asked Minister
Shane Gibson not to proceed
until he had checked with the
community on the matter,” the
Constituency Co-ordinator said.

Several community meetings
were held on the matter at the St
Mark’s Baptist Church through

were arrested and charged with .,-;
drug trafficking to be returned to
the Bahamas. wy
Mr Moncur alleged that gov- .-
ernment had conspired with US)... 4
authorities to entrap the men. “ad
During this demonstration, the party also « «.,;
called for Foreign Affairs Minister Fred |.
Mitchell to be stripped of his political portfolio. .+,~
In another protest, the party called for the (5,
excommunication of Prime Minister Perry ,°
Christie and Foreign Affairs Minister Fred -.:,. .
Mitchell from the Anglican church. 4 ayy

The website also claimed that
he is representing the FNM and
that demonstrations are being
funded by the FNM.

Bahamasuncensored said Mr
Moncur needs to come clean and tell the pub-
lic who he is really representing in these
demonstrations.

Mr Moncur hit back at the allegations yes-
terday, insisting that the Worker's party has
always been independent.

“Over the years, the party has either run as a
candidate, or supported the PLP or the FNM,”



a WORKER'S Pad
leader Rodney Moncur



Mr Moncur said. Just two days following photographs pub- }+ 4,:
Asked if he were being funded by the FNM, _ lished by The Tribune showing Immigration ; 4/»;
Mr Moncur said the worker's party receives Minister Shane Gibson and late celebrity Anna ~ »,,«

Nicole Smith in close embrace, the Worker’s
Party staged another protest to call for the res-
ignation of Mr Gibson as Minister of Labour .,,3..,,
and Immigration. 5 urBe

its funding from supporters as well as from
members who are required to pay dues.

He said there are many other issues Bahama-
suncensored should focus on — such as crime.

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of Caribbean Banking, as chairman of the RBC FINCO board of directors. Mr.
McDonald takes over from Mr. Gordon J. Feeney, who has retired as chairman after
serving on the Board for the past 16 years.

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“lam very pleased to announce that Ross has replaced me in this key role for RBC
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role as the leading provider of home financing for Bahamians,” said Mr. Feeney.
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the board as we chart RBC FINCO’s success moving forward,” said Mr. McDonald.

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strategy, as it strengthens its presence and performance in The Bahamas. He is a
30-year veteran with RBC Royal Bank of Canada and is head of RBC’s domestic
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Prior to accepting the position of chairman, McDonald senile on RBC FINCO’s Board
of Directors since 2001. He is currently a director of RBC Royal Bank of Canada
(Bahamas) Limited and RBC Royal Bank of Canada (Cayman) Limited, which
deliver trust and private banking services to offshore clients through Global
Private Banking.

About RBC FINCO

RBC FNC, established in 1953, is a leading provider of single- and multi-family
ges to Bahamians and attractive interest rates for its depositors. It has
anciee and 4 automated banking machines located in New Providence and
BC FINCO is owned 25 percent by the general Bahamian public,
pproximately 4,000 shareholders, and 75 percent by its majority —
hareholder Royal Bank of Canada.

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= TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 3



insurance
companies
give verdict on
car ownership

WHILE police and the Attor-
ney General’s office are inves-
tigating the “true ownership”
of vehicles stolen as part of a
lucrative car theft ring, insur-
ance companies say that the
original owners have unequivo-
cal rights to the cars.

In a letter to the editor, the
Bahamas General Insurance
Association (BGIA) stated that
a thief does not have title to
stolen property and cannot give
ownership to the person to
whom he sells the property.
Therefore, the BGIA said, all
original owners of the cars in
question have the right to the
stolen vehicles and should have
their property returned to them.

Two months after police
broke a large car theft ring in
Andros, victims who were
robbed of their vehicles are still
waiting to regain ownership of
their cars.

According to initial reports,
the Attorney General’s office
is currently investigating who
can claim ownership of a vehicle
once it has been stolen, sold and
resold several times over to oth-
er unsuspecting parties.

Cassandra Davenport, of the
Bahamian Forum expressed her
disbelief that her daughter
Janine was told by officials from
Road Traffic that the vehicle,
which was stolen from her now
belonged to the new buyers of
the stolen property.

Road Traffic officers report-
edly told Ms Davenport’s
daughter that she needs to get
reimbursed for her stolen car
by her insurance company.

However, co-ordinator of the
Bahamas General Insurance

Company Robin Hardy is refut-’

ing this, stating that “no matter
how many hands the stolen
property passes through, title
remains with the original owner.
“In the cases in question,
even if the purchasers bought
the vehicles genuinely beliey-
ing that the seller had a clear
title to the vehicles, in law they
have no title and the vehicles
should be returned to the orig-
inal owners from whom the
vehicles were stolen,” Mr Hardy
said in his letter to the editor.
The BGIA also pointed out
that if the original owner was
compensated for their loss by
an insurance company, then the

rights to the vehicle pass to the .

insurance company that can
then dispose of the vehicle or
return it to the original owner.

Man faces
firearm and
ammunition
charges —

FREEPORT - A Freeport
man was charged with numer-
ous serious offences in Freeport
Magistrate’s Court on Friday.

George Alexander, 25, of
No. 40 Clarke Avenue, was
arraigned on firearm and
ammunition charges in Court
Two before Magistrate Subu
LaSalle.

He was also charged with
resisting arrest and assaulting
police officers with a deadly
weapon.

It is alleged that on March 15
the accused, who was suspected
of possessing a firearm, was
involved in a violent struggle
with police officers as they
attempted to disarm him. Dur-
ing the struggle, the weapon dis-
charged, but no one was
injured.

Alexander was represented
by Brian Hanna. He pleaded
not guilty to the charges and
was granted $5,000 bail with one
surety. The case was adjourned
to October 23.

Share
your
news

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neighbourhoods. Call us
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years have been
‘disappointing’

THE past five years of the
Christie administration have
been disappointing Sir
Arthur Foulkes said yester-
day when he appeared on
Gems 105.9’s talk show,
“Tell It Like It Is”, hosted
by Sean McWeeny.

One of the major issues in
this election, he said, is going
to be Prime Minister
Christie.

“AMl of us I think in the
country generally felt that
Perry Christie is a decent
human being, very likable,
not a victimizer, not a person
who would indulge in the
politics of personal destruc-
tion and all the rest of it.

“But | think after a while
that wears off in the face of
so many other things. I
believe the Bahamian public
now regard Mr Christie as
indecisive; that’s the word we
hear mostly in criticism of Mr
Christie,” Sir Arthur said.

The political pioneer said
he believes Mr Christie’s
intentions are good and he
has a capacity to articulate
the vision, but history will
show that his indecision was
his Achilles heel.

“You could be a good guy
and you could tolerate fool-
ishness up to a point, beyond
that point, even if you don’t
indulge in it as a leader, the
foolishness becomes yours
and I think that has been Mr
Christie’s big problem,” Sir
Arthur. said.

However, he admitted
that Mr Christie’s greatest
strength is his personality
and the perception that he
is a decent person.

But, if the FNM were to

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ARTHUR Foulkes

be elected the government in
the next election, Sir Arthur

_said that they would have to lis-

ten more, not to be in as much
of a hurry as before and be
careful about process.

“I hear people say we have
good public relations, but I told
Mr Ingraham that when I was
away I was amazed at some of
the things you did that I wasn’t
aware of. Be careful about cul-



ture, cultural changes, cultural
legislation. The referendum was
about culture. Make no mistake
about that. You have to be very
careful with that.

“We ran into that in the ear-
ly days of the PLP when some
of us progressives got up there
talking about women ... we were
blown out of the water. The
women were saying ‘so why she
going up there with the men?’ It
is a cultural thing and it is unfor-
tunate and we have to take our
people step by step,” he said.

‘Sir Arthur said that he did
not think the FNM or any other
government would make that
mistake.

“The referendum, although
process was made the rallying
cry, it really wasn’t about
process issues, it was about the
issue itself about whether
women should be 100 per cent
equal to men in all respects that
was the issue and a lot of
women did not buy it,” he said.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE,



~ AROS LE Sa T_T.

oa Sa AR ER ER OTM AEE A PREC BN

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., RGSG

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUC. i CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

*

Riblishew Eder 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
wiichboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

Advertising Manager -

242) 502-2352

Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

An elec

{HS MORNING Prime Minister Christie
to the House to present the Boundaries
ynmission report.

ihe only certainty — until the report is

ially laid on the table of the House — is
that Montagu MP Brent Symonette,
Whose opinion was treated with complete con-
iempt by the commission, did not sign the
report. '

What we have been told so far is that
instead of 40 constituencies, there are now
41, despite the fact that up to March 12 when
the old register closed, there were fewer vot-
ers on the new register than on the old. We
have also been told that five constituencies
have been eliminated and four new ones cre-
ated,

‘This is what was in the report submitted to
the governor-general, who, on signing it,
returned it to Mr Christie for his further con-
sideration and presentation to the House. It

; sllin Mr Christie’s power to change the
report if he did not agree with any of the
boundary changes. That is why we say that

» one will know for certain what those
boundaries are until Mr Christie has spoken in

House today.

However, what everyone — who is aware
of what goes into making an election func-

Vie —- already knows is that within
time constraints from here until the elec-

is calied there is going to be complete
ision

ir Christie has already announced that

lection will be called on or before May 2.
ve don’t know if he has consulted a calendar

sly, but we do know that the calendar is

| going to accommodate him, and time is
quickly running out. Mr Christie has until May
i 2 when, according to the Constitution, if he
es nothing, parliament will dissolve itself.
Vith the time now left to him and the enor-
vious amount of work yet to be done before
the election, it would indeed be a miracle if
Bahamians go to be polls on or before May 2.

\pparently, when the PLP commission
members presented the report — representing
it as their completed plan — to FNM Deputy
Leader Brent Symonette for his considera-
ion, be, after consultation with his leader,
igzrecd 16'of the proposed boundary changes
w. Providence’s 24 constituencies. There



to N

were no changes in the Family Islands. The

PLP took the FNM recommendations away
ior further consideration.

What they eventually came back with was

so radically different from what they had pro-

osed and to what had been agreed with the




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tion of chaos expected

Opposition that Mr Symonette refused to sign
their new report.

When the FNM became the government
in 1992, there were 49 seats in the House. The
new government did not think that the voter
register justified that number of seats, nor
could the country afford 49 MPs, and so in
1997 the constituencies were shaved to 40.
Today with even fewer registered voters, Mr
Christie’s government, instead of reducing the
constituencies even further, has increased
House seats by one — from 40 to 41.

It is unlikely that the House will be pro-
rogued this week. The report will be present-
ed on Monday and debate will start on
Wednesday. The last time that there was a
boundaries debate, members spent five days
debating. With the electoral register down, it
is obvious that Mr Christie is trying to keep the
House in session as long as possible because as
soon as it is prorogued, the register closes —
and, unless there is a tremendous last minute
rush, Mr Christie will not get the numbers he
had hoped for. However, it is highly unlikely
that the House can continue to sit past next
week.

By Mr Christie’s failure to close the old
register sooner, he has thrust an almost impos-
sible job on the parliamentary registrar’s staff.

Within the next eight weeks, that staff will
have to write out by hand new voters cards
with their counterfoils for the dramatic
changes in the newly created constituencies, in
addition to the boundary changes in the
remaining constituencies. It has been esti-
mated that by the time that the two cards and
counterfoils for each voter have been written
out, the department will have had to make
360,000 changes by hand before the cards can
be put in the computer and distributed to vot-
ers. The parliamentary registrar has two weeks
in which to certify the register; the ballots
then have to be printed and the voters register
has to be published. The election will then
have to be called within four weeks with the
police having to vote a week before the public
goes to the polls.

As Mr Christie has planned this election,
there will be voters still running around on
election day when the polls are closing trying
to find their polling division.

One has to wonder whether this chaos has
been created by design, or by sheer incom-
petence.

Whatever it is, this election promises to go
down in history as an election of colossal mis-
management — almost fit for the Guinness
Book of Records.






Report o



tourism

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THERE is an old saying
that “it isn’t bragging if it is
true!” One of the things that
all Bahamians like to brag
about is that “it is better in
the Bahamas!” However, the
billion dollar question is
whether this assertion is
indeed factual? Or it is just
something Bahamians say to
identify as a Bahamian? A
recent statement in The Tri-
bune dated February 27, 2007
entitled “Nassau, Freeport
face low recommendations”
provides some interesting
answers for the nation’s num-
ber one industry, that of

‘tourism, based on an exit sur-

vey conducted by visitors to
the Bahamas. Some of these
responses gave failing grades
to some of the destinations
in the Bahamas, indicating
that the “Better in the
Bahamas” slogan may be just
a myth.

The destinations were eval-
uated using various criteria
such as activities available,
value for money, taxi/tour
operators, cleanliness, service,
attitude of the people, etc.
Grand Bahama was at the
bottom with an unacceptable
score of 46.4 per cent of per-
sons saying that they would
recommend Grand Bahama
to others. Nassau was slightly
ahead with a score of 56.1
with the main complaint
being a pricey destination.
When one considers the
trémendous amount of mon-
ey the government of the
Bahamas spends on adver-
tisements and other pro-
grammes promoting Grand
Bahama, the Bahamian tax-
payer is not getting a good
bang for their buck.

There seems to have been a
failure for Grand Bahama
despite all of its resources to
find a niche in the tourism
market. Its proximity to the
United States, just 51 miles
from West Palm Beach, has
not been a trump card. Its
only attraction appears to be
the cheapness of the tourism
product on Grand Bahama.
The hotel rooms are offered
at bargain basement prices
and many of the tourists com-
ing to Grand Bahama are
referred to as the “Burger
King” or “Kentucky Fried
Chicken” tourist, a reflection
of the fact that they are ona
tight budget.

Over the past two decades,
the quality and the number
of hotel rooms on Grand
Bahama had been on the
decline. Efforts by both the

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letters@tribuneme:



Ministry of Tourism and the
Grand Bahama Promotion
Board have not produced an
anticipated improvement in
tourism for Grand Bahama.
With no significant increase
in the number of hotel rooms
during that time, the tourism
industry on Grand Bahama
can only be described as
“stagnant.” Along with a
decline in the number of
hotel rooms is a limit in the
number of airlift seats coming
to Grand Bahama. This is a
chicken and egg syndrome as
the airlines say that they need
more hotel rooms to expand
and the hotels are saying that
they need more airline seats
to expand. Tourism projects,
such as the one by Ginn at
West, are really long term
and the public should not
expect any short term relief.

To make matters worse, the
Royal Oasis, one of the
largest hotels in Freeport, has
been closed since hurricane
Frances in 2004. There is
widespread speculation that
the re-opening of this resort
will usher in a new era for
Grand Bahama tourism. The
sad reality, however, is that
there is no quick fix for the
Grand Bahama tourism
industry. The sale of the Roy-
al Oasis is not the quick fix
that everyone is hoping for.
In the dilapidated state that it
is in and being over forty
years old, a reasonable sug-
gestion would be to implode
it and start fresh as they do so
often in Las Vegas (by coin-
cidence the implosion of the
Stardust Hotel in Las Vegas
is now on the CNN Headline
News). Even the Internation-
al Bazaar should have an
appointment with the bull-
dozer. What will improve the
Grand Bahama tourism prod-
uct is the elimination of the
stink attitudes and poor ser-
vice that we accept as the

standard for Grand Bahama. °

I have often jokingly com-
pared the Grand Bahama
tourism industry to the
“Pirates of the Caribbean” in
the scene where Johnny
Depp is being chased by the
natives with spears and sticks
off the island. Ironically, this
very scene I believe was
filmed on Grand Bahama. On
Grand Bahama, judging by
the poor performance in the
exit survey, this is exactly how
tourists are treated.

On the other hand, Har-
bour Island or ’Briland con-
tinues to be the shiny dia-

_mond in the crown of the

Bahamian tourism industry.
Not only has ’Briland out per-

formed all of the islands of

the Bahamas, but it has the
unique distinction of being
the best tourist destination in
the entire Caribbean region.
This region includes 26 coun-
tries with 44 different desti-
nations. In the exit survey,

’Briland received the fantastic.
score of 82.6 per cent and is
the Bahamian destination’
most likely to be recom-
mended by visitors. Even
more impressive is the fact
that in most categories of.
repeat visitors, ’Briland.
maintains a 90 per cent plus
chance of returning, not just.
once, but many times over.

Unlike the “chicken in the-
bag” tourist who comes to
Grand Bahama, ’Briland
attracts the world’s best. It is:
a common occurrence te
meet a family who spends.
$10,000 or more per week’
during their ’Briland visit."
Many come on their privat&
jets or mega yachts and so
can travel to almost any oth-,
er destination in the world.
Instead, they choose to come
to "Briland.

What is it that attracts cc
rich and famous to this,
Bahamian paradise? Yes,.
*Briland is blessed with nat-:
ural resources, such as the
Pink Sands Beach. However,'
within minutes of arriving at:
*Briland, one would quickly.
discover what makes ’Briland
so special. The greatest:
resource and treasure of ’Bri-
land is the people. The friend¢,
liness and hospitality of thesé:
people are known the world‘
over. Like Colonel Saunders
of KFC, whose claim to fame.
was that they do chicken.
right, ’Brilanders treat the
tourist right. From the ferry-
men to the taxi drivers, and;
from the waiters to the enters!
tainers, it is a natural effort té.
make any stranger feel wel-‘
come as they enjoy the “’Bri-,
land Sweet, Eh” experience.’
A warm smile and a sense of,
appreciation of them coming:
to ’Briland goes a long way:

The goodwill of such an,
elite tourism product was‘
developed over the years by,
our forefathers who had the»
vision and dedication to nur-?
ture what we enjoy today...
Until 1995, ’Briland didn’t;
even have a Ministry of;
Tourism office and so it is the;
people who deserve the cred;
it for this success story. 3}

One regret I have in all this’
was conveyed to tourism!
Minister Obie Wilchcombe in,
2005 when ’Briland was?
awarded the best destination
in the region title. It is dis-‘
turbing that this award was a‘
*Briland award and not bf
Bahamian award. Does it,
mean that the qualities inher-*
ent to ’Briland life are absent!
in other Bahamian islands?
If this is the case then hopeg®
fully the other islands would
learn from ’Briland.

The Ministry of Tourism
has now implemented a poli-
cy of marketing each Bahami=.
an Island destination sepa;»
rately. Those that fail to reach”
the mark will simply be left.
behind! 2

<

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE, DDS
*Briland,

March 14, 2007.

In Loving Memory
of the late

Sunrise: October 16th, 1939 * Sunset: March 9th, 2001

Dear Mom,

Much time has passed since you bid this world
farewell. Mom, not a day goes by that I don't think.
about you. I miss you dearly. You worked hard and
made sacrifices for your family; yet you're the Kind
of person who would say it wasn’t work or
sacrifice...but love. No matter where I go in life, or
how grown-up I get - I will never outgrow your
love ex times we shared. Because you stay so close
to me, in mind and heart. The Lord saw your
suffering and took you home to rest. Sleep sweetly

dear mom until we meet again.

Love Always, Kyla Ralston


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 5



MEG hh aa eames
© In brief] PM Christie allowing supporters to

launch personal attacks, says FNM

Woman is
seriously
injured in
accident

A YOUNG woman is in
hospital in serious condition
after suffering multiple
injuries in a traffic accident
in West End on Saturday.

- According to reports, Pip-
pa Smith, 25, of Deadman’s
Reef, was driving her 2006
Toyota Corolla around
7.30pm on Saturday when it
skidded off the road and
crashed into two utility poles
on Queen’s Highway.

Supt Basil Rahming
reported that both poles
were snapped in half by the
vehicle on impact. He said it
is believed that Ms Smith
was speeding when she lost
-control of the vehicle just
before reaching the Ginn sur
Mer administration com-
pound.

_ He said passing motorists
stopped at the scene and
helped Ms Smith from the
wreckage. She was rushed
by ambulance to the Rand
Memorial Hospital, where
she is detained with a bro-
ken arm, fractured pelvis,
ruptured bladder and other
bodily injuries.

“ Police are urging motorists
to slow down and to resist
the temptation to speed in
isolated areas.

+ Investigations are contin-
uing into the incident.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

MRR E
PHONE: 322-2157



WEEE aUas

MONDAY,
. MARCH 19TH

‘6:30amBahamas @ Sunrise - Live
11:00 Immediate Response









12:05 Immediate Response
‘4:00 Legends: Jay Mitchell


















2:00 Caribbean Passport
‘2:30 Turning Point
3:00 Ami Rushes
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis
‘4:00 Lisa Knight
14:30 Cybernet
§:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 Andiamo
5:30 The Envy Life
6:00 Gospel Grooves
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13 - Freeport
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
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10:00 Caribbean Newsline
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11:00 Bahamas Tonight
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NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the

right to make last minute
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42:00 ZNS News Update (Live)

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie has given his supporters
free reign to launch mean-spir-
ited and personal attacks on
anyone who would disagree
with the PLP, the FNM claimed
yesterday.

In its weekly commentary,
the FNM yesterday sought to
debunk claims Prime Minister
Perry Christie made in an April
4, 2002, speech at Clifford Park.

Among the quotes by Mr
Christie that the FNM sought
to draw attention to was the fol-
lowing: “You see, 1 want to help
build a great country. And this I
know: we can never achieve
greatness unless we first learn to
get along with each other. We
must celebrate our diversity,
whether it be ethnic, religious,
political or social.

“We must celebrate that
diversity, not condemn it; we

must nurture it, not suffocate
it. We must never persecute
someone just because he thinks
differently or votes differently
than we do.”

In light of that statement by
Mr Christie, the FNM said it is
strange that the prime minister
has allowed the PLP chairman
Raynard Rigby to claim on the
party’s website that the PLP has
“systematically and routinely
attacked those who are opposed
to our philosophy.”

The FNM asked yesterday:
“Which is it Mr Christie? Does
the PLP celebrate diversity or
does it systematically and rou-
tinely attack those who disagree
with its philosophy?”

“Bahamians now realise that
Mr Christie hides behind and
gives free rein to scores of
mean-spirited and personal
attacks on many who are bold



@ PERRY Christie: under fire
for comments at rally

‘enough to disagree with the

PLP,” the FNM said.
After his “malicious attacks
at the last PLP rally”, the oppo-



Rigby hits out at ‘senseless criticism’

PLP chairman Raynard Rigby
yesterday in a press release hit
out at the FNM’s “senseless crit-
icism” of the benefits that have
ensued to the Bahamian econo-
my under the PLP’s anchor pro-
ject economic strategy.

He said that the opposition has
shown that they do not under-
stand the opportunities that have
been created for the Bahamian
people by the expanding of the
national economy to centres oth-
er than Nassau, Freeport and
Marsh Harbour.

“It is a fact that there has
been no significant sale of land
from Bahamians to non-
Bahamians under this PLP gov-
ernment as compared to any
other period in our national
development. In fact it is the
public record that it was the
decision of the FNM to repeal
the Immovable Properties Act
and replace it with the Interna-
tional Persons Landholding Act

ROWerer sob tts wee
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runt er

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(IPLA) which allowed the
floodgates to open wide,” the
PLP chairman said.

Under the International Per-
sons Landholding Act (IPLA),
non-Bahamians are able to pur-
chase up to five acres of land
for residential purposes, with-
out seeking the prior approval
of Government.

Mr Rigby argues that as a
result of the passage of the
IPLA, many non-Bahamians
were able to speculate in
Bahamian real estate, which
was contrary to the national
investment policy under the
previous PLP administration.

He pointed out that the FNM
reduced the stamp tax on the
purchase of land by non-
Bahamians. Under the previous

PLP administration a foreign- |

er who acquired property in the

Bahamas paid double the stamp °

duty that a Bahamian would
have paid.

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“It is also obvious that the
FNM does not remember that it
was their policy that led to the
increase of the eligibility
requirement for economic per-
manent residence from $250,000

. to $500,000. They increased the

stamp duty on real estate trans-
actions with a value of $250,000
or more to 10 per cent.

“They wanted to maximize
Government revenue due to the
Canadian demand for perma-
nent residence in offshore juris-
dictions for tax purposes... it
significantly crippled the
Bahamian middle-class as prices
of affordable middle-class
homes increased overnight due
to the foreign demand for
inventory priced in the $500,000
range” Mr Rigby said.

Bahamian households, he
said, have enjoyed a 14 per
cent increase in personal
income during this same period
or 3.5 per cent per annum. The
incremental increase in per-
sonal income is outpacing the
rate of inflation which is con-
tained at 1.74 per cent per

annum.



>

Ae

Rosetta St. ~

sition party said, Mr Christie
can “no longer pretend to be
Mr Nice.”

The FNM also said that the
prime minister should “stop
pretending about another pas-
sionately delivered statement
he made at Clifford Park almost
five years ago”.

At that time Mr Christie said
that the PLP members must
conduct themselves in govern-
ment according to an “uncom-
promising code of complete
integrity and transparency.”

“If we set the right example
at the top, it will filter all the
way down to the bottom, both
in the public sector and in the
wider society,” Mr Christie said.

However, the FNM claimed
yesterday that the “new” PLP
seemed to have started where
the last PLP left off “in terms of
corruption”.

“Even after the most obvi-
ously unethical and irresponsi-
ble behaviour by Ministers and
backbenchers, Mr Christie only
acts after intense public pres-
sure and disastrous political
consequences, and then quite
inadequately. He has failed
utterly to fulfil his promise of
accountability and transparency
in his government,” the FNM
said.

The FNM stated that Mr
Christie is good at promising
investigations into the multiple
scandals drowning the PLP, but
that the people of the Bahamas
never seem to be able to get
the results of those investiga-
tions.

“Remember the Korean
boat scandal early in his admin-
istration? We have yet to hear
about the results of that inves-
tigation,” the FNM said.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

aa aaa eee
Medical tourism: a chance to address many ills

@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat).

ANY of the state
owned and operated
hospitals in’ the

Caribbean are in poor condi-
tion. Notwithstanding compe-
tent doctors and nurses, the

physical condition of many of

the hospitals is bad and their
equipment and technology are
inadequate.

Against this background, it
may seem odd that I am sug-
gesting in this commentary that
Caribbean governments, finan-
cial institutions and tourist
resorts should invest in health
tourism.

Nonetheless, I do suggest it

Bank
Financing
Available

as a chance not only to add a
lucrative string to the bow of
Caribbean tourism, but also as
an opportunity to provide local
people with better hospitals and
improved health care for a wide
range of illnesses.

\ huge market is rapidly
developing in the United States,
Canada and Europe of people
who are going abroad to seek
urgent medical attention, cos-
metic surgery and rehabilitation
in salubrious climes.

And, there is a massive drive
by several developing countries
to corner a significant portion of
this growing industry.

During this month alone
there are two events at which
alliances will be built to take
advantage of the opportunities
that health tourism is opening.

The Department of Tourism

in Kerala, a state in the South of
India, in partnership with the
Confederation of Indian Indus-
try (CII) is organising a show
and an international conference
on health tourism which will be
attended by prominent medical
tourism hospitals, medical insur-
ance companies and the travel
trade.

The state minister for tourism
Kodiveri Balakrishnan said:
"As a state, Kerala is leading
in the area of medical tourism.
We are planning to announce
a Medical Tourism Policy dur-
ing the inaugural session” of the
show.

Then, the Cyprus Tourism
Organisation is sponsoring a
World Health Tourism Con-
gress, targeting Corporate Buy-
ers in the HealthCare Tourism
Industry, Medical and Wellbe-

Insurance
Available

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Has a vacancy for a Laboratory Technician.

Responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

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The successful applicant will be a highly motivated
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essential.

Must be willing to work day, night and weekend shifts

when necessary

Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Please submit written resume to on or before March
30th, 2007, to:

The Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-1123

Nassau, Bahamas



ing tourism, Ministries of
Health, Corporations and Trav-
el Agencies.

here is yood reason for
this keen interest in

medical tourism.

Some countries, such as the
United Kingdom and Canada,
which operate public health-
care systems, are so overbur-
dened that it can take a year or
more to get needed medical
treatment including surgery for
hip replacements. In some cas-
es, even surgery for heart con-
ditions can take months to
schedule. Consequently, people



A huge market is
rapidly developing
in the United
States, Canada and
Europe of people
who are going
abroad to seek
urgent medical
attention, cosmetic
surgery and
rehabilitation in
salubrious climes.

are opting to go abroad to
places like India and Singapore
to be treated immediately in pri-
vate hospitals.

The cost of treatment in pri-
vate hospitals in North America
and Europe is much higher than
it is in developing countries that
have dedicated resources to
medical tourism.

A study conducted by the
Confederation of Indian Indus-
try and McKinsey consultants
estimated "medical tourism"
could be worth over US$2 bil-
lion by 2012. The study
revealed that last year over
150,000 foreigners visited India
alone for treatment, with the
number rising by 15 per cent a
year.

A similar number of Ameri-
cans, dissatisfied with the esca-
lating costs of health care,
sought surgery abroad in 2006

ANDRE},
SscHoor °

The International School of The Bahamas ,
TOUNDED 1948,



and the number is growing.
This is a reality recognised by

US health insurance companies

who see a benefit to their prof-

its by offering their subscribers ©

treatment at, for instance, Bum-
rungrad hospital in Thailand, if
their policies do not cover the
costs of US hospitals for proce-
dures they need.

Increasingly, more private
insurance providers will be
doing the same.

The middle-east is also a
growing market for medical
tourism.

Many wealthy Arabs, who
used to travel to Britain and the
United States for medical treat-
ment, have discovered that they
can receive as good medical
attention in better climates and
at better prices in India, Singa-
pore, the Philippines and
Malaysia —— all of whom are
hustling to develop the market
still further.

And, the private hospitals in
these developing countries have
extremely healthy bank
accounts. For instance, Mr.
Chai Sophonpanich, the Chair-



The middle-east
is also a growing
market for
medical tourism.



man of the Thai hospital, Bum-
rungrad, which is a publicly
traded company, reported at the
end of 2005 that the hospital
served more than a million
patients from over 190 coun-
tries paying an impressive divi-
dend to its shareholders.

B oth at home and in the
Diaspora, the

Caribbean has highly trained
and skilled doctors ranging from

THE TRIBUNE:

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1
{
|
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'
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|
|
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|
|
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AT.

@ SIR Ronald Sanders

general practitioners to sur-
geons and specialists. Caribbean
nurses are also poached every
day for work in the UK, the US
and Canada.

Undoubtedly, they can pro-
vide as good a service and per-
haps better to the growing mar-
ket for medical tourism. It’
would keep their talent at
home, and bring home many of .
them. And, while they serve a
lucrative foreign market at
home, they could also give their
skills to the local population
whose costs could be subsidised
by the foreign clientele.

But, such a development will
require precisely what the state
of Kerala is about to announce:
a medical tourism policy by gov-
ernments that includes incen-
tives for private companies to
invest in modern, well-
equipped, well-paying hospitals
and a strong marketing effort
to promote the Caribbean as a
health tourism destination.

It will also need visionary
companies and financial backers
who recognise the opportunity
that medical tourism presents
and seize the moment to invest
in it. r j

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com



(].8) world school

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The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) is an exciting and
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The following will be reviewed by the school when considering students applying to

the programme:

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¢ School reports and recommendations

Information pamphlets on the IBDP and the various courses offered at St. Andrew’s
School are available from the Admissions Office.

For further information, please contact:

Sharon Wilson
Admissions Officer
St Andrew’s School
Phone: 242.324.2621

e-mail: swilson@st-andrews.com

Additionally, general information may be obtained on the International
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,

\

THE TRIBUNE



‘AM
Cable Beach

* PLP has
a ‘Prayer
‘and Praise’
event at
Radisson

B WALLACE Rolle,
candidate for South
Beach, Gary Sawyer,
South Abaco, Hope
Strachan, Sea Breeze, and
Jackson Ritchie, Clifton

(Photos: Franklyn G
Ferguson)





ERICAN artist Vickie Winans singing at the PLP’s ‘Prayer and Praise’ at the Radisson



Former MP: think
hard about who

POLITICAL parties must be
extremely careful about whom
they propose to represent their
interests in the House of
Assembly, former PLP MP and

‘current chairman of the Hotel

Corporation George Smith said.
Speaking at a meeting of the
Rotary Club of West Nassau,
Mr Smith said that the same
yardstick must also be applied
to those appointed to the
Bahamas Senate.
; “In the Bahamas today,
although both major political
organisations have more or less
completed their proposed slate
of candidates for nominations
in the upcoming general elec-
tions, it is important that every-
one understands that such a
nomination process is not a fait
accompli until nomination day,”
he said.
' Mr Smith pointed out that
there is always time to amend,
to re-think, to decide anew,
repent and ask the forgiveness
of some constituencies if the
parties feel they are offering
constituents an unfair deal.
* “TI say to the leaders of both
major political organisations
that what your party has done
thus far, and will continue to do
and to promote, will not be
Written in stone until that fateful
nomination day, when will
come the people’s time to
decide,” Mr Smith said.,
' It has been rumoured among
political pundits that Mr Smith
may offer as an independent for
the Exuma constituency.

The former MP said that the
people deserve and have every
right to expect decent and com-
petent choices in every con-
stituency. ‘

“People must be convinced
that their candidate’s voice
would be heard in parliament,
he could have a seat at the table
and that he knows how to deal
with those who control things.
In this way people would renew
their faith in the principle of
government for the people,” Mr
Smith said.

' Bahamians, he said, want to
believe that their representa-
tive would be there for them
when “the lightning strikes.”

* It has always been a point of
comfort for him, Mr Smith said,
to believe that a good repre-
sentative does not have to pos-
sess the “wisdom of Solomon”,
but that “some measure of the
humility and understanding of
Solomon would help.”

“I went on the daunting front
line of politics in the Bahamas
when I was first elected to par-
liament for the Rolleville con-
stituency of Exuma at the ten-
der age of 25, serving for almost
three decades.

': “Some are saying that I am
not yet off that formidable front



GEORGE Smith

line, and indeed people keep
asking me that question. The

answer I give most of the time is.

one which wise old Bahamians
have been giving for many
years: ‘You talk some and you

keep some’,” the hotel corpo-
ration chairman said.



In these times of great social
challenges, when this whole
nation is struggling to get and
keep impressionable young peo-
ple on the right track, politi-
cians, Mr Smith said, need to
be careful.





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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



The problems of generation land

| HERE has been much
talk over the years of a

comprehensive Land Use Poli-
cy. In recent years the issue has
been given increased rhetorical
urgency by politicians, although
it remains to be seen whether
anything substantive will come
of it anytime soon.

For the moment at least, all
eyes are on those aspects of
land policy that affect non-local
acquisition of Bahamian real
estate and its presumed effect
on local purchasing power. In
some areas of The Bahamas,
such concerns are justified, since



WrictkT JER >

In Association with.

hohe athe Soe



a lack of planning and sudden
development has literally left
many locals feeling left out in
the cold as a result of a precipi-
tous climb in land prices.

But what risks being over-
looked yet again is the retarding
effect that certain “traditional”
Bahamian forms of land own-
ership are having on the devel-
opment of the local side of the
economy in the Family Islands,
even while the foreign domi-
nated real estate and investment
industry booms.

Exuma is a case in point. As
an island that is booming from
end to end, Great Exuma offers

Present

PERSPECTIVES



ANDREW ALLEN

locals with private landholdings
many opportunities to share in
the wealth that is being pro-
duced in the island’s economy.

Juxtapose a photo of George
Town ten years ago with one
taken today and the contrast is
pretty stark. Locals have clear-
ly made quite a lot of money
on sales of land in the last
decade. But they have also used



RoyalStar
eeeeeray nce

the opportunity afforded by ris-
ing real estate values to invest in
new shopping centres and com-
mercial buildings everywhere.

B ut, as in other islands,
Exuma suffers from a
dual system of land ownership,
in which the hearts of tradi-
tional settlements are either col-
lectively owned “generation
land”, or less commonly, com-
monage, as in parts of North
Eleuthera adjacent to Harbour
Island.

Parts of such settlements as
Rolletown, Steventon and
Moss Town, and virtually all
of Barraterre are presently
dominated by generation land,
under which any verifiable
descendant of the township is
entitled to build and occupy a
part of the property.

The problem with generation
land is that its occupiers never
become private owners of their
parcels and are thus incapable
of producing the kind of title
required for bank financing.
They are also not able to sell
the land, rendering it essential-
ly alienated from the rest of the

island’s booming economy.

A friend who is a winter res-
ident in Exuma recently
remarked how guests of his
often question the abundance
of half built structures sitting
on land that is clearly valuable.
Of course, what they do not
know is that, no matter how
pretty it is, “generation” land
simply cannot attract the financ-
ing normally required for build-
ings for improvements. Locals
simply build as they get the

as islands like Exuma urbanise,
the centres of these settlements
will form ghettos of under
investment. The only Exumians
excluded from bankable titles
to real estate (a crucial key to
upward mobility in The
Bahamas) will be those unfor-
tunate enough to inherit only
rights to generation land.
Presumably, the way around
all this would be for an enlight-
ened government (ah for one
of those!) to at least study the



What risks being overlooked yet
again is the retarding effect that
certain “traditional” Bahamian
forms of land ownership are
having on the development of the
local side of the economy in the

Family Islands.



money, creating uncoordinated
and somewhat sloppy looking
settlements.

W orse still, since gen-
eration land tends

to comprise the central areas of
traditionally settled townships,
there is a real probability that,

prospect of a comprehensive
reacquisition of generation land
by the crown with a view to reg-
ularising titles. In the meantime,
there would appear no more
just and reasonable use for pre-
sent crown land holdings than
to offer grants of crown land by
way of exchange for rights to
generation land.

PROPERTIES FOR SALE

LISTED PROPERTIES - RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

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LOT NO. 11 Block 22 Unit 2 LOT NO. 10 Block 32 Section 2 ‘
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family (0.35 acres) PROPERTY SIZE: Multi/Single Family a
LOCATION: South Side of Orlando Drive & Arden (0.33 acres) ;
Forest Road LOCATION: Eastern Side of Forest Lane ;
APPRAISED VALUE: $30,000 (Less Than 150 Yards West of Santa Maria Avenue) es ‘
APPRAISED VALUE: $30,000 v9)
SEA HORSE VILLAGE SUBDIVISION on
LOT NO. 31 Block 11 oats
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi/Single Family .
(0.27 acres) ’
LOCATION: Eastern Side of Bonito Street ¢
APPRAISED VALUE: $30,000 ote
Be In New York City on Playtex! “ri
Name: Telephone: INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE Peel
Address: CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET, wa) oye
Entries without receipts cannot be counted. OR CALL 242-502-6221 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO ‘s:
: : REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS. ont
NYC isthe BigA__ ibs a




THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 9



Ce SG aaa
Performers let their



| POET Shamija Moncur Pehiis one of her pieces Sduring the latest session of ‘Express Vourscle:
The event, held at Da Island Club in the Nassau Beach Hotel, is an open forum for poets,
musicians and performers to share their work. The next session will be held on Wednesday, March

21, at 8pm.



‘i PUBLISHED poet Sean Munnings reading his poetry



& POET Indy Seymour recites one of her pieces












B CULTURAL
veteran and
poet Odediah
Smith sharing
one of his
poems during
the latest last
week’s session
of “Express
Yourself.”



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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



a aaa a nea el ee
International Women’s Day collection

is given to Shepherd’s Nook home

SOCIAL Services Minister
Melanie Griffin presented a
cheque to ‘A Shepherd’s
Nook’, a home for girls.

The cheque, given to the
home’s president and admin-
istrator, Rev Betty Cleare,

..came from an offering collect-

g

ERHSHE?

’
‘
t
|
'
|
a
‘
ry

~4
{

ed at the International Wom-
en’s Day church service held at
Bethel Baptist Church.

During the presentation at
her Ministry on March 14, Mrs
Griffin thanked Rev Cleare
for the work the home is doing
in the community.



dosed for inventory

Saturday, March 24, 2007











“Ml Date:

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RUNCORN IC Lea

“Il commend you, your
house mother and the other
Board of Directors at A Shep-
herd’s Nook for the work you
do,” she said. “It is a work that
can only be done from the
heart.”

Rev Cleare thanked the
donors for “the generous gift.
It is going to go a long way in
helping with our groceries, and
helping with the programme
we have at the Shepherd’s
Nook,” she said.

‘When I came into Shep-
herd’s Nook I was totally
green to the whole concept of
social work, but I also knew
that I had a heart for excel-
lence and enhancing people’s
lives.

“T had to find someone who
would assist me in that work
and | found a friend in the per-
son of Minister Alisha Adder-
ley.”

Mrs Griffin also thanked
Bethel’s pastor, Rev Dr Tim-
othy Stewart, for allowing the
service to be held at his
church.

Rev Stewart said his church
can be called on at all times
to assist the Ministry of Social
Services and Community
Development.

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he EE Te a eee ae eee

avn







@ MINISTER of Social Services and Community Development Melanie Griffin presented a
cheque, made up of contributions collected during the International Women’s Day church service,
to “A Shepherd’s Nook.” Pictured from left are business manager and president of the Women’s
Department of Bethel Baptist Church, Rev Patricia Bethel; first assistant secretary and officer

in charge of Bureau of Women’s Affairs, Phedra Rahming; pastor of Bethel Baptist, Rev Timothy
Stewart; president and administrator at A Shepherd’s Nook, Rev Betty Cleare; Melanie Griffin;
senior assistant secretary at the ministry, Florinda Johnson and A Shepherd’s Nook house no

Rev Florence Elisha Adderley.

(BIS photo: Tim Aylen).

Teenager accused of smuggling drugs

FREEPORT — A 19-year-
old American visitor was arrest-
ed on Saturday accused of
attempting to smuggle $30,000
worth of illegal drugs at
Lucayan Harbour.

According to Supt Basil Rah-
ming, press liaison officer, a
female resident of Bradenton,
Florida, was at the Discovery
Cruise passenger terminal around
4pm when she was found in pos-
session of one kilo of cocaine.

_Mr Rahming said the woman
was walking through the secu-
rity X-ray screening equipment
when an alarm was activated.
A female security officer took
the woman to a private room,

wthad

where a search was conducted.

During the search, the offi-
cer discovered one taped plastic
package, containing one kilo of
cocaine, tied to the woman’s
back with a black pantyhose.



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in
their neighbourhoods.
Call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The teen was arrested and tak-
en into custody by Drug
Enforcement Unit officers.

The woman is expected to be
charged on Monday in ba Mag-
istrate’s Court.







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TS TART ca
“ THE TRIBUNE
®

BRED Pare



s

ve we

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



Cee 8 mk eT

FREEPORT — The Grand
Bahama business community
» commended US Ambassador
* John Rood on his accomplish-
s ments during his tenure in the
~, Bahamas.
. The Grand Bahama Cham-
*ber of Commerce hosted a
farewell luncheon on Friday for
Mr Rood at the Ruby Swiss
Restaurant, where business per-
sons, politicians and civic lead-
ers bid him farewell after sery-
ing three years as the ambas-
sador to the Bahamas.

Albert Gray, president of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
MP Kenneth Russell, and Rotary

~Club president Derek Handticld,
and other community teaders
- wished the ambassador well in



his future endeavours

“You are the epitome of a
true ambassador ... that came
along at the right time,” said
Freeport News Editor Oswald
Brown, who was also called on
to give brief farewell remarks.

Mr Rood said that the com-
mercial relationship between
the countries are very strong,
adding that the US does about
$2 billion of merchandise trade
with the Bahamas each year
He also noted that 85 per cent
of all Bahamian trade is with
the US.

But, more importantly, Mr
Rood noted that both countries
have co-operated closely in
areas such as drug trafficking,
migrant smuggling, and security.

Mr Rood said when he was
offered the job to serve he could
not turn it down because “1

it was




















an opportunity fo serve his
coupiy and a chance fo really
make a difference.”

Since his appointment, Mr
Rood has been at the forefront
in hurricane relict and restora-
tion efforts in the Bahamas, and
promoting literacy, and educa-
tional projects in the Bahamas.

Mr Rood and his family have
contributed personal funds to
help build a new home for
Bahamian israel Bonefish Fol-
ley’ Rolle, whose home was
destroyed by Hurricane Frances.
The US has also contributed
millions to the rebuilding of
some 19 homes at West End.

“T look back on my tenure as
Ambassador and think of the
millions of dollars in training
and equipment provided to sup-
port the outsianding collabora-
tion we enjoy through OPBAT

with Bahamian law enforcement
and the Defence Force,” he said.
Mr Rood was also instru-
mental in ensuring the continu-
ation of the US Customs Pre-
clearance facility in Grand
Bahama, despite the low
tourism arrivals to the island.
He said the US has also deep-
ened its commitment to Grand
Bahama through its decision to
establish both megaports screen-
ing, and the container security
initiative at the Freeport port.
“Through these initiatives
and others, I hope that I have
left the US-Bahamas relation-
ship even closer than it was
when I came. And I also hope
that I have strengthened the
special ties between Grand
Bahama, whose past and future
is so closely linked with the
United States,” he said.



Ambassador visits Hugh Campbell Primary

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT ~ US Ambas

.sador John Rood is getting clos-
ser to achieving his goal of visit-
sing 50 schools throughout the
, Bahamas. On Friday he visited
*the Hugh Campbell Primary
‘School in Freeport.

Mr Rood received an impres
sive welcome from the students,
who paid special tribute through
SC

‘
4
\
4
songs, poems, and a lively rake
é’n scrape performance for the
‘Ambassador, and his small
entourage at the US Embassy.
: “JT will be leaving soon ... but
tbefore T leave I plan to visit 50

‘schools.” he said. “tT have been

'
#
t



to every major island, but I still

have a few more schools to go.”

Ambassador Rood told stu-
dents that as the ambassador to
the Bahamas his duty is to assist
the Bahamas in times of need,
to establish bilateral relation-
ships, and to promote public
diplomacy.

“It has really been a wonder-
ful time for mein the Bahamas
to meet so many people and to
visit the schools here and to see
talents in your schools,” he said.

Ambassador Rood, who read
a book to the students, said that
public diplomacy and reaching
out to people about things, such
as literacy. are very important

“L have chosen reading

because Laura Bush, the wife
of President (George) Bush,
was a teacher and a librarian,
who promotes literacy.”

Mr Rood makes it a point to
read to students during his
school visits. The Embassy has
also donated books to the vari-
ous school libraries.

Mr Rood stated that the
Bahamian people are resilient,
optimistic, and a very giving
people.

“When I first presented my
credentials, Hurricane Frances
hit and we took a bus tour of
Freeport, and it was unbeliey-
able, and I will always
remember how optimistic the
people of the Bahamas are.” he

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recalled.

Ambassador Rood said the
United States assisted in build-
ing 19 homes in West End for
those very needy persons in that
settlement.

He said the gesture was
returned when the Bahamas
raised more than $1 million for
the people in New Orleans who
were affected by Hurricane
Katrina. “Bahamians prayed
and held a tele-a-thon for
pledges and musicians per-
formed, and students raised
money.” he said.

Mr Rood, who is from Jack-
sonville, has served three years
as ambassador to the Bahamas.

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MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 11





Rood pays visit to Ginn

US Ambassador John Rood made a brief stopover at the
West End property of Ginn sur Mer.

Ambassador Rood and his team — Dan O’Connor, the US
Embassy’s political officer, and Anne Marie Bain, commercial _
specialist — were given a brief tour of the property.
Refreshments were served at Ginn’s sales trailer where the
ambassador took in the master plan.

Ambassador Rood and his friend, Israel “Bonefish” Foley
were reunited once more before his departure from the
Bahamas. Mr Rood also said good-bye to his reading
programme counterpart, Cardinal Woods, principal at West
End Primary School. Mr Woods served as principal of
Woodcock Primary School in Nassau, where the ambassador
launched his reading programme.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

Contract signed to repair causeway

oy SPENT CEA Sa.

GOVERNMENT has signed
a contract of nearly $500,000 to
repair a dilapidated causeway
on Great Harbour Cay, the




















































Berry Islands.

Works Minister Bradley
Roberts signed the contract on
Thursday with Mr Terry
Winder of Winder Construction
— a local construction compa-

ny.

The project will include the
erection of 165 yards of guard
rails along the causeway; the
placement of 1,500 tonnes of
aggregate and boulders as a

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support base; the construction
of 200 yards of swales, parallel
to the causeway; the installa-
tion of 25 catch basins in the
swales; and, the placement of
60 cubic yards of top soil and
grass to protect the embank-
ment.

Mr Roberts told The Tribune
that the awarding of govern-
ment contracts to Bahamian
contractors is a firm policy and
philosophy of the government.

“It’s only when we are,
through circumstances beyond
our control, based on the impo-
sition of donor or lender organ-
isations, that you must go to
international tender. We believe
that our people (contractors)
have been able to demonstrate
that they are just as good as the
international contractors,” he
said.

The infrastructure upgrade to
the causeway in.Great Harbour
Cay, is another example of gov-
ernment’s desire to improve the
lives of Bahamians, according
to Vincent Peet, MP for North

THE TRIBUNE





@ THE government of the Bahamas signed a contract with

Winder Construction on Thursday to repair the causeway in
Great Harbour Cay, The Berry Islands. From left are David
Dean, chief councillor for the Berry Islands; Vincent Peet,
Minister of Labour and Financial Services and Member of
Parliament for North Andros; Malester Winder and Terry
Winder of Winder Construction. and Bradley Roberts, Minister

of Works and Immigration.

Andros and the Berry Islands.

“Today is such a special, spe-
cial day to have both areas of
my constituency benefit from
the vision and commitment of
this government to uplift the

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Class “A” Preference Shares
Dividend Payment

The Board of Directors of Colina
Holdings Bahamas Limited (CHBL) ts
pleased to announce that a Preference
Share Dividend for the period January
1, 2007 to March 31, 2007 at the
annual rate of B$ Prime +2.25% will
be paid to the Class “A” Preference

= Shareholders of record of CHBL on

& the 31° day of March 2007.

Payment will be made through the
Company’s Registrar and Transfer
Agent, CFAL Ltd. within 10 business
days of the record date.

Colina.

Holdings Bahamas

(BIS photo: Raymond Bethel)

lives of our people, to improve
the infrastructure and to pro-
vide safety in the case of a hur-
ricane or some disaster. So that,
should we be faced with those
challenges in the future, we will
be prepared both here in the
Berry Islands and Andros,” he
said.

Government also signed a
contract of nearly $2 million
earlier in the day in Lowe
Sound, Andros, which is a part
of Mr Peet’s constituency.

More announcements for
infrastructure upgrades are
expected as the election nears.
Some commentators suggest
that these announcements func-
tion as attempts by govern-
ments to sway voters. However,
others suggest that governments
rush these projects through,
near election time to satisfy the
vast number of promises made
at the beginning of their man-.
date.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share

i your story.











a

a



see ew
THE TRIBUNE






COUNTRY music fans
across the Bahamas are in for
an amazing treat, as Cable
Beach Resorts and Crystal
Palace Casino host one of the
brightest stars in the industry,
LeAnn Rimes, in a two show
performance, March 24 and 25.

Following a line-up of inter-
nationally acclaimed artists,
from the soul sister herself, Pat-
ti LaBelle, to the ever-youthful
Beach Boys, LeAnn is the latest
in a string of top artists to hit
the shores of Nassau as part of
the Cable Beach Resorts enter-
tainment revue.

With two performances
scheduled, Saturday, March 24
at 9pm in the Rainforest The-
atre and Sunday, March 25, at
3pm on the Crystal Beach,
Bahamians are already buzzing
about the upcoming concert,
said Sharon Saunders-Smith,
events and entertainment man-
ager, Crystal Palace Casino. She
added also that tickets for Sat-
urday’s performance are almost
sold out, as are the VIP tickets
for Sunday’s show on the Crys-
tal Beach.

Adding a bit of a twist to the
upcoming show, organisers have
planned something extra spe-
cial for the audience — an
opening act. Mrs Saunders-
Smith declined, however, to
identify the group, saying only
that it was an international
group and that they were very
good.

“It’s the first time we have an
opening act and it’s going to be
a surprise who they are. This is
a first for us — we’re trying a
new concept,” she said.

According to Ms Saunders-
Smith, Cable Beach Resorts will
again be offering an exclusive
drawing for Bahamians who
purchase tickets to the events.
Some 12 prizes will be present-
ed — from VIP tickets to the
concert, a weekend stay in one
of the resort’s suits, round-trip
limo rides to the concert to din-
ner at the Black Angus restau-
rant. The drawing will be held
Thursday, March 22.

In other entertainment news,
Cable Beach Resorts premiered
its nightclub, the Rum Jungle,
during a soft opening last Thurs-
day. The Hot Spot will be open
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
evenings after the Jambalaya
show at 11pm in the Rainfor-
est Theatre. The nightclub fea-
tures the “Dice Girls” — go-go
dancers who perform through-
out the evening on the shadow
box and a local DJ talent.

“Even though we do have
this nightclub in the Rainforest
Theatre — Jambalaya is still
doing well. Bahamians might
not know that we’ve added to
Jambalaya a local fire act fea-
turing ‘Pepper’, a Bahamian fire
dancer. We also have a new
lead singer for the show and
have added more _ local
dancers,” she said.

Following the LeAnn Rimes
Concert, Cable Beach Resorts

Bahamas



HM LEANNA Rimes

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LeAnn Rimes {Ops |
ew schedule at
Crystal Palace



ff MARIE Taylor

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 13

BENITH Fatal



@ BRENDALEE Silver

Our Lucaya selects year end winners

AFTER months of waiting
and hundreds of nominations,
the management of the Westin
and Sheraton Grand Bahama
Island Our Lucaya Resort
revealed the names of their
2006 associates, supervisor and
manager of the year winners
at a special lunch at the resort.

Victorious were: Brendalee
Silver, front of house associate
of the year and Marie Taylor,
heart of house associate of the
year, Benitha Fatal, supervisor

of the year and Jeremiah Saun-
ders, manager of the year.

Brendalee Silver, a front
desk agent at the Sheraton
Grand Bahama, has dedicated
more than 20 years to the hos-
pitality industry.

Marie Taylor, a seamstress
in the resort’s auto valet
department, has been with the
resort since December 1999
and was its September 2006
associate of the month heart
of the house award .

ONE COMPANY ONE GOAL

Accounts payable supervisor
-Benitha Fatal was awarded the
supervisor of the month award
for the period ending March
2006 and won the overall title
of supervisor of the year.

Employed with the resort
since July 1999, Jeremiah Saun-
ders, assistant chief of engi-
neering, was selected manag-
er of the quarter for the period
ending September 2006 before
winning the overall manager
of the year award.

ONE CHOICE

Colinalmperial bisurauce invites interested persons to. submit applications for the
position of Systens Developer it the information Technology depar bent.

Systems Developer

Position Summary
The successful candidate will: develop tools and applications to ensure the
overall efficiency of the business processes; maintain and enhance the core
line of business applications as necessary; and work with Senior

Developers to implement new technologies.

Job Requirements

Must have a Bachelor's

degree in IS or equivalent technical certifications

Minium 3 years programming experience with ASIN0 CL, REG IV / ILE

or ASS 400 Cobol

Minimum 2 vears programming exporivnce in sOl

Knowledge of industry standards re: Svsterm Change

Contre! procedures

Practical experience in insurams or banking fields preferred
Excellent attention te detail

Excellent analytical and problem solving skills
Strong verbal and written communication skills
Strong leadership and organizational skills

_ Knowledge of the following would be an asset:

NBase

CICS tor AS400
lava / Perl /XML
Tomeat

Crystal Reports

Microsoft Development (NET)

Responsibilities Include
Development of new applications to improve ihe business process
Supporting maintenance & enhancement of sisting applications

Implementation of changes using established testing procedures and change control

Bus & Truck

Troubleshooting of problems related to RPG and Cobol AS-100 progranis

Creation of technical specications and design documents

Work with team of developers and analysts to complete corporate objectives

Compensation will be commensurate with experience and qualifications.
Please submit your resume to our Corporate Headquar ters, 308 East Bay Strees,

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

Statement claims company seeking to
have concessions ‘vastly increased’

FROM page one

line has unfortunately passed
and, after March 15, Baha
Mar’s partners’ ‘walk away’
rights are in effect, and could
be exercised at any time if the
partners so chocse

“As thc Government should
know, the failure to finalise
uegotiations by March 15 has
increased the risk in the pro-
ject’s future, a project which,
if fulfilled, holds enormous eco-
nomic benefits for the

Bahamas. Baha Mar reiterates,
as it repeatedly did to the Gov-
ernment in the days leading up


































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We're expanding to our new premises,
on Chesapeake Rd. & we're seeking a:

Sales & Marketing
Meals

PRIMARY DUTIES:

*Spearhead the growth of current brands
& introduce new products to business.
houses & the general public in Nassau
& the Family islands.

eSupervise & train a small team of
salespersons/merchandisers on the trade.

*Monitor & track monthly sales by category;
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Competitive Salary w/ Sales Incehtive plus
Health Insurance & Vehicle Allowance!

to the March 15 deadline, that
it stands ready to meet with the
Government to achieve suc-
cessful negotiations so that the
project may go forward.”

However, the Government
said that after months of good
faith negotiations with a view
to facilitating the development,
on March 7 it communicated
its position on the investment
incentives, approvals and other
requests sought by Baha Mar,
together with government’s
response relating to Baha
Mar’s Conditions Precedent
obligations.

“Baha Mar has rejected sig-

%

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& guidelines

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1ea7a351

PRIMARY DUTIES:

Maintain in good order all inventory in medium
sized warehouse w/ frozen & dry goods.

*Dispatch & receive fleet of 4 to 5 trucks
before & after their daily routes.

*Receive all Incoming inventory.
«Supervise & verify orders being picked up,

* Assist w/ tracking & ordering inventory
items via computer.

SUCCESSFUL APPLICANT MUST:

*Have at least 2 years experience in
warehouse environment.

*Be able & willing to follow strict inventory
guidelines; as set out by management.

«Be self motivated & able to work independently.
Possess good leadership & organizational skills.
*Be capable of driving & operating fork lift.
*Have basic computer skills.
Competitive Salary w/ Annual Bonus
plus Health Insurance!

Suitable persons should send their
resume w/ references & a photo to

FUN FOODS WHOLESALE
Royal Bank Building, Mackey St.

or e-mail to Iburrows@lickety.com















































nificant parts of the Govern-
ment’s position and is now ask-
ing that Government reconsid-
er its position as communicated
to Baha Mar. In light of the
same, the Government’s rep-
resentatives indicated to Baha
Mar some three weeks ago the
necessity of securing an exten-
sion from its partners beyond
the March 15 deadline in order
to complete the transaction.
Such extensions are not unusu-
al in major agreements of this
nature,” the Government
release said.

Baha Mar previously said
Harrah’s now had the right to
withdraw from the $2.4 billion
project, something The Tribune
was told would send the devel-
opment “back to the drawing
board”.

The Cable Beach developer
said that while Harrah’s had so
far given no indication it would
use its right to “walk away”,

‘the failure to meet the dead-

line had exposed the project to

“increased risk”.

Baha Mar Development
Company entered into a Heads
of Agreement with the gov-
ernment on April 6, 2005 for a
$1 billion resort development.
on Cable Beach.

Baha Mar has subsequently
announced that the project was
being expanded to a $2 billion
development.

©

eS)
() can










~~

Nassau Street.

time.

P.O.BOX N -984

NMC ISTHE EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTOR
| OF GENUINE ACDELCO PRECISION
PARTS & SUPPLIES.

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Parts Department, Shirley Street - 356-7932

email: partsorder@nassaumotor.com » www.nassaumotor.com

MVE Reenter lle

Friends may pay their last respects at St. Martin
Monastery Chapel, # 96 Nassau Street on
Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. and at St.
Anslem 's Catholic Church, Bernard Road from
5:30 p.m. until service time.

In Lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to St.
Martin Monastery Development Fund c/o

Meanwhile, however, the
Government and its team of
technical experts are vigorous-
ly pursuing negotiations with
Baha Mar, together with
national and international
expert advisers.

Particular attention has been
given to the fulfilment of Baha
Mar’s conditions precedents
obligations under the existing
Heads of Agreement relating
to equity requirements, financ-
ing and the procurement of
world-class casino and hotel
joint venture partners.

Recently, the definitive
agreement relating to these
obligations was received by the
Government.

This document, the Govern-
ment said, required very close
scrutiny and analysis.

Both parties have continued
to dialogue with a view to
resolving all outstanding issues.
The Government said it
remained fully committed to
ensuring that the best possible
arrangements were made in
order to facilitate the Joint
Venture between Harrah’s,
Baha Mar and Starwood as its
other operating partner.

“The Government remains
optimistic that outstanding
issues could be resolved with

continued good faith negotia- i

tions within a timely manner,”
the release said.








Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

Sister Maria





of St. Martin
Monastery, #96
Nassau Street will be
held on Thursday
March 22nd, 2007 at
11:00 a.m. at St.
Jo h Catholic
, , Boyd Road.



. She is survived by her religious community of |

seventy years, The Benedictine Sisters "of Saint
Martin Monastery, The Benedictine Oblates; two
sisters, Mrs. Margaret Demetrius and Mrs. Alice
Wondside; cousin, Miss Miriam Roker; nieces,
Effie-Jane Sherman Wallis, Jaunianne Dorsette,
Christina Nwosa, Doris Rahming, Regina Talley,
Louise Russell, Druscilla, Annie and Christina
Moss, Lucy and Anne Woodside, Barbara
Rahming, Mrs. Alfred Huie and Mrs. Carolyn
Kinglock; nephews,
Benjamin Rahming, Anthony, Samuel, Donald
and Alexander Woodside, Hosea and Calvin
Moss, John, Ricardo, Frederick, Barry and Larry
Rahming and a host of other relatives and friends.

Ferdinand Sherman,



A Vigil will be held at St. Anslem 's Church,
Bernard Road, Fox Hill on Wednesday March
21st, 2007 at 7:30 p.m.








And again on Thursday at St. Joseph Catholic
Church, Boyd Roadfrom 10:00 a.m. until service






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Rahming, 87°

~ His Grace Archbishop...
Patrick C. Pinder assisted by the Clergy of the
Archdiocese of Nassau will officiate. Interment
will be made in St. Martin dePorres Cemetery,





THE TRIBUNE

Sir Arthur Foulkes:
race ought not to be an

issue in this election »

FROM page one

he said.

Despite the pronouncements
of some, Sir Arthur said he did
believe the race card is being
played in this election.

“If you make a reference to
the UBP, if one politician
makes a reference to the UBP
and accuses the FNM of wanti-
ng to go back to the old days
and to sell out‘and then anoth-
er politician at a meeting, say
in Fox Hill, brings up the race
thing it connects pretty neatly (
to the race issue) | think,” Sir
Arthur said.

However, he said, it is never
wrong to talk about history and
the country should do more
talking about history.

“We should teach our chil-
dren our young people about
our history, including the his-
tory of slavery and racism. | am
all for that. But I do not believe

that race is a legitimate issue in
this election nor for many elec-
tions gone. It is not an issue,”
Sir Arthur said.

Early in the life of the FNM,
he said, the participation of
“some of the old guard” did the
FNM a lot of harm even though
there was no danger of them
ever taking over.

“Remember when the FNM
was formed, our motto was All
Together. That was not a slo-
gan for that election. That was a
concept.

“We had this concept from
the very beginning the eight of
us and the others who joined,
of a Bahamas where the race
question would be put to bed
forever and that whites and
blacks together as equals would
participate in every thing in
their country including the gov-
ernance of their country. And it
is regrettable that it has not hap-
pened,” Sir Arthur said.

PLP confirms its
slate of candidates

FROM page one

yesterday.

According to other sources, the Sports, Youth and Housing
Minister will run for the constituency of Clifton — an area further.
west which includes several subdivisions.

St Margaret’s will be divided into two, with a portion going 6
Montagu, and some to the new constituency of St Anne’s.

Weekend sees two murders

FROM page one

year-old male companion, both
of East Street South, into cus-
tody and are now awaiting the
results of the autopsy on the
baby’s body.

Just hours after the baby’s
death, at [lam on Saturday,
police were called to the scene
of a shooting in the area of
Ethel Street and Montell
Heights.

’ When police arrived on the
scene they found a man with a
gunshot wound in his abdomen.

The man, believed to be in
his early twenties of central
New Providence, was rushed to
hospital, but died of his injuries
a short time later.

Just two hours later police
arrested a 25-year-old man ot
Milton Street in the Montell
Heights area after he anda
companion fled from police
when they had been observed
sitting in a green coloured
Oldsmobile, “acting suspicious-
ly”,

Police officers found a :357

. revolver and nine live rounds

of ammunition on the suspect.
It could not be confirmed if

the man taken into custody was

involved in the murder, but



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

| area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

police are following leads in the
matter, Mr Evans said.

The weekend’s second mur-
der occurred at 11pm on Satur-
day night in the Englerston
area.

According to police reports, a

’ group of men were playing

cards in the backyard of a home
in the area when an unidenti-
fied armed man approached
them and opened fire.

One of the men, who was

playing cards, was shot in the -

head and died at the scene.
The victim, a resident of the
Engierston community, is
believed to be in his early twen-
ties. é
This year’s high number of
murders, Mr Evans said yester-
day, has led Police Commis-
sioner Paul Farquharson to
introduce additional initiatives
to eradicate crime, which will
be launched sometime this
week.
Mr Evans said it is important
that Bahamians now partner

- with the police to remove illegal

weapons and social ills from the
country’s communities.

“Police remain committed to
eliminating crime so that the
majority of people can feel safe
again,” he said.













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THE TRIBUNE



i ieee



@ TIFFANY Blue ithapsedly - Delano aoannd (right) prepares
to sample the signature drink of the evening provided by Bristol

Cellars.

John Bull invites
customers for
evening viewing



Hi WINNER Nordin Siam (centre) receives his Tiffany & Co gift
from Andrew Roberts (left), director of operations of the John
Bull group of companies, and Tarek Vanderpool (right), jewelry

buyer at John Bull.

JOHN Bull, home to the local
jewelry boutique Tiffany & Co,
recently invited preferred cus-
tomers to celebrate an evening
of glamour during an exclusive
viewing of a spectacular travel-
ling gemstone jewelry collec-
tion at their 284 Bay Street loca-
tion.

Upon entering, guests
stepped into the world of
Tiffany — the world’s premier
house of jewelry design.

Greeted by beautiful live
models and a jazz trio, the
evening was spent viewing fab-
ulous pieces while feasting on
savory and sweet selections,
including signature Tiffany Blue
Box Petits Fours and Blue
Rhapsody Tiffany cocktails.

Select Tiffany & Co gifts,
including a suite of Tiffany jew-
elry, offered a surprising addi-
tion to the event, as happy win-

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so; call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ners took home an unexpected
delight.

As one on a short list of trade
accounts to host this collection,
John Bull was honoured to have
been given the opportunity to
present the collection to their
market.





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SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net



MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

The Tribune



Colinalmperial





Insurance Ltd,



Grand Bahama developer:
No Crown Land involved

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he developer
behind a major
investment pro-
posal for eastern
Grand Bahama
has denied to The Tribune that
it is proposing to develop all
Crown Land in that area, saying
its planned resort will be built
on privately-owned land

Gross margins from Bolue Hills hurt until company can prove water loss target hit

acquired from Bahamians.

In a statement sent to The
Tribune, Ken Farino, who is
acting as a Bahamas-based con-
sultant/adviser for developers
Beka Development, said “at no
time” had it discussed with the
Government either becoming
the developer of all Crown
Land in the East End, or
becoming the ‘master develop-
er’ for a 100 square-mile area.

Mr Farino confirmed to The

* Dismisses lawsuit as ‘without merit’

* Penalties fall to $368,000, as firm lauds record income

Tribune what Obie Wilch-
combe, the minister of tourism,
had told this newspaper two
weeks ago, namely that Beka
Development had submitted an
investment proposal to the
Government.

He said: “The resort pro-

posed in the East End is to be
built on land purchased from
private Bahamian citizens at a
price which is at or above fair
market value. It never has been

Consolidated hit by free water to Corporation

on Crown Land.

“At no time have there been
any proposals or discussions
with government to develop a
10 by 10 mile area (100 square
miles). At no time have there
been any proposals or discus-
sions with government to
become the developer for all
the Crown Land in the East
End.”

Mr Farino also denied that

Beka had “ever discussed” pur-



chasing Crown Land in the East
End for a $2,800 per acre price,
as a document published on the
project by a North Carolina-
based real estate firm, Infinity
Partners, had claimed.

The Infinity Partners docu-
ment, which was published on
the Internet and exposed by
The Tribune, created a storm
of controversy when its contents
were disclosed, especially the
claims that Beka Development

| Ex-AIBT chair advising

was in talks to become the ‘mas-
ter developer’ for East End
Grand Bahama. The document
also alleged that the Govern-
ment was “willing to sell sub-
stantially all of its east Crown
Land” to the project.

This prompted a flurry of
concern from residents of East
End Grand Bahama, plus FNM

SEE page 11B



group eyeing Film Studios

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE former chairman of the Association of International Banks
& Trusts (AIBT) is advising an investor group that is interested in
acquiring the Bahamas Film Studios, The Tribune has learnt, with
renewed interest expected to follow the collapse of Bahamas
FilmInvest International’s $14 million attempt to acquire the pro-
ject where Pirates of the Caribbean II and III were filmed.

Andrew Law, the former head of Credit Suisse Trust (Bahamas),
who has since sent up his own Bahamas-based financial services
company, International Protector Group (IPG), confirmed to The
Tribune that a group he was representing were now “assessing
their options”, having sat on the sidelines and waited to see whether
the Bahamas FilmInvest offer would succeed.

Although not identifying
investors in the group, Mr Law
said: “We are trying to put togeth- _

profits on company-wide bulk (wholesale)
water sales fell as a percentage of sales from
23 per cent for the nine months to Septem-
ber 30, 2006, to 19 per cent for the full-
year.

This was attributed to the fact that $1.7
million in sales made by the Blue Hills plant
to the Water & Sewerage Corporation dur-
ing the three months to ‘December 31, 2006,
were “made at essentially a break even
gross margin”.

In its form 10-K filed with the Securities

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CONSOLIDATED Water said the over-
all gross margin on water sales from its
‘Blue Hills reverse osmosis plant was “great-
‘ly reduced” during the 2006 fourth quarter
because, until it proves it has reduced water
losses from New Providence’s water distri-
‘bution system by 438 million gallons per
‘year, it has to supply 1.2 million free gallons
‘per day to the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration (WSC). _

Unveiling its 2006 fourth quarter and full-
_ year results, Consolidated Water said gross



@ JEFFREY PARKER, chairman

of Consolidated Water . s EE page 11B- sandany

SEE page 10B





Scotia launches private client
initiative first in Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL i
Tribune Business Editor Bank targets prowl
————__— __ wealthy Bahamian

THE Bahamas has become
the first country in the
Caribbean and Latin American
region to see Scotiabank launch
its Private Client Group, aiming
to provide a seamless, one-stop
service for the wealth manage-
ment needs and growing
demand from what the bank
perceives as an expanding mar-
ket of high net-worth Bahami-
ans.

Dianne Bingham, the centre
director for Scotia’s Bahamas-
based Private Client Group,
said the bank had seen “a grow-
ing interest in the domestic mar-

market with integrated
‘four pillar’ solution

ket with regard to these types of
service, and I feel personally it’s
something we will see continue
to grow, as we see the number
of mass affluent people grow in
the Bahamas”.

She added that the question
of why Scotiabank and others

SEE page 13B

Baha Mar to soon turn down
requests for retirement

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE developer behind the
$2.4 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment has told staff that
the high number of applicants

Jooking to take advantage of its

Voluntary Retirement and Sep-
aration Programme (VSP)
means that. it is “rapidly
approaching a point where we

- will be turning down requests

in selected areas”.

Writing to staff in the wake of
the failure to conclude the Joint
Venture Agreement with Har-
rah’s Entertainment by the
March 15 deadline, something
that could allow the casino and

ay PR

‘ho be uTERS, cl ar

entertainment operator to ‘walk
away’ from the deal to take a 43
per cent equity stake in Baha
Mar’s project, Don Robinson,
president of Baha Mar Resorts,
said: “Cable Beach Resorts will
become a world-class resort
area with or without Baha Mar,
and the future is very bright for
those of you who remain with
Cable Beach Resorts.

The Cable Beach Resorts are
the existing resorts — the Radis-
son, which is being transformed
into a Sheraton, the Wyndham
& Crystal Palace Casino, and
the Nassau Beach Hotel. It is

SEE page 12B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE























FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

“CAREER OPPORTUNITY
for

Treasurer — Bahamas and Cayman Operating Companies
Treasury Sales & Trading (TST)

Key Activities and Deliverables:

The Treasurer is a senior member of the TST leadership team that provide
best-in-class Balance sheet management, TST control and TST dealing support for
the FirstCaribbean Group. A key focus for TST is to enhance Group interest income
and develop / market TST products to the countries’ largest and most discerning

- clients. Countries include: Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, Cayman, British Virgin
Islands, St. Maarten, and Curacao,

Successfully manage and extract maximum value from business projects and process
improvement initiatives designed to strengthen the operational infrastructure of
FirstCaribbean TST

Build and improve the organizational structures and delivery platforms that support
the FirstCaribbean TST model and product lines

Manage to successful completion, business projects and process improvement
initiatives, designed to strengthen the operational infrastructure of FirstCaribbean
TST.

Develop effective partnerships with all functional groups including Marketing,
Finance, Human Resources and Operations & Technology that directly benefit TST
activities, customers and day-to day operations.

Key result areas include: balance sheet & liquidity management, product
sales/marketing function, product structured support, governance and market
risk

Qualifications/Experience:

¢ Graduate status with minimum of 7 years experience in the business/financial
world

° 3 years of specific. management experience in a TST environment

¢ Association of Corporate Treasurers (ACT) or equivalent qualification
preferred

¢ Understanding of the local Bahamas markets, competition, geographic, macro
economic and global factors impacting TST activities

¢ Seasoned director with a solid track record of success managing and growing
TST / Treasury Products business in international financial institutions

¢ Solid operational experience in both a sales and a trading environment

’ Remuneration:

¢ Salary commensurate with.the position’s seniority (FC Level 9 - the Bank
has 11 pay levels)

e Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred
loan rates

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by
March 23, 2007 to:

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.





-bottom line.











































. :
International Markets \ ARK 4 AP 3s
FOREX Rates ree.
Weekly % Change | ae
tent
CAD$ 1.1754 0.28 @ By Fidelity Capital Markets Markets (AML), up $0.03 or 7 am
GBP 1.9420 0.54 ~~ 4 per cent to close at $0.78. On
EUR 1.3316 1.54 | IT was an active trading — the down side, Consolidated The Bahamian Stock Market ate
' week in the Bahamian market Water Company Ltd - BDR ; "E
| as over 85,000 shares changed = (CWCB), lost $0.02 or 0.39 per FINDEX 791.63 YTD 6.67% =
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Weekly % Change of its 19 listed stocks trade, of The FINDEX gained 7.89 BISX | CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
§ which eight advanced and four —_ points for the week, to close SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE |...
Crude Oil 57.10 -4.85 remained unchanged. at 791.63. oie
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was Commonwealth Bank COMPANY NEWS BBL $0.85 $ ’ 3000 11'34% ad
(EBT) svn fou) shetes BOB $8.60 $0.10 5260 710% | --4
International Stock Market Indexes: changing hands and account- Cable Bahamas (CAB) — - BPF $11 95 $ : 0 0.44% -*
ing for 15.6 per cent of the total Fiscal 2006 was a stellar one BSL $14.60 $- 0 , 0.00%
Weekly % Change shares traded. The big for the technology giant, BWL $2 19 $0 19 3000 25.14% er
advancer for the week was’ marked by strong revenue CAB $10 33 $0.30 13300 330% ale
12,110.41 | -1.35 Bahamas Waste (BWL), up growth and cost containment. CBL $14.00 $ y 10881 11191% ny
1,386.95 -1.13 |. $0.19 or 9.50 per cent toend Net income attributable to CHL $2 i0 $- 5000 1053% te
2,372.66 _ 0.62 the week at $2.19. ordinary shareholders stood at CIB $14 70) $0 10 10040 389% ag
16,744.15 -2.45 Also advancing was Abaco — $18.1 million, which represents CWCB $5 08 $ 0.02 0 0.30% oh
' an increase of $6.8 million or S 2 46 $. ‘ 0 1.60% “4
60 per cemt over the $11.3 mil- at ane ; 0 "9'59% He
lion in net income recorded in FCC oo : 0 9.09% “
fiscal 2005. : : cae a LO .
Total revenues grew by $8.9 FCL $17.06 $0.35 5980 35.94% tyr:
million or 15.6 per cent to total a oe ‘ee oane Gah te
$65.9 million, while operating IS] $9.05 $- 0 : 5.93% . :
expenses increased by $2.5 mil- PRE $10 00 $- 0 0.00% oaks
lion or 9.03 per cent to total , 7 Deira a
$30.4 million. Operating prof-
it was $32.8 million, up from DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
$26.7 million year-over-year, : ‘
while ee oe ae ¢ ICD has declared dividends of $0.10 per share, payable on | ~ ¥
497 per cent a eae March 30, 2007, to all shareholders of record date March 12, |. »
Earnings per share for fiscal a -*.
ot by $0.35 to total ¢ CBL has declared dividends of $0.12 per share, payable on
In ralate Anew te Bond March 30, 2007, to all shareholders of record date March 15, ;
of Directors for CAB has 7%
oe oiee et © CAB has declared dividends of $0.06 per share, payable on Bc
007 ae a So menGlieiat March 30, 2007, to all shareholders of record date March 16, | _
; 2007. ‘ s
record date March 16, 2007. a
¢ CBL has declared an extraordinary dividend of $0.12 per
pein said Vo ae share, payable on April 30, 2007 to all shareholders of record 5
thatit had sold is Turks ee eee 4
Nv

Caicos Cost Right store to
Entervant Holdings (TCI) Ltd
for $2.5 million.





- AML management has said ‘
the proceeds from the sale of
this operation, along with the

$2.5 million to be received
from the sale of its shares in 3 e
BSL Holdings Ltd, will be used

to pay-off its bank debt. This mols Hl stories behind
presently stands at about $3.5

million. The elimination of the ld news, read Insight
bank debt will add about

$250,000 per monthto AML's [i sed Mondays






















FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE Ae
UNIT (THE “‘FIU”’) ue
PUBLI TICE —
Pursuant to Section 15(2) of The Financial Intelligence Unit “
Act, 2000, the public is hereby notified that, the revised ae
Suspicious Transactions Guidelines Relating to the me
Prevention of Money Laundering and the Financing of et
Terrorism (The ‘2007 Guidelines’’) for financial institutions aie
within The Commonwealth of the Bahamas have been issued on
and are effective as of 19th March 2007. —
The 2007 Guidelines replace those Guidelines issued in | J *“*
December 2001. ;
Copies of the 2007 Guidelines can be obtained between the s
hours of 9a.m. to 5p.m. Monday through Friday, from the
Administrative Offices, The Financial Intelligence Unit, 3rd san
Floor, Norfolk House, Frederick Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. a
Anthony M. Johnson sf
Director ”
Financial Intelligence Unit wee
P.O. Box SB 50086 —
Nassau, The Bahamas a
BUSINESS



WALL STREET

Che : Miami Herald |



sie avieeaasoernnuar sane unr cas rwnDoLmns

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

3B

Subprime woes an exit point for investors

M Investors started to pare their
stock portfolios when faced with
the news of lenders admitting
that borrowers with shaky credit
were defaulting on their
mortgages.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Some people
might wonder if the angst over prob-
lems in the subprime mortgage mar-
ket is overblown, but that hasn’t
stopped some investors from using it
as a reason to pare their stock portfo-
lios.

Résume
goes way |
ofeight |
tracks

Online job-screening software
has made the printed résumé
irrelevant.

BY DIANE STAFFORD
McClatchy News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Remember
eight-track tapes? Polyester leisure
suits? Beer-can openers?

The printed résumé — long the
standard way to apply for a white-
collar job — may soon join those
once-ubiquitous products in history’s
dustbin.

If you haven’t applied for a job
lately, you may be surprised. If you
have applied for just about any posi-
tion in a midsized or large company,
you know what’s happening.

Instead of reading your résumé, an
employer may ask you to fill out an
online form or take an online test that
measures how well you “fit” the job,
based on responses from successful
workers.

Google, for example, uses a
screening program to measure appli-
cants’ attitudes, behaviors, personal-
ity and biographical details. Answers
are scrunched in a formula that cre-
ates a score, indicating how well the
candidate is likely to fare on the job.

“It’s getting harder to sell yourself
for a job you think you’re qualified
for,” said Steve Murphy, a 48-year-
old job hunter from Lenexa, Kan,
who’s been surprised at all the elec-
tronic hoops he’s had to jump
through before nabbing interviews.
In most cases, he said, “You're just
able to post online.”

Murphy and applicants like him
discovered that résumés have gone

digital. Forget worrying about what -

kind of paper stock to use. You prob-
ably won’t need it.

In some cases, résumés have dis-
appeared from the hiring process
completely. Some employers don’t
even want them in digitized format.
They prefer customized online
forms, tailor-made to cull the appli-
cant field.

Some human-resource gurus sug-
gest the personal interview could be
next on the endangered-species list.

John Sullivan, a management pro-
fessor at San Francisco State Univer-

*TURN TO RESUME
SUMMER DRIVING

Wall Street shuddered as mort-
gage lenders admitted that borrowers
with shaky credit were delinquent —
put another way, defaulting — at an
alarming rate. The fears were that
subprime mortgage loans, those
made to people with poor credit rat-
ings, were just the start, and that bor-
rowers with stronger credit ratings
would also have problems making
their payments.

Major U.S. investment banks this
past week were quick to assuage mar-
ket fears by declaring troubled loans
were contained to just the subprime
market. But, that wasn’t enough for

some investors faced with an already
slowing U.S. economy and a
depressed housing market.

“Tt’s a major exit point,” said Mat-
thew Smith, president and chief
investment officer with New York-
based money management firm
Smith Affiliated Capital.

Not helping the situation was Alan
Greenspan.

‘The former Federal Reserve chair-
man, who last month fed the global
stock selloff with comments about a
possible recession in the United

States, predicted the subprime shake-:

out will worsen. He said subprime

mortgage defaults would spread to
other parts of the economy, espe-
cially if home prices decline.

“Tf prices go down, we will have
problems — problems in the sense of
spillover to other areas,” Greenspan
said at a Futures Industry Association
meeting in Boca Raton, Fla. on Thurs-
day.

The immediate impact of a shake-
out among subprime mortgages obvi-
ously will be on the lenders them-
selves. News that lenders are being
denied financing from creditors, and
might be forced to sell loan portfolios
at deep discounts, has ravaged their



;





VILLAGE: Real estate developer Frank McKinney funds self-sustaining villages for the poor in Haiti.
Above, he tours the newly completed Ange Village in Cap-Haitien, Haiti.

SHELTERING: -.
HAIT’?S POOR

FRANK MCKINNEY USES HIS VAST FORTUNE TO

He doesn’t grimace at the

stench, but seems pained when he
learns the children fish through the
water scavenging for crabs to eat or
sell. There is no electricity or run-
ning water in this makeshift village
built on a garbage dump.
A day later, the developer enter-
| tained billionaires interested in his
| $135 million home near Palm Beach,
| renting a red carpet, a Bentley with
diamond encrusted wheels and
models wearing fruit.

The multimillionaire who is
building one of the most expensive
homes in the United States is also
one of Haiti’s benefactors — he’s
already commissioned four villages



BUILD FREE HOMES IN HAITI,
THE HEMISPHERE’S POOREST NATION

BY KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

i CAP-HAITIEN, HAITI — Trudging through muddy sewer water,
Frank McKinney sidesteps a pig wandering aimlessly through this
destitute village, passing two dozen children with bloated bellies. He
pauses to give a stuffed toy to a young girl in a yellow dress.

for the poor, including one for
those living in the garbage dump,
and is planning two more this year.
The homes are given free.

“It’s taken a lot of work to be
able to understand I can live in
both words,” said McKinney, 43. “I
train myself to understand that this
is part of the stewardship. I’m not
in this to feel good. It’s oe part of
the calling.”

The mansion — Somnlete with a
combination shark tank-swimming
pool, bowling alley and ceiling
aquarium that snakes into a wet bar
— is the 32nd multimillion dollar
project for the Delray Beach devel-
oper. It is worlds away from the

Analysts: $3 gasoline unlikely

@ Barring a hurricane or
unexpected international strife,
analysts say that U.S. gas
supplies should be ample enough
this summer to keep prices
relatively stable.

BY ALAN ZIBEL
Associated Press

Elementary school principal
Randy Busscher of Holland, Mich. is
braced for gasoline prices of $3 a gal-
lon or more by summer break.

Analysts say Busscher and other
U.S. motorists may be more worried
than necessary, however. Absent a
major Gulf Coast hurricane, unex-
pected international strife or a wave
of refinery woes, average U.S. gaso-
line prices are not expected to rise to

the $3-a-gallon psychological thresh-
old this summer — a good sign as
well for the broader economy, which
is under pressure from a weakening
housing market.

When energy prices rise, the risk
is that consumer spending will fall,
particularly at discount stores and
low-priced restaurants, whose cus-
tomers tend to be more sensitive to
extra costs in their monthly budgets.

The stock prices of some restau-
rant chains, including Applebee’s
International, Darden Restaurants
and Wendy’s International dipped in
recent weeks as gasoline prices rose.
The Dow Jones Index for restaurants
and bars is down more than 5 percent
for the month, compared with a 4.7
percent decline for the benchmark

RECO RACDDABIG? DA RAEI. GOO

Standard & Poor’s 500 index.

Energy analysts say U.S. gasoline
supplies should be ample enough this
summer to keep prices relatively sta-
ble. “We don’t think that oil prices
are going to be a drag on the econ-
omy this summer,” said Global
Insight energy analyst Kevin Linde-
mer.

Economist Douglas Porter of BMO
Capital Markets in Toronto said con-
sumer spending seems more likely to
be hurt this summer by the slow-
down in the housing market than any
nominal increase in energy prices.

Still, the average price for regular
unleaded has shot up nearly 40 cents
per gallon since late January and

* TURN TO GAS PRICES

MIKE MAGUI/AP

simple $5,000 homes he builds in
Haiti.

His life is full of dichotomies,
though he seems to move with
grace between them.

Costumed in a black cape and |
mask for the unveiling of his $20
million house in 2005, he rode
down a zip line and successfully
dueled an evil invader before adra- |
matic fireworks show. The home
sold a few weeks later.

“Never losing the little boy
inside really keeps one in touch
with creativity,” said McKinney,
whose office is an elaborate two-
story tree house with an oceanfront
view.

He is eccentric, but not ostenta-
tious. He’ll compete in the 135-mile
Badwater marathon in Death Val-
ley for the third time later this year.
Though he garners about 17 per-
cent from the home sales, he drives
a 2002 Honda hybrid, walks his
8-year-old daughter to school daily
and attends church every Sunday.

He practices “exercising my risk
threshold like a muscle,” building
the multimillion dollar homes on



* TURN TO HAITI



stock prices — with some plunging
90 percent or more.

The next wave of investor discon-
tent pounded financial services firms,
especially ones with exposure to the
subprime market. Investment banks

. like Bear Stearns and Lehman Broth-

ers Holdings not only are creditors to
many mortgage lenders, but buy their
loans and repackage them as mort-
gage-backed securities.

And, although subprime exposure
for both of those investment houses
is minuscule when compared to their

° TURN TO INVESTORS

INTERNET VS. TV

Tech firms
urge use of
unused TV
airwaves

@ Unused and unlicensed TV
airwaves are at the center of a
developing battle between TV
broadcasters and tech

‘ companies that want to deliver

high-speed Internet service over
the airwaves.

By DIBYA SARKAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Microsoft,
Google and other technology compa-
nies are bumping into resistance
from U.S. television broadcasters as
they seek regulatory approval to
deliver high-speed Internet service
over unused television airwaves.

The technology companies, which
have submitted a prototype device to
the Federal Communications Com-
mission for testing, say their aim is to
make broadband Internet connec-
tions accessible and affordable to
millions more Americans.

Broadcasters, though, fear the
unproven device could interfere with
TV service, and even some technol-
ogy experts have reservations about
how well the device will actually per-
form. Matters could get even more
complicated, broadcasters say, when
the industry switches from analog to
digital signals in 2009.

At the center of this dispute are
unused and unlicensed TV airwaves,
part of the spectrum known as “white
spaces.” These white spaces are
located between channels 2 and 51 on
televisions that aren’t hooked up to
satellite or cable, though use of these
services would not preclude anyone
from accessing the Internet over
unused spectrum in their region.

“This is some prime spectrum real
estate,” said Ben Scott, policy direc-
tor for Free Press, a national nonpar-
tisan public interest research group,
which supports using the public air-
waves for Internet service.

In a nutshell, the technology com-
panies want to beam Internet access
through the white space and into
computers and mobile devices. And
they argue rural Americans would
benefit greatly because the technol-
ogy enables Internet service to
remote areas at a fraction of the cost
of cable- and telephone-based sub-
scription services.

“This is Wi-Fi on steroids,” Scott
said..i5 .

* TURN TO TELEVISION

FILLING UP:
When energy
prices rise,
consumer
spending falls.
Left, Sandra
Fairbank fills
up her
automobile at
a Mobil gas
station in
Cambridge,
Mass.

CHITOSE SUZUKI/AP

Tekh GES POY NT
4B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

WALL STREET

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Investors us subprime woes

Certainly, the U.S. mortgage crisis was partly

* INVESTORS

overall business, it still has
made investors nervous. The
Amex Securities Bro-

’ ker/Dealer index, which
tracks 12 of the most widely
known firms in the sector, has
fallen ll percent since compa-
nies began to disclose prob-
lems in subprime loans on
Feb. 8. ‘

That was the day HSBC
Holdings, Europe’s largest
bank, admitted delinquencies
on risky U.S. mortgages rose
to a four-year high. It was also
the day New Century Finan-
cial announced it had lost

PHILANTHROPY

Developer
uses his
fortune to

build free
homes

HAITI

spec, despite Florida’s often
fickle real estate market.
Sporting a teased blond
mane reminiscent of a 1980s
rocker, McKinney is some-
what of a rock star in the real
estate world. He brokers that
celebrity status to raise
money for his Haiti projects.
When McKinney went on a
nationwide book tour for his
second book, investors could
join him for eight-hour legs of
the journey if they donated
money to “The Caring House
Project Foundation.” ,
“He’s really a modern day
Robin Hood,” said St. Louis

real-estate investor Marlene.

Trice, who also accompanied
McKinney on a recent visit to
Haiti to see the village she
helped fund. “He creates a
huge amount of wealth in
everything that he does and
then turns it and gives it back
to the communities that don’t
have any.”

McKinney, who would not
disclose his net worth, ini-
tially tried building for the
local homeless, but was
stalled by government red
tape and quickly realized he
could build homes cheaper
and faster in one of the poor-
est and most violent countries
in the Western Hemisphere.
The villages cost between
$400,000 and $500,000 to
build.

To the Haitian children, he
is seen as the Beanie Baby
man and on a recent trip has
jammed 750 into backpacks

SUMMER DRIVING

Analysts: $3 per

°GAS PRICES

Busscher, who drives a fuel-
efficient Toyota Camry, is
prepared for the worst.

Seeing gasoline rise to last
summer’s levels, when prices
averaged more than $3 a gal-
lon for much of July and
August, “would bother me
and I’m sure it would bother
others.”

The national average price
for regular unleaded on Fri-
day was $2.55 a gallon, up
more than 30 cents from a
month ago, according to
AAA’s daily survey of more
than 85,000 self-serve sta-
tions.

JOB HUNT

track of how rapidly its loan
portfolio deteriorated.

Certainly, the U.S. mort-
gage crisis was partly respon-
sible for the Feb. 27 global
market swoon that included a
416-point drop in the Dow.
Problems with subprime lend-
ers — along with a sell off in
Chinese stocks and worries
about the economy — have
made Wall Street increasingly
more cautious about compa-
nies in general.

“T think the issue with the
subprime space is really a
huge issue and is about what
effect it will have on the con-
sumer,” said Jeffrey Morti-



responsible for the I’eb.

27 global market

swoon that included a -416-poin! drop in the

Dow.

mer, chief investment officer
for equities at Charles
Schwab Investment Manage-
ment. “I worry about con-
sumer spending, which is
two-thirds of the economy.
He contends consumers
unnerved by a buckling of
some subprime mortgage
lenders and a pullback or lev-
eling off in home values could

ratchet back their spending.
This kind of logic puts a num-
ber of sectors on Wall Street
at risk.

Beyond the obvious fallout
on home builders, retailers
are the next biggest target.
Americans worried about
making their mortgage pay-
ments could be that much less
willing to spend.



J. PAT CARTER/AP

BEST OF BOTH WORLDS: Real estate developer Frank McKinney lives in an $8-million
ocean-front home he built in Delray Beach, Fla.

that he passed out after the .

village’s dedication cere-
mony.

Normally talkative, McKin-
ney was silent for much of the
trip as he toured the Ange Vil-
lage, which includes homes
for 30 families, a community
center, medical clinic, school,
orphanage and acres of farm
land with goats and chickens
so the village can be self-
sufficient. More homes, a soc-
cer field and tilapia pond are
slated for Phase 2.

“This is the best thing that
ever happened to me,” said
Jean Louis, 47, who lives in
another village McKinney
built in Cap-Haitien with his
wife and five children. “This
home makes me feel safe. No
one will ever kick me out
again.”

Surrounded by lush green
mountains and not far from
the coast, McKinney noted
the landscape would be prime
real estate anywhere else than
this violent country with its

The Energy Information
Administration, the Energy
Department’s_ statistical
agency, projects the average
pump price of regular
unleaded will hit a peak of
around $2.70 a gallon in June,
then drop off as the summer
driving season wanes.

The average price of crude
oil is projected to remain
around $64 per barrel through
summer, down from last
year’s record levels of more
than $78 a barrel.

Gasoline prices have risen
in recent weeks due to
planned and unplanned refin-
ery outages, as well as falling
imports from Europe, accord-

HAITI AT A GLANCE

A bLEbE A byod

Ho

e Description: Poorest country in the Western Hemisphere;

economy is ina shambles
e Population: 8.4 million
Capital: Port-au-Prince

Median age: 18.2 years
Life expectancy: 53 years

GDP per capita: $1,800

mangoes

FIND OUT MORE

Area: 10,714 square miles
Major languages: Creole, French

Percent living below poverty line: 80%

Main exports: Light manufactures, coffee, oils, cocoa,

The Caring House Project Foundation: http://www. frank-
mckinney.com/caringHouseProject.php

pock marked, garbage strewn
roads.

With him were 12 other
real estate investors who have
contributed to his projects.
He’s hoping the abject pov-
erty will inspire them to
larger donations.

On the way back to the air-

port, McKinney said he is
eager to begin work on the
next village — slated for the
Haiti-Dominican Republic
border.

For now, he boarded a
plane home, to walk a red car-
pet and smile for the billion-
aires.

___MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

as exit point

Home improvement stores
like Home Depot and Lowes,
which already have been
affected by the slowing hous-
ing market, could be further
hurt as people do less home
renovating. Appliance makers
like Whirlpool might also see
sales dwindle as homeowners
put off buy a new refrigerator
or washing machine.

It could also trickle down
into national chains like
Wal-Mart Stores and Target if
consumers just don’t have as
much free cash to spend.
Wal-Mart already saw an
impact on its sales last year
from rising gasoline prices.

INTERNET VS. TV

Smith, whose firm manages
about $1.7 billion in customer
assets, said turmoil in the
mortgage sector will only
make consumers more con-
cerned about how they spend.

But, while retailers are hurt,

there are other more defen-

sive sectors that will still

thrive. “The non-discretion-
ary companies are where
most will look toward,” he
said. “No matter what hap-

pens to homeowners, there is,
still a need for energy, and,

there is still a need for health-

care. That’s not going to,

change no matter where the,

economy is.”

Tech firms urge
use of unused
TV airwaves

* TELEVISION

Scott Blake Harris, an
attorney representing a loose
coalition of technology com-
panies that typically compete
with one another, said he
believes the FCC should
authorize this technology so
long as its proponents can
prove it will not disrupt TV
programming.

But broadcasters want the
FCC to proceed cautiously.

The National Association
of Broadcasters, which repre-
sents more than a thousand
local TV stations as well as
major broadcasters including
Walt Disney’s ABC division
and Univision Communica-
tions, insists the industry is
not against the new technol-
ogy — only worried about
unintended consequences.

“If they (the technology
companies) are wrong, once
those devices get introduced
that means that people won’t
be able to get clear television
pictures,” said NAB spokes-
man Dennis Wharton.

Shure, a manufacturer of
wireless microphones, has
also expressed concerns, say-
ing use of white space for
Internet services could cause
interference with audio sys-
tems at concerts and sporting
events. Potential pitfalls
aside, proponents of the new
technology — including Dell,
Hewlett-Packard, Intel and
Philips Electronics North
America, a division of Nether-
lands-based Royal Philips
Electronics NV — say it could
also spur innovation.

Paul Brownell, a govern-
ment relations manager at
Dell, said white-space spec-
trum also could be used to
stream video and audio
throughout a house without

running wires all over the

place. The company is inter-

ested in building computers

that would come prepro-.

grammed to recognize Inter-
net service delivered via
white space.

Advocates said the white-
space spectrum is too valu-
able to be left idle because the

television airwaves can trans- |
mit better signal quality .

through obstacles and to a
wider geographic area. In

rural areas, the new technol- -

ogy is an attractive alternative
to phone-, cable- or satellite-
based Internet service

because it would not require ~

expensive new infrastructure
to be built, they said.

The lack of infrastructure
is a key reason why many

ene

rural areas lack high-speed '

Internet service. A recent

Pew Internet & American Life '

Project found that only 30
percent of rural residents
have high-speed Internet as
compared with 49 percent for

suburban residents and 52.
percent for urban Americans. -
Amid all this enthusiasm, .

however, there are skeptics.
Dorothy Robyn, a principal
with the Brattle Group, a
Cambridge, Mass.-based eco-
nomic consulting firm, said

the technology benefits could |

be overstated. Specitically,

she questioned whether the ,
device could deliver good- —
quality Internet service over ,

long distances.
For this reason, she said

licensing the white-space *
spectrum is critical to ensure ©

that it gets used in the best
and most efficient way. And
there’s an added benefit,

Robyn said: if signal interfer-_

ence ever became an issue,
broadcasters could point to
the source of the problem.

gallon gasoline price unlikely

Energy analysts say U.S. gasoline supplies
should be ample enough this summer to keep

prices relatively stable.

ing to the forecasting agency.

Those conditions are
expected to ease later this
spring.

And unlike the start of last
summer, when much of the
country made a transition to
ethanol as a gasoline-blending
component, there should be
ample supplies of the corn-
based fuel this year, said Tom
Kloza, chief oil analyst for Oil
Price Information Service.

Other economists disagree.

Wachovia economists pre-
dict gasoline prices this sum-
mer will average $2.75 to $3
per gallon — lower than last
year, but not by much.

“This year consumers have
not only to contend with high
gas prices, they've got to con-
tend with worries about slow-
ing economic growth,” said
Wachovia economist Gina
Martin.

“The job market is still
steady but not running as

quickly as it was last year.”

The Organization of Petro-
leum Exporting Countries
said in Vienna on Thursday
that it plans to keep crude-oil
production at existing levels,
satisfied that two recent
rounds of output cutbacks
helped balance global markets
and stabilize prices around
$60 a barrel.

OPEC warned, though, that
oil price volatility is likely to
continue in 2007.

Prices have zigzagged
recently, sometimes sharply
during the same day, buoyed
by political tensions with Iran
and pulled down by mild win-
ter temperatures in the

Northeast.
For many consumers,
though, explanations of inter-

national turmoil that sends oil: |

markets up and down are
hardly reassuring.

Warehouse worker Luis
Ortega, 35, who commutes 80
miles a day to his job in south-
ern California, has felt the
impact of higher pump prices
in recent weeks.

“T can’t go to the movies as
often, dinner as often. I drive
less and stay home more,
watch more TV,” he said, fill-
ing up his red 1998 Toyota
SUV with regular unleaded
priced at $3.09 a gallon near
downtown Los Angeles.

Online software makes printed résumés dinosaurs

° RESUME

sity, says most interviews are
as valuable as Ouija boards in
measuring whether a person
will be good on the job.
Interviewers ask the wrong
questions and job candidates
can lie or simply not shine,
when on the job they’d do
quite well, he says. Compa-
nies — especially those that

hire thousands of workers and
have high turnover — are
turning to a range of comput-
er-based filters to pare down
candidates to a manageable
number. At AMC Entertain-
ment, for example, the com-
pany is introducing questions
about availability, work eligi-
bility, desired pay, qualifica-
tions and pertinent awards in
the online application pro-

cess, said Keith Wiedenkeller,
senior vice president-human
resources.

The new screening soft-
ware allows an interview,
when it’s offered, “to be more
streamlined and efficient,”
with just five or six basic
questions needed, mostly of
the “tell me about a time
when you resolved a difficult
customer service situation”

variety, he said.

Even smaller companies,
where résumés still are
accepted, have purchased
screening software.

An increasingly popular
screening tool uses a kind of
standardized test. Applicants’
answers to questions — about
such characteristics as their
preferred noise level at work
or the time of day they feel

most energized — are com-
pared with answers from
workers who already are suc-
cessful in the jobs.

Many job hunters are frus-
trated at the digitized “deper-
sonalization” of the hiring
process. But many in the
human-resource industry are
glad online screening tools
exist.

“There’s no way anymore

to filter qualified applicants
by just looking for buzzwords
on résumés,” said Darren
Dupriest, president of Valid-
ity Screening Solutions, a
security and background
checking company in Over-
land Park.

“We've sacrificed face-to-
face for efficiency,” Dupriest
said. “The cost of a bad hire is
too great.”


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 5B



Film Studios buyer:
e will not be bullied

Hits out at Fuller over claims on paying Islands by Design

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he investment group
| who saw their $14 mil-
lion bid to acquire the
Bahamas Film Studios rejected
after failing to negotiate an
extension to the deal’s close,
said at the weekend that they
would not be “bullied” by the
vendor, telling The Tribune
they were “making it sound as
if we were the culprit”.

Owen Bethel, president of
Nassau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque
Group, said he was disap-
pointed that his investor con-
sortium had been unable to
negotiate an extension to the
March 15 closing deadline with
Ross Fuller, head of Ashby
Corporation, adding that the
deal’s collapse - at least for the
moment - would further delay
the Bahamas Film Studios’ re-
opening and attempts to
resume operations.

Mr Bethel also responded to
a release by Mr Fuller, in
which the latter said the dead-
line was not extended because
Mr Bethel and his group,
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional, had failed to “make
payments to an environmen-
tal firm as they had warrant-
ed to do”.

That firm is understood to
be Bahamas-based Islands By
Design, run by Keith Bishop,
who had sued the Bahamas
Film Studios for $80,000 over
an alleged unpaid Bill relating
to an environmental impact
assessment (EIA) he had per-
formed for the company.

Mr Fuller, in an e-mailed
reply to The Tribune’s ques-
tions, said the lawsuit from

Islands By Design was “pend-.
ing and will be dealt with pru-’

dently”, although he did not
explain what he meant by that.

Mr . Bethel, though,
explained that under the orig-
inal Memorandum of Agree-
ment signed with Mr Fuller for
the initial February 28, 2007,
closing, everything “was con-
ditional on government
approval” for the purchase by
Bahamas FilmInvest.

Mr Bethel said his group
eventually agreed to undertake
to pay Islands By Design the
money it was owed by the Stu-
dios, which he alleged was Mr
Fuller’s obligation, provided
they received government
approval.

This was not forthcoming, as
the Government had not had

the chance to complete its due
diligence and assessments by
then, which resulted in one
extension being negotiated
until March 15.

The two sides could not
agree terms for a further exten-
sion, and Mr Bethel told The
Tribune that Bahamas FilmIn-
vest “decided not to make any
further payments until the
agreement was extended”.

As a result, in the absence
of any extension agreement,
he said Bahamas FilmInvest
would not pay Mr Bishop and
“provide Mr Fuller with cash
funds to meet the Film Stu-
dios’ daily expenses”.

Referring to Mr Bishop, Mr
Bethel said: “We have been in
communications with his
lawyer to indicate that, ‘yes,
we would cover that’, subject
to negotiations and approval
being given by the Govern-
ment. There was nothing pre-
sented to him that we were
going to undertake that imme-
diately.”

“It’s making it sound as if
we were the culprits,” Mr
Bethel added.

“I am surprised that in our
attempts to negotiate in good
faith for an extension, and with
regard to the amount of time it
would take to obtain govern-
ment approval, that Mr Fuller
has decided not to proceed
with resolving and working out
an extension and new terms of
negotiation.

“The interest of ensuring the
project moves and gets opera-
tional as quickly as possible
will be further delayed through
this process, whether he is con-
tacting other investors or has
to come and negotiate with us
again.” .

Mr.Bethel told The Tribune:
“We’re still certainly very
much interested in the project
if Mr Fuller is prepared to sit at
the table and come to the table
in good faith. We are certainly
ready to close the deal in terms








billion in assets!

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@ OWEN Bethel, president of Montaque Group

of financing.

“The only issue is that we
are making it all subject to gov-
ernment approval. It seems
time is of the essence on Mr
Fuller’siside.......

“IT would also think it is dis-
appointing to the Bahamas
Film Commission and Ministry
of Tourism, who certainly have
plans to promote the whole
industry, including the facility
itself.”

Bahamas
deposit has been returned to
it by Mr Fuller, and Mr Bethel
said his team had run up con-
siderable expenses on their
acquisition attempt - well over
$300,000.

In a later release, Bahamas
FilmInvest said it stood ready
to “infuse millions” of dollars
into the 3,500 acres Bahamas
Film Studios project, some-
thing Mr Fuller had been
unable to do.

It accused Mr Fuller of



EN a

MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR

The incumbent will have overall responsibility for the efficient operation

and maintenance of equipment and machinery, with a keen focus on detail
in keeping with international standards. He/she will also be customer oriented
with a track record of mastery in mechanical areas. Specifically he/she will

be required to:

> Ensure the effective and efficient performance of the maintenance
function for the following assets:
Building and the environment
Packaging lines and blow molding operations
Utilities supplies: Electrical distribution, high and low pressure

air, refrigeration and RO water systems

Manage the workshop and the execution of planned and preventative
maintenance program
Diagnose equipment malfunction and remove, install or effect repairs

‘aS necessary

Evaluate the maintenance performance in his/her area of responsibility,
compile reports and effectively use performance data

Maintain technical integrity of plant to attain production targets and
keep abreast with latest technological advancements

Ideal candidate would have strong Electrical & Mechanical Engineering
experience, demonstrate a proficiency to trouble shoot and repair common
electrical problems and have the ability to work independently.

Please send resume to:

Human Resources Manager

P.O. BOX N-3207
DA 16436

NASSAU, BAHAMAS



FilmInvest’s

(FILE photo)

appearing to put himself
before the interests of the pro-
ject and the Bahamas, adding
that it was Bahamas FilmIn-
vest that resolved a $10 mil-
lion debt owed by the Studios
to FirstCaribbean Internation-
al Bank (Bahamas) through
talks with the loan’s guaran-
tor, United Insurance.

Mr Bethel added: “Mr
Fuller’s remarks appear to be a
negotiating ploy, either to pres-
sure Bahamas FilmInvest to
provide more favourable terms
or to use Bahamas FilmInvest’s
terms to attempt to negotiate a
more favourable deal from a
third party.

“In either case, Mr Fuller
has misjudged Bahamas
FilmInvest.

“We will not be bullied by
Mr Fuller, and we will assert
our rights against Mr Fuller,
his companies and any inter-
fering parties to the fullest
extent possible under the law.”

Presenter. Mr. Dudrick Edwards

Assistant Professor
School of Business, The College of The Bahamas

The Armoury
ey eT Mae

rr} experiencing difficulties
with telephone lines.

We can be contacted on the
following numbers:

(242) 322-2733
(242) 397-1600
(242) 323-1104

We apologise for any
inconvenience caused.

Signed: Management

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UTE R TS) STR aT



BAIC

In Conjunction With

The College of The Bahamas

_ Will Host

the business opportunities
available to them now, and
to encourage them to

- exploit such opportunities,
thereby empowering them
to become self employed.

Doing Business via the Internet

Possibilities of Pitfalls

Thursday March 15, 2007
at 7:00 p.m.

The College Of The Bahamas

(Bahamas Tourism Training Center)
(Lecture Theatre)

¢ Thursday Febmary 1, 2007
“Empowering Baharmians *
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter ~ Mr. Glenn Ferguson

« Thursday February 8, 2007

Business Planning, Forecasting & Marketing

B.TLY.L. - Old Trail Road
Presenter - Mr. Daniel Thompson

» Thursday February 15, 2007
‘Business Finance and Venture Capital

COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Jerome Gomez,

Tebruary 1-April §, 2007
(See Schedule Below)
1-00 p.m, Lecture/Presentation i

Interactive Panel Discussion
followed by Entrepreneur
Testimonials and Q&A session,

+ The College of The Bahamas ©
(Bahaaas Youriva Trainisg Center)
{Lecture Theatre}

Change your buying habits, “BUY to SELL’,
become self employed and create wealth.

Schedule of Weekly Seminars

« Thursday February 22, 2007
Book:Kgeping - Accounting for the Busmess
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Christopher Stuart

+ Thursday March 1, 2007
Busmess Opportumties in The Bahamas
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Benjamin Bailey

« Thursday March 8, 2007
Forging a New Vinon for the Bahamian Investor
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenters ~ Mr. Donald Demeritte
Mr. Paul Major

+ Thursday March 15, 2007
Doing Busmess via the Intemet - Possibilities of
Pitfalls COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Mr Dudrick Edwards

Thursday March 22, 2007

Import & Export, Customs, Concesnons

COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Bahamas Customs Representative

Thursday March 29, 2007

Book Keeping - Accounting for the Business
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Mr, Christopher Stuart

Thursday April 5, 2007
Govemment Regulations and Business License

COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Registrar Representative *

CONTACT; Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) at 322-3740 or 325-1912

Mr. Lester Stuart / Mr. Le-Var Miller


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007



CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
EXTENSION SERVICES (CEES)

ACADEMIC UPGRADING DEPARTMENT

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Geography (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teach Geography at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned



Bachelor's Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

level of BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Mathematics (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able
to teach Mathematics at the College Preparatory, evel.



level of BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College rep prota (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
iology at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor’s

Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the level of
BGCSE.in the subject area.
/

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Chernisty Nee Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teac emistry at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

level of BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Agriculture (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teach Agriculture at the College Preparatory evel. Candidates must have at least an earned
Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the
level of BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College Fae History/Socias Studies (New Providence Campus) Candidates must
e able to teach History/Social Studies at the College Preparatory evel. Candidates must have

at least an earned Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching :

experience at the level of BGCSE in the subject area. -

Part-time Instructor in College Prep Civics (New Providence Campus} Candidates must be able to teach
ivics at the College Preparatory evel. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor's i

Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the level of
BGCSE in the subject area.

Part-time Instructor in College Prep English Language New Providence Campus) Candidates must be
able to teach English at the College Preparatory, evel. Candidates must have at least an earned

Bachelor's Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the

level of BGCSE in the subject area.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete :
application packet consists of an application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form :
a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment) :
information of three references addressed to: :

and the names and contact

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

Part-time Instructor in Accounting for Beginners |, Il & Ill (New Providence Campus}
andidates must be able to teach Accounting at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must

have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent (e.g. CPA CA) in the subject. A teaching certificate

is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Introduction to Business | & Il (New Providence Campus)
andidate must be able to teach Introduction to Business at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates :

must have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable.




Part-time Instructor in’ Business’ Etiquette (NeW Providerice Carnpus

andidates must be able to teac iquette at the’introductory to advanced level. Candidates
must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Human Resource Management |, Il (New Providence Campus)
andidates must be able to teach Human Resource Management at the introductory to advanced level.



Candidates must have at least an earned Master's degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate

i is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Computer Applications I, Il (New Providence Campus) .

andidates must be able to teach computer courses at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates
must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is
desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Credit & Collections Procedures and Control | & Il (New Providence Campus)
andidates must be able to teach Credit ollections Procedures and Control at the introductory to
advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned Master’s degree or equivalent in the subject.

A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Superior Customer Service Workshop (New Providence Campus) ;
andidates must be able to teach Superior Customer Service /Course Workshop. Candidates must have :

at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Information Technology | & Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able
to teach Information Technology at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least

an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in QuickBooks (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach QuickBooks
at the introductory level. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the :

subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in PC Upgrade and Repair (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teac pgrade and Repair at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an

earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Effective PowerPoint W/S (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teach Microsoft PowerPoint at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an ;

earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Web Page Design Workshop (New Providence Campus) Candidate must be able
to teach Web Page Design at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned i

Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Interior Decorating 1.& Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to
teach Interior Decorating at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned :

Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Floral Design F I & Ill (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
oral Design at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least a minimum of five years }

working experience in the area.

Part-time Instructor in Effective Writing Skills (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
ective Writing at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at least an earned Bachelor’s ;

degree or equivalent in the subject or related area. A teaching certificate is desirable.

Part-time Instructor in Basic of Freehand Cutting | & Il (New Providence campus) Candidates must be
able to teach Basic of Freehand Cutting at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates must have at

least five years working experience in the area.

Part-time Instructor in Drapery Making | & Il (New Providence Campus) Candidates must be able to teach
rapery Making at the introductory level to advanced level. Candidates must have at least a minimum i

of five years working experience in the area.

Part-time Instructor in Bath and Kitchen Accessories (New Providence Campus)
andidates must be able to teach Bath and Kitchen Accessories at the introductory level to advanced

level. Candidates must have at least a minimum of five years working experience in the area.

j Part-time Instructor in Basic Car Maintenance (New Providence Campus) :
andidates must be able to teach Basic Car Maintenance at the introductory to advanced level. Candidates i

must have at least an earned Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in the subject.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete
application packet consists of an Application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form
a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment)
and the names and contact information of three references addressed to:

The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P.O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

andidates must have at least an earned
Bachelor’s Degree in the subject area, a Teaching Certificate and five years of teaching experience at the i

All candidates must have earned Masters’ Degrees from a recognized accredited institution in the
:_ relevant area or its equivalent.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A complete
: application packet consists of an Application Letter, a College of The Bahamas’ Application Form

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS '





EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS _

: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
‘New Providence, Bahamas



Lean Mastery

Human Resource Management
Business Administration
Administrative Skills
Supervisory Skills

Public Accounting

Project Management
Professional Management
Executive Leadership Skills
Writing & Research Skills

The Legal Environment

General Legal Principles
Employment Law

Company Law

Banking & Trust Law

Real Estate Law

Real Estate Management
Insurance Management & Sales
Insurance Law

E-business Practice & Management
Hotel Front Office Management
Accounting For Non-Financial Managers

ee ee ee ee ee ee ea

>






































? a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment) "
; and the names and contact information of three references addressed to: ‘ ¢
The Director ‘
Human Resources ‘
The College of The Bahamas '
. Oakes Field Campus *
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive :
P. O. Box N-4912 :
Nassau, Bahamas : "
( "

'
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS 3
STAFF VACANCY is
is
The College of the Bahamas invites applications for the following post: Q
Assistant, Alumni Relations & Development * {6
DIVISION: Office of the President a
UNIT: Alumni Relations and Development 4
START DATE: May 1, 2007 if
1
JOB DESCRIPTION iy
SUMMARY: id
Working out of The Office of the President, in a team under the joint direct supervision of the i
Development Officer and Alumni Relations Director, the Alumni Relations & Development Assistant iy
is responsible for the day-to-day administration of alumni and development activities. The Alumni 1%
Relations & Development Assistant participates in all fundraising activities including donor and alumni jh
events, database maintenance, information/record management, alumni and donor research, mailings, .
and special events. The successful candidate will be someone with strong organisational skills who : i"
is a good communicator both verbally and in writing and who enjoys team work. This is an excellent a
opportunity for someone who is also creative and who will enjoy working with others to build a new -e

Aluh{ni Relations and Development Department at The College/University of The Bahamas.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Process donations and prepare acknowledgement letters and other correspondence

Maintain foundation, corporation, individual donor and alumni record files

Create fundraising reports and other database reports as needed

Continually create, update and correct database records

Conduct preliminary research on prospective corporate foundation and individual donors

Coordinate productions and mailing of appeal letters

Send appropriate documentation to process credits to donors

Maintain guest lists, gather and prepare registration materials and other duties as

assigned for fund-raising and alumni events

e Handle all administrative details associated with committee meetings (i.e. prepare
and distribute notices, agendas, minutes, etc.).

e Prepare media materials for distribution. (i.e. copying, filing, mailing, e-mailing)

e Assemble media and donor kits for events and meetings.

e Other duties as assigned

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:
° Associate's or bachelor's degree

° Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint

° Capacity to manage substantial volumes of email correspondence and to organize
meetings using calendaring technology

Database maintenance and data entry experience

Excellent written and verbal communication skills ;

Ability to present information concisely and effectively, both verbally and in writing
Ability to organize work and to manage competing priorities

Proven accuracy and attention to detail

Proactive work ethic and ability to take initiative towards agreed upon goals
Excellent interpersonal skills

A team player and overall pleasant disposition

ta eb eee

While the normal candidate will have administrative experience, consideration will be given to any
entry level candidate who has demonstrated the capacity to excel, who is an excellent organizer, who
has strong communication and interpersonal skills and who demonstrates an excellent attitude and
willingness to learn and work effectively in a team setting.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed.
They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities, duties and skills
required of the Alumni Relations & Development Assistant

Compensation is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

To ensure full consideration, interested candidates should submit a College of The Bahamas Application
Form, a comprehensive resume and a cover letter of interest. To expedite the appointment procedure,
applicants should request that three referees send references under confidential cover directly to the
address listed below on or before April 5, 2007:

J
at

Oe FT A I IS CO OTe Tl PT IAI OEP DN MEET Ee RS

Human Resources Department
The College of The Bahamas












Ground Floor, Administration Building ‘A

Thompson Blvd and Poinciana Drive \,

P O Box N 4912 ie

Nassau, Bahamas 4

Email:hrapply@cob.edu.bs :

Please visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs for more information about the College and to access oa
the College’s Employment Application Form. !
‘’

THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE >
AT
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS ma

ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING COURSE: BEGINNING MARCH 27, 2007 ;
CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN CHINESE, Beginners’ Level f

— Tuesdays/Thursdays 7:00 — 8:30 7

LOCATION: The Munnings Building, next to KFC, by the COB roundabout |}
PRICE: $250 per course :

a

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL: 302-4584 or 302-4587

tag
<
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS






THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY

Library and Media Services























Librarian - Technical Services



The position falls in the area of Technical Services. The incumbent should be dynamic,
innovative individual with a strong commitment to service within a diverse community. The
Librarian will demonstrate successful administrative experience in a library, sound understanding
of emerging technologies and the ability to use them within the library setting and commitment
to developing a strong integrated library service within the academic environment.

The duties of the Librarian will include management of the Unit, leadership in short and long
range planning to enhance and expand library services, development and promotion of library
resources and services, personnel supervision, initiation and management of appropriate
emerging technologies, and liaison with relevant internal and external groups.

The Librarian should possess a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from an
accredited institution, and a minimum of two years, post Masters professional library experience.
The incumbent will demonstrate strong communication and interpersonal skills that engender

research, service to the community and library instruction will also be required.

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by April 30, 2007. A
complete application packet consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas’
Application Form, a detailed curriculum vitae, copies of all transcripts (original transcripts
required upon employment) and the names and contact information for three references
addressed to:



The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Please visit the College’s website at for more information about the institution and to
access the College’s Employment Application Form.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
STAFF VACANCY |

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the following position:

Purchasing Manager, Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
SUMMARY STATEMENT

This position will require the successful individual to hold responsibilities for the following:
° Purchasing of merchandise
° To ensure adequate inventory in the Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute and
the storeroom
° Institute competitive pricing and obtainment of high quality products.












e









It is expected that this person will possess strong critical thinking skills, business acumen and
excellent interpersonal skills. The ability to provide superior customer service is also vitahi

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS

e A Bachelors Degree is preferred with three years relevant post qualification experience
OR an Associate Degree with five years post qualification experience in a relevant area.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIREMENTS

Considerable knowledge of food & beverage
Knowledge of office procedures and paper trails
Computer proficient with basic knowledge of Microsoft Applications
Excellent written and oral communication skills

Ability to properly use a calculator

Express a positive attitude.

Excellent telephone skills.

Ability to establish priorities.

Ability to work independently.

Skill to use a personal computer and various software.
Ability to resolve problems.

Ability to analyze statistics



Physical Requirements
e Ability to lift up to 50 pounds.
° Ability to work on a personal computer for long periods of time

Salary Scale: $22,110 X $600 - $29,110

Interested candidates should submit a detailed curriculum vitae and a cover letter of interest,
giving full particulars of qualifications and experience to the Human Resources Department no

later than Friday, March 23, 2007

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES
(UWD
LL.B. PROGRAMME (FULL-TIME)
AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The normal entry requirements for the UWI LL.B. DEGREE are based on the following basic UWI
Matriculation standards:

(a) Five subjects, at least two of which must be at Advanced (A) Level and the remainder at CXC
(Caribbean Examinations Council) general or BGCSE (Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary
Education) or the equivalent; OR

(b) ASSOCIATE OR BACHELOR degree with a CUMULATIVE GPA OF 2.5 OR HIGHER.
Note: Space in the programme is limited and competition is high. Therefore, above average 'A'
Level grades and high averages (AT LEAST 3.0) in undergraduate degrees are required for an
applicant to stand a reasonable chance of gaining admission.

The College of The Bahamas will consider a limited number of applications from persons who
do not satisfy Matriculation standards as identified above but who have equivalent academic
qualifications. In particular, MATURE APPLICANTS OVER 30 WHO PROVIDE EVIDENCE
OF ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT CAN BE CONSIDERED. This is
an opportunity for persons who have already been associated with the practice of law in some way
j to read for a law degree. A resume must be submitted with the COB and UWI applications.

All applicants are required to sit a Proficiency Exam, at a date to announced, by end of June
# 2007. ‘

Interested persons must complete a College of The Bahamas and University of the West Indies
Application for Admission Form available from the Office of Admissions, 2nd Floor, Portia Smith
Building, Poinciana Drive, The College of The Bahamas.

Kindly submit by March 30, 2007 completed applications, original certificates (which will be
returned to the applicant), copies of original certificates, transcripts (sent directly from universities
or colleges previously attended) to the Director of Admissions at COB, and proof of payment of the
$40.00 application fee (paid at the BUSINESS OFFICE AT COB).

THE COLLEGE OF THE I

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

an excellent customer friendly environment. Evening and weekend work on rotation, library |-

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 7B

er















EDUCATING & TRAINING B



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PRESENTS

A One Day Workshop
in
Superior Customer Service

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the
fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on customer value,

retention and relationship building and employee motivation.

Topics to be covered:

The Customer Service Environment
Understanding the Customer
Communication and Customer Service
Handling Complaints and the Difficult Customer
Creating Your Customer Service Strategy for Loyal Customers

The Face of the Future
Date: Thursday, 29 March 2007
Time: 9:30am — 4:00pm

TBA

$170.00 Full payment is required at time of registration.
CASH, CREDIT CARD OR BANK CERTIFIED CHEQUE ACCEPTED

Application Fee:$40.00 (one time payment)
Certification: | A Continuing Education Certificate on successful completion.

Enquiries: Contact the co-ordinator at Tel. (242) 302-5201 / 302-5205 or 302-5202 or
email: nlacroix@cob.edu.bs

All fees included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time payment)
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.

Venue:

Tuition:

PRESIDENT’S SCHOLARS



PROGRAMME

The College of The Bahamas is now accepting applications for its prestigious and.
valuable President’s Scholars Programme (PSP), a scholarship and leadership programme
for high-achieving, highly-motivated, service-oriented students who will be pursuing
a FIRST-TIME bachelor degree at COB, beginning in Fall 2007.

Applications are welcome from all High School Seniors who possess:

° Cumulative GPA of 3.5 _
_ SAT scores of 1200 on the two-part (math and critical reading) 1800 three-

part (math, reading and writing) OR:

° Seven (7) BGCSE’s Gani of 5 A’s in core subjects)

° Proven leadership skills

Benefits

° Scholarship Award of $24,000.00 ($6,000.00 per year for 4 years)

° poe ne Leadership Training with opportunities for international
ravel.

Applications and brochures can be downloaded from

Hand deliver applications to The College of The Bahamas, Office of Student Leadership,
Room A 85, Administration Block, Oakes Field Campus, Nassau, The Bahamas OR
mail to P. O. Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas.

Deadline Friday, March 31, 2007
For further information, telephone the Director at (242) 302-4559

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

Presents a Panel Discussion










Perspectives on the Impact of Haitian Migration to The Bahamas

Wednesday, 218 March, 2007 at 7:00pm

The Foyer, Ground Floor
Portia Smith Building
Poinciana Drive
The College of The Bahamas

Panelists:

Former Minister and Marketing Director
Lucayan Tropical

Mr. Earl Deveaux






Dr. Evelyn McCollin Associate Professor History

The College of The Bahamas



Dr. Thaddeus McDonald Dean, Faculty of Social and
Educational Studies, The College
of The Bahamas

Mr. Eliezer Regnier Counsel and Attorney, Notary Public




Director of National Museum of
The Bahamas






Dr. Keith Tinker




Free Admission
Donations to the COB fund gladly accepted

For further information,
contact Dr. Evelyn McCollin or Jessica Minnis at 397-2606/7

\
er

-=PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

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“N

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER























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ACCAQ01 01__| ACCAFOR BEGINNERS II 6:00pm-8:00pm | MonWed __7-May | 10 wks_| $275

ACCA902 __ ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Il 6:00pm-8:00pm | Tues/Thurs _8-May | 10 wks _|
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. W/S 9:30am-4:30pm | Thurs 29-Mar | 1 day



SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. W/S

CREDIT AND COLLECTIONS |
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Tues 8-May | 6wks | $330 |

OMP953_ MoniWed _7-May | 9 wks | $500,

| 9:30am-4:30pm | Thurs = 3iMay | 1day _| $170 |

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icles neta f r Mon 7-Ma\

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR! | 6:00pm-9:00pm | Wed _—=——«9-May | 10 wks_| $400

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MGMT900_ | HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT | | 6:00pm-9:30pm | Thurs __—=—‘10May | 9wks _| $250 |

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SEW 800 [01 _| BASIC FREEHAND CUTTING | [6:00pm-9:00pm | Mon __—_—7-May | 10 wks_| $225 |

SEW 802 BASIC FREEHAND CUTTING II [6:00pm-9:00pm | Thurs __—*10May | 10 wks _| $260 |

Ssews05 ——s«([01_| DRAPERY MAKING I Tues 8-May | 10 wks _| $225 |

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 (242) 328-0093/328-1936/302-4300 ext
5202 or email: persdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).

CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course materials.

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
EXTENSION SERVICES

Computer Offerings — Summer 2007

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

This courses for. thetheginner who knows very little about computers
and does not understand how it works. This course covers the major
Vg wae eo ake EA ngompmepcencerts win rxteasive hands on.practice of various software using:
ee Tees aa (1) Microsoft Office — Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel — Spreadsheet (iii)
Microsoft Access — Database Management.

Course Description:

Pre-requisite: ' None

Begins: Monday, 7"" May 2007 6:00pm - 9:30pm Section 01 (CEES)
Saturday, 5" May 2007 10:00am _ - 1:30pmSection 02 (CEES)

Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Tuition: $450.00

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II

Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office — Word Processing (ii) Microsoft
Excel — Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access — Database Management.

Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I

Begins: Thursday, 10 May 2007
Time: 6:00pm - 9:30pm
Duration: 9 weeks
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Pre-requisite: None
Thursday, 31° May 2007

Begins:

Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $160.00

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR

Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
environments. The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware,

Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Monday 7th May 2007

Time: 6:00pm — 8:00pm Monday & Wednesday

Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: BHTC Computer Lab

Fees: $500.00 .

¢

QUICKBOOKS

Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs
(fewer than 20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting
activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students will learn how to set-up
their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Tuesday, 8 May 2007

Time: 6:00pm — 9:00pm

Duration: 6 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Fees: $330.00

WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web
pages will cover Web page creation, Web site management, and HTML. Specific
topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and

hosting of web pages.

Pre-requistte: Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of word-
processing, :

Begins: Thursday, 14" & 15" June 2007

Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm

Duration: 2 days

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Fees: $550.00

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 302-4300 ext 5201 5202 5205 or email

ees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



EDUCATING & TRAINING

An International Conference
In Commemoration of the 200" Anniversary of the Abolition
of the Transatlantic Slave Trade of

“Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: Telling the Story”
The College of The Bahamas
February 2008
Nassau, The Bahamas

Cali for. Papers

The College of The Bahamas will host the Conference: “Abolition of The Trans-Atlantic Slave
Trade: Telling the Story, February 2008 at the Oakes Field Campus, Nassau.

Abstracts of approximately 200 words are invited on the following topics:

Language and Oppression

Religion in Slavery: Agent Provocateur or Opiate?
Slavery and Human Sensibilities

Power and Enslavement

Kinship across the Diaspora

Identity: Culture, Race and Gender

Enslavement and Liberation: Pedagogy
Liberation: Ideologies, Contexts and Dynamics
Liberation: Simple Past.or Present Continuous?

Conference Structure

The conference will feature 20-minute papers from all disciplines, followed by 10-minute
discussions, presented in concurrent and plenary sessions. Panel and poster proposals will
also be considered. Such proposals should be as complete as possible. Artwork and poetry
reflecting the noted topics will be considered for exhibition and expression over the period
of the conference. ;

Submissions (4 paper copies and 1 electronic copy) should be directed to:
Jessica Minnis

Associate Professor

School of Social Sciences

The College of The Bahamas

Oakes Field Campus

P O Box N4912

Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail: abolitionconf@cob.edu.bs

Accommodation for Non-Resident Delegates

Only private sector accommodation is available. As the island of New Providence is a major
tourist destination and business centre, it offers a variety of accommodations, ranging from

well-kept bed and breakfasts to large luxury properties. Several of the smaller hotels and bed
and breakfasts, moderately priced, are located downtown or in nearby surburban areas, 15-
20 minute walk from the conference venue. A taxi ride takes about five to seven minutes and
costs about $8.00 each way. :
As a matter of course, we will assist delegates with hotel reservations and recommend early
booking to get the best rates. Names of recommended properties will be posted on the College
of The Bahamas website in short order.

Registration : n 7

# v APRS ATR ROTI Ag s é rat SRT A Sein Fog sae ‘
Fe days: $150:00 -e- Day'rate $100:00° * “Late’Registration: $200.00 © Student rate:

0
Dates for receipt of abstract, papers, and registration will be announced shortly.

Registration will be online at http://www.cob.edu.bs/abolitionconf.php

Calling all
COB alumni

Get in on the excitement of building
the University of The Bahamas!



Whether you graduated from The

College with the Class of ‘77 or just last

year, we want to hear from you to

e Keep you up to date on news of the
University of The Bahamas

e Network you with other alumni in
your field

e Invite you to a reception to meet the
President

e Brag about your achievements

e Ask your advice.

So COB Alumni, let’s reconnect.

Call Alumni and Development today
. 302-4355 or 6

or email

alumni(dcob.edu.bs

head{dcob.edu.bs







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eli tas hoy 4 the Graduate Programmes Office

in collaboration

THE TRIBUNE

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING & TRAINING. BAHAMIANS

Prospective Applicants
OT aa ee

Master's Degree
Ea? rogramme

_ Master of Science in Early
“Childhood and Elementary



3 Applications for the two programmes _
Offered by arenowavallablein
mits od (5-4 _ the Graduate Programmes Office

: ee ere _ Michael Hartley Eldon Complex

- Thompson Blvd :: Room 306 —

ays ye =
for submitting applications

to the Graduate Programmes Office is
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2007



in collaboration

=~ Bern
397.2602

WHEELOCK
COL «L
swisdom@cob.edu.bs

EGE

For more information



ospective Applicants

murs

rogramme

. _ Applications for the two programmes.
are now available in

Ae oe Michael Hartley Eldon Complex
f The Bahamas — - Thompson Bivd :: Room 306

THE DEADLINE
for submitting applications
to the Graduate Programmes Office is
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2007

Reale
397.2602

swisdom@cob.edu.bs





with





For more information

(CBA) will meet this week with the Cen-







er’s Degree





MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 9B
BUSINESS

Governor’s backing
for ACH software
vendor is sought

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor





THE Clearing Banks Association

tral Bank of the Bahamas governor,
Wendy Craigg, and one item on the agen-
da will be to obtain her approval for their
choice of software provider for the Auto-
mated Clearing House (ACH).

Paul McWeeney, Bank of the Bahamas
International’s managing director and
head of the ACH working group, said the
CBA had “come to an agreement on the
recommendation” for the ACH software
provider in principle.

“However, it was felt that we should
have that confirmed at the next meeting
with the Governor, which is scheduled for
next week,” Mr McWeeney told The Tri-
bune. “I don’t expect any major hiccups.”

Once the Governor’s confirmation is
obtained, the CBA will move into “final i,
negotiations” with the chosen software
vendor. ®@ PAUL McWEENEY



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS | | 2006

IN THE SUPREME COURT ee ~ CLEQUI000325
Equity Side :

IN THE MATTER of all those pieces parcels or lots of land
comprising Lots 73, 74 and 75 of the Gregory Town Crown Allotments _
situate in the Island of Eleuthera one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas. ‘

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act 1959

“AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Bernard A. Kuttner

The Petition of BERNARD A; KUTTNER of Millburn, New Jersey one of
the Untied States of America and Gregory Town, Eleuthera one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of;-

ALL THOSE pieces parcels or lots of land comprising lots 73,
74 and 75 of the Gregory Town Crown Allotments and which said pieces, -
parcels or lots of land are bounded as follows on the North West by Crown *
Land and by the property of the Petitioner and running thereon One hundred and =‘
Ninety-eight and seventy-nine hundreths (198.79) feet on the West North West ©
by the property of the Petitioner and running thereon One hundred and Eleven
and Thirty-two hundreths (111.32) feet on the North East by vacant land, by
Cave Street and Lot Number No.6 of the Gregory Town Crown Allotments
and running thereon One hundred and Seventy-eight and Sixty-two hundreths
(178.62) feet on the South East by the property of the Petitioner and running
thereon Three hundred (300) feet and on the South West by Crown Land and
running thereon One Hundred and Six and Seven hundreths (106.07) feet and
which said pieces parcels or lots of land are more particularly delineated and
shown on the plan filed in this matter and thereon coloured Pink.

Bernard A.Kuttner claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession of the
said land free from encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme
Court in the Commonwealth of Bahamas under. Section 3 The Quieting Titles
Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and the nature and extent _
thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the -
Court in accordance with provisions of the said Act.

A plan of the said land may be inspected duing normal office hours in
the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court in the said City of Nassau

(b) The Chambers of McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, Mareva
House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau, Attorneys for the
Petitioner; and

(c) The office of the Island Administrator at Govenor’s Harbour
Eleuthera,

Notice is hereby given that any persons having dower or a right of dower or an
Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the
14th day of May, 2007 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to be file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the said 14th day of May, 2007 will operate
as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 7th day of March, A.D. 2007.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Chambers
Mareva House
4 George Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Plaintiff
PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

EES RT NAcc TESTES |

Consolidated hit by free water to Corporation

FROM page 1B

& Exchange Commission
(SEC), BISX-listed Consoli-
dated Water said: “Our agree-
ment with the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation for the Blue
Hills plant contains a non-rev-
enue water (NRW) component
that requires us to reduce the
amount of water lost by the
public water distribution system
on New Providence Island over
a one-year period by 438 mil-
lion US gallons.

“Until such time as we can
demonstrate to the WSC that

1.2 million US gallons of water
per day to the WSC from the
Blue Hills plant at no cost to
the WSC.

“The costs associated with
providing this free water to
WSC are significant to overall
plant operating costs, and great-
ly reduced the overall gross
margin on total water sales from
the Blue Hills plant during the
fourth quarter of 2006. The lack
of gross margin on thése sales
made by the Blue Hills facility is
attributable to higher opera-
tional costs related to plant
start-up and our current obliga-
tions with respect to the NRW



we have achieved this reduc-
tion, we are required to provide

reduction component of the
Blue Hills contract. ~

“We are taking aggressive
actions to address these start-
up issues and to complete the
NRW project in order to reduce
operating costs and improve the
profitability of the Blue Hills

Tela LE

For the stories

profit of our bulk water seg-
ment in future periods may con-
tinue to be adversely affected
by the results for our Blue Hills
plant.” :

The company added that it
expected to meet the NRW
requirement and prove this to
the WSC in the 2007 third quar-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANNASTACIA FENELON OF
MARSH HARBOUR, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 19TH day of MARCH, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays














SEATS REAPS PS LTC SPSS CEPTS eee ae Se Sree
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OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE.

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infrastructure in place. 3

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operation. However, the gross



a
ry

‘e:

ter.

The Blue Hills plant has not
been without its problems. Con-
solidated Water also noted that
a Statement of Claim had been
filed against it in the Supreme
Court by Gruppozecca
Bahamas Ltd, seeking damages
of more than $950,000 for
alleged “breaches of obligation”
to it over the Blue Hills plant’s
construction.

Consolidated Water said the

claims made against its Bahami- -

an subsidiary were “without
merit”, and would be “vigor-
ously defended”.

Consolidated Water said its

full-year bulk water sales rose
by $6:579 million or 56 per cent
to $18.303 million, largely as a
result of the 7.2 million gallons
per day Blue Hills plant coming
on line and expanded produc-
tion capacity at its other New
Providence-based plant, Wind-
sor. Sales at the latter plant
increased by $610,119 over 2005
figures, and it also benefited
from reduced production penal-
ties.
. Those penalties at the Wind-
sor plant, whose production
capacity is 3.1 million gallons
per day, had fallen to $367,357
in 2006, having hit a high of
$571,349 in 2005.

Consolidated Water said in
its form 10-K; “Over the past

NOTICE

three years, we have experi-
enced various equipment fail-
ures and operational problems

which caused us to incur penal-

ties for not supplying minimum
water volumes to the WSC. We

also incurred penalties for not’

meeting diesel fuel and elec-
tricity efficiencies specified in
our water sale agreement with
the WSC. ;

“These penalties totalled
$367,257, $571,349, and
$313,408 in 2006, 2005, and
2004, respectively. We have
undertaken a programme to
replace certain equipment
prone to repetitive failure and
to reduce the fouling tendency
of the feed water to the plant.”

The contract for the Windsor
plant with the WSC tasts until
March 2013 or when it has sup-
plied 13.1 billion gallons of
water, whichever happens ear-
lier. ’

Consolidated Water said:
“From time to time since Octo-
ber 2004, we have been unable
to deliver the minimum water
volumes required under the
contract because of mechanical
equipment problems and mem-
brane fouling. As a result, we
have been subject to water rate
decreases that decreased rev-
enue by approximately
$400,000, $600,000 and $300,000
in 2006, 2005 and 2004, respec-

NOTICE is hereby given that TRACY ANN BLAIR COAKLEY
OF NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for. registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturatization ~
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
Statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 19th’
day of March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality .
and. Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

3 VIVID ie POSTITTONS

“Showroom Sales Associtate”’

° Highly self-motivated person with sharp,

dynamic personality

* Strong interpersonal skills

’ Fulltime and able to work weekends

* Computer literate

The ideal candidates possessing knowledge in

cither furniture sales, fabric sales, plumbing

hardware or tle Is preferable.

tively.

“We have implemented an
extensive programme to test
and understand the cause of the
membrane fouling, and have
expanded the production capac-
ity of the Windsor plant in order
to replace the production capac-
ity that was lost because of
membrane fouling.

“At present, we believe we
have resolved, the. membrane

fouling problem at the Wind-'

sor plant. However, membrane
fouling may.reoccur at the

RR eoveeee’e

ed a rival bid by a consortium
featuring Veolia Enerserve and
Bahamas-based BK Water and

. Sable (Bahamas). The last that
was known was the contract |

award still had to be debated
and voted on by Cabinet.
As a result of the Blue Hills ”

plant’s construction, Consoli- °
dated Water’s sales to the WSC *;
doubled, increasing from $4.595’

million in 2005 to $9.912 mil- ‘
lion in 2006, and accounting for

26 per cent of the company’s ~

total revenues, up from 18 per

cent the previous year. It sup- ~
plied the WSC with 2.3 billion °,
gallons of water in 2006, com- ,-

Windsor plant, and if we are
unable to meet the production
minimums due to this or other




operating issues, we could be in
technical default of the Windsor
supply contract and ‘subject to

~-various- adverse consequences,

including further water rate
decreases or cancellation of the
contract by the WSC.”
Announcing the company’s
results, Rick MacTaggart, its
president and: chief executive,
said that “additional capacity
and operational efficiencies” at
the Windsor plant during 2006
helped drive sales and revenues
in a year when the company
made a record profit of $7.521
million or $0.59 per share, a 36
per cent increase over 2005.
He indicated that Consoli-
dated Water was also prepar-
ing to.bid’on the request for

_ proposal (RFP) tender put out

by the Government for the

. Winton reversé osmosis: plant,

which will be capable of pro-

_ducing two million gallons per

day once constructed. There
was no mention, though, of
what has happened to the.con-
tract for the Perpall Tract
reverse osmosis plant, which

~appears:to. have disappeared

into a black hole since going out
to bid some two to three years

ago.

Consolidated Water had bid
on this, but The Tribune had
been told that the WSC and its
technical advisers, Camp, Dress-
er & McKee, had recommend-






. facility had been paid at March -

: Representatives from the
Canadian High Commission,

- Visa and Public Affairs Sections

| will be at the

a Canadian Consulate in Nassau,

pared to'853 million gallons the

year before.

Consolidated Water, which }
operates in the Bahamas _
through Consolidated Water *
(Bahamas), its almost 91 per ~

cent owned subsidiary, also sup- ,
plied six million gallons of water ,
to the Bimini Sands Resort and *
Bimini Beach Hotel through its ©

Bimini-based operating plant, '

a 20 per cent increase on the
previous year’s five million. The
plant is capable of providing
115,000 gallons of potable water ,
per day. “
Consolidated Water said
interest expense rose to $1.887
million in 2006, compared to
the $885,628 incurred the pre-
vious year, as a result of bor-
rowings to complete the Blue
Hills plant. Some $21.8 million

was used during 2006 to finance *-
the Blue Hills plant’s construc- *

tion.

Consolidated Water said it
expected to arrange the'
issuance of a $4 million perfor-
mance bond for the Blue Hills -

operation “some time in 2007”, ©

but its Bahamian subsidiary“
“was not in compliance with the

liabilities to tangible net worth ~

covenant” of its new $5.6 mil-

lion credit facility with the Roy-

al Bank of Canada at year-end '
2006. The term loans under this

2007.




r
rad

9am to lam, Thursday, March 22, 2007
To promote study in Canada.






Legal Notice

NOTICE

Salary commensurate with experience.
Showroom Sales
327-1691




Please fax resume to:





Appointments only - Please call 393-2123
KEAN COURT LTD. |

Legal Notice

NOTICE :

Legal Notice

NOTICE

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 15th day of

OPAH LIMITED COLVILLE LIMITED r

March 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) (In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced’ on the 15th day of
March 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 15th day of
March 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

PARTS TTS SIE
Pela) 52

For an expanding Freeport Auto Dealership.



Successful applicant must have a thorough
understanding of computerized inventory .
systems and must be willing to supervise
and train others. Knowledge of Japanese
and Korean parts is a must along with

proven dealership experience.





Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ACQUA WELLINGTON
OPPORTUNITY I LIMITED

Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Attractive and competitive remuneration
package available to successful applicant.

Please apply in writing to:
PARTS

P.O. Box F-41060
Freeport, Grand Bahama



Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000 notice is hereby given that the
above-named Company has been dissolved and struck off the
Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 20th day of February, 2007.

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
ACQUA WELLINGTON OPPORTUNITY I LIMITED



Owner asking $220,000 (ONO) for both Aircrafts as is.
The Aircrafts can be viewed at
Executive Flight Support, Nassau Bahamas

For further information or inspection call (242) 377-1256. ‘


fHE TRIBUNE

Ee ass

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 11B -

nt

invo



FROM page 1B

opposition politicians, with
some referring to it as a “Crown
Land fire sale” and fearing that
another large chunk of Bahami-
an land was being ‘given away’
to foreign resort developers,
and that this nation’s citizens
would receive no benefits and
be squeezed out.

Mr Farino’s comments indi-
cate these claims are incorrect,
and back up what The Tribune
first reported — that Infinity
Partners had ‘jumped the gun’
in spectacular style, causing
problems for the Government
and all involved with the Beka
project, not to mention consid-

potential resort and other part-

deal with them has been com-
pleted. It is understood that
while preliminary talks and dis-
cussions may have been held
with a number of them, no deal
has been done with a single
company named in the Infinity
Partners document, as every-
thing would hinge on Beka
Development first signing a
Heads of Agreement with the
Bahamian government.

For instance, the Infinity
Partners document said there
was a potential tie-up with Mar-
garitaville for a Margaritaville
Hotel and Casino. While
exploratory talks have taken
place with Beka, no agreement
has been reached, and Margar-
itaville is understood to have
been talking to a number of

tial casino operator. Foxwoods
executives, together with Mr
Farino, Harcourt representa-
tives and Driftwood
(Freeport’s) head, Donald
Archer, all recently toured the
casino at the still-closed Royal
Oasis resort, the Government
having asked Foxwoods to look
at becoming involved in
attempts to purchase and re-
open the resort that has been
closed since September 2004.

There have been talks
between Harcourt and Beka on
the Royal Oasis and how the
two could work together on fur-
ther developments in Grand
Bahama.

In addition, Beka is also
understood to be keen on dis-
cussing with the Government

land.

not interested in the harbour
currently used by South Riding
Point Holdings, for which the
latter holds a lease from the
Government for another almost
13 years, until December 31.
2019.

Jaime Vargas, South Riding
Point Holdings vice-president
of operations, previously told
The Tribune that the Infinity
Partners document had caused
the company considerable dis-
quiet, wondering whether it
would still have use of the har-
bour for the long-term.

South Riding Point Holdings
is understood to be mulling a
$16 million expansion of its
facility, adding two storage
tanks, but these plans are being
held up because the Govern-

EDAW and East Bay Group as

ronmental impact assessment
(EIA) groups for the develop-
ment respectively.

“The Government has
requested an environmental
impact assessment, and in order
to do so we have decided to
photograph from the air a 10
by 10 mile area,” Mr Farino told
‘The Tribune.

“This includes photograph-
ing from the north to the south
side of the island, so our pro-
ject will not have a negative
impact on the surrounding envi-
ronment, and so everything can
be properly planned.”

Mr Farino, who at one point
was the point man in seeking
to bring Marriolt to do a time-



share resort project at Discov-
ery Bay, and is also involved
with the Taino Beach Resort,”
said Beka had discussed “build-’ |
ing community facilities” such:
as schools, community build-:
ings, fire and police stations,:
low cost housing and other.
amenities that would “benefit
the East End of Grand;

Bahama”. »
‘We would hope to use pur-.;

chased or leased Government:
land for this purpose, but no :

agreement has been reached at:

this time because there seems

to be opposition to the use of..
any government land, even for,.
community purposes,” Mr Fari-.;

no said.

erable embarrassment. other developers eyeing the opening the air strip at the — ment has so far been reluctant as
From the developers’ point Bahamas, including the pro- — Bahamas Film Studios (the for- to enter into talks with the com- — om ae
of view, the statements in that — posed 2,000-acre Morgan Stan- — mer US Air Force Missile Base) pany over a lease extension. : ae
document are either incorrect, ley project in Freeport. for use by its proposed project. One area where Infinity Part- Vi & FE Limited HAY bcs
exaggerated, or involve naming In some areas, though, the ‘Phe Government owns the — ners got it right was in naming Hoe
tay tah

iq.

ners in terms that indicate a

Infinity document was right,
naming Foxwoods as the poten-

However, the developer is

the master planners and envi-

Ex-AIBT chair advising group eyeing Film Studios

FROM page 1B

er a group of investors to buy
the Film Studios from Ross
Fuller [chairman of selling com-
pany, Ashby Corporation].

“We thought that that oppor-
tunity had gone, and it now
seems there might be an oppor-
tunity back. We hope Ross will
actively consider any offer we
make.”

Mr Fuller and Ashby Corpo-
ration confirmed that they were
seeking new offers for the
Bahamas Film Studios after
they were unable to agree terms
for an extension to the March
15 deadline for Bahamas
FilmInvest, a group put togeth-
er by Owen Bethel, head of the
Nassau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque Group,

were “multiple groups with a
continued interest in investing”.

He added: “We are not
searching for a buyer, we are
simply entertaining additional
offers at this juncture. We hope
to see the entire matter settled
in a matter of weeks, and move
ahead with the project as
planned.”

Mr Fuller said FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
and United Insurance, the guar-
antor for the $9.95 million con-
struction loan that the former
had made to the Bahamas Film
Studios, had reached an agree-
ment where the latter would
pay the Studios’ debt to the
bank.

Out of the $14 million pur-
chase price that Ashby Corpo-
ration was due to receive, some
$9.95 million will now have to

source said.

Vhere is virtually no activity
taking place at the Bahamas
Film Studios site in eastern
Grand Bahama, which is the
former US Air Force Missile
Base. It is understood that the
location is just being manned
by security personnel, a far cry
from the Pirates of the
Caribbean filming days.

Disney and its Bahamas-
based production company,
Second Mate Productions, shot
the films at the Studios. How-
ever, Mr Fuller is blaming Dis-
ney for allegedly leaving $1 mil-
lion in unpaid bills behind it, an
allegation the company is
known to be disputing.

In his e-mailed replies to The
Tribune, he hinted this was a
key factor behind the Bahamas
Film Studios running up such





number of lawsuits filed against
it, and the need to settle a vari-
ety of debts.

Mr Fuller took control after
two of the project’s three
founders, Hans Schutte and
Michael Collyer, passed away.
The surviving partner, Paul
Quigley, is no longer with the
Bahamas Film Studios, as is
understood to be mounting a
$1.7 million legal action over
the way in which his involve-
ment was ended.

When asked about this, Mr
Fuller said in a cutting reply
that he had no knowledge of
the lawsuit “and cannot imagine
how an ex-employee with no
investment in the company
would......... file such a frivo-
lous lawsuit.

“We also believe that Mr
Quigley is an intelligent indi-

| As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
7 Company and the authorized Caterpillar dealer }«
j in the Bahamas, we are seeking a Financial |=

Rental Coordinator. The candidate should

os

| have a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting.. |
He/She should be knowledgeable in the field
of Marine Engineering and Inventory Control.
The candidate should be able to develop |
inventory systems for rental equipment, be

able to implement a system for service #

inventory for rental machines, create a i
maintenance program for company’s rental §

fleet, and monitor inventory system levels §
among technicians. The candidate should also |

have some knowledge about purchasing parts, {
inventory, and motors, and be able to ¢
coordinate the delivery of these parts, motors |

and equipment.

service excellence.






This person should be a |
professional who thrives on the challenge of jf -
developing outstanding customer relations and





to close its purchase. That dead- go back to United Insurance — massive debts — without explain- — vidual who has moved on with 1
line had already been extend- Company, rather than the bank, — ing how — and saying that Ash- his life.... One that will not Having both academic and practical a
ed once from the original Feb- While a further $1 million willbe — by was “working with ourcred- — include the Bahamas Film Stu- Ke
ruary 28, 2007, closing date. used to,pay off the Bahamas _ itors and. dealing with: ee ~ dios.” ; background AN the hale a eb Accounting’ pnerene!> a.
Apart from Mr Law’s group, Film Studios’ debts to other. as.we: CAML os »....The original business. Blea for. - é eee ‘ig : i
there are other parties interest- ~Grand Bahama-based and Another surcedémiliartl the Film Studios called for the oa y Rhee wees wa
ed in the Bahamas Film Stu- Bahamian suppliers. the situation told The Tribune: construction of sound stages iP : Aree a
dios. It is understood that while One Grand Bahama-based “I sure hope the Bahamas Film — and other TV and film produc- eee complete resume ait adnssion and aie ae
waiti el’s t business source told The Tri- Studios finds a buyer. It would tion facilities, followed by a ae
ape Mr Eller ses talks bune that the collapse of the be a huge shot in the arm for movie theme park, hotel and experience toM&E Limited, P.O. Box N-3238, oe
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Human Resources #

with a group headed by a Mia-
mi-based construction magnate,
although The Tribune has been



















deal involving Bahamas FilrmIn-
vest would further delay the
repayment of debts owed to





















us, and diversify us away from
the golf course and hotel mod-
el”.

He suggested that the Gov-

other real estate components.
Mr Bethel’s group estimated

that an $80-$90 million invest-

ment would be needed to

Department,



or email me@me-ltd.com. |.




unable to learn his name. Bahamian businesses, some- 1
In ‘addition, another poten- thing they were not too pleased ernment should have taken a realise this vision, and that the fj Only persons being interviewed for this position :
tial player is the Bahamian film- about. more proactive role in dealing Film Studios could employ lb tacted ,
maker Cedric Scott, who is “There are quite a few local — with the Bahamas Film Studios — between 700-1200 fixed staff will pe contacted. H
based in Los Angeles. Like Mr Suppliers who are owed money situation, especially as it was when in use. Ho:
Law and his investors, Mr Scott by the Studios outfit. We're all the landlord and owned the real ‘
is understood to have been _ Sitting around waiting, and this estate on which the project was mS
watching and waiting on the _ Will delay further the honour- _ sitting. a
sidelines to see if Mr Bethel’s ing of debts incurred with local However, the Studios’ sale q
group was successful. He and a suppliers and businesses,” the has been complicated by the :
group also previously looked at - ;
the Bahamas Film Studios, but a
were understood to have ee ZZ
backed off after doing some due B US HY 2 oe
diligence work. we pit ak 5
In an e-mailed reply to The H a
Tribune’s questions, Mr Fuller | =
did not rule out the possibility q _
of accepting another bid from ; POSITION VAC CANCY 3
Bahamas FilmInvest, sayin / Ne
thatit Mr Bethel’ $oroup ane MANUFACTURING PLANT OPERA’ PIONS MANAGER § :
aC 5 a . uw
back “with another, viable offer, al :
anything is possible”. !
Although declining to name | Pepsi Cola Bahamas, an affiliate of Pepsi Americas, Inc., is searching for a :
or discuss any other potential alified individu: APACE The Ti! Mati oti <4 i
bayers, Mi Pullec-said there qualified individual to manage its manufacturing operations. This includes ¥
- Production, Quality Control, Maintenance, Warehouse, Fleet, and Logistics. (5 ;
direct reports, 30+ indirect reports). ft
Qualified candidates must posses the following:
Education: a
tor : : . Minimum Bachelor’s degree in business, operations or related field “
This ideal candidate will report to the General Manager. Provides accurate project cost plate
forecast by assessing actual cost incurred and physical progress achieved for all phases § Experience: fe
. of a project (Engineering, Procurement, Fabrication, Construction, and Commissioning). ap pork ; . : . ; : greet
. Prior leadership, supervisor and coaching experience required. Operations ff:
Duties and Responsibilities: and distribution experience preferred
e Provide efficiency control by comparing actual and planned man-hours
e Set-up and maintain jobs (i.e. structure and budget in ERP system) Personal:
° Support Project Managers by collecting all relevant progress and cost data from ° Results oriented _
Ce Fee ey and Accounting ° Strong leadership ,
onsolidate ata in Project Cost Report for Project Manager’s review and approva z Team builder / Team player
© Prepare project cash flow ° Ability to coach and develop people
¢ Support Project Manager in change order manager 7 ere aa z - : ae C oe pel :
e Support Project Manager in contingency management ; Excellent interpersonal skills :
4h Process oriented :
Qualifications: . Problem solver t
Bachelors Degree in Accounting or similar field or equivalent combination of education ° Ability to multi task
and experience. Minimum Five (5) years experience in cost accounting and/or project :
Seana He AAG OF ee ee : nee eee ees h A competitive salary and benefits package will be offered to the successful
anc i east Five (5) years of SAGE/Timberline experience is a must. I sdidat sa ae faa sss tela ;
Sine ; } candidate. If you are a strong leader/manager capable of multi tasking and are
Intermediate level skills with Microsoft Office Software, accounting, cost control H a ai an . ae aan i F3 . . soa co ~ as i: ational c ‘ : , ‘ A i
procedures, analytical and problemsolving skills. effective communication shills both t _ oe ee cing Pare) TaD SOs EE SAORI Ee beens Y
verbally and in writing, and the ability to plan and manage multiple tasks/projects. mail or cmail resume to: 1
: ‘ % : : i 4
Physical Demands and Work Environment to be reviewed. Zz
Human Resources Manager H
{



Please respond by email to:
Fax:

: ; Pepsi Cola Bahamas Bottling Co., Ltd.
\ P.O. Box N-3004
i Prince Charles Drive
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 364-2123
e-mail: rhonda.rolle@pensibahamas. com

jobs@marmatglobal.com
242-363-1279










Mail: MARMAT
Attn: Office Manager
P.O. Box CR-56766

Nassau, Bahamas





02 NETS ii
SSS et | rca cana RCRD a SNARE ARID AAT HL eb de aa We OU RTS GS AA DSA


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Baha | r to soon turn down requests for retirement

FROM page 1B

only the latter which will be
demolished to make way for the
$2.4 billion revamp, along with
several towers at the Wyndham.

Separate and distinct from
this is the Baha Mar project,
which involves the construction
of a 1,000-room hotel and casi-
no branded by Harrah’s Cae-
sar’s Entertainment, plus hotels
branded by Starwood’s St Reg:
is, W and Westin brands. A con-
vention centre is also planned.



2 1/2 Bathrooms.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot Bomar Condominium
Westward Villas, situated in the Western District on the [sland of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting of 3 Bedrooms.








Yet the Government’s failure
to conclude a supplemental
Heads of Agreement with Baha
Mar by March 1 has meant that
the developer has been unable
to seal the joint venture deal
with Harrah’s and, secondly,

Starwood, which has a “me:

too” clause in its contract.
This would enable Starwood
to walk away from the project if

Harrah’s does, and the failure to |

hit that March 15 deadline
means that there is increased
risk the latter will do so.

Although Harrah's has given
no indication yet that it will

exercise this option, every day

. that goes by without its deator
the supplemental Heads of ©
Agreement with the Govern- -
‘this project, which provides such

ment being finalised increases

this risk. This has effectively.
placed the Baha Mar project on ._-
hold, forcing the developer to -
hold back on issuing $50 mil- -
lion in construction contracts |

for the new Commercial Vil-
lage, plus the West Bay Street
re-routing and other plans.

If Harrah’s were to withdraw,
it would effectively send the
Baha Mar project “back to the
drawing board”

In his letter to staff, Mr
Robinson said Baha Mar, which
has as its principal investors
Lyford Cay-based billionaires,
father-and-son Dikran and
Sarkis Izmirlian, remained
“committed to finalizing the
project and quickly beginning
construction once the REree:

ment is concluded. :
“It is*Baha Mar’s hope that

the Government will move to

successfully ‘complete its nego-

tiations with Baha Mar so that

significant benefits to the
Bahamgs, can commence.

“I want to reassure all of you
that.we are continuing to. rein-

- vest a tremendous amount of °

capital and energy into trans-
forming the existing Cable
Beach Resorts properties into
world class resorts.”

Mr Robinson said the “new-
ly-renovated portions” of the
Sheraton Cable Beach Resort,
the former Radisson, would
open soon, while the renova-
tions of two Wyndham towers
and suites would start in May.

Programme

The VSP programme, he
added, was in its fourth week,
and a “large number of appli-
cations had been submitted”.
This would cause Baha Mar to
turn down.a number of appli-
cations in certain areas.

The reasons for why the Goy-
ernment has been unable to

-conclude an agreement with

Baha Mar are unclear, with the
developers themselves just as
baffled and mystified as the gen-
eral public, it seems. After all, it
is a project that has been touted
on nimerous occasions by

Prime Minister Perry Christie, .

and is seen as his lasting legacy

to the Bahamian scaoles

The collapse of the Harrah’s
deal could deal the Prime Min-
ister a damaging blow, espe-
cially as it would come just
before a general election, and
having gone so far, many
observers feel it would be
almost impossible for the PLP
government not to reach a sup-
plemental Heads of Agreement
and get Baha Mar going.

One school of thought,
though, suggests that the Gov-
ernment’s reluctance may be
due to the fact that Baha Mar is
seeking an increase in the
investment incentives in pro-
portion to the size of its invest-
ment, which has risen from the
$1 billion contemplated in the
original Heads of Agreement
to $2.4 billion.

‘It is believed that the Gov-

‘ernment fears if it agrees to the

enhanced incentive package, it
could leave itself open to FNM
accusations that it has given too
much away and ‘sold out
Bahamian land to foreign devel-
opers’, something that could
also hurt its electoral prospects.

Unit Size 450 sq ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FENANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 1549”, All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March 2007.



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Apt No.23, Wild Tamarind
Condo situated in the Western District on the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Situated
thereon is Condo consisting of (3) three Bedrooms, (2) two Bathrooms.

Unit Size 1,400 sq ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
io FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

rem eeeee Aan aan eenncermnin memnemenenrinaenn ie ete tat Are enemy RE AE RENAE RON OY NTne Ney naseantn epee Rete ne a ey

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a scaled envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 2076”. All offers must be
| received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March 2007.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot: Lot #143
Yellow Elder Gardens Subdivision, situated in the Western
District on the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated theron is a Single Family
Residence, consisting of 3 Bedrooms | Bathroom.

Property Size: 3,200 Sq Ft
Building Size: 873 Sq Ft

This property ts being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMUTED.

All offers should be forwarded ia writting in a sealed
enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender
0878”. All offers must be received by the close of business
4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March, 2007.



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot: 500ft
west of Marigold Farm Road, and south of Hanna Road,
situated in the Southern District on the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
theron is vacant land.

Property Size: 16,102 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writting in a scaled

enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, PO. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked ~
3147”.
4:00 p.m.,

Tender
All offers must be received by the close of business
Uriday 30th March, 2007








NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TONEY CLAUDIUS GRIFFIN OF
EAST STREET OPPOSITE ODLE CORNER, P.O. BOX N1309,

NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any who knows

any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be |

eg should send a written and signed statement of the
ts within twenty-eight days from the 19TH day of MARCH,

2007 to the Minister for Nationality

P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



ay FINCO

BS ce
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS
RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #5, Lexington
. Estates Subdivision situated in the Southern District on the Island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of 3 Bedrooms. 2 Bathrooms.
_ Property Size 7,410 sq ft
. Building Size: 1,350 sqft

3

Lek ‘
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and. marked “Tender 1911”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4: 00 p-m., Friday 30th March 2007.

NOTICE | oa ee
RBC FINCO IN VITES’ TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #80,
Kennedy Subdivision situated in the Southern District on the
island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single
residence, consisting of 3 Bedrooms ! Bathroom.
®
Property Size: 3,600 Sq Ft
Building Size: 928 Sq Ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED. te

All offers should be forwarded in writting in a sealed
enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender
0726”. All offers must be received by the close of business
4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March, 2007.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #400,
Yellow Elder Gardens situated in the Western District on the
island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth. of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Multi
Family unit consisting of 1 - 3 Bedrooms i Bathroom, and 3
Bedrooms 1 Bathroom. -

Property Size: 3,200 Sq im

Building Size: 1,490 Sq Ft —

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writting in a sealed
enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender
1626”. All offers must be received by the close of business
4:00 p.m., Friday 30th March, 2007.



and Citizenship,



Legal Notice
NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF SERGIO DANGUILLECOURT
Late of Miami - Dade Country, Florida, USA

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the 5th
day of June 2007 after which date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of which
he shall then have notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
P.O. Box N-4805
St. Andrew’s Court, Frederick St. Steps
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executor - Barry Brant

ITUATION VACANT

TRAINED AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN

experienced in American, Japanese
and Korean vehicles needed

Applicants must be familiar with automotive
computer analysis systems and preference will
be given to applicant with proven dealership
experience. References as proof of good work
relationships must be supplied.

Apply in person or in writing to:
Manager
QUALITY AUTO SALES
(FREEPORT) LTD.
Queens Highway
P.O. Box F-42405
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Small Nassau based financial services company requires
self motivated and dynamic individual to lead its initiative
to promote tax and risk management structures for
successful small to medium sized businesses engaged in
ecommerce and international commerce with the specific
objective of exploiting synergies with captive insurance.

The successful applicant will have skills and experience
in the following areas:

1) payment platforms for businesses engaged in
ecommerce and international trading

2) risk management for the ownership of intellectual
property and for internet based operations

3) tax planning for ecommerce business and international 1
trading companies

4) knowledge of taxation and organization of captive
insurance companies

A relevant tertiary degree and professional qualification
is required along with a minimum of 10 years experience
in this area.

Applications to the Chief Operating Officer, P.O. Box
SS-5382, Nassau, Bahamas.



AALS

Ma ae esse arias ates al Se lewits e ms ee y

ee 2.9.9.

ES ea an Oe

a 6 & tO e

22 2) ewer

=~ ee eee
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007, PAGE 13B



Scotia launches private client

ek

Peal

\
al
ff
&

FROM page 1B

were not offering the same ser-
vices to high-net worth Bahami-
ans and residents that they
offeradefo international wealth
management clients had been
raised many times.

As a result, Scotiabank felt it
could develop “a niche in that
market, and have the first foot
in as well. We have quite a few
wealthy domestic clients, and
there’s no reason why they
should not expect the same lev-
el of service”

The, Bahamas-based Scotia
Private Client Group will lever-
age their Canadian parent’s
wealth management expertise,
plus that of Scotiatrust

(Bahamas), which has been
operating in this country since
1956, to offer services in the
areas of investment manage-

ment and advice, trusts and
estate planning, private bank-
ing services, and insurance.

The aim, Ms Bingham said,
of the focus on these four “pil-
lars” was to provide clients with
a seamless, comprehensive one-
stop solution to their wealth
management needs, drawing up
plans in conjunction with their
wishes.

Private

Previously, Scotiabank’s pri-
vate banking centre had served
the private banking needs of
wealthy Bahamians and resi-
dents for the past three-and-a-
half years, but her group now
aimed to provide a full wealth
management menu.

She explained that the
Bahamas had been chosen for
the Private Client Group’s
regional launch because apart
from its proximity to the US
and stability, it has “a more



Sih

ge

Major firm in the financial and
* legal services industry

Invites applicants for its Abaco office for the function of:




comprehensive legislative plat-
form” when it comes to private
wealth management than oth-
er countries in the Caribbean
and Latin America as a result of
having specialised in such ser-
vices for decades.

Ms Bingham said Scotiabank
also hoped the unit’s launch in
the Bahamas could help the
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange (BISX), leading
to the development of new
investment products and an
expansion of the capital mar-
kets.

“We hope that in conjunction
with us, we will see an increase
in BISX activities to assist in
providing products for our
clients,” Ms Bingham said. “We
hope to see common ground for
growth for both of us in that
area.

“We can provide some invest-
ment opportunities there, and
hopefully the Government will
see this as an opportunity for
an expansion of BISX’s role,
and the type of investment
products and opportunities they
can offer.”

The Scotia Private Client
Group, which currently has an
eight-strong staff that the bank
soon hopes to expand to nine

members, including an invest-
ment broker, is also seeking to
leverage further exchange con-
trol liberalization as it is exe-
cuted by the Government and
the Central Bank of the
Bahamas.

Focusing

Ms Bingham said the private
client group was also focusing
on the domestic trust market,
having “seen an increase in
regards to inquiries” for that
product and other estate plan-
ning and asset protection tools.

She pointed out that Bahami-
ans were now far more educat-
ed and aware on global stock
market and investment oppor-
tunities, and wealth was also
changing hands through being
passed from one generation to
the next.

The Bahamas group is look-
ing to serve the affluent and
mass affluent, including all of
Bahamians, residents and inter-
national clients.

The Scotia Private Client
Group model will next be rolled
out to the Cayman Islands and
the Dominican Republic, then
Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad &
Tobago, the British Virgin

» Legal Secretary

e imum 4 years experience
* Kgpiwledge of and ability to prepare legal documentation
¢ Working knowledge of Microsoft Office

° Good organizational skills

e Ability to work independently

¢ Salary commensurate with experience
* Attractive benefits








Reply in confidence to: .
,, Fax (242) 394-8430) |
Or email: glosbastian@hotmail.com



NOTICE

The. partners of SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES,
Constance A. Delancy and Angenette C. Pyfrom,
announce that effective 1** March, 2007 their Chambers
will re-locate from 245 Baillou Hill Road to:-

Naomi House
‘ No.19, 9" Terrace and West Court
Rb off Collins Avenue, Centreville

“y
New Providence, The Bahamas.

ae Telephone: (242) 323 4824
* (242) 325 104718

Fax: (242) 323 4827

Website: www.sydbri-legal.org

DRIVERS

Are you retired or work night Shift only?
Do you want to make some extra Cash?
$200 - $300 per week

Come Deliver for Domino’s Pizza

If you are:-
18yrs. or older
Have a Drivers License & good Driving record
Have your own Vehicle
Great Customer Service Attitude

pero wants YOU!!
ak:
Benefits

*: Good Health Insurance Plan
@Pension

at

Come into Abaco Markets Limited
dams Lown Center Mall Office
Pill out an application Today.
Ph. 325-2122 Fax 356-7855





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DUNBERRO OPNUNIE MC
NORTHERN DUNCOMBE OF #43 BURIAL GROUND
CORNER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
19TH day of MARCH, 2007 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











: AUTO
SERVICE VACANCY

Freeport automobile dealership is looking for
an energetic person to fill the position of

SERVICE WRITER/
| ADVISOR |

in our Service Department. Prospective
applicants should possess similar work
experience with some training in customer
management relations. Intermediate
computer skills are a must.

Please apply in writing to:
Service Advisor

P.O. Box F-41060
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Bl!

Pricing Information As Of:

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor ~ Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets
45

Fund Name Vv
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
) _ Fidelity Prime Income Fund

52wk-Low

initiative first in Bahamas

To atlvertise in The Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call 822-1986 today!

MAINTENANCE/HANDYMAN
WANTED

A leading retail company has an immediate opening
for a Maintenance/Handyman -

BASIC REQUIREMENTS

1. Should have a basic working knowledge electrical,
plumbing and general carpentry repairs.

2. Must have a clean current Police Record

3. Must be a self-starter with drive and determination

4, Must be able to work with minimum supervision.

5. Previous experience not required but would be an
asset.

Persons meeting the above requirements should submit
their Resumes via fax to the address below.

The positions offer career opportunities with excellent

salary and benefits package.

THE OPERATIONS MANAGER
Fax: 328-5902



Assistant Manager
Position Available Immediately
At
Domino’s Pizza

Qualifications:
You should have a High School Diploma
Past managerial experience
Certificate in Management is a plus
Must be available for day and night shifts,
including weekends
You should demonstrate strong communication,
leadership, motivational and people management
skills
You should have a valid driver’s license
You must have a GREAT attitude towards
customer service!

Basic responsibility to include:
e Maintain product, service and image standard
¢ To assist in supervision of all phases of
production.
To maintain a high level of efficiency &
productivity in all areas of store operation

Please send résumé on or before
October 2, 2006
Attention: Human Resource Department
P.O. Box SS-6704
Nassau, Bahamas
Or Fax 356-7855



0.55
2 BISx Lieted MutuaAne in
YTD%

‘o

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 , MARI SRMS. YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price fram day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV §$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

*-9 March 2007

** - 8 February 2007
*** - 31 January 2007
*** . 28 February 2007

seers. 8 February 200




PAGE 14B, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



GE asi ESE See aed ne
Investment Board pushes

for two Budget initiatives

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Domestic Investment
Board has requested that the
Government approve two ini-
tiatives in its budget for 2007-
2008 that would assist Bahami-
ans in creating their own busi-
nesses.

Paul Major, the Board’s con-
sultant, told a weekend busi-
ness seminar they would like to
see the Government make pro-
visions for training and the cre-
ation. of business plans for
future entrepreneurs.

“We realise that a lot of peo-
ple going into business have
not had any introduction into
business, so we're putting in
the Budget - if it can be
approved - what you might call
introductory and intermediate
training for business, and prac-
tical training,” he said.

“How to form and operate
your company, how to market
your company, how to do
proper accounting in your
company, very important

things. If you don’t understand
them, you are like a black man
stumbling in the dark.

“So we are going to insist
that we put these things in
place where you get free of
charge training to give you an
introductory or intermediary
orientation in business.” .

The second thing, Mr Major
said, was helping persons in
the creation of business plans.

“IT have seen business plans

that have cost as much as

$60,000-$70,0000. I have also
seen business plans that cost
as little as $500,” he said.
“Truth be told, a lot of peo-
ple with good ideas don’t have
$100 to invest in a business
plan, so you get a whole lot of
hand written notes that really
are not presentable to banks.
Even the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank has processes, pro-
cedures and analysis before
they can release either gov-

~ ernment, multi-lateral agency

or ‘public funds.

“We have recommended
that we.put aside at least $500
per project for persons to be

able to develop their business





@ PAUL MAJOR

plans. The IDB has also set
aside grant funding to help in
this area.”

Mr Major said that if these
items are passed, hopefully
Bahamians can begin to see
the funds become available to

them as soon as possible.

His comments came ata
small business seminar hosted
by Mark A Turnquest and
Associates, in collaboration
with the Small Business
Resource Centre.

Entrepreneurs told to specialise in sectors they know



@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

PERSONS interested in establishing their
own business need to enter a field they
have some knowledge, interest or ability
in, the chairman of the Bahamas Entrepre-
neurial Venture Fund, Jerome Gomez, said.
' Speaking to attendees at a small busi-
ness seminar hosted by Mark A Turnquest
and Associates, and the Small Business
Resource Centre, at the weekend, Mr
Gomez said a lot of persons chose fields

they have no experience or knowledge in,:

when there may be other areas they are
better suited for.
He explained that owning a business,

EVERY MONTH
GETS YOU
CLOSER TO



map Open a Scotiabank Home Savings Plan today.
You save a little every month for your home purchase
and we'll top it up with as much as $2,000.

<3 Scotiabank



life. Morey. Ralarice both

*Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.

t Conditions apply. Subject to credit approval

though extremely rewarding, was a huge
risk and challenge, something that is not
suited for every single individual. ‘

“You have to look within yourself, to
determine if you are an entrepreneur or an
investor, because some people are not cut
out to become business owners,” Mr

Gomez said,

He also highlighted the advantages of
partnering in business ventures.

“Most people want to go it alone, but it
may be a good idea to enter into a venture
with a partner.” Already, he said $2.5 of
the first $3 million allocated to the fund
has been granted, and the fund is hopeful
that the budgeted annual $1 million will
continue with the new government in the







2007-2008 budget.

Mr Gomez said it was hoped that the
fund will eventually be entirely sustained by
the private sector, and reminded the public
that monies were not only available for
start-up companies, but for companies wish-
ing to expand as well.

He cautioned applicants to remember
that the process does take at least three
months, and warned them not to get dis-
couraged by that timeframe.

In addition, Mr Gomez pointed out the
Fund’s Board liked applicants who were
willing “to bring something to the table to
show you believe in the venture”. He said
that in addition to personal funds, this could
be another successful business.



Qualifications:



from its



website:

Food industries
account for just eight
per cent of Domestic
Investment proposals

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

MORE resources need to be
allocated to ensure that
Bahamians embrace entrepre-
neurial opportunities in agri-
culture, livestock and fisheries,
areas that remain virtually
untouched by persons request-
ing assistance from the Domes-
tic Investment Board (DIB), a
senior government official said.

According to Michael Halki-
tis, chairman of the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC), these indus-
tries combined to only account
for 8 per cent of the proposal
submitted to the DIB.

“Some of the proposals under
active consideration include
proposals for Andros, Crooked
Island, Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Inagua, Long Island,
Mayaguana and New Provi-
dence,” he said.

These proposals could be cat-
egortisied into several sections,
including Agro Business, live-

- stock, fisheries, food textiles,

minerals, hotels and restaurants,
real estate and the ‘other’ cate-

gory.

Mr Halkitis pointed out that
the ‘other’ category accounted
for 43 per cent of the proposals
being viewed by the Domestic
Investment Board, while the
hotel and restaurants category

accounted for 26 per cent

Mr Halkitis noted that this
indicated a concentration in the
services and tourism-directed
industries of the economy.

“It is with interest that we
note and report that applica-
tions for agro business, livestock
and fisheries sadly only account
for a combined 8 per cent of the
proposals being studied by the
Domestic Investment Board,”
Mr Halkitis said. He added that
this was an indication that more
resources, investment incentives
and capital were needed to

encourage Bahamians to pay-
ticipate in those areas.

Mr Halkitis said BAIC would
fully support this, particularly
as agriculture only accounted
for a 3 per cent share of the pro-
posals submitted to the Domes-
tic Investment Board.

The projects which were
approved in this area will be
highlighted throughout the
domestic investment month, he
added.

His comments came at the
opening of a small business
seminar hosted by Mark A
Turnquest and Associate Cont-
panies, in collaooration with the
Small Business Resource Cen-
tre, held at the weekend.

Mr Halkitis explained that
the DIB was created out of:a
need to help facilitate Bahami-
ans in starting and expanding
their businesses by providing a
one-stop shop and eliminating
as much red tape as possible. «

“The Bahamian entrepreneur
has to see and believe that they
can have an opportunity to ben-
efit from the massive amount
of investment pouring into the
country,” he added. “So that is
what the domestic board is
about.”

Mr Halkitis said there needed
to be a proactive approach in
identifying opportunities that
will become available two to
three years down the road, and
to begin to prepare Bahamians
now for those opportunities that
will be available when anchor
project are up andrunning. .

Mr Halkitis also used the
opportunity to launch the
Domestic Investment Board’s
new brochure, which ‘he
described as a roadmap for
investors.

In addition to valuable con-
tact information for government
support offices, the brochure
also includes a timeline for get-
ting a project up and running,
plus relevant legislation and
concessions for Bahamian
investors.

EXCELLENT JOB OPPORTUNITY

q - ‘
~ -a: ‘

SENIOR ECONOMIST —



The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) in its mandate to
regulate the telecommunications sector is seeking to strengthen
its capacity in regulatory economic analysis.
seeking a suitably qualified economist with drive and ambition
to fill the position of SENIOR ECONOMIST. The successful
candidate will provide specialist advice on the economic and
financial performance on regulated utilities. The candidate will
also work as an integral part of a multidisciplinary team of
professionals to ensure effective oversight of the numerous
licensees in The Bahamas. The candidate will perform market
research and other economic studies relevant to the current and
future development of the telecommunications, electricity, and
water and sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

The PUC is

-Bachelor’s Degree in Economics or
Economics and Accounting;

-Master’s Degree in Economics or Finance; and
-Minimum of five (5) years relevant experience

The PUC offers a very attractive benefits package and excellent
opportunities for further development including specialist
training via short courses and seminars in The Bahamas and
overseas. Starting salary will be commensurate with relevant
experience. Further information about the PUC can be obtained

www.PUCBAHAMAS.gov.bs.

Applications should be received by March 30, 2007.

Interested applicants may deliver or fax resumes to:
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
4h Terrace East, Collins Avenue

Fax No. (242) 323-7288

E-mail: PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs _







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